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Sample records for acute respiratory illness

  1. Detection of respiratory viruses and the associated chemokine responses in serious acute respiratory illness

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    Sumino, Kaharu C.; Walter, Michael J.; Mikols, Cassandra L.; Thompson, Samantha A.; Gaudreault-Keener, Monique; Arens, Max. Q.; Agapov, Eugene; Hormozdi, David; Gaynor, Anne M.; Holtzman, Michael J.; Storch, Gregory A.

    2010-01-01

    Background A specific diagnosis of a lower respiratory viral infection is often difficult despite frequent clinical suspicion. This low diagnostic yield may be improved by use of sensitive detection methods and biomarkers. Methods We investigated the prevalence, clinical predictors and inflammatory mediator profile of respiratory viral infection in serious acute respiratory illness. Sequential bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids from all patients hospitalized with acute respiratory illness over 12 months (n=283) were tested for the presence of 17 respiratory viruses by multiplex PCR assay and for newly-discovered respiratory viruses (bocavirus, WU and KI polyomaviruses) by single-target PCR. BAL samples also underwent conventional testing (direct immunoflorescence and viral culture) for respiratory virus at the clinician’s discretion. 27 inflammatory mediators were measured in subset of the patients (n=64) using a multiplex immunoassay. Results We detected 39 respiratory viruses in 37 (13.1% of total) patients by molecular testing, including rhinovirus (n=13), influenza virus (n=8), respiratory syncytial virus (n=6), human metapneumovirus (n=3), coronavirus NL63 (n=2), parainfluenza virus (n=2), adenovirus (n=1), and newly-discovered viruses (n=4). Molecular methods were 3.8-fold more sensitive than conventional methods. Clinical characteristics alone were insufficient to separate patients with and without respiratory virus. The presence of respiratory virus was associated with increased levels of interferon-γ-inducible protein 10 (IP -10)(p<0.001) and eotaxin-1 (p=0.017) in BAL. Conclusions Respiratory viruses can be found in patients with serious acute respiratory illness by use of PCR assays more frequently than previously appreciated. IP-10 may be a useful biomarker for respiratory viral infection. PMID:20627924

  2. Factors associated with acute respiratory illness in day care children.

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    Hatakka, Katja; Piirainen, Laura; Pohjavuori, Sara; Poussa, Tuija; Savilahti, Erkki; Korpela, Riitta

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between child characteristics, parental and environmental factors and the occurrence of acute respiratory illness (ARI) and acute otitis media (AOM) among Finnish children attending day care centres (DCCs). The study was a cross-sectional questionnaire of 594 children aged 1-6 y from 18 DCCs in Helsinki, Finland. Recurrent (> or =4 diseases/y) ARI was present in 44% of the 1-3-y-olds and 23% of the 4-6-y-olds, and recurrent AOM in 15% and 2.5%, respectively. Parent atopic disease (odds ratio (OR) 1.53, p = 0.033), mother's academic education (OR 1.77, p = 0.008) and a medium length of DCC attendance compared to a short period (OR 1.67, p = 0.049) increased, while furry pets (OR 0.44, p = 0.003) and older child age (OR 0.38, p or =6 months (OR 0.20, p = 0.002) and older child age (OR 0.05, p < 0.001) reduced the risk of recurrent AOM. Parental and environmental factors had a significant impact on recurrent ARI and AOM episodes in children attending DCCs. These risk factors should be considered in future studies intending to reduce DCC infections.

  3. Management of Critically Ill Patients with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS

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    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS is frequently complicated with acute respiratory failure. In this article, we aim to focus on the management of the subgroup of SARS patients who are critically ill. Most SARS patients would require high flow oxygen supplementation, 20–30% required intensive care unit (ICU or high dependency care, and 13–26% developed acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. In some of these patients, the clinical course can progress relentlessly to septic shock and/or multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS. The management of critically ill SARS patients requires timely institution of pharmacotherapy where applicable and supportive treatment (oxygen therapy, noninvasive and invasive ventilation. Superimposed bacterial and other opportunistic infections are common, especially in those treated with mechanical ventilation. Subcutaneous emphysema, pneumothoraces and pneumomediastinum may arise spontaneously or as a result of positive ventilatory assistance. Older age is a consistently a poor prognostic factor. Appropriate use of personal protection equipment and adherence to infection control measures is mandatory for effective infection control. Much of the knowledge about the clinical aspects of SARS is based on retrospective observational data and randomized-controlled trials are required for confirmation. Physicians and scientists all over the world should collaborate to study this condition which may potentially threaten human existence.

  4. Passive smoking, as measured by hair nicotine, and severity of acute lower respiratory illnesses among children

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    Al-Delaimy WK

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to describe the association between passive smoking and the severity of acute lower respiratory illnesses (ALRI among 351 children aged 3–27 months admitted to hospital. A total of 297 children provided hair samples, which were analysed for hair nicotine levels as an indicator of passive smoking. A severity of illness grading system was developed by using clinical and management criteria used by the medical staff at hospital. The OR for children with more severe illness being exposed to higher nicotine levels was 1.2, 95% CI: 0.57–2.58 when using dichotomised respiratory severity levels and upper versus lower nicotine quartile levels. In an ordinal logistic regression model, the OR of more severe illness being associated with higher nicotine levels was 1.07 (95% CI: 0.92–1.25. When analysis was limited to the more severe cases, the OR of the least severe category compared to the most severe category, in relation to nicotine levels in hair, was 1.79 (95% CI: 0.5–6.30. The ordinal logistic regression of this group of severely-ill children (OR 1.1 (95% CI: 0.94–1.29 was not substantially different from the overall study subjects. Conclusion In general, children with more severe illness tended to have higher levels of nicotine in their hair, although the results were within the limit of chance. Possible explanations of our results include environmental tobacco smoke (ETS being an initiator of ALRI rather than a risk to severity, exposure levels of ETS were too low to demonstrate an effect on severity, or the power of this study was not high enough to detect an association.

  5. Healthcare-seeking behaviors for acute respiratory illness in two communities of Java, Indonesia: a cross-sectional survey.

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    Praptiningsih, Catharina Y; Lafond, Kathryn E; Wahyuningrum, Yunita; Storms, Aaron D; Mangiri, Amalya; Iuliano, Angela D; Samaan, Gina; Titaley, Christiana R; Yelda, Fitra; Kreslake, Jennifer; Storey, Douglas; Uyeki, Timothy M

    2016-06-01

    Understanding healthcare-seeking patterns for respiratory illness can help improve estimations of disease burden and inform public health interventions to control acute respiratory disease in Indonesia. The objectives of this study were to describe healthcare-seeking behaviors for respiratory illnesses in one rural and one urban community in Western Java, and to explore the factors that affect care seeking. From February 8, 2012 to March 1, 2012, a survey was conducted in 2520 households in the East Jakarta and Bogor districts to identify reported recent respiratory illnesses, as well as all hospitalizations from the previous 12-month period. We found that 4% (10% of those less than 5years) of people had respiratory disease resulting in a visit to a healthcare provider in the past 2weeks; these episodes were most commonly treated at government (33%) or private (44%) clinics. Forty-five people (0.4% of those surveyed) had respiratory hospitalizations in the past year, and just over half of these (24/45, 53%) occurred at a public hospital. Public health programs targeting respiratory disease in this region should account for care at private hospitals and clinics, as well as illnesses that are treated at home, in order to capture the true burden of illness in these communities.

  6. Effect of Antiplatelet Therapy on Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Mortality in Critically Ill Patients: A Meta-Analysis.

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    Lijun Wang

    Full Text Available Antiplatelet agents are commonly used for cardiovascular diseases, but their pleiotropic effects in critically ill patients are controversial. We therefore performed a meta-analysis of cohort studies to investigate the effect of antiplatelet therapy in the critically ill.Nine cohort studies, retrieved from PubMed and Embase before November 2015, involving 14,612 critically ill patients and 4765 cases of antiplatelet users, were meta-analysed. The main outcome was hospital or 30-day mortality. Secondary outcome was acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS or acute lung injury (ALI. Random- or fixed-effect models were taken for quantitative synthesis of the data.Antiplatelet therapy was associated with decreased mortality (odds ratio (OR 0.61; 95% confidence interval (CI, 0.52-0.71; I2 = 0%; P <0. 001 and ARDS/ALI (OR 0.64; 95% CI, 0.50-0.82; I2 = 0%; P <0. 001. In every stratum of subgroups, similar findings on mortality reduction were consistently observed in critically ill patients.Antiplatelet therapy is associated with reduced mortality and lower incidence of ARDS/ALI in critically ill patients, particularly those with predisposing conditions such as high-risk surgery, trauma, pneumonia, and sepsis. However, it remains unclear whether similar findings can be observed in the unselected and broad population with critical illness.

  7. Community-acquired pneumonia and survival of critically ill acute exacerbation of COPD patients in respiratory intensive care units

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    Lu, Zhiwei; Cheng, Yusheng; Tu, Xiongwen; Chen, Liang; Chen, Hu; Yang, Jian; Wang, Jinyan; Zhang, Liqin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to appraise the effect of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) on inhospital mortality in critically ill acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) patients admitted to a respiratory intensive care unit. Patients and methods A retrospective observational study was performed. Consecutive critically ill AECOPD patients receiving treatment in a respiratory intensive care unit were reviewed from September 1, 2012, to August 31, 2015. Categorical variables were analyzed using chi-square tests, and continuous variables were analyzed by Mann–Whitney U-test. Kaplan–Meier analysis was used to assess the association of CAP with survival of critically ill AECOPD patients for univariate analysis. Cox’s proportional hazards regression model was performed to identify risk factors for multivariate analysis. Results A total of 80 consecutive eligible individuals were reviewed. These included 38 patients with CAP and 42 patients without CAP. Patients with CAP had a higher inhospital rate of mortality than patients without CAP (42% vs 33.3%, Pcritically ill AECOPD patients (CAP: hazard ratio, 5.29; 95% CI, 1.50–18.47, Pcritically ill AECOPD patients. PMID:27563239

  8. Self-collected mid-turbinate swabs for the detection of respiratory viruses in adults with acute respiratory illnesses.

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    Oscar E Larios

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The gold standard for respiratory virus testing is a nasopharyngeal (NP swab, which is collected by a healthcare worker. Midturbinate (MT swabs are an alternative due to their ease of collection and possible self-collection by patients. The objective of this study was to compare the respiratory virus isolation of flocked MT swabs compared to flocked NP swabs. METHODS: Beginning in October 2008, healthy adults aged 18 to 69 years were recruited into a cohort and followed up for symptoms of influenza. They were asked to have NP and MT swabs taken as soon as possible after the onset of a fever or two or more respiratory symptoms with an acute onset. The swabs were tested for viral respiratory infections using Seeplex® RV12 multiplex PCR detection kit. Seventy six pairs of simultaneous NP and MT swabs were collected from 38 symptomatic subjects. Twenty nine (38% of these pairs were positive by either NP or MT swabs or both. Sixty nine (91% of the pair results were concordant. Two samples (3% for hCV OC43/HKU1 and 1 sample (1% for rhinovirus A/B were positive by NP but negative by MT. One sample each for hCV 229E/NL63, hCV OC43/HKU1, respiratory syncytial virus A, and influenza B were positive by MT but negative by NP. CONCLUSIONS: Flocked MT swabs are sensitive for the diagnosis of multiple respiratory viruses. Given the ease of MT collection and similar results between the two swabs, it is likely that MT swabs should be the preferred method of respiratory cell collection for outpatient studies. In light of this data, larger studies should be performed to ensure that this still holds true and data should also be collected on the patient preference of collection methods.

  9. A molecular epidemiological study of respiratory viruses detected in Japanese children with acute wheezing illness

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    Noda Masahiro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies strongly suggest that some respiratory viruses are associated with the induction of acute wheezing and/or exacerbation of bronchial asthma. However, molecular epidemiology of these viruses is not exactly known. Methods Using PCR technology, we attempted to detect various respiratory viruses from 115 Japanese children. Furthermore, the detected viruses were subjected to homology, pairwise distance, and phylogenetic analysis. Results Viruses were detected from 99 (86.1% patients. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV alone and human rhinovirus (HRV alone were detected in 47 (40.9% and 36 (31.3% patients, respectively. Both RSV and HRV were detected in 14 (12.2% patients. Human metapneumovirus (HMPV alone and human parainfluenza virus (HPIV alone were detected in 1 (0.9% patient each, respectively. Homology and phylogenetic analyses showed that the RSV and HRV strains were classified into genetically diverse species or subgroups. In addition, RSV was the dominant virus detected in patients with no history of wheezing, whereas HRV was dominant in patients with a history of wheezing. Conclusions The results suggested that these genetically diverse respiratory viruses, especially RSV and HRV, might be associated with wheezing in Japanese children.

  10. Air Quality and Acute Respiratory Illness in Biomass Fuel using homes in Bagamoyo, Tanzania

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    Satoshi Nakai

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory Diseases are public health concern worldwide. The diseases have been associated with air pollution especially indoor air pollution from biomass fuel burning in developing countries. However, researches on pollution levels and on association of respiratory diseases with biomass fuel pollution are limited. A study was therefore undertaken to characterize the levels of pollutants in biomass fuel using homes and examine the association between biomass fuel smoke exposure and Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI disease in Nianjema village in Bagamoyo, Tanzania. Pollution was assessed by measuring PM10, NO2, and CO concentrations in kitchen, living room and outdoors. ARI prevalence was assessed by use of questionnaire which gathered health information for all family members under the study. Results showed that PM10, NO2, and CO concentrations were highest in the kitchen and lowest outdoors. Kitchen concentrations were highest in the kitchen located in the living room for all pollutants except CO. Family size didn’t have effect on the levels measured in kitchens. Overall ARI prevalence for cooks and children under age 5 making up the exposed group was 54.67% with odds ratio (OR of 5.5; 95% CI 3.6 to 8.5 when compared with unexposed men and non-regular women cooks. Results of this study suggest an association between respiratory diseases and exposure to domestic biomass fuel smoke, but further studies with improved design are needed to confirm the association.

  11. Self reported incidence and morbidity of acute respiratory illness among deployed U.S. military in Iraq and Afghanistan.

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    Bryony W Soltis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Historically, respiratory infections have had a significant impact on U.S. military missions. Deployed troops are particularly at high risk due to close living conditions, stressful work environments and increased exposure to pathogens. To date, there are limited data available on acute respiratory illness (ARI among troops deployed in support of ongoing military operations, specifically Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF. METHODS: Using self-report data from two sources collected from troops deployed to Iraq, Afghanistan and the surrounding region, we analyzed incidence and risk factors for ARI. Military personnel on mid-deployment Rest & Recuperation (R&R or during redeployment were eligible to participate in the voluntary self-report survey. RESULTS: Overall, 39.5% reported having at least one ARI. Of these, 18.5% sought medical care and 33.8% reported having decreased job performance. The rate of self-reported ARI was 15 episodes per 100 person-months among those taking the voluntary survey, and 24.7 episodes per 100 person-months among those taking the clinic health questionnaire. Negative binomial regression analysis found female sex, Navy branch of service and lack of flush toilets to be independently associated with increased rates of ARI. Deployment to OIF, increasing age and higher rank were also positively associated with ARI risk. CONCLUSIONS: The overall percentage of deployed military personnel reporting at least one acute respiratory illness decreased since earlier parts of OIF/OEF. However, the reported effect on job performance increased tremendously. The most important factors associated with increased respiratory infection are female sex, Navy branch of service, lack of improved latrine facilities, deployment to OIF, increasing age and higher rank.

  12. Detection of human bocavirus from children and adults with acute respiratory tract illness in Guangzhou, southern China

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    Liu Wen-Kuan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human bocavirus (HBoV is a newly discovered parvovirus associated with acute respiratory tract illness (ARTI and gastrointestinal illness. Our study is the first to analyze the characteristics of HBoV-positive samples from ARTI patients with a wide age distribution from Guangzhou, southern China. Methods Throat swabs (n=2811 were collected and analyzed from children and adults with ARTI over a 13-month period. The HBoV complete genome from a 60 year-old female patient isolate was also determined. Results HBoV DNA was detected in 65/2811 (2.3% samples, of which 61/1797 were from children (Mycoplasma pneumoniae had the highest frequency of 16.9% (11/65. Upper and lower respiratory tract illness were common symptoms, with 19/65 (29.2% patients diagnosed with pneumonia by chest radiography. All four adult patients had systemic influenza-like symptoms. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete genome revealed a close relationship with other HBoVs, and a more distant relationship with HBoV2 and HBoV3. Conclusions HBoV was detected from children and adults with ARTI from Guangzhou, southern China. Elderly people were also susceptive to HBoV. A single lineage of HBoV was detected among a wide age distribution of patients with ARTI.

  13. Acute respiratory failure in critically ill patients with interstitial lung disease.

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    Lara Zafrani

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic known or unknown interstitial lung disease (ILD may present with severe respiratory flares that require intensive management. Outcome data in these patients are scarce.Clinical and radiological features were collected in 83 patients with ILD-associated acute respiratory failure (ARF. Determinants of hospital mortality and response to corticosteroid therapy were identified by logistic regression.Hospital and 1-year mortality rates were 41% and 54% respectively. Pulmonary hypertension, computed tomography (CT fibrosis and acute kidney injury were independently associated with mortality (odds ratio (OR 4.55; 95% confidence interval (95%CI (1.20-17.33; OR, 7.68; (1.78-33.22 and OR 10.60; (2.25-49.97 respectively. Response to steroids was higher in patients with shorter time from hospital admission to corticosteroid therapy. Patients with fibrosis on CT had lower response to steroids (OR, 0.03; (0.005-0.21. In mechanically ventilated patients, overdistension induced by high PEEP settings was associated with CT fibrosis and hospital mortality.Mortality is high in ILD-associated ARF. CT and echocardiography are valuable prognostic tools. Prompt corticosteroid therapy may improve survival.

  14. Data on respiratory variables in critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure placed on proportional assist ventilation with load adjustable gain factors (PAV+).

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    Georgopoulos, Dimitris; Xirouchaki, Nectaria; Tzanakis, Nikolaos; Younes, Magdy

    2016-09-01

    The data show respiratory variables in 108 critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure placed on proportional assist ventilation with load adjustable gain factors (PAV+) after at least 36 h on passive mechanical ventilation. PAV+ was continued for 48 h until the patients met pre-defined criteria either for switching to controlled modes or for breathing without ventilator assistance. Data during passive mechanical ventilation and during PAV+ are reported. Data are acquired from the whole population, as well as from patients with and without acute respiratory distress syndrome. The reported variables are tidal volume, driving pressure (ΔP, the difference between static end-inspiratory plateau pressure and positive end-expiratory airway pressure), respiratory system compliance and resistance, and arterial blood gasses. The data are supplemental to our original research article, which described individual ΔP in these patients and examined how it related to ΔP when the same patients were ventilated with passive mechanical ventilation using the currently accepted lung-protective strategy "Driving pressure during assisted mechanical ventilation. Is it controlled by patient brain?" [1].

  15. Data on respiratory variables in critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure placed on proportional assist ventilation with load adjustable gain factors (PAV+

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    Dimitris Georgopoulos

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The data show respiratory variables in 108 critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure placed on proportional assist ventilation with load adjustable gain factors (PAV+ after at least 36 h on passive mechanical ventilation. PAV+ was continued for 48 h until the patients met pre-defined criteria either for switching to controlled modes or for breathing without ventilator assistance. Data during passive mechanical ventilation and during PAV+ are reported. Data are acquired from the whole population, as well as from patients with and without acute respiratory distress syndrome. The reported variables are tidal volume, driving pressure (ΔP, the difference between static end-inspiratory plateau pressure and positive end-expiratory airway pressure, respiratory system compliance and resistance, and arterial blood gasses. The data are supplemental to our original research article, which described individual ΔP in these patients and examined how it related to ΔP when the same patients were ventilated with passive mechanical ventilation using the currently accepted lung-protective strategy “Driving pressure during assisted mechanical ventilation. Is it controlled by patient brain?” [1].

  16. Concurrent acute illness and comorbid conditions poorly predict antibiotic use in upper respiratory tract infections: a cross-sectional analysis

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    Perencevich Eli N

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inappropriate antibiotic use promotes resistance. Antibiotics are generally not indicated for upper respiratory infections (URIs. Our objectives were to describe patterns of URI treatment and to identify patient and provider factors associated with antibiotic use for URIs. Methods This study was a cross-sectional analysis of medical and pharmacy claims data from the Pennsylvania Medicaid fee-for-service program database. We identified Pennsylvania Medicaid recipients with a URI office visit over a one-year period. Our outcome variable was antibiotic use within seven days after the URI visit. Study variables included URI type and presence of concurrent acute illnesses and chronic conditions. We considered the associations of each study variable with antibiotic use in a logistic regression model, stratifying by age group and adjusting for confounders. Results Among 69,936 recipients with URI, 35,786 (51.2% received an antibiotic. In all age groups, acute sinusitis, chronic sinusitis, otitis, URI type and season were associated with antibiotic use. Except for the oldest group, physician specialty and streptococcal pharyngitis were associated with antibiotic use. History of chronic conditions was not associated with antibiotic use in any age group. In all age groups, concurrent acute illnesses and history of chronic conditions had only had fair to poor ability to distinguish patients who received an antibiotic from patients who did not. Conclusion Antibiotic prevalence for URIs was high, indicating that potentially inappropriate antibiotic utilization is occurring. Our data suggest that demographic and clinical factors are associated with antibiotic use, but additional reasons remain unexplained. Insight regarding reasons for antibiotic prescribing is needed to develop interventions to address the growing problem of antibiotic resistance.

  17. Patient-ventilator interaction during acute lung injury, and the role of spontaneous breathing: part 1: respiratory muscle function during critical illness.

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    Kallet, Richard H

    2011-02-01

    Since the early 1970s there has been an ongoing debate regarding the wisdom of promoting unassisted spontaneous breathing throughout the course of critical illness in patients with severe respiratory failure. The basis of this debate has focused on the clinical relevance of opposite problems. Historically, the term "disuse atrophy" has described a situation wherein sustained inactivity of the respiratory muscles (ie, passive ventilation) results in deconditioning and weakness. More recently it has been referred to as "ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction." In contrast, "use atrophy" describes a situation where chronic high-tension inspiratory work causes structural damage to the diaphragm and weakness. Both laboratory and clinical studies demonstrated that relatively brief periods of complete respiratory muscle inactivity, as well as intense muscle loading, result in acute inflammation, loss of muscle mass, and weakness. Yet in critical illness other factors also affect respiratory muscle function, including prolonged use of neuromuscular blocking agents, administration of corticosteroids, and sepsis. This makes the attribution of acquired respiratory muscle weakness and ventilator-dependence to either ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction or loaded breathing extremely difficult. Regardless, the clinical implications of this research strongly suggest that passive mechanical ventilation should be avoided whenever possible. However, promotion of unassisted spontaneous breathing in the acute phase of critical illness also may carry a substantial risk of respiratory muscle injury and weakness. Use of mechanical ventilation modes in a manner that induces spontaneous breathing effort, while simultaneously reducing the work load on the respiratory muscles, is probably sufficient to minimize both problems.

  18. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

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    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000103.htm Acute respiratory distress syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening lung condition that ...

  19. Acute effects of physiotherapeutic respiratory maneuvers in critically ill patients with craniocerebral trauma

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    Manoel Luiz de Cerqueira Neto

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of physiotherapeutic respiratory maneuvers on cerebral and cardiovascular hemodynamics and blood gas variables. METHOD: A descriptive, longitudinal, prospective, nonrandomized clinical trial that included 20 critical patients with severe craniocerebral trauma who were receiving mechanical ventilation and who were admitted to the intensive care unit. Each patient was subjected to the physiotherapeutic maneuvers of vibrocompression and increased manual expiratory flow (5 minutes on each hemithorax, along with subsequent airway suctioning with prior instillation of saline solution, hyperinflation and hyperoxygenation. Variables related to cardiovascular and cerebral hemodynamics and blood gas variables were recorded after each vibrocompression, increased manual expiratory flow and airway suctioning maneuver and 10 minutes after the end of airway suctioning. RESULTS: The hemodynamic and blood gas variables were maintained during vibrocompression and increased manual expiratory flow maneuvers; however, there were increases in mean arterial pressure, intracranial pressure, heart rate, pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary capillary pressure during airway suctioning. All of the values returned to baseline 10 minutes after the end of airway suctioning. CONCLUSION: Respiratory physiotherapy can be safely performed on patients with severe craniocerebral trauma. Additional caution must be taken when performing airway suctioning because this technique alters cerebral and cardiovascular hemodynamics, even in sedated and paralyzed patients.

  20. Acute respiratory symptoms and general illness during the first year of life: a population-based birth cohort study

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    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Holst, Klaus Kähler; Larsen, Karina

    2008-01-01

    Respiratory symptoms are common in infancy. Most illnesses occurring among children are dealt with by parents and do not require medical attention. Nevertheless, few studies have prospectively and on a community-basis assessed the amount of respiratory symptoms and general illness in normal infants....... In this population-based birth cohort study, 228 healthy infants from Copenhagen, Denmark were followed from birth to 1 year of age during 2004-2006. Symptoms were registered using daily diaries and monthly home visits. Interviews were performed at inclusion and every second month. Risk factor analysis was carried...... out by multiple logistic regression analysis. On average, children had general symptoms for 3.5 months during their first year of life, nasal discharge being most frequent followed by cough. Frequency of all symptoms increased steeply after 6 months of age. Each child had on average 6.3 episodes...

  1. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

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    Carmen Sílvia Valente Barbas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper, based on relevant literature articles and the authors' clinical experience, presents a goal-oriented respiratory management for critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS that can help improve clinicians' ability to care for these patients. Early recognition of ARDS modified risk factors and avoidance of aggravating factors during hospital stay such as nonprotective mechanical ventilation, multiple blood products transfusions, positive fluid balance, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and gastric aspiration can help decrease its incidence. An early extensive clinical, laboratory, and imaging evaluation of “at risk patients” allows a correct diagnosis of ARDS, assessment of comorbidities, and calculation of prognostic indices, so that a careful treatment can be planned. Rapid administration of antibiotics and resuscitative measures in case of sepsis and septic shock associated with protective ventilatory strategies and early short-term paralysis associated with differential ventilatory techniques (recruitment maneuvers with adequate positive end-expiratory pressure titration, prone position, and new extracorporeal membrane oxygenation techniques in severe ARDS can help improve its prognosis. Revaluation of ARDS patients on the third day of evolution (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA, biomarkers and response to infection therapy allows changes in the initial treatment plans and can help decrease ARDS mortality.

  2. A two-time-period comparison of the effects of ambient air pollution on outpatient visits for acute respiratory illnesses.

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    Sinclair, Amber Hughes; Edgerton, Eric S; Wyzga, Ron; Tolsma, Dennis

    2010-02-01

    Concentrations of numerous ambient air pollutants have declined in recent years across the United States. Although it can be expected that reductions in air pollutants are associated with reductions in health effects, it is unclear whether this is actually the case. The purpose of this analysis was to compare the levels of and relationships between air pollutants and acute respiratory outpatient visits for two consecutive time periods totaling 53 mo. Air pollution data were collected at a centrally located monitor in Atlanta, GA, and include 24-hr averages of particulate matter (PM) less than 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) and its components; coarse PM (PM10-2.5); PM less than 10 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10); oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs); 8-hr maximum ozone (O3); and 1-hr maximum nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and sulfur dioxide (SO2). In addition, several metals and fractions of elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) were investigated. Daily outpatient visit data were obtained from the electronic data warehouse of the Atlanta-based region of a nonprofit managed care organization. Poisson general linear modeling determined associations between daily levels of acute visits for four diagnosis groups (adult and child asthma, upper and lower respiratory infection) and air pollution measurements. Overall declining trends were observed in air pollutants and acute visits over the study period. Childhood asthma had the greatest number of significant associations with air pollutants, namely zinc and EC. The significant lag time between pollutant measurement and visit occurrence changed from 3-5 days in the first time period to 6-8 days in the later time period, but there was general consistency in several childhood asthma and pollutant associations over both time periods. The greatest evidence for a reduction in pollution being associated with an improvement in health response was for lower respiratory disease

  3. A UK general practice population cohort study investigating the association between lipid lowering drugs and 30-day mortality following medically attended acute respiratory illness.

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    Joshi, Roshni; Venkatesan, Sudhir; Myles, Puja R

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cholesterol lowering drugs HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) and PPARα activators (fibrates) have been shown to reduce host inflammation via non-disease specific immunomodulatory mechanisms. Recent studies suggest that commonly prescribed drugs in general practice, statins and fibrates, may be beneficial in influenza-like illness related mortality. This retrospective cohort study examines the association between two lipid lowering drugs, statins and fibrates, and all-cause 30-day mortality following a medically attended acute respiratory illness (MAARI). Methods. Primary care patient data were retrospectively extracted from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) database. The sample comprised 201,179 adults aged 30 years or older experiencing a MAARI episode. Patient exposure to statins or fibrates was coded as separate dichotomous variables and deemed current if the most recent GP prescription was issued in the 30 days prior to MAARI diagnosis. Multivariable logistic regression and Cox regression were used for analyses. Adjustment was carried out for chronic lung disease, heart failure, metformin and glitazones, comorbidity burden, socio-demographic and lifestyle variables such as smoking status and body mass index (BMI). Statistical interaction tests were carried out to check for effect modification by gender, body mass index, smoking status and comorbidity. Results. A total of 1,096 (5%) patients died within the 30-day follow up period. Of this group, 213 (19.4%) were statin users and 4 (0.4%) were fibrate users. After adjustment, a significant 35% reduction in odds [adj OR; 0.65 (95% CI [0.52-0.80])] and a 33% reduction in the hazard [adj HR: 0.67 (95% CI [0.55-0.83])] of all-cause 30-day mortality following MAARI was observed in statin users. A significant effect modification by comorbidity burden was observed for the association between statin use and MAARI-related mortality. Fibrate use was associated with a non

  4. Use of the PiCCO system in critically ill patients with septic shock and acute respiratory distress syndrome: a study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

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    Zhang Zhongheng

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemodynamic monitoring is very important in critically ill patients with shock or acute respiratory distress syndrome(ARDS. The PiCCO (Pulse index Contour Continuous Cardiac Output, Pulsion Medical Systems, Germany system has been developed and used in critical care settings for several years. However, its impact on clinical outcomes remains unknown. Methods/design The study is a randomized controlled multi-center trial. A total of 708 patients with ARDS, septic shock or both will be included from January 2012 to January 2014. Subjects will be randomized to receive PiCCO monitoring or not. Our primary end point is 30-day mortality, and secondary outcome measures include ICU length of stay, days on mechanical ventilation, days of vasoactive agent support, ICU-free survival days during a 30-day period, mechanical-ventilation-free survival days during a 30-day period, and maximum SOFA score during the first 7 days. Discussion We investigate whether the use of PiCCO monitoring will improve patient outcomes in critically ill patients with ARDS or septic shock. This will provide additional data on hemodynamic monitoring and help clinicians to make decisions on the use of PiCCO. Trial registration http://www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT01526382

  5. Etiology and Incidence of viral and bacterial acute respiratory illness among older children and adults in rural western Kenya, 2007-2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R Feikin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Few comprehensive data exist on disease incidence for specific etiologies of acute respiratory illness (ARI in older children and adults in Africa. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: From March 1, 2007, to February 28, 2010, among a surveillance population of 21,420 persons >5 years old in rural western Kenya, we collected blood for culture and malaria smears, nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swabs for quantitative real-time PCR for ten viruses and three atypical bacteria, and urine for pneumococcal antigen testing on outpatients and inpatients meeting a ARI case definition (cough or difficulty breathing or chest pain and temperature >38.0 °C or oxygen saturation 5 years old (adjusted annual incidence 12.0 per 100 person-years, influenza A virus was the most common virus (22% overall; 11% inpatients, 27% outpatients and Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most common bacteria (16% overall; 23% inpatients, 14% outpatients, yielding annual incidences of 2.6 and 1.7 episodes per 100 person-years, respectively. Influenza A virus, influenza B virus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and human metapneumovirus were more prevalent in swabs among cases (22%, 6%, 8% and 5%, respectively than controls. Adenovirus, parainfluenza viruses, rhinovirus/enterovirus, parechovirus, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae were not more prevalent among cases than controls. Pneumococcus and non-typhi Salmonella were more prevalent among HIV-infected adults, but prevalence of viruses was similar among HIV-infected and HIV-negative individuals. ARI incidence was highest during peak malaria season. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Vaccination against influenza and pneumococcus (by potential herd immunity from childhood vaccination or of HIV-infected adults might prevent much of the substantial ARI incidence among persons >5 years old in similar rural African settings.

  6. Factors driving customers to seek health care from pharmacies for acute respiratory illness and treatment recommendations from drug sellers in Dhaka city, Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Fahmida; Sturm-Ramirez, Katharine; Mamun, Abdullah Al; Iuliano, A Danielle; Bhuiyan, Mejbah Uddin; Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Ahmed, Makhdum; Haider, Sabbir; Rahman, Mahmudur; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Background Pharmacies in Bangladesh serve as an important source of health service. A survey in Dhaka reported that 48% of respondents with symptoms of acute respiratory illness (ARI) identified local pharmacies as their first point of care. This study explores the factors driving urban customers to seek health care from pharmacies for ARI, their treatment adherence, and outcome. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 100 selected pharmacies within Dhaka from June to December 2012. Study participants were patients or patients’ relatives aged >18 years seeking care for ARI from pharmacies without prescription. Structured interviews were conducted with customers after they sought health service from drug sellers and again over phone 5 days postinterview to discuss treatment adherence and outcome. Results We interviewed 302 customers patronizing 76 pharmacies; 186 (62%) sought care for themselves and 116 (38%) sought care for a sick relative. Most customers (215; 71%) were males. The majority (90%) of customers sought care from the study pharmacy as their first point of care, while 18 (6%) had previously sought care from another pharmacy and 11 (4%) from a physician for their illness episodes. The most frequently reported reasons for seeking care from pharmacies were ease of access to pharmacies (86%), lower cost (46%), availability of medicine (33%), knowing the drug seller (20%), and convenient hours of operation (19%). The most commonly recommended drugs were acetaminophen dispensed in 76% (228) of visits, antihistamine in 69% (208), and antibiotics in 42% (126). On follow-up, most (86%) of the customers had recovered and 12% had sought further treatment. Conclusion People with ARI preferred to seek care at pharmacies rather than clinics because these pharmacies were more accessible and provided prompt treatment and medicine with no service charge. We recommend raising awareness among drug sellers on proper dispensing practices and enforcement of

  7. Human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalized danish children with acute respiratory tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Henrik Larsen, Hans; Koch, Anders;

    2004-01-01

    The newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV) has been shown to be associated with respiratory illness. We determined the frequencies and clinical features of hMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in 374 Danish children with 383 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection...

  8. Acute respiratory failure in scrub typhus patients

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    Jyoti Narayan Sahoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory failure is a serious complication of scrub typhus. In this prospective study, all patients with a diagnosis of scrub typhus were included from a single center Intensive Care Unit (ICU. Demographic, clinical characteristics, laboratory, and imaging parameters of these patients at the time of ICU admission were compared. Of the 55 scrub typhus patients, 27 (49% had an acute respiratory failure. Seventeen patients had acute respiratory distress syndrome, and ten had cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Respiratory supported patients were older had significant chronic lungs disease and high severity illness scores (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation-II and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score. At ICU admission, these patients presented with more deranged laboratory markers, including high bilirubin, high creatine kinase, high lactate, metabolic acidosis, low serum albumin, and presence of ascites. The average ICU and hospital stay were 4.27 ± 2.74 and 6.53 ± 3.52 days, respectively, in the respiratory supported group. Three patients died in respiratory failure group, while only one patient died in nonrespiratory failure group.

  9. Acute Respiratory Distress in Children: Croup and Acute Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, B S; Shekhawat, Dhananjay S; Sharma, Prity; Meena, Chetan; Mohan, Hari

    2015-07-01

    Acute respiratory distress is one of the most common reason for emergency visits in children under 5 y of age. An accurate understanding of the epidemiology of these diseases, identification of risk factors and etiology is critical for successful treatment and prevention of related mortality. The cause of acute respiratory distress varies in etiology, and hence is amenable to different treatment modalities. Depending on the predominant symptoms and signs, a child presenting to the clinician can be divided into six groups, viz., stridor; cough, fever and difficulty in breathing or fast breathing; wheezing; mediastinal shift with severe respiratory distress; slow or irregular breathing in absence of any pulmonary sign; and respiratory distress with cardiac findings. A detailed history followed by a thorough clinical examination and laboratory evaluation assisted by imaging modalities if indicated, helps to establish the exact cause of respiratory distress in the child. Early recognition and prompt institution of appropriate management or referral can significantly improve the outcome of this illness. This article offers clinicians a brief update on the general management guidelines of respiratory distress in pediatric patients. Specific treatment depends on the exact cause, however croup and acute severe asthma have been discussed in this article.

  10. Prevalence, codetection and seasonal distribution of upper airway viruses and bacteria in children with acute respiratory illnesses with cough as a symptom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, K F; Grimwood, K; Sloots, T P; Whiley, D M; Acworth, J P; Phillips, N; Goyal, V; Chang, A B

    2016-06-01

    Most studies exploring the role of upper airway viruses and bacteria in paediatric acute respiratory infections (ARI) focus on specific clinical diagnoses and/or do not account for virus-bacteria interactions. We aimed to describe the frequency and predictors of virus and bacteria codetection in children with ARI and cough, irrespective of clinical diagnosis. Bilateral nasal swabs, demographic, clinical and risk factor data were collected at enrollment in children aged bacteria. Logistic regression was used to investigate associations between child characteristics and codetection of the organisms of interest. Between December 2011 and August 2014, swabs were collected from 817 (93.3%) of 876 enrolled children, median age 27.7 months (interquartile range 13.9-60.3 months). Overall, 740 (90.6%) of 817 specimens were positive for any organism. Both viruses and bacteria were detected in 423 specimens (51.8%). Factors associated with codetection were age (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) for age bacteria pairs. Virus-H. influenzae interactions in ARI should be investigated further, especially as the contribution of nontypeable H. influenzae to acute and chronic respiratory diseases is being increasingly recognized.

  11. Respiratory support for severe acute respiratory syndrome: integration of efficacy and safety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chen; CAO Zhi-xin

    2005-01-01

    @@ Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is an acute respiratory illness caused by infection with the SARS virus. The most obvious clinical characteristic of SARS is rapidly progressive pneumonia, and about 20% patients need intensive care due to acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).1-3 In the absence of effective drugs for SARS, supportive care, especially respiratory support techniques (RSTs), is of primary importance. On the other hand, offering RSTs to SARS patients may carry a high-risk of infection to healthcare workers because of the high infectivity of SARS. Therefore, the strategy of RSTs for SARS should be the integration of efficacy and safety. In this issue of the Chinese Medical Journal, an article from Hong Kong has retrospectively compared both the safety and efficacy of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) with that of invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) in the treatment of respiratory failure in SARS.

  12. Elevated transmission of upper respiratory illness among new recruits in military barracks in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Jens W; Bhoomiboonchoo, Piraya; Simasathien, Sriluck; Salje, Henrik; Huang, Angkana; Rangsin, Ram; Jarman, Richard G; Fernandez, Stefan; Klungthong, Chonticha; Hussem, Kittinun; Gibbons, Robert V; Yoon, In-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Background New recruits within military barracks present conditions favorable for the spread of respiratory pathogens. However, respiratory pathogen transmission in such confined settings in the tropics has not been well studied. Methods Recruits in four successive Royal Thai Army basic training classes living in military barracks were monitored for the symptoms of influenza-like illness (ILI) or upper respiratory illness (URI). Classes 1 and 2 were also monitored after basic training. Nasal/throat swabs from acute illnesses were collected and tested by influenza RT-PCR (all four classes). In addition, class 1 had multiplex PCR performed along with the analysis of bed locations within the barracks. Results Influenza-like illness/upper respiratory illness rates ranged from 4·7 to 6·9 per 100 recruit-weeks in the four classes and generally decreased during the course of basic training (P ILI cases in class 1 tended to be in closer proximity to each other. Conclusion Basic training recruits in military barracks in the tropics had high rates of acute respiratory illnesses with illness patterns consistent with external seeding followed by substantial internal transmission. Our findings may contribute to control measures in similar confined settings both within and outside the military. PMID:26271648

  13. Headache in the presentation of noncephalic acute illness

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    Tomer Tzadok

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Headache is a frequent symptom of many systemic diseases that do not involve cranial structures. In this observational study, we assessed factors associated with headache in the acute presentation of systemic conditions in a nonsurgical emergency department (ED. Methods: Consecutive patients, admitted to Soroka University Medical Center ED due to noncephalic illness, were prospectively surveyed using a structured questionnaire focused on the prevalence and characteristics of headache symptoms. Medical data were extracted from the patient's charts. Results: Between 1 and 6/2012, 194 patients aged 64.69 ± 19.52 years, were evaluated. Headache was reported by 83 (42.7% patients and was more common among patients with febrile illness (77.5% vs. 22.5%, P < 0.001. Respiratory illness and level of O2saturation were not associated with headache. Headache in the presentation of a noncephalic illness was associated with younger age (58 vs. 69, P < 0.001 and with suffering from a primary headache disorder (48.2% vs. 10.8%, P < 0.001. Headache was also associated with higher body temperature and lower platelets count. Conclusions: Headache is a common symptom in acute noncephalic conditions and was found to be associated with younger age and febrile disease on presentation. Patients who present with primary headache disorders are more prone to have headache during acute illness. Acute obstructive respiratory disease, hypercarbia or hypoxemia were not associated with headache.

  14. Human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalized danish children with acute respiratory tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Larsen, Hans Henrik; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper;

    2004-01-01

    The newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV) has been shown to be associated with respiratory illness. We determined the frequencies and clinical features of hMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in 374 Danish children with 383 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection...... children 1-6 months of age. Asthmatic bronchitis was diagnosed in 66.7% of hMPV and 10.6% of RSV-infected children (p respiratory support. hMPV is present in young...

  15. High added value of a population-based participatory surveillance system for community acute gastrointestinal, respiratory and influenza-like illnesses in Sweden, 2013-2014 using the web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, A; Merk, H; Carnahan, A; Galanis, I; VAN Straten, E; Danis, K; Edelstein, M; Wallensten, A

    2017-01-31

    In 2013-2014, the Public Health Agency of Sweden developed a web-based participatory surveillance system, Hӓlsorapport, based on a random sample of individuals reporting symptoms weekly online, to estimate the community incidence of self-reported acute gastrointestinal (AGI), acute respiratory (ARI) and influenza-like (ILI) illnesses and their severity. We evaluated Hӓlsorapport's acceptability, completeness, representativeness and its data correlation with other surveillance data. We calculated response proportions and Spearman correlation coefficients (r) between (i) incidence of illnesses in Hӓlsorapport and (ii) proportions of specific search terms to medical-advice website and reasons for calling a medical advice hotline. Of 34 748 invitees, 3245 (9·3%) joined the cohort. Participants answered 81% (139 013) of the weekly questionnaires and 90% (16 351) of follow-up questionnaires. AGI incidence correlated with searches on winter-vomiting disease [r = 0·81, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0·69-0·89], and ARI incidence correlated with searches on cough (r = 0·77, 95% CI 0·62-0·86). ILI incidence correlated with the web query-based estimated incidence of ILI patients consulting physicians (r = 0·63, 95% CI 0·42-0·77). The high response to different questionnaires and the correlation with other syndromic surveillance systems suggest that Hӓlsorapport offers a reasonable representation of AGI, ARI and ILI patterns in the community and can complement traditional and syndromic surveillance systems to estimate their burden in the community.

  16. Genetic associations with viral respiratory illnesses and asthma control in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loisel, D A; Du, G; Ahluwalia, T S;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Viral respiratory infections can cause acute wheezing illnesses in children and exacerbations of asthma. OBJECTIVE: We sought to identify variation in genes with known antiviral and pro-inflammatory functions to identify specific associations with more severe viral respiratory illnesses...... and the risk of virus-induced exacerbations during the peak fall season. METHODS: The associations between genetic variation at 326 SNPs in 63 candidate genes and 10 phenotypes related to viral respiratory infection and asthma control were examined in 226 children enrolled in the RhinoGen study. Replication...... of asthma control phenotypes was performed in 2128 children in the Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC). Significant associations in RhinoGen were further validated using virus-induced wheezing illness and asthma phenotypes in an independent sample of 122 children enrolled...

  17. Clinical and radiological features of pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza virus infection manifesting as acute febrile respiratory illness at their initial presentations: comparison with contemporaneous non-H1N1 patients

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    Yun, Tae Jin (Dept. of Radiology, Armed Force Byukjae Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)); Park, Chang Min; Choi, Seung Hong; Lee, Hyun Ju; Goo, Jin Mo (Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)), email: cmpark@radiol.snu.ac.kr; Kwon, Gu Jin (Dept. of Family Medicine, Armed Force Byukjae Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Dept. of Family Medicine, Gangneung Asan Hospital, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)); Woo, Sung Koo (Dept. of Radiology, Armed Force Byukjae Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)); Park, Seung Hoon (Dept. of Internal Medicine, Armed Force Byukjae Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of))

    2011-05-15

    Background Since the first outbreak caused by the pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza in Mexico, the virus has spread widely across the world with meaningful morbidity and mortality. However, there are few data on the comparative investigations to assess the clinical and radiological features between the H1N1 patient and non-H1N1 patients. Purpose To assess the clinical and radiological features of patients infected by the pandemic H1N1 2009 flu virus at their initial presentation and to compare them with contemporaneous non-H1N1 patients with acute febrile respiratory illness. Material and Methods This retrospective study was approved by the ethics committee of the Armed Forces Medical Command, South Korea. From August to September 2009, 337 consecutive patients presented with an acute febrile respiratory illness in a tertiary military hospital. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase-chain-reaction tests were performed in 62 of these patients under the impression of H1N1 infection. Clinical and radiological features at their initial presentation were described for the H1N1 group (n = 35) and non-H1N1 group (n = 27) and compared between the two groups. Results Increased C-reactive protein level (97%) without leukocytosis (9%) or increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (0%) was common in the H1N1 group at their initial presentation. On chest radiographs, 12 of 35 (34%) H1N1 patients had abnormal findings; nodules in 10 patients (83%) and consolidations in two (17%). Of the 28 H1N1 patients who underwent thin-section CT 16 patients (57%) showed abnormal findings; ground-glass opacities (GGOs) in 15 (94%), and nodules in 13 (81%). However, there were no significant differences between the H1N1 group and non-H1N1 group in terms of symptoms, laboratory results, or radiological findings (P > 0.05). Conclusion Patients with H1N1 infection show consistent clinical and radiological features at their initial presentation, however, clinical and radiological features of the H1N1 group are

  18. Rates of acute respiratory illnesses of infectious and allergic etiologies after permanent changes of duty assignments, active component, U.S. Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps, January 2005-September 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brundage, John F; Taubman, Stephen B; Clark, Leslie L

    2015-11-01

    Throughout history, acute respiratory illnesses (ARIs) have disproportionately affected military populations, particularly those in recruit training camps. A similar dynamic can affect non-trainee military settings. When military members are reassigned, they often develop ARIs within the first weeks of their arrivals at their new assignments. To assess the natures and magnitudes of the risks associated with new assignments, this analysis compared the experiences of service members within their first full calendar months at new assignments and during the same months at the same locations 1 year later. The results do not support the hypothesis that ARIs of infectious etiologies consistently occur more frequently soon after arriving at new assignments compared to 1 year later at the same locations. In contrast, during two-thirds of the 117 months considered here, rates of ARIs of presumed allergic etiologies (e.g., allergic rhinitis, asthma) were higher during the first months of new assignments compared to 1 year later. The limitations of the study methodology as well as the possible implications of the findings are discussed.

  19. Surveillance for hospitalized acute respiratory infection in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verani, Jennifer R; McCracken, John; Arvelo, Wences; Estevez, Alejandra; Lopez, Maria Renee; Reyes, Lissette; Moir, Juan Carlos; Bernart, Chris; Moscoso, Fabiola; Gray, Jennifer; Olsen, Sonja J; Lindblade, Kim A

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are an important cause of illness and death worldwide, yet data on the etiology of ARI and the population-level burden in developing countries are limited. Surveillance for ARI was conducted at two hospitals in Guatemala. Patients admitted with at least one sign of acute infection and one sign or symptom of respiratory illness met the criteria for a case of hospitalized ARI. Nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs were collected and tested by polymerase chain reaction for adenovirus, parainfluenza virus types 1,2 and 3, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B viruses, human metapneumovirus, Chlamydia pneumioniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Urine specimens were tested for Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen. Blood culture and chest radiograph were done at the discretion of the treating physician. Between November 2007 and December 2011, 3,964 case-patients were enrolled. While cases occurred among all age groups, 2,396 (60.4%) cases occurred in children Guatemala due to a variety of pathogens, can help guide public health policies aimed at reducing the burden of illness and death due to respiratory infections.

  20. Acute otitis media and respiratory virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruuskanen, O; Arola, M; Putto-Laurila, A; Mertsola, J; Meurman, O; Viljanen, M K; Halonen, P

    1989-02-01

    We studied the association of acute otitis media with different respiratory virus infections in a pediatric department on the basis of epidemics between 1980 and 1985. Altogether 4524 cases of acute otitis media were diagnosed. The diagnosis was confirmed by tympanocentesis in 3332 ears. Respiratory virus infection was diagnosed during the same period in 989 patients by detecting viral antigen in nasopharyngeal mucus. There was a significant correlation between acute otitis media and respiratory virus epidemics, especially respiratory syncytial virus epidemics. There was no significant correlation between outbreaks of other respiratory viruses and acute otitis media. Acute otitis media was diagnosed in 57% of respiratory syncytial virus, 35% of influenza A virus, 33% of parainfluenza type 3 virus, 30% of adenovirus, 28% of parainfluenza type 1 virus, 18% of influenza B virus and 10% of parainfluenza type 2 virus infections. These observations show a clear association of respiratory virus infections with acute otitis media. In this study on hospitalized children Haemophilus influenzae strains were the most common bacteriologic pathogens in middle ear fluid, occurring in 19% of cases. Streptococcus pneumoniae was present in 16% and Branhamella catarrhalis in 7% of cases. There was no association between specific viruses and bacteria observed in this study.

  1. Acute Stress Response in Critically Ill Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. den Brinker (Marieke)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe understanding of the endocrine changes in critically ill children is important, as it provides insights in the pathophysiology of the acute stress in children and its differences compared with adults. Furthermore, it delineates prognostic factors for survival and supports the rati

  2. Pathobiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapru, Anil; Flori, Heidi; Quasney, Michael W; Dahmer, Mary K

    2015-06-01

    The unique characteristics of pulmonary circulation and alveolar-epithelial capillary-endothelial barrier allow for maintenance of the air-filled, fluid-free status of the alveoli essential for facilitating gas exchange, maintaining alveolar stability, and defending the lung against inhaled pathogens. The hallmark of pathophysiology in acute respiratory distress syndrome is the loss of the alveolar capillary permeability barrier and the presence of protein-rich edema fluid in the alveoli. This alteration in permeability and accumulation of fluid in the alveoli accompanies damage to the lung epithelium and vascular endothelium along with dysregulated inflammation and inappropriate activity of leukocytes and platelets. In addition, there is uncontrolled activation of coagulation along with suppression of fibrinolysis and loss of surfactant. These pathophysiological changes result in the clinical manifestations of acute respiratory distress syndrome, which include hypoxemia, radiographic opacities, decreased functional residual capacity, increased physiologic deadspace, and decreased lung compliance. Resolution of acute respiratory distress syndrome involves the migration of cells to the site of injury and re-establishment of the epithelium and endothelium with or without the development of fibrosis. Most of the data related to acute respiratory distress syndrome, however, originate from studies in adults or in mature animals with very few studies performed in children or juvenile animals. The lack of studies in children is particularly problematic because the lungs and immune system are still developing during childhood and consequently the pathophysiology of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome may differ in significant ways from that seen in acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults. This article describes what is known of the pathophysiologic processes of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome as we know it today while also presenting the much

  3. Energy expenditure of acutely ill hospitalised patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gariballa Salah

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To measure energy expenditure of acutely ill elderly patients in hospital and following discharge in the community. Design Sixty-three consecutive hospitalised acutely ill elderly patients were recruited. Eight patients were studied to assess the reliability of the Delta Tract Machine as a measure of energy expenditure; 35 patients had their energy expenditure studied in hospital on two occasions and 20 patients had their energy expenditure measured in hospital and at 6 weeks in the community Results Men had higher basal energy expenditure (BMR values compared to women however the difference was not statistically significant [Men, mean (SD 1405 (321 Kcal, women 1238 (322 kcal; mean difference (95% CI 166 kcal (-17 to 531, p = 0.075]. After adjusting for age, gender and body mass index both medication and C-reactive protein (CRP, concentrations showed significant correlation with measured energy expenditure in hospital, (r = -0.36, "p Conclusion Tissue inflammation and medications were associated with change in measured energy expenditure in acutely ill patients.

  4. Noninvasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mas A

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Arantxa Mas, Josep MasipCritical Care Department, Consorci Sanitari Integral (CSI, Hospital Sant Joan Despí Moisès Broggi and Hospital General de l’Hospitalet, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: After the institution of positive-pressure ventilation, the use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV through an interface substantially increased. The first technique was continuous positive airway pressure; but, after the introduction of pressure support ventilation at the end of the 20th century, this became the main modality. Both techniques, and some others that have been recently introduced and which integrate some technological innovations, have extensively demonstrated a faster improvement of acute respiratory failure in different patient populations, avoiding endotracheal intubation and facilitating the release of conventional invasive mechanical ventilation. In acute settings, NIV is currently the first-line treatment for moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation as well as for acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and should be considered in immunocompromised patients with acute respiratory insufficiency, in difficult weaning, and in the prevention of postextubation failure. Alternatively, it can also be used in the postoperative period and in cases of pneumonia and asthma or as a palliative treatment. NIV is currently used in a wide range of acute settings, such as critical care and emergency departments, hospital wards, palliative or pediatric units, and in pre-hospital care. It is also used as a home care therapy in patients with chronic pulmonary or sleep disorders. The appropriate selection of patients and the adaptation to the technique are the keys to success. This review essentially analyzes the evidence of benefits of NIV in different populations with acute respiratory failure and describes the main modalities, new devices, and some practical aspects of the use of this technique. Keywords

  5. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: the Berlin Definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, V Marco; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; Thompson, B Taylor; Ferguson, Niall D; Caldwell, Ellen; Fan, Eddy; Camporota, Luigi; Slutsky, Arthur S

    2012-06-20

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was defined in 1994 by the American-European Consensus Conference (AECC); since then, issues regarding the reliability and validity of this definition have emerged. Using a consensus process, a panel of experts convened in 2011 (an initiative of the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine endorsed by the American Thoracic Society and the Society of Critical Care Medicine) developed the Berlin Definition, focusing on feasibility, reliability, validity, and objective evaluation of its performance. A draft definition proposed 3 mutually exclusive categories of ARDS based on degree of hypoxemia: mild (200 mm Hg Definition was empirically evaluated using patient-level meta-analysis of 4188 patients with ARDS from 4 multicenter clinical data sets and 269 patients with ARDS from 3 single-center data sets containing physiologic information. The 4 ancillary variables did not contribute to the predictive validity of severe ARDS for mortality and were removed from the definition. Using the Berlin Definition, stages of mild, moderate, and severe ARDS were associated with increased mortality (27%; 95% CI, 24%-30%; 32%; 95% CI, 29%-34%; and 45%; 95% CI, 42%-48%, respectively; P definition, the final Berlin Definition had better predictive validity for mortality, with an area under the receiver operating curve of 0.577 (95% CI, 0.561-0.593) vs 0.536 (95% CI, 0.520-0.553; P Definition for ARDS addresses a number of the limitations of the AECC definition. The approach of combining consensus discussions with empirical evaluation may serve as a model to create more accurate, evidence-based, critical illness syndrome definitions and to better inform clinical care, research, and health services planning.

  6. Current perspectives for management of acute respiratory insufficiency in premature infants with acute respiratory syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; Zhang, Ying; Li, Long-Yun

    2014-09-01

    Current perspectives for management of acute respiratory insufficiency in premature infants with acute respiratory syndrome and the pathology of acute respiratory insufficiency in the preterm infant, including the current therapy modalities on disposition are presented. Since the therapeutical challenge and primary clinical goal are to normalize ventilation ratio and lung perfusion, when respiratory insufficiency occurs, it is very important to introduce the respiratory support as soon possible, in order to reduce development of pulmonary cyanosis and edema, and intrapulmonary or intracardial shunts. A characteristic respiratory instability that reflects through fluctuations in gas exchange and ventilation is often present in premature infants. Adapting the respiratory support on a continuous basis to the infant's needs is challenging and not always effective. Although a large number of ventilation strategies for the neonate are available, there is a need for additional consensus on management of acute respiratory distress syndrome in pediatric population lately redefined by Berlin definition criteria, in order to efficiently apply various modes of respiratory support in daily pediatrician clinical use.

  7. Central respiratory failure during acute organophosphate poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Jennifer L; Dunn, Courtney; Gaspari, Romolo J

    2013-11-01

    Organophosphate (OP) pesticide poisoning is a global health problem with over 250,000 deaths per year. OPs affect neuronal signaling through acetylcholine (Ach) neurotransmission via inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), leading to accumulation of Ach at the synaptic cleft and excessive stimulation at post-synaptic receptors. Mortality due to OP agents is attributed to respiratory dysfunction, including central apnea. Cholinergic circuits are integral to many aspects of the central control of respiration, however it is unclear which mechanisms predominate during acute OP intoxication. A more complete understanding of the cholinergic aspects of both respiratory control as well as neural modification of pulmonary function is needed to better understand OP-induced respiratory dysfunction. In this article, we review the physiologic mechanisms of acute OP exposure in the context of the known cholinergic contributions to the central control of respiration. We also discuss the potential central cholinergic contributions to the known peripheral physiologic effects of OP intoxication.

  8. Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Other Respiratory Viral Infections in Older Adults With Moderate to Severe Influenza-like Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falsey, Ann R.; McElhaney, Janet E.; Beran, Jiri; van Essen, Gerrit A.; Duval, Xavier; Esen, Meral; Galtier, Florence; Gervais, Pierre; Hwang, Shinn-Jang; Kremsner, Peter; Launay, Odile; Leroux-Roels, Geert; McNeil, Shelly A.; Nowakowski, Andrzej; Richardus, Jan Hendrik; Ruiz-Palacios, Guillermo; St Rose, Suzanne; Devaster, Jeanne-Marie; Oostvogels, Lidia; Durviaux, Serge; Taylor, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    Background. Few studies have prospectively assessed viral etiologies of acute respiratory infections in community-based elderly individuals. We assessed viral respiratory pathogens in individuals ≥65 years with influenza-like illness (ILI). Methods. Multiplex reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction identified viral pathogens in nasal/throat swabs from 556 episodes of moderate-to-severe ILI, defined as ILI with pneumonia, hospitalization, or maximum daily influenza symptom severity score (ISS) >2. Cases were selected from a randomized trial of an adjuvanted vs nonadjuvanted influenza vaccine conducted in elderly adults from 15 countries. Results. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was detected in 7.4% (41/556) moderate-to-severe ILI episodes in elderly adults. Most (39/41) were single infections. There was a significant association between country and RSV detection (P = .004). RSV prevalence was 7.1% (2/28) in ILI with pneumonia, 12.5% (8/64) in ILI with hospitalization, and 6.7% (32/480) in ILI with maximum ISS > 2. Any virus was detected in 320/556 (57.6%) ILI episodes: influenza A (104/556, 18.7%), rhinovirus/enterovirus (82/556, 14.7%), coronavirus and human metapneumovirus (each 32/556, 5.6%). Conclusions. This first global study providing data on RSV disease in ≥65 year-olds confirms that RSV is an important respiratory pathogen in the elderly. Preventative measures such as vaccination could decrease severe respiratory illnesses and complications in the elderly. PMID:24482398

  9. SMART phones and the acute respiratory patient.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gleeson, L

    2012-05-01

    Definition of Respiratory Failure using PaO2 alone is confounded when patients are commenced on oxygen therapy prior to arterial blood gas (ABG) measurement. Furthermore, classification of Respiratory Failure as Type 1 or Type 2 using PaCO2 alone can give an inaccurate account of events as both types can co-exist. 100 consecutive presentations of acute respiratory distress were assessed initially using PaO2, and subsequently PaO2\\/FiO2 ratio, to diagnose Respiratory Failure. Respiratory Failure cases were classified as Type 1 or Type 2 initially using PaCO2, and subsequently alveolar-arterial (A-a) gradient. Any resultant change in management was documented. Of 100 presentations, an additional 16 cases were diagnosed as Respiratory Failure using PaO2\\/FiO2 ratio in place of PaO2 alone (p = 0.0338). Of 57 cases of Respiratory Failure, 22 cases classified as Type 2 using PaCO2 alone were reclassified as Type 1 using A-a gradient (p < 0.001). Of these 22 cases, management changed in 18.

  10. SMART phones and the acute respiratory patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, L; Alam, J; Lane, S

    2012-05-01

    Definition of Respiratory Failure using PaO2 alone is confounded when patients are commenced on oxygen therapy prior to arterial blood gas (ABG) measurement. Furthermore, classification of Respiratory Failure as Type 1 or Type 2 using PaCO2 alone can give an inaccurate account of events as both types can co-exist. 100 consecutive presentations of acute respiratory distress were assessed initially using PaO2, and subsequently PaO2/FiO2 ratio, to diagnose Respiratory Failure. Respiratory Failure cases were classified as Type 1 or Type 2 initially using PaCO2, and subsequently alveolar-arterial (A-a) gradient. Any resultant change in management was documented. Of 100 presentations, an additional 16 cases were diagnosed as Respiratory Failure using PaO2/FiO2 ratio in place of PaO2 alone (p = 0.0338). Of 57 cases of Respiratory Failure, 22 cases classified as Type 2 using PaCO2 alone were reclassified as Type 1 using A-a gradient (p < 0.001). Of these 22 cases, management changed in 18.

  11. Contribution of respiratory pathogens to influenza-like illness consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollaerts, K; Antoine, J; Van Casteren, V; Ducoffre, G; Hens, N; Quoilin, S

    2013-10-01

    Influenza-like illnesses (ILIs) are caused by several respiratory pathogens. These pathogens show weak to strong seasonal activity implying seasonality in ILI consultations. In this paper, the contribution of pathogens to seasonality of ILI consultations was statistically modelled. Virological count data were first smoothed using modulation models for seasonal time series. Second, Poisson regression was used regressing ILI consultation counts on the smoothed time series. Using ratios of the estimated regression parameters, relative measures of the underreporting of pathogens were obtained. Influenza viruses A and B, parainfluenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) significantly contributed to explain the seasonal variation in ILI consultations. We also found that RSV was the least and influenza virus A is the most underreported pathogen in Belgian laboratory surveillance. The proposed methods and results are helpful in interpreting the data of clinical and laboratory surveillance, which are the essential parts of influenza surveillance.

  12. Pharm GKB: Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available y syndrome PharmGKB Accession Id: PA136400566 External Vocabularies MeSH: Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome ...Publications related to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome: 1 view legend The following icons indicate that d...et al. Common Searches Search Medline Plus Search CTD Pharm GKB: Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome ... ...(D045169) SnoMedCT: Severe acute respiratory syndrome (398447004) UMLS: C1175175 (C1175175) MedDRA: SARS (10061986) NDFRT: Severe Acu...te Respiratory Syndrome [Disease/Finding] (N0000010956)

  13. Characteristics of patients with influenza-like illness, severe acture respiratory illness, and laboratory-confirmed influenza at a major children's hospital in Angola, 2009-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Yolanda; Oliveira, Erika; Vasconcelos, Jocelyne; Cohen, Adam L; Francisco, Moises

    2012-12-15

    There are no published data on influenza trends in Angola, where pneumonia is a leading cause of death among young children. This study aims to describe the seasonal trends, types, and subtypes of influenza virus recovered from patients with respiratory illness who were admitted to the major children's hospital in Angola from May 2009 through April 2011. Nasal and oral swabs were collected from patients seen in the outpatient clinic with influenza-like illness (ILI) or hospitalized with severe acute respiratory illness (SARI) and tested for influenza virus by polymerase chain reaction assays. Of 691 samples collected, 334 (48%) were from case patients with ILI, and 357 (52%) were from case patients with SARI. Most (86%) of these children were Angola.

  14. ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME IN PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhumala

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is a clinical syndrome of severe dyspnea of rapid onset, hypoxemia, and diffuse pulmonary infiltrates leading to respiratory failure. ARDS occurs in pregnancy and may have unique causes. Overall mortality for both the mother and the fetus is high and significant morbidity can persist even after initial recovery. ARDS is associated with obstetric causes such as amniotic fluid embolism, preeclampsia, septic abortion, and retained products of conception or non - obstetr ic causes that include sepsis, aspiration pneumonitis, influenza pneumonia, blood transfusions, and trauma. Here is a 24 years old female admitted with 7months of amenorrhea, who presented with respiratory failure, she was intubated and ventilated for 47da ys. She recovered, and a live baby was delivered. She was discharged after 73days.

  15. Burden of Self-reported Acute Gastrointestinal Illness in Cuba

    OpenAIRE

    Prieto, Pablo Aguiar; Finley, Rita L; Muchaal, P.K.; Guerin, Michele T; Isaacs, Sandy; Domínguez, Arnaldo Castro; Marie, Gisele Coutín; Perez, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal illness is an important public-health issue worldwide. Burden-of-illness studies have not previously been conducted in Cuba. The objective of the study was to determine the magnitude, distribution, and burden of self-reported acute gastrointestinal illness in Cuba. A retrospective, cross-sectional survey was conducted in three sentinel sites during June-July 2005 (rainy season) and during November 2005–January 2006 (dry season). Households were randomly selected from a ...

  16. Etnografía de la infección respiratoria aguda en una zona rural del altiplano mexicano Ethnography of acute respiratory illnesses in a rural zone of the Mexican central highlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HOMERO MARTÍNEZ

    1997-05-01

    menor costo fueron razones frecuentemente aducidas para estas elecciones. Conclusiones. Esta información puede resultar útil para mejorar la comunicación con las madres.Objective. To identify the terms used by mothers to refer to diseases, signs and symptoms related to acute respiratory illnesses (ARI, alarming signs which should motivate them to seek medical attention, and to describe common home practices of disease care and treatment. Material and methods. An ethnographic study was performed in six rural communities of the Mexican central highlands. Interviews were collected from 12 key informers, six mothers of children who had died from ARI and 24 mothers of children younger than five years of age, with several ethnographic techniques to complement information ("triangulation". Results. The most commonly identified diseases were cold, sore throat, cough, bronchitis, pneumonia and "broncomonía". Key signs to establish diagnosis included nasal discharge, sore throat, cough, head and body ache, fever, "bubbling" chest, general malaise and shortness of breath. Tachypnea was referred to as "b breathing", "much breathing", "rapid breathing" or "sizzle"; intercostal depression as "the chest sinks", stridor as "chest moan or chest snore", sibilance as "chest snore" and cyanosis as "he turns purple". Home treatments include herbal teas, lemon, green or red tomato or potato applied to the throat externally, as well as creams applied to chest or back. Antibiotic prescription was not common, contrary to antipiretics. Most mothers recognized mild illnesses: severe illnesses were recognized less frequently. When faced with a severe ARI, mothers sought attention firstly at the project clinic, second in frequency with a private physician in the capital of the province and then at the Health Ministry of the district. The reasons to choose these possibilities were mainly proximity and lower costs. Conclusions. This information can be useful to improve communication with mothers.

