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Sample records for acute respiratory tract

  1. Human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalized danish children with acute respiratory tract infection

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    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Henrik Larsen, Hans; Koch, Anders;

    2004-01-01

    The newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV) has been shown to be associated with respiratory illness. We determined the frequencies and clinical features of hMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in 374 Danish children with 383 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection...

  2. Treatment of acute upper respiratory tract infections in children

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    Rončević-Babin Nevenka P.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Acute respiratory tract infections are the most common diseases of childhood. A preschool child suffers up to 5-7 infections of upper airways during a year. Upper airway infections make 80 - 90% of all respiratory infections. Etiology and treatment In 75% of all cases respiratory infections are of viral etiology, 15% of bacterial and 10% are caused by mycoplasma, rickettsiae, fungi, parasites. The treatment of respiratory infections includes antimicrobial therapy (causal, relief of symptoms (symptomatic and application of general principles of child treatment. The choice of antimicrobial drug is based on the evidence of agents and their sensitivity to antimicrobial drugs, age, patient's condition, previous treatment and possible allergic reactions to the drug. In cases where adequate specimen cannot be obtained for microbiologic tests, when these tests do not reveal the agent, or therapy must start before evidence of the agent is available, we must decide about the therapy, taking in consideration the most frequent agents, and those that would cause the most devastating clinical picture. This therapy can be modified later, according to the isolated agent and its sensitivity to the drug. Considering the incidence and importance of respiratory infections in morbidity and mortality of children, the aim of this article was to present guidelines in treatment of respiratory infections. The main point remains that the treatment should take into consideration the individual patient before all.

  3. Treatment of acute lower respiratory tract infections in children

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    Rončević-Babin Nevenka P.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Acute respiratory tract infections are the most common childhood diseases. A preschool child suffers up to 5-7 infections of upper airways during a year. Lower airway infections make 5-20% of all respiratory infections. Etiologic factors In developed countries, 75% of pneumonias in childhood are of viral etiology, in 15% of bacterial, and in 10% of some other causative agent (mycoplasma, rickettsiae, fungi, parasites. In developing countries, bacterial pneumonias are present in much higher percentages. Treatment Treatment of respiratory infections includes antimicrobial therapy (causal, relief of symptoms (symptomatic and conduction of general principles in child treatment. The choice of antimicrobial drug is based on evidence of agents and their sensitivity to antimicrobial drugs, age, patient's condition, previous treatment and possible allergic reactions to the drug. In cases where we cannot provide adequate specimen for microbiologic testing, when these tests do not reveal the agent, or when therapy must be started before the agent is available, we must decide about the therapy, taking in consideration the most frequent agents, and those that would cause the most devastating clinical picture. This therapy can later be modified according to the isolated agent and its sensitivity to the drug. Conclusion Having in mind the incidence and importance of respiratory infections in morbidity and mortality of children the aim of this article was to show guidelines in treatment of respiratory infections in children. The main point remains that we should take in consideration the individual patient before all.

  4. Antibiotic use in acute upper respiratory tract infections.

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    Zoorob, Roger; Sidani, Mohamad A; Fremont, Richard D; Kihlberg, Courtney

    2012-11-01

    Upper respiratory tract infections account for millions of visits to family physicians each year in the United States. Although warranted in some cases, antibiotics are greatly overused. This article outlines the guidelines and indications for appropriate antibiotic use for common upper respiratory infections. Early antibiotic treatment may be indicated in patients with acute otitis media, group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngitis, epiglottitis, or bronchitis caused by pertussis. Persistent cases of rhinosinusitis may necessitate the use of antibiotics if symptoms persist beyond a period of observation. Antibiotics should not be considered in patients with the common cold or laryngitis. Judicious, evidence-based use of antibiotics will help contain costs and prevent adverse effects and drug resistance.

  5. Human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalized danish children with acute respiratory tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Larsen, Hans Henrik; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper;

    2004-01-01

    The newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV) has been shown to be associated with respiratory illness. We determined the frequencies and clinical features of hMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in 374 Danish children with 383 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection...... children 1-6 months of age. Asthmatic bronchitis was diagnosed in 66.7% of hMPV and 10.6% of RSV-infected children (p respiratory support. hMPV is present in young...

  6. Guidelines to rational use of antibiotics in acute upper respiratory tract infections in Chinese children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) is the most common disease afflicting Chinese children and ranks first in numbers of outpatients, hospitalization and fatality rate. ARTI is also the most frequent reason that antibiotics are prescribed.

  7. Assessment of a new algorithm in the management of acute respiratory tract infections in children

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    Seyed Ahmad Tabatabaei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the practicability of a new algorithm in decreasing the rate of incorrect diagnoses and inappropriate antibiotic usage in pediatric Acute Respiratory Tract Infection (ARTI. Materials and Methods: Children between 1 month to15 years brought to outpatient clinics of a children′s hospital with acute respiratory symptoms were managed according to the steps recommended in the algorithm. Results: Upper Respiratory Tract Infection, Lower Respiratory Tract Infection, and undifferentiated ARTI accounted for 82%, 14.5%, and 3.5% of 1 209 cases, respectively. Antibiotics were prescribed in 33%; for: Common cold, 4.1%; Sinusitis, 85.7%; Otitis media, 96.9%; Pharyngotonsillitis, 63.3%; Croup, 6.5%; Bronchitis, 15.6%; Pertussis-like syndrome, 82.1%; Bronchiolitis, 4.1%; and Pneumonia, 50%. Conclusion: Implementation of the ARTIs algorithm is practicable and can help to reduce diagnostic errors and rate of antibiotic prescription in children with ARTIs.

  8. Viral respiratory tract infections among patients with acute undifferentiated fever in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.L. Phuong; T.T.T. Nga; G.J. van Doornum; J. Groen; T.Q. Binh; P.T. Giao; L.Q. Hung; N.V. Nams; P.A. Kager; P.J. de Vries

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the proportion of viral respiratory tract infections among acute undifferentiated fevers (AUFs) at primary health facilities in southern Vietnam during 2001-2005, patients with AUF not caused by malaria were enrolled at twelve primary health facilities and a clinic for malaria control

  9. Acute bacterial infections of the lower respiratory tract in children from low-income countries

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    Fleer, A; Wolf, B.H.M.

    2000-01-01

    Acute bacterial infection of the lower respiratory tract is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children and is responsible for 4 million childhood deaths each year. Most of these deaths are caused by pneumonia and occur in the youngest children in the poorest parts of the world. Severe pneu

  10. ACUPUNCTURE TREATMENT OF 42 CASES OF ACUTE UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ManWei; WangJinglan

    2000-01-01

    We made clinical observations on the therapeutic effect of acupuncture on acute upper respiratory tract infection and compared with the effect of paracetamol and Antondine, The result showed that acupuncture therapy could allay fever more rapidly than drugs, so long as the differentiation of syndromes is correct and the acupoint is selected properly.

  11. Detection of viral acute lower respiratory tract infection in hospitalized infants using real-time PCR

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    Bassant Meligy

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: RV was the most commonly detected virus in children under 3 years admitted with acute lower respiratory tract infections. Coinfection was present in the majority of our patients; however it was not related significantly to parameters of disease severity.

  12. Human bocavirus in children suffering from acute lower respiratory tract infection in Beijing Children's Hospital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li-li; XU Wen-bo; SHEN Kun-ling; TANG Liu-ying; XIE Zheng-de; TAN Xiao-juan; LI Chong-shan; CUI Ai-li; JI Yi-xin; XU Song-tao; MAO Nai-ying

    2008-01-01

    Background Human bocavirus(HBoV)is a parvovirus recently found to possibly cause respiratory tract disease in children and adults.This studV investigated HBoV infection and its clinical characte rist:ics in children younger than five years of age suffering from acute Iower respiratory tract infection in Beijing Children's Hospital.Methods Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from children suffering from acute Iower respiratory tract infection during the winters of 2004 to 2006 (from November through the following February).HBoV was detected by polymerase chain reaction amplification and virus isolation and the amplification products were sequenced for identification.Results HBoV jnfection was detected in 16 of 333 study subjects.Coinfections with respiratory syncytial virus were detected in 3 of 16 HBoV positive patients with acute lower respiratory tract infection.The median age for HBoV positive children was 8 months(mean age,17 months;range,3 to 57 months).Among the HBoV positive children,14 were younger than 3 years old.9 were younger than 1 year old and 7 were younger than 6 months.These 16 positive HBoV children exhibited coughing and abnormal chest radiography findings and more than 60%of these children had wheezing and fever.Ten children were clinically diagnosed with pneumonia,2 bronchiolitis,2 acute bronchitis and 2 asthma.One child died.Conclusions HBoV was detected in about 5%of children with acute Iower respiratory infection seen in Beijing Children's Hospital.Fudher investigations regarding clinical and epidemiologic charactedstics of HBoV infection are needed.

  13. Viral-bacterial interactions and risk of acute otitis media complicating upper respiratory tract infection.

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    Pettigrew, Melinda M; Gent, Janneane F; Pyles, Richard B; Miller, Aaron L; Nokso-Koivisto, Johanna; Chonmaitree, Tasnee

    2011-11-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is a common complication of upper respiratory tract infection whose pathogenesis involves both viruses and bacteria. We examined risks of acute otitis media associated with specific combinations of respiratory viruses and acute otitis media bacterial pathogens. Data were from a prospective study of children ages 6 to 36 months and included viral and bacterial culture and quantitative PCR for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human bocavirus, and human metapneumovirus. Repeated-measure logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between specific viruses, bacteria, and the risk of acute otitis media complicating upper respiratory tract infection. In unadjusted analyses of data from 194 children, adenovirus, bocavirus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis were significantly associated with AOM (P virus loads (≥3.16 × 10(7) copies/ml) experienced increased acute otitis media risk. Higher viral loads of bocavirus and metapneumovirus were not significantly associated with acute otitis media. In adjusted models controlling for the presence of key viruses, bacteria, and acute otitis media risk factors, acute otitis media risk was independently associated with high RSV viral load with Streptococcus pneumoniae (odds ratio [OR], 4.40; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.90 and 10.19) and Haemophilus influenzae (OR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.38 and 3.02). The risk was higher for the presence of bocavirus and H. influenzae together (OR, 3.61; 95% CI, 1.90 and 6.86). Acute otitis media risk differs by the specific viruses and bacteria involved. Acute otitis media prevention efforts should consider methods for reducing infections caused by respiratory syncytial virus, bocavirus, and adenovirus in addition to acute otitis media bacterial pathogens.

  14. [Mucolytics in acute and chronic respiratory tract disorders. I. Pathophysiology and mechanisms of action].

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    Kupczyk, Maciej; Kuna, Piotr

    2002-03-01

    Mucus hypersecretion is a cardinal sign of both acute and chronic pulmonary diseases. Normally, mucus protects respiratory tract, but its overproduction leads to airway obstruction and promotes bacterial colonization. In the first part of our review we outlined the possible factors responsible for mucus hypersecretion and clinical consequences of this process. Mucolytic agents such as Ambroxol and N-acetylcysteine are able to alter the secretion of mucus and its physical properties which results in improvement of mucociliary clearance. Mechanisms of action and indications for use of mucolytics are presented. Mucolytics have been shown to have a role in improving lung functions and patients' quality of life. Undoubtedly they are useful as an adjunctive therapy of respiratory tract disorders. PMID:12053600

  15. Primary pneumocystis infection in infants hospitalized with acute respiratory tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Hans Henrik; von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Lundgren, Bettina;

    2007-01-01

    Acquisition of Pneumocystis jirovecii infection early in life has been confirmed by serologic studies. However, no evidence of clinical illness correlated with the primary infection has been found in immunocompetent children. We analyzed 458 nasopharyngeal aspirates from 422 patients hospitalized...... with 431 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection (RTI) by using a real-time PCR assay. In 68 episodes in 67 infants, P. jirovecii was identified. The odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of a positive signal compared with the first quartile of age (7-49 days) was 47.4 (11.0-203), 8.7 (1...

  16. Clinical characteristics and risk factors of severe respiratory syncytial virus-associated acute lower respiratory tract infections in hospitalized infants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Bo Zhang; Li-Juan Liu; Li-Ling Qian; Gao-Li Jiang; Chuan-Kai Wang; Pin Jia; Peng Shi; Jin Xu; Li-Bo Wang

    2014-01-01

    Background: To investigate the clinical characteristics and analyze risk factors for severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in hospitalized infants with acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRIs). Methods: A retrospective review of the medical records of infants with RSV-associated ALRIs between March 1st, 2011 and February 29th, 2012 was conducted. Subjects were followed up over the phone or by outpatient visit six and twelve months after discharge. Results: Among 913 RSV-associated ALRIs infants, 288 (31.5%) had severe infections, which accounted for 4.2% of hospitalized children. The hospital RSV mortality rate was 1.0%. The proportions of cases with tachypnea, apnea, cyanosis, and fine rales were significantly higher in the severe ALRIs group (all P Conclusions: Younger age, low birth weight and underlying disease are associated with severe RSVassociated ALRIs. Furthermore, severe RSV infections may be associated with a higher frequency of subsequent bronchitis, pneumonia and re-hospitalization in the following year.

  17. [Mucolytics in acute and chronic respiratory tract disorders. II. Uses for treatment and antioxidant properties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupczyk, Maciej; Kuna, Piotr

    2002-03-01

    In the first part of our editorial we reviewed the possible factors responsible for mucus hypersecretion in acute and chronic pulmonary diseases. The present paper presents the results of studies proving, that mucolytics are useful in adjunctive therapy of respiratory tract disorders. Mucolytic agents such as Ambroxol and N-acetylcysteine are able to alter the secretion of mucus and its physical properties which results in improvement of mucociliary clearance. Current evidence indicate, that these drugs are effective, especially in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and acute bronchitis. They produce a modest improvement in symptom control and lung function. It has been demonstrated that there is a synergism between mucolytics and antibiotics in the treatment of exacerbation of chronic bronchitis. Moreover, they act as scavengers of reactive oxygen species. Ambroxol is able to inhibit mediator release involved in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation. As mucolytics are cheap and well-tolerated they are beneficial in the therapy of patients suffering from respiratory tract disorders. PMID:12053601

  18. CLINICAL PROFILE OF ACUTE LOWER RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN BETWEEN 2MONTHS TO 5 YEARS

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    Amitoj Singh Chhina

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Acute respiratory infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in under - five children in developing countries. Hence, the present study was undertaken to study the various risk factors, clinical profile and outcome of acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRI in children aged 2 month to 5 years. OBJECTIVE : clinical features, laborato ry assessment and morbidity and mortality pattern associated with acute lower respiratory tract infections in children aged 2 months to 5 years. METHODS: 100 ALRI cases fulfilling WHO criteria for pneumonia, in the age group of 2 month to 5 years were evaluated for clinical profile as per a predesigned proforma in a rural medical college. RESULTS : Of cases 61% were infants and remaining 39%12 - 60 months age group, males outnumbered females with sex ratio of 1.3;1. Elevated total leukocyte counts for age were observed in only 22% of cases, of these 3% were having pneumonia, 9% severe pneumonia and 10% very severe pneumonia. Significant association was found between leukocytosis and ALRI severity (p= 0.0001 Positive blood culture was obtained in 8% of cases and was significantly associated with ALRI severity (p=. 0.027. Among the ALRI cases, 84% required oxygen supplementation at any time during the hospital stay and 8% required mechanical ventilation. The mortality rate was 1%; with 99% of cases recovering and getting discharged uneventfully. CONCLUSION : Among the clinical variables, the signs and symptoms of ALRI as per the WHO ARI Control Programme were found in almost all cases. Regarding the laboratory profile, leukocytosis and blood culture positivity w ere observed in a small percentage, but significant association with ALRI severity was observed for both. Thus, clinical signs, and not invasive blood tests are a better diagnostic tools, though the latter may provide additional therapeutic and prognostic information in severe disease

  19. Pteropine orthoreovirus infection among out-patients with acute upper respiratory tract infection in Malaysia.

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    Voon, Kenny; Tan, Yeh Fong; Leong, Pooi Pooi; Teng, Cheong Lieng; Gunnasekaran, Rajasekaran; Ujang, Kamsiah; Chua, Kaw Bing; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to assess the incidence rate of Pteropine orthreovirus (PRV) infection in patients with acute upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) in a suburban setting in Malaysia, where bats are known to be present in the neighborhood. Using molecular detection of PRVs directly from oropharyngeal swabs, our study demonstrates that PRV is among one of the common causative agents of acute URTI with cough and sore throat as the commonest presenting clinical features. Phylogenetic analysis on partial major outer and inner capsid proteins shows that these PRV strains are closely related to Melaka and Kampar viruses previously isolated in Malaysia. Further study is required to determine the public health significance of PRV infection in Southeast Asia, especially in cases where co-infection with other pathogens may potentially lead to different clinical outcomes. PMID:26106066

  20. Viral Co-Infections in Pediatric Patients Hospitalized with Lower Tract Acute Respiratory Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebey-López, Miriam; Herberg, Jethro; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Gormley, Stuart; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Molecular techniques can often reveal a broader range of pathogens in respiratory infections. We aim to investigate the prevalence and age pattern of viral co-infection in children hospitalized with lower tract acute respiratory infection (LT-ARI), using molecular techniques. Methods A nested polymerase chain reaction approach was used to detect Influenza (A, B), metapneumovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza (1–4), rhinovirus, adenovirus (A—F), bocavirus and coronaviruses (NL63, 229E, OC43) in respiratory samples of children with acute respiratory infection prospectively admitted to any of the GENDRES network hospitals between 2011–2013. The results were corroborated in an independent cohort collected in the UK. Results A total of 204 and 97 nasopharyngeal samples were collected in the GENDRES and UK cohorts, respectively. In both cohorts, RSV was the most frequent pathogen (52.9% and 36.1% of the cohorts, respectively). Co-infection with multiple viruses was found in 92 samples (45.1%) and 29 samples (29.9%), respectively; this was most frequent in the 12–24 months age group. The most frequently observed co-infection patterns were RSV—Rhinovirus (23 patients, 11.3%, GENDRES cohort) and RSV—bocavirus / bocavirus—influenza (5 patients, 5.2%, UK cohort). Conclusion The presence of more than one virus in pediatric patients admitted to hospital with LT-ARI is very frequent and seems to peak at 12–24 months of age. The clinical significance of these findings is unclear but should warrant further analysis. PMID:26332375

  1. Serologic study on the outbreak of acute upper respiratory tract Infections caused by adenovirus 3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Lufang; JU Liwen; JIANG Renjie; LIN Yuzun; ZHOU Liandi; YU Shunzhang; JIANG Qingwu

    2007-01-01

    From April to June,2004,an outbreak of acute upper respiratory tract infections(AURTI)occurred in the north area of Jiangsu Province,China.Twenty throat swabs were collected with 13 of them presenting an adenovirus (Ad)-like cytopathogenic effect on HEp-2.These were verified as Ad by the electron microscope,direct immunofluorescence assay and Ad primer-mediated PCR.Moreover,they were identified as adenovirus type 3(Ad3)by type-specific PCR and sequencing of the amplification products.Subsequent serologic studies were carried out to finally diagnose and document the outbreak.The neutralization test of paired serum of six in nine cases show obviously increased antibodies titers.The positive rate of IgM,IgG and recovery phase neutralization antibodies of the cases were 3.7%,44.4%and 59.5%respectively while those of the controls were 0%,8.3%and 33.3%respectively.The Pvalues of Chi-Square were 0.510,0.018 and 0.226 respectively.The concordance between IgG detected by ELISA and neutralization antibodies detected by the neutralization test was 61.4%and the Pvalue of Kappa was 0.070.By the serologic study,we can definitively diagnose that this outbreak of acute respiratory infections was caused by Adenovirus 3.

  2. Systematic Review of Clinical Trials Assessing the Effectiveness of Ivy Leaf (Hedera Helix) for Acute Upper Respiratory Tract Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Holzinger, Felix; Chenot, Jean-François

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Among nonantibiotic cough remedies, herbal preparations containing extracts from leaves of ivy (Hedera helix) enjoy great popularity. Objective. A systematic review to assess the effectiveness and tolerability of ivy for acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs). Methods. We searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs), nonrandomized controlled clinical trials and observational studies evaluating the efficacy of ivy preparations for acute URTIs. Study quality was asse...

  3. Systematic Review of Clinical Trials Assessing the Effectiveness of Ivy Leaf (Hedera Helix) for Acute Upper Respiratory Tract Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Holzinger, Felix; Chenot, Jean-François

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Among nonantibiotic cough remedies, herbal preparations containing extracts from leaves of ivy (Hedera helix) enjoy great popularity. Objective. A systematic review to assess the effectiveness and tolerability of ivy for acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs). Methods. We searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs), nonrandomized controlled clinical trials and observational studies evaluating the efficacy of ivy preparations for acute URTIs. Study quality was asse...

  4. Acute lower respiratory tract infection due to respiratory syncytial virus in a group of Egyptian children under 5 years of age

    OpenAIRE

    El-kholy Amany A; El-anany Mervat G; Mansi Yasmeen A; Fattouh Aya M; El-karaksy Hanaa M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background and aim Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the most important causes of acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRTI) in infants and young children. This study was conducted to describe the epidemiology of ALRTI associated with RSV among children ≤ 5 years old in Egypt. Patients and Methods We enrolled 427 children ≤ 5 years old diagnosed with ALRTI attending the outpatient clinic or Emergency Department (ED) of Children Hospital, Cairo University during a one-...

  5. Clinical characteristics of acute lower respiratory tract infections due to 13 respiratory viruses detected by multiplex PCR in children

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    Jeong-Sook Lim

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : This study was performed to investigate the epidemiologic and clinical features of 13 respiratory viruses in children with acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRIs. Methods : Nasopharyngeal aspirates were prospectively obtained from 325 children aged 15 years or less from May 2008 to April 2009 and were tested for the presence of 13 respiratory viruses by multiplex real-time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Results : Viruses were identified in 270 children (83.1%. Co-infections with ?#242; viruses were observed in 71 patients (26.3 %. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV was the most common virus detected (33.2%, followed by human rhinovirus (hRV (19.1%, influenza virus (Flu A (16.9%, human metapneumovirus (hMPV (15.4%, parainfluenza viruses (PIVs (8.3%, human bocavirus (hBoV (8.0%, adenovirus (ADV (5.8%, and human coronavirus (hCoV (2.2%. Clinical diagnoses of viral ALRIs were bronchiolitis (37.5%, pneumonia (34.5%, asthma exacerbation (20.9%, and croup (7.1%. Clinical diagnoses of viral bronchiolitis and pneumonia were frequently demonstrated in patients who tested positive for RSV, hRV, hMPV, or Flu A. Flu A and hRV were most commonly identified in children older than 3 years and were the 2 leading causes of asthma exacerbation. hRV C was detected in 14 (4.3% children, who were significantly older than those infected with hRV A (mean±SD, 4.1±3.5 years vs. 1.7±2.3 years; P=0.009. hBoV was usually detected in young children (2.3±3.4 years with bronchiolitis and pneumonia. Conclusion : This study described the features of ALRI associated with 13 respiratory viruses in Korean children. Additional investigations are required to define the roles of newly identified viruses in children with ALRIs.

  6. Maternal agency influences the prevalence of diarrhea and acute respiratory tract infections among young Indonesian children.

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    Agustina, Rina; Shankar, Anita V; Ayuningtyas, Azalea; Achadi, Endang L; Shankar, Anuraj H

    2015-05-01

    To examine the relationship between measures of mother's caretaking, practice and individual agency on acute diarrhea and respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) of Indonesian children. Using population-based household data from the Indonesian Demographic Health Surveys for 2002-2003 (n = 9,151 children) and 2007 (n = 9,714 children), we selected 28 indicators related to mother' caretaking, and applied principal component analysis to derive indices for access to care, practice and experience, and agency. The association between index quartiles (level 1-4) and the prevalence of diarrhea and ARTIs in the youngest child family size, child's age and sex, immunization status and received vitamin A supplementation. Moderate levels (level 3) of practice and experience were associated with decreased diarrheal risk (adjusted OR 0.86, 95 % CI 0.75-0.98), but not for ARTIs. Children of mothers with higher levels (level 4) of agency were protected against both diarrhea (adjusted OR 0.68, 95 % CI 0.60-0.77) and ARTIs (adjusted OR 0.77, 95 % CI 0.66-0.91). Stratified analyses with child's age and mother's education, and tests of interaction, showed that agency had a stronger effect on diarrhea and ARTIs prevalence in children child health. PMID:25108503

  7. Validation study of a diary for use in acute lower respiratory tract infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watson, L; Little, P; Moore, M; Warner, G; Williamson, [No Value

    2001-01-01

    Background. Despite lower respiratory tract infection (LRTi) being the most common illness treated by doctors, no validated outcome measure to assess symptom duration and severity has been developed for patient self-completion. Methods. As part of a randomized control trial researching management of

  8. Infection biomarkers in primary care patients with acute respiratory tract infections–comparison of Procalcitonin and C-reactive protein

    OpenAIRE

    Meili, Marc; Kutz, Alexander; Briel, Matthias; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Bucher, Heiner C.; Mueller, Beat; Schuetz, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a lack of studies comparing the utility of C-reactive protein (CRP) with Procalcitonin (PCT) for the management of patients with acute respiratory tract infections (ARI) in primary care. Our aim was to study the correlation between these markers and to compare their predictive accuracy in regard to clinical outcome prediction. Methods This is a secondary analysis using clinical and biomarker data of 458 primary care patients with pneumonic and non-pneumonic ARI. We used co...

  9. Maternal agency influences the prevalence of diarrhea and acute respiratory tract infections among young Indonesian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustina, Rina; Shankar, Anita V; Ayuningtyas, Azalea; Achadi, Endang L; Shankar, Anuraj H

    2015-05-01

    To examine the relationship between measures of mother's caretaking, practice and individual agency on acute diarrhea and respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) of Indonesian children. Using population-based household data from the Indonesian Demographic Health Surveys for 2002-2003 (n = 9,151 children) and 2007 (n = 9,714 children), we selected 28 indicators related to mother' caretaking, and applied principal component analysis to derive indices for access to care, practice and experience, and agency. The association between index quartiles (level 1-4) and the prevalence of diarrhea and ARTIs in the youngest child <5 years of age was assessed with multivariate logistic regression adjusting for socioeconomic status, residence type, mother's age and education, family size, child's age and sex, immunization status and received vitamin A supplementation. Moderate levels (level 3) of practice and experience were associated with decreased diarrheal risk (adjusted OR 0.86, 95 % CI 0.75-0.98), but not for ARTIs. Children of mothers with higher levels (level 4) of agency were protected against both diarrhea (adjusted OR 0.68, 95 % CI 0.60-0.77) and ARTIs (adjusted OR 0.77, 95 % CI 0.66-0.91). Stratified analyses with child's age and mother's education, and tests of interaction, showed that agency had a stronger effect on diarrhea and ARTIs prevalence in children <2 years of age. Maternal caretaking, especially agency, is strongly associated with lower prevalence of diarrhea and ARTIs in younger children. Interventions specifically designed to promote maternal autonomy and decision-making may lead to improved child health.

  10. ACUPUNCTURE TREATMENT OF 42 CASES OF ACUTE UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    满伟; 王敬兰

    2000-01-01

    We made clinical observations on the therapeutic effect of acupuncture on acute upperr espiratory tract infection and compared with the effect of paracetamol and Antondine, The result showed that acupuncture therapy could allay fever more rapidly than drugs, so long as the differentiation of syndromes is correct and the acupoint is selected properly.

  11. The development and validation of a multidimensional sum-scaling questionnaire to measure patient-reported outcomes in acute respiratory tract infections in primary care: the Acute Respiratory Tract Infection Questionnaire: ARTIQ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, R.; Thorsen, H.; Siersma, V.;

    2013-01-01

    to test dimensionality, objectivity, and reliability of items. Test of known groups' validity was conducted by comparing participants with and without an ARTI. RESULTS: The final version of the ARTIQ consisted of 38 items covering five dimensions (Physical-upper, Physical-lower, Psychological, Sleep...... interviews and field testing among adults with an ARTI were conducted to ascertain a high degree of face and content validity of the questionnaire. Subsequently, a draft version of the Acute Respiratory Tract Infection Questionnaire (ARTIQ) was statistically validated by using the partial credit Rasch model...

  12. Associations of hand-washing frequency with incidence of acute respiratory tract infection and influenza-like illness in adults: a population-based study in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Merk, Hanna; Kühlmann-Berenzon, Sharon; Linde, Annika; Nyrén, Olof

    2014-01-01

    Background Frequent hand-washing is standard advice for avoidance of respiratory tract infections, but the evidence for a preventive effect in a general community setting is sparse. We therefore set out to quantify, in a population-based adult general population cohort, the possible protection against acute respiratory tract infections (ARIs) conferred by a person’s self-perceived hand-washing frequency. Methods During the pandemic influenza season from September 2009 through May 2010, a coho...

  13. Respiratory tract and mediastinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Respiratory tract problems originating in attempts to diagnose and treat illness are commonplace. They range from pharyngeal trauma during intubation to radiation-induced thyroid carcinoma. Occasionally, as with pulmonary hypervolemia accompanying drug-induced renal failure, they originate at a distance. Their actual number far exceeds those brought to clinical attention. Familiarity with the procedures which give rise to these complications is helpful in detecting and remedying them. It is important, therefore, to discuss their pathogenesis as well as their clinical and radiological findings

  14. Detection of human bocavirus from children and adults with acute respiratory tract illness in Guangzhou, southern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wen-Kuan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human bocavirus (HBoV is a newly discovered parvovirus associated with acute respiratory tract illness (ARTI and gastrointestinal illness. Our study is the first to analyze the characteristics of HBoV-positive samples from ARTI patients with a wide age distribution from Guangzhou, southern China. Methods Throat swabs (n=2811 were collected and analyzed from children and adults with ARTI over a 13-month period. The HBoV complete genome from a 60 year-old female patient isolate was also determined. Results HBoV DNA was detected in 65/2811 (2.3% samples, of which 61/1797 were from children (Mycoplasma pneumoniae had the highest frequency of 16.9% (11/65. Upper and lower respiratory tract illness were common symptoms, with 19/65 (29.2% patients diagnosed with pneumonia by chest radiography. All four adult patients had systemic influenza-like symptoms. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete genome revealed a close relationship with other HBoVs, and a more distant relationship with HBoV2 and HBoV3. Conclusions HBoV was detected from children and adults with ARTI from Guangzhou, southern China. Elderly people were also susceptive to HBoV. A single lineage of HBoV was detected among a wide age distribution of patients with ARTI.

  15. Prescriber and Patient Responsibilities in Treatment of Acute Respiratory Tract Infections — Essential for Conservation of Antibiotics

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    Antonio C. Pignatari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Inappropriate antibiotic use in normally self-limiting acute respiratory tract infections (RTIs, such as sore throat and the common cold, is a global problem and an important factor for increasing levels of antibiotic resistance. A new group of international experts—the Global Respiratory Infection Partnership (GRIP—is committed to addressing this issue, with the interface between primary care practitioners and their patients as their core focus. To combat the overuse of antibiotics in the community, and facilitate a change from prescribing empiric antibiotic treatment towards cautious deferment combined with symptomatic relief, there is a need to introduce and enhance evidence-based dialogue between primary care practitioners and their patients. Communication with patients should focus on the de-medicalisation of self-limiting viral infections, which can be achieved via a coherent globally endorsed framework outlining the rationale for appropriate antibiotic use in acute RTIs in the context of antibiotic stewardship and conservancy. The planned framework is intended to be adaptable at a country level to reflect local behaviours, cultures and healthcare systems, and has the potential to serve as a model for change in other therapeutic areas.

  16. High prevalence of acute respiratory tract infections among Warao Amerindian children in Venezuela in relation to low immunization coverage and chronic malnutrition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, L.M.; Warris, A.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Nogal, B. del; Groot, R. de; Waard, J.H. de

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Higher prevalence rates of acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) have been described in Australian and Canadian indigenous populations than in nonindigenous age-matched counterparts. Few studies on ARTIs in South American indigenous populations have been published. We performed a cr

  17. Detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae by two polymerase chain reactions and role of M. pneumoniae in acute respiratory tract infections in pediatric patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ieven, M; Ursi, D; Van Bever, H; Quint, W; Niesters, H G; Goossens, H

    1996-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae and viruses in acute respiratory tract infections in children were studied during the winter of 1992-1993 in Antwerp, Belgium. M. pneumoniae was diagnosed in nasopharyngeal aspirates by culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). For this, amplification of a fragment of the PI

  18. Systematic Review of Clinical Trials Assessing the Effectiveness of Ivy Leaf (Hedera Helix for Acute Upper Respiratory Tract Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Holzinger

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Among nonantibiotic cough remedies, herbal preparations containing extracts from leaves of ivy (Hedera helix enjoy great popularity. Objective. A systematic review to assess the effectiveness and tolerability of ivy for acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs. Methods. We searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs, nonrandomized controlled clinical trials and observational studies evaluating the efficacy of ivy preparations for acute URTIs. Study quality was assessed by the Jadad score or the EPHPP tool. Results. 10 eligible studies were identified reporting on 17463 subjects. Studies were heterogeneous in design and conduct; 2 were RCTs. Three studies evaluated a combination of ivy and thyme, 7 studies investigated monopreparations of ivy. Only one RCT (=360 investigating an ivy/thyme combination used a placebo control and showed statistically significant superiority in reducing the frequency and duration of cough. All other studies lack a placebo control and show serious methodological flaws. They all conclude that ivy extracts are effective for reducing symptoms of URTI. Conclusion. Although all studies report that ivy extracts are effective to reduce symptoms of URTI, there is no convincing evidence due to serious methodological flaws and lack of placebo controls. The combination of ivy and thyme might be more effective but needs confirmation.

  19. Acute lower respiratory tract infection due to respiratory syncytial virus in a group of Egyptian children under 5 years of age

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    El-kholy Amany A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and aim Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is one of the most important causes of acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRTI in infants and young children. This study was conducted to describe the epidemiology of ALRTI associated with RSV among children ≤ 5 years old in Egypt. Patients and Methods We enrolled 427 children ≤ 5 years old diagnosed with ALRTI attending the outpatient clinic or Emergency Department (ED of Children Hospital, Cairo University during a one- year period. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were obtained from the patients, kept on ice and processed within 2 hours of collection. Immunoflourescent assay (IFA for RSV was performed. Results 91 cases (21.3% had viral etiology with RSV antigens detected in 70 cases (16.4%. The RSV positive cases were significantly younger than other non-RSV cases (mean age 8.2 months versus 14.2 months, p Conclusion RSV is the most common viral etiology of ALRTI in children below 5 years of age, especially in young infants below 6 months of age. It is more prevalent in winter and tends to cause severe infection.

  20. Prevalence and correlation of infectious agents in hospitalized children with acute respiratory tract infections in Central China.

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    Jia Liu

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs are associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially in children under the age of 5 years. Almost 2 million children die from ARTIs each year, and most of them are from developing countries. The prevalence and correlation of pathogens in ARTIs are poorly understood, but are critical for improving case prevention, treatment, and management. In this study, we investigated the prevalence and correlation of infectious agents in children with ARTIs. A total of 39,756 children with one or more symptoms, including fever, cough, sore throat, tonsillitis, pharyngitis, herpangina, pneumonia, and bronchiolitis, were enrolled in the study. All patients were hospitalized in Wuhan Children's Hospital between October 1, 2010 and September 30, 2012, and were evaluated for infectious agents. Pathogens, including Mycoplasma pneumoniae, influenza A virus, influenza B virus, adenoviruses, respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza virus, Legionella pneumophila, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, and Coxiella burnetii, were screened simultaneously in patient blood samples using anti-pathogen IgM tests. Regression analysis was used to reveal correlations among the pathogens. Our results showed that one or more pathogens were identified in 10,206 patients, and that Mycoplasma pneumoniae, adenoviruses, and influenza B virus were the leading infectious agents. Mixed-infections of pathogens were detected in 2,391 cases, with Mycoplasma pneumoniae as the most frequent pathogen. The most common agents in the co-infections were Mycoplasma pneumoniae and influenza B virus. Regression analysis revealed a linear correlation between the proportion of mixed infections and the incidence of multi-pathogen infections. The prevalence of infectious agents in children with ARTIs was determined. Equations were established to estimate multiple infections by single-pathogen detection. This revealed a linear correlation for

  1. Respiratory tract infection during Hajj

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alzeer Abdulaziz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory tract infection during Hajj (pilgrimage to Mecca is a common illness, and it is responsible for most of the hospital admissions. Influenza virus is the leading cause of upper respiratory tract infection during Hajj, and pneumonia can be serious. Taking into account the close contacts among the pilgrims, as well as the crowding, the potential for transmission of M. tuberculosis is expected to be high. These pilgrims can be a source for spreading infection on their return home. Although vaccination program for influenza is implemented, its efficacy is uncertain in this religious season. Future studies should concentrate on prevention and mitigation of these infections.

  2. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chap 33. Lee WL, Slutsky AS. Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and ARDS. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  3. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chap 33. Lee WL, Slutsky AS. Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and ARDS. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Respiratory Failure Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  4. Extensive upper respiratory tract sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Mafalda Trindade; Sousa, Carolina; Garanito, Luísa; Freire, Filipe

    2016-04-18

    Sarcoidosis is a chronic granulomatous disease of unknown aetiology. It can affect any part of the organism, although the lung is the most frequently affected organ. Upper airway involvement is rare, particularly if isolated. Sarcoidosis is a diagnosis of exclusion, established by histological evidence of non-caseating granulomas and the absence of other granulomatous diseases. The authors report a case of a man with sarcoidosis manifesting as a chronic inflammatory stenotic condition of the upper respiratory tract and trachea.

  5. Homeopathic medicine for acute cough in upper respiratory tract infections and acute bronchitis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanasi, Alessandro; Mazzolini, Massimiliano; Tursi, Francesco; Morselli-Labate, Antonio Maria; Paccapelo, Alexandro; Lecchi, Marzia

    2014-02-01

    Cough is a frequent symptom associated to upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) and, although being self-limiting, it might deeply affect the quality of life. Homeopathic products are often employed by patients to treat cough, but the evidence on their efficacy is scarce. Thus, we tested the efficacy of a homeopathic syrup in treating cough arising from URTIs with a randomized, double blind, placebo controlled clinical trial. Patients were treated with either the homeopathic syrup or a placebo for a week, and recorded cough severity in a diary by means of a verbal category-descriptive score for two weeks. Sputum viscosity was assessed with a viscosimeter before and after 4 days of treatment; patients were also asked to provide a subjective evaluation of viscosity. Eighty patients were randomized to receive placebo (n = 40) or the homeopathic syrup (n = 40). All patients completed the study. In each group cough scores decreased over time, however, after 4 and 7 days of treatment, cough severity was significantly lower in the homeopathic group than in the placebo one (p syrup employed in the study was able to effectively reduce cough severity and sputum viscosity, thereby representing a valid remedy for the management of acute cough induced by URTIs. PMID:23714686

  6. Predictors of severe disease in a hospitalized population of children with acute viral lower respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedraza-Bernal, Angela M; Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E; Acuña-Cordero, Ranniery

    2016-05-01

    Although predictors of severe viral acute lower respiratory infections (ALRIs) in children have been reported, there have been few research studies performed in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). The aim of the present study was to determine predictors of disease severity in a population of Colombian children disease conditions and the infecting respiratory viruses as predictor variables of severe disease. We defined severe disease as the necessity of pediatric intensive care unit admission. Of a total of 1,180 patients admitted with a diagnosis of ALRI, 416 (35.3%) were included because they were positive for any kind of respiratory virus. After controlling for potential confounders, it was found that a history of pulmonary hypertension (RR 3.62; CI 95% 2.38-5.52; P disease. The present study shows that respiratory viruses are significant causes of ALRI in infants and young children in Colombia, a typical tropical LMIC, especially during the rainy season. Additionally, the results of the present study show that clinical variables such as a history of pulmonary hypertension and a history of recurrent wheezing are more relevant for predicting ALRI severity than the infecting respiratory viruses.

  7. The Microbiome and the Respiratory Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Robert P; Erb-Downward, John R; Martinez, Fernando J; Huffnagle, Gary B

    2016-01-01

    Although the notion that "the normal lung is free from bacteria" remains common in textbooks, it is virtually always stated without citation or argument. The lungs are constantly exposed to diverse communities of microbes from the oropharynx and other sources, and over the past decade, novel culture-independent techniques of microbial identification have revealed that the lungs, previously considered sterile in health, harbor diverse communities of microbes. In this review, we describe the topography and population dynamics of the respiratory tract, both in health and as altered by acute and chronic lung disease. We provide a survey of current techniques of sampling, sequencing, and analysis of respiratory microbiota and review technical challenges and controversies in the field. We review and synthesize what is known about lung microbiota in various diseases and identify key lessons learned across disease states. PMID:26527186

  8. Clinical and epidemiological aspects related to the detection of adenovirus or respiratory syncytial virus in infants hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo A. Ferone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To characterize and compare clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory aspects ofinfants with acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI associated with the detection of adenovirus(ADV or respiratory syncytial virus (RSV. METHODS: A preliminary respiratory infection surveillance study collected samples of nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA for viral research, linked to the completion of a standard protocol, from children younger than two years admitted to a university hospital with ALRI, between March of 2008 and August of 2011. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR was used for eight viruses: ADV, RSV, metapneumovirus, Parainfluenza 1, 2, and 3, and Influenza A and B. Cases with NPA collectedduring the first 24 hours of admission, negative results of blood culture, and exclusive detection of ADV (Gadv group or RSV (Grsv group were selected for comparisons. RESULTS: The preliminary study included collection of 1,121 samples of NPA, 813 collected in thefirst 24 hours of admission, of which 50.3% were positive for at least one virus; RSV was identifiedin 27.3% of cases surveyed, and ADV was identified in 15.8%. Among the aspects analyzed inthe Gadv (n = 58 and Grsv (n = 134 groups, the following are noteworthy: the higher meanage, more frequent prescription of antibiotics, and the highest median of total white blood cellcount and C-reactive protein values in Gadv. CONCLUSIONS: PCR can detect persistent/latent forms of ADV, an aspect to be considered wheninterpreting results. Additional studies with quantitative diagnostic techniques could elucidatethe importance of the high frequency observed.

  9. Concurrent acute illness and comorbid conditions poorly predict antibiotic use in upper respiratory tract infections: a cross-sectional analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perencevich Eli N

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inappropriate antibiotic use promotes resistance. Antibiotics are generally not indicated for upper respiratory infections (URIs. Our objectives were to describe patterns of URI treatment and to identify patient and provider factors associated with antibiotic use for URIs. Methods This study was a cross-sectional analysis of medical and pharmacy claims data from the Pennsylvania Medicaid fee-for-service program database. We identified Pennsylvania Medicaid recipients with a URI office visit over a one-year period. Our outcome variable was antibiotic use within seven days after the URI visit. Study variables included URI type and presence of concurrent acute illnesses and chronic conditions. We considered the associations of each study variable with antibiotic use in a logistic regression model, stratifying by age group and adjusting for confounders. Results Among 69,936 recipients with URI, 35,786 (51.2% received an antibiotic. In all age groups, acute sinusitis, chronic sinusitis, otitis, URI type and season were associated with antibiotic use. Except for the oldest group, physician specialty and streptococcal pharyngitis were associated with antibiotic use. History of chronic conditions was not associated with antibiotic use in any age group. In all age groups, concurrent acute illnesses and history of chronic conditions had only had fair to poor ability to distinguish patients who received an antibiotic from patients who did not. Conclusion Antibiotic prevalence for URIs was high, indicating that potentially inappropriate antibiotic utilization is occurring. Our data suggest that demographic and clinical factors are associated with antibiotic use, but additional reasons remain unexplained. Insight regarding reasons for antibiotic prescribing is needed to develop interventions to address the growing problem of antibiotic resistance.

  10. Responsible prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnidge, J

    2001-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) are responsible for a large amount of community antibacterial use worldwide. Recent systematic reviews have demonstrated that most URTIs resolve naturally, even when bacteria are the cause. The high consumer expectation for antibacterials in URTIs requires intervention by the general practitioner and a number of useful strategies have been developed. Generic strategies, including eliciting patient expectations, avoiding the term 'just a virus', providing a value-for-money consultation, providing verbal and written information, empowering patients, conditional prescribing, directed education campaigns, and emphasis on symptomatic treatments, should be used as well as discussion of alternative medicines when relevant. The various conditions have differing rates of bacterial infection and require different approaches. For acute rhinitis, laryngitis and tracheitis, viruses are the only cause and, therefore, antibacterials are never required. In acute sore throat (pharyngitis) Streptococcus pyogenes is the only important bacterial cause. A scoring system can help to increase the likelihood of distinguishing a streptococcal as opposed to viral infection, or alternatively patients should be given antibacterials only if certain conditions are fulfilled. Strategies for treating acute otitis media vary in different countries. Most favour the strategy of prescribing antibacterials only when certain criteria are fulfilled, delaying antibacterial prescribing for at least 24 hours. In otitis media with effusion, on the other hand, there is no primary role for antibacterials, as the condition resolves naturally in almost all patients aged >3 months. Detailed strategies for acute sinusitis have not been worked out but restricting antibacterial prescribing to certain clinical complexes is currently recommended by several authorities because of the high natural resolution rate.

  11. Acute Urinary Tract Obstruction

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    Aleksic Djordje

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The kidneys are paired organs with the primary function of helping to remove toxins from the body and regulate water balance. They are vital to survival. After urine is produced in the kidneys, it must pass into the bladder, where it can be stored before being eliminated from the body through the urethra. Urinary tract obstruction is a common problem encountered by urologists, primary care physicians, and emergency medicine physicians. Urine can become obstructed at any point in this pathway. There are three groups of urinary tract obstructions: 1 obstruction of the urinary tract lumen; 2 obstruction of the urinary tract wall; and 3 extrinsic obstruction, which can press on the urinary tract lumen. An obstruction can be present from birth or develop later in life. The most common causes of obstruction include stones, strictures, tumours, and bladder dysfunction. These obstructions may result in the hydronephrosis of one or both kidneys, which, if left untreated, may lead to the deterioration of renal function. The goal of an initial treatment of urinary tract obstruction is to remove the obstruction. Later, we treat the cause that led to the obstruction. The bottom line is that all efforts should be made to preserve kidney function to avoid the need for dialysis or renal transplantation.

  12. Analysis on Lymphocyte Subsets in Children with Acute Respiratory Syncytial Virus Lower Respiratory Tract Infection%急性下呼吸道合胞病毒感染190例的淋巴细胞亚群分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴银芳; 郝创利; 陶慧; 杨晓蕴; 周菁; 孙惠泉; 陆燕红

    2013-01-01

    目的:分析急性下呼吸道合胞病毒感染患儿的外周血淋巴细胞亚群的变化,为临床免疫调节治疗提供依据。方法对小于6个月急性下呼吸道感染住院患儿行痰病原学检测,明确为呼吸道合胞病毒为感染组。选择门诊体检儿童为对照组。同时两组病例抽外周血采用流式细胞仪检测淋巴细胞亚群值。结果感染组CD3+、CD3+CD8+低于对照组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);CD3-CD19+、CD19+CD23+、CD4+/CD8+、CD3+CD25+高于对照组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。感染组与对照组CD3+CD4+、CD16+CD56+差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。结论急性下呼吸道合胞病毒感染患儿的细胞免疫功能紊乱:T淋巴细胞受到全面抑制,B淋巴细胞激活参与病毒的清除,NK细胞比例变化不显著。%Objective To analyze the changes of lymphocyte subsets in children with acute respiratory syncytial virus lower respiratory tract infection. Methods Multi-pathogen detection using direct fluorescence antibody test(DFA), clear etiology diagnosis. Lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood in part of patients(0.05). Conclusion Cellular immunity function is in disorder in children with acute respiratory syncytial virus lower respiratory tract infection. T lymphocytes are extensively depressed early in the course;B lymphocytes are involved in the virus clearance;NK cells have no signiifcant change with those critical cases.

  13. Cefotiam therapy of lower respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polis, M A; Tuazon, C U

    1985-01-01

    Cefotiam, a new cephalosporin, was evaluated in the treatment of lower respiratory tract infections in 29 patients. The bacteria isolated from the sputum of these patients included Streptococcus pneumoniae (31%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (31%), and Haemophilus influenzae (28%). Satisfactory response was observed in 90% of the patients. There were three treatment failures, two superinfections, and four colonizations with gram-negative organisms resistant to the drug. Superficial phlebitis was noted in two patients. The results of this study suggest that cefotiam is an effective and well-tolerated antibiotic for the treatment of lower respiratory tract infections due to susceptible organisms. PMID:3865632

  14. Possible Prevalence and Transmission of Acute Respiratory Tract Infections Caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae among the Internally Displaced Persons in Tsunami Disaster Evacuation Camps of Sri Lanka

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Batuwanthudawe, Ranjith; Thevanesam, Vasanthi; Kaji, Chiharu; Qin, Liang; Nishikiori, Nobuyuki; Saito, Wakana; Saito, Mariko; Watanabe, Kiwao; Oishi, Kazunori; Abeysinghe, Nihal; Kunii, Osamu

    2007-01-01

    Objective The objective of this prospective study was to investigate the status of acute respiratory tract infections caused by Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae in tsunami disaster evacuation camps. Methods Nasopharyngeal swabs (NP) of 324 internally displaced persons (IDP) in 3 different tsunami disaster evacuation camps of Sri Lanka were collected between March 18th and 20th, 2005, and analyzed for MIC, β-lactamase production, serotypes, PCR and pulsed-field gel electroph...

  15. Respiratory Syncytial Virus in Lower Respiratory Tract Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Anita Chakravarti; Bineeta Kashyap

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Acute lower respiratory infections lead to high morbidity and mortality rates in children from developing countries. The aim of this study was to look into the extent of respiratory syncytial virus infections in children with special reference to the role of specific immunoglobulins in protection against infection as well as the association with bacterial pathogens. Material & Methods: Nasopharyngeal aspirates were tested for respiratory syncytial virus antigen by enzyme immunoassa...

  16. Mechanisms of infection in the respiratory tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskerville, A

    1981-12-01

    Related to its potential vulnerability the respiratory tract has a very complex and effective defence apparatus. The interaction between these defence mechanisms and certain characteristics of aetiological agents results in a pattern in which initial infections by these agents tend to occur at specific sites in the tract. Infections in which the primary portal of entry is in the upper respiratory tract include Bordetella bronchiseptica and Haemophilus spp in pigs; Pasteurella spp in cattle, sheep, pigs; Mycoplasma spp in cattle, sheep, pigs and poultry; equine herpesvirus 1 in horses; infectious bovine rhinotracheitis in cattle; parainfluenza 3 in cattle and sheep; infectious laryngo-tracheitis and infectious bronchitis in poultry; feline viral rhinotracheitis and calicivirus in cats; Aujeszky's disease virus and swine influenza in pigs; and equine influenza in horses. Infections in which the primary portal of entry is in the lower respiratory tract include Aspergillus fumigatus in poultry and mammals, respiratory syncytial virus in cattle, distemper virus in dogs and adenovirus in cattle and dogs. A fuller understanding of the interactions between an agent and the host at the point of entry would make it much easier to develop effective vaccines and therapeutic agents. PMID:16030806

  17. Primary care management of respiratory tract infections in Dutch preschool children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Angelique G S C; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Schilder, Anne G M; Hoes, Arno W; de Jong, Vanya F G M; Hak, Eelko

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine age-specific antibiotic prescription and referral rates in preschool children diagnosed with acute respiratory tract infection (RTI) in primary care. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: Research database of the Netherlands University Medical Center Utrecht Primary Ca

  18. RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS INFECTION AMONG YOUNG CHILDREN WITH ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTION

    OpenAIRE

    Milani, M

    2003-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants,and also an important factor for hospitalization during the winter months. To determine the prevalence and importance of RSV as a cause of acute lower respiratory tract infection, we carried out a prospective study during 5 months period from November to March 1998 in 6 pediatric hospitals. A nasopharyngeal aspirate was obtained for detection of RSV in all cases. Sociodemographic data, clinic...

  19. Diversity and Evolutionary Histories of Human Coronaviruses NL63 and 229E Associated with Acute Upper Respiratory Tract Symptoms in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khannaq, Maryam Nabiel; Ng, Kim Tien; Oong, Xiang Yong; Pang, Yong Kek; Takebe, Yutaka; Chook, Jack Bee; Hanafi, Nik Sherina; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Tee, Kok Keng

    2016-05-01

    The human alphacoronaviruses HCoV-NL63 and HCoV-229E are commonly associated with upper respiratory tract infections (URTI). Information on their molecular epidemiology and evolutionary dynamics in the tropical region of southeast Asia however is limited. Here, we analyzed the phylogenetic, temporal distribution, population history, and clinical manifestations among patients infected with HCoV-NL63 and HCoV-229E. Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from 2,060 consenting adults presented with acute URTI symptoms in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, between 2012 and 2013. The presence of HCoV-NL63 and HCoV-229E was detected using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The spike glycoprotein, nucleocapsid, and 1a genes were sequenced for phylogenetic reconstruction and Bayesian coalescent inference. A total of 68/2,060 (3.3%) subjects were positive for human alphacoronavirus; HCoV-NL63 and HCoV-229E were detected in 45 (2.2%) and 23 (1.1%) patients, respectively. A peak in the number of HCoV-NL63 infections was recorded between June and October 2012. Phylogenetic inference revealed that 62.8% of HCoV-NL63 infections belonged to genotype B, 37.2% was genotype C, while all HCoV-229E sequences were clustered within group 4. Molecular dating analysis indicated that the origin of HCoV-NL63 was dated to 1921, before it diverged into genotype A (1975), genotype B (1996), and genotype C (2003). The root of the HCoV-229E tree was dated to 1955, before it diverged into groups 1-4 between the 1970s and 1990s. The study described the seasonality, molecular diversity, and evolutionary dynamics of human alphacoronavirus infections in a tropical region.

  20. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estenssoro, Elisa; Dubin, Arnaldo

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an acute respiratory failure produced by an inflammatory edema secondary to increased lung capillary permeability. This causes alveolar flooding and subsequently deep hypoxemia, with intrapulmonary shunt as its most important underlying mechanism. Characteristically, this alteration is unresponsive to high FIO2 and only reverses with end-expiratory positive pressure (PEEP). Pulmonary infiltrates on CXR and CT are the hallmark, together with decreased lung compliance. ARDS always occurs within a week of exposition to a precipitating factor; most frequently pneumonia, shock, aspiration of gastric contents, sepsis, and trauma. In CT scan, the disease is frequently inhomogeneous, with gravitational infiltrates coexisting with normal-density areas and also with hyperaerated parenchyma. Mortality is high (30-60%) especially in ARDS associated with septic shock and neurocritical diseases. The cornerstone of therapy lies in the treatment of the underlying cause and in the use mechanical ventilation which, if inappropriately administered, can lead to ventilator-induced lung injury. Tidal volume = 6 ml/kg of ideal body weight to maintain an end-inspiratory (plateau) pressure = 30 cm H2O ("protective ventilation") is the only variable consistently associated with decreased mortality. Moderate-to-high PEEP levels are frequently required to treat hypoxemia, yet no specific level or titration strategy has improved outcomes. Recently, the use of early prone positioning in patients with PaO2/FIO2 = 150 was associated with increased survival. In severely hypoxemic patients, it may be necessary to use adjuvants of mechanical ventilation as recruitment maneuvers, pressure-controlled modes, neuromuscular blocking agents, and extracorporeal-membrane oxygenation. Fluid restriction appears beneficial. PMID:27576283

  1. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Sílvia Valente Barbas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper, based on relevant literature articles and the authors' clinical experience, presents a goal-oriented respiratory management for critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS that can help improve clinicians' ability to care for these patients. Early recognition of ARDS modified risk factors and avoidance of aggravating factors during hospital stay such as nonprotective mechanical ventilation, multiple blood products transfusions, positive fluid balance, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and gastric aspiration can help decrease its incidence. An early extensive clinical, laboratory, and imaging evaluation of “at risk patients” allows a correct diagnosis of ARDS, assessment of comorbidities, and calculation of prognostic indices, so that a careful treatment can be planned. Rapid administration of antibiotics and resuscitative measures in case of sepsis and septic shock associated with protective ventilatory strategies and early short-term paralysis associated with differential ventilatory techniques (recruitment maneuvers with adequate positive end-expiratory pressure titration, prone position, and new extracorporeal membrane oxygenation techniques in severe ARDS can help improve its prognosis. Revaluation of ARDS patients on the third day of evolution (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA, biomarkers and response to infection therapy allows changes in the initial treatment plans and can help decrease ARDS mortality.

  2. Risk factors for lower respiratory tract infections in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: Acute respiratory tract infections are divided into two groups as upper and lower respiratory tract infections. These are very common diseases in childhood. In this study, we aimed to determine risk factors for lower respiratory tract in this region. Methodology: Hospital were included in our study. Their examinations, backgrounds, family histories and information about environmental factors were recorded in questionnaire forms. Results: Lack of vaccination, duration of breast feeding, onset age of cow's milk, family history for asthma and food allergy, number of hospitalized people in the same room, number of people who live in same house and smoking around the children were evaluated for the presence of LRTI, and LRTI risks of these factors were respectively observed as 1.69, 1.71, 1.61, 1.69, 1.20, 1.47, 1.56 and 2.63 fold increased. Conclusion: Standardization of clinical diagnosis, accurate and realistic use of antibiotics, correction of nutrition, improvement of socio-economic situation and the elimination of Respiratory Infections. (author)

  3. Management of respiratory tract infections in children

    OpenAIRE

    PAUL, Siba Prosad

    2014-01-01

    Siba Prosad Paul,1 Rachel Wilkinson,2 Christine Routley3 1Southmead Hospital, Bristol, 2St Richard's Hospital, Chichester, 3Paediatric Services, Yeovil District Hospital, Yeovil, UK Abstract: Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in children are one of the most common reasons for parents consulting health professionals. Most RTIs are self-limiting viral illnesses that will resolve with time and supportive management. However, it is important for the health professional to identify any ...

  4. Management of respiratory tract infections in children

    OpenAIRE

    Paul SP; Wilkinson R; Routley C

    2014-01-01

    Siba Prosad Paul,1 Rachel Wilkinson,2 Christine Routley3 1Southmead Hospital, Bristol, 2St Richard's Hospital, Chichester, 3Paediatric Services, Yeovil District Hospital, Yeovil, UK Abstract: Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in children are one of the most common reasons for parents consulting health professionals. Most RTIs are self-limiting viral illnesses that will resolve with time and supportive management. However, it is important for the health professional to identify any RTI ...

  5. C-reactive protein point-of-care testing and antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory tract infections in rural primary health centres of North Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yebyo, Henock; Medhanyie, Araya Abrha; Spigt, Mark; Hopstaken, Rogier

    2016-01-01

    Unjustified antibiotic prescribing for acute upper respiratory infections (URTIs) is probably more common in poor-resource settings where physicians are scarce. Introducing C-reactive protein (CRP) point-of-care testing in such settings could reduce the misuse of antibiotics, which could avert antibiotic resistance. However, information useful for the applicability of CRP test in resource-limited settings is lacking. This study aimed to elicit the frequency of antibiotic prescribing and distribution of CRP levels in remote, rural settings in Ethiopia. We included 414 patients with acute URTIs from four health centres. Health professionals recorded the clinical features of the patients, but the laboratory professionals measured the CRP levels of all patients at the point of care. The most prominent respiratory causes for consultation were acute URTIs combined (44.4%), and lower respiratory tract infections-pneumonia (29.71%) and acute bronchitis (25.84%). The CRP distribution was acute URTIs in the rural areas of Ethiopia is unduly high, with high proportions of mild, self-limiting illness, mostly URTIs. Implementation of CRP point-of-care testing in such resource-constrained settings, with low- or middle-grade healthcare professionals, could help reconcile the inappropriate use of antibiotics by withholding from patients who do not benefit from antibiotic treatment. PMID:26769226

  6. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadam, Suman; Bihler, Eric; Balaan, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a serious inflammatory disorder with high mortality. Its main pathologic mechanism seems to result from increased alveolar permeability. Its definition has also changed since first being described according to the Berlin definition, which now classifies ARDS on a severity scale based on PaO2 (partial pressure of oxygen, arterial)/FIO2 (fraction of inspired oxygen) ratio. The cornerstone of therapy was found to be a low tidal volume strategy featuring volumes of 6 to 8 mL per kg of ideal body weight that has been shown to have decreased mortality as proven by the ARDSnet trials. There are other areas of treatment right now that include extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, as well for severe refractory hypoxemia. Other methods that include prone positioning for ventilation have also shown improvements in oxygenation. Positive end-expiratory pressure with lung recruitment maneuvers has also been found to be helpful. Other therapies that include vasodilators and neuromuscular agents are still being explored and need further studies to define their role in ARDS. PMID:26919679

  7. The acute respiratory distress syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Modrykamien, Ariel M.; Gupta, Pooja

    2015-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a major cause of acute respiratory failure. Its development leads to high rates of mortality, as well as short- and long-term complications, such as physical and cognitive impairment. Therefore, early recognition of this syndrome and application of demonstrated therapeutic interventions are essential to change the natural course of this devastating entity. In this review article, we describe updated concepts in ARDS. Specifically, we discuss t...

  8. A touchdown nucleic acid amplification protocol as an alternative to culture backup for immunofluorescence in the routine diagnosis of acute viral respiratory tract infections

    OpenAIRE

    Feeney Susan A; Mitchell Suzanne J; Mitchell Frederick; De Ornellas Dennis; McCaughey Conall; O'Neill Hugh J; Ong Grace M; Coyle Peter V; Wyatt Dorothy E; Forde Marian; Stockton Joanne

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Immunofluorescence and virus culture are the main methods used to diagnose acute respiratory virus infections. Diagnosing these infections using nucleic acid amplification presents technical challenges, one of which is facilitating the different optimal annealing temperatures needed for each virus. To overcome this problem we developed a diagnostic molecular strip which combined a generic nested touchdown protocol with in-house primer master-mixes that could recognise 12 c...

  9. IRON AND IRON-RELATED PROTEINS IN THE LOWER RESPIRATORY TRACT OF ARDS PATIENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBJECTIVE: An increased oxidative stress in the lower respiratory tract of individuals with acute respiratory distress syndrome is considered to be one mechanism of lung injury in these patients. Cell and tissue damage resulting from an oxidative stress can ultimately be the cons...

  10. Validation of a multiplex reverse transcriptase PCR ELISA for the detection of 19 respiratory tract pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puppe, W.; Weigl, J.; Groendahl, B.; Knuf, M.; Rockahr, S.; von Bismarck, P.; Aron, G.; Niesters, H. G. M.; Osterhaus, A. D. M. E.; Schmitt, H. -J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Since acute respiratory tract infections inflict a high burden of disease in children worldwide, a multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction combined with a microwell hybridization assay (m-RT-PCR ELISA) to detect 19 different respiratory pathogens was developed and vali

  11. ASSOCIATION OF MYCOPLASMA PNEUMONIAE WITH RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Mohammed Saed Abdul-Wahab

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma pneumoniae is one of four most common species of organisms that are responsible for most clinically significant infections in humans. It is a frequent cause of acute respiratory infections in both children and adults. The organism can cause pharyngitis, otitis, tracheobronchitis, or community-acquired pneumonia, but patients may also remain totally asymptomatic. Aim of this prospective study for children, was to investigate the association of M. pneumoniae with respiratory tract infections in a Saudi population. This study was designed as a case-control study in which 90 patients (Mean age of the patients in case group was 5.94±2.73 and in control group was 6.51±2.26 of either sexes were included. These patients were classified into two groups: first group (case group, included 45 patients who had been admitted in hospital with diagnosis of respiratory tract infections and the second group (control group, included 45 healthy patients who had no history of respiratory tract infections. Both the groups were age and sex matched. Presence of IgM antibodies to Mycoplasma pneumoniae was assessed by ELISA technique in both groups. In the case group, 4 (9% cases out of 45 children were positive for anti-mycoplasma antibody whereas in the control group, all children were negative. All positive case group patients had symptoms of acute pneumonia. 18 (40% of the patients were diagnosed with bronchial asthma (40% inclusive of all the four cases diagnosed with Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. The relative risk for the occurrence of mycoplasma infection was estimated to be 9 (95%C.I = 0.49-162.43. However, on comparing the case and control groups, the result was not found to be statistically significant. (Fischer Exact Test p = 0.0583. Children in Saudi Arabia are at a relatively higher risk of developing Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection especially those predisposed with underlying chronic respiratory illnesses such as asthma. This is a first

  12. Microbial flora variations in the respiratory tract of mice

    OpenAIRE

    Cangemi de Gutierrez Rosa; Miguel de Nader Olga; Ruiz Holgado Aida Pesce de; Nader-Macias María Elena

    1999-01-01

    A stable microbial system in the respiratory tract acts as an important defense mechanism against pathogenic microorganisms. Perturbations in this system may allow pathogens to establish. In an ecological environment such as the respiratory tract, there are many diverse factors that play a role in the establishment of the indigenous flora. In the present work we studied the normal microbial flora of different areas of the respiratory tract of mice and their evolution from the time the mice we...

