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Sample records for acute regulatory protein

  1. The Contribution of Serine 194 Phosphorylation to Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein Function

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    Sasaki, Goro; Zubair, Mohamad; Ishii, Tomohiro; Mitsui, Toshikatsu; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Auchus, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) facilitates the delivery of cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane, where the cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme catalyzes the initial step of steroid hormone biosynthesis. StAR was initially identified in adrenocortical cells as a phosphoprotein, the expression and phosphorylation of which were stimulated by corticotropin. A number of in vitro studies have implicated cAMP-dependent phosphorylation at serine 194 (S194, S195 in hum...

  2. The life cycle of the steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein: from transcription through proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granot, Zvi; Silverman, Eran; Friedlander, Ruth; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Eimerl, Sarah; Timberg, Rina; Hales, Karen H; Hales, Dale B; Stocco, Douglas M; Orly, Joseph

    2002-11-01

    The Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory (StAR) protein is a mitochondrial protein required for the transport of cholesterol substrate to the P450scc enzyme located in the inner mitochondrial membranes of steroid producing cells. This study suggests that the acute regulation of the rodent StAR gene in the ovary is mediated by two factors, C/EBPbeta and GATA-4. Once translated, the StAR precursor protein is either imported into the mitochondria, or it is rapidly degraded in the cytosol. We predicted that in order to perpetuate StAR activity cycles, imported StAR should turn over rapidly to avoid a potentially harmful accumulation of the protein in sub-mitochondrial compartments. Pulse-chase experiments in metabolically labeled cells showed that: (a) the turnover rate of mature mitochondrial StAR protein (30 kDa) is much faster (t(1/2) = 4-5 h) than that of other mitochondrial proteins; (b) dissipation of the inner membrane potential (-delta psi) by carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (mCCCP) accelerates the mitochondrial degradation of StAR; (c) unexpectedly, the mitochondrial degradation of StAR is inhibited by MG132 and lactacystin, but not by epoxomicin. Furthermore, StAR degradation becomes inhibitor-resistant two hours after import. Therefore, these studies suggest a bi-phasic route of StAR turnover in the mitochondria. Shortly after import, StAR is degraded by inhibitor-sensitive protease(s) (phase I), whereas at later times, StAR turnover proceeds to completion through an MG132-resistant proteolytic activity (phase II). Collectively, this study defines StAR as a unique protein that can authentically be used to probe multiple proteolytic activities in mammalian mitochondria.

  3. Molecular cloning and expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein from bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana).

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    Kim, Seung-Chang; Oh, Sung-Dug; Ahn, Ryun-Sup; Soh, Jaemog; Kwon, Hyuk-Bang

    2009-06-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) transfers cholesterol from the outer mitochondrial membrane to the inner membrane where the cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) resides. This process is the rate-limiting step in steroidogenesis. StAR cDNAs have been cloned and characterized from a range of different species. To investigate the role of StAR in the amphibian system, we cloned a full-length StAR cDNA from bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in conjunction with rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The putative full-length bullfrog StAR (bfStAR) cDNA was 1862 base pairs (bp) in length, and the longest open reading frame (ORF) encoded a protein of 284 amino acids. Amino acid sequence comparison showed that amphibian StAR has a high degree of sequence identity, ranging from 62% to 98%, with StAR proteins of other species. Similar to other species, bfStAR contained two conserved domains, the mitochondrial targeting domain and cholesterol-binding domain, in the N-terminus and C-terminus of the protein, respectively. Northern blot analysis and RT-PCR indicated that StAR mRNA is expressed in the gonads and adrenal gland. Transfection of green monkey kidney (COS-1) cells with an expression construct for bfStAR revealed that it encoded 34 and 27kDa proteins that were recognized by antiserum raised against the human StAR-related lipid transfer (START) domain.

  4. MAR binding protein SMAR1 favors IL-10 mediated regulatory T cell function in acute colitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirlekar, Bhalchandra; Patil, Sachin; Bopanna, Ramanamurthy; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2015-01-01

    T reg cells are not only crucial for controlling immune responses to autoantigens but also prevent those directed towards commensal pathogens. Control of effector immune responses by T reg cells depend on their capacity to accumulate at inflammatory site and accordingly accommodate to inflammatory environment. Till date, the factors associated with maintaining these aspects of T reg phenotype is not understood properly. Here we have shown that a known nuclear matrix binding protein SMAR1 is selectively expressed more in colonic T reg cells and is required for their ability to accumulate at inflammatory site and to sustain high levels of Foxp3 and IL-10 expression during acute colitis. Elimination of anti-inflammatory subsets revealed a protective role for IL-10 producing T reg cells in SMAR1 −/− mice. Moreover, a combined action of Foxp3 and SMAR1 restricts effector cytokine production and enhance the production of IL-10 by colonic T reg cells that controls acute colitis. This data highlights a critical role of SMAR1 in maintaining T reg physiology during inflammatory disorders. - Highlights: • SMAR1 is essential to sustain high level of Foxp3 and IL-10 in T reg cells. • SMAR1 −/− T reg cells produce pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17 leads to inflammation. • IL-10 administration can control the inflammation in SMAR1 −/− mice. • Both Foxp3 and SMAR1 maintain T reg phenotype that controls colitis

  5. MAR binding protein SMAR1 favors IL-10 mediated regulatory T cell function in acute colitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirlekar, Bhalchandra; Patil, Sachin [Chromatin and Disease Biology Laboratory, National Centre for Cell Science, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Bopanna, Ramanamurthy [Experimental Animal Facility, National Centre for Cell Science, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Chattopadhyay, Samit, E-mail: samit@nccs.res.in [Chromatin and Disease Biology Laboratory, National Centre for Cell Science, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India)

    2015-08-21

    T{sub reg} cells are not only crucial for controlling immune responses to autoantigens but also prevent those directed towards commensal pathogens. Control of effector immune responses by T{sub reg} cells depend on their capacity to accumulate at inflammatory site and accordingly accommodate to inflammatory environment. Till date, the factors associated with maintaining these aspects of T{sub reg} phenotype is not understood properly. Here we have shown that a known nuclear matrix binding protein SMAR1 is selectively expressed more in colonic T{sub reg} cells and is required for their ability to accumulate at inflammatory site and to sustain high levels of Foxp3 and IL-10 expression during acute colitis. Elimination of anti-inflammatory subsets revealed a protective role for IL-10 producing T{sub reg} cells in SMAR1{sup −/−} mice. Moreover, a combined action of Foxp3 and SMAR1 restricts effector cytokine production and enhance the production of IL-10 by colonic T{sub reg} cells that controls acute colitis. This data highlights a critical role of SMAR1 in maintaining T{sub reg} physiology during inflammatory disorders. - Highlights: • SMAR1 is essential to sustain high level of Foxp3 and IL-10 in T{sub reg} cells. • SMAR1{sup −/−} T{sub reg} cells produce pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17 leads to inflammation. • IL-10 administration can control the inflammation in SMAR1{sup −/−} mice. • Both Foxp3 and SMAR1 maintain T{sub reg} phenotype that controls colitis.

  6. Role of Heat Shock Factor 1 in Conserving Cholesterol Transportation in Leydig Cell Steroidogenesis via Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein.

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    Oka, Shintaro; Shiraishi, Koji; Fujimoto, Mitsuaki; Katiyar, Arpit; Takii, Ryosuke; Nakai, Akira; Matsuyama, Hideyasu

    2017-08-01

    Testicular testosterone synthesis begins with cholesterol transport into mitochondria via steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein in Leydig cells. Acute heat stress is known to obstruct testicular steroidogenesis by transcriptional repression of StAR. In contrast, chronic heat stress such as cryptorchidism or varicocele generally does not affect testicular steroidogenesis, suggesting that Leydig cells adapt to heat stress and retain their steroid synthesis ability. However, the mechanisms of the stress response in steroid-producing cells are unclear. We examined the relationship between the heat stress response and heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), which protects cells from proteotoxic stress by inducing heat shock protein as a molecular chaperone. The influences of HSF1 deficiency on cholesterol transport by StAR and the expression of steroidogenic enzymes under chronic heat stress were studied in testes of HSF1-knockout (HSF1KO) mice with experimental cryptorchidism. StAR protein in wild-type-cryptorchid mice was transiently decreased after induction of cryptorchidism and then gradually returned to basal levels. In contrast, StAR protein in HSF1KO mice continued to decrease and failed to recover, resulting in impaired serum testosterone. StAR messenger RNA was not decreased with cryptorchidism, indicating that posttranslational modification of StAR, not its transcription, was obstructed in cryptorchidism. Other steroidogenic enzymes, including CYP11A1, 3β-HSD, and CYP17A1, were not decreased. Lipid droplets were increased in the cytosol of HSF1KO-cryptorchid mice, suggesting dysfunctional cholesterol transportation. These findings provide insight into the role of HSF1 in Leydig cell steroidogenesis, suggesting that it maintains cholesterol transport by recovering StAR under chronic heat stress. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  7. Congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia caused by a novel splicing mutation in the gene for the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein.

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    González, Alexis A; Reyes, M Loreto; Carvajal, Cristian A; Tobar, Jaime A; Mosso, Lorena M; Baquedano, Paulina; Solar, Antonieta; Venegas, Alejandro; Fardella, Carlos E

    2004-02-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) plays a crucial role in the transport of cholesterol from the cytoplasm to the inner mitochondrial membrane, facilitating its conversion to pregnenolone by cytochrome P450scc. Its essential role in steroidogenesis was demonstrated after observing that StAR gene mutations gave rise to a potentially lethal disease named congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia, in which virtually no steroids are produced. We report here a 2-month-old female patient, karyotype 46XY, who presented with growth failure, convulsions, dehydration, hypoglycemia, hyponatremia, hypotension, and severe hyperpigmentation suggestive of adrenal insufficiency. Serum cortisol, 17OH-progesterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, testosterone, 17OH-pregnenolone, and aldosterone levels were undetectable in the presence of high ACTH and plasma renin activity levels. Immunohistochemical analysis of testis tissues revealed the absence of StAR protein. Molecular analysis of StAR gene demonstrated a homozygous G to T mutation within the splice donor site of exon 1 (IVS1 + 1G>T). Her parents and one brother were heterozygous for this mutation. In vitro analysis of the mutation was performed in COS cells transfected with minigenes coding regions spanning exon-intron 1 to 3 carrying the mutant and the wild-type sequences. RT-PCR analyses of the mutant gene showed an abnormal mRNA transcript of 2430 bp (normal size 433 bp). Sequence analysis of the mutant mRNA demonstrated the retention of intron 1. Immunolocalization of the StAR minigene product detected the peptide in the mitochondria of COS cells transfected with the wild-type minigene but not in those transfected with the mutant minigene. We conclude that this mutation gives rise to a truncated StAR protein, which lacks an important N-terminal region and the entire lipid transfer domain.

  8. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, its receptors and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein during corpus luteum regression

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    Arfuso Frank

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Corpus luteum (CL regression is known to occur as two parts; functional regression when steroidogenesis declines and structural regression when apoptosis is induced. Previous studies suggest this process occurs by the production of luteolytic factors, such as tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha. Methods We examined TNF-alpha, TNF-alpha receptors (TNFR1 and 2 and steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR protein expression during CL regression in albino Wistar rats. CL from Days 16 and 22 of pregnancy and Day 3 post-partum were examined, in addition CL from Day 16 of pregnancy were cultured in vitro to induce apoptosis. mRNA was quantitated by kinetic RT-PCR and protein expression examined by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses. Results TNF-alpha mRNA increased on Day 3 post-partum. TNFR were immunolocalized to luteal cells, and an increase in TNFR2 mRNA observed on Day 3 post-partum whilst no change was detected in TNFR1 mRNA relative to Day 16. StAR protein decreased on Day 3 post-partum and following trophic withdrawal but no change was observed following exogenous TNF-alpha treatment. StAR mRNA decreased on Day 3 post-partum; however, it increased following trophic withdrawal and TNF-alpha treatment in vitro. Conclusion These results demonstrate the existence of TNFR1 and TNFR2 in rat CL and suggest the involvement of TNF-alpha in rat CL regression following parturition. Furthermore, decreased StAR expression over the same time points was consistent with the functional regression of the CL.

  9. Characterization of novel StAR (steroidogenic acute regulatory protein mutations causing non-classic lipoid adrenal hyperplasia.

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    Christa E Flück

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR is crucial for transport of cholesterol to mitochondria where biosynthesis of steroids is initiated. Loss of StAR function causes lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia (LCAH. OBJECTIVE: StAR gene mutations causing partial loss of function manifest atypical and may be mistaken as familial glucocorticoid deficiency. Only a few mutations have been reported. DESIGN: To report clinical, biochemical, genetic, protein structure and functional data on two novel StAR mutations, and to compare them with published literature. SETTING: Collaboration between the University Children's Hospital Bern, Switzerland, and the CIBERER, Hospital Vall d'Hebron, Autonomous University, Barcelona, Spain. PATIENTS: Two subjects of a non-consanguineous Caucasian family were studied. The 46,XX phenotypic normal female was diagnosed with adrenal insufficiency at the age of 10 months, had normal pubertal development and still has no signs of hypergonodatropic hypogonadism at 32 years of age. Her 46,XY brother was born with normal male external genitalia and was diagnosed with adrenal insufficiency at 14 months. Puberty was normal and no signs of hypergonadotropic hypogonadism are present at 29 years of age. RESULTS: StAR gene analysis revealed two novel compound heterozygote mutations T44HfsX3 and G221S. T44HfsX3 is a loss-of-function StAR mutation. G221S retains partial activity (∼30% and is therefore responsible for a milder, non-classic phenotype. G221S is located in the cholesterol binding pocket and seems to alter binding/release of cholesterol. CONCLUSIONS: StAR mutations located in the cholesterol binding pocket (V187M, R188C, R192C, G221D/S seem to cause non-classic lipoid CAH. Accuracy of genotype-phenotype prediction by in vitro testing may vary with the assays employed.

  10. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) overexpression attenuates HFD-induced hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance.

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    Qiu, Yanyan; Sui, Xianxian; Zhan, Yongkun; Xu, Chen; Li, Xiaobo; Ning, Yanxia; Zhi, Xiuling; Yin, Lianhua

    2017-04-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) covers a wide spectrum of liver pathology. Intracellular lipid accumulation is the first step in the development and progression of NAFLD. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) plays an important role in the synthesis of bile acid and intracellular lipid homeostasis and cholesterol metabolism. We hypothesize that StAR is involved in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) pathogenesis. The hypothesis was identified using free fatty acid (FFA)-overloaded NAFLD in vitro model and high-fat diet (HFD)-induced NAFLD mouse model transfected by recombinant adenovirus encoding StAR (StAR). StAR expression was also examined in pathology samples of patients with fatty liver by immunohistochemical staining. We found that the expression level of StAR was reduced in the livers obtained from fatty liver patients and NAFLD mice. Additionally, StAR overexpression decreased the levels of hepatic lipids and maintained the hepatic glucose homeostasis due to the activation of farnesoid x receptor (FXR). StAR overexpression attenuated the impairment of insulin signaling in fatty liver. This protective role of StAR was owing to a reduction of intracellular diacylglycerol levels and the phosphorylation of PKCε. Furthermore, FXR inactivation reversed the observed beneficial effects of StAR. The present study revealed that StAR overexpression can reduce hepatic lipid accumulation, regulate glucose metabolism and attenuate insulin resistance through a mechanism involving the activation of FXR. Our study suggests that StAR may be a potential therapeutic target for NAFLD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Potential of acute phase proteins as predictor of postpartum uterine infections during transition period and its regulatory mechanism in dairy cattle

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    A. Manimaran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the various systemic reactions against infection or injury, the acute phase response is the cascade of reaction and mostly coordinated by cytokines-mediated acute phase proteins (APPs production. Since APPs are sensitive innate immune molecules, they are useful for early detection of inflammation in bovines and believed to be better discriminators than routine hematological parameters. Therefore, the possibility of using APPs as a diagnostic and prognostic marker of inflammation in major bovine health disorders including postpartum uterine infection has been explored by many workers. In this review, we discussed specifically importance of postpartum uterine infection, the role of energy balance in uterine infections and potential of APPs as a predictor of postpartum uterine infections during the transition period and its regulatory mechanism in dairy cattle.

  12. Regulatory mechanism of the arginine vasopressin-enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion gene expression in acute and chronic stress.

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    Suzuki, Hitoshi; Kawasaki, Makoto; Ohnishi, Hideo; Nakamura, Toshitaka; Ueta, Yoichi

    2009-09-01

    Various kinds of stress cause neuroendocrine responses such as corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) or arginine vasopressin (AVP) release from parvocellular division of the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis. We examined the effects of acute and chronic stress on the expression of the AVP-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) fusion gene in the hypothalamus, using chronic salt loading as an osmotic stimulation, intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as acute inflammatory stress and adjuvant arthritis (AA) as chronic inflammatory/nociceptive stress. Salt loading caused a marked increase in the eGFP gene expression and eGFP fluorescence in the supraoptic nucleus, magnocellular division of the PVN and internal layer of the median eminence (ME). Administration of LPS caused increased fluorescence in parvocellular division of the PVN and external layer of the ME. AA rats revealed an increased expression of the eGFP gene and eGFP fluorescence in both magnocellular and parvocellular divisions of the PVN and both internal and external layers of the ME. On the other hand, the levels of the CRH gene expression in parvocellular division of the PVN were significantly decreased as AA developed, though plasma concentrations of corticosterone were significantly increased. These results indicate that AVP-eGFP transgenic rats enable the detection of changes in AVP expression more easily than by using procedures such as immunohistochemistry. We propose that AVP-eGFP transgenic rats represent a useful animal model for further understanding of the physiology of AVP expression in the hypothalamo-pituitary system under various physiological conditions, including various kinds of stress.

  13. Mitochondria-associated Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane (MAM) Regulates Steroidogenic Activity via Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein (StAR)-Voltage-dependent Anion Channel 2 (VDAC2) Interaction*

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    Prasad, Manoj; Kaur, Jasmeet; Pawlak, Kevin J.; Bose, Mahuya; Whittal, Randy M.; Bose, Himangshu S.

    2015-01-01

    Steroid hormones are essential for carbohydrate metabolism, stress management, and reproduction and are synthesized from cholesterol in mitochondria of adrenal glands and gonads/ovaries. In acute stress or hormonal stimulation, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) transports substrate cholesterol into the mitochondria for steroidogenesis by an unknown mechanism. Here, we report for the first time that StAR interacts with voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2) at the mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membrane (MAM) prior to its translocation to the mitochondrial matrix. In the MAM, StAR interacts with mitochondrial proteins Tom22 and VDAC2. However, Tom22 knockdown by siRNA had no effect on pregnenolone synthesis. In the absence of VDAC2, StAR was expressed but not processed into the mitochondria as a mature 30-kDa protein. VDAC2 interacted with StAR via its C-terminal 20 amino acids and N-terminal amino acids 221–229, regulating the mitochondrial processing of StAR into the mature protein. In the absence of VDAC2, StAR could not enter the mitochondria or interact with MAM-associated proteins, and therefore steroidogenesis was inhibited. Furthermore, the N terminus was not essential for StAR activity, and the N-terminal deletion mutant continued to interact with VDAC2. The endoplasmic reticulum-targeting prolactin signal sequence did not affect StAR association with the MAM and thus its mitochondrial targeting. Therefore, VDAC2 controls StAR processing and activity, and MAM is thus a central location for initiating mitochondrial steroidogenesis. PMID:25505173

  14. Mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membrane (MAM) regulates steroidogenic activity via steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR)-voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2) interaction.

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    Prasad, Manoj; Kaur, Jasmeet; Pawlak, Kevin J; Bose, Mahuya; Whittal, Randy M; Bose, Himangshu S

    2015-01-30

    Steroid hormones are essential for carbohydrate metabolism, stress management, and reproduction and are synthesized from cholesterol in mitochondria of adrenal glands and gonads/ovaries. In acute stress or hormonal stimulation, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) transports substrate cholesterol into the mitochondria for steroidogenesis by an unknown mechanism. Here, we report for the first time that StAR interacts with voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2) at the mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membrane (MAM) prior to its translocation to the mitochondrial matrix. In the MAM, StAR interacts with mitochondrial proteins Tom22 and VDAC2. However, Tom22 knockdown by siRNA had no effect on pregnenolone synthesis. In the absence of VDAC2, StAR was expressed but not processed into the mitochondria as a mature 30-kDa protein. VDAC2 interacted with StAR via its C-terminal 20 amino acids and N-terminal amino acids 221-229, regulating the mitochondrial processing of StAR into the mature protein. In the absence of VDAC2, StAR could not enter the mitochondria or interact with MAM-associated proteins, and therefore steroidogenesis was inhibited. Furthermore, the N terminus was not essential for StAR activity, and the N-terminal deletion mutant continued to interact with VDAC2. The endoplasmic reticulum-targeting prolactin signal sequence did not affect StAR association with the MAM and thus its mitochondrial targeting. Therefore, VDAC2 controls StAR processing and activity, and MAM is thus a central location for initiating mitochondrial steroidogenesis. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Trametes versicolor protein YZP activates regulatory B lymphocytes - gene identification through de novo assembly and function analysis in a murine acute colitis model.

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    Kuan, Yen-Chou; Wu, Ying-Jou; Hung, Chih-Liang; Sheu, Fuu

    2013-01-01

    Trametes versicolor (Yun-Zhi) is a medicinal fungus used as a chemotherapy co-treatment to enhance anti-tumor immunity. Although the efficacies of T. versicolor extracts have been documented, the active ingredients and mechanisms underlying the actions of these extracts remain uncharacterized. We purified a new protein, YZP, from the fruiting bodies of T. versicolor and identified the gene encoding YZP using RNA-seq and de novo assembly technologies. YZP is a 12-kDa non-glycosylated protein comprising 139 amino acids, including an 18-amino acids signal peptide. YZP induced a greater than 60-fold increase in IL-10 secretion in mice B lymphocytes; moreover, YZP specifically triggered the differentiation of CD1d(+) B cells into IL-10-producing regulatory B cells (Bregs) and enhanced the expression of CD1d. YZP-induced B cells suppressed approximately 40% of the LPS-activated macrophage production of inflammatory cytokines in a mixed leukocyte reaction and significantly alleviated the disease activity and colonic inflammation in a DSS-induced acute colitis murine model. Furthermore, YZP activated Breg function via interaction with TLR2 and TLR4 and up-regulation of the TLR-mediated signaling pathway. We purified a novel Breg-stimulating protein, YZP, from T. versicolor and developed an advanced approach combining RNA-seq and de novo assembly technologies.to clone its gene. We demonstrated that YZP activated CD1d(+) Breg differentiation through TLR2/4-mediated signaling pathway, and the YZP-stimulated B cells exhibited anti-inflammatory efficacies in vitro and in murine acute colitis models.

  16. Trametes versicolor protein YZP activates regulatory B lymphocytes - gene identification through de novo assembly and function analysis in a murine acute colitis model.

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    Yen-Chou Kuan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trametes versicolor (Yun-Zhi is a medicinal fungus used as a chemotherapy co-treatment to enhance anti-tumor immunity. Although the efficacies of T. versicolor extracts have been documented, the active ingredients and mechanisms underlying the actions of these extracts remain uncharacterized. RESULTS: We purified a new protein, YZP, from the fruiting bodies of T. versicolor and identified the gene encoding YZP using RNA-seq and de novo assembly technologies. YZP is a 12-kDa non-glycosylated protein comprising 139 amino acids, including an 18-amino acids signal peptide. YZP induced a greater than 60-fold increase in IL-10 secretion in mice B lymphocytes; moreover, YZP specifically triggered the differentiation of CD1d(+ B cells into IL-10-producing regulatory B cells (Bregs and enhanced the expression of CD1d. YZP-induced B cells suppressed approximately 40% of the LPS-activated macrophage production of inflammatory cytokines in a mixed leukocyte reaction and significantly alleviated the disease activity and colonic inflammation in a DSS-induced acute colitis murine model. Furthermore, YZP activated Breg function via interaction with TLR2 and TLR4 and up-regulation of the TLR-mediated signaling pathway. CONCLUSIONS: We purified a novel Breg-stimulating protein, YZP, from T. versicolor and developed an advanced approach combining RNA-seq and de novo assembly technologies.to clone its gene. We demonstrated that YZP activated CD1d(+ Breg differentiation through TLR2/4-mediated signaling pathway, and the YZP-stimulated B cells exhibited anti-inflammatory efficacies in vitro and in murine acute colitis models.

  17. Trametes versicolor Protein YZP Activates Regulatory B Lymphocytes – Gene Identification through De Novo Assembly and Function Analysis in a Murine Acute Colitis Model

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    Kuan, Yen-Chou; Wu, Ying-Jou; Hung, Chih-Liang; Sheu, Fuu

    2013-01-01

    Background Trametes versicolor (Yun-Zhi) is a medicinal fungus used as a chemotherapy co-treatment to enhance anti-tumor immunity. Although the efficacies of T. versicolor extracts have been documented, the active ingredients and mechanisms underlying the actions of these extracts remain uncharacterized. Results We purified a new protein, YZP, from the fruiting bodies of T. versicolor and identified the gene encoding YZP using RNA-seq and de novo assembly technologies. YZP is a 12-kDa non-glycosylated protein comprising 139 amino acids, including an 18-amino acids signal peptide. YZP induced a greater than 60-fold increase in IL-10 secretion in mice B lymphocytes; moreover, YZP specifically triggered the differentiation of CD1d+ B cells into IL-10-producing regulatory B cells (Bregs) and enhanced the expression of CD1d. YZP-induced B cells suppressed approximately 40% of the LPS-activated macrophage production of inflammatory cytokines in a mixed leukocyte reaction and significantly alleviated the disease activity and colonic inflammation in a DSS-induced acute colitis murine model. Furthermore, YZP activated Breg function via interaction with TLR2 and TLR4 and up-regulation of the TLR-mediated signaling pathway. Conclusions We purified a novel Breg-stimulating protein, YZP, from T. versicolor and developed an advanced approach combining RNA-seq and de novo assembly technologies.to clone its gene. We demonstrated that YZP activated CD1d+ Breg differentiation through TLR2/4-mediated signaling pathway, and the YZP-stimulated B cells exhibited anti-inflammatory efficacies in vitro and in murine acute colitis models. PMID:24019869

  18. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) gene expression construct: Development, nanodelivery and effect on reproduction in air-breathing catfish, Clarias batrachus.

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    Rathor, Pravesh Kumar; Bhat, Irfan Ahmad; Rather, Mohd Ashraf; Gireesh-Babu, Pathakota; Kumar, Kundan; Purayil, Suresh Babu Padinhate; Sharma, Rupam

    2017-11-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is responsible for the relocation of cholesterol across mitochondrial membrane in vertebrates and is, therefore, a key factor in regulating the rate and timing of steroidogenesis. In the present study, we developed chitosan nanoparticle (CNP) conjugated StAR gene construct (CNP-pcDNA4-StAR) in a eukaryotic expression vector, pcDNA4/HisMax A. CNPs of 135.4nm diameter, 26.7mV zeta potential and 0.381 polydispersity index were used for conjugation. The loading efficiency (LE) of pcDNA4-StAR construct with CNPs was found to be 86%. After the 24h of intramuscular injection, the CNP-pcDNA4-StAR plasmid could be detected from testis, brain, kidney and muscle tissues of Clarias batrachus. The transcript levels of important reproductive genes viz. cyp11a1, cyp17a1, 3β-hsd, 17β-hsd and cyp19a1 in CNP-pcDNA4-StAR treated group were initially low up to 24h, but significantly increased subsequently up to 120h. In naked pcDNA4-StAR treated group, the mRNA level of 3β-hsd, 17β-hsd and cyp19a1 increased initially up to 24h, while cyp11a1 and cyp17a1 increased up to 48h and then started declining. Similar results were obtained for 11-Ketotestosterone and 17β-estradiol. The results indicate relatively long lasting effects of nano-conjugated construct compared to the construct alone. Furthermore, the histopathology of gonads and liver authenticates its possible role in the gonadal development in fish without any adverse effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) enhances cAMP-responsive element binding (CREB) protein phosphorylation and phospho-CREB interaction with the mouse steroidogenic acute regulatory protein gene promoter.

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    Clem, Brian F; Hudson, Elizabeth A; Clark, Barbara J

    2005-03-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) transcription is regulated through cAMP-protein kinase A-dependent mechanisms that involve multiple transcription factors including the cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) family members. Classically, binding of phosphorylated CREB to cis-acting cAMP-responsive elements (5'-TGACGTCA-3') within target gene promoters leads to recruitment of the coactivator CREB binding protein (CBP). Herein we examined the extent of CREB family member phosphorylation on protein-DNA interactions and CBP recruitment with the StAR promoter. Immunoblot analysis revealed that CREB, cAMP-responsive element modulator (CREM), and activating transcription factor (ATF)-1 are expressed in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells, yet only CREB and ATF-1 are phosphorylated. (Bu)2cAMP treatment of MA-10 cells increased CREB phosphorylation approximately 2.3-fold within 30 min but did not change total nuclear CREB expression levels. Using DNA-affinity chromatography, we now show that CREB and ATF-1, but not CREM, interact with the StAR promoter, and this interaction is dependent on the activator protein-1 (AP-1) cis-acting element within the cAMP-responsive region. In addition, (Bu)2cAMP-treatment increased phosphorylated CREB (P-CREB) association with the StAR promoter but did not influence total CREB interaction. In vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated CREB binding to the StAR proximal promoter is independent of (Bu)2cAMP-treatment, confirming our in vitro analysis. However, (Bu)2cAMP-treatment increased P-CREB and CBP interaction with the StAR promoter, demonstrating for the first time the physical role of P-CREB:DNA interactions in CBP recruitment to the StAR proximal promoter.

  20. Acute phase reaction and acute phase proteins*

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    Gruys, E.; Toussaint, M.J.M.; Niewold, T.A.; Koopmans, S.J.

    2005-01-01

    A review of the systemic acute phase reaction with major cytokines involved, and the hepatic metabolic changes, negative and positive acute phase proteins (APPs) with function and associated pathology is given. It appears that APPs represent appropriate analytes for assessment of animal health. Whereas they represent non-specific markers as biological effect reactants, they can be used for assessing nutritional deficits and reactive processes, especially when positive and negative acute phase variables are combined in an index. When such acute phase index is applied to separate healthy animals from animals with some disease, much better results are obtained than with single analytes and statistically acceptable results for culling individual animals may be reached. Unfortunately at present no cheap, comprehensive and easy to use system is available for assessing various acute phase proteins in serum or blood samples at the same time. Protein microarray or fluid phase microchip technology may satisfy this need; and permit simultaneous analysis of numerous analytes in the same small volume sample and enable integration of information derived from systemic reactivity and nutrition with disease specific variables. Applying such technology may help to solve health problems in various countries not only in animal husbandry but also in human populations. PMID:16252337

  1. Steroidogenic impairment due to reduced ovarian transcription of cytochrome P450 side-chain-cleavage (P450scc) and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) during experimental nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Rico, Miguel; Guadalupe Ortiz-López, María; Camacho-Castillo, Luz; Cárdenas, Mario; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Menjívar, Marta

    2006-07-10

    The nephrotic syndrome is a renal disease characterized by proteinuria, hypoproteinemia, edema and hyperlipidemia. It has been reported that female nephrotic rats are characterized by loss of the oestrus cycle, follicle atresia, low gonadotropin and steroid concentrations; particularly, undetectable estradiol levels. Therefore, to determine the mechanisms involved in the ovarian steroidogenesis impairment, in this present study we evaluated the ovarian expression of the essential steroidogenesis components: cytochrome P450 side cholesterol chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). The experiments were conducted in the rat experimental model of nephrosis induced by puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN) and in control groups. The evaluation of the expression of P450scc and StAR mRNA were performed during the acute phase of nephrosis as well as after the exogenous administration of 1 or 4 doses of human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG), or a daily dose of FSH or FSH+hCG for 10 days. In addition, serum hormone concentrations, intra-ovarian steroid content, and the reproductive capacity were determined. The results revealed a decreased expression of mRNA of P450scc enzyme and StAR during nephrosis, and eventhough they increased after gonadotropins treatment, they did not conduce to a normal cycling rat period or fertility recovery. This study demonstrates that the mechanism by which ovarian steroid biosynthesis is altered during acute nephrosis involves damage at the P450scc and StAR mRNA synthesis and processing.

  2. Acute-phase proteins: As diagnostic tool

    OpenAIRE

    Sachin Jain; Vidhi Gautam; Sania Naseem

    2011-01-01

    The varied reactions of the host to infection, inflammation, or trauma are collectively known as the acute-phase response and encompass a wide range of pathophysiological responses such as pyrexia, leukocytosis, hormone alterations, and muscle protein depletion combining to minimize tissue damage while enhancing the repair process. The mechanism for stimulation of hepatic production of acute-phase proteins is by proinflammatory cytokines. The functions of positive acute-phase proteins (APP) a...

  3. Acute-phase proteins: As diagnostic tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Jain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The varied reactions of the host to infection, inflammation, or trauma are collectively known as the acute-phase response and encompass a wide range of pathophysiological responses such as pyrexia, leukocytosis, hormone alterations, and muscle protein depletion combining to minimize tissue damage while enhancing the repair process. The mechanism for stimulation of hepatic production of acute-phase proteins is by proinflammatory cytokines. The functions of positive acute-phase proteins (APP are regarded as important in optimization and trapping of microorganism and their products, in activating the complement system, in binding cellular remnants like nuclear fractions, in neutralizing enzymes, scavenging free hemoglobin and radicals, and in modulating the host′s immune response. APP can be used as diagnostic tool in many diseases like bovine respiratory syncytial virus, prostate cancer, bronchopneumonia, multiple myeloma, mastitis, Streptococcus suis infection, starvation, or lymphatic neoplasia. Thus, acute-phase proteins may provide an alternative means of monitoring animal health.

  4. Regulatory network of GATA3 in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Qianqian; Liao, Fei; Zhang, Shouyue; Zhang, Duyu; Zhang, Yan; Zhou, Xueyan; Xia, Xuyang; Ye, Yuanxin; Yang, Hanshuo; Li, Zhaozhi; Wang, Leiming; Wang, Xi; Ma, Zhigui; Zhu, Yiping; Ouyang, Liang

    2017-01-01

    GATA3 polymorphisms were reported to be significantly associated with susceptibility of pediatric B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), by impacting on GATA3 expression. We noticed that ALL-related GATA3 polymorphism located around in the tissue-specific enhancer, and significantly associated with GATA3 expression. Although the regulatory network of GATA3 has been well reported in T cells, the functional status of GATA3 is poorly understood in B-ALL. We thus conducted genome-wide gene...

  5. Increased regulatory T cells in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Siti-Zuleha; Hassan, Norfarazieda; Lee, Le-Jie; Md Noor, Sabariah; Osman, Raudhawati; Abdul-Jalil, Marsitah; Nordin, Abdul-Jalil; Abdullah, Maha

    2015-10-01

    Regulation in adaptive immune response balances a fine line that prevents instigation of self-damage or fall into unresponsiveness permitting abnormal cell growth. Mechanisms that keep this balance in check include regulatory T cells (Tregs). Tregs consist of a small but heterogeneous population which may be identified by the phenotype, CD3+CD4+CD25+CD127-. Role of Tregs in pathogenesis of cancers is thus far supported by evidence of increased Tregs in various cancers and may contribute to poorer prognosis. Tregs may also be important in acute leukemias. A review of the literature on Tregs in acute leukemias was conducted and Tregs were determined in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALLs). Studies on Tregs in B-cell ALL are few and controversial. We observed a significantly increased percentage of Tregs (mean ± SD, 9.72 ± 3.79% vs. 7.05 ± 1.74%; P = 0.047) in the bone marrow/peripheral blood of ALL (n = 17) compared to peripheral blood of normal controls (n = 35). A positive trend between Tregs and age (R = 0.474, P = 0.055, n = 17) implicates this factor of poor prognosis in B-cell ALL. Tregs in cancer are particularly significant in immunotherapy. The manipulation of the immune system to treat cancer has for a long time ignored regulatory mechanisms inducible or in place. In lymphoma studies tumor-specific mechanisms that are unlike conventional methods in the induction of Tregs have been hypothesized. In addition, tumor-infiltrating Tregs may present different profiles from peripheral blood pictures. Tregs will continue to be dissected to reveal their mysteries and their impact on clinical significance.

  6. Regulatory protein modification: techniques and protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hemmings, Hugh C

    1997-01-01

    ... important roles in cellular regulation. The techniques used to analyze various forms of posttranslational protein modification are described, along with current protocols, discussion of the methodological limitations, and relevant examples from recent publications. This collection should be of use to investigators of protein modification who work i...

  7. Functional Classification of Immune Regulatory Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubinstein, Rotem [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Ramagopal, Udupi A. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Nathenson, Stanley G. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Almo, Steven C. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Fiser, Andras [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Members of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) control innate and adaptive immunity and are prime targets for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, infectious diseases, and malignancies. We describe a computational method, termed the Brotherhood algorithm, which utilizes intermediate sequence information to classify proteins into functionally related families. This approach identifies functional relationships within the IgSF and predicts additional receptor-ligand interactions. As a specific example, we examine the nectin/nectin-like family of cell adhesion and signaling proteins and propose receptor-ligand interactions within this family. We were guided by the Brotherhood approach and present the high-resolution structural characterization of a homophilic interaction involving the class-I MHC-restricted T-cell-associated molecule, which we now classify as a nectin-like family member. The Brotherhood algorithm is likely to have a significant impact on structural immunology by identifying those proteins and complexes for which structural characterization will be particularly informative.

  8. Regulatory network of GATA3 in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Qianqian; Liao, Fei; Zhang, Shouyue; Zhang, Duyu; Zhang, Yan; Zhou, Xueyan; Xia, Xuyang; Ye, Yuanxin; Yang, Hanshuo; Li, Zhaozhi; Wang, Leiming; Wang, Xi; Ma, Zhigui; Zhu, Yiping; Ouyang, Liang; Wang, Yuelan; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Li; Xu, Heng; Shu, Yang

    2017-05-30

    GATA3 polymorphisms were reported to be significantly associated with susceptibility of pediatric B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), by impacting on GATA3 expression. We noticed that ALL-related GATA3 polymorphism located around in the tissue-specific enhancer, and significantly associated with GATA3 expression. Although the regulatory network of GATA3 has been well reported in T cells, the functional status of GATA3 is poorly understood in B-ALL. We thus conducted genome-wide gene expression association analyses to reveal expression associated genes and pathways in nine independent B-ALL patient cohorts. In B-ALL patients, 173 candidates were identified to be significantly associated with GATA3 expression, including some reported GATA3-related genes (e.g., ITM2A) and well-known tumor-related genes (e.g., STAT4). Some of the candidates exhibit tissue-specific and subtype-specific association with GATA3. Through overexpression and down-regulation of GATA3 in leukemia cell lines, several reported and novel GATA3 regulated genes were validated. Moreover, association of GATA3 expression and its targets can be impacted by SNPs (e.g., rs4894953), which locate in the potential GATA3 binding motif. Our findings suggest that GATA3 may be involved in multiple tumor-related pathways (e.g., STAT/JAK pathway) in B-ALL to impact leukemogenesis through epigenetic regulation.

  9. Protein kinase A regulatory subunit distribution in medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucignat-Caretta, Carla; Denaro, Luca; Redaelli, Marco; D'Avella, Domenico; Caretta, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies showed a differential distribution of the four regulatory subunits of cAMP-dependent protein kinases inside the brain, that changed in rodent gliomas: therefore, the distribution of these proteins inside the brain can give information on the functional state of the cells. Our goal was to examine human brain tumors to provide evidence for a differential distribution of protein kinase A in different tumors. The distribution of detergent insoluble regulatory (R1 and R2) and catalytic subunits of cAMP dependent kinases was examined in pediatric brain tumors by immunohistochemistry and fluorescent cAMP analogues binding. R2 is organized in large single dots in medulloblastomas, while it has a different appearance in other tumors. Fluorescent cAMP labelling was observed only in medulloblastoma. A different distribution of cAMP dependent protein kinases has been observed in medulloblastoma

  10. Co-suppression of sterol-regulatory element binding protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-06-22

    Jun 22, 2011 ... In Arabidopsis,. At5g35220 gene being sterol regulatory element-binding protein site 2, protease and metalloendopeptidase activity were required for chloroplast development and play a role in regulation of endodermal plastid size and number that are involved in ethylene-dependent gravitropism of light-.

  11. CONSTRUCTION AND ANALYSIS OF IPBR/XYLS HYBRID REGULATORY PROTEINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    IpbR and XylS are related regulatory proteins (having 56% identity). IpbR responds to isopropylbenzene as well as to a variety of hydrophobic chemicals to activate expression of the isopropylbenzene catabolic pathway operon of pRE4 from ipbOP. XylS responds to substituted benzoic...

  12. Hijacking Complement Regulatory Proteins for Bacterial Immune Evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovingh, Elise S; van den Broek, Bryan; Jongerius, Ilse

    2016-01-01

    The human complement system plays an important role in the defense against invading pathogens, inflammation and homeostasis. Invading microbes, such as bacteria, directly activate the complement system resulting in the formation of chemoattractants and in effective labeling of the bacteria for phagocytosis. In addition, formation of the membrane attack complex is responsible for direct killing of Gram-negative bacteria. In turn, bacteria have evolved several ways to evade complement activation on their surface in order to be able to colonize and invade the human host. One important mechanism of bacterial escape is attraction of complement regulatory proteins to the microbial surface. These molecules are present in the human body for tight regulation of the complement system to prevent damage to host self-surfaces. Therefore, recruitment of complement regulatory proteins to the bacterial surface results in decreased complement activation on the microbial surface which favors bacterial survival. This review will discuss recent advances in understanding the binding of complement regulatory proteins to the bacterial surface at the molecular level. This includes, new insights that have become available concerning specific conserved motives on complement regulatory proteins that are favorable for microbial binding. Finally, complement evasion molecules are of high importance for vaccine development due to their dominant role in bacterial survival, high immunogenicity and homology as well as their presence on the bacterial surface. Here, the use of complement evasion molecules for vaccine development will be discussed.

  13. Automated protein-DNA interaction screening of Drosophila regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hens, Korneel; Feuz, Jean-Daniel; Isakova, Alina; Iagovitina, Antonina; Massouras, Andreas; Bryois, Julien; Callaerts, Patrick; Celniker, Susan E; Deplancke, Bart

    2011-10-30

    Drosophila melanogaster has one of the best characterized metazoan genomes in terms of functionally annotated regulatory elements. To explore how these elements contribute to gene regulation, we need convenient tools to identify the proteins that bind to them. Here we describe the development and validation of a high-throughput yeast one-hybrid platform, which enables screening of DNA elements versus an array of full-length, sequence-verified clones containing over 85% of predicted Drosophila transcription factors. Using six well-characterized regulatory elements, we identified 33 transcription factor-DNA interactions of which 27 were previously unidentified. To simultaneously validate these interactions and locate the binding sites of involved transcription factors, we implemented a powerful microfluidics-based approach that enabled us to retrieve DNA-occupancy data for each transcription factor throughout the respective target DNA elements. Finally, we biologically validated several interactions and identified two new regulators of sine oculis gene expression and hence eye development.

  14. Signal regulatory proteins (SIRPS) are secreted presynaptic organizing molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemori, Hisashi; Sanes, Joshua R

    2008-12-05

    Formation of chemical synapses requires exchange of organizing signals between the synaptic partners. Using synaptic vesicle aggregation in cultured neurons as a marker of presynaptic differentiation, we purified candidate presynaptic organizers from mouse brain. A major bioactive species was the extracellular domain of signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRP-alpha), a transmembrane immunoglobulin superfamily member concentrated at synapses. The extracellular domain of SIRP-alpha is cleaved and shed in a developmentally regulated manner. The presynaptic organizing activity of SIRP-alpha is mediated in part by CD47. SIRP-alpha homologues, SIRP-beta and -gamma also have synaptic vesicle clustering activity. The effects of SIRP-alpha are distinct from those of another presynaptic organizer, FGF22: the two proteins induced vesicle clusters of different sizes, differed in their ability to promote neurite branching, and acted through different receptors and signaling pathways. SIRP family proteins may act together with other organizing molecules to pattern synapses.

  15. Exploitation of complement regulatory proteins by Borrelia and Francisella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madar, Marian; Bencurova, Elena; Mlynarcik, Patrik; Almeida, André M; Soares, Renata; Bhide, Katarina; Pulzova, Lucia; Kovac, Andrej; Coelho, Ana V; Bhide, Mangesh

    2015-06-01

    Pathogens have developed sophisticated mechanisms of complement evasion such as binding to the host complement regulatory proteins (CRPs) on their surface or expression of CRP mimicking molecules. The ability of pathogens to evade the complement system has been correlated with pathogenesis and host selectivity. Hitherto, little work has been undertaken to determine whether Borrelia and Francisella exploit various CRPs to block complement attack. Seventeen Borrelia (twelve species) and six Francisella (three subspecies) strains were used to assess their ability to bind human, sheep and cattle CRPs or mimic membrane associated complement regulators. A series of experiments including affinity ligand binding experiments, pull-down assays and mass spectrometry based protein identification, revealed an array of CRP binding proteins of Borrelia and Francisella. Unlike Francisella, Borrelia strains were able to bind multiple human CRPs. Three strains of Borrelia (SKT-4, SKT-2 and HO14) showed the presence of a human CD46-homologous motif, indicating their ability to possess putative human CD46 mimicking molecules. Similarly, five strains of Borrelia and two strains of Francisella may have surface proteins with human CD59-homologous motifs. Among ovine and bovine CRPs, the only CRP bound by Francisella (LVS, Tul4 strain) was vitronectin, while ovine C4BP, ovine factor H and bovine factor H were bound to Borrelia strains SKT-2, DN127 and Co53. This study presents an array of proteins of Borrelia and Francisella that bind CRPs or may mimic membrane-CRPs, thus enabling multiphasic complement evasion strategies of these pathogens.

  16. Enzymatic Mercury Detoxification: The Regulatory Protein MerR

    CERN Multimedia

    Ctortecka, B; Walsh, C T; Comess, K M

    2002-01-01

    Mercury ions and organomercurial reagents are extremely toxic due to their affinity for thiol groups. Many bacteria contain an elaborate detoxification system for a metabolic conversion of toxic Hg$^{2+}$ or organomercurials to less toxic elemental Hg$^0$. The main components of the enzymatic mercury detoxification (see Fig. 1) are the regulatory protein MerR (mercury responsive genetic switch), the organomercurial lyase MerB (cleavage of carbon mercury bonds), and the mercuric ion reductase MerA (reduction of mercuric ions). In these proteins Hg$^{2+}$ is usually coordinated by the thiol groups of cysteines. We utilize the nuclear quadrupole interaction (NQI) of ${\\rm^{199m}}$Hg detected by time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) to identify the Hg metal site geometries in these proteins in order to elucidate the molecular origin of the ultrasensitivity, selectivity and reaction mechanism of this detoxification system. The short lived TDPAC probe ${\\rm^{199m}}$Hg ($\\tau_{1/2} =$ 43 min) is su...

  17. A conserved regulatory mechanism in bifunctional biotin protein ligases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingheng; Beckett, Dorothy

    2017-08-01

    Class II bifunctional biotin protein ligases (BirA), which catalyze post-translational biotinylation and repress transcription initiation, are broadly distributed in eubacteria and archaea. However, it is unclear if these proteins all share the same molecular mechanism of transcription regulation. In Escherichia coli the corepressor biotinoyl-5'-AMP (bio-5'-AMP), which is also the intermediate in biotin transfer, promotes operator binding and resulting transcription repression by enhancing BirA dimerization. Like E. coli BirA (EcBirA), Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus subtilis BirA (Sa and BsBirA) repress transcription in vivo in a biotin-dependent manner. In this work, sedimentation equilibrium measurements were performed to investigate the molecular basis of this biotin-responsive transcription regulation. The results reveal that, as observed for EcBirA, Sa, and BsBirA dimerization reactions are significantly enhanced by bio-5'-AMP binding. Thus, the molecular mechanism of the Biotin Regulatory System is conserved in the biotin repressors from these three organisms. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  18. Monitoring health by values of acute phase proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruys, E.; Toussaint, M.J.M.; Niewold, T.A.; Koopmans, S.J.; Dijk, van E.; Meloen, R.H.

    2006-01-01

    A systemic acute phase reaction may develop during infection and inflammation, due to the action of peripherally liberated proinflammatory cytokines. Hepatic metabolism changes, and negative and positive acute phase proteins (APPs) can be measured in the blood: the APPs therefore represent

  19. Application of acute phase protein measurements in veterinary clinical chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Henning; Nielsen, J. P.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2004-01-01

    The body's early defence in response to trauma, inflammation or infection, the acute phase response, is a complex set of systemic reactions seen shortly after exposure to a triggering event. One of the many components is an acute phase protein response in which increased hepatic synthesis leads t...

  20. Pleiotropy constrains the evolution of protein but not regulatory sequences in a transcription regulatory network influencing complex social behaviours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria eMolodtsova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is increasingly apparent that genes and networks that influence complex behaviour are evolutionary conserved, which is paradoxical considering that behaviour is labile over evolutionary timescales. How does adaptive change in behaviour arise if behaviour is controlled by conserved, pleiotropic, and likely evolutionary constrained genes? Pleiotropy and connectedness are known to constrain the general rate of protein evolution, prompting some to suggest that the evolution of complex traits, including behaviour, is fuelled by regulatory sequence evolution. However, we seldom have data on the strength of selection on mutations in coding and regulatory sequences, and this hinders our ability to study how pleiotropy influences coding and regulatory sequence evolution. Here we use population genomics to estimate the strength of selection on coding and regulatory mutations for a transcriptional regulatory network that influences complex behaviour of honey bees. We found that replacement mutations in highly connected transcription factors and target genes experience significantly stronger negative selection relative to weakly connected transcription factors and targets. Adaptively evolving proteins were significantly more likely to reside at the periphery of the regulatory network, while proteins with signs of negative selection were near the core of the network. Interestingly, connectedness and network structure had minimal influence on the strength of selection on putative regulatory sequences for both transcription factors and their targets. Our study indicates that adaptive evolution of complex behaviour can arise because of positive selection on protein-coding mutations in peripheral genes, and on regulatory sequence mutations in both transcription factors and their targets throughout the network.

  1. Critical protein GAPDH and its regulatory mechanisms in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jin-Ying; Zhang, Fan; Hong, Chao-Qun; Giuliano, Armando E.; Cui, Xiao-Jiang; Zhou, Guang-Ji; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Cui, Yu-Kun

    2015-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), initially identified as a glycolytic enzyme and considered as a housekeeping gene, is widely used as an internal control in experiments on proteins, mRNA, and DNA. However, emerging evidence indicates that GAPDH is implicated in diverse functions independent of its role in energy metabolism; the expression status of GAPDH is also deregulated in various cancer cells. One of the most common effects of GAPDH is its inconsistent role in the determination of cancer cell fate. Furthermore, studies have described GAPDH as a regulator of cell death; other studies have suggested that GAPDH participates in tumor progression and serves as a new therapeutic target. However, related regulatory mechanisms of its numerous cellular functions and deregulated expression levels remain unclear. GAPDH is tightly regulated at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels, which are involved in the regulation of diverse GAPDH functions. Several cancer-related factors, such as insulin, hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), p53, nitric oxide (NO), and acetylated histone, not only modulate GAPDH gene expression but also affect protein functions via common pathways. Moreover, posttranslational modifications (PTMs) occurring in GAPDH in cancer cells result in new activities unrelated to the original glycolytic function of GAPDH. In this review, recent findings related to GAPDH transcriptional regulation and PTMs are summarized. Mechanisms and pathways involved in GAPDH regulation and its different roles in cancer cells are also described

  2. [The intracellular localization of the regulatory proteins of the densovirus of German cockroach, Blattella germanica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynova, E U; Kapelinskaia, T V; Schal, C; Mukha, D V

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular localization of the regulatory proteins encoded by the genome of the densovirus of German cockroach was analyzed using western-blotting of nuclear and cytoplasmic extracts of the densovirus-infected passaging cells tissue culture BGE-2. Two of the three regulatory proteins, NS1 and NS3, were shown to possess mainly nuclear localization, while NS2 protein was distributed between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Data obtained provide new information necessary for prediction of the functions of densovirus regulatory proteins. Intracellular localization of NS3 protein was described for the densoviruses for the first time.

  3. Alternative approaches for identifying acute systemic toxicity: Moving from research to regulatory testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Jon; Sullivan, Kristie; Clippinger, Amy J; Strickland, Judy; Bell, Shannon; Bhhatarai, Barun; Blaauboer, Bas; Casey, Warren; Dorman, David; Forsby, Anna; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Gehen, Sean; Graepel, Rabea; Hotchkiss, Jon; Lowit, Anna; Matheson, Joanna; Reaves, Elissa; Scarano, Louis; Sprankle, Catherine; Tunkel, Jay; Wilson, Dan; Xia, Menghang; Zhu, Hao; Allen, David

    2017-06-01

    Acute systemic toxicity testing provides the basis for hazard labeling and risk management of chemicals. A number of international efforts have been directed at identifying non-animal alternatives for in vivo acute systemic toxicity tests. A September 2015 workshop, Alternative Approaches for Identifying Acute Systemic Toxicity: Moving from Research to Regulatory Testing, reviewed the state-of-the-science of non-animal alternatives for this testing and explored ways to facilitate implementation of alternatives. Workshop attendees included representatives from international regulatory agencies, academia, nongovernmental organizations, and industry. Resources identified as necessary for meaningful progress in implementing alternatives included compiling and making available high-quality reference data, training on use and interpretation of in vitro and in silico approaches, and global harmonization of testing requirements. Attendees particularly noted the need to characterize variability in reference data to evaluate new approaches. They also noted the importance of understanding the mechanisms of acute toxicity, which could be facilitated by the development of adverse outcome pathways. Workshop breakout groups explored different approaches to reducing or replacing animal use for acute toxicity testing, with each group crafting a roadmap and strategy to accomplish near-term progress. The workshop steering committee has organized efforts to implement the recommendations of the workshop participants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The interaction between anticoagulant protein S and complement regulatory C4b-binding protein (C4BP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Poel, R. H.; Meijers, J. C.; Bouma, B. N.

    2000-01-01

    An important mechanism of regulation of blood coagulation is the anticoagulant protein C pathway. In this pathway, the anticoagulant activity of activated protein C is increased by its cofactor protein S. The cofactor activity of protein S can be regulated by binding to complement regulatory

  5. Acute phase proteins as diagnostic markers in horses with colic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Tina; Scheepers, Elrien; Sanz, Macarena

    2016-01-01

    Objective – To investigate the diagnostic potential of the concentrations of acute-phase proteins serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin (Hp), and fibrinogen in blood and peritoneal fluid (PF) for differentiating horses within flammatory colic (entero-colitis and peritonitis) from those with surgical...... colic. Design – Prospective observational multicenter study. Setting – Two university referral hospitals. Animals – Horses referred for severe acute abdominal pain to Hospital 1 (n = 148) or Hospital 2 (n = 78). Intervention – Blood and PF samples collected at admission were used for acute-phase protein...... concentrations) did not improve the model. When validated in Hospital 2 data, the models had good integrity and diagnostic performance. Conclusions – Evaluation of SAA in serum improved the ability to differentiate horses with acute inflammatory colic requiring medical treatment from horses with colic requiring...

  6. Acute phase serum proteins in diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rema M

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The serum concentration of various acute phase reactants were studied in patients with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus with and without retinopathy and in control subjects. The serum levels of haptoglobin was elevated in diabetics with retinopathy and the levels were highest in those with proliferative diabetic retinopathy. The levels of serum albumin, alpha-1 acid glycoprotein, alpha-1 antitrypsin and caeruloplasmin were not significantly different between the patients with retinopathy and controls. Haptoglobin increases serum viscosity and this could be the mechanism by which it plays a role in pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. These preliminary observations need to be confirmed by studies based on larger number of patients. Longitudinal studies on acute phase reactants in various stages of development of diabetic retinopathy would also provide valuable information.

  7. Impaired circulating CD4+ LAP+ regulatory T cells in patients with acute coronary syndrome and its mechanistic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Feng Zhu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: CD4(+ latency-associated peptide (LAP(+ regulatory T cells (Tregs are a newly discovered T cell subset in humans and the role of these cells in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS has not been explored. We designed to investigate whether circulating frequency and function of CD4(+LAP(+ Tregs are defective in ACS. METHODS: One hundred eleven ACS patients (acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina and 117 control patients were enrolled in the study. The control patients consisted of chronic stable angina (CSA and chest pain syndrome (CPS. The frequencies of circulating CD4(+LAP(+ Tregs and the expression of the transmembrane protein glycoprotein-A repetitions predominant (GARP on CD4(+ T cells were determined by flow cytometry. The function of CD4(+LAP(+ Tregs was detected using thymidine uptake. Serum interleukin-10 (IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β protein (TGF-β levels were detected using ELISA and expression of GARP mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs was measured by real time-polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: We found ACS patients had a significantly lower frequency of circulating CD4(+LAP(+ Tregs, and the function of these cells was reduced compared to controls. The expression of GARP in CD4(+ T cells and the serum levels of TGF-β in ACS patients were lower than those of control patients. The serum levels of IL-10 were similar between the two cohorts. CONCLUSIONS: A novel regulatory T cell subset, defined as CD4(+LAP(+ T cells is defective in ACS patients.

  8. Antidiabetic effects of glucokinase regulatory protein small-molecule disruptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, David J.; St Jean, David J.; Kurzeja, Robert J. M.; Wahl, Robert C.; Michelsen, Klaus; Cupples, Rod; Chen, Michelle; Wu, John; Sivits, Glenn; Helmering, Joan; Komorowski, Renée; Ashton, Kate S.; Pennington, Lewis D.; Fotsch, Christopher; Vazir, Mukta; Chen, Kui; Chmait, Samer; Zhang, Jiandong; Liu, Longbin; Norman, Mark H.; Andrews, Kristin L.; Bartberger, Michael D.; van, Gwyneth; Galbreath, Elizabeth J.; Vonderfecht, Steven L.; Wang, Minghan; Jordan, Steven R.; Véniant, Murielle M.; Hale, Clarence

    2013-12-01

    Glucose homeostasis is a vital and complex process, and its disruption can cause hyperglycaemia and type II diabetes mellitus. Glucokinase (GK), a key enzyme that regulates glucose homeostasis, converts glucose to glucose-6-phosphate in pancreatic β-cells, liver hepatocytes, specific hypothalamic neurons, and gut enterocytes. In hepatocytes, GK regulates glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis, suppresses glucose production, and is subject to the endogenous inhibitor GK regulatory protein (GKRP). During fasting, GKRP binds, inactivates and sequesters GK in the nucleus, which removes GK from the gluconeogenic process and prevents a futile cycle of glucose phosphorylation. Compounds that directly hyperactivate GK (GK activators) lower blood glucose levels and are being evaluated clinically as potential therapeutics for the treatment of type II diabetes mellitus. However, initial reports indicate that an increased risk of hypoglycaemia is associated with some GK activators. To mitigate the risk of hypoglycaemia, we sought to increase GK activity by blocking GKRP. Here we describe the identification of two potent small-molecule GK-GKRP disruptors (AMG-1694 and AMG-3969) that normalized blood glucose levels in several rodent models of diabetes. These compounds potently reversed the inhibitory effect of GKRP on GK activity and promoted GK translocation both in vitro (isolated hepatocytes) and in vivo (liver). A co-crystal structure of full-length human GKRP in complex with AMG-1694 revealed a previously unknown binding pocket in GKRP distinct from that of the phosphofructose-binding site. Furthermore, with AMG-1694 and AMG-3969 (but not GK activators), blood glucose lowering was restricted to diabetic and not normoglycaemic animals. These findings exploit a new cellular mechanism for lowering blood glucose levels with reduced potential for hypoglycaemic risk in patients with type II diabetes mellitus.

  9. Regulatory elements of Caenorhabditis elegans ribosomal protein genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sleumer Monica C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ribosomal protein genes (RPGs are essential, tightly regulated, and highly expressed during embryonic development and cell growth. Even though their protein sequences are strongly conserved, their mechanism of regulation is not conserved across yeast, Drosophila, and vertebrates. A recent investigation of genomic sequences conserved across both nematode species and associated with different gene groups indicated the existence of several elements in the upstream regions of C. elegans RPGs, providing a new insight regarding the regulation of these genes in C. elegans. Results In this study, we performed an in-depth examination of C. elegans RPG regulation and found nine highly conserved motifs in the upstream regions of C. elegans RPGs using the motif discovery algorithm DME. Four motifs were partially similar to transcription factor binding sites from C. elegans, Drosophila, yeast, and human. One pair of these motifs was found to co-occur in the upstream regions of 250 transcripts including 22 RPGs. The distance between the two motifs displayed a complex frequency pattern that was related to their relative orientation. We tested the impact of three of these motifs on the expression of rpl-2 using a series of reporter gene constructs and showed that all three motifs are necessary to maintain the high natural expression level of this gene. One of the motifs was similar to the binding site of an orthologue of POP-1, and we showed that RNAi knockdown of pop-1 impacts the expression of rpl-2. We further determined the transcription start site of rpl-2 by 5’ RACE and found that the motifs lie 40–90 bases upstream of the start site. We also found evidence that a noncoding RNA, contained within the outron of rpl-2, is co-transcribed with rpl-2 and cleaved during trans-splicing. Conclusions Our results indicate that C. elegans RPGs are regulated by a complex novel series of regulatory elements that is evolutionarily distinct from

  10. Usefulness of acute phase proteins for monitoring development of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Serum levels of acute phase proteins (APP) have been used to diagnose and follow up treatment of liver diseases. This study was carried out to determine the usefulness of APP to predict development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) among Hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers. Study design: In a prospective ...

  11. An AML1-ETO/miR-29b-1 regulatory circuit modulates phenotypic properties of acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Sayyed K; Perez, Andrew W; White, Elizabeth S; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Janet L; Stein, Gary S

    2017-06-20

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by an aggressive clinical course and frequent cytogenetic abnormalities that include specific chromosomal translocations. The 8;21 chromosomal rearrangement disrupts the key hematopoietic RUNX1 transcription factor, and contributes to leukemia through recruitment of co-repressor complexes to RUNX1 target genes, altered subnuclear localization, and deregulation of the myeloid gene regulatory program. However, a role of non-coding microRNAs (miRs) in t(8;21)-mediated leukemogenesis is minimally understood. We present evidence of an interplay between the tumor suppressor miR-29b-1 and the AML1-ETO (also designated RUNX1-RUNX1T1) oncogene that is encoded by the t(8;21). We find that AML1-ETO and corepressor NCoR co-occupy the miR-29a/b-1 locus and downregulate its expression in leukemia cells. Conversely, re-introduction of miR-29b-1 in leukemia cells expressing AML1-ETO causes significant downregulation at the protein level through direct targeting of the 3' untranslated region of the chimeric transcript. Restoration of miR-29b-1 expression in leukemia cells results in decreased cell growth and increased apoptosis. The AML1-ETO-dependent differentiation block and transcriptional program are partially reversed by miR-29b-1. Our findings establish a novel regulatory circuit between the tumor-suppressive miR-29b-1 and the oncogenic AML1-ETO that controls the leukemic phenotype in t(8;21)-carrying acute myeloid leukemia.