  17. Surveillance for hospitalized acute respiratory infection in Guatemala.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R Verani

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory infections (ARI are an important cause of illness and death worldwide, yet data on the etiology of ARI and the population-level burden in developing countries are limited. Surveillance for ARI was conducted at two hospitals in Guatemala. Patients admitted with at least one sign of acute infection and one sign or symptom of respiratory illness met the criteria for a case of hospitalized ARI. Nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs were collected and tested by polymerase chain reaction for adenovirus, parainfluenza virus types 1,2 and 3, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B viruses, human metapneumovirus, Chlamydia pneumioniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Urine specimens were tested for Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen. Blood culture and chest radiograph were done at the discretion of the treating physician. Between November 2007 and December 2011, 3,964 case-patients were enrolled. While cases occurred among all age groups, 2,396 (60.4% cases occurred in children <5 years old and 463 (11.7% among adults ≥65 years old. Viruses were found in 52.6% of all case-patients and 71.8% of those aged <1 year old; the most frequently detected was respiratory syncytial virus, affecting 26.4% of case-patients. Urine antigen testing for Streptococcus pneumoniae performed for case-patients ≥15 years old was positive in 15.1% of those tested. Among 2,364 (59.6% of case-patients with a radiograph, 907 (40.0% had findings suggestive of bacterial pneumonia. Overall, 230 (5.9% case-patients died during the hospitalization. Using population denominators, the observed hospitalized ARI incidence was 128 cases per 100,000, with the highest rates seen among children <1 year old (1,703 per 100,000, followed by adults ≥65 years old (292 per 100,000. These data, which demonstrate a substantial burden of hospitalized ARI in Guatemala due to a variety of pathogens, can help guide public health policies aimed at reducing the burden of illness and

  18. Neuroleptic-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Garcia Soriano

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: A case of neuroleptic malignant syndrome and acute respiratory distress syndrome is presented and discussed with emphasis on the role of muscle relaxation, creatine kinase, and respiratory function tests. CASE REPORT: A 41-year-old man presented right otalgia and peripheral facial paralysis. A computed tomography scan of the skull showed a hyperdense area, 2 cm in diameter, in the pathway of the anterior intercommunicating cerebral artery. Preoperative examination revealed: pH 7.4, PaCO2 40 torr, PaO2 80 torr (room air, Hb 13.8 g/dl, blood urea nitrogen 3.2 mmol/l, and creatinine 90 mmol/l. The chest x-ray was normal. The patient had not eaten during the 12-hour period prior to anesthesia induction. Intravenous halothane, fentanyl 0.5 mg and droperidol 25 mg were used for anesthesia. After the first six hours, the PaO2 was 65 torr (normal PaCO2 with FiO2 50% (PaO2/FiO2 130, and remained at this level until the end of the operation 4 hours later, maintaining PaCO2 at 35 torr. A thrombosed aneurysm was detected and resected, and the ends of the artery were closed with clips. No vasospasm was present. This case illustrates that neuroleptic drugs can cause neuroleptic malignant syndrome associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome is a disease that is difficult to diagnose. Acute respiratory distress syndrome is another manifestation of neuroleptic malignant syndrome that has not been recognized in previous reports: it may be produced by neuroleptic drugs independent of the manifestation of neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Some considerations regarding the cause and effect relationship between acute respiratory distress syndrome and neuroleptic drugs are discussed. Intensive care unit physicians should consider the possibility that patients receiving neuroleptic drugs could develop respiratory failure in the absence of other factors that might explain the syndrome.

  19. The Phosphate Levels of Critically ill Patients with Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Turan İnal

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The incidence of hypophosphatemia is higher in critically ill patients and prolonged the length of ICU stay and duration of mechanical ventilation. This study evaluated the prognostic value of phosphate levels in critically ill patients. Materials and Methods: All patients admitted to the general and surgical intensive care unit (ICU of Trakya University Medical Faculty, with respiratory failure during 1 year period (from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2009, were retrospectively enrolled. The phosphate levels, age, gender, length of ICU stay, duration of mechanical ventilation, APACHE II scores, medical drug usage and prognosis were recorded. Hypophosphataemia was defined as a level under 2.5 mg/dL and normophosphatemia was defined as a level between 2.5-4.7 mg/dL. Results: 139 patients were retrospectively enrolled into the study, of these, 41% had hypophosphataemia. There was no statistically significant difference in age, gender and APACHE II scores. The length of ICU stay was 20.16±16.31 days in hypophosphatemic patients and 12.62±12.43 days in normophosphatemic patients (p<0.05. The duration of mechanical ventilation was 17.54±16.27 days in hypophosphatemic patients and 9.94±11.55 days in normophosphatemic patients (p<0.05. The usage of catecholamines, beta adrenergic receptor agonists, diuretics and glucocorticoids were higher in hypophosphatemic patients (p<0.05. Conclusion: The duration of mechanical ventilation and the length of ICU stay was prolonged in hypophosphatemic patients with respiratory failure. We suggested to follow the phosphate levels tightly for early diagnosis and treatment of phosphate deficiency. (Journal of the Turkish Society of Intensive Care 2011; 9: 19-22

  20. Mayaro Virus in Child with Acute Febrile Illness, Haiti, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednicky, John; De Rochars, Valery Madsen Beau; Elbadry, Maha; Loeb, Julia; Telisma, Taina; Chavannes, Sonese; Anilis, Gina; Cella, Eleonora; Ciccozzi, Massinno; Okech, Bernard; Salemi, Marco; Morris, J Glenn

    2016-11-01

    Mayaro virus has been associated with small outbreaks in northern South America. We isolated this virus from a child with acute febrile illness in rural Haiti, confirming its role as a cause of mosquitoborne illness in the Caribbean region. The clinical presentation can mimic that of chikungunya, dengue, and Zika virus infections.

  1. Critical care ultrasonography in acute respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignon, Philippe; Repessé, Xavier; Vieillard-Baron, Antoine; Maury, Eric

    2016-08-15

    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is a leading indication for performing critical care ultrasonography (CCUS) which, in these patients, combines critical care echocardiography (CCE) and chest ultrasonography. CCE is ideally suited to guide the diagnostic work-up in patients presenting with ARF since it allows the assessment of left ventricular filling pressure and pulmonary artery pressure, and the identification of a potential underlying cardiopathy. In addition, CCE precisely depicts the consequences of pulmonary vascular lesions on right ventricular function and helps in adjusting the ventilator settings in patients sustaining moderate-to-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Similarly, CCE helps in identifying patients at high risk of ventilator weaning failure, depicts the mechanisms of weaning pulmonary edema in those patients who fail a spontaneous breathing trial, and guides tailored therapeutic strategy. In all these clinical settings, CCE provides unparalleled information on both the efficacy and tolerance of therapeutic changes. Chest ultrasonography provides further insights into pleural and lung abnormalities associated with ARF, irrespective of its origin. It also allows the assessment of the effects of treatment on lung aeration or pleural effusions. The major limitation of lung ultrasonography is that it is currently based on a qualitative approach in the absence of standardized quantification parameters. CCE combined with chest ultrasonography rapidly provides highly relevant information in patients sustaining ARF. A pragmatic strategy based on the serial use of CCUS for the management of patients presenting with ARF of various origins is detailed in the present manuscript.

  2. Severe respiratory illness associated with a novel coronavirus--Saudi Arabia and Qatar, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-12

    CDC is working closely with the World Health Organization (WHO) and other partners to better understand the public health risk presented by a recently detected, novel coronavirus. This virus has been identified in two patients, both previously healthy adults who suffered severe respiratory illness. The first patient, a man aged 60 years from Saudi Arabia, was hospitalized in June 2012 and died; the second patient, a man aged 49 years from Qatar with onset of symptoms in September 2012 was transported to the United Kingdom for intensive care. He remains hospitalized on life support with both pulmonary and renal failure. Person-to-person or health-care-associated transmission has not been identified to date. Interim case definitions based on acute respiratory illness and travel history were issued by WHO on September 29 and include criteria for "patient under investigation," "probable case," and "confirmed case". This information is current as of October 4. Updates on the investigation and the WHO case definition are available at http://www.who.int/csr/don/en/index.html.

  3. Acute respiratory failure following ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonello Nicolini

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome is a serious and potentially life-threatening physiological complication that may be encountered in patients who undergo controlled ovarian hyperstimulation cycles. The syndrome is typically associated with regimes of exogenous gonadotropins, but it can be seen, albeit rarely, when clomiphene is administered during the induction phase. Although this syndrome is widely described in scientific literature and is well known by obstetricians, the knowledge of this pathological and potentially life-threatening condition is generally less than satisfactory among physicians. The dramatic increase in therapeutic strategies to treat infertility has pushed this condition into the realm of acute care therapy. The potential complications of this syndrome, including pulmonary involvement, should be considered and identified so as to allow a more appropriate diagnosis and management. We describe a case of a woman with an extremely severe (Stage 6 ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome who presented ascites, bilateral pleural effusion and severe respiratory failure treated with non-invasive ventilation. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit because of severe respiratory failure, ascites, and bilateral pleural effusion due to ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. Treatment included non-invasive ventilation and three thoracentesis procedures, plus the administration of albumin, colloid solutions and high-dose furosemid. Severe form of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome is observed in 0.5-5% of the women treated, and intensive care may be required for management of thromboembolic complications, renal failure and severe respiratory failure. Pulmonary intensive care may involve thoracentesis, oxygen supplementation and, in more severe cases, assisted ventilation. To our knowledge, there have been only two studies in English language medical literature that describe severe respiratory failure treated with non

  4. Chinese herbal medicine for severe acute respiratory syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jianping; Manheimer, Eric; Shi, Yi

    2004-01-01

    To review randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effects of Chinese herbal medicine for treating severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) systematically.......To review randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effects of Chinese herbal medicine for treating severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) systematically....

  5. Clustering of acute respiratory infection hospitalizations in childcare facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Benn, Christine Stabell; Simonsen, Jacob;

    2010-01-01

    To estimate how risk of acute respiratory infection (ARI) hospitalization in children attending childcare facilities with a recently (within 1 month) hospitalized child is affected by gender, age and other characteristics.......To estimate how risk of acute respiratory infection (ARI) hospitalization in children attending childcare facilities with a recently (within 1 month) hospitalized child is affected by gender, age and other characteristics....

  6. Progress and perspectives in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotta, Alexandre Tellechea; Piva, Jefferson Pedro; Andreolio, Cinara; de Carvalho, Werther Brunow; Garcia, Pedro Celiny Ramos

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a disease of acute onset characterized by hypoxemia and infiltrates on chest radiographs that affects both adults and children of all ages. It is an important cause of respiratory failure in pediatric intensive care units and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, until recently, the definitions and diagnostic criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome have focused on the adult population. In this article, we review the evolution of the definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome over nearly five decades, with a special focus on the new pediatric definition. We also discuss recommendations for the implementation of mechanical ventilation strategies in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome in children and the use of adjuvant therapies.

  7. Nutrition: A Primary Therapy in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Wilson

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate nutrition is an essential component of intensive care management of children with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS and is linked to patient outcomes. One out of every two children in the PICU will develop malnutrition or have worsening of baseline malnutrition, and present with specific micronutrient deficiencies. Early and adequate enteral nutrition (EN is associated with improved 60-day survival after pediatric critical illness and yet, despite early EN guidelines, critically ill children receive on average only 55% of goal calories by PICU day 10. Inadequate delivery of EN is due to perceived feeding intolerance, reluctance to enterally feed children with hemodynamic instability, and fluid restriction. Underlying each of these factors is large practice variation between providers and across institutions for initiation, advancement and maintenance of EN. Strategies to improve early initiation, advancement, and to maintain delivery of EN are needed to improve morbidity and mortality from pediatric ARDS. Both over and underfeeding prolongs duration of mechanical ventilation in children and worsens other organ function such that precise calorie goals are needed. The gut is thought to act as a ‘motor’ of organ dysfunction and emerging data regarding the role of intestinal barrier functions and the intestinal microbiome on organ dysfunction and outcomes of critical illness present exciting opportunities to improve patient outcomes. Nutrition should be considered a primary rather than supportive therapy for pediatric ARDS. Precise nutritional therapies, which are titrated and targeted to preservation of intestinal barrier function, prevention of intestinal dysbiosis, preservation of lean body mass, and blunting of the systemic inflammatory response, offer great potential for improving outcomes of pediatric ARDS. In this review we examine the current evidence regarding dose, route, and timing of nutrition, current

  8. The effect of inhaled nitric oxide in acute respiratory distress syndrome in children and adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karam, O; Gebistorf, F; Wetterslev, J

    2017-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is associated with high mortality and morbidity. Inhaled nitric oxide has been used to improve oxygenation but its role remains controversial. Our primary objective in this systematic review was to examine the effects of inhaled nitric oxide administration...... on mortality in adults and children with acute respiratory distress syndrome. We included all randomised, controlled trials, irrespective of date of publication, blinding status, outcomes reported or language. Our primary outcome measure was all-cause mortality. We performed several subgroup and sensitivity......% CI) 1.59 (1.17-2.16)) with inhaled nitric oxide. In conclusion, there is insufficient evidence to support inhaled nitric oxide in any category of critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome despite a transient improvement in oxygenation, since mortality is not reduced and it may...

  9. Effects of air pollution on daily clinic visits for lower respiratory tract illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jing-Shiang; Chan, Chang-Chuan

    2002-01-01

    The authors used data obtained from clinic records and environmental monitoring stations in Taiwan during 1998 to estimate the association between air pollution and daily numbers of clinic visits for lower respiratory tract illness. A small-area design and hierarchical modeling were used for the analysis. Rates of daily clinic visits were associated with current-day concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and particulate matter less than or equal to 10 microm in aerometric diameter. People over age 65 years were the most susceptible, and estimated pollution effects decreased as the exposure time lag increased. The analysis also suggested that several community-specific variables, such as a community's population density and yearly air pollution levels, modified the effects of air pollution. In this paper, the authors demonstrate the use of a small-area design to assess acute health effects of air pollution.

  10. Prone positioning in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Kristy; Dufault, Marlene; Bergeron, Kathy

    2015-08-12

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a condition with a high morbidity and mortality rate, and treatment is often long and costly. Prone positioning is a rarely used intervention for patients with this syndrome, although research suggests it may be effective. A literature search was undertaken to examine the effects of prone positioning on oxygenation, morbidity and mortality in patients with ARDS. It revealed that prone positioning, when used with low tidal volume ventilation over an extended period, may reduce mortality rates in selected patients with severe ARDS. The selection of patients with severe ARDS for prone positioning should be done on a case-by-case basis to maximise benefits and minimise complications. Further research is required on the use of prone positioning in patients with severe ARDS to support or disclaim the therapy's use in practice, and to compare confounding variables such as ideal prone duration and mechanical versus manual pronation.

  11. Acute otitis media and respiratory viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, Yunus; Güven, Mehmet; Otlu, Bariş; Yenişehirli, Gülgün; Aladağ, Ibrahim; Eyibilen, Ahmet; Doğru, Salim

    2007-03-01

    The present study was performed to elucidate the clinical outcome, and etiology of acute otitis media (AOM) in children based on virologic and bacteriologic tests. The study group consisted of 120 children aged 6 to 144 months with AOM. Middle ear fluid (MEF) was tested for viral pathogens by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and for bacteria by gram-staining and culture. Clinical response was assessed on day 2 to 4, 11 to 13, 26 to 28. Respiratory viruses were isolated in 39 patients (32.5%). Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (46.5%) was the most common virus identified in MEF samples, followed by human rhinovirus (HRV) (25.6%), human coronavirus (HCV) (11.6%), influenza (IV) type A (9.3%), adenovirus type sub type A (AV) (4%), and parainfluenza (PIV) type -3 (2%) by RT-PCR. In total 69 bacterial species were isolated from 65 (54.8%) of 120 patients. Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) was the most frequently isolated bacteria. Viral RNA was detected in 31 (56.3%) of 55 bacteria-negative specimens and in 8 (12.3%) of 65 bacteria-positive MEF samples. No significant differences were found between children representing viral infection alone, combined viral and bacterial infection, bacterial infection alone, and neither viral nor bacterial infection, regarding clinical cure, relapse and reinfection rates. A significantly higher rate of secretory otitis media (SOM) was observed in alone or combined RSV infection with S. pneumonia or Haemophilus influenzae (H. influenzae) than in other viruses infection. Conclusion. This study provides information about etiologic agents and diagnosis of AOM in Turkish children. The findings highlight the importance of common respiratory viruses and bacterial pathogens, particularly RSV, HRV, S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae, in predisposing to and causing AOM in children.

  12. Pathogenesis of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Golubev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is a common complication of many diseases. Its polyetiological pattern determines the specific features of lung morphological changes and the clinical course of ARDS. Objective: to analyze the pathogenesis of ARDS in the context of the general pathological processes underlying its development. Material and methods. More than 200 lungs from the people who had died from severe concomitant injury or ARDS-complicated pneumonia were investigated. More than 150 rat experiments simulated various types of lung injury: ventilator-induced lung injury with different ventilation parameters; reperfusion injuries (systemic circulation blockade due to 12-minute vascular fascicle ligation, followed by the recovery of cardiac performance and breathing; microcirculatory disorder (injection of a thromboplastin solution into the jugular vein; blood loss; betaine-pepsin aspiration; and closed chest injury. Different parts of the right and left lungs were histologically examined 1 and 3 hours and 1 and 3 days after initiation of the experiment. Lung pieces were fixed in 10% neutral formalin solution and embedded in paraffin. Histological sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and using the van Gieson and Weigert procedures; the Schiff test was used. Results. The influence of aggression factors (trauma, blood loss, aspiration, infection, etc. results in damage to the lung and particularly air-blood barrier structures (endothelium, alveolar epithelium, their basement membrane. In turn the alteration of cellular and extracellular structures is followed by the increased permeability of hemomicrocirculatory bed vessels, leading to the development of non-cardiogenic (interstitial, alveolar pulmonary edema that is a central component in the pathogenesis of ARDS. Conclusion. The diagnosis of the early manifestations of ARDS must account for the nature of an aggression factor, the signs confirming the alteration of the lung

  13. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Obstetric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Galushka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to define the specific features of the course of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS in puer-peras with a complicated postpartum period. Subjects and methods. Sixty-seven puerperas with ARDS were examined. Group 1 included 27 puerperas with postpartum ARDS; Group 2 comprised 10 puerperas who had been treated in an intensive care and died; Group 3 consisted of nonobstetric patients with ARDS of various genesis (a control group. Results. In obstetric patients, the baseline oxygenation index was significantly lower than that in the control group. However, Group 1 patients showed a rapid increase in PaO2/FiO2 on days 3—4 of treatment. In the control group, the changes occurred later — on days 5—6. The baseline alveolar-arterial oxygen difference was significantly higher in the obstetric patients than that in the controls. In Group 1, AaDpO2 drastically decreased on days 3—4, which took place in parallel with an increase in the oxygenation index. At the beginning of the study, pulmonary shunting was high in the group of survivors, deceased, and controls. In Group 1, the shunting decreased on days 3—4 whereas in the control group this index normalized later — only by days 6—7. In Group 1, compliance remained lower throughout the observation, but on day 7 there was a significant difference in this index between the deceased, survivors, and controls. Conclusion. Thus, more severe baseline pulmonary gas exchange abnormalities are observed in obstetric patients than in general surgical and traumatological patients; the oxygenation index, alveolar-arterial oxygen difference, and pulmonary shunting index more rapidly change in patients with severe obstetric disease in its favorable course than in general surgical and traumatological patients; throughout the observation, thoracopulmonary compliance was less in obstetric patients than in the controls. Key words: acute respiratory distress syndrome, puerperium.

  14. Pathogenesis of severe acute respiratory syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ding-mei; LU Jia-hai; ZHONG Nan-shan

    2008-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) first emerged in Guangdong province,China in November2002.During the following 3 months,it spread rapidly across the world,resulting in approximately 800 deaths.In 2004,subsequent sporadic cases emerged in Singapore and China.A novel coronavims,SARS-CoV,was identified as the etiological agent of SARS.1,2 This virus belongs to a family of large,positive,single-stranded RNA viruses.Nevertheless,genomic characterization shows that the SARS-CoV is only moderately related to other known coronaviruses.3 In contrast with previously described coronaviruses,SARS-CoV infection typically causes severe symptoms related to the lower respiratory tract.The SARS-CoV genome includes 14 putative open reading frames encoding 28 potential proteins,and the functions of many of these proteins are not known.4 A number of complete and partial autopsies of SARS patients have been reported since the first outbreak in 2003.The predominant pathological finding in these cases was diffuse alveolar damage (DAD).This severe pulmonary injury of SARS patients is caused both by direct viral effects and immunopathogenetic factors.5 Many important aspects of the pathogenesis of SARS have not yet been fully clarified.In this article,we summarize the most important mechanisms involved in the complex pathogenesis of SARS,including clinical characters,host and receptors,immune system response and genetic factors.

  15. Interpretation of chest radiographs in both cancer and other critical care patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

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    Sema Yilmaz

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a clinical, pathophysiological and radiographic pattern that has signs of pulmonary edema occur without elevated pulmonary venous pressures. Clinical presentation and progression of acute respiratory distress syndrome are followed by frequently ordered portable chest X-ray in critically ill patients. We evaluated chest radiographs of ten cancer and other six critical care pediatric patients. The parenchymal imaging of lung in patients with cancer was reported the same as that of other critically ill children despite underlying pathophysiological variations in our investigation. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 270-273

  16. Prone ventilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome

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    Claude Guérin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Prone positioning has been used for many years in patients with acute lung injury (ALI/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, with no clear benefit for patient outcome. Meta-analyses have suggested better survival in patients with an arterial oxygen tension (PaO2/inspiratory oxygen fraction (FIO2 ratio <100 mmHg. A recent randomised controlled trial was performed in ARDS patients after a 12–24 h stabilisation period and severity criteria (PaO2/FIO2 <150 mmHg at a positive end-expiratory pressure ≥5 cmH2O. This trial has demonstrated a significant reduction in mortality from 32.8% in the supine group to 16% in the prone group (p<0.001. The reasons for this dramatic effect are not clear but probably involves a reduction in ventilator-induced lung injury due to prone positioning, for which there is ample evidence in experimental and clinical studies. The aims of this article are to discuss: the rationale of prone positioning in patients with ALI/ARDS; the evidence of its use based on trial analysis; and the limitations of its use as well as the current place of prone positioning in the management of patients with ALI/ARDS. From the currently available data, prone positioning should be used as a first-line therapy in patients with severe ALI/ARDS.

  17. Boussignac CPAP in acute respiratory failure

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    Federico Lari

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The application of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP is one of the most important therapeutic interventions used in patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF secondary to acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE. Thanks to its positive effects on both hemodynamics and ventilation, CPAP improves clinical and blood-gas parameters. Compared with standard oxygen therapy, use of CPAP is associated with decreased mortality and reduced need for intubation in these patients. Aim of the study: This review examines the principles of CPAP, techniques and equipment used to deliver it, and clinical applications. Special emphasis is placed on CPAP delivered with the Boussignac device. Discussion and conclusions: In emergency departments, this simple, lightweight, disposable device has proved to be well tolerated and similar to Venturi-like flow generators in terms of effectiveness. These findings suggest that Boussignac CPAP might be useful for managing ARF in non-critical care areas where other more complicated CPAP equipment (Venturi-like flow generators and ventilators are not available (for example, in general medical wards.

  18. Acute respiratory distress in a silversmith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Jignesh Mukeshkumar; Dhareshwar, Shashank; Sharma, Anand; Karanth, Raghuveer; Ramkumar, V. S.; Ramaiah, Indira

    2014-01-01

    A 25-year-old young male patient presented in casualty department with severe respiratory distress on the fourth day from onset of symptoms. The patient was nonsmoker and had no antecedent medical or drug history. Prior to admission, patient had dry cough and bilateral pleuritic chest pain for the last three days. He was in severe respiratory distress with use of accessory muscles of respiration. On examination, he had heart rate of 120 beats/min, blood pressure (BP) of 150/80, respiratory rate of 48-52/min and central cyanosis present. On systemic examination, reduced intensity of breath sounds with extensive rhonchi and crepitation was found in both lung fields, with other examination being within normal limits. On pulse oximetry, oxygen saturation was 28% on room air, which increased up to 36% with the help of 4 L oxygen via nasal prongs. PaO2/FiO2 ratio was 100. Chest X-ray analysis was suggestive of non-cardiac pulmonary edema in view of bilateral fluffy opacity without cardiomegaly. In view of 2/3 positive criteria, his provisional diagnosis was Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). He required mechanical ventilatory support and was gradually weaned over a period of 10 days. The patient was treated with broad spectrum antibiotics and other supportive measures. On re-evaluation of history, we found that he was a goldsmith by occupation, smelting silver and gold for the past 8-10 years. On the day of onset of symptoms, while smelting silver he was exposed to golden yellow fumes for around 15 minutes, with the quantum of exposure more than any other day earlier. From previous experience and analysis of similar silver metals, he was able to tell us that the silver was adulterated with large amount of cadmium on that day than before. Serum level of cadmium was 2.9 μg/L 6 days after initial exposure. At the time of discharge, he had residual opacities in the chest radiograph and resting oxygen saturation was 94% on room air. PMID:25006313

  19. Acute respiratory distress in a silversmith

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    Jignesh Mukeshkumar Parikh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 25-year-old young male patient presented in casualty department with severe respiratory distress on the fourth day from onset of symptoms. The patient was nonsmoker and had no antecedent medical or drug history. Prior to admission, patient had dry cough and bilateral pleuritic chest pain for the last three days. He was in severe respiratory distress with use of accessory muscles of respiration. On examination, he had heart rate of 120 beats/min, blood pressure (BP of 150/80, respiratory rate of 48-52/min and central cyanosis present. On systemic examination, reduced intensity of breath sounds with extensive rhonchi and crepitation was found in both lung fields, with other examination being within normal limits. On pulse oximetry, oxygen saturation was 28% on room air, which increased up to 36% with the help of 4 L oxygen via nasal prongs. PaO 2 /FiO 2 ratio was 100. Chest X-ray analysis was suggestive of non-cardiac pulmonary edema in view of bilateral fluffy opacity without cardiomegaly. In view of 2/3 positive criteria, his provisional diagnosis was Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS. He required mechanical ventilatory support and was gradually weaned over a period of 10 days. The patient was treated with broad spectrum antibiotics and other supportive measures. On re-evaluation of history, we found that he was a goldsmith by occupation, smelting silver and gold for the past 8-10 years. On the day of onset of symptoms, while smelting silver he was exposed to golden yellow fumes for around 15 minutes, with the quantum of exposure more than any other day earlier. From previous experience and analysis of similar silver metals, he was able to tell us that the silver was adulterated with large amount of cadmium on that day than before. Serum level of cadmium was 2.9 μg/L 6 days after initial exposure. At the time of discharge, he had residual opacities in the chest radiograph and resting oxygen saturation was 94% on room air.

  20. The effects of indoor environmental factors on respiratory illness in primary school children in Kuala Lumpur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, B H; Henry, R L

    1991-03-01

    The effects of indoor environmental factors on respiratory illness were studied in 15017-12 year old school children in Kuala Lumpur. Exposure to mosquito coil smoke for at least three nights a week was independently associated with asthma and persistent wheeze. Passive smoking, defined as sharing a bedroom with an adult smoker, was independently associated with a chest illness in the past year. No relationships were found between exposure to kerosene stoves, wood stoves, fumigation mat mosquito repellents or aerosol insecticides and respiratory illness. Host factors predictive of at least one respiratory outcome included family history of chest illness, history of allergy, male sex, hospitalization in the neonatal period and low paternal education. With 95% confidence, avoidance of regular exposure to mosquito coil smoke and passive smoking could reduce the prevalences of persistent wheeze, asthma and chest illness by up to 29%. Measurements of lung function confirmed the validity of questions pertaining to wheezing and asthma in the study questionnaire.

  1. The cost of community-managed viral respiratory illnesses in a cohort of healthy preschool-aged children

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    Allen Kelly M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute respiratory illnesses (ARIs during childhood are often caused by respiratory viruses, result in significant morbidity, and have associated costs for families and society. Despite their ubiquity, there is a lack of interdisciplinary epidemiologic and economic research that has collected primary impact data, particularly associated with indirect costs, from families during ARIs in children. Methods We conducted a 12-month cohort study in 234 preschool children with impact diary recording and PCR testing of nose-throat swabs for viruses during an ARI. We used applied values to estimate a virus-specific mean cost of ARIs. Results Impact diaries were available for 72% (523/725 of community-managed illnesses between January 2003 and January 2004. The mean cost of ARIs was AU$309 (95% confidence interval $263 to $354. Influenza illnesses had a mean cost of $904, compared with RSV, $304, the next most expensive single-virus illness, although confidence intervals overlapped. Mean carer time away from usual activity per day was two hours for influenza ARIs and between 30 and 45 minutes for all other ARI categories. Conclusion From a societal perspective, community-managed ARIs are a significant cost burden on families and society. The point estimate of the mean cost of community-managed influenza illnesses in healthy preschool aged children is three times greater than those illnesses caused by RSV and other respiratory viruses. Indirect costs, particularly carer time away from usual activity, are the key cost drivers for ARIs in children. The use of parent-collected specimens may enhance ARI surveillance and reduce any potential Hawthorne effect caused by compliance with study procedures. These findings reinforce the need for further integrated epidemiologic and economic research of ARIs in children to allow for comprehensive cost-effectiveness assessments of preventive and therapeutic options.

  2. Implementing hospital-based surveillance for severe acute respiratory infections caused by influenza and other respiratory pathogens in New Zealand

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    Q Sue Huang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent experience with pandemic influenza A(H1N1pdm09 highlighted the importance of global surveillance for severe respiratory disease to support pandemic preparedness and seasonal influenza control. Improved surveillance in the southern hemisphere is needed to provide critical data on influenza epidemiology, disease burden, circulating strains and effectiveness of influenza prevention and control measures. Hospital-based surveillance for severe acute respiratory infection (SARI cases was established in New Zealand on 30 April 2012. The aims were to measure incidence, prevalence, risk factors, clinical spectrum and outcomes for SARI and associated influenza and other respiratory pathogen cases as well as to understand influenza contribution to patients not meeting SARI case definition. Methods/Design: All inpatients with suspected respiratory infections who were admitted overnight to the study hospitals were screened daily. If a patient met the World Health Organization’s SARI case definition, a respiratory specimen was tested for influenza and other respiratory pathogens. A case report form captured demographics, history of presenting illness, co-morbidities, disease course and outcome and risk factors. These data were supplemented from electronic clinical records and other linked data sources. Discussion: Hospital-based SARI surveillance has been implemented and is fully functioning in New Zealand. Active, prospective, continuous, hospital-based SARI surveillance is useful in supporting pandemic preparedness for emerging influenza A(H7N9 virus infections and seasonal influenza prevention and control.

  3. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: epidemiology and management approaches

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    Walkey AJ

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Allan J Walkey,1 Ross Summer,1 Vu Ho,1 Philip Alkana21The Pulmonary Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; 2Asthma Research Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Acute lung injury and the more severe acute respiratory distress syndrome represent a spectrum of lung disease characterized by the sudden onset of inflammatory pulmonary edema secondary to myriad local or systemic insults. The present article provides a review of current evidence in the epidemiology and treatment of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, with a focus on significant knowledge gaps that may be addressed through epidemiologic methods.Keywords: acute lung injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, review, epidemiology

  4. Prolonged shedding of rhinovirus and re-infection in adults with respiratory tract illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlateva, Kalina T; de Vries, Jutte J C; Coenjaerts, Frank E J; van Loon, Anton M; Verheij, Theo; Little, Paul; Butler, Christopher C; Goossens, Herman; Ieven, Margareta; Claas, Eric C J

    2014-07-01

    Rhinovirus infections occur frequently throughout life and have been reported in about one-third of asymptomatic cases. The clinical significance of sequential rhinovirus infections remains unclear. To determine the incidence and clinical relevance of sequential rhinovirus detections, nasopharyngeal samples from 2485 adults with acute cough/lower respiratory illness were analysed. Patients were enrolled prospectively by general practitioners from 12 European Union countries during three consecutive years (2007-2010). Nasopharyngeal samples were collected at the initial general practitioner consultation and 28 days thereafter and symptom scores were recorded by patients over that period. Rhinovirus RNA was detected in 444 (18%) out of 2485 visit one samples and in 110 (4.4%) out of 2485 visit two respiratory samples. 21 (5%) of the 444 patients had both samples positive for rhinovirus. Genotyping of both virus detections was successful for 17 (81%) out of 21 of these patients. Prolonged rhinovirus shedding occurred in six (35%) out of 21 and re-infection with a different rhinovirus in 11 (65%) out of 21. Rhinovirus re-infections were significantly associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (p=0.04) and asthma (p=0.02) and appeared to be more severe than prolonged infections. Our findings indicate that in immunocompetent adults rhinovirus re-infections are more common than prolonged infections, and chronic airway comorbidities might predispose to more frequent rhinovirus re-infections.

  5. Chest sonography: a useful tool to differentiate acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema from acute respiratory distress syndrome

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    Soldati Gino

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Differential diagnosis between acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (APE and acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS may often be difficult. We evaluated the ability of chest sonography in the identification of characteristic pleuropulmonary signs useful in the diagnosis of ALI/ARDS and APE. Methods Chest sonography was performed on admission to the intensive care unit in 58 consecutive patients affected by ALI/ARDS or by acute pulmonary edema (APE. Results Ultrasound examination was focalised on finding in the two groups the presence of: 1 alveolar-interstitial syndrome (AIS 2 pleural lines abnormalities 3 absence or reduction of "gliding" sign 4 "spared areas" 5 consolidations 6 pleural effusion 7 "lung pulse". AIS was found in 100% of patients with ALI/ARDS and in 100% of patients with APE (p = ns. Pleural line abnormalities were observed in 100% of patients with ALI/ARDS and in 25% of patients with APE (p All signs, except the presence of AIS, presented a statistically significant difference in presentation between the two syndromes resulting specific for the ultrasonographic characterization of ALI/ARDS. Conclusion Pleuroparenchimal patterns in ALI/ARDS do find a characterization through ultrasonographic lung scan. In the critically ill the ultrasound demonstration of a dyshomogeneous AIS with spared areas, pleural line modifications and lung consolidations is strongly predictive, in an early phase, of non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema.

  6. Non-invasive versus invasive mechanical ventilation for respiratory failure in severe acute respiratory syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Loretta YC Yam; Alfred YF Chan; Thomas MT Cheung; Eva LH Tsui; Jane CK Chan; Vivian CW Wong

    2005-01-01

    Background Severe acute respiratory syndrome is frequently complicated by respiratory failure requiring ventilatory support. We aimed to compare the efficacy of non-invasive ventilation against invasive mechanical ventilation treating respiratory failure in this disease. Methods Retrospective analysis was conducted on all respiratory failure patients identified from the Hong Kong Hospital Authority Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Database. Intubation rate, mortality and secondary outcome of a hospital utilizing non-invasive ventilation under standard infection control conditions (NIV Hospital) were compared against 13 hospitals using solely invasive ventilation (IMV Hospitals). Multiple logistic regression analyses with adjustments for confounding variables were performed to test for association between outcomes and hospital groups. Results Both hospital groups had comparable demographics and clinical profiles, but NIV Hospital (42 patients) had higher lactate dehydrogenase ratio and worse radiographic score on admission and ribavirin-corticosteroid commencement. Compared to IMV Hospitals (451 patients), NIV Hospital had lower adjusted odds ratios for intubation (0.36, 95% CI 0.164-0.791, P=0.011) and death (0.235, 95% CI 0.077-0.716, P=0.011), and improved earlier after pulsed steroid rescue. There were no instances of transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome among health care workers due to the use of non-invasive ventilation.Conclusion Compared to invasive mechanical ventilation, non-invasive ventilation as initial ventilatory support for acute respiratory failure in the presence of severe acute respiratory syndrome appeared to be associated with reduced intubation need and mortality.

  7. [Kinetic therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chechenin, M G; Voevodin, S V; Pronichev, E Iu; Shuliveĭstrov, Iu V

    2004-01-01

    The authors evaluated the clinical and physiological effects of kinetic therapy (KT) in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Forty-six patients with ARDS underwent successive postural positioning in accordance with two regimens: 1) lateral, prone, contralateral, supine positions; 2) prone, lateral, contralateral, supine positions. The criterion for changing each position was the change in monitoring indices: SpO2, PaO2, and thoracopulmonary compliance (C). KT was performed until a respirator was withdrawn from the patient. In 25 patients, each maneuver of positioning was made during 30-minute propofol sedation. The control group included 24 patients with ARDS who received neither KT nor propofol sedation. KT caused a decrease in Vd/Vt, Qs/Qt and an increase in PaO2/FiO2 and C was more intensive, as compared with the control group. The duration of the patient's prone position was 3.2-0.7 hours and that of the supine position was 3.4-0.8 hours. The right and left lateral positions lasted 1.1-0.2 and 1.3-0.2 hours, respectively. KT regimen 1 was found to be more effective than KT regimen 2. Propofol sedation enhanced the efficiency of KT. The latter reduced death rates in patients with ARDS.

  8. Pathological study on severe acute respiratory syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郎振为; 张立洁; 张世杰; 孟忻; 李俊强; 宋晨朝; 孙琳; 周育森

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the pathological characteristics of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and its relationship to clinical manifestation. Methods Tissue specimens from 3 autopsies of probable SARS cases were studied by microscope, and the clinical data was reviewed.Results The typical pathological changes of lungs were diffuse hemorrhaging on the surface. A combination of serous, fibrinous and hemorrhagic inflammation was seen in most of the pulmonary alveoli with the engorgement of capillaries and detection of micro-thrombosis in some of these capillaries. Pulmonary alveoli thickened with interstitial mononuclear inflammatory infiltrates, suffered diffuse alveolar damage, experienced desquamation of pneumocytes and had hyaline-membrane formation, fibrinoid materials, and erythrocytes in alveolar spaces. There were thromboembolisms in some bronchial arteries. Furthermore, hemorrhagic necrosis was also evident in lymph nodes and spleen with the attenuation of lymphocytes. Other atypical pathological changes, such as hydropic degeneration, fatty degeneration, interstitial cell proliferation and lesions having existed before hospitalization were observed in the liver, heart, kidney and pancreas.Conclusion Severe damage to the pulmonary and immunological systems is responsible for the clinical features of SARS and may lead to the death of patients.

  9. ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISEASE AS THE DEBUT OF SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

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    A. Yu. Ischenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus — a chronic autoimmune disease that is often associated with infectious processes. The paper presents two clinical cases of systemic lupus erythematosus , debuted with acute respiratory infection.

  10. Extended-duration rivaroxaban thromboprophylaxis in acutely ill medical patients: MAGELLAN study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Alexander Thomas; Spiro, Theodore Erich; Büller, Harry Roger; Haskell, Lloyd; Hu, Dayi; Hull, Russell; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Merli, Geno; Schellong, Sebastian; Spyropoulos, Alex; Tapson, Victor

    2011-05-01

    Patients with acute medical illnesses are at increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Thromboprophylaxis is recommended in these patients but questions remain regarding the optimal duration of therapy. The aim of this study is to determine whether oral rivaroxaban is non-inferior to standard-duration (approximately 10 days) subcutaneous (s.c.) enoxaparin for the prevention of VTE in acutely ill medical patients, and whether extended-duration (approximately 5 weeks) rivaroxaban is superior to standard-duration enoxaparin. Patients aged 40 years or older and hospitalized for various acute medical illnesses with risk factors for VTE randomly receive either s.c. enoxaparin 40 mg once daily (od) for 10 ± 4 days or oral rivaroxaban 10 mg od for 35 ± 4 days. The primary efficacy outcomes are the composite of asymptomatic proximal deep vein thrombosis (DVT), symptomatic DVT, symptomatic non-fatal pulmonary embolism (PE), and VTE-related death up to day 10 + 4 and up to day 35 + 4. The primary safety outcome is the composite of treatment-emergent major bleeding and clinically relevant non-major bleeding. As of July 2010, 8,101 patients from 52 countries have been randomized. These patients have a broad range of medical conditions: approximately one-third were diagnosed with acute heart failure, just under one-third were diagnosed with acute infectious disease, and just under one-quarter were diagnosed with acute respiratory insufficiency. MAGELLAN will determine the efficacy, safety, and pharmacological profile of oral rivaroxaban for the prevention of VTE in a diverse population of medically ill patients and the potential of extended-duration therapy to reduce incidence of VTE.

  11. Acute effects of winter air pollution on respiratory health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, van der S.

    1999-01-01

    In this thesis, acute respiratory health effects of exposure to winter air pollution are investigated in panels of children (7-11 yr) and adults (50-70 yr) with and without chronic respiratory symptoms, living in urban and non-urban areas in the Netherlands. The study was performed during three cons

  12. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Prevention in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsueh-Erh

    2004-01-01

    Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is a newly identified respiratory disease that threatened Taiwan between April 14 and July 5, 2003. Chang Gung University experienced various SARS-related episodes, such as the postponement of classes for 7 days, the reporting of probable SARS cases, and the isolation of students under Level A and B…

  13. Status of acute upper respiratory infection, influenza-like illness, and influenza vaccination coverage among community residents in Jinan%济南市社区居民急性上呼吸道感染与流感样病例发病及其疫苗接种情况

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘营; 宋绍霞; 王伟; 耿兴义; 刘稳; 韩德彪; 刘倜; 吴巨龙; 李忠

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the status of acute upper respiratory infection and influenza-like illness (ILI) among community residents in Jinan in 2015, and to make a understand of the patient's medical treatment behavior and influenza vaccination coverage status in 2014.Methods Balloting method and convenient sampling method were used to launch a household survey.The residents who had been in Jinan for more than 3 months were selected, to investigate the residents' attack ratio of acute upper respiratory and influenza-like from Jan.8 to Feb.7, 2015.Totally, 1300 persons from 410 families were involved in this survey which recovered 1241 valid questionnaires with the efficiency of 95.5%.Based on the national age-urban demographic statistics in 2010, the attack rates of acute respiratory infections, influenza-like illness were estimated by the direct standardization method, and the influenza vaccination rates were also calculated in this study.x2-test method was used to compare the different status of incidence and vaccination among residents with different features.Results The attack rate of acute upper respiratory infection and influenza-like illness in Jinan from January 8,2015 to February 7, 2015 were 30.2% (375 cases), and 6.1%(76 cases), respectively, with a standardized rate of 29.1% and 5.4%.5.3% (66 cases) of the residents have vaccinated with the influenza vaccine inoculation, with an adjusted rate of 3.8%.The attack rate difference of acute upper respiratory tract infections was statistically significant between each age group (x2=17.121, P=0.002).The 0-4 age group had a highest attack rate (45.4%) of acute respiratory infection, while the 15-24age group got the lowest (26.5%).38.9% (146 cases) of patients went for a treatment in hospital.Among them, 37.7% (55 cases) of them selected the county level hospitals for treatment, 37.7% (55 cases) selected the community level hospitals, and 24.6% (36 cases) selected the individual clinic

  14. Brazilian medicinal plants to treat upper respiratory tract and bronchial illness: systematic review and meta-analyses—study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Luciane C; Silva, Maria Carolina O; Motta, Cristiane Bergamashi; Macho Quirós, Antonio; Biavatti, Maique Weber; de Oliveira, Jardel Corrêa; Guyatt, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory illness, often associated with cough and sputum, is frequent. In Brazil, herbal medicines are often recommended as a first-line treatment for respiratory illness. There exists uncertainty regarding the effectiveness of these treatments. No systematic review has evaluated Brazilian medicinal plants (BMP) to treat upper respiratory tract and bronchial illness (URTI). Methods and analysis We will conduct a systematic review and, if appropriate, a series of meta-analyses evaluating the safety and effectiveness of BMP for URTI. Eligible randomised controlled trials and observational studies will enrol adult or paediatric patients presenting with URTI treated by BMP approved by the Brazilian Health Surveillance Agency compared with placebo, no treatment or an alternative therapy. Our search will include the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), which contains the Cochrane Acute Respiratory Illness Group's Specialized Register; MEDLINE; EMBASE; CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature); Web of Science; AMED; LILACS; CAB abstracts; clinical trial.gov; the WHO Trial Register and the Brazilian thesis database (CAPES) without any language restrictions. Outcomes of interest are time to resolution of clinical symptoms and/or signs (cough, sputum production or activity limitations), severity of symptoms prior to resolution and major/minor adverse events. Teams of reviewers will, independently and in duplicate, screen titles and abstracts and the complete full text to determine eligibility. For eligible studies, reviewers will perform data abstraction and assess risk of bias of eligible trials. When appropriate, we will conduct meta-analyses. We will also assess the quality of body of evidence (confidence in estimates of effect) for each of the outcomes using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Ethics and dissemination The systematic review will be published in

  15. Aerosolized prostacyclin for acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions that are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Aerosolized prostacyclin has been used to improve oxygenation despite the limited evidence available so far.......Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions that are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Aerosolized prostacyclin has been used to improve oxygenation despite the limited evidence available so far....

  16. Thrombo-prophylaxis in acutely ill medical and critically ill patients

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    Saurabh Saigal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombo-prophylaxis has been shown to reduce the incidence of pulmonary embolism (PE and mortality in surgical patients. The purpose of this review is to find out the evidence-based clinical practice criteria of deep vein thrombosis (DVT prophylaxis in acutely ill medical and critically ill patients. English-language randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analysis were included if they provided clinical outcomes and evaluated therapy with low-dose heparin or related agents compared with placebo, no treatment, or other active prophylaxis in the critically ill and medically ill population. For the same, we searched MEDLINE, PUBMED, Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar. In acutely ill medical patients on the basis of meta-analysis by Lederle et al. (40 trials and LIFENOX study, heparin prophylaxis had no significant effect on mortality. The prophylaxis may have reduced PE in acutely ill medical patients, but led to more bleeding events, thus resulting in no net benefit. In critically ill patients, results of meta-analysis by Alhazzani et al. and PROTECT Trial indicate that any heparin prophylaxis compared with placebo reduces the rate of DVT and PE, but not symptomatic DVT. Major bleeding risk and mortality rates were similar. On the basis of MAGELLAN trial and EINSTEIN program, rivaroxaban offers a single-drug approach to the short-term and continued treatment of venous thrombosis. Aspirin has been used as antiplatelet agent, but when the data from two trials the ASPIRE and WARFASA study were pooled, there was a 32% reduction in the rate of recurrence of venous thrombo-embolism and a 34% reduction in the rate of major vascular events.

  17. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support in Adult Patients with Hematologic Malignancies and Severe Acute Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai Sun Park

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Administering extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO to critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome has substantially increased over the last decade, however administering ECMO to patients with hematologic malignancies may carry a particularly high risk. Here, we report the clinical outcomes of patients with hematologic malignancies and severe acute respiratory failure who were treated with ECMO. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of the medical records of patients with hematologic malignancies and severe acute respiratory failure who were treated with ECMO at the medical intensive care unit of a tertiary referral hospital between March 2010 and April 2015. Results: A total of 15 patients (9 men; median age 45 years with hematologic malignancies and severe acute respiratory failure received ECMO therapy during the study period. The median values of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, Murray Lung Injury Score, and Respiratory Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Survival Prediction Score were 29, 3.3, and -2, respectively. Seven patients received venovenous ECMO, whereas 8 patients received venoarterial ECMO. The median ECMO duration was 2 days. Successful weaning of ECMO was achieved in 3 patients. Hemorrhage complications developed in 4 patients (1 pulmonary hemorrhage, 1 intracranial hemorrhage, and 2 cases of gastrointestinal bleeding. The longest period of patient survival was 59 days after ECMO initiation. No significant differences in survival were noted between venovenous and venoarterial ECMO groups (10.0 vs. 10.5 days; p = 0.56. Conclusions: Patients with hematologic malignancies and severe acute respiratory failure demonstrate poor outcomes after ECMO treatment. Careful and appropriate selection of candidates for ECMO in these patients is necessary.

  18. Acute respiratory failure as a first manifestation of syringomyelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Bashapshe Ali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 40 year old woman presented with a short history of acute onset of breathlessness to the ER of our hospital and after initial evaluation for acute pulmonary embolism which was ruled out after carrying out the appropriate investigations, she was diagnosed to be afflicted with syringomyelia based on her neurological symptoms and clinical findings, which was confirmed by doing an MRI scan, which was her basic diagnosis that was complicated by acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. This case is being reported to highlight syringomyelia as an unusual cause of acute respiratory failure, which manifested clinically in this patient as its first presentation and the underlying neurological diagnosis has been found to be present in very few reported cases (less than 0.01% of case reports in the available literature as the basic disease in the absence of its classical presenting features. Problems associated with acute respiratory failure in the setting of syringomyelia are discussed.

  19. Non lineal respiratory systems mechanics simulation of acute respiratory distress syndrome during mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madorno, Matias; Rodriguez, Pablo O

    2010-01-01

    Model and simulation of biological systems help to better understand these systems. In ICUs patients often reach a complex situation where supportive maneuvers require special expertise. Among them, mechanical ventilation in patients suffering from acuter respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is specially challenging. This work presents a model which can be simulated and use to help in training of physicians and respiratory therapists to analyze the respiratory mechanics in this kind of patients. We validated the model in 2 ARDS patients.

  20. Surveillance of acute respiratory infections in general practices - The Netherlands, winters 1998/1999 and 1999/2000

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandhof WE van den; Bartelds AIM; Wilbrink B; Verweij C; Bijlsma K; Nat H van der; Boswijk H; Pronk JDD; Dorigo-Zetsma JW; Heijnen MLA; NIVEL; CIE; LIS

    2001-01-01

    To provide insight into the virological aetiology of influenza-like illnesses and other acute respiratory infections, nose/throat swabs were taken by 30-35 general practitioners of the sentinel surveillance network of The Netherlands Institute of Health Services Research from a random selection of p

  1. Air pollution and multiple acute respiratory outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustini, Annunziata; Stafoggia, Massimo; Colais, Paola; Berti, Giovanna; Bisanti, Luigi; Cadum, Ennio; Cernigliaro, Achille; Mallone, Sandra; Scarnato, Corrado; Forastiere, Francesco

    2013-08-01

    Short-term effects of air pollutants on respiratory mortality and morbidity have been consistently reported but usually studied separately. To more completely assess air pollution effects, we studied hospitalisations for respiratory diseases together with out-of-hospital respiratory deaths. A time-stratified case-crossover study was carried out in six Italian cities from 2001 to 2005. Daily particulate matter (particles with a 50% cut-off aerodynamic diameter of 10 μm (PM10)) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) associations with hospitalisations for respiratory diseases (n = 100 690), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (n = 38 577), lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) among COPD patients (n = 9886) and out-of-hospital respiratory deaths (n = 5490) were estimated for residents aged ≥35 years. For an increase of 10 μg·m(-3) in PM10, we found an immediate 0.59% (lag 0-1 days) increase in hospitalisations for respiratory diseases and a 0.67% increase for COPD; the 1.91% increase in LRTI hospitalisations lasted longer (lag 0-3 days) and the 3.95% increase in respiratory mortality lasted 6 days. Effects of NO2 were stronger and lasted longer (lag 0-5 days). Age, sex and previous ischaemic heart disease acted as effect modifiers for different outcomes. Analysing multiple rather than single respiratory events shows stronger air pollution effects. The temporal relationship between the pollutant increases and hospitalisations or mortality for respiratory diseases differs.

  2. Respiratory muscle strength and muscle endurance are not affected by acute metabolic acidemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nizet, T.; Heijdra, Y.F.; Elshout, F.J.J. van den; Ven, M.J.T. van de; Bosch, F.H.; Mulder, P.H.M. de; Folgering, H.T.M.

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory muscle fatigue in asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) contributes to respiratory failure with hypercapnia, and subsequent respiratory acidosis. Therapeutic induction of acute metabolic acidosis further increases the respiratory drive and, therefore, may diminish ventilator

  3. Severe acute respiratory failure secondary to acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia requiring mechanical ventilation: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cuenca, Sonia; Morales-García, Silvia; Martín-Hita, Ana; Frutos-Vivar, Fernando; Fernández-Segoviano, Pilar; Esteban, Andrés

    2012-08-01

    A 27-year-old woman was admitted to our ICU with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and criteria for ARDS. Despite an F(IO(2)) of 1.0 and a lung protective strategy, the patient died on day 15 without any improvement. The relatives gave consent for post-mortem analysis. The histopathologic study of the lung showed findings typical of an acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia. Apropos of this case we performed a PubMed search. We found 13 articles, including a total of 29 patients. Acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia is an unusual cause of acute lung injury. The diagnostic criterion is histopathologic. There is little information regarding the pathophysiology of this illness. Important questions remain regarding this disease, including predisposing factors and management. Patients who require mechanical ventilation have poor outcomes.

  4. High flow nasal oxygen in acute respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard, J-D

    2012-07-01

    Use of high flow nasal cannula oxygen (HFNC) is increasingly popular in adult ICUs for patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. This is the result of the successful long-term use of HFNC in the neonatal field and recent clinical data in adults indicating beneficial effects of HFNC over conventional facemask oxygen therapy. HFNC rapidly alleviates symptoms of respiratory distress and improves oxygenation by several mechanisms, including deadspace washout, reduction in oxygen dilution and in inspiratory nasopharyngeal resistance, a moderate positive airway pressure effect that may generate alveolar recruitment and an overall greater tolerance and comfort with the interface and the heated and humidified inspired gases. Indications of HFNC are broad, encompassing most if not all causes of acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. HFNC can also provide oxygen during invasive procedures, and be used to prevent or treat post-extubation respiratory failure. HFNC may also alleviate respiratory distress in patients at a palliative stage. Although observational studies suggest that HFNC might reduce the need for intubation in acute hypoxemic respiratory failure; such a reduction has not yet been demonstrated. Beyond this potential additional effect on outcome, the evidence already published argues in favor of the large use of HFNC as first line therapy for acute respiratory failure.

  5. Emergency thyroidectomy: Due to acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfu Bayhan

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Respiratory failure due to giant nodular goiter is a life-threatening situation and should be treated immediately by performing awake endotracheal intubation following emergency total thyroidectomy.

  6. Acute abdomen in a patient with paraesophageal hernia, resulting in acute compromised respiratory function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mekhael, Mira Rober; El-Hussuna, Alaa

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We present a case of acute abdomen, causing increased intra-abdominal pressure, leading to further herniation of an existing paraesophageal hernia, and consequently acute compromised respiratory function. This acute respiratory complication to a paraesophageal hernia has not previou......INTRODUCTION: We present a case of acute abdomen, causing increased intra-abdominal pressure, leading to further herniation of an existing paraesophageal hernia, and consequently acute compromised respiratory function. This acute respiratory complication to a paraesophageal hernia has...... if complicated by acute abdomen. These patients could benefit from elective hernia repair, rather than watchful waiting, as it would eliminate pulmonary symptoms and prevent similar cases. Patients monitored using watchful waiting should be informed that acute abdomen could cause acute compromised respiratory...... function. CONCLUSION: Any case of acute abdomen causing high intra-abdominal pressure could potentially cause further herniation of an existing paraesophageal hernia, resulting in acute compromised respiratory function. In patients known to have a paraesophageal hernia, similar cases should be suspected...

  7. Acute Childhood Illnesses and Health Seeking Behaviour among under five children in a village of Hooghly district, West Bengal

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    Indira Dey (Pal

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: – Acute respiratory infections and diarrhoeal diseases are important causes of morbidity in children worldwide. IMNCI component is addressing these two illnesses in a major way and is concentrating on health care practices of community. Objective: – to find out their health seeking behaviour. Methodology: – A community based , cross-sectional study was conducted in the Mollasimla village of Hooghly district of West Bengal using 2 weeks recall for acute illnesses. Results – It was found that 56.8%, 23.8% and 18.9% children suffered from ARI, fever and diarrhea respectively. Overall treatment rate was above 93% and most of the children were treated in hospitals and health centre. Conclusion: – Acute illnesses are still largely prevalent in the rural community. As mothers are the first care givers, they should be made aware of the preventive measures and the need for seeking treatment.

  8. Pulmonary hypertension due to acute respiratory distress syndrome

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    S.A. Ñamendys-Silva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Our aims were to describe the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, to characterize their hemodynamic cardiopulmonary profiles, and to correlate these parameters with outcome. All consecutive patients over 16 years of age who were in the intensive care unit with a diagnosis of ARDS and an in situ pulmonary artery catheter for hemodynamic monitoring were studied. Pulmonary hypertension was diagnosed when the mean pulmonary artery pressure was >25 mmHg at rest with a pulmonary artery occlusion pressure or left atrial pressure <15 mmHg. During the study period, 30 of 402 critically ill patients (7.46% who were admitted to the ICU fulfilled the criteria for ARDS. Of the 30 patients with ARDS, 14 met the criteria for pulmonary hypertension, a prevalence of 46.6% (95% CI; 28-66%. The most common cause of ARDS was pneumonia (56.3%. The overall mortality was 36.6% and was similar in patients with and without pulmonary hypertension. Differences in patients' hemodynamic profiles were influenced by the presence of pulmonary hypertension. The levels of positive end-expiratory pressure and peak pressure were higher in patients with pulmonary hypertension, and the PaCO2 was higher in those who died. The level of airway pressure seemed to influence the onset of pulmonary hypertension. Survival was determined by the severity of organ failure at admission to the intensive care unit.

  9. Acute Respiratory Infections in the Context of the Influenza A (H1N1 Pandemic

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    Hilda María Delgado Acosta

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: acute respiratory infections are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Objective: to characterize acute respiratory infections in the context of the influenza pandemic in Cienfuegos province. Methods: A case series study including 844 inpatients diagnosed with influenza-like illness, 806 suspected cases and 38 confirmed cases of pandemic influenza, was conducted. An analysis of the acute respiratory infections was performed, describing the pandemic in space and time. Suspected and confirmed cases were compared according to general variables, risk factors and interesting clinical features. Virus isolation and classification of confirmed cases considering source of infection and progress over time were showed. Data was collected from the Statistics Department of the Provincial Hygiene and Epidemiology Center and the inpatient database. Percentages, rates, the mean, standard deviation and Chi-square test with a 5 % margin of error were used.Results: acute respiratory infections morbidity increased since 2008, largely because of the impact of the pandemic and the increased clinical and epidemiological surveillance. Its association with risk factors such as pregnancy, chronic diseases and traveling abroad was demonstrated. Circulation of the pandemic influenza virus with displacement of seasonal viruses and prevalence of indigenous cases were observed. Conclusions: the characteristics of pandemic influenza in the province do not differ greatly from those described nationally and globally.

  10. Respiratory viruses in children hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection in Ghana

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    Kwofie Theophilus B

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute respiratory tract infections are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality among young children in developing countries. Information on the viral aetiology of acute respiratory infections in developing countries is very limited. The study was done to identify viruses associated with acute lower respiratory tract infection among children less than 5 years. Method Nasopharyngeal samples and blood cultures were collected from children less than 5 years who have been hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection. Viruses and bacteria were identified using Reverse Transcriptase Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction and conventional biochemical techniques. Results Out of 128 patients recruited, 33(25.88%%, 95%CI: 18.5% to 34.2% were positive for one or more viruses. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV was detected in 18(14.1%, 95%CI: 8.5% to 21.3% patients followed by Adenoviruses (AdV in 13(10.2%, 95%CI: 5.5% to 16.7%, Parainfluenza (PIV type: 1, 2, 3 in 4(3.1%, 95%CI: 0.9% to 7.8% and influenza B viruses in 1(0.8%, 95%CI: 0.0 to 4.3. Concomitant viral and bacterial co-infection occurred in two patients. There were no detectable significant differences in the clinical signs, symptoms and severity for the various pathogens isolated. A total of 61.1% (22/36 of positive viruses were detected during the rainy season and Respiratory Syncytial Virus was the most predominant. Conclusion The study has demonstrated an important burden of respiratory viruses as major causes of childhood acute respiratory infection in a tertiary health institution in Ghana. The data addresses a need for more studies on viral associated respiratory tract infection.

  11. Incidence and prevention of venous thromboembolism in acutely ill hospitalized elderly Chinese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-ying; FAN Jin; CHENG You-qin; WANG Yan; YAO Chen; ZHONG Nan-shan

    2011-01-01

    Background As the third most frequent cardiovascular disease, venous thromboembolism (VTE) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of VTE and steps for its prevention in acutely ill hospitalized elderly Chinese patients.Methods A prospective multi-center study was conducted from June 2006 to November 2007. A total of 607 patientsfrom 40 research centers in China were enrolled. Data of the patients' baseline characteristics, VTE events and prophylaxis/therapy methods were collected.Results Fifty-nine patients (9.7%) had an objectively confirmed VTE during the 90-day follow-up, of which, 59.3%occurred during the first week and 75% within 14 days. Forty-one patients died (6.6%) during the follow-up, 36.6% died within three weeks. We also found that medical disorders including respiratory failure (16.4%), acute brain infarction (15.6%), acute infectious diseases (14.3%), acute coronary artery syndrome (8.7%) and heart failure (7.6%) play a role in provoking VTE. Only 13.0% of the elderly patients with high risk of VTE used low dose unfractionated heparin, 7.1% used low molecular weight heparin, 5.4% used warfarin,0.3% used graduated compression stockings and none of them used intermittent pneumatic compression.Conclusions Our study showed similar results between our study and western countries in the VTE incidence by day 90 in elderly hospitalized patients with acute medical illness. Great caution must be applied in the care of acutely ill elderly hospitalized patients to deal with the complications of VTE. Application of safe and effective prophylaxes against embolism remains a critical challenge.

  12. Developing a multi-component immune model for evaluating the risk of respiratory illness in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, Maree; Pyne, David B; Elkington, Lisa J; Hall, Sharron T; Attia, John R; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Wood, Lisa G; Callister, Robin

    2017-01-01

    Clinical and laboratory identification of the underlying risk of respiratory illness in athletes has proved problematic. The aim of this study was to determine whether clinical data, combined with immune responses to standardised exercise protocols and genetic cytokine polymorphism status, could identify the risk of respiratory illness (symptoms) in a cohort of highly-trained athletes. Male endurance athletes (n=16; VO2max 66.5 ± 5.1 mL.kg-1.min-1) underwent a clinical evaluation of known risk factors by a physician and comprehensive laboratory analysis of immune responses both at rest and after two cycling ergometer tests: 60 min at 65% VO2max (LONG); and 6 x 3 min intervals at 90% VO2max (INTENSE). Blood tests were performed to determine Epstein Barr virus (EBV) status and DNA was genotyped for a panel of cytokine gene polymorphisms. Saliva was collected for measurement of IgA and detection of EBV DNA. Athletes were then followed for 9 months for self-reported episodes of respiratory illness, with confirmation of the underlying cause by a sports physician. There were no associations with risk of respiratory illness identified for any parameter assessed in the clinical evaluations. The laboratory parameters associated with an increased risk of respiratory illnesses in highly-trained athletes were cytokine gene polymorphisms for the high expression of IL-6 and IFN-ɣ; expression of EBV-DNA in saliva; and low levels of salivary IgA concentration. A genetic risk score was developed for the cumulative number of minor alleles for the cytokines evaluated. Athletes prone to recurrent respiratory illness were more likely to have immune disturbances that allow viral reactivation, and a genetic predisposition to pro-inflammatory cytokine responses to intense exercise.

  13. 'The Right Ventricle in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zochios, Vasileios; Parhar, Ken; Tunnicliffe, William; Roscoe, Andrew; Gao, Fang

    2017-03-03

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is associated with poor clinical outcomes with a pooled mortality rate of approximately 40% despite best standards of care. Current therapeutic strategies are based upon improving oxygenation and pulmonary compliance while minimizing ventilator induced lung injury. It has been demonstrated that relative hypoxemia can be well tolerated and improvements in oxygenation do not necessarily translate into survival benefit. Cardiac failure, in particular right ventricular dysfunction, is commonly encountered in moderate to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome and is reported to be one of the major determinants of mortality. The prevalence rate of echocardiographically evident right ventricular dysfunction in acute respiratory distress syndrome varies across studies ranging from 22% to 50%. Although there is no definitive causal relationship between right ventricular dysfunction and mortality, severe right ventricular dysfunction is associated with increased mortality. Factors that can adversely affect right ventricular function include hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, hypercapnia, and invasive ventilation with high driving pressure. It might be expected that early diagnosis of right ventricular dysfunction would be of benefit however, echocardiography markers (qualitative and quantitative) used to prospectively evaluate the right ventricle in acute respiratory distress syndrome have not been tested in adequately powered studies. In this review we examine the prognostic implications and pathophysiology of right ventricular dysfunction in acute respiratory distress syndrome and discuss available diagnostic modalities and treatment options. We aim to identify gaps in knowledge and directions for future research that could potentially improve clinical outcomes in this patient population.

  14. Acute appendicitis in acute leukemia and the potential role of decitabine in the critically ill patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Warad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute appendicitis in children with acute leukemia is uncommon and often recognized late. Immunocompromised host state coupled with the importance of avoiding treatment delays makes management additionally challenging. Leukemic infiltration of the appendix though rare must also be considered. Although successful conservative management has been reported, surgical intervention is required in most cases. We present our experience with acute appendicitis in children with acute leukemia and a case of complete remission of acute myeloid leukemia with a short course of decitabine. Decitabine may serve as bridging therapy in critically ill patients who are unable to undergo intensive chemotherapy.

  15. A review of pulmonary coagulopathy in acute lung injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome and pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuizen, Laurens; de Groot, Philip G.; Grutters, Jan C.; Biesma, Douwe H.

    2009-01-01

    Enhanced bronchoalveolar coagulation is a hallmark of many acute inflammatory lung diseases such as acute lung injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome and pneumonia. Intervention with natural anticoagulants in these diseases has therefore become a topic of interest. Recently, new data on the rol

  16. Mortality and morbidity of acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and acute respiratory distress syndrome in infants and young children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yan-feng; YU Wen-liang; XIE Min-hui; YAN Chao-ying; LU Zhu-jin; SUN Bo; XU Feng; LU Xiu-lan; WANG Ying; CHEN Jian-li; CHAO Jian-xin; ZHOU Xiao-wen; ZHANG Jian-hui; HUANG Yan-zhi

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (AHRF) often develops acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS),and its incidence and mortalities in critically ill pediatric patients in China were 2% and 40% respectively.This study aimed at prospectively investigating incidence,causes,mortality and its risk factors,and any relationship to initial tidal volume (VT) levels of mechanical ventilation,in children ≤5 years of age with AHRF and ARDS.Methods In 12 consecutive months in 23 pediatric intensive care units (PICU),AHRF and ARDS were identified in those requiring >12 hour intratracheal mechanical ventilation and followed up for 90 days or until death or discharge.ARDS was diagnosed according to the American-European Consensus definitions.The mortality and ventilation free days (VFD) were measured as the primary outcome,and major complications,initial disease severity,and burden were measured as the secondary outcome.Results In 13 491 PICU admissions,there were 439 AHRE,of which 345 (78.6%) developed ARDS,resulting in incidences of 3.3% and 2.6%,and corresponding mortalities of 30.3% and 32.8% respectively along with 8.2 and 6.7 times of relative risk of death in those with pneumonia (62.9%) and sepsis (33.7%) as major underlying diseases respectively.No association was found in VT levels during the first 7 days with mortality,nor for VT at levels <6,6-8,8-10,and >10 ml/kg in the first 3 days with mortality or length of VFD.By binary Logistic regression analyses,higher pediatric risk of mortality score Ⅲ,higher initial oxygenation index,and age <1 year were associated with higher mortality or shorter VFD in AHRF.Conclusions The incidence and mortalities of AHRF and ARDS in children ≤5 years were similar to or lower than the previously reported rates (in age up to 15 years),associated with initial disease severity and other confounders,but causal relationship for the initial VT levels as the independent factor to the major outcome

  17. [Pathogenesis and target therapy of acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, V V; Vlasenko, A V; Golubev, A M

    2014-01-01

    The paper summarizes results of experimental studies and clinical observations of the pathogenesis and effectiveness of respiratory, non-respiratory and pharmacological treatment methods for acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by direct and indirect damaging factors. The article deals with differences and peculiarities of morphological changes and lung functional disorders, clinical, laboratory and instrumental signs of various origins in ARDS and justifies necessity of differential diagnosis and differential treatment of ARDS, depending on the reasons for its development. Furthermore the article discusses an algorithm for differential diagnosis and differential treatment for ARDS caused by direct and indirect damaging factors.

  18. Place of Child Care and Medicated Respiratory Illness among Young American Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presser, Harriet B.

