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Sample records for acute streptococcal sepsis

  1. Streptococcal Sepsis

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    Maureen T. Fleming

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the compliance rate with a maternal risk-factor-based guideline for the prevention of neonatal group B streptococcal (GBS sepsis.

  2. Streptococcal acute pharyngitis

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    Lais Martins Moreira Anjos

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Acute pharyngitis/tonsillitis, which is characterized by inflammation of the posterior pharynx and tonsils, is a common disease. Several viruses and bacteria can cause acute pharyngitis; however, Streptococcus pyogenes (also known as Lancefield group A β-hemolytic streptococci is the only agent that requires an etiologic diagnosis and specific treatment. S. pyogenes is of major clinical importance because it can trigger post-infection systemic complications, acute rheumatic fever, and post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. Symptom onset in streptococcal infection is usually abrupt and includes intense sore throat, fever, chills, malaise, headache, tender enlarged anterior cervical lymph nodes, and pharyngeal or tonsillar exudate. Cough, coryza, conjunctivitis, and diarrhea are uncommon, and their presence suggests a viral cause. A diagnosis of pharyngitis is supported by the patient's history and by the physical examination. Throat culture is the gold standard for diagnosing streptococcus pharyngitis. However, it has been underused in public health services because of its low availability and because of the 1- to 2-day delay in obtaining results. Rapid antigen detection tests have been used to detect S. pyogenes directly from throat swabs within minutes. Clinical scoring systems have been developed to predict the risk of S. pyogenes infection. The most commonly used scoring system is the modified Centor score. Acute S. pyogenes pharyngitis is often a self-limiting disease. Penicillins are the first-choice treatment. For patients with penicillin allergy, cephalosporins can be an acceptable alternative, although primary hypersensitivity to cephalosporins can occur. Another drug option is the macrolides. Future perspectives to prevent streptococcal pharyngitis and post-infection systemic complications include the development of an anti-Streptococcus pyogenes vaccine.

  3. Ultra late onset group B streptococcal sepsis with acute renal failure in a child with urethral obstruction: a case report

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    Freudenstein Daniela

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Group B streptococci are a well-known cause of early and late onset sepsis. In neonates and older children gram-negative bacteria are mostly found in urinary tract infections and urosepsis. In adults predisposing factors for group B streptococci urinary tract infection may include diabetes mellitus and chronic renal failure. Case presentation We present a rare case of a five-month-old Caucasian boy with ultra late onset urosepsis and acute renal failure caused by group B streptococci serotype V. Excretion urography showed a subvesical obstruction that consequently was surgically corrected after antibiotic treatment of the acute infection. Conclusions Group B streptococci serotype V, urogenitary tract malformations, previous hospitalization and medical interventions may be important risk factors for the development of ultra late onset Group B streptococci sepsis in non-neonates.

  4. Compliance With Protocols for Prevention of Neonatal Group B Streptococcal Sepsis: Practicalities and Limitations

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    Gwendolyn L. Gilbert

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare two protocols for intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP against neonatal group B streptococcal (GBS sepsis, with respect to staff compliance, in a prospective cohort study in the obstetric units of a community hospital (A and a university teaching hospital (B.

  5. Multifocal Group B Streptococcal Infection in a Newborn: Case Report

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    Osman Öztekin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Group B streptococci cause sepsis and other infections in newborns very early in life (early-onset sepsis and also later (late-onset sepsis in the newborn period.Case Report: A case of multifocal group B streptococcal infection with sepsis, meningitis, ventriculitis, osteomyelitis and abscesses in a newborn infant was reported. Ventriculitis is often thought of as a secondary complication of acute group B streptococcal meningitis.Conclusion: Multifocal group B streptococcal infection is rare and group B streptococcal ventriculitis should be suspected in cases that are refractory to treatment or in patients who later develop hydrocephalus. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2011; 9: 141-4

  6. An unbiased systems genetics approach to mapping genetic loci modulating susceptibility to severe streptococcal sepsis.

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    Nourtan F Abdeltawab

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Striking individual differences in severity of group A streptococcal (GAS sepsis have been noted, even among patients infected with the same bacterial strain. We had provided evidence that HLA class II allelic variation contributes significantly to differences in systemic disease severity by modulating host responses to streptococcal superantigens. Inasmuch as the bacteria produce additional virulence factors that participate in the pathogenesis of this complex disease, we sought to identify additional gene networks modulating GAS sepsis. Accordingly, we applied a systems genetics approach using a panel of advanced recombinant inbred mice. By analyzing disease phenotypes in the context of mice genotypes we identified a highly significant quantitative trait locus (QTL on Chromosome 2 between 22 and 34 Mb that strongly predicts disease severity, accounting for 25%-30% of variance. This QTL harbors several polymorphic genes known to regulate immune responses to bacterial infections. We evaluated candidate genes within this QTL using multiple parameters that included linkage, gene ontology, variation in gene expression, cocitation networks, and biological relevance, and identified interleukin1 alpha and prostaglandin E synthases pathways as key networks involved in modulating GAS sepsis severity. The association of GAS sepsis with multiple pathways underscores the complexity of traits modulating GAS sepsis and provides a powerful approach for analyzing interactive traits affecting outcomes of other infectious diseases.

  7. DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF ACUTE STREPTOCOCCAL PHARYNGITIS IN CHILDREN

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    T. V. Kulichenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute streptococcal pharyngitis is diagnosed in 15–30% of the patients seeking medical advice for fever and sore throat. The local infection is usually mild/moderate; however, it may result in severe purulent and immunopathological complications. Despite high incidence and prevalence of the disease, the issues of diagnosis and treatment of streptococcal tonsillitis and pharyngitis remain highly discussable. The literature review presents information on the modern diagnostic principles, potential of using express tests to detect Streptococcus pyogenes infection and selection of antibacterial therapy of acute streptococcal pharyngitis based on the data of evidence-based studies and systemic reviews. The article emphasizes the most discussable issues of treatment, including antibiotic therapy pattern, and effectiveness of tonsillectomy in the event of chronic or recurrent tonsillitis.

  8. Severe acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis in an infant

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    Jameela A Kari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN is very rare below the age of two years. We report a 14-month-old girl who presented with frank hematuria and nephrotic syndrome following group A streptococcal pharyngitis (GAS, which was confirmed by laboratory investigations. The patient underwent a renal biopsy to confirm the diagnosis and was treated with prednisolone. The proteinuria and hematuria resolved completely in eight weeks. Our case demonstrates that APSGN should be considered in evaluating hematuria and nephrotic syndrome in infants and children below two years of age.

  9. Sepsis and Acute Kidney Injury.

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    Bilgili, Beliz; Haliloğlu, Murat; Cinel, İsmail

    2014-12-01

    Acute kindney injury (AKI) is a clinical syndrome which is generally defined as an abrupt decline in glomerular filtration rate, causing accumulation of nitrogenous products and rapid development of fluid, electrolyte and acid base disorders. In intensive care unit sepsis and septic shock are leading causes of AKI. Sepsis-induced AKI literally acts as a biologic indicator of clinical deterioration. AKI triggers variety of immune, inflammatory, metabolic and humoral patways; ultimately leading distant organ dysfunction and increases morbidity and mortality. Serial mesurements of creatinine and urine volume do not make it possible to diagnose AKI at early stages. Serum creatinine influenced by age, weight, hydration status and become apparent only when the kidneys have lost 50% of their function. For that reason we need new markers, and many biomarkers in the diagnosis of early AKI activity is assessed. Historically "Risk-Injury-Failure-Loss-Endstage" (RIFLE), "Acute Kidney Injury Netwok" (AKIN) and "The Kidney Disease/ Improving Global Outcomes" (KDIGO) classification systems are used for diagnosing easily in clinical practice and research and grading disease. Classifications including diagnostic criteria are formed for the identification of AKI. Neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL), cystatin-C (Cys-C), kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) and also "cell cycle arrest" molecules has been concerned for clinical use. In this review the pathophysiology of AKI, with the relationship of sepsis and the importance of early diagnosis of AKI is evaluated.

  10. Synchronous recurrence of group B streptococcal late-onset sepsis in twins.

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    Elling, Roland; Hufnagel, Markus; de Zoysa, Aruni; Lander, Fabian; Zumstein, Katharina; Krueger, Marcus; Henneke, Philipp

    2014-05-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) remains the leading cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis in industrialized countries. Whereas the use of intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis has led to a significant decline in early-onset sepsis, the incidence of late-onset sepsis has remained unchanged. Whether late-onset sepsis usually originates from established mucocutaneous GBS colonization of the infant or whether it results from an acute exogenous GBS infection remains controversial. Here we report on twins who both twice developed GBS sepsis in a strikingly parallel fashion, with both instances originating from a single hypervirulent GBS clone. Factored together, the presentation as cervical soft tissue infection in both cases, the synchronicity of the episodes, and the detection of GBS DNA in breast milk all strongly suggest an enteral mode of transmission with a short incubation period.

  11. Effect of Resident Physician Education Regarding Selective Chemoprophylaxis for the Prevention of Early Onset Group B Streptococcal Sepsis: An Outcome Study

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    Jeffrey S. Greenspoon

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a voluntary protocol for selective intrapartum chemoprophylaxis on the incidence of early onset group B streptococcal sepsis (GBS EOS.

  12. Severe hypoalphalipoproteinaemia in a child with acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN)

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    Alayli, Mohammad B; Sanjad, Sami A.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a child with acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN), who developed a very low plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (α-lipoprotein) in association with transient but massive proteinuria. The hypoalphalipoproteinaemia resolved spontaneously concomitant with the remission in proteinuria and the patient had a complete clinical recovery. Urinary loss of apolipoprotein A1 may have contributed to the hypoalphalipoproteinaemia. To our knowledge, this has not been repor...

  13. Post-streptococcal reactive arthritis in children: a distinct entity from acute rheumatic fever

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    Barash Judith

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is a debate whether post-streptococcal reactive arthritis (PSRA is a separate entity or a condition on the spectrum of acute rheumatic fever (ARF. We believe that PSRA is a distinct entity and in this paper we review the substantial differences between PSRA and ARF. We show how the demographic, clinical, genetic and treatment characteristics of PSRA differ from ARF. We review diagnostic criteria and regression formulas that attempt to classify patients with PSRA as opposed to ARF. The important implication of these findings may relate to the issue of prophylactic antibiotics after PSRA. However, future trials will be necessary to conclusively answer that question.

  14. Platelets promote bacterial dissemination in a mouse model of streptococcal sepsis.

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    Kahn, Fredrik; Hurley, Sinead; Shannon, Oonagh

    2013-01-01

    Platelets have been reported to contribute to inflammation and inflammatory disorders. In the present study, we demonstrate that platelets contribute to the acute response to bacterial infection in a mouse model of invasive Streptococcus pyogenes infection. Thrombocytopenia occurred rapidly in infected animals and this was associated with platelet activation, formation of platelet-neutrophil complexes and neutrophil activation. In order to assess the role of platelets during infection, platelets were depleted prior to infection. Platelet-depleted animals had significantly decreased platelet-neutrophil complex formation and neutrophil activation in response to infection. Importantly, significantly fewer bacteria disseminated to the blood, lungs, and spleen of platelet-depleted animals. Platelet-depleted animals did not decrease as significantly in weight as the infected control animals. The results demonstrate a previously unappreciated role for platelets during the pathophysiological response to infection, whereby S. pyogenes bacteria bind to platelets and platelets facilitate bacterial dissemination.

  15. Recurrent Acute Nonrheumatic Streptococcal Myocarditis Mimicking STEMI in a Young Adult

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    Amanda Chikly

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Myocarditis consists of an inflammation of the cardiac muscle, definitively diagnosed by endomyocardial biopsy. The causal agents are primarily infectious: in developed countries, viruses appear to be the main cause, whereas in developing countries rheumatic carditis, Chagas disease, and HIV are frequent causes. Furthermore, myocarditis can be indirectly induced by an infectious agent and occurs following a latency period during which antibodies are created. Typically, myocarditis observed in rheumatic fever related to group A streptococcal (GAS infection occurs after 2- to 3-week period of latency. In other instances, myocarditis can occur within few days following a streptococcal infection; thus, it does not fit the criteria for rheumatic fever. Myocarditis classically presents as acute heart failure, and can also be manifested by tachyarrhythmia or chest pain. Likewise, GAS-related myocarditis reportedly mimics myocardial infarction (MI with typical chest pain, electrocardiograph changes, and troponin elevation. Here we describe a case of recurrent myocarditis, 5 years apart, with clinical presentation imitating an acute MI in an otherwise healthy 37-year-old man. Both episodes occurred 3 days after GAS pharyngitis and resolved quickly following medical treatment.

  16. Post-streptococcal acute glomerulonephritis complicated by gouty arthritis: a case report.

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    Kuniyoshi, Yasutaka; Kamura, Azusa; Yasuda, Sumie; Tashiro, Makoto

    2015-06-17

    Gouty arthritis is uncommon in childhood and adolescence. On the other hand, there has been no report of cases with development of gouty arthritis with post-streptococcal acute glomerulonephritis (PSAGN) in pediatric patients. Here we report the case of a mildly obese 12-year-old boy with PSAGN complicated by gouty arthritis of the left first metatarsophalangeal joint. On follow-up, it was confirmed that as serum C3 level returned to normal, urinary excretion of uric acid increased and serum uric acid level decreased, thereby resolving the burning pain of the left big toe. In this case, not only did renal insufficiency associate with PSAGN but also mild obesity may have led to hyperuricemia and gouty arthritis. In conclusion, clinicians should be aware that PSAGN may be complicated by gouty arthritis in obese pediatric patients.

  17. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis mimicking breakthrough seizures

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    Kamille Abdool

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 14-year-old boy with a past history of primary generalized seizures, who had been seizure-free for 2 years on sodium valproate and presented with generalized tonic clonic seizures suggestive of breakthrough seizures. Examination revealed hypertension, impetiginous lesions of the lower limbs, microscopic hematuria, elevated antistreptolysin O titre and low complement levels consistent with acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI demonstrated changes consistent with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Hypertension was controlled with intravenous nitroglycerin followed by oral captopril and amlodipine. Brain MRI changes returned normal within 2 weeks. The nephritis went in to remission within 2 months and after 8 months the patient has been seizure free again. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome appeared to have neither short nor intermediate effect on seizure control in this patient. The relationship between posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and seizures is reviewed.

  18. Streptococcal necrotising myositis of obturator internus and piriformis in a type 2 diabetic patient presenting as sepsis of unknown origin.

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    Sharma, P R; McEvoy, H C; Floyd, D C

    2011-09-01

    This report describes a case of necrotising myositis of the obturator internus and piriformis muscles. Necrotising myositis is a rare result of group A streptococcal infection. It is usually fatal and has not been described previously in the obturator internus and piriformis. We describe how, following presentation to an emergency department, rapid diagnosis was arrived at by clinically guided radiological investigation. The report considers the possible aetiology of the condition, the diagnosis and its management, and reviews the relevant literature.

  19. Perianal streptococcal cellulitis

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    Complications that may result include: Anal scarring, fistula , or abscess Bleeding, discharge Bloodstream or other streptococcal infections (including heart, joint, and bone) Kidney disease (acute glomerulonephritis ) Severe skin and soft tissue ...

  20. Renal replacement therapy in sepsis-induced acute renal failure

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    Rajapakse Senaka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute renal failure (ARF is a common complication of sepsis and carries a high mortality. Renal replacement therapy (RRT during the acute stage is the mainstay of therapy. Va-rious modalities of RRT are available. Continuous RRT using convective methods are preferred in sepsis-induced ARF, especially in hemodynamically unstable patients, although clear evidence of benefit over intermittent hemodialysis is still not available. Peritoneal dialysis is clearly inferior, and is not recommended. Early initiation of RRT is probably advantageous, although the optimal timing of dialysis is yet unknown. Higher doses of RRT are more likely to be beneficial. Use of bio-compatible membranes and bicarbonate buffer in the dialysate are preferred. Anticoagulation during dialysis must be carefully adjusted and monitored.

  1. A-STREPTOCOCCAL INFECTION ON THE BORDER OF AGES

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    B. S. Belov

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available At present group A streptococcal infection remains one of the important problems of medicine. From the middle of the 1980-cs number of diseases with group A streptococcal etiology significantly increased in many countries of the world. It coincided with return of disappeared from circulation highly toxigcnic and virulent serotypes M-l, M-3, M-5, M-18. Oulbreaks of acute rheumatic fever were registered among civil and military persons in USA. Wide distribution of tonsillitis, pharingitis and streptoderma in USA and in countries of Western Europe is accompanied by increase of invasive group A streptococcal diseases (bacteriemia, sepsis, necrotizing fasciitis and myositis, toxic shock syndrome affecting predominantly working age people with fulminant development and high mortality reaching 80%. Causes of group A streptococcal infection epidemiology changes are not quite clear. Decrease of macroorganism immune response to above mentioned serotypes may play a role because their distribution was low for several decades. Created during evolution ability of some group of A streptococcal strains lo develop structural changes increasing virulence may also be one ol the causes. Main groups of antibiotics using for treatment of group A streptococcal infection are penicillines, cephalosporines, macrolides and lincosamides. Now practically in all countries of the world (including Russia high frequency of group A streptococcal strains resistant to tetracyclines, co-trimonasol, sulphanilamides and chloramphenicol is noted in patients with angina and pharingitis. So these drugs should not be used in this form of infcclion. Efficacy of penicillines in invasive forms of group A streptococcal infection is low because of insufficient expression of penicillin-binding proteins by the microbe. Clindamycine is more effective in such cases.

  2. Risk factors for early-onset group B streptococcal sepsis: estimation of odds ratios by critical literature review.

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    Benitz, W E; Gould, J B; Druzin, M L

    1999-06-01

    To identify and to establish the prevalence of ORs factors associated with increased risk for early-onset group B streptococcal (EOGBS) infection in neonates. streptococcal (EOGBS) infection in neonates. Literature review and reanalysis of published data. Risk factors for EOGBS infection include group B streptococcal (GBS)-positive vaginal culture at delivery (OR: 204), GBS-positive rectovaginal culture at 28 (OR: 9.64) or 36 weeks gestation (OR: 26. 7), vaginal Strep B OIA test positive at delivery (OR: 15.4), birth weight 18 hours (OR: 7.28), intrapartum fever >37.5 degrees C (OR: 4.05), intrapartum fever, PROM, or prematurity (OR: 9.74), intrapartum fever or PROM at term (OR: 11.5), chorioamnionitis (OR: 6.43). Chorioamnionitis is reported in most (88%) cases in which neonatal infection occurred despite intrapartum maternal antibiotic therapy. ORs could not be estimated for maternal GBS bacteriuria during pregnancy, with preterm premature rupture of membranes, or with a sibling or twin with invasive GBS disease, but these findings seem to be associated with a very high risk. Multiple gestation is not an independent risk factor for GBS infection. h Mothers with GBS bacteriuria during pregnancy, with another child with GBS disease, or with chorioamnionitis should receive empirical intrapartum antibiotic treatment. Their infants should have complete diagnostic evaluations and receive empirical treatment until infection is excluded by observation and negative cultures because of their particularly high risk for EOGBS infection. Either screening with cultures at 28 weeks gestation or identification of clinical risk factors, ie, PROM, intrapartum fever, or prematurity, may identify parturients whose infants include 65% of those with EOGBS infection. Intrapartum screening using the Strep B OIA rapid test identifies more at-risk infants (75%) than any other method. These risk identifiers may permit judicious selection of patients for prophylactic interventions.

  3. Injuria renal aguda en la sepsis grave Acute kidney injury in severe sepsis

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    Hernán Trimarchi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available La sepsis afecta al 40% de los pacientes críticos, siendo su mortalidad de aproximadamente un 30% en el caso de la sepsis grave, y de 75% con injuria renal aguda, la cual sucede en el 20-51% de los casos. Se realizó un estudio prospectivo, observacional, longitudinal, en 80 pacientes sépticos graves en el lapso de 1 año para determinar el desarrollo de injuria renal aguda y su relación con la mortalidad; correlacionar antecedentes clínicos y variaciones del laboratorio con la mortalidad; determinar la tasa de mortalidad de la sepsis grave; relacionar óbito y foco séptico primario; evaluar la predictibilidad de mortalidad según niveles de creatinina de ingreso y sus variaciones finales. Se definieron dos grupos: Obito (n = 25 y No-óbito (n = 55. Analizados según la creatinina de ingreso, 39 tenían valores normales de creatinina (10 óbitos y 41 la presentaban elevada (15 óbitos; según la creatinina de egreso, 48 presentaron creatinina normal y fallecieron 7, mientras que 32 tenían daño renal agudo, de los cuales 18 fallecieron. De los 25 pacientes fallecidos, el 72% presentaron daño renal. De éstos, 7 pacientes vivos y 2 fallecidos requirieron hemodiálisis. El foco primario más frecuente fue el respiratorio (26.4%. El desarrollo de daño renal es un alto predictor de mortalidad en la sepsis, independientemente de los valores iniciales de creatinina. Edad más avanzada, hipertensión arterial, score APACHE más elevado, anemia más grave, hipoalbuminemia, hiperfosfatemia e hiperkalemia se asociaron a mayor mortalidad. La mortalidad global fue 31.3%. La imposibilidad de identificar el foco séptico primario se asoció a mayor mortalidad. El foco respiratorio se relacionó a mayor riesgo de requerir hemodiálisis.Sepsis affects 40% of critically ill patients, with a reported mortality of approximately 30% in severe sepsis, raising to 75% when acute kidney injury ensues, which occurs in about 20-51% of cases. The present study

  4. A case report of thyroid storm induced by acute sepsis

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    Chiu-Yin Yeh; Wen-Liang Yu

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid storm is a rare but life-threatening condition, which can be induced by many critical diseases. We reported a 40-year-old woman with thyroid goiter manifesting with acute sepsis-induced hyperthyroidism. She mainly presented with abdominal bloating, diarrhea, lower limbs edema and exertional dyspnea. The lactate was 9.5 mmol/L and procalcitonin was 3.8 ng/mL, suggesting acute sepsis. The thyroid echo showed bilateral thyroid goiter. Relevant data included a thyroid-stimulating hormone level of 0.03 mIU/mL;free tetraiodothyronine, 5.67 ng/dL;thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody, 76.9%(normal range, < 14%); and antimicrosomal antibody titer, 1:102 400 (normal range,<1:100), suggesting toxic goiter with thyroid storm. Piperacillin/tazobactam, methimazole and Lugol's iodine achieved a good outcome. The symptoms of early sepsis and those of thyroid storm could be similar. Therefore, a careful history taking, a thorough physical examination and a high degree of suspicion could make early diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

  5. A case report of thyroid storm induced by acute sepsis

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    Chiu-Yin Yeh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid storm is a rare but life-threatening condition, which can be induced by many critical diseases. We reported a 40-year-old woman with thyroid goiter manifesting with acute sepsis-induced hyperthyroidism. She mainly presented with abdominal bloating, diarrhea, lower limbs edema and exertional dyspnea. The lactate was 9.5 mmol/L and procalcitonin was 3.8 ng/mL, suggesting acute sepsis. The thyroid echo showed bilateral thyroid goiter. Relevant data included a thyroid-stimulating hormone level of 0.03 μIU/mL; free tetraiodothyronine, 5.67 ng/dL; thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody, 76.9% (normal range, < 14%; and antimicrosomal antibody titer, 1:102400 (normal range, < 1:100, suggesting toxic goiter with thyroid storm. Piperacillin/tazobactam, methimazole and Lugol's iodine achieved a good outcome. The symptoms of early sepsis and those of thyroid storm could be similar. Therefore, a careful history taking, a thorough physical examination and a high degree of suspicion could make early diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

  6. Dress syndrome with sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome and pneumomediastinum

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    Prabhas Prasun Giri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS syndrome reflects a serious hypersensitivity reaction to drugs, and is characterized by skin rash, fever, lymph node enlargement, and internal organ involvement. So far, numerous drugs such as sulfonamides, phenobarbital, sulfasalazine, carbamazepine, and phenytoin have been reported to cause DRESS syndrome. We report a case of a 10-year-old girl who developed clinical manifestations of fever, rash, lymphadenopathy, hypereosinophilia, and visceral involvement (hepatitis and pneumonitis after taking phenobarbital for seizures, with subsequent development of sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS and spontaneous air leak syndrome (pnemothorax and pneumomediastinum. She was put on steroids and various antibiotics and was ventilated, but ultimately succumbed to sepsis and pulmonary complications.

  7. Acute neonatal appendicitis: a diagnosis to consider in abdominal sepsis.

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    Arias-Llorente, R P; Flórez-Díez, P; Oviedo-Gutiérrez, M; Suárez-Rodríguez, M; Costa-Romero, M; Solís-Sánchez, G; García-López, E

    2014-01-01

    Appendicitis in the neonatal period is extremely rare. Its low incidence together with non-specific clinical symptoms often mean the diagnosis is delayed, leading to increased rates of peritonitis and mortality. We report the case of a 33-week premature infant, small for gestational age (1180 g at birth), clinically stable and receiving exclusive enteral feeding, who presented clinical manifestations of necrotizing enterocolitis at 14 days of life. Acute phase reactants were elevated and abdominal radiography showed pneumoperitoneum. Laparotomy revealed acute perforated appendicitis without intestinal involvement and purulent fluid in the peritoneum, for which appendectomy was performed. Neonatal acute appendicitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of abdominal sepsis since early diagnosis and treatment significantly reduce associated morbidity and mortality.

  8. Percutaneous biliary drainage in acute suppurative cholangitis with biliary sepsis

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    Kim, Hyung Lyul; Cho, June Sik; Kwon, Soon Tae; Lee, Sang Jin; Rhee, Byung Chull [Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-11-15

    Acute suppurative cholangitis is a severe inflammatory process of the bile duct occurred as result of partial or complete obstruction of the bile duct, and may manifest clinically severe form of disease, rapidly deteriorating to life-threatening condition. We analyzed emergency percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage in 20 patients of acute suppurative cholangitis with biliary sepsis to evaluate the therapeutic effect and complication of the procedure. The underlying cause were 12 benign disease(stones) and eight malignant tumors and among eight malignant tumors, bile duct stones(n=4) and clonorchiasis(n=1) were combined. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage was performed successfully in 17 of 20 patients resulting in improvement of general condition and failed in three patients. The procedure were preterminated due to the patient's condition in two and biliary-proto fistula was developed in one. After biliary decompression by percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, effective and successful elective surgery was performed in nine cases, which were seven biliary stones and two biliary cancer with stones. Our experience suggest that emergency percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage is an initial and effective treatment of choice for acute suppurative cholangitis with sepsis and a safe alternative for nonsurgical treatment.

  9. Sepsis-induced acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis.

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    Angeli, Paolo; Tonon, Marta; Pilutti, Chiara; Morando, Filippo; Piano, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and life-threatening complication in patients with cirrhosis. Recently, new criteria for the diagnosis of AKI have been proposed in patients with cirrhosis by the International Club of Ascites. Almost all types of bacterial infections can induce AKI in patients with cirrhosis representing its most common precipitating event. The bacterial infection-induced AKI usually meets the diagnostic criteria of hepatorenal syndrome (HRS). Well in keeping with the "splanchnic arterial vasodilation hypothesis", it has been stated that HRS develops as a consequence of a severe reduction of effective circulating volume related to splanchnic arterial vasodilation and to an inadequate cardiac output. Nevertheless, the role of bacterial infections in precipitating organ failures, including renal failure, is enhanced when their course is characterized by the development of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), thus, when sepsis occurs. Sepsis has been shown to be capable to induce "per se" AKI in animals as well as in patients conditioning also the features of renal damage. This observation suggests that when precipitated by sepsis, the pathogenesis and the clinical course of AKI also in patients with cirrhosis may differentiate to a certain extent from AKI with another or no precipitating factor. The purpose of this review is to describe the features of AKI precipitated by bacterial infections and to highlight whether infection and/or the development of SIRS may influence its clinical course, and, in particular, the response to treatment.

  10. Sepsis

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    Perner, Anders; Gordon, Anthony C; De Backer, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is a major growing global burden and a major challenge to intensive care clinicians, researchers, guideline committee members and policy makers, because of its high and increasing incidence and great pathophysiological, molecular, genetic and clinical complexity. In spite of recent progress......, short-term mortality remains high and there is growing evidence of long-term morbidity and increased long-term mortality in survivors of sepsis both in developed and developing countries. Further improvement in the care of patients with sepsis will impact upon global health. In this narrative review...... and subsequent outcomes are to be improved in patients with sepsis....

  11. Antioxidant protection of statins in acute kidney injury induced by sepsis

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    Franciele do Nascimento Santos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective Evaluating the effect of preconditioning with simvastatin in acute kidney injury induced by sepsis. Method Male adult Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: SHAM (control; SHAM+Statin (0.5 mg/kg simvastatin, orally; Sepsis (cecal puncture ligation – CPL; Sepsis+Statin. Physiological parameters, peritoneal fluid culture, renal function, oxidative metabolites, severity of acute kidney injury and animal survival were evaluated. Results The treatment with simvastatin in induced sepsis showed elevation of creatinine clearance with attenuation of generation of oxidative metabolites, lower severity of acute kidney injury and reduced mortality. Conclusion This investigation confirmed the renoprotection with antioxidant principle of the simvastatin in acute kidney injury induced by sepsis in an experimental model.

  12. Sepsis/Acute renal failure | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Sepsis/Acute renal failure E.1.1.1Medical ...condition in easily understood language Sepsis /Acute Kidney failure E.1.1.2Therapeutic area Diseases [C] - ...l inclusion criteria Aged >18 years ITU stay > 12 hours – expected to stay for at least 3 daysHb less than 11.5 gm/dlAcute

  13. Acute Kidney Injury in Pediatric Severe Sepsis: An Independent Risk Factor for Death and New Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Julie C; Basu, Rajit K; Akcan-Arikan, Ayse; Izquierdo, Ledys M; Piñeres Olave, Byron E; Hassinger, Amanda B; Szczepanska, Maria; Deep, Akash; Williams, Duane; Sapru, Anil; Roy, Jason A; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Thomas, Neal J; Weiss, Scott L; Furth, Susan

    2016-12-01

    The prevalence of septic acute kidney injury and impact on functional status of PICU survivors are unknown. We used data from an international prospective severe sepsis study to elucidate functional outcomes of children suffering septic acute kidney injury. Secondary analysis of patients in the Sepsis PRevalence, OUtcomes, and Therapies point prevalence study: acute kidney injury was defined on the study day using Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes definitions. Patients with no acute kidney injury or stage 1 acute kidney injury ("no/mild acute kidney injury") were compared with those with stage 2 or 3 acute kidney injury ("severe acute kidney injury"). The primary outcome was a composite of death or new moderate disability at discharge defined as a Pediatric Overall Performance Category score of 3 or higher and increased by 1 from baseline. One hundred twenty-eight PICUs in 26 countries. Children with severe sepsis in the Sepsis PRevalence, OUtcomes, and Therapies study. None. One hundred two (21%) of 493 patients had severe acute kidney injury. More than twice as many patients with severe acute kidney injury died or developed new moderate disability compared with those with no/mild acute kidney injury (64% vs 30%; p sepsis and high mortality rates, septic acute kidney injury is independently associated with further increased death or new disability.

  14. Sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, Anders; Rhodes, Andrew; Venkatesh, Bala

    2017-01-01

    Because of its high incidence and clinical complexity, sepsis is a major challenge to clinicians and researchers and a global burden to healthcare systems and society. Despite recent progress, short- and long-term morbidity, mortality and costs remain high in both developed and developing countri...

  15. ACUTE DIALYSIS QUALITY INITIATIVE (ADQI) XIV SEPSIS PHENOTYPES AND TARGETS FOR BLOOD PURIFICATION IN SEPSIS: THE BOGOTÁ CONSENSUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellum, John A; Gómez, Hernando; Gómez, Alonso; Murray, Patrick; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-03-01

    Despite widespread use, there is currently no consensus on how extracorporeal blood purification therapies should be applied or studied in patients with sepsis. One major obstacle has been the lack of clear descriptions of specific sepsis phenotypes tied to mechanisms that would permit the identification of molecular targets. Current evidence suggests that sepsis-related morbidity and mortality involve widely different clinical phenotypes that variably include mitochondrial dysfunction, abnormalities of vascular biology including endothelial dysfunction and coagulopathy, epithelial dysfunction, and immune suppression and dysregulation. While most cases of sepsis involve some element of all of these pathobiologic processes, the magnitude of each varies greatly from patient to patient in part as a result of the pathogen and in part related to host-specific factors. Thus, the purpose of the fourteenth international consensus conference of acute dialysis quality initiative was to develop consensus for a conceptual model of sepsis-induced organ failure that can be treated by extracorporeal blood purification and possibly also with drugs or other therapies. We assembled a group of experts from around the world and used a modified Delphi method to reach consensus. Specific findings and recommendations for future research are provided in the four accompanying papers.

  16. Effect of administration of Streptococcus salivarius K12 on the occurrence of streptococcal pharyngo-tonsillitis, scarlet fever and acute otitis media in 3 years old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pierro, F; Colombo, M; Giuliani, M G; Danza, M L; Basile, I; Bollani, T; Conti, A M; Zanvit, A; Rottoli, A S

    2016-11-01

    Streptococcus salivarius K12 (BLIS K12) is a probiotic strain strongly antagonistic to the growth of Streptococcus pyogenes, the most important bacterial cause of pharyngeal infections in humans. Shown to colonize the oral cavity and to be safe for human use, BLIS K12 has previously been reported to reduce pharyngo-tonsillitis episodes in children or adults known to have experienced recurrent streptococcal infection. The present study was focussed upon evaluating the role of BLIS K12 in the control of streptococcal disease and acute otitis media in children attending the first year of kindergarten. By randomization, 222 enrolled children attending the first year of kindergarten were divided into a treated group (N = 111) receiving for 6 months a daily treatment with BLIS K12 (Bactoblis®) and a control group (N = 111) who were monitored as untreated controls. During the 6 months of treatment and 3 months of follow-up, the children were evaluated for treatment tolerance, and for episodes of streptococcal pharyngo-tonsillitis, scarlet fever and acute otitis media. During the 6-month trial (N = 111 per group) the incidence of streptococcal pharyngo-tonsillitis, scarlet fever and acute otitis media was approximately 16%, 9% and 44% respectively in the treated group and 48%, 4% and 80% in the control group. During the 3-months follow-up (N = 29 per group) the corresponding rates of infection were 15%, 0% and 12% in the treated group and 26%, 6% and 36% in the controls. No apparent side effects were detected in the treated group either during treatment or follow-up. All of the enrolled children completed the study. The daily administration of BLIS K12 to children attending their first year of kindergarten was associated with a significant reduction in episodes of streptococcal pharyngitis and acute otitis media. No protection against scarlet fever was detected.

  17. Early diagnostics and treatment with acute burn sepsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmedov A.A.; Shakirov B.M.; Karabaev H.K

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the value of the procalcitonin test used for early diagnosis of sepsis and to study the course and treatment of burn sepsis in patients with severe burns. Methods: Eighty patients in the Burn Department of Republican Scientific Centre of Emergency Medical Care, aged 17-75 years with burn injuries covering 30%-85% of the body surface, were enrolled in the study. Procalcitonin is marker of sepsis, procalcitonin > 2 ng/mL, sensitivity -89%, specific feature -94%. Results: The result showed that among septic patients with severe burns, rational use of intensive therapy for burn sepsis and septic shock in combination with parentrial ozonotherapy resulted in decreases of syndrome of poly organ insufficiency and lethal outcomes from 70%accordingly. The result allows the conclusion that the treatment examined leads to a significant increase in survival coefficient. Conclusions: This in turn confirms the efficacy of early necrectomy and auto dermoplasty of deep burn wounds in victims with sepsis.

  18. Clinical Efficacy and Safety of Liquid Pelargonium sidoides Preparation (EPs 7630 in Children with Acute Non-Streptococcal Tonsillopharyngitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Berezhnoi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Acute tonsillopharyngitis is amongst the most common reasons for children, adolescents and young adults to consult with a physician. Despite extensive prescription, antibiotic therapy is indicated in less than one-fifth of these cases. New treatment strategies for patients with non-group-A-streptococcal acute tonsillopharyngitis are therefore required. Objectives EPs 7630 is an extract from the roots of Pelargonium sidoides DC. After positive clinical study results in children with acute bronchitis, the present study was conducted to demonstrate the efficacy of EPs 7630 in the treatment of acute tonsillopharyngitis in children. Methods In this double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial with a group sequential design, the efficacy and tolerability of EPs 7630 were investigated in 6- to 10-year-old patients with acute tonsillopharyngitis, who showed no evidence of group A β-hemolytic streptococcus. Treatment duration was 6 days. Primary efficacy variable was change in the sum score of the tonsillitis severity score (TSS on day 4 compared to baseline. Results Overall, data on the change of the TSS measured for the EPs 7630 and placebo group were available for 60 and 64 children, respectively. After 4 days of treatment, the TSS had decreased from 9.6 ± 1.2 to 2.8 ± 2.6 points in the active medication group and from 9.5 ± 1.3 to 6.1 ± 4.1 points in the placebo group (P < 0.001, indicating superiority of EPs 7630 over placebo. Conclusions EPs 7630 was found to be efficacious in the treatment of acute tonsillopharyngitis in children and was very well tolerated.

  19. First Report of Acute Cholecystitis with Sepsis Caused by Cellulomonas denverensis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtaki, Hirofumi; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Sawamura, Haruki; Ohta, Hirotoshi; Inoue, Rina; Iwasa, Junpei; Ito, Hiroyasu; Murakami, Nobuo; Ezaki, Takayuki; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Seishima, Mitsuru

    2009-01-01

    Cellulomonas denverensis is a small and thin gram-positive rod-shaped bacterium that was proposed as a new species in 2005. Here we report a female case of acute cholecystitis and sepsis in which C. denverensis was determined to be causative. PMID:19656981

  20. 新生儿早发型 GBS败血症1例并文献复习%A case report of early-onset group B streptococcal sepsis and literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘蓓蓓; 叶飘; 蒲杰; 韩彦青

    2013-01-01

    目的:介绍新生儿早发型B族溶血链球菌( GBS)败血症的临床表现、治疗及预防方法。方法报道1例血培养及脑脊液培养均为阳性的早发型GBS败血症患儿的临床表现、实验室检查及治疗经过,并进行文献复习。结果该病例为一例以化脓性脑膜炎为主要表现的早发型GBS败血症,先后经积极1周青霉素及4周万古霉素抗感染治疗,治愈出院,随访预后良好。结论 GBS是新生儿早发型败血症重要的致病菌,青霉素是治疗的首选药物,必要时也可使用万古霉素抗感染治疗,建议对孕妇开展产前GBS筛查并进行预防性治疗,尤其应对高危新生儿进行监测以减少早发型GBS败血症的发生和远期严重后遗症。免疫预防和疫苗预防有望成为更有效的预防策略。%Objective To introduce the clinic manifestations , treatment and prophylaxis of early-onset neonatal group B streptococcal (GBS) sepsis.Methods Early-onset GBS sepsis in one case was reported with positive results both in blood culture and cerebrospinal culture.Its clinical manifestations , laboratory examinations , and process of treatment were reported and corresponding literatures were reviewed.Results The major clinic manifestation of the case was purulent meningitis .After one-week penicillin and four-week vancomycin treatment, the case was cured and discharged with good prognosis at follow -up.Conclusion GBS is the important pathogen of early-onset neonatal sepsis , and penicillin is the first choice for the treatment .Vancomycin can be used if necessary .GBS screening for pregnancy and preventive treatment is recommended , and high-risk neonates should be monitored to reduce the incidence of early-onset GBS sepsis and avoid serious sequela .Immunity regulation and vaccines may be more efficacious strategy in future .

  1. Effects of anabolic steroids on acute phase responses in intra-abdominal sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mealy

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The acute phase response is an important adaptive response to sepsis and injury. As anabolic steroids increase protein synthesis we postulated that these agents might also increase hepatic acute phase protein synthesis. Male Wistar rats were pretreated with testosterone or danazol for 48 h prior to caecal ligation and puncture (CLP. Thirty-six h following surgery the animals were killed and blood taken for full blood count, total protein, albumin, α, β and γ globulin fractions on serum electrophoresis, complement C3 and transferrin levels. Danazol increased the α1, α2 and β1 globulin serum protein fractions in comparison with no surgery and CLP alone groups. These results indicate that danazol increases plasma acute phase proteins, as measured by electrophoresis, in this model of intra-abdominal sepsis.

  2. Blood transfusion improves renal oxygenation and renal function in sepsis-induced acute kidney injury in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Zafrani (Lara); B. Ergin (Bulent); Kapucu, A. (Aysegul); C. Ince (Can)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The effects of blood transfusion on renal microcirculation during sepsis are unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effect of blood transfusion on renal microvascular oxygenation and renal function during sepsis-induced acute kidney injury. Methods: Twenty-seven Wistar

  3. Group A streptococcal genotypes from throat and skin isolates in the United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfaresi Mubarak S

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes causes a variety of human diseases that range from relatively mild skin infections to severe invasive diseases, such as acute rheumatic fever, glomerulonephritis, puerperal sepsis, necrotizing fasciitis, meningitis, and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Accurate identification and typing of group A hemolytic streptococci (GAS is essential for epidemiological and pathogenetic studies of streptococcal diseases. For this reason, The genetic diversity of group A streptococcal (GAS isolates from subjects in the United Arab Emirates with streptococcal disease was studied using emm gene sequence analysis. The emm typing system which is based on sequence analysis of PCR products of the N-terminal hypervariable region of the M protein gene, concurs with M serotyping almost 1:1. Findings A total of 38 GAS isolates were analyzed, including 35 isolates from throat and 3 from skin. Among the 38 isolates, a total of 25 different emm/st types were detected: 20 isolates (53% belonged to 16 validated standard reference emm types and 18 isolates (47% belonged to 9 recognized sequence types. Conclusions This is the first emm typing study in the United Arab Emirates to demonstrate the heterogeneity of the GAS population.

  4. Mechanisms of attenuation of abdominal sepsis induced acute lung injury by ascorbic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Bernard J; Kraskauskas, Donatas; Martin, Erika J; Farkas, Daniela; Wegelin, Jacob A; Brophy, Donald; Ward, Kevin R; Voelkel, Norbert F; Fowler, Alpha A; Natarajan, Ramesh

    2012-07-01

    Bacterial infections of the lungs and abdomen are among the most common causes of sepsis. Abdominal peritonitis often results in acute lung injury (ALI). Recent reports demonstrate a potential benefit of parenteral vitamin C [ascorbic acid (AscA)] in the pathogenesis of sepsis. Therefore we examined the mechanisms of vitamin C supplementation in the setting of abdominal peritonitis-mediated ALI. We hypothesized that vitamin C supplementation would protect lungs by restoring alveolar epithelial barrier integrity and preventing sepsis-associated coagulopathy. Male C57BL/6 mice were intraperitoneally injected with a fecal stem solution to induce abdominal peritonitis (FIP) 30 min prior to receiving either AscA (200 mg/kg) or dehydroascorbic acid (200 mg/kg). Variables examined included survival, extent of ALI, pulmonary inflammatory markers (myeloperoxidase, chemokines), bronchoalveolar epithelial permeability, alveolar fluid clearance, epithelial ion channel, and pump expression (aquaporin 5, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, epithelial sodium channel, and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase), tight junction protein expression (claudins, occludins, zona occludens), cytoskeletal rearrangements (F-actin polymerization), and coagulation parameters (thromboelastography, pro- and anticoagulants, fibrinolysis mediators) of septic blood. FIP-mediated ALI was characterized by compromised lung epithelial permeability, reduced alveolar fluid clearance, pulmonary inflammation and neutrophil sequestration, coagulation abnormalities, and increased mortality. Parenteral vitamin C infusion protected mice from the deleterious consequences of sepsis by multiple mechanisms, including attenuation of the proinflammatory response, enhancement of epithelial barrier function, increasing alveolar fluid clearance, and prevention of sepsis-associated coagulation abnormalities. Parenteral vitamin C may potentially have a role in the management of sepsis and ALI associated with sepsis.

  5. Monocytes in systematic inflammatory response syndrome: Differences between sepsis and acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vassilios Koussoulas; Michalis Tzivras; Vassiliki Karagianni; Ekaterini Spyridaki; Diamantis Plachouras; Helen Giamarellou; Evangelos J Giamarellos-Bourboulis

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To unravel the differences between systematic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) of acute pancreatitis compared to the same syndrome in sepsis.METHODS: Twenty-five patients were enrolled, 12 with sepsis and 13 acute pancreatitis. After diagnosis 20 mL blood was sampled. Half were assayed for isolation of monocytes and 10 mL was centrifuged for serum test of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin-6(IL-6). Half of monocytes were incubated in the presence of patients' serum and supernatants were collected. The other half was treated for estimation of optical photometry under caspase-3 inhibition. TNFα and IL-6 were estimated by an enzyme immunoassay.RESULTS: median ± SE of serum IL-6 in septic patients and acute pancreatitis patients was 192.30 ± 35.40 ng/L and 21.00 ± 16.05 ng/L, respectively (P < 0.01). Respective values of caspase-3 were 0.94 ± 0.17 pmol/min 104 cells and 0.34 ± 0.09 pmol/min 104 cells (P < 0.05).IL-6 of monocyte supernatants of patients with sepsis was significantly increased after addition of patients' serum, while that of patients with acute pancreatitis did not show significant difference.CONCLUSION: The data have shown that monocyte activity is different between acute pancreatitis and sepsis. This phenomenon might be explained as a different pathway to the pro-inflammatory cytokines release or could be a novel anti-inflammatory response in acute pancreatitis.

  6. Acute Lung Injury and Fibrosis in a Baboon Model of Escherichia coli Sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshari, Ravi S.; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Zhu, Hua; Popescu, Narcis I.; Peer, Glenn; Chaaban, Hala; Lambris, John D.; Polf, Holly; Lupu, Cristina; Kinasewitz, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis-induced inflammation of the lung leads to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which may trigger persistent fibrosis. The pathology of ARDS is complex and poorly understood, and the therapeutic approaches are limited. We used a baboon model of Escherichia coli sepsis that mimics the complexity of human disease to study the pathophysiology of ARDS. We performed extensive biochemical, histological, and functional analyses to characterize the disease progression and the long-term effects of sepsis on the lung structure and function. Similar to humans, sepsis-induced ARDS in baboons displays an early inflammatory exudative phase, with extensive necrosis. This is followed by a regenerative phase dominated by proliferation of type 2 epithelial cells, expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition markers, myofibroblast migration and proliferation, and collagen synthesis. Baboons that survived sepsis showed persistent inflammation and collagen deposition 6–27 months after the acute episodes. Long-term survivors had almost double the amount of collagen in the lung as compared with age-matched control animals. Immunostaining for procollagens showed persistent active collagen synthesis within the fibroblastic foci and interalveolar septa. Fibroblasts expressed markers of transforming growth factor-β and platelet-derived growth factor signaling, suggesting their potential role as mediators of myofibroblast migration and proliferation, and collagen deposition. In parallel, up-regulation of the inhibitors of extracellular proteases supports a deregulated matrix remodeling that may contribute to fibrosis. The primate model of sepsis-induced ARDS mimics the disease progression in humans, including chronic inflammation and long-lasting fibrosis. This model helps our understanding of the pathophysiology of fibrosis and the testing of new therapies. PMID:24066737

  7. Adhesion molecules involved in neutrophil recruitment during sepsis-induced acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herter, Jan M; Rossaint, Jan; Spieker, Tilmann; Zarbock, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication in critically ill patients and is associated with high mortality. Recruitment of neutrophils is a hallmark in the pathogenesis of AKI. Although ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a frequently used research model of AKI, the clinical relevance of IRI-induced AKI is limited. Epidemiologically, sepsis is the prevailing cause of kidney injury. However, it is still unknown whether these distinct entities of AKI share the same pathophysiological mechanisms. This study was initiated to investigate the molecular mechanisms of neutrophil recruitment into the kidney in a murine model of sepsis-induced AKI. By using a flow cytometry-based method, we show that the two β2-integrins Mac-1 and LFA-1 as well as E-selectin and P-selectin are involved in neutrophil recruitment into the kidney after induction of sepsis. The molecular mechanisms of neutrophil recruitment were further investigated using intravital microscopy, demonstrating that blocking one of these four molecules reduces the number of adherent leukocytes. This was accompanied by a renal upregulation of E-selectin, P-selectin and ICAM-1 (the counter-receptor of β2-integrins on endothelial cells) after sepsis induction. We conclude that blocking P-selectin, E-selectin, Mac-1 or LFA-1 protects mice from sepsis-induced AKI.

  8. Aggressive Periodontitis with Streptococcal Gingivitis a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Solanki

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute streptococcal gingivitis is an acute inflammation of the oral mucosa and also seen with the other oral diseases as aggressive periodontitis. Streptococcal infections of gingiva are seen rarely; also the origin of this gingival inflammation is occasionally different from that of routine plaque associated gingivitis. This case report describes a patient who presented with severe gingival inflammation and attachment loss that was diagnosed as an acute streptococcal infection associated with aggressive periodontitis. A case of aggressive periodontitis with streptococcal gingivitis was reported which was diagnosed treated with no postoperative complications.

  9. Levosimendan for the Prevention of Acute Organ Dysfunction in Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Anthony C; Perkins, Gavin D; Singer, Mervyn; McAuley, Daniel F; Orme, Robert M L; Santhakumaran, Shalini; Mason, Alexina J; Cross, Mary; Al-Beidh, Farah; Best-Lane, Janis; Brealey, David; Nutt, Christopher L; McNamee, James J; Reschreiter, Henrik; Breen, Andrew; Liu, Kathleen D; Ashby, Deborah

    2016-10-27

    Background Levosimendan is a calcium-sensitizing drug with inotropic and other properties that may improve outcomes in patients with sepsis. Methods We conducted a double-blind, randomized clinical trial to investigate whether levosimendan reduces the severity of organ dysfunction in adults with sepsis. Patients were randomly assigned to receive a blinded infusion of levosimendan (at a dose of 0.05 to 0.2 μg per kilogram of body weight per minute) for 24 hours or placebo in addition to standard care. The primary outcome was the mean daily Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score in the intensive care unit up to day 28 (scores for each of five systems range from 0 to 4, with higher scores indicating more severe dysfunction; maximum score, 20). Secondary outcomes included 28-day mortality, time to weaning from mechanical ventilation, and adverse events. Results The trial recruited 516 patients; 259 were assigned to receive levosimendan and 257 to receive placebo. There was no significant difference in the mean (±SD) SOFA score between the levosimendan group and the placebo group (6.68±3.96 vs. 6.06±3.89; mean difference, 0.61; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.07 to 1.29; P=0.053). Mortality at 28 days was 34.5% in the levosimendan group and 30.9% in the placebo group (absolute difference, 3.6 percentage points; 95% CI, -4.5 to 11.7; P=0.43). Among patients requiring ventilation at baseline, those in the levosimendan group were less likely than those in the placebo group to be successfully weaned from mechanical ventilation over the period of 28 days (hazard ratio, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.60 to 0.97; P=0.03). More patients in the levosimendan group than in the placebo group had supraventricular tachyarrhythmia (3.1% vs. 0.4%; absolute difference, 2.7 percentage points; 95% CI, 0.1 to 5.3; P=0.04). Conclusions The addition of levosimendan to standard treatment in adults with sepsis was not associated with less severe organ dysfunction or lower mortality

  10. A case of acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis that developed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Belde KASAP; Çarman, Kürşat Bora; Yiş, Uluç

    2014-01-01

    A 10-year male patient presented with swelling in the face, legs and scrotal area which developed 8 days after tonsillitis treatment. Acute post-sterotococcal glomerulonephritis (APSGN) was considered in the patient whose urinalysis revealed hematuria and proteinuria at nephrotic level, whose urea, creatinine, lipid profile and anti-streptolysine O antibody levels were increased, albumin and C3 value were decreased and whose 24-hour urine test revealed proteinuria. Renal biopsy was found to b...

  11. Acute kidney injury in sepsis: transient or intrinsic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jörres, Achim

    2013-11-20

    The negative prediction of intrinsic versus transient acute kidney injury (AKI) in septic patients may be facilitated by combined assessment of fractional excretion of sodium and urea. If both excretions are high this would signal the presence of transient AKI and suggest that successful restoration of diuresis by conservative therapy is likely, thus supporting a wait-and-watch approach regarding the initiation of acute renal replacement therapy.

  12. Macrolide treatment failure in streptococcal pharyngitis resulting in acute rheumatic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Latania K; McAuley, James B; Shulman, Stanford T

    2012-03-01

    Macrolide resistance (MR) in group A Streptococcus (GAS) has been well documented in several countries and has become clinically significant since the large increases in macrolide usage during the 1970s. Macrolides are recommended as an alternative therapy for GAS pharyngitis, the most common cause of bacterial pharyngitis. Macrolide resistance has been associated with certain emm types, a sequence-based typing system of the hypervariable region of the GAS M-protein gene. Clinical failure of macrolide treatment of GAS infections can be associated with complications including acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease, the leading cause of acquired heart disease in children worldwide. Here we report 2 pediatric cases of MR and/or treatment failure in the treatment of GAS pharyngitis with the subsequent development of acute rheumatic fever. We also review the literature on worldwide MR rates, molecular classifications, and emm types, primarily associated with GAS pharyngeal isolates between the years of 2000 and 2010. The use of macrolides in the management of GAS pharyngitis should be limited to patients with significant penicillin allergy.

  13. Rapid hemodilution is associated with increased sepsis and mortality among patients with severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO En-qiang; FEI Jian; PENG Yi-bing; HUANG Jie; TANG Yao-qing; ZHANG Sheng-dao

    2010-01-01

    Background Hemoconcentration may be an important factor that determines the progression of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). In addition, it has been proposed that biomarkers may be useful in predicting subsequent necrosis in SAP. However, it is still uncertain whether hemodilution in a short term can improve outcome. We aimed to investigate the effect of rapid hemodilution on the outcome of patients with SAP.Methods One hundred and fifteen patients were admitted prospectively according to the criteria within 24 hours of SAP onset. Patients were randomly assigned to either rapid hemodilution (hematocrit (HCT) <35%, n=56) or slow hemodilution (HCT 235%, n=59) within 48 hours of onset. Balthazar CT scores were calculated on admission, day 7, and day 14, after onset of the disease. Time interval for sepsis presented, incidence of sepsis within 28 days and in-hospital survival rate were determined.Results The amount of fluid used in rapid hemodilution was significantly more than that used in slow hemodilution (P <0.05) on the admission day, the first day, and the second day. There were significant differences between the rapid and slow hemodilution group in terms of hematocrit, oxygenation index, pH values, APACHE II scores and organ dysfunction at different time during the first week. There were significant differences in the time interval to sepsis in rapid hemodilution ((7.4 1.9) days) compared with the slow hemodilution group ((10.2 2.3) days), and the incidence of sepsis (78.6%) was higher in the rapid group compared to the slow (57.6%) in the first 28 days. The survival rate of the slow hemodilution group (84.7%) was better than the rapid hemodilution (66.1%. P<0.05).Conclusions Rapid hemodilution can increase the incidence of sepsis within 28 days and in-hospital mortality. Hematocrit should be maintained between 30%-40% in the acute response stage.

  14. Cord Blood Acute Phase Reactants Predict Early Onset Neonatal Sepsis in Preterm Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palac, Hannah L.; Yogev, Ram; Ernst, Linda M.; Mestan, Karen K.

    2017-01-01

    Background Early onset sepsis (EOS) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in preterm infants, yet diagnosis remains inadequate resulting in missed cases or prolonged empiric antibiotics with adverse consequences. Evaluation of acute phase reactant (APR) biomarkers in umbilical cord blood at birth may improve EOS detection in preterm infants with intrauterine infection. Methods In this nested case-control study, infants (29.7 weeks gestation, IQR: 27.7–32.2) were identified from a longitudinal cohort with archived cord blood and placental histopathology. Patients were categorized using culture, laboratory, clinical, and antibiotic treatment data into sepsis groups: confirmed sepsis (cEOS, n = 12); presumed sepsis (PS, n = 30); and no sepsis (controls, n = 30). Nine APRs were measured in duplicate from cord blood using commercially available multiplex immunoassays (Bio-Plex Pro™). In addition, placental histopathologic data were linked to biomarker results. Results cEOS organisms were Escherichia coli, Streptococcus agalactiae, Proteus mirabilis, Haemophilus influenzae and Listeria monocytogenes. C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin (Hp), serum amyloid P and ferritin were significantly elevated in cEOS compared to controls (p<0.01). SAA, CRP, and Hp were elevated in cEOS but not in PS (p<0.01) and had AUCs of 99%, 96%, and 95% respectively in predicting cEOS. Regression analysis revealed robust associations of SAA, CRP, and Hp with EOS after adjustment for covariates. Procalcitonin, fibrinogen, α-2-macroglobulin and tissue plasminogen activator were not significantly different across groups. Placental acute inflammation was associated with APR elevation and was present in all cEOS, 9 PS, and 17 control infants. Conclusion This study shows that certain APRs are elevated in cord blood of premature infants with EOS of intrauterine origin. SAA, CRP, and Hp at birth have potential diagnostic utility for risk stratification and

  15. Cord Blood Acute Phase Reactants Predict Early Onset Neonatal Sepsis in Preterm Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mithal, Leena B; Palac, Hannah L; Yogev, Ram; Ernst, Linda M; Mestan, Karen K

    2017-01-01

    Early onset sepsis (EOS) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in preterm infants, yet diagnosis remains inadequate resulting in missed cases or prolonged empiric antibiotics with adverse consequences. Evaluation of acute phase reactant (APR) biomarkers in umbilical cord blood at birth may improve EOS detection in preterm infants with intrauterine infection. In this nested case-control study, infants (29.7 weeks gestation, IQR: 27.7-32.2) were identified from a longitudinal cohort with archived cord blood and placental histopathology. Patients were categorized using culture, laboratory, clinical, and antibiotic treatment data into sepsis groups: confirmed sepsis (cEOS, n = 12); presumed sepsis (PS, n = 30); and no sepsis (controls, n = 30). Nine APRs were measured in duplicate from cord blood using commercially available multiplex immunoassays (Bio-Plex Pro™). In addition, placental histopathologic data were linked to biomarker results. cEOS organisms were Escherichia coli, Streptococcus agalactiae, Proteus mirabilis, Haemophilus influenzae and Listeria monocytogenes. C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin (Hp), serum amyloid P and ferritin were significantly elevated in cEOS compared to controls (p<0.01). SAA, CRP, and Hp were elevated in cEOS but not in PS (p<0.01) and had AUCs of 99%, 96%, and 95% respectively in predicting cEOS. Regression analysis revealed robust associations of SAA, CRP, and Hp with EOS after adjustment for covariates. Procalcitonin, fibrinogen, α-2-macroglobulin and tissue plasminogen activator were not significantly different across groups. Placental acute inflammation was associated with APR elevation and was present in all cEOS, 9 PS, and 17 control infants. This study shows that certain APRs are elevated in cord blood of premature infants with EOS of intrauterine origin. SAA, CRP, and Hp at birth have potential diagnostic utility for risk stratification and identification of infants with EOS.

  16. Diagnosis in acute abdominal pain and ongoing abdominal sepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiewiet, J.J.S.

    2016-01-01

    Acute abdominal pain is a common reason for presentation at the emergency department. To establish a timely and adequate diagnosis, doctors use the pattern of complaints and physical examination as the basis for the evaluation of a patient. In this thesis we conducted a study that showed that surgeo

  17. Tropical pyomyositis presenting as sepsis with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siddalingana Gouda TG; H Manjunath Hande; Weena Stanley; Ragini Bargur

    2011-01-01

    Tropical pyomyositis is an underdiagnosed condition. We reported a35 year old male farmer, who presented with septicemia and acute respiratory distress syndrome due to pyomyositis involving the paraspinal muscles. Culture of the pus grew methicillin sensitiveStaphylococcus aureus, and the patient recovered after surgical drainage and antibiotic treatment. Diagnostic delays can be avoided if tropical pyomyositis is considered as a differential diagnosis in patients with septicemia.

  18. STREPTOCOCCAL TONSILLITIS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Polunin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of acute tonsillitis retains its relevance over the past few years. Its most frequent causative agent is the ß-hemolytic streptococcus group A. This article covers the clinical presentation of the disease and its differential diagnosis as well as modern methods of diagnosing and treating the disease. The therapy of acute tonsillitis is based on a complex approach, which allows to increase its effectiveness considerably. It is offered to use local-effect antibacterial drugs alongside the systemic antibacterial therapy. There are recommendations on the usage of pastilles for local antibacterial treatment, which allow to decrease the pain intensity during streptococcal tonsillitis and to decrease the probability of complications.

  19. Flecainide Improve Sepsis Induced Acute Lung Injury by Controlling Inflammatory Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Song

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Flecainide is an antiarrhythmic agent that is used primarily in the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. Some evidences also suggest that flecainide can participate in alveolar fluid clearance and inflammatory responses. This experiment was aimed to evaluate the effects of flecainide on sepsis induced acute lung injury in a rat model. Methods: Rats were treated with subcutaneous infusion of saline or flecainide (0.1 or 0.2 mg/kg/hr by a mini-osmotic pump. Subcutaneous infusion was started 3 hours before and continued until 8 hours after intraperitoneal injection of saline or endotoxin. Animals were sacrificed for analyses of severity of acute lung injury with wet to dry (W/D ratio and lung injury score (LIS in lung and inflammatory responses with level of leukocyte, polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs and inteleukin-8 (IL-8 in bronchoalveolar lavages fluid (BALF. Results: Flecainide markedly improved dose dependently sepsis induced acute lung injury as analysed by W/D ratio (from 2.24 ± 0.11 to 1.76 ± 0.09, p < 0.05 and LIS (from 3 to 1, p < 0.05, and inflammatory response as determined by leukocyte (from 443 ± 127 to 229 ± 95, p < 0.05, PMNs (from 41.43 ± 17.63 to 2.43 ± 2.61, p < 0.05 and IL-8 (from 95.00 ± 15.28 to 40.00 ± 10.21, p < 0.05 in BALF. Conclusions: Flecanide improve sepsis induced acute lung injury in rats by controlling inflammatory responses.

  20. [Bacillus cereus sepsis and subarachnoid hemorrhage following consolidation chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawatani, Eri; Kishikawa, Yuki; Sankoda, Chikahiro; Kuwahara, Nobuo; Mori, Daisuke; Osoegawa, Kouichi; Matsuishi, Eijo; Gondo, Hisashi

    2009-04-01

    A 64-year-old man with acute myelogenous leukemia (FAB classification, M7) in remission received consolidation chemotherapy with mitoxantrone/cytosine arabinoside. WBC counts decreased to 0/microl on day 14, and fever (39.3 degrees C) and epigastralgia developed on day 15. Cefozopran was instituted for febrile neutropenia; however, on day 16, he was found to be in cardiac arrest. CT scan on day 16 revealed subarachnoid hemorrhage. Gram-positive rods were isolated from blood cultures on day 15, and were later identified as B.cereus. He recovered transiently, but eventually died on day 19. Postmortem examination demonstrated many colonies of B. cereus in the cerebrum, cerebellum, lung, and liver. Hepatocyte necrosis was also observed in the liver. Bacterial aneurysms or septic emboli were not identified in the arachnoid vessels, but necrosis of cerebral vessels was prominent, which was considered to be the cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage has been reported to be associated with B. cereus sepsis, which developed at nadir following chemotherapy for leukemia patients. Because of the aggressive clinical course of B. cereus sepsis, including the risk for subarachnoid hemorrhage, early treatment with effective antibiotics for B. cereus sepsis would be important in the management of leukemia patients after chemotherapy.

  1. Acute kidney injury and inflammatory response of sepsis following cecal ligation and puncture in d-galactose-induced aging rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Hu, Jie; Mao, Zhi; Kang, Hongjun; Liu, Hui; Fu, Wanlei; Lv, Yangfan; Zhou, Feihu

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the d-galactose (d-gal)-induced mimetic aging rat model has been widely used in studies of age-associated diseases, which have shown that chronic d-gal exposure induces premature aging similar to natural aging in rats. With the increasing rate of sepsis in the geriatric population, an easy-access animal model for preclinical studies of elderly sepsis is urgently needed. This study investigates whether a sepsis model that is established in d-gal-induced aging rats can serve as a suitable model for preclinical studies of elderly patients with sepsis. To investigate the acute kidney injury (AKI) and inflammatory response of sepsis following cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in d-gal-induced aging rats. Twelve-week-old male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into low-dose d-gal (L d-gal, 125 mg/kg/d), high-dose d-gal (H d-gal, 500 mg/kg/d), and control groups. After daily subcutaneous injection of d-gal for 6 weeks, the CLP method was used to establish a sepsis model. The mortality was 73.3%, 40%, and 33.3% in the H d-gal, L d-gal, and control groups, respectively. Blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, plasma neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, interleukin-6, interleukin-10, and tumor necrosis factor-α were markedly increased in the H d-gal group after establishment of the sepsis model (H d-gal vs control, Paging rats are more likely to die from sepsis than are young rats, and probably this is associated with increased severity of septic AKI and an increased inflammatory response. Therefore, use of the high-dose- d-gal-induced aging rat model of sepsis for preclinical studies can provide more useful information for the treatment of sepsis in elderly patients.

  2. Effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/δ on sepsis induced acute lung injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Cairui; Zhou Guopeng; Zeng Zeng

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are the first steps in the development of multiple organ failure induced by sepsis.A systemic excessive inflammatory reaction is currently the accepted mechanism of the pathogenesis of sepsis.Several studies have suggested a protective role of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-β/δ (PPAR-β/δ) in related inflammatory diseases.But the role of PPARβ/δ in ALI remains uncertain.The aim of this study was to investigate the role and possible mechanism of PPARβ/δ in ALI induced by sepsis.Methods Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) was used as a sepsis model.Rats were randomly divided into four groups,the control group (CON,n=6),sham-operation group (SHAM,n=12),cecal ligation and puncture group (CLP,n=30),GW501516 group (CLP+GW,n=25),which underwent CLP and were subcutaneously injected with the PPAR-β/δ agonist GW501516 (0.05 mg/100 g body weight).Survival was monitored to 24 hours after operation.Blood pressure,serum creatinine,blood urea nitrogen,aspartate aminotrasferase and alanine aminotrasferase were measured after CLP.Concentrations of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-1β in serum were detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits.Lung tissue samples were stained with H&E and scored according to the degree of inflammation.Bacterial colonies were counted in the peritoneal fluid.Alveolar macrophages were cultured and incubated with GW501516 (0.15 μmol/L) and PPARβ/δ adenovirus and then treated with Lipopolysaccharide (2 μg/ml) for 2 hours.The TNF-α,IL-1β and IL-6 RNA in lung and alveolar macrophages were determined by real-time PCR.Phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in lung and alveolar macrophages was detected by Western blotting.Results GW501516 significantly increased the survival of septic rats,decreased histological damage of the lungs,reduced inflammatory cytokines in serum and

  3. Exogenous Carbon Monoxide Decreases Sepsis-Induced Acute Kidney Injury and Inhibits NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO has shown various physiological effects including anti-inflammatory activity in several diseases, whereas the therapeutic efficacy of CO on sepsis-induced acute kidney injury (AKI has not been reported as of yet. The purpose of the present study was to explore the effects of exogenous CO on sepsis-induced AKI and nucleotide-binding domain-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3 inflammasome activation in rats. Male rats were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP to induce sepsis and AKI. Exogenous CO delivered from CO-releasing molecule 2 (CORM-2 was used intraperitoneally as intervention after CLP surgery. Therapeutic effects of CORM-2 on sepsis-induced AKI were assessed by measuring serum creatinine (Scr and blood urea nitrogen (BUN, kidney histology scores, apoptotic cell scores, oxidative stress, levels of cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β, and NLRP3 inflammasome expression. CORM-2 treatment protected against the sepsis-induced AKI as evidenced by reducing serum Scr/BUN levels, apoptotic cells scores, increasing survival rates, and decreasing renal histology scores. Furthermore, treatment with CORM-2 significantly reduced TNF-α and IL-1β levels and oxidative stress. Moreover, CORM-2 treatment significantly decreased NLRP3 inflammasome protein expressions. Our study provided evidence that CORM-2 treatment protected against sepsis-induced AKI and inhibited NLRP3 inflammasome activation, and suggested that CORM-2 could be a potential therapeutic candidate for treating sepsis-induced AKI.

  4. Exogenous Carbon Monoxide Decreases Sepsis-Induced Acute Kidney Injury and Inhibits NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Huang, Jian; Li, Yi; Chang, Ruiming; Wu, Haidong; Lin, Jiali; Huang, Zitong

    2015-08-31

    Carbon monoxide (CO) has shown various physiological effects including anti-inflammatory activity in several diseases, whereas the therapeutic efficacy of CO on sepsis-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) has not been reported as of yet. The purpose of the present study was to explore the effects of exogenous CO on sepsis-induced AKI and nucleotide-binding domain-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation in rats. Male rats were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) to induce sepsis and AKI. Exogenous CO delivered from CO-releasing molecule 2 (CORM-2) was used intraperitoneally as intervention after CLP surgery. Therapeutic effects of CORM-2 on sepsis-induced AKI were assessed by measuring serum creatinine (Scr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN), kidney histology scores, apoptotic cell scores, oxidative stress, levels of cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β, and NLRP3 inflammasome expression. CORM-2 treatment protected against the sepsis-induced AKI as evidenced by reducing serum Scr/BUN levels, apoptotic cells scores, increasing survival rates, and decreasing renal histology scores. Furthermore, treatment with CORM-2 significantly reduced TNF-α and IL-1β levels and oxidative stress. Moreover, CORM-2 treatment significantly decreased NLRP3 inflammasome protein expressions. Our study provided evidence that CORM-2 treatment protected against sepsis-induced AKI and inhibited NLRP3 inflammasome activation, and suggested that CORM-2 could be a potential therapeutic candidate for treating sepsis-induced AKI.

  5. Post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odalovic A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis (PSGN is a frequent cause of acute nephritis in children. This case study was done with the aim to point out that the infections caused by Group A streptococci, in spite of antibiotic era, are still present in the population. An 8-year old boy was admitted in our hospital with a two-day history of fewer, tonsillopharyngitis. After hospital admission, patient was treated with penicillin during the period of 10 days, antihypertensive medications (captopril, furosemide, including restricted diet of salt. After the treatment, patient became better. On demission it was found proteinuria and microhematuria PSGN is very serious disease, which leaves severe complications if the valid therapy with penicillin is not used in propriety time, during the recommended period of 10 days.