  12. Acute HIV-1 infection is associated with increased plasma levels of heme oxygenase-1 and presence of heme oxygenase-1-specific regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angin, Mathieu; Fathi, Anahita; King, Melanie; Ledoux, Mary B; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Altfeld, Marcus; Addo, Marylyn M

    2017-03-13

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an inducible stress response protein with potent anti-inflammatory activity and recent data suggest a potentially beneficial role in HIV pathogenesis. We investigated the impact of HO-1 and a novel subset of HO-1-specific CD8 regulatory T cells on virus-specific T-cell immunity in HIV-1-infected individuals. HO-1 protein levels were quantified in plasma from individuals at different stages of HIV-1 disease and longitudinally following primary HIV infection. HO-1-specific CD8 T cells were investigated by flow cytometry using human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I pentamers. Flow-sorted HO-1-specific CD8 T cells were cultured and tested for suppressive activity on HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T-cell clones clones. HO-1 gene expression was determined in sorted peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) subsets from individuals with acute HIV-1 infection. HO-1 plasma levels were significantly increased in HIV-1 infection, with the highest levels in individuals with acute HIV-1 infection, and gradually declined over time. The frequency of CD8 T cells specific for HO-1 was elevated in study participants with primary HIV-1 infection and flow-sorted HO-1-specific CD8 T cells were capable of suppressing HIV-1-specific lysis of cytotoxic T-cell clones clones. HO-1 gene expression was upregulated in multiple immune cell subsets during acute HIV-1 infection and HO-1 overexpression modulated anti-HIV immunity in vitro. Our data suggest that HO-1 is induced during acute HIV-1 infection, likely mediating anti-inflammatory effects and driving expansion of HO-1-specific CD8 regulatory T cells capable of suppressing HIV-1-specific immune responses in vitro. The investigation of HO-1 and the novel CD8 regulatory cell type described here provide further insight into immune regulation in HIV-1 infection and may hold potential for future immunotherapeutic intervention.

  13. Application of acute phase protein measurements in veterinary clinical chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Henning; Nielsen, J. P.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2004-01-01

    The body's early defence in response to trauma, inflammation or infection, the acute phase response, is a complex set of systemic reactions seen shortly after exposure to a triggering event. One of the many components is an acute phase protein response in which increased hepatic synthesis leads t...... A and their possible use as non-specific indicators of health in large animal veterinary medicine such as in the health status surveillance of pigs at the herd level, for the detection of mastitis in dairy cattle and for the prognosis of respiratory diseases in horses....

  14. Iron-regulatory proteins secure iron availability in cardiomyocytes to prevent heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Saba; Wang, Yong; Galy, Bruno; Korf-Klingebiel, Mortimer; Hirsch, Valentin; Baru, Abdul M; Rostami, Fatemeh; Reboll, Marc R; Heineke, Jörg; Flögel, Ulrich; Groos, Stephanie; Renner, André; Toischer, Karl; Zimmermann, Fabian; Engeli, Stefan; Jordan, Jens; Bauersachs, Johann; Hentze, Matthias W; Wollert, Kai C; Kempf, Tibor

    2017-02-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is associated with adverse outcomes in heart failure (HF) but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Intracellular iron availability is secured by two mRNA-binding iron-regulatory proteins (IRPs), IRP1 and IRP2. We generated mice with a cardiomyocyte-targeted deletion of Irp1 and Irp2 to explore the functional implications of ID in the heart independent of systemic ID and anaemia. Iron content in cardiomyocytes was reduced in Irp-targeted mice. The animals were not anaemic and did not show a phenotype under baseline conditions. Irp-targeted mice, however, were unable to increase left ventricular (LV) systolic function in response to an acute dobutamine challenge. After myocardial infarction, Irp-targeted mice developed more severe LV dysfunction with increased HF mortality. Mechanistically, the activity of the iron-sulphur cluster-containing complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain was reduced in left ventricles from Irp-targeted mice. As demonstrated by extracellular flux analysis in vitro, mitochondrial respiration was preserved at baseline but failed to increase in response to dobutamine in Irp-targeted cardiomyocytes. As shown by 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy in vivo, LV phosphocreatine/ATP ratio declined during dobutamine stress in Irp-targeted mice but remained stable in control mice. Intravenous injection of ferric carboxymaltose replenished cardiac iron stores, restored mitochondrial respiratory capacity and inotropic reserve, and attenuated adverse remodelling after myocardial infarction in Irp-targeted mice but not in control mice. As shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assays, IRP activity was significantly reduced in LV tissue samples from patients with advanced HF and reduced LV tissue iron content. ID in cardiomyocytes impairs mitochondrial respiration and adaptation to acute and chronic increases in workload. Iron supplementation restores cardiac energy reserve and function in iron

  15. An Appetite for Modernizing the Regulatory Framework for Protein Content Claims in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinangeli, Christopher P F; Foisy, Samara; Shoveller, Anna K; Porter, Cara; Musa-Veloso, Kathy; Sievenpiper, John L; Jenkins, David J A

    2017-08-23

    The need for protein-rich plant-based foods continues as dietary guidelines emphasize their contribution to healthy dietary patterns that prevent chronic disease and promote environmental sustainability. However, the Canadian Food and Drug Regulations provide a regulatory framework that can prevent Canadian consumers from identifying protein-rich plant-based foods. In Canada, protein nutrient content claims are based on the protein efficiency ratio (PER) and protein rating method, which is based on a rat growth bioassay. PERs are not additive, and the protein rating of a food is underpinned by its Reasonable Daily Intake. The restrictive nature of Canada's requirements for supporting protein claims therefore presents challenges for Canadian consumers to adapt to a rapidly changing food environment. This commentary will present two options for modernizing the regulatory framework for protein content claims in Canada. The first and preferred option advocates that protein quality not be considered in the determination of the eligibility of a food for protein content claims. The second and less preferred option, an interim solution, is a framework for adopting the protein digestibility corrected amino acid score as the official method for supporting protein content and quality claims and harmonizes Canada's regulatory framework with that of the USA.

  16. Shotgun Proteomics Identifies Proteins Specific for Acute Renal Transplant Rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigdel, Tara K.; Kaushal, Amit; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Qian, Weijun; Xiao, Wenzhong; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Sarwal, Minnie M.

    2010-01-04

    Acute rejection (AR) remains the primary risk factor for renal transplant outcome; development of non-invasive diagnostic biomarkers for AR is an unmet need. We used shotgun proteomics using LC-MS/MS and ELISA to analyze a set of 92 urine samples, from patients with AR, stable grafts (STA), proteinuria (NS), and healthy controls (HC). A total of 1446 urinary proteins were identified along with a number of NS specific, renal transplantation specific and AR specific proteins. Relative abundance of identified urinary proteins was measured by protein-level spectral counts adopting a weighted fold-change statistic, assigning increased weight for more frequently observed proteins. We have identified alterations in a number of specific urinary proteins in AR, primarily relating to MHC antigens, the complement cascade and extra-cellular matrix proteins. A subset of proteins (UMOD, SERPINF1 and CD44), have been further cross-validated by ELISA in an independent set of urine samples, for significant differences in the abundance of these urinary proteins in AR. This label-free, semi-quantitative approach for sampling the urinary proteome in normal and disease states provides a robust and sensitive method for detection of urinary proteins for serial, non-invasive clinical monitoring for graft rejection after

  17. Intracellular localization of ornithine decarboxylase and its regulatory protein, antizyme-1.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, R.G.; Cuijpers, V.M.J.I.; Groot, L.H. de; Thio, M.; Verhofstad, A.A.J.

    2004-01-01

    The enzyme ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and its regulatory protein antizyme-1 (AZ1) are key regulators in the homeostasis of polyamines. To gain more insight into the exact intracellular distribution of ODC and AZ1, we performed immunocytochemical and Green Fluorescent Protein-fluorocytochemical

  18. Core Transcriptional Regulatory Circuit Controlled by the TAL1 Complex in Human T Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Sanda, Takaomi; Lawton, Lee N.; Barrasa, M. Inmaculada; Fan, Zi Peng; Kohlhammer, Holger; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Ma, Wenxue; Tatarek, Jessica; Ahn, Yebin; Kelliher, Michelle A.; Jamieson, Catriona H.M.; Staudt, Louis M.; Young, Richard A.; Look, A. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The oncogenic transcription factor TAL1/SCL is aberrantly expressed in over 40% of cases of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), emphasizing its importance in the molecular pathogenesis of T-ALL. Here we identify the core transcriptional regulatory circuit controlled by TAL1 and its regulatory partners HEB, E2A, LMO1/2, GATA3 and RUNX1. We show that TAL1 forms a positive interconnected auto-regulatory loop with GATA3 and RUNX1, and that the TAL1 complex directly activates the MY...

  19. Dynamic SPR monitoring of yeast nuclear protein binding to a cis-regulatory element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Grace; Brody, James P.

    2007-01-01

    Gene expression is controlled by protein complexes binding to short specific sequences of DNA, called cis-regulatory elements. Expression of most eukaryotic genes is controlled by dozens of these elements. Comprehensive identification and monitoring of these elements is a major goal of genomics. In pursuit of this goal, we are developing a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based assay to identify and monitor cis-regulatory elements. To test whether we could reliably monitor protein binding to a regulatory element, we immobilized a 16 bp region of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome 5 onto a gold surface. This 16 bp region of DNA is known to bind several proteins and thought to control expression of the gene RNR1, which varies through the cell cycle. We synchronized yeast cell cultures, and then sampled these cultures at a regular interval. These samples were processed to purify nuclear lysate, which was then exposed to the sensor. We found that nuclear protein binds this particular element of DNA at a significantly higher rate (as compared to unsynchronized cells) during G1 phase. Other time points show levels of DNA-nuclear protein binding similar to the unsynchronized control. We also measured the apparent association complex of the binding to be 0.014 s -1 . We conclude that (1) SPR-based assays can monitor DNA-nuclear protein binding and that (2) for this particular cis-regulatory element, maximum DNA-nuclear protein binding occurs during G1 phase

  20. RNA-Binding Proteins in Trichomonas vaginalis: Atypical Multifunctional Proteins Involved in a Posttranscriptional Iron Regulatory Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa E.; Calla-Choque, Jaeson S.; Mancilla-Olea, Maria Inocente; Arroyo, Rossana

    2015-01-01

    Iron homeostasis is highly regulated in vertebrates through a regulatory system mediated by RNA-protein interactions between the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that interact with an iron responsive element (IRE) located in certain mRNAs, dubbed the IRE-IRP regulatory system. Trichomonas vaginalis, the causal agent of trichomoniasis, presents high iron dependency to regulate its growth, metabolism, and virulence properties. Although T. vaginalis lacks IRPs or proteins with aconitase activity, possesses gene expression mechanisms of iron regulation at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. However, only one gene with iron regulation at the transcriptional level has been described. Recently, our research group described an iron posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism in the T. vaginalis tvcp4 and tvcp12 cysteine proteinase mRNAs. The tvcp4 and tvcp12 mRNAs have a stem-loop structure in the 5'-coding region or in the 3'-UTR, respectively that interacts with T. vaginalis multifunctional proteins HSP70, α-Actinin, and Actin under iron starvation condition, causing translation inhibition or mRNA stabilization similar to the previously characterized IRE-IRP system in eukaryotes. Herein, we summarize recent progress and shed some light on atypical RNA-binding proteins that may participate in the iron posttranscriptional regulation in T. vaginalis. PMID:26703754

  1. Therapeutic reactivation of protein phosphatase 2A in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha eRamaswamy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A is a serine/threonine phosphatase that is required for normal cell growth and development. PP2A is a potent tumor suppressor, which is inactivated in cancer cells as a result of genetic deletions and mutations. In myeloid leukemias, genes encoding PP2A subunits are generally intact. Instead, PP2A is functionally inhibited by post-translational modifications of its catalytic C subunit, and interactions with negative regulators by its regulatory B and scaffold A subunits. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of genetic and functional inactivation of PP2A in human cancers, with a particular focus on human acute myeloid leukemias (AML. By analyzing expression of genes encoding PP2A subunits using transcriptome sequencing, we find that PP2A dysregulation in AML is characterized by silencing and overexpression of distinct A scaffold and B regulatory subunits, respectively. We review the mechanisms of functional PP2A activation by drugs such as fingolimod, forskolin, OP449, and perphenazine. This analysis yields two non-mutually exclusive mechanisms for therapeutic PP2A re-activation: i allosteric activation of the phosphatase activity, and ii stabilization of active holo-enzyme assembly and displacement of negative regulatory factors from A and B subunits. Future studies should allow the development of specific and potent pharmacologic activators of PP2A, and definition of susceptible disease subsets based on specific mechanisms of PP2A dysregulation.

  2. Nasopharyngeal Protein Biomarkers of Acute Respiratory Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W. Burke

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Infection of respiratory mucosa with viral pathogens triggers complex immunologic events in the affected host. We sought to characterize this response through proteomic analysis of nasopharyngeal lavage in human subjects experimentally challenged with influenza A/H3N2 or human rhinovirus, and to develop targeted assays measuring peptides involved in this host response allowing classification of acute respiratory virus infection. Unbiased proteomic discovery analysis identified 3285 peptides corresponding to 438 unique proteins, and revealed that infection with H3N2 induces significant alterations in protein expression. These include proteins involved in acute inflammatory response, innate immune response, and the complement cascade. These data provide insights into the nature of the biological response to viral infection of the upper respiratory tract, and the proteins that are dysregulated by viral infection form the basis of signature that accurately classifies the infected state. Verification of this signature using targeted mass spectrometry in independent cohorts of subjects challenged with influenza or rhinovirus demonstrates that it performs with high accuracy (0.8623 AUROC, 75% TPR, 97.46% TNR. With further development as a clinical diagnostic, this signature may have utility in rapid screening for emerging infections, avoidance of inappropriate antibacterial therapy, and more rapid implementation of appropriate therapeutic and public health strategies.

  3. Cell-cycle regulatory proteins in human wound healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartkova, Jirina; Grøn, Birgitte; Dabelsteen, Erik

    2003-01-01

    ) and A, and reduced expression of cyclins D(3) and E, the cyclin D-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), the MCM7 component of DNA replication origin complexes and the retinoblastoma protein pRb. Among the CDK inhibitors (CKIs), p16ink4a and p21Cip1 were moderately increased and decreased, respectively, whereas...

  4. The regulatory effect of nucleoside diphosphate kinase on G-protein and G-protein mediated phospholipase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D; Chang, K

    1995-03-01

    The effect of nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) on the activity of guanine nucleotide regulatory protein (G-protein) mediated phospholipase C (PLC) and on the [35S] GTPT tau S binding of G-protein was investigated in this work in order to demonstrate the mechanism behind the regulation of G-protein and its effector PLC by NDPK. The stimulation of PLC in turkey erythrocyte membrane by both GTP and GTP tau S indicated that the PLC stimulation was mediated by G-protein. NDPK alone stimulated PLC activity, as well as the stimulation in the presence of GTP and GDP, in a dose-dependent manner. However, NDPK inhibited GTP tau S-stimulated PLC. Furthermore, NDPK inhibited [35S]GTP tau S binding of purified Gi-protein in a non-competitive manner. A hypothesis implying an important role of direct interaction of G-protein and NDPK in the regulation of their functions is suggested and discussed.

  5. Helios expression in regulatory T cells promotes immunosuppression, angiogenesis and the growth of leukemia cells in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Li, Dong; Huang, Xiaoyang; Zhou, Panpan; Shi, Qing; Zhang, Bing; Ju, Xiuli

    2018-04-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) characterized by the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) are crucial for maintaining immune tolerance and preventing autoimmunity. However, FoxP3 does not function alone and Helios is considered a potential candidate for defining Treg subsets. In this study, we investigated the expression and function of Helios for identifying Tregs in childhood precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (pre-B ALL). Our results demonstrated that patients with pre-B ALL had a higher percentage of Helios + FoxP3 + CD4 + Tregs. And there was a positive correlation between the expression of Helios and the suppressive function of Tregs, the risk gradation of ALL. Helios in combination with CD4 and FoxP3 may be an effective way to detect functional Tregs in pre-B ALL by promoting the secretion of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. Furthermore, Helios + Tregs could regulate angiogenesis in the BM niche of pre-B ALL via the VEGFA/VEGFR2 pathway. We also found Helios + Tregs decreased apoptosis rate of nalm-6 cells by up-regulating the expression of anti-apoptosis protein Bcl-2. In summary, these data strongly imply the physiological importance of Helios expression in Tregs, and suggest that the manipulation of Helios may serve as a novel strategy for cancer immunotherapy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The impact of RGS and other G-protein regulatory proteins on Gαi-mediated signaling in immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehrl, John H

    2016-08-15

    Leukocyte chemoattractant receptors are members of the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Signaling downstream of these receptors directs the localization, positioning and homeostatic trafficking of leukocytes; as well as their recruitment to, and their retention at, inflammatory sites. Ligand induced changes in the molecular conformation of chemoattractant receptors results in the engagement of heterotrimeric G-proteins, which promotes α subunits to undergo GTP/GDP exchange. This results in the functional release of βγ subunits from the heterotrimers, thereby activating downstream effector molecules, which initiate leukocyte polarization, gradient sensing, and directional migration. Pertussis toxin ADP ribosylates Gαi subunits and prevents chemoattractant receptors from triggering Gαi nucleotide exchange. The use of pertussis toxin revealed the essential importance of Gαi subunit nucleotide exchange for chemoattractant receptor signaling. More recent studies have identified a range of regulatory mechanisms that target these receptors and their associated heterotrimeric G-proteins, thereby helping to control the magnitude, kinetics, and duration of signaling. A failure in these regulatory pathways can lead to impaired receptor signaling and immunopathology. The analysis of mice with targeted deletions of Gαi isoforms as well as some of these G-protein regulatory proteins is providing insights into their roles in chemoattractant receptor signaling. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Acute phase proteins in cattle after exposure to complex stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomborg, S. R.; Nielsen, L. R.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Stressors such as weaning, mixing and transportation have been shown to lead to increased blood concentrations of acute phase proteins (APP), including serum amyloid A (SAA) and haptoglobin, in calves. This study was therefore undertaken to assess whether SAA and haptoglobin levels...... concentrations of SAA and haptoglobin increased significantly in response to the stressors (P...... in blood mirror stress in adult cattle. Six clinically healthy Holstein cows and two Holstein heifers were transported for four to six hours to a research facility, where each animal was housed in solitary tie stalls. Blood samples for evaluation of leukocyte counts and serum SAA and haptoglobin...

  8. Plant Kinesin-Like Calmodulin Binding Protein Employs Its Regulatory Domain for Dimerization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia V Vinogradova

    Full Text Available Kinesin-like calmodulin binding protein (KCBP, a Kinesin-14 family motor protein, is involved in the structural organization of microtubules during mitosis and trichome morphogenesis in plants. The molecular mechanism of microtubule bundling by KCBP remains unknown. KCBP binding to microtubules is regulated by Ca(2+-binding proteins that recognize its C-terminal regulatory domain. In this work, we have discovered a new function of the regulatory domain. We present a crystal structure of an Arabidopsis KCBP fragment showing that the C-terminal regulatory domain forms a dimerization interface for KCBP. This dimerization site is distinct from the dimerization interface within the N-terminal domain. Side chains of hydrophobic residues of the calmodulin binding helix of the regulatory domain form the C-terminal dimerization interface. Biochemical experiments show that another segment of the regulatory domain located beyond the dimerization interface, its negatively charged coil, is unexpectedly and absolutely required to stabilize the dimers. The strong microtubule bundling properties of KCBP are unaffected by deletion of the C-terminal regulatory domain. The slow minus-end directed motility of KCBP is also unchanged in vitro. Although the C-terminal domain is not essential for microtubule bundling, we suggest that KCBP may use its two independent dimerization interfaces to support different types of bundled microtubule structures in cells. Two distinct dimerization sites may provide a mechanism for microtubule rearrangement in response to Ca(2+ signaling since Ca(2+- binding proteins can disengage KCBP dimers dependent on its C-terminal dimerization interface.

  9. Investigating the microRNA-mRNA regulatory network in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiguo; Zhang, Chengfang; Feng, Rui; Zhang, Haixia; Gao, Min; Ye, Ling

    2017-10-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a common myelogenous malignancy in adults that is often characterized by disease relapse. The pathophysiological mechanism of AML has not yet been elucidated. The present study aimed to identify the crucial microRNAs (miRNAs/miRs) and target genes in AML, and to uncover the potential oncogenic mechanism of AML. miRNA and mRNA expression-profiling microarray datasets were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Differential expression analysis was performed and a regulatory network between miRNAs and target genes was constructed. Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway enrichment analyses were used to predict the biological functions of the differentially expressed genes. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis was employed to verify the expression levels of miRNAs and target genes in AML patient samples. A total of 86 differentially expressed miRNAs and 468 differentially expressed mRNAs between AML and healthy blood samples were identified. In total, 47 miRNAs and 401 mRNAs were found to be upregulated, and 39 miRNAs and 67 mRNAs were found to be downregulated in AML. A total of 223 miRNA-target genes pairs were subjected to the construction of a regulatory network. Differentially expressed target genes were significantly enriched in the Wnt signaling pathway (hsa04310), melanogenesis (hsa04916) and pathways in cancer (hsa05200). Significantly differentially expressed miRNAs and genes, including hsa-miR-155, hsa-miR-192, annexin A2 ( ANXA2 ), frizzled class receptor 3 ( FZD3 ), and pleomorphic adenoma gene 1 ( PLAG1 ), may serve essential roles in AML oncogenesis. Overall, hsa-miR-155, hsa-miR-192, ANXA2 , FZD3 and PLAG1 may be associated with the development of AML via the involvement of the Wnt signaling pathway, melanogenesis and other cancer-associated signaling pathways.

  10. Protein C deficiency in a patient of acute myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamzeed Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A 42-year old male presented with acute myocardial infarction with no discernable risk factors; he never smoked; did not suffer from diabetes and had a well controlled blood pressure with single medication; plasma concentration of total cholesterol was on the upper normal limit, high and low density lipoprotein, cholesterol and triglyceride being normal. In addition to a single antihypertensive he received Allupurinol(Xanthine Oxidase inhibitorfor hyperuricaemia. Coronary angiogram revealed ectatic epicardial coronary arteries. The patient developed deep vein thrombosis of right leg after four days of the coronary angiogram. Coagulation analysis revealed protein C deficiency. The recognition of protein C deficiency as a risk factor for myocardial infarction is important as anticoagulators prevent further thrombotic events whereas inhibitors of platelet aggregation are ineffective. Ibrahim Med. Coll. J. 2009; 3(1: 34-35

  11. Anti-thrombin III, Protein C, and Protein S deficiency in acute coronary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasnan Ismail

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The final most common pathway for the majority of coronary artery disease is occlusion of a coronary vessel. Under normal conditions, antithrombin III (AT III, protein C, and protein S as an active protein C cofactor, are natural anticoagulants (hemostatic control that balances procoagulant activity (thrombin antithrombin complex balance to prevent thrombosis. If the condition becomes unbalanced, natural anticoagulants and the procoagulants can lead to thrombosis. Thirty subjects with acute coronary syndrome (ACS were studied for the incidence of antithrombin III (AT III, protein C, and protein S deficiencies, and the result were compare to the control group. Among patients with ACS, the frequency of distribution of AT-III with activity < 75% were 23,3% (7 of 30, and only 6,7% ( 2 of 30 in control subject. No one of the 30 control subject have protein C activity deficient, in ACS with activity < 70% were 13,3% (4 of 30. Fifteen out of the 30 (50% control subjects had protein S activity deficiency, while protein S deficiency activity < 70% was found 73.3.% (22 out of 30. On linear regression, the deterministic coefficient of AT-III activity deficiency to the development ACS was 13,25 %, and the deterministic coefficient of protein C activity deficient to the development of ACS was 9,06 %. The cut-off point for AT-III without protein S deficiency expected to contribute to the development of vessel disease was 45%. On discriminant analysis, protein C activity deficiency posed a risk for ACS of 4,5 greater than non deficient subjects, and AT-III activity deficiency posed a risk for ACS of 3,5 times greater than non deficient subjects. On binary logistic regression, protein S activity acted only as a reinforcing factor of AT-III activity deficiency in the development of ACS. Protein C and AT III deficiency can trigger ACS, with determinant coefficients of 9,06% and 13,25% respectively. Low levels of protein C posed a greater risk of

  12. Making Sense of Multifunctional Proteins: Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Accessory and Regulatory Proteins and Connections to Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Tyler B; Binning, Jennifer M; Gross, John D; Frankel, Alan D

    2017-09-29

    Viruses are completely dependent upon cellular machinery to support replication and have therefore developed strategies to co-opt cellular processes to optimize infection and counter host immune defenses. Many viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), encode a relatively small number of genes. Viruses with limited genetic content often encode multifunctional proteins that function at multiple stages of the viral replication cycle. In this review, we discuss the functions of HIV-1 regulatory (Tat and Rev) and accessory (Vif, Vpr, Vpu, and Nef) proteins. Each of these proteins has a highly conserved primary activity; however, numerous additional activities have been attributed to these viral proteins. We explore the possibility that HIV-1 proteins leverage their multifunctional nature to alter host transcriptional networks to elicit a diverse set of cellular responses. Although these transcriptional effects appear to benefit the virus, it is not yet clear whether they are strongly selected for during viral evolution or are a ripple effect from the primary function. As our detailed knowledge of these viral proteins improves, we will undoubtedly uncover how the multifunctional nature of these HIV-1 regulatory and accessory proteins, and in particular their transcriptional functions, work to drive viral pathogenesis.

  13. Cell-cycle regulatory proteins in human wound healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartkova, Jirina; Grøn, Birgitte; Dabelsteen, Erik

    2003-01-01

    the abundance of most of the CKIs, including p27Kip1, p57Kip2, p15ink4b and p18ink4c, was relatively maintained in the migrating epithelial tongue. These data indicate that downmodulation of several G(1)/S-phase cyclins and a relative excess of CKIs may cooperate to ensure the quiescent state of migrating......-cycle regulators critical for G(1)-phase progression and S-phase entry was here analysed immunohistochemically. Compared to normal human mucosa, epithelia migrating to cover 2- or 3-day-old wounds made either in vivo or in an organotypic cell culture all showed loss of the proliferation marker Ki67 and cyclins D(1......) and A, and reduced expression of cyclins D(3) and E, the cyclin D-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), the MCM7 component of DNA replication origin complexes and the retinoblastoma protein pRb. Among the CDK inhibitors (CKIs), p16ink4a and p21Cip1 were moderately increased and decreased, respectively, whereas...

  14. Decreased Helios Expression in Regulatory T Cells in Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs play an essential role in acute coronary syndrome (ACS. However, there is debate about which Treg subsets are truly critical to ACS. Helios, a transcription factor, was recently reported to be a bona fide marker for natural Tregs or activated Tregs with a suppression function, but little is known about its role in ACS. We therefore examined Helios+ Tregs in patients with ACS, patients with stable angina, and control subjects. 73 patients with ACS, 30 patients with stable angina, and 48 control subjects were enrolled. The frequencies and estimated absolute numbers of different Treg subsets in peripheral blood were measured by flow cytometry. Plasma cytokine level was measured by ELISA. The mRNA expression of Foxp3 and Helios in purified CD4+ T cells was determined by RT-PCR. Helios+ Tregs was decreased significantly in patients with ACS. The frequency and estimated absolute numbers of CD4+Foxp3+Helios+ Tregs were negatively correlated with IL-6 and positively correlated with circulating level of TGF-beta1 and HDL-C. The mRNA expression of Foxp3 and Helios was decreased in CD4+ T cells from patients with ACS. In summary, Helios+ Tregs was downregulated in patients with ACS and may play a role in ACS.

  15. Regulatory T cells in acute myelogenous leukemia: is it time for immunomodulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustun, Celalettin; Miller, Jeffrey S; Munn, David H; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Blazar, Bruce R

    2011-11-10

    The microenviroment of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is suppressive for immune effector cells. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been recognized as a contributor factor and may be recruited and exploited by leukemic cells to evade immunesurveillance. Studies have shown that the frequencies of marrow and blood Tregs are greater in patients with AML than in control patients. Although increased Tregs have been associated with a decreased risk of GVHD after allogeneic HCT and hence may impede the graft-versus-tumor effect, recent findings indicate that that this may not be the case. Because there is a need to improve outcomes of standard treatment (chemotherapy with or without allogeneic HCT) in AML, targeting Tregs present an outstanding opportunity in AML because discoveries may apply throughout its treatment. Here, we review data on the roles of Tregs in mediating immune system-AML interactions. We focused on in vitro, animal, and observational human studies of Tregs in AML biology, development, prognosis, and therapy in different settings (eg, vaccination and HCT). Manipulation of Tregs or other types of immunomodulation may become a part of AML treatment in the future.

  16. Regulatory T cells-derived IL-35 promotes the growth of adult acute myeloid leukemia blasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Qianshan; Pan, Ying; Wang, Yiping; Wang, Huiping; Xiong, Shudao; Li, Qing; Wang, Jia; Tao, Lili; Wang, Zhitao; Wu, Fan; Zhang, Rui; Zhai, Zhimin

    2015-11-15

    Tumor immune escape mechanism mediated by CD4+CD25+regulatory T cells (Tregs) is a key factor in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). IL-35, as a novel inhibitory cytokine, is produced by Tregs specially and regulates functions of Tregs in murine. However, IL-35 expression of Tregs in human is still disputed, and its role in AML is yet to be elucidated. In this study, we found that IL-35 was expressed highly in peripheral blood plasma of adult patients with AML and significantly correlated with the clinical stages of malignancy. Tregs-derived from adult AML patients produced IL-35 in a stimulation-dependent manner. IL-35 promoted AML blasts immune escape by expanding Tregs and inhibiting CD4+CD25-effector T cells (Teffs). Furthermore, IL-35 directly promoted the proliferation of AML blasts and reduced the apoptosis of AML blasts. Together, our study demonstrates that IL-35-derived from Tregs promotes the growth of adult AML blasts, suggesting that IL-35 has an important role in the pathogenesis of AML. © 2015 UICC.

  17. Ceruloplasmin: Macromolecular Assemblies with Iron-Containing Acute Phase Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samygina, Valeriya R.; Sokolov, Alexey V.; Bourenkov, Gleb; Petoukhov, Maxim V.; Pulina, Maria O.; Zakharova, Elena T.; Vasilyev, Vadim B.; Bartunik, Hans; Svergun, Dmitri I.

    2013-01-01

    Copper-containing ferroxidase ceruloplasmin (Cp) forms binary and ternary complexes with cationic proteins lactoferrin (Lf) and myeloperoxidase (Mpo) during inflammation. We present an X-ray crystal structure of a 2Cp-Mpo complex at 4.7 Å resolution. This structure allows one to identify major protein–protein interaction areas and provides an explanation for a competitive inhibition of Mpo by Cp and for the activation of p-phenylenediamine oxidation by Mpo. Small angle X-ray scattering was employed to construct low-resolution models of the Cp-Lf complex and, for the first time, of the ternary 2Cp-2Lf-Mpo complex in solution. The SAXS-based model of Cp-Lf supports the predicted 1∶1 stoichiometry of the complex and demonstrates that both lobes of Lf contact domains 1 and 6 of Cp. The 2Cp-2Lf-Mpo SAXS model reveals the absence of interaction between Mpo and Lf in the ternary complex, so Cp can serve as a mediator of protein interactions in complex architecture. Mpo protects antioxidant properties of Cp by isolating its sensitive loop from proteases. The latter is important for incorporation of Fe3+ into Lf, which activates ferroxidase activity of Cp and precludes oxidation of Cp substrates. Our models provide the structural basis for possible regulatory role of these complexes in preventing iron-induced oxidative damage. PMID:23843990

  18. Low protein alimentation normalizes renal haemodynamic response to acute protein ingestion in type 1 diabetic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellino, P; De Santo, N G; Capasso, G; Anastasio, P; Coppola, S; Capodicasa, G; Perna, A; Torella, R; Salvatore, T; Giordano, C

    1989-02-01

    The effect of an acute protein load (2 g kg-1 bodyweight [BW]) was studied in nine type 1 diabetic children. Patients were maintained on two different dietary regimens. In study one, patients were on a high protein diet providing from 2.7 to 1.8 g of protein/kg of BW per day. In study two, patients were reevaluated after three weeks of a diet providing from 1.0 to 1.2 g kg-1 of BW per day of protein. In study one (High Protein Diet), we failed to observe any rise in GFR and RPF following the protein meal (137 +/- 21 basal vs. 110 +/- 14 and 472 +/- 93 basal vs. 494 +/- 93 ml/1.73 m2 of SA min-1 at 60 min. This is in contrast with results from seven age matched controls consuming a free diet, which showed a significant rise in both GFR and RPF. In study two (low protein diet), basal GFR was significantly reduced. However after the protein load, both GFR (92 +/- 11 vs. 126 +/- 18 ml/1.73 m2 of SA min-1) and RPF (467 +/- 83 vs. 705 +/- 102 ml/1.73 m2 min-1) rose significantly (P less than 0.05 vs. basal). The data indicate that: 1. short term protein restriction reduces significantly GFR in type 1 diabetic children; 2. diabetic children maintained on an high protein intake show an altered haemodynamic response to protein ingestion; 3. a normal response to protein ingestion can be restored by short term dietary protein restriction.

  19. Type 2 diabetes mellitus with early phase acute inflammatory protein on serum protein electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ET Tuladhar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The onset of Type 2 diabetes has been associated with low grade systemic inflammation. The inflammatory status has been studied by measuring acute phase reactant proteins like hsCRP, α1- antitrypsin, α1-acid glycoprotein, ceruloplasmin, fibrinogen. Most of these acute phase reactants form α1 and α2 bands on electropherogram of serum proteins. The aim of this study was to evaluate inflammatory status in controlled and uncontrolled type 2 diabetes using cellulose acetate electrophoresis and to find the impact of glycemic status as indicated by HbA1c on inflammation process. Materials and Methods: Serum protein electrophoresis was done on serum samples of 60 cases of Diabetes [controlled and uncontrolled] using cellulose acetate paper technique. The electropherogram obtained was stained with Ponseu S and then quantitated using densitometer. Glycemic status was studied by HbA1c analysis. The density of α1and α2 bands in electropherogram were correlated with HbA1c level. Result: A significant increase in the percentage of α1 and α2 band proteins (0.765 and 0.716, p<0.001 were found with the increasing level of HbA1c. With cutoff of HbA1c 7% (American Diabetic Association recommended, the α1 and α2 serum proteins concentration are significantly higher (p<0.001 in uncontrolled diabetes mellitus compared to controlled diabetes mellitus Conclusion: Cellulose acetate electrophoresis of serum proteins show early phase acute inflammatory status in uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus. The process of systemic inflammation worsens with uncontrolled glycemia as indicated by HbA1c. Inflammatory status should be studied adjunct to glycemic status. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jpn.v2i3.6024 JPN 2012; 2(3: 211-214

  20. Functional modification of the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein after desensitization of turkey erythrocytes by catecholamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, M M; Stadel, J M; Iyengar, R; Lefkowitz, R J

    1983-07-01

    Densensitization of turkey erythrocytes by exposure to the beta-adrenergic agonist (-)isoproterenol leads to decreased activation of adenylate cyclase by agonist, NaF, and guanyl-5'-yl imido diphosphate, with no reduction in the number of beta-adrenergic receptors. Interactions between the receptor and the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein (N protein) also seem to be impaired. These observations suggest that a component distal to the beta-adrenergic receptor may be a locus of modification. Accordingly we examined the N protein to determine whether it was altered by desensitization. The rate at which (-)isoproterenol stimulated the release of [3H]GDP from the N protein was substantially lower in membranes prepared from desensitized cells, providing further evidence for uncoupling of the receptor and the N protein. The amount of N protein in membranes from control and desensitized cells was compared by labeling the 42,000 Mr component of the N protein with [32P]NAD+ and cholera toxin; no significant difference was found. However, significantly more N protein (p less than .001) was solubilized by cholate extraction of desensitized membranes, suggesting an altered association of the N protein with the membrane after desensitization. The functional activity of the N protein was measured by reconstitution of cholate extracts of turkey erythrocyte membranes into S49 lymphoma cyc- membranes. Reconstitution of (-)isoproterenol stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity was reduced significantly (p less than .05) after desensitization. These observations suggest that desensitization of the turkey erythrocyte by (-)isoproterenol results in functional modifications of the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein, leading to impaired interactions with the beta-adrenergic receptor and reduced activation of adenylate cyclase.

  1. Core transcriptional regulatory circuit controlled by the TAL1 complex in human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanda, Takaomi; Lawton, Lee N; Barrasa, M Inmaculada; Fan, Zi Peng; Kohlhammer, Holger; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Ma, Wenxue; Tatarek, Jessica; Ahn, Yebin; Kelliher, Michelle A; Jamieson, Catriona H M; Staudt, Louis M; Young, Richard A; Look, A Thomas

    2012-08-14

    The oncogenic transcription factor TAL1/SCL is aberrantly expressed in over 40% of cases of human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), emphasizing its importance in the molecular pathogenesis of T-ALL. Here we identify the core transcriptional regulatory circuit controlled by TAL1 and its regulatory partners HEB, E2A, LMO1/2, GATA3, and RUNX1. We show that TAL1 forms a positive interconnected autoregulatory loop with GATA3 and RUNX1 and that the TAL1 complex directly activates the MYB oncogene, forming a positive feed-forward regulatory loop that reinforces and stabilizes the TAL1-regulated oncogenic program. One of the critical downstream targets in this circuitry is the TRIB2 gene, which is oppositely regulated by TAL1 and E2A/HEB and is essential for the survival of T-ALL cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Structural studies of bacterial transcriptional regulatory proteins by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkman, Brian Finley [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to elucidate detailed structural information for peptide and protein molecules. A small peptide was designed and synthesized, and its three-dimensional structure was calculated using distance information derived from two-dimensional NMR measurements. The peptide was used to induce antibodies in mice, and the cross-reactivity of the antibodies with a related protein was analyzed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Two proteins which are involved in regulation of transcription in bacteria were also studied. The ferric uptake regulation (Fur) protein is a metal-dependent repressor which controls iron uptake in bacteria. Two- and three-dimensional NMR techniques, coupled with uniform and selective isotope labeling allowed the nearly complete assignment of the resonances of the metal-binding domain of the Fur protein. NTRC is a transcriptional enhancer binding protein whose N-terminal domain is a "receiver domain" in the family of "two-component" regulatory systems. Phosphorylation of the N-terminal domain of NTRC activates the initiation of transcription of aeries encoding proteins involved in nitrogen regulation. Three- and four-dimensional NMR spectroscopy methods have been used to complete the resonance assignments and determine the solution structure of the N-terminal receiver domain of the NTRC protein. Comparison of the solution structure of the NTRC receiver domain with the crystal structures of the homologous protein CheY reveals a very similar fold, with the only significant difference being the position of helix 4 relative to the rest of the protein. The determination of the structure of the NTRC receiver domain is the first step toward understanding a mechanism of signal transduction which is common to many bacterial regulatory systems.

  3. Overexpression of KH-type splicing regulatory protein regulates proliferation, migration, and implantation ability of osteosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruksakorn, Dumnoensun; Teeyakasem, Pimpisa; Klangjorhor, Jeerawan; Chaiyawat, Parunya; Settakorn, Jongkolnee; Diskul-Na-Ayudthaya, Penchatr; Chokchaichamnankit, Daranee; Pothacharoen, Peraphan; Srisomsap, Chantragan

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a common malignant bone tumor in children and adolescents. The current 5-year survival rate is ~60% and that seems to be reaching a plateau. In order to improve treatment outcomes of osteosarcoma, a better understanding of tumorigenesis and underlying molecular mechanisms is required for searching out possible new treatment targets. This study aimed to identify the potential proteins involving the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma using a proteomics approach. Proteins extracted from primary cell culture of osteosarcoma (n=7) and osteoblasts of cancellous bone (n=7) were studied. Using 2-DE based proteomics and LC-MS/MS analysis, we successfully determined seven differentially expressed protein spots. Four upregulated proteins and three downregulated proteins were observed in this study in which KH-type splicing regulatory protein (KSRP) was selected for further exploration. KSRP was significantly upregulated in osteosarcoma cells compared to osteoblasts using western blot assay. In addition, immunohistochemistry demonstrated that KSRP was also highly expressed in osteosarcoma tissue of independent cases from the experimental group. More importantly, KSRP silencing of osteosarcoma cell lines significantly decreased cell proliferation, migration ability, as well as implantation and growth ability in chick chorioallantoic membrane assay. Taken together, these findings demonstrate, that KSRP plays important roles in regulatory controls of osteosarcoma pathogenesis and serves as a potentially therapeutic target of osteosarcoma. PMID:27573585

  4. Role of regulatory T cells in acute myeloid leukemia patients undergoing relapse-preventive immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Frida Ewald; Nilsson, Malin; Rydström, Anna; Aurelius, Johan; Riise, Rebecca E; Movitz, Charlotta; Bernson, Elin; Kiffin, Roberta; Ståhlberg, Anders; Brune, Mats; Foà, Robin; Hellstrand, Kristoffer; Thorén, Fredrik B; Martner, Anna

    2017-11-01

    Regulatory T cells (T regs ) have been proposed to dampen functions of anti-neoplastic immune cells and thus promote cancer progression. In a phase IV trial (Re:Mission Trial, NCT01347996, http://www.clinicaltrials.gov ) 84 patients (age 18-79) with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR) received ten consecutive 3-week cycles of immunotherapy with histamine dihydrochloride (HDC) and low-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) to prevent relapse of leukemia in the post-consolidation phase. This study aimed at defining the features, function and dynamics of Foxp3 + CD25 high CD4 + T regs during immunotherapy and to determine the potential impact of T regs on relapse risk and survival. We observed a pronounced increase in T reg counts in peripheral blood during initial cycles of HDC/IL-2. The accumulating T regs resembled thymic-derived natural T regs (nT regs ), showed augmented expression of CTLA-4 and suppressed the cell cycle proliferation of conventional T cells ex vivo. Relapse of AML was not prognosticated by T reg counts at onset of treatment or after the first cycle of immunotherapy. However, the magnitude of T reg induction was diminished in subsequent treatment cycles. Exploratory analyses implied that a reduced expansion of T regs in later treatment cycles and a short T reg telomere length were significantly associated with a favorable clinical outcome. Our results suggest that immunotherapy with HDC/IL-2 in AML entails induction of immunosuppressive T regs that may be targeted for improved anti-leukemic efficiency.

  5. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and regulatory T cells in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Iman; Zayed, Rania A; Said, Fadwa; Latif, Lamyaa Abdel

    2016-09-01

    The microenvironment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is suppressive for immune cells. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been recognized to play a role in helping leukemic cells to evade immunesurveillance. The mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are essential contributors in immunomodulation of the microenvironment as they can promote differentiation of Tregs via the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) pathway. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the expression of IDO in bone marrow derived MSCs and to study its correlation to percentage of Tregs. Thirty-seven adult bone marrow samples were cultured in appropriate culture medium to isolate MSCs. Successful harvest of MSCs was determined by plastic adherence, morphology, and positive expression of CD271 and CD105; negative expression of CD34 and CD45 using flowcytometry. MSCs were examined for IDO expression by immunocytochemistry using anti-IDO monoclonal antibody. CD4+ CD25+ cells (Tregs) were measured in bone marrow samples by flowcytometry. MSCs were successfully isolated from 20 of the 37 bone marrow samples cultured. MSCs showed higher expression of IDO and Tregs percentage was higher in AML patients compared to control subjects (P = 0.002 and P < 0.001, respectively). A positive correlation was found between IDO expression and Tregs percentage (P value = 0.012, r = 0.5). In this study, we revealed an association between high IDO expression in MSCs and elevated levels of Tregs which could have an important role in the pathogenesis of AML, providing immunosuppressive microenvironment.

  6. Green fluorescent protein transgene driven by Kit regulatory sequences is expressed in hematopoietic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Cerisoli, Francesco; Cassinelli, Letizia; Lamorte, Giuseppe; Citterio, Stefania; Bertolotti, Francesca; Magli, Maria Cristina; Ottolenghi, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    The expression of Kit in multiple types of stem cells suggests that common transcriptional programs might regulate this gene in different stem cells. In this work, the authors used mouse lines expressing transgenic green fluorescent protein under the control of Kit promoter/first intron regulatory elements. This study provides the basis for the elucidation of DNA sequences regulating a stem cell gene in multiple types of stem cells.

  7. Acute Phase Proteins and Variables of Protein Metabolism in Dairy Cows during the Pre- and Postpartal Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cs. Tóthová

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to compare the concentrations of acute phase proteins and selected variables of protein metabolism in dairy cows of the Slovak Spotted breed from 4 weeks before parturition to 10 weeks after parturition. Acute phase proteins - haptoglobin (Hp and serum amyloid A (SAA - and variables of protein metabolism - total proteins, albumin, urea, creatinine, total immunoglobulins - were evaluated in blood serum. Significant differences were found in average values of the Hp and SAA concentrations in several groups during the monitored period (P P P P P P P P P < 0.001. The above mentioned results indicate that in the time around parturition there are significant changes in concentrations of acute phase proteins, as well as in the whole protein metabolism of dairy cows. These facts suggest that the postparturient period is a critical biological phase, throughout which there is the highest incidence of metabolic disorders.

  8. Early lymphocyte recovery after intensive timed sequential chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia: peripheral oligoclonal expansion of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakry, Christopher G; Hess, Allan D; Gocke, Christopher D; Thoburn, Christopher; Kos, Ferdynand; Meyer, Christian; Briel, Janet; Luznik, Leo; Smith, B Douglas; Levitsky, Hyam; Karp, Judith E

    2011-01-13

    Few published studies characterize early lymphocyte recovery after intensive chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). To test the hypothesis that lymphocyte recovery mirrors ontogeny, we characterized early lymphocyte recovery in 20 consecutive patients undergoing induction timed sequential chemotherapy for newly diagnosed AML. Recovering T lymphocytes were predominantly CD4(+) and included a greatly expanded population of CD3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T cells. Recovering CD3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T cells were phenotypically activated regulatory T cells and showed suppressive activity on cytokine production in a mixed lymphocyte reaction. Despite an initial burst of thymopoiesis, most recovering regulatory T cells were peripherally derived. Furthermore, regulatory T cells showed marked oligoclonal skewing, suggesting that their peripheral expansion was antigen-driven. Overall, lymphocyte recovery after chemotherapy differs from ontogeny, specifically identifying a peripherally expanded oligoclonal population of activated regulatory T lymphocytes. These differences suggest a stereotyped immunologic recovery shared by patients with newly diagnosed AML after induction timed sequential chemotherapy. Further insight into this oligoclonal regulatory T-cell population will be fundamental toward developing effective immunomodulatory techniques to improve survival for patients with AML.

  9. Lanosterol metabolism and sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) expression in male germ cell maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fon Tacer, Klementina; Kalanj-Bognar, Svjetlana; Waterman, Michael R; Rozman, Damjana

    2003-06-01

    Expression of genes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis in male germ cells is insensitive to the negative cholesterol feedback regulation, in contrast to cholesterol level-sensitive/sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-dependent gene regulation in somatic cells. The role of sterol regulatory element binding proteins in spermatogenic cells was an enigma until recently, when a soluble, 55kDa cholesterol-insensitive form of SREBP2 (SREBP2gc) was discovered [Mol. Cell. Endocrinol. 22 (2002) 8478], being translated from a germ cell-specific SREBP2 mRNA. Our RT-PCR results also show that SREBP2 as well as SREBP1c mRNAs are detectable in prepubertal and postpubertal male germ cells while SREBP1a is not detected. Surprisingly, three SREBP2 immunoreactive proteins (72, 63 and 55kDa), that are not present in mouse liver nuclei, reside in testis nuclei of prepubertal and adult mice. The 55kDa protein is likely SREBP2gc, the other two isoforms are novel. HPLC measurements in liver and testes of fasted prepubertal and postpubertal mice showed no significant difference in cholesterol level. However, FF-MAS and lanosterol/testis-meiosis activating sterol (T-MAS) intermediates that are detectable mainly in testes, increase in fasted postpubertal mice which coincides well with the elevated level of 68kDa SREBP2. Similar to SREBP2gc, the two novel SREBP2 immunoreactive proteins seem to be insensitive to the level of cholesterol.

  10. S-40: Acute Phase Protein Increse in High Altitude Mountaineers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Saka

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available “Erciyes Tigers” are an elite group of high altitude climbers. They have been climbing ErciyesMountain (3500 m, in Kayseri, Turkey once a week at least for ten years. When they climb Erciyes in winter, they also take a snow bath. This study investigated the effects of regular high altitude climbing on the metabolic and hematological responses of mountaineers. Venous blood samples were taken to investigate hematological, biochemical parameters and some hormone values from 21 mountaineers and 16 healthy age-matched sedentary volunteers at resting condition. The neutrophil/lymphocyte (N/L ratio was calculated. The N/L was associated with an increased risk of long-term mortality and it could provide a good measure of exercise stress and subsequent recovery. Most of the hematological and biochemical parameters i.e., erythrocyte, leukocyte, hemoglobin and hematocrit values did not change significantly. The neutrophil to lymphocyte (N/L ratio was significantly (p<0.04 decreased in the mountaineer compared with the sedentary group. Total protein (p<0.000 and albumin (0.001 were lower, while ferritin (p<0.04, creatine (p<0.03 and creatine phosphokinase levels (p<0.01 were higher in mountaineers. Our results show that regular high altitude climbing increased serum levels of some acute-phase proteins and these increments were not transient.

  11. Regulatory pathways for ATP-binding cassette transport proteins in kidney proximal tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Russel, Frans G M

    2012-12-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transport proteins (ABC transporters) represent important determinants of drug excretion. Protective or excretory tissues where these transporters mediate substrate efflux include the kidney proximal tubule. Regulation of the transport proteins in this tissue requires elaborate signaling pathways, including genetic, epigenetic, nuclear receptor mediated, posttranscriptional gene regulation involving microRNAs, and non-genomic (kinases) pathways triggered by hormones and/or growth factors. This review discusses current knowledge on regulatory pathways for ABC transporters in kidney proximal tubules, with a main focus on P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance proteins 2 and 4, and breast cancer resistance protein. Insight in these processes is of importance because variations in transporter activity due to certain (disease) conditions could lead to significant changes in drug efficacy or toxicity.

  12. The porcine acute phase response to infection with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. Haptoglobin, C-reactive protein, major acute phase protein and serum amyloid a protein are sensitive indicators of infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Klausen, Joan; Nielsen, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    , kinetics of induction and normalization were different between these proteins. It is concluded that experimental Ap-infection by the aerosol route induces a typical acute phase reaction in the pig, and that pig Hp, CRP, MAP, and SAA are major acute phase reactants. These findings indicate the possibility......In an experimental infection model mimicking acute Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (Ap) infection in swine (Sus scrofa) by aerosol inoculation, the development of a number of typical clinical signs was accompanied by a prototypic acute phase reaction encompassing fever and an acute phase protein...... response peaking at around 2 days after infection. Haptoglobin, C-reactive protein (CRP), and major acute phase protein (MAP) responded with large increases in serum levels, preceding the development of specific antibodies by 4-5 days. Serum amyloid A protein (SAA) was also strongly induced. The increase...

  13. Regulatory Activities of Four ArsR Proteins in Agrobacterium tumefaciens 5A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yoon-Suk; Brame, Keenan; Jetter, Jonathan; Bothner, Brian B; Wang, Gejiao; Thiyagarajan, Saravanamuthu; McDermott, Timothy R

    2016-06-15

    ArsR is a well-studied transcriptional repressor that regulates microbe-arsenic interactions. Most microorganisms have an arsR gene, but in cases where multiple copies exist, the respective roles or potential functional overlap have not been explored. We examined the repressors encoded by arsR1 and arsR2 (ars1 operon) and by arsR3 and arsR4 (ars2 operon) in Agrobacterium tumefaciens 5A. ArsR1 and ArsR4 are very similar in their primary sequences and diverge phylogenetically from ArsR2 and ArsR3, which are also quite similar to one another. Reporter constructs (lacZ) for arsR1, arsR2, and arsR4 were all inducible by As(III), but expression of arsR3 (monitored by reverse transcriptase PCR) was not influenced by As(III) and appeared to be linked transcriptionally to an upstream lysR-type gene. Experiments using a combination of deletion mutations and additional reporter assays illustrated that the encoded repressors (i) are not all autoregulatory as is typically known for ArsR proteins, (ii) exhibit variable control of each other's encoding genes, and (iii) exert variable control of other genes previously shown to be under the control of ArsR1. Furthermore, ArsR2, ArsR3, and ArsR4 appear to have an activator-like function for some genes otherwise repressed by ArsR1, which deviates from the well-studied repressor role of ArsR proteins. The differential regulatory activities suggest a complex regulatory network not previously observed in ArsR studies. The results indicate that fine-scale ArsR sequence deviations of the reiterated regulatory proteins apparently translate to different regulatory roles. Given the significance of the ArsR repressor in regulating various aspects of microbe-arsenic interactions, it is important to assess potential regulatory overlap and/or interference when a microorganism carries multiple copies of arsR This study explores this issue and shows that the four arsR genes in A. tumefaciens 5A, associated with two separate ars operons, encode

  14. Ca2+-regulatory proteins in cardiomyocytes from the right ventricle in children with congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Yihe

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoxia and hypertrophy are the most frequent pathophysiological consequence of congenital heart disease (CHD which can induce the alteration of Ca2+-regulatory proteins and inhibit cardiac contractility. Few studies have been performed to examine Ca2+-regulatory proteins in human cardiomyocytes from the hypertrophic right ventricle with or without hypoxia. Methods Right ventricle tissues were collected from children with tetralogy of Fallot [n = 25, hypoxia and hypertrophy group (HH group], pulmonary stenosis [n = 25, hypertrophy group (H group], or small isolated ventricular septal defect [n = 25, control group (C group] during open-heart surgery. Paraffin sections of tissues were stained with 3,3′-dioctadecyloxacarbocyanine perchlorate to measure cardiomyocyte size. Expression levels of Ca2+-regulatory proteins [sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2a, ryanodine receptor (RyR2, sodiumcalcium exchanger (NCX, sarcolipin (SLN and phospholamban (PLN] were analysed by means of real-time PCR, western blot, or immunofluorescence. Additionally, phosphorylation level of RyR and PLN and activity of protein phosphatase (PP1 were evaluated using western blot. Results Mild cardiomyocyte hypertrophy of the right ventricle in H and HH groups was confirmed by comparing cardiomyocyte size. A significant reduction of SERCA2a in mRNA (P16-phosphorylated PLN was down-regulated (PP Conclusions The decreased SERCA2a mRNA may be a biomarker of the pathological process in the early stage of cyanotic CHD with the hypertrophic right ventricle. A combination of hypoxia and hypertrophy can induce the adverse effect of PLN-Ser16 dephosphorylation. Increased PP1 could result in the decreased PLN-Ser16 and inhibition of PP1 is a potential therapeutic target for heart dysfunction in pediatrics.

  15. Differential recruitment of co-regulatory proteins to the human estrogen receptor 1 in response to xenoestrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L Cody; Clark, Jessica C; Bisesi, Joseph H; Ferguson, P Lee; Sabo-Attwood, Tara

    2016-09-01

    The diverse biological effects of xenoestrogens may be explained by their ability to differentially recruit co-regulatory proteins to the estrogen receptor (ER). We employed high-throughput receptor affinity binding and co-regulatory protein recruitment screening assays based on fluorescence polarization and time resolved florescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET), respectively, to assess xenoestrogen-specific binding and co-regulatory protein recruitment to the ER. Then we used a functional proteomic assay based on co-immunoprecipitation of ER-bound proteins to isolate and identify intact co-regulatory proteins recruited to a ligand-activated ER. Through these approaches, we revealed differential binding affinity of bisphenol-A (BPA) and genistein (GEN) to the human ERα (ESR1) and ligand-dependent recruitment of SRC-1 and SRC-3 peptides. Recruitment profiles were variable for each ligand and in some cases were distinct compared to 17β-estradiol (E2). For example, E2 and GEN recruited both SRC-1 and -3 peptides whereas BPA recruited only SRC-1 peptides. Results of the functional proteomic assay showed differential recruitment between ligands where E2 recruited the greatest number of proteins followed by BPA then GEN. A number of proteins share previously identified relationships with ESR1 as determined by STRING analysis. Although there was limited overlap in proteins identified between treatments, all ligands recruited proteins involved in cell growth as determined by subnetwork enrichment analysis (p<0.05). A comparative, in silico analysis revealed that fewer interactions exist between zebrafish (Danio rerio) esr1 and zebrafish orthologs of proteins identified in our functional proteomic analysis. Taken together these results identify recruitment of known and previously unknown co-regulatory proteins to ESR1 and highlight new methods to assay recruitment of low abundant and intact, endogenous co-regulatory proteins to ESR1 or other nuclear receptors, in

  16. Differential recruitment of co-regulatory proteins to the human estrogen receptor 1 in response to xenoestrogens☆,☆☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The diverse biological effects of xenoestrogens may be explained by their ability to differentially recruit co-regulatory proteins to the estrogen receptor (ER). We employed high-throughput receptor affinity binding and co-regulatory protein recruitment screening assays based on fluorescence polarization and time resolved florescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET), respectively, to assess xenoestrogen-specific binding and co-regulatory protein recruitment to the ER. Then we used a functional proteomic assay based on co-immunoprecipitation of ER-bound proteins to isolate and identify intact co-regulatory proteins recruited to a ligand-activated ER. Through these approaches, we revealed differential binding affinity of bisphenol-A (BPA) and genistein (GEN) to the human ERα (ESR1) and ligand-dependent recruitment of SRC-1 and SRC-3 peptides. Recruitment profiles were variable for each ligand and in some cases were distinct compared to 17β-estradiol (E2). For example, E2 and GEN recruited both SRC-1 and -3 peptides whereas BPA recruited only SRC-1 peptides. Results of the functional proteomic assay showed differential recruitment between ligands where E2 recruited the greatest number of proteins followed by BPA then GEN. A number of proteins share previously identified relationships with ESR1 as determined by STRING analysis. Although there was limited overlap in proteins identified between treatments, all ligands recruited proteins involved in cell growth as determined by subnetwork enrichment analysis (p < 0.05). A comparative, in silico analysis revealed that fewer interactions exist between zebrafish (Danio rerio) esr1 and zebrafish orthologs of proteins identified in our functional proteomic analysis. Taken together these results identify recruitment of known and previously unknown co-regulatory proteins to ESR1 and highlight new methods to assay recruitment of low abundant and intact, endogenous co-regulatory proteins to ESR1 or other nuclear receptors, in

  17. WrpA Is an Atypical Flavodoxin Family Protein under Regulatory Control of the Brucella abortus General Stress Response System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrou, Julien; Czyż, Daniel M; Willett, Jonathan W; Kim, Hye-Sook; Chhor, Gekleng; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Kim, Youngchang; Crosson, Sean

    2016-04-01

    The general stress response (GSR) system of the intracellular pathogen Brucella abortus controls the transcription of approximately 100 genes in response to a range of stress cues. The core genetic regulatory components of the GSR are required for B. abortus survival under nonoptimal growth conditions in vitro and for maintenance of chronic infection in an in vivo mouse model. The functions of the majority of the genes in the GSR transcriptional regulon remain undefined. bab1_1070 is among the most highly regulated genes in this regulon: its transcription is activated 20- to 30-fold by the GSR system under oxidative conditions in vitro. We have solved crystal structures of Bab1_1070 and demonstrate that it forms a homotetrameric complex that resembles those of WrbA-type NADH:quinone oxidoreductases, which are members of the flavodoxin protein family. However, B. abortus WrbA-related protein (WrpA) does not bind flavin cofactors with a high affinity and does not function as an NADH:quinone oxidoreductase in vitro. Soaking crystals with flavin mononucleotide (FMN) revealed a likely low-affinity binding site adjacent to the canonical WrbA flavin binding site. Deletion of wrpA (ΔwrpA) does not compromise cell survival under acute oxidative stress in vitro or attenuate infection in cell-based or mouse models. However, a ΔwrpA strain does elicit increased splenomegaly in a mouse model, suggesting that WrpA modulates B. abortus interaction with its mammalian host. Despite high structural homology with canonical WrbA proteins, we propose that B. abortus WrpA represents a functionally distinct member of the diverse flavodoxin family. Brucella abortus is an etiological agent of brucellosis, which is among the most common zoonotic diseases worldwide. The general stress response (GSR) regulatory system of B. abortus controls the transcription of approximately 100 genes and is required for maintenance of chronic infection in a murine model; the majority of GSR-regulated genes

  18. Fluorescence polarization assays to measure interactions between Gα subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins and regulatory motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziarz, Marcin; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence polarization (FP) is a simple and sensitive method allowing for the quantification of interactions between proteins and fluorescently tagged small molecules like peptides. Heterotrimeric G proteins are critical signal transducing molecules and their activity is controlled by a complex network of regulatory proteins. Some of these regulators have defined short motifs (G proteins and subsequently modulate their activity. For these cases, FP represents a robust and quantitative method to characterize the G protein regulator interaction. Here we describe FP assays in a 384-well plate format to quantify interactions between Gα subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins and peptides corresponding to the Gα binding and activating (GBA) or GoLoco motifs, which are present in some proteins with guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) (e.g., GIV/Girdin) or guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI) (e.g., RGS12) activity, respectively. This assay can be used to determine equilibrium dissociation constants, characterize the impact of single amino acid point mutations on the Gα-peptide interaction, and is suitable for high-throughput screening. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. EWS and FUS bind a subset of transcribed genes encoding proteins enriched in RNA regulatory functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yonglun; Friis, Jenny Blechingberg; Fernandes, Ana Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Background FUS (TLS) and EWS (EWSR1) belong to the FET-protein family of RNA and DNA binding proteins. FUS and EWS are structurally and functionally related and participate in transcriptional regulation and RNA processing. FUS and EWS are identified in translocation generated cancer fusion proteins...... and involved in the human neurological diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and fronto-temporal lobar degeneration. Results To determine the gene regulatory functions of FUS and EWS at the level of chromatin, we have performed chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (Ch......IP-seq). Our results show that FUS and EWS bind to a subset of actively transcribed genes, that binding often is downstream the poly(A)-signal, and that binding overlaps with RNA polymerase II. Functional examinations of selected target genes identified that FUS and EWS can regulate gene expression...

  20. Immunophenotype and increased presence of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    WU, CUI-PING; QING, XI; WU, CUI-YUN; ZHU, HONG; ZHOU, HAI-YAN

    2011-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), cancer of the white blood cells, is a heterogeneous disease that mainly occurs due to the malignant cloning of original and naive lymphocytes. The aim of this study was to explore the immunophenotype, the percentage of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and the expression of cytokines interleukin (IL)-2, IL-10 and TGF-β in patients with ALL. The immunophenotype and levels of CD4+CD25+ Tregs were detected using flow cytometry in the peripheral blood of 35 ...

  1. Serum protein capillary electrophoresis and measurement of acute phase proteins in a captive cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depauw, Sarah; Delanghe, Joris; Whitehouse-Tedd, Katherine; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads; Christensen, Michelle; Hesta, Myriam; Tugirimana, Pierrot; Budd, Jane; Dermauw, Veronique; Janssens, Geert P J

    2014-09-01

    Renal and gastrointestinal pathologies are widespread in the captive cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) population but are often diagnosed at a late stage, because diagnostic tools are limited to the evaluation of clinical signs or general blood examination. Presently, no data are available on serum proteins and acute-phase proteins in cheetahs during health or disease, although they might be important to improve health monitoring. This study aimed to quantify serum proteins by capillary electrophoresis in 80 serum samples from captive cheetahs, categorized according to health status and disease type. Moreover, serum amyloid A concentrations were measured via a turbidimetric immunoassay validated in domestic cats, whereas haptoglobin and C-reactive protein were determined by non-species-specific functional tests. Cheetahs classified as healthy had serum protein and acute phase protein concentrations within reference ranges for healthy domestic cats. In contrast, unhealthy cheetahs had higher (P cheetahs suffering from chronic kidney disease were significantly greater compared to the reportedly healthy cheetahs. Our study indicates that serum proteins in the cheetah can be analyzed by routine capillary electrophoresis, whereas acute-phase proteins can be measured using available immunoassays or non-species-specific techniques, which are also likely to be applicable in other exotic felids. Moreover, results suggest that serum amyloid A and haptoglobin are important acute-phase proteins in the diseased cheetah and highlight the need to evaluate their role as early-onset markers for disease.