  13. Risk factors for complicated bronchial asthma in children with acute lower respiratory tract infections%急性下呼吸道感染患儿合并支气管哮喘的危险因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵红玲; 程学文; 程首超; 王立琼

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the risk factors for asthma in children with acute lower respiratory tract infec‐tions so as to provide guidance for clinical prevention of asthma .METHODS The clinical data of 2 410 children with acute lower respiratory tract infections who were treated in the hospital from Jun 2011 to Jan 2014 were ret‐rospectively analyzed .The univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed to sta‐tistically analyze the risk factors for the asthma with the use of SPSS17 .0 software .RESULTS Of the 2 410 chil‐dren ,totally 112 cases were complicated with bronchial asthma ,with the incidence rate of 4 .6% .A total of 112 strains of pathogens have been isolated ,among which rhinovirus (RHV ) was dominant ,accounting for 37 .5%(23 strains) .The emergence of asthma in the children with acute lower respiratory tract infections was positively correlated with the young age ,family history of asthma ,allergic constitution ,respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection ,RHV infection ,and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP) infection ,which were the high risk factors for the asthma in the children with acute lower respiratory tract infections (P<0 .05) .CONCLUSION The children with acute lower respiratory tract infections ,who have the family history of asthma ,allergic constitution ,RSV infec‐tion ,or RHV infection ,or are male ,or young ,are at higher risk of asthma .It is necessary for the hospital to take targeted prevention and control measures according to the high risk factors for the asthma .%目的:探讨急性下呼吸道感染患儿发生哮喘的危险因素,为临床哮喘防治提供参考。方法回顾性分析2011年6月-2014年1月医院收治2410例急性下呼吸道感染患儿的临床资料,采用单因素及多因素logistic回归方法对患儿可能发生哮喘的危险因素进行统计分析,采用SPSS17.0软件进行统计处理。结果2410例患儿中共有112例合并支

  14. Defence System of Respiratory Tract and Clearence of Inhalation Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Nesrin Ocal

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that inhaled urban air contains many particles and gases. On the other hand, the anesthetic agents used in respiratory diseases comprise pharmaceutical particles. Deposition and cleaning processes of both the inhaled foreign particles and gases from room air, and inhalation agents from respiratory tract are very important clinically. These processes are carried out by the defense mechanisms of the respiratory system. In this review, the defence system of respiratory tract and...

  15. Management of respiratory tract infections in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul SP

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Siba Prosad Paul,1 Rachel Wilkinson,2 Christine Routley3 1Southmead Hospital, Bristol, 2St Richard's Hospital, Chichester, 3Paediatric Services, Yeovil District Hospital, Yeovil, UK Abstract: Respiratory tract infections (RTIs in children are one of the most common reasons for parents consulting health professionals. Most RTIs are self-limiting viral illnesses that will resolve with time and supportive management. However, it is important for the health professional to identify any RTI that may have more serious implications for the child and require medical intervention. Diagnosis can usually be made from the history and presenting symptoms such as cough, wheeze, tachypnea, fever, or stridor. Exclusion of "red flag" symptoms will enable health professionals to appropriately reassure parents and advise symptomatic management with antipyretics and adequate fluid administration. With the expanding role of nurses in ambulatory settings, many children are now being seen by health professionals other than doctors, (eg, advanced nurse practitioners, some of whom are trained in pediatrics while others have limited knowledge of nursing sick children. It is therefore vital that these professionals remain aware of any risk factors and that they can recognize "red flags" in a sick child rapidly and escalate further management appropriately. Some children will require admission to hospital for respiratory support and other therapies, such as intravenous antibiotics and fluids. With advancement of the "non-medical prescriber" within the nursing profession, awareness of when to give or not give antibiotic therapy needs careful consideration, especially in light of the problems that may arise from overuse of antibiotic treatment. Nurses have a vital role, not only in administering medications and supporting other medical interventions, but also in supporting the child and family over the period of illness. The education of the parents and the child, in some

  16. Acute effects of low-level sulphur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide exposures on the respiratory tract of susceptible subjects in cold environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salonen, R.O.; Randell, J.T.; Haelinen, A.I.; Pennanen, A.S. [National Public Health Inst., Kuopio (Finland). Div. of Environmental Health; Kosma, V.M. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Pathology; Pekkarinen, H. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physiology; Ruuskanen, J. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Environmental Sciences; Tukiainen, H. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Pulmonary Diseases

    1995-12-31

    Several recent epidemiological studies from Finland have suggested that sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) cause adverse health effects in susceptible population groups, such as children and asthmatic patients, at much smaller concentrations than the present guideline values of the World Health Organization. One possible explanation of these findings is that the relatively long winter-time increases the sensitivity of the respiratory tract to irritant pollutants. This hypothesis is supported by experimental human and animal studies, which have shown obstruction and inflammatory changes in the conducting airways after ventilation of cold and dry air. Asthmatic patients are much more sensitive than healthy subjects to the irritating effects of cold and dry air and of air pollutants. The airways of many non-asthmatic a topic subjects are also sensitive to cold air, but these subjects are poorly defined as a potential susceptible population group to air pollutants. The aims of this project are: (1) to construct experimental human and animal facilities and protocols for short-term studies on SO{sub 2} and NO{sub 2} exposures at subfreezing temperatures, (2) to apply advanced lung function methodologies and symptom assessment for characterisation of short-term respiratory responses of asthmatic and a topic subjects to these exposures, (3) to apply well-established pulmonary physiological, cytological and morphological methods for characterisation of short-term responses to and mechanisms of these exposures in the guinea-pig lower airways. (author)

  17. Patient-reported outcomes to assess the efficacy of extended-release guaifenesin for the treatment of acute respiratory tract infection symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albrecht Helmut

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guaifenesin is a component of medicines used to improve symptoms associated with upper respiratory tract infections. Patient-reported outcome instruments are valuable for evaluating symptom improvements; however, a validated tool to assess efficacy of mucoactive drugs does not exist. We compared the efficacy of extended-release guaifenesin with placebo for treatment of symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection using subjective efficacy assessments in a pilot study and confirmed precision of assessments in a validation study. Methods The pilot study was a randomized, double-blind study where patients were dosed with either 1200 mg extended-release guaifenesin (n = 188 or placebo (n = 190, every 12 hours for 7 days. Efficacy was assessed using subjective measures including the Daily Cough and Phlegm Diary, the Spontaneous Symptom Severity Assessment and the Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey. End-of-study assessments were completed by patients and investigator. The validation study consisted of two phases. In Phase I, subjects completed interviews to gather evidence to support the content validity of the Daily Cough and Phlegm Diary, the Spontaneous Symptom Severity Assessment and Patient’s End-of-Treatment Assessment. Phase II examined the psychometric properties of assessments evaluated in Phase I of the validation study using data from the pilot study. Results Subjective measures of efficacy at Day 4 showed the most prominent difference between treatment groups, in favor of guaifenesin. The 8-symptom related questions (SUM8 in the Daily Cough and Phlegm Diary, analyzed as a composite score appeared to be the strongest candidate endpoint for further evaluation. Results from the interviews in Phase I supported the content of the assessments which were validated during Phase II. Treatments were well tolerated. Conclusions Results from the clinical pilot and validation studies showed that the SUM8 diary

  18. Updating the ICRP human respiratory tract model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ICRP Task Group on Internal Dosimetry is developing new Occupational Intakes of Radionuclides (OIR) documents. Application of the Human Respiratory Tract Model (HRTM) requires a review of the lung-to-blood absorption characteristics of inhaled compounds of importance in radiological protection. Where appropriate, material-specific absorption parameter values will be given, and for other compounds, assignments to default Types will be made on current information. Publication of the OIR provides an opportunity for updating the HRTM in the light of experience and new information. The main possibilities under consideration relate to the two main clearance pathways. Recent studies provide important new data on rates of particle transport from the nasal passages, bronchial tree (slow phase) and alveolar region. The review of absorption rates provides a database of parameter values from which consideration can be given to deriving typical values for default Types F, M and S materials, and element-specific rapid dissolution rates. (authors)

  19. 婴儿呼吸道合胞病毒急性下呼吸道感染的相关因素分析%Related factors of acute lower respiratory tract infection with respiratory syncytial virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王瑾

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the related factors of acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRI) with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).Methods From July 2013 to July 2014,1 540 hospitalized infants with ALRI were selected in Pujiang County People’s Hospital, and they were divided into RSV positive group (n=816) and RSV negative group (n=724) according to test results of RSV.Comparison was made between two groups in the aspects of gender, age, birth weight, gestational age, onset season, underlying disease, combined congenital heart disease, resident population, total family monthly income, breastfeeding, family smoking, pregnancy associated with diabetes, pregnancy complicated with hypertension, and maternal atopic disease.Results Multivariate analysis showed that autumn and winter onset (OR=1.579, 95%CI=1.172-2.127), combined with congenital heart disease (OR=1.317, 95%CI=1.028-1.685), maternal atopic disease (OR=1.802, 95%CI=1.235-2.631) were risk factors of infant RSV associated ALRI, but the total family monthly income≥10 thousand Yuan (OR=0.679, 95%CI=0.499-0.924) was protective factor.Conclusion Infants with autumn and winter onset, combined with congenital heart disease and maternal atopic disease have higher rate of RSV associated ALRI, but the family with total monthly income≥10 thousand Yuan has low incidence of RSV related ALRI.%目的:探究影响婴儿呼吸道合胞病毒急性下呼吸道感染的相关因素。方法选取2013年7月至2014年7月于浙江省金华市浦江县人民医院住院的急性下呼吸道感染( ALRI)患儿1540例,根据浙江省金华市浦江县人民医院呼吸道合胞病毒(RSV)检测结果,将患儿分为RSV阳性组(n=816)和RSV阴性组(n=724)两组,对比两组患者的性别、年龄、出生体重、胎龄、发病季节、合并基础疾病、合并先心病、居住人口、家庭月收入、母乳喂养、家庭吸烟、妊娠合并糖尿病、妊娠合并高血压、孕母特

  20. Microdistribution and long-term retention of 239Pu (NO3)4 in the respiratory tracts of an acutely exposed plutonium worker and experimental beagle dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Christopher E; Wilson, Dulaney A; Brooks, Antone L; McCord, Stacey L; Dagle, Gerald E; James, Anthony C; Tolmachev, Sergei Y; Thrall, Brian D; Morgan, William F

    2012-11-01

    The long-term retention of inhaled soluble forms of plutonium raises concerns as to the potential health effects in persons working in nuclear energy or the nuclear weapons program. The distributions of long-term retained inhaled plutonium-nitrate [(239)Pu (NO(3))(4)] deposited in the lungs of an accidentally exposed nuclear worker (Human Case 0269) and in the lungs of experimentally exposed beagle dogs with varying initial lung depositions were determined via autoradiographs of selected histologic lung, lymph node, trachea, and nasal turbinate tissue sections. These studies showed that both the human and dogs had a nonuniform distribution of plutonium throughout the lung tissue. Fibrotic scar tissue effectively encapsulated a portion of the plutonium and prevented its clearance from the body or translocation to other tissues and diminished dose to organ parenchyma. Alpha radiation activity from deposited plutonium in Human Case 0269 was observed primarily along the subpleural regions while no alpha activity was seen in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes of this individual. However, relatively high activity levels in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes of the beagles indicated the lymphatic system was effective in clearing deposited plutonium from the lung tissues. In both the human case and beagle dogs, the appearance of retained plutonium within the respiratory tract was inconsistent with current biokinetic models of clearance for soluble forms of plutonium. Bound plutonium can have a marked effect on the dose to the lungs and subsequent radiation exposure has the potential to increase cancer risk.

  1. Microdistribution and Long-Term Retention of 239Pu (NO3)4 in the Respiratory Tracts of an Acutely Exposed Plutonium Worker and Experimental Beagle Dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Christopher E.; Wilson, Dulaney A.; Brooks, Antone L.; McCord, Stacey; Dagle, Gerald E.; James, Anthony C.; Tolmachev, Sergei Y.; Thrall, Brian D.; Morgan, William F.

    2012-11-01

    The long-term retention of inhaled soluble forms of plutonium raises concerns as to the potential health effects in persons working in nuclear energy or the nuclear weapons program. The distributions of long-term retained inhaled plutonium-nitrate [239Pu (NO3)4] deposited in the lungs of an accidentally exposed nuclear worker (Human Case 0269) and in the lungs of experimentally exposed beagle dogs with varying initial lung depositions were determined via autoradiographs of selected histological lung, lymph node, trachea, and nasal turbinate tissue sections. These studies showed that both the human and dogs had a non-uniform distribution of plutonium throughout the lung tissue. Fibrotic scar tissue effectively encapsulated a portion of the plutonium and prevented its clearance from the body or translocation to other tissues and diminished dose to organ parenchyma. Alpha radiation activity from deposited plutonium in Human Case 0269 was observed primarily along the sub-pleural regions while no alpha activity was seen in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes of this individual. However, relatively high activity levels in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes of the beagles indicated the lymphatic system was effective in clearing deposited plutonium from the lung tissues. In both the human case and beagle dogs, the appearance of retained plutonium within the respiratory tract was inconsistent with current biokinetic models of clearance for soluble forms of plutonium. Bound plutonium can have a marked effect on the dose to the lungs and subsequent radiation exposure has the potential increase in cancer risk.

  2. Fluorescence diagnosis of upper respiratory tract infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Kate C.; Inada, Natalia M.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2015-06-01

    The pharyngitis and laryngitis are respiratory tract infections highly common. Pharyngitis can be accompanied by fever, especially if caused by a systemic infection. Laryngitis is an inflammation of your voice box (larynx) from irritation or infection. The conventional treatment is the antibiotics administration, which may be responsible by an increase of identification of bacterial strains resistant to drug. This fact associated to high incidence of these infections become important to develop new technologies for diagnosis. This study aims to evaluate the use of widefield fluorescence imaging for the characterization of oropharynx infections, in order to diagnose the bacteria colonization. The imaging system for wide field fluorescence visualization is Evince® (MMOptics, São Carlos, SP, Brazil) coupled to an Apple iPhone® cell phone device. The system consists of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) operating in the violet blue region centered at green-red spectrum 450 nm and optical filters that allow viewing of fluorescence. A tongue depressor was adapted to Evince® for mouth opening. The same images were captured with white light and fluorescence with an optical system. The red fluorescence may be a bacterial marker for physiological monitoring of oropharynx infection processes. The bacterial biofilm on tissue were assigned to the presence of protoporphyrin IX. This work indicates that the autofluorescence of the tissue may be used as a non-invasive technique to aid in the oropharynx infection diagnostic.

  3. Submersion and acute respiratory failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Jang Su

    2014-01-01

    Objectives:To know the relationship between hypothermia, etiology, respiratory failure and prognosis of submersion in environmental emergency medicine.Methods:FromDecember1, 2002 toSeptember30,2007, there were52 hospitalized near- drowning cases in a medical center at northernTaiwan.Retrospective study of52 submersion patients who were hospitalized during the duration was analyzed.Results:The hypothermic groups are more commonly seen in acute respiratory failure after submersion,36%vs.21%,P<0.05.The hypothermic submersion patients who are older in age than normothermic submersion patients(44vs.27 years old,P<0.05).The suicidal submersion patients are older, hypothermic and longer length of stay than accidental submersion patients.Conclusions:Submersion patients who are hypothermic on arrival of emergency department(ED) are risky to respiratory failure and older, more hypothermic, longer hospital stay in suicidal submersion patients.

  4. Frequent respiratory tract infections in children. The role of environmental and genetic factors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruskamp, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTI), presenting as common cold, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, acute otitis media, bronchitis or pneumonia are a major health problem in children. In this thesis common environmental and host factors, as well as plausible genetic factors were evaluated in a large birth coho

  5. Early adaptive immune responses in the respiratory tract of foot and mouth disease-infected cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral disease which affects both domestic and wildlife biungulate species. This acute disease, caused by the FMD virus (FMDV), usually includes an active replication phase in the respiratory tract up to 72 h post-infection followed by hematogenous ...

  6. Main features of the proposed NCRP respiratory tract model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed NCRP respiratory tract dosimetry model regions include the naso-oro-pharyngo-laryngeal (NOPL), the tracheobronchial (TB), the pulmonary (P), and the lymph nodes (LN). Input aerosol concentrations are derived from a consideration of particle-size-dependent inspirability. Particle deposition in the respiratory tract is modelled using the mechanisms of inertial impaction, sedimentation and diffusion. The rates of absorption of particles, and transport to the blood, have been derived from clearance data from people and laboratory animals. The effect of body growth on particle deposition is considered. Particle clearance rates are assumed to be independent of age. The proposed respiratory tract model differs significantly from the 1966 Task Group Model in that (1) inspirability is considered; (2) new sub-regions of the respiratory tract are considered; (3) absorption of materials by the blood is treated in a more sophisticated fashion; and (4) body size (and thus age) is taken into account. (author)

  7. Surveillance for outbreaks of respiratory tract infections in nursing homes

    OpenAIRE

    Loeb, M; McGeer, A; McArthur, M; Peeling, R. W.; Petric, M; Simor, A E

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Outbreaks of respiratory tract infections are common in long-term care facilities for older people. The objective of our study was to determine both the frequency of such outbreaks and their clinical and epidemiological features. METHODS: Prospective surveillance for outbreaks of respiratory tract infections and a retrospective audit of surveillance records were conducted in 5 nursing homes in metropolitan Toronto over 3 years. The clinical manifestations of infected residents wer...

  8. Respiratory tract infections, reflex apnea and sudden infant death

    OpenAIRE

    Lindgren, Carl

    1996-01-01

    RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS, REFLEX APNEA AND SUDDEN INFANT DEATH. Experimental and epidemiological studies with special reference to Respiratory syncytial virus, Bordetella pertussis and sleep position. Carl Lindgren, Department of Women and Child Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockhohn, Sweden, and Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. The seasonal distribution of Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) ...

  9. Antiviral effects of bovine interferons on bovine respiratory tract viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Fulton, R W; Downing, M M; Cummins, J M

    1984-01-01

    The antiviral effects of bovine interferons on the replication of bovine respiratory tract viruses were studied. Bovine turbinate monolayer cultures were treated with bovine interferons and challenged with several bovine herpesvirus 1 strains, bovine viral diarrhea virus, parainfluenza type 3 virus, goat respiratory syncytial virus, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, bovine adenovirus type 7, or vesicular stomatitis virus. Treatment with bovine interferons reduced viral yield for each of the...

  10. Ganke Shuangqing Capsule for Acute Upper Respiratory Tract Infection:A Systematic Review%感咳双清胶囊治疗急性上呼吸道感染的系统评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗敏; 华鹏; 唐尧

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of Ganke shuangqing capsule for acute upper respiratory tract infection.METHODS: All randomized controlled trails (RCTs) of Ganke shuangqing capsule for acute upper respiratory tract infection were searched from CNKI, VIP, CBM, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library.The quality evaluation of the included studies referred to the Cochrane systematic reviews handbook 5.0.1, and RevMan 5.0 software was used for data analysis.RESULTS: 6 RCTs involving 1 194 patients with acute upper respiratory tract infection were included.Meta-analyses showed that in children the total effective rate of treatment group A1 was better than control group A2, there was statistically significant difference [RR= 1.15,95% CI( 1.08,1.22)]in adults the total effective rate of treatment group A1 was better than control group A2, there was statistically significant difference [RR=1.18, 95% CI (1.09, 1.28)]There was no significant difference in total effective rate between treatment group B1 and control group B2[RR= 1.02,95 % CI (0.94, 1.12)].The descriptive analysis was used because of clinical heterogeneity of main symptoms remission rate.CONCLUSION: In children, Ganke shuangqing capsule is better than ribavirin in the treatment of acute upper respiratory tract infection; In adults, total effective rate and main symptoms remission rate of Ganke shuangqing capsule for acute upper respiratory tract infection was better than or not inferior to ribavirin and Qinggan chuanxinlian tablets.Large-scale high quality RCTs were required to validate the results.%目的:系统评价感咳双清胶囊治疗急性上呼吸道感染的有效性和安全性.方法:计算机检索CNKI、VIP、CBM、MEDLINE、EMBASE、Cochrane图书馆,纳入有关感咳双清胶囊治疗急性上呼吸道感染的随机对照试验(RCT),参考Cochrane系统评价员手册5.0.1标准进行质量评价,采用RevMan 5.0软件进行数据处理.结果:共纳入6篇RCT,有

  11. Risk factors for acute respiratory syncytial virus infection of lower respiratory tract in hospitalized infants%婴儿急性下呼吸道呼吸道合胞病毒感染的危险因素研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓波; 刘丽娟; 施鹏; 蒋高立; 贾品; 王传凯; 王立波; 钱莉玲

    2014-01-01

    染的风险大为增加.%Objective To investigate the clinical epidemiologic characteristics and analyze risk factors for acute respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in hospitalized infants with acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRI).Method ALRI infants admitted to Children's Hospital of Fudan University from March 1 st,2011 to February 29th,2012,were enrolled in this study.Patient information included demographic characteristics,feeding history,family status,clinical presentation,accessory examination,treatment and prognosis.According to the etiology of ALRI infants,we compared the seasonal distribution,demographic characteristics,household characteristics and underlying diseases between RSV-positive patients and RSV-negative patients.Univariate and multiple Logistic regression analyses were used to determine factors that were associated with risk of RSV infection.Result Among 1 726 ALRI infants,there were 913 RSV-positive infants (52.9%).The occurrence of RSV infection had a seasonal variation,with a peak in winter (59.1%).The median (P25,P75) age of RSV infants was 64 (21-155) days.The gestational age (GA) and body weight (BW) was (37.5 ± 2.4) weeks and (3.07 ±0.66) kg,respectively.The male/female ratio among these was 1.9:1.RSV infection was more popular among infants in the families with smoking members,crowded living conditions,history of atopic mother.Differences of the proportion of patients with underlying disease between RSV-positive and negative groups were statistically significant (59.4% vs.54.2%,P < 0.05).Univariate logistic regression demonstrated that factors increasing the risk of RSV infection were:GA < 37weeks (OR =1.346,95% CI:1.037-1.748),birth weight < 2 500 g (OR =1.447,95 % CI:1.103-1.898),underlying diseases (OR =1.232,95 % CI:1.018-1.492),underlying CHD (OR =1.391,95% CI:1.120-1.728),environmental tobacco smoke exposure (OR =1.254,95% CI:1.035-1.519),mother with atopic diseases (OR =1.827,95% CI:1.296-2.573),crowded house with four or

  12. RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS INFECTION AMONG YOUNG CHILDREN WITH ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Milani

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants,and also an important factor for hospitalization during the winter months. To determine the prevalence and importance of RSV as a cause of acute lower respiratory tract infection, we carried out a prospective study during 5 months period from November to March 1998 in 6 pediatric hospitals. A nasopharyngeal aspirate was obtained for detection of RSV in all cases. Sociodemographic data, clinical signs, diagnosis and hospital admissions were documented. During this study period, 365 young infants (51.5% male, 48.5% female with respiratory tract infection were visited in 6 hospitals. The median age of patients was 24 months (range: 1 month to 5 years.RSV infection was found in 70 out of 365 patients (19.18%.Among the 70 children with RSV infection, 29 patients (41.42% were under 12 months of age.The main clinical manifestations of RSV infection were cough (88.57% and coryza (78.57%. There were no significant differences between patients who were tested positive for RSV and those who were tested negative with regard to demographic variables and clinical diagnoses. This study indicates that RSV is an important cause of respiratory tract infection in infants and young children .Distinguishing RSV from other respiratory infection is difficult because of the similarity in clinical presentation among children.

  13. Infecções agudas das vias aéreas superiores: diagnóstico e tratamento ambulatorial Acute upper respiratory tract infections: outpatient diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo M.C. Pitrez

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: apresentar uma revisão atualizada sobre as infecções das vias aéreas superiores (IVAS mais comuns na prática diária de consultório do pediatra, visando a uma adequada orientação de condutas diagnósticas e terapêuticas. FONTES DOS DADOS: foram revisadas referências obtidas na base de dados Medline. Foram selecionados os artigos mais relevantes sobre o tema. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: rinofaringite aguda, sinusite aguda, faringoamigdalite aguda estreptocócica e laringite viral aguda são apresentadas de forma crítica e sucinta. As dificuldades observadas na prática clínica, em relação ao diagnóstico diferencial de determinadas IVAS, limitações na busca do agente etiológico e o uso, muitas vezes abusivo, de antimicrobianos são analisados e discutidos. CONCLUSÕES: as IVAS são um dos motivos mais comuns de visita ao consultório do pediatra. Por isso, conceitos e informações atualizados são essenciais para que o manejo dessa doença seja otimizado, reduzindo a indicação de exames diagnósticos dispensáveis, ou a implementação de tratamentos desnecessários ou prejudiciais ao paciente.OBJECTIVE: to present an updated review of the most common upper respiratory infections (URI in children seen by the pediatrician in outpatient clinics, for better diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. SOURCES OF DATA: references from Medline database were reviewed. The most relevant articles were selected. SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS: acute rhinopharyngitis, sinusitis, streptococcal tonsillitis and viral croup are presented in a concise and critical view. Differential and etiological diagnosis limitations and the abusive use of antimicrobials in these illnesses are also discussed. CONCLUSIONS: URI are the most common cause of visits to pediatrician clinics. Therefore, update and critical concepts, as well as references are essential for a proper management of these illnesses, decreasing the indication of unnecessary diagnostic tests and

  14. Clinical Effect of Tanreqing Injection in the Treatment of Children with Acute Lower Respiratory Tract Infection%痰热清辅助治疗小儿急性下呼吸道感染疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖铮铮; 宋涛; 王玮

    2013-01-01

    目的 观察痰热清注射液辅助治疗小儿急性下呼吸道感染的疗效和安全性.方法 将50例患儿随机分为两组,治疗组25例,在常规治疗基础上给予痰热清注射液0.3~0.5 mg/(kg·d),每天1次,静脉滴注;对照组25例,给予常规治疗,观察两组治疗后发热、咳嗽、喘息及肺部阳性体征消失时间.结果 观察组的有效率为92%,对照组的有效率为80%,两组有效率差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).而退热、止咳、止喘、体征消失时间两组差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 痰热清辅助治疗小儿急性下呼吸道感染疗效好,安全性高,值得临床推广.%Objective To investigate the clinical effect of tanreqing injection and its safety in treatment on child with acute lower respiratory tract infection. Methods Fifty cases of child bronchopneumonia were divided into two groups: on the basis of routine method,the observed group(25 cases) was treated with tanreqing injection 0.3-0.5 mg/(kg · d) ,1 time a day,the control group(25 cases) was treated with routine drugs. The two groups were observed in the disappearance time of fever, cough, wheezing and positive signs of the lungs after treatment. Results The valid rate of observed group was 92% and the control group 80% ,there were not significantly different(P >0.05) ,the significant differences on the aspects of pyretolysis,cough stopping, wheezing stopping,physical sign disappearing were found between the observed group and the control group(P <0. 05). Conclusion Tanreqing injection was effective in the treatment of children with acute lower respiratory tract infection and heart failure,and it was worth clinical use.

  15. Respiratory tract retention of inhaled particles in experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variety of inhalation studies have been reviewed to develop a model for describing the retention of particles in the respiratory tracts of several species of experimental animals. Presently, the respiratory tract clearance model receives the greatest use in the radiation protection field. This model has several disadvantages in its basic construction and in its application to radionuclide exposures of people to heterogeneous aerosolized substances. These are discussed and an alternative model is described. The alternative model uses time-varying solubility functions to described absorption of material from the lung and upper respiratory tract. The solubility functions can be determined from studies in experimental animals or can be approximated from in vitro chemical systems. Application of this model to data from several experimental studies is included

  16. Pathogenesis of severe acute respiratory syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ding-mei; LU Jia-hai; ZHONG Nan-shan

    2008-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) first emerged in Guangdong province,China in November2002.During the following 3 months,it spread rapidly across the world,resulting in approximately 800 deaths.In 2004,subsequent sporadic cases emerged in Singapore and China.A novel coronavims,SARS-CoV,was identified as the etiological agent of SARS.1,2 This virus belongs to a family of large,positive,single-stranded RNA viruses.Nevertheless,genomic characterization shows that the SARS-CoV is only moderately related to other known coronaviruses.3 In contrast with previously described coronaviruses,SARS-CoV infection typically causes severe symptoms related to the lower respiratory tract.The SARS-CoV genome includes 14 putative open reading frames encoding 28 potential proteins,and the functions of many of these proteins are not known.4 A number of complete and partial autopsies of SARS patients have been reported since the first outbreak in 2003.The predominant pathological finding in these cases was diffuse alveolar damage (DAD).This severe pulmonary injury of SARS patients is caused both by direct viral effects and immunopathogenetic factors.5 Many important aspects of the pathogenesis of SARS have not yet been fully clarified.In this article,we summarize the most important mechanisms involved in the complex pathogenesis of SARS,including clinical characters,host and receptors,immune system response and genetic factors.

  17. 急性重症患儿下呼吸道感染病原菌的耐药性分析%Clinical analysis of bacterial resistance in pediatric patients with severe acute lower respiratory tract infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万江; 程黎; 刘贺临; 刘义红; 舒琼璋

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze pathogens in children with severe acute lower respiratory tract infections and clinical characteristics of drug resistance ,so as to provide the basis for clinical diagnosis and treatment .METHODS Totally 94 children with severe acute respiratory infections treated in ICU during Jan .2012-Jan .2015 were se-lected .Sputum specimens were collected by tracheal incubation of the sterile suction tube or tracheotomy to draw sputum .All specimens were screened by microscopy .The collected specimens were treated by gram staining and were sent to the laboratory for culture .The isolated microbial pathogens were identified by the identification sys-tem (Zhuhai Bact-IST) to determine the species .RESULTS Totally 117 pathogens were cultured from the 94 chil-dren ,including 27 gram-positive bacteria accounting for 23 .48% and 72 gram-negative bacteria accounting for 60 .87% .The main bacterial pathogens were Pseudomonas aeruginosa ,Staphylococcus aureus and Acinetobacter baumannii ,accounting for 17 .39% ,15 .65% and 14 .78% ,respectively .Gram-negative bacteria were mostly re-sistant and multidrug resistant bacteria ,with low sensitivity to imipenem and piperacillin .Gram-positive bacteria had a zero resistance to vancomycin .CONCLUSION Severe acute lower respiratory tract infections in children is mainly caused by gram-negative bacteria .Antibiotic agents should be selected based on susceptibility testing .%目的:分析急性重症患儿下呼吸道感染病原菌及其耐药性临床特点,为临床诊疗提供依据。方法选取2012年1月-2015年1月IC U接受治疗的急性重症患儿发生呼吸道感染94例,采用无菌吸痰管在气管插管或者气管切开内吸取痰液,所有标本均采用镜检的方式进行筛选;对采集标本进行革兰染色,然后送至实验室进行痰标本培养,对分离出的病原菌采用微生物鉴定系统(珠海Bact-IS T )进行菌株鉴定,确定种属。结果94

  18. Respiratory Complications from Acute Corrosive Poisonings in Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Chibishev, Andon; Simonovska, Natasa; Bozinovska, Cvetanka; Pereska, Zanina; Smokovski, Ivica; Glasnovic, Marija

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Acute corrosive poisonings are caused by ingestion of corrosive chemicals which are most commonly used as household agents. Intoxications with these kind of agents produce numerous and severe post-corrosive complications of the upper gastrointestinal tract. On the other hand, our experience showed that corrosive agents may also cause injuries of the respiratory system, which makes the treatment very hard and additionally complicates the severe clinical condition of the patient. ...

  19. Respiratory tract mortality in cement workers: a proportionate mortality study

    OpenAIRE

    Rachiotis George; Drivas Spyros; Kostikas Konstantinos; Makropoulos Vasilios; Hadjichristodoulou Christos

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The evidence regarding the association between lung cancer and occupational exposure to cement is controversial. This study investigated causes of deaths from cancer of respiratory tract among cement workers. Methods The deaths of the Greek Cement Workers Compensation Scheme were analyzed covering the period 1969-1998. All respiratory, lung, laryngeal and urinary bladder cancer proportionate mortality were calculated for cement production, maintenance, and office workers i...

  20. Factors affecting on the particle deposition in the respiratory tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deposition pattern of inhaled particles in the respiratory tracts is affected by anatomical structure of the respiratory tracts and respiratory pattern of animals, which are modified by many factors as animal species, physiological and psychological conditions, age, sex, smoking drug, lung diseases, etc. In human, studies have been focused on the initial lung deposition of particles and have made it clear that the respiratory pattern, gender, and diseases may have influence on the deposition pattern. On the other hand, there was little knowledge on the initial lung deposition of particles in laboratory animals. Recently, Raabe et al. have reported the initial lung deposition of 169Yb-aluminosilicate particles in mice, rats, hamsters, guinea pigs and rabbits. The authors have also investigated the lung deposition of latex particles with different sizes and 198Au-colloid in rats whose respiratory volumes during the inhalation were monitored by body plethysmography. These experiments indicated that the deposition of inhaled particles in distal lung e.g. small bronchiolar and alveolar region, was much lower in laboratory animals than that of human. This species difference may be due to smaller diameter of respiratory tract and/or shallower breathing and higher respiratory rate of laboratory animals. The experimental animals in which respiratory diseases were induced artificially have been used to investigate the modification factors on the deposition pattern of inhaled particles. As respiratory diseases, emphysema was induced in rats, hamsters, beagle dogs in some laboratories and pulmonary delayed type hypersensitivity reaction in rats was in our laboratory. The initial lung deposition of particles in these animals was consistently decreased in comparison with normals, regardless of the animal species and the type of disease. (author)

  1. Seasonality of long term wheezing following respiratory syncytial virus lower respiratory tract infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bont, L; Steijn, M; van Aalderen, WMC; Brus, F; Draaisma, JMT; Van Diemen-Steenvoorde, RAAM; Pekelharing-Berghuis, M; Kimpen, JLL

    2004-01-01

    Background: It is well known that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) is associated with subsequent wheezing episodes, but the precise natural course of wheezing following RSV LRTI is not known. This study aimed to determine the continuous development of wheezi

  2. Lower respiratory tract infection caused by respiratory syncytial virus : current management and new therapeutics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazur, Natalie; Martinon-Torres, Federico; Baraldi, Eugenio; Fauroux, Brigitte; Greenough, Anne; Heikkinen, Terho; Manzoni, Paolo; Mejias, Asuncion; Nair, Harish; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G.; Polack, Fernando P.; Ramilo, Octavio; Sharland, Mike; Stein, Renato; Madhi, Shabir A.; Bont, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major worldwide cause of morbidity and mortality in children under five years of age. Evidence-based management guidelines suggest that there is no effective treatment for RSV lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) and that supportive care, ie, hydration and

  3. 呼吸护理对急性左心力衰竭患者预防院内呼吸道感染的影响分析%Analysis of the Effect of Respiratory Nursing in the Prevention of Nosocomial Respiratory Tract Infection in Patients With Acute Left Heart Failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廉幼军

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the treatment of acute left knee pads power failure were the effect of prevention of nosocomial respiratory infection effect. Methods 50 patients of acute heart failure were randomly divided into a control group and observation group in our hospital. The control group received routine care approach, the observation group respiratory care approach. Comparison of the two groups were respiratory infections and nursing job satisfaction situation. Results There were upper respiratory tract infection rate was 16.00%, the control group was 44.00%, higher than the observation group, and P<0.05, satisfaction of observation group was 96.00%, the control group was 76.00%, higher than the observation group, and P<0.05. Conclusion The use of left heart failure patients in acute respiratory care can effectively reduce nosocomial respiratory infections, help patients successfully for rehabilitation process.%目的:探讨呼吸护理对急性左心力衰竭患者预防院内呼吸道感染的效果。方法将我院接受急性左心力衰竭治疗的50例患者随机分成对照组和观察组。对照组采用常规护理方式,观察组采用呼吸护理方式。比较两组患者的呼吸道感染率以及对护理工作的满意度。结果观察组呼吸道感染率为16.00%,对照组为44.00%,观察组高于对照组,且P<0.05;观察组满意度为96.00%,对照组为76.00%,观察组高于对照组,且P<0.05。结论在急性左心力衰竭患者中运用呼吸护理能有效降低院内呼吸道感染,帮助患者康复。

  4. Microbial flora variations in the respiratory tract of mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Cangemi de Gutierrez

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available A stable microbial system in the respiratory tract acts as an important defense mechanism against pathogenic microorganisms. Perturbations in this system may allow pathogens to establish. In an ecological environment such as the respiratory tract, there are many diverse factors that play a role in the establishment of the indigenous flora. In the present work we studied the normal microbial flora of different areas of the respiratory tract of mice and their evolution from the time the mice were born. Our interest was to know which were the dominant groups of microorganisms in each area, which were the first capable of colonizing and which dominated over time to be used as probiotic microorganisms. Our results show that Gram negative facultatively anaerobic bacilli and strict anaerobic microorganisms were the last ones to appear in the bronchia, while aerobic and Gram positive cocci were present in all the areas of the respiratory tract. The number of facultative aerobes and strict anaerobes were similar in the nasal passage, pharynx instilled and trachea, but lower in bronchia. The dominant species were Streptococcus viridans and Staphylococcus saprophyticcus, followed by S. epidermidis, Lactobacilli and S. cohnii I which were present on every studied days but at different proportions. This paper is the first part of a research topic investigating the protective effect of the indigenous flora against pathogens using the mice as an experimental model.

  5. Dysbiosis of upper respiratory tract microbiota in elderly pneumonia patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piters, Wouter A. A. de Steenhuijsen; Huijskens, Elisabeth G. W.; Wyllie, Anne L.; Biesbroek, Giske; van den Bergh, Menno R.; Veenhoven, Reinier H.; Wang, Xinhui; Trzcinski, Krzysztof; Bonten, Marc J.; Rossen, John W. A.; Sanders, Elisabeth A. M.; Bogaert, Debby

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly. We hypothesize that dysbiosis between regular residents of the upper respiratory tract (URT) microbiome, that is balance between commensals and potential pathogens, is involved in pathogen overgrowth and consequently disease

  6. Enabling factors for antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaruseviciene, Lina; Radzeviciene Jurgute, Ruta; Bjerrum, Lars;

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Introduction. General practitioners (GPs) write about 80% of all antibiotic prescriptions, the greatest number of them for patients with respiratory tract infections. However, there is a lack of research targeting the influence of external factors on antibiotic prescribing by physicians....

  7. [Serum procalcitonin and respiratory tract infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarka, V; Valat, C; Lemarié, E; Boissinot, E; Carré, P; Besnard, J C; Diot, P

    1999-12-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the prognostic value of serum procalcitonine (PCT) assay in adult respiratory infections. Forty-nine patients admitted with pleurisy, community-acquired pneumonia, tuberculosis, infection were included in this prospective study. PCT was assayed on admission and discharge. Biological and clinical parameters of gravity were also evaluated. Twenty patients had elevated PCT of more than 0.50 ng/ml. In 29 patients, PCT was undetectable. The serum PCT level was normal in the patients with tuberculosis, infection, pneumocytosis. PCT did not correlate with the biological and clinical markers of the disease severity but the evolution of PCT correlated with the evolution of C-reactive-protein (r = 0.58, p < 0.05). PCT seems to be an early marker of the evolution of respiratory infections, but it does not help to establish prognosis. Further studies are necessary to assess the potential value of PCT in more severe respiratory infections requiring assisted ventilation. PMID:10685471

  8. [Probiotics as stimulators of immune response against pathogens in the respiratory tract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyuzhin, O V; Afanasyev, S S; Bykov, A S

    2016-01-01

    This review analyzes whether.it is expedient to use oral probiotics for the stimulation of immune response against pathogens in the respiratory tract. It considers a relationship between.mucosal microbial colonization in different biotopes of the body and mucosal.immunity in the respiratory tract. The principal and terminological controversial issues of colonic dysbiosis and the possibilities of using the medicines and products containing live commensals/symbionts to correct microbiota disturbances are examined. There are data on the degree of resistance and resilience of the colonic microbial community exposed to destabilizing factors, antibiotics in particular. The properties of probiotics that have been proven to enhance host response against pathogens and the phenomena that characterize these probiotics as immunomodifiers and distinguish them from other immunostimulating/immunomodulating agents are described. Criteria for choosing effective and safe oral probiotics to stimulate an immune response in the respiratory tract are formulated. Finally, we review the data on the clinical and immunomodulatory effects of dietary supplement containing a combination of three probiotic strains (Lactobacillus gasseri PA 16/8, Bifidobacterium bifidum MF 20/5 and Bifidobacterium longum SP 07/3) with vitamins and minerals as an agent to prevent and reduce the severity of acute and recurrent respiratory tract infections. PMID:27458629

  9. CFD heat transfer simulation of the human upper respiratory tract for oronasal breathing condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz Farahmand

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Injuries due to inhalation of hot gas are commonly encountered when dealing with fire and combustible material, which is harmful and threatens human life. In the literature, various studies have been conducted to investigate heat and mass transfer characteristics in the human respiratory tract (HRT. This study focuses on assessing the injury taking place in the upper human respiratory tract and identifying acute tissue damage, based on level of exposure. A three-dimensional heat transfer simulation is performed using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD software to study the temperature profile through the upper HRT consisting of the nasal cavity, oral cavity, trachea, and the first two generations of bronchi. The model developed is for the simultaneous oronasal breathing during the inspiration phase with a high volumetric flow rate of 90 liters/minute and the inspired air temperature of 100 degrees Celsius. The geometric model depicting the upper HRT is generated based on the data available and literature cited. The results of the simulation give the temperature distribution along the center and the surface tissue of the respiratory tract. This temperature distribution will help to assess the level of damage induced in the upper respiratory tract and appropriate treatment for the damage. A comparison of nasal breathing, oral breathing, and oronasal breathing is performed. Temperature distribution can be utilized in the design of the respirator systems where inlet temperature is regulated favoring the human body conditions.

  10. Acute otitis media and respiratory virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruuskanen, O; Arola, M; Putto-Laurila, A; Mertsola, J; Meurman, O; Viljanen, M K; Halonen, P

    1989-02-01

    We studied the association of acute otitis media with different respiratory virus infections in a pediatric department on the basis of epidemics between 1980 and 1985. Altogether 4524 cases of acute otitis media were diagnosed. The diagnosis was confirmed by tympanocentesis in 3332 ears. Respiratory virus infection was diagnosed during the same period in 989 patients by detecting viral antigen in nasopharyngeal mucus. There was a significant correlation between acute otitis media and respiratory virus epidemics, especially respiratory syncytial virus epidemics. There was no significant correlation between outbreaks of other respiratory viruses and acute otitis media. Acute otitis media was diagnosed in 57% of respiratory syncytial virus, 35% of influenza A virus, 33% of parainfluenza type 3 virus, 30% of adenovirus, 28% of parainfluenza type 1 virus, 18% of influenza B virus and 10% of parainfluenza type 2 virus infections. These observations show a clear association of respiratory virus infections with acute otitis media. In this study on hospitalized children Haemophilus influenzae strains were the most common bacteriologic pathogens in middle ear fluid, occurring in 19% of cases. Streptococcus pneumoniae was present in 16% and Branhamella catarrhalis in 7% of cases. There was no association between specific viruses and bacteria observed in this study.

  11. Epidemiological features of acute lower respiratory tract viral infections in children%儿童急性下呼吸道病毒感染的临床流行特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张冰; 王晓; 张微; 陈旭央

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the epidemiological features of acute lower respiratory tract viral infections in chil-dren.MethodsA retrospective epidemiological investigation was conducted to analyze the prevalence rate, seasonality andsusceptible population of seven common respiratory viruses among 4355 hospitalized pediatric patients (<15 y) with acute respiratory tract infection during 2006 to 2010. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were screened for virus by direct immunofluorescent (DIF) assay.ResultsVirus was identified in 1093 out of 4355 patients (25.1%); RSV accounted for 17.6%, followed by PIV-3 (2.7%),ADV( 2%), IV-A( 1.3%), PIV-1 (0.7%), PIV-2(0.3%), IV-B(0.2% )and mixed( 0.3%). The median ages of infected pediatric patients were 4 months for RSV, 9 months for PIV-3, 13 months for ADV, 11 months for PIV-1 and 13.5 months for IV, respectively ( X2= 46.186, P<0.01 ).The infants and younger children were more susceptible for developing RSV and PIV-3 related disease, and RSV often occurred in winter and spring. The prevalence of viral infection in children with bronchiolitis,bronchitis,pneumonia and asthma were 64.5%, 15.6%, 17.6% and 31.7%, respectively.ConclusionThe respiratory viruses are still a main cause oflower respiratory tract infections in children, especially in infants and younger children. RSV remains the main pathogen of bronchiolitis.%目的 了解小儿急性病毒性下呼吸道感染的流行特征.方法 回顾性分析2006 至2010 年住院的急性下呼吸道感染儿童鼻咽吸取物4种7型常见呼吸道病毒的检出情况以及季节和年龄分布特点.直接免疫荧光法检测病毒.结果 4 355例患儿中有1 093例病毒检测阳性,总阳性率25.1%,其中呼吸道合胞病毒(RSV)阳性率17.6%,副流感病毒(PIV)-3 为2.7%,腺病毒(ADV)为2.0%,流感病毒(IV)-A1.3%,PIV-1 为0.7%,PIV-2 为0.3%,IV-B 为0.2%,混合感染0.3%.病毒感染患儿年龄中位数RSV 为4个月,PIV-3 为9个月,ADV 为13 个月,PIV-1 为11 个月,IV 为13.5 个

  12. Intravenous naloxone in acute respiratory failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Ayres, J.; J Rees; Lee, T.; Cochrane, G M

    1982-01-01

    A 58-year-old man presented with acute on chronic respiratory failure. In the acute stage of his illness an infusion of the opiate antagonist naloxone caused an improvement in oxygen saturation as measured by ear oximetry from 74% to 85%, while a saline infusion resulted in a return of oxygen saturation to the original value. When he had recovered from the acute episode the same dose of naloxone had no effect on oxygen saturation. These findings suggest that in acute respiratory failure there...

  13. Viral and bacterial interactions in the upper respiratory tract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid A T M Bosch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory infectious diseases are mainly caused by viruses or bacteria that often interact with one another. Although their presence is a prerequisite for subsequent infections, viruses and bacteria may be present in the nasopharynx without causing any respiratory symptoms. The upper respiratory tract hosts a vast range of commensals and potential pathogenic bacteria, which form a complex microbial community. This community is assumed to be constantly subject to synergistic and competitive interspecies interactions. Disturbances in the equilibrium, for instance due to the acquisition of new bacteria or viruses, may lead to overgrowth and invasion. A better understanding of the dynamics between commensals and pathogens in the upper respiratory tract may provide better insight into the pathogenesis of respiratory diseases. Here we review the current knowledge regarding specific bacterial-bacterial and viral-bacterial interactions that occur in the upper respiratory niche, and discuss mechanisms by which these interactions might be mediated. Finally, we propose a theoretical model to summarize and illustrate these mechanisms.

  14. Pneumococci in nasopharyngeal samples from Filipino children with acute respiratory infections.

    OpenAIRE

    Lankinen, K. S.; Leinonen, M; Tupasi, T E; Haikala, R; Ruutu, P.

    1994-01-01

    The presence of Streptococcus pneumoniae in the upper respiratory tract was studied in 318 Filipino children less than 5 years old with an acute lower respiratory tract infection. Nasopharyngeal samples were obtained from 292 children. With both quantitative bacterial culture and detection of capsular polysaccharide antigens by coagglutination, counterimmunoelectrophoresis, and latex agglutination, pneumococci were found in 160 (70%) of the 227 samples eligible for analysis. Culture was posit...

  15. 利复星序贯疗法治疗急性下呼吸道细菌感染的研讨%Study on the sequential therapy of levofloxacin in treatment of acute lower respiratory tract bacterial infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩钢

    2001-01-01

    目的:评价利复星序贯疗法治疗急性下呼吸道细菌性感染的疗效和安全性。方法:对102例急性下呼吸道细菌感染患者,采用利复星400mg/d,5~7d静脉滴注,继之以利复星400mg/d,4~7d口服。结果:痊愈30例(29.4%),显效64例(62.7%),有效率92.1%,细菌清除率88.9%,总疗程9~14d(平均11.8d),药物副作用发生较少(发生率3.92%)。结论:利复星序贯疗法治疗急性下呼吸道常见细菌性感染有效、安全、疗程短。%Objective:To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Levofloxacin in treatment of acute lower respiratory tract bacterial infection (ALRTBI) by sequential therapy. Methods: One hundred and two patients with ALRTBI were treated with Levofloxacin iv drip in a regimen of 400mg/ d for 5~7d then with oral Levofloxacin in dose of 400mg/ d for 4~7d in sequence.Results: An effective rate of 92.1% and a bacterial eradication rate of 88.9% were obtained with a tolerable side effect of 3.92%. Conclusion: Levofloxacin in sequential therapy is an effective and safe agent for treatment of ALRTBI.

  16. The CHICO (Children's Cough) Trial protocol: a feasibility randomised controlled trial investigating the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a complex intervention to improve the management of children presenting to primary care with acute respiratory tract infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Sophie L; Redmond, Niamh M; Lucas, Patricia; Cabral, Christie; Ingram, Jenny; Hollinghurst, Sandra; Hay, Alastair D; Peters, Tim J; Horwood, Jeremy; Little, Paul; Francis, Nick; Blair, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    Introduction While most respiratory tract infections (RTIs) will resolve without treatment, many children will receive antibiotics and some will develop severe symptoms requiring hospitalisation. There have been calls for evidence to reduce uncertainty regarding the identification of children who will and will not benefit from antibiotics. The aim of this feasibility trial is to test recruitment and the acceptance of a complex behavioural intervention designed to reduce antibiotic prescribing, and to inform how best to conduct a larger trial. Methods and analysis The CHICO (Children's Cough) trial is a single-centre feasibility cluster randomised controlled trial (RCT) comparing a web-based, within-consultation, behavioural intervention with usual care for children presenting to general practitioner practices with RTI and acute cough. The trial aims to recruit at least 300 children between October 2014 and April 2015, in a single area in South West England. Following informed consent, demographic information will be recorded, and symptoms and signs measured. Parents/carers of recruited children will be followed up on a weekly basis to establish symptom duration, resource use and cost of the illness to the parent until the child's cough has resolved or up to 8 weeks, whichever occurs earlier. A review of medical notes, including clinical history, primary care reconsultations and hospitalisations will be undertaken 2 months after recruitment. The trial feasibility will be assessed by: determining acceptability of the intervention to clinicians and parent/carers; quantifying differential recruitment and follow-up; determining intervention fidelity; the success in gathering the data necessary to conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis; and collecting data about antibiotic prescribing rates to inform the sample size needed for a fully powered RCT. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by the North West—Haydock Research Ethics Committee, UK (reference

  17. Do pollution and climate influence respiratory tract infections in children?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulo Duarte Passos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To review if pollution and climate changes can influence respiratory tract infections in children. Data source: articles published on the subject in PubMed, SciELO, Bireme, EBSCO and UpTodate were reviewed. The following inclusion criteria were considered: scientific papers between 2002 and 2012, study design, the pediatric population, reference documents such as the CETESB and World Health Organization Summary of the data: We analyzed research that correlated respiratory viruses and climate and/or pollution changes. Respiratory syncytial virus has been the virus related most to changes in climate and humidity. Other "old and new" respiratory viruses such as Human Bocavirus, Metapneumovirus, Parechovirus and Parainfuenza would need to be investigated owing to their clinical importance. Although much has been studied with regard to the relationship between climate change and public health, specific studies about its influence on children's health remain scarce.

  18. Study on the viral etiology of acute respiratory tract infections in Shanghai area during 2009-2010%2009~2010年上海地区急性呼吸道感染病毒病原谱分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何静; 周志统; 胡芸文; 龚燕; 张万菊; 徐磊; 刘祎; 钱方兴; 揭志军; 俞慧菊; 李杨

    2011-01-01

    调查2009~2010年上海地区人群急性呼吸道感染(ARTI)的病毒性病原,探讨2009甲型H1N1流感暴发背景下呼吸道感染病毒病原谱的构成.采用套式多重反转录-聚合酶链反应(RT- PCR)和实时荧光定量RT-PCR方法,对来自2 044例患者的2 044份标本(包括2 005份鼻咽拭子和39份肺泡灌洗液),同时检测腺病毒(ADV)、副流感病毒(PIV)、甲型流感病毒(FluA)、乙型流感病毒(FluB)、微小核糖核酸病毒、呼吸道合胞病毒(RSV)、人偏肺病毒(hMPV)、冠状病毒(CoV)和人博卡病毒(HBoV).其中,656 (32.09%)份标本经呼吸道病毒检测为阳性,52份标本为双重感染.FluA检出率最高(13.36%),其后依次为微小核糖核酸病毒(10.23%)、FluB(4.84%)、ADV(1.96%)、PIV(1.76%)、RSV(1.32%)、CoV(0.59%)、hMPV(0.39%)和HBoV(0.20%).但各月病毒检出率分布不均,2009和2010年呼吸道病毒检出率高峰出现在当年11月(53.07%和65.59%),低谷都出现在当年5月,且2009年5~9月的病毒检出率高于2010年同期(32.02% vs 15.38%,P0.05).呼吸道病毒检出率还与年龄相关,0~4岁组和5~14岁组病毒检出率高于其他年龄组.在0~4岁及≥65岁组中,微小核糖核酸病毒检出率最高,FluA次之;其余年龄组中FluA检出率最高.混合感染中15岁以下儿童占50%(26/52),微小核糖核酸病毒与其他病毒混合感染占84.62%(44/52).本研究表明,上海地区2009~2010年FluA是最常见的急性呼吸道感染病原,2009甲型H1N1流感病毒成为2009年FluA的优势亚型.微小核糖核酸病毒是混合感染中最常见的病原.结果提示,应长期监测主要呼吸道病毒的活动水平,并加强对微小核糖核酸病毒流行病学和致病性的研究.%The present paper aims to understand the viral etiology in patients with acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) in Shanghai area during 2009-2010 and to explore the respiratory viral spectrum under the background of 2009 A(H1N1) influenza outbreak

  19. Air pollution and multiple acute respiratory outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustini, Annunziata; Stafoggia, Massimo; Colais, Paola; Berti, Giovanna; Bisanti, Luigi; Cadum, Ennio; Cernigliaro, Achille; Mallone, Sandra; Scarnato, Corrado; Forastiere, Francesco

    2013-08-01

    Short-term effects of air pollutants on respiratory mortality and morbidity have been consistently reported but usually studied separately. To more completely assess air pollution effects, we studied hospitalisations for respiratory diseases together with out-of-hospital respiratory deaths. A time-stratified case-crossover study was carried out in six Italian cities from 2001 to 2005. Daily particulate matter (particles with a 50% cut-off aerodynamic diameter of 10 μm (PM10)) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) associations with hospitalisations for respiratory diseases (n = 100 690), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (n = 38 577), lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) among COPD patients (n = 9886) and out-of-hospital respiratory deaths (n = 5490) were estimated for residents aged ≥35 years. For an increase of 10 μg·m(-3) in PM10, we found an immediate 0.59% (lag 0-1 days) increase in hospitalisations for respiratory diseases and a 0.67% increase for COPD; the 1.91% increase in LRTI hospitalisations lasted longer (lag 0-3 days) and the 3.95% increase in respiratory mortality lasted 6 days. Effects of NO2 were stronger and lasted longer (lag 0-5 days). Age, sex and previous ischaemic heart disease acted as effect modifiers for different outcomes. Analysing multiple rather than single respiratory events shows stronger air pollution effects. The temporal relationship between the pollutant increases and hospitalisations or mortality for respiratory diseases differs.

  20. Metal toxicity and the respiratory tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemery, B

    1990-02-01

    The type of lung disease caused by metal compounds depends on the nature of the offending agent, its physicochemical form, the dose, exposure conditions and host factors. The fumes or gaseous forms of several metals, e.g. cadmium (Cd), manganese (Mn), mercury (Hg), nickel carbonyl (Nl(CO)4, zinc chloride (ZnCl2), vanadium pentoxide (V2O5), may lead to acute chemical pneumonitis and pulmonary oedema or to acute tracheobronchitis. Metal fume fever, which may follow the inhalation of metal fumes e.g. zinc (Zn), copper (Cu) and many others, is a poorly understood influenza-like reaction, accompanied by an acute self-limiting neutrophil alveolitis. Chronic obstructive lung disease may result from occupational exposure to mineral dusts, including probably some metallic dusts, or from jobs involving the working of metal compounds, such as welding. Exposure to cadmium may lead to emphysema. Bronchial asthma may be caused by complex platinum salts, nickel, chromium or cobalt, presumably on the basis of allergic sensitization. The cause of asthma in aluminium workers is unknown. It is remarkable that asthma induced by nickel (Ni) or chromium (Cr) is apparently infrequent, considering their potency and frequent involvement as dermal sensitizers. Metallic dusts deposited in the lung may give rise to pulmonary fibrosis and functional impairment, depending on the fibrogenic potential of the agent and on poorly understood host factors. Inhalation of iron compounds causes siderosis, a pneumoconiosis with little or no fibrosis. Hard metal lung disease is a fibrosis characterized by desquamative and giant cell interstitial pneumonitis and is probably caused by cobalt, since a similar disease has been observed in workers exposed to cobalt in the absence of tungsten carbide. Chronic beryllium disease is a fibrosis with sarcoid-like epitheloid granulomas and is presumably due to a cell-mediated immune response to beryllium. Such a mechanism may be responsible for the pulmonary fibrosis

  1. Submersion and acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jang Su

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Submersion patients who are hypothermic on arrival of emergency department (ED are risky to respiratory failure and older, more hypothermic, longer hospital stay in suicidal submersion patients.

  2. Incense use and respiratory tract carcinomas: a prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, J.M.; Wang, R.; Koh, W.P.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Incense use is an integral part of daily life in large parts of Asia. The burning of incense is a powerful producer of particulate matter and the smoke contains a multitude of well-characterized carcinogens. However, to the authors' knowledge, no convincing association has been reported...... between exposure to incense smoke and the development of cancer. Therefore, the relation between incense use and the risk of respiratory tract carcinomas was analyzed in a prospective cohort study. METHODS: Between 1993 and 1998, a population-based cohort of 61,320 Singapore Chinese who were free...... with incense use was estimated using a Cox proportional hazards model. RESULTS: A total of 325 upper respiratory tract (UPT) carcinomas and 821 lung carcinomas were observed during follow-up. Incense use was associated with a significantly increased risk of UPT carcinomas other than nasopharyngeal, whereas...

  3. How often do general practitioners prescribe antibiotics for otitis media and the most common respiratory tract infections?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jørund Straand

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available  ABSTRACTObjective:  Design:  Setting:  Material:  Results:  Conclusion:  Key words:  Antibiotics, general practice, diagnoses, respiratory tract infections, otitis media, pharmacoepidemiologyExcept for upper respiratory tract infection, antibiotic treatment is the rule not an exception, forall the diagnoses studied. In general practice, improved communication- and prescribing-skills are probablyessentials for implementing a more evidence based treatment of otitis media, and the common respiratorytract infections. The significance of patient related factors for seeing a GP (or not and for (not expectingantibiotics for otitis media and the common respiratory tract infections should be explored in future research.Antibiotics were issued during 57% of all contacts for the included diagnoses, ranging from 22%(upper respiratory tract infection to 91% (tonsillitis. All patients who had first time office consultations fortonsillitis, acute bronchitis and pneumonia, were prescribed antibiotics. One out of three patients who consultedthe doctor on the telephone for these diagnoses, were also prescribed an antibiotic.8610 physician-patient contacts, and 4909 antibiotic prescriptions for otitis media, upper respiratorytract infection, tonsillitis, sinusitis, acute bronchitis, and pneumonia.Cross sectional, multipractice study.GPs in the Norwegian county of Møre & Romsdal. Data were recorded during two months.To examine how frequently general practitioners actually prescribe antibiotics for patientscontacting them for otitis media, and the most common respiratory tract infection diagnoses, – by the type ofdoctor-patient contact during prescribing, and patients' age and sex.

  4. Pathobiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapru, Anil; Flori, Heidi; Quasney, Michael W; Dahmer, Mary K

    2015-06-01

    The unique characteristics of pulmonary circulation and alveolar-epithelial capillary-endothelial barrier allow for maintenance of the air-filled, fluid-free status of the alveoli essential for facilitating gas exchange, maintaining alveolar stability, and defending the lung against inhaled pathogens. The hallmark of pathophysiology in acute respiratory distress syndrome is the loss of the alveolar capillary permeability barrier and the presence of protein-rich edema fluid in the alveoli. This alteration in permeability and accumulation of fluid in the alveoli accompanies damage to the lung epithelium and vascular endothelium along with dysregulated inflammation and inappropriate activity of leukocytes and platelets. In addition, there is uncontrolled activation of coagulation along with suppression of fibrinolysis and loss of surfactant. These pathophysiological changes result in the clinical manifestations of acute respiratory distress syndrome, which include hypoxemia, radiographic opacities, decreased functional residual capacity, increased physiologic deadspace, and decreased lung compliance. Resolution of acute respiratory distress syndrome involves the migration of cells to the site of injury and re-establishment of the epithelium and endothelium with or without the development of fibrosis. Most of the data related to acute respiratory distress syndrome, however, originate from studies in adults or in mature animals with very few studies performed in children or juvenile animals. The lack of studies in children is particularly problematic because the lungs and immune system are still developing during childhood and consequently the pathophysiology of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome may differ in significant ways from that seen in acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults. This article describes what is known of the pathophysiologic processes of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome as we know it today while also presenting the much

  5. Determinants of prescribing of second-choice antibiotics for upper and lower respiratory tract in Dutch general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijn, H.J. van; Kuyvenhoven, M.M.; Schellevis, F.; Verheij, T.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the association between general practitioners' (GPs') characteristics and the volume of second-choice antibiotics for acute respiratory tract (RT) episodes by GPs. Methods: Morbidity and antibiotic prescription data originated from the Second Dutch Nat

  6. Software for the draft NCRP respiratory tract dosimetry model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A task group of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurement (NCRP) is developing a new respiratory tract dosimetry model to update an earlier model developed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Task Group on Lung Dynamics. To facilitate the use of the new model and model calculations, a menu-driven computer simulation package has been developed. The implementation and main features of the package are presented, including: (1) calculations of regional fractional deposition and clearance in the nasal, oral, tracheobronchial airways (16 generations), and pulmonary region; (2) scaling of respiratory tract airway size and breathing parameters for people of all sizes; and (3) incorporation of dissolution and mechanical clearance as two competing mechanisms. At present, the software package can be used to compute fractions of total inhaled radioactive material initially deposited and later retained in the respiratory tract regions. In the near future, the software will also make dosimetry calculations. This paper discusses mathematical formulations, computer languages, examples and future development associated with this package. (author)

  7. Pharmacotherapy of Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Raghavendran, Krishnan; Pryhuber, Gloria S.; Chess, Patricia R.; Davidson, Bruce A.; Paul R. Knight; Notter, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are characterized by rapid-onset respiratory failure following a variety of direct and indirect insults to the parenchyma or vasculature of the lungs. Mortality from ALI/ARDS is substantial, and current therapy primarily emphasizes mechanical ventilation and judicial fluid management plus standard treatment of the initiating insult and any known underlying disease. Current pharmacotherapy for ALI/ARDS is not optimal, a...

  8. The pressure gradient in the human respiratory tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chovancová, Michaela; Elcner, Jakub

    2014-03-01

    Respiratory airways cause resistance to air flow during inhalation and exhalation. The pressure gradient is necessary to transport the air from the mount (or nose) to pulmonary alveoli. The knowledge of pressure gradient (i.e. respiratory airways resistance) is also needed to solve the question of aerosol deposition in the human respiratory tract. The obtained data will be used as boundary conditions for CFD simulations of aerosol transport. Understanding of aerosol transport in the human lungs can help us to determine the health hazard of harmful particles. On the other hand it can be used to set the conditions for transport of medication to the desirable place. This article deals with the description of the mathematical equations defining the pressure gradient and resistance in the bronchial three and describes the geometry used in the calculation.

  9. Compliance with Recommendations on Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing for Respiratory Tract Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malo, Sara; Bjerrum, Lars; Feja, Cristina;

    2015-01-01

    Inappropriate antibiotic use in primary care, such as in Respiratory Tract Infections (RTIs), is an important cause of bacterial resistance. This study aimed at describing the current pattern of outpatient antibiotic use in acute RTIs in Spain and evaluating adherence to national recommendations......, and adherence to recommendations for antibiotic prescribing was assessed. One third of patients with a RTI were prescribed an antibiotic, with young adults (aged 15-64 years) being the most treated. High prescribing rates were observed in patients with acute otitis, sinusitis and acute tonsillitis (about 70......%), whereas low rates were found in acute bronchitis (50%) and non-specific upper RTIs (24%) episodes. A high prescription of broad-spectrum agents and antibiotics not recommended as first choice was observed. In accordance with Spanish guidelines, there exists a potential over-prescribing of antibiotics...

