WorldWideScience

Sample records for acute rheumatic fever

  1. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in indigenous populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steer, Andrew C; Carapetis, Jonathan R

    2009-12-01

    Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease are diseases of socioeconomic disadvantage. These diseases are common in developing countries and in Indigenous populations in industrialized countries. Clinicians who work with Indigenous populations need to maintain a high index of suspicion for the potential diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever, particularly in patients presenting with joint pain. Inexpensive medicines, such as aspirin, are the mainstay of symptomatic treatment of rheumatic fever; however, antiinflammatory treatment has no effect on the long-term rate of progression or severity of chronic valvular disease. The current focus of global efforts at prevention of rheumatic heart disease is on secondary prevention (regular administration of penicillin to prevent recurrent rheumatic fever), although primary prevention (timely treatment of streptococcal pharyngitis to prevent rheumatic fever) is also important in populations in which it is feasible.

  2. Changing clinical profile of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikh, A.M.; Sadiq, M.; Rehman, A.U.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clinical profile of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic recurrence seems to have changed in countries where rheumatic fever is still endemic. The objectives of this study were to compare clinical profile and outcome of patients suffering initial and recurrent episodes of acute rheumatic fever in children. Methods: This prospective study was conducted in two tertiary care hospitals from January to June 2011. The diagnosis was based on the modified Jones criteria. Sixty children were included in the study, 15 having first episode of rheumatic fever and 45 with rheumatic recurrence. The severity of carditis was assessed by Clinical and echocardiography means. Results: Carditis was the commonest presentation in both first (80 percentage) and recurrent attacks (100 percentage). Arthritis was seen in 60 percentage of children with first episode and in 26.7 percentage with recurrence. The frequency of subcutaneous nodules, invariably associated with carditis, was very high (33.3 percentage in the first and 48.3 percentage in recurrent episodes). Carditis was generally mild during first episode (53.3 percentage) and severe with rheumatic recurrence (55.6 percentage). There was no death in either group. One patient with severe mitral regurgitation and rheumatic recurrence underwent mitral valve repair for intractable heart failure. Conclusion: Clinical profile of rheumatic recurrence and acute rheumatic fever has changed. Rheumatic recurrence is associated with severe carditis. Carditis is more common than arthritis even in the first attack. Sub-cutaneous nodules are a frequent finding invariably associated with carditis. (author)

  3. Acute rheumatic fever ID adults

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, unlike other series, cardiac involvement was a prominent feature. Two patients died and a further 4 required valve replacements as a resuH of the disease. This suggests that local factors are of importance in determining the morbidity of the disease and that physicians should consider acute rheumatic disease in ...

  4. Acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis followed shortly by acute rheumatic fever.

    OpenAIRE

    Kwong, Y. L.; Chan, K. W.; Chan, M. K.

    1987-01-01

    A 16 year old girl with post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis developed acute rheumatic fever 19 days afterwards. Previous publications on concurrent post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis and acute rheumatic fever are reviewed.

  5. Rheumatic fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatic fever is still common in countries that have a lot of poverty and poor health systems. It does not often occur in the United States and other developed countries. When rheumatic fever does occur in the United ...

  6. Rheumatic Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... time, can lead to congestive heart failure. What causes rheumatic fever? Rheumatic fever is not an infection itself, but ... If the antibodies attack your heart, they can cause your heart valves to swell, which can ... is at risk for rheumatic fever? Fewer than 0.3% of people who have ...

  7. Consensus guidelines on pediatric acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Anita; Kumar, R Krishna; Gera, Rani Prem Kumar; Radhakrishnan, S; Mishra, Smita; Ahmed, Z

    2008-07-01

    Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic chronic valvular heart disease is an important preventable cause of morbidity and mortality in suburban and rural India. Its diagnosis is based on clinical criteria. These criteria need verification and revision in the Indian context. Furthermore, there are glaring differences in management protocols available in literature. These facts prompted Indian Academy of Pediatrics to review the management of rheumatic fever. Management of Rheumatic fever was reviewed and recommendation was formulated at national consultative meeting on 20th May 2007 at New Delhi. To formulate uniform guidelines on management of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in the Indian context. Guidelines were formulated for the management of streptococcal pharyngitis, acute rheumatic fever and its cardiac complication as well as secondary prophylaxis for recurrent episodes. (1) Streptococcal eradication with appropriate antibiotics (Benzathine penicillin single dose or penicillin V oral or azithromycin). (2) Diagnosis of rheumatic fever based on Jones criteria. (3) Control inflammatory process with aspirin with or without steroids (total duration of treatment of 12 weeks). (4) Treatment of chorea according to severity (therapy to continue for 2-3 weeks after clinical improvement). (5) Protocol for managing cardiac complication like valvular heart disease, congestive heart failure and atrial fibrillation. (6) Secondary prophylaxis with benzathine penicillin and management of anaphylaxis.

  8. Acute rheumatic fever in a child with Ebstein anomaly | Otaigbe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Ebstein anomaly (atrialisation of the right ventricle ) alone constitutes 0.5 -1% of congenital heart disease and usually presents as an isolated lesion. Association with mitral valve stenosis has been reported previously. We however present a case of Ebstein's anomaly with recurrent acute rheumatic fever (ARF) ...

  9. Acute Rheumatic Fever versus Post-Streptococcal Reactive Arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashry, K.M.

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatic fever is an inflammatory disease that may develop after a Group A streptococcal infection and can involve the heart, joints, skin, and brain. A migrating polyarthritis after throat infection with group A β-haemolytic streptococci is classically attributed to acute rheumatic fever (ARF). Sterile non-migratory arthritis may occur as a separate entity, the so called post streptococcal reactive arthritis (PSRA). This study aimed to identify clinical and serological differences of patients with reactive arthritis after infection with Lance field group Aβ-haemolytic streptococci, compared with acute rheumatic fever. Hundred and twenty patients were recruited for the study , they were classified into two groups according to the diagnosis of ARF and PSRA patients consecutively seen in the Rheumatology and the Pediatric wards. Clinical and laboratory data were assessed through a questionnaire. The diagnosis of rheumatic fever was made based on revised modified Jones' criteria, while the diagnosis of post streptococcal reactive arthritis was made based on Deighton criteria; these associated with laboratory data, electrocardiography, chest X-ray, and bi-dimensional echocardiography. Results revealed no significant differences between both groups as regard age where ρ>0.05, while there were a significant difference regarding the date of antecedent upper respiratory tract infection (ρ 0.05). Regarding the cardio logical changes P-R interval by ECG was prolonged in 19 patients (31.67%)and Echo study showed changes in 12 patient (20%) of cases of ARF patient only. On the basis of simple laboratory variables and management, it ws possible to differentiate ARF from PSRA patients. So it could be concluded that these two conditions are actually distinct identities

  10. Anti-inflammatory treatment for carditis in acute rheumatic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilliers, Antoinette; Adler, Alma J; Saloojee, Haroon

    2015-05-28

    Rheumatic heart disease remains an important cause of acquired heart disease in developing countries. Although prevention of rheumatic fever and management of recurrences have been well established, optimal management of active rheumatic carditis remains unclear. This is an update of a review published in 2003, and previously updated in 2009 and 2012. To assess the effects, both harmful and beneficial, of anti-inflammatory agents such as aspirin, corticosteroids and other drugs in preventing or reducing further valvular damage in patients with acute rheumatic fever. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (2013, Issue 9 of 12), MEDLINE (Ovid, 1948 to 2013 October Week 1), EMBASE (Ovid, 1980 to 2013 Week 41) and Latin American Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS) (1982 to 17 October 2013). We last searched Index Medicus (1950 to April 2001) in 2001. We checked reference lists of identified studies and applied no language restrictions. Randomised controlled trials comparing anti-inflammatory agents (e.g. aspirin, steroids, immunoglobulins, pentoxifylline) versus placebo or controls, or comparing any of the anti-inflammatory agents versus one another, in adults and children with acute rheumatic fever diagnosed according to Jones, or modified Jones, criteria. The presence of cardiac disease one year after treatment was the major outcome criterion selected. Two review authors extracted data and assessed risk of bias using the methodology outlined in the Cochrane Handbook of Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Standard methodological procedures as expected by The Cochrane Collaboration were used. No new studies were included in this update. Eight randomised controlled trials involving 996 people were selected for inclusion in the review. Researchers compared several steroidal agents such as corticotrophin, cortisone, hydrocortisone, dexamethasone, prednisone and intravenous immunoglobulin versus aspirin, placebo or no treatment. Six

  11. Controlling acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in developing countries: are we getting closer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dassel, Jessica L; Ralph, Anna P; Carapetis, Jonathan R

    2015-02-01

    To describe new developments (2013-2014) in acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) relevant to developing countries. Improved opportunities for the primary prevention of ARF now exist, because of point-of-care antigen tests for Streptococcus pyogenes, and clinical decision rules which inform management of pharyngitis without requiring culture results. There is optimism that a vaccine, providing protection against many ARF-causing S. pyogenes strains, may be available in coming years. Collaborative approaches to RHD control, including World Heart Federation initiatives and the development of registers, offer promise for better control of this disease. New data on RHD-associated costs provide persuasive arguments for better government-level investment in primary and secondary prevention. There is expanding knowledge of potential biomarkers and immunological profiles which characterize ARF/RHD, and genetic mutations conferring ARF/RHD risk, but as yet no new diagnostic testing strategy is ready for clinical application. Reduction in the disease burden and national costs of ARF and RHD are major priorities. New initiatives in the primary and secondary prevention of ARF/RHD, novel developments in pathogenesis and biomarker research and steady progress in vaccine development, are all causes for optimism for improving control of ARF/RHD, which affect the poorest of the poor.

  12. Acute rheumatic fever in adults | Whitelaw | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two patients died and a further 4 required valve replacements as a resuH of the disease. This suggests that local factors are of importance in determining the morbidity of the disease and that physicians should consider acute rheumatic disease in adults who present with unexplained valvular disease or carditis.

  13. Acute rheumatic fever: a public health concern in resource-poor settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olusegun Busari

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute rheumatic fever remains a public health concern in developing countries as well as in poorer communities and among indigenous populations in some developed nations. It poses serious economic problem at individual, communal and national levels through direct and indirect health care costs. The objective of this article is to review acute rheumatic fever in the global context with some emphasis on the continuing burden of this disease in the developing settings. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, PubMed, EMBASE and AJOL were searched with focus on epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment, and control of acute rheumatic fever. The review shows that acute rheumatic fever still occurs under conditions of impoverished overcrowding and poor sanitation and where access to healthcare services is limited. Since acute rheumatic fever is a preventable disease, improved housing and sanitation, access to effective healthcare services, early diagnosis, registration of cases and follow up remain the bedrock of the control of this disease [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(2.000: 153-169

  14. Acute Rheumatic Fever: Findings of a Hospital-Based Study and an Overview of Reported Outbreaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upton D Allen

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available To review the characteristics of reported outbreaks of acute rheumatic fever in the United States, and to determine if there is an increase in the incidence of acute rheumatic fever in the population served by the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, the authors conducted a literature search and a retrospective review of inpatients and outpatients, satisfying the revised Jones criteria for the diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever, from 1972 to 1988. Patients satisfying the revised Jones criteria for the time period 1972–88 were included in the study. There have been eight articles reporting an increase in acute rheumatic fever in the United States. In three, the majority of children were white and from middle class suburban/rural communities in different geographic locations. Mucoid strains of group A streptococci were implicated but not confirmed as being associated with the outbreaks in three. The results of the chart review at the Hospital for Sick Children revealed that 83 cases satisfied the revised Jones criteria. The number of cases per 100,000 children (aged 18 years or less per year, decreased progressively over the study period. Polyarthritis was the most frequently seen major criterion occurring in 73% of patients (61 of 83. The most frequently affected ethnic groups were Italians 23%, Afro-Canadians 19% and Orientals 8%. The reported outbreaks in the United States are multifocal and predominantly confined to white middle class children residing in suburban/rural communities. There was no evidence of an increase in the number of cases of acute rheumatic fever seen in the population served by the Hospital for Sick Children; there was a progressive decline in number of cases over the study period. The results facilitate the characterization of acute rheumatic fever within North America into three different patterns of occurrence.

  15. Incidence of acute rheumatic fever and chronic rheumatic heart disease, trends in deaths in the Tula region (1991—2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Nikolayevna Sorotskaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the incidence of acute rheumatic fever (ARF and chronic rheumatic heart disease (CRHD and theirs outcomes in the Tula Region in 1991 to 2011. In this period, the incidence of ARF decreased to 0.002, which was much lower than Russia's rates. That of CRHD in 2011 accounted for 1.6 per 1,000 adult population, which was comparable to the values in Russia. CRHD mortality rates showed a 2.5-fold decrease. The main causes of fatal outcomes were cardiovascular disorders.

  16. A Review of Acute Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease Research in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, L C; Nadia, R

    2016-06-01

    A total of 39 titles related to rheumatic fever or rheumatic heart disease in Malaysia were found with online literature search dating back to their inceptions and through 2014. Additional publications from conference journals were included. Nine papers were selected based on clinical relevance and future research implications. There were no population-based studies on the incidence or prevalence of ARF or RHD. In the 1980s, the incidence of admission due to ARF ranged from 2 to 21.1 per 100 000 paediatric admission per year. The burden of disease was significant in the adult population; 74.5% of patients with RHD were female, of which 77.1% were in the reproductive age group of 15-45 years old. Rheumatic mitral valve disease constituted almost half (46.7%) of all mitral valve repairs, ranging from 44.8 - 55.8 patients per year from 1997 - 2003. From 2010-2012, mitral valve interventions increased to 184 per year, of which 85.7% were mitral valve repair. In children with ARF, 25.4% - 41.7% had past history of rheumatic fever or RHD. In patients with rheumatic mitral valve disease undergoing surgical or medical interventions, only 6% reported history of ARF, none had history of GABHS pharyngitis or antibiotic prophylaxis. Only 44.7% of patients with RHD on follow-up were on intramuscular benzathine penicillin prophylaxis. Overall, there is scarcity of publications on ARF and RHD in Malaysia. Priority areas for research include determination of the incidence and prevalence of ARF and RHD, identification of high-risk populations, evaluation on the implementation and adherence of secondary preventive measures, identification of subclinical RHD especially amongst the high-risk population, and a surveillance system to monitor and evaluate preventive measures, disease progression and outcomes.

  17. The Incidence of Acute Rheumatic Fever in a Suburban Area of Los Angeles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odio, Alberto

    1986-01-01

    The incidence of in-hospital cases of acute rheumatic fever in residents of the San Fernando Valley section of Los Angeles (population 1,096,000) from 1971 through 1980 was 0.21 per 100,000 population for all ages and 0.63 per 100,000 for 5 to 17 year olds, both among the lowest ever reported in the world literature. Nevertheless, minority group patients had five times the risk of a white patient for acute rheumatic fever developing and a greater than 20-fold increase in the risk for the development of acute rheumatic fever with carditis. Unexpectedly, a low 30% of cases (8/27) had carditis either alone or with other major criteria, while a high 59% (16/27) had polyarthritis as the only major manifestation. This suggests the possibility of false-positive cases based on polyarthritis as the only major manifestation, and that an incidence of acute rheumatic fever may have been reached that is so low that “background” cases are a significant proportion of all cases. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:3953087

  18. Sugar, dental caries and the incidence of acute rheumatic fever: a cohort study of Māori and Pacific children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornley, Simon; Marshall, Roger J; Bach, Katie; Koopu, Pauline; Reynolds, Gary; Sundborn, Gerhard; Ei, Win Le Shwe Sin

    2017-04-01

    To determine whether dental caries, as an indicator of cumulative exposure to sugar, is associated with the incidence of acute rheumatic fever and chronic rheumatic heart disease, in Māori and Pacific children aged 5 and 6 years at their first dental visit. A cohort study was undertaken which linked school dental service records of caries with national hospital discharge and mortality records. Cox models were used to investigate the strength of the association between dental caries and rheumatic fever incidence. A total of 20 333 children who were free of rheumatic heart disease at enrolment were available for analysis. During a mean follow-up time of 5 years, 96 children developed acute rheumatic fever or chronic rheumatic heart disease. After adjustment for potential confounders, children with five or more primary teeth affected by caries were 57% (95% CI: 20% to 106%) more likely to develop disease during follow-up, compared to children whose primary teeth were caries free. The population attributable to the risk for caries in this cohort was 22%. Dental caries is positively associated with the incidence of acute rheumatic fever and chronic rheumatic heart disease in Māori and Pacific children. Sugar intake, an important risk factor for dental caries, is also likely to influence the aetiology of rheumatic fever. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Are minor echocardiographic changes associated with an increased risk of acute rheumatic fever or progression to rheumatic heart disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rémond, Marc; Atkinson, David; White, Andrew; Brown, Alex; Carapetis, Jonathan; Remenyi, Bo; Roberts, Kathryn; Maguire, Graeme

    2015-11-01

    The World Heart Federation criteria for the echocardiographic diagnosis of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) include a category "Borderline" RHD which may represent the earliest evidence of RHD. We aimed to determine the significance of minor heart valve abnormalities, including Borderline RHD, in predicting the future risk of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) or RHD. A prospective cohort study of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged 8 to 18 years was conducted. Cases comprised children with Borderline RHD or other minor non-specific valvular abnormalities (NSVAs) detected on prior echocardiography. Controls were children with a prior normal echocardiogram. Participants underwent a follow-up echocardiogram 2.5 to 5 years later to assess for progression of valvular changes and development of Definite RHD. Interval diagnoses of ARF were ascertained. There were 442 participants. Cases with Borderline RHD were at significantly greater risk of ARF (incidence rate ratio 8.8, 95% CI 1.4-53.8) and any echocardiographic progression of valve lesions (relative risk 8.19, 95% CI 2.43-27.53) than their Matched Controls. Cases with Borderline RHD were at increased risk of progression to Definite RHD (1 in 6 progressed) as were Cases with NSVAs (1 in 10 progressed). Children with Borderline RHD had an increased risk of ARF, progression of valvular lesions, and development of Definite RHD. These findings provide support for considering secondary antibiotic prophylaxis or ongoing surveillance echocardiography in high-risk children with Borderline RHD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Scabies is strongly associated with acute rheumatic fever in a cohort study of Auckland children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornley, Simon; Marshall, Roger; Jarrett, Paul; Sundborn, Gerhard; Reynolds, Edwin; Schofield, Grant

    2018-02-14

    This study sought to determine whether scabies infection is associated with acute rheumatic fever (ARF) or chronic rheumatic heart disease (CRHD). A cohort study was undertaken using health records of children aged 3-12 years attending an oral health service for the first time. Subjects were then linked to hospital diagnoses of scabies and ARF or CRHD. A total of 213 957 children free of rheumatic heart disease at baseline were available for analysis. During a mean follow-up time of 5.1 years, 440 children were diagnosed with ARF or CRHD in hospital records. Children diagnosed with scabies during follow-up were 23 times more likely to develop ARF or CRHD, compared with children who had no scabies diagnosis. After adjustment for confounders in a Cox model, the association reduced but remained strong (adjusted hazard ratio: 8.98; 95% confidence interval: 6.33-20.2). In an analysis restricted to children hospitalised at least once during follow-up, the adjusted hazard ratio for the same comparison was 3.43 (95% confidence interval: 1.85-6.37). A recent diagnosis of scabies from hospital records is strongly associated with a subsequent diagnosis of ARF. Further investigation of the role that scabies infestation may play in the aetiology of ARF is warranted. © 2018 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  1. Septic arthritis and acute rheumatic fever in children: the diagnostic value of serological inflammatory markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Raakhi M; Lennon, Diana; Boyle, Matthew J; Chivers, Karel; Frampton, Chris; Nicholson, Ross; Crawford, Haemish

    2015-01-01

    Joint pain and raised inflammatory markers are features of both acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and septic arthritis, often posing a diagnostic challenge to clinicians. Important differences in the presenting serological inflammatory marker profile may assist patient diagnosis, however, as clinical experience suggests that ARF is associated with a higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), whereas other serological markers may be similarly elevated in these 2 conditions. The goal of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of serological inflammatory markers and white cell count (WCC) in children presenting with acute joint pain secondary to ARF or septic arthritis. Data were obtained from the Auckland regional rheumatic fever database and hospital computer records between 2005 and 2012. Records of all patients under the age of 16 years who were admitted with a new diagnosis of ARF or septic arthritis were analyzed. The diagnosis of ARF was defined on the basis of the New Zealand modification of the Jones Criteria, and the diagnosis of septic arthritis was defined on the basis of joint fluid cytology and culture. Baseline characteristics, serological inflammatory markers, and serum WCC were compared between the ARF and septic arthritis patient groups. Children with ARF displayed significantly higher ESR, higher serum C-reactive protein, and lower serum WCC than children with septic arthritis on presentation to hospital. In children presenting with monoarthritis, an ESR>64.5, serum WCCseptic arthritis. A significant proportion (30%) of children with the final diagnosis of ARF initially presented with monoarthritis; 14% of these children (5/34) had received nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication before hospital presentation, and 74% of these children (25/34) had abnormal echocardiograms on admission. ARF and septic arthritis are important diagnoses to consider in children presenting with acute joint pain in New Zealand. A significant proportion of patients

  2. What about My Child and Rheumatic Fever?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cardiovascular Conditions What About My Child and Rheumatic Fever? Rheumatic fever is an inflammatory reaction that can occur after ... strep throat infections don’t lead to rheumatic fever. When they do, the time between the strep ...

  3. The incidence of acute rheumatic fever in a suburban area of Los Angeles. A ten-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odio, A

    1986-02-01

    The incidence of in-hospital cases of acute rheumatic fever in residents of the San Fernando Valley section of Los Angeles (population 1,096,000) from 1971 through 1980 was 0.21 per 100,000 population for all ages and 0.63 per 100,000 for 5 to 17 year olds, both among the lowest ever reported in the world literature. Nevertheless, minority group patients had five times the risk of a white patient for acute rheumatic fever developing and a greater than 20-fold increase in the risk for the development of acute rheumatic fever with carditis. Unexpectedly, a low 30% of cases (8/27) had carditis either alone or with other major criteria, while a high 59% (16/27) had polyarthritis as the only major manifestation. This suggests the possibility of false-positive cases based on polyarthritis as the only major manifestation, and that an incidence of acute rheumatic fever may have been reached that is so low that "background" cases are a significant proportion of all cases.

  4. Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in Gauteng on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The incidence of rheumatic fever (RF) and its complications has waned over the past three to four decades throughout the Western world, but RF remains a problem in developing countries and in the indigenous populations of some well-resourced countries. A marked decline in children presenting with acute ...

  5. Epidemiology of acute rheumatic fever in New Zealand 1996-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaine, Richard; Baker, Michael; Venugopal, Kamalesh

    2008-10-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and its sequela chronic rheumatic heart disease remain significant causes of morbidity and mortality in New Zealand, particularly among Māori and Pacific peoples. Despite its importance, ARF epidemiology has not been reviewed recently. The aims of this study were to assess trends in ARF incidence rates between 1996 and 2005 and the extent to which ARF is concentrated in certain populations based on age, sex, ethnicity and geographical location. This descriptive epidemiological study examined ARF incidence rates using hospitalisation data (1996-2005) and population data from the 1996 and 2001 censuses. Rates were compared by using rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals. New Zealand's annual ARF rate was 3.4 per 100,000. ARF was concentrated in certain populations: 5- to 14-year-olds, Māori and Pacific peoples and upper North Island areas. From 1996 to 2005, the New Zealand European and Others ARF rate decreased significantly while Māori and Pacific peoples' rates increased. Compared with New Zealand European and Others, rate ratios were 10.0 for Māori and 20.7 for Pacific peoples. Of all cases, 59.5% were Māori or Pacific children aged 5-14 years, yet this group comprised only 4.7% of the New Zealand population. ARF rates in New Zealand have failed to decrease since the 1980s and remain some of the highest reported in a developed country. There are large, and now widening, ethnic disparities in ARF incidence. ARF is so concentrated by age group, ethnicity and geographical area that highly targeted interventions could be considered, based on these characteristics.

  6. Serological Evidence of Immune Priming by Group A Streptococci in Patients with Acute Rheumatic Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy M Raynes

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Acute rheumatic fever (ARF is an autoimmune response to Group A Streptococcus (GAS infection. Repeated GAS exposures are proposed to ‘prime’ the immune system for autoimmunity. This notion of immune-priming by multiple GAS infections was first postulated in the 1960s, but direct experimental evidence to support the hypothesis has been lacking. Here we present novel methodology, based on antibody responses to GAS T‑antigens, that enables previous GAS exposures to be mapped in patient sera. T-antigens are surface expressed, type specific antigens and GAS strains fall into 18 major clades or T-types. A panel of recombinant T-antigens was generated and immunoassays were performed in parallel with serum depletion experiments allowing type-specific T‑antigen antibodies to be distinguished from cross-reactive antibodies. At least two distinct GAS exposures were detected in each of the ARF sera tested. Furthermore, no two sera had the same T-antigen reactivity profile suggesting that each patient was exposed to a unique series of GAS T‑types prior to developing ARF. The methods have provided much-needed experimental evidence to substantiate the immune-priming hypothesis, and will facilitate further serological profiling studies that explore the multifaceted interactions between GAS and the host.

  7. Serological Evidence of Immune Priming by Group A Streptococci in Patients with Acute Rheumatic Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynes, Jeremy M; Frost, Hannah R C; Williamson, Deborah A; Young, Paul G; Baker, Edward N; Steemson, John D; Loh, Jacelyn M; Proft, Thomas; Dunbar, P R; Atatoa Carr, Polly E; Bell, Anita; Moreland, Nicole J

    2016-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is an autoimmune response to Group A Streptococcus (GAS) infection. Repeated GAS exposures are proposed to 'prime' the immune system for autoimmunity. This notion of immune-priming by multiple GAS infections was first postulated in the 1960s, but direct experimental evidence to support the hypothesis has been lacking. Here, we present novel methodology, based on antibody responses to GAS T-antigens, that enables previous GAS exposures to be mapped in patient sera. T-antigens are surface expressed, type specific antigens and GAS strains fall into 18 major clades or T-types. A panel of recombinant T-antigens was generated and immunoassays were performed in parallel with serum depletion experiments allowing type-specific T-antigen antibodies to be distinguished from cross-reactive antibodies. At least two distinct GAS exposures were detected in each of the ARF sera tested. Furthermore, no two sera had the same T-antigen reactivity profile suggesting that each patient was exposed to a unique series of GAS T-types prior to developing ARF. The methods have provided much-needed experimental evidence to substantiate the immune-priming hypothesis, and will facilitate further serological profiling studies that explore the multifaceted interactions between GAS and the host.

  8. Acute rheumatic fever and its consequences: a persistent threat to developing nations in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jennifer L; Naguwa, Stanley M; Cheema, Gurtej S; Gershwin, M Eric

    2009-12-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is an autoimmune, multi-system response secondary to molecular mimicry following Lancefield group A streptococcus (GAS) pharyngitis; it is now most commonly found in the pediatric populations of developing nations. The major source of morbidity and mortality of ARF stems from rheumatic heart disease (RHD), although the cardinal symptoms of the disease also include polyarthritis, Sydenham's chorea, subcutaneous nodules, and erythema marginatum. Therapy is aimed towards treating the initial GAS infection, using anti-inflammatory medications for acute symptoms and surgery to correct RHD. Secondary prevention is crucial, given the high risk of recurrence, and includes long-term antibiotic prophylaxis. However, vaccination towards GAS may soon be on the horizon, which may assist in both decreasing the risk of initial infection in naïve patients and helping to lower the risk of recurrence.

  9. Revision of the Jones Criteria for the diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever in the era of Doppler echocardiography: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewitz, Michael H; Baltimore, Robert S; Tani, Lloyd Y; Sable, Craig A; Shulman, Stanford T; Carapetis, Jonathan; Remenyi, Bo; Taubert, Kathryn A; Bolger, Ann F; Beerman, Lee; Mayosi, Bongani M; Beaton, Andrea; Pandian, Natesa G; Kaplan, Edward L

    2015-05-19

    Acute rheumatic fever remains a serious healthcare concern for the majority of the world's population despite its decline in incidence in Europe and North America. The goal of this statement was to review the historic Jones criteria used to diagnose acute rheumatic fever in the context of the current epidemiology of the disease and to update those criteria to also take into account recent evidence supporting the use of Doppler echocardiography in the diagnosis of carditis as a major manifestation of acute rheumatic fever. To achieve this goal, the American Heart Association's Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young and its Rheumatic Fever, Endocarditis, and Kawasaki Disease Committee organized a writing group to comprehensively review and evaluate the impact of population-specific differences in acute rheumatic fever presentation and changes in presentation that can result from the now worldwide availability of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In addition, a methodological assessment of the numerous published studies that support the use of Doppler echocardiography as a means to diagnose cardiac involvement in acute rheumatic fever, even when overt clinical findings are not apparent, was undertaken to determine the evidence basis for defining subclinical carditis and including it as a major criterion of the Jones criteria. This effort has resulted in the first substantial revision to the Jones criteria by the American Heart Association since 1992 and the first application of the Classification of Recommendations and Levels of Evidence categories developed by the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association to the Jones criteria. This revision of the Jones criteria now brings them into closer alignment with other international guidelines for the diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever by defining high-risk populations, recognizing variability in clinical presentation in these high-risk populations, and including Doppler echocardiography as a tool

  10. Clinical assessment and echocardiography follow-up results of the children with acute rheumatic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Basturk

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute rheumatic fever (ARF is an inflammatory collagenous tissue disease which shows its cardinal signs in joints, heart, skin and nervous system while affecting whole connective tissue system more or less. This study was conducted in order to investigate the clinical pattern and severity of ARF, echocardiographic findings and the course of the patients with heart valve involvement by studying the clinical and laboratory aspects of the patients diagnosed with ARF according to updated Jones criteria. The study included 214 patients diagnosed with ARF for the first time between January 2005 and May 2008. All patients were scanned with doppler echocardiography (ECHO between certain intervals. Severity of carditis was grouped into 3 groups of mild, moderate and severe. The frequency of carditis was 57.9%, arthritis was 73.4%, chorea was 11.7% and erythema marginatum was 0.9% but no subcutaneous nodules. Recovery was observed in 22% of the cases of isolated aortic insufficiency (AI, 50% of the cases with isolated mitral insufficiency (MI and 80% of the cases with mitral and aortic insufficiencies together (MI+AI. Recovery in isolated MI was significantly much more than recovery in isolated AI. However, recovery in AI was significantly much more than in MI in cases of mitral and aortic insufficiencies together. In conclusion, ARF is a cause of acquired and preventable heart disease and it can be reversed through right diagnosis and appropriate treatment. Isolated mitral insufficiency, isolated aortic insufficiency and both mitral and aortic insufficiency are observed during a valvular disease. Remission among valvular diseases are most commonly in those with mitral insufficiency and remissions in both mitral and aortic insufficiency occur most commonly in aortic ones. Regular prophylaxis is the key element for long term prevention of patients with ARF.

  11. Acute rheumatic fever and exposure to poor housing conditions in New Zealand: A descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Jane R; Pierse, Nevil; Stefanogiannis, Niki; Jackson, Catherine; Baker, Michael G

    2017-04-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is an important public health problem in low- and middle-income countries and in certain populations in high-income countries. Indigenous Australians, and New Zealand Māori and Pacific people, have incidence rates among the highest in the world. We aimed to investigate ARF cases' housing conditions and sore throat treatment to identify opportunities for improving ARF prevention in New Zealand. Recently diagnosed cases and their care givers were interviewed. Information was obtained about the cases' demographics, housing circumstances and conditions, and sore throat treatment preceding ARF. We interviewed 55 cases. Most (75%) lived in rental housing and reported multiple measures of deprivation. Common exposures were household crowding (58%), bed-sharing (49%), dampness and mould (76%), cold (82%) and co-habiting with smokers (71%). Experiencing sore throat in the weeks before ARF was recalled by 62%, with 29% seeing a doctor or nurse and 13% of the total sample receiving antibiotics. The environmental conditions reported could contribute to high group A Streptococcus transmission and susceptibility to infection, thus increasing ARF risk. Sore throat treatment has important limitations as an intervention, particularly as 38% of participants did not recall sore throat preceding the diagnosis. The results support the need to improve rental housing. Interventions promoting minimum enforceable standards in social housing and private rental sectors (such as a housing warrant of fitness) could support these changes. A rigorous investigation, such as a case control study, is needed to explore risk factors further. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  12. ECHOCARDIOGRAPHIC PROFILE OF VALVULAR LESIONS IN CHILDREN WITH ACUTE RHEUMATIC FEVER / RHEUMATIC HEART DISEASE IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    OpenAIRE

    Ramu; Deepak Kumar

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT (B ACKGROUND): Rheumatic Heart disease is still a leading cause of valvular disease in developing countries like India and constitutes 10 to 50% of the cardiac patients in Indian hospitals. Echocardiography is a very sensitive investigation for the diagnosis of Rheumatic Carditis and its sequalae like Mitral, Aortic and Tricuspid valve disease as well as sub clinical Carditis. AIMS & OBJECTIVES: To study the profile, severity and gender based differences of ...

  13. Heart Lesion After the First Attack of the Rheumatic Fever 22 Years Experience in Single Centre

    OpenAIRE

    Bejiqi, Ramush A.; Retkoceri, Ragip; Zeka, Naim; Bejiqi, Hana; Retkoceri, Arber

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute rheumatic fever and its sequels, rheumatic heart diseases, remain major unsolved preventable health problems in Kosovo population, particularly among the disadvantages indigenous Albanian and Egyptians people. In Kosovo, despite of performing secondary prophylaxis with benzathine penicillin, acute rheumatic fever hospitalization rates have remained essentially unchanged for the last 20 years. The role of echocardiography in the diagnosis of acute rheumatic carditis was estab...

  14. Challenges to developing effective streptococcal vaccines to prevent rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma A

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Abhinay Sharma, D Patric Nitsche-SchmitzDepartment of Medical Microbiology, Helmholtz Center for Infection Research, Braunschweig, GermanyAbstract: Acute rheumatic fever is a sequela of Streptococcus pyogenes and potentially of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis infections. Acute rheumatic fever is caused by destructive autoimmunity and inflammation in the extracellular matrix and can lead to rheumatic heart disease, which is the most frequent cardiologic disease that is acquired in youth. Although effective treatments are available, acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease remain serious threats to human health, which affect millions and cause high economic losses. This has motivated the search for a vaccine that prevents the causative streptococcal infections. A variety of potential vaccine candidates have been identified and investigated in the past. Today, new approaches are applied to find alternative candidates. Nevertheless, several obstacles lie in the way of an approved S. pyogenes vaccine for use in humans. Herein, a subjective selection of promising vaccine candidates with respect to the prevention of acute rheumatic fever/rheumatic heart disease and safety regarding immunological side effects is discussed.Keywords: autoimmune disease, side effects, M protein vaccine, molecular mimicry, coiled-coil, collagen binding, PARF

  15. Genome sequence and comparative microarray analysis of serotype M18 group A Streptococcus strains associated with acute rheumatic fever outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoot, James C; Barbian, Kent D; Van Gompel, Jamie J; Smoot, Laura M; Chaussee, Michael S; Sylva, Gail L; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Ricklefs, Stacy M; Porcella, Stephen F; Parkins, Larye D; Beres, Stephen B; Campbell, David S; Smith, Todd M; Zhang, Qing; Kapur, Vivek; Daly, Judy A; Veasy, L George; Musser, James M

    2002-04-02

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF), a sequelae of group A Streptococcus (GAS) infection, is the most common cause of preventable childhood heart disease worldwide. The molecular basis of ARF and the subsequent rheumatic heart disease are poorly understood. Serotype M18 GAS strains have been associated for decades with ARF outbreaks in the U.S. As a first step toward gaining new insight into ARF pathogenesis, we sequenced the genome of strain MGAS8232, a serotype M18 organism isolated from a patient with ARF. The genome is a circular chromosome of 1,895,017 bp, and it shares 1.7 Mb of closely related genetic material with strain SF370 (a sequenced serotype M1 strain). Strain MGAS8232 has 178 ORFs absent in SF370. Phages, phage-like elements, and insertion sequences are the major sources of variation between the genomes. The genomes of strain MGAS8232 and SF370 encode many of the same proven or putative virulence factors. Importantly, strain MGAS8232 has genes encoding many additional secreted proteins involved in human-GAS interactions, including streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin A (scarlet fever toxin) and two uncharacterized pyrogenic exotoxin homologues, all phage-associated. DNA microarray analysis of 36 serotype M18 strains from diverse localities showed that most regions of variation were phages or phage-like elements. Two epidemics of ARF occurring 12 years apart in Salt Lake City, UT, were caused by serotype M18 strains that were genetically identical, or nearly so. Our analysis provides a critical foundation for accelerated research into ARF pathogenesis and a molecular framework to study the plasticity of GAS genomes.

  16. [Activity of lipid peroxidation processes in children with rheumatic fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanidze, E S; Zhvaniia, M A

    2005-02-01

    Pathogenic mechanism of acute and chronic inflammation is connected to the increased production of superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and other free radicals. Clinical role of lipid peroxidation (LPO) processes was studied in 38 patients in the age from 3 to 15 years old with different variants of Rheumatic Fever (RF). We have investigated the relationship between malonidialdehide (MDA) and RF. We measured the levels of MDA in the plasma in patients with acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and chronic rheumatic heart disease (CRHD). Our study revealed that the levels of MDA in patients with ARF are significantly higher than in patients with CRHD. These levels were also significantly higher in patients with history of disease for up to 2 years, than in patients with history longer than 2 years. Thus, the measurement of MDA in the plasma could be used as a laboratory test for relation of active state of rheumatic fever.

  17. High-producing MBL2 genotypes increase the risk of acute and chronic carditis in patients with history of rheumatic fever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schafranski, MD; Pereira Ferrari, L; Scherner, D

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatic fever (RF) and its most severe sequela, chronic rheumatic heart disease (CRHD), are mediated by an abnormal immunological host response following a Streptococcus pyogenes oropharyngeal infection. Mannan-binding lectin (MBL), a collectin that activates complement, binds to N......-acetylglucosamine, a molecule present on the streptococcus cell wall and on human heart valves. As high levels of MBL and MBL2 associated genotypes have previously been seen to be associated with CRHD, we investigated the association between MBL2 polymorphisms and the presence of acute carditis and arthritis in patients...

  18. Doppler echocardiography imaging in detecting multi-valvular lesions: a clinical evaluation in children with acute rheumatic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivaram, Pushpa; Ahmed, Molla Imaduddin; Kariyanna, Pramod Theetha; Sabbineni, Harika; Avula, Uma Mahesh R

    2013-01-01

    Doppler echocardiography has been demonstrated to be accurate in diagnosing valvular lesions in rheumatic heart disease (RHD) when compared to clinical evaluation alone. To perform Doppler echocardiography in children clinically diagnosed by the Jones criteria to have acute rheumatic fever (ARF), and to then compare the effectiveness of echo in detecting single/multi-valvular lesions with that of the initial clinical evaluation. We enrolled 93 children who were previously diagnosed with ARF by clinical examination. Presence of valvular lesions were enlisted, first by clinical auscultation, and then by performing Doppler echocardiography. We found that Doppler echocardiography was a sensitive technique, capable of detecting valvular lesions that were missed by clinical auscultation alone. Echocardiography of patients with carditis revealed mitral regurgitation to be the most common lesion present (53 patients, 56.98%), followed by aortic regurgitation in 21 patients (22.6%). The difference between clinical and echocardiographic diagnosis in ARF children with carditis was statistically significant for mitral regurgitation, aortic regurgitation and tricuspid regurgitation. Clinical auscultation alone revealed 4 cases of mitral stenosis, 39 mitral regurgitation, 14 aortic regurgitation, 9 tricuspid regurgitation; in contrast, echo revealed 5 cases of mitral stenosis, 53 mitral regurgitation, 21 aortic regurgitation, 18 tricuspid regurgitation. Doppler echocardiography is a more sensitive technique for detecting valvular lesions. In the setting of ARF, echo enables a 46.9% higher detection level of carditis, as compared to the clinical examination alone. Echo was very significant in detecting regurgitation lesions, especially for cases of tricuspid regurgitation in the setting of multivalvular involvement. The results of our study are in accordance with previous clinical studies, all of which clearly demonstrate the advantages of Doppler echocardiography, paving the way

  19. Doppler echocardiography imaging in detecting multi-valvular lesions: a clinical evaluation in children with acute rheumatic fever.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushpa Shivaram

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Doppler echocardiography has been demonstrated to be accurate in diagnosing valvular lesions in rheumatic heart disease (RHD when compared to clinical evaluation alone. OBJECTIVE: To perform Doppler echocardiography in children clinically diagnosed by the Jones criteria to have acute rheumatic fever (ARF, and to then compare the effectiveness of echo in detecting single/multi-valvular lesions with that of the initial clinical evaluation. METHODS AND RESULTS: We enrolled 93 children who were previously diagnosed with ARF by clinical examination. Presence of valvular lesions were enlisted, first by clinical auscultation, and then by performing Doppler echocardiography. We found that Doppler echocardiography was a sensitive technique, capable of detecting valvular lesions that were missed by clinical auscultation alone. Echocardiography of patients with carditis revealed mitral regurgitation to be the most common lesion present (53 patients, 56.98%, followed by aortic regurgitation in 21 patients (22.6%. The difference between clinical and echocardiographic diagnosis in ARF children with carditis was statistically significant for mitral regurgitation, aortic regurgitation and tricuspid regurgitation. Clinical auscultation alone revealed 4 cases of mitral stenosis, 39 mitral regurgitation, 14 aortic regurgitation, 9 tricuspid regurgitation; in contrast, echo revealed 5 cases of mitral stenosis, 53 mitral regurgitation, 21 aortic regurgitation, 18 tricuspid regurgitation. CONCLUSION: Doppler echocardiography is a more sensitive technique for detecting valvular lesions. In the setting of ARF, echo enables a 46.9% higher detection level of carditis, as compared to the clinical examination alone. Echo was very significant in detecting regurgitation lesions, especially for cases of tricuspid regurgitation in the setting of multivalvular involvement. The results of our study are in accordance with previous clinical studies, all of which clearly

  20. Similar erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein sensitivities at the onset of septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, acute rheumatic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E. Reitzenstein

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR and C-reactive protein (CRP are employed in the evaluation of patients with suspected septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and acute rheumatic fever. The purpose of this study is to determine if one test has greater sensitivity (rises earlier than the other. Laboratory data were retrieved for pediatric patients hospitalized with one of the above three conditions, who had both ESR and CRP tests done on or shortly prior to admission. Sensitivity calculations were performed for mild, moderate, and severe degrees of ESR and CRP elevation. Microcytic erythrocytes, as defined by mean corpuscular volume (MCV less than 80 μL, were identified to see if this affects the ESR. ESR or CRP sensitivities depend on the cutoff value (threshold chosen as a positive test. The sensitivities were similar for similar degrees of elevation. ESR and CRP discordance was not significantly related to MCV. We concluded that the CRP does not rise earlier than the ESR (their sensitivities are similar. Previously published conclusions are dependent on arbitrary thresholds. We could not find any evidence that MCV affects the ESR.

  1. Heart lesion after the first attack of the rheumatic Fever 22 years experience in single centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejiqi, Ramush A; Retkoceri, Ragip; Zeka, Naim; Bejiqi, Hana; Retkoceri, Arber

    2015-02-01

    Acute rheumatic fever and its sequels, rheumatic heart diseases, remain major unsolved preventable health problems in Kosovo population, particularly among the disadvantages indigenous Albanian and Egyptians people. In Kosovo, despite of performing secondary prophylaxis with benzathine penicillin, acute rheumatic fever hospitalization rates have remained essentially unchanged for the last 20 years. The role of echocardiography in the diagnosis of acute rheumatic carditis was established over the last 20 years. In this study we aimed to determine the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease in children from Kosovo population with first attack of acute rheumatic fever. Also, we presented that echocardiography examination detects a greater prevalence of rheumatic heart disease than other diagnostic procedures. We aimed to compare the sensitivity and specificity of cardiac auscultation, ECG record, lab analysis to echocardiography and to determine the feasibility of specific age in this setting. To optimize accurate diagnosis of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease, we utilized two group models. In the first group of 388 children, hospitalized and treated before 1999, diagnosis of rheumatic fever was decided basing on the clinical and laboratory findings whereas in second group (221 children treated from1999 to 2010) clinical and lab diagnosis were amplified also on the detection by echocardiography. In second group, using echocardiography as a method of diagnosis and assessment children with rheumatic fever, we found high rates of undetected rheumatic heart disease in this high-risk group population. Echocardiographic examination of children with rheumatic fever for rheumatic heart disease may over diagnose rheumatic heart disease unless congenital mitral valve anomalies and physiological regurgitation are excluded.

  2. Heart Lesion After the First Attack of the Rheumatic Fever 22 Years Experience in Single Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejiqi, Ramush A.; Retkoceri, Ragip; Zeka, Naim; Bejiqi, Hana; Retkoceri, Arber

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute rheumatic fever and its sequels, rheumatic heart diseases, remain major unsolved preventable health problems in Kosovo population, particularly among the disadvantages indigenous Albanian and Egyptians people. In Kosovo, despite of performing secondary prophylaxis with benzathine penicillin, acute rheumatic fever hospitalization rates have remained essentially unchanged for the last 20 years. The role of echocardiography in the diagnosis of acute rheumatic carditis was established over the last 20 years. Aims: In this study we aimed to determine the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease in children from Kosovo population with first attack of acute rheumatic fever. Also, we presented that echocardiography examination detects a greater prevalence of rheumatic heart disease than other diagnostic procedures. We aimed to compare the sensitivity and specificity of cardiac auscultation, ECG record, lab analysis to echocardiography and to determine the feasibility of specific age in this setting. Methods: To optimize accurate diagnosis of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease, we utilized two group models. In the first group of 388 children, hospitalized and treated before 1999, diagnosis of rheumatic fever was decided basing on the clinical and laboratory findings whereas in second group (221 children treated from1999 to 2010) clinical and lab diagnosis were amplified also on the detection by echocardiography. Conclusion: In second group, using echocardiography as a method of diagnosis and assessment children with rheumatic fever, we found high rates of undetected rheumatic heart disease in this high-risk group population. Echocardiographic examination of children with rheumatic fever for rheumatic heart disease may over diagnose rheumatic heart disease unless congenital mitral valve anomalies and physiological regurgitation are excluded. PMID:25870479

  3. Is a rheumatic fever register the best surveillance tool to evaluate rheumatic fever control in the Auckland region?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxon, Te Aro; Reed, Peter; Jelleyman, Timothy; Anderson, Philippa; Leversha, Alison; Jackson, Catherine; Lennon, Diana

    2017-08-11

    To determine the most accurate data source for acute rheumatic fever (ARF) epidemiology in the Auckland region. To assess coverage of the Auckland Regional Rheumatic Fever Register (ARRFR), (1998-2010) for children Auckland at the time of illness, register, hospitalisation and notification data were compared. A consistent definition was applied to determine definite and probable cases of ARF using clinical records. (www.heartfoundation.org.nz) RESULTS: Of 559 confirmed (definite and probable) RF cases Auckland. This was significantly more accurate than medical officer of health notification and hospitalisation data.

  4. Cardiac tamponade in acute rheumatic carditis.

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, A T; Mah, P K; Chia, B L

    1983-01-01

    In patients with valvular heart disease, fever, and cardiomegaly echocardiography is an invaluable noninvasive tool. In this report we describe a young female presenting with cardiac tamponade due to acute rheumatic carditis. Echocardiography showed an exudative pericardial effusion which was haemorrhagic on pericardiocentesis. She responded to steroid therapy with resolution of carditis and pericardial effusion.

  5. Notification of rheumatic fever in South Africa - evidence for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective To determine whether under-reporting of rheumatic fever occurs at hospital, municipal, provincial and national levels of the South African health system. Background: Information on the incidence of rheumatic fever (RF) and the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is required for the prevention of valvular ...

  6. [Rheumatic fever--a review of cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, P; Freitas, S; Alvares, S

    2000-09-01

    To analyse clinical presentation of rheumatic fever (RF), with special emphasis on cardiac involvement, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic findings and the outcome of the cases referred to Maria Pia Children's Hospital from January 1990 to September 1999. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical files of all cases referred to pediatric cardiology clinics with the suspicion of acute RF (Group 1) or with rheumatic valvular disease and heart failure (Group 2). In group 1 we studied the following: age and sex distribution, year of diagnosis, presence of Jones criteria treatment and outcome. In group 2 we analysed provenance, age of initial onset of RF, age of cardiology referral, treatment and outcome. Thirteen cases were identified, 8 in groups 1 and 5 in group 2. Group 1 included 3 girls and 2 boys, mean age of 10 years. The diagnosis of RF was based in the presence of 2 major and 1 minor manifestation (4/8), 1 major and 2 minor manifestations (1/8) and chorea in 3 cases associated with clinical carditis in one and subclinical carditis in another. Colour Doppler echocardiography showed pathological mitral regurgitation jet in 6 cases, associated with aortic regurgitation in 2 and dilatation of left ventricle in 3. All were treated with penicillin associated with anti-inflammatory drugs in 5 and haloperidol in 3. Group 2 included 3 girls and 2 boys, mean age 9.56 years. Four were from African countries (Angola and Guinea), and one came from the north of Portugal. The elapsed time between the initial acute attack and cardiology referral varied from 5 months to 3 years. All presented severe mitral insufficiency associated with aortic and/or tricuspid valve lesions, and heart failure. All five underwent valve surgery. The secondary prophylaxis was recommended in every patient. There was a recurrence in a child who had interrupted chemoprophylaxis. The patients from African countries were lost for follow-up. RF still remains a problem in present times, with

  7. A case of rheumatic fever with acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis and nephrotic syndrome caused by a cutaneous infection with beta-hemolytic streptococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Sauer Mikkelsen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A middle-aged patient of Greenlandic origin was referred for skin infection of the leg. An initial minor trauma of the skin of the distal right lower extremity was complicated by bullous erysipelas which cultured positive for group A β-hemolytic streptococci (GABHS. The clinical condition deteriorated and necrotizing fasciitis developed despite relevant surgical and antibiotic treatment. Approximately 3 weeks later, the patient developed arthralgia, impaired renal function with azotemia, hypertension and severe nephrotic syndrome with periorbital and peripheral edema. A kidney biopsy demonstrated endocapillary glomerulonephritis. Concomitantly, carditis with chest pain, moderately reduced left ventricular ejection fraction and mitral regurgitation were noted. The patient had no signs of pharyngitis in the whole period. The patient thus contracted poststreptococ glomerulonephritis and furthermore she fulfilled the criteria of acute rheumatic fever following a GABHS skin infection. We suggest a possible relation between a virulent GABHS clone causing NF and ARF.

  8. Global research priorities in rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carapetis, Jonathan R; Zühlke, Liesl J

    2011-01-01

    We now stand at a critical juncture for rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) control. In recent years, we have seen a surge of interest in these diseases in regions of the world where RF/RHD mostly occur. This brings real opportunities to make dramatic progress in the next few years, but also real risks if we miss these opportunities. Most public health and clinical approaches in RF/RHD arose directly from programmes of research. Many unanswered questions remain, including those around how to implement what we know will work, so research will continue to be essential in our efforts to bring a global solution to this disease. Here we outline our proposed research priorities in RF/RHD for the coming decade, grouped under the following four challenges: Translating what we know already into practical RHD control; How to identify people with RHD earlier, so that preventive measures have a higher chance of success; Better understanding of disease pathogenesis, with a view to improved diagnosis and treatment of ARF and RHD; and Finding an effective approach to primary prevention. We propose a mixture of basic, applied, and implementation science. With concerted efforts, strong links to clinical and public health infrastructure, and advocacy and funding support from the international community, there are good prospects for controlling these RF and RHD over the next decade

  9. Acute cholecystitis in a child with scarlet fever: A rare association

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    clinical features are exudative pharyngitis, fever and bright red exanthema. Otitis media, pneumonia, septicaemia, osteomyelitis, rheumatic fever and acute glomerulonephritis are the common complications associated with scarlet fever. However, hepatitis and vasculitis are other rare complications described in the literature.

  10. Clinical presentation of rheumatic fever in an endemic area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, Megan P; Sive, Alan A; Norton, Robert E; McBride, William J H; Ketheesan, Natkunam

    2010-06-01

    This study documented whether patients diagnosed with acute rheumatic fever (ARF) in North Queensland, Australia, conformed to the 1992 Revised Jones Criteria (RJC). The authors aimed to determine whether inclusion of subclinical carditis (SCC) and monarthritis as major manifestations and a low-grade temperature as a minor manifestation in the RJC are justified in this population. A retrospective review of patients in whom the diagnosis of ARF relied on the experience of clinicians and who were admitted to the Townsville and Cairns Base Hospitals between 1997 and 2007 was undertaken. Of the 98 cases reviewed, 71.4% satisfied the RJC. Modification of the RJC increased the rate of criteria satisfaction to 91.8%. On presentation, 27 patients had SCC. Of the patients with SCC followed up, 70.5% had long-term valvular consequences. In populations endemic for ARF, monarthritis, SCC and a low-grade temperature should be included in the RJC.

  11. Incidental histological diagnosis of acute rheumatic carditis: case report and review of the literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme S. Spina

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatic fever remains endemic in many countries and frequently causes heart failure due to severe chronic rheumatic valvular heart disease, which requires surgical treatment. Here, we report on a patient who underwent an elective surgical correction for mitral and aortic valvular heart disease and had a post-operative diagnosis of acute rheumatic carditis. The incidental finding of Aschoff bodies in myocardial biopsies is frequently reported in the nineteenth-century literature, with prevalences as high as 35%, but no clinical or prognostic data on the patients is included. The high frequency of this finding after cardiac surgery in classical reports suggests that these patients were not using secondary prophylaxis for rheumatic fever. We discuss the clinical diagnosis of acute rheumatic myocarditis in asymptomatic patients and the laboratorial and imaging methods for the diagnosis of acute rheumatic carditis. We also discuss the prognostic implications of this finding and review the related literature.

  12. RHEUMATIC FEVER AS NONVANISHING DISEASE: A PROBLEM STATE AND CLINICAL CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Shostak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Early diagnostics and treatment of patients with acute rheumatic fever (RF remains actual problem because rheumatic heart disease is still one of the main causes of acquired valvular lesions. Two cases of acute RF occurred in City Clinical Hospital №1 named after N.I. Pirogov in 2009 are presented. Different outcomes were observed during 6 and 10 months of clinical monitoring. The main approaches to diagnostics and treatment of RF are also described taking into consideration national and international guidelines.

  13. Overlapping humoral autoimmunity links rheumatic fever and the antiphospholipid syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blank, M; Krause, I; Magrini, L

    2006-01-01

    Rheumatic fever (RF) and the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) are autoimmune diseases that share similar cardiac and neurological pathologies. We assessed the presence of shared epitopes between M protein, N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) and beta2 glycoprotein-I (beta2GPI), the pathogenic...

  14. Technetium-99m pyrophosphate myocardial scintigraphy in the diagnosis of acute rheumatic carditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malhotra, A.; Radhakrishnan, S.; Reddy, K.S.; Gopinath, P.G.; Bhatia, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    Rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are major health problems in India. The most difficult decision to make in such a setting is whether a patient of acute rheumatic fever has acute rheumatic carditis or not. Physical signs such as a new cardiac murmur, cardiac enlargement, congestive cardiac failure although quoted as pointers to carditis are non-specific specially if the attack is superimposed on pre-existing RHD. Any investigation which will provide an answer to this problem would be very welcome. sup(99m)Tc pyrophosphate (Tc PYP) is a very sensitive indicator of myocardial necrosis in acute myocardial infarction. A study to determine the usefulness of this technique in diagnosis of rheumatic carditis in patients with unequivocal clinical evidence of myocarditis was undertaken. Results are reported. (author). 14 refs

  15. THE HYDROGEN ION CONCENTRATION OF JOINT EXUDATES IN RHEUMATIC FEVER AND OTHER FORMS OF ARTHRITIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boots, R H; Cullen, G E

    1922-09-30

    1. The hydrogen ion concentration of joint exudates aspirated from patients ill with acute rheumatic fever, arthritis of undetermined origin, and bacterial arthritis was determined. The hydrogen ion concentrations of the joint exudates from patients with acute rheumatic fever approximated the normal reaction of blood, varying from pH 7.27 to 7.42. Exudates from patients with arthritis of undetermined origin varied in pH from 7.33 to 7.47. The pH of a joint effusion occurring in a patient with myocardial insufficiency was 7.34. Bacteriologically, all of these fluids were sterile by ordinary means of cultivation. An exudate aspirated from a knee infected with Staphylococcus aureus had a pH of 6.69, while that from a patient having an arthritis due to Streptococcus hoemolyticus was also acid, having a pH of 6.19. 2. Since a definitely acid medium is necessary for the liberation of free salicylic acid and since all of the joint fluids from patients with acute rheumatic fever were slightly alkaline, no free salicylic acid could possibly exist in such joint fluids following the administration of salicylates.

  16. Incidental histological diagnosis of acute rheumatic myocarditis: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spina, Guilherme S; Sampaio, Roney O; Branco, Carlos E; Miranda, George B; Rosa, Vitor E E; Tarasoutchi, Flávio

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatic fever (RF) remains endemic in many countries and frequently causes heart failure due to severe chronic rheumatic valvular heart disease, which requires surgical treatment. Here, we report on a patient who underwent an elective surgical correction for mitral and aortic valvular heart disease and had a post-operative diagnosis of acute rheumatic carditis. The incidental finding of Aschoff bodies in myocardial biopsies is frequently reported in the nineteenth-century literature, with prevalences as high as 35%, but no clinical or prognostic data on the patients is included. The high frequency of this finding after cardiac surgery in classical reports suggests that these patients were not using secondary prophylaxis for RF. We discuss the clinical diagnosis of acute rheumatic myocarditis in asymptomatic patients and the laboratorial and imaging methods for the diagnosis of acute rheumatic carditis. We also discuss the prognostic implications of this finding and review the related literature.

  17. Grand Master Perellos : rheumatic fever and syphilis

    OpenAIRE

    Bonello, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    It is not given to everyone to have his maladies made the subject-matter of a published book. Not so Grand Master Perellos (1697 ­ 1720) who lived to see a 104-page volume about his recalcitrant fevers printed in his lifetime.1 It all started with a letter written on February 15, 1708, by Malta's protomedico (Chief Government Medical Officer) Dr Arcangelo Grech2 at the instance of the Grand Master, addressed to the most eminent physician in Sicily, indirectly asking for guidance about the def...

  18. Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart diseases in Fiji: a review from the surveillance system (1996 -2000).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuboni, Hien D; Finau, Sitaleki A; Cuboni, Giuseppe

    2006-09-01

    The Surveillance System for many Notifiable Diseases in Fiji is described by many as inadequate. This system includes the reporting and recording of Acute Rheumatic Fever (ARF) and Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHD). Prominent amongst the inadequacies of this system is the under reporting and the diagnostic dilemma and classification of he cases. Under-reporting was estimated at about 40% in Viti Levu, 44% in Vanua Levu, and 66% in the outer islands. This paper reviews the Surveillance System pertaining to ARF and RHD and describes the trends and demographic distribution of ARF and RHD in Fiji during the period 1996-2000 while highlighting the problem of the system A retrospective review of admission records of the Pediatric Ward, Colonial War Memorial Hospital (PW/CWMH), Suva, Fiji, from 1996 to 2000 was undertaken. Admission books were cross-checked with patient folders, when required, to avoid inaccurate counting of cases. Data obtained were analyzed and compared with those obtained from the Ministry of Health (MoH) during the same period. Under-reporting of ARF was documented with fewer ARF cases reported less than the actual number of ARF cases admitted to PW/CWMH in 1998 to 2000. On average, 18 ARF cases were reported each year for a cumulative incidence of 2.3 per 100,000 population; 173 RHD cases were reported each year for a cumulative incidence of about 21 per 100,000 population during this 5-year period. The problems seemed to be more prevalent among the Fijians compared to Indians; children in the 5-9 age group were more affected by ARF and those in the 10-14 age group were more affected by RHD. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean age between Fijian and Indian cases for both ARF and RHD. Under-reporting was apparent in the surveillance of ARF and RHD in Fiji. The cumulative incidence of ARF in Fiji appeared much lower than that reported from other Pacific countries. There is a definite need to improve the Disease Surveillance System

  19. [Activity of lipid peroxidation processes and the condition of antioxidative defense system in children with rheumatic fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanidze, E; Zhvania, M

    2005-10-01

    Aim of study consists of establishing of some clinical-biological correlates for rheumatic fever (RF) in children, namely correlations between clinical status and lipoperoxidation products -- malonidialdehide (MDA) and antioxidative enzymes in the blood. In the neutralization process of superoxside anions ceruloplazmin (CP), catalase (CAT) and transferin (TF) are key antioxidant enzymes (AOE) of antioxidative defense system (AOD). We studied 38 patients 3-15 years of age with different variants of RF. We measured the levels of MDA, CAT, CP, TF in the plasma in patients with acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and chronic rheumatic heart disease (CRHD). In all of our cases AOE (CAT, CP, TF) were high at time of diagnosis, concomitant with increased MDA and inflammatory tests. Our study revealed intensified activity of AOD enzymes in children with RF.