  6. [Group B streptococcal early-onset neonatal sepsis in the area of Barcelona (2004-2010). Analysis of missed opportunities for prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez, Montserrat; Sanfeliu, Isabel; Sierra, Montserrat; Dopico, Eva; Juncosa, Teresa; Andreu, Antonia; Lite, Josep; Guardià, Cèlia; Sánchez, Ferran; Bosch, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    To study the evolution of the incidence of early-onset neonatal sepsis (EOS) by Streptococcus agalactiae in the area of Barcelona and to analyze failure of compliance with the prevention protocol. A retrospective review was carried out on EOS cases in 8 Health-Care Centers in the Barcelona area between 2004 and 2010. Forty-nine newborns from 48 mothers were diagnosed with EOS. The incidence was 0.29‰ living newborns (0.18-0.47‰), with no significant differences in the fluctuations along the 7 years. The mortality rate was 8.16%. In 68.5% cases the maternal colonization studies were negative, and in 21% these studies were not performed. No risk factors were detected in 58.3% of pregnant women, and 22.9% of births were premature. In 58% of cases intra-partum antibiotic prophylaxis was not administered because it was not indicated, and in 42% due to failure to follow the protocol (3 strains were resistant to erythromycin). Resistance to clindamycin was 33.3%. The Streptococcus agalactiae serotypes more frequently isolated were iii, v, and ia. No significant changes were detected in the incidence of Streptococcus agalactiae EOS in the 7 years of the study. The increased sensitivity of screening methods with the use of molecular techniques, the performance of susceptibility testing of strains isolated from pregnant women, and the improvement of communication between Health-Care Centers, can contribute to a better implementation of the protocol, as well as to reduce the incidence of EOS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  7. Rest energy expenditure is decreased during the acute as compared to the recovery phase of sepsis in newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Carvalho Tatiana

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known with respect to the metabolic response and the requirements of infected newborns. Moreover, the nutritional needs and particularly the energy metabolism of newborns with sepsis are controversial matter. In this investigation we aimed to evaluate the rest energy expenditure (REE of newborns with bacterial sepsis during the acute and the recovery phases. Methods We studied nineteen neonates (27.3 ± 17.2 days old with bacterial sepsis during the acute phase and recovery of their illness. REE was determined by indirect calorimetry and VO2 and VCO2 measured by gas chromatography. Results REE significantly increased from 49.4 ± 13.1 kcal/kg/day during the acute to 68.3 ± 10.9 kcal/kg/day during recovery phase of sepsis (P 2 (7.4 ± 1.9 vs 10 ± 1.5 ml/kg/min and VCO2 (5.1 ± 1.7 vs 7.4 ± 1.5 ml/kg/min were also increased during the course of the disease (P Conclusion REE was increased during recovery compared to the sepsis phase. REE of septic newborns should be calculated on individualized basis, bearing in mind their metabolic capabilities.

  8. Extracorporeal blood therapy in sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome: the "purifying dream".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xuefeng; Dai, Huaping; Jia, Chun'e; Wang, Chen

    2014-01-01

    To discuss the rationale, hypothesis, modality of extracorporeal blood purification (EBP) techniques for the critically ill animal models or patients, and to summarize the experimental and clinical studies with inconsistent data which explored the EBP's efficacy in the areas of critical care medicine. Articles referred in this review were collected from the database of PubMed published in English up to June 2014. We had done a literature search by using the term "(sepsis OR acute lung injury OR acute respiratory distress syndrome) AND (extracorporeal blood purification OR hemofiltration OR hemoperfusion OR plasma exchange OR plasmapheresis OR adsorpiton)". Related original or review articles were included and carefully analyzed. Acute cellular and humoral immune disturbances occur in both sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Treatments aimed at targeting one single pro-/anti-inflammatory mediator have largely failed with no proven clinical benefits. Such failure shifts the therapeutic rationale to the nonspecific, broad-spectrum methods for modulating the over-activated inflammatory and anti-inflammatory response. Therefore, EBP techniques have become the potential weapons with high promise for removing the circulating pro-/anti-inflammatory mediators and promoting immune reconstitution. Over the years, multiple extracorporeal techniques for the critically ill animal models or patients have been developed, including hemofiltration (HF), high-volume hemofiltration (HVHF), high-cutoff hemofiltration (HCO-HF), hemo-perfusion or -adsorption (HP/HA), coupled plasma filtration adsorption (CPFA), and plasma exchange (PE). These previous studies showed that EBP therapy was feasible and safe for the critically ill animal models or patients. However, data on their efficacy (especially on the clinical benefits, such as mortality) were inconsistent. It is not now to conclude that EBP intervention can purify septic or ARDS patients with high clinical efficacy

  9. Ketamine attenuates sepsis-induced acute lung injury via regulation of HMGB1-RAGE pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kehan; Yang, Jianxue; Han, Xuechang

    2016-05-01

    High mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1) and receptor for the advanced glycation end product (RAGE) play important roles in the development of sepsis-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Ketamine is considered to confer protective effects on ALI during sepsis. In this study, we investigated the effects of ketamine on HMGB1-RAGE activation in a rat model of sepsis-induced ALI. ALI was induced in wild type (WT) and RAGE deficient (RAGE(-/-)) rats by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) or HMGB1 to mimic sepsis-induced ALI. Rats were randomly divided to six groups: sham-operation+normal saline (NS, 10 mL/kg), sham-operation+ketamine (10 mg/kg), CLP/HMGB1+NS (10 mL/kg), CLP/HMGB1+ketamine (5 mg/kg), CLP/HMGB1+ketamine (7.5 mg/kg), and CLP/HMGB1+ketamine (10 mg/kg) groups. NS and ketamine were administered at 3 and 12 h after CLP/HMGB1 via intraperitoneal injection. Pathological changes of lung, inflammatory cell counts, expression of HMGB1 and RAGE, and concentrations of various inflammatory mediators in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF) and lung tissue were then assessed. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathways in the lung were also evaluated. CLP/HMGB1 increased the wet to dry weight ratio and myeloperoxidase activity in lung, the number of total cells, neutrophils, and macrophages in the BALF, and inflammatory mediators in the BALF and lung tissues. Moreover, expression of HMGB1 and RAGE in lung tissues was increased after CLP. Ketamine inhibited all the above effects. It also inhibited the activation of IκB-α, NF-κB p65, and MAPK. Ketamine protects rats against HMGB1-RAGE activation in a rat model of sepsis-induced ALI. These effects may partially result from reductions in NF-κB and MAPK. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Vasculotoxic snake bite presenting with sepsis, acute renal failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Bhausaheb Vikhe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vasculotoxic snake bites are well known to cause local complications like necrosis and cellulitis and systemic complications such as coagulopathy, acute renal failure (ARF, and hemolysis. We report a case of young female patient who was bitten by a viper. She developed cellulitis, sepsis, ARF, and Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation. She was treated for the above complications and all her renal and hematological parameters returned to normal on seventh day. After this, on the same day, patient developed Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome probably due to the direct toxic effect of venom on pulmonary vascular endothelium which has been reported as a late complication of snake venom. With close monitoring and proper management of complications, the patient recovered and walked out of the hospital on the twenty first day without any complications.

  11. Influence of acute hyperglycemia in human sepsis on inflammatory cytokine and counterregulatory hormone concentrations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Kui Yu; Wei-Qin Li; Ning Li; Jie-Shou Li

    2003-01-01

    AIM: In human sepsis, a prominent component of the hypermetabolite is impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and hyperglycemia. Elevations in plasma glucose concentration impair immune function by altering cytokine production from macrophages. We assessed the role of glucose in the regulation of circulating levels of insulin, glucagon, cortisol,IL-6 and TNF-α in human sepsis with normal or impaired glucose tolerance.METHODS: According to the results of intravenous glucose tolerance test, forty patients were classified into two groups: control group (n=20) and IGT group (n=20).Plasma glucose levels were acutely raised in two groups and maintained at 15 mmol/L for 3 hours. Plasma insulin,glucagon and cortisol levels were measured by radioimmunoassay, the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 were detected by ELISA.RESULTS: In IGT group, the fasting concentrations of plasma glucose, insulin, glucagon, cortisol, IL-6 and TNFα levels were significantly higher than those in control group (P<0.05). During clamp, the control group had a higher average amount of dextrose infusion than the IGT group (P<0.01). In control group, plasma insulin levels rose from a basal value to a peak at an hour (P<0.05) and maintained at high levels. Plasma glucagon levels descended from a basal value to the lowest level within an hour (P<0.01)and low levels were maintained throughout the clamp. In IGT group, plasma insulin was more significantly elevated (P<0.01), and plasma glucagon levels were not significantly declined. Plasma cortisol levels were not significantly changed in two groups. In control group, plasma IL-6 and TNF-α levels rose (P<0.01) within 2 hours of the clamp and returned to basal values at 3 hours. In IGT group, increased levels of plasma cytokine lasted longer than in control group (3 hours vs. 2 hours, P<0.05), and the cytokine peaks of IGT group were higher (P<0.05) than those of control group.CONCLUSION: Acute hyperglycemia pricks up hyperinsulinemia and increases

  12. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Gvozdenović Ljiljana; Pasternak Janko; Milovanović Stanislav; Ivanov Dejan; Milić Saša

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is now recognized as a toxin-mediated, multisystem illness. It is characterized by an early onset of shock with multiorgan failure and continues to be associated with high morbidity and mortality, caused by group A Streptococcus pyogenes. The symptoms for staphylococcal and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome are similar. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome was not well described until 1993, when children who had suffered from varicella pre...

  13. Urinary exosomal activating transcriptional factor 3 as the early diagnostic biomarker for sepsis-induced acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panich, Tanaporn; Chancharoenthana, Wiwat; Somparn, Poorichaya; Issara-Amphorn, Jiraphorn; Hirankarn, Nattiya; Leelahavanichkul, Asada

    2017-01-07

    An early sepsis-induced acute kidney injury (sepsis-AKI) biomarker is currently in needed. Urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (uNGAL) is a candidate of sepsis-AKI biomarker but with different cut-point values. Urinary exosomal activating transcriptional factor 3 (uATF3) has been mentioned as an interesting biomarker. We conducted experiments in mice and a prospective, multicenter study in patients as a proof of concept that urine exosome is an interesting biomarker. An early expression of ATF3 in kidney of CD-1 mice at 6 h after cecal ligation and puncture implied the possibility of uATF3 as an early sepsis-AKI biomarker. Increase serum creatinine (Scr) ≥0.3 mg/dL from the baseline was used as an AKI diagnosis and urine was analyzed for uATF3 and uNGAL. Patients with baseline Scr at admission ≥1.5 mg/dL were excluded. The analysis showed higher Scr, uNGAL and uATF3 in patients with sepsis-AKI in comparison with patients with sepsis-non-AKI and healthy volunteers. A fair correlation, r(2) = 0.47, between uATF3 and uNGAL was showed in sepsis-AKI group with Scr ≥2 mg/dL. To see if uATF3 could be an early sepsis-AKI biomarker, urine sample was collected daily during the first week of the admission. In sepsis-AKI and sepsis-non-AKI groups, uNGAL were 367 ± 43 ng/mL and 183 ± 23 ng/mL, respectively; and uATF3 were 19 ± 4 ng/mL and 1.4 ± 0.8 ng/mL, respectively. With the mean value of uNGAL and uATF3 in sepsis AKI as a cut-off level, AUROC of uNGAL and uATF3 were 64% (95% CI 0.54 to 0.74) and 84% (95% CI 0.77 to 0.91), respectively. Urine exosome is an interesting source of urine biomarker and uATF3 is an interesting sepsis-AKI biomarker.

  14. Timing of Intubation in Acute Respiratory Failure Associated With Sepsis: A Mixed Methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Philippe R; Kumbamu, Ashok; Wilson, Michael E; Pannu, Jasleen K; Egginton, Jason S; Kashyap, Rahul; Gajic, Ognjen

    2017-08-31

    To analyze bedside clinicians' perspectives regarding the decision process to optimize timing of intubation in sepsis-associated acute respiratory failure. This mixed methods study was conducted from March 1, 2015, through June 30, 2016. Using qualitative research methods, factors that influenced variability in the decision to intubate were organized into categories and used to build a theoretical explanatory model grounded in current practice variance. All coding schemes were independently reviewed for accuracy and consistency. Themes and findings were then refined with member checking by feedback from individuals and from an anonymous questionnaire until saturation was achieved. The practice of intubation varied according to 3 domains: (1) patient factors included the nature of the acute illness, comorbidities, clinical presentation, severity, trajectory, and values and preferences; (2) clinician factors included background, training, experience, and practice style; and (3) system factors included workload, policies and protocols, hierarchy, communications, culture, and team dynamics. In different contexts, intubation was considered early (elective), just in time (urgent), or late (rescue). The initial assessment, initial decision, and reassessment mattered. Recognizing that the variability in both the decision to intubate and its timing depends on many factors, and not on clinical criteria alone, should render the clinician more attentive to the eventual progression of the acute respiratory failure. Copyright © 2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Diuretics induced uremia and nonrecovery of renal function in a patient with acute renal failure caused by sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, P. K.; Pal, A.; Panda, J.; Patnaik, S.

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis is a clinical syndrome related to severe infection and is characterized by systemic inflammation and injury to multiple organs and functional systems. Sepsis is one of the main causes of acute renal failure (ARF). Diuretics are frequently administered during ARF. However, there is scant evidence that diuretics provide any benefit to the patients with ARF. This case report highlights the occurrence of uremia and nonrecovery of renal function after administration of diuretics in a patient with ARF caused by sepsis. It is suggested that physicians should be cautious in prescribing diuretics to patients with ARF due to septicemia. Diuretics cause uremia and may lead to false diagnosis of chronic renal failure and nonrecovery of renal function. The patient may unnecessarily require prolonged dialysis. PMID:22022011

  16. Diuretics induced uremia and nonrecovery of renal function in a patient with acute renal failure caused by sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P K Sahu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a clinical syndrome related to severe infection and is characterized by systemic inflammation and injury to multiple organs and functional systems. Sepsis is one of the main causes of acute renal failure (ARF. Diuretics are frequently administered during ARF. However, there is scant evidence that diuretics provide any benefit to the patients with ARF. This case report highlights the occurrence of uremia and nonrecovery of renal function after administration of diuretics in a patient with ARF caused by sepsis. It is suggested that physicians should be cautious in prescribing diuretics to patients with ARF due to septicemia. Diuretics cause uremia and may lead to false diagnosis of chronic renal failure and nonrecovery of renal function. The patient may unnecessarily require prolonged dialysis.

  17. Extracorporeal blood therapy in sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome: the "purifying dream"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Xuefeng; Dai Huaping; Jia Chun'e; Wang Chen

    2014-01-01

    Objective To discuss the rationale,hypothesis,modality of extracorporeal blood purification (EBP) techniques for the critically ill animal models or patients,and to summarize the experimental and clinical studies with inconsistent data which explored the EBP's efficacy in the areas of critical care medicine.Data sources Articles referred in this review were collected from the database of PubMed published in English up to June 2014.Study selection We had done a literature search by using the term "(sepsis OR acute lung injury OR acute respiratory distress syndrome) AND (extracorporeal blood purification OR hemofiltration OR hemoperfusion OR plasma exchange OR plasmapheresis OR adsorpiton)".Related original or review articles were included and carefully analyzed.Results Acute cellular and humoral immune disturbances occur in both sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).Treatments aimed at targeting one single pro-/anti-inflammatory mediator have largely failed with no proven clinical benefits.Such failure shifts the therapeutic rationale to the nonspecific,broad-spectrum methods for modulating the over-activated inflammatory and anti-inflammatory response.Therefore,EBP techniques have become the potential weapons with high promise for removing the circulating pro-/anti-inflammatory mediators and promoting immune reconstitution.Over the years,multiple extracorporeal techniques for the critically ill animal models or patients have been developed,including hemofiltration (HF),high-volume hemofiltration (HVHF),high-cutoff hemofiltration (HCO-HF),hemo-perfusion or-adsorption (HP/HA),coupled plasma filtration adsorption (CPFA),and plasma exchange (PE).These previous studies showed that EBP therapy was feasible and safe for the critically ill animal models or patients.However,data on their efficacy (especially on the clinical benefits,such as mortality) were inconsistent.Conclusions It is not now to conclude that EBP intervention can purify septic or ARDS

  18. Comportamiento del fallo renal agudo en niños con sepsis grave Behavior of acute renal failure in children presenting with severe sepsis

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    María del Carmen Saura Hernández

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN. El objetivo de esta investigación fue determinar los factores de riesgo asociados al fallo renal agudo (FRA en un grupo de niños con sepsis grave atendidos entre enero del 2004 y diciembre del 2008. MÉTODOS. Se realizó un estudio observacional y analítico con una muestra de 171 pacientes. Se constituyeron dos grupos: el de estudio, integrado por 38 pacientes con estado de choque séptico o disfunción múltiple de órganos (DMO y FRA, y un grupo control, conformado por 133 niños en igual estadio de sepsis pero con función renal normal. Se revisaron las historias clínicas y se tuvieron en cuenta variables epidemiológicas, factores de riesgo de FRA y evolución de los casos. RESULTADOS. La incidencia de FRA fue del 22,2 %, y aunque disminuyó considerablemente en los 3 últimos años del estudio, la mortalidad fue del 42,1 %, mayoritariamente en el DMO (89,5 %. Se encontró dependencia entre la insuficiencia renal y la respuesta diurética no adecuada a la fluidoterapia (51,2 %, la inestabilidad hemodinámica por más de 24 h (46,5 %, la disfunción miocárdica (43,3 % y el uso de medicamentos nefrotóxicos (42,8 %. CONCLUSIONES. La respuesta diurética no adecuada a la fluidoterapia, la inestabilidad hemodinámica por más de 24 h, la disfunción miocárdica y el uso de medicamentos nefrotóxicos incrementan el riesgo de FRA en la sepsis grave, la cual duplica la mortalidad en relación con los pacientes que conservan la función renal. No obstante, la prevención de las formas graves de sepsis y un tratamiento adecuado de ésta disminuyen la incidencia de FRA.INTRODUCTION: The aim of present research was to determine the risk factor associated with the acute renal failure (ARF in a group of children with severe sepsis seen between January, 2004 and December, 2008. METHODS: An analytical and observational study was conducted in a sample including 171 patients. There were two groups: the study-group with 138 patients with

  19. Acute Kidney Injury in Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock in Patients with and without Diabetes Mellitus: A Multicenter Study.

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    Marion Venot

    Full Text Available Whether diabetes mellitus increases the risk of acute kidney injury (AKI during sepsis is controversial.We used a case-control design to compare the frequency of AKI, use of renal replacement therapy (RRT, and renal recovery in patients who had severe sepsis or septic shock with or without diabetes. The data were from the Outcomerea prospective multicenter database, in which 12 French ICUs enrolled patients admitted between January 1997 and June 2009.First, we compared 451 patients with severe sepsis or septic shock and diabetes to 3,277 controls with severe sepsis or septic shock and without diabetes. Then, we compared 318 cases (with diabetes to 746 matched controls (without diabetes. Diabetic patients did not have a higher frequency of AKI (hazard ratio [HR], 1.18; P = 0.05] or RRT (HR, 1.09; P = 0.6. However, at discharge, diabetic patients with severe sepsis or septic shock who experienced acute kidney injury during the ICU stay and were discharged alive more often required RRT (9.5% vs. 4.8%; P = 0.02, had higher serum creatinine values (134 vs. 103 µmoL/L; P<0.001 and had less often recovered a creatinine level less than 1.25 fold the basal creatinine (41.1% vs. 60.5%; P<0.001.In patients with severe sepsis or septic shock, diabetes is not associated with occurrence of AKI or need for RRT but is an independent risk factor for persistent renal dysfunction in patients who experience AKI during their ICU stay.

  20. Evaluation of the effect of red cell distribution width on the development of acute renal failure in patients with sepsis

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    Ali Veysel Kara

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Acute kidney injury (AKI is an important clinical entity that is known to increase mortality in patients with sepsis. Erythrocyte maturation and proliferation are inhibited by pro-inflammatory cytokines; these cytokines exert effects on red cell distribution width (RDW well. Based on this knowledge; our aim in this study was to evaluate the impact of RDW on acute kidney injury in patients with sepsis. Methods: 120 patients diagnosed with sepsis and admitted to intesive care unit (ICU and treated between 2009-2013 were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were divided into two groups as follows: group 1 (RDW≥16.8 and group 2 (RDW<16.8. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the association between RDW and AKI and mortality. Results: There was a statistically significant relationship between AKI and RDW (p<0.001, OR=11.52 but there were no statistically significant relationship between AKI and sex, age, serum lactate levels as well as SOFA score. Also, there were statistically significant relationship between mortality and RDW (p=0.044, OR=5, serum lactate levels (p=0.030 and SOFA score (p<0.001. RDW was found associated with both AKI and mortality. Conclusions: Results suggest that RDW is an important parameter for predicting development of AKI and mortality in ICU patients with sepsis.

  1. Protective Effects of Cucurbitacin B on Acute Lung Injury Induced by Sepsis in Rats

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    Hua, Shu; Liu, Xing; Lv, Shuguang; Wang, Zhifang

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of cucurbitacin B (CuB) on sepsis-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in rats. Material/Methods An ALI model was made by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in SD rats. Rats were randomly divided into 5 groups (n=15 per group): animals undergoing a sham CLP (sham group); animals undergoing CLP (CLP control group); animals undergoing CLP and treated with CuB at 1 mg/kg of body weight (bw) (low-dose CuB [L-CuB] group), animals undergoing CuB at 2 mg/kg of bw (mid-dose CuB [M-CuB] group); and animals undergoing CuB at 5 mg/kg of bw (high-dose CuB [H-CuB] group). Samples of blood and lung tissue were harvested at different time points (6, 12, and 24 hour post-CLP surgery) for the detection of indicators which represented ALI. Five rats were respectively sacrificed at each time point. Pathological changes of lung tissue were observed by H&E staining. Another 50 rats were distributed into the same five groups to record the 72 hour survival rates. Results Treatment with CuB significantly increased the blood gas PaO2 levels and decreased lung wet/dry (W/D) ratio (ptumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), (pprotection effects in a dose-depended manner. Conclusions CuB can effectively improve the pulmonary gas exchange function, reduce pulmonary edema, and inhibit the inflammatory response in the lung, revealing that CuB may serve as a potential therapeutic strategy for sepsis-induced ALI. PMID:28315572

  2. Antimicrobial-induced endotoxaemia in patients with sepsis in the field of acute pyelonephritis.

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    Giamarellos-Bourboulis E

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In vitro results have shown that antimicrobial agents may induce the Gram-negative bacteria to release endotoxins (LPS, which in turn, could trigger the secretion of cytokines from monocytes. AIMS: To compare the effect of cefuroxime, netilmicin or ciprofloxacin on serum levels of LPS and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha. METHODS: Seventy-four patients with acute pyelonephritis caused by Gram-negative bacteria and signs of sepsis were randomly assigned to receive one of three intravenous regimens of cefuroxime, netilmicin or ciprofloxacin. Blood samples were collected before therapy and at specified time intervals for 96 hours after the initiation of treatment for the determination of serum levels of LPS and of TNFalpha. RESULTS: Patients treated with cefuroxime presented an early peak of LPS and of TNFalpha in serum two hours after the initiation of treatment compared to the other study groups. After that time interval, concentrations of LPS and TNFalpha were similar in all the study groups. Fever accompanied by endotoxaemia was still detected for 48 hours after the start of therapy in 36, 37.5 and 36% of patients treated with cefuroxime, netilmicin and ciprofloxacin respectively. The corresponding figures for these agents at 72 hours were 28, 12.5 and 24%, respective and 12, 4.2 and 4% at 96 hours (P value not significant. CONCLUSIONS: With the exception of an early peak in the serum levels of LPS and TNFalpha in patients treated with cefuroxime, no significant difference could be detected amongst the study groups as far as their effect on serum levels of LPS and TNFalpha were concerned. This suggests that these three antimicrobial agents may be administered safely at the early stages of sepsis.

  3. Increased Resistin Levels in Intra-abdominal Sepsis: Correlation with proinflammatory cytokines & Acute Physiology & Chronic Health Evaluation II scores

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    Tonguç U. Yilmaz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Resistin, a hormone secreted from adipocytes and considered to be a likely cause of insulin resistance, has recently been accepted as a proinflammatory cytokine. This study aimed to determine the correlation between resistin levels in patients with intra-abdominal sepsis and mortality. Methods: Of 45 patients with intraabdominal sepsis, a total of 35 adult patients were included in the study. This study was undertaken from December 2011 to December 2012 and included patients who had no history of diabetes mellitus and who were admitted to the general surgery intensive care units of Gazi University and Bülent Ecevit University School of Medicine, Turkey. Evaluations were performed on 12 patients with sepsis, 10 patients with severe sepsis, 13 patients with septic shock and 15 healthy controls. The patients’ plasma resistin, interleukin-6 (IL-6, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β, procalcitonin, lactate and glucose levels and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II scores were studied daily for the first five days after admission. A correlation analysis of serum resistin levels with cytokine levels and APACHE II scores was performed. Results: Serum resistin levels in patients with sepsis were significantly higher than in the healthy controls (P <0.001. A significant correlation was found between serum resistin levels and APACHE II scores, serum IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, procalcitonin, lactate and glucose levels. Furthermore, a significant correlation was found between serum resistin levels and all-cause mortality (P = 0.02. Conclusion: The levels of resistin were significantly positively correlated with the severity of disease and were a possible mediator of a prolonged inflammatory state in patients with intra-abdominal sepsis.

  4. Predictive ability of circulating osteoprotegerin as a novel biomarker for early detection of acute kidney injury induced by sepsis.

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    Schaalan, Mona; Mohamed, Waleed

    2017-06-01

    Though significant progress has been made towards new diagnostic approaches for early detection of acute kidney injury (AKI) induced by different factors, there is still an urgent demand for a more specific and predictive biomarker for each type. The aim of this study is to unravel the potential diagnostic utility of circulating osteoprotegerin (OPG) in septic patients who developed AKI in the ICU, compared to cystatin C (a renal function maker) and KIM-1 (a kidney damage marker). Eighty patients (male = 43, female = 37) with ages ranging from 42 to 46 years and with sepsis, 40 of whom developed AKI, and 30 healthy controls were enrolled in this prospective study. Results revealed significant progressive elevation of OPG, along with cystatin C and KIM-1, among sepsis, severe sepsis, and sepsis-AKI patients. The progression of OPG levels paralleled the deterioration of kidney and endothelial functions from sepsis to sepsis-AKI, revealed as progressively increased levels of serum E-selectin (15.3%), endothelin-1 (ET-1) (19.6%), and decreased nitric oxide (NO) (29.7%), associated with elevations of TNF-α (25.5%) and TGF-β (18%). Their comparative prognostic validity of sepsis-AKI was assessed using ROC analysis, which revealed that OPG, KIM-1, and cystatin C showed similar AUCs (0.827-0.83) but with different sensitivities, viz., 84%, 88%, and 92%, respectively. Although cystatin showed 82% specificity, OPG showed a higher, similar specificity to KIM-1 of 85%, indicating its potential function as a marker of renal damage such as KIM-1. This study revealed a significant elevation of circulating OPG in septic patients with different levels of severity and those who progressed to AKI. Moreover, OPG showed a significant correlation to KIM-1 and cystatin, as well as conventional renal, inflammatory, and endothelial markers. Having a similar specificity to KIM-1, as evidenced by the ROC analysis, OPG has the potential to serve as a reliable biomarker of kidney damage

  5. Diagnostic value of urine sCD163 levels for sepsis and relevant acute kidney injury: a prospective study

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    Su Longxiang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sepsis is a common syndrome in critically ill patients and easily leads to the occurrence of acute kidney injury (AKI, with high mortality rates. This study aimed to investigate the diagnostic value of urine soluble CD163 (sCD163 for identification of sepsis, severity of sepsis, and for secondary AKI, and to assess the patients’ prognosis. Methods We enrolled 20 cases with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS, 40 cases with sepsis (further divided into 17 sepsis cases and 23 severe sepsis cases admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU, and 20 control cases. Results for urine sCD163 were recorded on the day of admission to the ICU, and AKI occurrence was noted. Results On the day of ICU admission, the sepsis group exhibited higher levels of urine sCD163 (74.8 ng/ml; range: 47.9-148.3 ng/ml compared with those in the SIRS group (31.9 ng/ml; 16.8-48.0, P . The area under the curve (AUC was 0.83 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.72-0.94, P  the sensitivity was 0.83, and the specificity was 0.75 (based on a cut-off point of 43.0 ng/ml. Moreover, the severe sepsis group appeared to have a higher level of sCD163 compared with that in the sepsis group (76.2; 47.2-167.5 ng/ml vs. 74.2; 46.2-131.6 ng/ml, but this was not significant. For 15 patients with AKI, urine sCD163 levels at AKI diagnosis were significantly higher than those of the remaining 35 sepsis patients upon ICU admission (121.0; 74.6-299.1 ng/ml vs. 61.8; 42.8-128.3 ng/ml, P = 0.049. The AUC for urine sCD163 was 0.688 (95% CI: 0.51-0.87, P = 0.049. Sepsis patients with a poor prognosis showed a higher urine sCD163 level at ICU admission (98.6; 50.3-275.6 ng/ml vs. 68.0; 44.8-114.5 ng/ml, but this was not significant. Patients with AKI with a poor prognosis had higher sCD163 levels than those in patients with a better prognosis (205.9; 38.6-766.0 ng/ml vs. 80.9; 74.9-141.0 ng/ml, but this was not significant. Conclusions This study shows, for the

  6. Risk of Acute Stroke After Hospitalization for Sepsis: A Case-Crossover Study.

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    Boehme, Amelia K; Ranawat, Purnima; Luna, Jorge; Kamel, Hooman; Elkind, Mitchell S V

    2017-03-01

    Infections have been found to increase the risk of stroke over the short term. We hypothesized that stroke risk would be highest shortly after a sepsis hospitalization, but that the risk would decrease, yet remain up to 1 year after sepsis. This case-crossover analysis utilized data obtained from the California State Inpatient Database of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. All stroke admissions were included. Exposure was defined as hospitalization for sepsis or septicemia 180, 90, 30, or 15 days before stroke (risk period) or similar time intervals exactly 1 or 2 years before stroke (control period). Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) for the association between sepsis/septicemia and ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. Ischemic (n=37 377) and hemorrhagic (n=12 817) strokes that occurred in 2009 were extracted where 3188 (8.5%) ischemic and 1101 (8.6%) hemorrhagic stroke patients had sepsis. Sepsis within 15 days before the stroke placed patients at the highest risk of ischemic (OR, 28.36; 95% CI, 20.02-40.10) and hemorrhagic stroke (OR, 12.10; 95% CI, 7.54-19.42); however, although the risk decreased, it remained elevated 181 to 365 days after sepsis for ischemic (OR, 2.59; 95% CI, 2.20-3.06) and hemorrhagic (OR, 3.92; 95% CI 3.29-4.69) strokes. There was an interaction with age (P=0.0006); risk of developing an ischemic stroke within 180 days of hospitalization for sepsis increased 18% with each 10-year decrease in age. Risk of stroke is high after sepsis, and this risk persists for up to a year. Younger sepsis patients have a particularly increased risk of stroke after sepsis. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Acute kidney injury and inflammatory response of sepsis following cecal ligation and puncture in D-galactose-induced aging rats

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    Liu C

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chao Liu,1,* Jie Hu,1,* Zhi Mao,1,* Hongjun Kang,1 Hui Liu,1 Wanlei Fu,2 Yangfan Lv,2 Feihu Zhou1 1Department of Critical Care Medicine, Chinese People’s Liberation Army General Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pathology, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Recently, the D-galactose (D-gal-induced mimetic aging rat model has been widely used in studies of age-associated diseases, which have shown that chronic D-gal exposure induces premature aging similar to natural aging in rats. With the increasing rate of sepsis in the geriatric population, an easy-access animal model for preclinical studies of elderly sepsis is urgently needed. This study investigates whether a sepsis model that is established in D-gal-induced aging rats can serve as a suitable model for preclinical studies of elderly patients with sepsis.Objective: To investigate the acute kidney injury (AKI and inflammatory response of sepsis following cecal ligation and puncture (CLP in D-gal-induced aging rats.Methods: Twelve-week-old male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into low-dose D-gal (L D-gal, 125 mg/kg/d, high-dose D-gal (H D-gal, 500 mg/kg/d, and control groups. After daily subcutaneous injection of D-gal for 6 weeks, the CLP method was used to establish a sepsis model.Results: The mortality was 73.3%, 40%, and 33.3% in the H D-gal, L D-gal, and control groups, respectively. Blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, plasma neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, interleukin-6, interleukin-10, and tumor necrosis factor-α were markedly increased in the H D-gal group after establishment of the sepsis model (H D-gal vs control, P<0.05 at 12 h and 24 h post-CLP. The rate of severe AKI (RIFLE-F at 24 h post-CLP was 43% for both the control and L D-gal groups and 80% for the H D-gal group.Conclusion: High-dose-D-gal-induced aging rats are

  8. Acute lung inflammation in Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055-induced pneumonia and sepsis in BALB/c mice: a comparative study.

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    Kumar, Vijay; Chhibber, Sanjay

    2011-10-01

    Lungs play an important role in the body's defense against a variety of pathogens, but this network of immune system-mediated defense can be deregulated during acute pulmonary infections. The present study compares acute lung inflammation occurring during Klebsiella pneumoniae B5055-induced pneumonia and sepsis in BALB/c mice. Pneumonia was induced by intranasal instillation of bacteria (10(4) cfu), while sepsis was developed by placing the fibrin-thrombin clot containing known amount of bacteria (10(2) cfu) into the peritoneal cavity of animals. Mice with sepsis showed 100% mortality within five post-infection days, whereas all the animals with pneumonia survived. In animals suffering from K. pneumoniae B5055-induced pneumonia, all the inflammatory parameters (TNF-α, IL-1α, MPO, MDA, and NO) were found to be maximum till third post-infection day, after that, a decline was observed, whereas in septic animals, all the above-mentioned markers of inflammation kept on increasing. Histopathological study showed presence of alternatively activated alveolar macrophages (or foam cells) in lungs of mice with pneumonia after third post-infection day, which might have contributed to the induction of resolution of inflammation, but no such observation was made in lungs of septic mice. Hence, during pneumonia, controlled activation of macrophages may lead to resolution of inflammation.

  9. The UK joint specialist societies guideline on the diagnosis and management of acute meningitis and meningococcal sepsis in immunocompetent adults.

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    McGill, F; Heyderman, R S; Michael, B D; Defres, S; Beeching, N J; Borrow, R; Glennie, L; Gaillemin, O; Wyncoll, D; Kaczmarski, E; Nadel, S; Thwaites, G; Cohen, J; Davies, N W S; Miller, A; Rhodes, A; Read, R C; Solomon, T

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial meningitis and meningococcal sepsis are rare conditions with high case fatality rates. Early recognition and prompt treatment saves lives. In 1999 the British Infection Society produced a consensus statement for the management of immunocompetent adults with meningitis and meningococcal sepsis. Since 1999 there have been many changes. We therefore set out to produce revised guidelines which provide a standardised evidence-based approach to the management of acute community acquired meningitis and meningococcal sepsis in adults. A working party consisting of infectious diseases physicians, neurologists, acute physicians, intensivists, microbiologists, public health experts and patient group representatives was formed. Key questions were identified and the literature reviewed. All recommendations were graded and agreed upon by the working party. The guidelines, which for the first time include viral meningitis, are written in accordance with the AGREE 2 tool and recommendations graded according to the GRADE system. Main changes from the original statement include the indications for pre-hospital antibiotics, timing of the lumbar puncture and the indications for neuroimaging. The list of investigations has been updated and more emphasis is placed on molecular diagnosis. Approaches to both antibiotic and steroid therapy have been revised. Several recommendations have been given regarding the follow-up of patients. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Epidemiology of neonatal group B streptococcal disease in the Netherlands before and after introduction of guidelines for prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trijbels-Smeulders, M.J.A.M.; Jonge, G.A. de; Pasker-de Jong, P.C.M.; Gerards, L.J.; Adriaanse, A.H.; Lingen, R.A. van; Kollee, L.A.A.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: (1) To describe the epidemiology of neonatal group B streptococcal (GBS) disease over five years (1997-2001) in the Netherlands, stratified for proven and probable sepsis and for very early (<12 h), late early (12 h - <7 days) and late (7-90 days) onset sepsis. (2) To evaluate the effect

  11. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome

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    Gvozdenović Ljiljana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is now recognized as a toxin-mediated, multisystem illness. It is characterized by an early onset of shock with multiorgan failure and continues to be associated with high morbidity and mortality, caused by group A Streptococcus pyogenes. The symptoms for staphylococcal and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome are similar. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome was not well described until 1993, when children who had suffered from varicella presented roughly 2-4 weeks later with a clinical syndrome highly suggestive of toxic shock syndrome. Characteristics, complications and therapy. It is characterized by a sudden onset of fever, chills, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle aches and rash. It can rapidly progress to severe and intractable hypotension and multisystem dysfunction. Almost every organ system can be involved. Complications of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome may include kidney failure, liver failure and even death. Crystalloids and inotropic agents are used to treat the hypovolemic shock aggressively, with close monitoring of the patient’s mean arterial pressure and central venous pressure. An immediate and aggressive management of hypovolemic shock is essential in streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Targeted antibiotics are indicated; penicillin or a betalactam antibiotic is used for treating group A streptococci, and clindamycin has emerged as a key portion of the standard treatment.

  12. Non-Necrotizing Streptococcal Cellulitis as a Cause of Acute, Atraumatic Compartment Syndrome of the Foot: A Case Report.

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    Toney, James; Donovan, Stephanie; Adelman, Vanessa; Adelman, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is widely accepted as a surgical emergency. Most cases of acute compartment syndrome occur after high-energy trauma, especially crush injuries. We present a unique case of acute, atraumatic compartment syndrome of the foot associated with infectious cellulitis. A 53-year-old male, with a medical history significant for human immunodeficiency virus, presented to the emergency department secondary to an insidious onset of intense foot pain, swelling, and an inability to bear weight on the affected extremity. He had no history of recent trauma. He was admitted to the hospital because of a suspected infection and subsequently was given intravenous antibiotics. During the admission, he developed a severe infection, and blood cultures demonstrated growth of group A streptococcus. No abscess or hematoma was identified on magnetic resonance imaging or during exploratory surgery. The findings from intraoperative cultures were negative. Despite proper medical care for his infection, the lower extremity pain worsened; therefore, compartmental pressures were obtained at the bedside. Multiple compartment pressures were measured and were >40 mm Hg. Compartment syndrome was diagnosed, and the patient was taken to the operating room for emergent fasciotomies. Surgical release of the medial, lateral, interosseous, and adductor compartments revealed copious amounts of serosanguinous drainage. Again, no definitive hematoma or purulence was identified. The patient's symptoms resolved after the fasciotomies, and he healed uneventfully. Our case highlights the need to consider acute compartment syndrome in the differential diagnosis for pain out of proportion to the clinical situation, even when a traditional etiology is absent. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Role of autophagy in ameliorating sepsis-induced acute lung injury by allicinin in mice].

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    Peng, Yue; Jiang, Yu; Ou, Hao; Xing, Wei; Yang, Mingshi; Gao, Min

    2017-08-28

    To investigate roles of autophagy in ameliorating sepsis-induced acute lung injury by allicinin in mice.
 Methods: A total of 152 male Balb/c mice (8-week old) were randomly divided into a sham group, a septic model group, an allicin treatment group, and an autophagy inhibition group. Septic mouse model was established by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Mice in the allicin treatment group were given allicin (30 mg/kg, intra-peritoneal injection) at 6 and 12 h, while those in the autophagy inhibition group were given autophagy inhibitor 3-MA (15 mg/kg, intra-peritoneal injection) at half an hour after allicin administration. Mice in the model and sham group were administered with the same amount of saline. Twenty mice in each group were randomly chosen to observe the 7 d survival rate. The other 12 mice were killed at 24 h, and the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) (n=6) and lung tissues (n=6) were collected. ELISA was used to detect the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the BALF. Hematoxylin-eosin staining was preformed to show the morphological changes in the lung tissues. Malondialdehyde (MDA) content and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the lung tissues were examined. The expression of LC3B and Beclin-1 was determined by immunohistochemical analysis.
 Results: Compared with the sham group, the 7 d survival rate and lung SOD activity were decreased in the CLP group (P<0.05); the lung morphological damage score, the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 in the BALF, MDA content in the lung, and expression of LC3B and Beclin-1 were increased greatly in the CLP group (P<0.05). Compared with the CLP group, the 7 d survival rate, lung SOD activity and the expressions of LC3B and Beclin-1 were increased significantly in the allicin treatment group (P<0.05); the lung morphological damage scores, the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 in the BALF and MDA content in the lung were decreased obviously in the allicin treatment group (P<0

  14. Protective Role of Liriodendrin in Sepsis-Induced Acute Lung Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Li, Dihua; Zhuo, Yuzhen; Zhang, Shukun; Wang, Ximo; Gao, Hongwei

    2016-10-01

    In current study, we investigated the role of liriodendrin, a constituent isolated from Sargentodoxa cuneata (Oliv.) Rehd. Et Wils (Sargentodoxaceae), in cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced acute lung inflammatory response and injury (ALI). The inflammatory mediator levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Pathologic changes in lung tissues were evaluated via pathological section with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. To investigate the mechanism whereby liriodendrin regulates lung inflammation, the phosphorylation of the NF-kB (p65) and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were determined by western blot assay. We show that liriodendrin treatment significantly improved the survival rate of mice with CLP-induced sepsis. Pulmonary histopathologic changes, alveolar hemorrhage, and neutrophil infiltration were markedly decreased by liriodendrin. In addition, liriodendrin decreased the production of the proinflammatory mediators including (TNF-α, IL-1β, MCP-1, and IL-6) in lung tissues. Vascular permeability and lung myeloperoxidase (MPO) accumulation in the liriodendrin-treated mice were substantially reduced. Moreover, liriodendrin treatment significantly suppressed the expression of VEGF and activation of NF-kB in the lung. We further show that liriodendrin significantly reduced the production of proinflammatory mediators and downregulated NF-kB signaling in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. Moreover, liriodendrin prevented the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by upregulating the expression of SIRT1 in RAW 264.7 cells. These findings provide a novel theoretical basis for the possible application of liriodendrin in clinic.

  15. Fish oil-supplemented parenteral nutrition could alleviate acute lung injury, modulate immunity, and reduce inflammation in rats with abdominal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaolong; Zhang, Xianxiang; Yang, Enqin; Zhang, Nanyang; Cao, Shougen; Zhou, Yanbing

    2015-09-01

    The objectives were to confirm that intravenous fish oil (FO) emulsions could alleviate acute lung injury, modulate immunity, and reduce inflammation in rats with abdominal sepsis and to explore the mechanisms of these effects. Thirty-six adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups randomly. Two days after central venous catheterization, rats were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture to produce abdominal sepsis. Rats were assigned to receive normal saline or total parenteral nutrition (TPN) containing standard soybean oil emulsions or FO-supplemented TPN at the onset of sepsis for 5 days. A sham operation and control treatment were performed in control group rats. Acute lung injury scores, peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets, plasma cytokines, and Foxp3 expression in the spleen were determined. Compared with the normal saline and TPN without FO, FO-supplemented TPN beneficially altered the distributions of the T-lymphocyte subsets and downregulated the acute lung injury scores, plasma cytokines, and expression of Foxp3 due to sepsis. Fish oil-supplemented TPN can decrease acute lung injury scores, alleviate histopathology, reduce the bacterial load in the peritoneal lavage fluid, modulate the lymphocyte subpopulation in the peripheral blood, downregulate Foxp3 expression in the spleen, and reduce plasma cytokines, which means that FO-supplemented TPN can alleviate acute lung injury, modulate immunity, and reduce inflammation in rats with abdominal sepsis.

  16. Protective effects of Xuebijing on endothelium in sepsis -induced acute kidney injury

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    Wei WANG

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To explore the protective effect of Xuebijing on the endothelium and extracellular matrix in sepsis-induced acute kidney injury (AKI rats for providing a new clinical treatment strategy. Methods  The method of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP was used to duplicate severe sepsis model. Thirty healthy male SD rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: Sham group (n=10, NS group (normal saline 4ml/kg, n=10, Xuebijing group (Xuebijing 4ml/kg, n=10. 6h after CLP, the rats were sacrificed and their kidneys were resected and histopathological characteristic was observed by light microscopic and transmission electron microscopic techniques. The expressions of ET-1 mRNA, iNOS mRNA, MMP-9 mRNA, TIMP-1 mRNA in the renal tissues were measured semi-quantitatively by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Results  The histopathological changes in renal tissue were observed by light microscope. The changes of renal glomerulus and renal tubuli in Xuebijing group were better than NS group. The ultrastructural changes in renal tissue were observed under electron microscope. Compared with NS group, ultrastructural changes of renal glomerulus and proximal convoluted tubule were smaller in Xuebijing group. The expressions of ET-1mRNA (0.631±0.169 vs 0.770±0.154, P<0.05, iNOS mRNA (0.507±0.071 vs 0.587±0.073, P<0.05, MMP-9mRNA (0.641±0.082 vs 0.742±0.116, P<0.05 and TIMP-1 mRNA (0.434±0.052 vs 0.520±0.049, P<0.01 were significantly lower in XBJ group renal tissues than in NS group. The expressions of ET-1 mRNA(0.770±0.154 vs 0.394±0.105, P<0.01, iNOS mRNA (0.587±0.073 vs 0.326±0.085, P<0.01, MMP-9 mRNA (0.742±0.116 vs 0.356±0.055, P<0.01 and TIMP-1 mRNA (0.520±0.049 vs 0.351±0.041, P<0.05 in renal tissues were more significantly increased in NS group compared with sham group. Conclusions  Xuebijing could reduce the levels of ET-1, iNOS, MMP-9 and TIMP-1 mRNA, protect the stability of endothelium and extracellular

  17. Acute kidney injury with hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.42 in severe sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Rasmus Gamborg; Haase, Nicolai; Lange, T

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aimed to detail the effects of hydroxyethyl starch (HES) vs. Ringer's on kidney function including the interaction with mortality in post-hoc analyses as resuscitation with HES 130/0.42 increased mortality in the Scandinavian Starch for Severe Sepsis/Septic Shock (6S) trial. METHODS...... on mortality was reduced when adjusting for AKI stage as a time-dependent covariate (P = 0.15). CONCLUSION: In patients with severe sepsis, HES appeared to increase the rate of severe AKI and use of RRT within the first 5 days. The increased mortality observed with HES may have been partly mediated through...

  18. Sepsis-related acute respiratory distress syndrome in children with cancer: the respiratory dynamics of a devastating condition

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    Arduini, Rodrigo Genaro; de Araujo, Orlei Ribeiro; da Silva, Dafne Cardoso Bourguignon; Senerchia, Andreza Almeida; Petrilli, Antonio Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical course and respiratory parameters of mechanically ventilated children with cancer suffering from sepsis-related acute respiratory distress syndrome. Methods This 2-year prospective, longitudinal, observational cohort study enrolled 29 children and adolescents. Clinical data, measurements of blood gases and ventilation parameters were collected at four different time points. Fluctuations between measurements as well as differences in estimated means were analyzed by linear mixed models in which death within 28 days from the onset of acute respiratory distress syndrome was the primary endpoint. Results There were 17 deaths within 28 days of acute respiratory distress syndrome onset and another 7 between 29 - 60 days. Only 5 patients survived for more than 60 days. Nine (31%) patients died as a direct consequence of refractory hypoxemia, and the others died of multiple organ failure and catecholamine-refractory shock. In 66% of the measurements, the tidal volume required to obtain oxygen saturation equal to or above 90% was greater than 7mL/kg. The estimated means of dynamic compliance were low and were similar for survivors and non-survivors but with a negative slope between the first and final measurements, accompanied by a negative slope of the tidal volume for non-survivors. Non-survivors were significantly more hypoxemic, with PaO2/FiO2 ratios showing lower estimated means and a negative slope along the four measurements. Peak, expiratory and mean airway pressures showed positive slopes in the non-survivors, who also had more metabolic acidosis. Conclusions In most of our children with cancer, sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome progressed with deteriorating ventilation indexes and escalating organic dysfunction, making this triad nearly fatal in children. PMID:28099641

  19. Heat Shock Protein A12B Protects Vascular Endothelial Cells Against Sepsis-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice.

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    Chen, Yi; Wang, Lei; Kang, Qiuxiang; Zhang, Xu; Yu, Guifang; Wan, Xiaojian; Wang, Jiafeng; Zhu, Keming

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary endothelial injury is a critical process in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI) during sepsis. Heat shock protein A12B (HSPA12B) is mainly expressed in endothelial cells and protects against several harmful factors. However, the effects of HSPA12B in sepsis-induced ALI and its potential mechanisms of action remain unclear. For in vivo experiments, C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into four groups (n=15): a sham operation group, a cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) group, a HSPA12B siRNA-CLP group and a negative control (NC) siRNA-CLP group. The mice were treated by nasal inhalation of 2-OMe-modified HSPA12B siRNA or NC siRNA. Sepsis was induced by CLP. Samples were harvested 24 and 48 hours post-CLP surgery. Pathological changes and scoring of lung tissue samples were monitored using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and IL-6) and myeloperoxidase activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were analyzed by ELISA. Pulmonary edema was assessed using a wet-to-dry weight ratio. Neutrophils and alveolar macrophages were counted using flow cytometry. Pulmonary endothelial cell apoptosis was detected by TUNEL staining. Expression levels of MAPK family signaling molecules and caspase-3 were measured by Western blot analysis. In addition, 7-day survival was recorded. For in vitro experiments, human umbilical vein endothelial cells were pre-transfected with HSPA12B siRNA or pIRES2-EGFP-HSPA12B-Flag plasmid and treated with lipopolysaccharide; subsequently, the expression levels of MAPK family signaling molecules and caspase-3 were measured by Western blotting. Nasal inhalation of nano-polymer-encapsulated HSPA12B siRNA specifically downregulated mRNA and protein expression levels of HSPA12B in lung tissues. The administration of HSPA12B siRNA aggravated lung pathological injury, upregulated pro-inflammatory cytokine (e.g., IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6) expression, and

  20. Blocking Cyclic Adenosine Diphosphate Ribose-mediated Calcium Overload Attenuates Sepsis-induced Acute Lung Injury in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian-yi Peng; Yu Zou; Li-Na Zhang; Mei-Lin Ai; Wei Liu; Yu-Hang Ai

    2016-01-01

    Background:Acute lung injury (ALI) is a common complication of sepsis that is associated with high mortality.Intracellular Ca2+ overload plays an important role in the pathophysiology of sepsis-induced ALI,and cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose (cADPR) is an important regulator of intracellular Ca2+ mobilization.The cluster of differentiation 38 (CD38)/cADPR pathway has been found to play roles in multiple inflammatory processes but its role in sepsis-induced ALI is still unknown.This study aimed to investigate whether the CD38/cADPR signaling pathway is activated in sepsis-induced ALI and whether blocking cADPR-mediated calcium overload attenuates ALI.Methods:Septic rat models were established by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP).Rats were divided into the sham group,the CLP group,and the CLP+ 8-bromo-cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose (8-Br-cADPR) group.Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+),cADPR,CD38,and intracellular Ca2+ levels in the lung tissues were measured at 6,12,24,and 48 h after CLP surgery.Lung histologic injury,tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α,malondialdehyde (MDA) levels,and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were measured.Results:NAD+,cADPR,CD38,and intracellular Ca2+ levels in the lungs of septic rats increased significantly at 24 h after CLP surgery.Treatment with 8-Br-cADPR,a specific inhibitor of cADPR,significantly reduced intracellular Ca2+ levels (P =0.007),attenuated lung histological injury (P =0.023),reduced TNF-α and MDA levels (P < 0.001 and P =0.002,respectively) and recovered SOD activity (P =0.031) in the lungs of septic rats.Conclusions:The CD38/cADPR pathway is activated in the lungs of septic rats,and blocking cADPR-mediated calcium overload with 8-Br-cADPR protects against sepsis-induced ALI.

  1. A unified theory of sepsis-induced acute kidney injury: inflammation, microcirculatory dysfunction, bioenergetics, and the tubular cell adaptation to injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomez, H.; Ince, C.; Backer, D. de; Pickkers, P.; Payen, D.; Hotchkiss, J.; Kellum, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Given that the leading clinical conditions associated with acute kidney injury (AKI), namely, sepsis, major surgery, heart failure, and hypovolemia, are all associated with shock, it is tempting to attribute all AKI to ischemia on the basis of macrohemodynamic changes. However, an increasing body of

  2. Blockage of glycolysis by targeting PFKFB3 alleviates sepsis-related acute lung injury via suppressing inflammation and apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yuanqi; Lan, Haibing; Yu, Zhihong; Wang, Meng; Wang, Shu; Chen, Yu; Rao, Haiwei; Li, Jingying; Sheng, Zhiyong; Shao, Jianghua

    2017-09-16

    Sepsis-related acute lung injury (ALI) is characterized by excessive lung inflammation and apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells resulting in acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Recent studies indicated that anaerobic glycolysis play an important role in sepsis. However, whether inhibition of aerobic glycolysis exhibits beneficial effect on sepsis-induced ALI is not known. In vivo, a cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced ALI mouse model was set up and mice treated with glycolytic inhibitor 3PO after CLP. The mice treated with the 3PO ameliorated the survival rate, histopathological changes, lung inflammation, lactate increased and lung apoptosis of mice with CLP-induced sepsis. In vitro, the exposure of human alveolar epithelial A549 cells to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) resulted in cell apoptosis, inflammatory cytokine production, enhanced glycolytic flux and reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased. While these changes were attenuated by 3PO treatment. Sequentially, treatment of A549 cells with lactate caused cell apoptosis and enhancement of ROS. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) significantly lowered LPS and lactate-induced the generation of ROS and cell apoptosis in A549 cells. Therefore, these results indicate that anaerobic glycolysis may be an important contributor in cell apoptosis of sepsis-related ALI. Moreover, LPS specifically induces apoptotic insults to A549 cell through lactate-mediated enhancement of ROS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Salidroside ameliorates sepsis-induced acute lung injury and mortality via downregulating NF-κB and HMGB1 pathways through the upregulation of SIRT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Kuo-Cheng; Chao, Sung-Chuan; Wu, Hsiao-Yi; Chiang, Chia-Lien; Wang, Ching-Chia; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Weng, Te-I

    2017-09-20

    Sepsis is a life-threatening medical condition. Salidroside, a substance isolated from Rhodiola rosea, possesses antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The effect and mechanism of salidroside on sepsis-induced acute lung injury still remains to be well clarified. Here, we investigated the effect and mechanism of salidroside on septic mouse models and explored the role of salidroside-upregulated SIRT1. Salidroside inhibited the inflammatory responses and HMGB1 productions in bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated macrophages and mice. Salidroside could also reverse the decreased SIRT1 protein expression in LPS-treated macrophages and mice. Salidroside also alleviated the sepsis-induced lung edema, lipid peroxidation, and histopathological changes and the mortality, and improved the lung PaO2/FiO2 ratio in cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced septic mice. Salidroside significantly decreased the serum TNF-α, IL-6, NO, and HMGB1 productions, pulmonary inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and phosphorylated NF-κB-p65 protein expressions, and pulmonary HMGB1 nuclear translocation in CLP septic mice. Moreover, sepsis decreased the SIRT1 protein expression in the lungs of CLP septic mice. Salidroside significantly upregulated the SIRT1 expression and inhibited the inflammatory responses in CLP septic mouse lungs. These results suggest that salidroside protects against sepsis-induced acute lung injury and mortality, which might be through the SIRT1-mediated repression of NF-κB activation and HMGB1 nucleocytoplasmic translocation.

  4. Differential Impact of Hyperglycemia in Critically Ill Patients: Significance in Acute Myocardial Infarction but Not in Sepsis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Wernly

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia is a common condition in critically ill patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU. These patients represent an inhomogeneous collective and hyperglycemia might need different evaluation depending on the underlying disorder. To elucidate this, we investigated and compared associations of severe hyperglycemia (>200 mg/dL and mortality in patients admitted to an ICU for acute myocardial infarction (AMI or sepsis as the two most frequent admission diagnoses. From 2006 to 2009, 2551 patients 69 (58–77 years; 1544 male; 337 patients suffering from type 2 diabetes (T2DM who were admitted because of either AMI or sepsis to an ICU in a tertiary care hospital were investigated retrospectively. Follow-up of patients was performed between May 2013 and November 2013. In a Cox regression analysis, maximum glucose concentration at the day of admission was associated with mortality in the overall cohort (HR = 1.006, 95% CI: 1.004–1.009; p < 0.001 and in patients suffering from myocardial infarction (HR = 1.101, 95% CI: 1.075–1.127; p < 0.001 but only in trend in patients admitted to an ICU for sepsis (HR = 1.030, 95% CI: 0.998–1.062; p = 0.07. Severe hyperglycemia was associated with adverse intra-ICU mortality in the overall cohort (23% vs. 13%; p < 0.001 and patients admitted for AMI (15% vs. 5%; p < 0.001 but not for septic patients (39% vs. 40%; p = 0.48. A medical history of type 2 diabetes (n = 337; 13% was not associated with increased intra-ICU mortality (15% vs. 15%; p = 0.93 but in patients with severe hyperglycemia and/or a known medical history of type 2 diabetes considered in combination, an increased mortality in AMI patients (intra-ICU 5% vs. 13%; p < 0.001 but not in septic patients (intra-ICU 38% vs. 41%; p = 0.53 could be evidenced. The presence of hyperglycemia in critically ill patients has differential impact within the different etiological groups. Hyperglycemia in AMI patients might identify a sicker patient

  5. Effects of continuous erythropoietin receptor activator in sepsis-induced acute kidney injury and multi-organ dysfunction.

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    Camila E Rodrigues

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite advances in supportive care, sepsis-related mortality remains high, especially in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI. Erythropoietin can protect organs against ischemia and sepsis. This effect has been linked to activation of intracellular survival pathways, although the mechanism remains unclear. Continuous erythropoietin receptor activator (CERA is an erythropoietin with a unique pharmacologic profile and long half-life. We hypothesized that pretreatment with CERA would be renoprotective in the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP model of sepsis-induced AKI. METHODS: RATS WERE RANDOMIZED INTO THREE GROUPS: control; CLP; and CLP+CERA (5 µg/kg body weight, i.p. administered 24 h before CLP. At 24 hours after CLP, we measured creatinine clearance, biochemical variables, and hemodynamic parameters. In kidney tissue, we performed immunoblotting--to quantify expression of the Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2, aquaporin 2 (AQP2, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4, erythropoietin receptor (EpoR, and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB--and immunohistochemical staining for CD68 (macrophage infiltration. Plasma interleukin (IL-2, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, interferon gamma, and tumor necrosis factor alpha were measured by multiplex detection. RESULTS: Pretreatment with CERA preserved creatinine clearance and tubular function, as well as the expression of NKCC2 and AQP2. In addition, CERA maintained plasma lactate at normal levels, as well as preserving plasma levels of transaminases and lactate dehydrogenase. Renal expression of TLR4 and NF-κB was lower in CLP+CERA rats than in CLP rats (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively, as were CD68-positive cell counts (p<0.01, whereas renal EpoR expression was higher (p<0.05. Plasma levels of all measured cytokines were lower in CLP+CERA rats than in CLP rats. CONCLUSION: CERA protects against sepsis-induced AKI. This protective effect is, in part, attributable to suppression of the inflammatory response.

  6. Study protocol for a multicentre randomised controlled trial: Safety, Tolerability, efficacy and quality of life Of a human recombinant alkaline Phosphatase in patients with sepsis-associated Acute Kidney Injury (STOP-AKI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, E.; Mehta, R.L.; Murray, P.T.; Hummel, J.; Joannidis, M.; Kellum, J.A.; Arend, J.; Pickkers, P.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs in 55-60% of critically ill patients, and sepsis is the most common underlying cause. No pharmacological treatment options are licensed to treat sepsis-associated AKI (SA-AKI); only supportive renal replacement therapy (RRT) is available. One of the

  7. Clinical course and outcome of disseminated intravascular coagulation diagnosed by Japanese Association for Acute Medicine criteria. Comparison between sepsis and trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushimoto, Shigeki; Gando, Satoshi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Ogura, Hiroshi; Mayumi, Toshihiko; Koseki, Kazuhide; Ikeda, Toshiaki; Ishikura, Hiroyasu; Iba, Toshiaki; Ueyama, Masashi; Eguchi, Yutaka; Otomo, Yasuhiro; Okamoto, Kohji; Endo, Shigeatsu; Shimazaki, Shuji

    2008-12-01

    The Japanese Association for Acute Medicine (JAAM) disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) study group recently announced new diagnostic criteria for DIC. These criteria have been prospectively validated and demonstrated to progress to overt DIC as defined by the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH). Although an underlying condition is essential for the development of DIC, it has never been clarified if patients with different underlying disorders have a similar course. Among 329 patients with DIC diagnosed by the JAAM criteria, those with underlying sepsis (n = 98) or trauma (n = 95) were compared. The 28-day mortality rate was significantly higher in sepsis patients than trauma patients (34.7% vs. 10.5%, p coagulation abnormalities, organ dysfunction, and the outcome of JAAM DIC differ between patients with sepsis and trauma.

  8. The Effects of Quercetin on Acute Lung Injury and Biomarkers of Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in the Rat Model of Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerin, Fethullah; Sener, Umit; Erman, Hayriye; Yilmaz, Ahsen; Aydin, Bayram; Armutcu, Ferah; Gurel, Ahmet

    2016-04-01

    Experimental studies indicate that sepsis causes remote organ injury although the molecular mechanism has not been clearly defined. In this report, the role of oxidative damage, and inflammation on lung injury, following sepsis model by cecal ligation and puncture, and the effects of quercetin, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory flavonoid, in the lung tissue were investigated. In the present study, we found that administration of single-dose quercetin before cecal ligation and puncture procedure, while markedly diminishing the levels of YKL-40 and oxidant molecules (xanthine oxidase (XO), nitric oxide (NO), and malondialdehyde (MDA)), increases the antioxidant enzymes levels. Quercetin is beneficial to acute lung injury by decreasing the levels of oxidative stress markers and increasing the antioxidant enzyme activities. Quercetin also causes a decrease in the serum levels of YKL-40 and periostin in the oxidative lung injury induced by the experimental sepsis model.

  9. Exogenous glucose administration impairs glucose tolerance and pancreatic insulin secretion during acute sepsis in non-diabetic mice.

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    Yoshio Watanabe

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The development of hyperglycemia and the use of early parenteral feeding are associated with poor outcomes in critically ill patients. We therefore examined the impact of exogenous glucose administration on the integrated metabolic function of endotoxemic mice using our recently developed frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIVGTT. We next extended our findings using a cecal ligation and puncture (CLP sepsis model administered early parenteral glucose support. METHODS: Male C57BL/6J mice, 8-12 weeks, were instrumented with chronic indwelling arterial and venous catheters. Endotoxemia was initiated with intra-arterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 1 mg/kg in the presence of saline or glucose infusion (100 µL/hr, and an FSIVGTT was performed after five hours. In a second experiment, catheterized mice underwent CLP and the impact of early parenteral glucose administration on glucose homeostasis and mortality was assessed over 24 hrs. MEASUREMENTS: AND MAIN RESULTS: Administration of LPS alone did not impair metabolic function, whereas glucose administration alone induced an insulin sensitive state. In contrast, LPS and glucose combined caused marked glucose intolerance and insulin resistance and significantly impaired pancreatic insulin secretion. Similarly, CLP mice receiving parenteral glucose developed fulminant hyperglycemia within 18 hrs (all > 600 mg/dl associated with increased systemic cytokine release and 40% mortality, whereas CLP alone (85 ± 2 mg/dL or sham mice receiving parenteral glucose (113 ± 3 mg/dL all survived and were not hyperglycemic. Despite profound hyperglycemia, plasma insulin in the CLP glucose-infused mice (3.7 ± 1.2 ng/ml was not higher than sham glucose infused mice (2.1 ± 0.3 ng/ml. CONCLUSIONS: The combination of parenteral glucose support and the systemic inflammatory response in the acute phase of sepsis induces profound insulin resistance and impairs compensatory pancreatic insulin

  10. Rapid detection of sepsis complicating acute necrotizing pancreatitis using polymerase chain reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhong Zhang; Tian Quan Han; Yao Qing Tang; Sheng Dao Zhang

    2001-01-01

    @@INTRODUCTION Acute narcotizing pancreatitis usually takes a severe clinical course and is associated with multiple organ dysfunction .With the further understanding of pathophysiological events of acute pancreatisis and the therapeutic measuses taken by the clinicians ,the patients can pass through the critical carry stages ,and then the septic complication caused by rtanslocated bacteria, mostly gram-negative microbes from the intestines ensues[1].

  11. Acute Neonatal Parotitis with Late-Onset Septic Shock due to Streptococcus agalactiae

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    M. Boulyana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute neonatal parotitis (ANP is a very rare disease. Most cases are managed conservatively; early antibiotics and adequate hydration may reduce the need for surgery. The most common cause of ANP is Staphylococcus aureus. We report a rare case of acute neonatal parotitis with late-onset septic shock due to Streptococcus agalactiae. The diagnosis was confirmed with ultrasound and isolation of Streptococcus agalactiae from blood culture. The patient was treated successfully with 10 days of intravenous antibiotics and supportive measures. Despite being rare, streptococcal ANP should be considered in the etiological diagnosis of neonatal sepsis. Early diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic might prevent serious complications.

  12. Landiolol hydrochloride ameliorates acute lung injury in a rat model of early sepsis through the suppression of elevated levels of pulmonary endothelin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuishi, Yujiro; Jesmin, Subrina; Kawano, Satoru; Hideaki, Sakuramoto; Shimojo, Nobutake; Mowa, Chishimba Nathan; Akhtar, Shila; Zaedi, Sohel; Khatun, Tanzila; Tsunoda, Yoshiya; Kiwamoto, Takumi; Hizawa, Nobuyuki; Inoue, Yoshiaki; Mizutani, Taro

    2016-12-01

    Among the dysfunctions and pathologies associated with sepsis, the underlying molecular mechanisms of sepsis-induced acute lung injury (ALI) are poorly understood. Endothelin (ET)-1, a potent vasoconstrictor and pro-inflammatory peptide, is known to be involved in the pathogenesis of ALI in a rat model of sepsis. Here, we investigated whether landiolol hydrochloride, an ultra-short-acting β-blocker, plays a crucial role in ameliorating and attenuating LPS-induced ALI through modulation of the ET-1 system. Male Wistar rats at 8weeks of age were administered with either saline or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for three hours (3h) and some of the LPS-administered rats were continuously treated with landiolol for 3h. ALI was induced by LPS, including levels of both circulatory and pulmonary TNF-α and IL-6 but [PaO2] was significantly decreased. LPS also induced a significant increase in levels of pulmonary ET-1 and ET-A receptor, but levels of ET-B receptor, which has vasodilating effects, were remarkably diminished. Further, LPS administration upregulated the pulmonary expression of HIF-1α. Finally, the treatment of LPS-administered rats with landiolol for 3h ameliorated and prevented ALI, normalized the altered levels of pulmonary ET-1 and ET-A receptors. Landiolol also induced significant down-regulation of ET-B receptor in lung tissues in the early hours (phase) of sepsis. However, Landiolol treatment had no effect on the up-regulated inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-6) in both plasma and lung tissues during sepsis, and expression of pulmonary HIF-1α also remained unchanged after landiolol treatment. Collectively, these data led us to conclude that landiolol may ameliorate sepsis-induced ALI via the pulmonary ET system. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Heparin-Binding Protein (HBP): A Causative Marker and Potential Target for Heparin Treatment of Human Sepsis-Induced Acute Kidney Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jane; Russell, James A; Bentzer, Peter; Parsons, Devyn; Secchia, Stefano; Mörgelin, Matthias; Walley, Keith R; Boyd, John H; Linder, Adam

    2017-09-01

    Sepsis-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common condition with high morbidity and mortality. Neutrophil-derived heparin-binding protein (HBP) induces vascular leakage and is a promising biomarker of sepsis-induced organ dysfunction. It remains unknown if HBP is prognostic of AKI in septic shock and if HBP could play a role in the pathophysiology of sepsis-induced AKI. To determine the association of plasma HBP levels with development of AKI, investigate the role of HBP in the pathophysiology of sepsis-induced AKI, and test the effect of blocking HBP using heparin derivatives. In 296 septic shock patients from the randomized multicenter Vasopressin and Septic Shock Trial (VASST) plasma HBP levels were associated with development of AKI and need for renal replacement therapy (RRT). Human renal tubular cells were exposed to recombinant HBP to evaluate inflammation and heparin derivatives were used to abrogate these effects. Finally, mice were exposed to HBP with and without heparin derivatives and the kidneys examined for signs of inflammation. Plasma HBP levels were significantly higher in patients with AKI and those requiring RRT. HBP levels identified patients with moderate AKI with an area under curve (AUC) of 0.85. HBP increased IL-6 production in renal tubular epithelial cells. Different heparin derivatives abrogated the HBP-induced increased inflammatory response in vitro and in vivo. Elevated plasma HBP is associated with development of sepsis-induced AKI and HBP is involved in its pathophysiology. Our studies suggest that heparin(s) could be tested for efficacy and safety of prevention of sepsis-induced AKI.

  14. Intestinal epithelium is more susceptible to cytopathic injury and altered permeability than the lung epithelium in the context of acute sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, Mark W; Bao, Shengying; Knoell, Daren L; Fahy, Ruairi J; Shao, Guohong; Crouser, Elliott D

    2011-10-01

    Mitochondrial morphology and function are altered in intestinal epithelia during endotoxemia. However, it is unclear whether mitochondrial abnormalities occur in lung epithelial cells during acute sepsis or whether mitochondrial dysfunction corresponds with altered epithelial barrier function. Thus, we hypothesized that the intestinal epithelium is more susceptible to mitochondrial injury than the lung epithelium during acute sepsis and that mitochondrial dysfunction precedes impaired barrier function. Using a resuscitated feline model of Escherichia coli-induced sepsis, lung and ileal tissues were harvested after 6 h for histological and mitochondrial ultrastructural analyses in septic (n = 6) and time-matched controls (n = 6). Human lung epithelial cells (HLEC) and Caco-2 monolayers (n = 5) were exposed to 'cytomix' (TNFα: 40 ng/ml, IL-1β: 20 ng/ml, IFNγ: 10 ng/ml) for 24-72 h, and measurements of transepithelial electrical resistance (TER), epithelial permeability and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ) were taken. Lung epithelial morphology, mitochondrial ultrastructure and pulmonary gas exchange were unaltered in septic animals compared to matching controls. While histologically intact, ileal epithelia demonstrated marked mitochondrial ultrastructural damage during sepsis. Caco-2 monolayers treated with cytomix showed a significant decrease in mitochondrial ΔΨ within 24 h, which was associated with a progressive reduction in TER and increased epithelial permeability over the subsequent 48 h. In contrast, mitochondrial ΔΨ and epithelial barrier functions were preserved in HLEC following cytomix. These findings indicate that intestinal epithelium is more susceptible to mitochondrial damage and dysfunction than the lung epithelium in the context of sepsis. Early alterations in mitochondrial function portend subsequent epithelial barrier dysfunction.