  10. Patterns Of Antimicrobial Use For Respiratory Tract Infections In Elderly Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Elderly patients are prone to respiratory tract infections (RTIs) both; acute bronchitis and pneumonia. A large proportion of the antibiotics prescribed are unlikely to provide clinical benefit to patients. There is an increased need to decrease excess antibiotic use in elderly to minimize antibiotic resistance. Objective: To describe patterns of antimicrobial use for respiratory tract infections (RTIs) among elderly Patients and methods: A cross sectional study was conducted on one hundred elderly patients, aged > 60 years, both males and females to describe patterns of antimicrobial use for respiratory tract infections (RTIs) among elderly patients. RTIs, categorized as acute bronchitis, and pneumonia, were studied for appropriateness of antimicrobial use, type of antibiotics used, and factors associated with their use. We rated antibiotic use as appropriate (when an effective drug was used), inappropriate (when a more effective drug was indicated), or unjustified (when use of any antimicrobial was not indicated). Results: Of 100 patients with RTI, overall treatment was appropriate in 79% of episodes, inappropriate in 9%, and unjustified in 12%. For acute bronchitis, treatment was appropriate in 85% and unjustified in 15% of cases. For pneumonia, treatment was appropriate in 55% of episodes. Among the most commonly used antimicrobials, B.Lactam + macrolides their use were unjustified in 41% of cases. There were statistical significant differences in the patterns of antibiotic use when stratified by age, gender, and co- morbid conditions including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Conclusion: Antimicrobials are unjustifiably used for 12% of RTIs and 15% of cases of acute bronchitis, thus suggesting a need for programs to improve antibiotic prescribing at hospitals.

  11. Diagnosis of Upper and Lower Respiratory Tract Bacterial Infections with the Use of Multiplex PCR Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Kourea-Kremastinou

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of respiratory infections by molecular techniques provides important information about the epidemiology of respiratory disease, especially during the post-vaccination era. The objective of the present study was the detection of bacterial pathogens directly in clinical samples from patients with upper and lower respiratory tract infections using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays developed in our laboratory. Clinical samples taken over a three-year period (2007–2009 and obtained from 349 patients (adults (n = 66; children (n = 283 with signs and symptoms of certain upper or lower respiratory tract infections, consisted of: bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL, n = 83, pleural fluids (n = 29, and middle-ear aspirates (n = 237. Overall, 212 samples (61% were confirmed by culture and/or PCR. Among the positive samples, Streptococcus pneumoniae (mainly serotype 3 was predominant (104/212; 49.0%, followed by non-typable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi 59/212; 27.8% and Streptococcus pyogenes (47/212; 22%. Haemophilus influenzae type b was detected in only three samples. The underlying microbiology of respiratory infections is gradually changing in response to various selective pressures, such as vaccine use and antibiotic consumption. The application of multiplex PCR (mPCR assays is particularly useful since it successfully identified the microorganisms implicated in acute otitis media or lower respiratory tract infections in nearly 75% of patients with a positive result compared to conventional cultures. Non-culture identification of the implicated pneumococcal serotypes is also an important issue for monitoring pneumococcal infections in the era of conjugate pneumococcal vaccines.

  12. Emergency thyroidectomy: Due to acute respiratory failure

    OpenAIRE

    Zulfu Bayhan; Sezgin Zeren; Bercis Imge Ucar; Isa Ozbay; Yalcin Sonmez; Metin Mestan; Onur Balaban; Nilufer Araz Bayhan; Mehmet Fatih Ekici

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Giant cervical and mediastinal goiter may lead to acute respiratory failure caused by laryngotracheal compression and airway obstruction. Here, we present a case admitted to the emergency service with a giant goiter along with respiratory failure and poor general health status, which required urgent surgical intervention. PRESENTATION OF CASE: A 71-year-old female admitted to the emergency room with shortness of breath and poor general health status resulting from a giant cer...

  13. Impact of chest radiography for children with lower respiratory tract infection: a propensity score approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Ecochard-Dugelay

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Management of acute respiratory tract infection varies substantially despite this being a condition frequently encountered in pediatric emergency departments. Previous studies have suggested that the use of antibiotics was higher when chest radiography was performed. However none of these analyses had considered the inherent indication bias of observational studies. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this work was to assess the relationship between performing chest radiography and prescribing antibiotics using a propensity score analysis to address the indication bias due to non-random radiography assignment. METHODS: We conducted a prospective study of 697 children younger than 2 years of age who presented during the winter months of 2006-2007 for suspicion of respiratory tract infection at the Pediatric Emergency Department of an urban general hospital in France (Paris suburb. We first determined the individual propensity score (probability of having a chest radiography according to baseline characteristics. Then we assessed the relation between radiography and antibiotic prescription using two methods: adjustment and matching on the propensity score. RESULTS: We found that performing a chest radiography lead to more frequent antibiotic prescription that may be expressed as OR = 2.3, CI [1.3-4.1], or as an increased use of antibiotics of 18.6% [0.08-0.29] in the group undergoing chest radiography. CONCLUSION: Chest radiography has a significant impact on the management of infants admitted for suspicion of respiratory tract infection in a pediatric emergency department and may lead to unnecessary administration of antibiotics.

  14. Clinical efficacy of ciprofloxacin in lower respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, S S

    1989-01-01

    The sputum pharmacokinetics and clinical efficacy of ciprofloxacin in lower respiratory tract infections is reviewed. Following intravenous administration, ciprofloxacin penetrates rapidly into bronchial tissue; the elimination half life is between 3 and 4 h and a dose dependency is seen. Following oral intake, the time to reach maximal concentrations is approximately two hours and after a dose of 750 mg the concentration may reach 1.7 mg/l in patients without cystic fibrosis and range from 0.5 to 3.4 mg/l in cystic fibrosis patients. Coadministration of ciprofloxacin increases serum levels and decreases total body clearance of theophylline. In controlled comparative clinical trials, ciprofloxacin has been found to have similar clinical efficacy as amoxycillin, ampicillin, cefalexin, doxycycline, co-trimoxazole, imipenem-cilastatin and ceftazidime for the treatment of a range of lower respiratory tract infections. Ciprofloxacin has been found to be superior in clinical efficacy to cefaclor. Experimental animal models suggest a role for ciprofloxacin in infections caused by Legionella pneumophila and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The clinical and bacteriological efficacy of ciprofloxacin is less pronounced in lung infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but is comparable to the combination of beta-lactams and aminoglycosides. Development of resistance is frequently observed during ciprofloxacin treatment of Ps. aeruginosa. Because of the availability of other oral and effective agents, ciprofloxacin is not recommended for empirical treatment of community acquired lower respiratory infections, but should be reserved for infections caused by multiply resistant organisms. PMID:2667111

  15. 支气管哮喘急性发作期呼吸道感染患儿的临床诊治分析%Analysis of Clinical Diagnosis and Treatment of Children With Bronchial Asthma Acute Episodes of Respiratory Tract Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段艳飞; 刘冬霞

    2016-01-01

    目的:探析支气管哮喘急性发作期呼吸道感染患儿治疗。方法随机将80例支气管哮喘急性发作期呼吸道感染患儿分为两组,分别行常规疗法和联合用药,比较两组疗效。结果两组治疗效果比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论临床上给予支气管哮喘急性发作期呼吸道感染患儿联合用药效果显著。%Objective To analyze the treatment for children with bronchial asthma acute episodes of respiratory tract infection.Methods 80 cases of children with bronchial asthma acute phase were randomly divided into two groups, which were respectively treated with routine therapy and combined medication, to compare the curative effect of two groups.Results There was the signiifcant difference between the treatment effect of two groups (P<0.05).Conclusion the effect of combined medication for children with bronchial asthma acute episodes of respiratory tract infection is remarkable.

  16. Procalcitonin guided antibiotic therapy and hospitalization in patients with lower respiratory tract infections: a prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henzen Christoph

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Lower respiratory tract infections like acute bronchitis, exacerbated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and community-acquired pneumonia are often unnecessarily treated with antibiotics, mainly because of physicians' difficulties to distinguish viral from bacterial cause and to estimate disease-severity. The goal of this trial is to compare medical outcomes, use of antibiotics and hospital resources in a strategy based on enforced evidence-based guidelines versus procalcitonin guided antibiotic therapy in patients with lower respiratory tract infections. Methods and design: We describe a prospective randomized controlled non-inferiority trial with an open intervention. We aim to randomize over a fixed recruitment period of 18 months a minimal number of 1002 patients from 6 hospitals in Switzerland. Patients must be >18 years of age with a lower respiratory tract infections Discussion: Use of and prolonged exposure to antibiotics in lower respiratory tract infections is high. The proposed trial investigates whether procalcitonin-guidance may safely reduce antibiotic consumption along with reductions in hospitalization costs and antibiotic resistance. It will additionally generate insights for improved prognostic assessment of patients with lower respiratory tract infections. Trial registration: ISRCTN95122877

  17. Airway CD8(+) T Cells Are Associated with Lung Injury during Infant Viral Respiratory Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Thomas J; Ravindranath, Thyyar M; Bickham, Kara L; Gordon, Claire L; Zhang, Feifan; Levin, Bruce; Baird, John S; Farber, Donna L

    2016-06-01

    Infants and young children are disproportionately susceptible to severe complications from respiratory viruses, although the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Recent studies show that the T cell response in the lung is important for protective responses to respiratory infections, although details on the infant/pediatric respiratory immune response remain sparse. The objectives of the present study were to characterize the local versus systemic immune response in infants and young children with respiratory failure from viral respiratory tract infections and its association to disease severity. Daily airway secretions were sampled from infants and children 4 years of age and younger receiving mechanical ventilation owing to respiratory failure from viral infection or noninfectious causes. Samples were examined for immune cell composition and markers of T cell activation. These parameters were then correlated with clinical disease severity. Innate immune cells and total CD3(+) T cells were present in similar proportions in airway aspirates derived from infected and uninfected groups; however, the CD8:CD4 T cell ratio was markedly increased in the airways of patients with viral infection compared with uninfected patients, and specifically in infected infants with acute lung injury. T cells in the airways were phenotypically and functionally distinct from those in blood with activated/memory phenotypes and increased cytotoxic capacity. We identified a significant increase in airway cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells in infants with lung injury from viral respiratory tract infection that was distinct from the T cell profile in circulation and associated with increasing disease severity. Airway sampling could therefore be diagnostically informative for assessing immune responses and lung damage. PMID:26618559

  18. Microbiological Study On Respiratory Tract Infections In Libya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    *A. H. Eldeeb and **E.M. Khashan

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recent reports revealed that 10% of the worldwide burden of morbidity and mortality relates to respiratory tract infection. Patient and methods: Five hundreds and fifty nine clinical strains were isolated and identified from 322 patients suffering from respiratory tract infections. Patients represented different ages, sexes, and types of infections. Out of the 322 patients, 204 were suffering from upper respiratory tract infections and 118 patients were suffering from lower respiratory tract infections. Patients of upper respiratory tract infections were suffering from chronic suppurative otitis media (63 patients, tonsillitis (50 patients, pharyngitis (48 patients, and sinusitis (43 patients. Results: Out of the total isolates, Staphylococcus aureus was the most prevalent organism, followed by Streptococcus pyogenes and Klebsiella pneumoniae (17.71, 12.34, and 11.27% respectively. Pseudomonas aeruginosa represented 6.26%. Serratia marcescens and Morganella morganii were the least isolated organisms. The results revealed that 52.42% of the strains were isolated from males and 47.58% from females. Staphylococcus aureus was the most prevalent organism in males (21.16% while in females Strept. pyogenes was the most prevalent organism (14.29%. Also, the study revealed that Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent isolate in age groups between 1-20, 21-40 and 41-60 years old (20.85%, 17.02% and 16.67% respectively. However, both Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae were isolated with equal incidences, 12% each, in elder patients (more than 60 years. The susceptibility pattern of the isolated bacteria to different antimicrobial agents was studied. Both levofloxacin and gatifloxacin showed the highest activity (100%, followed by ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin (96.44% and 93.39%, respectively. Those are followed by amikacin (91.86%, cefotaxime (89.31%, cefoperazone (86.26%, gentamicin (84.22%, ampicillin-sulbactam (70

  19. Anaerobic bacteria in upper respiratory tract and head and neck infections: microbiology and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Itzhak

    2012-04-01

    Anaerobes are the predominant components of oropharyngeal mucous membranes bacterial flora, and are therefore a common cause of bacterial infections of endogenous origin of upper respiratory tract and head and neck. This review summarizes the aerobic and anaerobic microbiology and antimicrobials therapy of these infections. These include acute and chronic otitis media, mastoiditis and sinusitis, pharyngo-tonsillitis, peritonsillar, retropharyngeal and parapharyngeal abscesses, suppurative thyroiditis, cervical lymphadenitis, parotitis, siliadenitis, and deep neck infections including Lemierre Syndrome. The recovery from these infections depends on prompt and proper medical and when indicated also surgical management.

  20. Low to medium WU-virus titers in young children with lower respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleines, Michael; Scheithauer, Simone; Hengst, Meike; Honnef, Dagmar; Ritter, Klaus; Mühler, Eberhard; Häusler, Martin; Rostamzadeh, Ayda

    2008-01-01

    The WU-virus (WUV), a novel polyomavirus, has recently been recovered from respiratory tract samples. Within a study collective of children with severe lower respiratory tract disease, 3% of the patients tested WUV positive. Viral loads ranged from 5 x 10(2) copies/ml to 1 x 10(4) copies/ml. The WUV genome-positive patients did not display specific clinical or radiological characteristics to be distinguished from other respiratory tract infections. PMID:19321930

  1. Respiratory failure in acute pancreatitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, A K; Haggie, S J; Jones, R B; Basran, G. S.

    1995-01-01

    There are a number of important pulmonary complications of acute pancreatitis which make a significant contribution to the morbidity and mortality of the condition. The pathophysiology and management guidelines are given for each and approaches towards better treatment in the future are discussed.

  2. A Study of status and disease burden in children with acute respiratory tract infection of Changchun area in 2008%2008年长春地区小儿急性呼吸道感染状况与疾病负担的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘迎新; 孙利炜; 刘愉; 张晓杰

    2012-01-01

    目的:了解2008年长春地区小儿急性呼吸道感染发病情况与疾病负担,为控制小儿急性呼吸道感染提供依据.方法:以2008年长春市儿童医院住院的急性呼吸道感染患儿为研究对象,用荧光定量PCR方法进行肺炎支原体检测,对患儿临床资料进行流行病学分析.结果:2008年长春地区小儿急性呼吸道感染发病率为33.67% (4923/14620),其中临床诊断急性上呼吸道感染(包括鼻炎、咽炎、扁桃体炎、喉炎)为14.08% (693/4923)、急性支气管炎为4.12% (203/4923)、急性毛细支气管炎为1.95% (96/4923)、支气管肺炎为76.88%(3785/4923)、大叶性肺炎1.14% (56/4923)、肺炎支原体肺炎1.83% (90/4923);患儿年龄均值为(28.59±20.32)月龄;发病人数1月份最多,5月份开始下降,10月份再次增多;平均住院天数为7天,平均每个患儿住院医疗费用3275.15元,总耗资约1912万元,1例因急性呼吸道感染死亡.结论:长春地区小儿急性呼吸道感染住院人数多、耗资大,控制小儿急性呼吸道感染是对社会和家庭的挑战也是儿科医务工作者的当务之急.%Objective; To study on the status and disease burden in children with acute respiratory tract infection of Changchun area in 2008 and to provide a basis for the control of acute respiratory infections. Methods; Children with acute respiratory infections in our hospital were studied. Using the method of fluorescence quantitative PCR to detect Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Clinical data of the children were studied by epidemiological method. Results: In 2008, in Changchun area, the incidence rate of acute respiratory tract infection in children was 33. 67% (4 923/14 620) . In which the rate of acute respiratory tract infection (including rhinitis, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, laryngitis) was 14. 08% (693/4 923), acute bronchitis was 4.12% (203/4923), acute bronchiolitis was 1. 95% (96/4923), bronchial pneumonia was 76. 889% (3 785/4 923), lobar

  3. SMART phones and the acute respiratory patient.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gleeson, L

    2012-05-01

    Definition of Respiratory Failure using PaO2 alone is confounded when patients are commenced on oxygen therapy prior to arterial blood gas (ABG) measurement. Furthermore, classification of Respiratory Failure as Type 1 or Type 2 using PaCO2 alone can give an inaccurate account of events as both types can co-exist. 100 consecutive presentations of acute respiratory distress were assessed initially using PaO2, and subsequently PaO2\\/FiO2 ratio, to diagnose Respiratory Failure. Respiratory Failure cases were classified as Type 1 or Type 2 initially using PaCO2, and subsequently alveolar-arterial (A-a) gradient. Any resultant change in management was documented. Of 100 presentations, an additional 16 cases were diagnosed as Respiratory Failure using PaO2\\/FiO2 ratio in place of PaO2 alone (p = 0.0338). Of 57 cases of Respiratory Failure, 22 cases classified as Type 2 using PaCO2 alone were reclassified as Type 1 using A-a gradient (p < 0.001). Of these 22 cases, management changed in 18.

  4. Proposed updating of the ICRP human respiratory tract model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ICRP Task Group on Internal Dosimetry is developing new Occupational Intakes of Radionuclides documents, which will include revised dose coefficients for inhalation of radionuclides by workers. Application of the ICRP Human Respiratory Tract Model requires a review of the lung-to-blood absorption characteristics of inhaled materials of importance in radiological protection. It is planned that, where appropriate, material-specific absorption parameter values will be given, and for other materials, assignments to default absorption Types will be made on the basis of current information. Publication of the Occupational Intakes of Radionuclides documents provides an opportunity for updating the Human Respiratory Tract Model in the light of experience and new information. The main possibilities under consideration relate to the two main clearance pathways: absorption to blood and particle transport. The review of absorption rates is providing a database of parameter values from which consideration can be given to deriving typical values for default Types F, M and S materials, and element-specific rapid dissolution rates. Important new data on rates of particle transport from the nasal passages, bronchial tree (slow phase) and alveolar-interstitial region have come from recent human studies, some of which were conducted to address uncertainties identified by development of the model. These new results, and others, are being reviewed alongside those available in 1993 when the model was finalised, to propose revisions based on the best currently-available information. This paper reports on the current status of this work. (author)

  5. ROLE OF IMUNOMET IN UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT DISORDERS: A RANDOMIZED DOUBLE BLIND PLACEBO CONTROLLED CLINICAL TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhikari Anjan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Upper respiratory tract disorders comprise 87.5% of total acute respiratory morbidity in India in children. This has become a major community health problem. The symptoms are often self limiting and many a time caused by viruses, however, recurrent attacks may lead to distinct morbidity. This study was conducted in hospital outpatient department on children who have been attending at frequent interval with complaints of sore throat, pharyngitis and tonsillitis. They were administered Imunomet syrup or tablet for a period of 8 weeks. At the end of the treatment, about 84% patients responded well to treatment and 16% patients had fair response to treatment. None of the patients showed any adverse reaction to treatment. The syrup was found to be palatable.

  6. Cefditoren in upper and lower community-acquired respiratory tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Soriano

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Francisco Soriano1, María-José Giménez1,2, Lorenzo Aguilar1,21PRISM-AG, Madrid, Spain; 2Microbiology Department, School of Medicine, University Complutense, Madrid, SpainAbstract: This article reviews and updates published data on cefditoren in the evolving scenario of resistance among the most prevalent isolates from respiratory tract infections in the community (Streptococcus pyogenes, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. By relating the in vitro activity of cefditoren (in national and multinational surveillance and against isolates with emerging resistant genotypes/phenotypes to its pharmacokinetics, the cefditoren pharmacodynamic activity predicting efficacy (in humans, animal models, and in vitro simulations is analyzed prior to reviewing clinical studies (tonsillopharyngitis, sinusitis, acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, and community-acquired pneumonia and the relationship between bacterial eradication and clinical efficacy. The high in vitro activity of cefditoren against the most prevalent respiratory isolates in the community, together with its pharmacokinetics (enabling a twice daily regimen leading to adequate pharmacodynamic indexes covering all S. pyogenes, H. influenzae, and at least 95% S. pneumoniae isolates, makes cefditoren an antibiotic that will play a significant role in the treatment of respiratory tract infections in the community. In the clinical setting, studies carried out with cefditoren showed that treatments with the 400 mg twice daily regimen were associated with high rates of bacteriological response, even against penicillin-nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae, with good correlation between bacteriological efficacy/response and clinical outcome.Keywords: cefditoren, Streptococcus pyogenes, Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, community-acquired respiratory tract infections

  7. Surveillance of acute respiratory infections among outpatients: A pilot study in Isfahan city

    OpenAIRE

    Abbasali Javadi; Peyman Adibi; Behrooz Ataei; Zary Nokhodian; Majid Yaran

    2015-01-01

    Background: Considering that there was not any regional survey in Isfahan, Iran regarding the epidemiology of acute respiratory tract infections (ARTI) in different age groups of general population, the aim of this study was to determine the epidemiologic feature of ARTIs in Isfahan using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, patients aged

  8. Atypical presentation of human bocavirus: Severe respiratory tract infection complicated with encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akturk, Hacer; Sık, Guntulu; Salman, Nuran; Sutcu, Murat; Tatli, Burak; Ciblak, Meral Akcay; Erol, Oguz Bulent; Torun, Selda Hancerli; Citak, Agop; Somer, Ayper

    2015-11-01

    Human bocavirus (HBOV) has been reported as a worldwide distributed respiratory pathogen. It has also been associated with encephalitis recently by detection of the virus in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients presented with encephalitis. This retrospective study aimed to present clinical features of HBOV infections in children with respiratory symptoms and describe unexplained encephalopathy in a subgroup of these patients. Results of 1,143 pediatric nasal samples from mid-December 2013 to July 2014 were reviewed for detection of HBOV. A multiplex real time polymerase chain reaction assay was used for viral detection. Medical records of the patients were retrospectively analyzed. HBOV was detected in 30 patients (2.6%). Median age was 14 months (5-80). Clinical diagnoses were upper respiratory tract infection (n = 10), bronchopneumonia (n = 9), acute bronchiolitis (n = 5), pneumonia (n = 4), acute bronchitis (n = 1), and asthma execarbation (n = 1). Hospitalization was required in 16 (53.3%) patients and 10 (62.5%) of them admitted to pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Noninvasive mechanical ventilation modalities was applied to four patients and mechanical ventilation to four patients. Intractable seizures developed in four patients while mechanically ventilated on the 2nd-3rd days of PICU admission. No specific reason for encephalopathy was found after a thorough investigation. No mortality was observed, but two patients were discharged with neurological sequela. HBOV may lead to respiratory infections in a wide spectrum of severity. This report indicates its potential to cause severe respiratory infections requiring PICU admission and highlights possible clinical association of HBOV and encephalopathy, which developed during severe respiratory infection. PMID:25966820

  9. ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME IN PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhumala

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is a clinical syndrome of severe dyspnea of rapid onset, hypoxemia, and diffuse pulmonary infiltrates leading to respiratory failure. ARDS occurs in pregnancy and may have unique causes. Overall mortality for both the mother and the fetus is high and significant morbidity can persist even after initial recovery. ARDS is associated with obstetric causes such as amniotic fluid embolism, preeclampsia, septic abortion, and retained products of conception or non - obstetr ic causes that include sepsis, aspiration pneumonitis, influenza pneumonia, blood transfusions, and trauma. Here is a 24 years old female admitted with 7months of amenorrhea, who presented with respiratory failure, she was intubated and ventilated for 47da ys. She recovered, and a live baby was delivered. She was discharged after 73days.

  10. Acute Respiratory Distress Due to Methane Inhalation

    OpenAIRE

    Jo, Jun Yeon; Kwon, Yong Sik; Lee, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Seok; Rho, Byung Hak; Choi, Won-Il

    2013-01-01

    Inhalation of toxic gases can lead to pneumonitis. It has been known that methane gas intoxication causes loss of consciousness or asphyxia. There is, however, a paucity of information about acute pulmonary toxicity from methane gas inhalation. A 21-year-old man was presented with respiratory distress after an accidental exposure to methane gas for one minute. He came in with a drowsy mentality and hypoxemia. Mechanical ventilation was applied immediately. The patient's symptoms and chest rad...

  11. Considering Respiratory Tract Infections and Antimicrobial Sensitivity: An Exploratory Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin, R.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to observe the sensitivity and resistance of status of antibiotics for respiratory tract infection (RTI. Throat swab culture and sensitivity report of 383 patients revealed sensitivity profiles were observed with amoxycillin (7.9%, penicillin (33.7%, ampicillin (36.6%, co-trimoxazole (46.5%, azithromycin (53.5%, erythromycin (57.4%, cephalexin (69.3%, gentamycin (78.2%, ciprofloxacin (80.2%, cephradine (81.2%, ceftazidime (93.1%, ceftriaxone (93.1%. Sensitivity to cefuroxime was reported 93.1% cases. Resistance was found with amoxycillin (90.1%, ampicillin (64.1%, penicillin (61.4%, co-trimoxazole (43.6%, erythromycin (39.6%, and azithromycin (34.7%. Cefuroxime demonstrates high level of sensitivity than other antibiotics and supports its consideration with patients with upper RTI.

  12. Velocity profiles in idealized model of human respiratory tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jicha M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with numerical simulation focused on velocity profiles in idealized model of human upper airways during steady inspiration. Three r gimes of breathing were investigated: Resting condition, Deep breathing and Light activity which correspond to most common regimes used for experiments and simulations. Calculation was validated with experimental data given by Phase Doppler Anemometry performed on the model with same geometry. This comparison was made in multiple points which form one cross-section in trachea near first bifurcation of bronchial tree. Development of velocity profile in trachea during steady inspiration was discussed with respect for common phenomenon formed in trachea and for future research of transport of aerosol particles in human respiratory tract.

  13. Relationship Between Upper Respiratory Tract Influenza Test Result and Clinical Outcomes Among Critically Ill Influenza Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, Krishna P.; Bajwa, Ednan K.; Parker, Robert A.; Andrew B Onderdonk; Walensky, Rochelle P.

    2016-01-01

    Among critically ill patients with lower respiratory tract (LRT)-confirmed influenza, we retrospectively observed worse 28-day clinical outcomes in upper respiratory tract (URT)-negative versus URT-positive subjects. This finding may reflect disease progression and highlights the need for influenza testing of both URT and LRT specimens to improve diagnostic yield and possibly inform prognosis.

  14. Lower Respiratory Tract Infections Due To Mycoplasma Pneumoniae: Report of Four Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Çetinkaya, Feyzullah; Göçmen, Ayhan; Ustaçelebi, Şemsettin

    1993-01-01

    Mycoplasma pnemoniae is one of the most important causes of lower respiratory tract infections in childhood In this study four cases diagnosed by complement fixation method are reported and the rilevant literature is reviewed Key words: Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Lower Respiratory Tract

  15. An association between Helicobacter pylori and upper respiratory tract disease: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariya, Shin; Okano, Mitsuhiro; Nishizaki, Kazunori

    2014-02-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a major cause of chronic gastritis and gastric ulcers and considerable evidence supports the notion that infection with this bacterium is also associated with gastric malignancy in addition to various other conditions including pulmonary, vascular and autoimmune disorders. Gastric juice infected with H. pylori might play an important role in upper respiratory tract infection. Although direct and/or indirect mechanisms might be involved in the association between H. pylori and upper respiratory tract diseases, the etiological role of H. pylori in upper respiratory tract disorders has not yet been fully elucidated. Although various studies over the past two decades have suggested a relationship between H. pylori and upper respiratory tract diseases, the findings are inconsistent. The present overview describes the outcomes of recent investigations into the impact of H. pylori on upper respiratory tract and adjacent lesions.

  16. Respiratory Failure in Acute Organophosphorus Pesticide Self-Poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Eddleston, Michael; Mohamed, Fahim; Davies, James OJ; Eyer, Peter; Worek, Franz; Sheriff, Mh Rezvi; Buckley, Nick A.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Acute organophosphorus (OP) pesticide poisoning is a major clinical problem in the developing world. Textbooks ascribe most deaths to respiratory failure occurring in one of two distinct clinical syndromes - acute cholinergic respiratory failure or the intermediate syndrome. The delayed failure appears to be due to respiratory muscle weakness, but its pathophysiology is not yet clear.

  17. Effectiveness of two types of intervention on antibiotic prescribing in respiratory tract infections in Primary Care in Spain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llor, Carles; Cots, Josep Maria; Hernández, Silvia;

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of two types of intervention in reducing antibiotic prescribing in respiratory tract infections (RTI).......To evaluate the effectiveness of two types of intervention in reducing antibiotic prescribing in respiratory tract infections (RTI)....

  18. 热毒宁注射剂治疗儿童急性上呼吸道感染196例疗效分析%Reduning injection treatment of children with acute upper respiratory tract infection in 196 cases curative effect analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张娴

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Analysis of reduning injection treatment of children with acute upper respiratory tract infection of chinical curatire effect. Methods: Our selection of pediatric since May 2012 to August 2012 clinical diagnosed with acute upper respiratory tract infection of 196 cases of children patients,age 1 full year of life to 6 years old,with conventional defervescence processing,to strengthen the diet care,based on this,and then divided into three groups for treatment,respectively reduning treatment group and control group ribavirin and reduning + amo schering clavulanic acid potassium treatment group. Results: After three days of treatment,hot poison better treatment group total effective rate reaches as high as 95.6%,and ribavirin control group have significant difference,and reduning + amo schering clavulanic acid potassium treatment group indifference. Conclusion: Reduning for children with acute upper respiratory tract infections have significant clinical curative effect,suit and safety.%  目的:分析热毒宁注射剂治疗儿童急性上呼吸道感染的临床疗效。方法:选取我院儿科2012年5~8月临床确诊为急性上呼吸道感染的196例儿童患者,年龄1~6周岁,予以常规退热处理,加强饮食护理,在此基础上,随机分为三组进行治疗,分别为热毒宁治疗组、利巴韦林对照组以及热毒宁+阿莫西林克拉维酸钾治疗组。结果:经过三天的治疗,热毒宁治疗组的总有效率高达95.6%,与利巴韦林对照组有显著性差异,与热毒宁+阿莫西林克拉维酸钾治疗组无差异。结论:热毒宁对儿童急性上呼吸道感染有显著的临床疗效,对症且安全。

  19. Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragaller Maximillian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Every year, more information accumulates about the possibility of treating patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome with specially designed mechanical ventilation strategies. Ventilator modes, positive end-expiratory pressure settings, and recruitment maneuvers play a major role in these strategies. However, what can we take from these experimental and clinical data to the clinical practice? In this article, we discuss substantial options of mechanical ventilation together with some adjunctive therapeutic measures, such as prone positioning and inhalation of nitric oxide.

  20. Deposition of inhaled particles in the respiratory tract as a function of age at exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A respiratory tract deposition model was developed that would accommodate age 1 month to adulthood as an initial step in calculating radiation dose following inhalation during environmental exposures. The approach to changing respiratory tract and physiological parameters to be applicable to children was to derive an analytical function describing the ratio of the child value to the value for a reference adult with the desired characteristics. A computer program was written to carry out the tracing of airflow through the respiratory tract and deposition in each of the sections for monodispersed particles of known density and diameter. 7 references

  1. The revised International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) dosimetric model for the human respiratory tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bair, W.J.

    1992-05-01

    A task group has revised the dosimetric model of the respiratory tract used to calculate annual limits on intake of radionuclides. The revised model can be used to project respiratory tract doses for workers and members of the public from airborne radionuclides and to assess past exposures. Doses calculated for specific extrathoracic and thoracic tissues can be adjusted to account for differences in radiosensitivity and summed to yield two values of dose for the respiratory tract that are applicable to the ICRP tissue weighted dosimetry system.

  2. The Revised International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) dosimetric model for the human respiratory tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bair, W.J.

    1991-09-01

    The new respiratory tract model is based on the premise that the large differences in radiation sensitivity of respiratory tract tissues, and the wide range of doses they receive, argue for calculating specific tissue doses rather than average lung doses for radiation protection purposes. The new model is more complex than the current lung model because it describes deposition of inhaled radioactive material in the clearance from several tissues and regions of the respiratory tract and is applicable to the worldwide population of both workers and the public. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Dysbiosis of upper respiratory tract microbiota in elderly pneumonia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A A; Huijskens, Elisabeth G W; Wyllie, Anne L; Biesbroek, Giske; van den Bergh, Menno R; Veenhoven, Reinier H; Wang, Xinhui; Trzciński, Krzysztof; Bonten, Marc J; Rossen, John W A; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Bogaert, Debby

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly. We hypothesize that dysbiosis between regular residents of the upper respiratory tract (URT) microbiome, that is balance between commensals and potential pathogens, is involved in pathogen overgrowth and consequently disease. We compared oropharyngeal microbiota of elderly pneumonia patients (n=100) with healthy elderly (n=91) by 16S-rRNA-based sequencing and verified our findings in young adult pneumonia patients (n=27) and young healthy adults (n=187). Microbiota profiles differed significantly between elderly pneumonia patients and healthy elderly (PERMANOVA, Pdisease was less clear. A decision tree model based on the relative abundance of five bacterial community members in URT microbiota showed high specificity of 95% and sensitivity of 84% (89% and 73%, respectively, after cross-validation) for differentiating pneumonia patients from healthy individuals. These results suggest that pneumonia in elderly and young adults is associated with dysbiosis of the URT microbiome with bacterial overgrowth of single species and absence of distinct anaerobic bacteria. Whether the observed microbiome changes are a cause or a consequence of the development of pneumonia or merely coincide with disease status remains a question for future research.

  4. Procalcitonin-guided antibiotic treatment of respiratory tract infections in a primary care setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, Rune; Jensen, Jens Ulrik Stæhr

    2011-01-01

    Clinical signs of infection do not allow for correct identification of bacterial and viral aetiology in acute respiratory infections. A valid tool to assist the clinician in identifying patients who will benefit from antibiotic therapy, as well as patients with a potentially serious infection, co...... are likely to benefit from antibiotic treatment and to rule out serious infections, and comments on further research to determine a future role for procalcitonin in primary care......., could greatly improve patient care and limit excessive antibiotic prescriptions. Procalcitonin is a new marker of suspected bacterial infection that has shown promise in guiding antibiotic therapy in acute respiratory tract infections in hospitals without compromising patient safety. Procalcitonin...... concentrations in primary care are low and can be used primarily to rule out serious infection. However, procalcitonin measurement should not be used as the sole basis for clinical decisions; clinical skills are prerequisites for the correct use of this new tool in practice. At present there is no point-of-care...

  5. Critical care ultrasonography in acute respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignon, Philippe; Repessé, Xavier; Vieillard-Baron, Antoine; Maury, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is a leading indication for performing critical care ultrasonography (CCUS) which, in these patients, combines critical care echocardiography (CCE) and chest ultrasonography. CCE is ideally suited to guide the diagnostic work-up in patients presenting with ARF since it allows the assessment of left ventricular filling pressure and pulmonary artery pressure, and the identification of a potential underlying cardiopathy. In addition, CCE precisely depicts the consequences of pulmonary vascular lesions on right ventricular function and helps in adjusting the ventilator settings in patients sustaining moderate-to-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Similarly, CCE helps in identifying patients at high risk of ventilator weaning failure, depicts the mechanisms of weaning pulmonary edema in those patients who fail a spontaneous breathing trial, and guides tailored therapeutic strategy. In all these clinical settings, CCE provides unparalleled information on both the efficacy and tolerance of therapeutic changes. Chest ultrasonography provides further insights into pleural and lung abnormalities associated with ARF, irrespective of its origin. It also allows the assessment of the effects of treatment on lung aeration or pleural effusions. The major limitation of lung ultrasonography is that it is currently based on a qualitative approach in the absence of standardized quantification parameters. CCE combined with chest ultrasonography rapidly provides highly relevant information in patients sustaining ARF. A pragmatic strategy based on the serial use of CCUS for the management of patients presenting with ARF of various origins is detailed in the present manuscript. PMID:27524204

  6. Critical care ultrasonography in acute respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignon, Philippe; Repessé, Xavier; Vieillard-Baron, Antoine; Maury, Eric

    2016-08-15

    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is a leading indication for performing critical care ultrasonography (CCUS) which, in these patients, combines critical care echocardiography (CCE) and chest ultrasonography. CCE is ideally suited to guide the diagnostic work-up in patients presenting with ARF since it allows the assessment of left ventricular filling pressure and pulmonary artery pressure, and the identification of a potential underlying cardiopathy. In addition, CCE precisely depicts the consequences of pulmonary vascular lesions on right ventricular function and helps in adjusting the ventilator settings in patients sustaining moderate-to-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Similarly, CCE helps in identifying patients at high risk of ventilator weaning failure, depicts the mechanisms of weaning pulmonary edema in those patients who fail a spontaneous breathing trial, and guides tailored therapeutic strategy. In all these clinical settings, CCE provides unparalleled information on both the efficacy and tolerance of therapeutic changes. Chest ultrasonography provides further insights into pleural and lung abnormalities associated with ARF, irrespective of its origin. It also allows the assessment of the effects of treatment on lung aeration or pleural effusions. The major limitation of lung ultrasonography is that it is currently based on a qualitative approach in the absence of standardized quantification parameters. CCE combined with chest ultrasonography rapidly provides highly relevant information in patients sustaining ARF. A pragmatic strategy based on the serial use of CCUS for the management of patients presenting with ARF of various origins is detailed in the present manuscript.

  7. Effects of air pollution on daily clinic visits for lower respiratory tract illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jing-Shiang; Chan, Chang-Chuan

    2002-01-01

    The authors used data obtained from clinic records and environmental monitoring stations in Taiwan during 1998 to estimate the association between air pollution and daily numbers of clinic visits for lower respiratory tract illness. A small-area design and hierarchical modeling were used for the analysis. Rates of daily clinic visits were associated with current-day concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and particulate matter less than or equal to 10 microm in aerometric diameter. People over age 65 years were the most susceptible, and estimated pollution effects decreased as the exposure time lag increased. The analysis also suggested that several community-specific variables, such as a community's population density and yearly air pollution levels, modified the effects of air pollution. In this paper, the authors demonstrate the use of a small-area design to assess acute health effects of air pollution.

  8. Aetiology and prediction of pneumonia in lower respiratory tract infection in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anette; Nexoe, Joergen; Bistrup, Lene A;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Knowledge of predominant pathogens and their association with outcome are of importance for the management of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). As antibiotic therapy is indicated in pneumonia and not in acute bronchitis, a predictor of pneumonia is needed. AIM: To describe...... the aetiology and outcome of LRTI in adults with pneumonic and adults with non-pneumonic LRTI treated in general practice and to identify predictors of radiographic pneumonia. DESIGN OF STUDY: Prospective, observational study. SETTING: Forty-two general practices and an outpatient clinic at the Department....... Primary outcome measure was hospitalisation within 4 weeks. RESULTS: Pneumonia was radiographically verified in 48 of 364 patients (13%). Bacterial infection was seen more often in patients with pneumonia (33% versus 17%, P

  9. Antibiotic prescriptions for suspected respiratory tract infection in primary care in South America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordoba, Gloria; Caballero, Lidia; Sandholdt, Håkon;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe and compare antibiotic prescribing patterns for primary care patients with respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in four South American countries. METHODS: This was a prospective observational study. General practitioners (GPs) from Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay and Uruguay......%) of these received an antibiotic prescription. There was a wide variation across countries in the use and selection of antibiotics. For example, 94% of patients with acute bronchitis were prescribed antibiotics in Bolivia, while in Uruguay only 21% received antibiotics. Amoxicillin was the most commonly prescribed...... antibiotic across countries, but prescription rates varied between 45% in Bolivia and 69% in Uruguay. Compared with the overall mean prescribing rate, and after adjusting for clinical presentation and demographics, prescribing of antibiotics varied by a factor of 6, the OR ranging from 0.37 (95% CI = 0...

  10. Antibiotic prescriptions for suspected respiratory tract infection in primary care in South America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordoba Currea, Gloria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe and compare antibiotic prescribing patterns for primary care patients with respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in four South American countries. Methods: Prospective observational study. General practitioners (GPs) from Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay and Uruguay registered data...... an antibiotic prescription. There was a wide variation across countries in the use and selection of antibiotics. For example, 94% of patients with acute bronchitis were prescribed antibiotics in Bolivia, while in Uruguay only 21% received antibiotics. Amoxicillin was the most commonly prescribed antibiotic...... across countries, but prescription rates varied between 45% in Bolivia and 69% in Uruguay. Compared with the overall mean prescribing rate and after adjusting for clinical presentation and demographics, prescribing of antibiotics varied by a factor of 6, the odds ratio ranging from 0.37 (95% CI 0.21; 0...

  11. Systematic Review of Factors Associated with Antibiotic Prescribing for Respiratory Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Rachel; Mah, Allison; Law, Michael R; McGrail, Kimberlyn; Patrick, David M

    2016-07-01

    Antibiotic use is a modifiable driver of antibiotic resistance. In many circumstances, antibiotic use is overly broad or unnecessary. We systematically assessed factors associated with antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections (RTI). Studies were included if they used actual (not self-reported or intended) prescribing data, assessed factors associated with antibiotic prescribing for RTIs, and performed multivariable analysis of associations. We searched Medline, Embase, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts using keyword and MeSH (medical subject headings) search terms. Two authors reviewed each abstract and independently appraised all included texts. Data on factors affecting antibiotic prescribing were extracted. Our searches retrieved a total of 2,848 abstracts, with 97 included in full-text review and 28 meeting full inclusion criteria. Compared to other factors, diagnosis of acute bronchitis was associated with increased antibiotic prescribing (range of adjusted odds ratios [aOR], 1.56 to 15.9). Features on physical exam, such as fever, purulent sputum, abnormal respiratory exam, and tonsillar exudate, were also associated with higher odds of antibiotic prescribing. Patient desire for an antibiotic was not associated or was modestly associated with prescription (range of aORs, 0.61 to 9.87), in contrast to physician perception of patient desire for antibiotics, which showed a stronger association (range of aORs, 2.11 to 23.3). Physician's perception of patient desire for antibiotics was strongly associated with antibiotic prescribing. Antimicrobial stewardship programs should continue to expand in the outpatient setting and should emphasize clear and direct communication between patients and physicians, as well as signs and symptoms that do and do not predict bacterial etiology of upper respiratory tract infections. PMID:27139474

  12. Acute respiratory failure following ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonello Nicolini

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome is a serious and potentially life-threatening physiological complication that may be encountered in patients who undergo controlled ovarian hyperstimulation cycles. The syndrome is typically associated with regimes of exogenous gonadotropins, but it can be seen, albeit rarely, when clomiphene is administered during the induction phase. Although this syndrome is widely described in scientific literature and is well known by obstetricians, the knowledge of this pathological and potentially life-threatening condition is generally less than satisfactory among physicians. The dramatic increase in therapeutic strategies to treat infertility has pushed this condition into the realm of acute care therapy. The potential complications of this syndrome, including pulmonary involvement, should be considered and identified so as to allow a more appropriate diagnosis and management. We describe a case of a woman with an extremely severe (Stage 6 ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome who presented ascites, bilateral pleural effusion and severe respiratory failure treated with non-invasive ventilation. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit because of severe respiratory failure, ascites, and bilateral pleural effusion due to ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. Treatment included non-invasive ventilation and three thoracentesis procedures, plus the administration of albumin, colloid solutions and high-dose furosemid. Severe form of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome is observed in 0.5-5% of the women treated, and intensive care may be required for management of thromboembolic complications, renal failure and severe respiratory failure. Pulmonary intensive care may involve thoracentesis, oxygen supplementation and, in more severe cases, assisted ventilation. To our knowledge, there have been only two studies in English language medical literature that describe severe respiratory failure treated with non

  13. Inappropriate antibiotic prescription for respiratory tract indications : most prominent in adult patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Anne R. J.; Verheij, Theo J. M.; van der Velden, Alike W.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Numerous studies suggest overprescribing of antibiotics for respiratory tract indications (RTIs), without really authenticating inappropriate prescription; the strict criteria of guideline recommendations were not taken into account as information on specific diagnoses, patient character

  14. Antibiotics for respiratory, ear and urinary tract disorders and consistency among GPs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ong, D.S.Y.; Kuyvenhoven, M.M.; Dijk, L. van; Verheij, T.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To describe specific diagnoses for which systemic antibiotics are prescribed, to assess adherence of antibiotic choice to national guidelines and to assess consistency among general practitioners (GPs) in prescribed volumes of antibiotics for respiratory, ear and urinary tract disorders.

  15. A new sampler for simulating aerosol deposition in the respiratory tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Dehong; ZHUO Weihai; YI Yanling; CHEN Bo; LIU Haikuan

    2008-01-01

    Abstract For estimation of the deposition fractions of radon progeny in different regions of the respiratory tract, a new sampler consisting of three different configurations of sampling heads was developed. The deposition fractions of aerosols on the wire screens inside the sampling heads were calculated with the fan model of filtration theory. The deposition fractions of aerosols in different regions of the respiratory tract were calculated with the lung dose evaluation program (LUDEP (C)) developed by National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) as References. In general indoor and mine environments, the deviation between the deposition fractions of attached aerosol on the wire screens designed in this study and its reference values in the respiratory tract is less than 5%. It is possible to accurately estimate the deposition fractions of radon progeny in different regions of the respiratory tract through mimic measurements of radon progeny collected with the new sampler.

  16. Systematic review of the epidemiology literature on formaldehyde and cancers of the upper respiratory tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: EPA is currently drafting a Toxicological Review of formaldehyde. As part of the comprehensive evaluation of potential hazards associated with exposure to formaldehyde, the potential hazards for cancers of the upper respiratory tract are being evaluated. We are aware ...

  17. 急性心肌梗死患者主动脉内球囊反搏术后下呼吸道感染风险及与预后关系%Risk factors for lower respiratory tract infection and its relation to prognosis in patients with acute myocardial infarction received intra-aortic balloon pump counterpulsation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢江; 牛丽丽; 崔俊玉; 谭琛

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To explore the risk factors for lower respiratory tract infection in patients with acute myo-cardial infarction (AMI) complicated with cardiogenic shock treated by intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) counterpul-sation,as well as its effect on prognosis. Methods:The risk factors for lower respiratory tract infection in 55 patients with AMI complicated with cardiogenic shock receiving IABP were analyzed logistically,and the effect of infection on prognosis was evaluated. Results: With treatment of IABP,43. 6% of the patients developed lower respiratory tract infection. The chance of developing the infection was higher in patients experienced invasive ventilation, blood transfusion, deep vein catheterization and lack of prophylactic use of antibiotics (P<0. 05). The mortality was higher in patients with infection than those without infection (75. 0% vs 38. 7%,P=0. 007). Cardiogenic shock, septic shock and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome were the main causes of death for patients with infections. Conclusion; Invasive ventilation, deep vein catheterization and blood transfusion are positively associated with lower respiratory tract infection, while prophylactic administration of antibiotics may reduce respiratory tract infections.%目的:探讨主动脉内球囊反搏(IABP)救治的急性心肌梗死(AMI)心源性休克患者发生下呼吸道感染的危险因素及对预后的影响.方法:回顾55例接受IABP治疗的AMI心源性休克患者,Logistic回归分析住院期间下呼吸道感染的危险因素,评估感染对预后的影响.结果:43.6% IABP治疗的AMI心源性休克患者发生下呼吸道感染,有创机械通气、输血(血液制品)、未预防性使用抗生素、深静脉置管者发生感染的机会比较大(P<0.05).感染患者病死率明显高于非感染者(75.0% vs 38.7%,P=0.007);心源性休克、感染性休克和多器官功能不全是下呼吸道感染患者主要的死因.结论:下呼吸道感染与有创通气

  18. Treatment of adults with community-acquired respiratory tract infections: results of a multicentric clinical trial with gatifloxacin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medeiros Eduardo Alexandrino Servolo

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory tract infections have an important clinical and economic impact and they are the most common indication for antibiotic use in outpatient practice. This prospective, multicenter non-controlled trial assessed the efficacy and safety of gatifloxacin in the treatment of community-acquired respiratory tract infections. Patients were treated with a daily oral dose of gatifloxacin 400 mg for 7-14 days. The diagnosis of respiratory infection was made based on the clinical condition and/or radiologic findings. A total of 5,044 adult patients with community-acquired respiratory infections was treated with gatifloxacin in different centers in Brazil between March 1, 2001, and October 31, 2001. Among the 5,044 patients treated, 1,501 patients (29.76% had community-acquired pneumonia, 756 (14.99% had acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis and 2,787 (55.25% had acute sinusitis. Of the total of patients treated, 3,607 (71.51% were considered cured, 1,261 (25% progressed with some clinical improvement, 28 (0.56% presented a relapse, 56 (1.11% failed to treatment and 92 (1.82% were unable to be evaluated. Adverse events were described in 634 (12.57% patients. The most common adverse events were: nausea (2.24%; dyspepsia (1.86%; diarrhea (0.79%; change in taste (0.46%; insomnia and irritability (0.22%; dizziness (0.77%; headache (0.42%; allergic reaction (0.18%; Central Nervous System alterations - insomnia, agitation, anxiety - (0.46%. This study showed that the treatment of respiratory tract infections with gatifloxacin was safe and efficient and had a low incidence of adverse events.

  19. Clustering of acute respiratory infection hospitalizations in childcare facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Benn, Christine Stabell; Simonsen, Jacob;

    2010-01-01

    To estimate how risk of acute respiratory infection (ARI) hospitalization in children attending childcare facilities with a recently (within 1 month) hospitalized child is affected by gender, age and other characteristics.......To estimate how risk of acute respiratory infection (ARI) hospitalization in children attending childcare facilities with a recently (within 1 month) hospitalized child is affected by gender, age and other characteristics....

  20. Chinese herbal medicine for severe acute respiratory syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jianping; Manheimer, Eric; Shi, Yi;

    2004-01-01

    To review randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effects of Chinese herbal medicine for treating severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) systematically.......To review randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effects of Chinese herbal medicine for treating severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) systematically....

  1. Role of pneumococcal virulence genes in the etiology of respiratory tract infection and biofilm formation

    OpenAIRE

    Kurola, P. (Paula)

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Streptococcus pneumoniae, pneumococcus, is a common cause of respiratory tract infections and also a common inhabitant of the upper respiratory tract of healthy people. At present, 93 different polysaccharide types have been identified and in addition to them, unencapsulated pneumococci are found especially in healthy carriers. Pneumococci are usually identified by using a bacterial culture combined with biochemical or immunochemical tests. Recently, new DNA-based methods, such a...

  2. Surfactant therapy for acute respiratory distress in infants

    OpenAIRE

    Corrado Moretti; Barbàra, Caterina S; Rosanna Grossi; Stefano Luciani; Fabio Midulla; Paola Papoff

    2014-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains the primary indication for admission to paediatric intensive care units and accounts for significant mortality, morbidity and resource utilization. Respiratory infections, in particular pneumonia and severe bronchiolitis, are the most common causes of respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation in infants and children. This paper reviews the pathophysiology of ARDS and the management of paediatric patients with acute lung injury. Dat...

  3. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: Pulmonary and extrapulmonary not so similar

    OpenAIRE

    Inderpaul Singh Sehgal; Sahajal Dhooria; Digambar Behera; Ritesh Agarwal

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by acute onset respiratory failure with bilateral pulmonary infiltrates and hypoxemia. Current evidence suggests different respiratory mechanics in pulmonary ARDS (ARDSp) and extrapulmonary ARDS (ARDSexp) with disproportionate decrease in lung compliance in the former and chest wall compliance in the latter. Herein, we report two patients of ARDS, one each with ARDSp and ARDSexp that were managed using real-time esophageal pressure m...

  4. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: Pulmonary and extrapulmonary not so similar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inderpaul Singh Sehgal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is characterized by acute onset respiratory failure with bilateral pulmonary infiltrates and hypoxemia. Current evidence suggests different respiratory mechanics in pulmonary ARDS (ARDSp and extrapulmonary ARDS (ARDSexp with disproportionate decrease in lung compliance in the former and chest wall compliance in the latter. Herein, we report two patients of ARDS, one each with ARDSp and ARDSexp that were managed using real-time esophageal pressure monitoring using the AVEA ventilator to tailor the ventilatory strategy.

  5. Acute respiratory infections in young Ethiopian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris RA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rebecca Arden HarrisDepartment of Family and Social Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USAThe identification of risk factors for acute respiratory infections (ARI is crucial for designing interventions to both minimize transmission and augment the immune response, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa where poverty-related ARI is still a major cause of preventable death in young children.1 I therefore read with interest Geberetsadik et al’s recent study of the factors associated with ARI in Ethiopian children.2 Their study uses nationally representative data on households and individuals to build a model of the social, demographic, and anthropometric determinants of ARI. A precise understanding of their model, however, requires clarification of several items in their paper.View original paper by Geberetsadik et al.

  6. Analysis of antibiotic consumption for treating respiratory tract infections in children and compliance with the national clinical guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakić Dragana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Respiratory infections are the most common infections in children. The aims of the study were to analyze the use of antibiotics for respiratory infections in the period 2008 - 2010 in children’s population in region of Niš and to estimate the rational use of antibiotics in relation to the recommendations of the National Guidelines for physicians in primary care. Material and methods. Data source was a Pharmacy Niš database. Antibiotics prescriptions were selected for the following diagnoses: H65-H75 (acute otitis media, mastoiditis, J01 (acute sinusitis, J02-J03 (tonsillopharyngitis, J12-J18 (community acquired pneumonia, J20 (acute bronchitis, J32 (chronic sinusitis, J42 (chronic bronchitis. Antibiotic consumption was expressed in defined daily dose/1000 inhabitants/day. Results. The most widely prescribed antibiotic for the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections in children during the three years was amoxicillin (34.63; 32.50 and 31.00 defined daily dose/1000 inhabitants/day in 2008, 2009 and 2010, respectively. In the treatment of infections of the middle ear and mastoid, the combination of amoxicillin and clavulanic acid, was the most prescribed antibiotics (60% of total consumption of antibiotics for this indication. Azithromycin was the most widely prescribed antibiotic for the treatment of lower respiratory tract infections in children during the observed period (6.92; 8.20 and 7.18 defined daily dose/1000 inhabitans/day in 2008, 2009 and 2010, respectively. Conclusion. Recommendations of national guidelines are not complied with the treatment of upper and lower respiratory infections in the children population in region of Niš. This could be a sign of potentially irrational use of antibiotics that need to be further examined. Education of physicians can influence irrational use of antibiotics.

  7. Acute otitis media and respiratory viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, Yunus; Güven, Mehmet; Otlu, Bariş; Yenişehirli, Gülgün; Aladağ, Ibrahim; Eyibilen, Ahmet; Doğru, Salim

    2007-03-01

    The present study was performed to elucidate the clinical outcome, and etiology of acute otitis media (AOM) in children based on virologic and bacteriologic tests. The study group consisted of 120 children aged 6 to 144 months with AOM. Middle ear fluid (MEF) was tested for viral pathogens by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and for bacteria by gram-staining and culture. Clinical response was assessed on day 2 to 4, 11 to 13, 26 to 28. Respiratory viruses were isolated in 39 patients (32.5%). Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (46.5%) was the most common virus identified in MEF samples, followed by human rhinovirus (HRV) (25.6%), human coronavirus (HCV) (11.6%), influenza (IV) type A (9.3%), adenovirus type sub type A (AV) (4%), and parainfluenza (PIV) type -3 (2%) by RT-PCR. In total 69 bacterial species were isolated from 65 (54.8%) of 120 patients. Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) was the most frequently isolated bacteria. Viral RNA was detected in 31 (56.3%) of 55 bacteria-negative specimens and in 8 (12.3%) of 65 bacteria-positive MEF samples. No significant differences were found between children representing viral infection alone, combined viral and bacterial infection, bacterial infection alone, and neither viral nor bacterial infection, regarding clinical cure, relapse and reinfection rates. A significantly higher rate of secretory otitis media (SOM) was observed in alone or combined RSV infection with S. pneumonia or Haemophilus influenzae (H. influenzae) than in other viruses infection. Conclusion. This study provides information about etiologic agents and diagnosis of AOM in Turkish children. The findings highlight the importance of common respiratory viruses and bacterial pathogens, particularly RSV, HRV, S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae, in predisposing to and causing AOM in children.

  8. Human respiratory tract model for radiological protection: A revision of the ICRP Dosimetric Model for the Respiratory System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1984, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) appointed a task group of Committee 2 to review and revise, as necessary, the ICRP Dosimetric Model for the Respiratory System. The model was originally published in 1966, modified slightly in Publication No. 19, and again in Publication No. 30 (in 1979). The task group concluded that research during the past 20 y suggested certain deficiencies in the ICRP Dosimetric Model for the Respiratory System. Research has also provided sufficient information for a revision of the model. The task group's approach has been to review, in depth, morphology and physiology of the respiratory tract; deposition of inhaled particles in the respiratory tract; clearance of deposited materials; and the nature and specific sites of damage to the respiratory tract caused by inhaled radioactive substances. This review has led to a redefinition of the regions of the respiratory tract for dosimetric purposes. The redefinition has a morphologic and physiological basis and is consistent with observed deposition and clearance of particles and with resultant pathology. Regions, as revised, are the extrathoracic (E-T) region, comprising the nasal and oral regions, the pharynx, larynx, and upper part of the trachea; the fast-clearing thoracic region (T[f]), comprising the remainder of the trachea and bronchi; and the slow-clearing thoracic region (T[s]), comprising the bronchioles, alveoli, and thoracic lymph nodes. A task group report will include models for calculating radiation doses to these regions of the respiratory tract following inhalation of representative alpha-, beta-, and gamma-emitting particulate and gaseous radionuclides. The models may be implemented as a package of computer codes available to a wide range of users

  9. Viral and Bacterial Interactions in the Upper Respiratory Tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, Astrid A. T. M.; Biesbroek, Giske; Trzcinski, Krzysztof; Sanders, Elisabeth A. M.; Bogaert, Debby

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory infectious diseases are mainly caused by viruses or bacteria that often interact with one another. Although their presence is a prerequisite for subsequent infections, viruses and bacteria may be present in the nasopharynx without causing any respiratory symptoms. The upper respiratory t

  10. X-ray orbiscope physiological examination of the upper respiratory tract in newborn and infants using

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physiological changes in the laryngotracheal axis were examined during the respiratory cycle by image inten fication with high image frequency (6 images/sec). This examination of movements appeared to be very useful in functional disturbances of the trachea for analyzing the symptoms of obstructive disturbances in the upper respiratory tract. (orig.)

  11. [Assessment of chronic glucose metabolism disorders coexisting with respiratory failure in non-critical ill patients hospitalized with lower respiratory tract infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobocińska, Magdalena Barbara; Loba, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Lungs are the target organ in chronic hyperglycemia, but its large reserves causes a subclinical course of these changes. Given the results of other researchers indicating reduced active surface of gas exchange and pulmonary capillary damage, it can be assumed that diabetes and other hyperglycemic states diminish these reserves and impair effectiveness of respiratory gas exchange during pneumonia. So it is plausible to observe coexistence of glucose metabolism disorders and respiratory failure in patients hospitalized with lower respiratory tract infection. An observational study was conducted on 130 patients hospitalized with bacteriologically confirmed pneumonia. 63 patients suffering from chronic glucose metabolism disorders (A) and 67 randomly selected patients in control group (B) were observed on laboratory and clinical findings. There was no significant difference in prevalence of acute respiratory failure, although in the study group a slightly greater number of patients diagnosed with acute respiratory failure was observed. There was a significantly greater number of patients with previously confirmed chronic respiratory failure using long-term oxygen theraphy in A group (p = 0.029). The B patients with average blood glucose level > 108 mg/dl had significantly lower partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2)(gIc ≤ 108: 58.6 +/- 9.8; glc > 108: 51.7 +/- 11.1; p = 0.042). There was a statistically significant negative correlation of the average blood glucose level and PaO2 in the control group (p = 0.0152) and a significant inverse association between the average blood glucose level and the partial pressure of oxygen in patients without COPD belonging to the control group (p = 0.049). Respiratory failure is frequent in patients hospitalized with pneumonia. In patients without chronic glucose metabolism disorders with blood glucose level rising the oxygen tension decreases The association is stronger in patients without COPD.

  12. Acute respiratory distress in a silversmith

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jignesh Mukeshkumar Parikh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 25-year-old young male patient presented in casualty department with severe respiratory distress on the fourth day from onset of symptoms. The patient was nonsmoker and had no antecedent medical or drug history. Prior to admission, patient had dry cough and bilateral pleuritic chest pain for the last three days. He was in severe respiratory distress with use of accessory muscles of respiration. On examination, he had heart rate of 120 beats/min, blood pressure (BP of 150/80, respiratory rate of 48-52/min and central cyanosis present. On systemic examination, reduced intensity of breath sounds with extensive rhonchi and crepitation was found in both lung fields, with other examination being within normal limits. On pulse oximetry, oxygen saturation was 28% on room air, which increased up to 36% with the help of 4 L oxygen via nasal prongs. PaO 2 /FiO 2 ratio was 100. Chest X-ray analysis was suggestive of non-cardiac pulmonary edema in view of bilateral fluffy opacity without cardiomegaly. In view of 2/3 positive criteria, his provisional diagnosis was Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS. He required mechanical ventilatory support and was gradually weaned over a period of 10 days. The patient was treated with broad spectrum antibiotics and other supportive measures. On re-evaluation of history, we found that he was a goldsmith by occupation, smelting silver and gold for the past 8-10 years. On the day of onset of symptoms, while smelting silver he was exposed to golden yellow fumes for around 15 minutes, with the quantum of exposure more than any other day earlier. From previous experience and analysis of similar silver metals, he was able to tell us that the silver was adulterated with large amount of cadmium on that day than before. Serum level of cadmium was 2.9 μg/L 6 days after initial exposure. At the time of discharge, he had residual opacities in the chest radiograph and resting oxygen saturation was 94% on room air.

  13. A preliminary approach to age-dependent deposition modeling for human respiratory tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the respiratory tract model, presented by the ICRP Task Group on Lung Dynamics, is limited to adult workers for determining internal radiation exposure from inhaled radionuclides, the development of the model for estimating radiation doses in the general public, including all age groups, from environmental radioactive materials is required. This paper provides background information in developing the age-dependent respiratory tract model. A way of obtaining deposition probability through major mechanisms, such as impaction, sedimentation, and diffusion, in the respiratory airways is given. A computer program for estimating the percent deposition of inhaled monodisperse particles is described. (Namekawa, K.)

  14. Clinical features of probable severe acute respiratory syndrome in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Ying Lu; Xiao-Yuan Xu; Yu Lei; Yang-Feng Wu; Bo-Wen Chen; Feng Xiao; Gao-Qiang Xie; De-Min Han

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To summarize clinical features of probable severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Beijing.METHODS: Retrospective cases involving 801 patients admitted to hospitals in Beijing between March and June 2003, with a diagnosis of probable SARS, moderate type.The series of clinical manifestation, laboratory and radiograph data obtained from 801 cases were analyzed. RESULTS: One to three days after the onset of SARS, the major clinical symptoms were fever (in 88.14% of patients), fatigue, headache, myalgia, arthralgia (25-36%), etc. The counts of WBC (in 22.56% of patients) lymphocyte (70.25%)and CD3, CD4, CD8 positive T cells (70%) decreased. From 4-7 d, the unspecific symptoms became weak; however, the rates of low respiratory tract symptoms, such as cough (24.18%), sputum production (14.26%), chest distress (21.04%) and shortness of breath (9.23%) increased, so did the abnormal rates on chest radiograph or CT. The low counts of WBC, lymphocyte and CD3, CD4, CD8 positiveT cells touched bottom. From 8 to 16 d, the patients presented progressive cough (29.96%), sputum production (13.09%), chest distress (29.96%) and shortness of breath (35.34%). All patients had infiltrates on chest radiograph or CT, some even with multi-infiltrates. Two weeks later, patients' respiratory symptoms started to alleviate, the infiltrates on the lung began to absorb gradually, the counts of WBC, lymphocyte and CD3, CD4, CD8 positive T cells were restored to normality.CONCLUSION: The data reported here provide evidence that the course of SARS could be divided into four stages, namely the initial stage, progressive stage, fastigium and convalescent stage.