    1988-01-01

    Study based on Child Health Supplement to 1981 National Health Interview Survey showed higher prevalence of medicated respiratory illness among children under age five when they were cared for outside the home. For children under age three, prevalence was highest in child care centers, lower in other homes, and lowest in own home. (Author/NB)

  19. Lactobacillus fermentum (PCC® supplementation and gastrointestinal and respiratory-tract illness symptoms: a randomised control trial in athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hopkins William G

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Probiotics purportedly reduce symptoms of gastrointestinal and upper respiratory-tract illness by modulating commensal microflora. Preventing and reducing symptoms of respiratory and gastrointestinal illness are the primary reason that dietary supplementation with probiotics are becoming increasingly popular with healthy active individuals. There is a paucity of data regarding the effectiveness of probiotics in this cohort. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a probiotic on faecal microbiology, self-reported illness symptoms and immunity in healthy well trained individuals. Methods Competitive cyclists (64 males and 35 females; age 35 ± 9 and 36 ± 9 y, VO2max 56 ± 6 and 52 ± 6 ml.kg-1.min-1, mean ± SD were randomised to either probiotic (minimum 1 × 109 Lactobacillus fermentum (PCC® per day or placebo treatment for 11 weeks in a double-blind, randomised, controlled trial. The outcome measures were faecal L. fermentum counts, self-reported symptoms of illness and serum cytokines. Results Lactobacillus numbers increased 7.7-fold (90% confidence limits 2.1- to 28-fold more in males on the probiotic, while there was an unclear 2.2-fold (0.2- to 18-fold increase in females taking the probiotic. The number and duration of mild gastrointestinal symptoms were ~2-fold greater in the probiotic group. However, there was a substantial 0.7 (0.2 to 1.2 of a scale step reduction in the severity of gastrointestinal illness at the mean training load in males, which became more pronounced as training load increased. The load (duration×severity of lower respiratory illness symptoms was less by a factor of 0.31 (99%CI; 0.07 to 0.96 in males taking the probiotic compared with placebo but increased by a factor of 2.2 (0.41 to 27 in females. Differences in use of cold and flu medication mirrored these symptoms. The observed effects on URTI had too much uncertainty for a decisive outcome. There were clear reductions in

  20. Probiotics in childhood: allergic illness and respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Giudice, Michele Miraglia; Leonardi, Salvatore; Ciprandi, Giorgio; Galdo, Francesca; Gubitosi, Adelmo; La Rosa, Mario; Salpietro, Carmelo; Marseglia, Gianluigi; Perrone, Laura

    2012-10-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a growing interest in the use of probiotics for allergic diseases. In the last years, some studies showed a significant improvement for atopic eczema by the administration of probiotics during pregnancy and postnatally. About food allergy, probiotics administration seems to be effective in the management of food allergy symptoms but has no effect on the prevention of sensitization. In the international literature, there are few studies that evaluated the probiotic effect on allergic rhinitis, and authors reported that probiotics might have a beneficial effect in AR by reducing symptom severity and medication use. Another major potential benefit of probiotics has been suggested in patients with asthma. On this topic, several studies have been carried out using different probiotics and the results have not been univocal. Indeed, probiotics seems to be able to offer protection about common cold and respiratory infections in healthy and hospitalized children.

  1. Using automated medical records for rapid identification of illness syndromes (syndromic surveillance: the example of lower respiratory infection

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    Dashevsky Inna

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gaps in disease surveillance capacity, particularly for emerging infections and bioterrorist attack, highlight a need for efficient, real time identification of diseases. Methods We studied automated records from 1996 through 1999 of approximately 250,000 health plan members in greater Boston. Results We identified 152,435 lower respiratory infection illness visits, comprising 106,670 episodes during 1,143,208 person-years. Three diagnoses, cough (ICD9CM 786.2, pneumonia not otherwise specified (ICD9CM 486 and acute bronchitis (ICD9CM 466.0 accounted for 91% of these visits, with expected age and sex distributions. Variation of weekly occurrences corresponded closely to national pneumonia and influenza mortality data. There was substantial variation in geographic location of the cases. Conclusion This information complements existing surveillance programs by assessing the large majority of episodes of illness for which no etiologic agents are identified. Additional advantages include: a sensitivity, uniformity and efficiency, since detection of events does not depend on clinicians' to actively report diagnoses, b timeliness, the data are available within a day of the clinical event; and c ease of integration into automated surveillance systems. These features facilitate early detection of conditions of public health importance, including regularly occurring events like seasonal respiratory illness, as well as unusual occurrences, such as a bioterrorist attack that first manifests as respiratory symptoms. These methods should also be applicable to other infectious and non-infectious conditions. Knowledge of disease patterns in real time may also help clinicians to manage patients, and assist health plan administrators in allocating resources efficiently.

  2. Acute respiratory viral infections in pediatric cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana C.A. Benites

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to estimate the prevalence of infection by respiratory viruses in pediatric patients with cancer and acute respiratory infection (ARI and/or fever. METHODS: cross-sectional study, from January 2011 to December 2012. The secretions of nasopharyngeal aspirates were analyzed in children younger than 21 years with acute respiratory infections. Patients were treated at the Grupo em Defesa da Criança Com Câncer (Grendacc and University Hospital (HU, Jundiaí, SP. The rapid test was used for detection of influenza virus (Kit Biotrin, Inc. Ireland, and real-time multiplex polymerase chain reaction (FTD, Respiratory pathogens, multiplex Fast Trade Kit, Malta for detection of influenza virus (H1N1, B, rhinovirus, parainfluenza virus, adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, human parechovirus, bocavirus, metapneumovirus, and human coronavirus. The prevalence of viral infection was estimated and association tests were used (χ2 or Fisher's exact test. RESULTS: 104 samples of nasopharyngeal aspirate and blood were analyzed. The median age was 12 ± 5.2 years, 51% males, 68% whites, 32% had repeated ARIs, 32% prior antibiotic use, 19.8% cough, and 8% contact with ARIs. A total of 94.3% were in good general status. Acute lymphocytic leukemia (42.3% was the most prevalent neoplasia. Respiratory viruses were detected in 50 samples: rhinoviruses (23.1%, respiratory syncytial virus AB (8.7%, and coronavirus (6.8%. Co-detection occurred in 19% of cases with 2 viruses and in 3% of those with 3 viruses, and was more frequent between rhinovirus and coronavirus 43. Fever in neutropenic patients was observed in 13%, of which four (30.7 were positive for viruses. There were no deaths. CONCLUSIONS: the prevalence of respiratory viruses was relevant in the infectious episode, with no increase in morbidity and mortality. Viral co-detection was frequent in patients with cancer and ARIs.

  3. Prone position in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setten, Mariano; Plotnikow, Gustavo Adrián; Accoce, Matías

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome occupies a great deal of attention in intensive care units. Despite ample knowledge of the physiopathology of this syndrome, the focus in intensive care units consists mostly of life-supporting treatment and avoidance of the side effects of invasive treatments. Although great advances in mechanical ventilation have occurred in the past 20 years, with a significant impact on mortality, the incidence continues to be high. Patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, especially the most severe cases, often present with refractory hypoxemia due to shunt, which can require additional treatments beyond mechanical ventilation, among which is mechanical ventilation in the prone position. This method, first recommended to improve oxygenation in 1974, can be easily implemented in any intensive care unit with trained personnel. Prone position has extremely robust bibliographic support. Various randomized clinical studies have demonstrated the effect of prone decubitus on the oxygenation of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome measured in terms of the PaO2/FiO2 ratio, including its effects on increasing patient survival. The members of the Respiratory Therapists Committee of the Sociedad Argentina de Terapia Intensiva performed a narrative review with the objective of discovering the available evidence related to the implementation of prone position, changes produced in the respiratory system due to the application of this maneuver, and its impact on mortality. Finally, guidelines are suggested for decision-making. PMID:27925054

  4. Vaccination against acute respiratory virus infections and measles in man.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); P. de Vries (Petra)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractSeveral viruses may cause more or less severe acute respiratory infections in man, some of which are followed by systemic infection. Only for influenza and measles are licensed vaccines available at present. The protection induced by influenza vaccines, which are based on inactivated who

  5. Blastomyces gilchristii as Cause of Fatal Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalcin, Daniel; Rothstein, Aaron; Spinato, Joanna; Escott, Nicholas; Kus, Julianne V

    2016-02-01

    Since the 2013 description of Blastomyces gilchristii, research describing the virulence or clinical outcome of B. gilchristii infection has been lacking. We report molecular evidence of B. gilchristii as an etiologic agent of fatal acute respiratory distress syndrome. B. gilchristii infection was confirmed by PCR and sequence analysis.

  6. Acute Respiratory Failure in 3 Children With Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Britt; Hellebostad, Marit; Ifversen, Marianne;

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia is a rare hematopoietic stem cell disease in children with features of both myelodysplasia and myeloproliferation. Extramedullary involvement has been reported and pulmonary involvement secondary to leukemic infiltration is an initial manifestation, which may resu...... in acute respiratory failure....

  7. The severe acute respiratory syndrome epidemic in mainland China dissected

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.C. Cao (Wu Chun); S.J. de Vlas (Sake); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis paper provides a review of a recently published series of studies that give a detailed and comprehensive documentation of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in mainland China, which severely struck the country in the spring of 2003. The epidemic spanned a large ge

  8. Host Transcriptional Response to Influenza and Other Acute Respiratory Viral Infections – A Prospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yijie; Franco, Luis M.; Atmar, Robert L.; Quarles, John M.; Arden, Nancy; Bucasas, Kristine L.; Wells, Janet M.; Niño, Diane; Wang, Xueqing; Zapata, Gladys E.; Shaw, Chad A.; Belmont, John W.; Couch, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the systemic response to naturally acquired acute respiratory viral infections, we prospectively enrolled 1610 healthy adults in 2009 and 2010. Of these, 142 subjects were followed for detailed evaluation of acute viral respiratory illness. We examined peripheral blood gene expression at 7 timepoints: enrollment, 5 illness visits and the end of each year of the study. 133 completed all study visits and yielded technically adequate peripheral blood microarray gene expression data. Seventy-three (55%) had an influenza virus infection, 64 influenza A and 9 influenza B. The remaining subjects had a rhinovirus infection (N = 32), other viral infections (N = 4), or no viral agent identified (N = 24). The results, which were replicated between two seasons, showed a dramatic upregulation of interferon pathway and innate immunity genes. This persisted for 2-4 days. The data show a recovery phase at days 4 and 6 with differentially expressed transcripts implicated in cell proliferation and repair. By day 21 the gene expression pattern was indistinguishable from baseline (enrollment). Influenza virus infection induced a higher magnitude and longer duration of the shared expression signature of illness compared to the other viral infections. Using lineage and activation state-specific transcripts to produce cell composition scores, patterns of B and T lymphocyte depressions accompanied by a major activation of NK cells were detected in the acute phase of illness. The data also demonstrate multiple dynamic gene modules that are reorganized and strengthened following infection. Finally, we examined pre- and post-infection anti-influenza antibody titers defining novel gene expression correlates. PMID:26070066

  9. Host Transcriptional Response to Influenza and Other Acute Respiratory Viral Infections--A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijie Zhai

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the systemic response to naturally acquired acute respiratory viral infections, we prospectively enrolled 1610 healthy adults in 2009 and 2010. Of these, 142 subjects were followed for detailed evaluation of acute viral respiratory illness. We examined peripheral blood gene expression at 7 timepoints: enrollment, 5 illness visits and the end of each year of the study. 133 completed all study visits and yielded technically adequate peripheral blood microarray gene expression data. Seventy-three (55% had an influenza virus infection, 64 influenza A and 9 influenza B. The remaining subjects had a rhinovirus infection (N = 32, other viral infections (N = 4, or no viral agent identified (N = 24. The results, which were replicated between two seasons, showed a dramatic upregulation of interferon pathway and innate immunity genes. This persisted for 2-4 days. The data show a recovery phase at days 4 and 6 with differentially expressed transcripts implicated in cell proliferation and repair. By day 21 the gene expression pattern was indistinguishable from baseline (enrollment. Influenza virus infection induced a higher magnitude and longer duration of the shared expression signature of illness compared to the other viral infections. Using lineage and activation state-specific transcripts to produce cell composition scores, patterns of B and T lymphocyte depressions accompanied by a major activation of NK cells were detected in the acute phase of illness. The data also demonstrate multiple dynamic gene modules that are reorganized and strengthened following infection. Finally, we examined pre- and post-infection anti-influenza antibody titers defining novel gene expression correlates.

  10. Virus profile in children with acute respiratory infections with various severities in Beijing, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Runan; Song Qinwei; Qian Yuan; Zhao Linqing; Deng Jie; Wang Fang; Sun Yu

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory infection (ARI) is one of the most common infectious diseases in infants and young children globally.This study aimed to determine the virus profile in children with ARI presenting with different severities.Methods Clinical specimens collected from children with ARI in Beijing from September 2010 to March 2011 were investigated for 18 respiratory viruses using an xTAG Respiratory Viral Panel Fast (RVP Fast) assay.The Pearson chisquare analysis was used to identify statistical significance.Results Of 270 cases from three groups of ARI patients,including Out-patients,In-patients and patients in the intensive care unit (ICU),viruses were detected in 176 (65.2%) specimens with the RVP Fast assay.The viral detection rate from the Out-patients group (50.0%) was significantly lower than that from the In-patients (71.1%) and ICU-patients (74.4%) groups.The virus distribution was different between the Out-patients group and the other hospitalized groups,while the virus detection rate and distribution characteristics were similar between the In-patients and ICU-patients groups.The coinfection rates of the Out-patients group,the In-patients group,and the ICU-patients group were 15.6%,50.0% and 35.8%,respectively.In addition to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and adenovirus (ADV),human rhinovirus (HRV) was frequently detected from children with serious illnesses,followed by human metapneumovirus (hMPV),human bocavirus (HBoV) and coronaviruses.Parainfluenza virus 3 (PIV3) was detected in children with lower respiratory illness,but rarely from those with serious illnesses in the ICU-patient group.Conclusion In addition to so-called common respiratory viruses,virus detection in children with ARI should include those thoucht to be uncommon respiratory viruses,especially when there are severe ARI-related clinical illnesses.

  11. Respiratory syncytial virus, adenoviruses, and mixed acute lower respiratory infections in children in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Carlos E; Rodríguez, Diego Andrés; Nino, Gustavo

    2015-05-01

    There is growing evidence suggesting greater severity and worse outcomes in children with mixed as compared to single respiratory virus infections. However, studies that assess the risk factors that may predispose a child to a mixture of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and adenoviral infections, are scarce. In a retrospective cohort study, the study investigated the epidemiology of RSV and adenovirus infections and predictors of mixed RSV-adenoviral infections in young children hospitalized with acute lower respiratory infection in Bogota, Colombia, South America, over a 2-year period 2009-2011. Of a total of 5,539 children admitted with a diagnosis of acute lower respiratory infection, 2,267 (40.9%) who were positive for RSV and/or adenovirus were selected. Out the total number of cases, 1,416 (62.5%) infections occurred during the 3-month period from March to May, the first rainy season of Bogota, Colombia. After controlling for gender, month when the nasopharyngeal sample was taken, and other pre-existing conditions, it was found that an age greater than 6 months (OR:1.74; CI 95%:1.05-2.89; P = 0.030) and malnutrition as a comorbidity (OR:9.92; CI 95%:1.01-100.9; P = 0.049) were independent predictors of mixed RSV-adenoviral infections in the sample of patients. In conclusion, RSV and adenovirus are significant causes of acute lower respiratory infection in infants and young children in Bogota, Colombia, especially during the first rainy season. The identified predictors of mixed RSV-adenoviral infections should be taken into account when planning intervention, in order to reduce the burden of acute lower respiratory infection in young children living in the country.

  12. Activated protein C in the treatment of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D. Cornet; G.P. van Nieuw Amerongen; A. Beishuizen; M.J. Schultz; A.R.J. Girbes; A.B.J. Groeneveld

    2009-01-01

    Background: Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) frequently necessitate mechanical ventilation in the intensive care unit. The syndromes have a high mortality rate and there is at present no treatment specifically directed at the underlying pathogenesis. Central in

  13. Epidemiology of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome in The Netherlands : A survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, Jan; Versteegt, Jens; Twisk, Jos; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Bindels, Alexander J. G. H.; Spijkstra, Jan-Jaap; Girbes, Armand R. J.; Groeneveld, A. B. Johan

    2007-01-01

    Background: The characteristics, incidence and risk factors for acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) may depend on definitions and geography. Methods: A prospective, 3-day point-prevalence study was performed by a survey of all intensive care units (ICU) in the Neth

  14. New insights towards the acute nonthyroidal illness syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA LUIZA eMAIA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS refers to changes in serum thyroid hormone levels observed in critically-ill patients in the absence of hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid primary dysfunction. Affected individuals have low T3, elevated rT3 and inappropriately normal TSH levels. The pathophysiological mechanisms are poorly understood but the acute and chronic changes in pituitary–thyroid function are probably the consequence of the action of multiple factors. The early phase seems to reflect changes occurring primarily in the peripheral thyroid hormone metabolism, best seen in humans since 80-90% of the circulating T3 are derived from the pro-hormone T4. The conversion of T4-to-T3 is catalyzed by type 1 (D1 and type 2 (D2 deiodinases via outer-ring deiodination. In contrast, type 3 deiodinase (D3 catalyzes the inactivation of both T4 and T3. Over the last decades, several studies have attempted to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the changes on circulating thyroid hormones in NTIS. Increased inflammatory cytokines, which occurs in response to virtually any illness, has long been speculated to play a role in derangements of deiodinase expression. On the other hand, oxidative stress due to augmented reactive oxygen species (ROS generation is characteristic of many diseases that are associated with NTIS. Changes in the intracellular redox state may disrupt deiodinase function by independent mechanisms, which might include depletion of the as yet unidentified endogenous thiol cofactor. Here we aim to present an updated picture of the advances in understanding the mechanisms that result in the fall of thyroid hormone levels in the acute phase of NTIS.

  15. Importance of respiratory viruses in acute otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Terho; Chonmaitree, Tasnee

    2003-04-01

    Acute otitis media is usually considered a simple bacterial infection that is treated with antibiotics. However, ample evidence derived from studies ranging from animal experiments to extensive clinical trials supports a crucial role for respiratory viruses in the etiology and pathogenesis of acute otitis media. Viral infection of the upper respiratory mucosa initiates the whole cascade of events that finally leads to the development of acute otitis media as a complication. The pathogenesis of acute otitis media involves a complex interplay between viruses, bacteria, and the host's inflammatory response. In a substantial number of children, viruses can be found in the middle-ear fluid either alone or together with bacteria, and recent studies indicate that at least some viruses actively invade the middle ear. Viruses appear to enhance the inflammatory process in the middle ear, and they may significantly impair the resolution of otitis media. Prevention of the predisposing viral infection by vaccination against the major viruses would probably be the most effective way to prevent acute otitis media. Alternatively, early treatment of the viral infection with specific antiviral agents would also be effective in reducing the occurrence of acute otitis media.

  16. Acute effects of urban air pollution on respiratory health of children with and without chronic respiratory symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee, S; Hoek, G; Boezen, H M; Schouten, J P; van Wijnen, J H; Brunekreef, B

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate to what extent different components of air pollution are associated with acute respiratory health effects in children with and without chronic respiratory symptoms. METHODS: During three consecutive winters starting in 1992-3, peak expiratory flow (PEF) and respiratory sym

  17. Dramatic Decline of Respiratory Illness Among US Military Recruits After the Renewed Use of Adenovirus Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Naval Health Research Center Dramatic Decline of Respiratory Illness Among US Military Recruits After the Renewed Use of Adenovirus Vaccines ...Renewed Use of Adenovirus Vaccines Jennifer M. Radin,1,2 Anthony W. Hawksworth,1 Patrick J. Blair,1 Dennis J. Faix,3 Rema Raman,4 Kevin L. Russell,5...hiatus, oral vaccines against adenovirus types 4 (Ad4) and 7 (Ad7) were again produced and administered to US military recruits. This study examined the

  18. Emergent severe acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by adenovirus type 55 in immunocompetent adults in 2013: a prospective observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Bing; He, Hangyong; Wang, Zheng; Qu, Jiuxin; Li, Xuyan; Chengjun BAN; Wan, Jun; Cao, Bin; Tong, Zhaohui; Wang, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Since 2008, severe cases of emerging human adenovirus type 55 (HAdV-55) in immunocompetent adults have been reported sporadically in China. The clinical features and outcomes of the most critically ill patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by HAdV-55 requiring invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) and/or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) are lacking. Methods We conducted a prospective, single-center observational study of pneumonia with A...

  19. Message concerning Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome ("SARS")

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    IMPORTANT REMINDER If you have just come back from one of the regions identified by the WHO as being infected with SARS, it is essential to monitor your state of health for ten days after your return. The syndrome manifests itself in the rapid onset of a high fever combined with respiratory problems (coughing, breathlessness, breathing difficulty). Should these signs appear, you must contact the CERN Medical Service as quickly as possible on number 73802 or 73186 during normal working hours, and the fire brigade at all other times on number 74444, indicating that you have just returned from one of the WHO-identified areas with recent local transmission.China: Beijing, Hong Kong (Special Administrative Region), Guangdong Province, Inner Mongolia, Shanxi Province, Tianjin ProvinceTaiwan:TaipeiMoreover, until further notice the CERN Management requests that all trips to these various regions of the world be reduced to a strict minimum and then only with the consent of the Division Leader concerned. Anyone comin...

  20. Acute respiratory failure secondary to mesalamine-induced interstitial pneumonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Albin; Karakurum, Ali

    2013-08-20

    Interstitial pneumonitis as an adverse effect of mesalamine therapy is a rare but potentially serious complication. Patients typically have a mild disease course with no documented cases of respiratory failure in published literature. Given its variable latent period and non-specific signs and symptoms, it may be difficult to diagnose. We present the case of a 65-year-old man who presented with symptoms of fever, shortness of breath and a non-productive cough, 2 weeks after initiation of therapy with mesalamine. His hospital course was complicated by acute respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. Radiographic studies revealed bilateral lower lobe infiltrates and bronchosopy with bronchoalveolar lavage and transbronchial biopsy were consistent with a diagnosis of drug-induced interstitial pneumonitis. The aim of this paper is to highlight the importance of considering a diagnosis of mesalamine-induced lung injury in patients presenting with respiratory symptoms while on mesalamine therapy and to review relevant literature.

  1. Early Treatment of Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybysz, Thomas M; Heffner, Alan C

    2016-02-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is defined by acute diffuse inflammatory lung injury invoked by a variety of systemic or pulmonary insults. Despite medical progress in management, mortality remains 27% to 45%. Patients with ARDS should be managed with low tidal volume ventilation. Permissive hypercapnea is well tolerated. Conservative fluid strategy can reduce ventilator and hospital days in patients without shock. Prone positioning and neuromuscular blockers reduce mortality in some patients. Early management of ARDS is relevant to emergency medicine. Identifying ARDS patients who should be transferred to an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation center is an important task for emergency providers.

  2. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome after near-drowning (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel, G; Jelen, S; Forster, B; Gullotta, U; Daum, S

    1977-08-01

    After successful rescue from drowning there may develop a situation which is called secondary drowning, resulting in acute respiratory distress characterized by interstitial pulmonary oedema, hypoxaemia, hypercapnia and acidosis during drowning, direct alteration of the alveolar membrane by aspirated water and particulate matters and a volume overloading by adsorption and--not seldom--inept therapy. This situation requires mechanical ventilation and forced diuresis, combined with high doses of steroids, antibiotics and digitalis. We present the case of an eleven year old patient whose clinical course demonstrate the necessity of exact clinical observation after rescue from drowning. After development of acute respiratory distress only the immediate utilization of the therapeutic modalities of an intensive care may result in a satisfactory outcome. Four months later our patient had normal pulmonary function except for a moderate reduction of compliance.

  3. Epidemiology of respiratory distress and the illness severity in late preterm or term infants: a prospective multi-center study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Xiao-lu; YI Bin; SHI Jing-yun; DU Li-zhong; XU Xue-feng; CHEN Chao; YAN Chao-ying; LIU Ya-ming; LIU Ling; XIONG Hong; SUN Hui-qing; LAI Jian-pu

    2010-01-01

    Background The severity of respiratory distress was associated with neonatal prognosis. This study aimed to explore the clinical characteristics, therapeutic interventions and short-term outcomes of late preterm or term infants who required respiratory support, and compare the usage of different illness severity assessment tools.Methods Seven neonatal intensive care units in tertiary hospitals were recruited. From November 2008 to October 2009, neonates born at ≥34 weeks' gestational age, admitted at <72 hours of age, requiring continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or mechanical ventilation for respiratory support were enrolled. Clinical data including demographic variables, underlying disease, complications, therapeutic interventions and short-term outcomes were collected. All infants were divided into three groups by Acute care of at-risk newborns (ACoRN) Respiratory Score <5, 5-8, and >8.Results During the study period, 503 newborn late preterm or term infants required respiratory support. The mean gestational age was (36.8±2.2) weeks, mean birth weight was (2734.5±603.5) g. The majority of the neonates were male (69.4%), late preterm (63.3%), delivered by cesarean section (74.8%), admitted in the first day of life (89.3%) and outborn (born at other hospitals, 76.9%). Of the cesarean section, 51.1% were performed electively. Infants in the severe group were more mature, had the highest rate of elective cesarean section, Apgar score <7 at 5 minutes and resuscitated with intubation, the in-hospital mortality increased significantly. In total, 58.1% of the patients were supported with mechanical ventilation and 17.3% received high frequency oscillation. Adjunctive therapies were commonly needed.Higher rate of infants in severe group needed mechanical ventilation or high frequency oscillation, volume expansion,bicarbonate infusion or vasopressors therapy (P <0.05). The incidence of complications was also increased significantly in severe group (P

  4. TCM Therapeutic Strategy on Acute Lung Injury Caused by Infectious Atypical Pneumonia and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐光华

    2003-01-01

    @@ Infectious atypical pneumonia (IAP) is also called severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) by WHO. In its development, around 20% of SARS can develop into the stage of acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), active and effective treatment of it constitutes the important basis for lowering mortality and reducing secondary pulmonary function impairment and pulmonary fibrosis.

  5. Inhaled nitric oxide for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and acute lung injury in children and adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure (AHRF), defined as acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), are critical conditions. AHRF results from a number of systemic conditions and is associated with high mortality and morbidity in all ages. Inhaled nitric oxide (INO) has...

  6. Acute respiratory distress syndrome associated with severe ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shiho; Sagara; Yasuo; Horie; Yumiko; Anezaki; Hideaki; Miyazawa; Masahiro; Iizuka

    2010-01-01

    Various extraintestinal manifestations including pulmonary abnormalities have been reported in patients with ulcerative colitis. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a serious and fatal pulmonary manifestation. We have experienced a 67-year-old male patient with ARDS associated with a severe type of ulcerative colitis (UC). Severe dyspnea symptoms occurred during the treatment of UC in a previous hospital and the patient was transferred to our hospital on June 27, 2007. Both blood and sputa culture...

  7. Tropical pyomyositis presenting as sepsis with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siddalingana Gouda TG; H Manjunath Hande; Weena Stanley; Ragini Bargur

    2011-01-01

    Tropical pyomyositis is an underdiagnosed condition. We reported a35 year old male farmer, who presented with septicemia and acute respiratory distress syndrome due to pyomyositis involving the paraspinal muscles. Culture of the pus grew methicillin sensitiveStaphylococcus aureus, and the patient recovered after surgical drainage and antibiotic treatment. Diagnostic delays can be avoided if tropical pyomyositis is considered as a differential diagnosis in patients with septicemia.

  8. Non-invasive mechanic ventilation in treating acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Lari

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Non invasive ventilation (NIV in acute respiratory failure (ARF improve clinical parameters, arterial blood gases, decrease mortality and endo tracheal intubation (ETI rate also outside the intensive care units (ICUs. Objective of this study is to verify applicability of NIV in a general non respiratory medical ward. We enrolled 68 consecutive patients (Pts with Hypoxemic or Hyper capnic ARF: acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE, exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, Pneu - monia, acute lung injury / acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS. NIV treatment was CPAP or PSV + PEEP. 12 Pts (18,5% met primary endpoint (NIV failure: 11 Pts (17% needed ETI (5ALI/ARDS p < 0,0001, 6COPD 16,6%, 1 Patient (1,5% died (Pneumonia. No Pts with ACPE failed (p = 0,0027. Secondary endpoints: significant improvement in Respiratory Rate (RR, Kelly Score, pH, PaCO2, PaO2 vs baseline. Median duration of treatment: 16:06 hours: COPD 18:54, ACPE 4:15. Mean length of hospitalisation: 8.66 days. No patients discontinued NIV, no side effects. Results are consistent with literature. Hypoxemic ARF related to ALI/ARDS and pneumonia show worst outcome: it is not advisable to manage these conditions with NIV outside the ICU. NIV for ARF due to COPD and ACPE is feasible, safe and effective in a general medical ward if selection of Pts, staff’s training and monitoring are appropriate. This should encourage the diffusion of NIV in this specific setting. According to strong evidences in literature, NIV should be considered a first line and standard treatment in these clinical conditions irrespective of the setting.

  9. Airway microbiota and acute respiratory infection in children

    OpenAIRE

    Hasegawa, Kohei; Camargo, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory infection (ARI), such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia, is the leading cause of hospitalization for U.S. infants. While the incidence and severity of ARI can vary widely among children, the reasons for these differences are not fully explained by traditional risk factors (e.g., prematurity, viral pathogens). The recent advent of molecular diagnostic techniques has revealed the presence of highly functional communities of microbes inhabiting the human body (i.e., microbiota) th...

  10. Prone positioning in the patient who has acute respiratory distress syndrome: the art and science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollman, Kathleen M

    2004-09-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains a significant contributor to the morbidity and mortality of patients in the ICU. A variety of treatments are used to support the lung of the patient who has ARDS and improve gas exchange during the acute injury phase. It seems, however, that the simple, safe, and noninvasive act of prone positioning of the critically ill patient who has ARDS may improve gas exchange while preventing potential complications of high positive end-expiratory pressure, volutrauma, and oxygen toxicity. This article provides the critical care nurse with the physiologic rationale for use of the prone position, indications and contraindications for use, safe strategies for prone positioning, and care techniques and monitoring methods of the patient who is in the prone position.

  11. CLINICAL ANALYSIS OF OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEASYNDROME WITH ACUTE RESPIRATORY FAILURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To study the clinical characteristics of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) induced acute respiratory failure. Methods The clinical and laboratory characteristics of 9 patients were reviewed. Results 9 patients (8 females, 1 male) presented with obesity and mental disturbance, with a BMI being 44.97 kg /m2, (45.25 kg/m2 in the fe male). The mean age of the group was 67.89 years (61~74 years). All had respiratory acidosis (mean pH 7.17), hypercapni a (mean PaCO2 94.10mmHg) (63.97~143.18mmHg), and hypoxemia (mean PaO2 39mmHg) (29.03~44.03mmHg). During periods of clinical stability all but 2 had awaken hypercapnia (mean PaCO2 46.73mmHg) (38.25~54.68mmHg). Four of the 9 patients had pulmonary function test showing FEV1>70%. Conclusion OSAS induced acute respiratory fail ure has a sudden onset and various presentations and can be reversed with early and proper treatment. The severity of abnormal pulmonary function was less than what would be expected to cause respiratory failure.

  12. Lactobacillus fermentum (PCC®) supplementation and gastrointestinal and respiratory-tract illness symptoms: a randomised control trial in athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Hopkins William G; Cripps Allan W; Pyne David B; West Nicholas P; Eskesen Dorte C; Jairath Ashok; Christophersen Claus T; Conlon Michael A; Fricker Peter A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Probiotics purportedly reduce symptoms of gastrointestinal and upper respiratory-tract illness by modulating commensal microflora. Preventing and reducing symptoms of respiratory and gastrointestinal illness are the primary reason that dietary supplementation with probiotics are becoming increasingly popular with healthy active individuals. There is a paucity of data regarding the effectiveness of probiotics in this cohort. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effecti...

  13. An assessment tool for acutely ill medical patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gleeson, Margaret

    2012-01-26

    This article reports the implementation and impact of a standardized systematic evidence-based predictive score for the initial assessment of acutely ill medical patients. The Simple Clinical Score (SCS) was introduced in the A&E department and the medical floor of the authors\\' hospital between June 2007 and July 2008. The SCS was well received by the staff - 67% felt it greatly improved patient assessment and was very valuable for ensuring appropriate placement of the patient after admission and improved the quality of care. This article describes the change process, the pilot evaluation and the training programme undertaken during the implementation of the SCS. It is hoped that this experience will be of value to other project teams who are undertaking similar initiatives.

  14. An assessment tool for acutely ill medical patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gleeson, Margaret

    2012-01-31

    This article reports the implementation and impact of a standardized systematic evidence-based predictive score for the initial assessment of acutely ill medical patients. The Simple Clinical Score (SCS) was introduced in the A&E department and the medical floor of the authors\\' hospital between June 2007 and July 2008. The SCS was well received by the staff - 67% felt it greatly improved patient assessment and was very valuable for ensuring appropriate placement of the patient after admission and improved the quality of care. This article describes the change process, the pilot evaluation and the training programme undertaken during the implementation of the SCS. It is hoped that this experience will be of value to other project teams who are undertaking similar initiatives.

  15. The Impact on Emergency Department Visits for Respiratory Illness During the Southern California Wildfires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul B. Dohrenwend

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In 2007 wildfires ravaged Southern California resulting in the largest evacuationdue to a wildfire in American history. We report how these wildfires affected emergencydepartment (ED visits for respiratory illness.Methods: We extracted data from a Kaiser Permanente database for a single metropolitancommunity ED. We compared the number of visits due to respiratory illness at t ime intervalsof 2 weeks before and during the time when the fires were burnin g. We counted the totalnumber of patients with chief complaint of dyspnea, cough, and asthma and final internationalclassification of disease 9 coding diagnosis of asthma, bronchitis, chronic obstructivepulmonary disease and respiratory syndrome, and analyzed data for both total number andproportion of ED visits. We evaluated the data using Early Aberration Reporting Systemsoftware to determine significant single-visit increases compared to expected counts. We alsoanalyzed the average length of ED stay. Data on air quality were extracted from the http://www.airnow.gov site.Results: There were significant differences between pre-fire and fire period average visit countsfor the chief complaints of dyspnea and asthma. Dypnea complaints increased by 3.2 visits perday. During the fire the diagnoses of asthma increased significantly by 2.6 patients per day. Airquality reached air quality index values of 300, indicating very unhealthy conditions. Average EDlength of stay times remained unchanged during the fire period compared to the pre-fire period.Conclusion: The 2007 Southern California wildfires caused significant surges in the volume ofED patients seeking treatment for respiratory illness. Disaster plans should prepare for thesesurges when future wildfires occur.

  16. Antiviral therapy and prophylaxis of acute respiratory infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Osidak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thearticle presents the results of years of studies (including biochemical and immunological of the effectiveness of application and prophylaxis (in relation to nosocomial infections and the safety of antiviral chemical preparation Arbidol in 694 children with influenza and influenza-like illness, including the coronavirus infection (43 children and combined lesions of respiratory tract (150, indicating the possible inclusion of the drug in the complex therapy for children with the listed diseases, regardless of the severity and nature of their course. The studies were conducted according to the regulated standard of test conditions and randomized clinical trials.

  17. Acute respiratory distress syndrome assessment after traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrooz Kazemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is one of the most important complications associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI. ARDS is caused by inflammation of the lungs and hypoxic damage with lung physiology abnormalities associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Aim of this study is to determine the epidemiology of ARDS and the prevalence of risk factors. Methods: This prospective study performed on patients with acute traumatic head injury hospitalization in the intensive care unit of the Shohaday-e Haftom-e-Tir Hospital (September 2012 to September 2013 done. About 12 months, the data were evaluated. Information including age, sex, education, employment, drug and alcohol addiction, were collected and analyzed. The inclusion criteria were head traumatic patients and exclusion was the patients with chest trauma. Questionnaire was designed with doctors supervision of neurosurgery. Then the collected data were analysis. Results: In this study, the incidence of ARDS was 23.8% and prevalence of metabolic acidosis was 31.4%. Most injury with metabolic acidosis was Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH 48 (60% and Subdural hemorrhage (SDH was Next Level with 39 (48% Correlation between Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS and Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS were significantly decreased (P< 0.0001. The level of consciousness in patients with skull fractures significantly lower than those without fractures (P= 0.009 [(2.3±4.6 vs (4.02±7.07]. Prevalence of metabolic acidosis during hospitalization was 80 patients (31.4%. Conclusion: Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a common complication of traumatic brain injury. Management and treatment is essential to reduce the mortality. In this study it was found the age of patients with ARDS was higher than patients without complications. ARDS risk factor for high blood pressure was higher in men. Most victims were pedestrians. The most common injury associated with ARDS was SDH. Our analysis

  18. Monitorization of Acute Brain Dysfunction in Critical Illness

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    Günseli Orhun

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute brain dysfunction is a clinical condition which is commonly observed in intensive care units and exhibits neurological changes ranging from delirium to coma. Typically observed during sepsis in critical patients, this syndrome is also named as “sepsis-associated encephalopathy” and this situation is of significance since it is related to mortality, increase of morbidity and long-term cognitive impairment. Monitorization of brain functions in critically ill patients should be commenced with detailed neurological examination and effects of sedative drugs, which can alter neurological responses during evaluation, should be taken into consideration. On the other hand, brain imaging methods and electrophysiological examinations are diagnostic procedures which complement neurological examination. While computed tomography enables diagnosis of structural intracerebral lesions, magnetic resonance imaging provides important information on primary pathological mechanisms of sepsis-associated encephalopathy and structural alterations developing in the brain. Evidence of diagnosis and prognosis of acute brain dysfunction can be acquired through use of electroencephalography for. Although it was believed that neurological biomarkers can be useful in determination of diagnosis and prognosis, further studies are needed in this subject.

  19. Modeling the Early Events of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infection In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Yu-Ting; Liao, Fang; Hsiao, Cheng-Hsiang; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Chen, Yee-Chun; Wu-Hsieh, Betty A.

    2006-01-01

    The clinical picture of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is characterized by pulmonary inflammation and respiratory failure, resembling that of acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, the events that lead to the recruitment of leukocytes are poorly understood. To study the cellular response in the acute phase of SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-host cell interaction, we investigated the induction of chemokines, adhesion molecules, and DC-SIGN (dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin) by SARS-CoV. Immunohistochemistry revealed neutrophil, macrophage, and CD8 T-cell infiltration in the lung autopsy of a SARS patient who died during the acute phase of illness. Additionally, pneumocytes and macrophages in the patient's lung expressed P-selectin and DC-SIGN. In in vitro study, we showed that the A549 and THP-1 cell lines were susceptible to SARS-CoV. A549 cells produced CCL2/monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and CXCL8/interleukin-8 (IL-8) after interaction with SARS-CoV and expressed P-selectin and VCAM-1. Moreover, SARS-CoV induced THP-1 cells to express CCL2/MCP-1, CXCL8/IL-8, CCL3/MIP-1α, CXCL10/IP-10, CCL4/MIP-1β, and CCL5/RANTES, which attracted neutrophils, monocytes, and activated T cells in a chemotaxis assay. We also demonstrated that DC-SIGN was inducible in THP-1 as well as A549 cells after SARS-CoV infection. Our in vitro experiments modeling infection in humans together with the study of a lung biopsy of a patient who died during the early phase of infection demonstrated that SARS-CoV, through a dynamic interaction with lung epithelial cells and monocytic cells, creates an environment conducive for immune cell migration and accumulation that eventually leads to lung injury. PMID:16501078

  20. Associations between co-detected respiratory viruses in children with acute respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaida, Atsushi; Kubo, Hideyuki; Takakura, Koh-ichi; Sekiguchi, Jun-ichiro; Yamamoto, Seiji P; Kohdera, Urara; Togawa, Masao; Amo, Kiyoko; Shiomi, Masashi; Ohyama, Minori; Goto, Kaoru; Hase, Atsushi; Kageyama, Tsutomu; Iritani, Nobuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are the major etiological agents of acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in young children. Although respiratory virus co-detections are common, analysis of combinations of co-detected viruses has never been conducted in Japan. Nineteen respiratory viruses or subtypes were surveyed using multiplex real-time PCR on 1,044 pediatric (patient age virus positive (1,414 viruses were detected), and 388 of the virus-positive specimens (43.5%, 388/891) were positive for multiple viruses. The ratio of multiple/total respiratory virus-positive specimens was high in children aged 0-35 months. Statistical analyses revealed that human bocavirus 1 and human adenovirus were synchronously co-detected. On the other hand, co-detections of human parainfluenza virus type 1 (HPIV-1) with HPIV-3, HPIV-3 with human metapneumovirus (hMPV), hMPV with respiratory syncytial virus A (RSV A), hMPV with influenza virus A (H1N1) 2009 (FLUA (H1N1) 2009), RSV A with RSV B, and human rhinovirus and FLUA (H1N1) 2009 were exclusive. These results suggest that young children (viruses, and some combinations of viruses are synchronously or exclusively co-detected.

  1. Three-view bedside ultrasound for the differentiation of acute respiratory distress syndrome from cardiogenic pulmonary edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantuani, Daniel; Nagdev, Arun; Stone, Michael

    2012-09-01

    Bedside ultrasound is being increasingly used by emergency physicians (EPs) for the differentiation of acute dyspnea in critically ill patients. Lung ultrasound is emerging as a highly sensitive tool in diagnosing alveolar interstitial edema with the presence of diffuse “B-lines” arising from the pleural line. However, when used independently, lung ultrasound is unable to differentiate between cardiogenic and noncardiogenic causes of pulmonary edema. This case report describes a rapid 3-view or “triple scan” sonographic examination to differentiate acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) from cardiogenic pulmonary edema.

  2. Acute lung injury and the acute respiratory distress syndrome in the injured patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakowitz Magdalena

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome are clinical entities of multi-factorial origin frequently seen in traumatically injured patients requiring intensive care. We performed an unsystematic search using PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews up to January 2012. The purpose of this article is to review recent evidence for the pathophysiology and the management of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome in the critically injured patient. Lung protective ventilation remains the most beneficial therapy. Future trials should compare intervention groups to controls receiving lung protective ventilation, and focus on relevant outcome measures such as duration of mechanical ventilation, length of intensive care unit stay, and mortality.

  3. Aspects of protein metabolism in children in acute and chronic illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geukers, V.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    In critically ill children, a negative protein balance is associated with an increased incidence of infections, fewer ventilator-free days, and increased length of stay in the pediatric intensive care unit. Additionally, a malnourished state due to chronic illness increases the risk of respiratory i

  4. [Emergence of new pneumonia: besides severe acute respiratory syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiarotti, P; Pozzi, E

    2006-10-01

    Important epidemiological modifications have been registered in respiratory infections, both in immunocompetent and immunocompromised hosts. Pathogens with modified antibiotic susceptibility patterns have emerged, which display an increased antibiotic resistance, such as S. pneumoniae, S. aureus, H. influenzae. This trait has a strong impact on the therapeutic choices, particularly when an empiric antibiotic treatment is selected. The prevalence of bacterial species showing non-susceptibility to the most common prescribed antibiotics (betalactams, macrolides etc.) follows a different geographic distribution. Some pathogens have acquired a new epidemiological role in patients affected with immune deficiencies: among them P. carinii and other bacterial, fungal and viral pathogens. The emergence of new, previously unknown, species, has been registered, both bacteria (C. pneumoniae) and viruses (Metapneumovirus, Hantavirus etc.). Such aspects must be considered in the diagnosis of respiratory infections, which should include diagnostic tests for the identification of such pathogens. Among the new respiratory infections severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) has quickly become a health care emergency, so that efforts have been made to identify the aetiological agent as well as the main epidemiological and clinical characteristics of the disease. Avian influenza has raised great interest immediately after the first cases of human infection caused by the avian virus, especially after the outbreaks in Asian countries and in the Netherlands. A crucial step in containing infection is the prevention of the disease; efforts are directed toward this endpoint.

  5. Multipathogen infections in hospitalized children with acute respiratory infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xicheng Hong

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To explore the epidemiologic and clinical features of, and interactions among, multipathogen infections in hospitalized children with acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI. A prospective study of children admitted with ARTI was conducted. Peripheral blood samples were analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence to detect respiratory agents including respiratory syncytial virus; adenovirus; influenza virus (Flu types A and B; parainfluenza virus (PIV types 1, 2, and 3; chlamydia pneumonia; and mycoplasma pneumonia. A medical history of each child was taken. Results Respiratory agents were detected in 164 (51.9% of 316 children with ARTI. A single agent was identified in 50 (15.8% children, and multiple agents in 114 (36.1%. Flu A was the most frequently detected agent, followed by Flu B. Coinfection occurred predominantly in August and was more frequent in children between 3 and 6 years of age. A significantly higher proportion of Flu A, Flu B, and PIV 1 was detected in samples with two or more pathogens per sample than in samples with a single pathogen. Conclusion Our study suggests that there is a high occurrence of multipathogen infections in children admitted with ARTI and that coinfection is associated with certain pathogens.

  6. Detection of novel respiratory viruses from influenza-like illness in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuse, Yuki; Suzuki, Akira; Kishi, Makiko; Galang, Hazel O; Lupisan, Socorro P; Olveda, Remigio M; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2010-05-01

    Several novel viruses have been recently identified in respiratory samples. However, the epidemiology of these viruses in tropical countries remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to provide an overview of the epidemiology of novel respiratory viruses, including human metapneumovirus, human bocavirus, new subtypes of human coronavirus (NL63 and HKU1), KI virus, WU virus, and Melaka virus in the Philippines, a tropical country. Nasopharyngeal aspirates from 465 patients with influenza-like illness were collected in 2006 and 2007. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and PCR were performed to detect viruses from culture-negative specimens. Human metapneumovirus, human bocavirus, human coronavirus HKU1, KI virus, and WU virus were detected for the first time in the Philippines; Melaka virus was not found.

  7. Behavioral Effects of Upper Respiratory Tract Illnesses: A Consideration of Possible Underlying Cognitive Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P. Smith

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that both experimentally induced upper respiratory tract illnesses (URTIs and naturally occurring URTIs influence mood and performance. The present study investigated possible cognitive mechanisms underlying the URTI-performance changes. Those who developed a cold (N = 47 had significantly faster, but less accurate, performance than those who remained healthy (N = 54. Illness had no effect on manipulations designed to influence encoding, response organisation (stimulus-response compatilibility or response preparation. Similarly, there was no evidence that different components of working memory were impaired. Overall, the present research confirms that URTIs can have an effect on performance efficiency. Further research is required to identify the physiological and behavioral mechanisms underlying these effects.

  8. Antibiotic use in acute upper respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoorob, Roger; Sidani, Mohamad A; Fremont, Richard D; Kihlberg, Courtney

    2012-11-01

    Upper respiratory tract infections account for millions of visits to family physicians each year in the United States. Although warranted in some cases, antibiotics are greatly overused. This article outlines the guidelines and indications for appropriate antibiotic use for common upper respiratory infections. Early antibiotic treatment may be indicated in patients with acute otitis media, group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngitis, epiglottitis, or bronchitis caused by pertussis. Persistent cases of rhinosinusitis may necessitate the use of antibiotics if symptoms persist beyond a period of observation. Antibiotics should not be considered in patients with the common cold or laryngitis. Judicious, evidence-based use of antibiotics will help contain costs and prevent adverse effects and drug resistance.

  9. Acute myocarditis associated with novel Middle east respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhogbani, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    The novel Middle east respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MeRS-CoV) has been identified as a cause of pneumonia; however, it has not been reported as a cause of acute myocarditis. A 60-year-old man presented with pneumonia and congestive heart failure. On the first day of admission, he was found to have an elevated troponin-l level and severe global left ventricular systolic dysfunction on echo-cardiography. The serum creatinine level was found mildly elevated. Chest radiography revealed in the lower lung fields accentuated bronchovascular lung markings and multiple small patchy opacities. Laboratory tests were negative for viruses known to cause myocarditis. Sputum sample was positive for MeRS-CoV. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance revealed evidence of acute myocarditis. the patient had all criteria specified by the international Consensus Group on CMR in Myocarditis that make a clinical suspicion for acute myocarditis. this was the first case that demonstrated that MeRS-CoV may cause acute myocarditis and acute-onset heart failure.

  10. A Comparison of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Outcomes Between Military and Civilian Burn Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    MILITARY MEDICINE, 180, 3:56, 2015 A Comparison of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Outcomes Between Military and Civilian Burn Patients J Alan...Chung, MC USA*‡ ABSTRACT Background: The objective of this report was to compare the prevalence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and...Development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a common complication of burn injury and is associated with poor outcomes. Previous reports using

  11. Prevalence and predictors of hypoxemia in acute respiratory infections presenting to pediatric emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singhi S

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Rational & Objective: Early detection of hypoxemia and oxygen therapy improves the outcome of children with acute respiratory illnesses (ARI. However, facility to measure oxygen saturation (SpO2 is not available in many health facilities of resource poor countries. We have studied prevalence of hypoxemia in children with ARI and examined value of various clinical signs to predict hypoxemia. Subjects & Methods: Consecutive children, aged 2 months - 59 months, with respiratory symptom(s attending the pediatric emergency service between Oct 2001 to December 2002 were studied. Presence or absence of cough, nasal flaring, ability to feed/drink, cyanosis, chestwall indrawing, wheeze, tachypnoea (respiratory rate >50/min in children up to 11 months and >40/min up to 59 months, crepitations on auscultation and oxygen saturation (SpO2, by Nellcore™pulse oximeter and clinical diagnosis were recorded. Results: Of 2216 children studied 266 (11.9% had hypoxemia (SpO2 £90%. It was seen in 73.8% of 126 patients with WHO defined very severe pneumonia, 25.8% of 331 patients with severe pneumonia, 11% of 146 patients with bronochiolitis and 6.5% of 338 patients with acute asthma. Most sensitive indicators of hypoxemia were chestwall indrawing (sensitivity-90%, negative predictive value -98% and crepitations (sensitivity-75%, negative predictive value 95.7% while the best positive predictive value was seen with cyanosis (71.4% and inability to feed (47.6%. Nasal flaring had the good balance of sensitivity (64%, specificity (82% and positive predictive value (33% among the signs studied. Conclusion: None of the clinical signs of respiratory distress had all the attributes of a good predictors of hypoxemia. Chest wall indrawing was the most sensitive and 'inability to feed/ drink' was the most specific indicator.

  12. Control dynamics of severe acute respiratory syndrome transmission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Haiying; RONG Feng; KE Fujiu; BAI Yilong

    2003-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a serious disease with many puzzling features. We present a simple, dynamic model to assess the epidemic potential of SARS and the effectiveness of control measures. With this model, we analysed the SARS epidemic data in Beijing. The data fitting gives the basic case reproduction number of 2.16 leading to the outbreak, and the variation of the effective reproduction number reflecting the control effect. Noticeably, our study shows that the response time and the strength of control measures have significant effects on the scale of the outbreak and the lasting time of the epidemic.

  13. Digestive system manifestations in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    詹俊; 陈为宪; 李楚强; 伍卫; 李建军; 江山平; 王景峰; 曾志勇; 黄子通; 黄洪章

    2003-01-01

    Objective To explore digestive system manifestations in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS).Method The clinical data of 96 cases with SARS admitted into our hospital from February 6, 2003 to March 28, 2003 were retrospectively analyzed.Results Among the 96 cases, 26 cases (27%) had diarrhea, 17 (18%) had nausea, 6 (6%) had vomiting, 16 (17%) had bellyache, and 8 (8%) had ALT elevation.Conclusions Patients with SARS may have digestive system manifestations; diarrhea is the most common symptom.

  14. [Ventilation in acute respiratory distress. Lung-protective strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruells, C S; Rossaint, R; Dembinski, R

    2012-11-01

    Ventilation of patients suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with protective ventilator settings is the standard in patient care. Besides the reduction of tidal volumes, the adjustment of a case-related positive end-expiratory pressure and preservation of spontaneous breathing activity at least 48 h after onset is part of this strategy. Bedside techniques have been developed to adapt ventilatory settings to the individual patient and the different stages of ARDS. This article reviews the pathophysiology of ARDS and ventilator-induced lung injury and presents current evidence-based strategies for ventilator settings in ARDS.

  15. Noninvasive Ventilation Practice Patterns for Acute Respiratory Failure in Canadian Tertiary Care Centres: A Descriptive Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geneviève C Digby

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The extent of noninvasive ventilation (NIV use for patients with acute respiratory failure in Canadian hospitals, indications for use and associated outcomes are unknown.

  16. ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME DAN ACUTE PNEUMONIA PADA NEAR DROWNING:SEBUAH LAPORAN KASUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Prinka Adyana

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Near drowning is a condition in which the victim survived the first 24 hours. The WorldHealth Organization (WHO , recorded worldwide in 2000 there were 400,000 incidentdrowned accidentally . That is, this figure ranks second only to traffic accidents.Aspiration pneumonia is a complication of near drwoning which occurred in 80 % ofcases of near drowning, while 50 % of patients sink into acute respiratory distresssyndrome ( ARDS . This case report discusses the acute respiratory distress syndromeand acute pneumonia in near drowning 24 years old , who had drowned at the beach for± 15 minutes , the chest x - ray obtained pulmonary edema dd / lung pnuemonia therepneuomothorax . Examination of multislice spiral computed tomography ( MSCT bilateral pneumothorax Thorax obtained major and minor fisuura right and left majorfissure , pneumomediastinum , pulmonary pneumonia contusio / suspected aspirationpneumonia , emphysema subcutis . In intensive care patients conducted for 9 days andreturn to akitivitas everyday

  17. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome: a review of the Berlin definition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luis Cabezón, N; Sánchez Castro, I; Bengoetxea Uriarte, U X; Rodrigo Casanova, M P; García Peña, J M; Aguilera Celorrio, L

    2014-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is due to many causes. The absence of a universal definition up until now has led to a series of practical problems for a definitive diagnosis. The incidences of ARDS and Acute Lung Injury (ALI) vary widely in the current literature. The American-European Consensus Conference definition has been applied since its publication in 1994 and has helped to improve knowledge about ARDS. However, 18 years later, in 2011, the European Intensive Medicine Society, requested a team of international experts to meet in Berlin to review the ARDS definition. The purpose of the Berlin definition is not to use it as a prognostic tool, but to improve coherence between research and clinical practice.

  18. [Corticosteroid administration for acute respiratory distress syndrome : therapeutic option?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möhnle, P; Briegel, J

    2012-04-01

    Despite a number of clinical trials there is still controversy about the role of corticosteroid therapy in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In addition recent meta-analyses differed markedly in the conclusions. This review is intended to provide a short practical guide for the clinician. Based on the available literature, high-dose and pre-emptive administration of corticosteroids is hazardous and not indicated. A low-dose corticosteroid regime given for 4 weeks may potentially be helpful and can be considered in acute or unresolved ARDS in less than 14 days after onset of ARDS, if a close infection surveillance program is available, if neuromuscular blockade can be avoided and if a stepwise dose reduction of corticosteroids is performed. The total daily dose at the beginning of treatment should not exceed 2 mg/kg body weight (BW) methylprednisolone.

  19. [Acute respiratory distress caused by a mediastinal pancreatic pseudocyst].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, A; Desport, J C; Dolan, P; Fressard, D; Feiss, P

    1993-01-01

    The pseudocyst of the pancreas is a frequent complication of acute pancreatitis. However to intrathoracic localization remains exceptional. A case of acute respiratory insufficiency in a 66-year-old man in whom artificial ventilation was required for such a complication is reported. This case stresses the difficulty often encountered for the differential diagnosis of these liquid tumors. The clinical signs are variable and non specific, especially in case of absence of any history of pancreatitis. The radiographic studies, in particular ultrasonography and CT-scanner defines its liquid nature and its connections. Endoscopy examination confirms its retro-oesophageal extension due to the migration through the oesophageal hiatus. Only the percutaneous needle aspiration of a collection or an associated pleural effusion confirms the diagnosis by the high content of amylases. The treatment of this type of localisation is surgical and essentially consists of an internal derivation.

  20. Description of Bacterial Respiratory Infections among Department of Defense Beneficiaries, Utilizing Electronic Clinical Laboratory Data, October 2008-September 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Respiratory illness is a constant threat for military personnel due to crowded and stressful occupational conditions. 1 Respiratory infections are...febrile respiratory illness (FRI) program and service-level streptococcus/acute respiratory disease (ARD) policies, as employed in the basic training...13 Research associates biofilms with common respiratory diseases such as otitis media and cystic fibrosis. 14 This report also presents

  1. Extracorporeal blood therapy in sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome: the "purifying dream"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Xuefeng; Dai Huaping; Jia Chun'e; Wang Chen

    2014-01-01

    Objective To discuss the rationale,hypothesis,modality of extracorporeal blood purification (EBP) techniques for the critically ill animal models or patients,and to summarize the experimental and clinical studies with inconsistent data which explored the EBP's efficacy in the areas of critical care medicine.Data sources Articles referred in this review were collected from the database of PubMed published in English up to June 2014.Study selection We had done a literature search by using the term "(sepsis OR acute lung injury OR acute respiratory distress syndrome) AND (extracorporeal blood purification OR hemofiltration OR hemoperfusion OR plasma exchange OR plasmapheresis OR adsorpiton)".Related original or review articles were included and carefully analyzed.Results Acute cellular and humoral immune disturbances occur in both sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).Treatments aimed at targeting one single pro-/anti-inflammatory mediator have largely failed with no proven clinical benefits.Such failure shifts the therapeutic rationale to the nonspecific,broad-spectrum methods for modulating the over-activated inflammatory and anti-inflammatory response.Therefore,EBP techniques have become the potential weapons with high promise for removing the circulating pro-/anti-inflammatory mediators and promoting immune reconstitution.Over the years,multiple extracorporeal techniques for the critically ill animal models or patients have been developed,including hemofiltration (HF),high-volume hemofiltration (HVHF),high-cutoff hemofiltration (HCO-HF),hemo-perfusion or-adsorption (HP/HA),coupled plasma filtration adsorption (CPFA),and plasma exchange (PE).These previous studies showed that EBP therapy was feasible and safe for the critically ill animal models or patients.However,data on their efficacy (especially on the clinical benefits,such as mortality) were inconsistent.Conclusions It is not now to conclude that EBP intervention can purify septic or ARDS

  2. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in a paediatric cluster in Singapore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsou, Ian Y.; Kaw, Gregory J.; Chee, Thomas S. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, 11 Jalan Tan Tock Seng, 308433, Singapore (Singapore); Loh, Lik Eng; Chan, Irene [Department of Paediatric Medicine, KK Women' s and Children' s Hospital, 100 Bukit Timah Road, 229899, Singapore (Singapore)

    2004-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a major infectious disease pandemic that occurred in early 2003, and one of the diagnostic criteria is the presence of chest radiographic findings. To describe the radiographic features of SARS in a cluster of affected children. The chest radiographs of four related children ranging in age from 18 months to 9 years diagnosed as having SARS were reviewed for the presence of air-space shadowing, air bronchograms, peribronchial thickening, interstitial disease, pleural effusion, pneumothorax, hilar lymphadenopathy and mediastinal widening. Ill-defined air-space shadowing was the common finding in all the children. The distribution was unifocal or multifocal. No other findings were seen on the radiographs. None of the children developed radiographic findings consistent with acute respiratory distress syndrome. All four children showed significant resolution of the radiographic findings 4-6 days after the initial radiograph. Early recognition of these features is important in implementing isolation and containment measures to prevent the spread of infection. SARS in children appears to manifest as a milder form of the disease as compared to adults. (orig.)

  3. Etiology of acute lower respiratory tract infections in children: current state of the issue (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Bogdanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lower respiratory tract infections are the leading cause of global morbidity and mortality in children under five years. Verification of the etiology of acute lower respiratory tract infections is necessary for definition of treatment and direction of prevention. Respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B, parainfluenza 1, 2, and 3 and adenovirus are considered the main reasons of acute lower respiratory tract infections. The importance of different viruses depends on countries, district, seasons and ages of children. Analysis of the results of studies from different regions of the world showed fluctuations in frequency of etiology definition of respiratory viruses from 25 to 90%. Respiratory syncytial virus is the main reason of acute lower respiratory tract infections, especially in the group of children up to 1 year.

  4. Message about the « severe acute respiratory disease syndrome »

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you are back from a journey in one of the zones pointed out by WHO concerned by the severe acute respiratory disease syndrome (SARS), it is necessary to monitor your health for at least ten days. This syndrome shows a high fever accompanied by cough or difficulty in breathing. If you become ill, you have to contact as quickly as possible the CERN medical service by dialling 73802 - 73186 during work hours or the Fire Brigade 74444 outside work hours. Tell this service about your recent travel to one of the regions where WHO has reported cases*. * For instant, the areas identified are the cities of Hanoi, Hong Kong, Singapore and the Province of Guangdong (South of China) and Toronto. The medical service recommends to avoid any trip in these world areas until further instruction. CERN Medical Service

  5. Outbreaks of Short-Incubation Ocular and Respiratory Illness Following Exposure to Indoor Swimming Pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Anna B.; Kile, James C.; Otto, Charles; Kazerouni, Neely; Austin, Connie; Blount, Benjamin C.; Wong, Hong-Nei; Beach, Michael J.; Fry, Alicia M.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Chlorination destroys pathogens in swimming pool water, but by-products of chlorination can cause human illness. We investigated outbreaks of ocular and respiratory symptoms associated with chlorinated indoor swimming pools at two hotels. Measurements We interviewed registered guests and companions who stayed at hotels X and Y within 2 days of outbreak onset. We performed bivariate and stratified analyses, calculated relative risks (RR), and conducted environmental investigations of indoor pool areas. Results Of 77 guests at hotel X, 47 (61%) completed questionnaires. Among persons exposed to the indoor pool area, 22 (71%) of 31 developed ocular symptoms [RR = 24; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.5–370], and 14 (45%) developed respiratory symptoms (RR = 6.8; 95% CI, 1.0–47) with a median duration of 10 hr (0.25–24 hr). We interviewed 30 (39%) of 77 registered persons and 59 unregistered companions at hotel Y. Among persons exposed to the indoor pool area, 41 (59%) of 69 developed ocular symptoms (RR = 24; 95% CI, 1.5–370), and 28 (41%) developed respiratory symptoms (RR = 17; 95% CI, 1.1–260) with a median duration of 2.5 hr (2 min–14 days). Four persons sought medical care. During the outbreak, the hotel X’s ventilation system malfunctioned. Appropriate water and air samples were not available for laboratory analysis. Conclusions and relevance to professional practice Indoor pool areas were associated with illness in these outbreaks. A large proportion of bathers were affected; symptoms were consistent with chloramine exposure and were sometimes severe. Improved staff training, pool maintenance, and pool area ventilation could prevent future outbreaks. PMID:17384776

  6. 血管外肺水指数和肺血管通透性指数评估重症患者急性呼吸窘迫综合征程度的可靠性%Reliability of extravascular lung water index and pulmonary vascular permeability index in assessing severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome in critically ill patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡雪珍; 龚裕强; 杨鹏; 孙来芳; 徐峰

    2016-01-01

    目的 探讨血管外肺水指数(EVLWI)和肺血管通透性指数(PVPI)评估重症患者急性呼吸窘迫综合征(ARDS)程度的可靠性.方法 选择本院EICU住院治疗的ARDS患者46例,年龄18~72岁,体重46~ 72 kg,性别不限,急性生理与慢性健康评分11 ~25分.将患者分成3组:重度组(n=16):氧合指数(PaO2/FiO2)≤100 mmHg;中度组(n=14):100 mmHg <PaO2/FiO2≤200 mmHg;轻度组(n=16):200 mmHg <PaO2/FiO2≤300 mmHg.于治疗前、诊断ARDS后24和72 h时测量PVPI和EVLWI、心指数(CI)、胸腔内血容量指数(ITBVI),并行血气分析,计算PaO2/FiO2.记录患者入院28 d的病死情况.PVPI、EVLWI与PaO2/FiO2、ITBVI和CI进行Pearson相关分析.结果 与轻度组比较,中度组及重度组患者各时点PVPI、EVLWI和28 d病死率升高(P<0.05);与中度组比较,重度组患者各时点PVPI、EVLWI和28 d病死率升高(P<0.05).PVPI与EVLWI和PaO2/FiO2的相关系数分别为0.778和-0.437(P<0.05),与CI和ITBVI无相关性(P>0.05);EVLWI与PaO2/FiO2和ITBVI的相关系数分别为-0.448,0.347(P< 0.05).PVPI和PaO2/FiO2的相关系数与EVLWI和PaO2/FiO2的相关系数比较差异无统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 PVPI和EVLWI均可评估重症患者ARDS程度,可靠性一致.%Objective To investigate the reliability of extravascular lung water index (EVLWI) and pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI) in assessing the severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in critically ill patients.Methods Forty-six patients with ARDS,who were admitted in our emergency intensive care unit,aged 18-72 yr,weighing 46-72 kg,of Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation Ⅱ score 11-25,were divided into 3 groups:PaO2/FiO2 ≤ 100 mmHg severe group (n =16);100 mmHg <PaO2/FiO2 ≤ 200 mmHg moderate group (n =14);200 mmHg <PaO2/FiO2 ≤ 300 mmHg mild group (n=16).Before treatment,and at 24 and 72 h after diagnosis of ARDS,PVPI,EVLWI,cardiac index (CI),and intrathoracic blood volume index (ITBVI

  7. The study protocol for a randomized controlled trial of a family-centred tobacco control program about environmental tobacco smoke (ETS to reduce respiratory illness in Indigenous infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segan Catherine

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute respiratory illness (ARI is the most common cause of acute presentations and hospitalisations of young Indigenous children in Australia and New Zealand (NZ. Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS from household smoking is a significant and preventable contributor to childhood ARI. This paper describes the protocol for a study which aims to test the efficacy of a family-centred tobacco control program about ETS to improve the respiratory health of Indigenous infants in Australia and New Zealand. For the purpose of this paper 'Indigenous' refers to Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples when referring to Australian Indigenous populations. In New Zealand, the term 'Indigenous' refers to Māori. Methods/Design This study will be a parallel, randomized, controlled trial. Participants will be Indigenous women and their infants, half of whom will be randomly allocated to an 'intervention' group, who will receive the tobacco control program over three home visits in the first three months of the infant's life and half to a control group receiving 'usual care' (i.e. they will not receive the tobacco control program. Indigenous health workers will deliver the intervention, the goal of which is to reduce or eliminate infant exposure to ETS. Data collection will occur at baseline (shortly after birth and when the infant is four months and one year of age. The primary outcome is a doctor-diagnosed, documented case of respiratory illness in participating infants. Discussion Interventions aimed at reducing exposure of Indigenous children to ETS have the potential for significant benefits for Indigenous communities. There is currently a dearth of evidence for the effect of tobacco control interventions to reduce children's exposure to ETS among Indigenous populations. This study will provide high-quality evidence of the efficacy of a family-centred tobacco control program on ETS to reduce respiratory illness. Outcomes of

  8. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in children under one year of age hospitalized for acute respiratory diseases in Pelotas, RS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Elaine Cardozo Macedo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Acute respiratory diseases (ARDs are a major cause of infant morbidity and mortality. OBJECTIVE: The present case-controlled study investigated the hospitalizations by ARDs in children under one year of age and the association with the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV in za Pelotas, RS. METHODS: All children under one year of age hospitalized due to ARDs from August 1997 to July of 1998 were followed-up in the four hospitals of the city. A standardized questionnaire was applied to the children's mother regarding symptoms of the actual illness in addition to social and demographic variables, nutrition, and previous morbidity. The final diagnosis of ARDs was performed by an arbiter (a pediatrician based on the hospital records of the children and the data on the questionnaire. Nasopharyngeal secretions were collected for RSV detection by direct immunofluorescence. RESULTS: The study included 650 children and the annual incidence rate of hospital admissions for ARDs was 13.9%. Admissions showed a seasonal pattern with most of the hospitalizations occurring from July to October. The main causes of admission were: pneumonia (43.7%, bronchiolitis (31.0%, asthma (20.3%, influenza (3.5%, otitis media (0.8% and laryngitis (0.6%. The overall prevalence of RSV was 30.7%, with 40.2% in bronchiolitis, 28.6% in influenza, 27.4% in asthma, 26.3% in pneumonia, and 25% in otitis media. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the present study confirm the high morbidity of ARDs in childhood and the seasonal pattern of ARDs hospitalizations and their association with RSV infection.

