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Sample records for acute respiratory illness

  1. ACR Appropriateness Criteria on acute respiratory illness.

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    Washington, Lacey; Khan, Arfa; Mohammed, Tan-Lucien; Batra, Poonam V; Gurney, Jud W; Haramati, Linda B; Jeudy, Jean; Macmahon, Heber; Rozenshtein, Anna; Vydareny, Kay H; Kaiser, Larry; Raoof, Suhail

    2009-10-01

    In a patient with acute respiratory illness (cough, sputum production, chest pain, and/or dyspnea), the need for chest imaging depends on the severity of illness, age of the patient, clinical history, physical and laboratory findings, and other risk factors. Chest radiographs seem warranted when one or more of the following are present: age > or = 40; dementia; a positive physical examination; hemoptysis; associated abnormalities (leukocytosis, hypoxemia); or other risk factors, including coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, or drug-induced acute respiratory failure. Chest CT may be warranted in complicated cases of severe pneumonia and in febrile neutropenic patients with normal or nonspecific chest radiographic findings. Literature on the indications and usefulness of radiologic studies for acute respiratory illness in different clinical settings is reviewed.

  2. Host gene expression classifiers diagnose acute respiratory illness etiology.

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    Tsalik, Ephraim L; Henao, Ricardo; Nichols, Marshall; Burke, Thomas; Ko, Emily R; McClain, Micah T; Hudson, Lori L; Mazur, Anna; Freeman, Debra H; Veldman, Tim; Langley, Raymond J; Quackenbush, Eugenia B; Glickman, Seth W; Cairns, Charles B; Jaehne, Anja K; Rivers, Emanuel P; Otero, Ronny M; Zaas, Aimee K; Kingsmore, Stephen F; Lucas, Joseph; Fowler, Vance G; Carin, Lawrence; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S; Woods, Christopher W

    2016-01-20

    Acute respiratory infections caused by bacterial or viral pathogens are among the most common reasons for seeking medical care. Despite improvements in pathogen-based diagnostics, most patients receive inappropriate antibiotics. Host response biomarkers offer an alternative diagnostic approach to direct antimicrobial use. This observational cohort study determined whether host gene expression patterns discriminate noninfectious from infectious illness and bacterial from viral causes of acute respiratory infection in the acute care setting. Peripheral whole blood gene expression from 273 subjects with community-onset acute respiratory infection (ARI) or noninfectious illness, as well as 44 healthy controls, was measured using microarrays. Sparse logistic regression was used to develop classifiers for bacterial ARI (71 probes), viral ARI (33 probes), or a noninfectious cause of illness (26 probes). Overall accuracy was 87% (238 of 273 concordant with clinical adjudication), which was more accurate than procalcitonin (78%, P diagnostic platforms to combat inappropriate antibiotic use and emerging antibiotic resistance. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Acute respiratory illnesses in the first 18 months of life

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    Ilse M. López Bravo

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available To help assess the causes and frequency of acute respiratory illnesses (ARI during the first 18 months of life in Chile, a cohort of 437 children born in good health between May 1991 and April 1992 was followed at an urban health clinic in northern Santiago. Information was obtained from medical checkups performed at the clinic, from emergency health care services, from private physicians, and from interviews with each child's mother when the child was enrolled in the study and when it was 6, 12, and 18 months old. Followup was completed for 379 (87% of the children. ARI accounted for 67% of all 3762 episodes of illness recorded for these children in the 18-month study period, 1384 (55% of the ARI episodes affecting the upper respiratory tract and the remaining 1144 (45% affecting the lower. The overall rate of ARI observed was 33 episodes per 100 child-months of observation. The incidences of upper, lower, and total ARI episodes decreased significantly in the third six months of life. A statistically significant association was found between upper ARI ( > or = 2 episodes and maternal smoking ( > or = 5 cigarettes per day, but no significant associations were found with any of the other risk factors studied. However, lower ARI ( > or = 2 episodes was significantly associated with maternal schooling ( or = 4 episodes was significantly associated with these factors and also with the existence of one or more siblings, birth in a cold season, limited breast-feeding (<4 months, and low socioeconomic status. Significant associations were found between obstructive bronchitis episodes and most of the risk factors studied (gender, siblings, season of birth, duration of breast-feeding, maternal schooling, smoking, use of polluting fuels in the home, and a family history of atopic allergy; similarly, significant associations were found between the occurrence of pneumonia and many risk factors (including siblings, season of birth, duration of breast

  4. СHILDREN OF MEGAPOLISES WHO FALL ILL FREQUENTLY: ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTION PREVENTION AND TREATMENT

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    R.M. Torshkhoeva

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to prevention and treatment of acute respiratory diseases children of megapolises who fall ill frequently. The authors prove the thesis that children falling ill frequently and residing in mega cities, and not only in Russia, have a similar immune status, according to which not only therapeutic but also preventive immunomodulatory treatment courses must be administered to them.Key words: frequently ill children, bacterial immunomodulation, cytokinic status.

  5. Association between sugar cane burning and acute respiratory illness on the island of Maui.

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    Mnatzaganian, Christina Louise; Pellegrin, Karen L; Miyamura, Jill; Valencia, Diana; Pang, Lorrin

    2015-10-07

    Sugar cane harvesting by burning on Maui island is an environmental health issue due to respiratory effects of smoke. Volcanic smog ("vog") from an active volcano on a neighboring island periodically blankets Maui and could confound a study of cane smoke's effects since cane burning is not allowed on vog days. This study examines the association between cane burning and emergency department (ED) visits, hospital admissions, and prescription fills for acute respiratory illnesses. This retrospective study controlled for confounders that could increase respiratory distress on non-burn days by matching each burn day with a non-burn day and then comparing the ratio of patients with respiratory distress residing in the path of sugar burn smoke to those residing elsewhere on Maui on burn versus non-burn days. Patients with acute respiratory distress were defined as those with one or more acute respiratory diagnoses at one of the hospitals or emergency departments on Maui. Separately, patients with acute respiratory illness were identified through prescription records from four community pharmacies, specifically defined as those who filled prescriptions for acute respiratory distress. There were 1,256 reports of respiratory distress prescriptions and 686 hospital/ED diagnoses of acute respiratory illness. The ratio of cases within to outside of smoke exposure was higher on burn days for both the ED/hospital data and the pharmacy, though not statistically significant. In post-hoc analyses of the pharmacy data based on the number of acres burned as a proxy for volume of smoke, there was a dose response trend for acreage burned such that the highest quartile showed a statistically significant higher proportion of acute respiratory distress in the exposed versus non-exposed regions (P = 0.015, OR 2.4, 95% CI [1.2-4.8]). After adjusting for confounders on non-burn days, there was a significantly higher incidence of respiratory distress in smoke-exposed regions when greater

  6. Passive smoking, as measured by hair nicotine, and severity of acute lower respiratory illnesses among children

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    Al-Delaimy WK

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to describe the association between passive smoking and the severity of acute lower respiratory illnesses (ALRI among 351 children aged 3–27 months admitted to hospital. A total of 297 children provided hair samples, which were analysed for hair nicotine levels as an indicator of passive smoking. A severity of illness grading system was developed by using clinical and management criteria used by the medical staff at hospital. The OR for children with more severe illness being exposed to higher nicotine levels was 1.2, 95% CI: 0.57–2.58 when using dichotomised respiratory severity levels and upper versus lower nicotine quartile levels. In an ordinal logistic regression model, the OR of more severe illness being associated with higher nicotine levels was 1.07 (95% CI: 0.92–1.25. When analysis was limited to the more severe cases, the OR of the least severe category compared to the most severe category, in relation to nicotine levels in hair, was 1.79 (95% CI: 0.5–6.30. The ordinal logistic regression of this group of severely-ill children (OR 1.1 (95% CI: 0.94–1.29 was not substantially different from the overall study subjects. Conclusion In general, children with more severe illness tended to have higher levels of nicotine in their hair, although the results were within the limit of chance. Possible explanations of our results include environmental tobacco smoke (ETS being an initiator of ALRI rather than a risk to severity, exposure levels of ETS were too low to demonstrate an effect on severity, or the power of this study was not high enough to detect an association.

  7. Sentinel surveillance for influenza among severe acute respiratory infection and acute febrile illness inpatients at three hospitals in Ghana.

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    Jones, Alexander H; Ampofo, William; Akuffo, Richard; Doman, Brooke; Duplessis, Christopher; Amankwa, Joseph A; Sarpong, Charity; Sagoe, Ken; Agbenohevi, Prince; Puplampu, Naiki; Armah, George; Koram, Kwadwo A; Nyarko, Edward O; Bel-Nono, Samuel; Dueger, Erica L

    2016-09-01

    Influenza epidemiology in Africa is generally not well understood. Using syndrome definitions to screen patients for laboratory confirmation of infection is an established means to effectively conduct influenza surveillance. To compare influenza-related epidemiologic data, from October 2010 through March 2013, we enrolled hospitalized severe acute respiratory infection (SARI; fever with respiratory symptoms) and acute febrile illness (AFI; fever without respiratory or other localizing symptoms) patients from three referral hospitals in Ghana. Demographic and epidemiologic data were obtained from enrolled patients after which nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swabs were collected, and processed by molecular methods for the presence of influenza viruses. Of 730 SARI patients, 59 (8%) were influenza positive; of 543 AFI patients, 34 (6%) were positive for influenza. Both SARI and AFI surveillance yielded influenza A(H3N2) (3% versus 1%), A(H1N1)pdm09 (2% versus 1%), and influenza B (3% versus 4%) in similar proportions. Data from both syndromes show year-round influenza transmission but with increased caseloads associated with the rainy seasons. As an appreciable percentage of influenza cases (37%) presented without defined respiratory symptoms, and thus met the AFI but not the SARI definition, it is important to consider broader screening criteria (i.e., AFI) to identify all laboratory-confirmed influenza. The identified influenza transmission seasonality has important implications for the timing of related public health interventions. © 2016 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Revision of clinical case definitions: influenza-like illness and severe acute respiratory infection

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    Qasmieh, Saba; Mounts, Anthony Wayne; Alexander, Burmaa; Besselaar, Terry; Briand, Sylvie; Brown, Caroline; Clark, Seth; Dueger, Erica; Gross, Diane; Hauge, Siri; Hirve, Siddhivinayak; Jorgensen, Pernille; Katz, Mark A; Mafi, Ali; Malik, Mamunur; McCarron, Margaret; Meerhoff, Tamara; Mori, Yuichiro; Mott, Joshua; Olivera, Maria Teresa da Costa; Ortiz, Justin R; Palekar, Rakhee; Rebelo-de-Andrade, Helena; Soetens, Loes; Yahaya, Ali Ahmed; Zhang, Wenqing; Vandemaele, Katelijn

    2018-01-01

    Abstract The formulation of accurate clinical case definitions is an integral part of an effective process of public health surveillance. Although such definitions should, ideally, be based on a standardized and fixed collection of defining criteria, they often require revision to reflect new knowledge of the condition involved and improvements in diagnostic testing. Optimal case definitions also need to have a balance of sensitivity and specificity that reflects their intended use. After the 2009–2010 H1N1 influenza pandemic, the World Health Organization (WHO) initiated a technical consultation on global influenza surveillance. This prompted improvements in the sensitivity and specificity of the case definition for influenza – i.e. a respiratory disease that lacks uniquely defining symptomology. The revision process not only modified the definition of influenza-like illness, to include a simplified list of the criteria shown to be most predictive of influenza infection, but also clarified the language used for the definition, to enhance interpretability. To capture severe cases of influenza that required hospitalization, a new case definition was also developed for severe acute respiratory infection in all age groups. The new definitions have been found to capture more cases without compromising specificity. Despite the challenge still posed in the clinical separation of influenza from other respiratory infections, the global use of the new WHO case definitions should help determine global trends in the characteristics and transmission of influenza viruses and the associated disease burden. PMID:29403115

  9. Clinical features of patients with acute respiratory illness and rhinovirus in their bronchoalveolar lavages.

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    Malcolm, E; Arruda, E; Hayden, F G; Kaiser, L

    2001-04-01

    Several reports in selected populations suggest that human rhinovirus (HRV) may be responsible for lower respiratory tract infections or pneumonia. We describe clinical features of all patients with rhinovirus cultured from their bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) during a 10-yr period in a tertiary care center. Results for viral culture of all lower respiratory specimens performed during a 10-year period at the University of Virginia Health Sciences Center were reviewed. A case was defined as any patient with a positive culture for HRV in a BAL specimen. A comprehensive review of the patients' medical records was performed. In one case, in situ hybridization (ISH) was performed in order to identify whether rhinoviral RNA was present in bronchial biopsy specimens. During the 10-year study period viruses were identified in 431 lower respiratory tract specimens, and were most frequently cytomegalovirus or herpes simplex virus. Twenty patients (ages, 2.5-86 year) had a bronchoalveolar specimen culture positive for HRV. All had an abnormal chest radiograph, 60% were admitted to the intensive care unit, and 25% expired during their hospitalization. In 18 patients (90%) various severe underlying conditions were identified including solid organ transplants in seven, malignancies in four and AIDS in two. An immunosuppressive disease or condition requiring immunosuppressive therapy was present in all cases. In addition to HRV, one or more potential pathogens were identified in respiratory specimens from 14 patients (70%). Histopathological abnormalities, ranging from fibropurulent debris in alveoli to diffuse alveolar damage, were present in 6 of 13 bronchial biopsies. In two cases without any other significant pathogens than HRV, acute inflammations with fibropurulent debris in alveoli were observed. One lung transplant patient showed intermittent recovery of HRV in her respiratory specimens during a 15-week time period, but ISH did not show HRV RNA in bronchial epithelial cells

  10. Risk Factors for Influenza-Associated Severe Acute Respiratory Illness Hospitalization in South Africa, 2012?2015

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    Tempia, Stefano; Walaza, Sibongile; Moyes, Jocelyn; Cohen, Adam L.; von Mollendorf, Claire; Treurnicht, Florette K.; Venter, Marietjie; Pretorius, Marthi; Hellferscee, Orienka; Mtshali, Senzo; Seleka, Mpho; Tshangela, Akhona; Nguweneza, Athermon; McAnerney, Johanna M.; Wolter, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background. Data on risk factors for influenza-associated hospitalizations in low- and middle-income countries are limited. Methods. We conducted active syndromic surveillance for hospitalized severe acute respiratory illness (SARI) and outpatient influenza-like illness (ILI) in 2 provinces of South Africa during 2012?2015. We compared the characteristics of influenza-positive patients with SARI to those with ILI to identify factors associated with severe disease requiring hospitaliz...

  11. Risk Factors for Outpatient Use of Antibiotics in Children with Acute Respiratory Illnesses.

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    Zhao, Sophie R; Griffin, Marie R; Patterson, Barron L; Mace, Rachel L; Wyatt, Dayna; Zhu, Yuwei; Talbot, H Keipp

    2017-03-01

    Antibiotics for acute respiratory illness (ARI) constitute most pediatric medication use and contribute to the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. We investigated antibiotic prescription risk factors for ARI in pediatric clinics and clinical follow-up in individuals prescribed and not prescribed antibiotics. In this observational study, we enrolled children ages 2 to 17 years old presenting with ARI with fever to two academic pediatric primary care outpatient clinics during influenza season 2013-2014. We collected information on demographics, initial symptoms, medical conditions, laboratory tests, discharge diagnoses, treatments, and 30 days of follow-up medical encounters. Factors associated with antibiotic prescription receipt were evaluated using logistic regression. Of 206 consented and enrolled children, 59 (29%) were prescribed antibiotics, 51 of 59 (86%) for indicated diagnoses: 34 for streptococcal pharyngitis, 15 for acute otitis media (AOM), and 2 for pneumonia. Discharge diagnoses were the only factors independently associated with an antibiotic prescription. Of children prescribed/not prescribed an antibiotic, 17%/17% received follow-up telephone calls and 27%/17% had follow-up visits related to ARI within 30 days. Two children with AOM were prescribed a second antibiotic during follow-up, and one developed Clostridium difficile colitis. Eighteen of 206 (9%) additional children were prescribed antibiotics within 30 days for ARI symptoms, 17 for streptococcal pharyngitis, AOM, pneumonia, or sinusitis; one was prescribed antibiotics for influenza-like illness. Among study children 2 to 17 years old with outpatient ARI, 29% were prescribed antibiotics at the initial visit and another 9% were prescribed antibiotics during the 30-day follow-up (most were for appropriate indications). Further decreasing antibiotic use in similar settings will likely require wider implementation of watchful waiting for AOM, a change in guidelines for pharyngitis management

  12. Principles of etiopathogenetic therapy for acute respiratory viral infections in frequently ill children

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    L. A. Kharitonova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate the impact of incorporation of cycloferon into a therapy regimen on the efficiency of treatment for acute respiratory viral infections (ARVI in frequently ill children. Subjects and methods. The results of treatment were analyzed in 117 children divided into three groups according to the therapy regimen. Thus, symptomatic and local antiviral therapies (interferon nasal ointment and viferon suppositories were prescribed to all the children; furthermore, Group 1 (control used antibiotic therapy; Group 2 (Comparison Group 1 took antibiotics and cycloferon (tablets, and Group 3 (Comparison Group 2 had Cycloferon. Results: At the beginning of treatment, there was a reduction in interferon-a and interferon-y values with preserved serum interferon levels, suggesting the diminished compensatory responses ensuring antiviral protection. Analysis of the immune status revealed that virtually half of the children exhibited activation of compensatory mechanisms (stimulation of CD4+ and CD8+ production and an increase in NST test activity, one third displayed a disturbance (decreases in CD4+, CDlfrf, IgA, and NST test activity. After treatment, interferonogenesis was recovered in the majority (86,7% of the patients taking Cycloferon, in 74,1% of those who had a treatment regimen containing cycloferon and antibiotics, and only in 47,1 % of those who received antibiotics. Comparison of the immunological indicators during therapy with antibiotics alone or in combination with cycloferon demonstrated a more noticeable and balanced response to the latter: the normalized CD4+ and CD8+ values in the patients on antibiotic therapy was 8,9 and 5,8%, respectively, and 11,1 % in those who received antibiotics and cycloferon. Conclusion. Incorporation of cycloferon into ARVI treatment regimens for frequently ill patients has the positive effect on immunological indicators, which shows itself as recovery of initially diminished interferonogenesis

  13. Impact of Statins on Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness Against Medically Attended Acute Respiratory Illness.

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    Omer, Saad B; Phadke, Varun K; Bednarczyk, Robert A; Chamberlain, Allison T; Brosseau, Jennifer L; Orenstein, Walter A

    2016-04-15

    Statins have antiinflammatory effects that may impact vaccine-induced immune responses. We investigated the impact of statin therapy on influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) against medically attended acute respiratory illness (MAARI). We conducted a retrospective cohort study over nine influenza seasons using research databases of a large managed care organization in the United States. Influenza vaccination and statin prescription statuses of cohort members and MAARI cases were ascertained on a per-season basis. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of MAARI were estimated using Poisson regression and stratified by statin use. Using a ratio of ratios approach, we compared IRRs from periods during to IRRs from periods before influenza circulation and then used relative IRRs to compute VE. After adjustment for multiple prespecified covariates, the influenza VE against MAARI was lower among statin users than nonusers during periods of local (14.1% vs 22.9%; mean difference, 11.4%; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.7% to 26.1%) and widespread (12.6% vs 26.2%; mean difference, 18.4%; 95% CI, 2.9%-36.2%) influenza circulation. In this study, statin therapy was associated with reduced influenza VE against MAARI. Since many cases of MAARI are not caused by influenza, studies of the impact of statins on influenza VE against laboratory-confirmed influenza are needed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Mortality amongst patients with influenza-associated severe acute respiratory illness, South Africa, 2009-2013.

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    Cheryl Cohen

    Full Text Available Data on the burden and risk groups for influenza-associated mortality from Africa are limited. We aimed to estimate the incidence and risk-factors for in-hospital influenza-associated severe acute respiratory illness (SARI deaths.Hospitalised patients with SARI were enrolled prospectively in four provinces of South Africa from 2009-2013. Using polymerase chain reaction, respiratory samples were tested for ten respiratory viruses and blood for pneumococcal DNA. The incidence of influenza-associated SARI deaths was estimated at one urban hospital with a defined catchment population.We enrolled 1376 patients with influenza-associated SARI and 3% (41 of 1358 with available outcome data died. In patients with available HIV-status, the case-fatality proportion (CFP was higher in HIV-infected (5%, 22/419 than HIV-uninfected individuals (2%, 13/620; p = 0.006. CFPs varied by age group, and generally increased with increasing age amongst individuals >5 years (p<0.001. On multivariable analysis, factors associated with death were age-group 45-64 years (odds ratio (OR 4.0, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.01-16.3 and ≥65 years (OR 6.5, 95%CI 1.2-34.3 compared to 1-4 year age-group who had the lowest CFP, HIV-infection (OR 2.9, 95%CI 1.1-7.8, underlying medical conditions other than HIV (OR 2.9, 95%CI 1.2-7.3 and pneumococcal co-infection (OR 4.1, 95%CI 1.5-11.2. The estimated incidence of influenza-associated SARI deaths per 100,000 population was highest in children <1 year (20.1, 95%CI 12.1-31.3 and adults aged 45-64 years (10.4, 95%CI 8.4-12.9. Adjusting for age, the rate of death was 20-fold (95%CI 15.0-27.8 higher in HIV-infected individuals than HIV-uninfected individuals.Influenza causes substantial mortality in urban South Africa, particularly in infants aged <1 year and HIV-infected individuals. More widespread access to antiretroviral treatment and influenza vaccination may reduce this burden.

  15. Illness Severity and Work Productivity Loss Among Working Adults With Medically Attended Acute Respiratory Illnesses: US Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness Network 2012-2013.

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    Petrie, Joshua G; Cheng, Caroline; Malosh, Ryan E; VanWormer, Jeffrey J; Flannery, Brendan; Zimmerman, Richard K; Gaglani, Manjusha; Jackson, Michael L; King, Jennifer P; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Benoit, Joyce; Robertson, Anne; Thaker, Swathi N; Monto, Arnold S; Ohmit, Suzanne E

    2016-02-15

    Influenza causes significant morbidity and mortality, with considerable economic costs, including lost work productivity. Influenza vaccines may reduce the economic burden through primary prevention of influenza and reduction in illness severity. We examined illness severity and work productivity loss among working adults with medically attended acute respiratory illnesses and compared outcomes for subjects with and without laboratory-confirmed influenza and by influenza vaccination status among subjects with influenza during the 2012-2013 influenza season. Illnesses laboratory-confirmed as influenza (ie, cases) were subjectively assessed as more severe than illnesses not caused by influenza (ie, noncases) based on multiple measures, including current health status at study enrollment (≤7 days from illness onset) and current activity and sleep quality status relative to usual. Influenza cases reported missing 45% more work hours (20.5 vs 15.0; P productivity as impeded to a greater degree (6.0 vs 5.4; P productivity loss were noted for vaccinated subjects. Influenza illnesses were more severe and resulted in more missed work hours and productivity loss than illnesses not confirmed as influenza. Modest reductions in illness severity for vaccinated cases were observed. These findings highlight the burden of influenza illnesses and illustrate the importance of laboratory confirmation of influenza outcomes in evaluations of vaccine effectiveness. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Bilateral acute iris transillumination following systemic moxifloxacin for respiratory illness: report of two cases and review of the literature.

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    Morshedi, R Grant; Bettis, Daniel I; Moshirfar, Majid; Vitale, Albert T

    2012-08-01

    To describe two cases of bilateral acute iris transillumination following systemic administration of moxifloxacin and review the literature. Review of clinical records, and review of the literature using the PubMed database. A 75 year-old man and 33 year-old woman presented with bilateral conjunctival injection, photophobia, and atonic, distorted pupils. The symptoms began acutely following a respiratory illness, for which both were treated with moxifloxacin. Both patients demonstrated profound iris transillumination, sectoral posterior bowing of the iris, corneal endothelial pigment dusting, and trabecular meshwork hyperpigmentation. One patient had a cotton-wool spot. A literature review identified 59 previous reports in 5 publications, including 17 patients with no antecedent fluoroquinolone use. Increased awareness of this recently described clinical entity should lead to a decrease in unnecessary diagnostic evaluations. It is currently unclear whether this disease represents an adverse effect of fluoroquinolone use or a sequela of a systemic illness.

  17. Air Quality and Acute Respiratory Illness in Biomass Fuel using homes in Bagamoyo, Tanzania

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    Satoshi Nakai

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory Diseases are public health concern worldwide. The diseases have been associated with air pollution especially indoor air pollution from biomass fuel burning in developing countries. However, researches on pollution levels and on association of respiratory diseases with biomass fuel pollution are limited. A study was therefore undertaken to characterize the levels of pollutants in biomass fuel using homes and examine the association between biomass fuel smoke exposure and Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI disease in Nianjema village in Bagamoyo, Tanzania. Pollution was assessed by measuring PM10, NO2, and CO concentrations in kitchen, living room and outdoors. ARI prevalence was assessed by use of questionnaire which gathered health information for all family members under the study. Results showed that PM10, NO2, and CO concentrations were highest in the kitchen and lowest outdoors. Kitchen concentrations were highest in the kitchen located in the living room for all pollutants except CO. Family size didn’t have effect on the levels measured in kitchens. Overall ARI prevalence for cooks and children under age 5 making up the exposed group was 54.67% with odds ratio (OR of 5.5; 95% CI 3.6 to 8.5 when compared with unexposed men and non-regular women cooks. Results of this study suggest an association between respiratory diseases and exposure to domestic biomass fuel smoke, but further studies with improved design are needed to confirm the association.

  18. Self reported incidence and morbidity of acute respiratory illness among deployed U.S. military in Iraq and Afghanistan.

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    Bryony W Soltis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Historically, respiratory infections have had a significant impact on U.S. military missions. Deployed troops are particularly at high risk due to close living conditions, stressful work environments and increased exposure to pathogens. To date, there are limited data available on acute respiratory illness (ARI among troops deployed in support of ongoing military operations, specifically Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF. METHODS: Using self-report data from two sources collected from troops deployed to Iraq, Afghanistan and the surrounding region, we analyzed incidence and risk factors for ARI. Military personnel on mid-deployment Rest & Recuperation (R&R or during redeployment were eligible to participate in the voluntary self-report survey. RESULTS: Overall, 39.5% reported having at least one ARI. Of these, 18.5% sought medical care and 33.8% reported having decreased job performance. The rate of self-reported ARI was 15 episodes per 100 person-months among those taking the voluntary survey, and 24.7 episodes per 100 person-months among those taking the clinic health questionnaire. Negative binomial regression analysis found female sex, Navy branch of service and lack of flush toilets to be independently associated with increased rates of ARI. Deployment to OIF, increasing age and higher rank were also positively associated with ARI risk. CONCLUSIONS: The overall percentage of deployed military personnel reporting at least one acute respiratory illness decreased since earlier parts of OIF/OEF. However, the reported effect on job performance increased tremendously. The most important factors associated with increased respiratory infection are female sex, Navy branch of service, lack of improved latrine facilities, deployment to OIF, increasing age and higher rank.

  19. Acute respiratory failure in critically ill patients with interstitial lung disease.

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    Lara Zafrani

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic known or unknown interstitial lung disease (ILD may present with severe respiratory flares that require intensive management. Outcome data in these patients are scarce.Clinical and radiological features were collected in 83 patients with ILD-associated acute respiratory failure (ARF. Determinants of hospital mortality and response to corticosteroid therapy were identified by logistic regression.Hospital and 1-year mortality rates were 41% and 54% respectively. Pulmonary hypertension, computed tomography (CT fibrosis and acute kidney injury were independently associated with mortality (odds ratio (OR 4.55; 95% confidence interval (95%CI (1.20-17.33; OR, 7.68; (1.78-33.22 and OR 10.60; (2.25-49.97 respectively. Response to steroids was higher in patients with shorter time from hospital admission to corticosteroid therapy. Patients with fibrosis on CT had lower response to steroids (OR, 0.03; (0.005-0.21. In mechanically ventilated patients, overdistension induced by high PEEP settings was associated with CT fibrosis and hospital mortality.Mortality is high in ILD-associated ARF. CT and echocardiography are valuable prognostic tools. Prompt corticosteroid therapy may improve survival.

  20. Data on respiratory variables in critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure placed on proportional assist ventilation with load adjustable gain factors (PAV+

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    Dimitris Georgopoulos

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The data show respiratory variables in 108 critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure placed on proportional assist ventilation with load adjustable gain factors (PAV+ after at least 36 h on passive mechanical ventilation. PAV+ was continued for 48 h until the patients met pre-defined criteria either for switching to controlled modes or for breathing without ventilator assistance. Data during passive mechanical ventilation and during PAV+ are reported. Data are acquired from the whole population, as well as from patients with and without acute respiratory distress syndrome. The reported variables are tidal volume, driving pressure (ΔP, the difference between static end-inspiratory plateau pressure and positive end-expiratory airway pressure, respiratory system compliance and resistance, and arterial blood gasses. The data are supplemental to our original research article, which described individual ΔP in these patients and examined how it related to ΔP when the same patients were ventilated with passive mechanical ventilation using the currently accepted lung-protective strategy “Driving pressure during assisted mechanical ventilation. Is it controlled by patient brain?” [1].

  1. Data on respiratory variables in critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure placed on proportional assist ventilation with load adjustable gain factors (PAV+).

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    Georgopoulos, Dimitris; Xirouchaki, Nectaria; Tzanakis, Nikolaos; Younes, Magdy

    2016-09-01

    The data show respiratory variables in 108 critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure placed on proportional assist ventilation with load adjustable gain factors (PAV+) after at least 36 h on passive mechanical ventilation. PAV+ was continued for 48 h until the patients met pre-defined criteria either for switching to controlled modes or for breathing without ventilator assistance. Data during passive mechanical ventilation and during PAV+ are reported. Data are acquired from the whole population, as well as from patients with and without acute respiratory distress syndrome. The reported variables are tidal volume, driving pressure (ΔP, the difference between static end-inspiratory plateau pressure and positive end-expiratory airway pressure), respiratory system compliance and resistance, and arterial blood gasses. The data are supplemental to our original research article, which described individual ΔP in these patients and examined how it related to ΔP when the same patients were ventilated with passive mechanical ventilation using the currently accepted lung-protective strategy "Driving pressure during assisted mechanical ventilation. Is it controlled by patient brain?" [1].

  2. Detection of human bocavirus from children and adults with acute respiratory tract illness in Guangzhou, southern China

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    Liu Wen-Kuan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human bocavirus (HBoV is a newly discovered parvovirus associated with acute respiratory tract illness (ARTI and gastrointestinal illness. Our study is the first to analyze the characteristics of HBoV-positive samples from ARTI patients with a wide age distribution from Guangzhou, southern China. Methods Throat swabs (n=2811 were collected and analyzed from children and adults with ARTI over a 13-month period. The HBoV complete genome from a 60 year-old female patient isolate was also determined. Results HBoV DNA was detected in 65/2811 (2.3% samples, of which 61/1797 were from children (Mycoplasma pneumoniae had the highest frequency of 16.9% (11/65. Upper and lower respiratory tract illness were common symptoms, with 19/65 (29.2% patients diagnosed with pneumonia by chest radiography. All four adult patients had systemic influenza-like symptoms. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete genome revealed a close relationship with other HBoVs, and a more distant relationship with HBoV2 and HBoV3. Conclusions HBoV was detected from children and adults with ARTI from Guangzhou, southern China. Elderly people were also susceptive to HBoV. A single lineage of HBoV was detected among a wide age distribution of patients with ARTI.

  3. Adults hospitalised with acute respiratory illness rarely have detectable bacteria in the absence of COPD or pneumonia; viral infection predominates in a large prospective UK sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Tristan W; Medina, Marie-jo; Batham, Sally; Curran, Martin D; Parmar, Surendra; Nicholson, Karl G

    2014-11-01

    Many adult patients hospitalised with acute respiratory illness have viruses detected but the overall importance of viral infection compared to bacterial infection is unclear. Patients were recruited from two acute hospital sites in Leicester (UK) over 3 successive winters. Samples were taken for viral and bacterial testing. Of the 780 patients hospitalised with acute respiratory illness 345 (44%) had a respiratory virus detected. Picornaviruses were the most commonly isolated viruses (detected in 23% of all patients). Virus detection rates exceeded 50% in patients with exacerbation of asthma (58%), acute bronchitis and Influenza-like-illness (64%), and ranged from 30 to 50% in patients with an exacerbation of COPD (38%), community acquired pneumonia (36%) and congestive cardiac failure (31%). Bacterial detection was relatively frequent in patients with exacerbation of COPD and pneumonia (25% and 33% respectively) but was uncommon in all other groups. Antibiotic use was high across all clinical groups (76% overall) and only 21% of all antibiotic use occurred in patients with detectable bacteria. Respiratory viruses are the predominant detectable aetiological agents in most hospitalised adults with acute respiratory illness. Antibiotic usage in hospital remains excessive including in clinical conditions associated with low rates of bacterial detection. Efforts at reducing excess antibiotic use should focus on these groups as a priority. Registered International Standard Controlled Trial Number: 21521552. Copyright © 2014 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Viral and bacterial causes of severe acute respiratory illness among children aged less than 5 years in a high malaria prevalence area of western Kenya, 2007-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feikin, Daniel R; Njenga, M Kariuki; Bigogo, Godfrey; Aura, Barrack; Aol, George; Audi, Allan; Jagero, Geoffrey; Muluare, Peter O; Gikunju, Stella; Nderitu, Leonard; Winchell, Jonas M; Schneider, Eileen; Erdman, Dean D; Oberste, M Steven; Katz, Mark A; Breiman, Robert F

    2013-01-01

    Few comprehensive data exist on the etiology of severe acute respiratory illness (SARI) among African children. From March 1, 2007 to February 28, 2010, we collected blood for culture and nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swabs for real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction for 10 viruses and 3 atypical bacteria among children aged causes and pneumococcus the most likely bacterial cause. Contemporaneous controls are important for interpreting upper respiratory tract specimens.

  5. Concurrent acute illness and comorbid conditions poorly predict antibiotic use in upper respiratory tract infections: a cross-sectional analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perencevich Eli N

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inappropriate antibiotic use promotes resistance. Antibiotics are generally not indicated for upper respiratory infections (URIs. Our objectives were to describe patterns of URI treatment and to identify patient and provider factors associated with antibiotic use for URIs. Methods This study was a cross-sectional analysis of medical and pharmacy claims data from the Pennsylvania Medicaid fee-for-service program database. We identified Pennsylvania Medicaid recipients with a URI office visit over a one-year period. Our outcome variable was antibiotic use within seven days after the URI visit. Study variables included URI type and presence of concurrent acute illnesses and chronic conditions. We considered the associations of each study variable with antibiotic use in a logistic regression model, stratifying by age group and adjusting for confounders. Results Among 69,936 recipients with URI, 35,786 (51.2% received an antibiotic. In all age groups, acute sinusitis, chronic sinusitis, otitis, URI type and season were associated with antibiotic use. Except for the oldest group, physician specialty and streptococcal pharyngitis were associated with antibiotic use. History of chronic conditions was not associated with antibiotic use in any age group. In all age groups, concurrent acute illnesses and history of chronic conditions had only had fair to poor ability to distinguish patients who received an antibiotic from patients who did not. Conclusion Antibiotic prevalence for URIs was high, indicating that potentially inappropriate antibiotic utilization is occurring. Our data suggest that demographic and clinical factors are associated with antibiotic use, but additional reasons remain unexplained. Insight regarding reasons for antibiotic prescribing is needed to develop interventions to address the growing problem of antibiotic resistance.

  6. Acute respiratory distress after transfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Jožef Gradišek

    2012-12-01

    Conclusions: Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO are clinical syndromes with predominant pulmonary injury and respiratory distress. Anaphylactic reaction, hemolytic transfusion reaction and transfusion of contaminated blood products also impair lung function but are less frequent. Transfusion in critically ill and injured patient is an independent risk factor for acute lung injury. It remains to be determined whether transfusion is the cause of increased mortality or only an indicator of disease severity

  7. Molecular point-of-care testing for respiratory viruses versus routine clinical care in adults with acute respiratory illness presenting to secondary care: a pragmatic randomised controlled trial protocol (ResPOC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendish, Nathan J; Malachira, Ahalya K; Clark, Tristan W

    2017-02-06

    Respiratory viruses are associated with a huge socio-economic burden and are responsible for a large proportion of acute respiratory illness in hospitalised adults. Laboratory PCR is accurate but takes at least 24 h to generate a result to clinicians and antigen-based point-of-care tests (POCT) lack sensitivity. Rapid molecular platforms, such as the FilmArray Respiratory Panel, have equivalent diagnostic accuracy to laboratory PCR and can generate a result in 1 h making them deployable as POCT. Molecular point-of-care testing for respiratory viruses in hospital has the potential to improve the detection rate of respiratory viruses, improve the use of influenza antivirals and reduce unnecessary antibiotic use, but high quality randomised trials with clinically relevant endpoints are needed. The ResPOC study is a pragmatic randomised controlled trial of molecular point-of-care testing for respiratory viruses in adults with acute respiratory illness presenting to a large teaching hospital in the United Kingdom. Eligible participants are adults presenting with acute respiratory illness to the emergency department or the acute medicine unit. Participants are allocated 1:1 by internet-based randomisation service to either the intervention of a nose and throat swab analysed immediately on the FilmArray Respiratory Panel as a POCT or receive routine clinical care. The primary outcome is the proportion of patients treated with antibiotics. Secondary outcomes include turnaround time, virus detection, neuraminidase inhibitor use, length of hospital stay and side room use. Analysis of the primary outcome will be by intention-to-treat and all enrolled participants will be included in safety analysis. Multiple novel molecular POCT platforms for infections including respiratory viruses have been developed and licensed in the last few years and many more are in development but the evidence base for clinical benefit above standard practice is minimal. This randomised controlled

  8. School absenteeism among school-aged children with medically attended acute viral respiratory illness during three influenza seasons, 2012-2013 through 2014-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Huong Q; Peterson, Siri H; King, Jennifer P; Meece, Jennifer K; Belongia, Edward A

    2017-05-01

    Acute respiratory illnesses (ARIs) are common in school-aged children, but few studies have assessed school absenteeism due to specific respiratory viruses. To evaluate school absenteeism among children with medically attended ARI due to common viruses. We analyzed follow-up surveys from children seeking care for acute respiratory illness who were enrolled in the influenza vaccine effectiveness study at Marshfield Clinic during the 2012-2013 through 2014-2015 influenza seasons. Archived influenza-negative respiratory swabs were retested using multiplex RT-PCR to detect 16 respiratory virus targets. Negative binomial and logistic regression models were used to examine the association between school absence and type of respiratory viruses; endpoints included mean days absent from school and prolonged (>2 days) absence. We examined the association between influenza vaccination and school absence among children with RT-PCR-confirmed influenza. Among 1027 children, 2295 days of school were missed due to medically attended ARIs; influenza accounted for 39% of illness episodes and 47% of days missed. Mean days absent were highest for influenza (0.96-1.19) and lowest for coronavirus (0.62). Children with B/Yamagata infection were more likely to report prolonged absence than children with A/H1N1 or A/H3N2 infection [OR (95% CI): 2.1 (1.0, 4.5) and 1.7 (1.0, 2.9), respectively]. Among children with influenza, vaccination status was not associated with prolonged absence. School absenteeism due to medically attended ARIs varies by viral infection. Influenza B infections accounted for the greatest burden of absenteeism. © 2016 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Sílvia Valente Barbas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper, based on relevant literature articles and the authors' clinical experience, presents a goal-oriented respiratory management for critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS that can help improve clinicians' ability to care for these patients. Early recognition of ARDS modified risk factors and avoidance of aggravating factors during hospital stay such as nonprotective mechanical ventilation, multiple blood products transfusions, positive fluid balance, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and gastric aspiration can help decrease its incidence. An early extensive clinical, laboratory, and imaging evaluation of “at risk patients” allows a correct diagnosis of ARDS, assessment of comorbidities, and calculation of prognostic indices, so that a careful treatment can be planned. Rapid administration of antibiotics and resuscitative measures in case of sepsis and septic shock associated with protective ventilatory strategies and early short-term paralysis associated with differential ventilatory techniques (recruitment maneuvers with adequate positive end-expiratory pressure titration, prone position, and new extracorporeal membrane oxygenation techniques in severe ARDS can help improve its prognosis. Revaluation of ARDS patients on the third day of evolution (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA, biomarkers and response to infection therapy allows changes in the initial treatment plans and can help decrease ARDS mortality.

  10. The role of influenza, RSV and other common respiratory viruses in severe acute respiratory infections and influenza-like illness in a population with a high HIV sero-prevalence, South Africa 2012-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, Marthi A; Tempia, Stefano; Walaza, Sibongile; Cohen, Adam L; Moyes, Jocelyn; Variava, Ebrahim; Dawood, Halima; Seleka, Mpho; Hellferscee, Orienka; Treurnicht, Florette; Cohen, Cheryl; Venter, Marietjie

    2016-02-01

    Viruses detected in patients with acute respiratory infections may be the cause of illness or asymptomatic shedding. To estimate the attributable fraction (AF) and the detection rate attributable to illness for each of the different respiratory viruses We compared the prevalence of 10 common respiratory viruses (influenza A and B viruses, parainfluenza virus 1-3; respiratory syncytial virus (RSV); adenovirus, rhinovirus, human metapneumovirus (hMPV) and enterovirus) in both HIV positive and negative patients hospitalized with severe acute respiratory illness (SARI), outpatients with influenza-like illness (ILI), and control subjects who did not report any febrile, respiratory or gastrointestinal illness during 2012-2015 in South Africa. We enrolled 1959 SARI, 3784 ILI and 1793 controls with a HIV sero-prevalence of 26%, 30% and 43%, respectively. Influenza virus (AF: 86.3%; 95%CI: 77.7-91.6%), hMPV (AF: 85.6%; 95%CI: 72.0-92.6%), and RSV (AF: 83.7%; 95%CI: 77.5-88.2%) infections were associated with severe disease., while rhinovirus (AF: 46.9%; 95%CI: 37.6-56.5%) and adenovirus (AF: 36.4%; 95%CI: 20.6-49.0%) were only moderately associated. Influenza, RSV and hMPV can be considered pathogens if detected in ILI and SARI while rhinovirus and adenovirus were commonly identified in controls suggesting that they may cause only a proportion of clinical disease observed in positive patients. Nonetheless, they may be important contributors to disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Health Risk Factors Associated with Acute Respiratory Illness Among U.S. Army Recruits Attending Basic Combat Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-11

    house), health practices (smoking, alcohol consumption, exercise, quality of sleep and diet), measured personality styles ( self - esteem , personal...Background: Little is known regarding the role of smoking history and aerobic fitness in acute respiratory infection (ARI) risk in military trainees...1.59) was associated with increased ARI. Also, associations tended to be larger among less aerobically fit male and female trainees. Physical stress

  12. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Confalonieri, Marco; Salton, Francesco; Fabiano, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Since its first description, the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has been acknowledged to be a major clinical problem in respiratory medicine. From July 2015 to July 2016 almost 300 indexed articles were published on ARDS. This review summarises only eight of them as an arbitrary overview of clinical relevance: definition and epidemiology, risk factors, prevention and treatment. A strict application of definition criteria is crucial, but the diverse resource-setting scenarios foste...

  13. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus not detected in children hospitalized with acute respiratory illness in Amman, Jordan, March 2010 to September 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuri-Bulos, N.; Payne, D. C.; Lu, X.; Erdman, D.; Wang, L.; Faouri, S.; Shehabi, A.; Johnson, M.; Becker, M. M.; Denison, M. R.; Williams, J. V.; Halasa, N. B.

    2015-01-01

    Hospitalized children < 2 years of age in Amman, Jordan, admitted for fever and/or respiratory symptoms, were tested for Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV): MERS-CoV by real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR). This was a prospective year-round viral surveillance study in children <2 years of age admitted with acute respiratory symptoms and/or fever from March 2010 to September 2012 and enrolled from a government-run hospital, Al-Bashir in Amman, Jordan. Clinical and demographic data, including antibiotic use, were collected. Combined nasal/throat swabs were collected, aliquoted, and frozen at −80°C. Specimen aliquots were shipped to Vanderbilt University and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and tested by rRT-PCR for MERS-CoV. Of the 2433 subjects enrolled from 16 March 2010 to 10 September 2012, 2427 subjects had viral testing and clinical data. Of 1898 specimens prospectively tested for other viruses between 16 March 2010 and 18 March 2012, 474 samples did not have other common respiratory viruses detected. These samples were tested at CDC for MERS-CoV and all were negative by rRT-PCR for MERS-CoV. Of the remaining 531 samples, collected from 19 March 2012 to 10 September 2012 and tested at Vanderbilt, none were positive for MERS-CoV. Our negative findings from a large sample of young Jordanian children hospitalized with fever and/or respiratory symptoms suggest that MERS-CoV was not widely circulating in Amman, Jordan, during the 30-month period of prospective, active surveillance occurring before and after the first documented MERS-CoV outbreak in the Middle East region. PMID:24313317

  14. A two-time-period comparison of the effects of ambient air pollution on outpatient visits for acute respiratory illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Amber Hughes; Edgerton, Eric S; Wyzga, Ron; Tolsma, Dennis

    2010-02-01

    Concentrations of numerous ambient air pollutants have declined in recent years across the United States. Although it can be expected that reductions in air pollutants are associated with reductions in health effects, it is unclear whether this is actually the case. The purpose of this analysis was to compare the levels of and relationships between air pollutants and acute respiratory outpatient visits for two consecutive time periods totaling 53 mo. Air pollution data were collected at a centrally located monitor in Atlanta, GA, and include 24-hr averages of particulate matter (PM) less than 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) and its components; coarse PM (PM10-2.5); PM less than 10 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10); oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs); 8-hr maximum ozone (O3); and 1-hr maximum nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and sulfur dioxide (SO2). In addition, several metals and fractions of elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) were investigated. Daily outpatient visit data were obtained from the electronic data warehouse of the Atlanta-based region of a nonprofit managed care organization. Poisson general linear modeling determined associations between daily levels of acute visits for four diagnosis groups (adult and child asthma, upper and lower respiratory infection) and air pollution measurements. Overall declining trends were observed in air pollutants and acute visits over the study period. Childhood asthma had the greatest number of significant associations with air pollutants, namely zinc and EC. The significant lag time between pollutant measurement and visit occurrence changed from 3-5 days in the first time period to 6-8 days in the later time period, but there was general consistency in several childhood asthma and pollutant associations over both time periods. The greatest evidence for a reduction in pollution being associated with an improvement in health response was for lower respiratory disease

  15. Burden, seasonal pattern and symptomatology of acute respiratory illnesses with different viral aetiologies in children presenting at outpatient clinics in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, L; Chan, K-H; Ip, D K M; Fang, V J; Fung, R O P; Leung, G M; Peiris, M J S; Cowling, B J

    2015-09-01

    Respiratory viruses cause acute respiratory diseases with a broad and overlapping spectrum of symptoms. We examined the clinical symptoms and explored the patterns of various respiratory viral infections in children in Hong Kong. Among 2090 specimens collected from outpatient care (2007-2010), 1343 (64.3%) were positive for any virus by the xTAG assay, and 81 (3.9%) were positive for co-infection. The most frequently detected viruses among children aged 6-15 years were enterovirus/rhinovirus and influenza virus A, whereas most non-influenza viruses were more frequently detected in younger children. Higher body temperature was more common for illnesses associated with influenza viruses than for those associated with non-influenza viruses, but other symptoms were largely similar across all infections. The seasonality pattern varied among different viruses, with influenza virus A being the predominant virus detected in winter, and enterovirus/rhinovirus being more commonly detected than influenza virus A in the other three seasons, except for 2009. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their fever and other symptoms are gone. Hand hygiene is the most important part of SARS prevention. ... Coronaviruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). In: Bennett JE, Dolin ...

  17. Acquired respiratory failure in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmand, R

    1995-01-01

    With increasing survival rates from acute medical or surgical emergencies a new form of peripheral neuropathy, CIP, has been recognized. CIP can be seen only in patients who are considered to be critically ill; therefore, it invariably occurs in the ICU. Typically, initial symptoms begin with transient (hours to a few days) septic encephalopathy followed by generalized weakness, manifested in weaning failure, limb weakness and hyporeflexia. Diagnosis is confirmed by an EMG. CIP should be considered in any elderly patient with sepsis and prolonged respiratory muscle weakness. Prognosis is poor in severe cases, in which the EMG also shows severe axonal degeneration. In milder forms, fair to good recovery is expected within weeks. Management includes treatment of sepsis, normalization of failing organ function, physical therapy and proper nutrition.

  18. O-chlorobenzylidene malononitrile (CS riot control agent) associated acute respiratory illnesses in a U.S. Army Basic Combat Training cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hout, Joseph J; White, Duvel W; Artino, Anthony R; Knapik, Joseph J

    2014-07-01

    Acute respiratory illnesses (ARIs) are among the leading causes for hospital visits in U.S. military training populations and historically peak during U.S. Army Basic Combat Training (BCT) following mandatory exposure to the riot control agent o-chlorobenzylidene malononitrile (CS). This observational prospective cohort studied the association between CS exposures and ARI-related health outcomes in 6,723 U.S. Army recruits attending BCT at Fort Jackson, South Carolina from August 1 to September 25, 2012 by capturing and linking the incidence of ARI before and after the mask confidence chamber to CS exposure data. Recruits had a significantly higher risk (risk ratio = 2.44; 95% confidence interval = 1.74, 3.43) of being diagnosed with ARI following exposure to CS compared to the period of training preceding exposure, and incidence of ARI after CS exposure was dependent on the CS exposure concentration (p = 0.03). There was a significant pre-/postexposure ARI difference across all CS concentration levels (p < 0.01), however, no significant differences were detected among these rate ratios (p = 0.72). As CS exposure is positively associated with ARI health outcomes in this population, interventions designed to reduce respiratory exposures could result in decreased hospital burden and lost training time in the U.S. Army BCT population. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  19. Factors driving customers to seek health care from pharmacies for acute respiratory illness and treatment recommendations from drug sellers in Dhaka city, Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chowdhury F

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Fahmida Chowdhury,1 Katharine Sturm-Ramirez,1,2 Abdullah Al Mamun,1 A Danielle Iuliano,2 Mejbah Uddin Bhuiyan,1 Mohammod Jobayer Chisti,1 Makhdum Ahmed,1 Sabbir Haider,3 Mahmudur Rahman,3 Eduardo Azziz-Baumgartner2 1Infectious Diseases Division, International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, Dhaka, Bangladesh; 2Influenza Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3Institute of Epidemiology, Disease Control and Research, Dhaka, Bangladesh Background: Pharmacies in Bangladesh serve as an important source of health service. A survey in Dhaka reported that 48% of respondents with symptoms of acute respiratory illness (ARI identified local pharmacies as their first point of care. This study explores the factors driving urban customers to seek health care from pharmacies for ARI, their treatment adherence, and outcome.Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 100 selected pharmacies within Dhaka from June to December 2012. Study participants were patients or patients’ relatives aged >18 years seeking care for ARI from pharmacies without prescription. Structured interviews were conducted with customers after they sought health service from drug sellers and again over phone 5 days postinterview to discuss treatment adherence and outcome.Results: We interviewed 302 customers patronizing 76 pharmacies; 186 (62% sought care for themselves and 116 (38% sought care for a sick relative. Most customers (215; 71% were males. The majority (90% of customers sought care from the study pharmacy as their first point of care, while 18 (6% had previously sought care from another pharmacy and 11 (4% from a physician for their illness episodes. The most frequently reported reasons for seeking care from pharmacies were ease of access to pharmacies (86%, lower cost (46%, availability of medicine (33%, knowing the drug seller (20%, and convenient hours of operation (19%. The most commonly recommended drugs were

  20. Risk factors associated with hospitalisation for influenza-associated severe acute respiratory illness in South Africa: A case-population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadom, Tochukwu Raphael; Smith, Adrian D; Tempia, Stefano; Madhi, Shabir A; Cohen, Cheryl; Cohen, Adam L

    2016-11-04

    Influenza is a common cause of severe respiratory illness, but risk factors for hospitalisation in low income settings with a high HIV prevalence are not well described. We aimed to assess risk factors associated with influenza-associated severe acute respiratory illness (SARI) hospitalisation in South Africa. We conducted a case-population study using data on risk conditions in patients hospitalised with SARI and the national prevalence of these conditions. Data on hospitalised cases were from the national SARI surveillance program while data on the referent population were from the latest national census or health and demographic surveillance surveys. From 2009 to 2012, we identified 3646 (7.9%) of 46,031 enrolled cases of SARI that were associated with influenza infection. Risk factors associated with hospitalisation included previous history of smoking [case-population ratio (CPR) 3.82, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.5-4.16], HIV infection (CPR 3.61, 95% CI 3.5-3.71), asthma (CPR 2.45, 95% CI 2.19-2.73), previous history of hospital admission in the past 12months (CPR 2.07, 95% CI 1.92-2.23), and tuberculosis (CPR 1.85, 95% CI 1.68-2.02). When stratified by age, there is increased risk of hospitalisation in those ⩽5yearsof age (CPR 3.07, 95% CI 2.93-3.21) and among those 35yearsof age and above (CPR 1.23, 95% CI 1.28-1.18). Male sex (CPR 0.85, 95% CI 0.82-0.88) and completion of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination schedule in children <5yearsof age (CPR 0.74, 95% CI 0.71-0.77) were associated with decreased risk of hospitalisation. These results identify groups at high-risk for severe influenza who should be considered potential targets for influenza vaccination in South Africa and similar settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Confalonieri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Since its first description, the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS has been acknowledged to be a major clinical problem in respiratory medicine. From July 2015 to July 2016 almost 300 indexed articles were published on ARDS. This review summarises only eight of them as an arbitrary overview of clinical relevance: definition and epidemiology, risk factors, prevention and treatment. A strict application of definition criteria is crucial, but the diverse resource-setting scenarios foster geographic variability and contrasting outcome data. A large international multicentre prospective cohort study including 50 countries across five continents reported that ARDS is underdiagnosed, and there is potential for improvement in its management. Furthermore, epidemiological data from low-income countries suggest that a revision of the current definition of ARDS is needed in order to improve its recognition and global clinical outcome. In addition to the well-known risk-factors for ARDS, exposure to high ozone levels and low vitamin D plasma concentrations were found to be predisposing circumstances. Drug-based preventive strategies remain a major challenge, since two recent trials on aspirin and statins failed to reduce the incidence in at-risk patients. A new disease-modifying therapy is awaited: some recent studies promised to improve the prognosis of ARDS, but mortality and disabling complications are still high in survivors in intensive care.

  2. Quantitation of respiratory viruses in relation to clinical course in children with acute respiratory tract infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Rogier R.; Schinkel, Janke; dek, Irene; Koekkoek, Sylvie M.; Visser, Caroline E.; de Jong, Menno D.; Molenkamp, Richard; Pajkrt, Dasja

    2010-01-01

    Quantitation of respiratory viruses by PCR could potentially aid in clinical interpretation of PCR results. We conducted a study in children admitted with acute respiratory tract infections to study correlations between the clinical course of illness and semiquantitative detection of 14 respiratory

  3. Epidemiology of severe acute respiratory illness (SARI among adults and children aged ≥5 years in a high HIV-prevalence setting, 2009-2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Cohen

    Full Text Available There are few published studies describing severe acute respiratory illness (SARI epidemiology amongst older children and adults from high HIV-prevalence settings. We aimed to describe SARI epidemiology amongst individuals aged ≥5 years in South Africa.We conducted prospective surveillance for individuals with SARI from 2009-2012. Using polymerase chain reaction, respiratory samples were tested for ten viruses, and blood for pneumococcal DNA. Cumulative annual SARI incidence was estimated at one site with population denominators.We enrolled 7193 individuals, 9% (621/7067 tested positive for influenza and 9% (600/6519 for pneumococcus. HIV-prevalence was 74% (4663/6334. Among HIV-infected individuals with available data, 41% of 2629 were receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART. The annual SARI hospitalisation incidence ranged from 325-617/100,000 population. HIV-infected individuals experienced a 13-19 times greater SARI incidence than HIV-uninfected individuals (p7 days rather than <2 days (OR1.7; 95%CI:1.2-2.2 and had a higher case-fatality ratio (8% vs 5%;OR1.7; 95%CI:1.2-2.3, but were less likely to be infected with influenza (OR 0.6; 95%CI:0.5-0.8. On multivariable analysis, independent risk indicators associated with death included HIV infection (OR 1.8;95%CI:1.3-2.4, increasing age-group, receiving mechanical ventilation (OR 6.5; 95%CI:1.3-32.0 and supplemental-oxygen therapy (OR 2.6; 95%CI:2.1-3.2.The burden of hospitalized SARI amongst individuals aged ≥5 years is high in South Africa. HIV-infected individuals are the most important risk group for SARI hospitalization and mortality in this setting.

  4. Factors driving customers to seek health care from pharmacies for acute respiratory illness and treatment recommendations from drug sellers in Dhaka city, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Fahmida; Sturm-Ramirez, Katharine; Mamun, Abdullah Al; Iuliano, A Danielle; Bhuiyan, Mejbah Uddin; Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Ahmed, Makhdum; Haider, Sabbir; Rahman, Mahmudur; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Pharmacies in Bangladesh serve as an important source of health service. A survey in Dhaka reported that 48% of respondents with symptoms of acute respiratory illness (ARI) identified local pharmacies as their first point of care. This study explores the factors driving urban customers to seek health care from pharmacies for ARI, their treatment adherence, and outcome. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 100 selected pharmacies within Dhaka from June to December 2012. Study participants were patients or patients' relatives aged >18 years seeking care for ARI from pharmacies without prescription. Structured interviews were conducted with customers after they sought health service from drug sellers and again over phone 5 days postinterview to discuss treatment adherence and outcome. We interviewed 302 customers patronizing 76 pharmacies; 186 (62%) sought care for themselves and 116 (38%) sought care for a sick relative. Most customers (215; 71%) were males. The majority (90%) of customers sought care from the study pharmacy as their first point of care, while 18 (6%) had previously sought care from another pharmacy and 11 (4%) from a physician for their illness episodes. The most frequently reported reasons for seeking care from pharmacies were ease of access to pharmacies (86%), lower cost (46%), availability of medicine (33%), knowing the drug seller (20%), and convenient hours of operation (19%). The most commonly recommended drugs were acetaminophen dispensed in 76% (228) of visits, antihistamine in 69% (208), and antibiotics in 42% (126). On follow-up, most (86%) of the customers had recovered and 12% had sought further treatment. People with ARI preferred to seek care at pharmacies rather than clinics because these pharmacies were more accessible and provided prompt treatment and medicine with no service charge. We recommend raising awareness among drug sellers on proper dispensing practices and enforcement of laws and regulations for drug sales.

  5. Application of a time-space clustering methodology to the assessment of acute environmental effects on respiratory illnesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, I F; Cuzick, J

    1978-06-01

    A new methodology is proposed for the identification of environmental events of health significance. Health indices measured on a daily basis at various locations in a single geographical area are collected over time. First, the daily variations are examined to determine whether they reflect purely random variations or whether there are days on which there are extreme variations not plausibly explicable as random events. After such days are identified, the question of whether they occur only at a single location within the larger geographical area at one time, or whether they occur simultaneously at more than one location is investigated. Tests of statistical significance for both temporal and spatial clustering are proposed. The methodology is applied to daily hospital emergency room visits for various respiratory complaints to several New York City hospitals situated in two geographically separated districts which, however, have populations of similar socio-economic and ethnic composition.

  6. Mortality, severe acute respiratory infection, and influenza-like illness associated with influenza A(H1N1pdm09 in Argentina, 2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Azziz-Baumgartner

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: While there is much information about the burden of influenza A(H1N1pdm09 in North America, little data exist on its burden in South America. METHODS: During April to December 2009, we actively searched for persons with severe acute respiratory infection and influenza-like illness (ILI in three sentinel cities. A proportion of case-patients provided swabs for influenza testing. We estimated the number of case-patients that would have tested positive for influenza by multiplying the number of untested case-patients by the proportion who tested positive. We estimated rates by dividing the estimated number of case-patients by the census population after adjusting for the proportion of case-patients with missing illness onset information and ILI case-patients who visited physicians multiple times for one illness event. RESULTS: We estimated that the influenza A(H1N1pdm09 mortality rate per 100,000 person-years (py ranged from 1.5 among persons aged 5-44 years to 5.6 among persons aged ≥ 65 years. A(H1N1pdm09 hospitalization rates per 100,000 py ranged between 26.9 among children aged <5 years to 41.8 among persons aged ≥ 65 years. Influenza A(H1N1pdm09 ILI rates per 100 py ranged between 1.6 among children aged <5 to 17.1 among persons aged 45-64 years. While 9 (53% of 17 influenza A(H1N1pdm09 decedents with available data had obesity and 7 (17% of 40 had diabetes, less than 4% of surviving influenza A(H1N1pdm09 case-patients had these pre-existing conditions (p ≤ 0.001. CONCLUSION: Influenza A(H1N1pdm09 caused a similar burden of disease in Argentina as in other countries. Such disease burden suggests the potential value of timely influenza vaccinations.

  7. Conservative fluid management or deresuscitation for patients with sepsis or acute respiratory distress syndrome following the resuscitation phase of critical illness: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silversides, Jonathan A; Major, Emmet; Ferguson, Andrew J; Mann, Emma E; McAuley, Daniel F; Marshall, John C; Blackwood, Bronagh; Fan, Eddy

    2017-02-01

    It is unknown whether a conservative approach to fluid administration or deresuscitation (active removal of fluid using diuretics or renal replacement therapy) is beneficial following haemodynamic stabilisation of critically ill patients. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of conservative or deresuscitative fluid strategies in adults and children with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), sepsis or systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in the post-resuscitation phase of critical illness. We searched Medline, EMBASE and the Cochrane central register of controlled trials from 1980 to June 2016, and manually reviewed relevant conference proceedings from 2009 to the present. Two reviewers independently assessed search results for inclusion and undertook data extraction and quality appraisal. We included randomised trials comparing fluid regimens with differing fluid balances between groups, and observational studies investigating the relationship between fluid balance and clinical outcomes. Forty-nine studies met the inclusion criteria. Marked clinical heterogeneity was evident. In a meta-analysis of 11 randomised trials (2051 patients) using a random-effects model, we found no significant difference in mortality with conservative or deresuscitative strategies compared with a liberal strategy or usual care [pooled risk ratio (RR) 0.92, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.82-1.02, I 2  = 0 %]. A conservative or deresuscitative strategy resulted in increased ventilator-free days (mean difference 1.82 days, 95 % CI 0.53-3.10, I 2  = 9 %) and reduced length of ICU stay (mean difference -1.88 days, 95 % CI -0.12 to -3.64, I 2  = 75 %) compared with a liberal strategy or standard care. In adults and children with ARDS, sepsis or SIRS, a conservative or deresuscitative fluid strategy results in an increased number of ventilator-free days and a decreased length of ICU stay compared with a liberal strategy or standard care. The effect on mortality

  8. Genetic associations with viral respiratory illnesses and asthma control in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loisel, D A; Du, G; Ahluwalia, T S

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Viral respiratory infections can cause acute wheezing illnesses in children and exacerbations of asthma. OBJECTIVE: We sought to identify variation in genes with known antiviral and pro-inflammatory functions to identify specific associations with more severe viral respiratory illness...

  9. The rate of antibiotic utilization in Iranian under 5-year-old children with acute respiratory tract illness: A nationwide community-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Mostafavi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To investigate the prevalence of antibiotic usage in children aged <5 years with acute respiratory tract illness (ARTI in Iran. Materials and Methods: Data were collected from a national health survey conducted in 2010 (Iran′s Multiple Indicator Demographic and Health Survey. Participants of this cross-sectional study were selected by multistage stratified cluster-random sampling from 31 provinces of Iran. Parents of children with <5 years of age responded to questions about the occurrence of any cough during the previous 2 weeks, referral to private/governmental/other health care systems, and utilization of any oral/injection form of antibiotics. Data were analyzed using SPSS software18. The chi-square test was used to determine antibiotic consumption in various gender and residency groups and also a place of residence with the referral health care system. Results: Of the 9345 children under 5 years who participated in the study, 1506 cases (16.2% had ARTI during 2 weeks prior to the interview, in whom 1143 (75.9% were referred to urban or rural health care centers (43.4 vs. 30.4%; P < 0.001. Antibiotics were utilized by 715 (62.6% of affected children. Injection formulations were used for 150 (13.1% patients. The frequency of receiving antibiotics was higher in urban than in rural inhabitants (66.0% vs. 57.7%; P < 0.05. Conclusion: The prevalence of total and injection antibiotics usage in children <5 years with ARTI is alarmingly high in Iran. Therefore, interventions to reduce antibiotic use are urgently needed.

  10. [Acute respiratory dyspnea in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casimir, G; Hanssens, L; Mulier, S

    2009-09-01

    Acute respiratory dyspnea is very frequent in children and must be quickly treated to obtain the best prognosis. The diagnosis depends from the natural history of the disease and from the quality of clinical assessment. The use of an algorithm according to the presence of stridor or bronchospasm is very contributive to the diagnosis. The paper reviews the pathophysiology of dyspnea in children and the more common diseases that are causing respiratory distress. Finally, treatment of respiratory failure and management of specific diseases are defined.

  11. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... edema; Increased-permeability pulmonary edema; ARDS; Acute lung injury ... RS, Gausche-Hill M, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; ...

  12. Zonography in acute respiratory diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druzhinina, V.S.; Fetisova, V.M.; Kozorez, A.G.

    1984-01-01

    Radiography was performed in 94 patients whose initial condition was assessed as acute respiratory disease. Radioscopy with x-ray image amplifier, roentgenography and zonography were used. Pulmonary changes were found in 61 persons. In 45 of them acute pneumonia was revealed, in 16 changes in the pulmonary pattern assessed as residual manifestations of pneumonia. Changes in 30 patients with pneumonia and 16 patients with residual manifestations were detected by zonography only

  13. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome- SARS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome- SARS · PowerPoint Presentation · Slide 3 · Global pattern of SARS epidemic · Slide 5 · SARS – clinical features · Radiological features of lungs-showing progression of disease · cT Scan of SARS lungs · Imaging type,cost,therapy · SARS – Lung Pathology.

  14. Acute Respiratory Failure in Acute Poisoning by Neutrotropic Substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Lodyagin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficiency of methods for diagnosing and treating critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF in acute poisoning by neurotropic substances. Subjects and methods. Two hundred and thirty-three patients with acute severe intoxication with neurotropic poisons were examined. All the patients were admitted for toxic-hypoxic coma and ARF; in this connection all the patients underwent artificial ventilation (AV. The patients were divided into 3 groups: 1 those in whom the traditional treatments (AV, detoxifying therapy, and infusional and cardiotropic support could restore the basic parameters of vital functions, as judged from the recovered oxygenation index; these patients had no metabolic shifts; 2 those who had signs of pulmonary hyperhydration, low cardiac output and moderate metabolic disorders, as suggested by elevated lactate levels; 3 seriously ill patients in whom the interval between the time of poisoning to care delivery was more than 20 hours; the patients of this group had the most significant metabolic disorders. Results. Correction of ARF in critically ill patients with acute poisoning should include, in addition to the rational parameters of AV and detoxifying therapy, agents for targeted therapy for sequels of hypoxia and energy deficiency states. For maximally rapid and effective oxygen transport recovery, the addition of perfluorane to the complex therapy cardinally improves the results of treatment and reduces mortality rates. Conclusion. The complexity of the pathogenesis of ARF and its sequels is a ground for diagnosing and correcting not only ventilation disturbances, but also pulmonary microcirculatory disorders and metabolic disturbances. Key words: acute intoxication with neu-rotropic poisons, acute respiratory failure, pulmonary hyperhydration, hypoxia, metabolic disturbances.

  15. The pattern of paediatric respiratory illnesses admitted in Ebonyi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Reports from the developed nations reveal respiratory tract infections as the leading cause of childhood hospital admissions. Children may be admitted for a variety of respiratory illnesses. Data on the spectrum of pediatric respiratory illnesses admitted in the hospital is scarce. Aim: To determine the pattern of ...

  16. Human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalized danish children with acute respiratory tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Henrik Larsen, Hans; Koch, Anders

    2004-01-01

    The newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV) has been shown to be associated with respiratory illness. We determined the frequencies and clinical features of hMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in 374 Danish children with 383 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection...... children 1-6 months of age. Asthmatic bronchitis was diagnosed in 66.7% of hMPV and 10.6% of RSV-infected children (p respiratory support. hMPV is present in young...

  17. Monitoring of the respiratory muscles in the critically ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doorduin, Jonne; van Hees, Hieronymus W H; van der Hoeven, Johannes G; Heunks, Leo M A

    2013-01-01

    Evidence has accumulated that respiratory muscle dysfunction develops in critically ill patients and contributes to prolonged weaning from mechanical ventilation. Accordingly, it seems highly appropriate to monitor the respiratory muscles in these patients. Today, we are only at the beginning of routinely monitoring respiratory muscle function. Indeed, most clinicians do not evaluate respiratory muscle function in critically ill patients at all. In our opinion, however, practical issues and the absence of sound scientific data for clinical benefit should not discourage clinicians from having a closer look at respiratory muscle function in critically ill patients. This perspective discusses the latest developments in the field of respiratory muscle monitoring and possible implications of monitoring respiratory muscle function in critically ill patients.

  18. Acute respiratory infections among returning Hajj pilgrims-Jordan, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abdallat, Mohammad Mousa; Rha, Brian; Alqasrawi, Sultan; Payne, Daniel C; Iblan, Ibrahim; Binder, Alison M; Haddadin, Aktham; Nsour, Mohannad Al; Alsanouri, Tarek; Mofleh, Jawad; Whitaker, Brett; Lindstrom, Stephen L; Tong, Suxiang; Ali, Sami Sheikh; Dahl, Rebecca Moritz; Berman, LaShondra; Zhang, Jing; Erdman, Dean D; Gerber, Susan I

    2017-04-01

    The emergence of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has prompted enhanced surveillance for respiratory infections among pilgrims returning from the Hajj, one of the largest annual mass gatherings in the world. To describe the epidemiology and etiologies of respiratory illnesses among pilgrims returning to Jordan after the 2014 Hajj. Surveillance for respiratory illness among pilgrims returning to Jordan after the 2014 Hajj was conducted at sentinel health care facilities using epidemiologic surveys and molecular diagnostic testing of upper respiratory specimens for multiple respiratory pathogens, including MERS-CoV. Among the 125 subjects, 58% tested positive for at least one virus; 47% tested positive for rhino/enterovirus. No cases of MERS-CoV were detected. The majority of pilgrims returning to Jordan from the 2014 Hajj with respiratory illness were determined to have a viral etiology, but none were due to MERS-CoV. A greater understanding of the epidemiology of acute respiratory infections among returning travelers to other countries after Hajj should help optimize surveillance systems and inform public health response practices. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Change of serum prealbumin levels and serum protein markers between egg white powder and casein protein additives in standard enteral feeding formulas in critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhurayanontachai, Rungsun; Sa-Nguansai, Sunatee

    2016-01-01

    Protein deficiency is a major problem in critically ill patients. Egg white powder recently became a standard additive for protein supplementation in our unit. However, clinical data are not available to support egg white powder supplementation compared to standard protein casein supplementation. This study aimed to determine the change of serum prealbumin (PAB) levels of egg white powder compared to casein additive in standard enteral feeding in critically ill patients with respiratory failure. A prospective double-blind, randomized, non-inferiority study was conducted in patients with acute respiratory failure in the medical intensive care unit and respiratory care unit. These patients randomly received 1500 kcal/day of enteral nutrition support with 40 g/day of protein additives by either egg white protein powder or casein protein for 7 days. The serum PAB and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured on days 1, 3, 5, and 7. Repeated-measures ANOVA determined the group effects displayed by serum PAB and CRP levels. p values egg white powder group. The clinical characteristics, baseline nutritional status, and biochemistries were not significantly different between the groups. No statistically significant differences were seen in the serum PAB and serum CRP levels between the two groups. The average mean ± SEM difference of serum PAB level between the groups was 2.3 ± 2.5 mg% (p = 0.58). The levels of PAB between the egg white protein additive and casein protein additive were not significantly different and less than the non-inferior margin. Thai Clinical Trials Registry TCTR20160126002.

  20. Monitoring of the respiratory muscles in the critically ill

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorduin, J.; Hees, H.W.H. van; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Heunks, L.M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence has accumulated that respiratory muscle dysfunction develops in critically ill patients and contributes to prolonged weaning from mechanical ventilation. Accordingly, it seems highly appropriate to monitor the respiratory muscles in these patients. Today, we are only at the beginning of

  1. Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure in immunocompromised patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azoulay, Elie; Pickkers, Peter; Soares, Marcio

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In immunocompromised patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (ARF), initial management aims primarily to avoid invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV). METHODS: To assess the impact of initial management on IMV and mortality rates, we performed a multinational observational pr...