  20. Rheumatic fever pathogenesis: Approach in research needs change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Tandon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite identifying that rheumatic fever (RF is the result of an immunological reaction following group-A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection, the pathogenesis remains elusive. RF has been incorrectly designated as causing pancarditis, since it does not cause myocarditis. Research directed toward myocarditis, targeting myosin to unravel the pathogenesis has not succeeded in more than 60 years. RF causes permanent damage to cardiac valves. The mitral valve (MV, derived from the wall of the left ventricle, is composed of a central core of connective tissue, covered on both sides by endothelium. The left ventricle does not have either myocardial or intermyocardial connective tissue involvement in RF. By exclusion, therefore, the primary site of RF damage appears to be the endothelium. Evaluation of the histopathology and immunopathology indicates that RF is a disease of the valvular and vascular endothelium. It is not a connective tissue disorder. Research to identify pathogenesis needs to be focused toward valvular endothelium.

  1. Gene polymorphisms of TNF-α and IL-10 related to rheumatic heart ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rheumatic fever, rheumatic, heart disease, TNF-α, IL-10 gene polymor- phisms. INTRODUCTION. Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) causes an acute generalized inflammatory re- sponse and an illness that selectively af- fects the heart, joints, brain and skin. In spite of the dramatic response nature of acute episode of rheumatic ...

  2. Association of rheumatic fever & rheumatic heart disease with plausible early & late-stage disease markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Subendu; Rastogi, Mukul; Chaudhary, Priyanka; Kumar, Rajesh; Arora, Priya; Sagar, Vivek; Sahni, Inderpal Singh; Shethi, Sunil; Thakur, Khemraj; Ailawadhi, Sourav; Toor, Devinder; Chakraborti, Anuradha

    2017-06-01

    Rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are the autoimmune sequelae caused by Group A Streptococcus. RHD still remains a major concern in the developing countries due to its poor diagnosis, lack of vaccines and social awareness among population. This study was aimed to identify the plausible early- and late-stage disease markers associated with RF/RHD. A total of 84 patients with confirmed pharyngitis (n=18), RF (n=23) and RHD (n=43) were included in the comparative analysis of different factors involved in host-pathogen interaction during RF/RHD pathogenesis. This study revealed high titre of serum antistreptolysin O (ASO) antibody in pharyngitis compared to RF and RHD patients, whereas procollagen type 1 C-peptide (PICP) level was elevated in RHD which showed an inverse correlation with serum ASO titre. The significant elevation of serum anti-peptide associated with RF (PARF) antibody in RF patients was correlated as a probable stage-specific determinant. In addition, pro-inflammatory cytokine profile revealed high levels of interleukin-12 (IL-12)/IL-23p40, IL-17A in RF, whereas IL-6 concentration was higher in RHD compared to healthy controls. The overall assessment of the factors/ disease markers involved in host-pathogen interaction in RF/RHD may be suggestive of plausible disease marker in different groups of patients. Further studies with larger sample need to be done to better understand RF/RHD pathogenesis.

  3. O perfil da antiestreptolisina O no diagnóstico da febre reumática aguda Antistreptolysin O titer profile in acute rheumatic fever diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Saad Magalhães Machado

    2001-04-01

    under regular penicillin prophylaxis. The levels of ASO in ARF were also significantly higher than in patients with isolated chorea, recurrent oropharyngeal infections or juvenile idiopathic arthritis (P = 0.0025, when age-matched samples of these groups were compared. The test’s sensitivity was 73.3% and the specificity was 57.6%, and it was calculated taking into account the upper limit of normality at 320 IU/ml, as well as the established diagnosis of ARF. The test’s specificity and positive predictive value increased with rising or higher titers, being higher with titers above 960 UI/ml. CONCLUSION: this reappraisal of ASO profile in ARF patients indicates a remarkable response during the acute phase, and that points to the extent to which ASO levels may differentiate ARF from other diseases with high levels of ASO antibodies, as coincidental but unrelated streptococcal infection or chronic arthritis flareup.

  4. Prevention of Acute Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Narayanan , Xavier Jouven , Eloi Marijon Download PDF https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.113.007855 Circulation. 2014; 130: ... e35-e37 , originally published July 28, 2014 https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.113.007855 Citation Manager Formats ...

  5. Rheumatic fever prophylaxis in South Africa - is bicillin 1,2 million ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1993-09-30

    Sep 30, 1993 ... inducing loss of the organism's hyaluronic acid capsule and. M-proteins'6.21 Rheumatogenic strains of GABHS tend to· be highly virulent."·'6 It is therefore possible that serum penicillin concentrations below the MBCs for GABHS might be effective in secondary prophylaxis of rheumatic fever. Ginsburg et al.

  6. Rheumatic fever prophylaxis in South Africa - is bicillin 1,2 million ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rheumatic fever is a major health problem in South Africa. Although intramuscular benzathine penicillin (bicillin) 1,2 million units (MU) every 4 weeks is widely used for secondary prophylaxis, studies in other countries have shown a recurrence rate of 3 - 8% over 5 - 6 years in patients on this regimen. It has been ...

  7. Immune complex detection in rheumatic fever and in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamashima, Y.; Kawakami, K.

    1981-01-01

    In this study, the authors have attempted to find the most suitable way to detect the circulating immune complexes exactly in patients with rheumatic fever and with JRA among three independent methods, Clq, conglutinin and Raji cell immunoassays. Clq binding was performed in liquid-phase radio immunoassay and conglutinin was in solid phase radio- and enzyme-immunoassays. Raji cell method was modified from the method by Theofilopoulous in 1976. (Auth.)

  8. Chikungunya fever. Rheumatic manifestations of an emerging disease in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horcada, M Loreto; Díaz-Calderón, Carlos; Garrido, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya fever is a viral disease caused by an alphavirus belonging to the Togaviridae family, transmitted by several species of Aedes mosquitoes: Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus (A. albopictus). It is endemic in Africa and Asia with recurrent outbreaks. It is an emerging disease and cases in Europe transmitted by A. albopictus have been established in Mediterranean areas. The first autochthonous cases detected on the Caribbean islands suppose a serious threat of spreading disease to America, which so far has been disease free. Clinical symptoms begin abruptly with fever, skin rash and polyarthritis. Although mortality is low, a high percentage of patients develop a chronic phase defined by persistent arthritis for months or even years. A severe immune response is responsible for joint inflammation. The absence of specific treatment and lack of vaccine requires detailed studies about its immunopathogenesis in order to determine the most appropriate target. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Improvement in rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease management and prevention using a health centre-based continuous quality improvement approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph, Anna P; Fittock, Marea; Schultz, Rosalie; Thompson, Dale; Dowden, Michelle; Clemens, Tom; Parnaby, Matthew G; Clark, Michele; McDonald, Malcolm I; Edwards, Keith N; Carapetis, Jonathan R; Bailie, Ross S

    2013-12-18

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) remains a major health concern for Aboriginal Australians. A key component of RHD control is prevention of recurrent acute rheumatic fever (ARF) using long-term secondary prophylaxis with intramuscular benzathine penicillin (BPG). This is the most important and cost-effective step in RHD control. However, there are significant challenges to effective implementation of secondary prophylaxis programs. This project aimed to increase understanding and improve quality of RHD care through development and implementation of a continuous quality improvement (CQI) strategy. We used a CQI strategy to promote implementation of national best-practice ARF/RHD management guidelines at primary health care level in Indigenous communities of the Northern Territory (NT), Australia, 2008-2010. Participatory action research methods were employed to identify system barriers to delivery of high quality care. This entailed facilitated discussion with primary care staff aided by a system assessment tool (SAT). Participants were encouraged to develop and implement strategies to overcome identified barriers, including better record-keeping, triage systems and strategies for patient follow-up. To assess performance, clinical records were audited at baseline, then annually for two years. Key performance indicators included proportion of people receiving adequate secondary prophylaxis (≥80% of scheduled 4-weekly penicillin injections) and quality of documentation. Six health centres participated, servicing approximately 154 people with ARF/RHD. Improvements occurred in indicators of service delivery including proportion of people receiving ≥40% of their scheduled BPG (increasing from 81/116 [70%] at baseline to 84/103 [82%] in year three, p = 0.04), proportion of people reviewed by a doctor within the past two years (112/154 [73%] and 134/156 [86%], p = 0.003), and proportion of people who received influenza vaccination (57/154 [37%] to 86/156 [55%], p

  10. The causes of acute Fever requiring hospitalization in geriatric patients: comparison of infectious and noninfectious etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagatay, A Atahan; Tufan, Fatih; Hindilerden, Fehmi; Aydin, Sibel; Elcioglu, Omer Celal; Karadeniz, Asli; Alpay, Nilufer; Gokturk, Suut; Taranoglu, Ozer

    2010-08-12

    Introduction. Infectious diseases may present with atypical presentations in the geriatric patients. While fever is an important finding of infections, it may also be a sign of noninfectious etiology. Methods. Geriatric patients who were hospitalized for acute fever in our infectious diseases unit were included. Acute fever was defined as presentation within the first week of fever above 37.3°C. Results. 185 patients were included (82 males and 103 females). Mean age was 69.7 ± 7.5 years. The cause of fever was an infectious disease in 135 and noninfectious disease in 32 and unknown in 18 of the patients. The most common infectious etiologies were respiratory tract infections (n = 46), urinary tract infections (n = 26), and skin and soft tissue infections (n = 23). Noninfectious causes of fever were rheumatic diseases (n = 8), solid tumors (n = 7), hematological diseases (n = 10), and vasculitis (n = 7). A noninfectious cause of fever was present in one patient with no underlying diseases and in 31 of 130 patients with underlying diseases. Conclusion. Geriatric patients with no underlying diseases generally had infectious causes of fever while noninfectious causes were responsible from fever in an important proportion of patients with underlying diseases.

  11. Acute pancreatitis complicating dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kalenahalli Jagadish; Chandrashekar, Anitha; Basavaraja, Chetak Kadabasal; Kumar, Halasahalli Chowdegowda Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Dengue infection can have spectrum of manifestations, often with an unpredictable clinical progression and outcome. There have been increasing reports of atypical manifestations. Abdominal pain or tenderness and persistent vomiting (warning signs) are present in the majority of cases with severe dengue prior to clinical deterioration. We report a 10-year-old child who presented with fever, persistent vomiting, and abdominal pain. A diagnosis of acute pancreatitis was made. This is a very infrequently reported complication of dengue hemorrhagic fever.

  12. Acute atrial fibrillation during dengue hemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veloso Henrique Horta

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is a viral infection transmitted by the mosquito, Aedes aegypti. Cardiac rhythm disorders, such as atrioventricular blocks and ventricular ectopic beats, appear during infection and are attributed to viral myocarditis. However, supraventricular arrhythmias have not been reported. We present a case of acute atrial fibrillation, with a rapid ventricular rate, successfully treated with intravenous amiodarone, in a 62-year-old man with dengue hemorrhagic fever, who had no structural heart disease.

  13. Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever presenting as Acute Abdomen

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Araimi, Hanaa; Al-Jabri, Amal; Mehmoud, Arshad; Al-Abri, Seif

    2011-01-01

    We describe a case of a 38 year-old Sri Lankan female who was referred to the surgeon on call with a picture of acute abdomen. She presented with a three-day history of fever, headache, abdominal pain and diarrhoea; however, the physical examination was not consistent with acute abdomen. Her platelet count was 22 ×109/L. A diagnosis of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) was made and dengue serology was positive. Dengue epidemics have been associated with a variety of gastrointestinal symptoms an...

  14. Comparison of illumigene Group A Streptococcus Assay with Culture of Throat Swabs from Children with Sore Throats in the New Zealand School-Based Rheumatic Fever Prevention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Arlo; Bissessor, Liselle; Farrell, Elizabeth; Shulman, Stanford T; Zheng, Xiaotian; Lennon, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Group A streptococcal (GAS) pharyngitis is a particularly important condition in areas of New Zealand where the incidence of acute rheumatic fever remains unacceptably high. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of GAS pharyngitis are cornerstones of the Rheumatic Fever Prevention Programme, but these are hindered by the turnaround time of culture. Tests with excellent performance and rapid turnaround times are needed. For this study, throat swabs (Copan ESwabs) were collected from schoolchildren self-identifying with a sore throat. Samples were tested by routine culture and the illumigene GAS assay using loop-mediated isothermal amplification. Discrepant results were resolved by retesting of the same specimen by an alternative molecular assay. Seven hundred fifty-seven throat swab specimens were tested by both methods. The performance characteristics of the illumigene assay using culture on blood agar as the "gold standard" and following discrepancy analysis were as follows: sensitivity, 82% and 87%, respectively; specificity, 93% and 98%, respectively; positive predictive value, 61% and 88%, respectively; and negative predictive value, 97% and 97%, respectively. In our unique setting of a school-based throat swabbing program, the illumigene assay did not perform quite as well as described in previous reports. Despite this, its improved sensitivity and rapid turnaround time compared with those of culture are appealing. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Penicillin Dried Blood Spot Assay for Use in Patients Receiving Intramuscular Benzathine Penicillin G and Other Penicillin Preparations To Prevent Rheumatic Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page-Sharp, Madhu; Coward, Jonathan; Moore, Brioni R; Salman, Sam; Marshall, Lewis; Davis, Timothy M E; Batty, Kevin T; Manning, Laurens

    2017-08-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) remains an important global health challenge. Administration of benzathine penicillin (BPG) every 3 to 4 weeks is recommended as a secondary prophylaxis to prevent recurrent episodes of acute rheumatic fever and subsequent RHD. Following intramuscular injection, BPG is hydrolyzed to penicillin G (benzylpenicillin). However, little is known of the pharmacokinetics (PK) of BPG in pediatric populations at high risk of RHD or of the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship between penicillin exposure and clinically relevant outcomes. Dried blood spot (DBS) assays can facilitate PK studies in situations where frequent venous blood sampling is logistically difficult. A liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy assay for penicillin G in plasma and DBS was developed and validated. Application of the DBS assay for PK studies was confirmed using samples from adult patients receiving penicillin as part of an infection management plan. The limit of quantification for penicillin G in DBS was 0.005 mg/liter. Penicillin G is stable in DBS for approximately 12 h at room temperature (22°C), 6 days at 4°C, and >1 month at -20°C. Plasma and DBS penicillin G concentrations for patients receiving BPG and penicillin G given via bolus doses correlated well and had comparable time-concentration profiles. There was poor correlation for patients receiving penicillin via continuous infusions, perhaps as a result of the presence of residual penicillin in the peripherally inserted central catheter, from which the plasma samples were collected. The present DBS penicillin G assay can be used as a surrogate for plasma concentrations to provide valid PK data for studies of BPG and other penicillin preparations developed to prevent rheumatic fever and RHD. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Clinical and echocardiographic features of children with rheumatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) constitute important public health problems in developing countries. Children with ARF and RHD seen at ... RHD is manifested with severe valvular lesions and a high TNF alpha indicating and ongoing inflammation. Pan African Medical Journal 2012; 13:36 ...

  17. Chikungunya fever presenting with acute optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohite, Abhijit Anand; Agius-Fernandez, Adriana

    2015-07-28

    Chikungunya fever is a vector borne virus that typically causes a self-limiting systemic illness with fever, skin rash and joint aches 2 weeks after infection. We present the case of a 69-year-old woman presenting with an acute unilateral optic neuropathy as a delayed complication of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection contracted during a recent trip to the West Indies. She presented to our ophthalmology department with acute painless visual field loss in the right eye and a recent flu-like illness. She was found to have a right relative afferent pupillary defect (RAPD) with unilateral optic disc swelling. Serology confirmed recent CHIKV infection. Treatment with intravenous methylprednisolone was delayed while awaiting MRI scans and serology results. At 5-month follow-up, there was a persistent right RAPD and marked optic atrophy with a corresponding inferior scotoma in the visual field. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  18. Adherence to secondary prophylaxis and disease recurrence in 536 Brazilian children with rheumatic fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background More than 15 million people worldwide have rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease due to RF. Secondary prophylaxis is a critical cost-effective intervention for preventing morbidity and mortality related to RF. Ensuring adequate adherence to secondary prophylaxis for RF is a challenging task. This study aimed to describe the rates of recurrent episodes of RF, quantify adherence to secondary prophylaxis, and examine the effects of medication adherence to the rates of RF in a cohort of Brazilian children and adolescents with RF. Methods This retrospective study took place in the Pediatric Rheumatology outpatient clinic at a tertiary care hospital (Instituto de Puericultura e Pediatria Martagão Gesteira) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and included patients with a diagnosis of RF from 1985 to 2005. Results 536 patients with RF comprised the study sample. Recurrent episodes of RF occurred in 88 of 536 patients (16.5%). Patients with a recurrent episode of RF were younger (p < 0.0001), more frequently males (p = 0.003), and less adherent (p < 0.0001) to secondary prophylaxis than patients without RF recurrence. Non-adherence to medication at any time during follow-up was detected in 35% of patients. Rates of non-adherence were higher in the group of patients that were lost to follow-up (42%) than in the group of patients still in follow-up (32%) (p = 0.027). Appointment frequency was inadequate in 10% of patients. Higher rates of inadequate appointment frequency were observed among patients who were eventually lost to follow-up (14.5%) than in patients who were successfully followed-up (8%) (p = 0.022). 180 patients (33.5%) were lost to follow up at some point in time. Conclusions We recommend implementation of a registry, and a system of active search of missing patients in every service responsible for the follow-up of RF patients. Measures to increase adherence to secondary prophylaxis need to be implemented formally, once non-adherence to secondary

  19. Fever, jaundice and acute renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Sam M; Pathak, Neha; Toms, Graham C; Gelding, Susan V; Sivaprakasam, Venkat

    2015-02-01

    Leptospirosis is an uncommon infectious disease that has protean clinical manifestations ranging from an innocuous 'flu-like' illness to potentially life-threatening multi-organ failure. Here we describe a case of Weil's disease that presented on the acute medical take with fever, jaundice and acute renal failure. We highlight the importance of careful history taking at the time of admission and how understanding the epidemiology and pathophysiology of leptospirosis enables a definitive diagnosis to be reached. © 2015 Royal College of Physicians.

  20. Rheumatic fever recurrence prevention: a nurse-led programme of 28-day penicillin in an area of high endemnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinetto, Heather; Lennon, Diana; Horsburgh, Margaret

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate safety and effectiveness of 28-day long-acting penicillin to prevent recurrences of acute rheumatic fever (ARF).   Historical cohort study using the regional RF register for Auckland, New Zealand, in a 5-14-year-old population with ARF rates of ~40-80/100,000. Consented patients were referred to a population-based delivery programme of free benzathine penicillin every 28 days by community nurses with discharge after the longer of 10 years of treatment or aged 21 years. First-episode and recurrent ARF cases classified as definite (Jones criteria 1992) or probable (Jones criteria 1956) were the main outcome measures. Of the 360 cases meeting the case definitions, 20 recurrences occurred in 19 people (median age 21 years). The age at first episode was 2-52 years (mode 11 years), median age 21.3 (8-40). ARF recurred 0-21 years after penicillin was discontinued. Seventy-two per cent of recurrent cases occurred within 5 years, and 12% between 5 years and 10 years. The 4-weekly long-acting penicillin failure rate (n= 1) was 0.07/100 patient years. The programme failure rate (Auckland residents) was 1.4/100 patient years (n= 20). Patient non-adherence accounted for 55% of recurrences. Two recurrences after discharge from prophylaxis as per the New Zealand guidelines occurred 3 years and 13 years later. In this environment, 28-day long-acting penicillin prophylaxis for at least 10 years delivered by community nurses is safe and effective for patients with no or mild cardiac disease by auscultation at discharge off penicillin. Penicillin delivery every 21 days (as suggested by a recent Cochrane review) would add to costs and complexity. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2011 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  1. Acute rheumatic fever in adults | Whitelaw | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 78, No 9 (1990) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  2. Acute pancreatitis in dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simadibrata, Marcellus

    2012-01-01

    We reported a case of acute pancreatitis as the complication of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). This complication can cause more severe fatal condition, and difficulties in treatment, although it is rare. Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) is one of the endemic diseases and often come as an outbreak event in South East Asia including Indonesia. Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) is a global public health problem, because until now there has been no medicine to eradicate the dengue virus, no dengue vaccine and difficult to eradicate the mosquitoes as the contagious vector. Diagnosis and treatment of acute pancreatitis as early as possible is important to improve the patient's condition and survival. The patient was a 59 year old male and had been treated conservatively. The patient was admitted to the hospital, oral fasting until the fourth day, given parenteral nutrition, antibiotic and other intravenous medicines. Initial oral liquid diet was given on the fifth day of hospitalization and changed gradually according to the condition. The patient was then improved and discharged from the hospital.

  3. Rheumatic valvulitis – Forgotten, but not gone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Xu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute rheumatic fever is an exceedingly rare condition in the developed world. It is thought to have nearly disappeared in the United States. Through the case of a 41-year-old Caucasian female who presented with progressive dyspnea and symptoms of heart failure, due to subacute rheumatic valvulitis, the importance of multimodality cardiovascular imaging assessment of patients presenting with severe, multi-valvular dysfunction is highlighted. This case also serves as a powerful reminder for clinicians that rheumatic valvulitis should remain in the differential diagnoses for patients with otherwise unexplained severe, multi-valvular dysfunction.

  4. Sub-acute toxicity evaluation of ethanol extract of rheumatic tea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sub-acute toxicity profile of Rheumatic Tea Formula (RTF), a polyherbal tea consisting of Salix alba, Eucalyptus globulus and Albizia chevalieri was investigated in wistar rats of both sexes. Wistar rats were orally administered three different doses of ethanol extract of RTF for 28 days after which the effect on body weight, ...

  5. Rheumatic Fever Follow-Up Study (RhFFUS protocol: a cohort study investigating the significance of minor echocardiographic abnormalities in Aboriginal Australian and Torres Strait Islander children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rémond Marc Gerard Wootton

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Australia, rheumatic heart disease (RHD is almost exclusively restricted to Aboriginal Australian and Torres Strait Islander people with children being at highest risk. International criteria for echocardiographic diagnosis of RHD have been developed but the significance of minor heart valve abnormalities which do not reach these criteria remains unclear. The Rheumatic Fever Follow-Up Study (RhFFUS aims to clarify this question in children and adolescents at high risk of RHD. Methods/design RhFFUS is a cohort study of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children and adolescents aged 8–17 years residing in 32 remote Australian communities. Cases are people with non-specific heart valve abnormalities detected on prior screening echocardiography. Controls (two per case are age, gender, community and ethnicity-matched to cases and had a prior normal screening echocardiogram. Participants will have echocardiography about 3 years after initial screening echocardiogram and enhanced surveillance for any history suggestive of acute rheumatic fever (ARF. It will then be determined if cases are at higher risk of (1 ARF or (2 developing progressive echocardiography-detected valve changes consistent with RHD. The occurrence and timing of episodes of ARF will be assessed retrospectively for 5 years from the time of the RhFFUS echocardiogram. Episodes of ARF will be identified through regional surveillance and notification databases, carer/subject interviews, primary healthcare history reviews, and hospital separation diagnoses. Progression of valvular abnormalities will be assessed prospectively using transthoracic echocardiography and standardized operating and reporting procedures. Progression of valve lesions will be determined by specialist cardiologist readers who will assess the initial screening and subsequent RhFFUS screening echocardiogram for each participant. The readers will be blinded to the initial assessment and

  6. Elevated D8/17 expression on B lymphocytes, a marker of rheumatic fever, measured with flow cytometry in tic disorder patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, PJ; Bijzet, J; Limburg, PC; Steenhuis, MP; Troost, PW; Oosterhoff, MD; Korf, J; Kallenberg, CGM; Minderaa, RB

    Objective: Elevated D8/17 expression on B lymphocytes is a known susceptibility marker of rheumatic fever. Previous studies have reported higher than usual D8/ 17 expression on B lymphocytes of patients with tic disorders. The purpose of this study was to assess D8/17 expression on B lymphocytes of

  7. Dengue hemorrhagic fever and acute hepatitis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Paula Gomes Mourão

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is the world's most important viral hemorrhagic fever disease, the most geographically wide-spread of the arthropod-born viruses, and it causes a wide clinical spectrum of disease. We report a case of dengue hemorrhagic fever complicated by acute hepatitis. The initial picture of classical dengue fever was followed by painful liver enlargement, vomiting, hematemesis, epistaxis and diarrhea. Severe liver injury was detected by laboratory investigation, according to a syndromic surveillance protocol, expressed in a self-limiting pattern and the patient had a complete recovery. The serological tests for hepatitis and yellow fever viruses were negative. MAC-ELISA for dengue was positive.

  8. Dengue fever mimicking acute appendicitis: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, M E C; Plummer, J M; Leake, P A; Powell, L; Chand, V; Chung, S; Tulloch, K

    2013-01-01

    Dengue fever is an acute viral disease, which usually presents as a mild febrile illness. Patients with severe disease present with dengue haemorrhagic fever or dengue toxic shock syndrome. Rarely, it presents with abdominal symptoms mimicking acute appendicitis. We present a case of a male patient presenting with right iliac fossa pain and suspected acute appendicitis that was later diagnosed with dengue fever following a negative appendicectomy. A 13-year old male patient presented with fever, localized right-sided abdominal pain and vomiting. Abdominal ultrasound was not helpful and appendicectomy was performed due to worsening abdominal signs and an elevated temperature. A normal appendix with enlarged mesenteric nodes was found at surgery. Complete blood count showed thrombocytopenia with leucopenia. Dengue fever was now suspected and confirmed by IgM enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay against dengue virus. This unusual presentation of dengue fever mimicking acute appendicitis should be suspected during viral outbreaks and in patients with atypical symptoms and cytopenias on blood evaluation in order to prevent unnecessary surgery. This case highlights the occurrence of abdominal symptoms and complications that may accompany dengue fever. Early recognition of dengue fever mimicking acute appendicitis will avoid non-therapeutic operation and the diagnosis may be aided by blood investigations indicating a leucopenia, which is uncommon in patients with suppurative acute appendicitis. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Acute Macular Neuroretinopathy Associated With Chikungunya Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Claudine E; Navajas, Eduardo V; Warner, Simon J; Heisler, Morgan; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2016-06-01

    A 47-year-old man with recent travel to the Caribbean was admitted with acute febrileillness associated with arthralgia and skin rash followed by sudden onset of bilateral visual field defects. Funduscopy revealed subtle bilateral paracentral dark lesions nasal to the fovea best seen on near infrared imaging as hyporeflective, wedge-shaped, paracentral macular lesions. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) through the lesions revealed hyperreflective bands at the level of the outer plexiform layer and outer nuclear layer (ONL), with concomitant attenuation of the underlying external limiting membrane (ELM), ellipsoid zone (EZ), and interdigitation zone (IZ). Neither fluorescein angiography nor speckle variance OCT angiography (sv-OCTA) showed any defects in retinal circulation. Work up revealed positive Immunoglobulin M for Chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Six months later, the patient had persistent scotomas, although reduced in size. SD-OCT showed subtle ONL thinning and restoration of the ELM, although EZ and IZ remained disrupted. Chikungunya fever may manifest as bilateral acute macular neuroretinopathy (AMN). Clinicians should be aware of possible systemic associations of AMN. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:596-599.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Dengue fever associated with acute scrotal oedema: two case reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamim, M.; Naqvi, S.Z.G.

    2011-01-01

    Scrotal oedema associated with dengue fever is a rare and self limiting condition resolving in a few days without any complication or sequelae. This is a report of two cases of dengue fever associated with acute scrotal and penile oedema. (author)

  11. Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome With Valvular Vegetations in Acute Q Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Million, Matthieu; Thuny, Franck; Bardin, Nathalie; Angelakis, Emmanouil; Edouard, Sophie; Bessis, Simon; Guimard, Thomas; Weitten, Thierry; Martin-Barbaz, François; Texereau, Michèle; Ayouz, Khelifa; Protopopescu, Camelia; Carrieri, Patrizia; Habib, Gilbert; Raoult, Didier

    2016-03-01

    Coxiella burnetii endocarditis is considered to be a late complication of Q fever in patients with preexisting valvular heart disease (VHD). We observed a large transient aortic vegetation in a patient with acute Q fever and high levels of IgG anticardiolipin antibodies (IgG aCL). Therefore, we sought to determine how commonly acute Q fever could cause valvular vegetations associated with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, which would be a new clinical entity. We performed a consecutive case series between January 2007 and April 2014 at the French National Referral Center for Q fever. Age, sex, history of VHD, immunosuppression, and IgG aCL assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were tested as potential predictors. Of the 759 patients with acute Q fever and available echocardiographic results, 9 (1.2%) were considered to have acute Q fever endocarditis, none of whom had a previously known VHD. After multiple adjustment, very high IgG aCL levels (>100 immunoglobulin G-type phospholipid units; relative risk [RR], 24.9 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 4.5-140.2]; P = .002) and immunosuppression (RR, 10.1 [95% CI, 3.0-32.4]; P = .002) were independently associated with acute Q fever endocarditis. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome with valvular vegetations in acute Q fever is a new clinical entity. This would suggest the value of systematically testing for C. burnetii in antiphospholipid-associated cardiac valve disease, and performing early echocardiography and antiphospholipid dosages in patients with acute Q fever. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Streptococcal pharyngitis and rheumatic heart disease: the superantigen hypothesis revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Jacklyn R; Kasper, Katherine J; Sule, Akshay N; McCormick, John K

    2018-03-09

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a human-specific and globally prominent bacterial pathogen that despite causing numerous human infections, this bacterium is normally found in an asymptomatic carrier state. This review provides an overview of both bacterial and human factors that likely play an important role in nasopharyngeal colonization and pharyngitis, as well as the development of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease. Here we highlight a recently described role for bacterial superantigens in promoting acute nasopharyngeal infection, and discuss how these immune system activating toxins could be crucial to initiate the autoimmune process in rheumatic heart disease. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Comparison of mechanical and biological prostheses when used to replace heart valves in children and adolescents with rheumatic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travancas, Paulo R; Dorigo, Ana H; Simões, Luiz C; Fonseca, Sandra C; Bloch, Kátia V; Herdy, Gesmar V

    2009-04-01

    To assess the outcomes in children and adolescents with rheumatic fever of the implantation of mechanical as opposed to biological heart valves. We assessed 73 patients with rheumatic heart disease under the age of 18 years, who underwent replacement of heart valves between January, 1996, and December, 2005, at the National Institute of Cardiology in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Of the group, 71 patients survived, and were divided into a group of 52 receiving mechanical prostheses, and 19 with biological prostheses. We compared endpoints between the groups in terms of mortality, reoperation, haemorrhage, and stroke. Survival curves were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared by the Mantel (log-rank) test. Overall mortality was 8.2%. In those receiving mechanical prostheses, 2 (3.8%) patients died, 5 (9.6%) underwent reoperation, 2 (3.8%) suffered severe haemorrhage, and 3 (5.8%) had strokes. In those receiving biological valves, 2 (10.5%) patients died, and 4 (21%) underwent reoperation. After 2, 4, and 8 years, overall survival was 96%, 93% and 86%, respectively, with a borderline difference between the groups (p = 0.06). The probabilities of remaining free from reoperation (p = 0.13), and from combined endpoints, showed no statistically significant difference between the groups (p = 0.28). Patients with mechanical prostheses had lower mortality and required fewer reoperations, but when all combined endpoints were considered, the groups did not differ. The biological prosthesis proved to be a good option for cardiac surgery in children and adolescents with difficulties or risks of anticoagulation.

  14. Fever and acute phase reactants in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vugt, H.; van Gool, J.; Deutz, N. E.

    1988-01-01

    In rats synthesis of some acute phase reactants can be induced by a combination of corticosteroids and adrenaline. During fever both hormones show high plasma levels. We studied the effect of fever induced by intra-cerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of PGE2 on the acute phase response. Fever was continuously recorded and 24 h after induction acute phase reactant (APR) response was measured as indicated by the rise of alpha-macrofetoprotein (alpha M FP, alpha 2 macroglobulin of the rat). Controls received 0.9% saline i.c.v. Controls did not develop fever (dTmax less than or equal to 1 degree C) nor did they show significant APR response. The maximal rise in body temperature after PGE2 (2.6 +/- 0.7 degrees C) correlated significantly with the rise in alpha M FP concentration 24 h later. Adrenalectomy prevented the APR response completely but the magnitude of the fever reaction remained the same (2.1 +/- 0.3 degrees C). alpha-Blockade gave a smaller fever response but had no effect on the APR response. In alpha- and beta-blockade, fever response was normal but no APR response was obtained. Destroying the sympathetic nerve supply to the liver with 6-OH dopamine retarded the fever response but again APR response was not impeded. In order to differentiate between the role of fever as such and the effect of PGE2 on APR synthesis, we used heat exposure to induce hyperthermia in normal rats who showed an APR response comparable with that after i.c.v. PGE2. Pretreatment with sodium salicylate before inducing hyperthermia led to a variable rise in alpha M FP. Fever as such, without tissue injury, induces an APR response. The pathway to this effect probably involves circulating corticosterone and adrenaline, possibly via a beta-receptor mediated stimulation. PMID:2460123

  15. Acute renal failure likely due to acute nephritic syndrome associated with typhoid fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Manabu; Kouzu, Hideshi; Nishihara, Masahiro; Takahashi, Tohru; Furuhashi, Masato; Sakamoto, Ken-ichi; Satoh, Naotoshi; Nishitani, Takahiro; Shikano, Yasukuni

    2005-10-01

    A 45-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of high fever and malaise. She also presented abnormal urine findings including macrohematuria and proteinuria with transient renal insufficiency. Salmonella Typhi was isolated from her blood and stool culture, and then she was diagnosed as having typhoid fever. Salmonella enterica serotype typhi infection can be complicated by renal involvement, although rare. In Japan, few cases have been reported about acute nephritic syndrome in typhoid fever. Here, we report a case of endemic acquired typhoid fever associated with acute renal failure probably due to acute nephritic syndrome successfully treated with levofloxacin.

  16. Thrombosis and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome during acute Q fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Million, Matthieu; Bardin, Nathalie; Bessis, Simon; Nouiakh, Nadia; Douliery, Charlaine; Edouard, Sophie; Angelakis, Emmanouil; Bosseray, Annick; Epaulard, Olivier; Branger, Stéphanie; Chaudier, Bernard; Blanc-Laserre, Karine; Ferreira-Maldent, Nicole; Demonchy, Elisa; Roblot, France; Reynes, Jacques; Djossou, Felix; Protopopescu, Camelia; Carrieri, Patrizia; Camoin-Jau, Laurence; Mege, Jean-Louis; Raoult, Didier

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Q fever is a neglected and potentially fatal disease. During acute Q fever, antiphospholipid antibodies are very prevalent and have been associated with fever, thrombocytopenia, acquired heart valve disease, and progression to chronic endocarditis. However, thrombosis, the main clinical criterion of the 2006 updated classification of the antiphospholipid syndrome, has not been assessed in this context. To test whether thrombosis is associated with antiphospholipid antibodies and whether the criteria for antiphospholipid syndrome can be met in patients with acute Q fever, we conducted a cross-sectional study at the French National Referral Center for Q fever. Patients included were diagnosed with acute Q fever in our Center between January 2007 and December 2015. Each patient's history and clinical characteristics were recorded with a standardized questionnaire. Predictive factors associated with thrombosis were assessed using a rare events logistic regression model. IgG anticardiolipin antibodies (IgG aCL) assessed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were tested on the Q fever diagnostic serum. A dose-dependent relationship between IgG aCL levels and thrombosis was tested using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Of the 664 patients identified for inclusion in the study, 313 (47.1%) had positive IgG aCL and 13 (1.9%) were diagnosed with thrombosis. Three patients fulfilled the antiphospholipid syndrome criteria. After multiple adjustments, only positive IgG aCL (relative risk, 14.46 [1.85–113.14], P = .011) were independently associated with thrombosis. ROC analysis identified a dose-dependent relationship between IgG aCL levels and occurrence of thrombosis (area under curve, 0.83, 95%CI [0.73–0.93], P antiphospholipid antibodies are associated with thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, and acquired valvular heart disease. Antiphospholipid antibodies should be systematically assessed in acute Q fever patients. Hydroxychloroquine

  17. Long-term follow-up of acute Q fever patients after a large epidemic

    OpenAIRE

    Wielders, CCH

    2014-01-01

    Between 2007 and 2009, one of the largest Q fever epidemics documented worldwide occurred in the Netherlands. This epidemic originated from dairy goat farms and resulted in over 3,500 notified human acute Q fever cases. After an episode of acute Q fever, the causative bacterium Coxiella burnetii may persist intracellularly, causing progression to chronic disease in approximately 2% of patients with confirmed acute Q fever. Chronic Q fever mainly presents as endocarditis or vascular infections...

  18. Dengue fever presenting with acute cerebellitis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withana, Milinda; Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Chang, Thashi; Karunanayake, Panduka; Rajapakse, Senaka

    2014-03-05

    The incidence of dengue fever is on the rise in tropical countries. In Sri Lanka, nearly 45,000 patients were reported in 2012. With the increasing numbers, rare manifestations of dengue are occasionally encountered. We report a patient who presented with bilateral cerebellar signs as the presenting feature of dengue. A 45-year-old previously healthy female from the suburbs of Colombo, Sri Lanka presented with an acute febrile illness associated with unsteadiness of gait. Clinical examination revealed a scanning dysarthria and marked horizontal nystagmus with bilateral dysmetria, dysdiadokokinesia and incordination more prominent on the right. Her gait was wide-based and ataxic with a tendency to fall to the right more than to the left. Dengue nonstructural protein antigen 1 test and IgM antibody testing both became positive indicating acute dengue infection. She recovered from the febrile episode within 9 days since the onset of fever but cerebellar symptoms outlasted the fever by one week. The magnetic resonance imaging of brain was normal and cerebellar signs resolved spontaneously by day 17 of the illness. Cerebellar syndrome in association with dengue fever has been reported in only four instances and our patient is the first reported case of dengue fever presenting with cerebellitis as the first manifestation of disease. This case report is intended to highlight the occurrence of acute cerebellitis as a presenting syndrome of the expanding list of unusual neurological manifestations of dengue infection.

  19. Acute gingival bleeding as a complication of dengue hemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is mosquito borne disease caused by dengue virus (DENV of Flaviviridae family. The clinical manifestations range from fever to severe hemorrhage, shock and death. Here, we report a case of 20-year-old male patient undergoing orthodontic treatment presenting with acute gingival bleeding with a history of fever, weakness, backache, retro orbital pain and ecchymosis over his right arm. The hematological investigations revealed anemia, thrombocytopenia and positive dengue non-structural protein-1 antigen and also positive immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibodies for DENV. Patient was diagnosed as a case of dengue hemorrhagic fever and was immediately referred for appropriate management. This case report emphasizes the importance of taking correct and thorough medical history.

  20. A case of acute liver failure in dengue hemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rama Biswas

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is an arboviral disease endemic in many parts of the world. The clinical presentation of dengue viral infection ranges from asymptomatic illness to fatal dengue shock syndrome. Although, it is known to cause hepatic involvement, it occasionally results in acute hepatic failure. We report a case of dengue hemorrhagic fever presenting with acute liver failure. The case recovered completely after treatment. Ibrahim Med. Coll. J. 2013; 7(2: 41-42

  1. Brain MR spectroscopy in children with a history of rheumatic fever with a special emphasis on neuropsychiatric complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkan, Alpay; Kutlu, Ramazan; Kocak, Gulendam; Sigirci, Ahmet; Emul, Murat; Dogan, Selda; Aslan, Mehmet; Sarac, Kaya; Yakinci, Cengiz

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether there are metabolite changes in basal ganglia of children with complete healing of rheumatic fever (RF), history of Syndenham chorea (SC) and obsessive compulsive-tic disorder (OCTD) developed after RF when compared with healthy controls and each other. Material and methods: A total of 49 children with history of RF and 31 healthy controls were included into the study. All patients and control group underwent a detailed neuropsychiatric evaluation. Children with the history of RF were classified into three groups as; group 1: with history of RF without neuropsychiatric complications (NCRF), group 2: only with history of SC (HSC), group 3: with HSC and OCTD (OCTD). After MR imaging, single voxel MR spectroscopy was performed in all subjects. Voxels (15x15x15 mm) were placed in basal ganglia. N-acetyl aspartate (NAA)/creatin (Cr), and choline (Cho)/Cr ratios were calculated. Results: OCTD were detected in 13 children with HSC. NAA/Cr ratio was found to be decreased in these children when compared with NCRF (n:29), HSC without OCTD (n:7) and control groups (n:31). No significant difference was found in metabolite ratios of children with HSC without OCTD when compared with NCRF and control groups. There were no significant differences in Cho/Cr ratio between patient and control groups. Conclusion: Although MR imaging findings was normal, MR spectroscopy findings (decreased NAA/Cr ratio) in our study support the neuronal loss in basal ganglia of children with OCTD and could indicate the development of permanent damage

  2. An unusual cause of acute abdominal pain in dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waseem, Tariq; Latif, Hina; Shabbir, Bilquis

    2014-07-01

    Dengue fever is an acute febrile viral disease caused by the bite of Aedes aegypti mosquito. It is a major health problem especially in tropical and subtropical areas including South East Asia and Pakistan. In the past few years, dengue fever has been endemic in Northern Punjab. Physicians managing dengue fever come across varied and uncommon complications of dengue fever. We report a case of dengue fever that developed severe right upper quadrant abdominal pain and induration after extreme retching and vomiting for 2 days. A rectus sheath hematoma was confirmed on noncontrast computed tomography (CT). Rectus sheath hematoma as a complication of dengue fever has rarely been reported before and never from this part of the world. Rectus sheath hematoma is an uncommon and often clinically misdiagnosed cause of abdominal pain. It is the result of bleeding into the rectus sheath from damage to the superior or inferior epigastric artery or their branches or from a direct tear of the rectus muscle. It can mimic almost any abdominal condition (See Fig.) (See Table).

  3. Valvular aspects of rheumatic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remenyi, Boglarka; ElGuindy, Ahmed; Smith, Sidney C; Yacoub, Magdi; Holmes, David R

    2016-03-26

    Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease remain major global health problems. Although strategies for primary and secondary prevention are well established, their worldwide implementation is suboptimum. In patients with advanced valvular heart disease, mechanical approaches (both percutaneous and surgical) are well described and can, for selected patients, greatly improve outcomes; however, access to centres with experienced staff is very restricted in regions that have the highest prevalence of disease. Development of diagnostic strategies that can be locally and regionally provided and improve access to expert centres for more advanced disease are urgent and, as yet, unmet clinical needs. We outline current management strategies for valvular rheumatic heart disease on the basis of either strong evidence or expert consensus, and highlight areas needing future research and development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Differentiation of Acute Q Fever from Other Infections in Patients Presenting to Hospitals, the Netherlands(1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijmel, S.P.; Krijger, E.; Delsing, C.E.; Sprong, T.; Nabuurs-Franssen, M.H.; Bleeker-Rovers, C.P.

    2015-01-01

    Differentiating acute Q fever from infections caused by other pathogens is essential. We conducted a retrospective case-control study to evaluate differences in clinical signs, symptoms, and outcomes for 82 patients with acute Q fever and 52 control patients who had pneumonia, fever and lower

  5. Acute cholecystitis in a child with scarlet fever: A rare association ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Group A streptococcal infection is common in children; however, scarlet fever is now considered rare except for isolated outbreaks. One of the rarest complications of scarlet fever is acute cholecystitis – very few cases have been reported in the literature. A 5-year-old boy was admitted with scarlet fever complicated by acute ...

  6. Long-term follow-up of acute Q fever patients after a large epidemic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielders, CCH

    2014-01-01

    Between 2007 and 2009, one of the largest Q fever epidemics documented worldwide occurred in the Netherlands. This epidemic originated from dairy goat farms and resulted in over 3,500 notified human acute Q fever cases. After an episode of acute Q fever, the causative bacterium Coxiella burnetii may

  7. [Coexistence of acute appendicitis and dengue fever: A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuna-Ramos, Juan Fidel; Silva-Gracia, Carlos; Maya-Vacio, Gerardo Joel; Romero-Utrilla, Alejandra; Ríos-Burgueño, Efrén Rafael; Velarde-Félix, Jesús Salvador

    2017-12-01

    Dengue is the most important human viral disease transmitted by mosquitoes. It can be asymptomatic or it can present in any of its 3clinical forms: Dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. However, some atypical manifestations have been reported in surgical emergencies caused by acute appendicitis in patients with dengue fever. We report the case of an 18-year-old Mexican male who presented to the emergency department of the General Hospital of Culiacan, Sinaloa, with symptoms of dengue fever, accompanied by crampy abdominal pain with positive Rovsing and Dunphy signs. Dengue infection was confirmed by a positive NS1 antigen test performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. An abdominal ultrasound revealed an appendicular process; as the abdominal pain in the right side kept increasing, an open appendectomy was performed. Abundant inflammatory liquid was observed during the surgery, and the pathology laboratory reported an oedematous appendix with fibrinopurulent plaques, which agreed with acute ulcerative appendicitis. The patient was discharged fully recovered without complications during the follow-up period. Acute abdominal pain can be caused in some cases by dengue infection. This can be confusing, which can lead to unnecessary surgical interventions, creating additional morbidities and costs for the patient. This unusual and coincident acute appendicitis with dengue highlights the importance of performing careful clinical studies for appropriate decision making, especially in dengue endemic regions during an outbreak of this disease. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  8. Gene polymorphisms of TNF-α and IL-10 related to rheumatic heart ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Rheumatic fever (RF) is inherited as a single recessive gene. Several genes are Likely to predispose an individual to develop rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). Polymorphisms of TNF-α gene were associated with susceptibility to develop RF.T cells from all rheumatic fever patients produce ...

  9. Unusual Presentation of Dengue Fever; A child with acute myocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moaz Aslam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever (DF is an acute febrile illness that follows a self-limiting course. However, some patients suffer from complications, including myocarditis, due to the involvement of other organs. A child presented at the Aga Khan University Hospital in Karachi, Pakistan, in June 2013 with a high-grade fever, malaise and epigastric pain radiating to the chest. Positive DF antigen and immunoglobulin M assays confirmed the diagnosis of DF. Persistent bradycardia with low blood pressure led to further cardiac investigations which showed a decreased ejection fraction and raised serum cardiac enzymes, indicating myocardial damage. With supportive care and use of inotropes, the spontaneous normalisation of cardiac enzyme levels and ejection fraction was observed. The child was discharged five days after admission. This case highlights the importance of identifying myocarditis in DF patients suffering from cardiac symptoms that are not explained by other potential aetiologies. Awareness, early suspicion and supportive care are essential to ensure favourable outcomes.

  10. Bilateral acute visual loss from Rathke's cleft cyst apoplexy in a patient with dengue fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cláudia De Franco Suzuki

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic complications of optic pathway diseases are extremely rare causes of acute visual loss associated with dengue fever. In this paper we report a patient presenting with dengue fever and bilateral acute visual loss caused by chiasmal compression due to Rathke's cleft cyst apoplexy. Considering the importance of early diagnosis and treatment to visual recovery, apoplexy of sellar and suprasellar tumors should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with acute visual loss and dengue fever.

  11. Acute Q fever and the risk of developing endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Aspas, A; Collado-Pérez, C; Vela-Manzano, L; Fernández-Gutiérrez Del Álamo, C; Tinoco-Racero, I; Girón-González, J A

    2015-01-01

    Assess clinical and serological data as parameters indicative of a possible evolution to endocarditis after an episode of acute Q fever. Retrospective cohort study of evolution to endocarditis after an acute Q fever episode, analyzing the clinical and serological evolution and the antibiotic treatment administered. Eighty patients were recruited, 20% of whom had phase i IgG antibody levels ≥ 1:1024 in the first 3 months. Only 44% of the patients underwent antibiotherapy in the acute phase; only 2 patients underwent extended antibiotherapy. Fifteen percent of the patients underwent an echocardiogram. None of the patients had symptoms suggestive of chronic infection or progressed to endocarditis after a median follow-up of 100 months, regardless of the early increase in phase i IgG antibodies. The early increase in phase i IgG antibodies in asymptomatic patients is not associated with progression to endocarditis despite not undergoing prolonged antibiotic treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  12. Should acute Q-fever patients be screened for valvulopathy to prevent endocarditis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Lange, Marit M A; Gijsen, Laura E V; Wielders, Cornelia C H; van der Hoek, Wim; Scheepmaker, Arko; Schneeberger, Peter M

    2018-01-01

    Echocardiographic screening of acute Q-fever patients and antibiotic prophylaxis for patients with cardiac valvulopathy are considered an important approach to prevent chronic Q-fever-related endocarditis. During a large Q-fever epidemic in the Netherlands, routine screening echocardiography was

  13. The 2007-2010 Q fever epidemic in The Netherlands: characteristics of notified acute Q fever patients and the association with dairy goat farming.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, F.; Hoek, W. van der; Wijers, N.; Schimmer, B.; Rietveld, A.; Wijkmans, C.J.; Vellema, P.; Schneeberger, P.M.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the Q fever epidemic in the Netherlands with emphasis on the epidemiological characteristics of acute Q fever patients and the association with veterinary factors. Data from 3264 notifications for acute Q fever in the period from 2007 through 2009 were analysed. The patients most

  14. Frequency, Pattern and Management of Acute Abdomen in Dengue Fever in Karachi, Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Shamim

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the frequency, pattern and management of acute abdomen in patients with dengue fever. Methods: This descriptive case series is a prospective analysis of acute abdomen in dengue fever that was performed at three secondary care hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan from June 1, 2005 to December 31, 2008. The inclusion criterion was all patients with confirmed diagnosis of dengue fever. Patients with incomplete laboratory, ultrasound or histopathology data were excluded...

  15. Inflammatory status in patients with rheumatic mitral stenosis: Guilty before and after balloon mitral valvuloplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ahmed Abdel Rahman

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: Inflammatory pathogenesis of rheumatic fever, suggested by hsCRP, seems fixed both before, and after BMV. A basal increase in hsCRP before BMV is related to BMV success and an acute increase immediately after BMV seems related to trauma of balloon dilatations.

  16. Typhoid Fever Presenting With Acute Renal Failure And Hepatitis Simultaneously - A Rare Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajput R.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Typhoid fever is an important health problem worldwide but its incidence is more in developing countries. Hepatic involvement is common, but both hepatic and renal involvement is rare in typhoid fever. We report a case of typhoid fever presenting with hepatitis and acute renal failure. A 17 year old male presenting with fever and pain abdomen was found to have raised blood urea, creatinine, liver enzymes and bilirubin. Widal and typhidot (IgM,IgG test were positive. His symptoms subsided and deranged parameters resolved with treatment of typhoid fever.

  17. The spectrum of rheumatic in-patient diagnoses at a pediatric hospital in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migowa, Angela; Colmegna, Inés; Hitchon, Carol; Were, Eugene; Ng'ang'a, Evelyn; Ngwiri, Thomas; Wachira, John; Bernatsky, Sasha; Scuccimarri, Rosie

    2017-01-14

    Pediatric rheumatic diseases are chronic illnesses that can cause considerable disease burden to children and their families. There is limited epidemiologic data on these diseases in East Africa. The aim of this study was to assess the spectrum of pediatric rheumatic diagnoses in an in-patient setting and determine the accuracy of ICD-10 codes in identifying these conditions. Medical records from Gertrude's Children's Hospital in Kenya were reviewed for patients diagnosed with "diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue" as per ICD-10 diagnostic codes assigned at discharge between January and December 2011. Cases were classified as "rheumatic" or "non-rheumatic". Accuracy of the assigned ICD-10 code was ascertained. Death records were reviewed. Longitudinal follow-up of "rheumatic" cases was done by chart review up to March 2014. Twenty six patients were classified as having a "rheumatic" condition accounting for 0.32% of patients admitted. Of these, 11 (42.3%) had an acute inflammatory arthropathy, 6 (23.1%) had septic arthritis, 4 (15.4%) had Kawasaki disease, 2 (7.7%) had pyomyositis, and there was one case each of septic bursitis, rheumatic fever, and a non-specific soft tissue disorder. No cases of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) were identified. One case of systemic lupus erythematosus was documented by death records. The agreement between the treating physician's discharge diagnosis and medical records ICD-10 code assignment was good (Kappa: 0.769). On follow-up, one child had recurrent knee swelling that was suspicious for JIA. Pediatric rheumatic conditions represented 0.32% of admissions at a pediatric hospital in Kenya. Acute inflammatory arthropathies, septic arthritis and Kawasaki disease were the most frequent in-patient rheumatic diagnoses. Chronic pediatric rheumatic diseases were rare amongst this in-patient population. Despite limitations associated with the use of administrative diagnostic codes, they can be a first step in

  18. Effect of high dose of steroid on plateletcount in acute stage of dengue Fever with thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashidhara, K C; Murthy, K A Sudharshan; Gowdappa, H Basavana; Bhograj, Abhijith

    2013-07-01

    Dengue infection is the most rapidly spreading mosquito-borne viral disease in the world and an estimated 50 million dengue infections reported annually. The pathogenesis of Thrombocytopenia in dengue fever (DF) is not clearly understood. Increased peripheral destruction of antibody coated platelets and acute bone marrow suppression were strongly suspected as the possible mechanism. This often leads to life threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and Dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Steroids are used in the treatment of Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura to increase the platelet count which is mediated by auto antibodies .This hypothesis would support the use of steroids in dengue fever. The objective of this study was to test whether an intravenous high dose dexamethasone was efficacious in increasing the platelet count in acute stage of dengue fever with thrombocytopenia. During the study period between June 2010 - 2011 in JSS Hospital Mysore, 127 patients were screened for dengue fever with thrombocytopenia (dengue fever.

  19. Massive Retinal Pigment Epithelial Detachment Following Acute Hypokalemic Quadriparesis in Dengue Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Neha; Bhambhwani, Vishaal; Jain, Pooja; Ghosh, Basudeb

    2016-01-01

    To describe an unusual retinal manifestation of dengue fever in an endemic region. A 35 year old male presenting with acute onset decreased vision in his right eye, was found to have a massive retinal pigment epithelial detachment (PED) extending up to the vascular arcades. He had been diagnosed with acute hypokalemic quadriparesis in dengue fever in the preceding week, which had resolved following treatment. The patient was managed conservatively. At three months follow up, there was spontaneous flattening of the PEDs with improvement in visual acuity. Dengue fever complicated by acute hypokalemic quadriparesis can be associated with PED, which can be large. The condition resolves spontaneously and bears a good prognosis.

  20. Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever as causes of acute undifferentiated febrile illness in Bulgaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christova, Iva; Younan, Rasha; Taseva, Evgenia; Gladnishka, Teodora; Trifonova, Iva; Ivanova, Vladislava; Spik, Kristin; Schmaljohn, Connie; Mohareb, Emad

    2013-03-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) are the 2 widespread viral hemorrhagic fevers occurring in Europe. HFRS is distributed throughout Europe, and CCHF has been reported mainly on the Balkan Peninsula and Russia. Both hemorrhagic fevers are endemic in Bulgaria. We investigated to what extent acute undifferentiated febrile illness in Bulgaria could be due to hantaviruses or to CCHF virus. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), we tested serum samples from 527 patients with acute febrile illness for antibodies against hantaviruses and CCHF virus. Immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies against hantaviruses were detected in 15 (2.8%) of the patients. Of the 15 hantavirus-positive patients, 8 (1.5%) were positive for Dobrava virus (DOBV), 5 (0.9%) were positive for Puumala virus (PUUV), and the remaining 2 were positive for both hantaviruses. A plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) confirmed 4 of the 10 DOBV-positive samples. PRNT was negative for all PUUV-positive samples. Serologic evidence of recent CCHF virus infection was found in 13 (2.5%) of the patients. Interestingly, HFRS and CCHF were not only detected in well-known endemic areas of Bulgaria but also in nonendemic regions. Our results suggested that in endemic countries, CCHF and/or HFRS might appear as a nonspecific febrile illness in a certain proportion of patients. Physicians must be aware of possible viral hemorrhagic fever cases, even if hemorrhages or renal impairment are not manifested.

  1. Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ear infections , sinus infections , mononucleosis , bronchitis , pneumonia , and tuberculosis Urinary tract infections Viral gastroenteritis and bacterial gastroenteritis Children may have a low-grade fever for 1 ...

  2. Long-Term Serological Follow-Up of Acute Q-Fever Patients after a Large Epidemic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielders, C.C.; Loenhout, J.A.F. van; Morroy, G.; Rietveld, A; Notermans, D.W.; Wever, P.C.; Renders, N.H.; Leenders, A.C.; Hoek, W. van der; Schneeberger, P.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Serological follow-up of acute Q-fever patients is important for detection of chronic infection but there is no consensus on its frequency and duration. The 2007-2009 Q-fever epidemic in the Netherlands allowed for long-term follow-up of a large cohort of acute Q-fever patients. The aim

  3. First Identification and Description of Rickettsioses and Q Fever as Causes of Acute Febrile Illness in Nicaragua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reller, Megan E; Chikeka, Ijeuru; Miles, Jeremy J; Dumler, J Stephen; Woods, Christopher W; Mayorga, Orlando; Matute, Armando J

    2016-12-01

    Rickettsial infections and Q fever present similarly to other acute febrile illnesses, but are infrequently diagnosed because of limited diagnostic tools. Despite sporadic reports, rickettsial infections and Q fever have not been prospectively studied in Central America. We enrolled consecutive patients presenting with undifferentiated fever in western Nicaragua and collected epidemiologic and clinical data and acute and convalescent sera. We used ELISA for screening and paired sera to confirm acute (≥4-fold rise in titer) spotted fever and typhus group rickettsial infections and Q fever as well as past (stable titer) infections. Characteristics associated with both acute and past infection were assessed. We enrolled 825 patients and identified acute rickettsial infections and acute Q fever in 0.9% and 1.3%, respectively. Clinical features were non-specific and neither rickettsial infections nor Q fever were considered or treated. Further study is warranted to define the burden of these infections in Central America.