  9. Detection of viral respiratory pathogens in mild and severe acute respiratory infections in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lili; Lee, Vernon Jian Ming; Cui, Lin; Lin, Raymond; Tan, Chyi Lin; Tan, Linda Wei Lin; Lim, Wei-yen; Leo, Yee-Sin; Low, Louie; Hibberd, Martin; Chen, Mark I-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the performance of laboratory methods and clinical case definitions in detecting the viral pathogens for acute respiratory infections (ARIs) from a prospective community cohort and hospital inpatients, nasopharyngeal swabs from cohort members reporting ARIs (community-ARI) and inpatients admitted with ARIs (inpatient-ARI) were tested by Singleplex Real Time-Polymerase Chain Reaction (SRT-PCR), multiplex RT-PCR (MRT-PCR) and pathogen-chip system (PathChip) between April 2012 and December 2013. Community-ARI and inpatient-ARI was also combined with mild and severe cases of influenza from a historical prospective study as mild-ARI and severe-ARI respectively to evaluate the performance of clinical case definitions. We analysed 130 community-ARI and 140 inpatient-ARI episodes (5 inpatient-ARI excluded because multiple pathogens were detected), involving 138 and 207 samples respectively. Detection by PCR declined with days post-onset for influenza virus; decrease was faster for community-ARI than for inpatient-ARI. No such patterns were observed for non-influenza respiratory virus infections. PathChip added substantially to viruses detected for community-ARI only. Clinical case definitions discriminated influenza from other mild-ARI but performed poorly for severe-ARI and for older participants. Rational strategies for diagnosis and surveillance of influenza and other respiratory virus must acknowledge the differences between ARIs presenting in community and hospital settings. PMID:28218288

  10. Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Fibrosis versus Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eIm

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and basic experimental approaches to pediatric acute lung injury (ALI, including acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, have historically focused on acute care and management of the patient. Additional efforts have focused on the etiology of pediatric ALI and ARDS, clinically defined as diffuse, bilateral diseases of the lung that compromise function leading to severe hypoxemia within seven days of defined insult. Insults can include ancillary events related to prematurity, can follow trauma and/or transfusion, or can present as sequelae of pulmonary infections and cardiovascular disease and/or injury. Pediatric ALI/ARDS remains one of the leading causes of infant and childhood morbidity and mortality, particularly in the developing world. Though incidence is relatively low, ranging from 2.9-9.5 cases/100,000 patients/year, mortality remains high, approaching 35% in some studies. However, this is a significant decrease from the historical mortality rate of over 50%. Several decades of advances in acute management and treatment, as well as better understanding of approaches to ventilation, oxygenation and surfactant regulation, have contributed to improvements in patient recovery. As such, there is a burgeoning interest in the long term impact of pediatric ALI/ARDS. Chronic pulmonary deficiencies in survivors appear to be caused by inappropriate injury repair, with fibrosis and predisposition to emphysema arising as irreversible secondary events that can severely compromise pulmonary development and function, as well as the overall health of the patient. In this chapter, the long term effectiveness of current treatments will be examined, as will the potential efficacy of novel, acute and long term therapies that support repair and delay or even impede the onset of secondary events, including fibrosis.

  11. Coxsackievirus A21, Enterovirus 68, and Acute Respiratory Tract Infection, China

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, Zichun; Gonzalez, Richard; Wang, Zhong; Ren, Lili; Xiao, Yan; Li, Jianguo; Li, Yongjun; Vernet, Guy; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Jin, Qi; Wang, Jianwei

    2012-01-01

    During August 2006–April 2010, in Beijing, China, 2 rare human enterovirus serotypes, coxsackievirus A21 and enterovirus 68, were detected most frequently in human enterovirus–positive adults with acute respiratory tract infections. Thus, during some years, these 2 viruses cause a substantial proportion of enterovirus-associated adult acute respiratory tract infections.

  12. Inhaled nitric oxide for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in children and adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebistorf, Fabienne; Karam, Oliver; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure (AHRF) and mostly acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions. AHRF results from several systemic conditions and is associated with high mortality and morbidity in individuals of all ages. Inhaled nitric oxide (INO) has been...

  13. Acute respiratory infections in elderly people: the role of micronutrients and lifestyle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graat, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections are the most frequent of all infectious diseases. In popular speech common cold, flu (influenza), and pneumonia all denote acute respiratory infections. Elderly people show an increased risk of these infections and their complications. In The Netherlands about 2.000 elde

  14. Acute effects of ambient air pollution episodes on respiratory health of children.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, G.

    1992-01-01

    In this thesis the acute effects of air pollution episodes on respiratory health of seven to eleven year old children living in non-urban communities in the Netherlands are discussed. Repeated measurements of pulmonary function (spirometry) and the occurrence of acute respiratory symptoms using a da

  15. Respiratory viruses in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koul, Parvaiz A; Mir, Hyder; Akram, Shabir; Potdar, Varsha; Chadha, Mandeep S

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) cause significant morbidity, mortality, and an inexorable decline of lung function. Data from developed countries have shown viruses to be important causes of AECOPD, but data from developing countries like India are scant. We set out to determine the contribution of viruses in the causation of hospitalized patients with AECOPD. Methods: Twin nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs collected from 233 patients admitted with an acute AECOPD and tested for respiratory viruses including respiratory syncytial virus A and B, parainfluenza were (PIV) 1, 2, 3, and 4, human metapneumovirus (hMPV) A and B, influenza A and B, enterovirus, corona NL65, OC43, and 229E viruses, adenovirus 2 and 4, rhinovirus, and bocavirus, by duplex real time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) using CDC approved primers and probes. Samples positive for influenza A were subtyped for A/H1N1pdm09 and A/H3N2 whereas influenza B samples were subtyped into B/Yamagata and B/Victoria subtypes, using primers and probes recommended by CDC, USA. Results: Respiratory viruses were detected in 46 (19.7%) cases, influenza A/H3N2 and rhinoviruses being the most common viruses detected. More than one virus was isolated in four cases consisting of hMPV-B + adeno-2 + Inf-B; rhino + H3N2, PIV-1 + rhino; and PIV-1+ hMPV-B in one case each. Ancillary supportive therapeutic measures included bronchodilators, antibiotics, steroids, and ventilation (noninvasive in 42 and invasive in 4). Antiviral therapy was instituted in influenza-positive patients. Three patients with A/H3N2 infection died during hospitalization. Conclusions: We conclude that respiratory viruses are important contributors to AECOPD in India. Our data calls for prompt investigation during an exacerbation for viruses to obviate inappropriate antibiotic use and institute antiviral therapy in viral disease amenable to antiviral therapy. Appropriate

  16. Prevention of venous thromboembolism in hospitalized acutely ill medical patients: focus on the clinical utility of (low-dose fondaparinux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Nisio M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Marcello Di Nisio,1,2 Ettore Porreca3 1Department of Medical, Oral and Biotechnological Sciences, University G D'Annunzio of Chieti-Pescara, Chieti, Italy; 2Department of Vascular Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; 3Department of Medicine and Aging, Centre for Aging Sciences, Internal Medicine Unit, University G D'Annunzio Foundation, Chieti, Italy Abstract: Venous thromboembolism (VTE is a frequent complication among acutely ill medical patients hospitalized for congestive heart failure, acute respiratory insufficiency, rheumatologic disorders, and acute infectious and/or inflammatory diseases. Based on robust data from randomized controlled studies and meta-analyses showing a reduced incidence of VTE by 40% to about 60% with pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis, prevention of VTE with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH, unfractionated heparin (UFH, or fondaparinux is currently recommended in all at-risk hospitalized acutely ill medical patients. In patients who are bleeding or are at high risk for major bleeding, mechanical prophylaxis with graduated compression stockings or intermittent pneumatic compression may be suggested. Thromboprophylaxis is generally continued for 6 to 14 days or for the duration of hospitalization. Selected cases could benefit from extended thromboprophylaxis beyond this period, although the risk of major bleeding remains a concern, and additional studies are needed to identify patients who may benefit from prolonged prophylaxis. For hospitalized acutely ill medical patients with renal insufficiency, a low dose (1.5 mg once daily of fondaparinux or prophylactic LMWH subcutaneously appears to have a safe profile, although proper evaluation in randomized studies is lacking. The evidence on the use of prophylaxis for VTE in this latter group of patients, as well as in those at higher risk of bleeding complications, such as patients with thrombocytopenia, remains scarce. For critically ill patients

  17. Prone positioning ventilation for treatment of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAN Mei-juan; HE Xiao-di

    2009-01-01

    Patients who are diagnosed with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) usually have ventilation-perfusion mismatch, severe decrease in lung capacity, and gas exchange abnormalities. Health care work-ers have implemented various strategies in an attempt to compensate for these pathological alterations. By rotating patients with ALI/ARDS between the supine and prone position, it is possible to achieve a significant improvement in PaO2/FiO2, decrease shunting and therefore improve oxy-genation without use of expensive, invasive and experimen-tal procedures.

  18. Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome: experimental and clinical investigations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hsing I Chen

    2011-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) can be associated with various disorders.Recent investigation has involved clinical studies in collaboration with clinical investigators and pathologists on the pathogenetic mechanisms of ALl or ARDS caused by various disorders.This literature review includes a brief historical retrospective of ALI/ARDS, the neurogenic pulmonary edema due to head injury, the long-term experimental studies and clinical investigations from our laboratory, the detrimental role of NO, the risk factors, and the possible pathogenetic mechanisms as well as therapeutic regimen for ALI/ARDS.

  19. Investigation of a potential zoonotic transmission of orthoreovirus associated with acute influenza-like illness in an adult patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Kaw Bing; Voon, Kenny; Yu, Meng; Keniscope, Canady; Abdul Rasid, Kasri; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2011-01-01

    Bats are increasingly being recognized as important reservoir hosts for a large number of viruses, some of them can be highly virulent when they infect human and livestock animals. Among the new bat zoonotic viruses discovered in recent years, several reoviruses (respiratory enteric orphan viruses) were found to be able to cause acute respiratory infections in humans, which included Melaka and Kampar viruses discovered in Malaysia, all of them belong to the genus Orthoreovirus, family Reoviridae. In this report, we describe the isolation of a highly related virus from an adult patient who suffered acute respiratory illness in Malaysia. Although there was no direct evidence of bat origin, epidemiological study indicated the potential exposure of the patient to bats before the onset of disease. The current study further demonstrates that spillover events of different strains of related orthoreoviruses from bats to humans are occurring on a regular basis, which calls for more intensive and systematic surveillances to fully assess the true public health impact of these newly discovered bat-borne zoonotic reoviruses.

  20. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Wartime Military Burns: Application of the Berlin Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome in wartime military burns: Application of the Berlin criteria Slava M. Belenkiy, MD, Allison R. Buel, DO, Jeremy...Andriy I. Batchinsky, MD, Leopoldo C. Cancio, MD, and Kevin K. Chung, MD, San Antonio, Texas BACKGROUND: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS...EVIDENCE: Epidemiologic/prognostic study, level III. KEY WORDS: Mechanical ventilation; adult respiratory distress syndrome ; the Berlin definition; combat

  1. Anti-infectious treatment in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min GAO

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is closely correlated with infection. Severe infection, e.g., sepsis and septic shock, can result in ARDS. Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP is one of the common complications in ARDS related infection. As regards ARDS related infection, community acquired infection (CAI is different from hospital acquired infection (HAI in bacterial spectrum. The former is mainly caused by Streptococcus pneumonia, Hemophilus influenzae, Moraxelle catarrhalis, atypical pathogens and Klebsiella pneumoniae. However, HAI is mainly caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumanii, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA, and other drug-resistant bacteria. The drug-resistant bacterial infection not only makes treatment difficult, but also leads to an increase in mechanical ventilation time, length of ICU stay, mortality rate, and medical costs. The present paper has reviewed the relationship between ARDS and infection, therapeutic principles and measures of ARDS related infection, and introduced the optimal strategy of anti-infectious treatment of ARDS.

  2. Acute respiratory failure in a rapidly enlarging benign cervical goitre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garingarao, Carlo Jan; Añonuevo-Cruz, Cecille; Gasacao, Ryan

    2013-07-22

    Benign goitres have the potential to reach massive sizes if neglected, but most have a protracted course that may or may not present with compressive symptoms. We report the case of a 57-year-old man who presented with a rapidly enlarging nodular goitre resulting in acute respiratory failure. Endotracheal intubation and emergency total thyroidectomy were performed, revealing massive thyroid nodules with minimal intrathoracic extension and tracheal erosion. Despite a course and clinical findings suggestive of malignant disease, histopathology was consistent with a benign multinodular goitre. Several cases of benign goitres necessitating endotracheal intubation have been reported. Airway compromise was attributed to a significant intrathoracic component, or inciting events such as thyroid haemorrhage, pregnancy, radioiodine uptake or major surgery. Obstructive symptoms may not correlate well with objective measures of upper airway obstruction such as radiographs or flow volume loops.

  3. Airway microbiota and acute respiratory infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kohei; Camargo, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARIs), such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia, are the leading cause of hospitalization of infants in the US. While the incidence and severity of ARI can vary widely among children, the reasons for these differences are not fully explained by traditional risk factors (e.g., prematurity, viral pathogens). The recent advent of molecular diagnostic techniques has revealed the presence of highly functional communities of microbes inhabiting the human body (i.e., microbiota) that appear to influence development of local and systemic immune response. We propose a 'risk and resilience' model in which airway microbiota are associated with an increased (risk microbiota) or decreased (resilience microbiota) incidence and severity of ARI in children. We also propose that modulating airway microbiota (e.g., from risk to resilience microbiota) during early childhood will optimize airway immunity and, thereby, decrease ARI incidence and severity in children.

  4. Clinical features of probable severe acute respiratory syndrome in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Ying Lu; Xiao-Yuan Xu; Yu Lei; Yang-Feng Wu; Bo-Wen Chen; Feng Xiao; Gao-Qiang Xie; De-Min Han

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To summarize clinical features of probable severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Beijing.METHODS: Retrospective cases involving 801 patients admitted to hospitals in Beijing between March and June 2003, with a diagnosis of probable SARS, moderate type.The series of clinical manifestation, laboratory and radiograph data obtained from 801 cases were analyzed. RESULTS: One to three days after the onset of SARS, the major clinical symptoms were fever (in 88.14% of patients), fatigue, headache, myalgia, arthralgia (25-36%), etc. The counts of WBC (in 22.56% of patients) lymphocyte (70.25%)and CD3, CD4, CD8 positive T cells (70%) decreased. From 4-7 d, the unspecific symptoms became weak; however, the rates of low respiratory tract symptoms, such as cough (24.18%), sputum production (14.26%), chest distress (21.04%) and shortness of breath (9.23%) increased, so did the abnormal rates on chest radiograph or CT. The low counts of WBC, lymphocyte and CD3, CD4, CD8 positiveT cells touched bottom. From 8 to 16 d, the patients presented progressive cough (29.96%), sputum production (13.09%), chest distress (29.96%) and shortness of breath (35.34%). All patients had infiltrates on chest radiograph or CT, some even with multi-infiltrates. Two weeks later, patients' respiratory symptoms started to alleviate, the infiltrates on the lung began to absorb gradually, the counts of WBC, lymphocyte and CD3, CD4, CD8 positive T cells were restored to normality.CONCLUSION: The data reported here provide evidence that the course of SARS could be divided into four stages, namely the initial stage, progressive stage, fastigium and convalescent stage.

  5. Fibromyalgia after severe acute respiratory syndrome: a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Xin-ping; ZENG Xiao-feng; XU Wen-bin

    2006-01-01

    @@ Since November 2002, an infectious disease with unknown cause occurred in China and many countries had been involved. Cases were reported in 28 countries and more than 5050 individuals had been infected.1 Lung is the most frequently involved organ and can be fatal in severe cases. At the end of February 2003, it was defined as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) by World Health Organization. China had a SARS epidemic in the spring of 2003. More than 1000 patients were infected and some patients died of respiratory failure.Finally, a new variant of coronavirus was suspected to be the pathogen although the pathogenesis was still unclear. Since it is a new disease and we have very limited knowledge about its clinical sequela, we followed the survived patients closely in order to understand it in depth. During the follow up, we discovered an interesting patient who was finally diagnosed as fibromyalgia. We report this case herein to share our experience with clinicians who may see patients with SARS or fibromyalgia.

  6. Viral etiology of acute respiratory infections (ari) in old adults from ageriatric care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Beltrán, Karent Julieth; Grupo de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Línea de investigación Microbiología Molecular y Aplicada de las enfermedades Infecciosas, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá-Colombia.; Segura, Juan Camilo; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá-Colombia; Bettin, Laura; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá-Colombia; Coriat, Jeanette; Programa de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá-Colombia; Mercado, Marcela; Instituto Nacional de Salud, Bogotá-Colombia.; Hidalgo, Marylin; Grupo de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Departamento de Microbiología. Facultad de Ciencias. Pontificia Universidad Javeriana. Bogotá, D.C. Colombia.; Díez, Hugo; Grupo de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá-Colombia.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine viral etiology of acute respiratory infections in older-than-60 adults, living at 4 geriatric care units in Bogota.Methods: The study was performed in two phases: Phase 1: Descriptive prospective study to evaluate incidence of viral respiratory infection during 1 year in old adults. 71 patients, suffering respiratory diseases, were selected, and evaluated, including physical exploration, thorax X-ray, and collection of respiratory samples for analysis. In order to dete...

  7. Respiratory protection and emerging infectious diseases: lessons from severe acute respiratory syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John H. Lange

    2005-01-01

    @@ The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) that emerged 2002-2003 and apparently again 2004 (reported by the news media on December 27, 2003) as the first confirmed case by the World Health Organization (WHO)1,2 raised awareness of emerging infectious diseases.3 Every year there are both new and old infectious diseases emerging as potential pandemic agents.4-6 However, few of these diseases receive the public attention and concern expressed as occurred during the emergence of SARS. Much of this concern was a result of the rapid spread of the novel coronavirus (CoV) to different regions of the world and its high infectivity, especially for health care workers (HCW).3 In many ways, the high percent of HCW infected is a warning of the potential hazards of old and emerging infectious diseases.6 However, SARS was not the only disease (e.g. Monkeypox) that emerged in 2003,3 rather it received the greatest attention.

  8. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in a Patient With Refractory Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Secondary to Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    life support (ECLS) in adults with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has increased markedly during the past few years after suc- cessful...Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in a Patient With Refractory Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Secondary to Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Christy...COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in a Patient With Refractory Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Secondary to

  9. Phospholipase A2 subclasses in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsiouli, Eirini; Nakos, George; Lekka, Marilena E

    2009-10-01

    Phospholipases A2 (PLA2) catalyse the cleavage of fatty acids esterified at the sn-2 position of glycerophospholipids. In acute lung injury-acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI-ARDS) several distinct isoenzymes appear in lung cells and fluid. Some are capable to trigger molecular events leading to enhanced inflammation and lung damage and others have a role in lung surfactant recycling preserving lung function: Secreted forms (groups sPLA2-IIA, -V, -X) can directly hydrolyze surfactant phospholipids. Cytosolic PLA2 (cPLA2-IVA) requiring Ca2+ has a preference for arachidonate, the precursor of eicosanoids which participate in the inflammatory response in the lung. Ca(2+)-independent intracellular PLA2s (iPLA2) take part in surfactant phospholipids turnover within alveolar cells. Acidic Ca(2+)-independent PLA2 (aiPLA2), of lysosomal origin, has additionally antioxidant properties, (peroxiredoxin VI activity), and participates in the formation of dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine in lung surfactant. PAF-AH degrades PAF, a potent mediator of inflammation, and oxidatively fragmented phospholipids but also leads to toxic metabolites. Therefore, the regulation of PLA2 isoforms could be a valuable approach for ARDS treatment.

  10. Recovery and outcomes after the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in patients and their family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herridge, Margaret S; Moss, Marc; Hough, Catherine L; Hopkins, Ramona O; Rice, Todd W; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Azoulay, Elie

    2016-05-01

    Outcomes after acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are similar to those of other survivors of critical illness and largely affect the nerve, muscle, and central nervous system but also include a constellation of varied physical devastations ranging from contractures and frozen joints to tooth loss and cosmesis. Compromised quality of life is related to a spectrum of impairment of physical, social, emotional, and neurocognitive function and to a much lesser extent discrete pulmonary disability. Intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICUAW) is ubiquitous and includes contributions from both critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy, and recovery from these lesions may be incomplete at 5 years after ICU discharge. Cognitive impairment in ARDS survivors ranges from 70 to 100 % at hospital discharge, 46 to 80 % at 1 year, and 20 % at 5 years, and mood disorders including depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are also sustained and prevalent. Robust multidisciplinary and longitudinal interventions that improve these outcomes are still uncertain and data in our literature are conflicting. Studies are needed in family members of ARDS survivors to better understand long-term outcomes of the post-ICU family syndrome and to evaluate how it affects patient recovery.

  11. Detection of respiratory viruses by real-time polymerase chain reaction in outpatients with acute respiratory infection

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    Ronaldo Bragança Martins Júnior

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are the major contributors to the morbidity and mortality of upper and lower acute respiratory infections (ARIs for all age groups. The aim of this study was to determine the frequencies for a large range of respiratory viruses using a sensitive molecular detection technique in specimens from outpatients of all ages with ARIs. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were obtained from 162 individuals between August 2007-August 2009. Twenty-three pathogenic respiratory agents, 18 respiratory viruses and five bacteria were investigated using multiplex real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and indirect immunofluorescence assay (IIF. Through IIF, 33 (20.4% specimens with respiratory virus were recognised, with influenza virus representing over half of the positive samples. Through a multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay, 88 (54.3% positive samples were detected; the most prevalent respiratory viral pathogens were influenza, human rhinovirus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV. Six cases of viral co-detection were observed, mainly involving RSV. The use of multiplex real-time RT-PCR increased the viral detection by 33.9% and revealed a larger number of respiratory viruses implicated in ARI cases, including the most recently described respiratory viruses [human bocavirus, human metapneumovirus, influenza A (H1N1 pdm09 virus, human coronavirus (HCoV NL63 and HCoV HKU1].

  12. Outcome at three months of COPD patients with acute hypercapnic respiratory failure treated with NPPV in an Acute Medicine Ward

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    Fabrizio Vincenti

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Non invasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV is increasingly used for patients with hypercapnic respiratory failure secondary to acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. NPPV has been shown to improve arterial blood gas tensions and dyspnoea and to prevent the need for intubation in patients admitted to hospital with an exacerbation of COPD associated with respiratory acidosis. Although advantages of NPPV over conventional treatment have been convincingly documented in the short period, there are fewer data as to the outcomes following hospital discharge. We have undertaken a prospective descriptive study to obtain comprehensive data on the in hospital and 3 month outcomes of a cohort of 57 COPD patients treated with NPPV for acute hypercapnic respiratory failure as a first intervention in addition to usual medical care. Patients with a COPD exacerbation had better outcomes than patients with COPD complicated by other acute conditions. Pneumonia was specifically associated with a higher inhospital risk of death. In our series about one in four patients with an indicator of previous severe respiratory disease (past admission for acute respiratory failure, previous use of NPPV, long term oxygen therapy or home NPPV was dead at three months after discharge and almost one in two was dead or had been readmitted. On the contrary, patients without indicators of previous severe respiratory disease benefited from NPPV during an acute episode of respiratory failure and had a chance of approximately 80% of being alive and free from recurrence at three months.

  13. Can illness perceptions predict lower heart rate variability following acute myocardial infarction?

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    Mary Princip

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Decreased heart rate variability (HRV has been reported to be a predictor of mortality after myocardial infarction (MI. Patients’ beliefs and perceptions concerning their illness may play a role in decreased HRV. This study investigated if illness perceptions predict HRV at three months following acute MI. Methods: 130 patients referred to a tertiary cardiology centre, were examined within 48 hours and three months following acute MI. At admission, patients’ cognitive representations of their MI were assessed using the German version of the self-rated Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (Brief IPQ. At admission and after three months (follow-up, frequency and time domain measures of HRV were obtained from 5-min electrocardiogram (ECG recordings during stable supine resting. Results: Linear hierarchical regression showed that the Brief IPQ dimensions timeline (β coefficient = -0.29; p = .044, personal control (β = 0.47; p = .008 and illness understanding (β = 0.43; p = .014 were significant predictors of HRV, adjusted for age, gender, baseline HRV, diabetes, beta-blockers, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, attendance of cardiac rehabilitation, and depressive symptoms. Conclusions: As patients’ negative perceptions of their illness are associated with lower HRV following acute MI, a brief illness perception questionnaire may help to identify patients who might benefit from a specific illness perceptions intervention.

  14. Adiponectin gene polymorphisms and acute respiratory distress syndrome susceptibility and mortality.

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    Amy M Ahasic

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Adiponectin is an anti-inflammatory adipokine that is the most abundant gene product of adipose tissue. Lower levels have been observed in obesity, insulin resistance, and in critical illness. However, elevated levels early in acute respiratory failure have been associated with mortality. Polymorphisms in adiponectin-related genes (ADIPOQ, ADIPOR1, ADIPOR2 have been examined for relationships with obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and to circulating adipokine levels, but many gaps in knowledge remain. The current study aims to assess the association between potentially functional polymorphisms in adiponectin-related genes with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS risk and mortality. METHODS: Consecutive patients with risk factors for ARDS admitted to the ICU were enrolled and followed prospectively for development of ARDS. ARDS cases were followed through day 60 for all-cause mortality. 2067 patients were successfully genotyped using the Illumina CVD BeadChip high-density platform. Of these, 567 patients developed ARDS. Forty-four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs on ADIPOQ, ADIPOR1 and ADIPOR2 were successfully genotyped. Of these, 9 SNPs were hypothesized to be functional based on their location (promoter, exon, or 3' untranslated region. These 9 SNPs were analyzed for association with ARDS case status and mortality among ARDS cases. RESULTS: After multivariable analysis and adjustment for multiple comparisons, no SNPs were significantly associated with ARDS case status. Among ARDS cases, homozygotes for the minor allele of rs2082940 (ADIPOQ had increased mortality (hazard ratio 2.61, 95% confidence interval 1.36-5.00, p = 0.0039 after adjustment for significant covariates. The significance of this association persisted after adjustment for multiple comparisons (FDR_q = 0.029. CONCLUSIONS: A common and potentially functional polymorphism in ADIPOQ may impact survival in ARDS. Further

  15. ADVANCEMENT IN MEDICAL TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH ACUTE RESPIRATORY VIRAL INFECTIONS

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    Kopcha V.S.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute respiratory viral infections are the special group of diseases, which in the structure of infectious pathology firmly occupies one of leading places. The problem of morbidity belongs to the number of leading medical problems not only in Ukraine but also in the whole world. In addition, there is a greater risk of epidemic flashes of acute respiratory infections in the conditions of megapolis with the expressed processes of migration and accumulation of people. Purpose of test – to promote efficiency of patients treatment with acute respiratory viral infections by complex application of preparation «Extralact» on a background traditional (base therapy without the use of other antiviral preparations, thoroughly to probe influence on clinical motion of the indicated illnesses, endogenous intoxication and immune status of organism. Patients & methods. Under a supervision was 60 patients (22 men and 38 women of young and middle age (hesitated from 18 to 58, which treated oneself concerning ARVI. Determined the indexes of Extralact efficiency: general duration of disease; frequency of development of complications; dynamics of clinical displays; dynamics of laboratory indexes, indexes of endogenous intoxication, and immunological indexes. Patients were randomised on 2 groups: a I group (30 persons – 50,0 % got treatment of base therapy preparations; the II group (30 patients – 50,0 % on a background base therapy got preparation «Extralact» for 2 capsules 3 times per days during 5 days. Results & discussion. Based on the examination of 60 patients with ARVI established following. Addition of base therapy of such patients of extralact in a dose 2 caps. 3 times daily during 5 days was accompanied by a significant advantage compared with only basic therapy on several grounds: the greater the number of patients advancing recovery up to 7 days, most regressed cough, relatively less there were complications. After 5 days of

  16. Diagnosis of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Nosocomial Pneumonia

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    A. N. Kuzovlev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to define the informative value of the parameters of gas exchange, lung volumetry, and central hemodynamics in the diagnosis of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS in nosocomial pneumonia (NP. Subjects and methods. The study included 38 patients with cancer and severe injury who were divided into 3 groups in accordance with the diagnostic criteria of ARDS and NP: 1 patients with ARDS + NP; 2 those with NP; 3 those with non-ARDS, non-PN. ARDS was diagnosed in 2 steps. At Step 1, the investigators took into account risk factors for ARDS and used the lung injury scale developed by J. Murray et al. and the ARDS diagnostic criteria defined by the American-European Consensus Conference on ARDS. At Step 2, after obtaining the data of lung volume-try (1—2 hours after Step 1, they assessed the compliance of the above criteria for ARDS with those developed by the V. A. Negovsky Research Institute of General Reanimatology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, and redistributed the patients between the groups. The stage of ARDS was determined in accordance with the classification of the above Institute. All the patients underwent a comprehensive examination the key element of which was to estimate gas exchange parameters and to monitor lung volumetry and central hemodynamics by the transpulmonary thermodilution methods, by using a Pulsion PiCCO Plus monitor (Pulsion Medical Systems, Germany. The findings were statistically analyzed using a Statistica 7.0 package (arithmetic mean, error of the mean, _ Student’s test, Newman-Keuls test, correlation analysis. The difference was considered to be significant if p-value was Results. The patients with ARDS + NP were observed to have a significantly lower oxygenation index (10 ml/kg and Murray scale scores (>2 than those in patients with NP without ARDS. The reference values of the pulmonary vascular permeability index due to its inadequate informative value call for further investigation. The

  17. The economic impact of the insured patients with severe chronic and acute illnesses: a qualitative approach

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    Budi Aji

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Little research has focused on the economic hardship among the insured with severe illnesses and high treatment costs, in particular, the consequence of poorer insurance coverage for high-cost illnesses. Therefore, we presented the case for identifying the experiences of insured patients with severe chronic and acute illnesses. This study identified a qualitative understanding of the economic impact of severe chronic and acute illnesses and household strategies to deal with high treatment costs. Design: Interviews were conducted with 19 insured households of three different health insurance programs with a family member that had been hospitalized for severe chronic or acute illnesses in either Banyumas or Margono Sukarjo hospitals in Banyumas, Central Java, Indonesia. A thematic analysis was applied to guide the interpretation of the data. Results: Insured households with a family member that had been hospitalized for severe chronic and acute illnesses were greatly affected by the high treatment costs. Four major issues emerged from this qualitative study: insured patients are still burdened with high out-of-pocket payments, households adopt various strategies to cope with the high cost of treatments, households experience financial hardships, and positive and negative perceptions of the insured regarding their health insurance coverage for acute and chronic illnesses. Conclusions: Askes and Jamsostek patients faced financial burdens from high cost sharing for hospital amenities, non-covered drugs, and treatments and other indirect costs. Meanwhile, Jamkesmas beneficiaries faced no financial burden for related medical services but were rather burdened with indirect costs for the carers. Households relied on internal resources to cover hospital bills as the first strategy, which included the mobilization of savings, sale of assets, and borrowing of money. External support was tapped secondarily and included financial support from

  18. Viral etiologies of acute respiratory infections among hospitalized Vietnamese children in Ho Chi Minh City, 2004-2008.

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    Anh Ha Lien Do

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The dominant viral etiologies responsible for acute respiratory infections (ARIs are poorly understood, particularly among hospitalized children in resource-limited tropical countries where morbidity and mortality caused by ARIs are highest. Improved etiological insight is needed to improve clinical management and prevention. OBJECTIVES: We conducted a three-year prospective descriptive study of severe respiratory illness among children from 2 months to 13 years of age within the largest referral hospital for infectious diseases in southern Vietnam. METHODS: Molecular detection for 15 viral species and subtypes was performed on three types of respiratory specimens (nose, throat swabs and nasopharyngeal aspirates using a multiplex RT-PCR kit (Seeplex™ RV detection, Seegene and additional monoplex real-time RT-PCRs. RESULTS: A total of 309 children were enrolled from November 2004 to January 2008. Viruses were identified in 72% (222/309 of cases, including respiratory syncytial virus (24%, influenza virus A and B (17%, human bocavirus (16%, enterovirus (9%, human coronavirus (8%, human metapneumovirus (7%, parainfluenza virus 1-3 (6%, adenovirus (5%, and human rhinovirus A (4%. Co-infections with multiple viruses were detected in 20% (62/309 of patients. When combined, diagnostic yields in nose and throat swabs were similar to nasopharyngeal aspirates. CONCLUSION: Similar to other parts in the world, RSV and influenza were the predominant viral pathogens detected in Vietnamese hospitalized children. Combined nasal and throat swabs are the specimens of choice for sensitive molecular detection of a broad panel of viral agents. Further research is required to better understand the clinical significance of single versus multiple viral coinfections and to address the role of bacterial (co-infections involved in severe respiratory illness.

  19. Avascular necrosis of bone in severe acute respiratory syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, N. E-mail: hongnan@bjmu.edu.cn; Du, X.K

    2004-07-01

    AIM: To report the incidence of avascular osteonecrosis (AVN) in severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty-seven SARS patients who had large joint pain between March 2003 and May 2003 underwent both plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination on the same day. All patients received steroids and ribavirin treatment. All plain radiographs and MR images were analysed by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. Any abnormalities, location, extent, morphology, the number, size and signal intensity of lesions were evaluated. RESULTS: Twenty-eight patients were identified with AVN, The mean time to diagnosis of AVN was 119 days after the onset of SARS, or 116 days after steroid use. Three patients had early bilateral AVN of the femoral head, four patients of one femoral head, five patients of the bilateral hips and knees, four patients of the ipsilateral hip and knees, 10 patients of the knee(s), one patient of the right proximal fibula, and one patient of the knees and talus. Results of hip, knee and ankle plain radiographs were negative. CONCLUSION: AVN can occur in the patients with SARS. AVN had a strong association with steroid use. More studies are required to confirm whether the virus itself can also lead to AVN.

  20. Profiling acute respiratory tract infections in children from Assam, India

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    Farzana Islam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute respiratory infections (ARI are leading global cause of under-five mortality and morbidity. Objective: To elicit the prevalence and risk factors associated with ARI among under-five children. Materials and Methods: A community-based cross-sectional study was undertaken in 21 registered urban slums of Guwahati in Assam to determine the prevalence and risk factors associated with ARI among 370 under-five children from 184 households and 370 families. Results: The prevalence of ARI was found to be 26.22%; infants and female children were more affected. Majority of the ARI cases were from nuclear families (84.54%, living in kutcha houses (90.72% with inadequate ventilation (84.54%, overcrowded living condition (81.44%, with kitchen attached to the living room (65.98% and using biomass fuel for cooking (89.69%. ARI was significantly associated with ventilation, location of kitchen in household; presence of overcrowding, nutritional status, and primary immunization status also had impacts on ARI. Conclusion: The present study had identified a high prevalence of the disease among under-fives. It also pointed out various socio-demographic, nutritional, and environmental modifiable risk factors which can be tackled by effective education of the community.

  1. Current status of severe acute respiratory syndrome in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-He Nie; Xin-Dong Luo; Jian-Zhong Zhang; Qin Su

    2003-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), also called infectious atypical pneumonia, is an emerging infectious disease caused by a novel variant of coronavirus (SARS associated coronavirus, SARS-CoV). It is mainly characterized by pulmonary infection with a high infectivity and fatality.SARS is swept across almost all the continents of the globe, and has currently involved 33 countries and regions, including the mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, North America and Europe. On June 30, 2003, an acumulative total reached 8450 cases with 810 deaths. SARS epidemic was very rampant in March, April and May 2003 in the mainland of China and Hong Kong. Chinese scientists and healthcare workers cooperated closely with other scientists from all over the world to fight the disease. On April 16, 2003, World Health Organization (WHO) formally declared that SARSCoV was an etiological agent of SARS. Currently, there is no specific and effective therapy and prevention method for SARS. The main treatments include corticosteroid therapy,antiviralagents, anti-infection, mechanical ventilation and isolation. This disease can be prevented and controlled, and it is also curable. Under the endeavor of the Chinese Government, medical staffs and other related professionals,SARS has been under control in China, and Chinese scientists have also made a great contribution to SARS research.Otherstudies in developing new detection assays and therapies, and discovering new drugs and vaccines are in progress. In this paper, we briefly review the current status of SARS in China.

  2. Severe acute respiratory syndrome: vaccine on the way

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ding-mei; WANG Guo-ling; LU Jia-hai

    2005-01-01

    @@ In November 2002, a new disease-severe acute respiratory syndrome, or SARS-first emerged in Guangdong Province, China. Subsequently, it spread to more than 30 countries worldwide.1 The causative agent was identified to be a previously unknown member of the coronaviridae family, and was named SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). SARS coronavirus is a large, enveloped, positive-sense RNA virus. The genome is about 30 kb, which is predicted to contain 14 functional open reading frames (ORFs). Two large 5'-terminal ORFs (1a and 1b) encode the polymerases that are required for viral RNA synthesis. The remaining twelve ORFs encode four structural proteins [spike protein (S), envelope protein (E), membrane protein (M) and nucleocapsid protein (N)] and eight accessory proteins.2 Though the SARS-CoV genome is clear, a great deal more work will be required to develop an efficient vaccine and effective drugs. Neutralizing antibodies were detectable in the convalescent sera of SARS patients, and sera from recovered patients could be used to treat newly infected individuals.3 The data suggest that protective humoral immunity is achievable and that vaccines can be developed for prevention of SARS. In this article, we review and discuss progress towards development of a SARS vaccine.

  3. Clinical Practice Guideline of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young-Jae; Moon, Jae Young; Shin, Ein-Soon; Kim, Je Hyeong; Jung, Hoon; Park, So Young; Kim, Ho Cheol; Sim, Yun Su; Rhee, Chin Kook; Lim, Jaemin; Lee, Seok Jeong; Lee, Won-Yeon; Lee, Hyun Jeong; Kwak, Sang Hyun; Kang, Eun Kyeong; Chung, Kyung Soo

    2016-01-01

    There is no well-stated practical guideline for mechanically ventilated patients with or without acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We generate strong (1) and weak (2) grade of recommendations based on high (A), moderate (B) and low (C) grade in the quality of evidence. In patients with ARDS, we recommend low tidal volume ventilation (1A) and prone position if it is not contraindicated (1B) to reduce their mortality. However, we did not support high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (1B) and inhaled nitric oxide (1A) as a standard treatment. We also suggest high positive end-expiratory pressure (2B), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a rescue therapy (2C), and neuromuscular blockage for 48 hours after starting mechanical ventilation (2B). The application of recruitment maneuver may reduce mortality (2B), however, the use of systemic steroids cannot reduce mortality (2B). In mechanically ventilated patients, we recommend light sedation (1B) and low tidal volume even without ARDS (1B) and suggest lung protective ventilation strategy during the operation to lower the incidence of lung complications including ARDS (2B). Early tracheostomy in mechanically ventilated patients can be performed only in limited patients (2A). In conclusion, of 12 recommendations, nine were in the management of ARDS, and three for mechanically ventilated patients.

  4. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS): HRCT findings in survivors

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    Jung, Jung Im; Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Jae Mun; Song, Jeong Sup; Lee, Kyo Young [The Catholic Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings of the lung in survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Among eleven patients who survived ARDS for one year, chest radiography and HRCT revealed pulmonary fibrosis in four. Causes of ARDS included pneumonia during pregnancy, near drowning, pneumonia during liver cirrhosis, and postoperative sepsis. Thoracoscopic biopsy and histopathologic correlation were available in one patient. HRCT showed diffuse interlobular septal thickening, ground glass opacity, parenchymal distortion, and traction bronchiectasis. Fuzzy centrilobular nodules were seen in two patients and one patient had multiple, large bullae in the left hemithorax. In all patients, lesions affected the upper and anterior zones of the lung more prominently. The distribution of pulmonary fibrosis was characteristic and reflected the pathogenesis of lung injury; fibrosis was largely due to hyperoxia caused by ventilator care. In one patient, histopathologic correlation showed that imaging findings were accounted for by thickening of the alveolar septum along with infiltration of chronic inflammatory cells and fibrosis. Fuzzy centrilobular nodules corresponded with bronchiolitis.

  5. Fluid in the management of the acute respiratory distress syndrome

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    Karki S

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema is the hallmark of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. The amount of fluid and which fluid should be used in these patients is controversial. Methods 43 patients with ARDS treated in the intensive care unit (ICU of the Second Hospital, Jilin University between November 1, 2011-November 1, 2012 were prospectively analyzed and was observational. Volume and the type of fluid administered were compared to 90 day mortality and the 24 and 72 hour sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA score, lactate level, oxygenation index (PaO2/FiO2, duration of ICU stay, total ventilator days, and need for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT. Results Mortality was increased when hydroxylethyl starch (HES was used in the first day or plasma substitutes were used during the first 3 days (P3000 ml during the first 24 hours or >8000 ml during the first 72 hours were associated with higher SOFA scores at 24 and 72 hours (P<0.05, both comparisons. Colloid, especially higher volume colloid use was also associated with increased SOFA scores at either 24 or 72 hours. Conclusions Limiting the use of colloids and the total amount of fluid administered to patients with ARDS is associated with improved mortality and SOFA scores.

  6. Lung tissue remodeling in the acute respiratory distress syndrome

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    Souza Alba Barros de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is characterized by diffuse alveolar damage, and evolves progressively with three phases: exsudative, fibroproliferative, and fibrotic. In the exudative phase, there are interstitial and alveolar edemas with hyaline membrane. The fibropro­liferative phase is characterized by exudate organization and fibroelastogenesis. There is proliferation of type II pneumocytes to cover the damaged epithelial surface, followed by differentiation into type I pneumocytes. The fibroproliferative phase starts early, and its severity is related to the patient?s prognosis. The alterations observed in the phenotype of the pulmonary parenchyma cells steer the tissue remodeling towards either progressive fibrosis or the restoration of normal alveolar architecture. The fibrotic phase is characterized by abnormal and excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins, mainly collagen. The dynamic control of collagen deposition and degradation is regulated by metalloproteinases and their tissular regulators. The deposition of proteoglycans in the extracellular matrix of ARDS patients needs better study. The regulation of extracellular matrix remodeling, in normal conditions or in several pulmonary diseases, such as ARDS, results from a complex mechanism that integrate the transcription of elements that destroy the matrix protein and produce activation/inhibition of several cellular types of lung tissue. This review article will analyze the ECM organization in ARDS, the different pulmonary parenchyma remodeling mechanisms, and the role of cytokines in the regulation of the different matrix components during the remodeling process.

  7. Inhaled Nitric Oxide for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Acute Lung Injury in Adults and Children: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis and Trial Sequential Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure, defined as acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, are critical conditions associated with frequent mortality and morbidity in all ages. Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) has been used to improve oxygenation, but its role remains...... be recommended for patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. iNO results in a transient improvement in oxygenation but does not reduce mortality and may be harmful....

  8. Scandinavian clinical practice guideline on fluid and drug therapy in adults with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claesson, J; Freundlich, M; Gunnarsson, I

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The objective of the Scandinavian Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (SSAI) task force on fluid and drug therapy in adults with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was to provide clinically relevant, evidence-based treatment recommendations according...

  9. Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP): relationship to Hamman-Rich syndrome, diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjay; Parambil, Joseph G

    2012-10-01

    Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) is a term used for an idiopathic form of acute lung injury characterized clinically by acute respiratory failure with bilateral lung infiltrates and histologically by diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), a combination of findings previously known as the Hamman-Rich syndrome. This review aims to clarify the diagnostic criteria of AIP, its relationship with DAD and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), key etiologies that need to be excluded before making the diagnosis, and the salient clinical features. Cases that meet clinical and pathologic criteria for AIP overlap substantially with those that fulfill clinical criteria for ARDS. The main differences between AIP and ARDS are that AIP requires a histologic diagnosis of DAD and exclusion of known etiologies. AIP should also be distinguished from "acute exacerbation of IPF," a condition in which acute lung injury (usually DAD) supervenes on underlying usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP)/idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).

  10. Nitrofurantoin-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome during pregnancy: A case report

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    Sherif S. Wahba

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is a rarely seen complication with nitrfurantoin. We report improvement of a parturient who was admitted to our hospital’s obstetrical unit with life threatening nitrofurantoin-induced acute respiratory failure. She had been taking nitrofurantoin for one week for urinary tract infection (UTI. Her chest radiography showed bilateral parenchymal infiltrates of the lung. The patient responded well to nitrofurantoin discontinuation and methylprednisolone infusion 1 mg/kg/day.

  11. Acute Respiratory Failure due to Neuromyelitis Optica Treated Successfully with Plasmapheresis

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    Massa Zantah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO is a demyelinating autoimmune disease involving the central nervous system. Acute respiratory failure from cervical myelitis due to NMO is known to occur but is uncommon in monophasic disease and is treated with high dose steroids. We report a case of a patient with NMO who developed acute respiratory failure related to cervical spinal cord involvement, refractory to pulse dose steroid therapy, which resolved with plasmapheresis.

  12. Respiratory inductive plethysmography accuracy at varying PEEP levels and degrees of acute lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.G. Markhorst (Dick); M.A. van Van Gestel (Miriam); H.R. van Genderingen (Huibert); J.J. Haitsma (Jack); B.F. Lachmann (Burkhard); A.J. van Vught (Adrianus)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBackground and objective: This study was performed to assess the accuracy of respiratory inductive plethysmographic (RIP) estimated lung volume changes at varying positive end-expiratory pressures (PEEP) during different degrees of acute respiratory failure. Methods: Measurements of insp

  13. Risk factors for and impact of respiratory failure on mortality in the early phase of acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dombernowsky, Tilde; Kristensen, Marlene Østermark; Rysgaard, Sisse

    2016-01-01

    : Retrospective cohort study including 359 patients admitted with acute pancreatitis. Information was gathered from electronic patient records. We defined respiratory failure based on the modified Marshall scoring system in the revised Atlanta criteria. Predictors of respiratory failure were evaluated......, or pneumonia may develop respiratory failure, suggests that acute lung injury, possibly associated with systemic inflammation, may be important.......BACKGROUND: The incidence of respiratory failure and other respiratory complications in the early phase of acute pancreatitis (AP) is not well investigated. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the incidence and risk factors of respiratory failure, and its impact on mortality in the early phase AP. METHODS...

  14. Investigación de un brote respiratorio agudo por exposición a cloro gas en una piscina pública Investigation of an outbreak of acute respiratory illness due to exposure to chlorine gas in a public swimming pool

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    Diego Almagro Nievas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Se diseñó un estudio de casos y controles para investigar el accidente químico ocurrido en una piscina pública en el verano de 2005 y describir los factores ambientales responsables, analizar el efecto del cloro gas y valorar la evolución clínica y funcional del aparato respiratorio. Las intervenciones fueron las siguientes: inspecciones ambientales, encuesta epidemiológica (variables sociodemográficas, ubicación en el momento del accidente, olor percibido y seguimiento clínico y espirométrico de la función respiratoria. Se encuestaron 65 casos y 48 controles. El suceso se produjo al mezclar accidentalmente ácido clorhídrico e hipoclorito sódico, lo que generó cloro gas. Los síntomas predominantes fueron tos y disnea. El riesgo de enfermar en niños era 10 veces mayor si tenían una enfermedad respiratoria previa y 4 veces superior si estaban a una distancia inferior a 40 m del lugar del accidente. Todos los casos evolucionaron hacia la curación, excepto uno que tenía antecedentes asmáticos.A case-control study was designed to investigate a chemical accident that occurred in a swimming-pool in the summer of 2005. The aim was to describe the environmental factors involved in the accident, to assess the effect of chlorine gas on the respiratory system, and to perform a clinical and spirometric follow-up. The following interventions were carried out: environmental inspection, epidemiologic survey (including sociodemographic variables, location at the time of the accident, perception of an abnormal smell, and clinical and spirometric outcomes to assess respiratory function. Sixty-five cases and 48 controls were identified and interviewed. The accident was produced by accidental admixture of hydrochloric acid with sodium hypochlorite resulting in chlorine gas release. The main clinical symptoms were dyspnea and cough. The risk of becoming ill was 10-fold higher in children with a previous lung disease and was 4-fold higher when

  15. Human Herpesvirus 6 Infection Presenting as an Acute Febrile Illness Associated with Thrombocytopenia and Leukopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Arnež

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an infant with acute fever, thrombocytopenia, and leukopenia, coming from an endemic region for tick-borne encephalitis, human granulocytic anaplasmosis, and hantavirus infection. The primary human herpesvirus 6 infection was diagnosed by seroconversion of specific IgM and IgG and by identification of viral DNA in the acute patient’s serum. The patient did not show skin rash suggestive of exanthema subitum during the course of illness.

  16. Viral etiologies of hospitalized acute lower respiratory infection patients in China, 2009-2013.

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    Luzhao Feng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute lower respiratory infections (ALRIs are an important cause of acute illnesses and mortality worldwide and in China. However, a large-scale study on the prevalence of viral infections across multiple provinces and seasons has not been previously reported from China. Here, we aimed to identify the viral etiologies associated with ALRIs from 22 Chinese provinces. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Active surveillance for hospitalized ALRI patients in 108 sentinel hospitals in 24 provinces of China was conducted from January 2009-September 2013. We enrolled hospitalized all-age patients with ALRI, and collected respiratory specimens, blood or serum collected for diagnostic testing for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, human influenza virus, adenoviruses (ADV, human parainfluenza virus (PIV, human metapneumovirus (hMPV, human coronavirus (hCoV and human bocavirus (hBoV. We included 28,369 ALRI patients from 81 (of the 108 sentinel hospitals in 22 (of the 24 provinces, and 10,387 (36.6% were positive for at least one etiology. The most frequently detected virus was RSV (9.9%, followed by influenza (6.6%, PIV (4.8%, ADV (3.4%, hBoV (1.9, hMPV (1.5% and hCoV (1.4%. Co-detections were found in 7.2% of patients. RSV was the most common etiology (17.0% in young children aged <2 years. Influenza viruses were the main cause of the ALRIs in adults and elderly. PIV, hBoV, hMPV and ADV infections were more frequent in children, while hCoV infection was distributed evenly in all-age. There were clear seasonal peaks for RSV, influenza, PIV, hBoV and hMPV infections. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings could serve as robust evidence for public health authorities in drawing up further plans to prevent and control ALRIs associated with viral pathogens. RSV is common in young children and prevention measures could have large public health impact. Influenza was most common in adults and influenza vaccination should be implemented on a wider scale in China.

  17. Acute hypothyroidism in a severely ill surgical patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, T; Hjortsø, N C

    1988-01-01

    A case of acute postoperative hypothyroidism in a 62-year old woman is presented. One month before emergency admission because of a perforated gastric ulcer the patient had normal thyroid function, despite removal of a thyroid adenoma 20 years earlier. Following surgery the patient developed...

  18. Diminishing willingness to pay per quality-adjusted life year: valuing acute foodborne illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haninger, Kevin; Hammitt, James K

    2011-09-01

    We design and conduct a stated-preference survey to estimate willingness to pay (WTP) to reduce foodborne risk of acute illness and to test whether WTP is proportional to the corresponding gain in expected quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). If QALYs measure utility for health, then economic theory requires WTP to be nearly proportional to changes in both health quality and duration of illness and WTP could be estimated by multiplying the expected change in QALYs by an appropriate monetary value. WTP is elicited using double-bounded, dichotomous-choice questions in which respondents (randomly selected from the U.S. general adult population, n = 2,858) decide whether to purchase a more expensive food to reduce the risk of foodborne illness. Health risks vary by baseline probability of illness, reduction in probability, duration and severity of illness, and conditional probability of mortality. The expected gain in QALYs is calculated using respondent-assessed decrements in health-related quality of life if ill combined with the duration of illness and reduction in probability specified in the survey. We find sharply diminishing marginal WTP for severity and duration of illness prevented. Our results suggest that individuals do not have a constant rate of WTP per QALY, which implies that WTP cannot be accurately estimated by multiplying the change in QALYs by an appropriate monetary value.

  19. Retrospective analysis on acute respiratory distress syndrome in ICU

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jin-bao; ZHANG Liang; ZHU Ke-ming; DENG Xiao-ming

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To assess the incidence, etiology, physiological and clinical features, mortality, and predictors of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in intensive care unit (ICU).Methods: A retrospective analysis of 5 314 patients admitted to the ICU of our hospital from April 1994 to December 2003 was performed in this study. The ARDS patients were identified with the criteria of the American-European Consensus Conference ( AECC ). Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation Ⅲ ( APACHE in), multiple organ dysfunction syndrome score (MODS score), and lung injury score (LIS) were determined on the onset day of ARDS for all the patients. Other recorded variables included age, sex, biochemical indicators, blood gas analysis, length of stay in ICU, length of ventilation, presence or absence of tracheostomy, ventilation variables, elective operation or emergency operation.Results:Totally, 131 patients (2.5%) developed ARDS, among whom, 12 patients were excluded from this study because they died within 24 hours and other 4 patients were also excluded for their incomplete information. Therefore, there were only 115 cases (62 males and 53 females, aged 22-75 years, 58 years on average) left,accounting for 2. 2% of the total admitted patients. Their average ICU stay was (11. 27±7. 24) days and APACHE in score was 17.23±7.21. Pneumonia and sepsis were the main cause of ARDS. The non-survivors were obviously older and showed significant difference in the ICU length of stay and length of ventilation as compared with the survivors. On admission, the non-survivors had significantly higher MODS and lower BE ( base excess). The hospital mortality was 55. 7%. The main cause of death was multiple organ failure. Predictors of death at the onset of ARDS were advanced age, MODS≥8, and LIS≥2.76.Conclusions: ARDS is a frequent syndrome in this cohort. Sepsis and pneumonia are the most common risk factors. The main cause of death is multiple organ failure. The mortality is

  20. Recovery from Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome with Long-Run Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Jeon

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is a severe lung disease associated with high mortality despite recent advances in management. Significant advances in extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO devices and management allow short-term support for patients with acute reversible respiratory failure and can serve as a bridge to transplantation in patients with irreversible respiratory failure. When ARDS does not respond to conventional treatment, ECMO and the interventional lung assist membrane (iLA are the most widely used complementary treatment options. Here, we report a clinical case of an adult patient who required prolonged duration venovenous (VV-ECMO for severe ARDS resulting in improvement while waiting for lung transplantation.

  1. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus persistence in Vero cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gustavo Palacios; Omar Jabado; Neil Renwick; Thomas Briese; W. Ian Lipkin

    2005-01-01

    Background Several coronaviruses establish persistent infections in vitro and in vivo, however it is unknown whether persistence is a feature of the severe acute respiratory syndorme coronavirus (SARS-CoV) life cycle. This study was conducted to investigate viral persistence.Methods We inoculated confluent monolayers of Vero cells with SARS-CoV at a multiplicity of infection of 0.1 TCID50 and passaged the remaining cells every 4 to 8 days for a total of 11 passages. Virus was titrated at each passage by limited dilution assay and nucleocapsid antigen was detected by Western blot and immunofluoresence assays. The presence of viral particles in passage 11 cells was assessed by electron microscopy. Changes in viral genomic sequences during persistent infection were examined by DNA sequencing. Results Cytopathic effect was extensive after initial inoculation but diminished with serial passages. Infectious virus was detected after each passage and viral growth curves were identical for parental virus stock and virus obtained from passage 11 cells. Nucleocapsid antigen was detected in the majority of cells after initial inoculation but in only 10%-40% of cells at passages 2-11. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of viral particles in passage 11 cells. Sequence analysis at passage 11 revealed fixed mutations in the spike (S) gene and ORFs 7a-8b but not in the nucleocapsid (N) gene. Conclusions SARS-CoV can establish a persistent infection in vitro. The mechanism for viral persistence is consistent with the formation of a carrier culture whereby a limited number of cells are infected with each round of virus replication and release. Persistence is associated with selected mutations in the SARS-CoV genome. This model may provide insight into SARS-related lung pathology and mechanisms by which humans and animals can serve as reservoirs for infection.

  2. The severe acute respiratory syndrome epidemic in mainland China dissected

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    Wuchun Cao

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a review of a recently published series of studies that give a detailed and comprehensive documentation of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS epidemic in mainland China, which severely struck the country in the spring of 2003. The epidemic spanned a large geographical extent but clustered in two areas: first in Guangdong Province, and about 3 months later in Beijing with its surrounding areas. Reanalysis of all available epidemiological data resulted in a total of 5327 probable cases of SARS, of whom 343 died. The resulting case fatality ratio (CFR of 6.4% was less than half of that in other SARS-affected countries or areas, and this difference could only partly be explained by younger age of patients and higher number of community acquired infections. Analysis of the impact of interventions demonstrated that strong political commitment and a centrally coordinated response was the most important factor to control SARS in mainland China, whereas the most stringent control measures were all initiated when the epidemic was already dying down. The long-term economic consequence of the epidemic was limited, much consumption was merely postponed, but for Beijing irrecoverable losses to the tourist sector were considerable. An important finding from a cohort study was that many former SARS patients currently suffer from avascular osteo­necrosis, as a consequence of the treatment with corticosteroids during their infection. The SARS epidemic provided valuable information and lessons relevant in controlling outbreaks of newly emerging infectious diseases, and has led to fundamental reforms of the Chinese health system. In particular, a comprehensive nation-wide internet-based disease reporting system was established.

  3. Parents' help-seeking behaviours during acute childhood illness at home: A contribution to explanatory theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, Sarah J; Jones, Caroline H D; Lakhanpaul, Monica; Roland, Damian T; Thompson, Matthew J

    2016-03-01

    Uncertainty and anxiety surround parents' decisions to seek medical help for an acutely ill child. Consultation rates for children are rising, yet little is known about factors that influence parents' help-seeking behaviours. We used focus groups and interviews to examine how 27 parents of children under five years, from a range of socioeconomic groups in the East Midlands of England, use information to make decisions during acute childhood illness at home. This article reports findings elucidating factors that influence help-seeking behaviours. Parents reported that decision-making during acute childhood illness was influenced by a range of personal, social and health service factors. Principal among these was parents' concern to do the right thing for their child. Their ability to assess the severity of the illness was influenced by knowledge and experience of childhood illness. When parents were unable to access their general practitioner (GP), feared criticism from or had lost trust in their GP, some parents reported using services elsewhere such as Accident and Emergency. These findings contribute to explanatory theory concerning parents' help-seeking behaviours. Professional and political solutions have not reduced demand; therefore, collaborative approaches involving the public and professionals are now needed to improve parents' access to information.

  4. Sepsis-related acute respiratory distress syndrome in children with cancer: the respiratory dynamics of a devastating condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduini, Rodrigo Genaro; de Araujo, Orlei Ribeiro; da Silva, Dafne Cardoso Bourguignon; Senerchia, Andreza Almeida; Petrilli, Antonio Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical course and respiratory parameters of mechanically ventilated children with cancer suffering from sepsis-related acute respiratory distress syndrome. Methods This 2-year prospective, longitudinal, observational cohort study enrolled 29 children and adolescents. Clinical data, measurements of blood gases and ventilation parameters were collected at four different time points. Fluctuations between measurements as well as differences in estimated means were analyzed by linear mixed models in which death within 28 days from the onset of acute respiratory distress syndrome was the primary endpoint. Results There were 17 deaths within 28 days of acute respiratory distress syndrome onset and another 7 between 29 - 60 days. Only 5 patients survived for more than 60 days. Nine (31%) patients died as a direct consequence of refractory hypoxemia, and the others died of multiple organ failure and catecholamine-refractory shock. In 66% of the measurements, the tidal volume required to obtain oxygen saturation equal to or above 90% was greater than 7mL/kg. The estimated means of dynamic compliance were low and were similar for survivors and non-survivors but with a negative slope between the first and final measurements, accompanied by a negative slope of the tidal volume for non-survivors. Non-survivors were significantly more hypoxemic, with PaO2/FiO2 ratios showing lower estimated means and a negative slope along the four measurements. Peak, expiratory and mean airway pressures showed positive slopes in the non-survivors, who also had more metabolic acidosis. Conclusions In most of our children with cancer, sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome progressed with deteriorating ventilation indexes and escalating organic dysfunction, making this triad nearly fatal in children. PMID:28099641

  5. Mass casualty acute pepper spray inhalation – Respiratory severity effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.M. Sweeting*

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: While the respiratory complaint was perceived as being the most detrimental of all presenting complaints, there was an overall non-threatening outcome in all patients. The presenting respiratory complaints were mostly subjective with benign outcome. Although various risk factors associated with severity increase of respiratory status, were present in a few of the index cases patients, their affect was negligible with a resultant benign outcome.

  6. Extended-duration rivaroxaban thromboprophylaxis in acutely ill medical patients: MAGELLAN study protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.T. Cohen; T.E. Spiro; H.R. Büller; L. Haskell; D. Hu; R. Hull; A. Mebazaa; G. Merli; S. Schellong; A. Spyropoulos; V. Tapson

    2011-01-01

    Patients with acute medical illnesses are at increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Thromboprophylaxis is recommended in these patients but questions remain regarding the optimal duration of therapy. The aim of this study is to determine wheth

  7. Thyroid Hormone Receptor beta Mediates Acute Illness-Induced Alterations in Central Thyroid Hormone Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Boelen; J. Kwakkel; O. Chassande; E. Fliers

    2009-01-01

    Acute illness in mice profoundly affects thyroid hormone metabolism in the hypothalamus and pituitary gland. It remains unknown whether the thyroid hormone receptor (TR)-beta is involved in these changes. In the present study, we investigated central thyroid hormone metabolism during lipopolysacchar

  8. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal for patients with acute respiratory failure secondary to the acute respiratory distress syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Marianne; Millar, Jonathan; Blackwood, Bronagh; Davies, Andrew; Brett, Stephen J; McAuley, Daniel F; McNamee, James J

    2014-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) continues to have significant mortality and morbidity. The only intervention proven to reduce mortality is the use of lung-protective mechanical ventilation strategies, although such a strategy may lead to problematic hypercapnia. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO₂R) devices allow uncoupling of ventilation from oxygenation, thereby removing carbon dioxide and facilitating lower tidal volume ventilation. We performed a systematic review to assess efficacy, complication rates, and utility of ECCO₂R devices. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), case-control studies and case series with 10 or more patients. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS (Literatura Latino Americana em Ciências da Saúde), and ISI Web of Science, in addition to grey literature and clinical trials registries. Data were independently extracted by two reviewers against predefined criteria and agreement was reached by consensus. Outcomes of interest included mortality, intensive care and hospital lengths of stay, respiratory parameters and complications. The review included 14 studies with 495 patients (two RCTs and 12 observational studies). Arteriovenous ECCO₂R was used in seven studies, and venovenous ECCO₂R in seven studies. Available evidence suggests no mortality benefit to ECCO₂R, although post hoc analysis of data from the most recent RCT showed an improvement in ventilator-free days in more severe ARDS. Organ failure-free days or ICU stay have not been shown to decrease with ECCOvR. Carbon dioxide removal was widely demonstrated as feasible, facilitating the use of lower tidal volume ventilation. Complication rates varied greatly across the included studies, representing technological advances. There was a general paucity of high-quality data and significant variation in both practice and technology used among studies, which confounded analysis. ECCO₂R is a rapidly evolving technology and is an efficacious treatment

  9. Viral-bacterial interactions and risk of acute otitis media complicating upper respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Melinda M; Gent, Janneane F; Pyles, Richard B; Miller, Aaron L; Nokso-Koivisto, Johanna; Chonmaitree, Tasnee

    2011-11-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is a common complication of upper respiratory tract infection whose pathogenesis involves both viruses and bacteria. We examined risks of acute otitis media associated with specific combinations of respiratory viruses and acute otitis media bacterial pathogens. Data were from a prospective study of children ages 6 to 36 months and included viral and bacterial culture and quantitative PCR for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human bocavirus, and human metapneumovirus. Repeated-measure logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between specific viruses, bacteria, and the risk of acute otitis media complicating upper respiratory tract infection. In unadjusted analyses of data from 194 children, adenovirus, bocavirus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis were significantly associated with AOM (P virus loads (≥3.16 × 10(7) copies/ml) experienced increased acute otitis media risk. Higher viral loads of bocavirus and metapneumovirus were not significantly associated with acute otitis media. In adjusted models controlling for the presence of key viruses, bacteria, and acute otitis media risk factors, acute otitis media risk was independently associated with high RSV viral load with Streptococcus pneumoniae (odds ratio [OR], 4.40; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.90 and 10.19) and Haemophilus influenzae (OR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.38 and 3.02). The risk was higher for the presence of bocavirus and H. influenzae together (OR, 3.61; 95% CI, 1.90 and 6.86). Acute otitis media risk differs by the specific viruses and bacteria involved. Acute otitis media prevention efforts should consider methods for reducing infections caused by respiratory syncytial virus, bocavirus, and adenovirus in addition to acute otitis media bacterial pathogens.

  10. An assessment of the effect of statin use on the incidence of acute respiratory infections in England during winters 1998-1999 to 2005-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, D M; Verlander, N Q; Elliot, A J; Zhao, H; Gelb, D; Jehring, D; Nguyen-Van-Tam, J S

    2010-09-01

    Statins reduce cardiovascular mortality and related risks associated with pneumonia suggesting potentially beneficial use in influenza pandemics. We investigated the effect of current statin use on acute respiratory infections in primary care. Data from anonymized electronic medical records of persons aged 45 years were examined for statin use, chronic morbidity, respiratory diagnoses, vaccination procedures, and immune suppression. Logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) for statin users vs. non-users in respiratory infection outcomes. A total of 329 881 person-year observations included 18% statin users and 46% influenza vaccinees. Adjusted ORs for statin users vs. non-users were: influenza-like illness, 1.05 (95% CI 0.92-1.20); acute bronchitis, 1.08 (95% CI 1.01-1.15); pneumonia, 0.91 (95% CI 0.73-1.13); all acute respiratory infections, 1.03 (95% CI 0.98-1.07); and urinary tract infections, 0.91 (95% CI 0.85-0.98). We found no benefit in respiratory infection outcomes attributable to statin use, although uniformly higher ORs in non-vaccinated statin users might suggest synergism between statins and influenza vaccination.

  11. Restrictive transfusion practice during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelker, Maria T; Busch, Thilo; Bercker, Sven; Fichtner, Falk; Kaisers, Udo X; Laudi, Sven

    2015-04-01

    Recommendations concerning the management of hemoglobin levels and hematocrit in patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) still advise maintenance of a normal hematocrit. In contrast, current transfusion guidelines for critically ill patients support restrictive transfusion practice. We report on a series of patients receiving venovenous ECMO (vvECMO) for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) treated according to the restrictive transfusion regimen recommended for critically ill patients. We retrospectively analyzed 18 patients receiving vvECMO due to severe ARDS. Hemoglobin concentrations were kept between 7 and 9 g/dL with a transfusion trigger at 7 g/dL or when physiological transfusion triggers were apparent. We assessed baseline data, hospital mortality, time on ECMO, hemoglobin levels, hematocrit, quantities of packed red blood cells received, and lactate concentrations and compared survivors and nonsurvivors. The overall mortality of all patients on vvECMO was 38.9%. Mean hemoglobin concentration over all patients and ECMO days was 8.30 ± 0.51 g/dL, and hematocrit was 0.25 ± 0.01, with no difference between survivors and nonsurvivors. Mean numbers of given PRBCs showed a trend towards higher quantities in the group of nonsurvivors, but the difference was not significant (1.97 ± 1.47 vs. 0.96 ± 0.76 units; P = 0.07). Mean lactate clearance from the first to the third day was 45.4 ± 28.3%, with no significant difference between survivors and nonsurvivors (P = 0.19). In our cohort of patients treated with ECMO due to severe ARDS, the application of a restrictive transfusion protocol did not result in an increased mortality. Safety and feasibility of the application of a restrictive transfusion protocol in patients on ECMO must further be evaluated in randomized controlled trials.

  12. Cynomolgus macaque as an animal model for severe acute respiratory syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James V Lawler

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS in 2002 and 2003 affected global health and caused major economic disruption. Adequate animal models are required to study the underlying pathogenesis of SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV infection and to develop effective vaccines and therapeutics. We report the first findings of measurable clinical disease in nonhuman primates (NHPs infected with SARS-CoV. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In order to characterize clinically relevant parameters of SARS-CoV infection in NHPs, we infected cynomolgus macaques with SARS-CoV in three groups: Group I was infected in the nares and bronchus, group II in the nares and conjunctiva, and group III intravenously. Nonhuman primates in groups I and II developed mild to moderate symptomatic illness. All NHPs demonstrated evidence of viral replication and developed neutralizing antibodies. Chest radiographs from several animals in groups I and II revealed unifocal or multifocal pneumonia that peaked between days 8 and 10 postinfection. Clinical laboratory tests were not significantly changed. Overall, inoculation by a mucosal route produced more prominent disease than did intravenous inoculation. Half of the group I animals were infected with a recombinant infectious clone SARS-CoV derived from the SARS-CoV Urbani strain. This infectious clone produced disease indistinguishable from wild-type Urbani strain. CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV infection of cynomolgus macaques did not reproduce the severe illness seen in the majority of adult human cases of SARS; however, our results suggest similarities to the milder syndrome of SARS-CoV infection characteristically seen in young children.

  13. Does virus-bacteria coinfection increase the clinical severity of acute respiratory infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damasio, Guilherme A C; Pereira, Luciane A; Moreira, Suzana D R; Duarte dos Santos, Claudia N; Dalla-Costa, Libera M; Raboni, Sonia M

    2015-09-01

    This retrospective cohort study investigated the presence of bacteria in respiratory secretions of patients hospitalized with acute respiratory infections and analyzed the impact of viral and bacterial coinfection on severity and the mortality rate. A total of 169 patients with acute respiratory infections were included, viruses and bacteria in respiratory samples were detected using molecular methods. Among all samples, 73.3% and 59.7% were positive for viruses and bacteria, respectively; 45% contained both virus and bacteria. Bacterial coinfection was more frequent in patients infected by community respiratory viruses than influenza A H1N1pdm (83.3% vs. 40.6%). The most frequently bacteria detected were Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. Both species were co-detected in 54 patients and identified alone in 22 and 21 patients, respectively. Overall, there were no significant differences in the period of hospitalization, severity, or mortality rate between patients infected with respiratory viruses alone and those coinfected by viruses and bacteria. The detection of mixed respiratory pathogens is frequent in hospitalized patients with acute respiratory infections, but its impact on the clinical outcome does not appear substantial. However, it should be noted that most of the patients received broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy, which may have contributed to this favorable outcome.