  2. Clinical and radiological features of pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza virus infection manifesting as acute febrile respiratory illness at their initial presentations: comparison with contemporaneous non-H1N1 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Tae Jin (Dept. of Radiology, Armed Force Byukjae Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)); Park, Chang Min; Choi, Seung Hong; Lee, Hyun Ju; Goo, Jin Mo (Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)), email: cmpark@radiol.snu.ac.kr; Kwon, Gu Jin (Dept. of Family Medicine, Armed Force Byukjae Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Dept. of Family Medicine, Gangneung Asan Hospital, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)); Woo, Sung Koo (Dept. of Radiology, Armed Force Byukjae Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)); Park, Seung Hoon (Dept. of Internal Medicine, Armed Force Byukjae Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of))

    2011-05-15

    Background Since the first outbreak caused by the pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza in Mexico, the virus has spread widely across the world with meaningful morbidity and mortality. However, there are few data on the comparative investigations to assess the clinical and radiological features between the H1N1 patient and non-H1N1 patients. Purpose To assess the clinical and radiological features of patients infected by the pandemic H1N1 2009 flu virus at their initial presentation and to compare them with contemporaneous non-H1N1 patients with acute febrile respiratory illness. Material and Methods This retrospective study was approved by the ethics committee of the Armed Forces Medical Command, South Korea. From August to September 2009, 337 consecutive patients presented with an acute febrile respiratory illness in a tertiary military hospital. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase-chain-reaction tests were performed in 62 of these patients under the impression of H1N1 infection. Clinical and radiological features at their initial presentation were described for the H1N1 group (n = 35) and non-H1N1 group (n = 27) and compared between the two groups. Results Increased C-reactive protein level (97%) without leukocytosis (9%) or increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (0%) was common in the H1N1 group at their initial presentation. On chest radiographs, 12 of 35 (34%) H1N1 patients had abnormal findings; nodules in 10 patients (83%) and consolidations in two (17%). Of the 28 H1N1 patients who underwent thin-section CT 16 patients (57%) showed abnormal findings; ground-glass opacities (GGOs) in 15 (94%), and nodules in 13 (81%). However, there were no significant differences between the H1N1 group and non-H1N1 group in terms of symptoms, laboratory results, or radiological findings (P > 0.05). Conclusion Patients with H1N1 infection show consistent clinical and radiological features at their initial presentation, however, clinical and radiological features of the H1N1 group are

  3. Clinical and radiological features of pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza virus infection manifesting as acute febrile respiratory illness at their initial presentations: comparison with contemporaneous non-H1N1 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Tae Jin; Park, Chang Min; Choi, Seung Hong; Lee, Hyun Ju; Goo, Jin Mo; Kwon, Gu Jin; Woo, Sung Koo; Park, Seung Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Background Since the first outbreak caused by the pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza in Mexico, the virus has spread widely across the world with meaningful morbidity and mortality. However, there are few data on the comparative investigations to assess the clinical and radiological features between the H1N1 patient and non-H1N1 patients. Purpose To assess the clinical and radiological features of patients infected by the pandemic H1N1 2009 flu virus at their initial presentation and to compare them with contemporaneous non-H1N1 patients with acute febrile respiratory illness. Material and Methods This retrospective study was approved by the ethics committee of the Armed Forces Medical Command, South Korea. From August to September 2009, 337 consecutive patients presented with an acute febrile respiratory illness in a tertiary military hospital. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase-chain-reaction tests were performed in 62 of these patients under the impression of H1N1 infection. Clinical and radiological features at their initial presentation were described for the H1N1 group (n = 35) and non-H1N1 group (n = 27) and compared between the two groups. Results Increased C-reactive protein level (97%) without leukocytosis (9%) or increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (0%) was common in the H1N1 group at their initial presentation. On chest radiographs, 12 of 35 (34%) H1N1 patients had abnormal findings; nodules in 10 patients (83%) and consolidations in two (17%). Of the 28 H1N1 patients who underwent thin-section CT 16 patients (57%) showed abnormal findings; ground-glass opacities (GGOs) in 15 (94%), and nodules in 13 (81%). However, there were no significant differences between the H1N1 group and non-H1N1 group in terms of symptoms, laboratory results, or radiological findings (P > 0.05). Conclusion Patients with H1N1 infection show consistent clinical and radiological features at their initial presentation, however, clinical and radiological features of the H1N1 group are

  4. Submersion and acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jang Su

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Submersion patients who are hypothermic on arrival of emergency department (ED are risky to respiratory failure and older, more hypothermic, longer hospital stay in suicidal submersion patients.

  5. Chronic cough postacute respiratory illness in children: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, Kerry-Ann F; Drescher, Benjamin J; Goyal, Vikas; Phillips, Natalie; Acworth, Jason; Marchant, Julie M; Chang, Anne B

    2017-11-01

    Data on the aetiology of persistent cough at the transitional stage from subacute to chronic cough (>4 weeks duration) are scarce. We aimed to (1) identify the prevalence of chronic cough following acute respiratory illness (ARI) and (2) determine the diagnostic outcomes of children with chronic cough. Prospective cohort study. A paediatric emergency department (ED) in Brisbane, Australia. Children aged cough. Children were followed weekly for 28 days;those with a persistent cough at day 28 were reviewed by a paediatric pulmonologist. Cough persistence at day 28 and pulmonologist diagnosis. 2586 children were screened and 776 (30%) were ineligible; 839 children (median age=2.3 years, range=0.5 months to 14.7 years, 60% male) were enrolled over 2 years. Most children (n=627, 74.8%) had cough duration of cough irrespective of cough duration at enrolment. The cough was wet in 59/171 (34.5%), dry in 45/171 (26.4%) and variable in 28/171 (16.1%). Of these 117 children , 117 (68.4%) were reviewed by a paediatric pulmonologist. A new and serious chronic lung disease was diagnosed in 36/117 (30.8%) children; 55/117 (47.0%) were diagnosed with protracted bacterial bronchitis. When chronic cough develops post-ARI, clinical review is warranted, particularly if parents report a history of prolonged or recurrent cough. Parents of children presenting acutely to ED with cough should be counselled about the development of chronic cough, as an underlying respiratory condition is not uncommon. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Modeling acute respiratory illness during the 2007 San Diego wildland fires using a coupled emissions-transport system and generalized additive modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, Brian; French, Nancy H F; Koziol, Benjamin W; Billmire, Michael; Owen, Robert Chris; Johnson, Jeffrey; Ginsberg, Michele; Loboda, Tatiana; Wu, Shiliang

    2013-11-05

    A study of the impacts on respiratory health of the 2007 wildland fires in and around San Diego County, California is presented. This study helps to address the impact of fire emissions on human health by modeling the exposure potential of proximate populations to atmospheric particulate matter (PM) from vegetation fires. Currently, there is no standard methodology to model and forecast the potential respiratory health effects of PM plumes from wildland fires, and in part this is due to a lack of methodology for rigorously relating the two. The contribution in this research specifically targets that absence by modeling explicitly the emission, transmission, and distribution of PM following a wildland fire in both space and time. Coupled empirical and deterministic models describing particulate matter (PM) emissions and atmospheric dispersion were linked to spatially explicit syndromic surveillance health data records collected through the San Diego Aberration Detection and Incident Characterization (SDADIC) system using a Generalized Additive Modeling (GAM) statistical approach. Two levels of geographic aggregation were modeled, a county-wide regional level and division of the county into six sub regions. Selected health syndromes within SDADIC from 16 emergency departments within San Diego County relevant for respiratory health were identified for inclusion in the model. The model captured the variability in emergency department visits due to several factors by including nine ancillary variables in addition to wildfire PM concentration. The model coefficients and nonlinear function plots indicate that at peak fire PM concentrations the odds of a person seeking emergency care is increased by approximately 50% compared to non-fire conditions (40% for the regional case, 70% for a geographically specific case). The sub-regional analyses show that demographic variables also influence respiratory health outcomes from smoke. The model developed in this study allows a

  7. Serum levels of N-terminal proB-type natriuretic peptide in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients--relation to tidal volume size and development of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Determann, Rogier M.; Royakkers, Annick A. N. M.; Schaefers, Jacqueline; de Boer, Anita M.; Binnekade, Jan M.; van Straalen, Jan P.; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2013-01-01

    Serum levels of N-terminal proB-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) are elevated in patients acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Recent studies showed a lower incidence of acute cor pulmonale in ARDS patients ventilated with lower tidal volumes. Consequently, serum levels of NT-proBNP may

  8. Estimating burden of influenza-associated influenza-like illness and severe acute respiratory infection at public healthcare facilities in Romania during the 2011/12-2015/16 influenza seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gefenaite, Giedre; Pistol, Adriana; Popescu, Rodica; Popovici, Odette; Ciurea, Daniel; Dolk, Christiaan; Jit, Mark; Gross, Diane

    2018-01-01

    Influenza is responsible for substantial morbidity and mortality, but there is limited information on reliable disease burden estimates, especially from middle-income countries in the WHO European Region. To estimate the incidence of medically attended influenza-associated influenza-like illness (ILI) and hospitalizations due to severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) presenting to public healthcare facilities in Romania. Sentinel influenza surveillance data for ILI and SARI from 2011/12-2015/16, including virological data, were used to estimate influenza-associated ILI and SARI incidence/100 000 and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). The overall annual incidence of ILI and influenza-associated ILI per 100 000 persons in Romania varied between 68 (95% CI: 61-76) and 318 (95% CI: 298-338) and between 23 (95% CI: 19-29) and 189 (95% CI: 149-240), respectively. The highest ILI and influenza incidence was among children aged 0-4 years. We estimated that SARI incidence per 100 000 persons was 6 (95% CI: 5-7) to 9 (95% CI: 8-10), of which 2 (95% CI: 1-2) to 3 (95% CI: 2-4) were due to influenza. Up to 0.3% of the Romanian population were annually reported with ILI, and 0.01% was hospitalized with SARI, of which as much as one-third could be explained by influenza. This evaluation was the first study estimating influenza burden in Romania. We found that during each influenza season, a substantial number of persons in Romania suffer from influenza-related ILI or are hospitalized due to influenza-associated SARI. © 2017 The World Health Organization. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Prevalence of non-influenza respiratory viruses in acute respiratory infection cases in Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Fernandes-Matano

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory infections are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although a viral aetiological agent is estimated to be involved in up to 80% of cases, the majority of these agents have never been specifically identified. Since 2009, diagnostic and surveillance efforts for influenza virus have been applied worldwide. However, insufficient epidemiological information is available for the many other respiratory viruses that can cause Acute respiratory infections.This study evaluated the presence of 14 non-influenza respiratory viruses in 872 pharyngeal exudate samples using RT-qPCR. All samples met the operational definition of a probable case of an influenza-like illness or severe acute respiratory infection and had a previous negative result for influenza by RT-qPCR.The presence of at least one non-influenza virus was observed in 312 samples (35.8%. The most frequent viruses were rhinovirus (RV; 33.0%, human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV; 30.8% and human metapneumovirus (HMPV; 10.6%. A total of 56 cases of co-infection (17.9% caused by 2, 3, or 4 viruses were identified. Approximately 62.5% of all positive cases were in children under 9 years of age.In this study, we identified 13 non-influenza respiratory viruses that could occur in any season of the year. This study provides evidence for the prevalence and seasonality of a wide range of respiratory viruses that circulate in Mexico and constitute a risk for the population. Additionally, our data suggest that including these tests more widely in the diagnostic algorithm for influenza may reduce the use of unnecessary antibiotics, reduce the hospitalisation time, and enrich national epidemiological data with respect to the infections caused by these viruses.

  10. Prevalence of non-influenza respiratory viruses in acute respiratory infection cases in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes-Matano, Larissa; Monroy-Muñoz, Irma Eloísa; Angeles-Martínez, Javier; Sarquiz-Martinez, Brenda; Palomec-Nava, Iliana Donají; Pardavé-Alejandre, Hector Daniel; Santos Coy-Arechavaleta, Andrea; Santacruz-Tinoco, Clara Esperanza; González-Ibarra, Joaquín; González-Bonilla, Cesar Raúl; Muñoz-Medina, José Esteban

    2017-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although a viral aetiological agent is estimated to be involved in up to 80% of cases, the majority of these agents have never been specifically identified. Since 2009, diagnostic and surveillance efforts for influenza virus have been applied worldwide. However, insufficient epidemiological information is available for the many other respiratory viruses that can cause Acute respiratory infections. This study evaluated the presence of 14 non-influenza respiratory viruses in 872 pharyngeal exudate samples using RT-qPCR. All samples met the operational definition of a probable case of an influenza-like illness or severe acute respiratory infection and had a previous negative result for influenza by RT-qPCR. The presence of at least one non-influenza virus was observed in 312 samples (35.8%). The most frequent viruses were rhinovirus (RV; 33.0%), human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV; 30.8%) and human metapneumovirus (HMPV; 10.6%). A total of 56 cases of co-infection (17.9%) caused by 2, 3, or 4 viruses were identified. Approximately 62.5% of all positive cases were in children under 9 years of age. In this study, we identified 13 non-influenza respiratory viruses that could occur in any season of the year. This study provides evidence for the prevalence and seasonality of a wide range of respiratory viruses that circulate in Mexico and constitute a risk for the population. Additionally, our data suggest that including these tests more widely in the diagnostic algorithm for influenza may reduce the use of unnecessary antibiotics, reduce the hospitalisation time, and enrich national epidemiological data with respect to the infections caused by these viruses.

  11. Investigation of an outbreak of acute respiratory disease in Côte D ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This study aim was to investigate an outbreak of human cases of unexplained influenza-like illness and fatal acute respiratory infection (ARI), with simultaneous poultry illness and high mortality raising concerns of possible influenza A (H5N1), virus in Cote d'Ivoire in February and March 2007. Materials and ...

  12. Noninvasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mas A

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Arantxa Mas, Josep MasipCritical Care Department, Consorci Sanitari Integral (CSI, Hospital Sant Joan Despí Moisès Broggi and Hospital General de l’Hospitalet, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: After the institution of positive-pressure ventilation, the use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV through an interface substantially increased. The first technique was continuous positive airway pressure; but, after the introduction of pressure support ventilation at the end of the 20th century, this became the main modality. Both techniques, and some others that have been recently introduced and which integrate some technological innovations, have extensively demonstrated a faster improvement of acute respiratory failure in different patient populations, avoiding endotracheal intubation and facilitating the release of conventional invasive mechanical ventilation. In acute settings, NIV is currently the first-line treatment for moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation as well as for acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and should be considered in immunocompromised patients with acute respiratory insufficiency, in difficult weaning, and in the prevention of postextubation failure. Alternatively, it can also be used in the postoperative period and in cases of pneumonia and asthma or as a palliative treatment. NIV is currently used in a wide range of acute settings, such as critical care and emergency departments, hospital wards, palliative or pediatric units, and in pre-hospital care. It is also used as a home care therapy in patients with chronic pulmonary or sleep disorders. The appropriate selection of patients and the adaptation to the technique are the keys to success. This review essentially analyzes the evidence of benefits of NIV in different populations with acute respiratory failure and describes the main modalities, new devices, and some practical aspects of the use of this technique. Keywords

  13. Environmental determinants of acute respiratory symptoms and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-04-20

    Apr 20, 1991 ... The impact of environmental risk factors associated with housing was examined in relation to diarrhoeal disease and acute respiratory symptoms in South African coloured child- ren. A multistage cluster sample representative of all coloured people living in the major urban and peri-urban areas of.

  14. Imaging in severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonio, G.E.; Wong, K.T.; Chu, W.C.W.; Hui, D.S.C.; Cheng, F.W.T.; Yuen, E.H.Y.; Chung, S.S.C.; Fok, T.F.; Sung, J.J.Y.; Ahuja, A.T.

    2003-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a highly infectious disease caused by a novel coronavirus, and has become pandemic within a short period of time. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis, management and follow-up of patients with SARS. The current status of imaging in SARS is presented in this review

  15. Drug use study for acute respiratory infection in children under 10 years of age

    OpenAIRE

    Iwan Dwiprahasto, Iwan Dwiprahasto

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute respiratory infection (ARI) is the commonest illness in children and the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in many developing countries. It comprises approximately 50 % of all illness in children under five years. Even though usually viral in origin and of a self-limiting nature, various study indicate that antibiotic prescribing for ARI is inappropriately high.Objective: This study was aimed to assess general practitioners' (GPs) prescribing pattern for acute respira...

  16. SMART phones and the acute respiratory patient.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gleeson, L

    2012-05-01

    Definition of Respiratory Failure using PaO2 alone is confounded when patients are commenced on oxygen therapy prior to arterial blood gas (ABG) measurement. Furthermore, classification of Respiratory Failure as Type 1 or Type 2 using PaCO2 alone can give an inaccurate account of events as both types can co-exist. 100 consecutive presentations of acute respiratory distress were assessed initially using PaO2, and subsequently PaO2\\/FiO2 ratio, to diagnose Respiratory Failure. Respiratory Failure cases were classified as Type 1 or Type 2 initially using PaCO2, and subsequently alveolar-arterial (A-a) gradient. Any resultant change in management was documented. Of 100 presentations, an additional 16 cases were diagnosed as Respiratory Failure using PaO2\\/FiO2 ratio in place of PaO2 alone (p = 0.0338). Of 57 cases of Respiratory Failure, 22 cases classified as Type 2 using PaCO2 alone were reclassified as Type 1 using A-a gradient (p < 0.001). Of these 22 cases, management changed in 18.

  17. Obesity and nutrition in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Renee D; Suratt, Benjamin T

    2014-12-01

    This article discusses obesity, its contribution to clinical outcomes, and the current literature on nutrition. More than one third of Americans are obese. Literature suggests that, among critically ill patients, the relationship between obesity and outcomes is complex. Obese patients may be at greater risk of developing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) than normal weight patients. Although obesity may confer greater morbidity in intensive care, it seems to decrease mortality. ARDS is a catabolic state; patients demonstrate a profound inflammatory response, multiple organ dysfunction, and hypermetabolism, often with malnutrition. The concept of pharmaconutrition has emerged. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Acute respiratory distress caused by Neosartorya udagawae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Farrell

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe the first reported case of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS attributed to Neosartorya udagawae infection. This mold grew rapidly in cultures of multiple respiratory specimens from a previously healthy 43-year-old woman. Neosartorya spp. are a recently recognized cause of invasive disease in immunocompromised patients that can be mistaken for their sexual teleomorph, Aspergillus fumigatus. Because the cultures were sterile, phenotypic identification was not possible. DNA sequencing of ITS, calmodulin and β-tubulin genes supported identification of Neosartorya udagawae. Our case is the first report of ARDS associated with Neosartorya sp. infection and defines a new clinical entity.

  19. Noninvasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas, Arantxa; Masip, Josep

    2014-01-01

    After the institution of positive-pressure ventilation, the use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) through an interface substantially increased. The first technique was continuous positive airway pressure; but, after the introduction of pressure support ventilation at the end of the 20th century, this became the main modality. Both techniques, and some others that have been recently introduced and which integrate some technological innovations, have extensively demonstrated a faster improvement of acute respiratory failure in different patient populations, avoiding endotracheal intubation and facilitating the release of conventional invasive mechanical ventilation. In acute settings, NIV is currently the first-line treatment for moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation as well as for acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and should be considered in immunocompromised patients with acute respiratory insufficiency, in difficult weaning, and in the prevention of postextubation failure. Alternatively, it can also be used in the postoperative period and in cases of pneumonia and asthma or as a palliative treatment. NIV is currently used in a wide range of acute settings, such as critical care and emergency departments, hospital wards, palliative or pediatric units, and in pre-hospital care. It is also used as a home care therapy in patients with chronic pulmonary or sleep disorders. The appropriate selection of patients and the adaptation to the technique are the keys to success. This review essentially analyzes the evidence of benefits of NIV in different populations with acute respiratory failure and describes the main modalities, new devices, and some practical aspects of the use of this technique.

  20. Energy expenditure of acutely ill hospitalised patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gariballa Salah

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To measure energy expenditure of acutely ill elderly patients in hospital and following discharge in the community. Design Sixty-three consecutive hospitalised acutely ill elderly patients were recruited. Eight patients were studied to assess the reliability of the Delta Tract Machine as a measure of energy expenditure; 35 patients had their energy expenditure studied in hospital on two occasions and 20 patients had their energy expenditure measured in hospital and at 6 weeks in the community Results Men had higher basal energy expenditure (BMR values compared to women however the difference was not statistically significant [Men, mean (SD 1405 (321 Kcal, women 1238 (322 kcal; mean difference (95% CI 166 kcal (-17 to 531, p = 0.075]. After adjusting for age, gender and body mass index both medication and C-reactive protein (CRP, concentrations showed significant correlation with measured energy expenditure in hospital, (r = -0.36, "p Conclusion Tissue inflammation and medications were associated with change in measured energy expenditure in acutely ill patients.

  1. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS After Nitric Acid Inhalation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülay Kır

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lung injury resulting from inhalation of chemical products continues to be associated with high morbidity and mortality. Concentrated nitric acids are also extremely corrosive fuming chemical liquids. Fumes of nitric acid (HNO3 and various oxides of nitrogen such as nitric oxide (NO and nitrogen dioxide (NO2 may cause fatal illnesses such as severe pulmonary edema and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS when inhaled. Intensive respiratory management including mechanical ventilation with positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP, inverse ratio ventilation, replacement of surfactant and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO, steroids and n-acetylcysteine (NAC may improve survival. In this case report we present the diagnosis and successful treatment of a 57 years old male patient who developed ARDS following pulmonary edema due to nitric acid fumes inhalation.

  2. Neuroleptic-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Garcia Soriano

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: A case of neuroleptic malignant syndrome and acute respiratory distress syndrome is presented and discussed with emphasis on the role of muscle relaxation, creatine kinase, and respiratory function tests. CASE REPORT: A 41-year-old man presented right otalgia and peripheral facial paralysis. A computed tomography scan of the skull showed a hyperdense area, 2 cm in diameter, in the pathway of the anterior intercommunicating cerebral artery. Preoperative examination revealed: pH 7.4, PaCO2 40 torr, PaO2 80 torr (room air, Hb 13.8 g/dl, blood urea nitrogen 3.2 mmol/l, and creatinine 90 mmol/l. The chest x-ray was normal. The patient had not eaten during the 12-hour period prior to anesthesia induction. Intravenous halothane, fentanyl 0.5 mg and droperidol 25 mg were used for anesthesia. After the first six hours, the PaO2 was 65 torr (normal PaCO2 with FiO2 50% (PaO2/FiO2 130, and remained at this level until the end of the operation 4 hours later, maintaining PaCO2 at 35 torr. A thrombosed aneurysm was detected and resected, and the ends of the artery were closed with clips. No vasospasm was present. This case illustrates that neuroleptic drugs can cause neuroleptic malignant syndrome associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome is a disease that is difficult to diagnose. Acute respiratory distress syndrome is another manifestation of neuroleptic malignant syndrome that has not been recognized in previous reports: it may be produced by neuroleptic drugs independent of the manifestation of neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Some considerations regarding the cause and effect relationship between acute respiratory distress syndrome and neuroleptic drugs are discussed. Intensive care unit physicians should consider the possibility that patients receiving neuroleptic drugs could develop respiratory failure in the absence of other factors that might explain the syndrome.

  3. Genetic associations with viral respiratory illnesses and asthma control in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loisel, Dagan A; Du, Gaixin; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer Singh; Tisler, Christopher J.; Evans, Michael D.; Myers, Rachel A.; Gangnon, Ronald E.; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Bisgaard, Hans; Jackson, Daniel J.; Lemanske, Robert F.; Nicolae, Dan L.; Gern, James E.; Ober, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Background Viral respiratory infections can cause acute wheezing illnesses in children and exacerbations of asthma. Objective We sought to identify variation in genes with known antiviral and pro-inflammatory functions to identify specific associations with more severe viral respiratory illnesses and the risk of virus-induced exacerbations during the peak fall season. Methods The associations between genetic variation at 326 SNPs in 63 candidate genes and 10 phenotypes related to viral respiratory infection and asthma control were examined in 226 children enrolled in the RhinoGen study. Replication of asthma control phenotypes was performed in 2,128 children in the Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC). Significant associations in RhinoGen were further validated using virus-induced wheezing illness and asthma phenotypes in an independent sample of 122 children enrolled in the Childhood Origins of Asthma birth cohort study (COAST). Results A significant excess of P values smaller than 0.05 was observed in the analysis of the 10 RhinoGen phenotypes. Polymorphisms in 12 genes were significantly associated with variation in the four phenotypes showing a significant enrichment of small P values. Six of those genes (STAT4, JAK2, MX1, VDR, DDX58, and EIF2AK2) also showed significant associations with asthma exacerbations in the COPSAC study or with asthma or virus-induced wheezing phenotypes in the COAST study. Conclusions We identified genetic factors contributing to individual differences in childhood viral respiratory illnesses and virus-induced exacerbations of asthma. Defining mechanisms of these associations may provide insight into the pathogenesis of viral respiratory infections and virus-induced exacerbations of asthma. PMID:26399222

  4. Is public transport a risk factor for acute respiratory infection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Packham Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between public transport use and acquisition of acute respiratory infection (ARI is not well understood but potentially important during epidemics and pandemics. Methods A case-control study performed during the 2008/09 influenza season. Cases (n = 72 consulted a General Practitioner with ARI, and controls with another non-respiratory acute condition (n = 66. Data were obtained on bus or tram usage in the five days preceding illness onset (cases or the five days before consultation (controls alongside demographic details. Multiple logistic regression modelling was used to investigate the association between bus or tram use and ARI, adjusting for potential confounders. Results Recent bus or tram use within five days of symptom onset was associated with an almost six-fold increased risk of consulting for ARI (adjusted OR = 5.94 95% CI 1.33-26.5. The risk of ARI appeared to be modified according to the degree of habitual bus and tram use, but this was not statistically significant (1-3 times/week: adjusted OR = 0.54 (95% CI 0.15-1.95; >3 times/week: 0.37 (95% CI 0.13-1.06. Conclusions We found a statistically significant association between ARI and bus or tram use in the five days before symptom onset. The risk appeared greatest among occasional bus or tram users, but this trend was not statistically significant. However, these data are plausible in relation to the greater likelihood of developing protective antibodies to common respiratory viruses if repeatedly exposed. The findings have differing implications for the control of seasonal acute respiratory infections and for pandemic influenza.

  5. Nutritional management in acute illness and acute kidney insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leverve, Xavier M; Cano, Noël J M

    2007-01-01

    There are now powerful compensatory therapies to counteract kidney deficiency and the prognosis of patients with acute renal failure is mainly related to the severity of the initial disease. Renal failure is accompanied by an increase in both severity and duration of the catabolic phase leading to stronger catabolic consequences. The specificity of the metabolic and nutritional disorders in the most severely ill patients is the consequence of three additive phenomena: (1) the metabolic response to stress and to organ dysfunction, (2) the lack of normal kidney function and (3) the interference with the renal treatment (hemodialysis, hemofiltration or both, continuous or intermittent, lactate or bicarbonate buffer, etc.). As in many other diseases of similar severity, adequate nutritional support in acutely ill patients with ARF is of great interest in clinical practice, although the real improvement as a result of this support is still difficult to assess in terms of morbidity or mortality.

  6. Relative Moldiness Index as Predictor of Childhood Respiratory Illness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vesper, Sephen J.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Haugland, Richard A.; Iossifova, Yulia; Lemasters, Grace; Levin, Linda; Hershey, Gurjit K.; Villareal, Manuel; Bernstein, David I.; Lockey, James; Reponen, Tina

    2007-01-01

    This study compared two classification methods to evaluate the mold condition in 271 homes of infants, 144 of which later developed symptoms of respiratory illness. A method using on-site visual mold inspection was compared to another method using a quantitative index of moldiness, calculated from mold specific quantitative PCR (MSQPCR) measurements on the concentration of 36 species of molds in floor dust samples called the EPA relative moldiness index© (ERMI©). The binary classification of homes as either moldy or non-moldy by on-site visual home inspection was not predictive of the development of wheeze and/or rhinitis. The odds-ratio of moldy vs. non-moldy homes to experience respiratory illness was estimated at 1.33 (p=0.27, Fisher’s exact test). Further, this method offers little flexibility in how it may be applied in support of decisions on mold remediation. On the other hand, a method developed and validated in this paper using the ERMI© index fit to a logistic function, can be used to predict the occurrence of illness in homes and allows stake holders to choose among various levels of risk. An example is given where an ERMI© value of -4.29 is used as a threshold for binary classification of homes producing an odds ratio of 2.53 (p=0.003, Fisher’s exact test). The ERMI© based methods presented here provide a new and more flexible platform to support mold remediation decisions.

  7. [Acute cor pulmonale in acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Cao, Quan; Zuo, Xiangrong

    2017-03-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a severe respiratory condition that is characterized by rapidly progressive hypoxemia with noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. Despite the improvement of therapeutic methods, the mortality of ARDS is in the range of 40%-50% all over the world. Some studies have shown that a significant number of patients with ARDS had acute cor pulmonale (ACP), and ACP is independently associated with the mortality of patients with ARDS, which has attracted wide attention in recent years. This paper reviewed recent related studies, summarized the prevalence, pathogenesis and diagnostic approaches of ACP in ARDS, especially echocardiography which was considered as a cornerstone for ACP diagnosis, and elucidated the beneficial effects of right ventricular protective ventilatory strategy and prone-positioning on the pulmonary vasculature and right heart, in order to provide a novel idea for the therapy of ACP in ARDS.

  8. Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome : Consensus Recommendations From the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jouvet, Philippe; Thomas, Neal J.; Willson, Douglas F.; Erickson, Simon; Khemani, Robinder; Smith, Lincoln; Zimmerman, Jerry; Dahmer, Mary; Flori, Heidi; Quasney, Michael; Sapru, Anil; Cheifetz, Ira M.; Rimensberger, Peter C.; Kneyber, Martin; Tamburro, Robert F.; Curley, Martha A. Q.; Nadkarni, Vinay; Valentine, Stacey; Emeriaud, Guillaume; Newth, Christopher; Carroll, Christopher L.; Essouri, Sandrine; Dalton, Heidi; Macrae, Duncan; Lopez-Cruces, Yolanda; Quasney, Michael; Santschi, Miriam; Watson, R. Scott; Bembea, Melania

    Objective: To describe the final recommendations of the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference. Design: Consensus conference of experts in pediatric acute lung injury. Setting: Not applicable. Subjects: PICU patients with evidence of acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress

  9. Acute febrile illness in cirrhosis - thinking beyond spontaneous bacterial peritonitis!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ajay K; Sircar, Shohini; Jain, Mayank; Adkar, Sagar; Waghmare, Chandrashekhar; Chahwala, Fatema

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to look at the aetiological factors presenting as acute febrile illness in cirrhotic patients. The study group included all cirrhotic patients admitted as inpatients between January and December 2011 with a history of fever of less than seven days duration. Detailed history, clinical examination and investigations, as required, were noted. The data collected were analysed. A total of 42 patients formed the study group. The male-to-female ratio was 9.5:1. The mean age at presentation was 45.09 years (24-77 years). The aetiological factors for fever were: spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (20), lower respiratory tract infection (8), urinary tract infection (6), lower limb cellulitis (4), acute cholecystitis (2) and malaria (2). The mean MELD (model for end-stage liver disease) score at presentation was 20.4. Three patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) and a mean MELD score of 31 died during the hospital admission. Febrile illness in cirrhosis is attributable to multiple causes. Outcome is dependent on the severity of underlying liver disease.

  10. Etnografía de la infección respiratoria aguda en una zona rural del altiplano mexicano Ethnography of acute respiratory illnesses in a rural zone of the Mexican central highlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HOMERO MARTÍNEZ

    1997-05-01

    menor costo fueron razones frecuentemente aducidas para estas elecciones. Conclusiones. Esta información puede resultar útil para mejorar la comunicación con las madres.Objective. To identify the terms used by mothers to refer to diseases, signs and symptoms related to acute respiratory illnesses (ARI, alarming signs which should motivate them to seek medical attention, and to describe common home practices of disease care and treatment. Material and methods. An ethnographic study was performed in six rural communities of the Mexican central highlands. Interviews were collected from 12 key informers, six mothers of children who had died from ARI and 24 mothers of children younger than five years of age, with several ethnographic techniques to complement information ("triangulation". Results. The most commonly identified diseases were cold, sore throat, cough, bronchitis, pneumonia and "broncomonía". Key signs to establish diagnosis included nasal discharge, sore throat, cough, head and body ache, fever, "bubbling" chest, general malaise and shortness of breath. Tachypnea was referred to as "b breathing", "much breathing", "rapid breathing" or "sizzle"; intercostal depression as "the chest sinks", stridor as "chest moan or chest snore", sibilance as "chest snore" and cyanosis as "he turns purple". Home treatments include herbal teas, lemon, green or red tomato or potato applied to the throat externally, as well as creams applied to chest or back. Antibiotic prescription was not common, contrary to antipiretics. Most mothers recognized mild illnesses: severe illnesses were recognized less frequently. When faced with a severe ARI, mothers sought attention firstly at the project clinic, second in frequency with a private physician in the capital of the province and then at the Health Ministry of the district. The reasons to choose these possibilities were mainly proximity and lower costs. Conclusions. This information can be useful to improve communication with mothers.

  11. The Incidence and Short-term Outcomes of Acute Respiratory Illness with Cough in Children from a Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Urban Community in Australia: A Community-Based Prospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry K. Hall

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAcute respiratory illnesses with cough (ARIwC are predominant causes of morbidity in Australian Indigenous children; however, data on disease burden in urban communities are scarce. This study aimed to determine the incidence of ARIwC, the predictors of recurrent (≥4 episodes ARIwC, and development of chronic cough following an ARIwC in urban, predominantly Indigenous, children aged <5 years from northern Brisbane, Australia.MethodsProspective cohort study of children aged <5 years registered with a primary healthcare center. ARIwC episodes and outcomes were collected for 12 months. Recurrent ARIwC was defined as ≥4 episodes in 12 months. Chronic cough was defined as cough lasting >4 weeks. Children who developed chronic cough were reviewed by a pediatric pulmonologist. Incidence densities per child-month of observation were calculated and predictors of recurrent ARIwC and chronic cough were evaluated in logistic regression models.ResultsBetween February 2013 and November 2015, 200 children were enrolled; median age of 18.1 months, range (0.7–59.7 months and 90% identified as Indigenous. A total of 1,722 child-months of observation were analyzed (mean/child = 8.58, 95% CI 8.18–9.0. The incidence of ARIwC was 24.8/100 child-months at risk (95% CI 22.3–27.5. Twenty-one children (10.5% experienced recurrent ARIwC. Chronic cough was identified in 70/272 (25.7% episodes of ARIwC. Predictors of recurrent ARIwC were presence of eczema, mold in the house, parent/carer employment status, and having an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mother/non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander father (compared to both parents being Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander. Predictors of chronic cough included being aged <12 months, eczema, childcare attendance, previous history of cough of >4 weeks duration, having an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mother/non-Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander father (compared to

  12. Acute respiratory failure following ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonello Nicolini

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome is a serious and potentially life-threatening physiological complication that may be encountered in patients who undergo controlled ovarian hyperstimulation cycles. The syndrome is typically associated with regimes of exogenous gonadotropins, but it can be seen, albeit rarely, when clomiphene is administered during the induction phase. Although this syndrome is widely described in scientific literature and is well known by obstetricians, the knowledge of this pathological and potentially life-threatening condition is generally less than satisfactory among physicians. The dramatic increase in therapeutic strategies to treat infertility has pushed this condition into the realm of acute care therapy. The potential complications of this syndrome, including pulmonary involvement, should be considered and identified so as to allow a more appropriate diagnosis and management. We describe a case of a woman with an extremely severe (Stage 6 ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome who presented ascites, bilateral pleural effusion and severe respiratory failure treated with non-invasive ventilation. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit because of severe respiratory failure, ascites, and bilateral pleural effusion due to ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. Treatment included non-invasive ventilation and three thoracentesis procedures, plus the administration of albumin, colloid solutions and high-dose furosemid. Severe form of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome is observed in 0.5-5% of the women treated, and intensive care may be required for management of thromboembolic complications, renal failure and severe respiratory failure. Pulmonary intensive care may involve thoracentesis, oxygen supplementation and, in more severe cases, assisted ventilation. To our knowledge, there have been only two studies in English language medical literature that describe severe respiratory failure treated with non

  13. Characteristics of patients with influenza-like illness, severe acture respiratory illness, and laboratory-confirmed influenza at a major children's hospital in Angola, 2009-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Yolanda; Oliveira, Erika; Vasconcelos, Jocelyne; Cohen, Adam L; Francisco, Moises

    2012-12-15

    There are no published data on influenza trends in Angola, where pneumonia is a leading cause of death among young children. This study aims to describe the seasonal trends, types, and subtypes of influenza virus recovered from patients with respiratory illness who were admitted to the major children's hospital in Angola from May 2009 through April 2011. Nasal and oral swabs were collected from patients seen in the outpatient clinic with influenza-like illness (ILI) or hospitalized with severe acute respiratory illness (SARI) and tested for influenza virus by polymerase chain reaction assays. Of 691 samples collected, 334 (48%) were from case patients with ILI, and 357 (52%) were from case patients with SARI. Most (86%) of these children were Angola.

  14. Phytotherapy of Acute Respiratory Viral Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.B. Ershova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays phytotherapy is increasingly being implemented into medical practice, especially for the prevention and treatment of many diseases. Acute respiratory viral infections are most common in childhood and in adults. Acute rhinitis, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, sinusitis, nasopharyngitis and acute laryngitis refer to diseases of the upper respiratory tract. The main reason for respiratory diseases in recurrent respiratory infection child is disorders of mucociliary and immune protection. The therapeutic value of medicinal plants is determined by their biologically active substances. The method of application of phytotherpy is an integral part of traditional medicine. Herbal medicine can be used at home and does not require special equipment. The main indications for the herbal medicine use in pediatrics are the initial stage of the disease as a primary method of treatment due to mild and low toxicity; as a supporting treatment for enhancing the protective forces of the child’s body during the disease deterioration. During the recovery period herbal medicine again occupies a leading position, especially in case of chronic diseases because it can be used for a long time and is well combined with synthetic drugs. The terms of appointment of herbs for children: prescription of medicinal plants for children must be individual according to indications, taking into account the child’s age; it is recommended to take into account the form and nature of the course of the main disease and comorbidities as well; at the initial stage of the treatment it is better to use some medicinal plants or species consisting of 2–3 plants and in the future a more complex composition; therapy with medicinal plants requires a long period to be used use, especially in chronic diseases; in the treatment of chronic diseases a good effect preventive courses of herbal medicine was revealed, which are appointed during seasonal exacerbations; in case of intolerance

  15. Determinants of acute respiratory infections in Soweto - a population ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Acute respiratory infections (ARIs) are an important cause of infant morbidity in both developing and developed countries, and they are the leading cause of death in poorer parts of the world. Respiratory viruses appear to be the most frequent microbiological pathogens, especially respiratory syncytial virus.

  16. Chinese herbal medicine for severe acute respiratory syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jianping; Manheimer, Eric; Shi, Yi

    2004-01-01

    To review randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effects of Chinese herbal medicine for treating severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) systematically.......To review randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effects of Chinese herbal medicine for treating severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) systematically....

  17. Clustering of acute respiratory infection hospitalizations in childcare facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Benn, Christine Stabell; Simonsen, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    To estimate how risk of acute respiratory infection (ARI) hospitalization in children attending childcare facilities with a recently (within 1 month) hospitalized child is affected by gender, age and other characteristics.......To estimate how risk of acute respiratory infection (ARI) hospitalization in children attending childcare facilities with a recently (within 1 month) hospitalized child is affected by gender, age and other characteristics....

  18. Acute respiratory infections in young Ethiopian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris RA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rebecca Arden HarrisDepartment of Family and Social Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USAThe identification of risk factors for acute respiratory infections (ARI is crucial for designing interventions to both minimize transmission and augment the immune response, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa where poverty-related ARI is still a major cause of preventable death in young children.1 I therefore read with interest Geberetsadik et al’s recent study of the factors associated with ARI in Ethiopian children.2 Their study uses nationally representative data on households and individuals to build a model of the social, demographic, and anthropometric determinants of ARI. A precise understanding of their model, however, requires clarification of several items in their paper.View original paper by Geberetsadik et al.

  19. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: evaluation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, I; Peñuelas, O; Esteban, A

    2012-03-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening condition that affects patients admitted in the Intensive Care Units (ICUs) under mechanical ventilation. ARDS is a process of non-hydrostatic pulmonary edema and hypoxemia associated with a variety of conditions, resulting in a direct (e.g., pneumonia) or indirect (e.g., sepsis) lung injury and is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. A large body of clinical and basic research has focused in ventilatory strategies and novel pharmacological therapies but, nowadays, treatment is mainly supportive. Mechanical ventilation is the hallmark of the management of these patients. In the last decades, the recognition that mechanical ventilation can contribute to harming the lung has changed the goals of this therapy and has driven research to focus in ventilatory strategies that mitigate lung injury. This review emphasizes clinical aspects in the evaluation and management of ARDS in the ICUs and updates the latest advances in these therapies.

  20. Prolonged Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Je Ko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available When all conventional treatments for respiratory failure in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS have failed, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO can provide a chance of survival in these desperately ill patients. A 49-year-old male patient developed septic shock and progressive ARDS after liver abscess drainage. Venovenous ECMO was given due to refractory respiratory failure on postoperative day 6. Initially, two heparin-binding hollow-fiber microporous membrane oxygenators in parallel were used in the ECMO circuit. Twenty-two oxygenators were changed in the first 22 days of ECMO support because of plasma leak in the oxygenators. Each oxygenator had an average life of 48 hours. Thereafter, a single silicone membrane oxygenator was used in the ECMO circuit, which did not require change during the remaining 596 hours of ECMO. The patient's tidal volume was only 90 mL in the nadir and less than 300 mL for 26 days during the ECMO course. The patient required ECMO support for 48 days and survived despite complications, including septic shock, ARDS, acute renal failure, drug-induced leukopenia, and multiple internal bleeding. This patient received an unusually long duration of ECMO support. However, he survived, recovered well, and was in New York Heart Association functional class I-II, with a forced expiratory volume in 1 second of 81% of the predicted level 18 months later. In conclusion, ECMO can provide a chance of survival for patients with refractory ARDS. The reversibility of lung function is possible in ARDS patients regardless of the severity of lung dysfunction at the time of treatment.

  1. Pathogenesis of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Golubev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is a common complication of many diseases. Its polyetiological pattern determines the specific features of lung morphological changes and the clinical course of ARDS. Objective: to analyze the pathogenesis of ARDS in the context of the general pathological processes underlying its development. Material and methods. More than 200 lungs from the people who had died from severe concomitant injury or ARDS-complicated pneumonia were investigated. More than 150 rat experiments simulated various types of lung injury: ventilator-induced lung injury with different ventilation parameters; reperfusion injuries (systemic circulation blockade due to 12-minute vascular fascicle ligation, followed by the recovery of cardiac performance and breathing; microcirculatory disorder (injection of a thromboplastin solution into the jugular vein; blood loss; betaine-pepsin aspiration; and closed chest injury. Different parts of the right and left lungs were histologically examined 1 and 3 hours and 1 and 3 days after initiation of the experiment. Lung pieces were fixed in 10% neutral formalin solution and embedded in paraffin. Histological sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and using the van Gieson and Weigert procedures; the Schiff test was used. Results. The influence of aggression factors (trauma, blood loss, aspiration, infection, etc. results in damage to the lung and particularly air-blood barrier structures (endothelium, alveolar epithelium, their basement membrane. In turn the alteration of cellular and extracellular structures is followed by the increased permeability of hemomicrocirculatory bed vessels, leading to the development of non-cardiogenic (interstitial, alveolar pulmonary edema that is a central component in the pathogenesis of ARDS. Conclusion. The diagnosis of the early manifestations of ARDS must account for the nature of an aggression factor, the signs confirming the alteration of the lung

  2. Synchronization of Cardio-Respiratory Dynamics in Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burykin, Anton; Buchman, Timothy

    2008-03-01

    We studied changes in cardio-respiratory synchronization and dynamics of cardiovascular system during transition from mechanical ventilation to spontaneous respiration in critically ill patients. This observational study exploits a standard clinical practice---the spontaneous breathing trial (SBT). The SBT consists of a period of mechanical ventilation, followed by a period of spontaneous breathing, followed by resumption of mechanical ventilation. We collected continuous respiratory, cardiac (EKG), and blood pressure signals of mechanically ventilated patients before, during and after SBT. The data were analyzed by means of spectral analysis, phase dynamics, and entropy measures. Mechanical ventilation appears to affect not only the lungs but also the cardiac and vascular systems. Spontaneous cardiovascular rhythms are entrained by the mechanical ventilator and are drawn into synchrony. Sudden interruption of mechanical ventilation causes gross desynchronization, which is restored by reinstitution of mechanical ventilation. The data suggest (1) therapies intended to support one organ system may propagate unanticipated effects to other organ systems and (2) sustained therapies may adversely affect recovery of normal organ system interactions.

  3. Importance of Respiratory Viruses in Acute Otitis Media

    OpenAIRE

    Heikkinen, Terho; Chonmaitree, Tasnee

    2003-01-01

    Acute otitis media is usually considered a simple bacterial infection that is treated with antibiotics. However, ample evidence derived from studies ranging from animal experiments to extensive clinical trials supports a crucial role for respiratory viruses in the etiology and pathogenesis of acute otitis media. Viral infection of the upper respiratory mucosa initiates the whole cascade of events that finally leads to the development of acute otitis media as a complication. The pathogenesis o...

  4. The effect of inhaled nitric oxide in acute respiratory distress syndrome in children and adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karam, O; Gebistorf, F; Wetterslev, J

    2017-01-01

    on mortality in adults and children with acute respiratory distress syndrome. We included all randomised, controlled trials, irrespective of date of publication, blinding status, outcomes reported or language. Our primary outcome measure was all-cause mortality. We performed several subgroup and sensitivity......Acute respiratory distress syndrome is associated with high mortality and morbidity. Inhaled nitric oxide has been used to improve oxygenation but its role remains controversial. Our primary objective in this systematic review was to examine the effects of inhaled nitric oxide administration......% CI) 1.59 (1.17-2.16)) with inhaled nitric oxide. In conclusion, there is insufficient evidence to support inhaled nitric oxide in any category of critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome despite a transient improvement in oxygenation, since mortality is not reduced and it may...

  5. Myasthenia gravis with acute respiratory failure in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Hasan Huseyin; Uca, Ali Ulvi; Teke, Turgut; Altas, Mustafa; Karatas, Emine

    2016-06-01

    Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is defined as a sudden malfunction in the ability of respiratory system to maintain adequate gas exchange. Acute hypercapnic respiratory failure develops as a result of ventilation deficiency and it is defined as an increase of PaCO 2 above 45 mmHg. Myasthenia Gravis (MG) is a sporadically developing auto-immune deficiency where the neuro-muscular transmission is affected and it is one of the important reasons for neurologically-induced respiratory distress. Here, we report a case of a 75-year-old male patient previously undiagnosed MG, who presented with ARF. MG is not a common entity that we encounter daily. Patients on occasions may present to the emergency department because of acute exacerbation. Though most of them were known cases, we should be aware of some unrecognized cases and should consider MG as a differential diagnosis for patients with acute respiratory failure.

  6. Clothiapine for acute psychotic illness: a meta-analysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    12. Clothiapine for acute psychotic illness: a meta-analysis. Introduction. Acute psychosis requires psychological and pharmacological treatment and, when a risk of self-harm or harm to others is present, the need for treatment can become urgent. Ideally, the drug(s) used in urgent treatment of acute psychosis should have.

  7. Acute respiratory infections in Pakistan: Have we made any progress?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, T.A.; Madni, S.A.; Zaidi, A.K.M.

    2004-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are the leading cause of death in young children in Pakistan, responsible for 20-30% of child deaths under age 5 years. This paper summarizes the research and technical development efforts over the last 15 years which have contributed to improving the effectiveness of the case management strategy to reduce mortality from 5' pneumonia in children in Pakistan. Community intervention is viable, effective and practical. Rising antimicrobial resistance among commonly used and A low-cost oral agent is of significant concern. Appropriate monitoring and evaluation of the impact of the ARI control programme is lacking. Lack of funding for programmatic activities, lack of coordination with other child survival programs, inadequate training for community health workers and general practitioners in the private sector, lack of public awareness about seeking timely and appropriate care and insufficient planning and support for ARI in the programmatic activities at provincial and district levels are major hindrances in decreasing the burden of ARI in the country. The recent introduction of the community-based Lady Health Worker (LHW) Programme and WHO and UNICEF-sponsored integrated management of childhood illness initiative present ideal opportunities for re-emphasizing early case detection and appropriate case management of ARI. Ultimately, focusing on preventive strategies such as improving nutrition, reducing indoor pollution, improving mass vaccination, as well as introduction of new vaccines effective against important respiratory pathogens will likely have the most impact on reducing severe ARI and deaths from severe disease. (author)

  8. Detection of bacterial and viral pathogens in hospitalized children with acute respiratory illness and determination of different socio demographic factors as important cause of the disease in Odisha, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagyalaxmi Biswal

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper an attempt has been made to analysis the status of acute respiratory tract infection among children in India. In the present study we aimed to present first time the detection of viruses, bacteria and mix infection of viruses and bacteria in hospitalized children with ARI and also to analyze the influence of socioeconomic status of parent in two divergent geographical settings of Odisha. Hospitalized children with ARI aged <5 were recruited from July 2014 to June 2015. Nasopharyngeal/Oropharyngial swabs were collected for detection of common respiratory viruses by reverse transcriptase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Bacteria were isolated by routine culture methods. Bivitiate analysis including chi square was used as test of significance. The analysis revealed 150 (56% were detected with ≥1 bacteria, 40 (15% with ≥ 1virus, 22 (8.2% with ≥ 2 bacteria and 20 (7-4% with both bacteria and virus. Most frequently detected pathogens were Klebsiella pneumonae (18.3%, Sptrptococcus pneumonae (12.7%, Parainfluenza A (36.6% and Influenza- A18 (30%. Incidences of pathogens were detected more among children <1 year, Gender discrimination in the form of dietary neglect of the female children has also been noted mostly in case of tribal patients. The present study had identified low socioeconomic status, poor housing conditions, illiterate mothers, birth weight, tobacco smoking families and nutritional status as important determinants for ARI. Interventions to improve these modifiable risk factors can significantly reduce the ARI burden among children especially in tribal population.

  9. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: epidemiology and management approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walkey AJ

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Allan J Walkey,1 Ross Summer,1 Vu Ho,1 Philip Alkana21The Pulmonary Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; 2Asthma Research Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Acute lung injury and the more severe acute respiratory distress syndrome represent a spectrum of lung disease characterized by the sudden onset of inflammatory pulmonary edema secondary to myriad local or systemic insults. The present article provides a review of current evidence in the epidemiology and treatment of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, with a focus on significant knowledge gaps that may be addressed through epidemiologic methods.Keywords: acute lung injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, review, epidemiology

  10. Acute Respiratory Distress: from syndrome to disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal-Fernández, P; Correger, E; Villanueva, J; Rios, F

    2016-04-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is currently one of the most important critical entities given its high incidence, rate of mortality, long-term sequelae and non-specific pharmacological treatment. The histological hallmark of ARDS is diffuse alveolar damage (DAD). Approximately 50% of ARDS patients present DAD, the rest is made up of a heterogeneous group of histological patterns, many of which correspond to a well-recognized disease. For that reason, if these patterns could be diagnosed, patients could benefit from a treatment. Recently, the effect of DAD in clinical and analytical evolution of ARDS has been demonstrated, so the classical approach to ARDS as an entity defined solely by clinical, radiological and gasometrical variables should be reconsidered. This narrative review aims to examine the need to evolve from the concept of ARDS as a syndrome to ARDS as a specific disease. So we have raised 4 critical questions: a) What is a disease?; b) what is DAD?; c) how is DAD considered according to ARDS definition?, and d) what is the relationship between ARDS and DAD? Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  11. Progressive Diaphragm Atrophy in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glau, Christie L; Conlon, Thomas W; Himebauch, Adam S; Yehya, Nadir; Weiss, Scott L; Berg, Robert A; Nishisaki, Akira

    2018-02-05

    Diaphragm atrophy is associated with delayed weaning from mechanical ventilation and increased mortality in critically ill adults. We sought to test for the presence of diaphragm atrophy in children with acute respiratory failure. Prospective, observational study. Single-center tertiary noncardiac PICU in a children's hospital. Invasively ventilated children with acute respiratory failure. Diaphragm thickness at end-expiration and end-inspiration were serially measured by ultrasound in 56 patients (median age, 17 mo; interquartile range, 5.5-52), first within 36 hours of intubation and last preceding extubation. The median duration of mechanical ventilation was 140 hours (interquartile range, 83-201). At initial measurement, thickness at end-expiration was 2.0 mm (interquartile range, 1.8-2.5) and thickness at end-inspiration was 2.5 mm (interquartile range, 2-2.8). The change in thickness at end-expiration during mechanical ventilation between first and last measurement was -13.8% (interquartile range, -27.4% to 0%), with a -3.4% daily atrophy rate (interquartile range, -5.6 to 0%). Thickening fraction = ([thickness at end-inspiration - thickness at end-expiration]/thickness at end-inspiration) throughout the course of mechanical ventilation was linearly correlated with spontaneous breathing fraction (beta coefficient, 9.4; 95% CI, 4.2-14.7; p = 0.001). For children with a period of spontaneous breathing fraction less than 0.5 during mechanical ventilation, those with exposure to a continuous neuromuscular blockade infusion (n = 15) had a significantly larger decrease in thickness at end-expiration compared with children with low spontaneous breathing fraction who were not exposed to a neuromuscular blockade infusion (n = 18) (-16.4%, [interquartile range, -28.4% to -7.0%] vs -7.3%; [interquartile range, -10.9% to -0%]; p = 0.036). Diaphragm atrophy is present in children on mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory failure. Diaphragm contractility, measured as

  12. Interpretation of chest radiographs in both cancer and other critical care patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sema Yilmaz

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a clinical, pathophysiological and radiographic pattern that has signs of pulmonary edema occur without elevated pulmonary venous pressures. Clinical presentation and progression of acute respiratory distress syndrome are followed by frequently ordered portable chest X-ray in critically ill patients. We evaluated chest radiographs of ten cancer and other six critical care pediatric patients. The parenchymal imaging of lung in patients with cancer was reported the same as that of other critically ill children despite underlying pathophysiological variations in our investigation. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 270-273

  13. Implementing hospital-based surveillance for severe acute respiratory infections caused by influenza and other respiratory pathogens in New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q Sue Huang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent experience with pandemic influenza A(H1N1pdm09 highlighted the importance of global surveillance for severe respiratory disease to support pandemic preparedness and seasonal influenza control. Improved surveillance in the southern hemisphere is needed to provide critical data on influenza epidemiology, disease burden, circulating strains and effectiveness of influenza prevention and control measures. Hospital-based surveillance for severe acute respiratory infection (SARI cases was established in New Zealand on 30 April 2012. The aims were to measure incidence, prevalence, risk factors, clinical spectrum and outcomes for SARI and associated influenza and other respiratory pathogen cases as well as to understand influenza contribution to patients not meeting SARI case definition. Methods/Design: All inpatients with suspected respiratory infections who were admitted overnight to the study hospitals were screened daily. If a patient met the World Health Organization’s SARI case definition, a respiratory specimen was tested for influenza and other respiratory pathogens. A case report form captured demographics, history of presenting illness, co-morbidities, disease course and outcome and risk factors. These data were supplemented from electronic clinical records and other linked data sources. Discussion: Hospital-based SARI surveillance has been implemented and is fully functioning in New Zealand. Active, prospective, continuous, hospital-based SARI surveillance is useful in supporting pandemic preparedness for emerging influenza A(H7N9 virus infections and seasonal influenza prevention and control.

  14. Shock induced endotheliopathy (SHINE) in acute critical illness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Pär Ingemar; Stensballe, Jakob; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye

    2017-01-01

    One quarter of patients suffering from acute critical illness such as severe trauma, sepsis, myocardial infarction (MI) or post cardiac arrest syndrome (PCAS) develop severe hemostatic aberrations and coagulopathy, which are associated with excess mortality. Despite the different types of injurious...... "hit", acutely critically ill patients share several phenotypic features that may be driven by the shock. This response, mounted by the body to various life-threatening conditions, is relatively homogenous and most likely evolutionarily adapted. We propose that shock-induced sympatho......-adrenal hyperactivation is a critical driver of endothelial cell and glycocalyx damage (endotheliopathy) in acute critical illness, with the overall aim of ensuring organ perfusion through an injured microvasculature. We have investigated more than 3000 patients suffering from different types of acute critical illness...

  15. ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISEASE AS THE DEBUT OF SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Ischenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus — a chronic autoimmune disease that is often associated with infectious processes. The paper presents two clinical cases of systemic lupus erythematosus , debuted with acute respiratory infection.

  16. The Recent Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Epidemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Severe Acute Respiratory syndrome (SARS) took the world by storm in the later part of February 2003.It is a syndrome characterized by fever, cough, sore throat , shortness of breath and malaise which may deteriorate very rapidly to respiratory failure and death. The symptoms of SARS are quite similar to those of common ...

  17. Acute effects of winter air pollution on respiratory health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, van der S.

    1999-01-01

    In this thesis, acute respiratory health effects of exposure to winter air pollution are investigated in panels of children (7-11 yr) and adults (50-70 yr) with and without chronic respiratory symptoms, living in urban and non-urban areas in the Netherlands. The study was performed during

  18. Acute respiratory acidosis and alkalosis – A modern quantitative interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andraž Stožer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Three different approaches for assessing the acid-base status of a patient exist, i.e. the Boston, Copenhagen, and Stewart´s approach, and they employ different parameters to assess a given acid-base disturbance. Students, researchers, and clinicians are getting confused by heated debates about which of these performs best and by the fact that during their curricula, they typically get acquainted with one of the approaches only, which prevents them to understand sources employing other approaches and to critically evaluate the advantages and drawbacks of each approach. In this paper, the authors introduce and define the basic parameters characterizing each of the approaches and point out differences and similarities between them. Special attention is devoted to how the different approaches assess the degree of change in the concentration of plasma bicarbonate that occurs during primary respiratory changes; proper understanding of these is necessary to correctly interpret chronic respiratory and metabolic acid-base changes.Conclusion: During acute respiratory acidosis the concentration of bicarbonate rises and during acute respiratory alkalosis it falls, depending on the buffering strength of non-bicarbonate buffers. During acute respiratory acid-base disturbances, buffer base (employed by the Copenhagen approach, apparent and effective strong ion difference, as well as strong ion gap (employed by the Stewart approach remain unchanged; the anion gap (employed by the Boston and Copenhagen approach falls during acute respiratory acidosis and rises during acute respiratory alkalosis.

  19. Progress in global surveillance and response capacity 10 years after severe acute respiratory syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braden, Christopher R; Dowell, Scott F; Jernigan, Daniel B; Hughes, James M

    2013-06-01

    Ten years have elapsed since the World Health Organization issued its first global alert for an unexplained illness named severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The anniversary provides an opportunity to reflect on the international response to this new global microbial threat. While global surveillance and response capacity for public health threats have been strengthened, critical gaps remain. Of 194 World Health Organization member states that signed on to the International Health Regulations (2005), challenges.

  20. Infectious etiologies of acute febrile illness among patients seeking health care in south-central Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Matthew R; Blair, Patrick J; Touch, Sok; Sokhal, Buth; Yasuda, Chadwick Y; Williams, Maya; Richards, Allen L; Burgess, Timothy H; Wierzba, Thomas F; Putnam, Shannon D

    2012-02-01

    The agents of human febrile illness can vary by region and country suggesting that diagnosis, treatment, and control programs need to be based on a methodical evaluation of area-specific etiologies. From December 2006 to December 2009, 9,997 individuals presenting with acute febrile illness at nine health care clinics in south-central Cambodia were enrolled in a study to elucidate the etiologies. Upon enrollment, respiratory specimens, whole blood, and serum were collected. Testing was performed for viral, bacterial, and parasitic pathogens. Etiologies were identified in 38.0% of patients. Influenza was the most frequent pathogen, followed by dengue, malaria, and bacterial pathogens isolated from blood culture. In addition, 3.5% of enrolled patients were infected with more than one pathogen. Our data provide the first systematic assessment of the etiologies of acute febrile illness in south-central Cambodia. Data from syndromic-based surveillance studies can help guide public health responses in developing nations.

  1. Elevation of Serum Acid Sphingomyelinase Activity in Children with Acute Respiratory Syncytial Virus Bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Shuichiro; Noguchi, Atsuko; Kikuchi, Wataru; Fukaya, Hiroshi; Igarashi, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Tsutomu

    2017-12-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is a lysosomal enzyme that hydrolyzes sphingomyelin into ceramide, a bioactive lipid to regulate cellular physiological functions. Thus, ASM activation has been reported as a key event in pathophysiological reactions including inflammation, cytokine release, oxidative stress, and endothelial damage in human diseases. Since ASM activation is associated with extracellular ASM secretion through unknown mechanisms, it can be detected by recognizing the elevation of secretory ASM (S-ASM) activity. Serum S-ASM activity has been reported to increase in chronic diseases, acute cardiac diseases, and systemic inflammatory diseases. However, the serum S-ASM has not been investigated in common acute illness. This study was designed to evaluate serum S-ASM activity in children with common acute illness. Fifty children with common acute illness and five healthy children were included in this study. The patients were categorized into five groups based on clinical diagnoses: acute respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis, adenovirus infection, streptococcal infection, asthma, and other infections due to unknown origin. The serum S-ASM activity was significantly elevated at 6.9 ± 1.6 nmol/0.1 mL/6 h in the group of acute RSV bronchiolitis patients compared with healthy children who had a mean level of 1.8 ± 0.8 nmol/0.1 mL/6 h (p ASM activity was not significantly elevated. The results suggest an association of ASM activation with RSV infection, a cause for common acute illness. This is the first report to describe the elevation of serum S-ASM activity in respiratory tract infection.

  2. Respiratory muscle strength and muscle endurance are not affected by acute metabolic acidemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nizet, T.A.C.; Heijdra, Y.F.; Elshout, F.J.J. van den; Ven, M.J.T. van de; Bosch, F.H.; Mulder, P.H.M. de; Folgering, H.T.M.

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory muscle fatigue in asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) contributes to respiratory failure with hypercapnia, and subsequent respiratory acidosis. Therapeutic induction of acute metabolic acidosis further increases the respiratory drive and, therefore, may diminish

  3. The costs of respiratory illnesses arising from Florida gulf coast Karenia brevis blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoagland, Porter; Jin, Di; Polansky, Lara Y; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Kirkpatrick, Gary; Fleming, Lora E; Reich, Andrew; Watkins, Sharon M; Ullmann, Steven G; Backer, Lorraine C

    2009-08-01

    Algal blooms of Karenia brevis, a harmful marine algae, occur almost annually off the west coast of Florida. At high concentrations, K. brevis blooms can cause harm through the release of potent toxins, known as brevetoxins, to the atmosphere. Epidemiologic studies suggest that aerosolized brevetoxins are linked to respiratory illnesses in humans. We hypothesized a relationship between K. brevis blooms and respiratory illness visits to hospital emergency departments (EDs) while controlling for environmental factors, disease, and tourism. We sought to use this relationship to estimate the costs of illness associated with aerosolized brevetoxins. We developed a statistical exposure-response model to express hypotheses about the relationship between respiratory illnesses and bloom events. We estimated the model with data on ED visits, K. brevis cell densities, and measures of pollen, pollutants, respiratory disease, and intra-annual population changes. We found that lagged K. brevis cell counts, low air temperatures, influenza outbreaks, high pollen counts, and tourist visits helped explain the number of respiratory-specific ED diagnoses. The capitalized estimated marginal costs of illness for ED respiratory illnesses associated with K. brevis blooms in Sarasota County, Florida, alone ranged from $0.5 to $4 million, depending on bloom severity. Blooms of K. brevis lead to significant economic impacts. The costs of illness of ED visits are a conservative estimate of the total economic impacts. It will become increasingly necessary to understand the scale of the economic losses associated with K. brevis blooms to make rational choices about appropriate mitigation.

  4. Myasthenia gravis with acute respiratory failure in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Huseyin Kozak

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory failure (ARF is defined as a sudden malfunction in the ability of respiratory system to maintain adequate gas exchange. Acute hypercapnic respiratory failure develops as a result of ventilation deficiency and it is defined as an increase of PaCO2 above 45 mmHg. Myasthenia Gravis (MG is a sporadically developing auto-immune deficiency where the neuro-muscular transmission is affected and it is one of the important reasons for neurologically-induced respiratory distress. Here, we report a case of a 75-year-old male patient previously undiagnosed MG, who presented with ARF. MG is not a common entity that we encounter daily. Patients on occasions may present to the emergency department because of acute exacerbation. Though most of them were known cases, we should be aware of some unrecognized cases and should consider MG as a differential diagnosis for patients with acute respiratory failure. Keywords: Acute respiratory failure, Myasthenia graves, Emergency medicine

  5. Pattern of acute respiratory infections in hospitalized children under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Acute respiratory infections are the commonest cause of acute morbidity in children especially those under five in the developing countries. Clinical diagnosis is of utmost importance considering the unavailability of radiological and microbiological services in most primary care settings in most developing ...

  6. Respiratory symptoms and acute painful episodes in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Eufemia; Sockrider, Marianna M; Dinu, Marlen; Acosta, Monica; Mueller, Brigitta U

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and determined whether respiratory symptoms were associated with prevalence of chest pain and number of acute painful episodes in children and adolescents with sickle cell disease. Participants (N = 93; 44 females, 49 males; mean age 9.8 +/- 4.3 years) reported coughing in the morning (21.5%), at night (31.2%), and during exercise (30.1%). Wheezing occurred both when they had a cold or infection (29.0%) and when they did not have (23.7%) a cold or infection. Sleep was disturbed by wheezing in 20.4%. Among the 76 patients who were school-age (>5 years), 19.7% of patients missed more than 4 days of school because of respiratory symptoms. The majority of patients reported having acute painful episodes (82.8%), and most (66.7%) reported having chest pain during acute painful episodes in the previous 12 months. Participants with acute pain episodes greater than 3 during the previous 12 months had significantly higher reports of breathing difficulties (P = .01) and chest pain (P = .002). The high number of respiratory symptoms (cough and wheeze) among patients with sickle cell disease may trigger acute painful episodes. Early screening and recognition, ongoing monitoring, and proactive management of respiratory symptoms may minimize the number of acute painful episodes.

  7. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Caused by Influenza B Virus Infection in a Patient with Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio A. Ñamendys-Silva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza B virus infections are less common than infections caused by influenza A virus in critically ill patients, but similar mortality rates have been observed for both influenza types. Pneumonia caused by influenza B virus is uncommon and has been reported in pediatric patients and previously healthy adults. Critically ill patients with pneumonia caused by influenza virus may develop acute respiratory distress syndrome. We describe the clinical course of a critically ill patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma nongerminal center B-cell phenotype who developed acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by influenza B virus infection. This paper emphasizes the need to suspect influenza B virus infection in critically ill immunocompromised patients with progressive deterioration of cardiopulmonary function despite treatment with antibiotics. Early initiation of neuraminidase inhibitor and the implementation of guidelines for management of severe sepsis and septic shock should be considered.

  8. Maternal smoking during pregnancy and postnatal exposure to environmental tobacco smoke as predisposition factors to acute respiratory infections.

    OpenAIRE

    Jedrychowski, W; Flak, E

    1997-01-01

    This study compared susceptibility to respiratory morbidity in a cohort of 9-year-old children exposed congenitally and postnatally to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) to susceptibility in a cohort of unexposed children. The epidemiologic study included 1129 children: 594 boys and 535 girls attending the second grade of grammar schools in Kraków, Poland. We found strong evidence that children exposed to ETS in their homes were more susceptible to acute respiratory tract illnesses than unexpo...

  9. Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Fluid Management in the PICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingelse, Sarah A; Wösten-van Asperen, Roelie M; Lemson, Joris; Daams, Joost G; Bem, Reinout A; van Woensel, Job B

    2016-01-01

    The administration of an appropriate volume of intravenous fluids, while avoiding fluid overload, is a major challenge in the pediatric intensive care unit. Despite our efforts, fluid overload is a very common clinical observation in critically ill children, in particular in those with pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (PARDS). Patients with ARDS have widespread damage of the alveolar-capillary barrier, potentially making them vulnerable to fluid overload with the development of pulmonary edema leading to prolonged course of disease. Indeed, studies in adults with ARDS have shown that an increased cumulative fluid balance is associated with adverse outcome. However, age-related differences in the development and consequences of fluid overload in ARDS may exist due to disparities in immunologic response and body water distribution. This systematic review summarizes the current literature on fluid imbalance and management in PARDS, with special emphasis on potential differences with adult patients. It discusses the adverse effects associated with fluid overload and the corresponding possible pathophysiological mechanisms of its development. Our intent is to provide an incentive to develop age-specific fluid management protocols to improve PARDS outcomes.

  10. Pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome: fluid management in the PICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A Ingelse

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The administration of an appropriate volume of intravenous fluids, while avoiding fluid overload, is a major challenge in the pediatric intensive care unit. Despite our efforts, fluid overload is a very common clinical observation in critically ill children, in particular in those with pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (PARDS. Patients with ARDS have widespread damage of the alveolar capillary barrier, potentially making them vulnerable to fluid overload with the development of pulmonary edema leading to prolonged course of disease. Indeed, studies in adults with ARDS have shown that an increased cumulative fluid balance is associated with adverse outcome. However, age-related differences in the development and consequences of fluid overload in ARDS may exist due to disparities in immunologic response and body water distribution. This systematic review summarizes the current literature on fluid imbalance and management in PARDS, with special emphasis on potential differences with adult patients. It discusses the adverse effects associated with fluid overload and the corresponding possible pathophysiological mechanisms of its development. Our intent is to provide an incentive to develop age-specific fluid management protocols to improve PARDS outcomes.

  11. Pulmonary hypertension due to acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Ñamendys-Silva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Our aims were to describe the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, to characterize their hemodynamic cardiopulmonary profiles, and to correlate these parameters with outcome. All consecutive patients over 16 years of age who were in the intensive care unit with a diagnosis of ARDS and an in situ pulmonary artery catheter for hemodynamic monitoring were studied. Pulmonary hypertension was diagnosed when the mean pulmonary artery pressure was >25 mmHg at rest with a pulmonary artery occlusion pressure or left atrial pressure <15 mmHg. During the study period, 30 of 402 critically ill patients (7.46% who were admitted to the ICU fulfilled the criteria for ARDS. Of the 30 patients with ARDS, 14 met the criteria for pulmonary hypertension, a prevalence of 46.6% (95% CI; 28-66%. The most common cause of ARDS was pneumonia (56.3%. The overall mortality was 36.6% and was similar in patients with and without pulmonary hypertension. Differences in patients' hemodynamic profiles were influenced by the presence of pulmonary hypertension. The levels of positive end-expiratory pressure and peak pressure were higher in patients with pulmonary hypertension, and the PaCO2 was higher in those who died. The level of airway pressure seemed to influence the onset of pulmonary hypertension. Survival was determined by the severity of organ failure at admission to the intensive care unit.

  12. Respiratory viruses in children hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwofie, Theophilus B; Anane, Yaw A; Nkrumah, Bernard; Annan, Augustina; Nguah, Samuel B; Owusu, Michael

    2012-04-10

    Acute respiratory tract infections are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality among young children in developing countries. Information on the viral aetiology of acute respiratory infections in developing countries is very limited. The study was done to identify viruses associated with acute lower respiratory tract infection among children less than 5 years. Nasopharyngeal samples and blood cultures were collected from children less than 5 years who have been hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection. Viruses and bacteria were identified using Reverse Transcriptase Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction and conventional biochemical techniques. Out of 128 patients recruited, 33(25.88%%, 95%CI: 18.5% to 34.2%) were positive for one or more viruses. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) was detected in 18(14.1%, 95%CI: 8.5% to 21.3%) patients followed by Adenoviruses (AdV) in 13(10.2%, 95%CI: 5.5% to 16.7%), Parainfluenza (PIV type: 1, 2, 3) in 4(3.1%, 95%CI: 0.9% to 7.8%) and influenza B viruses in 1(0.8%, 95%CI: 0.0 to 4.3). Concomitant viral and bacterial co-infection occurred in two patients. There were no detectable significant differences in the clinical signs, symptoms and severity for the various pathogens isolated. A total of 61.1% (22/36) of positive viruses were detected during the rainy season and Respiratory Syncytial Virus was the most predominant. The study has demonstrated an important burden of respiratory viruses as major causes of childhood acute respiratory infection in a tertiary health institution in Ghana. The data addresses a need for more studies on viral associated respiratory tract infection.