  4. Frequency, pattern and management of acute abdomen in dengue fever in Karachi, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamim, Muhammad

    2010-07-01

    This study aimed to determine the frequency, pattern and management of acute abdomen in patients with dengue fever. This descriptive case series is a prospective analysis of acute abdomen in dengue fever that was performed at three secondary care hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan from June 1, 2005 to December 31, 2008. The inclusion criterion was all patients with confirmed diagnosis of dengue fever. Patients with incomplete laboratory, ultrasound or histopathology data were excluded. Among 357 patients with dengue fever, 43 (12.04%) had acute abdomen. There were 15 men and 28 women, with a median age of 29 years. These included 26 cases of acute cholecystitis, 7 cases of acute appendicitis, 7 cases of nonspecific peritonitis, and 3 cases of acute pancreatitis. Dengue hemorrhagic fever/shock syndrome was found in acute pancreatitis, and two of these patients died. Emergency surgery was required in eight patients (5 appendectomy and 3 open cholecystectomy). Substantial transfusion of blood and its components was required in eight patients who underwent emergency surgery. Early diagnosis and prompt conservative management of dengue acute abdomen is necessary to avoid mortality and emergency surgery-related morbidity. However, if needed, surgery can be performed with acceptable morbidity. Copyright © 2010 Asian Surgical Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Prevalence of Rheumatic Heart Disease in a Public School of Belo Horizonte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Lavinia Pimentel, E-mail: lavinia.pimentel@globo.com; Camargos, Paulo Augusto Moreira; Torres, Rosália Morais; Meira, Zilda Maria Alves [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Previous studies indicate that compared with physical examination, Doppler echocardiography identifies a larger number of cases of rheumatic heart disease in apparently healthy individuals. To determine the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease among students in a public school of Belo Horizonte by clinical evaluation and Doppler echocardiography. This was a cross-sectional study conducted with 267 randomly selected school students aged between 6 and 16 years. students underwent anamnesis and physical examination with the purpose of establishing criteria for the diagnosis of rheumatic fever. They were all subjected to Doppler echocardiography using a portable machine. Those who exhibited nonphysiological mitral regurgitation (MR) and/or aortic regurgitation (AR) were referred to the Doppler echocardiography laboratory of the Hospital das Clínicas of the Universidade Federal of Minas Gerais (HC-UFMG) to undergo a second Doppler echocardiography examination. According to the findings, the cases of rheumatic heart disease were classified as definitive, probable, or possible. Of the 267 students, 1 (0.37%) had a clinical history compatible with the diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and portable Doppler echocardiography indicated nonphysiological MR and/or AR in 25 (9.4%). Of these, 16 (6%) underwent Doppler echocardiography at HC-UFMG. The results showed definitive rheumatic heart disease in 1 student, probable rheumatic heart disease in 3 students, and possible rheumatic heart disease in 1 student. In the population under study, the prevalence of cases compatible with rheumatic involvement was 5 times higher on Doppler echocardiography (18.7/1000; 95% CI 6.9/1000-41.0/1000) than on clinical evaluation (3.7/1000-95% CI)

  6. Prevalence of Rheumatic Heart Disease in a Public School of Belo Horizonte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Lavinia Pimentel; Camargos, Paulo Augusto Moreira; Torres, Rosália Morais; Meira, Zilda Maria Alves

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that compared with physical examination, Doppler echocardiography identifies a larger number of cases of rheumatic heart disease in apparently healthy individuals. To determine the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease among students in a public school of Belo Horizonte by clinical evaluation and Doppler echocardiography. This was a cross-sectional study conducted with 267 randomly selected school students aged between 6 and 16 years. students underwent anamnesis and physical examination with the purpose of establishing criteria for the diagnosis of rheumatic fever. They were all subjected to Doppler echocardiography using a portable machine. Those who exhibited nonphysiological mitral regurgitation (MR) and/or aortic regurgitation (AR) were referred to the Doppler echocardiography laboratory of the Hospital das Clínicas of the Universidade Federal of Minas Gerais (HC-UFMG) to undergo a second Doppler echocardiography examination. According to the findings, the cases of rheumatic heart disease were classified as definitive, probable, or possible. Of the 267 students, 1 (0.37%) had a clinical history compatible with the diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and portable Doppler echocardiography indicated nonphysiological MR and/or AR in 25 (9.4%). Of these, 16 (6%) underwent Doppler echocardiography at HC-UFMG. The results showed definitive rheumatic heart disease in 1 student, probable rheumatic heart disease in 3 students, and possible rheumatic heart disease in 1 student. In the population under study, the prevalence of cases compatible with rheumatic involvement was 5 times higher on Doppler echocardiography (18.7/1000; 95% CI 6.9/1000-41.0/1000) than on clinical evaluation (3.7/1000-95% CI)

  7. The changing spectrum of rheumatic mitral regurgitation in Soweto, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meel, Ruchika; Peters, Ferande; Libhaber, Elena; Essop, Mohammed Rafique

    To determine the clinical and echocardiographic characteristics of contemporary patients with rheumatic mitral regurgitation (MR) at Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital. This prospective, cross-sectional study included 84 patients with isolated moderate or severe rheumatic MR who underwent clinical and echocardiographic assessment. Mean age of the patients was 44 ± 15.3 years (84% females). Acute rheumatic fever was rare. Hypertension and HIV were present in 52 and 26%, respectively. Echocardiography showed leaflet thickening and calcification, restricted motion and subvalvular disease in 41, 25 and 34%, respectively. Carpentier IIIa leaflet dysfunction occurred in 80% of patients and leaflet prolapse was seen in only 20%. These findings contrast with the previous literature, where patients were younger, they had rheumatic carditis and there were no co-morbidities. Leaflets were pliable, isolated leaflet prolapse was common and commissural fusion was absent. Contemporary patients with rheumatic MR were older, fewer had rheumatic fever and there were more co-morbidities. Echocardiographic features had evolved to greater leaflet thickening, calcification and reduced motion with minimal prolapse. These findings may have important implications for surgical management of this disease.

  8. Dengue as a cause of acute undifferentiated fever in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phuong, Hoang Lan; de Vries, Peter J.; Nga, Tran T. T.; Giao, Phan T.; Hung, Le Q.; Binh, Tran Q.; Nam, Nguyen V.; Nagelkerke, Nico; Kager, Piet A.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dengue is a common cause of fever in the tropics but its contribution to the total burden of febrile illnesses that is presented to primary health facilities in endemic regions such as Vietnam, is largely unknown. We aimed to report the frequency of dengue as a cause of fever in Binh

  9. Dengue as a cause of acute undifferentiated fever in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phuong, H.L.; de Vries, P.J.; Nga, T.T.T.; Giao, P.T.; Hung, L.Q.; Binh, T.Q.; Nam, N.V.; Nagelkerke, N.; Kager, P.A.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Dengue is a common cause of fever in the tropics but its contribution to the total burden of febrile illnesses that is presented to primary health facilities in endemic regions such as Vietnam, is largely unknown. We aimed to report the frequency of dengue as a cause of fever in Binh

  10. Parameters indicative of persistence of valvular pathology at initial diagnosis in acute rheumatic carditis: the role of albumin and CD19 expression

    OpenAIRE

    Oner, Taliha; Ozdemir, Rahmi; Genc, Dildar Bahar; Kucuk, Mehmet; Karadeniz, Cem; Demirpence, Savas; Yilmazer, Murat Muhtar; Mese, Timur; Tavli, Vedide; Genel, Ferah

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of this study is to define the predictors of chronic carditis in patients with acute rheumatic carditis (ARC). Methods: Patients diagnosed with ARC between May 2010 and May 2011 were included in the study. Echocardiography, electrocardiography, lymphocyte subset analysis, acute phase reactants, plasma albumin levels, and antistreptolysin-O (ASO) tests were performed at initial presentation. The echocardiographic assessments were repeated at the sixth month of fol...

  11. Qualidade de vida de crianças e adolescentes portadores de febre reumática Quality of life of children and adolescents with rheumatic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia F. C. Carvalho

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a qualidade de vida de portadores de febre reumática em acompanhamento ambulatorial em dois hospitais. MÉTODOS: Estudo seccional utilizando o Questionário de Saúde da Criança (Child Health Questionnaire, CHQ aplicado aos pais de 133 pacientes com febre reumática, com idade entre 5 e 18 anos. Foram calculados os escores das diferentes dimensões do questionário e comparados nas categorias de variáveis clínicas e sociodemográficas, utilizando-se teste não paramétrico. RESULTADOS: A idade dos pacientes variou de 5 a 18 anos, com média de 12 e desvio padrão de 2,8. A forma de apresentação mais comum da doença foi a articular associada à cardíaca, presente em 74 casos (56,1%. A maioria das famílias pertencia à classe média baixa/pobre. Os seguintes parâmetros do questionário tiveram melhor performance: função física; atividade física social; aspectos sociais, emocionais e comportamentais na vida diária; dor corporal; e atividades familiares. Os itens com pior performance foram: coesão familiar; saúde geral; comportamento global; e impacto emocional nos pais. As meninas apresentaram melhor desempenho para: autoestima; aspectos sociais, emocionais e comportamentais; e saúde geral. A classe social B apresentou melhor performance para: saúde mental; função física; atividade física social; e atividades familiares. A classe social D/E, para dor corporal e aspectos socioemocionais. CONCLUSÕES: A qualidade de vida observada foi semelhante à de outras doenças crônicas estudadas, com resultado da performance nos diferentes parâmetros com valores intermediários, tanto no domínio físico como no domínio psicossocial. A classe social foi a variável que se associou a um maior número de componentes do CHQ.OBJECTIVE: To assess the quality of life of patients with rheumatic fever receiving outpatient treatment at two hospitals. METHODS: Cross-sectional study using the Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ

  12. Thrombosis and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome during acute Q fever: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Million, Matthieu; Bardin, Nathalie; Bessis, Simon; Nouiakh, Nadia; Douliery, Charlaine; Edouard, Sophie; Angelakis, Emmanouil; Bosseray, Annick; Epaulard, Olivier; Branger, Stéphanie; Chaudier, Bernard; Blanc-Laserre, Karine; Ferreira-Maldent, Nicole; Demonchy, Elisa; Roblot, France; Reynes, Jacques; Djossou, Felix; Protopopescu, Camelia; Carrieri, Patrizia; Camoin-Jau, Laurence; Mege, Jean-Louis; Raoult, Didier

    2017-07-01

    Q fever is a neglected and potentially fatal disease. During acute Q fever, antiphospholipid antibodies are very prevalent and have been associated with fever, thrombocytopenia, acquired heart valve disease, and progression to chronic endocarditis. However, thrombosis, the main clinical criterion of the 2006 updated classification of the antiphospholipid syndrome, has not been assessed in this context. To test whether thrombosis is associated with antiphospholipid antibodies and whether the criteria for antiphospholipid syndrome can be met in patients with acute Q fever, we conducted a cross-sectional study at the French National Referral Center for Q fever.Patients included were diagnosed with acute Q fever in our Center between January 2007 and December 2015. Each patient's history and clinical characteristics were recorded with a standardized questionnaire. Predictive factors associated with thrombosis were assessed using a rare events logistic regression model. IgG anticardiolipin antibodies (IgG aCL) assessed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were tested on the Q fever diagnostic serum. A dose-dependent relationship between IgG aCL levels and thrombosis was tested using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis.Of the 664 patients identified for inclusion in the study, 313 (47.1%) had positive IgG aCL and 13 (1.9%) were diagnosed with thrombosis. Three patients fulfilled the antiphospholipid syndrome criteria. After multiple adjustments, only positive IgG aCL (relative risk, 14.46 [1.85-113.14], P = .011) were independently associated with thrombosis. ROC analysis identified a dose-dependent relationship between IgG aCL levels and occurrence of thrombosis (area under curve, 0.83, 95%CI [0.73-0.93], P antiphospholipid antibodies are associated with thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, and acquired valvular heart disease. Antiphospholipid antibodies should be systematically assessed in acute Q fever patients. Hydroxychloroquine, which has been

  13. Acute Compressive Ulnar Neuropathy in a Patient of Dengue Fever: An Unusual Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K Mehtani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dengue haemorrhagic fever is known for its haemorrhagic and neurologic complications. Neurologic complications are caused by three mechanism namely neurotropism, systemic complications causing encephalopathy and postinfectious immune-mediated mechanisms. However acute compressive neuropathy due to haemorrhage is not frequent and we could find no literature describing this Case Report: We report a case of acute compressive ulnar neuropathy due to peri neural hematoma, following an attempt at intravenous cannulation in the cubital fossa in a patient of dengue haemorrhagic fever with thrombocytopenia. Immediate fasciotomy and removal of haematoma was performed to relieve the symptoms. Conclusion: Compression neuropathies can be seen in dengue hemorrhagic fever and removal of compressing hematoma relieves symptoms. Keywords: Dengue haemmorrhagic fever; coagulopathy; peri neural haematoma.

  14. Clinical aspects of rheumatic diseases in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saenger, L.

    1978-01-01

    Rheumatic fever is no longer the most problematic of rheumatic diseases as it poses some diagnostic, but no radiological problems. The most problematic are chronic inflammatory processes of the joints. Here, the fate in life of the child patients does indeed depend upon an exact diagnosis. (orig./AJ) [de

  15. Guidelines for the secondary prevention of rheumatic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrazaq Al-Jazairi

    2017-03-01

    Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease can be prevented with appropriate antibiotics administration to prevent the progression of valve damage. The current use of primary and secondary prevention antibiotics in Saudi Arabia is not known. Therefore, this clinical practice guideline is developed, based on the best available evidence, to promote appropriate antibiotics secondary prophylaxis use for prevention of rheumatic heart disease.

  16. Estudo comparativo das avaliações clínica e ecocardiográfica Doppler na evolução das lesões valvares em crianças e adolescentes portadores de febre reumática Comparative study of clinical and Doppler echocardiographic evaluations of the progression of valve diseases in children and adolescents with rheumatic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zilda Maria Alves Meira

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar os exames clínico e ecocardiográfico Doppler na avaliação das lesões valvares em crianças e adolescentes com febre reumática, bem como investigar a evolução da doença segundo essas avaliações. MÉTODOS: Trata-se de estudo observacional longitudinal que englobou 258 crianças e adolescentes com diagnóstico de febre reumática, baseado nos critérios de Jones. Os pacientes foram acompanhados durante o período de 2 a 15 anos. A presença e a quantificação das lesões valvares nas fases aguda e crônica foram determinadas pelas avaliações clínica e ecocardiográfica Doppler. Utilizou-se a estatística de Kappa para estimar a concordância entre as avaliações, e as evoluções clínica e ecocardiográfica Doppler da cardite e valvite, respectivamente, foram comparadas pelo teste do qui-quadrado ou de Fisher, p OBJECTIVE: Compare clinical and Doppler echocardiographic evaluations in assessing valvular diseases in children and adolescents with rheumatic fever, as well as assess the progression of the disease in light of these assessments. METHODS: This is a longitudinal study of 258 children and adolescents diagnosed with rheumatic fever according to Jones’ criteria. The follow-up period ranged from 2-15 years. The presence and quantification of valve diseases were determined by means of clinical and Doppler echocardiographic evaluations performed during the acute and chronic phases. The Kappa statististics method was used to estimate the degree of agreement between clinical and Doppler echocardiographic evaluations. Comparisons between clinical and Doppler echocardiographic findings on the progress of carditis and valvulitis, respectively, were made using chi-square test or Fisher’s exact test, p< 0.05. RESULTS: Of the 109 patients who underwent Doppler echocardiographic evaluation during the acute phase, 31 did not present clinical evidence of carditis, but the Doppler echocardiograms of 17 (54.8% of them

  17. [Symptomatic acute Q fever: a series of 87 cases in an area of Mallorca].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raya Cruz, Manuel; Gállego Lezaún, Cristina; García Gasalla, Mercedes; Cifuentes Luna, Carmen; Forteza Forteza, Teodoro; Fernández-Baca, Victoria; Gallegos Álvarez, Carmen; Payeras Cifre, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    Q fever is a widespread zoonotic infection caused by Coxiella burnetii (C. burnetii). Acute infection varies from a self-limited flu-like illness to pneumonia or hepatitis. A retrospective case study from March 2003 to December 2011 was conducted in the Hospital Son Llàtzer in Palma de Mallorca. Acute Q-fever was diagnosed in a patient with clinical suspicion and IgM in phase ii positive (≥ 1/40), with a positive IgG (≥1/80), or when IgG seroconversion was observed during convalescence. A total of 87 cases of acute Q fever were diagnosed. The median age was 50 years (range 21-89), and 69 (79.3%) were male. Fever and headache were the most common symptoms. Pneumonia was diagnosed in 39 (44.8%) patients, febrile episode in 21 (24.1%), and acute hepatitis in 23 (25.6%). Increased serum transaminases were observed in 19 (21.8%). Doxycycline was prescribed in 29 cases (33.4%). There were 30 (34.5%) patients lost to follow up after hospital discharge. A favorable outcome was observed in all other cases. Only one new case progressed to chronic Q fever. A total of 87 cases of acute Q fever were diagnosed. The median age was 50 years (range 21-89), and 69 (79.3%) were male. Fever and headache were the most common symptoms. Pneumonia was diagnosed in 39 (44.8%) patients, febrile episode in 21 (24.1%), and acute hepatitis in 23 (25.6%). Increased serum transaminases were observed in 19 (21.8%). Doxycycline was prescribed in 29 cases (33.4%). There were 30 (34.5%) patients lost to follow up after hospital discharge. A favorable outcome was observed in all other cases. Only one new case progressed to chronic Q fever. Acute Q fever acute is common our environment. Pneumonia was the most common clinical presentation. Even although doxycycline was prescribed in a small number of patients, a favorable outcome was observed in all cases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  18. Typhoid fever as a triggering factor in acute and intractable bronchial asthma attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardhana; Surachmanto, Eko E; Datau, E A

    2013-10-01

    Typhoid fever is an enteric infection caused by Salmonella typhi. In Indonesia, typhoid fever is endemic with high incidence of the disease. In daily practice we frequently have patients with bronchial asthma, and it is becoming worse when these patients get typhoid fever. After oral ingestion, Salmonella typhi invades the the intestine mucosa after conducted by microbial binding to epithelial cells, destroying the microfold cells (M cell) then passed through the lamina propria and detected by dendritic cells (DC) which express a variety of pathogen recognition receptors on the surfaces, including Toll-Like Receptor (TLR). expressed on macrophages and on intestinal epithelial cells inducing degradation of IB, and translocation of NF-B (Nuclear Factor-Kappa Beta). This process initiates the induction of pro-inflammatory gene expression profile adhesion molecules, chemokines, adhesion molecules, and other proteins that induce and perpetuate the inflammation in host cells then will induce acute ant intractable attack of bronchial asthma. The role of typhoid fever in bronchial asthma, especially in persons with acute attack of bronchial asthma, is not well understood. In this article, we will discuss the role of typhoid fever in the bronchial asthma patients which may cause bronchial asthma significantly become more severe even triggering the acute and intractable attack of bronchial asthma. This fact makes an important point, to treat completely the typhoid fever in patients with bronchial asthma.

  19. Management of acute fever in children: Guideline for community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fever is a normal physiological response to illness that facilitates and accelerates recovery. Although it is often associated with a self-limiting viral infection in children, it may also be a presenting symptom of more serious conditions requiring urgent medical care. Therefore, it is essential to distinguish between a child with ...

  20. Antibiotic therapy for acute Q fever in The Netherlands in 2007 and 2008 and its relation to hospitalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, F.; Riphagen-Dalhuisen, J.; Wijers, N.; Hak, E.; van der Sande, M. A. B.; Morroy, G.; Schneeberger, P. M.; Schimmer, B.; Notermans, D. W.; van der Hoek, W.

    Data about the effectiveness of different antibiotic regimens for the treatment of acute Q fever from clinical studies is scarce. We analysed the antibiotic treatment regimens of acute Q fever patients in 2007 and 2008 in The Netherlands and assessed whether hospitalization after a minimum of 2 days

  1. Fibroblastic rheumatism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Ranjan Parida

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblastic rheumatism (FR is a rare dermoarthopathy reported from different parts of the world since 1980. Although the exact cause is unknown, few reports implicate infection may be a triggering event. Patients usually present with multiple skin nodules and polyarthropathy with progressive skin contractures. Laboratory parameters including acute phase reactants are usually normal. The confirmatory diagnosis is based on histopathologic study of skin nodules, which demonstrate fibroblastic proliferation, thickened collagen fibers, dermal fibrosis, and decreased number of elastic fibers. Immunoreactivity for b-catenin, smooth muscle actin, and the monoclonal antibody HHF35 show myofibroblastic differentiation. Treatments with oral prednisolone and other disease-modifying drugs such as methotrexate, infliximab, and interferon have been tried with variable success. In general, skin lesions respond more aptly than joint symptoms indicating that skin fibroblast is more amenable to treatment than synovial fibroblasts. Awareness regarding this orphan disease among clinicians and pathologists will help in more reporting of such cases and finding out optimal treatment regimen.

  2. Acute Inhalation Exposure to Titanium Ethanolate as a Possible Cause of Metal Fume Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ahmadimanesh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Occupational inhalation exposure to noxious agents is not uncommon. Herein, we present a 26-year-old male student who had accidental acute inhalation exposure to a large quantity of titanium ethanolate and hydrogen chloride in chemistry lab. He was referred to the emergency department of our hospital with low-grade fever, dyspnea, headache, fatigue and myalgia. After 24 hrs of symptomatic treatment (oxygen therapy and acetaminophen, the fever was subsided and the patient discharged home in a good clinical condition. The presented symptoms could be interpreted as a form of metal fume fever. It can therefore be concluded that organo-metallic compound of titanium metal may have the potential to produce metal fume fever in human.

  3. Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Cases in the Country of Georgia: Acute Febrile Illness Surveillance Study Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchuloria, Tinatin; Imnadze, Paata; Chokheli, Maiko; Tsertsvadze, Tengiz; Endeladze, Marina; Mshvidobadze, Ketevan; Clark, Danielle V.; Bautista, Christian T.; Fadeel, Moustafa Abdel; Pimentel, Guillermo; House, Brent; Hepburn, Matthew J.; Wölfel, Silke; Wölfel, Roman; Rivard, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Minimal information is available on the incidence of Crimean–Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus and hantavirus infections in Georgia. From 2008 to 2011, 537 patients with fever ≥ 38°C for ≥ 48 hours without a diagnosis were enrolled into a sentinel surveillance study to investigate the incidence of nine pathogens, including CCHF virus and hantavirus. Of 14 patients with a hemorrhagic fever syndrome, 3 patients tested positive for CCHF virus immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies. Two of the patients enrolled in the study had acute renal failure. These 2 of 537 enrolled patients were the only patients in the study positive for hantavirus IgM antibodies. These results suggest that CCHF virus and hantavirus are contributing causes of acute febrile syndromes of infectious origin in Georgia. These findings support introduction of critical diagnostic approaches and confirm the need for additional surveillance in Georgia. PMID:24891463

  4. Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Infants and Children Chest Pain, Acute Chest Pain, Chronic Cold and Flu Cough Diarrhea Ear Problems Elimination Problems Elimination Problems in Infants and Children Eye Problems Facial Swelling Feeding Problems in Infants ...

  5. Acute Tetraplegia Caused by Rat Bite Fever in Snake Keeper and Transmission of Streptobacillus moniliformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Tobias; Poignant, Simon; Jouan, Youenn; Fawzy, Ahmad; Nicklas, Werner; Ewers, Christa; Mereghetti, Laurent; Guillon, Antoine

    2017-04-01

    We report acute tetraplegia caused by rat bite fever in a 59-year old man (snake keeper) and transmission of Streptobacillus moniliformis. We found an identical characteristic bacterial pattern in rat and human samples, which validated genotyping-based evidence for infection with the same strain, and identified diagnostic difficulties concerning infection with this microorganism.

  6. Acute undifferentiated fever in Binh Thuan province, Vietnam: imprecise clinical diagnosis and irrational pharmaco-therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phuong, Hoang L.; de Vries, Peter J.; Nagelkerke, Nico; Giao, Phan T.; Hung, Le Q.; Binh, Tran Q.; Nga, Tran T. Thanh; Nam, Nguyen V.; Kager, Piet A.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the characteristics of patients consulting commune primary healthcare posts for acute undifferentiated fever not being malaria (AUF), and to explore the diagnostic and therapeutic responses of the healthcare workers. METHODS: All patients presenting with AUF at 12 commune

  7. Disturbance of intracardiac hemodynamics in children with chronic rheumatic cardiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondratiev V.A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available By means of Doppler echocardiography there have been studied disturbances of intracardiac hemodynamics in 44 children aged 8-17 years with chronic rheumatic cardiac disease and developed mitral aortal and combined heart defects, as well as in chronic rheumatic cardiac disease without developed valvar defect. Differential approach has been defined to administration of inhibitors of angiotensin-converting factor in rheumatic heart defects: developed insufficiency of mitral and/or aortal valves II-III stage leads to remodeling of the left heart portions with developing chronic insufficiency of blood circulation, being an index for prolonged, not less than a year usage of the angiotensin-converting factor. In the presence of isolated mitral regurgitation, I stage in children with chronic rheumatic cardiac disease usage of the angiotensin-converting factor may be cancelled due to insignificant disturbances of valvar hemodynamics and a small risk of developing blood circulation insufficiency. Timely sanation of chronic infection foci in nasopharynx (conservative and surgical treatment of chronic tonsillitis, adenoid vegetations, therapy of hemolytic streptococcus presence decreases risk of developing rheumatic heart defect in children suffered acute rheumatic fever.

  8. Lassa Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Lassa Fever Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... French Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Lassa fever is an acute viral illness that occurs in ...

  9. HIV and Rheumatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions HIV & Rheumatic Diseases HIV and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Rheumatic diseases related ... knows he or she has HIV. What are HIV-associated rheumatic diseases? Some diseases of the joints ...

  10. Genetics and Rheumatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Well with Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Studying twins has ... 70%, and for non-identical pairs, even lower. Genetics and ankylosing spondylitis Each rheumatic disease has its ...

  11. Prodromal fever indicates a high risk of liver failure in acute hepatitis B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wen-Jun; Liu, Li; Sun, Chao; Yu, Jin-Hong; Xiao, Di; Li, Qiang

    2017-04-01

    The role of prodromal fever in the clinical course of acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is still largely unclear. This study was conducted to investigate the factors associated with prodromal fever and its role in the development of acute liver failure (ALF) in patients with acute hepatitis B (AHB). Inpatients with AHB diagnosed between January 2006 and December 2010 were evaluated and followed. Clinical manifestations, results of laboratory tests, and outcomes were compared between patients with and without prodromal fever. The diagnosis of AHB was based on the discrete onset of symptoms, jaundice, abnormal liver function tests, the detection of high-titer IgM antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc), and a compatible clinical history. A total of 618 AHB inpatients were identified during the study period, of whom 102 (16.5%) had prodromal fever and 41 (6.6%) developed ALF. Prodromal fever indicated more severe liver injury and was independently associated with hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) negativity. The occurrence of ALF was more common in febrile patients than in non-febrile patients (18.6% vs. 4.3%, pfever and temperature >38.0°C to be independently associated with the risk of ALF, with an odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 3.5 (1.4-8.6) and 7.1 (2.6-19.7), respectively. AHB patients with prodromal fever, which is associated with a lack of HBeAg due to HBV mutation, are at high risk of ALF. Febrile patients with AHB should be managed with particular care. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Red blood cell distribution width: can it be a predictive marker for long-term valvular involvement in children with acute rheumatic carditis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucuk, M; Ozdemir, R; Karadeniz, C; Celegen, K; Demirol, M; Yilmazer, M M; Mese, T; Unal, N

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) in patients with acute rheumatic carditis during the acute phase and after anti-inflammatory therapy. Pediatric patients diagnosed with acute rheumatic carditis (ARC) between 2006 and 2014 and age- and sex-matched controls were retrospectively analyzed. At the time of diagnosis and after 2 months of medical therapy, we reviewed the obtained demographic features; echocardiographic data; complete blood count reports, including RDW; acute phase reactants, including C-reactive protein; and erythrocyte sedimentation rate values. The number of the cases with ARC and age- and sex-matched controls were 100 and 110, respectively. The mean age of patients was 11.6 ± 2.5 years. WBC and platelet counts, RDW were found to be significantly higher in patient group compared with controls at the time of diagnosis, prior to the onset of treatment. RDW, platelet count, CRP, and ESR levels significantly decreased after an 8 weeks of medical treatment. RDW values after the medical treatment were still significantly higher compared with controls. RDW values were significantly higher in patients with multiple valvular involvement both prior to and after the treatment. Moreover, we found a significant and positive correlation between the RDW and the severity of mitral regurgitation in our patients (r: 0.46, P valvular lesions. However, long-term follow-up studies are needed involving adulthood period to support this hypothesis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The hemodyafiltration in the acute renal failure at the patients’ haemorrhagic fever with the nephritic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Trusov, V.; Shaklein, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Udmurt Republic is the natural focus and the hot spot of the haemorrhagic fever with the nephritic syndrome (HFNS). The acute renal failure (ARF), by our data, is being developed from 24 up to 49 % of the HFNS diseased persons, at the severe forms of which, side by side with the medicamental therapy, the hemodialysis is being used. In the last years, the efferent therapy new methods such, as the hemofiltration, the hemodyafiltration (HDF) are being used for the ARF medical treatment.

  14. Coronary embolism causing acute inferior wall and ventricular myocardial infarction in a patient with rheumatic valvular heart disease: treatment with thrombus aspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiao-Yu; Hui, Peng; Zheng, Yang

    2015-06-26

    An elderly man with rheumatic valvular heart disease and atrial fibrillation presented with acute myocardial infarction. A coronary angiogram revealed complete occlusion of the right coronary artery (RCA), and we therefore considered that a thrombus might have obstructed the ostium of the RCA. We used a guiding catheter and the syringe of an aspiration device to remove two large dark red thrombi. A subsequent angiogram revealed that blood flow through the RCA had recovered, and the endomembrane of the RCA was smooth, with no evidence of stenosis or residual thrombus. In this case, thrombus aspiration via a guiding catheter was efficacious for treating this type of coronary embolism.

  15. Prognostic value of clinical and Doppler echocardiographic findings in children and adolescents with significant rheumatic valvular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Fátima Derlene da Rocha Araújo; Eugênio Marcos Andrade Goulart; Zilda Maria Alves Meira

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever (RF) is based on clinical findings. However, during the chronic phase of the disease, the clinical approach is not sufficient for the follow-up of the patients and the Doppler echocardiography is a tool for the diagnosis of cardiac involvement. Prognostic variables that influence long-term outcomes are not well known. Methods: 462 patients with RF according to Jones criteria were studied, and followed-up from the initial attack to 13.6 ...

  16. An outbreak of acute fever among steam turbine condenser cleaners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauderdale, J F; Johnson, C C

    1983-03-01

    Ten of twelve men who participated in the cleaning of an electric power steam turbine condenser clogged with freshwater sponge experienced an acute febrile illness. Two similar outbreaks have been previously described, one of which has been attributed to the Legionnaires' Disease bacterium. Epidemiologic studies of this case showed a syndrome very similar to the two previously reported episodes. However, the exact etiology for this outbreak has not been identified. Environmental sampling was not initiated until after the cleaning was completed. Subsequent testing did not reveal any likely cause for the outbreak. The delayed onset of symptoms and the nature of the illness pointed to an infectious agent. In the absence of any suitable criteria for employee exposure evaluation, it is suggested that crews cleaning condensers under unusually dirty conditions, especially if eye or respiratory symptoms are reported, should be provided with respiratory protection.

  17. Fever in Children and Fever of Unknown Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Rajeshwar; Agarwal, Dipti

    2016-01-01

    Fever is the most common symptom in children and can be classified as fever with or without focus. Fever without focus can be less than 7 d and is subclassified as fever without localizing signs and fever of unknown origin (FUO). FUO is defined as a temperature greater than 38.3 °C, for more than 3 wk or failure to reach a diagnosis after 1 wk of inpatient investigations. The most common causes of FUO in children are infections, connective tissue disorders and neoplasms. Infectious diseases most commonly implicated in children with FUO are salmonellosis, tuberculosis, malaria and rickettsial diseases. Juvenile rheumatic arthritis is the connective tissue disease frequently associated with FUO. Malignancy is the third largest group responsible for FUO in children. Diagnostic approach of FUO includes detailed history and examination supported with investigations. Age, history of contact, exposure to wild animals and medications should be noted. Examination should include, apart from general appearance, presence of sweating, rashes, tonsillitis, sinusitis and lymph node enlargement. Other signs such as abdominal tenderness and hepatosplenomegly should be looked for. The muscles and bones should be carefully examined for connective tissue disorders. Complete blood count, blood smear examination and level of acute phase reactants should be part of initial investigations. Radiological imaging is useful aid in diagnosing FUO. Trials of antimicrobial agents should not be given as they can obscure the diagnosis of the disease in FUO.

  18. Dengue hemorrhagic fever complicated with acute liver failure: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalugama, Chamara; Gawarammana, Indika Bandara

    2017-12-08

    Dengue is a common arboviral infection with a clinically diverse spectrum of presentations. Although hepatic dysfunction is commonly identified in patients will dengue illness, acute liver failure is rare. The etiopathogenesis of hepatic dysfunction is multifactorial and related to direct viral invasion of hepatocytes, immunological factors and hypoxia particularly in cases of shock in dengue hemorrhagic fever. Ideal management of dengue-related hepatic dysfunction and acute liver failure is still debated. We report a 53-year-old Sri Lankan Sinhalese male with serologically confirmed dengue fever presenting with evidence of plasma leakage developing acute liver failure evidenced by deranged liver functions, coagulopathy and altered sensorium. In addition to the 'standard care', the patient was managed with intravenous N-acetyl cysteine and blood transfusions even in the absence of bleeding or dropping packed cell volume (PCV), targeting a higher PCV in anticipation of better oxygenation at tissue level. He made a full recovery with no sequential infections. N-acetyl cysteine and packed cell transfusion aiming at a higher PCV to maintain adequate tissue perfusion during shock may be beneficial in acute liver failure due to dengue virus. Large randomized trials should be carried out to establish the efficacy of these treatment strategies to support these observations and change the current practice.

  19. Low-Dose Intramuscular Diclofenac Sodium for Fever Control in Acute Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picetti, Edoardo; Servadei, Franco; Reverberi, Cristiana; De Carlo, Francesca; Rossi, Ilaria; Antonini, Marta Velia; Caspani, Maria Luisa

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the cerebral and hemodynamic effects of low-dose intramuscular diclofenac sodium (DCFS) administered for fever control in patients with acute brain injury in the intensive care unit. Inclusion criteria for this prospective clinical study were age ≥18 years; the ability to monitor intra-arterial blood pressure, core body temperature, and intracranial pressure; the placement of an indwelling jugular venous catheter for intermittent jugular venous oxygen saturation measurements; and a core body temperature ≥37.5°C. Exclusion criteria were hypovolemia, administration of drugs with hemodynamic effects during the study period, administration of antipyretics within 6 hours before the start of the study, acute heart failure, cerebral vasospasm, pregnancy, renal and gastric diseases, and allergy to DCFS. The study enrolled 30 patients with acute brain injury. Two We observed statistically significant decreases in core body temperature (P administration with respect to baseline (T0). The dosage of noradrenaline (norepinephrine) in subjects receiving treatment at the start of the study increased significantly from 0.14 μg/kg/minute ± 0.1 to 0.20 μg/kg/minute ± 0.1 (P = 0.0395). Low-dose intramuscular DCFS administration for fever control in patients with acute brain injury is effective but also exposes patients to potentially deleterious hypotensive episodes that must be diagnosed and treated expeditiously to prevent further damage to the injured brain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. HLA class I and class II HLA DRB profiles in Egyptian children with rheumatic valvular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hagrassy, Nashwa; El-Chennawi, Farha; Zaki, Maysaa El-Sayed; Fawzy, Hossam; Zaki, Adel; Joseph, Nabeil

    2010-07-01

    Poststreptococcal sequelae, especially acute rheumatic fever/rheumatic heart disease continues to occur in significant proportions in many parts of the world, especially in less developed countries. An important factor in the study of rheumatic heart disease is the human genetic susceptibility to the disease. The aim of the present study was to detect the most prevalent HLA class I and class II types associated with risk of rheumatic heart disease in Egyptian children. Our study was performed on 100 patients with rheumatic valvular heart diseases and 71 control subjects. Patients were recruited from the Heart Institute, Embaba, Egypt. HLA typing for HLA class I was performed by serotyping and HLDR allele genotyping was performed using INNO-LiPA kits. In the study of HLA class I, there was a statistically significant increase in the B5 allele (P = 0.03; odds ratio, 3.46 [1.12-10.72]) in patients compared to controls, while B49 and B52 alleles (P = 0.004 and P = 0.02) were found in controls only. There was a statistically significant increase in HLA DR* 04-02, 3.46 (1.12-10.72) and HLA DR *10-0101 5.75 (1.27-25.98) in patients. Meanwhile HLA DR*1309120 was found only in controls (P = 0.02). Our study provides further information on the genetic predisposition for rheumatic valvular disease and the protective genotypes in rheumatic heart disease. Further insight into the molecular mechanisms of the disease will be a useful tool for predicting clinical outcome in those patients and, thus, potentially offer new means and approaches to treatment and prophylaxis, including a potential vaccine.

  1. Long-Term Serological Follow-Up of Acute Q-Fever Patients after a Large Epidemic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia C H Wielders

    Full Text Available Serological follow-up of acute Q-fever patients is important for detection of chronic infection but there is no consensus on its frequency and duration. The 2007-2009 Q-fever epidemic in the Netherlands allowed for long-term follow-up of a large cohort of acute Q-fever patients. The aim of this study was to validate the current follow-up strategy targeted to identify patients with chronic Q-fever.A cohort of adult acute Q-fever patients, diagnosed between 2007 and 2009, for whom a twelve-month follow-up sample was available, was invited to complete a questionnaire and provide a blood sample, four years after the acute episode. Antibody profiles, determined by immunofluorescence assay in serum, were investigated with a special focus on high titres of IgG antibodies against phase I of Coxiella burnetii, as these are considered indicative for possible chronic Q-fever.Of the invited 1,907 patients fulfilling inclusion criteria, 1,289 (67.6% were included in the analysis. At any time during the four-year follow-up period, 58 (4.5% patients were classified as possible, probable, or proven chronic Q-fever according to the Dutch Q-fever Consensus Group criteria (which uses IgG phase I ≥1:1,024 to as serologic criterion for chronic Q-fever. Fifty-two (89.7% of these were identified within the first year after the acute episode. Of the six patients that were detected for the first time at four-year follow-up, five had an IgG phase I titre of 1:512 at twelve months.A twelve-month follow-up check after acute Q-fever is recommended as it adequately detects chronic Q-fever in patients without known risk factors. Additional serological and clinical follow-up is recommended for patients with IgG phase I ≥1:512, as they showed the highest risk to progress to chronic Q-fever.

  2. Rheumatic diseases during pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Yavuz, Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy induces immunologic changes that may differentially impact rheumatic disorders. The effects of pregnancy on rheumatic diseases vary by condition. The systemic rheumatic illnesses commonly complicating pregnancy are systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), scleroderma.

  3. Molecular detection of Coxiella burnetii from the formalin-fixed tissues of Q fever patients with acute hepatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Rock Jang

    Full Text Available Serologic diagnosis is one of the most widely used diagnostic methods for Q fever, but the window period in antibody response of 2 to 3 weeks after symptom onset results in significant diagnostic delay. We investigated the diagnostic utility of Q fever PCR from formalin-fixed liver tissues in Q fever patients with acute hepatitis.We reviewed the clinical and laboratory data in patients with Q fever hepatitis who underwent liver biopsy during a 17-year period, and whose biopsied tissues were available. We also selected patients who revealed granuloma in liver biopsy and with no Q fever diagnosis within the last 3 years as control. Acute Q fever hepatitis was diagnosed if two or more of the following clinical, serologic, or histopathologic criteria were met: (1 an infectious hepatitis-like clinical feature such as fever (≥ 38°C with elevated hepatic transaminase levels; (2 exhibition of a phase II immunoglobulin G (IgG antibodies titer by IFA of ≥ 1:128 in single determination, or a four-fold or greater rise between two separate samples obtained two or more weeks apart; (3 histologic finding of biopsy tissue showing characteristic fibrin ring granuloma.A total of 11 patients with acute Q fever hepatitis were selected and analyzed. Of the 11 patients, 3 (27% had exposure to zoonotic risk factors and 7 (63% met the serologic criteria. Granulomas with either circumferential or radiating fibrin deposition were observed in 10 cases on liver biopsy and in 1 case on bone marrow biopsy. 8 (73% revealed positive Coxiella burnetii PCR from their formalin-fixed liver tissues. In contrast, none of 10 patients with alternative diagnosis who had hepatic granuloma revealed positive C. burnetii PCR from their formalin-fixed liver tissues.Q fever PCR from formalin-fixed liver tissues appears to be a useful adjunct for diagnosing Q fever hepatitis.

  4. Clinical and echocardiographic features of children with rheumatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are leading causes of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in developing countries. Objectives: To describe the clinical and echocardiographic features of children with RF and RHD and compare these features with their serum C-reactive protein in 2 ...

  5. Acute pancreatitis associated with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome: clinical analysis of 12 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Heng; Zhao, Yu; Song, Fu-Chun

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the rare complications of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS), which easy to be misdiagnosed as acute abdomen, usually critically ill, poor treatment effect, highly mortality. In this study, we retrospectively analyzed to explore the clinical characteristics, 12 cases of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome complicated with acute pancreatitis treatment methods and prognosis. We conducted a retrospective study of HFRS in patients complicated with acute pancreatitis. 12 cases were collected from Ningbo first hospital between January 2001 and December 2012. Clinical information and laboratory parameters were obtained by reviewing literature and records. Twelve from 156 cases (7.69%) HFRS complicated with acute pancreatitis. Men comprised more than half (75%) of the sample population, the mean age was (38 ± 19) years. Abdominal pain was the main clinical manifestations in all the patients, all of their serum amylase and serum lipase were increased, 10 patients were given the total abdomen CT examination, eight cases showed enlargement of the pancreas and surrounding leakage, two cases showed pancreatic necrosis and hemorrhage. Three cases complicated with pulmonary edema. In 12 cases, four of them received hemodialysis treatment, one gives surgical intervention. Eight cases were complete remission, three cases were partial remission and one case was death. Acute pancreatitis is one of rare of the serious complications of HFRS, whereas the correct diagnosis and clear the cause of disease is critical for improve the quality of life of patients and reduce the mortality, timely hemodialysis treatment is effective, early intervention can improve the prognosis.

  6. Ciprofloxacin reduces occurrence of fever in children with acute leukemia who develop neutropenia during chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laoprasopwattana, Kamolwish; Khwanna, Thida; Suwankeeree, Pussayaban; Sujjanunt, Tipwan; Tunyapanit, Wanutsanun; Chelae, Sureerat

    2013-03-01

    Fluoroquinolones reduce occurrence of fever in adult cancer patients who develop neutropenia, but there has been no randomized controlled trial in children, and there are only a few studies considering resistance in intestinal floral after ciprofloxacin has been used. Children younger than 18 years with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoma scheduled to undergo chemotherapy were randomized to receive oral ciprofloxacin 20mg/kg/day or placebo from the beginning of their chemotherapy. Rectal swab cultures were taken before and at 1 and/or 2 weeks after the intervention. Of the total of 95 patients, 45 and 50 patients received ciprofloxacin and placebo, respectively. Of the 71 patients who developed neutropenia, the proportion of children who developed fever was significantly lower in the ciprofloxacin group than in the placebo group (17/34 [50.0%] versus 27/37 [73.0%]; absolute difference in risk, -23.0%; 95% confidence interval: -45.0% to -0.9%; P = 0.046). Ciprofloxacin significantly reduced the occurrence of febrile episodes in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the induction phase of chemotherapy, but not in patients with lymphoma or in the consolidation phase of chemotherapy. Adverse effects were not different between the groups. After intervention, the percentages of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae susceptible to ciprofloxacin were significantly lower in the ciprofloxacin group. Ciprofloxacin can prevent fever in neutropenic patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia during the induction phase of chemotherapy with good tolerance and no serious side effects. Due to the selective pressure of intestinal flora resistance to ciprofloxacin, the long-term effectiveness needs further investigation.

  7. Parameters indicative of persistence of valvular pathology at initial diagnosis in acute rheumatic carditis: the role of albumin and CD19 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taliha Oner

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: The aim of this study is to define the predictors of chronic carditis in patients with acute rheumatic carditis (ARC. Methods: Patients diagnosed with ARC between May 2010 and May 2011 were included in the study. Echocardiography, electrocardiography, lymphocyte subset analysis, acute phase reactants, plasma albumin levels, and antistreptolysin-O (ASO tests were performed at initial presentation. The echocardiographic assessments were repeated at the sixth month of follow-up. The patients were divided into two groups according to persistence of valvular pathology at 6th month as Group 1 and Group 2, and all clinical and laboratory parameters at admission were compared between two groups of valvular involvement. Results: During the one-year study period, 22 patients had valvular disease. Seventeen (77.2% patients showed regression in valvular pathology. An initial mild regurgitation disappeared in eight patients (36.3%. Among seven (31.8% patients with moderate regurgitation initially, the regurgitation disappeared in three, and four patients improved to mild regurgitation. Two patients with a severe regurgitation initially improved to moderate regurgitation (9.1%. In five (22.8% patients, the grade of regurgitation [moderate regurgitation in one (4.6%, and severe regurgitation in 4 (18.2%] remained unchanged. The albumin level was significantly lower at diagnosis in Group 2 (2.6 ± 0.48 g/dL. Lymphocyte subset analysis showed a significant decrease in the CD8 percentage and a significant increase in CD19 percentage at diagnosis in Group 2 compared to Group 1. Conclusion: The blood albumin level and the percentage of CD8 and CD19 (+ lymphocytes at diagnosis may help to predict chronic valvular disease risk in patients with acute rheumatic carditis.

  8. Parameters indicative of persistence of valvular pathology at initial diagnosis in acute rheumatic carditis: the role of albumin and CD19 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oner, Taliha; Ozdemir, Rahmi; Genc, Dildar Bahar; Kucuk, Mehmet; Karadeniz, Cem; Demirpence, Savas; Yilmazer, Murat Muhtar; Mese, Timur; Tavli, Vedide; Genel, Ferah

    The aim of this study is to define the predictors of chronic carditis in patients with acute rheumatic carditis (ARC). Patients diagnosed with ARC between May 2010 and May 2011 were included in the study. Echocardiography, electrocardiography, lymphocyte subset analysis, acute phase reactants, plasma albumin levels, and antistreptolysin-O (ASO) tests were performed at initial presentation. The echocardiographic assessments were repeated at the sixth month of follow-up. The patients were divided into two groups according to persistence of valvular pathology at 6th month as Group 1 and Group 2, and all clinical and laboratory parameters at admission were compared between two groups of valvular involvement. During the one-year study period, 22 patients had valvular disease. Seventeen (77.2%) patients showed regression in valvular pathology. An initial mild regurgitation disappeared in eight patients (36.3%). Among seven (31.8%) patients with moderate regurgitation initially, the regurgitation disappeared in three, and four patients improved to mild regurgitation. Two patients with a severe regurgitation initially improved to moderate regurgitation (9.1%). In five (22.8%) patients, the grade of regurgitation [moderate regurgitation in one (4.6%), and severe regurgitation in 4 (18.2%)] remained unchanged. The albumin level was significantly lower at diagnosis in Group 2 (2.6±0.48g/dL). Lymphocyte subset analysis showed a significant decrease in the CD8 percentage and a significant increase in CD19 percentage at diagnosis in Group 2 compared to Group 1. The blood albumin level and the percentage of CD8 and CD19 (+) lymphocytes at diagnosis may help to predict chronic valvular disease risk in patients with acute rheumatic carditis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  9. Calprotectin in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ometto, Francesca; Friso, Lara; Astorri, Davide; Botsios, Costantino; Raffeiner, Bernd; Punzi, Leonardo; Doria, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Calprotectin is a heterodimer formed by two proteins, S100A8 and S100A9, which are mainly produced by activated monocytes and neutrophils in the circulation and in inflamed tissues. The implication of calprotectin in the inflammatory process has already been demonstrated, but its role in the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and monitoring of rheumatic diseases has gained great attention in recent years. Calprotectin, being stable at room temperature, is a candidate biomarker for the follow-up of disease activity in many autoimmune disorders, where it can predict response to treatment or disease relapse. There is evidence that a number of immunomodulators, including TNF-α inhibitors, may reduce calprotectin expression. S100A8 and S100A9 have a potential role as a target of treatment in murine models of autoimmune disorders, since the direct or indirect blockade of these proteins results in amelioration of the disease process. In this review, we will go over the biologic functions of calprotectin which might be involved in the etiology of rheumatic disorders. We will also report evidence of its potential use as a disease biomarker. Impact statement Calprotectin is an acute-phase protein produced by monocytes and neutrophils in the circulation and inflamed tissues. Calprotectin seems to be more sensitive than CRP, being able to detect minimal residual inflammation and is a candidate biomarker in inflammatory diseases. High serum levels are associated with some severe manifestations of rheumatic diseases, such as glomerulonephritis and lung fibrosis. Calprotectin levels in other fluids, such as saliva and synovial fluid, might be helpful in the diagnosis of rheumatic diseases. Of interest is also the potential role of calprotectin as a target of treatment.

  10. Acute Q fever infection in Thuringia, Germany, after burial of roe deer fawn cadavers (Capreolus capreolus: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.T. Schleenvoigt

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We report on a case of a 48-year-old man who presented with acute Q fever infection after burying two fawn cadavers (Capreolus capreolus. Recent outbreaks of Q fever in Europe have been traced back to intensive goat breeding units, sheep flocks in the proximity of highly populated urban areas or to farmed deer. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing Q fever infection in a human linked to roe deer as a source of infection.

  11. Acute Cholecystitis as a Cause of Fever in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Rae Yang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Fever is a very common complication that has been related to poor outcomes after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH. The incidence of acalculous cholecystitis is reportedly 0.5%–5% in critically ill patients, and cerebrovascular disease is a risk factor for acute cholecystitis (AC. However, abdominal evaluations are not typically performed for febrile patients who have recently undergone aSAH surgeries. In this study, we discuss our experiences with febrile aSAH patients who were eventually diagnosed with AC. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 192 consecutive patients who underwent aSAH from January 2009 to December 2012. We evaluated their characteristics, vital signs, laboratory findings, radiologic images, and pathological data from hospitalization. We defined fever as a body temperature of >38.3°C, according to the Society of Critical Care Medicine guidelines. We categorized the causes of fever and compared them between patients with and without AC. Results Of the 192 enrolled patients, two had a history of cholecystectomy, and eight (4.2% were eventually diagnosed with AC. Among them, six patients had undergone laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In their pathological findings, two patients showed findings consistent with coexistent chronic cholecystitis, and two showed necrotic changes to the gall bladder. Patients with AC tended to have higher white blood cell counts, aspartame aminotransferase levels, and C-reactive protein levels than patients with fevers from other causes. Predictors of AC in the aSAH group were diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR], 8.758; P = 0.033 and the initial consecutive fasting time (OR, 1.325; P = 0.024. Conclusions AC may cause fever in patients with aSAH. When patients with aSAH have a fever, diabetes mellitus and a long fasting time, AC should be suspected. A high degree of suspicion and a thorough abdominal examination of febrile aSAH patients allow for prompt diagnosis and treatment of this

  12. Chikungunya Fever Among Patients with Acute Febrile Illness Attending a Tertiary Care Hospital in Mumbai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galate, Lata Baswanna; Agrawal, Sachee R; Shastri, Jayanthi S; Londhey, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya fever (CHIK) is an arboviral disease. Dengue fever (DENG) and CHIK are indistinguishable clinically and need to be differentiated by laboratory investigations. This study aimed at estimating the seroprevalence of CHIK mono-infection and CHIK and DENG dual infection in suspected patients. We also analyzed the age, sex distribution, joint involvement, and relation of joint movement restriction with visual analog scale (VAS). Two hundred patients clinically suspected with DENG and CHIK were enrolled from a Tertiary Care Hospital in Mumbai from April 2012 to October 2013. The detailed history and examination findings were recorded. Serum samples were subjected to DENG and CHIK immunoglobulin G (IgM) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The seroprevalence of CHIK was 12.5%. Mono-infection of CHIK was 3%, and CHIK and DENG dual infection was 9.5%. Most affected age group in CHIK cases was 46-60 years wherein female preponderance was seen. All 6 patients with CHIK mono-infection had fever and joint involvement; knee and elbow were the most commonly affected joints. All CHIK patients had VAS score of 6-10 with restricted joint movement. Of the patients with dual infection, the majorities were from 31 to 45 years with male preponderance; all had fever and joint pain mainly affecting knee and elbow. Of patients who had VAS score 6-10 in patients with dual infection, only 5.26% had restricted joint movement. IgM ELISA for Chikungunya infection should be included in the routine laboratory tests for acute febrile illness.

  13. USE OF A NEW FORM OF IBUPROFEN IN CHILDREN WITH FEVER AND ACUTE RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Lokshina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to study clinical efficacy, tolerance and safety of a new pelleted ibuprofen form for children in treatment of fever in patients with acute respiratory tract infection. Patients and methods: children aged from 6 to 12 years old with clinical manifestation of respiratory tract infections and requiring antipyretic treatment were included into the study. Children (n = 50 were administered ibuprofen at a single dose of 5–10 mg/kg of body weight, not more than 3–4 times per day. The efficacy assessment included time needed for temperature decrease (assessment was performed in 15, 30 and 60 minutes and duration of the antipyretic effect (assessment in 6, 8 and 12 hours. Rapidity of analgesic effect in children with ear ache, headache and myalgias was performed in 15, 30, 60 minutes and 6, 8 and 12 hours after the drug intake. Results: antipyretic effect of pelleted ibuprofen for children begins in 15 minutes after its intake. Stable temperature decrease during the first 6 hours was observed in 58% of children (the mean temperature was 37,1 ± 0,3 and maintained up for 12 hours. Relief of pain intensity was established in 62,1% of patients during the first 3 hours, and in 37,9% the pain syndrome was arrested completely. Conclusions: the new pelleted form of ibuprofen for children was proved to have high clinical efficacy and safety in treatment of fever in children with acute respiratory tract infections.

  14. Can whole-blood parameters be used in follow-up of children with rheumatic valvular heart disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpuz, Derya; Giray, Dilek; Ozyurt, Abdullah; Bozlu, Gulcin; Unal, Selma; Hallioglu, Olgu

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationships between red blood cell distribution width, platelet distribution width, and mean platelet volume and the presence and severity of valvular involvement in patients with rheumatic heart disease. Between April, 2012 and December, 2015, 151 patients who were admitted to the Pediatric Cardiology Unit with diagnosis of rheumatic heart disease and 148 healthy children were included to our study. Transthoracic echocardiography for all children was performed, and the values of red blood cell distribution width, platelet distribution width, and mean platelet volume, besides other blood count parameters, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein levels were recorded. Red blood cell distribution width, platelet distribution width, mean platelet volume, and C-reactive protein levels were significantly higher in patients with rheumatic heart disease when compared with healthy controls (p0.05). This is the first study in children with rheumatic heart disease that demonstrated significantly increased red blood cell distribution width, platelet distribution width, and mean platelet volume levels, as well as evaluated all three parameters together. Furthermore, red blood cell distribution width values in the chronical period of acute rheumatic fever, due to the positive correlation with the other chronic inflammatory markers, may help make the diagnosis in children.

  15. Etiologies of acute undifferentiated fever and clinical prediction of scrub typhus in a non-tropical endemic area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ho-Chul; Chon, Sung-Bin; Oh, Won Sup; Lee, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Ho-Jin

    2015-02-01

    Scrub typhus usually presents as acute undifferentiated fever. This cross-sectional study included adult patients presenting with acute undifferentiated fever defined as any febrile illness for ≤ 14 days without evidence of localized infection. Scrub typhus cases were defined by an antibody titer of a ≥ fourfold increase in paired sera, a ≥ 1:160 in a single serum using indirect immunofluorescence assay, or a positive result of the immunochromatographic test. Multiple regression analysis identified predictors associated with scrub typhus to develop a prediction rule. Of 250 cases with known etiology of acute undifferentiated fever, influenza (28.0%), hepatitis A (25.2%), and scrub typhus (16.4%) were major causes. A prediction rule for identifying suspected cases of scrub typhus consisted of age ≥ 65 years (two points), recent fieldwork/outdoor activities (one point), onset of illness during an outbreak period (two points), myalgia (one point), and eschar (two points). The c statistic was 0.977 (95% confidence interval = 0.960-0.994). At a cutoff value ≥ 4, the sensitivity and specificity were 92.7% (79.0-98.1%) and 90.9% (86.0-94.3%), respectively. Scrub typhus, the third leading cause of acute undifferentiated fever in our region, can be identified early using the prediction rule. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  16. High seroprevalence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae IgM in acute Q fever by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsu Lai

    Full Text Available Q fever is serologically cross-reactive with other intracellular microorganisms. However, studies of the serological status of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydophila pneumoniae during Q fever are rare. We conducted a retrospective serological study of M. pneumoniae and C. pneumoniae by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, a method widely used in clinical practice, in 102 cases of acute Q fever, 39 cases of scrub typhus, and 14 cases of murine typhus. The seropositive (57.8%, 7.7%, and 0%, p<0.001 and seroconversion rates (50.6%, 8.8%, and 0%, p<0.001 of M. pneumoniae IgM, but not M. pneumoniae IgG and C. pneumoniae IgG/IgM, in acute Q fever were significantly higher than in scrub typhus and murine typhus. Another ELISA kit also revealed a high seropositivity (49.5% and seroconversion rate (33.3% of M. pneumoniae IgM in acute Q fever. The temporal and age distributions of patients with positive M. pneumoniae IgM were not typical of M. pneumoniae pneumonia. Comparing acute Q fever patients who were positive for M. pneumoniae IgM (59 cases with those who were negative (43 cases, the demographic characteristics and underlying diseases were not different. In addition, the clinical manifestations associated with atypical pneumonia, including headache (71.2% vs. 81.4%, p=0.255, sore throat (8.5% vs. 16.3%, p=0.351, cough (35.6% vs. 23.3%, p=0.199, and chest x-ray suggesting pneumonia (19.3% vs. 9.5%, p=0.258, were unchanged between the two groups. Clinicians should be aware of the high seroprevalence of M. pneumoniae IgM in acute Q fever, particularly with ELISA kits, which can lead to misdiagnosis, overestimations of the prevalence of M. pneumoniae pneumonia, and underestimations of the true prevalence of Q fever pneumonia.