  14. The role of respiratory syncytial virus and other viral pathogens in acute otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, B S; Dollete, F R; Yolken, R H

    1982-07-01

    We utilized recently developed enzyme immunoassay techniques to examine the role of selected viruses in the etiology of acute otitis media. Viral pathogens were found in middle ear fluids obtained from 13 (24%) of 53 children with acute otitis media; respiratory syncytial virus accounted for ten of the 13 viral agents identified. In addition, respiratory syncytial viral antigen was found in nasopharyngeal washings obtained from 15 of the 53 children. Seven of these children had RSV identified as the sole middle ear pathogen, whereas six children had otitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae as either the sole middle ear pathogen or in combination with RSV. Similarly, all three children with respiratory infections caused by influenza virus had ear infections caused by bacterial pathogens, either alone or in combination with influenza virus. These findings suggest that, in patients with viral respiratory infection, coexisting acute otitis media may be associated with the recovery of either viruses or bacteria from the middle ear exudates.

  15. [Quantification of the acute respiratory insufficiency of laryngo-tracheal origin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintilie, Cătălina; Burlacu, Gabriela; Costinescu, V

    2009-01-01

    Acute respiratory insufficiency defines that status in which the respiratory system is not able to supply the metabolic requirements of the organism. The laryngo-tracheal segment plays an important role in the respiratory function, an obstruction at this level inducing an important limitation of oxygen intake. Due to the requirement of fast repermeabilisation of this segment, it is necessary to define all criteria (clinical and laboratory examination) required to diagnose and to evaluate the respiratory failure. The present paper depicts the clinical aspects, the acid-base equilibrium impairment induced by high level airway obstruction and the functional investigations available by ventilation tests.

  16. Influenza-like illness in acute myocardial infarction patients during the winter wave of the influenza A H1N1 pandemic in London: a case–control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren-Gash, Charlotte; Geretti, Anna Maria; Hamilton, George; Rakhit, Roby D; Smeeth, Liam; Hayward, Andrew C

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate recent respiratory and influenza-like illnesses (ILIs) in acute myocardial infarction patients compared with patients hospitalised for acute non-vascular surgical conditions during the second wave of the 2009 influenza A H1N1 pandemic. Design Case–control study. Setting Coronary care unit, acute cardiology and acute surgical admission wards in a major teaching hospital in London, UK. Participants 134 participants (70 cases and 64 controls) aged ≥40 years hospitalised for acute myocardial infarction and acute surgical conditions between 21 September 2009 and 28 February 2010, frequency-matched for gender, 5-year age-band and admission week. Primary exposure ILI (defined as feeling feverish with either a cough or sore throat) within the last month. Secondary exposures Acute respiratory illness within the last month not meeting ILI criteria; nasopharyngeal and throat swab positive for influenza virus. Results 29 of 134 (21.6%) participants reported respiratory illness within the last month, of whom 13 (9.7%) had illnesses meeting ILI criteria. The most frequently reported category for timing of respiratory symptom onset was 8–14 days before admission (31% of illnesses). Cases were more likely than controls to report ILI—adjusted OR 3.17 (95% CI 0.61 to 16.47)—as well as other key respiratory symptoms, and were less likely to have received influenza vaccination—adjusted OR 0.46 (95% CI 0.19 to 1.12)—although the differences were not statistically significant. No swabs were positive for influenza virus. Conclusions Point estimates suggested that recent ILI was more common in patients hospitalised with acute myocardial infarction than with acute surgical conditions during the second wave of the influenza A H1N1 pandemic, and influenza vaccination was associated with cardioprotection, although the findings were not statistically significant. The study was underpowered, partly because the age groups typically affected by acute

  17. Protective effect of antibiotics on mortality risk from acute respiratory infections in Mexican children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, V M; Koopman, J S; Garrido, F J; Bazúa, L F; Ibarra, J M; Stetler, H C

    1992-01-01

    A case-control study of mortality from acute respiratory infections (ARI) among children under five years of age was conducted in Naucalpan, an urban-suburban area of Mexico City, and in rural localities of Tlaxcala, Mexico. The study found that ARI deaths tended to occur in the poorest neighborhoods; 78% of the deceased study subjects were infants under six months old; and 68% of the deaths occurred at home. Comparison of the data for cases (fatalities) and control children who had severe ARI but recovered showed that failure to receive antibiotics was associated with death (odds ratio 28.5, 95% confidence interval 2.1-393.4). This antibiotic effect was controlled for numerous potentially confounding factors. It is evident that antibiotics had a much greater effect in the early days of the illness than later on. In general, the findings strongly support PAHO/WHO primary health care strategies--including such strategies as standardized management of severe ARI cases--that seek to reduce childhood ARI mortality.

  18. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-Retrospect and Lessons of 2004 Outbreak in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN-NIAN LIANG; RUO-GANG HUANG; XUE-QIN XIE; ZHE-NGLAI WU; TAO ZHAO; ZE-JUN LIU; BAO-YING GUAN; XIONG HE; MIN LIU; QI CHEN; GAI-FEN LIU; JIANG WU

    2006-01-01

    Objective To summarize lessons learned from an outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in China during the spring of 2004. Methods Data of SARS cases were officially reported by Beijing Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention (BCDC) and Anhui Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention (APCDC) and results of epidemiological investigations were collected and analyzed. Results Three generations of 11 cases of SARS were identified during the outbreak. Initial two cases were most likely to be infected in Diarrhea Virus Laboratory of National Institute of Virology, China Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and main mode of transmission was direct contact with SARS patients. Delay in detecting initial case resulted in spread of the illness at hospitals and communities with two generations of secondary cases. Conclusions SARS outbreak in 2004 has yielded following lessons for public health globally. (1) Lab bio-safety programs should be made and should be strictly abided by. Studies in highly pathogenic viruses such as SARS coronavirus should be utmost cautious. (2) Management systems of occupational exposure to virus and disease surveillance need to be strengthened to take all risk factors into account so as to detect potential patients with infectious disease as early as possible.

  19. Predicting postoperative acute respiratory failure in critical care using nursing notes and physiological signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddar, Vijay; Rajan, Vaibhav; Bhattacharya, Sakyajit; Roy, Shourya

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative Acute Respiratory Failure (ARF) is a serious complication in critical care affecting patient morbidity and mortality. In this paper we investigate a novel approach to predicting ARF in critically ill patients. We study the use of two disparate sources of information – semi-structured text contained in nursing notes and investigative reports that are regularly recorded and the respiration rate, a physiological signal that is continuously monitored during a patient's ICU stay. Unlike previous works that retrospectively analyze complications, we exclude discharge summaries from our analysis envisaging a real time system that predicts ARF during the ICU stay. Our experiments, on more than 800 patient records from the MIMIC II database, demonstrate that text sources within the ICU contain strong signals for distinguishing between patients who are at risk for ARF from those who are not at risk. These results suggest that large scale systems using both structured and unstructured data recorded in critical care can be effectively used to predict complications, which in turn can lead to preemptive care with potentially improved outcomes, mortality rates and decreased length of stay and cost.

  20. Acute HIV illness following blood transfusion in three African children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colebunders, R; Greenberg, A E; Francis, H; Kabote, N; Izaley, L; Nguyen-Dinh, P; Quinn, T C; Van der Groen, G; Curran, J W; Piot, P

    1988-04-01

    Three children are described in whom pre-transfusion samples were HIV-seronegative and post-transfusional samples, obtained within 1 week after transfusion, were HIV-seropositive. Two of them developed a transient fever within 1 week of receiving the blood transfusion, and a transient generalized skin eruption which lasted for about 2 weeks. All three developed persistent generalized lymphadenopathy. One child developed a lumbar herpes zoster 7 months after transfusion. IgM Western blots demonstrated the presence of antibodies to protein bands p17, p24 and p55 in all three children. These three case reports suggest that children who receive a seropositive blood transfusion are at high risk for developing acute manifestations of HIV infection.

  1. Validation study of a diary for use in acute lower respiratory tract infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watson, L; Little, P; Moore, M; Warner, G; Williamson, [No Value

    2001-01-01

    Background. Despite lower respiratory tract infection (LRTi) being the most common illness treated by doctors, no validated outcome measure to assess symptom duration and severity has been developed for patient self-completion. Methods. As part of a randomized control trial researching management of

  2. Similar virus spectra and seasonality in paediatric patients with acute respiratory disease, Ghana and Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annan, A; Ebach, F; Corman, V M; Krumkamp, R; Adu-Sarkodie, Y; Eis-Hübinger, A M; Kruppa, T; Simon, A; May, J; Evans, J; Panning, M; Drosten, C; Drexler, J F

    2016-04-01

    Epidemiological differences between tropical and temperate regions regarding viruses causing acute respiratory infection are poorly understood. This is in part because methodological differences limit the comparability of data from these two regions. Using identical molecular detection methods, we tested 1174 Ghanaian and 539 German children with acute respiratory infections sampled over 12 months for the 15 most common respiratory viruses by PCR. A total 43.2% of the Ghanaian and 56.6% of the German children tested positive for at least one respiratory virus. The pneumoviruses respiratory syncytial virus and human metapneumovirus were most frequently detected, in 13.1% and 25.1% within the Ghanaian and German children, respectively. At both study sites, pneumoviruses were more often observed at younger ages (p Ghana, virus spectra, age associations and seasonal fluctuation showed similarities between sites. Neither respiratory viruses overall, nor environmentally stable (non-enveloped) viruses in particular were more frequent in tropical Ghana. The standardization of our sampling and laboratory testing revealed similarities in acute respiratory infection virus patterns in tropical and temperate climates.

  3. Understanding Heroin Overdose: A Study of the Acute Respiratory Depressant Effects of Injected Pharmaceutical Heroin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, Caroline J; Bell, James; Rafferty, Gerrard F; Moxham, John; Strang, John

    2015-01-01

    Opioids are respiratory depressants and heroin/opioid overdose is a major contributor to the excess mortality of heroin addicts. The individual and situational variability of respiratory depression caused by intravenous heroin is poorly understood. This study used advanced respiratory monitoring to follow the time course and severity of acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. 10 patients (9/10 with chronic airflow obstruction) undergoing supervised injectable opioid treatment for heroin addiction received their usual prescribed dose of injectable opioid (diamorphine or methadone) (IOT), and their usual prescribed dose of oral opioid (methadone or sustained release oral morphine) after 30 minutes. The main outcome measures were pulse oximetry (SpO2%), end-tidal CO2% (ETCO2%) and neural respiratory drive (NRD) (quantified using parasternal intercostal muscle electromyography). Significant respiratory depression was defined as absence of inspiratory airflow >10s, SpO2% 10s and ETCO2% per breath >6.5%. Increases in ETCO2% indicated significant respiratory depression following IOT in 8/10 patients at 30 minutes. In contrast, SpO2% indicated significant respiratory depression in only 4/10 patients, with small absolute changes in SpO2% at 30 minutes. A decline in NRD from baseline to 30 minutes post IOT was also observed, but was not statistically significant. Baseline NRD and opioid-induced drop in SpO2% were inversely related. We conclude that significant acute respiratory depression is commonly induced by opioid drugs prescribed to treat opioid addiction. Hypoventilation is reliably detected by capnography, but not by SpO2% alone. Chronic suppression of NRD in the presence of underlying lung disease may be a risk factor for acute opioid-induced respiratory depression.

  4. Rapid declines in FEV1 and subsequent respiratory symptoms, illnesses, and mortality in coal miners in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beeckman, L.A.F.; Wang, M.L.; Petsonk, E.L.; Wagner, G.R. [NIOSH, Morgantown, WV (USA). Division of Respiratory District Studies, Center for District Control and Prevention and Human Services

    2001-03-01

    Coal mine dust exposure is associated with accelerated loss of lung function. The authors assessed long-term health outcomes in two groups of underground coal miners who during previous mine surveys had shown either high rates of FEV1 decline (cases, n = 310) or relatively stable lung function (referents, n = 324). Cases and referents were matched initially for age, height, smoking status, and FEV,. The authors determined vital status for 561 miners, and obtained a follow-up questionnaire for 121 cases and 143 referents. Responses on the follow-up questionnaire were compared with those on the last previous mine health survey questionnaire. Cases showed a greater incidence of symptoms than did referents for cough, phlegm production, Grades II and III dyspnea, and wheezing, and greater incidences than referents of chronic bronchitis and self-reported asthma and emphysema. More cases than referents (15% versus 4%) left mining before retirement because of chest illnesses. After controls were applied for age and smoking, cases had twice the risk of dying of cardiovascular and nonmalignant respiratory diseases and a 3.2-fold greater risk of dying of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease than did referents. Rapid declines in FEV1 experienced by some coal miners are associated with subsequent increases in respiratory symptoms, illnesses, and mortality from cardiovascular and nonmalignant respiratory diseases.

  5. Acute respiratory infection due to : current status of diagnostic methods

    OpenAIRE

    Loens, K.; Goossens, H.; Ieven, M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Because of the absence of well-standardized both in-house and FDA-approved commercially available diagnostic tests, the reliable diagnosis of respiratory infection due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae remains difficult. In addition, no formal external quality assessment schemes which would allow to conclude about the performance of M. pneumoniae diagnostic tests exist. In this review, the current state of knowledge of M. pneumoniae-associated respiratory infections in the context ...

  6. Progress in Pediatrics in 2012: choices in allergy, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hematology, infectious diseases, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffarelli, Carlo; Santamaria, Francesca; Vottero, Alessandra; Bernasconi, Sergio

    2013-05-08

    In this review, we summarize the progresses in allergy, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hematology, infectious diseases, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses that have been published in The Italian Journal of Pediatrics in 2012. The induction of Treg activity by probiotics might be effective for promoting tolerance towards food allergens. Nasal cytology is useful in patients with rhinitis for diagnosing chronic non-allergic non-infectious diseases. Atopic eczema is associated both with an aberrant skin matrix and impaired systemic immune response. Therefore, isolated topical treatment may have suboptimal effect. Diagnostic work-up of exercise-induced anaphylaxis, including exercise challenge test, is necessary to reach a diagnosis. Studies may support a role for nutrition on prevention of asthma and cardiovascular diseases. Clinicians need to early identify adolescent menstrual abnormalities to minimize sequelae, and to promote health information. In Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 2B investigations include acetylcholinesterase study of rectal mucosa followed by the molecular analysis of RET mutation. Low adherence to gluten-free diet and osteopenia are common problems in children with diabetes mellitus type 1 and celiac disease. In infantile colic, laboratory tests are usually unnecessary and the treatment is based on reassurance. Prevalence of obesity and stunting is elucidated by several studies. Evidences are growing that dietetic measures are needed to prevent obesity in children with acute leukemia. Treatment studies for infectious diseases show promise for probiotics along with standard triple therapy in children with Helicobacter pilori infection, while zinc has no effect on pneumonia. Educational programs about the proper management of the febrile child are warranted. A new hour-specific total serum bilirubin nomogram has been shown to be able to predict newborns without hyperbilirubinemia after 48 to 72 hours of life. Newborns with

  7. Acute respiratory distress syndrome following cutaneous exposure to Lysol: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y Y; Lu, C C; Perng, R P

    1999-12-01

    Lysol (mixed cresols) is a brand of popular detergent commonly used to disinfect toilets and floors in Taiwan. We report a patient with acute respiratory failure immediately following chemical burns caused by skin contact with Lysol solution. On admission, chest radiography showed bilateral diffuse pulmonary infiltrates and an arterial blood gas analysis disclosed hypoxemia refractory to a high concentration of oxygen by inhalation. Under the impression of acute respiratory distress syndrome, our patient was admitted to the intensive care unit for respiratory care. Poor clinical improvement was noted, despite aggressive respiratory therapy. High-dose steroid therapy (hydrocortisone 30 mg/kg/day) was administered from the seventh day after mechanical ventilation began and the ratio of arterial partial pressure of oxygen to fractional concentration of oxygen in inspired gas improved thereafter. The amount of steroid was gradually tapered to the maintenance dose and the patient was successfully weaned from the ventilator after a 93-day course of mechanical ventilation.

  8. Prevalencia de enfermedades respiratorias en el primer año de vida en hijos de madres que fumaron durante el embarazo Prevalence of respiratory illnesses in infants whose mothers smoked tobacco during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Mallol V

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio evaluó el efecto del tabaquismo materno durante el embarazo sobre la salud respiratoria de sus lactantes durante el primer año de vida, en 184 binomios madre-hijo. El análisis se realizó mediante chi cuadrado para proporciones y regresión logística multivariada ajustando para covariables. Los hijos de madres que fumaron durante el embarazo tuvieron un riesgo significativamente mayor de sufrir de bronquitis obstructiva (p This study assessed the effect of maternal tobacco smoking during pregnancy on their infants' respiratory health during the first year of life in a random sample of 184 mother-infant binomials. Data were analyzed using chi square test for proportions and multivariate logistic regression adjusting for covariates. Infants exposed to maternal smoking during pregnancy had a significantly higher risk of suffering from wheezing (p < 0.01, acute respiratory illnesses (p < 0.01 and admissions due to pneumonia (p < 0.05 during their first year of life than non-exposed infants. Accordingly to what has been described in developed countries, in this sample from a low socioeconomic status population, active maternal tobacco smoking during pregnancy significantly increased infants' susceptibility for suffering from wheezing, acute respiratory illnesses and hospital admissions due to pneumonia during the first year of life

  9. Extracorporeal Life Support for Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tülin Akarsu Ayazoğlu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is an acute diffuse, inflammatory lung injury, leading to increased pulmonary vascular permeability with hypoxemia and bilateral radiographic opacities, associated with decreased lung compliance. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO has been used to support primary or secondary diseases causing respiratory or cardiac failures in newborns, children and adults. Patients with severe ARDS are candidates for ECMO therapy. ECMO is a support modality, not a treatment; it is only beneficial in patients whose primary disease is reversible. ECMO complications-which can lead to mortality, morbidity, long-term disability and reduced quality of life-include surgical and organ bleeding, renal and multi-organ failure and central nervous system problems. The aim of this article was to provide a general overview of ECMO use and outcomes patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrom.

  10. The role of radiological imaging in diagnosis and treatment of severe acute respiratory syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张雪哲; 薛爱华

    2003-01-01

    @@ Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a severe contagious disease. Based on the current etiological study, SARS-CoV is thought to be the cause of SARS,[1,2] and the disease is transmitted mainly by respiratory droplets within a near distance and close contactwith a patient's secretions. The diagnosis of SARS depends on epidemiologicalhistory, clinical symptoms and signs, laboratory tests, and imaging findings, all of which will be discussed in this report for better understanding and control of SARS.

  11. A patient-centered research agenda for the care of the acutely ill older patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Heidi L; Leykum, Luci K; Mattison, Melissa L P; Vasilevskis, Eduard E; Meltzer, David O

    2015-05-01

    Hospitalists and others acute-care providers are limited by gaps in evidence addressing the needs of the acutely ill older adult population. The Society of Hospital Medicine sponsored the Acute Care of Older Patients Priority Setting Partnership to develop a research agenda focused on bridging this gap. Informed by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute framework for identification and prioritization of research areas, we adapted a methodology developed by the James Lind Alliance to engage diverse stakeholders in the research agenda setting process. The work of the Partnership proceeded through 4 steps: convening, consulting, collating, and prioritizing. First, the steering committee convened a partnership of 18 stakeholder organizations in May 2013. Next, stakeholder organizations surveyed members to identify important unanswered questions in the acute care of older persons, receiving 1299 responses from 580 individuals. Finally, an extensive and structured process of collation and prioritization resulted in a final list of 10 research questions in the following areas: advanced-care planning, care transitions, delirium, dementia, depression, medications, models of care, physical function, surgery, and training. With the changing demographics of the hospitalized population, a workforce with limited geriatrics training, and gaps in evidence to inform clinical decision making for acutely ill older patients, the identified research questions deserve the highest priority in directing future research efforts to improve care for the older hospitalized patient and enrich training.

  12. A feasible strategy for preventing blood clots in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (FBI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robinson, Sian I.; Zincuk, A.; Larsen, U. L.;

    2014-01-01

    urine output prior to discontinuing dialysis, and low neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin in dialysis-free intervals, as markers of renal recovery. METHODS/DESIGN: In a multicenter, double-blind randomized controlled trial in progress at three intensive care units across Denmark, we randomly......BACKGROUND: Previous pharmacokinetic trials suggested that 40 mg subcutaneous enoxaparin once daily provided inadequate thromboprophylaxis for intensive care unit patients. Critically ill patients with acute kidney injury are at increased risk of venous thromboembolism and yet are often excluded...... from these trials. We hypothesized that for critically ill patients with acute kidney injury receiving continuous renal replacement therapy, a dose of 1 mg/kg enoxaparin subcutaneously once daily would improve thromboprophylaxis without increasing the risk of bleeding. In addition, we seek to utilize...

  13. [Italian Program for Surveillance of Acute Pesticide-Related Illnesses: cases identified in 2005].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settimi, L; Davanzo, F; Travaglia, A; Locatelli, C; Cilento, I; Volpe, C; Russo, A; Miceli, G; Fracassi, A; Maiozzi, P; Marcello, I; Sesan, F; Urbani, E

    2007-01-01

    In 2005, the Italian System for Surveillance of Acute Pesticide-Related Illnesses (SIAF) identified 625 cases, among which 520 unintentionally exposed. The majority of these subjects were men (75%) and aged 26-65 years (65%). About 63% of all exposures occurred at work. Severity for these illnesses was low for 94% and moderate for 5%. Four cases were classified as illnesses of high severity. Some 70% of all the reported exposures occurred between May and September. The active ingredients responsible for the largest number of cases were: glyphosate (n. 56), copper sulphate (n. 55), methomyl (n. = 52), metam-sodium (n. 24). Three episodes of collective environmental exposure to soil fumigants involving 23 subjects were also detected.

  14. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a rescue therapy for acute respiratory failure during chemotherapy in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Won; Kim, Youn Seup

    2017-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by pneumonia in patients with hematologic malignancies can be life-threatening. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is the only temporary treatment for patients with ARDS who are refractory to conventional treatment. However, the immunosuppression and coagulopathies in hematological malignancies such as lymphoma and acute leukemia are relative contraindications for ECMO, due to high risks of infection and bleeding. Here, we report a 22-year-old man with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who developed pneumonia and ARDS during induction chemotherapy; he was treated with ECMO. PMID:28275497

  15. Treatment of Adenoviral Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Using Cidofovir With Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minhyeok; Kim, Seulgi; Kwon, Oh Jung; Kim, Ji Hye; Jeong, Inbeom; Son, Ji Woong; Na, Moon Jun; Yoon, Yoo Sang; Park, Hyun Woong; Kwon, Sun Jung

    2017-03-01

    Adenovirus infections are associated with respiratory (especially upper respiratory) infection and gastrointestinal disease and occur primarily in infants and children. Although rare in adults, severe lower respiratory adenovirus infections including pneumonia are reported in specific populations, such as military recruits and immunocompromised patients. Antiviral treatment is challenging due to limited clinical experience and lack of well-controlled randomized trials. Several previously reported cases of adenoviral pneumonia showed promising efficacy of cidofovir. However, few reports discussed the efficacy of cidofovir in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We experienced 3 cases of adenoviral pneumonia associated with ARDS and treated with cidofovir and respiratory support, including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). All 3 patients showed a positive clinical response to cidofovir and survival at 28 days. Cidofovir with early ECMO therapy may be a therapeutic option in adenoviral ARDS. A literature review identified 15 cases of adenovirus pneumonia associated with ARDS.

  16. Pilot study of participant-collected nasal swabs for acute respiratory infections in a low-income, urban population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vargas CY

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Celibell Y Vargas,1 Liqun Wang,1 Yaritza Castellanos de Belliard,1 Maria Morban,1 Hilbania Diaz,1 Elaine L Larson,2,3 Philip LaRussa,1 Lisa Saiman,1,4 Melissa S Stockwell1,5,6 1Department of Pediatrics, 2School of Nursing, 3Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, 4Department of Infection Prevention and Control, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, 5Department of Population and Family Health, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, 6NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY, USA Objective: To assess the feasibility and validity of unsupervised participant-collected nasal swabs to detect respiratory pathogens in a low-income, urban minority population. Methods: This project was conducted as part of an ongoing community-based surveillance study in New York City to identify viral etiologies of acute respiratory infection. In January 2014, following sample collection by trained research assistants, participants with acute respiratory infection from 30 households subsequently collected and returned a self-collected/parent-collected nasal swab via mail. Self/parental swabs corresponding with positive reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction primary research samples were analyzed. Results: Nearly all (96.8%, n=30/31 households agreed to participate; 100% reported returning the sample and 29 were received (median time: 8 days. Most (18; 62.1% of the primary research samples were positive. For eight influenza-positive research samples, seven (87.5% self-swabs were also positive. For ten other respiratory pathogen-positive research samples, eight (80.0% self-swabs were positive. Sensitivity of self-swabs for any respiratory pathogen was 83.3% and 87.5% for influenza, and specificity for both was 100%. There was no relationship between level of education and concordance of results between positive research samples and their matching participant swab. Conclusion: In this pilot study, self

  17. Recovery from respiratory failure after decompression laparotorny for severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sylvia Siebig; Igors Iesalnieks; Tanja Bruennler; Christine Dierkes; Julia Langgartner; Juergen Schoelmedch; Christian E Wrede

    2008-01-01

    We present three cases of patients (at the age of 56 years,49 years and 74 years respectively) with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP),complicated by intra-abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) and respiratory insufficiency with limitations of mechanical ventilation.The respiratory situation of the patients was significantly improved after decompression laparotomy (DL) and lung protective ventilation was re-achieved.ACS was discussed followed by a short review of the literature.Our cases show that DL may help patients with SAP to recover from severe respiratory failure.

  18. Immunoadjuvant Therapy and Noninvasive Ventilation for Acute Respiratory Failure in Lung Tuberculosis: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Franco, René Agustín; Olivas-Medina, Dahyr Alberto; Pacheco-Tena, Cesar Francisco; Duque-Rodríguez, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory failure caused by pulmonary tuberculosis is a rare event but with a high mortality even while receiving mechanical ventilatory support. We report the case of a young man with severe pulmonary tuberculosis refractory to conventional therapy who successfully overcame the critical period of his condition using noninvasive ventilation and immunoadjuvant therapy that included three doses of etanercept 25 mg subcutaneously. We conclude that the use of etanercept along with antituberculosis treatment appears to be safe and effective in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis presenting with acute respiratory failure. PMID:26273486

  19. Pulmonary hydatid cyst in a pregnant patient causing acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hijazi Mohammed

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A 21-year-old primigravida, at 32 weeks of gestation, presented with acute onset of respiratory failure and circulatory shock. Chest imaging showed findings suggestive of ruptured hydatid cyst, which was confirmed by histology post-thoracotomy. Tissue cultures from the removed cyst grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis also. She was successfully managed in the intensive care unit and was then discharged home on antituberculosis medications in addition to albendazole after prolonged hospitalization and a need for chest tube for bronchopleural fistula. Acute respiratory failure and anaphylactic shock secondary to ruptured pulmonary hydatid cyst and superimposed pulmonary tuberculosis in a pregnant lady should be considered in patients living in endemic areas.

  20. How safe is the prone position in acute respiratory distress syndrome at late pregnancy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Sukhen; Samanta, Sujay; Wig, Jyotsna; Baronia, A K

    2014-06-01

    We encountered a case of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome in late pregnancy due to influenza (H1N1) with refractory hypoxemia to conventional mechanical ventilation. Ventilation in prone position rescued this patient by maintaining oxygenation and sustaining improvement thereafter. Here, we discuss the mechanism of prone ventilation with special references to safety management of acute respiratory distress syndrome in the third trimester of pregnancy. It requires frequent monitoring of possible complications due to prone position and highly dedicated supporting staffs. More data are required on safety of proning in the late pregnancy.

  1. Effects of acute respiratory virus infection upon tracheal mucous transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerrard, C.S.; Levandowski, R.A.; Gerrity, T.R.; Yeates, D.B.; Klein, E.

    Tracheal mucous velocity was measured in 13 healthy non-smokers using an aerosol labelled with /sup 99m/Tc and a multidetector probe during respiratory virus infections. The movement of boluses of tracheal mucous were either absent or reduced in number in five subjects with myxovirus infection (four influenza and one respiratory syncytial virus) within 48 hr of the onset of symptoms and in four subjects 1 wk later. One subject with influenza still had reduced bolus formation 12-16 wk after infection. Frequent coughing was a feature of those subjects with absent tracheal boluses. In contrast, four subjects with rhinovirus infection had normal tracheal mucous velocity at 48 hr after the onset of symptoms (4.1 +/- 1.3 mm/min). Tracheal mucous velocity was also normal (4.6 +/- 1.1 mm/min) in four subjects in whom no specific viral agent could be defined but had typical symptomatology of respiratory viral infection. During health tracheal mucous velocity was normal (4.8 +/- 1.6 mm/min) in the eleven subjects who had measurements made. Disturbances in tracheal mucous transport during virus infection appear to depend upon the type of virus and are most severe in influenza A and respiratory syncytial virus infection.

  2. Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Sydnrome : Fluid Management in the PICU

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingelse, SA; Wösten-van Asperen, RM; Lemson, J; Daams, JG; Bem, R.A.; van Woensel, JB

    2016-01-01

    The administration of an appropriate volume of intravenous fluids, while avoiding fluid overload, is a major challenge in the pediatric intensive care unit. Despite our efforts, fluid overload is a very common clinical observation in critically ill children, in particular in those with pediatric acu

  3. Incidence and Mortality of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Children : A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, LR; Veltkamp, F; Bos, AP; van Woensel, Job B M; Serpa Neto, A; Schultz, MJ; Wösten-van Asperen, RM

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Our understanding of the acute respiratory distress syndrome in children is limited, and literature is dominated by investigations in adult patients. Recent preclinical studies suggest that the susceptibility to and severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome in children could differ

  4. Prognostic significance of early lactate clearance rate for severe acute respiratory failure patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    臧芝栋

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prognostic significanceof early lactate clearance rate for severe acute respiratory failure patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation(ECMO).Methods Forty-three patients with severe acute respiratory failure supported by venous-venous(v-v)ECMO were enrolled from January 2007 to January 2013.Arterial blood lactate at pre-ECMO support(0 h)and at

  5. Clinical characteristics and risk factors of severe respiratory syncytial virus-associated acute lower respiratory tract infections in hospitalized infants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Bo Zhang; Li-Juan Liu; Li-Ling Qian; Gao-Li Jiang; Chuan-Kai Wang; Pin Jia; Peng Shi; Jin Xu; Li-Bo Wang

    2014-01-01

    Background: To investigate the clinical characteristics and analyze risk factors for severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in hospitalized infants with acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRIs). Methods: A retrospective review of the medical records of infants with RSV-associated ALRIs between March 1st, 2011 and February 29th, 2012 was conducted. Subjects were followed up over the phone or by outpatient visit six and twelve months after discharge. Results: Among 913 RSV-associated ALRIs infants, 288 (31.5%) had severe infections, which accounted for 4.2% of hospitalized children. The hospital RSV mortality rate was 1.0%. The proportions of cases with tachypnea, apnea, cyanosis, and fine rales were significantly higher in the severe ALRIs group (all P Conclusions: Younger age, low birth weight and underlying disease are associated with severe RSVassociated ALRIs. Furthermore, severe RSV infections may be associated with a higher frequency of subsequent bronchitis, pneumonia and re-hospitalization in the following year.

  6. Should Immune-Enhancing Formulations Be Used for Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosevelt, Hannah

    2016-08-01

    The potential for regulating immune function in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) through enteral-administered anti-inflammatory lipids has generated much interest over the past 20 years. Yet recommendations remain inconclusive regarding the utilization of ω-3 fatty acids in patients with ARDS and acute lung injury (ALI). Studies are limited in number, with differing methods, small sample sizes, and conflicting results, making recommendations difficult to interpret.

  7. EFFECT OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION ON ACUTE STRESS-RELATED GASTRIC MUCOSAL DAMAGE OF SERIOUSLY ILL PATIENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵超; 肖文; 叶光福; 周建平; 周其璋

    2002-01-01

    Emergency endoscopy studies have shown that the most of seriously ill patients develop acute stress-related mucosal damage and ulceration within 24 hours of admission, which manifest the upper gastrointestinal tract

  8. Epidemiology of Acute Kidney Injury in Critically Ill Children and Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaddourah, Ahmad; Basu, Rajit K; Bagshaw, Sean M; Goldstein, Stuart L

    2017-01-05

    Background The epidemiologic characteristics of children and young adults with acute kidney injury have been described in single-center and retrospective studies. We conducted a multinational, prospective study involving patients admitted to pediatric intensive care units to define the incremental risk of death and complications associated with severe acute kidney injury. Methods We used the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes criteria to define acute kidney injury. Severe acute kidney injury was defined as stage 2 or 3 acute kidney injury (plasma creatinine level ≥2 times the baseline level or urine output <0.5 ml per kilogram of body weight per hour for ≥12 hours) and was assessed for the first 7 days of intensive care. All patients 3 months to 25 years of age who were admitted to 1 of 32 participating units were screened during 3 consecutive months. The primary outcome was 28-day mortality. Results A total of 4683 patients were evaluated; acute kidney injury developed in 1261 patients (26.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 25.6 to 28.2), and severe acute kidney injury developed in 543 patients (11.6%; 95% CI, 10.7 to 12.5). Severe acute kidney injury conferred an increased risk of death by day 28 after adjustment for 16 covariates (adjusted odds ratio, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.17 to 2.68); death occurred in 60 of the 543 patients (11.0%) with severe acute kidney injury versus 105 of the 4140 patients (2.5%) without severe acute kidney injury (P<0.001). Severe acute kidney injury was associated with increased use of mechanical ventilation and renal-replacement therapy. A stepwise increase in 28-day mortality was associated with worsening severity of acute kidney injury (P<0.001 by log-rank test). Assessment of acute kidney injury according to the plasma creatinine level alone failed to identify acute kidney injury in 67.2% of the patients with low urine output. Conclusions Acute kidney injury is common and is associated with poor outcomes, including increased

  9. Thrombocytopenia is associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome mortality: an international study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiehua Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early detection of the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS has the potential to improve the prognosis of critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU. However, no reliable biomarkers are currently available for accurate early detection of ARDS in patients with predisposing conditions. OBJECTIVES: This study examined risk factors and biomarkers for ARDS development and mortality in two prospective cohort studies. METHODS: We examined clinical risk factors for ARDS in a cohort of 178 patients in Beijing, China who were admitted to the ICU and were at high risk for ARDS. Identified biomarkers were then replicated in a second cohort of1,878 patients in Boston, USA. RESULTS: Of 178 patients recruited from participating hospitals in Beijing, 75 developed ARDS. After multivariate adjustment, sepsis (odds ratio [OR]:5.58, 95% CI: 1.70-18.3, pulmonary injury (OR: 3.22; 95% CI: 1.60-6.47, and thrombocytopenia, defined as platelet count <80×10(3/µL, (OR: 2.67; 95% CI: 1.27-5.62were significantly associated with increased risk of developing ARDS. Thrombocytopenia was also associated with increased mortality in patients who developed ARDS (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR]: 1.38, 95% CI: 1.07-1.57 but not in those who did not develop ARDS(AHR: 1.25, 95% CI: 0.96-1.62. The presence of both thrombocytopenia and ARDS substantially increased 60-day mortality. Sensitivity analyses showed that a platelet count of <100×10(3/µL in combination with ARDS provide the highest prognostic value for mortality. These associations were replicated in the cohort of US patients. CONCLUSIONS: This study of ICU patients in both China and US showed that thrombocytopenia is associated with an increased risk of ARDS and platelet count in combination with ARDS had a high predictive value for patient mortality.

  10. Influenza and other respiratory viruses detected by influenza-like illness surveillance in Leyte Island, the Philippines, 2010-2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirono Otomaru

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the role of influenza-like illness (ILI surveillance conducted on Leyte Island, the Philippines, including involvement of other respiratory viruses, from 2010 to 2013. ILI surveillance was conducted from January 2010 to March 2013 with 3 sentinel sites located in Tacloban city, Palo and Tanauan of Leyte Island. ILI was defined as fever ≥38°C or feverish feeling and either cough or running nose in a patient of any age. Influenza virus and other 5 respiratory viruses were searched. A total of 5,550 ILI cases visited the 3 sites and specimens were collected from 2,031 (36.6% cases. Among the cases sampled, 1,637 (75.6% were children aged <5 years. 874 (43.0% cases were positive for at least one of the respiratory viruses tested. Influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV were predominantly detected (both were 25.7% followed by human rhinovirus (HRV (17.5%. The age distributions were significantly different between those who were positive for influenza, HRV, and RSV. ILI cases were reported throughout the year and influenza virus was co-detected with those viruses on approximately half of the weeks of study period (RSV in 60.5% and HRV 47.4%. In terms of clinical manifestations, only the rates of headache and sore throat were significantly higher in influenza positive cases than cases positive to other viruses. In conclusion, syndromic ILI surveillance in this area is difficult to detect the start of influenza epidemic without laboratory confirmation which requires huge resources. Age was an important factor that affected positive rates of influenza and other respiratory viruses. Involvement of older age children may be useful to detect influenza more effectively.

  11. Successful management of acute respiratory failure with noninvasive mechanical ventilation after drowning, in an epileptic-patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, Paolo; Calcaterra, Salvatore; Bottari, Antonio; Girbino, Giuseppe; Fodale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Sea drowning is a common cause of accidental death worldwide. Respiratory complications such as acute pulmonary oedema, which is often complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome, is often seen. Noninvasive ventilation is already widely used as a first approach to treat acute respiratory failure resulting from multiple diseases. We report a case of a 45 year old man with a history of epilepsy, motor and mental handicap who developed acute respiratory failure secondary to sea water drowning after an epileptic crisis. We illustrate successful and rapid management of this case with noninvasive ventilation. We emphasize the advantages and limitations of using noninvasive ventilation to treat acute respiratory failure due to sea water drowning syndrome.

  12. Successful management of acute respiratory failure with noninvasive mechanical ventilation after drowning, in an epileptic-patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Ruggeri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sea drowning is a common cause of accidental death worldwide. Respiratory complications such as acute pulmonary oedema, which is often complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome, is often seen. Noninvasive ventilation is already widely used as a first approach to treat acute respiratory failure resulting from multiple diseases. We report a case of a 45 year old man with a history of epilepsy, motor and mental handicap who developed acute respiratory failure secondary to sea water drowning after an epileptic crisis. We illustrate successful and rapid management of this case with noninvasive ventilation. We emphasize the advantages and limitations of using noninvasive ventilation to treat acute respiratory failure due to sea water drowning syndrome.

  13. Cholecystectomy vs. percutaneous cholecystostomy for the management of critically ill patients with acute cholecystitis: a protocol for a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Ambe, Peter C; Kaptanis, Sarantos; Papadakis, Marios; Weber, Sebastian A.; Zirngibl, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute cholecystitis is a common diagnosis. However, the heterogeneity of presentation makes it difficult to standardize management. Although surgery is the mainstay of treatment, critically ill patients have been managed via percutaneous cholecystostomy. However, the role of percutaneous cholecystostomy in the management of such patients has not been clearly established. This systematic review will compare the outcomes of critically ill patients with acute cholecystitis managed wit...

  14. VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL INJURIES AND CHANGES OF BLOOD COAGULATION AND FIBRINOLYSIS INDEXES IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-lin He; Zhi Liu; Shu-yue Xia

    2004-01-01

    Objective To study endothelial damage by observing changes of circulating endothelial cells (CECs) in blood, coagulation and fibrinolysis index in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.Methods CECs were separated by isopycnic centrifugation method in 14 patients with acute lung injury (ALI), 7patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), 10 intensive care unit (ICU) controls, and 15 healthy controls.Plasma prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), fibrinogen (FG), fibrin degradation products (FDP), and D-dimer were examined simultaneously. Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) Ⅱ and lung injury score (LIS) were recorded to evaluate severity of illness and lung injury.Results (1) The number of CECs in ALI (10.4 ± 2.3 ) and ARDS groups ( 16.1 ± 2.7) was higher than that in the healthy (1.9 ± 0.5) (P < 0.01). In both ALI and ARDS, the number of CECs correlated with APACHE Ⅱ (r = 0.55, P < 0.05 and r =0.62, P < 0.05, respectively) and LIS (r = 0.60, P < 0.05 and r = 0.53, P < 0.05, respectively). CEC number was negatively correlated with PaO2 in ALI and ARDS (r=-0.49, P< 0.05 and r=-0.64, P< 0.05, respectively). (2) The level of FDP and D-dirmer were higher in ALI and ARDS patients than that in ICU and healthy control groups (P<0.05). The level of FG in ARDS group was significantly higher than in the ICU and healthy control groups (P < 0.05). But in ALI group, the level of FG was significantly higher than only healthy control group (P < 0.05).Conclusions Endothelial cell damage occurs in ARDS patients, which may play a major role in the pathophysiology of ARDS. Changes of endothelial cell activation and damage markers, such as CECs, plasma coagulation and fibrinolysis index,to some extent reflect severity of illness and lung injury in ARDS.

  15. Acute bacterial infections of the lower respiratory tract in children from low-income countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleer, A; Wolf, B.H.M.

    2000-01-01

    Acute bacterial infection of the lower respiratory tract is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children and is responsible for 4 million childhood deaths each year. Most of these deaths are caused by pneumonia and occur in the youngest children in the poorest parts of the world. Severe pneu

  16. Severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome resulting from tuberculosis correlates with bronchoalveolar lavage CXCL-8 expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adcock, I.M.; Hashemian, S.M.R.; Mortaz, E.; Masjedi, M.R.; Folkerts, G.

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has previously been linked to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Here this study investigates the link between inflammation and TB in ARDS by measuring inflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) from 90 patients with TB or ARDS alone and in

  17. Pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome: Host factors in Down syndrome and the general population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Bruijn

    2013-01-01

    We find that Down syndrome is an important risk factor for developing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in children, but the reason why remains to be elucidated. In addition, we find several differences between adult and pediatric ARDS. The association between C-reactive protein (CRP) level

  18. New diagnostic method of the acute respiratory distress syndrome; Neues Diagnoseverfahren des akuten Lungenversagens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bialy, J. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Hauptabt. Zyklotron

    2000-07-01

    Different diseases can be the risk factors for the ARDS (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome). A new bed-side diagnosis-system was developed in the Research Center Karlsruhe in cooperation with the University of Freiburg especially under the aspect of an early diagnosis and a long-time monitoring of the therapy with nitrogen-monoxide. (orig.)

  19. Exploring the Roles and Nature of Science: A Case Study of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeung Chung

    2008-01-01

    The roles of science in society and the nature of science are the focus of many science curricula. Current views about these two aspects of science have largely been informed by the history of scientific development. This article uses the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome--a recent health scare--as a case study to explore the roles of…

  20. Acute Respiratory Disease in US Army Trainees 3 Years after Reintroduction of Adenovirus Vaccine1

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormic, Zachary D.; Gaydos, Joel C.; Hawksworth, Anthony W.; Jordan, Nikki N.

    2017-01-01

    The 1999 cessation of vaccination against adenovirus types 4 and 7 among US Army trainees resulted in reemergence of acute respiratory disease (ARD) outbreaks. The 2011 implementation of a replacement vaccine led to dramatic and sustained decreases in ARD cases, supporting continuation of vaccination in this population at high risk for ARD. PMID:27748651

  1. ACUPUNCTURE TREATMENT OF 42 CASES OF ACUTE UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ManWei; WangJinglan

    2000-01-01

    We made clinical observations on the therapeutic effect of acupuncture on acute upper respiratory tract infection and compared with the effect of paracetamol and Antondine, The result showed that acupuncture therapy could allay fever more rapidly than drugs, so long as the differentiation of syndromes is correct and the acupoint is selected properly.

  2. Acute middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection in livestock Dromedaries, Dubai, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernery, Ulrich; Corman, Victor M; Wong, Emily Y M; Tsang, Alan K L; Muth, Doreen; Lau, Susanna K P; Khazanehdari, Kamal; Zirkel, Florian; Ali, Mansoor; Nagy, Peter; Juhasz, Jutka; Wernery, Renate; Joseph, Sunitha; Syriac, Ginu; Elizabeth, Shyna K; Patteril, Nissy Annie Georgy; Woo, Patrick C Y; Drosten, Christian

    2015-06-01

    Camels carry Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, but little is known about infection age or prevalence. We studied >800 dromedaries of all ages and 15 mother-calf pairs. This syndrome constitutes an acute, epidemic, and time-limited infection in camels <4 years of age, particularly calves. Delayed social separation of calves might reduce human infection risk.

  3. Viral respiratory tract infections among patients with acute undifferentiated fever in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.L. Phuong; T.T.T. Nga; G.J. van Doornum; J. Groen; T.Q. Binh; P.T. Giao; L.Q. Hung; N.V. Nams; P.A. Kager; P.J. de Vries

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the proportion of viral respiratory tract infections among acute undifferentiated fevers (AUFs) at primary health facilities in southern Vietnam during 2001-2005, patients with AUF not caused by malaria were enrolled at twelve primary health facilities and a clinic for malaria control

  4. Detection of viral acute lower respiratory tract infection in hospitalized infants using real-time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassant Meligy

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: RV was the most commonly detected virus in children under 3 years admitted with acute lower respiratory tract infections. Coinfection was present in the majority of our patients; however it was not related significantly to parameters of disease severity.

  5. Progress in Global Surveillance and Response Capacity 10 Years After Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-04-10

    Dr. Mike Miller reads an abridged version of the Emerging Infectious Diseases' synopsis, Progress in Global Surveillance and Response Capacity 10 Years after Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome.  Created: 4/10/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/11/2013.

  6. Severe acute respiratory syndrome--a new coronavirus from the Chinese dragon's lair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, T B; Kledal, T N; Andersen, O;

    2003-01-01

    The recent identification of a novel clinical entity, the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), the rapid subsequent spread and case fatality rates of 14-15% have prompted a massive international collaborative investigation facilitated by a network of laboratories established by the World Hea...

  7. Cytomegalovirus reactivation and mortality in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ong, David S Y; Spitoni, Cristian; Klein Klouwenberg, Peter M C; Verduyn Lunel, Frans M; Frencken, Jos F; Schultz, Marcus J; van der Poll, Tom; Kesecioglu, Jozef; Bonten, Marc J M; Cremer, Olaf L

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation occurs frequently in patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and has been associated with increased mortality. However, it remains unknown whether this association represents an independent risk for poor outcome. We aimed to estimate t

  8. Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome presenting as acute respiratory distress and cor pulmonale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, S A; Shanbag, P; Chavan, V; Shenoy, P

    2010-01-01

    We describe a 7-year-old boy with staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome who presented with acute respiratory distress and cor pulmonale. We wish to highlight this unusual presentation as the diagnosis of toxic shock syndrome depends chiefly on a high degree of clinical suspicion. Early diagnosis and prompt institution of appropriate therapy will significantly reduce morbidity and mortality.

  9. Characterization of a novel coronavirus associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Rota (Paul); M.S. Oberste (Steven); S.S. Monroe (Stephan); W.A. Nix (Allan); R. Campagnoli (Ray); J.P. Icenogle (Joseph); S. Penaranda; B. Bankamp (Bettina); K. Maher (Kaija); M.H. Chen (Min-hsin); S. Tong (Suxiong); A. Tamin (Azaibi); L. Lowe (Luis); M. Frace (Michael); J.L. DeRisi (Joseph); Q. Chen (Qi); D. Wang (David); D.D. Erdman (Dean); T.C. Peret (Teresa); C. Burns (Cara); T.G. Ksiazek (Thomas); P.E. Rollin (Pierre); A. Sanchez (Berenguer); S. Liffick (Stephanie); B. Holloway (Brian); J. Limor (Josef); K. McCaustland (Karen); M. Olsen-Rasmussen (Mellissa); S. Gunther; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); C. Drosten (Christian); M.A. Pallansch (Mark); L.J. Anderson (Larry); W.J. Belline; R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractIn March 2003, a novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV) was discovered in association with cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The sequence of the complete genome of SARS-CoV was determined, and the initial characterization of the viral genome is presented in this report. The geno

  10. The role of high flow oxygen therapy in acute respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masclans, J R; Pérez-Terán, P; Roca, O

    2015-11-01

    Acute respiratory failure represents one of the most common causes of intensive care unit admission and oxygen therapy remains the first-line therapy in the management of these patients. In recent years, high-flow oxygen via nasal cannula has been described as a useful alternative to conventional oxygen therapy in patients with acute respiratory failure. High-flow oxygen via nasal cannula rapidly alleviates symptoms of acute respiratory failure and improves oxygenation by several mechanisms, including dead space washout, reduction in oxygen dilution and inspiratory nasopharyngeal resistance, a moderate positive airway pressure effect that may generate alveolar recruitment and an overall greater tolerance and comfort with the interface and the heated and humidified inspired gases. However, the experience in adults is still limited and there are no clinical guidelines to establish recommendations for their use. This article aims to review the existing evidence on the use of high-flow oxygen via nasal cannula in adults with acute respiratory failure and its possible applications, advantages and limitations.

  11. Acute Respiratory Failure due to Alveolar Hemorrhage after Exposure to Organic Dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Mi Choi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH is associated with severe outcomes. We report a case of acute respiratory failure that required mechanical ventilation and was clinically and pathologically diagnosed as DAH related to exposure to organic dust. A 39-year-old man, who had visited a warehouse to grade beans for purchase, was referred to our hospital for impending respiratory failure. His initial radiographic examinations revealed diffuse bilateral ground-glass opacities in his lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage resulted in progressively bloodier returns, which is characteristic of DAH. He underwent bedside open lung biopsy of his right lower lobe in the intensive care unit. Biopsy results revealed DAH and organization with accumulation of hemosiderin-laden macrophages and a few fibroblastic foci. The patient was treated with empirical antibiotics and high-dose corticosteroids and successfully weaned from mechanical ventilation. DAH might be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with acute respiratory failure after exposure to organic particles.

  12. Access to medicines for acute illness in middle income countries in Central America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Cristina Martins Emmerick

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE : To analyze the main predictors of access to medicines for persons who experienced acute health conditions. METHODS : This was a cross-sectional analytic study, based on data from household surveys. We examined the predictors of: (1 seeking care for acute illness in the formal health care system and (2 obtaining all medicines sought for the acute condition. RESULTS : The significant predictors of seeking health care for acute illnesses were urban geographic location, head of household with secondary school education or above, age under 15, severity of illness perceived by the respondent, and having health insurance. The most important predictor of obtaining full access to medicines was seeking care in the formal health care system. People who sought care in the formal system were three times more likely to receive all the medicines sought (OR 3.0, 95%CI 2.3;4.0. For those who sought care in the formal health system, the strongest predictors of full access to medicines were seeking care in the private sector, having secondary school education or above, and positive perceptions of quality of health care and medicines in public sector health facilities. For patients who did not seek care in the formal health system, full access to medicines was more likely in Honduras or Nicaragua than in Guatemala. Urban geographic location, higher economic status, and male gender were also significant predictors. CONCLUSIONS : A substantial part of the population in these three countries sought and obtained medicines outside of the formal health care system, which may compromise quality of care and pose a risk to patients. Determinants of full access to medicines inside and outside the formal health care system differ, and thus may require different strategies to improve access to medicines.

  13. The amylase-to-creatinine clearance ratio--a non-specific response to acute illness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, M J; Playforth, M J; Rashid, S A; Cooper, E H

    1982-01-01

    It was felt that the apparent specificity of the amylase-to-creatine clearance ratio (ACCR) in several previous studies of pancreatitis might reflect a failure to utilize adequately ill control subjects. The ACCR and the renal clearances of beta 2-microglobulin (B2-m), similarly related to creatinine (BCCR) as well as the urinary concentration of albumin, were compared in 27 patients with acute pancreatitis, 8 with a perforated peptic ulcer and 7 with mild biliary colic, during the first 5 days in hospital. Acute pancreatitis was graded as mild (6), moderate (14) or severe (7), using a combination of clinical data, diagnostic peritoneal lavage and multiple criteria. Further assessment of the severity of the acute illness was obtained from measurement of C-reactive protein (C-RP). Lowest C-RP levels were found in the patients with mild pancreatitis and biliary colic, and highest levels in the patients with severe pancreatitis and perforated ulcer (P less than 0.002). Similarly, ACCR and BCCR levels were significantly lower in the two mild groups than in the two severe ones (P less than 0.01 and less than 0.002 respectively), although plasma amylase was raised only in patients with pancreatitis and plasma B2-m was similar in all groups. Electrophoresis of urine showed dense bands of tubuloprotein in patients from both severe groups. Urine albumin was higher in severe pancreatitis than in perforated ulcer (P less than 0.1), perhaps indicating a more specific glomerular lesion in pancreatitis. Thus a rise in amylase clearance appeared to be related to the severity of the acute illness, and may be a component of a non-specific tubuloproteinuria. In this study patients with a perforated peptic ulcer had increases in ACCR similar to those seen in patients with severe pancreatitis, and we are therefore doubtful whether ACCR has any role in the clinical diagnosis of pancreatic disease.

  14. The Feasibility of performing resistance exercise with acutely ill hospitalized older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rockwood Kenneth

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For older adults, hospitalization frequently results in deterioration of mobility and function. Nevertheless, there are little data about how older adults exercise in the hospital and definitive studies are not yet available to determine what type of physical activity will prevent hospital related decline. Strengthening exercise may prevent deconditioning and Pilates exercise, which focuses on proper body mechanics and posture, may promote safety. Methods A hospital-based resistance exercise program, which incorporates principles of resistance training and Pilates exercise, was developed and administered to intervention subjects to determine whether acutely-ill older patients can perform resistance exercise while in the hospital. Exercises were designed to be reproducible and easily performed in bed. The primary outcome measures were adherence and participation. Results Thirty-nine ill patients, recently admitted to an acute care hospital, who were over age 70 [mean age of 82.0 (SD= 7.3] and ambulatory prior to admission, were randomized to the resistance exercise group (19 or passive range of motion (ROM group (20. For the resistance exercise group, participation was 71% (p = 0.004 and adherence was 63% (p = 0.020. Participation and adherence for ROM exercises was 96% and 95%, respectively. Conclusion Using a standardized and simple exercise regimen, selected, ill, older adults in the hospital are able to comply with resistance exercise. Further studies are needed to determine if resistance exercise can prevent or treat hospital-related deterioration in mobility and function.

  15. Epidemiological profile of acute respiratory distress syndrome patients: A tertiary care experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magazine, Rahul; Rao, Shobitha; Chogtu, Bharti; Venkateswaran, Ramkumar; Shahul, Hameed Aboobackar; Goneppanavar, Umesh

    2017-01-01

    Background: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is seen in critically ill patients. Its etiological spectrum in India is expected to be different from that seen in western countries due to the high prevalence of tropical infections. Aim: To study the epidemiological profile of ARDS patients. Setting: A tertiary care hospital in Karnataka, India. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of 150 out of the 169 ARDS patients diagnosed during 2010–2012. Data collected included the clinical features and severity scoring parameters. Results: The mean age of the study population was 42.92 ± 13.91 years. The causes of ARDS included pneumonia (n = 35, 23.3%), scrub typhus (n = 33, 22%), leptospirosis (n = 11, 7.3%), malaria (n = 6, 4%), influenza (H1N1) (n = 10, 6.7%), pulmonary tuberculosis (n = 2, 1.3%), dengue (n = 1, 0.7%), abdominal sepsis (n = 16, 10.7%), skin infection (n = 3, 2%), unknown cause of sepsis (n = 18, 12%), and nonseptic causes (n = 15, 10%). A total of 77 (51.3%) patients survived, 66 (44%) expired, and 7 (4.7%) were discharged against medical advice (AMA). Preexisting comorbidities (46) were present in 13 survivors, 19 nonsurvivors, and four discharged AMA. History of surgery prior to the onset of ARDS was present in one survivor, 13 nonsurvivors, and one discharge AMA. Mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II, APACHE III, and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores in survivors were 9.06 ± 4.3, 49.22 ± 14, and 6.43 ± 2.5 and in nonsurvivors 21.11 ± 7, 86.45 ± 23.5, and 10.6 ± 10, respectively. Conclusion: The most common cause of ARDS in our study was pneumonia, but a large percentage of cases were due to the tropical infections. Preexisting comorbidity, surgery prior to the onset of ARDS, higher severity scores, and organ failure scores were more frequently observed among nonsurvivors than survivors. PMID:28144059

  16. Plasma Adiponectin, clinical factors, and patient outcomes during the acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan J Walkey

    Full Text Available Adiponectin (APN is an anti-inflammatory hormone derived from adipose tissue that attenuates acute lung injury in rodents. In this study, we investigated the association between circulating APN and outcomes among patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS.We performed a retrospective cohort study using data and plasma samples from participants in the multicenter ARDS Network Fluid and Catheter Treatment Trial.Plasma APN concentrations were measured in 816 (81.6% trial participants at baseline and in 568 (56.8% subjects at both baseline and day 7 after enrollment. Clinical factors associated with baseline APN levels in multivariable-adjusted models included sex, body mass index, past medical history of cirrhosis, and central venous pressure (model R2 = 9.7%. We did not observe an association between baseline APN and either severity of illness (APACHE III or extent of lung injury (Lung Injury Score. Among patients who received right heart catheterization (n = 384, baseline APN was inversely related to mean pulmonary artery pressure (β = -0.015, R2 1.5%, p = 0.02; however, this association did not persist in multivariable models (β = -0.009, R2 0.5%, p = 0.20. Neither baseline APN levels [HR per quartile1.04 (95% CI 0.91-1.18, p = 0.61], nor change in APN level from baseline to day 7 [HR 1.04 (95% CI 0.89-1.23, p = 0.62] were associated with 60 day mortality in Cox proportional hazards regression models. However, subgroup analysis identified an association between APN and mortality among patients who developed ARDS from extra-pulmonary etiologies [HR per quartile 1.31 (95% CI 1.08-1.57]. APN levels did not correlate with mortality among patients developing ARDS in association with direct pulmonary injury [HR 0.96 (95% CI 0.83-1.13], pinteraction = 0.016.Plasma APN levels did not correlate with disease severity or mortality in a large cohort of patients with ARDS. However, higher APN levels were

  17. Epidemiological profile of acute respiratory distress syndrome patients: A tertiary care experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Magazine

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is seen in critically ill patients. Its etiological spectrum in India is expected to be different from that seen in western countries due to the high prevalence of tropical infections. Aim: To study the epidemiological profile of ARDS patients. Setting: A tertiary care hospital in Karnataka, India. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of 150 out of the 169 ARDS patients diagnosed during 2010–2012. Data collected included the clinical features and severity scoring parameters. Results: The mean age of the study population was 42.92 ± 13.91 years. The causes of ARDS included pneumonia (n = 35, 23.3%, scrub typhus (n = 33, 22%, leptospirosis (n = 11, 7.3%, malaria (n = 6, 4%, influenza (H1N1 (n = 10, 6.7%, pulmonary tuberculosis (n = 2, 1.3%, dengue (n = 1, 0.7%, abdominal sepsis (n = 16, 10.7%, skin infection (n = 3, 2%, unknown cause of sepsis (n = 18, 12%, and nonseptic causes (n = 15, 10%. A total of 77 (51.3% patients survived, 66 (44% expired, and 7 (4.7% were discharged against medical advice (AMA. Preexisting comorbidities (46 were present in 13 survivors, 19 nonsurvivors, and four discharged AMA. History of surgery prior to the onset of ARDS was present in one survivor, 13 nonsurvivors, and one discharge AMA. Mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II, APACHE III, and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores in survivors were 9.06 ± 4.3, 49.22 ± 14, and 6.43 ± 2.5 and in nonsurvivors 21.11 ± 7, 86.45 ± 23.5, and 10.6 ± 10, respectively. Conclusion: The most common cause of ARDS in our study was pneumonia, but a large percentage of cases were due to the tropical infections. Preexisting comorbidity, surgery prior to the onset of ARDS, higher severity scores, and organ failure scores were more frequently observed among nonsurvivors than survivors.

  18. Diagnostic labelling as determinant of antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory tract episodes in general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijn, Huug J; Kuyvenhoven, Marijke M; Tiebosch, Hanneke M; Schellevis, François G; Verheij, Theo JM

    2007-01-01

    Background Next to other GP characteristics, diagnostic labelling (the proportion of acute respiratory tract (RT) episodes to be labelled as infections) probably contributes to a higher volume of antibiotic prescriptions for acute RT episodes. However, it is unknown whether there is an independent association between diagnostic labelling and the volume of prescribed antibiotics, or whether diagnostic labelling is associated with the number of presented acute RT episodes and consequently with the number of antibiotics prescribed per patient per year. Methods Data were used from the Second Dutch National Survey of General Practice (DNSGP-2) with 163 GPs from 85 Dutch practices, serving a population of 359,625 patients. Data over a 12 month period were analysed by means of multiple linear regression analysis. Main outcome measure was the volume of antibiotic prescriptions for acute RT episodes per 1,000 patients. Results The incidence was 236.9 acute RT episodes/1,000 patients. GPs labelled about 70% of acute RT episodes as infections, and antibiotics were prescribed in 41% of all acute RT episodes. A higher incidence of acute RT episodes (beta 0.67), a stronger inclination to label episodes as infections (beta 0.24), a stronger endorsement of the need of antibiotics in case of white spots in the throat (beta 0.11) and being male (beta 0.11) were independent determinants of the prescribed volume of antibiotics for acute RT episodes, whereas diagnostic labelling was not correlated with the incidence of acute RT episodes. Conclusion Diagnostic labelling is a relevant factor in GPs' antibiotic prescribing independent from the incidence of acute RT episodes. Therefore, quality assurance programs and postgraduate courses should emphasise to use evidence based prognostic criteria (e.g. chronic respiratory co-morbidity and old age) as an indication to prescribe antibiotics in stead of single inflammation signs or diagnostic labels. PMID:17883832

  19. Diagnostic labelling as determinant of antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory tract episodes in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schellevis François G

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Next to other GP characteristics, diagnostic labelling (the proportion of acute respiratory tract (RT episodes to be labelled as infections probably contributes to a higher volume of antibiotic prescriptions for acute RT episodes. However, it is unknown whether there is an independent association between diagnostic labelling and the volume of prescribed antibiotics, or whether diagnostic labelling is associated with the number of presented acute RT episodes and consequently with the number of antibiotics prescribed per patient per year. Methods Data were used from the Second Dutch National Survey of General Practice (DNSGP-2 with 163 GPs from 85 Dutch practices, serving a population of 359,625 patients. Data over a 12 month period were analysed by means of multiple linear regression analysis. Main outcome measure was the volume of antibiotic prescriptions for acute RT episodes per 1,000 patients. Results The incidence was 236.9 acute RT episodes/1,000 patients. GPs labelled about 70% of acute RT episodes as infections, and antibiotics were prescribed in 41% of all acute RT episodes. A higher incidence of acute RT episodes (beta 0.67, a stronger inclination to label episodes as infections (beta 0.24, a stronger endorsement of the need of antibiotics in case of white spots in the throat (beta 0.11 and being male (beta 0.11 were independent determinants of the prescribed volume of antibiotics for acute RT episodes, whereas diagnostic labelling was not correlated with the incidence of acute RT episodes. Conclusion Diagnostic labelling is a relevant factor in GPs' antibiotic prescribing independent from the incidence of acute RT episodes. Therefore, quality assurance programs and postgraduate courses should emphasise to use evidence based prognostic criteria (e.g. chronic respiratory co-morbidity and old age as an indication to prescribe antibiotics in stead of single inflammation signs or diagnostic labels.

  20. January 2015 Phoenix pulmonary journal club: noninvasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure

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    Mathew M

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation has expanded its role in the treatment of both chronic and acute respiratory failure. Its initial use in conditions such as obstructive sleep apnea, neuromuscular disease and tracheobronchomalacia, have been shown to improve quality of life and reduce mortality. Over the past 20 years studies have looked at using noninvasive ventilation in the management of acute respiratory failure from pulmonary edema, asthma and COPD exacerbations. During this month's journal club we reviewed 3 articles evaluating the efficacy of noninvasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure. Gupta D, Nath A, Agarwal R, Behera D. A prospective randomized controlled trial on the efficacy of noninvasive ventilation in severe acute asthma. Respir Care. 2010;55(5:536-43. [PubMed] This was a small unblinded randomized controlled trial (RCT looking at the efficacy using noninvasive ventilation (NIV in acute asthma. A total of 53 patients were included and divided into 2 groups of 28 patients ...

  1. Acute respiratory failure due to refeeding syndrome and hypophosphatemia induced by hypocaloric enteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Utpal; Sriram, Krishnan

    2009-03-01

    We report a case of acute respiratory failure due to refeeding syndrome caused by hypocaloric enteral tube feeds. A 60-y-old obese man, with a diagnosis of esophageal carcinoma with local metastases, underwent feeding jejunostomy tube insertion. Enteral tube feeding was initiated at small volumes providing 4.4 kcal x kg(-1) x d(-1) and gradually increased over 48 h to 29 kcal x kg(-1) x d(-1) (based on adjusted body weight). The patient then developed acute respiratory distress requiring intubation and ventilatory support. Serum phosphorus (P) level was extremely low at 4 d to adequately correct the electrolyte derangements. Successful liberation from mechanical ventilation was then possible. In chronically malnourished patients undergoing nutritional support, even hypocaloric feeding should be considered a risk factor for developing refeeding syndrome leading to severe and acute electrolyte fluid-balance and metabolic abnormalities.

  2. Illness behaviour and antibiotic prescription in patients with respiratory tract symptoms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijn, H.J. van; Kuyvenhoven, M.M.; Schellevis, F.G.; Verheij, T.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although the vast majority of respiratory tract symptoms are self-limiting, many patients visit their GP for these symptoms and antibiotics are over-prescribed. AIM: To explore determinants of patients visiting GPs for recent cough, sore throat, or earache; for being prescribed antibioti

  3. Physiological Correlation of Airway Pressure and Transpulmonary Pressure Stress Index on Respiratory Mechanics in Acute Respiratory Failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Pan; Lu Chen; Yun-Hang Zhang; Wei Liu; Rosario Urbino; V Marco Ranieri; Hai-Bo Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Background:Stress index at post-recruitment maneuvers could be a method of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) titration in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patients.However,airway pressure (Paw) stress index may not reflect lung mechanics in the patients with high chest wall elastance.This study was to evaluate the Paw stress index on lung mechanics and the correlation between Paw stress index and transpulmonary pressure (PL) stress index in acute respiratory failure (ARF) patients.Methods:Twenty-four ARF patients with mechanical ventilation (MV) were consecutively recruited from July 2011 to April 2013 in Zhongda Hospital,Nanjing,China and Ospedale S.Giovanni Battista-Molinette Hospital,Turin,Italy.All patients underwent MV with volume control (tidal volume 6 ml/kg) for 20 min.PEEP was set according to the ARDSnet study protocol.The patients were divided into two groups according to the chest wall elastance/respiratory system elastance ratio.The high elastance group (H group,n =14) had a ratio ≥30%,and the low elastance group (L group,n =10) had a ratio <30%.Respiratory elastance,gas-exchange,Paw stress index,and PL stress index were measured.Student's t-test,regression analysis,and Bland-Altman analysis were used for statistical analysis.Results:Pneumonia was the major cause of respiratory failure (71.0%).Compared with the L group,PEEP was lower in the H group (5.7 ± 1.7 cmH2O vs.9.0 ± 2.3 cm2O,P < 0.01).Compared with the H group,lung elastance was higher (20.0 ± 7.8 cmH2O/L vs.11.6 ± 3.6 cmH2O/L,P < 0.01),and stress was higher in the L group (7.0 ± 1.9 vs.4.9 ± 1.9,P =0.02).A linear relationship was observed between the Paw stress index and the PL stress index in H group (R2 =0.56,P < 0.01) and L group (R2 =0.85,P < 0.01).Conclusion:In the ARF patients with MV,Paw stress index can substitute for PL to guide ventilator settings.