  15. Neuronal antibody biomarkers for Sydenham's chorea identify a new group of children with chronic recurrent episodic acute exacerbations of tic and obsessive compulsive symptoms following a streptococcal infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvey S Singer

    Full Text Available Several autoantibodies (anti-dopamine 1 (D1R and 2 (D2R receptors, anti-tubulin, anti-lysoganglioside-GM1 and antibody-mediated activation of calcium calmodulin dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII signaling activity are elevated in children with Sydenham's chorea (SC. Recognizing proposed clinical and autoimmune similarities between SC and PANDAS (pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorder associated with a streptococcal infection, we sought to identify serial biomarker changes in a slightly different population. Antineuronal antibodies were measured in eight children (mean 11.3 years with chronic, dramatic, recurrent tics and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD associated with a group A β-hemolytic streptococcal (GABHS respiratory tract infection, but differing because they lacked choreiform movements. Longitudinal serum samples in most subjects included two pre-exacerbation samples, Exac, one midst Exac (abrupt recurrence of tic/OCD; temporally association with a GABHS infection in six of eight subjects, and two post-Exac. Controls included four groups of unaffected children (n = 70; mean 10.8 years obtained at four different institutions and published controls. Clinical exacerbations were not associated with a significant rise in antineuronal antibody titers. CaMKII activation was increased at the GABHS exacerbation point in 5/6 subjects, exceeded combined and published control's 95th percentile at least once in 7/8 subjects, and median values were elevated at each time point. Anti-tubulin and anti-D2R titers did not differ from published or combined control group's 95th percentile or median values. Differences in anti-lysoganglioside-GM1 and anti-D1R titers were dependent on the selected control. Variances in antibody titers and CaMKII activation were identified among the institutional control groups. Based on comparisons to published studies, results identify two groups of PANDAS: 1 a cohort, represented by this study, which lacks

  16. Pediatric Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prusakowski, Melanie K; Chen, Audrey P

    2017-02-01

    Pediatric sepsis is distinct from adult sepsis in its definitions, clinical presentations, and management. Recognition of pediatric sepsis is complicated by the various pediatric-specific comorbidities that contribute to its mortality and the age- and development-specific vital sign and clinical parameters that obscure its recognition. This article outlines the clinical presentation and management of sepsis in neonates, infants, and children, and highlights some key populations who require specialized care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A multicentre study of acute kidney injury in severe sepsis and septic shock: association with inflammatory phenotype and HLA genotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didier Payen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To investigate the association between severity of acute kidney injury (AKI and outcome, systemic inflammatory phenotype and HLA genotype in severe sepsis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Prospective multicenter observational study done in 4 intensive care units in two university hospitals. Severe sepsis and septic shock patients with at least 2 organ failures based on the SOFA score were classified: 1 "no AKI", 2 "mild AKI" (grouping stage 1 and 2 of AKIN score and 3 "severe AKI" (stage 3 of AKIN score. Sequential measurements: The vasopressor dependency index (VDI; dose and types of drugs to evaluate the association between hemodynamic status and the development of early AKI; plasma levels of IL-10, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF, IL-6 and HLA-DR monocyte expression. Genotyping of the 13 HLA-DRB1 alleles with deduction of presence of HLA-DRB3, -DRB4 and -DRB5 genes. We used multivariate analysis with competitive risk model to study associations. Overall, 176 study patients (146 with septic shock were classified from AKIN score as "no AKI" (n = 43, "mild AKI" (n = 74 or "severe AKI" (n = 59. The VDI did not differ between groups of AKI. After adjustment, "mild and severe AKI" were an independent risk factor for mortality (HR 2.42 95%CI[1.01-5.83], p = 0.048 and HR 1.99 95%CI[1.30-3.03], p = 0.001 respectively. "Severe AKI" had higher levels of plasma IL-10, MIF and IL-6 compared to "no AKI" and mild AKI (p<0.05 for each, with no difference in mHLA-DR at day 0. HLA-DRB genotyping showed a significantly lower proportion of 4 HLA-DRB alleles among patients requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT (58% than in patients with severe AKI who did not receive RRT (84% (p = 0.004. CONCLUSIONS: AKI severity is independently associated with mortality and plasma IL-10, MIF or IL-6 levels. Presence of 4 alleles of HLA-DRB in severe AKI patients seems associated with a lower need of RRT.

  18. Acute and long-term dysphagia in critically ill patients with severe sepsis: results of a prospective controlled observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielske, Joerg; Bohne, Silvia; Brunkhorst, Frank M; Axer, Hubertus; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2014-11-01

    Dysphagia is a major risk factor for morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients treated in intensive care units (ICUs). Structured otorhinolaryngological data on dysphagia in ICU survivors with severe sepsis are missing. In a prospective study, 30 ICU patients with severe sepsis and thirty without sepsis as control group were examined using bedside fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing after 14 days in the ICU (T1) and 4 months after onset of critical illness (T2). Swallowing dysfunction was assessed using the Penetration-Aspiration Scale (PAS). The Functional Oral Intake Scale was applied to evaluate the diet needed. Primary endpoint was the burden of dysphagia defined as PAS score >5. At T1, 19 of 30 severe sepsis patients showed aspiration with a PAS score >5, compared to 7 of 30 in critically ill patients without severe sepsis (p = 0.002). Severe sepsis and tracheostomy were independent risk factors for severe dysphagia with aspiration (PAS > 5) at T1 (p = 0.042 and 0.006, respectively). 4-month mortality (T2) was 57 % in severe sepsis patients compared to 20 % in patients without severe sepsis (p = 0.006). At T2, more severe sepsis survivors were tracheostomy-dependent and needed more often tube or parenteral feeding (p = 0.014 and p = 0.040, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed tracheostomy at T1 as independent risk factor for severe dysphagia at T2 (p = 0.030). Severe sepsis appears to be a relevant risk factor for long-term dysphagia. An otorhinolaryngological evaluation of dysphagia at ICU discharge is mandatory for survivors of severe critical illness to plan specific swallowing rehabilitation programs.

  19. Evaluation of short-term clinical efficacy of 3-day therapy with azithromycin in comparison with 5-day cefcapene-pivoxyl for acute streptococcal tonsillopharyngitis in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Takeharu; Rikimaru, Toru; Tokunaga, Naoto; Higashi, Toshihiro; Nakamura, Masahiro; Ichikawa, Yoichiro; Matsuo, Kazuhiko

    2011-08-01

    Group A streptococcal (GAS) tonsillopharyngitis is one of the few conditions for which antibiotics are advocated among common upper respiratory infections. Although a 3-day course of azithromycin is attracting attention as a treatment of choice for the condition, it is not clear if the efficacy of the treatment is comparable with that of treatment with cephalosporins. A prospective, randomized, comparative multicenter study was conducted to compare the efficacy of azithromycin (AZM) given once daily for 3 days with that of cefcapene-pivoxyl (CFPN-PI) divided into three daily doses for 5 days. 88 patients (male: 38, mean age: 16.5) were treated with AZM and 69 (male: 34, mean age: 16.9) with CFPN-PI. The symptoms of all but 5 (2 for AZM and 3 for CFPN-PI) of the patients were resolved by the 8th day of the treatment. By the 4th day of the treatment, criteria for clinical efficacy were fulfilled in 71 (80.7%) subjects who were treated with AZM and in 48 (67.6%) of those treated with CFPN-PI (p = 0.07). The same figures on the 8th day of the treatment were 86 (97.7%) and 68 (95.8%), respectively (p = 0.66), confirming there was no significant difference in clinical efficacy between the two treatments. Mild adverse reactions were reported by two patients treated with AZM and by none treated with CFPN-PI. The clinical efficacy of a 3-day course with AZM was comparable with that of a 5-day course of CFPN-PI for GAS tonsillopharyngitis.

  20. T helper type 2-polarized invariant natural killer T cells reduce disease severity in acute intra-abdominal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantha, R V; Mazzuca, D M; Xu, S X; Porcelli, S A; Fraser, D D; Martin, C M; Welch, I; Mele, T; Haeryfar, S M M; McCormick, J K

    2014-11-01

    Sepsis is characterized by a severe systemic inflammatory response to infection that is associated with high morbidity and mortality despite optimal care. Invariant natural killer T (iNK T) cells are potent regulatory lymphocytes that can produce pro- and/or anti-inflammatory cytokines, thus shaping the course and nature of immune responses; however, little is known about their role in sepsis. We demonstrate here that patients with sepsis/severe sepsis have significantly elevated proportions of iNK T cells in their peripheral blood (as a percentage of their circulating T cells) compared to non-septic patients. We therefore investigated the role of iNK T cells in a mouse model of intra-abdominal sepsis (IAS). Our data show that iNK T cells are pathogenic in IAS, and that T helper type 2 (Th2) polarization of iNK T cells using the synthetic glycolipid OCH significantly reduces mortality from IAS. This reduction in mortality is associated with the systemic elevation of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-13 and reduction of several proinflammatory cytokines within the spleen, notably interleukin (IL)-17. Finally, we show that treatment of sepsis with OCH in mice is accompanied by significantly reduced apoptosis of splenic T and B lymphocytes and macrophages, but not natural killer cells. We propose that modulation of iNK T cell responses towards a Th2 phenotype may be an effective therapeutic strategy in early sepsis.

  1. Management of guttate psoriasis in patients with associated streptococcal infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karabudak Abuaf O

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Özlem Karabudak Abuaf, Bilal DoganDepartment of Dermatology, GATA Haydarpasa Teaching Hospital, Istanbul, TurkeyAbstract: Psoriasis is a T cell-mediated inflammatory skin disease. It can be provoked or exacerbated by environmental factors, particularly medications and infections. Guttate psoriasis is a distinctive acute form of psoriasis that generally occurs in children and young adults. The association between guttate psoriasis and Streptococcus pyogenes is well established in medical literature; however, the exact mechanism can only be theorized. Treatment guidelines are not established, and it is unclear how necessary antibiotics are for acute state guttate psoriasis. Many dermatologists have recommended using antibiotic therapy or tonsillectomy, especially for patients with recurrent streptococcal infections. This paper briefly summarizes the possible mechanisms of pathogenesis and the recent research results on this topic and examines under what conditions a curative treatment of streptococcal infection by tonsillectomy or antibiotic treatment may benefit psoriasis patients.Keywords: guttate, psoriasis, treatment, Streptococcus pyogenes

  2. OPTICAL IMAGING OF LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE-INDUCED OXIDATIVE STRESS IN ACUTE LUNG INJURY FROM HYPEROXIA AND SEPSIS

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    REYHANEH SEPEHR

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many acute and chronic pulmonary disorders such as acute lung injury (ALI in adults and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD in premature infants. Bacterial infection and oxygen toxicity, which result in pulmonary vascular endothelial injury, contribute to impaired vascular growth and alveolar simplification seen in the lungs of premature infants with BPD. Hyperoxia induces ALI, reduces cell proliferation, causes DNA damage and promotes cell death by causing mitochondrial dysfunction. The objective of this study was to use an optical imaging technique to evaluate the variations in fluorescence intensities of the auto-fluorescent mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes, NADH and FAD in four different groups of rats. The ratio of these fluorescence signals (NADH/FAD, referred to as NADH redox ratio (NADH RR has been used as an indicator of tissue metabolism in injuries. Here, we investigated whether the changes in metabolic state can be used as a marker of oxidative stress caused by hyperoxia and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS exposure in neonatal rat lungs. We examined the tissue redox states of lungs from four groups of rat pups: normoxic (21% O2 pups, hyperoxic (90% O2 pups, pups treated with LPS (normoxic + LPS, and pups treated with LPS and hyperoxia (hyperoxic + LPS. Our results show that hyperoxia oxidized the respiratory chain as reflected by a ~ 31% decrease in lung tissue NADH RR as compared to that for normoxic lungs. LPS treatment alone or with hyperoxia had no significant effect on lung tissue NADH RR as compared to that for normoxic or hyperoxic lungs, respectively. Thus, NADH RR serves as a quantitative marker of oxidative stress level in lung injury caused by two clinically important conditions: hyperoxia and LPS exposure.

  3. OPTICAL IMAGING OF LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE-INDUCED OXIDATIVE STRESS IN ACUTE LUNG INJURY FROM HYPEROXIA AND SEPSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Audi, Said H; Maleki, Sepideh; Staniszewski, Kevin; Eis, Annie L; Konduri, Girija G; Ranji, Mahsa

    2013-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many acute and chronic pulmonary disorders such as acute lung injury (ALI) in adults and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature infants. Bacterial infection and oxygen toxicity, which result in pulmonary vascular endothelial injury, contribute to impaired vascular growth and alveolar simplification seen in the lungs of premature infants with BPD. Hyperoxia induces ALI, reduces cell proliferation, causes DNA damage and promotes cell death by causing mitochondrial dysfunction. The objective of this study was to use an optical imaging technique to evaluate the variations in fluorescence intensities of the auto-fluorescent mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes, NADH and FAD in four different groups of rats. The ratio of these fluorescence signals (NADH/FAD), referred to as NADH redox ratio (NADH RR) has been used as an indicator of tissue metabolism in injuries. Here, we investigated whether the changes in metabolic state can be used as a marker of oxidative stress caused by hyperoxia and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in neonatal rat lungs. We examined the tissue redox states of lungs from four groups of rat pups: normoxic (21% O2) pups, hyperoxic (90% O2) pups, pups treated with LPS (normoxic + LPS), and pups treated with LPS and hyperoxia (hyperoxic + LPS). Our results show that hyperoxia oxidized the respiratory chain as reflected by a ~31% decrease in lung tissue NADH RR as compared to that for normoxic lungs. LPS treatment alone or with hyperoxia had no significant effect on lung tissue NADH RR as compared to that for normoxic or hyperoxic lungs, respectively. Thus, NADH RR serves as a quantitative marker of oxidative stress level in lung injury caused by two clinically important conditions: hyperoxia and LPS exposure.

  4. RAGE deficiency attenuates the protective effect of Lidocaine against sepsis-induced acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhuo; Zhou, Jie; Liao, Changli; Li, Xiaobing; Liu, Minghua; Song, Daqiang; Jiang, Xian

    2017-04-01

    Lidocaine (Lido) is reported to suppress inflammatory responses and exhibit a therapeutic effect in models of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced acute lung injury (ALI). The receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE) exerts pro-inflammatory effects by enhancing pro-inflammatory cytokine production. However, the precise mechanism by which Lido confers protection against ALI is not clear. ALI was induced in RAGE WT and RAGE knockout (KO) rats using cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) operations for 24 h. The results showed that Lido significantly inhibited CLP-induced lung inflammation and histopathological lung injury. Furthermore, Lido significantly reduced CLP-induced upregulation of HMGB1 and RAGE expression and activation of the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. With the use of RAGE KO rats, we demonstrate here that RAGE deficiency attenuates the protective effect of Lido against CLP-induced lung inflammatory cell infiltration and histopathological lung injury. These results suggest that RAGE deficiency attenuates the protective effect of Lido against CLP-induced ALI by attenuating the pro-inflammatory cytokines production.

  5. All that seems sepsis is not sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek S Guleria

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Catastrophic antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (CAPS resembles severe sepsis in its acute presentation, with features of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS leading to multiple organ dysfunction. Infections are the best known triggers of CAPS. This emphasizes the need for early diagnosis and aggressive treatment as the mortality is as high as 50%. We present a 42-year-old woman who developed SIRS postoperatively and was eventually diagnosed as CAPS.

  6. Beta-hemolytic streptococcal bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Ulrik; Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2002-01-01

    Bacteremia with beta-hemolytic Streptococci groups A, B, C and G has a mortality rate of approximately 20%. In this study we analyzed the association of various patient risk factors with mortality. Records from 241 patients with beta-hemolytic streptococcal bacteremia were reviewed with particular...

  7. A unified theory of sepsis-induced acute kidney injury: inflammation, microcirculatory dysfunction, bioenergetics, and the tubular cell adaptation to injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Hernando; Ince, Can; De Backer, Daniel; Pickkers, Peter; Payen, Didier; Hotchkiss, John; Kellum, John A

    2014-01-01

    Given that the leading clinical conditions associated with acute kidney injury (AKI), namely, sepsis, major surgery, heart failure, and hypovolemia, are all associated with shock, it is tempting to attribute all AKI to ischemia on the basis of macrohemodynamic changes. However, an increasing body of evidence has suggested that in many patients, AKI can occur in the absence of overt signs of global renal hypoperfusion. Indeed, sepsis-induced AKI can occur in the setting of normal or even increased renal blood flow. Accordingly, renal injury may not be entirely explained solely on the basis of the classic paradigm of hypoperfusion, and thus other mechanisms must come into play. Herein, we put forward a "unifying theory" to explain the interplay between inflammation and oxidative stress, microvascular dysfunction, and the adaptive response of the tubular epithelial cell to the septic insult. We propose that this response is mostly adaptive in origin, that it is driven by mitochondria, and that it ultimately results in and explains the clinical phenotype of sepsis-induced AKI.

  8. Incidence Rate of Community-Acquired Sepsis Among Hospitalized Acute Medical Patients-A Population-Based Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard; Laursen, Christian B; Jensen, Thøger Gorm

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: Sepsis is a frequent cause of admission, but incidence rates based on administrative data have previously produced large differences in estimates. The aim of the study was to estimate the incidence of community-acquired sepsis based on patients' symptoms and clinical findings at arrival...... to the hospital. DESIGN:: Population-based survey. SETTING:: Medical emergency department from September 1, 2010, to August 31, 2011. PATIENTS:: All patients were manually reviewed using a structured protocol in order to identify the presence of infection. Vital signs and laboratory values were collected...

  9. Quadratic function between arterial partial oxygen pressure and mortality risk in sepsis patients: an interaction with simplified acute physiology score

    OpenAIRE

    Zhongheng Zhang; Xuqing Ji

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen therapy is widely used in emergency and critical care settings, while there is little evidence on its real therapeutic effect. The study aimed to explore the impact of arterial oxygen partial pressure (PaO2) on clinical outcomes in patients with sepsis. A large clinical database was employed for the study. Subjects meeting the diagnostic criteria of sepsis were eligible for the study. All measurements of PaO2 were extracted. The primary endpoint was death from any causes during hospita...

  10. The role of whole blood impedance aggregometry and its utilisation in the diagnosis and prognosis of patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis in acute critical illness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth R Davies

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the prognostic and diagnostic value of whole blood impedance aggregometry in patients with sepsis and SIRS and to compare with whole blood parameters (platelet count, haemoglobin, haematocrit and white cell count. METHODS: We performed an observational, prospective study in the acute setting. Platelet function was determined using whole blood impedance aggregometry (multiplate on admission to the Emergency Department or Intensive Care Unit and at 6 and 24 hours post admission. Platelet count, haemoglobin, haematocrit and white cell count were also determined. RESULTS: 106 adult patients that met SIRS and sepsis criteria were included. Platelet aggregation was significantly reduced in patients with severe sepsis/septic shock when compared to SIRS/uncomplicated sepsis (ADP: 90.7±37.6 vs 61.4±40.6; p<0.001, Arachadonic Acid 99.9±48.3 vs 66.3±50.2; p = 0.001, Collagen 102.6±33.0 vs 79.1±38.8; p = 0.001; SD ± mean. Furthermore platelet aggregation was significantly reduced in the 28 day mortality group when compared with the survival group (Arachadonic Acid 58.8±47.7 vs 91.1±50.9; p<0.05, Collagen 36.6±36.6 vs 98.0±35.1; p = 0.001; SD ± mean. However haemoglobin, haematocrit and platelet count were more effective at distinguishing between subgroups and were equally effective indicators of prognosis. Significant positive correlations were observed between whole blood impedance aggregometry and platelet count (ADP 0.588 p<0.0001, Arachadonic Acid 0.611 p<0.0001, Collagen 0.599 p<0.0001 (Pearson correlation. CONCLUSIONS: Reduced platelet aggregometry responses were not only significantly associated with morbidity and mortality in sepsis and SIRS patients, but also correlated with the different pathological groups. Whole blood aggregometry significantly correlated with platelet count, however, when we adjust for the different groups we investigated, the effect of platelet count appears to be non-significant.

  11. Acute administration of recombinant Angiopoietin-1 ameliorates multiple-organ dysfunction syndrome and improves survival in murine sepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    David, Sascha; Park, Joon-Keun; van Meurs, Matijs; Zijlstra, Jan G.; Koenecke, Christian; Schrimpf, Claudia; Shushakova, Nelli; Gueler, Faikah; Haller, Hermann; Kuempers, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Endothelial activation leading to vascular barrier breakdown plays an essential role in the pathophysiology of multiple-organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) in sepsis. Increasing evidence suggests that the function of the vessel-protective factor Angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1), a ligand of the en

  12. [A pseudo-epidemic of puerperal sepsis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, V; Derks, J B; Mascini, E M; Bruinse, H W

    2003-12-20

    Within a four-week period, five patients were admitted to the maternity ward of the Utrecht Children's Hospital diagnosed with puerperal sepsis due to group-A streptococcal infection. The clinical presentation was different for each patient. All patients recovered upon adequate antibiotic treatment. One of the children died, possibly due to sepsis and hypotension of his mother. As group-A streptococci can be extremely contagious and an epidemic was suspected, measures for additional hygiene were taken. Furthermore, all personnel at the maternity ward and the obstetric centre were tested. T-serotyping, M-genotyping, exotoxin A- and C-gene amplification and pulsed field gel electrophoresis were used to characterize the cultured group-A streptococci. Cross-contamination was not found. Therefore, this increase in puerperal sepsis was attributed to polyclonal expansion rather than an epidemic. All mothers of newly born children who present with fever and lower abdominal pain should be suspected of group-A streptococcal infection. Evaluation and treatment in hospital is indicated due to a sometimes fulminant course. When group-A streptococci are cultured again in a new pregnancy, eradication therapy during pregnancy or prophylactic treatment during birth should be considered to prevent recurrent infection.

  13. Surviving streptococcal toxic shock syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudhan Thayur R

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome and associated myositis caused by group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus pyogenes generally have a poor outcome despite aggressive operative treatment. Frequently the diagnosis is missed initially as the clinical features are non-specific. The progression to a toxic state is rapid and unless definitive treatment measures are initiated early, the end result can be catastrophic. We report a previously healthy patient who had features of toxic shock syndrome due to alpha haemolytic (viridans streptococcus mitis which was treated successfully with antibiotics, aggressive intensive care support including the use of a 'sepsis care bundle', monitoring and continuous multidisciplinary review. Life and limb threatening emergencies due to streptococcus mitis in an immune-competent person are rare and to our knowledge, have not previously been described in the English scientific literature. Successful outcome is possible provided a high degree of suspicion is maintained and the patient is intensively monitored.

  14. Genetic variation in the TNF receptor-associated factor 6 gene is associated with susceptibility to sepsis-induced acute lung injury

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    Song Zhenju

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies showed that overwhelming inflammatory response mediated by the toll-like receptor (TLR-related pathway was important in the development of acute lung injury (ALI. The aim of this study was to determine whether common genetic variation in four genes of the TLR signaling pathway were associated with sepsis-induced ALI susceptibility and risk of death in Chinese Han population. Methods Fourteen tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (tagSNPs in MyD88, IRAK1, IRAK4 and TRAF6 were genotyped in samples of sepsis-induced ALI (n = 272 and sepsis alone patients (n = 276, and tested for association in this case-control collection. Then, we investigated correlation between the associated SNP and the mRNA expression level of the corresponding gene. And we also investigated correlation between the associated SNP and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α as well as interleukin-6 (IL-6 concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs exposed to lipopolysaccharides (LPS ex vivo. The mRNA expression level was determined using real-time quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR assays, and concentrations of TNF-α and IL-6 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Results The association analysis revealed that rs4755453, an intronic SNP of TRAF6, was significantly associated with susceptibility to sepsis-induced ALI. The C allele frequency of rs4755453 in the sepsis alone group was significantly higher than that in the sepsis-induced ALI group (P = 0.00026, odds ratio (OR = 0.52, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.37–0.74. These associations remained significant after adjustment for covariates in multiple logistic regression analysis and for multiple comparisons. TRAF6 mRNA expression levels in PBMCs from homozygotes of the rs4755453G allele were significantly higher than that in heterozygotes and homozygotes of the rs4755453C allele at baseline (P = 0.012 and P = 0.003, respectively as

  15. A case of rheumatic fever with acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis and nephrotic syndrome caused by a cutaneous infection with beta-hemolytic streptococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Sauer Mikkelsen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A middle-aged patient of Greenlandic origin was referred for skin infection of the leg. An initial minor trauma of the skin of the distal right lower extremity was complicated by bullous erysipelas which cultured positive for group A β-hemolytic streptococci (GABHS. The clinical condition deteriorated and necrotizing fasciitis developed despite relevant surgical and antibiotic treatment. Approximately 3 weeks later, the patient developed arthralgia, impaired renal function with azotemia, hypertension and severe nephrotic syndrome with periorbital and peripheral edema. A kidney biopsy demonstrated endocapillary glomerulonephritis. Concomitantly, carditis with chest pain, moderately reduced left ventricular ejection fraction and mitral regurgitation were noted. The patient had no signs of pharyngitis in the whole period. The patient thus contracted poststreptococ glomerulonephritis and furthermore she fulfilled the criteria of acute rheumatic fever following a GABHS skin infection. We suggest a possible relation between a virulent GABHS clone causing NF and ARF.

  16. Tics, OCD and Streptococcal Infection (PANDAS

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    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Forty matched pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS case-control pairs were prospectively evaluated clinically and with testing for group A b-hemolytic streptococcus for an average of 2 years, in a study at University of Rochester School of Medicine, New York; and WHO Streptococcal Reference Laboratory, Minneapolis, MN.

  17. Effect of pentoxifylline on lung inflammation and gas exchange in a sepsis-induced acute lung injury model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.S. Oliveira-Junior

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Experimental models of sepsis-induced pulmonary alterations are important for the study of pathogenesis and for potential intervention therapies. The objective of the present study was to characterize lung dysfunction (low PaO2 and high PaCO2, and increased cellular infiltration, protein extravasation, and malondialdehyde (MDA production assessed in bronchoalveolar lavage in a sepsis model consisting of intraperitoneal (ip injection of Escherichia coli and the protective effects of pentoxifylline (PTX. Male Wistar rats (weighing between 270 and 350 g were injected ip with 10(7 or 10(9 CFU/100 g body weight or saline and samples were collected 2, 6, 12, and 24 h later (N = 5 each group. PaO2, PaCO2 and pH were measured in blood, and cellular influx, protein extravasation and MDA concentration were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage. In a second set of experiments either PTX or saline was administered 1 h prior to E. coli ip injection (N = 5 each group and the animals were observed for 6 h. Injection of 10(7 or 10(9 CFU/100 g body weight of E. coli induced acidosis, hypoxemia, and hypercapnia. An increased (P < 0.05 cell influx was observed in bronchoalveolar lavage, with a predominance of neutrophils. Total protein and MDA concentrations were also higher (P < 0.05 in the septic groups compared to control. A higher tumor necrosis factor-alpha (P < 0.05 concentration was also found in these animals. Changes in all parameters were more pronounced with the higher bacterial inoculum. PTX administered prior to sepsis reduced (P < 0.05 most functional alterations. These data show that an E. coli ip inoculum is a good model for the induction of lung dysfunction in sepsis, and suitable for studies of therapeutic interventions.

  18. Sepsis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Child Natural Disasters: How Families Can Help Sepsis KidsHealth > For Parents > Sepsis Print A A A ... Infections When to Call the Doctor What Is Sepsis? Sepsis is when the immune system responds to ...

  19. The evolutionary logic of sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rózsa, Lajos; Apari, Péter; Sulyok, Mihály; Tappe, Dennis; Bodó, Imre; Hardi, Richárd; Müller, Viktor

    2017-09-09

    The recently proposed Microbiome Mutiny Hypothesis posits that members of the human microbiome obtain information about the host individuals' health status and, when host survival is compromised, switch to an intensive exploitation strategy to maximize residual transmission. In animals and humans, sepsis is an acute systemic reaction to microbes invading the normally sterile body compartments. When induced by formerly mutualistic or neutral microbes, possibly in response to declining host health, sepsis appears to fit the 'microbiome mutiny' scenario except for its apparent failure to enhance transmission of the causative organisms. We propose that the ability of certain species of the microbiome to induce sepsis is not a fortuitous side effect of within-host replication, but rather it might, in some cases, be the result of their adaptive evolution. Whenever host health declines, inducing sepsis can be adaptive for those members of the healthy human microbiome that are capable of colonizing the future cadaver and spread by cadaver-borne transmission. We hypothesize that such microbes might exhibit switches along the 'mutualist - lethal pathogen - decomposer - mutualist again' scenario, implicating a previously unsuspected, surprising level of phenotypic plasticity. This hypothesis predicts that those species of the healthy microbiome that are recurring causative agents of sepsis can participate in the decomposition of cadavers, and can be transmitted as soil-borne or water-borne infections. Furthermore, in individual sepsis cases, the same microbial clones that dominate the systemic infection that precipitates sepsis, should also be present in high concentration during decomposition following death: this prediction is testable by molecular fingerprinting in experimentally induced animal models. Sepsis is a leading cause of human death worldwide. If further research confirms that some cases of sepsis indeed involve the 'mutiny' (facultative phenotypic switching) of

  20. Quadratic function between arterial partial oxygen pressure and mortality risk in sepsis patients: an interaction with simplified acute physiology score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongheng; Ji, Xuqing

    2016-10-13

    Oxygen therapy is widely used in emergency and critical care settings, while there is little evidence on its real therapeutic effect. The study aimed to explore the impact of arterial oxygen partial pressure (PaO2) on clinical outcomes in patients with sepsis. A large clinical database was employed for the study. Subjects meeting the diagnostic criteria of sepsis were eligible for the study. All measurements of PaO2 were extracted. The primary endpoint was death from any causes during hospital stay. Survey data analysis was performed by using individual ICU admission as the primary sampling unit. Quadratic function was assumed for PaO2 and its interaction with other covariates were explored. A total of 199,125 PaO2 samples were identified for 11,002 ICU admissions. Each ICU stay comprised 18 PaO2 samples in average. The fitted multivariable model supported our hypothesis that the effect of PaO2 on mortality risk was in quadratic form. There was significant interaction between PaO2 and SAPS-I (p = 0.007). Furthermore, the main effect of PaO2 on SOFA score was nonlinear. The study shows that the effect of PaO2 on mortality risk is in quadratic function form, and there is significant interaction between PaO2 and severity of illness.

  1. Neonatal sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are infected after delivery. The following increase an infant's risk of sepsis after delivery: Having a catheter in a blood vessel for ... Providing a clean place for birth Delivering the baby within 12 to 24 hours of when the membranes break (Cesarean delivery should be done in women within 4 to ...

  2. Scarlet Fever: A Group A Streptococcal Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Scarlet Fever: A Group A Streptococcal Infection Language: English Español ( ... red rash that feels rough, like sandpaper. Scarlet Fever Podcast A pediatrician explains the cause, treatment, and ...

  3. Senegenin Ameliorate Acute Lung Injury Through Reduction of Oxidative Stress and Inhibition of Inflammation in Cecal Ligation and Puncture-Induced Sepsis Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Hong; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Wang, Jian-Jie; Feng, Shan-Dan

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the protective effect of senegenin on acute lung injury (ALI) in rats induced by sepsis. Rat ALI model was reproduced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). All rats were randomly divided into five groups: group 1 (control), group 2 (CLP), group 3 (CLP + senegenin 15 mg/kg), group 4 (CLP + senegenin 30 mg/kg), and group 5 (CLP + senegenin 60 mg/kg). CLP + senegenin groups received senegenin by gavage daily for consecutive 5 days, respectively, while the mice in control and CLP groups were given an equivalent volume of saline. We detected the lung wet/dry weight ratios and the histopathology of the lung. The levels of lung tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione (GSH) were determined. Meanwhile, the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) levels were studied. The results demonstrated that senegenin treatment significantly attenuated CLP-induced lung injury, including reduction of lung wet/dry weight ratio, protein leak, infiltration of leukocytes, and MPO activity. In addition, senegenin markedly decreased MDA content and increased SOD activity and GSH level. Serum levels of TNF-α and IL-1β were also decreased by senegenin administration. Furthermore, senegenin administration inhibited the nuclear translocation of NF-κB in the lungs. These findings indicate that senegenin exerts protective effects on CLP-induced septic rats. Senegenin may be a potential therapeutic agent against sepsis.

  4. The doripenem serum concentrations in intensive care patients suffering from acute kidney injury, sepsis, and multi organ dysfunction syndrome undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy slow low-efficiency dialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wieczorek A; Tokarz A; Gaszynski W; Gaszynski T

    2014-01-01

    Andrzej Wieczorek, Andrzej Tokarz, Wojciech Gaszynski, Tomasz Gaszynski Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Therapy, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland Abstract: Doripenem is a novel wide-spectrum antibiotic, and a derivate of carbapenems. It is an ideal antibiotic for treatment of serious nosocomial infections and severe sepsis for its exceptionally high efficiency and broad antibacterial spectrum of action. Doripenem is eliminated mainly by the kidneys. In cases of acute kidn...

  5. Pulmonary Renal Syndrome After Streptococcal Pharyngitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopi Mara-Koosham PhD

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary renal syndrome is a class of small vessel vasculitides that are characterized by the dual presentation of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH and glomerulonephritis. Pulmonary renal syndrome has multiple etiologies, but its development has been rarely reported following infection with group A streptococcus. We present the case of a 36-year-old Native American male who was transferred to our facility due to refractory hypoxic respiratory failure. He had been diagnosed with streptococcal pharyngitis 2 weeks prior to admission. Given the presence of hemoptysis, bronchoscopy was performed and was consistent with DAH. Urinalysis demonstrated hematuria and proteinuria, in the setting of elevated creatinine and blood urea nitrogen. Additionally, antistreptolysin O titer was positive. Given the constellation of laboratory findings and history of streptococcal pharyngitis, the patient was diagnosed with PRS secondary to streptococcal infection. High-dose methylprednisolone was initiated with concomitant plasmapheresis. He was extubated successfully after his respiratory status improved and was eventually discharged home after making a full recovery within 2 weeks after admission. This case illustrates the importance of clinically relevant sequelae of streptococcal infection as well as the appropriate treatment of PRS secondary to streptococcal pharyngitis with plasmapheresis and intravenous corticosteroids.

  6. Intermediate-term and long-term mortality among acute medical patients hospitalized with community-acquired sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Daniel P; Pottegård, Anton; Laursen, Christian B

    2017-01-01

    : This was a population-based study of all adults admitted to an acute medical admission unit, Odense University Hospital, Denmark, from September 2010 to August 2011, identified by symptoms and clinical findings. We categorized the mortality periods into intermediate-term (31-180 days) and long-term (181-365, 366...

  7. Should Israel screen all mothers-to-be to prevent early-onset of neonatal group B streptococcal disease? A cost-utility analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ginsberg Gary M; Eidelman Arthur I; Shinwell Eric; Anis Emilia; Peyser Reuven; Lotan Yoram

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background In Israel, an average of 37 children are born each year with sepsis and another four with meningitis as a result of Group B Streptococcal (GBS) disease. Israel currently only screens mothers with defined risk factors (around 15% of all pregnancies) in order to identify candidates for Intrapartum Antiobiotic Prophyhlaxis (IAP) of GBS. This paper presents a cost-utility analysis of implementing an alternative strategy, which would expand the current protocol to one aiming to...

  8. Invasive group A streptococcal disease in The Netherlands : Evidence for a protective role of anti-exotoxin A antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mascini, EM; Jansze, M; Schellekens, JFP; Musser, JM; Faber, JAJ; Verhoef-Verhage, LAE; Schouls, L; van Leeuwen, WJ; Verhoef, J; van Dijk, H

    2000-01-01

    As part of a nationwide surveillance in The Netherlands during 1994-1997, 53 patients with invasive group A streptococcal (GAS) infections were evaluated for medical history, symptoms, and outcome. Patients' isolates were tested for the production of pyrogenic exotoxins A (SPE-A) and B (SPE-B). Acut

  9. Toxoids of Streptococcal Pyrogenic Exotoxin A Are Protective in Rabbit Models of Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Roggiani, Manuela; Stoehr, Jennifer A.; Olmsted, Stephen B.; Matsuka, Yury V.; Pillai, Subramonia; Ohlendorf, Douglas H.; Schlievert, Patrick M.

    2000-01-01

    Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxins (SPEs) are superantigens that have been implicated in causing streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS). Most notably, SPE serotype A is made by nearly all M-protein serotype 1 and 3 streptococci, the M types most associated with the illness (these strains contain one or more other SPEs, and those proteins are likely also to contribute to disease). We have prepared double-, triple-, and hexa-amino-acid mutants of SPE A by PCR and other mutagenesis procedures....

  10. Positive clinical outcomes derived from using Streptococcus salivarius K12 to prevent streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis in children: a pilot investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pierro, Francesco; Colombo, Maria; Zanvit, Alberto; Rottoli, Amilcare S

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius K12 (BLIS K12(®)) is a probiotic strain producing the bacteriocins salivaricin A2 and salivaricin B, both of which strongly antagonize the growth of Streptococcus pyogenes, the most important bacterial cause of pharyngeal infections in humans. It successfully colonizes and exhibits persistence in the oral cavity and is endowed with an excellent safety profile. Previous observations of a small group of children indicated that the use of BLIS K12 could also reduce the occurrence of viral pharyngitis. The present study focused on a further evaluation of the role of BLIS K12 in the control of pediatric streptococcal disease and moreover whether its use could also help provide protection against various nonstreptococcal infections. In total, 48 children with a recent history of recurrent pharyngeal streptococcal disease were enrolled in the treated group. The control group comprised 76 children known to have had a very low recent occurrence of oral streptococcal disease. The treated children were given BLIS K12 daily for 90 days. The number of episodes of streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis, tracheitis, viral pharyngitis, rhinitis, flu, laryngitis, acute otitis media, enteritis, and stomatitis was recorded during probiotic treatment and for a follow-up period of 9 months, and this was compared with the episodes of the control group over the corresponding period. Compared with the pretreatment time period, 2013, a 90% reduction of streptococcal pharyngeal disease was observed in 2014; compared with untreated children, a statistically significant reduction of all of the other disease conditions assessed, other than stomatitis, was detected in the probiotic-treated children. In agreement with previous findings, in the present study, it was found that the daily use of BLIS K12 has been associated with a concurrent and persisting reduction in the occurrence of pharyngeal, recurrent, streptococcal disease. Moreover, the benefits to children may also

  11. Sepsis and disseminated intravascular coagulation in an eastern spiny softshell turtle (Apalone spinifera spinifera) with acute mycobacteriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Maureen; Waliszewski, Nicole T; Garner, Michael M; Tseng, Florina S

    2009-09-01

    An adult, captive eastern spiny softshell turtle (Apalone spinifera spinifera) was examined for a 4-day history of lethargy and plastron discoloration. The turtle was obtunded and had pale mucous membranes, hemorrhagic nasal discharge, and petechiae on all limbs. The turtle was euthanized due to its grave condition. Necropsy revealed hemorrhagic coelomic effusion, petechiae on the serosal surfaces of the intestinal tract, and bilaterally hemorrhagic lungs. Histologic examination revealed numerous emboli of bacteria associated with fibrinocellular thrombi throughout the blood vessels of multiple tissues. The bacteria in the thrombi were slender bacilli that stained intensely acid fast. Culture of the coelomic fluid yielded Mycobacterium chelonae. Although mycobacteriosis in reptiles is typically a chronic, granulomatous disease, this case demonstrates that mycobacteriosis should be considered in reptiles presenting with acute, nongranulomatous disease. This case also describes clinically apparent hemorrhage due to disseminated intravascular coagulation, which is rarely described in chelonians.

  12. Neonatal sepsis: an old problem with new insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Birju A; Padbury, James F

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis continues to be a common and significant health care burden, especially in very-low-birth-weight infants (VLBWneonatal sepsis. Moreover, some studies among VLBW preterm infants have shown an increase in early-onset sepsis caused by Escherichia coli. As the signs and symptoms of neonatal sepsis are nonspecific, early diagnosis and prompt treatment remains a challenge. There have been a myriad of studies on various diagnostic markers like hematological indices, acute phase reactants, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, cytokines, and cell surface markers among others. Nonetheless, further research is needed to identify a biomarker with high diagnostic accuracy and validity. Some of the newer markers like inter α inhibitor proteins have shown promising results thereby potentially aiding in early detection of neonates with sepsis. In order to decrease the widespread, prolonged use of unnecessary antibiotics and improve the outcome of the infants with sepsis, reliable identification of sepsis at an earlier stage is paramount.

  13. Group B Streptococcal Septic Arthritis of the Shoulder and Potential Association with Pelvic Examination and PAP Smear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E. Daner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Group B streptococcal (GBS infection of a native joint in a nonpregnant adult is uncommon. While many women are colonized with this flora, it rarely becomes pathogenic in its adult host. GBS associated joint infections have been reported, most of which have been related to hematogenous seeding from unknown sources. To our knowledge, there are no published case reports of a GBS joint infection in association with a pelvic exam and Papanicolaou (PAP smear. In this case report, we present a case of GBS sepsis of a native shoulder, possibly resulting from a routine pelvic exam and PAP smear.

  14. Prognostic value and therapeutic potential of TREM-1 in Streptococcus pyogenes- induced sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Sarah A; Linnér, Anna; Beineke, Andreas; Lehne, Sabine; Höltje, Claudia; Hecht, Alexander; Norrby-Teglund, Anna; Medina, Eva; Goldmann, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    TREM-1 (triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells) is a surface molecule expressed on neutrophils and macrophages which has been implicated in the amplification of inflammatory responses triggered during infection. In the present study, we have investigated the clinical significance of TREM-1 in Streptococcus pyogenes-induced severe sepsis in both experimentally infected mice as well as in patients with streptococcal toxic shock. We found that S. pyogenes induced a dose-dependent upregulation of TREM-1 in in vitro cultured phagocytic cells and in the organs of S. pyogenes-infected mice. Furthermore, we reported a positive correlation between serum levels of soluble TREM-1 (sTREM-1) and disease severity in infected patients as well as in experimentally infected mice. Hence, sTREM-1 may represent a useful surrogate marker for streptococcal sepsis. We found that modulation of TREM-1 by administration of the TREM-1 decoy receptor rTREM-1/Fc substantially attenuated the synthesis of inflammatory cytokines. More importantly, treatment of S. pyogenes-infected septic mice with rTREM-1/Fc or the synthetically produced conserved extracellular domain LP17 significantly improved disease outcome. In summary, our data suggest that TREM-1 may not only represent a valuable marker for S. pyogenes infection severity but it may also be an attractive target for the treatment of streptococcal sepsis.

  15. Neonatal sepsis: progress towards improved outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shane, Andi L; Stoll, Barbara J

    2014-01-01

    Neonates are predisposed to infections during the perinatal period due to multiple exposures and a relatively compromised immune system. The burden of disease attributed to neonatal infections varies by geographic region and maternal and neonatal risk factors. Worldwide, it is estimated that more than 1.4 million neonatal deaths annually are the consequence of invasive infections. Risk factors for early-onset neonatal sepsis (EOS) include prematurity, immunologic immaturity, maternal Group B streptococcal colonization, prolonged rupture of membranes, and maternal intra-amniotic infection. Intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis administered to GBS-colonized women has reduced the burden of disease associated with early onset GBS invasive infections. Active surveillance has identified Gram-negative pathogens as an emerging etiology of early-onset invasive infections. Late-onset neonatal sepsis (LOS) attributable to Gram-positive organisms, including coagulase negative Staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus, is associated with increased morbidity and mortality among premature infants. Invasive candidiasis is an emerging cause of late-onset sepsis, especially among infants who receive broad spectrum antimicrobial agents. Prophylactic fluconazole administration to very low birthweight (VLBW) neonates during the first 6 weeks of life reduces invasive candidiasis in neonatal intensive care units with high rates of fungal infection. Prevention of healthcare associated infections through antimicrobial stewardship, limited steroid use, early enteral feeding, limited use of invasive devices and standardization of catheter care practices, and meticulous hand hygiene are important and cost-effective strategies for reducing the burden of late-onset neonatal sepsis. Copyright © 2013 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The effects of colloids or crystalloids on acute respiratory distress syndrome in swine (Sus scrofa models with severe sepsis: analysis on extravascular lung water, IL-8, and VCAM-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rismala Dewi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is a fatal complication of severe sepsis. Due to its higher molecular weight, the use of colloids in fluid resuscitation may be associated with fewer cases of ARDS compared to crystalloids. Extravascular lung water (EVLW elevation and levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 have been studied as indicators playing a role in the pathogenesis of ARDS. The aim of the study was to determine the effects of colloid or crystalloid on the incidence of ARDS, elevation of EVLW, and levels of IL-8 and VCAM-1, in swine models with severe sepsis.Methods: This was a randomized trial conducted at the Laboratory of Experimental Surgery, School of Veterinary Medicine, IPB, using 22 healthy swine models with a body weight of 8 to 12 kg. Subjects were randomly allocated to receive either colloid or crystalloid fluid resuscitation. After administration of endotoxin, clinical signs of ARDS, EVLW, IL-8, and VCAM-1 were monitored during sepsis, severe sepsis, and one- and three hours after fluid resuscitation. Analysis of data using the Wilcoxon test , Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, Mann-Whitney test, unpaired t test.Results: Mild ARDS was more prevalent in the colloid group, while moderate ARDS was more frequent in the crystalloid group. EVLW elevation was lower in the colloid compared to the crystalloid group. There was no significant difference in IL-8 and VCAM-1 levels between the two groups.Conclusion: The use of colloids in fluid resuscitation does not decrease the probability of ARDS events compared to crystalloids. Compared to crystalloids, colloids are associated with a lower increase in EVLWI, but not with IL-8 or VCAM-1 levels.

  17. Cardiorenal Syndromes and Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Chelazzi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The cardiorenal syndrome is a clinical and pathophysiological entity defined as the concomitant presence of renal and cardiovascular dysfunction. In patients with severe sepsis and septic shock, acute cardiovascular, and renal derangements are common, that is, the septic cardiorenal syndrome. The aim of this paper is to describe the pathophysiology and clinical features of septic cardiorenal syndrome in light of the actual clinical and experimental evidence. In particular, the importance of systemic and intrarenal endothelial dysfunction, alterations of kidney perfusion, and myocardial function, organ “crosstalk” and ubiquitous inflammatory injury have been extensively reviewed in light of their role in cardiorenal syndrome etiology. Treatment includes early and targeted optimization of hemodynamics to reverse systemic hypotension and restore urinary output. In case of persistent renal impairment, renal replacement therapy may be used to remove cytokines and restore renal function.

  18. Surviving Sepsis Campaign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rhodes, Andrew; Evans, Laura E; Alhazzani, Waleed

    2017-01-01

    (for those committee members attending the conference). A formal conflict-of-interest (COI) policy was developed at the onset of the process and enforced throughout. A stand-alone meeting was held for all panel members in December 2015. Teleconferences and electronic-based discussion among subgroups......, and evidence profiles were generated. Each subgroup generated a list of questions, searched for best available evidence, and then followed the principles of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system to assess the quality of evidence from high to very low...... of care have relatively weak support, evidence-based recommendations regarding the acute management of sepsis and septic shock are the foundation of improved outcomes for these critically ill patients with high mortality....

  19. An unusual case of sepsis and petechial rash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Christina

    2017-05-01

    This article describes a man who presented to the ED in acute distress with signs and symptoms of sepsis, pneumonia, and a new petechial rash on his chest. He was eventually diagnosed with Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Aggressive treatment of sepsis and timely administration of empiric antibiotics were lifesaving in this situation.

  20. Cardiorenal syndrome in sepsis: A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotecha, Aditya; Vallabhajosyula, Saraschandra; Coville, Hongchuan H; Kashani, Kianoush

    2017-09-01

    Multi-organ dysfunction is seen in nearly 40-60% of all patients presenting with sepsis, including renal and cardiac dysfunction. Cardiorenal syndrome type-5 reflects concomitant cardiac and renal dysfunction secondary to a systemic condition that primarily affects both organs, such as sepsis. There are limited data on the etiology, pathogenesis and clinical implications of cardiorenal syndrome in sepsis. Cardiac dysfunction and injury can be measured with cardiac biomarkers, echocardiographic dysfunction, and hemodynamic parameters. Acute kidney injury is systematically evaluated using serum creatinine and urine output criteria. This review seeks to systematically describe the epidemiology, risk factors, pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of cardiorenal syndrome type-5 in the setting of sepsis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The endothelium in sepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Ince (Can); P.R. Mayeux (Philip R.); T. Nguyen (Trung); H. Gomez (Hernando); J.A. Kellum (John A.); G.A. Ospina-Tascon (Gustavo A); G. Hernandez (Glenn); P. Murray (Patrick); D. de Backer (Daniel)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractSepsis affects practically all aspects of endothelial cell (EC) function and is thought to be the key factor in the progression from sepsis to organ failure. Endothelial functions affected by sepsis include vasoregulation, barrier function, inflammation, and hemostasis. These are among

  2. Use of Streptococcus salivarius K12 in the prevention of streptococcal and viral pharyngotonsillitis in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pierro, Francesco; Colombo, Maria; Zanvit, Alberto; Risso, Paolo; Rottoli, Amilcare S

    2014-01-01

    Background Streptococcus salivarius K12 is an oral probiotic strain releasing two lantibiotics (salivaricin A2 and salivaricin B) that antagonize the growth of S. pyogenes, the most important bacterial cause of pharyngeal infections in humans also affected by episodes of acute otitis media. S. salivarius K12 successfully colonizes the oral cavity, and is endowed with an excellent safety profile. We tested its preventive role in reducing the incidence of both streptococcal and viral pharyngitis and/or tonsillitis in children. Materials and methods We enrolled 61 children with a diagnosis of recurrent oral streptococcal disorders. Thirty-one of them were enrolled to be treated daily for 90 days with a slow-release tablet for oral use, containing no less than 1 billion colony-forming units/tablet of S. salivarius K12 (Bactoblis®), and the remaining 30 served as the untreated control group. During treatment, they were all examined for streptococcal infection. Twenty children (ten per group) were also assessed in terms of viral infection. Secondary end points in both groups were the number of days under antibiotic and antipyretic therapy and the number of days off school (children) and off work (parents). Results The 30 children who completed the 90-day trial with Bactoblis® showed a significant reduction in their episodes of streptococcal pharyngeal infection (>90%), as calculated by comparing the infection rates of the previous year. No difference was observed in the control group. The treated group showed a significant decrease in the incidence (80%) of oral viral infections. Again, there was no difference in the control group. With regard to secondary end points, the number of days under antibiotic treatment of the treated and control groups were 30 and 900 respectively, days under antipyretic treatment 16 and 228, days of absence from school 16 and 228, and days of absence from work 16 and 228. The product was well tolerated by the subjects, with no side effects

  3. Use of Streptococcus salivarius K12 in the prevention of streptococcal and viral pharyngotonsillitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pierro, Francesco; Colombo, Maria; Zanvit, Alberto; Risso, Paolo; Rottoli, Amilcare S

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius K12 is an oral probiotic strain releasing two lantibiotics (salivaricin A2 and salivaricin B) that antagonize the growth of S. pyogenes, the most important bacterial cause of pharyngeal infections in humans also affected by episodes of acute otitis media. S. salivarius K12 successfully colonizes the oral cavity, and is endowed with an excellent safety profile. We tested its preventive role in reducing the incidence of both streptococcal and viral pharyngitis and/or tonsillitis in children. We enrolled 61 children with a diagnosis of recurrent oral streptococcal disorders. Thirty-one of them were enrolled to be treated daily for 90 days with a slow-release tablet for oral use, containing no less than 1 billion colony-forming units/tablet of S. salivarius K12 (Bactoblis®), and the remaining 30 served as the untreated control group. During treatment, they were all examined for streptococcal infection. Twenty children (ten per group) were also assessed in terms of viral infection. Secondary end points in both groups were the number of days under antibiotic and antipyretic therapy and the number of days off school (children) and off work (parents). The 30 children who completed the 90-day trial with Bactoblis® showed a significant reduction in their episodes of streptococcal pharyngeal infection (>90%), as calculated by comparing the infection rates of the previous year. No difference was observed in the control group. The treated group showed a significant decrease in the incidence (80%) of oral viral infections. Again, there was no difference in the control group. With regard to secondary end points, the number of days under antibiotic treatment of the treated and control groups were 30 and 900 respectively, days under antipyretic treatment 16 and 228, days of absence from school 16 and 228, and days of absence from work 16 and 228. The product was well tolerated by the subjects, with no side effects, and only one individual reported bad

  4. Sepsis in acute myeloid leukaemia patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy: no impact of chitotriosidase and mannose-binding lectin polymorphisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klostergaard, Anja; Steffensen, Rudi; Møller, Jens K;

    2010-01-01

    in children with AML, and polymorphism in the MBL-coding gene (MBL2) seems to modify the risk of infections in several patient groups. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible associations between polymorphisms in CHIT1, MBL2 and sepsis in adult patients treated with high-dose chemotherapy...

  5. Group B streptococcal neonatal parotitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias Costa, Filipa; Ramos Andrade, Daniel; Cunha, Filipa Inês; Fernandes, Agostinho

    2015-06-10

    Acute neonatal parotitis (ANP) is a rare condition, characterised by parotid swelling and other local inflammatory signs. The most common pathogen is Staphylococcus aureus, but other organisms can be implicated. We describe the case of a 13-day-old term newborn, previously healthy, with late-onset group B Streptococcus (GBS) bacteraemia with ANP, who presented with irritability, reduced feeding and tender swelling of the right parotid. Laboratory evaluation showed neutrophilia, elevated C reactive protein and procalcitonin, with normal serum amylase concentration. Ultrasound findings were suggestive of acute parotitis. Empiric antibiotic therapy was immediately started and adjusted when culture results became available. The newborn was discharged after 10 days, with clinical improvement within the first 72 h. Although S. aureus is the most common pathogen implicated in ANP, GBS should be included in the differential diagnosis.

  6. 氯化钆对脓毒症大鼠急性肺损伤的肺保护作用%The Lung Protective Role by Gadolinium Trichloride in Sepsis of the Rats Acute Lung Injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

      目的探讨氯化钆(GdCl3)在脓毒症大鼠急性肺损伤中的肺保护作用及可能机制。方法采用盲肠结扎穿孔术(CLP)建立脓毒症模型。将36只成年Wistar大鼠随即均分为假手术组( Sham组)、脓毒症组(CLP组)和氯化钆治疗组(GdCl3组),GdCl3组术后经尾静脉注射氯化钆溶液。检测血浆TNF-α、丙二醛(MDA)水平,用HE染色法观察肺组织形态,测定肺湿/干重比,统计方法采用SPSS19.0。结果 GdCl3组血浆TNF-α及MDA水平、肺湿/干重比均显著低于CLP组(P<0.05),光镜下可见GdCl3组肺组织病理学改变明显减轻。结论 GdCl3可明显减轻脓毒症所致的急性肺损伤的炎性反应。%Objective To explore the lung protective role and the possible mechanism by Gadolinium trichloride in sepsis acute lung injury in rats. Methods Model group by sepsis was established by cecal ligation and puncture(CLP).Thirty-six male Wistar rats were randomly divided into sham operation group(Sham group), sepsis group(CLP group) and Gadolinium trichloride group (GdCl3 group), GdCl3 group were injected gadolinium chloride solution via the tail after intravenous . HE staining optical microscope observation of structural changes in the lungs,wet/dry weight ratios and were measured. Statistical Methods were used SPSS19.0. Results GdCl3 group plasma TNF-α and MDA levels , lung wet / dry weight ratios were significantly lower than the CLP group (P<0.05), the lung histopathological changes were significantly reduced of the GdCl3 group through optical microscope. Conclusion GdCl3 can significantly reduce the inflammatory response of sepsis -induced acute lung injury

  7. A Prospective Study of Nonsuppurative Complications of Streptococcal Pharyngitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesut Yılmaz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Group A Streptococci (GAS are the most important bacterial cause of pharyngitis. Antibiotic therapy can be prescribed and failure to treat it is associated with suppurative and nonsuppurative complications. Nonsuppurative complications occur after a latency period of a few weeks and include acute rheumatic fever, scarlet fever, streptococcal toxic shock syndrome, acute glomerulonephritis, and pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorder associated with group A streptococci. The aim of this study is to investigate the frequency of nonsuppurative complications in properly treated children with GAS pharyngitis. Methods: We investigated the frequency of nonsuppurative complications in 1030 proven GAS pharyngitis patients between 5 and 15 years old, who were properly treated by a prospective observational study. All patients diagnosed with GAS pharyngitis were followed up prospectively using a standard form for six months made by monthly phone calls. Results: All the isolates recovered from the patients were susceptible to penicillin. Twentyseven (2.6% patients developed scarlet fever. No other nonsuppurative complications occured in our patient cohort. Conclusions: Penicillin remains the drug of choice for treatment of GAS pharyngitis. The rate of nonsuppurative complications of GAS pharyngitis has decreased significantly in the antibiotic era. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2016;6(1: 8-11

  8. Risk factors for sepsis-associated encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Li; Ang Li; Yibing Weng; Shuwen Zhang; Meili Duan

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a diffuse and acute cerebral dysfunction caused by sepsis. Many sepsis patients exhibit acute deterioration in mental status during the early stage of disease, and central nervous system dysfunction has been shown to increase patient mortality. The present study selected 284 sepsis patients who were admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, from January to December 2009. The patients were assigned to SAE and non-SAE patient groups according to SAE occurrence. SAE incidence was 37.68%, and mortality was significantly greater in SAE patients compared with non-SAE patients (41.12% vs. 17.51%, P < 0.01). Univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated lower arterial partial pressure of oxygen and greater alanine aminotransferase and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores in the SAE group compared with the non-SAE group. Arterial partial pressure of oxygen, alanine aminotransferase, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores were determined to be potential risk factors for SAE.

  9. Cytokine and acute phase protein mRNA expression in liver tissue from pigs with severe sepsis caused by intravenous inoculation of Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Lerberg; Olsen, Helle Gerda; Iburg, Tine

    2010-01-01

    The aim was to substantiate previous findings of hepatic dysfunction in a porcine model of Staphylococcus aureus induced severe sepsis. Nine pigs were inoculated intravenously once or twice with 108S. aureus per kilogram body weight and killed 12, 24 and 48 h later. Three pigs served as controls....... Blood was sampled for bacteriology, haematology and clinical pathology. Tissues were collected at necropsy for bacteriology, gene expression analysis and histology. Bacterial counts in blood remained low, decreased in the lungs, liver and spleen, but increased in bone. All infected pigs developed sepsis...... of IL-6, IL-8, IL-1β, and CRP. N o increase could be detected in the IL-1α or TNFα liver-mRNA levels. IL-6, IL-8 and IL-1β expression peaked at 24 hours (2-5 fold compared to the control group). In conclusion, the increased liver cytokine mRNA levels indicate a local hepatic, non-infectious inflammatory...

  10. Sepsis biomarkers: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Biomarkers can be useful for identifying or ruling out sepsis, identifying patients who may benefit from specific therapies or assessing the response to therapy. Methods We used an electronic search of the PubMed database using the key words "sepsis" and "biomarker" to identify clinical and experimental studies which evaluated a biomarker in sepsis. Results The search retrieved 3370 references covering 178 different biomarkers. Conclusions Many biomarkers have been evaluated for use in sepsis. Most of the biomarkers had been tested clinically, primarily as prognostic markers in sepsis; relatively few have been used for diagnosis. None has sufficient specificity or sensitivity to be routinely employed in clinical practice. PCT and CRP have been most widely used, but even these have limited ability to distinguish sepsis from other inflammatory conditions or to predict outcome. PMID:20144219

  11. Steroid Use in Sepsis

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    Şerife Mehlika Kuşkonmaz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is defined as “systemic signs and symptoms of infection in the presence of infection”. Nearly one fourth of sepsis cases eventually die. Therefore, rapid and correct management of sepsis is important. There is no reliable test to evaluate adrenal insufficiency in sepsis due to the changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and intracellular effects of cortisol during the critical illness. Clinical studies reported conflicting results regarding the effects of steroid therapy on mortality and morbidity in sepsis. Contemporary sepsis management guidelines - although not based on strong evidence - suggest consideration of steroid use in septic patients who do not respond to intravenous fluids and vasopressors. Stronger evidence obtained from randomized controlled trials is needed for this suggestion to be certain. Turk Jem 2013; 17: 121-4

  12. The doripenem serum concentrations in intensive care patients suffering from acute kidney injury, sepsis, and multi organ dysfunction syndrome undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy slow low-efficiency dialysis

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    Wieczorek A

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Andrzej Wieczorek, Andrzej Tokarz, Wojciech Gaszynski, Tomasz Gaszynski Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Therapy, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland Abstract: Doripenem is a novel wide-spectrum antibiotic, and a derivate of carbapenems. It is an ideal antibiotic for treatment of serious nosocomial infections and severe sepsis for its exceptionally high efficiency and broad antibacterial spectrum of action. Doripenem is eliminated mainly by the kidneys. In cases of acute kidney injury, dosing of doripenem depends on creatinine clearance and requires adjustments. Doripenem is eliminated during hemodialysis because its molecular weight is 300–400 Da. The aim of this study was to establish the impact of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT slow low-efficiency dialysis (SLED on doripenem serum concentrations in a population of intensive-therapy patients with life-threatening infections and severe sepsis. Ten patients were enrolled in this observational study. Twelve blood samples were collected during the first administration of doripenem in a 1-hour continuous infusion while CRRT SLED was provided. Fluid chromatography was used for measurement of the concentration of doripenem in serum. In all collected samples, concentration of doripenem was above the minimum inhibition concentration of this antibiotic. Based on these results, we can draw the conclusion that doripenem concentration is above the minimum inhibition ­concentration throughout all of CRRT. The dosing pattern proposed by the manufacturer can be used in patients receiving CRRT SLED without necessary modifications. Keywords: AKI, antibiotic, antimicrobial therapy, carbapenem, CRRT, infection, MODS, SLED

  13. The doripenem serum concentrations in intensive care patients suffering from acute kidney injury, sepsis, and multi organ dysfunction syndrome undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy slow low-efficiency dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Andrzej; Tokarz, Andrzej; Gaszynski, Wojciech; Gaszynski, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Doripenem is a novel wide-spectrum antibiotic, and a derivate of carbapenems. It is an ideal antibiotic for treatment of serious nosocomial infections and severe sepsis for its exceptionally high efficiency and broad antibacterial spectrum of action. Doripenem is eliminated mainly by the kidneys. In cases of acute kidney injury, dosing of doripenem depends on creatinine clearance and requires adjustments. Doripenem is eliminated during hemodialysis because its molecular weight is 300-400 Da. The aim of this study was to establish the impact of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) slow low-efficiency dialysis (SLED) on doripenem serum concentrations in a population of intensive-therapy patients with life-threatening infections and severe sepsis. Ten patients were enrolled in this observational study. Twelve blood samples were collected during the first administration of doripenem in a 1-hour continuous infusion while CRRT SLED was provided. Fluid chromatography was used for measurement of the concentration of doripenem in serum. In all collected samples, concentration of doripenem was above the minimum inhibition concentration of this antibiotic. Based on these results, we can draw the conclusion that doripenem concentration is above the minimum inhibition concentration throughout all of CRRT. The dosing pattern proposed by the manufacturer can be used in patients receiving CRRT SLED without necessary modifications.

  14. Is neonatal group B streptococcal infection preventable?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Azam, M

    2011-05-01

    Early onset group B streptococcal (EOGBS) infection causes significant neonatal morbidity and mortality. We determined the incidence of EOGBS at Galway University Hospital (GUH) and examined any "missed opportunities" for preventing neonatal infection between 2004 and 2009. Our obstetric approach is risk-based. The incidence was 0.45\\/1,000 live-births; one death and one with neurological sequelae. A single mother received IAP; however we could not determine any potential for reducing cases of EOGBS by improving current IAP usage.

  15. NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN THE PATHOGENESIS AND TREATMENT OF SEPSIS

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    Matjaž Jereb

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Severe sepsis and septic shock are the most important causes of death in patients in intensive care units. In the last decades the incidence of sepsis increased and the case-fatality rate of septic shock did not decreased significantly despite improved intensive care medicine. Clinical presentations of severe sepsis and septic shock are predominantly a result of dysregulation of the immune system caused by parts of the bacterial cell wall, endotoxins and exotoxins. Inflammatory cascade and cytokines plays an important role in the pathogenesis of sepsis.Conclusions. Early and appropriate antimicrobial treatment as well as surgical removal of an septic focus improve the survival of patients with sepsis. In the past, various immunomodulatory therapies (antiendotoxins, antimediator interventions and immunostimulation therapy did not decreased the mortality of patients with sepsis. In the last years, however, some interventions in selected patients with severe sepsis and septic shock have shown significantly improved survival. These interventions include treatment with activated protein C, early goal-directed therapy, intensive treatment with insulin, low-dose corticosteroid treatment and use of low tidal volumes in patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome. In this article new developments in pathogenesis and therapy of sepsis are reviewed.

  16. Scoring systems for the characterization of sepsis and associated outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLymont, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is responsible for the utilisation of a significant proportion of healthcare resources and has high mortality rates. Early diagnosis and prompt interventions are associated with better outcomes but is impeded by a lack of diagnostic tools and the heterogeneous and enigmatic nature of sepsis. The recently updated definitions of sepsis have moved away from the centrality of inflammation and the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria which have been shown to be non-specific. Sepsis is now defined as a “life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host response to infection”. The Quick (q) Sequential (Sepsis-related) Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score is proposed as a surrogate for organ dysfunction and may act as a risk predictor for patients with known or suspected infection, as well as being a prompt for clinicians to consider the diagnosis of sepsis. Early warning scores (EWS) are track and trigger physiological monitoring systems that have become integrated within many healthcare systems for the detection of acutely deteriorating patients. The recent study by Churpek and colleagues sought to compare qSOFA to more established alerting criteria in a population of patients with presumed infection, and compared the ability to predict death or unplanned intensive care unit (ICU) admission. This perspective paper discusses recent advances in the diagnostic criteria for sepsis and how qSOFA may fit into the pre-existing models of acute care and sepsis quality improvement. PMID:28149888

  17. TLR2, TLR4 and the MYD88 signaling pathway are crucial for neutrophil migration in acute kidney injury induced by sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Castoldi

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the role of TLR2, TLR4 and MyD88 in sepsis-induced AKI. C57BL/6 TLR2(-/-, TLR4(-/- and MyD88(-/- male mice were subjected to sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP. Twenty four hours later, kidney tissue and blood samples were collected for analysis. The TLR2(-/-, TLR4(-/- and MyD88(-/- mice that were subjected to CLP had preserved renal morphology, and fewer areas of hypoxia and apoptosis compared with the wild-type C57BL/6 mice (WT. MyD88(-/- mice were completely protected compared with the WT mice. We also observed reduced expression of proinflammatory cytokines in the kidneys of the knockout mice compared with those of the WT mice and subsequent inhibition of increased vascular permeability in the kidneys of the knockout mice. The WT mice had increased GR1(+low cells migration compared with the knockout mice and decreased in GR1(+high cells migration into the peritoneal cavity. The TLR2(-/-, TLR4(-/-, and MyD88(-/- mice had lower neutrophil infiltration in the kidneys. Depletion of neutrophils in the WT mice led to protection of renal function and less inflammation in the kidneys of these mice. Innate immunity participates in polymicrobial sepsis-induced AKI, mainly through the MyD88 pathway, by leading to an increased migration of neutrophils to the kidney, increased production of proinflammatory cytokines, vascular permeability, hypoxia and apoptosis of tubular cells.

  18. TLR2, TLR4 and the MYD88 Signaling Pathway Are Crucial for Neutrophil Migration in Acute Kidney Injury Induced by Sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castoldi, Angela; Braga, Tárcio Teodoro; Correa-Costa, Matheus; Aguiar, Cristhiane Fávero; Bassi, Ênio José; Correa-Silva, Reinaldo; Elias, Rosa Maria; Salvador, Fábia; Moraes-Vieira, Pedro Manoel; Cenedeze, Marcos Antônio; Reis, Marlene Antônia; Hiyane, Meire Ioshie; Pacheco-Silva, Álvaro; Gonçalves, Giselle Martins; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of TLR2, TLR4 and MyD88 in sepsis-induced AKI. C57BL/6 TLR2−/−, TLR4−/− and MyD88−/− male mice were subjected to sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Twenty four hours later, kidney tissue and blood samples were collected for analysis. The TLR2−/−, TLR4−/− and MyD88−/− mice that were subjected to CLP had preserved renal morphology, and fewer areas of hypoxia and apoptosis compared with the wild-type C57BL/6 mice (WT). MyD88−/− mice were completely protected compared with the WT mice. We also observed reduced expression of proinflammatory cytokines in the kidneys of the knockout mice compared with those of the WT mice and subsequent inhibition of increased vascular permeability in the kidneys of the knockout mice. The WT mice had increased GR1+low cells migration compared with the knockout mice and decreased in GR1+high cells migration into the peritoneal cavity. The TLR2−/−, TLR4−/−, and MyD88−/− mice had lower neutrophil infiltration in the kidneys. Depletion of neutrophils in the WT mice led to protection of renal function and less inflammation in the kidneys of these mice. Innate immunity participates in polymicrobial sepsis-induced AKI, mainly through the MyD88 pathway, by leading to an increased migration of neutrophils to the kidney, increased production of proinflammatory cytokines, vascular permeability, hypoxia and apoptosis of tubular cells. PMID:22655058

  19. Factors Associated with Streptococcal Bacteremia in Diarrheal Children under Five Years of Age and Their Outcome in an Urban Hospital in Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu Sadat Mohammad Sayeem Bin Shahid

    Full Text Available Although Streptococcal bacteremia is common in diarrheal children with high morbidity and mortality, no systematic data are available on Streptococcal bacteremia in diarrheal children. We sought to evaluate the factors associated with Streptococcal bacteremia in diarrheal children under five years of age and their outcome.We used an unmatched case-control design to investigate the associated factors with Streptococcal bacteremia in all the diarrheal children under five years of age through electronic medical record system of Dhaka hospital of International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh. We had simultaneously used a retrospective cohort design to further evaluate the outcome of our study children. All the enrolled children had their blood culture done between January 2010 and December 2012. Comparison was made among the children with (cases = 26 and without Streptococcal bacteremia (controls = 78. Controls were selected randomly from hospitalized diarrheal children under five years of age.Cases had proportionately higher deaths compared to controls, but it was statistically insignificant (15% vs. 10%, p = 0.49. The cases more often presented with severe dehydration, fever, respiratory distress, severe sepsis, and abnormal mental status compared to the controls (for all p<0.05. In the logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders, it has been found that Streptococcal bacteremia in diarrheal children under five years of age was independently associated with nutritional edema (OR: 5.86, 95% CI = 1.28-26.80, hypoxemia (OR: 19.39, 95% CI = 2.14-175.91, fever (OR: 4.44, 95% CI = 1.13-17.42, delayed capillary refill time (OR: 7.00, 95% CI = 1.36-35.93, and respiratory distress (OR: 2.69, 95% CI = 1.02-7.12.The results of our analyses suggest that diarrheal children under five years of age presenting with nutritional edema, hypoxemia, fever, delayed capillary refill time, and respiratory distress may be at

  20. Insulin in sepsis and septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Undurti N

    2003-07-01

    NF-kappaB activation, and elevated concentrations of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1(IL-1), IL-6, free radicals, inducible nitric oxide (iNO), and stress hyperglycemia occurs in sepsis and this leads to systemic inflammatory response and myocardial depression seen in sepsis and septic shock. Conversely, insulin suppresses production of MIF, TNF-alpha, IL-1, IL-6, and free radicals, enhances endothelial NO generation, and enhances the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4, and IL-10, corrects stress hyperglycemia and improves myocardial function. This supports my earlier proposal that insulin (with or without glucose and potassium) therapy to maintain euglycemia suppresses the inflammatory response, improves myocardial function, and thus, is of benefit in acute myocardial infarction, sepsis andseptic shock.