  13. Respiratory viruses in children hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwofie Theophilus B

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute respiratory tract infections are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality among young children in developing countries. Information on the viral aetiology of acute respiratory infections in developing countries is very limited. The study was done to identify viruses associated with acute lower respiratory tract infection among children less than 5 years. Method Nasopharyngeal samples and blood cultures were collected from children less than 5 years who have been hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection. Viruses and bacteria were identified using Reverse Transcriptase Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction and conventional biochemical techniques. Results Out of 128 patients recruited, 33(25.88%%, 95%CI: 18.5% to 34.2% were positive for one or more viruses. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV was detected in 18(14.1%, 95%CI: 8.5% to 21.3% patients followed by Adenoviruses (AdV in 13(10.2%, 95%CI: 5.5% to 16.7%, Parainfluenza (PIV type: 1, 2, 3 in 4(3.1%, 95%CI: 0.9% to 7.8% and influenza B viruses in 1(0.8%, 95%CI: 0.0 to 4.3. Concomitant viral and bacterial co-infection occurred in two patients. There were no detectable significant differences in the clinical signs, symptoms and severity for the various pathogens isolated. A total of 61.1% (22/36 of positive viruses were detected during the rainy season and Respiratory Syncytial Virus was the most predominant. Conclusion The study has demonstrated an important burden of respiratory viruses as major causes of childhood acute respiratory infection in a tertiary health institution in Ghana. The data addresses a need for more studies on viral associated respiratory tract infection.

  14. The cost of community-managed viral respiratory illnesses in a cohort of healthy preschool-aged children

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    Allen Kelly M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute respiratory illnesses (ARIs during childhood are often caused by respiratory viruses, result in significant morbidity, and have associated costs for families and society. Despite their ubiquity, there is a lack of interdisciplinary epidemiologic and economic research that has collected primary impact data, particularly associated with indirect costs, from families during ARIs in children. Methods We conducted a 12-month cohort study in 234 preschool children with impact diary recording and PCR testing of nose-throat swabs for viruses during an ARI. We used applied values to estimate a virus-specific mean cost of ARIs. Results Impact diaries were available for 72% (523/725 of community-managed illnesses between January 2003 and January 2004. The mean cost of ARIs was AU$309 (95% confidence interval $263 to $354. Influenza illnesses had a mean cost of $904, compared with RSV, $304, the next most expensive single-virus illness, although confidence intervals overlapped. Mean carer time away from usual activity per day was two hours for influenza ARIs and between 30 and 45 minutes for all other ARI categories. Conclusion From a societal perspective, community-managed ARIs are a significant cost burden on families and society. The point estimate of the mean cost of community-managed influenza illnesses in healthy preschool aged children is three times greater than those illnesses caused by RSV and other respiratory viruses. Indirect costs, particularly carer time away from usual activity, are the key cost drivers for ARIs in children. The use of parent-collected specimens may enhance ARI surveillance and reduce any potential Hawthorne effect caused by compliance with study procedures. These findings reinforce the need for further integrated epidemiologic and economic research of ARIs in children to allow for comprehensive cost-effectiveness assessments of preventive and therapeutic options.

  15. Extracorporeal life support for adults with severe acute respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Cypel, Marcelo; Fan, Eddy

    2014-02-01

    Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) is an artificial means of maintaining adequate oxygenation and carbon dioxide elimination to enable injured lungs to recover from underlying disease. Technological advances have made ECLS devices smaller, less invasive, and easier to use. ECLS might, therefore, represent an important step towards improved management and outcomes of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Nevertheless, rigorous evidence of the ability of ECLS to improve short-term and long-term outcomes is needed before it can be widely implemented. Moreover, how to select patients and the timing and indications for ECLS in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome remain unclear. We describe the physiological principles, the putative risks and benefits, and the clinical evidence supporting the use of ECLS in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Additionally, we discuss controversies and future directions, such as novel technologies and indications, mechanical ventilation of the native lung during ECLS, and ethics considerations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Toluene inducing acute respiratory failure in a spray paint sniffer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Diego P; Chang, Aymara Y

    2012-01-01

    Toluene, formerly known as toluol, is an aromatic hydrocarbon that is widely used as an industrial feedstock and as a solvent. Like other solvents, toluene is sometimes also used as an inhalant drug for its intoxicating properties. It has potential to cause multiple effects in the body including death. I report a case of a 27-year-old male, chronic spray paint sniffer, who presented with severe generalized muscle weakness and developed acute respiratory failure requiring ventilatory support. Toluene toxicity was confirmed with measurement of hippuric acid of 8.0 g/L (normal <5.0 g/L). Acute respiratory failure is a rare complication of chronic toluene exposure that may be lethal if it is not recognized immediately. To our knowledge, this is the second case of acute respiratory failure due to toluene exposure.

  17. Insufficiency of Medical Care for Patients with Acute Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Dats

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research: to analyze insufficiency of medical care for patients with acute respiratory failure in the ICU.Materials and methods. It was a retrospective study of 160 patients' medical records (age from 15 to 84 years with acute respiratory failure (ARF hospitalized in the ICUs of 24 regional and municipal hospitals of the Irkutsk Oblast. Medical records were provided by the Territorial Fund of Compulsory Medical Insurance of citizens of Irkutsk region.The results. The basic defects in conducting mechanical ventilation were associated with improper lung function evaluation, microbiological tests of sputum and radiology. ARF was not diagnosed in 32 of 160 ICU patients (20%. In 23% of cases the causes of ARF were not diagnosed. The greatest part of the defects in the treatment of patients with acute respiratory failure was found during the treatment of hypoxemia: no recovery of the respiratory tract patency, no prescription of oxygen for hypoxemia, no mechanical ventilation for persistent hypoxemia on the background of maximum oxygen supply and late switching to mechanical ventilation at the stage of hypoxic cardiac arrest.Conclusions. The use of pulse oximetry alone in the absence of arterial blood gas analysis in 98% of patients with acute respiratory failure and failure to perform the lung X-ray and/or MSCT imaging in 21% of patients were accompanied by a high level of undiagnosed acute respiratory distress syndrome (78%, lung contusion (60%, pulmonary embolism (40%, cardiogenic pulmonary edema (33%, and nosocomial pneumonia (28%. Defects of treatment of patients with ARF in 46% of cases were caused by inadequate management of hypoxemia associated with the recovery of the respiratory tract patency, prescription of oxygen, and mechanical ventilation. 

  18. Absence of respiratory inflammatory reaction of elemental sulfur using the California Pesticide Illness Database and a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kiyoung; Smith, Jodi L; Last, Jerold A

    2005-01-01

    Elemental sulfur, a natural substance, is used as a fungicide. Elemental sulfur is the most heavily used agricultural chemical in California. In 2003, annual sulfur usage in California was about 34% of the total weight of pesticide active ingredient used in production agriculture. Even though sulfur is mostly used in dust form, the respiratory health effects of elemental sulfur are not well documented. The purpose of this paper is to address the possible respiratory effect of elemental sulfur using the California Pesticide Illness Database and laboratory experiments with mice. We analyzed the California Pesticide Illness Database between 1991 and 2001. Among 127 reports of definite, probable, and possible illness involving sulfur, 21 cases (16%) were identified as respiratory related. A mouse model was used to examine whether there was an inflammatory or fibrotic response to elemental sulfur. Dust solutions were injected intratracheally into ovalbumin sensitized mice and lung damage was evaluated. Lung inflammatory response was analyzed via total lavage cell counts and differentials, and airway collagen content was analyzed histologically and biochemically. No significant differences from controls were seen in animals exposed to sulfur particles. The findings suggest that acute exposure of elemental sulfur itself may not cause an inflammatory reaction. However, further studies are needed to understand the possible health effects of chronic sulfur exposure and environmental weathering of sulfur dust.

  19. A breath of fresh air: images of respiratory illness in novels, poems, films, music, and paintings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaptein, Ad A; Meulenberg, Frans; Smyth, Joshua M

    2015-03-01

    The nature and severity of respiratory disease are typically expressed with biomedical measures such as pulmonary function, X-rays, blood tests, and other physiological characteristics. The impact of respiratory illness on the sufferer, however, is reflected in the stories patients tell: to themselves, their social environment, and their health care providers. Behavioral research often applies standardized questionnaires to assess this subjective impact. Additional approaches to sampling patients' experience of respiratory illness may, however, provide important and clinically useful information that is not captured by other methods. Herein, we assert that novels, poems, movies, music, and paintings may represent a rich, experiential understanding of the patient's point of view of asthma, cystic fibrosis, lung cancer, and tuberculosis. Examination of these works illustrates the broad range and major impact of respiratory illness on patients' quality of life. We suggest that examining how illness is represented in various art forms may help patients, their social environment, and their health care providers in coping with the illness and in humanizing medical care. Medical students' clinical skills may benefit when illness experiences as expressed in art are incorporated in the medical curriculum. More generally, Narrative Health Psychology, Narrative Medicine, and Medical Humanities deserve more attention in education, training, and clinical care of (respiratory) physicians, medical students, and other health care professionals. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Enterococcus spp on fomites and hands indicate increased risk of respiratory illness in child care centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, Timothy R; Pickering, Amy J; Leckie, James O; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2013-08-01

    Surface-mediated transmission is a potential route for respiratory disease in child care centers, but evidence of its importance relative to other routes (eg, airborne) is limited. We tracked respiratory disease and monitored bacteria contamination on hands and fomites over 4 months during 64 visits at 2 child care centers. Staff monitored health daily by recording respiratory symptoms. We measured concentrations of Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp, and fecal coliform in hand rinses and on select fomites. We demonstrated that symptomatic respiratory illness was positively associated with microbial contamination on hands and fomites, as measured using Enterococcus spp. Enterococcus spp were 0.28 (95% confidence interval: 0.08-0.48)-log10 (colony-forming units per 2 hands) higher when an individual had symptomatic respiratory illness. Susceptible individuals were 1.62 (95% confidence interval: 1.06-2.46) times more likely to develop respiratory illness within 4 days with every log10 increase of Enterococcus spp on hands. The findings imply that hand contamination as measured using Enterococcus spp is a risk factor for onset of respiratory illness and highlight the utility of fecal indicator bacteria as a metric for hand and fomite contamination. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical characterization of influenza A and human respiratory syncytial virus among patients with influenza like illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Swati; Singh, Dharamveer; Zia, Amreen; Umrao, Jyoti; Srivastava, Naveen; Pandey, Ankita; Singh, Sushma; Bhattacharya, Piyali; Kumari, Reema; Kushwaha, Ramawadh; Dhole, T N

    2017-01-01

    Influenza A and Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) has been recognized as a major cause of acute respiratory tract infection. H1N1 is one of the subtypes of influenza A, pandemic worldwide in July 2009, causing 18,449 deaths globally. To investigate the prevalence and clinical manifestation of the influenza A, H1N1pdm09, and RSV. Throat/nasal swab collected from the patients of all age group either outpatients/inpatients having respiratory illness from 2 to 5 days. The clinical data were recorded in a predesigned questionnaire. RNA was extracted and analyzed by real time PCR at a tertiary care center, 2009-2014. Total 4,352 samples tested for influenza A and H1N1. Out of 4,352, 32.2% (median positivity 21%; range 16-41% during 6 years) were positive for influenza A and 19% were H1N1 (median positivity 16.7%; range 8.7-23% during 6 years). Total 1653 samples were analyzed for RSV from 2011 to 2014, 12% were RSV positive (median positivity 11.35%; range 10-16.3% during 4 years). Pharyngitis, dyspnea were frequent symptoms in influenza A and H1N1 (P influenza A and H1N1 was higher in age-group 21-30, whereas RSV in infant and children. H1N1 and RSV were co-circulated and have common clinical symptoms particularly in lower age group. Therefore, laboratory confirmation is necessary for further disease prognosis. Age was an important risk factor that affects the positivity of influenza A, H1N1, and RSV. Different clinical manifestation of H1N1 and RSV will be helpful for early and accurate diagnosis. J. Med. Virol. 89:49-54, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Acute intermittent hypoxia induced neural plasticity in respiratory motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Tao; Fong, Angelina Y; Bautista, Tara G; Pilowsky, Paul M

    2013-09-01

    Respiratory neural networks can adapt to rapid environmental change or be altered over the long term by various inputs. The mechanisms that underlie the plasticity necessary for adaptive changes in breathing remain unclear. Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH)-induced respiratory long-term facilitation (LTF) is one of the most extensively studied types of respiratory plasticity. Acute intermittent hypoxia-induced LTF is present in several respiratory motor outputs, innervating both pump muscles (i.e. diaphragm) and valve muscles (i.e. tongue, pharynx and larynx). Long-term facilitation is present in various species, including humans, and the expression of LTF is influenced by gender, age and genetics. Serotonin plays a key role in initiating and modulating plasticity at the level of respiratory motor neurons. Recently, multiple intracellular pathways have been elucidated that are capable of giving rise to respiratory LTF. These mainly activate the metabolic receptors coupled to Gq ('Q' pathway) and Gs ('S' pathway) proteins. Herein, we discuss AIH-induced respiratory LTF in animals and humans, as well as recent advances in our understanding of the synaptic and intracellular pathways underlying this form of plasticity. We also discuss the potential to use intermittent hypoxia to induce functional recovery following cervical spinal injury. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. [Respiratory illnesses in children younger than 5 years of age in southern Brazil: the influence of the home environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prietsch, Silvio O M; Fischer, Gilberto B; César, Juraci A; Lempek, Berenice S; Barbosa, Luciano V; Zogbi, Luciano; Cardoso, Olga C; Santos, Adriana M

    2003-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of acute lower respiratory tract infections and the risk factors associated with living conditions among children up to 5 years of age in the city of Rio Grande, in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. A population-based cross-sectional study was carried out with 775 children. A standardized questionnaire was administered to the mother or other caregiver at the child's home in order to collect information on housing conditions, socioeconomic status, and smoking in the home. Additional variables examined included nutritional status, duration of breast-feeding, prenatal care, and utilization of health care services. Environmental variables were analyzed individually and were also grouped together in an "environmental score" that encompassed 10 variables: type of house construction, type of floor, home heating system, type of stove, dog in the child's room, dog in the house, cat in the child's room, cat in the house, number of people per room, and maternal smoking. The grouped environmental score ranged from 0 (best) to 10 (worst). The analysis included two stages: a bivariate stage, in which the prevalence ratio was calculated for each risk factor, and a multivariate stage, with logistic regression. The overall prevalence of acute lower respiratory tract infections was 23.9%. The main risk factors identified were: environmental score >/= 3 points, maternal schooling or = 30 years was found to protect against the development of respiratory illness. Specific programs need to be implemented to control acute respiratory illnesses in the population studied. In future studies with this population, the environmental score that we developed could be used in place of the complete set of environmental variables that we tested. This environmental score should be applied in other contexts so as to determine its external validity.

  4. Acute respiratory viral infections in pediatric cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana C.A. Benites

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to estimate the prevalence of infection by respiratory viruses in pediatric patients with cancer and acute respiratory infection (ARI and/or fever. METHODS: cross-sectional study, from January 2011 to December 2012. The secretions of nasopharyngeal aspirates were analyzed in children younger than 21 years with acute respiratory infections. Patients were treated at the Grupo em Defesa da Criança Com Câncer (Grendacc and University Hospital (HU, Jundiaí, SP. The rapid test was used for detection of influenza virus (Kit Biotrin, Inc. Ireland, and real-time multiplex polymerase chain reaction (FTD, Respiratory pathogens, multiplex Fast Trade Kit, Malta for detection of influenza virus (H1N1, B, rhinovirus, parainfluenza virus, adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, human parechovirus, bocavirus, metapneumovirus, and human coronavirus. The prevalence of viral infection was estimated and association tests were used (χ2 or Fisher's exact test. RESULTS: 104 samples of nasopharyngeal aspirate and blood were analyzed. The median age was 12 ± 5.2 years, 51% males, 68% whites, 32% had repeated ARIs, 32% prior antibiotic use, 19.8% cough, and 8% contact with ARIs. A total of 94.3% were in good general status. Acute lymphocytic leukemia (42.3% was the most prevalent neoplasia. Respiratory viruses were detected in 50 samples: rhinoviruses (23.1%, respiratory syncytial virus AB (8.7%, and coronavirus (6.8%. Co-detection occurred in 19% of cases with 2 viruses and in 3% of those with 3 viruses, and was more frequent between rhinovirus and coronavirus 43. Fever in neutropenic patients was observed in 13%, of which four (30.7 were positive for viruses. There were no deaths. CONCLUSIONS: the prevalence of respiratory viruses was relevant in the infectious episode, with no increase in morbidity and mortality. Viral co-detection was frequent in patients with cancer and ARIs.

  5. Undiagnosed Acute Viral Febrile Illnesses, Sierra Leone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    dengue , West Nile, yellow fever , Rift Valley fever , chikungunya, Ebola, and Marburg viruses but not to Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic ...patients have acute diseases of unknown origin. To investigate what other ar- thropod-borne and hemorrhagic fever viral diseases might cause serious...ELISAs, we evaluated samples for antibodies to arthropod-borne and other hemorrhagic fever viruses. Approximately 25% of LASV-negative

  6. Nutritional immunomodulation in critically ill children with acute lung injury: feasibility and impact on circulating biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Brian R; Nadkarni, Vinay; Goldstein, Brahm; Checchia, Paul; Ayad, Onsy; Bean, Judy; DeMichele, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory failure caused by acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome is associated with significant morbidity in children. Enteral nutrition enriched with eicosapentaenoic acid, γ-linolenic acid and antioxidants (eicosapentaenoic acid + γ-linolenic acid) can safely modulate plasma phospholipid fatty acid profiles, reduce inflammation, and improve clinical outcomes in adults. There is little information regarding the use of enteral eicosapentaenoic acid + γ-linolenic acid to modulate plasma phospholipid fatty acid profiles in children. We sought to determine if continuous feeding of enteral nutrition containing eicosapentaenoic acid, γ-linolenic acid, and antioxidants was feasible in critically ill children with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome. We further evaluated the impact of such an approach on the alteration of plasma phospholipid fatty acid concentrations. Prospective, blinded, randomized, controlled, multicenter trial. PICU. Twenty-six critically ill children (age 6.2 ± 0.9 yr, PaO2/FIO2 185 ± 15) with the diagnosis of acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome. Mechanically ventilated children received either eicosapentaenoic acid + γ-linolenic acid or a standard pediatric enteral formula. Clinical, biochemical, plasma fatty acid, and safety data were assessed at baseline, study days 4 and 7. At baseline, there were no significant differences in the two study groups. Both groups met enteral feeding goals within 30 hrs and had similar caloric delivery. There were no differences in formula tolerance as measured by serum chemistries, liver and renal function, and hematology studies after 7 days of feeding either eicosapentaenoic acid + γ-linolenic acid or pediatric enteral formula. On study day 4 and 7, plasma phospholipid fatty acid profiles in the eicosapentaenoic acid + γ-linolenic acid group showed a significant increase in anti-inflammatory circulating markers. Providing enteral nutrition

  7. Parents' Expectations and Experiences of Antibiotics for Acute Respiratory Infections in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coxeter, Peter D; Mar, Chris Del; Hoffmann, Tammy C

    2017-03-01

    Primary care visits for children with acute respiratory infections frequently result in antibiotic prescriptions, although antibiotics have limited benefits for common acute respiratory infections and can cause harms, including antibiotic resistance. Parental demands are often blamed for antibiotic prescription. We aimed to explore parents' beliefs about antibiotic necessity, quantify their expectations of antibiotic benefit, and report experiences of other management options and exposure to and preferences for shared decision making. We conducted computer-assisted telephone interviews in an Australia-wide community sample of primary caregivers, hereafter referred to as parents, of children aged 1 to 12 years, using random digit dialing of household landline telephones. Of the 14,505 telephone numbers called, 10,340 were eligible numbers; 589 potentially eligible parents were reached, of whom 401 were interviewed. Most believed antibiotics provide benefits for common acute respiratory infections, especially for acute otitis media (92%), although not using them, particularly for acute cough and sore throat, was sometimes acceptable. Parents grossly overestimated the mean benefit of antibiotics on illness symptom duration by 5 to 10 times, and believed they reduce the likelihood of complications. The majority, 78%, recognized antibiotics may cause harm. Recalling the most recent relevant doctor visit, 44% of parents reported at least some discussion about why antibiotics might be used; shared decision making about antibiotic use was inconsistent, while 75% wanted more involvement in future decisions. Some parents have misperceptions about antibiotic use for acute respiratory infections, highlighting the need for improved communication during visits, including shared decision making to address overoptimistic expectations of antibiotics. Such communication should be one of several strategies that is used to reduce antibiotic use. © 2017 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  8. Rivaroxaban for Thromboprophylaxis in Acutely Ill Medical Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, Alexander T.; Spiro, Theodore E.; Büller, Harry R.; Haskell, Lloyd; Hu, Dayi; Hull, Russell; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Merli, Geno; Schellong, Sebastian; Spyropoulos, Alex C.; Tapson, Victor; Cohen, A. T.; Haskell, L.; Hu, D.; Hull, R.; Mebazaa, A.; Merli, G.; Schellong, S.; Spiro, T.; Spyropoulos, A. C.; Tapson, V.; Francis, C.; Kobayashi, S.; Leizorovicz, A.; Lowe, G.; Roberts, R.; Brandges, D.; Kolbach, D.; Limburg, M. L.; Mac Gillavry, M. R.; Otten, H. M.; Peters, R. G. J.; Prins, M. [=Martin H.; Robben, S.; Voorend, M.; Hemmrich, M.; Li, L.; Meng, I.; Mühlhofer, E.; Beckmann, H.; Desanctis, Y.; Duszczyszyn, A.; Fielding, L.; Twomey, T.; Müller, K.; Byra, W.; Nessel, C.; Atkinson, Sarah; Bottaro, F. J.; Caberlotto, O.; Grand, B.; Hendler, H.; Hojman, M.; Mykietiuk, A.; Salerno, R.; Baker, R.; Carroll, P.; Chong, B.; Colquhoun, D.; Gan, E.; Hall, S.; Jackson, D.; Leyden, M.; Salem, H.; Serisier, D.; Balcke, P.; Bauer, B.; Bauer, N. C.; Erlacher, L.; Fortunat, W.; Grafl, E.; Keil, F.; Kirchmair, P.; Pilger, E.; Schönherr, H.-R.; Siostrzonek, P.; Weidinger, F.; Weltermann, A.; Wenisch, C.; Blockmans, D.; Delobbe, A.; Hendrickx, K.; Jacquy, C.; Soupart, A.; Striekwold, H.; van Hoof, M.-E.; Vanden Abeele, A.; van Roey, G.; van Zandweghe, L.; Bizzacchi, J. M. A.; Cavalheiro, C.; Chamone, D.; Fiss, E.; Garicochea, B.; Lopes, A. C.; Rocha Moreira, R. C.; van Bellen, B.; Dimov, D.; Ivanov, Y.; Lyubenov, L.; Milanov, S.; Mincheva, V.; Nenkova, S.; Popov, D.; Taseva, M.; Bergeron, C.; Boulanger, J.-M.; Buck, B.; Daneault, N.; Desai, H.; Dube, F.; Kutsogiannis, D. J.; Miron, M.-J.; Moddel, G.; Shuaib, A.; Silver, F.; Stotts, G.; Verreault, S.; Bugedo, G.; Torres, H.; Chen, K.-N.; Chen, P.; Chen, R. C.; Chen, Y.; Gai, L.; Gao, Q.; Guo, S.; Hu, T.; Hua, Q.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li, W.; Li, Y.-S.; Liu, C.; Liu, J.; Liu, Y.; Qi, G.; Qin, X.; Shen, C.; Sun, S.; Sun, Y.; Wan, Q.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Wu, C.; Wu, J.; Wu, S.; Xian, S.; Xiu, Q.; Xu, B.; Yan, X.; Yang, K.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Zhang, D. P.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhou, Y.; Botero, R.; Cedano, J. E.; Fajardo, D.; Gómez, L. F.; Jaramillo, C. F.; Rada, R.; Uribe, L. G.; Velásquez, J. C.; Bergovec, M.; Hajnsek, S.; Knezevic, A.; Samarzija, M.; Steiner, R.; Zupancic-Salek, S.; Fiksa, J.; Gorican, K.; Linhart, A.; Macel, I.; Mayer, O.; Prochazka, V.; Sedlacek, J.; Avnstrøm, S.; Nielsen, H.; Nielsen, T.; Østergaard, O. V.; Tuxen, C.; Kolbassova, O.; Lember, M.; Marandi, T.; Uuetoa, T.; Karmakoski, J.; Lassila, R.; Aquilanti, S.; Bergmann, J.-F.; Brisot, D.; Debourdeau, P.; Duchemin, A.; Farge-Bancel, D.; Fournier, C.; Galinier, M.; Lacroix, P.; Lambert, M.; Le Jeunne, C.; Lorcerie, B.; Mahe, I.; Marquette, C.-H.; Mismetti, P.; Mottier, D.; Proust, A.; Quere, I.; Rihani, R.; Schmidt, J.; Stephan, D.; Vital-Durand, D.; Barth, J.; Beyer-Westendorf, J.; Borst, M.; Dormann, A.; Drouven, F.-M.; Espinola-Klein, C.; Heintges, T.; Hindahl, H.; Klotz, T.; Lawall, H.; Leschke, M.; Milstrey, H.-R.; Möbius-Winkler, S.; Mühlbauer, B.; Niederau, C.; Petermann, W.; Pohl, C.; Ringe, J.-D.; Sanner, B.; Scharrer, I.; Schmidt-Lucke, J. A.; Schöffauer, I.; Stoelben, E.; Theelen, W.; Veltkamp, R.; vom Dahl, J.; Apsokardos, S.; Babalis, D.; Bassaris, H.; Karafoulidou, A.; Katsivas, A.; Panoutsopoulos, G.; Patsilinakos, S.; Skoutelis, A.; Toubis, M.; Vlastos, F.; Wong, L. K. S.; Wong, R. S. M.; Frankfurter, Z.; Nagy, F.; Jakab, G.; Kondakor, I.; Nikl, J.; Nyirati, G.; Szakacs, Z.; Szegedi, N.; Avvaru, G.; Bhairappa, S.; Cheviri, A. N.; Gadkari, M.; Grant, P.; Kuchimanchi, K.; Kumar, K. P.; Mahajan, A.; Naik, A.; Oomman, A.; Raghu, C.; Ramanathan, R. M. P. L.; Talwar, D.; Whig, J.; Kalim, H.; Machfoed, M. H.; Tambunan, K. L.; Elias, M.; Elias, N.; Hayek, T.; Lishner, M.; Oren, S.; Osamah, H.; Sthoeger, Z.; Telman, G.; Zeltser, D.; Zimlichman, R.; Ageno, W.; Agnelli, G.; Berrettini, M.; Bondi, M.; Buzzoni, R.; Castaman, G.; de Blasio, A.; de Gaudenzi, E.; Falanga, A.; Fontanella, A.; Giorgi Pierfranceschi, M.; Landolfi, R.; Lodigiani, C.; Morra, E.; Parise, P.; Pini, M.; Pizzini, A.; Poggio, R.; Quintavalla, R.; Siragusa, S.; Violi, F.; Ando, S.; Fujimoto, K.; Fukui, K.; Funada, J.; Hataji, O.; Ibata, H.; Ichinose, T.; Ikefuji, H.; Imai, S.; Ito, K.; Kani, H.; Kato, M.; Momiyama, Y.; Nishi, S.; Mekaru, S.; Mio, T.; Nagaoka, M.; Nakagawa, H.; Nakamura, Y.; Okazaki, O.; Oshiro, K.; Ozawa, T.; Saito, T.; Sakagami, S.; Shimizu, A.; Shiohira, Y.; Tanaka, E.; Uchiyama, T.; Utsugisawa, K.; Tsuji, T.; Wada, A.; Yamada, N.; Bang, S.-M.; Chung, C.-S.; Kang, D. W.; Kim, Y.-K.; Lee, Y.-S.; YeunOh, D.; Yoon, B.-W.; Aizsilniece, I.; Krievins, D.; Kupcs, U.; Pontaga, N.; Rozitis, V.; Stukena, I.; Alekniene, B.; Bagdonas, A.; Basijokiene, V.; Butkiene, Z.; Griskeviciene, V.; Gumbrevicius, G.; Norviliene, R.; Petrauskiene, R.; Stonkus, S.; Vitkauskas, A.; Muller, P.; Rauh, S.; Chin, S. P.; Sim, K. H.; Wan Azman, B. W. A.; Cardoza Amador, J. I.; Gallegos Martínez, J.; Gómez Lara, M.; González Garza, J.; Hernández Gaeta, D. E.; Herver Cabrera, M. J.; Nares Ochoa, F.; Perea Sánchez, R. A.; Romero López, C.; Tanaka Chávez, A.; Vázquez López, M. Á; Velasco Rodríguez, V. M.; Dees, A.; de Kreuk, A. M.; Fijnheer, R.; ten Cate, H.; Jackson, S.; Ockelford, P.; Simpson, D.; Ghanima, W. K.; Schjesvold, F. H.; Stokstad, I.; Torp, R.; Aziz, Z.; Rizvi, N.; Tayyab, G. N.; Arrieta Días, F.; Castillo Leon, R.; Cotrina, R.; Moncada Vilela, Z.; Salas Pérez, M.; Salazar Candiotti, O. C.; Ulloa Pérez, V. R.; Biedrzycka, M.; Bojarska-Los, M.; Goch, A.; Gorska, M.; Gutowska-Jablonska, M.; Jahnz-Rozyk, K.; Krysiak, W.; Mirek-Bryniarska, E.; Ogorek, M.; Sydor, A.; Szczeklik, A.; Walasek, L.; Wrzesinski, K.; Zechowicz, T.; Bettencourt, P.; Ducla Soares, J.; Ferreira, A.; Ferreira, F.; Gomes, F.; Martins, A.; Mello e Silva, A.; Providência, L.; Rodrigues, T.; Santos, F.; Aroutynov, G.; Ershova, O.; Fedorova, T.; Glezer, M. G.; Khatkova, S.; Moiseev, V.; Shilkina, N.; Sotnikov, A.; Chua, G.; Gan, H. W.; Ng, A. W. K.; Ong, T. H.; Tan, R. S.; Tang, O. T.; Gaspar, L.; Kovar, F.; Spisak, V.; Stevlik, J.; Szentivanyi, M.; Flezar, M.; Gorjup, V.; Jereb, M.; Sok, M.; Tratar, G.; Zvan, B.; Adler, D.; Bloy, B.; Dreosti, L. M.; Engelbrecht, J. M.; Janse van Rensburg, H.; Koegelenberg, C. F. N.; Nortje, H.; Quinton, S.; Rabie, W. J.; Rapoport, B. L.; Roodt, A.; Smith, C.; Steenkamp, F. W. F. J.; van Nieuwenhuizen, E.; van Zyl, L.; Bisbe, J.; Castro, A.; Cereto Castro, F.; Conget, F.; Guil, M.; Monreal, M.; Nieto Rodríguez, J.-A.; Tirado Miranda, R.; Tolosa, C.; Trujillo Santos, J.; Villalta, J.; Bertholds, E.; Cwikiel, M.; Laska, A.-C.; Östergren, J.; Själander, A.; Svensson, P.; Timberg, I.; Torstensson, I.; Wiklund, P. G.; Banyai, M.; Baumgartner, I.; Imhof, A.; Jeanneret, C.; Nussbaumer, P.; Schifferli, J. A.; Chuang, K. Y.-C.; Guo, B.-F.; Lee, J. T.; Lin, Y.-H.; Shyu, K.-G.; Permpikul, C.; Pothirat, C.; Wattanathum, A.; Goker, E.; Ilerigelen, B.; Kucukoglu, S.; Nalbantgil, S.; Sirin, H.; Yilmaz, U.; Genyk, S.; Goncharova, Y.; Karpenko, O.; Korzh, O.; Koval, V.; Legkonogov, O.; Perepeliuk, M.; Polyakov, A.; Ryabichenko, T.; Skrebkov, V.; Sorkin, V.; Svyshchenko, Y.; Tseluyko, V.; Vakaliuk, I.; Vatutin, M.; Voronkov, L.; Cohen, A.; Durairaj, R.; Elliott, M.; Kesteven, P.; Luckit, J. K.; Rafferty, P.; Scully, M.; Albrecht, C. R.; Anderson, S.; Benninghoff, M.; Bidair, M.; Birch, T. A.; Brensilver, J.; Chastain, S.; Chen, D.; Comerota, A. J.; Concha, M.; Conrad, S. A.; Cox, M. J.; Daboul, N. Y.; Dexter, J.; Dietrich, D. W.; Fei, R. H.; Fontes, M. L.; French, W. J.; Gonzales, E.; Hazelrigg, M. R.; Heller, B. N.; Heyder, A. M.; Hill, G. T.; Jaffer, A. K.; Jetty, P.; Johnson, G.; Kaatz, S.; Kazimir, M.; Lavender, R. C.; Lawton, C. B.; Lerner, R.; Light, R. W.; Ling, T. G.; Mahal, S.; Manos, P.; Masson, J.; Maynor, K.; McLafferty, R. B.; Mehra, P.; Merli, G. J.; Minkowitz, H. S.; Murray, R. M.; Nadar, V.; Nathanson, A.; Patton, W. F.; Peberdy, M.; Plautz, M.; Pokharel, P.; Quintana, O. E.; Rajamani, K.; Rastogi, P.; Reiter, W. M.; Reyes, J. A.; Schuller, D.; Seibert, A.; Sharma, A.; Simmons, J.; Soff, G. A.; Stein, R. W.; Stoltz, S.; Suen, J.; Thurm, C.; Toe, W.; Updegrove, J. D.; Ward, J. A.; Waxman, K.; Welker, J.; Whittier, F. C.; Wright, P. E.; Wun, T.; Yusen, R. D.; Ziedalski, T. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The clinically appropriate duration of thromboprophylaxis in hospitalized patients with acute medical illnesses is unknown. In this multicenter, randomized, double-blind trial, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of oral rivaroxaban administered for an extended period, as compared with

  9. Acute high-altitude illness | Hofmeyr | South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A substantial proportion of South Africa (SA)'s population lives at high altitude (>1 500 m), and many travel to very high altitudes (>3 500 m) for tourism, business, recreation or religious pilgrimages every year. Despite this, knowledge of acute altitude illnesses is poor among SA doctors. At altitude, the decreasing ambient ...

  10. Factors influencing the pattern of malnutrition among acutely ill ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors influencing the pattern of malnutrition among acutely ill children presenting in a tertiary hospital in Nigeria. ... The factors associated with malnutrition included early introduction of complementary diets, number of children in the home, maternal illiteracy and lower socioeconomic status of the parents. Female children ...

  11. Prone position in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setten, Mariano; Plotnikow, Gustavo Adrián; Accoce, Matías

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome occupies a great deal of attention in intensive care units. Despite ample knowledge of the physiopathology of this syndrome, the focus in intensive care units consists mostly of life-supporting treatment and avoidance of the side effects of invasive treatments. Although great advances in mechanical ventilation have occurred in the past 20 years, with a significant impact on mortality, the incidence continues to be high. Patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, especially the most severe cases, often present with refractory hypoxemia due to shunt, which can require additional treatments beyond mechanical ventilation, among which is mechanical ventilation in the prone position. This method, first recommended to improve oxygenation in 1974, can be easily implemented in any intensive care unit with trained personnel. Prone position has extremely robust bibliographic support. Various randomized clinical studies have demonstrated the effect of prone decubitus on the oxygenation of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome measured in terms of the PaO2/FiO2 ratio, including its effects on increasing patient survival. The members of the Respiratory Therapists Committee of the Sociedad Argentina de Terapia Intensiva performed a narrative review with the objective of discovering the available evidence related to the implementation of prone position, changes produced in the respiratory system due to the application of this maneuver, and its impact on mortality. Finally, guidelines are suggested for decision-making. PMID:27925054

  12. Respiratory Complications from Acute Corrosive Poisonings in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibishev, Andon A.; Simonovska, Natasa; Bozinovska, Cvetanka; Pereska, Zanina; Smokovski, Ivica; Glasnovic, Marija

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Acute corrosive poisonings are caused by ingestion of corrosive chemicals which are most commonly used as household agents. Intoxications with these kind of agents produce numerous and severe post-corrosive complications of the upper gastrointestinal tract. On the other hand, our experience showed that corrosive agents may also cause injuries of the respiratory system, which makes the treatment very hard and additionally complicates the severe clinical condition of the patient. Objective: The aim of the study is to show the incidence of respiratory complications in acute corrosive poisonings, the need of various clinical investigations and also the treatment and final outcome of these kind of poisoning. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed clinical records of 415 patients hospitalized and treated at the University clinic for toxicology and urgent internal medicine, in Skopje, Republic of Macedonia, in the period between 2007 and 2011. The protocol consisted of methods for analyzing the systemic complications, with an accent on the post-corrosive respiratory complications. Results: From the total number of patients even 98 (23.61%) exhibited systemic complications, from which 51 (52.04%) are respiratory complications. The majority of patients are female (n=40, 78.43%) and the most common complication is pneumonia (n=47). The youngest patient in this study was 14 and the oldest was 87 years old. Conclusion: Besides the gastrointestinal complications in the acute corrosive poisonings respiratory complications are also very often. They complicate the clinical state of patient and very often lead to fatal endings. PMID:24944527

  13. Prone position in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setten, Mariano; Plotnikow, Gustavo Adrián; Accoce, Matías

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome occupies a great deal of attention in intensive care units. Despite ample knowledge of the physiopathology of this syndrome, the focus in intensive care units consists mostly of life-supporting treatment and avoidance of the side effects of invasive treatments. Although great advances in mechanical ventilation have occurred in the past 20 years, with a significant impact on mortality, the incidence continues to be high. Patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, especially the most severe cases, often present with refractory hypoxemia due to shunt, which can require additional treatments beyond mechanical ventilation, among which is mechanical ventilation in the prone position. This method, first recommended to improve oxygenation in 1974, can be easily implemented in any intensive care unit with trained personnel. Prone position has extremely robust bibliographic support. Various randomized clinical studies have demonstrated the effect of prone decubitus on the oxygenation of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome measured in terms of the PaO2/FiO2 ratio, including its effects on increasing patient survival. The members of the Respiratory Therapists Committee of the Sociedad Argentina de Terapia Intensiva performed a narrative review with the objective of discovering the available evidence related to the implementation of prone position, changes produced in the respiratory system due to the application of this maneuver, and its impact on mortality. Finally, guidelines are suggested for decision-making.

  14. The Costs of Respiratory Illnesses Arising from Florida Gulf Coast Karenia brevis Blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoagland, Porter; Jin, Di; Polansky, Lara Y.; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Kirkpatrick, Gary; Fleming, Lora E.; Reich, Andrew; Watkins, Sharon M.; Ullmann, Steven G.; Backer, Lorraine C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Algal blooms of Karenia brevis, a harmful marine algae, occur almost annually off the west coast of Florida. At high concentrations, K. brevis blooms can cause harm through the release of potent toxins, known as brevetoxins, to the atmosphere. Epidemiologic studies suggest that aerosolized brevetoxins are linked to respiratory illnesses in humans. Objectives We hypothesized a relationship between K. brevis blooms and respiratory illness visits to hospital emergency departments (EDs) while controlling for environmental factors, disease, and tourism. We sought to use this relationship to estimate the costs of illness associated with aerosolized brevetoxins. Methods We developed a statistical exposure–response model to express hypotheses about the relationship between respiratory illnesses and bloom events. We estimated the model with data on ED visits, K. brevis cell densities, and measures of pollen, pollutants, respiratory disease, and intra-annual population changes. Results We found that lagged K. brevis cell counts, low air temperatures, influenza outbreaks, high pollen counts, and tourist visits helped explain the number of respiratory-specific ED diagnoses. The capitalized estimated marginal costs of illness for ED respiratory illnesses associated with K. brevis blooms in Sarasota County, Florida, alone ranged from $0.5 to $4 million, depending on bloom severity. Conclusions Blooms of K. brevis lead to significant economic impacts. The costs of illness of ED visits are a conservative estimate of the total economic impacts. It will become increasingly necessary to understand the scale of the economic losses associated with K. brevis blooms to make rational choices about appropriate mitigation. PMID:19672403

  15. Vaccination against acute respiratory virus infections and measles in man.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); P. de Vries (Petra)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractSeveral viruses may cause more or less severe acute respiratory infections in man, some of which are followed by systemic infection. Only for influenza and measles are licensed vaccines available at present. The protection induced by influenza vaccines, which are based on inactivated

  16. Vitamin A status, other risk factors and acute respiratory infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1997-01-01

    Jan 1, 1997 ... Objective. This study evaluated the association between vitamin A status and the severity of acute respiratory infections (AAIs) in children, controlling for the influence of other known AAI risk factors. Design. Case control study_. Setting. Ambulatory and hospital-based stUdy. Patients. Severe cases (N = 35) ...

  17. Acute otitis media complicating upper respiratory tract infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Upper respiratory tract infections (UTRIs), which may be complicated by acute otitis media (AOM), account for a large number of visits to the primary physician especially in the developed world. Materials and Methods: This study aims to determine the knowledge and treatment outcomes of UTRIs complicated ...

  18. Cleaved caspase-3 in lung epithelium of children who died with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bem, Reinout A.; van der Loos, Chris M.; van Woensel, Job B. M.; Bos, Albert P.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the extent of cleaved caspase-3 immunostaining in lung epithelial cells in children with acute respiratory distress syndrome. DESIGN: Observational study in sixteen children who died with acute respiratory distress syndrome and diffuse alveolar damage. SETTING: Pediatric

  19. Acute Kidney Injury and Subsequent Frailty Status in Survivors of Critical Illness: A Secondary Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Kader, Khaled; Girard, Timothy D; Brummel, Nathan E; Saunders, Christina T; Blume, Jeffrey D; Clark, Amanda J; Vincz, Andrew J; Ely, E Wesley; Jackson, James C; Bell, Susan P; Archer, Kristin R; Ikizler, T Alp; Pandharipande, Pratik P; Siew, Edward D

    2018-01-25

    Acute kidney injury frequently complicates critical illness and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Frailty is common in critical illness survivors, but little is known about the impact of acute kidney injury. We examined the association of acute kidney injury and frailty within a year of hospital discharge in survivors of critical illness. Secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study. Medical/surgical ICU of a U.S. tertiary care medical center. Three hundred seventeen participants with respiratory failure and/or shock. None. Acute kidney injury was determined using Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes stages. Clinical frailty status was determined using the Clinical Frailty Scale at 3 and 12 months following discharge. Covariates included mean ICU Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score as well as baseline comorbidity (i.e., Charlson Comorbidity Index), kidney function, and Clinical Frailty Scale score. Of 317 patients, 243 (77%) had acute kidney injury and one in four patients with acute kidney injury was frail at baseline. In adjusted models, acute kidney injury stages 1, 2, and 3 were associated with higher frailty scores at 3 months (odds ratio, 1.92; 95% CI, 1.14-3.24; odds ratio, 2.40; 95% CI, 1.31-4.42; and odds ratio, 4.41; 95% CI, 2.20-8.82, respectively). At 12 months, a similar association of acute kidney injury stages 1, 2, and 3 and higher Clinical Frailty Scale score was noted (odds ratio, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.11-3.14; odds ratio, 1.81; 95% CI, 0.94-3.48; and odds ratio, 2.76; 95% CI, 1.34-5.66, respectively). In supplemental and sensitivity analyses, analogous patterns of association were observed. Acute kidney injury in survivors of critical illness predicted worse frailty status 3 and 12 months postdischarge. These findings have important implications on clinical decision making among acute kidney injury survivors and underscore the need to understand the drivers of

  20. Amoebic liver abscess – a cause of acute respiratory distress in an infant: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleem Mohammad M

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The usual presentation of amebic liver abscess in children is extremely variable and unpredictable. It presents with a picture of common pediatric illness that is fever, lethargy, and abdominal pain, and can go on to develop into a rare complication of rupture into the pleura to cause acute respiratory distress, which is another common pediatric illness. In our patient, diagnosis was not made or suspected in these two stages. Case presentation This is the report of a 2-year-old male infant who presented with a 2-week history of anorexia, fever, and abdominal pain. A few hours after admission, he suddenly developed acute respiratory distress; chest X-ray demonstrated massive right pleural effusion that failed to response to tube thoracostomy. Limited thoracotomy revealed a ruptured amebic liver abscess through the right cupola of the diaphragm. The content of the abscess was evacuated from the pleural cavity, which was drained with two large chest tubes. Serological examination confirmed the diagnosis of ruptured amebic liver abscess. Postoperative treatment with antibiotics including metronidazole continued until full recovery. Conclusion Diagnosis of such a rare disease requires a high degree of suspicion. In this patient, the diagnosis was only made postoperatively. The delay in presentation and the sudden onset of respiratory distress must be emphasized for all those physicians who care for children.

  1. Acute respiratory distress syndrome, metabolic acidosis, and respiratory acidosis associated with citalopram overdose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawa Edriss

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We report a 53-year-old man who ingested 2400 mg of citalopram and presented to the emergency department three hours post-ingestion with altered mental status, somnolence, and a blood pressure of 67/45 mmHg. He failed to respond to three boluses of normal saline (1000 ml each and required vasopressors. The patient developed serotonin syndrome with hyper-reflexia, rigidity, and ankle myoclonus. He had a tonic-clonic seizure in the ER requiring intravenous lorazepam and phenytoin. An ECG showed QT prolongation. Chest x-ray on presentation was normal. Within 32 hours the patient developed acute respiratory distress, hypoxemia, a wide A-a gradient, PaO2/FiO2< 200, and chest x-ray changes compatible with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. He had normal central venous pressures, normal cardiac biomarkers, normal systolic and diastolic functions on echocardiography, and no acute ST/T wave changes. His ABG showed a metabolic acidosis and a respiratory acidosis. The patient required intubation and ventilation. Citalopram has been associated with seizures and ECG abnormalities after overdoses. The respiratory complications and metabolic acidosis have been reported only a few times in the literature.  We are reporting the second case of ARDS and the fifth case of metabolic acidosis due to citalopram overdose and suggest that the metabolic acidemia is explained by propionic acid. The respiratory acidosis seen in this patient has not been reported previously.

  2. Burden of Self-reported Acute Gastrointestinal Illness in Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Pablo Aguiar; Finley, Rita L.; Guerin, Michele T.; Isaacs, Sandy; Domínguez, Arnaldo Castro; Marie, Gisele Coutín; Perez, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal illness is an important public-health issue worldwide. Burden-of-illness studies have not previously been conducted in Cuba. The objective of the study was to determine the magnitude, distribution, and burden of self-reported acute gastrointestinal illness in Cuba. A retrospective, cross-sectional survey was conducted in three sentinel sites during June-July 2005 (rainy season) and during November 2005–January 2006 (dry season). Households were randomly selected from a list maintained by the medical offices in each site. One individual per household was selected to complete a questionnaire in a face-to-face interview. The case definition was three or more bouts of loose stools in a 24-hour period within the last 30 days. In total, 97.3% of 6,576 interviews were completed. The overall prevalence of acute gastrointestinal illness was 10.6%. The risk of acute gastrointestinal illness was higher during the rainy season (odds ratio [OR]=3.85, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.18-4.66) in children (OR=3.12, 95% CI 2.24-4.36) and teens (OR=2.27, 95% CI 1.51-3.41) compared to people aged 25-54 years, in males (OR=1.24, 95% CI 1.04-1.47), and in the municipality of Santiago de Cuba (OR=1.33, 95% CI 1.11-1.61). Of 680 cases, 17.1-38.1% visited a physician, depending on sentinel site. Of the cases who visited a physician, 33.3-53.9% were requested to submit a stool sample, and of those, 72.7-100.0% complied. Of the cases who sought medical care, 16.7- 61.5% and 0-31.6% were treated with antidiarrhoeals and antibiotics respectively. Acute gastrointestinal illness represented a substantial burden of health compared to developed countries. Targeting the identified risk factors when allocating resources for education, food safety, and infrastructure might lower the morbidity associated with acute gastrointestinal illness. PMID:19507750

  3. Palytoxin-induced acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lokendra K. Thakur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Palytoxin is one of the most potent toxins known to mankind and poses a high risk to humans through ingestion, inhalation and dermal routes [1,2]. Although the exact mechanism of action is unknown it is postulated that palytoxin binds to the Na+/K + ATPase pump resulting in K+ efflux, Ca2+ influx and membrane depolarization leading to widespread secondary pharmacological actions [2]. Palytoxin is highly toxic and can affect multiple organs causing severe symptoms including death. Palytoxin poisoning is mainly developed after ingesting seafood. We are reporting a case of suspected inhalational palytoxin poisoning in a healthy healthcare provider from who developed severe respiratory distress within 12 hours of exposure to vapors. We have highlighted diagnostic clues and clinical features in the patients' history that may help intensivists to diagnose a case of ARDS secondary to palytoxin poisoning.

  4. Host Transcriptional Response to Influenza and Other Acute Respiratory Viral Infections – A Prospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yijie; Franco, Luis M.; Atmar, Robert L.; Quarles, John M.; Arden, Nancy; Bucasas, Kristine L.; Wells, Janet M.; Niño, Diane; Wang, Xueqing; Zapata, Gladys E.; Shaw, Chad A.; Belmont, John W.; Couch, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the systemic response to naturally acquired acute respiratory viral infections, we prospectively enrolled 1610 healthy adults in 2009 and 2010. Of these, 142 subjects were followed for detailed evaluation of acute viral respiratory illness. We examined peripheral blood gene expression at 7 timepoints: enrollment, 5 illness visits and the end of each year of the study. 133 completed all study visits and yielded technically adequate peripheral blood microarray gene expression data. Seventy-three (55%) had an influenza virus infection, 64 influenza A and 9 influenza B. The remaining subjects had a rhinovirus infection (N = 32), other viral infections (N = 4), or no viral agent identified (N = 24). The results, which were replicated between two seasons, showed a dramatic upregulation of interferon pathway and innate immunity genes. This persisted for 2-4 days. The data show a recovery phase at days 4 and 6 with differentially expressed transcripts implicated in cell proliferation and repair. By day 21 the gene expression pattern was indistinguishable from baseline (enrollment). Influenza virus infection induced a higher magnitude and longer duration of the shared expression signature of illness compared to the other viral infections. Using lineage and activation state-specific transcripts to produce cell composition scores, patterns of B and T lymphocyte depressions accompanied by a major activation of NK cells were detected in the acute phase of illness. The data also demonstrate multiple dynamic gene modules that are reorganized and strengthened following infection. Finally, we examined pre- and post-infection anti-influenza antibody titers defining novel gene expression correlates. PMID:26070066

  5. Host Transcriptional Response to Influenza and Other Acute Respiratory Viral Infections--A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijie Zhai

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the systemic response to naturally acquired acute respiratory viral infections, we prospectively enrolled 1610 healthy adults in 2009 and 2010. Of these, 142 subjects were followed for detailed evaluation of acute viral respiratory illness. We examined peripheral blood gene expression at 7 timepoints: enrollment, 5 illness visits and the end of each year of the study. 133 completed all study visits and yielded technically adequate peripheral blood microarray gene expression data. Seventy-three (55% had an influenza virus infection, 64 influenza A and 9 influenza B. The remaining subjects had a rhinovirus infection (N = 32, other viral infections (N = 4, or no viral agent identified (N = 24. The results, which were replicated between two seasons, showed a dramatic upregulation of interferon pathway and innate immunity genes. This persisted for 2-4 days. The data show a recovery phase at days 4 and 6 with differentially expressed transcripts implicated in cell proliferation and repair. By day 21 the gene expression pattern was indistinguishable from baseline (enrollment. Influenza virus infection induced a higher magnitude and longer duration of the shared expression signature of illness compared to the other viral infections. Using lineage and activation state-specific transcripts to produce cell composition scores, patterns of B and T lymphocyte depressions accompanied by a major activation of NK cells were detected in the acute phase of illness. The data also demonstrate multiple dynamic gene modules that are reorganized and strengthened following infection. Finally, we examined pre- and post-infection anti-influenza antibody titers defining novel gene expression correlates.

  6. Acute effects of dokha smoking on the cardiovascular and respiratory systems among UAE male university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Rizwana B; Abdul Haque, Noor Mohammad; Abdul Hadi Khalil Al Mohsen, Hassan; Abdul Hadi Khalil Al Mohsen, Ali; Haitham Khalaf Humadi, Marwa; Zaki Al Mubarak, Zainab; Mathew, Elsheba; Al Sharbatti, Shatha

    2012-01-01

    In the United Arab Emirates (UAE) tobacco use is rampant. A less reported, yet widely used form of smoking native to UAE is midwakh or dhokha. The aim of the study is to assess the acute effects of smoking dokha (Arabian pipe) on the cardiovascular and respiratory systems among male university students in the UAE. A quasi-experimental study was conducted among 97 male volunteers aged more than 17 years. Blood pressure, heart rate and respiratory rate of each participant, were measured before and immediately after smoking. A self administered questionnaire was used to collect personal details and data about smoking pattern. Mean increases in systolic blood pressures (12±1 mmHg), heart rates (20±2 bpm) and respiratory rates (4±1 breaths/min) were observed (pSmoking dokha has a significant acute effect on systolic blood pressure, heart rate and respiratory rate. Anti smoking campaigns must address the ill effects of this form of smoking. Results from the study warrant further research into this method of smoking which is becoming more popular.

  7. Obesity, Acute Kidney Injury, and Mortality in Critical Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danziger, John; Chen, Ken P; Lee, Joon; Feng, Mengling; Mark, Roger G; Celi, Leo Anthony; Mukamal, Kenneth J

    2016-02-01

    Although obesity is associated with risk for chronic kidney disease and improved survival, less is known about the associations of obesity with risk of acute kidney injury and post acute kidney injury mortality. In a single-center inception cohort of almost 15,000 critically ill patients, we evaluated the association of obesity with acute kidney injury and acute kidney injury severity, as well as in-hospital and 1-year survival. Acute kidney injury was defined using the Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative criteria. The acute kidney injury prevalence rates for normal, overweight, class I, II, and III obesity were 18.6%, 20.6%, 22.5%, 24.3%, and 24.0%, respectively, and the adjusted odds ratios of acute kidney injury were 1.18 (95% CI, 1.06-1.31), 1.35 (1.19-1.53), 1.47 (1.25-1.73), and 1.59 (1.31-1.87) when compared with normal weight, respectively. Each 5-kg/m² increase in body mass index was associated with a 10% risk (95% CI, 1.06-1.24; p Obesity is a risk factor for acute kidney injury, which is associated with increased short- and long-term mortality.

  8. Message concerning Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome ("SARS")

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    IMPORTANT REMINDER If you have just come back from one of the regions identified by the WHO as being infected with SARS, it is essential to monitor your state of health for ten days after your return. The syndrome manifests itself in the rapid onset of a high fever combined with respiratory problems (coughing, breathlessness, breathing difficulty). Should these signs appear, you must contact the CERN Medical Service as quickly as possible on number 73802 or 73186 during normal working hours, and the fire brigade at all other times on number 74444, indicating that you have just returned from one of the WHO-identified areas with recent local transmission.China: Beijing, Hong Kong (Special Administrative Region), Guangdong Province, Inner Mongolia, Shanxi Province, Tianjin ProvinceTaiwan:TaipeiMoreover, until further notice the CERN Management requests that all trips to these various regions of the world be reduced to a strict minimum and then only with the consent of the Division Leader concerned. Anyone comin...

  9. Acute effects of urban air pollution on respiratory health of children with and without chronic respiratory symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee, S; Hoek, G; Boezen, H M; Schouten, Jan; van Wijnen, J H; Brunekreef, B

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate to what extent different components of air pollution are associated with acute respiratory health effects in children with and without chronic respiratory symptoms. METHODS: During three consecutive winters starting in 1992-3, peak expiratory flow (PEF) and respiratory

  10. Urban Telemedicine Enables Equity in Access to Acute Illness Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronis, Sarah D; McConnochie, Kenneth M; Wang, Hongyue; Wood, Nancy E

    2017-02-01

    Children with care for acute illness available through the Health-e-Access telemedicine model at childcare and schools were previously found to have 22% less emergency department (ED) use than counterparts without this service, but they also had 24% greater acute care use overall. We assessed the hypothesis that increased utilization reflected improved access among impoverished inner-city children to a level experienced by more affluent suburban children. This observational study compared utilization among children without and with telemedicine access, beginning in 1993, ending in 2007, and based on 84,287 child-months of billing claims-based observation. Health-e-Access Telemedicine was initiated in stepwise manner over 187 study-months among 74 access sites (childcare, schools, community centers), beginning in month 105. Children dwelled in inner city, rest-of-city Rochester, NY, or in surrounding suburbs. Rate of total acute care visits (office, ED, telemedicine) was measured as visits per 100 child-years. Observed utilization rates were adjusted in multivariate analysis for age, sex, insurance type, and season of year. When both suburban and inner-city children lacked telemedicine access, overall acute illness visits were 75% greater among suburban than inner-city children (suburban:inner-city rate ratio 1.75, p Health-e-Access Telemedicine redressed socioeconomic disparities in acute care access in the Rochester area, thus contributing to a more equitable community.

  11. Interferon therapy of acute respiratory viral infections in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Abaturov

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of nasal spray Laferobionum® (100,000 IU/ml in children with acute respiratory viral infections. Materials and methods. The study included 84 children aged 12 to 18 years. Children of the main group (42 persons received Laferobionum® spray in addition to the standard treatment for acute respiratory viral infections. The drug was administered to children of 12–14 years for 2 spray doses in each nasal passage 4–5 times a day at regular intervals (with the exception of sleep time, children aged 14–18 years received 3 spray-doses per each nasal passage 5–6 times a day at regular intervals (excluding sleep time. The course of treatment for all subjects was 5 days. Children of the control group received standard treatment for acute respiratory viral infections without Laferobionum®. Objective research included: auscultation of the heart and lungs, examination of the skin and mucous membranes, measurement of heart rate, blood pressure and body temperature. All patients underwent a general blood test, a general urinalysis, identification of the pathogen using the method of direct immunofluorescence (in smears taken from the nasal passages in the laboratory “Medical Diagnostic Center of Dnipropetrovsk Medical Academy”. Results. In the non-epidemic period, the respiratory syncytial virus and adenoviruses were the leading viral pathogens of acute respiratory viral infections. The main clinical manifestations of acute respiratory viral infection in the observed patients were signs of general inflammatory and catarrhal syndromes. All patients had not severe course of the disease. The data of the physical examination performed before the beginning of treatment indicated the absence of clinically significant deviations from the cardiovascular system in the children of the main and control groups. Arterial blood pressure and heart rate in the subjects of both groups were

  12. Relation of Telemetry Use and Mortality Risk, Hospital Length of Stay, and Readmission Rates in Patients With Respiratory Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Nancy; Burton, M Caroline; Hull, Bryan; Beliles, Gregory; Pritchard, Ingrid; Trautman, Christopher; Ferry, Laura; Doyon, Amanda; Colby, Rebecca; Chuu, Andy; Kung, Shu Ting; Khang, Tran; Durocher, Donna; Buras, Matthew; Kosiorek, Heidi; Agrwal, Neera; Sen, Ayan; Goss, Darin; Geyer, Holly

    2017-10-15

    The 2004 American Heart Association expert opinion-based guidelines restrict telemetry use primarily to patients with current or high-risk cardiac conditions. Respiratory infections have emerged as a common source of hospitalization, and telemetry is frequently applied without indication in efforts to monitor patient decompensation. In this retrospective study, we aimed to determine whether telemetry impacts mortality risk, length of stay (LOS), or readmission rates in hospitalized patients with acute respiratory infection not meeting American Heart Association criteria. A total of 765 respiratory infection patient encounters with Diagnosis-Related Groups 193, 194, 195, 177, 178 and 179 admitted in 2013 to 2015 to 2 tertiary community-based medical centers (Mayo Clinic, Arizona, and Mayo Clinic, Florida) were evaluated, and outcomes between patients who underwent or did not undergo telemetry were compared. Overall, the median LOS was longer in patients who underwent telemetry (3.0 days vs 2.0 days, p Telemetry predicted LOS for both univariate (estimate 1.18, 95% confidence interval 1.06 to 1.32, p = 0.003) and multivariate (estimate 1.17, 95% confidence interval 1.06 to 1.30, p = 0.003) analyses after controlling for severity of illness but did not predict patient mortality. In conclusion, this study identified that patients with respiratory infection who underwent telemetry without clear indications may face increased LOS without reducing their readmission risk or improving the overall mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Influenza and respiratory syncytial virus in infants study (IRIS) of hospitalized and non-ill infants aged <1 year in four countries: study design and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Mark G; Hunt, Danielle R; Arbaji, Ali K; Simaku, Artan; Tallo, Veronica L; Biggs, Holly M; Kulb, Carolyn; Gordon, Aubree; Khader, Ilham Abu; Bino, Silvia; Lucero, Marilla G; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Shifflett, Pat; Sanchez, Felix; Marar, Basima I; Bakalli, Ilirjana; Simões, Eric A F; Levine, Min Z; Meece, Jennifer K; Balmaseda, Angel; Al-Sanouri, Tareq M; Dhimolea, Majlinda; de Jesus, Joanne N; Thornburg, Natalie J; Gerber, Susan I; Gresh, Lionel

    2017-03-22

    This multi-country prospective study of infants aged respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections associated with hospitalizations, to describe clinical features and antibody response to infection, and to examine predictors of very severe disease requiring intensive care. We are enrolling a hospital-based cohort and a sample of non-ill infants in four countries (Albania, Jordan, Nicaragua, and the Philippines) using a common protocol. We are currently starting year 2 of a 2- to 3-year study and will enroll approximately 3,000 infants hospitalized for any acute illness (respiratory or non-respiratory) during periods of local influenza and/or RSV circulation. After informed consent and within 24 h of admission, we collect blood and respiratory specimens and conduct an interview to assess socio-demographic characteristics, medical history, and symptoms of acute illness (onset ≤10 days). Vital signs, interventions, and medications are documented daily through medical record abstraction. A follow-up health assessment and collection of convalescent blood occurs 3-5 weeks after enrollment. Influenza and RSV infection is confirmed by singleplex real time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) assays. Serologic conversion will be assessed comparing acute and convalescent sera using hemagglutination inhibition assay for influenza antibodies and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for RSV. Concurrent with hospital-based enrollment, respiratory specimens are also being collected (and tested by rRT-PCR) from approximately 1,400 non-ill infants aged <1 year during routine medical or preventive care. The Influenza and RSV in Infants Study (IRIS) promises to expand our knowledge of the frequency, clinical features, and antibody profiles of serious influenza and RSV disease among infants aged <1 year, quantify the proportion of infections that may be missed by traditional surveillance, and inform decisions about the potential value of existing and new

  14. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Complicating Strongyloides stercoralis Hyperinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Ju Tsai

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloidiasis is endemic in tropic and subtropic areas, but is currently seldom encountered in developed area like Taiwan. We present an elder man with acute respiratory distress syndrome complicating Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection. There was no significant clue initially for diagnosing this patient as having S. stercoralis hyperinfection. Neither peripheral eosinophilia nor significant hemoptysis was noted. Bronchoscopy played a critical role to define the unexpected cause of his progressive pulmonary infiltrates. The correct diagnosis was soon made by recognition of the worm in bronchioloalveolar lavage cytology, and specific treatment was initiated promptly. For a septic patient with progressive pulmonary infiltrates, bronchoscopic studies including cytology may be necessary for defining the cause. Hyperinfection strongyloidiasis should be considered as a cause of acute respiratory distress syndrome in immunocompromised patient, especially with the presence of chronic gastrointestinal symptoms.

  15. Acute Kidney Injury as a Risk Factor for Delirium and Coma during Critical Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siew, Edward D; Fissell, William H; Tripp, Christina M; Blume, Jeffrey D; Wilson, Matthew D; Clark, Amanda J; Vincz, Andrew J; Ely, E Wesley; Pandharipande, Pratik P; Girard, Timothy D

    2017-06-15

    Acute kidney injury may contribute to distant organ dysfunction. Few studies have examined kidney injury as a risk factor for delirium and coma. To examine whether acute kidney injury is associated with delirium and coma in critically ill adults. In a prospective cohort study of intensive care unit patients with respiratory failure and/or shock, we examined the association between acute kidney injury and daily mental status using multinomial transition models adjusting for demographics, nonrenal organ failure, sepsis, prior mental status, and sedative exposure. Acute kidney injury was characterized daily using the difference between baseline and peak serum creatinine and staged according to Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes criteria. Mental status (normal vs. delirium vs. coma) was assessed daily with the Confusion Assessment Method for the ICU and Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale. Among 466 patients, stage 2 acute kidney injury was a risk factor for delirium (odds ratio [OR], 1.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-2.26) and coma (OR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.25-3.34) as was stage 3 injury (OR for delirium, 2.56; 95% CI, 1.57-4.16) (OR for coma, 3.34; 95% CI, 1.85-6.03). Daily peak serum creatinine (adjusted for baseline) values were also associated with delirium (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.18-1.55) and coma (OR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.20-1.74). Renal replacement therapy modified the association between stage 3 acute kidney injury and daily peak serum creatinine and both delirium and coma. Acute kidney injury is a risk factor for delirium and coma during critical illness.

  16. Non-invasive mechanic ventilation in treating acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Lari

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Non invasive ventilation (NIV in acute respiratory failure (ARF improve clinical parameters, arterial blood gases, decrease mortality and endo tracheal intubation (ETI rate also outside the intensive care units (ICUs. Objective of this study is to verify applicability of NIV in a general non respiratory medical ward. We enrolled 68 consecutive patients (Pts with Hypoxemic or Hyper capnic ARF: acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE, exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, Pneu - monia, acute lung injury / acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS. NIV treatment was CPAP or PSV + PEEP. 12 Pts (18,5% met primary endpoint (NIV failure: 11 Pts (17% needed ETI (5ALI/ARDS p < 0,0001, 6COPD 16,6%, 1 Patient (1,5% died (Pneumonia. No Pts with ACPE failed (p = 0,0027. Secondary endpoints: significant improvement in Respiratory Rate (RR, Kelly Score, pH, PaCO2, PaO2 vs baseline. Median duration of treatment: 16:06 hours: COPD 18:54, ACPE 4:15. Mean length of hospitalisation: 8.66 days. No patients discontinued NIV, no side effects. Results are consistent with literature. Hypoxemic ARF related to ALI/ARDS and pneumonia show worst outcome: it is not advisable to manage these conditions with NIV outside the ICU. NIV for ARF due to COPD and ACPE is feasible, safe and effective in a general medical ward if selection of Pts, staff’s training and monitoring are appropriate. This should encourage the diffusion of NIV in this specific setting. According to strong evidences in literature, NIV should be considered a first line and standard treatment in these clinical conditions irrespective of the setting.

  17. Coccidioidomycosis: an unusual cause of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Veras, Kelson Nobre; Figueirêdo, Bruno C. de Souza; Martins, Liline Maria Soares; Vasconcelos, Jayro T. Paiva; Wanke, Bodo

    2003-01-01

    A male farmer, 20 years old, from the countryside of the State of Piauí, developed acute respiratory infection. Despite adequate antimicrobial therapy, his conditions worsened, requiring mechanical ventilation. His X-rays showed diffuse pulmonary infiltrates. His PaO2/FiO2 ratio was 58. Direct microscopy and culture of tracheal aspirates showed the presence of Coccidioides immitis. Autochthonous cases of coccidioidomycosis have only recently been described in Brazil, most of them from the Sta...

  18. Acute respiratory distress syndrome after orthotopic liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Ge, Xupeng; Sun, Kai; Agopian, Vatche G; Wang, Yuelan; Yan, Min; Busuttil, Ronald W; Steadman, Randolph H; Xia, Victor W

    2016-02-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a devastating complication with substantial mortality. The aims of this study were to identify the incidence, preoperative and intraoperative risk factors, and impact of ARDS on outcomes in patients after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Adult OLT patients between January 2004 and October 2013 at our center were included. Postoperative ARDS was determined using the criteria proposed by the Berlin Definition. Multivariate logistic models were used to identify preoperative and intraoperative risk factors for ARDS. Of 1726 patients during the study period, 71 (4.1%) developed ARDS. In the preoperative model, encephalopathy (odds ratio [OR], 2.22; P = .022), preoperative requirement of intubation (OR, 2.06; P = .020), and total bilirubin (OR, 1.02; P = .003) were independent risk factors. In the intraoperative model, large pressor bolus was the sole risk factor for ARDS (OR, 2.69; P = .001). Postoperatively, patients with ARDS had a 2-fold increase in 1-year mortality, mechanical ventilation time, and length of hospital stay. Acute respiratory distress syndrome occurred at a rate of 4.1% following OLT in adult patients and was associated with preoperative encephalopathy, requirement of intubation, and total bilirubin and intraoperative large boluses of pressors. Acute respiratory distress syndrome was associated with increased mortality, longer ventilation time, and hospital stay. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Inhaled nitric oxide for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and acute lung injury in children and adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure (AHRF), defined as acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), are critical conditions. AHRF results from a number of systemic conditions and is associated with high mortality and morbidity in all ages. Inhaled nitric oxide (INO) has...

  20. Risk Factors for Mortality and Outcomes in Pediatric Acute Lung Injury/Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panico, Flávia F; Troster, Eduardo J; Oliveira, Cindy S; Faria, Aline; Lucena, Michelle; João, Paulo R D; Saad, Everardo D; Foronda, Flávia A K; Delgado, Artur F; de Carvalho, Werther Brunow

    2015-09-01

    Children admitted to PICUs often present with or develop respiratory failure that requires mechanical ventilation. We prospectively identified children admitted to three general PICUs, with the goal of identifying risk factors for mortality. Prospective multicenter observational study. Three general PICUs, two in São Paulo and one in Curitiba, Brazil. Children aged between 1 month and 15 years, consecutively admitted between August 2008 and July 2010, with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome that developed at least 12 hours after invasive or noninvasive mechanical ventilation. None. We used logistic regression models to explore the relationship between death and independent variables. Of 3,046 patients admitted to the three PICUs, 1,658 patients underwent mechanical ventilation, and 84 fulfilled the acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome inclusion criteria and were analyzed. Nearly 60% were boys, and the median age was 31 months. Pressure control/assist control was the initial mode of mechanical ventilation in 86% of cases, and the median durations of mechanical ventilation and PICU stay were 12 and 15 days, respectively. None of the eight patients with acute lung injury died, whereas 33 of 76 of the remaining patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome died, for an overall mortality rate of 39.3% (95% CI, 28.8-50.6%). In different multivariate logistic regression model, the number of organ dysfunctions at admission, peak inspiratory pressure, airway pressure gradient on day 1, and the mean airway pressure gradient over the first 7 days of mechanical ventilation were significantly associated with mortality. Mortality is high in pediatric acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. Mechanical ventilation-associated risk factors for death among such patients are potential targets for intervention.

  1. Acute respiratory distress syndrome assessment after traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrooz Kazemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is one of the most important complications associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI. ARDS is caused by inflammation of the lungs and hypoxic damage with lung physiology abnormalities associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Aim of this study is to determine the epidemiology of ARDS and the prevalence of risk factors. Methods: This prospective study performed on patients with acute traumatic head injury hospitalization in the intensive care unit of the Shohaday-e Haftom-e-Tir Hospital (September 2012 to September 2013 done. About 12 months, the data were evaluated. Information including age, sex, education, employment, drug and alcohol addiction, were collected and analyzed. The inclusion criteria were head traumatic patients and exclusion was the patients with chest trauma. Questionnaire was designed with doctors supervision of neurosurgery. Then the collected data were analysis. Results: In this study, the incidence of ARDS was 23.8% and prevalence of metabolic acidosis was 31.4%. Most injury with metabolic acidosis was Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH 48 (60% and Subdural hemorrhage (SDH was Next Level with 39 (48% Correlation between Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS and Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS were significantly decreased (P< 0.0001. The level of consciousness in patients with skull fractures significantly lower than those without fractures (P= 0.009 [(2.3±4.6 vs (4.02±7.07]. Prevalence of metabolic acidosis during hospitalization was 80 patients (31.4%. Conclusion: Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a common complication of traumatic brain injury. Management and treatment is essential to reduce the mortality. In this study it was found the age of patients with ARDS was higher than patients without complications. ARDS risk factor for high blood pressure was higher in men. Most victims were pedestrians. The most common injury associated with ARDS was SDH. Our analysis

  2. Smart Care? versus respiratory physiotherapy?driven manual weaning for critically ill adult patients: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Taniguchi, Corinne; Victor, Elivane S.; Pieri, Talita; Henn, Renata; Santana, Carolina; Giovanetti, Erica; Saghabi, Cilene; Timenetsky, Karina; Caserta Eid, Raquel; Silva, Eliezer; Matos, Gustavo F. J.; Schettino, Guilherme P. P.; Barbas, Carmen S. V.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A recent meta-analysis showed that weaning with SmartCare? (Dr?ger, L?beck, Germany) significantly decreased weaning time in critically ill patients. However, its utility compared with respiratory physiotherapist?protocolized weaning is still a matter of debate. We hypothesized that weaning with SmartCare? would be as effective as respiratory physiotherapy?driven weaning in critically ill patients. Methods Adult critically ill patients mechanically ventilated for more than 24 hou...