  15. The effect of vitamin D on lower respiratory tract infections in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şişmanlar, Tuğba; Aslan, Ayşe Tana; Gülbahar, Özlem; Özkan, Seçil

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Lower respiratory tract infections including mainly pneumonia represent an important public health problem leading to high mortality and mobidity rates in children aged below five years in developing countries including our country. Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with increased risk of rickets/osteomalacia, various cancers, autoimmune diseases, hyperproliferative skin diseases, cardiovascular system diseases and infectious diseases. Vitamin D has an important role in cellular and humoral immunity and pulmonary functions. Vitamin D deficiency and lower respiratory tract infection are common health problems in children in our country and no clinical study investigating the relationship between these problems has been conducted so far. In this case-control study, we aimed to assess the association between vitamin D level and lower respiratory tract infection in children. Material and Methods: Sixty-three children aged between six months and five years with lower respiratory infections and 59 age-matched children who had no history of respiratory symptoms in the last month and no accompanying chronic disease were compared in terms of vitamin D levels. The children in the patient group were also evaluated by the clinical picture. Results: No significant correlation was found between vitamin D levels and lower respiratory tract infection in terms of disease and its severity. However, it was found that vitamin D deficiency/ insufficiency was observed with a high rate in all children included in the study. Conclusions: Although no correlation was found between vitamin D level and lower respiratory tract infection, it is recommended that vitamin D level should be measured in children with lower respiratory tract infection and vitamin D supplementation should be given to all children especially in winter months based on the fact that the level of vitamin D was lower than normal in approximately half of the children included in the study and considering the

  16. Respiratory support for severe acute respiratory syndrome: integration of efficacy and safety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chen; CAO Zhi-xin

    2005-01-01

    @@ Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is an acute respiratory illness caused by infection with the SARS virus. The most obvious clinical characteristic of SARS is rapidly progressive pneumonia, and about 20% patients need intensive care due to acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).1-3 In the absence of effective drugs for SARS, supportive care, especially respiratory support techniques (RSTs), is of primary importance. On the other hand, offering RSTs to SARS patients may carry a high-risk of infection to healthcare workers because of the high infectivity of SARS. Therefore, the strategy of RSTs for SARS should be the integration of efficacy and safety. In this issue of the Chinese Medical Journal, an article from Hong Kong has retrospectively compared both the safety and efficacy of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) with that of invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) in the treatment of respiratory failure in SARS.

  17. Drug Utilization Study on Antibiotics Use in Lower Respiratory Tract Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Govind Naik

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Antibiotics are commonly prescribed for the lower respiratory tract infection. But if antibiotics are not used rationally then there will be increase chances of resistance of bacteria as well as increase in the total cost of treatment. This study was conducted to see the antibiotics utilization pattern. Aim: This drug utilization study was conducted to evaluate the pattern of antibiotics use in Medicine Department of a Krishna Hospital, Karad, Maharashtra, India. 96 case records were examined, of which 46.87% were LRTI (nonspecific LRTI and acute bronchitis and 51% were pneumonia. Female accounted for 53.12% and male for 46.87 % of total cases. The World Health Organization (WHO indicators (utilization in defined daily doses (DDD; DDD/1000inhibitant/day were used and the ATC/DDD method was implemented. The most frequently prescribed antibiotic was ceftriaxone, followed by Azithromycin. The DDD/1000inhibitant/day of Azithromycin was the highest (5.74. Average treatment period was found to be 5.42 and 6.52 for LRTI (nonspecific LRTI and Acute Bronchitis and pneumonia respectively. A total of 96 cases studied; in which 33 cases had mono-antibiotic therapy (33.37% and rest contained poly-antibiotics therapy (66.63%. Prescribing by generic names has to be encouraged. [Natl J Med Res 2013; 3(4.000: 324-327

  18. The role of imaging in adult acute urinary tract infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, J.A.W. [Diagnostic Radiology Department, St. Bartholomew`s Hospital, West Smithfield, London EC1A 7BE (United Kingdom)

    1997-08-01

    Imaging is required in only a minority of patients with urinary tract infection. Some patients who present with severe loin pain are imaged because ureteric colic is suspected. If urinary tract infection does not respond normally to antibiotics, imaging is undertaken to check for evidence of renal obstuction or sepsis. Finally, after the acute infection has been treated, imaging is required in some patients to check for factors pre-disposing to renal damage or to relapsing or recurrent infection. This review discusses the appropriate choice of imaging technique to use in each clinical situation and summarises the expected findings. (orig.). With 15 figs., 1 tab.

  19. BACTERIAL PROFILE, ANTIBIOTIC SENSITIVITY AND RESISTANCE OF LOWER RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS IN UPPER EGYPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal Agmy

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI account for a considerable proportion of morbidity and antibiotic use. We aimed to identify the causative bacteria, antibiotic sensitivity and resistance of hospitalized adult patients due to LRTI in Upper Egypt. METHODS: A multicentre prospective study was performed at 3 University Hospitals for 3 years. Samples included sputum or bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL for staining and culture, and serum for serology. Samples were cultured on 3 bacteriological media (Nutrient, Chocolate ,MacConkey's agars.Colonies were identified via MicroScan WalkAway-96. Pneumoslide IgM kit was used for detection of atypical pathogens via indirect immunofluorescent assay. RESULTS: The predominant isolates in 360 patients with CAP were S.pneumoniae (36%, C. pneumoniae (18%, and M. pneumoniae (12%. A higher sensitivity was recorded for moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, macrolides, and cefepime. A higher of resistance was recorded for doxycycline, cephalosporins, and β-lactam-β-lactamase inhibitors. The predominant isolates in 318 patients with HAP were, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus; MRSA (23%, K. pneumoniae (14%, and polymicrobial in 12%. A higher sensitivity was recorded for vancomycin, ciprofloxacin, and moxifloxacin. Very high resistance was recorded for β-lactam-β-lactamase inhibitors and cephalosporins. The predominant organisms in 376 patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (AECOPD were H. influnzae (30%, S. pneumoniae (25%, and M. catarrhalis(18%. A higher sensitivity was recorded for moxifloxacin, macrolides and cefepime. A higher rate of resistance was recorded for aminoglycosides and cephalosporins CONCLUSIONS: The most predominant bacteria for CAP in Upper Egypt are S. pneumoniae and atypical organisms, while that for HAP are MRSA and Gram negative bacteria. For acute exacerbation of COPD,H.influnzae was the commonest organism. Respiratory quinolones

  20. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: epidemiology and management approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walkey AJ

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Allan J Walkey,1 Ross Summer,1 Vu Ho,1 Philip Alkana21The Pulmonary Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; 2Asthma Research Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Acute lung injury and the more severe acute respiratory distress syndrome represent a spectrum of lung disease characterized by the sudden onset of inflammatory pulmonary edema secondary to myriad local or systemic insults. The present article provides a review of current evidence in the epidemiology and treatment of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, with a focus on significant knowledge gaps that may be addressed through epidemiologic methods.Keywords: acute lung injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, review, epidemiology

  1. The upper respiratory tract microbiome and its potential role in bovine respiratory disease and otitis media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Svetlana F.; Teixeira, Andre Gustavo V.; Higgins, Catherine H.; Lima, Fabio S.; Bicalho, Rodrigo C.

    2016-01-01

    The upper respiratory tract (URT) hosts a complex microbial community of commensal microorganisms and potential pathogens. Analyzing the composition and nature of the healthy URT microbiota and how it changes over time will contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of pneumonia and otitis. A longitudinal study was conducted including 174 Holstein calves that were divided in four groups: healthy calves, calves diagnosed with pneumonia, otitis or both diseases. Deep pharyngeal swabs were collected on days 3, 14, 28, and 35 of life, and next-generation sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene as well as quantitative PCR was performed. The URT of Holstein dairy calves aged 3 to 35 days revealed to host a highly diverse bacterial community. The relative abundances of the bacterial genera Mannheimia, Moraxella, and Mycoplasma were significantly higher in diseased versus healthy animals, and the total bacterial load of newborn calves at day 3 was higher for animals that developed pneumonia than for healthy animals. Our results corroborate the existing knowledge that species of Mannheimia and Mycoplasma are important pathogens in pneumonia and otitis. Furthermore, they suggest that species of Moraxella can potentially cause the same disorders (pneumonia and otitis), and that high neonatal bacterial load is a key contributor to the development of pneumonia. PMID:27363739

  2. Pathological study on severe acute respiratory syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郎振为; 张立洁; 张世杰; 孟忻; 李俊强; 宋晨朝; 孙琳; 周育森

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the pathological characteristics of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and its relationship to clinical manifestation. Methods Tissue specimens from 3 autopsies of probable SARS cases were studied by microscope, and the clinical data was reviewed.Results The typical pathological changes of lungs were diffuse hemorrhaging on the surface. A combination of serous, fibrinous and hemorrhagic inflammation was seen in most of the pulmonary alveoli with the engorgement of capillaries and detection of micro-thrombosis in some of these capillaries. Pulmonary alveoli thickened with interstitial mononuclear inflammatory infiltrates, suffered diffuse alveolar damage, experienced desquamation of pneumocytes and had hyaline-membrane formation, fibrinoid materials, and erythrocytes in alveolar spaces. There were thromboembolisms in some bronchial arteries. Furthermore, hemorrhagic necrosis was also evident in lymph nodes and spleen with the attenuation of lymphocytes. Other atypical pathological changes, such as hydropic degeneration, fatty degeneration, interstitial cell proliferation and lesions having existed before hospitalization were observed in the liver, heart, kidney and pancreas.Conclusion Severe damage to the pulmonary and immunological systems is responsible for the clinical features of SARS and may lead to the death of patients.

  3. Non-invasive versus invasive mechanical ventilation for respiratory failure in severe acute respiratory syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Loretta YC Yam; Alfred YF Chan; Thomas MT Cheung; Eva LH Tsui; Jane CK Chan; Vivian CW Wong

    2005-01-01

    Background Severe acute respiratory syndrome is frequently complicated by respiratory failure requiring ventilatory support. We aimed to compare the efficacy of non-invasive ventilation against invasive mechanical ventilation treating respiratory failure in this disease. Methods Retrospective analysis was conducted on all respiratory failure patients identified from the Hong Kong Hospital Authority Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Database. Intubation rate, mortality and secondary outcome of a hospital utilizing non-invasive ventilation under standard infection control conditions (NIV Hospital) were compared against 13 hospitals using solely invasive ventilation (IMV Hospitals). Multiple logistic regression analyses with adjustments for confounding variables were performed to test for association between outcomes and hospital groups. Results Both hospital groups had comparable demographics and clinical profiles, but NIV Hospital (42 patients) had higher lactate dehydrogenase ratio and worse radiographic score on admission and ribavirin-corticosteroid commencement. Compared to IMV Hospitals (451 patients), NIV Hospital had lower adjusted odds ratios for intubation (0.36, 95% CI 0.164-0.791, P=0.011) and death (0.235, 95% CI 0.077-0.716, P=0.011), and improved earlier after pulsed steroid rescue. There were no instances of transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome among health care workers due to the use of non-invasive ventilation.Conclusion Compared to invasive mechanical ventilation, non-invasive ventilation as initial ventilatory support for acute respiratory failure in the presence of severe acute respiratory syndrome appeared to be associated with reduced intubation need and mortality.

  4. Aerosolized prostacyclin for acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann;

    2010-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions that are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Aerosolized prostacyclin has been used to improve oxygenation despite the limited evidence available so far....

  5. ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISEASE AS THE DEBUT OF SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Ischenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus — a chronic autoimmune disease that is often associated with infectious processes. The paper presents two clinical cases of systemic lupus erythematosus , debuted with acute respiratory infection.

  6. Non-invasive mechanic ventilation in treating acute respiratory failure

    OpenAIRE

    Federico Lari; Novella Scandellari; Ferdinando De Maria; Virna Zecchi; Gianpaolo Bragagni; Fabrizio Giostra; Nicola DiBattista

    2009-01-01

    Non invasive ventilation (NIV) in acute respiratory failure (ARF) improve clinical parameters, arterial blood gases, decrease mortality and endo tracheal intubation (ETI) rate also outside the intensive care units (ICUs). Objective of this study is to verify applicability of NIV in a general non respiratory medical ward. We enrolled 68 consecutive patients (Pts) with Hypoxemic or Hyper capnic ARF: acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE), exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease ...

  7. Aerosolized prostacyclin for acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann;

    2010-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions that are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Aerosolized prostacyclin has been used to improve oxygenation despite the limited evidence available so far.......Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions that are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Aerosolized prostacyclin has been used to improve oxygenation despite the limited evidence available so far....

  8. Acute effects of winter air pollution on respiratory health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, van der S.

    1999-01-01

    In this thesis, acute respiratory health effects of exposure to winter air pollution are investigated in panels of children (7-11 yr) and adults (50-70 yr) with and without chronic respiratory symptoms, living in urban and non-urban areas in the Netherlands. The study was performed during three cons

  9. EXPERIMENTAL INFECTION OF THE RESPIRATORY TRACT WITH MYCOPLASMA PNEUMONIAE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a common human respiratory pathogen, has been studied experimentally for years using intranasal inoculation of the golden Sytrian hamster. Because of recent evidence outlining the role in pulmonary immune development of particle size and depth of mycoplasma...

  10. Application of sequence-independent amplification to screen for potentially viral pathogens from clinical respiratory samples of children with acute respiratory tract infection of unknown etiology%应用序列非依赖扩增技术检测儿童呼吸道标本中潜在病毒病原体

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭英; 钱渊; 段招军

    2012-01-01

    目的 应用序列非依赖扩增技术(sequence-independent amplification,SIA)检测常见病毒筛查阴性的5岁以下急性呼吸道感染患儿的呼吸道标本中可能存在的潜在病毒病原体,了解SIA扩增文库中各种背景核酸的组成.方法 随机选择45份常见病毒筛查阴性的5岁以下急性呼吸道感染患儿的鼻咽吸出物,0.45μm过滤和DNase/RNase处理去除病毒颗粒外的各种外源性核酸,再通过序列非依赖扩增技术对处理后的标本提取的核酸进行扩增,继而对扩增产物进行克隆、测序和BLAST比对.结果 测序403个克隆,获得有效序列368个,检出16个(16/368,4.3%)真核病毒同源序列,分别与Torque teno mini virus,Torque teno midi virus和Human bocavirus同源.此外,还检出1个真菌病毒( sclerotinia sclerotiorum hypovirulence associated DNA virus 1)同源序列和5个细菌病毒(噬菌体)同源序列.其余检出序列包含206个( 206/368,56.0%)与人基因组DNA同源的序列,11个(11/368,3.0%) rRNA同源序列,72个(72/368,19.6%)细菌同源序列,4个(4/368,1.1%)真菌同源序列,5个(5/368,1.4%)寄生虫同源序列,6个(6/368,1.6%)食源性序列,以及36个(36/368,9.8%)未能确定分类的序列.结论 核酸消化结合SIA方法可以检出常规检测方法所无法检出的潜在病毒病原体,本研究为后续系统性的查找和监测未知病毒提供了基础.%Objective Application of sequence-independent amplification (SIA) to identify the potentially viral pathogens in the clinical respiratory samples of children with acute respiratory tract infection of unknown etiology and characterize the composition of various non-viral sequences in the library of SIA amplicons.Method 45 randomly selected pediatric nasopharyngeal aspirate(NPA) samples for which no causal agent could be identified by common viruses screening were subjected to filtration & DNase/RNase treatments to remove the non-viral nucleic acid and then followed by

  11. Noninvasive Mechanical Ventilation in Acute Respiratory Failure Patients: A Respiratory Therapist Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Hidalgo, V.; Giugliano-Jaramillo, C; Pérez, R.; Cerpa, F; Budini, H; Cáceres, D.; Gutiérrez, T.; Molina, J; Keymer, J; Romero-Dapueto, C

    2015-01-01

    Physiotherapist in Chile and Respiratory Therapist worldwide are the professionals who are experts in respiratory care, in mechanical ventilation (MV), pathophysiology and connection and disconnection criteria. They should be experts in every aspect of the acute respiratory failure and its management, they and are the ones who in medical units are able to resolve doubts about ventilation and the setting of the ventilator. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation should be the first-line of treatmen...

  12. Respiratory muscle strength and muscle endurance are not affected by acute metabolic acidemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nizet, T.; Heijdra, Y.F.; Elshout, F.J.J. van den; Ven, M.J.T. van de; Bosch, F.H.; Mulder, P.H.M. de; Folgering, H.T.M.

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory muscle fatigue in asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) contributes to respiratory failure with hypercapnia, and subsequent respiratory acidosis. Therapeutic induction of acute metabolic acidosis further increases the respiratory drive and, therefore, may diminish ventilator

  13. Radiologic findings of childhood lower respiratory tract infection by influenza virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ho Taek; Park, Choong Ki; Shin, Hee Jung; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Hahm, Chang Kok; Hern, Ahn You [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-08-01

    After the RS (respiratory syncytial) virus, the influenza virus is the most common cause of childhood lower respiratory tract infection. We assessed the radiologic findings of childhood lower respiratory tract infection by the influenza virus. A total of 105 pediatric patients (76 males and 29 females; mean age, 2.4 years) with symptoms of respiratory tract infection were examined between March 1997 and April 2000. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were obtained and influenza virus infection was confirmed by direct or indirect immunofluorescent assays. Peribronchial infiltration, hyperinflation, atelectasis, pulmonary consolidation, and hilar lymphadenopathy were evaluated retrospectively at simple chest radiography. Bilateral perihiler peribronchial infiltration was noted in 78.1% of patients (n=82), hyperinflation in 63.8% (n=67), atelectasis in 3.8% (n=4, segmental 50%, lobar 50%), and pulmonary consolidation in 16.2% [n=17; segmental 70.6% (n=12), lobar 29.4% (n=5)]. Hilar lymphadenopathy was noted in one patient in whom there was no pleural effusion, and subglottic airway narrowing in 12 of 14 in whom the croup symptom complex was present. The major radiologic findings of influenza virus infection were bilateral perihilar peribronchial infiltration and hyperinflation. In some patients, upper respiratory tract infection was combined with subgolttic airway narrowing. Atelectasis or pleural effusion was rare.

  14. Radiologic findings of childhood lower respiratory tract infection by influenza virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the RS (respiratory syncytial) virus, the influenza virus is the most common cause of childhood lower respiratory tract infection. We assessed the radiologic findings of childhood lower respiratory tract infection by the influenza virus. A total of 105 pediatric patients (76 males and 29 females; mean age, 2.4 years) with symptoms of respiratory tract infection were examined between March 1997 and April 2000. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were obtained and influenza virus infection was confirmed by direct or indirect immunofluorescent assays. Peribronchial infiltration, hyperinflation, atelectasis, pulmonary consolidation, and hilar lymphadenopathy were evaluated retrospectively at simple chest radiography. Bilateral perihiler peribronchial infiltration was noted in 78.1% of patients (n=82), hyperinflation in 63.8% (n=67), atelectasis in 3.8% (n=4, segmental 50%, lobar 50%), and pulmonary consolidation in 16.2% [n=17; segmental 70.6% (n=12), lobar 29.4% (n=5)]. Hilar lymphadenopathy was noted in one patient in whom there was no pleural effusion, and subglottic airway narrowing in 12 of 14 in whom the croup symptom complex was present. The major radiologic findings of influenza virus infection were bilateral perihilar peribronchial infiltration and hyperinflation. In some patients, upper respiratory tract infection was combined with subgolttic airway narrowing. Atelectasis or pleural effusion was rare

  15. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: the Berlin Definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, V Marco; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; Thompson, B Taylor; Ferguson, Niall D; Caldwell, Ellen; Fan, Eddy; Camporota, Luigi; Slutsky, Arthur S

    2012-06-20

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was defined in 1994 by the American-European Consensus Conference (AECC); since then, issues regarding the reliability and validity of this definition have emerged. Using a consensus process, a panel of experts convened in 2011 (an initiative of the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine endorsed by the American Thoracic Society and the Society of Critical Care Medicine) developed the Berlin Definition, focusing on feasibility, reliability, validity, and objective evaluation of its performance. A draft definition proposed 3 mutually exclusive categories of ARDS based on degree of hypoxemia: mild (200 mm Hg Definition was empirically evaluated using patient-level meta-analysis of 4188 patients with ARDS from 4 multicenter clinical data sets and 269 patients with ARDS from 3 single-center data sets containing physiologic information. The 4 ancillary variables did not contribute to the predictive validity of severe ARDS for mortality and were removed from the definition. Using the Berlin Definition, stages of mild, moderate, and severe ARDS were associated with increased mortality (27%; 95% CI, 24%-30%; 32%; 95% CI, 29%-34%; and 45%; 95% CI, 42%-48%, respectively; P definition, the final Berlin Definition had better predictive validity for mortality, with an area under the receiver operating curve of 0.577 (95% CI, 0.561-0.593) vs 0.536 (95% CI, 0.520-0.553; P Definition for ARDS addresses a number of the limitations of the AECC definition. The approach of combining consensus discussions with empirical evaluation may serve as a model to create more accurate, evidence-based, critical illness syndrome definitions and to better inform clinical care, research, and health services planning.

  16. Absorbed fraction of electrons in human respiratory tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absorbed fractions of electrons, defined as part of electron energy deposited in the target, were calculated for various combinations of source and targets in HRTM. In that propose source code for PENELOPE was developed while respirator tract was modeled according to ICRP66. Absorbed fractions were fitted with the function presented in the paper

  17. Acute respiratory distress syndrome in an alpaca cria

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, Katharine M.; Streeter, Robert N.; Genova, Suzanne G.

    2011-01-01

    A 7-hour-old alpaca was presented for lethargy and depression. The cria responded favorably to initial treatment but developed acute-onset dyspnea 48 hours later. Acute respiratory distress syndrome was diagnosed by thoracic imaging and blood gas analysis. The cria was successfully treated with corticosteroids and discharged from the hospital.

  18. Aspergillus thyroiditis: a complication of respiratory tract infection in an immunocompromised patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvi, Madiha M; Meyer, David S; Hardin, Nicholas J; Dekay, James G; Marney, Annis M; Gilbert, Matthew P

    2013-01-01

    A 59-year-old male with past medical history significant for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma status after chemotherapy presented with acute onset of neck pain, odynophagia, and dysphagia associated with subjective fever, chills, and dyspnea. Physical findings included a temperature of 38.4°C, hypertension, and tachycardia. Patient was found to have anterior neck tenderness. Laboratory evaluation revealed neutropenia. The patient was started on empiric antibacterial and antiviral therapy and continued on home prophylactic antifungal treatment. Thyroid function tests revealed overt hyperthyroidism. A thyroid ultrasound showed heterogeneous echotexture without discrete nodules. Subacute thyroiditis was treated with methylprednisolone, metoprolol, and opiate analgesics. Patient's antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral treatments were broadened. A fine needle aspiration was not conducted. The patient's condition deteriorated rapidly over his brief hospital course and he expired. Autopsy showed fungal thyroiditis secondary to disseminated invasive Aspergillus. This report describes the presentation of fungal thyroiditis secondary to disseminated invasive Aspergillus originating from the respiratory tract. The authors review the diagnostic challenges, pathophysiology, and treatment of this condition. PMID:24455333

  19. An epidemiological survey to assess the clinical use of cephalosporins in community-acquired respiratory tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Sobti

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: In-clinic use of cefpodoxime as monotherapy is preferred in upper respiratory tract infections. However, clinicians recommend a combination therapy of cefpodoxime and levofloxacin in lower respiratory tract infections. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2015; 4(3.000: 547-550

  20. Carriage of Mycoplasma pneumoniae in the Upper Respiratory Tract of Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Children : An Observational Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spuesens, Emiel B. M.; Fraaij, Pieter L. A.; Visser, Eline G.; Hoogenboezem, Theo; Hop, Wim C. J.; van Adrichem, Leon N. A.; Weber, Frank; Moll, Henriette A.; Broekman, Berth; Berger, Marjolein Y.; van Rijsoort-Vos, Tineke; van Belkum, Alex; Schutten, Martin; Pas, Suzan D.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Hartwig, Nico G.; Vink, Cornelis; van Rossum, Annemarie M. C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Mycoplasma pneumoniae is thought to be a common cause of respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in children. The diagnosis of M. pneumoniae RTIs currently relies on serological methods and/or the detection of bacterial DNA in the upper respiratory tract (URT). It is conceivable, however, th

  1. Clinical relevance of prevention of respiratory syncytial virus lower respiratory tract infection in preterm infants born between 33 and 35 weeks gestational age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carbonell-Estrany, X.; Bont, L.; Doering, G.; Gouyon, J-B; Lanari, M.

    2008-01-01

    Premature infants are vulnerable to severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) resulting in hospitalisation and the potential for longer-term respiratory morbidity. Whilst the severity and consequence of RSV LRTI are generally accepted and recognised in infants

  2. Influenza A (H10N7) Virus Causes Respiratory Tract Disease in Harbor Seals and Ferrets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brand, Judith M A; Wohlsein, Peter; Herfst, Sander; Bodewes, Rogier; Pfankuche, Vanessa M; van de Bildt, Marco W G; Seehusen, Frauke; Puff, Christina; Richard, Mathilde; Siebert, Ursula; Lehnert, Kristina; Bestebroer, Theo; Lexmond, Pascal; Fouchier, Ron A M; Prenger-Berninghoff, Ellen; Herbst, Werner; Koopmans, Marion; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Kuiken, Thijs; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza viruses sporadically cross the species barrier to mammals, including humans, in which they may cause epidemic disease. Recently such an epidemic occurred due to the emergence of avian influenza virus of the subtype H10N7 (Seal/H10N7) in harbor seals (Phoca vitulina). This epidemic caused high mortality in seals along the north-west coast of Europe and represented a potential risk for human health. To characterize the spectrum of lesions and to identify the target cells and viral distribution, findings in 16 harbor seals spontaneously infected with Seal/H10N7 are described. The seals had respiratory tract inflammation extending from the nasal cavity to bronchi associated with intralesional virus antigen in respiratory epithelial cells. Virus infection was restricted to the respiratory tract. The fatal outcome of the viral infection in seals was most likely caused by secondary bacterial infections. To investigate the pathogenic potential of H10N7 infection for humans, we inoculated the seal virus intratracheally into six ferrets and performed pathological and virological analyses at 3 and 7 days post inoculation. These experimentally inoculated ferrets displayed mild clinical signs, virus excretion from the pharynx and respiratory tract inflammation extending from bronchi to alveoli that was associated with virus antigen expression exclusively in the respiratory epithelium. Virus was isolated only from the respiratory tract. In conclusion, Seal/H10N7 infection in naturally infected harbor seals and experimentally infected ferrets shows that respiratory epithelial cells are the permissive cells for viral replication. Fatal outcome in seals was caused by secondary bacterial pneumonia similar to that in fatal human cases during influenza pandemics. Productive infection of ferrets indicates that seal/H10N7 may possess a zoonotic potential. This outbreak of LPAI from wild birds to seals demonstrates the risk of such occasions for mammals and thus humans

  3. Infection Feature and Drug Resistance of Bacteria of Inferior Respiratory Tract in Patients with Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Guiyang of China%贵阳地区慢性阻塞性肺疾病急性加重期下呼吸道细菌感染特征和耐药性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周忠; 王燕; 蔡翠; 龙海; 张娟; 查小芳

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the infective bacteria of inferior respiratory tract by analyzing sputum and secretion from inferior respiratory tract in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease ( AECOPD ) in Guiyang of China, and to provide evidence for clinical therapy. Methods Sputum and secretion of inferior respiratory tract of 254 patients with AECOPD admitted in our hospital from 1 April 2009 to 30 April 2010 in Guiyang were cultured and drug sensitivity tests were conducted, with one or more strains of bacteria being cultured. Results Positive sputum and secretion of inferior respiratory tract culture were found in 215 ( 84. 65% ) patients with AECOPD, and 516 strains of pathogenic bacteria were cultured. Among these bacteria, the six main pathogenic bacteria were 305 (59. 11% ) strains of moraxella catarrhalis, 108 ( 20. 93% ) strains of streptococus viridans, 22 ( 4. 26% ) strains escherichia coli, 14 ( 2. 71% ) strains of enteroaerogen, 14 ( 2. 71% ) strains of klebsie pneumoniae and 11 ( 2. 13% ) strains of hafnia alvei. There were single infective bacteria in 154 patients with AECOPD and mixing infective bacteria in 61 patients with AECOPD. Single infective bacteria were the mainly influence factors for the severity of AECOPD. Single infective bacteria and mixing infective bacteria both showed linear regression correlation with the severity of AECOPD. The same bacterial isolates were founded many times in sputum cultures, but the drug resistances of these outcomes were not the same in 60 patients with AECOPD. Six main types of pathogenic bacteria had more drug resistance ( moraxella catarrhalis et al ) to penicillin, ampicillin, erythromycin, ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin. Most of the gram-negative bacillus had low drug resistance to cephalosporins. The positive sputum germiculture was positively correlated with the severity of heart function of corpulmonale. Conclusion The moraxella catarrhalis and treptococus

  4. Prognosis of primary care patients aged 80 years and older with lower respiratory tract infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Nadort, Christiana; Smeets, Hugo M; Bont, Jettie; Zuithoff, N Peter A; Hak, Eelko; Verheij, Theo J M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Predictors for a complicated course of a lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) episode among patients aged > or =80 years are unknown. AIM: To determine prognostic factors for hospital admission or death within 30 days after first onset of LRTI among primary care patients aged > or =8

  5. Effectiveness of adenoidectomy in children with recurrent upper respiratory tract infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Aardweg, M.T.A.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the effects of adenoidectomy in children with recurrent upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs).Despite being one of the most frequent operations performed in children, evidence for the effectiveness of adenoidectomy is scarce and guidance in particular for children with re

  6. Cupping Therapy for 103 Cases of High Fever due to Infection of the Upper Respiratory Tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘颖东

    2002-01-01

    @@ The cupping therapy has remarkable antipyretic effect in the treatment of fever. In recent years, the author has treated 103 cases of high fever caused by infection of the upper respiratory tract and obtained quite satisfactory therapeutic results. A report follows.

  7. Illness behaviour and antibiotic prescription in patients with respiratory tract symptoms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijn, H.J. van; Kuyvenhoven, M.M.; Schellevis, F.G.; Verheij, T.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although the vast majority of respiratory tract symptoms are self-limiting, many patients visit their GP for these symptoms and antibiotics are over-prescribed. AIM: To explore determinants of patients visiting GPs for recent cough, sore throat, or earache; for being prescribed antibioti

  8. Views on respiratory tract symptoms and antibiotics of Dutch general practitioners, practice staff and patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duijn, HJ; Kuyvenhoven, MA; Schellevis, FG; Verheij, TJM

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: To explore views on respiratory tract symptoms (cough, sore throat and earache) and antibiotics of GPs, practice staff, and patients. Methods: In a nationwide study, 181 GPs, 204 practice staff members and 1250 patients from 90 practices participated by answering 14 items relating to vie

  9. Selective media for recovery of Haemophilus influenzae from specimens contaminated with upper respiratory tract microbial flora.

    OpenAIRE

    Chapin, K. C.; Doern, G V

    1983-01-01

    Isolation of Haemophilus influenzae from specimens contaminated with upper respiratory tract microbial flora was attempted with three different media: enriched chocolate agar, chocolate agar plus vancomycin, and chocolate agar plus vancomycin, bacitracin, and clindamycin. Recovery rates of H. influenzae from 852 pediatric pharyngeal swab specimens were 6.0, 28.5, and 59.9%, respectively.

  10. Diagnosis and treatment of community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections : Strategies for efficient management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterheert, J.J.

    2005-01-01

    Lower respiratory tract infections are an important cause for morbidity and mortality and associated with considerable costs and antibiotic consumption, especially in patients needing hospitalization. The aim of this thesis was to evaluate diagnostic and treatment strategies to decrease costs and co

  11. Neonatal total IgE and respiratory tract infections in children with intrauterine smoke exposure.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruskamp, J.; Smit, H.; Rovers, M.M.; Hoekstra, M.O.; Schilder, A.G.M.; Brunekreef, B.; Wijga, A.; Kerkhof, M.; de Jongste, J.; Sanders, E.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is known to increase the risk of respiratory tract infections (RTI). Some children, however, may be more susceptible to the harmful effects of ETS than others. We examined whether early atopic status (defined by elevated neonatal total IgE (t

  12. Neonatal total IgE and respiratory tract infections in children with intrauterine smoke exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruskamp, Jopje; Smit, Henriette; Rovers, Maroeska; Hoekstra, Maarten; Schilder, Anne; Brunekreef, Bert; Wijga, Alet; Kerkhof, Marjan; de Jongste, Johan; Sanders, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    Background Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is known to increase the risk of respiratory tract infections (RTI). Some children, however, may be more susceptible to the harmful effects of ETS than others. We examined whether early atopic status (defined by elevated neonatal total IgE (tI

  13. Epidemiology of respiratory tract infections in Dutch general practice: a historical analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellevis, F.G.; Donker, G.

    2007-01-01

    Aims: To describe time trends in the incidence of respiratory tract infections in general practice in the Netherlands and its relation to sex and age. Design and Methods: Data will be presented from several morbidity surveys conducted in general practices in the Netherlands: the Intermittent Morbidi

  14. Disordered microbial communities in the upper respiratory tract of cigarette smokers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily S Charlson

    Full Text Available Cigarette smokers have an increased risk of infectious diseases involving the respiratory tract. Some effects of smoking on specific respiratory tract bacteria have been described, but the consequences for global airway microbial community composition have not been determined. Here, we used culture-independent high-density sequencing to analyze the microbiota from the right and left nasopharynx and oropharynx of 29 smoking and 33 nonsmoking healthy asymptomatic adults to assess microbial composition and effects of cigarette smoking. Bacterial communities were profiled using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S sequence tags (803,391 total reads, aligned to 16S rRNA databases, and communities compared using the UniFrac distance metric. A Random Forest machine-learning algorithm was used to predict smoking status and identify taxa that best distinguished between smokers and nonsmokers. Community composition was primarily determined by airway site, with individuals exhibiting minimal side-of-body or temporal variation. Within airway habitats, microbiota from smokers were significantly more diverse than nonsmokers and clustered separately. The distributions of several genera were systematically altered by smoking in both the oro- and nasopharynx, and there was an enrichment of anaerobic lineages associated with periodontal disease in the oropharynx. These results indicate that distinct regions of the human upper respiratory tract contain characteristic microbial communities that exhibit disordered patterns in cigarette smokers, both in individual components and global structure, which may contribute to the prevalence of respiratory tract complications in this population.

  15. The effect of using an interactive booklet on childhood respiratory tract infections in consultations: Study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuttall Jacqueline

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory tract infections in children result in more primary care consultations than any other acute condition, and are the most common reason for prescribing antibiotics (which are largely unnecessary. About a fifth of children consult again for the same illness episode. Providing parents with written information on respiratory tract infections may result in a reduction in re-consultation rates and antibiotic prescribing for these illnesses. Asking clinicians to provide and discuss the information during the consultation may enhance effectiveness. This paper outlines the protocol for a study designed to evaluate the use of a booklet on respiratory tract infections in children within primary care consultations. Methods/Design This will be a cluster randomised controlled trial. General practices will be randomised to provide parents consulting because their child has an acute respiratory tract infection with either an interactive booklet, or usual care. The booklet provides information on the expected duration of their child's illness, the likely benefits of various treatment options, signs and symptoms that should prompt re-consultation, and symptomatic treatment advice. It has been designed for use within the consultation and aims to enhance communication through the use of specific prompts. Clinicians randomised to using the interactive booklet will receive online training in its use. Outcomes will be assessed via a telephone interview with the parent two weeks after first consulting. The primary outcome will be the proportion of children who re-consult for the same illness episode. Secondary outcomes include: antibiotic use, parental satisfaction and enablement, and illness costs. Consultation rates for respiratory tract infections for the subsequent year will be assessed by a review of practice notes. Discussion Previous studies in adults and children have shown that educational interventions can result in reductions

  16. A pilot study on respiratory and digestive tract cancer among woodworkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esping, B; Axelson, O

    1980-09-01

    Cancer of the nose and paranasal sinuses is a known occupational hazard among workers in the furniture industry. An increased frequency of cancer at other sites has also been suggested to occur among different types of woodworkers in the United States, eg, cancer of the gastrointestinal tract and lung but also lymphatic and hematopoietic malignancies. This case-referent study is of a pilot character and was undertaken for the further elucidation of respiratory and digestive tract cancer among Swedish woodworkers. A four-fold excess of respiratory cancer, other than nasal cancer, was found, particularly in relation to furniture workers, whereas no definite excess of digestive tract cancer was indicated. Further studies seem worthwhile regarding cancer hazard in the woodworking industry.

  17. Respiratory tract clearance model for dosimetry and bioassay of inhaled radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, M.R.; Birchall, A. (National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (UK)); Cuddihy, R.G. (Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); James, A.C. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Roy, M. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire)

    1990-07-01

    The ICRP Task Group on Respiratory Tract Models is developing a model to describe the retention and clearance of deposited radionuclides for dose-intake calculations and interpretation of bioassay data. Clearance from each region is treated as competition between mechanical transport, which moves particles to the gastro-intestinal tract and lymph nodes, and the translocation of material to blood. It is assumed that mechanical transport rates are the same for all materials, and that rates of translocation to blood are the same in all regions. Time-dependent clearance is represented by combinations of compartments. Representative values of parameters to describe mechanical transport from the human respiratory tract have been estimated, and guidance is given on the determination of translocation rates. It is emphasized that the current version of the model described here is still provisional. 30 refs.

  18. An unusual cause of epistaxis, anemia and upper respiratory tract obstruction, Leeches: Report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin Şengül

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The leech is an endoparasite for man and may cause lethal complications. In this article, we report two cases of 4 and 6-year-old who presented epistaxis due to leech infestasyon in nasopharynx and other case of 65-year-old adult with alzheimer who presented obstruction of upper respiratory tracks and anemia due to leech infestation in larynx. Especially in rural areas, it should always be borne in mind that leech might cause high mortality and morbidity due to serious complications such as anemia and obstruction of upper respiratory tracts and should be considered in evaluating the differential diagnosis of upper airway obstruction. J Clin Exp Invest 2012; 3 (3: 401-403Key words: Leech, epistaxis, anemia, obstruction of upper respiratory tract.

  19. A review of pulmonary coagulopathy in acute lung injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome and pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuizen, Laurens; de Groot, Philip G.; Grutters, Jan C.; Biesma, Douwe H.

    2009-01-01

    Enhanced bronchoalveolar coagulation is a hallmark of many acute inflammatory lung diseases such as acute lung injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome and pneumonia. Intervention with natural anticoagulants in these diseases has therefore become a topic of interest. Recently, new data on the rol

  20. Extracorporeal life support for adults with severe acute respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Cypel, Marcelo; Fan, Eddy

    2014-02-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) is an artificial means of maintaining adequate oxygenation and carbon dioxide elimination to enable injured lungs to recover from underlying disease. Technological advances have made ECLS devices smaller, less invasive, and easier to use. ECLS might, therefore, represent an important step towards improved management and outcomes of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Nevertheless, rigorous evidence of the ability of ECLS to improve short-term and long-term outcomes is needed before it can be widely implemented. Moreover, how to select patients and the timing and indications for ECLS in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome remain unclear. We describe the physiological principles, the putative risks and benefits, and the clinical evidence supporting the use of ECLS in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Additionally, we discuss controversies and future directions, such as novel technologies and indications, mechanical ventilation of the native lung during ECLS, and ethics considerations. PMID:24503270

  1. The acute respiratory distress syndrome: from mechanism to translation

    OpenAIRE

    Han, SeungHye; Mallampalli, Rama K.

    2015-01-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a form of severe hypoxemic respiratory failure characterized by inflammatory injury to the alveolar capillary barrier with extravasation of protein-rich edema fluid into the airspace. Although many modalities have been investigated to treat ARDS for the past several decades, supportive therapies still remain the mainstay of treatment. Here, we briefly review the definition, epidemiology and pathophysiology of ARDS. Next, we present emerging as...

  2. An Unusual Cause of Acute Hypercapneic Respiratory Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Janice Wang; Astha Chichra; Seth Koenig

    2011-01-01

    We present a rare cause of hypercapneic respiratory failure through this case report of a 72-year-old man presenting with progressive dyspnea and dysphagia over two years. Hypercapneic respiratory failure was acute on chronic in nature without an obvious etiology. Extensive workup for intrinsic pulmonary disease and neurologic causes were negative. Laryngoscopy and diagnostic imaging confirmed the diagnosis of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, also known as DISH, as the cause of upper...

  3. Is there still room for novel viral pathogens in pediatric respiratory tract infections?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Taboada

    Full Text Available Viruses are the most frequent cause of respiratory disease in children. However, despite the advanced diagnostic methods currently in use, in 20 to 50% of respiratory samples a specific pathogen cannot be detected. In this work, we used a metagenomic approach and deep sequencing to examine respiratory samples from children with lower and upper respiratory tract infections that had been previously found negative for 6 bacteria and 15 respiratory viruses by PCR. Nasal washings from 25 children (out of 250 hospitalized with a diagnosis of pneumonia and nasopharyngeal swabs from 46 outpatient children (out of 526 were studied. DNA reads for at least one virus commonly associated to respiratory infections was found in 20 of 25 hospitalized patients, while reads for pathogenic respiratory bacteria were detected in the remaining 5 children. For outpatients, all the samples were pooled into 25 DNA libraries for sequencing. In this case, in 22 of the 25 sequenced libraries at least one respiratory virus was identified, while in all other, but one, pathogenic bacteria were detected. In both patient groups reads for respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus-OC43, and rhinovirus were identified. In addition, viruses less frequently associated to respiratory infections were also found. Saffold virus was detected in outpatient but not in hospitalized children. Anellovirus, rotavirus, and astrovirus, as well as several animal and plant viruses were detected in both groups. No novel viruses were identified. Adding up the deep sequencing results to the PCR data, 79.2% of 250 hospitalized and 76.6% of 526 ambulatory patients were positive for viruses, and all other children, but one, had pathogenic respiratory bacteria identified. These results suggest that at least in the type of populations studied and with the sampling methods used the odds of finding novel, clinically relevant viruses, in pediatric respiratory infections are low.

  4. Is There Still Room for Novel Viral Pathogens in Pediatric Respiratory Tract Infections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboada, Blanca; Espinoza, Marco A.; Isa, Pavel; Aponte, Fernando E.; Arias-Ortiz, María A.; Monge-Martínez, Jesús; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Rubén; Díaz-Hernández, Fidel; Zárate-Vidal, Fernando; Wong-Chew, Rosa María; Firo-Reyes, Verónica; del Río-Almendárez, Carlos N.; Gaitán-Meza, Jesús; Villaseñor-Sierra, Alberto; Martínez-Aguilar, Gerardo; Salas-Mier, Ma. del Carmen; Noyola, Daniel E.; Pérez-Gónzalez, Luis F.; López, Susana; Santos-Preciado, José I.; Arias, Carlos F.

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are the most frequent cause of respiratory disease in children. However, despite the advanced diagnostic methods currently in use, in 20 to 50% of respiratory samples a specific pathogen cannot be detected. In this work, we used a metagenomic approach and deep sequencing to examine respiratory samples from children with lower and upper respiratory tract infections that had been previously found negative for 6 bacteria and 15 respiratory viruses by PCR. Nasal washings from 25 children (out of 250) hospitalized with a diagnosis of pneumonia and nasopharyngeal swabs from 46 outpatient children (out of 526) were studied. DNA reads for at least one virus commonly associated to respiratory infections was found in 20 of 25 hospitalized patients, while reads for pathogenic respiratory bacteria were detected in the remaining 5 children. For outpatients, all the samples were pooled into 25 DNA libraries for sequencing. In this case, in 22 of the 25 sequenced libraries at least one respiratory virus was identified, while in all other, but one, pathogenic bacteria were detected. In both patient groups reads for respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus-OC43, and rhinovirus were identified. In addition, viruses less frequently associated to respiratory infections were also found. Saffold virus was detected in outpatient but not in hospitalized children. Anellovirus, rotavirus, and astrovirus, as well as several animal and plant viruses were detected in both groups. No novel viruses were identified. Adding up the deep sequencing results to the PCR data, 79.2% of 250 hospitalized and 76.6% of 526 ambulatory patients were positive for viruses, and all other children, but one, had pathogenic respiratory bacteria identified. These results suggest that at least in the type of populations studied and with the sampling methods used the odds of finding novel, clinically relevant viruses, in pediatric respiratory infections are low. PMID:25412469

  5. [Proteolytic enzymes: potential allergens for the skin and respiratory tract?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüthrich, B

    1985-03-01

    Proteolytic enzymes of animal, bacterial, mould or plant origin are used in many industrial processes, e.g. in the detergent, food and pharmaceutical industries as well as in medicine. The allergenic potency of these enzymes should not be underestimated, for they cause, in particular, IgE-mediated respiratory allergies. The risk of sensitization to enzymes due to inhalation as a result of occupational exposure is very high (up to 50%), and therapeutic applications are also not without risk. Therefore, the utmost care should be taken in the production and handling of pulverized enzymes and their inhalation should be avoided. Papain and Bromelain are used as tenderizers of meat and to clarify beer. Therefore, these enzymes are also potential ingestive allergens and may represent an unrecognized cause of an allergic reaction following a meal. As contact allergens the enzymes play a minor role; biodetergents in particular present no increased risk of skin damage for the user. PMID:3888919

  6. The Nucleus of the Solitary Tract and the coordination of respiratory and sympathetic activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel B. Zoccal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that breathing introduces rhythmical oscillations in the heart rate and arterial pressure levels. Sympathetic oscillations coupled to the respiratory activity have been suggested as an important homeostatic mechanism optimizing tissue perfusion and blood gas uptake/delivery. This respiratory-sympathetic coupling is strengthened in conditions of blood gas challenges (hypoxia and hypercapnia as a result of the synchronized activation of brainstem respiratory and sympathetic neurons, culminating with the emergence of entrained cardiovascular and respiratory reflex responses. Studies have proposed that the ventrolateral region of the medulla oblongata is a major site of synaptic interaction between respiratory and sympathetic neurons. However, other brainstem regions also play a relevant role in the patterning of respiratory and sympathetic motor outputs. Recent findings suggest that the neurons of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS, in the dorsal medulla, are essential for the processing and coordination of respiratory and sympathetic responses to hypoxia. The NTS is the first synaptic station of the cardiorespiratory afferent inputs, including peripheral chemoreceptors, baroreceptors and pulmonary stretch receptors. The synaptic profile of the NTS neurons receiving the excitatory drive from afferent inputs is complex and involves distinct neurotransmitters, including glutamate, ATP and acetylcholine. In the present review we discuss the role of the NTS circuitry in coordinating sympathetic and respiratory reflex responses. We also analyze the neuroplasticity of NTS neurons and their contribution for the development of cardiorespiratory dysfunctions, as observed in neurogenic hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea and metabolic disorders.

  7. Experimentally determined human respiratory tract deposition of airborne particles at a busy street

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löndahl, Jakob; Massling, Andreas; Swietlicki, Erik;

    2009-01-01

    Traffic is one of the major sources of harmful airborne particles worldwide. To relate exposure to adverse health effects it is important to determine the deposition probability of the inhaled particles in the human respiratory tract. The size-dependent deposition of 12-580 nm particles was measu......Traffic is one of the major sources of harmful airborne particles worldwide. To relate exposure to adverse health effects it is important to determine the deposition probability of the inhaled particles in the human respiratory tract. The size-dependent deposition of 12-580 nm particles...... was measured with a novel setup in 9 healthy subjects breathing by mouth on the windward side of a busy street in Copenhagen, Denmark. The aerosol was characterized both at the curbside and, to obtain the background concentration, at rooftop level. Particle hygroscopicity, a key parameter affecting respiratory...... investigated previously (equal inhaled mass concentrations). This was because the traffic exhaust particles had both a higher deposition probability and a higher number and surface area concentration per unit mass. To validate the results, the respiratory tract deposition was estimated by using the well...

  8. 苏州地区儿童急性下呼吸道人鼻病毒感染的流行病学及喘息相关因素%Epidemiology and risk factors associated with wheezing of human rhinovirus infection in children with acute lower respiratory tract in Suzhou

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于乐香; 陈正荣; 蒋吴君; 王宇清; 黄莉; 王美娟; 季伟; 邵雪君; 严永东

    2015-01-01

    目的 分析苏州地区儿童急性下呼吸道人鼻病毒(HRV)感染的流行病学特点及其引起喘息的相关危险因素.方法 回顾性分析2013年1月1日至2014年12月31日于苏州大学附属儿童医院住院的2 942例急性下呼吸道感染(ALRTI)患儿的临床资料,探讨HRV的感染情况、人群分布和时间分布特点,并采用Logistic多元回归分析HRV感染导致喘息的危险因素.结果 2 942例患儿中HRV阳性356例,阳性率12.10%;男女检出率差异无统计学意义[12.45%(233/1 872例)比11.50%(123/1 070例),x2=0.579,P=0.447];6个月~1岁婴儿检出率最高,为13.32%(65/488例),92.00%感染患儿为<5岁儿童;HRV全年散发,夏秋季为高峰,检出率分别为12.93%(91/704例)和14.74%(93/631例),冬季8.97%(66/736例),冬季检出率显著低于其他季节,差异有统计学意义(x2=11.376,P<0.05).喘息组患儿HRV检出率高于非喘息组,差异有统计学意义[13.55%(174/1 284例)比10.98%(182/1 658例)x22=4.509,P=0.034].Logistw多因素分析显示:性别、过敏史、既往反复呼吸道感染史及母孕期疾病史是HRV感染患儿发生喘息的独立危险因素(OR=0.391,95% CI:0.240~0.636,P=0.000;OR=2.524,95% CI:1.432~4.447,P=0.001;OR=1.980,95% CI:1.225 ~3.199,P=0.005;OR=0.186,95%CI:0.050 ~0.695,P=0.012).结论 HRV是苏州地区儿童ALRTI的重要病原;5岁以下儿童易感,夏秋季为高峰.HRV感染患儿喘息发生率高,对于有个人过敏史、既往有反复呼吸道感染及母孕期有妊振高血压综合征等疾病史的患儿,尤其是男童,在HRV感染后更容易发生喘息,甚至发展为支气管哮喘.%Objective To analyze the epidemiological characteristics and the risk factors for wheezing in children with acute lower respiratory tract infections with human rhinovirus (HRV).Methods The clinical data of 2 942 patients with acute lower respiratory tract HRV infections in Children's Hospital of Soochow University were

  9. The role and regulation of catalase in respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Mia M; Fan, Xin

    2014-09-01

    Respiratory tract bacterial pathogens are the etiologic agents of a variety of illnesses. The ability of these bacteria to cause disease is imparted through survival within the host and avoidance of pathogen clearance by the immune system. Respiratory tract pathogens are continually bombarded by reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may be produced by competing bacteria, normal metabolic function, or host immunological responses. In order to survive and proliferate, bacteria have adapted defense mechanisms to circumvent the effects of ROS. Bacteria employ the use of anti-oxidant enzymes, catalases and catalase-peroxidases, to relieve the effects of the oxidative stressors to which they are continually exposed. The decomposition of ROS has been shown to provide favorable conditions in which respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens such as Haemophilus influenzae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Legionella pneumophila, and Neisseria meningitidis are able to withstand exposure to highly reactive molecules and yet survive. Bacteria possessing mutations in the catalase gene have a decreased survival rate, yet may be able to compensate for the lack of catalatic activity if peroxidatic activity is present. An incomplete knowledge of the mechanisms by which catalase and catalase-peroxidases are regulated still persists, however, in some bacterial species, a regulatory factor known as OxyR has been shown to either up-regulate or down-regulate catalase gene expression. Yet, more research is still needed to increase the knowledge base in relation to this enzyme class. As with this review, we focus on major respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens in order to elucidate the function and regulation of catalases. The importance of the research could lead to the development of novel treatments against respiratory bacterial infections.

  10. Community Respiratory Viruses as a Cause of Lower Respiratory Tract Infections Following Suppressive Chemotherapy in Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Community respiratory viruses are an important cause of respiratory disease in the immunocompromised patients with cancer. To evaluate the occurrence and clinical significance of respiratory virus infections in hospitalized cancer patients at National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, during anticancer treatment, we studied cases that developed episodes of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI). Patients and Methods: Thirty patients with LRTI were studied clinically, radiologically, and microbiologically. Sputum cultures were done and an immunofluorescence search for IgM antibodies of influenza A and B, parainfluenza serotypes 1,2 and 3, adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, Legionella pneumophila, Coxiella burnettii, Chlamydia pneumoniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae were performed on serum samples of patients. The main presenting symptom was cough and expectoration. Hematologic malignancy was the underlying disease in 86.6% of cases. Blood cultures were positive in II patients (36.6%) only. Sputum cultures revealed a bacterial pathogen in [3 cases and fungi in 3; whereas viral and atypical bacterial lgM antibodies were detected in 13 and 4 patients; respectively. Influenza virus was the commonest virus detected, being of type B in 4 cases, type A in one case and mixed A and B in another 5 cases; followed by RSV in 5 patients. Taken together, bacteria were identified as a single cause of LRTI in 10 cases, viruses in 6, fungi in 3 and mixed causes in 7. Still, there were 4 undiagnosed cases. This study showed that respiratory viruses are common in LRTI, either as a single cause or mixed with bacterial pathogens. in hospitalized cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Diagnostic tests for respiratory viruses should be incorporated in the routine diagnostic study of patients with hematologic malignancies. Also, it must be emphasized that early CT chest is crucial as a base-line prior to initiation of anti-fungal or anti-viral therapy. In cancer patients with a

  11. Acute pancreatitis and acute respiratory distress syndrome complicating dengue haemorrhagic fever

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Avinash; Jain, Nirdesh; Gutch, Manish; Shankar, Amit

    2011-01-01

    Dengue infection is now known to present with wide spectrum of complications. Isolated cases of acute pancreatitis complicating dengue haemorrhagic fever have been reported in literature. Here the authors report a case of dengue haemorrhagic fever that develops acute pancreatitis and presented with acute onset of breathlessness, which then progressed to full-blown acute respiratory distress syndrome. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of dengue haemorrhagic fever complicated wi...

  12. Acute respiratory viral infections in pediatric cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana C.A. Benites

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to estimate the prevalence of infection by respiratory viruses in pediatric patients with cancer and acute respiratory infection (ARI and/or fever. METHODS: cross-sectional study, from January 2011 to December 2012. The secretions of nasopharyngeal aspirates were analyzed in children younger than 21 years with acute respiratory infections. Patients were treated at the Grupo em Defesa da Criança Com Câncer (Grendacc and University Hospital (HU, Jundiaí, SP. The rapid test was used for detection of influenza virus (Kit Biotrin, Inc. Ireland, and real-time multiplex polymerase chain reaction (FTD, Respiratory pathogens, multiplex Fast Trade Kit, Malta for detection of influenza virus (H1N1, B, rhinovirus, parainfluenza virus, adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, human parechovirus, bocavirus, metapneumovirus, and human coronavirus. The prevalence of viral infection was estimated and association tests were used (χ2 or Fisher's exact test. RESULTS: 104 samples of nasopharyngeal aspirate and blood were analyzed. The median age was 12 ± 5.2 years, 51% males, 68% whites, 32% had repeated ARIs, 32% prior antibiotic use, 19.8% cough, and 8% contact with ARIs. A total of 94.3% were in good general status. Acute lymphocytic leukemia (42.3% was the most prevalent neoplasia. Respiratory viruses were detected in 50 samples: rhinoviruses (23.1%, respiratory syncytial virus AB (8.7%, and coronavirus (6.8%. Co-detection occurred in 19% of cases with 2 viruses and in 3% of those with 3 viruses, and was more frequent between rhinovirus and coronavirus 43. Fever in neutropenic patients was observed in 13%, of which four (30.7 were positive for viruses. There were no deaths. CONCLUSIONS: the prevalence of respiratory viruses was relevant in the infectious episode, with no increase in morbidity and mortality. Viral co-detection was frequent in patients with cancer and ARIs.

  13. Spatiotemporal interplay of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and respiratory mucosal cells drives viral dissemination in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L; Wei, Q; Nishiura, K; Peng, J; Wang, H; Midkiff, C; Alvarez, X; Qin, C; Lackner, A; Chen, Z

    2016-07-01

    Innate immune responses have a critical role in the control of early virus replication and dissemination. It remains unknown, however, how severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) evades respiratory innate immunity to establish a systemic infection. Here we show in Chinese macaques that SARS-CoV traversed the mucosa through the respiratory tract within 2 days, resulting in extensive mucosal infiltration by T cells, MAC387(+), and CD163(+) monocytes/macrophages followed by limited viral replication in the lung but persistent viral shedding into the upper airway. Mucosal monocytes/macrophages sequestered virions in intracellular vesicles together with infected Langerhans cells and migrated into the tonsils and/or draining lymph nodes within 2 days. In lymphoid tissues, viral RNA and proteins were detected in infected monocytes upon differentiation into dendritic cells (DCs) within 3 days. Systemic viral dissemination was observed within 7 days. This study provides a comprehensive overview of the spatiotemporal interactions of SARS-CoV, monocytes/macrophages, and the DC network in mucosal tissues and highlights the fact that, while these innate cells contribute to viral clearance, they probably also serve as shelters and vehicles to provide a mechanism for the virus to escape host mucosal innate immunity and disseminate systemically. PMID:26647718

  14. 11.3.Upper respiratory tract disease and bronchial asthma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930295 Factors influencing carboxyhemog-lobin kinetics in inhalation lung injury.WU Wenxi (吴文溪).ist Affili Hosp,Nanjing MedCoil,210029.Chin J Intern Med 1992;31 (11):689—691.Anesthetized dogs were ventilated with 1%carbon monoxide (CO) in air for 10 minutes toproduce CO poisoning and then with room air (n=5) or pure oxygen (n=5) for 3 hours as con-trol.Acute lung injury was produced by intratra-cheal injection of 0.1 N HC1 (2 ml/kg) 30 min-utes before CO poisoning in another 10 experi-mental dogs.Arterial blood gas and earboxyhe-moglobin (COHb) were monitored before andafter CO poisoning.Pharmacokinetic analysis

  15. Estimates of committed effective dose and annual limit on intake for radioactive dusts using the new ICRP respiratory tract model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Brien, R.S. [Australian Radiation Lab., Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the implications of using the new ICRP 66 respiratory tract model for calculation of the committed effective dose(CED), for a period of 50 years post-intake, together with the annual limit on intake(ALI), for radioactive dusts encountered in the uranium and mineral sand mining and processing industries. Some of the differences between the old ICRP 30 respiratory tract model and the LUDEP 1.1 computer code, which is based on the new ICRP 66 respiratory tract model, are discussed and a comparison of values obtained using both models is given. 4 figs; 8 tabs; 16 refs.

  16. [The curative action of Monticelli Term's water in upper respiratory tract diseases (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchi, R; Jemmi, G; Barani, B

    1976-01-01

    The Authors study the action of the sodio bromide-iodic water of Monticelli Terme in upper respiratory tract disease and particularly assert that is not to neglect the organic ground on which establishes mucosa's disease. Therman treatment gives the best therapeutic results in every patient presenting chronic inflammatory processes of the upper respiratory trach alternating periods of quiescency and of activity, and poor therapeutic action in patients presenting chronic inveterate diseases with great alterations in vascular and glandular components of the mucosa. PMID:1021139

  17. Drugs in upper respiratory tract infections in paediatric patients in North Trinidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thurston P

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We explored the prescribing patterns of physicians in North Trinidad in treating upper respiratory tract infections (URTI in paediatric patients and the appropriateness of drugs prescribed.Methods: A retrospective observational study was conducted, with a sample size of 523 paediatric patients, diagnosed with an URTI during the period of June 2003 to 22 June 2005. The study was conducted at five Primary Health Care Facilities in North Trinidad.Results: The three most frequent URTIs diagnosed were non-specific URTI, common cold, and acute tonsillitis in rank order. Four patterns of prescribing were identified, (1 no drug therapy [1.9%]; (2 antibiotic therapy alone [6.1%]; (3 antibiotic and symptomatic therapy [53.0%]; and (4 symptomatic therapy alone [39.0%]. The, most frequently prescribed antibiotics were penicillins (amoxicillin [46.3%] and amoxicillin/clavulanate [5.3%] and a macrolide (erythromycin [6.1%]. The three symptomatic agents most frequently prescribed were paracetamol [40.1%]; diphenhydramine [29.1%]; and normal saline nasal drops [14.2%]. In 112 cases with swab analyses done, of these, 98.2% revealed a growth of commensals only, while 1.8% grew pathogenic micro-organisms. Of the cases showing commensal growth only, 84.6% were treated with an antibiotic, 14.5% were treated with symptomatic agents alone and 0.9% received no drug therapy at all. Conclusions: A large proportion of paediatric patients diagnosed with an URTI in North Trinidad was prescribed antibiotics although not indicated The inappropriate use of antibiotics can potentiate the worldwide trend of antimicrobial resistance.

  18. Impact of symptomatic upper respiratory tract infections on insulin absorption and action of Technosphere inhaled insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Philip A; Heinemann, Lutz; Boss, Anders; Rosenblit, Paul D

    2016-01-01

    Objective Uncomplicated, acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) occur in patients with diabetes at a similar frequency to the general population. This study (NCT00642681) investigated the effect of URTIs on the pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties of Technosphere inhaled insulin (TI) in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Research design and methods This was a phase 2 study conducted in patients who developed a URTI while being treated with TI in a phase 3 study (N=20, mean age 50 years, 60% men). Patients underwent two 4-hour meal challenges, during which blood samples were drawn to measure serum fumaryl diketopiperazine (FDKP; the excipient representing an essential part of TI), serum insulin, serum C-peptide, and plasma glucose. The primary outcome was the ratio of serum FDKP area under the concentration–time curve from 0 to 240 min (AUC0–240 min) during URTI and after clinical resolution of URTI symptoms (≥15 to ≤45 days). Results No significant differences in PK parameters were seen during URTI versus post-URTI for FDKP. The ratio of serum FDKP AUC0–240 min during URTI and post-URTI was 1.1 (SD 0.6), p=0.4462. Plasma glucose concentrations during each 4-hour meal challenge were similar, showing small non-significant differences. No adverse events, including hypoglycemia, occurred during meal challenge visits. Conclusions Development of an active, symptomatic URTI during treatment with TI had no significant impact on the PK/PD properties of TI, suggesting that no adjustment in prandial insulin dosing is needed. However, if patients are unable to conduct proper inhalation, they should administer their prandial insulin subcutaneously. Trial registration number NCT00642681; Results. PMID:27648286

  19. Procalcitonin-guided antibiotic treatment of respiratory tract infections in a primary care setting: are we there yet?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, R.; Jensen, J.U.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical signs of infection do not allow for correct identification of bacterial and viral aetiology in acute respiratory infections. A valid tool to assist the clinician in identifying patients who will benefit from antibiotic therapy, as well as patients with a potentially serious infection, co...... are likely to benefit from antibiotic treatment and to rule out serious infections, and comments on further research to determine a future role for procalcitonin in primary care......, could greatly improve patient care and limit excessive antibiotic prescriptions. Procalcitonin is a new marker of suspected bacterial infection that has shown promise in guiding antibiotic therapy in acute respiratory tract infections in hospitals without compromising patient safety. Procalcitonin...... concentrations in primary care are low and can be used primarily to rule out serious infection. However, procalcitonin measurement should not be used as the sole basis for clinical decisions; clinical skills are prerequisites for the correct use of this new tool in practice. At present there is no point-of-care...

  20. Acute respiratory failure in 3 children with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Britt; Hellebostad, Marit; Ifversen, Marianne;

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia is a rare hematopoietic stem cell disease in children with features of both myelodysplasia and myeloproliferation. Extramedullary involvement has been reported and pulmonary involvement secondary to leukemic infiltration is an initial manifestation, which may resu...... in acute respiratory failure....

  1. Consensus for the manaegment of severe acute respiratory syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chinese Medical Association,China Association of C

    2003-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Since recognition of the first case of sever acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Guangdong Province in November 2002,health care worker engaged in basic medicine,clinical medicine and preventive progress in the understanding of the etiology,epidemiology,diagnosis,treatment and prevention of SARS.

  2. The severe acute respiratory syndrome epidemic in mainland China dissected

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.C. Cao (Wu Chun); S.J. de Vlas (Sake); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis paper provides a review of a recently published series of studies that give a detailed and comprehensive documentation of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in mainland China, which severely struck the country in the spring of 2003. The epidemic spanned a large ge

  3. Non-invasive ventilation for surgical patients with acute respiratory failure

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Byoung Chul; Kyoung, Kyu Hyouck; Kim, Young Hwan; Hong, Suk-Kyung

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Acute respiratory failure is a relatively common complication in surgical patients, especially after abdominal surgery. Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is increasingly used in the treatment of acute respiratory failure. We have assessed the usefulness of NIV in surgical patients with acute respiratory failure. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical charts of patients who were admitted to a surgical intensive care unit between March 2007 and February 2008 with acute respiratory...