  1. Streptococcal Subdural Empyema as a Complication of Varicella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3-month-old male infant who presented with a group A streptococcal subdural empyema on day 5 of a varicella skin rash is reported from the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

  2. Streptococcal Infections, Rheumatic Fever and School Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, Milton

    1979-01-01

    Because rheumatic fever is a potentially serious complication of a streptococcal sore throat which can lead to permanent heart disease, this article advocates the expansion of school health services in medically underserved areas. (JMF)

  3. Increased extracellular heat shock protein 90α in severe sepsis and SIRS associated with multiple organ failure and related to acute inflammatory-metabolic stress response in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitrolaki, Michaela-Diana; Dimitriou, Helen; Venihaki, Maria; Katrinaki, Marianna; Ilia, Stavroula; Briassoulis, George

    2016-08-01

    Mammalian heat-shock-protein (HSP) 90α rapidly responses to environmental insults. We examined the hypothesis that not only serum HSP72 but also HSP90α is increased in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), severe-sepsis (SS), and/or sepsis (S) compared to healthy children (H); we assessed HSP90α relation to (a) multiple organ system failure (MOSF) and (b) inflammatory-metabolic response and severity of illness.A total of 65 children with S, SS, or SIRS and 25 H were included. ELISA was used to evaluate extracellular HSP90α and HSP72, chemiluminescence interleukins (ILs), flow-cytometry neutrophil-CD64 (nCD64)-expression.HSP90α, along with HSP72, were dramatically increased among MOSF patients. Patients in septic groups and SIRS had elevated HSP90α compared to H (P SIRS, and MOSF, HSP90α is related to the inflammatory stress, fever, outcome endpoints, and predicted mortality and inversely related to the low-LDL/low-HDL stress metabolic pattern.

  4. Positive clinical outcomes derived from using Streptococcus salivarius K12 to prevent streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis in children: a pilot investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Pierro F

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Francesco Di Pierro,1 Maria Colombo,2 Alberto Zanvit,3 Amilcare S Rottoli,4 1Scientific Department, Velleja Research, Milan, 2Pediatric Department, University of Parma, Parma, 3Stomatology Institute, 4Pediatric Department, Uboldo Hospital, Cernusco S/N, Milan, Italy Background: Streptococcus salivarius K12 (BLIS K12® is a probiotic strain producing the bacteriocins salivaricin A2 and salivaricin B, both of which strongly antagonize the growth of Streptococcus pyogenes, the most important bacterial cause of pharyngeal infections in humans. It successfully colonizes and exhibits persistence in the oral cavity and is endowed with an excellent safety profile. Previous observations of a small group of children indicated that the use of BLIS K12 could also reduce the occurrence of viral pharyngitis. The present study focused on a further evaluation of the role of BLIS K12 in the control of pediatric streptococcal disease and moreover whether its use could also help provide protection against various nonstreptococcal infections. Methods: In total, 48 children with a recent history of recurrent pharyngeal streptococcal disease were enrolled in the treated group. The control group comprised 76 children known to have had a very low recent occurrence of oral streptococcal disease. The treated children were given BLIS K12 daily for 90 days. The number of episodes of streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis, tracheitis, viral pharyngitis, rhinitis, flu, laryngitis, acute otitis media, enteritis, and stomatitis was recorded during probiotic treatment and for a follow-up period of 9 months, and this was compared with the episodes of the control group over the corresponding period. Results: Compared with the pretreatment time period, 2013, a 90% reduction of streptococcal pharyngeal disease was observed in 2014; compared with untreated children, a statistically significant reduction of all of the other disease conditions assessed, other than stomatitis, was detected

  5. Evolutionary paths of streptococcal and staphylococcal superantigens

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    Okumura Kayo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS harbors several superantigens (SAgs in the prophage region of its genome, although speG and smez are not located in this region. The diversity of SAgs is thought to arise during horizontal transfer, but their evolutionary pathways have not yet been determined. We recently completed sequencing the entire genome of S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE, the closest relative of GAS. Although speG is the only SAg gene of SDSE, speG was present in only 50% of clinical SDSE strains and smez in none. In this study, we analyzed the evolutionary paths of streptococcal and staphylococcal SAgs. Results We compared the sequences of the 12–60 kb speG regions of nine SDSE strains, five speG+ and four speG–. We found that the synteny of this region was highly conserved, whether or not the speG gene was present. Synteny analyses based on genome-wide comparisons of GAS and SDSE indicated that speG is the direct descendant of a common ancestor of streptococcal SAgs, whereas smez was deleted from SDSE after SDSE and GAS split from a common ancestor. Cumulative nucleotide skew analysis of SDSE genomes suggested that speG was located outside segments of steeper slopes than the stable region in the genome, whereas the region flanking smez was unstable, as expected from the results of GAS. We also detected a previously undescribed staphylococcal SAg gene, selW, and a staphylococcal SAg -like gene, ssl, in the core genomes of all Staphylococcus aureus strains sequenced. Amino acid substitution analyses, based on dN/dS window analysis of the products encoded by speG, selW and ssl suggested that all three genes have been subjected to strong positive selection. Evolutionary analysis based on the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo method showed that each clade included at least one direct descendant. Conclusions Our findings reveal a plausible model for the comprehensive evolutionary pathway of streptococcal and

  6. Puerperal Group A Streptococcal Infections: A Case Series and Discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary T. Busowski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Puerperal group A streptococcal infections, a major postpartum killer during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, have become (fortunately rare. We describe a cluster of 4 serious peripartum group A streptococcal infections occurring within the past five years at a single medical center. These cases were not epidemiologically linked and serve to illustrate the continuing risk of these potentially fulminant infections.

  7. Sepsis pathophysiology and anesthetic consideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuki, Koichi; Murakami, Naoka

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis remains to be a significant health care issue associated with high mortality and healthcare cost, despite the extensive effort to better understand the pathophysiology of the sepsis. Recently updated clinical guideline for severe sepsis and septic shock, "Surviving Sepsis Campaign 2012", emphasizes the importance of early goal-directed therapy, which can be implemented in intraoperative management of sepsis patients. Herein, we review the updates of current guideline and discuss its application to anesthesic management. Furthermore, we review the recent advance in knowledge of sepsis pathophysiology, focusing on immune modulation, which may lead to new clinical therapeutic approach to sepsis.

  8. Biomarkers of sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis is an unusual systemic reaction to what is sometimes an otherwise ordinary infection, and it probably represents a pattern of response by the immune system to injury. A hyper-inflammatory response is followed by an immunosuppressive phase during which multiple organ dysfunction is present and the patient is susceptible to nosocomial infection. Biomarkers to diagnose sepsis may allow early intervention which, although primarily supportive, can reduce the risk of death. Although lactate is currently the most commonly used biomarker to identify sepsis, other biomarkers may help to enhance lactate’s effectiveness; these include markers of the hyper-inflammatory phase of sepsis, such as pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines; proteins such as C-reactive protein and procalcitonin which are synthesized in response to infection and inflammation; and markers of neutrophil and monocyte activation. Recently, markers of the immunosuppressive phase of sepsis, such as anti-inflammatory cytokines, and alterations of the cell surface markers of monocytes and lymphocytes have been examined. Combinations of pro- and anti-inflammatory biomarkers in a multi-marker panel may help identify patients who are developing severe sepsis before organ dysfunction has advanced too far. Combined with innovative approaches to treatment that target the immunosuppressive phase, these biomarkers may help to reduce the mortality rate associated with severe sepsis which, despite advances in supportive measures, remains high. PMID:23480440

  9. Sepsis and septic shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Opal, Steven M.; Reinhart, Konrad; Turnbull, Isaiah R.; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2017-01-01

    For more than two decades, sepsis was defined as a microbial infection that produces fever (or hypothermia), tachycardia, tachypnoea and blood leukocyte changes. Sepsis is now increasingly being considered a dysregulated systemic inflammatory and immune response to microbial invasion that produces organ injury for which mortality rates are declining to 15–25%. Septic shock remains defined as sepsis with hyperlactataemia and concurrent hypotension requiring vasopressor therapy, with in-hospital mortality rates approaching 30–50%. With earlier recognition and more compliance to best practices, sepsis has become less of an immediate life-threatening disorder and more of a long-term chronic critical illness, often associated with prolonged inflammation, immune suppression, organ injury and lean tissue wasting. Furthermore, patients who survive sepsis have continuing risk of mortality after discharge, as well as long-term cognitive and functional deficits. Earlier recognition and improved implementation of best practices have reduced in-hospital mortality, but results from the use of immunomodulatory agents to date have been disappointing. Similarly, no biomarker can definitely diagnose sepsis or predict its clinical outcome. Because of its complexity, improvements in sepsis outcomes are likely to continue to be slow and incremental. PMID:28117397

  10. Pharmacological management of sepsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    Systemic sepsis continues to be the most-difficult management problem in caring for the combat casualty. The complications of sepsis pervade all areas of injury to soldiers in the field, whether it is mechanical (missiles), thermal (burns), chemical, biological, or radiation injury. With the advent of tactical nuclear weapons, the problem of sepsis will be much higher in future wars than has previously been experienced through the world. The purpose of this chapter is a) to review the data suggesting pharmacological agents that may benefit the septic patient, and b) to emphasize the adjunctive therapies that should be explored in clinical trials. The pharmacological management of sepsis remains controversial. Most of the drugs utilized clinically treat the symptoms of the disease and are not necessarily directed at fundamental mechanisms that are known to be present in sepsis. A broad data base is emerging, indicating that NSAID should be used in human clinical trials. Prostaglandins are sensitive indicators of cellular injury and may be mediators for a number of vasoactive chemicals. Opiate antagonists and calcium channel blockers require more in-depth data; however, recent studies generate excitement for their potential use in the critically ill patient. Pharmacological effects of antibiotics, in concert with other drugs, suggest an entirely new approach to pharmacological treatment in sepsis. There is no doubt that new treatment modalities or adjunctive therapies must be utilized to alter the poor prognosis of severe sepsis that we have observed in the past 4 decades.

  11. Knowledge and recognition of SIRS and sepsis among pediatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Alvin D; Mutsch, Karen Steffen; Knapp, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    A large amount of research demonstrates the importance of key interventions in reducing mortality rates of pediatric patients with sepsis (Dellinger et al., 2008). Assessment and recognition of declining status must occur for interventions to be initiated. Of health care practitioners, nurses typically spend the most time with patients, and they must be knowledgeable in recognizing the systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis while also being aware of the importance of prompt intervention. The literature does not discuss pediatric nurses' knowledge of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS)/sepsis recognition. The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge of acute and critical care pediatric nurses of SIRS diagnostic criteria, sepsis guidelines, and the importance of SIRS recognition. This cross-sectional, quantitative, correlational descriptive study included 242 acute and critical care pediatric nurses at a 490-bed urban pediatric hospital. Participants completed an original questionnaire with face and content validity regarding SIRS criteria, sepsis guidelines, priority interventions, and attitude toward the importance of SIRS recognition. Findings demonstrated a significant knowledge deficit among participants in several key areas of SIRS/sepsis recognition. The mean score was 60.8% ± 7.4%. Item analyses demonstrated nurses easily recognize septic shock but have difficulty recognizing patients in earlier stages of the sepsis continuum. Significant confusion was evident regarding the role of blood pressure and serum lactic acid levels in diagnosing sepsis. It is recommended that an educational intervention be created for acute and critical care pediatric nurses to aid them in recognizing sepsis in its earlier stages.

  12. Molecular Hydrogen Therapy Ameliorates Organ Damage Induced by Sepsis

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    Yijun Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since it was proposed in 2007, molecular hydrogen therapy has been widely concerned and researched. Many animal experiments were carried out in a variety of disease fields, such as cerebral infarction, ischemia reperfusion injury, Parkinson syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, chronic kidney disease, radiation injury, chronic hepatitis, rheumatoid arthritis, stress ulcer, acute sports injuries, mitochondrial and inflammatory disease, and acute erythema skin disease and other pathological processes or diseases. Molecular hydrogen therapy is pointed out as there is protective effect for sepsis patients, too. The impact of molecular hydrogen therapy against sepsis is shown from the aspects of basic vital signs, organ functions (brain, lung, liver, kidney, small intestine, etc., survival rate, and so forth. Molecular hydrogen therapy is able to significantly reduce the release of inflammatory factors and oxidative stress injury. Thereby it can reduce damage of various organ functions from sepsis and improve survival rate. Molecular hydrogen therapy is a prospective method against sepsis.

  13. Analysis of the risk of sepsis in patients with acute kidney injury factors%分析脓毒血症患者并发急性肾损伤的相关危险因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟璇; 肖先华

    2016-01-01

    目的:研究分析脓毒血症患者并发急性肾损伤的相关危险因素。方法选取2015年1月至2016年1月我院收治的脓毒血症患者患者127例为本次研究对象,按照入院后48小时肌酐的检查水平进行分组,其中AKI组55例,非AKI组72例。对比两组患者的基本情况以及实验室指标。结果胸腹感染、血液培养显示阳性,引发的两组患者的差异显著,P<0.05,具有统计学意义。AKI组患者男性比例明显高于非AKI组,P<0.05,具有统计学意义。结论性别情况、胸腹感染、血液培养显示阳性为主要引发急性肾损伤的相关危险因素,并对其实验化学指标进行研究分析发现, WBC、PCT、IL-6的指标变化合并急性肾损伤具有积极的意义。%Objective To study the risk of patients with sepsis complicated with acute kidney injury factors.Methods from January 2015 to January 2016 in our hospital 127 cases of patients with sepsis patients as the research object, according to the 48 hours after admission creatinine level examination were divided into two groups, including 55 cases of AKI group, non AKI group 72 cases. The basic situation of the two groups were compared and the laboratory index.Results thoracic and abdominal infection, blood culture showed that the differences between the two groups were positive for two kinds of printing caused significantly,P<0.05, with statistical significance in.AKI group were significantly higher than the proportion of men The non AKI group,P<0.05, has statistical significance.Conclusion gender, abdominal infection, blood culture positive for the main risk factors of acute kidney injury, and the experimental Research on chemical index analysis, WBC, PCT, IL-6 index changes with acute kidney injury has positive significance.

  14. New sepsis biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Limongi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis remains a leading cause of death in the intensive care units and in all age groups worldwide. Early recognition and diagnosis are key to achieving improved outcomes. Therefore, novel biomarkers that might better inform clinicians treating such patients are surely needed. The main attributes of successful biomarkers would be high sensitivity, specificity, possibility of bedside monitoring and financial accessibility. A panel of sepsis biomarkers along with currently used laboratory tests will facilitate earlier diagnosis, timely treatment and improved outcome may be more effective than single biomarkers. In this review, we summarize the most recent advances on sepsis biomarkers evaluated in clinical and experimental studies.

  15. New sepsis biomarkers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dolores Limongi; Cartesio D’Agostini; Marco Ciotti

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis remains a leading cause of death in the intensive care units and in all age groups worldwide. Early recognition and diagnosis are key to achieving improved outcomes.Therefore, novel biomarkers that might better inform clinicians treating such patients are surely needed. The main attributes of successful biomarkers would be high sensitivity,specificity, possibility of bedside monitoring and financial accessibility. A panel of sepsis biomarkers along with currently used laboratory tests will facilitate earlier diagnosis,timely treatment and improved outcome may be more effective than single biomarkers. In this review, we summarize the most recent advances on sepsis biomarkers evaluated in clinical and experimental studies.

  16. New sepsis biomarkers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dolores Limongi; Cartesio DAgostini; Marco Ciotti

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis remains a leading cause of death in the intensive care units and in all age groups worldwide. Early recognition and diagnosis are key to achieving improved outcomes. Therefore, novel biomarkers that might better inform clinicians treating such patients are surely needed. The main attributes of successful biomarkers would be high sensitivity, specificity, possibility of bedside monitoring and financial accessibility. A panel of sepsis biomarkers along with currently used laboratory tests will facilitate earlier diagnosis, timely treatment and improved outcome may be more effective than single biomarkers. In this review, we summarize the most recent advances on sepsis biomarkers evaluated in clinical and experimental studies.

  17. Sepsis Pathophysiology and Anesthetic Consideration

    OpenAIRE

    Yuki, Koichi; Murakami, Naoka

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis remains to be a significant health care issue associated with high mortality and healthcare cost, despite the extensive effort to better understand the pathophysiology of the sepsis. Recently updated clinical guideline for severe sepsis and septic shock, “Surviving Sepsis Campaign 2012”, emphasizes the importance of early goal-directed therapy, which can be implemented in intraoperative management of sepsis patients. Herein, we review the updates of current guideline and discuss its ap...

  18. The Endothelial Glycocalyx: New Diagnostic and Therapeutic Approaches in Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Martin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is defined as a life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host response to infection. The endothelial glycocalyx is one of the earliest sites involved during sepsis. This fragile layer is a complex network of cell-bound proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycan side chains, and sialoproteins lining the luminal side of endothelial cells with a thickness of about 1 to 3 μm. Sepsis-associated alterations of its structure affect endothelial permeability and result in the liberation of endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs. Once liberated in the circulatory system, DAMPs trigger the devastating consequences of the proinflammatory cascades in sepsis and septic shock. In this way, the injury to the glycocalyx with the consecutive release of DAMPs contributes to a number of specific clinical effects of sepsis, including acute kidney injury, respiratory failure, and septic cardiomyopathy. Moreover, the extent of glycocalyx degradation serves as a marker of endothelial dysfunction and sepsis severity. In this review, we highlight the crucial role of the glycocalyx in sepsis as a diagnostic tool and discuss the potential of members of the endothelial glycocalyx serving as hopeful therapeutic targets in sepsis-associated multiple organ failures.

  19. Acute kidney injury in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock: a comparison between the ‘Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function, End-stage kidney disease’ (RIFLE), Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) and Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) classifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Marta; Rodrigues, Natacha; Godinho, Iolanda; Gameiro, Joana; Neves, Marta; Gouveia, João; Costa e Silva, Zélia; Lopes, José António

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Using the Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function, End-stage kidney disease (RIFLE), Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) and Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) systems, the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) and their ability to predict in-hospital mortality in severe sepsis or septic shock was compared. Materials and methods We performed a retrospective analysis of 457 critically ill patients with severe sepsis or septic shock hospitalized between January 2008 and December 2014. Multivariate logistic regression was employed to evaluate the association between the RIFLE, AKIN and KDIGO systems with in-hospital mortality. Model fit was assessed by the goodness-of-fit test and discrimination by the area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve. Statistical significance was defined as P RIFLE (84.2%) and KDIGO (87.5%) identified more patients with AKI than AKIN (72.8%) (P RIFLE was not [adjusted OR 2.0 (95% CI 1–4), P = 0.063]. The AUROC curve for in-hospital mortality was similar between the three classifications (RIFLE 0.652, P RIFLE and KDIGO diagnosed more patients with AKI than AKIN, but the prediction ability for in-hospital mortality was similar between the three systems. PMID:28616211

  20. Acute kidney injury in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock: a comparison between the 'Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function, End-stage kidney disease' (RIFLE), Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) and Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) classifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Marta; Rodrigues, Natacha; Godinho, Iolanda; Gameiro, Joana; Neves, Marta; Gouveia, João; Costa E Silva, Zélia; Lopes, José António

    2017-06-01

    Using the Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function, End-stage kidney disease (RIFLE), Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) and Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) systems, the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) and their ability to predict in-hospital mortality in severe sepsis or septic shock was compared. We performed a retrospective analysis of 457 critically ill patients with severe sepsis or septic shock hospitalized between January 2008 and December 2014. Multivariate logistic regression was employed to evaluate the association between the RIFLE, AKIN and KDIGO systems with in-hospital mortality. Model fit was assessed by the goodness-of-fit test and discrimination by the area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve. Statistical significance was defined as P RIFLE (84.2%) and KDIGO (87.5%) identified more patients with AKI than AKIN (72.8%) (P RIFLE was not [adjusted OR 2.0 (95% CI 1-4), P = 0.063]. The AUROC curve for in-hospital mortality was similar between the three classifications (RIFLE 0.652, P RIFLE and KDIGO diagnosed more patients with AKI than AKIN, but the prediction ability for in-hospital mortality was similar between the three systems.

  1. May thrombopoietin be a useful marker of sepsis severity assessment in patients with SIRS entering the emergency department?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segre, Elisabetta; Pigozzi, Luca; Lison, Davide; Pivetta, Emanuele; Bosco, Ornella; Vizio, Barbara; Suppo, Umberto; Turvani, Fabrizio; Morello, Fulvio; Battista, Stefania; Moiraghi, Corrado; Montrucchio, Giuseppe; Lupia, Enrico

    2014-10-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO), a growth factor primarily involved in regulating thrombopoiesis, has been recently implicated in the pathogenesis of sepsis. TPO levels are, indeed, greatly increased in patients with sepsis compared to control subjects, and correlate with sepsis severity. The aim of this study was to evaluate TPO as predictive biomarker of sepsis and of sepsis severity in patients entering the emergency department (ED) with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). This was a prospective observational study. Ours is a sub-study of the 'Need-speed trial', a multi-center observational study involving six Italian centers affiliated to the GREAT Italian Network. TPO was measured by ELISA. We enrolled 13 patients with SIRS (6 with acute pancreatitis, 3 with acute heart failure, 1 with pulmonary embolism, and 3 with allergic reactions), and 40 patients with sepsis, eight of whom had severe sepsis and three septic shock. TPO was significantly higher in patients with sepsis than with SIRS. In addition, TPO was higher in patients with severe sepsis than with sepsis, and in patients with septic shock than with severe sepsis, although these differences did not reach the statistical significance. Our preliminary results suggest that TPO may have the potential to be considered a promising early biomarker for both the diagnosis of sepsis and the assessment of sepsis severity in patients with SIRS entering the ED.

  2. Fatal streptococcal toxic shock syndrome in a child with varicella and necrotizing fasciitis of the face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minodier, Philippe; Chaumoitre, Kathia; Vialet, Renaud; Imbert, Guenièvre; Bidet, Philippe

    2008-08-01

    The report described here presents a fatal streptococcal toxic shock syndrome secondary to a necrotizing fasciitis of the face in a 3-year-old girl with varicella. Pathogenesis and treatment of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome are discussed below.

  3. Lactic acidosis, hyperlactatemia and sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Montagnani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Among hospitalized patients, lactic acidosis represents the most common cause of metabolic acidosis. Lactate is not just a metabolic product of anaerobic glycolysis but is triggered by a variety of metabolites even before the onset of anaerobic metabolism as part of an adaptive response to a hypermetabolic state. On the basis of such considerations, lactic acidosis is divided into two classes: inadequate tissue oxygenation (type A and absence of tissue hypoxia (type B. Lactic acidosis is characterized by non-specific symptoms but it should be suspected in all critical patients who show hypovolemic, hypoxic, in septic or cardiogenic shock or if in the presence of an unexplained high anion gap metabolic acidosis. Lactic acidosis in sepsis and septic shock has traditionally been explained as a result of tissue hypoxia when whole-body oxygen delivery fails to meet whole body oxygen requirements. In sepsis lactate levels correlate with increased mortality with a poor prognostic threshold of 4 mmol/L. In hemodynamically stable patients with sepsis, hyperlactatemia might be the result of impaired lactate clearance rather than overproduction. In critically ill patients the speed at which hyperlactatemia resolves with appropriate therapy may be considered a useful prognostic indicator. The measure of blood lactate should be performed within 3 h of presentation in acute care setting. The presence of lactic acidosis requires early identification of the primary cause of shock for the best appropriate treatment. Since most cases of lactic acidosis depend on whole-body oxygen delivery failure, the maximization of systemic oxygen delivery remains the primary therapeutic option. When initial resuscitation does not substantially or completely correct lactic acidosis, it is also essential to consider other causes. The treatment of acidosis with buffering agents (specifically bicarbonate is generally advocated only in the setting of severe acidosis. Ongoing

  4. Neurologic complications of sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmutzhard, E; Pfausler, B

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decades, the incidence of sepsis and resultant neurologic sequelae has increased, both in industrialized and low- or middle-income countries, by approximately 5% per year. Up to 300 patients per 100 000 population per year are reported to suffer from sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock. Mortality is up to 30%, depending on the precision of diagnostic criteria. The increasing incidence of sepsis is partially explained by demographic changes in society, with aging, increasing numbers of immunocompromised patients, dissemination of multiresistant pathogens, and greater availability of supportive medical care in both industrialized and middle-income countries. This results in more septic patients being admitted to intensive care units. Septic encephalopathy is a manifestation especially of severe sepsis and septic shock where the neurologist plays a crucial role in diagnosis and management. It is well known that timely treatment of sepsis improves outcome and that septic encephalopathy may precede other signs and symptoms. Particularly in the elderly and immunocompromised patient, the brain may be the first organ to show signs of failure. The neurologist diagnosing early septic encephalopathy may therefore contribute to the optimal management of septic patients. The brain is not only an organ failing in sepsis (a "sepsis victim" - as with other organs), but it also overwhelmingly influences all inflammatory processes on a variety of pathophysiologic levels, thus contributing to the initiation and propagation of septic processes. Therefore, the best possible pathophysiologic understanding of septic encephalopathy is essential for its management, and the earliest possible therapy is crucial to prevent the evolution of septic encephalopathy, brain failure, and poor prognosis. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. IL-35 is elevated in clinical and experimental sepsis and mediates inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ju; Xu, Fang; Lin, Shihui; Tao, Xintong; Xiang, Yu; Lai, Xiaofei; Zhang, Liping

    2015-12-01

    Sepsis carries considerable morbidity and mortality. IL-35 is a newly described cytokine, which plays a regulatory role in infection and immunity. In this study, we found that IL-35 concentration in serum samples from adult or child patients with sepsis was significantly higher compared with that from healthy controls. IL-35 gradually increased according to sepsis severity. Increased serum IL-35 was associated with LOD (Logistic Organ Dysfunction) or SAPS II (Simplified Acute Physiology Score) scores, and correlated with markers of inflammation. In murine abdominal sepsis, administration of anti-IL-35 p35 antibodies significantly diminished dissemination of the bacteria in septic animals, which was accompanied by enhanced local neutrophil recruitment and early increased release of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Therefore, sepsis is associated with enhanced release of IL-35. In abdominal sepsis, IL-35 likely facilitates bacterial dissemination. IL-35 plays a major role in the immunopathogenesis of sepsis.

  6. Identity of streptococcal blood isolates and oral isolates from two patients with infective endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiehn, N E; Gutschik, E; Larsen, Tove

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to isolate streptococcal strains from the oral cavities of streptococcal endocarditis patients and compare these strains biochemically and genetically with the corresponding streptococcal blood isolates. Total identity was observed between the blood and oral cavity...

  7. Initially unrecognised group A streptococcal pelvic inflammatory disease in a postmenopausal woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouijzer, I J E; Polderman, F N; Bekers, E M; Bloks, P H C J; Schneeberger, P M; de Jager, C P C

    2014-11-01

    Invasive group A streptococcal infection is a severe disease with high mortality. Invasive group A streptococcal infection may arise after pelvic inflammatory disease. Pelvic inflammatory disease in postmenopausal women is rare. Here, we report a unique case of a postmenopausal woman with fatal invasive group A streptococcal infection due to pelvic inflammatory disease and an extraordinary course of diagnosis.

  8. Sepsis in frail patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Beltrame

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Frailty is defined as a clinical syndrome in which three or more of the following criteria are present: unintentional weight loss, self-reported exhaustion, weakness (grip strength, slow walking speed and low physical activity. Sepsis is defined as an inflammatory response to infection, with severe sepsis and septic shock being the most severe forms. The incidence of severe sepsis increases with older age and several studies have shown that there are many risk factors that predispose the elderly to a higher incidence of sepsis. Pre-existing co-morbidities such as cancer, diabetes, obesity, human immunodeficiency virus, and renal or pulmonary disease can cause sepsis, but other factors including poor lifestyle habits (i.e., smoking, drug or alcohol abuse, malnutrition, and endocrine deficiencies, which are frequent in the elderly, may also predispose to severe infections. Other risk factors for sepsis include recurrent hospitalization, especially in the Intensive Care Unit, and nursing home residence, where interventions such as urinary catheterization or multiple drug use are quite frequent and many studies reported that people above 65 years of age are three times more likely to be admitted to hospital than those aged 16-64 years, and have a higher risk of prolonged hospital stays, institutionalization and death. Clinical evaluation of the frail patient with sepsis poses some challenges. The immune response becomes progressively less efficient with increasing age thereby causing an altered response to infection and it is important to know that the clinical evaluation of the so-called fragile patient with severe infection should take into account the sometimes unusual signs and symptoms that, if identified, can lead to early diagnosis. Laboratory diagnostics can also be of great help in this setting. The treatment of sepsis in the fragile patient can be empirical or based on microbiological culture. Moreover, frail patient population presents

  9. Laparoscopy and Intra-Abdominal Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coyne

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Context Intra-abdominal sepsis has significant morbidity and mortality. In the developed world, there are many common causes originating from the lower gastrointestinal tract including diverticular disease, appendicitis, perforated cancers, and inflammatory bowel disease. It has a high cost and is associated with high levels of significant morbidity and mortality. Management options include radiologic drainage and surgical options include resection for more widespread sepsis. Laparoscopic surgery has increased and has been useful in elective setting. Its use in the emergency setting is less evaluated. Evidence Acquisition Evidence was acquired by searching online medical databases including Pubmed, Medline and Embase. Results Laparoscopic surgery has been shown to have a role in the acute setting. Studies show it has become the gold standard in the appendicitis. High quality Randomized controlled trials are in short supply but observational and cohort studies have shown equivalence and with increasing experience complication rates are reduced. Evidence is also increasing in the management of diverticular disease, crohn’s and ulcerative colitis as well as post-operative complication management and acute presentations of colorectal cancer. Conclusions Laparoscopic surgery is feasible in the management of intra-abdominal sepsis. It has become the new accepted standard in the management of appendicitis, and is safe, feasible and increasing in the management of complex diverticular disease, acute IBD and colorectal cancer in the emergency and post-operative setting.

  10. Simvastatin Treatment Improves Survival in a Murine Model of Burn Sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Infection is the most common and most serious complication of a major burn injury related to burn size. Despite improvements in antimicrobial therapies sepsis still accounts for 50–60% of deaths in burn patients. Given the acute onset and unpredictable nature of sepsis, primary prevention was rarely attempted in its management. However, recent studies have demonstrated that statin treatment can decrease mortality is a murine model of sepsis by preservation of cardiac function and reversal of ...

  11. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign: Where have we been and where are we going?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellinger, R Phillip

    2015-04-01

    The Surviving Sepsis Campaign develops and promotes evidence-based guidelines and performance-improvement practices aimed at reducing deaths from sepsis worldwide. The most recent guidelines, published in 2013, provide detailed management strategies for acute care, fluid resuscitation, and vasopressor use. In addition, the campaign has developed simple, short protocols for what to do within 3 and 6 hours of recognition of sepsis. These protocols are associated with reduced mortality rates.

  12. Primary Prevention of Rheumatic Fever, Diagnosis and Treatment of Acute Streptococcal Pharyngitis%风湿热的一级预防及急性链球菌咽炎的诊治——美国心脏学会儿童心血管疾病委员会风湿热、心内膜炎和川崎病组及美国儿科学会2009年指南节选

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李霞; 杜忠东

    2011-01-01

    Primary Prevention of Rheumatic Fever, Diagnosis and Treatment of Acute Streptococcal Pharyngitis-A Scientific Statement from the American Heart Association Rheumatic Fever, Endocarditis, and Kawasaki Disease Committee of the Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young,Endorsed by the American Academy of Pediatrics.%急性风湿热一级预防的主要方法是合理诊断并应用足量抗生素治疗A组乙型溶血性链球菌咽炎.A组乙型溶血性链球菌咽炎依靠临床表现和实验室检查结果综合诊断,其金标准是咽培养.治疗上首选青霉素,对青霉素过敏者,可口服头孢菌素、庆大霉素或大环内酯类/氮杂内酯类药物.

  13. Use of Streptococcus salivarius K12 in the prevention of streptococcal and viral pharyngotonsillitis in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Pierro F

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Francesco Di Pierro,1 Maria Colombo,2 Alberto Zanvit,3 Paolo Risso,4 Amilcare S Rottoli5 1Scientific Department, Velleja Research, Milan, 2Pediatric Department, University of Parma, Parma, 3Stomatology Institute, Milan, 4Laboratory of Epidemiology and Social Psychiatry, Mario Negri Institute, Milan, 5Pediatric Department, Uboldo Hospital, Cernusco sul Naviglio, Italy Background: Streptococcus salivarius K12 is an oral probiotic strain releasing two lantibiotics (salivaricin A2 and salivaricin B that antagonize the growth of S. pyogenes, the most important bacterial cause of pharyngeal infections in humans also affected by episodes of acute otitis media. S. salivarius K12 successfully colonizes the oral cavity, and is endowed with an excellent safety profile. We tested its preventive role in reducing the incidence of both streptococcal and viral pharyngitis and/or tonsillitis in children. Materials and methods: We enrolled 61 children with a diagnosis of recurrent oral streptococcal disorders. Thirty-one of them were enrolled to be treated daily for 90 days with a slow-release tablet for oral use, containing no less than 1 billion colony-forming units/tablet of S. salivarius K12 (Bactoblis®, and the remaining 30 served as the untreated control group. During treatment, they were all examined for streptococcal infection. Twenty children (ten per group were also assessed in terms of viral infection. Secondary end points in both groups were the number of days under antibiotic and antipyretic therapy and the number of days off school (children and off work (parents. Results: The 30 children who completed the 90-day trial with Bactoblis® showed a significant reduction in their episodes of streptococcal pharyngeal infection (>90%, as calculated by comparing the infection rates of the previous year. No difference was observed in the control group. The treated group showed a significant decrease in the incidence (80% of oral viral infections. Again

  14. Translational research and biomarkers in neonatal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delanghe, Joris R; Speeckaert, Marijn M

    2015-12-07

    As neonatal sepsis is a severe condition, there is a call for reliable biomarkers to differentiate between infected and noninfected newborns. Although blood culture has been considered as the gold standard, this analysis is still too slow and limited by false negative results. Use of CRP is hampered by a physiological 3-day increase, resulting in a low sensitivity to detect sepsis at an early stage. A moderate diagnostic accuracy of other acute phase proteins has been demonstrated (serum amyloid A, procalcitonin, lipopolysaccharide binding protein, mannose binding lectin and hepcidin). In neonatal sepsis, changed chemokine/cytokine levels are observed before those of acute phase reactants. High IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-α concentrations are detected in infected infants. Soluble interleukin-2 receptor has been used to identify bacteremia, whereas low plasma RANTES concentrations are characteristic for septicemia. Several cell adhesion molecules contribute to the pathogenesis of sepsis. As an upregulated CD64 expression on granulocytes is found within 1-6h after bacterial invasion, serial CD64 measurements could guide antibiotic therapy. An increased CD11b/CD18 density can improve the diagnosis, and a positive correlation between CD11b and the severity of systemic inflammation has been reported. An early increase in sCD14-ST presepsin is also observed during sepsis, whereas high sTREM-1 values in early-onset neonatal sepsis (EOS) have been associated with mortality. Biomarkers resulting from proteomics are also promising. A 4-biomarker 'mass restricted' score has been validated as diagnostic for intra-amniotic infection and/or inflammation. S100A8 in amniotic fluid is a strong predictor of an increased incidence of EOS. Proteomic analysis of cord blood has revealed altered protein expression patterns. The ApoSAA score is useful for identifying sepsis and could guide prescription of antibiotics. (1)H-NMR and GC-MS metabolomics allow to diagnose septic shock, which is

  15. Diagnostic value of static and dynamic scintigraphy in diagnosis of acute respiratory distress syndrome in the course of sepsis. Part 1. Lung perfusion scintigraphy; Wartosc diagnostyczna scyntygrafii statycznej i dynamicznej pluc w diagnostyce zespolu ostrej niewydolnosci oddechowej doroslych u chorych w przebiegu posocznicy. Czesc 1. Scyntygrafia perfuzyjna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurgilewicz, D.; Rogowski, F.; Malinowska, L. [Zaklad Medycyny Nuklearnej and Zaklad Anastezjologii i Intensywnej Terapii, Akademia Medyczna, Bialystok (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    One of the most important complication of sepsis is acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Diagnosis of the illness is mainly based on chest radiography and gasometric parameters of the blood. The aim of the study was to estimate the diagnostic usefulness of lung perfusion scintigraphy in early detection of blood flow and gas-exchange abnormalities in patients with ARDS in the course of sepsis. Scintigraphic studies of 12 patients in critical condition were performed, using Hungarian planar gamma camera type MB9200 and human albumin microspheres labelled with {sup 99m}Tc. Perfusion scans of patients with ARDS demonstrated blurring outlines and abundant diffuse foci of lack of radioactivity in both lungs and quantitative analysis indicated relative increase of Tc99m-MSA accumulation in upper zones of both lungs. Scans of suffering from sepsis were similar to control one. The course of the studies showed that scintigraphic methods could be safely use in patients with sepsis and ARDS and may be helpful in the early diagnosis of ARDS in the septic patients. (author) 12 refs, 2 figs, 4 tabs

  16. Sepsis: An update in management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galen, Benjamin T; Sankey, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    Hospitalists are a critical link in providing evidence-based care for patients with sepsis across the disease spectrum, from early recognition to recovery. The past decade of sepsis research has led to significant findings that will change clinical practice for hospital medicine practitioners. Although the incidence of severe sepsis in the United States has continued to rise, in-hospital mortality has declined. Management of the spectrum of sepsis disorders is no longer restricted to the intensive care unit (ICU). This review article will provide an update in the management of sepsis for hospitalists based on recently published pivotal studies. The expanding evidence base in sepsis includes early goal-directed therapy/clinical endpoints/sepsis bundles, antibiotics and source control, volume resuscitation, ICU considerations (including the use of insulin and corticosteroids), mortality/complications, and the newly recognized condition of "sepsis survivorship".

  17. Group A β-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis outbreak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culqui, Dante R; Manzanares-Laya, Sandra; Van Der Sluis, Sarah Lafuente; Fanlo, Albert Anton; Comas, Rosa Bartolomé; Rossi, Marcello; Caylá, Joán A

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to describe an outbreak of group A β-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis in health care professionals. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study of 17 clients who dined at the same table in a restaurant in Barcelona in July 2012. The frequency, timing and severity of symptoms were analyzed, as were demographic variables and others concerning the food ingested. The attack rate was 58.8%. Six of the 10 clients were positive for group A β-hemolytic streptococcal. Six of the 13 individuals who handled the food involved in the dinner had symptoms. No association was identified with the food consumed. There is epidemiological evidence of foodborne group A β-hemolytic streptococcal transmission, but respiratory transmission could not be ruled out. PMID:24897054

  18. Severe Maternal Sepsis in the UK, 2011–2012: A National Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Colleen D.; Kurinczuk, Jennifer J.; Lucas, D. Nuala; Tuffnell, Derek J.; Sellers, Susan; Knight, Marian

    2014-01-01

    Background In light of increasing rates and severity of sepsis worldwide, this study aimed to estimate the incidence of, and describe the causative organisms, sources of infection, and risk factors for, severe maternal sepsis in the UK. Methods and Findings A prospective case-control study included 365 confirmed cases of severe maternal sepsis and 757 controls from all UK obstetrician-led maternity units from June 1, 2011, to May 31, 2012. Incidence of severe sepsis was 4.7 (95% CI 4.2–5.2) per 10,000 maternities; 71 (19.5%) women developed septic shock; and five (1.4%) women died. Genital tract infection (31.0%) and the organism Escherichia coli (21.1%) were most common. Women had significantly increased adjusted odds ratios (aORs) of severe sepsis if they were black or other ethnic minority (aOR = 1.82; 95% CI 1.82–2.51), were primiparous (aOR = 1.60; 95% CI 1.17–2.20), had a pre-existing medical problem (aOR = 1.40; 95% CI 1.01–1.94), had febrile illness or were taking antibiotics in the 2 wk prior to presentation (aOR = 12.07; 95% CI 8.11–17.97), or had an operative vaginal delivery (aOR = 2.49; 95% CI 1.32–4.70), pre-labour cesarean (aOR = 3.83; 95% CI 2.24–6.56), or cesarean after labour onset (aOR = 8.06; 95% CI 4.65–13.97). Median time between delivery and sepsis was 3 d (interquartile range = 1–7 d). Multiple pregnancy (aOR = 5.75; 95% CI 1.54–21.45) and infection with group A streptococcus (aOR = 4.84; 2.17–10.78) were associated with progression to septic shock; for 16 (50%) women with a group A streptococcal infection there was sepsis. A limitation of this study was the proportion of women with sepsis without an identified organism or infection source (16.4%). Conclusions For each maternal sepsis death, approximately 50 women have life-threatening morbidity from sepsis. Follow-up to ensure infection is eradicated is important. The rapid progression to severe sepsis highlights the importance

  19. Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal Infections (PANDAS): An Evolving Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macerollo, Antonella; Martino, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcus infections (PANDAS) originated from the observational work of Swedo and collaborators, who formalized their definition in 1998 in a set of operational criteria. The application of these criteria, which focuses on tics and obsessive-compulsive symptoms as core symptoms, has encountered difficulties, eventually leading to a high rate of misdiagnosis. In particular, the core feature represented by the association between newly diagnosed infections and neuropsychiatric symptom relapses in youths with this diagnosis could not be demonstrated by longitudinal studies. Exploratory studies aiming to identify clinical or cognitive features that could discriminate PANDAS from other pediatric obsessive-compulsive and tic disorders present methodological limitations, and therefore are not conclusive. Other behavioral features, in addition to obsessive-compulsive symptoms and tics, have been included in pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndromes (PANS) and childhood acute neuropsychiatric syndromes (CANS), two new concepts recently proposed in order to define a much broader clinical spectrum encompassing etiologically diverse entities. Given the uncertainties on the clinical definition of PANDAS, it is not surprising that evidence in support of a post-infectious, immune-mediated pathophysiology is also insufficient. Anti-dopamine receptor antibodies might be relevant to both Sydenham's chorea (SC)-the prototypical post-streptococcal neuropsychiatric disorder-and some rare forms of encephalitis targeting the basal ganglia specifically, but studies exploring their association with children fulfilling Swedo's criteria for PANDAS have been inconclusive. Moreover, we lack evidence in favor of the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis or tonsillectomy in patients fulfilling Swedo's criteria for PANDAS, whereas a response to immune-mediated treatments like intravenous immunoglobulins has been documented by

  20. Sepsis-Associated Coagulopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scarlatescu Ecaterina

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Systemic inflammatory activation in sepsis often leads to coagulation activation, but the relationship is bilateral, as coagulation also modulates the inflammatory response. This close associate has significant consequences for the pathogenesis of microvascular thrombosis and organ dysfunction in sepsis. While coagulation activation can be beneficial for immune defense, it can also be detrimental once it becomes widespread and uncontrolled. The knowledge of the pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in the interaction between infection and coagulation may lead to the better timing for the administration of targeted antithrombotic therapies in septic patients. This brief review highlights the pathophysiologic pathways leading to the prothrombotic state in sepsis and the mechanisms that play a role in the interaction between infection and coagulation.

  1. Surviving Sepsis Campaign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rhodes, Andrew; Evans, Laura E; Alhazzani, Waleed

    2017-01-01

    , and evidence profiles were generated. Each subgroup generated a list of questions, searched for best available evidence, and then followed the principles of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system to assess the quality of evidence from high to very low......, and to formulate recommendations as strong or weak, or best practice statement when applicable. RESULTS: The Surviving Sepsis Guideline panel provided 93 statements on early management and resuscitation of patients with sepsis or septic shock. Overall, 32 were strong recommendations, 39 were weak recommendations......, and 18 were best-practice statements. No recommendation was provided for four questions. CONCLUSIONS: Substantial agreement exists among a large cohort of international experts regarding many strong recommendations for the best care of patients with sepsis. Although a significant number of aspects...

  2. Bacterial sepsis in the neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubarth, Lori Baas; Christensen, Carla M; Riley, Cheryl

    2017-09-21

    Neonatal bacterial infections leading to sepsis occur frequently in the first few days or weeks of life. NPs must be able to recognize the early signs of sepsis and understand the need for rapid evaluation and treatment. This article discusses antibiotic treatments for various types and locations of bacterial infections and sepsis in the neonate.

  3. Glucocorticosteroids for sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volbeda, M; Wetterslev, J; Gluud, C;

    2015-01-01

    outcomes were mortality at longest follow-up and serious adverse events. RESULTS: A total of 35 trials randomising 4682 patients were assessed and reviewed in full text. All trials but two had high risk of bias. No statistically significant effect was found for any dose of steroids versus placebo......-adjusted CI 0.7-1.48). The effects did not vary according to the degree of sepsis. TSA showed that many more randomised patients are needed before definitive conclusions may be drawn. CONCLUSION: Evidence to support or negate the use of steroids in any dose in sepsis patients is lacking. The results...

  4. Dextromethorphan Efficiently Increases Bactericidal Activity, Attenuates Inflammatory Responses, and Prevents Group A Streptococcal Sepsis▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-Han; Luo, Yueh-Hsia; Lin, Chiou-Feng; Chang, Yu-Tzu; Lu, Shiou-Ling; Kuo, Chih-Feng; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Lin, Yee-Shin

    2011-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is an important human pathogen that causes a wide spectrum of diseases, ranging from mild throat and skin infections to severe invasive diseases such as necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Dextromethorphan (DM), a dextrorotatory morphinan and a widely used antitussive drug, has recently been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we investigated the potential protective effect of DM in GAS infection using an air pouch infection mouse model. Our results showed that DM treatment increased the survival rate of GAS-infected mice. Bacterial numbers in the air pouch were lower in mice treated with DM than in those infected with GAS alone. The bacterial elimination efficacy was associated with increased cell viability and bactericidal activity of air-pouch-infiltrating cells. Moreover, DM treatment prevented bacterial dissemination in the blood and reduced serum levels of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and IL-1β and the chemokines monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2), and RANTES. In addition, GAS-induced mouse liver injury was reduced by DM treatment. Taken together, DM can increase bacterial killing and reduce inflammatory responses to prevent sepsis in GAS infection. The consideration of DM as an adjunct treatment in combination with antibiotics against bacterial infection warrants further study. PMID:21199930

  5. Maternal and Fetal Death following Group A Streptococcal Meningitis in Mid-Term Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaledeen, Abderahman; Law, Penelope

    2014-01-01

    Background. Group A streptococcal (GAS) meningitis is rarely seen in the antenatal period, but it is associated with significant mortality. We present a case of a mid-trimester woman who developed fulminant meningitis following a rapid onset atypical presentation of infection with this organism. Case. A multiparous 23+5-week woman presented with a 10-day history of a non-productive cough associated with pyrexia. Within minutes of her admission she collapsed and lost consciousness; sepsis was suspected and cross-specialty care was initiated. She was managed empirically in extremis with broad-spectrum antibiotics and mannitol with 3% hypertonic saline for suspected infection and raised intracranial pressure, respectively. Despite intensivist management, a CT head revealed diffuse oedema with coning of the cerebellar tonsils. Brainstem death was certified within 19 hours of admission and fetal death ensued. Postmortem bacteriology confirmed GAS meningitis. Conclusion. Through raising awareness of this patient and her disease course, we hope that future policy decisions, primary care, and hospital level management will be informed accordingly for treatment of pregnant women with suspected GAS infection. PMID:24883215

  6. Maternal and Fetal Death following Group A Streptococcal Meningitis in Mid-Term Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayinthen Vivekanantham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Group A streptococcal (GAS meningitis is rarely seen in the antenatal period, but it is associated with significant mortality. We present a case of a mid-trimester woman who developed fulminant meningitis following a rapid onset atypical presentation of infection with this organism. Case. A multiparous 23+5-week woman presented with a 10-day history of a non-productive cough associated with pyrexia. Within minutes of her admission she collapsed and lost consciousness; sepsis was suspected and cross-specialty care was initiated. She was managed empirically in extremis with broad-spectrum antibiotics and mannitol with 3% hypertonic saline for suspected infection and raised intracranial pressure, respectively. Despite intensivist management, a CT head revealed diffuse oedema with coning of the cerebellar tonsils. Brainstem death was certified within 19 hours of admission and fetal death ensued. Postmortem bacteriology confirmed GAS meningitis. Conclusion. Through raising awareness of this patient and her disease course, we hope that future policy decisions, primary care, and hospital level management will be informed accordingly for treatment of pregnant women with suspected GAS infection.

  7. [A study on early-onset group "B" streptococcal neonatal infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacheva, R; Todorova, M; Decheva, A; Yarakova, N; Kraleva, I; Takova, Ts; Dimitrova, N; Dobreva, A

    2012-01-01

    The results achieved with 80% reduction in the incidence of early-onset neonatal group B streptococcal (GBS) sepsis following the implementation of the preliminary (1996, 2002) and subsequently the revised (2010) guidelines for intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis imposed the discussion on a large scale of the updated:--algorithms for GBS screening (35-37 weeks of gestation) with the recommended dosage of penicillin-G for intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis for women having normal labor and delivery;--algorithms for GBS screening and intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis for women with preterm labor (PPROM) or premature rupture of membranes (PROM);--intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis regimens for women with penicillin allergy;--algorithm for management of newborns with respect to risk of early-onset GBS disease. The present study is aimed at studying the distribution of the early-onset GBS disease in our country based on the data of leading obstetrics & gynecology clinics and wards. The aim is to diferrentiate clinically the cases and investigate the influence of the known risk factors on the part of the mother. A special accent is put over the microbiological diagnostics of cases in view of CDC expanded recommendations on the laboratory methods for identification of GBS. As a final conclusion the necessity for introduction of an official registration of the early- and late-onset GBS disease in the country is emphasized.

  8. Effect of hydrogen inhalation on acute lung injury in rats with sepsis%吸入氢气对脓毒血症大鼠急性肺损伤的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    滕娜; 李会秦; 培娟; 曹玺; 帅训军; 姜敏; 艾登斌

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨吸入氢气(H2)对脓毒血症大鼠急性肺损伤的影响。方法选取雄性SD大鼠40只,体重200~250 g。采用随机数字表法将其分为4组(n=10):假手术组(SH组)、盲肠结扎穿孔组(CLP组)、1% H2组和2%H2组。采用CLP法制备脓毒血症模型。1%H2组与2%H2组于CLP术后12 h分别吸入1%H2与2%H22 h。结束后,采集股动脉血样行血气分析,计算氧合指数(PaO2/FiO2);测定血浆中高迁移率族蛋白1(HMGB1)、白细胞介素-6(IL-6)水平;随后处死大鼠取肺组织,检测肺组织中Toll样受体4(TLR-4)、核因子-剀B(NF-κB)、髓过氧化物酶(MPO)活性;光镜下观察肺组织病理改变。结果与SH组比较,CLP组、1% H2组、2%H2组PaO2/FiO2降低,血浆中HMGB1、IL-6水平升高,肺组织TLR-4、NF-κB、MPO水平升高,病理学损伤明显加重(P0.05)。结论吸入H2能够减轻脓毒血症引起的急性肺损伤,其机制可能与抑制炎性反应有关。%Objective To investigate the effect of hydrogen (H2) inhalation on acute lung injury in rats with sepsis. Methods Forty healthy male SD rats (weighing 200-250 g) were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 10) using a ran-dom number table:sham operation group (SH group), cecal ligation and puncture group (CLP group), 1% H2 group, 2%H2 group respectively. Sepsis model was produced by CLP. 1% H2 and 2% H2 group received 2 h inhalation of 1% H2 and 2% H2 at 12 h after CLP, respectively. At the end of hydrogen inhalation, blood samples were obtained for blood gas analysis. PaO2/FiO2 was calculated and the levels of high mobility group protein 1 (HMGB1), interleukin-6 (IL-6) were determined. The rats were then sacrificed and lungs were immediately removed for determination of the activity of Toll-like receptors-4 (TLR-4), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and myeloperoxidase (MPO); pathology assessment of lung was done under light microscope. Results Compared with SH group, PaO2/FiO2 was significantly

  9. Neonatal sepsis of nosocomial origin: an epidemiological study from the "Grupo de Hospitales Castrillo".

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Sastre, J B; Coto Cotallo, D; Fernández Colomer, B

    2002-01-01

    A prospective multicenter study was designed to assess the frequency, etiology, and mortality of nosocomial neonatal sepsis diagnosed between 1996 and 1997 in the neonatology services of 27 acute-care hospitals in Spain ("Grupo de Hospitales Castrillo"). Nosocomial sepsis is defined in the literature using chronological criteria (> 3-7 days of life at the onset of symptoms); accordingly, there is the possibility of including late-onset maternally acquired sepsis or of excluding early-onset nosocomial sepsis ( or = 1500 g (1.16%) (P 1500 g (17.3% vs. 6.5%, P < 0.001).

  10. A patient cohort on long-term sequelae of sepsis survivors: study protocol of the Mid-German Sepsis Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherag, André; Hartog, Christiane S; Fleischmann, Carolin; Ouart, Dominique; Hoffmann, Franziska; König, Christian; Kesselmeier, Miriam; Fiedler, Sandra; Philipp, Monique; Braune, Anke; Eichhorn, Cornelia; Gampe, Christin; Romeike, Heike; Reinhart, Konrad

    2017-08-23

    An increasing number of patients survive sepsis; however, we lack valid data on the long-term impact on morbidity from prospective observational studies. Therefore, we designed an observational cohort to quantify mid-term and long-term functional disabilities after intensive care unit (ICU)-treated sepsis. Ultimately, findings for the Mid-German Sepsis Cohort (MSC) will serve as basis for the implementation of follow-up structures for patients with sepsis and help to increase quality of care for sepsis survivors. All patients surviving ICU-treated sepsis are eligible and are recruited from five study centres in Germany (acute care hospital setting in Jena, Halle/Saale, Leipzig, Bad Berka, Erfurt; large long-term acute care hospital and rehabilitation setting in Klinik Bavaria Kreischa). Screening is performed by trained study nurses. Data are collected on ICU management of sepsis. On written informed consent provided by patients or proxies, follow-up is carried out by trained research staff at 3, 6 and 12 months and yearly thereafter. The primary outcome is functional disability as assessed by (instrumental) activities of daily living. Other outcomes cover domains like mortality, cognitive, emotional and physical impairment, and resource use. The estimated sample size of 3000 ICU survivors is calculated to allow detection of relevant changes in the primary outcome in sepsis survivors longitudinally. The study is conducted according to the current version of the Declaration of Helsinki and has been approved by four local/federal responsible institutional ethics committees and by the respective federal data protection commissioners. Results of MSC will be fed back to the patients and published in peer-reviewed journals. German Clinical Trials Registry DRKS00010050. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Apoptosis: Therapeutic target in neurodegeneration and sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Arboleda

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Cellular apoptosis has been considered as themain physiological mechanism underlyingneuronal demise associated to neurodegenerativediseases. Apoptosis has also been described inparenquimal and microvascular endotheliumin the acute phase of sepsis during multi-organicdysfunction. Therefore, strategies aimed toMuerte celular: blanco terapéutico enneurodegeneración y sepsisGonzalo Arboleda*, Luisa M. Matheus†prevent apoptosis (anti-apoptotic represent avaluable tool for prevention and/or retardationof the appearance of clinical symptoms in thesedisorders, which generate a large morbilitymortality,social and economic burden worldwide.The present review is aim to show that antiapoptoticstrategies hold a great therapeuticpotential. In this sense, we will review some ofthese potential therapies such as caspaseinhibitors, activated protein C, Bcl-2 family andthe PI3K/Akt signalling pathway.

  12. Surviving Sepsis Campaign: International Guidelines for Management of Sepsis and Septic Shock: 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Andrew; Evans, Laura E; Alhazzani, Waleed; Levy, Mitchell M; Antonelli, Massimo; Ferrer, Ricard; Kumar, Anand; Sevransky, Jonathan E; Sprung, Charles L; Nunnally, Mark E; Rochwerg, Bram; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; Angus, Derek C; Annane, Djillali; Beale, Richard J; Bellinghan, Geoffrey J; Bernard, Gordon R; Chiche, Jean-Daniel; Coopersmith, Craig; De Backer, Daniel P; French, Craig J; Fujishima, Seitaro; Gerlach, Herwig; Hidalgo, Jorge Luis; Hollenberg, Steven M; Jones, Alan E; Karnad, Dilip R; Kleinpell, Ruth M; Koh, Younsuk; Lisboa, Thiago Costa; Machado, Flavia R; Marini, John J; Marshall, John C; Mazuski, John E; McIntyre, Lauralyn A; McLean, Anthony S; Mehta, Sangeeta; Moreno, Rui P; Myburgh, John; Navalesi, Paolo; Nishida, Osamu; Osborn, Tiffany M; Perner, Anders; Plunkett, Colleen M; Ranieri, Marco; Schorr, Christa A; Seckel, Maureen A; Seymour, Christopher W; Shieh, Lisa; Shukri, Khalid A; Simpson, Steven Q; Singer, Mervyn; Thompson, B Taylor; Townsend, Sean R; Van der Poll, Thomas; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Wiersinga, W Joost; Zimmerman, Janice L; Dellinger, R Phillip

    2017-03-01

    To provide an update to "Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines for Management of Sepsis and Septic Shock: 2012". A consensus committee of 55 international experts representing 25 international organizations was convened. Nominal groups were assembled at key international meetings (for those committee members attending the conference). A formal conflict-of-interest (COI) policy was developed at the onset of the process and enforced throughout. A stand-alone meeting was held for all panel members in December 2015. Teleconferences and electronic-based discussion among subgroups and among the entire committee served as an integral part of the development. The panel consisted of five sections: hemodynamics, infection, adjunctive therapies, metabolic, and ventilation. Population, intervention, comparison, and outcomes (PICO) questions were reviewed and updated as needed, and evidence profiles were generated. Each subgroup generated a list of questions, searched for best available evidence, and then followed the principles of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system to assess the quality of evidence from high to very low, and to formulate recommendations as strong or weak, or best practice statement when applicable. The Surviving Sepsis Guideline panel provided 93 statements on early management and resuscitation of patients with sepsis or septic shock. Overall, 32 were strong recommendations, 39 were weak recommendations, and 18 were best-practice statements. No recommendation was provided for four questions. Substantial agreement exists among a large cohort of international experts regarding many strong recommendations for the best care of patients with sepsis. Although a significant number of aspects of care have relatively weak support, evidence-based recommendations regarding the acute management of sepsis and septic shock are the foundation of improved outcomes for these critically ill patients with high mortality.

  13. [Right renal arteriovenous fistula after nephrectomy with streptococcal endarteritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natali, J; Emerit, J; Reynier, P; Maraval, M

    1975-01-18

    The authors add a new case, to the 41 already published, of arterio-venous fistula of the renal pedicle after nephrectomy, with the peculiarity of its presentation as a prolonged fever resulting from streptococcal bacterial endarteritis at the site of the fistula (3rd case in the literature). Surgical treatment in association with massive and prolonged antibiotic therapy resulted in recovery.

  14. Semiquantitative Bacterial Observations With Group B Streptococcal Vulvovaginitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. G. Monif

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Group B streptococcal (GBS vulvovaginitis is a poorly-delineated clinical entity. The purpose of this study is to report semiquantitative data from four cases of GBS vulvovaginitis and to comment on their significance in terms of the in vitro inhibitory capabilities of GBS.

  15. Atypical streptococcal infection of gingiva associated with chronic mouth breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haytac, M Cenk; Oz, I Attila

    2007-01-01

    Streptococcal infections of oral tissues are mainly seen in young children who experience a variety of upper respiratory tract infections. The disease is characterized by fever, lymphadenopathy, and ulcers on the gingiva, lips, and tonsils. This case report presents an atypical streptococcal infection of the gingiva in an 18-year-old man. The patient was referred to the periodontology department complaining of a 2-month history of gingival enlargement. He had persistent fever (39.5 degrees C) and general malaise for 2 weeks. Intraoral examination revealed extremely inflamed and enlarged gingiva with spontaneous bleeding and suppuration. Based on the otolaryngologic consultation and the hematologic, immunologic, and microbiologic tests, the final diagnosis was an atypical streptococcal gingivitis with chronic adenoid-related mouth breathing and oral hygiene neglect as contributing factors. Treatment consisted of a broad-spectrum antibiotic regimen, supragingival and subgingival debridement, adenoidectomy, and scaling and root planing. A good response to nonsurgical therapy was achieved despite poor patient compliance, and no recurrence of gingival enlargement was observed after 1 year. Streptococcal gingivitis should be included in the differential diagnosis of suppurative gingival enlargements. Furthermore, chronic mouth breathing may initiate and/or contribute to this disease.

  16. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome secondary to group A Streptococcus vaginitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikone, Mayu; Kobayashi, Ken-Ichiro; Washino, Takuya; Ota, Masayuki; Sakamoto, Naoya; Iwabuchi, Sentaro; Ohnishi, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (TSS) is a systemic illness usually caused in the setting of infection by group A Streptococcus (GAS). The primary infections are often invasive infections of the respiratory tract or necrotizing infections of the skin and soft tissue, but some infections occur without relevant focus. GAS vaginitis is a rare condition among adult women and is accordingly thought to be uncommon as a cause of streptococcal TSS. Here we report the cases of two postmenopausal women with streptococcal TSS secondary to GAS vaginitis, one aged 55 and one aged 60. Both came to our emergency department with complaints or symptoms of abdominal pain, fever, hypotension, and multi-organ failure. In both cases, the relevant factor associated with streptococcal infection was a recent episode of GAS vaginitis. Both underwent fluid management and 14 days of antibiotic treatment and fully recovered without complications. Vaginitis was likely to be the primary infectious trigger of TSS in these two cases. Intrauterine device insertion, endometrial biopsy, and post-partum state have all been previously reported in TSS patients, and the female genital tract has been described as a portal of entry. GAS vaginitis warrants appropriate treatment as it may progress to severe systemic infection as described. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Management of group B streptococcal bacteriuria in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Victoria M; Yudin, Mark H

    2012-05-01

    To provide information regarding the management of group B streptococcal (GBS) bacteriuria to midwives, nurses, and physicians who are providing obstetrical care. The outcomes considered were neonatal GBS disease, preterm birth, pyelonephritis, chorioamnionitis, and recurrence of GBS colonization. Medline, PubMed, and the Cochrane database were searched for articles published in English to December 2010 on the topic of GBS bacteriuria in pregnancy. Bacteriuria is defined in this clinical practice guideline as the presence of bacteria in urine, regardless of the number of colony-forming units per mL (CFU/mL). Low colony counts refer to bacteriuria to optimize maternal and perinatal outcomes, to reduce the occurrences of antibiotic anaphylaxis, and to prevent increases in antibiotic resistance to GBS and non-GBS pathogens. No cost-benefit analysis is provided. 1. Treatment of any bacteriuria with colony counts ≥ 100 000 CFU/mL in pregnancy is an accepted and recommended strategy and includes treatment with appropriate antibiotics. (II-2A) 2. Women with documented group B streptococcal bacteriuria (regardless of level of colony-forming units per mL) in the current pregnancy should be treated at the time of labour or rupture of membranes with appropriate intravenous antibiotics for the prevention of early-onset neonatal group B streptococcal disease. (II-2A) 3. Asymptomatic women with urinary group B streptococcal colony counts bacteriuria should not be re-screened by genital tract culture or urinary culture in the third trimester, as they are presumed to be group B streptococcal colonized. (II-2D).

  18. Rheumatic fever, autoimmunity, and molecular mimicry: the streptococcal connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Madeleine W

    2014-01-01

    The group A streptococcus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and its link to autoimmune sequelae, has acquired a new level of understanding. Studies support the hypothesis that molecular mimicry between the group A streptococcus and heart or brain are important in directing immune responses in rheumatic fever. Rheumatic carditis, Sydenham chorea and a new group of behavioral disorders called pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections are reviewed with consideration of autoantibody and T cell responses and the role of molecular mimicry between the heart, brain and group A streptococcus as well as how immune responses contribute to pathogenic mechanisms in disease. In rheumatic carditis, studies have investigated human monoclonal autoantibodies and T cell clones for their crossreactivity and their mechanisms leading to valve damage in rheumatic heart disease. Although studies of human and animal sera from group A streptococcal diseases or immunization models have been crucial in providing clues to molecular mimicry and its role in the pathogenesis of rheumatic fever, study of human monoclonal autoantibodies have provided important insights into how antibodies against the valve may activate the valve endothelium and lead to T cell infiltration. Passive transfer of anti-streptococcal T cell lines in a rat model of rheumatic carditis illustrates effects of CD4+ T cells on the valve. Although Sydenham chorea has been known as the neurological manifestation of rheumatic fever for decades, the combination of autoimmunity and behavior is a relatively new concept linking brain, behavior and neuropsychiatric disorders with streptococcal infections. In Sydenham chorea, human mAbs and their expression in transgenic mice have linked autoimmunity to central dopamine pathways as well as dopamine receptors and dopaminergic neurons in basal ganglia. Taken together, the studies reviewed provide a basis for understanding streptococcal sequelae and

  19. Neuroinflammation in sepsis: sepsis associated delirium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piva, Simone; McCreadie, Victoria A; Latronico, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis-associated delirium (SAD) is a clinical manifestation of the involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) during sepsis. The purpose of this review is to provide a concise overview of SAD including the epidemiology and current diagnostic criteria for SAD. We present in detail the pathophysiology with regards to blood-brain-barrier breakdown, cytokine activation and neurotransmitter deregulation. Treatment and prognosis for SAD are also briefly discussed. SAD is the most common form of delirium acquired in the ICU (Intensive Care Unit), and is described in about 50% of septic patients. Clinical features include altered level of consciousness, reduced attention, change in cognition and perceptual disturbances. Symptoms can reversible, but prolonged deficits can be observed in older patients. Pathophysiology of SAD is poorly understood, but involves microvascular, metabolic and, not least, inflammatory mechanisms leading to CNS dysfunction. These mechanisms can be different in SAD compared to ICU delirium associated with other conditions. SAD is diagnosed clinically using validated tools such as CAM-ICU (Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Medicine) or ICDSC (The Intensive Care Delirium Screening Checklist), which have good specificity but low sensitivity. Neuroimaging studies and EEG (Electroencephalography) can be useful complement to clinical evaluation to define the severity of the condition. Prompt diagnosis and eradication of septic foci whenever possible is vital. Preventive measures for SAD in the critically ill patient requiring long-term sedation include maintaining light levels of sedation using non-benzodiazepine sedatives (either propofol or dexmedetomidine). Early mobilization of patients in the ICU is also recommended. Antipsychotic drugs (haloperidol and atypical antipsychotics) are widely used to treat SAD, but firm evidence of their efficacy is lacking.

  20. Systemic cytokine response in moribund mice of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Mitsumasa; Kajiwara, Hideko; Iida, Ken-ichiro; Hoshina, Takayuki; Kusuhara, Koichi; Hara, Toshiro; Yoshida, Shin-ichi

    2011-02-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes causes severe invasive disease in humans, including streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS). We previously reported a mouse model that is similar to human STSS. When mice were infected intramuscularly with 10(7) CFU of S. pyogenes, all of them survived acute phase of infection. After 20 or more days of infection, a number of them died suddenly accompanied by S. pyogenes bacteremia. We call this phenomenon "delayed death". We analyzed the serum cytokine levels of mice with delayed death, and compared them with those of mice who died in the acute phase of intravenous S. pyogenes infection. The serum levels of TNF-α and IFN-γ in mice of delayed death were more than 100 times higher than those in acute death mice. IL-10 and IL-12, which were not detected in acute death, were also significantly higher in mice of delayed death. IL-6 and MCP-1 (CCL-2) were elevated in both groups of mice. It was noteworthy that not only pro-inflammatory cytokines but also anti-inflammatory cytokines were elevated in delayed death. We also found that intravenous TNF-α injection accelerated delayed death, suggesting that an increase of serum TNF-α induced S. pyogenes bacteremia in our mouse model.

  1. Challenges to developing effective streptococcal vaccines to prevent rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease

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    Sharma A

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Abhinay Sharma, D Patric Nitsche-SchmitzDepartment of Medical Microbiology, Helmholtz Center for Infection Research, Braunschweig, GermanyAbstract: Acute rheumatic fever is a sequela of Streptococcus pyogenes and potentially of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis infections. Acute rheumatic fever is caused by destructive autoimmunity and inflammation in the extracellular matrix and can lead to rheumatic heart disease, which is the most frequent cardiologic disease that is acquired in youth. Although effective treatments are available, acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease remain serious threats to human health, which affect millions and cause high economic losses. This has motivated the search for a vaccine that prevents the causative streptococcal infections. A variety of potential vaccine candidates have been identified and investigated in the past. Today, new approaches are applied to find alternative candidates. Nevertheless, several obstacles lie in the way of an approved S. pyogenes vaccine for use in humans. Herein, a subjective selection of promising vaccine candidates with respect to the prevention of acute rheumatic fever/rheumatic heart disease and safety regarding immunological side effects is discussed.Keywords: autoimmune disease, side effects, M protein vaccine, molecular mimicry, coiled-coil, collagen binding, PARF

  2. Severe sepsis and septic shock due to Plasmodium vivax infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalkias, Athanasios; Aridas, Sotirios; Karageorgopoulos, Drosos E; Stratiotis, Georgios; Mystrioti, Dimitra; Mallios, Athanasios; Nakos, Ioannis; Mpellos, Nikolaos; Ganotopoulou, Asimina; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2013-04-01

    Plasmodium vivax malaria is typically characterized by a mild and benign clinical course. Organ dysfunction is rarely seen, whereas acute lung injury has been found to occur after starting antimalarial treatment. We present an unusual case of severe sepsis and septic shock due to Plasmodium vivax monoinfection.

  3. The encephalopathy of sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, A C; Gilbert, J J; Young, G B; Bolton, C F

    1985-11-01

    Twelve fatal cases of encephalopathy associated with sepsis were examined in a ten-year retrospective study. The sources of infection and organisms isolated were variable. Six of the patients had focal neurologic signs; five had seizures. The level of consciousness varied from drowsiness to deep coma, and electroencephalograms revealed diffuse or multifocal abnormalities. Computed tomographic head scans and cerebrospinal fluid examinations were usually unremarkable. Eight patients had disseminated microabscesses in the brain at autopsy. Four patients had proliferation of astrocytes and microglia in the cerebral cortex, a feature associated with metabolic encephalopathies. Additional findings included cerebral infarcts, brain purpura, multiple small white matter hemorrhages, and central pontine myelinolysis. Although sepsis may cause encephalopathy by producing disturbances in cerebral synaptic transmission and cerebral energy production through a toxic mechanism, bacterial invasion of the brain with the formation of disseminated microabscesses is also an important cause.

  4. Sepsis-induced Cardiomyopathy

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    Romero-Bermejo, Francisco J; Ruiz-Bailen, Manuel; Gil-Cebrian, Julián; Huertos-Ranchal, María J

    2011-01-01

    Myocardial dysfunction is one of the main predictors of poor outcome in septic patients, with mortality rates next to 70%. During the sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction, both ventricles can dilate and diminish its ejection fraction, having less response to fluid resuscitation and catecholamines, but typically is assumed to be reversible within 7-10 days. In the last 30 years, It´s being subject of substantial research; however no explanation of its etiopathogenesis or effective treatment have been proved yet. The aim of this manuscript is to review on the most relevant aspects of the sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction, discuss its clinical presentation, pathophysiology, etiopathogenesis, diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies proposed in recent years. PMID:22758615

  5. ERCP Related Sepsis

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    Iffet Palabıyıkoglu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic procedures performed worldwide have increased considerably in recent years. In addition to diagnosis, many cases previously necessitating surgery now often can be carried out by endoscopic techniques. However, endoscopy has introduced its own infection risk. Most reports of gastrointestinal endoscopy-associated infection describe sepsis after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP in patients with biliary tract obstruction. During this study, which was conducted by Infection Control Committee of Ankara University Hospital, 13 out of 1147 (1.1% and 17 out of 922 patients (1.8% had ERCP related sepsis in 2002 and 2003 respectively, at the ERCP Unit of Gastroenterology Department. Sepsis-caused mortality were 23.1 and 29.4% in 2002 and 2003 respectively. The first four causative agents were Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas spp, Klebsiella spp and Enterobacter spp. Type and frequency of the causative agents remind that both endogenous and exogenous mechanisms are together responsible for the infections emerging from ERCP Unit. Besides, increasing isolation of Pseudomonas spp. brings out the strong need for re-evaluation of infection control measures, mainly effective cleansing and disinfection of endoscopes.