  3. Antiviral therapy and prophylaxis of acute respiratory infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Osidak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thearticle presents the results of years of studies (including biochemical and immunological of the effectiveness of application and prophylaxis (in relation to nosocomial infections and the safety of antiviral chemical preparation Arbidol in 694 children with influenza and influenza-like illness, including the coronavirus infection (43 children and combined lesions of respiratory tract (150, indicating the possible inclusion of the drug in the complex therapy for children with the listed diseases, regardless of the severity and nature of their course. The studies were conducted according to the regulated standard of test conditions and randomized clinical trials.

  4. TNF-308 modifies the effect of second-hand smoke on respiratory illness-related school absences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenten, Madé; Berhane, Kiros; Rappaport, Edward B; Avol, Edward; Tsai, Wei-Wei; Gauderman, W James; McConnell, Rob; Dubeau, Louis; Gilliland, Frank D

    2005-12-15

    Exposure to second-hand smoke (SHS) has been associated with increased risk of respiratory illness in children including respiratory illness-related school absences. The role of genetic susceptibility in risk for adverse effects from SHS has not been extensively investigated in children. To determine whether the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) G-308A genotype influences the risk for respiratory illness-related school absences associated with SHS exposure. Incident school absences were collected, using an active surveillance system, between January and June 1996, as part of the Air Pollution and Absence Study, a prospective cohort study nested in the Children's Health Study. Buccal cells and absence reports were collected on 1,351 students from 27 elementary schools in California. Illness-related school absences were classified as nonrespiratory and respiratory illness-related, which were further categorized into upper or lower respiratory illness-related absences based on symptoms. The effect of SHS exposure on respiratory illness-related absences differed by TNF genotype (p interaction, 0.02). In children possessing at least one copy of the TNF-308 A variant, exposure to two or more household smokers was associated with a twofold risk of a school absence due to respiratory illness (relative risk, 2.13; 95% confidence interval, 1.34, 3.40) and a fourfold risk of lower respiratory illness-related school absence (relative risk, 4.15; 95% confidence interval, 2.57, 6.71) compared with unexposed children homozygous for the common TNF-308 G allele. These results indicate that a subgroup of genetically susceptible children are at substantially greater risk of respiratory illness if exposed to SHS.

  5. A Study of Clinical Profile of Patients presenting with Complications of Acute Febrile Illnesses During Monsoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salagre, Kaustubh Dilip; Sahay, Ravindra Nath; Pazare, Amar R; Dubey, Abhishek; Marathe, Kunal K

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study was to describe clinico-laboratory profile and outcome of complicated acute febrile illnesses among inpatients in a tertiary care hospital during monsoon. This was an observational, prospective study conducted in a tertiary care hospital in Mumbai, India. Between July 2016 to October 2016, adult patients admitted to the hospital with complicated acute febrile illness were included. Demographic, clinical and laboratory data were collected and analyzed for each patient. Associations were sought between death and organ specific complications. Out of 276 patients enrolled male gender 187(67.8%) and age group of below 35 years comprised the larger proportion of the cases with total 115(63.2%) dengue,37(80.4%) leptospirosis, 25(69.4%) malaria cases. The most common symptoms reported amongst the enrolled patients included generalized body ache (85.9%), headache (77.4%), vomiting (73.4%), abdominal pain (50%), high coloured urine (34.2%), and breathlessness (32.1%), loose motion (25.1%) and altered Sensorium (8.8%). Clinical signs seen and significantly associated were pedal edema 14.5% (P=0.001), icterus 20.7%(P=0.0001) and tachypnoea 19.4%(P =0.001). Most common complication of dengue was shock (70.9%) followed by hepatic (66.5%) and haematological (65%) derangements, that of malaria was CNS involvement (29.4%), and for leptospirosis it was renal failure (45.9%) followed by respiratory distress (22.3%). Overall mortality in Dengue was 7(3.8%), malaria 2(5.6%), leptospirosis 15(32.6%), Hepatitis E 2(50%). The similarity in clinical presentation and diversity of etiological agents demonstrates the complexity of diagnosis and treatment of acute febrile illness. This study of clinico-laboratory profile of complicated febrile monsoon illnesses will be helpful to reduce mortality associated with monsoon illnesses by early referral and prompt treatment. Dengue and leptospirosis remain the commonest etiologies and major killer due to respiratory and

  6. Brazilian medicinal plants to treat upper respiratory tract and bronchial illness: systematic review and meta-analyses-study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Luciane C; Silva, Maria Carolina O; Motta, Cristiane Bergamashi; Macho Quirós, Antonio; Biavatti, Maique Weber; de Oliveira, Jardel Corrêa; Guyatt, Gordon

    2014-07-23

    Respiratory illness, often associated with cough and sputum, is frequent. In Brazil, herbal medicines are often recommended as a first-line treatment for respiratory illness. There exists uncertainty regarding the effectiveness of these treatments. No systematic review has evaluated Brazilian medicinal plants (BMP) to treat upper respiratory tract and bronchial illness (URTI). We will conduct a systematic review and, if appropriate, a series of meta-analyses evaluating the safety and effectiveness of BMP for URTI. Eligible randomised controlled trials and observational studies will enrol adult or paediatric patients presenting with URTI treated by BMP approved by the Brazilian Health Surveillance Agency compared with placebo, no treatment or an alternative therapy. Our search will include the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), which contains the Cochrane Acute Respiratory Illness Group's Specialized Register; MEDLINE; EMBASE; CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature); Web of Science; AMED; LILACS; CAB abstracts; clinical trial.gov; the WHO Trial Register and the Brazilian thesis database (CAPES) without any language restrictions. Outcomes of interest are time to resolution of clinical symptoms and/or signs (cough, sputum production or activity limitations), severity of symptoms prior to resolution and major/minor adverse events. Teams of reviewers will, independently and in duplicate, screen titles and abstracts and the complete full text to determine eligibility. For eligible studies, reviewers will perform data abstraction and assess risk of bias of eligible trials. When appropriate, we will conduct meta-analyses. We will also assess the quality of body of evidence (confidence in estimates of effect) for each of the outcomes using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. The systematic review will be published in a peer-reviewed journal. Brief reports of review findings

  7. Nasopharyngeal Protein Biomarkers of Acute Respiratory Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W. Burke

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Infection of respiratory mucosa with viral pathogens triggers complex immunologic events in the affected host. We sought to characterize this response through proteomic analysis of nasopharyngeal lavage in human subjects experimentally challenged with influenza A/H3N2 or human rhinovirus, and to develop targeted assays measuring peptides involved in this host response allowing classification of acute respiratory virus infection. Unbiased proteomic discovery analysis identified 3285 peptides corresponding to 438 unique proteins, and revealed that infection with H3N2 induces significant alterations in protein expression. These include proteins involved in acute inflammatory response, innate immune response, and the complement cascade. These data provide insights into the nature of the biological response to viral infection of the upper respiratory tract, and the proteins that are dysregulated by viral infection form the basis of signature that accurately classifies the infected state. Verification of this signature using targeted mass spectrometry in independent cohorts of subjects challenged with influenza or rhinovirus demonstrates that it performs with high accuracy (0.8623 AUROC, 75% TPR, 97.46% TNR. With further development as a clinical diagnostic, this signature may have utility in rapid screening for emerging infections, avoidance of inappropriate antibacterial therapy, and more rapid implementation of appropriate therapeutic and public health strategies.

  8. Household fuel use and child respiratory ill health in two towns in Mpumalanga, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Patricia Nicole; Wright, Caradee Y; Voyi, Kuku V V; Mathee, Angela

    2015-09-21

    This cross-sectional study examined respiratory health outcomes and associated risk factors in children living in a part of South Africa characterised by high levels of air pollution. A questionnaire was used to collect self-reported respiratory health and risk factor data from the parents/guardians of children between the ages of 9 and 11 years attending primary schools in the study area. Six government schools were selected based on their location, class size and willingness to participate. Univariate and bivariate analyses as well as logistic regression analysis were performed on the data, using a p-value of 0.25 and biological plausibility. The overall prevalence of respiratory ill-health symptoms was 34.1%. The prevalence of respiratory ill-health conditions was significantly elevated among children from households using non-electrical fuels v. electricity for cooking (43.9% v. 31.6%; adjusted p-value 0.005). The same was noted among those using non-electrical fuels for heating (37.8% v. 29.0%). The elevated prevalence of some respiratory health outcomes among schoolchildren, especially in conjunction with domestic fossil fuel burning, is of concern. The data collected in this study may be used to complement or form a basis for future policy regarding indoor or ambient air quality in the area.

  9. [Viruses and clinical features associated with hospitalized children with acute respiratory infections in Lhasa, Tibet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong; Deng, Jie; Qian, Yuan; Zhu, Ru-nan; Sun, Yu; Zhao, Lin-qing; Wang, Fang; Shan, Min-na; Deji, Mei-duo

    2012-10-01

    To investigate the viral etiology and clinical features of hospitalized children with acute respiratory tract infections in Tibet. Nasopharyngeal aspirate samples were collected from children with acute respiratory tract infection hospitalized at the department of Pediatrics, Tibet Autonomous Region People's Hospital from April to July, 2011. The specimens of nasopharyngeal aspirate were screened for antigens of 7 common respiratory viruses by direct immunofluorescence (DIF) [respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), adenovirus (ADV), parainfluenza viruses type I-III, influenza virus A and B] and human metapneumovirus. Clinical data of the children were analyzed by statistical software SPSS16. A total of 167 children with acute respiratory tract infections hospitalized from April to July 2011 were enrolled in this investigation. Sixty-five out of 167 specimens were positive for viral antigens. The virus positive rate for specimens was 38.9% (65/167). Two of 65 positive specimens were positive for 2 virus antigens (RSV + influenza B) and (hMPV + parainfluenza virus type III), respectively. RSV was detected in 45 cases (67.2%, 45/67) which was the most predominant, followed by parainfluenza virus type III detected in 7 cases (10.4%, 7/67), ADV in 6 cases (9.0%, 6/67), parainfluenza virus type I in 4 cases (6.0%, 4/67), influenza virus type B in 3 cases (4.5%, 3/67), and hMPV in 2 cases (3.0%, 2/67). In addition to clinical manifestations of pneumonia, such as cough and shortness of breath, only 3 virus positive cases (6.67%) presented with wheezing, but the signs of severe cyanosis, fine rales in lung were common. Most of the children in this study recovered soon, only a few younger children with underlying diseases or complications had severe illness. Virus is an important pathogen for acute respiratory infections for hospitalized children in Tibet. RSV was the most predominant etiological agent, especially for those younger than 3 years old.

  10. Cochrane Commentary: Probiotics For Prevention of Acute Upper Respiratory Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics may improve a person's health by regulating their immune function. Some trials have shown that probiotic strains can prevent respiratory infections. Even though the previous version of our review showed benefits of probiotics for acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), several new studies have been published. To assess the effectiveness and safety of probiotics (any specified strain or dose), compared with placebo, in the prevention of acute URTIs in people of all ages, who are at risk of acute URTIs. We searched CENTRAL (2014, Issue 6), MEDLINE (1950 to July week 3, 2014), EMBASE (1974 to July 2014), Web of Science (1900 to July 2014), the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, which includes the China Biological Medicine Database (from 1978 to July 2014), the Chinese Medicine Popular Science Literature Database (from 2000 to July 2014) and the Masters Degree Dissertation of Beijing Union Medical College Database (from 1981 to July 2014). We also searched the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) and ClinicalTrials.gov for completed and ongoing trials on 31 July 2014. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing probiotics with placebo to prevent acute URTIs. Two review authors independently assessed the eligibility and quality of trials, and extracted data using the standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We included 13 RCTs, although we could only extract data to meta-analyze 12 trials, which involved 3720 participants including children, adults (aged around 40 years) and older people. We found that probiotics were better than placebo when measuring the number of participants experiencing episodes of acute URTI [at least one episode: odds ratio (OR): 0.53; 95% CI = 0.37-0.76, P school absence (OR: 0.10; 95% CI = 0.02-0.47, very low quality evidence). Probiotics and placebo were similar when measuring the rate ratio of episodes of acute URTI (rate ratio: 0

  11. Severe acute respiratory syndrome: implications for perinatal and neonatal nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebmann, Terri

    2005-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is an emerging infection that causes a potentially fatal respiratory disease. Although the SARS outbreak lasted less than 1 year, it resulted in significant morbidity and mortality and impacted nursing practices. A literature review was conducted. Only English language research articles in peer-reviewed journals, national organization publications, and book chapters were utilized. Data from 37 relevant articles were extracted, analyzed, and summarized. SARS' clinical description is presented, including its common signs/symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment. Recommended isolation practices for labor and delivery and proper procedures for donning, using, and doffing personal protective equipment are provided. Potential maternal outcomes include spontaneous miscarriage during the first trimester, preterm birth, emergency cesarean section, renal failure, secondary bacterial pneumonia, sepsis, adult respiratory distress syndrome, disseminated intravascular coagulation, surgical site infection, and maternal death. There have been no documented cases of vertical transmission; passive immunity is suspected on the basis of the presence of antibodies in some maternal body fluids. Potential neonatal outcomes include complications related to premature birth, intrauterine growth restriction, respiratory distress syndrome, and severe gastrointestinal manifestations. It is not known if or when SARS will reemerge, but perinatal and neonatal nurses should become familiar with its clinical description and proper infection control procedures to halt potential outbreaks.

  12. Generalized pustular psoriasis complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Samra, T; Constantin, J-M; Amarger, S; Mansard, S; Souteyrand, P; Bazin, J-E; D'Incan, M

    2004-02-01

    Psoriasis has a chronic and relatively benign course. However, severe complications are possible. One rare complication is acute interstitial pneumonitis. This entity should be suspected when a patient presents with dyspnoea and high fever. Knowledge of this pathology is crucial, for although it is essential to rule out aetiologies requiring specific management such as microbial infection or drug-related syndromes, diagnosis should not be delayed as its severe clinical course is improved by corticosteroids. We report two patients with an acute respiratory distress syndrome arising during the course of pustular psoriasis. Repeated bacteriological testing in lungs and blood remained negative. In both cases lung involvement was severe, requiring artificial ventilation. Dramatic clinical resolution was obtained by using corticosteroids. Besides infectious causes and drug hypersensitivity to methotrexate or acitretin, acute respiratory distress syndrome, sometimes due to a pulmonary capillary leak syndrome, is a rare cause of pneumonitis in the course of psoriasis, and may be fatal. Its pathogenesis is unknown. However, animal models suggest a role for T-helper (Th) 1 lymphocytes, known to be activated in psoriasis, and a role for tumour necrosis factor-alpha, a major Th1 cytokine, in alveolar damage.

  13. Implementing a bedside assessment of respiratory mechanics in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lu; Chen, Guang-Qiang; Shore, Kevin; Shklar, Orest; Martins, Concetta; Devenyi, Brian; Lindsay, Paul; McPhail, Heather; Lanys, Ashley; Soliman, Ibrahim; Tuma, Mazin; Kim, Michael; Porretta, Kerri; Greco, Pamela; Every, Hilary; Hayes, Chris; Baker, Andrew; Friedrich, Jan O; Brochard, Laurent

    2017-04-04

    Despite their potential interest for clinical management, measurements of respiratory mechanics in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are seldom performed in routine practice. We introduced a systematic assessment of respiratory mechanics in our clinical practice. After the first year of clinical use, we retrospectively assessed whether these measurements had any influence on clinical management and physiological parameters associated with clinical outcomes by comparing their value before and after performing the test. The respiratory mechanics assessment constituted a set of bedside measurements to determine passive lung and chest wall mechanics, response to positive end-expiratory pressure, and alveolar derecruitment. It was obtained early after ARDS diagnosis. The results were provided to the clinical team to be used at their own discretion. We compared ventilator settings and physiological variables before and after the test. The physiological endpoints were oxygenation index, dead space, and plateau and driving pressures. Sixty-one consecutive patients with ARDS were enrolled. Esophageal pressure was measured in 53 patients (86.9%). In 41 patients (67.2%), ventilator settings were changed after the measurements, often by reducing positive end-expiratory pressure or by switching pressure-targeted mode to volume-targeted mode. Following changes, the oxygenation index, airway plateau, and driving pressures were significantly improved, whereas the dead-space fraction remained unchanged. The oxygenation index continued to improve in the next 48 h. Implementing a systematic respiratory mechanics test leads to frequent individual adaptations of ventilator settings and allows improvement in oxygenation indexes and reduction of the risk of overdistention at the same time. The present study involves data from our ongoing registry for respiratory mechanics (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02623192 . Registered 30 July 2015).

  14. Acute respiratory failure due to ehrlichiosis - CT findings: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicknell, S.; Mason, A.

    2000-01-01

    Ehrlichiosis is a rare disease, with approximately 400 cases having been documented in the US since its recognition in 1986. Most of the reported cases were in the southeastern US, although 6 cases have been described in Washington state. Although most of these reported patients were admitted to hospital, severe complications developed in only a small proportion. Findings on chest imaging have been described in 3 children. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of computed tomographic (CT) findings in a young adult with erhlichiosis in whom acute respiratory failure developed. (author)

  15. Pathophysiology and Management of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidemann, Sabrina M; Nair, Alison; Bulut, Yonca; Sapru, Anil

    2017-10-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a syndrome of noncardiogenic pulmonary edema and hypoxia that accompanies up to 30% of deaths in pediatric intensive care units. Pediatric ARDS (PARDS) is diagnosed by the presence of hypoxia, defined by oxygenation index or Pao 2 /Fio 2 ratio cutoffs, and new chest infiltrate occurring within 7 days of a known insult. Hallmarks of ARDS include hypoxemia and decreased lung compliance, increased work of breathing, and impaired gas exchange. Mortality is often accompanied by multiple organ failure. Although many modalities to treat PARDS have been investigated, supportive therapies and lung protective ventilator support remain the mainstay. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Mechanical ventilation in the acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epelbaum, Oleg; Aronow, Wilbert S

    2017-08-01

    The management of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patient is fundamental to the field of intensive care medicine, and it presents unique challenges owing to the specialized mechanical ventilation techniques that such patients require. ARDS is a highly lethal disease, and there is compelling evidence that mechanical ventilation itself, if applied in an injurious fashion, can be a contributor to ARDS mortality. Therefore, it is imperative for any clinician central to the care of ARDS patients to understand the fundamental framework that underpins the approach to mechanical ventilation in this special scenario. The current review summarizes the major components of the mechanical ventilation strategy as it applies to ARDS.

  17. Acute respiratory distress syndrome in a neonate due to possible transfusion-related acute lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arti Maria

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI is a potentially life-threatening complication of blood component transfusion. It is relatively underdiagnosed entity in neonates with scant literature. We report a case of TRALI in a preterm neonate developing acute respiratory distress within 6 h of blood product transfusion in the absence of preexisting lung disease. Prompt ventilator and supportive management were instituted. The baby showed clinical and radiological improvement within 12 h; however, he succumbed to death due to acute massive pulmonary hemorrhage 36 h later. Possibility of TRALI should be kept if there is sudden deterioration of lung function after blood transfusion.

  18. WHO Severe Acute Respiratory Infections (SARI) Definition often Underdiagnoses Serious Respiratory Viral Infections in Hospitalized Jordanian Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuri-Bulos, Najwa; Piya, Bhinnata; Shehabi, Asem; Faouri, Samir; Williams, John V; Vermund, Sten; Halasa, Natasha B

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background The World Health Organization (WHO) case definition of severe acute respiratory infections (SARI) is anyone with an acute respiratory infection with symptoms within 10 days of presentation, cough, fever, and hospitalization. This is used to standardize global influenza surveillance with the caveat not all cases will be captured. We sought to determine the proportion of hospitalized Jordanian children admitted with acute respiratory illnesses meeting the SARI definition. Methods We conducted 3-year viral surveillance study in children <2 years admitted with acute respiratory symptoms and/or fever into a large government hospital in Amman. Demographic and clinical data were collected. We tested nasal/throat swabs for 11 viruses using q-RT-PCR. We compared children who met SARI definition to non-SARI. Results We enrolled 3168 children. Table 1 compares those children who met SARI definition vs. those who did not. Figure 1 compares % of children who were virus-positive and met SARI definition. Table 1. N (%) SARI (n = 1198) Non-SARI (n = 1970) p-values Male 729 (60.9) 1183 (60.1) 0.655 Median Age 6.7 months 2.3 months 0.000 Underlying medical condition 160 (13.4) 215 (10.9) 0.039 Pneumonia 192 (16.0) 202 (10.3) 0.000 Sepsis 150 (12.5) 750 (38.1) 0.000 Bronchiolitis 169 (14.1) 378 (19.2) 0.000 Bronchopneumonia 656 (54.8) 364 (18.5) 0.000 ≤10-day duration 1198 (100) 1848 (93.8) 0.000 Cough 1198 (100) 1172 (59.5) 0.000 Fever 1198 (100) 649 (32.9) 0.000 Fever and Cough 1198 (100) 48 (2.4) 0.000 Virus positive 1076 (89.8) 1505 (76.4) 0.000 Rhinovirus 438 (36.6) 800 (40.6) 0.024 Adenovirus 201 (16.8) 274 (13.9) 0.028 Parainfluenza 1–3 75 (6.3) 100 (5.1) 0.157 Respiratory Syncytial Virus 635 (53.0) 762 (38.7) 0.000 Influenza A-C 61 (5.1) 58 (2.9) 0.002 Human Metapneumovirus 153 (12.8) 120 (6.1) 0.000 Conclusion Children who met the definition of SARI were more likely to be older, have an underlying medical condition, have the diagnoses of pneumonia and

  19. Detection of respiratory viruses and Bordetella bronchiseptica in dogs with acute respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, B S; Kurz, S; Weber, K; Balzer, H-J; Hartmann, K

    2014-09-01

    Canine infectious respiratory disease (CIRD) is an acute, highly contagious disease complex caused by a variety of infectious agents. At present, the role of viral and bacterial components as primary or secondary pathogens in CIRD is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2), canine influenza virus (CIV), canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV), canine herpes virus-1 (CHV-1), canine distemper virus (CDV) and Bordetella bronchiseptica in dogs with CIRD and to compare the data with findings in healthy dogs. Sixty-one dogs with CIRD and 90 clinically healthy dogs from Southern Germany were prospectively enrolled in this study. Nasal and pharyngeal swabs were collected from all dogs and were analysed for CPIV, CAV-2, CIV, CRCoV, CHV-1, CDV, and B. bronchiseptica by real-time PCR. In dogs with acute respiratory signs, 37.7% tested positive for CPIV, 9.8% for CRCoV and 78.7% for B. bronchiseptica. Co-infections with more than one agent were detected in 47.9% of B. bronchiseptica-positive, 82.6% of CPIV-positive, and 100% of CRCoV-positive dogs. In clinically healthy dogs, 1.1% tested positive for CAV-2, 7.8% for CPIV and 45.6% for B. bronchiseptica. CPIV and B. bronchiseptica were detected significantly more often in dogs with CIRD than in clinically healthy dogs (P infectious agents in dogs with CIRD in Southern Germany. Mixed infections with several pathogens were common. In conclusion, clinically healthy dogs can carry respiratory pathogens and could act as sources of infection for susceptible dogs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Acute respiratory distress syndrome: a review of the Berlin definition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luis Cabezón, N; Sánchez Castro, I; Bengoetxea Uriarte, U X; Rodrigo Casanova, M P; García Peña, J M; Aguilera Celorrio, L

    2014-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is due to many causes. The absence of a universal definition up until now has led to a series of practical problems for a definitive diagnosis. The incidences of ARDS and Acute Lung Injury (ALI) vary widely in the current literature. The American-European Consensus Conference definition has been applied since its publication in 1994 and has helped to improve knowledge about ARDS. However, 18 years later, in 2011, the European Intensive Medicine Society, requested a team of international experts to meet in Berlin to review the ARDS definition. The purpose of the Berlin definition is not to use it as a prognostic tool, but to improve coherence between research and clinical practice. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Coccidioidomycosis: an unusual cause of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelson Nobre Veras

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A male farmer, 20 years old, from the countryside of the State of Piauí, developed acute respiratory infection. Despite adequate antimicrobial therapy, his conditions worsened, requiring mechanical ventilation. His X-rays showed diffuse pulmonary infiltrates. His PaO2/FiO2 ratio was 58. Direct microscopy and culture of tracheal aspirates showed the presence of Coccidioides immitis. Autochthonous cases of coccidioidomycosis have only recently been described in Brazil, most of them from the State of Piauí. C. immitis has been isolated from humans, dogs and armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus, and also from soil samples of armadillo's burrows. Failure to respond to antimicrobial therapy and a patient's origin from recognized endemic areas should alert to the possibility of acute pulmonary coccidioidomycosis.

  2. ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME DAN ACUTE PNEUMONIA PADA NEAR DROWNING:SEBUAH LAPORAN KASUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Prinka Adyana

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Near drowning is a condition in which the victim survived the first 24 hours. The WorldHealth Organization (WHO , recorded worldwide in 2000 there were 400,000 incidentdrowned accidentally . That is, this figure ranks second only to traffic accidents.Aspiration pneumonia is a complication of near drwoning which occurred in 80 % ofcases of near drowning, while 50 % of patients sink into acute respiratory distresssyndrome ( ARDS . This case report discusses the acute respiratory distress syndromeand acute pneumonia in near drowning 24 years old , who had drowned at the beach for± 15 minutes , the chest x - ray obtained pulmonary edema dd / lung pnuemonia therepneuomothorax . Examination of multislice spiral computed tomography ( MSCT bilateral pneumothorax Thorax obtained major and minor fisuura right and left majorfissure , pneumomediastinum , pulmonary pneumonia contusio / suspected aspirationpneumonia , emphysema subcutis . In intensive care patients conducted for 9 days andreturn to akitivitas everyday

  3. A 'shock room' for early management of the acutely ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piagnerelli, M; Van Nuffelen, M; Maetens, Y; Lheureux, P; Vincent, J L

    2009-05-01

    Our 850-bed, academic, tertiary care hospital uses a four-bed dedicated 'shock room' situated between the Departments of Emergency Medicine and Intensive Care to stabilise all acutely ill patients from outside or inside the hospital before transfer to the intensive care unit or other department. Admitted patients stay a maximum of four hours in the shock room. In this article we describe our experiences using this shock room by detailing the demographic data, including time and source of admission, diagnosis and outcome, for the 2514 patients admitted to the shock room in 2006. The most common reasons for admission were cardiac (33%) and neurological (21%) diagnoses. After diagnosis and initial treatment, 54% of patients were transferred to an intensive care unit or a coronary care unit; 2.5% of patients died in the shock room. The shock room provides a useful area of collaboration between emergency department and intensive care unit staff and enables acutely ill patients to be assessed and treated rapidly to optimise outcomes.

  4. Respiratory viruses in young South African children with acute lower respiratory infections and interactions with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalay, Alicia A; Abbott, Salome; Sikazwe, Chisha; Khoo, Siew-Kim; Bizzintino, Joelene; Zhang, Guicheng; Laing, Ingrid; Chidlow, Glenys R; Smith, David W; Gern, James; Goldblatt, Jack; Lehmann, Deborah; Green, Robin J; Le Souëf, Peter N

    2016-08-01

    Human rhinovirus (RV) is the most common respiratory virus and has been associated with frequent and severe acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI). The prevalence of RV species among HIV-infected children in South Africa is unknown. To describe the prevalence of respiratory viruses, including RV species, associated with HIV status and other clinical symptoms in children less than two years of age with and without ALRI in Pretoria, South Africa. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from 105 hospitalized ALRI cases and 53 non-ALRI controls less than two years of age. HIV status was determined. Common respiratory viruses were identified by PCR, and RV species and genotypes were identified by semi-nested PCR, sequencing and phylogenetic tree analyses. Respiratory viruses were more common among ALRI cases than controls (83.8% vs. 69.2%; p=0.041). RV was the most commonly identified virus in cases with pneumonia (45.6%) or bronchiolitis (52.1%), regardless of HIV status, as well as in controls (39.6%). RV-A was identified in 26.7% of cases and 15.1% of controls while RV-C was identified in 21.0% of cases and 18.9% of controls. HIV-infected children were more likely to be diagnosed with pneumonia than bronchiolitis (pHIV-infected cases (n=15) compared with 30.6% of HIV-uninfected cases (n=85, p=0.013), and was identified more frequently in bronchiolitis than in pneumonia cases (43.8% vs. 12.3%; pHIV infection may be protective against RSV and bronchiolitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Acute gastrointestinal illness following a prolonged community-wide water emergency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargano, J W; Freeland, A L; Morrison, M A; Stevens, K; Zajac, L; Wolkon, A; Hightower, A; Miller, M D; Brunkard, J M

    2015-10-01

    The drinking water infrastructure in the United States is ageing; extreme weather events place additional stress on water systems that can lead to interruptions in the delivery of safe drinking water. We investigated the association between household exposures to water service problems and acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) and acute respiratory illness (ARI) in Alabama communities that experienced a freeze-related community-wide water emergency. Following the water emergency, investigators conducted a household survey. Logistic regression models were used to estimate adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for self-reported AGI and ARI by water exposures. AGI was higher in households that lost water service for ⩾7 days (aPR 2·4, 95% CI 1·1-5·2) and experienced low water pressure for ⩾7 days (aPR 3·6, 95% CI 1·4-9·0) compared to households that experienced normal service and pressure; prevalence of AGI increased with increasing duration of water service interruptions. Investments in the ageing drinking water infrastructure are needed to prevent future low-pressure events and to maintain uninterrupted access to the fundamental public health protection provided by safe water supplies. Households and communities need to increase their awareness of and preparedness for water emergencies to mitigate adverse health impacts.

  6. ESSENTIAL OILS INHALATIONS IN COMPLEX TREATMENT AND PROPHYLAXIS OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY VIRAL INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Petrushina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of respiratory tract infections in children of the Russian Federation is high. That is why the questions of prophylaxis and treatment of acute respiratory viral infections (ARVI are always of a great interest of paediatricians. During epidemic outbreaks essential oils inhalations become a new perspective in treatment of such conditions. In the period of time since September 2011 till February 2012 the research workers of Paediatrics department of Tyumen State Medical Academy have estimated the oil «Dyshi» («Breathe» efficacy in complex treatment of ARVI in children. The usage of this medicine for the prophylaxis of respiratory infectionsdecreased the morbidity rate to 35% during the observation period, while each child in the comparison group had at least one episode of ARVI. The usage of this drug in the group of frequently ill children at the first symptoms of ARVI allowed to relieve the severity of disease and to prevent complications. Furthermore, the oil «Dyshi» has a number of other advantages: it is not irritating and habit-forming, it does not dry the nasal mucous membrane, it is safe for children and can be used for a long period of time.

  7. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in a paediatric cluster in Singapore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsou, Ian Y.; Kaw, Gregory J.; Chee, Thomas S.; Loh, Lik Eng; Chan, Irene

    2004-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a major infectious disease pandemic that occurred in early 2003, and one of the diagnostic criteria is the presence of chest radiographic findings. To describe the radiographic features of SARS in a cluster of affected children. The chest radiographs of four related children ranging in age from 18 months to 9 years diagnosed as having SARS were reviewed for the presence of air-space shadowing, air bronchograms, peribronchial thickening, interstitial disease, pleural effusion, pneumothorax, hilar lymphadenopathy and mediastinal widening. Ill-defined air-space shadowing was the common finding in all the children. The distribution was unifocal or multifocal. No other findings were seen on the radiographs. None of the children developed radiographic findings consistent with acute respiratory distress syndrome. All four children showed significant resolution of the radiographic findings 4-6 days after the initial radiograph. Early recognition of these features is important in implementing isolation and containment measures to prevent the spread of infection. SARS in children appears to manifest as a milder form of the disease as compared to adults. (orig.)

  8. Hypoxemic Respiratory Failure from Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Secondary to Leptospirosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon M. Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, characterized by hypoxemic respiratory failure, is associated with a mortality of 30–50% and is precipitated by both direct and indirect pulmonary insults. Treatment is largely supportive, consisting of lung protective ventilation and thereby necessitating Intensive Care Unit (ICU admission. The most common precipitant is community-acquired bacterial pneumonia, but other putative pathogens include viruses and fungi. On rare occasions, ARDS can be secondary to tropical disease. Accordingly, a history should include travel to endemic regions. Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease most common in the tropics and typically associated with mild pulmonary complications. We describe a case of a 25-year-old male with undiagnosed leptospirosis, presenting with fever and severe hypoxemic respiratory failure, returning from a Costa Rican holiday. There was no other organ failure. He was intubated and received lung protective ventilation. His condition improved after ampicillin and penicillin G were added empirically. This case illustrates the rare complication of ARDS from leptospirosis, the importance of taking a travel history, and the need for empiric therapy because of diagnostic delay.

  9. The impact on emergency department visits for respiratory illness during the southern california wildfires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohrenwend, Paul B; Le, Minh V; Bush, Jeff A; Thomas, Cyril F

    2013-03-01

    In 2007 wildfires ravaged Southern California resulting in the largest evacuation due to a wildfire in American history. We report how these wildfires affected emergency department (ED) visits for respiratory illness. We extracted data from a Kaiser Permanente database for a single metropolitan community ED. We compared the number of visits due to respiratory illness at time intervals of 2 weeks before and during the time when the fires were burning. We counted the total number of patients with chief complaint of dyspnea, cough, and asthma and final international classification of disease 9 coding diagnosis of asthma, bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and respiratory syndrome, and analyzed data for both total number and proportion of ED visits. We evaluated the data using Early Aberration Reporting System software to determine significant single-visit increases compared to expected counts. We also analyzed the average length of ED stay. Data on air quality were extracted from the http://www.airnow.gov site. There were significant differences between pre-fire and fire period average visit counts for the chief complaints of dyspnea and asthma. Dypnea complaints increased by 3.2 visits per day. During the fire the diagnoses of asthma increased significantly by 2.6 patients per day. Air quality reached air quality index values of 300, indicating very unhealthy conditions. Average ED length of stay times remained unchanged during the fire period compared to the pre-fire period. The 2007 Southern California wildfires caused significant surges in the volume of ED patients seeking treatment for respiratory illness. Disaster plans should prepare for these surges when future wildfires occur.

  10. The Impact on Emergency Department Visits for Respiratory Illness During the Southern California Wildfires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul B. Dohrenwend

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In 2007 wildfires ravaged Southern California resulting in the largest evacuationdue to a wildfire in American history. We report how these wildfires affected emergencydepartment (ED visits for respiratory illness.Methods: We extracted data from a Kaiser Permanente database for a single metropolitancommunity ED. We compared the number of visits due to respiratory illness at t ime intervalsof 2 weeks before and during the time when the fires were burnin g. We counted the totalnumber of patients with chief complaint of dyspnea, cough, and asthma and final internationalclassification of disease 9 coding diagnosis of asthma, bronchitis, chronic obstructivepulmonary disease and respiratory syndrome, and analyzed data for both total number andproportion of ED visits. We evaluated the data using Early Aberration Reporting Systemsoftware to determine significant single-visit increases compared to expected counts. We alsoanalyzed the average length of ED stay. Data on air quality were extracted from the http://www.airnow.gov site.Results: There were significant differences between pre-fire and fire period average visit countsfor the chief complaints of dyspnea and asthma. Dypnea complaints increased by 3.2 visits perday. During the fire the diagnoses of asthma increased significantly by 2.6 patients per day. Airquality reached air quality index values of 300, indicating very unhealthy conditions. Average EDlength of stay times remained unchanged during the fire period compared to the pre-fire period.Conclusion: The 2007 Southern California wildfires caused significant surges in the volume ofED patients seeking treatment for respiratory illness. Disaster plans should prepare for thesesurges when future wildfires occur.

  11. Current application of high flow oxygen nasal cannula in acute hypoxemic respiratory failure in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Bottani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available High flow oxygen with nasal cannula (HFONC is a relatively new mode of oxygen delivery. Advantages of HFONC versus conventional oxygen therapy (COT encompass carbon dioxide washout, generation of a slight positive end-expiratory pressure and maintenance of humidified gas flow through airways. These features are mostly shared with non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV, although with lack of a clearly comparable efficacy. In the last few years, HFONC has gained interest as a third alternative to COT and NIMV in the management of acute hypoxemic respiratory failure in the critically ill patient, both in intensive care units and emergency departments. The aim of this article is to review indications, effects and existing evidence on HFONC, COT and NIMV in the setting of acute hypoxemic respiratory failure.

  12. Message about the « severe acute respiratory disease syndrome »

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    If you are back from a journey in one of the zones pointed out by WHO concerned by the severe acute respiratory disease syndrome (SARS), it is necessary to monitor your health for at least ten days. This syndrome shows a high fever accompanied by cough or difficulty in breathing. If you become ill, you have to contact as quickly as possible the CERN medical service by dialling 73802 - 73186 during work hours or the Fire Brigade 74444 outside work hours. Tell this service about your recent travel to one of the regions where WHO has reported cases*. * For instant, the areas identified are the cities of Hanoi, Hong Kong, Singapore and the Province of Guangdong (South of China) and Toronto. The medical service recommends to avoid any trip in these world areas until further instruction. CERN Medical Service

  13. Non-invasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Abadesso

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to assess the clinical efficacy of non-invasive ventilation (NIV in avoiding endotracheal intubation (ETI, to demonstrate clinical and gasometric improvement and to identify predictive risk factors associated with NIV failure. An observational prospective clinical study was carried out. Included Patients with acute respiratory disease (ARD treated with NIV, from November 2006 to January 2010 in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU. NIV was used in 151 patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF. Patients were divided in two groups: NIV success and NIV failure, if ETI was required. Mean age was 7.2±20.3 months (median: 1 min: 0,3 max.: 156. Main diagnoses were bronchiolitis in 102 (67.5%, and pneumonia in 44 (29% patients. There was a significant improvement in respiratory rate (RR, heart rate (HR, pH, and pCO2 at 2, 6, 12 and 24 hours after NIV onset (P<0.05 in both groups. Improvement in pulse oximetric saturation/ fraction of inspired oxygen (SpO2/FiO2 was verified at 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 hours after NIV onset in the success group (P<0.001. In the failure group, significant SpO2/FiO2 improvement was only observed in the first 4 hours. NIV failure occurred in 34 patients (22.5%. Risk factors for NIV failure were apnea, prematurity, pneumonia, and bacterial co-infection (P<0.05. Independent risk factors for NIV failure were apneia (P<0.001; odds ratio 15.8; 95% confidence interval: 3.42-71.4 and pneumonia (P<0.001, odds ratio 31.25; 95% confidence interval: 8.33-111.11. There were no major complications related with NIV. In conclusion this study demonstrates the efficacy of NIV as a form of respiratory support for children and infants with ARF, preventing clinical deterioration and avoiding ETI in most of the patients. Risk factors for failure were related with immaturity and severe infection.

  14. Probiotics for preventing acute upper respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qiukui; Dong, Bi Rong; Wu, Taixiang

    2015-02-03

    Probiotics may improve a person's health by regulating their immune function. Some trials have shown that probiotic strains can prevent respiratory infections. Even though the previous version of our review showed benefits of probiotics for acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), several new studies have been published. To assess the effectiveness and safety of probiotics (any specified strain or dose), compared with placebo, in the prevention of acute URTIs in people of all ages, at risk of acute URTIs. We searched CENTRAL (2014, Issue 6), MEDLINE (1950 to July week 3, 2014), EMBASE (1974 to July 2014), Web of Science (1900 to July 2014), the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, which includes the China Biological Medicine Database (from 1978 to July 2014), the Chinese Medicine Popular Science Literature Database (from 2000 to July 2014) and the Masters Degree Dissertation of Beijing Union Medical College Database (from 1981 to July 2014). We also searched the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) and ClinicalTrials.gov for completed and ongoing trials on 31 July 2014. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing probiotics with placebo to prevent acute URTIs. Two review authors independently assessed the eligibility and quality of trials, and extracted data using the standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We included 13 RCTs, although we could only extract data to meta-analyse 12 trials, which involved 3720 participants including children, adults (aged around 40 years) and older people. We found that probiotics were better than placebo when measuring the number of participants experiencing episodes of acute URTI (at least one episode: odds ratio (OR) 0.53; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.37 to 0.76, P value school absence (OR 0.10; 95% CI 0.02 to 0.47, very low quality evidence). Probiotics and placebo were similar when measuring the rate ratio of episodes of acute

  15. An assessment tool for acutely ill medical patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gleeson, Margaret

    2012-01-26

    This article reports the implementation and impact of a standardized systematic evidence-based predictive score for the initial assessment of acutely ill medical patients. The Simple Clinical Score (SCS) was introduced in the A&E department and the medical floor of the authors\\' hospital between June 2007 and July 2008. The SCS was well received by the staff - 67% felt it greatly improved patient assessment and was very valuable for ensuring appropriate placement of the patient after admission and improved the quality of care. This article describes the change process, the pilot evaluation and the training programme undertaken during the implementation of the SCS. It is hoped that this experience will be of value to other project teams who are undertaking similar initiatives.

  16. An assessment tool for acutely ill medical patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gleeson, Margaret

    2012-01-31

    This article reports the implementation and impact of a standardized systematic evidence-based predictive score for the initial assessment of acutely ill medical patients. The Simple Clinical Score (SCS) was introduced in the A&E department and the medical floor of the authors\\' hospital between June 2007 and July 2008. The SCS was well received by the staff - 67% felt it greatly improved patient assessment and was very valuable for ensuring appropriate placement of the patient after admission and improved the quality of care. This article describes the change process, the pilot evaluation and the training programme undertaken during the implementation of the SCS. It is hoped that this experience will be of value to other project teams who are undertaking similar initiatives.

  17. Surfactant therapy for acute respiratory distress in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrado Moretti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS remains the primary indication for admission to paediatric intensive care units and accounts for significant mortality, morbidity and resource utilization. Respiratory infections, in particular pneumonia and severe bronchiolitis, are the most common causes of respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation in infants and children. This paper reviews the pathophysiology of ARDS and the management of paediatric patients with acute lung injury. Data indicate that adoption of a lung protective ventilation with low tidal volumes and of an open-lung ventilation strategy, characterized by sufficient positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP to avoid atelectasis, provides the greatest likelihood of survival and minimizes lung injury. The relative benefits of strategies such as high frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV, inhaled nitric oxide (iNO, recruiting manoeuvres and prone position are also considered. Moreover this article examines exogenous lung surfactant replacement therapy and its efficacy in the treatment of paediatric ARDS. In infants and children with acute lung injury the endogenous surfactant system is not only deficient, as observed in preterm infants, but altered via a variety of other mechanisms like inhibition and dysfunction. All factors contribute to the altered physiology seen in ARDS. The role of exogenous surfactant in lung injury beyond the neonatal period is therefore more complex and its limited efficacy may be related to a number of factors, among them inadequacy of pharmaceutical surfactants, insufficient dosing or drug delivery, poor drug distribution or, simply, an inability of the drug to counteract the underlying pathophysiology of ARDS. Several trials have found no clinical benefit from various surfactant supplementation methods in adult patients with ARDS, however some studies have shown that this therapy can improve oxygenation and decrease mortality in some specific

  18. Clinical differences between respiratory viral and bacterial mono- and dual pathogen detected among Singapore military servicemen with febrile respiratory illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Zheng Jie Marc; Zhao, Xiahong; Cook, Alex R; Loh, Jin Phang; Ng, Sock Hoon; Tan, Boon Huan; Lee, Vernon J

    2015-07-01

    Although it is known that febrile respiratory illnesses (FRI) may be caused by multiple respiratory pathogens, there are no population-level studies describing its impact on clinical disease. Between May 2009 and October 2012, 7733 FRI patients and controls in the Singapore military had clinical data and nasal wash samples collected prospectively and sent for PCR testing. Patients with one pathogen detected (mono-pathogen) were compared with those with two pathogens (dual pathogen) for differences in basic demographics and clinical presentation. In total, 45.8% had one pathogen detected, 20.2% had two pathogens detected, 30.9% had no pathogens detected, and 3.1% had more than two pathogens. Multiple pathogens were associated with recruits, those with asthma and non-smokers. Influenza A (80.0%), influenza B (73.0%) and mycoplasma (70.6%) were most commonly associated with mono-infections, while adenovirus was most commonly associated with dual infections (62.9%). Influenza A paired with S. pneumoniae had higher proportions of chills and rigors than their respective mono-pathogens (P = 0.03, P = 0.009). H. influenzae paired with either enterovirus or parainfluenzae had higher proportions of cough with phlegm than their respective mono-pathogens. Although there were observed differences in mean proportions of body temperature, nasal symptoms, sore throat, body aches and joint pains between viral and bacterial mono-pathogens, there were few differences between distinct dual-pathogen pairs and their respective mono-pathogen counterparts. A substantial number of FRI patients have multiple pathogens detected. Observed clinical differences between patients of dual pathogen and mono-pathogen indicate the likely presence of complex microbial interactions between the various pathogens. © 2015 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Non.Invasive Ventilation for Adult Acute Respiratory Failure. Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, G J; Bersten, A D

    1999-06-01

    To discuss the clinical indications and complications of non-invasive ventilation. A review of articles published in peer-reviewed journals from 1966 to 1998 and identified through a MEDLINE search on non-invasive ventilation. Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) has been used in patients with respiratory failure caused by cardiogenic pulmonary oedema, acute respiratory distress syndrome, acute asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, in patients with acute respiratory failure, it appears that acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema and acute respiratory failure associated with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia are the only disorders in which significant benefits have been associated with the use of the NIV mode of CPAP. The potential clinical benefit of CPAP in acute asthma and blunt chest trauma remains unclear. Pressure support ventilation is beneficial in patients with hypercapnic acute respiratory failure (ARF) secondary to respiratory muscle insufficiency, high inspiratory work loads, or reduced alveolar ventilation. It appears also to be associated with an improved outcome in COPD patients with hypercapnic ARF. Non-invasive ventilation using the modes of CPAP, PSV, BiPAP and NIPPV should be considered in patients with respiratory disorders who remain in acute respiratory failure despite conventional therapy, before considering invasive mechanical ventilation.

  20. Evaluation of physiological parameters before and after respiratory physiotherapy in newborns with acute viral bronchiolitis

    OpenAIRE

    S Gonçalves, Rodrigo A; Feitosa, Sérgio; de Castro Selestrin, Cláudia; Valenti, Vitor E; de Sousa, Fernando H; F Siqueira, Arnaldo A; Petenusso, Márcio; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Acute viral bronchiolitis is a respiratory disease with high morbidity that affects newborn in the first two years of life. Its treatment with physiotherapy has been highlighted as an important tool, however, there is no consensus regarding its effects on patients improvement. We aimed to evaluate the physiological parameters before and after the procedure respiratory therapy in newborn with acute viral bronchiolitis....

  1. Nonpulmonary treatments for pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome: proceedings from the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Stacey L; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Curley, Martha A Q

    2015-06-01

    To describe the recommendations from the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference on nonpulmonary treatments in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome. Consensus conference of experts in pediatric acute lung injury. A panel of 27 experts met over the course of 2 years to develop a taxonomy to define pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome and to make recommendations regarding treatment and research priorities. The nonpulmonary subgroup comprised three experts. When published data were lacking, a modified Delphi approach emphasizing strong professional agreement was utilized. The Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference experts developed and voted on a total of 151 recommendations addressing the topics related to pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome, 30 of which related to nonpulmonary treatment. All 30 recommendations had strong agreement. Patients with pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome should receive 1) minimal yet effective targeted sedation to facilitate mechanical ventilation; 2) neuromuscular blockade, if sedation alone is inadequate to achieve effective mechanical ventilation; 3) a nutrition plan to facilitate their recovery, maintain their growth, and meet their metabolic needs; 4) goal-directed fluid management to maintain adequate intravascular volume, end-organ perfusion, and optimal delivery of oxygen; and 5) goal-directed RBC transfusion to maintain adequate oxygen delivery. Future clinical trials in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome should report sedation, neuromuscular blockade, nutrition, fluid management, and transfusion exposures to allow comparison across studies. The Consensus Conference developed pediatric-specific definitions for pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome and recommendations regarding treatment and future research priorities. These recommendations for nonpulmonary treatment in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome are intended to promote optimization and

  2. Anti-infectious treatment in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min GAO

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is closely correlated with infection. Severe infection, e.g., sepsis and septic shock, can result in ARDS. Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP is one of the common complications in ARDS related infection. As regards ARDS related infection, community acquired infection (CAI is different from hospital acquired infection (HAI in bacterial spectrum. The former is mainly caused by Streptococcus pneumonia, Hemophilus influenzae, Moraxelle catarrhalis, atypical pathogens and Klebsiella pneumoniae. However, HAI is mainly caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumanii, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA, and other drug-resistant bacteria. The drug-resistant bacterial infection not only makes treatment difficult, but also leads to an increase in mechanical ventilation time, length of ICU stay, mortality rate, and medical costs. The present paper has reviewed the relationship between ARDS and infection, therapeutic principles and measures of ARDS related infection, and introduced the optimal strategy of anti-infectious treatment of ARDS.

  3. A comparison of volume control and pressure-regulated volume control ventilation in acute respiratory failure

    OpenAIRE

    Guldager, Henrik; Nielsen, Soeren L; Carl, Peder; Soerensen, Mogens B

    1997-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that a new mode of ventilation (pressure-regulated volume control; PRVC) is associated with improvements in respiratory mechanics and outcome when compared with conventional volume control (VC) ventilation in patients with acute respiratory failure. We conducted a randomised, prospective, open, cross over trial on 44 patients with acute respiratory failure in the general intensive care unit of a university hospital. After a stabiliz...

  4. Hand hygiene to reduce community transmission of influenza and acute respiratory tract infection: a systematic review.

    OpenAIRE

    Warren-Gash, C; Fragaszy, E; Hayward, AC

    2012-01-01

    : Please cite this paper as: Warren-Gash et al. (2012) Hand hygiene to reduce community transmission of influenza and acute respiratory tract infection: a systematic review. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses DOI: 10.1111/irv.12015. Hand hygiene may be associated with modest protection against some acute respiratory tract infections, but its specific role in influenza transmission in different settings is unclear. We aimed to review evidence that improving hand hygiene reduces primary an...

  5. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Severe Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Churlyaev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS in victims with isolated severe brain injury (SBI. Subject and methods. 171 studies were performed in 16 victims with SBI. Their general condition was rated as very critical. The patients were divided into three groups: 1 non-ARDS; 2 Stage 1 ARDS; and 3 Stage 2 ARDS. The indicators of Stages 1 and 2 were assessed in accordance with the classification proposed by V. V. Moroz and A. M. Golubev. Intracranial pressure (ICP, extravascular lung water index, pulmonary vascular permeability, central hemodynamics, oxygenation index, lung anastomosis, the X-ray pattern of the lung and brain (computed tomography, and its function were monitored. Results. The hemispheric cortical level of injury of the brain with function compensation of its stem was predominantly determined in the controls; subcompensation and decompensation were ascertained in the ARDS groups. According to the proposed classification, these patients developed Stages 1 and 2 ARDS. When ARDS developed, there were rises in the level of extravascular lung fluid and pulmonary vascular permeability, a reduction in the oxygenation index (it was 6—12 hours later as compared with them, increases in a lung shunt and ICP; X-ray study revealed bilateral infiltrates in the absence of heart failure in Stage 2 ARDS. The correlation was positive between ICP and extravascular lung water index, and lung vascular permeability index (r>0.4;p<0.05. Conclusion. The studies have indicated that the classification proposed by V. V. Moroz and A. M. Golubev enables an early diagnosis of ARDS. One of its causes is severe brainstem injury that results in increased extravascular fluid in the lung due to its enhanced vascular permeability. The ICP value is a determinant in the diagnosis of secondary brain injuries. Key words: acute respiratory distress syndrome, extravascu-lar lung fluid, pulmonary vascular permeability, brain injury

  6. [International cooperation on problems in acute respiratory viral infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tůmová, B

    1996-03-01

    The annual occurrence of acute respiratory infections (ARI) of viral origin incl. influenza, the serious character of influenza epidemics and pandemics were the reason why a network of 110 national influenza centres and four international collaborating centres were created. This worldwide surveillance programme is coordinated by WHO. With advancing integration of Europe scientific groups were created which implement this programme in Europe. EUROSENTINEL analyzes the notified morbidity from influenza and ARI in eight participating countries, EUROGEIG concentrates on the programme of influenza prevention and the preparation of anti-pandemic provisions, EUROGROG associates 27 National influenza centres which in the course of the season exchange information on the incidence of influenza and other respiratory viruses. ESWI (European Scientific Working Group on Influenza) organizes clinical and epidemiological investigations on the influence of influenza infection and the impact of anti-flu vaccination; it tries to harmonize the surveillance programme and raise its standard and strives for joint research projects. The National reference laboratory in Prague participates in all these programmes and takes also active part in some projects.

  7. Driving pressure and survival in the acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Marcelo B P; Meade, Maureen O; Slutsky, Arthur S; Brochard, Laurent; Costa, Eduardo L V; Schoenfeld, David A; Stewart, Thomas E; Briel, Matthias; Talmor, Daniel; Mercat, Alain; Richard, Jean-Christophe M; Carvalho, Carlos R R; Brower, Roy G

    2015-02-19

    Mechanical-ventilation strategies that use lower end-inspiratory (plateau) airway pressures, lower tidal volumes (VT), and higher positive end-expiratory pressures (PEEPs) can improve survival in patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but the relative importance of each of these components is uncertain. Because respiratory-system compliance (CRS) is strongly related to the volume of aerated remaining functional lung during disease (termed functional lung size), we hypothesized that driving pressure (ΔP=VT/CRS), in which VT is intrinsically normalized to functional lung size (instead of predicted lung size in healthy persons), would be an index more strongly associated with survival than VT or PEEP in patients who are not actively breathing. Using a statistical tool known as multilevel mediation analysis to analyze individual data from 3562 patients with ARDS enrolled in nine previously reported randomized trials, we examined ΔP as an independent variable associated with survival. In the mediation analysis, we estimated the isolated effects of changes in ΔP resulting from randomized ventilator settings while minimizing confounding due to the baseline severity of lung disease. Among ventilation variables, ΔP was most strongly associated with survival. A 1-SD increment in ΔP (approximately 7 cm of water) was associated with increased mortality (relative risk, 1.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.31 to 1.51; PAmparo e Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo and others.).

  8. Molecular mechanisms of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabel Peter

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS is a new infectious disease caused by a novel coronavirus that leads to deleterious pulmonary pathological features. Due to its high morbidity and mortality and widespread occurrence, SARS has evolved as an important respiratory disease which may be encountered everywhere in the world. The virus was identified as the causative agent of SARS due to the efforts of a WHO-led laboratory network. The potential mutability of the SARS-CoV genome may lead to new SARS outbreaks and several regions of the viral genomes open reading frames have been identified which may contribute to the severe virulence of the virus. With regard to the pathogenesis of SARS, several mechanisms involving both direct effects on target cells and indirect effects via the immune system may exist. Vaccination would offer the most attractive approach to prevent new epidemics of SARS, but the development of vaccines is difficult due to missing data on the role of immune system-virus interactions and the potential mutability of the virus. Even in a situation of no new infections, SARS remains a major health hazard, as new epidemics may arise. Therefore, further experimental and clinical research is required to control the disease.

  9. Zuclopenthixol acetate for acute schizophrenia and similar serious mental illnesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakody, Kaushadh; Gibson, Roger Carl; Kumar, Ajit; Gunadasa, Shalmini

    2014-01-01

    Background Medication used for acute aggression in psychiatry must have rapid onset of effect, low frequency of administration and low levels of adverse effects. Zuclopenthixol acetate is said to have these properties. Objectives To estimate the clinical effects of zuclopenthixol acetate for the management of acute aggression or violence thought to be due to serious mental illnesses, in comparison to other drugs used to treat similar conditions. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia’s Group Trials Register (July 2011). We supplemented this by citation searching and personal contact with authors and relevant pharmaceutical companies. Selection criteria All randomised clinical trials involving people thought to have serious mental illnesses comparing zuclopenthixol acetate with other drugs. Data collection and analysis Two review authors extracted and cross-checked data independently. We calculated fixed-effect relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous data. We analysed by intention-to-treat. We used mean differences (MD) for continuous variables. Main results We found no data for the primary outcome, tranquillisation. Compared with haloperidol, zuclopenthixol acetate was no more sedating at two hours (n = 40, 1 RCT, RR 0.60, 95% CI 0.27 to 1.34). People given zuclopenthixol acetate were not at reduced risk of being given supplementary antipsychotics (n = 134, 3 RCTs, RR 1.49, 95% CI 0.97 to 2.30) although additional use of benzodiazepines was less (n = 50, 1 RCT, RR 0.03, 95% CI 0.00 to 0.47). People given zuclopenthixol acetate had fewer injections over seven days compared with those allocated to haloperidol IM (n = 70, 1 RCT, RR 0.39, 95% CI 0.18 to 0.84, NNT 4, CI 3 to 14). We found no data on more episodes of aggression or harm to self or others. One trial (n = 148) reported no significant difference in adverse effects for people receiving zuclopenthixol acetate compared with those allocated haloperidol at one, three

  10. Hyperglycemia and acute kidney injury in critically ill children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordillo R

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Roberto Gordillo,1 Tania Ahluwalia,2 Robert Woroniecki3 1Department of Pediatrics, Division of Nephrology, 2Department of Pediatrics, University of Illinois College of Medicine, Peoria, IL, USA; 3Division of Pediatric Nephrology and Hypertension, Stony Brook Children’s Hospital, Stony Brook, NY, USA Background: Hyperglycemia and acute kidney injury (AKI are common in critically ill children and have been associated with higher morbidity and mortality. The incidence of AKI in children is difficult to estimate because of the lack of a standard definition for AKI. The pediatric RIFLE (Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function, and End-stage kidney disease criteria can be used to define AKI in children. Various biomarkers in urine and blood have been studied to detect AKI in critically ill children. However, it is not clear whether hyperglycemia is associated with AKI. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of hyperglycemia on kidney function and its effect on neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL in children. Methods: We studied retrospective and prospective cohorts of pediatric critically ill subjects admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU. We analyzed data from admission that included estimated glomerular filtration rate, plasma and urine NGAL, serum glucose and peak glycemia (highest glycemia during PICU admission, and length of hospital and PICU stay from two different institutions. Results: We found that the prevalence of hyperglycemia was 89% in the retrospective cohort and 86% in the prospective cohort, P=0.99. AKI was associated with peak glycemia, P=0.03. There was a statistically significant correlation between peak glycemia and hospital and PICU stays, P=<0.001 and P<0.001, respectively. Urine NGAL and plasma NGAL were not statistically different in subjects with and without hyperglycemia, P=0.99 and P=0.85, respectively. Subjects on vasopressors had lower estimated glomerular filtration rate and higher

  11. Influenza and other respiratory viruses involved in severe acute respiratory disease in northern Italy during the pandemic and postpandemic period (2009-2011)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pariani, Elena; Martinelli, Marianna; Canuti, Marta; Jazaeri Farsani, Seyed Mohammad; Oude Munnink, Bas B.; Deijs, Martin; Tanzi, Elisabetta; Zanetti, Alessandro; van der Hoek, Lia; Amendola, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Since 2009 pandemic, international health authorities recommended monitoring severe and complicated cases of respiratory disease, that is, severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We evaluated the proportion of SARI/ARDS cases and deaths due to

  12. Behavioral Effects of Upper Respiratory Tract Illnesses: A Consideration of Possible Underlying Cognitive Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P. Smith

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that both experimentally induced upper respiratory tract illnesses (URTIs and naturally occurring URTIs influence mood and performance. The present study investigated possible cognitive mechanisms underlying the URTI-performance changes. Those who developed a cold (N = 47 had significantly faster, but less accurate, performance than those who remained healthy (N = 54. Illness had no effect on manipulations designed to influence encoding, response organisation (stimulus-response compatilibility or response preparation. Similarly, there was no evidence that different components of working memory were impaired. Overall, the present research confirms that URTIs can have an effect on performance efficiency. Further research is required to identify the physiological and behavioral mechanisms underlying these effects.

  13. A course of acute respiratory infections in children with hyperplasia of lymphopharyngeal ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tkachenko V.Yu.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study the peculiarities of acute respiratory disease in children, depending on the presence of hyperplasia of lymphopharyngeal ring (HLR. Materials and methods. A total of 100 children 3–6 years old (the average age of 4 years and 10 months with clinical manifestations of acute respiratory infections. Formed two groups of observations: Group 1 — the children who suffering acute respiratory infections in the background HLR (n=50; Group 2 — the children who suffering acute respiratory infections without HLR (n=50. Results. Have HLR is accompanied by an increase in the duration and severity of acute respiratory infections in children of preschool age. In children HLR doubles the risk of complications from acute respiratory infections, and the possibility of various degrees of conductive hearing loss is three times higher than their peers without HLR. In nasal mucous in children with HLR show a more pronounced inflammatory process in the mucous membranes of the upper respiratory tract with the direct participation of bacteria in the pathological process. Conclusions. For children of preschool age the presence of HLR is accompanied by an increase in the duration and severity of acute respiratory disease with the development of bacterial complications.

  14. Characterisation of antibiotic prescriptions for acute respiratory tract infections in Danish general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, Rune; Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Saust, Laura Trolle

    2017-01-01

    Inappropriate use of antibiotics is contributing to the increasing rates of antimicrobial resistance. Several Danish guidelines on antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory tract infections in general practice have been issued to promote rational prescribing of antibiotics, however it is uncle......-line agents like macrolides and amoxicillin with or without clavulanic acid are overused. Strategies to improve the quality of antibiotic prescribing especially for pneumonia, acute otitis media and acute rhinosinusitis are warranted.......Inappropriate use of antibiotics is contributing to the increasing rates of antimicrobial resistance. Several Danish guidelines on antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory tract infections in general practice have been issued to promote rational prescribing of antibiotics, however it is unclear...... if these recommendations are followed. We aimed to characterise the pattern of antibiotic prescriptions for patients diagnosed with acute respiratory tract infections, by means of electronic prescriptions, labeled with clinical indications, from Danish general practice. Acute respiratory tract infections accounted for 456...

  15. Lung volume recruitment acutely increases respiratory system compliance in individuals with severe respiratory muscle weakness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Molgat-Seon

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine whether lung volume recruitment (LVR acutely increases respiratory system compliance (Crs in individuals with severe respiratory muscle weakness (RMW. Individuals with RMW resulting from neuromuscular disease or quadriplegia (n=12 and healthy controls (n=12 underwent pulmonary function testing and the measurement of Crs at baseline, immediately after, 1 h after and 2 h after a single standardised session of LVR. The LVR session involved 10 consecutive supramaximal lung inflations with a manual resuscitation bag to the highest tolerable mouth pressure or a maximum of 50 cmH2O. Each LVR inflation was followed by brief breath-hold and a maximal expiration to residual volume. At baseline, individuals with RMW had lower Crs than controls (37±5 cmH2O versus 109±10 mL·cmH2O−1, p0.05. LVR had no significant effect on measures of pulmonary function at any time point in either group (all p>0.05. During inflations, mean arterial pressure decreased significantly relative to baseline by 10.4±2.8 mmHg and 17.3±3.0 mmHg in individuals with RMW and controls, respectively (both p<0.05. LVR acutely increases Crs in individuals with RMW. However, the high airway pressures during inflations cause reductions in mean arterial pressure that should be considered when applying this technique.

  16. Acute respiratory failure induced by bleomycin and hyperoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goad, M.E.P.

    1985-01-01

    Bleomycin, a chemotherapeutic agent, and oxygen at concentrations greater than 20%, induce acute pulmonary damage separately and when administered together. The interaction of 5 U/kg intratracheal bleomycin and 24 hours of exposure to 80% oxygen in hamsters produces delayed onset acute respiratory distress syndrome three days after treatment. As little as 12 hours of 80% O 2 exposure, after intratracheal bleomycin, induces severe pulmonary damage. Lung lesions are characterized as diffuse alveolar damage. Significantly pulmonary edema, measured by iodine-125-bovine serum albumin and technetium-99m-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate, occurs 72 hours after treatment. Lesions progress from focal mild alveolar interstitial and air-space macrophage and granulocyte infiltrates at 24 hours to marked infiltrates and severe interstitial and air space edema with hemorrhages and hyaline membranes at 96 hours. Significant changes measured by electron microscopy morphometry are increases in volume fractions of neutrophils, alveolar tissue and mononuclear leukocytes. Surfactant assay of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid shows a marked decrease in the lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio at 72 hours. Proposed mechanisms of bleomycin and hyperoxia synergism include enhanced production of superoxide radicals either directly or indirectly by increasing neutrophil activity or numbers, or by alteration of cell mediators. The pulmonary edema, without evidence of severe morphological changes, may be secondary to alterations of transalveolar transport mechanisms

  17. Is Overall Mortality the Right Composite Endpoint in Clinical Trials of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Jesús; Martínez, Domingo; Mosteiro, Fernando; Ambrós, Alfonso; Añón, José M; Ferrando, Carlos; Soler, Juan A; Montiel, Raquel; Vidal, Anxela; Conesa-Cayuela, Luís A; Blanco, Jesús; Arrojo, Regina; Solano, Rosario; Capilla, Lucía; Del Campo, Rafael; Civantos, Belén; Fernández, María Mar; Aldecoa, César; Parra, Laura; Gutiérrez, Andrea; Martínez-Jiménez, Chanel; González-Martín, Jesús M; Fernández, Rosa L; Kacmarek, Robert M

    2018-02-07

    Overall mortality in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome is a composite endpoint because it includes death from multiple causes. In most acute respiratory distress syndrome trials, it is unknown whether reported deaths are due to acute respiratory distress syndrome or the underlying disease, unrelated to the specific intervention tested. We investigated the causes of death after contracting acute respiratory distress syndrome in a large cohort. A secondary analysis from three prospective, multicenter, observational studies. A network of multidisciplinary ICUs. We studied 778 patients with moderate-to-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome treated with lung-protective ventilation. None. We examined death in the ICU from individual causes. Overall ICU mortality was 38.8% (95% CI, 35.4-42.3). Causes of acute respiratory distress syndrome modified the risk of death. Twenty-three percent of deaths occurred from refractory hypoxemia due to nonresolving acute respiratory distress syndrome. Most patients died from causes unrelated to acute respiratory distress syndrome: 48.7% of nonsurvivors died from multisystem organ failure, and cancer or brain injury was involved in 37.1% of deaths. When quantifying the true burden of acute respiratory distress syndrome outcome, we identified 506 patients (65.0%) with one or more exclusion criteria for enrollment into current interventional trials. Overall ICU mortality of the "trial cohort" (21.3%) was markedly lower than the parent cohort (relative risk, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.43-0.70; p respiratory distress syndrome patients are not directly related to lung damage but to extrapulmonary multisystem organ failure. It would be challenging to prove that specific lung-directed therapies have an effect on overall survival.

  18. Acute Respiratory Failure in Renal Transplant Recipients: A Single Intensive Care Unit Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulas, Aydin; Kaplan, Serife; Zeyneloglu, Pinar; Torgay, Adnan; Pirat, Arash; Haberal, Mehmet

    2015-11-01

    Frequency of pulmonary complications after renal transplant has been reported to range from 3% to 17%. The objective of this study was to evaluate renal transplant recipients admitted to an intensive care unit to identify incidence and cause of acute respiratory failure in the postoperative period and compare clinical features and outcomes between those with and without acute respiratory failure. We retrospectively screened the data of 540 consecutive adult renal transplant recipients who received their grafts at a single transplant center and included those patients admitted to an intensive care unit during this period for this study. Acute respiratory failure was defined as severe dyspnea, respiratory distress, decreased oxygen saturation, hypoxemia or hypercapnia on room air, or requirement of noninvasive or invasive mechanical ventilation. Among the 540 adult renal transplant recipients, 55 (10.7%) were admitted to an intensive care unit, including 26 (47.3%) admitted for acute respiratory failure. Median time from transplant to intensive care unit admission was 10 months (range, 0-67 mo). The leading causes of acute respiratory failure were bacterial pneumonia (56%) and cardiogenic pulmonary edema (44%). Mean partial pressure of arterial oxygen to fractional inspired oxygen ratio was 174 ± 59, invasive mechanical ventilation was used in 13 patients (50%), and noninvasive mechanical ventilation was used in 8 patients (31%). The overall mortality was 16.4%. Acute respiratory failure was the reason for intensive care unit admission in almost half of our renal transplant recipients. Main causes of acute respiratory failure were bacterial pneumonia and cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Mortality of patients admitted for acute respiratory failure was similar to those without acute respiratory failure.

  19. Study of multiparameter respiratory pattern complexity in surgical critically ill patients during weaning trials

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    Maglaveras Nikos K

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Separation from mechanical ventilation is a difficult task, whereas conventional predictive indices have not been proven accurate enough, so far. A few studies have explored changes of breathing pattern variability for weaning outcome prediction, with conflicting results. In this study, we tried to assess respiratory complexity during weaning trials, using different non-linear methods derived from theory of complex systems, in a cohort of surgical critically ill patients. Results Thirty two patients were enrolled in the study. There were 22 who passed and 10 who failed a weaning trial. Tidal volume and mean inspiratory flow were analyzed for 10 minutes during two phases: 1. pressure support (PS ventilation (15-20 cm H2O and 2. weaning trials with PS: 5 cm H2O. Sample entropy (SampEn, detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA exponent, fractal dimension (FD and largest lyapunov exponents (LLE of the two respiratory parameters were computed in all patients and during the two phases of PS. Weaning failure patients exhibited significantly decreased respiratory pattern complexity, reflected in reduced sample entropy and lyapunov exponents and increased DFA exponents of respiratory flow time series, compared to weaning success subjects (p 0.1, SampEn and LLE predicted better weaning outcome compared with RSBI, P0.1 and RSBI* P0.1 (conventional model, R2 = 0.874 vs 0.643, p Conclusions We suggest that complexity analysis of respiratory signals can assess inherent breathing pattern dynamics and has increased prognostic impact upon weaning outcome in surgical patients.

  20. SARS (SEVERE ACUTE RESPIRATORY SYNDROME – A NEW CHALLENGE FOR THE MANKIND

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    Andrej Trampuž

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome is a recently recognized new infectious respiratory illness, which first appeared in southern China in November 2002, and has since then within months spread to 29 countries. In total, 8437 cases and 813 deaths occurred (situation as of August 1, 2003. SARS is caused by a novel coronavirus that is primarily spread by large droplet transmission, less commonly by surface contamination or by air (airborne. Around half of the infected were health care workers; the majority of cases acquired the infection in the hospital.Conclusions. Incubation period of SARS is 2 to 10 days. Early manifestations include fever, myalgia, and headache, followed 2 to 4 days later by cough, shortness of breath, and diarrhea. In 10–20% of patients, tracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation is required. Case-fatality is approximately 15%, in patients aged 60 years or older may be higher than 40%. There is no specific therapy or vaccine, and management consists of supportive care. This article summarizes updated information regarding epidemiology, clinical features, etiologic agent, modes of transmission of the disease, and infection control measures to contain SARS.

  1. Survey of causative agents for acute respiratory infections among patients in Khartoum- State, Sudan, 2010–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background This study was carried out to determine causative agents of acute respiratory illness of patients in Khartoum State, Sudan. Methods Four hundred patients experiencing respiratory infections within January-March 2010 and January-March 2011 were admitted at Khartoum Hospital and had their throat swab samples subjected to multiplex real-time RT-PCR to detect influenza viruses (including subtypes) and other viral agents. Isolation, nucleotide sequence and phylogenetic analysis on some influenza viruses based on the HA gene were done. Results Out of 400 patients, 66 were found to have influenza viruses (35, 27, 2, and 2 with types A, B, C, and A and B co-infections, respectively). Influenza viruses were detected in 28, 33 and 5 patients in the age groups Sudan strains belong to the same clade and are related to those strains from several countries such as USA, Japan, Italy, United Kingdom, Germany, Russia, Greece, Denmark, Taiwan, Turkey and Kenya. Seasonal A H3 subtypes have close similarity to strains from Singapore, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, USA and Nicaragua. For influenza B, Sudan strains belong to two different clades, and just like influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 and A H3 subtypes, seem to be part of worldwide endemic population (Kenya, USA, Brazil, Russia, Taiwan and Singapore). Conclusions In Sudan, the existence of respiratory viruses in patients with acute respiratory infection was confirmed and characterized for the first time by using molecular techniques. PMID:24160894

  2. The absence of exanthema is related with death and illness severity in acute enterovirus infection

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    Hong-Tao Zhou

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions: A considerable proportion of children with an acute enterovirus infection in Guangdong Province, China during 2009–2012 presented no exanthema, and the absence of exanthema was found to be related to death and illness severity for these acute enterovirus infections. Clinicians in China should consider enterovirus as the possible pathogen when treating children with an acute pathogen infection without exanthema.