  2. Rapid and widely disseminated acute phase protein response after experimental bacterial infection of pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Mortensen, Shila; Boye, Mette

    2009-01-01

    with measurements of interleukin-6 and selected acute phase proteins in serum. C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A were clearly induced 14-18 h after infection. Extrahepatic expression of acute phase proteins was found to be dramatically altered as a result of the lung infection with an extrahepatic acute phase...... protein response occurring concomitantly with the hepatic response. This suggests that the acute phase protein response is a more disseminated systemic response than previously thought. The current study provides to our knowledge the first example of porcine extrahepatic expression and regulation of C...... parts of innate host defence reactions remain somewhat elusive. In order to gain new insight into this early host defence response in the context of bacterial infection we studied gene expression changes in peripheral lymphoid tissues as compared to hepatic expression changes, 14-18 h after lung...

  3. Alteration of contractile and regulatory proteins in estrogen-induced hypertrophy of female rabbit bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Alpha Dian-Yu; Levin, Robert M; Kogan, Barry A; Whitbeck, Catherine; Leggett, Robert E; Kearns, Christine; Mannikarottu, Anita

    2006-11-01

    Estrogen is essential to mediate physiologic functions in female bladders. Deficiency of estrogen has been speculated to be an etiologic factor for bladder dysfunction in postmenopausal women. Our previous studies have demonstrated that estrogen supplementation in female rabbits induces a "functional hypertrophy" of the urinary bladder smooth muscle. The present study investigated the alterations in the contractile and regulatory proteins in this model. Twenty New Zealand white female rabbits were separated into five groups of 4 rabbits each. Group 1 served as the control, groups 2 to 6 underwent ovariectomy (Ovx), and group 2 served as the Ovx without estradiol treatment group. Two weeks after Ovx, groups 3 to 5 were given 17-beta estradiol (1 mg/kg/day) by subcutaneous implant for 1, 3, and 7 days, respectively. The expression of the contractile and regulatory proteins, such as myosin light chain kinase, rho-kinase, and caldesmon, was analyzed by Western blotting. The expression of myosin light chain kinase was enhanced by estradiol supplementation. The expression of rho-kinase-alpha was increased significantly (20-fold) after Ovx, which was downregulated after estrogen supplementation. No significant change was seen in rho-kinase-beta after Ovx or estradiol supplementation. The expression of caldesmon isoforms was enhanced by 1-day estradiol supplementation but decreased to lower levels than those of the control group by 3 and 7 days of estrogen treatment. The results of the present study have provided more understanding about the role of the contractile and regulatory proteins in detrusor muscle, in both dysfunctional atrophy induced by Ovx and functional hypertrophy induced by estrogen supplementation.

  4. mRNA Expression of Interferon Regulatory Factors during Acute Rejection of Liver Transplants in Patients with Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, M; Geramizadeh, B; Nabavizadeh, S H; Male-Hosseini, S A; Karimi, M H; Saadat, I

    2018-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) can play a critical role in the regulation of many facets of innate and adaptive immune responses through transcriptional activation of type I interferons, other proinflammatory cytokines, and chemokines. However, their roles in transplantation immunity still remain to be elucidated. To evaluate the time course of mRNA expression of all 9 members of IRFs family of transcription factors during liver allograft acute rejection. Blood samples of 19 patients with autoimmune hepatitis receiving liver transplants were collected on days 1, 3, 5, and 7 post-transplantation. The patients were followed for 6 months after transplantation and divided into two groups of acute rejection (AR) (n=4) and non-acute rejection (non-AR) (n=15). All of the studied transcription factors were down-regulated in AR-group on days 3, 5, and 7 post-transplantation compared to non-AR group. The mean±SEM IRF5 on day 7 post-transplantation was significantly (p=0.005) lower in AR-group than in non-AR group (0.7±0.21 vs . 1.91±0.27, respectively); expression of other IRFs family members was not significantly different between the two groups on days 3, 5, and 7 post-transplantation. IRF5 may have an important role during the acute rejection of liver transplants.

  5. Alternative approaches for identifying acute systemic toxicity : Moving from research to regulatory testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamm, Jon; Sullivan, Kristie; Clippinger, Amy J; Strickland, Judy; Bell, Shannon; Bhhatarai, Barun; Blaauboer, B; Casey, Warren; Dorman, David; Forsby, Anna; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Gehen, Sean; Graepel, Rabea; Hotchkiss, Jon; Lowit, Anna; Matheson, Joanna; Reaves, Elissa; Scarano, Louis; Sprankle, Catherine; Tunkel, Jay; Wilson, Dan; Xia, Menghang; Zhu, Hao; Allen, David

    Acute systemic toxicity testing provides the basis for hazard labeling and risk management of chemicals. A number of international efforts have been directed at identifying non-animal alternatives for in vivo acute systemic toxicity tests. A September 2015 workshop, Alternative Approaches for

  6. Depression of Complement Regulatory Factors in Rat and Human Renal Grafts Is Associated with the Progress of Acute T-Cell Mediated Rejection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuaki Yamanaka

    Full Text Available The association of complement with the progression of acute T cell mediated rejection (ATCMR is not well understood. We investigated the production of complement components and the expression of complement regulatory proteins (Cregs in acute T-cell mediated rejection using rat and human renal allografts.We prepared rat allograft and syngeneic graft models of renal transplantation. The expression of Complement components and Cregs was assessed in the rat grafts using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR and immunofluorescent staining. We also administered anti-Crry and anti-CD59 antibodies to the rat allograft model. Further, we assessed the relationship between the expression of membrane cofactor protein (MCP by immunohistochemical staining in human renal grafts and their clinical course.qRT-PCR results showed that the expression of Cregs, CD59 and rodent-specific complement regulator complement receptor 1-related gene/protein-y (Crry, was diminished in the rat allograft model especially on day 5 after transplantation in comparison with the syngeneic model. In contrast, the expression of complement components and receptors: C3, C3a receptor, C5a receptor, Factor B, C9, C1q, was increased, but not the expression of C4 and C5, indicating a possible activation of the alternative pathway. When anti-Crry and anti-CD59 mAbs were administered to the allograft, the survival period for each group was shortened. In the human ATCMR cases, the group with higher MCP expression in the grafts showed improved serum creatinine levels after the ATCMR treatment as well as a better 5-year graft survival rate.We conclude that the expression of Cregs in allografts is connected with ATCMR. Our results suggest that controlling complement activation in renal grafts can be a new strategy for the treatment of ATCMR.

  7. Pig-MAP, porcine acute phase proteins and standardisation of assays in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alava, M.A.; Gonzalez-Ramon, N.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    1997-01-01

    during the inflammation. In addition to CRP and Hp, a serum alpha(2)-globulin was observed to be the major acute phase (MAP) protein in pigs. Pig-MAP is a new mammalian plasma protein, which is the pig counterpart of a recently cloned human serum protein denominated PK-120 or MRP. Pig-MAP shows promise...

  8. Pro-protein convertases control the maturation and processing of the iron-regulatory protein, RGMc/hemojuvelin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rotwein Peter

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Repulsive guidance molecule c (RGMc or hemojuvelin, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked glycoprotein expressed in liver and striated muscle, plays a central role in systemic iron balance. Inactivating mutations in the RGMc gene cause juvenile hemochromatosis (JH, a rapidly progressing iron storage disorder with severe systemic manifestations. RGMc undergoes complex biosynthetic steps leading to membrane-bound and soluble forms of the protein, including both 50 and 40 kDa single-chain species. Results We now show that pro-protein convertases (PC are responsible for conversion of 50 kDa RGMc to a 40 kDa protein with a truncated COOH-terminus. Unlike related molecules RGMa and RGMb, RGMc encodes a conserved PC recognition and cleavage site, and JH-associated RGMc frame-shift mutants undergo COOH-terminal cleavage only if this site is present. A cell-impermeable peptide PC inhibitor blocks the appearance of 40 kDa RGMc in extra-cellular fluid, as does an engineered mutation in the conserved PC recognition sequence, while the PC furin cleaves 50 kDa RGMc in vitro into a 40 kDa molecule with an intact NH2-terminus. Iron loading reduces release of RGMc from the cell membrane, and diminishes accumulation of the 40 kDa species in cell culture medium. Conclusion Our results define a role for PCs in the maturation of RGMc that may have implications for the physiological actions of this critical iron-regulatory protein.

  9. Adolescent and adult rat cortical protein kinase A display divergent responses to acute ethanol exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigante, Eduardo D; Santerre, Jessica L; Carter, Jenna M; Werner, David F

    2014-08-01

    Adolescent rats display reduced sensitivity to many dysphoria-related effects of alcohol (ethanol) including motor ataxia and sedative hypnosis, but the underlying neurobiological factors that contribute to these differences remain unknown. The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, particularly the type II regulatory subunit (RII), has been implicated in ethanol-induced molecular and behavioral responses in adults. Therefore, the current study examined cerebral cortical PKA in adolescent and adult ethanol responses. With the exception of early adolescence, PKA RIIα and RIIβ subunit levels largely did not differ from adult levels in either whole cell lysate or P2 synaptosomal expression. However, following acute ethanol exposure, PKA RIIβ P2 synaptosomal expression and activity were increased in adults, but not in adolescents. Behaviorally, intracerebroventricular administration of the PKA activator Sp-cAMP and inhibitor Rp-cAMP prior to ethanol administration increased adolescent sensitivity to the sedative-hypnotic effects of ethanol compared to controls. Sp-cAMP was ineffective in adults whereas Rp-cAMP suggestively reduced loss of righting reflex (LORR) with paralleled increases in blood ethanol concentrations. Overall, these data suggest that PKA activity modulates the sedative/hypnotic effects of ethanol and may potentially play a wider role in the differential ethanol responses observed between adolescents and adults. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Potential Regulatory Proteins Involved in Chicken Eggshell Brownness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangqi Li

    Full Text Available Brown eggs are popular in many countries and consumers regard eggshell brownness as an important indicator of egg quality. However, the potential regulatory proteins and detailed molecular mechanisms regulating eggshell brownness have yet to be clearly defined. In the present study, we performed quantitative proteomics analysis with iTRAQ technology in the shell gland epithelium of hens laying dark and light brown eggs to investigate the candidate proteins and molecular mechanisms underlying variation in chicken eggshell brownness. The results indicated 147 differentially expressed proteins between these two groups, among which 65 and 82 proteins were significantly up-regulated in the light and dark groups, respectively. Functional analysis indicated that in the light group, the down-regulated iron-sulfur cluster assembly protein (Iba57 would decrease the synthesis of protoporphyrin IX; furthermore, the up-regulated protein solute carrier family 25 (mitochondrial carrier; adenine nucleotide translocator, member 5 (SLC25A5 and down-regulated translocator protein (TSPO would lead to increased amounts of protoporphyrin IX transported into the mitochondria matrix to form heme with iron, which is supplied by ovotransferrin protein (TF. In other words, chickens from the light group produce less protoporphyrin IX, which is mainly used for heme synthesis. Therefore, the exported protoporphyrin IX available for eggshell deposition and brownness is reduced in the light group. The current study provides valuable information to elucidate variation of chicken eggshell brownness, and demonstrates the feasibility and sensitivity of iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics analysis in providing useful insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying brown eggshell pigmentation.

  11. Guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins in retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Meisheng; Tran, V.T.; Fong, H.K.W. (Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States)); Pandey, S. (Doheny Eye Inst., Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1991-05-01

    The expression of GTP-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells was analyzed by RNA blot hybridization and cDNA amplification. Both adult and fetal human RPE cells contain mRNA for multiple G protein {alpha} subunits (G{alpha}) including G{sub s}{alpha}, G{sub i-1}{alpha}, G{sub i-2}{alpha}, G{sub i-3}{alpha}, and G{sub z}{alpha} (or G{sub x}{alpha}), where G{sub s} and G{sub i} are proteins that stimulate or inhibit adenylyl cyclase, respectively, and G{sub z} is a protein that may mediate pertussis toxin-insensitive events. Other G{alpha}-related mRNA transcripts were detected in fetal RPE cells by low-stringency hybridization to G{sub i-2}{alpha} and G{sub s}{alpha} protein-coding cDNA probes. The diversity of G proteins in RPE cells was further studied by cDNA amplification with reverse transcriptase and the polymerase chain reaction. This approach revealed that, besides the above mentioned members of the G{alpha} gene family, at least two other G{alpha} subunits are expressed in RPE cells. Human retinal cDNA clones that encode one of the additional G{alpha} subunits were isolated and characterized. The results indicate that this G{alpha} subunit belongs to a separate subfamily of G proteins that may be insensitive to inhibition by pertussis toxin.

  12. Anomalous DNA binding by E2 regulatory protein driven by spacer sequence TATA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Zhiqun; Zhang, Yongli; Hegde, Rashmi S; Shakked, Zippora; Crothers, Donald M

    2010-06-01

    We have investigated the anomalously weak binding of human papillomavirus (HPV) regulatory protein E2 to a DNA target containing the spacer sequence TATA. Experiments in magnesium (Mg(2+)) and calcium (Ca(2+)) ion buffers revealed a marked reduction in cutting by DNase I at the CpG sequence in the protein-binding site 3' to the TATA spacer sequence, Studies of the cation dependence of DNA-E2 affinities showed that upon E2 binding the TATA sequence releases approximately twice as many Mg(2+) ions as the average of the other spacer sequences. Binding experiments for TATA spacer relative to ATAT showed that in potassium ion (K(+)) the E2 affinity of the two sequences is nearly equal, but the relative dissociation constant (K(d)) for TATA increases in the order K(+ )TATA relative to ATAT is independent of ion concentration, whereas for Mg(2+) the affinity for TATA drops sharply as ion concentration increases. Thus, ions of increasing positive charge density increasingly distort the E2 binding site, weakening the affinity for protein. In the case of Mg(2+), additional ions are bound to TATA that require displacement for protein binding. We suggest that the TATA sequence may bias the DNA structure towards a conformation that binds the protein relatively weakly.

  13. The muscle oxidative regulatory response to acute exercise is not impaired in less advanced COPD despite a decreased oxidative phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilse G M Slot

    Full Text Available Already in an early disease stage, patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are confronted with impaired skeletal muscle function and physical performance due to a loss of oxidative type I muscle fibers and oxidative capacity (i.e. oxidative phenotype; Oxphen. Physical activity is a well-known stimulus of muscle Oxphen and crucial for its maintenance. We hypothesized that a blunted response of Oxphen genes to an acute bout of exercise could contribute to decreased Oxphen in COPD. For this, 28 patients with less advanced COPD (age 65 ± 7 yrs, FEV1 59 ± 16% predicted and 15 age- and gender-matched healthy controls performed an incremental cycle ergometry test. The Oxphen response to exercise was determined by the measurement of gene expression levels of Oxphen markers in pre and 4h-post exercise quadriceps biopsies. Because exercise-induced hypoxia and oxidative stress may interfere with Oxphen response, oxygen saturation and oxidative stress markers were assessed as well. Regardless of oxygen desaturation and absolute exercise intensities, the Oxphen regulatory response to exercise was comparable between COPD patients and controls with no evidence of increased oxidative stress. In conclusion, the muscle Oxphen regulatory response to acute exercise is not blunted in less advanced COPD, regardless of exercise-induced hypoxia. Hence, this study provides further rationale for incorporation of exercise training as integrated part of disease management to prevent or slow down loss of muscle Oxphen and related functional impairment in COPD.

  14. Serum protein capillary electrophoresis and measurement of acute phase proteins in a captive cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Depauw, Sarah; Delanghe, Joris; Whitehouse-Tedd, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Renal and gastrointestinal pathologies are widespread in the captive cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) population but are often diagnosed at a late stage, because diagnostic tools are limited to the evaluation of clinical signs or general blood examination. Presently, no data are available on serum...... proteins and acute-phase proteins in cheetahs during health or disease, although they might be important to improve health monitoring. This study aimed to quantify serum proteins by capillary electrophoresis in 80 serum samples from captive cheetahs, categorized according to health status and disease type....... Moreover, serum amyloid A concentrations were measured via a turbidimetric immunoassay validated in domestic cats, whereas haptoglobin and C-reactive protein were determined by non-species-specific functional tests. Cheetahs classified as healthy had serum protein and acute phase protein concentrations...

  15. The Positive Regulatory Roles of the TIFY10 Proteins in Plant Responses to Alkaline Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dan; Li, Rongtian; Liu, Xin; Sun, Mingzhe; Wu, Jing; Zhang, Ning; Zhu, Yanming

    2014-01-01

    The TIFY family is a novel plant-specific protein family, and is characterized by a conserved TIFY motif (TIFF/YXG). Our previous studies indicated the potential roles of TIFY10/11 proteins in plant responses to alkaline stress. In the current study, we focused on the regulatory roles and possible physiological and molecular basis of the TIFY10 proteins in plant responses to alkaline stress. We demonstrated the positive function of TIFY10s in alkaline responses by using the AtTIFY10a and AtTIFY10b knockout Arabidopsis, as evidenced by the relatively lower germination rates of attify10a and attify10b mutant seeds under alkaline stress. We also revealed that ectopic expression of GsTIFY10a in Medicago sativa promoted plant growth, and increased the NADP-ME activity, citric acid content and free proline content but decreased the MDA content of transgenic plants under alkaline stress. Furthermore, expression levels of the stress responsive genes including NADP-ME, CS, H+-ppase and P5CS were also up-regulated in GsTIFY10a transgenic plants under alkaline stress. Interestingly, GsTIFY10a overexpression increased the jasmonate content of the transgenic alfalfa. In addition, we showed that neither GsTIFY10a nor GsTIFY10e exhibited transcriptional activity in yeast cells. However, through Y2H and BiFc assays, we demonstrated that GsTIFY10a, not GsTIFY10e, could form homodimers in yeast cells and in living plant cells. As expected, we also demonstrated that GsTIFY10a and GsTIFY10e could heterodimerize with each other in both yeast and plant cells. Taken together, our results provided direct evidence supporting the positive regulatory roles of the TIFY10 proteins in plant responses to alkaline stress. PMID:25375909

  16. Development of neurodevelopmental disorders: a regulatory mechanism involving bromodomain-containing proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Junlin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neurodevelopmental disorders are classified as diseases that cause abnormal functions of the brain or central nervous system. Children with neurodevelopmental disorders show impaired language and speech abilities, learning and memory damage, and poor motor skills. However, we still know very little about the molecular etiology of these disorders. Recent evidence implicates the bromodomain-containing proteins (BCPs in the initiation and development of neurodevelopmental disorders. BCPs have a particular domain, the bromodomain (Brd, which was originally identified as specifically binding acetyl-lysine residues at the N-terminus of histone proteins in vitro and in vivo. Other domains of BCPs are responsible for binding partner proteins to form regulatory complexes. Once these complexes are assembled, BCPs alter chromosomal states and regulate gene expression. Some BCP complexes bind nucleosomes, are involved in basal transcription regulation, and influence the transcription of many genes. However, most BCPs are involved in targeting. For example, some BCPs function as a recruitment platform or scaffold through their Brds-binding targeting sites. Others are recruited to form a complex to bind the targeting sites of their partners. The regulation mediated by these proteins is especially critical during normal and abnormal development. Mutant BCPs or dysfunctional BCP-containing complexes are implicated in the initiation and development of neurodevelopmental disorders. However, the pathogenic molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. In this review, we focus on the roles of regulatory BCPs associated with neurodevelopmental disorders, including mental retardation, Fragile X syndrome (FRX, Williams syndrome (WS, Rett syndrome and Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS. A better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis, based upon the roles of BCPs, will lead to screening of targets for the treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders.

  17. Handshakes and Fights: The Regulatory Interplay of RNA-Binding Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Dassi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available What drives the flow of signals controlling the outcome of post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression? This regulatory layer, presiding to processes ranging from splicing to mRNA stability and localization, is a key determinant of protein levels and thus cell phenotypes. RNA-binding proteins (RBPs form a remarkable army of post-transcriptional regulators, strong of more than 1,500 genes implementing this expression fine-tuning plan and implicated in both cell physiology and pathology. RBPs can bind and control a wide array of RNA targets. This sheer amount of interactions form complex regulatory networks (PTRNs where the action of individual RBPs cannot be easily untangled from each other. While past studies have mostly focused on the action of individual RBPs on their targets, we are now observing an increasing amount of evidence describing the occurrence of interactions between RBPs, defining how common target RNAs are regulated. This suggests that the flow of signals in PTRNs is driven by the intertwined contribution of multiple RBPs, concurrently acting on each of their targets. Understanding how RBPs cooperate and compete is thus of paramount importance to chart the wiring of PTRNs and their impact on cell phenotypes. Here we review the current knowledge about patterns of RBP interaction and attempt at describing their general principles. We also discuss future directions which should be taken to reach a comprehensive understanding of this fundamental aspect of gene expression regulation.

  18. Malignant mixed Mullerian tumors of the uterus: histopathological evaluation of cell cycle and apoptotic regulatory proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senger Jenna-Lynn B

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim The aim of our study was to evaluate survival outcomes in malignant mixed Mullerian tumors (MMMT of the uterus with respect to the role of cell cycle and apoptotic regulatory proteins in the carcinomatous and sarcomatous components. Methods 23 cases of uterine MMMT identified from the Saskatchewan Cancer Agency (1970-1999 were evaluated. Immunohistochemical expression of Bad, Mcl-1, bcl-x, bak, mdm2, bax, p16, p21, p53, p27, EMA, Bcl-2, Ki67 and PCNA was correlated with clinico-pathological data including survival outcomes. Results Histopathological examination confirmed malignant epithelial component with homologous (12 cases and heterologous (11 cases sarcomatous elements. P53 was strongly expressed (70-95% in 15 cases and negative in 5 cases. The average survival in the p53+ve cases was 3.56 years as opposed to 8.94 years in p53-ve cases. Overexpression of p16 and Mcl-1 were observed in patients with longer survival outcomes (> 2 years. P16 and p21 were overexpressed in the carcinomatous and sarcomatous elements respectively. Cyclin-D1 was focally expressed only in the carcinomatous elements. Conclusions Our study supports that a cell cycle and apoptotic regulatory protein dysregulation is an important pathway for tumorigenesis and b p53 is an important immunoprognostic marker in MMMT of the uterus.

  19. Naturally-occurring, dually-functional fusions between restriction endonucleases and regulatory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jixiao; Blumenthal, Robert M

    2013-10-02

    Restriction-modification (RM) systems appear to play key roles in modulating gene flow among bacteria and archaea. Because the restriction endonuclease (REase) is potentially lethal to unmethylated new host cells, regulation to ensure pre-expression of the protective DNA methyltransferase (MTase) is essential to the spread of RM genes. This is particularly true for Type IIP RM systems, in which the REase and MTase are separate, independently-active proteins. A substantial subset of Type IIP RM systems are controlled by an activator-repressor called C protein. In these systems, C controls the promoter for its own gene, and for the downstream REase gene that lacks its own promoter. Thus MTase is expressed immediately after the RM genes enter a new cell, while expression of REase is delayed until sufficient C protein accumulates. To study the variation in and evolution of this regulatory mechanism, we searched for RM systems closely related to the well-studied C protein-dependent PvuII RM system. Unexpectedly, among those found were several in which the C protein and REase genes were fused. The gene for CR.NsoJS138I fusion protein (nsoJS138ICR, from the bacterium Niabella soli) was cloned, and the fusion protein produced and partially purified. Western blots provided no evidence that, under the conditions tested, anything other than full-length fusion protein is produced. This protein had REase activity in vitro and, as expected from the sequence similarity, its specificity was indistinguishable from that for PvuII REase, though the optimal reaction conditions were different. Furthermore, the fusion was active as a C protein, as revealed by in vivo activation of a lacZ reporter fusion to the promoter region for the nsoJS138ICR gene. Fusions between C proteins and REases have not previously been characterized, though other fusions have (such as between REases and MTases). These results reinforce the evidence for impressive modularity among RM system proteins, and raise

  20. HLA-haploidentical transplantation with regulatory and conventional T-cell adoptive immunotherapy prevents acute leukemia relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Massimo F; Di Ianni, Mauro; Ruggeri, Loredana; Falzetti, Franca; Carotti, Alessandra; Terenzi, Adelmo; Pierini, Antonio; Massei, Maria Speranza; Amico, Lucia; Urbani, Elena; Del Papa, Beatrice; Zei, Tiziana; Iacucci Ostini, Roberta; Cecchini, Debora; Tognellini, Rita; Reisner, Yair; Aversa, Franco; Falini, Brunangelo; Velardi, Andrea

    2014-07-24

    Posttransplant relapse is still the major cause of treatment failure in high-risk acute leukemia. Attempts to manipulate alloreactive T cells to spare normal cells while killing leukemic cells have been unsuccessful. In HLA-haploidentical transplantation, we reported that donor-derived T regulatory cells (Tregs), coinfused with conventional T cells (Tcons), protected recipients against graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The present phase 2 study investigated whether Treg-Tcon adoptive immunotherapy prevents posttransplant leukemia relapse. Forty-three adults with high-risk acute leukemia (acute myeloid leukemia 33; acute lymphoblastic leukemia 10) were conditioned with a total body irradiation-based regimen. Grafts included CD34(+) cells (mean 9.7 × 10(6)/kg), Tregs (mean 2.5 × 10(6)/kg), and Tcons (mean 1.1 × 10(6)/kg). No posttransplant immunosuppression was given. Ninety-five percent of patients achieved full-donor type engraftment and 15% developed ≥grade 2 acute GVHD. The probability of disease-free survival was 0.56 at a median follow-up of 46 months. The very low cumulative incidence of relapse (0.05) was significantly better than in historical controls. These results demonstrate the immunosuppressive potential of Tregs can be used to suppress GVHD without loss of the benefits of graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) activity. Humanized murine models provided insights into the mechanisms underlying separation of GVL from GVHD, suggesting the GVL effect is due to largely unopposed Tcon alloantigen recognition in bone marrow. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  1. Hepatic fatty acid biosynthesis is more responsive to protein than carbohydrate in rainbow trout during acute stimulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Weiwei; Panserat, Stéphane; Kaushik, Sadasivam; Terrier, Frédéric; Plagnes-Juan, Elisabeth; Seiliez, Iban; Skiba-Cassy, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    The link between dietary carbohydrate/protein and de novo lipogenesis (DNL) remains debatable in carnivorous fish. We aimed to evaluate and compare the response of hepatic lipogenic gene expression to dietary carbohydrate intake/glucose and dietary protein intake/amino acids (AAs) during acute stimulations using both in vivo and in vitro approaches. For the in vivo trial, three different diets and a controlled-feeding method were employed to supply fixed amount of dietary protein or carbohydrate in a single meal; for the in vitro trial, primary hepatocytes were stimulated with a low or high level of glucose (3 mM or 20 mM) and a low or high level of AAs (one-fold or four-fold concentrated AAs). In vitro data showed that a high level of AAs upregulated the expression of enzymes involved in DNL [fatty acid synthase (FAS) and ATP citrate lyase (ACLY)], lipid bioconversion [elongation of very long chain fatty acids like-5 (Elovl5), Elovl2, Δ6 fatty acyl desaturase (D6D) and stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1)], NADPH production [glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and malic enzyme (ME)], and transcriptional factor sterol regulatory element binding protein 1-like, while a high level of glucose only elevated the expression of ME. Data in trout liver also showed that high dietary protein intake induced higher lipogenic gene expression (FAS, ACLY, and Elovl2) regardless of dietary carbohydrate intake, while high carbohydrate intake markedly suppressed the expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and Elovl5. Overall, we conclude that, unlike rodents or humans, hepatic fatty acid biosynthetic gene expression in rainbow trout is more responsive to dietary protein intake/AAs than dietary carbohydrate intake/glucose during acute stimulations. This discrepancy probably represents one important physiological and metabolic difference between carnivores and omnivores. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  2. The regulatory role of immunosuppressants on immune abnormalities in acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    DUAN, LIGENG; MA, YU; CHI, JUNLIN; WANG, XU; WESLEY, ALEXANDER J.; CHEN, XIAOLI

    2013-01-01

    The uncontrolled progression of the inflammatory cascade is the main cause underlying the development of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) in acute pancreatitis. In this study, we investigated the effects of several immunosuppressants on mitigating the systemic inflammatory reaction syndrome (SIRS) and the compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS) associated with acute pancreatitis. A total of 93 male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 5 groups: group 1 was the sham ...

  3. Expression and purification of functional, recombinant Trypanosoma cruzi complement regulatory protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beucher, Margaret; Meira, Wendell S F; Zegarra, Vasthy; Galvão, Lúcia M C; Chiari, Egler; Norris, Karen A

    2003-01-01

    The complement regulatory protein (CRP) of Trypanosoma cruzi is a developmentally regulated glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane protein that protects the parasite from complement-mediated killing, and is an important virulence determinant of the microorganism. CRP binds human complement components C3b and C4b to restrict activation of the complement cascade. Here, we report production of functional, recombinant T. cruzi CRP in mammalian cells and a one-step purification of the recombinant protein. Exchange of the crp DNA sequence encoding the carboxy-terminal GPI signal sequence with the corresponding sequence of decay accelerating factor (DAF) was necessary for recognition, cleavage, and addition of GPI in mammalian cells. CRP production was assessed in two mammalian cell lines with crp-daf gene expression driven by three different transcription control regions: Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat, cytomegalovirus (CMV) immediate early gene, and chicken beta-actin promoter/CMV enhancer. We present evidence that CRP produced in transfected Chinese hamster Ovary (CHO) cells was functional and protected the cells from complement-mediated lysis. To facilitate purification of the recombinant protein, a hexahistidyl tag was incorporated at 3(') end of the cDNA upstream of the GPI anchor addition sequence. An additional histidine fusion construct was made that allowed for secretion and recovery of recombinant protein from culture supernatant fluid. Both membrane and secreted forms of the protein were purified in one step by nickel nitrilotriacetic acid. The production and purification of functionally active CRP in a non-infectious expression system will allow for structure and function studies aimed at identifying the active site(s) of this protein.

  4. The Yersinia pseudotuberculosis outer membrane protein Ail recruits the human complement regulatory protein factor H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Derek K; Riva, Rauna; Skurnik, Mikael; Meri, Seppo

    2012-10-01

    Previous investigations characterizing the mechanism(s) of complement resistance in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis showed that the outer membrane protein Ail can functionally recruit the regulator of the classical and lectin pathways of complement, C4b-binding protein. In this study, we extend these observations and show that Ail can also recruit the regulator of the alternative pathway (AP), factor H (fH). Binding to fH was dependent on Ail expression and observed in the context of full-length LPS. Inactivation of ail resulted in loss of fH binding. Ail expression conferred resistance to AP-mediated killing. Bound fH was functional as a cofactor for factor I-mediated cleavage and inactivation of C3b. Ail alone is sufficient to mediate fH binding and resistance to AP-mediated killing, because Ail expression in a laboratory Escherichia coli strain conferred both of these phenotypes. Binding was specific and inhibited by increasing heparin and NaCl concentrations. Using a panel of fH recombinant fragments, we observed that both short consensus repeats 5-7 and 19-20 regions are responsible for mediating the interaction with Ail. Collectively, these results suggest that fH recruitment is an additional mechanism of complement resistance of Ail. Recruitment of both fH and C4BP by Ail may confer Y. pseudotuberculosis with the ability to resist all pathways of complement activation.

  5. Structural model of the Rev regulatory protein from equine infectious anemia virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yungok Ihm

    Full Text Available Rev is an essential regulatory protein in the equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV and other lentiviruses, including HIV-1. It binds incompletely spliced viral mRNAs and shuttles them from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, a critical prerequisite for the production of viral structural proteins and genomic RNA. Despite its important role in production of infectious virus, the development of antiviral therapies directed against Rev has been hampered by the lack of an experimentally-determined structure of the full length protein. We have used a combined computational and biochemical approach to generate and evaluate a structural model of the Rev protein. The modeled EIAV Rev (ERev structure includes a total of 6 helices, four of which form an anti-parallel four-helix bundle. The first helix contains the leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES. An arginine-rich RNA binding motif, RRDRW, is located in a solvent-exposed loop region. An ERLE motif required for Rev activity is predicted to be buried in the core of modeled structure where it plays an essential role in stabilization of the Rev fold. This structural model is supported by existing genetic and functional data as well as by targeted mutagenesis of residues predicted to be essential for overall structural integrity. Our predicted structure should increase understanding of structure-function relationships in Rev and may provide a basis for the design of new therapies for lentiviral diseases.

  6. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance structural studies of peptides and proteins from the vaso-regulatory System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sizun, Philippe

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to show how Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) allows to determine the 3D structure of peptides and proteins in solution. A comparative study of peptides involved in the vaso-regulatory System (form small hormonal peptide to the 65 amido-acid protein hirudin) has allowed to design most efficient NMR 1D and 2D strategies. It rapidly appeared that the size of the peptide plays a key role in the structuration of the molecule, smallest peptides being weakly structured owing to the lack of cooperative effects. As the molecular size increases or if conformational locks are present (disulfide bridges) the probability of stable secondary structure increases. For the protein hirudin, a combination of ail available NMR parameters deduced form dedicated experiments (chemical shifts, coupling constants, overhauser effects, accessibility of amide protons) and molecular modelling under constraints allows a clear 3D structure to be proposed for this protein in solution. Finally, a comparative study of the experimental structures and of those deduced form prediction rules has shed light on the concept of structural predisposition, the latter being of high value for a better understanding of structure-activity relationships. (author) [fr

  7. Spectroscopic studies on peptides and proteins with cysteine-containing heme regulatory motifs (HRM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Erik; Florin, Nicole; Duthie, Fraser; Henning Brewitz, H; Kühl, Toni; Imhof, Diana; Hagelueken, Gregor; Schiemann, Olav

    2015-07-01

    The role of heme as a cofactor in enzymatic reactions has been studied for a long time and in great detail. Recently it was discovered that heme can also serve as a signalling molecule in cells but so far only few examples of this regulation have been studied. In order to discover new potentially heme-regulated proteins, we screened protein sequence databases for bacterial proteins that contain sequence features like a Cysteine-Proline (CP) motif, which is known for its heme-binding propensity. Based on this search we synthesized a series of these potential heme regulatory motifs (HRMs). We used cw EPR spectroscopy to investigate whether these sequences do indeed bind to heme and if the spin state of heme is changed upon interaction with the peptides. The corresponding proteins of two potential HRMs, FeoB and GlpF, were expressed and purified and their interaction with heme was studied by cw EPR and UV-Visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Expression of Th17 and CD4+ CD25+ T regulatory cells in peripheral blood of acute leukemia patients and their prognostic significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Mingli; Guo, Li; Ma, Yan; Li, Yi

    2016-11-01

    To discuss the expression of T helper cell 17 (Th17) cells and CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) in peripheral blood (PB) of patients with acute leukemia (AL), and to explore the relationship between them and disease prognosis. 40 patients diagnosed with acute leukemia in The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University from July 2012 to August 2014 were selected as the observation group. Meanwhile, 40 healthy people were taken as the control group. Flow Cytometry Method (FCM) was used to detect the level of Th17 cells and CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + cells in peripheral blood of the two groups, and enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA) method was used to test the level of IL17 and TGF-β in peripheral blood of two groups; reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was adopted to analyze the mRNA levels of RORγT and Foxp3 in peripheral blood. In addition, we examined the levels of Th17 and CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + cells and associated factor levels in patients with remission after AL chemotherapy. the Th17 cells (CD3 + CD4 + IL-17 + ) in acute leukemia patients accounted for (1.51±0.27)%, which was significantly higher than that of control group (0.36±0.23)%, with statistical significance (t=20.51, Pcells in AL patients was (3.37±0.48)%, which was significantly higher than that of control group of (1.26±0.27)%, with statistical significance (t=24.23, Pt=7.83, Pt=7.83, Pt=12.27, Pt=7.89, Pcells and CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + cells, and the serum levels of IL-17 and TGF-β in acute leukemia patients all decreased significantly after 6 months of chemotherapy, and the difference was statistically significant (Pcells, CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3 + cells and their secretory proteins IL-17, TGF-β and transcription factors were significantly increased in AL patients. Therefore, regular detection of peripheral blood Th17 and Treg cells, as well as their secretory proteins are useful for monitoring the immune status and prognosis of patients.

  9. Mutations in complement regulatory proteins predispose to preeclampsia: a genetic analysis of the PROMISSE cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane E Salmon

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy in women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or antiphospholipid antibodies (APL Ab--autoimmune conditions characterized by complement-mediated injury--is associated with increased risk of preeclampsia and miscarriage. Our previous studies in mice indicate that complement activation targeted to the placenta drives angiogenic imbalance and placental insufficiency.We use PROMISSE, a prospective study of 250 pregnant patients with SLE and/or APL Ab, to test the hypothesis in humans that impaired capacity to limit complement activation predisposes to preeclampsia. We sequenced genes encoding three complement regulatory proteins--membrane cofactor protein (MCP, complement factor I (CFI, and complement factor H (CFH--in 40 patients who had preeclampsia and found heterozygous mutations in seven (18%. Five of these patients had risk variants in MCP or CFI that were previously identified in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, a disease characterized by endothelial damage. One had a novel mutation in MCP that impairs regulation of C4b. These findings constitute, to our knowledge, the first genetic defects associated with preeclampsia in SLE and/or APL Ab. We confirmed the association of hypomorphic variants of MCP and CFI in a cohort of non-autoimmune preeclampsia patients in which five of 59 were heterozygous for mutations.The presence of risk variants in complement regulatory proteins in patients with SLE and/or APL Ab who develop preeclampsia, as well as in preeclampsia patients lacking autoimmune disease, links complement activation to disease pathogenesis and suggests new targets for treatment of this important public health problem.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00198068.

  10. Effects of montelukast sodium combined with pidotimod on acute phase protein and immune function in children with acute bronchitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the effects of montelukast sodium combined with pidotimod on acute phase protein (APP and indexes of immunologic function in pediatric acute bronchitis treatment. Methods: A total of 180 cases children with acute bronchitis acted as research objects were randomly divided into control group (n=65 and observation group (n=63. On the basis of conventional therapy, control group was treated by plus pidotimod. On this base, observation group was treated with montelukast sodium. The changes of acute phase proteins (CRP, HP, a1-AAG and CER and immune function (CD3+ , CD4+ , CD8+ and CD4+ /CD8+ levels before and after treatment were observed after 2 months. Results: Before treatment, CRP, HP, a1-AAG, CER, CD3+ , CD4+ , CD8+ and CD4+ /CD8+ levels of two groups had no statistically significant difference; CRP, HP, a1-AAG, CER, and CD8+ levels of control and observation groups decreased significantly after treatment, the decreases of observation group were more obvious than that of control group, and the levels after treatment were significantly lower than that of control groups. The levels of CD3+ , CD4+ and CD4+ /CD8+ in two groups after treatment were significantly higher than those before treatment. For observation group, the levels of CD3+ , CD4+ and CD4+ /CD8+ increased more significantly after treatment, which were significantly higher than that of the control group. Conclusion: Using Montelukast sodium combined with pidotimod can effectively reduce the children's acute phase protein levels, improve immune function, which has clinical value for the treatment of children with acute bronchitis.

  11. Contributions of protein-coding and regulatory change to adaptive molecular evolution in murid rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L Halligan

    Full Text Available The contribution of regulatory versus protein change to adaptive evolution has long been controversial. In principle, the rate and strength of adaptation within functional genetic elements can be quantified on the basis of an excess of nucleotide substitutions between species compared to the neutral expectation or from effects of recent substitutions on nucleotide diversity at linked sites. Here, we infer the nature of selective forces acting in proteins, their UTRs and conserved noncoding elements (CNEs using genome-wide patterns of diversity in wild house mice and divergence to related species. By applying an extension of the McDonald-Kreitman test, we infer that adaptive substitutions are widespread in protein-coding genes, UTRs and CNEs, and we estimate that there are at least four times as many adaptive substitutions in CNEs and UTRs as in proteins. We observe pronounced reductions in mean diversity around nonsynonymous sites (whether or not they have experienced a recent substitution. This can be explained by selection on multiple, linked CNEs and exons. We also observe substantial dips in mean diversity (after controlling for divergence around protein-coding exons and CNEs, which can also be explained by the combined effects of many linked exons and CNEs. A model of background selection (BGS can adequately explain the reduction in mean diversity observed around CNEs. However, BGS fails to explain the wide reductions in mean diversity surrounding exons (encompassing ~100 Kb, on average, implying that there is a substantial role for adaptation within exons or closely linked sites. The wide dips in diversity around exons, which are hard to explain by BGS, suggest that the fitness effects of adaptive amino acid substitutions could be substantially larger than substitutions in CNEs. We conclude that although there appear to be many more adaptive noncoding changes, substitutions in proteins may dominate phenotypic evolution.

  12. Crystal structures of the apo and ATP bound Mycobacterium tuberculosis nitrogen regulatory PII protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shetty, Nishant D.; Reddy, Manchi C.M.; Palaninathan, Satheesh K.; Owen, Joshua L.; Sacchettini, James C. (TAM)

    2010-10-11

    PII constitutes a family of signal transduction proteins that act as nitrogen sensors in microorganisms and plants. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has a single homologue of PII whose precise role has as yet not been explored. We have solved the crystal structures of the Mtb PII protein in its apo and ATP bound forms to 1.4 and 2.4 {angstrom} resolutions, respectively. The protein forms a trimeric assembly in the crystal lattice and folds similarly to the other PII family proteins. The Mtb PII:ATP binary complex structure reveals three ATP molecules per trimer, each bound between the base of the T-loop of one subunit and the C-loop of the neighboring subunit. In contrast to the apo structure, at least one subunit of the binary complex structure contains a completely ordered T-loop indicating that ATP binding plays a role in orienting this loop region towards target proteins like the ammonium transporter, AmtB. Arg38 of the T-loop makes direct contact with the {gamma}-phosphate of the ATP molecule replacing the Mg{sup 2+} position seen in the Methanococcus jannaschii GlnK1 structure. The C-loop of a neighboring subunit encloses the other side of the ATP molecule, placing the GlnK specific C-terminal 3{sub 10} helix in the vicinity. Homology modeling studies with the E. coli GlnK:AmtB complex reveal that Mtb PII could form a complex similar to the complex in E. coli. The structural conservation and operon organization suggests that the Mtb PII gene encodes for a GlnK protein and might play a key role in the nitrogen regulatory pathway.

  13. Serum level of soluble fibrinogen-like protein 2 in renal allograft recipients with acute rejection: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Z; Yang, C; Tang, Q; Zhao, T; Jia, Y; Ma, Z; Rong, R; Xu, M; Zhu, T

    2012-12-01

    Soluble fibrinogen-like protein 2 (sfgl2), which is mainly secreted by T cells, is a novel effector of regulatory T cells with immunosuppressive functions. The aim of this study was to investigate serum levels of sfgl2 among renal allograft recipients. From November 2010 to August 2011 we retrospectively divided 47 renal allograft recipients into an acute rejection (n = 19) versus a stable group (n = 28) according to allograft biopsy results, using the Banff 2007 classification. The acute rejection group was subdivided into grade I (n = 8) versus grade II T-cell-mediated (n = 6) or antibody-mediated rejection episodes (n = 5). Peripheral blood samples were collected at the time of biopsy. Fourteen healthy volunteers were included as normal group controls. Serum levels of sfgl2 were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Serum levels of sfgl2 were increased among renal allograft recipients suffering from biopsy-proven acute rejection episodes (61.91 ± 45.68 ng/mL), versus those with stable allografts (38.59 ± 19.92 ng/mL, P rejection episodes (41.71 ± 16.44 ng/mL, P rejection (34.10 ± 9.26 ng/mL, P rejection episodes to an extent dependent upon the pathological type and severity of the response. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Acute Exercise Decreases Tribbles Homolog 3 Protein Levels in the Hypothalamus of Obese Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Barbara De Almeira; Pauli, Luciana Santos Souza; DE Souza, Claudio Teodoro; DA Silva, Adelino Sanchez Ramos; Cintra, Dennys Esper Correa; Marinho, Rodolfo; DE Moura, Leandro Pereira; Ropelle, Eloize Cristina Chiarreotto; Botezelli, José Diego; Ropelle, Eduardo Rochete; Pauli, José Rodrigo

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effects of acute exercise on tribbles homolog 3 (TRB3) protein levels and on the interaction between TRB3 and Akt proteins in the hypothalamus of obese rats. In addition, we evaluated the relationship between TRB3 and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and verified whether an acute exercise session influences them. In the first part of the study, the rats were divided into three groups: control (lean), fed standard rodent chow; DIO, fed a high-fat diet; and DIO-EXE, fed a high-fat diet and submitted to a swimming acute exercise protocol. In the second part of the study, we used three other groups: control (lean) group receiving an intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusion of vehicle, lean group receiving an i.c.v. infusion of thapsigargin, and lean group receiving an i.c.v. infusion of thapsigargin and performing an acute exercise session. Four hours after the exercise session, food intake was measured, and the hypothalamus was dissected and separated for subsequent protein analysis by immunoblotting and real-time polymerase chain reaction. The acute exercise session reduced TRB3 protein levels, disrupted the interaction between TRB3 and Akt proteins, increased the phosphorylation of Foxo1, and restored the anorexigenic effects of insulin on the hypothalamus of DIO rats. Interestingly, the suppressive effects of acute exercise on TRB3 protein levels may be related, at least in part, to decreased ER stress (evaluated though pancreatic ER kinase phosphorylation and C/EBP homologous protein levels) in the hypothalamus. Exercise-mediated reduction of hypothalamic TRB3 protein levels may be associated with reduction of ER stress. These data provide a new mechanism by which an acute exercise session improves insulin sensitivity in the hypothalamus and restores food intake control in obesity.

  15. Acute differential effects of dietary protein quality on postprandial lipemia in obese non-diabetic subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmer-Jensen, Jens; Mortensen, Lene S; Astrup, Arne

    2013-01-01

    Non-fasting triglyceridemia is much closer associated to cardiovascular risk compared to fasting triglyceridemia. We hypothesized that there would be acute differential effects of four common dietary proteins (cod protein, whey isolate, gluten, and casein) on postprandial lipemia in obese non......-diabetic subjects. To test the hypothesis we conducted a randomized, acute clinical intervention study with crossover design. We supplemented a fat rich mixed meal with one of four dietary proteins i.e. cod protein, whey protein, gluten or casein. Eleven obese non-diabetic subjects (age: 40-68, body mass index: 30.......3-42.0 kg/m(2)) participated and blood samples were drawn in the 8-h postprandial period. Supplementation of a fat rich mixed meal with whey protein caused lower postprandial lipemia (P = .048) compared to supplementation with cod protein and gluten. This was primarily due to lower triglyceride...

  16. Signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPalpha cells in the adaptive response to ESAT-6/CFP-10 protein of tuberculous mycobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Ray Waters

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Early secretory antigenic target-6 (ESAT-6 and culture filtrate protein-10 (CFP-10 are co-secreted proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex mycobacteria (includes M. bovis, the zoonotic agent of bovine tuberculosis involved in phagolysosome escape of the bacillus and, potentially, in the efficient induction of granulomas. Upon tuberculosis infection, multi-nucleate giant cells are elicited, likely as a response aimed at containing mycobacteria. In tissue culture models, signal regulatory protein (SIRPalpha (also referred to as macrophage fusion receptor or CD172a is essential for multi-nucleate giant cell formation.In the present study, ESAT-6/CFP-10 complex and SIRPalpha interactions were evaluated with samples obtained from calves experimentally infected with M. bovis. Peripheral blood CD172a(+ (SIRPalpha-expressing cells from M. bovis-infected calves proliferated upon in vitro stimulation with ESAT-6/CFP-10 (either as a fusion protein or a peptide cocktail, but not with cells from animals receiving M. bovis strains lacking ESAT-6/CFP-10 (i.e, M. bovis BCG or M. bovis DeltaRD1. Sorted CD172a(+ cells from these cultures had a dendritic cell/macrophage morphology, bound fluorescently-tagged rESAT-6:CFP-10, bound and phagocytosed live M. bovis BCG, and co-expressed CD11c, DEC-205, CD44, MHC II, CD80/86 (a subset also co-expressed CD11b or CD8alpha. Intradermal administration of rESAT-6:CFP-10 into tuberculous calves elicited a delayed type hypersensitive response consisting of CD11c(+, CD172a(+, and CD3(+ cells, including CD172a-expressing multi-nucleated giant cells.These findings demonstrate the ability of ESAT-6/CFP-10 to specifically expand CD172a(+ cells, bind to CD172a(+ cells, and induce multi-nucleated giant cells expressing CD172a.

  17. Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor–Related Protein-1 Is a Therapeutic Target in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Toldo, PhD

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein-1 (LRP1 is a ubiquitous membrane receptor functioning as a scavenger and regulatory receptor, inducing anti-inflammatory and prosurvival signals. Based on the known structure–activity of the LRP1 receptor binding site, the authors synthesized a small peptide (SP16. SP16 induced a >50% reduction in infarct size (p < 0.001 and preservation of left ventricular systolic function (p < 0.001, and treatment with an LRP1 blocking antibody eliminated the protective effects of SP16. In conclusion, LRP1 activation with SP16 given within 30 min of reperfusion during experimental acute myocardial infarction leads to a cardioprotective signal reducing infarct size and preservation of cardiac systolic function.

  18. Partial regulatory T cell depletion prior to acute feline immunodeficiency virus infection does not alter disease pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rochelle Mikkelsen

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV infection in cats follows a disease course similar to HIV-1, including a short acute phase characterized by high viremia, and a prolonged asymptomatic phase characterized by low viremia and generalized immune dysfunction. CD4(+CD25(hiFoxP3(+ immunosuppressive regulatory T (Treg cells have been implicated as a possible cause of immune dysfunction during FIV and HIV-1 infection, as they are capable of modulating virus-specific and inflammatory immune responses. Additionally, the immunosuppressive capacity of feline Treg cells has been shown to be increased during FIV infection. We have previously shown that transient in vivo Treg cell depletion during asymptomatic FIV infection reveals FIV-specific immune responses suppressed by Treg cells. In this study, we sought to determine the immunological influence of Treg cells during acute FIV infection. We asked whether Treg cell depletion prior to infection with the highly pathogenic molecular clone FIV-C36 in cats could alter FIV pathogenesis. We report here that partial Treg cell depletion prior to FIV infection does not significantly change provirus, viremia, or CD4(+ T cell levels in blood and lymphoid tissues during the acute phase of disease. The effects of anti-CD25 mAb treatment are truncated in cats acutely infected with FIV-C36 as compared to chronically infected cats or FIV-naïve cats, as Treg cell levels were heightened in all treatment groups included in the study within two weeks post-FIV infection. Our findings suggest that the influence of Treg cell suppression during FIV pathogenesis is most prominent after Treg cells are activated in the environment of established FIV infection.

  19. Partial regulatory T cell depletion prior to acute feline immunodeficiency virus infection does not alter disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, S Rochelle; Long, Julie M; Zhang, Lin; Galemore, Erin R; VandeWoude, Sue; Dean, Gregg A

    2011-02-25

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection in cats follows a disease course similar to HIV-1, including a short acute phase characterized by high viremia, and a prolonged asymptomatic phase characterized by low viremia and generalized immune dysfunction. CD4(+)CD25(hi)FoxP3(+) immunosuppressive regulatory T (Treg) cells have been implicated as a possible cause of immune dysfunction during FIV and HIV-1 infection, as they are capable of modulating virus-specific and inflammatory immune responses. Additionally, the immunosuppressive capacity of feline Treg cells has been shown to be increased during FIV infection. We have previously shown that transient in vivo Treg cell depletion during asymptomatic FIV infection reveals FIV-specific immune responses suppressed by Treg cells. In this study, we sought to determine the immunological influence of Treg cells during acute FIV infection. We asked whether Treg cell depletion prior to infection with the highly pathogenic molecular clone FIV-C36 in cats could alter FIV pathogenesis. We report here that partial Treg cell depletion prior to FIV infection does not significantly change provirus, viremia, or CD4(+) T cell levels in blood and lymphoid tissues during the acute phase of disease. The effects of anti-CD25 mAb treatment are truncated in cats acutely infected with FIV-C36 as compared to chronically infected cats or FIV-naïve cats, as Treg cell levels were heightened in all treatment groups included in the study within two weeks post-FIV infection. Our findings suggest that the influence of Treg cell suppression during FIV pathogenesis is most prominent after Treg cells are activated in the environment of established FIV infection.

  20. Antagonistic regulation of flowering time through distinct regulatory subunits of protein phosphatase 2A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Heidari

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A consists of three types of subunits: a catalytic (C, a scaffolding (A, and a regulatory (B subunit. In Arabidopsis thaliana and other organisms the regulatory B subunits are divided into at least three non-related groups, B55, B' and B″. Flowering time in plants mutated in B55 or B' genes were investigated in this work. The PP2A-b55α and PP2A-b55β (knockout lines showed earlier flowering than WT, whereas a PP2A-b'γ (knockdown line showed late flowering. Average advancements of flowering in PP2A-b55 mutants were 3.4 days in continuous light, 6.6 days in 12 h days, and 8.2 days in 8 h days. Average delays in the PP2A-b'γ mutant line were 7.1 days in 16 h days and 4.7 days in 8 h days. Expression of marker genes of genetically distinct flowering pathways (CO, FLC, MYB33, SPL3, and the floral integrator (FT, SOC1 were tested in WT, pp2a mutants, and two known flowering time mutants elf6 and edm2. The results are compatible with B55 acting at and/or downstream of the floral integrator, in a non-identified pathway. B' γ was involved in repression of FLC, the main flowering repressor gene. For B'γ the results are consistent with the subunit being a component in the major autonomous flowering pathway. In conclusion PP2A is both a positive and negative regulator of flowering time, depending on the type of regulatory subunit involved.

  1. Transcriptional control by two leucine-responsive regulatory proteins in Halobacterium salinarum R1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarasov Valery

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Archaea combine bacterial-as well as eukaryotic-like features to regulate cellular processes. Halobacterium salinarum R1 encodes eight leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp-homologues. The function of two of them, Irp (OE3923F and lrpA1 (OE2621R, were analyzed by gene deletion and overexpression, including genome scale impacts using microarrays. Results It was shown that Lrp affects the transcription of multiple target genes, including those encoding enzymes involved in amino acid synthesis, central metabolism, transport processes and other regulators of transcription. In contrast, LrpA1 regulates transcription in a more specific manner. The aspB3 gene, coding for an aspartate transaminase, was repressed by LrpA1 in the presence of L-aspartate. Analytical DNA-affinity chromatography was adapted to high salt, and demonstrated binding of LrpA1 to its own promoter, as well as L-aspartate dependent binding to the aspB3 promoter. Conclusion The gene expression profiles of two archaeal Lrp-homologues report in detail their role in H. salinarum R1. LrpA1 and Lrp show similar functions to those already described in bacteria, but in addition they play a key role in regulatory networks, such as controlling the transcription of other regulators. In a more detailed analysis ligand dependent binding of LrpA1 was demonstrated to its target gene aspB3.

  2. The regulatory role of immunosuppressants on immune abnormalities in acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Ligeng; Ma, Yu; Chi, Junlin; Wang, Xu; Wesley, Alexander J; Chen, Xiaoli

    2014-03-01

    The uncontrolled progression of the inflammatory cascade is the main cause underlying the development of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) in acute pancreatitis. In this study, we investigated the effects of several immunosuppressants on mitigating the systemic inflammatory reaction syndrome (SIRS) and the compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS) associated with acute pancreatitis. A total of 93 male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 5 groups: group 1 was the sham group and group 2 underwent laparoscopic intrapancreatic duct injection of sodium taurocholate to induce pancreatitis. The remaining 3 groups were the same as group 2, with the addition of methylprednisolone, cyclophosphamide or methotrexate treatment (metastab, CTX or MTX groups, respectively). Following establishment of the acute pancreatitis model, the serum levels of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in groups 2, 3, 4 and 5 were found to be significantly elevated. Following immunosuppressant administration, the levels of all inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines investigated in groups 3, 4 and 5 were decreased compared to those in group 2. The pancreatic amylase levels and pancreatic wet weight (PWW) were also decreased in groups 3, 4 and 5 compared to those in group 2. Therefore, immunosuppressants may reduce inflammation-related cytokine levels in acute pancreatitis and relieve disease progression.

  3. Effector and regulatory T cells in patients with acute optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsakiri, Anna; Kjærsgaard, Erik; Grigoriadis, Nikolaos

    2012-01-01

    Optic neuritis (ON) is an autoimmune acute demyelinating disease of the optic nerve and may occur in patients with confirmed multiple sclerosis (MS) or as a clinically isolated syndrome. T lymphocytes play a central role in the pathogenesis of MS. The phenotype of different T cell subsets...

  4. Properties of Sequence Conservation in Upstream Regulatory and Protein Coding Sequences among Paralogs in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Dale N.; Wiehe, Thomas

    Whole genome duplication (WGD) has catalyzed the formation of new species, genes with novel functions, altered expression patterns, complexified signaling pathways and has provided organisms a level of genetic robustness. We studied the long-term evolution and interrelationships of 5’ upstream regulatory sequences (URSs), protein coding sequences (CDSs) and expression correlations (EC) of duplicated gene pairs in Arabidopsis. Three distinct methods revealed significant evolutionary conservation between paralogous URSs and were highly correlated with microarray-based expression correlation of the respective gene pairs. Positional information on exact matches between sequences unveiled the contribution of micro-chromosomal rearrangements on expression divergence. A three-way rank analysis of URS similarity, CDS divergence and EC uncovered specific gene functional biases. Transcription factor activity was associated with gene pairs exhibiting conserved URSs and divergent CDSs, whereas a broad array of metabolic enzymes was found to be associated with gene pairs showing diverged URSs but conserved CDSs.

  5. Structural and regulatory diversity shape HLA-C protein expression levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur, Gurman; Gras, Stephanie; Mobbs, Jesse I

    2017-01-01

    Expression of HLA-C varies widely across individuals in an allele-specific manner. This variation in expression can influence efficacy of the immune response, as shown for infectious and autoimmune diseases. MicroRNA binding partially influences differential HLA-C expression, but the additional...... contributing factors have remained undetermined. Here we use functional and structural analyses to demonstrate that HLA-C expression is modulated not just at the RNA level, but also at the protein level. Specifically, we show that variation in exons 2 and 3, which encode the α1/α2 domains, drives differential...... expression of HLA-C allomorphs at the cell surface by influencing the structure of the peptide-binding cleft and the diversity of peptides bound by the HLA-C molecules. Together with a phylogenetic analysis, these results highlight the diversity and long-term balancing selection of regulatory factors...

  6. Regulatory effect of porcine plasma protein hydrolysates on pasting and gelatinization action of corn starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Baohua; Niu, Haili; Sun, Fangda; Han, Jianchun; Liu, Qian

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the regulatory effect of porcine plasma protein hydrolysates (PPPH) on the physicochemical, pasting, and gelatinization properties of corn starch (CS). The results showed that the solubility of CS markedly increased, whereas swelling power and gel penetration force decreased with increased PPPH concentration (Pstarch granules at room temperature (25°C) and then formed a network with swollen starch granules during gelatinization. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images indicated that the blocklet sizes of gelatinized CS-PPPH mixtures were smaller and more uniform than native CS. The results proved that pasting and gelatinization abilities of CS can be effectively influenced by adding PPPH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Acute differential effects of milk-derived dietary proteins on postprandial lipaemia in obese non-diabetic subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmer-Jensen, Jens; Hartvigsen, Merete; Mortensen, L.S.

    2012-01-01

    Postprandial lipaemia is an established risk factor for atherosclerosis. To investigate the acute effect of four milk-derived dietary proteins (alpha-lactalbumin, whey isolate, caseinoglycomacropeptide and whey hydrolysate) on postprandial lipaemia, we have conducted a randomized, acute, single...

  8. Effect of acute resistance exercise and sex on human patellar tendon structural and regulatory mRNA expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sullivan, B.E.; Carroll, C.C.; Jemiolo, B.

    2009-01-01

    -2, MMP-9, MMP-3, and TIMP-1 at rest and after RE. Patellar tendon biopsy samples were taken from six individuals (3 men and 3 women) before and 4 h after a bout of RE and from a another six individuals (3 men and 3 women) before and 24 h after RE. Resting mRNA expression was used for sex comparisons...... (6 men and 6 women). Collagen type I, collagen type III, and MMP-2 were downregulated (P 0.05) 24 h after RE. All other genes remained unchanged (P > 0.05) after RE. Women had higher resting mRNA expression (P ... = 0.08) toward lower resting expression of MMP-3 than men. All other genes were not influenced (P > 0.05) by sex. Acute RE appears to stimulate a change in collagen type I, collagen type III, and MMP-2 gene regulation in the human patellar tendon. Sex influences the structural and regulatory m...

  9. The cellular prion protein is preferentially expressed by CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, Jeremy D; Garden, Oliver A; Kaur, Gurman; Collinge, John; Jackson, Graham S; Altmann, Daniel M

    2008-01-01

    Post-translational modification of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) is intimately associated with the pathogenesis of prion disease, yet the normal function of the protein remains unclear. PrPC is expressed in lymphoid cells and is known to be a T-cell activation antigen. Further, transcription profiling studies of regulatory T cells have shown preferential overexpression of PrPC, suggesting a possible role in regulatory function. We report that both the expression of PrP message and cell surface PrPC levels are increased in murine CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells compared with CD4+ CD25− cells. However, PrP0/0 mice do not show altered regulatory T-cell numbers or forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) expression levels, or impaired regulatory T-cell function in vitro. Nevertheless, the preferential expression of surface PrPC by regulatory T cells raises the possibility that therapeutic ligation of PrPC might alter immune regulation. PMID:18462346

  10. The multifaceted activity of the VirF regulatory protein in the Shigella lifestyle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Letizia Di Martino

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Shigella is a highly adapted human pathogen, mainly found in the developing world and causing a severe enteric syndrome. The highly sophisticated infectious strategy of Shigella banks on the capacity to invade the intestinal epithelial barrier and cause its inflammatory destruction. The cellular pathogenesis and clinical presentation of shigellosis are the sum of the complex action of a large number of bacterial virulence factors mainly located on a large virulence plasmid (pINV. The expression of pINV genes is controlled by multiple environmental stimuli through a regulatory cascade involving proteins and sRNAs encoded by both the pINV and the chromosome. The primary regulator of the virulence phenotype is VirF, a DNA-binding protein belonging to the AraC family of transcriptional regulators. The virF gene, located on the pINV, is expressed only within the host, mainly in response to the temperature transition occurring when the bacterium transits from the outer environment to the intestinal milieu. VirF then acts as anti-H-NS protein and directly activates the icsA and virB genes, triggering the full expression of the invasion program of Shigella. In this review we will focus on the structure of VirF, on its sophisticated regulation, and on its role as major player in the path leading from the non invasive to the invasive phenotype of Shigella. We will address also the involvement of VirF in mechanisms aimed at withstanding adverse conditions inside the host, indicating that this protein is emerging as a global regulator whose action is not limited to virulence systems. Finally, we will discuss recent observations conferring VirF the potential of a novel antibacterial target for shigellosis.