  6. The Epidemiology of Hospital Death Following Pediatric Severe Sepsis: When, Why, and How Children With Sepsis Die.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Scott L; Balamuth, Fran; Hensley, Josey; Fitzgerald, Julie C; Bush, Jenny; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Thomas, Neal J; Hall, Mark; Muszynski, Jennifer

    2017-09-01

    The epidemiology of in-hospital death after pediatric sepsis has not been well characterized. We investigated the timing, cause, mode, and attribution of death in children with severe sepsis, hypothesizing that refractory shock leading to early death is rare in the current era. Retrospective observational study. Emergency departments and ICUs at two academic children's hospitals. Seventy-nine patients less than 18 years old treated for severe sepsis/septic shock in 2012-2013 who died prior to hospital discharge. None. Time to death from sepsis recognition, cause and mode of death, and attribution of death to sepsis were determined from medical records. Organ dysfunction was assessed via daily Pediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction-2 scores for 7 days preceding death with an increase greater than or equal to 5 defined as worsening organ dysfunction. The median time to death was 8 days (interquartile range, 1-12 d) with 25%, 35%, and 49% of cumulative deaths within 1, 3, and 7 days of sepsis recognition, respectively. The most common cause of death was refractory shock (34%), then multiple organ dysfunction syndrome after shock recovery (27%), neurologic injury (19%), single-organ respiratory failure (9%), and nonseptic comorbidity (6%). Early deaths (≤ 3 d) were mostly due to refractory shock in young, previously healthy patients while multiple organ dysfunction syndrome predominated after 3 days. Mode of death was withdrawal in 72%, unsuccessful cardiopulmonary resuscitation in 22%, and irreversible loss of neurologic function in 6%. Ninety percent of deaths were attributable to acute or chronic manifestations of sepsis. Only 23% had a rise in Pediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction-2 that indicated worsening organ dysfunction. Refractory shock remains a common cause of death in pediatric sepsis, especially for early deaths. Later deaths were mostly attributable to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, neurologic, and respiratory failure after life-sustaining therapies

  7. Vitamin D Level and Risk of Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Sepsis

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    Anna J. Jovanovich

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has reported reduced serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD levels is associated with acute infectious illness. The relationship between vitamin D status, measured prior to acute infectious illness, with risk of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and sepsis has not been examined. Community-living individuals hospitalized with CAP or sepsis were age-, sex-, race-, and season-matched with controls. ICD-9 codes identified CAP and sepsis; chest radiograph confirmed CAP. Serum 25(OHD levels were measured up to 15 months prior to hospitalization. Regression models adjusted for diabetes, renal disease, and peripheral vascular disease evaluated the association of 25(OHD levels with CAP or sepsis risk. A total of 132 CAP patients and controls were 60 ± 17 years, 71% female, and 86% Caucasian. The 25(OHD levels <37 nmol/L (adjusted odds ratio (OR 2.57, 95% CI 1.08–6.08 were strongly associated with increased odds of CAP hospitalization. A total of 422 sepsis patients and controls were 65 ± 14 years, 59% female, and 91% Caucasian. The 25(OHD levels <37 nmol/L (adjusted OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.11–2.77 were associated with increased odds of sepsis hospitalization. Vitamin D status was inversely associated with risk of CAP and sepsis hospitalization in a community-living adult population. Further clinical trials are needed to evaluate whether vitamin D supplementation can reduce risk of infections, including CAP and sepsis.

  8. Development of a mortality prediction formula due to sepsis/severe sepsis in a medical intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anant Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although sepsis is one of the leading causes of mortality in hospitalized patients, information regarding early predictive factors for mortality and morbidity is limited. Materials and Methods: Patients fulfilling the Infectious Disease Society of America criteria of sepsis within the medical intensive care unit (ICU were included over two years. Apart from baseline hematological, biochemical, and metabolic parameters, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II, Simplified Acute Physiology Score II and III (SAPS II and SAPS III, and Sequential Organ Function Assessment (SOFA scores were calculated on day 1 of admission. Patients were followed till death or discharge from the ICU. Results: One hundred patients were enrolled over two years (54% males. The overall mortality was 53%, (69.5% in females, 38.8% in males (P < 0.01. Mortality was 65.7%, 55.7%, and 33.3% in patients with septic shock, severe sepsis, and sepsis, respectively. Patients who died were significantly older than the survivors (mean age, 57.37 ± 20.42 years and 44.29 ± 15.53 years respectively, P < 0.01. Nonsurvivors were significantly more anemic and had higher APACHE II, SAPS II, SAPS III, and SOFA scores. The presence of acute respiratory distress syndrome and renal dysfunction were associated with higher mortality (75% and 70.2%, respectively. There was no significant difference in the duration of mechanical ventilation or ICU stay between survivors and nonsurvivors. On multivariate analysis, significant predictors of mortality with odds ratio greater than 2 included the presence of anemia, SAPS II score greater than 35, SAPS III score greater than 47, and SOFA score greater than 6 at day 1 of admission. Conclusion: Several demographic and laboratory parameters as well as composite critical illness scoring systems are reliable early predictors of mortality in sepsis. A sepsis mortality prediction formula (AIIMS Sepsis Score based on SAPS II

  9. Neuroanatomy and Physiology of Brain Dysfunction in Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazeraud, Aurelien; Pascal, Quentin; Verdonk, Franck; Heming, Nicholas; Chrétien, Fabrice; Sharshar, Tarek

    2016-06-01

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE), a complication of sepsis, is often complicated by acute and long-term brain dysfunction. SAE is associated with electroencephalogram pattern changes and abnormal neuroimaging findings. The major processes involved are neuroinflammation, circulatory dysfunction, and excitotoxicity. Neuroinflammation and microcirculatory alterations are diffuse, whereas excitotoxicity might occur in more specific structures involved in the response to stress and the control of vital functions. A dysfunction of the brainstem, amygdala, and hippocampus might account for the increased mortality, psychological disorders, and cognitive impairment. This review summarizes clinical and paraclinical features of SAE and describes its mechanisms at cellular and structural levels.

  10. The immune system's role in sepsis progression, resolution, and long-term outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delano, Matthew J; Ward, Peter A

    2016-11-01

    Sepsis occurs when an infection exceeds local tissue containment and induces a series of dysregulated physiologic responses that result in organ dysfunction. A subset of patients with sepsis progress to septic shock, defined by profound circulatory, cellular, and metabolic abnormalities, and associated with a greater mortality. Historically, sepsis-induced organ dysfunction and lethality were attributed to the complex interplay between the initial inflammatory and later anti-inflammatory responses. With advances in intensive care medicine and goal-directed interventions, early 30-day sepsis mortality has diminished, only to steadily escalate long after "recovery" from acute events. As so many sepsis survivors succumb later to persistent, recurrent, nosocomial, and secondary infections, many investigators have turned their attention to the long-term sepsis-induced alterations in cellular immune function. Sepsis clearly alters the innate and adaptive immune responses for sustained periods of time after clinical recovery, with immune suppression, chronic inflammation, and persistence of bacterial representing such alterations. Understanding that sepsis-associated immune cell defects correlate with long-term mortality, more investigations have centered on the potential for immune modulatory therapy to improve long-term patient outcomes. These efforts are focused on more clearly defining and effectively reversing the persistent immune cell dysfunction associated with long-term sepsis mortality. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Streptococcal Receptor Polysaccharides: Recognition Molecules for Oral Biofilm Formation

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    Kolenbrander Paul E

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Strains of viridans group streptococci that initiate colonization of the human tooth surface typically coaggregate with each other and with Actinomyces naeslundii, another member of the developing biofilm community. These interactions generally involve adhesin-mediated recognition of streptococcal receptor polysaccharides (RPS. The objective of our studies is to understand the role of these polysaccharides in oral biofilm development. Methods Different structural types of RPS have been characterized by their reactions with specific antibodies and lectin-like adhesins. Streptococcal gene clusters for RPS biosynthesis were identified, sequenced, characterized and compared. RPS-producing bacteria were detected in biofilm samples using specific antibodies and gene probes. Results Six different types of RPS have been identified from representative viridans group streptococci that coaggregate with A. naeslundii. Each type is composed of a different hexa- or heptasaccharide repeating unit, the structures of which contain host-like motifs, either GalNAcβ1-3Gal or Galβ1-3GalNAc. These motifs account for RPS-mediated recognition, whereas other features of these polysaccharides are more closely associated with RPS antigenicity. The RPS-dependent interaction of S. oralis with A. naeslundii promotes growth of these bacteria and biofilm formation in flowing saliva. Type specific differences in RPS production have been noted among the resident streptococcal floras of different individuals, raising the possibility of RPS-based differences in the composition of oral biofilm communities. Conclusion The structural, functional and molecular properties of streptococcal RPS support a recognition role of these cell surface molecules in oral biofilm formation.

  12. Endotoxin dosage in sepsis

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    Vincenzo Rondinelli

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Endotoxin, a component of the cell wall of Gram-negative bacteria is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of septic shock and multiple organ failure (MOF. Its entry into the bloodstream stimulates monocytes/macrophages which once activated produce and release cytokines, nitric oxide and other mediators that induce systemic inflammation, endothelial damage, organ dysfunction, hypotension (shock and MOF.The aim of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of a quantitative test for the dosage of endotoxin to determine the risk of severe Gram-negative sepsis. Materials and methods. In the period January 2009 - June 2011 we performed 897 tests for 765 patients, mostly coming from the emergency room and intensive care, of which 328 (43% women (mean age 53 and 437 (57% male (mean age 49. Fifty-nine patients, no statistically significant difference in sex, were monitored by an average of two determinations of EA.All patients had procalcitonin values significantly altered.The kit used was EAA (Endotoxin Activity Assay Estor Company, Milan, which has three ranges of endotoxin activity (EA: low risk of sepsis if <0.40 units, medium if between 0.40 and 0.59; high if 0.60. Results. 78 out of 765 patients (10% had a low risk, 447 (58% a medium risk and 240 (32% a high risk.The dosage of EA, combined with that of procalcitonin, has allowed a more targeted antibiotic therapy. Six patients in serious clinical conditions were treated by direct hemoperfusion with Toraymyxin, a device comprising a housing containing a fiber polypropylene and polystyrene with surface-bound polymyxin B, an antibiotic that removes bacterial endotoxins from the blood. Conclusions.The test is useful in risk stratification as well as Gram negative sepsis, to set and monitor targeted therapies, also based on the neutralization of endotoxin.

  13. Capsule of Streptococcus pyogenes is essential for delayed death of mice in a model of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Ken-ichiro; Seki, Masanori; Saito, Mitsumasa; Kawamura, Yoshiaki; Kajiwara, Hideko; Yoshida, Shin-ichi

    2006-01-01

    We have previously reported a mouse model of severe group A streptococcal infection (Microbiol. Immunol. 45: 777-786, 2001). When we injected Streptococcus pyogenes strains intramuscularly, the mice suffered from acute phase of infection for a few days but recovered from the illness and gained body weight. These mice, however, began to die after 3 weeks of infection, which we called 'delayed death.' Bacterial strains isolated from organs of the dead mice showed thick capsules. We, therefore, constructed a hyaluronic acid capsule gene, hasA, knockout mutant by homologous recombination and the effect of capsule on the death was observed. hasA knockout strain did not cause delayed death, though it caused acute death at high doses of infection. According to this result, the capsule is a critical pathogenic factor for causing the delayed death in our mouse model.

  14. [Primary peritonitis combined with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome following an upper respiratory tract infection caused by Streptococcus pyogenes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Bossche, M J A; Devriendt, D; Weyne, L; Van Ranst, M

    2008-04-12

    A 52-year-old woman with no previous history of major health problems presented with an acute abdomen and symptoms of shock. Three days earlier she had been diagnosed as having acute laryngitis which was treated with steroids. On admission she was suffering from hypotension, renal failure, liver failure and coagulopathy. Emergency laparotomy revealed purulent fluid spread diffusely throughout the abdominal cavity. Streptococcus pyogenes was grown in culture from this fluid, enabling a diagnosis of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) with primary peritonitis to be made. This combination is rare, and has been described only a few times. Only one other patient is known in whom this combination was preceded by respiratory symptoms. The treatment consists of abdominal lavage, intravenous administration of antibiotics and immunoglobulins, and support for renal function, liver function, respiration and coagulation.

  15. Study of the role of tumor necrosis factor-α (-308 G/A) and interleukin-10 (-1082 G/A) polymorphisms as potential risk factors to acute kidney injury in patients with severe sepsis using high-resolution melting curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashad, Doaa I; Elsayed, Eman T; Helmy, Tamer A; Elawady, Samier M

    2017-11-01

    Septic acute kidney injury (AKI) is a prevalent complication in intensive care units with an increased incidence of complications. The aim of the present study was to assess the use of high-resolution melting curve (HRM) analysis in investigating whether the genetic polymorphisms; -308 G/A of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and -1082 G /A of Interleukin-10 (IL-10) genes may predispose patients diagnosed with severe sepsis to the development of AKI. One hundred and fifty patients with severe sepsis participated in the present study; only sixty-six developed AKI. Both polymorphisms were studied using HRM analysis. The low producer genotype of both studied polymorphism of TNF-α and IL-10 genes was associated with AKI. Using logistic regression analysis, the low producer genotypes remained an independent risk factor for AKI. A statistically significant difference was detected between both studied groups as regards the low producer genotype in both TNF-α (-308 G/A) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) (-1082 G/A) polymorphisms being prevalent in patients developing AKI. Principle conclusions: The low producer genotypes of both TNF-α (-308 G/A) and IL-10 (-1082 G/A) polymorphisms could be considered a risk factor for the development of AKI in critically ill patients with severe sepsis, thus management technique implemented for this category should be modulated rescuing this sector of patients from the grave deterioration to acute kidney injury. Using HRM for genotyping proved to be a highly efficient, simple, cost-effective genotyping technique that is most appropriate for the routine study of large-scale samples.

  16. Soluble L-selectin levels predict survival in sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Jakob B; Nielsen, Ole H; Strøm, Jens

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate serum soluble L-selectin as a prognostic factor for survival in patients with sepsis. DESIGN: A prospective study of mortality in patients with sepsis whose serum levels of sL-selectin were measured on admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) and 4 days later. Follow-up data...... organs, and 14 control subjects. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: On admission to the ICU the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II was calculated, and relevant microbial cultures were performed. Mortality was registered at various follow-up points: 7 days after admission, at discharge from hospital......, and 3 and 12 months after admission. Serum sL-selectin levels were significantly lower in the patients than in the controls. Sepsis nonsurvivors had significantly lower levels than survivors. Efficiency analysis and receiver operation characteristics showed that the ideal cutoff point for s...

  17. Transient EDTA-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia in a patient with sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, M; Kudo, H; Yoshitake, S; Ito, K; Shinguu, C; Noguchi, T

    2000-02-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia (EDTA-PTCP) is the phenomenon of a spurious low platelet count due to antiplatelet antibodies that cause platelet clumping in blood anticoagulated with EDTA. We describe a case of EDTA-PTCP that appeared transiently with the development of sepsis. A 50-year-old man underwent Bentall's aortic root replacement for acute aortic dissection with aortic insufficiency. Postoperatively the patient suffered paralytic ileus followed by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus enteritis and septicemia with endotoxemia. EDTA-PTCP appeared with the development of sepsis, and disappeared with its resolution. To avoid incorrect diagnoses and inappropriate treatment, EDTA-PTCP should always be considered as a possible cause of reported low platelet counts, even in patients with sepsis.

  18. Blood transfusion practices in sepsis

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    TVSP Murthy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a clinical syndrome characterised by systemic inflammation due to infection. There is a spectrum with severity ranging from sepsis to severe sepsis and septic shock. Even with optimal treatment, mortality due to severe sepsis or septic shock is significant and poses a challenge to management. Antibiotics, source control, resuscitation with fluids, vasopressor and inotropic agents are the main-stay of treatment for septic shock. These may be supplemented with transfusion of red blood cells and or blood products, in the case of anaemia to sustain sufficient oxygen delivery [1] or to manage associated haematological issues. Transfusion in sepsis has always been a debatable issue, especially in relation to choice of the fluid and the role of blood or blood product transfusion.

  19. Immunization with a streptococcal multiple-epitope recombinant protein protects mice against invasive group A streptococcal infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chih-Feng; Tsao, Nina; Hsieh, I-Chen; Lin, Yee-Shin; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Hung, Yu-Ting

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus; GAS) causes clinical diseases, including pharyngitis, scarlet fever, impetigo, necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. A number of group A streptococcus vaccine candidates have been developed, but only one 26-valent recombinant M protein vaccine has entered clinical trials. Differing from the design of a 26-valent recombinant M protein vaccine, we provide here a vaccination using the polyvalence epitope recombinant FSBM protein (rFSBM), which contains four different epitopes, including the fibronectin-binding repeats domain of streptococcal fibronectin binding protein Sfb1, the C-terminal immunogenic segment of streptolysin S, the C3-binding motif of streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B, and the C-terminal conserved segment of M protein. Vaccination with the rFSBM protein successfully prevented mortality and skin lesions caused by several emm strains of GAS infection. Anti-FSBM antibodies collected from the rFSBM-immunized mice were able to opsonize at least six emm strains and can neutralize the hemolytic activity of streptolysin S. Furthermore, the internalization of GAS into nonphagocytic cells is also reduced by anti-FSBM serum. These findings suggest that rFSBM can be applied as a vaccine candidate to prevent different emm strains of GAS infection. PMID:28355251

  20. Culture-Negative Severe Sepsis: Nationwide Trends and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shipra; Sakhuja, Ankit; Kumar, Gagan; McGrath, Eric; Nanchal, Rahul S; Kashani, Kianoush B

    2016-12-01

    Although 28% to 49% of severe sepsis hospitalizations have been described as being "culture negative," there are very limited data on the epidemiology and outcomes of those with culture-negative severe sepsis (CNSS). The objectives of this study were to investigate the proportion and trends of CNSS and its association with mortality. Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database from 2000 to 2010, we identified adults hospitalized with severe sepsis. Those without any specific organism codes were identified as "with CNSS." We examined the proportion of CNSS hospitalizations and rates of mortality associated with it. We also assessed the independent effect of CNSS on mortality. Of 6,843,279 admissions of patients with severe sepsis, 3,226,406 (47.1%) had culture-negative results. The age-adjusted proportion of CNSS increased from 33.9% in 2000 to 43.5% in 2010 (P sepsis (OR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.72-1.77). CNSS among hospitalized patients is common, and its proportion is on the rise. CNSS is associated with greater acute organ dysfunction and mortality. Having CNSS is an independent predictor of death. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Sepsis and ARDS: The Dark Side of Histones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiheng Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in management over the last several decades, sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS still remain major clinical challenges and the leading causes of death for patients in intensive care units (ICUs due to insufficient understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of these diseases. However, recent studies have shown that histones, also known as chromatin-basic structure proteins, could be released into the extracellular space during severe stress and physical challenges to the body (e.g., sepsis and ARDS. Due to their cytotoxic and proinflammatory effects, extracellular histones can lead to excessive and overwhelming cell damage and death, thus contributing to the pathogenesis of both sepsis and ARDS. In addition, antihistone-based treatments (e.g., neutralizing antibodies, activated protein C, and heparin have shown protective effects and have significantly improved the outcomes of mice suffering from sepsis and ARDS. Here, we review researches related to the pathological role of histone in context of sepsis and ARDS and evaluate the potential value of histones as biomarkers and therapeutic targets of these diseases.

  2. Sepsis and ARDS: The Dark Side of Histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiheng; Huang, Yongbo; Mao, Pu; Zhang, Jianrong; Li, Yimin

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in management over the last several decades, sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) still remain major clinical challenges and the leading causes of death for patients in intensive care units (ICUs) due to insufficient understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of these diseases. However, recent studies have shown that histones, also known as chromatin-basic structure proteins, could be released into the extracellular space during severe stress and physical challenges to the body (e.g., sepsis and ARDS). Due to their cytotoxic and proinflammatory effects, extracellular histones can lead to excessive and overwhelming cell damage and death, thus contributing to the pathogenesis of both sepsis and ARDS. In addition, antihistone-based treatments (e.g., neutralizing antibodies, activated protein C, and heparin) have shown protective effects and have significantly improved the outcomes of mice suffering from sepsis and ARDS. Here, we review researches related to the pathological role of histone in context of sepsis and ARDS and evaluate the potential value of histones as biomarkers and therapeutic targets of these diseases.

  3. Initially unrecognised group A streptococcal pelvic inflammatory disease in a postmenopausal woman

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kouijzer, I.J.; Polderman, F.N.; Bekers, E.M.; Bloks, P.H.; Schneeberger, P.M.; Jager, C.P. de

    2014-01-01

    Invasive group A streptococcal infection is a severe disease with high mortality. Invasive group A streptococcal infection may arise after pelvic inflammatory disease. Pelvic inflammatory disease in postmenopausal women is rare. Here, we report a unique case of a postmenopausal woman with fatal

  4. Severe Sepsis in Severely Malnourished Young Bangladeshi Children with Pneumonia: A Retrospective Case Control Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammod Jobayer Chisti

    Full Text Available In developing countries, there is no published report on predicting factors of severe sepsis in severely acute malnourished (SAM children having pneumonia and impact of fluid resuscitation in such children. Thus, we aimed to identify predicting factors for severe sepsis and assess the outcome of fluid resuscitation of such children.In this retrospective case-control study SAM children aged 0-59 months, admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU of the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh from April 2011 through July 2012 with history of cough or difficult breathing and radiologic pneumonia, who were assessed for severe sepsis at admission constituted the study population. We compared the pneumonic SAM children with severe sepsis (cases = 50 with those without severe sepsis (controls = 354. Severe sepsis was defined with objective clinical criteria and managed with fluid resuscitation, in addition to antibiotic and other supportive therapy, following the standard hospital guideline, which is very similar to the WHO guideline.The case-fatality-rate was significantly higher among the cases than the controls (40% vs. 4%; p<0.001. In logistic regression analysis after adjusting for potential confounders, lack of BCG vaccination, drowsiness, abdominal distension, acute kidney injury, and metabolic acidosis at admission remained as independent predicting factors for severe sepsis in pneumonic SAM children (p<0.05 for all comparisons.We noted a much higher case fatality among under-five SAM children with pneumonia and severe sepsis who required fluid resuscitation in addition to standard antibiotic and other supportive therapy compared to those without severe sepsis. Independent risk factors and outcome of the management of severe sepsis in our study children highlight the importance for defining optimal fluid resuscitation therapy aiming at reducing the case fatality in such children.

  5. Neonatal Sepsis and Neutrophil Insufficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvan, John Nicholas; Bagby, Gregory J.; Welsh, David A.; Nelson, Steve; Zhang, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis has continuously been a leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality despite current advances in chemotherapy and patient intensive care facilities. Neonates are at high risk for developing bacterial infections due to quantitative and qualitative insufficiencies of innate immunity, particularly granulocyte lineage development and response to infection. Although antibiotics remain the mainstay of treatment, adjuvant therapies enhancing immune function have shown promise in treating sepsis in neonates. This chapter reviews current strategies for the clinical management of neonatal sepsis and analyzes mechanisms underlying insufficiencies of neutrophil defense in neonates with emphasis on new directions for adjuvant therapy development. PMID:20521927

  6. Comparative Assessment of Cytokine Pattern in Early and Late Onset of Neonatal Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaertynov, Kh S; Boichuk, S V; Khaiboullina, S F; Anokhin, V A; Andreeva, A A; Lombardi, V C; Satrutdinov, M A; Agafonova, E A; Rizvanov, A A

    2017-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a significant health issue associated with high mortality. Immune responses associated with neonatal sepsis, such as proinflammatory cytokine production, are believed to play a central role in the pathogenesis of this disease. In the present study, serum levels of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL1-β, and IL-6 and the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 were evaluated for 25 subjects with neonatal sepsis. We observed that subjects with late onset of sepsis (LOS), as well as those with early onset of sepsis (EOS), had a substantial increase in serum TNF-α. In contrast to EOS, subjects with LOS demonstrated a significant increase in serum levels IL-6 and IL-10. Additionally, we observed a significant difference in cytokine profiles between acute and postacute cases of neonatal sepsis. For instance, the level of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-6, was elevated in the acute phase, whereas the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-10, became substantially upregulated during the postacute phase. Additionally, no correlation was observed between cytokine levels and CRP levels or lymphocyte counts. Thus, in contrast to CRP levels and lymphocyte counts, examination of the cytokine profile can provide valuable information when determining the most effective therapy for treating neonatal sepsis. This information may be useful to physicians when determining if anti-inflammatory or immune stimulatory therapy is warranted.

  7. Comparative Assessment of Cytokine Pattern in Early and Late Onset of Neonatal Sepsis

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    Kh. S. Khaertynov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal sepsis is a significant health issue associated with high mortality. Immune responses associated with neonatal sepsis, such as proinflammatory cytokine production, are believed to play a central role in the pathogenesis of this disease. In the present study, serum levels of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL1-β, and IL-6 and the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 were evaluated for 25 subjects with neonatal sepsis. We observed that subjects with late onset of sepsis (LOS, as well as those with early onset of sepsis (EOS, had a substantial increase in serum TNF-α. In contrast to EOS, subjects with LOS demonstrated a significant increase in serum levels IL-6 and IL-10. Additionally, we observed a significant difference in cytokine profiles between acute and postacute cases of neonatal sepsis. For instance, the level of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-6, was elevated in the acute phase, whereas the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-10, became substantially upregulated during the postacute phase. Additionally, no correlation was observed between cytokine levels and CRP levels or lymphocyte counts. Thus, in contrast to CRP levels and lymphocyte counts, examination of the cytokine profile can provide valuable information when determining the most effective therapy for treating neonatal sepsis. This information may be useful to physicians when determining if anti-inflammatory or immune stimulatory therapy is warranted.

  8. Diagnostic criteria of acute rheumatic fever.

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    Burke, Rebecca J; Chang, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever is an inflammatory sequela of Group A Streptococcal pharyngitis that affects multiple organ systems. The incidence of acute rheumatic fever has been declining even before the use of antibiotics became widespread, however the disease remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in children, particularly in developing countries and has been estimated to affect 19 per 100,000 children worldwide. Acute rheumatic fever is a clinical diagnosis, and therefore subject to the judgment of the clinician. Because of the variable presentation, the Jones criteria were first developed in 1944 to aid clinicians in the diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever. The Jones criteria have been modified throughout the years, most recently in 1992 to aid clinicians in the diagnosis of initial attacks of acute rheumatic fever and to minimize overdiagnosis of the disease. Diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever is based on the presence of documented preceding Group A Streptococcal infection, in addition to the presence of two major manifestations or one major and two minor manifestations of the Jones criteria. Without documentation of antecedent Group A Streptococcal infection, the diagnosis is much less likely except in a few rare scenarios. Carditis, polyarthritis and Sydenham's chorea are the most common major manifestations of acute rheumatic fever. However, despite the predominance of these major manifestations of acute rheumatic fever, there can be significant overlap with other disorders such as Lyme disease, serum sickness, drug reactions, and post-Streptococcal reactive arthritis. This overlap between disease processes has led to continued investigation of the pathophysiology as well as development of new biomarkers and laboratory studies to aid in the diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever and distinction from other disease processes.

  9. Moraxella catarrhalis sepsis

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    Paola Gualdi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Moraxella catarrhalis is a Gram-negative aerobic diplococcus, commensal of the oro-pharingeal cavity, actually playing an emerging role in the upper respiratory tract infections together with Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. This study reports the case of a twoyearold child who was admitted into hospital with fever, headache and vomit. The chest radiograph showed signs of basal lung involvementmaking the clinical suspicion of bacterial infectionlikely. From blood culture a Moraxella catarrhalis strain was isolated. In young children M. catarrhalis is known to cause otitis media and sinusitis, but only rarely bacteremia. In this case the child showed a clinical picture of lung infection and consequent sepsis due to M. catarrhalis.

  10. Sepsis por shigella flexneri

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    César Cabrera C

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un caso raro de sepsis por Shigella flexneri en una paciente de 45 años de edad quien estando hospitalizada para el estudio de un tumor cerebral, requirió el uso de manitol y dosis altas de corticoides; luego de ello presenta deposiciones líquidas con moco y sangre, desarrolla síndrome de respuesta inflamatoria sistémica, luego se aísla Shigella flexneri en el hemocultivo; recibió tratamiento antibiótico con ciprofloxacina. Se describen las características del caso y se comenta de acuerdo con la revisión de literatura.

  11. Sepsis: implication for nursing

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    Fabio Bertoncini

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a serious health problem that is off worldwide interest; it is associated with a high mortality rate despite continuing improvements in infection management and the awareness of population is still poor despite its importance. Direct interventions to achieve the goal of clinician, like reduction of mortality, pass through the resuscitation and antibiotics but their effectiveness depends on the early recognition of symptoms and therefore the septic state. The nursing role is crucial both for the early recognition of the disease state, as well as to treat the patient with professionalism and promptness and to provide appropriate assistance to the kind of complexity that creates this pathological state: to achieve these aims, recommendations and bundles were developed to guide clinical nurses in septic patients’ care.

  12. Correlation between Protection against Sepsis by Probiotic Therapy and Stimulation of a Novel Bacterial Phylotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, J.; Timmerman, H.M.; Fuentes, S.; Minnen, L.P. van; Panneman, H.; Konstantinov, S.R.; Rombouts, F.M.; Gooszen, H.G.; Akkermans, L.M.; Smidt, H.; Rijkers, G.T.

    2011-01-01

    Prophylactic probiotic therapy has shown beneficial effects in an experimental rat model for acute pancreatitis on the health status of the animals. Mechanisms by which probiotic therapy interferes with severity of acute pancreatitis and associated sepsis, however, are poorly understood. The aims of

  13. Correlation between protection against sepsis by probiotic therapy and stimulation of a novel bacterial phylotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, J.; Timmerman, H.M.; Fuentes, S.; Minnen, van L.P.; Panneman, H.; Konstantinov, S.R.; Rombouts, F.M.; Gooszen, H.G.; Akkermans, L.M.A.; Smidt, H.; Rijkers, G.T.

    2011-01-01

    Prophylactic probiotic therapy has shown beneficial effects in an experimental rat model for acute pancreatitis on the health status of the animals. Mechanisms by which probiotic therapy interferes with severity of acute pancreatitis and associated sepsis, however, are poorly understood. The aims of

  14. Correlation between Protection against Sepsis by Probiotic Therapy and Stimulation of a Novel Bacterial Phylotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, Jacoline; Timmerman, Harro M.; Fuentes, Susana; van Minnen, L. Paul; Panneman, Henk; Konstantinov, Sergey R.; Rombouts, Frans M.; Gooszen, Hein G.; Akkermans, Louis M. A.; Smidt, Hauke; Rijkers, Ger T.

    2011-01-01

    Prophylactic probiotic therapy has shown beneficial effects in an experimental rat model for acute pancreatitis on the health status of the animals. Mechanisms by which probiotic therapy interferes with severity of acute pancreatitis and associated sepsis, however, are poorly understood. The aims of

  15. Radiologic findings of neonatal sepsis

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    Kim, Sam Soo; Han, Dae Hee; Choi, Guk Myeong; Jung, Hye Won [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Hye Kyung; Han, Bokyung Kim; Lee, Nam Yong [Sansung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-06-01

    To review the simple radiographic and sonographic findings in infants with neonatal sepsis. We retrospectively analyzed simple chest and abdominal radiographs, and brain sonograms in 36 newborn infants (preterm : term=23 :13). With neonatal sepsis diagnosed by blood culture and clinical manifestations. Pulmonary parenchymal infiltrate excluding respiratory distress syndrome and pulmonary edema or atelectasis was found in 22 infants (61%). Paralytic ileus, hepatosplenomegaly, and necrotizing enterocolitis were present in 18(50%), 9(25%), and 1(3%) infants, respectively, while skeletal changes suggesting osteomyelitis were found in three. Brain sonography was performed in 29 infants and in four, abnormalities were seen ; these comprised three germinal matrix hemorrhages and one intraparenchymal hemorrhage. In six patients(17%) radiologic examinations revealed no abnormality. In patients with neonatal sepsis, pulmonary infiltrates and paralytic ileus were common abnormalities. Although these were nonspecific, radiologic findings may be used to supplement clinical and laboratory findings in diagnosing neonatal sepsis and planning its treatment.

  16. Thyroid hormone disorders and sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Bin; Yu, Zhui; Li, Yinping

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response syndrome with high mortality, which results from severe infection and can lead to secondary organ dysfunction. It is one of the most common cause of death in intensive care unit. Clinical reports have shown that sepsis was often accompanied by thyroid dysfunction, which is called "low triiodothyronine (T3)" syndrome and characterized by decreased blood total T3 and free T3, and by normal or decreased thyroxine (T4) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). This syndrome may greatly affect the prognosis of patients with sepsis. The main purpose of this review is to illustrate the role of thyroid hormone disorder in the development and prognosis of sepsis.

  17. Neonatal Sepsis and Inflammatory Mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis Machado, Juliana; Soave, Danilo Figueiredo; da Silva, Marcos Vinícius; de Menezes, Liliana Borges; Etchebehere, Renata Margarida; Monteiro, Maria Luiza Gonçalves dos Reis; Antônia dos Reis, Marlene; Corrêa, Rosana Rosa Miranda; Celes, Mara Rúbia Nunes

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality and its signs and symptoms are nonspecific, which makes the diagnosis difficult. The routinely used laboratory tests are not effective methods of analysis, as they are extremely nonspecific and often cause inappropriate use of antibiotics. Sepsis is the result of an infection associated with a systemic inflammatory response with production and release of a wide range of inflammatory mediators. Cytokines are potent inflammatory mediators and their serum levels are increased during infections, so changes from other inflammatory effector molecules may occur. Although proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines have been identified as probable markers of neonatal infection, in order to characterize the inflammatory response during sepsis, it is necessary to analyze a panel of cytokines and not only the measurement of individual cytokines. Measurements of inflammatory mediators bring new options for diagnosing and following up neonatal sepsis, thus enabling early treatment and, as a result, increased neonatal survival. By taking into account the magnitude of neonatal sepsis, the aim of this review is to address the role of cytokines in the pathogenesis of neonatal sepsis and its value as a diagnostic criterion. PMID:25614712

  18. Severe sepsis in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umberger, Reba; Callen, Bonnie; Brown, Mary Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Severe sepsis may be underrecognized in older adults. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to review special considerations related to early detection of severe sepsis in older adults. Normal organ changes attributed to aging may delay early detection of sepsis at the time when interventions have the greatest potential to improve patient outcomes. Systems are reviewed for changes. For example, the cardiovascular system may have a limited or absent compensatory response to inflammation after an infectious insult, and the febrile response and recruitment of white blood cells may be blunted because of immunosenescence in aging. Three of the 4 hallmark responses (temperature, heart rate, and white blood cell count) to systemic inflammation may be diminished in older adults as compared with younger adults. It is important to consider that older adults may not always manifest the typical systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Atypical signs such as confusion, decreased appetite, and unsteady gait may occur before sepsis related organ failure. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria and a comparison of organ failure criteria were reviewed. Mortality rates in sepsis and severe sepsis remain high and are often complicated by multiple organ failures. As the numbers of older adults increase, early identification and prompt treatment is crucial in improving patient outcomes.

  19. Streptococcal peritonitis in Australian peritoneal dialysis patients: predictors, treatment and outcomes in 287 cases

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    McDonald Stephen P

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has not been a comprehensive, multi-centre study of streptococcal peritonitis in patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD to date. Methods The predictors, treatment and clinical outcomes of streptococcal peritonitis were examined by binary logistic regression and multilevel, multivariate poisson regression in all Australian PD patients involving 66 centres between 2003 and 2006. Results Two hundred and eighty-seven episodes of streptococcal peritonitis (4.6% of all peritonitis episodes occurred in 256 individuals. Its occurrence was independently predicted by Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander racial origin. Compared with other organisms, streptococcal peritonitis was associated with significantly lower risks of relapse (3% vs 15%, catheter removal (10% vs 23% and permanent haemodialysis transfer (9% vs 18%, as well as a shorter duration of hospitalisation (5 vs 6 days. Overall, 249 (87% patients were successfully treated with antibiotics without experiencing relapse, catheter removal or death. The majority of streptococcal peritonitis episodes were treated with either intraperitoneal vancomycin (most common or first-generation cephalosporins for a median period of 13 days (interquartile range 8–18 days. Initial empiric antibiotic choice did not influence outcomes. Conclusion Streptococcal peritonitis is a not infrequent complication of PD, which is more common in indigenous patients. When treated with either first-generation cephalosporins or vancomycin for a period of 2 weeks, streptococcal peritonitis is associated with lower risks of relapse, catheter removal and permanent haemodialysis transfer than other forms of PD-associated peritonitis.

  20. [Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome or Kawasaki disease? Two case studies of children with group A streptococcal pneumonia empyema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosland, A; Arlaud, K; Rousset-Rouvière, C; Fouilloux, V; Paut, O; Dubus, J-C; Bosdure, E

    2011-12-01

    We report 2 cases of children with group A streptococcus pyogenes pleuropneumonia, in one child associated with Kawasaki disease and in the other with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. These 2 features, with theoretically well-defined clinical and biological criteria, are difficult to differentiate in clinical practice, however, likely due to their pathophysiological links. In case of clinical doubt, an echocardiography needs to be performed to search for coronary involvement and treatment including intravenous immunoglobulins, and an antibiotic with an anti-toxin effect such as clindamycin has to be started early.

  1. Pleural empyema and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome due to Streptococcus pyogenes in a healthy Spanish traveler in Japan

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    Tetsuya Sakai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Group A Streptococcus (GAS, Streptococcus pyogenes causes invasive infections including streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS and local infections. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of an invasive GAS infection with pneumonia and pleural empyema (PE followed by STSS (disseminated intravascular coagulation [DIC] and acute renal insufficiency in a healthy male adult. He received combined supportive therapies of PE drainage, anti-DIC agent, hemodialysis, and antimicrobials and eventually made a clinical recovery. GAS isolated from PE was found to have emm1/speA genes, suggestive of a pathogenic strain. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of this disease entity (pneumonia, PE, and STSS in healthy male adults as well as children and adult women.

  2. Pleural empyema and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome due to Streptococcus pyogenes in a healthy Spanish traveler in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Tetsuya; Taniyama, Daisuke; Takahashi, Saeko; Nakamura, Morio; Takahashi, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS, Streptococcus pyogenes) causes invasive infections including streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) and local infections. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of an invasive GAS infection with pneumonia and pleural empyema (PE) followed by STSS (disseminated intravascular coagulation [DIC] and acute renal insufficiency) in a healthy male adult. He received combined supportive therapies of PE drainage, anti-DIC agent, hemodialysis, and antimicrobials and eventually made a clinical recovery. GAS isolated from PE was found to have emm1/speA genes, suggestive of a pathogenic strain. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of this disease entity (pneumonia, PE, and STSS) in healthy male adults as well as children and adult women.

  3. Surviving sepsis in the critical care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Lara

    2015-01-01

    The management of sepsis and septic shock in the intensive care environment is a complex task requiring the cooperation of a multidisciplinary team. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign provides systematic guidelines for the recognition, early intervention, and supportive management of sepsis. Critical care nurses are instrumental in ensuring that these guidelines and other sources of evidence-based practice are used for patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. This article discusses the pathophysiologic processes in severe sepsis and septic shock and discusses the appropriate interventions as recommended by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign. Recommended early treatments are reviewed along with interventions related to hemodynamics, perfusion, and supportive care in the critical care environment.

  4. Functional polymorphisms of interferon-gamma affect pneumonia-induced sepsis.

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    Ding Wang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Sepsis is an inflammatory syndrome caused by infection, and both its incidence and mortality are high. Because interferon-gamma (IFN-γ plays an important role in inflammation, this work assessed IFN-γ single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs that may be associated with sepsis. METHODS: A total of 196 patients with pneumonia-induced sepsis and 213 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers participated in our study from July 2012 to July 2013 in Guangzhou, China. Patient clinical information was collected. Clinical pathology was assessed in subgroups defined based on clinical criteria, APACHE II (acute physiology and chronic health evaluation and SOFA (sepsis-related organ failure assessment scores and discharge rate. Four functional SNPs, -1616T/C (rs2069705, -764G/C (rs2069707, +874A/T (rs2430561 and +3234C/T (rs2069718, were genotyped by Snapshot in both sepsis patients and healthy controls. Pearson's chi-square test or Fisher's exact test were used to analyze the distribution of the SNPs, and the probability values (P values, odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated. RESULTS: No mutations in the IFN-γ -764G/C SNP were detected among the participants in our study. The +874A/T and +3234C/T SNPs were in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD (r(2 = 0.894. The -1616 TC+TT, +874 AT+AA genotype and the TAC haplotype were significantly associated with sepsis susceptibility, while the CTT haplotype was associated with protection against sepsis incidence. Genotype of -1616 TT wasn't only protective against severity of sepsis, but also against higher APACHE II and SOFA scores as +874 AA and +3234 CC. The TAC haplotype was was protective against progression to severe sepsis either. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that functional IFN-γ SNPs and their haplotypes are associated with pneumonia-induced sepsis.

  5. Improving multidisciplinary severe sepsis management using the Sepsis Six .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Amar; Asghar, Maryam; Raulia, Gagandeep; Mandal, Amit Keiran John

    2016-12-01

    Each year in the UK, it is estimated that more than 100,000 people are admitted to hospital with sepsis and around 37,000 people will die as a result of the condition. We present an audit, re-audit and the implications these have had on the management of severe sepsis using the Sepsis Six, ultimately through actively promoting teamwork to initiate the protocol. This led to a significant improvement in management, decreasing admissions to the intensive care unit (ITU), length of stay in hospital and the number of patient deaths.The initial audit and re-audit were done over 2-month periods. All clerking notes of patients with a medical consultant diagnosis of 'sepsis' on post-take ward round were analysed and further screened for presence of severe sepsis according to national guidelines.There was significant improvement from only 1% of patients being appropriately managed (according to the existing guidelines) to 67% of eligible subjects adhering to the protocol (psepsis with trust-wide updated protocols, resulting in a decrease in hospital morbidity and mortality. © Royal College of Physicians 2016. All rights reserved.

  6. HMGB1 redox during sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulmahdi, Wasan; Patel, Devika; Rabadi, May M; Azar, Tala; Jules, Edson; Lipphardt, Mark; Hashemiyoon, Rameen; Ratliff, Brian B

    2017-10-01

    During sepsis, the alarmin HMGB1 is released from tissues and promotes systemic inflammation that results in multi-organ damage, with the kidney particularly susceptible to injury. The severity of inflammation and pro-damage signaling mediated by HMGB1 appears to be dependent on the alarmin's redox state. Therefore, we examined HMGB1 redox in kidney cells during sepsis. Using intravital microscopy, CellROX labeling of kidneys in live mice indicated increased ROS generation in the kidney perivascular endothelium and tubules during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sepsis. Subsequent CellROX and MitoSOX labeling of LPS-stressed endothelial and kidney proximal tubule cells demonstrated increased ROS generation in these cells as sepsis worsens. Consequently, HMGB1 oxidation increased in the cytoplasm of kidney cells during its translocation from the nucleus to the circulation, with the degree of oxidation dependent on the severity of sepsis, as measured in in vivo mouse samples using a thiol assay and mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The greater the oxidation of HMGB1, the greater the ability of the alarmin to stimulate pro-inflammatory cyto-/chemokine release (measured by Luminex Multiplex) and alter mitochondrial ATP generation (Luminescent ATP Detection Assay). Administration of glutathione and thioredoxin inhibitors to cell cultures enhanced HMGB1 oxidation during sepsis in endothelial and proximal tubule cells, respectively. In conclusion, as sepsis worsens, ROS generation and HMGB1 oxidation increases in kidney cells, which enhances HMGB1's pro-inflammatory signaling. Conversely, the glutathione and thioredoxin systems work to maintain the protein in its reduced state. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Antimicrobial peptides in human sepsis

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    Lukas eMartin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Nearly 100 years ago, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs were identified as an important part of innate immunity. They exist in species from bacteria to mammals and can be isolated in body fluids and on surfaces constitutively or induced by inflammation. Defensins have anti-bacterial effects against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as anti-viral and anti-yeast effects. Human neutrophil peptides (HNP 1-3 and human beta-defensins (HBDs 1-3 are some of the most important defensins in humans. Recent studies have demonstrated higher levels of HNP -1-3 and HBD-2 in sepsis. The bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI attenuates local inflammatory response and decreases systemic toxicity of endotoxins. Moreover, BPI might reflect the severity of organ dysfunction in sepsis. Elevated plasma lactoferrin is detected in patients with organ failure. HNP-1-3, lactoferrin, BPI and heparin-binding protein (HBP are increased in sepsis. Human lactoferrin peptide 1-11 (hLF 1-11 possesses antimicrobial activity and modulates inflammation. The recombinant form of lactoferrin (talactoferrin alpha, TLF has been shown to decrease mortality in critically ill patients. A phase II/III study with TLF in sepsis did not confirm this result. The growing number of multiresistant bacteria is an ongoing problem in sepsis therapy. Furthermore, antibiotics are known to promote the liberation of pro-inflammatory cell components and thus augment the severity of sepsis. Compared to antibiotics, AMPs kill bacteria but also neutralize pathogenic factors such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS. The obstacle to applying naturally occurring AMPs is their high nephro- and neurotoxicity. Therefore, the challenge is to develop peptides to treat septic patients effectively without causing harm. This overview focuses on natural and synthetic AMPs in human and experimental sepsis and their potential to provide significant improvements in the treatment of critically ill with severe

  8. Streptococcal necrotizing fasciitis with toxic shock syndrome and rapid fatal outcome

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    Kojić Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Streptococcal necrotizing fasciitis (NF is a serious soft tissue infection with rapid progression of inflammatory process among superficial or deep fascia, systemic host response to infection leading to toxic shock syndrome (TSS, and multiple organ failure. Lethality is high. Case Outline. A 46-year-old male without co-morbidities was admitted to the Emergency Department with redness, swelling and pain on his right lower leg. He became sick two day s ea rlier with m alaise, chills and shivering. On admission he was hypotensive, anuric, with erythematous rash on his face, neck and chest, with acute ren al failure and elevated creatine phosphokinase level. During the next several hours, the changes on his right lower leg rapidly spread to the whole leg, followed by skin destruction and subcutaneo us bleeding, indicating NF. Aggressive antimicrobial, supportive and symptom atic therapy was initiated immediately and on the same evening surgical intervention was performed. Despite these measures, a rapid development of severe TSS, with lethal outcome, occurred in less than 40 hours after the admission. Stre ptococcus pyogenes (group A β-hemolytic Streptococcus was isolated from the throat, skin and tissue obtained duri ng the surgery. Conclusion. Necrotizing fasciitis is a very serious disease with unpre dictable course. For that reason doctors must devote a great deal of a ttention to early, i.e. timely diagnosis of this disease, whose treatment with a multid isciplinary approach is very important.

  9. Pediatric case of crescentic post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis with myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody.

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    Kanai, Hiroaki; Sawanobori, Emi; Koizumi, Keiichi; Ohashi, Ryuji; Higashida, Kosuke

    2015-04-01

    Post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis (PSGN) generally has a good renal prognosis, and immunosuppressive therapies are not needed. However, a few patients present with severe acute kidney injury and extensive crescent formations. The etiology of such patients is not well known, and involvement of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies is rarely reported. A 9-year-old girl with rapidly progressive nephritic syndrome was diagnosed with PSGN. A biopsy showed diffuse crescentic glomerulonephritis with immunoglobulin G and C3 deposits; moreover, humps were observed on electron microscopy. After she was administered methylprednisolone pulse therapy and intravenous cyclophosphamide, followed by prednisolone and azathioprine therapy, her urinary abnormalities improved and renal function normalized. However, the myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA) titers gradually increased. We speculated that PSGN may be augmented by increased MPO-ANCA levels. Therefore, the patient is currently being treated with losartan, enalapril, azathioprine, and prednisolone. Although the MPO-ANCA titer remains high, urinary findings show mild proteinuria and her renal function has been norma for 18 months since onset. A progressive clinical course and severe histological findings may indicate the involvement of ANCA in deterioration of condition in patients with PSGN. Furthermore, in such cases immunosuppressive therapies should be considered even in pediatric PSGN.

  10. Sepsis-induced morbidity in mice: effects on body temperature, body weight, cage activity, social behavior and cytokines in brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Jill I; Ratti, Pietro-Luca; Datta, Subhash C; Raymond, Richard M; Opp, Mark R

    2013-07-01

    Infection negatively impacts mental health, as evidenced by the lethargy, malaise, and cognitive deficits experienced during illness. These changes in central nervous system processes, collectively termed sickness behavior, have been shown in animal models to be mediated primarily by the actions of cytokines in brain. Most studies of sickness behavior to date have used bolus injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or selective administration of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) or IL-6 as the immune challenge. Such models, although useful for determining mechanisms responsible for acute changes in physiology and behavior, do not adequately represent the more complex effects on central nervous system (CNS) processes of a true infection with replicating pathogens. In the present study, we used the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model to quantify sepsis-induced alterations in several facets of physiology and behavior of mice. We determined the impact of sepsis on cage activity, body temperature, food and water consumption and body weights of mice. Because cytokines are critical mediators of changes in behavior and temperature regulation during immune challenge, we also quantified sepsis-induced alterations in cytokine mRNA and protein in brain during the acute period of sepsis onset. We now report that cage activity and temperature regulation in mice that survive are altered for up to 23 days after sepsis induction. Food and water consumption are transiently reduced, and body weight is lost during sepsis. Furthermore, sepsis decreases social interactions for 24-48 h. Finally, mRNA and protein for IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) are upregulated in the hypothalamus, hippocampus, and brain stem during sepsis onset, from 6h to 72 h post sepsis induction. Collectively, these data indicate that sepsis not only acutely alters physiology, behavior and cytokine profiles in brain, but that some brain functions are impaired for

  11. Experimental Cannabinoid 2 Receptor-Mediated Immune Modulation in Sepsis

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    J. Sardinha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a complex condition that results from a dysregulated immune system in response to a systemic infection. Current treatments lack effectiveness in reducing the incidence and mortality associated with this disease. The endocannabinoid system offers great promise in managing sepsis pathogenesis due to its unique characteristics. The present study explored the effect of modulating the CB2 receptor pathway in an acute sepsis mouse model. Endotoxemia was induced by intravenous injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS in mice and intestinal microcirculation was assessed through intravital microscopy. We found that HU308 (CB2 receptor agonist reduced the number of adherent leukocytes in submucosal venules but did not restore muscular and mucosal villi FCD in endotoxemic mice. AM630 (CB2 receptor antagonist maintained the level of adherent leukocytes induced by LPS but further reduced muscular and mucosal villi FCD. URB597 (FAAH inhibitor and JZL184 (MAGL inhibitor both reduced the number of adherent leukocytes in submucosal venules but did not restore the mucosal villi FCD. Using various compounds we have shown different mechanisms of activating CB2 receptors to reduce leukocyte endothelial interactions in order to prevent further inflammatory damage during sepsis.

  12. Soluble Suppression of Tumorigenicity 2 and Echocardiography in Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyun Suk; Hur, Mina; Kim, Hanah; Magrini, Laura; Marino, Rossella; Di Somma, Salvatore

    2016-11-01

    Soluble suppression of tumorigenicity 2 (sST2) has emerged as a biomarker of cardiac stretch or remodeling, and has demonstrated a role in acutely decompensated heart failure. However, its role in sepsis-induced cardiac dysfunction is still unknown. We explored whether sST2 serum concentration reflects either systolic or diastolic dysfunction as measured by Doppler echocardiography. In a total of 127 patients with sepsis, correlations between sST2 and blood pressure, left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction, LV diastolic filling (ratio of early transmitral flow velocity to early diastolic mitral annulus velocity), and resting pulmonary arterial pressure were evaluated. Correlations between sST2 and other sepsis biomarkers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [hs-CRP] and procalcitonin) were also examined. sST2 showed a moderate correlation with mean arterial pressure (r=-0.3499) but no correlation with LV ejection fraction, diastolic filling, or resting pulmonary hypertension. It showed moderate correlations with hs-CRP and procalcitonin (r=0.2608 and r=0.3829, respectively). sST2 might have a role as a biomarker of shock or inflammation, but it cannot reflect echocardiographic findings of LV ejection fraction or diastolic filling in sepsis.

  13. Immunomodulatory Effect of Continuous Venovenous Hemofiltration during Sepsis: Preliminary Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Servillo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Severe sepsis and septic shock are the primary causes of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS, which is the most frequent cause of death in intensive care unit patients. Many pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6, play a strategic role in septic syndrome. Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT removes in a nonselective way pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators. Objective. To investigate the effects of continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH as an immunomodulatory treatment of sepsis in a prospective clinical study. Methods. High flux hemofiltration (Qf = 60 ml/Kg/hr was performed for 72 hr in thirteen critically ill patients suffering from severe sepsis or septic shock with acute renal failure (ARF. IL-6 gene expression was measured by real-time PCR analysis on RNA extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cell before beginning of treatment (T0 and after 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours (T1–4. Results. Real-time PCR analysis demonstrated in twelve patients IL-6 mRNA reduction after 12 hours of treatment and a progressive increase after 24, 48, and 72 hours. Conclusions. We suggest that an immunomodulatory effect might exist during CVVH performed in critically ill patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. Our data show that the transcriptional activity of IL-6 increases during CVVH.

  14. Epidemiology of sepsis in Catalonia: analysis of incidence and outcomes in a European setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yébenes, Juan Carlos; Ruiz-Rodriguez, Juan Carlos; Ferrer, Ricard; Clèries, Montserrat; Bosch, Anna; Lorencio, Carol; Rodriguez, Alejandro; Nuvials, Xavier; Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Artigas, Antoni

    2017-12-01

    Up-to-date identification of local trends in sepsis incidence and outcomes is of considerable public health importance. The aim of our study was to estimate annual incidence rates and in-hospital mortality trends for hospitalized patients with sepsis in a European setting, while avoiding selection bias in relation to different complexity hospitals. A large retrospective analysis of a 5-year period (2008-2012) was conducted of hospital discharge records obtained from the Catalan Health System (CatSalut) Minimum Basic Data Set for Acute-Care Hospitals (a mandatory population-based register of admissions to all public and private acute-care hospitals in Catalonia). Patients hospitalized with sepsis were detected on the basis of ICD-9-CM codes used to identify acute organ dysfunction and infectious processes. Of 4,761,726 discharges from all acute-care hospitals in Catalonia, 82,300 cases (1.72%) had sepsis diagnoses. Annual incidence was 212.7 per 100,000 inhabitants/year, rising from 167.2 in 2008 to 261.8 in 2012. Length of hospital stay fell from 18.4 to 15.3 days (p < .00001), representing a relative reduction of 17%. Hospital mortality fell from 23.7 to 19.7% (p < .0001), representing a relative reduction of 16.9%. These differences were confirmed in the multivariate analysis (adjusted for age group, sex, comorbidities, ICU admission, emergency admission, organ dysfunction, number of organ failures, sepsis source and bacteraemia). Sepsis incidence has risen in recent years, whereas mortality has fallen. Our findings confirm reports for other parts of the world, in the context of scarce administrative data on sepsis in Europe.

  15. Diagnostic utility of biomarkers for neonatal sepsis--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedegaard, Sofie Sommer; Wisborg, Kirsten; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2015-03-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis and treatment of the neonate with suspected sepsis are essential to prevent life-threatening complications. Diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is a challenge due to non-specific clinical signs and the fact that infection markers are difficult to interpret in the first and critical phase of neonatal sepsis. The objective of the present study was to systematically evaluate existing evidence of the diagnostic utility of biomarkers for prediction of sepsis in neonates. We conducted a systematic literature search performed in PubMed and Embase. The study population was neonates with gestation age > 24 weeks in their first 28 days of life with suspected sepsis. The included manuscripts were rated due to criteria from a modified rating scale developed by Douglas Altman. Of 292 potentially relevant manuscripts, 77 fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria; 16 (21%) were rated as high-quality studies. C-reactive protein (CRP) was the most extensively studied biomarker evaluated. The high-quality studies indicated that the acute phase protein serum amyloid A had high sensitivity, both at onset of symptoms and 2 days after. The studies evaluating serum amyloid A presented a variable positive predictive value (PPV, 0.67 and 0.92) with a high negative predictive value (NPV, 0.97 and 1.00). The existing evidence of the diagnostic value of serum amyloid A for neonatal sepsis showed promising results, and should be further investigated in clinical settings.

  16. 重组人促红细胞生成素对脓毒症大鼠肺脏的保护作用%Protective effects of recombinant human erythropoietin on acute lung injury induced by sepsis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    桑珍珍; 许云; 盛英杰; 赵敏

    2013-01-01

    were not as serious as those in the LPS group,showing only a little inflammatory cells infiltration of focal alveoli.Conclusions Recombinant human erythropoietin can inhibit the genesis of TNF-α,IL-6 and iNOS in serum,modifying the inflammatory response and providing protective effects against acute lung injury induced by sepsis.

  17. PREVALENCE OF BETA-HAEMOLYTIC STREPTOCOCCAL THROAT INFECTIONS IN PAEDIATRIC AGE GROUP IN MADURAI

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sugumari Chandrasegaran; Mahesh Prabhu Subramaniyan

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To assess the prevalence of Streptococcal sore throat infections in the paediatric age group in order to provide prompt treatment at an early stage to reduce the fatal consequences of post-infectious sequelae...

  18. [Epidemiology of invasive group A streptococcal infections in developed countries : the Canadian experience with necrotizing fasciitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovetchkine, Ph; Bidet, Ph; Minodier, Ph; Frère, J; Bingen, E

    2014-11-01

    In industrialized countries, group A streptococcal infections were a source of concern, mainly due to the occurrence of rheumatic fever and its cardiac complications. At present, the incidence of rheumatic fever is decreasing in these countries, giving way to an increasing occurrence of invasive streptococcal group A infections with high level of morbidity and mortality. Streptococcal necrotizing fasciitis, a specific entity, emerged these last decades, often in association with chickenpox. The introduction of the varicella vaccine in the province of Quebec routine immunization program, was followed by a significant decrease in the number of necrotizing fasciitis or other skin and soft-tissues infections in our pediatric population. However, in our experience at the CHU Sainte-Justine, this immunization program has not been helpful to reduce the overall incidence of invasive group A streptococcal infections. Conversely, an increase in the number of pleuro-pulmonary and osteo-articular infections was observed.

  19. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome presenting as septic knee arthritis in a 5-year-old child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwattar, Basil J; Strongwater, Allan; Sala, Debra A

    2008-01-01

    Group A streptococci, also known as Streptococcus pyogenes, is a common cause of infection in the pediatric population. Recently, the incidence of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome, a serious and often deadly manifestation of group A streptococci infection, has increased. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome often presents with complaints of musculoskeletal pain, which frequently leads to early involvement of an orthopaedic surgeon. In this case report, we present a 5-year-old child who presented with a septic arthritis of the knee, whose final diagnosis was streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. A review of the literature and the aspects of this case report emphasize the emergent nature of streptococcal joint infections and the judicious use of orthopaedic intervention in such patients.

  20. Association of fungal sepsis and galactosemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sanjay; Bharti, Bhavneet; Inusha, P

    2010-06-01

    Galactosemia is one of the rare inborn errors of metabolism, which if detected early can be treated effectively. Galactosemic infants have a significant increased risk of developing sepsis. E. coli sepsis is a known entity, and also an important cause of early mortality in these children. But fungal sepsis in these patients is rarely reported. Here is a case of 45 day-old child who presented with fungal sepsis, which on investigation turned out to be galactosemia.

  1. Severe sepsis management are we doing enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Tom; Vollman, Kathleen

    2003-10-01

    For the first time in medical history, a drug has been shown to reduce the mortality associated with sepsis, the leading cause of death in many ICUs. Optimal use by appropriate selection of patients and early recognition of sepsis could save thousands of lives. Nurses play a major role in recognizing severe sepsis. By using the concepts introduced here, nurses can play a direct role in saving the lives of patients with sepsis.

  2. Immunosuppression after sepsis: systemic inflammation and sepsis induce a loss of naive T-cells but no enduring cell-autonomous defects in T-cell function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robby Markwart

    Full Text Available Sepsis describes the life-threatening systemic inflammatory response (SIRS of an organism to an infection and is the leading cause of mortality on intensive care units (ICU worldwide. An acute episode of sepsis is characterized by the extensive release of cytokines and other mediators resulting in a dysregulated immune response leading to organ damage and/or death. This initial pro-inflammatory burst often transits into a state of immune suppression characterised by loss of immune cells and T-cell dysfunction at later disease stages in sepsis survivors. However, despite these appreciations, the precise nature of the evoked defect in T-cell immunity in post-acute phases of SIRS remains unknown. Here we present an in-depth functional analysis of T-cell function in post-acute SIRS/sepsis. We document that T-cell function is not compromised on a per cell basis in experimental rodent models of infection-free SIRS (LPS or CpG or septic peritonitis. Transgenic antigen-specific T-cells feature an unaltered cytokine response if challenged in vivo and ex vivo with cognate antigens. Isolated CD4(+/CD8(+ T-cells from post-acute septic animals do not exhibit defects in T-cell receptor-mediated activation at the the level of receptor-proximal signalling, activation marker upregulation or expansion. However, SIRS/sepsis induced transient lymphopenia and gave rise to an environment of immune attenuation at post acute disease stages. Thus, systemic inflammation has an acute impact on T-cell numbers and adaptive immunity, but does not cause major cell-autonomous enduring functional defects in T-cells.

  3. Sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE): a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Rebecca; Scott, L Keith; Minagar, Alireza; Conrad, Steven

    2004-05-01

    Sepsis associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a poorly understood condition that is associated with severe sepsis and appears to have a negative influence on survival. The incidence of encephalopathy secondary to sepsis is unknown. Amino acid derangements, blood-brain barrier disruption, abnormal neurotransmitters, and direct CNS effect are possible causes of septic encephalopathy. Research has not defined the pathogenesis of SAE.

  4. Implementatie van de Surviving Sepsis Campaign bundels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Rensen; A. Willems; J. Schouten; N. Stevens; Lilian Vloet; F. Zeegers

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis komt vaak voor in ziekenhuizen. Ernstige sepsis is verantwoordelijk voor 10 - 20% van alle Intensive Care (IC) opnames en is de belangrijkste doodsoorzaak op niet-cardiale IC?s. De gemiddelde mortaliteit van volwassenen met ernstige sepsis op de IC is 33% en van volwassenen met septische shoc

  5. Implementatie van de Surviving Sepsis Campaign bundels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Rensen; A. Willems; J. Schouten; N. Stevens; Lilian Vloet; F. Zeegers

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis komt vaak voor in ziekenhuizen. Ernstige sepsis is verantwoordelijk voor 10 - 20% van alle Intensive Care (IC) opnames en is de belangrijkste doodsoorzaak op niet-cardiale IC?s. De gemiddelde mortaliteit van volwassenen met ernstige sepsis op de IC is 33% en van volwassenen met septische

  6. Diagnostic and Prognostic Assessment Value of High Mobility Group Box 1 for Sepsis and Related Acute Kidney Injury%高迁移率族蛋白1对脓毒症及相关急性肾损伤的诊断和预后评估价值研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱英; 郑世翔; 丁国华; 陈星华

    2016-01-01

    度与特异度分别为73.3%和92.3%, ROC曲线下面积为0.84〔95%CI (0.69,0.99), P=0.002〕。(4)当以尿HMGB1水平为1025.5 ng/L作为截断点时,诊断脓毒症AKI的灵敏度、特异度分别为70.0%和83.3%, ROC曲线下面积为0.73〔95%CI (0.53,0.93), P=0.046〕。(5)当以尿HMGB1水平为875.6 ng/L作为截断点时,预测脓毒症AKI预后的灵敏度、特异度分别为71.4%和90.9%, ROC曲线下面积为0.90〔95%CI (0,0.99), P=0.006〕。(6)采用二元Logistic回归分析脓毒症AKI患者疾病转归与血、尿HMGB1水平及临床指标的相关性,结果显示尿HMGB1水平及APACHEⅡ评分是脓毒症患者AKI病情恶化的相关因素( b分别为0.010和-0.353, P值分别为0.037和0.046)。结论血、尿HMGB1在脓毒症及相关AKI患者中均明显升高,血HMGB1对脓毒症病情严重程度有鉴别价值,尿HMGB1有助于诊断脓毒症AKI并评估严重脓毒症及脓毒症AKI患者的预后。%Objective To investigate the diagnostic and prognostic value of high mobility group box 1 ( HMGB1) for sepsis and sepsis-induced acute kidney injury ( AKI) .Methods We enrolled 40 patients who were definitely diagnosed with sepsis in Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University from October 2014 to March 2015.According to the severity degree of disease, 12 patients were assigned into normal sepsis group, and 28 patients were assigned into severe sepsis group.According to 28 d outcome, the patients of severe sepsis group were divided into worsening subgroup (n=13) and improving subgroup (n=15);according to whether AKI occurred, the patients were further divided into severe sepsis AKI subgroup ( n=18) and severe sepsis non-AKI subgroup ( n=10 ); according to 28 d outcome, the patients in severe sepsis AKI group were further divided into worsening subgroup (n=11) and improving subgroup (n=7).We also enrolled 5 healthy volunteers as control group.Within 24 hours after enrollment, clinical data were

  7. Galactosemia presenting as recurrent sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, Narendra; Rathi, Akanksha

    2011-12-01

    Galactosemia is a treatable metabolic disorder caused by the deficiency of enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) and inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. A case of neonate manifesting with recurrent Escherichia coli sepsis is presented here which turned out to be a classic galactosemia. No other common presenting features were observed in this infant except cataract on slit lamp examination. To the best of our knowledge, there is no case of galactosemia reported in literature which presented with recurrent neonatal sepsis without hepatomegaly, hyperbilirubinemia, bleeding disorder, vomiting, diarrhea, failure to thrive, hypoglycemia, coagulopathy, hemolysis or renal tubular acidosis.

  8. Importance of diagnostic laboratory methods of beta hemolytic streptococcus group A in comparison with clinical findings in the diagnosis of streptococcal sore throat and unnecessary antibacterial therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiman Eini

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Streptococcus Pyogenes (group A streptococcus, GAS is the most important cause of bacterial pharyngitis in children and adolescents. Acute pharyngitis is one of the most common conditions in all ages but it is most common in children. Over diagnosis of acute pharyngitis represents one of the major causes of antibiotic abuse. The goal of this study is to make an estimate of the frequency of group A streptococcus in sore throat patients in Farshchian hospital emergency department and clinic in Hamadan. Methods: For estimation of the clinical features role in diagnosis of streptococcal sore throat, we took samples of 100 patients with average age of 32.96±29.86 years with sore throat. We took samples from pharynx and used standard methods of bacteriology in order to detect streptococcus. Results: Group A Streptococcus (GAS accounts for 3 percent of all cases of pharyngitis. Clinically, all of the patients had sore throat. The percent breakdowns are as follows: 30% had exudate, 78% had fever, 8% had lymphadenopathy and 7.7 percent of exudative pharyngitis was streptococcal. The cost for unnecessary antibiotic therapy for every single patient who had negative pharynx culture was approximately 32160 Rails. Conclusion: The low frequency of streptococcus pharyngitis in treated patients reveal that diagnosis based on clinical features is not reliable. We recommend use of other diagnostic methods such as Rapid Antigen Detection Tests (RATs. Only reliable and scientific protocols for antibiotic to therapy.

  9. Antibiotic Resistance Patterns in Invasive Group B Streptococcal Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei L. Castor

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are used for both group B streptococcal (GBS prevention and treatment. Active population-based surveillance for invasive GBS disease was conducted in four states during 1996—2003. Of 3813 case-isolates, 91.0% (3471 were serotyped, 77.1% (2937 had susceptibility testing, and 46.6% (3471 had both. All were sensitive to penicillin, ampicillin, cefazolin, cefotaxime, and vancomycin. Clindamycin and erythromycin resistance was 12.7% and 25.6%, respectively, and associated with serotype V (P<.001. Clindamycin resistance increased from 10.5% to 15.0% (X2 for trend 12.70; P<.001; inducible clindamycin resistance was associated with the erm genotype. Erythromycin resistance increased from 15.8% to 32.8% (X2 for trend 55.46; P<.001. While GBS remains susceptible to beta-lactams, resistance to alternative agents such as erythromycin and clindamycin is an increasing concern.

  10. [Characteristics of group A streptococcal meningitis in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, C; Bidet, Ph; Bonacorsi, S; Béchet, S; Cohen, R

    2014-11-01

    Group A streptococcal (GAS) meningitis in children are rare. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical, biological and outcome data on GAS meningitis recorded in the Bacterial Meningitis (BM) French Surveillance Network (GPIP/ACTIV). From 2001 through 2012, 4,564 children suffering from proven bacterial meningitis were recorded in the data base. Among them, 0.7 % were GAS infections. The median age was 5.6 years. A history of community acquired infection before the onset of GAS meningitis was frequent. Apart from the identification of the bacterial species, GAS meningitis were clinically and biologically indistinguishable from meningitis caused by other pathogens notably S. pneumoniae. Case fatality rate was 8 %.

  11. Recurrent group A streptococcal vulvovaginitis in adult women: family epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Jack D; Funaro, Deana; Kaplan, Edward L

    2007-03-01

    Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GAS) vulvovaginitis has been reported in prepubertal girls. In adult women, a vaginal carrier state has been described, but vulvovaginitis is rarely reported. We describe 2 cases of recurrent GAS vulvovaginitis in women whose husbands were gastrointestinal carriers of GAS. Characterization of the isolated strains demonstrated that identical emm types of GAS were shared by partners. Treatment of both partners resulted in resolution of vaginitis. On the basis of negative vaginal culture results obtained after treatment of each individual episode of vaginitis, we believe that the female patients were reinfected as a result of exposure to their husbands, with shedding likely to have occurred in bed. These cases reiterate the necessity for adequate screening of the patient's family and contacts in cases of recurrent GAS infection by culturing all potential areas of GAS carriage.

  12. Group G streptococcal myositis in a patient with myeloproliferative neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Midha, MD MBS

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While many cases of streptococcal infection are due to Lancefield groups A and B, there has been a rise in reported cases of infections due to group G streptococcus. We present a case of an individual with a hematologic malignancy who developed myositis secondary to group G streptococcus, with no clearly identifiable source of infection. The patient was managed with antibiotic therapy rather than surgical intervention due to high surgical risk related to severe thrombocytopenia. Targeted antibiotics initiated early in the course of disease may prevent the need for surgical intervention. Early diagnosis and treatment are critical to avoid the high morbidity and mortality of life-threatening infections caused by group G streptococcus.