  4. Inappropriate prescribing in an acutely ill population of elderly patients as determined by Beers' Criteria.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, Paul F

    2012-02-03

    INTRODUCTION: Adverse drug events (ADEs) are associated with inappropriate prescribing (IP) and result in increased morbidity, mortality and resource utilisation. We used Beers\\' Criteria to determine the three-month prevalence of IP in a non-selected community-dwelling population of acutely ill older people requiring hospitalisation. METHODS: A prospective, observational study of 597 consecutive acute admissions was performed. Diagnoses and concurrent medications were recorded before hospital physician intervention, and Beers\\' Criteria applied. RESULTS: Mean patient age (SD) was 77 (7) years. Median number of medications was 5, range 0-13. IP occurred in 32% of patients (n = 191), with 24%, 6% and 2% taking 1, 2 and 3 inappropriate medications respectively. Patients taking >5 medications were 3.3 times more likely to receive an inappropriate medication than those taking < or =5 medications (OR 3.34: 95%, CI 2.37-4.79; P<0.001). Forty-nine per cent of patients with inappropriate prescriptions were admitted with adverse effects of the inappropriate medications. Sixteen per cent of all admissions were associated with such adverse effects. CONCLUSION: IP is highly prevalent in acutely ill older patients and is associated with polypharmacy and hospitalisation. However, Beers\\' Criteria cannot be used as a gold standard as they do not comprehensively address all aspects of IP in older people.

  5. REVIEW OF CLINICAL CASES OF DRUG ALLERGIC REACTIONS IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE RESPIRATORY VIRAL INFECTIONS

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    Sydorchuk A.S.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Problem of drug-induced allergic reaction is especially actual both in well-developing countries as well as in countries of Eastern European region. By the WHO data, distribution of allergy is up to 30 %, and main reasons for that are increasing of pharmaceuticals consumption by a person, change of nutrition style towards more chemicals synthetic substitutions. Generally, a quantity of Europeans with allergy reach 150 mln. Reactions of hypersensitivity to medications is so serious discussion question among physicians and their patients, since it is the most important reason to stop treatment and for refuse remedies. Authors hope, that presenting here clinical material will bring benefit both clinicians and patients like cases of drug-induced allergic reactions due to self-prescribed treatment (antipyretics, antibiotics. Thus, this research paper aimed to analyze the clinical cases of drug-induced allergy in patients with acute respiratory illnesses, which had admitted to Infectious diseases department of Municipal Clinical Hospital of Chernivtsi city (Ukraine. Materials & Methods. Descriptional clinical study enrolled six clinical cases of drug-induced allergy in male patients admitted in different time to the Infectious Diseases Department of Municipal Clinical Hospital of Chernivtsi city (Ukraine with clinical manifestation and epidemiological data of acute respiratory viral infections. Mostly cases of drug-induced allergy confirmed by the indirect immune-termomistry for determination of role of a drug. Results & discussion. First case in male 52 years old patient with signs of polymorphic exudative erythema induced by pills against common cold named «Coldflu». Patient had manifestation clinical features of acute respiratory viral infection and was hospitalized to the Department of Droplet infections for detoxicative and desensitization treatment. Within few days his infectious problem had solved, nevertheless skin rash still

  6. [Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalická, Hana; Bělohlávek, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema is a clinical syndrome manifested by rapidly progressive respiratory distress leading, without therapy, to severe respiratory insufficiency and subsequent multiorgan failure. The pathophysiological causes are: the change in the pressure gradients in the pulmonary capillaries, the impaired membrane permeability of the alveolocapillary in the lungs, and impaired lymphatic drainage. Unlike in cardiogenic pulmonary edema, cardiac disease is not a cause, and there is no increase in wedge pressure (< 18 mm Hg). The aetiological base is diverse and includes more clinical pathological factors. The diagnosis and evaluation are usually very difficult due to the rapidly deteriorating clinical condition of the patients. A decisive, quick and comprehensive approach, using all available invasive and non-invasive methods is necessary. The basic steps of treatment are: the use of different types of ventilatory support in order to achieve adequate oxygenation, dealing with possible hemodynamic instability, and, when needed, other specific procedures. It is always important to keep in mind that this is a very serious condition with a high mortality rate. And there is a need for fast and efficient access to the best specialized clinic.

  7. [An unusual cause of acute respiratory distress: obstructive bronchial aspergillosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margery, J; Perez, J-P; Vaylet, F; Bordier, E; Dot, J-M; Saint-Blancard, P; Bonnichon, A; Guigay, J; Pats, B; L'Her, P

    2004-06-01

    We report the case of a 77-Year-old immunocompetent woman who required intensive care for acute dyspnea revealing complete atelectasia of the left lung related to an aspergillus mycelium plug blocking the principal bronchus. The clinical course was favorable after deobstruction by thermocoagulation and oral itraconazole given for six Months. The patient was free of parenchymatous or endobronchial sequelae. Adjuvant oral corticoid therapy was given temporarily during the second Month of treatment when signs of transition towards allergic aspergillosis developed. Four Months after discontinuing the antifungal treatment, the patient developed a new episode of acute dyspnea caused by atelectasia limited to the right lower lobe. Treatment by itraconazole was resumed and continued as long-term therapy. No recurrence has been observed for eighteen Months. The diagnostic and therapeutic problems raised by Aspergillus fumigatus are well known in the immunocompromised subject, but can also be encountered in the immunocompetent subject.

  8. [Preliminary analysis on respiratory syncytial virus identified in children with acute respiratory infections in Tibet Autonomous Region, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jie; Zhu, Ru-Nan; Qian, Yuan; Sun, Yu; Zhao, Lin-Qing; Wang, Fang; Wu, Hong; Shan, Min-Na; Deji, Mei-Duo

    2012-03-01

    To understand the role of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in children with acute respiratory infections (ARI) in Tibet Autonomous Region and the contribution of two major groups of RSV, nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPA) were collected from hospitalized children with ARI in Department of Pediatrics, Tibet People's Hospital in Lasa, Tibet from April to July in 2011 and tested for seven common respiratory viruses and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) by direct immunofluorescence assay (DFA). Total RNAs were extracted from RSV positive samples by DFA and reverse transcripted to cDNA. Nested-PCR was employed to determine the genogroups of RSV, which were confirmed by real time-PCR and sequence analysis for G protein encoding gene. The Characteristics and variations of G genes from RSV in this project were identified by sequence comparison with those G genes in GenBank. Out of 167 samples, 65 were positive for respiratory viruses with a total positive rate of 38.9%, including 45 (69.2%, 45/65)positive samples for RSV. Among 42 samples that were positive for RSV and genotyped, 40 were identified as group A and 2 as group B. Sequence analysis of full-length G genes for 7 RSV of group A indicated that all of these belonged to subgroup GA2. The nucleotide identities between RSVs from Tibet and prototype A2 strain were 90.7%-91.8%, with 86.5%-87.2% identities of amino acid. The mutations of amino acids were mainly located in both ends of a highly conserved region in the ectodomain of the G proteins. The data indicated that RSV was the most important viral etiologic agent of ARI in spring of 2011 in Tibet and group A of RSV was predominant during the study period. High divergence existed in the ectodomain of G proteins of RSVs from Tibet.

  9. Plasticity of the systemic inflammatory response to acute infection during critical illness: development of the riboleukogram.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E McDunn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diagnosis of acute infection in the critically ill remains a challenge. We hypothesized that circulating leukocyte transcriptional profiles can be used to monitor the host response to and recovery from infection complicating critical illness. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A translational research approach was employed. Fifteen mice underwent intratracheal injections of live P. aeruginosa, P. aeruginosa endotoxin, live S. pneumoniae, or normal saline. At 24 hours after injury, GeneChip microarray analysis of circulating buffy coat RNA identified 219 genes that distinguished between the pulmonary insults and differences in 7-day mortality. Similarly, buffy coat microarray expression profiles were generated from 27 mechanically ventilated patients every two days for up to three weeks. Significant heterogeneity of VAP microarray profiles was observed secondary to patient ethnicity, age, and gender, yet 85 genes were identified with consistent changes in abundance during the seven days bracketing the diagnosis of VAP. Principal components analysis of these 85 genes appeared to differentiate between the responses of subjects who did versus those who did not develop VAP, as defined by a general trajectory (riboleukogram for the onset and resolution of VAP. As patients recovered from critical illness complicated by acute infection, the riboleukograms converged, consistent with an immune attractor. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Here we present the culmination of a mouse pneumonia study, demonstrating for the first time that disease trajectories derived from microarray expression profiles can be used to quantitatively track the clinical course of acute disease and identify a state of immune recovery. These data suggest that the onset of an infection-specific transcriptional program may precede the clinical diagnosis of pneumonia in patients. Moreover, riboleukograms may help explain variance in the host response due to differences in ethnic

  10. Respiratory virus infection as a cause of prolonged symptoms in acute otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arola, M; Ziegler, T; Ruuskanen, O

    1990-05-01

    We studied respiratory viruses in 22 children with acute otitis media who had failed to improve after at least 48 hours of antimicrobial therapy. The mean duration of preenrollment antimicrobial therapy was 4.8 days. For comparison we studied 66 children with newly diagnosed acute otitis media. Respiratory viruses were isolated from middle ear fluid or from the nasopharynx, or both, significantly more often in the patients unresponsive to initial antimicrobial therapy than in the comparison patients (68% vs 41%, p less than 0.05). Viruses were recovered from the middle ear fluid in 32% of the study patients and from 15% of the comparison group. Bacteria were isolated from the middle ear fluid of four (18%) children in the study group; one child had an isolate resistant to initial antimicrobial therapy. All four children with bacteria in the middle ear fluid had evidence of concomitant respiratory virus infection. Our results indicate that respiratory virus infection is often present in patients with acute otitis media unresponsive to initial antimicrobial therapy, and may explain the prolongation of symptoms of infection. Resistant bacteria seem to be a less common cause of failure of the initial treatment.

  11. Burden of Acute Gastrointestinal Illness in Gálvez, Argentina, 2007

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, M Kate; Perez, Enrique; Shannon E Majowicz; Reid-Smith, Richard; Albil, Silvia; Monteverde, Marcos; McEwen, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the magnitude and distribution of acute gastrointestinal illness (GI) in Gálvez, Argentina, and assessed the outcome of a seven-day versus 30-day recall period in survey methodology. A cross-sectional population survey, with either a seven-day or a 30-day retrospective recall period, was conducted through door-to-door visits to randomly-selected residents during the ‘high’ and the ‘low’ seasons of GI in the community. Comparisons were made between the annual incidence rat...

  12. The pragmatics of feeding the pediatric patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verger, Judy T; Bradshaw, Darla J; Henry, Elizabeth; Roberts, Kathryn E

    2004-09-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) represents the ultimate pulmonary response to a wide range of injuries, from septicemia to trauma. Optimal nutrition is vital to enhancing oxygen delivery, supporting adequate cardiac contractility and respiratory musculature, eliminating fluid and electrolyte imbalances, and supporting the proinflammatory response. Research is providing a better understanding of nutrients that specifically address the complex physiologic changes in ARDS. This article highlights the pathophysiology of ARDS as it relates to nutrition, relevant nutritional assessment, and important enteral and parenteral considerations for the pediatric patient who has ARDS.

  13. Acute respiratory failure after endoscopic third ventriculostomy: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essam A Elgamal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV is a relatively safe procedure. However, postoperative acute respiratory failure may be fatal. The authors report an 8-month-old patient with obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to posterior fossa cyst, and Chiari malformation. After ETV he developed difficulty in breathing, and had to be reintubated and ventilated. The infant recovered fully after craniocervical decompression and insertion of cystoperitoneal shunt. We speculate that respiratory failure is related to relative expansion of the posterior fossa arachnoid cyst, causing significant compression on the brain stem. Supportive care with mechanical ventilation and brain stem decompression were the mainstay of treatment.

  14. Long-term survival for COPD patients receiving noninvasive ventilation for acute respiratory failure

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    Titlestad IL

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Ingrid L Titlestad,1 Annmarie T Lassen,2 Jørgen Vestbo1,3 1Department of Respiratory Medicine, 2Department of Emergency Medicine, Odense University Hospital, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; 3Respiratory Research Group, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, University Hospital South Manchester NHS Foundation Trust, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK Abstract: Implementation of noninvasive ventilation (NIV as an add-on treatment has been routinely used in a non-intensive care setting since 2004 for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and acute hypercapnic respiratory failure at a university hospital in Denmark. Although randomized controlled trials show lowered mortality rates in highly selected patients with acute exacerbation and respiratory failure, there are only few reports on long-term survival after receiving NIV. We present long-term all-cause mortality data from patients receiving NIV for the first time. Method: Data from medical records were retrospectively retrieved from all patients receiving NIV for the first time after being admitted acutely to an acute medical ward and further transfer to a respiratory ward with respiratory failure and a diagnosis of COPD in the period January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2007; patients were followed until January 2012. Demographic data collected included age, sex, diagnoses at discharge, and, when present, FEV1; a “not-to-intubate” order was also registered when listed. Results: In total, 253 patients (143 female, 110 male received NIV for the first time. The median age was 72 years (range 46–91 years. The 30-day mortality rate was 29.3%. The 5-year survival rate was 23.7%. Women showed a trend towards better survival than men (25.7% vs 19.2%, P = 0.25, and the trend was even more pronounced for patients with COPD. Conclusion: The mortality rate of patients receiving NIV is high, as expected in a real-life setting, but with a 5-year survival rate

  15. Acute Respiratory Infections In Underfives : Experience At Comprehensive Rural Health Services Project Hospital. Ballabgarh

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    Reddaiah V.P

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Research Question: What are the symptoms and signs with which under-fives with acute respiratory infections are admitted to a rural hospital? Objectives: i To analyse the symptoms, signs and diagnosis of Acute Respiratory Infections in under-fives. ii To compare the experience with WHO guidelines. Design: Retrospective analysis of under-five patients admitted with ARI. Setting: Comprehensive Rural Health Services Project Hospital, Ballabgarh. Participants; Under-fives admitted with ARI. Outcome: Signs, symptoms, diagnosis of ARI. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive analysis of findings. Results: 73.6% admitted were males, 63.2% were infants. The most commonly complained symptoms at the time of admission were fever (69.6%, Cough (63.2%, breathlessness (61.6% inability to feed (19.2 and diarrhoea (19.2%. 76.0% had crepitations, 26.4% had chest in drawing, 23.2% had ronchi, and 14.4%had respiratory distress. Only 33.3% had respiratory rate more than 60 per minute among children less than 2 months old, 56.9% had respiratory rate more than 50 per minute among children 2-12 month old. 54.3% had respiratory rate more than 40 per minute among 12 months to 5 years of age. 76% had pneumonias. The case fatality rate (CFR was 12.8% and most of the deaths occurred within 24 hours of arrival. The C.F.R was more in females and among young infants. Conclusion: Fever should be included in the lead symptoms of ARI along with cough and breathlessness. There is a need for looking at Respiratory rate for recognition of Pneumonias.

  16. A case of Clostridium difficile infection complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome treated with fecal microbiota transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Eun; Gweon, Tae-Geun; Yeo, Chang Dong; Cho, Young-Seok; Kim, Gi Jun; Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Jong Wook; Kim, Hyunho; Lee, Hye Won; Lim, Taeseok; Ham, Hyoju; Oh, Hyun Jin; Lee, Yeongbok; Byeon, Jaeho; Park, Sung Soo

    2014-09-21

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a life-threatening disorder caused mainly by pneumonia. Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a common nosocomial diarrheal disease. Disruption of normal intestinal flora by antibiotics is the main risk factor for CDI. The use of broad-spectrum antibiotics for serious medical conditions can make it difficult to treat CDI complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome. Fecal microbiota transplantation is a highly effective treatment in patients with refractory CDI. Here we report on a patient with refractory CDI and acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by pneumonia who was treated with fecal microbiota transplantation.

  17. Etiology and Incidence of Viral Acute Respiratory Infections Among Refugees Aged 5 Years and Older in Hagadera Camp, Dadaab, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Gedi A; Ahmed, Jamal A; Marano, Nina; Mohamed, Abdinoor; Moturi, Edna; Burton, Wagacha; Otieno, Samora; Fields, Barry; Montgomery, Joel; Kabugi, Willy; Musa, Hashim; Cookson, Susan T

    2015-12-01

    We used the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-Kenya Medical Research Institute Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI) Surveillance System data to estimate severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) hospitalization rates, viral etiology, and associated complaints of influenza-like illnesses (ILI) and SARI conditions among those aged 5 years and older in Hagadera, Dadaab refugee camp, Kenya, for 2010-2012. A total of 471 patients aged ≥ 5 years met the case definition for ILI or SARI. SARI hospitalization rates per 10,000 person-years were 14.7 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 9.1, 22.2) for those aged 5-14 years; 3.4 (95% CI = 1.6, 7.2) for those aged 15-24 year; and 3.8 (95% CI = 1.6, 7.2) for those aged ≥ 25 years. Persons between the ages of 5 and 14 years had 3.5 greater odds to have been hospitalized as a result of SARI than those aged ≥ 25 years (odds ratio [OR] = 3.5, P < 0.001). Among the 419 samples tested, 169 (40.3%) were positive for one or more virus. Of those samples having viruses, 36.9% had influenza A; 29.9% had adenovirus; 20.2% had influenza B; and 14.4% had parainfluenza 1, 2, or 3. Muscle/joint pain was associated with influenza A (P = 0.002), whereas headache was associated with influenza B (P = 0.019). ARIs were responsible for a substantial disease burden in Hagadera camp.

  18. Acute respiratory and cardiovascular admissions after a public smoking ban in Geneva, Switzerland.

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    Jean-Paul Humair

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many countries have introduced legislations for public smoking bans to reduce the harmful effects of exposure to tobacco smoke. Smoking bans cause significant reductions in admissions for acute coronary syndromes but their impact on respiratory diseases is unclear. In Geneva, Switzerland, two popular votes led to a stepwise implementation of a state smoking ban in public places, with a temporary suspension. This study evaluated the effect of this smoking ban on hospitalisations for acute respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. METHODS: This before and after intervention study was conducted at the University Hospitals of Geneva, Switzerland, across 4 periods with different smoking legislations. It included 5,345 patients with a first hospitalisation for acute coronary syndrome, ischemic stroke, acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pneumonia and acute asthma. The main outcomes were the incidence rate ratios (IRR of admissions for each diagnosis after the final ban compared to the pre-ban period and adjusted for age, gender, season, influenza epidemic and secular trend. RESULTS: Hospitalisations for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease significantly decreased over the 4 periods and were lowest after the final ban (IRR=0.54 [95%CI: 0.42-0.68]. We observed a trend in reduced admissions for acute coronary syndromes (IRR=0.90 [95%CI: 0.80-1.00]. Admissions for ischemic stroke, asthma and pneumonia did not significantly change. CONCLUSIONS: A legislative smoking ban was followed by a strong decrease in hospitalisations for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and a trend for reduced admissions for acute coronary syndrome. Smoking bans are likely to be very beneficial for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  19. Clinical characteristics of acute lower respiratory tract infections due to 13 respiratory viruses detected by multiplex PCR in children

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    Jeong-Sook Lim

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : This study was performed to investigate the epidemiologic and clinical features of 13 respiratory viruses in children with acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRIs. Methods : Nasopharyngeal aspirates were prospectively obtained from 325 children aged 15 years or less from May 2008 to April 2009 and were tested for the presence of 13 respiratory viruses by multiplex real-time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Results : Viruses were identified in 270 children (83.1%. Co-infections with ?#242; viruses were observed in 71 patients (26.3 %. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV was the most common virus detected (33.2%, followed by human rhinovirus (hRV (19.1%, influenza virus (Flu A (16.9%, human metapneumovirus (hMPV (15.4%, parainfluenza viruses (PIVs (8.3%, human bocavirus (hBoV (8.0%, adenovirus (ADV (5.8%, and human coronavirus (hCoV (2.2%. Clinical diagnoses of viral ALRIs were bronchiolitis (37.5%, pneumonia (34.5%, asthma exacerbation (20.9%, and croup (7.1%. Clinical diagnoses of viral bronchiolitis and pneumonia were frequently demonstrated in patients who tested positive for RSV, hRV, hMPV, or Flu A. Flu A and hRV were most commonly identified in children older than 3 years and were the 2 leading causes of asthma exacerbation. hRV C was detected in 14 (4.3% children, who were significantly older than those infected with hRV A (mean±SD, 4.1±3.5 years vs. 1.7±2.3 years; P=0.009. hBoV was usually detected in young children (2.3±3.4 years with bronchiolitis and pneumonia. Conclusion : This study described the features of ALRI associated with 13 respiratory viruses in Korean children. Additional investigations are required to define the roles of newly identified viruses in children with ALRIs.

  20. Acute Uncomplicated Febrile Illness in Children Aged 2-59 months in Zanzibar - Aetiologies, Antibiotic Treatment and Outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Elfving

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that a large proportion of children with fever in Africa present at primary health care facilities, few studies have been designed to specifically study the causes of uncomplicated childhood febrile illness at this level of care, especially in areas like Zanzibar that has recently undergone a dramatic change from high to low malaria transmission.We prospectively studied the aetiology of febrile illness in 677 children aged 2-59 months with acute uncomplicated fever managed by IMCI (Integrated Management of Childhood Illness guidelines in Zanzibar, using point-of-care tests, urine culture, blood-PCR, chest X-ray (CXR of IMCI-pneumonia classified patients, and multiple quantitative (qPCR investigations of nasopharyngeal (NPH (all patients and rectal (GE swabs (diarrhoea patients. For comparison, we also performed NPH and GE qPCR analyses in 167 healthy community controls. Final fever diagnoses were retrospectively established based on all clinical and laboratory data. Clinical outcome was assessed during a 14-day follow-up. The utility of IMCI for identifying infections presumed to require antibiotics was evaluated.NPH-qPCR and GE-qPCR detected ≥1 pathogen in 657/672 (98% and 153/164 (93% of patients and 158/166 (95% and 144/165 (87% of controls, respectively. Overall, 57% (387/677 had IMCI-pneumonia, but only 12% (42/342 had CXR-confirmed pneumonia. Two patients were positive for Plasmodium falciparum. Respiratory syncytial virus (24.5%, influenza A/B (22.3%, rhinovirus (10.5% and group-A streptococci (6.4%, CXR-confirmed pneumonia (6.2%, Shigella (4.3% were the most common viral and bacterial fever diagnoses, respectively. Blood-PCR conducted in a sub-group of patients (n = 83 without defined fever diagnosis was negative for rickettsiae, chikungunya, dengue, Rift Valley fever and West Nile viruses. Antibiotics were prescribed to 500 (74% patients, but only 152 (22% had an infection retrospectively considered to require

  1. Acute Uncomplicated Febrile Illness in Children Aged 2-59 months in Zanzibar – Aetiologies, Antibiotic Treatment and Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfving, Kristina; Shakely, Deler; Andersson, Maria; Baltzell, Kimberly; Ali, Abdullah S.; Bachelard, Marc; Falk, Kerstin I.; Ljung, Annika; Msellem, Mwinyi I.; Omar, Rahila S.; Parola, Philippe; Xu, Weiping; Petzold, Max; Trollfors, Birger; Björkman, Anders; Lindh, Magnus; Mårtensson, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the fact that a large proportion of children with fever in Africa present at primary health care facilities, few studies have been designed to specifically study the causes of uncomplicated childhood febrile illness at this level of care, especially in areas like Zanzibar that has recently undergone a dramatic change from high to low malaria transmission. Methods We prospectively studied the aetiology of febrile illness in 677 children aged 2–59 months with acute uncomplicated fever managed by IMCI (Integrated Management of Childhood Illness) guidelines in Zanzibar, using point-of-care tests, urine culture, blood-PCR, chest X-ray (CXR) of IMCI-pneumonia classified patients, and multiple quantitative (q)PCR investigations of nasopharyngeal (NPH) (all patients) and rectal (GE) swabs (diarrhoea patients). For comparison, we also performed NPH and GE qPCR analyses in 167 healthy community controls. Final fever diagnoses were retrospectively established based on all clinical and laboratory data. Clinical outcome was assessed during a 14-day follow-up. The utility of IMCI for identifying infections presumed to require antibiotics was evaluated. Findings NPH-qPCR and GE-qPCR detected ≥1 pathogen in 657/672 (98%) and 153/164 (93%) of patients and 158/166 (95%) and 144/165 (87%) of controls, respectively. Overall, 57% (387/677) had IMCI-pneumonia, but only 12% (42/342) had CXR-confirmed pneumonia. Two patients were positive for Plasmodium falciparum. Respiratory syncytial virus (24.5%), influenza A/B (22.3%), rhinovirus (10.5%) and group-A streptococci (6.4%), CXR-confirmed pneumonia (6.2%), Shigella (4.3%) were the most common viral and bacterial fever diagnoses, respectively. Blood-PCR conducted in a sub-group of patients (n = 83) without defined fever diagnosis was negative for rickettsiae, chikungunya, dengue, Rift Valley fever and West Nile viruses. Antibiotics were prescribed to 500 (74%) patients, but only 152 (22%) had an infection

  2. Noninvasive ventilation for acute respiratory failure: state of the art (I part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Lari

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the last years Non-Invasive Ventilation (NIV has been playing an important role in the treatment of Acute Respiratory Failure (ARF. A lot of trials have shown improvements in clinical features (respiratory rate, neurological score, pH and arterial blood gases. Methods: In particular clinical conditions, such as Acute Cardiogenic Pulmonary Edema (ACPE and acute exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD, systematic reviews and meta-analysis show a reduction in the need for intubation and in-hospital mortality compared to standard medical treatment. In other clinical conditions, such as acute asthma, Acute Lung Injury (ALI/Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS and severe pneumonia, NIV does not show significant improvements in term of avoided intubations or mortality rate. Although the first important data on NIV comes from studies performed in Intensive Care Units (ICUs, subsequently these methodologies of ventilation have been used with increasing frequency in Emergency Departments (ED and medical wards. Results: Studies developed in ICU sometimes report slightly worse outcomes compared to studies performed in general wards due to the need to treat more severe patients in ICU. Aetiology remains one of the most important factor determining prognosis: different pathological mechanisms substain different clinical conditions and not in all cases the application of positive pressures to the airways is useful. NIV for ARF due to COPD and ACPE is feasible, safe and effective also in a general medical ward if selection of patients, staff training and monitoring are appropriate: its early application improves clinical parameters, arterial blood gases, prevents endotracheal intubation, decreases mortality and hospitalisation. This should encourage the diffusion of NIV in this specific setting.

  3. Detection of excess influenza severity: associating respiratory hospitalization and mortality data with reports of influenza-like illness by primary care physicians.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaard, C. van den; Asten, L. van; Meijer, A.; Pelt, W. van; Nagelkerke, N.J.D.; Donker, G.A.; Sande, M.A.B. van der; Koopmans, D.V.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We explored whether excesses in influenza severity can be detected by combining respiratory syndromic hospital and mortality data with data on influenza-like illness (ILI) cases obtained from general practitioners. METHODS: To identify excesses in the severity of influenza infections in

  4. [Acute respiratory insufficiency due to COPD: invasive mechanical ventilation or not?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, K Merijn; Djamin, Remco S; Belderbos, Huub N A; van den Berg, Bart

    2014-01-01

    The decision to move to a form of mechanical ventilation in patients with acute respiratory failure due to an acute exacerbation of COPD is influenced by expectations about survival and quality of life after discharge from the ICU. Physicians tend to be too pessimistic about the survival outcome of an ICU stay with invasive mechanical ventilation. The forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) is not an adequate prognostic parameter. In order to prevent undertreatment of patients with respiratory failure due to an exacerbation of COPD, knowledge of prognostic parameters and quality of life in these patients is very important. End of life care should be integrated into the standard care of COPD patients.

  5. Noninvasive ventilation for acute respiratory failure: state of the art (II part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Lari

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the last years Non-Invasive Ventilation (NIV has been playing an important role in the treatment of Acute Respiratory Failure (ARF. Prospective randomised controlled trials have shown improvements in clinical features (respiratory rate, neurological score, pH and arterial blood gases and in particular clinical conditions (Acute Cardiogenic Pulmonary Edema, ACPE, and acute exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, COPD systematic reviews and metha-analysis confirm a reduction in the need for intubation and in-hospital mortality compared to standard medical treatment. Methods: The most important techniques of ventilation in spontaneous breathing are: Continuous Positive Airway Pression (CPAP, usually performed with Venturi-like flow generators, and bi-level positive pressure ventilation (an high inspiratory pressure and a low expiratory pressure, performed with ventilators. Facial mask rather than nasal mask is used in ARF: the helmet is useful for prolonged treatments. Results: NIV’s success seems to be determined by early application, correct selection of patients and staff training. Controindications to NIV are: cardiac or respiratory arrest, a respiratory rate < 12 per minute, upper airway obstruction, hemodynamic instability or unstable cardiac arrhythmia, encephalopathy (Kelly score > 3, facial surgery trauma or deformity, inability to cooperate or protect the airway, high risk of aspiration and an inability to clear respiratory secretions. Conclusions: Bi-level ventilation for ARF due to COPD and CPAP or bi-level bentilation for ARF due to ACPE are feasible, safe and effective also in a General Medical ward if the selection of patients, the staff’s training and the monitoring are appropriate: they improve clinical parameters, arterial blood gases, prevent ETI, decrease mortality and hospitalisation. This should encourage the diffusion of NIV in this specific setting.

  6. Chest X ray changes in severe acute respiratory syndrome cases after discontinuation of glucocorticosteroids treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚婉贞; 陈亚红; 张立强; 王筱宏; 孙永昌; 孙威; 韩江莉; 张福春; 郑亚安; 孙伯章; 贺蓓; 赵鸣武

    2004-01-01

    @@ Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a disease identified in Asia, North America and Europe. The drugs for treatment and prevention of and vaccine for the disease are in research.1,2 There is still no agreement on glucocorticosteroid treatment of SARS. In treatment of SARS patients with glucocorticosteroids, we found 5 cases whose chest X ray changes were different from what the literature reported.

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of a Novel Human WU Polyomavirus Isolate Associated with Acute Respiratory Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehority, Walter N.; Schwalm, Kurt C.; Young, Jesse M.; Gross, Stephen M.; Schroth, Gary P.; Young, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of a WU polyomavirus (WUPyV) isolate, NM040708, collected from a patient with an acute respiratory infection in New Mexico. The double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genome of NM040708 is 5,229 bp in length and differs from the WUPyV reference with accession no. NC_009539 by 6 nucleotides and 2 amino acids. PMID:27151782

  8. Cynomolgus Macaque as an Animal Model for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    125– 128. 49. Wong KC, Leung KS, Hui M (2003) Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in a geriatric patient with a hip fracture. A case report. J...developed neutralizing antibodies. Chest radiographs from several animals in groups I and II revealed unifocal or multifocal pneumonia that peaked...Groups I and II revealed unifocal or multifocal pneumonia that peaked between days 8 -10 postinfection. Clinical laboratory tests were not

  9. Respiratory failure induced by acute organophosphate poisoning in rats: effects of vagotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspari, Romolo J; Paydarfar, David

    2009-03-01

    Acute organophosphate (OP) poisoning causes respiratory failure through two mechanisms: central apnea and pulmonary dysfunction. The vagus nerve is involved in both the central control of respiratory rhythm as well as the control of pulmonary vasculature, airways and secretions. We used a rat model of acute OP poisoning with and without a surgical vagotomy to explore the role of the vagus in OP-induced respiratory failure. Dichlorvos (2,2-dichlorovinyl dimethyl phosphate) injection (100mg/kg subcutaneously, 3 x LD50) resulted in progressive hypoventilation and apnea in all animals, irrespective of whether or not the vagi were intact. However, vagotomized animals exhibited a more rapidly progressive decline in ventilation and oxygenation. Artificial mechanical ventilation initiated at onset of apnea resulted in improvement in oxygenation and arterial pressure in poisoned animals with no difference between vagus intact or vagotomized animals. Our observations suggest that vagal mechanisms have a beneficial effect during the poisoning process. We speculate that vagally mediated feedback signals from the lung to the brainstem serve as a modest protective mechanism against central respiratory depressive effects of the poison and that bulbar-generated efferent vagal signals do not cause sufficient pulmonary dysfunction to impair pulmonary gas exchange.

  10. Association between the concentration of fine particles in the atmosphere and acute respiratory diseases in children

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    Antônio Paula Nascimento

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To analyze the association between fine particulate matter concentration in the atmosphere and hospital care by acute respiratory diseases in children. METHODS Ecological study, carried out in the region of Grande Vitória, Espírito Santo, in the winter (June 21 to September 21, 2013 and summer (December 21, 2013 to March 19, 2014. We assessed data of daily count for outpatient care and hospitalization by respiratory diseases (ICD-10 in children from zero to 12 years in three hospitals in the Region of Grande Vitória. For collecting fine particulate matter, we used portable samplers of particles installed in six locations in the studied region. The Generalized Additive Model with Poisson distribution, fitted for the effects of predictor covariates, was used to evaluate the relationship between respiratory outcomes and concentration of fine particulate matter. RESULTS The increase of 4.2 µg/m3 (interquartile range in the concentration of fine particulate matter increased in 3.8% and 5.6% the risk of medical care or hospitalization, respectively, on the same day and with six-day lag from the exposure. CONCLUSIONS We identified positive association between outpatient care and hospitalizations of children under 12 years due to acute respiratory diseases and the concentration of fine particulate matter in the atmosphere.

  11. Gastrointestinal and respiratory illness in children that do and do not attend child day care centers: a cost-of-illness study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remko Enserink

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gastrointestinal and respiratory diseases are major causes of morbidity for young children, particularly for those children attending child day care centers (DCCs. Although both diseases are presumed to cause considerable societal costs for care and treatment of illness, the extent of these costs, and the difference of these costs between children that do and do not attend such centers, is largely unknown. OBJECTIVE: Estimate the societal costs for care and treatment of episodes of gastroenteritis (GE and influenza-like illness (ILI experienced by Dutch children that attend a DCC, compared to children that do not attend a DCC. METHODS: A web-based monthly survey was conducted among households with children aged 0-48 months from October 2012 to October 2013. Households filled-in a questionnaire on the incidence of GE and ILI episodes experienced by their child during the past 4 weeks, on the costs related to care and treatment of these episodes, and on DCC arrangements. Costs and incidence were adjusted for socioeconomic characteristics including education level, nationality and monthly income of parents, number of children in the household, gender and age of the child and month of survey conduct. RESULTS: Children attending a DCC experienced higher rates of GE (aIRR 1.4 [95%CI: 1.2-1.9] and ILI (aIRR: 1.4 [95%CI: 1.2-1.6] compared to children not attending a DCC. The societal costs for care and treatment of an episode of GE and ILI experienced by a DCC-attending child were estimated at €215.45 [€115.69-€315.02] and €196.32 [€161.58-€232.74] respectively, twice as high as for a non-DCC-attending child. The DCC-attributable economic burden of GE and ILI for the Netherlands was estimated at €25 million and €72 million per year. CONCLUSIONS: Although children attending a DCC experience only slightly higher rates of GE and ILI compared to children not attending a DCC, the costs involved per episode are substantially higher.

  12. The Etiological Structure of Acute Respiratory Diseases in the Years 2009—2013 in Children of Voronezh

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    S. P. Kokoreva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the etiology of acute respiratory infections was carried out in 865 children hospitalized to a hospital infection in the ears 2009—2013. It was found that respiratory viruses dominated in the etiological structure of acute respiratory infections of children, with a leading position in the number of revised survey diagnoses in different years of observation occupied influenza, but in recent years there is a growth trend of respiratory syncytial virus infection. The most pronounced seasonality of hospitalized children to help in the verification of the diagnosis, there was just the influenza, and mycoplasma infection. Children of preschool and school age with influenza and micoplasma infections are hospitalized more often, while for respiratory diseases other etiology, especially with respiratory syncytial virus infection children up to 3 years are hospitalized.

  13. Ascent schedules, acute altitude illness, and altitude acclimatization: Observations on the Yushu Earthquake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Tianyi; Hou Shike; Li Shuzhi; Li Wenxiang; Gen Deng

    2013-01-01

    During the Yushu Earthquake on April 14,2010,a large number of rescuers from sea level or lowlands ascended to the quake areas very rapidly or rapidly less than 24 h.However,Yushu Earthquake is the highest quake in the world at altitudes between 3750 m and 4878 m where is a serious hypoxic environment.A high incidence of acute altitude illness was found in the unacclimatized rescuers; the mountain rescue operation changed as "rescue the rescuers".Lesson from the Yushu Earthquake is that the occurrence of acute altitude illness may be closely related to the ascent schedules.This prompted us to study the relationship between ascent rate and the incidence and severity of acute altitude illness; five different groups were compared.The first group was 42 sea level male young soldiers who ascended to quake area very rapidly within 8 h at 4000 m; the second group was 48 sea level male young soldiers who ascended to 4000 m rapidly less than 18 h; the third group was 66 acclimatized medical workers from 2261 m who ascended to 4000 m rapidly within 12 h; the fourth group was 56 Tibetan medical workers from 2800 m who ascended to 4000 m rapidly within 8 h; the fifth group was 50 male sea level workers who ascended to 4000 m gradually over a period of 4 d.The results showed that the sea level rescuers ascended to 4000 m very rapidly or rapidly had the highest incidence of acute mountain sickness (AMS) with the greatest AMS scores and the lowest arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) ; the sea level workers ascended to 4000 m gradually had moderate incidence of AMS with moderate AMS scores and SaO2 values; whereas the acclimatized and adapted rescuers had the lowest incidence of AMS,lowest AMS scores and higher SaO2; especially none AMS occurred in Tibetan rescuers.AMS score is inversely related to the ascent rate (r=-0.24,p<0.001).Additionally,acute altitude illness is significantly influenced by altitude acclimatization.The ascent rate is inversely related to

  14. Using pRIFLE criteria for acute kidney injury in critically ill children

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    Rina Amalia C. Saragih

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI in critically ill children and its mortality rate is high. The lack of a uniform definition for AKI leads to failure in determining kidney injury, delayed treatment, and the inability to generalize research results. Objectives To evaluate the pediatric RIFLE (pRIFLE criteria (risk for renal dysfunction, injury to the kidney, failure of kidney function, loss of kidney function, and end-stage renal disease for diagnosing and following the clinical course of AKI in critically ill children. We also aimed to compare AKI severity on days 1 and 3 of pediatric intensive care unit (PICUu stay in critically ill pediatric patients. Methods This prospective cohort study was performed in PICU patients. Urine output (UOP, serum creatinine (SCr, and glomerular filtration rate on days 1 and 3 of PICU stay were recorded. Classification of AKI was determined according to pRIFLE criteria. We also recorded subjects’ immune status, pediatric logistic organ dysfunction (PELOD score, admission diagnosis, the use of vasoactive medications, diuretics, and ventilators, as well as PICU length of stay and mortality. Results Forty patients were enrolled in this study. AKI was found in 13 patients (33%. A comparison of AKI severity on day 1 and day 3 revealed no statistically significant differences for attainment of pRIFLE criteria by urine output only (pRIFLE UOP; P=0.087 and by both UOP and SCr (pRIFLECr+UOP; P=0.577. However, attainment of pRIFLE criteria by SCr only (pRIFLECr was significantly improved between days 1 and 3 (P=0.026. There was no statistically significant difference in mortality or length of stay between subjects with AKI and those without AKI. Conclusion The pRIFLE criteria is feasible for use in diagnosing and following the clinical course of AKI in critically ill children.[Paediatr Indones. 2013;53:32-6.

  15. An integrative review of systematic reviews related to the management of breathlessness in respiratory illnesses

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    Smith Jaclyn

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breathlessness is a debilitating and distressing symptom in a wide variety of diseases and still a difficult symptom to manage. An integrative review of systematic reviews of non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions for breathlessness in non-malignant disease was undertaken to identify the current state of clinical understanding of the management of breathlessness and highlight promising interventions that merit further investigation. Methods Systematic reviews were identified via electronic databases between July 2007 and September 2009. Reviews were included within the study if they reported research on adult participants using either a measure of breathlessness or some other measure of respiratory symptoms. Results In total 219 systematic reviews were identified and 153 included within the final review, of these 59 addressed non-pharmacological interventions and 94 addressed pharmacological interventions. The reviews covered in excess of 2000 trials. The majority of systematic reviews were conducted on interventions for asthma and COPD, and mainly focussed upon a small number of pharmacological interventions such as corticosteroids and bronchodilators, including beta-agonists. In contrast, other conditions involving breathlessness have received little or no attention and studies continue to focus upon pharmacological approaches. Moreover, although there are a number of non-pharmacological studies that have shown some promise, particularly for COPD, their conclusions are limited by a lack of good quality evidence from RCTs, small sample sizes and limited replication. Conclusions More research should focus in the future on the management of breathlessness in respiratory diseases other than asthma and COPD. In addition, pharmacological treatments do not completely manage breathlessness and have an added burden of side effects. It is therefore important to focus more research on promising non

  16. Illness behaviour and antibiotic prescription in patients with respiratory tract symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijn, Huug J; Kuyvenhoven, Marijke M; Schellevis, François G; Verheij, Theo JM

    2007-01-01

    Background Although the vast majority of respiratory tract symptoms are self-limiting, many patients visit their GP for these symptoms and antibiotics are overprescribed. Aim To explore determinants of patients visiting GPs for recent cough, sore throat, or earache; for being prescribed antibiotics; and for patients' satisfaction with visiting the GP. Design of the study Second Dutch National Survey of General Practice (DNSGP-2) with a health interview and an additional questionnaire. Setting A total of 7057 adult patients of 163 GPs in the Netherlands. Method Characteristics of patients and GPs as well as morbidity data were derived from the DNSGP-2 and a health interview. Characteristics of the symptoms, GPs' management and patients' satisfaction were measured by an additional written questionnaire. Data were analysed by means of multivariate logistic regression. Results About 40% of the responders (n = 1083) reported cough, sore throat, or earache in the 2 weeks preceding the interview and, of them, 250 visited their GP. Of this latter group, 97 patients were prescribed antibiotics. Apart from non-medical reasons, relevant medical factors played an important role in deciding to visit the GP. Smokers and patients with cardiac disease or diabetes mellitus were not especially inclined to see their GP. Smoking behaviour, fever, and views on respiratory tract symptoms and antibiotics of patients and GPs were associated with being prescribed antibiotics. Patients' perception of having been carefully examined was associated with their satisfaction, while receiving antibiotics was not. Conclusion GPs should inform patients with clear elevated risk when to visit their GP in cases of cough, sore throat, or earache. There is still a need for GPs and patients to be better informed about the limited significance of single inflammation signs (for example, fever and green phlegm) as an indication for antibiotics. Careful examination of the patient contributes to patient

  17. Modulation of the acute respiratory effects of winter air pollution by serum and dietary antioxidants : a panel study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grievink, L; Hoek, G; Boezen, HM; van't Veer, P; Brunekreef, B

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated whether a high dietary intake or serum concentration of antioxidant (pro-) vitamins could attenuate the acute respiratory effects of air pollution in panels of adults (n=227) aged 50-70 yrs with chronic respiratory symptoms in two winters starting in 1993/1994. Subjects perfo

  18. ACUTE RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS INFECTION IN CHILDREN IN THE AGE ASPECT

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    V. B. Rovny

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical features of laboratory-confirmed acute respiratory syncytial virus infection (ARSVI are described in 221 children of the age from 1 month to 5 years. Febrile fever has been recorded in 76% of patients with ARSVI, and significantly more often in children in the second year of life (92%, but the difference in the temerature or duration has not been found. 98% of children have had symptoms of the lower respiratory tract lesions. The most common ARSVI manifestations in the patients of the first year of life were obstructive diseases of the lower respiratory tract (obstructive bronchitis in 53% and bronchiolitis in 11% of children, in the patients of the second year of life — pneumonia (28%, p < 0,05 and catarrhal otitis (26%; p < 0,05. Bronchial obstruction syndrome in children of the first year of life was characterized by the significantly higher frequency (73% and the maximal duration (9,7 ± 1,08 days. The largest number of cases of the severe respiratory failure has been recorded among patients of the second year of life (3 degree of respiratory failure in 22% of patients, p < 0,05.

  19. The impact of haze on the adolescent's acute respiratory disease:A single institution study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan Fairos Wan Yaacob; Nor Suhana Mohamad Noor; Nor Ili Che A Bakar; Nurulhuda Afisah Mat Zin; Fahisham Taib

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine the impact of haze in the reduction of peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) reading and identify the risk factors affecting respiratory function due to haze. Methods: This study was conducted during haze period among secondary school stu-dents in Kota Bharu. We analyzed data on a total of 126 secondary school children measuring the respiratory health and symptoms in October 2015 using standardized questionnaire and PEFR measurement. Clinical characteristics on the risk factor and prevalence of haze effect were explored. Chi-square test and independent sample t-test was used to investigate the relationship between risk factors and haze effect and logistic regression analysis for the odds of having haze effect. Results: The findings revealed a significant reduction in PEFR reading of more than 15%from the expected PEFR values. It was also noted that the children with headache, cough, mucus and sore throat respiratory symptoms had consistently higher rates of respiratory illness of having haze effect compared to those who did not. Conclusions: Student with haze effect documented much higher symptoms during haze especially female students. Symptoms such as headache, wheezing and mucus were noted among the normal secondary school children in Kota Bharu.

  20. A comparison of early versus late initiation of renal replacement therapy in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Our aim was to investigate the impact of early versus late initiation of renal replacement therapy (RRT) on clinical outcomes in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). Methods: Systematic review and meta-analysis were used in this study. PUBMED, EMBASE, SCOPUS, Web......-regression controlling for illness severity (Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II)), baseline creatinine and urea did not impact the overall summary estimate for mortality. Of studies reporting secondary outcomes, five studies (out of seven) reported greater renal recovery, seven (out of eight...

  1. Arboviral etiologies of acute febrile illnesses in Western South America, 2000-2007.

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    Brett M Forshey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses are among the most common agents of human febrile illness worldwide and the most important emerging pathogens, causing multiple notable epidemics of human disease over recent decades. Despite the public health relevance, little is know about the geographic distribution, relative impact, and risk factors for arbovirus infection in many regions of the world. Our objectives were to describe the arboviruses associated with acute undifferentiated febrile illness in participating clinics in four countries in South America and to provide detailed epidemiological analysis of arbovirus infection in Iquitos, Peru, where more extensive monitoring was conducted. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: A clinic-based syndromic surveillance system was implemented in 13 locations in Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, and Paraguay. Serum samples and demographic information were collected from febrile participants reporting to local health clinics or hospitals. Acute-phase sera were tested for viral infection by immunofluorescence assay or RT-PCR, while acute- and convalescent-phase sera were tested for pathogen-specific IgM by ELISA. Between May 2000 and December 2007, 20,880 participants were included in the study, with evidence for recent arbovirus infection detected for 6,793 (32.5%. Dengue viruses (Flavivirus were the most common arbovirus infections, totaling 26.0% of febrile episodes, with DENV-3 as the most common serotype. Alphavirus (Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus [VEEV] and Mayaro virus [MAYV] and Orthobunyavirus (Oropouche virus [OROV], Group C viruses, and Guaroa virus infections were both observed in approximately 3% of febrile episodes. In Iquitos, risk factors for VEEV and MAYV infection included being male and reporting to a rural (vs urban clinic. In contrast, OROV infection was similar between sexes and type of clinic. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data provide a better understanding of the geographic range of

  2. Arboviral Etiologies of Acute Febrile Illnesses in Western South America, 2000–2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forshey, Brett M.; Guevara, Carolina; Laguna-Torres, V. Alberto; Cespedes, Manuel; Vargas, Jorge; Gianella, Alberto; Vallejo, Efrain; Madrid, César; Aguayo, Nicolas; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Suarez, Victor; Morales, Ana Maria; Beingolea, Luis; Reyes, Nora; Perez, Juan; Negrete, Monica; Rocha, Claudio; Morrison, Amy C.; Russell, Kevin L.; J. Blair, Patrick; Olson, James G.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) are among the most common agents of human febrile illness worldwide and the most important emerging pathogens, causing multiple notable epidemics of human disease over recent decades. Despite the public health relevance, little is know about the geographic distribution, relative impact, and risk factors for arbovirus infection in many regions of the world. Our objectives were to describe the arboviruses associated with acute undifferentiated febrile illness in participating clinics in four countries in South America and to provide detailed epidemiological analysis of arbovirus infection in Iquitos, Peru, where more extensive monitoring was conducted. Methodology/Findings A clinic-based syndromic surveillance system was implemented in 13 locations in Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, and Paraguay. Serum samples and demographic information were collected from febrile participants reporting to local health clinics or hospitals. Acute-phase sera were tested for viral infection by immunofluorescence assay or RT-PCR, while acute- and convalescent-phase sera were tested for pathogen-specific IgM by ELISA. Between May 2000 and December 2007, 20,880 participants were included in the study, with evidence for recent arbovirus infection detected for 6,793 (32.5%). Dengue viruses (Flavivirus) were the most common arbovirus infections, totaling 26.0% of febrile episodes, with DENV-3 as the most common serotype. Alphavirus (Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus [VEEV] and Mayaro virus [MAYV]) and Orthobunyavirus (Oropouche virus [OROV], Group C viruses, and Guaroa virus) infections were both observed in approximately 3% of febrile episodes. In Iquitos, risk factors for VEEV and MAYV infection included being male and reporting to a rural (vs urban) clinic. In contrast, OROV infection was similar between sexes and type of clinic. Conclusions/Significance Our data provide a better understanding of the geographic range of arboviruses in South

  3. Critical illness neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayan J

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The neuromuscular syndrome of acute limb and respiratory weakness that commonly accompanies patients with multi-organ failure and sepsis constitutes critical illness polyneuropathy. It is a major cause of difficulty in weaning off the patient from the ventilator after respiratory and cardiac causes have been excluded. It is usually an axonal motor-sensory polyneuropathy, and is usually associated with or accompanied with a coma producing septic encephalopathy. The neuropathy is usually not apparent until the patient′s encephalopathy has peaked, and may be noted only when the brain dysfunction is resolving. Patients usually have a protracted hospital course complicated by multi-organ failure and the systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Elevated serum glucose levels and reduced albumin are risk factors for nerve dysfunction, as is prolonged intensive care unit stay. Polyneuropathy may develop after only one week of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome, but the frequency tends to correlate with the duration of the severe illness.

  4. Detection and characterization of Mycoplasma pneumoniae during an outbreak of respiratory illness at a university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Jessica L; Diaz, Maureen H; Petrone, Brianna L; Benitez, Alvaro J; Wolff, Bernard J; Edison, Laura; Tobin-D'Angelo, Melissa; Moore, Ashley; Martyn, Audrey; Dishman, Hope; Drenzek, Cherie L; Turner, Kim; Hicks, Lauri A; Winchell, Jonas M

    2014-03-01

    An outbreak at a university in Georgia was identified after 83 cases of probable pneumonia were reported among students. Respiratory specimens were obtained from 21 students for the outbreak investigation. The TaqMan array card (TAC), a quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based multipathogen detection technology, was used to initially identify Mycoplasma pneumoniae as the causative agent in this outbreak. TAC demonstrated 100% diagnostic specificity and sensitivity compared to those of the multiplex qPCR assay for this agent. All M. pneumoniae specimens (n=12) and isolates (n=10) were found through genetic analysis to be susceptible to macrolide antibiotics. The strain diversity of M. pneumoniae associated with this outbreak setting was identified using a variety of molecular typing procedures, resulting in two P1 genotypes (types 1 [60%] and 2 [40%]) and seven different multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) profiles. Continued molecular typing of this organism, particularly during outbreaks, may enhance the current understanding of the epidemiology of M. pneumoniae and may ultimately lead to a more effective public health response.

  5. Viral Co-Infections in Pediatric Patients Hospitalized with Lower Tract Acute Respiratory Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebey-López, Miriam; Herberg, Jethro; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Gormley, Stuart; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Molecular techniques can often reveal a broader range of pathogens in respiratory infections. We aim to investigate the prevalence and age pattern of viral co-infection in children hospitalized with lower tract acute respiratory infection (LT-ARI), using molecular techniques. Methods A nested polymerase chain reaction approach was used to detect Influenza (A, B), metapneumovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza (1–4), rhinovirus, adenovirus (A—F), bocavirus and coronaviruses (NL63, 229E, OC43) in respiratory samples of children with acute respiratory infection prospectively admitted to any of the GENDRES network hospitals between 2011–2013. The results were corroborated in an independent cohort collected in the UK. Results A total of 204 and 97 nasopharyngeal samples were collected in the GENDRES and UK cohorts, respectively. In both cohorts, RSV was the most frequent pathogen (52.9% and 36.1% of the cohorts, respectively). Co-infection with multiple viruses was found in 92 samples (45.1%) and 29 samples (29.9%), respectively; this was most frequent in the 12–24 months age group. The most frequently observed co-infection patterns were RSV—Rhinovirus (23 patients, 11.3%, GENDRES cohort) and RSV—bocavirus / bocavirus—influenza (5 patients, 5.2%, UK cohort). Conclusion The presence of more than one virus in pediatric patients admitted to hospital with LT-ARI is very frequent and seems to peak at 12–24 months of age. The clinical significance of these findings is unclear but should warrant further analysis. PMID:26332375

  6. Focused Sonographic Examination of the Heart, Lungs and Deep Veins in Acute Admitted Patients with Respiratory Symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Christian Borbjerg; Sloth, Erik; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg;

    2012-01-01

    of the clinical examination. In addition, most of the diseases, which are commonly seen in patients with acute respiratory symptoms, can be diagnosed using sonography. Sonography could be integrated as a part of the primary evaluation, potentially improving the diagnostic performance. We therefore evaluated...... the use of sonographic examination of the heart, lungs and deep veins, performed within one hour of the primary evaluation, in acute admitted patients with respiratory symptoms. Methods: We performed a prospective cross sectional blinded observational study, conducted in a medical emergency department....... Patients were included if one or more of the following symptoms or clinical findings were present: respiratory rate > 20, saturation heart, lungs and deep veins...

  7. Vasculotoxic snake bite presenting with sepsis, acute renal failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and acute respiratory distress syndrome

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    Vikram Bhausaheb Vikhe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vasculotoxic snake bites are well known to cause local complications like necrosis and cellulitis and systemic complications such as coagulopathy, acute renal failure (ARF, and hemolysis. We report a case of young female patient who was bitten by a viper. She developed cellulitis, sepsis, ARF, and Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation. She was treated for the above complications and all her renal and hematological parameters returned to normal on seventh day. After this, on the same day, patient developed Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome probably due to the direct toxic effect of venom on pulmonary vascular endothelium which has been reported as a late complication of snake venom. With close monitoring and proper management of complications, the patient recovered and walked out of the hospital on the twenty first day without any complications.

  8. A clinical diagnostic model for predicting influenza among young adult military personnel with febrile respiratory illness in Singapore.

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    Vernon J Lee

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Influenza infections present with wide-ranging clinical features. We aim to compare the differences in presentation between influenza and non-influenza cases among those with febrile respiratory illness (FRI to determine predictors of influenza infection. METHODS: Personnel with FRI (defined as fever ≥ 37.5 °C, with cough or sore throat were recruited from the sentinel surveillance system in the Singapore military. Nasal washes were collected, and tested using the Resplex II and additional PCR assays for etiological determination. Interviewer-administered questionnaires collected information on patient demographics and clinical features. Univariate comparison of the various parameters was conducted, with statistically significant parameters entered into a multivariate logistic regression model. The final multivariate model for influenza versus non-influenza cases was used to build a predictive probability clinical diagnostic model. RESULTS: 821 out of 2858 subjects recruited from 11 May 2009 to 25 Jun 2010 had influenza, of which 434 (52.9% had 2009 influenza A (H1N1, 58 (7.1% seasonal influenza A (H3N2 and 269 (32.8% influenza B. Influenza-positive cases were significantly more likely to present with running nose, chills and rigors, ocular symptoms and higher temperature, and less likely with sore throat, photophobia, injected pharynx, and nausea/vomiting. Our clinical diagnostic model had a sensitivity of 65% (95% CI: 58%, 72%, specificity of 69% (95% CI: 62%, 75%, and overall accuracy of 68% (95% CI: 64%, 71%, performing significantly better than conventional influenza-like illness (ILI criteria. CONCLUSIONS: Use of a clinical diagnostic model may help predict influenza better than the conventional ILI definition among young adults with FRI.

  9. Assessment of acutely mentally ill patients' satisfaction of care: there is a difference among ethnic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Robert L; Olson, Tom; Bader, Julia

    2007-03-01

    The relationship between quality of care and patient satisfaction has been documented. The specific research aim related to this study is to determine if differences exist among Caucasians, Asians, and Pacific Islanders who are hospitalized for an acute mental illness with regard to their perceived satisfaction with the care. The results of the overall study have been reported elsewhere. The sample was composed of 138 patients, of whom 34.7% were Caucasian, 31.2% Pacific Islanders, and 34.8% Asians. Within 24 hours of discharge, patients completed the Perceptions of Care instrument. Caucasians were over-represented in our sample in comparison to their percentage in the general population of Hawaii. These patients were significantly more satisfied (p = .04) with their care than the other ethnic groups. No single variable was found to specifically indicate why they were more satisfied than Pacific Islanders and Asians.

  10. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease masquerading as acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis-like illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gun-Ha; Kim, Kyoung Min; Suh, Sang-Il; Ki, Chang-Seok; Eun, Baik-Lin

    2014-07-01

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX1) is a clinically heterogeneous hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with X-linked transmission. Common clinical manifestations of CMTX1 disease, as in other forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, are distal muscle wasting and weakness, hyporeflexia, distal sensory disturbance, and foot deformities. Mutations in the connexin-32 gene (gap junction protein β1 [GJB1]) are responsible for CMTX1 disease. In this report, we describe a patient with CMTX1 disease presenting with recurrent attacks of transient and episodic acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis (ADEM)-like symptoms without previous signs of lower extremity weakness or foot deformities; the patient, as well as his asymptomatic mother, exhibited a novel GJB1 mutation (p.Met1Ile). Differential diagnosis of recurrent and transient ADEM-like illness, if unexplained, should include the possibility of CMTX1 disease.

  11. Clinical evaluation of sivelestat for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome following surgery for abdominal sepsis

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    Tsuboko Y

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Yoshiaki Tsuboko,1 Shinhiro Takeda,1,2 Seiji Mii,1 Keiko Nakazato,1 Keiji Tanaka,2 Eiji Uchida,3 Atsuhiro Sakamoto11Department of Anesthesiology, Nippon Medical School, 2Intensive Care Unit and Cardiac Care Unit, Nippon Medical School Hospital, 3Department of Surgery, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, JapanBackground: The efficacy of sivelestat in the treatment of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS has not been established. In part, this is due to the wide variety of factors involved in the etiology of ALI/ARDS. In this study, we examined the efficacy of sivelestat in patients with ALI/ARDS associated with abdominal sepsis.Methods: The subjects were 49 patients with ALI/ARDS after surgery for abdominal sepsis. The efficacy of sivelestat was retrospectively assessed in two treatment groups, ie, a sivelestat group (n = 34 and a non-sivelestat group (n = 15.Results: The sivelestat group showed significant improvements in oxygenation, thrombocytopenia, and multiple organ dysfunction score. The number of ventilator days (6.6 ± 6.1 versus 11.1 ± 8.4 days; P = 0.034 and length of stay in the intensive care unit (8.5 ± 6.2 versus 13.3 ± 9.5 days; P = 0.036 were significantly lower in the sivelestat group. The hospital mortality rate decreased by half in the sivelestat group, but was not significantly different between the two groups.Conclusion: Administration of sivelestat to patients with ALI/ARDS following surgery for abdominal sepsis resulted in early improvements of oxygenation and multiple organ dysfunction score, early ventilator weaning, and early discharge from the intensive care unit.Keywords: sivelestat, acute lung injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, abdominal sepsis

  12. Clinical Evaluation of a Single-Tube Multiple RT-PCR Assay for the Detection of 13 Common Virus Types/Subtypes Associated with Acute Respiratory Infection.

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    Dan Zhang

    Full Text Available Respiratory viruses are among the most important causes of human morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially for infants and young children. In the past years, a few commercial multiplex RT-PCR assays have been used to detect respiratory viruses in spite of the high cost. In the present study, an improved single-tube multiplex reverse transcription PCR assay for simultaneous detection of 13 respiratory viruses was evaluated and compared with a previously reported two-tube assay as the reference method using clinical nasopharyngeal aspirates samples. Of 310 prospectively tested respiratory specimens selected from children hospitalized with acute respiratory illness, 226 (72.90%, 226/310 and 214 (69.03%, 214/310 positive for one or more viruses were identified by the single-tube and the two-tube assays, respectively, with combined test results showing good concordance (Kappa value = 0.874. Individually, the single-tube assay for adenovirus (Adv, human metapneumovirus (HMPV, human rhinovirus (HRV, parainfluenza virus type 1 (PIV1, parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3 and parainfluenza virus type 4 (PIV4 showed the significantly superior sensitivities to those of the two-tube assay. No false positives were found. In conclusion, our results demonstrates the one-tube assay revealed significant improvements over the two-tube assay in terms of the better sensitivity, more accurate quality control, less nonspecific amplification, more cost-effective and shorter turn-around time and will be a valuable tool for routine surveillance of respiratory virus infection in China.

  13. A pilot study of qigong practice and upper respiratory illness in elite swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Peggy A; Innes, Kim E; Alton, John; Bovbjerg, Viktor E; Owens, Justine E

    2011-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract infections (URIs) are a common complaint in competitive swimmers and can adversely affect performance. No intervention has yet been shown to reduce URI incidence in intensively trained athletes. The University of Virginia varsity swim team received three weeks of training in qigong for the purpose of reducing stress and improving health. Our primary objective was to assess the relationship between qigong practice and symptoms of URI during a time when swimmers would be at high URI risk. Secondary objectives were to assess degree of compliance with a qigong practice regimen, to evaluate differences between qigong practitioners and non-practitioners, and to determine the response-rate and reliability of a newly developed internet-based, self-report survey. The design was observational, cross-sectional, and prospective. Weekly data on cold and flu symptoms, concurrent health problems and medication use, and qigong practice were gathered for seven weeks. Retrospective information on health and qigong training response was also collected. Participants were 27 of the 55 members of the University of Virginia Swim Team in the Virginia Athletic Department. Main outcomes were measures of aggregated cold/flu symptoms and Qigong practice. Survey completion was 100%, with no missing data, and reliability of the instrument was acceptable. Cold and flu symptoms showed a significant non-linear association with frequency of qigong practice (R(2) = 0.33, p qigong at least once per week (R(2) = 0.70, p Qigong practitioners did not differ from non-practitioners in demographic or lifestyle characteristics, medical history, supplement or medication use, or belief in qigong. These preliminary findings suggest that qigong practice may be protective against URIs among elite swimmers who practice at least once per week.

  14. Hydroclimatic variables and acute gastro-intestinal illness in British Columbia, Canada: A time series analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galway, L. P.; Allen, D. M.; Parkes, M. W.; Li, L.; Takaro, T. K.

    2015-02-01

    Using epidemiologic time series analysis, we examine associations between three hydroclimatic variables (temperature, precipitation, and streamflow) and waterborne acute gastro-intestinal illness (AGI) in two communities in the province of British Columbia (BC), Canada. The communities were selected to represent the major hydroclimatic regimes that characterize BC: rainfall-dominated and snowfall dominated. Our results show that the number of monthly cases of AGI increased with increasing temperature, precipitation, and streamflow in the same month in the context of a rainfall-dominated regime, and with increasing streamflow in the previous month in the context of a snowfall-dominated regime. These results suggest that hydroclimatology plays a role in driving the occurrence and variability of AGI in these settings. Further, this study highlights that the nature and magnitude of the effects of hydroclimatic variability on AGI are different in the context of a snowfall-dominated regime versus a rainfall-dominated regimes. We conclude by proposing that the watershed may be an appropriate context for enhancing our understanding of the complex linkages between hydroclimatic variability and waterborne illness in the context of a changing climate.

  15. Checklist for early recognition and treatment of acute illness: International collaboration to improve critical care practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukoja, Marija; Kashyap, Rahul; Gavrilovic, Srdjan; Dong, Yue; Kilickaya, Oguz; Gajic, Ognjen

    2015-02-04

    Processes to ensure world-wide best-practice for critical care delivery are likely to minimize preventable death, disability and costly complications for any healthcare system's sickest patients, but no large-scale efforts have so far been undertaken towards these goals. The advances in medical informatics and human factors engineering have provided possibility for novel and user-friendly clinical decision support tools that can be applied in a complex and busy hospital setting. To facilitate timely and accurate best-practice delivery in critically ill patients international group of intensive care unit (ICU) physicians and researchers developed a simple decision support tool: Checklist for Early Recognition and Treatment of Acute Illness (CERTAIN). The tool has been refined and tested in high fidelity simulated clinical environment and has been shown to improve performance of clinical providers faced with simulated emergencies. The aim of this international educational intervention is to implement CERTAIN into clinical practice in hospital settings with variable resources (included those in low income countries) and evaluate the impact of the tool on the care processes and patient outcomes. To accomplish our aims, CERTAIN will be uniformly available on either mobile or fixed computing devices (as well as a backup paper version) and applied in a standardized manner in the ICUs of diverse hospitals. To ensure the effectiveness of the proposed intervention, access to CERTAIN is coupled with structured training of bedside ICU providers.

  16. A novel swine model of ricin-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahaf Katalan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary exposure to the plant toxin ricin leads to respiratory insufficiency and death. To date, in-depth study of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS following pulmonary exposure to toxins is hampered by the lack of an appropriate animal model. To this end, we established the pig as a large animal model for the comprehensive study of the multifarious clinical manifestations of pulmonary ricinosis. Here, we report for the first time, the monitoring of barometric whole body plethysmography for pulmonary function tests in non-anesthetized ricin-treated pigs. Up to 30 h post-exposure, as a result of progressing hypoxemia and to prevent carbon dioxide retention, animals exhibited a compensatory response of elevation in minute volume, attributed mainly to a large elevation in respiratory rate with minimal response in tidal volume. This response was followed by decompensation, manifested by a decrease in minute volume and severe hypoxemia, refractory to oxygen treatment. Radiological evaluation revealed evidence of early diffuse bilateral pulmonary infiltrates while hemodynamic parameters remained unchanged, excluding cardiac failure as an explanation for respiratory insufficiency. Ricin-intoxicated pigs suffered from increased lung permeability accompanied by cytokine storming. Histological studies revealed lung tissue insults that accumulated over time and led to diffuse alveolar damage. Charting the decline in PaO2/FiO2 ratio in a mechanically ventilated pig confirmed that ricin-induced respiratory damage complies with the accepted diagnostic criteria for ARDS. The establishment of this animal model of pulmonary ricinosis should help in the pursuit of efficient medical countermeasures specifically tailored to deal with the respiratory deficiencies stemming from ricin-induced ARDS.

  17. A novel swine model of ricin-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katalan, Shahaf; Falach, Reut; Rosner, Amir; Goldvaser, Michael; Brosh-Nissimov, Tal; Dvir, Ayana; Mizrachi, Avi; Goren, Orr; Cohen, Barak; Gal, Yoav; Sapoznikov, Anita; Ehrlich, Sharon; Kronman, Chanoch

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pulmonary exposure to the plant toxin ricin leads to respiratory insufficiency and death. To date, in-depth study of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) following pulmonary exposure to toxins is hampered by the lack of an appropriate animal model. To this end, we established the pig as a large animal model for the comprehensive study of the multifarious clinical manifestations of pulmonary ricinosis. Here, we report for the first time, the monitoring of barometric whole body plethysmography for pulmonary function tests in non-anesthetized ricin-treated pigs. Up to 30 h post-exposure, as a result of progressing hypoxemia and to prevent carbon dioxide retention, animals exhibited a compensatory response of elevation in minute volume, attributed mainly to a large elevation in respiratory rate with minimal response in tidal volume. This response was followed by decompensation, manifested by a decrease in minute volume and severe hypoxemia, refractory to oxygen treatment. Radiological evaluation revealed evidence of early diffuse bilateral pulmonary infiltrates while hemodynamic parameters remained unchanged, excluding cardiac failure as an explanation for respiratory insufficiency. Ricin-intoxicated pigs suffered from increased lung permeability accompanied by cytokine storming. Histological studies revealed lung tissue insults that accumulated over time and led to diffuse alveolar damage. Charting the decline in PaO2/FiO2 ratio in a mechanically ventilated pig confirmed that ricin-induced respiratory damage complies with the accepted diagnostic criteria for ARDS. The establishment of this animal model of pulmonary ricinosis should help in the pursuit of efficient medical countermeasures specifically tailored to deal with the respiratory deficiencies stemming from ricin-induced ARDS. PMID:28067630

  18. Viral Infection in Adults with Severe Acute Respiratory Infection in Colombia.

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    Yuly Andrea Remolina

    Full Text Available To identify the viral aetiology in adult patients with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI admitted to sentinel surveillance institutions in Bogotá in 2012.A cross-sectional study was conducted in which microarray molecular techniques for viral identification were used on nasopharyngeal samples of adult patients submitted to the surveillance system, and further descriptions of clinical features and relevant clinical outcomes, such as mortality, need for critical care, use of mechanical ventilation and hospital stay, were obtained.Respiratory infections requiring hospital admission in surveillance centres in Bogotá, Colombia.Ninety-one adult patients with acute respiratory infection (55% were female.Viral identification, intensive care unit admission, hospital stay, and mortality.Viral identification was achieved for 63 patients (69.2%. Comorbidity was frequently identified and mainly involved chronic pulmonary disease or pregnancy. Influenza, Bocavirus and Adenovirus were identified in 30.8%, 28.6% and 18.7% of the cases, respectively. Admission to the intensive care unit occurred in 42.9% of the cases, while mechanical ventilation was required for 36.3%. The average hospital stay was 9.9 days, and mortality was 15.4%. Antibiotics were empirically used in 90.1% of patients.The prevalence of viral aetiology of SARI in this study was high, with adverse clinical outcomes, intensive care requirements and high mortality.