  3. Suspected ventilator-associated respiratory infection in severely ill patients: a prospective observational study.

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    Shahin, Jason; Bielinski, Michael; Guichon, Celine; Flemming, Catherine; Kristof, Arnold S

    2013-10-22

    Ventilator-associated respiratory infection (VARI) is an important cause of morbidity in critically-ill patients. Clinical trials performed in heterogeneous populations have suggested there are limited benefits from invasive diagnostic testing to identify patients at risk or to target antimicrobial therapy. However, multiple patient subgroups (for example, immunocompromised, antibiotic-treated) have traditionally been excluded from randomization. We hypothesized that a prospective surveillance study would better identify patients with suspected VARI (sVARI) at high risk for adverse clinical outcomes, and who might be specifically targeted in future trials. We performed a prospective observational study in all patients ventilated for greater than 48 hours. sVARI was identified by surveillance for changes in white blood cell count, temperature, sputum, and/or new chest X-ray infiltrates. Indices of disease co-morbidity, as well as mortality, duration of mechanical ventilation, and length of hospital or ICU stay were correlated with sVARI. Of 1806 patients admitted to the ICU over 14 months, 267 were ventilated for greater than 48 hours, and 77 developed sVARI. Incidence of sVARI was associated with iatrogenic immunosuppression or admission for respiratory illness. Any sVARI, whether suspected ventilator-associated pneumonia (sVAP) or ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis (sVAT), was associated with increased length of stay and duration of mechanical ventilation. Clinical surveillance for sVARI identifies patients at risk for increased morbidity. Iatrogenically immunosuppressed patients, a subgroup previously excluded from randomized clinical trials, represent a growing proportion of the critically-ill at risk for sVARI who might be targeted for future investigations on diagnostic or therapeutic modalities.

  4. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: clinical recognition and preventive management in chiropractic acute care practice.

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    Mirtz, T A

    2001-09-01

    To present clinical information relevant to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and its appearance in chiropractic acute care practice. The National Library of Medicine MEDLINE database was used, along with the bibliographies of selected articles and textbooks commonly found in chiropractic college libraries and bookstores. Clinical studies from the English literature were selected if they pertained to incidence, clinical relevancy, or the association of ARDS with commonly-seen diagnoses in chiropractic neuromusculoskeletal or orthopedic practice. All relevant studies identified by the search were evaluated based on information pertinent to chiropractic management of acute care patients. ARDS is a pulmonary distress syndrome with a high mortality rate. Recognizable indications for the possible development of ARDS include chest pain, head injury, and thoracic spine pain with or without trauma. Clinical evaluation, radiographic findings, and laboratory findings are presented to assist practitioners in identifying this disease process of multiple etiology. A study of the basic pathophysiologic processes that occur in the formation of ARDS is presented to help practitioners gain clinical appreciation. Strategies for preventing respiratory distress in chiropractic patients are also presented and include use of the postural position and the clinical maxim of "slow, deep breathing despite pain" to lessen incident rates of subjects at risk. Although ARDS may not be prevalent in chiropractic practice, it is important for physicians to be aware of the clinical basics (including its pathophysiology), its medical significance, and the preventive strategies that may be used to minimize its occurrence. This basic understanding will further advance knowledge of this disease complex.

  5. IVC Measurements in Critically Ill Patients with Acute Renal Failure

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    Rami Jambeih

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine whether the inferior vena cava (IVC measurement by bedside ultrasound (US-IVC predicts improvement in renal function in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI. Design. Prospective observational study. Setting. Medical intensive care unit. Patients. 33 patients with AKI were included. Intervention. US-IVC was done on admission. The patients’ management was done by the primary teams, who were unaware of the US-IVC findings. Two groups of patients were identified. Group 1 included patients who were managed in concordance with their US-IVC (potential volume responders who had a positive fluid balance at 48 h after admission and potential volume nonresponders who had an even or negative fluid balance at 48 hours after admission. Group 2 included patients in whom the fluid management was discordant with their US-IVC. Measurements and Main Results. At 48 hours, Group 1 patients had a greater improvement in creatinine [85% versus 31%, p=0.0002], creatinine clearance (78±93% versus 8±64%, p=0.002, and urine output (0.86±0.54 versus 0.45±0.36 ml/Kg/h, p=0.03. Conclusion. In critically ill patients with AKI, concurrence of fluid therapy with IVC predicted fluid management, as assessed by bedside ultrasound, was associated with improved renal function at 48 hours. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov registration number: NCT02064244.

  6. The study protocol for a randomized controlled trial of a family-centred tobacco control program about environmental tobacco smoke (ETS to reduce respiratory illness in Indigenous infants

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    Segan Catherine

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute respiratory illness (ARI is the most common cause of acute presentations and hospitalisations of young Indigenous children in Australia and New Zealand (NZ. Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS from household smoking is a significant and preventable contributor to childhood ARI. This paper describes the protocol for a study which aims to test the efficacy of a family-centred tobacco control program about ETS to improve the respiratory health of Indigenous infants in Australia and New Zealand. For the purpose of this paper 'Indigenous' refers to Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples when referring to Australian Indigenous populations. In New Zealand, the term 'Indigenous' refers to Māori. Methods/Design This study will be a parallel, randomized, controlled trial. Participants will be Indigenous women and their infants, half of whom will be randomly allocated to an 'intervention' group, who will receive the tobacco control program over three home visits in the first three months of the infant's life and half to a control group receiving 'usual care' (i.e. they will not receive the tobacco control program. Indigenous health workers will deliver the intervention, the goal of which is to reduce or eliminate infant exposure to ETS. Data collection will occur at baseline (shortly after birth and when the infant is four months and one year of age. The primary outcome is a doctor-diagnosed, documented case of respiratory illness in participating infants. Discussion Interventions aimed at reducing exposure of Indigenous children to ETS have the potential for significant benefits for Indigenous communities. There is currently a dearth of evidence for the effect of tobacco control interventions to reduce children's exposure to ETS among Indigenous populations. This study will provide high-quality evidence of the efficacy of a family-centred tobacco control program on ETS to reduce respiratory illness. Outcomes of

  7. Indoor exposures and acute respiratory effects in two general population samples from a rural and an urban area in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoni, Marzia; Scognamiglio, Antonio; Carrozzi, Laura; Baldacci, Sandra; Angino, Anna; Pistelli, Francesco; Di Pede, Francesco; Viegi, Giovanni

    2004-01-01

    A study of indoor air exposures and acute respiratory effects in adults was conducted in the Po Delta (rural) and Pisa (urban) areas of Italy. Indoor exposures were monitored for nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) and particulate matter <2.5 microm (PM(2.5)) for 1 week during the winter or summer in a total of 421 houses (2/3 in Pisa). Information on house characteristics, subjects' daily activity pattern and presence of acute respiratory symptoms was collected by a standardized questionnaire. Peak expiratory flow (PEF) maneuvers were performed by adult subjects four times daily; maximum amplitude and diurnal variation were taken into account. Indices of NO(2) and PM(2.5) exposures were computed as the product of weekly mean pollutant concentration by the time of daily exposure. Mean levels of pollutants were significantly higher in winter than in summer, regardless of the area. The relationship between exposure indices and acute respiratory symptoms was investigated only in winter. In spite of a slightly lower indoor level in the urban than in the rural area in winter (NO(2): 15 vs. 22 ppb; PM(2.5): 67 vs. 76 microg/m(3)), prevalence rates of acute respiratory symptoms were significantly higher in the urban than in the rural area. Acute respiratory illnesses with fever were significantly associated with indices of NO(2) (odds ratio (OR)=1.66; 95% CI=1.08-2.57) and PM(2.5) exposures (OR=1.62; 95% CI=1.04-2.51), while bronchitic/asthmatic symptoms were associated only with PM(2.5) (OR=1.39; 95% CI=1.17-1.66). PEF variability was positively related only to PM(2.5) exposure index (OR=1.38; 95% CI=1.24-1.54, for maximum amplitude; OR=1.37; 95% CI=1.23-1.53, for diurnal variation). In conclusion, indoor pollution exposures were associated with the presence of acute respiratory symptoms and mild lung function impairment in a rural and an urban area of Northern-Central Italy.

  8. Risk factors for respiratory failure with tetraplegia after acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, J; Shao, J; Qi, H-H; Song, D-W; Zhu, W

    2015-01-01

    To analyze risk factors for respiratory failure with tetraplegia after acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI). Total 180 tetraplegia cases after acute traumatic CSCI treated in Shanghai Changzheng Hospital from 2001 to 2011 were reviewed retrospectively and the frequency of respiratory failure in these patients were analyzed against the factors including age, gender, cause of injury, level/severity of injury, high-dose methylprednisolone (MP) therapy, and surgery intervention, using Chi-square test to look into the correlations of the prevalence of respiratory failure to those factors. Of the 180 tetraplegia with acute traumatic CSCI, 29 patients (16.11%) developed respiratory failure. The factors, including age, level and severity of injury, high-dose MP therapy, and surgery intervention, were found to significantly correlate with the appearance of respiratory failure in tetraplegia after acute traumatic CSCI (p < 0.05), while no significant correlation was found between the other factors: gender and cause of injury and the frequency of respiratory failure. Age, level/severity of injury, high-dose MP therapy, and surgery intervention are the four major relevant factors of respiratory failure in patients with acute traumatic CSCI. The appropriate and timing treatments involving high-dose MP therapy and surgical decompression and reconstruction can substantially increase the rates of clinical improvements and reduce the frequency of respiratory failure.

  9. Value associated with mindfulness meditation and moderate exercise intervention in acute respiratory infection: the MEPARI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakel, David; Mundt, Marlon; Ewers, Tola; Fortney, Luke; Zgierska, Aleksandra; Gassman, Michele; Barrett, Bruce

    2013-08-01

    Acute respiratory infection (ARI) is among the most common, debilitating and expensive human illnesses. The purpose of this study was to assess ARI-related costs and determine if mindfulness meditation or exercise can add value. One hundred and fifty-four adults ≥50 years from Madison, WI for the 2009-10 cold/flu season were randomized to (i) wait-list control (ii) meditation or (iii) moderate intensity exercise. ARI-related costs were assessed through self-reported medication use, number of missed work days and medical visits. Costs per subject were based on cost of generic medications, missed work days ($126.20) and clinic visits ($78.70). Monte Carlo bootstrap methods evaluated reduced costs of ARI episodes. The total cost per subject for the control group was $214 (95% CI: $105-$358), exercise $136 (95% CI: $64-$232) and meditation $65 (95% CI: $34-$104). The majority of cost savings was through a reduction in missed days of work. Exercise had the highest medication costs at $16.60 compared with $5.90 for meditation (P = 0.004) and $7.20 for control (P = 0.046). Combining these cost benefits with the improved outcomes in incidence, duration and severity seen with the Meditation or Exercise for Preventing Acute Respiratory Infection study, meditation and exercise add value for ARI. Compared with control, meditation had the greatest cost benefit. This savings is offset by the cost of the intervention ($450/subject) that would negate the short-term but perhaps not long-term savings. Meditation and exercise add value to ARI-associated health-related costs with improved outcomes. Further research is needed to confirm results and inform policies on adding value to medical spending.

  10. Herpes simplex type 1 pneumonitis and acute respiratory distress syndrome in a patient with chronic lymphatic leukemia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luginbuehl, Miriam; Imhof, Alexander; Klarer, Alexander

    2017-11-23

    Pulmonary pathogenicity of herpes simplex virus type 1 in patients in intensive care without classic immunosuppression as well as the necessity of antiviral treatment in the case of herpes simplex virus detection in respiratory specimens in these patients is controversial. We present a case of acute respiratory distress syndrome in a patient with stable chronic lymphatic leukemia not requiring treatment, in whom we diagnosed herpes simplex virus type 1 bronchopneumonitis based on herpes simplex virus type 1 detection in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and clinical response to antiviral treatment. A 72-year-old white man presented with symptoms of lower respiratory tract infection. His medical history was significant for chronic lymphatic leukemia, which had been stable without treatment, arterial hypertension, multiple squamous cell carcinomas of the scalp, and alcohol overuse. Community-acquired pneumonia was suspected and appropriate broad-spectrum antibacterial treatment was initiated. Within a few hours, rapid respiratory deterioration led to cardiac arrest. He was successfully resuscitated, but developed acute respiratory distress syndrome. Furthermore, he remained febrile and inflammation markers remained elevated despite antibacterial treatment. Polymerase chain reaction from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and viral culture from tracheobronchial secretions tested positive for herpes simplex virus type 1. We initiated antiviral treatment with acyclovir. Concomitantly we further escalated the antibacterial treatment, although no bacterial pathogen had been isolated at any point. Defervescence occurred rapidly and his C-reactive protein and leukocyte levels decreased. He was successfully weaned from mechanical ventilation, transferred to the ward, and eventually discharged to home. Herpes simplex virus should be considered a cause for lower respiratory tract infection in critically ill patients, especially in the setting of an underlying disease.

  11. Profiling acute respiratory tract infections in children from Assam, India

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    Farzana Islam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute respiratory infections (ARI are leading global cause of under-five mortality and morbidity. Objective: To elicit the prevalence and risk factors associated with ARI among under-five children. Materials and Methods: A community-based cross-sectional study was undertaken in 21 registered urban slums of Guwahati in Assam to determine the prevalence and risk factors associated with ARI among 370 under-five children from 184 households and 370 families. Results: The prevalence of ARI was found to be 26.22%; infants and female children were more affected. Majority of the ARI cases were from nuclear families (84.54%, living in kutcha houses (90.72% with inadequate ventilation (84.54%, overcrowded living condition (81.44%, with kitchen attached to the living room (65.98% and using biomass fuel for cooking (89.69%. ARI was significantly associated with ventilation, location of kitchen in household; presence of overcrowding, nutritional status, and primary immunization status also had impacts on ARI. Conclusion: The present study had identified a high prevalence of the disease among under-fives. It also pointed out various socio-demographic, nutritional, and environmental modifiable risk factors which can be tackled by effective education of the community.

  12. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS): HRCT findings in survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Jung Im; Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Jae Mun; Song, Jeong Sup; Lee, Kyo Young

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings of the lung in survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Among eleven patients who survived ARDS for one year, chest radiography and HRCT revealed pulmonary fibrosis in four. Causes of ARDS included pneumonia during pregnancy, near drowning, pneumonia during liver cirrhosis, and postoperative sepsis. Thoracoscopic biopsy and histopathologic correlation were available in one patient. HRCT showed diffuse interlobular septal thickening, ground glass opacity, parenchymal distortion, and traction bronchiectasis. Fuzzy centrilobular nodules were seen in two patients and one patient had multiple, large bullae in the left hemithorax. In all patients, lesions affected the upper and anterior zones of the lung more prominently. The distribution of pulmonary fibrosis was characteristic and reflected the pathogenesis of lung injury; fibrosis was largely due to hyperoxia caused by ventilator care. In one patient, histopathologic correlation showed that imaging findings were accounted for by thickening of the alveolar septum along with infiltration of chronic inflammatory cells and fibrosis. Fuzzy centrilobular nodules corresponded with bronchiolitis

  13. Fluid in the management of the acute respiratory distress syndrome

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    Karki S

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema is the hallmark of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. The amount of fluid and which fluid should be used in these patients is controversial. Methods 43 patients with ARDS treated in the intensive care unit (ICU of the Second Hospital, Jilin University between November 1, 2011-November 1, 2012 were prospectively analyzed and was observational. Volume and the type of fluid administered were compared to 90 day mortality and the 24 and 72 hour sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA score, lactate level, oxygenation index (PaO2/FiO2, duration of ICU stay, total ventilator days, and need for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT. Results Mortality was increased when hydroxylethyl starch (HES was used in the first day or plasma substitutes were used during the first 3 days (P3000 ml during the first 24 hours or >8000 ml during the first 72 hours were associated with higher SOFA scores at 24 and 72 hours (P<0.05, both comparisons. Colloid, especially higher volume colloid use was also associated with increased SOFA scores at either 24 or 72 hours. Conclusions Limiting the use of colloids and the total amount of fluid administered to patients with ARDS is associated with improved mortality and SOFA scores.

  14. Clinical Practice Guideline of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

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    Young-Jae Cho

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available There is no well-stated practical guideline for mechanically ventilated patients with or without acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. We generate strong (1 and weak (2 grade of recommendations based on high (A, moderate (B and low (C grade in the quality of evidence. In patients with ARDS, we recommend low tidal volume ventilation (1A and prone position if it is not contraindicated (1B to reduce their mortality. However, we did not support high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (1B and inhaled nitric oxide (1A as a standard treatment. We also suggest high positive end-expiratory pressure (2B, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a rescue therapy (2C, and neuromuscular blockage for 48 hours after starting mechanical ventilation (2B. The application of recruitment maneuver may reduce mortality (2B, however, the use of systemic steroids cannot reduce mortality (2B. In mechanically ventilated patients, we recommend light sedation (1B and low tidal volume even without ARDS (1B and suggest lung protective ventilation strategy during the operation to lower the incidence of lung complications including ARDS (2B. Early tracheostomy in mechanically ventilated patients can be performed only in limited patients (2A. In conclusion, of 12 recommendations, nine were in the management of ARDS, and three for mechanically ventilated patients.

  15. Avascular necrosis of bone in severe acute respiratory syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, N. E-mail: hongnan@bjmu.edu.cn; Du, X.K

    2004-07-01

    AIM: To report the incidence of avascular osteonecrosis (AVN) in severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty-seven SARS patients who had large joint pain between March 2003 and May 2003 underwent both plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination on the same day. All patients received steroids and ribavirin treatment. All plain radiographs and MR images were analysed by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. Any abnormalities, location, extent, morphology, the number, size and signal intensity of lesions were evaluated. RESULTS: Twenty-eight patients were identified with AVN, The mean time to diagnosis of AVN was 119 days after the onset of SARS, or 116 days after steroid use. Three patients had early bilateral AVN of the femoral head, four patients of one femoral head, five patients of the bilateral hips and knees, four patients of the ipsilateral hip and knees, 10 patients of the knee(s), one patient of the right proximal fibula, and one patient of the knees and talus. Results of hip, knee and ankle plain radiographs were negative. CONCLUSION: AVN can occur in the patients with SARS. AVN had a strong association with steroid use. More studies are required to confirm whether the virus itself can also lead to AVN.

  16. Avascular necrosis of bone in severe acute respiratory syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, N.; Du, X.K.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To report the incidence of avascular osteonecrosis (AVN) in severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty-seven SARS patients who had large joint pain between March 2003 and May 2003 underwent both plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination on the same day. All patients received steroids and ribavirin treatment. All plain radiographs and MR images were analysed by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. Any abnormalities, location, extent, morphology, the number, size and signal intensity of lesions were evaluated. RESULTS: Twenty-eight patients were identified with AVN, The mean time to diagnosis of AVN was 119 days after the onset of SARS, or 116 days after steroid use. Three patients had early bilateral AVN of the femoral head, four patients of one femoral head, five patients of the bilateral hips and knees, four patients of the ipsilateral hip and knees, 10 patients of the knee(s), one patient of the right proximal fibula, and one patient of the knees and talus. Results of hip, knee and ankle plain radiographs were negative. CONCLUSION: AVN can occur in the patients with SARS. AVN had a strong association with steroid use. More studies are required to confirm whether the virus itself can also lead to AVN

  17. Prone position for acute respiratory failure in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Roxanna; Noble, David W; Sudlow, Alexis

    2015-11-13

    Acute hypoxaemia de novo or on a background of chronic hypoxaemia is a common reason for admission to intensive care and for provision of mechanical ventilation. Various refinements of mechanical ventilation or adjuncts are employed to improve patient outcomes. Mortality from acute respiratory distress syndrome, one of the main contributors to the need for mechanical ventilation for hypoxaemia, remains approximately 40%. Ventilation in the prone position may improve lung mechanics and gas exchange and could improve outcomes. The objectives of this review are (1) to ascertain whether prone ventilation offers a mortality advantage when compared with traditional supine or semi recumbent ventilation in patients with severe acute respiratory failure requiring conventional invasive artificial ventilation, and (2) to supplement previous systematic reviews on prone ventilation for hypoxaemic respiratory failure in an adult population. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 1), Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to 31 January 2014), EMBASE (1980 to 31 January 2014), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (1982 to 31 January 2014) and Latin American Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS) (1992 to 31 January 2014) in Ovid MEDLINE for eligible randomized controlled trials. We also searched for studies by handsearching reference lists of relevant articles, by contacting colleagues and by handsearching published proceedings of relevant journals. We applied no language constraints, and we reran the searches in CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and LILACS in June 2015. We added five new studies of potential interest to the list of "Studies awaiting classification" and will incorporate them into formal review findings during the review update. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that examined the effects of prone position versus supine/semi recumbent position during conventional mechanical ventilation in

  18. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS): HRCT findings in survivors

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    Jung, Jung Im; Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Jae Mun; Song, Jeong Sup; Lee, Kyo Young [The Catholic Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings of the lung in survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Among eleven patients who survived ARDS for one year, chest radiography and HRCT revealed pulmonary fibrosis in four. Causes of ARDS included pneumonia during pregnancy, near drowning, pneumonia during liver cirrhosis, and postoperative sepsis. Thoracoscopic biopsy and histopathologic correlation were available in one patient. HRCT showed diffuse interlobular septal thickening, ground glass opacity, parenchymal distortion, and traction bronchiectasis. Fuzzy centrilobular nodules were seen in two patients and one patient had multiple, large bullae in the left hemithorax. In all patients, lesions affected the upper and anterior zones of the lung more prominently. The distribution of pulmonary fibrosis was characteristic and reflected the pathogenesis of lung injury; fibrosis was largely due to hyperoxia caused by ventilator care. In one patient, histopathologic correlation showed that imaging findings were accounted for by thickening of the alveolar septum along with infiltration of chronic inflammatory cells and fibrosis. Fuzzy centrilobular nodules corresponded with bronchiolitis.

  19. Definition and epidemiology of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezoagli, Emanuele; Fumagalli, Roberto; Bellani, Giacomo

    2017-07-01

    Fifty years ago, Ashbaugh and colleagues defined for the first time the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), one among the most challenging clinical condition of the critical care medicine. The scientific community worked over the years to generate a unified definition of ARDS, which saw its revisited version in the Berlin definition, in 2014. Epidemiologic information about ARDS is limited in the era of the new Berlin definition, and wide differences are reported among countries all over the world. Despite decades of study in the field of lung injury, ARDS is still so far under-recognized, with 2 out of 5 cases missed by clinicians. Furthermore, although advances of ventilator strategies in the management of ARDS associated with outcome improvements-such as protective mechanical ventilation, lower driving pressure, higher PEEP levels and prone positioning-ARDS appears to be undertreated and mortality remains elevated up to 40%. In this review, we cover the history that led to the current worldwide accepted Berlin definition of ARDS and we summarize the recent data regarding ARDS epidemiology.

  20. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Associated With Rabies: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Hsiang Hsu

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is the first potentially lethal complication in rabies virus infection, although its occurrence is rare. We report on a fatal case of rabies virus infection in a 45-year-old woman from Hu-Nan Province, China. The neurologic signs of limb numbness and water phobia occurred from 61 days after the dog bite; the clinical course was progressive, with the most severe clinical manifestations being fever, encephalitis, and ARDS. The woman expired 12 days after admission to the hospital. An autopsy proved rabies encephalitis, mainly involving the medulla oblongata, the thalamus, part of the pons, the cerebellum, and the hippocampus. The lung pathologic examination revealed the organizing phase of ARDS with diffuse alveolar damage, hyaline membrane formation, type II alveolar cell hyperplasia accompanied by proliferation of fibroblasts and infiltration of mononuclear cells into the interstitial space. Immunohistochemistry stain and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction for rabies virus failed to demonstrate the organism in the lung tissue. Strong expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS was detected in the alveolar macrophages. An immunologic mechanism with iNOS expression in the absence of direct invasion of the organism may participate in the pathogenesis of ARDS associated with rabies.

  1. Lung tissue remodeling in the acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza Alba Barros de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is characterized by diffuse alveolar damage, and evolves progressively with three phases: exsudative, fibroproliferative, and fibrotic. In the exudative phase, there are interstitial and alveolar edemas with hyaline membrane. The fibropro­liferative phase is characterized by exudate organization and fibroelastogenesis. There is proliferation of type II pneumocytes to cover the damaged epithelial surface, followed by differentiation into type I pneumocytes. The fibroproliferative phase starts early, and its severity is related to the patient?s prognosis. The alterations observed in the phenotype of the pulmonary parenchyma cells steer the tissue remodeling towards either progressive fibrosis or the restoration of normal alveolar architecture. The fibrotic phase is characterized by abnormal and excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins, mainly collagen. The dynamic control of collagen deposition and degradation is regulated by metalloproteinases and their tissular regulators. The deposition of proteoglycans in the extracellular matrix of ARDS patients needs better study. The regulation of extracellular matrix remodeling, in normal conditions or in several pulmonary diseases, such as ARDS, results from a complex mechanism that integrate the transcription of elements that destroy the matrix protein and produce activation/inhibition of several cellular types of lung tissue. This review article will analyze the ECM organization in ARDS, the different pulmonary parenchyma remodeling mechanisms, and the role of cytokines in the regulation of the different matrix components during the remodeling process.

  2. ADVANCEMENT IN MEDICAL TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH ACUTE RESPIRATORY VIRAL INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopcha V.S.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute respiratory viral infections are the special group of diseases, which in the structure of infectious pathology firmly occupies one of leading places. The problem of morbidity belongs to the number of leading medical problems not only in Ukraine but also in the whole world. In addition, there is a greater risk of epidemic flashes of acute respiratory infections in the conditions of megapolis with the expressed processes of migration and accumulation of people. Purpose of test – to promote efficiency of patients treatment with acute respiratory viral infections by complex application of preparation «Extralact» on a background traditional (base therapy without the use of other antiviral preparations, thoroughly to probe influence on clinical motion of the indicated illnesses, endogenous intoxication and immune status of organism. Patients & methods. Under a supervision was 60 patients (22 men and 38 women of young and middle age (hesitated from 18 to 58, which treated oneself concerning ARVI. Determined the indexes of Extralact efficiency: general duration of disease; frequency of development of complications; dynamics of clinical displays; dynamics of laboratory indexes, indexes of endogenous intoxication, and immunological indexes. Patients were randomised on 2 groups: a I group (30 persons – 50,0 % got treatment of base therapy preparations; the II group (30 patients – 50,0 % on a background base therapy got preparation «Extralact» for 2 capsules 3 times per days during 5 days. Results & discussion. Based on the examination of 60 patients with ARVI established following. Addition of base therapy of such patients of extralact in a dose 2 caps. 3 times daily during 5 days was accompanied by a significant advantage compared with only basic therapy on several grounds: the greater the number of patients advancing recovery up to 7 days, most regressed cough, relatively less there were complications. After 5 days of

  3. [Respiratory infections caused by Aspergillus spp. in critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez Lerma, F; Olaechea Astigarraga, P; Palomar Martínez, M; Rodríguez Carvajal, M; Machado Casas, J F; Jiménez Quintana, M M; Esteve Urbano, F; Ballesteros Herráez, J C; Zavala Zegarra, E

    2015-04-01

    The presence of respiratory fungal infection in the critically ill patient is associated with high morbidity and mortality. To assess the incidence of respiratory infection caused by Aspergillus spp. independently of the origin of infection in patients admitted to Spanish ICUs, as well as to describe the rates, characteristics, outcomes and prognostic factors in patients with this type of infection. An observational, retrospective, open-label and multicenter study was carried out in a cohort of patients with respiratory infection caused by Aspergillus spp. admitted to Spanish ICUs between 2006 and 2012 (months of April, May and June), and included in the ENVIN-HELICS registry (108,244 patients and 825,797 days of ICU stay). Variables independently related to in-hospital mortality were identified by multiple logistic regression analysis. A total of 267 patients from 79 of the 198 participating ICUs were included (2.46 cases per 1000 ICU patients and 3.23 episodes per 10,000 days of ICU stay). From a clinical point of view, infections were classified as ventilator-associated pneumonia in 93 cases (34.8%), pneumonia unrelated to mechanical ventilation in 120 cases (44.9%), and tracheobronchitis in 54 cases (20.2%). The study population included older patients (mean 64.8±17.1 years), with a high severity level (APACHE II score 22.03±7.7), clinical diseases (64.8%) and prolonged hospital stay before the identification of Aspergillus spp. (median 11 days), transferred to the ICU mainly from hospital wards (58.1%) and with high ICU (57.3%) and hospital (59.6%) mortality rates, exhibiting important differences depending on the type of infection involved. Independent mortality risk factors were previous admission to a hospital ward (OR=7.08, 95%CI: 3.18-15.76), a history of immunosuppression (OR=2.52, 95%CI: 1.24-5.13) and severe sepsis or septic shock (OR=8.91, 95%CI: 4.24-18.76). Respiratory infections caused by Aspergillus spp. in critically ill patients admitted to

  4. The acute effects of body position strategies and respiratory therapy in paralyzed patients with acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, K; Johannigman, J A; Campbell, R S; Marraccini, A; Luchette, F A; Frame, S B; Branson, R D

    2001-01-01

    Routine turning of critically ill patients is a standard of care. In recent years, specialized beds that provide automated turning have been introduced. These beds have been reported to improve lung function, reduce hospital-acquired pneumonia, and facilitate secretion removal. This trial was designed to measure the physiological effects of routine turning and respiratory therapy in comparison with continuous lateral rotation (CLR). The study was a prospective, quasi-experimental, random assignment, trial with patients serving as their own controls. Paralyzed, sedated patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome were eligible for study. Patients were randomized to receive four turning and secretion management regimens in random sequence for 6 h each over a period of 24 h: (1) routine turning every 2 h from the left to right lateral position; (2) routine turning every 2 h from the left to right lateral position including a 15-min period of manual percussion and postural drainage (P&PD); (3) CLR with a specialized bed that turned patients from left to right lateral position, pausing at each position for 2 min; and (4) CLR with a specialized bed that turned patients from left to right lateral position pausing at each position for 2 min, and a 15-min period of percussion provided by the pneumatic cushions of the bed every 2 h. Nineteen patients were entered into the study. There were no statistically significant differences in the measured cardiorespiratory variables. There was a tendency for the ratio of partial pressure of arterial oxygen to fractional inspired oxygen concentration (PaO2/FIO2) to increase (174 +/- 31 versus 188 +/- 36; P = 0.068) and for the ratio of deadspace to tidal volume (Vd/Vt) to decrease (0.62 +/- 0.18 versus 0.59 +/- 0.18; P = 0.19) during periods of CLR, but these differences did not achieve statistical significance. There were statistically significant increases in sputum volume during the periods of CLR. The addition of P&PD did not

  5. Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure in immunocompromised patients : The Efraim multinational prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azoulay, Elie; Pickkers, Peter; Soares, Marcio; Perner, Anders; Rello, Jordi; Bauer, Philippe R.; van de Louw, Andry; Hemelaar, Pleun; Lemiale, Virginie; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Loeches, Ignacio Martin; Meyhoff, Tine Sylvest; Salluh, Jorge; Schellongowski, Peter; Rusinova, Katerina; Terzi, Nicolas; Mehta, Sangeeta; Antonelli, Massimo; Kouatchet, Achille; Barratt-Due, Andreas; Valkonen, Miia; Landburg, Precious Pearl; Bruneel, Fabrice; Bukan, Ramin Brandt; Pene, Frederic; Metaxa, Victoria; Moreau, Anne Sophie; Souppart, Virginie; Burghi, Gaston; Girault, Christophe; Silva, Ulysses V. A.; Montini, Luca; Barbier, Francois; Nielsen, Lene B.; Gaborit, Benjamin; Mokart, Djamel; Chevret, Sylvie

    2017-01-01

    Background: In immunocompromised patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (ARF), initial management aims primarily to avoid invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV). Methods: To assess the impact of initial management on IMV and mortality rates, we performed a multinational observational

  6. Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure in immunocompromised patients: the Efraim multinational prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azoulay, E.; Pickkers, P.; Soares, M.; Perner, A.; Rello, J.; Bauer, P.R.; Louw, A. van de; Hemelaar, P.; Lemiale, V.; Taccone, F.S.; Loeches, I.M.; Meyhoff, T.S.; Salluh, J.; Schellongowski, P.; Rusinova, K.; Terzi, N.; Mehta, S.; Antonelli, M.; Kouatchet, A.; Barratt-Due, A.; Valkonen, M.; Landburg, P.P.; Bruneel, F.; Bukan, R.B.; Pene, F.; Metaxa, V.; Moreau, A.S.; Souppart, V.; Burghi, G.; Girault, C.; Silva, U.V.A.; Montini, L.; Barbier, F.; Nielsen, L.B.; Gaborit, B.; Mokart, D.; Chevret, S.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In immunocompromised patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (ARF), initial management aims primarily to avoid invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV). METHODS: To assess the impact of initial management on IMV and mortality rates, we performed a multinational observational

  7. The influence of a fentanyl and dexmedetomidine combination on external respiratory functions in acute hemorrhage model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay G. Vengerovich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The synthetic opioid analgesic fentanyl is widely used for prophylaxis and therapy of traumatic shock associated with massive bleeding. Its side effects – skeletal muscle rigidity and respiratory center depression – are especially pronounced with repeated administration. It is rational to apply fentanyl in diminished doses in combination with non-opioid analgesics in order to reduce respiratory disturbances risk.Aim. The aim of the work is to justify the influence of opioid analgesic fentanyl and α2 -adrenomimetic dexmedetomidine combination on external respiratory functions in acute hemorrhage model.Materials and methods. Acute loss of 35–40% of circulating blood volume was modeled in experiments on 75 white mongrel male rats. The external respiratory functions (respiratory rate, respiratory volume, breath volume per minute were estimated in animals of 5 groups: 1 – rats without analgesic help (controls; 2–3 – rats receiving a single fentanyl intramuscular injection (ED99 98,96 mcg/kg or fentanyl together with dexme detomidine (ED99 of combination 67,94 mcg/kg 15 min after acute blood loss; 4–5 – rats receiving the same drugs 15 min, 30, 45 and 60 min later.Results. In experimental acute loss of 35–40% of circulating blood volume, 15 min later a secondary acute respiratory failure developed with a drop of respiratory rate, respiratory volume and volume of breath per minute by 30%, 21 and 47% (p < 0,05. The external respiratory functions recoverеd after 4 h mainly due to the increase of respiratory volume. A single intramuscular injection of fentanyl caused respiratory depression 15 min after experimental blood loss which resulted in the decrease of breath volume per minute to 30–61% (p < 0,05 for 90 min. Four intramuscular injections of fentanyl 15 min, 30, 45 and 60 min after hemorrhage caused a severe respiratory dysfunction, accompanied by apnea periods and Biot’s respiration. Respiratory rate was reduced

  8. Respiratory and Systemic Effects of LASSBio596 Plus Surfactant in Experimental Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnatas Dutra Silva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Exogenous surfactant has been proposed as adjunctive therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, but it is inactivated by different factors present in the alveolar space. We hypothesized that co-administration of LASSBio596, a molecule with significant anti-inflammatory properties, and exogenous surfactant could reduce lung inflammation, thus enabling the surfactant to reduce edema and improve lung function, in experimental ARDS. Methods: ARDS was induced by cecal ligation and puncture surgery in BALB/c mice. A sham-operated group was used as control (CTRL. After surgery (6 hours, CTRL and ARDS animals were assigned to receive: (1 sterile saline solution; (2 LASSBio596; (3 exogenous surfactant or (4 LASSBio596 plus exogenous surfactant (n = 22/group. Results: Regardless of exogenous surfactant administration, LASSBio596 improved survival rate and reduced collagen fiber content, total number of cells and neutrophils in PLF and blood, cell apoptosis, protein content in BALF, and urea and creatinine levels. LASSBio596 plus surfactant yielded all of the aforementioned beneficial effects, as well as increased BALF lipid content and reduced surface tension. Conclusion: LASSBio596 exhibited major anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrogenic effects in experimental sepsis-induced ARDS. Its association with surfactant may provide further advantages, potentially by reducing surface tension.

  9. Risk of viral acute gastrointestinal illness from non-disinfected drinking water distribution systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) resulting from pathogens directly entering the piping of drinking water distribution systems is insufficiently understood. Here, we estimate AGI incidence attributable to virus intrusions into non-disinfecting municipal distribution systems. Viruses were enumerat...

  10. Clinical profile of acutely ill psychiatric patients admitted to a general ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-01-30

    gpg.gov.za. Clinical profile of acutely ill psychiatric patients admitted to a general hospital psychiatric unit. ABR Janse van Rensburg. Division of Psychiatry, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. Abstract.

  11. Oxygen Exposure Resulting in Arterial Oxygen Tensions Above the Protocol Goal Was Associated With Worse Clinical Outcomes in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Neil R; Brower, Roy G; Hager, David N; Thompson, B Taylor; Netzer, Giora; Shanholtz, Carl; Lagakos, Adrian; Checkley, William

    2018-04-01

    High fractions of inspired oxygen may augment lung damage to exacerbate lung injury in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Participants enrolled in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network trials had a goal partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood range of 55-80 mm Hg, yet the effect of oxygen exposure above this arterial oxygen tension range on clinical outcomes is unknown. We sought to determine if oxygen exposure that resulted in a partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood above goal (> 80 mm Hg) was associated with worse outcomes in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Longitudinal analysis of data collected in these trials. Ten clinical trials conducted at Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network hospitals between 1996 and 2013. Critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. None. We defined above goal oxygen exposure as the difference between the fraction of inspired oxygen and 0.5 whenever the fraction of inspired oxygen was above 0.5 and when the partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood was above 80 mm Hg. We then summed above goal oxygen exposures in the first five days to calculate a cumulative above goal oxygen exposure. We determined the effect of a cumulative 5-day above goal oxygen exposure on mortality prior to discharge home at 90 days. Among 2,994 participants (mean age, 51.3 yr; 54% male) with a study-entry partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood/fraction of inspired oxygen that met acute respiratory distress syndrome criteria, average cumulative above goal oxygen exposure was 0.24 fraction of inspired oxygen-days (interquartile range, 0-0.38). Participants with above goal oxygen exposure were more likely to die (adjusted interquartile range odds ratio, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.11-1.31) and have lower ventilator-free days (adjusted interquartile range mean difference of -0.83; 95% CI, -1.18 to -0.48) and lower hospital-free days (adjusted interquartile range mean difference of -1.38; 95

  12. Evaluation of physiological parameters before and after respiratory physiotherapy in newborns with acute viral bronchiolitis

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves, Rodrigo A.; Feitosa, Sérgio; Selestrin, Cláudia Ceasa; Valenti, Vitor Engrácia [UNESP; Sousa, Fernando Henrique [UNESP; siqueira, Arnaldo augusto Franco; Abreu, Luiz Carlos de

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acute viral bronchiolitis is a respiratory disease with high morbidity that affects newborn in the first two years of life. Its treatment with physiotherapy has been highlighted as an important tool, however, there is no consensus regarding its effects on patients improvement. We aimed to evaluate the physiological parameters before and after the procedure respiratory therapy in newborn with acute viral bronchiolitis. Method: This was a cross sectional observational study in 30 ne...

  13. Risk Factors for Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Under-five ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    Subjects and Methods: A cross‑sectional study of 436 under‑five ... diagnosed of any form of acute respiratory infections were consecutively enrolled for the study. Children who were above 5 years, but had ARIs were excluded. Children who ... respiratory distress, and pulse oximetry reading of less than. 90% that required ...

  14. Household Air Pollution and Acute Lower Respiratory Infections in Adults: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jary, Hannah; Simpson, Hope; Havens, Deborah; Manda, Geoffrey; Pope, Daniel; Bruce, Nigel; Mortimer, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Household air pollution from solid fuel burning kills over 4 million people every year including half a million children from acute lower respiratory infections. Although biologically plausible, it is not clear whether household air pollution is also associated with acute lower respiratory infections in adults. We systematically reviewed the literature on household air pollution and acute lower respiratory infection in adults to identify knowledge gaps and research opportunities. Ten bibliographic databases were searched to identify studies of household air pollution and adult acute lower respiratory infection. Data were extracted from eligible studies using standardised forms. From 4617 titles, 513 abstracts and 72 full-text articles were reviewed. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria of which 2 found a significant adjusted increased risk of acute lower respiratory infection, 2 identified a univariate association whilst 4 found no significant association. Study quality was generally limited. Heterogeneity in methods and findings precluded meta-analysis. A systematic review of the literature found limited evidence for an association between household air pollution and risk of acute lower respiratory infection in adults. Additional research, with carefully defined exposure and outcome measures, is required to complete the risk profile caused by household air pollution in adults. CRD42015028042.

  15. Household Air Pollution and Acute Lower Respiratory Infections in Adults: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Jary

    Full Text Available Household air pollution from solid fuel burning kills over 4 million people every year including half a million children from acute lower respiratory infections. Although biologically plausible, it is not clear whether household air pollution is also associated with acute lower respiratory infections in adults. We systematically reviewed the literature on household air pollution and acute lower respiratory infection in adults to identify knowledge gaps and research opportunities.Ten bibliographic databases were searched to identify studies of household air pollution and adult acute lower respiratory infection. Data were extracted from eligible studies using standardised forms.From 4617 titles, 513 abstracts and 72 full-text articles were reviewed. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria of which 2 found a significant adjusted increased risk of acute lower respiratory infection, 2 identified a univariate association whilst 4 found no significant association. Study quality was generally limited. Heterogeneity in methods and findings precluded meta-analysis.A systematic review of the literature found limited evidence for an association between household air pollution and risk of acute lower respiratory infection in adults. Additional research, with carefully defined exposure and outcome measures, is required to complete the risk profile caused by household air pollution in adults.CRD42015028042.

  16. An overview of air pollution and respiratory illnesses in Sri Lanka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senarath, C. [Nilwala College of Education, Wilpita, Akuressa (Sri Lanka)

    2005-07-01

    This paper examines the effects on human health and controlling measures of air pollution in Sri Lanka. The objectives of the study were to identify and categorize the major air pollutants in Sri Lanka and their sources; examine the public health effects of air pollution; study the air pollution situation in Sri Lanka; understand the link between respiratory illnesses in Sri Lanka and air pollution; and, find control measures taken by the regulatory authorities to abate air pollution. Data were collected through interviews and conversation with air pollution stakeholders, reference materials, and visits with the Central Environmental Authority, Urban Development Authority and Public Health Bureau. The paper concludes that automobile exhaust is one of the major causes of air pollution and that respiratory diseases in Sri Lanka have become a major health problem. The author recommends that control measures should be strengthened to abate air pollution in Sri Lanka; steps should be taken to minimize traffic congestion and to develop programs to raise public awareness; artificial materials such as polythene and plastics in day-to-day activities should be minimized; and recycling processes of artificial materials should be enhanced. 7 refs., 4 tabs., 2 figs.

  17. Viral etiologies of acute respiratory infections among hospitalized Vietnamese children in Ho Chi Minh City, 2004-2008.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anh Ha Lien Do

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The dominant viral etiologies responsible for acute respiratory infections (ARIs are poorly understood, particularly among hospitalized children in resource-limited tropical countries where morbidity and mortality caused by ARIs are highest. Improved etiological insight is needed to improve clinical management and prevention.We conducted a three-year prospective descriptive study of severe respiratory illness among children from 2 months to 13 years of age within the largest referral hospital for infectious diseases in southern Vietnam.Molecular detection for 15 viral species and subtypes was performed on three types of respiratory specimens (nose, throat swabs and nasopharyngeal aspirates using a multiplex RT-PCR kit (Seeplex™ RV detection, Seegene and additional monoplex real-time RT-PCRs.A total of 309 children were enrolled from November 2004 to January 2008. Viruses were identified in 72% (222/309 of cases, including respiratory syncytial virus (24%, influenza virus A and B (17%, human bocavirus (16%, enterovirus (9%, human coronavirus (8%, human metapneumovirus (7%, parainfluenza virus 1-3 (6%, adenovirus (5%, and human rhinovirus A (4%. Co-infections with multiple viruses were detected in 20% (62/309 of patients. When combined, diagnostic yields in nose and throat swabs were similar to nasopharyngeal aspirates.Similar to other parts in the world, RSV and influenza were the predominant viral pathogens detected in Vietnamese hospitalized children. Combined nasal and throat swabs are the specimens of choice for sensitive molecular detection of a broad panel of viral agents. Further research is required to better understand the clinical significance of single versus multiple viral coinfections and to address the role of bacterial (co-infections involved in severe respiratory illness.

  18. Intraindividual variability and the effect of acute illness on immune senescence markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    High, Kevin P; Trader, Melissa; Pahor, Marco; Loeb, Mark

    2005-10-01

    To determine the intraindividual variability and effect of acute illness on two markers of immune senescence. Cohort study with repeated measures. Clinical research center and emergency department at two academic medical centers. Seventy-three subjects aged 65 and older enrolled in three groups: chronic underlying conditions but no acute illness, acutely ill with infection (community-acquired pneumonia), and acutely ill without infection. CD16 density on polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and the proportion of CD8+ T cells that express CD28 determined twice in the nonacutely ill group and three times (Days 0, 30, and 60) in the acute illness groups. In the nonacutely ill group, PMN CD16 density demonstrated wide intraindividual variation, but there was a strong correlation for repeated measures of the percentage of CD8+ T cells expressing CD28 (correlation coefficient (r)=0.77, PDay 0 versus Day 30 for either immune marker. In contrast, a strong correlation existed between Day 30 and Day 60 values, particularly for CD8+/CD28+ percentage (r=0.58-0.86; P=.006 to days of convalescence appears adequate for it to return to baseline.

  19. Nutritional management of acute kidney injury in the critically ill: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-07-08

    Jul 8, 2013 ... Abstract. Optimal nutritional management of critically ill patients who present with acute kidney injury (AKI) is paramount. The management of this ... feeding or total parenteral nutrition (TPN), and usually dialysis or haemofiltration to limit waste ..... critically ill cancer patients. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2009 ...

  20. The severe acute respiratory syndrome epidemic in mainland China dissected

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuchun Cao

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a review of a recently published series of studies that give a detailed and comprehensive documentation of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS epidemic in mainland China, which severely struck the country in the spring of 2003. The epidemic spanned a large geographical extent but clustered in two areas: first in Guangdong Province, and about 3 months later in Beijing with its surrounding areas. Reanalysis of all available epidemiological data resulted in a total of 5327 probable cases of SARS, of whom 343 died. The resulting case fatality ratio (CFR of 6.4% was less than half of that in other SARS-affected countries or areas, and this difference could only partly be explained by younger age of patients and higher number of community acquired infections. Analysis of the impact of interventions demonstrated that strong political commitment and a centrally coordinated response was the most important factor to control SARS in mainland China, whereas the most stringent control measures were all initiated when the epidemic was already dying down. The long-term economic consequence of the epidemic was limited, much consumption was merely postponed, but for Beijing irrecoverable losses to the tourist sector were considerable. An important finding from a cohort study was that many former SARS patients currently suffer from avascular osteo­necrosis, as a consequence of the treatment with corticosteroids during their infection. The SARS epidemic provided valuable information and lessons relevant in controlling outbreaks of newly emerging infectious diseases, and has led to fundamental reforms of the Chinese health system. In particular, a comprehensive nation-wide internet-based disease reporting system was established.

  1. The effectiveness of heliox in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Sema; Daglioglu, Kenan; Yildizdas, Dincer; Bayram, Ibrahim; Gumurdulu, Derya; Polat, Sait

    2013-01-01

    The management of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was investigated with the use of heliox in an experimental model. To investigate whether heliox can be considered a new therapeutic approach in ARDS. ARDS was designed in Wistar albino male rats, 250-300 g in weight, by intratracheal instillation of physiological saline solution. Anesthezied and tracheotomized rats with ARDS were pressure-controlled ventilated. At the end of 210 min, helium gas was tried. All rats were assigned to two groups: Group 1 (n = 10) was the control group, and was given no treatment; group 2 (n = 7) was given heliox (He: O(2) = 50:50). The heliox group received heliox for 1 h continously. Rats were continued to be kept on a ventilator through the experiment. Two hours after the last inhalation, both lungs of the rats were excised for both histopathological examination and immunohistochemical evaluation. Histopathological grading were expressed as median interquartile range. Mann-Whitney U-test was used to assess the relationships between the variables. The infiltation of neutrophils were decreased in rats treated with heliox. Edema in the interstitial and intraalveolar areas was less than that of the control rats. Also, the diminishing of perivascular and/or intraalveolar hemorrhage was apperant. Hyaline membrane (HM) formation decreased in the heliox group compared with the control group. Decreased inducible nitric oxide synthase expression was shown via immunohistochemical examination in the heliox group. The present study histopathologically indicated the effectiveness of heliox in the decreasing of neutrophil infiltation, interstitial/intraalveolar edema, perivascular and/or intraalveolar hemorrhage and HM formation in ARDS. Besides the known effect of heliox in obstructive lung disease, inhaled heliox therapy could be associated with the improvement of inflamation in ARDS.

  2. Biomarkers of acute respiratory allergen exposure: Screening for sensitization potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pucheu-Haston, Cherie M.; Copeland, Lisa B.; Vallanat, Beena; Boykin, Elizabeth; Ward, Marsha D.W.

    2010-01-01

    Effective hazard screening will require the development of high-throughput or in vitro assays for the identification of potential sensitizers. The goal of this preliminary study was to identify potential biomarkers that differentiate the response to allergens vs non-allergens following an acute exposure in naive individuals. Female BALB/c mice received a single intratracheal aspiration exposure to Metarhizium anisopliae crude antigen (MACA) or bovine serum albumin (BSA) in Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) or HBSS alone. Mice were terminated after 1, 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 h. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was evaluated to determine total and differential cellularity, total protein concentration and LDH activity. RNA was isolated from lung tissue for microarray analysis and qRT-PCR. MACA administration induced a rapid increase in BALF neutrophils, lymphocytes, eosinophils and total protein compared to BSA or HBSS. Microarray analysis demonstrated differential expression of genes involved in cytokine production, signaling, inflammatory cell recruitment, adhesion and activation in 3 and 12 h MACA-treated samples compared to BSA or HBSS. Further analyses allowed identification of ∼ 100 candidate biomarker genes. Eleven genes were selected for further assessment by qRT-PCR. Of these, 6 demonstrated persistently increased expression (Ccl17, Ccl22, Ccl7, Cxcl10, Cxcl2, Saa1), while C3ar1 increased from 6-24 h. In conclusion, a single respiratory exposure of mice to an allergenic mold extract induces an inflammatory response which is distinct in phenotype and gene transcription from the response to a control protein. Further validation of these biomarkers with additional allergens and irritants is needed. These biomarkers may facilitate improvements in screening methods.

  3. ACUTE LOWER RESPIRATORY INFECTION IN GUARANI INDIGENOUS CHILDREN, BRAZIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Patricia Gomes de; Cardoso, Andrey Moreira; Sant'Anna, Clemax Couto; March, Maria de Fátima Bazhuni Pombo

    2018-03-29

    To describe the clinical profile and treatment of Brazilian Guarani indigenous children aged less than five years hospitalized for acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI), living in villages in the states from Rio de Janeiro to Rio Grande do Sul. Of the 234 children, 23 were excluded (incomplete data). The analysis was conducted in 211 children. Data were extracted from charts by a form. Based on record of wheezing and x-ray findings, ALRI was classified as bacterial, viral and viral-bacterial. A bivariate analysis was conducted using multinomial regression. Median age was 11 months. From the total sample, the ALRI cases were classified as viral (40.8%), bacterial (35.1%) and viral-bacterial (24.1%). It was verified that 53.1% of hospitalizations did not have clinical-radiological-laboratorial evidence to justify them. In the multinomial regression analysis, the comparison of bacterial and viral-bacterial showed the likelihood of having a cough was 3.1 times higher in the former (95%CI 1.11-8.70), whereas having chest retractions was 61.0% lower (OR 0.39, 95%CI 0.16-0.92). Comparing viral with viral-bacterial, the likelihood of being male was 2.2 times higher in the viral (95%CI 1.05-4.69), and of having tachypnea 58.0% lower (OR 0.42, 95%CI 0.19-0.92). Higher proportion of viral processes was identified, as well as viral-bacterial co-infections. Coughing was a symptom indicative of bacterial infection, whereas chest retractions and tachypnea showed viral-bacterial ALRI. Part of the resolution of non-severe ALRI still occurs at hospital level; therefore, we concluded that health services need to implement their programs in order to improve indigenous primary care.

  4. Body temperature and mortality in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell-Chaple, Hildy M; Puntillo, Kathleen A; Matthay, Michael A; Liu, Kathleen D

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the relationship between body temperature and outcomes in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). A better understanding of this relationship may provide evidence for fever suppression or warming interventions, which are commonly applied in practice. To examine the relationship between body temperature and mortality in patients with ARDS. Secondary analysis of body temperature and mortality using data from the ARDS Network Fluid and Catheter Treatment Trial (n = 969). Body temperature at baseline and on study day 2, primary cause of ARDS, severity of illness, and 90-day mortality were analyzed by using multiple logistic regression. Mean baseline temperature was 37.5°C (SD, 1.1°C; range, 27.2°C-40.7°C). At baseline, fever (≥ 38.3°C) was present in 23% and hypothermia (temperature was a significant predictor of 90-day mortality after primary cause of ARDS and score on the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III were adjusted for. Higher temperature was associated with decreased mortality: for every 1°C increase in baseline temperature, the odds of death decreased by 15% (odds ratio, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.73-0.98, P = .03). When patients were divided into 5 temperature groups, mortality was lower with higher temperature (P for trend = .02). Early in ARDS, fever is associated with improved survival rates. Fever in the acute phase response to lung injury and its relationship to recovery may be an important factor in determining patients' outcome and warrants further study. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  5. Mass casualty acute pepper spray inhalation – Respiratory severity effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.M. Sweeting*

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: While the respiratory complaint was perceived as being the most detrimental of all presenting complaints, there was an overall non-threatening outcome in all patients. The presenting respiratory complaints were mostly subjective with benign outcome. Although various risk factors associated with severity increase of respiratory status, were present in a few of the index cases patients, their affect was negligible with a resultant benign outcome.

  6. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal for patients with acute respiratory failure secondary to the acute respiratory distress syndrome: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) continues to have significant mortality and morbidity. The only intervention proven to reduce mortality is the use of lung-protective mechanical ventilation strategies, although such a strategy may lead to problematic hypercapnia. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO2R) devices allow uncoupling of ventilation from oxygenation, thereby removing carbon dioxide and facilitating lower tidal volume ventilation. We performed a systematic review to assess efficacy, complication rates, and utility of ECCO2R devices. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), case–control studies and case series with 10 or more patients. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS (Literatura Latino Americana em Ciências da Saúde), and ISI Web of Science, in addition to grey literature and clinical trials registries. Data were independently extracted by two reviewers against predefined criteria and agreement was reached by consensus. Outcomes of interest included mortality, intensive care and hospital lengths of stay, respiratory parameters and complications. The review included 14 studies with 495 patients (two RCTs and 12 observational studies). Arteriovenous ECCO2R was used in seven studies, and venovenous ECCO2R in seven studies. Available evidence suggests no mortality benefit to ECCO2R, although post hoc analysis of data from the most recent RCT showed an improvement in ventilator-free days in more severe ARDS. Organ failure-free days or ICU stay have not been shown to decrease with ECCO2R. Carbon dioxide removal was widely demonstrated as feasible, facilitating the use of lower tidal volume ventilation. Complication rates varied greatly across the included studies, representing technological advances. There was a general paucity of high-quality data and significant variation in both practice and technology used among studies, which confounded analysis. ECCO2R is a rapidly evolving technology and is an efficacious treatment to enable

  7. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal for patients with acute respiratory failure secondary to the acute respiratory distress syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Marianne; Millar, Jonathan; Blackwood, Bronagh; Davies, Andrew; Brett, Stephen J; McAuley, Daniel F; McNamee, James J

    2014-05-15

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) continues to have significant mortality and morbidity. The only intervention proven to reduce mortality is the use of lung-protective mechanical ventilation strategies, although such a strategy may lead to problematic hypercapnia. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO₂R) devices allow uncoupling of ventilation from oxygenation, thereby removing carbon dioxide and facilitating lower tidal volume ventilation. We performed a systematic review to assess efficacy, complication rates, and utility of ECCO₂R devices. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), case-control studies and case series with 10 or more patients. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS (Literatura Latino Americana em Ciências da Saúde), and ISI Web of Science, in addition to grey literature and clinical trials registries. Data were independently extracted by two reviewers against predefined criteria and agreement was reached by consensus. Outcomes of interest included mortality, intensive care and hospital lengths of stay, respiratory parameters and complications. The review included 14 studies with 495 patients (two RCTs and 12 observational studies). Arteriovenous ECCO₂R was used in seven studies, and venovenous ECCO₂R in seven studies. Available evidence suggests no mortality benefit to ECCO₂R, although post hoc analysis of data from the most recent RCT showed an improvement in ventilator-free days in more severe ARDS. Organ failure-free days or ICU stay have not been shown to decrease with ECCOvR. Carbon dioxide removal was widely demonstrated as feasible, facilitating the use of lower tidal volume ventilation. Complication rates varied greatly across the included studies, representing technological advances. There was a general paucity of high-quality data and significant variation in both practice and technology used among studies, which confounded analysis. ECCO₂R is a rapidly evolving technology and is an efficacious treatment

  8. Identification of a novel human papillomavirus by metagenomic analysis of samples from patients with febrile respiratory illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mokili, J.L.; Dutilh, B.E.; Lim, Y.W.; Schneider, B.S.; Taylor, T.; Haynes, M.R.; Metzgar, D.; Myers, C.A.; Blair, P.J.; Nosrat, B.; Wolfe, N.D.; Rohwer, F.

    2013-01-01

    As part of a virus discovery investigation using a metagenomic approach, a highly divergent novel Human papillomavirus type was identified in pooled convenience nasal/oropharyngeal swab samples collected from patients with febrile respiratory illness. Phylogenetic analysis of the whole genome and

  9. Acute folate deficiency in a critically ill patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerlings, S. E.; Rommes, J. H.; van Toorn, D. W.; Bakker, J.

    1997-01-01

    A 19-year-old male patient developed thrombocytopenia and leukopenia due to acute folate deficiency while recovering from a multiple organ failure syndrome. Risk factors for acute folate deficiency are extensive tissue damage due to sepsis, trauma or surgery and acute renal failure requiring renal

  10. Viral etiologies of hospitalized acute lower respiratory infection patients in China, 2009-2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luzhao Feng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute lower respiratory infections (ALRIs are an important cause of acute illnesses and mortality worldwide and in China. However, a large-scale study on the prevalence of viral infections across multiple provinces and seasons has not been previously reported from China. Here, we aimed to identify the viral etiologies associated with ALRIs from 22 Chinese provinces. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Active surveillance for hospitalized ALRI patients in 108 sentinel hospitals in 24 provinces of China was conducted from January 2009-September 2013. We enrolled hospitalized all-age patients with ALRI, and collected respiratory specimens, blood or serum collected for diagnostic testing for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, human influenza virus, adenoviruses (ADV, human parainfluenza virus (PIV, human metapneumovirus (hMPV, human coronavirus (hCoV and human bocavirus (hBoV. We included 28,369 ALRI patients from 81 (of the 108 sentinel hospitals in 22 (of the 24 provinces, and 10,387 (36.6% were positive for at least one etiology. The most frequently detected virus was RSV (9.9%, followed by influenza (6.6%, PIV (4.8%, ADV (3.4%, hBoV (1.9, hMPV (1.5% and hCoV (1.4%. Co-detections were found in 7.2% of patients. RSV was the most common etiology (17.0% in young children aged <2 years. Influenza viruses were the main cause of the ALRIs in adults and elderly. PIV, hBoV, hMPV and ADV infections were more frequent in children, while hCoV infection was distributed evenly in all-age. There were clear seasonal peaks for RSV, influenza, PIV, hBoV and hMPV infections. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings could serve as robust evidence for public health authorities in drawing up further plans to prevent and control ALRIs associated with viral pathogens. RSV is common in young children and prevention measures could have large public health impact. Influenza was most common in adults and influenza vaccination should be implemented on a wider scale in China.

  11. Acute phase protein changes in calves during an outbreak of respiratory disease caused by bovine respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orro, Toomas; Pohjanvirta, Tarja; Rikula, Ulla; Huovilainen, Anita; Alasuutari, Sakari; Sihvonen, Liisa; Pelkonen, Sinikka; Soveri, Timo

    2011-01-01

    Bovine acute phase proteins (APPs), lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP), serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin (Hp) and alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein (AGP) were evaluated as inflammatory markers during an outbreak of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) caused by bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV). Calves (n = 10) presented mild to moderate signs of respiratory disease. Secondary bacterial infections, Pasteurella multocida and Mycoplasma dispar as major species, were detected in tracheobronchial lavage samples. Concentrations of SAA and LBP increased at week 1 had the highest values at week 3 and decreased at week 4 of outbreak. Some calves had high Hp concentrations at week 3, but AGP concentrations did not rise during respiratory disease. Higher SAA, LBP and Hp concentrations at a later stage of BRD (week 3) were associated with the low BRSV-specific IgG(1) production, suggesting that these calves had enhanced inflammatory response to the secondary bacterial infection. In conclusion, APPs (especially SAA and LBP) are sensitive markers of respiratory infection, and they may be useful to explore host response to the respiratory infections in clinical research. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of Air Pollutants on Outpatient Visits for Acute Respiratory Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The air pollution in China is a severe problem. The aim of our study was to investigate the impact of air pollutants on acute respiratory outcomes in outpatients. Outpatient data from 2 December 2013 to 1 December 2014 were collected, as well as air pollutant data including ozone (O3, nitrogen dioxide (NO2, carbon monoxide (CO, sulfur dioxide (SO2, and particulate matter (PM2.5 and PM10. We screened six categories of acute respiratory outcomes and analyzed their associations with different air pollutant exposures, including upper respiratory tract infection (URTI, acute bronchitis (AB, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP, acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD, acute exacerbation of asthma (AE-asthma, and acute exacerbation of bronchiectasis (AEBX. A case-crossover design with a bidirectional control sampling approach was used for statistical analysis. A total of 57,144 patients were enrolled for analysis. PM2.5, PM10, NO2, SO2, and CO exposures were positively associated with outpatient visits for URTI, AB, CAP, and AEBX. PM10, SO2, and CO exposures were positively associated with outpatient visits for AECOPD. Exposure to O3 was positively associated with outpatient visits for AE-asthma, but negatively associated with outpatient visits for URTI, CAP, and AEBX. In conclusion, air pollutants had acute effects on outpatient visits for acute respiratory outcomes, with specific outcomes associated with specific pollutants.

  13. POTENTIALS OF SYMPTOMATIC TREATMENT OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. R. Selimzyanova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute infection of upper respiratory tract is one of the most topical medical and social problems: it is respiratory diseases that cause the majority of children’s and adults’ non-attendance of school lessons and working days. Childhood respiratory infections are characterized by prolonged clinical course. The most common causes of upper respiratory tract infections are viruses, such as rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza and parainfluenza viruses, adeno-, corona- and metapneumoviruses as well as Coxsackie virus and ECHO virus. Antiviral agents are efficient only when administered during first 24–48 hours from the onset of disease, and a number of such drugs have only specific activity, therefore the limitation of possibilities of etiotropic therapy of acute respiratory infections can be established. This often leads to excessive inappropriate usage of antibacterial drugs. Such symptoms as nasal stuffiness and cough which accompany acute respiratory tract infections, can significantly affect patients’ and his family’s quality of life. Symptomatic therapy is traditionally used in order to relieve these symptoms. The article contains data on potentials of one of such symptomatic drugs in treatment of upper respiratory tract infections.

  14. Hand hygiene to reduce community transmission of influenza and acute respiratory tract infection: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren‐Gash, Charlotte; Fragaszy, Ellen; Hayward, Andrew C.

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Warren‐Gash et al. (2012) Hand hygiene to reduce community transmission of influenza and acute respiratory tract infection: a systematic review. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses DOI: 10.1111/irv.12015. Hand hygiene may be associated with modest protection against some acute respiratory tract infections, but its specific role in influenza transmission in different settings is unclear. We aimed to review evidence that improving hand hygiene reduces primary and secondary transmission of (i) influenza and (ii) acute respiratory tract infections in community settings. We searched Medline, Embase, Global Health and Cochrane databases up to 13 February 2012 for reports in any language of original research investigating the effect of hand hygiene on influenza or acute respiratory tract infection where aetiology was unspecified in community settings including institutions such as schools, and domestic residences. Data were presented and quality rated across outcomes according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Sixteen articles met inclusion criteria. There was moderate to low‐quality evidence of a reduction in both influenza and respiratory tract infection with hand hygiene interventions in schools, greatest in a lower–middle‐income setting. There was high‐quality evidence of a small reduction in respiratory infection in childcare settings. There was high‐quality evidence for a large reduction in respiratory infection with a hand hygiene intervention in squatter settlements in a low‐income setting. There was moderate‐ to high‐quality evidence of no effect on secondary transmission of influenza in households that had already experienced an index case. While hand hygiene interventions have potential to reduce transmission of influenza and acute respiratory tract infections, their effectiveness varies depending on setting, context and compliance. PMID:23043518

  15. Effectiveness and predictors of failure of noninvasive mechanical ventilation in acute respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-González, F; González-Robledo, J; Sánchez-Hernández, F; Moreno-García, M N; Barreda-Mellado, I

    2016-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness and identify predictors of failure of noninvasive ventilation. A retrospective, longitudinal descriptive study was made. Adult patients with acute respiratory failure. A total of 410 consecutive patients with noninvasive ventilation treated in an Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary university hospital from 2006 to 2011. Noninvasive ventilation. Demographic variables and clinical and laboratory test parameters at the start and two hours after the start of noninvasive ventilation. Evolution during admission to the Unit and until hospital discharge. The failure rate was 50%, with an overall mortality rate of 33%. A total of 156 patients had hypoxemic respiratory failure, 87 postextubation respiratory failure, 78 exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 61 hypercapnic respiratory failure without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and 28 had acute pulmonary edema. The failure rates were 74%, 54%, 27%, 31% and 21%, respectively. The etiology of respiratory failure, serum bilirubin at the start, APACHEII score, radiological findings, the need for sedation to tolerate noninvasive ventilation, changes in level of consciousness, PaO2/FIO2 ratio, respiratory rate and heart rate from the start and two hours after the start of noninvasive ventilation were independently associated to failure. The effectiveness of noninvasive ventilation varies according to the etiology of respiratory failure. Its use in hypoxemic respiratory failure and postextubation respiratory failure should be assessed individually. Predictors of failure could be useful to prevent delayed intubation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  16. Risk factors for and impact of respiratory failure on mortality in the early phase of acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dombernowsky, Tilde; Kristensen, Marlene Østermark; Rysgaard, Sisse

    2016-01-01

    : Retrospective cohort study including 359 patients admitted with acute pancreatitis. Information was gathered from electronic patient records. We defined respiratory failure based on the modified Marshall scoring system in the revised Atlanta criteria. Predictors of respiratory failure were evaluated...

  17. International study on microcirculatory shock occurrence in acutely ill patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vellinga, Namkje A. R.; Boerma, E. Christiaan; Koopmans, Matty; Donati, Abele; Dubin, Arnaldo; Shapiro, Nathan I.; Pearse, Rupert M.; Machado, Flavia R.; Fries, Michael; Akarsu-Ayazoglu, Tulin; Pranskunas, Andrius; Hollenberg, Steven; Balestra, Gianmarco; van Iterson, Mat; van der Voort, Peter H. J.; Sadaka, Farid; Minto, Gary; Aypar, Ulku; Hurtado, F. Javier; Martinelli, Giampaolo; Payen, Didier; van Haren, Frank; Holley, Anthony; Pattnaik, Rajyabardhan; Gomez, Hernando; Mehta, Ravindra L.; Rodriguez, Alejandro H.; Ruiz, Carolina; Canales, Héctor S.; Duranteau, Jacques; Spronk, Peter E.; Jhanji, Shaman; Hubble, Sheena; Chierego, Marialuisa; Jung, Christian; Martin, Daniel; Sorbara, Carlo; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Bakker, Jan; Ince, Can; Koopmans, M.; van Iterson, M.; van der Voort, P. H. J.; Bakker, J.; van Bommel, J.; Ruiz, C.; Hernandez, G.; Machado, F. R.; Bafi, A. T.; Dubin, A.; Kanoore Edul, V. S.; Canales, H. S.; Hurtado, F. J.; Lacuesta, G.; Baz, M.; Hollenberg, S. M.; Patel, U.; Shapiro, N. I.; Gomez, H.; Simon, P.; Pinsky, M.; Sadaka, F. G.; Krause, K.; Mehta, R.; Jung, C.; Fries, M.; Pearse, R. M.; Smith, A.; Martin, D. S.; Meale, P.; Jhanji, S.; Minto, G.; Lai, C.; Ferguson, C.; McMillan, H.; Quintrell, T.; Sair, M.; Martinelli, G.; Lombrano, M.; Hubble, S. M. A.; Thorn, C.; Rodriguez, A. H.; Martin-Loeches, I.; van Haren, F. M. P.; Pranskunas, A.; Pilvinis, V.; Donati, A.; Sorbara, C.; Forti, A.; Comin, A.; Chierego, M. L.; Pellis, T.; Holley, A.; Paratz, J.; Duranteau, J.; Harrois, A.; Payen, D.; Legrand, M.; Bucher, E.; Pattnaik, R.; Dondorp, A. M.; Herdman, M. T.; Aypar, U.; Ayhan, B.; Ayazoglu-Akarsu, T.

    2015-01-01

    Microcirculatory alterations are associated with adverse outcome in subsets of critically ill patients. The prevalence and significance of microcirculatory alterations in the general ICU population are unknown. We studied the prevalence of microcirculatory alterations in a heterogeneous ICU

  18. Acute cor pulmonale during protective ventilation for acute respiratory distress syndrome: prevalence, predictors, and clinical impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekontso Dessap, Armand; Boissier, Florence; Charron, Cyril; Bégot, Emmanuelle; Repessé, Xavier; Legras, Annick; Brun-Buisson, Christian; Vignon, Philippe; Vieillard-Baron, Antoine

    2016-05-01

    Increased right ventricle (RV) afterload during acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) may induce acute cor pulmonale (ACP). To determine the prevalence and prognosis of ACP and build a clinical risk score for the early detection of ACP. This was a prospective study in which 752 patients with moderate-to-severe ARDS receiving protective ventilation were assessed using transesophageal echocardiography in 11 intensive care units. The study cohort was randomly split in a derivation (n = 502) and a validation (n = 250) cohort. ACP was defined as septal dyskinesia with a dilated RV [end-diastolic RV/left ventricle (LV) area ratio >0.6 (≥1 for severe dilatation)]. ACP was found in 164 of the 752 patients (prevalence of 22 %; 95 % confidence interval 19-25 %). In the derivation cohort, the ACP risk score included four variables [pneumonia as a cause of ARDS, driving pressure ≥18 cm H2O, arterial oxygen partial pressure to fractional inspired oxygen (PaO2/FiO2) ratio <150 mmHg, and arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure ≥48 mmHg]. The ACP risk score had a reasonable discrimination and a good calibration. Hospital mortality did not differ between patients with or without ACP, but it was significantly higher in patients with severe ACP than in the other patients [31/54 (57 %) vs. 291/698 (42 %); p = 0.03]. Independent risk factors for hospital mortality included severe ACP along with male gender, age, SAPS II, shock, PaO2/FiO2 ratio, respiratory rate, and driving pressure, while prone position was protective. We report a 22 % prevalence of ACP and a poor outcome of severe ACP. We propose a simple clinical risk score for early identification of ACP that could trigger specific therapeutic strategies to reduce RV afterload.