  17. Study of acute undifferentiated fever cases and their etiologies in rural Konkan area of Maharashtra state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil S. N

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute undifferentiated fever (AUF is a common cause for which the patients seek health care in India. It is region specific and has similar clinical presentation, with varied etiologies. Due to this it posses challenge to the diagnosis, treatment and public health. Majority of patients present with nondescript symptoms. Scrub typhus, Malaria, Enteric Fever, Dengue, Leptospirosis, Chikungunya, Spotted fever, Rickettsiosis, Hantavirus, Q fever, Brucellosis, Influenza and other bacterial infections are some of the common etiologies of AUF. The prevalence of local AUF etiologies helps to prioritize differential diagnosis and guide the treatment. The study aimed to find out the predominant AUF etiologies in the rural Konkan area of Maharashtra state in India. Materials and Methods: This prospective observational study was conducted at a tertiary care hospital on the samples received from District hospitals and Primary health centers from Sindhudurg District of Maharashtra state for the duration of October 2012 to January 2014. Patients with age 5years and with classical symptoms of febrile illness were included in the study. About 500 blood samples received were investigated for Malaria, Bacterial culture sensitivity, Leptospira culture, ELISA for scrub typhus, Brucella, Dengue and Leptospira and further evaluated for commonest region specific AUF etiology. Results: The study included 500 blood samples obtained from patients presenting with classical symptoms of AUF. Samples received from males showed highest number of positive cases amounting for 82.47% with majority of cases (83% cases in middle age group. The sero-positivity of samples accounted for 42.8%. Brucella was the most common cause of AUF (28.50% followed by Leptospira (27.10% and Scrub typhus (21.49%. Interestingly there were no positive cases of malaria and only 11.21% samples positive for Dengue which are considered as most common AUF etiologies and treated accordingly

  18. Acute undifferentiated fever in India: a multicentre study of aetiology and diagnostic accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mørch, Kristine; Manoharan, Anand; Chandy, Sara; Chacko, Novin; Alvarez-Uria, Gerardo; Patil, Suvarna; Henry, Anil; Nesaraj, Joel; Kuriakose, Cijoy; Singh, Ashita; Kurian, Siby; Gill Haanshuus, Christel; Langeland, Nina; Blomberg, Bjørn; Vasanthan Antony, George; Mathai, Dilip

    2017-10-04

    The objectives of this study were to determine the proportion of malaria, bacteraemia, scrub typhus, leptospirosis, chikungunya and dengue among hospitalized patients with acute undifferentiated fever in India, and to describe the performance of standard diagnostic methods. During April 2011-November 2012, 1564 patients aged ≥5 years with febrile illness for 2-14 days were consecutively included in an observational study at seven community hospitals in six states in India. Malaria microscopy, blood culture, Dengue rapid NS1 antigen and IgM Combo test, Leptospira IgM ELISA, Scrub typhus IgM ELISA and Chikungunya IgM ELISA were routinely performed at the hospitals. Second line testing, Dengue IgM capture ELISA (MAC-ELISA), Scrub typhus immunofluorescence (IFA), Leptospira Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT), malaria PCR and malaria immunochromatographic rapid diagnostic test (RDT) Parahit Total™ were performed at the coordinating centre. Convalescence samples were not available. Case definitions were as follows: Leptospirosis: Positive ELISA and positive MAT. Scrub typhus: Positive ELISA and positive IFA. Dengue: Positive RDT and/or positive MAC-ELISA. Chikungunya: Positive ELISA. Bacteraemia: Growth in blood culture excluding those defined as contaminants. Malaria: Positive genus-specific PCR. Malaria was diagnosed in 17% (268/1564) and among these 54% had P. falciparum. Dengue was diagnosed in 16% (244/1564). Bacteraemia was found in 8% (124/1564), and among these Salmonella typhi or S. paratyphi constituted 35%. Scrub typhus was diagnosed in 10%, leptospirosis in 7% and chikungunya in 6%. Fulfilling more than one case definition was common, most frequent in chikungunya where 26% (25/98) also had positive dengue test. Malaria and dengue were the most common causes of fever in this study. A high overlap between case definitions probably reflects high prevalence of prior infections, cross reactivity and subclinical infections, rather than high prevalence of

  19. Comparison of the performance of IFA, CFA, and ELISA assays for the serodiagnosis of acute Q fever by quality assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herremans, Tineke; Hogema, Boris M; Nabuurs, Marrigje; Peeters, Marcel; Wegdam-Blans, Marjolijn; Schneeberger, Peter; Nijhuis, Carla; Notermans, Daan W; Galama, Joep; Horrevorts, Anton; van Loo, Inge H M; Vlaminckx, Bart; Zaaijer, Hans L; Koopmans, Marion P; Berkhout, Hanneke; Socolovschi, Cristina; Raoult, Didier; Stenos, John; Nicholson, William; Bijlmer, Henk

    2013-01-01

    The indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) is considered the reference method for diagnosing Q fever, but serology is also performed by complement fixation assay (CFA) or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). However, comparability between these assays is not clear, and therefore a quality assessment was performed. A total of 25 serum samples from negative controls, Q fever patients, and a serial diluted high-positive sample were analyzed in 10 Dutch laboratories. Six laboratories performed CFA, 5 performed IFA, and 5 performed ELISAs. Three international reference laboratories from Australia, France, and the USA also participated in this study. Qualitative values between laboratories using the same methods were within close range, and all 3 methods correctly identified acute Q fever patients. The IFA, ELISA, and CFA are all suitable serodiagnostic assays to diagnose acute Q fever, but the IFA remains an important tool in the follow-up of patients and in identifying patients at risk for developing chronic Q fever. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Tri-phasic fever in dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D, Pradeepa H; Rao, Sathish B; B, Ganaraj; Bhat, Gopalakrishna; M, Chakrapani

    2018-01-01

    Dengue fever is an acute febrile illness with a duration of 2-12 days. Our observational study observed the 24-h continuous tympanic temperature pattern of 15 patients with dengue fever and compared this with 26 others with fever due to a non-dengue aetiology. A tri-phasic fever pattern was seen among two-thirds of dengue fever patients, but in only one with an inflammatory disease. One-third of dengue fever patients exhibited a single peak temperature. Continuous temperature monitoring and temperature pattern analysis in clinical settings can aid in the early differentiation of dengue fever from non-dengue aetiology.

  1. Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease among children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of the 22 with RHD, 14 (63.6%) presented de novo and 1 had bacterial endocarditis. Among the outpatients, 15 had cardiac failure while echocardiographic findings included mitral regurgitation (18/19) and aortic regurgitation (5/19). At presentation, 18/26 known cases were on oral penicillin prophylaxis and 7 on injectable ...

  2. Management of patients with rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    36%, 20%, 6% and 7% respectively.8. Group A streptococcus is the only group credited with the capacity to cause non-suppurative sequelae. The dominance of Lancefield groups other than A in tropical and subtropical countries has raised questions about the possibility that non- group A beta-haemolytic streptococci may ...

  3. Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SA) and the rest of Africa. The Drakensberg Declaration, which initiated and promoted the ... Subsequent attempts at solutions to controlling. ARF and RHD ... of RHD in sub-Saharan Africa has emanated from echocardiography screening ...

  4. Hospitalized acute patients with fever and severe infection have lower mortality than patients with hypo- or normothermia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard; Havshøj, Ulrik; Pedersen, Peter Bank

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Severe infection is a frequent cause of admission to an acute medical unit (AMU). However, not all infected patients present with fever. The aim was to assess differences in 30-day mortality among patients hospitalized with community-acquired severe infection presenting with hypo......-, normo- or fever. METHODS: A retrospective single-center follow-up at an AMU from August 1 2009 to August 31 2011. Patients were included the first time they presented with severe infection within the study period. Temperature was categorized into hypothermia (...), and fever (>38.0C). Severe infection was defined as a discharge diagnosis indicating infection combined with organ failure within the first 24 hours after arrival. Multivariable Cox regression analysis was computed to assess the association between temperature and 30-day mortality. RESULTS: A total of 2...

  5. Rheumatic and nonrheumatic valvular heart disease: epidemiology, management, and prevention in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essop, Mohammed Rafique; Nkomo, Vuyisile T

    2005-12-06

    Unlike the Western world, valvular disease ranks among the major cardiovascular afflictions in Africa. Acute rheumatic fever and chronic rheumatic valvular disease in their most virulent form are still commonly encountered and impose a huge burden on limited healthcare resources. We performed a systematic review of the literature with PubMed using rheumatic fever, rheumatic heart disease, valvular disease, warfarin anticoagulation, and pregnancy as search items. Literature emanating from Africa was emphasized. Epidemiology, current concepts on pathogenesis, and aspects of the medical and surgical management of this disease as seen from an African perspective are presented. The association of pregnancy with mitral stenosis is common and may be fatal if not managed appropriately. A practical approach to these patients is presented to optimize maternal and fetal outcome. Pregnant patients with mechanical valves require careful attention to ensure maternal survival and prevent fetal warfarin embryopathy. Prolonged subcutaneous heparin and frequent monitoring of the partial thromboplastin time are impractical in this setting, and the merits of different anticoagulation regimens are discussed. Congenital submitral aneurysms are a unique cause of mitral regurgitation, with the vast majority of cases originating from sub-Saharan Africa. Although the precise etiology is as yet unclear, the clinical and echocardiographic features are sufficiently characteristic to allow a preoperative diagnosis to be made. Transesophageal echocardiography allows much better definition of the size and anatomic relationships of the aneurysm. Surgical resection can be difficult but is usually curative. Mitral valve prolapse and endocarditis constitute the remaining frequent causes of valvular disease and are discussed briefly. The spectrum and presentation of valvular disease in Africa are uniquely different from elsewhere. Together with socioeconomic issues and the HIV pandemic, this fact

  6. Rheumatic heart disease: 15 years of clinical and immunological follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roney O Sampaio

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Roney O Sampaio, Kellen C Fae, Lea MF Demarchi, Pablo MA Pomerantzeff, Vera D Aiello, Guilherme S Spina, Ana C Tanaka, Sandra E Oshiro, Max Grinberg, Jorge Kalil, Luiza GuilhermeHeart Institute (InCor, University of São Paulo, BrazilAbstract: Rheumatic fever (RF is a sequel of group A streptococcal throat infection and occurs in untreated susceptible children. Rheumatic heart disease (RHD, the major sequel of RF, occurs in 30%–45% of RF patients. RF is still considered endemic in some regions of Brazil and is responsible for approximately 90% of early childhood valvular surgery in the country. In this study, we present a 15-year clinical follow-up of 25 children who underwent surgical valvular repair. Histopathological and immunological features of heart tissue lesions of RHD patients were also evaluated. The patients presented severe forms of RHD with congestive symptoms at a very young age. Many of them had surgery at the acute phase of RF. Histological analysis showed the presence of dense valvular inflammatory infiltrates and Aschoff nodules in the myocardium of 21% of acute RHD patients. Infiltrating T-cells were mainly CD4+ in heart tissue biopsies of patients with rheumatic activity. In addition, CD4+ and CD8+ infiltrating T-cell clones recognized streptococcal M peptides and cardiac tissue proteins. These findings may open the possibilities of new ways of immunotherapy. In addition, we demonstrated that the surgical procedure during acute phase of the disease improved the quality of life of young RHD patients.Keywords: rheumatic heart disease, Streptococcus pyogenes, heart failure, inflammatory infiltrate, T lymphocytes, molecular mimicry

  7. Rheumatic heart disease screening: Current concepts and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Dougherty

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatic heart disease (RHD is a disease of poverty, is almost entirely preventable, and is the most common cardiovascular disease worldwide in those under 25 years. RHD is caused by acute rheumatic fever (ARF which typically results in cumulative valvular lesions that may present clinically after a number of years of subclinical disease. Therapeutic interventions, therefore, typically focus on preventing subsequent ARF episodes (with penicillin prophylaxis. However, not all patients with ARF develop symptoms and not all symptomatic cases present to a physician or are correctly diagnosed. Therefore, if we hope to control ARF and RHD at the population level, we need a more reliable discriminator of subclinical disease. Recent studies have examined the utility of echocardiographic screening, which is far superior to auscultation at detecting RHD. However, there are many concerns surrounding this approach. Despite the introduction of the World Heart Federation diagnostic criteria in 2012, we still do not really know what constitutes the most subtle changes of RHD by echocardiography. This poses serious problems regarding whom to treat and what to do with the rest, both important decisions with widespread implications for already stretched health-care systems. In addition, issues ranging from improving the uptake of penicillin prophylaxis in ARF/RHD-positive patients, improving portable echocardiographic equipment, understanding the natural history of subclinical RHD and how it might respond to penicillin, and developing simplified diagnostic criteria that can be applied by nonexperts, all need to be effectively tackled before routine widespread screening for RHD can be endorsed.

  8. Clinical, epidemiological and virological features of dengue virus infections in vietnamese patients presenting to primary care facilities with acute undifferentiated fever

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thai, Khoa T. D.; Phuong, Hoang Lan; Thanh Nga, Tran Thi; Giao, Phan Trong; Hung, Le Quoc; van Nam, Nguyen; Binh, Tran Quang; Simmons, Cameron; Farrar, Jeremy; Hien, Tran Thinh; Rogier van Doorn, H.; de Jong, Menno D.; de Vries, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To explore clinical and virological characteristics and describe the epidemiology of dengue in patients who presented with acute undifferentiated fever (AUF) at primary health centers (PHC) in Binh Thuan Province, Vietnam. Methods: A prospective observational study was conducted from

  9. PROSPECTIVE STUDY OF ETIOLOGY, CLINICAL PROFILE AND OUTCOME IN PATIENTS WITH FEVER, JAUNDICE AND ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study etiology, risk factors, various clinical and lab parameters and outcome of patients presenting with fever, jaundice and acute kidney injury. MATERIALS AND METHODS : An open prospective study was done on 100 patients presented with triad of fever, jaundice and acute kidney injury (AKI in the Depar tment of Medicine of G R Medical College and JA Group of Hospitals, Gwalior, MP from September 2011 to November 2012. Patients having temperature more than >100 0 F, serum creatinine ≥1.3 mg/dL or a 50 % increase from baseline or a reduction in urine output (documented oliguria of 6 hours, serum bilirubin >1.8 mg/dL were included in the study. A detailed history, clinical examination and investigations were done to find the cause of these derangements and all the patients were managed acc ordingly. RESULTS: A total 100 patients were included in study out of which 70% were males. Out of 100 patients, 50% were of septicemia, 34% were having malaria, 12% had acute pancreatitis and 4% patients were of dengue. Out of 50 septicemia patients, 35(7 0% were male, out of which 11(31.42% were of 56 - 65 years of age. Out of 17 deaths, 13(76% were males. Among total death, 11(22% were in septicemia followed by 5(14.70% in malaria patients. CONCLUSION: Many infectious and non - infectious diseases like malaria, septicemia, acute pancreatitis, dengue fever etc. can present with fever, jaundice and deranged renal functions. This triad of presentation is associated wi th high morbidity and mortality and the advanced age, male gender presences of anemia were the risk factors for high mortality. AKI occurs most commonly in association with P. falciparum malaria. Early diagnosis and prompt management including dialysis can reduce mortality and expedite recovery of renal function

  10. Black water fever associated with acute renal failure among Congolese children in Kinshasa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodi, Joseph M; Nsibu, Célestin N; Aloni, Michel N; Lukute, Guy N; Kunuanuna, Thomas S; Tshibassu, Pierre M; Pakasa, Nestor

    2014-11-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is reported in some severe forms of malaria such as black water fever (BWF). It is associated with a high mortality rate and can be managed effectively with adequate renal replacement. A prospective survey of children with dark urine after a malarial infection with Plasmodium falciparum was coupled with a chart review study of patients managed in the past 11 years in the Pediatrics' Kinshasa University Hospital. Eighty-nine cases of ARF were identified, but data from only 63 patients were available, of whom 44 (69.8%) had severe malaria (39 with BWF and 5 with cerebral malaria). The mean age of the patients was 8.2±1.73 years. Of the 39 cases of BWF, an association with quinine ingestion was observed in 32 children (82%). Urea and creatinine levels were elevated in all cases (135.4±88.2 and 3.83±2.81 mg/dL, respectively). Oligo-anuria was observed in 44.4%, severe metabolic acidosis (bicarbonatemetabolic acidosis were observed more often than other clinical/metabolic disturbances. Severe renal impairment remains a significant complication with a high mortality rate in low-resource settings.

  11. Clinical significance of markers of collagen metabolism in rheumatic mitral valve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Tanima; Mukherjee, Somaditya; Ghosh, Sudip; Biswas, Monodeep; Dutta, Santanu; Pattari, Sanjib; Chatterjee, Shelly; Bandyopadhyay, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHD), a chronic acquired heart disorder results from Acute Rheumatic Fever. It is a major public health concern in developing countries. In RHD, mostly the valves get affected. The present study investigated whether extracellular matrix remodelling in rheumatic valve leads to altered levels of collagen metabolism markers and if such markers can be clinically used to diagnose or monitor disease progression. This is a case control study comprising 118 subjects. It included 77 cases and 41 healthy controls. Cases were classified into two groups- Mitral Stenosis (MS) and Mitral Regurgitation (MR). Carboxy-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP), amino-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP), total Matrix Metalloproteinase-1(MMP-1) and Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) were assessed. Histopathology studies were performed on excised mitral valve leaflets. A p value 459 ng/mL for PICP provided 91% sensitivity, 90% specificity and a likelihood ratio of 9 in diagnosing RHD. Histopathology analysis revealed inflammation, scarring, neovascularisation and extensive leaflet fibrosis in diseased mitral valve. Levels of collagen metabolism markers correlated with echocardiographic parameters for RHD diagnosis.

  12. Combination immunotherapy in the treatment of chronic bilateral panuveitis and uveitic glaucoma during acute dengue fever infection in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Kevin P; Tawakol, Jan B; Khan, Tasnim; Capriotti, Joseph A

    2015-01-01

    Ocular manifestations of the dengue fever virus include bilateral panuveitis that can occur after the acute systemic infection has resolved. In most reported cases, the inflammation resolves with topical or systemic steroid therapy. We report a case of chronic, refractory bilateral panuveitis and uveitic glaucoma that began during the acute phase of the systemic infection and required treatment with oral steroids, multiple steroid-sparing agents, and surgical therapy for glaucoma. A 22-year-old male with acute systemic dengue fever presented with bilateral pain and decreased vision. Clinical examination revealed bilateral panuveitis with elevated intraocular pressures. Management required oral steroids, mycophenolate mofetil, cyclosporine, and bilateral glaucoma valve implantation. This case highlights the fact that dengue-associated panuveitis can begin in the acute stage of systemic infection and persist long after convalescence with progression to chronic bilateral panuveitis and uveitic glaucoma. Dengue-associated chronic panuveitis with uveitic glaucoma may be effectively managed with a combination of steroid-sparing oral immunosuppression and glaucoma surgery. This is, to our knowledge, the first case of bilateral refractory dengue-associated panuveitis from the Caribbean treated with combination steroid-sparing oral immunosuppression and bilateral glaucoma valve implantation.

  13. Black water fever associated with acute renal failure among Congolese children in Kinshasa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M Bodi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute renal failure (ARF is reported in some severe forms of malaria such as black water fever (BWF. It is associated with a high mortality rate and can be managed effectively with adequate renal replacement. A prospective survey of children with dark urine after a malarial infection with Plasmodium falciparum was coupled with a chart review study of patients managed in the past 11 years in the Pediatrics′ Kinshasa University Hospital. Eighty-nine cases of ARF were identified, but data from only 63 patients were available, of whom 44 (69.8% had severe malaria (39 with BWF and 5 with cerebral malaria. The mean age of the patients was 8.2 ± 1.73 years. Of the 39 cases of BWF, an association with quinine ingestion was observed in 32 children (82%. Urea and creatinine levels were elevated in all cases (135.4 ± 88.2 and 3.83 ± 2.81 mg/dL, respectively. Oligo-anuria was observed in 44.4%, severe metabolic acidosis (bicarbonate <15 mEq/L in 61.5% and hyponatremia (<130 mEq/L in 33.3%. Peritoneal dialysis was required in 36 patients, including 20 with BWF. The remaining patients were managed with conservative treatment. Twenty-eight children (44.4%, including 20 on dialysis, fully recovered and 14 died (22.2%, including eight cases of BWF. Our study suggests that ARF is commonly associated with BWF in Congolese children. Elevated urea and creatinine and severe metabolic acidosis were observed more often than other clinical/metabolic disturbances. Severe renal impairment remains a significant complication with a high mortality rate in low-resource settings.

  14. Rheumatic diseases and pregnancy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Systemic lupus erythematosus. Rheumatic diseases predominantly affect young women of childbearing age; therefore pregnancy is a topic of major interest. Pregnancy-induced changes in immune function can have an effect on underlying disease activity.[1-3] Pregnant women with rheumatic diseases constitute a high-risk ...

  15. Evolution from acute Q fever to endocarditis is associated with underlying valvulopathy and age and can be prevented by prolonged antibiotic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Million, Matthieu; Walter, Gaëlle; Thuny, Franck; Habib, Gilbert; Raoult, Didier

    2013-09-01

     The prevention of Q fever endocarditis through the use of systematic echocardiography and antibiotic prophylaxis in patients with acute Q fever and valvulopathy has never been validated in a cohort study.  From 2007 to 2012, all patients followed at the French National Referral Center for acute Q fever were included in a cohort study. The prevention of endocarditis included a systematic transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and a 12-month course of doxycycline and hydroxychloroquine prophylaxis in patients with significant valvulopathy. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) was performed in patients with a negative TTE and a rapid rise of phase I immunoglobulin G titers.  Seventy-two patients were included with a median follow-up time of 22 months. A valvulopathy was identified in 31 patients (43%), being previously unknown in 24 (33%) and diagnosed only upon TEE or a second TTE in 7 (10%). The major determinants associated with endocarditis were age (hazard ratio [HR], 1.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.006-1.13; P = .03), aortic regurgitation (HR, 10.2; 95% CI, 3.2-32.2; P valvulopathy.  Acute Q fever could be associated with an increased prevalence of valvulopathy. The evolution from acute Q fever to endocarditis is associated with age and valvulopathy and can be entirely prevented by antibiotic prophylaxis. Although the name "chronic Q fever" suggests otherwise, rapid evolution (<1 month) was observed.

  16. [Tumors in rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świerkot, Jerzy; Lewandowicz-Uszyńska, Aleksandra; Bogunia-Kubik, Katarzyna

    2013-12-11

    Patients with systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases (such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, or Sjögren's syndrome) are at increased risk of cancer, including hematological malignancies (leukemias and lymphomas), as well as non-hematological cancers (e.g. lung, esophageal, prostate or ovarian cancer). This increased risk for cancer development in patients with rheumatic diseases is attributed to the immune (autoimmune) processes and the medical treatment. Due to the often similar symptoms and the occurrence of systemic paraneoplastic syndromes it is very important to evaluate the association between rheumatic diseases and cancer. This paper presents issues concerning the development of cancer in patients with rheumatic diseases and the risk of cancer associated with drugs used for the treatment of rheumatic diseases.

  17. Dengue fever as an acute febrile disease after overseas travel: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarumoto, Norihito; Abe, Yoshinobu; Yamaguchi, Toshiyuki; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Kurane, Ichiro; Maesaki, Shigefumi

    2011-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is a relatively common infection in travelers, with about 100 cases being reported annually in Japan, and this number is increasing. We herein describe two patients who developed a fever after returning to Japan from Southeast Asia and who were serologically diagnosed with DF. Patient 1 was a 19-year-old man who spent 6 days in Thailand and developed diarrhea and a fever after returning to Japan. Virological studies showed dengue virus (DV) serotype 3 by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), and anti-DV IgM and IgG antibodies were both positive by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Patient 2 was a 43-year-old man who spent time in various Asian countries and developed a fever and arthralgia after returning to Japan. Virological studies showed DV serotype 2 by RT-PCR, and anti-DV IgM and IgG antibodies were both positive by ELISA. DF and other febrile diseases, including Chikungunya fever, should be strongly suspected in patients who develop fever after returning to Japan from other Asian countries, irrespective of whether patients remember being bitten by mosquitoes.

  18. Laboratory tests in the diagnosis and follow-up of pediatric rheumatic diseases: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breda, Luciana; Nozzi, Manuela; De Sanctis, Sara; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2010-08-01

    We reviewed the literature to evaluate the role of common laboratory tests and to examine the recent progress in the laboratory diagnosis of pediatric rheumatic diseases. We used the PubMed database (1950-2008) to search for the keywords "laboratory," "erythrocyte sedimentation rate" (ESR), "C-reactive protein" (CRP), "blood cytology," "procalcitonin" (PCT), "complement system," "ferritin," "antistreptolysin O titer" (ASO), "autoantibodies," "genetic studies," in conjunction with "rheumatic disease in children" and "pediatric autoimmune diseases." All relevant original and review articles in English were reviewed as well as textbooks of pediatric rheumatology. Laboratory tests (ESR, CRP, blood cytology, complement system, ferritin, ASO titer) play an important role in confirming a diagnosis and in the follow-up of rheumatic diseases in the pediatric age group. The ESR is probably the most widely measured index of the acute phase response. Measurement of CRP is very useful in the rapid diagnosis of infection as a progressive increase can be shown in the first 48 hours. Also, the subsequent fall in serum CRP concentration on resolution of inflammation is useful for monitoring the efficacy of treatment. In chronic diseases, a combination of CRP and ESR may provide the most useful information. Cytopenia and different forms of anemia can be encountered in many rheumatic diseases: they can be related to disease activity or to therapeutic side effects. Determination of complement levels (C3 and/or C4) is useful in the follow-up of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. Ferritin is a laboratory hallmark of primary and secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. ASO titer should be obtained to confirm a diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever; other important antibody markers of streptococcal infection include antihyaluronidase, antideoxyribonuclease B, and antistreptokinase antibodies. We also found that, in the pediatric age, the

  19. Fever, hyperglycaemia and swallowing dysfunction management in acute stroke: A cluster randomised controlled trial of knowledge transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quinn Clare

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperglycaemia, fever, and swallowing dysfunction are poorly managed in the admission phase of acute stroke, and patient outcomes are compromised. Use of evidence-based guidelines could improve care but have not been effectively implemented. Our study aims to develop and trial an intervention based on multidisciplinary team-building to improve management of fever, hyperglycaemia, and swallowing dysfunction in patients following acute stroke. Methods and design Metropolitan acute stroke units (ASUs located in New South Wales, Australia will be stratified by service category (A or B and, within strata, by baseline patient recruitment numbers (high or low in this prospective, multicentre, single-blind, cluster randomised controlled trial (CRCT. ASUs then will be randomised independently to either intervention or control groups. ASUs allocated to the intervention group will receive: unit-based workshops to identify local barriers and enablers; a standardised core education program; evidence-based clinical treatment protocols; and ongoing engagement of local staff. Control group ASUs will receive only an abridged version of the National Clinical Guidelines for Acute Stroke Management. The following outcome measures will be collected at 90 days post-hospital admission: patient death, disability (modified Rankin Score; dependency (Barthel Index and Health Status (SF-36. Additional measures include: performance of swallowing screening within 24 hours of admission; glycaemic control and temperature control. Discussion This is a unique study of research transfer in acute stroke. Providing optimal inpatient care during the admission phase is essential if we are to combat the rising incidence of debilitating stroke. Our CRCT will also allow us to test interventions focussed on multidisciplinary ASU teams rather than individual disciplines, an imperative of modern hospital services. Trial Registration Australia New Zealand Clinical Trial

  20. Fever, hyperglycaemia and swallowing dysfunction management in acute stroke: a cluster randomised controlled trial of knowledge transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Sandy; Levi, Christopher; Ward, Jeanette; Grimshaw, Jeremy; Griffiths, Rhonda; D'Este, Catherine; Dale, Simeon; Cheung, N Wah; Quinn, Clare; Evans, Malcolm; Cadilhac, Dominique

    2009-03-16

    Hyperglycaemia, fever, and swallowing dysfunction are poorly managed in the admission phase of acute stroke, and patient outcomes are compromised. Use of evidence-based guidelines could improve care but have not been effectively implemented. Our study aims to develop and trial an intervention based on multidisciplinary team-building to improve management of fever, hyperglycaemia, and swallowing dysfunction in patients following acute stroke. Metropolitan acute stroke units (ASUs) located in New South Wales, Australia will be stratified by service category (A or B) and, within strata, by baseline patient recruitment numbers (high or low) in this prospective, multicentre, single-blind, cluster randomised controlled trial (CRCT). ASUs then will be randomised independently to either intervention or control groups. ASUs allocated to the intervention group will receive: unit-based workshops to identify local barriers and enablers; a standardised core education program; evidence-based clinical treatment protocols; and ongoing engagement of local staff. Control group ASUs will receive only an abridged version of the National Clinical Guidelines for Acute Stroke Management. The following outcome measures will be collected at 90 days post-hospital admission: patient death, disability (modified Rankin Score); dependency (Barthel Index) and Health Status (SF-36). Additional measures include: performance of swallowing screening within 24 hours of admission; glycaemic control and temperature control. This is a unique study of research transfer in acute stroke. Providing optimal inpatient care during the admission phase is essential if we are to combat the rising incidence of debilitating stroke. Our CRCT will also allow us to test interventions focussed on multidisciplinary ASU teams rather than individual disciplines, an imperative of modern hospital services. Australia New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry (ANZCTR) No: ACTRN12608000563369.

  1. prevalence of rheumatic heart disease among primary school pupils

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-01-01

    Jan 1, 2013 ... weighing machine looking ahead. The weight once captured was displayed on the machine. The weight was read to the nearest 0.1 kg. The height was taken with the aid of ..... Gordis L. The virtual disappearance of rheumatic fever in the United States: Lessons in the rise and fall of the disease. Circulation ...

  2. Evidence of acute rickettsioses among patients presumed to have chikungunya fever during the chikungunya outbreak in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premaratna, R; Halambarachchige, L P; Nanayakkara, D M; Chandrasena, T G A N; Rajapakse, R P V J; Bandara, N K B K R G W; de Silva, H J

    2011-12-01

    Chikungunya fever (CGF) and rickettsioses are known to cause acute onset febrile illnesses associated with severe arthritis. Rickettsial arthritis is curable with the use of appropriate anti-rickettsial antibiotics, however the arthritis of CGF tends to have a prolonged course leading to protracted disability. The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of CGF and rickettsioses to cases of fever and arthritis during a presumed CGF outbreak in Sri Lanka. Fifty-eight consecutive patients with presumed CGF were further investigated to determine the occurrence of rickettsioses among them, and to identify differences in clinical, hematological, and biochemical parameters between the two diseases. Nearly a third of the patients had serological evidence of rickettsioses accounting for their illness. The presence of a late onset major joint arthropathy sparing the small joints of the hands and feet, and the occurrence of a late onset discrete maculopapular rash over the trunk and extremities, suggested rickettsioses over CGF. White blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and liver function tests were not helpful in differentiating rickettsioses from CGF. Patients with rickettsioses and arthritis who received an empirical course of doxycycline recovered faster than those who did not receive specific treatment. The establishment of rapid diagnostic methods able to differentiate the etiological agents of fever and arthritis, such as CGF and rickettsioses, would be beneficial in endemic settings. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Circulating cytokines and procalcitonin in acute Q fever granulomatous hepatitis with poor response to antibiotic and short-course steroid therapy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Lin-Li

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Q fever is a zoonosis distributed worldwide that is caused by Coxiella burnetii infection and the defervescence usually occurs within few days of appropriate antibiotic therapy. Whether the changes of cytokine levels are associated with acute Q fever with persistent fever despite antibiotic therapy had not been investigated before. Case Presentation We report a rare case of acute Q fever granulomatous hepatitis remained pyrexia despite several antibiotic therapy and 6-day course of oral prednisolone. During the 18-month follow-up, the investigation of the serum cytokines profile and procalcitonin (PCT revealed that initially elevated levels of interleukin-2 (IL-2, IL-8, IL-10, and PCT decreased gradually, but the IL-6 remained in low titer. No evidence of chronic Q fever was identified by examinations of serum antibodies against C. burnetii and echocardiography. Conclusions The changes of cytokine levels may be associated with acute Q fever with poor response to treatment and PCT may be an indicator for monitoring the response to treatment.

  4. Acute Parasitic Infections as a Cause of Fever of Unknown Origin in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    patients with acute Fasciola and Beeson, 1961) and tuberculosis was hepatica infection, 9 patients with acute the most common infection causing FUO...fascioliasis Safwat Y and Woody JN. (1990b): in Egypt. Am. J. Trop. Med. -,9g. 32, The treatment of acute Fasciola hepatica 550: 554. infection in children...infection. Clinically, acute Fasciola and patients with an infection. 32 were caused acute Schistosoma infection present a by tuberculosis and of these 32

  5. Polysaccharides from Arnebia euchroma Ameliorated Endotoxic Fever and Acute Lung Injury in Rats Through Inhibiting Complement System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Ying-Ye; Jiang, Yun; Li, Hong; Zhang, Yun-Yi; Lu, Yan; Chen, Dao-Feng

    2017-02-01

    Arnebiaeuchroma (Royle) Johnst (Ruanzicao) is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine (TCM). It is extensively used in China and other countries for treatment of inflammatory diseases. It is known that hyper-activated complement system involves in the fever and acute lung injury (ALI) in rats. In our preliminary studies, anti-complementary activity of crude Arnebiaeuchroma polysaccharides (CAEP) had been demonstrated in vitro. This study aimed to investigate the role and mechanism of crude Arnebiaeuchroma polysaccharides (CAEP) using two animal models, which relate with inappropriate activation of complement system. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced fever model, the body temperature and leukocytes of peripheral blood in rats were significantly increased, while the complement levels of serum were remarkably decreased. CAEP administration alleviated the LPS-induced fever, reduced the number of leukocytes, and improved the levels of complement. Histological assay showed that there were severe damages and complement depositions in lung of the ALI rats. Further detection displayed that the oxidant stress was enhanced, and total hemolytic activity and C3/C4 levels in serum were decreased significantly in the ALI model group. Remarkably, CAEP not only attenuated the morphological injury, edema, and permeability in the lung but also significantly weakened the oxidant stress in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in the ALI rats. The levels of complement and complement depositions were improved by the CAEP treatment. In conclusion, the CAEP treatment ameliorated febrile response induced by LPS and acute lung injury induced by LPS plus ischemia-reperfusion. CAEP exerted beneficial effects on inflammatory disease potentially via inhibiting the inappropriate activation of complement system.

  6. Chikungunya: acute fever, rash and debilitating arthralgias in a returning traveler from Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kathryn B; Pureza, Vincent; Walker, Patricia F

    2014-01-01

    The following case report details a case of chikungunya fever in a returning traveler from Haiti. The report highlights the clinical presentation and natural history of the disease, and emphasizes that chikungunya has become established in the western hemisphere, with a resultant need for heightened provider awareness. © 2014 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  7. Murine typhus and leptospirosis as causes of acute undifferentiated fever, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gasem, M. Hussein; Wagenaar, Jiri F. P.; Goris, Marga G. A.; Adi, Mateus S.; Isbandrio, Bambang B.; Hartskeerl, Rudy A.; Rolain, Jean Marc; Raoult, Didier; van Gorp, Eric C. M.

    2009-01-01

    To investigate rickettsioses and leptospirosis among urban residents of Semarang, Indonesia, we tested the blood of 137 patients with fever. Evidence of Rickettsia typhi, the agent of murine typhus, was found in 9 patients. Another 9 patients showed inconclusive serologic results. Thirteen patients

  8. Murine Typhus and Leptospirosis as Causes of Acute Undifferentiated Fever, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gasem, M.H.; Wagenaar, J.F.P.; Goris, M.G.A.; Adi, M.S.; Isbandrio, B.B.; Hartskeerl, R.A.; Rolain, J.M.; Raoult, D.; van Gorp, E.C.M.

    2009-01-01

    To investigate rickettsioses and leptospirosis among urban residents of Semarang, Indonesia, we tested the blood of 137 patients with fever. Evidence of Rickettsia typhi, the agent of murine typhus, was found in 9 patients. Another 9 patients showed inconclusive serologic results. Thirteen patients

  9. Awareness of malaria and treatment-seeking behaviour among persons with acute undifferentiated fever in the endemic regions of Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naing, Phyo Aung; Maung, Thae Maung; Tripathy, Jaya Prasad; Oo, Tin; Wai, Khin Thet; Thi, Aung

    2017-01-01

    Myanmar has a high burden of malaria with two-third of the population at risk of malaria. One of the basic elements of the Roll Back Malaria Initiative to fight against malaria is early diagnosis and treatment within 24 h of fever. Public awareness about malaria is a key factor in malaria prevention and control and in improving treatment-seeking behaviour. A large community-based survey was carried out in 27 townships of malaria endemic regions in Myanmar in 2015 which reported on the knowledge, behaviour and practices around malaria in the general population. We used the data already collected in this survey to assess (i) general public awareness of malaria and (ii) treatment-seeking behaviour and associated factors among persons with acute undifferentiated fever. A total of 6597 respondents from 6625 households were interviewed (response rate of 99.5%). About 85% of the respondents were aware that mosquito bite was the mode of transmission of malaria and 90% mentioned that malaria was preventable. However, only 16% of the respondents knew about anti-malaria drug resistance. There were certain misconceptions about the transmission of malaria such as dirty water, same blood group, sharing shelter, sleeping/eating together and poor hygiene. Health facility staff were the most common source of information about malaria (80%). Nearly one-fourth (23%) of the respondents with fever resorted to self-medication. Around 28% of the respondents with fever underwent blood testing, less than half of whom (44%) were tested within 24 h. Elderly age group, females, those with poor knowledge about malaria and those residing in non-Regional Artemisinin Resistance Initiative townships were associated with poor treatment-seeking behaviour in case of fever. Although there is fair knowledge on mosquito bite as a mode of transmission and prevention of malaria, there are some misconceptions about transmission of malaria. Those having poor knowledge about malaria have poor treatment

  10. [A case of Chikungunya fever in the Primorye Territory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simakova, A I; Popov, A F; Sokotun, S A; Sokotun, O A; Petukhova, S A

    2014-01-01

    The authors analyze a case of Chikungunya fever imported to Vladivostok. The disease was severe and resulted in disability in a female patient for more than 6 months. There were difficulties in its differential diagnosis with rheumatic diseases.

  11. Prediction of residual valvular lesions in rheumatic heart disease: role of adhesion molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, Mona; Yahia, Sohier; Eldars, Waleed; Eldegla, Heba; Matter, Mohamed; Attia, Gehan; Hawas, Samia

    2013-03-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a chronic condition characterized by fibrosis and scarring of the cardiac valves and damage to the heart muscle, leading to congestive heart failure and death. This prospective cohort study was conducted to investigate the possible relation between the levels of serum adhesion molecules and acute rheumatic fever (ARF) carditis, valvular insult severity, and residual valvular lesion after improvement of rheumatic activity. Serum levels of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and E-selectin were assayed by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) for 50 children with ARF carditis during activity and after improvement and for 50 healthy children as control subjects. After the acute attack, patients were followed up regularly to detect residual valvular lesion. The serum levels of these adhesion molecules were significantly higher in the patients than in the control group (p valvular lesion (ICAM-1, >1,032.3 μg/ml; VCAM-1, >3,662.3 μg/ml; E-selectin, >104.8 μg/ml). Finally, by combining the three adhesion molecules in a single prediction model, the highest area under the curve (AUC) ± standard error (SE) was obtained (0.869 ± 0.052), and the positive likelihood ratio for having a residual valvular lesion was increased (17.33). Levels of serum adhesion molecules could predict residual valvular lesions in RHD patients. The authors recommend that the serum level of adhesion molecules be measured in all cases of ARF carditis.

  12. Aspectos da gravidez e pós-parto de adolescentes portadoras de febre reumática Aspects of the pregnancy and post delivery of adolescents with rheumatic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Julia Pantoja Moraes

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a incidência e evolução de gravidez entre adolescentes portadoras de febre reumática (FR do nosso serviço. MÉTODOS: Avaliação retrospectiva de 510 prontuários de pacientes com diagnóstico de FR, no período de 1983 a 2001. RESULTADOS: Dos 510 pacientes analisados, 123 (46% eram adolescentes femininas. Dezesseis (13% engravidaram neste período, com um total de 19 gestações (uma apresentou duas gestações e outra três; 14 realizaram pré-natal adequadamente. A idade da primeira gestação variou de 14 a 19 anos (média 16,7; e a idade do início da atividade sexual, de 13 a 18 anos (média 15,2. Insuficiência mitral ocorreu em 15 casos, estando associada com insuficiência aórtica em cinco. Intercorrências durante o pré-natal foram observadas em duas pacientes: em uma houve recidiva da FR com Coréia e em outra infecção pelo HIV. O parto vaginal ocorreu em sete adolescentes, parto fórcipe em três e cesareana em quatro: uma com HIV, uma com gestação gemelar e duas com distocia funcional. Treze recém-nascidos foram adequados para idade gestacional e apenas os gêmeos foram prematuros. No pós-parto, uma paciente apresentou infecção na incisão cirúrgica e outra abscesso mamário. Nenhuma paciente reativou a FR no parto e pós-parto. CONCLUSÕES: As gestações não apresentaram descompensação cardíaca, com predomínio de valvulites de leve intensidade. Atividade sexual precoce e aumento da gravidez em adolescentes são realidades nos ambulatórios de reumatologia pediátrica, justificando a necessidade de uma melhor orientação em relação à sexualidade e uso de métodos anticoncepcionais na rotina do atendimento.BACKGROUND: To evaluate the incidence and follow-up of pregnancy among adolescents with rheumatic fever (RF attended at the authors' service. METHODS: A retrospective evaluation was undertaken of 510 patients with a diagnosis of RF according to records from 1983 to 2001. RESULTS: We

  13. Early Guillain-Barré Syndrome associated with acute dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, O; Billot, S; Guyon, D; Daures, M; Descloux, E; Gourinat, A C; Molko, N; Dupont-Rouzeyrol, M

    2016-04-01

    Various forms of neurological manifestations are reported in dengue fever. We describe here three cases of concomitant Guillain-Barré syndrome and dengue virus (DENV) infection during the largest DENV-1 outbreak in New Caledonia. Research of viral RNA was positive in both blood and CSF samples. All patients were treated with intravenous polyvalent immunoglobulins and recovered without sequelae within one week. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Sphingomonas paucimobilis bacteraemia and shock in a patient with rheumatic carditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Yozgat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute rheumatic fever (ARF carditis is treated with steroids, which can cause changes in the cellular immune response, especially decreased CD3 (+ T cells. Nosocomial infections due to steroid use for treatment of ARF carditis or secondary to the changes in the cellular immune response have not been reported in the literature. Sphingomonas paucimobilis is a Gram-negative bacillus causing community- and hospital-acquired infections. It has been reported as causing bacteraemia/sepsis, pneumonia or peritonitis in patients with malignancies, immunosuppression or diabetes. We present a case with S. paucimobilis bacteraemia/sepsis and shock after administration of steroids for treatment of ARF carditis. We suggest early identification of the causative agent and appropriate adjustments of the treatment plan to avoid shock and possible mortality. This is the first reported case of S. paucimobilis bacteraemia/sepsis in the setting of steroid use for ARF carditis.

  15. [Rheumatic diseases and multimorbidity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasonov, E L; Gordeev, A V; Galushko, E A

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, investigators' undeniable and justified interest has not been fading in comorbidities in the presence of rheumatic diseases. The terms "comorbidity" and "multimorbidity" are frequently and not always consciously used as interinterchangeable, confusing the terminology and accordingly the elaboration of strategies for further researches. The concepts "(co-occurring disease" and "multimodality" are not mutually exclusive or contradictory, but these should be considered from another point of view than "comorbidity". The problem of multimorbid disease is the rule rather than the exception for clinicians treating primarily "typical" rheumatic patients. Recent researches could outline a few key areas for further study of the concept of multimorbidity in rheumatologic practice, which will be able to turn the international research community from rheumatic disease to the patient as a whole.

  16. Malignancy and Rheumatic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeriano

    1997-05-01

    BACKGROUND: A wide variety of clinically significant interactions occur between neoplastic and rheumatic diseases, and many are clinically significant. METHODS: The types of interactions between rheumatologic and neoplastic diseases and their clinical manifestations are reviewed and described. RESULTS: Several diseases included in the classic definition of rheumatology are associated with an increased incidence of specific neoplasms. Conversely, many neoplasms, by a variety of mechanisms, can cause or simulate many rheumatic diseases. CONCLUSIONS: Knowledge of the increased propensity for neoplasia in certain conditions and of the possibility that cancer may be the cause of specific rheumatologic syndromes will assist the physician in providing optimal clinical care to affected patients.

  17. [Microbiota and inflammatory rheumatisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarlborg, Matthias; Alpizar-Rodriguez, Deshiré; Baillet, Athan; Finckh, Axel

    2018-03-07

    The microbiota and dysbiosis are involved in various diseases. Many studies in mice and humans demonstrate its influence on inflammatory rheumatisms. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Prevotella copri, a Gram-negative bacteria of the intestinal flora, is found to be more prevalent in the early stages of the disease. Specific antibodies against this germ have been identified in RA patients, suggesting a role of this bacteria in the initiation of the disease. Oral microorganisms involved in periodontitis have also been associated with the development and the activity of RA. These discoveries imply new targets in the management of inflammatory rheumatisms.

  18. Presentation and diagnosis of acute Q fever in Portugal — A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Alves

    2017-01-01

    Serological tests can be negative in the initial period of the disease. Molecular biology methods by polymerase chain-reaction are extremely important in acute disease, allowing timely diagnosis and treatment.

  19. Echocardiographic screening of schoolchildren in American Samoa to detect rheumatic heart disease: a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn S Barnes

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Shawn S Barnes1 James Sim2 James R Marrone3 Venudhar D Reddy2 Darragh C O’Carroll1 Lauren Sumida1 Guliz Erdem21John A Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA; 2Department of Pediatrics, John A Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA; 3Department of Pediatrics, Lyndon Baines Johnson Tropical Medical Center, Pago Pago, American SamoaBackground: We report a practical and affordable pilot echocardiographic screening model for the detection of rheumatic heart disease (RHD in Samoan children.Materials and methods: Following a brief training period, three medical students recruited and screened 58.3% (N = 140 of schoolchildren aged 7–18 years on the remote Pacific island of Ta’u, American Samoa, performing echocardiography with a SonoSite® portable ultrasound machine.Results: None of the echocardiographic images obtained showed significant abnormality consistent with RHD on their review by two pediatric cardiologists on Oahu, Hawaii.Conclusions: The implementation of echocardiographic screening in resource-poor regions with high rates of acute rheumatic fever and RHD, such as American Samoa, is feasible with limited training of personnel.Keywords: pediatric, RHD, Samoa, schoolchildren, screening

  20. [Presence of bacterial DNA in valvular tissue of patients with chronic rheumatic heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Fernando E; Carrión A, Flavio; Valenzuela M, Sylvia; Turner G, Eduardo; Aceitón E, Cristian; Hirigoyen P, Carolina; Bogdanic W, Katherine; Solís D, Claudia; Mansilla A, Karina; Urra G, Soledad

    2007-08-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a delayed consequence of a pharyngeal infection with Group A streptococcus (GAS), usually ascribed to a cross-reactive immune response to the host cardiac tissues. Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and its ensuing valvular sequelae are thus considered the prototype of a post-infectious autoimmune disease, with no direct evidence of residual streptococcal antigen in diseased valvular tissues. However, recent studies concerning the antigenic specificity and clonality of intralesional lymphocytes have revealed oligoclonal expansions characteristic of an antigen specific response, that might be related to GAS. To search for bacterial DNA in valvular tissue from RHD patients and controls. We extracted DNA from surgically excised valve specimens from 15 RHD patients and 6 non RHD controls and tested for the presence of bacterial DNA by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) with primers for 16S rRNA. Eighty percent (12/15) of valve specimens from RHD patients were positive for bacterial DNA, as opposed to none of the valves (n =6) from non RHD controls. These results suggest that GAS might persist in valvular tissue in patients with ARF and contribute to the inflammatory scarring lesion that leads to cardiovascular sequelae.

  1. Paraneoplastic rheumatic syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Stella Seiffert de Assis Goulart

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This article makes a review of the literature on paraneoplasticrheumatic syndromes. Rheumatic diseases may sometimeshave manifestations associated with the development of tumorprocesses, being considered paraneoplastic. Certain manifestationshave studies confi rming a strong association with malignancy;among these are hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, paraneoplasticpolyarthritis, dermatomyositis, and vasculitis. On the otherhand, chemotherapy and radiotherapy can induce rheumatologiccomplications in cancer patients.

  2. Non-Steroid Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Are Better than Acetaminophen on Fever Control at Acute Stage of Fracture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang-Ting Yeh

    Full Text Available In addition to adequate surgical fixation and an aggressive rehabilitation program, pain relief is one of the most critical factors in the acute stage of fracture treatment. The most common analgesics are nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs and Acetaminophen, both of which relieve pain and reduce body temperature. In clinical experiences, they exhibit effective pain control; however, their influence on body temperature remains controversial. This study is aimed at determining the effects of analgesics at the acute stage of traumatic fracture by performing a clinical retrospective study of patients with fractures and a fracture animal model. The retrospective study revealed that, in the acetaminophen group, the mean value of postmedication body temperature (BT was significantly higher than that of the premedication BT. The change in BT was highly related with the medication rather than other risk factors. Forty eight 12-week-old male Wistar rats were divided into 6 groups: a control group, fracture group, fracture-Acetaminophen group, Acetaminophen group, fracture-Arcoxia group, and Arcoxia group. Fracture rats were prepared by breaking their unilateral tibia and fibula. Their inflammation conditions were evaluated by measuring their serum cytokine level and their physiological status was evaluated by estimating their central temperature, heart rate, and mean blood pressure. The hepatic adverse effects were assessed by measuring the serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (sGOT and alanine aminotransferase (sGPT. The central temperature in the fracture-Acetaminophen group exceeded that in the groups fed normal saline water or Arcoxia. Accumulated hepatic injury was presented as steadily ascending curves of sGOT and sGPT. Inflammation-related cytokine levels were not higher in the Acetaminophen fracture group and were significantly lower in the fracture-Arcoxia group. Fever appeared to be aggravated by acetaminophen and more related to the

  3. Detection of herpes simplex virus type 1 in rheumatic valvular tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhi-gang; Wang, Xiu-nan; Li, Yan-wen; Zhang, Hong-yi; Archard, Leonard C

    2005-03-05

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is the most important sequela of rheumatic fever (RF): evidence that streptococcal infection is aetiological is prominent, but sometimes contradictory. Acute HSV-1 infection in mouse leads to carditis and valvulitis whereas recurrent infection results in inflammatory granulomatous lesions that resemble Aschoff bodies. Cells containing HSV-1 inclusions or virus infected giant cells appear similar to Anitschkow cells or Aschoff cells respectively. We hypothesized that HSV-1 infection also may be involved in RHD. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded valvular tissue samples from 32 patients with RHD were investigated for evidence of HSV-1 infection. HSV-1 antigen was detected by immunohistochemistry, using HSV-1-specific monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. HSV-1 glycoprotein D gene sequences were amplified by nPCR, using beta-globin gene amplification in the same samples as internal control. Valvular tissue from 5 cases of sudden death and 3 cases died of neisseria meningitis without a history of valvular disease was used for comparison. HSV-1-infected lung tissue was used as positive control. HSV-1 antigens were detected in valvular tissues from 21 of 32 (65.6%) patients. Fifteen of these 21 (46.9% of cases), but no antigen-negative sample, were positive also for HSV DNA. Nucleotide sequence of PCR products was homologous to the targeted region of the HSV-1 glycoprotein D gene. HSV-1 antigen was present also in one case of sudden death but viral DNA was not found in any tissue sample from the comparison group. Results from reagent and positive controls were as anticipated. This is the first study to show the presence of HSV-1 antigen and genomic DNA in valvular tissues from patients with RHD and provides evidence for an association of HSV-1 infection with some cases of rheumatic valvular disease.

  4. Comparison of acute phase response during attack and attack-free period in children with Familial Mediterranean Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdal Çakmak

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to compare acutephase reactant (AFR levels at attack period and attackfreeperiod under colchicine treatment in children with FamilialMediterranean Fever (FMF.Methods: The diagnosis of FMF was done based on clinicalcriteria and patients were prospectively followed upfor average of 1.2 years. Symptom-onset age, age at diagnosis,clinical symptoms and features of FMF attackswere recorded. MEFV gene mutations were detected byreverse hybridization (strip assay method. Peripheralblood leukocyte count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate(ESR, C-reactive protein (CRP and blood fibrinogen levelswere measured by standard methods, both at attackperiod and during attack-free period.Results: Totally 105 (55 girls, 50 boys children with FMFwere included. The mean age was 8.9±3.2 years, meansymptom onset age was 5.9 years and mean age at diagnosiswas 8.1 years. MEFV gene mutations were asfollows: E148Q (29.2%, M694V (24.8%, R761H (15.3%and V726A (13.1%. The mean AFR values were overnormal values in attack period and there was at least onehigh AFR level in 80.0% of patients. In attack-free period,although the mean values of all AFRs were within normallimits, 31.4% of patients had at least one high AFR level.Conclusion: Based on these data, one-third of FMF childrenhad a high AFR level, which may be a marker of subclinicalinflammation. In children with continuous inflammationduring attack-free period, a new anti-inflammatorydrug additional to colchicine can be considered in order toprevent complications of chronic inflammation. J Clin ExpInvest 2013; 4 (2: 213-218Key words: Familial Mediterranean Fever, acute phasereactants, children, attack period, attack-free period

  5. Acute psychosis followed by fever: Malignant neuroleptic syndrome or viral encephalitis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Zvezdana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome is rare, but potentially fatal idiosyncratic reaction to antipsychotic medications. It is sometimes difficult to diagnose some clinical cases as neuroleptic malignant syndrome and differentiate it from the acute viral encephalitis. Case report. We reported a patient diagnosed with acute psychotic reaction which appeared for the first time. The treatment started with typical antipsychotic, which led to febrility. The clinical presentation of the patient was characterised by the signs and symptoms that might have indicated the neuroleptic malignant syndrome as well as central nervous system viral disease. In order to make a detailed diagnosis additional procedures were performed: electroencephalogram, magnetic resonance imaging of the head, lumbar puncture and a serological test of the cerebrospinal fluid. Considering that after the tests viral encephalitis was ruled out and the diagnosis of neuroleptic malignant syndrome made, antipsychotic therapy was immediately stopped. The patient was initially treated with symptomatic therapy and after that with atypical antipsychotic and electroconvulsive therapy, which led to complete recovery. Conclusion. We present the difficulties of early diagnosis at the first episode of acute psychotic disorder associated with acute febrile condition. Concerning the differential diagnosis it is necessary to consider both neuroleptic malignant syndrome and viral encephalitis, i.e. it is necessary to make the neuroradiological diagnosis and conduct cerebrospinal fluid analysis and blood test. In neuroleptic malignant syndrome treatment a combined use of electroconvulsive therapy and low doses of atypical antipsychotic are confirmed to be successful.

  6. A Fever in Acute Aortic Dissection is Caused by Endogenous Mediators that Influence the Extrinsic Coagulation Pathway and Do Not Elevate Procalcitonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue Arita, Yoshie; Akutsu, Koichi; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Kawanaka, Hidekazu; Kitamura, Mitsunobu; Murata, Hiroshige; Miyachi, Hideki; Hosokawa, Yusuke; Tanaka, Keiji; Shimizu, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    Objective A fever is observed in approximately one-third of cases of acute aortic dissection (AAD); however, the causes remain unclear. We investigated the mechanism of a fever in AAD by measuring the serum concentrations of inflammatory markers, mediators of coagulation and fibrinolysis, and procalcitonin, a marker of bacterial infection. Methods We retrospectively studied 43 patients with medically treated AAD without apparent infection. Patients were divided into those with (Group A; n=19) and without (Group B; n=24) a maximum body temperature >38°C. We established which patients fulfilled the criteria for systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), and its relationship with a fever was examined. Mediators of inflammation, coagulation and fibrinolysis were compared by a univariate analysis. Factors independently associated with a fever were established by a multivariate analysis. Results The criteria for SIRS were fulfilled in a greater proportion of patients in Group A (79%) than in Group B (42%, p=0.001). There was no difference in the procalcitonin concentration between Groups A and B (0.15±0.17 ng/mL vs. 0.11±0.12 ng/mL, respectively; p=0.572). Serum procalcitonin concentrations lay within the normal range in all patients in whom it was measured, which showed that the fever was caused by endogenous mediators. On the multivariate analysis, there was a borderline significant relationship between a fever and the prothrombin time-International Normalized Ratio (p=0.065), likely reflecting the extrinsic pathway activity initiated by tissue factor. Conclusion Our findings suggest that a fever in AAD could be caused by SIRS, provoked by endogenous mediators that influence the extrinsic coagulation pathway without elevating the serum procalcitonin concentration.

  7. Mania in dengue fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anurag Jhanjee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever, also known as break bone fever, is a mosquito-borne infection that causes a severe flu-like illness. During the last few years, there had been increasing reports of dengue fever with unusual manifestations, primarily with neurological symptoms. Psychiatric morbidity during acute dengue infection has rarely been reported. There has not been any systemic study mentioning the prevalence and pattern of psychiatric sequelae. We report a 28-year-old male who after an acute dengue infection developed an episode of mania which was successfully treated.

  8. Palindromic Rheumatism: Does It Cause Joint Pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palindromic rheumatism: Precursor to rheumatoid arthritis? Is palindromic rheumatism a precursor to rheumatoid arthritis? Answers from April Chang-Miller, ... a third of the people who have palindromic rheumatism will go on to develop rheumatoid arthritis. Palindromic ...

  9. Investigating an outbreak of acute fever in Chuuk, Federated States of Micronesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Hoy

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In September 2012, there was an unexpected increase of acute febrile illness (AFI in Chuuk State of the Federated States of Micronesia. At the same time, dengue outbreaks were occurring in two of the Federated States of Micronesia’s other three states. The cause of AFI was suspected to be dengue; however, by the end of October, only one of 39 samples was positive for dengue. The objective of the investigation was to establish the cause of the outbreak. Methods: A line list was created and data analysed by time, place, person and clinical features. Reported symptoms were compared with the published symptoms of several diagnoses and laboratory testing undertaken. Results: Of the 168 suspected cases, 62% were less than 20 years of age and 60% were male. The clinical features of the cases were not typical for dengue but suggestive of respiratory illness. Nasopharyngeal swabs were subsequently collected and found to be positive for influenza. Public health measures were undertaken and the AFI returned to expected levels. Discussion: Clinical diagnosis of acute febrile illness (AFI can often be difficult and misleading. This can mean that opportunities for preventive measures early on in an outbreak are missed. In any outbreak, descriptive epidemiological analyses are valuable in helping to ascertain the cause of the outbreak.

  10. Rheumatic Diseases in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qing Yu; Chen, Ren; Darmawan, John; Xiao, Zheng Yu; Chen, Su Biao; Wigley, Richard; Le Chen, Shun; Zhang, Nai Zheng

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Epidemiological studies of rheumatic diseases have been conducted during the past 20 years in China. The aim of this study was to clarify prevalence rates of common rheumatic diseases in China. Methods Relevant reports of population-based surveys conducted from 1980 to 2006 were retrieved. Studies using the World Health Organization-International League of Associations for Rheumatology COPCORD (Community Oriented Program for Control of Rheumatic Diseases) protocol and those that did not employ this protocol but were published in recognized journals were identified and analyzed. Results Thirty-eight surveys including 241,169 adults from 25 provinces/cities were pooled for analysis. The prevalence of rheumatic complaints ranged from 11.6% to 46.4%, varying by locality, study protocol and age of the people surveyed. Prevalence of symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA) varied from 5.1% to 20.8%, with common sites of involvement being the lumbar spine, knee joint and cervical spine. Compared with rates of radiographic and symptomatic knee OA in the USA, elderly men in Beijing exhibited similar prevalence rates and elderly women exhibited a higher prevalence. The prevalence of hip OA and hand OA was much lower in Chinese than in Caucasian populations, but both kinds of OA were more common in coal miners. The prevalence of ankylosing spondylitis ranged from 0.2% to 0.54% among Han ethnic Chinese and were lower among mixed ethnic populations. The prevalence of psoriatic arthritis ranged from 0.01% to 0.1%, and that of reactive arthritis was 0.02%; undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy was identified in 0.64% to 1.2% of the individuals included in the surveys. The prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) ranged from 0.2% to 0.93%, with the highest rate being reported from a Taiwan urban area. In mainland China there were no significant differences in prevalence of RA between the northern and southern parts of China, or between different ethnic groups. The prevalence of

  11. Microevolution of the chromosomal region of acute disease antigen A (adaA in the query (Q fever agent Coxiella burnetii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Frangoulidis

    Full Text Available The acute disease antigen A (adaA gene is believed to be associated with Coxiella burnetii strains causing acute Q fever. The detailed analysis of the adaA genomic region of 23 human- and 86 animal-derived C. burnetii isolates presented in this study reveals a much more polymorphic appearance and distribution of the adaA gene, resulting in a classification of C. burnetii strains of better differentiation than previously anticipated. Three different genomic variants of the adaA gene were identified which could be detected in isolates from acute and chronic patients, rendering the association of adaA positive strains with acute Q fever disease disputable. In addition, all adaA positive strains in humans and animals showed the occurrence of the QpH1 plasmid. All adaA positive isolates of acute human patients except one showed a distinct SNP variation at position 431, also predominant in sheep strains, which correlates well with the observation that sheep are a major source of human infection. Furthermore, the phylogenetic analysis of the adaA gene revealed three deletion events and supported the hypothesis that strain Dugway 5J108-111 might be the ancestor of all known C. burnetii strains. Based on our findings, we could confirm the QpDV group and we were able to define a new genotypic cluster. The adaA gene polymorphisms shown here improve molecular typing of Q fever, and give new insights into microevolutionary adaption processes in C. burnetii.