  19. Respiratory dialysis for avoidance of intubation in acute exacerbation of COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Raj Kumar; Schmidt, Werner; Lund, Laura W; Herth, Felix J F

    2013-01-01

    Noninvasive ventilatory support has become the standard of care for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) experiencing exacerbations leading to acute hypercapnic respiratory failure. Despite advances in the use of noninvasive ventilation and the associated improvement in survival, as many as 26% of these patients fail noninvasive support and have a higher subsequent risk of mortality than patients treated initially with invasive mechanical ventilation. We report the use of a novel device to avoid invasive mechanical ventilation in two patients who were experiencing acute hypercapnic respiratory failure because of an exacerbation of COPD and were deteriorating, despite support with noninvasive ventilation. This device provided partial extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal at dialysis-like settings through a single 15.5 Fr venovenous cannula inserted percutaneously through the right femoral vein. The primary results were rapid reduction in arterial carbon dioxide and correction of pH. Neither patient required intubation, despite imminent failure of noninvasive ventilation before initiation of extracorporeal support. Both patients were weaned from noninvasive and extracorporeal support within 3 days. We concluded that low-flow extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal, or respiratory dialysis, is a viable option for avoiding intubation and invasive mechanical ventilation in patients with COPD experiencing an exacerbation who are failing noninvasive ventilatory support.

  20. [Bocavirus in infants under 5 years with acute respiratory infection. Chaco Province, Argentina, 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deluca, Gerardo D; Urquijo, María Cecilia; Passarella, Carolina; Picón, César; Picón, Dimas; Acosta, María; Rovira, Carina; Marín, Héctor M

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory infection (ARI) is the most frequent pathology along human life, being the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in children under 5 years. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of bocavirus (BoV) in infants under 5 years with symptoms of ARI from north Argentina (Chaco province). The study was performed on nasopharyngeal aspirates from 488 patients, in the period of January-December 2014. The samples were tested by real time PCR and 36 positive BoV cases (7.4%) were detected. The period with the highest detection rate was June-September with 28 cases (77.8%), of which 26 (72.2%) were infants between 6-18 moths of life. In half of BoV positive cases this virus was detected as single infection of the upper respiratory tract, and in the remaining 50%, as concomitant infection with other microorganisms. To our knowledge, this would be the first study on molecular epidemiology of BoV in northern Argentina. We emphasize the importance of investigating these new viruses capable of generating acute respiratory disease and also to disseminate awareness on their circulation within the community.

  1. Epidemiological and Phylogenetic Characteristics of Influenza B Infection in Severe Acute Respiratory Infection Cases in Beijing, 2014 to 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yang; Zhang, Yi; Yang, Peng; Qian, Haiqun; Shi, Weixian; Wu, Shuangsheng; Cui, Shujuan; Zhang, Daitao; Wang, Quanyi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Influenza B viral infection is of great importance, but the epidemiological and phylogenetic characteristics of influenza B infection in severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) cases are still unclear. The clinical information of 2816 SARI cases and 467,737 influenza-like illness (ILI) cases in Beijing area from September 2014 to April 2015 were collected and analyzed. Among them, 91 influenza B viruses isolated from SARI cases were sequenced. The overall yield rate of influenza A/B infection was 14.21% and 27.77% in sampled SARI and ILI cases, respectively. Compared with influenza A infection, the frequency of influenza B infection in SARI cases was higher in younger patients. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that most tested hemagglutination genes belonged to Yamagata lineage Clade 3, which were similar with current circulating viruses but different with 2014 to 2015 influenza season vaccine strain (Clade 2). Importantly, HA-Y3/NA-V4 intralineage reassorting was identified in Beijing area for the first time, which can act as a possible risk factor of SARIs. The influenza activity and virus types/subtypes/lineages among SARI patients were well correlated with that of ILI cases. Furthermore, the potential risk of reassorted influenza B virus infection should not be overlooked. PMID:26717393

  2. Lung Injury Prediction Score Is Useful in Predicting Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Mortality in Surgical Critical Care Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary M. Bauman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lung injury prediction score (LIPS is valuable for early recognition of ventilated patients at high risk for developing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. This study analyzes the value of LIPS in predicting ARDS and mortality among ventilated surgical patients. Methods. IRB approved, prospective observational study including all ventilated patients admitted to the surgical intensive care unit at a single tertiary center over 6 months. ARDS was defined using the Berlin criteria. LIPS were calculated for all patients and analyzed. Logistic regression models evaluated the ability of LIPS to predict development of ARDS and mortality. A receiver operator characteristic (ROC curve demonstrated the optimal LIPS value to statistically predict development of ARDS. Results. 268 ventilated patients were observed; 141 developed ARDS and 127 did not. The average LIPS for patients who developed ARDS was 8.8±2.8 versus 5.4±2.8 for those who did not (p<0.001. An ROC area under the curve of 0.79 demonstrates LIPS is statistically powerful for predicting ARDS development. Furthermore, for every 1-unit increase in LIPS, the odds of developing ARDS increase by 1.50 (p<0.001 and odds of ICU mortality increase by 1.22 (p<0.001. Conclusion. LIPS is reliable for predicting development of ARDS and predicting mortality in critically ill surgical patients.

  3. Determinants of Noninvasive Ventilation Outcomes during an Episode of Acute Hypercapnic Respiratory Failure in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: The Effects of Comorbidities and Causes of Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Maria Grazia Pacilli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To investigate the effect of the cause of acute respiratory failure and the role of comorbidities both acute and chronic on the outcome of COPD patients admitted to Respiratory Intensive Care Unit (RICU with acute respiratory failure and treated with NIV. Design. Observational prospective study. Patients and Methods. 176 COPD patients consecutively admitted to our RICU over a period of 3 years and treated with NIV were evaluated. In all patients demographic, clinical, and functional parameters were recorded including the cause of acute respiratory failure, SAPS II score, Charlson comorbidity index, and further comorbidities not listed in the Charlson index. NIV success was defined as clinical improvement leading to discharge to regular ward, while exitus or need for endotracheal intubation was considered failure. Results. NIV outcome was successful in 134 patients while 42 underwent failure. Univariate analysis showed significantly higher SAP II score, Charlson index, prevalence of pneumonia, and lower serum albumin level in the failure group. Multivariate analysis confirmed a significant predictive value for pneumonia and albumin. Conclusions. The most important determinants of NIV outcome in COPD patients are the presence of pneumonia and the level of serum albumin as an indicator of the patient nutritional status.

  4. Identification of a novel human papillomavirus by metagenomic analysis of samples from patients with febrile respiratory illness.

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    John L Mokili

    Full Text Available As part of a virus discovery investigation using a metagenomic approach, a highly divergent novel Human papillomavirus type was identified in pooled convenience nasal/oropharyngeal swab samples collected from patients with febrile respiratory illness. Phylogenetic analysis of the whole genome and the L1 gene reveals that the new HPV identified in this study clusters with previously described gamma papillomaviruses, sharing only 61.1% (whole genome and 63.1% (L1 sequence identity with its closest relative in the Papillomavirus episteme (PAVE database. This new virus was named HPV_SD2 pending official classification. The complete genome of HPV-SD2 is 7,299 bp long (36.3% G/C and contains 7 open reading frames (L2, L1, E6, E7, E1, E2 and E4 and a non-coding long control region (LCR between L1 and E6. The metagenomic procedures, coupled with the bioinformatic methods described herein are well suited to detect small circular genomes such as those of human papillomaviruses.

  5. Progress in pediatrics in 2011. Choices in endocrinology, gastroenterology, hemato-oncology, infectious diseases, otolaryngology, pharmacotherapy and respiratory tract illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffarelli, Carlo; Santamaria, Francesca; Cesari, Silvia; Di Giorgio, Angela; Bernasconi, Sergio

    2012-06-08

    Main progresses in endocrinology, gastroenterology, hemato-oncology, infectious diseases, otolaryngology, pharmacotherapy, and respiratory tract illnesses selected from articles published in The Italian Journal of Pediatrics in 2011 were reviewed. Risk factors for gastroenteritis and appendicitis in developing countries may be useful in improving our understanding of these diseases. Childhood hearing impairment is a world-wide problem which continues to have an high prevalence in newborns. Among the mechanisms of diseases, obese children often have asthma and high hepcidin levels that may reduce serum iron concentrations. In cystic fibrosis, 18q distal deletion has been described as a novel mutation. Hypothyroidism in children with central nervous system infections may increase mortality rates. Infrared tympanic thermometer (IRTT) in oral mode for the measurement of body temperature may be useful in fever screening in a busy setup. In newborns, the transmission of CMV infection through breast milk may be prevented through freezing or pasteurization. Recent advances in treatment of constipation, urinary tract infections, leukemia, pain in children with cancer, neonates with sepsis or difficult weaning from mechanical ventilation will likely contribute towards optimizing management of these common disorders. The work of the Family Pediatricians Medicines for Children Research Network aims to develop competence, infrastructure, networking and education for pediatric clinical trials.

  6. Progress in pediatrics in 2011. Choices in endocrinology, gastroenterology, hemato-oncology, infectious diseases, otolaryngology, pharmacotherapy and respiratory tract illnesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caffarelli Carlo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Main progresses in endocrinology, gastroenterology, hemato-oncology, infectious diseases, otolaryngology, pharmacotherapy, and respiratory tract illnesses selected from articles published in The Italian Journal of Pediatrics in 2011 were reviewed. Risk factors for gastroenteritis and appendicitis in developing countries may be useful in improving our understanding of these diseases. Childhood hearing impairment is a world-wide problem which continues to have an high prevalence in newborns. Among the mechanisms of diseases, obese children often have asthma and high hepcidin levels that may reduce serum iron concentrations. In cystic fibrosis, 18q distal deletion has been described as a novel mutation. Hypothyroidism in children with central nervous system infections may increase mortality rates. Infrared tympanic thermometer (IRTT in oral mode for the measurement of body temperature may be useful in fever screening in a busy setup. In newborns, the transmission of CMV infection through breast milk may be prevented through freezing or pasteurization. Recent advances in treatment of constipation, urinary tract infections, leukemia, pain in children with cancer, neonates with sepsis or difficult weaning from mechanical ventilation will likely contribute towards optimizing management of these common disorders. The work of the Family Pediatricians Medicines for Children Research Network aims to develop competence, infrastructure, networking and education for pediatric clinical trials.

  7. Progress in pediatrics in 2013: choices in allergology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hypertension, infectious diseases, neonatology, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffarelli, Carlo; Santamaria, Francesca; Vottero, Alessandra; Dascola, Carlotta Povesi; Mirra, Virginia; Sperli, Francesco; Bernasconi, Sergio

    2014-07-12

    This review will provide new information related to pathophysiology and management of specific diseases that have been addressed by selected articles published in the Italian Journal of Pediatrics in 2013, focusing on allergology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hypertension, infectious diseases, neonatology, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses in children. Recommendations for interpretation of skin prick test to foods in atopic eczema, management of allergic conjunctivitis, hypertension and breastfeeding in women treated with antiepileptic drugs and healthy breakfast have been reported. Epidemiological studies have given emphasis to high incidence of autoimmune disorders in patients with Turner syndrome, increasing prevalence of celiac disease, frequency of hypertension in adolescents, incidence and risk factor for retinopathy of prematurity. Advances in prevention include elucidation of the role of probiotics in reducing occurrence of allergies and feeding intolerance, and events of foetal life that influence later onset of diseases. Mechanistic studies suggested a role for vitamin D deficiency in asthma and type 1 diabetes and for reactivation of Varicella-Zoster virus in aseptic meningitis. Regarding diagnosis, a new mean for the diagnosis of hyperbilirubinaemia in newborns, a score for recognition of impaired nutritional status and growth and criteria for early Dyke-Davidoff-Masson Syndrome have been suggested. New therapeutic approaches consist of use of etanercept for reducing insulin dose in type 1 diabetes, probiotics in atopic eczema, and melatonin in viral infections.

  8. Anaphylaxis Complicated by Acute Respiratory Distress and Fatal Outcome in A Nigerian Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agelebe, Efeturi; Musa, Tawakalit Lily; Ajayi, Idowu Adebowale

    2017-01-01

    Reports on hypersensitivity diseases in Nigerians are rare. We report the incidence of anaphylaxis in three siblings following fatal outcome in their mother. Urticarial rashes were noticed in three siblings’ resident in a South Western Nigerian town, one week before presentation at our facility. All the three siblings developed respiratory distress four days after the rash was noticed. Onset of respiratory distress made the family seek care at a private hospital, where they were admitted and treated with intravenous aminophylline and ceftriaxone. The mother of the children had experienced the same symptoms earlier also. She took treatment and died in the same private hospital, where her children received care. Death of the mother and worsening respiratory distress in the children made the father effect transfer of the children to the paediatric emergency unit of Ladoke Akintola University of Technology Teaching Hospital, Osogbo. The three children made a slow but uneventful recovery after instituting appropriate management for anaphylaxis and acute respiratory distress syndrome. The cases are discussed with a view to create awareness amongst health practitioners about the occurrence of anaphylaxis in our society. The need for prompt recognition and appropriate management, when confronted with this disease is also underscored.

  9. Acute Muscular Sarcocystosis: an international investigation among ill travelers returning from Tioman Island, Malaysia, 2011 and 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two provider-based traveler-focused networks allowed for the detection of a large outbreak of acute muscular sarcocystosis (AMS). Clinicians evaluating travelers returning ill from Malaysia with fever and myalgia noted the biphasic aspect of the disease, the later onset of elevated CPK and eosinophi...

  10. Prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescribing in an acutely ill population of older patients admitted to six European hospitals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, Paul

    2011-11-01

    Potentially inappropriate prescribing is common in older people presenting to hospital with acute illness in Ireland. The aim of this study was to determine if this phenomenon is unique to Ireland or whether it is a more widespread problem in hospitals across Europe.

  11. Pharmacokinetics of cefotaxime in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury treated with continuous renal replacement therapy : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koedijk, Joost B; Valk-Swinkels, Corinne G H; Rijpstra, Tom A; Touw, Daan J; Mulder, Paul G H; van der Voort, Peter H J; Van't Veer, Nils E; van der Meer, Nardo J M

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study is to describe the pharmacokinetics of cefotaxime (CTX) in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) when treated with continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). MATERIALS AND METHODS: This single-center prospe

  12. Understanding international differences in terminology for delirium and other types of acute brain dysfunction in critically ill patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morandi, A; Pandharipande, P; Trabucchi, M; Rozzini, R; Mistraletti, G; Trompeo, A C; Gregoretti, C; Gattinoni, L; Ranieri, M V; Brochard, L; Annane, D; Putensen, C; Guenther, U; Fuentes, P; Tobar, E; Anzueto, A R; Esteban, A; Skrobik, Y; Salluh, J I F; Soares, M; Granja, C; Stubhaug, A; de Rooij, S E; Ely, E Wesley

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Delirium (acute brain dysfunction) is a potentially life threatening disturbance in brain function that frequently occurs in critically ill patients. While this area of brain dysfunction in critical care is rapidly advancing, striking limitations in use of terminology related to delirium

  13. [Acute respiratory insufficiency due to severe lung injury - ARDS and ALI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, M

    2010-09-01

    As a consequence of the novel therapeutic option of mechanical ventilation in early intensive care medicine, the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was defined as a disease entity of its own representing the most severe form of acute lung injury (ALI). Since its first description four decades ago, our knowledge about the aetiology, physiology, histology and epidemiology of this lethal pulmonary complication of severe acute diseases such as pneumonia or sepsis has been increasing steadily. The initial major therapeutic advances were due to improvements in intensive care medical procedures and monitoring. The large ARDS Network clinical trial on the magnitude of tidal volume impressively demonstrated the feasibility of targeted clinical trials in patients with ARDS that provide robust evidence in this field. This clinical trial, as well as following large-scale trials in ARDS patients, led to significant changes of ventilation therapy and therapeutic strategies that improve the outcome of this disease entity. Advances in the standardisation of care for ARDS patients involving innovative therapeutic procedures such as extracorporeal gas exchange systems will lead to a further improvement in ARDS management and outcome. Modern pulmonary medicine can play a pivotal role in this process and can contribute its rich experiences in all areas of the respiratory system.

  14. The Relationship between the Plasma Triglyceride Concentration and the Severity of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Kuzkov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Triglycerides (TG may be involved in the pathogenesis of critical impairments. Objective: to study the relationship between the plasma concentration of TG, the outcome of the disease, and the markers of its severity in intensive care unit patients with early-stage acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. Subjects and methods. The prospective study included 18 patients with acute lung injury (ALI, who needed respiratory support. For further analysis, all the patients were divided into groups with TG < 1.00 mmol/l (TGlow; n=7 and >1.00 mmol/l (TGhigh; n=11. Results. A negative correlation was found between plasma TG concentration and oxygenation index (PaO2/FiO2. In the TG^jgh group, extravas-cular lung water index was significantly higher and cardiac index was lower than those in the TGlow group. Among the deceased patients, there was a 1.03 mmol/l reduction in TG concentration by day 4 of the study whereas in the survivors, TG concentration increased by an average of 0.15 mmol/l (p=0.02. Conclusion. In the patients with ALI, the plasma concentration of TG is related to oxygenation impairments and the degree of pulmonary edema, as well as with the outcome of the disease. Key words: triglycerides, acute lung injury, extravascular lung water index, pulmonary edema.

  15. The role of rhinovirus in children hospitalized for acute respiratory disease, Santa Fe, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudi, Juan Manuel; Molina, Fabiana; Díaz, Rocío; Bonet, Virginia; Ortellao, Lucila; Cantarutti, Diego; Gómez, Alejandra; Pierini, Judith; Cociglio, Raquel; Kusznierz, Gabriela

    2015-12-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) were historically considered upper airway pathogens. However, they have recently been proven to cause infections in the lower respiratory tract, resulting in hospitalization of children with pneumonia, bronchiolitis, and chronic pulmonary obstruction. In this report, HRV frequency and seasonality are described together with patient clinical-epidemiological aspects. From a total of 452 surveyed samples, the HRV nucleic acids was detected in 172 (38.1%) and found in every month of the study year. 60% of inpatients with acute respiratory infection (ARI) associated with HRV were under 6 months of age and 31% had a clinical history, being preterm birth and recurrent wheezing the prevailing conditions. The most frequent discharge diagnoses were pneumonia (35.2%), bronchiolitis (32.4%), and bronchitis (12.4%). Fifteen point nine percent of patients required admission into intensive care units. The results obtained in this study demonstrated the association between HRV and children hospitalizations caused by ARI.

  16. Antithymocyte globulin-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome after renal transplantation: a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TU Guo-wei; JU Min-jie; XU Ming; RONG Rui-ming; ZHU Tong-yu; LUO Zhe

    2012-01-01

    Antithymocyte globulin (ATG) has long been used for immune-induction and anti-rejection treatments for solid organ transplantations.To date,few cases of ATG-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) have been published.Here,we present a case of ARDS caused by a single low-dose of ATG in a renal transplant recipient and the subsequent treatments administered.Although the patient suffered from ARDS and delayed graft function,he was successfully treated.We emphasize that the presence of such complications should be considered when unexplained respiratory distress occurs.Early use of corticosteroids,adjustment of immunosuppressive regimens,and conservative fluid management,as well as empiric antimicrobial therapies,may be effective strategies for the treatment of ARDS caused by ATG.

  17. Guillain-Barre syndrome masquerading as acute respiratory failure in an infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS is a rare entity in infants. We report a case of GBS in a 5-month-old girl. The child presented with cough, loose stools, breathing difficulty, and listlessness. The child was treated as pneumonia with respiratory failure. Due to difficulty in weaning from ventilation with areflexia, marked hypotonia, and reduced power in all four limbs; possibilities of spinal muscular atrophy, poliomyelitis, and myopathies were kept. Nerve conduction velocity study was suggestive of mixed sensory-motor, severe axonal, and demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. Cerebrospinal fluid study revealed albuminocytological dissociation. Child was diagnosed as GBS and treated with intravenous immunoglobulin. Child recovered completely on follow-up. GBS should be considered as a differential diagnosis in acute onset respiratory failure with neuromuscular weakness in infants.

  18. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as the Initial Clinical Manifestation of an Antisynthetase Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seo-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Antisynthetase syndrome has been recognized as an important cause of autoimmune inflammatory myopathy in a subset of patients with polymyositis and dermatomyositis. It is associated with serum antibody to aminoacyl-transfer RNA synthetases and is characterized by a constellation of manifestations, including fever, myositis, interstitial lung disease, mechanic's hand-like cutaneous involvement, Raynaud phenomenon, and polyarthritis. Lung disease is the presenting feature in 50% of the cases. We report a case of a 60-year-old female with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which later proved to be an unexpected and initial manifestation of anti-Jo-1 antibody–positive antisynthetase syndrome. The present case showed resolution of ARDS after treatment with high-dose corticosteroids. Given that steroids are not greatly beneficial in the treatment of ARDS, it is likely that the improvement of the respiratory symptoms in this patient also resulted from the prompt suppression of the inflammatory systemic response by corticosteroids. PMID:27433180

  19. Detection of respiratory virus antigens in nasopharyngeal secretions from patients with acute respiratory disease by radio-immunoassay and tissue culture isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlicher, L; Hoffmann, H G; Habermehl, K O

    1984-01-01

    An investigation was made of the sensitivity and specificity of four-layer radio-immunoassays (RIA) in the detection of adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza virus types A and B, as well as para-influenza virus types 1, 2 and 3 from nasopharyngeal aspirates of 146 patients with acute respiratory disease. The sensitivity of RIA was comparable with that of tissue culture isolation if the total number of positives is considered. The difference may have been caused both by a higher efficiency of the RIA for detection of inactivated or non-cultivable agents and by a higher efficiency of tissue culture methods if the samples contained only small amounts of antigen. Differences between the two antigen detection systems were found in particular with respiratory syncytial virus and influenza B virus. At present, the use of tissue culture isolation together with RIA is the optimal routine laboratory procedure for the diagnosis of respiratory infections.

  20. Identification and characterization of a new orthoreovirus from patients with acute respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Kaw Bing; Voon, Kenny; Crameri, Gary; Tan, Hui Siu; Rosli, Juliana; McEachern, Jennifer A; Suluraju, Sivagami; Yu, Meng; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2008-01-01

    First discovered in the early 1950s, reoviruses (respiratory enteric orphan viruses) were not associated with any known disease, and hence named orphan viruses. Recently, our group reported the isolation of the Melaka virus from a patient with acute respiratory disease and provided data suggesting that this new orthoreovirus is capable of human-to-human transmission and is probably of bat origin. Here we report yet another Melaka-like reovirus (named Kampar virus) isolated from the throat swab of a 54 year old male patient in Kampar, Perak, Malaysia who was suffering from high fever, acute respiratory disease and vomiting at the time of virus isolation. Serological studies indicated that Kampar virus was transmitted from the index case to at least one other individual and caused respiratory disease in the contact case. Sequence analysis of the four small class genome segments indicated that Kampar and Melaka viruses are closely related. This was confirmed by virus neutralization assay, showing an effective two-way cross neutralization, i.e., the serum against one virus was able to neutralize the other. Although the exact origin of Kampar virus is unknown, epidemiological tracing revealed that the house of the index case is surrounded by fruit trees frequently visited by fruit bats. There is a high probability that Kampar virus originated from bats and was transmitted to humans via bat droppings or contaminated fruits. The discovery of Kampar virus highlights the increasing trend of emergence of bat zoonotic viruses and the need to expand our understanding of bats as a source of many unknown viruses.

  1. A retrospective study of 78 patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖正伦; 黎毅敏; 陈荣昌; 李时悦; 钟淑卿; 钟南山

    2003-01-01

    Objective To summarize the clinical features of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and to discuss diagnosis and management of the disease.Methods A retrospective study was conducted on 78 cases of SARS referred to the Guangzhou Institute of Respiratory Diseases (GIRD) between December 22, 2002 and near the end of March 2003. Items reviewed cover all data concerning clinical manifestations, laboratory investigation and radiology.Results The patients in the study consisted of 42 males and 36 females, aged 20 -75 yrs (mean age 37. 5 +11.6 yrs), including 44 affected health-care professionals. Clinical symptoms seen in the group were fever (100. 0%), cough (88. 5%), and dyspnea (79. 5%). There were 12 cases (15. 3%) with WBCs <4.0×109/L, 49 cases (62. 8%) ranging between (4. 0 -10. 0) ×109/L and 17 cases (21.8%) over 10. 0 × 109/L. The average was(7. 58 ±4. 96) × 109/L, with 0.75 ±0. 14 (neutrophil) and 0.18 ±0.11 (lymphocyte). Chest films and CT scanning revealed changes related to pneumonia. The transmission of the disease was likely via close contact with contagious droplets.The prevalences of acute lung injury (ALI, in 37cases ) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, 21 out of 37 cases ) were considerably high among the patients. Seven patients who developed ARDS complicated with multiple organs dysfunction syndrome (MODS) died.Conclusions A history of close contact, fever, sign of pneumonia by X-ray and normal-to-lowered WBC counts are favorable for the diagnosis of SARS. Recognition of All as the important index for critical SARS and comprehensive supportive management are of paramount in decreasing the mortality of the disease.

  2. CLINICAL PROFILE OF ACUTE LOWER RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN BETWEEN 2MONTHS TO 5 YEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitoj Singh Chhina

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Acute respiratory infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in under - five children in developing countries. Hence, the present study was undertaken to study the various risk factors, clinical profile and outcome of acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRI in children aged 2 month to 5 years. OBJECTIVE : clinical features, laborato ry assessment and morbidity and mortality pattern associated with acute lower respiratory tract infections in children aged 2 months to 5 years. METHODS: 100 ALRI cases fulfilling WHO criteria for pneumonia, in the age group of 2 month to 5 years were evaluated for clinical profile as per a predesigned proforma in a rural medical college. RESULTS : Of cases 61% were infants and remaining 39%12 - 60 months age group, males outnumbered females with sex ratio of 1.3;1. Elevated total leukocyte counts for age were observed in only 22% of cases, of these 3% were having pneumonia, 9% severe pneumonia and 10% very severe pneumonia. Significant association was found between leukocytosis and ALRI severity (p= 0.0001 Positive blood culture was obtained in 8% of cases and was significantly associated with ALRI severity (p=. 0.027. Among the ALRI cases, 84% required oxygen supplementation at any time during the hospital stay and 8% required mechanical ventilation. The mortality rate was 1%; with 99% of cases recovering and getting discharged uneventfully. CONCLUSION : Among the clinical variables, the signs and symptoms of ALRI as per the WHO ARI Control Programme were found in almost all cases. Regarding the laboratory profile, leukocytosis and blood culture positivity w ere observed in a small percentage, but significant association with ALRI severity was observed for both. Thus, clinical signs, and not invasive blood tests are a better diagnostic tools, though the latter may provide additional therapeutic and prognostic information in severe disease

  3. Use and Safety of Anthroposophic Medications for Acute Respiratory and Ear Infections: A Prospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald J. Hamre

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Anthroposophic medications (AMED are widely used, but safety data on AMED from large prospective studies are sparse. The objective of this analysis was to determine the frequency of adverse drug reactions (ADR to AMED in outpatients using AMED for acute respiratory and ear infections.Methods: A prospective four-week observational cohort study was conducted in 21 primary care practices in Europe and the U.S.A. The cohort comprised 715 consecutive outpatients aged 1 month, treated by anthroposophic physicians for acute otitis and respiratory infections. Physicians’ prescription data and patient reports of adverse events were analyzed. Main outcome measures were use of AMED and ADR to AMED.Results: Two patients had confirmed ADR to AMED: 1 swelling and redness at the injection site after subcutaneous injections of Prunus spinosa 5%, 2 sleeplessness after intake of Pneumodoron® 2 liquid. These ADR lasted one and two days respectively; both subsided after dose reduction; none were unexpected; none were serious. The frequency of confirmed ADR to AMED was 0.61% (2/327 of all different AMED used, 0.28% (2/715 of patients, and 0.004% (3/73,443 of applications.Conclusion: In this prospective study, anthroposophic medications used by primary care patients with acute respiratory or ear infections were well tolerated.Abbreviations: A-: anthroposophy; ADR: adverse drug reactions; AE: adverse events; AM: anthroposophic medicine; AMED: AM medication; C-: conventional; ENE-patients: eligible, not enrolled patients; IIPCOS: International Primary Care Outcomes Study

  4. Intravenous vitamin C as adjunctive therapy for enterovirus/rhinovirus induced acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler III, Alpha A; Kim, Christin; Lepler, Lawrence; Malhotra, Rajiv; Debesa, Orlando; Natarajan, Ramesh; Fisher, Bernard J; Syed, Aamer; DeWilde, Christine; Priday, Anna; Kasirajan, Vigneshwar

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of virus-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) treated with parenteral vitamin C in a patient testing positive for enterovirus/rhinovirus on viral screening. This report outlines the first use of high dose intravenous vitamin C as an interventional therapy for ARDS, resulting from enterovirus/rhinovirus respiratory infection. From very significant preclinical research performed at Virginia Commonwealth University with vitamin C and with the very positive results of a previously performed phase I safety trial infusing high dose vitamin C intravenously into patients with severe sepsis, we reasoned that infusing identical dosing to a patient with ARDS from viral infection would be therapeutic. We report here the case of a 20-year-old, previously healthy, female who contracted respiratory enterovirus/rhinovirus infection that led to acute lung injury and rapidly to ARDS. She contracted the infection in central Italy while on an 8-d spring break from college. During a return flight to the United States, she developed increasing dyspnea and hypoxemia that rapidly developed into acute lung injury that led to ARDS. When support with mechanical ventilation failed, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was initiated. Twelve hours following ECMO initiation, high dose intravenous vitamin C was begun. The patient’s recovery was rapid. ECMO and mechanical ventilation were discontinued by day-7 and the patient recovered with no long-term ARDS sequelae. Infusing high dose intravenous vitamin C into this patient with virus-induced ARDS was associated with rapid resolution of lung injury with no evidence of post-ARDS fibroproliferative sequelae. Intravenous vitamin C as a treatment for ARDS may open a new era of therapy for ARDS from many causes. PMID:28224112

  5. Does Prone Positioning Improve Oxygenation and Reduce Mortality in Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R Henderson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of computed tomography imaging more than 25 years ago led to characterization of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS as areas of relatively normal lung parenchyma juxtaposed with areas of dense consolidation and atelectasis. Given that this heterogeneity is often dorsally distributed, investigators questioned whether care for ARDS patients in the prone position would lead to improved mortality outcomes. This clinical review discusses the physiological rationale and clinical evidence supporting prone positioning in treating ARDS, in addition to its complications and contraindications.

  6. The role of heparin-binding protein in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘杨

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the role of heparin-binding protein(HBP)in sepsis-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome(ARDS),and to evaluate the prognostic value of HBP in ARDS.Methods Sixty seven sepsis patients were enrolled in the prospective study.According to whether present ARDS,patients were divided into two groups:ARDS group and non-ARDS group.Blood samples were obtained within 2 hours after patients were diagnosed with sepsis.We measured the level of interleukin-6,interleukin-8 and HBP by ELISA,counted the

  7. Acute Respiratory Distress following Intravenous Injection of an Oil-Steroid Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Russell

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of acute respiratory distress and hypoxemia following accidental intravenous injection of an oil-steroid solution in a body builder is presented. Chest roentography at the time of presentation showed diffuse bilateral opacities, and computed tomography revealed predominantly peripheral ground-glass opacifications. The patient’s symptoms gradually improved over 48 h and imaging of the chest was unremarkable one week later. The pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of this rare but potentially life-threatening complication of intravenous oil injection are discussed.

  8. Seasonal pattern of hospitalization from acute respiratory infections in Yaoundé, Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchidjou, Hyppolite Kuekou; Vescio, Fenicia; Boros, Stefano; Guemkam, Georgette; Minka, Esthelle; Lobe, Monny; Cappelli, Giulia; Colizzi, Vittorio; Tietche, Felix; Rezza, Giovanni

    2010-10-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARIs) are among the leading causes of childhood morbidity and mortality in Africa. The effects of climatic factors on occurrence of ARIs in the tropics are not clear. During the years 2006-07, we reviewed the clinical registers of the Chantal Biya Foundation (CBF), Yaoundé, Cameroon, paediatric hospital to investigate the association between climatic factors and ARIs in children. Our findings show that rain, high relative humidity and low temperatures are directly associated with an increase in the frequency of hospitalization from ARIs. Given the high frequency of hospitalization from ARIs we suggest that influenza vaccination campaigns should be implemented taking into account the seasonality in Cameroon.

  9. Acute respiratory infections among under-5 children in India: A situational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Kalaiselvi; Chinnakali, Palanivel; Majumdar, Anindo; Krishnan, Iswarya Santhana

    2014-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARIs) are the leading cause of death among children less than 5 years in India. Emergence of newer pathogenic organisms, reemergence of disease previously controlled, wide spread antibiotic resistance, and suboptimal immunization coverage even after many innovative efforts are major factors responsible for high incidence of ARI. Drastic reduction in the burden of ARI by low-cost interventions such as hand washing, breast feeding, availability of rapid and feasible array of diagnostics, and introduction of pentavalent vaccine under National Immunization Schedule which are ongoing are necessary for reduction of ARI.

  10. Azathioprine associated acute respiratory distress syndrome: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scherbak D

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A 58-year-old Caucasian man treated with azathioprine to prevent rejection of an orthotopic liver transplant, presented to the Carl Hayden VA Medical Center with rapid respiratory decline and appeared septic. He required urgent intubation, mechanical ventilator support and empiric antibiotics. His clinical picture and imaging studies were consistent with acute respiratory distress syndrome; however, extensive infectious work up failed to reveal an offending organism. Review of his current medications implicated azathioprine and upon discontinuation of this agent, the patient made a rapid recovery. He was subsequently extubated, transferred out of the ICU and soon discharged home in good health. Prescribed for organ transplant rejection and a wide array of autoimmune diseases, azathioprine has been rarely correlated with pneumonitis and rapid respiratory failure. No reported cases were found in which azathioprine was used to treat liver transplant rejection and associated with development of the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. However, there have been ARDS cases in which azathioprine was used for other purposes. We review all the available cases of azathioprine associated ARDS. The patients in these reports had similar clinical symptoms on presentation as our patient: hypoxia, febrile episodes and rapid development of ARDS with no infectious etiology. Most notable is the rapid resolution of ARDS after discontinuation of azathioprine. Although azathioprine toxicity related respiratory failure is rare, this correlation should still be considered in the differential for immunosuppressed patients presenting with rapid pulmonary decline. Further studies are needed and warranted to better correlate this connection, but it is imperative to recognize that the relationship exists.

  11. Severity of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in haematology patients: long-term impact and early predictive factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagier, D; Platon, L; Chow-Chine, L; Sannini, A; Bisbal, M; Brun, J-P; Blache, J-L; Faucher, M; Mokart, D

    2016-09-01

    Severe forms of acute respiratory distress syndrome in patients with haematological diseases expose clinicians to specific medical and ethical considerations. We prospectively followed 143 patients with haematological malignancies, and whose lungs were mechanically ventilated for more than 24 h, over a 5-y period. We sought to identify prognostic factors of long-term outcome, and in particular to evaluate the impact of the severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome in these patients. A secondary objective was to identify the early (first 48 h from ICU admission) predictive factors for acute respiratory distress syndrome severity. An evolutive haematological disease (HR 1.71; 95% CI 1.13-2.58), moderate to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (HR 1.81; 95% CI 1.13-2.69) and need for renal replacement therapy (HR 2.24; 95% CI 1.52-3.31) were associated with long-term mortality. Resolution of neutropaenia during ICU stay (HR 0.63; 95% CI 0.42-0.94) and early microbiological documentation (HR 0.62; 95% CI 0.42-0.91) were associated with survival. The extent of pulmonary infiltration observed on the first chest X-ray and the diagnosis of invasive fungal infection were the most relevant early predictive factors of the severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  12. Pteropine orthoreovirus infection among out-patients with acute upper respiratory tract infection in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voon, Kenny; Tan, Yeh Fong; Leong, Pooi Pooi; Teng, Cheong Lieng; Gunnasekaran, Rajasekaran; Ujang, Kamsiah; Chua, Kaw Bing; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to assess the incidence rate of Pteropine orthreovirus (PRV) infection in patients with acute upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) in a suburban setting in Malaysia, where bats are known to be present in the neighborhood. Using molecular detection of PRVs directly from oropharyngeal swabs, our study demonstrates that PRV is among one of the common causative agents of acute URTI with cough and sore throat as the commonest presenting clinical features. Phylogenetic analysis on partial major outer and inner capsid proteins shows that these PRV strains are closely related to Melaka and Kampar viruses previously isolated in Malaysia. Further study is required to determine the public health significance of PRV infection in Southeast Asia, especially in cases where co-infection with other pathogens may potentially lead to different clinical outcomes.

  13. Malnutrition in acutely ill children at the paediatric emergency unit in a tertiary hospital in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac E Ocheke

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In many developing countries, malnutrition remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality particularly in under-five children. The factors responsible for malnutrition could be immediate, underlying or basic, acting either alone or together. It has been shown that children who are malnourished have poorer outcomes from other illnesses than well-nourished children. It is important therefore to periodically describe the extent and pattern of childhood malnutrition so that effective preventive measures can be put in place. Objective: To describe the prevalence and pattern of malnutrition in children presenting with acute illnesses at the Jos University Teaching Hospital. Patients and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study in children aged 6 to 59 months seen at the paediatric emergency unit from April to October 2012. The subjects were recruited consecutively. Each child had both clinical assessment and appropriate laboratory evaluations done alongside anthropometric measurements. The nutritional/dietary and socio-demographic histories were also obtained. Results: Of the 379 children, 224 (59.1% were males and 155 (40.9% females. The median age was 17 months, range (6-57. Wasting (WFH z-scores ≤−3 to <−1SD was evident in one hundred children, giving an overall prevalence of 26.9%. Severe wasting (WFH z-score <−3, was present in 22 (5.9% children indicating the prevalence of marasmus, whereas only two children (0.53% had oedematous malnutrition (kwashiorkor. Stunting or chronic malnutrition, (HFA z-scores ≤−3 to <−1SD was present in 67 children (18.0%. Seventeen (4.6% were severely stunted (HFA z-score <−3. Conclusions: Wasting was the most common form of malnutrition in the study.

  14. Does Viral Co-Infection Influence the Severity of Acute Respiratory Infection in Children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Justicia, Antonio; Rivero-Calle, Irene; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple viruses are often detected in children with respiratory infection but the significance of co-infection in pathogenesis, severity and outcome is unclear. Objectives To correlate the presence of viral co-infection with clinical phenotype in children admitted with acute respiratory infections (ARI). Methods We collected detailed clinical information on severity for children admitted with ARI as part of a Spanish prospective multicenter study (GENDRES network) between 2011–2013. A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach was used to detect respiratory viruses in respiratory secretions. Findings were compared to an independent cohort collected in the UK. Results 204 children were recruited in the main cohort and 97 in the replication cohort. The number of detected viruses did not correlate with any markers of severity. However, bacterial superinfection was associated with increased severity (OR: 4.356; P-value = 0.005), PICU admission (OR: 3.342; P-value = 0.006), higher clinical score (1.988; P-value = 0.002) respiratory support requirement (OR: 7.484; P-value < 0.001) and longer hospital length of stay (OR: 1.468; P-value < 0.001). In addition, pneumococcal vaccination was found to be a protective factor in terms of degree of respiratory distress (OR: 2.917; P-value = 0.035), PICU admission (OR: 0.301; P-value = 0.011), lower clinical score (-1.499; P-value = 0.021) respiratory support requirement (OR: 0.324; P-value = 0.016) and oxygen necessity (OR: 0.328; P-value = 0.001). All these findings were replicated in the UK cohort. Conclusion The presence of more than one virus in hospitalized children with ARI is very frequent but it does not seem to have a major clinical impact in terms of severity. However bacterial superinfection increases the severity of the disease course. On the contrary, pneumococcal vaccination plays a protective role. PMID:27096199

  15. Urinary Kidney Injury Molecule-1 (KIM-1 in Early Diagnosis of Acute Kidney Injury in Pediatric Critically Ill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Lestari Paramastuty

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI often associated with a high hospital morbi-mortality rate in the intensive care unit patients. Kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1, has many characteristics of ideal biomarker for kidney injury. The aim of this study was to compared the temporal pattern of elevation urinary KIM-1 level following critically ill children with SCr as standart biomarker of AKI. Prospective analytic observational study was conducted during October to March 2014 in the Saiful Anwar General Hospital and Physiology Laboratory Brawijaya University. There were 13 critically ill as subjects. SCr and KIM-1 levels from all subjects were measured three times ( at admission, after 1st and 6th hour. Subjects were devided into AKI - non-AKI groups by SCr level and survivor - non survivor group at the and of the observations. Results showed that there were significantly increased levels of KIM-1 in the AKI and non-AKI and survivor-non survivor group at time point. However, we found that delta KIM-1 at time point increased significant in non AKI group and survivor group. KIM-1 at admission can diagnosed AKI in critically ill children. We conclude that urinary KIM-1 is a sensitive non-invasive biomarker to diagnosed acute kidney injury in critically ill children. Increase level of KIM-1 by time shows protective and good outcome in critically ill children.

  16. The provision of thromboprophylaxis and the prediction of renal recovery in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robinson, Sian; Larsen, Ulla L.; Zincuk, Aleksander

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is unknown whether the dose of enoxaparin can be optimised, without increasing the risk of bleeding, in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is associated with AKI, and the subsequent need for continuous renal rep...... be able to predict renal recovery in critically ill patients, and allow proper utilization of resources. (EU Clinical Trials Register EudraCT Number: 2012-004368-23; URL: https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu/ctr-search/trial/2012-004368-23/DK)....

  17. Hypersensitivity Reaction and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Pyrethroid Poisoning and Role of Steroid Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jisa George

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pyrethroids are generally of low toxicity to humans, but in suicidal poisonings which are usually associated with ingestion of high doses, they lead to severe systemic effects. Case Report: A 30-year old woman presented to emergency department with a history of intentional ingestion of about 15 mL of prallethrin around 3 days earlier. She complained of shortness of breath along with chest pain for the last 2 days. She reported no vomiting or stomach pain prior to presentation to hospital. On chest auscultation, breath sounds were mildly decreased in bilateral infrascapular areas with generalized crepitation. Arterial blood gas analysis revealed respiratory alkalosis. Chest X ray and computed tomography of thorax revealed widespread confluent areas of consolidation with interlobular septal thickening involving bilateral parahilar regions suggestive of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. The patient did not respond to broad spectrum antibiotic coverage, diuretics and oxygen inhalation. Intravenous methylprednisolone (2 mg/kg/day divided 6 hourly was started and slowly tapered off during the next days. The patient discharged after 3 weeks in good health. Discussion: As pyrethroids can affect sodium channels, the osmotic gradient of alveolar epithelium probably disrupts and therefore, alveolar infiltrations gradually spread over lungs. In addition, there is a possibility of hypersensitivity reactions to pyrethroids, which can cause progressive inflammation and involve respiratory tract in severe cases. Conclusion: Pyrethroid poisoning can lead to ARDS. Steroid therapy may help such patients tide over the pulmonary crisis.

  18. The role of surfactant treatment in preterm infants and term newborns with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirbelauer, J; Speer, C P

    2009-05-01

    Surfactant treatment in preterm infants and term newborns with (acute respiratory distress syndrome) ARDS-like severe respiratory failure has become part of an individualized treatment strategy in many intensive care units around the world. These babies constitute heterogeneous groups of gestational ages, lung maturity, as well as of the underlying disease processes and postnatal interventions. The pathophysiology of respiratory failure in preterm infants is characterized by a combination of primary surfactant deficiency and surfactant inactivation as a result of plasma proteins leaking into the airways from areas of epithelial disruption and injury. Various pre- and postnatal factors, such as exposure to chorioamnionitis, pneumonia, sepsis and asphyxia, induce an injurious inflammatory response in the lungs of preterm infants, which may subsequently affect surfactant function, synthesis and alveolar stability. Surfactant inactivation--and dysfunction--is also a hallmark in newborns with meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS), pneumonia and other disorders affecting the pulmonary function. Although for the majority of suggested indications no data from randomized controlled trials exist, a surfactant replacement that counterbalances surfactant inactivation seems to improve oxygenation and lung function in many babies with ARDS without any apparent negative side effects. Newborns with MAS will definitely benefit from a reduced need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Clinical experience seems to justify surfactant treatment in neonates with ARDS.

  19. Effect and mechanism analysis of continuous blood purification on acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Hong Xu; Jia-Bin Chen; Yin-Wen Xia

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the effect and mechanism of continuous blood purification (CBP) on acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and provide reference for clinical treatment. Methods:80 cases of patients with ARDS in our hospital were analyzed, the clinical indicators and hemodynamic parameters before and after CBP were compared, and ELISA was used to detect expression change of serum interleukin family and ERK signaling pathway protein. 80 cases of healthy subjects during the same period were taken as control group.Results:Compared with before treatment, heart rate, pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary artery wedge pressure were effectively normalized after CBP, hemodynamic parameters were effectively improved, and compared with control group, there were significant statistical differences (P<0.05); meanwhile, after CBP, interleukins IL2, IL6 and IL10 as well as TGFβlevels significantly decreased, MEK signaling pathway protein Ras, MEK and ERK1/2 expression significantly decreased, and compared with before treatment, there were significant statistical differences (P<0.01,P<0.05).Conclusions:Continuous blood purification may play the role of treating acute respiratory distress syndrome through reducing levels of interleukins and TGFβ as well as inhibiting MEK signaling pathway.

  20. Submersion and early-onset acute respiratory distress syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Wayde; MacDonald, Russell D

    2011-01-01

    Drowning is a common cause of accidental death, particularly in younger people, and acute respiratory failure is common in these patients. This case report describes a healthy 18-year-old man who suffered a cardiorespiratory arrest due to submersion while swimming in a freshwater lake. First-responder cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation using an automated external defibrillator resulted in a return of spontaneous circulation. The patient was evacuated to a tertiary care center by a rotor-wing air medical crew. The crew experienced difficulties in oxygenating and ventilating the patient because of early-onset acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). This case report describes the pathophysiology and prehospital management of a patient with suspected early-onset ARDS secondary to drowning. This case report is unique because it describes the oxygenation and ventilation difficulties encountered in managing this patient in the transport setting, and possible strategies to deal with these difficulties. Finally, this case report highlights the prehospital bypass decision-making process for patients requiring specialized medical care.

  1. Serologic study on the outbreak of acute upper respiratory tract Infections caused by adenovirus 3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Lufang; JU Liwen; JIANG Renjie; LIN Yuzun; ZHOU Liandi; YU Shunzhang; JIANG Qingwu

    2007-01-01

    From April to June,2004,an outbreak of acute upper respiratory tract infections(AURTI)occurred in the north area of Jiangsu Province,China.Twenty throat swabs were collected with 13 of them presenting an adenovirus (Ad)-like cytopathogenic effect on HEp-2.These were verified as Ad by the electron microscope,direct immunofluorescence assay and Ad primer-mediated PCR.Moreover,they were identified as adenovirus type 3(Ad3)by type-specific PCR and sequencing of the amplification products.Subsequent serologic studies were carried out to finally diagnose and document the outbreak.The neutralization test of paired serum of six in nine cases show obviously increased antibodies titers.The positive rate of IgM,IgG and recovery phase neutralization antibodies of the cases were 3.7%,44.4%and 59.5%respectively while those of the controls were 0%,8.3%and 33.3%respectively.The Pvalues of Chi-Square were 0.510,0.018 and 0.226 respectively.The concordance between IgG detected by ELISA and neutralization antibodies detected by the neutralization test was 61.4%and the Pvalue of Kappa was 0.070.By the serologic study,we can definitively diagnose that this outbreak of acute respiratory infections was caused by Adenovirus 3.

  2. [Genetic predisposition and Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: New tools for genetic study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erranz, M Benjamín; Wilhelm, B Jan; Riquelme, V Raquel; Cruces, R Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is the most severe form of respiratory failure. Theoretically, any acute lung condition can lead to ARDS, but only a small percentage of individuals actually develop the disease. On this basis, genetic factors have been implicated in the risk of developing ARDS. Based on the pathophysiology of this disease, many candidate genes have been evaluated as potential modifiers in patient, as well as in animal models, of ARDS. Recent experimental data and clinical studies suggest that variations of genes involved in key processes of tissue, cellular and molecular lung damage may influence susceptibility and prognosis of ARDS. However, the pathogenesis of pediatric ARDS is complex, and therefore, it can be expected that many genes might contribute. Genetic variations such as single nucleotide polymorphisms and copy-number variations are likely associated with susceptibility to ARDS in children with primary lung injury. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies can objectively examine these variations, and help identify important new genes and pathogenetic pathways for future analysis. This approach might also have diagnostic and therapeutic implications, such as predicting patient risk or developing a personalized therapeutic approach to this serious syndrome.

  3. Focused ultrasound examination of the chest on patients admitted with acute signs of respiratory problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riishede, M; Laursen, C B; Teglbjærg, L S

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Patients with acute respiratory problems poses a diagnostic challenge because similar symptoms can be caused by various pathological conditions. Focused ultrasound examination (f-US) of the heart and lungs has proven to increase the diagnostic accuracy in these patients. In this pro......INTRODUCTION: Patients with acute respiratory problems poses a diagnostic challenge because similar symptoms can be caused by various pathological conditions. Focused ultrasound examination (f-US) of the heart and lungs has proven to increase the diagnostic accuracy in these patients...... presumptive diagnosis at 4 hours from admission. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This is a semiblinded randomised prospective study. 288 patients will be included and randomised into the control or intervention group. All patients receive a standard diagnostic evaluation by the EP to assess the primary presumptive....... As standard for correct diagnosis, we perform a blinded journal audit after discharge. As primary analysis, we use the intention-to-treat analysis. CONCLUSIONS: This study is the first multicentre trial in EDs to investigate whether f-US, in the hands of the EP, increases the proportion of correct diagnosis...

  4. Determinants of noninvasive ventilation success or failure in morbidly obese patients in acute respiratory failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm Lemyze

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Acute respiratory failure (ARF is a common life-threatening complication in morbidly obese patients with obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS. We aimed to identify the determinants of noninvasive ventilation (NIV success or failure for this indication. METHODS: We prospectively included 76 consecutive patients with BMI>40 kg/m2 diagnosed with OHS and treated by NIV for ARF in a 15-bed ICU of a tertiary hospital. RESULTS: NIV failed to reverse ARF in only 13 patients. Factors associated with NIV failure included pneumonia (n = 12/13, 92% vs n = 9/63, 14%; p<0.0001, high SOFA (10 vs 5; p<0.0001 and SAPS2 score (63 vs 39; p<0.0001 at admission. These patients often experienced poor outcome despite early resort to endotracheal intubation (in-hospital mortality, 92.3% vs 17.5%; p<0.001. The only factor significantly associated with successful response to NIV was idiopathic decompensation of OHS (n = 30, 48% vs n = 0, 0%; p = 0.001. In the NIV success group (n = 63, 33 patients (53% experienced a delayed response to NIV (with persistent hypercapnic acidosis during the first 6 hours. CONCLUSIONS: Multiple organ failure and pneumonia were the main factors associated with NIV failure and death in morbidly obese patients in hypoxemic ARF. On the opposite, NIV was constantly successful and could be safely pushed further in case of severe hypercapnic acute respiratory decompensation of OHS.

  5. Effects of chloramphenicol preconditioning on oxidative respiratory function of cerebral mitochondria in rats exposed to acute hypoxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈丽峰; 柳君泽; 党永明; 宋熔

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the roles of chloramphenicol (CAP) preconditioning in the oxidative respiratory function of cerebral mitochondria in rats exposed to acute hypoxia during acute hypoxia by observing the changes of mitochondrial oxidative respiratory function and cytochrome C oxidase (COX) activity. Methods: Adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: control (C), medication (M), hypoxia (H), and medication plus hypoxia (MH). Rats in groups M and MH were administered by peritoneal injection of CAP (50 mg/kg) every 12 h for 7 d before decapitation, but those in groups H and MH were exposed to a hypobaric chamber simulating 5 000 m high altitude for 24 h. The rat cerebral cortex was removed and mitochondria were isolated by centrifugation. Mitochondrial respiratory function and COX activity were measured by Clark oxygen electrode. Results: Compared with Group C, Group H showed significantly elevated state 4respiration (ST4), decreased state 3 respiration (ST3), and respiratory control rate (RCR) in mitochondrial respiration during acute hypoxic exposure. ST3 in Group MH was significantly lower than that in Group C, but was not significantly different from that in Groups H and M, while ST4 in Group MH was significantly lower than that in groups C and H. RCR in Group MH was higher than that in Group H, but lower than that in Group C. COX activity in Group H was significantly lower than that in Group C. In Group MH, COX activity increased and was higher than that in Group H, but was still lower than that in Group C. Conclusion: Acute hypoxic exposure could lead to mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction, suggesting that CAP preconditioning might be beneficial to the recovery of rat respiratory finction. The change of COX activity is consistent with that of mitochondrial respiratory function during acute hypoxic exposure and CAP-administration, indicating that COX plays an important role in oxidative phosphorylation function of mitochondria from

  6. Partial ventilatory support modalities in acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome-a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M McMullen

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The efficacy of partial ventilatory support modes that allow spontaneous breathing in patients with acute lung injury (ALI and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is unclear. The objective of this scoping review was to assess the effects of partial ventilatory support on mortality, duration of mechanical ventilation, and both hospital and intensive care unit (ICU lengths of stay (LOS for patients with ALI and ARDS; the secondary objective was to describe physiologic effects on hemodynamics, respiratory system and other organ function. METHODS: MEDLINE (1966-2009, Cochrane, and EmBase (1980-2009 databases were searched using common ventilator modes as keywords and reference lists from retrieved manuscripts hand searched for additional studies. Two researchers independently reviewed and graded the studies using a modified Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine grading system. Studies in adult ALI/ARDS patients were included for primary objectives and pre-clinical studies for supporting evidence. RESULTS: Two randomized controlled trials (RCTs were identified, in addition to six prospective cohort studies, one retrospective cohort study, one case control study, 41 clinical physiologic studies and 28 pre-clinical studies. No study was powered to assess mortality, one RCT showed shorter ICU length of stay, and the other demonstrated more ventilator free days. Beneficial effects of preserved spontaneous breathing were mainly physiological effects demonstrated as improvement of gas exchange, hemodynamics and non-pulmonary organ perfusion and function. CONCLUSIONS: The use of partial ventilatory support modalities is often feasible in patients with ALI/ARDS, and may be associated with short-term physiological benefits without appreciable impact on clinically important outcomes.

  7. Effect of nebulized budesonide on respiratory mechanics and oxygenation in acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome: Randomized controlled study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Hatem Saber; Meguid, Mona Mohamed Abdel

    2017-01-01

    Background: We tested the hypothesis that nebulized budesonide would improve lung mechanics and oxygenation in patients with early acute lung injury (ALI) and/or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) during protective mechanical ventilation strategy without adversely affecting systemic hemodynamics. Methods: Patients with ALI/ARDS were included and assigned into two groups; budesonide group (30 cases) in whom 1 mg–2 ml budesonide suspension was nebulized through the endotracheal tube and control group (30 cases) in whom 2 ml saline (placebo) were nebulized instead of budesonide. This regimen was repeated every 12 h for three successive days alongside with constant ventilator settings in both groups. Hemodynamics, airway pressures, and PaO2/FiO2 were measured throughout the study period (72 h) with either nebulized budesonide or saline. Furthermore, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were analyzed serologically as markers of inflammation at pre- and post-nebulization sessions. Results: We found a significant difference between the two groups regarding PaO2/FiO2 (P = 0.023), peak (P = 0.021), and plateau (P = 0.032) airway pressures. Furthermore, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were significantly reduced after budesonide nebulizations. No significant difference was found between the two groups regarding hemodynamic variables. Conclusion: Nebulized budesonide improved oxygenation, peak, and plateau airway pressures and significantly reduced inflammatory markers (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6) without affecting hemodynamics. Trial Registry: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry (ANZCTR) at the number: ACTRN12615000373572. PMID:28217046

  8. Role of hormonal factors in plasma K alterations in acute respiratory and metabolic alkalosis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, H; Hishida, A; Ohishi, K; Kimura, M; Honda, N

    1990-02-01

    Studies were performed on previously nephrectomized dogs to examine roles of hormonal factors in plasma potassium alterations in acute alkalosis. Respiratory and metabolic alkalosis were induced by hyperventilation and intravenous NaHCO3 or tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) infusion, respectively. Respiratory and NaHCO3-induced alkalosis provoked decreases in plasma potassium from the control value of 5.12 +/- 0.68 (SE) to 4.21 +/- 0.55 meq/l (P less than 0.01) and from 4.65 +/- 0.26 to 3.91 +/- 0.16 meq/l (P less than 0.01) within 180 min, respectively. In contrast, Tris-induced alkalosis elicited an increase in plasma potassium from the control value of 4.56 +/- 0.30 to 5.31 +/- 0.30 meq/l (P less than 0.01). Hypokalemia in respiratory alkalosis was associated with a decrease in the plasma norepinephrine concentration from the control level of 377 +/- 104 to 155 +/- 41 pg/ml (P less than 0.05) but not with changes in plasma levels of epinephrine, insulin, glucagon, cortisol, and aldosterone. However, this hypokalemia was not affected by phentolamine. Also, somatostatin did not modify the hypokalemic response. NaHCO3-induced hypokalemia was associated with a decline in the plasma aldosterone and norepinephrine concentrations. The decline in plasma norepinephrine in NaHCO3-induced alkalosis followed the decrease in plasma potassium. In Tris-induced alkalosis, plasma insulin increased but norepinephrine decreased. The findings do not suggest fundamental roles of the hormonal factors in the plasma potassium alterations in bilaterally nephrectomized dogs with acute alkalosis.

  9. Review: Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS): the mechanism, present strategies and future perspectives of therapies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUH Shi-ping; CHIANG Chi-huei

    2007-01-01

    Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS), which manifests as non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, respiratory distress and hypoxemia, could be resulted from various processes that directly or indirectly injure the lung.Extensive investigations in experimental models and humans with ALI/ARDS have revealed many molecular mechanisms that offer therapeutic opportunities for cell or gene therapy. Herein the present strategies and future perspectives of the treatment for ALI/ARDS, include the ventilatory, pharmacological, as well as cell therapies.

  10. [Importance of the case of coronavirus-associated severe acute respiratory syndrome detected in Hungary in 2005].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rókusz, László; Jankovics, István; Jankovics, Máté; Sarkadi, Júlia; Visontai, Ildikó

    2013-11-24

    Ten years have elapsed since the severe acute respiratory syndrome outbreak, which resulted in more than 8000 cases worldwide with more than 700 deaths. Recently, a new coronavirus, the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus emerged, causing serious respiratory cases and death. By the end of August 2013, 108 cases including 50 deaths were reported. The authors discuss a coronavirus-associated severe acute respiratory syndrome, which was detected in Hungary in 2005 and highlight its significance in 2013. In 2005 the patient was hospitalized and all relevant clinical and microbiological tests were performed. Based on the IgG antibody positivity of the serum samples, the patient was diagnosed as having severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection in the past. The time and source of the infection remained unknown. The condition of the patient improved and he was discharged from the hospital. The case raises the possibility of infections in Hungary imported from remote areas of the world and the importance of thorough examination of patients with severe respiratory syndrome with unknown etiology.

  11. Burden of acute gastrointestinal illness in Denmark 2009: a population-based telephone survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, L; Korsgaard, H; Ethelberg, S

    2012-02-01

    A cross-sectional telephone survey was conducted in Denmark throughout 2009 to determine the incidence of acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI). Using the Danish population register, a random population sample stratified by gender and age groups was selected and mobile or landline phone numbers found. Representative numbers of interviews were performed by gender, age group and month. A recently proposed international case definition of AGI, including cases with diarrhoea and/or vomiting in a 4-week recall period, was used. A total of 1853 individuals were included and 206 (11·1%) fulfilled the case definition; 78% reported diarrhoea. This corresponds to an overall standardized incidence rate of 1·4 (95% CI 1·2-1·6) episodes of AGI per person-year. The incidence rate was generally higher in the younger age groups; only being 2·3, 1·9 and 0·80 per person-year in the 0-9, 10-39 and ≥40 years age groups, respectively. The incidence rate estimates were considerably higher when calculated from shorter recall periods.

  12. Burden of Acute Gastrointestinal Illness in Gálvez, Argentina, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Enrique; Majowicz, Shannon E.; Reid-Smith, Richard; Albil, Silvia; Monteverde, Marcos; McEwen, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the magnitude and distribution of acute gastrointestinal illness (GI) in Gálvez, Argentina, and assessed the outcome of a seven-day versus 30-day recall period in survey methodology. A cross-sectional population survey, with either a seven-day or a 30-day retrospective recall period, was conducted through door-to-door visits to randomly-selected residents during the ‘high’ and the ‘low’ seasons of GI in the community. Comparisons were made between the annual incidence rates obtained using the seven-day and the 30-day recall period. Using the 30-day recall period, the mean annual incidence rates was 0.43 (low season of GI) and 0.49 (high season of GI) episodes per person-year. Using the seven-day recall period, the mean annual incidence rate was 0.76 (low season of GI) and 2.66 (high season of GI) episodes per person-year. This study highlights the significant burden of GI in a South American community and confirms the importance of seasonality when investigating GI in the population. The findings suggest that a longer recall period may underestimate the burden of GI in retrospective population surveys of GI. PMID:20411678

  13. Clinical study on high-resolution CT and pulmonary function in severe acute respiratory syndrome patients during recovery phase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Cheng-hong; HE Zheng-yi; MA Da-qing; ZHANG Shu-wen; WANG Bao-en; WANG Chao; WEN Yan; JIANG Li; LIU Ying; JIAO Yun-min; CHEN Jiang-hong; TANG Shu-zhen; YUE Mao-xing

    2005-01-01

    @@ Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is an acute respiratory infectious disease caused by a novel coronavirus, firstly broke out in November 2002 in Guangdong and prevailed quickly in Beijing, Hong Kong, Taiwan and other regions of China. It was one of the most potential pandemic diseases and had affected more than 20 other countries.1,2 There have been a lot of resear-ches2-7 in terms of its etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical characteristics, diagnostics, treatment and prevention, vaccines and so on.

  14. Impact of influenza vaccination on respiratory illness rates in children attending private boarding schools in England, 2013-2014: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brousseau, N; Green, H K; Andrews, N; Pryse, R; Baguelin, M; Sunderland, A; Ellis, J; Pebody, R

    2015-12-01

    Several private boarding schools in England have established universal influenza vaccination programmes for their pupils. We evaluated the impact of these programmes on the burden of respiratory illnesses in boarders. Between November 2013 and May 2014, age-specific respiratory disease incidence rates in boarders were compared between schools offering and not offering influenza vaccine to healthy boarders. We adjusted for age, sex, school size and week using negative binomial regression. Forty-three schools comprising 14 776 boarders participated. Almost all boarders (99%) were aged 11-17 years. Nineteen (44%) schools vaccinated healthy boarders against influenza, with a mean uptake of 48·5% (range 14·2-88·5%). Over the study period, 1468 respiratory illnesses were reported in boarders (5·66/1000 boarder-weeks); of these, 33 were influenza-like illnesses (ILIs, 0·26/1000 boarder-weeks) in vaccinating schools and 95 were ILIs (0·74/1000 boarder-weeks) in non-vaccinating schools. The impact of vaccinating healthy boarders was a 54% reduction in ILI in all boarders [rate ratio (RR) 0·46, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0·28-0·76]. Disease rates were also reduced for upper respiratory tract infections (RR 0·72, 95% CI 0·61-0·85) and chest infections (RR 0·18, 95% CI 0·09-0·36). These findings demonstrate a significant impact of influenza vaccination on ILI and other clinical endpoints in secondary-school boarders. Additional research is needed to investigate the impact of influenza vaccination in non-boarding secondary-school settings.

  15. Morphological changes of carotid bodies in acute respiratory distress syndrome: a morphometric study in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinhaes E.N.G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotid bodies are chemoreceptors sensitive to a fall of partial oxygen pressure in blood (hypoxia. The morphological alterations of these organs in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and in people living at high altitude are well known. However, it is not known whether the histological profile of human carotid bodies is changed in acute clinical conditions such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. The objective of the present study was to perform a quantitative analysis of the histology of carotid bodies collected from patients who died of ARDS. A morphometric study of carotid bodies collected during routine autopsies was carried out on three groups: patients that died of non-respiratory diseases (controls, N = 8, patients that presented COPD and died of its complications or associated diseases (N = 7, and patients that died of ARDS (N = 7. Morphometric measurements of the volume fraction of clusters of chief cells were performed in five fields on each slide at 40X magnification. The numerical proportion of the four main histological cell types (light, dark, progenitor and sustentacular cells was determined analyzing 10 fields on each slide at 400X magnification. The proportion of dark cells was 0.22 in ARDS patients, 0.12 in controls (P<0.001, and 0.08 in the COPD group. The proportion of light cells was 0.33 (ARDS, 0.44 (controls (P<0.001, and 0.36 (COPD. These findings suggest that chronic and acute hypoxia have different effects on the histology of glomic tissue.

  16. The effects of salbutamol in an experimental model with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sema Yilmaz; Diner Yildizdas; Kenan Daglioglu; Arbil Acikalin; Can Acipayam; Ibrahim Bayram; Derya Gumurdulu; Atila Tanyeli

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate salbutamol effects on histopathologic features of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Methods: ARDS was designed in Wistar albino male rats, 250-300 g in weight, by intratracheal instillation of physiological saline solution. Anesthezied and tracheotomized rats with ARDS were pressure-controlled ventilated. At the end of the 210 minutes, two hours past and nebulized salbutamol inhalation was tried. All rats were assigned to two groups: Group 1 (n=10) control group, given no treatment, group 2 (n=10) received salbutamol. Nebulized salbutamol inhalation was given in the dosage of 0, 15 mg/kg/dose. Rats were continued to be on ventilator through the experiment. After the last inhalation, two hours past and their both lungs were excised for histopathological examination. Results: Rat-model ARDS had similar histopathological appearance occuring during the acute phase of the acute respiratory distress syndrome in humans. A statistical difference was seen between control and salbutamol group (P=0.002) for HM. The margination of leukocytes was decreased in salbutamol group. The difference was significant (P<0.042). Hemorrhage and interstitial/intraalveolar edema were much lower in 0.15 mg/dose nebulized salbutamol group than that of control group. There was a significant difference statistically between two groups (P<0.001). Conclusions: Inhaled salbutamol therapy for ARDS is may be associated with the improvement of inflamation. Besides known effects of salbutamol, the reducing of infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes, interstitial/intraalveolar edema, perivascular and/or intraalveolar hemorrhage and hyaline membrane formation should be emphasized.