  11. Phage phi 29 regulatory protein p4 stabilizes the binding of the RNA polymerase to the late promoter in a process involving direct protein-protein contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuez, B; Rojo, F; Salas, M

    1992-12-01

    Transcription from the late promoter, PA3, of Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29 is activated by the viral regulatory protein p4. A kinetic analysis of the activation process has revealed that the role of protein p4 is to stabilize the binding of RNA polymerase to the promoter as a closed complex without significantly affecting further steps of the initiation process. Electrophoretic band-shift assays performed with a DNA fragment spanning only the protein p4 binding site showed that RNA polymerase could efficiently retard the complex formed by protein p4 bound to the DNA. Similarly, when a DNA fragment containing only the RNA polymerase-binding region of PA3 was used, p4 greatly stimulated the binding of RNA polymerase to the DNA. These results strongly suggest that p4 and RNA polymerase contact each other at the PA3 promoter. In the light of current knowledge of the p4 activation mechanism, we propose that direct contacts between the two proteins participate in the activation process.

  12. Recombinant protein-based assays for detection of antibodies to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus spike and nucleocapsid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Lia M; Miao, Congrong; Harcourt, Jennifer L; Montgomery, Joel M; Le, Mai Quynh; Dryga, Sergey A; Kamrud, Kurt I; Rivers, Bryan; Babcock, Gregory J; Oliver, Jennifer Betts; Comer, James A; Reynolds, Mary; Uyeki, Timothy M; Bausch, Daniel; Ksiazek, Thomas; Thomas, William; Alterson, Harold; Smith, Jonathan; Ambrosino, Donna M; Anderson, Larry J

    2007-03-01

    Recombinant severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) nucleocapsid and spike protein-based immunoglobulin G immunoassays were developed and evaluated. Our assays demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity to the SARS coronavirus in sera collected from patients as late as 2 years postonset of symptoms. These assays will be useful not only for routine SARS coronavirus diagnostics but also for epidemiological and antibody kinetic studies.

  13. Role of CC chemokines (macrophage inflammatory protein-1 beta, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, RANTES) in acute lung injury in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bless, N M; Huber-Lang, M; Guo, R F

    2000-01-01

    The role of the CC chemokines, macrophage inflammatory protein-1 beta (MIP-1 beta), monocyte chemotactic peptide-1 (MCP-1), and RANTES, in acute lung inflammatory injury induced by intrapulmonary deposition of IgG immune complexes injury in rats was determined. Rat MIP-1 beta, MCP-1, and RANTES w...

  14. The Protein Phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit Twins stabilizes Plk4 to induce centriole amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlee, Christopher W; Klebba, Joey E; Buster, Daniel W; Rogers, Gregory C

    2011-10-17

    Centriole duplication is a tightly regulated process that must occur only once per cell cycle; otherwise, supernumerary centrioles can induce aneuploidy and tumorigenesis. Plk4 (Polo-like kinase 4) activity initiates centriole duplication and is regulated by ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. Throughout interphase, Plk4 autophosphorylation triggers its degradation, thus preventing centriole amplification. However, Plk4 activity is required during mitosis for proper centriole duplication, but the mechanism stabilizing mitotic Plk4 is unknown. In this paper, we show that PP2A (Protein Phosphatase 2A(Twins)) counteracts Plk4 autophosphorylation, thus stabilizing Plk4 and promoting centriole duplication. Like Plk4, the protein level of PP2A's regulatory subunit, Twins (Tws), peaks during mitosis and is required for centriole duplication. However, untimely Tws expression stabilizes Plk4 inappropriately, inducing centriole amplification. Paradoxically, expression of tumor-promoting simian virus 40 small tumor antigen (ST), a reported PP2A inhibitor, promotes centrosome amplification by an unknown mechanism. We demonstrate that ST actually mimics Tws function in stabilizing Plk4 and inducing centriole amplification.

  15. A mutation in protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A affects auxin transport in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbers, C.; DeLong, A.; Deruere, J.; Bernasconi, P.; Soll, D.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin controls processes such as cell elongation, root hair development and root branching. Tropisms, growth curvatures triggered by gravity, light and touch, are also auxin-mediated responses. Auxin is synthesized in the shoot apex and transported through the stem, but the molecular mechanism of auxin transport is not well understood. Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and other inhibitors of auxin transport block tropic curvature responses and inhibit root and shoot elongation. We have isolated a novel Arabidopsis thaliana mutant designated roots curl in NPA (rcn1). Mutant seedlings exhibit altered responses to NPA in root curling and hypocotyl elongation. Auxin efflux in mutant seedlings displays increased sensitivity to NPA. The rcn1 mutation was transferred-DNA (T-DNA) tagged and sequences flanking the T-DNA insert were cloned. Analysis of the RCN1 cDNA reveals that the T-DNA insertion disrupts a gene for the regulatory A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-A). The RCN1 gene rescues the rcn1 mutant phenotype and also complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PP2A-A mutation, tpd3-1. These data implicate protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of auxin transport in Arabidopsis.

  16. Unperturbed posttranscriptional regulatory Rev protein function and HIV-1 replication in astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Chauhan

    Full Text Available Astrocytes protect neurons, but also evoke proinflammatory responses to injury and viral infections, including HIV. There is a prevailing notion that HIV-1 Rev protein function in astrocytes is perturbed, leading to restricted viral replication. In earlier studies, our finding of restricted viral entry into astrocytes led us to investigate whether there are any intracellular restrictions, including crippled Rev function, in astrocytes. Despite barely detectable levels of DDX3 (Rev-supporting RNA helicase and TRBP (anti-PKR in primary astrocytes compared to astrocytic cells, Rev function was unperturbed in wild-type, but not DDX3-ablated astrocytes. As in permissive cells, after HIV-1 entry bypass in astrocytes, viral-encoded Tat and Rev proteins had robust regulatory activities, leading to efficient viral replication. Productive HIV-1 infection in astrocytes persisted for several weeks. Our findings on HIV-1 entry bypass in astrocytes demonstrated that the intracellular environment is conducive to viral replication and that Tat and Rev functions are unperturbed.

  17. Construction of protein profile classification model and screening of proteomic signature of acute leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yun; Zhuo, Jiacai; Duan, Yonggang; Shi, Benhang; Chen, Xuhong; Zhang, Xiaoli; Xiao, Liang; Lou, Jin; Huang, Ruihong; Zhang, Qiongli; Du, Xin; Li, Ming; Wang, Daping; Shi, Dunyun

    2014-01-01

    The French-American-British (FAB) and WHO classifications provide important guidelines for the diagnosis, treatment, and prognostic prediction of acute leukemia, but are incapable of accurately differentiating all subtypes, and not well correlated with the clinical outcomes. In this study, we performed the protein profiling of the bone marrow mononuclear cells from the patients with acute leukemia and the health volunteers (control) by surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time of flig...

  18. Epitopes of human immunodeficiency virus regulatory proteins tat, nef, and rev are expressed in normal human tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parmentier, H. K.; van Wichen, D. F.; Meyling, F. H.; Goudsmit, J.; Schuurman, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    The expression of regulatory proteins tat, rev, and nef of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) and tat of HIV-2 was studied in frozen sections of lymph nodes from HIV-1-infected individuals, and various tissues from uninfected persons. In HIV-1-positive lymph nodes, monoclonal antibodies to

  19. Relationship between Acute Phase Proteins and Serum Fatty Acid Composition in Morbidly Obese Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Fernandes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obesity is considered a low-grade inflammatory state and has been associated with increased acute phase proteins as well as changes in serum fatty acids. Few studies have assessed associations between acute phase proteins and serum fatty acids in morbidly obese patients. Objective. To investigate the relationship between acute phase proteins (C-Reactive Protein, Orosomucoid, and Albumin and serum fatty acids in morbidly obese patients. Methods. Twenty-two morbidly obese patients were enrolled in this study. Biochemical and clinical data were obtained before bariatric surgery, and fatty acids measured in preoperative serum. Results. Orosomucoid was negatively correlated with lauric acid (P=0.027 and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA (P=0.037 and positively with arachidonic acid (AA (P=0.035, AA/EPA ratio (P=0.005, and n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids ratio (P=0.035. C-Reactive Protein (CRP was negatively correlated with lauric acid (P=0.048, and both CRP and CRP/Albumin ratio were negatively correlated with margaric acid (P=0.010, P=0.008, resp.. Albumin was positively correlated with EPA (P=0.027 and margaric acid (P=0.008. Other correlations were not statistically significant. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that serum fatty acids are linked to acute phase proteins in morbidly obese patients.

  20. The aryloxyalkanoate dioxygenase-12 (AAD-12) protein is not acutely toxic in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papineni, Sabitha; Golden, Rachel M; Thomas, Johnson

    2017-12-01

    Typically, when a protein is orally toxic, it acts via acute mechanisms, especially at high doses. Therefore, an acute oral toxicity study is considered appropriate for evaluating the safety of transgenic proteins. Soybean plants (events DAS-68416-4 and DAS-444Ø6-6) have been genetically modified to express the aryloxyalkanoate dioxygenase-12 (AAD-12) protein. The AAD-12 protein provides tolerance to the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). This paper summarizes the study designs of two acute oral toxicity studies evaluating the AAD-12 protein and reports the results of these studies. No mortalities or adverse effects were observed in mice when AAD-12 was tested up to a limit dose of 5000 mg/kg body weight. Based on the results of these studies, it can be concluded that AAD-12 protein, as expressed in genetically modified DAS-68416-4 and DAS-444Ø6-6 soybeans, lacks acute toxicity via the oral route. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Adaptation of Tri-molecular fluorescence complementation allows assaying of regulatory Csr RNA-protein interactions in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelderman, Grant; Sivakumar, Anusha; Lipp, Sarah; Contreras, Lydia

    2015-02-01

    sRNAs play a significant role in controlling and regulating cellular metabolism. One of the more interesting aspects of certain sRNAs is their ability to make global changes in the cell by interacting with regulatory proteins. In this work, we demonstrate the use of an in vivo Tri-molecular Fluorescence Complementation assay to detect and visualize the central regulatory sRNA-protein interaction of the Carbon Storage Regulatory system in E. coli. The Carbon Storage Regulator consists primarily of an RNA binding protein, CsrA, that alters the activity of mRNA targets and of an sRNA, CsrB, that modulates the activity of CsrA. We describe the construction of a fluorescence complementation system that detects the interactions between CsrB and CsrA. Additionally, we demonstrate that the intensity of the fluorescence of this system is able to detect changes in the affinity of the CsrB-CsrA interaction, as caused by mutations in the protein sequence of CsrA. While previous methods have adopted this technique to study mRNA or RNA localization, this is the first attempt to use this technique to study the sRNA-protein interaction directly in bacteria. This method presents a potentially powerful tool to study complex bacterial RNA protein interactions in vivo. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Transcriptional regulatory networks downstream of TAL1/SCL in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Palomero, Teresa; Odom, Duncan T.; O'Neil, Jennifer; Ferrando, Adolfo A.; Margolin, Adam; Neuberg, Donna S.; Winter, Stuart S.; Larson, Richard S.; Li, Wei; Liu, X. Shirley; Young, Richard A.; Look, A. Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Aberrant expression of 1 or more transcription factor oncogenes is a critical component of the molecular pathogenesis of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL); however, oncogenic transcriptional programs downstream of T-ALL oncogenes are mostly unknown. TAL1/SCL is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor oncogene aberrantly expressed in 60% of human T-ALLs. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) on chip to identify 71 direct transcriptional targets of TAL1/SCL. ...

  3. Pig-MAP, porcine acute phase proteins and standardisation of assays in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alava, M.A.; Gonzalez-Ramon, N.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    1997-01-01

    for the presence of infectious, inflammatory and pathological lesions in animals. The ability to monitor the APP concentration in serum of pigs will improve the quality and safety of the meat produced as well as provide important diagnostic information for animal health and welfare. The serum concentration of APP......The pattern of plasma proteins changes greatly following infection, inflammation or tissue injury. The concentration of some proteins referred to as acute phase proteins (APPs) significantly increases within hours or days after the onset of these processes. In contrast, the concentration of other...... proteins, such as albumin (Alb), called negative acute phase proteins, decreases. APPs have been extensively studied in man and rat, but less so in other species. In recent work, the APPs have been characterised in pigs in response to inflammation following turpentine injection. The concentrations of C...

  4. Does acute or habitual protein deprivation influence liking for monosodium glutamate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Una; Yeomans, Martin R

    2017-03-15

    The umami flavour generated by monosodium glutamate (MSG) has been proposed as the marker for the presence of protein in foods. As protein is the most closely regulated macronutrient in the diet, the present study addressed whether acute protein deprivation, habitual protein intake or a combination of the two influenced liking for the taste of MSG. 24 low-restraint male participants (mean age: 22; BMI: 23) consumed either their habitual breakfast (baseline), a low protein breakfast (breakfast meal with low protein milk and milkshake) or a high protein breakfast (breakfast meal with high protein milk and milkshake) on three different days, and then evaluated the acceptability of umami (MSG), salty (NaCl) or sweet (Acesulphame K) tastes at low or high concentrations in a soup context at lunchtime. Participants also completed a habitual protein intake questionnaire (39-item protein Food Frequency Questionnaire). Liking for all tastes was higher on the low than on the high protein day, and NaCl and Acesulphame K were liked less on both protein manipulation days when compared to the no added flavour control. Habitual protein intake was not related to liking for MSG stimuli alone but habitual high protein consumers rated a high concentration of MSG as more pleasant than any other taste when in protein deficit. Overall, these findings suggest that liking for high MSG concentrations may be moderated by nutritional need in high protein consumers. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Targeted proteomics as a tool for porcine acute phase proteins measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marco-Ramell, Anna; Bassols, Anna; Bislev, Stine Lønnerup

    2013-01-01

    ) and there is recent evidence that they can be also considered as welfare markers (Giannetto et al., 2011). During an acute stress situation, the levels of some interleukins (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) are increased (Elenkov and Chrousos, 2002) and consequently the concentration of the APPs varies dramatically. In pigs...... the most important APPs include haptoglobin (Hp), C-reactive protein (CRP), the inter-α-inhibitor-heavy chain 4 (ITIH4, also called Pig major acute phase protein, or Pig-MAP), serum amyloid A (SAA) and apolipoprotein A-I (Apo A-I), but also other proteins are well known to mark the acute phase response......, as albumin, transferrin (Heegaard et al., 2011) and fetuin A (Brown et al., 1992)....

  6. Characterization of the regulatory subunit of Yarrowia lipolytica cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Evidences of a monomeric protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronberg, Florencia; Giacometti, Romina; Ruiz-Herrera, José; Passeron, Susana

    2011-05-01

    cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) catalytic (C) and regulatory (R) subunits from Yarrowia lipolytica are encoded by single genes, TPK1 and RKA1, respectively. Here we performed the heterologous expression, purification and characterization of the R subunit from Y. lipolytica yeast cells, and explored the main biochemical features of the PKA. The purified recombinant R, active and capable to interact with C subunit was used to prepare highly specific polyclonal antiserum. Sucrose-gradient centrifugation and gel filtration analysis of both recombinant and native R revealed the monomeric nature of this subunit. Hydrodynamic parameters of the holoenzyme indicated that Y. lipolytica PKA is a dimer of 90 kDa composed of an R subunit of 42 kDa and a C subunit of 39 kDa. The identification of the N-terminal sequence was carried out by mass spectrometry analysis of the purified native R subunit. The differences between N-terminal sequences of R subunits from Y. lipolytica and other organisms, particularly a short linker that spans the inhibitory site, were discussed as the possible cause of the lack of dimerization. R was identified as a type II subunit since our results indicated that it was phosphorylated in vivo by C at S124 identified by anti-phospho-PKA substrate (RRXS/T) antibody. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Schiff Base Metal Derivatives Enhance the Expression of HSP70 and Suppress BAX Proteins in Prevention of Acute Gastric Lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Golbabapour

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Schiff base complexes have appeared to be promising in the treatment of different diseases and disorders and have drawn a lot of attention to their biological activities. This study was conducted to evaluate the regulatory effect of Schiff base metal derivatives on the expression of heat shock proteins (HSP 70 and BAX in protection against acute haemorrhagic gastric ulcer in rats. Rats were assigned to 6 groups of 6 rats: the normal control (Tween 20 5% v/v, 5 mL/kg, the positive control (Tween 20 5% v/v, 5 mL/kg, and four Schiff base derivative groups named Schiff_1, Schiff_2, Schiff_3, and Schiff_4 (25 mg/kg. After 1 h, all of the groups received ethanol 95% (5 mL/kg but the normal control received Tween 20 (Tween 20 5% v/v, 5 mL/kg. The animals were euthanized after 60 min and the stomachs were dissected for histology (H&E, immunohistochemistry, and western blot analysis against HSP70 and BAX proteins. The results showed that the Schiff base metal derivatives enhanced the expression of HSP70 and suppressed the expression of BAX proteins during their gastroprotection against ethanol-induced gastric lesion in rats.

  8. WrpA Is an Atypical Flavodoxin Family Protein under Regulatory Control of the Brucella abortus General Stress Response System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrou, Julien; Czyż, Daniel M.; Willett, Jonathan W.; Kim, Hye-Sook; Chhor, Gekleng; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Kim, Youngchang; Crosson, Sean; Stock, A. M.

    2016-02-08

    ABSTRACT

    The general stress response (GSR) system of the intracellular pathogenBrucella abortuscontrols the transcription of approximately 100 genes in response to a range of stress cues. The core genetic regulatory components of the GSR are required forB. abortussurvival under nonoptimal growth conditionsin vitroand for maintenance of chronic infection in anin vivomouse model. The functions of the majority of the genes in the GSR transcriptional regulon remain undefined.bab1_1070is among the most highly regulated genes in this regulon: its transcription is activated 20- to 30-fold by the GSR system under oxidative conditionsin vitro. We have solved crystal structures of Bab1_1070 and demonstrate that it forms a homotetrameric complex that resembles those of WrbA-type NADH:quinone oxidoreductases, which are members of the flavodoxin protein family. However,B. abortusWrbA-relatedprotein (WrpA) does not bind flavin cofactors with a high affinity and does not function as an NADH:quinone oxidoreductasein vitro. Soaking crystals with flavin mononucleotide (FMN) revealed a likely low-affinity binding site adjacent to the canonical WrbA flavin binding site. Deletion ofwrpAwrpA) does not compromise cell survival under acute oxidative stressin vitroor attenuate infection in cell-based or mouse models. However, a ΔwrpAstrain does elicit increased splenomegaly in a mouse model, suggesting that WrpA modulatesB. abortusinteraction with its mammalian host. Despite

  9. Acute phase proteins in dogs naturally infected with the Giant Kidney Worm (Dioctophyme renale)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Elizabeth M. S.; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads; Thomas, Funmilola

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dioctophyme renale is a nematode parasite of dogs, usually found in the right kidney, causing severe damage to the renal parenchyma. Objectives: The objective was to evaluate the acute phase response in dogs naturally infected with this Giant Kidney Worm and the possible effects...... of nephrectomy on circulating concentrations of select acute phase proteins (APP) such as serum amyloid A (SAA), C-reactive protein (CRP), and haptoglobin(HP). Methods: Nephrectomy was performed in infected dogs and the worms were collected for identification. Blood samples were taken 24 hours before surgery...

  10. Influence of Acute High Glucose on Protein Abundance Changes in Murine Glomerular Mesangial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle T. Barati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of acute exposure to high glucose levels as experienced by glomerular mesangial cells in postprandial conditions and states such as in prediabetes were investigated using proteomic methods. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry methods were used to identify protein expression patterns in immortalized rat mesangial cells altered by 2 h high glucose (HG growth conditions as compared to isoosmotic/normal glucose control (NG⁎ conditions. Unique protein expression changes at 2 h HG treatment were measured for 51 protein spots. These proteins could be broadly grouped into two categories: (1 proteins involved in cell survival/cell signaling and (2 proteins involved in stress response. Immunoblot experiments for a protein belonging to both categories, prohibitin (PHB, supported a trend for increased total expression as well as significant increases in an acidic PHB isoform. Additional studies confirmed the regulation of proteasomal subunit alpha-type 2 and the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone and oxidoreductase PDI (protein disulfide isomerase, suggesting altered ER protein folding capacity and proteasomal function in response to acute HG. We conclude that short term high glucose induces subtle changes in protein abundances suggesting posttranslational modifications and regulation of pathways involved in proteostasis.

  11. Global gene expression profiling in Escherichia coli K12. The effects of leucine-responsive regulatory protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, She-pin; Baldi, Pierre; Hatfield, G Wesley

    2002-10-25

    Leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) is a global regulatory protein that affects the expression of multiple genes and operons in bacteria. Although the physiological purpose of Lrp-mediated gene regulation remains unclear, it has been suggested that it functions to coordinate cellular metabolism with the nutritional state of the environment. The results of gene expression profiles between otherwise isogenic lrp(+) and lrp(-) strains of Escherichia coli support this suggestion. The newly discovered Lrp-regulated genes reported here are involved either in small molecule or macromolecule synthesis or degradation, or in small molecule transport and environmental stress responses. Although many of these regulatory effects are direct, others are indirect consequences of Lrp-mediated changes in the expression levels of other global regulatory proteins. Because computational methods to analyze and interpret high dimensional DNA microarray data are still an early stage, much of the emphasis of this work is directed toward the development of methods to identify differentially expressed genes with a high level of confidence. In particular, we describe a Bayesian statistical framework for a posterior estimate of the standard deviation of gene measurements based on a limited number of replications. We also describe an algorithm to compute a posterior estimate of differential expression for each gene based on the experiment-wide global false positive and false negative level for a DNA microarray data set. This allows the experimenter to compute posterior probabilities of differential expression for each individual differential gene expression measurement.

  12. Upregulation of CD200 is associated with Foxp3+ regulatory T cell expansion and disease progression in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memarian, Ali; Nourizadeh, Maryam; Masoumi, Farimah; Tabrizi, Mina; Emami, Amir Hossein; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Hadjati, Jamshid; Mirahmadian, Mahroo; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood

    2013-02-01

    Immunosuppression in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an important mechanism of tumor escape. CD200, as an immunosuppressive molecule, is overexpressed in some hematological malignancies and it has also been shown to be an independent prognostic factor in AML. In the current study, simultaneous CD200 expression and Foxp3(+) regulatory T cell levels were investigated in Iranian patients with AML by flow cytometry. We also assessed the effect of CD200-CD200R blockade on Th1 and T-reg cytokine production and T cell proliferation in autologous AML- and monocyte-DC mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLRs). ELISA assay was performed to detect IL-2, IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-10, and TGF-β production in MLR supernatants. Expression of Foxp3, IL-10, and TGF-β mRNAs in MLRs were detected by real-time PCR. Our results demonstrated significant overexpression of CD200 (P = 0.001) in association with higher frequencies of Foxp3(+) T cells in AML patients (r = 0.8, P T cell levels with lower Foxp3 intensity was also shown in CD200-CD200R-blocked MLRs. Expression of IL-10 mRNA declined significantly only in AML-DC MLRs where CD200-CD200R interaction was blocked and the same result was observed for TGF-β and Foxp3 mRNA in both AML- and monocyte-DC MLRs. These data present a significant role for CD200 in suppressing anti-tumor immune response through stimulation of regulatory mechanisms in AML patients and suggest that CD200 may have a prognostic value in this malignancy and its blockade may be used as a target for AML immunotherapy.

  13. Human sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1a contributes significantly to hepatic lipogenic gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitter, Andreas; Nüssler, Andreas K; Thasler, Wolfgang E; Klein, Kathrin; Zanger, Ulrich M; Schwab, Matthias; Burk, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) 1, the master regulator of lipogenesis, was shown to be associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which is attributed to its major isoform SREBP1c. Based on studies in mice, the minor isoform SREBP1a is regarded as negligible for hepatic lipogenesis. This study aims to elucidate the expression and functional role of SREBP1a in human liver. mRNA expression of both isoforms was quantified in cohorts of human livers and primary human hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were treated with PF-429242 to inhibit the proteolytic activation of SREBP precursor protein. SREBP1a-specifc and pan-SREBP1 knock-down were performed by transfection of respective siRNAs. Lipogenic SREBP-target gene expression was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. In human liver, SREBP1a accounts for up to half of the total SREBP1 pool. Treatment with PF-429242 indicated SREBP-dependent auto-regulation of SREBP1a, which however was much weaker than of SREBP1c. SREBP1a-specifc knock-down also reduced significantly the expression of SREBP1c and of SREBP-target genes. Regarding most SREBP-target genes, simultaneous knock-down of both isoforms resulted in effects of only similar extent as SREBP1a-specific knock-down. We here showed that SREBP1a is significantly contributing to the human hepatic SREBP1 pool and has a share in human hepatic lipogenic gene expression. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Human Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein 1a Contributes Significantly to Hepatic Lipogenic Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Bitter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP 1, the master regulator of lipogenesis, was shown to be associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which is attributed to its major isoform SREBP1c. Based on studies in mice, the minor isoform SREBP1a is regarded as negligible for hepatic lipogenesis. This study aims to elucidate the expression and functional role of SREBP1a in human liver. Methods: mRNA expression of both isoforms was quantified in cohorts of human livers and primary human hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were treated with PF-429242 to inhibit the proteolytic activation of SREBP precursor protein. SREBP1a-specifc and pan-SREBP1 knock-down were performed by transfection of respective siRNAs. Lipogenic SREBP-target gene expression was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. Results: In human liver, SREBP1a accounts for up to half of the total SREBP1 pool. Treatment with PF-429242 indicated SREBP-dependent auto-regulation of SREBP1a, which however was much weaker than of SREBP1c. SREBP1a-specifc knock-down also reduced significantly the expression of SREBP1c and of SREBP-target genes. Regarding most SREBP-target genes, simultaneous knock-down of both isoforms resulted in effects of only similar extent as SREBP1a-specific knock-down. Conclusion: We here showed that SREBP1a is significantly contributing to the human hepatic SREBP1 pool and has a share in human hepatic lipogenic gene expression.

  15. Regulatory roles of microtubule-associated proteins in neuronal morphogenesis. Involvement of the extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramírez G.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available As a result of recent investigations, the cytoskeleton can be viewed as a cytoplasmic system of interconnected filaments with three major integrative levels: self-assembling macromolecules, filamentous polymers, e.g., microtubules, intermediate filaments and actin filaments, and supramolecular structures formed by bundles of these filaments or networks resulting from cross-bridges between these major cytoskeletal polymers. The organization of this biological structure appears to be sensitive to fine spatially and temporally dependent regulatory signals. In differentiating neurons, regulation of cytoskeleton organization is particularly relevant, and the microtubule-associated protein (MAP tau appears to play roles in the extension of large neuritic processes and axons as well as in the stabilization of microtubular polymers along these processes. Within this context, tau is directly involved in defining neuronal polarity as well as in the generation of neuronal growth cones. There is increasing evidence that elements of the extracellular matrix contribute to the control of cytoskeleton organization in differentiating neurons, and that these regulations could be mediated by changes in MAP activity. In this brief review, we discuss the possible roles of tau in mediating the effects of extracellular matrix components on the internal cytoskeletal arrays and its organization in growing neurons.

  16. Cross-phosphorylation of bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine protein kinases on key regulatory residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei eShi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria possess protein serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases which resemble eukaryal kinases in their capacity to phosphorylate multiple substrates. We hypothesized that the analogy might extend further, and bacterial kinases may also undergo mutual phosphorylation and activation, which is currently considered as a hallmark of eukaryal kinase networks. In order to test this hypothesis, we explored the capacity of all members of four different classes of serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases present in the firmicute model organism Bacillus subtilis to phosphorylate each other in vitro and interact with each other in vivo. The interactomics data suggested a high degree of connectivity among all types of kinases, while phosphorylation assays revealed equally wide-spread cross-phosphorylation events. Our findings suggest that the Hanks-type kinases PrkC, PrkD and YabT exhibit the highest capacity to phosphorylate other B. subtilis kinases, while the BY-kinase PtkA and the two-component-like kinases RsbW and SpoIIAB show the highest propensity to be phosphorylated by other kinases. Analysis of phosphorylated residues on several selected recipient kinases suggests that most cross-phosphorylation events concern key regulatory residues. Therefore, cross-phosphorylation events are very likely to influence the capacity of recipient kinases to phosphorylate substrates downstream in the signal transduction cascade. We therefore conclude that bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases probably engage in a network-type behavior previously described only in eukaryal cells.

  17. Sequence-selective DNA binding to the regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J C; Wang, J H

    1989-06-15

    The fluorescence of Trp-226 in the regulatory subunit of bovine type II cAMP-dependent protein kinase is unaffected by the binding of cAMP, but is quenched by the binding of 2'-dansyl-cAMP (DNS-cAMP). Up to 67% of the fluorescence of Trp-226 can be quenched by resonant energy transfer to the DNS-cAMP bound to the first site, and 96% of the fluorescence can be quenched by saturating both sites with DNS-cAMP. The observed efficiencies of energy transfer gave a distance of 16 A between Trp-226 and the DNS-cAMP bound at the first site and a distance of 12.7 A between Trp-226 and the DNS-cAMP bound at second site. The fluorescence of Trp-226 was suppressed by incubation of RII with the self-complementary octanucleotide TGACGTCA (CRE) due to binding of the oligonucleotide to RII. A detailed study of the binding equilibrium showed that each RII(cAMP)2 molecule binds 1 molecule of CRE with Kd = 80 nM. The corresponding Kd value for cAMP-depleted RII was found to be 25-fold higher. RII was also found to bind randomly selected DNA fragments with an average Kd value much higher than that of CRE. These observations show for the first time that the binding of oligonucleotide to RII is cAMP-enhanced and sequence-selective.

  18. Bacteraemia and acute phase proteins in Nigerian women with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    C-reactive protein, alpha–2-macroglobulin, transferrin and bacteraemia were studied in women with recurrent abortion and compared with the pregnant women as well as non-pregnant women with no history of abortion (controls). The results showed a significantly reduced level of transferrin but significantly raised levels of ...

  19. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE of urinary protein in acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sufi M Suhail

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental and clinical studies have shown the importance of urinary proteomics in acute kidney injury (AKI. We analyzed the protein in urine of patients with clinical AKI using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE for its diagnostic value, and followed them up for 40 months to evaluate prognosis. Urine from 31 consecutive cases of AKI was analyzed with SDS-PAGE to determine the low, middle and high molecular weight proteins. Fractional excretion of sodium (FENa was estimated from serum and urine creatinine and sodium (Na. The cases were followed-up for 40 months from the end of the recruitment of study cases. Glomerular protein was higher in the hematuria group when compared with the non-hematuria group (P <0.04 and in the AKI group than in the acute on chronic renal failure (AKI-on-CRF group (P <0.002. Tubular protein was higher in the AKI-on-CRF group (P <0.003 than in the AKI group. Tubular protein correlated with FENa in groups with diabetes mellitus (DM, AKI-on-CRF, and without hematuria (P <0.03, P <0.02 and P <0.004, respectively. Pattern of protein did not differ between groups with and without DM and clinical acute tubular necrosis (ATN. At the end of 40 months follow-up, category with predominantly glomerular protein progressed to chronic renal failure (CRF or end-stage renal failure in higher proportion (P <0.05. In clinical AKI, we observed that glomerular protein dominated in cases with glomerular insult, as indicated by hematuria. Tubular protein was common in the study cases with CRF, DM and cases without hematuria. This indicates tubulo-interstitial injury for AKI in these cases. Patients with predominantly glomerular protein had an adverse outcome.

  20. The diagnostic accuracy of acute phase proteins and proinflammatory cytokines in sheep with pneumonic pasteurellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael M. El-Deeb

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of acute phase proteins and proinflammatory cytokines in sheep with pneumonic pasteurellosis. Blood samples were collected from 56 sheep (36 naturally infected with Pasteurella multocida and 20 healthy controls belonging to one farm in Eastern region, Saudi Arabia. Serum samples were evaluated for acute phase proteins (Haptoglobin (Hp, serum amyloid A (SAA and fibrinogen (Fb, and the proinflammatory cytokines (interleukins (IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, and interferon-gamma (IFN-ϒ. Additionally, nasopharyngeal swabs and bronchoalveolar lavages were collected from all animals for bacteriological examinations. Receiver operating characteristic curve was used to assess the diagnostic performance of each parameter. All parameters showed moderate to high degree of positive correlation with case-control status. There was no significant difference in the area under the curve (AUC among acute phase proteins; however, both Hp and SAA showed better sensitivity and specificity than Fb. The proinflammatory cytokines (IL1-α, IL1-β, and IL6 showed similar and highly accurate diagnostic performance (AUC > 0.9, whereas IFN-ϒ was moderately accurate (AUC = 0.79. In conclusion, this study confirms the value of acute phase proteins and cytokines as diagnostic biomarkers of naturally occuring pneumonic pasteurellosis in sheep.

  1. The effect of chronic ammonia exposure on acute phase proteins, immunoglobulin and cytokines in laying hens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammonia is a potential health hazard to both humans and animals, causing systemic low-grade inflammation based on its levels and durations. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of 45 weeks of exposure to 30 ppm NH3 on the concentrations of acute phase proteins, immunoglobulins and c...

  2. Role of macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1 alpha) in acute lung injury in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shanley, T P; Schmal, H; Friedl, H P

    1995-01-01

    The role of macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1 alpha) in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury in rats after intrapulmonary deposition of IgG immune complexes or intratracheal administration of LPS has been assessed. Critical to these studies was the cloning and functional expression...

  3. Role of heat shock protein hsp90 in formation of protective reactions in acute toxic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glushkova, O V; Novoselova, T V; Khrenov, M O; Parfenyuk, S B; Lunin, S M; Fesenko, E E; Novoselova, E G

    2010-06-01

    The involvement of heat shock protein Hsp90 in pro-inflammatory response in male NMRI mice under conditions of acute toxic stress, caused by lipopolysaccharide from Gram negative bacteria, was studied using geldanamycin, a specific blocker of the activity of this protein. It is shown that the introduction of geldanamycin lowers total intoxication of the organism upon acute toxic stress caused by endotoxin. Thus, a decrease in cytokine TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, IL-1, and IL-10 concentrations in blood serum of the geldanamycin-treated animals with acute toxic stress was found along with normalization of functional activity of nitric oxide producing peritoneal macrophages. Studying expression of receptor protein Tlr-4 as well of proteins of two signal cascades, NF-kappaB and SAPK/JNK, has shown that mechanisms of the geldanamycin protective effect are realized at the level of inhibition of Tlr-4 receptor expression, which provides for endotoxin-to-cell binding, and due to lowering the endotoxin-stimulated activation of signal cascades NF-kappaB and SAPK/JNK. The results suggest Hsp90 might be a therapeutic target in diseases accompanied by acute toxic stress.

  4. Expression of multidrug resistance-associated proteins predicts prognosis in childhood and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plasschaert, SLA; de Bont, ESJM; Boezen, M; vander Kolk, DM; Daenen, SMJG; Faber, KN; Kamps, WA; de Vries, EGE; Vellenga, E

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are treated with a variety of chemotherapeutic drugs, which can be transported by six multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP). These MRPs have strongly overlapping functional activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the

  5. Nickel decreases cellular iron level and converts cytosolic aconitase to iron-regulatory protein 1 in A549 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Haobin; Davidson, Todd; Singleton, Steven; Garrick, Michael D.; Costa, Max

    2005-01-01

    Nickel (Ni) compounds are well-established carcinogens and are known to initiate a hypoxic response in cells via the stabilization and transactivation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). This change may be the consequence of nickel's interference with the function of several Fe(II)-dependent enzymes. In this study, the effects of soluble nickel exposure on cellular iron homeostasis were investigated. Nickel treatment decreased both mitochondrial and cytosolic aconitase (c-aconitase) activity in A549 cells. Cytosolic aconitase was converted to iron-regulatory protein 1, a form critical for the regulation of cellular iron homeostasis. The increased activity of iron-regulatory protein 1 after nickel exposure stabilized and increased transferrin receptor (Tfr) mRNA and antagonized the iron-induced ferritin light chain protein synthesis. The decrease of aconitase activity after nickel treatment reflected neither direct interference with aconitase function nor obstruction of [4Fe-4S] cluster reconstitution by nickel. Exposure of A549 cells to soluble nickel decreased total cellular iron by about 40%, a decrease that likely caused the observed decrease in aconitase activity and the increase of iron-regulatory protein 1 activity. Iron treatment reversed the effect of nickel on cytosolic aconitase and iron-regulatory protein 1. To assess the mechanism for the observed effects, human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells over expressing divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) were compared to A549 cells expressing only endogenous transporters for inhibition of iron uptake by nickel. The inhibition data suggest that nickel can enter via DMT1 and compete with iron for entry into the cell. This disturbance of cellular iron homeostasis by nickel may have a great impact on the ability of the cell to regulate a variety of cell functions, as well as create a state of hypoxia in cells under normal oxygen tension. These effects may be very important in how nickel exerts phenotypic

  6. The Prognostic Impact of Some Cell Cycle Regulatory Proteins in Egyptian Breast Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KAMEL, A.; Mokhtar, N.; Elshaknkiry, N.; Yassin, D.; Elnahass, Y.; Zakarya, O.; Elbasmy, A.; Elmetenawy, W.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The particular goal of this work is to study some cell cycle regulatory proteins and their potential impact on prognosis of breast cancer; p53, cyclin D 1 and p27 are potential effectors being the major contributors to the control of the restriction (R) check point of the cell cycle. We also aimed to evaluate different techniques used to detect these cell cycle proteins. Material and Methods: Forty five breast cancer patients as well as 10 controls with non malignant pathology were assessed for cell cycle regulators each by 2 different techniques; p53 was assessed by enzyme immunoassay (EJA) and immunohistochemistry (lHC), cyclin D1 by Western Blotting (WB) and IHC and p27 by WB and me. The cut-off was calculated as the mean of the normal controls +2 SD. Patients were followed up for 4 years and their laboratory data were correlated with different clinical parameters and with other studied regulators. Results: Eighty seven percent of cases (39/45) were positive for p53 by EIA with a range from 20 to 4300, and a mean of 464±97 I pg/mg protein. By mc, 80% (24/30) of the cases showed varying degrees of positivity. Using WB, cyclin D 1 showed high expression levels above cut off values in 69% of patients (31/45) and in 67% (20/30) by me. The corresponding positive figures for p27 were 82% (37/45) and 73% (22/30) using the two techniques, respectively. No significant association was found between p53, cyclin 01 and p27 on one side and different clinical parameters as lymph node status, tumor size or presence of distant metastases on the other side. Survival was poor in patients with high p53 expression. Cyclin D1 positive cases showed comparable survival with negative cases, whereas high p27 levels favored a longer disease free survival. Conclusions: Techniques more suitable for assessment of each of these markers in our consideration were EIA for p53, WB for cyclin D1 and IHC for p27. Moreover, this study demonstrated that these markers were relevant to the

  7. Mitogen-activated protein kinases in the acute diabetic myocardium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strnisková, M.; Barančík, M.; Neckář, Jan; Ravingerová, T.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 249, 1-2 (2003), s. 59-65 ISSN 0300-8177 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A069 Grant - others:VEGA(SK) 2/2063/22 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : experimental diabetes * ischemia * mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.763, year: 2003

  8. Azacitidine augments expansion of regulatory T cells after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodyear, Oliver C; Dennis, Mike; Jilani, Nadira Y; Loke, Justin; Siddique, Shamyla; Ryan, Gordon; Nunnick, Jane; Khanum, Rahela; Raghavan, Manoj; Cook, Mark; Snowden, John A; Griffiths, Mike; Russell, Nigel; Yin, John; Crawley, Charles; Cook, Gordon; Vyas, Paresh; Moss, Paul; Malladi, Ram; Craddock, Charles F

    2012-04-05

    Strategies that augment a GVL effect without increasing the risk of GVHD are required to improve the outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Azacitidine (AZA) up-regulates the expression of tumor Ags on leukemic blasts in vitro and expands the numbers of immunomodulatory T regulatory cells (Tregs) in animal models. Reasoning that AZA might selectively augment a GVL effect, we studied the immunologic sequelae of AZA administration after allogeneic SCT. Twenty-seven patients who had undergone a reduced intensity allogeneic transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia were treated with monthly courses of AZA, and CD8(+) T-cell responses to candidate tumor Ags and circulating Tregs were measured. AZA after transplantation was well tolerated, and its administration was associated with a low incidence of GVHD. Administration of AZA increased the number of Tregs within the first 3 months after transplantation compared with a control population (P = .0127). AZA administration also induced a cytotoxic CD8(+) T-cell response to several tumor Ags, including melanoma-associated Ag 1, B melanoma antigen 1, and Wilm tumor Ag 1. These data support the further examination of AZA after transplantation as a mechanism of augmenting a GVL effect without a concomitant increase in GVHD.

  9. Corruption of dendritic cell antigen presentation during acute GVHD leads to regulatory T-cell failure and chronic GVHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Koyama, Motoko; Le Texier, Laetitia; Markey, Kate A; Cheong, Melody; Kuns, Rachel D; Lineburg, Katie E; Teal, Bianca E; Alexander, Kylie A; Clouston, Andrew D; Blazar, Bruce R; Hill, Geoffrey R; MacDonald, Kelli P A

    2016-08-11

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a major cause of late mortality following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and is characterized by tissue fibrosis manifesting as scleroderma and bronchiolitis obliterans. The development of acute GVHD (aGVHD) is a powerful clinical predictor of subsequent cGVHD, suggesting that aGVHD may invoke the immunologic pathways responsible for cGVHD. In preclinical models in which sclerodermatous cGVHD develops after a preceding period of mild aGVHD, we show that antigen presentation within major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II of donor dendritic cells (DCs) is markedly impaired early after BMT. This is associated with a failure of regulatory T-cell (Treg) homeostasis and cGVHD. Donor DC-restricted deletion of MHC class II phenocopied this Treg deficiency and cGVHD. Moreover, specific depletion of donor Tregs after BMT also induced cGVHD, whereas adoptive transfer of Tregs ameliorated it. These data demonstrate that the defect in Treg homeostasis seen in cGVHD is a causative lesion and is downstream of defective antigen presentation within MHC class II that is induced by aGVHD. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  10. Whole Genome Shotgun Sequencing Shows Selection on Leptospira Regulatory Proteins during in vitro Culture Attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Jason S.; Corey, Victoria C.; Ricaldi, Jessica N.; Vinetz, Joseph M.; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.; Matthias, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is the most common zoonotic disease worldwide with an estimated 500,000 severe cases reported annually, and case fatality rates of 12–25%, due primarily to acute kidney and lung injuries. Despite its prevalence, the molecular mechanisms underlying leptospirosis pathogenesis remain poorly understood. To identify virulence-related genes in Leptospira interrogans, we delineated cumulative genome changes that occurred during serial in vitro passage of a highly virulent strain of L. interrogans serovar Lai into a nearly avirulent isogenic derivative. Comparison of protein coding and computationally predicted noncoding RNA (ncRNA) genes between these two polyclonal strains identified 15 nonsynonymous single nucleotide variant (nsSNV) alleles that increased in frequency and 19 that decreased, whereas no changes in allelic frequency were observed among the ncRNA genes. Some of the nsSNV alleles were in six genes shown previously to be transcriptionally upregulated during exposure to in vivo-like conditions. Five of these nsSNVs were in evolutionarily conserved positions in genes related to signal transduction and metabolism. Frequency changes of minor nsSNV alleles identified in this study likely contributed to the loss of virulence during serial in vitro culture. The identification of new virulence-associated genes should spur additional experimental inquiry into their potential role in Leptospira pathogenesis. PMID:26711524

  11. Circulating microbial products and acute phase proteins as markers of pathogenesis in lymphatic filarial disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Anuradha

    Full Text Available Lymphatic filariasis can be associated with development of serious pathology in the form of lymphedema, hydrocele, and elephantiasis in a subset of infected patients. Dysregulated host inflammatory responses leading to systemic immune activation are thought to play a central role in filarial disease pathogenesis. We measured the plasma levels of microbial translocation markers, acute phase proteins, and inflammatory cytokines in individuals with chronic filarial pathology with (CP Ag+ or without (CP Ag- active infection; with clinically asymptomatic infections (INF; and in those without infection (endemic normal [EN]. Comparisons between the two actively infected groups (CP Ag+ compared to INF and those without active infection (CP Ag- compared to EN were used preliminarily to identify markers of pathogenesis. Thereafter, we tested for group effects among all the four groups using linear models on the log transformed responses of the markers. Our data suggest that circulating levels of microbial translocation products (lipopolysaccharide and LPS-binding protein, acute phase proteins (haptoglobin and serum amyloid protein-A, and inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-12, and TNF-α are associated with pathogenesis of disease in lymphatic filarial infection and implicate an important role for circulating microbial products and acute phase proteins.

  12. Protein metabolism in malnourished children with acute lower respiratory infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manary, M.; Broadhead, R.

    1996-01-01

    We studied 19 subjects and 15 controls from November 1994 to February 1995. HIV infection is common among this population and HIV testing was done by ELISA of most subjects and controls in the course of their routine clinical care. To determine how HIV infection effects protein metabolism all HIV infected subjects and controls were grouped into a third category and compared to the subjects and controls. After the HIV subgrouping we were left with 13 subjects, 13 controls, and 8 HIV positive patients. KIC enrichments were used to calculate protein synthesis and breakdown, as KIC is believed to reflect intracellular leucine concentrations. Of note in Table 2 is the KIC/Leucine ratio is consistently greater than 1, averaging 1.3 over 16 samples. This is an unexpected finding as the KIC/Leucine ratio has been shown to be constant with a value of about 0.75 over a wide range of conditions. Samples for these eight patients have been evaluated under six different GCMS conditions to verify this unexpected observation. This ratio > 1.0 has been consistently found under all of these conditions. We are not certain what biological phenomenon can explain this, but it calls into question the validity of the four compartment model upon which these calculations are based. It is not unreasonable to expect that children with kwashiorkor metabolize ketoacids differently, and this difference could account for the increased KIC/Leucine ratio. 19 refs, 4 tabs

  13. Successful immunotherapy of autoimmune cholangitis by adoptive transfer of forkhead box protein 3+ regulatory T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, H; Zhang, W; Yang, G-X; Ando, Y; Tomiyama, T; Tsuneyama, K; Leung, P; Coppel, R L; Ansari, A A; Lian, Z X; Ridgway, W M; Joh, T; Gershwin, M E

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) has lagged behind that of other autoimmune diseases. In this study we have addressed the potential utility of immunotherapy using regulatory T cells (Treg) to treat murine autoimmune cholangitis. In particular, we have taken advantage of our ability to produce portal inflammation and bile duct cell loss by transfer of CD8+ T cells from the dominant negative form of transforming growth factor beta receptor type II (dnTGF-βRII) mice to recombination-activating gene (Rag)1–/– recipients. We then used this robust established adoptive transfer system and co-transferred CD8+ T cells from dnTGF-βRII mice with either C57BL/6 or dnTGF-βRII forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3+) T cells. Recipient mice were monitored for histology, including portal inflammation and intralobular biliary cell damage, and also included a study of the phenotypical changes in recipient lymphoid populations and local and systemic cytokine production. Importantly, we report herein that adoptive transfer of Treg from C57BL/6 but not dnTGF-βRII mice significantly reduced the pathology of autoimmune cholangitis, including decreased portal inflammation and bile duct damage as well as down-regulation of the secondary inflammatory response. Further, to define the mechanism of action that explains the differential ability of C57BL/6 Treg versus dnTGF-βRII Treg on the ability to down-regulate autoimmune cholangitis, we noted significant differential expression of glycoprotein A repetitions predominant (GARP), CD73, CD101 and CD103 and a functionally significant increase in interleukin (IL)-10 in Treg from C57BL/6 compared to dnTGF-βRII mice. Our data reflect the therapeutic potential of wild-type CD4+ FoxP3+ Treg in reducing the excessive T cell responses of autoimmune cholangitis, which has significance for the potential immunotherapy of PBC. PMID:25041369

  14. Successful immunotherapy of autoimmune cholangitis by adoptive transfer of forkhead box protein 3(+) regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, H; Zhang, W; Yang, G-X; Ando, Y; Tomiyama, T; Tsuneyama, K; Leung, P; Coppel, R L; Ansari, A A; Lian, Z X; Ridgway, W M; Joh, T; Gershwin, M E

    2014-11-01

    Treatment of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) has lagged behind that of other autoimmune diseases. In this study we have addressed the potential utility of immunotherapy using regulatory T cells (Treg ) to treat murine autoimmune cholangitis. In particular, we have taken advantage of our ability to produce portal inflammation and bile duct cell loss by transfer of CD8(+) T cells from the dominant negative form of transforming growth factor beta receptor type II (dnTGF-βRII) mice to recombination-activating gene (Rag)1(-/-) recipients. We then used this robust established adoptive transfer system and co-transferred CD8(+) T cells from dnTGF-βRII mice with either C57BL/6 or dnTGF-βRII forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3(+) ) T cells. Recipient mice were monitored for histology, including portal inflammation and intralobular biliary cell damage, and also included a study of the phenotypical changes in recipient lymphoid populations and local and systemic cytokine production. Importantly, we report herein that adoptive transfer of Treg from C57BL/6 but not dnTGF-βRII mice significantly reduced the pathology of autoimmune cholangitis, including decreased portal inflammation and bile duct damage as well as down-regulation of the secondary inflammatory response. Further, to define the mechanism of action that explains the differential ability of C57BL/6 Treg versus dnTGF-βRII Treg on the ability to down-regulate autoimmune cholangitis, we noted significant differential expression of glycoprotein A repetitions predominant (GARP), CD73, CD101 and CD103 and a functionally significant increase in interleukin (IL)-10 in Treg from C57BL/6 compared to dnTGF-βRII mice. Our data reflect the therapeutic potential of wild-type CD4(+) FoxP3(+) Treg in reducing the excessive T cell responses of autoimmune cholangitis, which has significance for the potential immunotherapy of PBC. © 2014 British Society for Immunology.

  15. Involvement of the iron regulatory protein from Eisenia andrei earthworms in the regulation of cellular iron homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Procházková

    Full Text Available Iron homeostasis in cells is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs that exist in different organisms. IRPs are cytosolic proteins that bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs of the 5'- or 3'-untranslated regions (UTR of mRNAs that encode many proteins involved in iron metabolism. In this study, we have cloned and described a new regulatory protein belonging to the family of IRPs from the earthworm Eisenia andrei (EaIRP. The earthworm IRE site in 5'-UTR of ferritin mRNA most likely folds into a secondary structure that differs from the conventional IRE structures of ferritin due to the absence of a typically unpaired cytosine that participates in protein binding. Prepared recombinant EaIRP and proteins from mammalian liver extracts are able to bind both mammalian and Eisenia IRE structures of ferritin mRNA, although the affinity of the rEaIRP/Eisenia IRE structure is rather low. This result suggests the possible contribution of a conventional IRE structure. When IRP is supplemented with a Fe-S cluster, it can function as a cytosolic aconitase. Cellular cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions, as well as recombinant EaIRP, exhibit aconitase activity that can be abolished by the action of oxygen radicals. The highest expression of EaIRP was detected in parts of the digestive tract. We can assume that earthworms may possess an IRE/IRP regulatory network as a potential mechanism for maintaining cellular iron homeostasis, although the aconitase function of EaIRP is most likely more relevant.

  16. Involvement of the Iron Regulatory Protein from Eisenia andrei Earthworms in the Regulation of Cellular Iron Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procházková, Petra; Škanta, František; Roubalová, Radka; Šilerová, Marcela; Dvořák, Jiří; Bilej, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Iron homeostasis in cells is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that exist in different organisms. IRPs are cytosolic proteins that bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) of the 5′- or 3′-untranslated regions (UTR) of mRNAs that encode many proteins involved in iron metabolism. In this study, we have cloned and described a new regulatory protein belonging to the family of IRPs from the earthworm Eisenia andrei (EaIRP). The earthworm IRE site in 5′-UTR of ferritin mRNA most likely folds into a secondary structure that differs from the conventional IRE structures of ferritin due to the absence of a typically unpaired cytosine that participates in protein binding. Prepared recombinant EaIRP and proteins from mammalian liver extracts are able to bind both mammalian and Eisenia IRE structures of ferritin mRNA, although the affinity of the rEaIRP/Eisenia IRE structure is rather low. This result suggests the possible contribution of a conventional IRE structure. When IRP is supplemented with a Fe-S cluster, it can function as a cytosolic aconitase. Cellular cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions, as well as recombinant EaIRP, exhibit aconitase activity that can be abolished by the action of oxygen radicals. The highest expression of EaIRP was detected in parts of the digestive tract. We can assume that earthworms may possess an IRE/IRP regulatory network as a potential mechanism for maintaining cellular iron homeostasis, although the aconitase function of EaIRP is most likely more relevant. PMID:25279857

  17. Adolescent and adult rat cortical protein kinase A display divergent responses to acute ethanol exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Gigante, Eduardo D.; Santerre, Jessica L.; Carter, Jenna M.; Werner, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent rats display reduced sensitivity to many dysphoria-related effects of alcohol (ethanol) including motor ataxia and sedative hypnosis, but the underlying neurobiological factors that contribute to these differences remain unknown. The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, particularly the type II regulatory subunit (RII), has been implicated in ethanol-induced molecular and behavioral responses in adults. Therefore, the current study examine...

  18. Modeling the Dynamics of Acute Phase Protein Expression in Human Hepatoma Cells Stimulated by IL-6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaobin Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-6 (IL-6 is a systemic inflammatory mediator that triggers the human body’s acute phase response to trauma or inflammation. Although mathematical models for IL-6 signaling pathways have previously been developed, reactions that describe the expression of acute phase proteins were not included. To address this deficiency, a recent model of IL-6 signaling was extended to predict the dynamics of acute phase protein expression in IL-6-stimulated HepG2 cells (a human hepatoma cell line. This included reactions that describe the regulation of haptoglobin, fibrinogen, and albumin secretion by nuclear transcription factors STAT3 dimer and C/EBPβ. This new extended model was validated against two different sets of experimental data. Using the validated model, a sensitivity analysis was performed to identify seven potential drug targets to regulate the secretion of haptoglobin, fibrinogen, and albumin. The drug-target binding kinetics for these seven targets was then integrated with the IL-6 kinetic model to rank them based upon the influence of their pairing with drugs on acute phase protein dynamics. It was found that gp80, JAK, and gp130 were the three most promising drug targets and that it was possible to reduce the therapeutic dosage by combining drugs aimed at the top three targets in a cocktail. These findings suggest hypotheses for further experimental investigation.

  19. Inhibitors Alter the Stochasticity of Regulatory Proteins to Force Cells to Switch to the Other State in the Bistable System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhang, Wun-Sin; Lo, Shih-Chiang; Yeh, Chen-Chao; Shu, Che-Chi

    2017-06-30

    The cellular behaviors under the control of genetic circuits are subject to stochastic fluctuations, or noise. The stochasticity in gene regulation, far from a nuisance, has been gradually appreciated for its unusual function in cellular activities. In this work, with Chemical Master Equation (CME), we discovered that the addition of inhibitors altered the stochasticity of regulatory proteins. For a bistable system of a mutually inhibitory network, such a change of noise led to the migration of cells in the bimodal distribution. We proposed that the consumption of regulatory protein caused by the addition of inhibitor is not the only reason for pushing cells to the specific state; the change of the intracellular stochasticity is also the main cause for the redistribution. For the level of the inhibitor capable of driving 99% of cells, if there is no consumption of regulatory protein, 88% of cells were guided to the specific state. It implied that cells were pushed, by the inhibitor, to the specific state due to the change of stochasticity.

  20. Cross regulation between Candida albicans catalytic and regulatory subunits of protein kinase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacometti, Romina; Kronberg, Florencia; Biondi, Ricardo M; Hernández, Alejandra I; Passeron, Susana

    2012-01-01

    In the pathogen Candida albicans protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit is encoded by two genes TPK1 and TPK2 and the regulatory subunit by one gene, BCY1. PKA mediates several cellular processes such as cell cycle regulation and the yeast to hyphae transition, a key factor for C. albicans virulence. The catalytic isoforms Tpk1p and Tpk2p share redundant functions in vegetative growth and hyphal development, though they differentially regulate glycogen metabolism, the stress response pathway and pseudohyphal formation. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae it was earlier reported that BCY1 overexpression not only increased the amount of TPK3 mRNA but also its catalytic activity. In C. albicans a significant decrease in Bcy1p expression levels was already observed in tpk2Δ null strains. In this work we showed that the upregulation in Bcy1p expression was observed in a set of strains having a TPK1 or TPK2 allele reintegrated in its own locus, as well as in strains expressing the TPKs under the control of the constitutive ACT1 promoter. To confirm the cross regulation event between Bcy1p and Tpkp expression we generated a mutant strain with the lowest PKA activity carrying one TPK1 and a unique BCY1 allele with the aim to obtain two derived strains in which BCY1 or TPK1 were placed under their own promoters inserted in the RPS10 neutral locus. We found that placing one copy of BCY1 upregulated the levels of Tpk1p and its catalytic activity; while TPK1 insertion led to an increase in BCY1 mRNA, Bcy1p and in a high cAMP binding activity. Our results suggest that C. albicans cells were able to compensate for the increased levels of either Tpk1p or Tpk2p subunits with a corresponding elevation of Bcy1 protein levels and vice versa, implying a tightly regulated mechanism to balance holoenzyme formation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Impaired mitochondrial respiration and protein nitration in the rat hippocampus after acute inhalation of combustion smoke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Heung M.; Reed, Jason; Greeley, George H.; Englander, Ella W.

    2009-01-01

    Survivors of massive inhalation of combustion smoke endure critical injuries, including lasting neurological complications. We have previously reported that acute inhalation of combustion smoke disrupts the nitric oxide homeostasis in the rat brain. In this study, we extend our findings and report that a 30-minute exposure of awake rats to ambient wood combustion smoke induces protein nitration in the rat hippocampus and that mitochondrial proteins are a sensitive nitration target in this setting. Mitochondria are central to energy metabolism and cellular signaling and are critical to proper cell function. Here, analyses of the mitochondrial proteome showed elevated protein nitration in the course of a 24-hour recovery following exposure to smoke. Mass spectrometry identification of several significantly nitrated mitochondrial proteins revealed diverse functions and involvement in central aspects of mitochondrial physiology. The nitrated proteins include the ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase, F1-ATP synthase α subunit, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3), succinate dehydrogenase Fp subunit, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) protein. Furthermore, acute exposure to combustion smoke significantly compromised the respiratory capacity of hippocampal mitochondria. Importantly, elevated protein nitration and reduced mitochondrial respiration in the hippocampus persisted beyond the time required for restoration of normal oxygen and carboxyhemoglobin blood levels after the cessation of exposure to smoke. Thus, the time frame for intensification of the various smoke-induced effects differs between blood and brain tissues. Taken together, our findings suggest that nitration of essential mitochondrial proteins may contribute to the reduction in mitochondrial respiratory capacity and underlie, in part, the brain pathophysiology after acute inhalation of combustion smoke

  2. Systemic acute-phase reactants, C-reactive protein and haptoglobin, in adult periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    EBERSOLE, J L; MACHEN, R L; STEFFEN, M J; WILLMANN, D E

    1997-01-01

    Capture ELISAs with biotinylated monospecific antibodies were developed to detect both C-reactive protein (CRP) and haptoglobin (Hp) in serum of adult periodontitis (AP) patients and normal subjects. Each acute-phase reactant was significantly increased in serum from AP patients with CRP at 9.12 ±1.61 mg/l versus 2.17 ± 0.41 mg/l (P acute-phase reactants. The conclusions are that either these molecules are formed locally and distributed to the serum, or these presumably localized infections impact upon the systemic components of the host protective responses. PMID:9030874

  3. Calorie and Protein Intake in Acute Rehabilitation Inpatients with Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Versus Other Diagnoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background: Obesity and its consequences affect patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). There is a paucity of data with regard to the dietary intake patterns of patients with SCI in the acute inpatient rehabilitation setting. Our hypothesis is that acute rehabilitation inpatients with SCI consume significantly more calories and protein than other inpatient rehabilitation diagnoses. Objective: To compare calorie and protein intake in patients with new SCI versus other diagnoses (new traumatic brain injury [TBI], new stroke, and Parkinson’s disease [PD]) in the acute inpatient rehabilitation setting. Methods: The intake of 78 acute rehabilitation inpatients was recorded by registered dieticians utilizing once-weekly calorie and protein intake calculations. Results: Mean ± SD calorie intake (kcal) for the SCI, TBI, stroke, and PD groups was 1,967.9 ± 611.6, 1,546.8 ± 352.3, 1,459.7 ± 443.2, and 1,459.4 ± 434.6, respectively. ANOVA revealed a significant overall group difference, F(3, 74) = 4.74, P = .004. Mean ± SD protein intake (g) for the SCI, TBI, stroke, and PD groups was 71.5 ± 25.0, 61.1 ± 12.8, 57.6 ± 16.6, and 55.1 ± 19.1, respectively. ANOVA did not reveal an overall group difference, F(3, 74) = 2.50, P = .066. Conclusions: Given the diet-related comorbidities and energy balance abnormalities associated with SCI, combined with the intake levels demonstrated in this study, education with regard to appropriate calorie intake in patients with SCI should be given in the acute inpatient rehabilitation setting. PMID:23960707

  4. Construction of protein profile classification model and screening of proteomic signature of acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yun; Zhuo, Jiacai; Duan, Yonggang; Shi, Benhang; Chen, Xuhong; Zhang, Xiaoli; Xiao, Liang; Lou, Jin; Huang, Ruihong; Zhang, Qiongli; Du, Xin; Li, Ming; Wang, Daping; Shi, Dunyun

    2014-01-01

    The French-American-British (FAB) and WHO classifications provide important guidelines for the diagnosis, treatment, and prognostic prediction of acute leukemia, but are incapable of accurately differentiating all subtypes, and not well correlated with the clinical outcomes. In this study, we performed the protein profiling of the bone marrow mononuclear cells from the patients with acute leukemia and the health volunteers (control) by surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (SELDI_TOF_MS). The patients with acute leukemia were analyzed as unitary by the profiling that were grouped into acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), acute myeloid leukemia-granulocytic (AML-Gran), acute myeloid leukemia-monocytic (AML-Mon) acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and control. Based on 109 proteomic signatures, the classification models of acute leukemia were constructed to screen the predictors by the improvement of the proteomic signatures and to detect their expression characteristics. According to the improvement and the expression characteristics of the predictors, the proteomic signatures (M3829, M1593, M2121, M2536, M1016) characterized successively each group (CON, APL, AML-Gra, AML-Mon, ALL) were screened as target molecules for identification. Meanwhile, the proteomic-based class of determinant samples could be made by the classification models. The credibility of the proteomic-based classification passed the evaluation of Biomarker Patterns Software 5.0 (BPS 5.0) scoring and validated application in clinical practice. The results suggested that the proteomic signatures characterized by different blasts were potential for developing new treatment and monitoring approaches of leukemia blasts. Moreover, the classification model was potential in serving as new diagnose approach of leukemia.

  5. Iron-regulatory proteins DmdR1 and DmdR2 of Streptomyces coelicolor form two different DNA-protein complexes with iron boxes.

    OpenAIRE

    Flores, Francisco J; Martín, Juan F

    2004-01-01

    In high G+C Gram-positive bacteria, the control of expression of genes involved in iron metabolism is exerted by a DmdR [divalent (bivalent) metal-dependent regulatory protein] in the presence of Fe2+ or other bivalent ions. The dmdR1 and dmdR2 genes of Streptomyces coelicolor were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and the DmdR1 and DmdR2 proteins were purified to homogeneity. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays showed that both DmdR1 and DmdR2 bind to the 19-nt tox and desA iron boxes form...