  12. Episode of Familial Mediterranean Fever-Related Peritonitis in the Second Trimester of Pregnancy Followed by Acute Cholecystitis: Dilemmas and Pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmidis, Christophoros; Anthimidis, Georgios; Varsamis, Nikolaos; Makedou, Fotini; Georgakoudi, Eleni; Efthimiadis, Christophoros

    2016-02-24

    Differential diagnosis of acute abdomen in pregnant patients is one of the greatest challenges for the clinician. Occurrence of Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) paroxysm of peritonitis and acute cholecystitis during pregnancy is a unique clinical entity that leads to serious diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas. We present the case of a 33-year-old Armenian patient at 16 weeks' gestational age with a history of FMF, who was admitted twice within 1 month with acute abdomen. The first episode was attributed to FMF and successfully treated conservatively with colchicine. The second episode was diagnosed as acute cholecystitis and led to emergent laparoscopic cholecystectomy and lysis of peritoneal adhesions from previous FMF attacks. The patient presented an uneventful postoperative clinical course and had a normal delivery of a healthy infant at the 39th week of gestation. Pregnant patients with acute abdomen should be evaluated with open mind. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first published report of the coexistence of 2 different causes of acute abdomen during pregnancy. Meticulous history and thorough physical, laboratory, and radiologic examination are the keys to reach a correct diagnosis. Treatment of pregnant patients with acute abdomen should be individualized. Administration of colchicine should be continued during conception, pregnancy, and lactation in patients with FMF history. Laparoscopic intervention in pregnant patients with surgical abdomen such as acute cholecystitis is the optimal method of treatment.

  13. Diagnosing acute and prevalent HIV-1 infection in young African adults seeking care for fever: a systematic review and audit of current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Henrieke A B; Mugo, Peter; Wahome, Elizabeth; Mwashigadi, Grace; Thiong'o, Alexander; Smith, Adrian; Sanders, Eduard J; Graham, Susan M

    2014-06-01

    Fever is a common complaint in HIV-1 infected adults and may be a presenting sign of acute HIV-1 infection (AHI). We investigated the extent to which HIV-1 infection was considered in the diagnostic evaluation of febrile adults in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) through a systematic review of published literature and guidelines in the period 2003-2014. We also performed a detailed audit of current practice for the evaluation of febrile young adults in coastal Kenya. Our review identified 43 studies investigating the aetiology of fever in adult outpatients in SSA. While the guidelines identified recommend testing for HIV-1 infection, none mentioned AHI. In our audit of current practice at nine health facilities, only 189 out of 1173 (16.1%) patients, aged 18-29 years, were tested for HIV-1. In a detailed record review, only 2 out of 39 (5.1%) young adults seeking care for fever were tested for HIV-1, and the possibility of AHI was not mentioned. Available literature on adult outpatients presenting with fever is heavily focused on diagnosing malaria and guidelines are poorly defined in terms of evaluating aetiologies other than malaria. Current practice in coastal Kenya shows poor uptake of provider-initiated HIV-1 testing and AHI is not currently considered in the differential diagnosis. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  14. Chronic pain associated with the Chikungunya Fever: long lasting burden of an acute illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dallel Radhouane

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is responsible for major epidemics worldwide. Autochthonous cases were recently reported in several European countries. Acute infection is thought to be monophasic. However reports on chronic pain related to CHIKV infection have been made. In particular, the fact that many of these patients do not respond well to usual analgesics suggests that the nature of chronic pain may be not only nociceptive but also neuropathic. Neuropathic pain syndromes require specific treatment and the identification of neuropathic characteristics (NC in a pain syndrome is a major step towards pain control. Methods We carried out a cross-sectional study at the end of the major two-wave outbreak lasting 17 months in Réunion Island. We assessed pain in 106 patients seeking general practitioners with confirmed infection with the CHIK virus, and evaluated its impact on quality of life (QoL. Results The mean intensity of pain on the visual-analogical scale (VAS was 5.8 ± 2.1, and its mean duration was 89 ± 2 days. Fifty-six patients fulfilled the definition of chronic pain. Pain had NC in 18.9% according to the DN4 questionnaire. Conversely, about two thirds (65% of patients with NC had chronic pain. The average pain intensity was similar between patients with or without NC (6.0 ± 1.7 vs 6.1 ± 2.0. However, the total score of the Short Form-McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ(15.5 ± 5.2 vs 11.6 ± 5.2; p Conclusions There exists a specific chronic pain condition associated to CHIKV. Pain with NC seems to be associated with more aggressive clinical picture, more intense impact in QoL and more challenging pharmacological treatment.

  15. Effect of administration of Streptococcus salivarius K12 on the occurrence of streptococcal pharyngo-tonsillitis, scarlet fever and acute otitis media in 3 years old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pierro, F; Colombo, M; Giuliani, M G; Danza, M L; Basile, I; Bollani, T; Conti, A M; Zanvit, A; Rottoli, A S

    2016-11-01

    Streptococcus salivarius K12 (BLIS K12) is a probiotic strain strongly antagonistic to the growth of Streptococcus pyogenes, the most important bacterial cause of pharyngeal infections in humans. Shown to colonize the oral cavity and to be safe for human use, BLIS K12 has previously been reported to reduce pharyngo-tonsillitis episodes in children or adults known to have experienced recurrent streptococcal infection. The present study was focussed upon evaluating the role of BLIS K12 in the control of streptococcal disease and acute otitis media in children attending the first year of kindergarten. By randomization, 222 enrolled children attending the first year of kindergarten were divided into a treated group (N = 111) receiving for 6 months a daily treatment with BLIS K12 (Bactoblis®) and a control group (N = 111) who were monitored as untreated controls. During the 6 months of treatment and 3 months of follow-up, the children were evaluated for treatment tolerance, and for episodes of streptococcal pharyngo-tonsillitis, scarlet fever and acute otitis media. During the 6-month trial (N = 111 per group) the incidence of streptococcal pharyngo-tonsillitis, scarlet fever and acute otitis media was approximately 16%, 9% and 44% respectively in the treated group and 48%, 4% and 80% in the control group. During the 3-months follow-up (N = 29 per group) the corresponding rates of infection were 15%, 0% and 12% in the treated group and 26%, 6% and 36% in the controls. No apparent side effects were detected in the treated group either during treatment or follow-up. All of the enrolled children completed the study. The daily administration of BLIS K12 to children attending their first year of kindergarten was associated with a significant reduction in episodes of streptococcal pharyngitis and acute otitis media. No protection against scarlet fever was detected.

  16. Clinical Outcomes in 3343 Children and Adults With Rheumatic Heart Disease From 14 Low- and Middle-Income Countries: Two-Year Follow-Up of the Global Rheumatic Heart Disease Registry (the REMEDY Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zühlke, Liesl; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Engel, Mark E; Rangarajan, Sumathy; Mackie, Pam; Cupido-Katya Mauff, Blanche; Islam, Shofiqul; Daniels, Rezeen; Francis, Veronica; Ogendo, Stephen; Gitura, Bernard; Mondo, Charles; Okello, Emmy; Lwabi, Peter; Al-Kebsi, Mohammed M; Hugo-Hamman, Christopher; Sheta, Sahar S; Haileamlak, Abraham; Daniel, Wandimu; Goshu, Dejuma Yadeta; Abdissa, Senbeta G; Desta, Araya G; Shasho, Bekele A; Begna, Dufera M; ElSayed, Ahmed; Ibrahim, Ahmed S; Musuku, John; Bode-Thomas, Fidelia; Yilgwan, Christopher C; Amusa, Ganiyu A; Ige, Olukemi; Okeahialam, Basil; Sutton, Christopher; Misra, Rajeev; Abul Fadl, Azza; Kennedy, Neil; Damasceno, Albertino; Sani, Mahmoud U; Ogah, Okechukwu S; Elhassan, Taiwo OlunugaHuda H M; Mocumbi, Ana Olga; Adeoye, Abiodun M; Mntla, Phindile; Ojji, Dike; Mucumbitsi, Joseph; Teo, Koon; Yusuf, Salim; Mayosi, Bongani M

    2016-11-08

    There are few contemporary data on the mortality and morbidity associated with rheumatic heart disease or information on their predictors. We report the 2-year follow-up of individuals with rheumatic heart disease from 14 low- and middle-income countries in Africa and Asia. Between January 2010 and November 2012, we enrolled 3343 patients from 25 centers in 14 countries and followed them for 2 years to assess mortality, congestive heart failure, stroke or transient ischemic attack, recurrent acute rheumatic fever, and infective endocarditis. Vital status at 24 months was known for 2960 (88.5%) patients. Two-thirds were female. Although patients were young (median age, 28 years; interquartile range, 18-40), the 2-year case fatality rate was high (500 deaths, 16.9%). Mortality rate was 116.3/1000 patient-years in the first year and 65.4/1000 patient-years in the second year. Median age at death was 28.7 years. Independent predictors of death were severe valve disease (hazard ratio [HR], 2.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.80-3.11), congestive heart failure (HR, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.70-2.72), New York Heart Association functional class III/IV (HR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.32-2.10), atrial fibrillation (HR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.10-1.78), and older age (HR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.02 per year increase) at enrollment. Postprimary education (HR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.54-0.85) and female sex (HR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.52-0.80) were associated with lower risk of death. Two hundred and four (6.9%) patients had new congestive heart failure (incidence, 38.42/1000 patient-years), 46 (1.6%) had a stroke or transient ischemic attack (8.45/1000 patient-years), 19 (0.6%) had recurrent acute rheumatic fever (3.49/1000 patient-years), and 20 (0.7%) had infective endocarditis (3.65/1000 patient-years). Previous stroke and older age were independent predictors of stroke/transient ischemic attack or systemic embolism. Patients from low- and lower-middle-income countries had significantly higher age- and sex

  17. The Yield of Fever, Inflammatory Markers and Ultrasound in the Diagnosis of Acute Cholecystitis: A Validation of the 2013 Tokyo Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, K; Beenen, E; Gananadha, S; Mosse, C

    2016-12-01

    Each year, 1-4 % of people with known gallstones become symptomatic, either presenting with biliary colic or as acute cholecystitis. The distinction between both diagnoses remains challenging. To aid the proper diagnosis, the revised 2013 Tokyo Guidelines (TG 2013) were proposed with a self-acclaimed diagnostic accuracy of over 90 %. However, this accuracy has not been verified by others so far. To determine the accuracy of the TG 2013 guidelines in the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis both in its single components of fever, inflammatory markers and US features and of the combined application of the TG 2013 guidelines as a whole. A 5-year retrospective analysis equal to the TG 2013 validation process of all emergency cholecystectomies for acute cholecystitis or persistent biliary pain with an ultrasound performed during the same admission. Acute cholecystitis at histology was the golden standard. Inclusion criteria were met by 169 patients with a prevalence of acute cholecystitis of 52.7 %. The individual features of fever, gallbladder wall thickening and probe tenderness were not significant in univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis only, neutrophil count was an independent predictor. The combined application of the TG 2013 guidelines led to a better sensitivity of 83.1 % at the cost a reduced specificity of 37.5 % compared to neutrophil count alone. The accuracy was therefore only 60.3 %, which was well below the TG 2013 report. The 2013 Tokyo Guidelines were slightly better in predicting acute cholecystitis but over diagnosed two-thirds of normal gallbladders compared to neutrophil count alone.

  18. Effect of secondary penicillin prophylaxis on valvular changes in patients with rheumatic heart disease in Far North Queensland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haran, Shankar; Crane, Natalie; Kazi, Saniya; Axford-Haines, Louise; White, Andrew

    2017-11-23

    To determine the effect of secondary penicillin prophylaxis (SPP) on echocardiographic diagnosed valvular changes in patients with rheumatic heart disease (RHD) or history of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) in the Townsville Health district. Patients with known ARF/RHD were identified from the North Queensland RHD register, serial echocardiogram results and number of SPP doses received in 2014 were collated. Descriptive statistics were utilised. Townsville Hospital and outreach clinics within the Townsville Health catchment zone. All patients diagnosed with ARF or RHD between 2010 and October 2013 who had serial echocardiograms prior to and post commencement of SPP were included. All patients were of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent. Progression of echocardiographic valvular changes and association with SPP compliance. Compliance with SPP among the study population was a secondary outcome measure. Twenty-three patients were recruited. Only those patients who were compliant with SPP had any improvement in valvular changes on echocardiogram. Four of six patients without any baseline valvular involvement developed new valvular changes. Seventy percent of patients received >75% of SPP doses. This small study of patients in Townsville suggests that with good SPP compliance there is regression of some cardiac lesions over time in people with RHD. Furthermore the natural history of ARF in the Indigenous population is progressive requiring strict adherence to SPP. Prospective studies or use of data from the nationwide RHD register and standardised reporting of cardiac echocardiograms will provide more robust evidence. © 2017 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  19. Rift Valley fever vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Ikegami, Tetsuro; Makino, Shinji

    2009-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), which belongs to the genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae, is a negative-stranded RNA virus carrying a tripartite RNA genome. RVFV is transmitted by mosquitoes and causes large outbreaks among ruminants and humans in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Human patients develop an acute febrile illness, followed by a fatal hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis or ocular diseases, whereas ruminants experience abortions during outbreak. Effective vaccination of both human...

  20. Osteoblast Role in Rheumatic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Addolorata Corrado

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in osteoblast growth, differentiation and activity play a role in the pathogenesis of several rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritides, osteoarthritis, and osteoporosis. In fact, in these rheumatic diseases, abnormal activity of Wnt signaling, receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK-RANK ligand (RANKL-osteoprotegerin (OPG signaling, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs pathway and other mechanisms have been described in osteoblasts. This review article is focused on current knowledge on the role of osteoblast dysregulation occurring in rheumatic diseases.

  1. Osteoblast Role in Rheumatic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrado, Addolorata; Maruotti, Nicola; Cantatore, Francesco Paolo

    2017-06-15

    Alterations in osteoblast growth, differentiation and activity play a role in the pathogenesis of several rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritides, osteoarthritis, and osteoporosis. In fact, in these rheumatic diseases, abnormal activity of Wnt signaling, receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK)-RANK ligand (RANKL)-osteoprotegerin (OPG) signaling, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) pathway and other mechanisms have been described in osteoblasts. This review article is focused on current knowledge on the role of osteoblast dysregulation occurring in rheumatic diseases.

  2. Whole-body MR imaging for patients with rheumatism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weckbach, Sabine [Department of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Unversity Hospital Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, 68167 Mannheim (Germany)], E-mail: sabine.weckbach@umm.de

    2009-06-15

    WB-MRI in rheumatic diseases is still an emerging imaging tool. So far, WB-MRI in rheumatism is mainly used in seronegative spondyloarthropathies. In these diseases it has the ability to visualize the majority of involved joints and soft tissue structures (both active inflammatory changes and chronic structural abnormalities) in one examination, making it suitable for imaging of different forms of spondylopathies, allowing different types of joint involvement to be recognized and assessing both the acute symptoms of disease and the longer-term consequences. Its role in daily practice is not yet clear. WB-MRI is not recommended as a first line investigation in every patient suffering from a form of spondyloarthropathy, but may add important information in difficult cases. Moreover, WB-MRI might obtain a stronger role in the early diagnosis of spondyloarthritides and in the assessment of treatment response. Other rheumatic diseases where WB-MRI may play a role in the future are polymyositis/dermatomyositis, CRMO and certain forms of systemic vasculitis. WB-MRI in rheumatism is a promising tool with great potential, however further systematic evaluation of its abilities and limitations in different forms of rheumatic diseases is awaited.

  3. Whole-body MR imaging for patients with rheumatism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weckbach, Sabine

    2009-01-01

    WB-MRI in rheumatic diseases is still an emerging imaging tool. So far, WB-MRI in rheumatism is mainly used in seronegative spondyloarthropathies. In these diseases it has the ability to visualize the majority of involved joints and soft tissue structures (both active inflammatory changes and chronic structural abnormalities) in one examination, making it suitable for imaging of different forms of spondylopathies, allowing different types of joint involvement to be recognized and assessing both the acute symptoms of disease and the longer-term consequences. Its role in daily practice is not yet clear. WB-MRI is not recommended as a first line investigation in every patient suffering from a form of spondyloarthropathy, but may add important information in difficult cases. Moreover, WB-MRI might obtain a stronger role in the early diagnosis of spondyloarthritides and in the assessment of treatment response. Other rheumatic diseases where WB-MRI may play a role in the future are polymyositis/dermatomyositis, CRMO and certain forms of systemic vasculitis. WB-MRI in rheumatism is a promising tool with great potential, however further systematic evaluation of its abilities and limitations in different forms of rheumatic diseases is awaited.

  4. Filgrastim as a Rescue Therapy for Persistent Neutropenia in a Case of Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Myocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desh Deepak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenesis of dengue involves suppression of immune system leading to development of characteristic presentation of haematological picture of thrombocytopenia and leucopenia. Sometimes, this suppression in immune response is responsible for deterioration in clinical status of the patient in spite of all specific and supportive therapy. Certain drugs like steroids are used for rescue therapy in conditions like sepsis. We present a novel use of filgrastim as a rescue therapy in a patient with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, myocarditis, and febrile neutropenia and not responding to standard management.

  5. Vitamin D and rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossini, M; Gatti, D; Viapiana, O; Caimmi, C; Idolazzi, L; Fracassi, E; Adami, S

    2014-07-28

    Vitamin D has some well-known effects on calcium, phosphate and bone metabolism, but it has recently shown to have many other effects, which may potentially be relevant to patients with extra-skeletal rheumatic diseases. Such effects may be justified by: 1) the presence of the vitamin D receptors also on extra-osseous cells, such as cartilage cells, sinoviocytes, muscle cells; 2) the proven role of vitamin D in the control of the transcription of genes involved in rheumatic diseases; 3) the evidence that vitamin D has multiple endocrine effects not only on calcium homeostasis; 4) the activation of vitamin D not only in the kidneys, but also in monocyte-macrophage and lymphocytic cell lines and in some epithelial cells with additional intracrine and paracrine effects. Vitamin D deficiency has been reported in numerous metabolic, degenerative, inflammatory and autoimmune rheumatic diseases. In some cases this association was also related to the risk of developing a rheumatic disease or the degree of disease activity. However there is no conclusive evidence of the efficacy of a preventive or therapeutic strategy based on vitamin D supplementation in extra-skeletal rheumatic diseases. This review aims to provide an overview of the latest evidence concerning the relationship between vitamin D and the most relevant rheumatic diseases.

  6. Unusual Presentation of Dengue Fever Leading to Unnecessary Appendectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Lovekesh; Singh, Mahendra; Saxena, Ashish; Kolhe, Yuvraj; Karande, Snehal K; Singh, Narendra; Venkatesh, P; Meena, Rambabu

    2015-01-01

    Dengue fever is the most important arbovirus illness with an estimated incidence of 50-100 million cases per year. The common symptoms of dengue include fever, rash, malaise, nausea, vomiting, and musculoskeletal pain. Dengue fever may present as acute abdomen leading to diagnostic dilemma. The acute surgical complications of dengue fever include acute pancreatitis, acute acalculous cholecystitis, nonspecific peritonitis, and acute appendicitis. We report a case of dengue fever that mimicked acute appendicitis leading to unnecessary appendectomy. A careful history examination for dengue-related signs, and serial hemogram over the first 3-4 days of disease may prevent unnecessary appendectomy.

  7. Hay Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can trigger a type of allergy called hay fever. Symptoms can include Sneezing, often with a runny ... eyes Your health care provider may diagnose hay fever based on a physical exam and your symptoms. ...

  8. Valley Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valley Fever is a disease caused by a fungus (or mold) called Coccidioides. The fungi live in the soil ... from person to person. Anyone can get Valley Fever. But it's most common among older adults, especially ...

  9. Appendicular perforation in dengue fever: our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunjan Desai

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Dengue viral infections have become one of major emerging infectious diseases in the tropics. Acute abdomen occurring in dengue viral infection is not uncommon. The spectrums of acute surgical emergencies which raise suspicion of an abdominal catastrophe in patients presenting with dengue fever include acute pancreatitis, acute acalculous cholecystitis, non-specific peritonitis and very rarely acute appendicitis. The presence of low white cell count and platelet count can raise suspicion of a diagnosis of dengue in a patient presenting with acute abdominal pain, during a dengue epidemic. We herein report three patients with dengue fever who had appendicular perforation during the course of their viral fever.

  10. IL-10 and ET-1 as biomarkers of rheumatic valve disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sydney Correia Leão

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the immunological profile and gene expression of endothelin-1 (ET-1 in mitral valves of patients with rheumatic fever originated from a reference service in cardiovascular surgery. Methods: This was a quantitative, observational and cross-sectional study. Thirty-five subjects (divided into four groups participated in the study, 25 patients with chronic rheumatic heart disease and ten control subjects. The mean age of the sample studied was 34.5 years. Seventeen of them (48.58% were male and 18 (51.42% were female. Inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-4 and IL-10 were measured and ten mitral valves of patients who underwent first valve replacement were collected for determination of gene expression of endothelin-1 by real time PCR. Results: Among the groups studied (patients vs. controls, there was a statistically significant difference in IL-10 levels (P=0.002, and no differences in other cytokines. Expression of endothelin-1 was observed in 70% of samples. Quantitatively, average of ET-1 expression was 62.85±25.63%. Conclusion: Inflammatory cytokine IL-10 participates in the maintenance of chronicity of rheumatic fever in patients who underwent valve replacement and those who are undergoing medical treatment. The expression of endothelin-1 in heart valve lesions in patients undergoing mitral valve replacement confirms its association with inflammatory activity in rheumatic fever.

  11. An acute multispecies episode of sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever in captive wild animals in an Italian zoo

    Science.gov (United States)

    In July 2011, in a zoological garden in Rome, Italy, malignant catarrhal fever (MCF), a fatal, systemic disease of Artiodactyls, was suspected on the basis of neurological signs and gross lesions observed in a banteng, the first animal to die of this infection. An MCF type-specific, one-step PCR wit...

  12. Relapsing fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It is characterized by repeated episodes of fever. Causes Relapsing fever is an infection caused by several species of ... death of very large numbers of borrelia bacteria causes shock) Weakness Widespread bleeding ... health care provider right away if you develop a fever after returning from a trip. Possible infections need ...

  13. Digestive comorbidity in patients with rheumatic diseases: Not only NSAID-induced gastropathy

    OpenAIRE

    A. E. Karateev; N. V. Gontarenko; A. V. Tsurgan

    2016-01-01

    Digestive comorbidity is a serious problem that significantly aggravates the course of rheumatic diseases. Diseases of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), liver, and pancreatobiliary system may present a threat to life and substantially worsen its quality. The incidence of many digestive diseases, such as gastric ulcer (including its complicated forms), cholelithiasis, and acute pancreatitis, in patients with rheumatic diseases (at least in those with rheumatoid arthritis) is considerably highe...

  14. KONSUPREN IN THETHERAPY OF RHEUMATIC DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z S Alekberova

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary Aim: to assess the efficacy and tolerability of Consupren (Galena, Chekia in some rheumatic diseases. Material and methods. Three months’ therapy by Consupren was studied in 12 patients: 4 with SLE, 4 with Behcet’s disease, 2 with rheumatoid arthritis with systemic manifestations, 2 with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Sandimmune therapy was changed for Consupren in 9 patients. All patients were controlled for the level of serum creatinine and AD and had consultations with ophtalmologist. Results. 3 SLE patients treated by Consupren demonstrated decreasing of proteinuria, disease activity by SLAM and SLEDA1, the fourth patient demonstrated fading of diskoid rash and normalizing of temperature. Patients with Behcet’s disease had no episodes of ulcerous stomatitis and uveitis exacerbation, in one patient stable nodular erythema disappeared. Patients with JRA improved articular syndrome, normalized temperature, reduced acute phase indices. Both patients continue taking Consupren, RA patients had long term of onset of the disease and 111-IV radiological stage , thus the effect on the articular syndrome was not so demonstrative but the activity of the disease reduced. Conclusion: consupren is effective and well tolerable drug for patients with systemic manifestations of rheumatic diseases. No side effects were noticed.

  15. Mortality Reduction for Fever, Hyperglycemia, and Swallowing Nurse-Initiated Stroke Intervention: QASC Trial (Quality in Acute Stroke Care) Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Sandy; Coughlan, Kelly; Mnatzaganian, George; Low Choy, Nancy; Dale, Simeon; Jammali-Blasi, Asmara; Levi, Chris; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Ward, Jeanette; Cadilhac, Dominique A; McElduff, Patrick; Hiller, Janet E; D'Este, Catherine

    2017-05-01

    Implementation of nurse-initiated protocols to manage fever, hyperglycemia, and swallowing dysfunction decreased death and disability 90 days poststroke in the QASC trial (Quality in Acute Stroke Care) conducted in 19 Australian acute stroke units (2005-2010). We now examine long-term all-cause mortality. Mortality was ascertained using Australia's National Death Index. Cox proportional hazards regression compared time to death adjusting for correlation within stroke units using the cluster sandwich (Huber-White estimator) method. Primary analyses included treatment group only unadjusted for covariates. Secondary analysis adjusted for age, sex, marital status, education, and stroke severity using multiple imputation for missing covariates. One thousand and seventy-six participants (intervention n=600; control n=476) were followed for a median of 4.1 years (minimum 0.3 to maximum 70 months), of whom 264 (24.5%) had died. Baseline demographic and clinical characteristics were generally well balanced by group. The QASC intervention group had improved long-term survival (>20%), but this was only statistically significant in adjusted analyses (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.58-1.07; P =0.13; adjusted HR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.59-0.99; P =0.045). Older age (75-84 years; HR, 4.9; 95% CI, 2.8-8.7; P stroke severity (HR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.3-1.9; P disease (including stroke) was listed either as the primary or secondary cause of death in 80% (211/264) of all deaths. Our results demonstrate the potential long-term and sustained benefit of nurse-initiated multidisciplinary protocols for management of fever, hyperglycemia, and swallowing dysfunction. These protocols should be a routine part of acute stroke care. URL: http://www.anzctr.org.au. Unique identifier: ACTRN12608000563369. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Neutropenic Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Lindsey; Ybarra, Michael

    2017-12-01

    Fever is a common presenting complaint among adult or pediatric patients in the emergency department setting. Although fever in healthy individuals does not necessarily indicate severe illness, fever in patients with neutropenia may herald a life-threatening infection. Therefore, prompt recognition of patients with neutropenic fever is imperative. Serious bacterial illness is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality for neutropenic patients. Neutropenic fever should trigger the initiation of a rapid work-up and the administration of empiric systemic antibiotic therapy to attenuate or avoid the progression along the spectrum of sepsis, severe sepsis, septic shock syndrome, and death. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Rheumatic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilherme, Luiza; Cury, Patricia; Demarchi, Lea M.F.; Coelho, Verônica; Abel, Lúcia; Lopez, Ana P.; Oshiro, Sandra Emiko; Aliotti, Selma; Cunha-Neto, Edécio; Pomerantzeff, Pablo M.A.; Tanaka, Ana C.; Kalil, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    Heart lesions of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) patients contain T-cell clones that recognize heart proteins and streptococcal M peptides. To functionally characterize heart-infiltrating T lymphocytes, we evaluated their cytokine profile, both directly in situ and in T-cell lines derived from the heart (HIL). Interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-4, and IL-10 expressions were characterized in 20 heart tissue infiltrates from 14 RHD patients by immunohistochemistry. IFN-γ-, TNF-α-, and IL-10-positive cells were consistently predominant, whereas IL-4 was scarce in the valves. In agreement with these data, the in vitro experiments, in which 13 HILs derived from heart samples of eight patients were stimulated with M5 protein and the immunodominant M5 (81-96) peptide, IL-4 was detected in HIL derived from the atrium (three of six) but not from the valve (zero of seven). IFN-γ and IL-10 production were detected in culture supernatants in 11 of 13 and 6 of 12 HILs, respectively. The predominant IFN-γ and TNF-α expression in the heart suggests that Th1-type cytokines could mediate RHD. Unlike in reversible myocardium inflammation, the significantly lower IL-4 expression in the valvular tissue (P = 0.02) may contribute to the progression of the RHD leading to permanent valvular damage (relative risk, 4.3; odds ratio, 15.8). The lack of IL-4 in vitro production by valve-derived HIL also emphasizes the more severe tissue destruction in valves observed in RHD. PMID:15509528

  18. The macrophages in rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laria A

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Antonella Laria, Alfredomaria Lurati , Mariagrazia Marrazza , Daniela Mazzocchi, Katia Angela Re, Magda Scarpellini Rheumatology Unit, Fornaroli Hospital, Magenta, Italy Abstract: Macrophages belong to the innate immune system giving us protection against pathogens. However it is known that they are also involved in rheumatic diseases. Activated macrophages have two different phenotypes related to different stimuli: M1 (classically activated and M2 (alternatively activated. M1 macrophages release high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, reactive nitrogen and oxygen intermediates killing microorganisms and tumor cells; while M2 macrophages are involved in resolution of inflammation through phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils, reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and increased synthesis of mediators important in tissue remodeling, angiogenesis, and wound repair. The role of macrophages in the different rheumatic diseases is different according to their M1/M2 macrophages phenotype. Keywords: macrophage, rheumatic diseases

  19. Co-existence of ischemic stroke in Rheumatic and non-rheumatic atrial Fibrillation in a tertiary care teaching hospital of Western Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Chandra Kafle

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Stroke is a major public health burden worldwide leading to long-term morbidity and even mortality. Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common sustained arrhythmia and is an independent factor to increase risk of ischemic stroke. The risk of stroke further enhanced in rheumatic atrial fibrillation and affects younger population of developing countries.  The study has aimed to find out frequency of co-existence of stroke in AF and secondarily to look for age distribution of stroke and risk factors of AF.Materials & Methods: A retrospective analysis of trans-thoracic echocardiographic records of patients from 1st June 2009 to 31st June 2016 was done. Data were collected in a pre-structured proforma and analyzed.Results: Among 15767 echocardiographies, 577 (3.65% cases were recorded to have atrial fibrillation. Mean age 65(±15 years ranging from 14 to 100 years. Rheumatic heart disease was the second most common cause of atrial fibrillation after hypertension. The co-existence of ischemic stroke was seen in 87(15.07% cases with male to female ratio of 1:1.3. The proportion of stroke in rheumatic Atrial fibrillation was 21(18.75% which was higher than in non-Rheumatic atrial fibrillation 66(14.2%.Conclusion: Rheumatic heart disease is contributing as second most common cause of atrial fibrillation after hypertension, nearly one fourth of total stroke and most common (93% cause of stroke below the age of 45 years. Preventive strategies aimed at health awareness about rheumatic fever, screening programs at community level, early detection and treatment for hypertension and Rheumatic heart disease can contribute in reduction of stroke burden. 

  20. Acute respiratory infection, diarrhoea and fever in young children at-risk of intellectual disability in 24 low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Eric; Savage, Amber

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to (1) estimate the prevalence of acute respiratory infection (ARI) symptoms, diarrhoea and fever in the previous two weeks among 3-4 year old children who are/are not at-risk of intellectual disability in 24 low- and middle-income countries and (2) to investigate possible inequities in access to treatment among affected children. Cross-sectional survey. Secondary analysis of Rounds 4 and 5 UNICEF Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS) from 24 low- and middle-income countries (n = 99,934 children). Pooled estimates indicated that young children at-risk of intellectual disability in low-income countries were significantly more likely than their peers to have reported symptoms of ARI and diarrhoea in the previous 2 weeks, and significantly less likely to have received appropriate treatment. Pooled estimates indicated that in middle-income countries children at-risk of intellectual disability were significantly more likely than their peers to have reported symptoms of ARI, diarrhoea and fever during the previous 2 weeks. Symptomatic children at-risk of intellectual disability were significantly less likely than their peers to have received antibiotics/antimotility medication for diarrhoea or antibiotics for ARI symptoms, but significantly more likely to be prescribed anti-malarials for fever. These results indicate the existence of significant inequalities and possible inequities in the exposure to and the treatment of three major infectious diseases among children who are/are not considered at-risk of intellectual disabilities in low- and middle-income countries. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Strategies for early detection of chronic Q-fever: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielders, C.C.; Morroy, G.; Wever, P.C.; Coutinho, R.A.; Schneeberger, P.M.; Hoek, W. van der

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic Q-fever, a condition with high morbidity and mortality, may develop after an acute infection with Coxiella burnetii (acute Q-fever). Several strategies have been suggested for early detection of chronic Q-fever, focusing on follow-up of known acute Q-fever patients and detection

  2. Fever in Patients With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasikhova, Yanina; Ludlow, Steven; Baluch, Aliyah

    2017-04-01

    The definition of fever is flexible and depends on the clinical context. Fever is frequently observed in patients with cancer. Infectious and noninfectious causes of fever in patients with various oncological and hematological malignancies and the usefulness of biomarkers are discussed. To treat patients in a timely manner and to minimize morbidity and mortality, it is paramount that health care professionals determine the cause of fever. The usefulness of biomarkers in febrile patients with cancer continues to be controversial. Fever is frequently seen in patients with cancer and can be associated with a variety of infectious and noninfectious causes. The utility of acute-phase reactants, such as erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and procalcitonin, along with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug challenge should be further evaluated as adjunct tools for the workup of fever in patients with cancer.

  3. The value of the levels of acute phase reactants for the prediction of familial Mediterranean fever associated amyloidosis: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalçinkaya, F; Cakar, N; Acar, B; Tutar, E; Güriz, H; Elhan, A H; Oztürk, S; Kansu, A; Ince, E; Atalay, S; Girgin, N; Doğru, U; Aysev, D; Ekim, M

    2007-04-01

    In order to determine the role of levels of acute phase proteins (APPs) for the development of amyloidosis in familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) patients, the levels of serum amyloid A (SAA), C reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were measured in paired sera of 36 FMF patients during and in between acute attacks, 39 of their healthy parents (obligate heterozgotes), and 15 patients with FMF associated amyloidosis. To compare the levels of APPs, 39 patients with chronic infections or inflammatory diseases who may develop secondary amyloidosis, 20 patients with acute infections who are known to have elevated acute phase response but will never develop amyloidosis and 19 healthy controls were included. The median levels of all APPs are increased in the patients with FMF during attacks and a significant decrease was observed after the attack was over. The level of SAA was above reference range in all FMF patients during the attack free period and the level of at least one other APP was also above normal in 64% of the patients. Both CRP and SAA levels were found to be higher in obligate heterozygotes compared to controls. The levels of SAA in patients with FMF during the attack-free period, obligate heterozygotes and patients with FMF-amyloidosis were found to be similar. The levels in each group were found to be higher than SAA levels found in healthy controls yet lower than the levels measured in the patients with acute infections and patients with chronic inflammation or chronic infections. In conclusion, our results show that SAA level reflects subclinical inflammation with high sensitivity but its value for the prediction of amyloid formation process seems to be low.

  4. The management of subacute bacterial endocarditis superimposed on rheumatic heart disease in the immediate pre-penicillin era: the case of Pasquale Imperato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperato, Pascal James; Imperato, Austin C; Imperato, Gavin H

    2012-12-01

    Subacute bacterial endocarditis (SBE) was invariably a fatal disease in the pre-penicillin era. The availability of sulfonamide antibiotics beginning in the mid-1930s raised hopes that they would be effective in SBE. Unfortunately, except in rare instances, they were not. This paper reviews the clinical experience with sulfonamides in the pre-penicillin period in treating patients with SBE. It presents in detail the case of Pasquale Imperato, who died from the disease at the age of 72 years on 30 November 1942. In so doing, it focuses on the medical management measures then available to treat patients with SBE and on the inevitable course of the illness once it began. Also discussed is the relationship of acute rheumatic fever and its sequela, rheumatic heart disease, to predisposing people to SBE and possible genetic factors. The well-known case of Alfred S. Reinhart, a Harvard Medical School student who died from SBE in 1931 and who kept a detailed chronicle of his disease, is also discussed and contrasted with Pasquale Imperato's case.

  5. Case report 511: Fibroblastic rheumatism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, R.J.; Martel, W.; Headington, J.T.; Kaufman, R.A.; Cincinnati Univ., OH

    1989-01-01

    We report a ten-year-old child with the newly described entity of fibroblastic rheumatism. This child developed rapid, progressive, symmetrical polyarthritis, similar to the radiographic appearance of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, except for the rapidity of progression. The polyarthritis was preceded by the development of skin nodules with characteristic histological changes. (orig./GDG)

  6. Yellow Fever Vaccine in Patients With Rheumatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-05

    Systemic Lupus; Rheumatoid Arthritis; Spondyloarthritis; Inflammatory Myopathy; Systemic Sclerosis; Mixed Connective Tissue Disease; Takayasu Arteritis; Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis; Sjogren's Syndrome; Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis; Juvenile Dermatomyositis

  7. Streptococcal acute pharyngitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lais Martins Moreira Anjos

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Acute pharyngitis/tonsillitis, which is characterized by inflammation of the posterior pharynx and tonsils, is a common disease. Several viruses and bacteria can cause acute pharyngitis; however, Streptococcus pyogenes (also known as Lancefield group A β-hemolytic streptococci is the only agent that requires an etiologic diagnosis and specific treatment. S. pyogenes is of major clinical importance because it can trigger post-infection systemic complications, acute rheumatic fever, and post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. Symptom onset in streptococcal infection is usually abrupt and includes intense sore throat, fever, chills, malaise, headache, tender enlarged anterior cervical lymph nodes, and pharyngeal or tonsillar exudate. Cough, coryza, conjunctivitis, and diarrhea are uncommon, and their presence suggests a viral cause. A diagnosis of pharyngitis is supported by the patient's history and by the physical examination. Throat culture is the gold standard for diagnosing streptococcus pharyngitis. However, it has been underused in public health services because of its low availability and because of the 1- to 2-day delay in obtaining results. Rapid antigen detection tests have been used to detect S. pyogenes directly from throat swabs within minutes. Clinical scoring systems have been developed to predict the risk of S. pyogenes infection. The most commonly used scoring system is the modified Centor score. Acute S. pyogenes pharyngitis is often a self-limiting disease. Penicillins are the first-choice treatment. For patients with penicillin allergy, cephalosporins can be an acceptable alternative, although primary hypersensitivity to cephalosporins can occur. Another drug option is the macrolides. Future perspectives to prevent streptococcal pharyngitis and post-infection systemic complications include the development of an anti-Streptococcus pyogenes vaccine.

  8. Chronic Q Fever in the Netherlands 5 Years after the Start of the Q Fever Epidemic: Results from the Dutch Chronic Q Fever Database

    OpenAIRE

    Kampschreur, Linda M.; Delsing, Corine E.; Groenwold, Rolf H. H.; Wegdam-Blans, Marjolijn C. A.; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P.; de Jager-Leclercq, Monique G. L.; Hoepelman, Andy I. M.; van Kasteren, Marjo E.; Buijs, Jacqueline; Renders, Nicole H. M.; Nabuurs-Franssen, Marrigje H.; Oosterheert, Jan Jelrik; Wever, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii causes Q fever, a zoonosis, which has acute and chronic manifestations. From 2007 to 2010, the Netherlands experienced a large Q fever outbreak, which has offered a unique opportunity to analyze chronic Q fever cases. In an observational cohort study, baseline characteristics and clinical characteristics, as well as mortality, of patients with proven, probable, or possible chronic Q fever in the Netherlands, were analyzed. In total, 284 chronic Q fever patients were identifi...

  9. Dengue fever

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Dengue fever is caused by dengue viruses. (DENV). Transmission of DENV has increased dramatically in the past two decades making DENV the most important human pathogens among arthropod-borne viruses (1). About 50-. 100 million dengue fever infections occur every year in tropical and subtropical.

  10. Relationship between genetic mutation variations and acute-phase reactants in the attack-free period of children diagnosed with familial Mediterranean fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Kosan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF is a periodic autoinflammatory disease characterized by chronic inflammation. This study investigated the relationship between acute-phase reactants and gene mutations in attack-free periods of childhood FMF. Patients diagnosed with FMF were divided into four groups based on genetic features: no mutation, homozygous, heterozygous, and compound heterozygous. These groups were monitored for 2 years, and blood samples were collected every 6 months during attack-free periods. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, and white blood cell count were measured. A disease severity score was determined for each patient. Mean values for erythrocyte sedimentation rate and fibrinogen were significantly different in the homozygous group. White blood cell count and C-reactive protein were similar between the groups. Disease severity score was higher in patients with the M694V mutation than in individuals without the mutation, as well as in those with other mutation groups. Periodic follow-up of patients with FMF MEFV mutations in subjects with acute-phase reactants may be useful in the prevention of morbidity.

  11. Relationship between genetic mutation variations and acute-phase reactants in the attack-free period of children diagnosed with familial Mediterranean fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosan, C; Cayir, A; Turan, M I

    2013-10-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a periodic autoinflammatory disease characterized by chronic inflammation. This study investigated the relationship between acute-phase reactants and gene mutations in attack-free periods of childhood FMF. Patients diagnosed with FMF were divided into four groups based on genetic features: no mutation, homozygous, heterozygous, and compound heterozygous. These groups were monitored for 2 years, and blood samples were collected every 6 months during attack-free periods. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, and white blood cell count were measured. A disease severity score was determined for each patient. Mean values for erythrocyte sedimentation rate and fibrinogen were significantly different in the homozygous group. White blood cell count and C-reactive protein were similar between the groups. Disease severity score was higher in patients with the M694V mutation than in individuals without the mutation, as well as in those with other mutation groups. Periodic follow-up of patients with FMF MEFV mutations in subjects with acute-phase reactants may be useful in the prevention of morbidity.

  12. Relationship between genetic mutation variations and acute-phase reactants in the attack-free period of children diagnosed with familial Mediterranean fever

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosan, C. [Department of Pediatric Nephrology, Faculty of Medicine, Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkey); Cayir, A.; Turan, M.I. [Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkey)

    2013-09-18

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a periodic autoinflammatory disease characterized by chronic inflammation. This study investigated the relationship between acute-phase reactants and gene mutations in attack-free periods of childhood FMF. Patients diagnosed with FMF were divided into four groups based on genetic features: no mutation, homozygous, heterozygous, and compound heterozygous. These groups were monitored for 2 years, and blood samples were collected every 6 months during attack-free periods. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, and white blood cell count were measured. A disease severity score was determined for each patient. Mean values for erythrocyte sedimentation rate and fibrinogen were significantly different in the homozygous group. White blood cell count and C-reactive protein were similar between the groups. Disease severity score was higher in patients with the M694V mutation than in individuals without the mutation, as well as in those with other mutation groups. Periodic follow-up of patients with FMF MEFV mutations in subjects with acute-phase reactants may be useful in the prevention of morbidity.

  13. The challenges of managing rheumatic disease of the mitral valve in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Sherard G

    2014-12-01

    Between January, 2009 and December, 2013, 84 patients were identified who underwent isolated mitral valve surgery in Jamaica at The University Hospital of the West Indies and The Bustamante Hospital for Children. The most common pathology requiring surgery was rheumatic heart disease, accounting for 84% of the procedures performed. The majority of patients had regurgitation of the mitral valve (67%), stenosis of the mitral valve (22%), and mixed mitral valve disease (11%). The most common procedure performed was replacement of the mitral valve (69%), followed by mitral valve repair (29%). Among the patients, one underwent closed mitral commissurotomy. The choice of procedure differed between age groups. In the paediatric population (group of patients who underwent mitral valve repair for rheumatic heart disease, 19% required re-operation. The average time between initial surgery and re-operation was 1.2 years. Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease remain significant public health challenges in Jamaica and other developing countries. Focus must remain on primary and secondary prevention strategies in order to limit the burden of rheumatic valvulopathies. Attention should also be directed towards improving access to surgical treatment for young adults.

  14. Dengue hemorrhagic fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemorrhagic dengue; Dengue shock syndrome; Philippine hemorrhagic fever; Thai hemorrhagic fever; Singapore hemorrhagic fever ... Four different dengue viruses are known to cause dengue hemorrhagic fever. Dengue hemorrhagic fever occurs when a person is bitten by ...

  15. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS expression in monocytes during acute Dengue Fever in patients and during in vitro infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerqueira Denise IS

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mononuclear phagocytes are considered to be main targets for Dengue Virus (DENV replication. These cells are activated after infection, producing proinflammatory mediators, including tumour-necrosis factor-α, which has also been detected in vivo. Nitric oxide (NO, usually produced by activated mononuclear phagocytes, has antimicrobial and antiviral activities. Methods The expression of DENV antigens and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS in human blood isolated monocytes were analysed by flow cytometry using cells either from patients with acute Dengue Fever or after DENV-1 in vitro infection. DENV-1 susceptibility to iNOS inhibition and NO production was investigated using NG-methyl L-Arginine (NGMLA as an iNOS inhibitor, which was added to DENV-1 infected human monocytes, and sodium nitroprussiate (SNP, a NO donor, added to infected C6/36 mosquito cell clone. Viral antigens after treatments were detected by flow cytometry analysis. Results INOS expression in activated monocytes was observed in 10 out of 21 patients with Dengue Fever and was absent in cells from ten healthy individuals. DENV antigens detected in 25 out of 35 patients, were observed early during in vitro infection (3 days, significantly diminished with time, indicating that virus replicated, however monocytes controlled the infection. On the other hand, the iNOS expression was detected at increasing frequency in in vitro infected monocytes from three to six days, exhibiting an inverse relationship to DENV antigen expression. We demonstrated that the detection of the DENV-1 antigen was enhanced during monocyte treatment with NGMLA. In the mosquito cell line C6/36, virus detection was significantly reduced in the presence of SNP, when compared to that of untreated cells. Conclusion This study is the first to reveal the activation of DENV infected monocytes based on induction of iNOS both in vivo and in vitro, as well as the susceptibility of DENV-1 to a NO production.

  16. Radiosynovectomy in rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław B. Ćwikła

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Radiosynovectomy is a safe and repeatable treatment method of chronic synovitis with synovial overgrowth and refractory chronic or acute inflammatory joint effusion. It consist in the intraarticular administration of a radioactive isotope in the form of a colloid causing the extinguishing of active synovitis. The radiocolloid causes permanent irradiation of the synovium with beta ray electron beams, which ultimately leads to its fibrosis and extinguishes the inflammatory process destroying the joint. The main indications for radiosynovectomy include chronic and acute arthritis in the course of systemic diseases, intraarticular bleeding in hemorrhagic diatheses (hemophilia, selected cases of osteoarthritis, recurrent effusions following surgery, e.g. arthroplasty, or other iatrogenic post-surgery complications causing arthritis. Radiosynovectomy is also performed in pigmented villonodular synovitis and crystal synovitis. The most common method used to determine the eligibility for radiosynovectomy is an ultrasound, which shows the location and activity of the thickened synovium. The administration of a radiocolloid into the joint, sheath or bursa should also be performed under the control of the ultrasound image, as this ensures a precise location of the puncture needle and full control of the isotope administration process. Clinical efficacy of radiosynovectomy depends on the proper qualification of patients for the procedure. The success rate of radiosynovectomy in common indications is 65–80%. It is confirmed by the visualization of avascular (fibrotic synovium in follow-up ultrasound tests. The aim of this article is to present techniques and indications for the radiosynovectomy treatment.

  17. Histopathologic characterization of lesios in rheumatic valvulopathy

    OpenAIRE

    R. Ricca; M. Mora; L. Abete; E. Fulcheri

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac valvulopathies may be caused by acquired or congenital diseases and result in valvular stenosis and/or insufficiency. For a correct diagnostic evaluation of cardianc valves, and in particular of rheumatic valvulopathy, pathologists should know the patient's clinical history, the degree of insufficiency and/or stenosis and echographiacal data. Histopathologic features of rheumatic valvulopathy include precocious, tardy and terminal lesions. Rheumatic valvulopathy may produce mitral ins...

  18. Persistent High IgG Phase I Antibody Levels against Coxiella burnetii among Veterinarians Compared to Patients Previously Diagnosed with Acute Q Fever after Three Years of Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielders, Cornelia C. H.; Boerman, Anneroos W.; Schimmer, Barbara; van den Brom, René; Notermans, Daan W.; van der Hoek, Wim; Schneeberger, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about the development of chronic Q fever in occupational risk groups. The aim of this study was to perform long-term follow-up of Coxiella burnetii seropositive veterinarians and investigate the course of IgG phase I and phase II antibodies against C. burnetii antigens and to compare this course with that in patients previously diagnosed with acute Q fever. Methods Veterinarians with IgG phase I ≥1:256 (immunofluorescence assay) that participated in a previous seroprevalence study were asked to provide a second blood sample three years later. IgG antibody profiles were compared to a group of acute Q fever patients who had IgG phase I ≥1:256 twelve months after diagnosis. Results IgG phase I was detected in all veterinarians (n = 76) and in 85% of Q fever patients (n = 98) after three years (pveterinarians and 12% of patients (OR 3.95, 95% CI: 1.84–8.49). Conclusions IgG phase I persists among veterinarians presumably because of continuous exposure to C. burnetii during their work. Serological and clinical follow-up of occupationally exposed risk groups should be considered. PMID:25602602

  19. Severity of acute hepatitis and its outcome in patients with dengue fever in a tertiary care hospital Karachi, Pakistan (South Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhtar Jaweed

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Liver injury due to dengue viral infection is not uncommon. Acute liver injury is a severe complicating factor in dengue, predisposing to life-threatening hemorrhage, Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (DIC and encephalopathy. Therefore we sought to determine the frequency of hepatitis in dengue infection and to compare the outcome (length of stay, in hospital mortality, complications between patients of Dengue who have mild/moderate (ALT 23-300 IU/L v/s severe acute hepatitis (ALT > 300 IU/L. Methods A Cohort study of inpatients with dengue viral infection done at Aga Khan University Hospital Karachi. All patients (≥ 14 yrs age admitted with diagnosis of Dengue Fever (DF, Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF or Dengue Shock Syndrome (DSS were included. Chi square test was used to compare categorical variables and fischer exact test where applicable. Survival analysis (Cox regression and log rank for primary outcome was done. Student t test was used to compare continuous variables. A p value of less than or equal to 0.05 was taken as significant. Results Six hundred and ninety nine patients were enrolled, including 87% (605 patients with DF and 13% (94 patients with DHF or DSS. Liver functions tests showed median ALT of 88.50 IU/L; IQR 43.25-188 IU/L, median AST of 174 IU/L; IQR 87-371.5 IU/L and median T.Bil of 0.8 mg/dl; IQR 0.6-1.3 mg/dl. Seventy one percent (496 had mild to moderate hepatitis and 15% (103 had severe hepatitis. Mean length of stay (LOS in patients with mild/moderate hepatitis was 3.63 days v.s 4.3 days in those with severe hepatitis (P value 0.002. Overall mortality was 33.3% (n = 6 in mild/moderate hepatitis vs 66.7% (n = 12 in severe hepatitis group (p value Conclusion Severe hepatitis (SGPT>300IU in Dengue is associated with prolonged LOS, mortality, bleeding and RF.

  20. Valley Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... loss Headache Valley fever Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  1. Yellow fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease is common in South America and in sub-Saharan Africa. Anyone can get yellow fever, but older people ... by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is ...

  2. Chronic Q Fever in the Netherlands 5 Years after the Start of the Q Fever Epidemic: Results from the Dutch Chronic Q Fever Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delsing, Corine E.; Groenwold, Rolf H. H.; Wegdam-Blans, Marjolijn C. A.; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P.; de Jager-Leclercq, Monique G. L.; Hoepelman, Andy I. M.; van Kasteren, Marjo E.; Buijs, Jacqueline; Renders, Nicole H. M.; Nabuurs-Franssen, Marrigje H.; Oosterheert, Jan Jelrik; Wever, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii causes Q fever, a zoonosis, which has acute and chronic manifestations. From 2007 to 2010, the Netherlands experienced a large Q fever outbreak, which has offered a unique opportunity to analyze chronic Q fever cases. In an observational cohort study, baseline characteristics and clinical characteristics, as well as mortality, of patients with proven, probable, or possible chronic Q fever in the Netherlands, were analyzed. In total, 284 chronic Q fever patients were identified, of which 151 (53.7%) had proven, 64 (22.5%) probable, and 69 (24.3%) possible chronic Q fever. Among proven and probable chronic Q fever patients, vascular infection focus (56.7%) was more prevalent than endocarditis (34.9%). An acute Q fever episode was recalled by 27.0% of the patients. The all-cause mortality rate was 19.1%, while the chronic Q fever-related mortality rate was 13.0%, with mortality rates of 9.3% among endocarditis patients and 18% among patients with a vascular focus of infection. Increasing age (P = 0.004 and 0.010), proven chronic Q fever (P = 0.020 and 0.002), vascular chronic Q fever (P = 0.024 and 0.005), acute presentation with chronic Q fever (P = 0.002 and P fever (P = 0.025 and P fever-related mortality, respectively. PMID:24599987

  3. Some acute phase reactants and cholesterol levels in serum of patient with Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Ismail; Bakir, Sevtap; Engin, Aynur; Aydin, Hüseyin; Poyraz, Omer

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C - reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid-A (SAA) and cholesterol levels in patients with Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) and determine the relationship of these parameters with the severity of disease. By polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method 40 patients were diagnosed as CCHF and 39 volunteer without any systemic disease whose blood were taken and their serum separated. SAA, CRP and ESR were measured with ELISA, nephelometry and Mix-Rate x100 vital diagnostic device, respectively, in serum samples. High density lipoprotein (HDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL) and total cholesterol levels were determined by using autoanalyzer HDL, LDL and total cholesterol kit (Syncron LX20). Statistically significant difference was determined between patients and controls in terms of the levels of SAA, CRP, HDL, LDL and total cholesterol (p0.05). Using of CRP and SAA together might increase the sensitivity of diagnosis of CCHF infection. However, none of the parameters investigated in this study were found to be a proper marker of the prognosis in CCHF. Cholesterol levels were significantly decreased in patients with CCHF, which was suggested to be associated with the increased serum levels of SAA in the patient group.

  4. Implementation of evidence-based treatment protocols to manage fever, hyperglycaemia, and swallowing dysfunction in acute stroke (QASC): a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Sandy; McElduff, Patrick; Ward, Jeanette; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Dale, Simeon; D'Este, Catherine; Drury, Peta; Griffiths, Rhonda; Cheung, N Wah; Quinn, Clare; Evans, Malcolm; Cadilhac, Dominique; Levi, Christopher

    2011-11-12

    We assessed patient outcomes 90 days after hospital admission for stroke following a multidisciplinary intervention targeting evidence-based management of fever, hyperglycaemia, and swallowing dysfunction in acute stroke units (ASUs). In the Quality in Acute Stroke Care (QASC) study, a single-blind cluster randomised controlled trial, we randomised ASUs (clusters) in New South Wales, Australia, with immediate access to CT and on-site high dependency units, to intervention or control group. Patients were eligible if they spoke English, were aged 18 years or older, had had an ischaemic stroke or intracerebral haemorrhage, and presented within 48 h of onset of symptoms. Intervention ASUs received treatment protocols to manage fever, hyperglycaemia, and swallowing dysfunction with multidisciplinary team building workshops to address implementation barriers. Control ASUs received only an abridged version of existing guidelines. We recruited pre-intervention and post-intervention patient cohorts to compare 90-day death or dependency (modified Rankin scale [mRS] ≥2), functional dependency (Barthel index), and SF-36 physical and mental component summary scores. Research assistants, the statistician, and patients were masked to trial groups. All analyses were done by intention to treat. This trial is registered at the Australia New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry (ANZCTR), number ACTRN12608000563369. 19 ASUs were randomly assigned to intervention (n=10) or control (n=9). Of 6564 assessed for eligibility, 1696 patients' data were obtained (687 pre-intervention; 1009 post-intervention). Results showed that, irrespective of stroke severity, intervention ASU patients were significantly less likely to be dead or dependent (mRS ≥2) at 90 days than control ASU patients (236 [42%] of 558 patients in the intervention group vs 259 [58%] of 449 in the control group, p=0·002; number needed to treat 6·4; adjusted absolute difference 15·7% [95% CI 5·8-25·4]). They also had a

  5. What is the best acute phase reactant for familial Mediterranean fever follow-up and its role in the prediction of complications? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erer, Burak; Demirkaya, Erkan; Ozen, Seza; Kallinich, Tilmann

    2016-04-01

    The most dreaded complication of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is amyloidosis; controversy exists as to what acute phase reactant (APR) should be monitored in these patients. To analyze the best acute phase reactant for FMF follow-up to help guide physicians to decide on what APR parameter to use, we also attempted to define the best APR in predicting the complications of FMF, specifically the development of amyloidosis. Systematic review based on a sensitive search to capture studies that: (1) included FMF patients; (2) measured serum amyloid A (SAA), CRP (C-reactive protein), proteinuria, or ESR (erythrocyte sedimentation rate); (3) amyloidosis were the outcome measure; (4) sensitivity, specificity, predictive value, and other performance parameters could be calculated; and (5) had a longitudinal design. Of 1905 captured items, 26 were selected for detailed review, of which only two finally met the criteria, and the quality was only moderate; the articles did not analyzed the performance by means of sensitivity and specificity to predict, or even detect, amyloidosis, and thus had to be calculated based on text. The 26 screened studies were very heterogeneous in designs, parameters measured, and results, despite being set from research questions similar to ours. They were mainly descriptive, and it was very difficult to interpret the true performance of the tests. The correlation between the various APR is low. The evidence supporting the monitoring of FMF with any APR over the others is limited. Well designed longitudinal studies with a mixture of outcomes should be undertaken. Until them, recommending an APR over other would be based on expert opinion and indirect evidence.

  6. Digestive comorbidity in patients with rheumatic diseases: Not only NSAID-induced gastropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Karateev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Digestive comorbidity is a serious problem that significantly aggravates the course of rheumatic diseases. Diseases of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT, liver, and pancreatobiliary system may present a threat to life and substantially worsen its quality. The incidence of many digestive diseases, such as gastric ulcer (including its complicated forms, cholelithiasis, and acute pancreatitis, in patients with rheumatic diseases (at least in those with rheumatoid arthritis is considerably higher than in the population. The presence of this comorbidity poses substantial challenges during active anti-rheumatic therapy. Rheumatologists are very familiar with issues in the prevention of GIT complications due to the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. However, new time presents new challenges. The widespread use of immunosuppressive agents and biologic agents requires careful monitoring of complications associated with liver and bowel diseases. This review considers a relationship of rheumatic diseases and anti-rheumatic therapy to comorbidities, such as cholelithiasis, acute pancreatitis, viral hepatitis B and C, and intestinal diverticula. 

  7. ABO blood groups and rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çildağ, Songül; Kara, Yasemin; Şentürk, Taşkın

    2017-12-01

    Various genetic and environmental risk factors have been shown to be associated with the incidence of rheumatic diseases. However, the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases poorly understood. Several studies have shown associations of ABO blood groups with various diseases. Our study aimed to determine whether there is an association between the types of rheumatic diseases and ABO and Rh blood groups. The study included the patients, followed up at the Immunology-Rheumatology clinic between January 2016 and December 2016 for diagnosis of rheumatic disease, who had an ABO Rh blood data. Age, gender, type of rheumatic disease, ABO Rh blood groups were recorded. When 823 patients were assessed for blood types, 42.5% patients had A type, 33.2% had O type, 15.4% had B type, and 8.9% had AB type. There was significant difference in the distribution of blood types in rheumatic diseases. While SpA, vasculitis, UCTD, Behçet's and RA were more common in the patients with A blood type; FMF, SLE, SSc and SjS were more common in the patients with O blood type. In addition, the blood type where all the diseases are observed the least commonly was AB. There was significant difference in the distribution of Rh factor in rheumatic diseases. 92.2% patients were Rh positive and 7.8% patients were Rh negative. In our study, we thought that the higher incidence of different rheumatic diseases in different blood types was associated with different genetic predisposition.