  4. In vivo Measurement of Unattached Radon Progeny Deposited in the Human Respiratory Tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterweck, G.; Vezzu, G.; Schuler, Ch.; Mueller, R.; Marsh, J.W.; Thrift, S.; Birchall, A

    2001-07-01

    Seven nose breathing and seven mouth breathing volunteers were exposed to atmospheres enriched with unattached radon progeny ({sup 218}Po, {sup 214}Pb and {sup 214}Bi). The activity of these radionuclides deposited in the respiratory track was measured in vivo after the exposures. The results of these measurements are in agreement with predictions calculated with the ICRP Publication 66 Human Respiratory Tract Model. Temporal analysis of the activity deposited in the heads of the volunteers leads to the conclusion that a significant amount of the deposited activity associated with particle diameters of about 1 nm is not subject to a fast transport to the gastrointestinal tract as generally reported for larger aerosol particles. (author)

  5. Sarcoid-like lymphocytosis of the lower respiratory tract in patients with active Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiéjan, J M; Cosnes, J; Chollet-Martin, S; Soler, P; Basset, F M; Le Quintrec, Y; Hance, A J

    1986-01-01

    To re-evaluate the relationship between Crohn's disease and sarcoidosis, we compared the numbers and types of cells recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage from normal volunteers and patients with Crohn's disease, with other forms of inflammatory bowel disease, and with sarcoidosis. Patients with Crohn's disease, but not patients with other inflammatory bowel disorders, had an increase in the number of T lymphocytes on the surface of the lower respiratory tract similar to that seen in patients with sarcoidosis. As in sarcoidosis, this lymphocytosis results from an expansion of the T4+ T-lymphocyte subset, is characteristic of patients with active disease only, and is not associated with similar abnormalities in the peripheral blood. Thus, patients with apparently localized Crohn's disease have sarcoid-like lymphocytosis of the lower respiratory tract, a finding that emphasizes the systemic nature of Crohn's disease and the disorder's close relationship to sarcoidosis. PMID:3940500

  6. Upper Respiratory Tract Disease in the Gopher Tortoise Is Caused by Mycoplasma agassizii†

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, M B; McLaughlin, G. S.; Klein, P A; Crenshaw, B. C.; Schumacher, I M; Brown, D R; Jacobson, E R

    1999-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) has been observed in a number of tortoise species, including the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) and the gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus). Clinical signs of URTD in gopher tortoises are similar to those in desert tortoises and include serous, mucoid, or purulent discharge from the nares, excessive tearing to purulent ocular discharge, conjunctivitis, and edema of the eyelids and ocular glands. The objectives of the present study were to determi...

  7. The Efficacy of Systemic Corticosteroids in Treatment of Respiratory Tract Infections During Hajj 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Tabatabaei, Aminreza; Heidarzadeh, Abbas; Shamspour, Navvab; Kolivand, Pirhosein

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diagnosis and treatment of respiratory tract infections (RTI) in a mass-gathering situation such as hajj is a medical challenge that requires quick decision-making and considerable knowledge about its etiology and treatment methods. High prevalence of RTI during Hajj and tendency of caravan physicians to treat of patients quickly in such situation lead to prescription of parenteral steroids. Nonetheless, no study has focused on the short-term and long-term effects of systemic ster...

  8. Antibiotic prescribing patterns for upper respiratory tract infections in rural Western China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Objective To explore the prescribing patterns of outpatients receiving antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections(URTIs)in rural Western China and to identify the correlation in terms of doctors and patients characteristics.Methods Totally 7 678 prescriptions for URTIs were collected from 680 primary health village clinics of 40 counties across 10 provinces of Western China.Two outcome variables were used in the analysis:the occurrence of prescribing at least one antibiotic drug for an URTI and the ...

  9. Prognostic value of procalcitonin in hospitalized patients with lower respiratory tract infections

    OpenAIRE

    NOBRE Vandack; Borges, Isabela

    2016-01-01

    Lower respiratory tract infections are common and potentially lethal conditions and are a major cause of inadequate antibiotic prescriptions. Characterization of disease severity and prognostic prediction in affected patients can aid disease management and can increase accuracy in determining the need for and place of hospitalization. The inclusion of biomarkers, particularly procalcitonin, in the decision taken process is a promising strategy. This study aims to present a narrative review of...

  10. Mycoplasmas isolated from the respiratory tract of cattle in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    OpenAIRE

    Zinka, Maksimović; Maid, Rifatbegović

    2012-01-01

    This study represents Mycoplasma species isolated from the respiratory tract of cattle in Bosnia and Herzegovina between 2002 and 2010. A total of 328 nasal swabs and 59 lung samples were submitted for isolation of mycoplasmas. Mycoplasmas were isolated from 27 samples (6.9%). M. bovis was recovered from eight nasal swabs and two lungs, while M. bovirhinis (n=4) and Acholeplasma sp. (n=1) were detected only in nasal swabs. Twelve mycoplasma isolates were unidentified (44.4%).

  11. Macrolide overuse for treatment of respiratory tract infections in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinnerskov, Mette; Therkildsen, Julie Maria; Cordoba, Gloria;

    2011-01-01

    High consumption of macrolides has been linked to increased macrolide resistance in the common pathogens of respiratory tract infections (RTIs). According to Danish recommendations, penicillin is the first-choice treatment for RTIs and macrolides should only be prescribed when a patient is allergic...... to penicillin or for treatment of mycoplasma pneumonias. The aim of the present study was to explore the prescription of macrolides for different RTIs to patients without penicillin allergy in general practice in Denmark....

  12. Hemoglobin level as a risk factor for lower respiratory tract infections in Lebanese children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawsan Mourad

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pneumonia is the biggest single cause of childhood death under the age of 5 years, and anemia affects approximately 30% of infants and children all over the world. Aim: Determination of the relationship between anemia and lower respiratory tract infection as a risk factor in Lebanese children. Patients and Methods A total number of two hundred infants and children aged nine months to twelve years were included; One hundred cases were hospitalized for lower respiratory tract infection in Department of Pediatrics, Makassed General Hospital, and one hundred healthy, age and sex matched controls, were selected from outpatient department. Complete blood count, iron level, ferritin level, and total iron binding capacity were taken if hemoglobin level less than eleven gram per deci-liter. In addition peripheral blood smear, chest radiograph and C-reactive protein were done to hospitalized cases. Definition of iron deficiency anemia and normal laboratory values were predetermined. Results: Anemia was found in 32% of hospitalized cases and 16% of healthy controls. Mean hemoglobin level was 9.99 ± 0.62 gram per deci-liter and 11.99 ± 0.92 gram per deci-liter in anemic and non-anemic group respectively with a significant P-value of 0.001. C-reactive protein levels and number hospitalization days were similar among the anemic and non-anemic group. History of recurrent chest infections was significantly higher in both anemic group and hospitalized cases compared to non-anemic group and healthy controls. Low hemoglobin level was a risk factor for lower respiratory tract infection with a P-value of 0.008. Conclusion: Anemic children were two times more susceptible to lower respiratory tract infection compared to the control group, and iron deficiency anemia was predominating. Accurate diagnosis and prevention of anemia, whatever its etiology, is essential.

  13. Hemoglobin level as a risk factor for lower respiratory tract infections in Lebanese children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawsan Mourad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pneumonia is the biggest single cause of childhood death under the age of 5 years, and anemia affects approximately 30% of infants and children all over the world. Aim: Determination of the relationship between anemia and lower respiratory tract infection as a risk factor in Lebanese children. Patients and Methods A total number of two hundred infants and children aged nine months to twelve years were included; One hundred cases were hospitalized for lower respiratory tract infection in Department of Pediatrics, Makassed General Hospital, and one hundred healthy, age and sex matched controls, were selected from outpatient department. Complete blood count, iron level, ferritin level, and total iron binding capacity were taken if hemoglobin level less than eleven gram per deci-liter. In addition peripheral blood smear, chest radiograph and C-reactive protein were done to hospitalized cases. Definition of iron deficiency anemia and normal laboratory values were predetermined. Results: Anemia was found in 32% of hospitalized cases and 16% of healthy controls. Mean hemoglobin level was 9.99 ΁ 0.62 gram per deci-liter and 11.99 ΁ 0.92 gram per deci-liter in anemic and non-anemic group respectively with a significant P-value of 0.001. C-reactive protein levels and number hospitalization days were similar among the anemic and non-anemic group. History of recurrent chest infections was significantly higher in both anemic group and hospitalized cases compared to non-anemic group and healthy controls. Low hemoglobin level was a risk factor for lower respiratory tract infection with a P-value of 0.008. Conclusion: Anemic children were two times more susceptible to lower respiratory tract infection compared to the control group, and iron deficiency anemia was predominating. Accurate diagnosis and prevention of anemia, whatever its etiology, is essential.

  14. Respiratory tract changes in guinea pigs, rats, and mice following a single six-hour exposure to methyl isocyanate vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, E.H.; Dodd, D.E.

    1987-06-01

    Groups of male and female Fischer 344 rats, B6C3F1 mice, and Hartley guinea pigs were exposed once for 6 hr to mean concentrations of 10.5, 5.4, 2.4, 1.0, or 0 (control) ppm of methyl isocyanate (MIC) vapor. Rats and mice were also exposed to 20.4 ppm of MIC. The majority of deaths occurred during postexposure days 1 through 3. The 6-hr LC/sub 50/ values were 6.1 ppm for rats, 12.2 ppm for mice, and 5.4 ppm for guinea pigs. Notable clinical observations during and immediately following MIC exposure were lacrimation, perinasal/perioral wetness, respiratory difficulty (e.g., mouth breathing), decreased activity, ataxia, and hypothermia. Body weight losses were common in all species following MIC exposures of 2.4 ppm or greater. Microscopic lesions included acute necrosis of the epithelial lining throughout the respiratory tract in animals that died shortly after exposure, coupled with congestion, edema, and inflammation. A microscopic lesion that appeared unique to guinea pigs was bronchiolitis obliterans. Additional microscopic lesions observed in some animals that died or were sacrificed at the end of the study (postexposure day 14) consisted of squamous metaplasia of respiratory epithelium in the nasal cavity, which extended into the larynx, trachea, and in some cases, the bronchi. In addition, epithelial regeneration throughout the tract and submucosal fibroplasia in the trachea, bronchi, and bronchioles were observed, the latter lesion being primarily confined to rodents. Only in guinea pigs were there lesions in the 1.0 ppm group attributed to MIC exposure. In conclusion, guinea pigs were more sensitive to the MIC vapor than were rats, which were in turn more sensitive than mice.

  15. The role of rhinovirus in children hospitalized for acute respiratory disease, Santa Fe, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudi, Juan Manuel; Molina, Fabiana; Díaz, Rocío; Bonet, Virginia; Ortellao, Lucila; Cantarutti, Diego; Gómez, Alejandra; Pierini, Judith; Cociglio, Raquel; Kusznierz, Gabriela

    2015-12-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) were historically considered upper airway pathogens. However, they have recently been proven to cause infections in the lower respiratory tract, resulting in hospitalization of children with pneumonia, bronchiolitis, and chronic pulmonary obstruction. In this report, HRV frequency and seasonality are described together with patient clinical-epidemiological aspects. From a total of 452 surveyed samples, the HRV nucleic acids was detected in 172 (38.1%) and found in every month of the study year. 60% of inpatients with acute respiratory infection (ARI) associated with HRV were under 6 months of age and 31% had a clinical history, being preterm birth and recurrent wheezing the prevailing conditions. The most frequent discharge diagnoses were pneumonia (35.2%), bronchiolitis (32.4%), and bronchitis (12.4%). Fifteen point nine percent of patients required admission into intensive care units. The results obtained in this study demonstrated the association between HRV and children hospitalizations caused by ARI. PMID:25983014

  16. Association of residential dampness and mold with respiratory tract infections and bronchitis: a meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William J.; Eliseeva, Ekaterina A.; Mendell, Mark J.

    2010-11-15

    Dampness and mold have been shown in qualitative reviews to be associated with a variety of adverse respiratory health effects, including respiratory tract infections. Several published meta-analyses have provided quantitative summaries for some of these associations, but not for respiratory infections. Demonstrating a causal relationship between dampness-related agents, which are preventable exposures, and respiratory tract infections would suggest important new public health strategies. We report the results of quantitative meta-analyses of published studies that examined the association of dampness or mold in homes with respiratory infections and bronchitis. For primary studies meeting eligibility criteria, we transformed reported odds ratios (ORs) and confidence intervals (CIs) to the log scale. Both fixed and random effects models were applied to the log ORs and their variances. Most studies contained multiple estimated ORs. Models accounted for the correlation between multiple results within the studies analyzed. One set of analyses was performed with all eligible studies, and another set restricted to studies that controlled for age, gender, smoking, and socioeconomic status. Subgroups of studies were assessed to explore heterogeneity. Funnel plots were used to assess publication bias. The resulting summary estimates of ORs from random effects models based on all studies ranged from 1.38 to 1.50, with 95% CIs excluding the null in all cases. Use of different analysis models and restricting analyses based on control of multiple confounding variables changed findings only slightly. ORs (95% CIs) from random effects models using studies adjusting for major confounding variables were, for bronchitis, 1.45 (1.32-1.59); for respiratory infections, 1.44 (1.31-1.59); for respiratory infections excluding nonspecific upper respiratory infections, 1.50 (1.32-1.70), and for respiratory infections in children or infants, 1.48 (1.33-1.65). Little effect of publication

  17. Azithromycin does not improve disease course in hospitalized infants with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease : A randomized equivalence trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; van Woensel, Job B. M.; Uijtendaal, Esther; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; Kimpen, Jan L. L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Nearly halt of all hospitalized infants with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease (LRTD) are treated with (parenteral) antibiotics. The present study was designed to test our hypothesis that the use of antibiotics would not lead to a reduced duration of hospi

  18. Change of immune indexes and oxidative stress state of children with recurrent respiratory tract infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Qing Wu; Shu-Ping Liao; Xiao-Lan Lin; Qiong-Fang Huang

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To observe and analyze the change situation of immune indexes and oxidative stress state of children with recurrent respiratory tract infection.Methods:75 children with recurrent respiratory tract infection in our hospital from January 2014 to June 2015 were selected as observation group, 75 healthy children with health examination at the same time were selected as control group, then the immune indexes and oxidative stress state related serum indexes of two groups were detected,and the detection results of observation group with boys and girls, mild, moderate and severe disease were compared.Results: The cellular immune and erythrocyte immune and oxidative stress state related serum indexes of observation group were all worse than those of control group,and the detection results of observation group with mild, moderate and severe disease had obvious differences too, allP0.05.Conclusion:The change of immune indexes and oxidative stress state of children with recurrent respiratory tract infection are obvious,and the differences of children with mild, moderate and severe disease are obvious too,while the differences of boys and girls are not obvious.

  19. Serum biomarkers in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome an ailing prognosticator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pneumatikos Ioannis

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The use of biomarkers in medicine lies in their ability to detect disease and support diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. New research and novel understanding of the molecular basis of the disease reveals an abundance of exciting new biomarkers who present a promise for use in the everyday clinical practice. The past fifteen years have seen the emergence of numerous clinical applications of several new molecules as biologic markers in the research field relevant to acute respiratory distress syndrome (translational research. The scope of this review is to summarize the current state of knowledge about serum biomarkers in acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome and their potential value as prognostic tools and present some of the future perspectives and challenges.

  20. Respiratory and allergic diseases: from upper respiratory tract infections to asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber, Raja

    2002-06-01

    patient, mind-body interventions such as yoga, hypnosis, and biofeedback-assisted relaxation and breathing exercises are beneficial for stress reduction in general and may be helpful in further controlling asthma. Encouraging parents to learn how to massage their asthmatic children may appeal to some parents and provide benefits for parents and children alike. Acupuncture and chiropractic treatment cannot be recommended at this time, although some patients may derive benefit because of the placebo effect. For patients with allergic rhinitis, there are no good clinical research data on the use of quercetin and vitamin C. Similarly, freeze-dried stinging nettle leaves may be tried, but the applicable research evidence also is poor. Further studies are needed to assess the efficacy of these supplements and herbs. Homeopathic remedies based on extreme dilutions of the allergen may be beneficial in allergic rhinitis but require collaboration with an experienced homeopath. There are no research data on constitutional homeopathic approaches to asthma and allergic rhinitis. Patients with COPD are helped by exercise, pulmonary rehabilitation, and increased caloric protein and fat intake. Vitamin C and n-3 supplements are safe and reasonable; however, studies are needed to establish their efficacy in COPD. On the other hand, there are convincing data in favor of N-acetyl-cysteine supplementation for the patient with COPD at doses ranging between 400 and 1200 mg daily. Red blood cell magnesium levels may guide the use of magnesium replacement. The use of L-carnitine and coenzyme Q10 in patients with COPD needs further study. The addition of essential oils to the dietary regimen of patients with chronic bronchitis is worth exploring. Patients with upper respiratory tract infections can expect a shorter duration of symptoms by taking high doses of vitamin C (2 g) with zinc supplements, preferably the nasal zinc gel, at the onset of their symptoms. Adding an herb such as echinacea or

  1. Acute syndrome of radiation: injuries to the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute syndrome of radiation: injuries to the gastrointestinal tract. Exposure to ionising radiation at medium to high doses results in the manifestation of mixed pathologies. Following the analysis of several radiation accidents it is clear that intestinal injury influences patient survival. However the appearance of the classically defined gastrointestinal syndrome is not always evident. Nevertheless injury to the gastrointestinal tract, in particular loss of barrier function, seems to play an important role in the development of Multiple Organ Failure such as reported in the recent accident at Tokai Mura. Ionising radiation overexposure results in changes in intestinal motility and nutrient, fluid and electrolyte absorption and secretion all which may contribute to the genesis of diarrhea. In addition to modified cellular transport properties for nutrients or electrolytes, important loss of epithelial cells is also a major contributing factor. Intestinal functions are controlled by many factors such as neurotransmitters, locally released mediators from endocrine cells or immunocompetent cells in addition to luminal agents. To date, treatment of radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury is mainly symptomatic. However treatments such as growth factors, anti-inflammatory cytokines as well as cellular transplantation remain to be validated in the radiation accident situation. (author)

  2. Efficacy and Safety of Procalcitonin-Guided Antibiotic Therapy in Lower Respiratory Tract Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner C. Albrich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 14 randomized controlled studies to date, a procalcitonin (PCT-based algorithm has been proven to markedly reduce the use of antibiotics along with an unimpaired high safety and low complication rates in patients with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs. However, compliance with the algorithm and safety out of controlled study conditions has not yet been sufficiently investigated. Methods: We performed a prospective international multicenter observational post-study surveillance of consecutive adults with community-acquired LRTI in 14 centers (Switzerland (n = 10, France (n = 3 and the United States (n = 1. Results: Between September 2009 and November 2010, 1,759 patients were enrolled (median age 71; female sex 44.4%. 1,520 (86.4% patients had a final diagnosis of LRTI (community-acquired pneumonia (CAP, 53.7%; acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD, 17.1%; and acute bronchitis, 14.4%. Compliance with the PCT-guided therapy (overall 68.2% was highest in patients with bronchitis (81.0% vs. AECOPD, 70.1%; CAP, 63.7%; p < 0.001, outpatients (86.1% vs. inpatients, 65.9%; p < 0.001 and algorithm-experienced centers (82.5% vs. algorithm-naive, 60.1%; p < 0.001 and showed significant geographical differences. The initial decision about the antibiotic therapy was based on PCT value in 72.4%. In another 8.6% of patients, antibiotics were administered despite low PCT values but according to predefined criteria. Thus, the algorithm was followed in 81.0% of patients. In a multivariable Cox hazard ratio model, longer antibiotic therapy duration was associated with algorithm-non-compliance, country, hospitalization, CAP vs. bronchitis, renal failure and algorithm-naïvety of the study center. In a multivariable logistic regression complications (death, empyema, ICU treatment, mechanical ventilation, relapse, and antibiotic-associated side effects were significantly associated with increasing CURB65-Score, CAP

  3. Treatment of 31 Cases of Infant Respiratory Tract Infection by Health-care Tuina plus Medicated Bath

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jie; WU Xue-fei

    2003-01-01

    Thirty-one cases of infant respiratory tract infection were treated by no-pain health-care Tuina plus medicated bath. Since the therapeutic effects were satisfactory, so parents and infants are willing to accept.

  4. Continued high rates of antibiotic prescribing to adults with respiratory tract infection : survey of 568 UK general practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gulliford, Martin C; Dregan, Alex; Moore, Michael V; Ashworth, Mark; Staa, Tjeerd van; McCann, Gerard; Charlton, Judith; Yardley, Lucy; Little, Paul; McDermott, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Overutilisation of antibiotics may contribute to the emergence of antimicrobial drug resistance, a growing international concern. This study aimed to analyse the performance of UK general practices with respect to antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections (RTIs) among young

  5. Antimicrobial susceptibility of communityacquired respiratory tract pathogens isolated from patients in primary hospitals in Shanghai from 2007 to 2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周春妹

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the etiology of communityacquired respiratory tract infections (CARTI) and the antimicrobial resistance of the major pathogens in primary hospitals in Shanghai.Methods Patients with CARTI were prospectively recruited from 30 primary hospitals

  6. Activated protein C in the treatment of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D. Cornet; G.P. van Nieuw Amerongen; A. Beishuizen; M.J. Schultz; A.R.J. Girbes; A.B.J. Groeneveld

    2009-01-01

    Background: Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) frequently necessitate mechanical ventilation in the intensive care unit. The syndromes have a high mortality rate and there is at present no treatment specifically directed at the underlying pathogenesis. Central in

  7. Epidemiology of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome in The Netherlands : A survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, Jan; Versteegt, Jens; Twisk, Jos; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Bindels, Alexander J. G. H.; Spijkstra, Jan-Jaap; Girbes, Armand R. J.; Groeneveld, A. B. Johan

    2007-01-01

    Background: The characteristics, incidence and risk factors for acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) may depend on definitions and geography. Methods: A prospective, 3-day point-prevalence study was performed by a survey of all intensive care units (ICU) in the Neth

  8. Effects of Acetaminophen on Oxidant and Irritant Respiratory Tract Responses to Environmental Tobacco Smoke in Female Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Gregory J.; Cichocki, Joseph A.; Doughty, Bennett J.; Manautou, Jose E.; Jordt, Sven-Eric; Morris, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although it is known that acetaminophen causes oxidative injury in the liver, it is not known whether it causes oxidative stress in the respiratory tract. If so, this widely used analgesic may potentiate the adverse effects of oxidant air pollutants. Objectives: The goal of this study was to determine if acetaminophen induces respiratory tract oxidative stress and/or potentiates the oxidative stress and irritant responses to an inhaled oxidant: environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). M...

  9. Importance of respiratory viruses in acute otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Terho; Chonmaitree, Tasnee

    2003-04-01

    Acute otitis media is usually considered a simple bacterial infection that is treated with antibiotics. However, ample evidence derived from studies ranging from animal experiments to extensive clinical trials supports a crucial role for respiratory viruses in the etiology and pathogenesis of acute otitis media. Viral infection of the upper respiratory mucosa initiates the whole cascade of events that finally leads to the development of acute otitis media as a complication. The pathogenesis of acute otitis media involves a complex interplay between viruses, bacteria, and the host's inflammatory response. In a substantial number of children, viruses can be found in the middle-ear fluid either alone or together with bacteria, and recent studies indicate that at least some viruses actively invade the middle ear. Viruses appear to enhance the inflammatory process in the middle ear, and they may significantly impair the resolution of otitis media. Prevention of the predisposing viral infection by vaccination against the major viruses would probably be the most effective way to prevent acute otitis media. Alternatively, early treatment of the viral infection with specific antiviral agents would also be effective in reducing the occurrence of acute otitis media.

  10. Mammalian Cell-Derived Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Like Particles Protect the Lower as well as the Upper Respiratory Tract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramila Walpita

    Full Text Available Globally, Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV is a leading cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in children less than one year of age and in USA alone, between 85,000 and 144,000 infants are hospitalized every year. To date, there is no licensed vaccine. We have evaluated vaccine potential of mammalian cell-derived native RSV virus-like particles (RSV VLPs composed of the two surface glycoproteins G and F, and the matrix protein M. Results of in vitro testing showed that the VLPs were functionally assembled and immunoreactive, and that the recombinantly expressed F protein was cleaved intracellularly similarly to the virus-synthesized F protein to produce the F1 and F2 subunits; the presence of the F1 fragment is critical for vaccine development since all the neutralizing epitopes present in the F protein are embedded in this fragment. Additional in vitro testing in human macrophage cell line THP-1 showed that both virus and the VLPs were sensed by TLR-4 and induced a Th1-biased cytokine response. Cotton rats vaccinated with RSV VLPs adjuvanted with alum and monophosphoryl lipid A induced potent neutralizing antibody response, and conferred protection in the lower as well as the upper respiratory tract based on substantial virus clearance from these sites. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first VLP/virosome vaccine study reporting protection of the lower as well as the upper respiratory tract: Prevention from replication in the nose is an important consideration if the target population is infants < 6 months of age. This is because continued virus replication in the nose results in nasal congestion and babies at this age are obligate nose breathers. In conclusion, these results taken together suggest that our VLPs show promise to be a safe and effective vaccine for RSV.

  11. Acute effects of urban air pollution on respiratory health of children with and without chronic respiratory symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee, S; Hoek, G; Boezen, H M; Schouten, J P; van Wijnen, J H; Brunekreef, B

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate to what extent different components of air pollution are associated with acute respiratory health effects in children with and without chronic respiratory symptoms. METHODS: During three consecutive winters starting in 1992-3, peak expiratory flow (PEF) and respiratory sym

  12. Multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacilli in lower respiratory tract infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashidhar Vishwanath

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Lower respiratory tract infections are among important causes of morbidity and mortality for all age groups. The emergence of multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacilli is an issue of increasing concern.A retrospective study including respiratory specimens (sputum and BAL was conducted in our tertiary care centre. Samples were processed for microscopy, culture and susceptibility testing following standard methods. Multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacilli causing lower respiratory tract infections were studied for their causation of disease. The effect of appropriate treatment on clinical outcome was observed.A total of 472 Gram-negative pathogens were isolated from sputum and broncho-alveolar lavage fluid specimens during the study period. Among these Gram-negative pathogens 175 (37% were found to be multidrug resistant. Klebsiella pneumoniae 85 (48.6% and Acinetobacter spp. 59 (33.7% were the predominant multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacilli isolated. Based on clinico-microbiological correlation, 138 (78.9% multidrug resistant isolates were found to be pathogenic and the rest 37 (21.1% were considered as colonizers. After initiating appropriate antibiotic therapy, clinical improvement was seen in 110 (79.7% patients. In the patients who showed improvement, amikacin (34.3% and cefoperazone-sulbactum (21.8% were found to be the most effective drugs.A large majority of the isolated multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacilli were found to be pathogenic. Regular surveillance which directs appropriate empirical therapy; and good clinic-microbiological workup of each case of lower respiratory tract infection can reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with multidrug resistant organisms.

  13. [Pharmacological effects of N-acetyl-L-cysteine on the respiratory tract. (I). Quantitative and qualitative changes in respiratory tract fluid and sputum (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogi, K; Saito, T; Kasé, Y; Hitoshi, T

    1981-06-01

    The following three experiments were performed to determine the effects of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) on the quantity and quality of respiratory tract fluid (RTF) and sputum. All drugs used were administered into the stomach through a gastric tube. 1) Indirect measurement of bronchial secretion in rats, which was expressed by the amounts of dye excreted into the respiratory tract, was carried out according the the Sakuno's method, with some modification. Some expectorants of the secretomotor type, such as bromhexine and pilocarpine, significantly increased the secretion, even at low doses. On the other hand, mucolytic agents such as NAC augmented the secretion only in doses of 500 to 1500 mg/kg. 2)As a direct method of measurements, Kasé's modification of Perry and Boyd's method was used to collect RTF, quantitatively, from rabbits. The RTF of healthy rabbits was colorless and watery. The administration of NAC in doses of 500 to 1500 mg/kg augmented the output volume and RTF became slightly turbid, probably due to an increase in the viscous mucus. 3) Rabbits with subacute bronchitis were prepared by long-term exposure to air contaminated with SO2 gas and sputa were collected before and after administration of NAC, respectively, according to the Kase's method. The sputa were opalescent and viscous gel included nodular masses. The administration of NAC, 1000 and 1500 mg/kg resulted in a dose dependent decrease in the relative viscosity. The percent-decreased in viscosity with NAC was statistically correlated with that in amounts of dry matter, those in protein and polysaccharide in the sputa. From the results described above, it was concluded that NAC given into the stomach can liquefy sputum by splitting mucoprotein disulphide linkages, that is, altering the rheological characteristics of sputum to facilitate expectoration.

  14. [Pharmacological effects of N-acetyl-L-cysteine on the respiratory tract. (I). Quantitative and qualitative changes in respiratory tract fluid and sputum (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogi, K; Saito, T; Kasé, Y; Hitoshi, T

    1981-06-01

    The following three experiments were performed to determine the effects of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) on the quantity and quality of respiratory tract fluid (RTF) and sputum. All drugs used were administered into the stomach through a gastric tube. 1) Indirect measurement of bronchial secretion in rats, which was expressed by the amounts of dye excreted into the respiratory tract, was carried out according the the Sakuno's method, with some modification. Some expectorants of the secretomotor type, such as bromhexine and pilocarpine, significantly increased the secretion, even at low doses. On the other hand, mucolytic agents such as NAC augmented the secretion only in doses of 500 to 1500 mg/kg. 2)As a direct method of measurements, Kasé's modification of Perry and Boyd's method was used to collect RTF, quantitatively, from rabbits. The RTF of healthy rabbits was colorless and watery. The administration of NAC in doses of 500 to 1500 mg/kg augmented the output volume and RTF became slightly turbid, probably due to an increase in the viscous mucus. 3) Rabbits with subacute bronchitis were prepared by long-term exposure to air contaminated with SO2 gas and sputa were collected before and after administration of NAC, respectively, according to the Kase's method. The sputa were opalescent and viscous gel included nodular masses. The administration of NAC, 1000 and 1500 mg/kg resulted in a dose dependent decrease in the relative viscosity. The percent-decreased in viscosity with NAC was statistically correlated with that in amounts of dry matter, those in protein and polysaccharide in the sputa. From the results described above, it was concluded that NAC given into the stomach can liquefy sputum by splitting mucoprotein disulphide linkages, that is, altering the rheological characteristics of sputum to facilitate expectoration. PMID:7286849

  15. [Bocavirus in infants under 5 years with acute respiratory infection. Chaco Province, Argentina, 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deluca, Gerardo D; Urquijo, María Cecilia; Passarella, Carolina; Picón, César; Picón, Dimas; Acosta, María; Rovira, Carina; Marín, Héctor M

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory infection (ARI) is the most frequent pathology along human life, being the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in children under 5 years. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of bocavirus (BoV) in infants under 5 years with symptoms of ARI from north Argentina (Chaco province). The study was performed on nasopharyngeal aspirates from 488 patients, in the period of January-December 2014. The samples were tested by real time PCR and 36 positive BoV cases (7.4%) were detected. The period with the highest detection rate was June-September with 28 cases (77.8%), of which 26 (72.2%) were infants between 6-18 moths of life. In half of BoV positive cases this virus was detected as single infection of the upper respiratory tract, and in the remaining 50%, as concomitant infection with other microorganisms. To our knowledge, this would be the first study on molecular epidemiology of BoV in northern Argentina. We emphasize the importance of investigating these new viruses capable of generating acute respiratory disease and also to disseminate awareness on their circulation within the community.

  16. Message concerning Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome ("SARS")

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    IMPORTANT REMINDER If you have just come back from one of the regions identified by the WHO as being infected with SARS, it is essential to monitor your state of health for ten days after your return. The syndrome manifests itself in the rapid onset of a high fever combined with respiratory problems (coughing, breathlessness, breathing difficulty). Should these signs appear, you must contact the CERN Medical Service as quickly as possible on number 73802 or 73186 during normal working hours, and the fire brigade at all other times on number 74444, indicating that you have just returned from one of the WHO-identified areas with recent local transmission.China: Beijing, Hong Kong (Special Administrative Region), Guangdong Province, Inner Mongolia, Shanxi Province, Tianjin ProvinceTaiwan:TaipeiMoreover, until further notice the CERN Management requests that all trips to these various regions of the world be reduced to a strict minimum and then only with the consent of the Division Leader concerned. Anyone comin...

  17. Clinical observation on treating fever in patients with acute upper respiratory tract infection by Tanreqing plus ribavirin%痰热清联合利巴韦林治疗急性上呼吸道感染发热患者的疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁益辉; 李舟文; 申梅

    2012-01-01

      目的:观察痰热清联合利巴韦林治疗急性上呼吸道感染发热患者的临床疗效.方法:将120例患者随机分为利巴韦林组、痰热清组、联合组各40例,分别给予利巴韦林注射液,痰热清注射液,利巴韦林注射液+痰热清注射液治疗,观察三组患者的临床疗效、体温起效时间、解热时间及痊愈时间.结果:利巴韦林与痰热清均能较好的治疗急性上呼吸道感染,两组差异无显著性意义(P>0.05);利巴韦林组与联合组临床疗效比较,两组差异有显著性意义(P0.05);Compared the clinical efficacy of ribavirin group and the combined group, the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05);Compared the clinical efficacy of Tanreqing group and the combined group, the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05);The onset time of Tanreqing group was shorter than that of the ribavirin group, the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05);antipyretic time and healing time were shorter than that of the ribavirin group, There are significant differences (P<0.01). The onset time, antipyretic time and healing time of the ribavirin group were shorter than that of the ribavirin group and Tanreqing group, there are significant differences (P<0.01). Conclusion: Ribavirin and Tanreqing had a better therapeutic effect in treating acute upper respiratory tract infection, the antipyretic action of anreqing was better than that of ribavirin, body temperature onset time, antipyretic time, and recovery time were shorter than that of ribavirin, but no significant difference in both clinical efficacy. The effects of combination was better than that of single using ribavirin or Tanreqing, the onset time, antipyretic, healing time were shorter.

  18. Development of Medication Reminder System for Acute Upper Respiratory Tract Infection Based on Association Rules Algorithm%基于关联规则算法构建 急性上呼吸道感染用药提示系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丰; 王昱; 李鹏飞; 尹巍巍; 李劲松

    2015-01-01

    Along with the constant improvement and expansion of the hospital information system, the database of various businesses are also increasingly expanding. In face of massive clinical information data, we need to apply techniques of Data Mining to discover useful information. Acute upper respiratory tract infection is called AURTI for short. Broadly speaking AURTI is not just one disease, but a group of diseases. As a common disease, AURTI is frequent and complicated rather than a single disease. Thus, how to choose the most effective treatment methods to improve the treatment efficiency has played a key role. In this paper, we apply the methods of data mining and use association rules algorithm to analyze the associations between vital signs and medications. We design and develop a reminder system of AURTI medication based on association algorithm to determine which drug should be taken according to the specific signs and to offer suggestions to doctors. The system helps to reduce medication errors, improves the patients' safety and overall quality of care.%随着医院信息系统的不断完善扩大,各项业务的数据库日益膨胀.面对海量的临床信息数据,需要应用数据挖掘技术手段发掘出其中潜在的信息.急性上呼吸道感染(简称上感),广义上是一系列疾病的总称,具有常见多发的特点,所以选择一种有效的治疗方法对提高诊疗质量将起到关键性作用.利用数据挖掘的手段,应用关联规则算法对患有急性上呼吸道感染的病人进行分析,找到病人相关特征信息与用药之间的关联规则;并基于该关联规则构建急性上呼吸道感染用药的提示系统,对医生为病人用药进行评估,提高病人安全和整体医疗质量.

  19. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome after near-drowning (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel, G; Jelen, S; Forster, B; Gullotta, U; Daum, S

    1977-08-01

    After successful rescue from drowning there may develop a situation which is called secondary drowning, resulting in acute respiratory distress characterized by interstitial pulmonary oedema, hypoxaemia, hypercapnia and acidosis during drowning, direct alteration of the alveolar membrane by aspirated water and particulate matters and a volume overloading by adsorption and--not seldom--inept therapy. This situation requires mechanical ventilation and forced diuresis, combined with high doses of steroids, antibiotics and digitalis. We present the case of an eleven year old patient whose clinical course demonstrate the necessity of exact clinical observation after rescue from drowning. After development of acute respiratory distress only the immediate utilization of the therapeutic modalities of an intensive care may result in a satisfactory outcome. Four months later our patient had normal pulmonary function except for a moderate reduction of compliance.

  20. Fungal contamination of the respiratory tract and associated respiratory impairment among sawmill workers in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asit Adhikari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Wood processing workers are exposed to wood-associated microbiological contaminants, including fungi. Our aim was to study the potential association between sputum fungus and adverse respiratory effects in such workers. In a group of sawmill workers, we administered a respiratory questionnaire, performed lung function testing and quantified the proportions of leukocytes in spontaneously expectorated sputum samples. We identified fungal species by DNA sequencing. Of 54 sawmill workers, 19 yielded fungal positive sputum samples (mean age 42.5±10.4 years and 35 were negative for fungus (mean age 36.9±5.2 years. The fungus was identified as Candida sp. in all samples. Those with fungal-positive sputum, compared to others, reported more cough (26% versus 63% and haemoptysis (6% versus 37% (both p<0.05, manifested reduced forced midexpiratory flow rates (FEF25–75% (82.3±4.5 versus 69.2±9.9% predicted, p<0.001, and had higher sputum eosinophil counts (median 9.25 versus 3.25%, p<0.01. Reduction of FEF25–75% was associated both with fungus detection in sputum (−12.7%, 95% CI−8.5– −16.9% and sputum eosinophils (−2.1% per 1% increase in eosinophils, 95% CI −1.5– −2.8% (both p<0.001. In sawmill workers, Candida sp. detectable in sputum was associated with respiratory symptoms, sputum eosinophilia and reduced FEF25–75%.

  1. TCM Therapeutic Strategy on Acute Lung Injury Caused by Infectious Atypical Pneumonia and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐光华

    2003-01-01

    @@ Infectious atypical pneumonia (IAP) is also called severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) by WHO. In its development, around 20% of SARS can develop into the stage of acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), active and effective treatment of it constitutes the important basis for lowering mortality and reducing secondary pulmonary function impairment and pulmonary fibrosis.

  2. Inhaled nitric oxide for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and acute lung injury in children and adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann;

    2010-01-01

    Acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure (AHRF), defined as acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), are critical conditions. AHRF results from a number of systemic conditions and is associated with high mortality and morbidity in all ages. Inhaled nitric oxide (INO) has...

  3. Caudal Nuclei Of The Rat Nucleus Of The Solitary Tract Differentially Innervate Respiratory Compartments Within The Ventrolateral Medulla

    OpenAIRE

    Alheid, George F.; Jiao, Weijie; McCrimmon, Donald R.

    2011-01-01

    A substantial array of respiratory, cardiovascular, visceral and somatic afferents are relayed via the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) to the brainstem (and forebrain). Despite some degree of overlap within the NTS, specificity is maintained in central respiratory reflexes driven by 2nd order afferent relay neurons in the NTS. While the topographical arrangement of respiratory-related afferents targeting the NTS has been extensively investigated, their higher order brainstem targets beyon...

  4. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome: Clinical and Laboratory Manifestations

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Christopher W.K.; Chan, Michael H M; Wong, Chun K.

    2004-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a recently emerged infectious disease with significant morbidity and mortality. An epidemic in 2003 affected 8,098 patients in 29 countries with 774 deaths. The aetiological agent is a new coronavirus spread by droplet transmission. Clinical and general laboratory manifestations included fever, chills, rigor, myalgia, malaise, diarrhoea, cough, dyspnoea, pneumonia, lymphopenia, neutrophilia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase...

  5. Surfactant alteration and replacement in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Walmrath Dieter; Grimminger Friedrich; Markart Philipp; Schmidt Reinhold; Ruppert Clemens; Günther Andreas; Seeger Werner

    2001-01-01

    Abstract The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a frequent, life-threatening disease in which a marked increase in alveolar surface tension has been repeatedly observed. It is caused by factors including a lack of surface-active compounds, changes in the phospholipid, fatty acid, neutral lipid, and surfactant apoprotein composition, imbalance of the extracellular surfactant subtype distribution, inhibition of surfactant function by plasma protein leakage, incorporation of surfactan...

  6. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Pathophysiology and Therapeutic Options

    OpenAIRE

    Pierrakos, Charalampos; Karanikolas, Menelaos; Scolletta, Sabino; Karamouzos, Vasilios; Velissaris, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a common entity in critical care. ARDS is associated with many diagnoses, including trauma and sepsis, can lead to multiple organ failure and has high mortality. The present article is a narrative review of the literature on ARDS, including ARDS pathophysiology and therapeutic options currently being evaluated or in use in clinical practice. The literature review covers relevant publications until January 2011. Recent developments in the therapeut...

  7. Acute respiratory distress syndrome--two decades later.

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    Twenty years have now elapsed since Ashbaugh and Petty first described the syndrome of acute respiratory failure associated with a wide spectrum of clinical conditions. During the past two decades, significant advances have emerged in our understanding of the clinical conditions associated with the syndrome and the pathophysiological changes affecting the alveolar-capillary membrane responsible for the characteristic non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Recent data have reaffirmed the notion that...

  8. Non-invasive mechanic ventilation in treating acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Lari

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Non invasive ventilation (NIV in acute respiratory failure (ARF improve clinical parameters, arterial blood gases, decrease mortality and endo tracheal intubation (ETI rate also outside the intensive care units (ICUs. Objective of this study is to verify applicability of NIV in a general non respiratory medical ward. We enrolled 68 consecutive patients (Pts with Hypoxemic or Hyper capnic ARF: acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE, exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, Pneu - monia, acute lung injury / acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS. NIV treatment was CPAP or PSV + PEEP. 12 Pts (18,5% met primary endpoint (NIV failure: 11 Pts (17% needed ETI (5ALI/ARDS p < 0,0001, 6COPD 16,6%, 1 Patient (1,5% died (Pneumonia. No Pts with ACPE failed (p = 0,0027. Secondary endpoints: significant improvement in Respiratory Rate (RR, Kelly Score, pH, PaCO2, PaO2 vs baseline. Median duration of treatment: 16:06 hours: COPD 18:54, ACPE 4:15. Mean length of hospitalisation: 8.66 days. No patients discontinued NIV, no side effects. Results are consistent with literature. Hypoxemic ARF related to ALI/ARDS and pneumonia show worst outcome: it is not advisable to manage these conditions with NIV outside the ICU. NIV for ARF due to COPD and ACPE is feasible, safe and effective in a general medical ward if selection of Pts, staff’s training and monitoring are appropriate. This should encourage the diffusion of NIV in this specific setting. According to strong evidences in literature, NIV should be considered a first line and standard treatment in these clinical conditions irrespective of the setting.

  9. Anti-infectious treatment in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Min; Xiao, Zhen-Liang; Fu-xiang LI

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is closely correlated with infection. Severe infection, e.g., sepsis and septic shock, can result in ARDS. Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is one of the common complications in ARDS related infection. As regards ARDS related infection, community acquired infection (CAI) is different from hospital acquired infection (HAI) in bacterial spectrum. The former is mainly caused by Streptococcus pneumonia, Hemophilus influenzae, Moraxelle catarrhalis, ...

  10. The Current Care for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kawamae, Kaneyuki; Iseki, Ken

    2003-01-01

    The mortality rate of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has been still high. A many kinds of strategies for ARDS are being tried in the world. The important factors which influence for pathological-physiology of ARDS during the mechanical ventilation are gravity consolidation, atelectasis, and ventilator induced lung injury (VILI). VILI is caused by shear stress that is induced by the repeated collapse and recruit of alveolus. Alveolar over-distention caused by large tidal volume als...

  11. Acute respiratory distress syndrome associated with severe ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shiho; Sagara; Yasuo; Horie; Yumiko; Anezaki; Hideaki; Miyazawa; Masahiro; Iizuka

    2010-01-01

    Various extraintestinal manifestations including pulmonary abnormalities have been reported in patients with ulcerative colitis. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a serious and fatal pulmonary manifestation. We have experienced a 67-year-old male patient with ARDS associated with a severe type of ulcerative colitis (UC). Severe dyspnea symptoms occurred during the treatment of UC in a previous hospital and the patient was transferred to our hospital on June 27, 2007. Both blood and sputa culture...

  12. Human Pharyngeal Microbiome May Play A Protective Role in Respiratory Tract Infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhancheng Gao; Yu Kang; Jun Yu; Lufeng Ren

    2014-01-01

    The human pharyngeal microbiome, which resides at the juncture of digestive and respi-ratory tracts, may have an active role in the prevention of respiratory tract infections, similar to the actions of the intestinal microbiome against enteric infections. Recent studies have demonstrated that the pharyngeal microbiome comprises an abundance of bacterial species that interacts with the local epithelial and immune cells, and together, they form a unique micro-ecological system. Most of the microbial species in microbiomes are obligate symbionts constantly adapting to their unique surroundings. Indigenous commensal species are capable of both maintaining dominance and evoking host immune responses to eliminate invading species. Temporary damage to the pha-ryngeal microbiome due to the impaired local epithelia is also considered an important predisposing risk factor for infections. Therefore, reinforcement of microbiome homeostasis to prevent invasion of infection-prone species would provide a novel treatment strategy in addition to antibiotic treat-ment and vaccination. Hence continued research efforts on evaluating probiotic treatment and developing appropriate procedures are necessary to both prevent and treat respiratory infections.

  13. The development of lavage procedures for the upper and lower respiratory tract of the cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New techniques for routine bronchopulmonary lavage (BPL) and nasal flushing in the anaesthetized cat which are safe, reproducible and simple to use have been developed. Five adult mixed-breed cats from a specific pathogen-free colony were selected, fasted overnight and weighed. The feeding tube was passed through the endotracheal tube and down the trachea until it became wedged in the bronchus. Nasal flushing was then immediately carried out after the BPL with the endotracheal tube in position. Radiological and fluoroscopic examinations were carried out to determine the position of the feeding tube in the lung. Lateral and dorsoventral views of the thorax of each cat were taken. These examinations identified the tube most frequently in the caudal lobe of the lung. The lavage techniques described provide a definite procedure for investigating the cellular and humoral mechanisms operating in the upper and lower respiratory tract of the cat. These methods can be used to sample directly the cellular and humoral constituents contributing to defence mechanisms in the feline respiratory tract and to monitor the local changes accompanying respiratory disease

  14. CLINICAL ANALYSIS OF OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEASYNDROME WITH ACUTE RESPIRATORY FAILURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To study the clinical characteristics of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) induced acute respiratory failure. Methods The clinical and laboratory characteristics of 9 patients were reviewed. Results 9 patients (8 females, 1 male) presented with obesity and mental disturbance, with a BMI being 44.97 kg /m2, (45.25 kg/m2 in the fe male). The mean age of the group was 67.89 years (61~74 years). All had respiratory acidosis (mean pH 7.17), hypercapni a (mean PaCO2 94.10mmHg) (63.97~143.18mmHg), and hypoxemia (mean PaO2 39mmHg) (29.03~44.03mmHg). During periods of clinical stability all but 2 had awaken hypercapnia (mean PaCO2 46.73mmHg) (38.25~54.68mmHg). Four of the 9 patients had pulmonary function test showing FEV1>70%. Conclusion OSAS induced acute respiratory fail ure has a sudden onset and various presentations and can be reversed with early and proper treatment. The severity of abnormal pulmonary function was less than what would be expected to cause respiratory failure.

  15. Epidemiological pattern of community-acquired respiratory tract infections of the conscripts in the North Fleet during a vaccine-challenged period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Lobzin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of the new military units in the North fleet is accompanied by vaccination using Exhausted diphtheria tetanus vaccine, modified. The accination coincides with periods of a rising number of army conscripts being taken ill with community-acquired infection of respiratory tracts: acute tonsillitis, acute bronchitis and community-acquired pneumonia. We need to study is to ascertain whether there is the correlation between the periods of the increase in the number of ervicemen fallen ill with community-acquired infection of respiratory tracts and the diphtheria and tetanus vaccination. The study was carried out on the North fleet conscripts who were drawn blood samples from the ulnar vein before and after the vaccination using Exhausted diphtheria tetanus vaccine, modified. The blood was examined for the presence of antibodies to diphtheria and tetanus using direct hemagglutination test. The health status of the vaccinated conscripts was under observation for 4 months, during which acute illnesses (acute tonsillitis, acute bronchitis and community-acquired pneumonia were registered. Serologic testing demonstrated a high rate of immunological protection against diphtheria and tetanus before vaccination. After the diphtheria and tetanus vaccination, the number of conscripts, who were taken ill in the first month, was significantly higher compared to the following months. The conscripts, who fell ill, had high antibody titers against diphtheria and tetanus in the vaccine-challenged period. Vaccination of the servicemen using Exhausted diphtheria tetanus vaccine, modified, is serologically unfounded; it leads to complications such as acute tonsillitis, acute bronchitis and community-acquired pneumonia during the vaccinechallenged period especially during the first month and less considerably during the following months.

  16. [Bacteriological and virological status in upper respiratory tract infections of cats (cat common cold complex)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Kerstin; Radeloff, Isabel; Stephan, Bernd; Greife, Heinrich; Hellmann, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Between October 2002 and January 2005,460 bacteriological samples from cats with an acute upper respiratory tract infection were analysed in clinical field studies in two accredited laboratories in Germany. Oropharyngeal swabs were taken from these cats and sent to the laboratories for routine diagnostics. In the swab samples of 460 cats 382 bacteria strains were isolated. The following bacteria were isolated most frequently: Pasteurella spp. (32.5 %), Staphylococcus spp. (18.5 %), Escherichia coli (17.0 %), Streptococcus spp. (9.1 %), Pseudomonas spp. (6.9 %) and Klebsiella spp. (3.0 %). Bordetella bronchiseptica was found in 0.4 % of the animals To evaluate possible regional and time influences, the animals were split into three populations: 1: Germany, laboratory A; 2: Germany, laboratory B; 3: France and Belgium, laboratory B. In population 1 an 2 Pasteurella spp. were found most frequently with 42.2 % and 36.5 %, respectively. The second most frequently isolated bacterial species were Staphylococcus spp. with 14.1 % and 21.4 % and E. coli with 13.6 % and 17.5 % respectively. In population 3 Staphylococcus spp., E. coli (20 % each) and Pasteurella spp. (18.5 %) were isolated at almost the same frequency. Virological parameter were additionally analysed in 328 cats (population 2 and 3). Serum samples were analysed for antibodies specific for Feline Calicivirus (FCV) and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) and for Feline Leukaemia Virus (FeLV) antigen. Oropharyngeal swabs were analysed for Feline Herpesvirus (FHV) by using PCR. Calicivirus-specific antibodies were found in 99.6 % of the cats of population 2 and in 100 % of the animals in population 3. Herpesvirus was detected in 15.3 % and 23.3 % of the cats, respectively. FeLV-Antigen was found in 0.4 % of the animals in population 2 and in 10.1 % of the cats in population 3, while FIV-antibodies were identified in 8.7 % of the animals of population 2 and in 6.1 % of the cats of population 3. In total FHV was

  17. Dosimetry model for bronchial and extrathoracic tissues of the respiratory tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Task Group to Review the Lung Model for the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is proposing to revise the dosimetry model for the respiratory tract on the basis of the relative radiosensitivities of the various tissue components. The task group considers that if all tissues were to receive the same radiation dose, approximately 64% of fatal cancers would be likely to arise in the bronchi, about 12% in the bronchioles, about 20% in extrathoracic tissues (divided between the naso-- and oropharynx and larynx), and only about 4% in the alveolar-interstitial tissue, with a very small fraction of all cancers (less than 0.1%) in lymph nodes. A new and detailed treatment of dose received by epithelia in the tracheo-bronchiolar and extra-thoracic regions of the respiratory tract is therefore required. This paper describes the approach proposed by the task group to evaluate doses to presumed target cells in each of these tissues at risk in the respiratory tract from non-uniform irradiation by α-, β- and electron-emitters. The task group's approach takes into account the impact of observed phenomena that may cause long-lived radionuclides to be retained in epithelial tissues: the uptake of particles by the airway wall; the chemical binding of sparingly soluble nuclides in epithelial tissues; and, especially in the bronchi and bronchicles, the slow clearance of particles by mucus. Values of dose, weighted by the task group's proposed relative risk factors are calculated for several types of α- and β- emitters. These weighted doses are compared with the committed effective dose equivalent calculated using the current ICRP lung model, in which the simplifying assumption is made that all of the activity retained in the thorax uniformly irradiates the 1 kg mass of a ''composite'' lung. 11 refs., 14 figs., 7 tabs

  18. Drug resistance in community-acquired respiratory tract infections: role for an emerging antibacterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Aguilar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Lorenzo Aguilar1, María-José Giménez1, José Barberán21Microbiology Department, School of Medicine, University Complutense, Madrid; 2Infectious Diseases Department, Hospital Central de la Defensa Gomez Ulla, Madrid, SpainAbstract: The nasopharynx is the ecological niche where evolution towards resistance occurs in respiratory tract isolates. Dynamics of different bacterial populations in antibiotic-free multibacterial niches are the baseline that antibiotic treatments can alter by shifting the competitive balance in favor of resistant populations. For this reason, antibiotic resistance is increasingly being considered to be an ecological problem. Traditionally, resistance has implied the need for development of new antibiotics for which basic efficacy and safety data are required prior to licensing. Antibiotic development is mainly focused on demonstrating clinical efficacy and setting susceptibility breakpoints for efficacy prediction. However, additional information on pharmacodynamic data predicting absence of selection of resistance and of resistant subpopulations, and specific surveillance on resistance to core antibiotics (to detect emerging resistances and its link with antibiotic consumption in the community are valuable data in defining the role of a new antibiotic, not only from the perspective of its therapeutic potential but also from the ecologic perspective (countering resistances to core antibiotics in the community. The documented information on cefditoren gleaned from published studies in recent years is an example of the role for an emerging oral antibacterial facing current antibiotic resistance in community-acquired respiratory tract infections.Keywords: respiratory tract infection, antibiotic resistance, cefditoren, community

  19. Comparison of old and new ICRP models for respiratory tract dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines the historical development and application of respiratory tract dosimetry models by the International Commission for Radiological Protection, ICRP, for health protection from inhaled radioactive aerosols. Three different models are discussed, those that were included in ICRP recommendations published in 1960 and 1979, and the new ICRP Publication 66. Basic features of these models are compared and contrasted. These features include model structure, sites and frequencies of particle deposition, processes and rates of clearance of the deposited material from the respiratory tract, and consideration of the parameters involved in these processes and how various factors can influence these parameters. All three models lead to the calculation of absorbed radiation doses with differing degrees of regional and local specificity. These calculations are achieved using different tools ranging from quick hand calculations to sophisticated computerized modeling approaches. A side-by-side review of these models indicates several important trends in respiratory tract dosimetry models, the most obvious of which is the increased complexity of each new model over the past 30+ years. These increases reflect both the increasing size of the knowledge base derived from studies in laboratory animals and in human subjects and the need for models more broadly applicable for both occupational and environmental exposures. It is likely that future research will be directed to those key aspects of the new model having the largest uncertainties. The detailed design of the new model and its associated software provide excellent means of identifying useful research areas and using the resulting new information in organized and productive ways

  20. Successful treatment of Chlamydophila pneumoniae acute respiratory distress syndrome with extracorporeal membrane oxygenator: a case report and diagnostic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Bels David

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Chlamydophila pneumoniae is a respiratory pathogen known to infect the upper and lower respiratory tracts. Infection severity can range from sub-clinical pulmonary infection to acute respiratory distress syndrome. Case presentation A previously healthy 62-year-old Caucasian man was admitted to our hospital for acute respiratory failure. Serum samples obtained every week starting from the day of admission showed clear-cut seroconversion for C. pneumoniae antibodies. All other cultures obtained during the first days of hospitalization were negative. Despite maximal ventilatory support (high positive end expiratory pressure, fraction of inspired oxygen of 1.0, nitric oxide inhalation, neuromuscular blocking agents and prone positioning, our patient remained severely hypoxemic, which led us to initiate an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation treatment. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and hemodiafiltration were withdrawn on day 12. Our patient was extubated on day 18 and discharged from our Intensive Care Unit on day 20. He went home a month later. Conclusion We describe the first published case of acute respiratory distress syndrome due to C. pneumoniae infection successfully treated by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, a very useful tool in this syndrome. A quick and specific method for the definite diagnosis of Chlamydophila infection should be developed.

  1. An investigation into the role of Chlamydophila spp. in bovine upper respiratory tract disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twomey, D F; Griffiths, P C; Horigan, M W; Hignett, B C; Martin, T P

    2006-05-01

    An outbreak of upper respiratory tract disease was investigated in a group of 17 housed home-bred calves on a mixed dairy, beef and sheep farm in Devon. Conjunctival swabs were collected and tested for Chlamydophila spp. DNA using a PCR test that detects Chlamydophila abortus and Chlamydophila psittaci. Six of the calves tested gave a positive result. Further epidemiological observations and laboratory testing indicated that the adult dairy cows, from which the affected calves originated, were the most likely source of infection.

  2. Influences of parameter uncertainties within the ICRP 66 respiratory tract model: particle deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolch, W E; Farfán, E B; Huh, C; Huston, T E; Bolch, W E

    2001-10-01

    Risk assessment associated with the inhalation of radioactive aerosols requires as an initial step the determination of particle deposition within the various anatomic regions of the respiratory tract. The model outlined in ICRP Publication 66 represents to date one of the most complete overall descriptions of not only particle deposition, but of particle clearance and local radiation dosimetry of lung tissues. In this study, a systematic review of the deposition component within the ICRP 66 respiratory tract model was conducted in which probability density functions were assigned to all input parameters. These distributions were subsequently incorporated within a computer code LUDUC (LUng Dose Uncertainty Code) in which Latin hypercube sampling techniques are used to generate multiple (e.g., 1,000) sets of input vectors (i.e., trials) for all of the model parameters needed to assess particle deposition within the extrathoracic (anterior and posterior), bronchial, bronchiolar, and alveolar-interstitial regions of the ICRP 66 respiratory tract model. Particle deposition values for the various trial simulations were shown to be well described by lognormal probability distributions. Geometric mean deposition fractions from LUDUC were found to be within approximately +/- 10% of the single-value estimates from the LUDEP computer code for each anatomic region and for particle diameters ranging from 0.001 to 50 microm. In all regions of the respiratory tract, LUDUC simulations for an adult male at light exertion show that uncertainties in particle deposition fractions are distributed only over a range of about a factor of approximately 2-4 for particle sizes between 0.005 to 0.2 microm. Below 0.005 microm, uncertainties increase only for deposition within the alveolar region. At particle sizes exceeding 1 microm, uncertainties in the deposition fraction within the extrathoracic regions are relatively small, but approach a factor of 20 for deposition in the bronchial

  3. Interventions to improve adherence to first-line antibiotics in respiratory tract infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llor, Carl; Monedero, María José; García, Guillermo;

    2015-01-01

    intervention (II), aimed to improve the adherence to recommendations on first-line antibiotics in patients with respiratory tract infections (RTIs). Methods: General practitioners (GPs) from different regions of Spain were offered two different interventions on antibiotic prescribing. They registered all...... included training and access to point-of-care tests in practice. Results: The GPs registered 15 073 RTIs before the intervention and 12 760 RTIs after. The antibiotic prescribing rate reduced from 27.7% to 19.8%. Prescribing of first-choice antibiotics increased after the intervention in both groups...

  4. Quality indicators for treatment of respiratory tract infections? An assessment by Danish general practitioners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Bjerrum, Lars; Gahrn-Hansen, Bente;

    2013-01-01

    Background: In 2008, a set of 41 quality indicators for antibiotic treatment of respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in general practice were developed in an international setting as part of the European project HAPPY AUDIT. Objectives: To investigate Danish general practitioners' (GPs') assessment...... of 62 (61%) responded. Quality indicators focusing on the frequency of prescribing of narrow-spectrum penicillin were rated as suitable by more than 80% of the Danish GPs, while quality indicators concerning cephalosporins or quinolones were rated suitable by less than half of the GPs. The antibiotic...... treatment of RTIs, only a few of them were rated suitable by the GPs, who are supposed to use them....

  5. European H16N3 gull influenza virus attaches to the human respiratory tract and eye.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Lindskog

    Full Text Available We explored the attachment of an H16N3 influenza virus to human, mallard, and gull tissues using virus histochemistry applied to tissue microarrays and employing human and mallard viruses as references. Of the viruses tested, the H16N3 gull virus most readily attached to the human respiratory tract and eye. These results underscore the need to assess the potential for gull influenza viruses to replicate in human tissues and further investigate the role of gulls in influenza virus ecology.

  6. Insights into the respiratory tract microbiota of patients with cystic fibrosis during early Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keravec, Marlene; Mounier, Jerome; Prestat , Emmanuel; Vallet, Sophie; Jansson, Janet K.; Bergaud , Gaetaqn; Rosec, Silvain; Gourious, Stephanie; Rault, Gilles; Coton, Emmanuel; Barbier, George; Hery-Arnaud, Geneveieve

    2015-08-09

    Abstract Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays a major role in cystic fibrosis (CF) progression. Therefore, it is important to understand the initial steps of P. aeruginosa infection. The structure and dynamics of CF respiratory tract microbial communities during the early stages of P. aeruginosa colonization were characterized by pyrosequencing and cloning-sequencing. The respiratory microbiota showed high diversity, related to the young age of the CF cohort (mean age 10 years). Wide inter- and intra-individual variations were revealed. A common core microbiota of 5 phyla and 13 predominant genera was found, the majority of which were obligate anaerobes. A few genera were significantly more prevalent in patients never infected by P. aeruginosa. Persistence of an anaerobic core microbiota regardless of P. aeruginosa status suggests a major role of certain anaerobes in the pathophysiology of lung infections in CF. Some genera may be potential biomarkers of pulmonary infection state.

  7. Characterization of human metapneumovirus from pediatric patients with acute respiratory infections in a 4-year period in Beijing, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ru-nan; QIAN Yuan; ZHAO Lin-qing; DENG Jie; SUN Yu; WANG Fang; LIAO Bin; LI Yan; HUANG Rong-yan

    2011-01-01

    Background Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) was discovered by scientists in the Netherlands as a novel respiratory virus in 2001 and had been found in children with acute respiratory tract infections (ARTI) in China. The objective of this study was to determine the importance of hMPV infection in children in Beijing and the genotypes of the circulating virus by the surveillance during a four-consecutive-year period.Methods Clinical specimens collected from children with ARTI from January 2006 to December 2009 were tested for hMPV by RT-PCR using primers targeting the matrix (M) gene, followed by genotyping of hMPV directly from positive samples by diplex PCR with primers for glycoprotein (G) genes. Sequence analysis was used for genotyping of those un-typable samples. Common respiratory viruses in these clinical specimens were tested by virus isolation and antigen detection, in addition to hMPV detection.Results Of 4730 tested specimens, 191 (4.0%) were positive for hMPV and 62.8% of 191 were identified as genotype A. The positive rate of hMPV from hospitalized patients was higher than that from outpatients each year. Most of hMPV positive children were under five years old. The peak of hMPV activity mostly occurred in late spring and overlapped with or followed that of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and followed by parainfluenza virus 3. Of hMPV infected cases,68.6% were lower respiratory tract infection, among which 79.4% were hospitalized, and upper respiratory tract infection was diagnosed for 31.4% of hMPV infected children. The 9.4% of hMPV positive samples were found to co-exist with other respiratory viruses.Conclusions hMPV was an important pathogen for ARTI in pediatric patients, especially those under five years old.Both genotypes A and B circulated simultaneously in Beijing.