  13. Inflammasome/IL-1β Responses to Streptococcal Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher N. LaRock

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation mediated by the inflammasome and the cytokine IL-1β are some of the earliest and most important alarms to infection. These pathways are responsive to the virulence factors that pathogens use to subvert immune processes, and thus are typically activated only by microbes with potential to cause severe disease. Among the most serious human infections are those caused by the pathogenic streptococci, in part because these species numerous strategies for immune evasion. Since the virulence factor armament of each pathogen is unique, the role of IL-1β and the pathways leading to its activation varies for each infection. This review summarizes the role of IL-1β during infections caused by streptococcal pathogens, with emphasis on emergent mechanisms and concepts countering paradigms determined for other organisms.

  14. Antihypertensive agents acting on the renin-angiotensin system and the risk of sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dial, Sandra; Nessim, Sharon J; Kezouh, Abbas; Benisty, Jacques; Suissa, Samy

    2014-11-01

    In response to safety concerns from two large randomized controlled trials, we investigated whether the use of telmisartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), ARBs as a class and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) increase the risk of sepsis, sepsis-associated mortality and renal failure in hypertensive patients. We performed a nested case-control study from a retrospective cohort of adults with hypertension from the UK General Practice Research Database diagnosed between 1 January 2000 and 30 June 2009. All subjects hospitalized with sepsis during follow-up were matched for age, sex, practice and duration of follow-up with 10 control subjects. Exposure was defined as current use of antihypertensive drugs. From the cohort of 550 436 hypertensive patients, 1965 were hospitalized with sepsis during follow-up (rate 6.9 per 10 000 per year), of whom 824 died and 346 developed acute renal failure within 30 days. Compared with use of β-blockers, calcium-channel blockers or diuretics, use of ARBs, including telmisartan, was not associated with an elevated risk of sepsis (relative risk 1.09; 95% confidence interval 0.83-1.43); but use ACEIs was (relative risk 1.65; 95% confidence interval 1.42-1.93). Users of ARBs, β-blockers, calcium-channel blockers or diuretics, but not users of ACEIs, had lower rates of hospitalization for sepsis compared with untreated hypertensive patients. Findings were similar for sepsis-related 30 day mortality and renal failure. Hypertensive patients treated with ARBs, including telmisartan, do not appear to be at increased risk of sepsis or sepsis-related 30 day mortality or renal failure. On the contrary, users of ACEIs may have an increased risk. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  15. Antihypertensive agents acting on the renin–angiotensin system and the risk of sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dial, Sandra; Nessim, Sharon J; Kezouh, Abbas; Benisty, Jacques; Suissa, Samy

    2014-01-01

    Aims In response to safety concerns from two large randomized controlled trials, we investigated whether the use of telmisartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), ARBs as a class and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) increase the risk of sepsis, sepsis-associated mortality and renal failure in hypertensive patients. Methods We performed a nested case–control study from a retrospective cohort of adults with hypertension from the UK General Practice Research Database diagnosed between 1 January 2000 and 30 June 2009. All subjects hospitalized with sepsis during follow-up were matched for age, sex, practice and duration of follow-up with 10 control subjects. Exposure was defined as current use of antihypertensive drugs. Results From the cohort of 550 436 hypertensive patients, 1965 were hospitalized with sepsis during follow-up (rate 6.9 per 10 000 per year), of whom 824 died and 346 developed acute renal failure within 30 days. Compared with use of β-blockers, calcium-channel blockers or diuretics, use of ARBs, including telmisartan, was not associated with an elevated risk of sepsis (relative risk 1.09; 95% confidence interval 0.83–1.43); but use ACEIs was (relative risk 1.65; 95% confidence interval 1.42–1.93). Users of ARBs, β-blockers, calcium-channel blockers or diuretics, but not users of ACEIs, had lower rates of hospitalization for sepsis compared with untreated hypertensive patients. Findings were similar for sepsis-related 30 day mortality and renal failure. Conclusions Hypertensive patients treated with ARBs, including telmisartan, do not appear to be at increased risk of sepsis or sepsis-related 30 day mortality or renal failure. On the contrary, users of ACEIs may have an increased risk. PMID:24803383

  16. A Multiplex Assay for Detection of Staphylococcal and Streptococcal Exotoxins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Sharma

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal and streptococcal exotoxins, also known as superantigens, mediate a range of diseases including toxic shock syndrome, and they exacerbate skin, pulmonary and systemic infections caused by these organisms. When present in food sources they can cause enteric effects commonly known as food poisoning. A rapid, sensitive assay for the toxins would enable testing of clinical samples and improve surveillance of food sources. Here we developed a bead-based, two-color flow cytometry assay using single protein domains of the beta chain of T cell receptors engineered for high-affinity for staphylococcal (SEA, SEB and TSST-1 and streptococcal (SpeA and SpeC toxins. Site-directed biotinylated forms of these high-affinity agents were used together with commercial, polyclonal, anti-toxin reagents to enable specific and sensitive detection with SD50 values of 400 pg/ml (SEA, 3 pg/ml (SEB, 25 pg/ml (TSST-1, 6 ng/ml (SpeA, and 100 pg/ml (SpeC. These sensitivities were in the range of 4- to 80-fold higher than achieved with standard ELISAs using the same reagents. A multiplex format of the assay showed reduced sensitivity due to higher noise associated with the use of multiple polyclonal agents, but the sensitivities were still well within the range necessary for detection in food sources or for rapid detection of toxins in culture supernatants. For example, the assay specifically detected toxins in supernatants derived from cultures of Staphylococcus aureus. Thus, these reagents can be used for simultaneous detection of the toxins in food sources or culture supernatants of potential pathogenic strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes.

  17. Surviving sepsis campaign: international guidelines for management of severe sepsis and septic shock: 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellinger, R Phillip; Levy, Mitchell M; Rhodes, Andrew; Annane, Djillali; Gerlach, Herwig; Opal, Steven M; Sevransky, Jonathan E; Sprung, Charles L; Douglas, Ivor S; Jaeschke, Roman; Osborn, Tiffany M; Nunnally, Mark E; Townsend, Sean R; Reinhart, Konrad; Kleinpell, Ruth M; Angus, Derek C; Deutschman, Clifford S; Machado, Flavia R; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; Webb, Steven A; Beale, Richard J; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Moreno, Rui

    2013-02-01

    -escalation, when appropriate (1B); infection source control with attention to the balance of risks and benefits of the chosen method within 12 hrs of diagnosis (1C); initial fluid resuscitation with crystalloid (1B) and consideration of the addition of albumin in patients who continue to require substantial amounts of crystalloid to maintain adequate mean arterial pressure (2C) and the avoidance of hetastarch formulations (1C); initial fluid challenge in patients with sepsis-induced tissue hypoperfusion and suspicion of hypovolemia to achieve a minimum of 30 mL/kg of crystalloids (more rapid administration and greater amounts of fluid may be needed in some patients) (1C); fluid challenge technique continued as long as hemodynamic improvement, as based on either dynamic or static variables (UG); norepinephrine as the first-choice vasopressor to maintain mean arterial pressure ≥ 65 mm Hg (1B); epinephrine when an additional agent is needed to maintain adequate blood pressure (2B); vasopressin (0.03 U/min) can be added to norepinephrine to either raise mean arterial pressure to target or to decrease norepinephrine dose but should not be used as the initial vasopressor (UG); dopamine is not recommended except in highly selected circumstances (2C); dobutamine infusion administered or added to vasopressor in the presence of a) myocardial dysfunction as suggested by elevated cardiac filling pressures and low cardiac output, or b) ongoing signs of hypoperfusion despite achieving adequate intravascular volume and adequate mean arterial pressure (1C); avoiding use of intravenous hydrocortisone in adult septic shock patients if adequate fluid resuscitation and vasopressor therapy are able to restore hemodynamic stability (2C); hemoglobin target of 7-9 g/dL in the absence of tissue hypoperfusion, ischemic coronary artery disease, or acute hemorrhage (1B); low tidal volume (1A) and limitation of inspiratory plateau pressure (1B) for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS); application of

  18. Surviving Sepsis Campaign: international guidelines for management of severe sepsis and septic shock, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellinger, R P; Levy, Mitchell M; Rhodes, Andrew; Annane, Djillali; Gerlach, Herwig; Opal, Steven M; Sevransky, Jonathan E; Sprung, Charles L; Douglas, Ivor S; Jaeschke, Roman; Osborn, Tiffany M; Nunnally, Mark E; Townsend, Sean R; Reinhart, Konrad; Kleinpell, Ruth M; Angus, Derek C; Deutschman, Clifford S; Machado, Flavia R; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; Webb, Steven; Beale, Richard J; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Moreno, Rui

    2013-02-01

    ); infection source control with attention to the balance of risks and benefits of the chosen method within 12 h of diagnosis (1C); initial fluid resuscitation with crystalloid (1B) and consideration of the addition of albumin in patients who continue to require substantial amounts of crystalloid to maintain adequate mean arterial pressure (2C) and the avoidance of hetastarch formulations (1B); initial fluid challenge in patients with sepsis-induced tissue hypoperfusion and suspicion of hypovolemia to achieve a minimum of 30 mL/kg of crystalloids (more rapid administration and greater amounts of fluid may be needed in some patients (1C); fluid challenge technique continued as long as hemodynamic improvement is based on either dynamic or static variables (UG); norepinephrine as the first-choice vasopressor to maintain mean arterial pressure ≥65 mmHg (1B); epinephrine when an additional agent is needed to maintain adequate blood pressure (2B); vasopressin (0.03 U/min) can be added to norepinephrine to either raise mean arterial pressure to target or to decrease norepinephrine dose but should not be used as the initial vasopressor (UG); dopamine is not recommended except in highly selected circumstances (2C); dobutamine infusion administered or added to vasopressor in the presence of (a) myocardial dysfunction as suggested by elevated cardiac filling pressures and low cardiac output, or (b) ongoing signs of hypoperfusion despite achieving adequate intravascular volume and adequate mean arterial pressure (1C); avoiding use of intravenous hydrocortisone in adult septic shock patients if adequate fluid resuscitation and vasopressor therapy are able to restore hemodynamic stability (2C); hemoglobin target of 7-9 g/dL in the absence of tissue hypoperfusion, ischemic coronary artery disease, or acute hemorrhage (1B); low tidal volume (1A) and limitation of inspiratory plateau pressure (1B) for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS); application of at least a minimal amount of

  19. Therapeutic effects of compound hypertonic saline on rats with sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Dong

    Full Text Available Sepsis is one of the major causes of death and is the biggest obstacle preventing improvement of the success rate in curing critical illnesses. Currently, isotonic solutions are used in fluid resuscitation technique. Several studies have shown that hypertonic saline applied in hemorrhagic shock can rapidly increase the plasma osmotic pressure, facilitate the rapid return of interstitial fluid into the blood vessels, and restore the effective circulating blood volume. Here, we established a rat model of sepsis by using the cecal ligation and puncture approach. We found that intravenous injection of hypertonic saline dextran (7.5% NaCl/6% dextran after cecal ligation and puncture can improve circulatory failure at the onset of sepsis. We found that the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and intracellular adhesion molecule 1 levels in the lung tissue of cecal ligation and puncture rats treated with hypertonic saline dextran were significantly lower than the corresponding levels in the control group. We inferred that hypertonic saline dextran has a positive immunoregulatory effect and inhibits the overexpression of the inflammatory response in the treatment of sepsis. The percentage of neutrophils, lung myeloperoxidase activity, wet to dry weight ratio of lung tissues, histopathological changes in lung tissues, and indicators of arterial blood gas analysis was significantly better in the hypertonic saline dextran-treated group than in the other groups in this study. Hypertonic saline dextran-treated rats had significantly improved survival rates at 9 and 18 h compared to the control group. Our results suggest that hypertonic saline dextran plays a protective role in acute lung injury caused after cecal ligation and puncture. In conclusion, hypertonic/hyperoncotic solutions have beneficial therapeutic effects in the treatment of an animal model of sepsis.

  20. Scintigraphic evaluation in musculoskeletal sepsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkel, K.D.; Fitzgerald, R.H. Jr.; Brown, M.L.

    1984-07-01

    In this article, the mechanism of technetium, gallium, and indium-labeled white blood cell localization in septic processes is detailed, and the method of interpretation of these three isotopes with relationship to musculoskeletal infection is outlined. Specific clinical application of technetium, gallium, and indium-labeled white blood cell imaging for musculoskeletal sepsis is reviewed.

  1. Which biomarkers reveal neonatal sepsis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Wang

    Full Text Available We address the identification of optimal biomarkers for the rapid diagnosis of neonatal sepsis. We employ both canonical correlation analysis (CCA and sparse support vector machine (SSVM classifiers to select the best subset of biomarkers from a large hematological data set collected from infants with suspected sepsis from Yale-New Haven Hospital's Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU. CCA is used to select sets of biomarkers of increasing size that are most highly correlated with infection. The effectiveness of these biomarkers is then validated by constructing a sparse support vector machine diagnostic classifier. We find that the following set of five biomarkers capture the essential diagnostic information (in order of importance: Bands, Platelets, neutrophil CD64, White Blood Cells, and Segs. Further, the diagnostic performance of the optimal set of biomarkers is significantly higher than that of isolated individual biomarkers. These results suggest an enhanced sepsis scoring system for neonatal sepsis that includes these five biomarkers. We demonstrate the robustness of our analysis by comparing CCA with the Forward Selection method and SSVM with LASSO Logistic Regression.

  2. Targeting Rac1 signaling inhibits streptococcal M1 protein-induced CXC chemokine formation, neutrophil infiltration and lung injury.

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    Songen Zhang

    Full Text Available Infections with Streptococcus pyogenes exhibit a wide spectrum of infections ranging from mild pharyngitis to severe Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS. The M1 serotype of Streptococcus pyogenes is most commonly associated with STSS. In the present study, we hypothesized that Rac1 signaling might regulate M1 protein-induced lung injury. We studied the effect of a Rac1 inhibitor (NSC23766 on M1 protein-provoked pulmonary injury. Male C57BL/6 mice received NSC23766 prior to M1 protein challenge. Bronchoalveolar fluid and lung tissue were harvested for quantification of neutrophil recruitment, edema and CXC chemokine formation. Neutrophil expression of Mac-1 was quantified by use of flow cytometry. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine gene expression of CXC chemokines in alveolar macrophages. Treatment with NSC23766 decreased M1 protein-induced neutrophil infiltration, edema formation and tissue injury in the lung. M1 protein challenge markedly enhanced Mac-1 expression on neutrophils and CXC chemokine levels in the lung. Inhibition of Rac1 activity had no effect on M1 protein-induced expression of Mac-1 on neutrophils. However, Rac1 inhibition markedly decreased M1 protein-evoked formation of CXC chemokines in the lung. Moreover, NSC23766 completely inhibited M1 protein-provoked gene expression of CXC chemokines in alveolar macrophages. We conclude that these novel results suggest that Rac1 signaling is a significant regulator of neutrophil infiltration and CXC chemokine production in the lung. Thus, targeting Rac1 activity might be a potent strategy to attenuate streptococcal M1 protein-triggered acute lung damage.

  3. Etiology of pediatric fever in western Kenya: a case-control study of falciparum malaria, respiratory viruses, and streptococcal pharyngitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, Wendy P; Mott, Joshua A; Laktabai, Jeremiah; Wamburu, Kabura; Fields, Barry; Armstrong, Janice; Taylor, Steve M; MacIntyre, Charles; Sen, Reeshi; Menya, Diana; Pan, William; Nicholson, Bradly P; Woods, Christopher W; Holland, Thomas L

    2015-05-01

    In Kenya, more than 10 million episodes of acute febrile illness are treated annually among children under 5 years. Most are clinically managed as malaria without parasitological confirmation. There is an unmet need to describe pathogen-specific etiologies of fever. We enrolled 370 febrile children and 184 healthy controls. We report demographic and clinical characteristics of patients with Plasmodium falciparum, group A streptococcal (GAS) pharyngitis, and respiratory viruses (influenza A and B, respiratory syncytial virus [RSV], parainfluenza [PIV] types 1-3, adenovirus, human metapneumovirus [hMPV]), as well as those with undifferentiated fever. Of febrile children, 79.7% were treated for malaria. However, P. falciparum was detected infrequently in both cases and controls (14/268 [5.2%] versus 3/133 [2.3%], P = 0.165), whereas 41% (117/282) of febrile children had a respiratory viral infection, compared with 24.8% (29/117) of controls (P = 0.002). Only 9/515 (1.7%) children had streptococcal infection. Of febrile children, 22/269 (8.2%) were infected with > 1 pathogen, and 102/275 (37.1%) had fevers of unknown etiology. Respiratory viruses were common in both groups, but only influenza or parainfluenza was more likely to be associated with symptomatic disease (attributable fraction [AF] 67.5% and 59%, respectively). Malaria was overdiagnosed and overtreated. Few children presented to the hospital with GAS pharyngitis. An enhanced understanding of carriage of common pathogens, improved diagnostic capacity, and better-informed clinical algorithms for febrile illness are needed.

  4. Platelets induce apoptosis during sepsis in a contact-dependent manner that is inhibited by GPIIb/IIIa blockade.

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    Matthew Sharron

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: End-organ apoptosis is well-described in progressive sepsis and Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome (MODS, especially where platelets accumulate (e.g. spleen and lung. We previously reported an acute sepsis-induced cytotoxic platelet phenotype expressing serine protease granzyme B. We now aim to define the site(s of and mechanism(s by which platelet granzyme B induces end-organ apoptosis in sepsis. METHODS: End-organ apoptosis in murine sepsis (i.e. polymicrobial peritonitis was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Platelet cytotoxicity was measured by flow cytometry following 90 minute ex vivo co-incubation with healthy murine splenocytes. Sepsis progression was measured via validated preclinical murine sepsis score. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: There was evident apoptosis in spleen, lung, and kidney sections from septic wild type mice. In contrast, there was a lack of TUNEL staining in spleens and lungs from septic granzyme B null mice and these mice survived longer following induction of sepsis than wild type mice. In co-incubation experiments, physical separation of septic platelets from splenocytes by a semi-permeable membrane reduced splenocyte apoptosis to a rate indistinguishable from negative controls. Chemical separation by the platelet GPIIb/IIIa receptor inhibitor eptifibatide decreased apoptosis by 66.6±10.6% (p = 0.008. Mice treated with eptifibatide in vivo survived longer following induction of sepsis than vehicle control mice. CONCLUSIONS: In sepsis, platelet granzyme B-mediated apoptosis occurs in spleen and lung, and absence of granzyme B slows sepsis progression. This process proceeds in a contact-dependent manner that is inhibited ex vivo and in vivo by the platelet GPIIb/IIIa receptor inhibitor eptifibatide. The GPIIb/IIIa inhibitors and other classes of anti-platelet drugs may be protective in sepsis.

  5. Assessment of Sepsis-3 criteria and quick SOFA in patients with cirrhosis and bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piano, Salvatore; Bartoletti, Michele; Tonon, Marta; Baldassarre, Maurizio; Chies, Giada; Romano, Antonietta; Viale, Pierluigi; Vettore, Elia; Domenicali, Marco; Stanco, Marialuisa; Pilutti, Chiara; Frigo, Anna Chiara; Brocca, Alessandra; Bernardi, Mauro; Caraceni, Paolo; Angeli, Paolo

    2017-08-31

    Patients with cirrhosis have a high risk of sepsis, which confers a poor prognosis. The systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria have several limitations in cirrhosis. Recently, new criteria for sepsis (Sepsis-3) have been suggested in the general population (increase of Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) ≥2 points from baseline). Outside the intensive care unit (ICU), the quick SOFA (qSOFA (at least two among alteration in mental status, systolic blood pressure ≤100 mm Hg or respiratory rate ≥22/min)) was suggested to screen for sepsis. These criteria have never been evaluated in patients with cirrhosis. The aim of the study was to assess the ability of Sepsis-3 criteria in predicting in-hospital mortality in patients with cirrhosis and bacterial/fungal infections. 259 consecutive patients with cirrhosis and bacterial/fungal infections were prospectively included. Demographic, laboratory and microbiological data were collected at diagnosis of infection. Baseline SOFA was assessed using preadmission data. Patients were followed up until death, liver transplantation or discharge. Findings were externally validated (197 patients). Sepsis-3 and qSOFA had significantly greater discrimination for in-hospital mortality (area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC)=0.784 and 0.732, respectively) than SIRS (AUROC=0.606) (p<0.01 for both). Similar results were observed in the validation cohort. Sepsis-3 (subdistribution HR (sHR)=5.47; p=0.006), qSOFA (sHR=1.99; p=0.020), Chronic Liver Failure Consortium Acute Decompensation score (sHR=1.05; p=0.001) and C reactive protein (sHR=1.01;p=0.034) were found to be independent predictors of in-hospital mortality. Patients with Sepsis-3 had higher incidence of acute-on-chronic liver failure, septic shock and transfer to ICU than those without Sepsis-3. Sepsis-3 criteria are more accurate than SIRS criteria in predicting the severity of infections in patients with cirrhosis. qSOFA is a

  6. Normalization of Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time Correlates with Low Levels of Dabigatran in a Patient with Severe Sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højland, Rikke Ebenhard; Thorup, Stine Borch; Rasmussen, Bodil Steen

    2015-01-01

    treated with dabigatran etexilate was admitted to intensive care unit with severe sepsis and acute renal failure and in need of bilateral lower limp amputation due to ischemia. The patient had severe coagulopathy and was treated with continuous venovenous hemofiltration in attempt to remove dabigatran......The oral anticoagulant dabigatran etexilate can be a challenge when patients need acute surgery. Sepsis and acute renal failure exacerbate the anticoagulant effect. There is no specific reversal agent for dabigatran etexilate, but it can be removed by hemodialysis. We present a case where a patient...

  7. [Prevention of neonatal group B streptococcal sepsis in Hungary in 2012. Preliminary data of a nation-wide survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sziller, István; Szabó, Miklós; Valek, Andrea; Rigó, Barbara; Ács, Nándor

    2014-07-20

    Bevezetés: Magyarországon jelenleg nincs kötelező útmutató a korai kezdetű újszülöttkori B csoportú Streptococcus-szepszis megelőzésére. Célkitűzés: A szerzők a szülészeti intézetekben spontán szerveződő prevenciós módszerek megismerését tűzték ki célul. Módszer: Az országban működő 71 szülészeti intézettől érdeklődtek a 2012. évben folytatott gyakorlatukról. Eredmények: Megkeresésükre 20 intézetből (27,4%) érkezett válasz. A felmérésben részt vevő intézetekből összesen 36 092 szülésről és 36 588 újszülöttről kaptak adatokat, miközben 2012-ben Magyarországon összesen 90 269 szülést tartottak nyilván. A választ küldő intézetekben a 2012. évi országos szülésszám 39,9%-a zajlott. Valamennyi választ küldő intézet rendelkezett saját stratégiával az újszülöttek korai kezdetű szepszisének megelőzésére. A profilaxisra szoruló terhesek azonosítása az esetek 95%-ában bakteriológiai tenyésztéssel, 5%-ában kizárólag kockázatelemzéssel történt. A bakteriológiai módszert alkalmazó intézetek 58%-a a tenyésztést a 36. hét után végezte. A profilaxisra elsőnek választott antibiotikum minden intézetben penicillinszármazék volt (100%). Az intrapartum antibiotikumprofilaxis többszöri adagolásból állt az intézetek 80%-ában. Kötelező érvényű népegészségügyi előírások hiányában is a hazai szülészeti intézetekben proaktív stratégiával foglalkoztak a korai kezdetű újszülöttkori szepszis megelőzésének kérdésével. Következtetések: A vizsgálatban részt vevő intézetek több mint felében a profilaxis módszere az elfogadott nemzetközi gyakorlatnak felelt meg. Az önkéntes felmérésben a részvételi hajlandóság alacsony volt. Orv. Hetil., 2014, 155(29), 1167–1172.

  8. Increasing prevalence of group B streptococcal infection among pregnant women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kathrine Birch; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Rosthoj, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Group B streptococci (GBS) can cause preterm delivery for women and sepsis and meningitis in infants younger than 90 days of age. The present retrospective cohort study determines the trend over time in the rates of GBS and in demographic risk factors for GBS among pregnant women.......3% in 2002 to 5.1% in 2010 (p neonates in the general population and 7.8 per 1,000 among women with GBS (p

  9. Streptococcal necrotising fasciitis from diverse strains of Streptococcus pyogenes in tropical northern Australia: case series and comparison with the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carson Phillip

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the mid-1980's there has been a worldwide resurgence of severe disease from group A streptococcus (GAS, with clonal clusters implicated in Europe and the United States. However GAS associated sepsis and rheumatic fever have always remained at high levels in many less developed countries. In this context we aimed to study GAS necrotising fasciitis (NF in a region where there are high background rates of GAS carriage and disease. Methods We describe the epidemiology, clinical and laboratory features of 14 consecutive cases of GAS NF treated over a seven year period from tropical northern Australia. Results Incidence rates of GAS NF in the Aboriginal population were up to five times those previously published from other countries. Clinical features were similar to those described elsewhere, with 7/14 (50% bacteremic and 9/14 (64% having associated streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. 11/14 (79% had underlying chronic illnesses, including all four fatalities (29% mortality overall. Important laboratory differences from other series were that leukocytosis was absent in 9/14 (64% but all had substantial lymphopenia. Sequence typing of the 14 NF-associated GAS isolates showed no clonality, with only one emm type 1 and two emm type 3 strains. Conclusions While NF clusters can occur from a single emergent GAS clone, this was not evident in our tropical region, where high rates of NF parallel high overall rates of GAS infection from a wide diversity of strains. The specific virulence factors of GAS strains which do cause NF and the basis of the inadequate host response in those patients who develop NF on infection with these GAS require further elucidation.

  10. Use of intravenous immunoglobulin therapy in the treatment of septic shock, in particular severe invasive group A streptococcal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay H Raithatha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Group A streptococcus (GAS is a β-hemolytic bacterium often found in the throat and skin. The two most severe clinical manifestations of GAS are streptococcal toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg is a gamma globulin made from purified pooled plasma of thousands of donors, consisting mainly of IgG. We report the case of a 40-year-old man admitted after 2 days of vomiting and severe right-sided chest pain. He was hypotensive with a sinus tachycardia, pyrexial, and vasodilated. The only other positive finding was a swollen and erythematous chest wall. Muscle layer biopsies and blood cultures soon grew extensive GAS, and an initial diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis was made. The clinical syndrome was of severe septic shock secondary to invasive GAS. The patient quickly deteriorated with a worsening metabolic acidosis. Despite maximal intensive care therapy including fluids, vasoactive agents, and also activated protein C, the patient continued to remain profoundly hypotensive. A decision was made to commence IVIg, with the aim of immunomodulation of the inflammatory cascade seen in sepsis. Over the next 24 hours the patient improved, was extubated 3 days later, and subsequently discharged from hospital after 2 weeks. Although the evidence for the use of IVIg in severe invasive GAS disease is limited, we feel that on reviewing the available literature its use in this case was justified. The limited worldwide supply and high costs, together with a limited evidence base, warrant restricting its use to cases in which conventional therapy has failed. The literature for use of intravenous immunoglobulin in invasive GAS infection will be reviewed in this article.

  11. Invasive Group A streptococcal disease in Ireland, 2004 to 2010.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, J

    2011-01-01

    Invasive group A streptococcal infections (iGAS) are a major clinical and public health challenge. iGAS is a notifiable disease in Ireland since 2004. The aim of this paper is to describe the epidemiology of iGAS in Ireland for the first time over the seven-year period from 2004 to 2010. The Irish national electronic infectious disease reporting system was used by laboratories to enter the source of iGAS isolates, and by departments of public health to enter clinical and epidemiological details. We extracted and analysed data from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2010. Over the study period, 400 iGAS cases were notified. The annual incidence of iGAS doubled, from 0.8 per 100,000 population in 2004 to 1.6 in 2008, and then remained the same in 2009 and 2010. The reported average annual incidence rates were highest among children up to five years of age (2.3\\/100,000) and adults aged over 60 years (3.2\\/100,000). The most common risk factors associated with iGAS were skin lesions or wounds. Of the 174 people for whom clinical syndrome information was available, 28 (16%) cases presented with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome and 19 (11%) with necrotising fasciitis. Of the 141 cases for whom seven-day outcomes were recorded, 11 people died with iGAS identified as the main cause of death (seven-day case fatality rate 8%). The notification rate of iGAS in Ireland was lower than that reported in the United Kingdom, Nordic countries and North America but higher than southern and eastern European countries. The reasons for lower notification rates in Ireland compared with other countries may be due to a real difference in incidence, possibly due to prescribing practices, or due to artefacts resulting from the specific Irish case definition and\\/or low reporting in the early stages of a new surveillance system. iGAS disease remains an uncommon but potentially severe disease in Ireland. Ongoing surveillance is required in order to undertake appropriate control measures and

  12. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein and risk of sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry E Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Conventional C-reactive protein assays have been used to detect or guide the treatment of acute sepsis. The objective of this study was to determine the association between elevated baseline high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP and the risk of future sepsis events. METHODS: We studied data from 30,239 community dwelling, black and white individuals, age ≥45 years old enrolled in the REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS cohort. Baseline hsCRP and participant characteristics were determined at the start of the study. We identified sepsis events through review of hospital records. Elevated hsCRP was defined as values >3.0 mg/L. Using Cox regression, we determined the association between elevated hsCRP and first sepsis event, adjusting for sociodemographic factors (age, sex, race, region, education, income, health behaviors (tobacco and alcohol use, chronic medical conditions (coronary artery disease, diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, chronic lung disease and statin use. RESULTS: Over the mean observation time of 5.7 years (IQR 4.5-7.1, 974 individuals experienced a sepsis event, and 11,447 (37.9% had elevated baseline hsCRP (>3.0 mg/L. Elevated baseline hsCRP was independently associated with subsequent sepsis (adjusted HR 1.56; 95% CI 1.36-1.79, adjusted for sociodemographics, health behaviors, chronic medical conditions and statin use. CONCLUSION: Elevated baseline hsCRP was associated with increased risk of future sepsis events. hsCRP may help to identify individuals at increased risk for sepsis.

  13. A simple bioscore improves diagnostic accuracy of sepsis after surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zimeng; Chen, Juan; Liu, Yongjun; Si, Xiang; Jiang, Zhiyi; Zhang, Xuyu; Guan, Xiangdong

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and accurate prediction for sepsis remains a challenge in surgical intensive care units. Detection of individual biomarkers is often of marginal usefulness, and several biomarkers are difficult to measure in the clinical setting. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic performance of three routine biomarkers, procalcitonin (PCT), B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), and lymphocyte percentage, as individual or in combination for sepsis in surgical critically ill patients. Circulating PCT, BNP, and lymphocyte percentage were measured in surgical patients on admission to the intensive care unit. A bioscore system combining these biomarkers was constructed. All studied variables were analyzed according to the diagnosis and clinical outcomes of sepsis. A total of 320 consecutive patients were included in the analysis. One hundred fifty-six patients presented with sepsis. In the patients with sepsis, levels of PCT and BNP increased and lymphocyte percentage decreased. For individual biomarkers, PCT achieved the best area under the curve for the diagnosis of sepsis, whereas the diagnostic performance of the bioscore was better than that of each individual biomarker (area under the curve, 0.914 [95% confidence interval, 0.862-0.951]). Levels of BNP and bioscore increased in nonsurvivors in the entire cohort, but the accuracy of these two variables for mortality prediction was lower than that shown by Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score. Furthermore, bioscore failed to predict outcomes in septic patients. A simple bioscore combining PCT together with BNP and lymphocyte percentage improves the diagnostic accuracy for sepsis in surgical critically ill patients but fails to predict outcomes in surgical patients with sepsis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of clinical symptoms and rapid diagnostic test in group A streptococcal perianal infections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Robert; Levy, Corinne; Bonacorsi, Stéphane; Wollner, Alain; Koskas, Marc; Jung, Camille; Béchet, Stéphane; Chalumeau, Martin; Cohen, Jérémie; Bidet, Philippe

    2015-01-15

    From 2009 to 2014, we prospectively enrolled 132 children with perianal infections. The presentation of painful defecation, anal fissures, and macroscopic blood in stools was highly suggestive of group A streptococcal perianal infection (probability 83.3%). We found a high sensitivity of a group A streptococcal rapid diagnostic testing (98%) but relatively low specificity (72.8%).

  15. Molecular epidemiology of the sil streptococcal invasive locus in group A streptococci causing invasive infections in French children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidet, Philippe; Courroux, Céline; Salgueiro, Christophe; Carol, Agnès; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Bonacorsi, Stéphane; Bingen, Edouard

    2007-06-01

    We found 31 different emm-toxin genotypes among 74 group A streptococcal isolates causing invasive infections in French children. The predominant emm types were emm1 (25%), emm3 (8%), emm4 (8%), emm6 (7%), and emm89 (9%). Sixteen percent of isolates harbored the streptococcal invasive locus, half of them belonging to emm4.

  16. Invasive group A streptococcal diseases and pyrogenic exotoxins A and B : an update on pathogenesis and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mascini, EM; Verhoef-Verhage, EAE; van Dijk, H

    2000-01-01

    Since the mid-1980s, there have been increasing numbers of reports on the resurgence of severe invasive group A streptococcal infections world-wide. Despite prompt therapy with penicillin and/or clindamycin, the mortality rates of these infections, including streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome,

  17. An aggressive group a streptococcal cellulitis of the hand and forearm requiring surgical debridement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharucha, Neil J; Alaia, Michael J; Paksima, Nader; Christoforou, Dimitrios; Gupta, Salil

    2011-01-03

    Group A streptococcus is responsible for a diverse range of soft tissue infections. Manifestations range from minor oropharyngeal and cellulitic skin infections to more severe conditions such as necrotizing fasciitis and septic shock. Troubling increases in the incidence and the severity of streptococcal infections have been reported over the past 25 years. Cases of streptococcal necrotizing fasciitis have received significant attention in the literature, with prompt surgical debridement being the mainstay of treatment. However, cases of rapidly progressing upper extremity streptococcal cellulitis leading to shock and a subsequent surgical intervention have not been well described. This article presents a case of an 85-year-old woman with a rapidly progressing, erythematous, painful, swollen hand associated with fever, hypotension, and mental status change. Due to a high clinical suspicion for necrotizing fasciitis, the patient was rapidly resuscitated and underwent immediate surgical irrigation and debridement. All intraoperative fascial pathology specimens were negative for necrotizing fasciitis, leading to a final diagnosis of Group A streptococcal cellulitis. Although surgical intervention is not commonly considered in patients with cellulitis, our patient benefited from irrigation and debridement with soft tissue decompression. In cases of necrotizing fasciitis as well as rapidly progressive cellulitis, prompt diagnosis and aggressive treatment may help patients avoid the catastrophic consequences of rapidly progressive group A streptococcal infections.

  18. Spontaneous perforation of the cystic duct in streptococcal toxic shock syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endeman Henrik

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is a complication of group A streptococcal infection, most often originating from the skin. The syndrome is characterized by fever, hypotension and multiple organ failure. Mortality rate may be as high as 80%. Case presentation A 25-year-old man of Indian origin presented with abdominal complaints, rash and fever after an episode of pharyngitis. The patient was operated and a biliary peritonitis was found caused by perforation of the cystic duct in the absence of calculi. Cholecystectomy was performed, but after the operation, the patient's condition worsened and multi-organ failure developed. Group A streptococci were cultured in blood taken at admission and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome was diagnosed. Treatment consisted of antibiotics, corticosteroids, immunoglobulin and supportive treatment for haemodynamic, respiratory and renal failure. Conclusion This is a patient with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome complicated by spontaneous perforation of the cystic duct. Spontaneous perforation of the cystic duct is a rare finding, most often reported in children and secondary to anatomic defects. We found only one similar adult case in the literature. Perforation may be due to microthrombosis and ischaemia, and so be a part of the multi-organ failure often found in streptococcal toxic shock syndrome.

  19. DIAGNOSIS OF ACUTE PHARYNGITIS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Kulichenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This literature review is dedicated to the issue of clinical and laboratory diagnosis of acute pharyngitis in children and adolescents. Relevance of the topic is justified by omnipresent (up to 70% of patients with acute pharyngitis unreasonable prescription of antibacterial drugs. Differential diagnosis of acute pharyngitis is aimed at identifying patients with the infection induced by group A-hemolytic streptococcus requiring antimicrobial therapy. The article presents current recommendations on microbial diagnosis of streptococcal tonsillitis and a potential of using express tests for rapid diagnosis verification. 

  20. Sepsis-Induced Cardiomyopathy: Mechanisms and Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Cun Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a lethal syndrome with a high incidence and a weighty economy burden. The pathophysiology of sepsis includes inflammation, immune dysfunction, and dysfunction of coagulation, while sepsis-induced cardiomyopathy (SIC, defined as a global but reversible dysfunction of both sides of the heart induced by sepsis, plays a significant role in all of the aspects above in the pathogenesis of sepsis. The complex pathogenesis of SIC involves a combination of dysregulation of inflammatory mediators, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, disorder of calcium regulation, autonomic nervous system dysregulation, and endothelial dysfunction. The treatments for SIC include the signal pathway intervention, Chinese traditional medicine, and other specific therapy. Here, we reviewed the latest literatures on the mechanisms and treatments of SIC and hope to provide further insights to researchers and create a new road for the therapy of sepsis.

  1. Clinical Significance of Tissue Factor and CD13 Double-Positive Microparticles in Sirs Patients with Trauma and Severe Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hisatake; Yamakawa, Kazuma; Ogura, Hiroshi; Koh, Taichin; Matsumoto, Naoya; Shimazu, Takeshi

    2017-04-01

    Activated immune cells such as monocytes are key factors in systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) following trauma and sepsis. Activated monocytes induce almost all tissue factor (TF) expression contributing to inflammation and coagulation. TF and CD13 double-positive microparticles (TF/CD13MPs) are predominantly released from these activated monocytes. This study aimed to evaluate TF/CD13MPs and assess their usefulness as a biomarker of pathogenesis in early SIRS following trauma and sepsis. This prospective study comprising 24 trauma patients, 25 severe sepsis patients, and 23 healthy controls was conducted from November 2012 to February 2015. Blood samples were collected from patients within 24 h after injury and diagnosis of severe sepsis and from healthy controls. Numbers of TF/CD13MPs were measured by flow cytometry immediately thereafter. Injury Severity Score (ISS) and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores were calculated at patient enrollment. APACHE II and SOFA scores and International Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) overt disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) diagnostic criteria algorithm were calculated at the time of enrollment of severe sepsis patients. Numbers of TF/CD13MPs were significantly increased in both trauma and severe sepsis patients versus controls and correlated significantly with ISS and APACHE II score in trauma patients and with APACHE II and ISTH DIC scores in severe sepsis patients. Increased numbers of TF/CD13MPs correlated significantly with severities in the acute phase in trauma and severe sepsis patients, suggesting that TF/CD13MPs are important in the pathogenesis of early SIRS following trauma and sepsis.

  2. Bacterial Culture of Neonatal Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AH Movahedian

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal bacterial sepsis is one of the major cause of morbidity and mortality in neonates. This retrospective study was performed to determine the incidence of bacterial sepsis with focus on Gram negative organisms in neonates admitted at Beheshti Hospital in Kashan, during a 3-yr period, from September 2002 to September 2005. Blood culture was performed on all neonates with risk factors or signs of suggestive sepsis. Blood samples were cultured using brain heart infusion (BHI broth according to standard method. From the 1680 neonates 36% had positive blood culture for Pseudomans aeruginosa, 20.7% for Coagulase negative Staphylococci, and 17% for Klebsiella spp. Gram-negative organisms accounted for 72.1% of all positive cultures. The overall mortality rate was 19.8% (22 /111 of whom 63.6% (14 /22 were preterm. Pseudomona aeruginosa and Klebsiella spp. showed a high degree of resistance to commonly used antibiotics (ampicillin, gentamicin as well as third generation cephalosporins. Continued local surveillance studies are urged to monitor emerging antimicrobial resistance and to guide interventions to minimize its occurrence.

  3. Biosensor of endotoxin and sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yang; Wang, Xiang; Wu, Xi; Gao, Wei; He, Qing-hua; Cai, Shaoxi

    2001-09-01

    To investigate the relation between biosensor of endotoxin and endotoxin of plasma in sepsis. Method: biosensor of endotoxin was designed with technology of quartz crystal microbalance bioaffinity sensor ligand of endotoxin were immobilized by protein A conjugate. When a sample soliton of plasma containing endotoxin 0.01, 0.03, 0.06, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0Eu, treated with perchloric acid and injected into slot of quartz crystal surface respectively, the ligand was released from the surface of quartz crystal to form a more stable complex with endotoxin in solution. The endotoxin concentration corresponded to the weight change on the crystal surface, and caused change of frequency that occurred when desorbed. The result was biosensor of endotoxin might detect endotoxin of plasma in sepsis, measurements range between 0.05Eu and 0.5Eu in the stop flow mode, measurement range between 0.1Eu and 1Eu in the flow mode. The sensor of endotoxin could detect the endotoxin of plasm rapidly, and use for detection sepsis in clinically.

  4. Early-Onset Neonatal Sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Kari A.; Anderson-Berry, Ann L.; Delair, Shirley F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Early-onset sepsis remains a common and serious problem for neonates, especially preterm infants. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is the most common etiologic agent, while Escherichia coli is the most common cause of mortality. Current efforts toward maternal intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis have significantly reduced the rates of GBS disease but have been associated with increased rates of Gram-negative infections, especially among very-low-birth-weight infants. The diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is based on a combination of clinical presentation; the use of nonspecific markers, including C-reactive protein and procalcitonin (where available); blood cultures; and the use of molecular methods, including PCR. Cytokines, including interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 8 (IL-8), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and cell surface antigens, including soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM) and CD64, are also being increasingly examined for use as nonspecific screening measures for neonatal sepsis. Viruses, in particular enteroviruses, parechoviruses, and herpes simplex virus (HSV), should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Empirical treatment should be based on local patterns of antimicrobial resistance but typically consists of the use of ampicillin and gentamicin, or ampicillin and cefotaxime if meningitis is suspected, until the etiologic agent has been identified. Current research is focused primarily on development of vaccines against GBS. PMID:24396135

  5. Hyporesponsiveness of peripheral blood lymphocytes to streptococcal superantigens in patients with guttate psoriasis: evidence for systemic stimulation of T cells with superantigens released from focally infecting Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokura, Y; Seo, N; Ohshima, A; Wakita, H; Yokote, R; Furukawa, F; Takigawa, M

    1999-01-01

    Throat infection with Streptococcus pyogenes is the most important trigger for acute guttate psoriasis. We examined the in vitro responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to streptococcal superantigens, SPEA and SPEC, and staphylococcal superantigens, SEB and TSST-1, in patients with guttate psoriasis, in patients with chronic plaque psoriasis, and in healthy subjects. PBMC from patients with guttate psoriasis responded poorly to SPEA and SPEC at concentrations of 0.1 and 1 ng/ml as compared with those from patients with plaque psoriasis, but showed high responses to SEB and TSST-1. The hyporesponsiveness recovered after improvement of the skin eruption. There was no significant difference between guttate and chronic types of psoriasis in the percentage of circulating T-cell receptor BV2 or BV8-bearing T cells, responsive to streptococcal superantigens, indicating that T-cell clonal anergy was a mechanism underlying the hyporesponsiveness. Our results suggest that superantigens released from focally infecting S. pyogenes induce a transient activation of relevant T cells, leading to the development of skin eruption and, subsequently, temporary T-cell anergy to these toxins.

  6. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy and its differential diagnosis.

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    Iacobone, Emanuele; Bailly-Salin, Juliette; Polito, Andrea; Friedman, Diane; Stevens, Robert D; Sharshar, Tarek

    2009-10-01

    Sepsis is often complicated by an acute and reversible deterioration of mental status, which is associated with increased mortality and is consistent with delirium but can also be revealed by a focal neurologic sign. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy is accompanied by abnormalities of electroencephalogram and somatosensory-evoked potentials, increased in biomarkers of brain injury (i.e., neuron-specific enolase, S-100 beta-protein) and, frequently, by neuroradiological abnormalities, notably leukoencephalopathy. Its mechanism is highly complex, resulting from both inflammatory and noninflammatory processes that affect all brain cells and induce blood-brain barrier breakdown, dysfunction of intracellular metabolism, brain cell death, and brain injuries. Its diagnosis relies essentially on neurologic examination that can lead one to perform specific neurologic tests. Electroencephalography is required in the presence of seizure; neuroimaging in the presence of seizure, focal neurologic signs or suspicion of cerebral infection; and both when encephalopathy remains unexplained. In practice, cerebrospinal fluid analysis should be performed if there is any doubt of meningitis. Hepatic, uremic, or respiratory encephalopathy, metabolic disturbances, drug overdose, withdrawal of sedatives or opioids, alcohol withdrawal delirium, and Wernicke's encephalopathy are the main differential diagnoses of sepsis-associated encephalopathy. Patient management is based mainly on controlling infection, organ system failure, and metabolic homeostasis, at the same time avoiding neurotoxic drugs.

  7. Intensive insulin therapy and pentastarch resuscitation in severe sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunkhorst, Frank M; Engel, Christoph; Bloos, Frank; Meier-Hellmann, Andreas; Ragaller, Max; Weiler, Norbert; Moerer, Onnen; Gruendling, Matthias; Oppert, Michael; Grond, Stefan; Olthoff, Derk; Jaschinski, Ulrich; John, Stefan; Rossaint, Rolf; Welte, Tobias; Schaefer, Martin; Kern, Peter; Kuhnt, Evelyn; Kiehntopf, Michael; Hartog, Christiane; Natanson, Charles; Loeffler, Markus; Reinhart, Konrad

    2008-01-10

    The role of intensive insulin therapy in patients with severe sepsis is uncertain. Fluid resuscitation improves survival among patients with septic shock, but evidence is lacking to support the choice of either crystalloids or colloids. In a multicenter, two-by-two factorial trial, we randomly assigned patients with severe sepsis to receive either intensive insulin therapy to maintain euglycemia or conventional insulin therapy and either 10% pentastarch, a low-molecular-weight hydroxyethyl starch (HES 200/0.5), or modified Ringer's lactate for fluid resuscitation. The rate of death at 28 days and the mean score for organ failure were coprimary end points. The trial was stopped early for safety reasons. Among 537 patients who could be evaluated, the mean morning blood glucose level was lower in the intensive-therapy group (112 mg per deciliter [6.2 mmol per liter]) than in the conventional-therapy group (151 mg per deciliter [8.4 mmol per liter], Ptherapy group than in the conventional-therapy group (17.0% vs. 4.1%, Ptherapy was associated with higher rates of acute renal failure and renal-replacement therapy than was Ringer's lactate. The use of intensive insulin therapy placed critically ill patients with sepsis at increased risk for serious adverse events related to hypoglycemia. As used in this study, HES was harmful, and its toxicity increased with accumulating doses. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00135473.) 2008 Massachusetts Medical Society

  8. Effect of door-to-antibiotic time on mortality of patients with sepsis in emergency department: a prospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Jalili

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis constitutes an important cause of hospital admission with a high mortality rate. Appropriate antibiotic therapy is the cornerstone of therapy in patients with sepsis. Although numerous studies have recommended early antibiotic initiation in severe sepsis or septic shock stages of sepsis syndrome, its role in treatment of patients with sepsis who have not entered these stages remains to be investigated. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of door-to-antibiotic time in sepsis patients with various degrees of severity. This is a longitudinal prospective cohort study on adult patients admitted with sepsis to the emergency department. Sepsis was defined as presence of at least two criteria of systemic inflammatory response syndrome and procalcitonin levels ≥ 2μg/l. Severity of sepsis was determined using the APACHE II (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scoring system. Time to antibiotic administration was recorded and its relationship with mortality was assessed. A total of 145 patients were eligible for enrollment. The mean age was 60.4 years and the mean APACHE score was 13.7. The overall in-hospital mortality was 21.4%, and the mean length of stay in hospital was 211.9 hours. The mean door-to-antibiotic time for our patients was 104.4 minutes. Antibiotic administration time and mortality in patients with APACHE scores of 21 or higher (P=0.05 were significantly related; whereas such a relationship was not observed for patients with APACHE scores of 11- 20 (P=0.46. We observed early antibiotic initiation for patients in sepsis phase with higher severity scores was associated with significant improvement in survival rate.

  9. Sepsis prediction in critically ill patients by platelet activation markers on ICU admission: a prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layios, Nathalie; Delierneux, Céline; Hego, Alexandre; Huart, Justine; Gosset, Christian; Lecut, Christelle; Maes, Nathalie; Geurts, Pierre; Joly, Arnaud; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Albert, Adelin; Damas, Pierre; Gothot, André; Oury, Cécile

    2017-12-01

    Platelets have been involved in both immune surveillance and host defense against severe infection. To date, whether platelet phenotype or other hemostasis components could be associated with predisposition to sepsis in critical illness remains unknown. The aim of this work was to identify platelet markers that could predict sepsis occurrence in critically ill injured patients. This single-center, prospective, observational, 7-month study was based on a cohort of 99 non-infected adult patients admitted to ICUs for elective cardiac surgery, trauma, acute brain injury, and post-operative prolonged ventilation and followed up during ICU stay. Clinical characteristics and severity score (SOFA) were recorded on admission. Platelet activation markers, including fibrinogen binding to platelets, platelet membrane P-selectin expression, plasma soluble CD40L, and platelet-leukocytes aggregates were assayed by flow cytometry at admission and 48 h later, and then at the time of sepsis diagnosis (Sepsis-3 criteria) and 7 days later for sepsis patients. Hospitalization data and outcomes were also recorded. Of the 99 patients, 19 developed sepsis after a median time of 5 days. These patients had a higher SOFA score at admission; levels of fibrinogen binding to platelets (platelet-Fg) and of D-dimers were also significantly increased compared to the other patients. Levels 48 h after ICU admission no longer differed between the two patient groups. Platelet-Fg % was an independent predictor of sepsis (P = 0.0031). By ROC curve analysis, cutoff point for Platelet-Fg (AUC = 0.75) was 50%. In patients with a SOFA cutoff of 8, the risk of sepsis reached 87% when Platelet-Fg levels were above 50%. Patients with sepsis had longer ICU and hospital stays and higher death rate. Platelet-bound fibrinogen levels assayed by flow cytometry within 24 h of ICU admission help identifying critically ill patients at risk of developing sepsis.

  10. [Intoxication syndrome concomitant with recurrent streptococcal tonsillitis and its correction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavelkina, V F; Laseeva, M G

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study selected features of intoxication in the patients presenting with recurrent tonsillitis (RT) and managed by means of the combination of basal therapy with reamberine, a preparation showing the detoxication activity. A total of 70 patients with moderately severe recurrent streptococcal tonsillitis induced by infection with group A beta-hemolytic streptococci were available for the examination. Characteristics of endogenous intoxication were explored. The study has demonstrated that recurrent tonsillitis is associated with the development of the pronounced symptoms of endogenous intoxication (EI) as suggested by the enhanced leukocytic index of intoxication (LII) and the elevated levels of medium molecular weight molecules (MWM) with the simultaneous impairment of detoxication properties of albumin. Collectively, these changes are indicative of incompleteness of the pathological process that may be regarded as an unfavourable prognostic factor and suggests the risk of development of tonsillogenic pathology, its relapses, and chronization of the process. Taken together, these findings indicate the necessity of developing novel approaches to the treatment of recurrent tonsillitis with special reference to the use of pharmaceutical products possessed of detoxication activity. Reamberine introduced in the combined treatment of RT was shown to decrease the severity of intoxication as confirmed by normalization of LII and MWM levels as well as the improvement of detoxication properties of albumin. It is concluded that therapeutic efficacy of reamberine opens up wide prospects for its clinical applications.

  11. [Management of severe invasive group A streptococcal infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faye, A; Lorrot, M; Bidet, Ph; Bonacorsi, S; Cohen, R

    2014-11-01

    The group A streptococcus (GAS) is the 5(th) responsible pathogen of invasive infections in children in France. These particularly severe diseases are dominated in children by soft tissue infection, isolated bacteremia but also osteoarthritis. Other complications are rare in France such as lung infections, necrotizing fasciitis (NF) and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS). More unusual localizations such as meningitis, neonatal infections, severe ear and throat and gastrointestinal infections and vascular disorders are also described. Based on published series, mortality ranging from 0-8 % of cases, is high but still lower than that observed in adults. Probabilistic antibiotherapy includes a β-lactam with anti-SGA but also anti-staphylococcal (predominantly methi-S in France) activity such as clavulanic acid- amoxicillin followed by amoxicillin as soon as identification of SGA is performed. The addition of an anti-toxin antibiotic such as clindamycin is recommended particularly in NF or STSS or clinical signs suggestive of toxin production by the SGA (rash, gastrointestinal signs, hemodynamic disorders). The use of intravenous polyvalent immunoglobulins must also be discussed in NF and STSS. In all cases surgery should be discussed. The prognosis of these potentially very severe infections is related to their early diagnosis and treatment. A better understanding of the pathophysiology of these infections may optimize their management but also their prevention.

  12. Procalcitonin is not sufficiently reliable to be the sole marker of neonatal sepsis of nosocomial origin

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    Moro Serrano Manuel

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has recently been suggested that serum procalcitonin (PCT is of value in the diagnosis of neonatal sepsis, with varying results. The aim of this prospective multicenter study was to assess the usefulness of PCT as a marker of neonatal sepsis of nosocomial origin. Methods One hundred infants aged between 4 and 28 days of life admitted to the Neonatology Services of 13 acute-care teaching hospitals in Spain over 1-year with clinical suspicion of neonatal sepsis of nosocomial origin were included in the study. Serum PCT concentrations were determined by a specific immunoluminometric assay. The reliability of PCT for the diagnosis of nosocomial neonatal sepsis at the time of suspicion of infection and at 12–24 h and 36–48 h after the onset of symptoms was calculated by receiver-operating characteristics (ROC curves. The Youden's index (sensitivity + specificity - 1 was used for determination of optimal cutoff values of the diagnostic tests in the different postnatal periods. Sensitivity, specificity, and the likelihood ratio of a positive and negative result with the 95% confidence interval (CI were calculated. Results The diagnosis of nosocomial sepsis was confirmed in 61 neonates. Serum PCT concentrations were significantly higher at initial suspicion and at 12–24 h and 36–48 h after the onset of symptoms in neonates with confirmed sepsis than in neonates with clinically suspected but not confirmed sepsis. Optimal PCT thresholds according to ROC curves were 0.59 ng/mL at the time of suspicion of sepsis (sensitivity 81.4%, specificity 80.6%; 1.34 ng/mL within 12–24 h of birth (sensitivity 73.7%, specificity 80.6%, and 0.69 ng/mL within 36–48 h of birth (sensitivity 86.5%, specificity 72.7%. Conclusion Serum PCT concentrations showed a moderate diagnostic reliability for the detection of nosocomial neonatal sepsis from the time of suspicion of infection. PCT is not sufficiently reliable to be the sole marker of

  13. Procalcitonin is not sufficiently reliable to be the sole marker of neonatal sepsis of nosocomial origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Sastre, José B; Pérez Solís, David; Roqués Serradilla, Vicente; Fernández Colomer, Belén; Coto Cotallo, Gil D; Krauel Vidal, Xavier; Narbona López, Eduardo; García del Río, Manuel; Sánchez Luna, Manuel; Belaustegui Cueto, Antonio; Moro Serrano, Manuel; Urbón Artero, Alfonso; Álvaro Iglesias, Emilio; Cotero Lavín, Ángel; Martínez Vilalta, Eduardo; Jiménez Cobos, Bartolomé

    2006-01-01

    Background It has recently been suggested that serum procalcitonin (PCT) is of value in the diagnosis of neonatal sepsis, with varying results. The aim of this prospective multicenter study was to assess the usefulness of PCT as a marker of neonatal sepsis of nosocomial origin. Methods One hundred infants aged between 4 and 28 days of life admitted to the Neonatology Services of 13 acute-care teaching hospitals in Spain over 1-year with clinical suspicion of neonatal sepsis of nosocomial origin were included in the study. Serum PCT concentrations were determined by a specific immunoluminometric assay. The reliability of PCT for the diagnosis of nosocomial neonatal sepsis at the time of suspicion of infection and at 12–24 h and 36–48 h after the onset of symptoms was calculated by receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curves. The Youden's index (sensitivity + specificity - 1) was used for determination of optimal cutoff values of the diagnostic tests in the different postnatal periods. Sensitivity, specificity, and the likelihood ratio of a positive and negative result with the 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. Results The diagnosis of nosocomial sepsis was confirmed in 61 neonates. Serum PCT concentrations were significantly higher at initial suspicion and at 12–24 h and 36–48 h after the onset of symptoms in neonates with confirmed sepsis than in neonates with clinically suspected but not confirmed sepsis. Optimal PCT thresholds according to ROC curves were 0.59 ng/mL at the time of suspicion of sepsis (sensitivity 81.4%, specificity 80.6%); 1.34 ng/mL within 12–24 h of birth (sensitivity 73.7%, specificity 80.6%), and 0.69 ng/mL within 36–48 h of birth (sensitivity 86.5%, specificity 72.7%). Conclusion Serum PCT concentrations showed a moderate diagnostic reliability for the detection of nosocomial neonatal sepsis from the time of suspicion of infection. PCT is not sufficiently reliable to be the sole marker of sepsis, but would be

  14. The Effect of Sepsis on the Erythrocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Ryon M; Sharpe, Michael D; Singer, Mervyn; Ellis, Christopher G

    2017-09-08

    Sepsis induces a wide range of effects on the red blood cell (RBC). Some of the effects including altered metabolism and decreased 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate are preventable with appropriate treatment, whereas others, including decreased erythrocyte deformability and redistribution of membrane phospholipids, appear to be permanent, and factors in RBC clearance. Here, we review the effects of sepsis on the erythrocyte, including changes in RBC volume, metabolism and hemoglobin's affinity for oxygen, morphology, RBC deformability (an early indicator of sepsis), antioxidant status, intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis, membrane proteins, membrane phospholipid redistribution, clearance and RBC O₂-dependent adenosine triphosphate efflux (an RBC hypoxia signaling mechanism involved in microvascular autoregulation). We also consider the causes of these effects by host mediated oxidant stress and bacterial virulence factors. Additionally, we consider the altered erythrocyte microenvironment due to sepsis induced microvascular dysregulation and speculate on the possible effects of RBC autoxidation. In future, a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in sepsis induced erythrocyte pathophysiology and clearance may guide improved sepsis treatments. Evidence that small molecule antioxidants protect the erythrocyte from loss of deformability, and more importantly improve septic patient outcome suggest further research in this area is warranted. While not generally considered a critical factor in sepsis, erythrocytes (and especially a smaller subpopulation) appear to be highly susceptible to sepsis induced injury, provide an early warning signal of sepsis and are a factor in the microvascular dysfunction that has been associated with organ dysfunction.

  15. Ready for Prime Time? Biomarkers in Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Brit; Koyfman, Alex

    2017-02-01

    Sepsis is a common condition managed in the emergency department. Current diagnosis relies on physiologic criteria and suspicion of a source of infection using history, physical examination, laboratory studies, and imaging studies. The infection triggers a host response with the aim to destroy the pathogen, and this response can be measured. A reliable biomarker for sepsis should assist with earlier diagnosis, improve risk stratification, or improve clinical decision making. Current biomarkers for sepsis include lactate, troponin, and procalcitonin. This article discusses the use of lactate, procalcitonin, troponin, and novel biomarkers for use in sepsis.

  16. Autophagy in sepsis: Degradation into exhaustion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Jeffery; Yu, Jun; Wong, Sunny H; Zhang, Lin; Liu, Xiaodong; Wong, Wai T; Leung, Czarina C H; Choi, Gordon; Wang, Maggie H T; Gin, Tony; Chan, Matthew T V; Wu, William K K

    2016-07-01

    Autophagy is one of the innate immune defense mechanisms against microbial challenges. Previous in vitro and in vivo models of sepsis demonstrated that autophagy was activated initially in sepsis, followed by a subsequent phase of impairment. Autophagy modulation appears to be protective against multiple organ injuries in these murine sepsis models. This is achieved in part by preventing apoptosis, maintaining a balance between the productions of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and preserving mitochondrial functions. This article aims to discuss the role of autophagy in sepsis and the therapeutic potential of autophagy enhancers.

  17. Methods for reducing sepsis mortality in emergency departments and inpatient units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerfler, Martin E; D'Angelo, John; Jacobsen, Diane; Jarrett, Mark P; Kabcenell, Andrea I; Masick, Kevin D; Parmentier, Darlene; Nelson, Karen L; Stier, Lori

    2015-05-01

    As part of a zero-tolerance approach to preventable deaths, North Shore-LIJ Health System (North Shore-LIJ) leadership prioritized a major patient safety initiative to reduce sepsis mortality in 2009 across 10 acute care hospitals (an 11th joined later). At baseline (2008), approximately 3,500 patients were discharged with a diagnosis of sepsis, which ranked as the top All Patient Refined Diagnosis-Related Group by number of deaths (N = 883). Initially, the focus was sepsis recognition and treatment in the emergency departments (EDs). North Shore-LIJ, the 14th largest health care system in the United States, cares for individuals at every stage of life at 19 acute care and specialty hospitals and more than 400 outpatient physician practice sites throughout New York City and the greater New York metropolitan area. The health system launched a strategic partnership with the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) in August 2011 to accelerate the pace of sepsis improvement. Throughout the course of the initiative, North Shore-LIJ collaborated with many local, state, national, and international organizations to test innovative ideas, share evidence-based best practices, and, more recently, to raise public awareness. North Shore-LIJ reduced overall sepsis mortality by approximately 50% in a six-year period (2008-2013; sustained through 2014) and increased compliance with sepsis resuscitation bundle elements in the EDs and inpatient units in the 11 acute care hospitals. Improvements were achieved by engaging leadership; fostering interprofessional collaboration, collaborating with other leading health care organizations; and developing meaningful, real-time metrics for all levels of staff.

  18. Successful Treatment of Necrotizing Fasciitis and Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome with the Addition of Linezolid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Rac

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a deep-seated subcutaneous tissue infection that is commonly associated with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (TSS. Surgical debridement plus penicillin and clindamycin are the current standard of care. We report a case of necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal TSS where linezolid was added after a failure to improve with standard therapy. Briefly after isolation of Streptococcus pyogenes from tissue cultures, the patient underwent two surgical debridement procedures and was changed to standard of care therapy. While the patient was hemodynamically stable, the patient’s wounds, leukocytosis, and thrombocytopenia all progressively worsened. After initiation of linezolid, the patient slowly improved clinically. The present report is the first to highlight the role of linezolid in streptococcal necrotizing fasciitis and TSS not improving with standard therapy.

  19. Successful Treatment of Necrotizing Fasciitis and Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome with the Addition of Linezolid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojikian, Karine D.; Lucar, Jose

    2017-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a deep-seated subcutaneous tissue infection that is commonly associated with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (TSS). Surgical debridement plus penicillin and clindamycin are the current standard of care. We report a case of necrotizing fasciitis and streptococcal TSS where linezolid was added after a failure to improve with standard therapy. Briefly after isolation of Streptococcus pyogenes from tissue cultures, the patient underwent two surgical debridement procedures and was changed to standard of care therapy. While the patient was hemodynamically stable, the patient's wounds, leukocytosis, and thrombocytopenia all progressively worsened. After initiation of linezolid, the patient slowly improved clinically. The present report is the first to highlight the role of linezolid in streptococcal necrotizing fasciitis and TSS not improving with standard therapy. PMID:28299216

  20. Post-streptococcal auto-antibodies inhibit protein disulfide isomerase and are associated with insulin resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Aran

    Full Text Available Post-streptococcal autoimmunity affects millions worldwide, targeting multiple organs including the heart, brain, and kidneys. To explore the post-streptococcal autoimmunity spectrum, we used western blot analyses, to screen 310 sera from healthy subjects with (33% and without (67% markers of recent streptococcal infections [anti-Streptolysin O (ASLO or anti-DNAse B (ADB]. A 58 KDa protein, reacting strongly with post-streptococcal sera, was identified as Protein Disulfide Isomerase (PDI, an abundant protein with pleiotropic metabolic, immunologic, and thrombotic effects. Anti-PDI autoantibodies, purified from human sera, targeted similar epitopes in Streptolysin O (SLO, P51-61 and PDI (P328-338. The correlation between post-streptococcal status and anti-human PDI auto-immunity was further confirmed in a total of 2987 samples (13.6% in 530 ASLO positive versus 5.6% in 2457 ASLO negative samples, p<0.0001. Finally, anti-PDI auto-antibodies inhibited PDI-mediated insulin degradation in vitro (n = 90, p<0.001, and correlated with higher serum insulin (14.1 iu/ml vs. 12.2 iu/ml, n = 1215, p = 0.039 and insulin resistance (Homeostatic Model Assessment (HOMA 4.1 vs. 3.1, n = 1215, p = 0.004, in a population-based cohort. These results identify PDI as a major target of post-streptococcal autoimmunity, and establish a new link between infection, autoimmunity, and metabolic disturbances.

  1. Increased concentrations of C-reactive protein but not high-mobility group box 1 in dogs with naturally occurring sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, I; Wernersson, S; Ambrosen, A; Kindahl, H; Södersten, F; Wang, L; Hagman, R

    2013-11-15

    Sepsis is difficult to diagnose and remains a common mortality cause worldwide in both humans and animals. The uterine infection pyometra causes sepsis in more than half of affected dogs and therefore allows the natural physiological development of sepsis to be studied. To find a sepsis-specific biochemical marker that could be combined with conventional clinical criteria for a more robust and quick diagnosis of sepsis, we measured systemic concentrations of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in 23 healthy control dogs and in 27 dogs with pyometra, 74% of which had sepsis. We also measured concentrations of the major acute phase protein C-reactive protein (CRP) and an indicator for endotoxaemia, prostaglandin F2α metabolite (PGM) to assess the relative contribution of HMGB1 to the detection of systemic inflammation and endotoxaemia. We found that HMGB1 concentrations, in line with concentrations of CRP and PGM, were significantly increased in dogs with pyometra, and that concentrations of CRP, but not HMGB1, were significantly higher in dogs with sepsis compared to dogs without sepsis. Although serum HMGB1 did not differ between dogs with or without sepsis and was not correlated with either CRP or PGM concentrations, HMGB1 was correlated with the total white blood cell counts, suggesting an independent regulation and involvement in inflammation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Monocyte Profiles in Critically Ill Patients With Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-02

    Pseudomonas Infections; Pseudomonas Septicemia; Pseudomonas; Pneumonia; Pseudomonal Bacteraemia; Pseudomonas Urinary Tract Infection; Pseudomonas Gastrointestinal Tract Infection; Sepsis; Sepsis, Severe; Critically Ill

  3. Stress disorders following prolonged critical illness in survivors of severe sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintermann, Gloria-Beatrice; Brunkhorst, Frank Martin; Petrowski, Katja; Strauss, Bernhard; Oehmichen, Frank; Pohl, Marcus; Rosendahl, Jenny

    2015-06-01

    To examine the frequency of acute stress disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder in chronically critically ill patients with a specific focus on severe sepsis, to classify different courses of stress disorders from 4 weeks to 6 months after transfer from acute care hospital to postacute rehabilitation, and to identify patients at risk by examining the relationship between clinical, demographic, and psychological variables and stress disorder symptoms. Prospective longitudinal cohort study, three assessment times within 4 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after transfer to postacute rehabilitation. Patients were consecutively enrolled in a large rehabilitation hospital (Clinic Bavaria, Kreischa, Germany) admitted for ventilator weaning from acute care hospitals. We included 90 patients with admission diagnosis critical illness polyneuropathy or critical illness myopathy with or without severe sepsis, age between 18 and 70 years with a length of ICU stay greater than 5 days. None. Acute stress disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder were diagnosed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, criteria by a trained and experienced clinical psychologist using a semistructured clinical interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. We further administered the Acute Stress Disorder Scale and the Posttraumatic Symptom Scale-10 to assess symptoms of acute stress disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder. Three percent of the patients had an acute stress disorder diagnosis 4 weeks after transfer to postacute rehabilitation. Posttraumatic stress disorder was found in 7% of the patients at 3-month follow-up and in 12% after 6 months, respectively. Eighteen percent of the patients showed a delayed onset of posttraumatic stress disorder. Sepsis turned out to be a significant predictor of posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms at 3-month follow-up. A regular screening of post-ICU patients after discharge from

  4. Methods and compositions for diagnosing and preventing a group B streptococcal infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Linda Jeannine; Seifert, Kyle N.; Adderson, Elisabeth E.; Bohnsack, John F.

    2009-09-15

    The present invention provides a group B streptococcal (GBS) surface antigen, designated epsilon antigen, that is co-expressed with the delta antigen on a subset of serotype III GBS. Epsilon is expressed on more pathogenic Restriction Digest Pattern (RDP) III-3 GBS, but not on RDP types 1, 2, or 4. Accordingly, the present invention provides compositions and methods for detecting a group B streptococcus serotype III, RDP III-3 strain. Vaccines and methods of identifying agents which inhibit adhesion of a group B streptococcal cell to a host cell are also provided.

  5. I costi della sepsi in Italia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lucioni

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate additional hospitalisation costs and intangible costs (mortality in patients with sepsis (intended as severe sepsis or sepsis shock in Italy. The evaluation is based on clinical data from the Italian Sepsis Study, a prospective, multicentre study conducted in 99 Intensive Care Units (ICUslocated across Italy. Each ICU enrolled the first two (or three patients admitted each month, during the year April 1993 to March 1994. In particular, data collected included the Average Length Of Stay (ALOS in ICU and later in the regular ward, and the mortality within four weeks and in hospital. Out of the 2,946 patients enrolled, 2,641 never developed sepsis and were considered as the control group (comparability was confirmed based on gender, age, and comorbidity. The additional (respective to the control group ALOSs of the patients with sepsis were valued in monetary terms using per diem full costs, inflated to 2000: 1,033.43 Euro for l day in ICU (published data and 299.54 Euro for l day in the regular ward (estimated data based on published materials. Statistical significance was tested with Student t test. The hospitalisation cost of a patient with sepsis (21,571.88 Euro is significantly higher (+86% than that patient without sepsis (11,590.84 Euro, due to a longer (+ 163% stay in the expensive ICU, not balanced by shorter stay in the regular ward. Also intangible costs are significantly higher: the risk for an ICU patient with sepsis to die in hospital is 3 times higher than that of an ICU patient without sepsis. In particular, those patients developing sepsis after admission are more costly and with a higher mortality risk.

  6. CYTOKINE RESPONSE AND OTHER DIFFERENCES BETWEEN CRITICAL PHASES OF SEPSIS-ASSOCIATED SYSTEMIC INFLAMMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Yu. Gusev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute sepsis (1-3 days after admission has been compared with tertiary peritonitis, as a clinical variant of prolonged sepsis (7 to 42 days after admission. A total of 153 patients were enrolled into the study, including 112 cases of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS, as assessed by SOFA score, of them thirty-one with septic shock; fatal outcomes, in 48 cases. Plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein, cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNFα, cortisol, troponin I, myoglobin, D-dimer were detected by means of immunochemiluminesce assay (ImmuLite. Development of systemic inflammation (SI was evaluated by appropriate integral criteria. An association was established between SI development and critical complications in the both groups of patients. Meanwhile, hyperergic variants of SI development associated with high cytokine levels, proved to prevail in acute sepsis. On the contrary, hypoergic variants were more common in cases of tertiary peritonitis, being characterized by relatively low levels of cytokines, along with higher probability of other SI syndromes and risks of lethal outcomes. In summary, systemic inflammatory events in acute versus prolonged sepsis may proceed by different pathogenetic pathways.