  8. Epidemiology, health systems and stakeholders in rheumatic heart disease in Africa: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloi, Annesinah Hlengiwe; Watkins, David; Engel, Mark E; Mall, Sumaya; Zühlke, Liesl

    2016-05-20

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a chronic disease affecting the heart valves, secondary to group A streptococcal infection (GAS) and subsequent acute rheumatic fever (ARF). However, RHD cure and preventative measures are inextricably linked with socioeconomic development, as the disease mainly affects children and young adults living in poverty. In order to address RHD, public health officials and health policymakers require up-to-date knowledge on the epidemiology of GAS, ARF and RHD, as well as the existing enablers and gaps in delivery of evidence-based care for these conditions. We propose to conduct a systematic review to assess the literature comprehensively, synthesising all existing quantitative and qualitative data relating to RHD in Africa. We plan to conduct a comprehensive literature search using a number of databases and reference lists of relevant articles published from January 1995 to December 2015. Two evaluators will independently review and extract data from each article. Additionally, we will assess overall study quality and risk of bias, using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale and the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme criteria for quantitative and qualitative studies, respectively. We will meta-analyse estimates of prevalence, incidence, case fatality and mortality for each of the conditions separately for each country. Qualitative meta-analysis will be conducted for facilitators and barriers in RHD health access. Lastly, we will create a list of key stakeholders. This protocol is registered in the PROSPERO International Prospective Register of systematic reviews, registration number CRD42016032852. The information provided by this review will inform and assist relevant stakeholders in identifying key areas of intervention, and designing and implementing evidence-based programmes and policies at the local and regional level. With slight modifications (ie, to the country terms in the search strategy), this protocol can be used as part of a needs

  9. Newly diagnosed rheumatic heart disease among indigenous populations in the Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabel, Mariana; Tafflet, Muriel; Noël, Baptiste; Parks, Tom; Axler, Olivier; Robert, Jacques; Nadra, Marie; Phelippeau, Gwendolyne; Descloux, Elodie; Cazorla, Cécile; Missotte, Isabelle; Gervolino, Shirley; Barguil, Yann; Rouchon, Bernard; Laumond, Sylvie; Jubeau, Thierry; Braunstein, Corinne; Empana, Jean-Philippe; Marijon, Eloi; Jouven, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) remains the leading acquired heart disease in the young worldwide. We aimed at assessing outcomes and influencing factors in the contemporary era. Hospital-based cohort in a high-income island nation where RHD remains endemic and the population is captive. All patients admitted with newly diagnosed RHD according to World Heart Federation echocardiographic criteria were enrolled (2005-2013). The incidence of major cardiovascular events (MACEs) including heart failure, peripheral embolism, stroke, heart valve intervention and cardiovascular death was calculated, and their determinants identified. Of the 396 patients, 43.9% were male with median age 18 years (IQR 10-40)). 127 (32.1%) patients presented with mild, 131 (33.1%) with moderate and 138 (34.8%) with severe heart valve disease. 205 (51.8%) had features of acute rheumatic fever. 106 (26.8%) presented with at least one MACE. Among the remaining 290 patients, after a median follow-up period of 4.08 (95% CI 1.84 to 6.84) years, 7 patients (2.4%) died and 62 (21.4%) had a first MACE. The annual incidence of first MACE and of heart failure were 59.05‰ (95% CI 44.35 to 73.75) and 29.06‰ (95% CI 19.29 to 38.82), respectively. The severity of RHD at diagnosis (moderate vs mild HR 3.39 (0.95 to 12.12); severe vs mild RHD HR 10.81 (3.11 to 37.62), p<0.001) and ongoing secondary prophylaxis at follow-up (HR 0.27 (0.12 to 0.63), p=0.01) were the two most influential factors associated with MACE. Newly diagnosed RHD is associated with poor outcomes, mainly in patients with moderate or severe valve disease and no secondary prophylaxis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Chronic Q fever in the Netherlands 5 years after the start of the Q fever epidemic: results from the Dutch chronic Q fever database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampschreur, L.M.; Delsing, C.E.; Groenwold, R.H.; Wegdam-Blans, M.C.; Bleeker-Rovers, C.P.; Jager-Leclercq, M.G. De; Hoepelman, A.I.; Kasteren, M.E.E. van; Buijs, J.; Renders, N.H.; Nabuurs-Franssen, M.H.; Oosterheert, J.J.; Wever, P.C.

    2014-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii causes Q fever, a zoonosis, which has acute and chronic manifestations. From 2007 to 2010, the Netherlands experienced a large Q fever outbreak, which has offered a unique opportunity to analyze chronic Q fever cases. In an observational cohort study, baseline characteristics and

  11. Rat-bite fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streptobacillary fever; Streptobacillosis; Haverhill fever; Epidemic arthritic erythema; Spirillary fever; Sodoku ... Rat-bite fever can be caused by either of 2 different bacteria, Streptobacillus moniliformis or Spirillum minus. Both of these are ...

  12. Chronic Q fever in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampschreur, L.M.

    2013-01-01

    From 2007-2010, during the recent Q fever epidemic in the Netherlands, over 4000 cases of acute Q fever were registered, which is an underestimation of the total amount of Coxiella burnetii infections due to a high amount of asymptomatic primary infections. In the literature it is stated that 1-5%

  13. A case of ADEM following Chikungunya fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Pranab; Roy, Pinaki; Basu, Arindam; Das, Biman; Ghosh, U S

    2014-05-01

    Chikungunya most often is a self-limiting febrile illness with polyarthritis and the virus is not known to be neurotropic. We are reporting a case of chikugunya fever presenting as acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis(ADEM) which is very rare.

  14. Dengue fever

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Garg A, Garg J, Rao YK et al. Prevalence of dengue. 8. among clinically suspected febrile episodes at a teaching hospital in North India. Journal of Infectious Diseases and. Immunity 2011; 3 (5): 85 – 89. Reiter P. Yellow fever and dengue: a threat to Europe? 9. Euro Surveill 2010; 15 (10): 11 – 16. Gibbons RV, Vaughn DW.

  15. Orchid Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Phillip

    2004-01-01

    Exotic, captivating, and seductive, orchids have long fascinated plant lovers. They first attracted the attention of Westerners in the 17th century, when explorers brought back samples from South America and Asia. By the mid-1800s, orchid collecting had reached a fever pitch, not unlike that of the Dutch tulip craze of the 1630s, with rich (and…

  16. Dengue Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of DHF, which is a medical emergency. To treat severe cases of dengue fever at a hospital, doctors will give intravenous (IV) fluids and electrolytes (salts) to replace those lost through vomiting or ... enough to effectively treat the disease. In more advanced cases, doctors may ...

  17. Scarlet Fever

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-06-09

    Katherine Fleming-Dutra, pediatrician, discusses scarlet fever, its cause, how to treat it, and how to prevent its spread.  Created: 6/9/2011 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 6/9/2011.

  18. Drug-Induced- or Rheumatic- Valvular Heart Disease in Patients Exposed to Benfluorex?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Ven, Florent; Alavi, Zarrin; Jobic, Yannick; Etienne, Yves; Didier, Romain; Porcher, Raphaël

    2016-01-01

    There is a risk of misdiagnosis between benfluorex-induced VHD and acute rheumatic fever (ARF)-related VHD due to common characteristics of both etiologies. We aimed at estimating the probability for a patient exposed to benfluorex presenting with VHD to have, at the same time, a history of ARF-related VHD. Such epidemiological approach could help at reducing the risk of misdiagnosis. We used INSEE data and related literature as well as various modeling hypotheses to drive and test a formula for calculating the probability of a patient presenting with VHD and a history of benfluorex intake to have a prior history of ARF-related VHD. Different scenarios were estimated by a Markov model on the life course of people born in France between 1940 and 1960. Sensitivity analyses were performed under these scenarios. According to the different scenarios and gender, the probability that a patient born between 1940 and 1960 presenting with VHD and a history of benfluorex intake would have had a prior history of ARF-related VHD varied from 0.2% to 2.7%. The probabilities by the year of birth were as follows: 0.8%-2.7% for a patient born in 1940, < 0.5% in all scenarios for patients born after 1955, and < 0.2% in all scenarios for patients, born in 1960. Our results indicate that the burden of ARF-related VHD is low in the patient population exposed to benfluorex. The probability of ARF related VHD should not be over-estimated in the diagnostic procedure of VHD.

  19. Drug-Induced- or Rheumatic- Valvular Heart Disease in Patients Exposed to Benfluorex?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent Le Ven

    Full Text Available There is a risk of misdiagnosis between benfluorex-induced VHD and acute rheumatic fever (ARF-related VHD due to common characteristics of both etiologies. We aimed at estimating the probability for a patient exposed to benfluorex presenting with VHD to have, at the same time, a history of ARF-related VHD. Such epidemiological approach could help at reducing the risk of misdiagnosis. We used INSEE data and related literature as well as various modeling hypotheses to drive and test a formula for calculating the probability of a patient presenting with VHD and a history of benfluorex intake to have a prior history of ARF-related VHD. Different scenarios were estimated by a Markov model on the life course of people born in France between 1940 and 1960. Sensitivity analyses were performed under these scenarios. According to the different scenarios and gender, the probability that a patient born between 1940 and 1960 presenting with VHD and a history of benfluorex intake would have had a prior history of ARF-related VHD varied from 0.2% to 2.7%. The probabilities by the year of birth were as follows: 0.8%-2.7% for a patient born in 1940, < 0.5% in all scenarios for patients born after 1955, and < 0.2% in all scenarios for patients, born in 1960. Our results indicate that the burden of ARF-related VHD is low in the patient population exposed to benfluorex. The probability of ARF related VHD should not be over-estimated in the diagnostic procedure of VHD.

  20. Pulmonary pathology of the rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Kevin O; Trahan, Sylvain; Gruden, James

    2007-08-01

    Thoracic manifestations of the rheumatic diseases (RDs) are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The five RDs most frequently associated with pleuropulmonary disease are (1) rheumatoid arthritis (RA), (2) systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), (3) progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS), (4) polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM), and (5) Sjögren syndrome (SS). The clinical presentation is highly variable, ranging from pleuritic pain alone to slowly progressive breathlessness accompanied by cough. On occasion RD may present acutely with overwhelming respiratory failure as the first pulmonary manifestation. In all of the RDs, the pathology is dominated by either or both inflammation and fibrosis, but the anatomical distribution in each varies somewhat. For example, airway-associated lymphoid hyperplasia is a common manifestation of SS, PM/DM preferentially involves the alveolar parenchyma, and pleural inflammation is most commonly seen in RA. Such changes may be detected radiologically as peribronchovascular disease in SS, ground-glass infiltrates in PM/DM, and pleural disease with effusion in RA. Some RDs are more commonly associated with distinctive histopathology, such as rheumatoid nodules in RA, or lymphoid hyperplasia in both RA and SS. Patients with PSS are at particular risk for pulmonary hypertension when the lung is involved. Also, statistically, acute lung injury occurs more commonly in some, such as SLE and PM/DM. The very common use of immunosuppressive agents in the treatment of RD creates additional diagnostic problems related to drug toxicity and infection. Finally, a major confounding factor occurs when preclinical RD presents first as pulmonary disease (particularly PM/DM), an occurrence that may invoke one of the so-called idiopathic interstitial pneumonias. The most common pleuropulmonary pathological manifestations of the five major RDs are presented and discussed with brief radiological correlations.

  1. Katayama fever ID scuba divers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-03-02

    Mar 2, 1991 ... A. C. EVANS, D. J. MARTIN, B. D. GINSBURG. Summary. Katayama fever or acute schistosomiasis probably occurs more commonly than is recorded. Interviews with a 3-man scuba diving team who had had contact with a large dam in an·endemic area of the eastern Transvaal Lowveld at the same time ...

  2. Social implications of rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłak, Anna; Raciborski, Filip; Samel-Kowalik, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Social consequences of a disease constitute limitations in performing roles relating to working life as well as family and social life caused by the disease, mainly chronic. The aim of the study was to analyze the social consequences of rheumatic diseases in the aspect of disability pensions with respect to incapacity for work and quality of life. The occurrence of rheumatic diseases is related not only to increased risk of different types of organic changes, but above all disability. In Europe almost 50% of persons suffering from diseases of the musculoskeletal system who are currently unemployed were breadwinners. Nearly 60% of them received legal disability status. The loss of work ability is, among other things, the consequence of progressive disability. In Europe 40% of persons suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) had to stop working due to the disease. Most of the persons diagnosed with RA were of working age. It results in the decrease in the quality of life as well as economic difficulties (decreased incomes and increased disease-related costs). In Poland the results of the analysis of the Social Insurance Institution (ZUS) of first-time disability recognition issued for the purpose of disability pensions in 2014 showed that the incapacity for work was caused by diseases relating to general health condition (65.5%). Diseases of the musculoskeletal system were the cause of partial inability to work of 21.6% of persons who received a disability pension for the first time (as many as 5,349 certificates were issued). Early diagnosis and implementation of effective treatment are the necessary conditions for a patient to sustain activity, both professional and social, which is of crucial importance to reduce the negative effects of the disease.

  3. Typhoid fever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wain, John; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Mikoleit, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    , especially those in Africa. The main barriers to control are vaccines that are not immunogenic in very young children and the development of multidrug resistance, which threatens efficacy of antimicrobial chemotherapy. Clinicians, microbiologists, and epidemiologists worldwide need to be familiar...... cause of enteric fever, but now S Typhi is being displaced by infections with drug-resistant S enterica serovar Paratyphi A. New conjugate vaccines are imminent and new treatments have been promised, but the engagement of local medical and public health institutions in endemic areas is needed to allow...... with shifting trends in enteric fever. This knowledge is crucial, both to control the disease and to manage cases. Additionally, salmonella serovars that cause human infection can change over time and location. In areas of Asia, multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S Typhi) has been the main...

  4. [Milk fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, M

    1989-05-01

    Infectious complications following delivery were, in the past, attributed to "milk fever": these were milk congestion, milk deposits, rancid milk, etc., that were held responsible. The milk was reabsorbed into the blood of the patient and settled in the peritoneum ("milk peritonitis"), in the broad ligaments (pelvic abscess), in the thighs (phlebitis) and also in the breasts (breast abscess). This belief, originated by Aristotle, was accepted by excellent authors like Andre Levret (1703-1780), one of the most famous French obstetricians and Nicolas Puzos, at the same time. More recently, authors alluded to it and blamed "milk fever" for being at the origin of dramatic pictures which they described in their novels, like Victor Hugo and Guy de Maupassant, for instance.

  5. X-ray atlas of rheumatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dihlmann, W.

    1986-01-01

    This atlas comprises instructive X-rays of the various inflammatory rheumatic joint diseases in all stages at the extremities and the spinal column. In addition, the complex pattern of the wide range of arthroses, also known as degenerative rheumatic disease is included. Besides the instructive pointers to X-ray diagnosis, the book is also a guide to differential diagnosis. Hence, this book is actually an X-ray atlas of joint diseases in general. Selected Contents: Introduction: What Does ''Rheumatism'' Actually Mean?/Radiographic Methodology in Rheumatic Diseases of the Locomotor System/The Mosaic of Arthritis/Adult Rheumatoid Arthritis/Seronegative Spondylarthritis/Classic Collagen Diseases/Enthesiopathies/Gout-Pseudogout

  6. Typhoid fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wain, John; Hendriksen, Rene S; Mikoleit, Matthew L; Keddy, Karen H; Ochiai, R Leon

    2015-03-21

    Control of typhoid fever relies on clinical information, diagnosis, and an understanding for the epidemiology of the disease. Despite the breadth of work done so far, much is not known about the biology of this human-adapted bacterial pathogen and the complexity of the disease in endemic areas, especially those in Africa. The main barriers to control are vaccines that are not immunogenic in very young children and the development of multidrug resistance, which threatens efficacy of antimicrobial chemotherapy. Clinicians, microbiologists, and epidemiologists worldwide need to be familiar with shifting trends in enteric fever. This knowledge is crucial, both to control the disease and to manage cases. Additionally, salmonella serovars that cause human infection can change over time and location. In areas of Asia, multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S Typhi) has been the main cause of enteric fever, but now S Typhi is being displaced by infections with drug-resistant S enterica serovar Paratyphi A. New conjugate vaccines are imminent and new treatments have been promised, but the engagement of local medical and public health institutions in endemic areas is needed to allow surveillance and to implement control measures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The radiologic examination in rheumatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houli, J.

    1985-01-01

    The importance of the radiologic examination in rheumatic diseases is discussed. The value of correct execution (incidence and appropriate method) and posterior interpretation in the radiographic proceeding is broached aiming at a clinic-radiologic association. The necessity of an analitic radiographic examination is emphasized and basic principles of its interpretation are described. The expressives aspects of main rheumatic diseases are presented (M.A.C.) [pt

  8. [Music for rheumatism--a historical overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, S

    1990-01-01

    The history of the use of music to lessen the pain of rheumatism is seen in the use of musical therapy in medicine as a whole. Sources citing the use of music specifically in rheumatism are rare; often, rather than rheumatism, terms like "gout (podagra)" or "joint-pain" are mentioned. This is connected with the obscure and pathognomic perceptions of rheumatism. In the archeo-medicine and for primitive cultures the considered potency of music was primarily dominated by animistic thinking. In antiquity humoral pathology developed a philosophy that tried to explain the benefits of music, even for rheumatism, but found little acceptance. In the Middle Ages and in the Baroque period iatromechanistic conceptions determined music as useful in fight against pain. In the Romantic period there was speculation about music as a causal therapy, but it was shortlived. In the 20th century music is applied as an active therapy in the care of persons suffering from rheumatism; its empiric success as a remedy in rehabilitative and palliative therapy is recognized.

  9. Persisting eicosanoid pathways in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotkova, Marina; Jakobsson, Per-Johan

    2014-04-01

    An unmet clinical need exists for early treatment of rheumatic diseases and improved treatment strategies that can better maintain remission with reduced ongoing subclinical inflammation and bone destruction. Eicosanoids form one of the most complex networks in the body controlling many physiological and pathophysiological processes, including inflammation, autoimmunity and cancer. Persisting eicosanoid pathways are thought to be involved in the development of rheumatic diseases, and targeting this pathway might enable improved treatment strategies. Several enzymes of the arachidonic acid cascade as well as eicosanoid receptors (all part of the eicosanoid pathway) are today well-recognized targets for anti-inflammatory drugs that can reduce symptoms of inflammation in rheumatic diseases. In this Review, we outline the evidence supporting pivotal roles of eicosanoid signalling in the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases and discuss findings from studies in animals and humans. We focus first on rheumatoid arthritis and discuss the upregulation of the cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways as most data are available in this condition. Research into the roles of eicosanoids in other rheumatic diseases (osteoarthritis, idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, systemic lupus erythematosus and gout) is also progressing rapidly and is discussed. Finally, we summarize the prospects of targeting eicosanoid pathways as anti-inflammatory treatment strategies for patients with rheumatic diseases.

  10. The new face of rheumatic heart disease in South West Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinwusi PO

    2013-05-01

    of appropriate antibiotic therapy for sore throats resulting in the prevention of rheumatic fever and RHD. However, late presentation is still very common, hence we advocate a more aggressive drive to make the Drakensberg declaration on the control of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease functional in our practice area.Keywords: rheumatic fever, group A β-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngitis, valvular lesions, heart failure

  11. Dengue fever: diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2010-07-01

    Dengue fever is a common tropical infection. This acute febrile illness can be a deadly infection in cases of severe manifestation, causing dengue hemorrhagic shock. In this brief article, I will summarize and discuss the diagnosis and treatment of this disease. For diagnosis of dengue, most tropical doctors make use of presumptive diagnosis; however, the definite diagnosis should be based on immunodiagnosis or viral study. Focusing on treatment, symptomatic and supportive treatment is the main therapeutic approach. The role of antiviral drugs in the treatment of dengue fever has been limited, but is currently widely studied.

  12. Prognostic value of clinical and Doppler echocardiographic findings in children and adolescents with significant rheumatic valvular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Fátima Derlene da Rocha; Goulart, Eugênio Marcos Andrade; Meira, Zilda Maria Alves

    2012-07-01

    The diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever (RF) is based on clinical findings. However, during the chronic phase of the disease, the clinical approach is not sufficient for the follow-up of the patients and the Doppler echocardiography is a tool for the diagnosis of cardiac involvement. Prognostic variables that influence long-term outcomes are not well known. 462 patients with RF according to Jones criteria were studied, and followed-up from the initial attack to 13.6 ± 4.6 years. All patients underwent clinical assessment and Doppler echocardiography for the detection of heart valve involvement in the acute and chronic phases. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors influencing long-term heart valve disease. Carditis occurred in 55.8% and subclinical valvulitis in 35.3% patients. In the chronic phase, 33% of the patients had significant valvular heart disease. No normal Doppler echocardiography exam was observed on patients who had severe valvulitis, although heart auscultation had become normal in 13% of these. In the multivariate analysis, only the severity of carditis and the mitral and/or aortic valvulitis were associated with significant valvular heart disease. Chorea or arthritis were protective factors for significant valvular heart disease, odds ratio 0.41 (95% C.I. 0.22 - 0.77) and 0.43 (95% C.I. 0.23 - 0.82), respectively. Our study suggests that the use of Doppler echocardiography during RF helps to identify prognostic factors regarding the development of significant valvular heart disease. Initial severe carditis is an important factor in the long-term prognosis of chronic RHD, whereas arthritis and chore during the initial episode of RF appears to be protective. Strict secondary prophylaxis should be mandatory in high risk patients.

  13. Prognostic value of clinical and Doppler echocardiographic findings in children and adolescents with significant rheumatic valvular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araújo, Fátima Derlene da Rocha; Goulart, Eugênio Marcos Andrade; Meira, Zilda Maria Alves

    2012-01-01

    The diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever (RF) is based on clinical findings. However, during the chronic phase of the disease, the clinical approach is not sufficient for the follow-up of the patients and the Doppler echocardiography is a tool for the diagnosis of cardiac involvement. Prognostic variables that influence long-term outcomes are not well known. 462 patients with RF according to Jones criteria were studied, and followed-up from the initial attack to 13.6 ± 4.6 years. All patients underwent clinical assessment and Doppler echocardiography for the detection of heart valve involvement in the acute and chronic phases. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors influencing long-term heart valve disease. Carditis occurred in 55.8% and subclinical valvulitis in 35.3% patients. In the chronic phase, 33% of the patients had significant valvular heart disease. No normal Doppler echocardiography exam was observed on patients who had severe valvulitis, although heart auscultation had become normal in 13% of these. In the multivariate analysis, only the severity of carditis and the mitral and/or aortic valvulitis were associated with significant valvular heart disease. Chorea or arthritis were protective factors for significant valvular heart disease, odds ratio 0.41 (95% C.I. 0.22 – 0.77) and 0.43 (95% C.I. 0.23 – 0.82), respectively. Our study suggests that the use of Doppler echocardiography during RF helps to identify prognostic factors regarding the development of significant valvular heart disease. Initial severe carditis is an important factor in the long-term prognosis of chronic RHD, whereas arthritis and chore during the initial episode of RF appears to be protective. Strict secondary prophylaxis should be mandatory in high risk patients

  14. Zika fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez de Salazar, Pablo; Suy, Anna; Sánchez-Montalvá, Adrián; Rodó, Carlota; Salvador, Fernando; Molina, Israel

    2016-04-01

    Zika fever is an arboviral systemic disease that has recently become a public health challenge of global concern after its spread through the Americas. This review highlights the current understanding on Zika virus epidemiology, its routes of transmission, clinical manifestations, diagnostic tests, and the current management, prevention and control strategies. It also delves the association between Zika infection and complications, such as microencephaly or Guillem-Barré syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  15. Hay Fever Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Library ▸ Allergy Library ▸ Hay Fever Medications Share | Hay Fever and Allergy Medications This article has been reviewed ... MD, FAAAAI Seasonal allergic rhinitis known as hay fever symptoms range from being mildly annoying to seriously ...

  16. Dengue fever (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengue fever, or West Nile fever, is a mild viral illness transmitted by mosquitoes which causes fever, rashes and muscle and joint aches. Treatment includes rehydration and recovery is expected. A second exposure to the virus can result in Dengue ...

  17. [Soft tissue rheumatism in erderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepański, Leszek

    2008-01-01

    Disorders of soft, peri-articular tissues are a common cause of musculoskeletal pain in elderly patients. Nevertheless, most physicians underestimate the role of soft tissue rheumatism in the pathomechanism of the pain. The impairments of soft tissue can not be diagnosed by X-rays examinations, whereas degenerative lesions of joints are easy diagnosed using this method even despite of their uncertain role in producing the symptoms. The incidence of pain syndromes originated from soft tissues differ regarding to the age of patients. In young subjects the incidence of all of them is generally low. Syndromes provoked by overloading during work: repetitive strain syndrome, canal tunnel syndrome, tennis elbow, golfers elbow, shoulder tendon coin disorders and myofascial pain syndrome are common in middle-aged patients. The morbidity of fibromialgia syndrome is also lower in old people probably as the result of diminished numbers and degenerative changes in nociceptive fibers. The syndromes prevailing in elderly patients include trochanteric syndrome and the pain syndromes provoked by muscle spasm depended on posture abnormalities. In the soft tissue pain syndrome prevention adapted to old age kinesitherapy and avoiding muscle overloading are recommended. Soft tissue pain syndromes are usually treated with non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs. In local pain syndromes better results can be obtained by local treatment. Local injections of glikocorticosteroids are usually very effective and safe.

  18. Low frequency of acute hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections but high past HEV exposure in subjects from Cambodia with mild liver enzyme elevations, unexplained fever or immunodeficiency due to HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouhin, Janin; Barennes, Hubert; Madec, Yoann; Prak, Sophearot; Hou, Serey Vannak; Kerleguer, Alexandra; Kim, Saorin; Pean, Polidy; Rouet, François

    2015-10-01

    In Cambodia, previous studies conducted on hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection are scant, sometimes old, and showed inconsistent results. Moreover, there is no data about HEV infection in Cambodian HIV-1-infected patients. To assess the occurrence of acute HEV infections and the level of past HEV exposure in one Mekong country. Using anti-HEV IgM and HEV RNA detection, we retrospectively investigated the presence of acute HEV infection in 825 individuals, including 350 subjects with or without fever, 300 subjects with or without liver enzyme elevations (LEE) and 175 antiretroviral treatment (ART)-naïve, severely immunocompromised HIV-1-infected patients. The detection of anti-HEV IgG was also performed to assess ancient HEV exposure. Nine individuals tested positive for anti-HEV IgM yielding an overall rate of 1.1% (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.5-2.0). We did not find significant differences for anti-HEV IgM rates between subjects with unexplained fevers (1.5%) and those with malaria or dengue-associated fever (1.7%) or non-febrile individuals (0%) (P=0.49), and between subjects with (1.5%) and without (2.0%) LEE (P=0.87). No HIV-infected patient tested positive for anti-HEV IgM. HEV RNA was not detected in all tested plasma specimens (n=578). Overall, the anti-HEV IgG prevalence rate was 30.1% (95% CI, 27.0-33.2). The scarcity of recent HEV infection contrasted with the high level of past HEV exposure. The role of HEV in liver disease is likely minor in Cambodia since no HEV RNA was detected in our studied populations, including HIV-positive patients with severe immunodepression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Contraception for adolescents with chronic rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benito Lourenço

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Contraception is an important issue and should be a matter of concern in every medical visit of adolescent and young patients with chronic rheumatic diseases. This narrative review discusses contraception methods in adolescents with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE, antiphospholipid syndrome (APS, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM. Barrier methods are safe and their use should be encouraged for all adolescents with chronic rheumatic diseases. Combined oral contraceptives (COC are strictly prohibited for JSLE and APS patients with positive antiphospholipid antibodies. Reversible long-acting contraception can be encouraged and offered routinely to the JSLE adolescent patient and other rheumatic diseases. Progestin-only pills are safe in the majority of rheumatic diseases, although the main concern related to its use by adolescents is poor adherence due to menstrual irregularity. Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate injections every three months is a highly effective contraception strategy, although its long-term use is associated with decreased bone mineral density. COC or other combined hormonal contraceptive may be options for JIA and JDM patients. Oral levonorgestrel should be considered as an emergency contraception method for all adolescents with chronic rheumatic diseases, including patients with contraindication to COC.

  20. Interaction of pregnancy and autoimmune rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østensen, Monika; Villiger, Peter M; Förger, Frauke

    2012-05-01

    During pregnancy, the fetus represents a natural allograft that is not normally rejected. While the maternal immune system retains the ability to respond to foreign antigens, tolerance mechanisms are up-regulated to protect the fetus from immunologic attacks by the mother. The profound immunologic adaptations during and after pregnancy do influence maternal autoimmune rheumatic diseases in several ways. One is triggering the onset of a rheumatic disease in the post partum period, the other influencing disease activity of established rheumatic disease. The review will discuss the mechanisms of increased susceptibility of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the first year post partum with a specific emphasis on the role of fetal cells or antigens persisting in the maternal circulation (so called microchimerism). Furthermore, the different influences of pregnancy on established rheumatic diseases will be highlighted. A marked beneficial effect of pregnancy is observed on RA whereas several other rheumatic diseases as ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) show either no particular effect or an aggravation of symptoms during pregnancy. Differences emerging in regard to modulation of disease symptoms during pregnancy seem related to response to hormones, the type of cytokine profile and immune response prevailing as well as further downstream interactions of molecular pathways that are important in disease pathogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Histopathologic characterization of lesios in rheumatic valvulopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ricca

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac valvulopathies may be caused by acquired or congenital diseases and result in valvular stenosis and/or insufficiency. For a correct diagnostic evaluation of cardianc valves, and in particular of rheumatic valvulopathy, pathologists should know the patient's clinical history, the degree of insufficiency and/or stenosis and echographiacal data. Histopathologic features of rheumatic valvulopathy include precocious, tardy and terminal lesions. Rheumatic valvulopathy may produce mitral insufficiency. Mitral valve incompetence has been calssified into three types by echography (Carpentier, 1980. 56 cases of valvular samples have been examinated at our institution from January 2004 to January 2008. Any case was processed according to diagnostic/opeartive protocol we prepared carefully: gross examination, photographic documentation, sampling, standard stains and histochemical special stains. On the basis of the operative diagnostic protocol, histopathologic diagnosis of rheumatic valvulopathy was effected in three cases. Special methods of histochemistry, in addition to hematoxylin and eosin, are fundamental for the differential diagnosis of valvulopathies. Histopathologic diagnosis of rheumatic valvulopathy is complex and requests several histomorphologic data: our operative diagnostic protocol is extremely useful to reach an anatomo-pathologic diagnosis of surgical sample, which constitutes an essential element to confirm preoperative clinical-echographic diagnosis.

  2. Clinical aspects of autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldblatt, Fiona; O'Neill, Sean G

    2013-08-31

    Multisystem autoimmune rheumatic diseases are heterogeneous rare disorders associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Efforts to create international consensus within the past decade have resulted in the publication of new classification or nomenclature criteria for several autoimmune rheumatic diseases, specifically for systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren's syndrome, and the systemic vasculitides. Substantial progress has been made in the formulation of new criteria in systemic sclerosis and idiopathic inflammatory myositis. Although the autoimmune rheumatic diseases share many common features and clinical presentations, differentiation between the diseases is crucial because of important distinctions in clinical course, appropriate drugs, and prognoses. We review some of the dilemmas in the diagnosis of these autoimmune rheumatic diseases, and focus on the importance of new classification criteria, clinical assessment, and interpretation of autoimmune serology. In this era of improvement of mortality rates for patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases, we pay particular attention to the effect of leading complications, specifically cardiovascular manifestations and cancer, and we update epidemiology and prognosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Immune System and Its Link to Rheumatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Immune System & Its Link to Rheumatic Disease The Immune System and Its Link to Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts ... of a vessel of the body). What’s the immune system? The immune system allows us to identify and ...

  4. Dengue fever: a Wikipedia clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilman, James M; De Wolff, Jacob; Beards, Graham M; Basden, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    Dengue fever, also known as breakbone fever, is a mosquito-borne infectious tropical disease caused by the dengue virus. Symptoms include fever, headache, muscle and joint pains, and a characteristic skin rash that is similar to measles. In a small proportion of cases, the disease develops into life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever, which results in bleeding, thrombocytopenia, and leakage of blood plasma, or into dengue shock syndrome, in which dangerously low blood pressure occurs. Treatment of acute dengue fever is supportive, with either oral or intravenous rehydration for mild or moderate disease and use of intravenous fluids and blood transfusion for more severe cases. Along with attempts to eliminate the mosquito vector, work is ongoing to develop a vaccine and medications targeted directly at the virus.

  5. Autoimmunity in Rheumatic Diseases Is Induced by Microbial Infections via Crossreactivity or Molecular Mimicry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Rashid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A general consensus supports fundamental roles for both genetic and environmental, mainly microbial, factors in the development of autoimmune diseases. One form of autoimmune rheumatic diseases is confined to a group of nonpyogenic conditions which are usually preceded by or associated with either explicit or occult infections. A previous history of clinical pharyngitis, gastroenteritis/urethritis, or tick-borne skin manifestation can be obtained from patients with rheumatic fever, reactive arthritis, or Lyme disease, respectively, whilst, other rheumatic diseases like rheumatoid arthritis (RA, ankylosing spondylitis (AS, and Crohn’s disease (CD are usually lacking such an association with a noticeable microbial infection. A great amount of data supports the notion that RA is most likely caused by Proteus asymptomatic urinary tract infections, whilst AS and CD are caused by subclinical bowel infections with Klebsiella microbes. Molecular mimicry is the main pathogenetic mechanism that can explain these forms of microbe-disease associations, where the causative microbes can initiate the disease with consequent productions of antibacterial and crossreactive autoantibodies which have a great impact in the propagation and the development of these diseases.

  6. Dengue Fever with rectus sheath hematoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anurag; Bhatia, Sonia; Singh, Rajendra Pratap; Malik, Gaurav

    2014-04-01

    Dengue fever, also known as breakbone fever, is an infectious tropical disease caused by the Dengue virus. It is associated with a number of complications, which are well documented. However, Dengue fever associated with rectus sheath hematoma (RSH) is a very rare complication. Only one case report has been published prior supporting the association of Dengue fever with RSH. We report a case of Dengue fever who presented with RSH and was successfully treated conservatively. RSH is also an uncommon cause of acute abdominal pain. It is accumulation of blood in the sheath of the rectus abdominis, secondary to rupture of an epigastric vessel or muscle tear.

  7. Cause of Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Bleeding in Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Sari, Elza Febria; Syam, Ari Fahrial; Nainggolan, Leonard

    2008-01-01

    Dengue fever is an acute mosquito-transmitted disease caused by the dengue fever virus which had clinical manifestations range from fever to severe hemorrhage, shock, and death.1 There were 500,000 cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever and 25,000 deaths due to dengue annually worldwide. Bleeding is one of the major problems encountered in dengue fever. The reported prevalence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in dengue patients varies from 5% to 30%. The pathogenesis of hemorrhage could be mult...

  8. Kid's Guide to Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Educators Search English Español A Kid's Guide to Fever KidsHealth / For Kids / A Kid's Guide to Fever ... change into some lighter-weight pajamas. Fighting a Fever For almost all kids, fevers aren't a ...

  9. Fever of unknown origin: Most frequent causes in adults patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovska-Jovicić, Biljana; Canović, Predrag; Gajović, Olgica; Raković, Ivana; Mijailović, Zeljko

    2016-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of fever of unknown origin (FUO) includes more than 200 different diseases and conditions. The aim of this study was to identify the most frequent causes of FUO among adult patients according to gender and age. The study included 74 patients examined from June 2010 to June 2013 at the Infectious Disease Clinic, Clinical Center Kragujevac in Serbia, according to the defined criteria for FUO. The patients were divided according to the diagnosis into four groups: infectious, malignant, rheumatic and "other diseases". A cause of febricity could not be estabilshed in a portion of subjects, and they comprised the group of undiagnosed cases. Infectious diseases were dominant in the study, followed by rheumatic diseases, which were most frequently found in women and the elderly. The diseases recognised as the most common causes of febricity were subacute thyroiditis, subacute endocarditis, Still's disease, rheumatic polymyalgia with or without temporal arteritis, and cytomegalovirus infection. In 44% of the patients, the final diagnosis was composed of only six clinical entities. The importance of establishing the diagnosis of rheumatic disease is especially emphasised, in line with other authors' research indicating the number of these diseases is on the rise. The diagnostic approach to FUO should always be directed to the known frequency of diseases.

  10. Major histocompatibility complex: its role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune rheumatic diseases - doi:10.5020/18061230.2006.p155

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crésio Alves

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to allow early diagnosis and more efficient treatments, many studies have been trying to define genetic markers of rheumatic diseases. Amongst them, antigens and alleles of the HLA (Human Leukocyte Antigens system are distinguished. Located in the short arm of chromosome 6, the HLA system exerts genetic influence on the susceptibility and severity of these diseases. The discovery of new molecular methods to typify HLA alleles and the recent nomenclature updates have been contributing to a better understanding of this system. Unfortunately, this information has not been adequately published in the clinical literature. The present work aimed at presenting the function, nomenclature and methods of detection of the HLA polymorphism; and to review its associations with rheumatic fever, systemic erythematosus lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis and spondyloarthropathies. Articles that were published between 1980 and 2005 were searched in the MEDLINE and LILACS data basis. This review demonstrated that although the HLA association is well established for some rheumatic diseases (e.g., HLA-B27 and spondyloarthropathies, HLA DR-3 and HLA-DR4 with rheumatoid arthritis, HLA-DR4 and lupus others vary in different ethnic-racial group and illnesses, due to its polymorphism. It is necessary to study populations from different ethnic backgrounds to identify new associations or to strengthen associations with the ones already identified. This knowledge will contribute to future prophylactic or therapeutic interventions in patients with rheumatic disorders or at risk to develop them.

  11. Q Fever: An Old but Still a Poorly Understood Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Honarmand

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Q fever is a bacterial infection affecting mainly the lungs, liver, and heart. It is found around the world and is caused by the bacteria Coxiella burnetii. The bacteria affects sheep, goats, cattle, dogs, cats, birds, rodents, and ticks. Infected animals shed this bacteria in birth products, feces, milk, and urine. Humans usually get Q fever by breathing in contaminated droplets released by infected animals and drinking raw milk. People at highest risk for this infection are farmers, laboratory workers, sheep and dairy workers, and veterinarians. Chronic Q fever develops in people who have been infected for more than 6 months. It usually takes about 20 days after exposure to the bacteria for symptoms to occur. Most cases are mild, yet some severe cases have been reported. Symptoms of acute Q fever may include: chest pain with breathing, cough, fever, headache, jaundice, muscle pains, and shortness of breath. Symptoms of chronic Q fever may include chills, fatigue, night sweats, prolonged fever, and shortness of breath. Q fever is diagnosed with a blood antibody test. The main treatment for the disease is with antibiotics. For acute Q fever, doxycycline is recommended. For chronic Q fever, a combination of doxycycline and hydroxychloroquine is often used long term. Complications are cirrhosis, hepatitis, encephalitis, endocarditis, pericarditis, myocarditis, interstitial pulmonary fibrosis, meningitis, and pneumonia. People at risk should always: carefully dispose of animal products that may be infected, disinfect any contaminated areas, and thoroughly wash their hands. Pasteurizing milk can also help prevent Q fever.

  12. Perspectives for uveitis treatment in rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla Aleksandrovna Godzenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes current approaches to treating uveitis in rheumatic diseases and theoretical backgrounds for using tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α inhibitors. The data available in the literature suggest that anti-TNF-α therapy is highly effective in relieving and preventing uveitis attacks.

  13. Diagnostic radiology in the rheumatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, A.; Martin, W.

    1986-01-01

    In the radiological investigation of joint disease there are several signs which are helpful in making a diagnosis, Individually these signs will often suggest the presence of joint disease but may not be specific. However when present in combination or when considering the anatomic distribution, a definitive diagnosis is possible. Several of the signs of rheumatic disease can occur in other nonrheumatic conditions

  14. Lung Manifestations in the Rheumatic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Tracy J; Dellaripa, Paul F

    2017-12-01

    Lung ailments in rheumatic diseases present unique challenges for diagnosis and management and are a source of significant morbidity and mortality for patients. Unlike the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, patients with rheumatic diseases experience lung disease in the context of a systemic disease that may make it more difficult to recognize and that may present greater risks with treatment. Despite recent advances in our awareness of these diseases, there is still a significant lack of understanding of natural history to elucidate which patients will have disease that is progressive and thus warrants treatment. What we do know is that a subset of patients with rheumatic disease experience parenchymal lung disease that can prognostically resemble idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, such as in rheumatoid arthritis, and that others can have aggressive inflammatory lung disease in the context of autoimmune myositis, systemic sclerosis, or an undifferentiated autoimmune process. As we enter into a paradigm shift where we view lung health as a cornerstone of our care of patients with rheumatic diseases, we hopefully will improve our ability to identify those patients at highest risk for pulmonary disease and progression, and offer emerging treatments which will result in better outcomes and a better quality of life. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Radiological imaging in pediatric rheumatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matuszewska, Genowefa; Zaniewicz-Kaniewska, Katarzyna; Włodkowska-Korytkowska, Monika; Smorawińska, Patrycja; Saied, Fadhil; Kunisz, Wojciech; Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona

    2014-01-01

    Radiological imaging plays a fundamental role in the diagnosis and monitoring of rheumatic diseases. The basic method of imaging is a classic X-ray picture, which for many years has been used as a single method for the recognition and evaluation of the effects of disease management. In today’s modern day treatment of rheumatic diseases, ultrasonography and magnetic resonance are more commonly performed for early detection of inflammatory changes in the region of soft tissue, subchondral bone and bone marrow. In spite of their usefulness and fundamental role in the diagnosis, X-ray still remains an essential tool in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis in children and is complementary to today’s methods of imaging diagnostics. In clinical practice, X-ray imaging is still an important examination performed not only to recognize the disorders, but also to provide a differential diagnosis. It helps estimate disease progression and is used to monitor the effects of treatment and the development of possible complications. Differential diagnosis of rheumatic diseases is performed on the basis of localization and type of radiographic changes. The surrounding periarticular soft tissues, bone structures, joint space, with special attention to articular bone surfaces and epiphyses, are analyzed. The aim of this work is to describe characteristic inflammatory changes present on X-ray imaging typical for the most commonly diagnosed rheumatic diseases in children, such as juvenile idiopathic arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic scleroderma, mixed connective tissue disease, juvenile dermatomyositis, juvenile spondyloarthropathy and systemic vascular disease

  16. Contribution of dengue fever to the burden of acute febrile illnesses in Papua New Guinea: an age-specific prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senn, Nicolas; Luang-Suarkia, Dagwin; Manong, Doris; Siba, Peter Max; McBride, William John Hannan

    2011-07-01

    Malaria is a major contributor to the burden of febrile illnesses in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Dengue fever (DF) is likely to contribute; however, its epidemiology in PNG is poorly understood. We performed a prospective age-stratified study in outpatient clinics investigating the prevalence of DF; 578 patients were enrolled, and 317 patients with a negative rapid diagnostic test (RDT) for malaria were tested for dengue. Malaria was confirmed in 52% (301/578, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 48-56%), DF was diagnosed in 8% (46/578, 95% CI = 6-10%), and 40% (95% CI = 36-44%) had neither diagnosis. Among the 317 malaria RDT-negative patients, 14% (45/317, 95% CI = 10-18%) had DF. The seroprevalence of dengue immunoglobulin G (IgG) was 83% (204/247, 95% CI = 78-87%), and no dengue hemorrhagic fever was seen. This study provides good evidence for the first time that DF is common in PNG and is responsible for 8% of fever episodes. The common occurrence of DF in a population with presumed previous exposure to dengue is an important observation.

  17. [A short history of anti-rheumatic therapy. II. Aspirin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasero, G; Marson, P

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of aspirin, an antipyretic, anti-inflammatory and analgesic drug, undoubtedly represents a milestone in the history of medical therapy. Since ancient times the derivatives of willow (Salix alba) were used to treat a variety of fevers and pain syndromes, although the first report dates back to 1763 when the English Reverend Edward Stone described the effect of an extract of the bark willow in treating malaria. In the XIX century many apothecaries and chemists, including the Italian Raffaele Piria and Cesare Bertagnini, developed the biological processes of extraction and chemical synthesis of salicylates, and then analyzed their therapeutic properties and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics. In 1899 the Bayer Company, where Felix Hoffmann, Heinrich Dreser and Arthur Eichengrün worked, recorded acetyl-salicylic acid under the name "Aspirin". In the XX century, besides the definition of the correct applications of aspirin in the anti-rheumatic therapy being defined, Lawrence L. Crawen identified the property of this drug as an anti-platelet agent, thus opening the way for more widespread uses in cardiovascular diseases.

  18. A short history of anti-rheumatic therapy. II. Aspirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Marson

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of aspirin, an antipyretic, anti-inflammatory and analgesic drug, undoubtedly represents a milestone in the history of medical therapy. Since ancient times the derivatives of willow (Salix alba were used to treat a variety of fevers and pain syndromes, although the first report dates back to 1763 when the English Reverend Edward Stone described the effect of an extract of the bark willow in treating malaria. In the XIX century many apothecaries and chemists, including the Italian Raffaele Piria and Cesare Bertagnini, developed the biological processes of extraction and chemical synthesis of salicylates, and then analyzed their therapeutic properties and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics. In 1899 the Bayer Company, where Felix Hoffmann, Heinrich Dreser and Arthur Eichengrün worked, recorded acetyl-salicylic acid under the name “Aspirin”. In the XX century, besides the definition of the correct applications of aspirin in the anti-rheumatic therapy being defined, Lawrence L. Crawen identified the property of this drug as an anti-platelet agent, thus opening the way for more widespread uses in cardiovascular diseases.

  19. Dengue fever outbreak: a clinical management experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, S.; Illyas, M.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the frequency of dengue as a cause of fever and compare the clinical and haematological characteristics of Dengue-probable and Dengue-proven cases. All patients with age above 14 years, who were either hospitalized or treated in medical outdoor clinic due to acute febrile illness, were evaluated for clinical features of Dengue Fever (DF), Dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and Dengue Shock Syndrome (DSS). Patients showing typical clinical features and haematological findings suggestive of Dengue fever (As per WHO criteria) were evaluated in detail for comparison of probable and confirmed cases of Dengue fever. All other cases of acute febrile illness, not showing clinical features or haematological abnormalities of Dengue fever, were excluded. The clinical and laboratory features were recorded on SPSS 11.0 programme and graded where required, for descriptive and statistical analysis. Out of 5200 patients with febrile illness, 107 (2%) presented with typical features of DF, 40/107 (37%) were Dengue-proven while 67/107 (63%) were Dengue-probable. Out of Dengue-proven cases, 38 were of DF and 2 were of DHF. Day 1 temperature ranged from 99-105 degreeC (mean 101 degree C). Chills and rigors were noticed in 86 (80%), myalgia in 67%, headache in 54%, pharyngitis in 35%, rash in 28%, and bleeding manifestations in 2% cases. Hepatomegaly in 1(0.5%), lymphadenopathy in 1 (0.5%) and splenomegaly in 12 (11.2%) cases. Leucopoenia (count 40 U/L in 57% cases. Frequency of clinically suspected dengue virus infection was 107 (2%), while confirmed dengue fever cases were 40 (0.8%) out of 5200 fever cases. Fever with chills and rigors, body aches, headache, myalgia, rash, haemorrhagic manifestations, platelet count, total leukocyte count, and ALT, are parameters to screen the cases of suspected dengue virus infection, the diagnosis cannot be confirmed unless supported by molecular studies or dengue specific IgM. (author)

  20. Acute tonsillitis at infectious patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. P. Finogeev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined 1824 patients with diphtheria treated in Clinical Infectious Diseases Hospital Botkin (St. Petersburg in 1993 – 1994, and more than 500 patients referred to the clinic with a diagnosis of «angina». Based on published data and our own research observations investigated the etiology of acute tonsillitis. Bacterial tonsillitis should be treated with antibiotics, and this is important aetiological interpretation of these diseases. Streptococcal tonsillitis should always be a sore throat syndrome as a diagnostic sign of support. For other forms of lymphoma lesion of the tonsils should not be defined as «angina», and called «tonsillitis». Аngina as β-hemolytic streptococcus group A infection is recognized as the leader in the development of rheumatic fever. On the basis of a large clinical material briefly analyzed the clinical manifestations of various forms of diphtheria with membranous tonsillitis. Also presented with a syndrome of infectious diseases as tonsillitis, therapeutic and surgical «mask» of infectious diseases.

  1. Lassa fever or lassa hemorrhagic fever risk to humans from rodent-borne zoonoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bahnasawy, Mamdouh M; Megahed, Laila Abdel-Mawla; Abdalla Saleh, Hala Ahmed; Morsy, Tosson A

    2015-04-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) typically manifest as rapidly progressing acute febrile syndromes with profound hemorrhagic manifestations and very high fatality rates. Lassa fever, an acute hemorrhagic fever characterized by fever, muscle aches, sore throat, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and chest and abdominal pain. Rodents are important reservoirs of rodent-borne zoonosis worldwide. Transmission rodents to humans occur by aerosol spread, either from the genus Mastomys rodents' excreta (multimammate rat) or through the close contact with infected patients (nosocomial infection). Other rodents of the genera Rattus, Mus, Lemniscomys, and Praomys are incriminated rodents hosts. Now one may ask do the rodents' ectoparasites play a role in Lassa virus zoonotic transmission. This paper summarized the update knowledge on LHV; hopping it might be useful to the clinicians, nursing staff, laboratories' personals as well as those concerned zoonoses from rodents and rodent control.

  2. Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome and coexisting hantavirus pulmonary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Min Hong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS is an acute viral disease with fever, hemorrhage and renal failure caused by hantavirus infection. Hantavirus induces HFRS or hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS. HPS progression to a life-threatening pulmonary disease is found primarily in the USA and very rarely in South Korea. Here, we report a case of HFRS and coexisting HPS.

  3. Familial Mediterranean fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000363.htm Familial Mediterranean fever To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a rare disorder passed down ...

  4. Haemorrhagic Fevers, Viral

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fever, dengue, Omsk haemorrhagic fever, Kyasanur forest disease). Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa in 2014-2015 All information on Ebola virus disease Ebola features map Dashboard - Progress update ...

  5. Q fever - early

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spread by domestic and wild animals and ticks. Causes Q fever is caused by the bacteria Coxiella burnetii , which ... Prevention Pasteurization of milk destroys the bacteria that cause early Q fever. Domestic animals should be inspected for signs of ...

  6. Q fever in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Anders; Svendsen, Claus Bo; Christensen, Jens Jorgen

    2010-01-01

    We report a patient with Q fever endocarditis in a settlement in eastern Greenland (Isortoq, Ammassalik area). Likely animal sources include sled dogs and seals. Q fever may be underdiagnosed in Arctic areas but may also represent an emerging infection.......We report a patient with Q fever endocarditis in a settlement in eastern Greenland (Isortoq, Ammassalik area). Likely animal sources include sled dogs and seals. Q fever may be underdiagnosed in Arctic areas but may also represent an emerging infection....

  7. Management of rheumatic chorea: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araújo Alexandra Prufer de Queiroz Campos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rheumatic chorea (RC has recently been linked to an antibody-mediated immune mechanism. OBJECTIVE/METHOD: To verify if this knowledge reflected in management changes we conceived a descriptive study. RESULTS: The medical charts of 20 children (13 females aged 6 to 12 years (mean 8 years, diagnosed as RC from June 1996 to June 1999, were reviewed. All patients received some medical treatment. Haloperidol was the most prescribed medication (15 patients - 75 %. Sulpiride, diazepam and valproate were also used as symptomatic treatment. Imune-modulating therapy with prednisone was prescribed for seven children. The shortest course of chorea (16 days occurred in a patient treated with prednisone. CONCLUSION: Prednisone has been prescribed for rheumatic chorea besides the traditional symptomatic approach. A great variety of antichoreic drugs are being employed.

  8. Osseous temporomandibular joint abnormalities in rheumatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larheim, T.A.; Kolbenstvedt, A.; Rikshospitalet, Oslo

    1990-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was compared with hypocycloidal tomography in 30 joints of 15 adults with rheumatic disease. CT included 1.5 mm thick axial scans (at 1.0 mm intervals) with reformatted oblique sagittal and oblique coronal sections. Multisection (at 2.0 mm intervals) tomography included oblique sagittal and occasionally, oblique coronal sections. CT demonstrated bone abnormalities in 21 and tomography in 20 joints, indicating high agreement between the imaging modalities regarding number of abnormal TMJs. Bone structures were, however, better visualized by multiplanar CT due to superior contrast and spatial resolution particularly in the most lateral and medial parts of the joint, indicating superiority of CT for depicting subtle bony TMJ abnormalities in patients with rheumatic disease. (orig.)

  9. Rat Bite Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Rat Bite Fever Page Content Article Body Rat-bite fever is a disease that occurs in humans who ... ingestion of contaminated food or milk products (Haverhill fever). Most cases in the United States are caused ...

  10. Rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Reyna, Tatiana Sofía; Martínez-Reyes, Cynthia; Yamamoto-Furusho, Jesús Kazúo

    2009-11-28

    This article reviews the literature concerning rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including common immune-mediated pathways, frequency, clinical course and therapy. Musculoskeletal complications are frequent and well-recognized manifestations in IBD, and affect up to 33% of patients with IBD. The strong link between the bowel and the osteo-articular system is suggested by many clinical and experimental observations, notably in HLA-B27 transgenic rats. The autoimmune pathogenic mechanisms shared by IBD and spondyloarthropathies include genetic susceptibility to abnormal antigen presentation, aberrant recognition of self, the presence of autoantibodies against specific antigens shared by the colon and other extra-colonic tissues, and increased intestinal permeability. The response against microorganisms may have an important role through molecular mimicry and other mechanisms. Rheumatic manifestations of IBD have been divided into peripheral arthritis, and axial involvement, including sacroiliitis, with or without spondylitis, similar to idiopathic ankylosing spondylitis. Other periarticular features can occur, including enthesopathy, tendonitis, clubbing, periostitis, and granulomatous lesions of joints and bones. Osteoporosis and osteomalacia secondary to IBD and iatrogenic complications can also occur. The management of the rheumatic manifestations of IBD consists of physical therapy in combination with local injection of corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; caution is in order however, because of their possible harmful effects on intestinal integrity, permeability, and even on gut inflammation. Sulfasalazine, methotrexate, azathioprine, cyclosporine and leflunomide should be used for selected indications. In some cases, tumor necrosis factor-alpha blocking agents should be considered as first-line therapy.

  11. Resilience in women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Manuel; Rodriguez, Yhojan; Pacheco, Yovana; Zapata, Elizabeth; Monsalve, Diana M; Mantilla, Rubén D; Rodríguez-Jimenez, Monica; Ramírez-Santana, Carolina; Molano-González, Nicolás; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2017-12-28

    To evaluate the relationship between resilience and clinical outcomes in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases. Focus groups, individual interviews, and chart reviews were done to collect data on 188 women with autoimmune rheumatic diseases, namely rheumatoid arthritis (n=51), systemic lupus erythematosus (n=70), systemic sclerosis (n=35), and Sjögren's syndrome (n=32). Demographic, clinical, and laboratory variables were assessed including disease activity by patient reported outcomes. Resilience was evaluated by using the Brief Resilience Scale. Bivariate, multiple linear regression, and classification and regression trees were used to analyse data. Resilience was influenced by age, duration of disease, and socioeconomic status. Lower resilience scores were observed in younger patients (50years) had higher resilience scores regardless of socioeconomic status. There was no influence of disease activity on resilience. A particular behaviour was observed in systemic sclerosis in which patients with high socioeconomic status and regular physical activity had higher resilience scores. Resilience in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases is a continuum process influenced by age and socioeconomic status. The ways in which these variables along with exercise influence resilience deserve further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. New pharmacological strategies in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiotis, R E; Buzoianu, A D; Mureșanu, D F; Suciu, S

    2016-01-01

    Targeting the pathogenic pathway of chronic inflammation represents an unmet challenge for controlling disease activity, preventing functional disability, and maintaining an adequate quality of life in patients with rheumatic diseases. Abatacept, a novel molecule that inhibits co-stimulation signal, induces an inhibitory effect on the T-cells. This will further interfere with the activity of several cell lines, leading to the normalization of the immune response. In the latest years, abatacept has been extensively investigated in studies of rheumatoid arthritis for which it was recently approved as a second line biologic treatment in Romania. This review presents the clinical efficacy of abatacept in several rheumatic diseases and highlights the safety profile of this biological agent. Abbreviations : ACR = American College of Rheumatology, ADR = Adverse drug reaction, APC = antigen presenting cell, ApS = psoriatic arthritis, CRP = C reactive protein, CTLA-4 = Cytotoxic T-Cell Lymphocyte Antigen-4, DAS = Disease activity score, DMARDs = Disease modifying antirheumatic drugs, EMA = European Medicine Agency, EULAR = European League Against Rheumatism, FDA = Food and Drugs Administration, HBV = Hepatitis B virus, JIA = Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis, LDA = low disease activity (LDA), MRI = magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), MTX = methotrexate, RA = rheumatoid arthritis, RCT = randomized controlled trial, SS = Sjogren's syndrome, TCR = T cell receptor.

  13. Lassa fever – full recovery without ribavarin treatment: a case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Lassa fever is a rodent-borne zoonosis that clinically manifests as an acute hemorrhagic fever. It is treated using ribavarin. Surviving Lassa fever without receiving the antiviral drug ribavarin is rare. Only few cases have been documented to date. Case Presentation: We report a case of a 59-year old female with ...

  14. Yellow Fever Outbreaks in Unvaccinated Populations, Brazil, 2008–2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Alessandro Pecego Martins; Costa, Zouraide Guerra Antunes; Ramos, Daniel Garkauskas; Andrade, Maria Auxiliadora; Jayme, Valéria de Sá; de Almeida, Marco Antônio Barreto; Vettorello, Kátia Campomar; Mascheretti, Melissa; Flannery, Brendan

    2014-01-01

    Due to the risk of severe vaccine-associated adverse events, yellow fever vaccination in Brazil is only recommended in areas considered at risk for disease. From September 2008 through June 2009, two outbreaks of yellow fever in previously unvaccinated populations resulted in 21 confirmed cases with 9 deaths (case-fatality, 43%) in the southern state of Rio Grande do Sul and 28 cases with 11 deaths (39%) in Sao Paulo state. Epizootic deaths of non-human primates were reported before and during the outbreak. Over 5.5 million doses of yellow fever vaccine were administered in the two most affected states. Vaccine-associated adverse events were associated with six deaths due to acute viscerotropic disease (0.8 deaths per million doses administered) and 45 cases of acute neurotropic disease (5.6 per million doses administered). Yellow fever vaccine recommendations were revised to include areas in Brazil previously not considered at risk for yellow fever. PMID:24625634

  15. Unreliability of three commercial Coxiella burnetii phase II IgM ELISA kits for the seroscreening of acute Q fever in human cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraj Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: The three different ELISA kits exhibited poor agreement amongst them and unacceptable level of false positivity. IFA remains to be the only option for diagnosing acute QF. Discrepancy between the clinical findings and IFA/ELISA results needs confirmation by C. burnetii DNA detection in real-time polymerase chain reaction.

  16. Pollutants make rheumatic diseases worse: Facts on polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) exposure and rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abella, Vanessa; Pérez, Tamara; Scotece, Morena; Conde, Javier; Pirozzi, Claudio; Pino, Jesús; Lago, Francisca; González-Gay, Miguel Ángel; Mera, Antonio; Gómez, Rodolfo; Gualillo, Oreste

    2016-07-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants that bioaccumulate in adipose tissue, disturbing its metabolism and the balance of adipokines, related to obesity. The altering secretion pattern of adipokines from the adipose tissue and the increasing mechanical load in weight-bearing joints presented in obesity condition, are risk factors for osteoarthritis development. The most prevalent rheumatic diseases, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, are chronic conditions that target the whole joints, leading to increasing disability and health care cost. The goal of this focused review is to summarize the current knowledge on the role of PCBs in osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis pathogenesis. A PubMed search was managed using keywords as "rheumatic diseases", "polychlorinated biphenyls", "obesity" and "endocrine disruption". The incidence of rheumatoid arthritis has been reported to be increased especially in urban areas in industrialized countries, emphasizing the importance of environment in the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases. Analysis of two cohorts exposed to PCBs food contamination showed high incidence of arthritis. In addition, PCBs in serum correlated positively with the prevalence of self-reported arthritis. Few studies support the hypothesis that osteoarthritis development could be related to PCBs induction of chondrocytes apoptosis. Evidences have emerged for a relationship between PCBs and development of several types of arthritis. Further research is encouraged to determine the correlation between PCBs exposure and the development of rheumatic diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saijo, Masayuki; Moriikawa, Shigeru; Kurane, Ichiro

    2004-12-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is an acute infectious disease caused by CCHF virus (CCHFV), a member of the family Bunyaviridae, genus Nairovirus. The case fatality rate of CCHF ranges from 10-40%. Because CCHF is not present in Japan, many Japanese virologists and clinicians are not very familiar with this disease. However, there remains the possibility of an introduction of CCHFV or other hemorrhagic fever viruses into Japan from surrounding endemic areas. Development of diagnostic laboratory capacity for viral hemorrhagic fevers is necessary even in countries without these diseases. At the National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan, laboratory-based systems such as recombinant protein-based antibody detection, antigen-capture and pathological examination have been developed. In this review article, epidemiologic and clinical data on CCHF in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, compiled through field investigations and diagnostic testing utilizing the aforementioned laboratory systems, are presented. CCHFV infections are closely associated with the environmental conditions, life styles, religion, occupation, and human economic activities. Based on these data, preventive measures for CCHFV infections are also discussed.