  19. Cynomolgus macaque as an animal model for severe acute respiratory syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James V Lawler

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS in 2002 and 2003 affected global health and caused major economic disruption. Adequate animal models are required to study the underlying pathogenesis of SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV infection and to develop effective vaccines and therapeutics. We report the first findings of measurable clinical disease in nonhuman primates (NHPs infected with SARS-CoV.In order to characterize clinically relevant parameters of SARS-CoV infection in NHPs, we infected cynomolgus macaques with SARS-CoV in three groups: Group I was infected in the nares and bronchus, group II in the nares and conjunctiva, and group III intravenously. Nonhuman primates in groups I and II developed mild to moderate symptomatic illness. All NHPs demonstrated evidence of viral replication and developed neutralizing antibodies. Chest radiographs from several animals in groups I and II revealed unifocal or multifocal pneumonia that peaked between days 8 and 10 postinfection. Clinical laboratory tests were not significantly changed. Overall, inoculation by a mucosal route produced more prominent disease than did intravenous inoculation. Half of the group I animals were infected with a recombinant infectious clone SARS-CoV derived from the SARS-CoV Urbani strain. This infectious clone produced disease indistinguishable from wild-type Urbani strain.SARS-CoV infection of cynomolgus macaques did not reproduce the severe illness seen in the majority of adult human cases of SARS; however, our results suggest similarities to the milder syndrome of SARS-CoV infection characteristically seen in young children.

  20. Acute respiratory distress syndrome induced by a swine 2009 H1N1 variant in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS induced by pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza virus has been widely reported and was considered the main cause of death in critically ill patients with 2009 H1N1 infection. However, no animal model has been developed for ARDS caused by infection with 2009 H1N1 virus. Here, we present a mouse model of ARDS induced by 2009 H1N1 virus.Mice were inoculated with A/swine/Shandong/731/2009 (SD/09, which was a 2009 H1N1 influenza variant with a G222D mutation in the hemagglutinin. Clinical symptoms were recorded every day. Lung injury was assessed by lung water content and histopathological observation. Arterial blood gas, leukocyte count in the bronchial alveolar lavage fluid and blood, virus titers, and cytokine levels in the lung were measured at various times post-inoculation. Mice infected with SD/09 virus showed typical ARDS symptoms characterized by 60% lethality on days 8-10 post-inoculation, highly edematous lungs, inflammatory cellular infiltration, alveolar and interstitial edema, lung hemorrhage, progressive and severe hypoxemia, and elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines.These results suggested that we successfully established an ARDS mouse model induced by a virulent 2009 H1N1 variant without previous adaptation, which may be of benefit for evaluating the pathogenesis or therapy of human ARDS caused by 2009 H1N1 virus.

  1. High-Flow Nasal Cannula Oxygenation in Immunocompromised Patients With Acute Hypoxemic Respiratory Failure: A Groupe de Recherche Respiratoire en Réanimation Onco-Hématologique Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemiale, Virginie; Resche-Rigon, Matthieu; Mokart, Djamel; Pène, Frédéric; Argaud, Laurent; Mayaux, Julien; Guitton, Christophe; Rabbat, Antoine; Girault, Christophe; Kouatchet, Achille; Vincent, François; Bruneel, Fabrice; Nyunga, Martine; Seguin, Amélie; Klouche, Kada; Colin, Gwenahel; Kontar, Loay; Perez, Pierre; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Benoit, Dominique D; Papazian, Laurent; Demoule, Alexandre; Chevret, Sylvie; Azoulay, Elie

    2017-03-01

    In immunocompromised patients with acute respiratory failure, invasive mechanical ventilation remains associated with high mortality. Choosing the adequate oxygenation strategy is of the utmost importance in that setting. High-flow nasal oxygen has recently shown survival benefits in unselected patients with acute respiratory failure. The objective was to assess outcomes of immunocompromised patients with hypoxemic acute respiratory failure treated with high-flow nasal oxygen. We performed a post hoc analysis of a randomized controlled trial of noninvasive ventilation in critically ill immunocompromised patients with hypoxemic acute respiratory failure. Twenty-nine ICUs in France and Belgium. Critically ill immunocompromised patients with hypoxemic acute respiratory failure. A propensity score-based approach was used to assess the impact of high-flow nasal oxygen compared with standard oxygen on day 28 mortality. Among 374 patients included in the study, 353 met inclusion criteria. Underlying disease included mostly malignancies (n = 296; 84%). Acute respiratory failure etiologies were mostly pneumonia (n = 157; 44.4%) or opportunistic infection (n = 76; 21.5%). Noninvasive ventilation was administered to 180 patients (51%). Invasive mechanical ventilation was ultimately needed in 142 patients (40.2%). Day 28 mortality was 22.6% (80 deaths). Throughout the ICU stay, 127 patients (36%) received high-flow nasal oxygen whereas 226 patients received standard oxygen. Ninety patients in each group (high-flow nasal oxygen or standard oxygen) were matched according to the propensity score, including 91 of 180 (51%) who received noninvasive ventilation. High-flow nasal oxygen was neither associated with a lower intubation rate (hazard ratio, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.11-1.61; p = 0.2) nor day 28 mortality (hazard ratio, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.45-1.42; p = 0.45). In immunocompromised patients with hypoxemic acute respiratory failure, high-flow nasal oxygen when compared with standard oxygen

  2. Associations between presence of handwashing stations and soap in the home and diarrhoea and respiratory illness, in children less than five years old in rural western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamm, K B; Feikin, D R; Bigogo, G M; Aol, G; Audi, A; Cohen, A L; Shah, M M; Yu, J; Breiman, R F; Ram, P K

    2014-04-01

    We tested whether soap presence in the home or a designated handwashing station was associated with diarrhoea and respiratory illness in Kenya. In April 2009, we observed presence of a handwashing station and soap in households participating in a longitudinal health surveillance system in rural Kenya. Diarrhoea and acute respiratory illness (ARI) in children soap in the home and a handwashing station. Among 2547 children, prevalence of diarrhoea and ARI was 2.3 and 11.4 days per 100 child-days, respectively. Soap was observed in 97% of households. Children in households with soap had 1.3 fewer days of diarrhoea/100 child-days (95% CI -2.6, -0.1) than children in households without soap. ARI prevalence was not associated with presence of soap. A handwashing station was identified in 1.4% of households and was not associated with a difference in diarrhoea or ARI prevalence. Soap presence in the home was significantly associated with reduced diarrhoea, but not ARI, in children in rural western Kenya. Whereas most households had soap in the home, almost none had a designated handwashing station, which may prevent handwashing at key times of hand contamination. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Clothiapine for acute psychotic illness: a meta-analysis | Carpenter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To estimate the effects of clothiapine, a dibenzothiazepine neuroleptic, for the management of acute psychosis. Methods: Six databases were searched, reference lists were inspected and relevant industry and authors contacted. Randomised clinical trials involving clothiapine for acute psychosis were identified ...

  4. Human respiratory syncytial virus load normalized by cell quantification as predictor of acute respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Novo, Miriam; Boga, José A; Álvarez-Argüelles, Marta E; Rojo-Alba, Susana; Fernández, Ana; Menéndez, María J; de Oña, María; Melón, Santiago

    2018-01-05

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a common cause of respiratory infections. The main objective is to analyze the prediction ability of viral load of HRSV normalized by cell number in respiratory symptoms. A prospective, descriptive, and analytical study was performed. From 7307 respiratory samples processed between December 2014 to April 2016, 1019 HRSV-positive samples, were included in this study. Low respiratory tract infection was present in 729 patients (71.54%). Normalized HRSV load was calculated by quantification of HRSV genome and human β-globin gene and expressed as log10 copies/1000 cells. HRSV mean loads were 4.09 ± 2.08 and 4.82 ± 2.09 log10 copies/1000 cells in the 549 pharyngeal and 470 nasopharyngeal samples, respectively (P respiratory tract infection and 4.22 ± 2.28 log10 copies/1000 cells with upper respiratory tract infection or febrile syndrome (P < 0.05). A possible cut off value to predict LRTI evolution was tentatively established. Normalization of viral load by cell number in the samples is essential to ensure an optimal virological molecular diagnosis avoiding that the quality of samples affects the results. A high viral load can be a useful marker to predict disease progression. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Acute respiratory distress syndrome 40 years later: time to revisit its definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phua, Jason; Stewart, Thomas E; Ferguson, Niall D

    2008-10-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a common disorder associated with significant mortality and morbidity. The aim of this article is to critically evaluate the definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome and examine the impact the definition has on clinical practice and research. Articles from a MEDLINE search (1950 to August 2007) using the Medical Subject Heading respiratory distress syndrome, adult, diagnosis, limited to the English language and human subjects, their relevant bibliographies, and personal collections, were reviewed. The definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome is important to researchers, clinicians, and administrators alike. It has evolved significantly over the last 40 years, culminating in the American-European Consensus Conference definition, which was published in 1994. Although the American-European Consensus Conference definition is widely used, it has some important limitations that may impact on the conduct of clinical research, on resource allocation, and ultimately on the bedside management of such patients. These limitations stem partially from the fact that as defined, acute respiratory distress syndrome is a heterogeneous entity and also involve the reliability and validity of the criteria used in the definition. This article critically evaluates the American-European Consensus Conference definition and its limitations. Importantly, it highlights how these limitations may contribute to clinical trials that have failed to detect a potential true treatment effect. Finally, recommendations are made that could be considered in future definition modifications with an emphasis on the significance of accurately identifying the target population in future trials and subsequently in clinical care. How acute respiratory distress syndrome is defined has a significant impact on the results of randomized, controlled trials and epidemiologic studies. Changes to the current American-European Consensus Conference definition are

  6. Understanding Heroin Overdose: A Study of the Acute Respiratory Depressant Effects of Injected Pharmaceutical Heroin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, Caroline J; Bell, James; Rafferty, Gerrard F; Moxham, John; Strang, John

    2015-01-01

    Opioids are respiratory depressants and heroin/opioid overdose is a major contributor to the excess mortality of heroin addicts. The individual and situational variability of respiratory depression caused by intravenous heroin is poorly understood. This study used advanced respiratory monitoring to follow the time course and severity of acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. 10 patients (9/10 with chronic airflow obstruction) undergoing supervised injectable opioid treatment for heroin addiction received their usual prescribed dose of injectable opioid (diamorphine or methadone) (IOT), and their usual prescribed dose of oral opioid (methadone or sustained release oral morphine) after 30 minutes. The main outcome measures were pulse oximetry (SpO2%), end-tidal CO2% (ETCO2%) and neural respiratory drive (NRD) (quantified using parasternal intercostal muscle electromyography). Significant respiratory depression was defined as absence of inspiratory airflow >10s, SpO2% 10s and ETCO2% per breath >6.5%. Increases in ETCO2% indicated significant respiratory depression following IOT in 8/10 patients at 30 minutes. In contrast, SpO2% indicated significant respiratory depression in only 4/10 patients, with small absolute changes in SpO2% at 30 minutes. A decline in NRD from baseline to 30 minutes post IOT was also observed, but was not statistically significant. Baseline NRD and opioid-induced drop in SpO2% were inversely related. We conclude that significant acute respiratory depression is commonly induced by opioid drugs prescribed to treat opioid addiction. Hypoventilation is reliably detected by capnography, but not by SpO2% alone. Chronic suppression of NRD in the presence of underlying lung disease may be a risk factor for acute opioid-induced respiratory depression.

  7. Understanding Heroin Overdose: A Study of the Acute Respiratory Depressant Effects of Injected Pharmaceutical Heroin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline J Jolley

    Full Text Available Opioids are respiratory depressants and heroin/opioid overdose is a major contributor to the excess mortality of heroin addicts. The individual and situational variability of respiratory depression caused by intravenous heroin is poorly understood. This study used advanced respiratory monitoring to follow the time course and severity of acute opioid-induced respiratory depression. 10 patients (9/10 with chronic airflow obstruction undergoing supervised injectable opioid treatment for heroin addiction received their usual prescribed dose of injectable opioid (diamorphine or methadone (IOT, and their usual prescribed dose of oral opioid (methadone or sustained release oral morphine after 30 minutes. The main outcome measures were pulse oximetry (SpO2%, end-tidal CO2% (ETCO2% and neural respiratory drive (NRD (quantified using parasternal intercostal muscle electromyography. Significant respiratory depression was defined as absence of inspiratory airflow >10s, SpO2% 10s and ETCO2% per breath >6.5%. Increases in ETCO2% indicated significant respiratory depression following IOT in 8/10 patients at 30 minutes. In contrast, SpO2% indicated significant respiratory depression in only 4/10 patients, with small absolute changes in SpO2% at 30 minutes. A decline in NRD from baseline to 30 minutes post IOT was also observed, but was not statistically significant. Baseline NRD and opioid-induced drop in SpO2% were inversely related. We conclude that significant acute respiratory depression is commonly induced by opioid drugs prescribed to treat opioid addiction. Hypoventilation is reliably detected by capnography, but not by SpO2% alone. Chronic suppression of NRD in the presence of underlying lung disease may be a risk factor for acute opioid-induced respiratory depression.

  8. Investigación de un brote respiratorio agudo por exposición a cloro gas en una piscina pública Investigation of an outbreak of acute respiratory illness due to exposure to chlorine gas in a public swimming pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Almagro Nievas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Se diseñó un estudio de casos y controles para investigar el accidente químico ocurrido en una piscina pública en el verano de 2005 y describir los factores ambientales responsables, analizar el efecto del cloro gas y valorar la evolución clínica y funcional del aparato respiratorio. Las intervenciones fueron las siguientes: inspecciones ambientales, encuesta epidemiológica (variables sociodemográficas, ubicación en el momento del accidente, olor percibido y seguimiento clínico y espirométrico de la función respiratoria. Se encuestaron 65 casos y 48 controles. El suceso se produjo al mezclar accidentalmente ácido clorhídrico e hipoclorito sódico, lo que generó cloro gas. Los síntomas predominantes fueron tos y disnea. El riesgo de enfermar en niños era 10 veces mayor si tenían una enfermedad respiratoria previa y 4 veces superior si estaban a una distancia inferior a 40 m del lugar del accidente. Todos los casos evolucionaron hacia la curación, excepto uno que tenía antecedentes asmáticos.A case-control study was designed to investigate a chemical accident that occurred in a swimming-pool in the summer of 2005. The aim was to describe the environmental factors involved in the accident, to assess the effect of chlorine gas on the respiratory system, and to perform a clinical and spirometric follow-up. The following interventions were carried out: environmental inspection, epidemiologic survey (including sociodemographic variables, location at the time of the accident, perception of an abnormal smell, and clinical and spirometric outcomes to assess respiratory function. Sixty-five cases and 48 controls were identified and interviewed. The accident was produced by accidental admixture of hydrochloric acid with sodium hypochlorite resulting in chlorine gas release. The main clinical symptoms were dyspnea and cough. The risk of becoming ill was 10-fold higher in children with a previous lung disease and was 4-fold higher when

  9. Parent Preferences for Shared Decision-making in Acute Versus Chronic Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom, Dina M; Aquino, Christian; Arredondo, Anthony R; Foster, Byron A

    2017-10-01

    The goal of this study was to examine preferences for shared decision-making (SDM) in parents of acutely ill versus chronically ill children in the inpatient setting. Additionally, we explored the effect of parental perception of illness severity and uncertainty in illness on decision-making preference. In this cross-sectional study, we surveyed parents of children admitted to pediatric inpatient units at an academic, tertiary-care hospital. Surveys were administered in person and used validated tools to assess SDM preferences and uncertainty in illness. Descriptive statistics evaluated associations stratified by acute versus chronic illness, and multivariable analyses were performed. Of the 200 parents who participated, the majority were women (78%), Hispanic (81.5%), English speaking (73%), between 30 and 39 years old (37.5%), and had an education achievement of less than a college degree (77%). The mean age of hospitalized children was 8.1 years, and half reported a chronic illness. Most parents preferred an active (43%) or collaborative (40%) role in SDM. There was no association with SDM preference by demographics, number of previous hospitalizations, perception of illness severity, or uncertainty. However, parents of chronically ill children significantly preferred a passive role in SDM when they perceived a high level of uncertainty in illness. Most parents of hospitalized children prefer to take an active or collaborative role in SDM. However, parents of chronically ill children who perceive high levels of uncertainty surrounding their children's illness prefer a passive role, thus illustrating the complexity in decision-making among this parent population. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  10. Respiratory illness healthcare-seeking behavior assessment in the Lao People's Democratic Republic (Laos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayxay, Mayfong; Hansana, Visanou; Sengphilom, Bouachanh; Oulay, Latsamy; Thammavongsa, Vatsana; Somphet, Vatsana; Taykeophithoune, Chansathit; Nathavong, Soudavanh; Phanthady, Johnly; Chareunvong, Kongmany; Chanthavilay, Phetsavanh; Sychareun, Vanphanom

    2013-05-04

    Respiratory illness (RI) remains a public health problem in Laos, but little is known about the overall burden and people's healthcare-seeking behavior for RI. Understanding the burden of RI and community patterns of healthcare-seeking behavior would provide better guidance for Lao public health program and policy planners to improve RI public health practice, surveillance systems, and prevention strategies. A quantitative and qualitative survey was conducted in 14 randomly selected villages of two purposively selected peri-urban and two rural provinces in Laos. A pre-designed and pre-tested questionnaire was used to collect information on RI in household members (defined as new fever with cough and/or sore-throat in the absence of other diagnoses during the preceding 30 days) from all heads of household in each village. Sixteen focus group discussions were conducted to obtain more information to support the quantitative survey. Among 1,751 households (9,114 people) studied, 3.5% (317/9,114) had experienced RI (fever, cough, and/or sore-throat) in the 30 days before the survey [6.2% in rural and 2.4% in peri-urban areas (pLaos and this is probably due to the differences in environmental and hygienic conditions, health service availability and socio-economic status between the two areas. Therefore strategies for healthcare service improvement may also need to differ between the two areas.

  11. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Caused by Leukemic Infiltration of the Lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Kuang Wu

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory distress syndrome resulting from leukemic pulmonary infiltrates is seldom diagnosed antemortem. Two 60- and 80-year-old women presented with general malaise, progressive shortness of breath, and hyperleukocytosis, which progressed to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS after admission. Acute leukemia with pulmonary infection was initially diagnosed, but subsequent examinations including open lung biopsy revealed leukemic pulmonary infiltrates without infection. In one case, the clinical condition and chest radiography improved initially after combination therapy with chemotherapy for leukemia and aggressive pulmonary support. However, new pulmonary infiltration on chest radiography and hypoxemia recurred, which was consistent with acute lysis pneumopathy. Despite aggressive treatment, both patients died due to rapidly deteriorating condition. Leukemic pulmonary involvement should be considered in acute leukemia patients with non-infectious diffusive lung infiltration, especially in acute leukemia with a high blast count.

  12. Randomized Controlled Trial of Mindfulness Meditation and Exercise for the Prevention of Acute Respiratory Infection: Possible Mechanisms of Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Zgierska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A randomized trial suggests that meditation and exercise may prevent acute respiratory infection (ARI. This paper explores potential mediating mechanisms. Methods. Community-recruited adults were randomly assigned to three nonblinded arms: 8-week mindfulness-based stress reduction (N=51, moderate-intensity exercise (N=51, or wait-list control (N=52. Primary outcomes were ARI illness burden (validated Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey. Potential mediators included self-reported psychophysical health and exercise intensity (baseline, 9 weeks, and 3 months. A Baron and Kenny approach-based mediational analysis model, adjusted for group status, age, and gender, evaluated the relationship between the primary outcome and a potential mediator using zero-inflated modeling and Sobel testing. Results. Of 154 randomized, 149 completed the trial (51, 47, and 51 in meditation, exercise, and control groups and were analyzed (82% female, 94% Caucasian, 59.3 ± SD 6.6 years old. Mediational analyses suggested that improved mindfulness (Mindful Attention Awareness Scale at 3 months may mediate intervention effects on ARI severity and duration (P<0.05; 1 point increase in the mindfulness score corresponded to a shortened ARI duration by 7.2–9.6 hours. Conclusions. Meditation and exercise may decrease the ARI illness burden through increased mindfulness. These preliminary findings need confirmation, if confirmed, they would have important policy and clinical implications. This trial registration was Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01057771.

  13. Effects of Sigh on Regional Lung Strain and Ventilation Heterogeneity in Acute Respiratory Failure Patients Undergoing Assisted Mechanical Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Tommaso; Eronia, Nilde; Abbruzzese, Chiara; Marcolin, Roberto; Coppadoro, Andrea; Spadaro, Savino; Patroniti, Nicolo'; Bellani, Giacomo; Pesenti, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    In acute respiratory failure patients undergoing pressure support ventilation, a short cyclic recruitment maneuver (Sigh) might induce reaeration of collapsed lung regions, possibly decreasing regional lung strain and improving the homogeneity of ventilation distribution. We aimed to describe the regional effects of different Sigh rates on reaeration, strain, and ventilation heterogeneity, as measured by thoracic electrical impedance tomography. Prospective, randomized, cross-over study. General ICU of a single university-affiliated hospital. We enrolled 20 critically ill patients intubated and mechanically ventilated with PaO2/FIO2 up to 300 mm Hg and positive end-expiratory pressure at least 5 cm H2O (15 with acute respiratory distress syndrome), undergoing pressure support ventilation as per clinical decision. Sigh was added to pressure support ventilation as a 35 cm H2O continuous positive airway pressure period lasting 3-4 seconds at different rates (no-Sigh vs 0.5, 1, and 2 Sigh(s)/min). All study phases were randomly performed and lasted 20 minutes. In the last minutes of each phase, we measured arterial blood gases, changes in end-expiratory lung volume of nondependent and dependent regions, tidal volume reaching nondependent and dependent lung (Vtnondep and Vtdep), dynamic intratidal ventilation heterogeneity, defined as the average ratio of Vt reaching nondependent/Vt reaching dependent lung regions along inspiration (VtHit). With Sigh, oxygenation improved (p ventilation heterogeneity. Our study generates the hypothesis that in ventilated acute respiratory failure patients, Sigh may enhance regional lung protection.

  14. Acute respiratory distress syndrome following cutaneous exposure to Lysol: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y Y; Lu, C C; Perng, R P

    1999-12-01

    Lysol (mixed cresols) is a brand of popular detergent commonly used to disinfect toilets and floors in Taiwan. We report a patient with acute respiratory failure immediately following chemical burns caused by skin contact with Lysol solution. On admission, chest radiography showed bilateral diffuse pulmonary infiltrates and an arterial blood gas analysis disclosed hypoxemia refractory to a high concentration of oxygen by inhalation. Under the impression of acute respiratory distress syndrome, our patient was admitted to the intensive care unit for respiratory care. Poor clinical improvement was noted, despite aggressive respiratory therapy. High-dose steroid therapy (hydrocortisone 30 mg/kg/day) was administered from the seventh day after mechanical ventilation began and the ratio of arterial partial pressure of oxygen to fractional concentration of oxygen in inspired gas improved thereafter. The amount of steroid was gradually tapered to the maintenance dose and the patient was successfully weaned from the ventilator after a 93-day course of mechanical ventilation.

  15. Predicting recovery from acute kidney injury in critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Itenov, Theis S; Berthelsen, Rasmus Ehrenfried; Jensen, Jens-Ulrik

    2018-01-01

    these patients. DESIGN: Observational study with development and validation of a risk prediction model. SETTING: Nine academic ICUs in Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: Development cohort of critically ill patients with AKI at ICU admission from the Procalcitonin and Survival Study cohort (n = 568), validation cohort...

  16. Interobserver agreement for post mortem renal histopathology and diagnosis of acute tubular necrosis in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassford, Neil J; Skene, Alison; Guardiola, Maria B; Chan, Matthew J; Bagshaw, Sean M; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Solez, Kim

    2017-12-01

    The renal histopathology of critically ill patients dying with acute kidney injury (AKI) in intensive care units of high income countries remains uncertain. Retrospective observational assessment of interobserver agreement in the reporting of renal post mortem histopathology, and the ability of pathologists blinded to the clinical context to independently identify the presence of pre-mortem AKI from digital images of histological sections from 34 critically ill patients dying in teaching hospitals in Australia and Canada. We identified a heterogeneous cohort with a median age of 65 years (interquartile range [IQR], 56.5-77), APACHE II score of 27 (IQR, 19-33), and sepsis as the most common admission diagnosis (12/34; 35%). The most common proximate causes of death were cardiovascular (19/34; 56%) and respiratory (7/34; 21%) failure. AKI was common, with 23 patients (68%) developing RIFLE-F AKI, and 21 patients (62%) receiving renal replacement therapy. Structured reporting for tubular inflammation showed excellent agreement (kappa = 1), but no other subdomain demonstrated better than moderate agreement (kappa histopathology in critically ill patients is neither robust nor reproducible; independent pathologists agree poorly on the diagnosis of ATN, and their structural assessment appears dissociated from ante-mortem renal function.

  17. Elementary School-Based Influenza Vaccination: Evaluating Impact on Respiratory Illness Absenteeism and Laboratory-Confirmed Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjos, Sonia A.; Irving, Stephanie A.; Meece, Jennifer K.; Belongia, Edward A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies of influenza vaccine effectiveness in schools have assessed all-cause absenteeism rather than laboratory-confirmed influenza. We conducted an observational pilot study to identify absences due to respiratory illness and laboratory-confirmed influenza in schools with and without school-based vaccination. Methods A local public health agency initiated school-based influenza vaccination in two Wisconsin elementary schools during October 2010 (exposed schools); two nearby schools served as a comparison group (non-exposed schools). Absences due to fever or cough illness were monitored for 12 weeks. During the 4 weeks of peak influenza activity, parents of absent children with fever/cough illness were contacted and offered influenza testing. Results Parental consent for sharing absenteeism data was obtained for 937 (57%) of 1,640 students. Fifty-two percent and 28%, respectively, of all students in exposed and non-exposed schools were vaccinated. Absences due to fever or cough illness were significantly lower in the exposed schools during seven of 12 surveillance weeks. Twenty-seven percent of students at exposed schools and 39% at unexposed schools had one or more days of absence due to fever/cough illness (pabsenteeism due to fever or cough illness, but not absenteeism for other reasons. Although nonspecific, absence due to fever or cough illness may be a useful surrogate endpoint in school-based studies if identification of laboratory confirmed influenza is not feasible. PMID:23991071

  18. Severe Plasmodium ovale malaria complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome in a young Caucasian man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Abramo, Alessandra; Gebremeskel Tekle, Saba; Iannetta, Marco; Scorzolini, Laura; Oliva, Alessandra; Paglia, Maria Grazia; Corpolongo, Angela; Nicastri, Emanuele

    2018-04-02

    Although Plasmodium ovale is considered the cause of only mild malaria, a case of severe malaria due to P. ovale with acute respiratory distress syndrome is reported. A 37-year old Caucasian man returning home from Angola was admitted for ovale malaria to the National Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani in Rome, Italy. Two days after initiation of oral chloroquine treatment, an acute respiratory distress syndrome was diagnosed through chest X-ray and chest CT scan with intravenous contrast. Intravenous artesunate and oral doxycycline were started and he made a full recovery. Ovale malaria is usually considered a tropical infectious disease associated with low morbidity and mortality. However, severe disease and death have occasionally been reported. In this case clinical failure of oral chloroquine treatment with clinical progression towards acute respiratory distress syndrome is described.

  19. CLINICAL AND IMMUNOLOGICAL EFFICACY OF INOSINE PRANOBEX FOR ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN WITH ATOPIC ASTHMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Bulgakova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence rate of atopic asthma in children remains high. One of the reasons for lack of control over asthma symptoms is repeated infection. The article describes results from the study of immunomodulating medication inosine pranobex used in treatment of acute respiratory infections in children with atopic asthma. The results obtained prove the efficacy and safety of this medication. The use of this immunomodifier with antiviral activity during the period of acute respiratory infection in children with atopic asthma contributes to shortening of intoxication and catarrhal signs duration, elimination of viral agents. Key words: asthma, acute respiratory infections, immunomodifiers, inosine pranobex, children. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(3:98-105

  20. Variables predictive of outcome in patients with acute hypercapneic respiratory failure treated with noninvasive ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salahuddin, N.; Irfan, M.; Khan, S.; Naeem, M.; Haque, A.S.

    2010-01-01

    To assess results with NIV in acute hypercapneic respiratory failure and to identify outcome predictors. This was a retrospective observational study on consecutive patients presenting with acute type II respiratory failure and meeting criteria for NIV use over a 5 year period. Patients presenting with haemodynamic instability, inability to protect their airway, malignant arrhythmias and recent oesophageal surgery were excluded. Univariate and Multivariate regression analysis was used to determine the impact on survival. A p value of 35 Meq/L (adjusted Odds ratio 0.9; 95% CI 0.83, 0.98, p < 0.015) identified those less at risk for intubation. NIV was found to be both safe and effective in the management of acute hypercapneic respiratory failure. Sepsis and serum HCO/sub 3/ at admission identified patients having poor outcomes (JPMA 60:13; 2010). (author)

  1. Acute Respiratory Viral Infection in Children: Modern Approaches to Diagnosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A. Baranov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to acute respiratory viral infections (ARVI in children. ARVI take one of the leading places in a childhood morbidity structure. The article provides an overview of the clinical guidelines developed and approved by the professional association «Union of Pediatricians of Russia» for acute respiratory infections in children. These guidelines summarize the experience of the leading world and domestic specialists, contain scientific and practical data that correspond to the most relevant trends in the management of children with this pathology. The authors present modern information on the etiology, pathogenesis, classification, clinical findings and differential diagnosis of various nosological forms of acute respiratory tract infections in the pediatric population. The general (strategic principles of drug-free and drug treatment are discussed in detail.

  2. PIDOTIMOD IN TREATMENT OF CHILDREN WITH ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTION WITH CONCOMITANT RECURRENT OBSTRUCTIVE SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    E. E. Lokshina; O. V. Kravchenko; O. V. Zaytseva

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory infections are frequent in children; consequently evaluation of prophylactic effectiveness of immunomodulators is needed. Objective: to evaluate of clinical, immunological efficacy and safety of pidotimod in complex treatment of children with acute respiratory infections (ARI) and obstructive syndrome. Methods: patients 3–10 years old hospitalized with ARI and obstructive syndrome participated the study. Children from first group (n = 30) were treated with pidotimod 400 mg 2 times...

  3. Pulmonary Specific Ancillary Treatment for Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome : Proceedings From the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamburro, Robert F.; Kneyber, Martin C. J.

    Objective: To provide an overview of the current literature on pulmonary-specific therapeutic approaches to pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome to determine recommendations for clinical practice and/or future research. Data Sources: PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, SCOPUS, and the Cochrane Library

  4. Decision support tool for early differential diagnosis of acute lung injury and cardiogenic pulmonary edema in medical critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmickl, Christopher N; Shahjehan, Khurram; Li, Guangxi; Dhokarh, Rajanigandha; Kashyap, Rahul; Janish, Christopher; Alsara, Anas; Jaffe, Allan S; Hubmayr, Rolf D; Gajic, Ognjen

    2012-01-01

    At the onset of acute hypoxic respiratory failure, critically ill patients with acute lung injury (ALI) may be difficult to distinguish from those with cardiogenic pulmonary edema (CPE). No single clinical parameter provides satisfying prediction. We hypothesized that a combination of those will facilitate early differential diagnosis. In a population-based retrospective development cohort, validated electronic surveillance identified critically ill adult patients with acute pulmonary edema. Recursive partitioning and logistic regression were used to develop a decision support tool based on routine clinical information to differentiate ALI from CPE. Performance of the score was validated in an independent cohort of referral patients. Blinded post hoc expert review served as gold standard. Of 332 patients in a development cohort, expert reviewers (κ, 0.86) classified 156 as having ALI and 176 as having CPE. The validation cohort had 161 patients (ALI = 113, CPE = 48). The score was based on risk factors for ALI and CPE, age, alcohol abuse, chemotherapy, and peripheral oxygen saturation/Fio(2) ratio. It demonstrated good discrimination (area under curve [AUC] = 0.81; 95% CI, 0.77-0.86) and calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow [HL] P = .16). Similar performance was obtained in the validation cohort (AUC = 0.80; 95% CI, 0.72-0.88; HL P = .13). A simple decision support tool accurately classifies acute pulmonary edema, reserving advanced testing for a subset of patients in whom satisfying prediction cannot be made. This novel tool may facilitate early inclusion of patients with ALI and CPE into research studies as well as improve and rationalize clinical management and resource use.

  5. The economic impact of the insured patients with severe chronic and acute illnesses: a qualitative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi Aji

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Little research has focused on the economic hardship among the insured with severe illnesses and high treatment costs, in particular, the consequence of poorer insurance coverage for high-cost illnesses. Therefore, we presented the case for identifying the experiences of insured patients with severe chronic and acute illnesses. This study identified a qualitative understanding of the economic impact of severe chronic and acute illnesses and household strategies to deal with high treatment costs. Design: Interviews were conducted with 19 insured households of three different health insurance programs with a family member that had been hospitalized for severe chronic or acute illnesses in either Banyumas or Margono Sukarjo hospitals in Banyumas, Central Java, Indonesia. A thematic analysis was applied to guide the interpretation of the data. Results: Insured households with a family member that had been hospitalized for severe chronic and acute illnesses were greatly affected by the high treatment costs. Four major issues emerged from this qualitative study: insured patients are still burdened with high out-of-pocket payments, households adopt various strategies to cope with the high cost of treatments, households experience financial hardships, and positive and negative perceptions of the insured regarding their health insurance coverage for acute and chronic illnesses. Conclusions: Askes and Jamsostek patients faced financial burdens from high cost sharing for hospital amenities, non-covered drugs, and treatments and other indirect costs. Meanwhile, Jamkesmas beneficiaries faced no financial burden for related medical services but were rather burdened with indirect costs for the carers. Households relied on internal resources to cover hospital bills as the first strategy, which included the mobilization of savings, sale of assets, and borrowing of money. External support was tapped secondarily and included financial support from

  6. [Influenza-related respiratory illnesses and associated causes among the elderly in a city in Northeast Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Aline de Andrade; Nunes, Marco Antônio Prado; Oliveira, Cristiane Costa da Cunha; Lima, Sônia Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Nationwide influenza vaccination campaigns are held annually in Brazil during the same time of the year. This study aimed to analyze deaths from respiratory illnesses and influenza-related causes among the elderly in the city of Aracaju, capital of Sergipe State, Brazil. Data were analyzed from the following databases: Information System on Influenza Epidemiological Surveillance (SIVEP_GRIPE), Hospital Information System (SIH), Mortality Information System (SIM), and Health Informatics Department (DATASUS), from 1998 to 2007, Sergipe State Central Laboratory (LACEN-SE), and rainfall data from the National Meteorology Institute (INMET). The year 2007 showed the highest mortality rate from influenza and related causes in elderly individuals. From 1998 to 2007, mortality rates from influenza-related respiratory illnesses and associated causes in Aracaju city were higher than in the States of Brazil, indicating the need to reformulate the influenza vaccination schedule in elderly residents of this city.

  7. The effect of acute exposure to hyperbaric oxygen on respiratory system mechanics in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubini, Alessandro; Porzionato, Andrea; Zara, Susi; Cataldi, Amelia; Garetto, Giacomo; Bosco, Gerardo

    2013-10-01

    This study was designed to investigate the possible effects of acute hyperbaric hyperoxia on respiratory mechanics of anaesthetised, positive-pressure ventilated rats. We measured respiratory mechanics by the end-inflation occlusion method in nine rats previously acutely exposed to hyperbaric hyperoxia in a standard fashion. The method allows the measurements of respiratory system elastance and of both the "ohmic" and of the viscoelastic components of airway resistance, which respectively depend on the newtonian pressure dissipation due to the ohmic airway resistance to air flow, and on the viscoelastic pressure dissipation caused by respiratory system tissues stress-relaxation. The activities of inducible and endothelial NO-synthase in the lung's tissues (iNOS and eNOS respectively) also were investigated. Data were compared with those obtained in control animals. We found that the exposure to hyperbaric hyperoxia increased respiratory system elastance and both the "ohmic" and viscoelastic components of inspiratory resistances. These changes were accompanied by increased iNOS but not eNOS activities. Hyperbaric hyperoxia was shown to acutely induce detrimental effects on respiratory mechanics. A possible causative role was suggested for increased nitrogen reactive species production because of increased iNOS activity.

  8. Seasonality of Acute Otitis Media and the Role of Respiratory Viral Activity in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockmann, Chris; Ampofo, Krow; Hersh, Adam L.; Carleton, Scott T.; Korgenski, Kent; Sheng, Xiaoming; Pavia, Andrew T.; Byington, Carrie L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute otitis media (AOM) occurs as a complication of viral upper respiratory tract infections in young children. AOM and respiratory viruses both display seasonal variation. Our objective was to examine the temporal association between circulating respiratory viruses and the occurrence of pediatric ambulatory care visits for AOM. Methods This retrospective study included 9 seasons of respiratory viral activity (2002-2010) in Utah. We used Intermountain Healthcare's electronic medical records to assess community respiratory viral activity via laboratory-based active surveillance and to identify children <18 years with outpatient visits and ICD-9 codes for AOM. We assessed the strength of the association between AOM and individual respiratory viruses using interrupted time series analyses. Results During the study period, 96,418 respiratory viral tests were performed; 46,460 (48%) were positive. The most commonly identified viruses were: RSV (22%), rhinovirus (8%), influenza (8%), parainfluenza (4%), human metapneumovirus (3%), and adenovirus (3%). AOM was diagnosed during 271,268 ambulatory visits. There were significant associations between peak activity of RSV, human metapneumovirus, influenza A, and office visits for AOM. Adenovirus, parainfluenza, and rhinovirus were not associated with visits for AOM. Conclusions Seasonal RSV, human metapneumovirus, and influenza activity were temporally associated with increased diagnoses of AOM among children. These findings support the role of individual respiratory viruses in the development AOM. These data also underscore the potential for respiratory viral vaccines to reduce the burden of AOM. PMID:23249910

  9. A chest radiograph scoring system in patients with severe acute respiratory infection: a validation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Emma; Haven, Kathryn; Reed, Peter; Bissielo, Ange; Harvey, Dave; McArthur, Colin; Bringans, Cameron; Freundlich, Simone; Ingram, R. Joan H.; Perry, David; Wilson, Francessa; Milne, David; Modahl, Lucy; Huang, Q. Sue; Gross, Diane; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Grant, Cameron C.

    2015-01-01

    The term severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) encompasses a heterogeneous group of respiratory illnesses. Grading the severity of SARI is currently reliant on indirect disease severity measures such as respiratory and heart rate, and the need for oxygen or intensive care. With the lungs being the primary organ system involved in SARI, chest radiographs (CXRs) are potentially useful for describing disease severity. Our objective was to develop and validate a SARI CXR severity scoring system. We completed validation within an active SARI surveillance project, with SARI defined using the World Health Organization case definition of an acute respiratory infection with a history of fever, or measured fever of ≥ 38 °C; and cough; and with onset within the last 10 days; and requiring hospital admission. We randomly selected 250 SARI cases. Admission CXR findings were categorized as: 1 = normal; 2 = patchy atelectasis and/or hyperinflation and/or bronchial wall thickening; 3 = focal consolidation; 4 = multifocal consolidation; and 5 = diffuse alveolar changes. Initially, four radiologists scored CXRs independently. Subsequently, a pediatrician, physician, two residents, two medical students, and a research nurse independently scored CXR reports. Inter-observer reliability was determined using a weighted Kappa (κ) for comparisons between radiologists; radiologists and clinicians; and clinicians. Agreement was defined as moderate (κ > 0.4–0.6), good (κ > 0.6–0.8) and very good (κ > 0.8–1.0). Agreement between the two pediatric radiologists was very good (κ = 0.83, 95 % CI 0.65–1.00) and between the two adult radiologists was good (κ = 0.75, 95 % CI 0.57–0. 93). Agreement of the clinicians with the radiologists was moderate-to-good (pediatrician:κ = 0.65; pediatric resident:κ = 0.69; physician:κ = 0.68; resident:κ = 0.67; research nurse:κ = 0.49, medical students: κ = 0.53 and κ = 0.56). Agreement between clinicians was good-to-very good

  10. Clinical features of acute respiratory viral infections in children in conjunction with pathology of pharyngeal tonsil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олександр Іванович Сміян

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to study clinical features of the clinical course of an acute respiratory viral infection in conjunction with pathology of pharyngeal tonsil in children of preschool age. Methods: generally clinical;Laboratory and instrumental;Statistical.Separation of viral infection was done using the methods of lumicroscopy and polymerase chain reaction from nasopharynx lavage.Statistical processing of received results was carried out with the help of standard statistical computer system «MicrosoftExcel» (2007 adapted for medical and biological studies. Result:In the clinical presentation of respiratory viral infection prevailed rhinorrhea, short cough, subfibrilitet with usual duration near 3 days. On the contrary in children with acute respiratory viral infections with pathology of the pharyngeal tonsil prevailed stuffiness in nose, productive cough, snore and decrease of hearing, ear ache, polyadenopathy. Fever had fibril and hectic character with duration more than 3 days. . Dyspeptic syndrome was demonstrated more intensively in children with acute respiratory viral infections with pathology of the pharyngeal tonsil and characterized with thickening on tongue, periodic ache in stomach, meteorism, constipation, stool instability. Conclusions: The main syndromes in the clinical presentation of an acute respiratory viral infection were: intoxicational, catarrhal and dyspeptic. In children with pathology of the pharyngeal tonsil the clinical course of ARVI was more evident with long course and increase of the frequency of complications of ARVI

  11. Roentgenologic aspects of acute respiratory in sufficiency after heart valve prosthesis implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pchelin, I.G.; Ishchenko, B.I.

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of the X-ray findings in 156 patients with acute respiratory insufficiency (ART) in the immediate periods after implantation of heart valve prostheses has shown that various pulmonary complications, such as pulmonary edema (in 84% of cases), atelectasis, hypoventilation (5.1%), hemothorax (6.4%), pneumothorax (0.6%) were the prerequisites for the development of respiratory disorders. Pneumonias were not the primary cause of ART but an additional factor for the respiratory disorder progress, for they develop in the presence of previous pulmonary changes. The necessity and possibility of establishing the pathogenetic mechanism of pulmonary edema is shown

  12. Acute or chronic respiratory failure. Assessment and management of patients with COPD in the emergency setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, G A; Hall, J B

    1989-06-16

    Patients with acute or chronic respiratory failure exhibit severe pulmonary impairment as a baseline characteristic. Additional minor insults can precipitate cardiopulmonary failure that requires hospital admission and possibly mechanical ventilation. Our approach to these patients emphasizes evaluation of the imbalance between neuromuscular competence and mechanical load on the respiratory system. In this way, reversible factors can be identified and corrected before they progress to inspiratory muscle fatigue and respiratory failure. For cases in which deterioration is inexorable, guidelines for mechanical ventilation are given and approaches to eventual liberation from the ventilator are reviewed.

  13. Pulmonary hydatid cyst in a pregnant patient causing acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hijazi Mohammed

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A 21-year-old primigravida, at 32 weeks of gestation, presented with acute onset of respiratory failure and circulatory shock. Chest imaging showed findings suggestive of ruptured hydatid cyst, which was confirmed by histology post-thoracotomy. Tissue cultures from the removed cyst grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis also. She was successfully managed in the intensive care unit and was then discharged home on antituberculosis medications in addition to albendazole after prolonged hospitalization and a need for chest tube for bronchopleural fistula. Acute respiratory failure and anaphylactic shock secondary to ruptured pulmonary hydatid cyst and superimposed pulmonary tuberculosis in a pregnant lady should be considered in patients living in endemic areas.

  14. Pathophysiology and Treatment of Acute Respiratory Failure in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The volume of air left in the lungs when airway closure occurs ... LUNG. 4. VOLUME. (LI r). 3. 2. YEARS. 20. 30. 40. 50. 60. NORMAL ADULT. (AI. 70. ADULT. WITH. ARF. (8). Fig. 1. Increasing closing volume shown in relation to age. is known as the .... with emphysema, by depressing the respiratory centre, will result in the ...

  15. Mortality Factor Survey of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tei-Chu Liu

    2009-03-01

    Conclusion: The mortality rate of intubation patients was 115 times higher than that of those who did not require intubation. Therefore, special care must be taken with SARS disease with severe infiltration chest X-ray images and respiratory distress. Positive medical treatment should be performed to lower the mortality rate.

  16. Prevalence of viral aetiologies in children with acute respiratory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ; 6.4%), influenza (20; 5.2%), respiratory syncytial virus (19; 4.9%) and unidentified viruses (86; 22.2%). Majority of the viruses were isolated from patients with LRTI (110; 28.4%) while URTI had 67 (17.3%) isolates. The age cluster 1-12months ...

  17. Farmer's Lung: Causes and Symptoms of Mold and Dust Induced Respiratory Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Youth VCE Publications / 442 / 442-602 Farmer's Lung: Causes and Symptoms of Mold and Dust Induced Respiratory ... Date August 18, 2014 Available As Farmer's Lung: Causes and Symptoms of Mold and Dust Induced Respiratory ...

  18. High incidence of respiratory infections in 'nil by mouth' tube-fed acute ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, P C; Lee, A H; Binns, C W

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory infections are common in acute stroke. Previous studies have found dysphagia is associated with respiratory infections. Of interest is whether patients who are 'Nil by Mouth' (NBM) and tube fed have higher risk of developing infections due to aspiration of bacteria-laden saliva or refluxed material than stroke patients who are fed orally. Prospective cohort of 330 ischemic stroke survivors were followed for 30 days and infections recorded. 115 infections were treated with antibiotics; these included 51 respiratory infections. Incidence of infection in NBM tube-fed stroke patients (n = 74) was 69%, with 30 respiratory infections occurring in 74 patients who received enteral feeding after stroke. Logistic regression analysis showed tube feeding during admission was a significant risk for respiratory infection. We also saw a significant time-to-event effect with 73% (22/30) respiratory infections in tube-fed survivors diagnosed on days 2-4 after stroke, and 76% (39/51) of infections in all tube-fed survivors occurring by day 7 after stroke. Relevance to a theory of critical period of susceptibility to infection in acute stroke is discussed. NBM tube-fed survivors were unlikely to have aspirated anything other than saliva/secretions or reflux, yet experienced significantly higher rates of respiratory infections than survivors fed orally. Stringent oral care and measures to prevent reflux are potentially modifiable aspects of stroke management. 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Changes of Respiratory Mechanics in COPD Patients from Stable State to Acute Exacerbations with Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceriana, Piero; Vitacca, Michele; Carlucci, Annalisa; Paneroni, Mara; Pisani, Lara; Nava, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    Symptoms, clinical course, functional and biological data during an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (EXCOPD) have been investigated, but data on physiological changes of respiratory mechanics during a severe exacerbation with respiratory acidosis requiring noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) are scant. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes of respiratory mechanics in COPD patients comparing data observed during EXCOPD with those observed during stable state in the recovery phase. In 18 COPD patients having severe EXCOPD requiring NIMV for global respiratory failure, we measured respiratory mechanics during both EXCOPD (T0) and once the patients achieved a stable state (T1). The diaphragm and inspiratory muscles effort was significantly increased under relapse, as well as the pressure-time product of the diaphragm and the inspiratory muscle (PTPdi and PTPes). The resistive loads to breathe (i.e., PEEPi,dyn, compliance and inspiratory resistances) were also markedly increased, while the maximal pressures generated by the diaphragm and the inspiratory muscles, together with forced expired volumes were decreased. All these indices statistically improved but with a great intrasubject variability in stable condition. Moreover, tension-time index (TTdi) significantly improved from the EXCOPD state to the condition of clinical stability (0.156 ± 0.04 at T0 vs. 0.082 ± 0.02 at T1 p < 0.001). During an EXCOPD, the load/capacity of the respiratory pump is impaired, and although the patients exhibit a rapid shallow breathing pattern, this does not necessarily correlate with a TTdi ≥ 0.15. These changes are reverted once they recover from the EXCOPD, despite a large variability between patients.

  20. The acute effects of body position strategies and respiratory therapy in paralyzed patients with acute lung injury

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Kenneth; Johannigman, Jay A; Campbell, Robert S; Marraccini, Ann; Luchette, Fred A; Frame, Scott B; Branson, Richard D

    2001-01-01

    Background: Routine turning of critically ill patients is a standard of care. In recent years, specialized beds that provide automated turning have been introduced. These beds have been reported to improve lung function, reduce hospital-acquired pneumonia, and facilitate secretion removal. This trial was designed to measure the physiological effects of routine turning and respiratory therapy in comparison with continuous lateral rotation (CLR). Methods: The study was a prospective, quasi-expe...

  1. Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Sydnrome : Fluid Management in the PICU

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingelse, SA; Wösten-van Asperen, RM; Lemson, J; Daams, JG; Bem, R.A.; van Woensel, JB

    2016-01-01

    The administration of an appropriate volume of intravenous fluids, while avoiding fluid overload, is a major challenge in the pediatric intensive care unit. Despite our efforts, fluid overload is a very common clinical observation in critically ill children, in particular in those with pediatric

  2. Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Fluid Management in the PICU

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingelse, Sarah A.; Wösten-van Asperen, Roelie M.; Lemson, Joris; Daams, Joost G.; Bem, Reinout A.; van Woensel, Job B.

    2016-01-01

    The administration of an appropriate volume of intravenous fluids, while avoiding fluid overload, is a major challenge in the pediatric intensive care unit. Despite our efforts, fluid overload is a very common clinical observation in critically ill children, in particular in those with pediatric

  3. Acute hypothyroidism in a severely ill surgical patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, T; Hjortsø, N C

    1988-01-01

    A case of acute postoperative hypothyroidism in a 62-year old woman is presented. One month before emergency admission because of a perforated gastric ulcer the patient had normal thyroid function, despite removal of a thyroid adenoma 20 years earlier. Following surgery the patient developed...

  4. Pilot study of participant-collected nasal swabs for acute respiratory infections in a low-income, urban population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vargas CY

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Celibell Y Vargas,1 Liqun Wang,1 Yaritza Castellanos de Belliard,1 Maria Morban,1 Hilbania Diaz,1 Elaine L Larson,2,3 Philip LaRussa,1 Lisa Saiman,1,4 Melissa S Stockwell1,5,6 1Department of Pediatrics, 2School of Nursing, 3Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, 4Department of Infection Prevention and Control, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, 5Department of Population and Family Health, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, 6NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY, USA Objective: To assess the feasibility and validity of unsupervised participant-collected nasal swabs to detect respiratory pathogens in a low-income, urban minority population. Methods: This project was conducted as part of an ongoing community-based surveillance study in New York City to identify viral etiologies of acute respiratory infection. In January 2014, following sample collection by trained research assistants, participants with acute respiratory infection from 30 households subsequently collected and returned a self-collected/parent-collected nasal swab via mail. Self/parental swabs corresponding with positive reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction primary research samples were analyzed. Results: Nearly all (96.8%, n=30/31 households agreed to participate; 100% reported returning the sample and 29 were received (median time: 8 days. Most (18; 62.1% of the primary research samples were positive. For eight influenza-positive research samples, seven (87.5% self-swabs were also positive. For ten other respiratory pathogen-positive research samples, eight (80.0% self-swabs were positive. Sensitivity of self-swabs for any respiratory pathogen was 83.3% and 87.5% for influenza, and specificity for both was 100%. There was no relationship between level of education and concordance of results between positive research samples and their matching participant swab. Conclusion: In this pilot study, self

  5. Effects of upper respiratory tract illnesses, ibuprofen and caffeine on reaction time and alertness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew P; Nutt, David J

    2014-05-01

    Compared with healthy individuals, those with upper respiratory tract illnesses (URTIs) report reduced alertness and have slower reaction times. It is important to evaluate medication that can remove this behavioural malaise. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of a combination of ibuprofen plus caffeine with ibuprofen and caffeine alone, and placebo on malaise associated with URTIs, as measured by psychomotor performance and mood testing. Volunteers were randomly assigned to one of four medication conditions as follows: 200 mg ibuprofen and 100 mg caffeine; 200 mg ibuprofen; 100 mg caffeine; placebo. A single oral dose was given and testing followed for 3 h. Efficacy variables were based on the volunteers' performance, measured by psychomotor performance and mood. The pre-drug results confirmed that those with an URTI had a more negative mood and impaired performance. Results from the simple reaction time task, at both 55- and 110-min post-dosing, showed that a single-dose of caffeinated products (I200/C100 and CAF100) led to significantly faster reaction times than IBU200 and placebo. These effects were generally confirmed with the other performance tasks. Subjective measures showed that the combination of ibuprofen and caffeine was superior to the other conditions. There were no serious adverse events reported, and study medication was well tolerated. The results from the post-drug assessments suggest that a combination of ibuprofen and caffeine was the optimum treatment for malaise associated with URTIs in that it had significant effects on objective performance and subjective measures.

  6. Human Herpesvirus 6 Infection Presenting as an Acute Febrile Illness Associated with Thrombocytopenia and Leukopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Arnež

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an infant with acute fever, thrombocytopenia, and leukopenia, coming from an endemic region for tick-borne encephalitis, human granulocytic anaplasmosis, and hantavirus infection. The primary human herpesvirus 6 infection was diagnosed by seroconversion of specific IgM and IgG and by identification of viral DNA in the acute patient’s serum. The patient did not show skin rash suggestive of exanthema subitum during the course of illness.

  7. Demographic determinants of acute gastrointestinal illness in Canada: a population study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horrocks Julie

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastrointestinal illness is an important global public health issue, even in developed countries, where the morbidity and economic impact are significant. Our objective was to evaluate the demographic determinants of acute gastrointestinal illness in Canadians. Methods We used data from two population-based studies conducted in select communities between 2001 and 2003. Together, the studies comprised 8,108 randomly selected respondents; proxies were used for all respondents under 12 years and for respondents under 19 years at the discretion of the parent or guardian. Using univariate and multivariate logistic regression, we evaluated the following demographic determinants: age, gender, cultural group, and urban/rural status of the respondent, highest education level of the respondent or proxy, number of people in the household, and total annual household income. Two-way interaction terms were included in the multivariate analyses. The final multivariate model included income, age, gender, and the interaction between income and gender. Results After adjusting for income, gender, and their interaction, children under 10 years had the highest risk of acute gastrointestinal illness, followed by young adults aged 20 to 24 years. For males, the risk of acute gastrointestinal illness was similar across all income levels, but for females the risk was much higher in the lowest income category. Specifically, in those with total annual household incomes of less than $20,000, the odds of acute gastrointestinal illness were 2.46 times higher in females than in males. Conclusion Understanding the demographic determinants of acute gastrointestinal illness is essential in order to identify vulnerable groups to which intervention and prevention efforts can be targeted.

  8. Global, regional, and national disease burden estimates of acute lower respiratory infections due to respiratory syncytial virus in young children in 2015 : A systematic review and modelling study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shi, Ting; McAllister, David A.; O'Brien, Katherine L.; Simoes, Eric A. F.; Madhi, Shabir A.; Gessner, Bradford D.; Polack, Fernando P.; Balsells, Evelyn; Acacio, Sozinho; Aguayo, Claudia; Alassani, Issifou; Ali, Asad; Antonio, Martin; Awasthi, Shally; Awori, Juliet O.; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Baggett, Henry C.; Baillie, Vicky L.; Balmaseda, Angel; Barahona, Alfredo; Basnet, Sudha; Bassat, Quique; Basualdo, Wilma; Bigogo, Godfrey; Bont, Louis; Breiman, Robert F.; Brooks, W. Abdullah; Broor, Shobha; Bruce, Nigel; Bruden, Dana; Buchy, Philippe; Campbell, Stuart; Carosone-Link, Phyllis; Chadha, Mandeep; Chipeta, James; Chou, Monidarin; Clara, Wilfrido; Cohen, Cheryl; de Cuellar, Elizabeth; Dang, Duc Anh; Dash-yandag, Budragchaagiin; Deloria-Knoll, Maria; Dherani, Mukesh; Eap, Tekchheng; Ebruke, Bernard E.; Echavarria, Marcela; de Freitas Lázaro Emediato, Carla Cecília; Fasce, Rodrigo A.; Feikin, Daniel R.; Feng, Luzhao; Gentile, Angela; Gordon, Aubree; Goswami, Doli; Goyet, Sophie; Groome, Michelle J; Halasa, Natasha; Hirve, Siddhivinayak; Homaira, Nusrat; Howie, Stephen R.C.; Jara, Jorge; Jroundi, Imane; Kartasasmita, Cissy B.; Khuri-Bulos, Najwa; Kotloff, Karen L.; Krishnan, Anand; Libster, Romina; Lopez, Olga; Lucero, Marilla G.; Lucion, Florencia; Lupisan, Socorro P.; Marcone, Debora N.; McCracken, John P.; Mejia, Mario; Moisi, Jennifer C.; Montgomery, Joel M.; Moore, David P.; Moraleda, Cinta; Moyes, Jocelyn; Munywoki, Patrick; Mutyara, Kuswandewi; Nicol, Mark P.; Nokes, D. James; Nymadawa, Pagbajabyn; da Costa Oliveira, Maria Tereza; Oshitani, Histoshi; Pandey, Nitin; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Phillips, Lia N.; Picot, Valentina Sanchez; Rahman, Mustafizur; Rakoto-Andrianarivelo, Mala; Rasmussen, Zeba A.; Rath, Barbara A.; Robinson, Annick; Romero, Candice; Russomando, Graciela; Salimi, Vahid; Sawatwong, Pongpun; Scheltema, Nienke; Schweiger, Brunhilde; Scott, J. Anthony G.; Seidenberg, Phil; Shen, Kunling; Singleton, Rosalyn; Sotomayor, Viviana; Strand, Tor A.; Sutanto, Agustinus; Sylla, Mariam; Tapia, Milagritos D.; Thamthitiwat, Somsak; Thomas, Elizabeth D.; Tokarz, Rafal; Turner, Claudia; Venter, Marietjie; Waicharoen, Sunthareeya; Wang, Jianwei; Watthanaworawit, Wanitda; Yoshida, Lay Myint; Yu, Hongjie; Zar, Heather J.; Campbell, Harry; Nair, Harish

    2017-01-01

    Background: We have previously estimated that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was associated with 22% of all episodes of (severe) acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI) resulting in 55 000 to 199 000 deaths in children younger than 5 years in 2005. In the past 5 years, major research activity on

  9. Increased risk of respiratory illness associated with kerosene fuel use among women and children in urban Bangalore, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Young; Baumgartner, Jill; Harnden, Sarah; Alexander, Bruce H; Town, Robert J; D'Souza, George; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy

    2015-02-01

    Kerosene is a widely used cooking and lighting fuel in developing countries. The potential respiratory health effects of cooking with kerosene relative to cooking with cleaner fuels such as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) have not been well characterised. We sampled 600 households from six urban neighbourhoods in Bangalore, India. Each household's primary cook, usually the woman of the house, was interviewed to collect information on current domestic fuel use and whether there was any presence of respiratory symptoms or illness in her or in the children in the household. Our analysis was limited to 547 adult females (ages 18-85) and 845 children (ages 0-17) in households exclusively cooking with either kerosene or LPG. We investigated the associations between kerosene use and the likelihood of having respiratory symptoms or illness using multivariate logistic regression models. Among adult women, cooking with kerosene was associated with cough (OR=1.88; 95% CI 1.19 to 2.99), bronchitis (OR=1.54; 95% CI 1.00 to 2.37), phlegm (OR=1.51; 95% CI 0.98 to 2.33) and chest illness (OR=1.61; 95% CI 1.02 to 2.53), relative to cooking with LPG in the multivariate models. Among children, living in a household cooking with kerosene was associated with bronchitis (OR=1.91; 95% CI 1.17 to 3.13), phlegm (OR=2.020; 95% CI 1.29 to 3.74) and chest illness (OR=1.70; 95% CI 0.99 to 2.90) after adjusting for other covariates. We also found associations between kerosene use and wheezing, difficulty breathing and asthma in adults and cough and wheezing in children, though these associations were not statistically significant. Women and children in households cooking with kerosene were more likely to have respiratory symptoms and illnesses compared with those in households cooking with LPG. Transitioning from kerosene to LPG for cooking may improve respiratory health among adult women and children in this population. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where

  10. Respiratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    The words "respiratory" and "respiration" refer to the lungs and breathing. ... Boron WF. Organization of the respiratory system. In: Boron WF, Boulpaep EL, eds. Medical Physiology . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 26.

  11. Acute Illness Protocol for Maple Syrup Urine Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodan, Lance H; Aldubayan, Saud H; Berry, Gerard T; Levy, Harvey L

    2018-01-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs) are genetic disorders that disrupt enzyme activity, cellular transport, or energy production. They are individually rare but collectively have an incidence of 1:1000. Most patients with IEMs are followed up by a physician with expertise in biochemical genetics (metabolism), but may present outside this setting. Because IEMs can present acutely with life-threatening crises that require specific interventions, it is critical for the emergency medicine physician, pediatrician, internist, and critical care physician as well as the biochemical geneticist to have information on the initial assessment and management of patients with these disorders. Appropriate early care can be lifesaving. This protocol is not designed to replace the expert consultation of a biochemical geneticist, but rather to improve early care and increase the level of comfort of the acute care physician with initial management of maple syrup urine disease until specialty consultation is obtained.

  12. Acute hypothyroidism in a severely ill surgical patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, T; Hjortsø, N C

    1988-01-01

    A case of acute postoperative hypothyroidism in a 62-year old woman is presented. One month before emergency admission because of a perforated gastric ulcer the patient had normal thyroid function, despite removal of a thyroid adenoma 20 years earlier. Following surgery the patient developed...... circulatory instability, renal insufficiency, hypothermia and immeasurable concentrations of thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). Treatment with triiodothyronine was commenced but the patient died following an episode of severe hypotension....

  13. Successful management of acute respiratory failure with noninvasive mechanical ventilation after drowning, in an epileptic-patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Ruggeri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sea drowning is a common cause of accidental death worldwide. Respiratory complications such as acute pulmonary oedema, which is often complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome, is often seen. Noninvasive ventilation is already widely used as a first approach to treat acute respiratory failure resulting from multiple diseases. We report a case of a 45 year old man with a history of epilepsy, motor and mental handicap who developed acute respiratory failure secondary to sea water drowning after an epileptic crisis. We illustrate successful and rapid management of this case with noninvasive ventilation. We emphasize the advantages and limitations of using noninvasive ventilation to treat acute respiratory failure due to sea water drowning syndrome.

  14. [Acute respiratory failure as the sol inaugural sign of Arnold-Chiari malformation. Two cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaouch, N; Meraï, S; Cheikh Rouhou, S; Ben Romdhane, K; Ben Mrad, S; Besbes, M; Tritar, F

    2007-10-01

    Arnold-Chiari malformation is an occipitocervical malformation where the cerebellar amygdales descend below the occipital foramen. Acute respiratory failure is an exceptional inaugural sign. We report two cases disclosed by alveolar hypoventilation associated with type I Arnold-Chiari malformation. The two patients age 51 and 52 years had an uneventful past history and presented with hypercapnic encephalopathy with acute respiratory failure requiring ventilatory assistance. Respiratory function tests, helicoidal thoracic computed tomographic angiography, electromyogram, cardiac echography, and thyroid and immunological tests were normal. Blood gases and polysomnography were in favor of central hypoventilation without sleep apnea. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated type I Arnold-Chiari malformation. The course was complicated by recurrent respiratory failure in both patients. Surgical decompression performed for the first patient provided no improvement. This patient died two months after surgery subsequent to aspiration pneumonia. The second patient was treated with continuous positive pressure noninvasive ventilatory assistance and had a good outcome at 25 months. These two cases illustrate the absence of any neurological sign, acute respiratory failure being the only sign of Arnold-Chiari malformation.

  15. Smart Care™ versus respiratory physiotherapy-driven manual weaning for critically ill adult patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Corinne; Victor, Elivane S; Pieri, Talita; Henn, Renata; Santana, Carolina; Giovanetti, Erica; Saghabi, Cilene; Timenetsky, Karina; Caserta Eid, Raquel; Silva, Eliezer; Matos, Gustavo F J; Schettino, Guilherme P P; Barbas, Carmen S V

    2015-06-11

    A recent meta-analysis showed that weaning with SmartCare™ (Dräger, Lübeck, Germany) significantly decreased weaning time in critically ill patients. However, its utility compared with respiratory physiotherapist-protocolized weaning is still a matter of debate. We hypothesized that weaning with SmartCare™ would be as effective as respiratory physiotherapy-driven weaning in critically ill patients. Adult critically ill patients mechanically ventilated for more than 24 hours in the adult intensive care unit of the Albert Einstein Hospital, São Paulo, Brazil, were randomly assigned to be weaned either by progressive discontinuation of pressure support ventilation (PSV) with SmartCare™. Demographic data, respiratory function parameters, level of PSV, tidal volume (VT), positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), inspired oxygen fraction (FIO2), peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2), end-tidal carbon dioxide concentration (EtCO2) and airway occlusion pressure at 0.1 second (P0.1) were recorded at the beginning of the weaning process and before extubation. Mechanical ventilation time, weaning duration and rate of extubation failure were compared. Seventy patients were enrolled 35 in each group. There was no difference between the two groups concerning age, sex or diagnosis at study entry. There was no difference in maximal inspiratory pressure, maximal expiratory pressure, forced vital capacity or rapid shallow breathing index at the beginning of the weaning trial. PEEP, VT, FIO2, SpO2, respiratory rate, EtCO2 and P0.1 were similar between the two groups, but PSV was not (median: 8 vs. 10 cmH2O; p =0.007). When the patients were ready for extubation, PSV (8 vs. 5 cmH2O; p =0.015) and PEEP (8 vs. 5 cmH2O; p respiratory physiotherapy-driven weaning group. Total duration of mechanical ventilation (3.5 [2.0-7.3] days vs. 4.1 [2.7-7.1] days; p =0.467) and extubation failure (2 vs. 2; p =1.00) were similar between the two groups. Weaning duration was shorter in the

  16. Efficiency of Oxygen Therapy by Simple Face Mask and Nasal Cannula for Acute Respiratory Failure in Infants and Young Children

    OpenAIRE

    Ioana D. BADIU TIŞA; Sorana BOLBOACĂ; Nicolae MIU; Daniela IACOB

    2013-01-01

    Premises: Acute respiratory failure caused by respiratory diseases, which is a frequent pathology in infants and young children, requires oxygen therapy, which can be administered by different devices. Objectives: To evaluate the efficiency of two devices for oxygen administration by determining a clinical appraisal score for acute respiratory failure in infants and young children by oxygen therapy using simple face masks and nasal cannulas. Material and methods: 74 children, aged between one...

  17. Parents' help-seeking behaviours during acute childhood illness at home: A contribution to explanatory theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, Sarah J; Jones, Caroline H D; Lakhanpaul, Monica; Roland, Damian T; Thompson, Matthew J

    2016-03-01

    Uncertainty and anxiety surround parents' decisions to seek medical help for an acutely ill child. Consultation rates for children are rising, yet little is known about factors that influence parents' help-seeking behaviours. We used focus groups and interviews to examine how 27 parents of children under five years, from a range of socioeconomic groups in the East Midlands of England, use information to make decisions during acute childhood illness at home. This article reports findings elucidating factors that influence help-seeking behaviours. Parents reported that decision-making during acute childhood illness was influenced by a range of personal, social and health service factors. Principal among these was parents' concern to do the right thing for their child. Their ability to assess the severity of the illness was influenced by knowledge and experience of childhood illness. When parents were unable to access their general practitioner (GP), feared criticism from or had lost trust in their GP, some parents reported using services elsewhere such as Accident and Emergency. These findings contribute to explanatory theory concerning parents' help-seeking behaviours. Professional and political solutions have not reduced demand; therefore, collaborative approaches involving the public and professionals are now needed to improve parents' access to information. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Intensive Care Physiotherapy during Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, Laveena; Kobayashi, Tadahiro; DeBacker, Julian; Doobay, Ravi; Telesnicki, Teagan; Lo, Vincent; Cote, Nathalie; Cypel, Marcelo; Keshavjee, Shaf; Ferguson, Niall D; Fan, Eddy

    2017-02-01

    There are limited data on physiotherapy during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We sought to characterize physiotherapy delivered to patients with ARDS supported with ECMO, as well as to evaluate the association of this therapeutic modality with mortality. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all adult patients with ARDS supported with ECMO at our institution between 2010 and 2015. The highest level of daily activity while on ECMO was coded using the ICU Mobility Scale. Through multivariable logistic regression, we evaluated the association between intensive care unit (ICU) physiotherapy and ICU mortality. In an exploratory univariate analysis, we also evaluated factors associated with a higher intensity of ICU rehabilitation while on ECMO. Of 107 patients who underwent ECMO, 61 (57%) had ARDS requiring venovenous ECMO. The ICU physiotherapy team was consulted for 82% (n = 50) of patients. Thirty-nine percent (n = 18) of these patients achieved an activity level of 2 or higher (active exercises in bed), and 17% (n = 8) achieved an activity level 4 or higher (actively sitting over the side of the bed). In an exploratory analysis, consultation with the ICU physiotherapy team was associated with decreased ICU mortality (odds ratio, 0.19; 95% confidence interval, 0.04-0.98). In univariate analysis, severity-of-illness factors differentiated higher-intensity and lower-intensity physiotherapy. Physiotherapy during ECMO is feasible and safe when performed by an experienced team and executed in stages. Although our study suggests an association with improved ICU mortality, future research is needed to identify potential barriers, optimal timing, dosage, and safety profile.

  19. C-reactive protein point-of-care testing in acutely ill children: a mixed methods study in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Bruel, Ann; Jones, Caroline; Thompson, Matthew; Mant, David

    2016-04-01

    Point-of-care C-reactive protein (CRP) testing of adults with acute respiratory infection in primary care reduces antibiotic prescribing by 22%. The acceptability and impact of CRP testing in children is unknown To determine the acceptability and impact of CRP testing in acutely ill children. Mixed methods study comprising an observational cohort with a nested randomised controlled trial and embedded qualitative study. Children presenting with an acute illness to general practice out-of-hours services; children with a temperature ≥38°C were randomised in the nested trial; parents and clinical staff were invited to the qualitative study. Informed consent rates; parental and staff views on testing. Consent to involvement in the study was obtained for 200/297 children (67.3%, 95% CI 61.7% to 72.6%); the finger-prick test might have been a contributory factor for 63 of the 97 children declining participation but it was cited as a definite factor in only 10 cases. None of the parents or staff raised concerns about the acceptability of testing, describing the pain caused as minor and transient. General practitioner views on the utility of the CRP test were inconsistent. CRP point-of-care testing in children is feasible in primary care and is likely to be acceptable. However, it will not reduce antibiotic prescribing and hospital referrals until general practitioners accept its diagnostic value in children. ISRCTN 69736109. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. What Can We Apply to Manage Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease with Acute Respiratory Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Deog Kyeom; Lee, Jungsil; Park, Ju Hee; Yoo, Kwang Ha

    2018-04-01

    Acute exacerbation(s) of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) tend to be critical and debilitating events leading to poorer outcomes in relation to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) treatment modalities, and contribute to a higher and earlier mortality rate in COPD patients. Besides pro-active preventative measures intended to obviate acquisition of AECOPD, early recovery from severe AECOPD is an important issue in determining the long-term prognosis of patients diagnosed with COPD. Updated GOLD guidelines and recently published American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society clinical recommendations emphasize the importance of use of pharmacologic treatment including bronchodilators, systemic steroids and/or antibiotics. As a non-pharmacologic strategy to combat the effects of AECOPD, noninvasive ventilation (NIV) is recommended as the treatment of choice as this therapy is thought to be most effective in reducing intubation risk in patients diagnosed with AECOPD with acute respiratory failure. Recently, a few adjunctive modalities, including NIV with helmet and helium-oxygen mixture, have been tried in cases of AECOPD with respiratory failure. As yet, insufficient documentation exists to permit recommendation of this therapy without qualification. Although there are too few findings, as yet, to allow for regular andr routine application of those modalities in AECOPD, there is anecdotal evidence to indicate both mechanical and physiological benefits connected with this therapy. High-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy is another supportive strategy which serves to improve the symptoms of hypoxic respiratory failure. The therapy also produced improvement in ventilatory variables, and it may be successfully applied in cases of hypercapnic respiratory failure. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal has been successfully attempted in cases of adult respiratory distress syndrome, with protective hypercapnic ventilatory strategy. Nowadays, it is

  1. Acute renal failure in critically ill patients: a multinational, multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uchino, Shigehiko; Kellum, John A.; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Doig, Gordon S.; Morimatsu, Hiroshi; Morgera, Stanislao; Schetz, Miet; Tan, Ian; Bouman, Catherine; Macedo, Ettiene; Gibney, Noel; Tolwani, Ashita; Ronco, Claudio

    2005-01-01

    Although acute renal failure (ARF) is believed to be common in the setting of critical illness and is associated with a high risk of death, little is known about its epidemiology and outcome or how these vary in different regions of the world. To determine the period prevalence of ARF in intensive

  2. Pattern of self-medication for acute febrile illness in the outpatient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pattern of self-medication for acute febrile illness in the outpatient clinic of an urban tertiary hospital in Jos. ... cross-sectional study at the GOPD of BHUTH, Jos from October 2012 to February 2013. The participants were drawn from all patients with fever or history of fever of not more than two weeks duration at presentation.