  7. Clinical Efficacy of Sustained Low-efficiency Daily Diafiltration Combined with Hemoperfusion in Treatment of Sepsis-induced Acute Kidney Injury%连续低效每日血液透析滤过联合血液灌流治疗脓毒症急性肾损伤的临床疗效研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆煜; 张克娜; 谭位华

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical efficacy of sustained low-efficiency daily diafiltration( SLEDD-f) combined with hemoperfusion( HP)in treatment of sepsis-induced acute kidney injury. Methods A total of 43 patients with sepsis-induced acute kidney injury who received CRRT or SLEDD-f combined with HP treatment in department of emergency, the First Hospital Affiliated to Nanhua University from January 2008 to December 2011,were divided into CRRT group( C group,21 cases)and LEDD-f combined with HP treatment group( T group,22 cases)according to various blood purification methods. APCHEⅡ score,mean arterial pressure( MAP),dopamine( DA)dose,levels of serum creatinine( Scr),hemo-globin(Hb),Albumin(Alb),white blood cell count(WBC),high-sensitivity C-reactive protein(hs-CRP),serum IL-6,IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α)before and after treatment were compared between two groups. The com-plication rates,30 days survival rates,and the duration of ICU stays were compared between two groups. Results There was no statistical difference in APCHEⅡ score,MAP,DA dose,levels of Scr,Hb,Alb,WBC,hs-CRP,IL-6,IL-10 and TNF-α before treatment between two groups(P .0. 05). There were significant differences in MAP,DA dose,levels of Scr, WBC,hs-CRP,IL-6,IL-10 and TNF-α after treatment between two groups(P<0. 05). Patients in two groups had no serious complications during therapy period. The 30 days survival rate in group C〔47. 6%(10/21)〕was significantly lower than that〔77. 3%(17/22)〕in group T(χ2 =4. 044,P<0. 05). The duration of ICU stays in group C〔(16. 3 ± 5. 2) d〕was significantly longer than that in group T〔(11. 2 ± 3. 5)d〕(t=3. 789,P<0. 05). Conclusion The clinical efficacy of SLEDD-f combined with HP is better than CRRT in the treatment of sepsis-induced acute kidney injury,and 30 days survival rate is higher,duration of ICU stays is shorter,SLEDD-f combined with HP therapy is a new treatment program for patients with sepsis-induced acute kidney

  8. Outcomes and Resource Use of Sepsis-associated Stays by Presence on Admission, Severity, and Hospital Type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephen L; Ashton, Carol M; Kiehne, Lisa B; Nicolas, Juan C; Rose, Alexis L; Shirkey, Beverly A; Masud, Faisal; Wray, Nelda P

    2016-03-01

    To establish a baseline for the incidence of sepsis by severity and presence on admission in acute care hospital settings before implementation of a broad sepsis screening and response initiative. A retrospective cohort study using hospital discharge abstracts of 5672 patients, aged 18 years and above, with sepsis-associated stays between February 2012 and January 2013 at an academic medical center and 5 community hospitals in Texas. Sepsis was present on admission in almost 85% of cases and acquired in-hospital in the remainder. The overall inpatient death rate was 17.2%, but was higher in hospital-acquired sepsis (38.6%, medical; 29.2%, surgical) and Stages 2 (17.6%) and 3 (36.4%) compared with Stage 1 (5.9%). Patients treated at the academic medical center had a higher death rate (22.5% vs. 15.1%, Psepsis and the detection of sepsis in the prehospitalization and early hospitalization period. Hospital characteristics and case mix should be accounted for in cross-hospital comparisons of sepsis outcomes and costs.

  9. Sepsis neonatal por Estreptococos Pyogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Rodríguez-Herrera

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el caso de un paciente masculino, recién nacido a término adecuado para la edad gestacional, quien nace por parto vaginal, con el antecedente de fiebre en la madre durante el periodo de postparto inmediato. Los padres consultan a los 2 días de vida pues le notan dificultad respiratoria, hipoactividad y rechazo a la leche materna. El paciente se interna y se aborda como una sepsis. Durante su estancia en el servicio de neonatología del Hospital Nacional de Niños asocia fallo respiratorio que amerita ventilación mecánica asistida por varios días en diferentes ocasiones, derrame pleural exudativo, convulsiones de origen hipóxico isquémico. Con reporte de hemocultivos positivos por Estreptococos pyogenes. El Estreptococos pyogenes o estreptococo β-hemolνtico del grupo A, fue un problema en los comienzos del siglo pasado, siendo frecuente en las infecciones puerperales y del reciιn nacido. En la actualidad es un germen sumamente raro en los procesos de sepsis neonatal.2 La gravedad de la enfermedad causada por este microorganismo en el periodo neonatal varνa desde una onfalitis crónica de bajo grado a una septicemia, una meningitis fulminante y la muerte.1 El presente artículo pretende hacer un resumen del paciente, con su evolución clínica, radiológica y además ejemplificar todas las complicaciones que tuvimos con este germen tan poco frecuente en la actualidad en sepsis neonatal.

  10. Oestrogen sulfotransferase ablation sensitizes mice to sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Xiaojuan; Guo, Yan; Jiang, Mengxi; Hu, Bingfang; Li, Zhigang; Fan, Jie; Deng, Meihong; Billiar, Timothy R; Kucera, Heidi R; Gaikwad, Nilesh W; Xu, Meishu; Lu, Peipei; Yan, Jiong; Fu, Haiyan; Liu, Youhua; Yu, Lushan; Huang, Min; Zeng, Su; Xie, Wen

    2015-08-10

    Sepsis is the host's deleterious systemic inflammatory response to microbial infections. Here we report an essential role for the oestrogen sulfotransferase (EST or SULT1E1), a conjugating enzyme that sulfonates and deactivates estrogens, in sepsis response. Both the caecal ligation and puncture (CLP) and lipopolysaccharide models of sepsis induce the expression of EST and compromise the activity of oestrogen, an anti-inflammatory hormone. Surprisingly, EST ablation sensitizes mice to sepsis-induced death. Mechanistically, EST ablation attenuates sepsis-induced inflammatory responses due to compromised oestrogen deactivation, leading to increased sepsis lethality. In contrast, transgenic overexpression of EST promotes oestrogen deactivation and sensitizes mice to CLP-induced inflammatory response. The induction of EST by sepsis is NF-κB dependent and EST is a NF-κB-target gene. The reciprocal regulation of inflammation and EST may represent a yet-to-be-explored mechanism of endocrine regulation of inflammation, which has an impact on the clinical outcome of sepsis.

  11. Think Sepsis. Time Matters. PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-08-23

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the August 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. Sepsis is a medical emergency and can happen quickly. Learn the signs of sepsis and how to prevent it.  Created: 8/23/2016 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 8/23/2016.

  12. Pseudomonas sepsis with Noma: an association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, S; Tullu, M S; Lahiri, K R; Deshmukh, C T

    2005-08-01

    We report here a 2.5-year-old male child with community-acquired Pseudomonal sepsis showing the characteristic lesions of ecthyma gangrenosum. The child had development of gangrenous changes of the nose and face - the 'cancrum oris' or 'Noma'. We highlight the possible association of Pseudomonas sepsis and Noma, with malnutrition playing a central role in causing both the diseases.

  13. Neuro-oxidative-nitrosative stress in sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan M G; Møller, Kirsten; Bailey, Damian M

    2011-01-01

    Neuro-oxidative-nitrosative stress may prove the molecular basis underlying brain dysfunction in sepsis. In the current review, we describe how sepsis-induced reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) trigger lipid peroxidation chain reactions throughout the cerebrovasculature and surrounding...

  14. Expression of microRNA -30e in sepsis - induced acute lung injury rats and its correlation with the levels of inflammatory cytokines%微小 RNA-30e 在脓毒症急性肺损伤大鼠中的表达及其与炎性因子水平的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘翠; 刘舒; 黄锦达; 陈亦婷; 吕娟娟; 郑贵浪; 曾其毅

    2016-01-01

    新的生物学标志。%Objective To investigate the differential expression of microRNA - 30e in sepsis - induced acute lung injury(ALI)and its correlation with interleukin(IL)- 1β and tumor necrosis factor(TNF)- α from two aspects of in vivo and in vitro. Methods Thirty SD male rats were randomly divided into 5 groups:normal control group,3 - hour sepsis group,6 - hour sepsis group,12 - hour sepsis group and 24 - hour sepsis group in equal number. Sepsis - in-duced ALI model was induced by intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide(LPS,10 mg/ kg). The rat alveolar mac-rophages NR8383 were divided into blank control group and LPS(1 mg/ L)stimulated 3,6,12,24 hour groups. Inverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction was used to assay the production changes of IL - 1β,TNF - α and miRNA - 30e in lungs and cells. The injury of lung tissue was evaluated through histopathology. Results The levels of IL - 1β and TNF - α in lung tissues of rats in sepsis groups were obviously up - regulated when compared with those in normal control groups(all P ﹤ 0. 01). The lung tissue hematoxylin - eosin staining indicated ALI in the sepsis group. The relative expression of miR - 30e in rat lung tissue in sepsis 3,6,12,24 hour groups were respectively 0. 26 ± 0. 02, 0. 41 ± 0. 08,0. 29 ± 0. 05 and 0. 18 ± 0. 05,which were significantly lower than those in normal control group(1. 23 ± 0. 24,all P ﹤ 0. 01). The levels of IL - 1β and TNF - α in LPS stimulated NR8383 cells at different time points were obviously up - regulated when compared with those in blank control groups(all P ﹤ 0. 01). The relative expression of miR - 30e in LPS stimulated 3,6,12,24 hour groups were respectively 0. 27 ± 0. 04,0. 55 ± 0. 05,0. 65 ± 0. 02 and 0. 41 ± 0. 10,which were significantly lower than those in blank control group(1. 17 ± 0. 21,all P ﹤ 0. 01). The expres-sion of miR - 30e in lung tissues of groups showed significantly negative correlations with those of IL - 1β and TNF - α(IL - 1β:r = - 0. 417

  15. Application of daytime continuous veno-venous hemodiafiltration for the treatment of sepsis with acute kidney injury patients%日间静静脉血液透析滤过在脓毒血症合并急性肾损伤的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张汀; 王艳; 阿胜; 陈孟华

    2011-01-01

    目的研究日间静静脉血液透析滤过(continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration,CVVHDF)在脓毒血症合并急性肾损伤(acute kidney injury,AKI)患者治疗中的应用和影响预后的因素.方法观察分析宁夏医科大学总医院肾脏内科采用日间静静脉血液透析滤过以置换流量35~40ml/(kg·h)、透析液流量1500~2000 ml/h为方案救治的16例脓毒血症合并急性肾损伤患者的资料,评估临床特点和影响预后的因素.结果7例(43.8%)患者度过疾病的急性期(存活组),APACHE Ⅱ评分为(25.4±6.7);9例(56.2%)患者在急性期死亡(死亡组),APACHE Ⅱ评分为(34.4±4.3).对2组患者的临床资料、生化指标、机械通气状况、脏器损伤的特点、疾病的严重程度等因素进行分析,发现2组患者应用CVVHDF治疗前的机械通气状况、脏器衰竭数量、血钠、尿量之间差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).同时,死亡组APACHE Ⅱ评分(急性生理学与慢性健康状况评分Ⅱ)高于存活组,代谢性酸中毒严重程度明显.结论日间CVVHDF可降低脓毒血症合并急性肾损伤患者的死亡率.脓毒血症患者的预后受患者是否存在机械通气、脏器衰竭数量、血钠水平、代谢性酸中毒程度及APACHE Ⅱ分值的影响.%Objective To evaluate the clinical efficacy of continuous veno-venous hemodiafiltration (CWHDF) in treating critically ill patients with sepsis and acute renal injury. Methods The clinical features and factors affecting prognosis were retrospectively analyzed in 16 critically ill patients with sepsis and acute renal injury who received daytime CWHDF in this hospital from Jan. 2010 to Feb. 2011. Patients received this treatment schedule with CWHDF of 35-40 ml per kilogram of body weight per hour and 1500-2000 ml dialysate per hour. Results Seven patients (43.8%) survived the acute phase of their illness, with APACHE 11 score being 25.4 ± 6.7; whereas nine patients (56.2%) died during the acute phase, with

  16. Group a streptococcal cellulitis in the early puerperium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Branka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Infectious diseases caused by Streptococcus pyogenes, a member of the group A Streptococci (GAS are among the most common life threatening ones. Patients with GAS infections have a poor survival rate. Cellulitis is a severe invasive GAS infection and the most common clinical presentation of the disease associated with more deaths than it can be seen in other GAS infections. According to the literature data, most cases of GAS toxic shock syndrome are developed in the puerperium. However, there are two main problems with GAS infection in early puerperium and this case report is aimed at reminding on them. The first problem is an absence of awareness that it can be postpartal invasive GAS infection before the microbiology laboratory confirms it, and the second one is that we have little knowledge about GAS infection, in general. Case report. A 32- year-old healthy woman, gravida 1, para 1, was hospitalized three days after vaginal delivery with a 38-hour history of fever, pain in the left leg (under the knee, and head injury after short period of conscious lost. Clinical picture of GAS infection was cellulites. Group A Streptoccocus pyogenes was isolated in vaginal culture. Rapid antibiotic and supportive treatment stopped development of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS and potential multiorganic failure. Signs and symptoms of the infection lasted 25 days, and complete recovery of the patient almost 50 days. Conclusion. In all women in childbed with a history of fever early after delivery, vaginal and cervical culture specimens should be taken as soon as possible. Early recognition of GAS infection in early puerperium and prompt initiation of antimicrobial drug and supportive therapy can prevent development of STSS and lethal outcome.

  17. Group B Streptococcal Colonization Among Pregnant Women in Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Manu; Rench, Marcia A; Baker, Carol J; Singh, Pushpa; Hans, Charoo; Edwards, Morven S

    2017-07-01

    Little is known regarding maternal group B streptococcal (GBS) colonization prevalence and capsular (CPS) serotype distribution among pregnant women in India. The objective of this prospective cohort study was to determine GBS recto-vaginal colonization prevalence in pregnant women at Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital in Delhi, India. Literature review identified reports from India assessing GBS colonization prevalence in pregnant women. Rectal and vaginal swabs were inoculated into Strep B Carrot Broth (Hardy Diagnostics, Santa Maria, CA) and subcultured onto GBS Detect plates (Hardy Diagnostics, Santa Maria, CA). Isolates were serotyped using ImmuLex Strep-B latex kits (Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark). Thirteen studies were identified citing GBS colonization prevalence during pregnancy as 0.47%-16%. Among 300 pregnant women (mean age: 26.9 years; mean gestation: 34 weeks) enrolled (August 2015 to April 2016), GBS colonization prevalence was 15%. Fifteen percent of women had vaginal only, 29% had rectal only and 56% had both sites colonized. CPS types were Ia (13.3%), Ib (4.4%), II (20%), III (22.2%), V (20%) and VII (6.7%); 13.3% were nontypable. Fetal loss in a prior pregnancy at ≥20-weeks gestation was more common in colonized than noncolonized women (15.6% vs. 3.5%; P = 0.004). Employing recent census data for the birth cohort and estimating that 1%-2% of neonates born to colonized women develop early-onset disease, at least 39,000 cases of early-onset disease may occur yearly in India. Using optimal methods, 15% of third trimester pregnant women in India are GBS colonized. A multivalent vaccine containing 6 CPS types (Ia, Ib, II, III, V and VII) would encompass ~87% of GBS carried by pregnant women in India.

  18. Predictive value of NGAL for use of renal replacement therapy in patients with severe sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortrup, P B; Haase, N; Treschow, F;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The predictive value of plasma and urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) for use of renal replacement therapy (RRT) and acute kidney injury (AKI) is not established in patients with severe sepsis. METHODS: This was a prospective observational study in three general...... intensive care units (ICUs) in adult ICU patients with severe sepsis needing fluid resuscitation and a sub-study of the 6S trial. Plasma and urine were sampled at baseline and NGAL was measured using particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (The NGAL Test). Outcome measures were use of RRT in ICU......ROCs. CONCLUSION: In ICU patients with severe sepsis, plasma and urine NGAL had low predictive power for use of RRT, AKI and 90-day mortality. These results were supported by sensitivity and exploratory analyses....

  19. [Advances in the study of the relationship between autophagy and sepsis-induced lung injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingtong; Li, Hengyu; Xia, Zhaofan

    2014-08-01

    Sepsis is one of the most common pathogenetic causes of acute lung injury (ALI), and at present there is still a lack of effective targeted techniques and methods for its prevention and treatment. Autophagy is a homeostatic mecha- nism common to all eukaryotic cells, including adaption to environment, defense against invasion of pathogens, and maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Autophagy is also involved in a variety of lung-related diseases. In septic lung injury, autophagy not only serves to dissipate dysfunctional organelles, but also inhibits the release of inflammatory cytokines. This review aims at eliciting the role of autophagy in sepsis-induced ALI and further exploring the potential targets of autophagy in inhibiting inflammation, in an effort to provide a new perspective for clinical treatment of sepsis-induced ALI.

  20. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy: not just delirium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Godinho Zampieri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in intensive care units. Organ dysfunction is triggered by inflammatory insults and tissue hypoperfusion. The brain plays a pivotal role in sepsis, acting as both a mediator of the immune response and a target for the pathologic process. The measurement of brain dysfunction is difficult because there are no specific biomarkers of neuronal injury, and bedside evaluation of cognitive performance is difficult in an intensive care unit. Although sepsis-associated encephalopathy was described decades ago, it has only recently been subjected to scientific scrutiny and is not yet completely understood. The pathophysiology of sepsis-associated encephalopathy involves direct cellular damage to the brain, mitochondrial and endothelial dysfunction and disturbances in neurotransmission. This review describes the most recent findings in the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of sepsis-associated encephalopathy and focuses on its many presentations.

  1. Aspectos histomorfológicos e respiratórios em modelo de lesão pulmonar aguda por sepse em ratos tratados com pentoxifilina Histomorphologic and respiratory aspects of acute lung injury in rats induced by experimental sepsis and under pentoxifylline treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Rogerio Souza de Oliveira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar as alterações histomorfológicas e respiratórias em modelo de lesão pulmonar aguda por sepse em ratos tratados com pentoxifilina. MÉTODOS: Foram utilizados 15 ratos adultos distribuídos em três grupos (n=5, por grupo, assim constituídos: GC - receberam apenas ventilação mecânica; GS - Animais sépticos tratados com solução salina e mecanicamente ventilados; GS+PTX - Animais sépticos, com infusão de pentoxifilina e mecanicamente ventilados. Todos os animais foram ventilados por um período de 180 minutos. Ao final deste período, foram avaliadas variáveis gasométricas (gasometria arterial, gravimétricas (relação peso úmido/peso seco, concentração de proteínas totais no lavado broncoalveolar e histomorfométricas (espessura dos septos alveolares. Os dados obtidos foram submetidos a análise estatística (P OBJECTIVE: Respiratory repercussion on acute lung injury in a model of induced sepsis intraperitoneally. METHODS: Fifteen animals taken at random were submitted to adult male Wistar rats. The rats were randomly divided into 3 groups (n=15: Group C - control group received only mechanical ventilation; Group S - rats received live Escherichia coli (E. coli intraperitoneally (septic and after 6 hours they were treated with normal saline infusion and ventilated with a low tidal volume. Group S+PTX - rats received live Escherichia coli intraperitoneally (septic and after 6 hours they were treated with pentoxifylline (PTX infusion and ventilated with a low tidal volume. All animals were ventilated during 180 minutes. We analyzed the arterial blood gases, gravimetric indices and histomorphometric analysis. RESULTS: Blood gases, wet to dry ratios, and total protein concentrations in the bronchoalveolar lavage were analyzed in all experimental groups. In the end of the experiment the partial pressure of oxygen was higher in the GS+PTX (460,0 ± 38,2 mmHg compared with GS (336,0 ± 14,6 mmHg. Pentoxifylline with

  2. Long-term risk of seizures in adult survivors of sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznik, Michael E; Merkler, Alexander E; Mahta, Ali; Murthy, Santosh B; Claassen, Jan; Kamel, Hooman

    2017-09-06

    To examine the association between sepsis and the long-term risk of seizures. We conducted a retrospective population-based cohort study using administrative claims data from all emergency department visits and hospitalizations at nonfederal acute care hospitals in California, Florida, and New York from 2005 to 2013. Using previously validated diagnosis codes, we identified all adult patients hospitalized with sepsis. Our outcome was any emergency department visit or hospitalization for seizure. Poisson regression and demographic data were used to calculate age-, sex-, and race-standardized incidence rate ratios (IRR). To confirm our findings, we used a matched cohort of hospitalized patients without sepsis for comparison and additionally assessed claims data from a nationally representative 5% sample of Medicare beneficiaries. We identified 842,735 patients with sepsis. The annual incidence of seizure was 1.29% (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.27%-1.30%) in patients with sepsis vs 0.16% (95% CI 0.16%-0.16%) in the general population (IRR 4.98; 95% CI 4.92-5.04). A secondary analysis using matched hospitalized patients confirmed these findings (IRR 4.33; 95% CI 4.13-4.55), as did a separate analysis of Medicare beneficiaries, in whom we found a similar strength of association (IRR 2.72; 95% CI 2.60-2.83), as we did in patients ≥65 years of age in our primary statewide data (IRR 2.83; 95% CI 2.78-2.88). We found that survivors of sepsis faced a significantly higher long-term risk of seizures than both the general population and other hospitalized patients. Our findings suggest that sepsis is associated with pathways that lead to permanent neurologic sequelae. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  3. Chronic filarial infection provides protection against bacterial sepsis by functionally reprogramming macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Gondorf

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Helminths immunomodulate their hosts and induce a regulatory, anti-inflammatory milieu that prevents allergies and autoimmune diseases. Helminth immunomodulation may benefit sepsis outcome by preventing exacerbated inflammation and severe pathology, but the influence on bacterial clearance remains unclear. To address this, mice were chronically infected with the filarial nematode Litomosoides sigmodontis (L.s. and the outcome of acute systemic inflammation caused by i.p. Escherichia coli injection was determined. L.s. infection significantly improved E. coli-induced hypothermia, bacterial clearance and sepsis survival and correlated with reduced concentrations of associated pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines and a less pronounced pro-inflammatory macrophage gene expression profile. Improved sepsis outcome in L.s.-infected animals was mediated by macrophages, but independent of the alternatively activated macrophage subset. Endosymbiotic Wolbachia bacteria that are present in most human pathogenic filariae, as well as L.s., signal via TLR2 and modulate macrophage function. Here, gene expression profiles of peritoneal macrophages from L.s.-infected mice revealed a downregulation of genes involved in TLR signaling, and pulsing of macrophages in vitro with L.s. extract reduced LPS-triggered activation. Subsequent transfer improved sepsis outcome in naïve mice in a Wolbachia- and TLR2-dependent manner. In vivo, phagocytosis was increased in macrophages from L.s.-infected wild type, but not TLR2-deficient animals. In association, L.s. infection neither improved bacterial clearance in TLR2-deficient animals nor ameliorated E. coli-induced hypothermia and sepsis survival. These results indicate that chronic L.s. infection has a dual beneficial effect on bacterial sepsis, reducing pro-inflammatory immune responses and improving bacterial control. Thus, helminths and their antigens may not only improve the outcome of autoimmune and allergic diseases

  4. Sepsis-induced brain dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Nicolas; Kandelman, Stanislas; Mantz, Jean; Chrétien, Fabrice; Sharshar, Tarek

    2013-02-01

    Systemic infection is often revealed by or associated with brain dysfunction, which is characterized by alteration of consciousness, ranging from delirium to coma, seizure or focal neurological signs. Its pathophysiology involves an ischemic process, secondary to impairment of cerebral perfusion and its determinants and a neuroinflammatory process that includes endothelial activation, alteration of the blood-brain barrier and passage of neurotoxic mediators. Microcirculatory dysfunction is common to these two processes. This brain dysfunction is associated with increased mortality, morbidity and long-term cognitive disability. Its diagnosis relies essentially on neurological examination that can lead to specific investigations, including electrophysiological testing or neuroimaging. In practice, cerebrospinal fluid analysis is indisputably required when meningitis is suspected. Hepatic, uremic or respiratory encephalopathy, metabolic disturbances, drug overdose, sedative or opioid withdrawal, alcohol withdrawal delirium or Wernicke's encephalopathy are the main differential diagnoses. Currently, treatment consists mainly of controlling sepsis. The effects of insulin therapy and steroids need to be assessed. Various drugs acting on sepsis-induced blood-brain barrier dysfunction, brain oxidative stress and inflammation have been tested in septic animals but not yet in patients.

  5. Heparanase Mediates Intestinal Inflammation and Injury in a Mouse Model of Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Song; He, Ying; Hu, Ziwei; Lu, Siyu; Yin, Xiaohan; Ma, Xiaochun; Lv, Chuanzhu; Jin, Guiyun

    2017-04-01

    Heparanase, a heparan sulfate (HS)-specific endoglycosidase, plays an important role in inflammation and mediates acute pulmonary and renal injuries during sepsis. To explore its role in septic intestinal injury, a non-anticoagulant heparanase inhibitor, N-desulfated/re- N-acetylated heparin (NAH), was administrated to a mouse sepsis model induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Immunohistochemical staining revealed massive shedding of HS from the intestinal mucosal surfaces after CLP, and effective inhibition of heparanase by NAH was confirmed by markedly reduced HS shedding. Following CLP, intestinal expression of heparanase was increased, whereas pretreatment with NAH reduced the sepsis-induced upregulation of heparanase expression. Meanwhile, CLP led to shedding of syndecan-1 and upregulated expression of proteases such as matrix metalloprotease-9 and urokinase-type plasminogen activator in the intestine, whereas NAH markedly suppressed syndecan-1 shedding and protease upregulation following CLP. In addition, pretreatment with NAH attenuated intestinal injury, inhibited neutrophil infiltration and suppressed the production of inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6) in the intestine during sepsis, and it also significantly reduced the elevation of inflammatory cytokines in the serum 24 hr after CLP. Our findings demonstrate that the activation of intestinal heparanase contributes to intestinal injury during early sepsis by facilitating the destruction of mucosal epithelial glycocalyx and promoting inflammatory responses.

  6. Myeloid Cell-Specific Knockout of NFI-A Improves Sepsis Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPeak, Melissa B; Youssef, Dima; Williams, Danielle A; Pritchett, Christopher; Yao, Zhi Q; McCall, Charles E; El Gazzar, Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    Myeloid progenitor-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) arise from myeloid progenitors and suppress both innate and adaptive immunity. MDSCs expand during the later phases of sepsis in mice, promote immunosuppression, and reduce survival. Here, we report that the myeloid differentiation-related transcription factor nuclear factor I-A (NFI-A) controls MDSC expansion during sepsis and impacts survival. Unlike MDSCs, myeloid cells with conditional deletion of the Nfia gene normally differentiated into effector cells during sepsis, cleared infecting bacteria, and did not express immunosuppressive mediators. In contrast, ectopic expression of NFI-A in myeloid progenitors from NFI-A myeloid cell-deficient mice impeded myeloid cell maturation and promoted immune repressor function. Importantly, surviving septic mice with conditionally deficient NFI-A myeloid cells were able to respond to challenge with bacterial endotoxin by mounting an acute inflammatory response. Together, these results support the concept of NFI-A as a master molecular transcriptome switch that controls myeloid cell differentiation and maturation and that malfunction of this switch during sepsis promotes MDSC expansion that adversely impacts sepsis outcome. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Simvastatin Treatment Improves Survival in a Murine Model of Burn Sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beffa, David C; Fischman, Alan J.; Fagan, Shawn P.; Hamrahi, Victoria F.; Kaneki, Masao; Yu, Yong-Ming; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Carter, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    Infection is the most common and most serious complication of a major burn injury related to burn size. Despite improvements in antimicrobial therapies sepsis still accounts for 50–60% of deaths in burn patients. Given the acute onset and unpredictable nature of sepsis, primary prevention was rarely attempted in its management. However, recent studies have demonstrated that statin treatment can decrease mortality is a murine model of sepsis by preservation of cardiac function and reversal of inflammatory alterations. In addition, it has been shown that treatment with statins is associated with reduced incidence of sepsis in human patients. In the current study groups of CD1 male mice (n=12) were anesthetized and subjected to a dorsal 30% TBSA scald burn injury. Starting 2 hours post burn, the animals were divided into a treatment group receiving 0.2 µ/g simvastatin or a sham group receiving placebo. Simvastatin and placebo were administered by intraperitoneal injection with two dosing regimens; once daily and every 12 hours. On Post burn day 7 cecal ligation and puncture with a 21-gauge needle was performed under ketamine/xylazine anesthesia and the two different dosing schedules were continued. A simvastatin dose dependant improvement in survival was observed in the burn sepsis model. PMID:21145172

  8. [A postpartum woman with toxic shock syndrome: group A streptococcal infection, a much feared postpartum complication.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbink, K.; Kortekaas, J.C.; Buise, M.P.; Dokter, J.; Kuppens, S.M.; Hasaart, T.H.M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The development of toxic shock syndrome (TSS) after an invasive group A streptococcal (GAS) infection in the postpartum period is a much feared complication. The mortality rate of TSS with necrotizing fasciitis is 30 to 50%. CASE DESCRIPTION: We present the case of a woman with atypical

  9. Streptococcal Adhesin P (SadP) contributes to Streptococcus suis adhesion to the human intestinal epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrando, Maria Laura; Willemse, Niels; Zaccaria, Edoardo; Pannekoek, Yvonne; Ende, van der Arie; Schultsz, Constance

    2017-01-01

    Background Streptococcus suis is a zoonotic pathogen, causing meningitis and septicemia. We previously demonstrated that the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is an entry site for zoonotic S. suis infection. Here we studied the contribution of Streptococcal adhesin Protein (SadP) to hostpathogen

  10. Travel-related Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome caused by emm type 78 Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappe, Dennis; Schulze, Marco H; van der Linden, Mark; Ziegler, Uwe; Müller, Andreas; Stich, August

    2011-08-01

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is a serious health problem in developed and developing countries. We here report a case of severe protracted disease after a minor skin infection in a young traveler returning from West Malaysia which was caused by an unusual emm-type strain harboring speG and smeZ superantigen genes.

  11. Influence of surface roughness on streptococcal adhesion forces to composite resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mei, Li; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C; Ren, Yijin

    OBJECTIVE: To determine streptococcal adhesion forces with composite resins with different surface roughness. METHODS: Polishing and grinding were applied to obtain smooth (roughness 20 nm), moderately rough (150 nm) and rough (350 nm) surfaces of two orthodontic, light-cured composites. Adhesion

  12. Influence of surface roughness on streptococcal adhesion forces to composite resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mei, Li; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C; Ren, Yijin

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine streptococcal adhesion forces with composite resins with different surface roughness. METHODS: Polishing and grinding were applied to obtain smooth (roughness 20 nm), moderately rough (150 nm) and rough (350 nm) surfaces of two orthodontic, light-cured composites. Adhesion fo

  13. Paedatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorder Associated with Streptococcal Infection in an Indian Adolescent--A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sachin; Vaish, Supriya; Chopra, Saurabh; Singh, Vindyaprakash; Sharma, Priyanka

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders associated with Streptococcal infection (PANDAS) is a unique constellation of signs and symptoms that exist in a subset of children with rapid onset or exacerbation of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and/or tic disorders due to an initial autoimmune reaction to a Group A Beta Hemolytic…

  14. Sepsis neonatal por Estreptococos Pyogenes Neonatal Sepsis by Streptococcus pyogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Rodríguez-Herrera

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el caso de un paciente masculino, recién nacido a término adecuado para la edad gestacional, quien nace por parto vaginal, con el antecedente de fiebre en la madre durante el periodo de postparto inmediato. Los padres consultan a los 2 días de vida pues le notan dificultad respiratoria, hipoactividad y rechazo a la leche materna. El paciente se interna y se aborda como una sepsis. Durante su estancia en el servicio de neonatología del Hospital Nacional de Niños asocia fallo respiratorio que amerita ventilación mecánica asistida por varios días en diferentes ocasiones, derrame pleural exudativo, convulsiones de origen hipóxico isquémico. Con reporte de hemocultivos positivos por Estreptococos pyogenes. El Estreptococos pyogenes o estreptococo β-hemolνtico del grupo A, fue un problema en los comienzos del siglo pasado, siendo frecuente en las infecciones puerperales y del reciιn nacido. En la actualidad es un germen sumamente raro en los procesos de sepsis neonatal.2 La gravedad de la enfermedad causada por este microorganismo en el periodo neonatal varνa desde una onfalitis crónica de bajo grado a una septicemia, una meningitis fulminante y la muerte.1 El presente artículo pretende hacer un resumen del paciente, con su evolución clínica, radiológica y además ejemplificar todas las complicaciones que tuvimos con este germen tan poco frecuente en la actualidad en sepsis neonatal.We present herein the case of a newborn patient of appropriate gestational age weight ( 3700 grams, born by vaginal delivery, from a mother that had had 2 previous pregnancies (2 normal deliveries. During the immediate puerperium she had fever. The parents consulted at the age of 2 days, stating that they had noticed difficult breathing since his birth, hipoactivity and poor appetite. He was admitted to the hospital and underwent several studies searching for the origin and germ causing the sepsis. He developed respiratory failure and needed

  15. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorr, Christa A; Dellinger, R Phillip

    2014-04-01

    The Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) was created in 2002 and consists of severe sepsis management guidelines and a sepsis performance improvement program. The second revision of the guidelines, published in 2013, are sponsored by 30 international scientific organizations and contain changes in recommendations for fluids and vasopressor administration. The new 3- and 6-hour sepsis 'bundles' (sets of care elements) include a software program that can be downloaded free from the Surviving Sepsis Campaign website (www.survivingsepsis.org). The traditional intensive care unit and emergency department champion-driven sepsis performance improvement program continues internationally with the kick off of a new grant-funded hospital floor sepsis performance improvement initiative.

  16. Streptococcal Diversity of Human Milk and Comparison of Different Methods for the Taxonomic Identification of Streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Virginia; Mediano, Pilar; Del Campo, Rosa; Rodríguez, Juan M; Marín, María

    2016-11-01

    The genus Streptococcus is 1 of the dominant bacterial groups in human milk, but the taxonomic identification of some species remains difficult. The objective of this study was to investigate the discriminatory ability of different methods to identify streptococcal species in order to perform an assessment of the streptococcal diversity of human milk microbiota as accurately as possible. The identification of 105 streptococcal strains from human milk was performed by 16S rRNA, tuf, and sodA gene sequencing, phylogenetic analysis, and Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus mitis, and Streptococcus parasanguinis were the streptococcal dominant species in the human milk microbiota. Sequencing of housekeeping genes allowed the classification of 96.2% (16S rRNA), 84.8% ( sodA), and 88.6% ( tuf) of the isolates. Phylogenetic analysis showed 3 main streptococcal clusters corresponding with the mitis (73 isolates), salivarius (29), mutans (1)-pyogenic (2) groups, but many of the mitis group isolates (36) could not be assigned to any species. The application of the MALDI-TOF Bruker Biotyper system resulted in the identification of 56 isolates (53.33%) at the species level, but it could not discriminate between S pneumoniae and S mitis isolates, in contrast to the Vitek-MS system. There was a good agreement among the different methods assessed in this study to identify those isolates of the salivarius, mutans, and pyogenic groups, whereas unambiguous discrimination could not be achieved concerning some species of the mitis group ( S mitis, S pneumoniae, S pseudopneumoniae, S oralis).

  17. Effect of Fluoride Mouthrinse and Toothpaste on Number of Streptococcal Colony Forming Units of Dental Plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SE Jabbarifar

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Frequent topical fluoride therapy through toothpaste, mouthrinse, professional gels and solutions causes decrease in incidence, pause and repair of dental caries in the enamel. These mechanisms are done through penetration of fluoride ions (F- and their replacement with hydroxyl ions (OH- of hydroxyappatite of enamel, interfere with microbial metabolism of dental plaque and bacteriostatic effect on some cariogenic bacterial strains such as streptococci. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of fluoride mouthrinse and toothpaste on the number of streptococcal colony forming units of dental plaque. Methods: 62 children with 6-7 years old were put in two groups. Samples of dental plaque from each group were collected both before and after use of the fluoride mouthrinse and or toothpaste. The samples were cultured on blood agar to find the number of streptococcal colony forming units (CFU. The mean colony forming unit was compared inter and intra groups before and after application of Fluoride products. Results: The streptococcal CFU of dental plaque before and after use of the mouthrinse and toothpaste respectively was (1240±1367, 1253±1341.5 and (551±716, 898±1151. Statistically, the streptococcal CFU in each group before and after use of the toothpaste and mouthrinse was significantly different. Conclusion: The findings of this study indicated that the fluoride toothpaste and mouthrinse reduce number of streptococcal colony forming units of dental plaque. Also this reduction was not depended on level of (F- Ions, sort of vehicle of fluoride and frequent application of the fluoride mouthrinse and toothpaste. Keywords: fluoride mouthrinse, fluoride toothpaste, colony forming unit (CFU, streptococcus

  18. Surface characterization of dental ceramics and initial streptococcal adhesion in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnel, Sebastian; Rosentritt, Martin; Handel, Gerhard; Bürgers, Ralf

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the surface properties of dental ceramic materials belonging to different ceramic classes, and to correlate the findings to the initial adherence of three oral streptococcal strains. Rectangular specimens were prepared from different ceramic materials (glass/lithium disilicate glass/glass-infiltrated zirconia/partially sintered zirconia/hipped zirconia ceramic) and polished; surface roughness (Ra) was determined. Glass plates were used as a control. Specimens were incubated with phosphate-buffered saline or an artificial saliva (protein mixture; 2h, 37 degrees C). Surface free energy (gamma(t)) and its polar (gamma(p)) and disperse (gamma(d)) contribution were determined prior to and after artificial saliva exposure. Uncoated and protein-coated specimens were incubated with Streptococcus gordonii DSMZ 6777, Streptococcus oralis DSMZ 20068 or Streptococcus sanguinis DSMZ 20068 suspension for 2.5h at 37 degrees C (n=15 for each treatment and strain). Adherent streptococci were quantified fluorometrically. The lithium disilicate glass ceramic showed the highest values for Ra; the lowest values were found for the glass ceramic, the partially sintered zirconia and the hipped zirconia ceramic. Protein coating caused a significant increase in gamma(t) and gamma(p), but not in the control material. The control material showed higher values for streptococcal adhesion than all ceramic materials. After protein coating, only slight and random differences in streptococcal adhesion were found between the various ceramic materials. Dental ceramic materials show differences in terms of Ra, gamma(t) and initial streptococcal adhesion; however, correlations between surface properties and streptococcal adhesion were poor.

  19. Sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... meningitis ) Liver or gallbladder Lungs ( bacterial pneumonia ) Skin ( cellulitis ) For people in the hospital, common sites of infection include intravenous lines, surgical wounds, surgical drains, and ...

  20. [Model of meningococcal sepsis in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnoproshina, L I; Ermakova, L G; Belova, T N; Filippov, Iu V; Efimov, D D

    1978-11-01

    The authors studied a possibility of obtaining experimental meningococcus sepsis model on mice. The use of cyclophosphane, iron compounds, yolk medium produced no significant organism. When 4--5% mucine was injected intraperitoneally together with meningococcus culture mice died with sepsis phenomena. Differences were revealed in the sensitivity of linear and mongrel mice to meningococcus infection--AKR mice proved to be more sensitive. At the same time it was found that mongrel mice weighing from 10 to 12 g could be used to induce meningococcus sepsis.

  1. Where Sepsis and Antimicrobial Resistance Countermeasures Converge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Timothy J. J.; Urosevic, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    The United Nations General Assembly debate on antimicrobial resistance (AMR) recognizes the global significance of AMR. Much work needs to be done on technology capability and capacity to convert the strategic intent of the debate into operational plans and tangible outcomes. Enhancement of the biomedical science–clinician interface requires better exploitation of systems biology tools for in-laboratory and point of care methods that detect sepsis and characterize AMR. These need to link sepsis and AMR data with responsive, real-time surveillance. We propose an AMR sepsis register, similar in concept to a cancer registry, to aid coordination of AMR countermeasures. PMID:28220145

  2. Morganella morganii sepsis with massive hemolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Hoon; Cho, Chong Rae; Um, Tae Hyun; Rhu, Ji Yoon; Kim, Eu Suk; Jeong, Jae Won; Lee, Hye Ran

    2007-12-01

    Morganella morganii is a facultative gram-negative and anaerobic rod. It may be a cause of devastating infections in neonates and immunocompromised hosts. Some bacterial infections such as Clostridium and Vibrio are associated with hemolysis. However, massive hemolysis caused by M. morganii sepsis has not yet been reported. We observed a 59-yr-old man who had chemotherapy-induced neutropenia and was found to have massive hemolysis and metabolic acidosis due to sepsis. He died 6 hr after admission in spite of aggressive treatment. Two sets of blood cultures revealed the growth of M. morganii. We report here that M. morganii sepsis can cause fatal massive hemolysis leading to death.

  3. Clinical and microbiological features of maternal sepsis: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abir, G; Akdagli, S; Butwick, A; Carvalho, B

    2017-02-01

    Identifying pregnant women with sepsis is challenging because diagnostic clinical and laboratory criteria overlap with normal pregnant physiologic indices. Our primary study aim was to describe clinical and laboratory characteristics of women diagnosed with sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock. Our secondary aim was to determine positive predictive values for International Classification of Disease (ICD)-9 billing codes for sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock. After gaining Institutional Review Board approval, we identified women with ICD-9 codes for sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock who were admitted to a single tertiary obstetric center from 2007-2013. Diagnoses were confirmed using criteria from the International Sepsis Definitions Conference report. Demographic, obstetric, vital signs and laboratory data were abstracted by medical chart review. We identified 190 women with sepsis-related ICD-9 codes: of these, 35 (18%) women met the criteria for a clinical diagnosis of sepsis, severe sepsis or septic shock. Twenty (57%) women had a sepsis-related diagnosis after cesarean delivery. Twenty-one (60%) women had one or more pre-existing medical conditions and 19 (54%) women had one or more obstetric-related conditions. The genital tract was the most common site of infection. We observed considerable heterogeneity in maternal vital signs and laboratory indices for women with ICD-9 codes for sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock. The positive predictive value for each sepsis-related ICD-9 code was low: 16% (95% CI 10 to 24%) for sepsis, 10% (95% CI 3 to 25%) for severe sepsis and 24% (95% CI 10 to 46%) for septic shock. We identified marked heterogeneity in patient characteristics, clinical features, laboratory indices and microbiological findings among cohorts of women diagnosed with maternal sepsis, severe sepsis or septic shock. Based on our findings, the incidence of maternal sepsis using ICD-9 codes may be significantly overestimated. Copyright

  4. Complete genome sequence of Streptococcus pyogenes M1 476, isolated from a patient with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Watanabe, Shinya; Kirikae, Teruo

    2012-10-01

    Here, we report the completely annotated genome sequence of Streptococcus pyogenes M1 476 isolated from a patient with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) during pregnancy. The genome sequence will provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying STSS.

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus pyogenes M1 476, Isolated from a Patient with Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; WATANABE, Shinya; Kirikae, Teruo

    2012-01-01

    Here, we report the completely annotated genome sequence of Streptococcus pyogenes M1 476 isolated from a patient with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) during pregnancy. The genome sequence will provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying STSS.

  6. Epidemiological features and risk factors of sepsis-associated encephalopathy in intensive care unit patients: 2008-2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li-na; WANG Xiao-ting; AI Yu-hang; GUO Qu-lian; HUANG Li; LIU Zhi-yong; Yao Bo

    2012-01-01

    Background Encephalopathy is a common complication of sepsis,and its onset can occur at any stage of sepsis and implies worse prognosis.However,the incidence,epidemiology,and pathogenesis of sepsis-associated encephalopathy remain controversial.The purpose of this study was to investigate the epidemiological features and risk factors for sepsis-associated encephalopathy.Methods Our retrospective study included all patients with sepsis admitted to our intensive care unit from 2008 to 2011.After excluding 91 patients,232 patients were assigned to either a sepsis-associated encephalopathy group or sepsis without encephalopathy group.Between-group differences in baseline patient data including vital signs,disease severity,pathogens,sites of infection,biochemical indicators,and time on a mechanical ventilator,intensive care unit (ICU) stay,and 28-day mortality rate were analyzed.Results The incidence of sepsis-associated encephalopathy was 17.7%.The sepsis-associated encephalopathy group had significantly higher 28-day mortality (56.1% vs.35.1%; P=0.013),spent a significantly longer time on a ventilator ((8.2±2.2) days vs.(2.9±0.4) days; P=0.021),and had a significantly longer ICU stay ((12.4±2.4) days vs.(7.1±0.6) days;P=0.042).Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation Ⅱ score,Glasgow coma scale,heart rate,blood lactate,serum sodium,platelets,serum albumin,and pH values were related to the presence of encephalopathy.Patients with biliary tract infections and intestinal infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus,Enterococcus faecium,Acinetobacter spp,Pseudomonas aeruginosa,and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia,were more prone to develop sepsis-associated encephalopathy.Conclusions Encephalopathy increases mortality rate in septic patients.Clinical intervention to reduce risk factors and thereby morbidity and mortality depends on a correct understanding of the differences between patients with sepsis and patients with both sepsis and encephalopathy.

  7. Immunosuppression after Sepsis: Systemic Inflammation and Sepsis Induce a Loss of Naïve T-Cells but No Enduring Cell-Autonomous Defects in T-Cell Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markwart, Robby; Condotta, Stephanie A.; Requardt, Robert P.; Borken, Farina; Schubert, Katja; Weigel, Cynthia; Bauer, Michael; Griffith, Thomas S.; Förster, Martin; Brunkhorst, Frank M.; Badovinac, Vladimir P.; Rubio, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis describes the life-threatening systemic inflammatory response (SIRS) of an organism to an infection and is the leading cause of mortality on intensive care units (ICU) worldwide. An acute episode of sepsis is characterized by the extensive release of cytokines and other mediators resulting in a dysregulated immune response leading to organ damage and/or death. This initial pro-inflammatory burst often transits into a state of immune suppression characterised by loss of immune cells and T-cell dysfunction at later disease stages in sepsis survivors. However, despite these appreciations, the precise nature of the evoked defect in T-cell immunity in post-acute phases of SIRS remains unknown. Here we present an in-depth functional analysis of T-cell function in post-acute SIRS/sepsis. We document that T-cell function is not compromised on a per cell basis in experimental rodent models of infection-free SIRS (LPS or CpG) or septic peritonitis. Transgenic antigen-specific T-cells feature an unaltered cytokine response if challenged in vivo and ex vivo with cognate antigens. Isolated CD4+/CD8+ T-cells from post-acute septic animals do not exhibit defects in T-cell receptor-mediated activation at the the level of receptor-proximal signalling, activation marker upregulation or expansion. However, SIRS/sepsis induced transient lymphopenia and gave rise to an environment of immune attenuation at post acute disease stages. Thus, systemic inflammation has an acute impact on T-cell numbers and adaptive immunity, but does not cause major cell-autonomous enduring functional defects in T-cells. PMID:25541945

  8. Procalcitonin as a predictor of sepsis and outcome in severe trauma patients: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nonika Rajkumari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite the advances in medical sciences, the morbidity and mortality due to sepsis in severe trauma patients remains high; hence the need for early and accurate diagnosis. Very few prospective studies are available in a country like India, which tried to analyze the prediction of sepsis using serum procalcitonin (PCT in such a large scale among trauma patients. This study explores the role of the biomarker PCT in early diagnosis of sepsis and prediction of outcomes in severe trauma cases. Materials and Methods: We studied the patient population prospectively in two different groups. One with acute trauma but no clinical evidence of sepsis and the second group with clinical evidence of sepsis and are followed. Bronchoalveolar lavage, tracheal aspirates, pus, urine, body fluids from sterile body sites, etc., were collected including blood for culture and serum for PCT assays. Such assays were done on samples collected on days 1 and 4 and then compared. Additionally, C-reactive protein (CRP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR levels were also tested. Antimicrobial sensitivity tests were carried out for all the isolates from the clinical samples and correlated with the clinically suspected cases of sepsis. Outcomes of the patients were noted. Results: Patients with high initial PCT levels (>2 ng/ml in severe trauma cases had poor outcomes and risk of developing complications. Its correlation with severe outcomes was better marked as compared with CRP and ESR levels. The difference in PCT levels between days 1 and 4 in group two patients was statistically significant (P = 0.006 but were not statistically significant for CRP (P = 0.646 and ESR (P = 0.935. The study also shows that PCT levels fall in response to appropriate antimicrobial treatment. Conclusion: PCT is a useful biomarker for early and accurate prediction of sepsis in severe trauma patients. If used in adjunct to clinical findings, it proves to be a good biomarker for

  9. Acute Rheumatic Fever: Global Persistence of a Preventable Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono-Neri, Francine

    2016-10-21

    The persistence of acute rheumatic fever continues to be seen globally. Once thought to be eradicated in various parts of the world, the disease came back with a vengeance secondary to a lack of diligence on the part of providers. Today, the global burden of group A streptococcal infection, the culprit of the numerous sequelae manifested in acute rheumatic fever, is considerable. Although a completely preventable disease, rheumatic fever continues to exist. It is a devastating disease that involves long-term, multisystem treatment and monitoring for patients who were unsuccessful at eradicating the precipitating group A streptococcal infection. Prevention is the key to resolving the dilemma of the disease's global burden, yet the method to yield its prevention still remains unknown. Thus, meticulous attention to implementing proper treatment is the mainstay and remains a top priority.

  10. Severe sepsis secondary to emphysematous cystitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    M.M. Gargouri

    We present the case of a patient with EC who presented with severe sepsis of unknown origin. He ... Peer review under responsibility of Pan African Urological Surgeons' ... nantly on the left side, minimal dysuria and fever for the previous 7.

  11. Apolipoprotein M - a new biomarker in sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Christina; Nielsen, Lars Bo

    2012-01-01

    Care Kumaraswamy and colleagues have investigated whether plasma apolipoprotein M (apoM) is affected during different grades of sepsis, septic shock and systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Interestingly, plasma apoM was significantly decreased in all groups of patients with a relationship...... to severity of disease. This identifies apoM as a potential new biomarker in sepsis. It also underscores the possibility that altered high-density lipoprotein in sepsis patients can affect the course of disease. Thus, since apoM is the carrier of Sphingosine-1-P (S1P), a molecule with great influence...... on vascular barrier function, the study presented raises the interest and relevance for further studies of apoM and S1P in relation to sepsis and inflammation....

  12. SEPSIS-ASSOCIATED DISSEMINATED INTRAVASCULAR COAGULATION AND THROMBOEMBOLIC DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Semeraro

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is almost invariably associated with haemostatic abnormalities ranging from subclinical activation of blood coagulation (hypercoagulability, which may contribute to localized venous thromboembolism, to acute disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC, characterized by massive thrombin formation and widespread microvascular thrombosis, partly responsible of the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS, and subsequent consumption of platelets and coagulation proteins causing, in most severe cases, bleeding manifestations. There is general agreement that the key event underlying this life-threatening sepsis complication is the overwhelming inflammatory host response to the infectious agent leading to the overexpression of inflammatory mediators. Mechanistically, the latter, together with the micro-organism and its derivatives, causes DIC by 1 up-regulation of procoagulant molecules, primarily tissue factor (TF, which is produced mainly by stimulated monocytes-macrophages and by specific cells in target tissues; 2 impairment of physiological anticoagulant pathways (antithrombin, protein C pathway, tissue factor pathway inhibitor, which is orchestrated mainly by dysfunctional endothelial cells (ECs; and 3 suppression of fibrinolysis due to increased plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 by ECs and likely also to thrombin-mediated  activation of thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI. Notably, clotting enzymes non only lead to microvascular thrombosis but can also elicit cellular responses that amplify the inflammatory reactions. Inflammatory mediators can also cause, directly or indirectly, cell apoptosis or necrosis and recent evidence indicates that products released from dead cells, such as nuclear proteins (particularly extracellular histones, are able to propagate further inflammation, coagulation, cell death and MODS. These insights into the pathogenetic mechanisms of DIC and MODS may have important implications for the

  13. Ensemble models of neutrophil trafficking in severe sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Ok Song

    Full Text Available A hallmark of severe sepsis is systemic inflammation which activates leukocytes and can result in their misdirection. This leads to both impaired migration to the locus of infection and increased infiltration into healthy tissues. In order to better understand the pathophysiologic mechanisms involved, we developed a coarse-grained phenomenological model of the acute inflammatory response in CLP (cecal ligation and puncture-induced sepsis in rats. This model incorporates distinct neutrophil kinetic responses to the inflammatory stimulus and the dynamic interactions between components of a compartmentalized inflammatory response. Ensembles of model parameter sets consistent with experimental observations were statistically generated using a Markov-Chain Monte Carlo sampling. Prediction uncertainty in the model states was quantified over the resulting ensemble parameter sets. Forward simulation of the parameter ensembles successfully captured experimental features and predicted that systemically activated circulating neutrophils display impaired migration to the tissue and neutrophil sequestration in the lung, consequently contributing to tissue damage and mortality. Principal component and multiple regression analyses of the parameter ensembles estimated from survivor and non-survivor cohorts provide insight into pathologic mechanisms dictating outcome in sepsis. Furthermore, the model was extended to incorporate hypothetical mechanisms by which immune modulation using extracorporeal blood purification results in improved outcome in septic rats. Simulations identified a sub-population (about 18% of the treated population that benefited from blood purification. Survivors displayed enhanced neutrophil migration to tissue and reduced sequestration of lung neutrophils, contributing to improved outcome. The model ensemble presented herein provides a platform for generating and testing hypotheses in silico, as well as motivating further experimental

  14. Neonatal infectious diseases: evaluation of neonatal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Gonzalez, Andres; Spearman, Paul W; Stoll, Barbara J

    2013-04-01

    Neonatal sepsis remains a feared cause of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period. Maternal, neonatal, and environmental factors are associated with risk of infection, and a combination of prevention strategies, judicious neonatal evaluation, and early initiation of therapy are required to prevent adverse outcomes. This article reviews recent trends in epidemiology and provides an update on risk factors, diagnostic methods, and management of neonatal sepsis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Toll-like receptors in neonatal sepsis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Hare, Fiona M

    2013-06-01

    Toll-like receptors are vital transmembrane receptors that initiate the innate immune response to many micro-organisms. The discovery of these receptors has improved our understanding of host-pathogen interactions, and these receptors play an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple neonatal conditions such as sepsis and brain injury. Toll-like receptors, especially TLRs 2 and 4, are associated with necrotizing enterocolitis, periventricular leukomalacia and sepsis.

  16. Detection of intracytoplasmic Th1/Th2 cytokine profiles in patients with sepsis and severe sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadinejad Z

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sepsis is the leading cause of death in critically ill patients throughout the world. The incidence is increasing despite the major advances in the development of antimicrobial agents and other supportive treatments. Based on multiple studies, it has been shown that patient outcome depends on Th1 and Th2 cytokine response. Moreover, whenever the Th2 response is predominant, the sepsis is more severe. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between cytokine levels and the severity of sepsis in patients. Methods: A cross-sectional study on the cellular levels of several pro-inflammatory cytokines was carried out in patients with sepsis and severe sepsis. The study included 37 patients (24 men and 13 women, 26 of them had sepsis and 11 had the severe form of sepsis Thirty-seven healthy volunteers served as controls. The average age of the patients was 57 years (±23.3 years, with a range of 21 to 92 years. From the whole blood of the subjects, we separated the monocytes and leukocytes, which were then cultured. Using an ELISA method, we measured levels of IFN- and IL-12 (associated with Th1, and IL-4 and IL-10 (associated with Th2 in the cultured cells with and without cell stimulation. Results: No correlation was found for IFN- production in the cells of patients with sepsis and severe sepsis, regardless of whether the patients had died or survived. However, IL-12 levels were significantly decreased in severe sepsis compared with those of sepsis patients (P=0.048. Furthermore, the cells of expired patients also had significantly decreased IL-12 levels compared with those of surviving patients (P=0.028. We also found that the levels of IFN-, IL-4, and IL-10 were decreased in patients compared with those of controls, which correlated to their production. However, there was no correlation for IL-12 production between the cells of the patients compared with those of the controls. There was also no correlation for

  17. [Are statins a therapeutic alternative in sepsis?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; Rivera-Buendía, Santos; Carrillo-Córdova, Jorge Raúl; Carrillo-Córdova, Luis Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Sepsis continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Evidence is emerging from observational studies and basic science research that statins might be associated with reduced mortality in sepsis. Statins have diverse immunomodulatory and antiinflammatory properties independent of their lipid-lowering ability. The protective association between statins and sepsis persisted in high-risk subgroups including patients with diabetes mellitus, those with malignancy, and those receiving steroids. This review discusses the basis of these observations and the current place of statin therapy in patients with sepsis. This is a rapidly growing field of fascinating experimental biology. It suggests an urgent need to investigate the pharmacology of these drugs and reappraise their therapeutic indications in critically ill patients. If this finding is supported by prospective controlled trials, statins may play an important role in sepsis related mortality. By the other hand statins are significantly cheaper than other therapies that have been shown to improve outcome in sepsis, and the demonstration of mortality benefit would have enormous cost-benefit implication.

  18. Pleiotropic regulations of neutrophil receptors response to sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huafeng; Sun, Bingwei

    2017-03-01

    Sepsis is a complex clinical condition that causes a high mortality rate worldwide. Numerous studies on the pathophysiology of sepsis have revealed an imbalance in the inflammatory network, thus leading to tissue damage, organ failure, and ultimately death. The impairment of neu-trophil migration is associated with the outcome of sepsis. Literature review was performed on the roles of neutrophil recruitment and neutrophil receptors as pleiotropic regulators during sepsis. Additionally, we systematically classify neutrophil receptors with regard to the neutrophil response during sepsis and discuss the clinical implications of these receptors for the treatment of sepsis. Increasing evidence suggests that there is significant dysfunction in neutrophil recruitment during sepsis, characterized by the failure to migrate to the site of infection. Neutrophil receptors, as pleiotropic regulators, play important roles in the neutrophil response during sepsis. Neutrophil receptors play key roles in chemotactic neutrophil migration and may prove to be suitable targets in future pharmacological therapies for sepsis.

  19. Decreased Tissue COX5B Expression and Mitochondrial Dysfunction during Sepsis-Induced Kidney Injury in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Lennert; Braunecker, Stefan; Adler, Christoph; De Robertis, Edoardo; Cirillo, Fabrizio

    2017-01-01

    Background. Sepsis is defined as a life-threatening organ dysfunction due to a dysregulated host response to infection. Sepsis is the dominant cause of acute kidney injury (AKI), accounting for nearly 50% of episodes of acute renal failure. Signaling cascades and pathways within the kidney are largely unknown and analysis of these molecular mechanisms may enhance knowledge on pathophysiology and possible therapeutic options. Material and Methods. 26 male Wistar rats were assigned to either a sham group (control, N = 6) or sepsis group (N = 20; cecal ligature and puncture model, 24 and 48 hours after CLP). Surviving rats (n = 12) were decapitated at 24 hours (early phase; n = 6) or 48 hours (late phase; n = 6) after CLP and kidneys removed for proteomic analysis. 2D-DIGE and DeCyder 2D software (t-test, P cytochrome c oxidase subunit B (COX5b), myosin-6 (MYH6), and myosin-7 (MYH7). A significant correlation with the proteins was found for mitochondrial energy production and electron transport. Conclusions. COX5B could be a promising biomarker candidate since a significant association was found during experimental sepsis in the present study. For future research, COX5B should be evaluated as a biomarker in both human urine and serum to identify sepsis. PMID:28246552

  20. Update on group B streptococcal infections: perinatal and neonatal periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandyal, Raja R

    2008-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS), one of the beta-Hemolytic streptococci, remains a leading cause of neonatal sepsis in the United States. The first consensus guidelines for the prevention of neonatal GBS disease were published in 1996, recommending intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis on the basis of screening-based or risk-based strategies. Since then, there has been a 70% decrease in the rate of early-onset GBS disease. On the basis of evidence-validating superiority of this screening-based strategy, new national guidelines were released in 2002. Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2005 showed a continued decrease in the annual incidence of early-onset GBS infection. The screening-based strategy involves universal screening of all pregnant women at 35 to 37 weeks' gestation for vaginal and rectal GBS colonization and recommends intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis for all GBS carriers (unless delivered by planned cesarean section before the onset of labor in a woman with intact membranes) with penicillin-G (or ampicillin). For mothers with severe penicillin allergy, clindamycin or erythromycin is recommended, when GBS' sensitivity is known; otherwise, vancomycin is recommended. Cefazolin is recommended for individuals with mild penicillin allergy. Severe anaphylactic reactions to penicillin were extremely rare. Emergence of antibiotic resistance to penicillin is still a theoretical possibility. This article provides a detailed account of recommendations for screening, diagnosing, and treating GBS disease in newborns.

  1. Staphylococcus aureus sepsis induces early renal mitochondrial DNA repair and mitochondrial biogenesis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel R Bartz

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI contributes to the high morbidity and mortality of multi-system organ failure in sepsis. However, recovery of renal function after sepsis-induced AKI suggests active repair of energy-producing pathways. Here, we tested the hypothesis in mice that Staphyloccocus aureus sepsis damages mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA in the kidney and activates mtDNA repair and mitochondrial biogenesis. Sepsis was induced in wild-type C57Bl/6J and Cox-8 Gfp-tagged mitochondrial-reporter mice via intraperitoneal fibrin clots embedded with S. aureus. Kidneys from surviving mice were harvested at time zero (control, 24, or 48 hours after infection and evaluated for renal inflammation, oxidative stress markers, mtDNA content, and mitochondrial biogenesis markers, and OGG1 and UDG mitochondrial DNA repair enzymes. We examined the kidneys of the mitochondrial reporter mice for changes in staining density and distribution. S. aureus sepsis induced sharp amplification of renal Tnf, Il-10, and Ngal mRNAs with decreased renal mtDNA content and increased tubular and glomerular cell death and accumulation of protein carbonyls and 8-OHdG. Subsequently, mtDNA repair and mitochondrial biogenesis was evidenced by elevated OGG1 levels and significant increases in NRF-1, NRF-2, and mtTFA expression. Overall, renal mitochondrial mass, tracked by citrate synthase mRNA and protein, increased in parallel with changes in mitochondrial GFP-fluorescence especially in proximal tubules in the renal cortex and medulla. Sub-lethal S. aureus sepsis thus induces widespread renal mitochondrial damage that triggers the induction of the renal mtDNA repair protein, OGG1, and mitochondrial biogenesis as a conspicuous resolution mechanism after systemic bacterial infection.

  2. Proenkephalin, Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin, and Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rates in Patients With Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hanah; Hur, Mina; Lee, Seungho; Marino, Rossella; Magrini, Laura; Cardelli, Patrizia; Struck, Joachim; Bergmann, Andreas; Hartmann, Oliver; Di Somma, Salvatore

    2017-09-01

    Proenkephalin (PENK) has been suggested as a novel biomarker for kidney function. We investigated the diagnostic and prognostic utility of plasma PENK in comparison with neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) and estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) in septic patients. A total of 167 septic patients were enrolled: 99 with sepsis, 37 with septic shock, and 31 with suspected sepsis. PENK and NGAL concentrations were measured and GFR was estimated by using the isotope dilution mass spectrometry traceable-Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) Study and three Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equations: CKD-EPI(Cr), CDK-EPI(CysC), and CKD-EPI(Cr-CysC). The PENK, NGAL, and eGFR results were compared according to sepsis severity, presence or absence of acute kidney injury (AKI), and clinical outcomes. The PENK, NGAL, and eGFR results were significantly associated with sepsis severity and differed significantly between patients with and without AKI only in the sepsis group (all P<0.05). PENK was superior to NGAL in predicting AKI (P=0.022) and renal replacement therapy (RRT) (P=0.0085). Regardless of the variable GFR category by the different eGFR equations, PENK showed constant and significant associations with all eGFR equations. Unlike NGAL, PENK was not influenced by inflammation and predicted the 30-day mortality. PENK is a highly sensitive and objective biomarker of AKI and RRT and is useful for prognosis prediction in septic patients. With its diagnostic robustness and predictive power for survival, PENK constitutes a promising biomarker in critical care settings including sepsis.

  3. Incidence and distribution of pathogens in early-onset neonatal sepsis in the era of antenatal antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Pierre; Dheu, Céline; Bolender, Chantal; Chognot, Didier; Keller, Laurence; Demil, Houria; Donato, Lionel; Langer, Bruno; Messer, Jean; Astruc, Dominique

    2010-09-01

    In 2001 France issued a new set of guidelines for the use of antenatal antibiotics (AA). These guidelines recommended intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis (IAP) to prevent group B streptococcal (GBS) disease and AA to prolong pregnancy in the event of preterm premature rupture of membranes (AA for PPROM). This study aims to determine the effects of AA, recommended by national guidelines, on the incidence and distribution of pathogens in early-onset neonatal sepsis (EONS). We performed a population-based, prospective, observational study of level II and III perinatal centres throughout the region of Alsace, a northeastern area of France, between March 2004 and February 2005. The study population included all neonates with confirmed or probable EONS, who were treated with antibiotics for at least 5 days. We analysed exposure to AA, as well as clinical and microbiological data obtained from medical records. A total of 20 131 neonates were born during the study period, and 217 were included in the study. Of these, 24 subjects had confirmed sepsis, 140 had probable sepsis and 53 had possible EONS. The overall incidence of confirmed EONS was 1.19 per 1000 births. The infecting bacteria was GBS in 15 of 24 (62.5%) confirmed EONS cases (incidence: 0.75 per 1000 births) and in 81 of 140 (58%) probable sepsis cases. Escherichia coli was identified in 6 of 24 (25%) cases of confirmed EONS (incidence: 0.3 per 1000 births) and in 30 of 140 (21%) cases of clinical sepsis. Among E. coli infections (n= 36), amoxicillin resistance (n= 18) was statistically linked with AA use (P = 0.045). This link was significant in cases of PPROM (P = 0.015), but not when IAP was administered to prevent GBS disease (P = 0.264). IAP was not performed in 18 of 60 (30%) cases and 32 of 93 (34%) cases, despite positive screening or the presence of risk factors for EONS, respectively. Group B streptococcus remains the predominant pathogen in the era of AA. Aminopenicillin-resistant E. coli infections

  4. Raised cardiac enzymes in sepsis with renal failure: An encompassing umbrella or a masquerader?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilip Gude

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Elevation of cardiac enzymes and troponins particularly in settings of sepsis and renal failure may cloud the diagnostic picture of acute coronary syndrome in many cases. Interpretation of such elevated enzymes thus warrants caution. It necessitates adequate awareness amongst clinicians, of conditions with such elevation in the absence of myocardial ischemia/infarction as well as those that harbinger false positives. We discuss one such case that posed a diagnostic dilemma and review the pertinent literature.

  5. PRACTICAL APPLICATION OF MODERN METHODS OF INPATIENT STREPTOCOCCAL INFECTION DIAGNOSTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Darmanyan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is commonly known that acute tonsillites are in most cases caused by viral infections. Only ca. 20% of patients require antibacterial therapy, including cases of the group-A-β-hemolytic-streptococcus-caused tonsillites. Etiologic diagnostics of acute tonsillitis is extremely complicated in terms of both clinical symptoms and bacterial inflammation marker levels, which is why it is positive result of a cultural study of palatine tonsillar materials that should serve as an indication to prescription of systemic antibacterial therapy. Express test for detection of the group A β-hemolytic streptococcus, comparable to the cultural study method in terms of sensitivity and specificity, helps reasonable approach to the treatment of acute tonsillites.

  6. Group B streptococcal immunisation of pregnant women for the prevention of early and late onset Group B streptococcal infection of the neonate as well as adult disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenchington, Anna L.; Lamont, Ronald F.

    2017-01-01

    or in the future, vaccination. Areas covered: The introduction of a vaccine to women in the third trimester is likely to further reduce the burden of disease and provide benefits beyond the prevention of early neonatal disease, including meningitis and disability following late onset disease. Development......Introduction: Early onset neonatal Group B streptococcal disease is preventable. Intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis has resulted in a significant reduction in neonatal mortality and morbidity. National guidelines for the selection of women eligible for intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis, whether...

  7. A biomarker panel to discriminate between systemic inflammatory response syndrome SIRS and sepsis and sepsis severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punyadeera, C.; Schneider, E. M.; Schaffer, D.; Hsu, H-Y.; Joos, T.O.; Kriebel, F; Weiss, M.; Verhaegh, W.F.J.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we report on initial efforts to discover putative biomarkers for differential diagnosis of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) vs. sepsis; and different stages of sepsis. In addition, we also investigated whether there are proteins that can discriminate between patients wh

  8. A biomarker panel to discriminate between systemic inflammatory response syndrome SIRS and sepsis and sepsis severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punyadeera, C.; Schneider, E. M.; Schaffer, D.; Hsu, H-Y.; Joos, T.O.; Kriebel, F; Weiss, M.; Verhaegh, W.F.J.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we report on initial efforts to discover putative biomarkers for differential diagnosis of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) vs. sepsis; and different stages of sepsis. In addition, we also investigated whether there are proteins that can discriminate between patients

  9. The Protection of Carbon Monoxide Releasing Molecules on Sepsis with Acute Kidney Injury in Rats%一氧化碳释放分子对大鼠脓毒症诱导急性肾损伤的保护作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄健; 李毅; 王鹏; 常瑞明; 王泽彬; 江丽屏; 梁剑波

    2015-01-01

    目的:观察一氧化碳释放分子(CORM-2)对脓毒血症大鼠急性肾损伤的影响。方法:采用盲肠结扎穿孔术诱导大鼠脓毒症肾损伤模型,64只雄性SD 大鼠随机平均分为4组(n=16),假手术组(Sham 组)、Sham 组+CORM-2组,盲肠结扎穿孔(CLP)组及CLP+CORM-2组。 CORM-2治疗组为盲肠结扎穿孔术后给予腹腔注射10mg/kg 剂量CORM-2。观察各组大鼠3d 累积生存率,术后12 h 测定肾脏组织中肌酐和尿素氮水平,同时检测IL-1β及TNF-α水平,观察各组大鼠24 h 时间点肾脏组织病理学变化。结果:与对照组(Sham 组,Sham+CORM-2组)相比,CLP 组及 CLP+CORM-2组大鼠生存率下降,肾组织肌酐、尿素氮升高,IL-1β及 TNF-α水平升高(P <0.05)。但与CLP 组相比,CLP+CORM2可提高大鼠的3d 累积生存率,并改善脓毒症大鼠肾组织损伤,降低肾组织中IL-1β及TNF-α水平(P <0.05)。结论: CORM-2对脓毒症大鼠急性肾损伤有保护作用,其机制可能与CORM-2抑制脓毒症致肾损伤大鼠的炎性反应相关。%Objective:To investigate the effects of carbon monoxide releasing molecules (CORM-2) on sepsis with acute kidney injury in rats. Methods: Sepsis kidney injury model was induced by cecal ligation and puncture 64 male SD rats. The rats were randomly divided into four groups (n = 16), sham-operated group (Sham group), Sham group + CORM-2 group, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) group and CLP + CORM-2 group. CORM-2 treatment group were given intraperitoneal injection of 10 mg/kg dose of CORM-2 after cecal ligation and puncture. The three days cumulative survival rate was observed in four groups. The levels of blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, IL-1β and TNF-α of kidney tissue were detected after 12 h of CLP , and the renal histopathological changes were observed after 24 h of CLP in each group. Results: Compared with the

  10. Much Ado About the New Definitions of Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Copotoiu Sanda-Maria

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Following the publication of the new definition of sepsis (Sepsis-3, a plethora of articles have been published in medical journals. Recognizing the epidemiological importance of the previous definitions, first issued in 1992 (Sepsis-1, and subsequently revised in 2001 (Sepsis-2, the most recent opinion emphasizes the failure “to provide adequate groups of patients with homogenous aetiologies, presentations and outcomes”, and blamed one of the causes “for the failure of several randomized controlled trials (RCTs, that tested the efficacy of adjuvant sepsis therapies”. This review summarizes the recent advances in sepsis definition.