  18. Interventions for treating patients with chikungunya virus infection-related rheumatic and musculoskeletal disorders: A systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Martí-Carvajal

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus infection (CHIKV is caused by a mosquito-borne alphavirus. CHIKV causes high fever and painful rheumatic disorders that may persist for years. Because little is known about interventions for treating CHIKV-related illness, we conducted a systematic review.We used Cochrane methods. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, LILACS and other sources from the earliest records to March 2016. We had no language restrictions. We included randomized controlled trials assessing any intervention for treating acute or chronic CHIKV-related illness. Our primary outcomes were pain relief, global health status (GHS or health related quality of life (HRQL, and serious adverse events (SAEs. We assessed bias risk with the Cochrane tool and used GRADE to assess evidence quality.We screened 2,229 records and found five small trials with a total of 402 participants. Patients receiving chloroquine (CHQ had better chronic pain relief than those receiving placebo (relative risk [RR] 2.67, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.23 to 5.77, N = 54, but acute pain relief was marginally not different between groups (mean difference [MD] 1.46, 95% CI 0.00 to 2.92, N = 54. SAEs were similar (RR = 15.00, 95% CI 0.90 to 250.24, N = 54. Comparing CHQ with paracetamol (PCM, CHQ patients had better pain relief (RR = 1.52, 95% CI 1.20 to 1.93, N = 86. Compared with hydroxychloroquine (HCHQ, disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs reduced pain (MD = -14.80, 95% CI -19.12 to -10.48, N = 72. DMARDs patients had less disability (MD = -0.74, 95% CI -0.92 to -0.56, N = 72 and less disease activity (MD = -1.35; 95% CI -1.70 to -1.00; N = 72. SAEs were similar between DMARDs and HCHQ groups (RR = 2.84, 95% CI 0.12 to 67.53, N = 72. Comparing meloxicam (MXM with CHQ, there was no difference in pain relief (MD = 0.24, 95% CI = -0.81 to 1.29; p = 0.65, N = 70, GHS or HRQL (MD = -0.31, 95% CI -2.06 to 1.44, N = 70 or SAEs (RR = 0.85, 95% CI 0.30 to 2.42, N = 70. Finally

  19. Factors that precipitate heart failure among children with rheumatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To identify factors that precipitates heart failure in children with rheumatic heart disease. Design: a descriptive cross-sectional study. Setting: Paediatric wards at the Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital. Subjects: Children with Rheumatic heart disease admitted for in-patient care due to decompensated heart ...

  20. factors that precipitate heart failure among children with rheumatic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-11-11

    Nov 11, 2011 ... heart failure, atrial fibrillation or embolic phenomena. (1). Currently, rheumatic heart disease mainly affects children in developing countries especially where poverty is widespread. Rheumatic heart disease is a major cause of cardiac failure in Africa and Asia especially in children five to fifteen years and ...

  1. Echocardiographic patterns of juvenile rheumatic heart disease at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To describe the echocardiographic features of children with rheumatic heart disease seen at the Kenyatta National Hospital. Design: A retrospective study. Setting: The Kenyatta National Hospital Heart Unit. Subjects: Patients aged 20 years and less with echocardiographic diagnosis of rheumatic heart disease.

  2. Immunomodulatory interplay of the microbiome and therapy of rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrov, Barbara E; Amsterdam, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    Modulation of the immune system by microbes, especially from the gastrointestinal tract, is increasingly considered a key factor in the onset, course and outcome of rheumatic diseases. The interplay of the microbiome, along with genetic predisposition and environmental exposure, is thought to be an important trigger for rheumatic diseases. Improved identification of the relationship of disease-specific genetic alterations and rheumatic diseases has potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Treatment of rheumatic disorders is influenced by microbial actions but this interplay can be challenging due to variable and unpredictable responses to therapies. Expanded knowledge of the microbiome now allows clinicians to more precisely select ideal medication regimens and to predict response to and toxicity from drugs. Rheumatic diseases and associated therapies were among the earliest microbiome interactions investigated, yet it is notable that current research is focused on clinical and immunological associations but, in comparison, a limited number of studies regarding the microbiome's impact on treatment for rheumatic diseases have been published. In the coming years, further knowledge of immunomodulating interactions between the microbiome and the immune system will aid our understanding of autoimmunity and will be increasingly important in selection of therapeutic agents for patients with autoimmune and rheumatic diseases. In this review, recent literature regarding the bidirectional immunomodulatory effects of the microbiome with rheumatic diseases and current understanding and gaps regarding the drug-microbiome interface in the management of these disorders is presented.

  3. Moving towards a molecular taxonomy of autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barturen, Guillermo; Beretta, Lorenzo; Cervera, Ricard; van Vollenhoven, Ronald; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.

    2018-01-01

    Autoimmune rheumatic diseases pose many problems that have, in general, already been solved in the field of cancer. The heterogeneity of each disease, the clinical similarities and differences between different autoimmune rheumatic diseases and the large number of patients that remain without a

  4. The exanthem of dengue fever: Clinical features of two US tourists traveling abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincus, Laura B.; Grossman, Marc E.; Fox, Lindy P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue fever is the most common identifiable cause of acute febrile illness among travelers returning from South America, South Central Asia, Southeast Asia, and the Caribbean. Although the characteristic exanthem of dengue fever occurs in up to 50% of patients, few descriptions of it are found in the dermatology literature, and discussions of how to distinguish the dengue exanthem from other infectious disease entities are rare. Chikungunya fever is an emerging infectious disease now seen in returning US tourists and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of dengue fever in the appropriate patient. Objective The purpose of our study was to report two cases of dengue fever among returning US tourists, provide a review of dengue fever, offer an extensive differential diagnosis of dengue fever, and raise awareness among dermatologists of chikungunya fever. Methods This study includes clinical findings of two returning travelers, one who traveled to Mexico and the other to Thailand, complemented by a discussion of both dengue fever and its differential diagnosis. Limitations Limited to 2 case reports. Conclusion Dengue fever should be considered in the differential diagnosis of fever and rash in the returning traveler. Dermatologists should be aware of the distinctive exanthem of dengue fever. Recognition of the dengue fever rash permits a rapid and early diagnosis, which is critical, as dengue fever can progress to life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome. PMID:17959270

  5. Rheumatic Disease Autoantibodies in Autoimmune Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utiyama, Shirley R R; Zenatti, Katiane B; Nóbrega, Heloisa A J; Soares, Juliana Z C; Skare, Thelma L; Matsubara, Caroline; Muzzilo, Dominique A; Nisihara, Renato M

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune liver diseases (ALDs) are known to be associated with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARDs) and their autoantibodies. We aimed to study the prevalence of SARDs and related autoantibodies, as well as their prognostic implications in a group of patients with ALDs. This was a cross-sectional study. Sixty patients with ALDs (38.3% with autoimmune hepatitis; 11.7% with primary biliary cirrhosis; 25% with primary sclerosing cholangitis and 25% with overlap syndrome) were studied for the presence of SARDs and their autoantibodies. There was autoimmune rheumatic disease in 20% of the studied sample. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were the commonest (11.6% and 5%, respectively). Antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) were present in 35% of the patients, followed by anti-Ro (20.0%); anti-nucleosome (18.3%); rheumatoid factor (10%) anti-CCP (8.3%); anti-RNP (8.3%); anti-ds-DNA (6.6%); anti-La (3.3%); anti-Sm (3.3%), anti-ribosomal P (3.3%). Anti-Ro (p = 0.0004), anti-La (p = 0.03), anti-RNP (p = 0.04) and anti-Sm (p = 0.03) were commonly found in patients with SARD, but not anti-DNA, anti-nucleosome and anti-ribosomal P. No differences were found in liver function tests regarding to the presence of autoantibodies. There was a high prevalence of SARD and their autoantibodies in ALD patients. Anti-Ro, anti-La, anti-RNP and anti-Sm positivity points to an association with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases. The presence of autoantibodies was not related to liver function tests.

  6. Current perspective on rituximab in rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schioppo T

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Tommaso Schioppo, Francesca Ingegnoli Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, Division of Rheumatology, ASST Pini, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milano, Italy Abstract: The steadily increasing knowledge regarding pathogenetic mechanisms in ­autoimmune rheumatic diseases has paved the way to different therapeutic approaches. In particular, the market entry of biologics has dramatically modified the natural history of rheumatic chronic inflammatory diseases with a meaningful impact on patients’ quality of life. Among the wide spectrum of available biological treatments, rituximab (RTX, first used in the treatment of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, was later approved for rheumatoid arthritis and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies-associated vasculitis. Nowadays, in rheumatology, RTX is also used with off-label indications in patients with systemic sclerosis, Sjögren’s syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus. RTX is a monoclonal antibody directed to CD20 molecules expressed on the surfaces of pre-B and mature B lymphocytes. It acts by causing apoptosis of these cells with antibody- and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. As inflammatory responses to cell-associated immune complexes are key elements in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune rheumatic diseases, such an approach might be effective in these patients. In fact, RTX, by promoting the rapid and long-term depletion of circulating and lymphoid tissue-associated B cells, leads to a lower recruitment of these effector cells at sites of immune complex deposition, thus reducing inflammation and tissue damage. RTX is of the most interest to rheumatologists as it represents an important additional therapeutic approach. Thus, the advent in clinical practice of approved RTX biosimilars, such as CT-P10, may be of help in improving treatment access as well as in reducing costs. Keywords: rituximab, rheumatoid arthritis, ANCA-associated vasculitis, systemic sclerosis, Sj

  7. Maternal and fetal outcome in women with rheumatic heart disease: a 3-year observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezk, Mohamed; Gamal, Awni

    2016-08-01

    To assess prospectively the maternal and fetal outcome in women with rheumatic heart disease (RHD). This was a prospective 3-year observational study carried out at Menoufia University Hospital, Egypt in which 192 patients out of 9856 pregnant women were diagnosed with RHD and divided into two groups: low- and high-risk groups based on the New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classification. Enrolled patients were followed to assess the maternal and fetal outcome. Mitral valve disease was the commonest single valve (118/192, 51.4 %) affected by rheumatic fever. Cardiac women with NYHA class I&II characterized by having fewer pulmonary hypertension, taking cardiac medications, prior heart failure and prior cardiac surgery than those with NYHA class III&IV. On the hand, cardiac women with NYHA III&IV have poorer maternal outcome with more complications as heart failure, arrhythmias, thromboembolism, admission to cardiac ICU, delivery by cesarean section and defective lactation. Prematurity and NICU admission were significantly more in NYHA III&IV. RHD still constitutes a major cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Multidisciplinary cooperation, proper preconception and antenatal care are the key measures to improve the outcomes of these patients.

  8. Complementary and alternative medicine for rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng Sophia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of complementary and alternative medicine is not uncommonly encountered in our patients. This manuscript reviewed the latest evidence on other modalities in treating rheumatic diseases. Treatments that are found to be helpful for rheumatoid arthritis include herbs, fish oil, and acupuncture. Fish oil, vitamin D, N-acetylcysteine, and cognitive behavior treatments are helpful for systemic lupus erythematosus. Hydrotherapy and massage are potentially beneficial for fibromyalgia patients. Diet supplement is not found to be beneficial for osteoarthritis. CAM modalities will need further studies.

  9. Q Fever with Unusual Exposure History: A Classic Presentation of a Commonly Misdiagnosed Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randall J. Nett

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a man presumptively diagnosed and treated for Rocky Mountain spotted fever following exposure to multiple ticks while riding horses. The laboratory testing of acute and convalescent serum specimens led to laboratory confirmation of acute Q fever as the etiology. This case represents a potential tickborne transmission of Coxiella burnetii and highlights the importance of considering Q fever as a possible diagnosis following tick exposures.

  10. Psychosis in dengue fever

    OpenAIRE

    Suprakash Chaudhury; Biswajit Jagtap; Deepak Kumar Ghosh

    2017-01-01

    An 18-year-old male student developed abnormal behavior while undergoing treatment for dengue fever. He was ill-kempt, irritable and had auditory and visual hallucinations and vague persecutory delusions in clear sensorium with impaired insight. The psychotic episode had a temporal correlation with dengue fever. Psychiatric comorbidities of dengue fever including mania, anxiety, depression, and catatonia are mentioned in literature but the literature on the psychosis following dengue is spars...

  11. Familial Mediterranean fever: An updated review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarı, İsmail; Birlik, Merih; Kasifoğlu, Timuçin

    2014-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) is a hereditary autoinflammatory disorder characterised by acute attacks of fever and serosal inflammation. FMF primarily affects Jewish, Armenian, Turkish, and Arab populations. The disease is accompanied by a marked decrease in quality of life due to the effects of attacks and subclinical inflammation in the attack-free periods. Untreated or inadequately treated patients run the risk of amyloidosis, which is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. In this review, the current information available on FMF is summarised. PMID:27708867

  12. ETIOLOGY OF OROYA FEVER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Hideyo

    1926-01-01

    3 months, in one instance, with a remittence during the 3rd to 5th weeks, to the acute high fever (106°F.) of 1 day's duration in the fatally infected monkey, No. 25. The more usual reaction, however, is an irregular course of moderate fever with one or more periods of high temperature (105°). Bartonella bacilliformis was constantly demonstrated, both microscopically and by culture tests, in the lymph glands of animals sacrificed 2 to 3 months after inoculation, and in two of three instances it was present also in the spleen, bone marrow, and heart blood. In the case of M. rhesus 6, which died 26 days after inoculation, the microorganism was obtained also in culture from the lymph glands, spleen, and heart blood taken at autopsy. In the other animal which died, a terminal bactelial infection, while not obscuring the effects of the Bartonella infection, made it impossible to isolate the parasite from either blood or tissues. The skin lesions, whether of the nodular type, induced by introduction of the virus intradermally or by application to the scarified skin, or of the miliary character occurring spontaneously as a result of systemic infection, always yielded cultures of Bartonella bacilliformis, and stained sections of such lesions revealed the parasites in large numbers in their characteristic situation in the endothelial cells. A chronic, systemic infection, in which the lymph glands are enlarged and Bartonella bacilliformis is present in the blood in high titer, may be induced by local inoculation, as shown in the case of M. rhesus 5. The local lesions induced in one instance by introduction of a passage strain, both intradermally and by scarification, attained within 2 months extraordinary size, the nodules arising at adjacent sites of inoculation on the right eyebrow having coalesced into a large pedunculated mass which overhung the eye. This type of reaction had not been observed hitherto in the course of the present study but has been described by earlier

  13. Metabolic syndrome in inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. La Montagna

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Toward the end of the last century a better knowledge of cardiovascular (CV risk factors and their associations led investigators to propose the existence of a unique pathophysiological condition called “metabolic” or “insulin resistance syndrome”. Among all, insulin-resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia are considered its most important treatment targets. Different definitions have been provided by World Health Organization (WHO and by The Third Report of The National Cholesterol Education Program’s Adult Treatment Panel (NCEP-ATP III. In particular, abdominal obesity, hypertension, low HDL cholesterol and hyperglicemia are the most common items used for its definition. The presence of MetS is effective in predicting the future risk of diabetes and coronaropathies. The evidence of a higher CV risk rate among different rheumatic inflammatory diseases has recently been associated with high prevalence of MetS in some cases. Rheumatoid or psoriatic arthritis have the large series among arthritis, whereas systemic lupus erythematosus among connective tissue disorders. This review analyses all most important studies about the evidence of MetS in rheumatic patients and the main clinical and prognostic significance of this relation.

  14. Cryotherapy in the treatment of rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksiezopolska-Pietrzak, K

    2000-12-30

    Cryotherapy is the application of a temperature lower than -100 C to the outer surface of the body, for a period of 2-3 minutes, in order to evoke and make use of physiological reactions to cold. The body's positive response to cryotherapy is a supportive factor in the treatment of the underlying disease and facilitates kinseitherapy. Low temperatures, obtained by injecting air chilled with liquid nitrogen vapor, can be applied either locally, on selected parts of the locomotor apparatus, or generally, on the entire body (in a cryosauna or cryochamber). The best therapeutic effects are obtained by applying cryotherapy twice a day, with at least a 3-hour interval between procedures. Kinesitherapy is necessarily applied after each cryotherapy session. This form of treatment should be continued for 2 to 6 weeks, depending on the patient's individual needs. Cryotherapy reduces pain and edema, relaxes skeletal muscles, and increases the range motion in the treated area, which makes it possible to conduct exercises increasing muscle strength. Thus cryotherapy would seem to meet all requirements for use in the rehabilitation of patients with rheumatic diseases. Cryotherapy requires little time to apply, is well tolerated by patients, and leads to rapid improvement of the patient's status after application. The relatively small number of contraindications makes cryotherapy a method of choice for broad application in the treatment of rheumatic diseases.

  15. Acute interstitial pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuervo M, Francisco; Carrillo Bayona, Jorge; Ojeda, Paulina

    2004-01-01

    The paper refers to a 71 year-old patient, to who is diagnosed acute interstitial pneumonia; with square of 20 days of evolution of cough dry emetizant, fever, general uneasiness, migraine, progressive dyspnoea and lost of weight

  16. Malignant Mediterranean spotted fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunge, Snehal Balvant; Patil, Vaibhav; Ambar, Sameer; Naik, Vishwas

    2015-12-01

    Fever with rash is one of the most common causes of referral to a dermatologist. A plethora of conditions need to be considered in the differential diagnosis. They may be broadly classified into infectious causes, drug reactions, and autoimmune disorders. Here we present a rare case of rickettsial fever with cardiac involvement in an elderly male patient with no comorbidities.

  17. Fever of unknown origin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleeker-Rovers, C.P.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Oyen, W.J.G.

    2009-01-01

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) often is defined as a fever greater than 38.3 degrees C on several occasions during at least 3 weeks with uncertain diagnosis after a number of obligatory tests. In general, infection accounts for approximately one-fourth of cases of FUO, followed by neoplasm and

  18. Haemoragisk Rift Valley Fever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabiansen, Christian; Thybo, Søren

    2007-01-01

    A case of fatal hemorrhagic Rift Valley fever during an epidemic in Kenya's North Eastern Province in January 2007 is described.......A case of fatal hemorrhagic Rift Valley fever during an epidemic in Kenya's North Eastern Province in January 2007 is described....

  19. African tick bite fever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jakob Aaquist; Thybo, Søren

    2011-01-01

    The incident of spotted fever imported to Denmark is unknown. We present a classic case of African Tick Bite Fever (ATBF) to highlight a disease, which frequently infects wildlife enthusiasts and hunters on vacation in South Africa. ATBF has a good prognosis and is easily treated with doxycyclin...

  20. Rat bite fever.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaastra, W.; Boot, R.G.A.; Ho, H.; Lipman, L.J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Rat bite fever (RBF) is a bacterial zoonosis for which two causal bacterial species have been identified: Streptobacillis moniliformis and Spirillum minus. Haverhill fever (HF) is a form of S. moniliformis infection believed to develop after ingestion of contaminated food or water. Here the

  1. Persistent high fever for more than 10 days during acute phase is a risk factor for endothelial dysfunction in children with a history of Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yasuhiko; Katayama, Hiroshi; Kishi, Kanta; Ozaki, Noriyasu; Shimizu, Tatsuo; Tamai, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Endothelial dysfunction has previously been reported in children with a history of Kawasaki disease, but the determinants of endothelial function in Kawasaki disease patients are still unknown. In this study, we investigated endothelial function in Kawasaki disease patients and attempted to identify risk factors for persistent endothelial dysfunction. Using high-resolution ultrasound, we measured the percent flow-mediated dilatation, an arterial response to reactive hyperemia, to evaluate endothelial function in 67 patients with a history of Kawasaki disease and 28 age- and sex-matched control subjects. We divided the Kawasaki disease patients into a group with impaired endothelial function (the percent flow-mediated dilatation below -2 standard deviations of the control group) and a group with normal endothelial function (the percent flow-mediated dilatation more than -2 standard deviations of control). Logistic multiple regression analysis was performed to identify independent predictors of impaired endothelial function. In Kawasaki disease patients, the percent flow-mediated dilatation was significantly lower than in the control subjects (9.8±3.6%, compared with 13.1±3.4%, pKawasaki disease patients (3 patients with coronary artery lesions and 10 patients without coronary artery lesions), the percent flow-mediated dilatation was below -2 standard deviations of control. Logistic multiple regression analysis showed that a febrile period of longer than 10 days during the acute phase was the significant risk factor for endothelial dysfunction (odds ratio: 8.562; 95% confidence interval: 1.366-53.68). Presence of coronary artery lesions was not a determinant of endothelial dysfunction. Systemic endothelial dysfunction exists in children with a history of Kawasaki disease, and a febrile period of longer than 10 days during the acute phase is an independent predictor of endothelial dysfunction irrespective of coronary artery involvement. Copyright © 2015 Japanese

  2. Prevalence of Group A beta-haemolytic Streptococcus isolated from children with acute pharyngotonsillitis in Aden, Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba-Saddik, I A; Munibari, A A; Alhilali, A M; Ismail, S M; Murshed, F M; Coulter, J B S; Cuevas, L E; Hart, C A; Brabin, B J; Parry, C M

    2014-04-01

    To estimate the prevalence of Group A beta-haemolytic streptococcus (GAS) and non-GAS infections among children with acute pharyngotonsillitis in Aden, Yemen, to evaluate the value of a rapid diagnostic test and the McIsaac score for patient management in this setting and to determine the occurrence of emm genotypes among a subset of GAS isolated from children with acute pharyngotonsillitis and a history of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) or rheumatic heart disease (RHD). Group A beta-haemolytic streptococcus infections in school-aged children with acute pharyngotonsillitis in Aden, Yemen, were diagnosed by a rapid GAS antigen detection test (RADT) and/or GAS culture from a throat swab. The RADT value and the McIsaac screening score for patient management were evaluated. The emm genotype of a subset of GAS isolates was determined. Group A beta-haemolytic streptococcus pharyngotonsillitis was diagnosed in 287/691 (41.5%; 95% CI 37.8-45.3) children. Group B, Group C and Group G beta-haemolytic streptococci were isolated from 4.3% children. The RADT had a sensitivity of 238/258 (92.2%) and specificity of 404/423 (95.5%) against GAS culture. A McIsaac score of ≥4 had a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 82% for confirmed GAS infection. The emm genotypes in 21 GAS isolates from children with pharyngitis and a history of ARF and confirmed RHD were emm87 (11), emm12 (6), emm28 (3) and emm5 (1). This study demonstrates a very high prevalence of GAS infections in Yemeni children and the value of the RADT and the McIsaac score in this setting. More extensive emm genotyping is necessary to understand the local epidemiology of circulating strains. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. CLINICAL COMPLICATIONS OF CHIKUNGUNYA FEVER IN MAURITIUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Smita Sulackshana Devi Goorah

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya fever, an emerging mosquito-borne viral disease, has affected Mauritius with two recent outbreaks in 2005 and 2006 respectively. A study was carried out in 2007 to describe the clinical complications post-Chikungunya infection. Ethical clearance was obtained for this study. Data collection was carried out in February and March 2007 on a sample of people who had suffered from Chikungunya fever by means of a comprehensive questionnaire. Participants comprised 77 people; there were 41 males and 36 females. Participants ranged from 6 to 69 years. 70 participants experienced persisting joint pains for at least 6 months following the acute phase. Of these, 35 had residual joint complaints after 6 months. 44 participants suffered from psychological sequelae. 10 participants had dermatological sequelae, 6 had iatrogenic complications due to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID-induced gastritis, and 3 participants with serologically confirmed Chikungunya fever had neurological manifestations and changes on CT/MRI which could correspond to demyelination. Statistical analysis demonstrated that there was a weak linear relationship between the number of complications and increasing age; there was a significant difference in the number of complications according to gender, females being more affected than males; participants with co-morbidities had more complications and psychological sequelae than previously healthy participants. This study highlights that Chikungunya fever, which causes a significant impact on health in the acute phase, can have significant sequelae months afterwards and this includes psychological sequelae.

  4. Rheumatic effects of vibration at work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Keith T; Bovenzi, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Occupational exposures to vibration come in many guises and are very common at a population level. It follows that an important minority of working-aged patients seen by medical services will have been exposed to this hazard of employment. Vibration can cause human health effects which may manifest in the patients that rheumatologists see. In this chapter we identify the health effects of relevance to them, and review their epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, and vocational and clinical management. On either side of this, we describe the nature and assessment of the hazard, the scale and common patterns of exposure to vibration in the community, and the legal basis for controlling health risks, and comment on the role of health surveillance in detecting early adverse effects and what can be done to prevent the rheumatic effects of vibration at work. PMID:26612239

  5. MicroRNAs in autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.D. Sebastiani

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of autoimmune diseases remains largely unknown. In recent years, besides genetic factors, several studies proposed that the epigenome may hold the key to a better understanding of autoimmunity initiation and perpetuation. More specifically epigenetic regulatory mechanisms comprise DNA methylation, a variety of histone modifications, and microRNA (miRNA activity, all of which act upon gene and protein expression levels. In particular it is well known that epigenetic mechanisms are important for controlling the pattern of gene expression during development, the cell cycle, and the response to biological or environmental changes. In the present review a description of the most frequent epigenetic deregulations, in particular the role of miRNA, in rheumatic autoimmune disorders will be analyzed.

  6. Refractory Rheumatic Disorder: Atypical Postpregnancy Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Mourgues

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report on a young patient with severe osteoporosis that was initially revealed when she presented with polyarthralgia during her second pregnancy. Postpartum, the pain increased and her X-ray did not show any abnormalities. A bone scintigraphy was performed. It indicated an inflammatory rheumatic disorder. Six months after partum, an investigation of right coxalgia revealed a spontaneous basicervical fracture. Given the persistent polyarthralgia, the patient underwent a new scintigraphy, which revealed areas of what looked to be old rib and L1 fractures. A subsequent full body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scan revealed signal abnormalities that could indicate multiple lower limb bone fractures. Despite exhaustive biological, radiological, and histological testing, no secondary cause for the osteoporosis was found. The patient was started on teriparatide. We finally concluded that, despite the atypical presentation, the patient was suffering from postpregnancy osteoporosis. It is possible that the frequency of occurrence of this still poorly understood disease is underestimated.

  7. MALDI mass spectrometry imaging in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Beatriz; Cillero-Pastor, Berta; Blanco, Francisco J; Ruiz-Romero, Cristina

    2017-07-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a technique used to visualize the spatial distribution of biomolecules such as peptides, proteins, lipids or other organic compounds by their molecular masses. Among the different MSI strategies, MALDI-MSI provides a sensitive and label-free approach for imaging of a wide variety of protein or peptide biomarkers from the surface of tissue sections, being currently used in an increasing number of biomedical applications such as biomarker discovery and tissue classification. In the field of rheumatology, MALDI-MSI has been applied to date for the analysis of joint tissues such as synovial membrane or cartilage. This review summarizes the studies and key achievements obtained using MALDI-MSI to increase understanding on rheumatic pathologies and to describe potential diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers of these diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: MALDI Imaging, edited by Dr. Corinna Henkel and Prof. Peter Hoffmann. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Vaccination in paediatric patients with auto-immune rheumatic diseases : A systemic literature review for the European League against Rheumatism evidence-based recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijstek, M. W.; de Bruin, L. M. Ott; Borrow, R.; van der Klis, F.; Kone-Paut, I.; Fasth, A.; Minden, K.; Ravelli, A.; Abinun, M.; Pileggi, G.; Borte, M.; Bijl, M.; Wulffraat, N. M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze available evidence on vaccinations in paediatric patients with rheumatic and auto-inflammatory diseases. This evidence formed the basis of the recently constructed European League against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for vaccination of these patients. Methods: A

  9. Nephritis and cerebellar ataxia: rare presenting features of enteric fever.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parmar R

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Enteric fever is a common infectious disease of the tropical world, about 80% of these cases occur in Asian countries. Enteric fever presenting with isolated cerebellar ataxia or nephritis is rare. We report three cases of enteric fever that presented with these complications. Isolated cerebellar ataxia usually occurs in the second week, whereas in our cases it presented within first four days of fever. The common complications of enteric fever related to the urinary tract are cystitis, pyelitis, and pyelonephritis. Glomerulonephritis is uncommon. Most patients with enteric glomerulonephritis present with acute renal failure, hypertensive encephalopathy, or nephritic syndrome. In comparison, our case had milder manifestations. All three patients were treated with parenteral ceftriaxone and showed a prompt recovery.

  10. Therapy for influenza and acute respiratory viral infection in young and middle-aged schoolchildren: Effect of Ingavirin® on intoxication, fever, and catarrhal syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Farber

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the clinical results of a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled multicenter phase III study evaluating the clinical efficacy and safety of Ingavirin® capsules 30 mg at a daily dose of 60 mg for the treatment of influenza and other acute respiratory viral infections (ARVI in 7–12-year-old children.The study included 310 children of both sexes. The study participants took Ingavirin® 60 mg/day or placebo for 5 days. The drug was shown to be effective in normalizing temperature and alleviating intoxication and catarrhal syndromes just at day 3 of therapy. Ingavirin® was demonstrated to considerably reduce the risk of bacterial complications of ARVI/influenza, which require antibiotic therapy, which is important for clinical use in children. This clinical trial has shown the high safety and tolerance of the drug. Ingavirin® contributes to accelerated virus elimination, shorter disease duration, and lower risk of complications.

  11. DENGUE FEVER IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Zvereva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently in Russia number of cases of dengue fever in adults grows up, whereas in endemic areas, due to the wide spread of the disease is more common in children, which symptoms has its own characteristics. In the article is reviewed a clinical case of girl living in Moscow who has been returned from the Thailand vacation — the first registered case of dengue fever in childhood. In the article were discussed the problems of diagnostics of the disease, an algorithm for diagnosis of dengue fever.

  12. [Non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossermelli, W; Pastor, E H

    1995-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) comprise an important class of medicaments that reduced the symptoms of inflamation in rheumatic disease. This article emphasizes similarities and class characteristics of the NSAID, mechanisms of action, and drug-interactions.

  13. Hand-related physical function in rheumatic hand conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klokker, Louise; Terwee, Caroline; Wæhrens, Eva Elisabet Ejlersen

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is no consensus about what constitutes the most appropriate patient-reported outcome measurement (PROM) instrument for measuring physical function in patients with rheumatic hand conditions. Existing instruments lack psychometric testing and vary in feasibility...... and their psychometric qualities. We aim to develop a PROM instrument to assess hand-related physical function in rheumatic hand conditions. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will perform a systematic search to identify existing PROMs to rheumatic hand conditions, and select items relevant for hand-related physical function...... as well as those items from the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Physical Function (PF) item bank that are relevant to patients with rheumatic hand conditions. Selection will be based on consensus among reviewers. Content validity of selected items will be established...

  14. Mind body therapies in rehabilitation of patients with rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rosso, Angela; Maddali-Bongi, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Mind body therapies (MBT) share a global approach involving both mental and physical dimensions, and focus on relationship between brain, mind, body and behavior and their effects on health and disease. MBT include concentration based therapies and movement based therapies, comprising traditional Oriental practices and somatic techniques. The greatest part of rheumatic diseases have a chronic course, leading to progressive damages at musculoskeletal system and causing physical problems, psychological and social concerns. Thus, rheumatic patients need to be treated with a multidisciplinary approach integrating pharmacological therapies and rehabilitation techniques, that not should only aim to reduce the progression of damages at musculoskeletal system. Thus, MBT, using an overall approach, could be useful in taking care of the overall health of the patients with chronic rheumatic diseases. This review will deal with different MBT and with their effects in the most common chronic rheumatic diseases (Rheumatoid Arthritis, Ankylosing Spondylitis, Fibromyalgia Syndrome). Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. The role of IL-33 in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Lihua; Chen, Jie; Gong, Feili; Shi, Guixiu

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-33 (IL-33), a novel member of IL-1 family, has been recently implicated in several inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. IL-33 can be produced by various types of tissues and cells and induce gene expression of Th2-associated cytokines via binding to the orphan receptor ST2. By promoting Th2 type immune response, IL-33 plays important roles in the allergy, whereas its function in autoimmune diseases attracts more attention. Recent studies reported the correlation of IL-33 with rheumatic diseases, and most of them found that the IL-33 expression levels were consistent with disease activity and development. Furthermore, evidence has indicated that IL-33-related treatment may ameliorate the pathogenic conditions and attenuate disease progression of those rheumatic diseases. Therefore, elucidation of the roles of IL-33 in rheumatic diseases would be beneficial to understand the pathogenesis and therapy of these diseases. In this paper, we will summarize the roles of IL-33 in the rheumatic diseases.

  16. A comparative hospital-based observational study of mono- and co-infections of malaria, dengue virus and scrub typhus causing acute undifferentiated fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S; Dhar, M; Mittal, G; Bhat, N K; Shirazi, N; Kalra, V; Sati, H C; Gupta, V

    2016-04-01

    Positive serology for dengue and/or scrub typhus infection with/without positive malarial smear (designated as mixed or co-infection) is being increasingly observed during epidemics of acute undifferentiated febrile illnesses (AUFIs). We planned to study the clinical and biochemical spectrum of co-infections with Plasmodium sp., dengue virus and scrub typhus and compare these with mono-infection by the same organisms. During the period from December 2012 to December 2013, all cases presenting with AUFIs to a single medical unit of a referral centre in Garhwal region of the north Indian state of Uttarakhand were retrospectively selected and categorised aetiologically as co-infections, malaria, dengue or scrub typhus. The groups thus created were compared in terms of demographic, clinical, biochemical and outcome parameters. The co-infection group (n = 49) was associated with milder clinical manifestations, fewer, milder and non-progressive organ dysfunction, and lesser need for intensive care, mechanical ventilation and dialysis as compared to mono-infections. When co-infections were sub-grouped and compared with the relevant mono-infections, there were differences in certain haematological and biochemical parameters; however, this difference did not translate into differential outcomes. Scrub typhus mono-infection was associated with severe disease in terms of both morbidity and mortality. Malaria, dengue and scrub typhus should be routinely tested in all patients with AUFIs. Co-infections, whether true or due to serological cross-reactivity, appear to be a separate entity so far as presentation and morbidity is concerned. Further insight is needed into the mechanism and identification of the protective infection.

  17. Fever origins in the tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odio, W T; Mangalaboyi, L J; M'Belepe, M R; Ditu, M S

    1982-01-01

    The causes of fever were attempted to identify in a prospective study on 300 adult in- and outpatients with fever at Kinshasa Teaching Hospital, Zaire. Infection was by far the primary cause of fever (87%). Tuberculosis occurred in 15% of the inpatients. Malaria was the most frequent febrile disease: one fever in two was malaria. Connective tissue diseases and neoplasms were rare.

  18. Anti-Rheumatic Potential of Pakistani Medicinal Plants: A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamal, M.; Adnan, M.; Murad, W.; Tariq, A.; Bibi, H.; Rahman, H.; Shinwari, Z. K.

    2016-01-01

    Present review aimed to provide a comprehensive documentation of plants used as anti-rheumatic ethnomedicines in Pakistan and to suggest future recommendations. Data on anti-rheumatic plants was collected from published scientific papers, reports and thesis using online searching engines such as Google Scholar PubMed and Science Direct. Five distinct zones in the country were classified on the basis of geography, humidity and rainfall. We used Sorenson similarity index for plants and their parts used between different zones. A total of 137 anti-rheumatic plant species representing 55 families and 104 genera are used in Pakistan. Herbs (87 plants) were the primary source of anti-rheumatic medicinal plants, while leaves (22 % plant species) were the most frequently used part in the preparation of ethnomedicinal recipes. Highest number of 52 medicinal plant species were found in Zone A having high mountains and cold climate where the prevalence of rheumatism was more common. Solanum surattense was found with highest conservation concerns as it was using in 13 different areas against rheumatism. Results of Sorenson index revealed that there is a similarity of plants and its parts uses between different zones. In conclusions, geography and climate have an important role in causing rheumatic disease. Pakistan has a number of anti-rheumatic plants that are used by the local populations through their traditional knowledge. Moreover, inter zonal similarities among plants and its part uses indicate higher pharmacological potency of these medicinal plants. Further, the review will also provide an insight regarding the conservation status of reported plants. (author)

  19. Anti-B cell antibody therapies for inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, Mikkel; Jayne, David R W

    2014-01-01

    Several monoclonal antibodies targeting B cells have been tested as therapeutics for inflammatory rheumatic diseases. We review important observations from randomized clinical trials regarding the efficacy and safety of anti-B cell antibody-based therapies for rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus...... and functions in rheumatic disorders. Future studies should also evaluate how to maintain disease control by means of conventional and/or biologic immunosuppressants after remission-induction with anti-B cell antibodies....

  20. MRI of the temporomandibular joint in patients with rheumatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okochi, Kiyoshi; Ida, Mizue; Ohbayashi, Naoto

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the MRI findings of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in patients with rheumatic disease. The characteristic MRI findings of the TMJs in rheumatic patients were considered the obscurity of temporal posterior attachment (TPA) visualization and the presence of osseous changes of the condyle. As for the osseous changes, nearly 50% of the condyles had erosive changes and 20% showed severe bone destruction. (author)

  1. High burden of rheumatic diseases in Lebanon: a COPCORD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaaya, Monique; Slim, Zeinab N; Habib, Rima R; Arayssi, Thurayya; Dana, Rouwayda; Hamdan, Omar; Assi, Maher; Issa, Zeinab; Uthman, Imad

    2012-04-01

    To estimate the prevalence of rheumatic diseases in Lebanon and to explore their distribution by geographic location, age, and gender.   Using the Community Oriented Program for the Control of Rheumatic Diseases (COPCORD) methodology, a random sample of 3530 individuals aged 15 and above was interviewed from the six Lebanese governorates. Positive respondents were evaluated by rheumatologists using the internationally accepted classification criterion of the American College of Rheumatology for the diagnosis of rheumatic diseases. Prevalence rates of current and past musculoskeletal problems were 24.4% and 8.4%, respectively. Shoulder (14.3%), knee (14.2%) and back (13.6%) were the most common pain sites. Point prevalence of rheumatic diseases was 15.0%. The most frequent types of rheumatic diseases were of mechanical origin, namely soft tissue rheumatism (5.8%) and osteoarthritis (4.0%). Rheumatoid arthritis (1.0%) and spondylathropathies (0.3%) constituted the most common inflammatory diseases. Coastal areas had the lowest prevalence of all diseases except for fibromyalgia. All diseases showed an increasing prevalence pattern with age and a higher prevalence among women than men. This is the first study to give population-based estimates of rheumatic diseases in Lebanon. The high burden calls for public health attention for early detection, control and prevention of these conditions. Point prevalence of individual diseases was within the range of results from other COPCORD surveys with some variations that can be attributed to differences in methodology and geo-ethnic factors. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases © 2011 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. [Mirror therapy for inflammatory rheumatic pain: Potentials and limitations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekrater-Bodmann, R

    2015-11-01

    Mirror therapy reduces chronic pain and might also be suitable for the treatment of inflammatory rheumatic pain. On the basis of the relevant literature this article a) characterizes the universal alterations in body perception and body representation in chronic pain, b) describes the potential mechanisms underlying mirror therapy and c) discusses the chances of success of mirror therapy for the treatment of inflammatory rheumatic pain. Literature search on the effectiveness and mechanisms of mirror therapy and derived procedures for the potential treatment of pain in inflammatory rheumatic disorders. There is evidence that mirror therapy can alleviate chronic pain experiences by correcting the accompanying distorted body perception as well as body representation by multimodal sensory stimulation. As there is probably a similar distortion in persons with chronic pain related to inflammatory rheumatic disorders, mirror therapy might also have positive effects in this field; however, the accompanying characteristics of these disorders, such as motor impairment and motor-evoked pain, may complicate the implementation of this kind of treatment. Mirror therapy represents an intervention with few side effects and might have positive effects on the experience of chronic pain in patients with inflammatory rheumatic disorders. Further clinical research is required in order to evaluate the potential of mirror therapy and associated interventional methods for the treatment of inflammatory rheumatic pain.

  3. Imaging of fetal thymus in pregnant women with rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warby, Ann-Christin; Amler, Susanne; Jacobi, Annett M; Hammer, Kerstin; Möllmann, Ute; Falkenberg, Maria K; Möllers, Mareike; Kiesel, Ludwig; Klockenbusch, Walter; Schmitz, Ralf

    2014-09-01

    To determine whether certain rheumatic diseases will affect the fetal thymus diameter when compared to uncomplicated singleton pregnancies. Additionally, we created a reference chart for fetal thymus size in healthy singleton pregnancies from 19 to 37 weeks of gestation. Sonographic fetal thymus size was retrospectively evaluated in 190 healthy pregnant women, and 84 pregnancies of mothers suffering from systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), or Sjögren's syndrome between 19 and 37 weeks of gestation. These fetuses were matched one-to-one for gestational age with control fetuses. The thymic-thoracic ratio (TT-ratio) was defined as the quotient of the anteroposterior thymic and the intrathoracic mediastinal diameter. Rheumatic diseases often affect pregnancy outcome, especially in case of primary APS. The TT ratio of fetuses of mothers suffering from rheumatic disease was equal to controls (P=0.807). Ours is the first study to assess the correlation of fetal thymus size in high-risk pregnancies with rheumatic diseases in comparison to controls. Women with rheumatic diseases deal with pregnancy complications more frequently than controls. Our data suggest that maternal rheumatic diseases do not affect the fetal thymus size.

  4. [Present status of an arbovirus infection: yellow fever, its natural history of hemorrhagic fever, Rift Valley fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digoutte, J P

    1999-12-01

    . Intermediate yellow fever--a term coined to define epidemia which do not correspond exactly to urban yellow fever. The cycle involves men and monkeys through wild vectors as Aedes furcifer but also through Aedes aegypti and the mortality rate is much lower than for urban epidemics. In urban yellow fever, man is the only vertebrate host involved in the circulation of the virus, the vector being generally Aedes aegypti. This vector maintains a selective pressure, increasing the transmission of virus capable of producing high viremia in man. In the selvatic cycles, two cycles can be distinguished: one of maintenance which does not increase the quantity of virus in circulation and one of amplification which does increase this quantity. As we shall see, it develops into an epizootic form but also in an epidemic form in man. When the decrease in yellow fevers across Africa is considered, it appears that all major epidemics occur in West Africa inspite of the presence of wild cycles of the yellow fever virus in Central and East Africa. For the rare epidemics that have occurred there, the vector has never been Aedes aegypti. In a recent outbreak in Kenya, the vector was Aedes bromeliae. The examination of part of the gene encoding for envelope protein showed the presence of two geographical types corresponding to West-Africa and Central East-Africa. Clinically speaking, yellow fever is an haemorrhagic fever with hepatitis similar to other haemorrhagic fevers such as Rift Valley fever. When, in 1987, an outbreak of haemorrhagic fever occurred in southern Mauritania, for several days it was thought to be yellow fever. Four days later, the diagnosis was corrected by isolating and identifying the virus as that of Rift Valley fever (RVFV). RVFV causes several pathogenic syndromes in human beings: acute febrile illness, haemorrhagic fever, haemorrhagic fever with hepatitis, nervous syndromes or ocular disease. Mortality rate was high for haemorrhagic fever with hepatitis, reaching 36

  5. Fatal Yellow Fever in Travelers to Brazil, 2018.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, Davidson H; Angelo, Kristina; Caumes, Eric; van Genderen, Perry J J; Florescu, Simin A; Popescu, Corneliu P; Perret, Cecilia; McBride, Angela; Checkley, Anna; Ryan, Jenny; Cetron, Martin; Schlagenhauf, Patricia

    2018-03-23

    Yellow fever virus is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes yellow fever, an acute infectious disease that occurs in South America and sub-Saharan Africa. Most patients with yellow fever are asymptomatic, but among the 15% who develop severe illness, the case fatality rate is 20%-60%. Effective live-attenuated virus vaccines are available that protect against yellow fever (1). An outbreak of yellow fever began in Brazil in December 2016; since July 2017, cases in both humans and nonhuman primates have been reported from the states of São Paulo, Minas Gerais, and Rio de Janeiro, including cases occurring near large urban centers in these states (2). On January 16, 2018, the World Health Organization updated yellow fever vaccination recommendations for Brazil to include all persons traveling to or living in Espírito Santo, São Paulo, and Rio de Janeiro states, and certain cities in Bahia state, in addition to areas where vaccination had been recommended before the recent outbreak (3). Since January 2018, 10 travel-related cases of yellow fever, including four deaths, have been reported in international travelers returning from Brazil. None of the 10 travelers had received yellow fever vaccination.

  6. Undiagnosed Acute Viral Febrile Illnesses, Sierra Leone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    dengue , West Nile, yellow fever , Rift Valley fever , chikungunya, Ebola, and Marburg viruses but not to Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic ...patients have acute diseases of unknown origin. To investigate what other ar- thropod-borne and hemorrhagic fever viral diseases might cause serious...ELISAs, we evaluated samples for antibodies to arthropod-borne and other hemorrhagic fever viruses. Approximately 25% of LASV-negative

  7. Vaccination in paediatric patients with auto-immune rheumatic diseases: a systemic literature review for the European League against Rheumatism evidence-based recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijstek, M W; Ott de Bruin, L M; Borrow, R; van der Klis, F; Koné-Paut, I; Fasth, A; Minden, K; Ravelli, A; Abinun, M; Pileggi, G; Borte, M; Bijl, M; Wulffraat, N M

    2011-12-01

    To analyze available evidence on vaccinations in paediatric patients with rheumatic and autoinflammatory diseases. This evidence formed the basis of the recently constructed European League against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for vaccination of these patients. A systematic literature review in the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases was conducted using various terms for vaccinations, paediatric rheumatic and autoinflammatory diseases and immunosuppressive drugs. Only papers on paediatric patients (rheumatic diseases is reassuring, but too limited to draw definite conclusions. More research is needed on the safety and efficacy of especially live-attenuated vaccines in patients with rheumatic and autoinflammatory diseases using high dose immunosuppressive drugs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Cardiac arrhythmias and conduction disturbances in autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seferović, P M; Ristić, A D; Maksimović, R; Simeunović, D S; Ristić, G G; Radovanović, G; Seferović, D; Maisch, B; Matucci-Cerinic, M

    2006-10-01

    Rhythm and conduction disturbances and sudden cardiac death (SCD) are important manifestations of cardiac involvement in autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARDs). In patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a major cause of SCD is atherosclerotic coronary artery disease, leading to acute coronary syndrome and ventricular arrhythmias. In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), sinus tachycardia, atrial fibrillation and atrial ectopic beats are the major cardiac arrhythmias. In some cases, sinus tachycardia may be the only manifestation of cardiac involvement. The most frequent cardiac rhythm disturbances in systemic sclerosis (SSc) are premature ventricular contractions (PVCs), often appearing as monomorphic, single PVCs, or rarely as bigeminy, trigeminy or pairs. Transient atrial fibrillation, flutter or paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia are also described in 20-30% of SSc patients. Non-sustained ventricular tachycardia was described in 7-13%, while SCD is reported in 5-21% of unselected patients with SSc. The conduction disorders are more frequent in ARD than the cardiac arrhythmias. In RA, infiltration of the atrioventricular (AV) node can cause right bundle branch block in 35% of patients. AV block is rare in RA, and is usually complete. In SLE small vessel vasculitis, the infiltration of the sinus or AV nodes, or active myocarditis can lead to first-degree AV block in 34-70% of patients. In contrast to RA, conduction abnormalities may regress when the underlying disease is controlled. In neonatal lupus, 3% of infants whose mothers are antibody positive develop complete heart block. Conduction disturbances in SSc are due to fibrosis of sinoatrial node, presenting as abnormal ECG, bundle and fascicular blocks and occur in 25-75% of patients.

  9. Identification of factors for physicians to facilitate early differential diagnosis of scrub typhus, murine typhus, and Q fever from dengue fever in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ko; Lee, Nan-Yao; Ko, Wen-Chien; Tsai, Jih-Jin; Lin, Wei-Ru; Chen, Tun-Chieh; Lu, Po-Liang; Chen, Yen-Hsu

    2017-02-01

    Dengue fever, rickettsial diseases, and Q fever are acute febrile illnesses with similar manifestations in tropical areas. Early differential diagnosis of scrub typhus, murine typhus, and Q fever from dengue fever may be made by understanding the distinguishing clinical characteristics and the significance of demographic and weather factors. We conducted a retrospective study to identify clinical, demographic, and meteorological characteristics of 454 dengue fever, 178 scrub typhus, 143 Q fever, and 81 murine typhus cases in three Taiwan hospitals. Case numbers of murine typhus and Q fever correlated significantly with temperature and rainfall; the scrub typhus case number was only significantly related with temperature. Neither temperature nor rainfall correlated with the case number of dengue fever. The rarity of dengue fever cases from January to June in Taiwan may be a helpful clue for diagnosis in the area. A male predominance was observed, as the male-to-female rate was 2.1 for murine typhus and 7.4 for Q fever. Multivariate analysis revealed the following six important factors for differentiating the rickettsial diseases and Q fever group from the dengue fever group: fever ≥8 days, alanine aminotransferase > aspartate aminotransferase, platelets >63,000/mL, C-reactive protein >31.9 mg/L, absence of bone pain, and absence of a bleeding syndrome. Understanding the rarity of dengue in the first half of a year in Taiwan and the six differentiating factors may help facilitate the early differential diagnosis of rickettsial diseases and Q fever from dengue fever, permitting early antibiotic treatment. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. The second rheumatic heart disease forum report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zühlke, Liesl J; Engel, Mark E; Remenyi, Bo; Wyber, Rosemary; Carapetis, Jonathan

    2013-09-01

    The second rheumatic heart disease (RHD) forum was held on February 18, 2013, at the Sixth World Congress of Pediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery in Cape Town, South Africa, to focus attention on key areas in global RHD control, management, and prevention. Building on the foundation of the first RHD forum, over 150 interested participants met to discuss critical issues on the RHD landscape. Unique to this meeting was a mixture of diverse backgrounds and disciplines, all crucially important to the conversation around RHD control and prevention. Some clear priorities have emerged for RHD activities in the next era: the necessity for political intervention and policy change; increasing the health workforce by incorporating teaching, training, and task-shifting; revitalizing the research agenda by merging basic, clinical, and translational research; and obtaining universal access to high-quality penicillin. There was also an urgent request for new resources; for existing resources to be further developed, improved, and shared across platforms; and for resources to be supported in the nonmedical arena. Finally, the necessity of involving the patient community in the ongoing discussion was highlighted. The participants of both the first and second RHD forum represent a new, thriving, and growing community of RHD activists who should usher in a new era of significant improvements in RHD control and prevention. Copyright © 2013 World Heart Federation (Geneva). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Periodontal disease in pediatric rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabri, Gisele M C; Savioli, Cynthia; Siqueira, José T; Campos, Lucia M; Bonfá, Eloisa; Silva, Clovis A

    2014-01-01

    Gingivitis and periodontitis are immunoinflammatory periodontal diseases characterized by chronic localized infections usually associated with insidious inflammation This narrative review discusses periodontal diseases and mechanisms influencing the immune response and autoimmunity in pediatric rheumatic diseases (PRD), particularly juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (C-SLE) and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Gingivitis was more frequently observed in these diseases compared to health controls, whereas periodontitis was a rare finding. In JIA patients, gingivitis and periodontitis were related to mechanical factors, chronic arthritis with functional disability, dysregulation of the immunoinflammatory response, diet and drugs, mainly corticosteroids and cyclosporine. In C-SLE, gingivitis was associated with longer disease period, high doses of corticosteroids, B-cell hyperactivation and immunoglobulin G elevation. There are scarce data on periodontal diseases in JDM population, and a unique gingival pattern, characterized by gingival erythema, capillary dilation and bush-loop formation, was observed in active patients. In conclusion, gingivitis was the most common periodontal disease in PRD. The observed association with disease activity reinforces the need for future studies to determine if resolution of this complication will influence disease course or severity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Cardiovascular Imaging Techniques in Systemic Rheumatic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola Atzeni

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The risk of cardiovascular (CV events and mortality is significantly higher in patients with systemic rheumatic diseases than in the general population. Although CV involvement in such patients is highly heterogeneous and may affect various structures of the heart, it can now be diagnosed earlier and promptly treated. Various types of assessments are employed for the evaluation of CV risk such as transthoracic or transesophageal echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and computed tomography (CT to investigate valve abnormalities, pericardial disease, and ventricular wall motion defects. The diameter of coronary arteries can be assessed using invasive quantitative coronarography or intravascular ultrasound, and coronary flow reserve can be assessed using non-invasive transesophageal or transthoracic ultrasonography (US, MRI, CT, or positron emission tomography (PET after endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Finally, peripheral circulation can be measured invasively using strain-gauge plethysmography in an arm after the arterial infusion of an endothelium-dependent vasodilator or non-invasively by means of US or MRI measurements of flow-mediated vasodilation of the brachial artery. All of the above are reliable methods of investigating CV involvement, but more recently, introduced use of speckle tracking echocardiography and 3-dimensional US are diagnostically more accurate.

  13. Perioperative management of patients with rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissar, Lina; Almoallim, Hani; Albazli, Khaled; Alotaibi, Manal; Alwafi, Samar

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to explore the assessment of patients with rheumatologic diseases, especially rheumatoid arthritis (RA), before undergoing orthopedic surgery. Perioperative assessment ensures an early diagnosis of the patient's medical condition, overall health, medical co-morbidities, and the assessment of the risk factors associated with the proposed procedures. Perioperative assessment allows for proper postoperative management of complications and of the management of drugs such as disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARD) and anti-platelets, and corticosteroids. The assessment also supports follow up plans, and patient education. Perioperative assessment enables the discussion of the proposed treatment plans and the factors associated with them in each case among the different specialists involved to facilitate an appropriate early decision-making about the assessment and treatment of patients with rheumatologic diseases. It also enables the discussion of both condition and procedure with the patient to ensure a good postoperative care. The article identifies the components of perioperative medical evaluation, discusses perioperative management of co-morbidities and the management of specific clinical problems related to RA, systemic lupus erythematosus, the management of DMARDs, like methotrexate (MTX) and biologic therapies, prophylactic antibiotics, and postoperative follow up, including patient education and rehabilitation.

  14. Perioperative Management of Patients with Rheumatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissar, Lina; Almoallim, Hani; Albazli, Khaled; Alotaibi, Manal; Alwafi, Samar

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to explore the assessment of patients with rheumatologic diseases, especially rheumatoid arthritis (RA), before undergoing orthopedic surgery. Perioperative assessment ensures an early diagnosis of the patient's medical condition, overall health, medical co-morbidities, and the assessment of the risk factors associated with the proposed procedures. Perioperative assessment allows for proper postoperative management of complications and of the management of drugs such as disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARD) and anti-platelets, and corticosteroids. The assessment also supports follow up plans, and patient education. Perioperative assessment enables the discussion of the proposed treatment plans and the factors associated with them in each case among the different specialists involved to facilitate an appropriate early decision-making about the assessment and treatment of patients with rheumatologic diseases. It also enables the discussion of both condition and procedure with the patient to ensure a good postoperative care. The article identifies the components of perioperative medical evaluation, discusses perioperative management of co-morbidities and the management of specific clinical problems related to RA, systemic lupus erythematosus, the management of DMARDs, like methotrexate (MTX) and biologic therapies, prophylactic antibiotics, and postoperative follow up, including patient education and rehabilitation PMID:24062860

  15. Role of bone scan in rheumatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yun Young

    2003-01-01

    Rheumatic diseases can be categorized by pathology into several specific types of musculoskeletal problems, including synovitis (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis), enthesopathy (e.g. ankylosing spondylitis) and cartilage degeneration (e.g. osteoarthritis). Skeletal radiographs have contributed to the diagnosis of these articular diseases, and some disease entities need typical radiographic changes as a factor of the diagnostic criteria. However, they sometimes show normal radiographic findings in the early stage of disease, when there is demineralization of less than 30-50%. Bone scans have also been used in arthritis, but not widely because the findings are nonspecific and it is thought that bone scans do not add significant information to routine radiography. Bone scans do however play a different role than simple radiography, and it is a complementary imaging method in the course of management of arthritis. The image quality of bone scans can be improved by obtaining regional views and images under al pin-hole collimator, and through a variety of scintigraphic techniques including the three phase bone scan and bone SPECT. Therefore, bone scans could improve the diagnostic value, and answer multiple clinical questions, based on the pathophysiology of various forms of arthritis

  16. Recurrent Acute Tonsillitis, The 'Core' Issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saikat Samaddar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Today bacteriological and patho-anatomical considerations too are taken into account while treating a case of tonsillitis. Past decade has seen the rise of resistance amongst the common pathogens, as well as rise in the number of unusual offenders. Determination of the true offending organism and prescribing an antibiotic as per the sensitivity pattern is of utmost importance.  Materials and Method: A prospective longitudinal study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital in Kolkata. The study population consisted of patients presenting with recurrent attacks of acute tonsillitis. Determination of throat swab micro flora, ASO titre and core tissue microflora was done and correlated statistically. Result: There was poor correlation between throat swab and core tissue microflora. Positive predictive value of throat swab was 10%. Pseudomonas is the predominant flora harbouring tonsillar core in our study population. Amoxicillin the most commonly prescribed antibiotic stands out to be the most resistant one. No statistical significance could be reached comparing streptococcal tonsillitis with ASO titre. Discussion: The real pathology within the tonsil core is not always reflected in routine throat swab and bacteriology of recurrent tonsillitis may differ in different regions. ASO titre estimation adds up to the economic burden if rheumatic fever is not suspected. Judicious use of antibiotics based on true sensitivity pattern is encouraged. In the era of antibiotics Tonsillectomy still holds an important position in the management of recurrent attacks. Conclusion: Pseudomonas was found to be the most common pathogen in recurrent acute tonsillitis. Core tissue study remains the Gold standard in identifying the pathogenic organism. Oral third generation Cephalosporin was the most efficacious antibiotic for recurrent tonsillitis in our study population.

  17. Yellow fever in a traveller returning from Suriname to the Netherlands, March 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouthuyzen-Bakker, Marjan; Knoester, Marjolein; van den Berg, Aad P; GeurtsvanKessel, Corine H; Koopmans, Marion Pg; Van Leer-Buter, Coretta; Oude Velthuis, Bob; Pas, Suzan D; Ruijs, Wilhelmina Lm; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Vreden, Stephen Gs; van der Werf, Tjip S; Reusken, Chantal Bem; Bierman, Wouter Fw

    2017-03-16

    A Dutch traveller returning from Suriname in early March 2017, presented with fever and severe acute liver injury. Yellow fever was diagnosed by (q)RT-PCR and sequencing. During hospital stay, the patient's condition deteriorated and she developed hepatic encephalopathy requiring transfer to the intensive care. Although yellow fever has not been reported in the last four decades in Suriname, vaccination is recommended by the World Health Organization for visitors to this country. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2017.

  18. Recurrent Fever in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torreggiani, Sofia; Filocamo, Giovanni; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-03-25

    Children presenting with recurrent fever may represent a diagnostic challenge. After excluding the most common etiologies, which include the consecutive occurrence of independent uncomplicated infections, a wide range of possible causes are considered. This article summarizes infectious and noninfectious causes of recurrent fever in pediatric patients. We highlight that, when investigating recurrent fever, it is important to consider age at onset, family history, duration of febrile episodes, length of interval between episodes, associated symptoms and response to treatment. Additionally, information regarding travel history and exposure to animals is helpful, especially with regard to infections. With the exclusion of repeated independent uncomplicated infections, many infective causes of recurrent fever are relatively rare in Western countries; therefore, clinicians should be attuned to suggestive case history data. It is important to rule out the possibility of an infectious process or a malignancy, in particular, if steroid therapy is being considered. After excluding an infectious or neoplastic etiology, immune-mediated and autoinflammatory diseases should be taken into consideration. Together with case history data, a careful physical exam during and between febrile episodes may give useful clues and guide laboratory investigations. However, despite a thorough evaluation, a recurrent fever may remain unexplained. A watchful follow-up is thus mandatory because new signs and symptoms may appear over time.