  3. Thyroid Hormone Receptor beta Mediates Acute Illness-Induced Alterations in Central Thyroid Hormone Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelen, Anita; Kwakkel, Joan; Chassande, Olivier; Fliers, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Acute illness in mice profoundly affects thyroid hormone metabolism in the hypothalamus and pituitary gland. It remains unknown whether the thyroid hormone receptor (TR)-beta is involved in these changes. In the present study, we investigated central thyroid hormone metabolism during

  4. Acute bacterial infections of the lower respiratory tract in children from low-income countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleer, A; Wolf, B.H.M.

    Acute bacterial infection of the lower respiratory tract is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children and is responsible for 4 million childhood deaths each year. Most of these deaths are caused by pneumonia and occur in the youngest children in the poorest parts of the world. Severe

  5. Acute Respiratory Infections in the Middle-Belt Region of Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: ARI continues to be a leeding cause of death among children globally beyond the year 2000. Close 12 million children under the age of 5years die each year in the developing countries, mainly from preventable causes and approximately 2.28 million (19%) were due to acute respiratory infections (ARI).

  6. MODERN OPPORTUNITIES OF INTERFERON THERAPY AT INFLUENZA AND ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Chebotareva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The new dosing scheme for the preparation VIFERON®, rectal suppositories for infants of II, III and IV groups of health was suggested. The application of the scheme has resulted in a more pronounced clinical and immunological effects at treatment of influenza and acute respiratory infections compared to the previously used sc heme. 

  7. Noninvasive Ventilation of Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Insights from the LUNG SAFE Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellani, Giacomo; Laffey, John G.; Pham, Tài; Madotto, Fabiana; Fan, Eddy; Brochard, Laurent; Esteban, Andres; Gattinoni, Luciano; Bumbasirevic, Vesna; Piquilloud, Lise; van Haren, Frank; Larsson, Anders; McAuley, Daniel F.; Bauer, Philippe R.; Arabi, Yaseen M.; Ranieri, Marco; Antonelli, Massimo; Rubenfeld, Gordon D.; Thompson, B. Taylor; Wrigge, Hermann; Slutsky, Arthur S.; Pesenti, Antonio; Rios, Fernando; Sottiaux, T.; Depuydt, p; Lora, Fredy S.; Azevedo, Luciano Cesar; Bugedo, Guillermo; Qiu, Haibo; Gonzalez, Marcos; Silesky, Juan; Cerny, Vladimir; Nielsen, Jonas; Jibaja, Manuel; Matamis, Dimitrios; Ranero, Jorge Luis; Amin, Pravin; Hashemian, S. M.; Clarkson, Kevin; Kurahashi, Kiyoyasu; Villagomez, Asisclo; Zeggwagh, Amine Ali; Heunks, Leo M.; Laake, Jon Henrik; Palo, Jose Emmanuel; do Vale Fernandes, Antero; Sandesc, Dorel; Arabi, Yaasen; Bumbasierevic, Vesna; Nin, Nicolas; Lorente, Jose A.; Abroug, Fekri; McNamee, Lia; Hurtado, Javier; Bajwa, Ed; Démpaire, Gabriel; Francois, Guy M.; Sula, Hektor; Nunci, Lordian; Cani, Alma; Zazu, Alan; Dellera, Christian; Insaurralde, Carolina S.; Alejandro, Risso V.; Daldin, Julio; Vinzio, Mauricio; Fernandez, Ruben O.; Cardonnet, Luis P.; Bettini, Lisandro R.; Bisso, Mariano Carboni; Osman, Emilio M.; Setten, Mariano G.; Lovazzano, Pablo; Alvarez, Javier; Villar, Veronica; Pozo, Norberto C.; Grubissich, Nicolas; Plotnikow, Gustavo A.; Vasquez, Daniela N.; Ilutovich, Santiago; Tiribelli, Norberto; Chena, Ariel; Pellegrini, Carlos A.; Saenz, María G.; Estenssoro, Elisa; Brizuela, Matias; Gianinetto, Hernan; Gomez, Pablo E.; Cerrato, Valeria I.; Bezzi, Marco G.; Borello, Silvina A.; Loiacono, Flavia A.; Fernandez, Adriana M.; Knowles, Serena; Reynolds, Claire; Inskip, Deborah M.; Miller, Jennene J.; Kong, Jing; Whitehead, Christina; Bihari, Shailesh; Seven, Aylin; Krstevski, Amanda; Rodgers, Helen J.; Millar, Rebecca T.; Mckenna, Toni E.; Bailey, Irene M.; Hanlon, Gabrielle C.; Aneman, Anders; Lynch, Joan M.; Azad, Raman; Neal, John; Woods, Paul W.; Roberts, Brigit L.; Kol, Mark R.; Wong, Helen S.; Riss, Katharina C.; Staudinger, Thomas; Wittebole, Xavier; Berghe, Caroline; Bulpa, Pierre A.; Dive, Alain M.; Verstraete, Rik; Lebbinck, Herve; Depuydt, Pieter; Vermassen, Joris; Meersseman, Philippe; Ceunen, Helga; Rosa, Jonas I.; Beraldo, Daniel O.; Piras, Claudio; Rampinelli, Adenilton M.; Nassar Jr, Antonio P.; Mataloun, Sergio; Moock, Marcelo; Thompson, Marlus M.; Gonçalves, Claudio H.; Antônio, Ana Carolina P.; Ascoli, Aline; Biondi, Rodrigo S.; Fontenele, Danielle C.; Nobrega, Danielle; Sales, Vanessa M.; Shindhe, Suresh; Aiman, Maizatul; Laffey, John; Beloncle, Francois; Davies, Kyle G.; Cirone, Rob; Manoharan, Venika; Ismail, Mehvish; Goligher, Ewan C.; Jassal, Mandeep; Nishikawa, Erin; Javeed, Areej; Curley, Gerard; Rittayamai, Nuttapol; Parotto, Matteo; Ferguson, Niall D.; Mehta, Sangeeta; Knoll, Jenny; Pronovost, Antoine; Canestrini, Sergio; Bruhn, Alejandro R.; Garcia, Patricio H.; Aliaga, Felipe A.; Farías, Pamela A.; Yumha, Jacob S.; Ortiz, Claudia A.; Salas, Javier E.; Saez, Alejandro A.; Vega, Luis D.; Labarca, Eduardo F.; Martinez, Felipe T.; Carreño, Nicolás G.; Lora, Pilar; Liu, Haitao; Liu, Ling; Tang, Rui; Luo, Xiaoming; An, Youzhong; Zhao, Huiying; Gao, Yan; Zhai, Zhe; Ye, Zheng L.; Wang, Wei; Li, Wenwen; Li, Qingdong; Zheng, Ruiqiang; Yu, Wenkui; Shen, Juanhong; Li, Xinyu; Yu, Tao; Wu, Ya Q.; Huang, Xiao B.; He, Zhenyang; Lu, Yuanhua; Han, Hui; Zhang, Fan; Sun, Renhua; Wang, Hua X.; Qin, Shu H.; Zhu, Bao H.; Zhao, Jun; Liu, Jian; Li, Bin; Liu, Jing L.; Zhou, Fa C.; Li, Qiong J.; Zhang, Xing Y.; Li-Xin, Zhou; Xin-Hua, Qiang; Jiang, Liangyan; Gao, Yuan N.; Zhao, Xian Y.; Li, Yuan Y.; Li, Xiao L.; Wang, Chunting; Yao, Qingchun; Yu, Rongguo; Chen, Kai; Shao, Huanzhang; Qin, Bingyu; Huang, Qing Q.; Zhu, Wei H.; Hang, Ai Y.; Hua, Ma X.; Li, Yimin; Xu, Yonghao; Di, Yu D.; Ling, Long L.; Qin, Tie H.; Wang, Shou H.; Qin, Junping; Han, Yi; Zhou, Suming; Vargas, Monica P.; Silesky Jimenez, Juan I.; González Rojas, Manuel A.; Solis-Quesada, Jaime E.; Ramirez-Alfaro, Christian M.; Máca, Jan; Sklienka, Peter; Gjedsted, Jakob; Christiansen, Aage; Villamagua, Boris G.; Llano, Miguel; Burtin, Philippe; Buzancais, Gautier; Beuret, Pascal; Pelletier, Nicolas; Mortaza, Satar; Mercat, Alain; Chelly, Jonathan; Jochmans, Sébastien; Terzi, Nicolas; Daubin, Cédric; Carteaux, Guillaume; de Prost, Nicolas; Chiche, Jean-Daniel; Daviaud, Fabrice; Pham, Tai; Fartoukh, Muriel; Barberet, Guillaume; Biehler, Jerome; Dellamonica, Jean; Doyen, Denis; Arnal, Jean-Michel; Briquet, Anais; Hraiech, Sami; Papazian, Laurent; Follin, Arnaud; Roux, Damien; Messika, Jonathan; Kalaitzis, Evangelos; Dangers, Laurence; Combes, Alain; Au, Siu-Ming; Béduneau, Gaetan; Carpentier, Dorothée; Zogheib, Elie H.; Dupont, Herve; Ricome, Sylvie; Santoli, Francesco L.; Besset, Sebastien L.; Michel, Philippe; Gelée, Bruno; Danin, Pierre-Eric; Goubaux, Bernard; Crova, Philippe J.; Phan, Nga T.; Berkelmans, Frantz; Badie, Julio C.; Tapponnier, Romain; Gally, Josette; Khebbeb, Samy; Herbrecht, Jean-Etienne; Schneider, Francis; Declercq, Pierre-Louis M.; Rigaud, Jean-Philippe; Duranteau, Jacques; Harrois, Anatole; Chabanne, Russell; Marin, Julien; Bigot, Charlene; Thibault, Sandrine; Ghazi, Mohammed; Boukhazna, Messabi; Zein, Salem Ould; Richecoeur, Jack R.; Combaux, Daniele M.; Grelon, Fabien; Le Moal, Charlene; Sauvadet, Elise P.; Robine, Adrien; Lemiale, Virginie; Reuter, Danielle; Dres, Martin; Demoule, Alexandre; Goldgran-Toledano, Dany; Baboi, Loredana; Guérin, Claude; Lohner, Ralph; Kraßler, Jens; Schäfer, Susanne; Zacharowski, Kai D.; Meybohm, Patrick; Reske, Andreas W.; Simon, Philipp; Hopf, Hans-Bernd F.; Schuetz, Michael; Baltus, Thomas; Papanikolaou, Metaxia N.; Papavasilopoulou, Theonymfi G.; Zacharas, Giannis A.; Ourailogloy, Vasilis; Mouloudi, Eleni K.; Massa, Eleni V.; Nagy, Eva O.; Stamou, Electra E.; Kiourtzieva, Ellada V.; Oikonomou, Marina A.; Avila, Luis E.; Cortez, Cesar A.; Citalán, Johanna E.; Jog, Sameer A.; Sable, Safal D.; Shah, Bhagyesh; Gurjar, Mohan; Baronia, Arvind K.; Memon, Mohammedfaruk; Muthuchellappan, Radhakrishnan; Ramesh, Venkatapura J.; Shenoy, Anitha; Unnikrishnan, Ramesh; Dixit, Subhal B.; Rhayakar, Rachana V.; Ramakrishnan, Nagarajan; Bhardwaj, Vallish K.; Mahto, Heera L.; Sagar, Sudha V.; Palaniswamy, Vijayanand; Ganesan, Deeban; Hashemian, Seyed Mohammadreza; Jamaati, Hamidreza; Heidari, Farshad; Meaney, Edel A.; Nichol, Alistair; Knapman, Karl M.; O’Croinin, Donall; Dunne, Eimhin S.; Breen, Dorothy M.; Clarkson, Kevin P.; Jaafar, Rola F.; Dwyer, Rory; Amir, Fahd; Ajetunmobi, Olaitan O.; O’Muircheartaigh, Aogan C.; Black, Colin S.; Treanor, Nuala; Collins, Daniel V.; Altaf, Wahid; Zani, Gianluca; Fusari, Maurizio; Spadaro, Savino; Volta, Carlo A.; Graziani, Romano; Brunettini, Barbara; Palmese, Salvatore; Formenti, Paolo; Umbrello, Michele; Lombardo, Andrea; Pecci, Elisabetta; Botteri, Marco; Savioli, Monica; Protti, Alessandro; Mattei, Alessia; Schiavoni, Lorenzo; Tinnirello, Andrea; Todeschini, Manuel; Giarratano, Antonino; Cortegiani, Andrea; Sher, Sara; Rossi, Anna; Antonelli, Massimo M.; Montini, Luca M.; Casalena, Paolo; Scafetti, Sergio; Panarello, Giovanna; Occhipinti, Giovanna; Patroniti, Nicolò; Pozzi, Matteo; Biscione, Roberto R.; Poli, Michela M.; Raimondi, Ferdinando; Albiero, Daniela; Crapelli, Giulia; Beck, Eduardo; Pota, Vincenzo; Schiavone, Vincenzo; Molin, Alexandre; Tarantino, Fabio; Monti, Giacomo; Frati, Elena; Mirabella, Lucia; Cinnella, Gilda; Fossali, Tommaso; Colombo, Riccardo; Terragni, Pierpaolo; Pattarino, Ilaria; Mojoli, Francesco; Braschi, Antonio; Borotto, Erika E.; Cracchiolo, Andrea N.; Palma, Daniela M.; Raponi, Francesco; Foti, Giuseppe; Vascotto, Ettore R.; Coppadoro, Andrea; Brazzi, Luca; Floris, Leda; Iotti, Giorgio A.; Venti, Aaron; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Takagi, Shunsuke; Maeyama, Hiroki N.; Watanabe, Eizo; Yamaji, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Kazuyoshi; Shiozaki, Kyoko; Futami, Satoru; Ryosuke, Sekine; Saito, Koji; Kameyama, Yoshinobu; Ueno, Keiko; Izawa, Masayo; Okuda, Nao; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Harasawa, Tomofumi; Nasu, Michitaka; Takada, Tadaaki; Ito, Fumihito; Nunomiya, Shin; Koyama, Kansuke; Abe, Toshikazu; Andoh, Kohkichi; Kusumoto, Kohei; Hirata, Akira; Takaba, Akihiro; Kimura, Hiroyasu; Matsumoto, Shuhei; Higashijima, Ushio; Honda, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Nobumasa; Imai, Hiroshi; Ogino, Yasuaki; Mizuguchi, Ichiko; Ichikado, Kazuya; Nitta, Kenichi; Mochizuki, Katsunori; Hashida, Tomoaki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Niimi, Daisuke; Ueda, Takeshi; Kashiwa, Yozo; Uchiyama, Akinori; Sabelnikovs, Olegs; Oss, Peteris; Haddad, Youssef; Liew, Kong Y.; Ñamendys-Silva, Silvio A.; Jarquin-Badiola, Yves D.; Sanchez-Hurtado, Luis A.; Gomez-Flores, Saira S.; Marin, Maria C.; Villagomez, Asisclo J.; Lemus, Jordana S.; Fierro, Jonathan M.; Cervantes, Mavy Ramirez; Flores Mejia, Francisco Javier; Dector, Dulce; Dector, Dulce M.; Gonzalez, Daniel R.; Estrella, Claudia R.; Sanchez-Medina, Jorge R.; Ramirez-Gutierrez, Alvaro; George, Fernando G.; Aguirre, Janet S.; Buensuseso, Juan A.; Poblano, Manuel; Dendane, Tarek; Balkhi, Hicham; Elkhayari, Mina; Samkaoui, Nacer; Ezzouine, Hanane; Benslama, Abdellatif; Amor, Mourad; Maazouzi, Wajdi; Cimic, Nedim; Beck, Oliver; Bruns, Monique M.; Schouten, Jeroen A.; Rinia, Myra; Raaijmakers, Monique; van Wezel, Hellen M.; Heines, Serge J.; Strauch, Ulrich; Buise, Marc P.; Simonis, Fabienne D.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Goodson, Jennifer C.; Browne, Troy S.; Navarra, Leanlove; Hunt, Anna; Hutchison, Robyn A.; Bailey, Mathew B.; Newby, Lynette; Mcarthur, Colin; Kalkoff, Michael; Mcleod, Alex; Casement, Jonathan; Hacking, Danielle J.; Andersen, Finn H.; Dolva, Merete S.; Laake, Jon H.; Barratt-Due, Andreas; Noremark, Kim Andre L.; Søreide, Eldar; Sjøbø, Brit Å; Guttormsen, Anne B.; Yoshido, Hector H. Leon; Aguilar, Ronald Zumaran; Oscanoa, Fredy A. Montes; Alisasis, Alain U.; Robles, Joanne B.; Pasanting-Lim, Rossini Abbie B.; Tan, Beatriz C.; Andruszkiewicz, Pawel; Jakubowska, Karina; Coxo, Cristina M.; Alvarez, António M.; Oliveira, Bruno S.; Montanha, Gustavo M.; Barros, Nelson C.; Pereira, Carlos S.; Messias, António M.; Monteiro, Jorge M.; Araujo, Ana M.; Catorze, Nuno T.; Marum, Susan M.; Bouw, Maria J.; Gomes, Rui M.; Brito, Vania A.; Castro, Silvia; Estilita, Joana M.; Barros, Filipa M.; Serra, Isabel M.; Martinho, Aurelia M.; Tomescu, Dana R.; Marcu, Alexandra; Bedreag, Ovidiu H.; Papurica, Marius; Corneci, Dan E.; Negoita, Silvius Ioan; Grigoriev, Evgeny; Gritsan, Alexey I.; Gazenkampf, Andrey A.; Almekhlafi, Ghaleb; Albarrak, Mohamad M.; Mustafa, Ghanem M.; Maghrabi, Khalid A.; Salahuddin, Nawal; Aisa, Tharwat M.; Al Jabbary, Ahmed S.; Tabhan, Edgardo; Trinidad, Olivia A.; Al Dorzi, Hasan M.; Tabhan, Edgardo E.; Bolon, Stefan; Smith, Oliver; Mancebo, Jordi; Lopez-Delgado, Juan C.; Esteve, Francisco; Rialp, Gemma; Forteza, Catalina; de Haro, Candelaria; Artigas, Antonio; Albaiceta, Guillermo M.; de Cima-Iglesias, Sara; Seoane-Quiroga, Leticia; Ruiz-Aguilar, Antonio L.; Claraco-Vega, Luis M.; Soler, Juan Alfonso; Lorente, Maria del Carmen; Hermosa, Cecilia; Gordo, Federico; Prieto-González, Miryam; López-Messa, Juan B.; Perez, Manuel P.; Perez, Cesar P.; Allue, Raquel Montoiro; Roche-Campo, Ferran; Ibañez-Santacruz, Marcos; Temprano, Susana; Pintado, Maria C.; de Pablo, Raul; Gómez, Pilar Ricart Aroa; Rodriguez Ruiz, Silvia; Iglesias Moles, Silvia; Jurado, Mª Teresa; Arizmendi, Alfons; Piacentini, Enrique A.; Franco, Nieves; Honrubia, Teresa; Perez Cheng, Meisy; Perez Losada, Elena; Blanco, Javier; Yuste, Luis J.; Carbayo-Gorriz, Cecilia; Cazorla-Barranquero, Francisca G.; Alonso, Javier G.; Alda, Rosa S.; Algaba, Ángela; Navarro, Gonzalo; Cereijo, Enrique; Diaz-Rodriguez, Esther; Pastor Marcos, Diego; Alvarez Montero, Laura; Herrera Para, Luis; Jimenez Sanchez, Roberto; Blasco Navalpotro, Miguel Angel; Diaz Abad, Ricardo; Castro, Alejandro G.; Jose D Artiga, Maria; Ceniceros-Barros, Alexandra; Montiel González, Raquel; Parrilla Toribio, Dácil; Penuelas, Oscar; Roser, Tomas P.; Olga, Moreno F.; Gallego Curto, Elena; Manzano Sánchez, Rocío; Imma, Vallverdu P.; Elisabet, Garcia M.; Claverias, Laura; Magret, Monica; Pellicer, Ana M.; Rodriguez, Lucia L.; Sánchez-Ballesteros, Jesús; González-Salamanca, Ángela; Jimenez, Antonio G.; Huerta, Francisco P.; Sotillo Diaz, Juan Carlos J.; Bermejo Lopez, Esther; Llinares Moya, David D.; Tallet Alfonso, Alec A.; Eugenio Luis, Palazon Sanchez; Sanchez Cesar, Palazon; Rafael, Sánchez I.; Virgilio, Corcoles G.; Recio, Noelia N.; Adamsson, Richard O.; Rylander, Christian C.; Holzgraefe, Bernhard; Broman, Lars M.; Wessbergh, Joanna; Persson, Linnea; Schiöler, Fredrik; Kedelv, Hans; Oscarsson Tibblin, Anna; Appelberg, Henrik; Hedlund, Lars; Helleberg, Johan; Eriksson, Karin E.; Glietsch, Rita; Larsson, Niklas; Nygren, Ingela; Nunes, Silvia L.; Morin, Anna-Karin; Kander, Thomas; Adolfsson, Anne; Zender, Hervé O.; Leemann-Refondini, Corinne; Elatrous, Souheil; Bouchoucha, Slaheddine; Chouchene, Imed; Ouanes, Islem; Souissi, Asma Ben; Kamoun, Salma; Demirkiran, Oktay; Aker, Mustafa; Erbabacan, Emre; Ceylan, Ilkay; Girgin, Nermin Kelebek; Ozcelik, Menekse; Ünal, Necmettin; Meco, Basak Ceyda; Akyol, Onat O.; Derman, Suleyman S.; Kennedy, Barry; Parhar, Ken; Srinivasa, Latha; McAuley, Danny; Hopkins, Phil; Mellis, Clare; Kakar, Vivek; Hadfield, Dan; Vercueil, Andre; Bhowmick, Kaushik; Humphreys, Sally K.; Ferguson, Andrew; Mckee, Raymond; Raj, Ashok S.; Fawkes, Danielle A.; Watt, Philip; Twohey, Linda; Jha, Rajeev R.; Thomas, Matthew; Morton, Alex; Kadaba, Varsha; Smith, Mark J.; Hormis, Anil P.; Kannan, Santhana G.; Namih, Miriam; Reschreiter, Henrik; Camsooksai, Julie; Kumar, Alek; Rugonfalvi, Szabolcs; Nutt, Christopher; Oneill, Orla; Seasman, Colette; Dempsey, Ged; Scott, Christopher J.; Ellis, Helen E.; McKechnie, Stuart; Hutton, Paula J.; Di Tomasso, Nora N.; Vitale, Michela N.; Griffin, Ruth O.; Dean, Michael N.; Cranshaw, Julius H.; Willett, Emma L.; Ioannou, Nicholas; Gillis, Sarah; Csabi, Peter; Macfadyen, Rosaleen; Dawson, Heidi; Preez, Pieter D.; Williams, Alexandra J.; Boyd, Owen; Ortiz-Ruiz de Gordoa, Laura; Bramall, Jon; Symmonds, Sophie; Chau, Simon K.; Wenham, Tim; Szakmany, Tamas; Toth-Tarsoly, Piroska; Mccalman, Katie H.; Alexander, Peter; Stephenson, Lorraine; Collyer, Thomas; Chapman, Rhiannon; Cooper, Raphael; Allan, Russell M.; Sim, Malcolm; Wrathall, David W.; Irvine, Donald A.; Zantua, Kim S.; Adams, John C.; Burtenshaw, Andrew J.; Sellors, Gareth P.; Welters, Ingeborg D.; Williams, Karen E.; Hessell, Robert J.; Oldroyd, Matthew G.; Battle, Ceri E.; Pillai, Suresh; Kajtor, Istvan; Sivashanmugavel, Mageswaran; Okane, Sinead C.; Donnelly, Adrian; Frigyik, Aniko D.; Careless, Jon P.; May, Martin M.; Stewart, Richard; Trinder, T. John; Hagan, Samantha J.; Wise, Matt P.; Cole, Jade M.; MacFie, Caroline C.; Dowling, Anna T.; Nin, Nicolás; Nuñez, Edgardo; Pittini, Gustavo; Rodriguez, Ruben; Imperio, María C.; Santos, Cristina; França, Ana G.; Ebeid, Alejandro; Deicas, Alberto; Serra, Carolina; Uppalapati, Aditya; Kamel, Ghassan; Banner-Goodspeed, Valerie M.; Beitler, Jeremy R.; Reddy Mukkera, Satyanarayana; Kulkarni, Shreedhar; Lee, Jarone; Mesar, Tomaz; Shinn Iii, John O.; Gomaa, Dina; Tainter, Christopher; Yeatts, Dale J.; Warren, Jessica; Lanspa, Michael J.; Miller, Russel R.; Grissom, Colin K.; Brown, Samuel M.; Gosselin, Ryan J.; Kitch, Barrett T.; Cohen, Jason E.; Beegle, Scott H.; Gueret, Renaud M.; Tulaimat, Aiman; Choudry, Shazia; Stigler, William; Batra, Hitesh; Huff, Nidhi G.; Lamb, Keith D.; Oetting, Trevor W.; Mohr, Nicholas M.; Judy, Claine; Saito, Shigeki; Kheir, Fayez M.; Kheir, Fayez; Schlichting, Adam B.; Delsing, Angela; Crouch, Daniel R.; Elmasri, Mary; Ismail, Dina; Dreyer, Kyle R.; Blakeman, Thomas C.; Baron, Rebecca M.; Quintana Grijalba, Carolina; Hou, Peter C.; Seethala, Raghu; Aisiku, Imo; Henderson, Galen; Frendl, Gyorgy; Hou, Sen-Kuang; Owens, Robert L.; Schomer, Ashley; Jovanovic, Bojan; Surbatovic, Maja; Veljovic, Milic

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) is increasingly used in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The evidence supporting NIV use in patients with ARDS remains relatively sparse. Objectives: To determine whether, during NIV, the categorization of ARDS severity based on the

  8. The use of Rheum palmatum L. In the treatment of acute respiratory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of Rheum palmatum L. In the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome: a meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials. Tie-zhu Yang, Yan Liu, Yue-Yun Liu, Xiu-Fang Ding, Jia-Xu Chen, Mei-Jing Kou, Xiao-Juan Zou ...

  9. Characterization of a novel coronavirus associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Rota (Paul); M.S. Oberste (Steven); S.S. Monroe (Stephan); W.A. Nix (Allan); R. Campagnoli (Ray); J.P. Icenogle (Joseph); S. Penaranda; B. Bankamp (Bettina); K. Maher (Kaija); M.H. Chen (Min-hsin); S. Tong (Suxiong); A. Tamin (Azaibi); L. Lowe (Luis); M. Frace (Michael); J.L. DeRisi (Joseph); Q. Chen (Qi); D. Wang (David); D.D. Erdman (Dean); T.C. Peret (Teresa); C. Burns (Cara); T.G. Ksiazek (Thomas); P.E. Rollin (Pierre); A. Sanchez (Berenguer); S. Liffick (Stephanie); B. Holloway (Brian); J. Limor (Josef); K. McCaustland (Karen); M. Olsen-Rasmussen (Mellissa); S. Gunther; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); C. Drosten (Christian); M.A. Pallansch (Mark); L.J. Anderson (Larry); W.J. Belline; R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractIn March 2003, a novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV) was discovered in association with cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The sequence of the complete genome of SARS-CoV was determined, and the initial characterization of the viral genome is presented in this report. The

  10. Contrast media inhibit exogenous surfactant therapy in rats with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kesecioglu, Jozef; Haitsma, Jack J.; Schultz, Marcus J.; den Heeten, Gerard J.; Lachmann, Burkhard

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To test the effects of various contrast media on the pulmonary surfactant system. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In a rat model of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) induced by lung lavage, the effects of surfactant suspended in saline were compared with surfactant suspended in the contrast

  11. Progress in Global Surveillance and Response Capacity 10 Years After Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-04-10

    Dr. Mike Miller reads an abridged version of the Emerging Infectious Diseases' synopsis, Progress in Global Surveillance and Response Capacity 10 Years after Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome.  Created: 4/10/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/11/2013.

  12. Effect of procalcitonin-guided antibiotic treatment on mortality in acute respiratory infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuetz, Philipp; Wirz, Yannick; Sager, Ramon

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In February, 2017, the US Food and Drug Administration approved the blood infection marker procalcitonin for guiding antibiotic therapy in patients with acute respiratory infections. This meta-analysis of patient data from 26 randomised controlled trials was designed to assess safety ...

  13. Long-term survival for COPD patients receiving noninvasive ventilation for acute respiratory failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Titlestad, Ingrid L; Lassen, Annmarie T; Vestbo, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Implementation of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) as an add-on treatment has been routinely used in a non-intensive care setting since 2004 for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and acute hypercapnic respiratory failure at a university hospital in Denmark. Although randomized...

  14. Pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome: Host factors in Down syndrome and the general population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, M.

    2013-01-01

    We find that Down syndrome is an important risk factor for developing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in children, but the reason why remains to be elucidated. In addition, we find several differences between adult and pediatric ARDS. The association between C-reactive protein (CRP)

  15. Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome presenting as acute respiratory distress and cor pulmonale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, S A; Shanbag, P; Chavan, V; Shenoy, P

    2010-01-01

    We describe a 7-year-old boy with staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome who presented with acute respiratory distress and cor pulmonale. We wish to highlight this unusual presentation as the diagnosis of toxic shock syndrome depends chiefly on a high degree of clinical suspicion. Early diagnosis and prompt institution of appropriate therapy will significantly reduce morbidity and mortality.

  16. Evaluation of physiological parameters before and after respiratory physiotherapy in newborns with acute viral bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    S Gonçalves, Rodrigo A; Feitosa, Sérgio; de Castro Selestrin, Cláudia; Valenti, Vitor E; de Sousa, Fernando H; F Siqueira, Arnaldo A; Petenusso, Márcio; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos

    2014-01-08

    Acute viral bronchiolitis is a respiratory disease with high morbidity that affects newborn in the first two years of life. Its treatment with physiotherapy has been highlighted as an important tool, however, there is no consensus regarding its effects on patients improvement. We aimed to evaluate the physiological parameters before and after the procedure respiratory therapy in newborn with acute viral bronchiolitis. This was a cross sectional observational study in 30 newborns with acute viral bronchiolitis and indicated for physiotherapy care in a hospitalized Urgency and Emergency Unit. It was collected the clinical data of newborn through evaluation form, and we measured heart rate (HR), oxygen saturation (SpO2) and respiratory rate (RR). We measured the variables before physiotherapy treatment, 3, 6 and 9 minutes after the physiotherapy treatment. There has been no change in HR, however, we observed a decrease in RR at 6 and 9 min compared to 3 min and increase in SpO2 at 3, 6 and 9 min compared to before physiotherapy. Respiratory physiotherapy may be an effective therapy for the treatment of newborn with Acute Viral Bronchitis.

  17. Electrical impedance tomography in the assessment of extravascular lung water in noncardiogenic acute respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunst, P. W.; Vonk Noordegraaf, A.; Raaijmakers, E.; Bakker, J.; Groeneveld, A. B.; Postmus, P. E.; de Vries, P. M.

    1999-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: To establish the value of electrical impedance tomography (EIT) in assessing pulmonary edema in noncardiogenic acute respiratory failure (ARF), as compared to the thermal dye double indicator dilution technique (TDD). DESIGN: Prospective clinical study. SETTING: ICU of a general

  18. Focus assessed transthoracic echocardiography (FATE) in patients acutely admitted with respiratory symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Christian Borbjerg; Jakobsen, Carl-Johan; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg

    2012-01-01

    the diagnostic performance of the clinical examination in patients with acute respiratory symptoms [3]. Thus FATE could be integrated as a part of the patient assessment, potentially improving diagnostics. We evaluated the use of a sonographic examination, including FATE, performed within one hour of the primary...... appraisal in patients acutely admitted with respiratory symptoms. Method: We conducted a prospective crosssectional, blinded observational study in a medical emergency department. Patients were included if one of the following symptoms or clinical findings was present: respiratory rate >20, saturation ...%, oxygen therapy initiated, dyspnoea, cough or chest pain. Within one hour after the primary evaluation sonographic examination including FATE was done by a physician blinded to patient history and primary appraisal. Results: We identified and screened 342 patients of whom 139 patients fulfilled inclusion...

  19. Acute Respiratory Failure due to Alveolar Hemorrhage after Exposure to Organic Dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Mi Choi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH is associated with severe outcomes. We report a case of acute respiratory failure that required mechanical ventilation and was clinically and pathologically diagnosed as DAH related to exposure to organic dust. A 39-year-old man, who had visited a warehouse to grade beans for purchase, was referred to our hospital for impending respiratory failure. His initial radiographic examinations revealed diffuse bilateral ground-glass opacities in his lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage resulted in progressively bloodier returns, which is characteristic of DAH. He underwent bedside open lung biopsy of his right lower lobe in the intensive care unit. Biopsy results revealed DAH and organization with accumulation of hemosiderin-laden macrophages and a few fibroblastic foci. The patient was treated with empirical antibiotics and high-dose corticosteroids and successfully weaned from mechanical ventilation. DAH might be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with acute respiratory failure after exposure to organic particles.

  20. Viral Infection in the Development and Progression of Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Nye

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Viral infections are an important cause of pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS. Numerous viruses, including respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and influenza A (H1N1 virus, have been implicated in the progression of pneumonia to ARDS; yet the incidence of progression is unknown. Despite acute and chronic morbidity associated with respiratory viral infections, particularly in ‘at risk’ populations, treatment options are limited. Thus, with few exceptions, care is symptomatic. In addition, mortality rates for viral related ARDS have yet to be determined. This review outlines what is known about ARDS secondary to viral infections including the epidemiology, the pathophysiology and diagnosis. In addition, emerging treatment options to prevent infection, and to decrease disease burden will be outlined. We focused on RSV and influenza A (H1N1 viral-induced ARDS, as these are the most common viruses leading to pediatric ARDS, and have specific prophylactic and definitive treatment options.

  1. Amiodarone-related acute respiratory distress syndrome following sudden withdrawal of steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Pierre-Emmanuel; Doise, Jean-Marc; Quenot, Jean-Pierre; Muller, Géraldine; Aube, Hervé; Baudouin, Nicolas; Piard, Françoise; Besancenot, Jean-François; Blettery, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    Acute lung toxicity is a rare but classical complication of amiodarone therapy. We report the case of a patient who developed an optic neuropathy after 15 years of amiodarone administration, and who was treated for 2 weeks with steroids. Following withdrawal of steroids, the patient rapidly developed an acute respiratory distress syndrome. Postmortem lung histologic examination was consistent with amiodarone-induced pneumonitis. Since this complication is thought to be of immunological origin, we speculate that the sudden withdrawal of steroids was implicated in the development of the acute lung injury.

  2. Acute and long-term survival in chronically critically ill surgical patients: a retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl, Wolfgang H; Wolf, Hilde; Schneider, Christian P; Küchenhoff, Helmut; Jauch, Karl-Walter

    2007-01-01

    Various cohort studies have shown that acute (short-term) mortality rates in unselected critically ill patients may have improved during the past 15 years. Whether these benefits also affect acute and long-term prognosis in chronically critically ill patients is unclear, as are determinants relevant to prognosis. We conducted a retrospective analysis of data collected from March 1993 to February 2005. A cohort of 390 consecutive surgical patients requiring intensive care therapy for more than 28 days was analyzed. The intensive care unit (ICU) survival rate was 53.6%. Survival rates at one, three and five years were 61.8%, 44.7% and 37.0% among ICU survivors. After adjustment for relevant covariates, acute and long-term survival rates did not differ significantly between 1993 to 1999 and 1999 to 2005 intervals. Acute prognosis was determined by disease severity during ICU stay and by primary diagnosis. However, only the latter was independently associated with long-term prognosis. Advanced age was an independent prognostic determinant of poor short-term and long-term survival. Acute and long-term prognosis in chronically critically ill surgical patients has remained unchanged throughout the past 12 years. After successful surgical intervention and intensive care, long-term outcome is reasonably good and is mainly determined by age and underlying disease.

  3. Acute Illness Among Surfers After Exposure to Seawater in Dry- and Wet-Weather Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Benjamin F; Schiff, Kenneth C; Ercumen, Ayse; Benjamin-Chung, Jade; Steele, Joshua A; Griffith, John F; Steinberg, Steven J; Smith, Paul; McGee, Charles D; Wilson, Richard; Nelsen, Chad; Weisberg, Stephen B; Colford, John M

    2017-10-01

    Rainstorms increase levels of fecal indicator bacteria in urban coastal waters, but it is unknown whether exposure to seawater after rainstorms increases rates of acute illness. Our objective was to provide the first estimates of rates of acute illness after seawater exposure during both dry- and wet-weather periods and to determine the relationship between levels of indicator bacteria and illness among surfers, a population with a high potential for exposure after rain. We enrolled 654 surfers in San Diego, California, and followed them longitudinally during the 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 winters (33,377 days of observation, 10,081 surf sessions). We measured daily surf activities and illness symptoms (gastrointestinal illness, sinus infections, ear infections, infected wounds). Compared with no exposure, exposure to seawater during dry weather increased incidence rates of all outcomes (e.g., for earache or infection, adjusted incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 1.86, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.27, 2.71; for infected wounds, IRR = 3.04, 95% CI: 1.54, 5.98); exposure during wet weather further increased rates (e.g., for earache or infection, IRR = 3.28, 95% CI: 1.95, 5.51; for infected wounds, IRR = 4.96, 95% CI: 2.18, 11.29). Fecal indicator bacteria measured in seawater (Enterococcus species, fecal coliforms, total coliforms) were strongly associated with incident illness only during wet weather. Urban coastal seawater exposure increases the incidence rates of many acute illnesses among surfers, with higher incidence rates after rainstorms. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

  4. Core Domains for Clinical Research in Acute Respiratory Failure Survivors: An International Modified Delphi Consensus Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Alison E; Sepulveda, Kristin A; Dinglas, Victor D; Chessare, Caroline M; Bingham, Clifton O; Needham, Dale M

    2017-06-01

    To identify the "core domains" (i.e., patient outcomes, health-related conditions, or aspects of health) that relevant stakeholders agree are essential to assess in all clinical research studies evaluating the outcomes of acute respiratory failure survivors after hospital discharge. A two-round consensus process, using a modified Delphi methodology, with participants from 16 countries, including patient and caregiver representatives. Prior to voting, participants were asked to review 1) results from surveys of clinical researchers, acute respiratory failure survivors, and caregivers that rated the importance of 19 preliminary outcome domains and 2) results from a qualitative study of acute respiratory failure survivors' outcomes after hospital discharge, as related to the 19 preliminary outcome domains. Participants also were asked to suggest any additional potential domains for evaluation in the first Delphi survey. Web-based surveys of participants representing four stakeholder groups relevant to clinical research evaluating postdischarge outcomes of acute respiratory failure survivors: clinical researchers, clinicians, patients and caregivers, and U.S. federal research funding organizations. None. None. Survey response rates were 97% and 99% in round 1 and round 2, respectively. There were seven domains that met the a priori consensus criteria to be designated as core domains: physical function, cognition, mental health, survival, pulmonary function, pain, and muscle and/or nerve function. This study generated a consensus-based list of core domains that should be assessed in all clinical research studies evaluating acute respiratory failure survivors after hospital discharge. Identifying appropriate measurement instruments to assess these core domains is an important next step toward developing a set of core outcome measures for this field of research.

  5. January 2015 Phoenix pulmonary journal club: noninvasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew M

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation has expanded its role in the treatment of both chronic and acute respiratory failure. Its initial use in conditions such as obstructive sleep apnea, neuromuscular disease and tracheobronchomalacia, have been shown to improve quality of life and reduce mortality. Over the past 20 years studies have looked at using noninvasive ventilation in the management of acute respiratory failure from pulmonary edema, asthma and COPD exacerbations. During this month's journal club we reviewed 3 articles evaluating the efficacy of noninvasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure. Gupta D, Nath A, Agarwal R, Behera D. A prospective randomized controlled trial on the efficacy of noninvasive ventilation in severe acute asthma. Respir Care. 2010;55(5:536-43. [PubMed] This was a small unblinded randomized controlled trial (RCT looking at the efficacy using noninvasive ventilation (NIV in acute asthma. A total of 53 patients were included and divided into 2 groups of 28 patients ...

  6. Nation-wide surveillance of human acute respiratory virus infections between 2013 and 2015 in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Min; Jung, Hee-Dong; Cheong, Hyang-Min; Lee, Anna; Lee, Nam-Joo; Chu, Hyuk; Kim, Sung Soon; Choi, Jang-Hoon

    2018-02-28

    The prevalence of eight respiratory viruses detected in patients with acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in Korea was investigated through analysis of data recorded by the Korea Influenza and Respiratory Viruses Surveillance System (KINRESS) from 2013 to 2015. Nasal aspirate and throat swabs specimens were collected from 36,915 patients with ARIs, and viral nucleic acids were detected by real-time (reverse-transcription) polymerase chain reaction for eight respiratory viruses, including human respiratory syncytial viruses (HRSVs), influenza viruses (IFVs), human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs), human coronaviruses (HCoVs), human rhinovirus (HRV), human adenovirus (HAdV), human bocavirus (HBoV), and human metapneumovirus (HMPV). The overall positive rate of patient specimens was 49.4% (18,236/36,915), 5% of which carried two or more viruses simultaneously. HRV (15.6%) was the most predominantly detected virus, followed by IFVs (14.6%), HAdV (7.5%), HPIVs (5.8%), HCoVs (4.2%), HRSVs (3.6%), HBoV (1.9%), and HMPV (1.6%). Most of the ARIs were significantly correlated with clinical symptoms of fever, cough, and runny nose. Although HRV and HAdV were frequently detected throughout the year in patients, other respiratory viruses showed apparent seasonality. HRSVs and IFVs were the major causative agents of acute respiratory diseases in infants and young children. Overall, this study demonstrates a meaningful relationship between viral infection and typical manifestations of known clinical features as well as seasonality, age distribution, and co-infection among respiratory viruses. Therefore, these data could provide useful information for public health management and to enhance patient care for primary clinicians. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. VITAMIN PREVENTIVE ALGORITHM FOR CHILDREN WITH ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISEASES: TECHNOLOGY OF INCREASING NON SPECIFIC RESISTANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Gromova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm of choosing adequate vitamin combination for children's acute respiratory diseases is suggested on the basis of Pikovit vitamin complex (KRKA, Slovenia. It is emphasized that the choice of vitamins should be based on the peculiarities of their metabolism and their role in the body. The importance of vitamin therapy is in its immunomodifying effect and increasing child's abilities for adaptation. Choice of vitamin and mineral complex for seasonal child ARD prevention depends on physiological vitamin doses and the fact that vitamin and mineral complexes containing iron and copper should be excluded in the acute phase of the disease. Latest research data is provided demonstrating the inadvisability of using iron and copper additives to children with ARD. The article provides information on the necessity of qualified primary inspection of the sick child, diagnosing activities, composing an individual diet, vitamin and pharmacological therapy.Key words: polyvitamin products, prevention, acute respiratory infections, children.

  8. Acute respiratory distress syndrome after convalescent plasma use: treatment of a patient with Ebola virus disease contracted in Madrid, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Rillo, Marta; Arsuaga, Marta; Ramírez-Olivencia, Germán; de la Calle, Fernando; Borobia, Alberto M; Sánchez-Seco, Paz; Lago, Mar; Figueira, Juan C; Fernández-Puntero, Belén; Viejo, Aurora; Negredo, Anabel; Nuñez, Concepción; Flores, Eva; Carcas, Antonio J; Jiménez-Yuste, Victor; Lasala, Fátima; García-de-Lorenzo, Abelardo; Arnalich, Francisco; Arribas, Jose R

    2015-07-01

    In the current epidemic of Ebola virus disease, health-care workers have been transferred to Europe and the USA for optimised supportive care and experimental treatments. We describe the clinical course of the first case of Ebola virus disease contracted outside of Africa, in Madrid, Spain. Herein we report clinical, laboratory, and virological findings of the treatment of a female nurse assistant aged 44 years who was infected with Ebola virus around Sept 25-26, 2014, while caring for a Spanish missionary with confirmed Ebola virus disease who had been medically evacuated from Sierra Leone to La Paz-Carlos III University Hospital, Madrid. We also describe the use of experimental treatments for Ebola virus disease in this patient. The patient was symptomatic for 1 week before first hospital admission on Oct 6, 2014. We used supportive treatment with intravenous fluids, broad-spectrum antibiotics, and experimental treatments with convalescent plasma from two survivors of Ebola virus disease and high-dose favipiravir. On day 10 of illness, she had acute respiratory distress syndrome, possibly caused by transfusion-related acute lung injury, which was managed without mechanical ventilation. Discharge was delayed because of the detection of viral RNA in several bodily fluids despite clearance of viraemia. The patient was discharged on day 34 of illness. At the time of discharge, the patient had possible subacute post-viral thyroiditis. None of the people who had contact with the patient before and after admission became infected with Ebola virus. This report emphasises the uncertainties about the efficacy of experimental treatments for Ebola virus disease. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of transfusion-related acute lung injury when using convalescent plasma for the treatment of Ebola virus disease. La Paz-Carlos III University Hospital. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Amoxicillin for acute lower respiratory tract infection in primary care: subgroup analysis of potential high-risk groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Michael; Stuart, Beth; Coenen, Samuel; Butler, Chris C; Goossens, Herman; Verheij, Theo J M; Little, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Antibiotics are of limited overall clinical benefit for uncomplicated lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) but there is uncertainty about their effectiveness for patients with features associated with higher levels of antibiotic prescribing. To estimate the benefits and harms of antibiotics for acute LRTI among those producing coloured sputum, smokers, those with fever or prior comorbidities, and longer duration of prior illness. Secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial of antibiotic placebo for acute LRTI in primary care. Two thousand and sixty-one adults with acute LRTI, where pneumonia was not suspected clinically, were given amoxicillin or matching placebo. The duration of symptoms, rated moderately bad or worse (primary outcome), symptom severity on days 2-4 (0-6 scale), and the development of new or worsening symptoms were analysed in pre-specified subgroups of interest. Evidence of differential treatment effectiveness was assessed in prespecified subgroups by interaction terms. No subgroups were identified that were significantly more likely to benefit from antibiotics in terms of symptom duration or the development of new or worsening symptoms. Those with a history of significant comorbidities experienced a significantly greater reduction in symptom severity between days 2 and 4 (interaction term -0.28, P = 0.003; estimated effect of antibiotics among those with a past history -0.28 [95% confidence interval = -0.44 to -0.11], P = 0.001), equivalent to three people in 10 rating symptoms as a slight rather than a moderately bad problem. For subgroups not specified in advance antibiotics provided a modest reduction in symptom severity for non-smokers and for those with short prior illness duration (resistance.

  10. Management of Acute Diarrheal Illness During Deployment: A Deployment Health Guideline and Expert Panel Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, Mark S; Martin, Gregory J; Murray, Clinton K; Burgess, Timothy H; Connor, Patrick; Mancuso, James D; Schnaubelt, Elizabeth R; Ballard, Timothy P; Fraser, Jamie; Tribble, David R

    2017-09-01

    Acute diarrheal illness during deployment causes significant morbidity and loss of duty days. Effective and timely treatment is needed to reduce individual, unit, and health system performance impacts. This critical appraisal of the literature, as part of the development of expert consensus guidelines, asked several key questions related to self-care and healthcare-seeking behavior, antibiotics for self-treatment of travelers' diarrhea, what antibiotics/regimens should be considered for treatment of acute watery diarrhea and febrile diarrhea and/or dysentery, and when and what laboratory diagnostics should be used to support management of deployment-related travelers' diarrhea. Studies of acute diarrhea management in military and other travelers were assessed for relevance and quality. On the basis of this critical appraisal, guideline recommendations were developed and graded by the Expert Panel using good standards in clinical guideline development methodology. New definitions for defining the severity of diarrhea during deployment were established. A total of 13 graded recommendations on the topics of prophylaxis, therapy and diagnosis, and follow-up were developed. In addition, four non-graded consensus-based statements were adopted. Successful management of acute diarrheal illness during deployment requires action at the provider, population, and commander levels. Strong evidence supports that single-dose antimicrobial therapy is effective in most cases of moderate to severe acute diarrheal illness during deployment. Further studies are needed to address gaps in available knowledge regarding optimal therapies for treatment, prevention, and laboratory testing of acute diarrheal illness. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  11. FLT-3 ITD Positive Acute Basophilic Leukemia with Rare Complex Karyotype Presenting with Acute Respiratory Failure: Case Report

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    Antohe Ion

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute basophilic leukemia is a rare subtype of acute myeloid leukemia, as categorized by the 2008 World Health Organization classification of myeloid neoplasms. Acute basophilic leukemia diagnosis requires thorough morphological, cytochemical, immunophenotypic, molecular, and cytogenetic studies and exclusion of other hematological neoplasms associating basophilia. The disease course is defined by histamine driven, occasionally life-threatening respiratory, cardiovascular, cutaneous or digestive complications, as well as primary refractoriness to standard therapy. Clinical presentation: We herein report a case of a 63-year-old asthmatic female patient diagnosed with acute basophilic leukemia, associated with previously unpublished cytogenetic features and FLT-3 ITD mutation, pulmonary leukostasis and spontaneous pulmonary capillary leak syndrome, which worsened immediately following chemotherapy initiation. Respiratory complications were successfully managed, but recrudesced upon emergence of refractory disease and were ultimately fatal. We highlight the likelihood of pulmonary complications induced by basophil degranulation and tumor lysis in hypercellular acute basophilic leukemia and the potential benefit of histamine receptor blockade in this setting.

  12. Elementary school-based influenza vaccination: evaluating impact on respiratory illness absenteeism and laboratory-confirmed influenza.

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    Sonia A Kjos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies of influenza vaccine effectiveness in schools have assessed all-cause absenteeism rather than laboratory-confirmed influenza. We conducted an observational pilot study to identify absences due to respiratory illness and laboratory-confirmed influenza in schools with and without school-based vaccination. METHODS: A local public health agency initiated school-based influenza vaccination in two Wisconsin elementary schools during October 2010 (exposed schools; two nearby schools served as a comparison group (non-exposed schools. Absences due to fever or cough illness were monitored for 12 weeks. During the 4 weeks of peak influenza activity, parents of absent children with fever/cough illness were contacted and offered influenza testing. RESULTS: Parental consent for sharing absenteeism data was obtained for 937 (57% of 1,640 students. Fifty-two percent and 28%, respectively, of all students in exposed and non-exposed schools were vaccinated. Absences due to fever or cough illness were significantly lower in the exposed schools during seven of 12 surveillance weeks. Twenty-seven percent of students at exposed schools and 39% at unexposed schools had one or more days of absence due to fever/cough illness (p<0.0001. There was no significant difference in the proportion of students absent for other reasons (p = 0.23. During the 4 week period of influenza testing, respiratory samples were obtained for 68 (42% of 163 episodes of absence due to fever or cough illness. Influenza was detected in 6 students; 3 attended exposed schools. CONCLUSIONS: Detection of laboratory-confirmed influenza in schools was challenging due to multiple consent requirements, difficulty obtaining samples from absent children, and a mild influenza season. School-based influenza vaccination was associated with reduced absenteeism due to fever or cough illness, but not absenteeism for other reasons. Although nonspecific, absence due to fever or cough

  13. Elementary school-based influenza vaccination: evaluating impact on respiratory illness absenteeism and laboratory-confirmed influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjos, Sonia A; Irving, Stephanie A; Meece, Jennifer K; Belongia, Edward A

    2013-01-01

    Studies of influenza vaccine effectiveness in schools have assessed all-cause absenteeism rather than laboratory-confirmed influenza. We conducted an observational pilot study to identify absences due to respiratory illness and laboratory-confirmed influenza in schools with and without school-based vaccination. A local public health agency initiated school-based influenza vaccination in two Wisconsin elementary schools during October 2010 (exposed schools); two nearby schools served as a comparison group (non-exposed schools). Absences due to fever or cough illness were monitored for 12 weeks. During the 4 weeks of peak influenza activity, parents of absent children with fever/cough illness were contacted and offered influenza testing. Parental consent for sharing absenteeism data was obtained for 937 (57%) of 1,640 students. Fifty-two percent and 28%, respectively, of all students in exposed and non-exposed schools were vaccinated. Absences due to fever or cough illness were significantly lower in the exposed schools during seven of 12 surveillance weeks. Twenty-seven percent of students at exposed schools and 39% at unexposed schools had one or more days of absence due to fever/cough illness (pschools. Detection of laboratory-confirmed influenza in schools was challenging due to multiple consent requirements, difficulty obtaining samples from absent children, and a mild influenza season. School-based influenza vaccination was associated with reduced absenteeism due to fever or cough illness, but not absenteeism for other reasons. Although nonspecific, absence due to fever or cough illness may be a useful surrogate endpoint in school-based studies if identification of laboratory confirmed influenza is not feasible.

  14. Progress in Pediatrics in 2012: choices in allergy, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hematology, infectious diseases, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffarelli, Carlo; Santamaria, Francesca; Vottero, Alessandra; Bernasconi, Sergio

    2013-05-08

    In this review, we summarize the progresses in allergy, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hematology, infectious diseases, neurology, nutrition and respiratory tract illnesses that have been published in The Italian Journal of Pediatrics in 2012. The induction of Treg activity by probiotics might be effective for promoting tolerance towards food allergens. Nasal cytology is useful in patients with rhinitis for diagnosing chronic non-allergic non-infectious diseases. Atopic eczema is associated both with an aberrant skin matrix and impaired systemic immune response. Therefore, isolated topical treatment may have suboptimal effect. Diagnostic work-up of exercise-induced anaphylaxis, including exercise challenge test, is necessary to reach a diagnosis. Studies may support a role for nutrition on prevention of asthma and cardiovascular diseases. Clinicians need to early identify adolescent menstrual abnormalities to minimize sequelae, and to promote health information. In Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 2B investigations include acetylcholinesterase study of rectal mucosa followed by the molecular analysis of RET mutation. Low adherence to gluten-free diet and osteopenia are common problems in children with diabetes mellitus type 1 and celiac disease. In infantile colic, laboratory tests are usually unnecessary and the treatment is based on reassurance. Prevalence of obesity and stunting is elucidated by several studies. Evidences are growing that dietetic measures are needed to prevent obesity in children with acute leukemia. Treatment studies for infectious diseases show promise for probiotics along with standard triple therapy in children with Helicobacter pilori infection, while zinc has no effect on pneumonia. Educational programs about the proper management of the febrile child are warranted. A new hour-specific total serum bilirubin nomogram has been shown to be able to predict newborns without hyperbilirubinemia after 48 to 72 hours of life. Newborns with

  15. [Preliminary analysis on respiratory syncytial virus identified in children with acute respiratory infections in Tibet Autonomous Region, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jie; Zhu, Ru-Nan; Qian, Yuan; Sun, Yu; Zhao, Lin-Qing; Wang, Fang; Wu, Hong; Shan, Min-Na; Deji, Mei-Duo

    2012-03-01

    To understand the role of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in children with acute respiratory infections (ARI) in Tibet Autonomous Region and the contribution of two major groups of RSV, nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPA) were collected from hospitalized children with ARI in Department of Pediatrics, Tibet People's Hospital in Lasa, Tibet from April to July in 2011 and tested for seven common respiratory viruses and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) by direct immunofluorescence assay (DFA). Total RNAs were extracted from RSV positive samples by DFA and reverse transcripted to cDNA. Nested-PCR was employed to determine the genogroups of RSV, which were confirmed by real time-PCR and sequence analysis for G protein encoding gene. The Characteristics and variations of G genes from RSV in this project were identified by sequence comparison with those G genes in GenBank. Out of 167 samples, 65 were positive for respiratory viruses with a total positive rate of 38.9%, including 45 (69.2%, 45/65)positive samples for RSV. Among 42 samples that were positive for RSV and genotyped, 40 were identified as group A and 2 as group B. Sequence analysis of full-length G genes for 7 RSV of group A indicated that all of these belonged to subgroup GA2. The nucleotide identities between RSVs from Tibet and prototype A2 strain were 90.7%-91.8%, with 86.5%-87.2% identities of amino acid. The mutations of amino acids were mainly located in both ends of a highly conserved region in the ectodomain of the G proteins. The data indicated that RSV was the most important viral etiologic agent of ARI in spring of 2011 in Tibet and group A of RSV was predominant during the study period. High divergence existed in the ectodomain of G proteins of RSVs from Tibet.

  16. Physiotherapy for adult patients with critical illness: recommendations of the European Respiratory Society and European Society of Intensive Care Medicine Task Force on Physiotherapy for Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselink, R; Bott, J; Johnson, M; Dean, E; Nava, S; Norrenberg, M; Schönhofer, B; Stiller, K; van de Leur, H; Vincent, J L

    2008-07-01

    The Task Force reviewed and discussed the available literature on the effectiveness of physiotherapy for acute and chronic critically ill adult patients. Evidence from randomized controlled trials or meta-analyses was limited and most of the recommendations were level C (evidence from uncontrolled or nonrandomized trials, or from observational studies) and D (expert opinion). However, the following evidence-based targets for physiotherapy were identified: deconditioning, impaired airway clearance, atelectasis, intubation avoidance, and weaning failure. Discrepancies and lack of data on the efficacy of physiotherapy in clinical trials support the need to identify guidelines for physiotherapy assessments, in particular to identify patient characteristics that enable treatments to be prescribed and modified on an individual basis. There is a need to standardize pathways for clinical decision-making and education, to define the professional profile of physiotherapists, and increase the awareness of the benefits of prevention and treatment of immobility and deconditioning for critically ill adult patients.

  17. Efficacy of continuous renal replacement therapy in the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis associated acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, H-X; Xu, J-Y; Li, M-Q

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the efficacy of the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) using continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) by evaluating the effect of CRRT on respiratory and circulatory function as well as serum cytokines level. Fifty four randomly selected patients with confirmed SAP complicated by ARDS after being admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) within 72 hr of onset were included in the study. Patients received mechanical respiratory support and CRRT. Arterial blood gas analysis was conducted and serum cytokine levels, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 4 (IL-4) and interleukin 6 (IL-6), as well as C reactive protein (CRP) were evaluated respectively both before and 6h, 12h, and 24h after CRRT therapy. Peak inspiratory pressure and pulmonary compliance were also recorded. Arterial oxygen tension (PaO2), oxygenation index (OI) as well as dynamic pulmonary compliance were all elevated significantly, whereas peak inspiratory pressure significantly decreased at 6h, 12h and 24h after CRRT respectively; serum cytokine level and CRP significantly decreased (p < 0.05). CRRT can effectively reduce the level of inflammatory mediators, and improve respiratory and circulatory function.

  18. Human Metapneumovirus and Respiratory Syncytial Virus Disease in Children, Yemen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sonboli, Najla; Hart, Charles A.; Al-Aghbari, Nasher; Al-Ansi, Ahmed; Ashoor, Omar

    2006-01-01

    Factors increasing the severity of respiratory infections in developing countries are poorly described. We report factors associated with severe acute respiratory illness in Yemeni children (266 infected with respiratory syncytial virus and 66 with human metapneumovirus). Age, indoor air pollution, and incomplete vaccinations were risk factors and differed from those in industrialized countries. PMID:17073098

  19. Management of Chronic Kidney Disease Patients in the Intensive Care Unit: Mixing Acute and Chronic Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rosa, Silvia; Samoni, Sara; Villa, Gianluca; Ronco, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at high risk for developing critical illness and for admission to intensive care units (ICU). 'Critically ill CKD patients' frequently develop an acute worsening of renal function (i.e. acute-on-chronic, AoC) that contributes to long-term kidney dysfunction, potentially leading to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). An integrated multidisciplinary effort is thus necessary to adequately manage the multi-organ damage of those kidney patients and contemporaneously reduce the progression of kidney dysfunction when they are critically ill. The aim of this review is to describe (1) the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the development of AoC kidney dysfunction and its role in the progression toward ESKD; (2) the most common clinical presentations of critical illness among CKD/ESKD patients; and (3) the continuum of care for CKD/ESKD patients from maintenance hemodialysis/peritoneal dialysis to acute renal replacement therapy performed in ICU and, vice-versa, for AoC patients who develop ESKD. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. INFLUENZA AND ACUTE VIRAL RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN THE PRACTICE OF THE EMERGENCY CREWS OF MOSCOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Plavunov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza and acute viral respiratory infections have a great social significance during epidemic rise of morbidity and demand differential diagnosis of pneumonia with bacterial etiology and consultation with an infectious disease doctor in case of seeing patients in non-core hospitals. This article highlights the problem of influenza and acute respiratory viral infections’ early diagnosis. Clinical manifestations of influenza and other respiratory extremely similar. The differential diagnosis must take into account the presence of mixed infection in the same patient. According to the results of consultative infectious ambulance teams in 2014-2016, quality of diagnostics of this infectious pathology was examined. Observed deaths in persons later seeking medical treatment, not receiving timely antiviral therapy and related to high-risk groups: patients with obesity, chronic alcohol intoxication, diabetes, pregnant women. Influenza and acute viral respiratory infections, more complicated by pneumonia, people in the older age group, indicating the need for timely medical evacuation of patients older than 60 years. In some cases, in the diagnosis of influenza was helped by the results of laboratory studies (especially the trend to leukopenia and a positive rapid test. It should be noted that a negative rapid test for influenza was not a reason for exclusion of the diagnosis “influenza”.

  1. A case of acute respiratory failure in a young man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Di Stefano

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A 40 years old man presents with a few hours history of progressive dyspnea. He was suffering from almost a week of low grade fever. The night before the onset of dyspnea he had high fever (39,5°C, polyuria and dysuria. His blood pressure is 115/65 mmHg and his oxygen saturation while breathing ambient air is 81%. Chest auscultation reveals rales bilaterally. A chest radiography shows bilateral pulmonary infiltrates consistent with pulmonary edema. How should this patient be evaluated to establish the cause of the acute pulmonary edema and to determine appropriate therapy?

  2. Acute respiratory symptoms and evacuation-related behavior after exposure to chlorine gas leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sung-Woo; Choi, Won-Jun; Yi, Min-Kee; Song, Seng-Ho; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Han, Sang-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    A study was performed on the accidental chlorine gas leakage that occurred in a factory of printed circuit boards manufactured without chlorine. Health examination was performed for all 52 workers suspected of exposure to chlorine gas, and their evacuation-related behaviors were observed in addition to analyzing the factors that affected the duration of their acute respiratory symptoms. Behavioral characteristics during the incidence of the accidental chlorine gas leakage, the estimated time of exposure, and the duration of subjective acute respiratory symptoms were investigated. In addition, clinical examination, chest radiography, and dental erosion test were performed. As variables that affected the duration of respiratory symptoms, dose group, body weight, age, sex, smoking, work period, and wearing a protective gear were included and analyzed by using the Cox proportional hazard model. Of 47 workers exposed to chlorine gas, 36 (77 %) developed more than one subjective symptom. The duration of the subjective symptoms according to exposure level significantly differed, with a median of 1 day (range, 0-5 days) in the low-exposure group and 2 days (range, 0-25 days) in the high-exposure group. Among the variables that affected the duration of the acute respiratory symptoms, which were analyzed by using the Cox proportional hazard model, only exposure level was significant (hazard ratio 2.087, 95 % CI = 1.119, 3.890). Regarding the evacuation-related behaviors, 22 workers (47 %) voluntarily evacuated to a safety zone immediately after recognizing the accidental exposure, but 25 workers (43 %) delayed evacuation until the start of mandatory evacuation (min 5, max 25 min). The duration of the subjective acute respiratory symptoms significantly differed between the low- and high-exposure groups. Among the 27 workers in the high-exposure group, 17 misjudged the toxicity after being aware of the gas leakage, which is a relatively high number.

  3. [Massive pneumonia with severe acute respiratory insufficiency after chicken pox in a female patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagorni-Obradović, Lj; Mitić-Milikić, M; Sekulić, S; Vukcević, M; Grozdenović, E

    2000-01-01

    A female patient who developed massive bilateral pneumonia with severe respiratory insufficiency during recovery from varicella, is presented. Blood serologic analyses detected the cause of infection--Mycoplasma pneumoniae, while Streptococcus pneumoniae was isolated by bacteriological examination of the sputum. M. pneumoniae is a causative agent of acute upper and lower respiratory airway infections with a frequently mild clinical picture. This agent rarely provokes massive pneumonia with severe clinical appearance as described in the patient, who had immunodeficiency due to previous infection with Varicella zoster virus.

  4. The pragmatics of feeding the pediatric patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verger, Judy T; Bradshaw, Darla J; Henry, Elizabeth; Roberts, Kathryn E

    2004-09-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) represents the ultimate pulmonary response to a wide range of injuries, from septicemia to trauma. Optimal nutrition is vital to enhancing oxygen delivery, supporting adequate cardiac contractility and respiratory musculature, eliminating fluid and electrolyte imbalances, and supporting the proinflammatory response. Research is providing a better understanding of nutrients that specifically address the complex physiologic changes in ARDS. This article highlights the pathophysiology of ARDS as it relates to nutrition, relevant nutritional assessment, and important enteral and parenteral considerations for the pediatric patient who has ARDS.

  5. Typical or atypical pneumonia and severe acute respiratory symptoms in PICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hon, Kam Lun; Leung, Agnes S Y; Cheung, Kam Lau; Fu, Antony C; Chu, Winnie Chiu Wing; Ip, Margaret; Chan, Paul K S

    2015-07-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP) is a common childhood pathogen associated with atypical pneumonia (AP). It is often a mild disease and seldom results in paediatric intensive care (PICU) admission. In 2003, World Health Organization (WHO) coined the word SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) in patients with severe acute respiratory symptoms (sars) for an outbreak of AP in Hong Kong due to a novel coronavirus. In 2012, another outbreak of coronavirus AP occurred in the Middle East. Confusing case definitions such as MERS (Middle East respiratory syndrome) and SARI (severe acute respiratory infections) were coined. This paper aims to present a case of MP with sars, ARDS, pneumonia and pleural effusion during the MERS epidemics, and review the incidence and mortality of severe AP with MP. We presented a case of MP with sars, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), pneumonia and pleural effusion during the MERS epidemics, and performed a literature review on the incidence and mortality of severe AP with MP requiring PICU care. In early 2013, an 11-year-old girl presented with sars, ARDS (acute respiratory distress syndrome), right-sided pneumonia and pleural effusion. She was treated with multiple antibiotics. Streptococcus pneumoniae was not isolated in this girl with 'typical' pneumonia by symptomatology and chest radiography, but tracheal aspirate identified MP instead. The respiratory equations are computed with PaO2 /FiO2 consistent with severe lung injury. Literature on the incidence and mortality of severe AP with MP requiring PICU care is reviewed. Six, 165 and 293 articles were found when PubMed (a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine) was searched for the terms 'mycoplasma' and 'ICU', 'mycoplasma' and 'mortality', and 'mycoplasma' and 'severe'. Mortality and PICU admission associated with MP is general low and rarely reported. Experimental and clinical studies have suggested that the pathogenesis of lung injuries in MP infection is associated

  6. Challenges on non-invasive ventilation to treat acute respiratory failure in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, Raffaele

    2016-11-15

    Acute respiratory failure is a frequent complication in elderly patients especially if suffering from chronic cardio-pulmonary diseases. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation constitutes a successful therapeutic tool in the elderly as, like in younger patients, it is able to prevent endotracheal intubation in a wide range of acute conditions; moreover, this ventilator technique is largely applied in the elderly in whom invasive mechanical ventilation is considered not appropriated. Furthermore, the integration of new technological devices, ethical issues and environment of treatment are still largely debated in the treatment of acute respiratory failure in the elderly.This review aims at reporting and critically analyzing the peculiarities in the management of acute respiratory failure in elderly people, the role of noninvasive mechanical ventilation, the potential advantages of applying alternative or integrated therapeutic tools (i.e. high-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy, non-invasive and invasive cough assist devices and low-flow carbon-dioxide extracorporeal systems), drawbacks in physician's communication and "end of life" decisions. As several areas of this topic are not supported by evidence-based data, this report takes in account also "real-life" data as well as author's experience.The choice of the setting and of the timing of non-invasive mechanical ventilation in elderly people with advanced cardiopulmonary disease should be carefully evaluated together with the chance of using integrated or alternative supportive devices. Last but not least, economic and ethical issues may often challenges the behavior of the physicians towards elderly people who are hospitalized for acute respiratory failure at the end stage of their cardiopulmonary and neoplastic diseases.

  7. Acute respiratory and cardiovascular admissions after a public smoking ban in Geneva, Switzerland.

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    Jean-Paul Humair

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many countries have introduced legislations for public smoking bans to reduce the harmful effects of exposure to tobacco smoke. Smoking bans cause significant reductions in admissions for acute coronary syndromes but their impact on respiratory diseases is unclear. In Geneva, Switzerland, two popular votes led to a stepwise implementation of a state smoking ban in public places, with a temporary suspension. This study evaluated the effect of this smoking ban on hospitalisations for acute respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. METHODS: This before and after intervention study was conducted at the University Hospitals of Geneva, Switzerland, across 4 periods with different smoking legislations. It included 5,345 patients with a first hospitalisation for acute coronary syndrome, ischemic stroke, acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pneumonia and acute asthma. The main outcomes were the incidence rate ratios (IRR of admissions for each diagnosis after the final ban compared to the pre-ban period and adjusted for age, gender, season, influenza epidemic and secular trend. RESULTS: Hospitalisations for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease significantly decreased over the 4 periods and were lowest after the final ban (IRR=0.54 [95%CI: 0.42-0.68]. We observed a trend in reduced admissions for acute coronary syndromes (IRR=0.90 [95%CI: 0.80-1.00]. Admissions for ischemic stroke, asthma and pneumonia did not significantly change. CONCLUSIONS: A legislative smoking ban was followed by a strong decrease in hospitalisations for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and a trend for reduced admissions for acute coronary syndrome. Smoking bans are likely to be very beneficial for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  8. Acute kidney injury enhances outcome prediction ability of sequential organ failure assessment score in critically ill patients.

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    Chih-Hsiang Chang

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common and serious complication in intensive care unit (ICU patients and also often part of a multiple organ failure syndrome. The sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA score is an excellent tool for assessing the extent of organ dysfunction in critically ill patients. This study aimed to evaluate the outcome prediction ability of SOFA and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE III score in ICU patients with AKI.A total of 543 critically ill patients were admitted to the medical ICU of a tertiary-care hospital from July 2007 to June 2008. Demographic, clinical and laboratory variables were prospectively recorded for post hoc analysis as predictors of survival on the first day of ICU admission.One hundred and eighty-seven (34.4% patients presented with AKI on the first day of ICU admission based on the risk of renal failure, injury to kidney, failure of kidney function, loss of kidney function, and end-stage renal failure (RIFLE classification. Major causes of the ICU admissions involved respiratory failure (58%. Overall in-ICU mortality was 37.9% and the hospital mortality was 44.7%. The predictive accuracy for ICU mortality of SOFA (areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves: 0.815±0.032 was as good as APACHE III in the AKI group. However, cumulative survival rates at 6-month follow-up following hospital discharge differed significantly (p<0.001 for SOFA score ≤10 vs. ≥11 in these ICU patients with AKI.For patients coexisting with AKI admitted to ICU, this work recommends application of SOFA by physicians to assess ICU mortality because of its practicality and low cost. A SOFA score of ≥ "11" on ICU day 1 should be considered an indicator of negative short-term outcome.

  9. Household fuel use and child respiratory ill health in two towns in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . 29.0%). Conclusion. The elevated prevalence of some respiratory health outcomes among schoolchildren, especially in conjunction with domestic fossil fuel burning, is of concern. The data collected in this study may be used to complement ...