  6. [Change of CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells and NK Cells in peripheral blood of children with acute leukemia and its possible significance in tumor immunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ze-Lin; Hu, Guan-Yu; Chen, Fu-Xiong; Lu, Hui-Min; Wu, Zi-Liang; Li, Hua-Mei; Wei, Feng-Gui; Guan, Jing-Ming; Wu, Li-Ping

    2010-06-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the changes of CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells and NK cells in peripheral blood of acute leukemia children at different stages, the function of immune system and the possible roles of the CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells as well as NK cells in leukemia immunity. The number and proportion of CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells and NK cells were detected by flow cytometry in the peripheral blood of 53 acute leukemia children, including 25 patients in new diagnosis and 28 patients in continuous complete remission (CCR), and were compared with that of 20 normal children. The results indicated that the mean proportion of CD4(+) CD25(+) CD127(+) in CD4(+) T cells of peripheral blood in newly diagnosed patients, patients with CCR and normal children were (9.55 +/- 2.41)%, (8.54 +/- 2.51)% and (6.25 +/- 0.85)% respectively, the mean proportions of CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(+) in newly diagnosed patients and patients with CCR were higher than that in normal children, the mean proportion of CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(+) in newly diagnosed patients were higher than that in patients with CCR (p cell count in patients with acute leukaemia decreased as compared with normal control, while after achieving CCR, the NK cell count in patients were also less than that in normal control (4.11 +/- 3.87% and 10.41 +/- 7.20% vs 14.06 +/- 5.95%, p regulatory T cells is a simple, reproductive and accurate method, and the CD4(+) CD25(+) CD127(+) T cells can better reflect the proportion of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells. The increase of regulatory T cells and decrease of NK cells in pediatric patients with acute leukemia indicate that the function of NK cells may be depressed. Treg T cells play a role in occurrence and development of leukemia, and are involved in down-regulating NK cell function.

  7. Immunophenotype and increased presence of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cui-Ping; Qing, Xi; Wu, Cui-Yun; Zhu, Hong; Zhou, Hai-Yan

    2012-02-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), cancer of the white blood cells, is a heterogeneous disease that mainly occurs due to the malignant cloning of original and naive lymphocytes. The aim of this study was to explore the immunophenotype, the percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) and the expression of cytokines interleukin (IL)-2, IL-10 and TGF-β in patients with ALL. The immunophenotype and levels of CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs were detected using flow cytometry in the peripheral blood of 35 ALL patients, with 18 healthy individuals being selected as controls. The results suggested that 22 patients had B cell ALL (B-ALL) and 13 had T cell ALL (T-ALL) among the 35 ALL patients. In B-ALL patients, the surface antigen CD19 was most commonly expressed; in T-ALL patients, CD7 was most common. Furthermore, the percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells in the peripheral blood of B-ALL and T-ALL patients was higher compared to that of healthy individuals (Pcell culture supernatants from B-ALL and T-ALL patients were higher compared to those in the controls (Pcells, IL-2, IL-10 or TGF-β in B-ALL versus T-ALL patients. The authors concluded that CD19 and CD7 may serve as diagnostic markers of B-ALL and T-ALL, respectively. The increased presence of CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells and the altered levels of secreted cytokines are indicative of an immunosuppressive mechanism in the pathogenesis of ALL.

  8. Chemotherapy alters the increased numbers of myeloid-derived suppressor and regulatory T cells in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Mohamed Labib; El-Shanshory, Mohamed R; Abdou, Said H; Attia, Mohamed S; Sobhy, Shymaa M; Zidan, Mona F; Zidan, Abdel-Aziz A

    2018-04-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer diagnosed in children. The precise mechanism behind the relapse in this disease is not clearly known. One possible mechanism could be the accumulation of immunosuppressive cells, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and T regulatory cells (T regs ) which we and others have reported to mediate suppression of anti-tumor immune responses. In this study, we aimed to analyze the numbers of these cells in a population of B-ALL pediatric patients. Peripheral blood samples withdrawn from B-ALL pediatric patients (n = 45 before, during and after the induction phase of chemotherapy. Using multi parametric flow cytometric analysis. MDSCs were identified as Lin - HLA-DR - CD33 + CD11b + ; and T reg cells were defined as CD4 + CD25 + CD127 -/low . Early diagnosed B-ALL patients showed significant increases in the numbers of MDSCs and T regs as compared to healthy volunteers. During induction of chemotherapy, however, the patients showed higher and lower numbers of MDSCs and T reg cells, respectively as compared to early diagnosed patients (i.e., before chemotherapy). After induction of chemotherapy, the numbers of MDSCs and T reg cells showed higher increases and decreases, respectively as compared to the numbers in patients during chemotherapy. Our results indicate that B-ALL patients harbor high numbers of both MDSCs and T regs cells. This pilot study opens a new avenue to investigate the mechanism mediating the emergence of these cells on larger number of B-ALL patients at different treatment stages.

  9. Two-dimensional electrophoresis protein profiling as an analytical tool for human acute leukemia classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jiu-Wei; Wang, Jie; He, Kun; Jin, Bao-Feng; Wang, Hong-Xia; Li, Wei; Kang, Li-Hua; Hu, Mei-Ru; Li, Hui-Yan; Yu, Ming; Shen, Bei-Fen; Wang, Guan-Jun; Zhang, Xue-Min

    2005-01-01

    Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) was used to profile the proteins of leukemic cells from 61 cases of akute leukemia (AL) characterized by the French-American-British (FAB) classification. The differentially expressed protein spots were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and electrospray ionization-tandem MS (ESI-MS/MS). The distinct protein profiles (DPPs) of AL FAB subtypes were explored successfully, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), its subtypes (M2, M3, and M5), and acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL), which were homogeneous within different samples of the same subgroup but clearly differed from all other subgroups. We also found a group of proteins differentially expressed between AL cells and normal white blood cells. Among the DPPs of AL subtypes, some proteins have been reported, but most of them were first reported here to mark AML differentiation and to discriminate AML from ALL. These data show that 2-DE protein profiling could be used as an analytical tool for facilitating molecular definition of human AL classification and understanding the mechanism of leukemogensis, and the extension of the present analysis to the currently less well-defined AL will identify additional subgroups and may promote the identification of new targets for specific treatment approaches.

  10. Regulation of Src trafficking and activation by the endocytic regulatory proteins MICAL-L1 and EHD1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinecke, James B.; Katafiasz, Dawn; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Localization of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase Src to the cell periphery is required for its activation and to mediate focal adhesion turnover, cell spreading and migration. Inactive Src localizes to a perinuclear compartment and the movement of Src to the plasma membrane is mediated by endocytic transport. However, the precise pathways and regulatory proteins that are responsible for SRC transport are incompletely understood. Here, we demonstrate that Src partially colocalizes with the endocytic regulatory protein MICAL-L1 (molecule interacting with CasL-like protein 1) in mammalian cells. Furthermore, MICAL-L1 is required for growth-factor- and integrin-induced Src activation and transport to the cell periphery in HeLa cells and human fibroblasts. Accordingly, MICAL-L1 depletion impairs focal adhesion turnover, cell spreading and cell migration. Interestingly, we find that the MICAL-L1 interaction partner EHD1 (EH domain-containing protein 1) is also required for Src activation and transport. Moreover, the MICAL-L1-mediated recruitment of EHD1 to Src-containing recycling endosomes is required for the release of Src from the perinuclear endocytic recycling compartment in response to growth factor stimulation. Our study sheds new light on the mechanism by which Src is transported to the plasma membrane and activated, and provides a new function for MICAL-L1 and EHD1 in the regulation of intracellular non-receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:24481818

  11. Partitioning of genetic variation between regulatory and coding gene segments: the predominance of software variation in genes encoding introvert proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchison, A

    1997-01-01

    In considering genetic variation in eukaryotes, a fundamental distinction can be made between variation in regulatory (software) and coding (hardware) gene segments. For quantitative traits the bulk of variation, particularly that near the population mean, appears to reside in regulatory segments. The main exceptions to this rule concern proteins which handle extrinsic substances, here termed extrovert proteins. The immune system includes an unusually large proportion of this exceptional category, but even so its chief source of variation may well be polymorphism in regulatory gene segments. The main evidence for this view emerges from genome scanning for quantitative trait loci (QTL), which in the case of the immune system points to a major contribution of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes. Further support comes from sequencing of major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) class II promoters, where a high level of polymorphism has been detected. These Mhc promoters appear to act, in part at least, by gating the back-signal from T cells into antigen-presenting cells. Both these forms of polymorphism are likely to be sustained by the need for flexibility in the immune response. Future work on promoter polymorphism is likely to benefit from the input from genome informatics.

  12. Proteins involved in platelet signaling are differentially regulated in acute coronary syndrome: a proteomic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Fernández Parguiña

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Platelets play a fundamental role in pathological events underlying acute coronary syndrome (ACS. Because platelets do not have a nucleus, proteomics constitutes an optimal approach to follow platelet molecular events associated with the onset of the acute episode. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed the first high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-based proteome analysis of circulating platelets from patients with non-ST segment elevation ACS (NSTE-ACS. Proteins were identified by mass spectrometry and validations were by western blotting. Forty protein features (corresponding to 22 unique genes were found to be differentially regulated between NSTE-ACS patients and matched controls with chronic ischemic cardiopathy. The number of differences decreased at day 5 (28 and 6 months after the acute event (5. Interestingly, a systems biology approach demonstrated that 16 of the 22 differentially regulated proteins identified are interconnected as part of a common network related to cell assembly and organization and cell morphology, processes very related to platelet activation. Indeed, 14 of those proteins are either signaling or cytoskeletal, and nine of them are known to participate in platelet activation by αIIbβ3 and/or GPVI receptors. Several of the proteins identified participate in platelet activation through post-translational modifications, as shown here for ILK, Src and Talin. Interestingly, the platelet-secreted glycoprotein SPARC was down-regulated in NSTE-ACS patients compared to stable controls, which is consistent with a secretion process from activated platelets. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study provides novel information on platelet proteome changes associated with platelet activation in NSTE-ACS, highlighting the presence of proteins involved in platelet signaling. This investigation paves the way for future studies in the search for novel platelet-related biomarkers and drug targets

  13. Lrp, a major regulatory protein in Escherichia coli, bends DNA and can organize the assembly of a higher-order nucleoprotein structure.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Q; Calvo, J M

    1993-01-01

    Lrp (Leucine-responsive regulatory protein) is a global regulatory protein that controls the expression of many operons in Escherichia coli. One of those operons, ilvIH, contains six Lrp binding sites located within a several hundred base pair region upstream of the promoter region. Analysis of the binding of Lrp to a set of circularly permuted DNA fragments from this region indicates that Lrp induces DNA bending. The results of DNase I footprinting experiments suggest that Lrp binding to thi...

  14. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF SERUM C - REACTIVE PROTEIN ESTIMATION IN ACUTE MENINGITIS IN ADULTS

    OpenAIRE

    Konatham; Kathyayani

    2015-01-01

    In the study of 50 cases of acute meningitis the following observations were made in sex incidence, age, clinical presentation, CSF analysis and serum C reactive protein levels and prognosis. Serum CRP level of less than 6 mg / l with signs of meningeal inf ection is a definitive indicative of viral meningitis and CRP levels more than 48 mg / l with clinical signs of meningeal infection is definite indication of bacterial meningitis. AIM OF THE STUDY: to evalu...

  15. Acute phase proteins in bovine milk in an experimental model of Staphylococcus aureus subclinical mastitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckersall, P D; Young, F J; Nolan, A M

    2006-01-01

    -SAA3 in mammary tissues was determined using immunocytochemistry. Increases of M-SAA3 and Hp in milk occurred within 12 h of Staphylococcus aureus infusion, with peak concentrations occurring 3 d after infusion of the bacteria. The increase of acute phase proteins in milk (15 h) preceded the increase......, may play a significant role in the early response to invasion of mammary tissues by pathogenic bacteria....

  16. Serum eosinophil cationic protein levels can be useful for predicting acute exacerbation of asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuhiro Kamimura

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on a case in which five consecutive exacerbations of asthma were monitored by following serum eosinophil cationic protein (ECP levels. The serum ECP level correlated well with each exacerbation and tended to increase even before the exacerbations of asthma became apparent. This case shows that serum levels of ECP can be useful markers of disease activity and may also be predictive markers for acute exacerbation.

  17. Multiple drug resistance protein (MDR-1, multidrug resistance-related protein (MRP and lung resistance protein (LRP gene expression in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvis Terci Valera

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Despite the advances in the cure rate for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, approximately 25% of affected children suffer relapses. Expression of genes for the multiple drug resistance protein (MDR-1, multidrug resistance-related protein (MRP, and lung resistance protein (LRP may confer the phenotype of resistance to the treatment of neoplasias. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the expression of the MDR-1, MRP and LRP genes in children with a diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia via the semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, and to determine the correlation between expression and event-free survival and clinical and laboratory variables. DESIGN: A retrospective clinical study. SETTING: Laboratory of Pediatric Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: Bone marrow aspirates from 30 children with a diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia were assessed for the expression of messenger RNA for the MDR-1, MRP and LRP genes by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. RESULTS: In the three groups studied, only the increased expression of LRP was related to worsened event-free survival (p = 0.005. The presence of the common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA was correlated with increased LRP expression (p = 0.009 and increased risk of relapse or death (p = 0.05. The relative risk of relapse or death was six times higher among children with high LRP expression upon diagnosis (p = 0.05, as confirmed by multivariate analysis of the three genes studied (p = 0.035. DISCUSSION: Cell resistance to drugs is a determinant of the response to chemotherapy and its detection via RT-PCR may be of clinical importance. CONCLUSIONS: Evaluation of the expression of genes for resistance to antineoplastic drugs in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia upon diagnosis, and particularly the expression of the LRP gene, may be of clinical relevance, and should be the

  18. The Role of BCL2 Family of Apoptosis Regulator Proteins in Acute and Chronic Leukemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora Tzifi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The disturbance of apoptosis molecular signaling pathways is involved in carcinogenesis. BCL2 family of proteins is the hallmark of apoptosis regulation. In the last decade, new members of BCL2 gene family were discovered and cloned and were found to be differentially expressed in many types of cancer. BCL2 protein family, through its role in regulation of apoptotic pathways, is possibly related to cancer pathophysiology and resistance to conventional chemotherapy. It is well known that leukemias are haematopoietic malignancies characterized by biological diversity, varied cytogenetics, different immunophenotype profiles, and diverse outcome. Current research focuses on the prognostic impact and specific role of these proteins in the pathogenesis of leukemias. The understanding of the molecular pathways that participate in the biology of leukemias may lead to the design of new therapies which may improve patients' survival. In the present paper, we describe current knowledge on the role of BCL2 apoptosis regulator proteins in acute and chronic leukemias.

  19. Decreased PARP and procaspase-2 protein levels are associated with cellular drug resistance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Holleman (Amy); M.L. den Boer (Monique); K.M. Kazemier (Karin); H.B. Beverloo (Berna); A.R.M. von Bergh (Anne); G.E. Janka-Schaub (Gritta); R. Pieters (Rob)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractDrug resistance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with impaired ability to induce apoptosis. To elucidate causes of apoptotic defects, we studied the protein expression of Apaf-1, procaspases-2, -3, -6, -7,

  20. Immunodepletion of high-abundant proteins from acute and chronic wound fluids to elucidate low-abundant regulators in wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chojnacki Caroline

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The process of wound healing consists of several well distinguishable and finely tuned phases. For most of these phases specific proteins have been characterized, although the underlying mechanisms of regulation are not yet fully understood. It is an open question as to whether deficits in wound healing can be traced back to chronic illnesses such as diabetes mellitus. Previous research efforts in this field focus largely on a restricted set of marker proteins due to the limitations detection by antibodies imposes. For mechanistic purposes the elucidation of differences in acute and chronic wounds can be addressed by a less restricted proteome study. Mass spectrometric (MS methods, e.g. multi dimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT, are well suitable for this complex theme of interest. The human wound fluid proteome is extremely complex, as is human plasma. Therefore, high-abundant proteins often mask the mass spectrometric detection of lower-abundant ones, which makes a depletion step of such predominant proteins inevitable. Findings In this study a commercially available immunodepletion kit was evaluated for the detection of low-abundant proteins from wound fluids. The dynamic range of the entire workflow was significantly increased to 5-6 orders of magnitude, which makes low-abundant regulatory proteins involved in wound healing accessible for MS detection. Conclusion The depletion of abundant proteins is absolutely necessary in order to analyze highly complex protein mixtures such as wound fluids using mass spectrometry. For this the used immunodepletion kit is a first but important step in order to represent the entire dynamic range of highly complex protein mixtures in the future.

  1. Prediction of the Grade of Acute Cholecystitis by Plasma Level of C-Reactive Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabul Gurbulak, Esin; Gurbulak, Bunyamin; Akgun, Ismail Ethem; Duzkoylu, Yigit; Battal, Muharrem; Fevzi Celayir, Mustafa; Demir, Uygar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute cholecystitis is the most common complication of gallbladder stones. Today, Tokyo guidelines criteria are recommended for diagnosis, grading, and management of acute cholecystitis. Objectives: We aimed to evaluate the levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) at different cut-off values to predict the severity of the disease and its possible role in grading the disease with regard to the guideline. Patients and Methods: This is a retrospective study, analyzing 682 cases out of consecutive 892 patients with acute cholecystitis admitted to two different general surgery clinics in Istanbul, Turkey. Records of patients diagnosed with acute cholecystitis were screened retrospectively from the hospital computer database between January 2011 and July 2014. A total of 210 patients with concomitant diseases causing high CRP levels were excluded from the study. The criteria of Tokyo guidelines were used in grading the severity of acute cholecystitis, and patients were divided into 3 groups. CRP values at the time of admission were analyzed and compared among the groups. Results: Mean CRP levels of groups were found to be significantly different, 18.96 mg/L in Group I, 133.51 mg/L in Group II, and 237.23 mg/L in Group III (P < 0.001). Having examined CRP values among the groups, they were found to be highly and significantly correlated with the disease grade (P < 0.0001). After evaluating CRP levels according to the grade of the disease, group 2 was distinguished from group 1 with a cut-off CRP level of 70.65 mg/L, and from group 3 with a value of 198.95 mg/L. Those results were found to be statistically significant (P < 0.001). Conclusions: CRP, a well-known acute phase reactant that increases rapidly in various inflammatory processes, can be accepted as a strong predictor in classifying different grades of the disease, and treatment can be reliably planned according to this classification. PMID:26023353

  2. Regulatory pathways for ATP-binding cassette transport proteins in kidney proximal tubules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masereeuw, R.; Russel, F.G.M.

    2012-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transport proteins (ABC transporters) represent important determinants of drug excretion. Protective or excretory tissues where these transporters mediate substrate efflux include the kidney proximal tubule. Regulation of the transport proteins in this tissue requires

  3. Urinary heat shock protein 72 as a biomarker of acute kidney injury in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruchim, Yaron; Avital, Yochai; Horowitz, Michal; Mazaki-Tovi, Michal; Aroch, Itamar; Segev, Gilad

    2017-07-01

    Early recognition of acute kidney injury (AKI) is important, as therapy is potentially more efficacious if instituted early in the course of disease. Urinary heat shock protein-72 to urinary creatinine ratio (uHSP72/uCr) was assessed as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in AKI in dogs. Fifty-three dogs were enrolled in five groups: healthy controls (n=11), urinary tract infection (n=10), chronic kidney disease (CKD; n=11), AKI (n=13), and acute decompensating CKD (n=8). Urinary heat shock protein-72 to urinary creatinine ratio was highest in the AKI group (P0.05 compared to each of the other two groups). The area under the curve (AUC) for the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis of uHSP72/uCr to predict AKI, compared to the control group, was 0.97. A cutoff value of 0.20ng/mg corresponded to sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 82%, respectively. Urinary heat shock protein-72 to urinary creatinine ratio was significantly lower in dogs categorized as survivors vs. non-survivors of AKI; ROC AUC, 0.91 (95% confidence intervals, 0.74-1.0). Urinary heat shock protein-72 to urinary creatinine ratio is a potentially useful diagnostic and prognostic biomarker of AKI in dogs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification of Arsenic Direct-Binding Proteins in Acute Promyelocytic Leukaemia Cells

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    Tao Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The identification of arsenic direct-binding proteins is essential for determining the mechanism by which arsenic trioxide achieves its chemotherapeutic effects. At least two cysteines close together in the amino acid sequence are crucial to the binding of arsenic and essential to the identification of arsenic-binding proteins. In the present study, arsenic binding proteins were pulled down with streptavidin and identified using a liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer (LC-MS/MS. More than 40 arsenic-binding proteins were separated, and redox-related proteins, glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1, heat shock 70 kDa protein 9 (HSPA9 and pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2, were further studied using binding assays in vitro. Notably, PKM2 has a high affinity for arsenic. In contrast to PKM2, GSTP1and HSPA9 did not combine with arsenic directly in vitro. These observations suggest that arsenic-mediated acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL suppressive effects involve PKM2. In summary, we identified several arsenic binding proteins in APL cells and investigated the therapeutic mechanisms of arsenic trioxide for APL. Further investigation into specific signal pathways by which PKM2 mediates APL developments may lead to a better understanding of arsenic effects on APL.

  5. Cell Cycle and Apoptosis Regulatory Protein (CARP)-1 is Expressed inOsteoblasts and Regulated by PTH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Sonali; Mahalingam, Chandrika D.; Das, Varsha; Jamal, Shazia; Levi, Edi; Rishi, Arun K.; Datta, Nabanita S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •CARP-1 is identified for the first time in bone cells. •PTH downregulates CARP-1 expression in differentiated osteoblasts. •PTH displaces CARP-1 from nucleus to the cytoplasm in differentiated osteoblasts. •Downregulation of CARP-1 by PTH involves PKA, PKC and P-p38 MAPK pathways. -- Abstract: Bone mass is dependent on osteoblast proliferation, differentiation and life-span of osteoblasts. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) controls osteoblast cell cycle regulatory proteins and suppresses mature osteoblasts apoptosis. Intermittent administration of PTH increases bone mass but the mechanism of action are complex and incompletely understood. Cell Cycle and Apoptosis Regulatory Protein (CARP)-1 (aka CCAR1) is a novel transducer of signaling by diverse agents including cell growth and differentiation factors. To gain further insight into the molecular mechanism, we investigated involvement of CARP-1 in PTH signaling in osteoblasts. Immunostaining studies revealed presence of CARP-1 in osteoblasts and osteocytes, while a minimal to absent levels were noted in the chondrocytes of femora from 10 to 12-week old mice. Treatment of 7-day differentiated MC3T3-E1 clone-4 (MC-4) mouse osteoblastic cells and primary calvarial osteoblasts with PTH for 30 min to 5 h followed by Western blot analysis showed 2- to 3-fold down-regulation of CARP-1 protein expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner compared to the respective vehicle treated control cells. H-89, a Protein Kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, suppressed PTH action on CARP-1 protein expression indicating PKA-dependent mechanism. PMA, a Protein Kinase C (PKC) agonist, mimicked PTH action, and the PKC inhibitor, GF109203X, partially blocked PTH-dependent downregulation of CARP-1, implying involvement of PKC. U0126, a Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Kinase (MEK) inhibitor, failed to interfere with CARP-1 suppression by PTH. In contrast, SB203580, p38 inhibitor, attenuated PTH down-regulation of CARP-1

  6. Cell Cycle and Apoptosis Regulatory Protein (CARP)-1 is Expressed inOsteoblasts and Regulated by PTH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Sonali; Mahalingam, Chandrika D.; Das, Varsha [Department of Internal Medicine/Endocrinology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Jamal, Shazia [Department of Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Levi, Edi [Department of Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Department of Pathology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Rishi, Arun K. [Department of Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); VA Medical Center, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Datta, Nabanita S., E-mail: ndatta@med.wayne.edu [Department of Internal Medicine/Endocrinology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Cardiovascular Research Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •CARP-1 is identified for the first time in bone cells. •PTH downregulates CARP-1 expression in differentiated osteoblasts. •PTH displaces CARP-1 from nucleus to the cytoplasm in differentiated osteoblasts. •Downregulation of CARP-1 by PTH involves PKA, PKC and P-p38 MAPK pathways. -- Abstract: Bone mass is dependent on osteoblast proliferation, differentiation and life-span of osteoblasts. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) controls osteoblast cell cycle regulatory proteins and suppresses mature osteoblasts apoptosis. Intermittent administration of PTH increases bone mass but the mechanism of action are complex and incompletely understood. Cell Cycle and Apoptosis Regulatory Protein (CARP)-1 (aka CCAR1) is a novel transducer of signaling by diverse agents including cell growth and differentiation factors. To gain further insight into the molecular mechanism, we investigated involvement of CARP-1 in PTH signaling in osteoblasts. Immunostaining studies revealed presence of CARP-1 in osteoblasts and osteocytes, while a minimal to absent levels were noted in the chondrocytes of femora from 10 to 12-week old mice. Treatment of 7-day differentiated MC3T3-E1 clone-4 (MC-4) mouse osteoblastic cells and primary calvarial osteoblasts with PTH for 30 min to 5 h followed by Western blot analysis showed 2- to 3-fold down-regulation of CARP-1 protein expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner compared to the respective vehicle treated control cells. H-89, a Protein Kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, suppressed PTH action on CARP-1 protein expression indicating PKA-dependent mechanism. PMA, a Protein Kinase C (PKC) agonist, mimicked PTH action, and the PKC inhibitor, GF109203X, partially blocked PTH-dependent downregulation of CARP-1, implying involvement of PKC. U0126, a Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Kinase (MEK) inhibitor, failed to interfere with CARP-1 suppression by PTH. In contrast, SB203580, p38 inhibitor, attenuated PTH down-regulation of CARP-1

  7. Optimal combinations of acute phase proteins for detecting infectious disease in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Stockmarr, Anders; Piñeiro, Matilde

    2011-01-01

    The acute phase protein (APP) response is an early systemic sign of disease, detected as substantial changes in APP serum concentrations and most disease states involving inflammatory reactions give rise to APP responses. To obtain a detailed picture of the general utility of porcine APPs to detect...... any disease with an inflammatory component seven porcine APPs were analysed in serum sampled at regular intervals in six different experimental challenge groups of pigs, including three bacterial (Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Streptococcus suis, Mycoplasma hyosynoviae), one parasitic (Toxoplasma...... for single APPs and for APP combinations. Combinations of APPs allowed the detection of disease more sensitively than any individual APP and the best three-protein combinations were CRP, apoA1, pigMAP and CRP, apoA1, Hp, respectively, closely followed by the two-protein combinations CRP, pigMAP and apoA1...

  8. Identification of Egg White Proteins and Divergence in the Regulatory Region of the Ovalbumin Gene in Avians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jindong; Hu, Jianhong; Chen, Li; Liu, Yali; Xu, Xiaoqin; He, Jun; Shen, Jianliang; Lu, Lizhi

    2017-01-01

    Egg white proteins play an important role in avian reproductive systems and are an ideal resource for bioreactor construction. In this study, 1D electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF-MS were performed to analyze egg white proteins in four species. In total, 18, 11, 28, and 13 proteins were identified in the egg whites of the chicken, duck, goose, and pigeon, respectively. Egg white proteins in chickens have been studied previously; therefore, we focused on the proteins in goose and duck egg whites. Based on the amino acid sequence analysis and a comparison of the unique peptides, high similarity was observed between the goose and duck egg whites. Diversity in the regulatory region of the ovalbumin gene explained the higher ovalbumin expression in the duck and goose than in the chicken. These data clarify the evolutionary processes underlying to the unique peptides contributing to the differential expression of ovalbumin in avians. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Using BAC transgenesis in zebrafish to identify regulatory sequences of the amyloid precursor protein gene in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakes Leighcraft A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-coding DNA in and around the human Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP gene that is central to Alzheimer’s disease (AD shares little sequence similarity with that of appb in zebrafish. Identifying DNA domains regulating expression of the gene in such situations becomes a challenge. Taking advantage of the zebrafish system that allows rapid functional analyses of gene regulatory sequences, we previously showed that two discontinuous DNA domains in zebrafish appb are important for expression of the gene in neurons: an enhancer in intron 1 and sequences 28–31 kb upstream of the gene. Here we identify the putative transcription factor binding sites responsible for this distal cis-acting regulation, and use that information to identify a regulatory region of the human APP gene. Results Functional analyses of intron 1 enhancer mutations in enhancer-trap BACs expressed as transgenes in zebrafish identified putative binding sites of two known transcription factor proteins, E4BP4/ NFIL3 and Forkhead, to be required for expression of appb. A cluster of three E4BP4 sites at −31 kb is also shown to be essential for neuron-specific expression, suggesting that the dependence of expression on upstream sequences is mediated by these E4BP4 sites. E4BP4/ NFIL3 and XFD1 sites in the intron enhancer and E4BP4/ NFIL3 sites at −31 kb specifically and efficiently bind the corresponding zebrafish proteins in vitro. These sites are statistically over-represented in both the zebrafish appb and the human APP genes, although their locations are different. Remarkably, a cluster of four E4BP4 sites in intron 4 of human APP exists in actively transcribing chromatin in a human neuroblastoma cell-line, SHSY5Y, expressing APP as shown using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP experiments. Thus although the two genes share little sequence conservation, they appear to share the same regulatory logic and are regulated by a similar set of transcription

  10. Using BAC transgenesis in zebrafish to identify regulatory sequences of the amyloid precursor protein gene in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakes, Leighcraft A; Du, Hansen; Wolf, Hope M; Hatcher, Charles; Norford, Derek C; Precht, Patricia; Sen, Ranjan; Chatterjee, Pradeep K

    2012-09-04

    Non-coding DNA in and around the human Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) gene that is central to Alzheimer's disease (AD) shares little sequence similarity with that of appb in zebrafish. Identifying DNA domains regulating expression of the gene in such situations becomes a challenge. Taking advantage of the zebrafish system that allows rapid functional analyses of gene regulatory sequences, we previously showed that two discontinuous DNA domains in zebrafish appb are important for expression of the gene in neurons: an enhancer in intron 1 and sequences 28-31 kb upstream of the gene. Here we identify the putative transcription factor binding sites responsible for this distal cis-acting regulation, and use that information to identify a regulatory region of the human APP gene. Functional analyses of intron 1 enhancer mutations in enhancer-trap BACs expressed as transgenes in zebrafish identified putative binding sites of two known transcription factor proteins, E4BP4/ NFIL3 and Forkhead, to be required for expression of appb. A cluster of three E4BP4 sites at -31 kb is also shown to be essential for neuron-specific expression, suggesting that the dependence of expression on upstream sequences is mediated by these E4BP4 sites. E4BP4/ NFIL3 and XFD1 sites in the intron enhancer and E4BP4/ NFIL3 sites at -31 kb specifically and efficiently bind the corresponding zebrafish proteins in vitro. These sites are statistically over-represented in both the zebrafish appb and the human APP genes, although their locations are different. Remarkably, a cluster of four E4BP4 sites in intron 4 of human APP exists in actively transcribing chromatin in a human neuroblastoma cell-line, SHSY5Y, expressing APP as shown using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments. Thus although the two genes share little sequence conservation, they appear to share the same regulatory logic and are regulated by a similar set of transcription factors. The results suggest that the clock

  11. Phosphorylation of the regulatory beta-subunit of protein kinase CK2 by checkpoint kinase Chk1: identification of the in vitro CK2beta phosphorylation site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lars P; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Højrup, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The regulatory beta-subunit of protein kinase CK2 mediates the formation of the CK2 tetrameric form and it has functions independent of CK2 catalytic subunit through interaction with several intracellular proteins. Recently, we have shown that CK2beta associates with the human checkpoint kinase Chk...

  12. Mapping of protein phosphatase-6 association with its SAPS domain regulatory subunit using a model of helical repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edelson Jessica R

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helical repeat motifs are common among regulatory subunits for type-1 and type-2A protein Ser/Thr phosphatases. Yeast Sit4 is a distinctive type-2A phosphatase that has dedicated regulatory subunits named Sit4-Associated Proteins (SAPS. These subunits are conserved, and three human SAPS-related proteins are known to associate with PP6 phosphatase, the Sit4 human homologue. Results Here we show that endogenous SAPS subunit PP6R3 co-precipitates half of PP6 in cell extracts, and the SAPS region of PP6R3 is sufficient for binding PP6. The SAPS domain of recombinant GST-PP6R3 is relatively resistant to trypsin despite having many K and R residues, and the purified SAPS domain (residues 1-513 has a circular dichroic spectrum indicative of mostly alpha helical structure. We used sequence alignments and 3D-jury methods to develop alternative models for the SAPS domain, based on available structures of other helical repeat proteins. The models were used to select sites for charge-reversal substitutions in the SAPS domain of PP6R3 that were tested by co-precipitation of endogenous PP6c with FLAG-tagged PP6R3 from mammalian cells. Mutations that reduced binding with PP6 suggest that SAPS adopts a helical repeat similar to the structure of p115 golgin, but distinct from the PP2A-A subunit. These mutations did not cause perturbations in overall PP6R3 conformation, evidenced by no change in kinetics or preferential cleavage by chymotrypsin. Conclusion The conserved SAPS domain in PP6R3 forms helical repeats similar to those in golgin p115 and negatively charged residues in interhelical loops are used to associate specifically with PP6. The results advance understanding of how distinctive helical repeat subunits uniquely distribute and differentially regulate closely related Ser/Thr phosphatases.

  13. The ratio of circulating regulatory T cells (Tregs/Th17 cells is associated with acute allograft rejection in liver transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wang

    Full Text Available CD4(+CD25(+FoxP3(+ regulatory T cells (Tregs and Th17 cells are known to be involved in the alloreactive responses in organ transplantation, but little is known about the relationship between Tregs and Th17 cells in the context of liver alloresponse. Here, we investigated whether the circulating Tregs/Th17 ratio is associated with acute allograft rejection in liver transplantation. In present study, thirty-eight patients who received liver transplant were enrolled. The patients were divided into two groups: acute allograft rejection group (Gr-AR (n = 16 and stable allograft liver function group (Gr-SF (n = 22. The frequencies of circulating Tregs and circulating Th17 cells, as well as Tregs/Th17 ratio were determined using flow cytometry. The association between Tregs/Th17 ratio and acute allograft rejection was then analyzed. Our results showed that the frequency of circulating Tregs was significantly decreased, whereas the frequency of circulating Th17 cells was significantly increased in liver allograft recipients who developed acute rejection. Tregs/Th17 ratio had a negative correlation with liver damage indices and the score of rejection activity index (RAI after liver transplantation. In addition, the percentages of CTLA-4(+, HLA-DR(+, Ki67(+, and IL-10(+ Tregs were higher in Gr-SF group than in Gr-AR group. Our results suggested that the ratio of circulating Tregs/Th17 cells is associated with acute allograft rejection, thus the ratio may serve as an alternative marker for the diagnosis of acute rejection.

  14. FK506 BINDING PROTEIN 12 DEFICIENCY IN ENDOTHELIAL AND HEMATOPOIETIC CELLS DECREASES REGULATORY T CELLS AND CAUSES HYPERTENSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiasson, Valorie L.; Talreja, Deepa; Young, Kristina J.; Chatterjee, Piyali; Banes-Berceli, Amy K.; Mitchell, Brett M.

    2011-01-01

    Patients treated with the immunosuppressive drug tacrolimus (FK506), which binds FK506 Binding Protein 12 (FKBP12) then inhibits the calcium-dependent phosphatase calcineurin, exhibit decreased regulatory T cells, endothelial dysfunction, and hypertension; however the mechanisms and whether altered T cell polarization play a role are unknown. Tacrolimus treatment of mice for 1 week dose-dependently decreased CD4+/FoxP3+ (regulatory T cells) and increased CD4+/IL-17+ (T helper 17) cells in the spleen, and caused endothelial dysfunction and hypertension. To determine the mechanisms, we crossed floxed FKBP12 mice with Tie2-Cre mice to generate offspring lacking FKBP12 in endothelial and hematopoietic cells only (FKBP12EC KO). Given FKBP12’s role in inhibiting TGF-β receptor activation, Tie2-Cre-mediated deletion of FKBP12 increased TGF-β receptor activation and SMAD2/3 signaling. FKBP12EC KO mice exhibited increased vascular expression of genes and proteins related to endothelial cell activation and inflammation. Serum levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-2, IL-6, IFNγ, IL-17a, IL-21, and IL-23 were increased significantly suggesting a Th17 cell-mediated inflammatory state. Flow cytometry studies confirmed this as splenocyte levels of CD4+/IL-17+ cells were increased significantly while CD4+/FoxP3+ cells were decreased in FKBP12EC KO mice. Furthermore, spleens from FKBP12EC KO mice showed increased STAT3 activation, involved in Th17 cell induction, and decreased STAT5 activation, involved in regulatory T cell induction. FKBP12EC KO mice also exhibited endothelial dysfunction and hypertension. These data suggest that tacrolimus, through its activation of TGF-β receptors in endothelial and hematopoietic cells, may cause endothelial dysfunction and hypertension by activating endothelial cells, reducing Tregs, and increasing Th17 cell polarization and inflammation. PMID:21518963

  15. Acute phase reactants in Sudanese children with severe protein-energy malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suliman, Omer S M; Salih, Mustafa A M; Karrar, Zein A; Mohammed, Abdelrahim O; Helsing, Chrestover

    2011-01-01

    The pre-dietary rehabilitation levels of acute phase proteins (APP) namely, alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), orosomucoid (ORO), haptoglobin (HAP), fibrinogen (FIB) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in the plasma of Sudanese children with severe protein energy malnutrition (PEM) were compared with those of normal controls, and with the levels after dietary rehabilitation. Eighty one children were included in the study; 49 with severe PEM (23 with marasmus, 17 with marasmic-kwashiorkor and 9 with kwashiorkor), 13 with tuberculosis (TB) and 19 healthy children as controls. The study showed a high incidence of infections, especially acute respiratory infection (ARI), diarrhoeal diseases and intestinal parasites in the malnourished children. The mean plasma level of albumin was significantly lower in the malnourished children compared to controls (P<0.001), with kwashiorkor children showing the lowest mean level. This hypoalbuminaemia was significantly associated with the presence of ARI and intestinal parasites. The mean plasma levels of the APP, except FIB, were significantly higher in malnourished children than in controls, with higher levels associated with ARI and the presence of fever. Malnourished children with TB had significantly higher mean levels of the APP (AAT, HAP, FIB, CRP) compared to those without TB. The mean levels of HAP and AAT were significantly lower in the presence of diarrhoea, suggesting their loss in the stool. The mean levels of the APP after two weeks dietary rehabilitation and antimicrobial treatment showed a significant drop in only two of the APP, namely CRP, ORO, while FIB showed a significant rise.

  16. HIV infection and drugs of abuse: role of acute phase proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samikkannu, Thangavel; Rao, Kurapati V K; Arias, Adriana Y; Kalaichezian, Aarthi; Sagar, Vidya; Yoo, Changwon; Nair, Madhavan P N

    2013-09-17

    HIV infection and drugs of abuse such as methamphetamine (METH), cocaine, and alcohol use have been identified as risk factors for triggering inflammation. Acute phase proteins such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid A (SAA) are the biomarkers of inflammation. Hence, the interactive effect of drugs of abuse with acute phase proteins in HIV-positive subjects was investigated. Plasma samples were utilized from 75 subjects with METH use, cocaine use, alcohol use, and HIV-positive alone and HIV-positive METH, cocaine, and alcohol users, and age-matched control subjects. The plasma CRP and SAA levels were measured by ELISA and western blot respectively and the CD4 counts were also measured. Observed results indicated that the CRP and SAA levels in HIV-positive subjects who are METH, cocaine and alcohol users were significantly higher when compared with either drugs of abuse or HIV-positive alone. The CD4 counts were also dramatically reduced in HIV-positive with drugs of abuse subjects compared with only HIV-positive subjects. These results suggest that, in HIV-positive subjects, drugs of abuse increase the levels of CRP and SAA, which may impact on the HIV infection and disease progression.

  17. Oral Administration of Astrovirus Capsid Protein Is Sufficient To Induce Acute Diarrhea In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria A. Meliopoulos

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The disease mechanisms associated with the onset of astrovirus diarrhea are unknown. Unlike other enteric virus infections, astrovirus infection is not associated with an inflammatory response or cellular damage. In vitro studies in differentiated Caco-2 cells demonstrated that human astrovirus serotype 1 (HAstV-1 capsid protein alone disrupts the actin cytoskeleton and tight junction complex, leading to increased epithelial barrier permeability. In this study, we show that oral administration of purified recombinant turkey astrovirus 2 (TAstV-2 capsid protein results in acute diarrhea in a dose- and time-dependent manner in turkey poults. Similarly to that induced by infectious virus, TAstV-2 capsid-induced diarrhea was independent of inflammation or histological changes but was associated with increased intestinal barrier permeability, as well as redistribution of sodium hydrogen exchanger 3 (NHE3 from the membrane to the cytoplasm of the intestinal epithelium. Unlike other viral enterotoxins that have been identified, astrovirus capsid induces diarrhea after oral administration, reproducing the natural route of infection and demonstrating that ingestion of intact noninfectious capsid protein may be sufficient to provoke acute diarrhea. Based on these data, we hypothesize that the astrovirus capsid acts like an enterotoxin and induces intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction.

  18. Interleukin 6 and lipopolysaccharide binding protein - markers of inflammation in acute appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brănescu, C; Serban, D; Dascălu, A M; Oprescu, S M; Savlovschi, C

    2013-01-01

    The rate of incidence of acute appendicitis is 12% in the case of male patients and 25% in case of women, which represents about 7% of the world population. The appendectomy rate has remained constant (i.e. 10 out of 10,000 patients per year). Appendicitis most often occurs in patients aged between 11-40 years, on the threshold between the third and fourth decades, the average age being 31.3 years. Since the first appendectomy performed by Claudius Amyand (1681/6 -1740), on December, 6th, 1735 to our days, i.e., 270 years later, time has confirmed the efficiency of both the therapy method and the surgical solution. The surgical cure in case of acute appendicitis has proved to be acceptable within the most widely practised techniques in general surgery. The variety of clinical forms has reached all age ranges, which in its turn has resulted in a large number of semiotic signs. In the case of acute appendicitis, interdisciplinarity has allowed the transfer of concept and methodology transfer among many areas of expertise, aimed at a better, minute understanding of the inflammatory event itself. Acute appendicitis illustrates inflammation development at digestive level and provides for a diagnostic and paraclinical exploration which continually upgrades. The recent inclusion in the studies of the Lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP)- type inflammation markers has laid the foundation of the latter's documented presence in the case of acute appendicitis-related inflammation. Proof of the correlation between the histopathological, clinical and evolutive forms can be found by identifying and quantifying these inflammation markers. The importance of studying inflammation markers allows us to conduct studies going beyond the prognosis of the various stages in which these markers were identified. The present article shows the results of a 1-year monitoring of the inflammation markers' values for Interleukin-6 and Lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP)-types, both pre

  19. Phosphorylation of protein kinase A (PKA) regulatory subunit RIα by protein kinase G (PKG) primes PKA for catalytic activity in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haushalter, Kristofer J; Casteel, Darren E; Raffeiner, Andrea; Stefan, Eduard; Patel, Hemal H; Taylor, Susan S

    2018-03-23

    cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKAc) is a pivotal signaling protein in eukaryotic cells. PKAc has two well-characterized regulatory subunit proteins, RI and RII (each having α and β isoforms), which keep the PKAc catalytic subunit in a catalytically inactive state until activation by cAMP. Previous reports showed that the RIα regulatory subunit is phosphorylated by cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) in vitro , whereupon phosphorylated RIα no longer inhibits PKAc at normal (1:1) stoichiometric ratios. However, the significance of this phosphorylation as a mechanism for activating type I PKA holoenzymes has not been fully explored, especially in cellular systems. In this study, we further examined the potential of RIα phosphorylation to regulate physiologically relevant "desensitization" of PKAc activity. First, the serine 101 site of RIα was validated as a target of PKGIα phosphorylation both in vitro and in cells. Analysis of a phosphomimetic substitution in RIα (S101E) showed that modification of this site increases PKAc activity in vitro and in cells, even without cAMP stimulation. Numerous techniques were used to show that although Ser 101 variants of RIα can bind PKAc, the modified linker region of the S101E mutant has a significantly reduced affinity for the PKAc active site. These findings suggest that RIα phosphorylation may be a novel mechanism to circumvent the requirement of cAMP stimulus to activate type I PKA in cells. We have thus proposed a model to explain how PKG phosphorylation of RIα creates a "sensitized intermediate" state that is in effect primed to trigger PKAc activity.

  20. Cryptotanshinone deregulates unfolded protein response and eukaryotic initiation factor signaling in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ching-Fen; Seo, Ean-Jeong; Klauck, Sabine M; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-02-15

    Unfolded protein responses (UPR) determine cell fate and are recognized as anticancer targets. In a previous research, we reported that cryptotanshinone (CPT) exerted cytotoxic effects toward acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells through mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. In the present study, we further investigated the role of UPR in CPT-induced cytotoxicity on acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells by applying tools of pharmacogenomics and bioinformatics. Gene expression profiling was performed by mRNA microarray hybridization. Potential transcription factor binding motifs were identified in the promoter regions of the deregulated genes by Cistrome software. Molecular docking on eIF-4A and PI3K was performed to investigate the inhibitory activity of CPT on translation initiation. CPT regulated genes related to UPR and eIF2 signaling pathways. The DNA-Damage-Inducible Transcript 3 (DDIT3) gene, which is activated as consequence of UPR malfunction during apoptosis, was induced and validated by in vitro experiments. Transcription factor binding motif analysis of the microarrary-retrieved deregulated genes in the promoter region emphasized the relevance of transcription factors, such as ATF2, ATF4 and XBP1, regulating UPR and cell apoptosis. Molecular docking suggested inhibitory effects of CPT by binding to eIF-4A and PI3K providing evidence for a role of CPT's in the disruption of protein synthesis. CPT triggered UPR and inhibited protein synthesis via eIF-mediated translation initiation, potentially supporting CPT-induced cytotoxic effects toward acute leukemia cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Endothelin and calciotropic hormones share regulatory pathways in multidrug resistance protein 2-mediated transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, K.E.; Masereeuw, R.; Miller, D.S.; Hang, X.M.; Flik, G.

    2007-01-01

    The kidney of vertebrates plays a key role in excretion of endogenous waste products and xenobiotics. Active secretion in the proximal nephron is at the basis of this excretion, mediated by carrier proteins including multidrug resistance protein 2 (Mrp2). We previously showed that Mrp2 function is

  2. Endothelin and calciotropic hormones share regulatory pathways in multidrug resistance protein 2-mediated transport.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, K.E.; Masereeuw, R.; Miller, D.S.; Hang, X.M.; Flik, G.

    2007-01-01

    The kidney of vertebrates plays a key role in excretion of endogenous waste products and xenobiotics. Active secretion in the proximal nephron is at the basis of this excretion, mediated by carrier proteins including multidrug resistance protein 2 (Mrp2). We previously showed that Mrp2 function is

  3. Endothelin and calciotropic hormones share regulatory pathways in multidrug resistance protein 2 (Mrp2-) mediated transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, K.E.; Masereeuw, R.; Miller, D.S.; Hang, X.M.; Flik, G.

    2006-01-01

    The kidney of vertebrates plays a key role in excretion of endogenous waste products and xenobiotics. Active secretion in the proximal nephron is at the basis of this excretion, mediated by carrier proteins including multidrug resistance protein 2 (Mrp2). We previously showed that Mrp2 function is

  4. Distinct responses of protein turnover regulatory pathways in hypoxia- and semistarvation-induced muscle atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Theije, Chiel C.; Langen, Ramon C. J.; Lamers, Wouter H.; Schols, Annemie M. W. J.; Köhler, S. Eleonore

    2013-01-01

    The balance of muscle protein synthesis and degradation determines skeletal muscle mass. We hypothesized that hypoxia-induced muscle atrophy and alterations in the regulation of muscle protein turnover include a hypoxia-specific component, in addition to the observed effects of reduction in food

  5. Guanine nucleotide regulatory protein co-purifies with the D2-dopamine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senogles, S.E.; Caron, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    The D 2 -dopamine receptor from bovine anterior pituitary was purified ∼1000 fold by affinity chromatography on CMOS-Sepharose. Reconstitution of the affinity-purified receptor into phospholipid vesicles revealed the presence of high and low affinity agonist sites as detected by N-n-propylnorapomorphine (NPA) competition experiments with 3 H-spiperone. High affinity agonist binding could be converted to the low affinity form by guanine nucleotides, indicating the presence of an endogenous guanine nucleotide binding protein (N protein) in the affinity-purified D 2 receptor preparations. Furthermore, this preparation contained an agonist-sensitive GTPase activity which was stimulated 2-3 fold over basal by 10 μM NPA. 35 S-GTPγS binding to these preparations revealed a stoichiometry of 0.4-0.7 mole N protein/mole receptor, suggesting the N protein may be specifically coupled with the purified D 2 -dopamine receptor and not present as a contaminant. Pertussis toxin treatment of the affinity purified receptor preparations prevented high affinity agonist binding, as well as agonist stimulation of the GTPase activity, presumably by inactivating the associated N protein. Pertussis toxin lead to the ADP-ribosylation of a protein of 39-40K on SDS-PAGE. These findings indicate that an endogenous N protein, N/sub i/ or N/sub o/, co-purifies with the D 2 -dopamine receptor which may reflect a precoupling of this receptor with an N protein within the membranes

  6. Endothelin and calciotropic hormones share regulatory pathways in multidrug resistance protein 2-mediated transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, K.E.; Masereeuw, R.; Miller, D.S.; Hang, X.M.; Flik, G.

    2006-01-01

    The kidney of vertebrates plays a key role in excretion of endogenous waste products and xenobiotics. Active secretion in the proximal nephron is at the basis of this excretion, mediated by carrier proteins including multidrug resistance protein 2 (Mrp2). We previously showed that Mrp2 function is

  7. The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-coronavirus 3a protein may function as a modulator of the trafficking properties of the spike protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Yee-Joo

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recent publication reported that a tyrosine-dependent sorting signal, present in cytoplasmic tail of the spike protein of most coronaviruses, mediates the intracellular retention of the spike protein. This motif is missing from the spike protein of the severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus (SARS-CoV, resulting in high level of surface expression of the spike protein when it is expressed on its own in vitro. Presentation of the hypothesis It has been shown that the severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus genome contains open reading frames that encode for proteins with no homologue in other coronaviruses. One of them is the 3a protein, which is expressed during infection in vitro and in vivo. The 3a protein, which contains a tyrosine-dependent sorting signal in its cytoplasmic domain, is expressed on the cell surface and can undergo internalization. In addition, 3a can bind to the spike protein and through this interaction, it may be able to cause the spike protein to become internalized, resulting in a decrease in its surface expression. Testing the hypothesis The effects of 3a on the internalization of cell surface spike protein can be examined biochemically and the significance of the interplay between these two viral proteins during viral infection can be studied using reverse genetics methodology. Implication of the hypothesis If this hypothesis is proven, it will indicate that the severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus modulates the surface expression of the spike protein via a different mechanism from other coronaviruses. The interaction between 3a and S, which are expressed from separate subgenomic RNA, would be important for controlling the trafficking properties of S. The cell surface expression of S in infected cells significantly impacts viral assembly, viral spread and viral pathogenesis. Modulation by this unique pathway could confer certain advantages during the replication of the severe

  8. Protein source and quality in therapeutic foods affect the immune response and outcome in severe acute malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protein is a vital component of therapeutic foods designed to treat severe acute malnutrition (SAM) in children; however there are still unknowns about the quality and quantity of the proteins to use in these foods. This review examines two recent studies investigating several different qualities an...

  9. P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance protein activities in relation to treatment outcome in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, EGE; van Putten, WLJ; Verdonck, LF; Ossenkoppele, GJ; Verhoef, GEG; Vellenga, E

    Despite treatment with intensive chemotherapy, a considerable number of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) die from their disease due to the occurrence of resistance. Overexpression of the transporter proteins P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) 1 has been identified

  10. Quantitative Profiling Identifies Potential Regulatory Proteins Involved in Development from Dauer Stage to L4 Stage in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunhee; Lee, Hyoung-Joo; Hahm, Jeong-Hoon; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Park, Don-Ha; Hancock, William S; Paik, Young-Ki

    2016-02-05

    When Caenorhabditis elegans encounters unfavorable growth conditions, it enters the dauer stage, an alternative L3 developmental period. A dauer larva resumes larval development to the normal L4 stage by uncharacterized postdauer reprogramming (PDR) when growth conditions become more favorable. During this transition period, certain heterochronic genes involved in controlling the proper sequence of developmental events are known to act, with their mutations suppressing the Muv (multivulva) phenotype in C. elegans. To identify the specific proteins in which the Muv phenotype is highly suppressed, quantitative proteomic analysis with iTRAQ labeling of samples obtained from worms at L1 + 30 h (for continuous development [CD]) and dauer recovery +3 h (for postdauer development [PD]) was carried out to detect changes in protein abundance in the CD and PD states of both N2 and lin-28(n719). Of the 1661 unique proteins identified with a proteomic approach identifies and quantitates the regulatory proteins potentially involved in PDR in C. elegans, which safeguards the overall lifecycle in response to environmental changes.

  11. CCAAT displacement protein (CDP/cut) binds a negative regulatory element in the human tryptophan hydroxylase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teerawatanasuk, N; Skalnik, D G; Carr, L G

    1999-01-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of serotonin, a neurotransmitter that has been implicated in many psychiatric illnesses. The mechanism of transcriptional regulation of the human TPH gene is largely unknown. We have identified a negative regulatory element located between nucleotides -310 and -220 in the human TPH (hTPH) gene. Electromobility shift analyses performed with the -310/-220 hTPH probe and nuclear extract from P815-HTR (a TPH-expressing cell line) revealed two slow migrating protein-DNA complexes, designated I and II. CCAAT displacement protein (CDP/Cut) is involved in complex I formation as shown in electromobility shift analysis, using consensus oligonucleotide competitor and antibody. Mutations in the CDP/Cut binding site not only disrupted the CDP-DNA complex but also disrupted the second complex, suggesting that the core binding sequences of the two proteins are overlapping. The functional importance of these protein-DNA interactions was assessed by transiently transfecting wild-type and mutant pTPH/luciferase reporter constructs into P815-HTR cells. Mutations in the core CDP/Cut site resulted in an approximately fourfold increase in relative luciferase activities. Because CDP/Cut has been shown to repress transcription of many target genes, we speculate that disruption of the CDP/Cut binding was responsible, at least in part, for the activation of hTPH gene.

  12. Matricellular Proteins Play a Potential Role in Acute Primary Angle Closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Fu, Mingshui; Liu, Kun; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Zhihua; Zhou, Minwen; Xu, Xun

    2018-03-20

    To quantify levels of matricellular proteins in aqueous humor samples from acute primary angle closure (APAC) and non-glaucomatous cataract eyes and investigate their correlation with intraocular pressure (IOP) fluctuation. Aqueous humor samples were collected from 63 eyes including 29 current APAC eyes, 12 previous APAC eyes, and 22 cataract eyes. Concentrations of four main matricellular proteins (SPARC, tenascin-C, thrombospondin-2, and osteopontin) were measured using multiplexed immunoassay kits. Correlations between matricellular proteins and age, sex, and IOP were then detected using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. The levels of SPARC, thrombospondin-2, and osteopontin were significantly elevated in the APAC group as compared to the cataract group (p APAC group into current and previous APAC groups showed that only the differences of SPARC and thrombospondin-2 between the current APAC and cataract groups were significant (both p APAC group but no correlation was found in the previous APAC or cataract groups. The levels of matricellular proteins were significantly elevated in the current APAC eyes and positively correlated to IOP. Further studies are necessary to investigate the molecular mechanisms and histological evidence of pathogenesis in matricellular proteins in APAC.

  13. PuF, an antimetastatic and developmental signaling protein, interacts with the Alzheimer's amyloid-β precursor protein via a tissue-specific proximal regulatory element (PRE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Debomoy K; Maloney, Bryan; Rogers, Jack T; Ge, Yuan-Wen

    2013-01-31

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is intimately tied to amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide. Extraneuronal brain plaques consisting primarily of Aβ aggregates are a hallmark of AD. Intraneuronal Aβ subunits are strongly implicated in disease progression. Protein sequence mutations of the Aβ precursor protein (APP) account for a small proportion of AD cases, suggesting that regulation of the associated gene (APP) may play a more important role in AD etiology. The APP promoter possesses a novel 30 nucleotide sequence, or "proximal regulatory element" (PRE), at -76/-47, from the +1 transcription start site that confers cell type specificity. This PRE contains sequences that make it vulnerable to epigenetic modification and may present a viable target for drug studies. We examined PRE-nuclear protein interaction by gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and PRE mutant EMSA. This was followed by functional studies of PRE mutant/reporter gene fusion clones. EMSA probed with the PRE showed DNA-protein interaction in multiple nuclear extracts and in human brain tissue nuclear extract in a tissue-type specific manner. We identified transcription factors that are likely to bind the PRE, using competition gel shift and gel supershift: Activator protein 2 (AP2), nm23 nucleoside diphosphate kinase/metastatic inhibitory protein (PuF), and specificity protein 1 (SP1). These sites crossed a known single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). EMSA with PRE mutants and promoter/reporter clone transfection analysis further implicated PuF in cells and extracts. Functional assays of mutant/reporter clone transfections were evaluated by ELISA of reporter protein levels. EMSA and ELISA results correlated by meta-analysis. We propose that PuF may regulate the APP gene promoter and that AD risk may be increased by interference with PuF regulation at the PRE. PuF is targeted by calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitor 1, which also interacts with the integrins. These proteins are connected

  14. Identification of a novel Leucine-rich repeat protein and candidate PP1 regulatory subunit expressed in developing spermatids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sperry Ann O

    2008-01-01

    . TLRR is homologous to a class of regulatory subunits for PP1, a central phosphatase in the reversible phosphorylation of proteins that is key to modulation of many intracellular processes. TLRR may serve to target this important signaling molecule near the nucleus of developing spermatids in order to control the cellular rearrangements of spermiogenesis.

  15. Temperature inducible β-sheet structure in the transactivation domains of retroviral regulatory proteins of the Rev family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumb, Werner; Graf, Christine; Parslow, Tristram; Schneider, Rainer; Auer, Manfred

    1999-11-01

    The interaction of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) regulatory protein Rev with cellular cofactors is crucial for the viral life cycle. The HIV-1 Rev transactivation domain is functionally interchangeable with analog regions of Rev proteins of other retroviruses suggesting common folding patterns. In order to obtain experimental evidence for similar structural features mediating protein-protein contacts we investigated activation domain peptides from HIV-1, HIV-2, VISNA virus, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) by CD spectroscopy, secondary structure prediction and sequence analysis. Although different in polarity and hydrophobicity, all peptides showed a similar behavior with respect to solution conformation, concentration dependence and variations in ionic strength and pH. Temperature studies revealed an unusual induction of β-structure with rising temperatures in all activation domain peptides. The high stability of β-structure in this region was demonstrated in three different peptides of the activation domain of HIV-1 Rev in solutions containing 40% hexafluoropropanol, a reagent usually known to induce α-helix into amino acid sequences. Sequence alignments revealed similarities between the polar effector domains from FIV and EIAV and the leucine rich (hydrophobic) effector domains found in HIV-1, HIV-2 and VISNA. Studies on activation domain peptides of two dominant negative HIV-1 Rev mutants, M10 and M32, pointed towards different reasons for the biological behavior. Whereas the peptide containing the M10 mutation (L 78E 79→D 78L 79) showed wild-type structure, the M32 mutant peptide (L 78L 81L 83→A 78A 81A 83) revealed a different protein fold to be the reason for the disturbed binding to cellular cofactors. From our data, we conclude, that the activation domain of Rev proteins from different viral origins adopt a similar fold and that a β-structural element is involved in binding to a

  16. Selection on Coding and Regulatory Variation Maintains Individuality in Major Urinary Protein Scent Marks in Wild Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Sheehan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of individuals by scent is widespread across animal taxa. Though animals can often discriminate chemical blends based on many compounds, recent work shows that specific protein pheromones are necessary and sufficient for individual recognition via scent marks in mice. The genetic nature of individuality in scent marks (e.g. coding versus regulatory variation and the evolutionary processes that maintain diversity are poorly understood. The individual signatures in scent marks of house mice are the protein products of a group of highly similar paralogs in the major urinary protein (Mup gene family. Using the offspring of wild-caught mice, we examine individuality in the major urinary protein (MUP scent marks at the DNA, RNA and protein levels. We show that individuality arises through a combination of variation at amino acid coding sites and differential transcription of central Mup genes across individuals, and we identify eSNPs in promoters. There is no evidence of post-transcriptional processes influencing phenotypic diversity as transcripts accurately predict the relative abundance of proteins in urine samples. The match between transcripts and urine samples taken six months earlier also emphasizes that the proportional relationships across central MUP isoforms in urine is stable. Balancing selection maintains coding variants at moderate frequencies, though pheromone diversity appears limited by interactions with vomeronasal receptors. We find that differential transcription of the central Mup paralogs within and between individuals significantly increases the individuality of pheromone blends. Balancing selection on gene regulation allows for increased individuality via combinatorial diversity in a limited number of pheromones.

  17. Regulatory T Cells Contribute to the Inhibition of Radiation-Induced Acute Lung Inflammation via Bee Venom Phospholipase A₂ in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dasom; Lee, Gihyun; Sohn, Sung-Hwa; Park, Soojin; Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Lee, Ji Min; Yang, Jieun; Cho, Jaeho; Bae, Hyunsu

    2016-04-30

    Bee venom has long been used to treat various inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Previously, we reported that bee venom phospholipase A₂ (bvPLA₂) has an anti-inflammatory effect through the induction of regulatory T cells. Radiotherapy is a common anti-cancer method, but often causes adverse effects, such as inflammation. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effects of bvPLA₂ in radiation-induced acute lung inflammation. Mice were focally irradiated with 75 Gy of X-rays in the lung and administered bvPLA₂ six times after radiation. To evaluate the level of inflammation, the number of immune cells, mRNA level of inflammatory cytokine, and histological changes in the lung were measured. BvPLA₂ treatment reduced the accumulation of immune cells, such as macrophages, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and eosinophils. In addition, bvPLA₂ treatment decreased inflammasome-, chemokine-, cytokine- and fibrosis-related genes' mRNA expression. The histological results also demonstrated the attenuating effect of bvPLA₂ on radiation-induced lung inflammation. Furthermore, regulatory T cell depletion abolished the therapeutic effects of bvPLA₂ in radiation-induced pneumonitis, implicating the anti-inflammatory effects of bvPLA₂ are dependent upon regulatory T cells. These results support the therapeutic potential of bvPLA₂ in radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis treatments.

  18. Regulatory T Cells Contribute to the Inhibition of Radiation-Induced Acute Lung Inflammation via Bee Venom Phospholipase A2 in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasom Shin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Bee venom has long been used to treat various inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Previously, we reported that bee venom phospholipase A2 (bvPLA2 has an anti-inflammatory effect through the induction of regulatory T cells. Radiotherapy is a common anti-cancer method, but often causes adverse effects, such as inflammation. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effects of bvPLA2 in radiation-induced acute lung inflammation. Mice were focally irradiated with 75 Gy of X-rays in the lung and administered bvPLA2 six times after radiation. To evaluate the level of inflammation, the number of immune cells, mRNA level of inflammatory cytokine, and histological changes in the lung were measured. BvPLA2 treatment reduced the accumulation of immune cells, such as macrophages, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and eosinophils. In addition, bvPLA2 treatment decreased inflammasome-, chemokine-, cytokine- and fibrosis-related genes’ mRNA expression. The histological results also demonstrated the attenuating effect of bvPLA2 on radiation-induced lung inflammation. Furthermore, regulatory T cell depletion abolished the therapeutic effects of bvPLA2 in radiation-induced pneumonitis, implicating the anti-inflammatory effects of bvPLA2 are dependent upon regulatory T cells. These results support the therapeutic potential of bvPLA2 in radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis treatments.