  8. The comparative analysis on the curative effect of amoxicillin clavulanate combined with compound pholcodine syrup for children with acute bacterial upper respiratory tract infection%阿莫西林克拉维酸钾联合复方福尔可定治疗小儿急性细菌性上呼吸道感染的临床疗效随机对照分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王冰; 徐洁; 唐新业; 姚红兵

    2014-01-01

    Objective To observe the curative effect of amoxicillin clavulanate combined with compound phol-codine syrup for children with acute bacterial upper respiratory tract infection.Methods One hundred and sixty chil-dren with acute bacterial upper respiratory tract infection were chosen,and divided into treatment group(80 cases) and control group(80 cases)randomly.Amoxicillin clavulanic(7∶1)combined with compound pholcodine syrup were enrolled in the treatment group,while amoxicillin clavulanic(7∶1)combined with lung cough syrup were in the con-trol group.The bacterial clearance rate,oral secretory SIgA and total effective rate were compared before and after the treatment for 7 days.Results There was no significant difference in the bacterial clearance rate in the two groups (P >0.05).The oral secretory SigA increased after treatment comparing with that before treatment(P 0.05)in the control one.The total effective rate in the treatment group was higher than that in the control one(93.75% vs.86.25%)(P <0.05).No serious side effect occurred in the two groups.Conclusion It has significant effect using amoxicillin clavulanic combined with compound pholcodine syrup in treatment of pediatric acute bacterial upper respiratory tract infection.%目的:观察阿莫西林克拉维酸钾干混悬剂联合复方福尔可定治疗小儿急性细菌性上呼吸道感染的临床疗效。方法选择急性细菌性上呼吸道感染患儿160例,分为治疗组(80例)和对照组(80例),治疗组选用阿莫西林克拉维酸钾干混悬剂(7∶1)+复方福尔可定口服溶液,对照组选用阿莫西林克拉维酸钾干混悬剂(7∶1)+肺力咳糖浆。治疗疗程均为7 d,比较治疗前后两组细菌清除率、口腔分泌性 SIgA 和总有效率。结果细菌清除率两组差异无统计学意义(P >0.05),治疗后实验组患儿口腔分泌性 SIgA 较治疗前有升高(P <0.05),而对照组

  9. 阿莫西林克拉维酸钾联合复方福尔可定治疗小儿急性细菌性上呼吸道感染的临床疗效随机对照分析%The comparative analysis on the curative effect of amoxicillin clavulanate combined with compound pholcodine syrup for children with acute bacterial upper respiratory tract infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王冰; 徐洁; 唐新业; 姚红兵

    2014-01-01

    目的:观察阿莫西林克拉维酸钾干混悬剂联合复方福尔可定治疗小儿急性细菌性上呼吸道感染的临床疗效。方法选择急性细菌性上呼吸道感染患儿160例,分为治疗组(80例)和对照组(80例),治疗组选用阿莫西林克拉维酸钾干混悬剂(7∶1)+复方福尔可定口服溶液,对照组选用阿莫西林克拉维酸钾干混悬剂(7∶1)+肺力咳糖浆。治疗疗程均为7 d,比较治疗前后两组细菌清除率、口腔分泌性 SIgA 和总有效率。结果细菌清除率两组差异无统计学意义(P >0.05),治疗后实验组患儿口腔分泌性 SIgA 较治疗前有升高(P <0.05),而对照组差异无统计学意义(P >0.05),治疗组总有效率93.75%。显著高于对照组86.25%(P <0.05),两组患儿均无严重的不良反应发生。结论阿莫西林克拉维酸钾干混悬剂联合复方福尔可定治疗小儿急性细菌性上呼吸道感染疗效显著。%Objective To observe the curative effect of amoxicillin clavulanate combined with compound phol-codine syrup for children with acute bacterial upper respiratory tract infection.Methods One hundred and sixty chil-dren with acute bacterial upper respiratory tract infection were chosen,and divided into treatment group(80 cases) and control group(80 cases)randomly.Amoxicillin clavulanic(7∶1)combined with compound pholcodine syrup were enrolled in the treatment group,while amoxicillin clavulanic(7∶1)combined with lung cough syrup were in the con-trol group.The bacterial clearance rate,oral secretory SIgA and total effective rate were compared before and after the treatment for 7 days.Results There was no significant difference in the bacterial clearance rate in the two groups (P >0.05).The oral secretory SigA increased after treatment comparing with that before treatment(P 0.05)in the control one.The total effective rate in the treatment group was higher than that

  10. Acute respiratory distress syndrome associated with tumor lysis syndrome in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Macaluso

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumor lysis syndrome is a serious and dangerous complication usually associated with antiblastic treatment in some malignancies characterized by high cell turn-over. Mild or severe electrolyte abnormalities including high serum levels of uric acid, potassium, phosphorus, creatinine, bun and reduction of calcium can be responsible for multi-organ failure, involving mostly kidneys, heart and central nervous system. Renal damage can be followed by acute renal failure, weight gain, progressive liver impairment, overproduction of cytokines, and subsequent maintenance of multi-organ damage. Life-threatening acute respiratory failure associated with tumor lysis syndrome is rare. We describe a child with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed an unusually dramatic tumor lysis syndrome, after administration of the first low doses of steroid, that was rapidly associated with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Subsequent clinical course and treatment modalities that resulted in the gradual and full recovery of the child are also described.

  11. Acute respiratory distress syndrome associated with tumor lysis syndrome in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaluso, Alessandra; Genova, Selene; Maringhini, Silvio; Coffaro, Giancarlo; Ziino, Ottavio; D'Angelo, Paolo

    2015-02-24

    Tumor lysis syndrome is a serious and dangerous complication usually associated with antiblastic treatment in some malignancies characterized by high cell turn-over. Mild or severe electrolyte abnormalities including high serum levels of uric acid, potassium, phosphorus, creatinine, bun and reduction of calcium can be responsible for multi-organ failure, involving mostly kidneys, heart and central nervous system. Renal damage can be followed by acute renal failure, weight gain, progressive liver impairment, overproduction of cytokines, and subsequent maintenance of multi-organ damage. Life-threatening acute respiratory failure associated with tumor lysis syndrome is rare. We describe a child with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed an unusually dramatic tumor lysis syndrome, after administration of the first low doses of steroid, that was rapidly associated with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Subsequent clinical course and treatment modalities that resulted in the gradual and full recovery of the child are also described. PMID:25918625

  12. Therapeutic Modulation of Coagulation and Fibrinolysis in Acute Lung Injury and the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Sebag, Sara C.; Bastarache, Julie A.; Ware, Lorraine B.

    2011-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and acute lung injury (ALI) are characterized by excessive intra-alveolar fibrin deposition, driven, at least in part by inflammation. The imbalance between activation of coagulation and inhibition of fibrinolysis in patients with ALI/ARDS favors fibrin formation and appears to occur both systemically and in the lung and airspace. Tissue factor (TF), a key mediator of the activation of coagulation in the lung, has been implicated in the pathogenesis ...

  13. Role of Ventilation in Cases of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome /Acute Lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Hemant M Shah; Shilpa B Sutariya; Parul M Bhatt; Nishil Shah; Shweta Gamit

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Acute lung injury (ALI) and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) are characterized by refractory hypoxemia that develops secondary to high-permeability pulmonary edema. These syndromes are gaining more attention as a means of better comprehending the pathophysiology of ARDS and possiblyfor modifying ventilatory management. In this context a study was done to compare role of invasive and non-invasive ventilation in cases of ARDS/ALI. Methods: in this study patients of AR...

  14. Perioperative respiratory adverse events in children with active upper respiratory tract infection who received general anesthesia through an orotracheal tube and inhalation agents

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, So Yeon; Kim, Jeong Min; Lee, Jae Hoon; Kang, Young Ran; Jeong, Seung Ho; Koo, Bon-Nyeo

    2013-01-01

    Background Active upper respiratory tract infection (URI), orotracheal intubation and use of inhalation anesthetics are known risk factors for perioperative respiratory adverse events (RAE). This study investigated the risk factors of perioperative RAE in children with these risk factors. Methods The records of 159 children who underwent general anesthesia with an orotracheal tube and inhalation were reviewed. These patients also had at least one of the following URI symptoms on the day of su...

  15. Prevalence and emerging resistance of Moraxella catarrhalis in lower respiratory tract infections in Karachi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of Moraxella catarrhalis in sputum cultures from patients with lower respiratory tract infection and their antimicrobial sensitivity profiles. Methods: The study comprised sputum specimens of 776 patients at various branches of Dr Essa's Diagnostic Lab, Karachi. The specimens were cultured on blood, chocolate, and eosin methylene blue agars between October 2010 and October 2011. The isolates were identified by conventional methods and anti-biograms were determined by the Kirby-Bauer Agar Disc Diffusion Method. Results: Moraxella catarrhalis was isolated from 39 (5.02%) sputa of which 18 (46.15%) belonged to males. The bimodal age prevalence was 238 (30.7%) in age group 20-29 years, and 180 (23.1%) in 70 years and above. Amoxicillin/clavulanate, cefotaxime, and ceftriaxone were most effective (100%). Very high resistance was seen with amikacin (92.3%), cefixime (92.3%), fosfomycin (84.6%), cefuroxime (84.6%), erythromycin and amoxicillin (76.9%), cotrimoxazole (90%) and doxycycline (76.9%). Conclusions: The incidence of Moraxella catarrhalis in sputum encourages routine culture and sensitivity of sputa from patients suffering from lower respiratory tract infection, especially the elderly and immunocompromised, for tailored drug prescription. (author)

  16. Carboxylesterases in the respiratory tracts of rabbits, rats and Syrian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, A R; Miller, S C; Petridou-Fischer, J

    1987-04-01

    Esters are a widespread class of organic compounds found both in industry and the environment. Because esters are often volatile and, therefore, readily inhaled, the capacity of respiratory tract tissues as well as liver S-9 homogenates from rats, rabbits, and Syrian hamsters to hydrolyze a variety of esters was investigated. A new technique to determine hydrolysis rates by measuring carboxylic acid residues using ion chromatography was proven effective. The results indicated that esters, including potentially carcinogenic beta-lactones, are readily hydrolyzed by respiratory tract enzymes. Species and tissue differences were apparent. The nasal ethmoturbinates had especially high levels of esterase activity with tissue weight-normalized activities from rabbits and hamsters for most substrates exceeding all other tissues tested, including liver. Phenyl acetate was the most rapidly hydrolyzed by ethmoturbinate tissue of the esters tested. Among straight chain aliphatic alcohol acetates, hydrolysis rates increased with carbon number up to pentyl alcohol and then decreased. Branched 4-carbon alcohol acetates were less rapidly hydrolyzed than n-butyl acetate. Correlation of hydrophobicity constants with hydrolysis rates indicated that, for the straight chain aliphatic acetates, a bilinear model best fit the data. PMID:3576643

  17. Acute respiratory symptoms and general illness during the first year of life: a population-based birth cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Holst, Klaus Kähler; Larsen, Karina;

    2008-01-01

    Respiratory symptoms are common in infancy. Most illnesses occurring among children are dealt with by parents and do not require medical attention. Nevertheless, few studies have prospectively and on a community-basis assessed the amount of respiratory symptoms and general illness in normal infants...... out by multiple logistic regression analysis. On average, children had general symptoms for 3.5 months during their first year of life, nasal discharge being most frequent followed by cough. Frequency of all symptoms increased steeply after 6 months of age. Each child had on average 6.3 episodes...... (median: 5.1, inter-quartile range (IQR): 3.3-7.8) of acute respiratory tract illness (ARTI) (nasal discharge and > or = 1 of the following symptoms: cough, fever, wheezing, tachypnea, malaise, or lost appetite) and 5.6 episodes (median: 4.3, IQR: 2.1-7.3) of simple rhinitis per 365 days at risk...

  18. Candelabra aloe (Aloe arborescens) in the therapy and prophylaxis of upper respiratory tract infections: traditional use and recent research results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Petra; Fal, Andrzej M; Jambor, Jerzy; Michalak, Anna; Noster, Britta; Sievers, Hartwig; Steuber, Anke; Walas-Marcinek, Natalia

    2013-02-01

    Aloe arborescens (Candelabra Aloe) has been used in the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections in Central and Eastern European countries for many decades. Originally introduced to support the healing and recovery in cornea transplant patients, aqueous A. arborescens extracts soon became popular in the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections with a focus on toddlers and children. Recent preclinical and clinical data show that immunomodulatory, antiinflammatory, and antiviral effects contribute to its therapeutic efficacy. Based on its well documented, longstanding traditional use and its excellent safety and tolerability, A. arborescens may be considered a valuable addition to the spectrum of herbal medicinal products for the treatment and prophylaxis of upper respiratory tract infections, in particular common cold, in adults and children. PMID:23361849

  19. Therapeutic options for acute cough due to upper respiratory infections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Ian M

    2012-02-01

    Cough due to upper respiratory tract infections (URIs) is one of the most frequent complaints encountered by pediatric health-care providers, and one of the most disruptive symptoms for children and families. Despite the frequency of URIs, there is limited evidence to support the few therapeutic agents currently available in the United States (US) to treat acute cough due to URI. Published, well-designed, contemporary research supporting the efficacy of narcotics (codeine, hydrocodone) and US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved over-the-counter (OTC) oral antitussives and expectorants (dextromethorphan, diphenhydramine, chlophedianol, and guaifenesin) is absent for URI-associated pediatric cough. Alternatively, honey and topically applied vapor rubs may be effective antitussives.

  20. Surveillance of acute respiratory infections among outpatients: A pilot study in Isfahan city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbasali Javadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Considering that there was not any regional survey in Isfahan, Iran regarding the epidemiology of acute respiratory tract infections (ARTI in different age groups of general population, the aim of this study was to determine the epidemiologic feature of ARTIs in Isfahan using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR method. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, patients aged 15 years old. Rhinovirus was the most common cause of ARTI in patients aged 50 years. Influenza virus B was the most common cause of ARTI in patients aged 5-50 years. Conclusion: Our study provides baseline information on the epidemiologic and clinical feature of outpatients with ARTIs in Isfahan city. Though our findings in this pilot study could be helpful in diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of ARTI, planning preventive interventional.

  1. Therapeutic options for acute cough due to upper respiratory infections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Ian M

    2012-02-01

    Cough due to upper respiratory tract infections (URIs) is one of the most frequent complaints encountered by pediatric health-care providers, and one of the most disruptive symptoms for children and families. Despite the frequency of URIs, there is limited evidence to support the few therapeutic agents currently available in the United States (US) to treat acute cough due to URI. Published, well-designed, contemporary research supporting the efficacy of narcotics (codeine, hydrocodone) and US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved over-the-counter (OTC) oral antitussives and expectorants (dextromethorphan, diphenhydramine, chlophedianol, and guaifenesin) is absent for URI-associated pediatric cough. Alternatively, honey and topically applied vapor rubs may be effective antitussives. PMID:21892785

  2. Acute respiratory failure due to ehrlichiosis - CT findings: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlichiosis is a rare disease, with approximately 400 cases having been documented in the US since its recognition in 1986. Most of the reported cases were in the southeastern US, although 6 cases have been described in Washington state. Although most of these reported patients were admitted to hospital, severe complications developed in only a small proportion. Findings on chest imaging have been described in 3 children. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of computed tomographic (CT) findings in a young adult with erhlichiosis in whom acute respiratory failure developed. (author)

  3. Update: Outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome--worldwide, 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-03-28

    CDC continues to support the World Health Organization (WHO) in the investigation of a multicountry outbreak of unexplained atypical pneumonia referred to as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). This report includes summaries of the epidemiologic investigations and public health responses in several affected locations where CDC is collaborating with international and national health authorities. This report also describes an unusual cluster of cases associated with a hotel in Hong Kong and identifies the potential etiologic agent of SARS. Epidemiologic and laboratory investigations of SAPS are ongoing. PMID:12680518

  4. Control dynamics of severe acute respiratory syndrome transmission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Haiying; RONG Feng; KE Fujiu; BAI Yilong

    2003-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a serious disease with many puzzling features. We present a simple, dynamic model to assess the epidemic potential of SARS and the effectiveness of control measures. With this model, we analysed the SARS epidemic data in Beijing. The data fitting gives the basic case reproduction number of 2.16 leading to the outbreak, and the variation of the effective reproduction number reflecting the control effect. Noticeably, our study shows that the response time and the strength of control measures have significant effects on the scale of the outbreak and the lasting time of the epidemic.

  5. ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME DAN ACUTE PNEUMONIA PADA NEAR DROWNING:SEBUAH LAPORAN KASUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Prinka Adyana

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Near drowning is a condition in which the victim survived the first 24 hours. The WorldHealth Organization (WHO , recorded worldwide in 2000 there were 400,000 incidentdrowned accidentally . That is, this figure ranks second only to traffic accidents.Aspiration pneumonia is a complication of near drwoning which occurred in 80 % ofcases of near drowning, while 50 % of patients sink into acute respiratory distresssyndrome ( ARDS . This case report discusses the acute respiratory distress syndromeand acute pneumonia in near drowning 24 years old , who had drowned at the beach for± 15 minutes , the chest x - ray obtained pulmonary edema dd / lung pnuemonia therepneuomothorax . Examination of multislice spiral computed tomography ( MSCT bilateral pneumothorax Thorax obtained major and minor fisuura right and left majorfissure , pneumomediastinum , pulmonary pneumonia contusio / suspected aspirationpneumonia , emphysema subcutis . In intensive care patients conducted for 9 days andreturn to akitivitas everyday

  6. Recurrent lower respiratory tract infections in children: a practical approach to diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patria, Maria Francesca; Esposito, Susanna

    2013-03-01

    Many children are affected by recurrent lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs), but the majority of them do not suffer from serious lung or extrapulmonary disease. The challenge for clinicians is to distinguish the recurrent RTIs with self-limiting or minor problems from those with underlying disease. The aim of this review is to describe a practical approach to children with recurrent LRTIs that limits unnecessary, expensive and time-consuming investigations. The children can be divided into three groups on the basis of their personal and family history and clinical findings: 1) otherwise healthy children who do not need further investigations; 2) those with risk factors for respiratory infections for whom a wait-and-see approach can be recommended; and 3) those in whom further investigations are mandatory. However, regardless of the origin of the recurrent LRTIs, it is important to remember that prevention by means of vaccines against respiratory pathogens (i.e. type b Haemophilus influenzae, pertussis, pneumococcal and influenza vaccines) can play a key role.

  7. Reducing general practice trainees' antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections: an evaluation of a combined face-to-face workshop and online educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magin, Parker J; Morgan, Simon; Tapley, Amanda; Davis, Joshua S; McArthur, Lawrie; Henderson, Kim M; Mulquiney, Katie J; Dallas, Anthea; Davey, Andrew R; Scott, John; van Driel, Mieke L

    2016-03-01

    Over-prescription of antibiotics for non-pneumonia respiratory tract infections (RTIs) is a major concern in general practice. Australian general practice registrars (trainees) have inappropriately high rates of prescription of antibiotics for RTIs. The 'apprenticeship' educational model and the trainee-trainer relationship are drivers of this inappropriate prescribing. We aimed to reduce registrars' non-pneumonia RTI antibiotic prescribing via an educational intervention (a 90-min face-to-face workshop supported by online modules), complemented by delivery of the same intervention, separately, to their trainers. We conducted a pre- and post-intervention comparison of the registrars' intention to prescribe antibiotics for common RTIs using McNemar's test. We similarly tested changes in supervisors' intended prescribing. Prescribing intentions were elicited by responses to six written clinical vignettes (upper respiratory tract infection, otitis media, sore throat and three acute bronchitis vignettes). We found that, for registrars, there were statistically significant reductions in antibiotic prescribing for the sore throat (24.0% absolute reduction), otitis media (17.5% absolute reduction) and two of the three acute bronchitis (12.0% and 18.0% absolute reduction) vignettes. There were significant reductions in supervisors' antibiotic prescribing intentions for the same four vignettes. We conclude that our intervention produced a significant change in registrars' intention to prescribe antibiotics for non-pneumonia RTIs. PMID:27005837

  8. Reducing general practice trainees' antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections: an evaluation of a combined face-to-face workshop and online educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magin, Parker J; Morgan, Simon; Tapley, Amanda; Davis, Joshua S; McArthur, Lawrie; Henderson, Kim M; Mulquiney, Katie J; Dallas, Anthea; Davey, Andrew R; Scott, John; van Driel, Mieke L

    2016-03-01

    Over-prescription of antibiotics for non-pneumonia respiratory tract infections (RTIs) is a major concern in general practice. Australian general practice registrars (trainees) have inappropriately high rates of prescription of antibiotics for RTIs. The 'apprenticeship' educational model and the trainee-trainer relationship are drivers of this inappropriate prescribing. We aimed to reduce registrars' non-pneumonia RTI antibiotic prescribing via an educational intervention (a 90-min face-to-face workshop supported by online modules), complemented by delivery of the same intervention, separately, to their trainers. We conducted a pre- and post-intervention comparison of the registrars' intention to prescribe antibiotics for common RTIs using McNemar's test. We similarly tested changes in supervisors' intended prescribing. Prescribing intentions were elicited by responses to six written clinical vignettes (upper respiratory tract infection, otitis media, sore throat and three acute bronchitis vignettes). We found that, for registrars, there were statistically significant reductions in antibiotic prescribing for the sore throat (24.0% absolute reduction), otitis media (17.5% absolute reduction) and two of the three acute bronchitis (12.0% and 18.0% absolute reduction) vignettes. There were significant reductions in supervisors' antibiotic prescribing intentions for the same four vignettes. We conclude that our intervention produced a significant change in registrars' intention to prescribe antibiotics for non-pneumonia RTIs.

  9. The use of household cleaning products during pregnancy and lower respiratory tract infections and wheezing during early life.

    OpenAIRE

    Casas, L.; Zock, J. P.; Carsin, A.E.; Fernández-Somoano, A.; A.Esplugues; Santa-Marina, L.; Tardón, A.; Ballester, F; Basterrechea, M.; Sunyer, J.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of household use of cleaning products during pregnancy on infant wheezing and lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI). In four prospective Spanish birth cohorts (n = 2,292), pregnant women reported the use of household cleaning products. When infants were 12-18 months old, current cleaning product use and infant's wheezing and LRTI were reported. Cohort-specific associations between the use of specific products and respiratory outcomes were evaluated using multivaria...

  10. Lactobacillus fermentum (PCC®) supplementation and gastrointestinal and respiratory-tract illness symptoms: a randomised control trial in athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Hopkins William G; Cripps Allan W; Pyne David B; West Nicholas P; Eskesen Dorte C; Jairath Ashok; Christophersen Claus T; Conlon Michael A; Fricker Peter A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Probiotics purportedly reduce symptoms of gastrointestinal and upper respiratory-tract illness by modulating commensal microflora. Preventing and reducing symptoms of respiratory and gastrointestinal illness are the primary reason that dietary supplementation with probiotics are becoming increasingly popular with healthy active individuals. There is a paucity of data regarding the effectiveness of probiotics in this cohort. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effecti...

  11. Immune parameters, symptoms of upper respiratory tract infections, and training-load indicators in volleyball athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dias R

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Rodrigo Dias1, Anelena Bueno Frollini1, Diego Trevisan Brunelli1, André Katayama Yamada1, Richard Diego Leite4, Ricardo Adamoli Simões1, Guilherme Souza Lobo Salles1, Débora Trevisan1, Idico Luiz Pellegrinotti1, Marcelo de Castro César1, Silvia Cristina Crepaldi Alves1, Rozangela Verlengia1, João Paulo Borin2, Jonato Prestes2,3, Claudia Regina Cavaglieri21Núcleo de Performance Humana, Mestrado em Educação Física, Faculdade de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brasil; 2Faculdade de Educação Física (FEF Universidade Estadual de Campinas – UNICAMP, Campinas, Brasil; 3Programa de Mestrado e Doutorado em Educação Física, Universidade Católica de Brasília, Brasília, Brasil; 4Laboratório de Pesquisa Clínica e Experimental em Biologia Vascular (BioVasc, Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Universidade Estadual do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, BrasilBackground: The control of immunological alterations becomes important during in-season training, as a result of increased incidence of infectious diseases, and may assist in avoiding interruptions to training due to illness.Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate 28 weeks of chronic immune modulations in female volleyball athletes.Methods: The sample was composed of twelve athletes aged 19.47 ± 2.49 years, height 1.78 ± 0.08 cm, and body mass 66.77 ± 7.8 kg. Leukocytes, individual immune cell count, interleukin (IL-2, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α plasma cytokines were measured during the competitive period.Results: Results revealed that immune variables were correlated with symptoms of upper respiratory tract infections and training-load indicators, indicating a possible marker of immune status. There was a statistically significant increase in total leukocytes, neutrophils, and monocyte count, a decrease in lymphocytes, and an increase in upper respiratory tract infection symptoms, with no change

  12. Acute gross sterile pyuria after oral ciprofloxacin treatment of urinary tract infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pathoom Sukkaromdee; Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2016-01-01

    The sterile pyuria is an interesting problem in urology. Acute gross sterile pyuria is not a common clinical problem and is difficult to make a correct diagnosis. Here, the authors reported a case of acute gross sterile pyuria after oral ciprofloxacin treatment of urinary tract infection. The patient developed problem after complete course of 7-day acute upper urinary tract treatment. The patient was observed with cloudy whitish urine that had never seen before. The urinalysis showed sterile pyuria. This case was treated by conservative method and the problem was resolved within 7 days.

  13. New Epidemiological and Clinical Signatures of 18 Pathogens from Respiratory Tract Infections Based on a 5-Year Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Liao

    Full Text Available Respiratory tract infections (RTIs are a heavy burden on society. However, due to the complex etiology of RTIs, the clinical diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of these infections remain challenging, especially in developing countries.To determine the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of 18 respiratory pathogens, we analyzed 12,502 patients with acute respiratory infections (ARIs by performing polymerase chain reaction (PCR on patient pharyngeal swabs.Samples positive for at least 1 pathogen were obtained from 48.42% of the total patients. Of these pathogen-positive patients, 17.99% were infected with more than 1 pathogen. Of the 18 pathogens analyzed, four were detected with a positive detection rate (PDR > 5%: influenza A virus (IAV > respiratory syncytial virus (RSV >Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP > human coronavirus (HCoV. The pathogens with the 4 highest co-infection rates (CIRs were as follows: HCoV > human bocavirus (HBoV > enterovirus (EV > parainfluenza virus (PIV. The overall positive detection rate (PDR varied significantly according to patient age, the season and year of detection, and the disease subgroup, but not according to patient sex. The individual PDRs of the pathogens followed 3 types of distributions for patient sex, 4 types of distributions for patient age, 4 types of seasonal distributions, 2 types of seasonal epidemic trends, 4 types of yearly epidemic trends, and different susceptibility distributions in the disease subgroups. Additionally, the overall CIR showed significantly different distributions according to patient sex, patient age, and the disease subgroup, whereas the CIRs of individual pathogens suggested significant preference characteristics.IAV remains the most common pathogen among the pathogens analyzed. More effort should be directed toward the prevention and control of pathogens that show a trend of increasing incidence such as HCoV, human adenovirus (ADV, and RSV. Although clinically

  14. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): a year in review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowronski, Danuta M; Astell, Caroline; Brunham, Robert C; Low, Donald E; Petric, Martin; Roper, Rachel L; Talbot, Pierre J; Tam, Theresa; Babiuk, Lorne

    2005-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) emerged from China as an untreatable and rapidly spreading respiratory illness of unknown etiology. Following point source exposure in February 2003, more than a dozen guests infected at a Hong Kong hotel seeded multi-country outbreaks that persisted through the spring of 2003. The World Health Organization responded by invoking traditional public health measures and advanced technologies to control the illness and contain the cause. A novel coronavirus was implicated and its entire genome was sequenced by mid-April 2003. The urgency of responding to this threat focused scientific endeavor and stimulated global collaboration. Through real-time application of accumulating knowledge, the world proved capable of arresting the first pandemic threat of the twenty-first century, despite early respiratory-borne spread and global susceptibility. This review synthesizes lessons learned from this remarkable achievement. These lessons can be applied to re-emergence of SARS or to the next pandemic threat to arise. PMID:15660517

  15. ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporters of the Human Respiratory Tract Pathogen, Moraxella catarrhalis: Role in Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Timothy F; Brauer, Aimee L; Johnson, Antoinette; Kirkham, Charmaine

    2016-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a human respiratory tract pathogen that causes otitis media (middle ear infections) in children and respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In view of the huge global burden of disease caused by M. catarrhalis, the development of vaccines to prevent these infections and better approaches to treatment have become priorities. In previous work, we used a genome mining approach that identified three substrate binding proteins (SBPs) of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters as promising candidate vaccine antigens. In the present study, we performed a comprehensive assessment of 19 SBPs of 15 ABC transporter systems in the M. catarrhalis genome by engineering knockout mutants and studying their role in assays that assess mechanisms of infection. The capacity of M. catarrhalis to survive and grow in the nutrient-limited and hostile environment of the human respiratory tract, including intracellular growth, account in part for its virulence. The results show that ABC transporters that mediate uptake of peptides, amino acids, cations and anions play important roles in pathogenesis by enabling M. catarrhalis to 1) grow in nutrient-limited conditions, 2) invade and survive in human respiratory epithelial cells and 3) persist in the lungs in a murine pulmonary clearance model. The knockout mutants of SBPs and ABC transporters showed different patterns of activity in the assay systems, supporting the conclusion that different SBPs and ABC transporters function at different stages in the pathogenesis of infection. These results indicate that ABC transporters are nutritional virulence factors, functioning to enable the survival of M catarrhalis in the diverse microenvironments of the respiratory tract. Based on the role of ABC transporters as virulence factors of M. catarrhalis, these molecules represent potential drug targets to eradicate the organism from the human respiratory tract. PMID:27391026

  16. Assessment of mucous transport in the respiratory tract by radioisotopic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the body's major defense mechanisms is the mucociliary transport system of the respiratory tract. The function of this system is to remove secretions and trapped inhaled biological and nonbiological particles-including, for example, viruses, bacteria, industrial dusts, and aspirated material-from the lung, thus keeping the airway surface clean and sterile. This cleansing process is accomplished by the action of vigorously beating cilia in the airway epithelium on secretions lining the surface of the airways, which entrap the inhaled foreign materials to be removed from the lung. In this way, normal secretions are moved progressively upward toward the pharynx to be swallowed or, if secretions are produced to excess, expectorated

  17. Intensified microbiological investigations in adult patients admitted to hospital with lower respiratory tract infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Jens; Rasmussen, TR; Sommer, T;

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the diagnostic yield of a programme with intensified microbiological investigations in immunocompetent adult patients with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI). Patients in the study group were included prospectively and consecutively from...... lavage (BAL). Only 7% in the historic control group were discharged with an aetiological diagnosis of their infections; while the diagnostic yield in the study group increased to 51% of patients. In the study group the presence of new infiltrates on chest X-ray increased the detection...... of a microbiological aetiology from 37% with no infiltrates to 62% with infiltrates and recent antibiotic therapy reduced the detection of a microbiological cause of infection from 61% in 36 patients who had not received antibiotic therapy to 39% in 31 patients who had received recent antibiotic therapy prior...

  18. [Cefditoren pivoxil: A new oral cephalosporin for skin, soft tissue and respiratory tract infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Martin, J; Romá, E; Salavert, M; Doménech, L; Poveda, J L

    2006-09-01

    Cefditoren pivoxil, a new-third generation cephalosporin antibiotic that has recently been granted approval in Spain, shows important activity over a large part of the pathogens causing skin, soft tissue and respiratory tract infections, including Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Cefditoren has also been shown to be stable against hydrolysis by many common beta-lactamases. Data from in vitro studies and clinical trials show this antibiotic as an oral formulation with an intrinsic activity against Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis and Streptococcus pneumoniae equivalent to that of other third-generation cephalosporins administered via parenteral, like cefotaxime or ceftriaxone, thereby placing its maximal benefits mainly in the treatment of ambulatory infections. This paper reviews the main characteristics of cefditoren pivoxil (spectrum of activity, chemical structure, mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, adverse effects and clinical efficacy) and attempts to find its place in current antibiotic therapeutics.

  19. Lower respiratory tract infection and rapid expansion of an abdominal aortic aneurysm: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puppala Sapna

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The rate of abdominal aortic aneurysm expansion is related to multiple factors. There is some evidence that inflammation can accelerate aneurysm expansion. However, the association between pulmonary sepsis and rapid abdominal aortic aneurysm expansion is rarely reported. Case presentation Here we present a case of a rapidly expanding abdominal aortic aneurysm in a 68-year-old Caucasian man with a concomitant lower respiratory tract infection and systemic sepsis requiring intensive monitoring and urgent endovascular intervention. Our patient had an uncomplicated post-operative recovery and a follow-up computed tomography scan at one month demonstrated no evidence of an endoleak. Conclusion This case highlights the potential association between pulmonary sepsis and rapid abdominal aortic aneurysm expansion. In such cases, a policy of frequent monitoring should be adopted to identify those patients requiring definitive management.

  20. The comparison and characterisation of glycolytic mycoplasmas isolated from the respiratory tract of sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G E; Foggie, A; Mould, D L; Livitt, S

    1976-02-01

    Nine strains of glycolytic mycoplasmas isolated from the respiratory tract of apparently healthy sheep, pneumonic sheep and sheep with pulmonary adenomatosis (SPA) were compared with a Queensland strain (Y98) of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae. All strains were very similar in their reactions in 14 biochemical tests and in their sensitivities to optochin, digitonin, sodium polyanethol sulphonate, and 11 antibiotics. Polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and serological cross-reactions by the agar-gel double diffusion, metabolic inhibition (MI) and growht-inhibition (GI) tests also showed that all strains could be classified as M. ovipneumoniae. The MI and GI tests, however, showed considerable intraspecific differences among strains, with apparent polarisation of SPA strains and non-SPA strains at opposite ends of the antigenic spectrum. Two representative strains were tested by the MI test against antisera to 39 mycoplasma species or serogroups, with negative results.

  1. Behavioral Effects of Upper Respiratory Tract Illnesses: A Consideration of Possible Underlying Cognitive Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P. Smith

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that both experimentally induced upper respiratory tract illnesses (URTIs and naturally occurring URTIs influence mood and performance. The present study investigated possible cognitive mechanisms underlying the URTI-performance changes. Those who developed a cold (N = 47 had significantly faster, but less accurate, performance than those who remained healthy (N = 54. Illness had no effect on manipulations designed to influence encoding, response organisation (stimulus-response compatilibility or response preparation. Similarly, there was no evidence that different components of working memory were impaired. Overall, the present research confirms that URTIs can have an effect on performance efficiency. Further research is required to identify the physiological and behavioral mechanisms underlying these effects.

  2. Viral Respiratory Tract Infections in Adult Patients Attending Outpatient and Emergency Departments, Taiwan, 2012-2013: A PCR/Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Hsin-I; Wang, Hsuan-Chen; Su, Ih-Jen; Hsu, Hsiang-Chin; Wang, Jen-Ren; Sun, Hsiao Fang Sunny; Chou, Chien-Hsuan; Ko, Wen-Chien; Hsieh, Ming-I; Wu, Chi-Jung

    2015-09-01

    Viral etiologies of respiratory tract infections (RTIs) have been less studied in adult than in pediatric populations. Furthermore, the ability of PCR/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) to detect enteroviruses and rhinoviruses in respiratory samples has not been well evaluated. We sought to use PCR/ESI-MS to comprehensively investigate the viral epidemiology of adult RTIs, including testing for rhinoviruses and enteroviruses. Nasopharyngeal or throat swabs from 267 adults with acute RTIs (212 upper RTIs and 55 lower RTIs) who visited a local clinic or the outpatient or emergency departments of a medical center in Taiwan between October 2012 and June 2013 were tested for respiratory viruses by both virus isolation and PCR/ESI-MS. Throat swabs from 15 patients with bacterial infections and 27 individuals without active infections were included as control samples. Respiratory viruses were found in 23.6%, 47.2%, and 47.9% of the 267 cases by virus isolation, PCR/ESI-MS, and both methods, respectively. When both methods were used, the influenza A virus (24.3%) and rhinoviruses (9.4%) were the most frequently identified viruses, whereas human coronaviruses, human metapneumovirus (hMPV), enteroviruses, adenoviruses, respiratory syncytial virus, and parainfluenza viruses were identified in small proportions of cases (old age, and immunosuppression were independently associated with lower RTIs. In conclusion, PCR/ESI-MS improved the diagnostic yield for viral RTIs. Non-influenza respiratory virus infections were associated with patients with comorbidities and with lower RTIs. Additional studies that delineate the clinical need for including non-influenza respiratory viruses in the diagnostic work-up in these populations are warranted. PMID:26402811

  3. Morphologic observations on respiratory tracts of chickens after hatchery infectious bronchitis vaccination and formaldehyde fumigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Matteo, A M; Soñez, M C; Plano, C M; von Lawzewitsch, I

    2000-01-01

    The histologic changes in the respiratory tracts of chickens were evaluated after hatchery fumigation with 40% formaldehyde vapors and vaccination against infectious bronchitis virus with live attenuated vaccine (Massachusetts serotype). One-day-old chickens were housed in four isolation units in controlled environmental conditions, fed and watered ad libitum, and separated into four groups: 1) fumigated and vaccinated birds (FV group); 2) nonfumigated and vaccinated birds (NFV group); 3) fumigated and nonvaccinated birds (FNV group); and 4) control group (C group). All birds were tested to be free from Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Mycoplasma synoviae. After necropsy on the first, eighth, and twenty-sixth days after birth, samples from tracheal upper portion and lungs were conventionally processed for light, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy. Tissue response was monitored by microscopic examination of trachea and lung. On the first day of observation, fumigated and vaccinated birds (FV group) showed extensively damaged tracheal epithelium with exfoliated areas and some active glands with electrodense granules, and in the lung, the primary bronchi epithelium had disorganized cilia and abundant lymphocytes, with emphysematous areas in tertiary bronchus. On day 8 after vaccination, cubical and cylindrical tracheal cell proliferation was observed, and on day 26, ciliated columnar epithelium was almost regenerated with heterophil corion infiltration, and hyaline cartilage nodules appeared in parabronchi. The nonfumigated and vaccinated birds (NFV) revealed less injury on the epithelial surface and a more rapid response to epithelial regeneration than the in only fumigated animals (FNV). The control group did not show remarkable morphologic changes. Postvaccinal and fumigation effects on the upper respiratory tract were temporary, whereas in lungs, increased emphysema, cartilage nodules in the interchange zone, and general lymphocyte infiltration had caused

  4. Respiratory Tract Lung Geometry and Dosimetry Model for Male Sprague-Dawley Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Frederick J.; Asgharian, Bahman; Schroeter, Jeffry D.; Price, Owen; Corley, Richard A.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Jacob, Rick E.; Cox, Timothy C.; Kabilan, Senthil; Bentley, Timothy

    2015-07-24

    While inhalation toxicological studies of various compounds have been conducted using a number of different strains of rats, mechanistic dosimetry models have only had tracheobronchial (TB) structural data for Long-Evans rats, detailed morphometric data on the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats and limited alveolar data on other strains. Based upon CT imaging data for two male Sprague-Dawley rats, a 15-generation, symmetric typical path model was developed for the TB region. Literature data for the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats were analyzed to develop an eight-generation model, and the two regions were joined to provide a complete lower respiratory tract model for Sprague-Dawley rats. The resulting lung model was used to examine particle deposition in Sprague-Dawley rats and to compare these results with predicted deposition in Long-Evans rats. Relationships of various physiologic variables and lung volumes were either developed in this study or extracted from the literature to provide the necessary input data for examining particle deposition. While the lengths, diameters and branching angles of the TB airways differed between the two Sprague-Dawley rats, the predicted deposition patterns in the three major respiratory tract regions were very similar. Between Sprague-Dawley and Long-Evans rats, significant differences in TB and alveolar predicted deposition fractions were observed over a wide range of particle sizes, with TB deposition fractions being up to 3- to 4-fold greater in Sprague-Dawley rats and alveolar deposition being significantly greater in Long-Evans rats. Thus, strain-specific lung geometry models should be used for particle deposition calculations and interspecies dose comparisons.

  5. Aminomethyl spectinomycins as therapeutics for drug-resistant respiratory tract and sexually transmitted bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhn, David F; Waidyarachchi, Samanthi L; Madhura, Dora B; Shcherbakov, Dimitri; Zheng, Zhong; Liu, Jiuyu; Abdelrahman, Yasser M; Singh, Aman P; Duscha, Stefan; Rathi, Chetan; Lee, Robin B; Belland, Robert J; Meibohm, Bernd; Rosch, Jason W; Böttger, Erik C; Lee, Richard E

    2015-05-20

    The antibiotic spectinomycin is a potent inhibitor of bacterial protein synthesis with a unique mechanism of action and an excellent safety index, but it lacks antibacterial activity against most clinically important pathogens. A series of N-benzyl-substituted 3'-(R)-3'-aminomethyl-3'-hydroxy spectinomycins was developed on the basis of a computational analysis of the aminomethyl spectinomycin binding site and structure-guided synthesis. These compounds had ribosomal inhibition values comparable to spectinomycin but showed increased potency against the common respiratory tract pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Legionella pneumophila, and Moraxella catarrhalis, as well as the sexually transmitted bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis. Non-ribosome-binding 3'-(S) isomers of the lead compounds demonstrated weak inhibitory activity in in vitro protein translation assays and poor antibacterial activity, indicating that the antibacterial activity of the series remains on target against the ribosome. Compounds also demonstrated no mammalian cytotoxicity, improved microsomal stability, and favorable pharmacokinetic properties in rats. The lead compound from the series exhibited excellent chemical stability superior to spectinomycin; no interaction with a panel of human receptors and drug metabolism enzymes, suggesting low potential for adverse reactions or drug-drug interactions in vivo; activity in vitro against a panel of penicillin-, macrolide-, and cephalosporin-resistant S. pneumoniae clinical isolates; and the ability to cure mice of fatal pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis at a dose of 5 mg/kg. Together, these studies indicate that N-benzyl aminomethyl spectinomycins are suitable for further development to treat drug-resistant respiratory tract and sexually transmitted bacterial infections. PMID:25995221

  6. Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Fibrosis versus Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eIm

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and basic experimental approaches to pediatric acute lung injury (ALI, including acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, have historically focused on acute care and management of the patient. Additional efforts have focused on the etiology of pediatric ALI and ARDS, clinically defined as diffuse, bilateral diseases of the lung that compromise function leading to severe hypoxemia within seven days of defined insult. Insults can include ancillary events related to prematurity, can follow trauma and/or transfusion, or can present as sequelae of pulmonary infections and cardiovascular disease and/or injury. Pediatric ALI/ARDS remains one of the leading causes of infant and childhood morbidity and mortality, particularly in the developing world. Though incidence is relatively low, ranging from 2.9-9.5 cases/100,000 patients/year, mortality remains high, approaching 35% in some studies. However, this is a significant decrease from the historical mortality rate of over 50%. Several decades of advances in acute management and treatment, as well as better understanding of approaches to ventilation, oxygenation and surfactant regulation, have contributed to improvements in patient recovery. As such, there is a burgeoning interest in the long term impact of pediatric ALI/ARDS. Chronic pulmonary deficiencies in survivors appear to be caused by inappropriate injury repair, with fibrosis and predisposition to emphysema arising as irreversible secondary events that can severely compromise pulmonary development and function, as well as the overall health of the patient. In this chapter, the long term effectiveness of current treatments will be examined, as will the potential efficacy of novel, acute and long term therapies that support repair and delay or even impede the onset of secondary events, including fibrosis.

  7. [Current approaches to the treatment of severe hypoxic respiratory insufficiency (acute lung injury; acute respiratory distress syndrome)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, S; Müller, T; Pfeifer, M

    2011-02-01

    Lung-protective ventilation with a low tidal volume, plateau pressure 90% and permissive hypercapnia results in reduction of the mortality rate in patients with acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The level of the positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) must be chosen in relation to oxygen requirement. High frequency oscillatory ventilation and neurally adjusted ventilatory assist are promising methods. However, further studies with firm end-points have to be awaited before a final judgment is possible. Veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) can ensure life-sustaining gas exchange in patients with severe vitally compromised pulmonary failure, to provide time for lung tissue to heal and reduce ventilatory stress. The latest guidelines for analgesia and sedation in intensive care medicine demand consistent monitoring of the level of sedation and the intensity of pain. The sedation should be interrupted daily, with phases of awakenings and, if possible, spontaneous breathing. Methods of supportive treatment: Positional treatment (prone position) and inhalation of vasodilators can improve ventilation/perfusion mismatch and thus oxygenation. However, administration of surfactant is currently not advised in adult respiratory failure. PMID:21271478

  8. Sources of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and its role in respiratory tract colonization and nosocomial pneumonia in intensive care unit patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jie; CHEN Er-zhen; QU Hong-ping; MAO En-qiang; ZHU Zheng-gang; NI Yu-xing; HAN Li-zhong

    2013-01-01

    Background Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAB) is an important and emerging hospital-acquired pathogen worldwide.This study was conducted to identify the sources of MDRAB and its role in respiratory tract colonization and nosocomial pneumonia in intensive care unit (ICU) patients.Methods We conducted a prospective active surveillance study of MDRAB in three ICUs at a Chinese Hospital from April to August 2011,to identify the sources of MDRAB and its role in respiratory tract colonization and nosocomial pneumonia.Results One hundred and fourteen (13.0%) MDRAB isolates were detected from 876 specimens,with a sensitivity of 11.6% (55/474) in screening of the pharyngeal and tracheal swabs,and 14.7% (59/402) of the sputum/endotracheal aspirates.MDRAB colonization/infection was found in 34 (26.8%) of 127 patients,including 16 (12.6%) cases of pure colonization and 18 (14.2%) cases of pneumonia (two pre-ICU-acquired cases of pneumonia and 16 ICU-acquired cases of pneumonia).Previous respiratory tract MDRAB colonization was found in 22 (17.3%) patients:eight (6.3%)were pre-ICU-acquired colonization and 14 (11.0%) ICU-acquired colonization.Of eight pre-ICU-colonized patients,five were transferred from other wards or hospitals with hospitalization >72 hours,and three came from the community with no previous hospitalization.Overall,6/22 colonized patients presented with secondary pneumonia; only two (9.1%) colonized MDRAB strains were associated with secondary infections.Respiratory tract MDRAB colonization had no significant relationship with nosocomial pneumonia (P=-0.725).In addition,acute respiratory failure,mechanical ventilation,renal failure,and prior carbapenem use were risk factors for MDRAB colonization/infection.Conclusions A high proportion of cases of MDRAB colonization/infection in ICU patients were detected through screening cultures.About one-third were acquired from general wards and the community before ICU admission

  9. Clinical Observation on 46 Cases of Infantile Repeated Respiratory Tract Infection Treated by Mild-Moxibustion over Acupoints on Back

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙训; 常奇; 寿琼

    2001-01-01

    @@Repeated respiratory tract infection is a frequently-occurring disease during childhood. At present, western medicine doctors generally adopt anti-infectives and immunomodulators to treat the disease, while traditional Chinese medicine doctors mainly administer decoction of Chinese herbs. The authors treated 46 cases of repeated respiratory tract infection from March 1990 to April 1996 by applying mild-moxibustion over points on the back with satisfactory therapeutic results. A report follows. Clinical Data All the 86 cases were outpatients in our hospital with duration of common cold for over 10 days and characterized by relapse of respiratory tract infection. There were over 7-time relapse of respiratory tract infection on each case within a year. Eighty-six cases were randomly divided into treatment group (46 cases) and control group (40 cases). Of the 46 cases in the treatment group, 22 were boys and 24 girls. 17 cases (36.9%) were 6 months to 4 years old, 18 (39.1%) 4 to 6 years, and 11 (23.9%) 6 to 12 years. Among the 40 cases in the control group, 19 cases were boys and 21 girls.

  10. Quality indicators for diagnosis and treatment of respiratory tract infections in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plejdrup, Malene; Bjerrum, Lars; Gahrn-Hansen, Bente;

    Objective: To develop a set of quality indicators focusing on the diagnosis and treatment of respiratory tract infections in general practice.  Material and methods: A modified 2-round Delphi study was conducted from April to July 2008. A panel of 27 experts (13 countries) comprising mainly general...

  11. The use of household cleaning products during pregnancy and lower respiratory tract infections and wheezing during early life.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casas, L.; Zock, J.P.; Carsin, A.E.; Fernández-Somoano, A.; Esplugues, A.; Santa-Marina, L.; Tardón, A.; Ballester, F.; Basterrechea, M.; Sunyer, J.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of household use of cleaning products during pregnancy on infant wheezing and lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI). In four prospective Spanish birth cohorts (n = 2,292), pregnant women reported the use of household cleaning products. When infants were 12-18 months old,

  12. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of MMPs in the respiratory tract: Potential implications in asthma and other lung diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Guéders, Maud; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Noël, Agnès; Cataldo, Didier

    2006-01-01

    In healthy lung, Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their physiological inhibitors, tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs), are produced in the respiratory tract by a panel of different structural cells. These activities are mandatory for many physiological processes including development, wound healing and cell trafficking. Deregulation of proteolytic-antiproteolytic network and inappropriate secretion of various MMPs by stimulated structural or inflammatory cells is though...

  13. Phenotypic and genetic characterization of NAD-dependent Pasteurellaceae from the respiratory tract of pigs and their possible pathogenetic importance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielstein, P.; Wuthe, H.H.; Angen, Øystein;

    2001-01-01

    . In the present study, 107 of these NAD-dependent isolates from the porcine respiratory tract, primarily from lungs with pathological changes, were investigated. On the basis of phenotypic criteria, such as haemolysis, urease, catalase, and indole formation as well as other fermentative activities, 50...

  14. College Students, Shared Decision Making, and the Appropriate Use of Antibiotics for Respiratory Tract Infections: A Systematic Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyer, Kristina; Hulton, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This systematic review examines shared decision making to promote the appropriate use of antibiotics for college students with respiratory tract infections. Participants/Methods: CINAL, Cochrane, PubMed, EBSCO, and PsycNET were searched in October 2014 using the following criteria: English language, human subjects, peer-reviewed, shared…

  15. The upper respiratory tract microbiome of hospitalised patients with community-acquired pneumonia of unknown aetiology: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy L Wiemken

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available   The composition of the upper respiratory tract microbiome may play an important role in the development of lower respiratory tract infections. Here, we characterised the microbiome of the nasopharynx and oropharynx of hospitalised patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP with unknown aetiology in an attempt to obtain insight into the aetiology of CAP. A random sample of 10 patients hospitalised with CAP previously enrolled in a separate clinical trial (ClinicalTrials.gov registry, Study ID: NCT01248715 in which a complete microbiological workup was not able to define an aetiology were analysed in this pilot study. This larger trial (n = 1,221 enrolled patients from 9 adult hospitals in Louisville, Kentucky, USA. Nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swabs were obtained for metagenomic analysis. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR for Streptococcus pneumoniae was performed in all patients. One patient had a distinct nasophararyngeal microbiome consisting largely of Haemophilus influenzae. This was the only patient with a negative PCR for S. pneumoniae in both nasophararyngeal and oropharyngeal specimens. Overall, substantial differences were found between nasophararyngeal and oropharyngeal microbiomes. The upper respiratory tract microbiome of only one patient suggested H. influenzae as a probable aetiology of CAP. Although this was a pilot study of only 10 patients, the presence of S. pneumoniae in the upper respiratory tract of the other 9 patients warrants further investigation.

  16. Intervention with educational outreach at large scale to reduce antibiotics for respiratory tract infections : a controlled before and after study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, H. M.; Kuyvenhoven, M. M.; Akkerman, A. E.; Welschen, I.; van Essen, G. A.; Verheij, T. J. M.; Schouten, G.P.

    2009-01-01

    Background. A multiple intervention targeted to reduce antibiotic prescribing with an educational outreach programme had proven to be effective in a randomized controlled trial in 12 peer review groups, demonstrating 12% less prescriptions for respiratory tract infections. Objective. To assess the e

  17. Prone positioning ventilation for treatment of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAN Mei-juan; HE Xiao-di

    2009-01-01

    Patients who are diagnosed with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) usually have ventilation-perfusion mismatch, severe decrease in lung capacity, and gas exchange abnormalities. Health care work-ers have implemented various strategies in an attempt to compensate for these pathological alterations. By rotating patients with ALI/ARDS between the supine and prone position, it is possible to achieve a significant improvement in PaO2/FiO2, decrease shunting and therefore improve oxy-genation without use of expensive, invasive and experimen-tal procedures.

  18. Systematic review of evidence-based guidelines on medication therapy for upper respiratory tract infection in children with AGREE instrument.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linan Zeng

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To summarize recommendations of existing guidelines on the treatment of upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs in children, and to assess the methodological quality of these guidelines. METHODS: We searched seven databases and web sites of relevant academic agencies. Evidence-based guidelines on pediatric URTIs were included. AGREE II was used to assess the quality of these guidelines. Two researchers selected guidelines independently and extracted information on publication years, institutions, target populations, recommendations, quality of evidence, and strength of recommendations. We compared the similarities and differences of recommendations and their strength. We also analyzed the reasons for variation. RESULTS: Thirteen guidelines meeting our inclusion criteria were included. Huge differences existed among these 13 guidelines concerning the categorization of evidence and recommendations. Nearly all of these guidelines lacked the sufficient involvement of stake holders. Further, the applicability of these guidelines still needs to be improved. In terms of recommendations, penicillin and amoxicillin were suggested for group A streptococcal pharyngitis. Amoxicillin and amoxicillin-clavulanate were recommended for acute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS. An observation of 2-3 days prior to antibiotic therapy initiation for mild acute otitis media (AOM was recommended with amoxicillin as the suggested first choice agent. Direct evidence to support strong recommendations on the therapy for influenza is still lacking. In addition, the antimicrobial durations for pharyngitis and ABRS were still controversial. No consensus was reached for the onset of antibiotics for ABRS in children. CONCLUSIONS: Future guidelines should use a consistent grading system for the quality of evidence and strength of recommendations. More effort needs to be paid to seek the preference of stake holders and to improve the applicability of guidelines

  19. Acute respiratory infections in elderly people: the role of micronutrients and lifestyle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graat, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections are the most frequent of all infectious diseases. In popular speech common cold, flu (influenza), and pneumonia all denote acute respiratory infections. Elderly people show an increased risk of these infections and their complications. In The Netherlands about 2.000 elde

  20. Acute effects of ambient air pollution episodes on respiratory health of children.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, G.

    1992-01-01

    In this thesis the acute effects of air pollution episodes on respiratory health of seven to eleven year old children living in non-urban communities in the Netherlands are discussed. Repeated measurements of pulmonary function (spirometry) and the occurrence of acute respiratory symptoms using a da

  1. Noninvasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure due to H1N1 influenza

    OpenAIRE

    Mohapatra, Prasanta R.; Naveen Dutt; Sushant Khanduri; Baijayantimala Mishra; Janmeja, Ashok K

    2011-01-01

    We present a case of severe H1N1 influenza with hypoxemic acute respiratory failure necessitating mechanical ventilation benefited from noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV). The NIPPV may be of great use in treating patients with H1N1-related acute respiratory distress syndrome in a resource poor setting or when invasive ventilator is unavailable.

  2. Acute respiratory failure due to thyroid storm developing immediately after delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Kitazawa, Chie; Aoki, Shigeru; Takahashi, Tsuneo; Hirahara, Fumiki

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Acute respiratory failure occurs in less than 0.1% of pregnancies. Thyroid storm should be included in the differential diagnosis of possible causes of acute respiratory failure occurring immediately after delivery, and delivery is a high risk factor for thyroid storm in pregnant women with thyrotoxicosis.

  3. The respiratory tract deposition model proposed by the ICRP Task Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Task Group has developed a new model of the deposition of inhaled aerosols in each anatomical region of the respiratory tract. The model is used to evaluate the fraction of airborne activity that is deposited in respiratory regions having distinct retention characteristics and clearance pathways, and/or tissue sensitivity: the extrathoracic airways of the naso- and oropharynx and larynx, the bronchi, the bronchioles, and the alveolated airways of the lung. Drawn from experimental data on total and regional deposition in human subjects, the model is based on extrapolation of these data by means of a detailed theoretical model of aerosol transport and deposition within the lung. The Task Group model applies to all practical conditions, and for aerosol particles and vapours from atomic size up to very coarse aerosols with an activity median aerodynamic diameter of 100 μm. The model is designed to predict regional deposition in different subjects, including adults of either sex, children of various ages, and infants, and also to account for anatomical differences among Caucasian and non-Caucasian subjects. The Task Group model represents aerosol inhalability and regional deposition in different subjects by algebraic expressions of aerosol size, breathing rates, standard lung volumes, and scaling factors for airway dimensions. It is emphasised that the current version of the model described here is still provisional. (author)

  4. The respiratory tract deposition model proposed by the ICRP Task Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, A.C.; Briant, J.K. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Stahlhofen, W.; Rudolf, G. (Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Muenchen, Frankfurt am Main (Germany, F.R.). Abt. fuer Biophysikalische Strahlenforschung); Egan, M.J.; Nixon, W. (AEA Safety and Reliability, Culcheth (UK)); Gehr, P. (Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Anatomisches Inst.)

    1990-11-01

    The Task Group has developed a new model of the deposition of inhaled aerosols in each anatomical region of the respiratory tract. The model is used to evaluate the fraction of airborne activity that is deposited in respiratory regions having distinct retention characteristics and clearance pathways: the anterior nares, the extrathoracic airways of the naso- and oropharynx and larynx, the bronchi, the bronchioles, and the alveolated airways of the lung. Drawn from experimental data on total and regional deposition in human subjects, the model is based on extrapolation of these data by means of a detailed theoretical model of aerosol transport and deposition within the lung. The Task Group model applies to all practical conditions, and for aerosol particles and vapors from atomic size up to very coarse aerosols with an activity median aerodynamic diameter of 100 {mu}m. The model is designed to predict regional deposition in different subjects, including adults of either sex, children of various ages, and infants, and also to account for anatomical differences among Caucasian and non-Caucasian subjects. The Task Group model represents aerosol inhalability and regional deposition in different subjects by algebraic expressions of aerosol size, breathing rates, standard lung volumes, and scaling factors for airway dimensions. 35 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Treatment of Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in Primary Care: A Randomized Study Using Aromatic Herbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eran Ben-Arye

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is a prospective randomized double-blind controlled trial whose aim was to investigate the clinical effects of aromatic essential oils in patients with upper respiratory tract infections. The trial was conducted in six primary care clinics in northern Israel. A spray containing aromatic essential oils of five plants (Eucalyptus citriodora, Eucalyptus globulus, Mentha piperita, Origanum syriacum, and Rosmarinus officinalisas applied 5 times a day for 3 days and compared with a placebo spray. The main outcome measure was patient assessment of the change in severity of the most debilitating symptom (sore throat, hoarseness or cough. Sixty patients participated in the study (26 in the study group and 34 in the control group. Intention-to-treat analysis showed that 20 minutes following the spray use, participants in the study group reported a greater improvement in symptom severity compared to participants in the placebo group (=.019. There was no difference in symptom severity between the two groups after 3 days of treatment (=.042. In conclusion, spray application of five aromatic plants reported in this study brings about significant and immediate improvement in symptoms of upper respiratory ailment. This effect is not significant after 3 days of treatment.

  6. Impacts of upper respiratory tract disease on olfactory behavior of the Mojave desert tortoise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germano, Jennifer; Van Zerr, Vanessa E.; Esque, Todd C.; Nussear, Ken E.; Lamberski, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) caused by Mycoplasma agassizii is considered a threat to desert tortoise populations that should be addressed as part of the recovery of the species. Clinical signs can be intermittent and include serous or mucoid nasal discharge and respiratory difficulty when nares are occluded. This nasal congestion may result in a loss of the olfactory sense. Turtles are known to use olfaction to identify food items, predators, and conspecifics; therefore, it is likely that URTD affects not only their physical well-being but also their behavior and ability to perform necessary functions in the wild. To determine more specifically the impact nasal discharge might have on free-ranging tortoises (Gopherus agassizii), we compared the responses of tortoises with and without nasal discharge and both positive and negative for M. agassizii antibodies to a visually hidden olfactory food stimulus and an empty control. We found that nasal discharge did reduce sense of smell and hence the ability to locate food. Our study also showed that moderate chronic nasal discharge in the absence of other clinical signs did not affect appetite in desert tortoises.

  7. Treatment of upper respiratory tract infections in primary care: a randomized study using aromatic herbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Dudai, Nativ; Eini, Anat; Torem, Moshe; Schiff, Elad; Rakover, Yoseph

    2011-01-01

    This study is a prospective randomized double-blind controlled trial whose aim was to investigate the clinical effects of aromatic essential oils in patients with upper respiratory tract infections. The trial was conducted in six primary care clinics in northern Israel. A spray containing aromatic essential oils of five plants (Eucalyptus citriodora, Eucalyptus globulus, Mentha piperita, Origanum syriacum, and Rosmarinus officinalis) as applied 5 times a day for 3 days and compared with a placebo spray. The main outcome measure was patient assessment of the change in severity of the most debilitating symptom (sore throat, hoarseness or cough). Sixty patients participated in the study (26 in the study group and 34 in the control group). Intention-to-treat analysis showed that 20 minutes following the spray use, participants in the study group reported a greater improvement in symptom severity compared to participants in the placebo group (P = .019). There was no difference in symptom severity between the two groups after 3 days of treatment (P = .042). In conclusion, spray application of five aromatic plants reported in this study brings about significant and immediate improvement in symptoms of upper respiratory ailment. This effect is not significant after 3 days of treatment. PMID:21052500

  8. Treatment of Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in Primary Care: A Randomized Study Using Aromatic Herbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Dudai, Nativ; Eini, Anat; Torem, Moshe; Schiff, Elad; Rakover, Yoseph

    2011-01-01

    This study is a prospective randomized double-blind controlled trial whose aim was to investigate the clinical effects of aromatic essential oils in patients with upper respiratory tract infections. The trial was conducted in six primary care clinics in northern Israel. A spray containing aromatic essential oils of five plants (Eucalyptus citriodora, Eucalyptus globulus, Mentha piperita, Origanum syriacum, and Rosmarinus officinalis) as applied 5 times a day for 3 days and compared with a placebo spray. The main outcome measure was patient assessment of the change in severity of the most debilitating symptom (sore throat, hoarseness or cough). Sixty patients participated in the study (26 in the study group and 34 in the control group). Intention-to-treat analysis showed that 20 minutes following the spray use, participants in the study group reported a greater improvement in symptom severity compared to participants in the placebo group (P = .019). There was no difference in symptom severity between the two groups after 3 days of treatment (P = .042). In conclusion, spray application of five aromatic plants reported in this study brings about significant and immediate improvement in symptoms of upper respiratory ailment. This effect is not significant after 3 days of treatment. PMID:21052500

  9. The respiratory tract deposition model proposed by the ICRP Task Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Task Group has developed a new model of the deposition of inhaled aerosols in each anatomical region of the respiratory tract. The model is used to evaluate the fraction of airborne activity that is deposited in respiratory regions having distinct retention characteristics and clearance pathways: the anterior nares, the extrathoracic airways of the naso- and oropharynx and larynx, the bronchi, the bronchioles, and the alveolated airways of the lung. Drawn from experimental data on total and regional deposition in human subjects, the model is based on extrapolation of these data by means of a detailed theoretical model of aerosol transport and deposition within the lung. The Task Group model applies to all practical conditions, and for aerosol particles and vapors from atomic size up to very coarse aerosols with an activity median aerodynamic diameter of 100 μm. The model is designed to predict regional deposition in different subjects, including adults of either sex, children of various ages, and infants, and also to account for anatomical differences among Caucasian and non-Caucasian subjects. The Task Group model represents aerosol inhalability and regional deposition in different subjects by algebraic expressions of aerosol size, breathing rates, standard lung volumes, and scaling factors for airway dimensions. 35 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Atmospheric particulate matter and hospital admission due to lower respiratory tract infection: a case-cross study in Shijiazhuang, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi-na BAI

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To explore the association between atmospheric particulate matter (PM10/PM2.5 levels and hospital admissions due to lower respiratory tract infection in Shijiazhuang. Methods  Data of air pollution, meteorologic data, and the data of patients admitted to hospital due to lower respiratory tract infection were retrospectively analyzed. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated to analyze correlations between atmospheric particulate matter and meteorologic factors. Data of hospital admission due to lower respiratory tract infection and of atmospheric air pollution levels in Shijiazhuang were obtained, a bidirectional case-crossover design was used to investigate the association between hospital admissions due to lower respiratory tract infection and levels of atmospheric particles. Stratified analyses of exposure based on age, gender, complications and season were performed to evaluate the effect. Results  Pearson's correlation analysis showed positive correlations among PM2.5, PM10, SO2, NO2 and CO. The concentration of all these five pollutants were negatively correlated with O3 and daily mean temperature, while a positive correlation was found between concentrations of the 5 pollutants and daily average temperature and O3. In single-pollutant model, every 10μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 and PM10 at lag5 brought the corresponding OR values (95%CI up to 1.010(1.005-1.015 and 1.006(1.003-1.009 respectively. In the multi-pollutant models, the observed effects of PM2.5 remained significant. Stratified analysis based on gender, age, season and comorbidities showed that the effect of PM2.5 exposure on lower respiratory tract infection admissions was stronger in males, persons younger than 60 years of age and persons without comorbidities, and even more stronger in cold season. The effect of PM10 exposure on lower respiratory tract infection admissions was stronger in females, persons older than 60 years of age and persons with

  11. Pros and cons of recruitment maneuvers in acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, Patricia R M; Pelosi, Paolo; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama

    2010-08-01

    In patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, a protective mechanical ventilation strategy characterized by low tidal volumes has been associated with reduced mortality. However, such a strategy may result in alveolar collapse, leading to cyclic opening and closing of atelectatic alveoli and distal airways. Thus, recruitment maneuvers (RMs) have been used to open up collapsed lungs, while adequate positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) levels may counteract alveolar derecruitment during low tidal volume ventilation, improving respiratory function and minimizing ventilator-associated lung injury. Nevertheless, considerable uncertainty remains regarding the appropriateness of RMs. The most commonly used RM is conventional sustained inflation, associated with respiratory and cardiovascular side effects, which may be minimized by newly proposed strategies: prolonged or incremental PEEP elevation; pressure-controlled ventilation with fixed PEEP and increased driving pressure; pressure-controlled ventilation applied with escalating PEEP and constant driving pressure; and long and slow increase in pressure. The efficiency of RMs may be affected by different factors, including the nature and extent of lung injury, capability of increasing inspiratory transpulmonary pressures, patient positioning and cardiac preload. Current evidence suggests that RMs can be used before setting PEEP, after ventilator circuit disconnection or as a rescue maneuver to overcome severe hypoxemia; however, their routine use does not seem to be justified at present. The development of new lung recruitment strategies that have fewer hemodynamic and biological effects on the lungs, as well as randomized clinical trials analyzing the impact of RMs on morbidity and mortality of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome patients, are warranted. PMID:20658909

  12. Surfactant therapy for acute respiratory distress in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrado Moretti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS remains the primary indication for admission to paediatric intensive care units and accounts for significant mortality, morbidity and resource utilization. Respiratory infections, in particular pneumonia and severe bronchiolitis, are the most common causes of respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation in infants and children. This paper reviews the pathophysiology of ARDS and the management of paediatric patients with acute lung injury. Data indicate that adoption of a lung protective ventilation with low tidal volumes and of an open-lung ventilation strategy, characterized by sufficient positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP to avoid atelectasis, provides the greatest likelihood of survival and minimizes lung injury. The relative benefits of strategies such as high frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV, inhaled nitric oxide (iNO, recruiting manoeuvres and prone position are also considered. Moreover this article examines exogenous lung surfactant replacement therapy and its efficacy in the treatment of paediatric ARDS. In infants and children with acute lung injury the endogenous surfactant system is not only deficient, as observed in preterm infants, but altered via a variety of other mechanisms like inhibition and dysfunction. All factors contribute to the altered physiology seen in ARDS. The role of exogenous surfactant in lung injury beyond the neonatal period is therefore more complex and its limited efficacy may be related to a number of factors, among them inadequacy of pharmaceutical surfactants, insufficient dosing or drug delivery, poor drug distribution or, simply, an inability of the drug to counteract the underlying pathophysiology of ARDS. Several trials have found no clinical benefit from various surfactant supplementation methods in adult patients with ARDS, however some studies have shown that this therapy can improve oxygenation and decrease mortality in some specific

  13. Some viral and bacterial respiratory tract infections of dairy cattle during the summer season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kale M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, dairy cattle with respiratory system problems that were brought to a private slaughterhouse in Burdur province were investigated for viral and bacterial infections present in the summer season. The blood samples were collected from 56 animals. The samples were tested for antibodies against bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1, bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV, bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV, bovine parainfluenza virus 3 (BPIV-3 and bovine adenovirus 3 (BAV-3 by ELISA. Bacteriological cultivation was carried out from lung samples taken after cutting the same animals. The seropositivity rates which were determined for 5 viruses in cattle (BoHV- 1, BVDV, BRSV, BPIV-3 and BAV-3 were 7.14%, 50%, 94.64%, 94.64% and 82.14% respectively. The presence of antibodies against the viruses was as follows; 5.36% of cattle had antibodies against only one virus, 14.29% against two, 30.36% against three, 44.64% against four and 5.36% against five viruses. A total of 36 bacterial agents were isolated from 30 out of 56 lung samples. From the lung samples, only one bacterium was isolated from 39.3% (22/56 samples, and more than one bacterium from 14.3% (8/56. Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus spp. were detected as the most often isolated agents. Compared to bacteria, the rates of viral infections associated with Escherichia coli (BRSV+BPIV-3+BAV- 3+Escherichia coli; 8.92% and BRSV+BPIV-3+Escherichia coli; 5.35% were higher. As a consequence, it was thought that primary agents which were the viruses and bacteria may have attended as secondary factors in respiratory tract infections of dairy cattle.