  19. Nuclear medicine in patients with prolonged fever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meller, J.

    2007-01-01

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) was originally defined as recurrent fever of 38.2 C or higher, lasting 2-3 weeks or longer, and undiagnosed after 1 week of hospital evaluation. The last criterion has undergone modification and is now generally interpreted as no diagnosis after appropriate inpatient or outpatient evaluation. The three major categories that account for the majority of fever of unknown origin (FUO) are infections, malignancies and non infectious inflammatory diseases. In this respect FOU in its original definition is clearly separated from nosocomial, post-operative and neutropenic fever, where acute infection is more common. Although in-vitro- or in-vivo-labelled white blood cells (WBCs) have a high diagnostic accuracy in the detection and exclusion of granulocytic pathology, these methods are only of limited value in patients with 'classic' FUO in establishing the final diagnosis due to the low prevalence of acute infection in this group. Labelled WBCs therefore seem to be more useful in patients with nosocomial, post-operative and neutropenic fever. 67 Ga citrate is the only commercially available gamma emitter in imaging acute, chronic, granulomatous and autoimmune inflammation and also various malignant diseases. Therefore 67 Ga citrate was for a long time considered to be the tracer of choice in the diagnostic work-up of FUO. The number of 67 Ga scans contributing to the final diagnosis was found to be higher than it has been reported for labelled WBCs. The positron emitter [ 18 F]-2-fluoro-2'-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) have been systematically evaluated in the context of classic FUO by several groups within last 5 years. This data, although limited, indicate that FDG-imaging should considered as the most promising procedure in patients with undetermined fever. FDG-PT seems to be more sensitive than other techniques, offers a more rapid diagnosis without an increase of the patients radioactive burden. It is expected that the PET/CT technology will

  20. Hand-related physical function in rheumatic hand conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klokker, Louise; Terwee, Caroline B; Wæhrens, Eva Ejlersen

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is no consensus about what constitutes the most appropriate patient-reported outcome measurement (PROM) instrument for measuring physical function in patients with rheumatic hand conditions. Existing instruments lack psychometric testing and vary in feasibility and their psych......INTRODUCTION: There is no consensus about what constitutes the most appropriate patient-reported outcome measurement (PROM) instrument for measuring physical function in patients with rheumatic hand conditions. Existing instruments lack psychometric testing and vary in feasibility...... and their psychometric qualities. We aim to develop a PROM instrument to assess hand-related physical function in rheumatic hand conditions. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will perform a systematic search to identify existing PROMs to rheumatic hand conditions, and select items relevant for hand-related physical function...... as well as those items from the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Physical Function (PF) item bank that are relevant to patients with rheumatic hand conditions. Selection will be based on consensus among reviewers. Content validity of selected items will be established...

  1. Protecting Bone Health in Pediatric Rheumatic Diseases: Pharmacological Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yujuan; Milojevic, Diana

    2017-06-01

    Bone health in children with rheumatic conditions may be compromised due to several factors related to the inflammatory disease state, delayed puberty, altered life style, including decreased physical activities, sun avoidance, suboptimal calcium and vitamin D intake, and medical treatments, mainly glucocorticoids and possibly some disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. Low bone density or even fragility fractures could be asymptomatic; therefore, children with diseases of high inflammatory load, such as systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, juvenile dermatomyositis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and those requiring chronic glucocorticoids may benefit from routine screening of bone health. Most commonly used assessment tools are laboratory testing including serum 25-OH-vitamin D measurement and bone mineral density measurement by a variety of methods, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry as the most widely used. Early disease control, use of steroid-sparing medications such as disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs and biologics, supplemental vitamin D and calcium, and promotion of weight-bearing physical activities can help optimize bone health. Additional treatment options for osteoporosis such as bisphosphonates are still controversial in children with chronic rheumatic diseases, especially those with decreased bone density without fragility fractures. This article reviews common risk factors leading to compromised bone health in children with chronic rheumatic diseases and discusses the general approach to prevention and treatment of bone fragility.

  2. Assessement of rheumatic diseases with computational radiology: current status and future potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peloschek, Philipp; Boesen, Mikael; Donner, Rene

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, several computational image analysis methods to assess disease progression in rheumatic diseases were presented. This review article explains the basics of these methods as well as their potential application in rheumatic disease monitoring, it covers radiography, sonography...

  3. Familial Mediterranean Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adem Kucuk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial Mediterranean Fever is an autosomal recessive inherited disease with a course of autoinflammation, which is characterized by the episodes of fever and serositis. It affects the populations from Mediterranean basin. Genetic mutation of the disease is on MEFV gene located on short arm of Chromosome 16. The disease is diagnosed based on clinical evaluation. Amyloidosis is the most important complication. The only agent that decreases the development of amyloidosis and the frequency and severity of the episodes is colchicine, which has been used for about 40 years. In this review, we aimed to discuss especially the most recent advances about Familial Mediterranean Fever which is commonly seen in our population.

  4. Lithotrites and postoperative fever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chu, David I; Lipkin, Michael E; Wang, Agnes J

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the risks of fever from different lithotrites after percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) PNL database is a prospective, multi-institutional, international PNL registry. Of 5,803 total...... patients, 4,968 received preoperative antibiotics, were supplied with complete information and included in this analysis. The lithotrites assessed included no fragmentation, ultrasonic, laser, pneumatic and combination ultrasonic/pneumatic. Risk of fever was estimated using multivariate logistic regression...... with adjustment for diabetes, steroid use, a history of positive urine culture, the presence of staghorn calculi or preoperative nephrostomy, stone burden and lithotrite. RESULTS: The overall fever rate was 10%. Pneumatic lithotrites were used in 43% of the cohort, followed by ultrasonic (24%), combination...

  5. Dr Robert Robertson (1742-1829): Fever Specialist and Philosopher-Experimenter in the Treatment of Fevers with Peruvian Bark in the Latter Eighteenth-century Royal Navy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Bruce

    2015-12-01

    The life and works of Dr Robert Robertson are reviewed set against the background of the extant British management of fevers during the latter 18th-century. Commencing in 1769, using the febrifuge Peruvian bark (cortex Peruvianus; Jesuit's Powder), he experimented and tested Peruvian bark mono-therapy protocols in the tropics in the cure and prevention of intermittent fever (predominantly malaria). His later work also showed the benefit of the bark in the acute care of developed continuous fevers (largely Ship Fever due to Epidemic Louse-borne Typhus Fever) in both the Temperate and Torrid Zones. In the realm of comparative statistics Robertson first demonstrated the safety and effectiveness of bark therapy against the dangerous depleting processes of the antiphlogistic regimen. He was the first to alert the Admiralty to the efficacy of bark in both the cure of acute fevers as well as a prophylactic in the tropics, and signalled the dangers of bloodletting in treating fevers of the tropics. He authored 13 books devoted to fevers outlining his theory of Febrile Infection and its treatment. The essay concludes with his role as the Physician-in-Charge of the Royal Hospital, Greenwich over a 28-year period, as an acknowledged expert in the small British group of 18th-century fever specialists.

  6. Katayama fever in scuba divers - A report of 3 cases | Evans | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Katayama fever in scuba divers - A report of 3 cases. A.C. Evans, D.J. Martin, B.D. Ginsburg. Abstract. Katayama fever or acute schistosomiasis probably occurs more commonly than is recorded. Interviews with a 3-man scuba diving team who had had contact with a large dam in an ·endemic area of the eastern Transvaal ...

  7. Lassa fever in a physician and his children: a case report | Achinge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: We report a confirmed case of Lassa fever in a physician and two of his children with the aim ofreminding healthcare workers on the risk of acquiring and transmitting Lassa fever. Methods: A 55 year old male physician presented with acute febrile illness with no response to antimalarial and antibiotic drugs ...

  8. Yellow fever in a traveller returning from Suriname to the Netherlands, March 2017

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouthuyzen-Bakker, M.; Knoester, M.; Berg, A.P. van den; GeurtsvanKessel, C.H.; Koopmans, M.P.; Leer-Buter, C. Van; Velthuis, B.; Pas, S.D.; Ruijs, W.L.M.; Schmidt-Chanasit, J.; Vreden, S.G.; Werf, T.S. van der; Reusken, C.B.; Bierman, W.F.

    2017-01-01

    A Dutch traveller returning from Suriname in early March 2017, presented with fever and severe acute liver injury. Yellow fever was diagnosed by (q)RT-PCR and sequencing. During hospital stay, the patient's condition deteriorated and she developed hepatic encephalopathy requiring transfer to the

  9. Yellow fever in a traveller returning from Suriname to the Netherlands, March 2017

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouthuyzen-Bakker, M.; Knoester, M.; van den Berg, A. P.; GeurtsvanKessel, C. H.; Koopmans, M. P.; Van Leer-Buter, C.; Velthuis, B. Oude; Pas, S. D.; Ruijs, W. L.; Schmidt-Chanasit, J.; Vreden, S. G.; van der Werf, T. S.; Reusken, C. B.; Bierman, W. F.

    2017-01-01

    A Dutch traveller returning from Suriname in early March 2017, presented with fever and severe acute liver injury. Yellow fever was diagnosed by (q) RT-PCR and sequencing. During hospital stay, the patient's condition deteriorated and she developed hepatic encephalopathy requiring transfer to the

  10. Yellow fever in a traveller returning from Suriname to the Netherlands, March 2017

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Wouthuyzen-Bakker (Marjan); M. Knoester; A.P. van den Berg; C.H. Geurts van Kessel (Corine); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion); C. Van Leer-Buter (Coretta); B. Oude Velthuis; S.D. Pas (Suzan); W.L.M. Ruijs (Wilhelmina L.M.); J. Schmidt-Chanasit (Jonas); S.G. Vreden; T.S. van der Werf; C.B.E.M. Reusken (Chantal); W.F.W. Bierman (Wouter)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractA Dutch traveller returning from Suriname in early March 2017, presented with fever and severe acute liver injury. Yellow fever was diagnosed by (q)RT-PCR and sequencing. During hospital stay, the patient’s condition deteriorated and she developed hepatic encephalopathy requiring

  11. Marburg Hemorrhagic Fever (Marburg HF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Marburg hemorrhagic fever (Marburg HF) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... first recognized in 1967, when outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever occurred simultaneously in laboratories in Marburg and Frankfurt, ...

  12. Neurohumoral relationship in patients with rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Dryazenkova

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess neurohumoral relationship state in pts with systemic vasculitis (SV and systemic connective tissue diseases. Material and Methods. 54 pts with rheumatic diseases (RS were included: 18 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, 16 with systemic sclerosis, 20 with systemic vasculitis (SV. Mean age was 49,3 5,4 years. Disease duration varied from 5 to 10 years. Control group consisted of 20 healthy persons. 24- hours ECG monitoring, heart rate variability (HRV spectral analysis, functional (clinoorthostatic sign and exercise ECG testing (isometric exercise, dynamic load, veloergometry were performed. Plasma histamine level, histaminase activity, plasma serotonin, tryptophan-5-hydrolase, oxytriptophandecar- boxylase, MAO levels were examined to assess vasoactive amine system state. Vasoactive amine system slate was assessed on histamine/serotonin ratio. Histamine/histaminase, serotonin/MAO, histaminase/MAO ratios were used to judge inhibitory activity. Results. Compared with control pts with RS showed marked and significant decrease of ergotropic mediators (noradrenaline, adrenaline and their metabolites concentration which correlated with HRV. Increase of histaminase that processes appropriate biogenic amine excess quantity was found in all forms of RS. More intensive than in healthy persons monoamine metabolism accompanied by their degradation acceleration resulted in enhanced MAO activity (significant in polyarteritis. LF/HF index reflecting summated activity of autonomic influences on heart rate showed significant prevalence of sympathetic effect in SV (3,46 0,31, p<0,05, CRV analysis showed adequate autonomic supply only in 11,7% of pts with RS. Conclusion. Exercise testing in dynamic analysis of quantitative HRV indices should be performed to determine autonomic reactivity ю assess homeostatic possibilities and adaptation reserve in pts with RS.

  13. Role of vaccinations and prophylaxis in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Despoina; Tsoulas, Christos; Tragiannidis, Athanassios; Sipsas, Nikolaos V

    2015-04-01

    Targeted strategies for reducing the increased risk of infection in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases include vaccinations as well as antibiotic prophylaxis in selected patients. However, there are still issues under debate: Is vaccination in patients with rheumatic diseases immunogenic? Is it safe? What is the impact of immunosuppressive drugs on vaccine immunogenicity and safety? Does vaccination cause disease flares? In which cases is prophylaxis against Pneumocystis jirovecii required? This review addresses these important questions to which clinicians and researchers still do not have definite answers. The first part includes immunization recommendations and reviews current data on vaccine efficacy and safety in patients with rheumatic diseases. The second part discusses prophylaxis for Pneumocystis pneumonia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Association of Familial Mediterranean Fever and Crohn’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökhan Tümgör

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial Mediterranean fever is an autosomal recessive,short, acute, self-limiting disease characterized by attacksof fever and polyserositis, which is common in countriesaround the Mediterranean. Inflammatory bowel diseaseis a term used to describe Ulcerative colitis and Crohn’sdisease that associated with chronic idiopathic inflammatory.The patient had FMF but she had been well untilapproximately 20 days before admission, when malaise,fever, abdominal pain, right knee and ankle edema developed.She was taking colchicine. The patient diagnosedas Crohn Disease by endoscopy and histopathology. Thiscase report is presented to emphasize the association oftwo diseases.Key words: Familial Mediterranean Fever, inflammatorybowel disease, Crohn’s disease, childhood

  15. The prevalence of severe fatigue in rheumatic diseases: an international study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overman, C.L.; Da Silva, J.A.P.; Kool, M.B.; Geenen, R.

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue is a common, disabling, and difficult-tomanage problem in rheumatic diseases. Prevalence estimates of fatigue within rheumatic diseases vary considerably. Data on the prevalence of severe fatigue across multiple rheumatic diseases using a similar instrument is missing. Our aim was to provide

  16. Severe fatigue is highly prevalent in ALL rheumatic diseases : an international study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geenen, R.; Overman, C.L.; Da Silva, J.A.P.; Kool, M.B.

    Background Fatigue is a common, disabling, and difficult to manage problem in rheumatic diseases. Prevalence estimates of fatigue within various rheumatic disease groups vary considerably. Data on the relative prevalence of severe fatigue across multiple rheumatic diseases using a similar instrument

  17. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their fever and other symptoms are gone. Hand hygiene is the most important part of SARS prevention. ... Coronaviruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). In: Bennett JE, Dolin ...

  18. [Cardiovascular risk in patients with rheumatic disease and its management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laštůvka, Jiří; Oreská, Sabína; Tomčík, Michal; Vrablík, Michal

    2018-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in patients with rheumatic diseases is increased by 50 % compared to the general population. This is a result of the increased inflammatory activity as well as modification of traditional CVD risk factors by the primary disease. So called lipid paradox, paradoxical decrease of concentrations of atherogenic plasma lipids due to increased inflammatory activity and their rise with successful anti-inflammatory treatment, is of particular importance. CVD risk in rheumatic diseases is further modified by drugs used for their treatment: while some treatment modalities increase the risk (e.g. glucocorticoids), others may act in an opposite direction (methotrexate, biological therapies). CVD risk stratification in patients with rheumatic diseases is uneasy; so far none of the specific scoring systems has been shown superior to traditional ones designed for the general population. Principles of cardiovascular risk intervention remain the same as for the general population: the management starts with lifestyle measures (healthy diet, increase in physical activity and smoking cessation) complemented with pharmacotherapy when indicated. Blood pressure as well as lipid lowering therapies should be led according to the same principles as in the general population and, also, to the same treatment goals. To improve CVD prevention outcomes in patients with rheumatic diseases it seems feasible to work in interdisciplinary teams led by a rheumatologist cooperating with a specialist in CVD prevention strategies (general practitioner, cardiologist, internist, diabetes specialist). A nutritional therapist and a physiotherapist are important members of the team, too. Interdisciplinary and complex CVD prevention in patients with rheumatic diseases decreases CVD morbidity.Key words: cardiovascular risk - intervention - lipid paradox - rheumatic diseases - risk factors - risk stratification.

  19. [Comparison of the transcriptional profiles of patients with dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever reveals differences in the immune response and clues in immunopathogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton-Triviño, Natalia; Martín, Katherine; Giaya, Kris; Rodríguez, Jairo A; Bosch, Irene; Castellanos, Jaime E

    2010-01-01

    Dengue infection demonstrates a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations from mild disease (dengue fever) to severe dengue hemorrhagic fever, but the immunopathogenic mechanisms involved in disease severity are not clear. Differentially expressed genes associated to immune response were identified from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of Colombian children with dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever. Microarray analysis was used as a tool to establish and compare transcriptional profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells of six children in acute phase of dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever. The commercial gene chip used was Affymnetrix GeneChip HG_U133_Plus_2. Dengue hemorrhagic fever patients expressed interleukin 6, chemokines, complement proteins and pentraxin 3, along with the lymphocyte inhibitors lymphocyte-activation gene 3 and cathepsin L1. An interaction model for these genes showed tissue factor playing a central role in the network generated. In contrast, dengue fever patients expressed cytokines, complement and the leukotrienes inhibitors lactotransferrin, C1 inhibitor, and leukotriene-B (4-omega-hydroxylase 2). These results indicate that in dengue fever, cytokine and complement inhibitors are able to limit endothelial damage and prevent increases in vascular permeability, whereas dengue- hemorrhagic fever patients have immune cell dysfunction and unregulated complement and cytokine action. This leads to "hypercoagulation" and endothelial damage, thereby increasing disease severity. Verification of the pathogenic role of the identified molecules will contribute to understanding of dengue pathogenesis and lead to rational development of therapeutic drugs.

  20. Fever in Infants and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Read MoreDepression in Children and TeensRead MoreBMI Calculator Fever in Infants and ChildrenBecause young children are not ... Facial Swelling Feeding Problems in Infants and Children Fever Fever in Infants and Children Foot Problems Genital ...

  1. Vitamin D serostatus and dengue fever progression to dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamor, E; Villar, L A; Lozano, A; Herrera, V M; Herrán, O F

    2017-10-01

    Vitamin D could modulate pathways leading to dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS). We examined the associations of serum total 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D] and vitamin D binding protein (VDBP) concentrations in patients with uncomplicated dengue fever (DF) with risk of progression to DHF/DSS. In a case-control study nested in a cohort of DF patients who were followed during the acute episode in Bucaramanga, Colombia, we compared 25(OH)D and VDBP at onset of fever between 110 cases who progressed to DHF/DSS and 235 DF controls who did not progress. 25(OH)D concentrations were also compared between the acute sample and a sample collected >1 year post-convalescence in a subgroup. Compared with 25(OH)D ⩾75 nmol/l, adjusted odds ratios (95% CI) for progression were 0·44 (0·22-0·88) and 0·13 (0·02-1·05) for 50 to 75 nmol/l (vitamin D insufficiency) and <50 nmol/l (vitamin D deficiency), respectively (P, trend = 0·003). Mean 25(OH)D concentrations were much lower post-convalescence compared with the acute episode, regardless of case status. Compared with controls, mean VDBP was non-significantly lower in cases. We conclude that low serum 25(OH)D concentrations in DF patients predict decreased odds of progression to DHF/DSS.

  2. Imaging of the hip in patients with rheumatic disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutry, Nathalie [Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France)]. E-mail: nboutry@chru-lille.fr; Khalil, Chadi [Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Jaspart, Matthieu [Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Marie-Helene, Vieillard [Department of Rheumatology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Demondion, Xavier [Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Cotten, Anne [Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France)

    2007-07-15

    Hip joint abnormalities are commonly encountered in patients with rheumatic disorders. Although conventional radiography remains the mainstay for diagnosis of joint damage and subsequent follow-up, magnetic resonance imaging and, to a lesser extent, ultrasound have afforded the ability to detect early signs of articular involvement (i.e., synovitis and bone erosions), and to assess disease activity in treated patients. In more advanced stages of rheumatic disorders, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound are both useful in assessing paraarticular involvement (i.e., bursitis and synovial cysts)

  3. [Gynecological and obstetrical management of rheumatic diseases in reproductive age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Franco; Stracquadanio, Mariagrazia; Privitera, Agata; Ciotta, Lilliana; DE Luca, Francesco

    2018-04-01

    The gynecologist's role in the management of rheumatic patients is complex: it includes the prevention of damage caused by drugs, the counseling about contraception to avoid pregnancy while taking teratogen drugs, the scheduling of pregnancy during the quiescent phase of the specific disease, the replacement of teratogen drugs and a competent management of the pregnancy. The task is carried out as part of a multidisciplinary team with a focus on the differential diagnosis between specific complications of pregnancy and the complications of the rheumatic disease. This is the right way to allow a conscious reproduction, with reduced risks and acceptable maternal-fetal outcomes, to this kind of patients considered at high risk.

  4. Population Genetics and Natural Selection in Rheumatic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Paula S

    2017-08-01

    Human genetic diversity is the result of population genetic forces. This genetic variation influences disease risk and contributes to health disparities. Natural selection is an important influence on human genetic variation. Because immune and inflammatory function genes are enriched for signals of positive selection, the prevalence of rheumatic disease-risk alleles seen in different populations is partially the result of differing selective pressures (eg, due to pathogens). This review summarizes the genetic regions associated with susceptibility to different rheumatic diseases and concomitant evidence for natural selection, including known agents of selection exerting selective pressure in these regions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases (NDB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Kaleb

    2016-01-01

    The National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases (NDB) is a longitudinal observational patient-driven database, founded as a non-profit research organization in 1998 by Dr. Frederick Wolfe. Patients are sent a primary questionnaire twice a year. More than 50,000 patients with more than 100 various rheumatic diseases under the care of more than 1,500 rheumatologists have completed at least one 6-month questionnaire. Many important publications concerning rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, fibromyalgia, and pharmaco-epidemiology have resulted from NDB research.

  6. Hypoadrenalism in patients with fatigue and rheumatic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitra Methiniti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many patients with rheumatic disease complain of fatigue. Clinicians may interpret this as part of the disease process in the absence of anaemia or hypothyroidism, and sometimes respond with the empiric addition of steroids to therapy. The possibility of true hypoadrenalism is only occasionally considered, and little data exists on the frequency with which it coexists with rheumatic disease. Random serum cortisol may be requested by clinicians to help exclude hypoadrenalism as a factor in fatigue. We undertook a survey to assess how frequently this test was of clinical relevance, what was done in patients with low results, and which patients were most likely to have true adrenal failure. All random cortisol assays requested by the members of a rheumatological team over one year were identified and the notes examined retrospectively. The indication for the request, the result, the ultimate clinical diagnosis and all prior diagnoses were recorded. Where further investigations were undertaken, these too were noted. The results were compared to those in an age and gender matched population of patients with general medical conditions (excluding endocrine disorders for whom cortisol assays had also been requested. Random cortisol was requested by a team of four consultants in 74 patients with a variety of rheumatic disorders over 12 months, usually because of unexplained fatigue. Among the control group of 75 medical patients, the commonest reasons for requesting cortisol assay were fatigue, low sodium and unexplained anaemia. Mean cortisol levels were significantly higher in medical patients (512 nmol/L than those with rheumatic disease (351 nmol/L [P=0.04]. The results were low (<200 nmol/L in 14 rheumatic patients and 7 medical patients. Among these 21 individuals, synacthen tests were performed in 16 and were indicative of hypoadrenalism in 6 cases. Further investigations revealed primary hypoadrenalism in 3 patients, with tertiary adrenal

  7. Travelers' Health: Yellow Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... YFV transmission is present,” as defined by the World Health Organization, are countries or areas where “yellow fever has ... this table are not contained on the official World Health Organization list of countries with risk of YFV transmission ( ...

  8. Hereditary periodic fever syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McDermott, MF; Frenkel, J

    Hereditary periodic fever syndromes are defined by recurrent attacks of generalised inflammation for which no infectious or auto-immune cause can be identified. For most of these disorders, the molecular basis has recently been elucidated. This has opened the prospect of novel therapeutic

  9. Breathing Valley Fever

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-02-04

    Dr. Duc Vugia, chief of the Infectious Diseases Branch in the California Department of Public Health, discusses Valley Fever.  Created: 2/4/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/5/2014.

  10. Seasonal Allergies (Hay Fever)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Seasonal Allergies (Hay Fever) KidsHealth / For Parents / Seasonal Allergies (Hay ... español Alergia estacional (fiebre del heno) About Seasonal Allergies "Achoo!" It's your son's third sneezing fit of ...

  11. Acute Thrombo-embolic Renal Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijiang Zhou

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year-old woman was admitted for acute onset of right lower abdominal pain. She was taking anticoagulant medication regularly for rheumatic valvular disease and atrial fibrillation. Physical examination revealed no obvious abdominal or flank tenderness. Right thrombo-embolic renal infarction was diagnosed after performing computed tomography angiography (CTA.

  12. Conventional X-ray examination and computed tomography in inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lingg, G.

    1996-01-01

    Plain-film radiography is an important and basic element in the assessment of inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Its various uses include assessment of inflammatory osseous destruction and the activity of inflammatory changes. Furthermore, the inflammatory collateral phenomena can indicate an acute clinical phase, and the articular soft tissue swelling and tenosynovitis are shown directly and indirectly very clearly. On the other hand, high-resolution computed tomography is very capable of showing cortical structures of bone complementary to MR. In some special clinical questions and anatomical regions, especially the axial skeleton, it delivers information of high specifity, partly for definitive diagnosis and partly for planning surgical procedures. The assessment of changes in the sacroiliac joints, sternoclavicular joints and craniocervical junction are domains of computed tomography. (orig.) [de

  13. Correlation between erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein level in patients with rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kotulska

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR and serum level of C-reactive protein (CRP are the acute phase reactants most commonly determined in patients with rheumatic diseases. The indices are affected by different factors, but both of them are applied for evaluation of the disease activity in patients with inflammatory disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Material and methods : The authors compared the results of ESR and CRP, which were carried out during routine diagnosis in 200 patients admitted to the Department of Rheumatology. Results: A significant correlation between ESR and CRP was found (ESR after 1 h/CRP: correlation coefficient 0.6944, ESR after 2 h/CRP: correlation coefficient 0.6126. There was no difference in ESR or CRP between male and female patients, and patients older than 40 years had higher ESR and CRP. Conclusions : The obtained results support the usefulness of both indices in the clinical practice of rheumatologists.

  14. Rift Valley fever potential mosquito vectors and their infection status ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    conducted to determine the abundance of potential mosquito vectors and their RVFV infection status in. Ngorongoro District ... Rift Valley fever (RVF) is an acute febrile arthropod-borne viral zoonotic disease of mainly human ..... A.S., Rollin, P.E., Swanepoel, R., Ksiazek, T.G. & Nichol, S.T. (2002) Genetic analysis of viruses.

  15. Occurrence of rift valley fever (RVF) in Dodoma region, Tanzania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rift Valley Fever (RVF) is a peracute or acute febrile zoonotic mosquito-borne viral disease affecting wildlife, domestic animals and occasionally humans. It occurs after heavy rains and ... While waiting for the results the patients were treated for malaria and/or meningitis based on visual/ clinical signs. However, most of the ...

  16. Borrelia miyamotoi: a widespread tick-borne relapsing fever spirochete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagemakers, Alex; Staarink, Pieter J.; Sprong, Hein; Hovius, Joppe W. R.

    2015-01-01

    Borrelia miyamotoi is a relapsing fever spirochete that has only recently been identified as a human pathogen. Borrelia miyamotoi is genetically and ecologically distinct from Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, while both are present in Ixodes ticks. Over 50 patients with an acute febrile illness have

  17. Prophylactic penicillin by the full moon: a novel approach in Central Australia that may help to reduce the risk of rheumatic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, T M; Schultz, R; McDonald, V; Andrews, R M

    2010-01-01

    Uptake of penicillin prophylaxis to prevent recurrent rheumatic fever and its sequela rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is not optimal in the Northern Territory of Australia. The Full Moon Strategy (the Strategy) was introduced in the Central Australian region in June 2006 to improve the uptake of prophylactic penicillin: clients and healthcare workers were encouraged to use the full moon as a cue for the timing of the 4 weekly prophylactic penicillin injection. To determine the impact and effectiveness of the Strategy on knowledge and uptake of benzathine penicillin prophylaxis for clients at risk of RHD, and for primary healthcare workers in Central Australia. Clients at risk of RHD in four remote Aboriginal communities and the town camps of Alice Springs were identified from the RHD database. Consenting clients or their carers were interviewed about their knowledge of the Strategy and the health promotional tools used. Their healthcare records were then reviewed for prophylaxis uptake 2 years prior to and 2 years following the introduction of the Strategy. Primary healthcare workers in the four remote communities who were available at the time of the study visit were interviewed about their knowledge and use of the Strategy and the health promotional tools. Fifty RHD clients and 19 healthcare workers were interviewed. Most were aware of the flipchart but less than half knew of the calendar poster, hand-held card or radio advertisement. Prophylaxis uptake increased significantly from 47% in the 2 years prior to the introduction of the Strategy, to 57% 2 years after the Strategy was introduced. Introduction of the Strategy coincided with an improvement in uptake of prophylaxis but not around the time of the full moon. Uptake of benzathine penicillin remains inadequate and further innovative measures are needed to control rheumatic fever and its sequela in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

  18. Rheumatic Heart Disease Associated with Secondary Renal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... non-specific chronic inflammatory changes. The patient's secondary amyloidosis was presumed to be related to the long standing RHD after exclusion of other causes of secondary amyloidosis. The patient finally died due to heart failure and acute pulmonary edema. Conclusion: Long standing RHD can lead to secondary ...

  19. Understanding lack of understanding : Invalidation in rheumatic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, M.B.

    2012-01-01

    The quality of life of patients with chronic rheumatic diseases is negatively influenced by symptoms such as pain, fatigue, and stiffness, and secondary symptoms such as physical limitations and depressive mood. On top of this burden, some patients experience negative responses from others, such as

  20. Rheumatic diseases and pregnancy | Gcelu | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this article is to discuss the optimal management of pregnant women with SLE and other rheumatic diseases, including antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. The effects of pregnancy on underlying diseases ...

  1. Mechanisms and management of heart failure in active rheumatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fulminating active rheumatic carditis has been observed for over three decades in this environment with no recent alteration in either the incidence or the pattern of presentation. Heart failure (in this context defined as 'an inadequate circulation at rest together with a raised pulmonary venous pressure, with or without an ...

  2. New insights into the epigenetics of inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballestar, Esteban; Li, Tianlu

    2017-10-01

    Over the past decade, awareness of the importance of epigenetic alterations in the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases has grown in parallel with a general recognition of the fundamental role of epigenetics in the regulation of gene expression. Large-scale efforts to generate genome-wide maps of epigenetic modifications in different cell types, as well as in physiological and pathological contexts, illustrate the increasing recognition of the relevance of epigenetics. To date, although several reports have demonstrated the occurrence of epigenetic alterations in a wide range of inflammatory rheumatic conditions, epigenomic information is rarely used in a clinical setting. By contrast, several epigenetic biomarkers and treatments are currently in use for personalized therapies in patients with cancer. This Review highlights advances from the past 5 years in the field of epigenetics and their application to inflammatory rheumatic diseases, delineating the future lines of development for a rational use of epigenetic information in clinical settings and in personalized medicine. These advances include the identification of epipolymorphisms associated with clinical outcomes, DNA methylation as a contributor to disease susceptibility in rheumatic conditions, the discovery of novel epigenetic mechanisms that modulate disease susceptibility and the development of new epigenetic therapies.

  3. Fatigue and functioning in rheumatic diseases: a biopsychological perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overman, C.L.

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatic diseases are characterized by inflammation, damage and pain, mostly of the joints and connective tissues. They can have a profound negative impact on almost every aspect of a patient’s life as well as on the direct environment and society as a whole. Patients are hampered in their daily

  4. Rheumatic manifestations among HIV positive adults attending the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Rheumatic manifestations in HIV are common and sometimes the initial presentation of the disease. HIV is now a common infection at the Infectious Disease Clinic, Mulago. The spectrum of joint diseases seen depend on a number of factors such as, the CD4 count, HLA status and current therapy. Objective: ...

  5. Determinants of cardiovascular risk in current rheumatic practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, I.L.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to study cardiovascular risk in arthritis: Firstly, how do different rheumatic diseases compare in the patients’ traditional cardiovascular (CV) risk factor profiles, and does this justify the general focus on rheumatoid arthritis regarding cardiovascular complications in

  6. factors that precipitate heart failure among children with rheumatic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-11-11

    Nov 11, 2011 ... clinical examination performed by the investigator on the day of admission and recorded in a coded questionnaire. Clinical diagnosis of rheumatic heart disease and cardiac failure were used as the screening criteria and patients who met the study criteria underwent further clinical and laboratory evaluation ...

  7. Osteoporosis in rheumatic diseases | Basma | African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Inflammatory joint disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, as well as other rheumatic conditions, such as Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) and ankylosing spondylitis comprise a heterogeneous group of joint disorders that are all associated with extra-articular manifestations, including bone loss and fractures ...

  8. Mechanisms and active rheumatic management carditis of heart failure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-08-18

    Aug 18, 1990 ... active rheumatic management carditis. , of heart failure. •. In. J. B. BARLOW, R. H. MARCUS, W. A. POCOCK, C. W. BARLOW,. R.ESSOP, P.SAREU. Summary. Fulminating ... management of the valve lesion mandatory as a life-saving measure. .... definite clubbing of the fmgers in about 15% of patients. This.

  9. Asymptomatic rheumatic heart disease in South African schoolchildren

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and low sensitivity. [10] The practical implications for longer-term screening are still unclear.[11] Recent publications of long-term follow-up have divergent recommendations for ... article examines recent research evidence on the prevalence of asymptomatic rheumatic heart disease (RHD) in South Africa and considers.

  10. Poncet\\'s Disease (Tuberculous Rheumatism) in a Nigerian Boy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Poncet's disease or tuberculous rheumatism is an immunological reaction to mycobacteria tubercle with resultant reactive polyarthritis. Prompt distinction between Poncet's disease and tuberculous arthritis should be made because of the poor prognostic significance of tuberculous arthritis. In this paper, we report the case ...

  11. Fibroblastic rheumatism: Scientific Letter | Kawtar | African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fibroblastic Rheumatism (FR) is a rare rheumatologic entity of unknown etiology. The pathophysiological mechanism involving fibroblast proliferation is characterized by symmetrical polyarthritis associated with sudden onset of cutaneous nodules, flexion contractures. Bone erosion can occur as the disease progresses and ...

  12. Early identification of iflammantory rheumatic bone disease via mammography technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, F.; Jakic, L.

    1981-01-01

    A decisive improvement of early X-ray diagnosis of inflammatory rheumatic osseus changes becomes possible by means of an appropriate combination of film and foil of the type which has been in use in mammography for a long time. (orig.) [de

  13. Itineraries of the rheumatic patients towards the rheumatologist in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To describe the itineraries of the rheumatic patients towards the rheumatologist. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was performed in patients attending the rheumatology unit of the University Hospital of Kinshasa from 1st October 2012 to 31st March 2013. Data collected were general demographic ...

  14. Osteoarthrosis and nonarticular rheumatism treated by low laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipa, Ciprian; Moldovan, Corneliu I.; Crangulescu, Nicolae; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.; Vasiliu, Virgil V.

    1995-03-01

    557 patients with various noninflammatory rheumatism (osteoarthrosis and nonarticular) were treated in four different ways: with GaAs laser, 1 - 2 mW output power alone, with HeNe laser, 2 mW alone, with GaAs and HeNe together and with classical antiflammatory therapy.

  15. An echocardiography audit to determine and characterise rheumatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Rheumatic heart disease is still a common problem in Zimbabwe. It has a significant mortality rate due to heart failure, stroke or endocarditis. Timely surgical interventions can reduce mortality. An echocardiography audit was performed to determine the proportion of patients referred for echocardiography who ...

  16. Familial systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease in Nigerians: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Systemic Autoimmune Rheumatic Diseases (SARD) are chronic disorders affecting multiple organs. Most SARDs have a female preponderance. SARDs have rarely been reported in African blacks, although there is increasing reportage of recent. Different SARDs are believed to have genetic predisposition and familial ...

  17. Infections and treatment of patients with rheumatic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atzeni, F; Bendtzen, K; Bobbio-Pallavicini, F

    2008-01-01

    , and for the shortest possible time should therefore greatly reduce the risk of infections. Infection is a major co-morbidity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and conventional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) can increase the risk of their occurrence, including tuberculosis. TNF-alpha plays a key role...

  18. [Roles of Musculoskeletal Ultrasonography in the Management of Rheumatic Diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Kei

    2015-05-01

    Inflammation of soft tissues and the subsequent structural damage are the characteristic features of many rheumatic conditions. However, the conventional measures to evaluate these features are not accurate, potentially causing under- and over-diagnosis or treatment. Musculoskeletal ultrasonography, on the other hand, directly visualizes features which are characteristic to rheumatic conditions, such as synovitis, tenosynovitis, bursitis, enthesitis, crystal depositions, bone erosions, and osteophytes/enthesophytes. By visualizing these key features, ultrasound facilitates a more accurate evaluation of rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthropathy, crystal-induced arthritis, and osteoarthritis. For RA, we investigated the impact of ultrasound on the 2010 ACR/EULAR RA classification criteria when joint involvement was determined. We assessed 109 patients with early arthritis using ultrasound. When the presence of joint swelling and number of involved joints were determined by ultrasound, the classification of RA was different from that without ultrasound in approximately 20% of the patients. Moreover, the accuracy of the classification to identify patients who required methotrexate treatment within a year improved by ultrasound. In addition, we and other investigators demonstrated the advantage of ultrasound over conventional measures in the assessment of disease activity of RA. Ultrasound also supports the education of both physicians and patients and communication between them. The utilization of musculoskeletal ultrasonography in more hospitals and clinics is expected to improve the quality of daily practice for rheumatic diseases.

  19. Frequency and severity of rheumatic heart disease in the catchment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Frequency and severity of rheumatic heart disease in the catchment area of Gauteng hospitals, 1993-1995. Sally-Ann Clur. Abstract. No Abstract. South African Medical Journal Vol. 96(3) 2006: 233-237. Article Metrics. Metrics Loading ... Metrics powered by PLOS ALM.

  20. Infections in the management of rheumatic diseases: An update ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients with inflammatory rheumatic conditions have an increased risk of infection. While this could be the result of the underlying disease, it may also be caused by the use of immunosuppressive therapies, which are needed to treat these disorders. An increasing number of patients with rheumatoid arthritis or other ...

  1. Frequency of rheumatic diseases in Portugal: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monjardino, Teresa; Lucas, Raquel; Barros, Henrique

    2011-01-01

    To describe the frequency of rheuma­tic diseases in Portugal through a systematic review of published literature, critically appraising available information and identifying data collection gaps. We systematically reviewed the literature to retrieve data on the occurrence of rheumatic diseases in Portugal through MEDLINE and Índex das Revistas Médicas Portuguesas searches, PhD theses, and national health surveys reports. Original articles in English or Portuguese published between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2010 were included. We retrieved information for the prevalence of rheumatic diseases, osteoarthritis, back pain, work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMDs), osteoporosis, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis and other systemic rheumatic diseases and for the incidence of back pain, osteoporotic fracture and other systemic rheumatic diseases. The prevalence of rheumatic diseases ranged from 16.0% to 24.0% and the prevalence of osteoarthritis was 11.1% (95% confidence intervals (95%CI): 9.4-13.1) in the knee and 5.5% (95%CI: 4.3-7.0) in the hip. Regarding back pain, period prevalence ranged from 8.0% (95%CI: 6.1-10.1) to 29.5% (95%CI: 23.4-36.2) in children and from 12.3% (95%CI: 10.5-14.3) to 51.3% (95%CI: 48.6-53.9) in adults. The prevalence of WRMDs ranged from 5.9% to 84.2% (95%CI: 80.8-87.3). The yearly incidence of osteoporotic fracture (per 100 000) ranged from 93.3 to 481 (95%CI: 407-564) in women and from 31.9 to 154 (95%CI: 106-218) in men. The prevalence of osteoporosis in women ranged from 11.0% to 15.4% (95%CI: 13.4-17.6) and in men from 1.1% to 16.8% (95%CI: 12.2-22.3). The prevalence of fibromyalgia ranged from 3.6% (95%CI: 2.0-5.2) to 3.7% (95%CI: 2.0-5.4). The prevalence estimates of ankylosing spondylitis and of spondyloarthritis were 0.6% and 1.6% (95%CI: 0.8-2.7), respectively. The prevalence of systemic lupus erythematosus was estimated in 0.2% (95%CI: 0.1-0.8). There is a broad spectrum of information available

  2. Pulmonary hypertension in rheumatic diseases: epidemiology and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahane, Anupama

    2013-07-01

    The focus of this review is to increase awareness of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in patients with rheumatic diseases. Epidemiology and pathogenesis of PAH in rheumatic diseases is reviewed, with recommendations for early screening and diagnosis and suggestion of possible role of immunosuppressive therapy in treatment for PAH in rheumatic diseases. A MEDLINE search for articles published between January 1970 and June 2012 was conducted using the following keywords: pulmonary hypertension, scleroderma, systemic sclerosis, pulmonary arterial hypertension, connective tissues disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, mixed connective tissue disease, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren's syndrome, vasculitis, sarcoidosis, inflammatory myopathies, dermatomyositis, ankylosing spondylitis, spondyloarthropathies, diagnosis and treatment. Pathogenesis and disease burden of PAH in rheumatic diseases was highlighted, with emphasis on early consideration and workup of PAH. Screening recommendations and treatment were touched upon. PAH is most commonly seen in systemic sclerosis and may be seen in isolation or in association with interstitial lung disease. Several pathophysiologic processes have been identified including an obliterative vasculopathy, veno-occlusive disease, formation of microthrombi and pulmonary fibrosis. PAH in systemic lupus erythematosus is associated with higher prevalence of antiphospholipid and anticardiolipin antibodies and the presence of Raynaud's phenomenon. Endothelial proliferation with vascular remodeling, abnormal coagulation with thrombus formation and immune-mediated vasculopathy are the postulated mechanisms. Improvement with immunosuppressive medications has been reported. Pulmonary fibrosis, extrinsic compression of pulmonary arteries and granulomatous vasculitis have been reported in patients with sarcoidosis. Intimal and medial hyperplasia with luminal narrowing has been observed in Sjogren's syndrome, mixed connective tissue disease and

  3. Ebola haemorrhagic fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, Heinz; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2012-01-01

    Ebola viruses are the causative agents of a severe form of viral haemorrhagic fever in man, designated Ebola haemorrhagic fever, and are endemic in regions of central Africa. The exception is the species Reston Ebola virus, which has not been associated with human disease and is found in the Philippines. Ebola virus constitutes an important local public health threat in Africa, with a worldwide effect through imported infections and through the fear of misuse for biological terrorism. Ebola virus is thought to also have a detrimental effect on the great ape population in Africa. Case-fatality rates of the African species in man are as high as 90%, with no prophylaxis or treatment available. Ebola virus infections are characterised by immune suppression and a systemic inflammatory response that causes impairment of the vascular, coagulation, and immune systems, leading to multiorgan failure and shock, and thus, in some ways, resembling septic shock. PMID:21084112

  4. Treatment of dengue fever

    OpenAIRE

    Rajapakse, Senaka; Rodrigo,Chaturaka; Rajapakse,Anoja Chamarie

    2012-01-01

    Senaka Rajapakse,1,2 Chaturaka Rodrigo,1 Anoja Rajapakse31Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka; 2Lincoln County Hospital, United Lincolnshire NHS Trust, Lincoln, UK; 3Kings Mill Hospital, Sherwood Forest NHS Foundation Trust, Mansfield, UKAbstract: The endemic area for dengue fever extends over 60 countries, and approximately 2.5 billion people are at risk of infection. The incidence of dengue has multiplied many times over the last five decad...

  5. Hypogonadism and the risk of rheumatic autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillargeon, Jacques; Al Snih, Soham; Raji, Mukaila A; Urban, Randall J; Sharma, Gulshan; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Lopez, David S; Baillargeon, Gwen; Kuo, Yong-Fang

    2016-12-01

    Testosterone deficiency has been linked with autoimmune disease and an increase in inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor, and interleukin-6 (IL-6). However, no large-scale longitudinal studies have examined this association. We examined whether untreated hypogonadism was associated with an increased risk of rheumatic autoimmune disease in a large nationally representative cohort. Using one of the nation's largest commercial insurance databases, we conducted a retrospective cohort study in which we identified 123,460 men diagnosed with hypogonadism between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2014 and with no prior history of rheumatic autoimmune disease. We matched this cohort to 370,380 men without hypogonadism, at a 1 to 3 ratio, on age and index/diagnosis date. All patients were followed until December 31, 2014 or until they lost insurance coverage or were diagnosed with a rheumatic autoimmune disease. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs). Untreated hypogonadism was associated with an increased risk of developing any rheumatic autoimmune disease (HR = 1.33, 95 % CI = 1.28, 1.38), rheumatoid arthritis (HR = 1.31, 95 % CI = 1.22, 1.44), and lupus (HR = 1.58, 95 % CI = 1.28, 1.94). These findings persisted using latency periods of 1 and 2 years. Hypogonadism was not associated with the control outcome, epilepsy (HR = 1.04, 95 % CI = 0.96, 1.15). Patients diagnosed with hypogonadism who were not treated with testosterone had an increased risk of developing any rheumatic autoimmune disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and lupus. Future research should further examine this association, with particular attention to underlying mechanisms.

  6. Hypogonadism and the risk of rheumatic autoimmune disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snih, Soham Al; Raji, Mukaila A.; Urban, Randall J.; Sharma, Gulshan; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Lopez, David S.; Baillargeon, Gwen; Kuo, Yong-Fang

    2017-01-01

    Testosterone deficiency has been linked with autoimmune disease and an increase in inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor, and interleukin-6 (IL-6). However, no large-scale longitudinal studies have examined this association. We examined whether untreated hypogonadism was associated with an increased risk of rheumatic autoimmune disease in a large nationally representative cohort. Using one of the nation’s largest commercial insurance databases, we conducted a retrospective cohort study in which we identified 123,460 men diagnosed with hypogonadism between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2014 and with no prior history of rheumatic autoimmune disease. We matched this cohort to 370,380 men without hypogonadism, at a 1 to 3 ratio, on age and index/diagnosis date. All patients were followed until December 31, 2014 or until they lost insurance coverage or were diagnosed with a rheumatic autoimmune disease. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs). Untreated hypogonadism was associated with an increased risk of developing any rheumatic autoimmune disease (HR = 1.33, 95 % CI = 1.28, 1.38), rheumatoid arthritis (HR = 1.31, 95 % CI = 1.22, 1.44), and lupus (HR = 1.58, 95 % CI = 1.28, 1.94). These findings persisted using latency periods of 1 and 2 years. Hypogonadism was not associated with the control outcome, epilepsy (HR = 1.04, 95 % CI = 0.96, 1.15). Patients diagnosed with hypogonadism who were not treated with testosterone had an increased risk of developing any rheumatic autoimmune disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and lupus. Future research should further examine this association, with particular attention to underlying mechanisms. PMID:27325124

  7. Hepatitis B Serology in Patients with Rheumatic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuchtenberger, Martin; Schäfer, Arne; Philipp Nigg, Axel; Rupert Kraus, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Only limited data are available on the prevalence of hepatitis B in patients with proven rheumatic diseases and thus the risk of reactivation under immunosuppressive therapy. To analyse hepatitis B serology in patients with rheumatic diseases prior to therapy. In total, 1,338 patient records were analysed for HBsAg, HBsAb and HBcAb in a cross-sectional, single-centre study between 2011 and 2015 at first presentation. Data acquisition was realized using electronic patient files created during routine care. The main variables considered as predictors for HBV reactivation included (i) the exact type of rheumatic disease and (ii) the therapeutically induced immunosuppression. Overall, 5.9% of patients (n=79) had proven contact with hepatitis B (HBcAb positive), and HBsAb were not detected in 1.3% (n=18). The rate of vaccinated subjects was 7.8%. HBsAg was detected in 3 patients (0.2%). In addition, 70.3% of patients were treated during the course of rheumatologic disease previously or currently with glucocorticoids, 85.2% with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and 20.1% with a biologic agent ( e.g. , anti-IL-6, anti-TNFalpha, anti-CD20, CTLA4Ig or anti-IL-12/23). Prevalence of hepatitis B serostatus in the analysed rheumatic patients regarding HBs-Ag and HBcAb with or without HBsAb prior to therapy does not differ from the data published for the general population in Germany. However, the rate of hepatitis B vaccinated patients was lower. In general, a significant portion of patients (5.9%) has been exposed to HBV and therefore exhibited an increased risk of reactivation of hepatitis B when undergoing immunosuppressive therapy.

  8. Acute acalculous cholecystitis complicating chemotherapy for acute myeloblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfa Kassar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a rare complication in the treatment of acute myeloblastic leukemia. Diagnosis of acute acalculous cholecystitis remains difficult during neutropenic period. We present two acute myeloblastic leukemia patients that developed acute acalculous cholecystitis during chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. They suffered from fever, vomiting and acute pain in the epigastrium. Ultrasound demonstrated an acalculous gallbladder. Surgical management was required in one patient and conservative treatment was attempted in the other patient. None treatment measures were effective and two patients died. Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a serious complication in neutropenic patients. Earlier diagnosis could have expedited the management of these patients.

  9. Guillain-Barre syndrome following dengue fever and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralapanawa, Dissanayake Mudiyanselage Priyantha Udaya Kumara; Kularatne, Senanayake Abeysinghe Mudiyanselage; Jayalath, Widana Arachilage Thilak Ananda

    2015-11-27

    Dengue is an arboviral infection that classically presents with fever, joint pain, headaches, skin flush and morbilliform rashes. The incidence of neurological symptoms and complications in dengue varies from 1 to 25% that include encephalopathy, Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), acute motor weakness, seizures, neuritis, hypokalaemic paralysis, pyramidal tract signs, and a few more. Dengue fever as an antecedent infection in GBS is uncommon. A 34-years-old Sri Lankan Sinhalese male presented with fever, headache and myalgia of 3 days and developed leucopenia and thrombocytopenia without evidence of haemoconcentration. The diagnosis of dengue fever was confirmed as he had positive dengue NS1 antigen test on the third day of fever. He made full recovery and was discharged after 4 days of hospital stay. Six days later, he presented with history of acute flaccid weakness of both lower limbs and upper limbs which was of progressive ascending nature. The electromyography had evidence of demyelinating neuropathy and cerebrospinal fluid showed albuminocytological dissociation. Subsequently, IgM for dengue virus was positive. Dengue is endemic in Sri Lanka. Post dengue Guillain-Barre syndrome is a potential neurological complications of this infection.

  10. A Q fever case mimicking crimean-congo haemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O Karabay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii is the bacterium that causes Q fever. Human infection is mainly transmitted from cattle, goats and sheep. The disease is usually self-limited. Pneumonia and hepatitis are the most common clinical manifestations. In this study, we present a case of Q fever from the western part of Turkey mimicking Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF in terms of clinical and laboratory findings.

  11. Temporal Artery Thermometry to Detect Pediatric Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ann Hudson; Carrigan, Julie Dagenhart; Solomon, David M; Tart, Rebecca Creech

    2015-10-01

    This research investigated effectiveness of temporal artery thermometry (TAT) to detect high rectal fever in children ≥ 91 days and ≤ 4 years old. Rectal temperature was initially evaluated immediately followed by TAT. As expected, the difference between mean rectal (38.05 ± .99 °C) and mean TA (37.55 ± .8 °C) temperatures in subjects (N = 239) was significant (p thermometry with greater frequency at higher temperatures. This observation provides probable explanation for the disparity between these thermometry methods. A TAT sensitivity of 75% and specificity of 85% were determined for detecting high fever (39 °C)-a finding clinically unacceptable. In contrast, among the small number of injured subjects enrolled, TAT detected high rectal fever with 100% sensitivity and specificity. This finding, if confirmed, suggests TAT screening for well and injured children has potential for clinical practice by diminishing rectal measurements and their associated risks in the acute care and/or ambulatory practice setting. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Beyond malaria--causes of fever in outpatient Tanzanian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Acremont, Valérie; Kilowoko, Mary; Kyungu, Esther; Philipina, Sister; Sangu, Willy; Kahama-Maro, Judith; Lengeler, Christian; Cherpillod, Pascal; Kaiser, Laurent; Genton, Blaise

    2014-02-27

    As the incidence of malaria diminishes, a better understanding of nonmalarial fever is important for effective management of illness in children. In this study, we explored the spectrum of causes of fever in African children. We recruited children younger than 10 years of age with a temperature of 38°C or higher at two outpatient clinics--one rural and one urban--in Tanzania. Medical histories were obtained and clinical examinations conducted by means of systematic procedures. Blood and nasopharyngeal specimens were collected to perform rapid diagnostic tests, serologic tests, culture, and molecular tests for potential pathogens causing acute fever. Final diagnoses were determined with the use of algorithms and a set of prespecified criteria. Analyses of data derived from clinical presentation and from 25,743 laboratory investigations yielded 1232 diagnoses. Of 1005 children (22.6% of whom had multiple diagnoses), 62.2% had an acute respiratory infection; 5.0% of these infections were radiologically confirmed pneumonia. A systemic bacterial, viral, or parasitic infection other than malaria or typhoid fever was found in 13.3% of children, nasopharyngeal viral infection (without respiratory symptoms or signs) in 11.9%, malaria in 10.5%, gastroenteritis in 10.3%, urinary tract infection in 5.9%, typhoid fever in 3.7%, skin or mucosal infection in 1.5%, and meningitis in 0.2%. The cause of fever was undetermined in 3.2% of the children. A total of 70.5% of the children had viral disease, 22.0% had bacterial disease, and 10.9% had parasitic disease. These results provide a description of the numerous causes of fever in African children in two representative settings. Evidence of a viral process was found more commonly than evidence of a bacterial or parasitic process. (Funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation and others.).

  13. Dengue and Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever

    OpenAIRE

    Gubler, Duane J.

    1998-01-01

    Dengue fever, a very old disease, has reemerged in the past 20 years with an expanded geographic distribution of both the viruses and the mosquito vectors, increased epidemic activity, the development of hyperendemicity (the cocirculation of multiple serotypes), and the emergence of dengue hemorrhagic fever in new geographic regions. In 1998 this mosquito-borne disease is the most important tropical infectious disease after malaria, with an estimated 100 million cases of dengue fever, 500,000...

  14. Fever in the pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Robyn; Dor, Maya R; McQuilkin, Patricia A

    2013-11-01

    Fever is the most common reason that children and infants are brought to emergency departments. Emergency physicians face the challenge of quickly distinguishing benign from life-threatening conditions. The management of fever in children is guided by the patient's age, immunization status, and immune status as well as the results of a careful physical examination and appropriate laboratory tests and radiographic views. In this article, the evaluation and treatment of children with fevers of known and unknown origin are described. Causes of common and dangerous conditions that include fever in their manifestation are also discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 12, Number 3, April 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-01

    of all types) and of respiratory infections (especially those that are clinically virulent and efficiently transmitted) should be focuses of military...immersion type 13 19 12 6 2 Q fever . 1 3 1 2 Cold weather, unspecified 19 13 9 5 13 Rabies , human . . . . . Cryptosporidiosis . . . . . Relapsing fever... Rabies , human . . . . 1 Cryptosporidiosis . . . . . Relapsing fever . . . . . Cyclospora . . . . . Rheumatic fever, acute . 1 . . . Dengue fever . . . 3

  16. Serum cytokine/chemokine profiles in patients with dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (FHD) by using protein array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Renato Antonio Dos Santos; Cordeiro, Marli Tenório; Moura, Patrícia Muniz Mendes Freire de; Baptista Filho, Paulo Neves Bapti; Braga-Neto, Ulisses de Mendonça; Marques, Ernesto Torres de Azevedo; Gil, Laura Helena Vega Gonzales

    2017-04-01

    DENV infection can induce different clinical manifestations varying from mild forms to dengue fever (DF) or the severe hemorrhagic fever (DHF). Several factors are involved in the progression from DF to DHF. No marker is available to predict this progression. Such biomarker could allow a suitable medical care at the beginning of the infection, improving patient prognosis. The aim of this study was to compare the serum expression levels of acute phase proteins in a well-established cohort of dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) patients, in order to individuate a prognostic marker of diseases severity. The serum levels of 36 cytokines, chemokines and acute phase proteins were determined in DF and DHF patients and compared to healthy volunteers using a multiplex protein array and near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence detection. Serum levels of IL-1ra, IL-23, MIF, sCD40 ligand, IP-10 and GRO-α were also determined by ELISA. At the early stages of infection, GRO-α and IP-10 expression levels were different in DF compared to DHF patients. Besides, GRO-α was positively correlated with platelet counts and IP-10 was negatively correlated with total protein levels. These findings suggest that high levels of GRO-α during acute DENV infection may be associated with a good prognosis, while high levels of IP-10 may be a warning sign of infection severity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Ebola hemorrhagic Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever is an often-fatal disease caused by a virus of the Filoviridae family, genus Ebolavirus. Initial signs and symptoms of the disease are nonspecific, often progressing on to a severe hemorrhagic illness. Special Operations Forces Medical Providers should be aware of this disease, which occurs in sporadic outbreaks throughout Africa. Treatment at the present time is mainly supportive. Special care should be taken to prevent contact with bodily fluids of those infected, which can transmit the virus to caregivers. 2014.

  18. Relapsing fever, a disappearing cause of fever and maternal death ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To study the incidence of tick borne relapsing fever (TBRF) during the last 50 years, once like malaria an endemic disease in Sengerema, Tanzania. Design: By analyzing the annual reports, focusing on the number of admissions, maternal deaths, blood smears of patients with fever for Borrelia.

  19. Rheumatic Mitral Valve Disease Is Associated With Worse Outcomes in Stroke: A Thailand National Database Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Adrian D; Mannu, Gurdeep S; Clark, Allan B; Tiamkao, Somsak; Kongbunkiat, Kannikar; Bettencourt-Silva, Joao H; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak; Kasemsap, Narongrit; Barlas, Raphae S; Mamas, Mamas; Myint, Phyo Kyaw

    2016-11-01

    Rheumatic valvular heart disease is associated with the increased risk of cerebrovascular events, although there are limited data on the prognosis of patients with rheumatic mitral valve disease (RMVD) after stroke. We examined the association between RMVD and both serious and common cardiovascular and noncardiovascular (respiratory and infective) complications in a cohort of hospitalized stroke patients based in Thailand. Factors associated with in-hospital mortality were also explored. Data were obtained from a National Insurance Database. All hospitalized strokes between October 1, 2004, and January 31, 2013, were included in the current study. Characteristics and outcomes were compared for RMVD and non-RMVD patients. Logistic regression, propensity score matching, and multivariate models were used to assess study outcomes. In total, 594 681 patients (mean [SD] age=64 [14.5] years) with a diagnosis of stroke (ischemic=306 154; hemorrhagic=195 392; undetermined=93 135) were included in this study, of whom 5461 had RMVD. Results from primary analyses showed that after ischemic stroke, and controlling for potential confounding covariates, RMVD was associated (Pstroke patients, RMVD was associated with increased odds (fully adjusted model) for respiratory failure (1.26 [1.01-1.57]), and in patients with undetermined stroke, RMVD was associated with increased odds (fully adjusted analyses) for shock (3.00 [1.46-6.14]), respiratory failure (2.70 [1.91-3.79]), and pneumonia (2.42 [1.88-3.11]). RMVD is associated with the development of cardiac arrest, shock, arrhythmias, respiratory failure, pneumonia, and sepsis after acute stroke. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: familial Mediterranean fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Familial Mediterranean fever Familial Mediterranean fever Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Familial Mediterranean fever is an inherited condition characterized by recurrent episodes ...