  19. Liver injury in acute hepatitis A is associated with decreased frequency of regulatory T cells caused by Fas-mediated apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Seok; Lee, Jeewon; Lee, Hyun Woong; Chang, Dong-Yeop; Sung, Pil Soo; Jung, Min Kyung; Park, Jun Yong; Kim, Ja Kyung; Lee, Jung Il; Park, Hana; Cheong, Jae Youn; Suh, Kyung-Suk; Kim, Hyung Joon; Lee, June Sung; Kim, Kyung-Ah; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2015-08-01

    Foxp3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) control immune responses, but their role in acute viral hepatitis remains elusive. Herein, we investigated alteration in the peripheral blood Treg population during acute hepatitis A (AHA) and its implication in the immune-mediated liver injury. The study included 71 patients with AHA, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated. The suppressive activity of Treg population was determined by assessing anti-CD3/CD28-stimulated proliferation of Treg-depleted and reconstituted PBMCs. Treg cell frequency, phenotype and apoptosis in PBMCs were analysed by flow cytometry. The frequency of circulating Tregs was reduced during AHA. Moreover, the suppressive activity of the total Treg pool in the peripheral blood was attenuated during AHA. Treg frequency and suppressive activity of the Treg population inversely correlated with the serum alanine aminotransferase level. Fas was overexpressed on Tregs during AHA, suggesting their susceptibility to Fas-induced apoptosis. Indeed, increased apoptotic death was observed in Tregs of patients with AHA compared with healthy controls. In addition, agonistic anti-Fas treatment further increased apoptotic death of Tregs from patients with AHA. The decreased Treg frequency and Fas overexpression on Tregs were not observed in other acute liver diseases such as acute hepatitis B, acute hepatitis C and toxic/drug-induced hepatitis. The size of the Treg pool was contracted during AHA, resulting from apoptosis of Tregs induced by a Fas-mediated mechanism. Decrease in Treg numbers led to reduced suppressive activity of the Treg pool and consequently resulted in severe liver injury during AHA. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Protein-Thiol Oxidation and Cell Death: Regulatory Role of Glutaredoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Erin M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Glutaredoxin (Grx) is the primary enzyme responsible for catalysis of deglutathionylation of protein-mixed disulfides with glutathione (GSH) (protein-SSG). This reversible post-translational modification alters the activity and function of many proteins important in regulation of critical cellular processes. Aberrant regulation of protein glutathionylation/deglutathionylation reactions due to changes in Grx activity can disrupt both apoptotic and survival signaling pathways. Recent Advances: Grx is known to regulate the activity of many proteins through reversible glutathionylation, such as Ras, Fas, ASK1, NFκB, and procaspase-3, all of which play important roles in control of apoptosis. Reactive oxygen species and/or reactive nitrogen species mediate oxidative modifications of critical Cys residues on these apoptotic mediators, facilitating protein-SSG formation and thereby altering protein function and apoptotic signaling. Critical Issues: Much of what is known about the regulation of apoptotic mediators by Grx and reversible glutathionylation has been gleaned from in vitro studies of discrete apoptotic pathways. To relate these results to events in vivo it is important to examine changes in protein-SSG status in situ under natural cellular conditions, maintaining relevant GSH:GSSG ratios and using appropriate inducers of apoptosis. Future Directions: Apoptosis is a highly complex, tightly regulated process involving many different checks and balances. The influence of Grx activity on the interconnectivity among these various pathways remains unknown. Knowledge of the effects of Grx is essential for developing novel therapeutic approaches for treating diseases involving dysregulated apoptosis, such as cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases, where alterations in redox homeostasis are hallmarks for pathogenesis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 1748–1763. PMID:22530666

  1. Reversible oxidation of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) alters its interactions with signaling and regulatory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrastro, Ivan; Tveen-Jensen, Karina; Woscholski, Rudiger; Spickett, Corinne M; Pitt, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is involved in a number of different cellular processes including metabolism, apoptosis, cell proliferation and survival. It is a redox-sensitive dual-specificity protein phosphatase that acts as a tumor suppressor by negatively regulating the PI3K/Akt pathway. While direct evidence of redox regulation of PTEN downstream signaling has been reported, the effect of PTEN redox status on its protein-protein interactions is poorly understood. PTEN-GST in its reduced and a DTT-reversible H2O2-oxidized form was immobilized on a glutathione-sepharose support and incubated with cell lysate to capture interacting proteins. Captured proteins were analyzed by LC-MSMS and comparatively quantified using label-free methods. 97 Potential protein interactors were identified, including a significant number that are novel. The abundance of fourteen interactors was found to vary significantly with the redox status of PTEN. Altered binding to PTEN was confirmed by affinity pull-down and Western blotting for Prdx1, Trx, and Anxa2, while DDB1 was validated as a novel interactor with unaltered binding. These results suggest that the redox status of PTEN causes a functional variation in the PTEN interactome. The resin capture method developed had distinct advantages in that the redox status of PTEN could be directly controlled and measured. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Report of the European Society of Cardiology Cardiovascular Round Table regulatory workshop update of the evaluation of new agents for the treatment of acute coronary syndrome: Executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Héctor; de Graeff, Pieter; Richard-Lordereau, Isabelle; Emmerich, Joseph; Fox, Keith Aa; Friedman, Carola P; Gaudin, Christophe; El-Gazayerly, Amany; Goldman, Samantha; Hemmrich, Melanie; Henderson, Robert A; Himmelmann, Anders; Irs, Alar; Jackson, Neville; James, Stefan K; Katus, Hugo A; Laslop, Andrea; Laws, Ian; Mehran, Roxana; Ong, Seleen; Prasad, Krishna; Roffi, Marco; Rosano, Giuseppe Mc; Rose, Martin; Sinnaeve, Peter R; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Thygesen, Kristian; Van de Werf, Frans; Varin, Claire; Verheugt, Freek Wa; de Los Angeles Alonso García, Maria

    2016-06-29

    Regulatory authorities interpret the results of randomized controlled trials according to published principles. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) is planning a revision of the 2000 and 2003 guidance documents on clinical investigation of new medicinal products for the treatment of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) to achieve consistency with current knowledge in the field. This manuscript summarizes the key output from a collaborative workshop, organized by the Cardiovascular Round Table and the European Affairs Committee of the European Society of Cardiology, involving clinicians, academic researchers, trialists, European and US regulators, and pharmaceutical industry researchers. Specific questions in four key areas were selected as priorities for changes in regulatory guidance: patient selection, endpoints, methodologic issues and issues related to the research for novel agents. Patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non-STEMI (NSTEMI) should be studied separately for therapies aimed at the specific pathophysiology of either condition, particularly for treatment of the acute phase, but can be studied together for other treatments, especially long-term therapy. Unstable angina patients should be excluded from acute phase ACS trials. In general, cardiovascular death and reinfarction are recommended for primary efficacy endpoints; other endpoints may be considered if specifically relevant for the therapy under study. New agents or interventions should be tested against a background of evidence-based therapy with expanded follow-up for safety assessment. In conclusion, new guidance documents for randomized controlled trials in ACS should consider changes regarding patient and endpoint selection and definitions, and trial designs. Specific requirements for the evaluation of novel pharmacological therapies need further clarification. © The European Society of Cardiology 2016.

  3. Acute phase protein expression during elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus-1 viremia in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Jeffrey J; Cray, Carolyn; Rodriguez, Marilyn; Arheart, Kristopher L; Ling, Paul D; Herron, Alan

    2013-09-01

    Infection of Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) with elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus (EEHV) can be associated with rapid, lethal hemorrhagic disease and has been documented in elephant herds in human care and in the wild. Recent reports describe real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays used to monitor clinically ill elephants and also to detect subclinical EEHV1 infection in apparently healthy Asian elephants. Acute phase proteins have been demonstrated to increase with a variety of infectious etiologies in domesticated mammals but have not yet been described in elephants. In addition, the immune response of Asian elephants to EEHV1 infection has not been described. In this study, whole blood and trunk wash samples representing repeated measures from eight elephants were examined for the presence of EEHV1 using a qPCR assay. Elephants were classified into groups, as follows: whole blood negative and positive and trunk wash negative and positive. Serum amyloid A (SAA) and haptoglobin (HP) levels were compared between these groups. A significant difference in SAA was observed with nearly a threefold higher mean value during periods of viremia (P=0.011). Higher values of SAA were associated with >10,000 virus genome copies/ml EEHV1 in whole blood. There were no significant differences in HP levels, although some individual animals did exhibit increased levels with infection. These data indicate that an inflammatory process is stimulated during EEHV1 viremia. Acute phase protein quantitation may aid in monitoring the health status of Asian elephants.

  4. Interrelationship between Somatic Cell Count and Acute Phase Proteins in Serum and Milk of Dairy Cows

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    G. Kováč

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to compare the concentrations of two acute phase proteins, haptoglobin (Hp and serum amyloid A (SAA, in serum and milk of Holstein-Friesian dairy cows grouped according to somatic cell count thresholds ( 400,000 cells/ml compared to groups with lower SCC thresholds in composite milk samples. In contrast, significant differences were not demonstrated between the groups in Hp and SAA concentrations determined in serum. The concentrations of Hp in serum and milk were found to be correlated (r = 0.69, P = 0.0003, whereas there was a lower correlation trend in the case of serum versus milk concentrations of SAA (r = 0.43, P = 0.0478. High significant correlations were observed either between milk haptoglobin values and SCC or milk serum amyloid A concentrations and SCC (r = 0.83, r = 0.81, P P = 0.0014 and poorly correlated with SAA values determined in serum (r = 0.43, P = 0.0478. According to the results obtained in this study we can conclude that measurements of the acute phase proteins, haptoglobin and serum amyloid A predominantly in milk, may be a useful tool in diagnosing mastitis and may be a useful marker of milk quality.

  5. Coordination of Hepatitis C Virus Assembly by Distinct Regulatory Regions in Nonstructural Protein 5A.

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    Margarita Zayas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV nonstructural protein (NS5A is a RNA-binding protein composed of a N-terminal membrane anchor, a structured domain I (DI and two intrinsically disordered domains (DII and DIII interacting with viral and cellular proteins. While DI and DII are essential for RNA replication, DIII is required for assembly. How these processes are orchestrated by NS5A is poorly understood. In this study, we identified a highly conserved basic cluster (BC at the N-terminus of DIII that is critical for particle assembly. We generated BC mutants and compared them with mutants that are blocked at different stages of the assembly process: a NS5A serine cluster (SC mutant blocked in NS5A-core interaction and a mutant lacking the envelope glycoproteins (ΔE1E2. We found that BC mutations did not affect core-NS5A interaction, but strongly impaired core-RNA association as well as virus particle envelopment. Moreover, BC mutations impaired RNA-NS5A interaction arguing that the BC might be required for loading of core protein with viral RNA. Interestingly, RNA-core interaction was also reduced with the ΔE1E2 mutant, suggesting that nucleocapsid formation and envelopment are coupled. These findings argue for two NS5A DIII determinants regulating assembly at distinct, but closely linked steps: (i SC-dependent recruitment of replication complexes to core protein and (ii BC-dependent RNA genome delivery to core protein, triggering encapsidation that is tightly coupled to particle envelopment. These results provide a striking example how a single viral protein exerts multiple functions to coordinate the steps from RNA replication to the assembly of infectious virus particles.

  6. Serum amyloid A3 is a high density lipoprotein-associated acute-phase protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannock, Lisa R; De Beer, Maria C; Ji, Ailing; Shridas, Preetha; Noffsinger, Victoria P; den Hartigh, Laura; Chait, Alan; De Beer, Frederick C; Webb, Nancy R

    2018-02-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is a family of acute-phase reactants. Plasma levels of human SAA1/SAA2 (mouse SAA1.1/2.1) can increase ≥1,000-fold during an acute-phase response. Mice, but not humans, express a third relatively understudied SAA isoform, SAA3. We investigated whether mouse SAA3 is an HDL-associated acute-phase SAA. Quantitative RT-PCR with isoform-specific primers indicated that SAA3 and SAA1.1/2.1 are induced similarly in livers (∼2,500-fold vs. ∼6,000-fold, respectively) and fat (∼400-fold vs. ∼100-fold, respectively) of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-injected mice. In situ hybridization demonstrated that all three SAAs are produced by hepatocytes. All three SAA isoforms were detected in plasma of LPS-injected mice, although SAA3 levels were ∼20% of SAA1.1/2.1 levels. Fast protein LC analyses indicated that virtually all of SAA1.1/2.1 eluted with HDL, whereas ∼15% of SAA3 was lipid poor/free. After density gradient ultracentrifugation, isoelectric focusing demonstrated that ∼100% of plasma SAA1.1 was recovered in HDL compared with only ∼50% of SAA2.1 and ∼10% of SAA3. Thus, SAA3 appears to be more loosely associated with HDL, resulting in lipid-poor/free SAA3. We conclude that SAA3 is a major hepatic acute-phase SAA in mice that may produce systemic effects during inflammation. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Inhibition of the activity of pro-inflammatory secretory phospholipase A2 by acute phase proteins

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    W. Pruzanski

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Pro-Inflammatory non-pancreatic phospholipase A2 (sPLA2 is markedly over-expressed in acute systemic and chronic local inflammatory processes. Since in acute phase reaction sPLA2 is often over-expressed simultaneously with acute phase proteins (APP, it is important to determine whether APP interacts with sPLA2. We tested ten APPs for interaction with sPLA2 using as a substrate multilamellar Hposomes composed either of PC:Lyso PC or PE:Lyso PE. Using PC:Lyso PC substrate, CRP, lactoferrin and SAP were found to inhibit sPLA2 activity with an IC50 of 25 μg/ml, 7.5 μg/ml and 50 μg/ml, respectively, corresponding to 0.21 μM, 0.1 μM and 0.21 μM respectively. Using PE:Lyso PE substrate only SAP was inhibitory, with an IC50 of 10 μg/ml (0.04 μM. Phosphorylcholine abolished the inhibitory activity of CRP but not of SAP or lactoferrin. Addition of phosphorylethanolamine or of excess calcium had no effect on the inhibitory activity of APP. Limulin, lysozyme, transferrin, β2-microglobulin, α2-macroglobulin, human and bovine albumins had no effect on sPLA2 activity. Therefore neither the structure of pentraxins, or ironbinding, bacteriostatic property or amyloidogenic property preclude whether APP modulates sPLA2 activity. Inhibition of pro-inflammatory sPLA2 by APP may be one of the protective mechanisms of the acute phase reaction.

  8. Purification and binding analysis of the nitrogen fixation regulatory NifA protein from Azospirillum brasilense

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    L.M.P. Passaglia

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available NifA protein activates transcription of nitrogen fixation operons by the alternative sigma54 holoenzyme form of RNA polymerase. This protein binds to a well-defined upstream activator sequence (UAS located at the -200/-100 position of nif promoters with the consensus motif TGT-N10-ACA. NifA of Azospirillum brasilense was purified in the form of a glutathione-S-transferase (GST-NifA fusion protein and proteolytic release of GST yielded inactive and partially soluble NifA. However, the purified NifA was able to induce the production of specific anti-A. brasilense NifA-antiserum that recognized NifA from A. brasilense but not from K. pneumoniae. Both GST-NifA and NifA expressed from the E. coli tac promoter are able to activate transcription from the nifHDK promoter but only in an A. brasilense background. In order to investigate the mechanism that regulates NifA binding capacity we have used E. coli total protein extracts expressing A. brasilense nifA in mobility shift assays. DNA fragments carrying the two overlapping, wild-type or mutated UAS motifs present in the nifH promoter region revealed a retarded band of related size. These data show that the binding activity present in the C-terminal domain of A. brasilense NifA protein is still functional even in the presence of oxygen.

  9. Evaluation of acute phase proteins in cows affected by Traumatic Reticuloperitonitis

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    Ali Rezaei

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic Reticuloperitonitis is one of the most important diseases of the bovine digestive system which if diagnosed in early stage and before severe adhesions develop, more effective treatments leading to better prognosis could be under taken. In the course of accurate and timely diagnosis                            of these diseases, acute phase proteins of the affected animals were evaluated. For this purpose,                       blood samples were taken form jugular vein of 25 Holstein cows in which the presence of disease         clinically and confirmed with laparatomy and their sera separated. Blood sample were also collected from 20 healthy cows as the control group. After preparing serum sample, total protein haptoglobin, serum amyloid A and ceruloplasmin were measured in both groups. Total protein was determined by the Biuret method, haptoglobin and serum amyloid A by ELISA and ceruloplasmin through determination of the oxidative activity. Statistical analysis indicated significant difference in the amounts of total protein, haptoglobin and serum amyloid A between the two groups (p

  10. Emerging role of Lipopolysaccharide binding protein in sepsis-induced acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasi, Alessandra; Intini, Angelica; Divella, Chiara; Franzin, Rossana; Montemurno, Eustacchio; Grandaliano, Giuseppe; Ronco, Claudio; Fiaccadori, Enrico; Pertosa, Giovanni Battista; Gesualdo, Loreto; Castellano, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis remains a serious cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients, with limited therapeutic options available. Of the several disorders connected with sepsis, acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the major complications. The pathophysiology of sepsis-induced AKI is characterized by severe inflammation in renal parenchyma with endothelial dysfunction, intra-glomerular thrombosis and tubular injury. Endothelial dysfunction is regulated by several mechanisms implicated in cellular de-differentiation, such as endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT). Gram-negative bacteria and their cell wall component lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are frequently involved in the pathogenesis of AKI. The host recognition of LPS requires a specific receptor, which belongs to the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family of proteins, called TLR4, and two carrier proteins, namely the LPS-binding protein (LBP) and cluster of differentiation 14 (CD14). In particular, LBP is released as a consequence of Gram-negative infection and maximizes the activation of TLR4 signalling. Recent findings regarding the emerging role of LBP in mediating sepsis-induced AKI, and the possible beneficial effects resulting from the removal of this endogenous adaptor protein, will be discussed in this review. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  11. Vanadate stimulates adenylate cyclase via the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein by a mechanism differing from that of fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawietz, W; Downs, R W; Spiegel, A M; Aurbach, G D

    1982-03-01

    Vanadate stimulates adenylate cyclase activity in turkey erythrocyte membranes. The maximal stimulation is 7-fold over basal at 3 mM vanadate; higher concentrations are inhibitory. A suboptimal concentration of fluoride (1 mM) together with vanadate (3 mM) activates adenylate cyclase in a non-additive manner; cyclase activation by optimal fluoride (10 mM) is inhibited by vanadate (3 mM). There is no stimulation by vanadate of adenylate cyclase activity (measured either with Mg2+ or Mn2+) in CYC- S49 lymphoma cell membranes. Vanadate (3 mM) shows no effect on binding of Beta-adrenergic agonists or antagonists to the [3H] (-)-dihydroalprenolol binding site in turkey erythrocyte membranes. These results suggest that the effect of vanadate on Adenylate cyclase is mediated through the nucleotide regulatory protein and may act by a mechanism similar to fluoride. However, in cholera toxic-treated membranes as well as in GDP-beta-S plus isoproterenol-treated membranes, fluoride-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity is significantly reduced, but vanadate stimulation is not. Our results suggest that although the actions of vanadate and fluoride in adenylate cyclase may each involve the nucleotide regulatory unit, the exact mechanisms of activation by the two anions differ.

  12. Phosphorylation of the 19S regulatory particle ATPase subunit, Rpt6, modifies susceptibility to proteotoxic stress and protein aggregation.

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    Esther Magdalena Marquez-Lona

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS is a highly conserved and tightly regulated biochemical pathway that degrades the majority of proteins in eukaryotic cells. Importantly, the UPS is responsible for counteracting altered protein homeostasis induced by a variety of proteotoxic stresses. We previously reported that Rpt6, the ATPase subunit of the 19S regulatory particle (RP of the 26S proteasome, is phosphorylated in mammalian neurons at serine 120 in response to neuronal activity. Furthermore, we found that Rpt6 S120 phosphorylation, which regulates the activity and distribution of proteasomes in neurons, is relevant for proteasome-dependent synaptic remodeling and function. To better understand the role of proteasome phosphorylation, we have constructed models of altered Rpt6 phosphorylation in S. cerevisiae by introducing chromosomal point mutations that prevent or mimic phosphorylation at the conserved serine (S119. We find that mutants which prevent Rpt6 phosphorylation at this site (rpt6-S119A, had increased susceptibility to proteotoxic stress, displayed abnormal morphology and had reduced proteasome activity. Since impaired proteasome function has been linked to the aggregation of toxic proteins including the Huntington's disease (HD related huntingtin (Htt protein with expanded polyglutamine repeats, we evaluated the extent of Htt aggregation in our phospho-dead (rpt6-S119A and phospho-mimetic (rpt6-S119D mutants. We showed Htt103Q aggregate size to be significantly larger in rpt6-S119A mutants compared to wild-type or rpt6-S119D strains. Furthermore, we observed that phosphorylation of endogenous Rpt6 at S119 is increased in response to various stress conditions. Together, these data suggest that Rpt6 phosphorylation at S119 may play an important function in proteasome-dependent relief of proteotoxic stress that can be critical in protein aggregation pathologies.

  13. Visualizing the regulatory role of Angiopoietin-like protein 8 (ANGPTL8) in glucose and lipid metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqa, Amnah; Cirillo, Elisa; Tareen, Samar H K; Ali, Amjad; Kutmon, Martina; Eijssen, Lars M T; Ahmad, Jamil; Evelo, Chris T; Coort, Susan L

    2017-10-01

    ANGPTL8 (Angiopoietin-like protein 8) is a newly identified hormone emerging as a novel drug target for treatment of diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia due to its unique metabolic nature. With increasing number of studies targeting the regulation of ANGPTL8, integration of their findings becomes indispensable. This study has been conducted with the aim to collect, analyze, integrate and visualize the available knowledge in the literature about ANGPTL8 and its regulation. We utilized this knowledge to construct a regulatory pathway of ANGPTL8 which is available at WikiPathways, an open source pathways database. It allows us to visualize ANGPTL8's regulation with respect to other genes/proteins in different pathways helping us to understand the complex interplay of novel hormones/genes/proteins in metabolic disorders. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to present an integrated pathway view of ANGPTL8's regulation and its associated pathways and is important resource for future omics-based studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Uncovering packaging features of co-regulated modules based on human protein interaction and transcriptional regulatory networks

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    He Weiming

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Network co-regulated modules are believed to have the functionality of packaging multiple biological entities, and can thus be assumed to coordinate many biological functions in their network neighbouring regions. Results Here, we weighted edges of a human protein interaction network and a transcriptional regulatory network to construct an integrated network, and introduce a probabilistic model and a bipartite graph framework to exploit human co-regulated modules and uncover their specific features in packaging different biological entities (genes, protein complexes or metabolic pathways. Finally, we identified 96 human co-regulated modules based on this method, and evaluate its effectiveness by comparing it with four other methods. Conclusions Dysfunctions in co-regulated interactions often occur in the development of cancer. Therefore, we focussed on an example co-regulated module and found that it could integrate a number of cancer-related genes. This was extended to causal dysfunctions of some complexes maintained by several physically interacting proteins, thus coordinating several metabolic pathways that directly underlie cancer.

  15. Calcium-regulatory proteins as modulators of chemotherapy in human neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florea, Ana-Maria; Varghese, Elizabeth; McCallum, Jennifer E; Mahgoub, Safa; Helmy, Irfan; Varghese, Sharon; Gopinath, Neha; Sass, Steffen; Theis, Fabian J; Reifenberger, Guido; Büsselberg, Dietrich

    2017-04-04

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is a pediatric cancer treated with poly-chemotherapy including platinum complexes (e.g. cisplatin (CDDP), carboplatin), DNA alkylating agents, and topoisomerase I inhibitors (e.g. topotecan (TOPO)). Despite aggressive treatment, NB may become resistant to chemotherapy. We investigated whether CDDP and TOPO treatment of NB cells interacts with the expression and function of proteins involved in regulating calcium signaling. Human neuroblastoma cell lines SH-SY5Y, IMR-32 and NLF were used to investigate the effects of CDDP and TOPO on cell viability, apoptosis, calcium homeostasis, and expression of selected proteins regulating intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). In addition, the impact of pharmacological inhibition of [Ca2+]i-regulating proteins on neuroblastoma cell survival was studied. Treatment of neuroblastoma cells with increasing concentrations of CDDP (0.1-10 μM) or TOPO (0.1 nM-1 μM) induced cytotoxicity and increased apoptosis in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Both drugs increased [Ca2+]i over time. Treatment with CDDP or TOPO also modified mRNA expression of selected genes encoding [Ca2+]i-regulating proteins. Differentially regulated genes included S100A6, ITPR1, ITPR3, RYR1 and RYR3. With FACS and confocal laser scanning microscopy experiments we validated their differential expression at the protein level. Importantly, treatment of neuroblastoma cells with pharmacological modulators of [Ca2+]i-regulating proteins in combination with CDDP or TOPO increased cytotoxicity. Thus, our results confirm an important role of calcium signaling in the response of neuroblastoma cells to chemotherapy and suggest [Ca2+]i modulation as a promising strategy for adjunctive treatment.

  16. The onset of the progression of acute phase response mechanisms induced by extreme impacts can be followed by the decrease in blood levels of positive acute phase proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larina, Olga; Bekker, Anna

    Studies performed at space flights and earth-based simulation models detected the plasma indices of acute phase reaction (APR), i.e. the increase of APR cytokine mediators and alterations in the production of blood acute phase proteins (APP) at the initial stages of adaptation to altered gravity conditions. Acute phase response is the principal constituent of the functional activity of innate immunity system. Changes in plasma APPs contents are considered to serve the restoration of homeostasis state. According to trends of their concentration shifts at the evolving of acute phase reaction APPs are denoted as positive, neutral, or negative. Plasma concentrations of positive acute phase proteins α1-acid glycoprotein (α1-AGP), α1-antitrypsin (α1-AT), and neutral α2-macroglobulin (α2-M) were measured in human study at 12-hour antiorthostatic position (AOP) with 15° head down tilt and hypoxia experiments at 14% oxygen in pressure chamber. Both of these impacts were shown to produce alterations in the APP levels indicative for acute phase response. Nevertheless, in AOP experiment noticeable decrease in α1-AGP concentration occurred by hour 12, and even more pronounced decline of α1-AGP and α1-AT were found on hypoxia hours 12 and 36. Acute phase proteins α1-AGP and α2-M possess the features of proteinase inhibitors. This function is implemented by the formation of complexes with the molecules of proteolytic enzymes which subsequently are removed from the blood flow. Transient decrease in plasma concentrations of protease inhibitors on early phases of APR development was reported to result from the growth of plasma protease activity due to cathepsin release from activated leukocytes, which had not yet been compensated by enhanced APP synthesis. Being a carrier protein for positively charged and neutral substances, α1-AGP shows pronounced elevation in its blood content during APR development. As assumed, it is required for the transportation of the increased

  17. A simple promoter containing two Sp1 sites controls the expression of sterol-regulatory-element-binding protein 1a (SREBP-1a)

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Chengkang; Shin, Dong-Ju; Osborne, Timothy F.

    2005-01-01

    The mammalian gene for SREBP-1 (sterol-regulatory-element-binding protein 1) contains two promoters that control the production of two proteins, SREBP-1a and -1c, and each contains a unique N-terminal transcriptional activation domain, but they are otherwise identical. The relative level of each mRNA varies from tissue to tissue and they respond differently to regulatory stimuli. SREBP-1c is more abundantly expressed in liver, where its level is also regulated by insulin and liver X receptor ...

  18. The regulatory beta-subunit of protein kinase CK2 regulates cell-cycle progression at the onset of mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, C W; Olsen, B B; Meek, D

    2008-01-01

    Cell-cycle transition from the G(2) phase into mitosis is regulated by the cyclin-dependent protein kinase 1 (CDK1) in complex with cyclin B. CDK1 activity is controlled by both inhibitory phosphorylation, catalysed by the Myt1 and Wee1 kinases, and activating dephosphorylation, mediated by the CDC...... interference results in delayed cell-cycle progression at the onset of mitosis. Knockdown of CK2beta causes stabilization of Wee1 and increased phosphorylation of CDK1 at the inhibitory Tyr15. PLK1-Wee1 association is an essential event in the degradation of Wee1 in unperturbed cell cycle. We have found...... regulatory subunit, identifying it as a new component of signaling pathways that regulate cell-cycle progression at the entry of mitosis.Oncogene advance online publication, 12 May 2008; doi:10.1038/onc.2008.146....

  19. Antiglucocorticoid RU38486 reduces net protein catabolism in experimental acute renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mondry Adrian

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In acute renal failure, a pronounced net protein catabolism occurs that has long been associated with corticoid action. By competitively blocking the glucocorticoid receptor with the potent antiglucocorticoid RU 38486, the present study addressed the question to what extent does corticoid action specific to uremia cause the observed muscle degradation, and does inhibition of glucocorticoid action reduce the protein wasting? Methods RU 38486 was administered in a dose of 50 mg/kg/24 h for 48 h after operation to fasted bilaterally nephrectomized (BNX male adult Wistar rats and sham operated (SHAM controls. Protein turnover was evaluated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC of amino acid efflux in sera from isolated perfused hindquarters of animals treated with RU 38486 versus untreated controls. Results Administration of RU 38486 reduces the total amino acid efflux (TAAE by 18.6% in SHAM and 15.6% in BNX and efflux of the indicator of net protein turnover, phenylalanine (Phe by 33.3% in SHAM and 13% in BNX animals as compared to the equally operated, but untreated animals. However, the significantly higher protein degradation observed in BNX (0.6 ± 0.2 nmol/min/g muscle versus SHAM (0.2 ± 0.1 nmol/min/g muscle rats, as demonstrated by the marker of myofribrillar proteolytic rate, 3-Methylhistidine (3 MH remains unaffected by administration of RU 38486 (0.5 ± 0.1 v. 0.2 ± 0.1 nmol/min/g muscle in BNX v. SHAM. Conclusion RU 38486 does not act on changes of muscular protein turnover specific to uremia but reduces the effect of stress- stimulated elevated corticosterone secretion arising from surgery and fasting. A potentially beneficial effect against stress- induced catabolism in severe illness can be postulated that merits further study.

  20. Conservation of protein abundance patterns reveals the regulatory architecture of the EGFR-MAPK pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, T.; Niepel, M.; McDermott, J. E.; Gao, Y.; Nicora, C. D.; Chrisler, W. B.; Markillie, L. M.; Petyuk, V. A.; Smith, R. D.; Rodland, K. D.; Sorger, P. K.; Qian, W. -J.; Wiley, H. S.

    2016-07-12

    It is not known whether cancer cells generally show quantitative differences in the expression of signaling pathway proteins that could dysregulate signal transduction. To explore this issue, we first defined the primary components of the EGF-MAPK pathway in normal human mammary epithelial cells, identifying 16 core proteins and 10 feedback regulators. We then quantified their absolute abundance across a panel of normal and cancer cell lines. We found that core pathway proteins were expressed at very similar levels across all cell types. In contrast, the EGFR and transcriptionally controlled feedback regulators were expressed at highly variable levels. The absolute abundance of most core pathway proteins was between 50,000- 70,000 copies per cell, but the adaptors SOS1, SOS2, and GAB1 were found at far lower levels (2,000-5,000 per cell). MAPK signaling showed saturation in all cells between 3,000-10,000 occupied EGFR, consistent with the idea that low adaptor levels limit signaling. Our results suggest that the core MAPK pathway is essentially invariant across different cell types, with cell- specific differences in signaling likely due to variable levels of feedback regulators. The low abundance of adaptors relative to the EGFR could be responsible for previous observation of saturable signaling, endocytosis, and high affinity EGFR.

  1. Heat Shock Protein A2 (HSPA2): Regulatory Roles in Germ Cell Development and Sperm Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Brett; Bromfield, Elizabeth G; Cui, Jinwei; De Iuliis, Geoffry N

    2017-01-01

    Among the numerous families of heat shock protein (HSP) that have been implicated in the regulation of reproductive system development and function, those belonging to the 70 kDa HSP family have emerged as being indispensable for male fertility. In particular, the testis-enriched heat shock 70 kDa protein 2 (HSPA2) has been shown to be critical for the progression of germ cell differentiation during spermatogenesis in the mouse model. Beyond this developmentally important window, mounting evidence has also implicated HSPA2 in the functional transformation of the human sperm cell during their ascent of the female reproductive tract. Specifically, HSPA2 appears to coordinate the remodelling of specialised sperm domains overlying the anterior region of the sperm head compatible with their principle role in oocyte recognition. The fact that levels of the HSPA2 protein in mature spermatozoa tightly correlate with the efficacy of oocyte binding highlight its utility as a powerful prognostic biomarker of male fertility. In this chapter, we consider the unique structural and biochemical characteristics of HSPA2 that enable this heat shock protein to fulfil its prominent roles in orchestrating the morphological differentiation of male germ cells during spermatogenesis as well as their functional transformation during post-testicular sperm maturation.

  2. [Examination of acute phase proteins concentrations in children with allergic rhinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Iwona; Sobieska, Magdalena; Pucher, Beata; Grzegorowski, Michał; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2006-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is an inflammatory disorder of upper respiratory tract (about 15 per cent of the population in industrialized countries suffer from this condition), characterized by frequent sneezing and a runny or stuffy nose sometimes accompanied by watery eyes. As the most common allergic condition, allergic rhinitis affects people of all ages. Boys are twice as likely to get allergic rhinitis than girls. The median age of onset of the condition is 10 years old, meaning that equal numbers of children develop the condition before and after age 10. Symptoms usually appear in childhood first and then lessen by the age of 30 or 40. Seasonal allergic rhinitis usually results from tree, grass or weed pollen. With this type of rhinitis, symptoms will decrease with the arrival of cold weather. Perennial allergic rhinitis can cause year-round symptoms. This allergic reaction is the result of indoor irritants such as feathers, mold spores, animal dander (hair and skin shed by pets) or dust mites. It is often aggravated by a food allergy, the most common being an allergy to milk. Acute phase proteins (APP) belong to the most ancient part of the unspecific immunity and contribute markedly to the keeping of homeostasis. As much as 30 various proteins are for the moment regarded as APP. Being multifunctional regulators and effectors APP stay in multiple relations to practically all types of cells and molecules. Among APP following functional groups may be described: transport proteins (transferrin, ceruloplasmin and haptoglobin), clotting factors (fibrinogen), antiproteases (alpha1-antitrypsin, alpha1-antichymotrypsin, alpha2-macroglobulin), complement components (C3, C4) and several proteins of hardly known function, like C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A, acid alpha1-glycoprotein (AGP) and others. From a group of 32 children, aged from 5 to 14 years, with symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis, and from a control group of 10 healthy children sex and age matched

  3. Acute phase reactants in Sudanese children with severe protein-energy malnutrition*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Mustafa A. M.; Karrar, Zein A.; Mohammed, Abdelrahim O.; Helsing, Chrestover

    2011-01-01

    The pre-dietary rehabilitation levels of acute phase proteins (APP) namely, alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), orosomucoid (ORO), haptoglobin (HAP), fibrinogen (FIB) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in the plasma of Sudanese children with severe protein energy malnutrition (PEM) were compared with those of normal controls, and with the levels after dietary rehabilitation. Eighty one children were included in the study; 49 with severe PEM (23 with marasmus, 17 with marasmic-kwashiorkor and 9 with kwashiorkor), 13 with tuberculosis (TB) and 19 healthy children as controls. The study showed a high incidence of infections, especially acute respiratory infection (ARI), diarrhoeal diseases and intestinal parasites in the malnourished children. The mean plasma level of albumin was significantly lower in the malnourished children compared to controls (P<0.001), with kwashiorkor children showing the lowest mean level. This hypoalbuminaemia was significantly associated with the presence of ARI and intestinal parasites. The mean plasma levels of the APP, except FIB, were significantly higher in malnourished children than in controls, with higher levels associated with ARI and the presence of fever. Malnourished children with TB had significantly higher mean levels of the APP (AAT, HAP, FIB, CRP) compared to those without TB. The mean levels of HAP and AAT were significantly lower in the presence of diarrhoea, suggesting their loss in the stool. The mean levels of the APP after two weeks dietary rehabilitation and antimicrobial treatment showed a significant drop in only two of the APP, namely CRP, ORO, while FIB showed a significant rise. PMID:27493306

  4. Acute phase and transport protein synthesis in simulated infection in undernourished men using uniformly labelled Spirulina Platensis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeds, P.J.; Opekun, A.; Jahoor, F.; Wong, W.W.; Klein, P.D.

    1994-01-01

    Although it has been known for many years that injury and infection lead to body nitrogen loss, the reason has remained obscure. In this paper, we develop the argument that the processes that are activated during infection demand the provision of specific amino acids which have to be supplied from body protein. In particular, we show that the positive acute phase proteins are very rich in the aromatic amino acids and the exaggerated use of these amino acids (phenylalanine, tryptophan and tyrosine) in acute phase protein synthesis lead to an endogenous ''amino acid imbalance'' which restricts the use of other amino acids for tissue protein synthesis. Minimally invasive protocols, involving the administration of 15 N and 13 C-labelled amino acids for studying whole body nitrogen turnover, amino acid oxidation and plasma protein synthesis are described. (author). 22 refs, 3 tabs

  5. Studies on Shigella boydii infection in Caenorhabditis elegans and bioinformatics analysis of immune regulatory protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesika, Periyanaina; Balamurugan, Krishnaswamy

    2012-12-01

    Shigella boydii causes bacillary dysentery or shigellosis and generates a significant burden in the developing nations. S. boydii-mediated infection assays were performed at both physiological and molecular levels using Caenorhabditis elegans as a host. Continuous exposure of worms to S. boydii showed a reduced life span indicating the pathogenicity of Shigella. Quantitative Real-Time PCR analysis was performed to analyze the expression and regulation of host specific candidate-antimicrobial genes (clec-60, clec-87, lys-7), which were expressed significantly during early infection, but weakened during the latter hours. Increased mortality of mutant RB1285 by S. boydii and Shigella flexneri indicated the role of lys-7 during Shigella infection. Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) database was used to analyze the interaction of immune proteins in both C. elegans and humans. In addition, the expression and regulation were revealed about immune genes (clec-61, clec-62, clec-63, F54D5.3 and ZK1320.2), which encode several intermediate immune protein partners (CLEC-61, CLEC-62, CLEC-63, F54D5.3, ZK1320.2, W03D2.6 and THN-2) that interact with LYS-7 and CLEC-60 and were found to play a role in C. elegans immune defense against S. boydii infections. Similarly, the immune genes that are specific to the human defense system, which encode IGHV4-39, A2M, LTF, and CD79A, were predicted to be expressed with LYZ and MBL2, thus indicating their regulation during Shigella infections. Our results using the lowest eukaryotic model system and human database indicated that the major players involved in immunity-related processes appear to be common in cases of Shigella sp. mediated immune responses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Methods for Protein Interaction and Structural Prediction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Bovine proteins containing poly-glutamine repeats are often polymorphic and enriched for components of transcriptional regulatory complexes

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Whan, Vicki

    2010-11-23

    Abstract Background About forty human diseases are caused by repeat instability mutations. A distinct subset of these diseases is the result of extreme expansions of polymorphic trinucleotide repeats; typically CAG repeats encoding poly-glutamine (poly-Q) tracts in proteins. Polymorphic repeat length variation is also apparent in human poly-Q encoding genes from normal individuals. As these coding sequence repeats are subject to selection in mammals, it has been suggested that normal variations in some of these typically highly conserved genes are implicated in morphological differences between species and phenotypic variations within species. At present, poly-Q encoding genes in non-human mammalian species are poorly documented, as are their functions and propensities for polymorphic variation. Results The current investigation identified 178 bovine poly-Q encoding genes (Q ≥ 5) and within this group, 26 genes with orthologs in both human and mouse that did not contain poly-Q repeats. The bovine poly-Q encoding genes typically had ubiquitous expression patterns although there was bias towards expression in epithelia, brain and testes. They were also characterised by unusually large sizes. Analysis of gene ontology terms revealed that the encoded proteins were strongly enriched for functions associated with transcriptional regulation and many contributed to physical interaction networks in the nucleus where they presumably act cooperatively in transcriptional regulatory complexes. In addition, the coding sequence CAG repeats in some bovine genes impacted mRNA splicing thereby generating unusual transcriptional diversity, which in at least one instance was tissue-specific. The poly-Q encoding genes were prioritised using multiple criteria for their likelihood of being polymorphic and then the highest ranking group was experimentally tested for polymorphic variation within a cattle diversity panel. Extensive and meiotically stable variation was identified

  7. Structural and dynamic characterization of eukaryotic gene regulatory protein domains in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Andrew Loyd [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-05-01

    Solution NMR was primarily used to characterize structure and dynamics in two different eukaryotic protein systems: the δ-Al-ε activation domain from c-jun and the Drosophila RNA-binding protein Sex-lethal. The second system is the Drosophila Sex-lethal (Sxl) protein, an RNA-binding protein which is the ``master switch`` in sex determination. Sxl contains two adjacent RNA-binding domains (RBDs) of the RNP consensus-type. The NMR spectrum of the second RBD (Sxl-RBD2) was assigned using multidimensional heteronuclear NMR, and an intermediate-resolution family of structures was calculated from primarily NOE distance restraints. The overall fold was determined to be similar to other RBDs: a βαβ-βαβ pattern of secondary structure, with the two helices packed against a 4-stranded anti-parallel β-sheet. In addition 15N T1, T2, and 15N/1H NOE relaxation measurements were carried out to characterize the backbone dynamics of Sxl-RBD2 in solution. RNA corresponding to the polypyrimidine tract of transformer pre-mRNA was generated and titrated into 3 different Sxl-RBD protein constructs. Combining Sxl-RBD1+2 (bht RBDs) with this RNA formed a specific, high affinity protein/RNA complex that is amenable to further NMR characterization. The backbone 1H, 13C, and 15N resonances of Sxl-RBD1+2 were assigned using a triple-resonance approach, and 15N relaxation experiments were carried out to characterize the backbone dynamics of this complex. The changes in chemical shift in Sxl-RBD1+2 upon binding RNA are observed using Sxl-RBD2 as a substitute for unbound Sxl-RBD1+2. This allowed the binding interface to be qualitatively mapped for the second domain.

  8. Transcriptional analysis of the jamaicamide gene cluster from the marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula and identification of possible regulatory proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorrestein Pieter C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula is a prolific producer of bioactive secondary metabolites. Although biosynthetic gene clusters encoding several of these compounds have been identified, little is known about how these clusters of genes are transcribed or regulated, and techniques targeting genetic manipulation in Lyngbya strains have not yet been developed. We conducted transcriptional analyses of the jamaicamide gene cluster from a Jamaican strain of Lyngbya majuscula, and isolated proteins that could be involved in jamaicamide regulation. Results An unusually long untranslated leader region of approximately 840 bp is located between the jamaicamide transcription start site (TSS and gene cluster start codon. All of the intergenic regions between the pathway ORFs were transcribed into RNA in RT-PCR experiments; however, a promoter prediction program indicated the possible presence of promoters in multiple intergenic regions. Because the functionality of these promoters could not be verified in vivo, we used a reporter gene assay in E. coli to show that several of these intergenic regions, as well as the primary promoter preceding the TSS, are capable of driving β-galactosidase production. A protein pulldown assay was also used to isolate proteins that may regulate the jamaicamide pathway. Pulldown experiments using the intergenic region upstream of jamA as a DNA probe isolated two proteins that were identified by LC-MS/MS. By BLAST analysis, one of these had close sequence identity to a regulatory protein in another cyanobacterial species. Protein comparisons suggest a possible correlation between secondary metabolism regulation and light dependent complementary chromatic adaptation. Electromobility shift assays were used to evaluate binding of the recombinant proteins to the jamaicamide promoter region. Conclusion Insights into natural product regulation in cyanobacteria are of significant value to drug discovery

  9. Sterol regulatory element binding protein and dietary lipid regulation of fatty acid synthesis in the mammary epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Michael C; Monks, Jenifer; Burns, Valerie; Phistry, Meridee; Marians, Russell; Foote, Monica R; Bauman, Dale E; Anderson, Steven M; Neville, Margaret C

    2010-12-01

    The lactating mammary gland synthesizes large amounts of triglyceride from fatty acids derived from the blood and from de novo lipogenesis. The latter is significantly increased at parturition and decreased when additional dietary fatty acids become available. To begin to understand the molecular regulation of de novo lipogenesis, we tested the hypothesis that the transcription factor sterol regulatory element binding factor (SREBF)-1c is a primary regulator of this system. Expression of Srebf1c mRNA and six of its known target genes increased ≥2.5-fold at parturition. However, Srebf1c-null mice showed only minor deficiencies in lipid synthesis during lactation, possibly due to compensation by Srebf1a expression. To abrogate the function of both isoforms of Srebf1, we bred mice to obtain a mammary epithelial cell-specific deletion of SREBF cleavage-activating protein (SCAP), the SREBF escort protein. These dams showed a significant lactation deficiency, and expression of mRNA for fatty acid synthase (Fasn), insulin-induced gene 1 (Insig1), mitochondrial citrate transporter (Slc25a1), and stearoyl-CoA desaturase 2 (Scd2) was reduced threefold or more; however, the mRNA levels of acetyl-CoA carboxylase-1α (Acaca) and ATP citrate lyase (Acly) were unchanged. Furthermore, a 46% fat diet significantly decreased de novo fatty acid synthesis and reduced the protein levels of ACACA, ACLY, and FASN significantly, with no change in their mRNA levels. These data lead us to conclude that two modes of regulation exist to control fatty acid synthesis in the mammary gland of the lactating mouse: the well-known SREBF1 system and a novel mechanism that acts at the posttranscriptional level in the presence of SCAP deletion and high-fat feeding to alter enzyme protein.

  10. Dentin Sialophosphoprotein: A Regulatory Protein for Dental Pulp Stem Cell Identity and Fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shiliang; Lim, Dandrich; Dong, Zhihong; Saunders, Thomas L.; Ma, Peter X.; Marcelo, Cynthia L.

    2014-01-01

    The dentin sialophosphoprotein (dspp) transcript is expressed during tooth development as a DSPP precursor protein, which then undergoes cleavage to form mature dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and phosphophoryn (PP) proteins. Previous studies using DSPP-knockout (KO) mice have reported that these animals have hypomineralized teeth, thin dentin, and a large dental pulp chamber, similar to those from patients with dentinogenesis imperfecta III. However, there is no information about factors that regulate dental pulp stem cell lineage fate, a critical early event in the odontoblast-dentin mineralization scheme. To reveal the role of DSPP in odontoblast lineage differentiation during tooth development, we systematically examined teeth from wild-type (wt) and DSPP-KO C57BL/6 mice between the ages of postnatal day 1 and 3 months. We found developmental abnormalities not previously reported, such as circular dentin formation within dental pulp cells and altered odontoblast differentiation in DSPP-KO mice, even as early as 1 day after birth. Surprisingly, we also identified chondrocyte-like cells in the dental pulp from KO-mice teeth. Thus, these studies that compare wt and DSPP-KO mice suggest that the expression of DSPP precursor protein is required for normal odontoblast lineage differentiation and that the absence of DSPP allows dental pulp cells to differentiate into chondrocyte-like cells, which could negatively impact pulpal wound healing and tissue regeneration. PMID:25027178

  11. Direct control of type IIA topoisomerase activity by a chromosomally encoded regulatory protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Seychelle M; Lyubimov, Artem Y; Hershey, David M; Schoeffler, Allyn J; Sengupta, Sugopa; Nagaraja, Valakunja; Berger, James M

    2014-07-01

    Precise control of supercoiling homeostasis is critical to DNA-dependent processes such as gene expression, replication, and damage response. Topoisomerases are central regulators of DNA supercoiling commonly thought to act independently in the recognition and modulation of chromosome superstructure; however, recent evidence has indicated that cells tightly regulate topoisomerase activity to support chromosome dynamics, transcriptional response, and replicative events. How topoisomerase control is executed and linked to the internal status of a cell is poorly understood. To investigate these connections, we determined the structure of Escherichia coli gyrase, a type IIA topoisomerase bound to YacG, a recently identified chromosomally encoded inhibitor protein. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that YacG is frequently associated with coenzyme A (CoA) production enzymes, linking the protein to metabolism and stress. The structure, along with supporting solution studies, shows that YacG represses gyrase by sterically occluding the principal DNA-binding site of the enzyme. Unexpectedly, YacG acts by both engaging two spatially segregated regions associated with small-molecule inhibitor interactions (fluoroquinolone antibiotics and the newly reported antagonist GSK299423) and remodeling the gyrase holoenzyme into an inactive, ATP-trapped configuration. This study establishes a new mechanism for the protein-based control of topoisomerases, an approach that may be used to alter supercoiling levels for responding to changes in cellular state. © 2014 Vos et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  12. Drosophila Protein Kinase CK2: Genetics, Regulatory Complexity and Emerging Roles during Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohna Bandyopadhyay

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available CK2 is a Ser/Thr protein kinase that is highly conserved amongst all eukaryotes. It is a well-known oncogenic kinase that regulates vital cell autonomous functions and animal development. Genetic studies in the fruit fly Drosophila are providing unique insights into the roles of CK2 in cell signaling, embryogenesis, organogenesis, neurogenesis, and the circadian clock, and are revealing hitherto unknown complexities in CK2 functions and regulation. Here, we review Drosophila CK2 with respect to its structure, subunit diversity, potential mechanisms of regulation, developmental abnormalities linked to mutations in the gene encoding CK2 subunits, and emerging roles in multiple aspects of eye development. We examine the Drosophila CK2 “interaction map” and the eye-specific “transcriptome” databases, which raise the prospect that this protein kinase has many additional targets in the developing eye. We discuss the possibility that CK2 functions during early retinal neurogenesis in Drosophila and mammals bear greater similarity than has been recognized, and that this conservation may extend to other developmental programs. Together, these studies underscore the immense power of the Drosophila model organism to provide new insights and avenues to further investigate developmentally relevant targets of this protein kinase.

  13. Transcriptome-wide analysis of regulatory interactions of the RNA-binding protein HuR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, Svetlana; Jens, Marvin; Theil, Kathrin; Schwanhäusser, Björn; Selbach, Matthias; Landthaler, Markus; Rajewsky, Nikolaus

    2011-08-05

    Posttranscriptional gene regulation relies on hundreds of RNA binding proteins (RBPs) but the function of most RBPs is unknown. The human RBP HuR/ELAVL1 is a conserved mRNA stability regulator. We used PAR-CLIP, a recently developed method based on RNA-protein crosslinking, to identify transcriptome-wide ∼26,000 HuR binding sites. These sites were on average highly conserved, enriched for HuR binding motifs and mainly located in 3' untranslated regions. Surprisingly, many sites were intronic, implicating HuR in mRNA processing. Upon HuR knockdown, mRNA levels and protein synthesis of thousands of target genes were downregulated, validating functionality. HuR and miRNA binding sites tended to reside nearby but generally did not overlap. Additionally, HuR knockdown triggered strong and specific upregulation of miR-7. In summary, we identified thousands of direct and functional HuR targets, found a human miRNA controlled by HuR, and propose a role for HuR in splicing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Intracellular Localization of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Protein: Absence of Nucleolar Accumulation during Infection and after Expression as a Recombinant Protein in Vero Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rowland, Raymond R. R.; Chauhan, Vinita; Fang, Ying; Pekosz, Andrew; Kerrigan, Maureen; Burton, Miriam D.

    2005-01-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of several members within the order Nidovirales localizes to the nucleolus during infection and after transfection of cells with N genes. However, confocal microscopy of N protein localization in Vero cells infected with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) or transfected with the SARS-CoV N gene failed to show the presence of N in the nucleoplasm or nucleolus. Amino acids 369 to 389, which contain putative nuclear localization signal (NLS)...

  15. Acute-phase protein behavior in dairy cattle herd naturally infected with Trypanosoma vivax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Paulo Henrique; Fidelis Junior, Otavio Luiz; Marques, Luiz Carlos; Machado, Rosangela Zacarias; Barnabé, Patrícia de Athayde; André, Marcos Rogério; Balbuena, Tiago Santana; Cadioli, Fabiano Antonio

    2015-07-30

    Trypanosoma vivax is a hemoprotozoon that causes disease in cattle and is difficult to diagnose. The host-parasite relationship in cattle that are infected by T. vivax has only been poorly studied. In the present study, a total of 429 serum proteinograms were produced from naturally infected animals (NIF) and were compared with 50 samples from control animals (C). The total protein, IgA band, complement C3 β chain band, albumin band, antitrypsin band, IgG band, haptoglobin band, complement C3c α chain band and protein HP-20 band presented higher levels in the serum proteinograms of the NIF group. Inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4, α2-macroglobulin, complement C6, ceruloplasmin, transferrin band and apolipoprotein A1 band presented lower levels in this group. There was no significant difference (pNIF and C groups. Acute phase proteins may be useful for understanding the host-parasite relationship, since the antitrypsin band was only present in the NIF group. This can be used as an indicator for infection in cattle that are naturally infected by T. vivax. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Analysis of A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) interaction with protein kinase A (PKA) regulatory subunits: PKA isoform specificity in AKAP binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberg, F W; Maleszka, A; Eide, T; Vossebein, L; Tasken, K

    2000-04-28

    Compartmentalization of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is in part mediated by specialized protein motifs in the dimerization domain of the regulatory (R)-subunits of PKA that participate in protein-protein interactions with an amphipathic helix region in A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). In order to develop a molecular understanding of the subcellular distribution and specific functions of PKA isozymes mediated by association with AKAPs, it is of importance to determine the apparent binding constants of the R-subunit-AKAP interactions. Here, we present a novel approach using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to examine directly the association and dissociation of AKAPs with all four R-subunit isoforms immobilized on a modified cAMP surface with a high level of accuracy. We show that both AKAP79 and S-AKAP84/D-AKAP1 bind RIIalpha very well (apparent K(D) values of 0.5 and 2 nM, respectively). Both proteins also bind RIIbeta quite well, but with three- to fourfold lower affinities than those observed versus RIIalpha. However, only S-AKAP84/D-AKAP1 interacts with RIalpha at a nanomolar affinity (apparent K(D) of 185 nM). In comparison, AKAP95 binds RIIalpha (apparent K(D) of 5.9 nM) with a tenfold higher affinity than RIIbeta and has no detectable binding to RIalpha. Surface competition assays with increasing concentrations of a competitor peptide covering amino acid residues 493 to 515 of the thyroid anchoring protein Ht31, demonstrated that Ht31, but not a proline-substituted peptide, Ht31-P, competed binding of RIIalpha and RIIbeta to all the AKAPs examined (EC(50)-values from 6 to 360 nM). Furthermore, RIalpha interaction with S-AKAP84/D-AKAP1 was competed (EC(50) 355 nM) with the same peptide. Here we report for the first time an approach to determine apparent rate- and equilibria binding constants for the interaction of all PKA isoforms with any AKAP as well as a novel approach for characterizing peptide competitors that disrupt PKA-AKAP anchoring

  17. Arsenic trioxide decreases the amount and inhibits the function of regulatory T cells, which may contribute to its efficacy in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wen; Li, Xiaoxia; Quan, Lina; Yao, Jiying; Mu, Guannan; Guo, Jingjie; Wang, Yitong

    2018-03-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) exhibits substantial clinical efficacy in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Here, we investigated whether ATO exerts its efficacy by affecting regulatory T (Treg) cells. We determined whether ATO treatment influenced the amount and function of purified Treg cells. We also examined the effect of ATO treatment on Treg cells from APL patients. ATO treatment induced apoptosis in purified Treg cells and dampened the inhibition of effector T (Teff) cells proliferation and the secretion of cytokine by Treg cells. Treg cell levels in the peripheral blood and serum IL-10 levels were dramatically decreased in APL patients after single ATO treatment. In summary, our results show that ATO decreases the amount and inhibits the function of Treg cells, thereby enhancing Teff cell function and overall anti-tumor immunity.

  18. Distinct protein signatures of acute myeloid leukemia bone marrow-derived stromal cells are prognostic for patient survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornblau, Steven M; Ruvolo, Peter P; Wang, Rui-Yu; Battula, V Lokesh; Shpall, Elisabeth J; Ruvolo, Vivian R; McQueen, Teresa; Qui, YiHua; Zeng, Zhihong; Pierce, Sherry; Jacamo, Rodrigo; Yoo, Suk-Young; Le, Phuong M; Sun, Jeffery; Hail, Numsen; Konopleva, Marina; Andreeff, Michael

    2018-03-15

    Mesenchymal stromal cells support acute myeloid leukemia cell survival in the bone marrow microenvironment. Protein expression profiles of acute myeloid leukemia-derived mesenchymal stromal cells are unknown. Reverse phase protein array analysis was performed to compare expression of 151 proteins from acute myeloid leukemia mesenchymal stromal cells (n = 106) with mesenchymal stromal cells from healthy donors (n = 71). Protein expression differed significantly between the two groups with nineteen proteins overexpressed in leukemia stromal cells and nine overexpressed in normal stromal cells. Unbiased hierarchical clustering analysis of the samples using these twenty-eight proteins revealed three protein constellations whose variation in expression defined four mesenchymal stromal cells protein expression signatures: Class 1, Class 2, Class 3, and Class 4. These cells populations appear to have clinical relevance. Specifically, patients with Class 3 cells have longer survival and remission duration compared to other groups. Comparison of leukemia mesenchymal stromal cells at first diagnosis with those obtained at salvage (i.e., relapse/refractory) showed differential expression of nine proteins reflecting a shift toward osteogenic differentiation. Leukemia mesenchymal stromal cells are more senescent compared to their normal counterparts, possibly due to the over expressed p53/p21 axis as confirmed by high β-galactosidase staining. In addition, over expression of BCL-XL in leukemia mesenchymal stromal cells might accord survival advantage under conditions of senescence or stress and over-expressed galectin-3 exerts profound immunosuppression. Together, our findings suggest that the identification of specific populations of mesenchymal stromal cells in acute myeloid leukemia patients may be an important determinant of therapeutic response. Copyright © 2018, Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  19. Ondansetron in acute food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome, a retrospective case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miceli Sopo, S; Bersani, G; Monaco, S; Cerchiara, G; Lee, E; Campbell, D; Mehr, S

    2017-04-01

    Therapy for moderate to severe acute food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) typically consists of intravenous fluids and corticosteroids (traditional therapy). Ondansetron has been suggested as an adjunctive treatment. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of the parenteral (intravenous or intramuscular) ondansetron vs traditional therapy to resolve the symptoms of acute FPIES. Cases of FPIES who had a positive oral food challenge (OFC) were retrospectively examined at two major hospitals over a two-year period (Rome, Italy; and Sydney, Australia). The efficacy of therapy, based on the percentage of cases who stopped vomiting, was compared in cases who received parenteral ondansetron and in cases who received traditional therapy or no pharmacological therapy. A total of 66 patients were included: 37 had parenteral ondansetron, 14 were treated with traditional therapy, and 15 did not receive any pharmacological therapy. Nineteen percentage of children treated with ondansetron continued vomiting after the administration of the therapy vs 93% of children who received traditional therapy (P < 0.05, relative risk = 0.2). Children who received ondansetron or no therapy were less likely to require an admission overnight compared with those who received traditional therapy (P < 0.05). Parenteral ondansetron is significantly more effective than traditional therapy in resolving acute symptoms of FPIES. The relative risk = 0.2 greatly reduces the bias linked to the lack of randomization. These findings suggest an effective treatment for vomiting in positive FPIES OFCs and allow for more confidence in performing OFCs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Regulation of steroid 5-{alpha} reductase type 2 (Srd5a2) by sterol regulatory element binding proteins and statin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Young-Kyo [Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, 3244 McGaugh Hall, University of California, UC Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-3900 (United States); Zhu, Bing [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0144 (United States); Jeon, Tae-Il [Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, 3244 McGaugh Hall, University of California, UC Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-3900 (United States); Osborne, Timothy F., E-mail: tfosborn@uci.edu [Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, 3244 McGaugh Hall, University of California, UC Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-3900 (United States)

    2009-11-01

    In this study, we show that sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) regulate expression of Srd5a2, an enzyme that catalyzes the irreversible conversion of testosterone to dihydroxytestosterone in the male reproductive tract and is highly expressed in androgen-sensitive tissues such as the prostate and skin. We show that Srd5a2 is induced in livers and prostate from mice fed a chow diet supplemented with lovastatin plus ezitimibe (L/E), which increases the activity of nuclear SREBP-2. The three fold increase in Srd5a2 mRNA mediated by L/E treatment was accompanied by the induction of SREBP-2 binding to the Srd5a2 promoter detected by a ChIP-chip assay in liver. We identified a SREBP-2 responsive region within the first 300 upstream bases of the mouse Srd5a2 promoter by co-transfection assays which contain a site that bound SREBP-2 in vitro by an EMSA. Srd5a2 protein was also induced in cells over-expressing SREBP-2 in culture. The induction of Srd5a2 through SREBP-2 provides a mechanistic explanation for why even though statin therapy is effective in reducing cholesterol levels in treating hypercholesterolemia it does not compromise androgen production in clinical studies.

  1. Genome-wide targeting of the epigenetic regulatory protein CTCF to gene promoters by the transcription factor TFII-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Hernández, Rodrigo; Marques, Maud; Hilmi, Khalid; Zhao, Teijun; Saad, Amine; Alaoui-Jamali, Moulay A; del Rincon, Sonia V; Ashworth, Todd; Roy, Ananda L; Emerson, Beverly M; Witcher, Michael

    2015-02-17

    CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) is a key regulator of nuclear chromatin structure and gene regulation. The impact of CTCF on transcriptional output is highly varied, ranging from repression to transcriptional pausing and transactivation. The multifunctional nature of CTCF may be directed solely through remodeling chromatin architecture. However, another hypothesis is that the multifunctional nature of CTCF is mediated, in part, through differential association with protein partners having unique functions. Consistent with this hypothesis, our mass spectrometry analyses of CTCF interacting partners reveal a previously undefined association with the transcription factor general transcription factor II-I (TFII-I). Biochemical fractionation of CTCF indicates that a distinct CTCF complex incorporating TFII-I is assembled on DNA. Unexpectedly, we found that the interaction between CTCF and TFII-I is essential for directing CTCF to the promoter proximal regulatory regions of target genes across the genome, particularly at genes involved in metabolism. At genes coregulated by CTCF and TFII-I, we find knockdown of TFII-I results in diminished CTCF binding, lack of cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) recruitment, and an attenuation of RNA polymerase II phosphorylation at serine 5. Phenotypically, knockdown of TFII-I alters the cellular response to metabolic stress. Our data indicate that TFII-I directs CTCF binding to target genes, and in turn the two proteins cooperate to recruit CDK8 and enhance transcription initiation.

  2. Regulatory proteins (inhibitors or activators) affect estimates of Msub(r) of enzymes and receptors by radiation inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potier, M.; Giroux, S.