  14. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus (HPV in upper respiratory tract mucosa in a group of pre-school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslaw Szydłowski

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available [b]introduction[/b]. Human Papillomavirus (HPV is a group of DNA viruses which is an etiological factor of many benign and malignant diseases of the upper respiratory tract mucosa, female genital tract and the skin. HPV infection is considered a sexually-transmitted infection, but can also be transmitted by non-sexual routes, including perinatal vertical transmission, physical contact, iatrogenic infection and autoinoculation. Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis (RRP in children is connected with HPV infection transmitted vertically from mother to child during the passage of the foetus through an infected birth canal. [b]objective. [/b]The aim of this study was to establish the level of Human Papillomaviruses carrier state in upper respiratory tract mucosa in healthy pre-school children, and to identify potential risk factors for HPV infection. [b]materials and method[/b]. After obtaining consent from their parents, 97 pre-school children were examined – 51 girls and 46 boys between the ages of 3 – 5 years; average age – 4 years and 5 months. 68 children were urban dwellers and 29 came from a rural environment. A questionnaire with detailed history was taken including parents’ and child`s personal data, as well as perinatal risk factors in pregnancy. Socio-demographic information was also obtained, including the standard of living, and chosen environmental factors. Routine ENT examination was performed. Exfoliated oral squamous cells were collected from swabs and analysed for the presence of DNA papillomaviruses by polymerase chain reaction. [b]results.[/b] The presence of HPV in the respiratory tract in children was detected in 19.6% cases. ‘High oncogenic potential’ HPVs, such as HPV-16 and HPV-18, were not observed in squamous cell mucosa of the respiratory tract in the children. No significant differences were observed between the HPV carrier state in urban and rural inhabitants.

  15. An undiagnosed myasthenia gravis presenting as isolated recurrent acute respiratory failure

    OpenAIRE

    Shri Ram Sharma; Nalini Sharma; Yeolekar, M E

    2012-01-01

    Acute respiratory failure is an uncommon initial presentation of myasthenia gravis (MG). In our case a 22-year-old woman of unrecognized MG presented to the emergency department with isolated respiratory failure as the first presenting symptom. Initially she presented with dysphonia and was managed by speech therapist and ENT surgeons for 3 months. Subsequently, she presented with signs and symptoms of sepsis and went into acute respiratory failure. This case highlights the need to consider M...

  16. Silicone Modeling of the Interior Spaces of Hollow Organs: Use in Dog and Manatee Respiratory Tract and in a Beef Heart

    OpenAIRE

    Charles J. Grossman; Richard Hamilton; Lisa A. Close-Jacob; Martine D. Wit; Jeffery Werwa

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: The mechanism, by which the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) vocalizes, remains unknown because the manatee larynx does not contain true vocal cords. Since sound can be generated when air passes through a narrow respiratory structure we needed to visualize the internal anatomy of manatee respiratory tract to locate any candidate regions for study. Approach: To visualize the internal anatomy of upper and lower manatee respiratory tract we ...

  17. Intravenous moxifloxacin in routine hospital treatment of respiratory tract infections in China: results of a multicenter, noninterventional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen R

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Rongchang Chen1, Wenjiang Ma2, Xuezhong Yu3, Xinmin Liu4, Jihong Zhu5, Hong Liang6, Xiaomei Wu7, Tao Guo81State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Disease, First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, China; 2Respiratory Department, The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical School of Zhejiang University, China; 3Emergency Department, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, China; 4Geriatric Department, Peking University First Hospital, China; 5Emergency Department, Peking University People's Hospital, China; 6Respiratory Department, Huadong Hospital Affiliated to Fudan University, China; 7Respiratory Department, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, China; 8Hematology Department, Wuhan Union Hospital, ChinaObjective: To investigate the effectiveness, safety, and tolerability of moxifloxacin (MXF (intravenous [IV] or sequential therapy [IV followed by oral] under daily treatment conditions in a large number of patients with respiratory tract infections.Design: Patients with a diagnosis of respiratory tract infection should be treated with MXF IV and/or tablets 400 mg once daily for a duration at the physician's discretion. For each patient, the physician documented data at an initial visit and at the end of therapy (EOT visit and/or, in the case of sequential therapy, an interim visit when the patient switched to oral treatment.Results: A total of 1953 patients treated with MXF were documented and were valid for an effectiveness and safety evaluation. An improvement was observed in 98.1% (n = 1911/1949 of patients treated with MXF. Recovery was documented in 89.9% (n = 1754/1951 of the patients. At the EOT visit, severity of infection was assessed to be "relieved" or at least "improved" in 96.5% (n = 1873/1940 of the patients. Physicians assessed overall effectiveness as "good" or "very good" in 93.3% (n = 1822/1953 of all patients. The physicians' overall tolerability rating was "very good" or "good" in 93.5% (n

  18. Randomized trial of a fixed combination (KanJang) of herbal extracts containing Adhatoda vasica, Echinacea purpurea and Eleutherococcus senticosus in patients with upper respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narimanian, M; Badalyan, M; Panosyan, V; Gabrielyan, E; Panossian, A; Wikman, G; Wagner, H

    2005-08-01

    The clinical efficacy of KanJang oral solution, a fixed combination of standardised extracts of Echinacea purpurea, Adhatoda vasica and Eleutherococcus senticosus, was compared with the combined extracts of Echinacea purpurea and Eleutherococcus senticosus alone (Echinacea mixture) in a controlled, double blind, randomized trial, and with Bromhexine (a standard treatment) in a controlled, open, randomized clinical trial on patients with non-complicated acute respiratory tract infections. Many of the parameters evaluated, such as severity of coughing, frequency of coughing, efficacy of mucus discharge in the respiratory tract, nasal congestion and a general feeling of sickness, showed significantly greater improvement in patients treated with KanJang compared with those receiving the standard treatment. However, no significant differences in the improvement of these symptoms (except in a reduced frequency of coughing) were observed between patients treated with the Echinacea mixture and those receiving the standard treatment. The only explanation is that the lack of extract of A. vasica in the Echinacea mixture reduces its efficacy compared with the complete KanJang oral solution even though direct double-blind comparison yielded no significant differences between these two groups of patients. The recovery time of patients being treated with KanJang or Echinacea mixture was 2 days shorter than that of patients receiving the standard treatment. None of the patients completing the study reported adverse reactions to the medication taken. The significance of the results obtained in this study is discussed with respect to the efficacy of KanJang in the treatment of acute respiratory infection and to the concept that multi-drug therapy offers higher efficacy compared with mono-drug treatment of such infections. PMID:16121513

  19. Effects of acute oligohydramnios on respiratory system of fetal sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savich, R D; Guerra, F A; Lee, C C; Padbury, J F; Kitterman, J A

    1992-08-01

    Prolonged oligohydramnios, or a lack of amniotic fluid, is associated with pulmonary hypoplasia and subsequent perinatal morbidity, but it is unclear whether short-term or acute oligohydramnios has any effect on the fetal respiratory system. To investigate the acute effects of removal of amniotic fluid, we studied nine chronically catheterized fetal sheep at 122-127 days gestation. During a control period, we measured the volume of fluid in the fetal potential airways and air spaces (VL), production rate of that fluid, incidence and amplitude of fetal breathing movements, tracheal pressures, and fetal plasma concentrations of cortisol, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. We then drained the amniotic fluid for a short period of time [24-48 h, 30.0 +/- 4.0 (SE) h] and repeated the above measurements. The volume of fluid drained for the initial studies was 1,004 +/- 236 ml. Acute oligohydramnios decreased VL from 35.4 +/- 2.9 ml/kg during control to 22.0 +/- 1.6 after oligohydramnios (P less than 0.004). Acute oligohydramnios did not affect the fetal lung fluid production rate, fetal breathing movements, or any of the other measured variables. Seven repeat studies were performed in six of the fetuses after reaccumulation of the amniotic fluid at 130-138 days, and in four of these studies the lung volume also decreased, although the overall mean for the repeat studies was not significantly different (27.0 +/- 5.2 ml/kg for control vs. 25.5 +/- 5.5 ml/kg for oligohydramnios). Again, none of the other measured variables were altered by oligohydramnios in the repeat studies.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1399988

  20. Anti-infectious treatment in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min GAO

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is closely correlated with infection. Severe infection, e.g., sepsis and septic shock, can result in ARDS. Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP is one of the common complications in ARDS related infection. As regards ARDS related infection, community acquired infection (CAI is different from hospital acquired infection (HAI in bacterial spectrum. The former is mainly caused by Streptococcus pneumonia, Hemophilus influenzae, Moraxelle catarrhalis, atypical pathogens and Klebsiella pneumoniae. However, HAI is mainly caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumanii, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA, and other drug-resistant bacteria. The drug-resistant bacterial infection not only makes treatment difficult, but also leads to an increase in mechanical ventilation time, length of ICU stay, mortality rate, and medical costs. The present paper has reviewed the relationship between ARDS and infection, therapeutic principles and measures of ARDS related infection, and introduced the optimal strategy of anti-infectious treatment of ARDS.

  1. Bronchoalveolar hemostasis in lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glas, G J; Van Der Sluijs, K F; Schultz, M J; Hofstra, J-J H; Van Der Poll, T; Levi, M

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced intrapulmonary fibrin deposition as a result of abnormal broncho-alveolar fibrin turnover is a hallmark of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), pneumonia and ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), and is important to the pathogenesis of these conditions. The mechanisms that contribute to alveolar coagulopathy are localized tissue factor-mediated thrombin generation, impaired activity of natural coagulation inhibitors and depression of bronchoalveolar urokinase plasminogen activator-mediated fibrinolysis, caused by the increase of plasminogen activator inhibitors. There is an intense and bidirectional interaction between coagulation and inflammatory pathways in the bronchoalveolar compartment. Systemic or local administration of anticoagulant agents (including activated protein C, antithrombin and heparin) and profibrinolytic agents (such as plasminogen activators) attenuate pulmonary coagulopathy. Several preclinical studies show additional anti-inflammatory effects of these therapies in ARDS and pneumonia. PMID:23114008

  2. Lactobacillus fermentum (PCC® supplementation and gastrointestinal and respiratory-tract illness symptoms: a randomised control trial in athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hopkins William G

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Probiotics purportedly reduce symptoms of gastrointestinal and upper respiratory-tract illness by modulating commensal microflora. Preventing and reducing symptoms of respiratory and gastrointestinal illness are the primary reason that dietary supplementation with probiotics are becoming increasingly popular with healthy active individuals. There is a paucity of data regarding the effectiveness of probiotics in this cohort. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a probiotic on faecal microbiology, self-reported illness symptoms and immunity in healthy well trained individuals. Methods Competitive cyclists (64 males and 35 females; age 35 ± 9 and 36 ± 9 y, VO2max 56 ± 6 and 52 ± 6 ml.kg-1.min-1, mean ± SD were randomised to either probiotic (minimum 1 × 109 Lactobacillus fermentum (PCC® per day or placebo treatment for 11 weeks in a double-blind, randomised, controlled trial. The outcome measures were faecal L. fermentum counts, self-reported symptoms of illness and serum cytokines. Results Lactobacillus numbers increased 7.7-fold (90% confidence limits 2.1- to 28-fold more in males on the probiotic, while there was an unclear 2.2-fold (0.2- to 18-fold increase in females taking the probiotic. The number and duration of mild gastrointestinal symptoms were ~2-fold greater in the probiotic group. However, there was a substantial 0.7 (0.2 to 1.2 of a scale step reduction in the severity of gastrointestinal illness at the mean training load in males, which became more pronounced as training load increased. The load (duration×severity of lower respiratory illness symptoms was less by a factor of 0.31 (99%CI; 0.07 to 0.96 in males taking the probiotic compared with placebo but increased by a factor of 2.2 (0.41 to 27 in females. Differences in use of cold and flu medication mirrored these symptoms. The observed effects on URTI had too much uncertainty for a decisive outcome. There were clear reductions in

  3. CLINICAL PROFILE OF CHILDREN IN THE AGE GROUP 6 MONTHS TO 60 MONTHS WITH LOWER RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharath Kumar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT : Infections of the respiratory tract are perhaps the most common human ailments. Acute Respiratory Infections (ARI has quite a high morbidity and mortality in children in developing countries 1 ARI is responsible for about 30 - 50 percent of visits to health facilities and for about 20 - 40 percent of hospital admissions. Pneumonia is a leading cause of mortality in children worldwide. Because mortality due to pneumonia in developing countries is attributable mainly to bacterial etiology , IM NCI strategy recommends the use of antibiotics when a child presented with tachypnea as defined previously . AIMS : To re - define or refine tachypnea as a specific indicator of bacterial pneumonia. To identify other clinical predictors for identifying bacteri al pneumonia. DESIGNS : The study was designed to be done in two phases . In the first phase it is to be carried out as a descriptive study of children presenting with fever and respiratory distress in the OPD to identify the specific markers for bacterial p neumonia. In the second phase presenting clinical features in children with radiological pneumonia will be analysed to validate the findings from Phase I. MATERIALS AND METHODS : This was a hospital based study and was conducted in Sri Manakula V inayagar Me dical College and Hospital , Puducherry . The study included 100 Children in the age group 6 months to 5 years presenting in the out patients department with fever and respiratory distress Children attending the out - patient department on a fixed day of the w eek (Monday and who come under this study population during the study period were admitted and recruited in the study and informed verbal consent for participation was taken from the parents. Their clinical profiles were recorded as in phase I. All childr en coming under this study population were given antibiotics and supportive treatment. The cases were monitored for any worsening or improvement every 6 th hourly on day 1 and

  4. Fibromyalgia after severe acute respiratory syndrome: a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Xin-ping; ZENG Xiao-feng; XU Wen-bin

    2006-01-01

    @@ Since November 2002, an infectious disease with unknown cause occurred in China and many countries had been involved. Cases were reported in 28 countries and more than 5050 individuals had been infected.1 Lung is the most frequently involved organ and can be fatal in severe cases. At the end of February 2003, it was defined as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) by World Health Organization. China had a SARS epidemic in the spring of 2003. More than 1000 patients were infected and some patients died of respiratory failure.Finally, a new variant of coronavirus was suspected to be the pathogen although the pathogenesis was still unclear. Since it is a new disease and we have very limited knowledge about its clinical sequela, we followed the survived patients closely in order to understand it in depth. During the follow up, we discovered an interesting patient who was finally diagnosed as fibromyalgia. We report this case herein to share our experience with clinicians who may see patients with SARS or fibromyalgia.

  5. Epidemiology of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): adults and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Nan-Shan; Wong, Gary W K

    2004-12-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a newly described respiratory infection with pandemic potential. The causative agent is a new strain of coronavirus most likely originating from wild animals. This disease first emerged in November 2002 in Guangdong Province, China. Early in the outbreak the infection had been transmitted primarily via household contacts and healthcare settings. In late February 2003 the infection was transmitted to Hong Kong when an infected doctor from the mainland visited there. During his stay in Hong Kong at least 17 guests and visitors were infected at the hotel at which he stayed. By modern day air travel, the infection was rapidly spread to other countries including Vietnam, Singapore and Canada by these infected guests. With the implementation of effective control strategies including early isolation of suspected cases, strict infection control measures in the hospital setting, meticulous contact tracing and quarantine, the outbreak was finally brought under control by July 2003. In addition, there were another two events of SARS in China between the end of December 2003 and January 2004 and from March to May 2004; both were readily controlled without significant patient spread. PMID:15531250

  6. Acute respiratory infections in Pakistan: Have we made any progress?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are the leading cause of death in young children in Pakistan, responsible for 20-30% of child deaths under age 5 years. This paper summarizes the research and technical development efforts over the last 15 years which have contributed to improving the effectiveness of the case management strategy to reduce mortality from 5' pneumonia in children in Pakistan. Community intervention is viable, effective and practical. Rising antimicrobial resistance among commonly used and A low-cost oral agent is of significant concern. Appropriate monitoring and evaluation of the impact of the ARI control programme is lacking. Lack of funding for programmatic activities, lack of coordination with other child survival programs, inadequate training for community health workers and general practitioners in the private sector, lack of public awareness about seeking timely and appropriate care and insufficient planning and support for ARI in the programmatic activities at provincial and district levels are major hindrances in decreasing the burden of ARI in the country. The recent introduction of the community-based Lady Health Worker (LHW) Programme and WHO and UNICEF-sponsored integrated management of childhood illness initiative present ideal opportunities for re-emphasizing early case detection and appropriate case management of ARI. Ultimately, focusing on preventive strategies such as improving nutrition, reducing indoor pollution, improving mass vaccination, as well as introduction of new vaccines effective against important respiratory pathogens will likely have the most impact on reducing severe ARI and deaths from severe disease. (author)

  7. Successful management of acute respiratory failure with noninvasive mechanical ventilation after drowning, in an epileptic-patient

    OpenAIRE

    Paolo Ruggeri; Salvatore Calcaterra; Antonio Bottari; Giuseppe Girbino; Vincenzo Fodale

    2016-01-01

    Sea drowning is a common cause of accidental death worldwide. Respiratory complications such as acute pulmonary oedema, which is often complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome, is often seen. Noninvasive ventilation is already widely used as a first approach to treat acute respiratory failure resulting from multiple diseases. We report a case of a 45 year old man with a history of epilepsy, motor and mental handicap who developed acute respiratory failure secondary to sea water drow...

  8. Association of alveolar recruitment maneuvers and prone position in acute respiratory disease syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Daniela Caetano; Rocha, Eduardo; Ribeiro, Tatiane Flores

    2009-06-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome is the clinical presentation of acute lung injury characterized by diffuse alveolar damage and development of non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema due to increased pulmonary alveolar-capillary membrane permeability. Alveolar recruitment maneuvers and prone position can be used in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome. The objective of this review of literature was to identify possible benefits, indications, complications and care of the associated recruitment maneuvers and prone position for treatment of the acute respiratory distress syndrome. This national and international scientific literature review was developed according to the established criteria for searching the databases MedLine, LILACS, SciElo, PubMed, Cochrane, from 1994 to 2008 in Portuguese and English, with the key words: acute respiratory distress syndrome, alveolar recruitment maneuver and prone position. Despite advances in the understanding of acute respiratory distress syndrome pathophysiology, mortality is still expressive. Alveolar recruitment maneuvers and prone position significantly contribute to treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome patient aiming to improve oxygenation and minimizing complications of refractory hypoxemia and reduction of pulmonary compliance. However,as there are few studies in literature associating alveolar recruitment maneuvers and prone position for treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome, additional research and evidences of clinical application are required. PMID:25303351

  9. Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury (VILI) in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS): Volutrauma and Molecular Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Carrasco Loza, R; Villamizar Rodríguez, G; Medel Fernández, N

    2015-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a clinical condition secondary to a variety of insults leading to a severe acute respiratory failure and high mortality in critically ill patients. Patients with ARDS generally require mechanical ventilation, which is another important factor that may increase the ALI (acute lung injury) by a series of pathophysiological mechanisms, whose common element is the initial volutrauma in the alveolar units, and forming part of an entity known clinically...

  10. Sublingual immunotherapy as an alternative to induce protection against acute respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Wolf, Natalia; Rial, Analía; Saavedra, José M; Chabalgoity, José A

    2014-01-01

    Sublingual route has been widely used to deliver small molecules into the bloodstream and to modulate the immune response at different sites. It has been shown to effectively induce humoral and cellular responses at systemic and mucosal sites, namely the lungs and urogenital tract. Sublingual vaccination can promote protection against infections at the lower and upper respiratory tract; it can also promote tolerance to allergens and ameliorate asthma symptoms. Modulation of lung's immune response by sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is safer than direct administration of formulations by intranasal route because it does not require delivery of potentially harmful molecules directly into the airways. In contrast to intranasal delivery, side effects involving brain toxicity or facial paralysis are not promoted by SLIT. The immune mechanisms underlying SLIT remain elusive and its use for the treatment of acute lung infections has not yet been explored. Thus, development of appropriate animal models of SLIT is needed to further explore its potential advantages. This work shows how to perform sublingual administration of therapeutic agents in mice to evaluate their ability to protect against acute pneumococcal pneumonia. Technical aspects of mouse handling during sublingual inoculation, precise identification of sublingual mucosa, draining lymph nodes and isolation of tissues, bronchoalveolar lavage and lungs are illustrated. Protocols for single cell suspension preparation for FACS analysis are described in detail. Other downstream applications for the analysis of the immune response are discussed. Technical aspects of the preparation of Streptococcus pneumoniae inoculum and intranasal challenge of mice are also explained. SLIT is a simple technique that allows screening of candidate molecules to modulate lungs' immune response. Parameters affecting the success of SLIT are related to molecular size, susceptibility to degradation and stability of highly concentrated

  11. Respiratory protection and emerging infectious diseases: lessons from severe acute respiratory syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John H. Lange

    2005-01-01

    @@ The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) that emerged 2002-2003 and apparently again 2004 (reported by the news media on December 27, 2003) as the first confirmed case by the World Health Organization (WHO)1,2 raised awareness of emerging infectious diseases.3 Every year there are both new and old infectious diseases emerging as potential pandemic agents.4-6 However, few of these diseases receive the public attention and concern expressed as occurred during the emergence of SARS. Much of this concern was a result of the rapid spread of the novel coronavirus (CoV) to different regions of the world and its high infectivity, especially for health care workers (HCW).3 In many ways, the high percent of HCW infected is a warning of the potential hazards of old and emerging infectious diseases.6 However, SARS was not the only disease (e.g. Monkeypox) that emerged in 2003,3 rather it received the greatest attention.

  12. Surfactant alteration and replacement in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walmrath Dieter

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is a frequent, life-threatening disease in which a marked increase in alveolar surface tension has been repeatedly observed. It is caused by factors including a lack of surface-active compounds, changes in the phospholipid, fatty acid, neutral lipid, and surfactant apoprotein composition, imbalance of the extracellular surfactant subtype distribution, inhibition of surfactant function by plasma protein leakage, incorporation of surfactant phospholipids and apoproteins into polymerizing fibrin, and damage/inhibition of surfactant compounds by inflammatory mediators. There is now good evidence that these surfactant abnormalities promote alveolar instability and collapse and, consequently, loss of compliance and the profound gas exchange abnormalities seen in ARDS. An acute improvement of gas exchange properties together with a far-reaching restoration of surfactant properties was encountered in recently performed pilot studies. Here we summarize what is known about the kind and severity of surfactant changes occuring in ARDS, the contribution of these changes to lung failure, and the role of surfactant administration for therapy of ARDS.

  13. Acute respiratory failure as a manifestation of an arachnoid cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pillai Lalitha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Arachnoid cysts are the most common congenital cystic lesions in the brain occurring in the middle fossa, suprasellar region and occasionally in the posterior fossa. Conventionally all cysts are considered as benign and symptoms are attributed to expansion of cysts causing compression of adjacent neurological structures, bleeds within the cyst or due to the development of acute hydrocephalus. We are reporting this case of a 15-year-old female patient with non-progressive weakness in the limbs since the age of seven years who presented with acute onset syncopal attacks and respiratory failure. She was intubated and ventilated. An magnetic resonance imaging scan showed large posterior fossa cyst extending up to mid second cervical vertebra causing compression of the medulla and pons, with mild hydrocephalus. After a failed attempt to wean her from the ventilator a cysto peritoneal shunt surgery was performed following which she was weaned from the ventilator successfully. Weakness in the upper and lower limbs, which had increased in the preceding month, also improved following the surgery.

  14. Acute respiratory failure induced by bleomycin and hyperoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleomycin, a chemotherapeutic agent, and oxygen at concentrations greater than 20%, induce acute pulmonary damage separately and when administered together. The interaction of 5 U/kg intratracheal bleomycin and 24 hours of exposure to 80% oxygen in hamsters produces delayed onset acute respiratory distress syndrome three days after treatment. As little as 12 hours of 80% O2 exposure, after intratracheal bleomycin, induces severe pulmonary damage. Lung lesions are characterized as diffuse alveolar damage. Significantly pulmonary edema, measured by iodine-125-bovine serum albumin and technetium-99m-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate, occurs 72 hours after treatment. Lesions progress from focal mild alveolar interstitial and air-space macrophage and granulocyte infiltrates at 24 hours to marked infiltrates and severe interstitial and air space edema with hemorrhages and hyaline membranes at 96 hours. Significant changes measured by electron microscopy morphometry are increases in volume fractions of neutrophils, alveolar tissue and mononuclear leukocytes. Surfactant assay of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid shows a marked decrease in the lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio at 72 hours. Proposed mechanisms of bleomycin and hyperoxia synergism include enhanced production of superoxide radicals either directly or indirectly by increasing neutrophil activity or numbers, or by alteration of cell mediators. The pulmonary edema, without evidence of severe morphological changes, may be secondary to alterations of transalveolar transport mechanisms

  15. Factors associated with acute respiratory illness in day care children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakka, Katja; Piirainen, Laura; Pohjavuori, Sara; Poussa, Tuija; Savilahti, Erkki; Korpela, Riitta

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between child characteristics, parental and environmental factors and the occurrence of acute respiratory illness (ARI) and acute otitis media (AOM) among Finnish children attending day care centres (DCCs). The study was a cross-sectional questionnaire of 594 children aged 1-6 y from 18 DCCs in Helsinki, Finland. Recurrent (> or =4 diseases/y) ARI was present in 44% of the 1-3-y-olds and 23% of the 4-6-y-olds, and recurrent AOM in 15% and 2.5%, respectively. Parent atopic disease (odds ratio (OR) 1.53, p = 0.033), mother's academic education (OR 1.77, p = 0.008) and a medium length of DCC attendance compared to a short period (OR 1.67, p = 0.049) increased, while furry pets (OR 0.44, p = 0.003) and older child age (OR 0.38, p or =6 months (OR 0.20, p = 0.002) and older child age (OR 0.05, p < 0.001) reduced the risk of recurrent AOM. Parental and environmental factors had a significant impact on recurrent ARI and AOM episodes in children attending DCCs. These risk factors should be considered in future studies intending to reduce DCC infections.

  16. Airflow and Aerosol-Drug Delivery in a CT Scan based Human Respiratory Tract with Tumor using CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek K.Srivastav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on to study the effect of a tumor present in the respiratory tract (in trachea on airflow pattern and aerosol-drug deposition. A realistic model of human respiratory tract was constructed from spiral computed tomography (CT scan data and a bifocal tumor (Glomus tumor was constructed in the tract. The inspiratory flow characteristics of the realistic human airway models (with and without tumor was numerically solved using the realizable k turbulence model for airflow and Shear Stress Transport (SST k-ω turbulence model for two-phase flow. The velocity (contours and vector plots, wall shear stress and deposition efficiency of aerosol were obtained at different locations to the upstream and downstream region of the bifocal tumor in respiratory tract. The flow pattern shows that the maximum flow disturbance occurs around the tumor and at downstream of the flow. Magnitude and location of maximum wall shear stress in the presence of the tumor helps in identifying the extent and probable location of the wall injury during the normal and heavy breathing conditions. Deposition efficiency of aerosol-drug on tumor location will be useful for designing the efficient targeted drug delivery system.

  17. Distribution patterns of influenza virus receptors and viral attachment patterns in the respiratory and intestinal tracts of seven avian species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa Taiana

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study assessed the presence of sialic acid α-2,3 and α-2,6 linked glycan receptors in seven avian species. The respiratory and intestinal tracts of the chicken, common quail, red-legged partridge, turkey, golden pheasant, ostrich, and mallard were tested by means of lectin histochemistry, using the lectins Maackia amurensis agglutinin II and Sambucus nigra agglutinin, which show affinity for α-2,3 and α-2,6 receptors, respectively. Additionally, the pattern of virus attachment (PVA was evaluated with virus histochemistry, using an avian-origin H4N5 virus and a human-origin seasonal H1N1 virus. There was a great variation of receptor distribution among the tissues and avian species studied. Both α-2,3 and α-2,6 receptors were present in the respiratory and intestinal tracts of the chicken, common quail, red-legged partridge, turkey, and golden pheasant. In ostriches, the expression of the receptor was basically restricted to α-2,3 in both the respiratory and intestinal tracts and in mallards the α-2,6 receptors were absent from the intestinal tract. The results obtained with the lectin histochemistry were, in general, in agreement with the PVA. The differential expression and distribution of α-2,3 and α-2,6 receptors among various avian species might reflect a potentially decisive factor in the emergence of new viral strains.

  18. Determining the basic characteristics of aerosols suitable for studies of deposition in the respiratory tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legáth, L; Naus, A; Halík, J

    1988-01-01

    Studies of aerosol particle deposition in the respiratory tract requires experimental inhalation of artificial model aerosols. The paper formulates some of the most important requirements for the properties of such aerosols. Several suitable fractions were prepared as part of a research project dealing with the use of microporous polymers for diagnostic purposes. 5 fractions of the polymer designated G-gel 60 with the particle size as stated by the manufacturer, ranging from 3 to 7 micron were evaluated using a 16-channel particle dispersity analyzer HIAC/ROYCO MT 3210 with the sensor 1200 and operated by a microprocessor, the equipment being coupled to an APPLE IIe computer. G-gel 60 particles introduced into the aerosol were characterized by the parameters CMAD, MMAD and sg both numerically and graphically. The measurement procedure was found to be very sensitive with respect to all fractions in evaluating the subtile differences between different lot numbers of the aerosol. G-gel 60 fractions characterized both numerically and graphically were compared with the known aerosols from paraffin oil and atmospheric air. The equipment MT 3210 enables prompt determination of the percentages of aerosol particles distribution by size class. The authors conclude that the procedure, both in its numerical and graphical versions, is particularly suitable for the diagnosis of aerosol particles deposition in the respiratory tract, offering a new application for HIAC/ROYCO in the field of medicine. In evaluating atmospheric aerosol in exhaled air, the number of particles was found to be below that in inhaled air, the difference being dependent on the choice of investigation methods. Percentual distribution of deposited particles following one minute ventilation proved to be at its maximum, as regards atmospheric aerosol, in the 0.30-0.50 micron range. The deposition curve was similar to already published curves, being characterized by an S-shaped pattern with maximum deposition

  19. Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS): the mechanism, present strategies and future perspectives of therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Luh, Shi-Ping; Chiang, Chi-huei

    2006-01-01

    Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS), which manifests as non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, respiratory distress and hypoxemia, could be resulted from various processes that directly or indirectly injure the lung. Extensive investigations in experimental models and humans with ALI/ARDS have revealed many molecular mechanisms that offer therapeutic opportunities for cell or gene therapy. Herein the present strategies and future perspectives of the treatment for ALI/AR...

  20. Infants with recurrent lower respiratory tract symptoms – who benefits of extensive investigations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Kotaniemi-Syrjänen

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available There is limited information on lung function and exhaled nitric oxide fraction (FeNO in infants with recurrent lower respiratory tract symptoms. In 2000–2003, 201 recurrently symptomatic infants were referred to a tertiary center for further investigation. As part of the clinical investigation, whole-body plethysmography, tidal FeNO measurements, and skin prick tests were performed. In addition, 77 (38% of the children underwent bronchoscopy. Increased work of breathing in clinical examination (in 22%, and abnormal chest radiograph (in 30%, were associated with decreased airway conductance (sGaw z-score –1.65 (p<0.001 and p = 0.048, respectively and hyperinflation of the lungs (FRC z-score 1.65(p = 0.004 and p = 0.038, respectively. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS was associated with FeNO 40 ppb (p = 0.009. Increased work of breathing, sGaw z-score –1.65, and FRC z-score 1.65, were associated with low FeNO (p = 0.002, p = 0.005, p = 0.026, respectively. A definitive diagnosis was made in 184 (92% children; asthma was diagnosed in 149 (74%, infection in 23 (11%, and a structural abnormality in 12 (6%. Abnormal findings in clinical examination predicted the diagnosis of asthma or a structural abnormality in 96% of cases, whereas in children with underlying respiratory infection or no definitive diagnosis, clinical examination was normal in 92% (p<0.001. In conclusion, clinical findings of bronchial obstruction predict well lung function and the diagnosis of asthma in recurrently symptomatic infants. FeNO is affected by ETS exposure, clinical state of the child, and the used methods, and the information obtained should be interpreted with care.

  1. A linear, time-varying simulation of the respiratory tract system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, O.

    1992-11-01

    These results show that regional deposition efficiencies of inhaled particles are highly dependent on the level of physical activity in all the spectrum of thermodynamic and aerodynamic aerosol particle sizes; also it was shown that for particles in the aerodynamic size range, the values of regional deposition efficiencies at the inner regions of the lung are highly dependent on age. In addition, the shape of regional deposition efficiency curves as a function of particle size have a similar behavior for all ages; thus, any variation of the airway geometry and respiratory physiological parameters such as tidal volumes and breathing frequencies due to age difference do not cause a change in the fundamental mechanisms of deposition. Thus, for all the cases of physical activity and age dependency, the deposition of ultrafine aerosol particles is highly enhanced by diffusive processes in all regions of the respiratory tract, and for very large aerosol size particles this behavior is repeated again due to impaction and sedimentation mechanisms. Although the results presented at this work, are the result of computer simulations based on different sources of experimental data, the structure of the computer simulation code BIODEP is flexible enough to the acquisition of any kind of new experimental information in terms of biokinetic analysis and regional deposition parameters. In addition, since the design of BIODEP was intended for easy access to the users, then with exception of the subroutine DIVPAG, at this moment, the modular design of BIODEP using FORTRAN 77 allows the implementation of all the subroutines of BIODEP to be used in a interactive mode with any microcomputer.

  2. On the behavior of particles in the human respiratory tract. Ueber das Verhalten von Aerosolteilchen im menschlichen Atemtrakt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahlhofen, W.; Scheuch, G. (Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany, F.R.))

    1989-01-01

    The results of a series of inhalation experiments (nose- as well as mouth-breathing) are the basis for an estimation of particle behavior in the whole human respiratory tract and in certain regions as extrathoracic, tracheobronchial and alveolar region. Particle behavior depends on the breathing parameters and on particle diameter. Additionally the clearance function of the tracheobronchial tract is given. The clearance is shown to be slowed down for particles being smaller than six micrometers. This fact cannot be neglected in case dosis effect relations are calculated. The corresponding consequences are discussed. (orig.).

  3. Determinants of Noninvasive Ventilation Outcomes during an Episode of Acute Hypercapnic Respiratory Failure in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: The Effects of Comorbidities and Causes of Respiratory Failure

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the effect of the cause of acute respiratory failure and the role of comorbidities both acute and chronic on the outcome of COPD patients admitted to Respiratory Intensive Care Unit (RICU) with acute respiratory failure and treated with NIV. Design. Observational prospective study. Patients and Methods. 176 COPD patients consecutively admitted to our RICU over a period of 3 years and treated with NIV were evaluated. In all patients demographic, clinical, and functio...

  4. Physician behaviour for antimicrobial prescribing for paediatric upper respiratory tract infections: a survey in general practice in Trinidad, West Indies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramdhanie Joseph

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs are among the most frequent reasons for physician office visits in paediatrics. Despite their predominant viral aetiology, URTIs continue to be treated with antimicrobials. We explored general practitioners' (GPs prescribing behaviour for antimicrobials in children (≤ 16 years with URTIs in Trinidad, using the guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC as a reference. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on 92 consenting GPs from the 109 contacted in Central and East Trinidad, between January to June 2003. Using a pilot-tested questionnaire, GPs identified the 5 most frequent URTIs they see in office and reported on their antimicrobial prescribing practices for these URTIs to trained research students. Results The 5 most frequent URTIs presenting in children in general practice, are the common cold, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, sinusitis and acute otitis media (AOM in rank order. GPs prescribe at least 25 different antibiotics for these URTIs with significant associations for amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, cefaclor, cefuroxime, erythromycin, clarithromycin and azithromycin (p 30 years were more likely to prescribe antibiotics for the common cold (p = 0.014. Severity (95.7% and duration of illness (82.5% influenced doctors' prescribing and over prescribing in general practice was attributed to parent demands (75% and concern for secondary bacterial infections (70%. Physicians do not request laboratory investigations primarily because they are unnecessary (86% and the waiting time for results is too long (51%. Conclusions Antibiotics are over prescribed for paediatric URTIs in Trinidad and amoxicillin with co-amoxiclav were preferentially prescribed. Except for AOM, GPs' prescribing varied from the CDC guidelines for drug and duration. Physicians recognise antibiotics are overused and consider parents expecting antibiotics and a concern for secondary

  5. The impact of passive smoking on the development of lower respiratory tract infections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskinoglu, Pembe; Cimrin, Dilek; Aksakoglu, Gazanfer

    2007-10-01

    Environmental tobacco smoke is an important public health problem. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of passive smoking on lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) in children aged 2-12 years. A case-control study was conducted on matched-pair design. One-hundred and fifty children with LRTIs and 150 healthy children were included in the study. Data were collected through questionnaire and urine samples for the determination of cotinine levels, and were analysed by McNemar chi-square, paired t-test and Pearson correlation tests. The prevalence of parental self-reported, indoor smoking was 71.3% in children with LRTI and 72.0% in healthy children. Employing 30 ng mg(-1), the cut-off level of urinary cotinine/creatinine as commonly accepted, 87.3% of the children with LRTIs and 84.7% of healthy children were found to be passive smokers (p = 0.61, odds ratio (OR) = 0.93; confidence interval (CI) = 0.34-2.53). If 60 ng mg(-1) of urinary cotinine/creatinine was accepted as a cut-off level, it was observed that the rates of passive smoking were 76.7% and 50.7%, respectively (p = 0.000, OR = 4.72; 95% CI = 2.62-8.52). Dose-dependent exposure to environmental tobacco smoke was found to be associated with the incidence of LRTI. PMID:17517813

  6. Modeling micro-particle deposition in human upper respiratory tract under steady inhalation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianhua Huang; Lianzhong Zhang; Suyuan Yu

    2011-01-01

    A representative human upper respiratory tract (URT) with idealized oral region and asymmetric tracheobronchial (TB) airway has been modeled,and laminar-to-turbulent airflow for typical inhalation modes as well as micro-particle transport and deposition has been simulated using CFX10.0 software from Ansys Inc. on a personal computer. The asymmetric TB airway could not be replaced by an extended straight tube as outlet of the oral region while investigating the tracheal airflow field and particle deposition.Compared to an idealized oral airway with an extended straight tube,several differences could be noted:(i) The laryngeal jet extends further down the trachea and inclines towards the anterior wall: (ii) the turbulence level in trachea is less and decays more quickly: (iii) three recirculation zones are visible with intense adverse current after the glottis; (iv) deposition of small particles in trachea is reduced due to lower turbulence. Refined unstructured mesh with densified boundary layer mesh could be a proper substitute for the structured mesh in the human URT model with asymmetric TB airway. Based on the refined unstructured mesh,the physiological structure of uvula in the soft palate is properly simulated in the present human URT model.

  7. Pulmonary radiographic findings and mortality in hospitalized patients with lower respiratory tract infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) remain a widespread problem and have a significant impact on primary healthcare resources. Previous studies have reported conflicting results on whether pulmonary radiographic findings at presentation predict lethality for patients with LRTIs. The aim of this study was to determine if the pulmonary radiographic findings at the third day of hospitalisation were independently associated with lethality in patients with LRTIs. A total of 616 patients with LRTIs, admitted to our hospital, were evaluated with regard to radiographic data. The prognostic analysis included an univariate approach of the following radiographic findings: focal alveolar infiltrates in one or more segments, focal alveolar infiltrates in one or more lobes, cavitations, diffuse infiltrates, solitary or multiple nodules, pleural effusion and fibrosis. Of the 616 patients, 560 patients (90.0%) had at least one pulmonary radiographic finding confirmed by a panel of radiologists. Statistical analysis was performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) for Windows. Eleven independent radiographic variables were examined for association with lethality. Overall lethality was 10.2% (553 survivors, 63 non-survivors). The only parameter found to be significantly different between survivors and non-survivors was cavitations on chest radiograph (p-value: 0.047). In conclusion, the presence of cavitations on chest radiograph at third day of hospitalisation can help physicians' assessment of prognosis in patients with LRTIs, as it is an independent predictor of lethality

  8. Pulmonary radiographic findings and mortality in hospitalized patients with lower respiratory tract infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trakada, G. [Division of Pulmonology, Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Patras Medical School, Patras 26500 (Greece)]. E-mail: gtrakada@hotmail.com; Pouli, A. [Agios Savas Hospital, Athens (Greece); Goumas, P. [Department of ORL, University Hospital of Patras Medical School, Patras (Greece)

    2006-02-15

    Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) remain a widespread problem and have a significant impact on primary healthcare resources. Previous studies have reported conflicting results on whether pulmonary radiographic findings at presentation predict lethality for patients with LRTIs. The aim of this study was to determine if the pulmonary radiographic findings at the third day of hospitalisation were independently associated with lethality in patients with LRTIs. A total of 616 patients with LRTIs, admitted to our hospital, were evaluated with regard to radiographic data. The prognostic analysis included an univariate approach of the following radiographic findings: focal alveolar infiltrates in one or more segments, focal alveolar infiltrates in one or more lobes, cavitations, diffuse infiltrates, solitary or multiple nodules, pleural effusion and fibrosis. Of the 616 patients, 560 patients (90.0%) had at least one pulmonary radiographic finding confirmed by a panel of radiologists. Statistical analysis was performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) for Windows. Eleven independent radiographic variables were examined for association with lethality. Overall lethality was 10.2% (553 survivors, 63 non-survivors). The only parameter found to be significantly different between survivors and non-survivors was cavitations on chest radiograph (p-value: 0.047). In conclusion, the presence of cavitations on chest radiograph at third day of hospitalisation can help physicians' assessment of prognosis in patients with LRTIs, as it is an independent predictor of lethality.

  9. Diagnosis and Management of Recurrent Respiratory Tract Infections in Children: A Practical Guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Context Respiratory tract infections (RTIs affect children all over the world and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. RTIs are usually triggered by viruses, though bacterial infections are also common. Results Children are particularly susceptible to RTIs due to the relative immaturity of their immune systems, and genetic factors (such as family history of atopy and/or environmental factors (such as exposure to pollution and pathogens also render certain populations more vulnerable to infection. Furthermore, RTIs tend to be recurrent and can result in multiple infections per year. The management of recurrent RTIs poses a tremendous challenge for physicians, who have a limited armamentarium with which to alleviate patients’ symptoms, treat their disease, and prevent recurrences. Conclusions Though antibiotics are rarely indicated, they are often still used to treat RTIs. The resulting increase in bacterial resistance, the lack of treatment efficacy, and drug-related side effects all underscore the need for alternative strategies to manage recurrent RTIs. This article uses a typical pediatric case study to review central issues in the diagnosis and management of recurrent RTIs in children, with an emphasis on the role of immunomodulation as a preventive strategy.

  10. Characterisation of Candida within the Mycobiome/Microbiome of the Lower Respiratory Tract of ICU Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Krause

    Full Text Available Whether the presence of Candida spp. in lower respiratory tract (LRT secretions is a marker of underlying disease, intensive care unit (ICU treatment and antibiotic therapy or contributes to poor clinical outcome is unclear. We investigated healthy controls, patients with proposed risk factors for Candida growth in LRT (antibiotic therapy, ICU treatment with and without antibiotic therapy, ICU patients with pneumonia and antibiotic therapy and candidemic patients (for comparison of truly invasive and colonizing Candida spp.. Fungal patterns were determined by conventional culture based microbiology combined with molecular approaches (next generation sequencing, multilocus sequence typing for description of fungal and concommitant bacterial microbiota in LRT, and host and fungal biomarkes were investigated. Admission to and treatment on ICUs shifted LRT fungal microbiota to Candida spp. dominated fungal profiles but antibiotic therapy did not. Compared to controls, Candida was part of fungal microbiota in LRT of ICU patients without pneumonia with and without antibiotic therapy (63% and 50% of total fungal genera and of ICU patients with pneumonia with antibiotic therapy (73% (p<0.05. No case of invasive candidiasis originating from Candida in the LRT was detected. There was no common bacterial microbiota profile associated or dissociated with Candida spp. in LRT. Colonizing and invasive Candida strains (from candidemic patients did not match to certain clades withdrawing the presence of a particular pathogenic and invasive clade. The presence of Candida spp. in the LRT rather reflected rapidly occurring LRT dysbiosis driven by ICU related factors than was associated with invasive candidiasis.

  11. Mycoplasmas isolated from the respiratory tract of cattle and goats in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusiluka, L J; Ojeniyi, B; Friis, N F; Kazwala, R R; Kokotovic, B

    2000-01-01

    A microbiological study of the mycoplasma flora in the respiratory tracts of cattle and goats in selected regions of Tanzania is described. In the examination of cattle, mycoplasmas were isolated from 60 (17.8%) of the 338 examined lung samples, 8 (47.1%) of the 17 lymph nodes, 4 (13.3%) of the 30 pleural fluid samples and 4 (3.9%) of the 103 nasal swabs examined. All the isolates were identified as Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides, Small Colony type except for one isolate from pleural fluid which was identified as Mycoplasma arginini. M. mycoides subsp. mycoides, Small Colony type was isolated from samples originating from Dodoma, Iringa, Mbeya, Morogoro and Shinyanga regions where outbreaks of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia had been reported. In the examination of goats, mycoplasmas were isolated from 54 (34.0%) of the 159 examined lung samples, 41 (18.1%) of the 226 nasal swabs and 4 (40.0%) of the 10 pleural fluid samples. The species demonstrated were Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, M. mycoides subsp. mycoides, Small Colony type Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and M. Capricolum subsp. arginini. The isolation of M. capripneumoniae in the Coast and Morogoro regions confirmed the presence of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia in the regions.

  12. Immunohistochemical Analysis of Leucocyte Subsets in the Sinonasal Mucosa of Cats with Upper Respiratory Tract Aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, J L; Krockenberger, M B; Day, M J; Beatty, J A; Dhand, N K; Barrs, V R

    2016-01-01

    Leucocyte populations in the sinonasal mucosa of cats with and without upper respiratory tract aspergillosis were compared using immunohistochemistry and computer-aided morphometry. Inflammation was identified in the nasal mucosa of all affected cats, comprising predominantly of lymphoplasmacytic infiltration of the lamina propria associated with epithelial proliferation and degeneration. There was intense and diffuse expression of class II antigens of the major histocompatibility complex, associated with sites of hyphal invasion with hyperplasia and ulceration of the epithelium adjacent to fungal elements. Significantly more CD79b(+) cells, total lymphocytes, immunoglobulin (Ig)-expressing cells and MAC387(+) cells infiltrated the epithelium and more IgG(+) cells and total Ig-expressing cells infiltrated the lamina propria in affected cats compared with controls. Importantly, the inflammatory profile in affected cats was not consistent with the T helper (Th)1 and Th17 cell-mediated response that confers protective acquired immunity against invasive aspergillosis in dogs and people and in murine models of the infection. This finding may help to explain the development of invasive aspergillosis in systemically immunocompetent cats. PMID:27576043

  13. Characteristics of Streptococcus pneumoniae Strains Colonizing Upper Respiratory Tract of Healthy Preschool Children in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Korona-Glowniak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistant and invasive pneumococci may spread temporally and locally in day care centers (DCCs. We examined 267 children attending four DCCs located in the same city and 70 children staying at home in three seasons (autumn, winter, and spring to determine prevalence, serotype distribution, antibiotic resistance patterns, and transmission of pneumococcal strains colonizing upper respiratory tract of healthy children without antipneumococcal vaccination. By pheno- and genotyping, we determined clonality of pneumococci, including drug-resistant strains. The average carriage of pneumococci in three seasons was 38.2%. 73.4% and 80.4% of the isolates belonged to serotypes present in 10- and 13-valent conjugate vaccine, respectively. Among the pneumococcal strains, 33.3% were susceptible to all antimicrobial tested and 39.2% had decreased susceptibility to penicillin. Multidrug resistance was common (35.7%; 97.5% of drug-resistant isolates represented serotypes included to 10- and 13-valent conjugate vaccine. According to BOX-PCR, clonality definitely was observed only in case of serotype 14. Multivariate analysis determined DCC attendance as strongly related to pneumococcal colonization in all three seasons, but important seasonal differences were demonstrated. In children attending DCCs, we observed dynamic turnover of pneumococcal strains, especially penicillin nonsusceptible and multidrug resistant, which were mostly distributed among serotypes included to available pneumococcal conjugate vaccines.

  14. Morphology of respiratory tract lesions in rats exposed to radon progeny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagle, G.E.; Cross, F.T.; Gies, R.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-12-31

    We will discuss the morphologic features of lesions in the respiratory tract of rats exposed to radon and radon progeny. Groups of male Wister rats were exposed to from 10 to 1000 working levels (WL) of radon progeny in the presence of less than 1 to about 15 mg m{sup {minus}3} uranium ore dust. Cumulative exposures ranged from 20 to approximately 10,000 working level months (WLM). Higher exposure levels produced radiation pneumonitis characterized by interstitial fibrosis, associated with alveolar epithelial cell hyperplasia and accumulations of alveolar macrophages containing phagocytosed uranium ore dust. Nodular fibrosis and alveolar proteinosis were correlated with deposits of uranium ore dust. Vesicular emphysema also occurred at higher exposure levels. Pulmonary adenomatosis appeared to be a preneoplastic lesion; it was composed of nodular proliferation of bronchioloalveolar epithelium without disruption of the general architecture of the parenchyma. At exposure levels where rats lived longer than 1 y, lung tumors and a few tumors of the nasal cavity developed. The principal lung tumors were pulmonary adenomas, bronchioloalveolar carcinomas, papillary adenocarcinomas, epidermoid carcinomas, and adenosquamous carcinomas. Occasionally, malignant mesotheliomas and sarcomas were also present. The malignant lung tumors were characterized by invasion and occasionally metastasized to regional lymph nodes. Lower exposure rates produced more tumors, generally of different histologic types, and more fatal tumors than higher exposure rates. The similarity to relationships of human radon progeny exposure as far as incidence and types of lung tumors establish the validity of this animal model for studying radon carcinogenesis in humans.

  15. A Computer Model for the Simulation of Nonspherical Particle Dynamics in the Human Respiratory Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Sturm

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the study presented here deposition of spheres and nonspherical particles with various aspect ratios (0.01–100 in the human respiratory tract was theoretically modeled. Shape of the nonspherical particles was considered by the application of the latest aerodynamic diameter concepts. Particle deposition was predicted by using a stochastic model of the lung geometry and simulating particle transport trajectories according to the random-walk algorithm. Concerning fibers total deposition is significantly enhanced with respect to that of spheres for μm-sized particles, whereby at normal breathing conditions peripheral lung compartments serve as primary deposition targets. In the case of oblate disks, total deposition becomes mostly remarkable for submicron particles, with the bronchioli and alveoli being targeted to a high extent. Enhancement of the aerodynamic diameter and/or flow rate generally causes a displacement of deposition maxima from peripheral to more proximal lung regions. From these findings, it can be concluded that these particle classes may represent tremendous occupational hazards, especially if they are attached with radioactive elements or heavy metals.

  16. Respiratory tract exacerbations revisited: ventilation, inflammation, perfusion, and structure (VIPS) monitoring to redefine treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiddens, Harm A W M; Stick, Stephen M; Wild, Jim M; Ciet, Pierluigi; Parker, Geoffrey J M; Koch, Armin; Vogel-Claussen, Jens

    2015-10-01

    For cystic fibrosis (CF) patients older than 6 years there are convincing data that suggest respiratory tract exacerbations (RTE) play an important role in the progressive loss of functional lung tissue. There is a poor understanding of the pathobiology of RTE and whether specific treatment of RTE reduces lung damage in the long term. In addition, there are limited tools available to measure the various components of CF lung disease and responses to therapy. Therefore, in order to better understand the impact of RTE on CF lung disease we need to develop sensitive measures to characterize RTE and responses to treatment; and improve our understanding of structure-function changes during treatment of RTE. In this paper we review our current knowledge of the impact of RTE on the progression of lung disease and identify strategies to improve our understanding of the pathobiology of RTE. By improving our knowledge regarding RTE in CF we will be better positioned to develop approaches to treatment that are individualized and that can prevent permanent structural damage. We suggest the development of a ventilation, perfusion, inflammation and structure (VIPS)-MRI suite that supplies the clinician with data on ventilation, inflammation, perfusion, and structure in one MRI session. VIPS-MRI could be an important step to better understand the factors that contribute to and limit treatment efficacy of RTE.

  17. Mycoplasmosis and upper respiratory tract disease of tortoises: a review and update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Elliott R.; Brown, Mary B.; Wendland, Lori; Brown, Daniel R.; Klein, Paul A.; Christopher, Mary M.; Berry, Kristin H.

    2014-01-01

    Tortoise mycoplasmosis is one of the most extensively characterized infectious diseases of chelonians. A 1989 outbreak of upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) in free-ranging Agassiz's desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) brought together an investigative team of researchers, diagnosticians, pathologists, immunologists and clinicians from multiple institutions and agencies. Electron microscopic studies of affected tortoises revealed a microorganism in close association with the nasal mucosa that subsequently was identified as a new species, Mycoplasma agassizii. Over the next 24 years, a second causative agent, Mycoplasma testudineum, was discovered, the geographic distribution and host range of tortoise mycoplasmosis were expanded, diagnostic tests were developed and refined for antibody and pathogen detection, transmission studies confirmed the pathogenicity of the original M. agassizii isolate, clinical (and subclinical) disease and laboratory abnormalities were characterized, many extrinsic and predisposing factors were found to play a role in morbidity and mortality associated with mycoplasmal infection, and social behavior was implicated in disease transmission. The translation of scientific research into management decisions has sometimes led to undesirable outcomes, such as euthanasia of clinically healthy tortoises. In this article, we review and assess current research on tortoise mycoplasmosis, arguably the most important chronic infectious disease of wild and captive North American and European tortoises, and update the implications for management and conservation of tortoises in the wild.

  18. Morphology of respiratory tract lesions in rats exposed to radon progeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We will discuss the morphologic features of lesions in the respiratory tract of rats exposed to radon and radon progeny. Groups of male Wister rats were exposed to from 10 to 1000 working levels (WL) of radon progeny in the presence of less than 1 to about 15 mg m-3 uranium ore dust. Cumulative exposures ranged from 20 to approximately 10,000 working level months (WLM). Higher exposure levels produced radiation pneumonitis characterized by interstitial fibrosis, associated with alveolar epithelial cell hyperplasia and accumulations of alveolar macrophages containing phagocytosed uranium ore dust. Nodular fibrosis and alveolar proteinosis were correlated with deposits of uranium ore dust. Vesicular emphysema also occurred at higher exposure levels. Pulmonary adenomatosis appeared to be a preneoplastic lesion; it was composed of nodular proliferation of bronchioloalveolar epithelium without disruption of the general architecture of the parenchyma. At exposure levels where rats lived longer than 1 y, lung tumors and a few tumors of the nasal cavity developed. The principal lung tumors were pulmonary adenomas, bronchioloalveolar carcinomas, papillary adenocarcinomas, epidermoid carcinomas, and adenosquamous carcinomas. Occasionally, malignant mesotheliomas and sarcomas were also present. The malignant lung tumors were characterized by invasion and occasionally metastasized to regional lymph nodes. Lower exposure rates produced more tumors, generally of different histologic types, and more fatal tumors than higher exposure rates. The similarity to relationships of human radon progeny exposure as far as incidence and types of lung tumors establish the validity of this animal model for studying radon carcinogenesis in humans

  19. Prophylactic antibody treatment and intramuscular immunization reduce infectious human rhinovirus 16 load in the lower respiratory tract of challenged cotton rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge C.G. Blanco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human rhinoviruses (HRV represent the single most important etiological agents of the common cold and are the most frequent cause of acute respiratory infections in humans. Currently the performance of available animal models for immunization studies using HRV challenge is very limited. The cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus is a well-recognized model for the study of human respiratory viral infections. In this work we show that, without requiring any genetic modification of either the host or the virus, intranasal infection of cotton rats with HRV16 resulted in measurable isolation of infective virus, lower respiratory tract pathology, mucus production, and expression of interferon-activated genes. Intramuscular immunization with live HRV16 generated robust protective immunity that correlated with high serum levels of neutralizing antibodies. In addition, cotton rats treated prophylactically with hyperimmune anti-HRV16 serum were protected against HRV16 intranasal challenge. Finally, protection by immunization was efficiently transferred from mothers to newborn animals resulting in a substantial reduction of infectious virus loads in the lung following intranasal challenge. Overall, our results demonstrate that the cotton rat provides valuable additional model development options for testing vaccines and prophylactic therapies against rhinovirus infection.

  20. Measurement of the deposited activity of the short-lived radon progeny in the human respiratory tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vezzu, G.; Butterweck-Dempewolf, G.; Schuler, C. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland). Div. for Radiation Protection and Waste Management

    1998-12-31

    Volunteers were exposed in the radon chamber at Paul Scherrer Institut to an atmosphere enriched with highly unattached radon progeny. The deposited radon progeny activity in the respiratory tract of the volunteers was determined using a low level in-vivo counter. The detector arrangement and its calibration for the measurement of deposited radon progeny activity is described and the results for a mouth and a nose breathing volunteer are presented. For the nose breathing volunteer 55% of the deposited radon progeny activity was located in the head and the remaining 45% in the chest whereas for the mouth breathing volunteer 25% was located in the head and the remaining 75% in the chest. A mean clearance half-life for the deposited radon progeny from the respiratory tract of (2{+-}1) h was obtained from the analyses of the temporal behaviour of the deposited radon progeny activity in the head. (orig.)

  1. The possibility of evaluation on inflammatory change at respiratory tract in chronic bronchial asthma using 67Ga scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    67Ga scintigraphy was performed in 17 patients with chronic bronchial asthma to grasp the inflammatory change of respiratory tract. On 67Ga scintigraphy, abnormal accumulations were detected on lung fields in 6 cases (35.3%) of 17 cases. In 5 cases of these 6 cases, the defect areas which were pointed out on 81mKr ventilation scintigraphy were matched to the abnormal accumulation areas which were pointed out on 67Ga scintigraphy. In dynamics, the abnormal accumulation areas which were pointed out on 67Ga scintigraphy were matched to the defect areas which had been at all times pointed out on 81mKr ventilation scintigraphy. 67Ga scintigraphy was expected to be one of index to grasp the inflammatory change of respiratory tract in patients with chronic bronchial asthma. (author)

  2. Quality indicators for diagnosis and treatment of respiratory tract infections in general practice: a modified Delphi study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Bjerrum, Lars; Gahrn-Hansen, Bente;

    2010-01-01

    , clinical microbiologists, and clinical pharmacologists were asked to rate the relevance of 59 quality indicators for diagnosis and treatment of respiratory tract infections with regard to reducing antimicrobial resistance and improving patient health. A thorough literature review was carried out to ensure...... was achieved in both Delphi rounds. A total of 41 of the proposed 59 quality indicators attained consensus. None of the quality indicators focusing on the diagnostic process achieved consensus. Consensus was attained for 14 quality indicators focusing on the decision regarding antibiotic treatment and for 27...... quality indicators focusing on the choice of antibiotics. CONCLUSION: This study resulted in a final set of 41 quality indicators concerning respiratory tract infections in general practice. These quality indicators may be used to strengthen general practitioners' focus on their management of patients...

  3. STUDY OF FOSFOMYCIN TROMETAMOL IN ACUTE LOWER URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetkamal

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES To evaluate the efficacy of single oral dose of Fosfomycin Trometamol (FT in patients of uncomplicated lower urinary tract infections. METHODS One hundred women between 18-65 years’ age group with uncomplicated Urinary Tract Infection (UTI with culture positive for E. coli and Enterococcus were enrolled in this prospective study. Patients with culture positive for E. coli and Enterococcus and with in-vitro susceptibility to Fosfomycin Trometamol (FT as tested by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method were given single oral dose of Fosfomycin trometamol, i.e. 3 g. These patients were followed up for clinical and bacteriological cure and any adverse effects. RESULTS The incidence of E. coli infection was 86% and Enterococcus infection was 14%; 78% of E. coli isolates were susceptible to FT with 22% being resistant; 86% of Enterococcus isolates were susceptible to FT with 14% being resistant. Incidence of adverse effects of FT was only 2%. CONCLUSIONS Fosfomycin trometamol might be considered as a promising single dose oral antibiotic for uncomplicated UTI due to E. coli and Enterococcus spp.