  10. Respiratory viruses involved in influenza-like illness in a Greek pediatric population during the winter period of the years 2005-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogka, Vasiliki; Kossivakis, Athanasios; Kalliaropoulos, Antonios; Moutousi, Afroditi; Sgouras, Dionyssios; Panagiotopoulos, Takis; Chrousos, George P; Theodoridou, Maria; Syriopoulou, Vassiliki P; Mentis, Andreas F

    2011-10-01

    Viruses are the major cause of pediatric respiratory tract infection and yet many suspected cases of illness remain uncharacterized. This study aimed to determine the distribution of several respiratory viruses in children diagnosed as having influenza-like illness, over the winter period of 2005-2008. Molecular assays including conventional and real time PCR protocols, were employed to screen respiratory specimens, collected by clinicians of the Influenza sentinel system and of outpatient pediatric clinics, for identification of several respiratory viruses. Of 1,272 specimens tested, 814 (64%) were positive for at least one virus and included 387 influenza viruses, 160 rhinoviruses, 155 respiratory syncytial viruses, 95 adenoviruses, 81 bocaviruses, 47 parainfluenza viruses, 44 metapneumoviruses, and 30 coronaviruses. Simultaneous presence of two or three viruses was observed in 173 of the above positive cases, 21% of which included influenza virus and rhinovirus. The majority of positive cases occurred during January and February. Influenza virus predominated in children older than 1 year old, with type B being the dominant type for the first season and subtypes A/H3N2 and A/H1N1 the following two winter seasons, respectively. Respiratory syncytial virus prevailed in children younger than 2 years old, with subtypes A and B alternating from year to year. This is the most comprehensive study of the epidemiology of respiratory viruses in Greece, indicating influenza, rhinovirus and respiratory syncytial virus as major contributors to influenza-like illness in children. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Involved in Severe Acute Respiratory Disease in Northern Italy during the Pandemic and Postpandemic Period (2009–2011

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    Elena Pariani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 2009 pandemic, international health authorities recommended monitoring severe and complicated cases of respiratory disease, that is, severe acute respiratory infection (SARI and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. We evaluated the proportion of SARI/ARDS cases and deaths due to influenza A(H1N1pdm09 infection and the impact of other respiratory viruses during pandemic and postpandemic period (2009–2011 in northern Italy; additionally we searched for unknown viruses in those cases for which diagnosis remained negative. 206 respiratory samples were collected from SARI/ARDS cases and analyzed by real-time RT-PCR/PCR to investigate influenza viruses and other common respiratory pathogens; also, a virus discovery technique (VIDISCA-454 was applied on those samples tested negative to all pathogens. Influenza A(H1N1pdm09 virus was detected in 58.3% of specimens, with a case fatality rate of 11.3%. The impact of other respiratory viruses was 19.4%, and the most commonly detected viruses were human rhinovirus/enterovirus and influenza A(H3N2. VIDISCA-454 enabled the identification of one previously undiagnosed measles infection. Nearly 22% of SARI/ARDS cases did not obtain a definite diagnosis. In clinical practice, great efforts should be dedicated to improving the diagnosis of severe respiratory disease; the introduction of innovative molecular technologies, as VIDISCA-454, will certainly help in reducing such “diagnostic gap.”

  12. Noninvasive ventilation for acute respiratory failure: state of the art (I part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Lari

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the last years Non-Invasive Ventilation (NIV has been playing an important role in the treatment of Acute Respiratory Failure (ARF. A lot of trials have shown improvements in clinical features (respiratory rate, neurological score, pH and arterial blood gases. Methods: In particular clinical conditions, such as Acute Cardiogenic Pulmonary Edema (ACPE and acute exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD, systematic reviews and meta-analysis show a reduction in the need for intubation and in-hospital mortality compared to standard medical treatment. In other clinical conditions, such as acute asthma, Acute Lung Injury (ALI/Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS and severe pneumonia, NIV does not show significant improvements in term of avoided intubations or mortality rate. Although the first important data on NIV comes from studies performed in Intensive Care Units (ICUs, subsequently these methodologies of ventilation have been used with increasing frequency in Emergency Departments (ED and medical wards. Results: Studies developed in ICU sometimes report slightly worse outcomes compared to studies performed in general wards due to the need to treat more severe patients in ICU. Aetiology remains one of the most important factor determining prognosis: different pathological mechanisms substain different clinical conditions and not in all cases the application of positive pressures to the airways is useful. NIV for ARF due to COPD and ACPE is feasible, safe and effective also in a general medical ward if selection of patients, staff training and monitoring are appropriate: its early application improves clinical parameters, arterial blood gases, prevents endotracheal intubation, decreases mortality and hospitalisation. This should encourage the diffusion of NIV in this specific setting.

  13. Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist increases respiratory variability and complexity in acute respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Matthieu; Demoule, Alexandre; Cracco, Christophe; Gharbi, Alexandre; Fiamma, Marie-Noëlle; Straus, Christian; Duguet, Alexandre; Gottfried, Stewart B; Similowski, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) is a partial ventilatory support mode where positive pressure is provided in relation to diaphragmatic electrical activity (EAdi). Central inspiratory activity is normally not monotonous, but it demonstrates short-term variability and complexity. The authors reasoned that NAVA should produce a more "natural" or variable breathing pattern than other modes. This study compared respiratory variability and complexity during pressure support ventilation (PSV) and NAVA. Flow and EAdi were recorded during routine PSV (tidal volume approximately 6-8 ml/kg) and four NAVA levels (1-4 cm H2O/microVEAdi) in 12 intubated patients. Breath-by-breath variability of flow and EAdi-related variables was quantified by the coefficient of variation (CV) and autocorrelation analysis. Complexity of flow and EAdi was described using noise titration, largest Lyapunov exponent, Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy, and three-dimensional phase portraits. Switching from PSV to NAVA increased the CV and decreased the autocorrelation for most flow-related variables in a dose-dependent manner (P Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy for flow were greater during NAVA than PSV and increased with NAVA level (P Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy for EAdi were not influenced by ventilator mode. Compared with PSV, NAVA increases the breathing pattern variability and complexity of flow, whereas the complexity of EAdi is unchanged. Whether this improves clinical outcomes remains to be determined.

  14. Influenza and other respiratory viruses detected by influenza-like illness surveillance in Leyte Island, the Philippines, 2010-2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirono Otomaru

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the role of influenza-like illness (ILI surveillance conducted on Leyte Island, the Philippines, including involvement of other respiratory viruses, from 2010 to 2013. ILI surveillance was conducted from January 2010 to March 2013 with 3 sentinel sites located in Tacloban city, Palo and Tanauan of Leyte Island. ILI was defined as fever ≥38°C or feverish feeling and either cough or running nose in a patient of any age. Influenza virus and other 5 respiratory viruses were searched. A total of 5,550 ILI cases visited the 3 sites and specimens were collected from 2,031 (36.6% cases. Among the cases sampled, 1,637 (75.6% were children aged <5 years. 874 (43.0% cases were positive for at least one of the respiratory viruses tested. Influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV were predominantly detected (both were 25.7% followed by human rhinovirus (HRV (17.5%. The age distributions were significantly different between those who were positive for influenza, HRV, and RSV. ILI cases were reported throughout the year and influenza virus was co-detected with those viruses on approximately half of the weeks of study period (RSV in 60.5% and HRV 47.4%. In terms of clinical manifestations, only the rates of headache and sore throat were significantly higher in influenza positive cases than cases positive to other viruses. In conclusion, syndromic ILI surveillance in this area is difficult to detect the start of influenza epidemic without laboratory confirmation which requires huge resources. Age was an important factor that affected positive rates of influenza and other respiratory viruses. Involvement of older age children may be useful to detect influenza more effectively.

  15. Characteristics of severe acute respiratory infectionassociated hospitalization in Yemen, 2014/15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabet, A A K; Al-Kohani, A; Shadoul, A; Al-Mahaqri, A; Bin Yahya, M; Saleh, A H; Al-Adeemy, D; Khan, W; Malik, M

    2016-10-02

    This study aims to describe etiological agents, demographic details of patients, seasonality and underlying conditions among patients hospitalized due to viral severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) in Yemen. We carried out a retrospective descriptive analysis of data from January 2014 to December 2015. Nasopharyngeal swabs were taken from each patient for laboratory testing. A total of 1346 diagnostic specimens were tested, of which 733 (54%) were positive for influenza viruses. Influenza A(H3) and A(H1N1) pdm09 predominated. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was reported predominantly among children (41%). Males (61%) were more affected than females. The median age was 1 year (range 0.5-94.0). The median length of hospitalization was 6 days. Chronic cardiovascular disease was the most commonly reported underlying condition, but 67% had no documented underlying disease. Respiratory viruses, particularly RSV, adenovirus and influenza, were commonly associated with hospitalization for SARI.

  16. Failure of Noninvasive Ventilation for De Novo Acute Hypoxemic Respiratory Failure: Role of Tidal Volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carteaux, Guillaume; Millán-Guilarte, Teresa; De Prost, Nicolas; Razazi, Keyvan; Abid, Shariq; Thille, Arnaud W; Schortgen, Frédérique; Brochard, Laurent; Brun-Buisson, Christian; Mekontso Dessap, Armand

    2016-02-01

    A low or moderate expired tidal volume can be difficult to achieve during noninvasive ventilation for de novo acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (i.e., not due to exacerbation of chronic lung disease or cardiac failure). We assessed expired tidal volume and its association with noninvasive ventilation outcome. Prospective observational study. Twenty-four bed university medical ICU. Consecutive patients receiving noninvasive ventilation for acute hypoxemic respiratory failure between August 2010 and February 2013. Noninvasive ventilation was uniformly delivered using a simple algorithm targeting the expired tidal volume between 6 and 8 mL/kg of predicted body weight. Expired tidal volume was averaged and respiratory and hemodynamic variables were systematically recorded at each noninvasive ventilation session. Sixty-two patients were enrolled, including 47 meeting criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome, and 32 failed noninvasive ventilation (51%). Pneumonia (n = 51, 82%) was the main etiology of acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. The median (interquartile range) expired tidal volume averaged over all noninvasive ventilation sessions (mean expired tidal volume) was 9.8 mL/kg predicted body weight (8.1-11.1 mL/kg predicted body weight). The mean expired tidal volume was significantly higher in patients who failed noninvasive ventilation as compared with those who succeeded (10.6 mL/kg predicted body weight [9.6-12.0] vs 8.5 mL/kg predicted body weight [7.6-10.2]; p = 0.001), and expired tidal volume was independently associated with noninvasive ventilation failure in multivariate analysis. This effect was mainly driven by patients with PaO2/FIO2 up to 200 mm Hg. In these patients, the expired tidal volume above 9.5 mL/kg predicted body weight predicted noninvasive ventilation failure with a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 87%. A low expired tidal volume is almost impossible to achieve in the majority of patients receiving noninvasive ventilation

  17. CERTAIN ASPECTS OF COUGH PATHOGENETIC THERAPY OF ACUTE CHILD RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.I. Bardenikova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An open controlled comparative research was conducted on 263 children with acute respiratory infection (ARI in order to evaluate the clinical effectiveness, acceptability and safety of plant based preparation that contains ivy leaf extract. It was established that prescribing the preparation during the first days of disease reduced the duration of dry and inefficient cough, improved sputum rheology and bronchial tree drainage function, reduced bronchial obstruction intensity, reduced the need for prescribing bronchial spasmolitics less necessary and decreased Staybin term. Compared to other antibcough medicines, plant based preparation with ivy leaf extract has quicker effect (effective on the 1st–3rd day.Key words: children, acute respiratory infections, cough, treatment.

  18. PIDOTIMOD IN TREATMENT OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTION IN FREQUENTLY AILING CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.S. Kharlamova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This trial studied effectiveness and safety of pidotimoid (Imunorix in complex treatment of children with acute respiratory infection (ARI. Treatment with pidotimoid during 2 weeks (n = 30 resulted in lesser duration of fever and intoxication symptoms, and symptoms of laryngo-tracheitis, compared to control group (n = 30. Besides, children from pidotimoid group showed more rapid transformation of dry cough to hydrated cough, and decrease of its intensity. This beneficial change was accompanied by improvement of microbiocenosis. Effectiveness of pidotimoid was estimated by 73% of doctors as «good» (67% in control group. There was no any complication, related to treatment with this medication. The rate of repeated cases of ARI was three times lower then in control group in 6 months. All patients with ARI had no recurrent laryngeal stenosis.Key words: frequently ailing children, acute respiratory infection, treatment, prophylaxis, pidotimoid.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(2:27-33

  19. Inhaled nitric oxide for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in children and adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebistorf, Fabienne; Karam, Oliver; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure (AHRF) and mostly acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions. AHRF results from several systemic conditions and is associated with high mortality and morbidity in individuals of all ages. Inhaled nitric oxide (INO) has been...... used to improve oxygenation, but its role remains controversial. This Cochrane review was originally published in 2003, and has been updated in 2010 and 2016. OBJECTIVES: The primary objective was to examine the effects of administration of inhaled nitric oxide on mortality in adults and children...... data and resolved disagreements by discussion. Our primary outcome measure was all-cause mortality. We performed several subgroup and sensitivity analyses to assess the effects of INO in adults and children and on various clinical and physiological outcomes. We presented pooled estimates of the effects...

  20. Acute respiratory infections in the Canadian Native Indian population: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser-Lee, N J; Hessel, P A

    1994-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality among Natives in Canada. Studies examining the mortality experience of Canadian Natives have reported SMRs for ARI ranging from 2.92 to 21.23. Morbidity from ARI is also increased relative to other Canadians with rate ratios for pneumonia ranging from 3.28 to 17.6. Several risk factors have been associated with an increase in ARI including smoking, exposure to passive smoke, feeding practices, and socioeconomic factors such as housing, residential crowding and family size. The effects of other risk factors are less clear. There continues to be a need for epidemiological studies of ARI in Canadian Natives while at the same time, ARI control programs should be implemented to reduce the incidence and severity of acute respiratory infections in this population.

  1. Acute respiratory failure caused by organizing pneumonia secondary to antineoplastic therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Adriell Ramalho; Amorim, Fábio Ferreira; Soares, Paulo Henrique Alves; de Moura, Edmilson Bastos; Maia, Marcelo de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases belong to a group of diseases that typically exhibit a subacute or chronic progression but that may cause acute respiratory failure. The male patient, who was 37 years of age and undergoing therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, was admitted with cough, fever, dyspnea and acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Mechanical ventilation and antibiotic therapy were initiated but were associated with unfavorable progression. Thoracic computed tomography showed bilateral pulmonary "ground glass" opacities. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy was initiated with satisfactory response because the patient had used three drugs related to organizing pneumonia (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and rituximab), and the clinical and radiological symptoms were suggestive. Organizing pneumonia may be idiopathic or linked to collagen diseases, drugs and cancer and usually responds to corticosteroid therapy. The diagnosis was anatomopathological, but the patient's clinical condition precluded performing a lung biopsy. Organizing pneumonia should be a differential diagnosis in patients with apparent pneumonia and a progression that is unfavorable to antimicrobial treatment. PMID:23917942

  2. Recent advances in understanding acute respiratory distress syndrome [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Wohlrab

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is characterized by acute diffuse lung injury, which results in increased pulmonary vascular permeability and loss of aerated lung tissue. This causes bilateral opacity consistent with pulmonary edema, hypoxemia, increased venous admixture, and decreased lung compliance such that patients with ARDS need supportive care in the intensive care unit to maintain oxygenation and prevent adverse outcomes. Recently, advances in understanding the underlying pathophysiology of ARDS led to new approaches in managing these patients. In this review, we want to focus on recent scientific evidence in the field of ARDS research and discuss promising new developments in the treatment of this disease.

  3. Noninvasive ventilation for acute respiratory failure: state of the art (II part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Lari

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the last years Non-Invasive Ventilation (NIV has been playing an important role in the treatment of Acute Respiratory Failure (ARF. Prospective randomised controlled trials have shown improvements in clinical features (respiratory rate, neurological score, pH and arterial blood gases and in particular clinical conditions (Acute Cardiogenic Pulmonary Edema, ACPE, and acute exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, COPD systematic reviews and metha-analysis confirm a reduction in the need for intubation and in-hospital mortality compared to standard medical treatment. Methods: The most important techniques of ventilation in spontaneous breathing are: Continuous Positive Airway Pression (CPAP, usually performed with Venturi-like flow generators, and bi-level positive pressure ventilation (an high inspiratory pressure and a low expiratory pressure, performed with ventilators. Facial mask rather than nasal mask is used in ARF: the helmet is useful for prolonged treatments. Results: NIV’s success seems to be determined by early application, correct selection of patients and staff training. Controindications to NIV are: cardiac or respiratory arrest, a respiratory rate < 12 per minute, upper airway obstruction, hemodynamic instability or unstable cardiac arrhythmia, encephalopathy (Kelly score > 3, facial surgery trauma or deformity, inability to cooperate or protect the airway, high risk of aspiration and an inability to clear respiratory secretions. Conclusions: Bi-level ventilation for ARF due to COPD and CPAP or bi-level bentilation for ARF due to ACPE are feasible, safe and effective also in a General Medical ward if the selection of patients, the staff’s training and the monitoring are appropriate: they improve clinical parameters, arterial blood gases, prevent ETI, decrease mortality and hospitalisation. This should encourage the diffusion of NIV in this specific setting.

  4. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in an HIV-positive man with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to pneumocystis and cytomegalovirus pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Deirdre; Lynam, Almida; Carton, Edmund; Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Sheehan, Gerard; Lynn, Niamh; O'Brien, Serena; Mulcahy, Fiona

    2018-02-01

    The management of critically ill human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients is challenging; however, intensive care unit-related mortality has declined significantly in recent years. There are 10 case reports in the literature of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) use in HIV-positive patients, of whom seven survived to hospital discharge. We describe a 33-year-old Brazilian man who presented with Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia and severe hypoxic respiratory failure. He developed refractory acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and was commenced on veno-venous ECMO. He was successfully decannulated following 21 days of ECMO and survived to hospital discharge. Despite poor evidence surrounding the use of ECMO in immunocompromised patients, it is evident that ECMO could represent an important rescue therapy in HIV-positive patients with refractory ARDS.

  5. Magnitude and characteristics of acute paraquat- and diquat-related illnesses in the US: 1998–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortenberry, Gamola Z.; Beckman, John; Schwartz, Abby; Prado, Joanne Bonnar; Graham, Lucia S.; Higgins, Sheila; Lackovic, Michelle; Mulay, Prakash; Bojes, Heidi; Waltz, Justin; Mitchell, Yvette; Leinenkugel, Kathy; Oriel, Michel S.; Evans, Elizabeth; Calvert, Geoffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Paraquat and diquat are among the most commonly used herbicides in the world. Objectives Determine the magnitude, characteristics, and root causes for acute paraquat- and diquat-related illnesses in the US Methods Illnesses associated with paraquat or diquat exposure occurring from 1998 through 2011 were identified from the Sentinel Event Notification System for Occupational Risks (SENSOR)-Pesticides Program, the California Department of Pesticide Regulation (CDPR) Pesticide Illness Surveillance Program (PISP), and the Incident Data System (IDS). Cases identified by the National Poison Data System (NPDS) were reviewed for the years 1998–2003 and 2006–2013. Results A total of 300 paraquat- and 144 diquat-related acute illnesses were identified by SENSOR, PISP, and IDS. NPDS identified 693 paraquat- and 2128 diquat-related acute illnesses. In SENSOR/PISP/IDS, illnesses were commonly low severity (paraquat=41%; diquat=81%); however, SENSOR/PISP/IDS identified 24 deaths caused by paraquat and 5 deaths associated with diquat. Nineteen paraquat-related deaths were due to ingestion, seven of which were unintentional, often due to improper storage in beverage bottles. In SENSOR/PISP/IDS, paraquat and diquat-related acute illnesses were work-related in 68% (n=203) and 29% (n=42) of cases, respectively. When herbicide application site was known, the vast majority of acute paraquat-related illnesses (81%) arose from agricultural applications. Common root causes of illness were failure to use adequate personal protective equipment (PPE), application equipment failure, and spill/splash of herbicide. Conclusions Although the magnitude of acute paraquat/diquat-related illnesses was relatively low, several fatalities were identified. Many illnesses could be prevented through stricter compliance with label requirements (e.g. ensuring proper herbicide storage and PPE use), and through enhanced training of certified applicators. PMID:26775000

  6. A Comparative Study of Clinical Presentation and Risk Factors for Adverse Outcome in Patients Hospitalised with Acute Respiratory Disease Due to MERS Coronavirus or Other Causes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa A Garbati

    Full Text Available Middle East Respiratory syndrome (MERS first emerged in Saudi Arabia in 2012 and remains a global health concern. The objective of this study was to compare the clinical features and risk factors for adverse outcome in patients with RT-PCR confirmed MERS and in those with acute respiratory disease who were MERS-CoV negative, presenting to the King Fahad Medical City (KFMC in Riyadh between October 2012 and May 2014. The demographics, clinical and laboratory characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with RT-PCR confirmed MERS-CoV infection was compared with those testing negative MERS-CoV PCR. Health care workers (HCW with MERS were compared with MERS patients who were not health care workers. One hundred and fifty nine patients were eligible for inclusion. Forty eight tested positive for MERS CoV, 44 (92% being hospital acquired infections and 23 were HCW. There were 111 MERS-CoV negative patients with acute respiratory illnesses included in this study as "negative controls". Patient with confirmed MERS-CoV infection were not clinically distinguishable from those with negative MERS-CoV RT-PCR results although diarrhoea was commoner in MERS patients. A high level of suspicion in initiating laboratory tests for MERS-CoV is therefore indicated. Variables associated with adverse outcome were older age and diabetes as a co-morbid illness. Interestingly, co-morbid illnesses other than diabetes were not significantly associated with poor outcome. Health care workers with MERS had a markedly better clinical outcome compared to non HCW MERS patients.

  7. Mortality in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Judith Ju-Ming; Jit, Mark; Sultana, Rehena; Mok, Yee Hui; Yeo, Joo Guan; Koh, Jia Wen Janine Cynthia; Loh, Tsee Foong; Lee, Jan Hau

    2017-01-01

    Sparse and conflicting evidence exists regarding mortality risk from pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We aimed to determine the pooled mortality in pediatric ARDS and to describe its trend over time. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Web of Science were searched from 1960 to August 2015. Keywords or medical subject headings (MESH) terms used included "respiratory distress syndrome, adult," "acute lung injury," "acute respiratory insufficiency," "acute hypoxemic respiratory failure," "pediatrics," and "child." Study inclusion criteria were (1) pediatric patients aged 0 days to 18 years, (2) sufficient baseline data described in the pediatric ARDS group, and (3) mortality data. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and prospective observational studies were eligible. Data on study characteristics, patient demographics, measures of oxygenation, and mortality were extracted using a standard data extraction form. Independent authors conducted the search, applied the selection criteria, and extracted the data. Methodological quality of studies was assessed. Meta-analysis using a random-effects model was performed to obtain pooled estimates of mortality. Meta-regression was performed to analyze variables contributing to change in mortality over time. Eight RCTs and 21 observational studies (n = 2274 patients) were included. Pooled mortality rate was 24% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 19-31). There was a decrease in mortality rates over 3 epochs (≤2000, 2001-2009, and ≥2010: 40% [95% CI: 24-59], 35% [95% CI: 21-51], and 18% [95% CI: 12-26], respectively, P < .001). Observational studies reported a higher mortality rate than RCTs (27% [95% CI: 24-29] versus 16% [95% CI: 12-20], P < .001). Earlier year of publication was an independent factor associated with mortality. Overall mortality rate in pediatric ARDS is approximately 24%. Studies conducted and published later were associated with better survival.

  8. Low-level Circulation of Enterovirus D68–Associated Acute Respiratory Infections, Germany, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiche, Janine; Böttcher, Sindy; Diedrich, Sabine; Buchholz, Udo; Buda, Silke; Haas, Walter; Schweiger, Brunhilde

    2015-01-01

    We used physician sentinel surveillance to identify 25 (7.7%) mild to severe infections with enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) in children and adults among 325 outpatients with acute respiratory infections in Germany during August–October 2014. Results suggested low-level circulation of enterovirus D68 in Germany. Viruses were characterized by sequencing viral protein (VP) 1 and VP4/VP2 genomic regions. PMID:25898320

  9. Promising approaches for the treatment and prevention of viral respiratory illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G; Megremis, Spyridon; Kitsioulis, Nikolaos A; Vangelatou, Olympia; West, Peter; Xepapadaki, Paraskevi

    2017-10-01

    Viral respiratory tract infections are the most common human ailments, leading to enormous health and economic burden. Hundreds of viral species and subtypes have been associated with these conditions, with influenza viruses, respiratory syncytial virus, and rhinoviruses being the most frequent and with the highest burden. When considering prevention or treatment of viral respiratory tract infections, potential targets include the causative pathogens themselves but also the immune response, disease transmission, or even just the symptoms. Strategies targeting all these aspects are developing concurrently, and several novel and promising approaches are emerging. In this perspective we overview the entire range of options and highlight some of the most promising approaches, including new antiviral agents, symptomatic or immunomodulatory drugs, the re-emergence of natural remedies, and vaccines and public health policies toward prevention. Wide-scale prevention through immunization appears to be within reach for respiratory syncytial virus and promising for influenza virus, whereas additional effort is needed in regard to rhinovirus, as well as other respiratory tract viruses. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Altered Pathogenesis of Porcine Respiratory Coronavirus in Pigs due to Immunosuppressive Effects of Dexamethasone: Implications for Corticosteroid Use in Treatment of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus▿

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Kwonil; Alekseev, Konstantin P.; Zhang, Xinsheng; Cheon, Doo-Sung; Vlasova, Anastasia N.; Saif, Linda J.

    2007-01-01

    The pathogenesis and optimal treatments for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) are unclear, although corticosteroids were used to reduce lung and systemic inflammation. Because the pulmonary pathology of porcine respiratory coronavirus (PRCV) in pigs resembles SARS, we used PRCV as a model to clarify the effects of the corticosteroid dexamethasone (DEX) on coronavirus (CoV)-induced pneumonia. Conventional weaned pigs (n = 130) in one of four groups (PRCV/phosphate-buffered saline [PBS] ...

  11. [Role of invasive and non-invasive ventilation in the treatment of acute respiratory failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Sergio; Zangrillo, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation is the most common invasive treatment for acute respiratory failure in intensive care units. According to non-intensivist clinicians, ventilation could be considered as a therapy for blood gas exchange, even though positive pressure ventilation can be extremely dangerous for injured lung tissue. Despite constant advances in ventilation software and modalities, aimed at optimizing patient/ventilator adjustment, the scientific community has addressed major attention in new protective strategies to ventilate the lung, trying to prevent and reduce life-threatening iatrogenic injuries that may derive from inappropriate use of mechanical ventilation. In this review we describe the main ventilation techniques as well as new emerging methodologies. The physiological bases on which the acute respiratory distress syndrome network has significantly changed the strategy for ventilation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome are also discussed. Non-invasive ventilation, including both continuous positive airway pressure and pressure support ventilation, is considered the gold standard for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations. There is an increasing interest in the clinical use of non-invasive ventilation outside intensive care units. Although many studies have analyzed risks and benefits of non-invasive ventilation in the intensive care setting, feasibility and organization processes to perform this technique in the non-intensive wards, by preserving efficacy and safety, need to be debated.

  12. Acute illness-induced behavioral alterations are similar to those observed during withdrawal from acute alcohol exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, Laura; Doremus-Fitzwater, Tamara L.; Buck, Hollin M.; Deak, Terrence

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to an immunogen results in a constellation of behavioral changes collectively referred to as “sickness behaviors,” with alterations in cytokine expression previously shown to contribute to this sickness response. Since behaviors observed during ethanol withdrawal are strikingly similar to sickness behaviors, we hypothesized that behavioral manifestations of ethanol withdrawal might be an expression of sickness behaviors induced by ethanol-related changes in peripheral and/or central cytokine expression. Accordingly, behaviors exhibited during a modified social investigation test were first characterized in male rats following an acute injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 μg/kg). Subsequently, behavioral changes after either a high (4-g/kg; Experiment 2) or low dose (0.5 g/kg; Experiment 3) of ethanol were also examined in the same social investigation test, as well as in the forced-swim test (FST; Experiment 4). Results from these experiments demonstrated similar reductions in both exploration and social investigatory behavior during acute illness and ethanol withdrawal, while a seemingly paradoxical decrease in immobility was observed in the FST during acute ethanol withdrawal. In follow-up studies, neither indomethacin (Experiment 5) nor interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (Experiment 6) pre-exposure reversed the ethanol withdrawal-induced behavioral changes observed in this social investigation test. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that the behavioral sequelae of acute illness and ethanol withdrawal are similar in nature, while antagonist studies suggest that these behavioral alterations are not reversed by blockade of IL-1 receptors or inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. Though a direct mechanistic link between cytokines and the expression of acute ethanol withdrawal-related behaviors has yet to be found, future studies examining the involvement of brain cytokines as potential mediators of ethanol effects are greatly needed. PMID

  13. Epidemiology, Patterns of Care, and Mortality for Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Intensive Care Units in 50 Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellani, Giacomo; Laffey, John G.; Pham, Tài; Fan, Eddy; Brochard, Laurent; Esteban, Andres; Gattinoni, Luciano; van Haren, Frank; Larsson, Anders; McAuley, Daniel F.; Ranieri, Marco; Rubenfeld, Gordon; Thompson, B. Taylor; Wrigge, Hermann; Slutsky, Arthur S.; Pesenti, Antonio; Francois, Guy M.; Rabboni, Francesca; Madotto, Fabiana; Conti, Sara; Sula, Hektor; Nunci, Lordian; Cani, Alma; Zazu, Alan; Dellera, Christian; Insaurralde, Carolina S.; Alejandro, Risso V.; Daldin, Julio; Vinzio, Mauricio; Fernandez, Ruben O.; Cardonnet, Luis P.; Bettini, Lisandro R.; Bisso, Mariano Carboni; Osman, Emilio M.; Setten, Mariano G.; Lovazzano, Pablo; Alvarez, Javier; Villar, Veronica; Pozo, Norberto C.; Grubissich, Nicolas; Plotnikow, Gustavo A.; Vasquez, Daniela N.; Ilutovich, Santiago; Tiribelli, Norberto; Chena, Ariel; Pellegrini, Carlos A.; Saenz, María G.; Estenssoro, Elisa; Brizuela, Matias; Gianinetto, Hernan; Gomez, Pablo E.; Cerrato, Valeria I.; Bezzi, Marco G.; Borello, Silvina A.; Loiacono, Flavia A.; Fernandez, Adriana M.; Knowles, Serena; Reynolds, Claire; Inskip, Deborah M.; Miller, Jennene J.; Kong, Jing; Whitehead, Christina; Bihari, Shailesh; Seven, Aylin; Krstevski, Amanda; Rodgers, Helen J.; Millar, Rebecca T.; Mckenna, Toni E.; Bailey, Irene M.; Hanlon, Gabrielle C.; Aneman, Anders; Lynch, Joan M.; Azad, Raman; Neal, John; Woods, Paul W.; Roberts, Brigit L.; Kol, Mark R.; Wong, Helen S.; Riss, Katharina C.; Staudinger, Thomas; Wittebole, Xavier; Berghe, Caroline; Bulpa, Pierre A.; Dive, Alain M.; Verstraete, Rik; Lebbinck, Herve; Depuydt, Pieter; Vermassen, Joris; Meersseman, Philippe; Ceunen, Helga; Rosa, Jonas I.; Beraldo, Daniel O.; Piras, Claudio; Rampinelli, Adenilton M.; Nassar, Antonio P.; Mataloun, Sergio; Moock, Marcelo; Thompson, Marlus M.; Gonçalves, Claudio H.; Antônio, Ana Carolina P.; Ascoli, Aline; Biondi, Rodrigo S.; Fontenele, Danielle C.; Nobrega, Danielle; Sales, Vanessa M.; Shindhe, Suresh; Ismail, Dk Maizatul Aiman B. Pg Hj; Laffey, John; Beloncle, Francois; Davies, Kyle G.; Cirone, Rob; Manoharan, Venika; Ismail, Mehvish; Goligher, Ewan C.; Jassal, Mandeep; Ferguson, Niall D.; Nishikawa, Erin; Javeed, Areej; Curley, Gerard; Rittayamai, Nuttapol; Parotto, Matteo; Mehta, Sangeeta; Knoll, Jenny; Pronovost, Antoine; Canestrini, Sergio; Bruhn, Alejandro R.; Garcia, Patricio H.; Aliaga, Felipe A.; Farías, Pamela A.; Yumha, Jacob S.; Ortiz, Claudia A.; Salas, Javier E.; Saez, Alejandro A.; Vega, Luis D.; Labarca, Eduardo F.; Martinez, Felipe T.; Carreño, Nicolás G.; Lora, Pilar; Liu, Haitao; Qiu, Haibo; Liu, Ling; Tang, Rui; Luo, Xiaoming; An, Youzhong; Zhao, Huiying; Gao, Yan; Zhai, Zhe; Ye, Zheng L.; Wang, Wei; Li, Wenwen; Li, Qingdong; Zheng, Ruiqiang; Yu, Wenkui; Shen, Juanhong; Li, Xinyu; Yu, Tao; Lu, Weihua; Wu, Ya Q.; Huang, Xiao B.; He, Zhenyang; Lu, Yuanhua; Han, Hui; Zhang, Fan; Sun, Renhua; Wang, Hua X.; Qin, Shu H.; Zhu, Bao H.; Zhao, Jun; Liu, Jian; Li, Bin; Liu, Jing L.; Zhou, Fa C.; Li, Qiong J.; Zhang, Xing Y.; Li-Xin, Zhou; Xin-Hua, Qiang; Jiang, Liangyan; Gao, Yuan N.; Zhao, Xian Y.; Li, Yuan Y.; Li, Xiao L.; Wang, Chunting; Yao, Qingchun; Yu, Rongguo; Chen, Kai; Shao, Huanzhang; Qin, Bingyu; Huang, Qing Q.; Zhu, Wei H.; Hang, Ai Y.; Hua, Ma X.; Li, Yimin; Xu, Yonghao; Di, Yu D.; Ling, Long L.; Qin, Tie H.; Wang, Shou H.; Qin, Junping; Han, Yi; Zhou, Suming; Vargas, Monica P.; Jimenez, Juan I. Silesky; Rojas, Manuel A. González; Solis-Quesada, Jaime E.; Ramirez-Alfaro, Christian M.; Máca, Jan; Sklienka, Peter; Gjedsted, Jakob; Christiansen, Aage; Nielsen, Jonas; Villamagua, Boris G.; Llano, Miguel; Burtin, Philippe; Buzancais, Gautier; Beuret, Pascal; Pelletier, Nicolas; Mortaza, Satar; Mercat, Alain; Chelly, Jonathan; Jochmans, Sébastien; Terzi, Nicolas; Daubin, Cédric; Carteaux, Guillaume; de Prost, Nicolas; Chiche, Jean-Daniel; Daviaud, Fabrice; Fartoukh, Muriel; Barberet, Guillaume; Biehler, Jerome; Dellamonica, Jean; Doyen, Denis; Arnal, Jean-Michel; Briquet, Anais; Klasen, Fanny; Papazian, Laurent; Follin, Arnaud; Roux, Damien; Messika, Jonathan; Kalaitzis, Evangelos; Dangers, Laurence; Combes, Alain; Au, Siu-Ming; Béduneau, Gaetan; Carpentier, Dorothée; Zogheib, Elie H.; Dupont, Herve; Ricome, Sylvie; Santoli, Francesco L.; Besset, Sebastien L.; Michel, Philippe; Gelée, Bruno; Danin, Pierre-Eric; Goubaux, Bernard; Crova, Philippe J.; Phan, Nga T.; Berkelmans, Frantz; Badie, Julio C.; Tapponnier, Romain; Gally, Josette; Khebbeb, Samy; Herbrecht, Jean-Etienne; Schneider, Francis; Declercq, Pierre-Louis M.; Rigaud, Jean-Philippe; Duranteau, Jacques; Harrois, Anatole; Chabanne, Russell; Marin, Julien; Constantin, Jean-Michel; Thibault, Sandrine; Ghazi, Mohammed; Boukhazna, Messabi; Zein, Salem Ould; Richecoeur, Jack R.; Combaux, Daniele M.; Grelon, Fabien; Le Moal, Charlene; Sauvadet, Elise P.; Robine, Adrien; Lemiale, Virginie; Reuter, Danielle; Dres, Martin; Demoule, Alexandre; Goldgran-Toledano, Dany; Baboi, Loredana; Guérin, Claude; Lohner, Ralph; Kraßler, Jens; Schäfer, Susanne; Zacharowski, Kai D.; Meybohm, Patrick; Reske, Andreas W.; Simon, Philipp; Hopf, Hans-Bernd F.; Schuetz, Michael; Baltus, Thomas; Papanikolaou, Metaxia N.; Papavasilopoulou, Theonymfi G.; Zacharas, Giannis A.; Ourailogloy, Vasilis; Mouloudi, Eleni K.; Massa, Eleni V.; Nagy, Eva O.; Stamou, Electra E.; Kiourtzieva, Ellada V.; Oikonomou, Marina A.; Avila, Luis E.; Cortez, Cesar A.; Citalán, Johanna E.; Jog, Sameer A.; Sable, Safal D.; Shah, Bhagyesh; Gurjar, Mohan; Baronia, Arvind K.; Memon, Mohammedfaruk; Muthuchellappan, Radhakrishnan; Ramesh, Venkatapura J.; Shenoy, Anitha; Unnikrishnan, Ramesh; Dixit, Subhal B.; Rhayakar, Rachana V.; Ramakrishnan, Nagarajan; Bhardwaj, Vallish K.; Mahto, Heera L.; Sagar, Sudha V.; Palaniswamy, Vijayanand; Ganesan, Deeban; Hashemian, Seyed Mohammadreza; Jamaati, Hamidreza; Heidari, Farshad; Meaney, Edel A.; Nichol, Alistair; Knapman, Karl M.; O'Croinin, Donall; Dunne, Eimhin S.; Breen, Dorothy M.; Clarkson, Kevin P.; Jaafar, Rola F.; Dwyer, Rory; Amir, Fahd; Ajetunmobi, Olaitan O.; O'Muircheartaigh, Aogan C.; Black, Colin S.; Treanor, Nuala; Collins, Daniel V.; Altaf, Wahid; Zani, Gianluca; Fusari, Maurizio; Spadaro, Savino; Volta, Carlo A.; Graziani, Romano; Brunettini, Barbara; Palmese, Salvatore; Formenti, Paolo; Umbrello, Michele; Lombardo, Andrea; Pecci, Elisabetta; Botteri, Marco; Savioli, Monica; Protti, Alessandro; Mattei, Alessia; Schiavoni, Lorenzo; Tinnirello, Andrea; Todeschini, Manuel; Giarratano, Antonino; Cortegiani, Andrea; Sher, Sara; Rossi, Anna; Antonelli, Massimo M.; Montini, Luca M.; Casalena, Paolo; Scafetti, Sergio; Panarello, Giovanna; Occhipinti, Giovanna; Patroniti, Nicolò; Pozzi, Matteo; Biscione, Roberto R.; Poli, Michela M.; Raimondi, Ferdinando; Albiero, Daniela; Crapelli, Giulia; Beck, Eduardo; Pota, Vincenzo; Schiavone, Vincenzo; Molin, Alexandre; Tarantino, Fabio; Monti, Giacomo; Frati, Elena; Mirabella, Lucia; Cinnella, Gilda; Fossali, Tommaso; Colombo, Riccardo; Pattarino, Pierpaolo Terragni Ilaria; Mojoli, Francesco; Braschi, Antonio; Borotto, Erika E.; Cracchiolo, Andrea N.; Palma, Daniela M.; Raponi, Francesco; Foti, Giuseppe; Vascotto, Ettore R.; Coppadoro, Andrea; Brazzi, Luca; Floris, Leda; Iotti, Giorgio A.; Venti, Aaron; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Takagi, Shunsuke; Maeyama, Hiroki N.; Watanabe, Eizo; Yamaji, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Kazuyoshi; Shiozaki, Kyoko; Futami, Satoru; Ryosuke, Sekine; Saito, Koji; Kameyama, Yoshinobu; Ueno, Keiko; Izawa, Masayo; Okuda, Nao; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Harasawa, Tomofumi; Nasu, Michitaka; Takada, Tadaaki; Ito, Fumihito; Nunomiya, Shin; Koyama, Kansuke; Abe, Toshikazu; Andoh, Kohkichi; Kusumoto, Kohei; Hirata, Akira; Takaba, Akihiro; Kimura, Hiroyasu; Matsumoto, Shuhei; Higashijima, Ushio; Honda, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Nobumasa; Imai, Hiroshi; Ogino, Yasuaki; Mizuguchi, Ichiko; Ichikado, Kazuya; Nitta, Kenichi; Mochizuki, Katsunori; Hashida, Tomoaki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Niimi, Daisuke; Ueda, Takeshi; Kashiwa, Yozo; Uchiyama, Akinori; Sabelnikovs, Olegs; Oss, Peteris; Haddad, Youssef; Liew, Kong Y.; Ñamendys-Silva, Silvio A.; Jarquin-Badiola, Yves D.; Sanchez-Hurtado, Luis A.; Gomez-Flores, Saira S.; Marin, Maria C.; Villagomez, Asisclo J.; Lemus, Jordana S.; Fierro, Jonathan M.; Cervantes, Mavy Ramirez; Mejia, Francisco Javier Flores; Dector, Dulce; Dector, Dulce M.; Gonzalez, Daniel R.; Estrella, Claudia R.; Sanchez-Medina, Jorge R.; Ramirez-Gutierrez, Alvaro; George, Fernando G.; Aguirre, Janet S.; Buensuseso, Juan A.; Poblano, Manuel; Dendane, Tarek; Zeggwagh, Amine Ali; Balkhi, Hicham; Elkhayari, Mina; Samkaoui, Nacer; Ezzouine, Hanane; Benslama, Abdellatif; Amor, Mourad; Maazouzi, Wajdi; Cimic, Nedim; Beck, Oliver; Bruns, Monique M.; Schouten, Jeroen A.; Rinia, Myra; Raaijmakers, Monique; Heunks, Leo M.; van Wezel, Hellen M.; Heines, Serge J.; Strauch, Ulrich; Buise, Marc P.; Simonis, Fabienne D.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Goodson, Jennifer C.; Browne, Troy S.; Navarra, Leanlove; Hunt, Anna; Hutchison, Robyn A.; Bailey, Mathew B.; Newby, Lynette; Mcarthur, Colin; Kalkoff, Michael; Mcleod, Alex; Casement, Jonathan; Hacking, Danielle J.; Andersen, Finn H.; Dolva, Merete S.; Laake, Jon H.; Barratt-Due, Andreas; Noremark, Kim Andre L.; Søreide, Eldar; Sjøbø, Brit Å; Guttormsen, Anne B.; Yoshido, Hector H. Leon; Aguilar, Ronald Zumaran; Oscanoa, Fredy A. Montes; Alisasis, Alain U.; Robles, Joanne B.; Pasanting-Lim, Rossini Abbie B.; Tan, Beatriz C.; Andruszkiewicz, Pawel; Jakubowska, Karina; Coxo, Cristina M.; Alvarez, António M.; Oliveira, Bruno S.; Montanha, Gustavo M.; Barros, Nelson C.; Pereira, Carlos S.; Messias, António M.; Monteiro, Jorge M.; Araujo, Ana M.; Catorze, Nuno T.; Marum, Susan M.; Bouw, Maria J.; Gomes, Rui M.; Brito, Vania A.; Castro, Silvia; Estilita, Joana M.; Barros, Filipa M.; Serra, Isabel M.; Martinho, Aurelia M.; Tomescu, Dana R.; Marcu, Alexandra; Bedreag, Ovidiu H.; Papurica, Marius; Corneci, Dan E.; Negoita, Silvius Ioan; Grigoriev, Evgeny; Gritsan, Alexey I.; Gazenkampf, Andrey A.; Almekhlafi, Ghaleb; Albarrak, Mohamad M.; Mustafa, Ghanem M.; Maghrabi, Khalid A.; Salahuddin, Nawal; Aisa, Tharwat M.; Al Jabbary, Ahmed S.; Tabhan, Edgardo; Arabi, Yaseen M.; Trinidad, Olivia A.; Al Dorzi, Hasan M.; Tabhan, Edgardo E.; Bolon, Stefan; Smith, Oliver; Mancebo, Jordi; Aguirre-Bermeo, Hernan; Lopez-Delgado, Juan C.; Esteve, Francisco; Rialp, Gemma; Forteza, Catalina; de Haro, Candelaria; Artigas, Antonio; Albaiceta, Guillermo M.; de Cima-Iglesias, Sara; Seoane-Quiroga, Leticia; Ceniceros-Barros, Alexandra; Ruiz-Aguilar, Antonio L.; Claraco-Vega, Luis M.; Soler, Juan Alfonso; Lorente, Maria del Carmen; Hermosa, Cecilia; Gordo, Federico; Prieto-González, Miryam; López-Messa, Juan B.; Perez, Manuel P.; Perez, Cesar P.; Allue, Raquel Montoiro; Roche-Campo, Ferran; Ibañez-Santacruz, Marcos; Temprano, Susana; Pintado, Maria C.; de Pablo, Raul; Gómez, Pilar Ricart Aroa; Ruiz, Silvia Rodriguez; Moles, Silvia Iglesias; Jurado, Ma Teresa; Arizmendi, Alfons; Piacentini, Enrique A.; Franco, Nieves; Honrubia, Teresa; Cheng, Meisy Perez; Losada, Elena Perez; Blanco, Javier; Yuste, Luis J.; Carbayo-Gorriz, Cecilia; Cazorla-Barranquero, Francisca G.; Alonso, Javier G.; Alda, Rosa S.; Algaba, Ángela; Navarro, Gonzalo; Cereijo, Enrique; Diaz-Rodriguez, Esther; Marcos, Diego Pastor; Montero, Laura Alvarez; Para, Luis Herrera; Sanchez, Roberto Jimenez; Navalpotro, Miguel Angel Blasco; Abad, Ricardo Diaz; González, Raquel Montiel; Toribio, Dácil Parrilla; Castro, Alejandro G.; Artiga, Maria Jose D.; Penuelas, Oscar; Roser, Tomas P.; Olga, Moreno F.; Curto, Elena Gallego; Sánchez, Rocío Manzano; Imma, Vallverdu P.; Elisabet, Garcia M.; Claverias, Laura; Magret, Monica; Pellicer, Ana M.; Rodriguez, Lucia L.; Sánchez-Ballesteros, Jesús; González-Salamanca, Ángela; Jimenez, Antonio G.; Huerta, Francisco P.; Diaz, Juan Carlos J. Sotillo; Lopez, Esther Bermejo; Moya, David D. Llinares; Alfonso, Alec A. Tallet; Luis, Palazon Sanchez Eugenio; Cesar, Palazon Sanchez; Rafael, Sánchez I.; Virgilio, Corcoles G.; Recio, Noelia N.; Adamsson, Richard O.; Rylander, Christian C.; Holzgraefe, Bernhard; Broman, Lars M.; Wessbergh, Joanna; Persson, Linnea; Schiöler, Fredrik; Kedelv, Hans; Tibblin, Anna Oscarsson; Appelberg, Henrik; Hedlund, Lars; Helleberg, Johan; Eriksson, Karin E.; Glietsch, Rita; Larsson, Niklas; Nygren, Ingela; Nunes, Silvia L.; Morin, Anna-Karin; Kander, Thomas; Adolfsson, Anne; Piquilloud, Lise; Zender, Hervé O.; Leemann-Refondini, Corinne; Elatrous, Souheil; Bouchoucha, Slaheddine; Chouchene, Imed; Ouanes, Islem; Ben Souissi, Asma; Kamoun, Salma; Demirkiran, Oktay; Aker, Mustafa; Erbabacan, Emre; Ceylan, Ilkay; Girgin, Nermin Kelebek; Ozcelik, Menekse; Ünal, Necmettin; Meco, Basak Ceyda; Akyol, Onat O.; Derman, Suleyman S.; Kennedy, Barry; Parhar, Ken; Srinivasa, Latha; McNamee, Lia; McAuley, Danny; Steinberg, Jack; Hopkins, Phil; Mellis, Clare; Kakar, Vivek; Hadfield, Dan; Vercueil, Andre; Bhowmick, Kaushik; Humphreys, Sally K.; Ferguson, Andrew; Mckee, Raymond; Raj, Ashok S.; Fawkes, Danielle A.; Watt, Philip; Twohey, Linda; Jha, Rajeev R.; Thomas, Matthew; Morton, Alex; Kadaba, Varsha; Smith, Mark J.; Hormis, Anil P.; Kannan, Santhana G.; Namih, Miriam; Reschreiter, Henrik; Camsooksai, Julie; Kumar, Alek; Rugonfalvi, Szabolcs; Nutt, Christopher; Oneill, Orla; Seasman, Colette; Dempsey, Ged; Scott, Christopher J.; Ellis, Helen E.; McKechnie, Stuart; Hutton, Paula J.; Di Tomasso, Nora N.; Vitale, Michela N.; Griffin, Ruth O.; Dean, Michael N.; Cranshaw, Julius H.; Willett, Emma L.; Ioannou, Nicholas; Gillis, Sarah; Csabi, Peter; Macfadyen, Rosaleen; Dawson, Heidi; Preez, Pieter D.; Williams, Alexandra J.; Boyd, Owen; de Gordoa, Laura Ortiz-Ruiz; Bramall, Jon; Symmonds, Sophie; Chau, Simon K.; Wenham, Tim; Szakmany, Tamas; Toth-Tarsoly, Piroska; Mccalman, Katie H.; Alexander, Peter; Stephenson, Lorraine; Collyer, Thomas; Chapman, Rhiannon; Cooper, Raphael; Allan, Russell M.; Sim, Malcolm; Wrathall, David W.; Irvine, Donald A.; Zantua, Kim S.; Adams, John C.; Burtenshaw, Andrew J.; Sellors, Gareth P.; Welters, Ingeborg D.; Williams, Karen E.; Hessell, Robert J.; Oldroyd, Matthew G.; Battle, Ceri E.; Pillai, Suresh; Kajtor, Istvan; Sivashanmugavel, Mageswaran; Okane, Sinead C.; Donnelly, Adrian; Frigyik, Aniko D.; Careless, Jon P.; May, Martin M.; Stewart, Richard; Trinder, T. John; Hagan, Samantha J.; Wise, Matt P.; Cole, Jade M.; MacFie, Caroline C.; Dowling, Anna T.; Hurtado, Javier; Nin, Nicolás; Nuñez, Edgardo; Pittini, Gustavo; Rodriguez, Ruben; Imperio, María C.; Santos, Cristina; França, Ana G.; Ebeid, Alejandro; Deicas, Alberto; Serra, Carolina; Uppalapati, Aditya; Kamel, Ghassan; Banner-Goodspeed, Valerie M.; Beitler, Jeremy R.; Mukkera, Satyanarayana Reddy; Kulkarni, Shreedhar; Lee, Jarone; Mesar, Tomaz; Shinn, John O.; Gomaa, Dina; Tainter, Christopher; Yeatts, Dale J.; Warren, Jessica; Lanspa, Michael J.; Miller, Russel R.; Grissom, Colin K.; Brown, Samuel M.; Bauer, Philippe R.; Gosselin, Ryan J.; Kitch, Barrett T.; Cohen, Jason E.; Beegle, Scott H.; Stoger, John H.; Gueret, Renaud M.; Tulaimat, Aiman; Choudry, Shazia; Stigler, William; Batra, Hitesh; Huff, Nidhi G.; Lamb, Keith D.; Oetting, Trevor W.; Mohr, Nicholas M.; Judy, Claine; Saito, Shigeki; Kheir, Fayez M.; Kheir, Fayez; Schlichting, Adam B.; Delsing, Angela; Crouch, Daniel R.; Elmasri, Mary; Ismail, Dina; Dreyer, Kyle R.; Blakeman, Thomas C.; Baron, Rebecca M.; Grijalba, Carolina Quintana; Hou, Peter C.; Seethala, Raghu; Aisiku, Imo; Henderson, Galen; Frendl, Gyorgy; Hou, Sen-Kuang; Owens, Robert L.; Schomer, Ashley; Bumbasirevic, Vesna; Jovanovic, Bojan; Surbatovic, Maja; Veljovic, Milic

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Limited information exists about the epidemiology, recognition, management, and outcomes of patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). OBJECTIVES To evaluate intensive care unit (ICU) incidence and outcome of ARDS and to assess clinician recognition, ventilation

  14. The potential of heliox as a therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults and children: a descriptive review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurskens, Charlotte J. P.; Wösten-van Asperen, Roelie M.; Preckel, Benedikt; Juffermans, Nicole P.

    2015-01-01

    In neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and acute RDS (ARDS) mechanical ventilation is often necessary to manage hypoxia, whilst protecting the lungs through lower volume ventilation and permissive hypercapnia. Mechanical ventilation can, however, induce or aggravate the lung injury caused

  15. Assisted Ventilation in Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Lung-distending Pressure and Patient-Ventilator Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorduin, J.; Sinderby, C.A.; Beck, J.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Heunks, L.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), the use of assisted mechanical ventilation is a subject of debate. Assisted ventilation has benefits over controlled ventilation, such as preserved diaphragm function and improved oxygenation. Therefore, higher level of

  16. Impact and safety of open lung biopsy in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, G; Garay, M; Mendoza, D; Cardinal-Fernández, P

    2018-02-28

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an inflammatory lung disorder, and its pathological hallmark is diffuse alveolar damage (DAD). Given that open lung biopsy (OLB) can sometimes result in severe side effects, it is rarely performed in patients with ARDS. The aims of this study were to describe: (a) the rate of treatment change associated with the histological result; and (b) the incidence of side effects induced by OLB. A retrospective, single-center, descriptive observational study was carried out in Hospital Santa Clara (Bogotá, Colombia) from February 2007 to January 2014. Critically ill patients over 18 years of age, undergoing invasive mechanical ventilation, diagnosed with ARDS of unknown etiology, and with OLB performed at the bedside. ARDS was diagnosed according to the Berlin definition. DAD was defined by the presence of a hyaline membrane plus at least one of the following: intra-alveolar edema, alveolar type I cell necrosis, alveolar type II cell (cuboidal cells) proliferation progressively covering the denuded alveolar-capillary membrane, interstitial proliferation of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts, or organizing interstitial fibrosis. The rate of treatment change (RTC) was established according to whether the OLB pathology report resulted in: a) the prescription or discontinuation of an antimicrobial; b) the indication of new procedures; c) medical interconsultation; or d) limitation of therapeutic effort. Patients were followed-up until death or hospital discharge. This study was approved by the Ethics Committee. A total of 32 OLBs were performed during the study period; 17 were ruled out as they did not involve ARDS, and 15 were considered for further analysis. A histological diagnosis was reached in 14 of the 15 patients (12 DAD, one case of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia and one case of Wegener's granulomatosis with alveolar hemorrhage). The RTC rate was 0.73. The most frequent intervention was discontinuation of

  17. Milk containing probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and respiratory illness in children: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumpu, M; Kekkonen, R A; Kautiainen, H; Järvenpää, S; Kristo, A; Huovinen, P; Pitkäranta, A; Korpela, R; Hatakka, K

    2012-09-01

    To determine whether long-term daily consumption of milk containing probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (GG) decreases respiratory illness in children. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted with 523 children aged 2-6 years attending day care centers in Finland. Subjects received either normal milk or the same milk with GG on three daily meals for 28 weeks. Daily recording of children' symptoms was done by parents. Primary outcome data from 501 subjects were available for analysis, and data from 128 subjects were analyzed as completed cases in terms of recovery of GG in fecal samples. Number of days with at least one respiratory symptom in all subjects was 5.03/month (95% confidence interval (CI): 4.92-5.15) in the GG group and 5.17/month (95% CI: 5.05-5.29) in the placebo group incidence rate ratio (IRR) 0.97; 95% CI: 0.94-1.00; P=0.098). In the completed cases, the figures were 4.71 days/month (95% CI: 4.52-4.90) in the GG group and 5.67 days/month (95% CI: 5.40-5.94) in the placebo group (IRR 0.83; 95% CI: 0.78-0.88; PGG reduced the occurrence of respiratory illness in children attending day care centers in the completed cases subgroup, but not in the total population. Thus, future clinical trials are warranted to clarify the association between fecal recovery of a probiotic and the symptom prevalence.

  18. Early wheezing phenotypes and severity of respiratory illness in very early childhood: study on intrauterine exposure to fine particle matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedrychowski, Wieslaw; Perera, Frederica P; Maugeri, Umberto; Mrozek-Budzyn, Dorota; Mroz, Elzbieta; Flak, Elzbieta; Edwards, Susan; Spengler, John D; Jacek, Ryszard; Sowa, Agata; Musiał, Agnieszka

    2009-08-01

    The main goal of the paper was to assess the pattern of risk factors having an impact on the onset of early wheezing phenotypes in the birth cohort of 468 two-year olds and to investigate the severity of respiratory illness in the two-year olds in relation to both wheezing phenotypes, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and personal PM(2.5) exposure over pregnancy period (fine particulate matter). The secondary goal of the paper was to assess possible association of early persistent wheezing with the length of the baby at birth. Pregnant women were recruited from ambulatory prenatal clinics in the first and second trimester of pregnancy. Only women 18-35 years of age, who claimed to be non-smokers, with singleton pregnancies, without illicit drug use and HIV infection, free from chronic diseases were eligible for the study. In the statistical analysis of respiratory health of children multinomial logistic regression and zero-inflated Poisson regression models were used. Approximately one third of the children in the study sample experienced wheezing in the first 2 years of life and in about two third of cases (67%) the symptom developed already in the first year of life. The early wheezing was easily reversible and in about 70% of infants with wheezing the symptom receded in the second year of life. The adjusted relative risk ratio (RRR) of persistent wheezing increased with maternal atopy (RRR=3.05; 95%CI: 1.30-7.15), older siblings (RRR=3.05; 95%CI: 1.67-5.58) and prenatal ETS exposure (RRR=1.13; 95%CI: 1.04-1.23), but was inversely associated with the length of baby at birth (RRR=0.88; 95%CI: 0.76-1.01). The adjusted incidence risk ratios (IRR) of coughing, difficult breathing, runny/stuffy nose and pharyngitis/tonsillitis in wheezers were much higher than that observed among non-wheezers and significantly depended on prenatal PM(2.5) exposure, older siblings and maternal atopy. The study shows a clear inverse association between maternal age or maternal education

  19. EARLY WHEEZING PHENOTYPES AND SEVERITY OF RESPIRATORY ILLNESS IN VERY EARLY CHILDHOOD. STUDY ON INTRAUTERINE EXPOSURE TO FINE PARTICLE MATTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedrychowski, Wieslaw; Perera, Frederica P.; Maugeri, Umberto; Mrozek-Budzyn, Dorota; Mroz, Elzbieta; Flak, Elzbieta; Edwards, Susan; Spengler, John D.; Jacek, Ryszard; Sowa, Agata; Musia, Agnieszka

    2009-01-01

    The main goal of the paper was to assess the pattern of risk factors having an impact on the onset of early wheezing phenotypes in the birth cohort of 468 two-year olds and to investigate the severity of respiratory illness in the two-year olds in relation to both wheezing phenotypes, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and personal PM2.5 exposure over pregnancy period (fine particulate matter). The secondary goal of the paper was to assess possible association of early persistent wheezing with the length of the baby at birth. Pregnant women were recruited from ambulatory prenatal clinics in the first and second trimester of pregnancy. Only women 18–35 years of age, who claimed to be non-smokers, with singleton pregnancies, without illicit drug use and HIV infection, free from chronic diseases were eligible for the study. In the statistical analysis of respiratory health of children multinomial logistic regression and zero-inflated Poisson regression models were used. Approximately one third of the children in the study sample experienced wheezing in the first two years of life and in about two third of cases (67%) the symptom developed already in the first year of life. The early wheezing was easily reversible and in about 70% of infants with wheezing the symptom receded in the second year of life. The adjusted relative risk ratio (RRR) of persistent wheezing increased with maternal atopy (RRR = 3.05; 95%CI: 1.30 – 7.15), older siblings (RRR = 3.05; 95%CI: 1.67 – 5.58) and prenatal ETS exposure (RRR= 1.13; 95%CI: 1.04 – 1.23), but was inversely associated with the length of baby at birth (RRR = 0.88; 95%CI: 0.76 – 1.01). The adjusted incidence risk ratios (IRR) of coughing, difficult breathing, runny/stuffy nose and pharyngitis/tonsillitis in wheezers were much higher than that observed among non-wheezers and significantly depended on prenatal PM2.5 exposure, older siblings and maternal atopy. The study shows a clear inverse association between maternal

  20. Polio-Like Illness Associated With Outbreak of Upper Respiratory Tract Infection in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crone, Megan; Tellier, Raymond; Wei, Xing-Chang; Kuhn, Susan; Vanderkooi, Otto G; Kim, Jong; Mah, Jean K; Mineyko, Aleksandra

    2016-03-01

    Poliomyelitis is a historically devastating neurological complication of poliovirus infection. Poliovirus vaccines have decreased the incidence of poliomyelitis to 209 global cases in 2014, with new cases of acute flaccid myelitis primarily associated with nonpolio enteroviruses. Recently, during outbreaks of enterovirus D68 throughout North America and Europe, cases of acute flaccid myelitis have been reported, suggesting another nonpolio enterovirus associated with acute flaccid myelitis. The authors describe 3 patients diagnosed with acute flaccid myelitis during a province-wide outbreak of enterovirus D68 with the virus detected in 2 of the patients. Given the significant morbidity associated with acute flaccid myelitis and potential for nonpolio enterovirus to cause outbreaks, prompt identification and notification of public health authorities are warranted. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. HIV Infection in hospitalized under-5 children with acute watery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Ezechukwu

    2011-12-31

    Dec 31, 2011 ... Five of them presented within 48 hours of diarrhoea . Associated illness. Three had malaria while two had acute respiratory infec- tion in addition to acute diarrhea. Past Medical History. Two had been admitted earlier for febrile illness but no previous history of blood transfusion. None had a chronic illness.

  2. ACUTE RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS INFECTION IN CHILDREN IN THE AGE ASPECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Rovny

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical features of laboratory-confirmed acute respiratory syncytial virus infection (ARSVI are described in 221 children of the age from 1 month to 5 years. Febrile fever has been recorded in 76% of patients with ARSVI, and significantly more often in children in the second year of life (92%, but the difference in the temerature or duration has not been found. 98% of children have had symptoms of the lower respiratory tract lesions. The most common ARSVI manifestations in the patients of the first year of life were obstructive diseases of the lower respiratory tract (obstructive bronchitis in 53% and bronchiolitis in 11% of children, in the patients of the second year of life — pneumonia (28%, p < 0,05 and catarrhal otitis (26%; p < 0,05. Bronchial obstruction syndrome in children of the first year of life was characterized by the significantly higher frequency (73% and the maximal duration (9,7 ± 1,08 days. The largest number of cases of the severe respiratory failure has been recorded among patients of the second year of life (3 degree of respiratory failure in 22% of patients, p < 0,05.

  3. Estimating the risks of smoking, air pollution, and passive smoke on acute respiratory conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostro, B.D. (California Public Health Foundation, Berkeley (USA))

    1989-06-01

    Five years of the annual Health Interview Survey, conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics, are used to estimate the effects of air pollution, smoking, and environmental tobacco smoke on respiratory restrictions in activity for adults, and bed disability for children. After adjusting for several socioeconomic factors, the multiple regression estimates indicate that an independent and statistically significant association exists between these three forms of air pollution and respiratory morbidity. The comparative risks of these exposures are computed and the plausibility of the relative risks is examined by comparing the equivalent doses with actual measurements of exposure taken in the homes of smokers. The results indicate that: (1) smokers will have a 55-75% excess in days with respiratory conditions severe enough to cause reductions in normal activity; (2) a 1 microgram increase in fine particulate matter air pollution is associated with a 3% excess in acute respiratory disease; and (3) a pack-a-day smoker will increase respiratory restricted days for a nonsmoking spouse by 20% and increase the number of bed disability days for young children living in the household by 20%. The results also indicate that the estimates of the effects of secondhand smoking on children are improved when the mother's work status is known and incorporated into the exposure estimate.

  4. Harmonisation of the acute respiratory infection reporting system in the Czech Republic with the European community networks.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kyncl, J.; Paget, W.J.; Havlickova, M.; Kriz, B.

    2005-01-01

    Respiratory virus activity is detected in Europe each winter, yet the precise timing and size of this activity is highly unpredictable. The impact of influenza infection and/or acute respiratory infection in European countries is continuously monitored through a variety of surveillance systems. All

  5. Modulation of the acute respiratory effects of winter air pollution by serum and dietary antioxidants : a panel study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grievink, L; Hoek, G; Boezen, HM; van't Veer, P; Brunekreef, B

    This study investigated whether a high dietary intake or serum concentration of antioxidant (pro-) vitamins could attenuate the acute respiratory effects of air pollution in panels of adults (n=227) aged 50-70 yrs with chronic respiratory symptoms in two winters starting in 1993/1994. Subjects

  6. Adequate feeding and the usefulness of the respiratory quotient in critically ill children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulst, Jessie M.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Zimmermann, Luc J.; Hop, Wim C.; Büller, Hans A.; Tibboel, Dick; Joosten, Koen F. M.

    2005-01-01

    We determined incidences of underfeeding and overfeeding in children who were admitted to a multidisciplinary tertiary pediatric intensive care and evaluated the usefulness of the respiratory quotient (RQ) obtained from indirect calorimetry to assess feeding adequacy. Children 18 y and younger who

  7. Non-invasive ventilation in immunocompromised patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Jerath, Angela; Dres, Martin; Parotto, Matteo

    2016-03-01

    The survival rate of immunocompromised patients has improved over the past decades in light of remarkable progress in diagnostic and therapeutic options. Simultaneously, there has been an increase in the number of immunocompromised patients with life threatening complications requiring intensive care unit (ICU) treatment. ICU admission is necessary in up to 15% of patients with acute leukemia and 20% of bone marrow transplantation recipients, and the main reason for ICU referral in this patient population is acute hypoxemic respiratory failure, which is associated with a high mortality rate, particularly in patients requiring endotracheal intubation. The application of non-invasive ventilation (NIV), and thus the avoidance of endotracheal intubation and invasive mechanical ventilation with its side effects, appears therefore of great importance in this patient population. Early trials supported the benefits of NIV in these settings, and the 2011 Canadian guidelines for the use of NIV in critical care settings suggest the use of NIV in immune-compromised patients with a grade 2B recommendation. However, the very encouraging results from initial seminal trials were not confirmed in subsequent observational and randomized clinical studies, questioning the beneficial effect of NIV in immune-compromised patients. Based on these observations, a French group led by Azoulay decided to assess whether early intermittent respiratory support with NIV had a role in reducing the mortality rate of immune-compromised patients with non-hypercapnic hypoxemic respiratory failure developed in less than 72 h, and hence conducted a multicenter randomized controlled trial (RCT) in experienced ICUs in France. This perspective reviews the findings from their RCT in the context of the current critical care landscape, and in light of recent results from other trials focused on the early management of acute hypoxemic respiratory failure.

  8. Surfactant for acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by near drowning in a newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fettah, Nurdan; Dilli, Dilek; Beken, Serdar; Zenciroglu, Aysegul; Okumuş, Nurullah

    2014-03-01

    Near drowning is the term for survival after suffocation caused by submersion in water or another fluid. Pulmonary insufficiency may develop insidiously or suddenly because of near drowning. We want to present a newborn case of acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by near drowning. A 26-day-old boy was brought to the emergency department because of severe respiratory distress. Two hours before admission, the baby suddenly slipped out his mother's hands and fell in the bathtub full of water while bathing. After initial resuscitation, he was transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit for mechanical ventilation. PaO2/FIO2 ratio was 97, with SaO2 of 84%. Bilateral heterogeneous densities were seen on his chest x-ray film. The baby was considered to have acute respiratory distress syndrome. Antibiotics were given to prevent infection. Because conventional therapy failed to improve oxygenation, a single dose of surfactant was tested via an intubation cannula. Four hours later, poractant alfa (Curosurf) administered repeatedly at the same dosage because of hypoxemia (PaO2/FIO2 ratio, 124; SaO2, 88%). Oxygen saturation was increased to more than 90% in 24 hours, which was maintained for 3 days when we were able to wean him from mechanical ventilation. After 7 days, the x-ray film showed considerable clearing of shadows. He was discharged home on the 15th day after full recovery. This case report describes a rapid and persistent improvement after 2 doses of surfactant in acute respiratory distress syndrome with severe oxygenation failure caused by near drowning in a newborn.

  9. Early experience of a new extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal device for acute hypercapnic respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiruvoipati, Ravindranath; Buscher, Hergen; Winearls, James; Breeding, Jeff; Ghosh, Debasish; Chaterjee, Shimonti; Braun, Gary; Paul, Eldho; Fraser, John F; Botha, John

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances in the technology of extracorporeal respiratory assist systems have led to a renewed interest in extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCOR). The Hemolung is a new, low-flow, venovenous, minimally invasive, partial ECCOR device that has recently been introduced to clinical practice to aid in avoiding invasive ventilation or to facilitate lung-protective ventilation. We report our early experience on use, efficacy and safety of the Hemolung in three Australian intensive care units. Retrospective review of all patients with acute or acute-on-chronic respiratory failure (due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD] with severe hypercapnic respiratory failure when non-invasive ventilation failed; acute respiratory distress syndrome; COPD; or asthma when lung-protective ventilation was not feasible due to hypercapnia) for whom the Hemolung was used. Fifteen patients were treated with ECCOR. In four out of five patients, the aim of avoiding intubation was achieved. In the remaining 10 patients, the strategy of instituting lung-protective ventilation was successful. The median duration for ECCOR was 5 days (interquartile range, 3-7 days). The pH and PCO 2 improved significantly within 6 hours of instituting ECCOR, in conjunction with a significant reduction in minute ventilation. The CO 2 clearance was 90-100 mL/min. A total of 93% of patients survived to weaning from ECCOR, 73% survived to ICU discharge and 67% survived to hospital discharge. Our data shows that ECCOR was safe and effective in this cohort. Further experience is vital to identify the patients who may benefit most from this promising therapy.

  10. Observer variation in chest radiography of acute lower respiratory infections in children: a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swingler, George H

    2001-01-01

    Knowledge of the accuracy of chest radiograph findings in acute lower respiratory infection in children is important when making clinical decisions. I conducted a systematic review of agreement between and within observers in the detection of radiographic features of acute lower respiratory infections in children, and described the quality of the design and reporting of studies, whether included or excluded from the review. Included studies were those of observer variation in the interpretation of radiographic features of lower respiratory infection in children (neonatal nurseries excluded) in which radiographs were read independently and a clinical population was studied. I searched MEDLINE, HealthSTAR and HSRPROJ databases (1966 to 1999), handsearched the reference lists of identified papers and contacted authors of identified studies. I performed the data extraction alone. Ten studies of observer interpretation of radiographic features of lower respiratory infection in children were identified. Seven of the studies satisfied four or more of the seven design and reporting criteria. Six studies met the inclusion criteria for the review. Inter-observer agreement varied with the radiographic feature examined. Kappa statistics ranged from around 0.80 for individual radiographic features to 0.27–0.38 for bacterial vs viral etiology. Little information was identified on observer agreement on radiographic features of lower respiratory tract infections in children. Agreement varied with the features assessed from 'fair' to 'very good'. Aspects of the quality of the methods and reporting need attention in future studies, particularly the description of criteria for radiographic features

  11. Cadherin-related Family Member 3 Genetics and Rhinovirus C Respiratory Illnesses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønnelykke, Klaus; Coleman, Amaziah T; Evans, Michael D

    2018-01-01

    Background Experimental evidence suggests that CDHR3 is a receptor for rhinovirus-C (RV-C), and a missense variant in this gene (rs6967330) is associated with childhood asthma with severe exacerbations. Objective To determine whether rs6967330 influences RV-C infections and illnesses in early chi...

  12. Antibiotics for acute respiratory infections in general practice: comparison of prescribing rates with guideline recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Amanda R; Pollack, Allan J; Plejdrup Hansen, Malene; Glasziou, Paul P; Looke, David Fm; Britt, Helena C; Del Mar, Christopher B

    2017-07-17

    To compare the current rate of antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in Australian general practice with the recommendations in the most widely consulted therapeutic guidelines in Australia (Therapeutic Guidelines). Comparison of general practice activity data for April 2010 - March 2015 (derived from Bettering the Evaluation and Care of Health [BEACH] study) with estimated rates of prescribing recommended by Therapeutic Guidelines. Antibiotic prescribing rates and estimated guideline-recommended rates per 100 encounters and per full-time equivalent (FTE) GP per year for eight ARIs; number of prescriptions nationally per year. An estimated mean 5.97 million (95% CI, 5.69-6.24 million) ARI cases per year were managed in Australian general practice with at least one antibiotic, equivalent to an estimated 230 cases per FTE GP/year (95% CI, 219-240 cases/FTE/year). Antibiotics are not recommended by the guidelines for acute bronchitis/bronchiolitis (current prescribing rate, 85%) or influenza (11%); they are always recommended for community-acquired pneumonia (current prescribing rate, 72%) and pertussis (71%); and they are recommended for 0.5-8% of cases of acute rhinosinusitis (current prescribing rate, 41%), 20-31% of cases of acute otitis media (89%), and 19-40% cases of acute pharyngitis or tonsillitis (94%). Had GPs adhered to the guidelines, they would have prescribed antibiotics for 0.65-1.36 million ARIs per year nationally, or at 11-23% of the current prescribing rate. Antibiotics were prescribed more frequently than recommended for acute rhinosinusitis, acute bronc