  11. Laboratory detection of sepsis: biomarkers and molecular approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Stefan; Carroll, Karen C

    2013-09-01

    Sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Rapid diagnosis and therapeutic interventions are desirable to improve the overall mortality in patients with sepsis. However, gold standard laboratory diagnostic methods for sepsis, pose a significant challenge to rapid diagnosis of sepsis by physicians and laboratories. This article discusses the usefulness and potential of biomarkers and molecular test methods for a more rapid clinical and laboratory diagnosis of sepsis. Because new technologies are quickly emerging, physicians and laboratories must appreciate the key factors and characteristics that affect the clinical usefulness and diagnostic accuracy of these test methodologies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Lethal streptococcal toxic shock syndrome in pediatrics. Presentation of 3 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Alvarez, J M; Valerón Lemaur, M E; Consuegra Llapur, E; Urquía Martí, L; Morón Saén de Casas, A; González Jorge, R

    2007-03-01

    Three cases of children admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Medicine Unit in the months of February to March 2004 with the diagnosis of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome are presented. Two were under 2 years of age and the initial symptoms suggested viriasis. They evolved towards septic shock with early multiorganic failure and then death due to massive hemoptysis, ventricular fibrillation due to hyperkaliemia. Streptococcus pyogenes with serotypes M1T1 was isolated in all the cases and the patients had the clinical criteria of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Their course was unfavorable in spite of the resuscitation steps, early antibiotic treatment and artificial support of the different organic failures. We stress the rareness of the cases, early age, its appearance in a short period of time, its sudden onset and the null response to treatment initiated.

  13. Detection of streptococcal class I M protein in psoriasis by confocal immunofluorescent microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talanin, N Y; Shelley, W B; Raeder, R; Shelley, E D; Boyle, M D

    1997-05-01

    Epidemiological evidence implicates Streptococcus pyogenes (group A) infection as a common triggering stimulus for psoriasis. Unequivocal demonstration of streptococcal antigens in psoriatic skin has been difficult due to cross-reactive antigens in both normal human tissue and group A streptococci, which complicate immunohistological analysis. In this study cryostat sections of involved psoriatic skin were stained with monoclonal antibody 111-15504 to group A streptococci. The epitope recognized by this antibody was found to be specific for group A streptococci and is associated with class I M protein. Streptococcal antigens were found in the dermal papillae and epidermis of psoriatic skin lesions of 20 out 38 patients. These findings indicate that specific S. pyogenes antigen, associated with class I M protein, is often present in psoriatic lesions. Such an antigen, originating from focal infection elsewhere could be responsible for T-lymphocyte inflammatory responses triggering the development of psoriatic lesions.

  14. 按柏林新标准分析急诊脓毒症患者发生急性呼吸窘迫综合征的危险因素%Analysis of the risk factors of acute respiratory distress syndrome of Berlin new definition in patients with sepsis in emergency department

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔良; 刘志

    2015-01-01

    ObjectiveTo discuss the risk factors of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in patients with sepsis in emergency department.Methods 312 patients with sepsis admitted to Department of Emergency of China Medical University Affiliated First Hospital were retrospectively analyzed, and they were divided into two groups according to development of ARDS, which was defined according to the Berlin new definition. The age, gender, vital signs, laboratory results, underlying disease, the mortality in emergency department sepsis (MEDS) score and lung injury prediction score (LIPS) were collected. Univariate analysis was done for each parameter. Statistical significance results were evaluated by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was plotted to analyze the predictive value of the parameter for ARDS.Results The incidence of sepsis-related ARDS was 11.2% (35/312). Within 35 cases of ARDS, there were 10 cases of mild ARDS, 18 cases of moderate ARDS, and 7 cases of severe ARDS. Univariate analysis showed that age (t = -2.134,P = 0.035), oxygenation index (t = -4.245, P = 0.001), arterial lactate (Lac,t = 6.245,P< 0.001), drugs for vascular diseases (χ2 = 4.261,P = 0.026), shock (χ2 = 4.386,P = 0.021), MEDS (t = 4.021,P = 0.045), LIPS (t = 5.569,P< 0.001), lung infections (χ2 = 4.289, P = 0.025), and mechanical ventilation (χ2 = 6.245,P = 0.001) were related to ARDS. The incidence of ARDS was different in different levels of Lac, which was 5.00% (3/16) at low level of Lac (< 2.0 mmol/L),9.46% (14/148) at middle level of Lac (2.0-3.9 mmol/L) and 17.31% (18/104) at high level of Lac (≥4.0 mmol/L). It was shown by multivariate logistic regression analysis that LIPS [odds ratio (OR) = 5.124, 95% confidence interval (95%CI) =3.642-10.153,P = 0.002], Lac (OR = 18.180, 95%CI = 7.677-32.989,P< 0.001) were independent risk factors for ARDS. It was shown by area under ROC (AUC) that the predictive value of LIPS and Lac in

  15. Properties and type antigen patterns of group B streptococcal isolates from pigs and nutrias.

    OpenAIRE

    Wibawan, I W; Lämmler, C; Smola, J

    1993-01-01

    All 59 group B streptococcal cultures isolated from pigs and nutrias reacted with group B-specific antiserum and gave a positive CAMP reaction in the zone of staphylococcal beta-lysin. Most of the cultures were pigmented; all cultures hydrolyzed Na hippurate and utilized salicin, maltose, and saccharose but not esculin, mannitol, or inulin. Fifty-three percent of the group B streptococci from pigs and none of those from nutrias were lactose positive. Serotyping revealed that most of the group...

  16. Separation of T-cell-stimulating activity from streptococcal M protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Fleischer, B; Schmidt, K.H.; Gerlach, D.; Köhler, W.

    1992-01-01

    The superantigenic properties of M protein type 5 of Streptococcus pyogenes have been implicated as an important pathogenicity factor in streptococcal autoimmune diseases. Here we show that after a single purification step by affinity chromatography on immobilized albumin or fibrinogen, M protein has no mitogenic activity for T cells. We demonstrate that the superantigenicity of M proteins of type 5 and type 1 is due to contamination with the highly potent pyrogenic exotoxins of S. pyogenes i...

  17. Population-Based Surveillance of Invasive Group A Streptococcal Disease in British Columbia: 1996-1998

    OpenAIRE

    Gordean L Bjornson; Scheifele, David W; Alison Bell; Arlene King

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify and describe all cases of invasive group A streptococcal (GAS) infection occurring in British Columbia during a two-year period.DESIGN: Active, laboratory-based surveillance with supplemental case description.SETTING: Forty community and regional hospitals and the provincial laboratory participated, encompassing all health regions.POPULATION STUDIED: Entire provincial population from April 1, 1996 to March 31, 1998.MAIN RESULTS: Over the 24-month surveillance period, 18...

  18. Production of bacteremia and meningitis in infant rats with group B streptococcal serotypes.

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrieri, P; Burke, B; Nelson, J.

    1980-01-01

    Group B streptococcal strains, representing the five major serotypes, were inoculated into infant rats by intranasal, oral, and intraperitoneal routes. Bacteremia regularly followed injection by the intraperitoneal route. Four strains (three of type III) isolated from human cerebrospinal fluid appeared more virulent for 5-day-old rats. Injection of fewer than 10 colony-forming units of one strain, a type III, led to bacteremia and death in 27% of animals. The cumulative bacteremia and mortali...

  19. Regulatory RNAs in the Less Studied Streptococcal Species: from Nomenclature to Identification

    OpenAIRE

    Quentin, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcal species are Gram-positive bacteria involved in severe and invasive diseases in humans and animals. Although, this group includes different pathogenic species involved in life-threatening infections for humans, it also includes beneficial species, such as Streptococcus thermophilus, which is used in yogurt production. In bacteria virulence factors are controlled by various regulatory networks including regulatory RNAs. For clearness and to develop logical thinking, we start this ...

  20. Regulatory RNAs in the Less Studied Streptococcal Species: from Nomenclature to Identification

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Amine Zorgani; Roland Quentin; Marie-Frédérique Lartigue

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcal species are Gram-positive bacteria involved in severe and invasive diseases in humans and animals. Although this group includes different pathogenic species involved in life-threatening infections for humans, it also includes beneficial species, such as Streptococcus thermophilus, which is used in yogurt production. In bacteria virulence factors are controlled by various regulatory networks including regulatory RNAs. For clearness and to develop logical thinking, we start this r...

  1. Designing a Pediatric Severe Sepsis Screening Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eSepanski

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We sought to create a screening tool with improved predictive value for pediatric severe sepsis and septic shock that can be incorporated into the electronic medical record and actively screen all patients arriving at a pediatric Emergency Department (ED. Gold standard severe sepsis cases were identified using a combination of coded discharge diagnosis and physician chart review from 7,402 children who visited a pediatric ED over two months. The tool’s identification of severe sepsis was initially based on International Consensus Conference on Pediatric Sepsis (ICCPS parameters that were refined by an iterative, virtual process that allowed us to propose successive changes in sepsis detection parameters in order to optimize the tool’s predictive value based on receiver operating curve (ROC characteristics. Age-specific normal and abnormal values for heart rate (HR and respiratory rate (RR were empirically derived from 143,603 children seen in a second pediatric ED over three years. Univariate analyses were performed for each measure in the tool to assess its association with severe sepsis and to characterize it as an early or late indicator of severe sepsis. A split-sample was used to validate the final, optimized tool. The final tool incorporated age-specific thresholds for abnormal HR and RR and employed a linear temperature correction for each category. The final tool’s positive predictive value was 48.7%, a significant, nearly three-fold improvement over the original ICCPS tool. False positive Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS identifications were nearly six-fold lower.

  2. The spectrum and outcome of surgical sepsis in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Green

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Sepsis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and the incidence appears to be increasing. In the resource-limited environment in low- and middle-income countries, the management of surgical sepsis (SS continues to represent a significant portion of the workload for most general surgeons. Objective. To describe the spectrum of SS seen at a busy emergency department, and categorise the outcomes. Methods. The Pietermaritzburg Metropolitan Trauma Service (PMTS and Pietermaritzburg Metropolitan Surgical Service (PMSS in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa (SA, maintain a prospective electronic registry. All patients with features of sepsis among emergency general surgical patients >15 years of age admitted to the PMSS over the period January 2012 - January 2015 were identified. From this cohort, all patients with sepsis that required surgical source control or who had a documented surgical source of sepsis (i.e. had SS were selected for analysis. Results. Of a total of 6 020 adult surgical patients on the database, a cohort of 1 240 acute surgical patients with features of sepsis were identified, and 675 with SS were then analysed further. Of the 675 patients, 49.2% were male, and the mean age was 46 years (standard deviation (SD 19; 47.0% presented to the PMSS directly from within the metropolitan area, while the remaining 53.0% were referred from hospitals outside the area. Physiological parameters (mean values on presentation were as follows: systolic blood pressure 123 mmHg (standard deviation (SD 23, respiratory rate 22 breaths/min (SD 5.2, heart rate 107 bpm (SD 19, temperature 37°C (SD 2 and white cell count 20 × 109/L (SD 8. Of the patients, 21.6% were known to be HIV-positive, 13.5% (91/675 were negative and 64.9% were of unknown status; 57.6% had intra-abdominal sepsis, 26.1% diabetes-related limb sepsis and the remaining 16.3% soft-tissue infections; 17.5% required intensive care unit admission, with a mean

  3. Increased concentrations of Serum amyloid A in dogs with sepsis caused by pyometra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jitpean, Supranee; Pettersson, Ann; Höglund, Odd V; Holst, Bodil Ström; Olsson, Ulf; Hagman, Ragnvi

    2014-11-28

    Sepsis is a serious and potentially life-threatening condition and early diagnosis and appropriate treatment is crucial for survival. Pyometra is one of the most common diseases in intact female dogs. The disease often leads to sepsis (systemic inflammatory response syndrome, SIRS, caused by infection). Diagnostic markers for detecting sepsis are gaining increasing interest in veterinary medicine. Acute phase proteins (APPs) such as C-reactive protein (CRP) are useful for detecting systemic inflammation in dogs. Serum amyloid A (SAA) is another major APP in dogs that is not yet as widely used. Albumin is regarded as a negative APP and has earlier been evaluated for prediction of prognosis in septic dogs. The aim of the present study was to determine SAA, CRP and albumin concentrations in dogs with sepsis and pyometra and to evaluate whether these inflammatory markers are associated with length of postoperative hospitalization. Thirty-one surgically treated bitches with pyometra were included, whereof 23 septic (SIRS-positive) and eight non-septic (SIRS-negative). Albumin concentrations were analyzed by routine automated methods. SAA and CRP analyses were performed with previously validated commercially available assays (ELISA and immunoturbidimetric).Mean (± SE) serum concentrations of SAA were significantly higher in septic (130.8 ± 8.0 mg/L) compared to non-septic bitches (88.5 ± 12.5 mg/L). Using a cut-off value for SAA of 109.07 mg/L (n = 31 bitches), the sensitivity and specificity for detecting sepsis was 74% and 50%, respectively. Serum albumin concentrations were not significantly different in septic compared to non-septic bitches (mean ± SE, 25 ± 1 g/L and 26 ± 1 g/L, respectively). CRP concentrations were also not significantly different in septic (mean ± SE 225.6 ± 16.0 mg/L) compared to non-septic bitches (mean ± SE, 176.0 ± 27.1 mg/L). None of these inflammatory markers were associated with the outcome as measured by length of hospitalization

  4. Diagnostic value of sTREM-1 and procalcitonin levels in the early diagnosis of sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksaray, Sebahat; Alagoz, Pinar; Inan, Asuman; Cevan, Simin; Ozgultekin, Asu

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Sepsis is still major cause of morbidity and mortality, despite improvements in diagnosis and treatment in modern medicine. Therefore, laboratory examinations that provide correct and rapid results are needed to support the diagnosis. This study was conducted to investigate value of immunological indicators procalcitonin (PCT) and soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1) in differential diagnosis of patients with sepsis and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), as well as to assess their importance in determining prognosis of patients with sepsis. METHODS: Total of 90 patients, 38 with SIRS and 52 with sepsis, who were between the ages 20 to 92, were included in this prospectively planned study. Blood sample was collected from the patients during hospitalization and again in follow-up visit. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MyBioSource, Inc., San Diego, CA, USA) was used to measure sTREM-1, and PCT was measured using mini VIDAS B.R.A.H.M.S PCT assay (Biomerieux, S.A., Marcy-l’Étoile, France). In addition, patients were clinically assessed using Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II scoring system. RESULTS: On day of intensive care unit admission, sTREM-1 and PCT levels, as well as APACHE II score were significantly higher in sepsis group than SIRS group (p=0.001, p=0.01, p=0.001, respectively). Values of sTREM-1 and APACHE II score were higher in the patients with positive blood cultures than those with negative culture results (p=0.002, p=0.006, respectively). PCT, C-reactive protein, and sTREM-1 levels were significantly higher in nonsurviving group. In differentiation of SIRS from sepsis, sTREM-1 cut-off value ≥133 pg/mL and PCT cut-off value of 1.57 ng/mL yielded sensitivity of 71.1% and 67.33%, and specificity of 73.3% and 65.79%, respectively. CONCLUSION: In patients with suspected sepsis, sTREM-1 and PCT can be used as indicators, in addition to scoring systems such as APACHE II and

  5. Endothelial dysfunction assessed by brachial artery ultrasound in severe sepsis and septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Leandro; Prado, Karen; Foppa, Murilo; Martinelli, Nidiane; Aguiar, Cynthia; Furian, Thiago; Clausell, Nadine; Rohde, Luis Eduardo

    2012-06-01

    Noninvasive evaluation of endothelial function may be accomplished by ultrasound assessment of flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) of the brachial artery. This study aims to investigate the role of FMD analysis on intrahospital prognosis of patients with sepsis. Adult patients admitted to the intensive care unit with severe sepsis or septic shock were consecutively included. Brachial artery FMD was measured upon admission, after 24 and 72 hours. A group of apparently healthy subjects paired for sex and age was used as controls. Patients were followed up to discharge or death. We studied 42 patients (mean age, 51 ± 19 years) with sepsis predominantly of abdominal or respiratory etiology (75%). Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation II risk score was 23 ± 7, and intrahospital mortality rate was 33%. Flow-mediated vasodilation in septic patients was significantly lower than in healthy controls (1.5 ± 7% vs 6 ± 4%, P < .001). Most of the nonsurvivors (86%) showed a decline in sequential FMD analyses, whereas only 43% of survivors showed a reduction of FMD (P = .01). In nonsurvivors, FMD was significantly lower 72 hours after sepsis onset (-3.3% ± 10% vs 5.2% ± 4%; P < .05; time-group interaction P value = .03). Brachial FMD is altered in septic patients with hemodynamic instability, and its deterioration may be an early marker of unfavorable prognosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Metabolites in Blood for Prediction of Bacteremic Sepsis in the Emergency Room.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M Kauppi

    Full Text Available A metabolomics approach for prediction of bacteremic sepsis in patients in the emergency room (ER was investigated. In a prospective study, whole blood samples from 65 patients with bacteremic sepsis and 49 ER controls were compared. The blood samples were analyzed using gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Multivariate and logistic regression modeling using metabolites identified by chromatography or using conventional laboratory parameters and clinical scores of infection were employed. A predictive model of bacteremic sepsis with 107 metabolites was developed and validated. The number of metabolites was reduced stepwise until identifying a set of 6 predictive metabolites. A 6-metabolite predictive logistic regression model showed a sensitivity of 0.91(95% CI 0.69-0.99 and a specificity 0.84 (95% CI 0.58-0.94 with an AUC of 0.93 (95% CI 0.89-1.01. Myristic acid was the single most predictive metabolite, with a sensitivity of 1.00 (95% CI 0.85-1.00 and specificity of 0.95 (95% CI 0.74-0.99, and performed better than various combinations of conventional laboratory and clinical parameters. We found that a metabolomics approach for analysis of acute blood samples was useful for identification of patients with bacteremic sepsis. Metabolomics should be further evaluated as a new tool for infection diagnostics.

  7. Global DNA methylation in neonatal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhas, Benet Bosco; Antony, Hiasindh Ashmi; Bhat, Vishnu; Newton, Banupriya; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2015-04-01

    To find out whether gDNA methylation can be used as a diagnostic/prognostic method for neonatal sepsis. The study was conducted in the neonatal division of a tertiary care referral hospital. Fifty one newborns as cases and thirty seven newborns as controls were enrolled in the study. Using 5-mC DNA ELISA method, the percentage of genomic DNA methylated in these newborns was established. Highly significant difference in percentage of gDNA methylated was found between the cases and controls (Cases: 2.4 ± 0.39; 2.07 ± 0.35; P sepsis (clinical, probable and culture positive) and without sepsis. Although the global DNA methylation was not a highly sensitive diagnostic method, this study reveals that DNA methylation might play a vital role in neonatal sepsis susceptibility. Identification of the specific differentially methylated genes might serve as a promising future diagnostic/prognostic marker for neonatal sepsis.

  8. Neuromuscular Dysfunction in Experimental Sepsis and Glutamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çankayalı, İlkin; Boyacılar, Özden; Demirağ, Kubilay; Uyar, Mehmet; Moral, Ali Reşat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Electrophysiological studies show that critical illness polyneuromyopathy appears in the early stage of sepsis before the manifestation of clinical findings. The metabolic response observed during sepsis causes glutamine to become a relative essential amino acid. Aims: We aimed to assess the changes in neuromuscular transmission in the early stage of sepsis after glutamine supplementation. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into two groups. Rats in both groups were given normal feeding for one week. In the study group, 1 g/kg/day glutamine was added to normal feeding by feeding tube for one week. Cecal ligation and perforation (CLP) surgery was performed at the end of one week. Before and 24 hours after CLP, compound muscle action potentials were recorded from the gastrocnemius muscle. Results: Latency measurements before and 24 hours after CLP were 0.68±0.05 ms and 0.80±0.09 ms in the control group and 0.69±0.07 ms and 0.73±0.07 ms in the study group (p<0.05). Conclusion: Since enteral glutamine prevented compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) latency prolongation in the early phase of sepsis, it was concluded that enteral glutamine replacement might be promising in the prevention of neuromuscular dysfunction in sepsis; however, further studies are required. PMID:27308070

  9. Neonatal sepsis in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutouby, A; Habibullah, J

    1995-06-01

    The case records of all neonates admitted to the neonatal unit of Al Wasl Hospital (Dubai) in a period of 60 months (May 1987-April 1992) were analysed. One-hundred-and-six neonates had confirmed sepsis. The most common causative organisms were Group B Streptococci (23 per cent), E. coli (17 per cent), Staph. epidermidis (17 per cent), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (16 per cent). Group B Streptococcus presented as the most common organism in very early (< or = 24 hours) and early onset (2-6 days) of sepsis (34 per cent, 21/61), Klebsiella pneumoniae (24 per cent), Staphylococcal epidermidis (18 per cent) and Candida (13 per cent) were most common organisms causing late onset of sepsis (7-30 days). Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae had highest mortality (71 per cent, 5/7; and 59 per cent, 10/17, respectively). Lowest mortality (4 per cent, 1/25) was observed in Group B Streptococcus sepsis. Prematurity, low birth weight, and nosocomial sepsis were high risk factors associated with fatal outcome.

  10. Soluble L-selectin levels predict survival in sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Jakob B; Nielsen, Ole H; Strøm, Jens

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate serum soluble L-selectin as a prognostic factor for survival in patients with sepsis.......To evaluate serum soluble L-selectin as a prognostic factor for survival in patients with sepsis....

  11. Effects of high volume hemofiltration on HMGB1,TNF-a,IL-6 in serum and live,lung, kidney tissues of sepsis dog model with acute renal failure%DMSA-Fe3O4纳米磁流体介导热疗对兔VX2肿瘤的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    臧汉杰; 冯耀良; 余超; 祖庆泉; 马明; 顾宁

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of high volume hemofiltration(HVHF) on high mobility group box chromosomal protein 1 ( HMGB1), TNF-a, IL-6 in serum and live, lung, kidney tissues of sepsis dog model with acute kidney failure. Methods The bilateral ureters of twelve male Beagle dogs were ligated and lipopolysaccharide( LPS) 1.0 mg/kg was injected to establish the sepstic dog models with acute kidney failure. The dogs were equally randomized to model group and HVHF group( treated with HVHF for 24 h after injection of LPS immediately). Venous blood was collected to check blood routine, liver and kidney functions and electrolytes before and at 2,4,8,16,24 h after injection of LPS. Arterial blood gas analysis was performed before and at 24 h after injection of LPS. EILSA was used to determine the concentrations of HMGB1, TNF-a, IL-6 in serum at different time points above and in supernatant of liver, lung and kidney tissues at 24 h after injection of LPS. Results Compared with model group, the levels of HMGB1, TNF-o, IL-6 in serum and liver, lung, kidney tissues were decreased, peak time of HMGB1 level in serum was delayed, liver, lung and kidney functions were improved in HVHF group (P<0. 05). Conclusion HVHF therapy can decrease the concentrations of HMGB1,TNF-a and IL-6 in serum and liver,lung and kidney tissues and protect the liver, lung and kidney functions of septic dog with acute kidney failure.%目的 探讨交变磁场介导的二巯基丁二酸(DMSA)-Fe3O4纳米磁流体热疗治疗兔VX2肿瘤的疗效.方法 建立20只兔后肢VX2软组织肿瘤模型,随机分为4组:A组(对照组)、B组(磁流体局部注射组十热疗)、C组(磁流体动脉灌注组十热疗)、D组(磁流体静脉注射组十热疗),每组5只.成瘤2周后CT测量肿瘤大小.结果 B组和C组的肿瘤中心区[(46.01±1.97)℃和(40.38±1.50)℃]和肿瘤边缘区[(40.35±1.36)℃和(42.57±1.80)℃]的温度显著高于正常肌肉组织[(35.73±1.32)℃和(35.37±1.55)

  12. Tolerability of inhaled N-chlorotaurine in an acute pig streptococcal lower airway inflammation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Consolato

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inhalation of N-chlorotaurine (NCT, an endogenous new broad spectrum non-antibiotic anti-infective, has been shown to be very well tolerated in the pig model recently. In the present study, inhaled NCT was tested for tolerability and efficacy in the infected bronchopulmonary system using the same model. Methods Anesthetized pigs were inoculated with 20 ml of a solution containing approximately 108 CFU/ml Streptococcus pyogenes strain d68 via a duodenal tube placed through the tracheal tube down to the carina. Two hours later, 5 ml of 1% NCT aqueous solution (test group, n = 15 or 5 ml of 0.9% NaCl (control group, n = 16 was inhaled via the tracheal tube connected to a nebulizer. Inhalation was repeated every hour, four times in total. Lung function and haemodynamics were monitored. Bronchoalveolar lavage samples were removed for determination of colony forming units (CFU, and lung samples for histology. Results Arterial pressure of oxygen (PaO2 decreased rapidly after instillation of the bacteria in all animals and showed only a slight further decrease at the end of the experiment without a difference between both groups. Pulmonary artery pressure increased to a peak 1-1.5 h after application of the bacteria, decreased in the following hour and remained constant during treatment, again similarly in both groups. Histology demonstrated granulocytic infiltration in the central parts of the lung, while this was absent in the periphery. Expression of TNF-alpha, IL-8, and haemoxygenase-1 in lung biopsies was similar in both groups. CFU counts in bronchoalveolar lavage came to 170 (10; 1388 CFU/ml (median and 25 and 75 percentiles for the NCT treated pigs, and to 250 (10; 5.5 × 105 CFU/ml for NaCl treated pigs (p = 0.4159. Conclusions Inhaled NCT at a concentration of 1% proved to be very well tolerated also in the infected bronchopulmonary system. This study confirms the tolerability in this delicate body region, which has been proven in healthy pigs previously. Regarding efficacy, no conclusions can be drawn, mainly because of the limited test period of the model.

  13. Automated electronic medical record sepsis detection in the emergency department

    OpenAIRE

    Su Q. Nguyen; Edwin Mwakalindile; Booth, James S.; Vicki Hogan; Jordan Morgan; Prickett, Charles T; Donnelly, John P; Wang, Henry E.

    2014-01-01

    Background. While often first treated in the emergency department (ED), identification of sepsis is difficult. Electronic medical record (EMR) clinical decision tools offer a novel strategy for identifying patients with sepsis. The objective of this study was to test the accuracy of an EMR-based, automated sepsis identification system. Methods. We tested an EMR-based sepsis identification tool at a major academic, urban ED with 64,000 annual visits. The EMR system collected vital sign and lab...

  14. Automated electronic medical record sepsis detection in the emergency department

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Su Q.; Edwin Mwakalindile; Booth, James S.; Vicki Hogan; Jordan Morgan; Prickett, Charles T; Donnelly, John P.; Wang, Henry E.

    2014-01-01

    Background. While often first treated in the emergency department (ED), identification of sepsis is difficult. Electronic medical record (EMR) clinical decision tools offer a novel strategy for identifying patients with sepsis. The objective of this study was to test the accuracy of an EMR-based, automated sepsis identification system. Methods. We tested an EMR-based sepsis identification tool at a major academic, urban ED with 64,000 annual visits. The EMR system collected vital sign and lab...

  15. Automated electronic medical record sepsis detection in the Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Su; Mwakalindile, Edwin; Booth, James S.; Hogan, Vicki; Morgan, Jordan; Prickett, Charles T; Donnelly, John P.; Wang, Henry E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: While often first treated in the Emergency Department (ED), identification of sepsis is difficult. Electronic medical record (EMR) clinical decision tools offer a novel strategy for identifying patients with sepsis. The objective of this study was to test the accuracy of an EMR-based, automated sepsis identification system. Methods : We tested an EMR-based sepsis identification tool at a major academic, urban ED with 64,000 annual visits. The EMR system collected vital sign and la...

  16. Is there NO treatment for severe sepsis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cauwels A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response syndrome in the presence of suspected or proven infection, and it may progress to or encompass organ failure (severe sepsis and hypotension (septic shock. Clinicians possess an arsenal of supportive measures to combat severe sepsis and septic shock, and some success, albeit controversial, has been achieved by using low doses of corticosteroids or recombinant human activated protein C. However, a truly effective mediator-directed specific treatment has not been developed yet. Treatment with low doses of corticosteroids or with recombinant human activated protein C remains controversial and its success very limited. Attempts to treat shock by blocking LPS, TNF or IL-1 were unsuccessful, as were attempts to use interferon-gamma or granulocyte colony stimulating factor. Inhibiting nitric oxide synthases held promise but met with considerable difficulties. Scavenging excess nitric oxide or targeting molecules downstream of inducible nitric oxide synthase, such as soluble guanylate cyclase or potassium channels, might offer other alternatives.

  17. Optic atrophy, necrotizing anterior scleritis and keratitis presenting in association with Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papageorgiou Konstantinos I

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We report a case of optic atrophy, necrotizing anterior scleritis and keratitis presenting in a patient with Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome. Case presentation A 43-year-old woman developed streptococcal toxic shock syndrome secondary to septic arthritis of her right ankle. Streptococcus pyogenes (b-haemolyticus Group A was isolated from blood cultures and joint aspirate. She was referred for ophthalmology review as her right eye became injected and the pupil had become unresponsive to light whilst she was in the Intensive Therapy Unit (ITU. The iris appeared atrophic and was mid-dilated with no direct or consensual response to light. Three zones of sub-epithelial opacification where noted in the cornea. There where extensive posterior synechiae. Indirect ophthalmoscopy showed a pale right disc. The vision was reduced to hand movements (HM. A diagnosis of optic atrophy was made secondary to post-streptococcal uveitis. She subsequently developed a necrotizing anterior scleritis. Conclusion This case illustrates a previously unreported association of optic atrophy, necrotizing anterior scleritis and keratitis in a patient with post-streptococcal uveitis. This patient had developed Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome secondary to septic arthritis. We recommend increased awareness of the potential risks of these patients developing severe ocular involvement.

  18. Sepsis in intensive care patients: challenges in diagnosis and prognostication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Klouwenberg, P.M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a syndrome that arises when the body’s response to a severe infection injures its own tissues. It is a major and increasing cause of in-hospital morbidity and mortality. Despite recent advances in the management of sepsis, the morbidity and mortality caused by sepsis remain unacceptably hi

  19. Diabetes and sepsis outcomes - it is not all bad news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yende, S.; van der Poll, T.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus have an increased risk of developing infections and sepsis. In this issue of Critical Care Esper and colleagues report on a large survey, involving 12.5 million sepsis cases, that examined the impact of pre-existing diabetes on organ dysfunction during sepsis. Their m

  20. Sepsis in HIV-infected patients; epidemiology and host response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huson, M.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, we examined the impact of HIV infection on the epidemiology (Part I) of sepsis, and host response (Part II) to sepsis. We studied sepsis patients in Gabon, a setting with a high prevalence of HIV, and in Dutch intensive care units (ICUs). In Part I, we found that HIV positive patient

  1. An Evidence Based Approach to Sepsis: Educational Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for recognizing and treating sepsis have been available for decades, yet healthcare providers do not adhere to the recommendations. Sepsis can progress rapidly if not recognized early. Literature reports reveal that sepsis is the leading cause of death in non-cardiac intensive care units (ICUs), and it is one of the most…

  2. Sepsis in HIV-infected patients; epidemiology and host response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huson, M.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, we examined the impact of HIV infection on the epidemiology (Part I) of sepsis, and host response (Part II) to sepsis. We studied sepsis patients in Gabon, a setting with a high prevalence of HIV, and in Dutch intensive care units (ICUs). In Part I, we found that HIV positive

  3. Sepsis in intensive care patients: challenges in diagnosis and prognostication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Klouwenberg, P.M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a syndrome that arises when the body’s response to a severe infection injures its own tissues. It is a major and increasing cause of in-hospital morbidity and mortality. Despite recent advances in the management of sepsis, the morbidity and mortality caused by sepsis remain unacceptably

  4. Cardiovascular disfunction during sepsis Disfunción cardiovascular en sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Senior Sánchez

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available A review is presented on some aspects of sepsis, with emphasis on cardiovascular alterations; the following subjects are included: reasons for increasing frequency of sepsis, up to date terminology, diagnostic criteria, pathogenesis, manifestations of cardiovascular disfunction, present day therapy and therapeutic perspectives. Se hace una revisión somera de algunos aspectos de la sepsis con énfasis en los cambios cardiovasculares que tienen lugar durante ella; se incluyen los siguientes: razones para el incremento de la frecuencia, terminología, criterios de diagnóstico, patogénesis,manifestaciones de la disfunción cardiovascular, terapia actual y perspectivas terapéuticas.

  5. New sepsis definition changes incidence of sepsis in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, James N; Thompson, Kelly; Shetty, Amith; Iredell, Jonathan R; Lander, Harvey; Myburgh, John A; Finfer, Simon

    2017-03-01

    To estimate the impact of adopting the proposed new diagnostic criteria for sepsis, based on Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) criteria, on the diagnosis and apparent mortality of sepsis in Australian and New Zealand intensive care units. A two-stage, post hoc analysis of prospectively collected ICU research data from 3780 adult patients in 77 Australian and New Zealand ICUs on 7 study days, between 2009 and 2014. The proportion of patients who were diagnosed with sepsis using the criteria for systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and who met the SOFA criteria for sepsis, and the proportion of patients who were admitted to the ICU with a diagnosis consistent with infection, who met either, both or neither sets of criteria for sepsis; comparison of the demographic differences and in-hospital mortality between these groups. Of 926 patients diagnosed with sepsis on a study day using SIRS criteria, 796/923 (86.2% [95% CI, 84.0%-88.5%]) satisfied the SOFA criteria. Inhospital mortality was similar in these groups, with death recorded for 216/872 patients (24.8% [95% CI, 21.9%-27.8%]) who met the SIRS criteria for sepsis, and for 200/747 patients (26.8% [95% CI, 23.6%-30.1%]) who met both the SIRS and SOFA criteria for sepsis. Of 122 patients meeting the SIRS criteria but not the SOFA criteria, 16 (13.1% [95% CI, 7.7%-19.1%]) died. Of 241 patients admitted with an infective condition and complete data, 142 (58.9% [95% CI, 52.4%-65.2%]) satisfied the SIRS criteria for sepsis and 210 (87.1% [95% CI, 82.2%-91.1%]) satisfied the SOFA criteria. Of the 241 patients, 99 (41.1%) were not classified as having sepsis on the study day by SIRS criteria and, of these, 80 (80.8%) met the SOFA criteria. Adopting the SOFA criteria will increase the apparent incidence of sepsis in patients admitted to the ICU with infective conditions without affecting the mortality rate. Prospective evaluation of the effect of adopting the new definition of sepsis is required.

  6. Effects of acute hypervolemic hemodilution with hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 on the lung in a rabbit model of sepsis%羟乙基淀粉130/0.4急性高容量血液稀释对脓毒症兔肺脏的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁卫华; 金孝岠; 鲁美静

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of acute hypervolemic hemodilution (AHH) with hydroxyethyl starch (HES) 130/0.4 on the lung in a rabbit model of sepsis and their possible mechanism. Methods Thirty healthy New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into three groups (n=10 each): group sham operation (C), group sepsis model (E) and group AHH. Sepsis model was reproduced with modified colon ascendens stent peritonitis (CASP). In group C laparotomy was done but without puncturing the colon. At 4 hours after CASP, AHH was carried out intravenous infusion of 6% HES 130/0.4 20 ml/kg at 20 ml/min. Lactated Ringer solution was infused at 10 ml·kg-1·h-1 in all three groups during the experiment. The animals breathed spontaneously during the experiment. A catheter was introduced into the right carotid artery for blood sampling, and it was connected to a pressure transducer for continuous mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) monitoring. At 4 hours and 8 hours after CASP, a median abdominal incision was made and photographic documentation of abdominal situs was made. At the same time arterial blood samples were drawn at 4 hours and 8 hours after CASP for blood gas analysis and determination of hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit (Hct). The plasma component was separated and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) was measured. Respiratory rate and urinary output were record. The rabbits were sacrificed at 8 hours after CASP. The right lungs were immediately removed for determination of total protein concentration in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF). The wet/dry (W/D) lung weight rate were calculated. The sections of lung were stained with hematoxylin and eosin for light microscopic examination and the injury score was recorded. Results ①MAP declined gradually and HR tended to accelerate during the course of the experiment in group E, but no significant differences were found in both group C and group AHH. ②After AHH, the Hb and Hct decreased by 20% in group AHH

  7. Palpable purpura complicated by streptococcal toxic shock syndrome resulting in limb necrosis and amputation: a case of levamisole and cocaine coingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyer, Craig W; Peters, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Palpable purpura resulting from cocaine and levamisole coingestion has been reported with increasing frequency over the last several years as distribution of this drug combination becomes more universal. Toxicity from ingestion of this dangerous combination is difficult to diagnose due to the multitude of possible clinical presentations, variety of possible adulterants, and elusive nature of levamisole given its short half-life and limited availability of detection methods. Levamisole is a chemotherapeutic and immunomodulatory agent currently marketed as a veterinary anthelmintic. We describe the case of a 48-year-old woman admitted to our intensive care unit with a diagnosis of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), confirmed from fluid taken from an elbow lesion that grew Streptococcus pyogenes. She was noted to have bullae of the elbow and diffuse purpura with necrotic centers covering a large portion of her body (trunk, legs, arms, back, toes, fingers, and tip of nose). On further evaluation, she was found to have ingested levamisole-tainted cocaine. The patient's complications related to either cocaine and levamisole coingestion or STSS included thrombocytopenia, acute renal failure, and limb necrosis. Thrombocytopenia gradually improved upon treatment with prednisone, and acute renal failure improved with intravenous fluid resuscitation; however, she subsequently required several appendage amputations due to severe gangrene. Clinicians must have high suspicion for ingestion of this drug combination and request prompt testing of urine samples for levamisole if a patient who admits to illicit drug use presents with purpuric or necrotic skin lesions.

  8. [Usefulness of sCD14-ST in the diagnosis of sepsis in patient with renal failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Dario; Zanoli, Luca; Fatuzzo, Pasquale; Granata, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Since many years, researchers have focused their studies to find out early sepsis biomarkers for the purpose of gaining time in the application of early goal-directed therapy protocol. Procalcitonin (PCT) is a reliable biomarker for sepsis, although it has a low specificity and prognostic value. Other recently proposed sepsis biomarkers such as interleukins, C-reactive protein (CRP), myeloid cells expressing triggering receptor-1 (TREM-1) and soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) still have a controversial and uncertain clinical value. In 2004 a new biomarker, soluble CD14 SubType (sCD14-ST, Presepsin), with a good performance in the diagnosis and prognostic evaluation of sepsis has been proposed. First studies highlighted that Presepsin is highly sensitive and specific at the same time. However, further studies on the clinical value of Presepsin are needed, particularly in order to explain the relationship between Presepsin and kidney failure. Indeed, Presepsin is a 13 KDa molecule theoretically totally filtered by glomerulus and reabsorbed and metabolized by proximal convoluted tubules. Therefore, the Presepsin plasmatic level could be highly influenced by an acute kidney injury in the course of sepsis or by a pre-existing chronic kidney disease. In this article we reviewed the latest evidences about the diagnostic and prognostic performances of Presepsin as a sepsis biomarker. We evaluated the usefulness of Presepsin in the context of acute and chronic kidney dysfunction. The great number of articles have been collected and the thorough revision of data from the nephrologists perspective let us consider this work exhaustive and scientifically reliable, although concise: a good starting point for the physician who wants to make use of Presepsin.

  9. Positive Effect of SeptimebTM on Mortality Rate in Severe Sepsis: a Novel Non Antibiotic Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Kouti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background:Septimebis a new herbal-derived remedy, recently approved for its potential immunomodulatory effects.Regarding the key role of immune system in the pathogenesis of severe sepsis and lack of any standard treatment for improving survival of these patients;weevaluated the effect of Septimeb -as an adjutant to standard treatment-on inflammatory biomarkers and mortality rates in patients with severe sepsis.Methods:In this multicenter, randomized, single-blind trial, we assigned patients with severe sepsis and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II score of more than 20 toreceive standard treatment of severe sepsis (control group or standard treatment plus Septimeb. This group was treated with Septimeb for 14 days then followed up for another14 days. APACHE score, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA and Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS were calculated daily. Blood samples were analyzed for interleukin 2 tumor necrosis factor-α, total antioxidant power, platelet growth factor and matrix metalloproteinase 2.Results:A total of 29 patients underwent randomization(13 in control group and 16 in Septimeb group. There was significant difference between the Septimeb and control group in the 14 days mortality rate(18.8% vs. 53.85 respectively, P=0.048. Compared to control group,Septimebwas significantly effective in improving SAPS(P= 0.029, SOFA(P=0.003 and APACHE II(P=0.008 scores. Inflammatory biomarkers didn’t change significantly between the two groups(P>0.05.Conclusion Septimeb reduces mortality rates among patients with severe sepsis and it could be added as a safe adjutant to standard treatment of sepsis.

  10. Predictive Value of IL-8 for Sepsis and Severe Infections After Burn Injury: A Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Robert; Herndon, David N; Finnerty, Celeste C; Cox, Robert A; Song, Juquan; Jeschke, Marc G

    2015-03-01

    The inflammatory response induced by burn injury contributes to increased incidence of infections, sepsis, organ failure, and mortality. Thus, monitoring postburn inflammation is of paramount importance but, so far, there are no reliable biomarkers available to monitor and/or predict infectious complications after burn. As interleukin 8 (IL-8) is a major mediator for inflammatory responses, the aim of our study was to determine whether IL-8 expression can be used to predict postburn sepsis, infections, and mortality. Plasma cytokines, acute-phase proteins, constitutive proteins, and hormones were analyzed during the first 60 days after injury from 468 pediatric burn patients. Demographics and clinical outcome variables (length of stay, infection, sepsis, multiorgan failure [MOF], and mortality) were recorded. A cutoff level for IL-8 was determined using receiver operating characteristic analysis. Statistical significance is set at P Patients were grouped according to their average IL-8 levels relative to this cutoff and stratified into high (H) (n = 133) and low (L) (n = 335) groups. In the L group, regression analysis revealed a significant predictive value of IL-8 to percent of total body surface area burned and incidence of MOF (P inflammatory and acute-phase responses compared with the L group (P burn patients.

  11. Early bacterial genome detection in body fluids from patients with severe sepsis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugard, Anthony; Chainier, Delphine; Barraud, Olivier; Garnier, Fabien; Ploy, Marie-Cécile; Vignon, Philippe; François, Bruno

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and interest of real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) testing for bacterial genomes in body fluids other than blood in patients with acute severe sepsis. Twenty-six consecutive patients admitted for severe sepsis or septic shock were prospectively studied. Body fluids were sampled as clinically indicated and tested using standard microbiological methods and modified RT-PCR methods (universal PCR and specific PCRs). Results of standard microbiological tests were compared with those of PCR tests. Direct RT-PCR testing was successfully performed on all nonblood body fluids. Of 29 body fluids collected, 23 were positive for at least 1 microorganism with conventional tests. Of 18 microbiological tests positive for a single microorganism, 15 fully agreed with RT-PCR assays, and the remaining 3 samples were infected with bacteria not screened by PCR testing. Among the 5 polymicrobial results obtained with conventional tests, RT-PCR agreed in 4 patients. The RT-PCR tests allowed additional clinically relevant bacterial identification in 3 of 6 samples with negative microbiological culture. Our results indicate that direct PCR testing may improve the detection of bacteria in body fluids other than blood in patients with acute severe sepsis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Autoantibody germ-line gene segment encodes V{sub H} and V{sub L} regions of a human anti-streptococcal monoclonal antibody recognizing streptococcal M protein and human cardiac myosin epitopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, A.; Cunningham, M.W. [Univ. of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Adderson, E.E. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-15

    Cross-reactivity of anti-streptococcal Abs with human cardiac myosin may result in sequelae following group A streptococcal infections. Molecular mimicry between group A streptococcal M protein and cardiac myosin may be the basis for the immunologic cross-reactivity. In this study, a cross-reactive human anti-streptococcal/antimyosin mAb (10.2.3) was characterized, and the myosin epitopes were recognized by the Ab identified. mAb 10.2.3 reacted with four peptides from the light meromyosin (LMM) tail fragment of human cardiac myosin, including LMM-10 (1411-1428), LMM-23 (1580-1597), LMM-27 (1632-1649), and LMM-30 (1671-1687). Only LMM-30 inhibited binding of mAb 10.2.3 to streptococcal M protein and human cardiac myosin. Human mAb 10.2.3 labeled cytoskeletal structures within rat heart cells in indirect immunofluorescence, and reacted with group A streptococci expressing various M protein serotypes, PepM5, and recombinant M protein. The nucleotide sequence of gene segments encoding the Ig heavy and light chain V region of mAb 10.2.3 was determined. The light chain V segment was encoded by a VK1 gene segment that was 98.5% identical with germ-line gene humig{sub K}Vi5. The V segment of the heavy chain was encoded by a V{sub H}3a gene segment that differed from the V{sub H}26 germ-line gene by a single base change. V{sub H}26 is expressed preferentially in early development and encodes autoantibodies with anti-DNA and rheumatoid factor specificities. Anti-streptococcal mAb 10.2.3 is an autoantibody encoded by V{sub H} and V{sub L} genes, with little or no somatic mutation. 63 refs., 11 figs.

  13. Natural history of anorectal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahnan, K; Askari, A; Adegbola, S O; Tozer, P J; Phillips, R K S; Hart, A; Faiz, O D

    2017-08-31

    Progression from anorectal abscess to fistula is poorly described and it remains unclear which patients develop a fistula following an abscess. The aim was to assess the burden of anorectal abscess and to identify risk factors for subsequent fistula formation. The Hospital Episode Statistics database was used to identify all patients presenting with new anorectal abscesses. Cox regression analysis was undertaken to identify factors predictive of fistula formation. A total of 165 536 patients were identified in the database as having attended a hospital in England with an abscess for the first time between 1997 and 2012. Of these, 158 713 (95·9 per cent) had complete data for all variables and were included in this study, the remaining 6823 (4·1 per cent) with incomplete data were excluded from the study. The overall incidence rate of abscess was 20·2 per 100 000. The rate of subsequent fistula formation following an abscess was 15·5 per cent (23 012 of 148 286) in idiopathic cases and 41·6 per cent (4337 of 10 427 in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) (26·7 per cent coded concurrently as ulcerative colitis; 47·2 per cent coded as Crohn's disease). Of all patients who developed a fistula, 67·5 per cent did so within the first year. Independent predictors of fistula formation were: IBD, in particular Crohn's disease (hazard ratio (HR) 3·51; P < 0·001), ulcerative colitis (HR 1·82; P < 0·001), female sex (HR 1·18; P < 0·001), age at time of first abscess 41-60 years (HR 1·85 versus less than 20 years; P < 0·001), and intersphincteric (HR 1·53; P < 0·001) or ischiorectal (HR 1·48; P < 0·001) abscess location compared with perianal. Some 2·9 per cent of all patients presenting with a new abscess were subsequently diagnosed with Crohn's disease; the median time to diagnosis was 14 months. The burden of anorectal sepsis is high, with subsequent fistula formation nearly three times more common in

  14. Leberversagen bei Sepsis und Multiorganversagen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapral C

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Eine Störung der Leberfunktion wird bei etwa 20–25% der Patienten mit Organversagen im Rahmen einer schweren Entzündungsreaktion beobachtet. Obwohl der klinische Parameter hierfür – der Anstieg des Bilirubins – in der Regel erst nach Funktionsstörungen anderer Organe auftritt, zeigen sehr sensitive Nachweismethoden einer hepatalen Dysfunktion wie die Indozyangrünclearance, daß die Leberbeteiligung ein sehr frühes Ereignis darstellt. Ursache für die Funktionseinschränkung der Leber sind vor allem Zytokine, die großteils direkt in der Leber selbst auf die verschiedenen Stimuli (Endotoxine, Hypoxie usw. freigesetzt werden. Spezifische Therapiemaßnahmen zur Verbesserung der Leberfunktion stehen dem Kliniker derzeit nicht zur Verfügung. Es gilt auch hier der Grundsatz, daß durch eine frühzeitige Herdsanierung und effektive Kreislauftherapie die Zytokinaktivierung möglichst gering gehalten werden soll, um damit auch Organtoxizitäten zu vermindern. Die zur Verfügung stehenden, kreislaufaktiven Substanzen zeigen eine individuell nur schwer voraussagbare, sehr unterschiedliche Wirkung auf Kreislauf und Funktion der Leber. Einzig Adrenalin dürfte aufgrund der vorliegenden Untersuchungen eine eher ungünstige Wirkung haben und sollte daher nicht zur Anwendung kommen. In der letzten Zeit konnten jedoch durch neue Maßnahmen erste klinische Erfolge nachgewiesen werden, bzw. im Tierexperiment eine Verbesserung der Leberfunktion beobachtet werden. So konnte durch Normalisierung der Blutzuckerkonzentration bei Patienten mit Sepsis eine Verbesserung der Mortalität und auch Verbesserung der mitochondrialen Funktion von Leberzellen beobachtet werden. Durch die Gabe von N-Acetylcystein wurde in Studien an kleinen Fallzahlen eine günstige Wirkung beobachtet, größere Studien werden hier Klarheit schaffen. Ebenfalls in klinischer Erprobung ist die orale Gabe von Gallensäuren, die den Gallensäuregehalt des Darmes erhöhen und damit die

  15. Implementing surviving sepsis campaign bundles in China: a prospective cohort study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi-qiang; XI Xiu-ming; LUO Xin; LI Jie; JIANG Li

    2013-01-01

    Background Surviving sepsis campaign (SSC) bundles have been demonstrated to significantly improve survival in sepsis and septic shock patients worldwide.Compliance with these protocols and resultant mortality in sepsis patients was investigated in intensive care units (ICUs) in China.Methods Adult patients with severe sepsis or septic shock treated from September 2007 to October 2008 in 11 ICUs of Chinese teaching hospitals were included.The primary outcome was compliance with resuscitation and management bundles.Secondary outcomes included individual bundle protocol impact and the effects of the completed bundle protocol number on 28-day mortality.Results Overall compliance during 6-hr resuscitation and 24-hour management bundles were 5.5% and 17.4%,respectively,and 28-day mortality was 33.0%.Compliance with protocols for blood cultures before antibiotics (42.2%),central venous pressure ≥8 mmHg (65.9%),central venous oxygen saturation ≥70% (25.0%),and optimized glucose control (82.1%),were significantly associated with decreased 28-day mortality (P <0.05).When adjusted for age,acute organ dysfunction,and APACHE Ⅱ score,compliance with the blood culture before antibiotics protocol produced the most significant decrease in 28-day mortality (OR,0.33; 95% Cl,0.16-0.70; P=-0.004).Compliance with ≥5 protocols in the 6-hour resuscitation bundle was also associated with lower 28-day mortality in septic shock patients (OR,0.17; 95% Cl,0.06-0.54; P =0.001).Conclusions Compliance with resuscitation and management bundles is generally poor in China; however,when applied,6-hour resuscitation bundle are associated with significant reductions in 28-day mortality for sepsis patients.

  16. A PROSPECTIVE, OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF SOLUBLE FLT-1 AND VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR IN SEPSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Nathan I.; Yano, Kiichiro; Okada, Hitomi; Fischer, Christopher; Howell, Michael; Spokes, Katherine C.; Ngo, Long; Angus, Derek C.; Aird, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Prior murine and human studies suggest that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) contributes to endothelial cell activation and severity of illness in sepsis. Furthermore, circulating levels of soluble VEGF receptor 1 (sFLT) levels were found to increase as part of the early response to sepsis in mice. The objective of the study was to evaluate the blood levels of free VEGF-A and sFLT in patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with suspected infection and to assess the relationship of these levels with severity of illness and inflammation. It was a prospective, observational study initiated in the ED of an urban, tertiary care, university hospital. Inclusion criteria were (1) ED patients aged 18 years or older and (2) clinical suspicion of infection. Eighty-three patients were enrolled in the study. The major findings were that (1) the mean VEGF and sFLT levels were increasingly higher across the following groups: noninfected control patients, infected patients without shock, and septic shock patients; (2) initial and 24-h VEGF levels had a significant correlation with the presence of septic shock at 24 h; (3) initial and 24-h sFLT levels correlated with Acute Physiology Age Chronic Health Evaluation II and Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment scores initially and at 24 h; and (4) VEGF and sFLT levels correlated with inflammatory cascade activation. This is the first report of sFLT as a potential new marker of severity in patients with sepsis. Vascular endothelial cell growth factor and its signaling axis are important in the endothelial cell response to sepsis, and further elucidation of these mechanisms may lead to advances in future diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities. PMID:18598002

  17. Chronic Critical Illness from Sepsis Is Associated with an Enhanced TCR Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borken, Farina; Markwart, Robby; Requardt, Robert P; Schubert, Katja; Spacek, Michal; Verner, Miroslav; Rückriem, Stefan; Scherag, André; Oehmichen, Frank; Brunkhorst, Frank M; Rubio, Ignacio

    2017-06-15

    Sepsis is characterized by a disproportionate host response to infection that often culminates in multiple organ failure. Current concepts invoke a deregulated immune reaction involving features of hyperinflammation, as well as protracted immune suppression. However, owing to the scarcity of human data, the precise origin of a long-term suppression of adaptive immunity remains doubtful. We report on an explorative clinical study of chronic critical illness (CCI) patients aimed at assessing the long-term consequences of sepsis on T cell function. Blood was drawn from 12 male CCI patients (median age 67 y, range 48-79 y) receiving continuous mechanical ventilation and renal replacement therapy in a long-term care hospital who had been treated in an external acute care hospital for severe sepsis. T cells were purified and subjected to flow cytometric immune-phenotyping and functional assays. We found that T cells from CCI patients featured higher basal levels of activation and stronger expression of the inhibitory surface receptor programmed cell death 1 compared with controls. However, T cells from CCI patients exhibited no suppressed TCR response at the level of proximal TCR signaling (activation/phosphorylation of PLCγ, Erk, Akt, LAT), activation marker upregulation (CD69, CD25, CD154, NUR77), IL-2 production, or clonal expansion. Rather, our data illustrate an augmented response in T cells from CCI patients in response to TCR/coreceptor (CD3/CD28) challenge. Thus, the present findings reveal that CCI sepsis patients feature signs of immune suppression but that their T cells exhibit a primed, rather than a suppressed, phenotype in their TCR response, arguing against a generalized T cell paralysis as a major cause of protracted immune suppression from sepsis. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. Polarization of microglia and its role in bacterial sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Monique; Sonai, Beatriz; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe

    2017-02-15

    Microglial polarization in response to brain inflammatory conditions is a crescent field in neuroscience. However, the effect of systemic inflammation, and specifically sepsis, is a relatively unexplored field that has great interest and relevance. Sepsis has been associated with both early and late harmful events of the central nervous system, suggesting that there is a close link between sepsis and neuroinflammation. During sepsis evolution it is supposed that microglial could exert both neurotoxic and repairing effects depending on the specific microglial phenotype assumed. In this context, here it was reviewed the role of microglial polarization during sepsis-associated brain dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. [International guidelines of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign : update 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briegel, J; Möhnle, P

    2013-04-01

    An update of the international guidelines for therapy of sepsis was published in February 2012 by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC). The update includes a further development of the guidelines from 2004 and 2008. The guidelines are divided into three sections, sepsis-specific therapeutic measures, recommendations on general intensive care measures for sepsis and finally special features of sepsis in pediatric intensive care medicine are presented in detail. This article discusses the most important amendments in the first two sections and delving deeper into the guidelines.

  20. Late-onset Streptococcus pasteurianus sepsis in a preterm baby in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarakçı, Nuriye; Dağı, Hatice Türk; Uğur, Ayşe Rüveyda; Tuncer, İnci; Taştekin, Ayhan

    2014-01-01

    Apnea, cyanosis, lethargy and prolongation in capillary filling time developed on the postnatal 37th day in a preterm baby who was born at the 30th gestational week with a birth weight of 1 300 g. Acute phase reactants and immature/total neutrophil count ratio were found to be high. The patient who was diagnosed with sepsis was successfully treated with meropenem which was started empirically. In his blood culture Streptococcus pasteurianus grew. S. pasteurianus is in the subgroup of streptococcus bovis which is one of the D group streptococci and its previous name is S. bovis type II/2. In the literature, there are very few cases of neonatal infection related with this bacterium. As far as we know, this is first case of neonatal sepsis caused by S. pasteurianus in Turkey. In addition, we tried to determine the clinical properties of neonatal infections arising from S. pasteurianus by reviewing the literature. PMID:26078653

  1. Xanthine oxidase activity and free radical generation in patients with sepsis syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galley, H F; Davies, Michael Jonathan; Webster, N R

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine xanthine oxidase activity, free radical concentrations, and lipid peroxidation in patients with sepsis syndrome compared with noninfected critically ill patients. DESIGN: A prospective observational study. SETTING: A nine-bed intensive care unit in a university teaching......). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with sepsis have xanthine oxidase activation, high free-radical concentrations, and evidence of free radical damage. The finding that xanthine oxidase activity was lower in those patients who died, coupled with increased lactate concentrations implies more severe ischemia with incomplete...... to the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score or to the presence of organ dysfunction. The mean ascorbyl radical concentration (arbitrary units) determined by electron paramagnetic resonance following spin trapping was increased in patients compared with healthy subjects (p

  2. Plasma Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin Is Primarily Related to Inflammation during Sepsis: A Translational Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Gordon P.; Hurtado-Oliveros, Jorge; Chung, Ha-Yeun; Knoll, Kristin; Neumann, Thomas; Müller, Hans J.; Herbsleb, Marco; Kohl, Matthias; Busch, Martin; Sossdorf, Maik; Claus, Ralf A.

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) during sepsis is common and underestimated. Plasma neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (plasma-NGAL) is discussed as new biomarker for AKI diagnosis, but during inflammation its function and diagnostic impact remain unclear. The association between plasma-NGAL and inflammatory markers in septic patients, but also in healthy controls and patients with chronic inflammation before and after either maximum exercise test or treatment with an anti-TNF therapy were investigated. In-vitro blood stimulations with IL-6, lipopolysaccharide, NGAL or its combinations were performed to investigate cause-effect-relationship. Plasma-NGAL levels were stronger associated with inflammation markers including IL-6 (Sepsis: r=0.785 PSepsis: r=0.714 Pdetection during severe inflammation - indeed it has to be interpreted carefully within this setting - but additionally might offer therapeutic potential. PMID:25893429

  3. [Pharmaconutrition with parenteral selenium in sepsis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, P L; de Oliveira Figliolino, L F; Hardy, G; Manzanares, W

    2014-04-01

    Critical illness is characterized by oxidative stress which leads to multiple organ failure, and sepsis-related organ dysfunction remains the most common cause of death in the intensive care unit. Over the last 2 decades, different antioxidant therapies have been developed to improve outcomes in septic patients. According to recent evidence, selenium therapy should be considered the cornerstone of the antioxidant strategies. Selenium given as selenious acid or sodium selenite should be considered as a drug or pharmaconutrient with prooxidant and cytotoxic effects when a loading dose in intravenous bolus form is administered, particularly in the early stage of severe sepsis/septic shock. To date, several phase ii trials have demonstrated that selenium therapy may be able to decrease mortality, improve organ dysfunction and reduce infections in critically ill septic patients. The effect of selenium therapy in sepsis syndrome must be confirmed by large, well designed phase iii clinical trials. The purpose of this review is to discuss current evidence on selenium pharmaconutrition in sepsis syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  4. Current treatment of sepsis and endotoxaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periti, P

    2000-09-01

    This article reviews the new criteria for selecting the proper antimicrobial agent and dosage regimen for standard treatment of severe sepsis, with the intention of preventing septic shock. After introducing new concepts on the pathogenesis of sepsis and septic shock, the authors analyse the parameters of beta-lactam antibacterial activity, the antibiotic-induced release of bacterial endotoxin and the interrelationships between pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antibiotics in the search for an optimum dosage regimen of antimicrobial mono- or polytherapy for severely ill septic patients admitted to the intensive care unit. The mortality rate resulting from severe bacterial sepsis, particularly that associated with shock, still approaches 50% in spite of appropriate antimicrobial therapy and optimum supportive care. Bacterial endotoxins that are part of the cell wall are one of the cofactors in the pathogenesis of sepsis and septic shock and are often induced by antimicrobial chemotherapy, even if administered rationally. Not all antimicrobial agents are equally capable of inducing septic shock; this is dependent on their mechanism of action rather than on the causative pathogen species. The quantity of endotoxin released depends on the drug dose and whether filaments or spheroplast formation predominate. Some antibiotics, such as carbapenems, ceftriaxone, cefepime, glycopeptides, aminoglycosides and quinolones, do not have the propensity to provoke septic shock because their rapid bacterial activity induces mainly spheroplast or fragile spheroplast-like bacterial forms.

  5. [Clinical and immunological criteria of burn sepsis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlyk, I V; Pivovarova, L P; Krylov, K M; Filippova, O V; Il'ina, V A; Krylov, P K

    2005-01-01

    A hundred and twenty-nine victims aged 16 to 60 years who had skin burns in the area of 15 to 60% of the body surface without severe concomitant somatic disease (SAPS less than 9 scores). The clinical symptoms of a systemic inflammatory response (SIR) and the signs of wound infection were recorded in all the examinees. The victims underwent a comprehensive clinical and laboratory examination, 55 of them were immunologically studied over time (on admission, on days 3 and 10). To reveal the predictive clinical and immunological criteria for sepsis, the examinees were divided into 3 groups. Group 1 comprised 33 burnt persons who were observed to have the symptoms of SIR and the signs of burn wound infections without impaired function of organs and systems. Group 2 included 46 victims with severe sepsis and a good outcome of burn disease. Group 3 consisted of 50 patients who had died from severe sepsis. Analysis of the results of the study has indicated that the count of formed blood elements by calculating the leukocytic intoxication index, the estimation of the level of lysosomal cation proteins in the neutrophilic granulocytes, the detection of populations of T helper cells, cytotoxic lymphocytes, as well as histomorphological and bacteriological findings are early and valid criteria for the development of infectious complications. Their use for the diagnosis and prediction of sepsis permits initiation of its treatment at early stages, without awaiting the appearance of the signs of a septic process.

  6. Ralstonia picketti neonatal sepsis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepak; Sharma, Pradeep; Soni, Priyanka; Gupta, Basudev

    2017-01-07

    Ralstonia genus are gram negative bacillus and includes four bacteria namely Ralstonia picketti, Ralstonia Solanacearum, Ralstonia insidiosa and Ralstonia mannitolilytica. These are opportunistic pathogens and cause infections in immunocompromised host. The sources of infection are usually contaminated solutions and water. The majority of the reported cases are caused by R. picketti. It is very rare cause of neonatal sepsis with less than twenty cases reported in literature till date. A late preterm male infant, Indian race was admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit for respiratory distress developing soon after birth. The infant was managed with respiratory support and gradually infant improved and diagnosis of transient tachypnea of newborn was made. At age of 84 h of postnatal life, the infant developed features of neonatal sepsis and investigations were suggestive of sepsis. The infant was started on intravenous antibiotic, multiple vasopressors and steroids. The blood culture showed growth of multi-drug resistant R. picketti. The antibiotics were changed as per sensitivity pattern and infant was discharged in good condition and was accepting breast feeding at the time of discharge. There was also no other case of R. picketti in the nursery during the same time period. Ralstonia picketti is an uncommon cause of neonatal sepsis and usually source of infection are contaminated solutions and medical products. The management involves early detection, treatment with appropriate antibiotics and doing surveillance culture to identify the possible source of infection.

  7. Perioperative treatment of patients with sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Michael; Perner, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Key elements in the initial resuscitation and stabilization of the patient with sepsis are fluid therapy, vasopressor or inotropic support, administration of adequate antibiotics and source control. This review will primarily discuss fluid, vasopressor and antibiotic therapy because these have been...

  8. Implementation of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Vikramjit; Evans, Laura

    2017-10-01

    Early identification and appropriate management of sepsis improves outcomes. Despite convincing data showing the benefits of early recognition and treatment of sepsis and septic shock, implementation of such evidence-based therapy is suboptimal. This review describes methods that have been shown to improve bedside application of the evidence-based guidelines. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) has developed guidelines for the management of severe sepsis and septic shock. The initial SSC guidelines were published in 2004; as evidence continued to evolve, the guidelines were updated, with the most recent iteration published in 2016. Guidelines by themselves can take years to change clinical practice. To affect more rapid change, the SSC guidelines are filtered into bundles to impact behavior change in a simple and uniform way. Implementation of the SSC bundles revolves around practice improvement measures. Hospitals that have successfully implemented these bundles have consistently shown improved outcomes and reductions in healthcare spending. Finally, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has approved SSC bundle compliance as a core measure, and hospitals in the United States are mandated to collect and report their data regularly to Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

  9. Pathogenesis of Multiple Organ Failure in Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossaint, Jan; Zarbock, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a severe critical illness syndrome that arises from infectious insults. While the host immune system is generally beneficial, an overshooting and unregulated immune response can cause serious organ tissue injury. During sepsis, systemic hypotension, disturbed perfusion of the microcirculation, and direct tissue-toxicity caused by inflammatory immune reaction can occur and contribute to organ failure. The failure of two or more vital organ systems is termed multi-organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and resembles a very critical condition associated with high morbidity and mortality. Importantly, no specific treatment strategy exists to efficiently prevent the development of MODS during sepsis. In this review, we aim to identify the relevant molecular immunological pathways involved in the pathogenesis of MODS during sepsis. We believe that a detailed understanding of this mechanism is necessary for the development of new treatment approaches for septic patients. In particular, knowledge of the endogenous regulators keeping the balance between necessary immune system activation to combat infections and prevention of host tissue damage would greatly improve the chances for the development of effective interventions.

  10. Immunotolerance during bacterial pneumonia and sepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerwerf, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia and sepsis are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Massive use of antibiotics promotes pathogen resistance, and, as a consequence, the incidence of drug-resistant bacteria is increasing. Therefore, it is of the utmost importance to expand our comprehension of host

  11. Role of critical care in urological sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagamani Sen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections arising from the urinary tract may either elicit a Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome or result in Sepsis. This may progress to severe sepsis with associated multi-organ dysfunction and perfusion abnormalities, including hypotension. The mortality associated with sepsis is high, reaching up to 46% in patients with septic shock. Infections arising from the urinary tract may arise either following a primary pathology in the urinary tract or may be acquired as a nosocomial infection. Most of these infections are caused by gram negative organisms, though occasionally gram positive organisms and fungi can infect the urinary tract under certain circumstances. Evaluation of a patient with sepsis should include establishing the diagnosis based on standard criteria, a search for the source and appropriate microbial cultures. Management of these patients requires aggressive fluid resuscitation to achieve well defined goals. This may need to be accompanied by the use of vasopressors and mechanical ventilation. Antimicrobial therapy based on the likely causative organism should be initiated, pending the culture results. Appropriate source control measures should also be taken. Prompt recognition, aggressive resuscitation and appropriate source control measures along with appropriate antimicrobial therapy will help to reduce the mortality in patients with urosepsis.

  12. Role of cellular events in the pathophysiology of sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhan, Chandra; Dipankar, Pankaj; Chakraborty, Papiya; Sarangi, Pranita P

    2016-11-01

    Sepsis is a dysregulated host immune response due to an uncontrolled infection. It is a leading cause of mortality in adult intensive care units globally. When the host immune response induced against a local infection fails to contain it locally, it progresses to sepsis, severe sepsis, septic shock and death. Literature survey was performed on the roles of different innate and adaptive immune cells in the development and progression of sepsis. Additionally, the effects of septic changes on reprogramming of different immune cells were also summarized to prepare the manuscript. Scientific evidences to date suggest that the loss of balance between inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses results in reprogramming of immune cell activities that lead to irreversible tissue damaging events and multi-organ failure during sepsis. Many surface receptors expressed on immune cells at various stages of sepsis have been suggested as biomarkers for sepsis diagnosis. Various immunomodulatory therapeutics, which could improve the functions of immune cells during sepsis, were shown to restore immunological homeostasis and improve survival in animal models of sepsis. In-depth and comprehensive knowledge on the immune cell activities and their correlation with severity of sepsis will help clinicians and scientists to design effective immunomodulatory therapeutics for treating sepsis.

  13. Autophagy Primes Neutrophils for Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation during Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Young; Shrestha, Sanjeeb; Youn, Young-Jin; Kim, Jun-Kyu; Kim, Shin-Yeong; Kim, Hyun Jung; Park, So-Hee; Ahn, Won-Gyun; Kim, Shin; Lee, Myung Goo; Jung, Ki-Suck; Park, Yong Bum; Mo, Eun-Kyung; Ko, Yousang; Lee, Suh-Young; Koh, Younsuck; Park, Myung Jae; Song, Dong-Keun; Hong, Chang-Won

    2017-09-01

    Neutrophils are key effectors in the host's immune response to sepsis. Excessive stimulation or dysregulated neutrophil functions are believed to be responsible for sepsis pathogenesis. However, the mechanisms regulating functional plasticity of neutrophils during sepsis have not been fully determined. We investigated the role of autophagy in neutrophil functions during sepsis in patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Neutrophils were isolated from patients with sepsis and stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). The levels of reactive oxygen species generation, neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation, and granule release, and the autophagic status were evaluated. The effect of neutrophil autophagy augmentation was further evaluated in a mouse model of sepsis. Neutrophils isolated from patients who survived sepsis showed an increase in autophagy induction, and were primed for NET formation in response to subsequent PMA stimulation. In contrast, neutrophils isolated from patients who did not survive sepsis showed dysregulated autophagy and a decreased response to PMA stimulation. The induction of autophagy primed healthy neutrophils for NET formation and vice versa. In a mouse model of sepsis, the augmentation of autophagy improved survival via a NET-dependent mechanism. These results indicate that neutrophil autophagy primes neutrophils for increased NET formation, which is important for proper neutrophil effector functions during sepsis. Our study provides important insights into the role of autophagy in neutrophils during sepsis.

  14. Clinical analysis of cases of neonatal Streptococcus agalactiae sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, S J; Tang, X S; Zhao, W L; Qiu, H X; Wang, H; Feng, Z C

    2016-06-17

    With the advent of antibiotic resistance, pathogenic bacteria have become a major threat in cases of neonatal sep