  4. Prediction of Acute Respiratory Disease in Current and Former Smokers With and Without COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Victor; Regan, Elizabeth; Williams, André A. A.; Santorico, Stephanie A.; Make, Barry J.; Lynch, David A.; Hokanson, John E.; Washko, George R.; Bercz, Peter; Soler, Xavier; Marchetti, Nathaniel; Criner, Gerard J.; Ramsdell, Joe; Han, MeiLan K.; Demeo, Dawn; Anzueto, Antonio; Comellas, Alejandro; Crapo, James D.; Dransfield, Mark; Wells, J. Michael; Hersh, Craig P.; MacIntyre, Neil; Martinez, Fernando; Nath, Hrudaya P.; Niewoehner, Dennis; Sciurba, Frank; Sharafkhaneh, Amir; Silverman, Edwin K.; van Beek, Edwin J. R.; Wilson, Carla; Wendt, Christine; Wise, Robert A.; Curtis, Jeffrey; Kazerooni, Ella; Hanania, Nicola; Alapat, Philip; Bandi, Venkata; Guntupalli, Kalpalatha; Guy, Elizabeth; Lunn, William; Mallampalli, Antara; Trinh, Charles; Atik, Mustafa; DeMeo, Dawn; Hersh, Craig; Jacobson, Francine; Graham Barr, R.; Thomashow, Byron; Austin, John; MacIntyre, Neil; Washington, Lacey; Page McAdams, H.; Rosiello, Richard; Bresnahan, Timothy; McEvoy, Charlene; Tashjian, Joseph; Wise, Robert; Hansel, Nadia; Brown, Robert; Casaburi, Richard; Porszasz, Janos; Fischer, Hans; Budoff, Matt; Sharafkhaneh, Amir; Niewoehner, Dennis; Allen, Tadashi; Rice, Kathryn; Foreman, Marilyn; Westney, Gloria; Berkowitz, Eugene; Bowler, Russell; Friedlander, Adam; Meoni, Eleonora; Criner, Gerard; Kim, Victor; Marchetti, Nathaniel; Satti, Aditi; James Mamary, A.; Steiner, Robert; Dass, Chandra; Bailey, William; Dransfield, Mark; Gerald, Lynn; Nath, Hrudaya; Ramsdell, Joe; Ferguson, Paul; Friedman, Paul; McLennan, Geoffrey; van Beek, Edwin JR; Martinez, Fernando; Han, MeiLan; Thompson, Deborah; Kazerooni, Ella; Wendt, Christine; Allen, Tadashi; Sciurba, Frank; Weissfeld, Joel; Fuhrman, Carl; Bon, Jessica; Anzueto, Antonio; Adams, Sandra; Orozco, Carlos; Santiago Restrepo, C.; Mumbower, Amy; Crapo, James; Silverman, Edwin; Make, Barry; Regan, Elizabeth; Samet, Jonathan; Willis, Amy; Stinson, Douglas; Beaty, Terri; Klanderman, Barbara; Laird, Nan; Lange, Christoph; Ionita, Iuliana; Santorico, Stephanie; Silverman, Edwin; Lynch, David; Schroeder, Joyce; Newell, John; Reilly, John; Coxson, Harvey; Judy, Philip; Hoffman, Eric; San Jose Estepar, Raul; Washko, George; Leek, Rebecca; Zach, Jordan; Kluiber, Alex; Rodionova, Anastasia; Mann, Tanya; Crapo, Robert; Jensen, Robert; Farzadegan, Homayoon; Murphy, James; Everett, Douglas; Wilson, Carla; Hokanson, John

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The risk factors for acute episodes of respiratory disease in current and former smokers who do not have COPD are unknown. METHODS: Eight thousand two hundred forty-six non-Hispanic white and black current and former smokers in the Genetic Epidemiology of COPD (COPDGene) cohort had longitudinal follow-up (LFU) every 6 months to determine acute respiratory episodes requiring antibiotics or systemic corticosteroids, an ED visit, or hospitalization. Negative binomial regression was used to determine the factors associated with acute respiratory episodes. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for time to first episode and an acute episode of respiratory disease risk score. RESULTS: At enrollment, 4,442 subjects did not have COPD, 658 had mild COPD, and 3,146 had moderate or worse COPD. Nine thousand three hundred three acute episodes of respiratory disease and 2,707 hospitalizations were reported in LFU (3,044 acute episodes of respiratory disease and 827 hospitalizations in those without COPD). Major predictors included acute episodes of respiratory disease in year prior to enrollment (HR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.15-1.24 per exacerbation), airflow obstruction (HR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.91-0.96 per 10% change in % predicted FEV1), and poor health-related quality of life (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.06-1.08 for each 4-unit increase in St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire score). Risks were similar for those with and without COPD. CONCLUSIONS: Although acute episode of respiratory disease rates are higher in subjects with COPD, risk factors are similar, and at a population level, there are more episodes in smokers without COPD. PMID:24945159

  5. Detection of antibodies to a pathogenic mycoplasma in desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) with upper respiratory tract disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Schumacher, I M; Brown, M B; Jacobson, E R; Collins, B R; Klein, P A

    1993-01-01

    Mycoplasma agassizii (proposed species novum) is the etiologic agent of an upper respiratory tract disease in the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii), which is threatened in most of its range. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of M. agassizii-specific antibodies in desert tortoises was developed with a monoclonal antibody with specificity for desert tortoise immunoglobulin light chain. Plasma samples from one group of tortoises were tested immediately before and ...

  6. PspA Family Distribution, Antimicrobial Resistance and Serotype of Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolated from Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Muneki Hotomi; Akihisa Togawa; Masamitsu Kono; Yorihiko Ikeda; Shin Takei; Hollingshead, Susan K.; Briles, David E.; Kenji Suzuki; Noboru Yamanaka

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The protection against pneumococcal infections provided by currently available pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccines are restricted to the limited number of the serotypes included in the vaccine. In the present study, we evaluated the distribution of the pneumococcal capsular type and surface protein A (PspA) family of pneumococcal isolates from upper respiratory tract infections in Japan. METHODS: A total of 251 S. pneumoniae isolates from patients seeking treatment for ...

  7. Inhibitory substances produced by Streptococcus salivarius and colonization of the upper respiratory tract with group A streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huskins, W. C.; Kaplan, E. L.

    1989-01-01

    It has been proposed that inhibitory substances produced by viridans streptococci colonizing the upper respiratory tract aid in eradication of established group A streptococcal colonization of that site. We studied the prevalence of inhibitory-substance producing strains of Streptococcus salivarius in throat cultures from three groups of children: 16 children with persistently positive throat cultures for group A streptococci despite receiving recommended therapeutic courses of antibiotics (group I), 26 children from whom group A streptococci were eradicated from the upper respiratory tract by antibiotic therapy (group II), and 18 children who never harboured group A streptococci in their upper respiratory tract during the study period (group III). An in vitro deferred antagonism method was employed to detect inhibitory substances; 5233 strains of S. salivarius were examined. Strains of S. salivarius producing inhibitory substances were isolated from 76-88% of the children in each group on at least one occasion. However, only a small percentage of subjects in each group harboured strains producing these substances in every throat culture. The mean total percentage of S. salivarius strains producing inhibitory substances was 21.8% in children in group I, 22.4% in children in group II, and 16.4% in children in group III; these percentages were not statistically different (P greater than 0.1). In this study, we could not confirm a significant role for inhibitory substances produced by S. salivarius in the eradication of group A streptococci from the upper respiratory tract of colonized individuals. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:2500355

  8. Metagenomic Analysis of Respiratory Tract DNA Viral Communities in Cystic Fibrosis and Non-Cystic Fibrosis Individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Willner, Dana; Furlan, Mike; Haynes, Matthew; Schmieder, Robert; Angly, Florent E.; Silva, Joas; Tammadoni, Sassan; Nosrat, Bahador; Conrad, Douglas; Rohwer, Forest

    2009-01-01

    The human respiratory tract is constantly exposed to a wide variety of viruses, microbes and inorganic particulates from environmental air, water and food. Physical characteristics of inhaled particles and airway mucosal immunity determine which viruses and microbes will persist in the airways. Here we present the first metagenomic study of DNA viral communities in the airways of diseased and non-diseased individuals. We obtained sequences from sputum DNA viral communities in 5 individuals wi...

  9. Probiotics and vitamin C for the prevention of respiratory tract infections in children attending preschool: a randomised controlled pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Garaiova, I.; Muchová, J; Nagyová, Z; Wang, D; Li, J. V.; Országhová, Z; Michael, D R; Plummer, S F; Ďuračková, Z

    2014-01-01

    Background: This pilot study investigates the efficacy of a probiotic consortium (Lab4) in combination with vitamin C on the prevention of respiratory tract infections in children attending preschool facilities. Subjects/methods: In a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled pilot study with children aged 3–6 years, 57 received 1.25 × 1010 colony-forming units of Lactobacillus acidophilus CUL21 (NCIMB 30156), Lactobacillus acidophilus CUL60 (NCIMB 30157), Bifidobacterium bifidum CUL20 (NC...

  10. Novel avian-origin influenza A (H7N9) virus attachment to the respiratory tract of five animal models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.Y. Siegers (Jurre); K.R. Short (Kirsty); L.M.E. Leijten (Lonneke); M.T. de Graaf (Marieke); M.I. Spronken (Monique); E.J.A. Schrauwen (Eefje); N. Marshall (Nicolle); A.C. Lowen (Anice); G. Gabriel (Gülsah); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); T. Kuiken (Thijs); D.A.J. van Riel (Debby)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractWe determined the pattern of attachment of the avian-origin H7N9 influenza viruses A/Anhui/1/2013 and A/Shanghai/1/2013 to the respiratory tract in ferrets, macaques, mice, pigs, and guinea pigs and compared it to that in humans. The H7N9 attachment pattern in macaques, mice, and to a le

  11. Association between respiratory tract diseases and secondhand smoke exposure among never smoking flight attendants: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murawski Judith

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about long-term adverse health consequences experienced by flight attendants exposed to secondhand smoke (SHS during the time smoking was allowed on airplanes. We undertook this study to evaluate the association between accumulated flight time in smoky airplane cabins and respiratory tract diseases in a cohort of never smoking flight attendants. Methods We conducted a mailed survey in a cohort of flight attendants. Of 15,000 mailed questionnaires, 2053 (14% were completed and returned. We excluded respondents with a personal history of smoking (n = 748 and non smokers with a history of respiratory tract diseases before the age of 18 years (n = 298. The remaining 1007 respondents form the study sample. Results The overall study sample was predominantly white (86% and female (89%, with a mean age of 54 years. Overall, 69.7% of the respondents were diagnosed with at least one respiratory tract disease. Among these respondents, 43.4% reported a diagnosis of sinusitis, 40.3% allergies, 30.8% bronchitis, 23.2% middle ear infections, 13.6% asthma, 13.4% hay fever, 12.5% pneumonia, and 2.0% chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. More hours in a smoky cabin were observed to be significantly associated with sinusitis (OR = 1.21; p = 0.024, middle ear infections (OR = 1.30; p = 0.006, and asthma (OR = 1.26; p = 0.042. Conclusion We observed a significant association between hours of smoky cabin exposure and self-reported reported sinusitis, middle ear infections, and asthma. Our findings suggest a dose-response between duration of SHS exposure and diseases of the respiratory tract. Our findings add additional evidence to the growing body of knowledge supporting the need for widespread implementation of clean indoor air policies to decrease the risk of adverse health consequences experienced by never smokers exposed to SHS.

  12. Effect of Carbon Dioxide on Testing of Susceptibilities of Respiratory Tract Pathogens to Macrolide and Azalide Antimicrobial Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, M M; Hill, S. L.; Piddock, Laura J. V.

    1999-01-01

    The in vitro activities of erythromycin, azithromycin, and clarithromycin against 178 clinical isolates from the lower respiratory tract of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were determined by an agar dilution method. The plates were incubated in air alone or in 5% carbon dioxide. The MICs measured in air alone were lower for most isolates than those measured in 5% carbon dioxide, illustrating the “pH effect” of incubation in carbon dioxide. Testing of isolates in 5% carbon ...

  13. Hemodynamics of Acute Right Heart Failure in Mechanically Ventilated Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    In critically ill patients with circulatory shock, the role of the left ventricle has long been appreciated and the object of measurement and therapeutic targeting. The right ventricle is often under appreciated and dysfunction may be overlooked. Generally, the right ventricle operates passively to support the ejection of the left ventricular diastolic volume. A loss of right ventricular wall compliance secondary to pulmonary pressures may result in an alteration in the normal pressure-volume relationship, ultimately affecting the stroke volume and cardiac output. Traditional right heart filling indices may increase because of decreasing compliance, further complicating the picture. The pathophysiology of pulmonary vascular dysfunction in acute respiratory distress syndrome combined with the effects of a mean airway pressure strategy may create an acute cor pulmonale. PMID:26567491

  14. In utero exposure to 25(OH) D and risk of childhood asthma, wheeze and respiratory tract infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Haixia; Xun, Pengcheng; Pike, Katharine;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies of the associations between in utero 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH) D] exposure and childhood asthma risk, wheeze and respiratory tract infections are inconsistent and inconclusive. OBJECTIVES: To assess the associations between 25(OH) D levels in cord blood or maternal venous bl...... associated with the risk of asthma and wheeze during childhood. These findings are in keeping with the results of two recently published randomized clinical trials of vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy.......BACKGROUND: Studies of the associations between in utero 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH) D] exposure and childhood asthma risk, wheeze and respiratory tract infections are inconsistent and inconclusive. OBJECTIVES: To assess the associations between 25(OH) D levels in cord blood or maternal venous...... blood and risk of offspring's asthma, wheeze and respiratory tract infections. METHODS: Data were derived from PubMed, EMBASE, Google Scholar, references from relevant articles, and de novo results from published studies until December, 2015. Random-effects meta-analysis was conducted among 16 birth...

  15. Seasonal behavior of radon decay products in indoor air and resulting radiation dose to human respiratory tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M.A. Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of radiation hazard of indoor radon is largely due to the radon progenies, which are inhaled and deposited in the human respiratory tract. It is essential to evaluate aerodynamic characteristics of the radon progenies, which are either attached or unattached to aerosol particles, because the dose is strongly dependent on the location of deposition in respiratory tract and hence on the aerodynamic characteristics of the aerosol particles. This paper presents the seasonal behavior of radon decay products in indoor air under domestic conditions at Nagoya University, Japan. A low pressure cascade impactor as an instrument for classifying aerosol sizes and imaging plate as a radiation detector have been employed to characterize the activity size distribution of short-lived radon decay products. In parallel, radon and its progenies concentrations were measured. Taking into account the progeny characteristics, the inhalation dose in the different seasons was also estimated based on a lung dose model with the structure that is related to the ICRP66 respiratory tract model. The result evident that, the highest dose 0.22 mSvy−1 was observed during the winter where the highest value of equilibrium equivalent concentration of radon (EEC and lowest value of the activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD were found in this season; whereas, the dose in spring appeared to be lowest 0.02 mSvy−1.

  16. Comparative studies on virus detection in acute respiratory diseases in humans by means of RIA and cultivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In winter 1981, 146 patients with an acute respiratory infection were examined. Nasopharyngeal specimens were obtained by intranasal catheter. Comparative investigations were performed by cultivation in tissue culture and by a four-layer radioimmunoassay. In the radioimmunoassay, polystyrene beads were used as the solid phase, ginea pig antivirus immunoglobulins as the captive antibodies, rabbit anti-virus immunoglobulins as the secondary antibodies and 125I-labelled sheep anti-rabbit immunoglobulins were used as the indicator antibodies. The radioimmunoassay was developed for the detection of adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B virus and parainfluenza type 1, type 2 and type 3 virus. Tissue culture seems to be more sensitive for detection of adenovirus and influenza A virus, though some infections with influenza A virus could only be diagnosed by the radioimmunoassay. In other cases (respiratory syncytial virus, influenza B virus) antigen detection by radioimmunoassay is more efficient. Presently the combination of both antigen-detection-systems still is the optimal diagnostic procedure for detecting virus infections of the respiratory tract. (orig./MG)

  17. Acute respiratory distress syndrome in the global context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buregeya, Egide; Fowler, Robert A; Talmor, Daniel S; Twagirumugabe, Theogene; Kiviri, Willy; Riviello, Elisabeth D

    2014-09-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a clinically defined syndrome of hypoxia and bilateral pulmonary infiltrates due to inflammatory pathways triggered by pulmonary and nonpulmonary insults, and ARDS is pathologically correlated with diffuse alveolar damage. Estimates of ARDS's impact in the developed world vary widely, with some of the discrepancies attributed to marked differences in the availability of intensive care beds and mechanical ventilation. Almost nothing is known about the epidemiology of ARDS in the developing world, in part due to a clinical definition requiring positive pressure ventilation, arterial blood gases, and chest radiography. Current frameworks for comparing the epidemiology of death and disability across the world including the GBD (Global Burden of Disease Study) 2010 are ill-suited to quantifying critical illness syndromes including ARDS. Modifications to the definition of ARDS to allow a provision for environments without the capacity for positive pressure ventilation, and to allow for alternate diagnostic techniques including pulse oximetry and ultrasound, may make it possible to quantify and describe the impact of ARDS in the global context. PMID:25667180

  18. Severe acute respiratory syndrome: vaccine on the way

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ding-mei; WANG Guo-ling; LU Jia-hai

    2005-01-01

    @@ In November 2002, a new disease-severe acute respiratory syndrome, or SARS-first emerged in Guangdong Province, China. Subsequently, it spread to more than 30 countries worldwide.1 The causative agent was identified to be a previously unknown member of the coronaviridae family, and was named SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). SARS coronavirus is a large, enveloped, positive-sense RNA virus. The genome is about 30 kb, which is predicted to contain 14 functional open reading frames (ORFs). Two large 5'-terminal ORFs (1a and 1b) encode the polymerases that are required for viral RNA synthesis. The remaining twelve ORFs encode four structural proteins [spike protein (S), envelope protein (E), membrane protein (M) and nucleocapsid protein (N)] and eight accessory proteins.2 Though the SARS-CoV genome is clear, a great deal more work will be required to develop an efficient vaccine and effective drugs. Neutralizing antibodies were detectable in the convalescent sera of SARS patients, and sera from recovered patients could be used to treat newly infected individuals.3 The data suggest that protective humoral immunity is achievable and that vaccines can be developed for prevention of SARS. In this article, we review and discuss progress towards development of a SARS vaccine.

  19. Pulmonary hypertension due to acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Ñamendys-Silva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Our aims were to describe the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, to characterize their hemodynamic cardiopulmonary profiles, and to correlate these parameters with outcome. All consecutive patients over 16 years of age who were in the intensive care unit with a diagnosis of ARDS and an in situ pulmonary artery catheter for hemodynamic monitoring were studied. Pulmonary hypertension was diagnosed when the mean pulmonary artery pressure was >25 mmHg at rest with a pulmonary artery occlusion pressure or left atrial pressure <15 mmHg. During the study period, 30 of 402 critically ill patients (7.46% who were admitted to the ICU fulfilled the criteria for ARDS. Of the 30 patients with ARDS, 14 met the criteria for pulmonary hypertension, a prevalence of 46.6% (95% CI; 28-66%. The most common cause of ARDS was pneumonia (56.3%. The overall mortality was 36.6% and was similar in patients with and without pulmonary hypertension. Differences in patients' hemodynamic profiles were influenced by the presence of pulmonary hypertension. The levels of positive end-expiratory pressure and peak pressure were higher in patients with pulmonary hypertension, and the PaCO2 was higher in those who died. The level of airway pressure seemed to influence the onset of pulmonary hypertension. Survival was determined by the severity of organ failure at admission to the intensive care unit.

  20. Current status of severe acute respiratory syndrome in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-He Nie; Xin-Dong Luo; Jian-Zhong Zhang; Qin Su

    2003-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), also called infectious atypical pneumonia, is an emerging infectious disease caused by a novel variant of coronavirus (SARS associated coronavirus, SARS-CoV). It is mainly characterized by pulmonary infection with a high infectivity and fatality.SARS is swept across almost all the continents of the globe, and has currently involved 33 countries and regions, including the mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, North America and Europe. On June 30, 2003, an acumulative total reached 8450 cases with 810 deaths. SARS epidemic was very rampant in March, April and May 2003 in the mainland of China and Hong Kong. Chinese scientists and healthcare workers cooperated closely with other scientists from all over the world to fight the disease. On April 16, 2003, World Health Organization (WHO) formally declared that SARSCoV was an etiological agent of SARS. Currently, there is no specific and effective therapy and prevention method for SARS. The main treatments include corticosteroid therapy,antiviralagents, anti-infection, mechanical ventilation and isolation. This disease can be prevented and controlled, and it is also curable. Under the endeavor of the Chinese Government, medical staffs and other related professionals,SARS has been under control in China, and Chinese scientists have also made a great contribution to SARS research.Otherstudies in developing new detection assays and therapies, and discovering new drugs and vaccines are in progress. In this paper, we briefly review the current status of SARS in China.

  1. Clinical Practice Guideline of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young-Jae; Moon, Jae Young; Shin, Ein-Soon; Kim, Je Hyeong; Jung, Hoon; Park, So Young; Kim, Ho Cheol; Sim, Yun Su; Rhee, Chin Kook; Lim, Jaemin; Lee, Seok Jeong; Lee, Won-Yeon; Lee, Hyun Jeong; Kwak, Sang Hyun; Kang, Eun Kyeong; Chung, Kyung Soo

    2016-01-01

    There is no well-stated practical guideline for mechanically ventilated patients with or without acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We generate strong (1) and weak (2) grade of recommendations based on high (A), moderate (B) and low (C) grade in the quality of evidence. In patients with ARDS, we recommend low tidal volume ventilation (1A) and prone position if it is not contraindicated (1B) to reduce their mortality. However, we did not support high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (1B) and inhaled nitric oxide (1A) as a standard treatment. We also suggest high positive end-expiratory pressure (2B), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a rescue therapy (2C), and neuromuscular blockage for 48 hours after starting mechanical ventilation (2B). The application of recruitment maneuver may reduce mortality (2B), however, the use of systemic steroids cannot reduce mortality (2B). In mechanically ventilated patients, we recommend light sedation (1B) and low tidal volume even without ARDS (1B) and suggest lung protective ventilation strategy during the operation to lower the incidence of lung complications including ARDS (2B). Early tracheostomy in mechanically ventilated patients can be performed only in limited patients (2A). In conclusion, of 12 recommendations, nine were in the management of ARDS, and three for mechanically ventilated patients.

  2. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS): HRCT findings in survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jung Im; Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Jae Mun; Song, Jeong Sup; Lee, Kyo Young [The Catholic Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings of the lung in survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Among eleven patients who survived ARDS for one year, chest radiography and HRCT revealed pulmonary fibrosis in four. Causes of ARDS included pneumonia during pregnancy, near drowning, pneumonia during liver cirrhosis, and postoperative sepsis. Thoracoscopic biopsy and histopathologic correlation were available in one patient. HRCT showed diffuse interlobular septal thickening, ground glass opacity, parenchymal distortion, and traction bronchiectasis. Fuzzy centrilobular nodules were seen in two patients and one patient had multiple, large bullae in the left hemithorax. In all patients, lesions affected the upper and anterior zones of the lung more prominently. The distribution of pulmonary fibrosis was characteristic and reflected the pathogenesis of lung injury; fibrosis was largely due to hyperoxia caused by ventilator care. In one patient, histopathologic correlation showed that imaging findings were accounted for by thickening of the alveolar septum along with infiltration of chronic inflammatory cells and fibrosis. Fuzzy centrilobular nodules corresponded with bronchiolitis.

  3. Lung tissue remodeling in the acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza Alba Barros de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is characterized by diffuse alveolar damage, and evolves progressively with three phases: exsudative, fibroproliferative, and fibrotic. In the exudative phase, there are interstitial and alveolar edemas with hyaline membrane. The fibropro­liferative phase is characterized by exudate organization and fibroelastogenesis. There is proliferation of type II pneumocytes to cover the damaged epithelial surface, followed by differentiation into type I pneumocytes. The fibroproliferative phase starts early, and its severity is related to the patient?s prognosis. The alterations observed in the phenotype of the pulmonary parenchyma cells steer the tissue remodeling towards either progressive fibrosis or the restoration of normal alveolar architecture. The fibrotic phase is characterized by abnormal and excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins, mainly collagen. The dynamic control of collagen deposition and degradation is regulated by metalloproteinases and their tissular regulators. The deposition of proteoglycans in the extracellular matrix of ARDS patients needs better study. The regulation of extracellular matrix remodeling, in normal conditions or in several pulmonary diseases, such as ARDS, results from a complex mechanism that integrate the transcription of elements that destroy the matrix protein and produce activation/inhibition of several cellular types of lung tissue. This review article will analyze the ECM organization in ARDS, the different pulmonary parenchyma remodeling mechanisms, and the role of cytokines in the regulation of the different matrix components during the remodeling process.

  4. Fluid in the management of the acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karki S

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema is the hallmark of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. The amount of fluid and which fluid should be used in these patients is controversial. Methods 43 patients with ARDS treated in the intensive care unit (ICU of the Second Hospital, Jilin University between November 1, 2011-November 1, 2012 were prospectively analyzed and was observational. Volume and the type of fluid administered were compared to 90 day mortality and the 24 and 72 hour sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA score, lactate level, oxygenation index (PaO2/FiO2, duration of ICU stay, total ventilator days, and need for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT. Results Mortality was increased when hydroxylethyl starch (HES was used in the first day or plasma substitutes were used during the first 3 days (P3000 ml during the first 24 hours or >8000 ml during the first 72 hours were associated with higher SOFA scores at 24 and 72 hours (P<0.05, both comparisons. Colloid, especially higher volume colloid use was also associated with increased SOFA scores at either 24 or 72 hours. Conclusions Limiting the use of colloids and the total amount of fluid administered to patients with ARDS is associated with improved mortality and SOFA scores.

  5. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke and respiratory tract infections in pre-school children – a cross-sectional study in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Emilia Bielska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available [b][/b]Introduction and objective. Knowledge of the harmful influence of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS has a positive impact on changing social behaviours worldwide. In many homes smoking is totally prohibited; in some others, partial limitations of tobacco consumption have been introduced. Objective. To study the correlation between the adopted rules of tobacco use in homes of 3-year-olds, and the kind and frequency of acute respiratory system infections within a 6-month period of attending pre-schools. Materials and methods. The study was performed among children attending municipal pre-schools in Białystok, Poland. The data was collected by anonymous questionnaires completed by the parents of 302 children aged 3 years chosen randomly from 1,200 children attending 51 pre-schools. The exposure of children to tobacco smoke was measured by determining cotinine to creatinine ratio (CCR in urine. Results. In the 150 families of children who were surveyed, 210 were smokers. Every day, the smokers consisted of fathers (37.3% and mothers (23.6%. The 3-year-old children were divided into 3 groups according to smoking habits in their homes: 28.5% of the children under examination came from homes where tobacco smoking was forbidden (mean CCR – 15.21ng/mg, SD=11.86, 26.2% came from homes where tobacco was smoked in separate rooms (mean CCR – 65.75 ng/ml, SD=81.51, 45.4% lived in homes where no rules connected with smoking had been established (mean CCR – 61.75 ng/ml, SD= 70.29. During the analyzed period of 6 months, 85% of the children had at least 1 respiratory tract infection (60% – upper, 16.9% – lower, 16.5% – upper and lower, 7.1% – otitis media. Conclusions. The majority of the 3-year-old children who had lower respiratory tract infections required antibiotics and hospitalization. Living in a home where no tobacco rules were established may cause an increase of respiratory tract infections.

  6. The experience of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for severe acute respiratory failure in adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙兵

    2013-01-01

    Objective To summarize the experience of extracor-poreal membrane oxygenation(ECMO) for patients with severe acute respiratory failure in adults and to investigate the factors associated with death. Methods The

  7. Mortality and morbidity of acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and acute respiratory distress syndrome in infants and young children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yan-feng; YU Wen-liang; XIE Min-hui; YAN Chao-ying; LU Zhu-jin; SUN Bo; XU Feng; LU Xiu-lan; WANG Ying; CHEN Jian-li; CHAO Jian-xin; ZHOU Xiao-wen; ZHANG Jian-hui; HUANG Yan-zhi

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (AHRF) often develops acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS),and its incidence and mortalities in critically ill pediatric patients in China were 2% and 40% respectively.This study aimed at prospectively investigating incidence,causes,mortality and its risk factors,and any relationship to initial tidal volume (VT) levels of mechanical ventilation,in children ≤5 years of age with AHRF and ARDS.Methods In 12 consecutive months in 23 pediatric intensive care units (PICU),AHRF and ARDS were identified in those requiring >12 hour intratracheal mechanical ventilation and followed up for 90 days or until death or discharge.ARDS was diagnosed according to the American-European Consensus definitions.The mortality and ventilation free days (VFD) were measured as the primary outcome,and major complications,initial disease severity,and burden were measured as the secondary outcome.Results In 13 491 PICU admissions,there were 439 AHRE,of which 345 (78.6%) developed ARDS,resulting in incidences of 3.3% and 2.6%,and corresponding mortalities of 30.3% and 32.8% respectively along with 8.2 and 6.7 times of relative risk of death in those with pneumonia (62.9%) and sepsis (33.7%) as major underlying diseases respectively.No association was found in VT levels during the first 7 days with mortality,nor for VT at levels <6,6-8,8-10,and >10 ml/kg in the first 3 days with mortality or length of VFD.By binary Logistic regression analyses,higher pediatric risk of mortality score Ⅲ,higher initial oxygenation index,and age <1 year were associated with higher mortality or shorter VFD in AHRF.Conclusions The incidence and mortalities of AHRF and ARDS in children ≤5 years were similar to or lower than the previously reported rates (in age up to 15 years),associated with initial disease severity and other confounders,but causal relationship for the initial VT levels as the independent factor to the major outcome

  8. Bacterial Respiratory Tract Infections are Promoted by Systemic Hyperglycemia after Severe Burn Injury in Pediatric Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Robert; Herndon, David N; Mlcak, Ronald P; Finnerty, Celeste C; Cox, Robert A; Williams, Felicia N; Jeschke, Marc G

    2014-01-01

    Background Burn injuries are associated with hyperglycemia leading to increased incidence of infections with pneumonia being one of the most prominent and adverse complication. Recently, various studies in critically ill patients indicated that increased pulmonary glucose levels with airway/blood glucose threshold over 150 mg/dl lead to an overwhelming growth of bacteria in the broncho-pulmonary system, subsequently resulting in an increased risk of pulmonary infections. The aim of the present study was to determine whether a similar cutoff value exists for severely burned pediatric patients. Methods One-hundred six severely burned pediatric patients were enrolled in the study. Patients were divided in two groups: high (H) defined as daily average glucose levels >75% of LOS >150 mg/dl), and low (L) with daily average glucose levels >75% of the LOS <150 mg/dl). Incidences of pneumonia, atelectasis, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) were assessed. Incidence of infections, sepsis, and respiratory parameters were recorded. Blood was analyzed for glucose and insulin levels. Statistical analysis was performed using Student’s t-test and chi-square test. Significance was set at p<0.05. Results Patient groups were similar in demographics and injury characteristics. Pneumonia in patients on the mechanical ventilation (L: 21% H: 32%) and off mechanical ventilation (L: 5% H: 15%), as well as ARDS were significantly higher in the high group (L: 3% H: 19%), p<0.05, while atelectasis was not different. Patients in the high group required significantly longer ventilation compared to low patients (p<0.05). Furthermore, incidence of infection and sepsis were significantly higher in the high group, p<0.05. Conclusion Our results indicate that systemic glucose levels over 150 mg/dl are associated with a higher incidence of pneumonia confirming the previous studies in critically ill patients. PMID:24074819

  9. Acute Stridor and Respiratory Failure due to Retrosternal Subglottic Stenosis of Unknown Origin

    OpenAIRE

    Linda Smith; Nicola Jane Willis; Tharindu Vithanage; Gerben Keijzers; Tara Cochrane

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory failure due to subglottic stenosis is a rare but serious condition. A 22-year-old male presented to the emergency department (ED) with shortness of breath, stridor, and change in tone of voice. The patient did not complain of B-symptoms (fever, weight loss, and night sweats). In the week before this presentation, he was diagnosed with an upper respiratory tract infection with associated bronchospasm and discharged on oral antibiotics and inhaled salbutamol without effect. He devel...

  10. Low prevalence of Chlamydia pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae among patients with symptoms of respiratory tract infections in Dutch general practices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, A.; Dagnelie, C.F.; Jong, J.C. de; Vries, A. de; Besteboer, T.M.; Loon, A.M. van; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Ossewaarde, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    Acute respiratory disease is one of the most common reasons to consult a general practitioner. A substantial part of these diseases cannot be explained by an infection with a virus or a common pathogenic bacterium. To study this diagnostic deficit, the prevalence of Chlamydia pneumoniae and Mycoplas

  11. Acute Respiratory Distress following Intravenous Injection of an Oil-Steroid Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Russell; Aric Storck; Martha Ainslie

    2011-01-01

    Several case reports have described acute lung injury and respiratory distress following the intravascular injection of oil. Although biochemical and mechanical theories explaining the pathological mechanism of pulmonary oil embolism have been proposed, the phenomenon is not completely understood. This report describes a case of acute respiratory distress and hypoxemia involving a 21-year-old bodybuilder who self-administered an injection of anabolic steroids suspended in oil. The ensuing bri...

  12. Intravenous colistin-induced acute respiratory failure: A case report and a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Amardeep; Soriano, Sheryll Mae; Song, Mingchen; Chihara, Shingo

    2014-07-01

    The emergence of multi-drug-resistant gram negative bacillary infections has regained popularity of ancient drugs such as polymyxins. We report a case of acute respiratory failure induced by use of intravenous colistimethate, which is one of the forms of polymyxin. The patient is a 31 year old female with paraplegia due to spina bifida who underwent excisional debridement of large lumbosacral decubitus ulcer with osteomyelitis infected with pan-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and MRSA. Six days after initiation of intravenous colistimethate and vancomycin, she developed acute respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. Pan-culture was negative including a chest radiograph. V/Q scan showed low probability for pulmonary embolism. Echocardiogram showed normal right ventricle with no strain or pulmonary hypertension. Colistimethate was discontinued. Within 24 hours, she was extubated. In the early years after introduction of polymyxin, there were several reports of acute respiratory paralysis. The mechanism is thought to be noncompetitive myoneuronal presynaptic blockade of acetylcholine release. Though a direct causal relationship for respiratory failure is often difficult to establish in current era with multiple co morbidities, the timeframe of apnea, acuity of onset as well as rapid recovery in our case clearly point out the causal relationship. In addition, our patient also developed acute renal failure, presumably due to colistimethate induced nephrotoxicity, a possible contributing factor for her acute respiratory failure. In summary, colistimethate can induce acute neurotoxicity including respiratory muscular weakness and acute respiratory failure. Clinicians should consider its toxicity in the differential diagnosis of acute respiratory failure especially in critically ill patients. PMID:25337492

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells - a promising therapy for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Hayes M; Curley G; Laffey JG.

    2012-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) constitutes a spectrum of severe acute respiratory failure in response to a variety of inciting stimuli that is the leading cause of death and disability in the critically ill. Despite decades of research, there are no therapies for ARDS, and management remains supportive. A growing understanding of the complexity of the pathophysiology of ARDS, coupled with advances in stem cell biology, has lead to a renewed interest in the therapeutic potential of...

  14. Acute Respiratory Failure due to Neuromyelitis Optica Treated Successfully with Plasmapheresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massa Zantah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO is a demyelinating autoimmune disease involving the central nervous system. Acute respiratory failure from cervical myelitis due to NMO is known to occur but is uncommon in monophasic disease and is treated with high dose steroids. We report a case of a patient with NMO who developed acute respiratory failure related to cervical spinal cord involvement, refractory to pulse dose steroid therapy, which resolved with plasmapheresis.

  15. Evaluation of physiological parameters before and after respiratory physiotherapy in newborns with acute viral bronchiolitis

    OpenAIRE

    S Gonçalves, Rodrigo A; Feitosa, Sérgio; de Castro Selestrin, Cláudia; Vitor E. Valenti; de Sousa, Fernando H; F Siqueira, Arnaldo A; Petenusso, Márcio; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute viral bronchiolitis is a respiratory disease with high morbidity that affects newborn in the first two years of life. Its treatment with physiotherapy has been highlighted as an important tool, however, there is no consensus regarding its effects on patients improvement. We aimed to evaluate the physiological parameters before and after the procedure respiratory therapy in newborn with acute viral bronchiolitis. Method This was a cross sectional observational study in 30 newb...

  16. Acute Respiratory Failure due to Neuromyelitis Optica Treated Successfully with Plasmapheresis

    OpenAIRE

    Massa Zantah; Coyle, Timothy B.; Debapriya Datta

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) is a demyelinating autoimmune disease involving the central nervous system. Acute respiratory failure from cervical myelitis due to NMO is known to occur but is uncommon in monophasic disease and is treated with high dose steroids. We report a case of a patient with NMO who developed acute respiratory failure related to cervical spinal cord involvement, refractory to pulse dose steroid therapy, which resolved with plasmapheresis.

  17. Altered molecular specificity of surfactant phosphatidycholine synthesis in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Dushianthan, Ahilanandan; Goss, Victoria; Cusack, Rebecca; Grocott, Michael P. W.; Postle, Anthony D

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening critical illness, characterised by qualitative and quantitative surfactant compositional changes associated with premature airway collapse, gas-exchange abnormalities and acute hypoxic respiratory failure. The underlying mechanisms for this dysregulation in surfactant metabolisms are not fully explored. Lack of therapeutic benefits from clinical trials, highlight the importance of detailed in-vivo analysis and charact...

  18. Fluid management with a simplified conservative protocol for the acute respiratory distress syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Grissom, CK; Hirshberg, EL; Dickerson, JB; Brown, SM; Lanspa, MJ; Liu, KD; Schoenfeld, D; Hite, RD; Miller, RR; Morris, AH; Hudson, L; Gundel, S; Hough, C.; Neff, M.; Sims, K.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 by the Society of Critical Care Medicine and Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Objectives: In the Fluid and Catheter Treatment Trial (FACTT) of the National Institutes of Health Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network, a conservative fluid protocol (FACTT Conservative) resulted in a lower cumulative fluid balance and better outcomes than a liberal fluid protocol (FACTT Liberal). Subsequent Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network studies used a simplified conservative fluid protoco...

  19. January 2015 Phoenix pulmonary journal club: noninvasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure

    OpenAIRE

    Mathew M

    2015-01-01

    No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation has expanded its role in the treatment of both chronic and acute respiratory failure. Its initial use in conditions such as obstructive sleep apnea, neuromuscular disease and tracheobronchomalacia, have been shown to improve quality of life and reduce mortality. Over the past 20 years studies have looked at using noninvasive ventilation in the management of acute respiratory failure from pulmon...

  20. A chest radiograph scoring system in patients with severe acute respiratory infection: a validation study

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Emma; Haven, Kathryn; Reed, Peter; Bissielo, Ange; Harvey, Dave; McArthur, Colin; Bringans, Cameron; Freundlich, Simone; Ingram, R. Joan H.; Perry, David; Wilson, Francessa; Milne, David; Modahl, Lucy; Huang, Q. Sue; Gross, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Background The term severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) encompasses a heterogeneous group of respiratory illnesses. Grading the severity of SARI is currently reliant on indirect disease severity measures such as respiratory and heart rate, and the need for oxygen or intensive care. With the lungs being the primary organ system involved in SARI, chest radiographs (CXRs) are potentially useful for describing disease severity. Our objective was to develop and validate a SARI CXR severity s...

  1. Chemical exposure-response relationship between air pollutants and reactive oxygen species in the human respiratory tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakey, Pascale S. J.; Berkemeier, Thomas; Tong, Haijie; Arangio, Andrea M.; Lucas, Kurt; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-09-01

    Air pollution can cause oxidative stress and adverse health effects such as asthma and other respiratory diseases, but the underlying chemical processes are not well characterized. Here we present chemical exposure-response relations between ambient concentrations of air pollutants and the production rates and concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of the human respiratory tract. In highly polluted environments, fine particulate matter (PM2.5) containing redox-active transition metals, quinones, and secondary organic aerosols can increase ROS concentrations in the ELF to levels characteristic for respiratory diseases. Ambient ozone readily saturates the ELF and can enhance oxidative stress by depleting antioxidants and surfactants. Chemical exposure-response relations provide a quantitative basis for assessing the relative importance of specific air pollutants in different regions of the world, showing that aerosol-induced epithelial ROS levels in polluted megacity air can be several orders of magnitude higher than in pristine rainforest air.

  2. Chemical exposure-response relationship between air pollutants and reactive oxygen species in the human respiratory tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakey, Pascale S J; Berkemeier, Thomas; Tong, Haijie; Arangio, Andrea M; Lucas, Kurt; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    Air pollution can cause oxidative stress and adverse health effects such as asthma and other respiratory diseases, but the underlying chemical processes are not well characterized. Here we present chemical exposure-response relations between ambient concentrations of air pollutants and the production rates and concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of the human respiratory tract. In highly polluted environments, fine particulate matter (PM2.5) containing redox-active transition metals, quinones, and secondary organic aerosols can increase ROS concentrations in the ELF to levels characteristic for respiratory diseases. Ambient ozone readily saturates the ELF and can enhance oxidative stress by depleting antioxidants and surfactants. Chemical exposure-response relations provide a quantitative basis for assessing the relative importance of specific air pollutants in different regions of the world, showing that aerosol-induced epithelial ROS levels in polluted megacity air can be several orders of magnitude higher than in pristine rainforest air. PMID:27605301

  3. Chemical exposure-response relationship between air pollutants and reactive oxygen species in the human respiratory tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakey, Pascale S. J.; Berkemeier, Thomas; Tong, Haijie; Arangio, Andrea M.; Lucas, Kurt; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    Air pollution can cause oxidative stress and adverse health effects such as asthma and other respiratory diseases, but the underlying chemical processes are not well characterized. Here we present chemical exposure-response relations between ambient concentrations of air pollutants and the production rates and concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of the human respiratory tract. In highly polluted environments, fine particulate matter (PM2.5) containing redox-active transition metals, quinones, and secondary organic aerosols can increase ROS concentrations in the ELF to levels characteristic for respiratory diseases. Ambient ozone readily saturates the ELF and can enhance oxidative stress by depleting antioxidants and surfactants. Chemical exposure-response relations provide a quantitative basis for assessing the relative importance of specific air pollutants in different regions of the world, showing that aerosol-induced epithelial ROS levels in polluted megacity air can be several orders of magnitude higher than in pristine rainforest air. PMID:27605301

  4. Simptomi in znaki s področja spodnjih dihal v ambulanti družinskega zdravnika: Lower respiratory tract symptoms in family practice:

    OpenAIRE

    Kopčavar Guček, Nena; Mazej Poredoš, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Cough, dyspnea.chest pain, wheezing, hemoptysis, hemoptoe, abnormal breathing patterns and sputum are the main symptoms of lower respiratory tract disease, which can easily be recognized via a thorough examination of medical history in a family practice. The specificity of the symptoms varies greatly. While cough can indicate the involvement of several organs, wheezing is highly indicative of lower respiratory tract disease. This article discusses some of the lung symptoms and signs, their ch...

  5. Effect of vitamin D supplementation on prevention of upper respiratory tract infections : a systematic review of randomized controlled trials / y Guo Jing

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Jing; 郭婧

    2013-01-01

    Background The prevention of chronic diseases has always been a major focus in the medical field as a measure to improve public health. As a potential prevention to one of the most common chronic diseases, vitamin D was previously reported to show some signs of positive effect on the prevention of upper respiratory tract infections. Although trials were performed to demonstrate the association between the effectiveness of vitamin D and upper respiratory tract infections in the past few yea...

  6. Four country healthcare-associated infection prevalence survey: pneumonia and lower respiratory tract infections.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Humphreys, H

    2010-03-01

    In 2006, the Hospital Infection Society was funded by the respective health services in England, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland to conduct a prevalence survey of healthcare-associated infection (HCAI). Here, we report the prevalence of pneumonia and lower respiratory tract infection other than pneumonia (LRTIOP) in these four countries. The prevalence of all HCAIs was 7.59% (5743 out of 75 694). Nine hundred (15.7%) of these infections were pneumonia, and 402 (7.0%) were LRTIOP. The prevalence of both infections was higher for males than for females, and increased threefold from those aged <35 to those aged >85 years (P<0.001). At the time of the survey or in the preceding seven days, 23.7% and 18.2% of patients with pneumonia and LRTIOP, respectively, were mechanically ventilated compared to 5.2% of patients in the whole study population. Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was the cause of pneumonia and LRTIOP in 7.6% and 18.1% of patients, respectively (P<0.001). More patients with LRTIOP (4.2%) had concurrent diarrhoea due to Clostridium difficile compared to patients with pneumonia (2.4%), but this did not reach statistical significance. Other HCAIs were present in 137 (15.2%) of patients with pneumonia and 66 (16.4%) of those with LRTIOP. The results suggest that reducing instrumentation, such as mechanical ventilation where possible, should help reduce infection. The higher prevalence of MRSA as a cause of LRTIOP suggests a lack of specificity in identifying the microbial cause and the association with C. difficile emphasises the need for better use of antibiotics.

  7. Alternative Treatment Applications in Children with Respiratory Tract Infections in the West of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naci Topaloğlu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is known that the trend toward alternative treatments is increasing each day regardless of the differences between communities. We aimed to detect alternative treatments in our region and to determine the thoughts of families about these treatments. Materials and Methods: A total of 214 patients presenting to General Pediatrics Outpatient Clinics of Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University Teaching and Research Hospital between October 2012 and February 2012 with fever, coughs, sore throat, wheezing and diagnosed as upper or lower respiratory tract infection and their parents are included in the study. Results: A total of 93.7% of parents were using non-drug applications with varying frequencies. Alternative practices are being used prior to drug treatment (62.7%, with drugs (28.7%, when there is no response to drugs (6.7% or never (1.9%. Most common used applications to reduce cough was to give pure honey (30.6% and the most common application to lower the fever was to use warm shower (48.1%. Most common source of information for these applications was relatives and family members. It was shown that the most requested resources to get information were doctors, nurses and other health care professionals with 84.5%. There was statistically significant correlation between educational status and frequency of usage of non-drug applications. However, requested source of information did not change according to the educational status. Conclusions: As a result we thought that doctors and nurses dealing with child health and disease should obtain information about alternative treatments and help the parents about logical managements. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2013; 11: 23-6

  8. Upper respiratory tract bacteria in Influenza-like illness cases in Indonesia using multiplex PCR method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivi Setiawaty

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang: Walaupun surveilans ILI di Indonesia sudah berlangsung sejak tahun 2006, namun belum diketahui data mengenai bakteri-bakteri yang dapat dideteksi dari kasus ILI dan kemungkinan menyebabkan ILI.Metode: Penelitian dilakukan pada bulan Maret – Desember tahun 2012, laboratorium Virologi Pusat Biomedis dan Teknologi Dasar Kesehatan menerima spesimen apus tenggorokan dan apus hidung dari 9 puskesmas yang menjadi sentinel surveilan ILI. Spesimen diperiksa menggunakan multipleks PCR untuk mendeteksi 6 panel bakteri.Hasil:Sebanyak 175 spesimen kasus ILI bakteri yang paling banyak ditemukan pada spesimen ini adalah Streptococcus pneumoniae (n=163, Haemophilus influenzae (n=146 dan Legionella pneumophila (41.Kesimpulan:Pada pasien ILI bakteri yang biasa terdeteksi pada saluran pernapasan bagian atas adalah Streptococcus  pneumoniae, Haemophilus  influenzae  dan  Legionella  pneumophila.  (Health Science Indones 2013;2:83-6Kata kunci:infeksi bakteri, ILI, PCR multipleksAbstractBackground: ILI surveillance in Indonesia has been conducted since 2006, but no data on the bacteria can be detected and caused ILI has been obtained. Method: From March to December 2012, Center for Research on Biomedic and Basic Health Technology’s laboratory was receiving throat and nose swab specimens from nine Public Health Centers appointed as the sentinels for ILI surveillance. These specimens were analyzed using multiplex PCR method, which detected six panels of bacteria. Results: 175 specimens taken from ILI patients contained three most frequently found species of bacteria: Streptococcus pneumoniae (n=163, Haemophilus influenzae (n=146 andLegionella pneumophila (41. Conclusion: In ILI patients, there are several bacteria most frequently detected in upper respiratory tract such as Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Legionella pneumophila. (Health Science Indonesia 2013;2:83-6Key words:bacterial infection, ILI, multiplex PCR

  9. Respiratory tract infection is the major cause of the ambulatory visits in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lue KoHuang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As children represent the future, ensuring that they receive proper health care should be a primary concern of our societies. Epidemiological research underpins the importance of effective child health care strategies, and highlights the need for accurate data collection; such surveys are currently lacking in Taiwan. In our descriptive studies, we compared the differences of the ten most common diseases in the year 2000 and 2009 among Taiwanese children. Methods Data for a total of 174,651 and 142,200 visits under eighteen years old were collected from the National Health Insurance Research Database in year 2000 and 2009. A maximum of three outpatient diagnostic codes (the International Classification of Disease [ICD], ninth revision could be listed for every visit. Data were categorized according to the principal diagnoses, age and different specialties of physicians. Results Respiratory tract infection was the most common disease (58.21% to 44.77%. Teeth (4.90% to 5.16% and eye (2.52% to 3.15% problems were the also in the list of top ten diseases. In year 2009, the rate of allergic rhinitis was 2.87% in 7-18 years old group. Pediatricians were the first option for consultation, followed by ear, nose and throat specialists and family physicians. However, for the school age children group, the role of pediatricians with regards to children's health care showed a decrease in its importance. Conclusions The amount of information relevant to child health care is rapidly expanding. The ten most common diseases of the present analysis may serve as baseline data for future evaluations of the changes of type of diseases among children.

  10. Microbiology of lower respiratory tract infection in workers of garment industry of Kathmandu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Pant

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES This study was designed with the objectives of describing the distribution pattern of microorganisms responsible for causing LRTI in the workers of garment industries. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 198 cases of suspected person of Lower Respiratory Tract infection (LRTI LRTI were included in this study. This study was conducted between November 2009 to April 2010. Specimen for the study was expectorated sputum. Gram-stain, Ziehl-Neelsen stains and culture were performed. RESULTS On direct microscopic examination, 20.51% were Gram positive bacteria, 79.48% were Gram negative bacteria and 4% were smear positive AFB. On culture sensitivity examination, 22% percent showed growth of different bacteria in different culture media. The bacteria isolated from the samples included Klebsiella pneumoniae (15.38%, Proteus mirabilis (15.38% and Citrobacterfruendii (15.38%. Gram Negative bacteria were found most susceptible to Ciprofloxacin (92.30%, 24/26 and Amikacin (92.30%, 24/26. Similarly, Gram Positive bacteria were found most susceptible to Ciprofloxacin (100%, 8/8 followed by Cloxacillin and Cephalexin (87.5%, 7/8. Smear positive AFB was significantly associated with not using the protective measures (mask by workers and presence of symptoms (cough for more than two weeks, night sweat, hemoptysis and anorexia (p=0.031. Culture positivity was significantly associated with symptoms like production of purulent sputum (p=0.045. CONCLUSION There was insignificant association between LRTI and risk factors present in working room of garment industries. Most of the isolates were sensitive to Ciprofloxacin and resistance to Ampicillin and Cephalexin.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v10i3.12772 Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2014, Vol-10, No-3, 14-22

  11. Experimental determination of the regional deposition of aerosol particles in the human respiratory tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahlhofen, W.; Gebhart, J.; Heyder, J.

    1980-06-01

    The experimental techniques and the results of inhalation studies with radioaerosols on normal non-smokers for mouth-breathing are described and discussed. Monodisperse iron oxide particles tagged with /sup 198/Au are produced with a spinning top generator in the aerodynamic size range between 1 to 10 ..mu..m. An aerosol inhalation apparatus enables the subjects to breathe under standardized conditions with respect to tidal volume and breathing frequency. The calculation of total deposition is based upon measurements of the number of in- and exhaled particles per breath by means of photometric methods and pneumotachography. The retention of the radioactive particles present in the body after aerosol administration is measured with a body counter designed and constructed for these experiments. Retention measurements as functions of time after inhalation are carried out in extrathoracic-, chest- and stomach-position. The body counter consists of four shielded NaF(Tl)-dectors. Characteristic feature of the body counter is its low sensitivity to neighboring organs and to neighboring regions within the respiratory tract. For the evaluation of extrathoracic deposition, the activity measured in the stomach immediately after inhalation is added to extrathoracic activity. The elimination of material from the chest is found to be much slower for the material deposited in the alveolar region than for the amount deposited in the tracheobronchial tree. This allows the intrathoracic deposition to be divided into tracheolbronchial and alveolar deposition by means of the different slopes of the normalized chest retention function. Different normalized chest retention functions are presented and analyzed with respect to their different elimination rats belonging to the tracheobronchial and alveolar region. Total, tracheobronchial, alveolar and extrathoracic deposition data are reported in the aerodynamic diameter range between 1 and 10 ..mu..m.

  12. Micromachined polymerase chain reaction system for multiple DNA amplification of upper respiratory tract infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chia-Sheng; Lee, Gwo-Bin; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Chang, Chih-Ching; Hsieh, Tsung-Min; Huang, Fu-Chun; Luo, Ching-Hsing

    2005-01-15

    This paper presents a micro polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip for the DNA-based diagnosis of microorganism genes and the detection of their corresponding antibiotic-resistant genes. The micro PCR chip comprises cheap biocompatible soda-lime glass substrates with integrated thin-film platinum resistors as heating/sensing elements, and is fabricated using micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) techniques in a reliable batch-fabrication process. The heating and temperature sensing elements are made of the same material and are located inside the reaction chamber in order to ensure a uniform temperature distribution. This study performs the detection of several genes associated with upper respiratory tract infection microorganisms, i.e. Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemopilus influenze, Staphylococcu aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Neisseria meningitides, together with their corresponding antibiotic-resistant genes. The lower thermal inertia of the proposed micro PCR chip relative to conventional bench-top PCR systems enables a more rapid detection operation with reduced sample and reagent consumption. The experimental data reveal that the high heating and cooling rates of the system (20 and 10 degrees C/s, respectively) permit successful DNA amplification within 15 min. The micro PCR chip is also capable of performing multiple DNA amplification, i.e. the simultaneous duplication of multiple genes under different conditions in separate reaction wells. Compared with the large-scale PCR system, it is greatly advantageous for fast diagnosis of multiple infectious diseases. Multiplex PCR amplification of two DNA segments in the same well is also feasible using the proposed micro device. The developed micro PCR chip provides a crucial tool for genetic analysis, molecular biology, infectious disease detection, and many other biomedical applications. PMID:15590288

  13. Comparisons of calculated respiratory tract deposition of particles based on the NCRP/ITRI model and the new ICRP66 model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Phalen, R.F. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Chang, I. [Lovelace Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) in the United States and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) have been independently reviewing and revising respiratory tract dosimetry models for inhaled radioactive aerosols. The newly proposed NCRP respiratory tract dosimetry model represents a significant change in philosophy from the old ICRP Task Group model. The proposed NCRP model describes respiratory tract deposition, clearance, and dosimetry for radioactive substances inhaled by workers and the general public and is expected to be published soon. In support of the NCRP proposed model, ITRI staff members have been developing computer software. Although this software is still incomplete, the deposition portion has been completed and can be used to calculate inhaled particle deposition within the respiratory tract for particle sizes as small as radon and radon progeny ({approximately} 1 nm) to particles larger than 100 {mu}m. Recently, ICRP published their new dosimetric model for the respiratory tract, ICRP66. Based on ICRP66, the National Radiological Protection Board of the UK developed PC-based software, LUDEP, for calculating particle deposition and internal doses. The purpose of this report is to compare the calculated respiratory tract deposition of particles using the NCRP/ITRI model and the ICRP66 model, under the same particle size distribution and breathing conditions. In summary, the general trends of the deposition curves for the two models were similar.

  14. Surveillance of acute community acquired urinary tract bacterial infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sibanarayan Rath; Rabindra N. Padhy

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To record the antibiotic resistance of community acquired uropathogens over a period of 24 months (May 2011-April 2012). Methods: Urine samples from patients of outpatient department (OPD) were used for isolating urinary tract infection (UTI)-causing bacteria that were cultured on suitable selective media and identified by biochemical tests. Their antibiograms were ascertained by Kirby-Bauer’s disc diffusion method, using 17 antibiotics of 5 different classes. Results: From 2137 urine samples 1332 strains of pathogenic bacteria belonging to 11 species were isolated. Two Gram-positives, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis and nine Gram-negatives, Acinetobacter baumannii, Citrobacter sp., Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were isolated. Both S. aureus and E. faecalis were vancomycin resistant, and resistant-strains of all pathogens increased in each 6-month period of study. Particularly, all Gram-negatives were resistant to nitrofurantoin and co-trimoxazole, the most preferred antibiotics of empiric therapy for UTI, but were moderately resistant to gentamicin, ampicillin, amoxyclav, ofloxacin and gatifloxacin. Most Gram-negatives produced extended spectrum β-lactamase. Conclusions: It was concluded that periodic surveillance of pathogens is an essential corollary in effective health management in any country, as empiric therapy is a common/essential practice in effective clinical management.

  15. Neonatal bronchial hyperresponsiveness precedes acute severe viral bronchiolitis in infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chawes, Bo L K; Poorisrisak, Porntiva; Johnston, Sebastian L;

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus and other respiratory tract viruses lead to common colds in most infants, whereas a minority develop acute severe bronchiolitis often requiring hospitalization. We hypothesized that such an excessive response to respiratory tract viral infection is caused by host factors...

  16. Retrospective analysis on acute respiratory distress syndrome in ICU

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jin-bao; ZHANG Liang; ZHU Ke-ming; DENG Xiao-ming

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To assess the incidence, etiology, physiological and clinical features, mortality, and predictors of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in intensive care unit (ICU).Methods: A retrospective analysis of 5 314 patients admitted to the ICU of our hospital from April 1994 to December 2003 was performed in this study. The ARDS patients were identified with the criteria of the American-European Consensus Conference ( AECC ). Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation Ⅲ ( APACHE in), multiple organ dysfunction syndrome score (MODS score), and lung injury score (LIS) were determined on the onset day of ARDS for all the patients. Other recorded variables included age, sex, biochemical indicators, blood gas analysis, length of stay in ICU, length of ventilation, presence or absence of tracheostomy, ventilation variables, elective operation or emergency operation.Results:Totally, 131 patients (2.5%) developed ARDS, among whom, 12 patients were excluded from this study because they died within 24 hours and other 4 patients were also excluded for their incomplete information. Therefore, there were only 115 cases (62 males and 53 females, aged 22-75 years, 58 years on average) left,accounting for 2. 2% of the total admitted patients. Their average ICU stay was (11. 27±7. 24) days and APACHE in score was 17.23±7.21. Pneumonia and sepsis were the main cause of ARDS. The non-survivors were obviously older and showed significant difference in the ICU length of stay and length of ventilation as compared with the survivors. On admission, the non-survivors had significantly higher MODS and lower BE ( base excess). The hospital mortality was 55. 7%. The main cause of death was multiple organ failure. Predictors of death at the onset of ARDS were advanced age, MODS≥8, and LIS≥2.76.Conclusions: ARDS is a frequent syndrome in this cohort. Sepsis and pneumonia are the most common risk factors. The main cause of death is multiple organ failure. The mortality is

  17. Evaluation of corticospinal tract injury with three-dimensional diffusion tensor tract in patients with acute cerebral infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Xiao; Ziqian Chen; Biyun Zhang; Ping Ni

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Three-dimensional diffusion tensor tract (DTT) is the newest imaging to describe the structure of white matter fiber in three-dimensions, it has great significance in dividing the concrete anatomic site of gray and white matter lesions, displaying the correlation with fibrous band and judging clinical prognosis, which is incomparable by other imagings.OBJECTTVE: To observe the conditions of corticospinal tract (CST) in acute cerebral ischemic stroke patients,and analyze the relationship between motor function and the severity of CST injury.DESIGN: A case-control observation.SETTTNG: Department of Medical Imaging, Fuzhou General Hospital of Nanjing Military Area Command of Chinese PLA.PARTTCTPANTS: Fifteen patients with acute cerebral infarction were selected from Fuzhou General Hospital of Nanjing Military Area Command of Chinese PLA from February to December in 2005. They all suffered from acute attack and motor disorder of hemiplegic limbs to different extent, and were conformed by CT or MRI.There were 9 males and 6 females, aging 16-87 years old, the median age was 51.7 years, and all were right handed. Fifteen right-handed normal subjects, who were matched by age and sex with the patients in the cerebral infarction group, were selected from the relatives of patients and physicians of the Imaging Department as the control group. All the subjects were informed and agreed with the study.METHODS: The patients with acute cerebral infarction and subjects in the control group received MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with GE 1.5 T nuclear magnetic resonance system, fiber tracking with the software of dTV- Ⅱ. Fractional anisotropy (FA) maps and three-dimensional tractography of bilateral CST of all patients were created. Displacement, continuity and destroy of fibrous bands were observed. At the same time, muscle strength of ipsilateral hand of patients with cerebral infarction was measured with Brunnstrom standard. The correlation between the severity

  18. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Outcomes after Near-hanging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansoor, Sahar; Afshar, Majid; Barrett, Matthew; Smith, Gordon S.; Barr, Erik A.; Lissauer, Matthew E.; McCurdy, Michael T.; Murthi, Sarah B.; Netzer, Giora

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Assess the case rate of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) after near-hanging, and the secondary outcomes of traumatic and/or anoxic brain injury, and death. Risk factors for the outcomes were assessed. Method Single-center, state-wide retrospective cohort study of consecutive patients admitted between August, 2002, and September, 2011, with a primary diagnosis of non-judicial "hanging injury". Results Of 56 patients, 73% were male. The median age was 31 (IQR: 16–56). Upon arrival, 9% (5/56) did not have a pulse, and 23% (13/56) patients were intubated. The median Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) was 13 (IQR: 3–15); 14% (8/56) had a GCS=3. ARDS developed in 9% (5/56) of patients. Traumatic anoxic brain injury resulted in 9% (5/56) of patients. The in-hospital case fatality was 5% (3/56). Lower median GCS [3 (IQR: 3–7) vs. 14 (IQR: 3–15), p=0.0003] and intubation in field or in trauma resuscitation unit [100% (5/5) vs. 16% (8/51), p=0.0003] were associated with ARDS development. Risk factors of death were GCS=3 [100% (3/3) vs. 9% (5/53), p=0.002]; pulselessness upon arrival of emergency medical services [100% (3/3) vs. 4% (2/53), p<0.001]; and abnormal neurologic imaging [50% (1/2) vs. zero, p=0.04]. Conclusions The ARDS case rate after near-hanging is similar to the general trauma population. Low GCS and intubation are associated with increased risk of ARDS development. The rate of traumatic and/or anoxic brain injury in this population is low. PMID:25596627

  19. The severe acute respiratory syndrome epidemic in mainland China dissected

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuchun Cao

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a review of a recently published series of studies that give a detailed and comprehensive documentation of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS epidemic in mainland China, which severely struck the country in the spring of 2003. The epidemic spanned a large geographical extent but clustered in two areas: first in Guangdong Province, and about 3 months later in Beijing with its surrounding areas. Reanalysis of all available epidemiological data resulted in a total of 5327 probable cases of SARS, of whom 343 died. The resulting case fatality ratio (CFR of 6.4% was less than half of that in other SARS-affected countries or areas, and this difference could only partly be explained by younger age of patients and higher number of community acquired infections. Analysis of the impact of interventions demonstrated that strong political commitment and a centrally coordinated response was the most important factor to control SARS in mainland China, whereas the most stringent control measures were all initiated when the epidemic was already dying down. The long-term economic consequence of the epidemic was limited, much consumption was merely postponed, but for Beijing irrecoverable losses to the tourist sector were considerable. An important finding from a cohort study was that many former SARS patients currently suffer from avascular osteo­necrosis, as a consequence of the treatment with corticosteroids during their infection. The SARS epidemic provided valuable information and lessons relevant in controlling outbreaks of newly emerging infectious diseases, and has led to fundamental reforms of the Chinese health system. In particular, a comprehensive nation-wide internet-based disease reporting system was established.

  20. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus persistence in Vero cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gustavo Palacios; Omar Jabado; Neil Renwick; Thomas Briese; W. Ian Lipkin

    2005-01-01

    Background Several coronaviruses establish persistent infections in vitro and in vivo, however it is unknown whether persistence is a feature of the severe acute respiratory syndorme coronavirus (SARS-CoV) life cycle. This study was conducted to investigate viral persistence.Methods We inoculated confluent monolayers of Vero cells with SARS-CoV at a multiplicity of infection of 0.1 TCID50 and passaged the remaining cells every 4 to 8 days for a total of 11 passages. Virus was titrated at each passage by limited dilution assay and nucleocapsid antigen was detected by Western blot and immunofluoresence assays. The presence of viral particles in passage 11 cells was assessed by electron microscopy. Changes in viral genomic sequences during persistent infection were examined by DNA sequencing. Results Cytopathic effect was extensive after initial inoculation but diminished with serial passages. Infectious virus was detected after each passage and viral growth curves were identical for parental virus stock and virus obtained from passage 11 cells. Nucleocapsid antigen was detected in the majority of cells after initial inoculation but in only 10%-40% of cells at passages 2-11. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of viral particles in passage 11 cells. Sequence analysis at passage 11 revealed fixed mutations in the spike (S) gene and ORFs 7a-8b but not in the nucleocapsid (N) gene. Conclusions SARS-CoV can establish a persistent infection in vitro. The mechanism for viral persistence is consistent with the formation of a carrier culture whereby a limited number of cells are infected with each round of virus replication and release. Persistence is associated with selected mutations in the SARS-CoV genome. This model may provide insight into SARS-related lung pathology and mechanisms by which humans and animals can serve as reservoirs for infection.