    1985-01-01

    The radiation-inactivation method allows the determination of the Msub(r) of enzymes and receptors by monitoring the decay of biological activity as a function of absorbed dose. The presence of regulatory or effector proteins (inhibitors or activators) associated with an enzyme or receptor, or released in the preparation after tissue homogenization, may affect the decay of biological activity. How the activity is affected, however, will depend on the type of inhibition (competitive or non-competitive), the inhibitor or activator concentration, the dissociation constant of the enzyme-effector system, and the effector Msub(r) relative to that of the enzyme. Since little is known on how effector proteins influence radiation inactivation of enzymes and receptors, we have considered a theoretical model in an effort to provide a framework for the interpretation of experimentally obtained data. Our model predicts that competitive and non-competitive inhibitors of enzymes could be distinguished by analysing irradiated samples with various substrate concentrations. Inhibitors will decrease whereas activators will increase the apparent target size of enzymes or receptors. (author)

  3. Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 5 Inhibition Upregulates Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells Frequency and Function during the Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingxia Zheng

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Ulcerative colitis (UC pathogenesis is related to imbalance of immune responses, and the equilibrium between inflammatory T cells and Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs plays an important role in the intestinal homeostasis. Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs regulate chromatin remodeling and gene expression. Here, we investigated whether inhibition of PRMTs affects colitis pathogenesis in mice and inflammatory bowel disease patients and further explored the underlying mechanisms. In this study, we found that protein arginine N-methyltransferase inhibitor 1 (AMI-1 treatments increased Tregs frequency, function, and reduced colitis incidence. Adoptive transfer of AMI-1-treated Tregs could reduce the colitis incidence. Colitis was associated with increased local PRMT5 expression, which was inhibited by AMI-1 treatment. Additionally, PRMT5 knockdown T cells produced a better response to TGFβ and promoted Tregs differentiation through decreased DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1 expression. PRMT5 also enhanced H3K27me3 and DNMT1 binding to Foxp3 promoter, which restricted Tregs differentiation. Furthermore, PRMT5 knockdown led to decreased Foxp3 promoter methylation during Tregs induction. PRMT5 expression had a negative relationship with Tregs in UC patients, knockdown of PRMT5 expression increased Tregs frequency and decreased TNFα, IL-6, and IL-13 levels. Our study outlines a novel regulation of PRMT5 on Tregs development and function. Strategies to decrease PRMT5 expression might have therapeutic potential to control UC.

  4. Histone/protein deacetylase inhibitor therapy for enhancement of Foxp3+ T-regulatory cell function post-transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Beier, U H; Akimova, T; Dahiya, S; Han, R; Samanta, A; Levine, M H; Hancock, W W

    2018-03-30

    T-regulatory (Treg) cells are like other cells present throughout the body in being subject to biochemical modifications in response to extracellular signals. An important component of these responses involves changes in post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histones and many non-histone proteins, including phosphorylation/dephosphorylation, ubiquitination/deubiquitination and acetylation/deacetylation. Foxp3, the key transcription factor of Tregs, is constantly being rapidly turned over, and a number of these PTMs determine its level of expression and activity. Of interest in the transplant setting, modulation of the acetylation or deacetylation of key lysine residues in Foxp3 can promote the stability and function, leading to increased Treg production and increased Treg suppressive activity. This mini-review focuses on recent data concerning the roles that histone/protein deacetylases (HDACs) play in control of Treg function, and how small molecule HDAC inhibitors can be used to promote Treg-dependent allograft survival in experimental models. These data are discussed in the light of increasing interest in the identification and clinical evaluation of isoform-selective HDAC inhibitors, and their potential application as tools to modulate Foxp3+ Treg cell numbers and function in transplant recipients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. C-reactive protein as an inflammatory marker in monitoring therapy effectiveness of acute odontogenic infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dražić Radojica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Clinical presentation of acute odontogenic infections may vary, while adequate evaluation of its severity is of great importance for determination of appropriate and effective therapy. Objective. The aim of the present study was to monitor changes of C-reactive protein (CRP levels, to correlate its values with symptoms of different acute odontogenic infections (AOI, and to monitor the effectiveness of the applied therapy. Methods. Fifty-four patients with AOI were included in the study. Eighteen patients with good drainage and normal body temperature were treated only by surgical incision without using antibiotics. Twenty-two patients with poor drainage after incision and normal body temperature were treated by surgical incision and antibiotics. Fourteen patients with elevated body temperature were treated by incision and antibiotics, irrespective of the quality of the drainage. CRP levels were measured on admission, on the 3rd and 7th day after therapy initiation. Results. On admission CRP levels were higher in AOI with elevated body temperature compared to poorly and well-drained AOI. There were no differences in CRP levels between well and poorly drained AOI on admission. On the 3rd day, a decline in the CRP levels was evident in all three groups of patients, and there was no difference among the groups. On the 7th day, the CRP levels normalized in all groups. Conclusion. CRP levels correlate well with the severity and resolution of AOI and could be used as a reliable parameter in monitoring the effectiveness of AOI therapy.

  6. Antioxidant and regulatory role of mitochondrial uncoupling protein UCP2 in pancreatic beta-cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježek, Petr; Olejár, Tomáš; Smolková, Katarína; Ježek, Jan; Dlasková, Andrea; Plecitá-Hlavatá, Lydie; Zelenka, Jaroslav; Špaček, Tomáš; Engstová, Hana; Reguera Pajuelo, David; Jabůrek, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 63, Suppl.1 (2014), S73-S91 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0346; GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/12/1247; GA ČR(CZ) GPP304/10/P204; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0025 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : mitochondria * uncoupling protein UCP2 * pancreatic beta-cells * reactive oxygen species * glucose-stimulated insulin secretion Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2014

  7. A widespread amino acid polymorphism at codon 905 of the glycogen-associated regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase-1 is associated with insulin resistance and hypersecretion of insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L; Hansen, T; Vestergaard, H

    1995-01-01

    The regulatory G-subunit of the glycogen-associated form of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) plays a crucial part in muscle tissue glycogen synthesis and breakdown. As impaired insulin stimulated glycogen synthesis in peripheral tissues is considered to be a pathogenic factor in subsets of non-insulin...

  8. Altered expression of the cell cycle regulatory protein cyclin D1 in the rat dentate gyrus after adrenalectomy-induced granular cell lass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postigo, JA; Van der Werf, YD; Korf, J; Krugers, HJ

    1998-01-01

    The loss of dentate gyrus (DG) granular cells after removal of the rat adrenal glands (ADX) is mediated by a process that is apoptotic in nature. The present study was initiated to compare changes in the immunocytochemical distribution of the cell-cycle regulatory protein cyclin D1, which has been

  9. Sterol regulatory element binding protein 2 overexpression is associated with reduced adipogenesis and ectopic fat accumulation in transgenic spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Landa, Vladimír; Zídek, Václav; Mlejnek, Petr; Šimáková, Miroslava; Šilhavý, Jan; Trnovská, J.; Kazdová, L.; Pravenec, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 5 (2014), s. 587-590 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH12061 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : sterol regulatory element binding protein 2 * transgenic * spontaneously hypertensive rat * lipid metabolism Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2014

  10. Heat Shock Protein 90α Is a Potential Serological Biomarker of Acute Rejection after Renal Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maehana, Takeshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Fukuzawa, Nobuyuki; Ishida, Hideki; Harada, Hiroshi; Tanabe, Kazunari; Masumori, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), a molecular chaperone associated with the activation of client proteins, was recently reported to play an important role in immunologic reactions. To date, the role of HSP90 in solid organ transplantations has remained unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between serum HSP90α levels and acute allograft rejection after organ and tissue transplantation using serum samples from kidney allograft recipients, an in vitro antibody-mediated rejection model, and a murine skin transplantation. Serum HSP90α levels were significantly higher in kidney recipients at the time of acute rejection (AR) than in those with no evidence of rejection. In most cases with AR, serum HSP90 decreased to baseline after the treatment. On the other hand, serum HSP90α was not elevated as much in patients with chronic rejection, calcineurin inhibitor nephrotoxicity, or BK virus nephropathy as in AR patients. In vitro study showed that HSP90α concentration in the supernatant was significantly higher in the supernatant of human aortic endothelial cells cocultured with specific anti-HLA IgG under complement attack than in that of cells cocultured with nonspecific IgG. In mice receiving skin transplantation, serum HSP90α was elevated when the first graft was rejected and the level further increased during more severe rejection of the second graft. The results suggest that HSP90α is released into the serum by cell damage due to AR in organ and tissue transplantation, and it is potentially a new biomarker to help detect AR in kidney recipients.

  11. Heat Shock Protein 90α Is a Potential Serological Biomarker of Acute Rejection after Renal Transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Maehana

    Full Text Available Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90, a molecular chaperone associated with the activation of client proteins, was recently reported to play an important role in immunologic reactions. To date, the role of HSP90 in solid organ transplantations has remained unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between serum HSP90α levels and acute allograft rejection after organ and tissue transplantation using serum samples from kidney allograft recipients, an in vitro antibody-mediated rejection model, and a murine skin transplantation.Serum HSP90α levels were significantly higher in kidney recipients at the time of acute rejection (AR than in those with no evidence of rejection. In most cases with AR, serum HSP90 decreased to baseline after the treatment. On the other hand, serum HSP90α was not elevated as much in patients with chronic rejection, calcineurin inhibitor nephrotoxicity, or BK virus nephropathy as in AR patients. In vitro study showed that HSP90α concentration in the supernatant was significantly higher in the supernatant of human aortic endothelial cells cocultured with specific anti-HLA IgG under complement attack than in that of cells cocultured with nonspecific IgG. In mice receiving skin transplantation, serum HSP90α was elevated when the first graft was rejected and the level further increased during more severe rejection of the second graft.The results suggest that HSP90α is released into the serum by cell damage due to AR in organ and tissue transplantation, and it is potentially a new biomarker to help detect AR in kidney recipients.

  12. Novel functions for the endocytic regulatory proteins MICAL-L1 and EHD1 in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinecke, James B; Katafiasz, Dawn; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2015-01-01

    During interphase, recycling endosomes mediate the transport of internalized cargo back to the plasma membrane. However, in mitotic cells, recycling endosomes are essential for the completion of cytokinesis, the last phase of mitosis that promotes the physical separation the two daughter cells. Despite recent advances, our understanding of the molecular determinants that regulate recycling endosome dynamics during cytokinesis remains incomplete. We have previously demonstrated that Molecule Interacting with CasL Like-1 (MICAL-L1) and C-terminal Eps15 Homology Domain protein 1 (EHD1) coordinately regulate receptor transport from tubular recycling endosomes during interphase. However, their potential roles in controlling cytokinesis had not been addressed. In this study, we show that MICAL-L1 and EHD1 regulate mitosis. Depletion of either protein resulted in increased numbers of bi-nucleated cells. We provide evidence that bi-nucleation in MICAL-L1- and EHD1-depleted cells is a consequence of impaired recycling endosome transport during late cytokinesis. However, depletion of MICAL-L1, but not EHD1, resulted in aberrant chromosome alignment and lagging chromosomes, suggesting an EHD1-independent function for MICAL-L1 earlier in mitosis. Moreover, we provide evidence that MICAL-L1 and EHD1 differentially influence microtubule dynamics during early and late mitosis. Collectively, our new data suggest several unanticipated roles for MICAL-L1 and EHD1 during the cell cycle. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. A novel Snf2 protein maintains trans-generational regulatory states established by paramutation in maize.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Hale

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Paramutations represent heritable epigenetic alterations that cause departures from Mendelian inheritance. While the mechanism responsible is largely unknown, recent results in both mouse and maize suggest paramutations are correlated with RNA molecules capable of affecting changes in gene expression patterns. In maize, multiple required to maintain repression (rmr loci stabilize these paramutant states. Here we show rmr1 encodes a novel Snf2 protein that affects both small RNA accumulation and cytosine methylation of a proximal transposon fragment at the Pl1-Rhoades allele. However, these cytosine methylation differences do not define the various epigenetic states associated with paramutations. Pedigree analyses also show RMR1 does not mediate the allelic interactions that typically establish paramutations. Strikingly, our mutant analyses show that Pl1-Rhoades RNA transcript levels are altered independently of transcription rates, implicating a post-transcriptional level of RMR1 action. These results suggest the RNA component of maize paramutation maintains small heterochromatic-like domains that can affect, via the activity of a Snf2 protein, the stability of nascent transcripts from adjacent genes by way of a cotranscriptional repression process. These findings highlight a mechanism by which alleles of endogenous loci can acquire novel expression patterns that are meiotically transmissible.

  14. Regulatory T cells in the humoral response of protein deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, P; Turner, K J

    1979-01-01

    Cell suspensions from the spleen or thymus of mice fed normally or mice that were protein deficient were injected into mice from each dietary group and also syngeneic nudes. Antigen, polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP), was injected at the stage of cell transfer and the antibody titres of the recipient animals were compared with those of control animals given only antigen. The regime was repeated using cell suspensions from donor animals which had been primed with antigen. These experiments showed that spleen cells were suppressive only when transferred from deficient to normal mice. Thymocytes generally lacked suppressive effects, except when given to irradiated mice also injected with "normal" spleen cells. However, thymocytes from deficient mice were marginally enhancing in nude mice, deficient mice and older "normals". To explain these results, it is suggested that responses to PVP are determined by distinct "suppressor-inducing" and "suppressor" T cells which act via helper T cells. The latter probably affect B cells directly and largely influence IgG production. It also appears likely that the ratio of helper to suppressor (inducer and effector) T cells is increased by protein deficiency.

  15. Interaction between the immune system and acute myeloid leukemia: A model incorporating promotion of regulatory T cell expansion by leukemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Yoshiaki; Saikawa, Yutaka; Nishiyama, Nobuaki

    2018-03-01

    Population dynamics of regulatory T cells (Treg) are crucial for the underlying interplay between leukemic and immune cells in progression of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The goal of this work is to elucidate the dynamics of a model that includes Treg, which can be qualitatively assessed by accumulating clinical findings on the impact of activated immune cell infusion after selective Treg depletion. We constructed an ordinary differential equation model to describe the dynamics of three components in AML: leukemic blast cells, mature regulatory T cells (Treg), and mature effective T cells (Teff), including cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The model includes promotion of Treg expansion by leukemic blast cells, leukemic stem cell and progenitor cell targeting by Teff, and Treg-mediated Teff suppression, and exhibits two coexisting, stable steady states, corresponding to high leukemic cell load at diagnosis or relapse, and to long-term complete remission. Our model is capable of explaining the clinical findings that the survival of patients with AML after allogeneic stem cell transplantation is influenced by the duration of complete remission, and that cut-off minimal residual disease thresholds associated with a 100% relapse rate are identified in AML. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Multiple regulatory roles of the mouse transmembrane adaptor protein NTAL in gene transcription and mast cell physiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Polakovicova

    Full Text Available Non-T cell activation linker (NTAL; also called LAB or LAT2 is a transmembrane adaptor protein that is expressed in a subset of hematopoietic cells, including mast cells. There are conflicting reports on the role of NTAL in the high affinity immunoglobulin E receptor (FcεRI signaling. Studies carried out on mast cells derived from mice with NTAL knock out (KO and wild type mice suggested that NTAL is a negative regulator of FcεRI signaling, while experiments with RNAi-mediated NTAL knockdown (KD in human mast cells and rat basophilic leukemia cells suggested its positive regulatory role. To determine whether different methodologies of NTAL ablation (KO vs KD have different physiological consequences, we compared under well defined conditions FcεRI-mediated signaling events in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs with NTAL KO or KD. BMMCs with both NTAL KO and KD exhibited enhanced degranulation, calcium mobilization, chemotaxis, tyrosine phosphorylation of LAT and ERK, and depolymerization of filamentous actin. These data provide clear evidence that NTAL is a negative regulator of FcεRI activation events in murine BMMCs, independently of possible compensatory developmental alterations. To gain further insight into the role of NTAL in mast cells, we examined the transcriptome profiles of resting and antigen-activated NTAL KO, NTAL KD, and corresponding control BMMCs. Through this analysis we identified several genes that were differentially regulated in nonactivated and antigen-activated NTAL-deficient cells, when compared to the corresponding control cells. Some of the genes seem to be involved in regulation of cholesterol-dependent events in antigen-mediated chemotaxis. The combined data indicate multiple regulatory roles of NTAL in gene expression and mast cell physiology.

  17. Responsibility of regulatory gene expression and repressed protein synthesis for triacylglycerol accumulation on sulfur-starvation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi eSato

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Triacylglycerol (TG synthesis is induced for energy and carbon storage in algal cells under nitrogen(N-starved conditions, and helps prevent reactive oxygen species production through fatty acid synthesis that consumes excessive reducing power. Here, the regulatory mechanism for the TG content in sulfur(S-starved cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was examined, in comparison to that in N- or phosphorus(P-starved cells. S- and N-starved cells exhibited markedly increased TG contents with up-regulation of mRNA levels of diacylglycerol acyltransferase genes. S-Starvation also induced expression of the genes for phosphatidate synthesis. In contrast, P-starved cells exhibited little alteration of the TG content with almost no induction of these genes. The results implied deficient nutrient-specific regulation of the TG content. An arg9 disruptant defective in arginine synthesis, even without nutritional deficiencies, exhibited an increased TG content upon removal of supplemented arginine, which repressed protein synthesis. Repression of protein synthesis thus seemed crucial for TG accumulation in S- or N-starved cells. Meanwhile, the results of inhibitor experiments involving cells inferred that TG accumulation during S-starvation is supported by photosynthesis and de novo fatty acid synthesis. During S-starvation, sac1 and snrk2.2 disruptants, which are defective in the response to the ambient S-status, accumulated TG at lower and higher levels, respectively, than the wild type. The sac1 and snrk2.2 disruptants showed no or much greater up-regulation of diacylglycerol acyltransferase genes, respectively. In conclusion, TG synthesis would be activated in S-starved cells, through the diversion of metabolic carbon-flow from protein to TG synthesis, and simultaneously through up-regulation of the expression of a particular set of genes for TG synthesis at proper levels through the actions of SAC1 and SNRK2.2.

  18. Perilipin-mediated lipid droplet formation in adipocytes promotes sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 processing and triacylglyceride accumulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Takahashi

    Full Text Available Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1 has been thought to be a critical factor that assists adipogenesis. During adipogenesis SREBP-1 stimulates lipogenic gene expression, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ enhances perilipin (plin gene expression, resulting in generating lipid droplets (LDs to store triacylglycerol (TAG in adipocytes. Plin coats adipocyte LDs and protects them from lipolysis. Here we show in white adipose tissue (WAT of plin-/- mice that nuclear active SREBP-1 and its target gene expression, but not nuclear SREBP-2, significantly decreased on attenuated LD formation. When plin-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs differentiated into adipocytes, attenuated LDs were formed and nuclear SREBP-1 decreased, but enforced plin expression restored them to their original state. Since LDs are largely derived from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, alterations in the ER cholesterol content were investigated during adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 cells. The ER cholesterol greatly reduced in differentiated adipocytes. The ER cholesterol level in plin-/- WAT was significantly higher than that of wild-type mice, suggesting that increased LD formation caused a change in ER environment along with a decrease in cholesterol. When GFP-SREBP-1 fusion proteins were exogenously expressed in 3T3-L1 cells, a mutant protein lacking the S1P cleavage site was poorly processed during adipogenesis, providing evidence of the increased canonical pathway for SREBP processing in which SREBP-1 is activated by two cleavage enzymes in the Golgi. Therefore, LD biogenesis may create the ER microenvironment favorable for SREBP-1 activation. We describe the novel interplay between LD formation and SREBP-1 activation through a positive feedback loop.

  19. The function of the RNA-binding protein TEL1 in moss reveals ancient regulatory mechanisms of shoot development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivancos, Julien; Spinner, Lara; Mazubert, Christelle; Charlot, Florence; Paquet, Nicolas; Thareau, Vincent; Dron, Michel; Nogué, Fabien; Charon, Céline

    2012-03-01

    The shoot represents the basic body plan in land plants. It consists of a repeated structure composed of stems and leaves. Whereas vascular plants generate a shoot in their diploid phase, non-vascular plants such as mosses form a shoot (called the gametophore) in their haploid generation. The evolution of regulatory mechanisms or genetic networks used in the development of these two kinds of shoots is unclear. TERMINAL EAR1-like genes have been involved in diploid shoot development in vascular plants. Here, we show that disruption of PpTEL1 from the moss Physcomitrella patens, causes reduced protonema growth and gametophore initiation, as well as defects in gametophore development. Leafy shoots formed on ΔTEL1 mutants exhibit shorter stems with more leaves per shoot, suggesting an accelerated leaf initiation (shortened plastochron), a phenotype shared with the Poaceae vascular plants TE1 and PLA2/LHD2 mutants. Moreover, the positive correlation between plastochron length and leaf size observed in ΔTEL1 mutants suggests a conserved compensatory mechanism correlating leaf growth and leaf initiation rate that would minimize overall changes in plant biomass. The RNA-binding protein encoded by PpTEL1 contains two N-terminus RNA-recognition motifs, and a third C-terminus non-canonical RRM, specific to TEL proteins. Removal of the PpTEL1 C-terminus (including this third RRM) or only 16-18 amino acids within it seriously impairs PpTEL1 function, suggesting a critical role for this third RRM. These results show a conserved function of the RNA-binding PpTEL1 protein in the regulation of shoot development, from early ancestors to vascular plants, that depends on the third TEL-specific RRM.

  20. C/EBP homologous protein deficiency aggravates acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Te-I; Wu, Hsiao-Yi; Chen, Bo-Lin; Jhuang, Jie-Yang; Huang, Kuo-How; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Liu, Shing-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the pathophysiological role of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) in severe acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury. METHODS: A severe acute pancreatitis model was induced with 6 injections of cerulein (Cn, 50 μg/kg) at 1-h intervals, then intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 7.5 mg/kg) in CHOP-deficient (Chop-/-) mice and wild-type (WT) mice. Animals were sacrificed under anesthesia, 3 h or 18 h after LPS injection. Serum amylase, lipase, and cytokines [interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α], pathological changes, acute lung injury, and apoptosis in the pancreas were evaluated. Serum amylase and lipase activities were detected using a medical automatic chemical analyzer. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits were used to evaluate TNF-α and IL-6 levels in mouse serum and lung tissue homogenates. Apoptotic cells in sections of pancreatic tissues were determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick-end labeling (TUNEL) analysis. The mouse carotid arteries were cannulated and arterial blood samples were collected for PaO2 analysis. The oxygenation index was expressed as PaO2/FiO2. RESULTS: Administration of Cn and LPS for 9 and 24 h induced severe acute pancreatitis in Chop-/- and WT mice. When comparing Chop-/- mice and WT mice, we observed that CHOP-deficient mice had greater increases in serum TNF-α (214.40 ± 19.52 pg/mL vs 150.40 ± 16.70 pg/mL; P = 0.037), amylase (4236.40 ± 646.32 U/L vs 2535.30 ± 81.83 U/L; P = 0.041), lipase (1678.20 ± 170.57 U/L vs 1046.21 ± 35.37 U/L; P = 0.008), and IL-6 (2054.44 ± 293.81 pg/mL vs 1316.10 ± 108.74 pg/mL; P = 0.046) than WT mice. The histopathological changes in the pancreases and lungs, decreased PaO2/FiO2 ratio, and increased TNF-α and IL-6 levels in the lungs were greater in Chop-/- mice than in WT mice (pancreas: Chop-/- vs WT mice, hemorrhage, P = 0.005; edema, P = 0.005; inflammatory cells infiltration, P = 0.005; total

  1. Effects of Acute Endurance Exercise on Plasma Protein Profiles of Endurance-Trained and Untrained Individuals over Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Schild

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute physical exercise and repeated exercise stimuli affect whole-body metabolic and immunologic homeostasis. The aim of this study was to determine plasma protein profiles of trained (EET, n=19 and untrained (SED, n=17 individuals at rest and in response to an acute bout of endurance exercise. Participants completed a bicycle exercise test at an intensity corresponding to 80% of their VO2max. Plasma samples were taken before, directly after, and three hours after exercise and analyzed using multiplex immunoassays. Seventy-eight plasma variables were included in the final analysis. Twenty-nine variables displayed significant acute exercise effects in both groups. Seven proteins differed between groups, without being affected by acute exercise. Among these A2Macro and IL-5 were higher in EET individuals while leptin showed elevated levels in SED individuals. Fifteen variables revealed group and time differences with elevated levels for IL-3, IL-7, IL-10, and TNFR2 in EET individuals. An interaction effect could be observed for nine variables including IL-6, MMP-2, MMP-3, and muscle damage markers. The proteins that differ between groups indicate a long-term exercise effect on plasma protein concentrations. These findings might be of importance in the development of exercise-based strategies in the prevention and therapy of chronic metabolic and inflammatory diseases and for training monitoring.

  2. Essential role for cyclic-AMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB) in the survival of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sligte, Naomi E.; Kampen, Kim R.; ter Elst, Arja; Scherpen, Frank J. G.; Meeuwsen-de Boer, Tiny G. J.; Guryev, Victor; van Leeuwen, Frank N.; Kornblau, Steven M.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) relapse remains a leading cause of cancer related death in children, therefore, new therapeutic options are needed. Recently, we showed that a peptide derived from Cyclic-AMP Responsive Element Binding Protein (CREB) was highly phosphorylated in pediatric

  3. Effects of a heat shock protein inducer on the atrial fibrillation substrate caused by acute atrial ischaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sakabe, Masao; Shiroshita-Takeshita, Akiko; Maguy, Ange; Brundel, Bianca J. J. M.; Fujiki, Akira; Inoue, Hiroshi; Nattel, Stanley

    2008-01-01

    Aims Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are a set of endogenous cytoprotective factors activated by various pathological conditions. This study addressed the effects of geranylgeranylacetone (GGA), an orally active HSP inducer, on the atrial fibrillation (AF) substrate associated with acute atria( ischaemia

  4. Dietary supplementation with aromatic amino acids increases protein synthesis in children wHh severe acute malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although 2 earlier studies reported that aromatic amino acid (AAA) supplementation of children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) improved whole-body protein anabolism during the early postadmission (maintenance) phase of rehabilitation, it is not known whether this positive effect was maintained ...

  5. Increased percentages of regulatory T cells are associated with inflammatory and neuroendocrine responses to acute psychological stress and poorer health status in older men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronaldson, Amy; Gazali, Ahmad M; Zalli, Argita; Kaiser, Frank; Thompson, Stephen J; Henderson, Brian; Steptoe, Andrew; Carvalho, Livia

    2016-05-01

    The percentage of regulatory T cells (TRegs)-a subtype of T lymphocyte that suppresses the immune response-appears to be reduced in a number of stress-related diseases. The role of the TReg in stress-disease pathways has not yet been investigated. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between biological responsivity to acute psychosocial stress and the percentage of TRegs in healthy older adults. The secondary purpose was to measure the associations between TReg percentage and psychological and physical well-being in the participants. Salivary cortisol and plasma interleukin (IL)-6 samples were obtained from 121 healthy older men and women from the Whitehall II cohort following acute psychophysiological stress testing. Three years later at a follow-up visit, we measured TReg percentages and psychological and physical well-being were recorded using the Short Form 36 Health Survey and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Blunted cortisol responses (p = 0.004) and elevated IL-6 responses (p = 0.027) to acute psychophysiological stress were associated with greater TReg percentage independently of age, sex, BMI, smoking status, employment grade, time of testing, and baseline measures of cortisol and IL-6, respectively. Percentage of TRegs was associated cross-sectionally with lower physical (p = 0.043) and mental health status (p = 0.008), and higher levels of depressive symptoms (p = 0.002), independently of covariates. Increased levels of TRegs may act as a defence against increased inflammation and may be a pre-indication for chronically stressed individuals on the cusp of clinical illness.

  6. Applicability of the fish embryo acute toxicity (FET) test (OECD 236) in the regulatory context of Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation, and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobanska, Marta; Scholz, Stefan; Nyman, Anna-Maija; Cesnaitis, Romanas; Gutierrez Alonso, Simon; Klüver, Nils; Kühne, Ralph; Tyle, Henrik; de Knecht, Joop; Dang, Zhichao; Lundbergh, Ivar; Carlon, Claudio; De Coen, Wim

    2018-03-01

    In 2013 the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) test guideline (236) for fish embryo acute toxicity (FET) was adopted. It determines the acute toxicity of chemicals to embryonic fish. Previous studies show a good correlation of FET with the standard acute fish toxicity (AFT) test; however, the potential of the FET test to predict AFT, which is required by the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation, and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) regulation (EC 1907/2006) and the Classification, Labelling and Packaging (CLP) Regulation (EC 1272/2008), has not yet been fully clarified. In 2015 the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) requested that a consultant perform a scientific analysis of the applicability of FET to predict AFT. The purpose was to compare the toxicity of substances to fish embryos and to adult fish, and to investigate whether certain factors (e.g., physicochemical properties, modes of action, or chemical structures) could be used to define the applicability boundaries of the FET test. Given the limited data availability, the analysis focused on organic substances. The present critical review summarizes the main findings and discusses regulatory application of the FET test under REACH. Given some limitations (e.g., neurotoxic mode of action) and/or remaining uncertainties (e.g., deviation of some narcotic substances), it has been found that the FET test alone is currently not sufficient to meet the essential information on AFT as required by the REACH regulation. However, the test may be used within weight-of-evidence approaches together with other independent, relevant, and reliable sources of information. The present review also discusses further research needs that may overcome the remaining uncertainties and help to increase acceptance of FET as a replacement for AFT in the future. For example, an increase in the availability of data generated according to OECD test guideline 236 may provide evidence of a higher predictive power

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of conformation changes of HIV-1 regulatory protein on graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Daohui; Li, Libo; He, Daohang; Zhou, Jian, E-mail: jianzhou@scut.edu.cn

    2016-07-30

    Graphical abstract: Preferential adsorption of Vpr13-33 on graphene accompanied by early conformational change from α-helix to β-sheet structures was observed by molecular simulations. This work presents the molecular mechanism of graphene-induced peptide conformational alteration and sheds light on developing graphene-based materials to inhibit HIV. - Highlights: • Graphene induced early structural transition of Vpr13-33 is studied by MD simulations. • Both π-π stacking and hydrophobic interactions orchestrate the peptide adsorption. • Vpr has an increased propensity of β-sheet content on graphene surface. • To develop graphene-based materials to inhibit HIV is possible. - Abstract: The fragment of viral protein R (Vpr), Vpr13-33, plays an important role in regulating nuclear importing of HIV genes through channel formation in which it adopts a leucine-zipper-like alpha-helical conformation. A recent experimental study reported that helical Vpr13-33 would transform to β-sheet or random coil structures and aggregate on the surface of graphene or graphene oxide through hydrophobic interactions. Due to experimental limitations, however, there is still a considerable lack of understanding on the adsorption dynamics at the early stage of the conformational transition at water-graphene interface and the underlying driving force at molecular level. In this study, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were used to explore the conformation transition phenomena. Vpr13-33 kept α-helical structure in solution, but changed to β-sheet structure when strongly adsorbed onto graphene. Preferential adsorption of Vpr13-33 on graphene is dominated by hydrophobic interactions. The cluster analysis identified the most significant populated conformation and the early stage of structure conversion from α-helical to β-sheet was found, but the full β-sheet propagation was not observed. Free energy landscape analysis further complemented the transformation analysis of

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of conformation changes of HIV-1 regulatory protein on graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Daohui; Li, Libo; He, Daohang; Zhou, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Preferential adsorption of Vpr13-33 on graphene accompanied by early conformational change from α-helix to β-sheet structures was observed by molecular simulations. This work presents the molecular mechanism of graphene-induced peptide conformational alteration and sheds light on developing graphene-based materials to inhibit HIV. - Highlights: • Graphene induced early structural transition of Vpr13-33 is studied by MD simulations. • Both π-π stacking and hydrophobic interactions orchestrate the peptide adsorption. • Vpr has an increased propensity of β-sheet content on graphene surface. • To develop graphene-based materials to inhibit HIV is possible. - Abstract: The fragment of viral protein R (Vpr), Vpr13-33, plays an important role in regulating nuclear importing of HIV genes through channel formation in which it adopts a leucine-zipper-like alpha-helical conformation. A recent experimental study reported that helical Vpr13-33 would transform to β-sheet or random coil structures and aggregate on the surface of graphene or graphene oxide through hydrophobic interactions. Due to experimental limitations, however, there is still a considerable lack of understanding on the adsorption dynamics at the early stage of the conformational transition at water-graphene interface and the underlying driving force at molecular level. In this study, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were used to explore the conformation transition phenomena. Vpr13-33 kept α-helical structure in solution, but changed to β-sheet structure when strongly adsorbed onto graphene. Preferential adsorption of Vpr13-33 on graphene is dominated by hydrophobic interactions. The cluster analysis identified the most significant populated conformation and the early stage of structure conversion from α-helical to β-sheet was found, but the full β-sheet propagation was not observed. Free energy landscape analysis further complemented the transformation analysis of

  9. Contributions of high mobility group box protein in experimental and clinical acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Tomoyuki; Hashimoto, Satoru; Amaya, Fumimasa; Kitamura, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Masaki; Kobayashi, Atsuko; Maruyama, Ikuro; Yamada, Shingo; Hasegawa, Naoki; Soejima, Junko; Koh, Hidefumi; Ishizaka, Akitoshi

    2004-12-15

    This study was performed to examine the putative role of high mobility group box (HMGB) protein in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI). Observations were made (1) in 21 patients who were septic with ALI and 15 patients with normal lung function and (2) in a mouse model 24 hours after intratracheal instillation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The concentrations of HMGB1 were increased in plasma and lung epithelial lining fluid of patients with ALI and mice instilled with LPS. LPS-induced ALI was mitigated by anti-HMGB1 antibody. Although this protein was not detected in the plasma of control humans or mice, the concentrations of HMGB1 in lung epithelial lining fluid or in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were unexpectedly high. The nuclear expression of HMGB1 was apparent in epithelial cells surrounding terminal bronchioles in normal mice, whereas its nuclear and cytoplasmic expression was observed in alveolar macrophages in LPS-instilled mice. Lung instillation of HMGB2 did not cause as much inflammation as HMGB1. Extracellular HMGB1 may play a key role in the pathogenesis of clinical and experimental ALI. However, its expression in normal airways is noteworthy and suggests that it also plays a physiologic role in the lung.

  10. Acute phase proteins: Biomarkers of infection and inflammation in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckersall, P D; Bell, R

    2010-07-01

    Acute phase proteins (APPs) have been used as biomarkers of inflammation, infection and trauma for decades in human medicine but have been relatively under-utilised in the context of veterinary medicine. However, significant progress has been made in the detection, measurement and application of APPs as biomarkers in both companion and farm animal medicine over recent years. In the dog, C-reactive protein, haptoglobin and serum amyloid A have been identified as significant diagnostic 'markers' of steroid-responsive meningitis-arteritis, while in cats and cattle haptoglobin and alpha(1) acid glycoprotein and haptoglobin and serum amyloid A have proved valuable biomarkers of disease, respectively. In dairy cattle, haptoglobin and a mammary-associated serum amyloid A3 isoform, produced by the inflamed mammary gland during episodes of mastitis, have great potential as biomarkers of this economically important disease. Understanding the use of APP as biomarkers of inflammatory conditions of domestic animals has expanded significantly over recent years, and, with the insights provided by ongoing research, it is likely that these compounds will be increasingly used in the future in the diagnosis and prognosis of both companion and farm animal disease. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of heat shock protein 32 (Hsp32) as a novel target in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Meyer, Renata A; Herrmann, Harald; Peter, Barbara; Gleixner, Karoline V; Stefanzl, Gabriele; Hadzijusufovic, Emir; Pickl, Winfried F; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Melo, Junia V; Maeda, Hiroshi; Jäger, Ulrich; Valent, Peter

    2014-03-15

    Heat shock proteins (Hsp) are increasingly employed as therapeutic targets in oncology. We have shown that Hsp32, also known as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), serves as survival factor and potential target in Ph+ chronic myeloid leukemia. We here report that primary cells and cell lines derived from patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) express Hsp32 mRNA and the Hsp32 protein in a constitutive manner. Highly enriched CD34+/CD38- ALL stem cells also expressed Hsp32. Two Hsp32-targeting drugs, pegylated zinc protoporphyrine (PEG-ZnPP) and styrene maleic acid-micelle-encapsulated ZnPP (SMA-ZnPP), induced apoptosis and growth arrest in the BCR/ABL1+ cell lines, in Ph- lymphoblastic cell lines and in primary Ph+ and Ph- ALL cells. The effects of PEG-ZnPP and SMA-ZnPP on growth of leukemic cells were dose-dependent. In Ph+ ALL, major growth-inhibitory effects of the Hsp32-targeting drugs were observed in imatinib-sensitive and imatinib-resistant cells. Hsp32-targeting drugs were found to synergize with imatinib, nilotinib, and bendamustine in producing growth inhibition and apoptosis in Ph+ ALL cells. A siRNA against Hsp32 was found to inhibit growth and survival of ALL cells and to synergize with imatinib in suppressing the growth of ALL cells. In conclusion, Hsp32 is an essential survival factor and potential new target in ALL.

  12. C-reactive protein, haptoglobin and Pig-Major acute phase protein profiles of pigs infected experimentally by different isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saco, Y; Martínez-Lobo, F; Cortey, M; Pato, R; Peña, R; Segalés, J; Prieto, C; Bassols, A

    2016-02-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus (PRRSV) is the etiologic agent of PRRS, one of the most important diseases in swine worldwide. In the present work, the effects of different PRRSV strains were tested on a piglet experimental model to study the induced acute phase response. For this purpose, pigs (n=15 for each group) were intranasally inoculated with one of five PRRSV strains (isolates EU10, 12, 17, 18 from genotype 1 and isolate JA-142 from genotype 2). The acute phase response was monitored by measuring acute phase proteins (APPs). Specifically, the serum concentration of haptoglobin (Hp), C-reactive protein (CRP) and Pig-Major Acute Protein (Pig-MAP) was determined at 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18 and 21 days p.i. Clinical signs and growth performance were also monitored during the experiment. All animals became viremic after inoculation during the study period. The APP response was heterogeneous and dependent on the strain, being strains EU10, EU 18 and JA-142 those that induced the highest response and the strongest clinical signs. In general, Hp was the most sensitive biomarker for PRRSV infection, CRP behaved as moderate and Pig-MAP was the less responsive during the course of PRRSV experimental infection. Hp and CRP were significantly discriminatory between infected and control pigs, but not Pig-MAP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Differential 3’ processing of specific transcripts expands regulatory and protein diversity across neuronal cell types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jereb, Saša; Hwang, Hun-Way; Van Otterloo, Eric; Govek, Eve-Ellen; Fak, John J; Yuan, Yuan; Hatten, Mary E

    2018-01-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) regulates mRNA translation, stability, and protein localization. However, it is unclear to what extent APA regulates these processes uniquely in specific cell types. Using a new technique, cTag-PAPERCLIP, we discovered significant differences in APA between the principal types of mouse cerebellar neurons, the Purkinje and granule cells, as well as between proliferating and differentiated granule cells. Transcripts that differed in APA in these comparisons were enriched in key neuronal functions and many differed in coding sequence in addition to 3’UTR length. We characterize Memo1, a transcript that shifted from expressing a short 3’UTR isoform to a longer one during granule cell differentiation. We show that Memo1 regulates granule cell precursor proliferation and that its long 3’UTR isoform is targeted by miR-124, contributing to its downregulation during development. Our findings provide insight into roles for APA in specific cell types and establish a platform for further functional studies. PMID:29578408

  14. Absence of residual structure in the intrinsically disordered regulatory protein CP12 in its reduced state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Launay, Hélène; Barré, Patrick; Puppo, Carine; Manneville, Stéphanie; Gontero, Brigitte; Receveur-Bréchot, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    The redox switch protein CP12 is a key player of the regulation of the Benson–Calvin cycle. Its oxidation state is controlled by the formation/dissociation of two intramolecular disulphide bridges during the day/night cycle. CP12 was known to be globally intrinsically disordered on a large scale in its reduced state, while being partly ordered in the oxidised state. By combining Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Small Angle X-ray Scattering experiments, we showed that, contrary to secondary structure or disorder predictions, reduced CP12 is fully disordered, with no transient or local residual structure likely to be precursor of the structures identified in the oxidised active state and/or in the bound state with GAPDH or PRK. These results highlight the diversity of the mechanisms of regulation of conditionally disordered redox switches, and question the stability of oxidised CP12 scaffold. - Highlights: • CP12 is predicted to form two helices in its N-terminal sequence. • Reduced CP12 is disordered as a random coil according to SAXS. • Limited or no transient structures are observed in reduced CP12 by NMR.

  15. Absence of residual structure in the intrinsically disordered regulatory protein CP12 in its reduced state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Launay, Hélène; Barré, Patrick [Laboratory of integrative Structural and Chemical Biology (iSCB), Centre de Recherche en Cancérologie de Marseille (CRCM), CNRS UMR 7258, INSERM U 1068, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Aix-Marseille Universités, Marseille 13009 (France); Puppo, Carine [Aix-Marseille Université, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, UMR 7281, Laboratoire de Bioénergétique et Ingénierie des Protéines, 31 Chemin Joseph Aiguier, 13402, Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Manneville, Stéphanie [Laboratory of integrative Structural and Chemical Biology (iSCB), Centre de Recherche en Cancérologie de Marseille (CRCM), CNRS UMR 7258, INSERM U 1068, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Aix-Marseille Universités, Marseille 13009 (France); Gontero, Brigitte [Aix-Marseille Université, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, UMR 7281, Laboratoire de Bioénergétique et Ingénierie des Protéines, 31 Chemin Joseph Aiguier, 13402, Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Receveur-Bréchot, Véronique, E-mail: veronique.brechot@inserm.fr [Laboratory of integrative Structural and Chemical Biology (iSCB), Centre de Recherche en Cancérologie de Marseille (CRCM), CNRS UMR 7258, INSERM U 1068, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Aix-Marseille Universités, Marseille 13009 (France)

    2016-08-12

    The redox switch protein CP12 is a key player of the regulation of the Benson–Calvin cycle. Its oxidation state is controlled by the formation/dissociation of two intramolecular disulphide bridges during the day/night cycle. CP12 was known to be globally intrinsically disordered on a large scale in its reduced state, while being partly ordered in the oxidised state. By combining Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Small Angle X-ray Scattering experiments, we showed that, contrary to secondary structure or disorder predictions, reduced CP12 is fully disordered, with no transient or local residual structure likely to be precursor of the structures identified in the oxidised active state and/or in the bound state with GAPDH or PRK. These results highlight the diversity of the mechanisms of regulation of conditionally disordered redox switches, and question the stability of oxidised CP12 scaffold. - Highlights: • CP12 is predicted to form two helices in its N-terminal sequence. • Reduced CP12 is disordered as a random coil according to SAXS. • Limited or no transient structures are observed in reduced CP12 by NMR.

  16. Hydroxysafflor yellow A suppress oleic acid-induced acute lung injury via protein kinase A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chaoyun [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Binzhou Medical University, Yantai, Shandong 264003 (China); Huang, Qingxian [Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Yantai Yuhuangding Hospital, Yantai, Shandong 264000 (China); Wang, Chunhua; Zhu, Xiaoxi; Duan, Yunfeng; Yuan, Shuai [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Binzhou Medical University, Yantai, Shandong 264003 (China); Bai, Xianyong, E-mail: xybai2012@163.com [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Binzhou Medical University, Yantai, Shandong 264003 (China)

    2013-11-01

    Inflammation response and oxidative stress play important roles in acute lung injury (ALI). Activation of the cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway may attenuate ALI by suppressing immune responses and inhibiting the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA) is a natural flavonoid compound that reduces oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokine-mediated damage. In this study, we examined whether HSYA could protect the lungs from oleic acid (OA)-induced injury, which was used to mimic ALI, and determined the role of the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway in this process. Arterial oxygen tension (PaO{sub 2}), carbon dioxide tension, pH, and the PaO{sub 2}/fraction of inspired oxygen ratio in the blood were detected using a blood gas analyzer. We measured wet/dry lung weight ratio and evaluated tissue morphology. The protein and inflammatory cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum were determined using enzyme-linked immunoassay. The activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, PKA, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, and the concentrations of cAMP and malondialdehyde in the lung tissue were detected using assay kits. Bcl-2, Bax, caspase 3, and p22{sup phox} levels in the lung tissue were analyzed using Western blotting. OA increased the inflammatory cytokine and ROS levels and caused lung dysfunction by decreasing cAMP synthesis, inhibiting PKA activity, stimulating caspase 3, and reducing the Bcl-2/Bax ratio. H-89 increased these effects. HSYA significantly increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes, inhibited the inflammatory response via cAMP/PKA pathway activation, and attenuated OA-induced lung injury. Our results show that the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway is required for the protective effect of HSYA against ALI. - Highlights: • Oleic acid (OA) cause acute lung injury (ALI) via inhibiting cAMP/PKA signal pathway. • Blocking protein kinase A (PKA) activation may

  17. Hydroxysafflor yellow A suppress oleic acid-induced acute lung injury via protein kinase A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chaoyun; Huang, Qingxian; Wang, Chunhua; Zhu, Xiaoxi; Duan, Yunfeng; Yuan, Shuai; Bai, Xianyong

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation response and oxidative stress play important roles in acute lung injury (ALI). Activation of the cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway may attenuate ALI by suppressing immune responses and inhibiting the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA) is a natural flavonoid compound that reduces oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokine-mediated damage. In this study, we examined whether HSYA could protect the lungs from oleic acid (OA)-induced injury, which was used to mimic ALI, and determined the role of the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway in this process. Arterial oxygen tension (PaO 2 ), carbon dioxide tension, pH, and the PaO 2 /fraction of inspired oxygen ratio in the blood were detected using a blood gas analyzer. We measured wet/dry lung weight ratio and evaluated tissue morphology. The protein and inflammatory cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum were determined using enzyme-linked immunoassay. The activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, PKA, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, and the concentrations of cAMP and malondialdehyde in the lung tissue were detected using assay kits. Bcl-2, Bax, caspase 3, and p22 phox levels in the lung tissue were analyzed using Western blotting. OA increased the inflammatory cytokine and ROS levels and caused lung dysfunction by decreasing cAMP synthesis, inhibiting PKA activity, stimulating caspase 3, and reducing the Bcl-2/Bax ratio. H-89 increased these effects. HSYA significantly increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes, inhibited the inflammatory response via cAMP/PKA pathway activation, and attenuated OA-induced lung injury. Our results show that the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway is required for the protective effect of HSYA against ALI. - Highlights: • Oleic acid (OA) cause acute lung injury (ALI) via inhibiting cAMP/PKA signal pathway. • Blocking protein kinase A (PKA) activation may enhance Cytokine

  18. Microtubule plus-end tracking of end-binding protein 1 (EB1) is regulated by CDK5 regulatory subunit-associated protein 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Ka-Wing; Au, Franco K C; Jia, Yue; Yang, Shaozhong; Zhou, Liying; Qi, Robert Z

    2017-05-05

    Microtubules are polar cytoskeleton filaments that extend via growth at their plus ends. Microtubule plus-end-tracking proteins (+TIPs) accumulate at these growing plus ends to control microtubule dynamics and attachment. The +TIP end-binding protein 1 (EB1) and its homologs possess an autonomous plus-end-tracking mechanism and interact with other known +TIPs, which then recruit those +TIPs to the growing plus ends. A major +TIP class contains the S X IP (Ser- X -Ile-Pro, with X denoting any amino acid residue) motif, known to interact with EB1 and its homologs for plus-end tracking, but the role of S X IP in regulating EB1 activities is unclear. We show here that an interaction of EB1 with the S X IP-containing +TIP CDK5 regulatory subunit-associated protein 2 (CDK5RAP2) regulates several EB1 activities, including microtubule plus-end tracking, dynamics at microtubule plus ends, microtubule and α/β-tubulin binding, and microtubule polymerization. The S X IP motif fused with a dimerization domain from CDK5RAP2 significantly enhanced EB1 plus-end-tracking and microtubule-polymerizing and bundling activities, but the S X IP motif alone failed to do so. An S X IP-binding-deficient EB1 mutant displayed significantly lower microtubule plus-end tracking than the wild-type protein in transfected cells. These results suggest that EB1 cooperates with CDK5RAP2 and perhaps other S X IP-containing +TIPs in tracking growing microtubule tips. We also generated plus-end-tracking chimeras of CDK5RAP2 and the adenomatous polyposis coli protein (APC) and found that overexpression of the dimerization domains interfered with microtubule plus-end tracking of their respective S X IP-containing chimeras. Our results suggest that disruption of S X IP dimerization enables detailed investigations of microtubule plus-end-associated functions of individual S X IP-containing +TIPs. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Identification and Utility of FdmR1 as a Streptomyces Antibiotic Regulatory Protein Activator for Fredericamycin Production in Streptomyces griseus ATCC 49344 and Heterologous Hosts▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yihua; Wendt-Pienkowski, Evelyn; Shen, Ben

    2008-01-01

    The fredericamycin (FDM) A biosynthetic gene cluster, cloned previously from Streptomyces griseus ATCC 49344, contains three putative regulatory genes, fdmR, fdmR1, and fdmR2. Their deduced gene products show high similarity to members of the Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory protein (SARP) family (FdmR1) or to MarR-like regulators (FdmR and FdmR2). Here we provide experimental data supporting FdmR1 as a SARP-type activator. Inactivation of fdmR1 abolished FDM biosynthesis, and FDM productio...

  20. Cardiac myosin binding protein-C plays no regulatory role in skeletal muscle structure and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Lin

    Full Text Available Myosin binding protein-C (MyBP-C exists in three major isoforms: slow skeletal, fast skeletal, and cardiac. While cardiac MyBP-C (cMyBP-C expression is restricted to the heart in the adult, it is transiently expressed in neonatal stages of some skeletal muscles. However, it is unclear whether this expression is necessary for the proper development and function of skeletal muscle. Our aim was to determine whether the absence of cMyBP-C alters the structure, function, or MyBP-C isoform expression in adult skeletal muscle using a cMyBP-C null mouse model (cMyBP-C((t/t. Slow MyBP-C was expressed in both slow and fast skeletal muscles, whereas fast MyBP-C was mostly restricted to fast skeletal muscles. Expression of these isoforms was unaffected in skeletal muscle from cMyBP-C((t/t mice. Slow and fast skeletal muscles in cMyBP-C((t/t mice showed no histological or ultrastructural changes in comparison to the wild-type control. In addition, slow muscle twitch, tetanus tension, and susceptibility to injury were all similar to the wild-type controls. Interestingly, fMyBP-C expression was significantly increased in the cMyBP-C((t/t hearts undergoing severe dilated cardiomyopathy, though this does not seem to prevent dysfunction. Additionally, expression of both slow and fast isoforms was increased in myopathic skeletal muscles. Our data demonstrate that i MyBP-C isoforms are differentially regulated in both cardiac and skeletal muscles, ii cMyBP-C is dispensable for the development of skeletal muscle with no functional or structural consequences in the adult myocyte, and iii skeletal isoforms can transcomplement in the heart in the absence of cMyBP-C.

  1. The effects of soy and whey protein supplementation on acute hormonal reponses to resistance exercise in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, William J; Solomon-Hill, Glenn; Volk, Brittanie M; Kupchak, Brian R; Looney, David P; Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay; Comstock, Brett A; Szivak, Tunde K; Hooper, David R; Flanagan, Shawn D; Maresh, Carl M; Volek, Jeff S

    2013-01-01

    For many resistance-trained men concerns exist regarding the production of estrogen with the consumption of soy protein when training for muscle strength and size. Thus, the purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of soy and whey protein supplementation on sex hormones following an acute bout of heavy resistance exercise in resistance trained men. Ten resistance-trained men (age 21.7 ± 2.8 [SD] years; height 175.0 ± 5.4 cm; weight 84.2 ± 9.1 kg) volunteered to participate in an investigation. Utilizing a within subject randomized crossover balanced placebo design, all subjects completed 3 experimental treatment conditions supplementing with whey protein isolate (WPI), soy protein isolate (SPI), and maltodextrin placebo control for 14 days with participants ingesting 20 g of their assigned supplement each morning at approximately the same time each day. Following supplementation, subjects performed an acute heavy resistance exercise test consisting of 6 sets of 10 repetitions in the squat exercise at 80% of the subject's one repetition maximum. This investigation observed lower testosterone responses following supplementation with soy protein in addition to a positive blunted cortisol response with the use of whey protein at some recovery time points. Although sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) was proposed as a possible mechanism for understanding changes in androgen content, SHBG did not differ between experimental treatments. Importantly, there were no significant differences between groups in changes in estradiol concentrations. Our main findings demonstrate that 14 days of supplementation with soy protein does appear to partially blunt serum testosterone. In addition, whey influences the response of cortisol following an acute bout of resistance exercise by blunting its increase during recovery. Protein supplementation alters the physiological responses to a commonly used exercise modality with some differences due to the type of protein

  2. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus envelope protein regulates cell stress response and apoptosis.

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    Marta L DeDiego

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Severe acute respiratory syndrome virus (SARS-CoV that lacks the envelope (E gene (rSARS-CoV-ΔE is attenuated in vivo. To identify factors that contribute to rSARS-CoV-ΔE attenuation, gene expression in cells infected by SARS-CoV with or without E gene was compared. Twenty-five stress response genes were preferentially upregulated during infection in the absence of the E gene. In addition, genes involved in signal transduction, transcription, cell metabolism, immunoregulation, inflammation, apoptosis and cell cycle and differentiation were differentially regulated in cells infected with rSARS-CoV with or without the E gene. Administration of E protein in trans reduced the stress response in cells infected with rSARS-CoV-ΔE or with respiratory syncytial virus, or treated with drugs, such as tunicamycin and thapsigargin that elicit cell stress by different mechanisms. In addition, SARS-CoV E protein down-regulated the signaling pathway inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE-1 of the unfolded protein response, but not the PKR-like ER kinase (PERK or activating transcription factor 6 (ATF-6 pathways, and reduced cell apoptosis. Overall, the activation of the IRE-1 pathway was not able to restore cell homeostasis, and apoptosis was induced probably as a measure to protect the host by limiting virus production and dissemination. The expression of proinflammatory cytokines was reduced in rSARS-CoV-ΔE-infected cells compared to rSARS-CoV-infected cells, suggesting that the increase in stress responses and the reduction of inflammation in the absence of the E gene contributed to the attenuation of rSARS-CoV-ΔE.

  3. Post-transcriptional effects and interactions between chronic mild stress and acute sleep deprivation: regulation of translation factor and cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding protein phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grønli, Janne; Dagestad, Grethe; Milde, Anne Marita; Murison, Robert; Bramham, Clive R

    2012-12-01

    Stress and restricted or disrupted sleep trigger adaptive responses in the brain at the level of gene transcription. We investigated the possible impact of chronic mild stress (CMS), acute sleep deprivation, and a combination of these in male rats on post-transcriptional mechanisms important for cognitive function and synaptic plasticity. Relationships between sleep architecture and translational regulators were also assessed. After four weeks of CMS, phosphorylation of two key translation factors, eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) and elongation factor 2 (eEF2), was enhanced in the prefrontal cortex, but unchanged in the hippocampus and dentate gyrus. Sleep deprivation decreased phosphorylated eIF4E in the dentate gyrus. In contrast, eEF2 phosphorylation was elevated in all brain regions after sleep deprivation. Thus, CMS and sleep deprivation, when given alone, have distinct region-specific effects. Furthermore, the combined treatment revealed striking interactions with eEF2 phosphorylation in which sleep deprivation counteracts the effect of CMS cortically and CMS modulates the effects of sleep deprivation in the hippocampus proper. Although CMS exposure alone had no effect in the hippocampus, it inhibited the sleep deprivation-induced eIF4E phosphorylation, while inducing phosphorylation of a major regulatory RNA-binding protein, cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding protein (CPEB) in the combined treatment. CMS had no effect on plasma corticosterone, but led to disruption of sleep. Sleep quality and sleep quantity in non-stressed animals showed predictive changes in eIF4E and eEF2 phosphorylation cortically. Prior exposure to CMS abolishes this relationship. We conclude that CMS and acute sleep deprivation have interactive and brain region-specific effects on translational regulators of relevance to mechanisms of stress responsiveness and sleep homeostasis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification of Rbd2 as a candidate protease for sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) cleavage in fission yeast

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    Kim, Jinsil; Ha, Hye-Jeong [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sujin [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Functional Genomics, University of Science and Technology (UST), 217 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34113 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Ah-Reum [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sook-Jeong [Department of New Drug Discovery and Development, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34134 (Korea, Republic of); Hoe, Kwang-Lae, E-mail: kwanghoe@cnu.ac.kr [Department of New Drug Discovery and Development, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34134 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Uk, E-mail: kimdongu@kribb.re.kr [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-25

    Lipid homeostasis in mammalian cells is regulated by sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors that are activated through sequential cleavage by Golgi Site-1 and Site-2 proteases. Fission yeast SREBP, Sre1, engages a different mechanism involving the Golgi Dsc E3 ligase complex, but it is not clearly understood exactly how Sre1 is proteolytically cleaved and activated. In this study, we screened the Schizosaccharomyces pombe non-essential haploid deletion collection to identify missing components of the Sre1 cleavage machinery. Our screen identified an additional component of the SREBP pathway required for Sre1 proteolysis named rhomboid protein 2 (Rbd2). We show that an rbd2 deletion mutant fails to grow under hypoxic and hypoxia-mimetic conditions due to lack of Sre1 activity and that this growth phenotype is rescued by Sre1N, a cleaved active form of Sre1. We found that the growth inhibition phenotype under low oxygen conditions is specific to the strain with deletion of rbd2, not any other fission yeast rhomboid-encoding genes. Our study also identified conserved residues of Rbd2 that are required for Sre1 proteolytic cleavage. All together, our results suggest that Rbd2 is a functional SREBP protease with conserved residues required for Sre1 cleavage and provide an important piece of the puzzle to understand the mechanisms for Sre1 activation and the regulation of various biological and pathological processes involving SREBPs. - Highlights: • An rbd2-deleted yeast strain shows defects in growth in response to low oxygen levels. • rbd2-deficient cells fail to generate cleaved Sre1 (Sre1N) under hypoxic conditions. • Expression of Sre1N rescues the rbd2 deletion mutant growth phenotype. • Rbd2 contains conserved residues potentially critical for catalytic activity. • Mutation of the conserved Rbd2 catalytic residues leads to defects in Sre1 cleavage.

  5. Regulation of the CDP-choline pathway by sterol regulatory element binding proteins involves transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, Neale D; Lagace, Thomas A

    2003-06-15

    The synthesis of phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) by the CDP-choline pathway is under the control of the rate-limiting enzyme CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CCT). Sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) have been proposed to regulate CCT at the transcriptional level, or via the synthesis of lipid activators or substrates of the CDP-choline pathway. To assess the contributions of these two mechanisms, we examined CCTalpha expression and PtdCho synthesis by the CDP-choline pathway in cholesterol and fatty acid auxotrophic CHO M19 cells inducibly expressing constitutively active nuclear forms of SREBP1a or SREBP2. Induction of either SREBP resulted in increased expression of mRNAs for sterol-regulated genes, elevated fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis (>10-50-fold) and increased PtdCho synthesis (2-fold). CCTalpha mRNA was increased 2-fold by enforced expression of SREBP1a or SREBP2. The resultant increase in CCTalpha protein and activity (2-fold) was restricted primarily to the soluble fraction of cells, and increased CCTalpha activity in vivo was not detected. Inhibition of the synthesis of fatty acids or their CoA esters by cerulenin or triacsin C respectively following SREBP induction effectively blocked the accompanying elevation in PtdCho synthesis. Thus PtdCho synthesis was driven by increased synthesis of fatty acids or a product thereof. These data show that transcriptional activation of CCTalpha is modest relative to that of other SREBP-regulated genes, and that stimulation of PtdCho synthesis by SREBPs in CHO cells is due primarily to increased fatty acid synthesis.

  6. Glucokinase regulatory protein genetic variant interacts with omega-3 PUFA to influence insulin resistance and inflammation in metabolic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Perez-Martinez

    Full Text Available Glucokinase Regulatory Protein (GCKR plays a central role regulating both hepatic triglyceride and glucose metabolism. Fatty acids are key metabolic regulators, which interact with genetic factors and influence glucose metabolism and other metabolic traits. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA have been of considerable interest, due to their potential to reduce metabolic syndrome (MetS risk.To examine whether genetic variability at the GCKR gene locus was associated with the degree of insulin resistance, plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP and n-3 PUFA in MetS subjects.Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, HOMA-B, plasma concentrations of C-peptide, CRP, fatty acid composition and the GCKR rs1260326-P446L polymorphism, were determined in a cross-sectional analysis of 379 subjects with MetS participating in the LIPGENE dietary cohort.Among subjects with n-3 PUFA levels below the population median, carriers of the common C/C genotype had higher plasma concentrations of fasting insulin (P = 0.019, C-peptide (P = 0.004, HOMA-IR (P = 0.008 and CRP (P = 0.032 as compared with subjects carrying the minor T-allele (Leu446. In contrast, homozygous C/C carriers with n-3 PUFA levels above the median showed lower plasma concentrations of fasting insulin, peptide C, HOMA-IR and CRP, as compared with individuals with the T-allele.We have demonstrated a significant interaction between the GCKR rs1260326-P446L polymorphism and plasma n-3 PUFA levels modulating insulin resistance and inflammatory markers in MetS subjects. Further studies are needed to confirm this gene-diet interaction in the general population and whether targeted dietary recommendations can prevent MetS in genetically susceptible individuals.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00429195.

  7. The Global Regulatory Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein (CRP) Controls Multifactorial Fluoroquinolone Susceptibility in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kary, Stefani C; Yoneda, Joshua R K; Olshefsky, Stephen C; Stewart, Laura A; West, Steven B; Cameron, Andrew D S

    2017-11-01

    Fluoroquinolone antibiotics are prescribed for the treatment of Salmonella enterica infections, but resistance to this family of antibiotics is growing. Here we report that loss of the global regulatory protein cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP) or its allosteric effector, cAMP, reduces susceptibility to fluoroquinolones. A Δ crp mutation was synergistic with the primary fluoroquinolone resistance allele gyrA83 , thus able to contribute to clinically relevant resistance. Decreased susceptibility to fluoroquinolones could be partly explained by decreased expression of the outer membrane porin genes ompA and ompF with a concomitant increase in the expression of the ciprofloxacin resistance efflux pump gene acrB in Δ crp cells. Expression of gyrAB , which encode the DNA supercoiling enzyme GyrAB, which is blocked by fluoroquinolones, and expression of topA , which encodes the dominant supercoiling-relaxing enzyme topoisomerase I, were unchanged in Δ crp cells. Yet Δ crp cells maintained a more relaxed state of DNA supercoiling, correlating with an observed increase in topoisomerase IV ( parCE ) expression. Surprisingly, the Δ crp mutation had the unanticipated effect of enhancing fitness in the presence of fluoroquinolone antibiotics, which can be explained by the observation that exposure of Δ crp cells to ciprofloxacin had the counterintuitive effect of restoring wild-type levels of DNA supercoiling. Consistent with this, Δ crp cells did not become elongated or induce the SOS response when challenged with ciprofloxacin. These findings implicate the combined action of multiple drug resistance mechanisms in Δ crp cells: reduced permeability and elevated efflux of fluoroquinolones coupled with a relaxed DNA supercoiling state that buffers cells against GyrAB inhibition by fluoroquinolones. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. Extracellular Acidic pH Activates the Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein 2 to Promote Tumor Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Ayano; Yamamoto, Shogo; Nakaki, Ryo; Shimamura, Teppei; Hamakubo, Takao; Sakai, Juro; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Yoshida, Tetsuo; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Osawa, Tsuyoshi

    2017-02-28

    Conditions of the tumor microenvironment, such as hypoxia and nutrient starvation, play critical roles in cancer progression. However, the role of acidic extracellular pH in cancer progression is not studied as extensively as that of hypoxia. Here, we show that extracellular acidic pH (pH 6.8) triggered activation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 (SREBP2) by stimulating nuclear translocation and promoter binding to its targets, along with intracellular acidification. Interestingly, inhibition of SREBP2, but not SREBP1, suppressed the upregulation of low pH-induced cholesterol biosynthesis-related genes. Moreover, acyl-CoA synthetase short-chain family member 2 (ACSS2), a direct SREBP2 target, provided a growth advantage to cancer cells under acidic pH. Furthermore, acidic pH-responsive SREBP2 target genes were associated with reduced overall survival of cancer patients. Thus, our findings show that SREBP2 is a key transcriptional regulator of metabolic genes and progression of cancer cells, partly in response to extracellular acidification. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The TEAD/TEF family protein Scalloped mediates transcriptional output of the Hippo growth-regulatory pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shian; Liu, Yi; Zheng, Yonggang; Dong, Jixin; Pan, Duojia

    2008-03-01

    The Hippo (Hpo) kinase cascade restricts tissue growth by inactivating the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie (Yki), which regulates the expression of target genes such as the cell death inhibitor diap1 by unknown mechanisms. Here we identify the TEAD/TEF family protein Scalloped (Sd) as a DNA-binding transcription factor that partners with Yki to mediate the transcriptional output of the Hpo growth-regulatory pathway. The diap1 (th) locus harbors a minimal Sd-binding Hpo Responsive Element (HRE) that mediates transcriptional regulation by the Hpo pathway. Sd binds directly to Yki, and a Yki missense mutation that abrogates Sd-Yki binding also inactivates Yki function in vivo. We further demonstrate that sd is required for yki-induced tissue overgrowth and target gene expression, and that sd activity is conserved in its mammalian homolog. Our results uncover a heretofore missing link in the Hpo signaling pathway and provide a glimpse of the molecular events on a Hpo-responsive enhancer element.