  17. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Outcomes in Acute Respiratory Distress Treatment: Case Study in a Chinese Referral Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei; Li, Tong; Xu, Lei; Hu, Xiao-min; Duan, Da-wei; Li, Zhi-bo; Gao, Xin-jing; Li, Jun; Wu, Peng; Liu, Ying-Wu

    2017-01-01

    Background No definitive conclusions have been drawn from the available data about the utilization of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) to treat severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The aim of this study was to review our center’s experience with ECMO and determine predictors of outcome from our Chinese center. Material/Methods We retrospectively analyzed a total of 23 consecutive candidates who fulfilled the study entry criteria between January 2009 and December 2015. Detailed clinical data, ECMO flow, and respiratory parameters before and after the introduction of ECMO were compared among in-hospital survivors and nonsurvivors; factors associated with mortality were investigated. Results Hemodynamics and oxygenation parameters were significantly improved after ECMO initiation. Thirteen patients survived to hospital discharge. Univariate correlation analysis demonstrated that APACHE II score (r=−0.463, p=0.03), acute kidney injury (r=−0.574, p=0.005), membrane oxygenator replacement (r=−0.516, p=0.014) and total length of hospital stay (r=0.526, p=0.012) were significantly correlated with survival to hospital discharge, and that the evolution of the levels of urea nitrogen, platelet, and fibrinogen may help to determine patient prognosis. Sixteen patients referred for ECMO from an outside hospital were successfully transported to our institution by ambulance, including seven transported under ECMO support. The survival rate of the ECMO-transport group was comparable to the conventional transport or the non-transport group (both p=1.000). Conclusions ECMO is an effective alternative option for severe ARDS. APACHE II score on admission, onset of acute kidney injury, and membrane oxygenator replacement, and the evolution of levels of urea nitrogen, platelet, and fibrinogen during hospitalization may help to determine the in-hospital patient prognosis. By establishing a well-trained mobile ECMO team, a long-distance, inter

  18. Childhood Acute Respiratory Infections and Household Environment in an Eastern Indonesian Urban Setting

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    Tomoyuki Shibata

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This pilot study evaluated the potential effect of household environmental factors such as income, maternal characteristics, and indoor air pollution on children’s respiratory status in an Eastern Indonesian community. Household data were collected from cross-sectional (n = 461 participants and preliminary childhood case-control surveys (pneumonia cases = 31 diagnosed within three months at a local health clinic; controls = 30. Particulate matter (PM2.5 and PM10 was measured in living rooms, kitchens, children’s bedrooms, and outside areas in close proximity once during the case-control household interviews (55 homes and once per hour from 6 a.m. to midnight in 11 homes. The household survey showed that children were 1.98 times (p = 0.02 more likely to have coughing symptoms indicating respiratory infection, if mothers were not the primary caregivers. More children exhibited coughing if they were not exclusively breastfed (OR = 2.18; p = 0.06 or there was a possibility that their mothers were exposed to environmental tobacco smoke during pregnancy (OR = 2.05; p = 0.08. This study suggests that household incomes and mother’s education have an indirect effect on childhood pneumonia and respiratory illness. The concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 ranged from 0.5 to 35.7 µg/m3 and 7.7 to 575.7 µg/m3, respectively, based on grab samples. PM was significantly different between the case and control groups (p < 0.01. The study also suggests that ambient air may dilute indoor pollution, but also introduces pollution into the home from the community environment. Effective intervention programs need to be developed that consider multiple direct and indirect risk factors to protect children.

  19. Targeting Neutrophils to Prevent Malaria-Associated Acute Lung Injury/Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeiro-Pereira, Paulo V.; Gomes, Eliane; Neto, Antonio Condino; D' Império Lima, Maria R.; Alvarez, José M.; Portugal, Silvia; Epiphanio, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Malaria remains one of the greatest burdens to global health, causing nearly 500,000 deaths in 2014. When manifesting in the lungs, severe malaria causes acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS). We have previously shown that a proportion of DBA/2 mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) develop ALI/ARDS and that these mice recapitulate various aspects of the human syndrome, such as pulmonary edema, hemorrhaging, pleural effusion and hypoxemia. Herein, we investigated the role of neutrophils in the pathogenesis of malaria-associated ALI/ARDS. Mice developing ALI/ARDS showed greater neutrophil accumulation in the lungs compared with mice that did not develop pulmonary complications. In addition, mice with ALI/ARDS produced more neutrophil-attracting chemokines, myeloperoxidase and reactive oxygen species. We also observed that the parasites Plasmodium falciparum and PbA induced the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) ex vivo, which were associated with inflammation and tissue injury. The depletion of neutrophils, treatment with AMD3100 (a CXCR4 antagonist), Pulmozyme (human recombinant DNase) or Sivelestat (inhibitor of neutrophil elastase) decreased the development of malaria-associated ALI/ARDS and significantly increased mouse survival. This study implicates neutrophils and NETs in the genesis of experimentally induced malaria-associated ALI/ARDS and proposes a new therapeutic approach to improve the prognosis of severe malaria. PMID:27926944

  20. Mechanical ventilation strategies for intensive care unit patients without acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome: a systematic review and network meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Lei; Wang, Weiwei; Zhao, Nana; Guo, Libo; Chi, Chunjie; Hou, Wei; Wu, Anqi; Tong, Hongshuang; Wang, Yue; Wang, Changsong; Li, Enyou

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been shown that the application of a lung-protective mechanical ventilation strategy can improve the prognosis of patients with acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, the optimal mechanical ventilation strategy for intensive care unit (ICU) patients without ALI or ARDS is uncertain. Therefore, we performed a network meta-analysis to identify the optimal mechanical ventilation strategy for these patients. Methods We searched the Cochra...

  1. Prevalence and outcome of gastrointestinal bleeding and use of acid suppressants in acutely ill adult intensive care patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Mette; Perner, Anders; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe the prevalence of, risk factors for, and prognostic importance of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and use of acid suppressants in acutely ill adult intensive care patients. METHODS: We included adults without GI bleeding who were acutely admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU...... bleeding occurred in 2.6 % (95 % confidence interval 1.6-3.6 %) of patients. The following variables at ICU admission were independently associated with clinically important GI bleeding: three or more co-existing diseases (odds ratio 8.9, 2.7-28.8), co-existing liver disease (7.6, 3.3-17.6), use of renal...

  2. First case of atypical takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a bilateral lung-transplanted patient due to acute respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadri, Jelena R; Bataisou, Roxana D; Diekmann, Johanna; Lüscher, Thomas F; Templin, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy which is characterised by a transient left ventricular wall motion abnormality was first described in 1990. The disease is still not well known, and as such it is suggested that an emotional trigger is mandatory in this disease. We present the case of a 51-year old female patient seven years after bilateral lung transplantation, who developed acute respiratory distress syndrome and subsequently suffered from atypical takotsubo cardiomyopathy with transient severe reduction of ejection fraction and haemodynamic instability needing acute intensive care treatment. Acute respiratory failure has emerged as an important physical trigger factor in takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Little is known about the association of hypoxia and takotsubo cardiomyopathy which can elicit a life-threatening condition requiring acute intensive care. Therefore, experimental studies are needed to investigate the role of hypoxia in takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

  3. Short-term exposure to ambient particulate matter and emergency ambulance dispatch for acute illness in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasmin, Saira; Ueda, Kayo; Stickley, Andrew; Yasumoto, Shinya; Phung, Vera Ling Hui; Oishi, Mizuki; Yasukouchi, Shusuke; Uehara, Yamato; Michikawa, Takehiro; Nitta, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    Short-term exposure to air pollution may be linked to negative health outcomes that require an emergency medical response. However, few studies have been undertaken on this phenomenon to date. The aim of this study therefore was to examine the association between short-term exposure to ambient suspended particulate matter (SPM) and emergency ambulance dispatches (EADs) for acute illness in Japan. Daily EAD data, daily mean SPM and meteorological data were obtained for four prefectures in the Kanto region of Japan for the period from 2007 to 2011. The area-specific association between daily EAD for acute illness and SPM was explored using generalized linear models while controlling for ambient temperature, relative humidity, seasonality, long-term trends, day of the week and public holidays. Stratified analyses were conducted to evaluate the modifying effects of age, sex and medical conditions. Area-specific estimates were combined using meta-analyses. For the total study period the mean level of SPM was 23.7μg/m(3). In general, higher SPM was associated with a significant increase in EAD for acute illness [estimated pooled relative risk (RR): 1.008, 95% CI: 1.007 to 1.010 per 10μg/m(3) increase in SPM at lag 0-1]. The effects of SPM on EAD for acute illness were significantly greater for moderate/mild medical conditions (e.g. cases that resulted in 3weeks hospitalization or which resulted in death). Using EAD data, this study has shown the adverse health effects of ambient air pollution. This highlights the importance of reducing the level of air pollution in order to maintain population health and well-being.

  4. Successful treatment of Chlamydophila pneumoniae acute respiratory distress syndrome with extracorporeal membrane oxygenator: a case report and diagnostic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Bels David

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Chlamydophila pneumoniae is a respiratory pathogen known to infect the upper and lower respiratory tracts. Infection severity can range from sub-clinical pulmonary infection to acute respiratory distress syndrome. Case presentation A previously healthy 62-year-old Caucasian man was admitted to our hospital for acute respiratory failure. Serum samples obtained every week starting from the day of admission showed clear-cut seroconversion for C. pneumoniae antibodies. All other cultures obtained during the first days of hospitalization were negative. Despite maximal ventilatory support (high positive end expiratory pressure, fraction of inspired oxygen of 1.0, nitric oxide inhalation, neuromuscular blocking agents and prone positioning, our patient remained severely hypoxemic, which led us to initiate an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation treatment. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and hemodiafiltration were withdrawn on day 12. Our patient was extubated on day 18 and discharged from our Intensive Care Unit on day 20. He went home a month later. Conclusion We describe the first published case of acute respiratory distress syndrome due to C. pneumoniae infection successfully treated by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, a very useful tool in this syndrome. A quick and specific method for the definite diagnosis of Chlamydophila infection should be developed.

  5. The predictive value of the NICE "red traffic lights" in acutely ill children.

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    Evelien Kerkhof

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Early recognition and treatment of febrile children with serious infections (SI improves prognosis, however, early detection can be difficult. We aimed to validate the predictive rule-in value of the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE most severe alarming signs or symptoms to identify SI in children. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: The 16 most severe ("red" features of the NICE traffic light system were validated in seven different primary care and emergency department settings, including 6,260 children presenting with acute illness. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: We focussed on the individual predictive value of single red features for SI and their combinations. Results were presented as positive likelihood ratios, sensitivities and specificities. We categorised "general" and "disease-specific" red features. Changes in pre-test probability versus post-test probability for SI were visualised in Fagan nomograms. RESULTS: Almost all red features had rule-in value for SI, but only four individual red features substantially raised the probability of SI in more than one dataset: "does not wake/stay awake", "reduced skin turgor", "non-blanching rash", and "focal neurological signs". The presence of ≥ 3 red features improved prediction of SI but still lacked strong rule-in value as likelihood ratios were below 5. CONCLUSIONS: The rule-in value of the most severe alarming signs or symptoms of the NICE traffic light system for identifying children with SI was limited, even when multiple red features were present. Our study highlights the importance of assessing the predictive value of alarming signs in clinical guidelines prior to widespread implementation in routine practice.

  6. Healthcare use for acute gastrointestinal illness in two Inuit communities: Rigolet and Iqaluit, Canada

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    Sherilee L. Harper

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of self-reported acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI in Rigolet, Nunatsiavut, and Iqaluit, Nunavut, is higher than reported elsewhere in Canada; as such, understanding AGI-related healthcare use is important for healthcare provision, public health practice and surveillance of AGI. Objectives: This study described symptoms, severity and duration of self-reported AGI in the general population and examined the incidence and factors associated with healthcare utilization for AGI in these 2 Inuit communities. Design: Cross-sectional survey data were analysed using multivariable exact logistic regression to examine factors associated with individuals’ self-reported healthcare and over-the-counter (OTC medication utilization related to AGI symptoms. Results: In Rigolet, few AGI cases used healthcare services [4.8% (95% CI=1.5–14.4%]; in Iqaluit, some cases used healthcare services [16.9% (95% CI=11.2–24.7%]. Missing traditional activities due to AGI (OR=3.8; 95% CI=1.18–12.4 and taking OTC medication for AGI symptoms (OR=3.8; 95% CI=1.2–15.1 were associated with increased odds of using healthcare services in Iqaluit. In both communities, AGI severity and secondary symptoms (extreme tiredness, headache, muscle pains, chills were significantly associated with increased odds of taking OTC medication. Conclusions: While rates of self-reported AGI were higher in Inuit communities compared to non-Inuit communities in Canada, there were lower rates of AGI-related healthcare use in Inuit communities compared to other regions in Canada. As such, the rates of healthcare use for a given disease can differ between Inuit and non-Inuit communities, and caution should be exercised in making comparisons between Inuit and non-Inuit health outcomes based solely on clinic records and healthcare use.

  7. Urinary L-FABP predicts poor outcomes in critically ill patients with early acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Sharidan K; Clark, Amanda J; Bian, Aihua; Shintani, Ayumi K; Wickersham, Nancy E; Ware, Lorraine B; Ikizler, T Alp; Siew, Edward D

    2015-03-01

    Biomarker studies for early detection of acute kidney injury (AKI) have been limited by nonselective testing and uncertainties in using small changes in serum creatinine as a reference standard. Here we examine the ability of urine L-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), interleukin-18 (IL-18), and kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) to predict injury progression, dialysis, or death within 7 days in critically ill adults with early AKI. Of 152 patients with known baseline creatinine examined, 36 experienced the composite outcome. Urine L-FABP demonstrated an area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC-ROC) of 0.79 (95% confidence interval 0.70-0.86), which improved to 0.82 (95% confidence interval 0.75-0.90) when added to the clinical model (AUC-ROC of 0.74). Urine NGAL, IL-18, and KIM-1 had AUC-ROCs of 0.65, 0.64, and 0.62, respectively, but did not significantly improve discrimination of the clinical model. The category-free net reclassification index improved with urine L-FABP (total net reclassification index for nonevents 31.0%) and urine NGAL (total net reclassification index for events 33.3%). However, only urine L-FABP significantly improved the integrated discrimination index. Thus, modest early changes in serum creatinine can help target biomarker measurement for determining prognosis with urine L-FABP, providing independent and additive prognostic information when combined with clinical predictors.

  8. Bartonella henselae as a cause of acute-onset febrile illness in cats

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    Edward B Breitschwerdt

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Case series summary At different time points spanning 6 months, three adopted feral flea-infested cats, residing in the household of a veterinary technician, became acutely anorexic, lethargic and febrile. Enrichment blood culture/PCR using Bartonella alpha Proteobacteria growth medium (BAPGM confirmed initial infection with the same Bartonella henselae genotype in all three cases. With the exception of anemia and neutropenia, complete blood counts, serum biochemical profiles and urinalysis results were within reference intervals. Also, tests for feline leukemia virus, feline immunodeficiency virus, Toxoplasma gondii and feline coronavirus antibodies were negative. Serial daily temperature monitoring in one case confirmed a cyclic, relapsing febrile temperature pattern during 1 month, with resolution during and after treatment with azithromycin. Bartonella henselae Western immunoblot (WB results did not consistently correlate with BAPGM enrichment blood culture/PCR results or B henselae indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA titers, and WB titration results were not informative for establishing antibiotic treatment failure. During the respective follow-up periods, no illnesses or additional febrile episodes were reported, despite repeat documentation of B henselae bacteremia in two cats available for follow-up (one with the same genotype and the other with a different B henselae genotype; one cat was, unfortunately, killed by dogs before follow-up testing. Relevance and novel information We conclude that microbiological diagnosis and treatment of B henselae infection in cats can be challenging, that antibody titration results and resolution of clinical abnormalities may not correlate with a therapeutic cure, and that fever and potentially neutropenia should be differential diagnostic considerations for young cats with suspected bartonellosis.

  9. Recent advances in mechanical ventilation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

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    Nuttapol Rittayamai

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is characterised by different degrees of severity and different stages. Understanding these differences can help to better adapt the ventilatory settings to protect the lung from ventilator-induced lung injury by reducing hyperinflation or keeping the lung open when it is possible. The same therapies may be useful and beneficial in certain forms of ARDS, and risky or harmful at other stages: this includes high positive end-expiratory pressure, allowance of spontaneous breathing activity or use of noninvasive ventilation. The severity of the disease is the primary indicator to individualise treatment. Monitoring tools such as oesophageal pressure or lung volume measurements may also help to set the ventilator. At an earlier stage, an adequate lung protective strategy may also help to prevent the development of ARDS.

  10. Severe acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by unintentional sewing machine lubricant ingestion: A case report

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    Sunil Kishore

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sewing machine oil ingestion is rare but is possible due to its availability at home. Chemically, it belongs to hydrocarbon family which is toxic if aspirated, owing to their physical properties such as high volatility and low viscosity. On the contrary, sewing machine lubricant has high viscosity and low volatility which makes it aspiration less likely. The main danger of hydrocarbon ingestion is chemical pneumonitis which may be as severe as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. We report a case of a 5-year-old girl with accidental ingestion of sewing machine lubricant oil, who subsequently developed ARDS refractory to mechanical ventilation. There was much improvement with airway pressure release ventilation mode of ventilation, but the child succumbed to death due to pulmonary hemorrhage.

  11. Analysis of high risk factors related to acute respiratory distress syndrome following severe thoracoabdominal injuries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Guo-shou; BAI Xiang-jun; ZHAN Cheng-ye

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the high risk factors related to acute respiratory distress syndrome ( ARDS ) following serious thoracoabdominal injuries.Methods: The clinical data of 282 patients with serious thoracoabdominal injuries were retrospectively studied. Univariate and Cox multivariate regression analysis were used to determine the risk factors related to ARDS following serious thoracoabdominal injuries.Results: The incidence of ARDS was 31.9% (90/282) in patients with serious thoracoabdominal injuries.The mortality caused by ARDS was 37.8% (34/90). The univariate analysis and multivariate analysis demonstrated that the clinical conditions such as elder age, shock,dyspnea, abnormal arterial blood gas, hemopneumothorax,pulmonary contusion, flail chest, coexisting pulmonary diseases, multiple abdominal injury and high ISS score were the independent high risk factors related to ARDS.Conclusion: There are many high risk factors related to ARDS following severe thoracoabdominal injuries, which should be detected early and treated timely to decrease the incidence and mortality of ARDS.

  12. Continuous positive airway pressure and noninvasive ventilation in prehospital treatment of patients with acute respiratory failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, Skule A; Bøtker, Morten Thingemann; Riddervold, Ingunn S;

    2014-01-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and noninvasive ventilation (NIV) are frequently used inhospital for treating respiratory failure, especially in treatment of acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Early initiation of treatment...... is important for success and introduction already in the prehospital setting may be beneficial. Our goal was to assess the evidence for an effect of prehospital CPAP or NIV as a supplement to standard medical treatment alone on the following outcome measures; mortality, hospital length of stay, intensive care...... examine prehospital CPAP. Of these, only one small, randomized controlled trial shows a reduced mortality rate and a reduced intubation rate with supplemental CPAP. The other three studies have neutral findings, but in two of these a trend toward lower intubation rate is found. The effect of supplemental...

  13. Surveillance of acute respiratory infections among outpatients: A pilot study in Isfahan city

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    Abbasali Javadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Considering that there was not any regional survey in Isfahan, Iran regarding the epidemiology of acute respiratory tract infections (ARTI in different age groups of general population, the aim of this study was to determine the epidemiologic feature of ARTIs in Isfahan using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR method. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, patients aged 15 years old. Rhinovirus was the most common cause of ARTI in patients aged 50 years. Influenza virus B was the most common cause of ARTI in patients aged 5-50 years. Conclusion: Our study provides baseline information on the epidemiologic and clinical feature of outpatients with ARTIs in Isfahan city. Though our findings in this pilot study could be helpful in diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of ARTI, planning preventive interventional.

  14. Antiviral activity of cepharanthine against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chuan-hai; XIONG Sheng; LI Jiu-xiang; QI Shu-yuan; WANG Yi-fei; LIU Xin-jian; LU Jia-hai; QIAN Chui-wen; WAN Zhuo-yue; YAN Xin-ge; ZHENG Huan-ying; ZHANG Mei-ying

    2005-01-01

    @@ Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is the first severe viral epidemic we encountered this century, which once spread in more than thirty countries in 2003.1 The etiological agent of SARS has been confirmed to be a novel coronavirus, namely SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV),2,3 and the first outbreak of SARS has been successfully controlled worldwide, but the identification of SARS-CoV isolated from wild animals, the emergence of some sporadic SARS cases later after that outbreak, all suggest that the recurrence of such an epidemic is not unlikely in the future. In this case, development of SARS vaccines and specific drugs is undoubtedly essential to the control and prevention from the possible outbreak.4,5

  15. A Curious Case of Acute Respiratory Failure: Is It Antisynthetase Syndrome?

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    Gurveen Malhotra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antisynthetase (AS syndrome is a major subgroup of inflammatory myopathies seen in a minority of patients with dermatomyositis and polymyositis. Although it is usually associated with elevated creatine phosphokinase level, some patients may have amyopathic dermatomyositis (ADM like presentation with predominant skin involvement. Interstitial lung disease (ILD is the main pulmonary manifestation and may be severe thereby determining the prognosis. It may rarely present with a very aggressive course resulting in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. We report a case of a 43-year-old male who presented with nonresolving pneumonia who was eventually diagnosed to have ADM through a skin biopsy without any muscle weakness. ADM may be associated with rapidly progressive course of interstitial lung disease (ADM-ILD which is associated with high mortality. Differentiation between ADM-ILD and AS syndrome may be difficult in the absence of positive serology and clinical presentation may help in clinching the diagnosis.

  16. Misdiagnostic analysis of clinically diagnosed severe acute respiratory syndrome after following up 197 convalescent patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU You-ning; TIAN Qing; HU Hong; XIE Li-xin; FAN Bao-xing; XU Hong-min; CHEN Wei-jun

    2005-01-01

    @@ The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is an emerging and highly contagious infection caused by a newly discovered strain of coronavirus.1 Since the clinical case definition of SARS is similar to other severe atypical pneumonias, specific laboratory tests that can accurately diagnose SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) infection are important. However, published data are insufficient to investigate whether clinically diagnosed SARS patients may include some non-SARS pneumonia. Therefore, we aimed to determine clinical and laboratory features to differentiate SARS patients from non-SARS pneumonias that could reduce misdiagnosis of SARS. A retrospective analysis of clinical and laboratory characteristics after the initial onset of SARS, as well as its convalescent-phase, was examined from clinically diagnosed 197 SARS patients.

  17. [Pulmonary contusion and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) as complications of blunt chest trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalska, Agata; Jurczyk, Agnieszka P; Machała, Waldemar; Szram, Stefan; Berent, Jarosław

    2009-01-01

    Blunt chest traumas are common nowadays due to development of motor transport. They are associated with high mortality rates because of serious injuries of internal organs. The mechanisms of injuries are complex and may cause damages ranging from small ones, such as bruises or abrasions, to life-threatening trauma. Among typical injuries there are rib fractures, sternal fractures, pneumothorax, hemothorax, diaphragm lacerations, pulmonary contusions, cardiac tamponade, cardiac rupture and many others. The authors of the article would like to emphasize the pathophysiology and diagnostic difficulties in such blunt chest trauma complications as pulmonary contusions and acute respiratory distress syndrome, for which no causal treatment is available and only early diagnosis and administration of symptomatic treatment may increase the patients' chances to survive. In Forensic Medicine Department, Medical University of Łódź, an opinion was issued on a case which illustrates the clinical problem.

  18. Molecular biological analysis of genotyping and phylogeny of severe acute respiratory syndrome associated coronavirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王志刚; 李兰娟; 罗芸; 张俊彦; 王敏雅; 程苏云; 张严峻; 王晓萌; 卢亦愚; 吴南屏; 梅玲玲; 王赞信

    2004-01-01

    Background SARS-CoV is the causative agent of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) which has been associated with outbreaks of SARS in Guangdong, Hong Kong and Beijing of China, and other regions worldwide. SARS-CoV from human has shown some variations but its origin is still unknown. The genotyping and phylogeny of SARS-CoV were analyzed and reported in this paper. Methods Full or partial genomes of 44 SARS-CoV strains were collected from GenBank. The genotype, single nucleotide polymorphism and phylogeny of these SARS-CoV strains were analyzed by molecular biological, bioinformatic and epidemiological methods. Conclusion The results mentioned above suggest that SARS-CoV is responding to host immunological pressures and experiencing variation which provide clues, information and evidence of molecular biology for the clinical pathology, vaccine developing and epidemic investigation.

  19. Therapeutic options for acute cough due to upper respiratory infections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Ian M

    2012-02-01

    Cough due to upper respiratory tract infections (URIs) is one of the most frequent complaints encountered by pediatric health-care providers, and one of the most disruptive symptoms for children and families. Despite the frequency of URIs, there is limited evidence to support the few therapeutic agents currently available in the United States (US) to treat acute cough due to URI. Published, well-designed, contemporary research supporting the efficacy of narcotics (codeine, hydrocodone) and US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved over-the-counter (OTC) oral antitussives and expectorants (dextromethorphan, diphenhydramine, chlophedianol, and guaifenesin) is absent for URI-associated pediatric cough. Alternatively, honey and topically applied vapor rubs may be effective antitussives.

  20. Lung Transplantation in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Caused by Influenza Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youjin Chang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is a life-threatening disease with a high mortality rate. Although many therapeutic trials have been performed for improving the mortality of severe ARDS, limited strategies have demonstrated better outcomes. Recently, advanced rescue therapies such as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO made it possible to consider lung transplantation (LTPL in patients with ARDS, but data is insufficient. We report a 62-year-old man who underwent LTPL due to ARDS with no underlying lung disease. He was admitted to the hospital due to influenza A pneumonia-induced ARDS. Although he was supported by ECMO, he progressively deteriorated. We judged that his lungs were irreversibly damaged and decided he needed to undergo LTPL. Finally, bilateral sequential double-lung transplantation was successfully performed. He has since been alive for three years. Conclusively, we demonstrate that LTPL can be a therapeutic option in patients with severe ARDS refractory to conventional therapies.

  1. Quantitative assessment of relative roles of drivers of acute respiratory diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Prashant; Baruah, Jurismita

    2014-10-01

    Several thousands of people, including children, suffer from acute respiratory disease (ARD) every year worldwide. Pro-active planning and mitigation for these diseases require identification of the major drivers in a location-specific manner. While the importance of air pollutants in ARD has been extensively studied and emphasized, the role of weather variables has been less explored. With Delhi with its large population and pollution as a test case, we examine the relative roles of air pollution and weather (cold days) in ARD. It is shown that both the number of cold days and air pollution play important roles in ARD load; however, the number of cold days emerges as the major driver. These conclusions are consistent with analyses for several other states in India. The robust association between ARD load and cold days provides basis for estimating and predicting ARD load through dynamical model, as well as impact of climate change.

  2. Intravascular lymphoma presenting as a specific pulmonary embolism and acute respiratory failure: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgin-Lavialle Sophie

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The occurrence of an intravascular lymphoma with severe pulmonary involvement mimicking pulmonary embolism is described. Case presentation A 38-year-old man was referred to our intensive care unit with acute respiratory failure and long lasting fever. Appropriate investigations failed to demonstrate any bacterial, viral, parasitic or mycobacterial infection. A chest computed tomography scan ruled out any proximal or sub-segmental pulmonary embolism but the ventilation/perfusion lung scan concluded that there was a high probability of pulmonary embolism. The cutaneous biopsy pathology diagnosed intravascular lymphoma. Conclusion Intravascular lymphoma is a rare disease characterized by exclusive or predominant growth of neoplastic cells within the lumina of small blood vessels. Lung involvement seems to be common, but predominant lung presentation of this disease is rare. In our patient, urgent chemotherapy, along with adequate supportive care allowed complete recovery.

  3. Coupled plasma filtration adsorption for the treatment of a patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute kidney injury: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucisano, Gaetano; Capria, Maria; Matera, Giovanni; Presta, Pierangela; Comi, Nicolino; Talarico, Roberta; Rametti, Linda; Quirino, Angela; Giancotti, Aida; Fuiano, Giorgio

    2011-10-01

    Coupled plasma filtration adsorption (CPFA) is an extracorporeal blood purification therapy based on non-specific pro- and anti-inflammatory mediator adsorption on a special resin cartridge coupled with continuous veno-venous haemofiltration or continuous veno-venous haemodiafiltration and is one of the emerging treatments for septic patients. However, in the literature, there are limited data about its efficacy in treating patients with acute diseases but without the traditional criteria for sepsis. We describe the case of a 43-year-old male who developed acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to pneumonia and acute kidney injury, whose clinical conditions rapidly improved after early CPFA therapy.

  4. External validation of the APPS, a new and simple outcome prediction score in patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Lieuwe D; Schouten, Laura R; Cremer, Olaf L; Ong, David S Y; Schultz, Marcus J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A recently developed prediction score based on age, arterial oxygen partial pressure to fractional inspired oxygen ratio (PaO2/FiO2) and plateau pressure (abbreviated as 'APPS') was shown to accurately predict mortality in patients diagnosed with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (

  5. Value of oxygenation index in assessment of outcome of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome treated by mechanical ventilator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔莉

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the value of oxygenation index in assessing the outcome of mechanical ventilated patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome(ARDS).Methods From September 2008 to September 2013,patients meeting the Berlin definition of ARDS were evaluated in this retrospective study.Data included oxygenation

  6. Influence of prone position ventilation in conjunction with inhalation of NO on acute respiratory distress syndrome in patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    於江泉

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of prone position ventilation(PPV) combined with inhalation of NO on oxygenation of acute respiratory distress syndrome(ARDS)patients. Methods A total of 21 patients with ARDS composed of 15 male and 6 female aged ranging from 2 to

  7. Chlamydia pneumoniae and mycoplasma pneumoniae in children with acute respiratory infection in general practices in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjhie, J.H.T.; Dorigo-Zetsma, J.W.; Roosendaal, R.; Brule, A.J.C. van den; Bestebroer, T.M.; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C.M.J.E.

    2000-01-01

    In this retrospective study Chlamydia pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in samples (n=457) from children presenting with acute respiratory infection to general practitioners during 1992-97. Samples were collected in autumn and winter, an

  8. Asthma and pneumonia among children less than five years with acute respiratory symptoms in Mulago Hospital, Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nantanda, Rebecca; Tumwine, James K; Ndeezi, Grace;

    2013-01-01

    Pneumonia is considered the major cause of mortality among children with acute respiratory disease in low-income countries but may be over-diagnosed at the cost of under-diagnosing asthma. We report the magnitude of asthma and pneumonia among "under-fives" with cough and difficulty breathing, based...

  9. [The use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome due to pandemic influenza].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapik, Piotr; Przybylski, Roman; Nadziakiewicz, Paweł; Koba, Rafał; Maciejewski, Tomasz; Borowicz, Marcin; Włoczka, Grzegorz; Pawlak, Szymon; Zembala, Marian

    2011-01-01

    Pandemic influenza particularly often is associated with symptoms of acute respiratory failure, and in case of refractory hypoxemia patients may have indications for the extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). The paper presents a case of a pandemic influenza virus infection, where classical indications for veno-venous ECMO occured. Practical aspects of this kind of treatment in the intensive care unit are discussed.

  10. Imbalance between pulmonary angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 activity in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wosten-van Asperen, Roelie M.; Bos, Albert; Bem, Reinout A.; Dierdorp, Barbara S.; Dekker, Tamara; van Goor, Harry; Kamilic, Jelena; van der Loos, Chris M.; van den Berg, Elske; Bruijn, Martijn; van Woensel, Job B.; Lutter, Rene

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Angiotensin-converting enzyme and its effector peptide angiotensin II have been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Recently, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 was identified as the counter-regulatory enzyme of angiotensin-converting enzyme that converts a

  11. Viral etiology and clinical profiles of children with severe acute respiratory infections in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: No comprehensive analysis is available on the viral etiology and clinical characterization among children with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI in China during 2009 H1N1 pandemic and post-pandemic period. METHODS: Cohort of 370 hospitalized children (1 to 72 months with SARI from May 2008 to March 2010 was enrolled in this study. Nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA specimens were tested by a commercial assay for 18 respiratory viral targets. The viral distribution and its association with clinical character were statistically analyzed. RESULTS: Viral pathogen was detected in 350 (94.29% of children with SARI. Overall, the most popular viruses were: enterovirus/rhinovirus (EV/RV (54.05%, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV (51.08%, human bocavirus (BoCA (33.78%, human parainfluenzaviruse type 3 (PIV3 (15.41%, and adenovirus (ADV (12.97%. Pandemic H1N1 was the dominant influenza virus (IFV but was only detected in 20 (5.41% of children. Moreover, detection rate of RSV and human metapneumovirus (hMPV among suburb participants were significantly higher than that of urban area (P<0.05. Incidence of VSARI among suburb participants was also significant higher, especially among those of 24 to 59 months group (P<0.05. CONCLUSION: Piconaviruses (EV/RV and paramyxoviruses are the most popular viral pathogens among children with SARI in this study. RSV and hMPV significantly increase the risk of SARI, especially in children younger than 24 months. Higher incidence of VSARI and more susceptibilities to RSV and hMPV infections were found in suburban patients.

  12. Evidence-based clinical practice guideline: inhaled nitric oxide for neonates with acute hypoxic respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBlasi, Robert M; Myers, Timothy R; Hess, Dean R

    2010-12-01

    Inhaled nitric oxide (INO) is a colorless, odorless gas that is also a potent pulmonary vasodilator. When given via the inhaled route it is a selective pulmonary vasodilator. INO is approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of term and near-term neonates with hypoxemic respiratory failure associated with clinical or echocardiographic evidence of pulmonary arterial hypertension. A systematic review of the literature was conducted with the intention of making recommendations related to the clinical use of INO for its FDA-approved indication. Specifically, we wrote these evidence-based clinical practice guidelines to address the following questions: (1) What is the evidence for labeled use? (2) What are the specific indications for INO for neonates with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure? (3) Does the use of INO impact oxygenation, mortality, or utilization of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)? (4) Does INO affect long-term outcomes? (5) Is INO cost-effective therapy? (6) How is the appropriate dosing regimen and dose response to INO established? (7) How is the dose of INO titrated and weaned? (8) Which INO delivery system should be used? (9) How should INO be implemented with different respiratory support devices? (10) What adverse effects of INO should be monitored, and at what frequency? (11) What physiologic parameters should be monitored during INO? (12) Is scavenging of gases necessary to protect the caregivers? Using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) scoring system, 22 recommendations are developed for the use of INO in newborns.

  13. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus envelope protein ion channel activity promotes virus fitness and pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose L Nieto-Torres

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Deletion of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV envelope (E gene attenuates the virus. E gene encodes a small multifunctional protein that possesses ion channel (IC activity, an important function in virus-host interaction. To test the contribution of E protein IC activity in virus pathogenesis, two recombinant mouse-adapted SARS-CoVs, each containing one single amino acid mutation that suppressed ion conductivity, were engineered. After serial infections, mutant viruses, in general, incorporated compensatory mutations within E gene that rendered active ion channels. Furthermore, IC activity conferred better fitness in competition assays, suggesting that ion conductivity represents an advantage for the virus. Interestingly, mice infected with viruses displaying E protein IC activity, either with the wild-type E protein sequence or with the revertants that restored ion transport, rapidly lost weight and died. In contrast, mice infected with mutants lacking IC activity, which did not incorporate mutations within E gene during the experiment, recovered from disease and most survived. Knocking down E protein IC activity did not significantly affect virus growth in infected mice but decreased edema accumulation, the major determinant of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS leading to death. Reduced edema correlated with lung epithelia integrity and proper localization of Na+/K+ ATPase, which participates in edema resolution. Levels of inflammasome-activated IL-1β were reduced in the lung airways of the animals infected with viruses lacking E protein IC activity, indicating that E protein IC function is required for inflammasome activation. Reduction of IL-1β was accompanied by diminished amounts of TNF and IL-6 in the absence of E protein ion conductivity. All these key cytokines promote the progression of lung damage and ARDS pathology. In conclusion, E protein IC activity represents a new determinant for SARS

  14. THE EFFECTS OF TIME-RELEASED GARLIC POWDER TABLETS ON ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISEASES IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IGOR SOBENIN

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In spite of commonly spread positive opinion about the antibacterial and antiviral properties of garlic, very few and fragmented data exist on the benefits of garlic and garlic-based preparations in the prevention of acute respiratory diseases (ARD. This study was performed to elucidate the effect of timereleased garlic powder tablets (Allicor in prevention of ARD in children. At the first stage, in open-labeled 5-months study it has been shown that ARD morbidity was reduced by 2.4-fold in 172 Allicor-treated (600 mg daily schoolchildren aged 7-16 as compared to 468 controls. At the second stage, the effects of Allicor (300 mg daily on ARD morbidity were investigated in the double-blinded placebo-controlled randomized 5-months comparative study in 42 children aged 10-12 in comparison with 41 placebo-treated children and 73 benzimidazole-treated children. Allicor treatment reduced ARD morbidity by 2.4-fold as compared to placebo, and by 1.7-fold as compared to benzimidazole. Health index in Allicor-treated group was 1.5-fold higher as compared either to placebo- or benzimidazole-treated children. The results of this study have demonstrated that garlic powder tablets Allicor are effective in non-specific prevention of acute respiratory infections in children and possess no side effects. Additionally, the commonly used ARD prevention withbenzimidazole turned to be entirely ineffective in placebocontrolled study, so the development of new useful and safe efficient drugs like garlic-based preparations is of ultimate importance.

  15. Optimising Diagnosis and Antibiotic Prescribing for Acutely Ill Children in Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-16

    Sepsis; Bacteraemia; Meningitis; Abscess; Pneumonia; Osteomyelitis; Cellulitis; Gastro-enteritis With Dehydration; Complicated Urinary Tract Infection; Viral Respiratory Infection Complicated With Hypoxia

  16. Potential therapeutic application of adult stem cells in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Jian-xin; LI Li

    2009-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains a poor prognosis in spite of the recent development of new therapeutic strategies. Cell-based therapy with stem cells has been considered as a promising way for the treatment of vital organ damage. Putative endogenous stem cells have been shown to be located within the adult lung in the basal layer of the upper airways, within or near pulmonary neu-roendocrine cell rests, at the bronchoalveolar junction, as well as within the alveolar epithelium. These stem cells are hypothesized to be the source of lung regeneration and repair. But this mechanism seems to be insufficient after lung injury. There is increasing excitement over the last few years with the suggestion that exogenous stem cells may offer new treatment options for ARDS. Exogenous stem cells have the abihty to differentiate and function as both airway and lung parenchymal epithelial cells in both in vitro and in-creasingly in vivo experiments. However, there is great con-troversy concerning the repair effect of adult stem cells in lung injury. This review evaluates the advances in endog-enous respiratory stem cells, and assesses the evidence for the use of stem cells in the repair of lung injury.

  17. Pneumonia, Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, and Early Immune-Modulator Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Yil Lee

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is caused by infectious insults, such as pneumonia from various pathogens or related to other noninfectious events. Clinical and histopathologic characteristics are similar across severely affected patients, suggesting that a common mode of immune reaction may be involved in the immunopathogenesis of ARDS. There may be etiologic substances that have an affinity for respiratory cells and induce lung cell injury in cases of ARDS. These substances originate not only from pathogens, but also from injured host cells. At the molecular level, these substances have various sizes and biochemical characteristics, classifying them as protein substances and non-protein substances. Immune cells and immune proteins may recognize and act on these substances, including pathogenic proteins and peptides, depending upon the size and biochemical properties of the substances (this theory is known as the protein-homeostasis-system hypothesis. The severity or chronicity of ARDS depends on the amount of etiologic substances with corresponding immune reactions, the duration of the appearance of specific immune cells, or the repertoire of specific immune cells that control the substances. Therefore, treatment with early systemic immune modulators (corticosteroids and/or intravenous immunoglobulin as soon as possible may reduce aberrant immune responses in the potential stage of ARDS.

  18. Acute respiratory distress syndrome due to vivax malaria: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André V. Lomar

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Severe pulmonary involvement in malaria has been frequently reported in cases of Plasmodium falciparum infection, but rarely in vivax malaria. Among the 11 previous cases of vivax-related severe respiratory involvement described in the literature, all except one developed it after the beginning of anti-malarial treatment; these appear to correspond to an exacerbation of the inflammatory response. We report the case of a 43-year-old Brazilian woman living in a malaria-endemic area, who presented acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS caused by P. vivax before starting anti-malarial treatment. The diagnosis was made based on microscopic methods. A negative rapid immunochromatographic assay, based on the detection of Histidine Rich Protein-2 (HRP-2 of P. falciparum, indicated that falciparum malaria was unlikely. After specific anti-plasmodial therapy and intensive supportive care, the patient was discharged from the hospital. We conclude that vivax malaria-associated ARDS can develop before anti-malarial therapy.

  19. Burkholderia mallei CLH001 Attenuated Vaccine Strain Is Immunogenic and Protects against Acute Respiratory Glanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Christopher L; Mott, Tiffany M; Muruato, Laura A; Sbrana, Elena; Torres, Alfredo G

    2016-08-01

    Burkholderia mallei is the causative agent of glanders, an incapacitating disease with high mortality rates in respiratory cases. Its endemicity and ineffective treatment options emphasize its public health threat and highlight the need for a vaccine. Live attenuated vaccines are considered the most viable vaccine strategy for Burkholderia, but single-gene-deletion mutants have not provided complete protection. In this study, we constructed the select-agent-excluded B. mallei ΔtonB Δhcp1 (CLH001) vaccine strain and investigated its ability to protect against acute respiratory glanders. Here we show that CLH001 is attenuated, safe, and effective at protecting against lethal B. mallei challenge. Intranasal administration of CLH001 to BALB/c and NOD SCID gamma (NSG) mice resulted in complete survival without detectable colonization or abnormal organ histopathology. Additionally, BALB/c mice intranasally immunized with CLH001 in a prime/boost regimen were fully protected against lethal challenge with the B. mallei lux (CSM001) wild-type strain.

  20. Acute Respiratory Disease at a Chinese Military Recruitment Training Center:Three-Year Consecutive Investigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Background Military recruits are at a higher risk of acute respiratory disease (ARD) and the causative agents might change over time, which needs to be investigated. Methods The nasopharyngeal swabs and blood samples were consecutively collected from conscripts for three years in a military training center. The real-time lfuorescent quantitative PCR assays were conducted for 15 species of common respiratory pathogens; the serum anti-Legionella pneumophila antibodies were detected by indirect immunolfuorescence (IIF) assay, and serum anti-Microplasma pneumoniae antibodies, serum anti-in-lfuenza B virus and anti-inlfuenza A virus-IgM and IgG were detected by ELISA. Results The prevalences of ARD were 59.3% (108/182) in 2008, 23.3% (50/215) in 2009,and 19.6% (40/204) in 2010. Among the patients with ARD from 2008 to 2010, the inlfuenza B virus infection accounted for 45.4%, 30.0% and 55.0%, and seasonal inlfuenza A virus infection for 8.3%, 8.0% and 5.0%, respectively; the positive rates of serum anti-Legionella pneumophila and anti-Microplasma pneumoniae antibodies in recruits was lower than 10% each year respectively in the three years without diagnostic signiifcance. Conclusion The early appropriate diagnosis and treatment of ARD in military personnel will ensure the power strength of armed forces.

  1. Mechanical Ventilation during Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Patients with Acute Severe Respiratory Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wan-Jie; Chen, Kun; Ni, Hongying

    2017-01-01

    Conventionally, a substantial number of patients with acute respiratory failure require mechanical ventilation (MV) to avert catastrophe of hypoxemia and hypercapnia. However, mechanical ventilation per se can cause lung injury, accelerating the disease progression. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides an alternative to rescue patients with severe respiratory failure that conventional mechanical ventilation fails to maintain adequate gas exchange. The physiology behind ECMO and its interaction with MV were reviewed. Next, we discussed the timing of ECMO initiation based on the risks and benefits of ECMO. During the running of ECMO, the protective ventilation strategy can be employed without worrying about catastrophic hypoxemia and carbon dioxide retention. There is a large body of evidence showing that protective ventilation with low tidal volume, high positive end-expiratory pressure, and prone positioning can provide benefits on mortality outcome. More recently, there is an increasing popularity on the use of awake and spontaneous breathing for patients undergoing ECMO, which is thought to be beneficial in terms of rehabilitation. PMID:28127231

  2. A case of lung cancer associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome after thoracic radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enoki, Masafumi; Tojima, Hirokazu [Tokyo Rosai Hospital (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    A 73-year-old man presented with dyspnea, cough, fever, appetite loss and stridor due to bronchial stenosis. Fiber-optic bronchoscopy revealed an endobronchial lesion in the right main bronchus and biopsy specimens showed poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. The clinical stage of lung cancer was IIIB (T4N2M0). The patient received 60 Gy in 30 fractions over 43 days to a field including the right hilum and mediastinum. The tumor decreased in size and stenosis of the bronchus disappeared. A week after completion of radiation the patient began to have high grade fever and dyspnea, and progressive hypoxia developed. A chest radiograph showed diffuse bilateral interstitial infiltrates. Despite mechanical ventilation with PEEP and the administration of steroids, he died of respiratory failure three weeks after completion of radiation. Necropsy specimens obtained from the left lung revealed massive deposition of fibrin in the alveolar airspaces associated with hyaline membranes and hyperplasia of type II cells indicating diffuse alveolar damage. The patient had mild pulmonary fibrosis on a CT scan taken before the start of radiotherapy. We conclude that care should be taken if the case has pulmonary fibrosis because radiation therapy can precipitate severe radiation pneumonitis and acute respiratory distress syndrome in such cases. (author)

  3. [Incidence and risk factors for diarrhoea and acute respiratory infections in urban communities of Pernambuco, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez, M L; Mosquera, M; Cuevas, L E; González, E S; Veras, I C; Luz, E O; Batista Filho, M; Gurgel, R Q

    1999-01-01

    Magnitude and distribution of Diarrhoea and Acute Respiratory Infections (ARI) in children were studied within a larger broader research that focused on health education. Two household surveys were conducted in a sample of families with at least one child under five years of Recife and Olinda in April-May 1992 and 1994. The total number of children studied was 5,436. The estimated adjusted annual incidence rate (AAIR) of diarrhoea was 2.7 episodes per child. The two-week incidence rate of diarrhoea was 10.2% for both years. Risk factors associated with higher incidence of diarrhoea were age (under two years), lack of sanitation facilities, and absence of electrical appliances in the household. Estimated AAIR of ARI was 9. 5 episodes per child. The two-week incidence rate of ARI was 41.0% in 1992 and 32.6% in 1994. Majority of ARIs affected the upper respiratory tract (75.9%). The only factor consistently associated with a higher risk of ARI was age (under three years). Study results indicate that both pathologies are still an important health problem for children under five in Pernambuco. In particular, in the case of diarrhoea the need for improving the access to basic services, such as water supply and sewage system is urgently needed.

  4. Human coronavirus EMC is not the same as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Stanley; Zhao, Jincun

    2013-01-15

    A newly identified betacoronavirus, human coronavirus EMC (HCoV-EMC), has been isolated from several patients with respiratory and renal disease in the Middle East. While only a few infected patients have been identified, the mortality of the infection is greater than 50%. Like its better-known cousin severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), HCoV-EMC appears to have originated from bats. In a recent article in mBio, Müller et al. described several important differences between the two viruses [M. A. Müller et al., mBio 3(6):e00515-12, 2012, doi:10.1128/mBio.00515-12]. Unlike SARS-CoV, HCoV-EMC can directly infect bat cells. As important, HCoV-EMC does not enter cells using the SARS-CoV receptor, human angiotensin-converting receptor-2 (hACE2). These results provide a strong incentive for identifying the host cell receptor used by HCoV-EMC. Identification of the receptor will provide insight into the pathogenesis of pulmonary and renal disease and may also suggest novel therapeutic interventions.

  5. Mechanical Ventilation during Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Patients with Acute Severe Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongheng Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventionally, a substantial number of patients with acute respiratory failure require mechanical ventilation (MV to avert catastrophe of hypoxemia and hypercapnia. However, mechanical ventilation per se can cause lung injury, accelerating the disease progression. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO provides an alternative to rescue patients with severe respiratory failure that conventional mechanical ventilation fails to maintain adequate gas exchange. The physiology behind ECMO and its interaction with MV were reviewed. Next, we discussed the timing of ECMO initiation based on the risks and benefits of ECMO. During the running of ECMO, the protective ventilation strategy can be employed without worrying about catastrophic hypoxemia and carbon dioxide retention. There is a large body of evidence showing that protective ventilation with low tidal volume, high positive end-expiratory pressure, and prone positioning can provide benefits on mortality outcome. More recently, there is an increasing popularity on the use of awake and spontaneous breathing for patients undergoing ECMO, which is thought to be beneficial in terms of rehabilitation.

  6. Efficacy of prone position in acute respiratory distress syndrome patients: A pathophysiology-based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulouras, Vasilios; Papathanakos, Georgios; Papathanasiou, Athanasios; Nakos, Georgios

    2016-05-04

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a syndrome with heterogeneous underlying pathological processes. It represents a common clinical problem in intensive care unit patients and it is characterized by high mortality. The mainstay of treatment for ARDS is lung protective ventilation with low tidal volumes and positive end-expiratory pressure sufficient for alveolar recruitment. Prone positioning is a supplementary strategy available in managing patients with ARDS. It was first described 40 years ago and it proves to be in alignment with two major ARDS pathophysiological lung models; the "sponge lung" - and the "shape matching" -model. Current evidence strongly supports that prone positioning has beneficial effects on gas exchange, respiratory mechanics, lung protection and hemodynamics as it redistributes transpulmonary pressure, stress and strain throughout the lung and unloads the right ventricle. The factors that individually influence the time course of alveolar recruitment and the improvement in oxygenation during prone positioning have not been well characterized. Although patients' response to prone positioning is quite variable and hard to predict, large randomized trials and recent meta-analyses show that prone position in conjunction with a lung-protective strategy, when performed early and in sufficient duration, may improve survival in patients with ARDS. This pathophysiology-based review and recent clinical evidence strongly support the use of prone positioning in the early management of severe ARDS systematically and not as a rescue maneuver or a last-ditch effort.

  7. Viral Agents Causing Acute Respiratory Infections in Children under Five: A Study from Eastern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravakar Mishra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acute respiratory infections (ARIs are important cause of mortality and morbidity in children under five in developing country. Methods. This observational study was conducted over two-year period in a tertiary care teaching hospital of Eastern India. Nasal and throat swabs were collected, transported to the laboratory at 2–8°C in viral transport media, and then processed for detection of viruses using mono/multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results. A total of 300 children aged 2–60 months with ARIs were included. The most common age group affected with LRI was 2–12 mo and with URI was >12–60 mo. Viruses were detected in 248 cases. In URI, 77 were positive for single virus and 19 were positive for more than one virus; in LRI, 113 were positive for single virus and 12 were positive for more than one virus. The most common viruses isolated from URI cases were rhinovirus and adenovirus. The most common viruses isolated from LRI cases were respiratory syncytial virus and influenza virus. Most cases occurred in the months of January, December, and August. Conclusion. Viruses constitute a significant cause of ARI in children under five. RSV, ADV, RV, and IFV were the most prevalent viruses isolated.

  8. Respiratory infectious phenotypes in acute exacerbation of COPD: an aid to length of stay and COPD Assessment Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai MY

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Meng-Yuan Dai,1 Jin-Ping Qiao,2 Yuan-Hong Xu,2 Guang-He Fei1 1Pulmonary Department, 2Department of Clinical Laboratory, First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, People’s Republic of China Purpose: To investigate the respiratory infectious phenotypes and their impact on length of stay (LOS and the COPD Assessment Test (CAT Scale in acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD. Patients and methods: We categorized 81 eligible patients into bacterial infection, viral infection, coinfection, and non-infectious groups. The respiratory virus examination was determined by a liquid bead array xTAG Respiratory Virus Panel in pharyngeal swabs, while bacterial infection was studied by conventional sputum culture. LOS and CAT as well as demographic information were recorded. Results: Viruses were detected in 38 subjects, bacteria in 17, and of these, seven had both. Influenza virus was the most frequently isolated virus, followed by enterovirus/rhinovirus, coronavirus, bocavirus, metapneumovirus, parainfluenza virus types 1, 2, 3, and 4, and respiratory syncytial virus. Bacteriologic analyses of sputum showed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most common bacteria, followed by Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The longest LOS and the highest CAT score were detected in coinfection group. CAT score was positively correlated with LOS. Conclusion: Respiratory infection is a common causative agent of exacerbations in COPD. Respiratory coinfection is likely to be a determinant of more severe acute exacerbations with longer LOS. CAT score may be a predictor of longer LOS in AECOPD. Keywords: COPD, acute exacerbation, respiratory infectious, phenotypes, LOS, CAT

  9. AB022. A case of severe leptospirosis with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akritidou, Sofia; Panagiotidou, Evangelia; Sourla, Evdokia; Konstanta, Soultana; Kotoulas, Serafim-Xrisovalantis; Bikos, Vasilios; Bagalas, Vasilios; Katalin, Fekete; Pitsiou, Georgia; Ioannis, Stanopoulos; Athanasia, Pataka

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a microbial infection which occurs in humans and animals and is caused by Leptospira (Leptospira spp.). In Greece, it occurs at a frequency of 0.22:100,000, and 24 severe cases have been reported in 2013. It manifests in three forms: anicteric (90%), icteric (5–10%) and severe. Severe leptospirosis can be a rare cause of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), leading to intubation, jaundice, alveolar bleeding and multi-organ failure. A 71-year-old male patient presented at the emergency department with dyspnea on exertion, fever, gastrointestinal disorders, muscle aches and fatigue, that started four days ago. Occupation with pigeons was also reported. Blood gas analysis revealed severe type I respiratory failure, and a chest CT was performed, revealing ARDS. The patient was intubated. Acute renal failure (urea: 238, creatinine: 4.81) that required renal replacement therapy developed along with increased bilirubin (max value of total: 8.2 with direct: 7.42), and positive direct and indirect Coombs test. Moreover, hemorrhage through the tracheal tube complicated the clinical condition, resulting to obstruction of tracheal tube. Furthermore, anemia, thrombocytopenia and severe leycocytosis were also observed (white blood cells: 42,620). Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage due to vasculitis and connective tissue disease was suspected, and a complete immunological control was ordered. Infectious pathogens, such as Str. Pneumoniae, Legionella, Mycoplasma, Leptospira spp., Chlamidia, HBV, HCV, influenza were also suspected and all the necessary samples were tested. He received levofloxacin, piperacillin/tazobactam, vibramycin, and oseltamivir, but after receiving the positive results for leptospira, antibiotic treatment was revised with the final choice of levofloxacin and piperacillin/tazobactam. Despite improvement of renal and liver function, leycocytosis, CRP and PCT values, high fever begun that was attributed at first to the Jarisch

  10. Chronic-Alcohol-Abuse-Induced Oxidative Stress in the Development of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

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    Yan Liang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic alcohol ingestion increases the risk of developing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, a severe form of acute lung injury, characterized by alveolar epithelial and endothelial barrier disruption and intense inflammation. Alcohol abuse is also associated with a higher incidence of sepsis or pneumonia resulting in a higher rate of admittance to intensive care, longer inpatient stays, higher healthcare costs, and a 2–4 times greater mortality rate. Chronic alcohol ingestion induced severe oxidative stress associated with increased ROS generation, depletion of the critical antioxidant glutathione (GSH, and oxidation of the thiol/disulfide redox potential in the alveolar epithelial lining fluid and exhaled breath condensate. Across intracellular and extracellular GSH pools in alveolar type II cells and alveolar macrophages, chronic alcohol ingestion consistently induced a 40–60 mV oxidation of GSH/GSSG suggesting that the redox potentials of different alveolar GSH pools are in equilibrium. Alcohol-induced GSH depletion or oxidation was associated with impaired functions of alveolar type II cells and alveolar macrophages but could be reversed by restoring GSH pools in the alveolar lining fluid. The aims of this paper are to address the mechanisms for alcohol-induced GSH depletion and oxidation and the subsequent effects in alveolar barrier integrity, modulation of the immune response, and apoptosis.

  11. [Effect of artificial ventilation on pulmonary capillary pressure in acute respiratory insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrousse, J; Tenaillon, A; Massabie, P; Simonneau, G; Lissac, J

    1977-05-07

    To determine the influence of intermittent positive pressure breathing (IPPB), the level of pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) was compared during IPPB and after a short period off the respirator in 68 occasions on 42 patients with an acute respiratory failure (ARF) of various etiologies. During IPPB, the average PCWP was in the normal range in patients with toxic or neurologic comas and in cases of increased pulmonary capillary permeability edema (IPCPE), PCWP slightly increased within chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) complicated with ARF and in hemodynamic acute pulmonary edema (HAPE). During the weaning stage, PCWP decreased in the groups of coma, COPD, and IPCPE, but increased in HAPE. The weaning test demonstrates that IPPB influenced PCWP in all patients. Therefore, PCWP cannot be assumed to represent the left ventricle filling pressure. The weaning test allows differentiation of IPCPE from HAPE. In the event of over-infusion or hypovolemia, PCWP measured under IPPB can lead to misinterpretation if not followed up by a second measurement off the respirator.

  12. Comparative evaluation of acute respiratory distress syndrome in patients with and without H1N1 infection at a tertiary care referral center

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    Tanvir Samra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available H1N1 subtype of influenza A virus has clinical presentation ranging from mild flu like illness to severe lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. The aim of our study was to compare the demographic characteristics, clinical presentation, and mortality of critically ill patients with (H1N1+ and without H1N1 infection (H1N1-. We retrospectively analyzed medical charts of patients admitted in "Swine Flu ICU" with ARDS from August 2009 to May 2010. Real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR assay was used for detection of H1N1 virus in the respiratory specimens. Clinical data from 106 (H1N1 , 45; H1N1+, 61 patients was collected and compared. Mean delay in presentation to our hospital was 5.7 ± 3.1 days and co-morbidities were present in two-fifth of the total admissions. Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA score of patients with and without H1N1 infection was comparable; 7.8 ± 3.5 and 6.6 ± 3.1 on day 1 and 7.2 ± 4.5 and 6.5 ± 3.1 on day 3, respectively. H1N1+ patients were relatively younger in age (34.2 ± 12.9 years vs. 42.8 ± 18.1, P = 0.005 but presented with significantly lower PaO 2 :FiO 2 ratio (87.3 ± 48.7 vs. 114 ± 51.7 in comparison to those who subsequently tested as H1N1 . The total leucocyte counts were significantly lower in H1N1+ patients during the first four days of illness but incidence of renal failure (P = 0.02 was higher in H1N1+ patients. The mortality in both the groups was high (H1N1+, 77%; H1N1, 68% but comparable. There was a mean delay of 5.7 ± 3.1 days in initiation of antivirals. Patients with H1N1 infection were relatively younger in age and with a significantly higher incidence of refractory hypoxia and acute renal failure. Mortality from ARDS reported in our study in both the groups was high but comparable.

  13. The potential role and limitations of echocardiography in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

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    Lazzeri, Chiara; Cianchi, Giovanni; Bonizzoli, Manuela; Batacchi, Stefano; Peris, Adriano; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2016-04-01

    Bedside use of Doppler echocardiography is being featured as a promising, clinically useful tool in assessing the pulmonary circulation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The present review is aimed at summarizing the available evidence obtained with echocardiography on right ventricle (RV) function and pulmonary circulation in ARDS and to highlight the potential of this technique in clinical practice (only articles in English language were considered). According to the available evidence on echocardiographic findings, the following conclusions can be drawn: (a) echocardiography (transthoracic and transesophageal) has a growing role in the management ARDS patients mainly because of the strict interactions between the lung (and ventilation) and the RV and pulmonary circulation; (b) there may be a continuum of alterations in RV size and function and pulmonary circulation which may end in the development of acute cor pulmonale, probably paralleling ARDS disease severity; and (c) the detection of acute cor pulmonale should prompt intensivists to tailor their ventilatory strategy to the individual patient depending on the echocardiography findings. Bearing in mind the clinical role and growing importance of echocardiography in ARDS and the available evidence on this topic, we present a flow chart including the parameters to be measured and the timing of echo exams in ARDS patients. Despite the important progress that echocardiography has gained in the evaluation of patients with ARDS, several open questions remain and echocardiography still appears to be underused in these patients. A more systematic use of echocardiography (mainly through shared protocols) in ARDS could help intensivists to tailor the optimal treatment in individual patients as well as highlighting the limits and potential of this methodology in patients with ALI.

  14. RESPIRATORY SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    10.1 Respiratory failure2003068 Evaluation of non-invasive ventilation in a-cute respiratory failure with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. GU Jianyong(顾俭勇), et al. Dept E-mergen, Zhongshan Hosp, Fudan Univ, Shanghai 200032. Shanghai J Med 2002; 25 (12): 741 - 743.Objective:To observe the effect of non-invasive venti-lation(NIV) in acute respiratory failure with chronic

  15. A prospective study of symptoms, function, and medication use during acute illness in nursing home residents: design, rationale and cohort description

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    Liu Sophia

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nursing home residents are at high risk for developing acute illnesses. Compared with community dwelling adults, nursing home residents are often more frail, prone to multiple medical problems and symptoms, and are at higher risk for adverse outcomes from acute illnesses. In addition, because of polypharmacy and the high burden of chronic disease, nursing home residents are particularly vulnerable to disruptions in transitions of care such as medication interruptions in the setting of acute illness. In order to better estimate the effect of acute illness on nursing home residents, we have initiated a prospective cohort which will allow us to observe patterns of acute illnesses and the consequence of acute illnesses, including symptoms and function, among nursing home residents. We also aim to examine the patterns of medication interruption, and identify patient, provider and environmental factors that influence continuity of medication prescribing at different points of care transition. Methods This is a prospective cohort of nursing home residents residing in two nursing homes in a metropolitan area. Baseline characteristics including age, gender, race, and comorbid conditions are recorded. Participants are followed longitudinally for a planned period of 3 years. We record acute illness incidence and characteristics, and measure symptoms including depression, pain, withdrawal symptoms, and function using standardized scales. Results 76 nursing home residents have been followed for a median of 666 days to date. At baseline, mean age of residents was 74.4 (± 11.9; 32% were female; 59% were white. The most common chronic conditions were dementia (41%, depression (38%, congestive heart failure (25% and chronic obstructive lung disease (27%. Mean pain score was 4.7 (± 3.6 on a scale of 0 to 10; Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15 score was 5.2 (± 4.4. During follow up, 138 acute illness episodes were identified, for an

  16. ACUTE UNDIFFERENTIATED FEBRILE ILLNESS AMONG ADULTS – A HOSPITAL BASED OBSERVATIONAL STUDY

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    Shivkumar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. BACKGROUND: Fever is a burning issue in the tropics and the mos t common cause of morbidity. Quite frequently this fever goes undi agnosed because of many reasons like the lack of diagnostic facilities, insufficient epidemi ological data available on causes of fever, and so on. This research study was aimed to find out the e tiology and clinical markers of Acute Undifferentiated Febrile Illness [AUFI] among the r ural population of Southern India. METHODOLOGY: This prospective, observational study was conducted at Government Villupuram Medical College and Hospital, a rural ter tiary care centre in Tamil Nadu, India. Consecutive hospitalised adult patients [>16 years] with AUFI[5-14 days fever] were enrolled into the study from August 2010 to February 2012 [1 8 months].Upon enrollment, detailed history was recorded, physical examination done and basic blood tests including biochemical examination, smear study for malaria, blood culture s and serology for the commonly encountered infections were done according to study protocol. The patients were followed up until clinical recovery and convalescence. The data were entered in MS excel and analyzed using Epi-info software 2008 version. RESULTS: A total of 403 patients were included in the study . The distribution of AUFI included Malaria 133[33%], Typhoid 83[20.59%], Dengue 42[10.4%], Leptospirosis 25[6.2%], and other causes 36[8.9%] and unknown cause 84[20.84%]. Malaria patients were significantly associated with jaundice , altered mentation, travel outside the district, elevated AST/ALT levels, thrombocytopenia and splenomegaly. Typhoid fever was associated with longer fever duration, abdominal pai n, coated tongue, relative bradycardia, normal platelet counts and low leucocyte count. Deng ue fever could be predicted by rash, pruritis, petechiae ,retro-orbital pain and low platele t counts. Leptospirosis patients showed significant association with conjunctival suffusion , muscle

  17. A longitudinal study of respiratory viruses and bacteria in the etiology of acute otitis media with effusion.

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    Henderson, F W; Collier, A M; Sanyal, M A; Watkins, J M; Fairclough, D L; Clyde, W A; Denny, F W

    1982-06-10

    We analyzed data from a 14-year longitudinal study of respiratory infections in young children to determine the relative importance of viral respiratory infection and nasopharyngeal colonization with Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae as factors influencing the occurrence of acute otitis media with effusion. The incidence of this disorder was increased in children with viral respiratory infections (average relative risk, 3.2; P less than 0.0001). Infection with respiratory syncytial virus, influenza virus (type A or B), and adenovirus conferred a greater risk of otitis media than did infection with parainfluenza virus, enterovirus, or rhinovirus. Colonization of the nasopharynx with Str. pneumoniae or H. influenzae had a lesser effect on the incidence of the disease (average relative risk; 1.5; P less than 0.01). Infections with the viruses more closely associated with acute otitis media (respiratory syncytial virus, adenovirus, and influenza A or B) were correlated with an increased risk of recurrent disease. Prevention of selected otitis-associated viral infections should reduce the incidence of this disease.

  18. Respiratory care year in review 2011: long-term oxygen therapy, pulmonary rehabilitation, airway management, acute lung injury, education, and management.

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    Dunne, Patrick J; Macintyre, Neil R; Schmidt, Ulrich H; Haas, Carl F; Jones-Boggs Rye, Kathy; Kauffman, Garry W; Hess, Dean R

    2012-04-01

    For the busy clinician, educator, or manager, it is becoming an increasing challenge to filter the literature to what is relevant to one's practice and then update one's practice based on the current evidence. The purpose of this paper is to review the recent literature related to long-term oxygen therapy, pulmonary rehabilitation, airway management, acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, respiratory care education, and respiratory care management. These topics were chosen and reviewed in a manner that is most likely to have interest to the readers of Respiratory Care.

  19. Improving antibiotic adherence in treatment of acute upper respiratory infections: a quality improvement process

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    Rittu Hingorani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Approximately 25 million people in the United States visit their primary care physician each year for acute respiratory infections (ARI. They are a common cause of unnecessary prescription of antibiotics; despite well-validated national treatment guidelines, around 73% of adults with ARI are prescribed antibiotics in the United States. Inappropriate use of antibiotics has profound implications. Methods: Our aim was to increase adherence to antibiotic guidelines for treatment of ARI in an internal medicine outpatient practice. We used a package of active and passive interventions to improve physician awareness of treatment guidelines; these included short sessions of didactic teaching, antibiotic guidelines posters in patient examination rooms and staff areas, clinical decision support (CDS tools integrated into the electronic medical record system, guideline adherence report cards for providers, and reiteration of CDS tool use and guideline adherence at monthly group meetings. Process measures were the rate of use of CDS tools for the management of ARI and patient callbacks within 72 h for the same issue. Outcome measures were compliance with antibiotic prescribing guidelines. Results: Our low-cost interventions led to a significant improvement in ARI treatment guideline adherence. There was improvement in compliance with treatment guidelines for sinusitis (90.90% vs. 57.58%, p<0.001, pharyngitis (64.28% vs. 25.00%, p = 0.003, upper respiratory infection (96.18% vs. 73.68%, p = 0.008, and the aggregated measure of ARI (91.25% vs. 78.6%, p<0.001. Rate of CDS tool usage was 40.5% with a 72-h callback rate of 0.05%. Conclusion: Simple, low-cost interventions can improve appropriate antibiotic use for ARI and change the prescribing habits of providers in an outpatient setting. Provider and patient education is a vital component of antibiotic stewardship. Simple interventions for common outpatient conditions can have a positive impact

  20. Venous pCO(2) and pH can be used to screen for significant hypercarbia in emergency patients with acute respiratory disease.

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    Kelly, Anne-Maree; Kyle, Elizabeth; McAlpine, Ross

    2002-01-01

    This prospective study of patients with acute respiratory illness or potential ventilatory compromise compared pCO(2) and pH on an arterial and a venous blood sample with the aims of determining whether venous pH and pCO(2) can replace arterial values in the management of patients with acute respiratory disease and to determine whether there is a cut-off level of venous pCO(2) that can accurately screen for significant hypercarbia (pCO(2) > 50 mm Hg). Data were analyzed using bias plot and receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve methods. There were 196 sample-pairs analyzed; 56 (29%) had significant hypercarbia. For pH, there was very good agreement with venous samples being an average of 0.034 pH units lower than arterial samples. With respect to pCO(2), there was only fair agreement, with the pCO(2) on average 5.8 mm Hg higher in venous samples and 95% limits of agreement -8.8 to +20.5 mm Hg. The ROC curve analysis showed that a venous pCO(2) level of 45 mm Hg was a potential screening cutoff (sensitivity for the detection of hypercarbia of 100%, specificity 57%). This study shows that venous pH is an acceptable substitute for arterial measurement but there is not sufficient agreement for venous pCO(2) to be able to replace arterial pCO(2) in the clinical evaluation of ventilatory function. Venous pCO(2) may be able to be used as a screening test for hypercarbia using a screening cut-off of 45 mm Hg.