  10. The role of the acute phase protein PTX3 in the ventilator-induced lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JM Real

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The pentraxin 3 (PTX3 is an acute phase proinflammatory protein produced by fibroblasts and alveolar epithelial cells. We have previously demonstrated that PTX3 is a key modulator of inflammation. Mechanical ventilation (MV is a life saving therapeutic approach for patients with acute lung injury that, nevertheless could lead to an inflammatory response and tissue injury (ventilator-induced lung injury: VILI, representing a major cause of iatrogenic lung damage in intensive units. Our objective was to investigate the role of PTX3 in VILI. PTX3 transgenic, knockout and Wt control mice (n = 12/group were ventilated (45ml·kg–1 until respiratory system Elastance increased 50% (Ers150%, an indicator of VILI. Histological analysis demonstrated that using a Ers150% was appropriate for our analysis since identical degrees of inflammation were observed in Tg, KO and Wt mice as assessed by leukocyte infiltration, oedema, alveolar collapse and number of breaks in alveolar septa. However, Tg mice reached Ers150% faster than Wt controls (p = 0.0225. We also showed that the lack of PTX3 does not abolish the occurrence of VILI in KOs. Gene expression profile of PTX3, IL-1beta, IL-6, KC, IFNgamma, TGFbeta and PCIII were investigated by QPCR. MV drastically up modulated PTX3 as well as IL-1beta, IL-6, IFNgamma and KC. Alternatively, mice were ventilated for 20, 40 and 60 min. The faster kinetics of Tg mice to reach Ers150% was accompanied by an earlier augmentation of IL-1b and PTX3 expression. The kinetics of local PTX3 expression in the lungs of ventilated mice strongly suggests the involvement of this pentraxin in the pathogenesis of VILI.

  11. Acute post-exercise myofibrillar protein synthesis is not correlated with resistance training-induced muscle hypertrophy in young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Cameron J; Churchward-Venne, Tyler A; Parise, Gianni; Bellamy, Leeann; Baker, Steven K; Smith, Kenneth; Atherton, Philip J; Phillips, Stuart M

    2014-01-01

    Muscle hypertrophy following resistance training (RT) involves activation of myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS) to expand the myofibrillar protein pool. The degree of hypertrophy following RT is, however, highly variable and thus we sought to determine the relationship between the acute activation of MPS and RT-induced hypertrophy. We measured MPS and signalling protein activation after the first session of resistance exercise (RE) in untrained men (n = 23) and then examined the relation between MPS with magnetic resonance image determined hypertrophy. To measure MPS, young men (24±1 yr; body mass index  = 26.4±0.9 kg•m²) underwent a primed constant infusion of L-[ring-¹³C₆] phenylalanine to measure MPS at rest, and acutely following their first bout of RE prior to 16 wk of RT. Rates of MPS were increased 235±38% (Pmuscle volume and acute rates of MPS measured over 1-3 h (r = 0.02), 3-6 h (r = 0.16) or the aggregate 1-6 h post-exercise period (r = 0.10). Hypertrophy after chronic RT was correlated (r = 0.42, P = 0.05) with phosphorylation of 4E-BP1(Thr37/46) at 1 hour post RE. We conclude that acute measures of MPS following an initial exposure to RE in novices are not correlated with muscle hypertrophy following chronic RT.

  12. Latex-protein complexes from an acute phase recombinant antigen of Toxoplasma gondii for the diagnosis of recently acquired toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretti, Leandro E; Gonzalez, Verónica D G; Marcipar, Iván S; Gugliotta, Luis M

    2014-08-01

    The synthesis and characterization of latex-protein complexes (LPC), from the acute phase recombinant antigen P35 (P35Ag) of Toxoplasma gondii and "core-shell" carboxylated or polystyrene (PS) latexes (of different sizes and charge densities) are considered, with the aim of producing immunoagglutination reagents able to detect recently acquired toxoplasmosis. Physical adsorption (PA) and chemical coupling (CC) of P35Ag onto latex particles at different pH were investigated. Greater amounts of adsorbed protein were obtained on PS latexes than on carboxylated latexes, indicating that hydrophobic forces govern the interactions between the protein and the particle surface. In the CC experiments, the highest amount of bound protein was obtained at pH 6, near the isoelectric point of the protein (IP=6.27). At this pH, it decreased both the repulsion between particle surface and protein, and the repulsion between neighboring molecules. The LPC were characterized and the antigenicity of the P35Ag protein coupled on the particles surface was evaluated by Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (ELISA). Results from ELISA showed that the P35Ag coupled to the latex particles surface was not affected during the particles sensitization by PA and CC and the produced LPC were able to recognize specific anti-P35Ag antibodies present in the acute phase of the disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Urinary protein profiles in ketorolac-associated acute kidney injury in patients undergoing orthopedic day surgery

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    Mariano F

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Filippo Mariano,1 Chiara Cogno,1 Fulvia Giaretta,2,3 Ilaria Deambrosis,2,3 Simona Pozza,4 Maurizio Berardino,5 Giuseppe Massazza,6 Luigi Biancone1,3 1Department of General and Specialist Medicine, Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation Unit, City of Health and Science, CTO Hospital, Turin, 2Department of General and Specialist Medicine, Laboratory of Nephrology and Immunopathology, City of Health and Science, Molinette Hospital, Turin, 3Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, 4Department of Radiology and Radiotherapy, CTO Radiology, City of Health and Science, CTO Hospital, Turin, 5Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care 5, City of Health and Science, CTO Hospital, Turin, 6Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Week Hospital Unit, City of Health and Science, CTO Hospital, and University of Turin, Turin, Italy Background: Parenteral administration of ketorolac is very effective in controlling postoperative pain for orthopedic surgery. Ketorolac can induce clinically relevant renal alterations in elderly patients, whereas its short course is considered safe for young adults with normal preoperative renal function. In this study, of a cohort of young adults undergoing elective orthopedic day surgery, we sought cases complicated by readmission due to acute kidney injury (AKI.Patients and methods: Among 1397 young adults, aged 18–32 years who were admitted to undergo orthopedic day surgery from 2013 to 2015, four patients (0.29%, three males/one female treated in postprocedure with ketorolac (from 60 to 90 mg/day for 1–2 days were readmitted for suspected severe AKI. We evaluated functional outcome, urinary protein profiles and kidney biopsy (1 patient.Results: After day surgery discharge, they experienced gastrointestinal disturbances, flank pain and fever. Readmitted on post-surgery days 3–4, they presented with oliguric AKI (creatinine range 158.4–466.4 µmol/L and

  14. Involvement of activated leukocytes in the regulation of plasma levels of acute phase proteins in microgravity simulation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larina, Olga; Bekker, Anna; Turin-Kuzmin, Alexey

    2016-07-01

    Earth-based studies of microgravity effects showed the induction of the mechanisms of acute phase reaction (APR). APR comprises the transition of stress-sensitive protein kinases of macrophages and other responsive cells into the active state and the phosphorylation of transcription factors which in turn stimulate the production of acute-phase reaction cytokines. Leukocyte activation is accompanied by the acceleration of the formation of oxygen radicals which can serve a functional indice of leukocyte cell state. The series of events at acute phase response result in selective changes in the synthesis of a number of secretory blood proteins (acute phase proteins, APPs) in liver cells thus contributing the recovery of homeostasis state in the organism. Earlier experiment with head-down tilt showed the increase in plasma concentrations of two cytokine mediators of acute phase response, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) being the outcome of the activation of producer cells, foremost, leukocytes. In experiment with 4-day dry immersion chemiluminescent (ChL) reply of the whole blood samples to a test stimulus were studied along with the measurements of plasma levels of APPs, namely, alpha1-antitrypsin (alpha1-AT), alpha1-acid glycoprotein (alpha1-AGP), alpha2-macroglobulin (alpha2-M), ceruloplasmin (Cer), haptoglobin (Hp), C3-complement component (C3), C-reactive protein (CRP). Eight individuals aged 21.2 ± 3.2 years were the test subjects in the investigation. Protein studies showed a noticeable increase in the mean plasma levels of all APPs measured in experiment thus producing the evidence of the activation of acute phase response mechanisms while individual patterns revealed variability during the immersion period. The overall trends were similar to these in the previous immersion series. The augment in the strength of signal in stimulated light emission tests was higher after 1- and 2-day of immersion exposure than before the

  15. The role of interferon-γ inducible protein-10 in a mouse model of acute liver injury post induced pluripotent stem cells transplantation.

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    Che-Chang Chan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Liver injuries are important medical problems that require effective therapy. Stem cell or hepatocyte transplantation has the potential to restore function of the damaged liver and ameliorate injury. However, the regulatory factors crucial for the repair and regeneration after cell transplantation have not been fully characterized. Our study investigated the effects and the expression of the regulatory factors in mouse models of acute liver injury either transplanted with the induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS or the hepatocytes that differentiated from iPS cells (iHL. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mice received CCl(4 injection and were randomized to receive vehicle, iPS, or iHL transfusions vial tail veins and were observed for 24, 48 or 72 hours. The group of mice with iPS transplantation performed better than the group of mice receiving iHL in reducing the serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and liver necrosis areas at 24 hours after CCl(4 injury. Moreover, iPS significantly increased the numbers of proliferating hepatocytes at 48 hours. Cytokine array identified that chemokine IP-10 could be the potential regulatory factor that ameliorates liver injury. Further studies revealed that iPS secreted IP-10 in vitro and transfusion of iPS increased IP-10 protein and mRNA expressions in the injured livers in vivo. The primary hepatocytes and non-parenchyma cells were isolated from normal and injured livers. Hepatocytes from injured livers that received iPS treatment expressed more IP-10 mRNA than their non-hepatocyte counter-parts. In addition, animal studies revealed that administration of recombinant IP-10 (rIP-10 effectively reduced liver injuries while IP-10-neutralizing antibody attenuated the protective effects of iPS and decreased hepatocyte proliferation. Both iPS and rIP-10 significantly reduced the 72-hour mortality rate in mice that received multiple CCl(4-injuries. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These

  16. Regulatory T cells are strong promoters of acute ischemic stroke in mice by inducing dysfunction of the cerebral microvasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Kraft, Peter; Dreykluft, Angela; Hagedorn, Ina; Göbel, Kerstin; Schuhmann, Michael K; Langhauser, Friederike; Helluy, Xavier; Schwarz, Tobias; Bittner, Stefan; Mayer, Christian T; Brede, Marc; Varallyay, Csanad; Pham, Mirko; Bendszus, Martin; Jakob, Peter; Magnus, Tim; Meuth, Sven G; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Zernecke, Alma; Sparwasser, Tim; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Stoll, Guido; Wiendl, Heinz

    2013-01-24

    We have recently identified T cells as important mediators of ischemic brain damage, but the contribution of the different T-cell subsets is unclear. Forkhead box P3 (FoxP3)-positive regulatory T cells (Tregs) are generally regarded as prototypic anti-inflammatory cells that maintain immune tolerance and counteract tissue damage in a variety of immune-mediated disorders. In the present study, we examined the role of Tregs after experimental brain ischemia/reperfusion injury. Selective depletion of Tregs in the DEREG mouse model dramatically reduced infarct size and improved neurologic function 24 hours after stroke and this protective effect was preserved at later stages of infarct development. The specificity of this detrimental Treg effect was confirmed by adoptive transfer experiments in wild-type mice and in Rag1(-/-) mice lacking lymphocytes. Mechanistically, Tregs induced microvascular dysfunction in vivo by increased interaction with the ischemic brain endothelium via the LFA-1/ICAM-1 pathway and platelets and these findings were confirmed in vitro. Ablation of Tregs reduced microvascular thrombus formation and improved cerebral reperfusion on stroke, as revealed by ultra-high-field magnetic resonance imaging at 17.6 Tesla. In contrast, established immunoregulatory characteristics of Tregs had no functional relevance. We define herein a novel and unexpected role of Tregs in a primary nonimmunologic disease state.

  17. Diagnostic accuracy of porcine acute phase proteins in meat juice for detecting disease at abattoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, A M; Martínez-Subiela, S; Cerón, J J

    2015-07-04

    The aim of this work was to evaluate whether acute phase protein (APP) determinations could assist Official Veterinarians carrying out work in slaughterhouses. To test this hypothesis, the diagnostic accuracy of APP determinations in meat juice of pigs was analysed to differentiate between healthy and diseased pigs. One hundred and one pigs of two different origins were classified into two groups according to their health status (healthy and diseased pigs), which was determined by a veterinary clinical examination on the farm. To assess the pigs' immune status, against the main porcine diseases, serological analyses were monitored. A general idea of the degree of disease coverage was analysed by examining organ lesions postmortem. Haptoglobin (Hp) and C reactive protein (CRP) were measured in meat juice samples. 72.13 per cent of pigs appeared to be seropositive for the porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus, and almost 86.2 per cent of them had concomitant infections with other pathogens, such as Porcine circovirus type 2 or Swine influenza virus. Median Hp and CRP concentrations were significantly higher in diseased animals at different stages of the production chain, when compared with levels found in healthy finishing pigs (P<0.0001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed the highest sensitivity-specificity pairs, nearly 80-90 per cent, at cut-off levels of 83 and 10 µg/ml for Hp and CRP determinations, respectively, with high AUCs 0.9. This cut-off could be useful for veterinary inspections at the time of slaughter, to differentiate between the carcase of a healthy animal and the carcase of an animal suffering from a systemic disease, which should be completely condemned. British Veterinary Association.

  18. IFN-γ-producing Th1-like regulatory T cells may limit acute cellular renal allograft rejection: Paradoxical post-transplantation effects of IFN-γ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoguang; Huang, Haiyan; Wang, Qiang; Cai, Ming; Qian, Yeyong; Han, Yong; Wang, Xinying; Gao, Yu; Yuan, Ming; Xu, Liang; Yao, Chen; Xiao, Li; Shi, Bingyi

    2017-02-01

    IFN-γ is a protypical proinflammatory cytokine that plays a central role in inflammation and acute graft rejection. Accumulating evidence indicates that IFN-γ can exert previously unexpected immunoregulatory activities. However, little is known about the role of IFN-γ secreted by Th1-like regulatory T cells in human kidney transplantation. To determine the function of IFN-γ in acute T cell-mediated renal allograft rejection (ACR), we examined serum cytokine expression profiles in ACR patients by human cytokine multiplex immunoassay and analyzed the cellular origins of IFN-γ in peripheral blood and renal allograft biopsies from ACR cases and controls by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry, respectively. The results showed significant reduction in serum concentrations of Th1-inducing cytokines IL-12p70 and IFN-γ as well as Th2-related cytokine IL-4 in ACR patients compared with stable controls. However, levels of several Th1-, Th2- and Th17-related cytokines, such as IL-2, TNF-α, TNF-β, IL-12 (p40), IL-10, IL-15, IL-17, IL-21, and IL-23, as well as the frequencies of Th1 and Th17 cell, did not differ between ACR cases and stable controls. Moreover, we found the levels of IFN-γ were correlated with those of the anti-inflammatory factor, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) in ACR. Notably, the Th1-like Treg cell-to-Foxp3 - Th1 cell ratio was significantly lower in ACR patients compared with that in stable controls. In graft biopsies from ACR patients, Treg cells and Th1-like Treg cells were less abundant than those without ACR. Our study indicates that IFN-γ secreted from Th1-like Treg cells negatively modulates ACR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. C-reactive protein in acute myocardial infarction: association with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berton, Giuseppe; Cordiano, Rocco; Palmieri, Rosa; Pianca, Sigismondo; Pagliara, Valeria; Palatini, Paolo

    2003-06-01

    High C-reactive protein (CRP) levels have been associated with higher mortality rate in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, it is not known whether inflammation plays a role in the time-course of heart failure (HF) in this clinical setting. Our aim was to study the nature of the relationship between CRP and HF during AMI. This prospective study was carried out in 269 subjects admitted to the hospital for suspected AMI. Of these, 220 had evidence of AMI. The other 49 subjects were studied as controls. CRP was assessed on the first, third, and seventh day after admission. CRP was significantly higher in the patients with AMI than in the control patients (P =.001) and peaked on the third day. Among the patients with AMI, CRP was higher in patients with HF than in patients without HF (adjusted P =.008, P =.02 and P =.03 on 1st, 3rd, and 7th day, respectively). Prevalence of HF on admission was slightly higher in the subjects with first-day CRP >or=15 mg/L than in those with CRP or=85 mg/L than in those with CRP below that level (P <.0001), and log-third-day CRP was independently associated with 1-year mortality at multivariable analysis (P =.0001). CRP on admission to hospital is suitable for predicting the time-course of HF in patients with AMI. Peak CRP value is a strong independent predictor of global and HF-mortality during the following year.

  20. Investigational BET bromodomain protein inhibitors in early stage clinical trials for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Thorsten; Gardin, Claude

    2017-07-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous group of malignancies driven by genetic mutations and deregulated epigenetic control. Relapse/refractory disease remains frequent in younger patients and even more so in older patients, including treatment with epigenetic drugs in this age group, mainly with hypomethylating agents. New treatment strategies are urgently needed. The recent discovery that epigenetic readers of the bromodomain (BRD) and extraterminal (BET) protein family, are crucial for AML maintenance by transcription of oncogenic c-MYC lead to rapid development of BET inhibitors entering clinical trials. Areas covered: We provide a critical overview using main sources for the use of BET inhibitors in AML treatment. Limits of this treatment approach including resistance mechanisms and future directions including development of new generation BET inhibitors and combination strategies with other drugs are detailed. Expert opinion: BET inhibitors were expected to overcome limits of conventional treatment in patients as impressive in vitro data emerged recently in well-characterized AML subsets, including those associated with poor risk characteristics in the clinic. Nevertheless single activity of BET inhibitors appears to be modest and resistance mechanisms were already identified. BET inhibitors with alternative mechanisms of action and/or combination strategies with epigenetic drugs should be tested.

  1. Tumor necrosis factor-α induced protein 6 attenuates acute lung injury following paraquat exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiajun; Zhen, Jiantao; Zhu, Jingfa; Lin, Qingming

    2016-01-01

    Paraquat exposure commonly occurs in the developing countries and the mortality rate is high. However, there is currently no consensus on the efficacy of treatment for paraquat exposure. The study was aimed to explore the effects of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) induced protein 6 (TSG-6) on acute lung injury (ALI) following paraquat exposure in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into the sham group (n = 8), the paraquat group (n = 8), and the paraquat TSG-6-treated group (n = 8). Rats were administered with 50 mg/kg of paraquat intraperitoneally. At 1 h after exposure, rats were treated with 30 μg of recombinant human TSG-6 (rhTSG-6) intraperitoneally. After 6 h of exposure, ALI scores were evaluated by histology and the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in lung was assayed using real-time RT-PCR. ALI scores were significantly lower in the paraquat TSG-6-treated group, compared with the paraquat group (p paraquat TSG-6-treated group, compared with the paraquat group (p paraquat exposure by suppressing inflammatory response.

  2. Preserved skeletal muscle protein anabolic response to acute exercise and protein intake in well-treated rheumatoid arthritis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Ulla Ramer; Dideriksen, Kasper; Andersen, Mads Bisgaard

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is often associated with diminished muscle mass, reflecting an imbalance between protein synthesis and protein breakdown. To investigate the anabolic potential of both exercise and nutritional protein intake we investigated the muscle protein synthesis rate...... and in combination with physical exercise in patients with well-treated RA to a similar extent as in healthy individuals. This indicates that moderately inflamed RA patients have maintained their muscle anabolic responsiveness to physical activity and protein intake....

  3. Driving midgut-specific expression and secretion of a foreign protein in transgenic mosquitoes with AgAper1 regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, E G; Donnelly-Doman, M; Fujioka, H; Ghosh, A; Moreira, L; Jacobs-Lorena, M

    2005-06-01

    The Anopheles gambiae adult peritrophic matrix protein 1 (AgAper1) regulatory elements were used to drive the expression of phospholipase A2 (PLA2), a protein known to disrupt malaria parasite development in mosquitoes. These AgAper1 regulatory elements were sufficient to promote the accumulation of PLA2 in midgut epithelial cells before a blood meal and its release into the lumen upon blood ingestion. Plasmodium berghei oocyst formation was reduced by approximately 80% (74-91% range) in transgenic mosquitoes. Blood-seeking behaviour and survival of AgAper1-PLA2 transgenic mosquitoes were comparable to sibling wild-type mosquitoes, while fertility was substantially lower. Ultrastructural studies suggest that decreased fitness is a consequence of internal damage to midgut epithelial cells.

  4. Effects of retinoic acid and hydrogen peroxide on sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1a activation during adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Eldaim, Mabrouk A. Abd; Okamatsu-Ogura, Yuko; Terao, Akira; Kimura, Kazuhiro

    2010-01-01

    Both retinoic acid (RA) and oxidative stress (H2O2) increased transcription and cleavage of membrane-bound sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1, leading to enhanced transcription of fatty acid synthase (FAS) in hepatoma cells. On the other hand, RA and H2O2 decreased and increased lipogenesis in adipocytes, respectively, although roles of SREBP-1 activation in these effects remain to be elucidated. To elucidate its involvement, we examined the activation of SREBP...

  5. Platelet cytosolic 44-kDa protein is a substrate of cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation and is not recognized by antisera against the. alpha. subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina Y Vedia, L.M.; Reep, B.R.; Lapetina, E.G. (Burroughs Wellcome Co., Research Triangle Park, NC (USA))

    1988-08-01

    ADP-ribosylation induced by cholera toxin and pertussis toxin was studied in particulate and cytosolic fractions of human platelets. Platelets were disrupted by a cycle of freezing and thawing in the presence of a hyposmotic buffer containing protease inhibitors. In both fractions, the A subunit of cholera toxin ADP-ribosylates two proteins with molecular masses of 42 and 44 kDa, whereas pertussis toxin ADP-ribosylates a 41-kDa polypeptide. Two antisera against the {alpha} subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein recognize only the 42-kDa polypeptide. Cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation of the 42- and 44-kDa proteins is reduced by pretreatment of platelets with iloprost, a prostacyclin analog. The 44-kDa protein, which is substrate of cholera toxin, could be extracted completely from the membrane and recovered in the cytosolic fraction when the cells were disrupted by Dounce homogenization and the pellet was extensively washed. A 44-kDa protein can also be labeled with 8-azidoguanosine 5{prime}-({alpha}-{sup 32}P)triphosphate in the cytosol and membranes. These finding indicate that cholera and pertussis toxins produced covalent modifications of proteins present in particulate and cytosolic platelet fractions. Moreover, the 44-kDa protein might be an {alpha} subunit of a guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein that is not recognized by available antisera.

  6. Platelet cytosolic 44-kDa protein is a substrate of cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation and is not recognized by antisera against the α subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina Y Vedia, L.M.; Reep, B.R.; Lapetina, E.G.

    1988-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation induced by cholera toxin and pertussis toxin was studied in particulate and cytosolic fractions of human platelets. Platelets were disrupted by a cycle of freezing and thawing in the presence of a hyposmotic buffer containing protease inhibitors. In both fractions, the A subunit of cholera toxin ADP-ribosylates two proteins with molecular masses of 42 and 44 kDa, whereas pertussis toxin ADP-ribosylates a 41-kDa polypeptide. Two antisera against the α subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein recognize only the 42-kDa polypeptide. Cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation of the 42- and 44-kDa proteins is reduced by pretreatment of platelets with iloprost, a prostacyclin analog. The 44-kDa protein, which is substrate of cholera toxin, could be extracted completely from the membrane and recovered in the cytosolic fraction when the cells were disrupted by Dounce homogenization and the pellet was extensively washed. A 44-kDa protein can also be labeled with 8-azidoguanosine 5'-[α- 32 P]triphosphate in the cytosol and membranes. These finding indicate that cholera and pertussis toxins produced covalent modifications of proteins present in particulate and cytosolic platelet fractions. Moreover, the 44-kDa protein might be an α subunit of a guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein that is not recognized by available antisera

  7. Detection of Signal Regulatory Protein α in Saimiri sciureus (Squirrel Monkey) by Anti-Human Monoclonal Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Hugo Amorim dos Santos; Costa-Correa, Edmar Henrique; Bianco-Junior, Cesare; Andrade, Márcia Cristina Ribeiro; Lima-Junior, Josué da Costa; Pratt-Riccio, Lilian Rose; Daniel-Ribeiro, Cláudio Tadeu; Totino, Paulo Renato Rivas

    2017-01-01

    Non-human primates (NHP) are suitable models for studying different aspects of the human system, including pathogenesis and protective immunity to many diseases. However, the lack of specific immunological reagents for neo-tropical monkeys, such as Saimiri sciureus, is still a major factor limiting studies in these models. An alternative strategy to circumvent this obstacle has been the selection of immunological reagents directed to humans, which present cross-reactivity with NHP molecules. In this context and considering the key role of inhibitory immunoreceptors—such as the signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα)—in the regulation of immune responses, in the present study, we attempted to evaluate the ability of anti-human SIRPα monoclonal antibodies to recognize SIRPα in antigen-presenting S. sciureus peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). As shown by flow cytometry analysis, the profile of anti-SIRPα staining as well as the levels of SIRPα-positive cells in PBMC from S. sciureus were similar to those observed in human PBMC. Furthermore, using anti-SIRPα monoclonal antibody, it was possible to detect a decrease of the SIRPα levels on surface of S. sciureus cells after in vitro stimulation with lipopolysaccharides. Finally, using computed-based analysis, we observed a high degree of conservation of SIRPα across six species of primates and the presence of shared epitopes in the extracellular domain between humans and Saimiri genus that could be targeted by antibodies. In conclusion, we have identified a commercially available anti-human monoclonal antibody that is able to detect SIRPα of S. sciureus monkeys and that, therefore, can facilitate the study of the immunomodulatory role of SIRPα when S. sciureus is used as a model. PMID:29312325

  8. Detection of Signal Regulatory Protein α in Saimiri sciureus (Squirrel Monkey by Anti-Human Monoclonal Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Amorim dos Santos de Souza

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-human primates (NHP are suitable models for studying different aspects of the human system, including pathogenesis and protective immunity to many diseases. However, the lack of specific immunological reagents for neo-tropical monkeys, such as Saimiri sciureus, is still a major factor limiting studies in these models. An alternative strategy to circumvent this obstacle has been the selection of immunological reagents directed to humans, which present cross-reactivity with NHP molecules. In this context and considering the key role of inhibitory immunoreceptors—such as the signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα—in the regulation of immune responses, in the present study, we attempted to evaluate the ability of anti-human SIRPα monoclonal antibodies to recognize SIRPα in antigen-presenting S. sciureus peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. As shown by flow cytometry analysis, the profile of anti-SIRPα staining as well as the levels of SIRPα-positive cells in PBMC from S. sciureus were similar to those observed in human PBMC. Furthermore, using anti-SIRPα monoclonal antibody, it was possible to detect a decrease of the SIRPα levels on surface of S. sciureus cells after in vitro stimulation with lipopolysaccharides. Finally, using computed-based analysis, we observed a high degree of conservation of SIRPα across six species of primates and the presence of shared epitopes in the extracellular domain between humans and Saimiri genus that could be targeted by antibodies. In conclusion, we have identified a commercially available anti-human monoclonal antibody that is able to detect SIRPα of S. sciureus monkeys and that, therefore, can facilitate the study of the immunomodulatory role of SIRPα when S. sciureus is used as a model.

  9. The adeno-associated virus major regulatory protein Rep78-c-Jun-DNA motif complex modulates AP-1 activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, C. Krishna; Meyers, Craig; Zhan Dejin; You Hong; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Mehta, Jawahar L.; Liu Yong; Hermonat, Paul L.

    2003-01-01

    Multiple epidemiologic studies show that adeno-associated virus (AAV) is negatively associated with cervical cancer (CX CA), a cancer which is positively associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Mechanisms for this correlation may be by Rep78's (AAV's major regulatory protein) ability to bind the HPV-16 p97 promoter DNA and inhibit transcription, to bind and interfere with the functions of the E7 oncoprotein of HPV-16, and to bind a variety of HPV-important cellular transcription factors such as Sp1 and TBP. c-Jun is another important cellular factor intimately linked to the HPV life cycle, as well as keratinocyte differentiation and skin development. Skin is the natural host tissue for both HPV and AAV. In this article it is demonstrated that Rep78 directly interacts with c-Jun, both in vitro and in vivo, as analyzed by Western blot, yeast two-hybrid cDNA, and electrophoretic mobility shift-supershift assay (EMSA supershift). Addition of anti-Rep78 antibodies inhibited the EMSA supershift. Investigating the biological implications of this interaction, Rep78 inhibited the c-Jun-dependent c-jun promoter in transient and stable chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase (CAT) assays. Rep78 also inhibited c-Jun-augmented c-jun promoter as well as the HPV-16 p97 promoter activity (also c-Jun regulated) in in vitro transcription assays in T47D nuclear extracts. Finally, the Rep78-c-Jun interaction mapped to the amino-half of Rep78. The ability of Rep78 to interact with c-Jun and down-regulate AP-1-dependent transcription suggests one more mechanism by which AAV may modulate the HPV life cycle and the carcinogenesis process

  10. Leucine responsive regulatory protein is involved in methionine metabolism and polyamine homeostasis in acetic acid bacterium Komagataeibacter europaeus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Yuri; Akasaka, Naoki; Sakoda, Hisao; Hidese, Ryota; Fujiwara, Shinsuke

    2018-01-01

    The leucine responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) is a global transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes involved in amino acid metabolism. To identify metabolic pathways and related genes under the control of Lrp in the acetic acid bacterium Komagataeibacter europaeus, the Kelrp null mutant (KGMA7110), which requires supplementation of all 20 amino acids for normal growth, was cultivated in minimal media containing or lacking particular amino acids. The results confirmed that KGMA7110 was auxotrophic for methionine and its catabolites S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and spermidine (SPD). Quantitative reverse-transcription PCR analysis revealed lower metK (SAM synthetase) and mdtI (SPD efflux pump) expression in KGMA7110 than in wild-type KGMA0119. By contrast, these genes were significantly up-regulated in the Kelrp mutant lacking the putative C-terminal ligand-sensing domain (KGMA7203), indicating abnormal regulation of target genes by the KeLrp variant in KGMA7203. KGMA7110 (0.69±0.27 μM) and KGMA7203 (4.90±0.61 μM) excreted lower and higher quantities of SPD, respectively, than KGMA0119 (2.28±0.26 μM). This was attributed to imbalanced carbon flow caused by Kelrp disruption that respectively attenuated and stimulated metK and mdtI expression. These findings indicate that KeLrp plays a key role in SAM biosynthesis and intracellular polyamine homeostasis in K. europaeus. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Interaction of the regulatory subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase with PATZ1 (ZNF278)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Weng-Lang; Ravatn, Roald; Kudoh, Kazuya; Alabanza, Leah; Chin, Khew-Voon

    2010-01-01

    The effects of cAMP in cell are predominantly mediated by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), which is composed of two genetically distinct subunits, catalytic (C) and regulatory (R), forming a tetrameric holoenzyme R 2 C 2 . The only known function for the R subunit is that of inhibiting the activity of the C subunit kinase. It has been shown that overexpression of RIα, but not the C subunit kinase, is associated with neoplastic transformation. In addition, it has also been demonstrated that mutation in the RIα, but not the C subunit is associated with increased resistance to the DNA-damaging anticancer drug cisplatin, thus suggesting that the RIα subunit of PKA may have functions independent of the kinase. We show here that the RIα subunit interacts with a BTB/POZ domain zinc-finger transcription factor, PATZ1 (ZNF278), and co-expression with RIα results in its sequestration in the cytoplasm. The cytoplasmic/nuclear translocation is inducible by cAMP. C-terminus deletion abolishes PATZ1 interaction with RIα and results in its localization in the nucleus. PATZ1 transactivates the cMyc promoter and the presence of cAMP and co-expression with RIα modulates its transactivation. Moreover, PATZ1 is aberrantly expressed in cancer. Taken together, our results showed a potentially novel mechanism of cAMP signaling mediated through the interaction of RIα with PATZ1 that is independent of the kinase activity of PKA, and the aberrant expression of PATZ1 in cancer point to its role in cell growth regulation.

  12. Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins are regulators of the rat thyroid peroxidase gene in thyroid cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Rauer

    Full Text Available Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs-1c and -2, which were initially discovered as master transcriptional regulators of lipid biosynthesis and uptake, were recently identified as novel transcriptional regulators of the sodium-iodide symporter gene in the thyroid, which is essential for thyroid hormone synthesis. Based on this observation that SREBPs play a role for thyroid hormone synthesis, we hypothesized that another gene involved in thyroid hormone synthesis, the thyroid peroxidase (TPO gene, is also a target of SREBP-1c and -2. Thyroid epithelial cells treated with 25-hydroxycholesterol, which is known to inhibit SREBP activation, had about 50% decreased mRNA levels of TPO. Similarly, the mRNA level of TPO was reduced by about 50% in response to siRNA mediated knockdown of both, SREBP-1 and SREBP-2. Reporter gene assays revealed that overexpression of active SREBP-1c and -2 causes a strong transcriptional activation of the rat TPO gene, which was localized to an approximately 80 bp region in the intron 1 of the rat TPO gene. In vitro- and in vivo-binding of both, SREBP-1c and SREBP-2, to this region in the rat TPO gene could be demonstrated using gel-shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Mutation analysis of the 80 bp region of rat TPO intron 1 revealed two isolated and two overlapping SREBP-binding elements from which one, the overlapping SRE+609/InvSRE+614, was shown to be functional in reporter gene assays. In connection with recent findings that the rat NIS gene is also a SREBP target gene in the thyroid, the present findings suggest that SREBPs may be possible novel targets for pharmacological modulation of thyroid hormone synthesis.

  13. High concentrations of protein test substances may have non-toxic effects on Daphnia magna: implications for regulatory study designs and ecological risk assessments for GM crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raybould, Alan; Burns, Andrea; Hamer, Mick

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory testing for possible adverse effects of insecticidal proteins on non-target organisms (NTOs) is an important part of many ecological risk assessments for regulatory decision-making about the cultivation of insect-resistant genetically modified (IRGM) crops. To increase confidence in the risk assessments, regulatory guidelines for effects testing specify that representative surrogate species for NTOs are exposed to concentrations of insecticidal proteins that are in excess of worst-case predicted exposures in the field. High concentrations in effects tests are achieved by using protein test substances produced in microbes, such as Escherichia coli. In a study that exposed Daphnia magna to a single high concentration of a microbial test substance containing Vip3Aa20, the insecticidal protein in MIR162 maize, small reductions in growth were observed. These effects were surprising as many other studies strongly suggest that the activity of Vip3Aa20 is limited to Lepidoptera. A plausible explanation for the effect on growth is that high concentrations of test substance have a non-toxic effect on Daphnia, perhaps by reducing its feeding rate. A follow-up study tested that hypothesis by exposing D. magna to several concentrations of Vip3Aa20, and a high concentration of a non-toxic protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA). Vip3Aa20 and BSA had sporadic effects on the reproduction and growth of D. magna. The pattern of the effects suggests that they result from non-toxic effects of high concentrations of protein, and not from toxicity. The implications of these results for regulatory NTO effects testing and ERA of IRGM crops are discussed.

  14. Identification of a phosphorylation-dependent nuclear localization motif in interferon regulatory factor 2 binding protein 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen C T Teng

    Full Text Available Interferon regulatory factor 2 binding protein 2 (IRF2BP2 is a muscle-enriched transcription factor required to activate vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGFA expression in muscle. IRF2BP2 is found in the nucleus of cardiac and skeletal muscle cells. During the process of skeletal muscle differentiation, some IRF2BP2 becomes relocated to the cytoplasm, although the functional significance of this relocation and the mechanisms that control nucleocytoplasmic localization of IRF2BP2 are not yet known.Here, by fusing IRF2BP2 to green fluorescent protein and testing a series of deletion and site-directed mutagenesis constructs, we mapped the nuclear localization signal (NLS to an evolutionarily conserved sequence (354ARKRKPSP(361 in IRF2BP2. This sequence corresponds to a classical nuclear localization motif bearing positively charged arginine and lysine residues. Substitution of arginine and lysine with negatively charged aspartic acid residues blocked nuclear localization. However, these residues were not sufficient because nuclear targeting of IRF2BP2 also required phosphorylation of serine 360 (S360. Many large-scale phosphopeptide proteomic studies had reported previously that serine 360 of IRF2BP2 is phosphorylated in numerous human cell types. Alanine substitution at this site abolished IRF2BP2 nuclear localization in C(2C(12 myoblasts and CV1 cells. In contrast, substituting serine 360 with aspartic acid forced nuclear retention and prevented cytoplasmic redistribution in differentiated C(2C(12 muscle cells. As for the effects of these mutations on VEGFA promoter activity, the S360A mutation interfered with VEGFA activation, as expected. Surprisingly, the S360D mutation also interfered with VEGFA activation, suggesting that this mutation, while enforcing nuclear entry, may disrupt an essential activation function of IRF2BP2.Nuclear localization of IRF2BP2 depends on phosphorylation near a conserved NLS. Changes in phosphorylation status

  15. Program death-1 signaling and regulatory T cells collaborate to resist the function of adoptively transferred cytotoxic T lymphocytes in advanced acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qing; Munger, Meghan E; Highfill, Steven L; Tolar, Jakub; Weigel, Brenda J; Riddle, Megan; Sharpe, Arlene H; Vallera, Daniel A; Azuma, Miyuki; Levine, Bruce L; June, Carl H; Murphy, William J; Munn, David H; Blazar, Bruce R

    2010-10-07

    Tumor-induced immune defects can weaken host immune response and permit tumor cell growth. In a systemic model of murine acute myeloid leukemia (AML), tumor progression resulted in increased regulatory T cells (Treg) and elevation of program death-1 (PD-1) expression on CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) at the tumor site. PD-1 knockout mice were more resistant to AML despite the presence of similar percentage of Tregs compared with wild type. In vitro, intact Treg suppression of CD8(+) T-cell responses was dependent on PD-1 expression by T cells and Tregs and PD-L1 expression by antigen-presenting cells. In vivo, the function of adoptively transferred AML-reactive CTLs was reduced by AML-associated Tregs. Anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibody treatment increased the proliferation and function of CTLs at tumor sites, reduced AML tumor burden, and resulted in long-term survivors. Treg depletion followed by PD-1/PD-L1 blockade showed superior efficacy for eradication of established AML. These data demonstrated that interaction between PD-1 and PD-L1 can facilitate Treg-induced suppression of T-effector cells and dampen the antitumor immune response. PD-1/PD-L1 blockade coupled with Treg depletion represents an important new approach that can be readily translated into the clinic to improve the therapeutic efficacy of adoptive AML-reactive CTLs in advanced AML disease.

  16. Co-expression of IGF-1 family members with myogenic regulatory factors following acute damaging muscle-lengthening contractions in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Bryon R; O'Reilly, Ciara E; Phillips, Stuart M; Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Parise, Gianni

    2008-01-01

    Muscle regeneration following injury is dependent on the ability of muscle satellite cells to activate, proliferate and fuse with damaged fibres. This process is controlled by the myogenic regulatory factors (MRF). Little is known about the temporal relation of the MRF with the expression of known myogenic growth factors (i.e. IGF-1) in humans following muscle damage. Eight subjects (20.6 ± 2.1 years; 81.4 ± 9.8 kg) performed 300 lengthening contractions (180 deg s−1) of their knee extensors in one leg on a dynamometer. Blood and muscle samples were collected before and at 4 (T4), 24 (T24), 72 (T72) and 120 h (T120) post-exercise. Mechano growth factor (MGF), IGF-1Ea and IGF-1Eb mRNA were quantified. Serum IGF-1 did not change over the post-exercise time course. IGF-1Ea and IGF-1Eb mRNA increased ∼4- to 6-fold by T72 (P marked by an increase in both Myf5 and MyoD, while IGF-1Ea and -Eb may be temporally related to differentiation as marked by an increase in MRF4 and myogenin expression following acute muscle damage. PMID:18818249

  17. Day/night changes in serum S100B protein concentrations in acute paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morera-Fumero, Armando L; Díaz-Mesa, Estefanía; Abreu-Gonzalez, Pedro; Fernandez-Lopez, Lourdes; Cejas-Mendez, Maria Del Rosario

    2017-04-03

    There are day/night and seasonal changes in biological markers such as melatonin and cortisol. Controversial changes in serum S100B protein levels have been described in schizophrenia. We aim studying whether serum S100B levels present day/night variations in schizophrenia patients and whether S100B levels are related to psychopathology. Sixty-five paranoid schizophrenic inpatients participated in the study. Psychopathology was assessed with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) at admission and discharge. Blood was drawn at 12:00 (midday) and 00:00 (midnight) hours at admission and discharge. Sixty-five healthy subjects matched by age, gender and season acted as control group. At admission and discharge patients had significantly higher serum S100B concentrations at midday and midnight than healthy subjects. At admission, patients showed a day/night variation of S100B levels, with higher S100B levels at 12:00 than at 00:00h (143.7±26.3pg/ml vs. 96.9±16.6pg/ml). This day/night difference was not present in the control group. Midday and midnight S100B at admission decreased when compared to S100B at discharge (midday, 143.7±26.3 vs. 83.0±12, midnight 96.9±16.6 vs. 68.6±14.5). There was a positive correlation between the PANSS positive subscale and S100B concentrations at admission. This correlation was not present at discharge. acute paranoid schizophrenia inpatients present a day/night change of S100B serum levels at admission that disappears at discharge. The correlation between serum S100B concentrations and the PANSS positive scores at admission as well as the decrease of S100B at discharge may be interpreted as an acute biological response to the clinical state of the patients. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Candida albicans Lacking the Gene Encoding the Regulatory Subunit of Protein Kinase A Displays a Defect in Hyphal Formation and an Altered Localization of the Catalytic Subunit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassola, Alejandro; Parrot, Marc; Silberstein, Susana; Magee, Beatrice B.; Passeron, Susana; Giasson, Luc; Cantore, María L.

    2004-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Candida albicans switches from a yeast-like to a filamentous mode of growth in response to a variety of environmental conditions. We examined the morphogenetic behavior of C. albicans yeast cells lacking the BCY1 gene, which encodes the regulatory subunit of protein kinase A. We cloned the BCY1 gene and generated a bcy1 tpk2 double mutant strain because a homozygous bcy1 mutant in a wild-type genetic background could not be obtained. In the bcy1 tpk2 mutant, protein kinase A activity (due to the presence of the TPK1 gene) was cyclic AMP independent, indicating that the cells harbored an unregulated phosphotransferase activity. This mutant has constitutive protein kinase A activity and displayed a defective germinative phenotype in N-acetylglucosamine and in serum-containing medium. The subcellular localization of a Tpk1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein was examined in wild-type, tpk2 null, and bcy1 tpk2 double mutant strains. The fusion protein was observed to be predominantly nuclear in wild-type and tpk2 strains. This was not the case in the bcy1 tpk2 double mutant, where it appeared dispersed throughout the cell. Coimmunoprecipitation of Bcy1p with the Tpk1-GFP fusion protein demonstrated the interaction of these proteins inside the cell. These results suggest that one of the roles of Bcy1p is to tether the protein kinase A catalytic subunit to the nucleus. PMID:14871949

  19. Helicobacter pylori CheZ(HP) and ChePep form a novel chemotaxis-regulatory complex distinct from the core chemotaxis signaling proteins and the flagellar motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertsethtakarn, Paphavee; Howitt, Michael R; Castellon, Juan; Amieva, Manuel R; Ottemann, Karen M

    2015-09-01

    Chemotaxis is important for Helicobacter pylori to colonize the stomach. Like other bacteria, H. pylori uses chemoreceptors and conserved chemotaxis proteins to phosphorylate the flagellar rotational response regulator, CheY, and modulate the flagellar rotational direction. Phosphorylated CheY is returned to its non-phosphorylated state by phosphatases such as CheZ. In previously studied cases, chemotaxis phosphatases localize to the cellular poles by interactions with either the CheA chemotaxis kinase or flagellar motor proteins. We report here that the H. pylori CheZ, CheZ(HP), localizes to the poles independently of the flagellar motor, CheA, and all typical chemotaxis proteins. Instead, CheZ(HP) localization depends on the chemotaxis regulatory protein ChePep, and reciprocally, ChePep requires CheZ(HP) for its polar localization. We furthermore show that these proteins interact directly. Functional domain mapping of CheZ(HP) determined the polar localization motif lies within the central domain of the protein and that the protein has regions outside of the active site that participate in chemotaxis. Our results suggest that CheZ(HP) and ChePep form a distinct complex. These results therefore suggest the intriguing idea that some phosphatases localize independently of the other chemotaxis and motility proteins, possibly to confer unique regulation on these proteins' activities. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The role of C-reactive protein in prediction of the severity of acute diverticulitis in an emergency unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkelä, Jyrki T; Klintrup, Kai; Takala, Heikki; Rautio, Tero

    2015-05-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the most appropriate initial imaging modality for the assessment of acute diverticulitis. The aim here was to determine the usefulness of C-reactive protein (CRP) in predicting the severity of the diverticulitis process and the need for a CT examination. The CRP values of 350 patients who presented first time with symptoms of acute diverticulitis and underwent CT imaging on admission to Oulu University Hospital were compared with the CT findings and clinical parameters by means of both univariate and multivariate analyses. The receiver operating characteristic curve showed that a CRP cut-off value of 149.5 mg/l significantly discriminated acute uncomplicated diverticulitis from complicated diverticulitis (specificity 65%, sensitivity 85%, area under the curve 0.811, p = 0.0001). In multivariate analysis, a CRP value over 150 mg/l and old age were independent risk factors for acute complicated diverticulitis. The mean CRP value was significantly higher in the patients who died, 207 (84 SD), than in those who survived, 139 (SD 83). In addition, a CRP value over 150 mg/l and free abdominal fluid in CT were independent variables predicting postoperative mortality. CRP is useful for the predicting the severity of acute diverticulitis on admission. Patients with a CRP value higher than 150 mg/l have an in increased risk of complicated diverticulitis and a CT examination should always be carried out.

  1. Interaction of activator of G-protein signaling 3 (AGS3) with LKB1, a serine/threonine kinase involved in cell polarity and cell cycle progression: phosphorylation of the G-protein regulatory (GPR) motif as a regulatory mechanism for the interaction of GPR motifs with Gi alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumer, Joe B; Bernard, Michael L; Peterson, Yuri K; Nezu, Jun-ichi; Chung, Peter; Dunican, Dara J; Knoblich, Juergen A; Lanier, Stephen M

    2003-06-27

    Activator of G-protein signaling 3 (AGS3) has a modular domain structure consisting of seven tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs) and four G-protein regulatory (GPR) motifs. Each GPR motif binds to the alpha subunit of Gi/Go (Gialpha > Goalpha) stabilizing the GDP-bound conformation of Galpha and apparently competing with Gbetagamma for GalphaGDP binding. As an initial approach to identify regulatory mechanisms for AGS3-G-protein interactions, a yeast two-hybrid screen was initiated using the TPR and linker region of AGS3 as bait. This screen identified the serine/threonine kinase LKB1, which is involved in the regulation of cell cycle progression and polarity. Protein interaction assays in mammalian systems using transfected cells or brain lysate indicated the regulated formation of a protein complex consisting of LKB1, AGS3, and G-proteins. The interaction between AGS3 and LKB1 was also observed with orthologous proteins in Drosophila where both proteins are involved in cell polarity. LKB1 immunoprecipitates from COS7 cells transfected with LKB1 phosphorylated the GPR domains of AGS3 and the related protein LGN but not the AGS3-TPR domain. GPR domain phosphorylation was completely blocked by a consensus GPR motif peptide, and placement of a phosphate moiety within a consensus GPR motif reduced the ability of the peptide to interact with G-proteins. These data suggest that phosphorylation of GPR domains may be a general mechanism regulating the interaction of GPR-containing proteins with G-proteins. Such a mechanism may be of particular note in regard to localized signal processing in the plasma membrane involving G-protein subunits and/or intracellular functions regulated by heterotrimeric G-proteins that occur independently of a typical G-protein-coupled receptor.

  2. Recombinant Protein-Based Assays for Detection of Antibodies to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Spike and Nucleocapsid Proteins▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Lia M.; Miao, Congrong; Harcourt, Jennifer L.; Montgomery, Joel M.; Le, Mai Quynh; Dryga, Sergey A.; Kamrud, Kurt I.; Rivers, Bryan; Babcock, Gregory J.; Oliver, Jennifer Betts; Comer, James A.; Reynolds, Mary; Uyeki, Timothy M.; Bausch, Daniel; Ksiazek, Thomas; Thomas, William; Alterson, Harold; Smith, Jonathan; Ambrosino, Donna M.; Anderson, Larry J.

    2007-01-01

    Recombinant severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) nucleocapsid and spike protein-based immunoglobulin G immunoassays were developed and evaluated. Our assays demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity to the SARS coronavirus in sera collected from patients as late as 2 years postonset of symptoms. These assays will be useful not only for routine SARS coronavirus diagnostics but also for epidemiological and antibody kinetic studies. PMID:17229882

  3. Cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory proteins, proliferative markers, cell signaling molecules, CD209, and decorin immunoreactivity in low-grade myxofibrosarcoma and myxoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Justin M M; Memoli, Vincent A; Gonzalez, Raul S

    2015-08-01

    The histologic differential diagnosis between intramuscular myxoma and low-grade myxofibrosarcoma can be quite difficult in some cases. To identify a diagnostic immunohistochemical marker, we compared the staining profiles of 19 different antigens, including cell cycle proteins, apoptosis proteins, and proliferative markers, and selected other signaling and structural proteins in these two tumors. Ten cases each of intramuscular myxoma and low-grade myxofibrosarcoma were stained with antibodies directed against apoptosis regulatory proteins (Bcl2, activated caspase-3, phospho-H2A.X, and cleaved PARP), cell cycle regulatory proteins (Rb1, Cyclin-A, CDKN1B, and Cdt1), proliferative markers (KI67, MCM2, phospho-histone H3, and geminin), cell signalling molecules (c-Myc, EGF, EGFR, PLA2G4A, and HSP90), a dendritic cell marker (CD209), and the extracellular matrix proteoglycan decorin. Staining patterns of myxoma and myxofibrosarcoma were compared using Fisher's exact test and the Mann-Whitney test. For each potential diagnostic marker studied, the proportions of cases scored as positive on both dichotomous or ordinal scales were not significantly different between myxoma and myxofibrosarcoma. Myxoma and myxofibrosarcoma share a common immunophenotype for each of the markers studied. Distinction between these tumors is still predominantly based on morphologic criteria.

  4. Effect of nerve growth factor on the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins in PC12 cells: dissection of the neurotrophic response from the anti-mitogenic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Grunsven, L A; Billon, N; Savatier, P; Thomas, A; Urdiales, J L; Rudkin, B B

    1996-03-21

    PC12 cells treated with nerve growth factor (NGF) undergo a G1 block and differentiate. Expression of selected cell cycle regulatory proteins was studied under culture conditions which permit observation of a differentiation response independently from a mitogenic or anti-mitogenic response. The expression of all cell cycle regulatory proteins studied is modulated by NGF addition to exponentially-growing cultures in the presence of serum. While levels of most of these proteins decrease, accumulation of cyclin D1 and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 Cip1/WAF1 is observed. Cyclin D1 associated kinase activity is inhibited, correlating with an increase in p21 protein. PC12 cells, synchronized by serum starvation, undergo morphological and functional differentiation in the presence of NGF. Neither cyclin D1 nor p21 are present in such cultures, nor is their expression upregulated by NGF, indicating that they are not required for this process. Removal of serum from differentiated PC12 cells results in loss of these proteins, but has no effect on differentiation or the nonproliferative state in presence of NGF. Together, the results indicate that cyclin D1 and p21 are not necessary for differentiation per se, nor are they required for maintenance of the differentiated state in the absence of serum.

  5. Acute differential effects of milk-derived dietary proteins on postprandial lipaemia in obese non-diabetic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmer-Jensen, J; Hartvigsen, M L; Mortensen, L S; Astrup, A; de Vrese, M; Holst, J J; Thomsen, C; Hermansen, K

    2012-01-01

    Postprandial lipaemia is an established risk factor for atherosclerosis. To investigate the acute effect of four milk-derived dietary proteins (alpha-lactalbumin, whey isolate, caseinoglycomacropeptide and whey hydrolysate) on postprandial lipaemia, we have conducted a randomized, acute, single-blinded clinical intervention study with crossover design. A total of 11 obese non-diabetic subjects (age: 44-74, BMI: 30-41.4 kg m(-2)) were included. On 4 different days the subjects ingested a high-fat meal with the following energy distribution: 66% energy from fat (100 g of butter), 15% of energy from carbohydrate (90 g of white wheat bread) and 19% of energy from protein (45 g of pure protein). Our primary variable was plasma triglyceride measured in the 8-h postprandial period. Secondarily, retinyl palmitate, non-esterified free fatty acids, glucose, insulin, glucagon, GLP-1 and GIP, active and total grehlin and cholecystokinin were measured. We observed no statistically significant (P=0.8) differences between meals on our primary variable that is, triglycerides. Whey hydrolysate was associated with a significantly (P=0.02) smaller postprandial suppression of non-esterified free fatty acids compared with the other dietary proteins. We did not observe significant differences in postprandial lipaemia to the four milk-derived dietary proteins. Whey hydrolysate caused less postprandial suppression of free fatty acids.

  6. Study of C-reactive protein and C3 complement as acute phase reactants in unstable angina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Barnali; Gupta, B; Sharma, D K; Talib, V H

    2013-06-01

    Prevalence rates of coronary artery disease are reported to be very high in Asian Indians. Traditional risk factors alone fail to explain the high rates of coronary artery disease in Indians. Acute phase reactants C-reactive protein and C3 in Indian subjects with unstable angina were evaluated and compared them with suitable controls to test the hypothesis that a relationship exists between acute phase reactants and unstable angina. Forty cases of unstable angina and forty suitable controls were enrolled for the study. Cases of unstable angina had significantly increased level of CRP as compared to control group (p = 0.01098). Statistically significant difference was found between case and control groups in TLC (p = 0.0037) and ESR (p = 0.0368), TLC and ESR being more in case group as compared to control group. C-reactive protein was significantly correlated with TLC, ESR and C3 in case group and TLC and ESR in control group. C3 was significantly correlated with all the other three inflammatory markers. C-reactive protein, TLC and ESR in case group while no correlation was observed with any variable in control group. The present study concludes that a relationship exists between acute phase reactants studied and unstable angina.

  7. Impact of Diet Supplemented by Coconut Milk on Corticosterone and Acute Phase Protein Level under High Stocking Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid SHAKERI

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of coconut milk supplementation on corticosterone and acute phase protein level under high stocking density. A total 300 Cobb 500 male chicks were placed in cages and stocked as 10 birds/cage (normal stocking density and 15 birds/cage (high stocking density. The treatments were as (i control diet and stocked at 10 and 15 birds/cage (ii control diet + 3% coconut milk from 1-42 day and stocked at 10 and 15 birds/cage (iii control diet + 5% coconut milk from 1-42 day and stocked at 10 and 15 birds/cage. On day 42, 20 birds per treatment were slaughtered to collect blood samples. The results showed higher level of corticosterone and acute phase protein level in control diet compare to other supplemented diets with coconut milk. In conclusion, coconut milk decreased the level of corticosterone and acute phase protein when chicks were subjected to high stocking density.

  8. The value of pancreatic stone protein in predicting acute appendicitis in patients presenting at the emergency department with abdominal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tschuor Christoph

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic Stone Protein (PSP is a protein naturally produced mainly in the pancreas and the gut. There is evidence from experimental and clinical trials that blood PSP levels rise in the presence of inflammation or infection. However, it is not known whether PSP is superior to other established blood tests (e.g. White Blood Count, Neutrophils or C - reactive protein in predicting appendicitis in patients presenting with abdominal pain and a clinical suspicion of appendicitis at the emergency room. Methods/design The PSP Appendix Trial is a prospective, multi-center, cohort study to assess the value of PSP in the diagnostic workup of acute appendicitis. 245 patients will be prospectively recruited. Interim analysis will be performed once 123 patients are recruited. The primary endpoint of the study concerns the diagnostic accuracy of PSP in predicting acute appendicitis and therefore the evidence of appendicitis on the histopathological specimen after appendectomy. Discussion The PSP Appendix Trial is a prospective, multi-center, cohort study to assess the value of PSP in the diagnostic workup of acute appendicitis. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01610193; Institution Ethical Board Approval ID: KEKZH- Nr. 2011–0501

  9. Primary Screening for Proteins Differentially Expressed in the Myocardium of a Rat Model of Acute Methamphetamine Intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang Qu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of myocardial injury induced by the cardiovascular toxicity of methamphetamine (MA has been shown to depend on alterations in myocardial proteins caused by MA. Primary screening of the expression of myocardial proteins in a rat model of MA intoxication was achieved by combining two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analyses, which revealed a total of 100 differentially expressed proteins. Of these, 13 displayed significantly altered expression. Moreover, Western blotting and real-time reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses of several relative proteins demonstrated that acute MA intoxication lowers protein expression and mRNA transcription of aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 and NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone 1 alpha subcomplex subunit 10. In contrast, MA intoxication elevated the protein expression and mRNA transcription of heat shock protein family B (small member 1. By combining behavioral assessments of experimental rat models with the histological and pathological changes evident in cardiomyocytes, a mechanism accounting for MA myocardial toxicity was suggested. MA alters the regulation of gene transcription and the subsequent expression of certain proteins that participate in myocardial respiration and in responding to oxidative stress, resulting in myocardial dysfunction and structural changes that affect the functioning of the cardiovascular system.

  10. Disaturated-phosphatidylcholine and Surfactant protein-B turnover in human acute lung injury and in control patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizzi Sabina

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS and Acute Lung Injury (ALI have low concentrations of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine and surfactant protein-B in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. No information is available on their turnover. Objectives To analyze disaturated-phosphatidylcholine and surfactant protein-B turnover in patients with ARDS/ALI and in human adults with normal lungs (controls. Methods 2H2O as precursor of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine-palmitate and 113C-Leucine as precursor of surfactant protein-B were administered intravenously to 12 patients with ARDS/ALI and to 8 controls. Disaturated-phosphatidylcholine and surfactant protein-B were isolated from serial tracheal aspirates, and their fractional synthetic rate was derived from the 2H and 13C enrichment curves, obtained by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Disaturated-phosphatidylcholine, surfactant protein-B, and protein concentrations in tracheal aspirates were also measured. Results 1 Surfactant protein-B turned over at faster rate than disaturated-phosphatidylcholine both in ARDS/ALI patients and in controls. 2 In patients with ARDS/ALI the fractional synthesis rate of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine was 3.1 times higher than in controls (p Conclusions 1 Disaturated-phosphatidylcholine and surfactant protein-B have a different turnover both in healthy and diseased lungs. 2 In ARDS/ALI the synthesis of these two surfactant components may be differently regulated.

  11. Does C-reactive Protein Add Prognostic Value to GRACE Score in Acute Coronary Syndromes?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correia, Luis Cláudio Lemos; Vasconcelos, Isis; Garcia, Guilherme; Kalil, Felipe; Ferreira, Felipe; Silva, André; Oliveira, Ruan; Carvalhal, Manuela; Freitas, Caio; Noya-Rabelo, Márcia Maria

    2014-01-01

    The incremental prognostic value of plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in relation to GRACE score has not been established in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with non-ST segment elevation. To test the hypothesis that CRP measurements at admission increases the prognostic value of GRACE score in patients with ACS. A total of 290 subjects, consecutively admitted for ACS, with plasma material obtained upon admission CRP measurement using a high-sensitivity method (nephelometry) were studied. Cardiovascular outcomes during hospitalization were defined by the combination of death, nonfatal myocardial infarction or nonfatal refractory angina. The incidence of cardiovascular events during hospitalization was 15% (18 deaths, 11 myocardial infarctions, 13 angina episodes) with CRP showing C-statistics of 0.60 (95% CI = 0.51-0.70, p = 0.034) in predicting these outcomes. After adjustment for the GRACE score, elevated CRP (defined as the best cutoff point) tended to be associated with hospital events (OR = 1.89, 95% CI = 0.92 to 3.88, p = 0.08). However, the addition of the variable elevated CRP in the GRACE model did not result in significant increase in C-statistics, which ranged from 0.705 to 0.718 (p = 0.46). Similarly, there was no significant reclassification of risk with the addition of CRP in the predictor model (net reclassification = 5.7 %, p = 0.15). Although CRP is associated with hospital outcomes, this inflammatory marker does not increase the prognostic value of the GRACE score

  12. Does C-reactive Protein Add Prognostic Value to GRACE Score in Acute Coronary Syndromes?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correia, Luis Cláudio Lemos, E-mail: lccorreia@terra.com.br; Vasconcelos, Isis; Garcia, Guilherme; Kalil, Felipe; Ferreira, Felipe; Silva, André; Oliveira, Ruan; Carvalhal, Manuela; Freitas, Caio; Noya-Rabelo, Márcia Maria [Escola Bahiana de Medicina e Saúde Pública, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Hospital São Rafael, Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    2014-05-15

    The incremental prognostic value of plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in relation to GRACE score has not been established in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with non-ST segment elevation. To test the hypothesis that CRP measurements at admission increases the prognostic value of GRACE score in patients with ACS. A total of 290 subjects, consecutively admitted for ACS, with plasma material obtained upon admission CRP measurement using a high-sensitivity method (nephelometry) were studied. Cardiovascular outcomes during hospitalization were defined by the combination of death, nonfatal myocardial infarction or nonfatal refractory angina. The incidence of cardiovascular events during hospitalization was 15% (18 deaths, 11 myocardial infarctions, 13 angina episodes) with CRP showing C-statistics of 0.60 (95% CI = 0.51-0.70, p = 0.034) in predicting these outcomes. After adjustment for the GRACE score, elevated CRP (defined as the best cutoff point) tended to be associated with hospital events (OR = 1.89, 95% CI = 0.92 to 3.88, p = 0.08). However, the addition of the variable elevated CRP in the GRACE model did not result in significant increase in C-statistics, which ranged from 0.705 to 0.718 (p = 0.46). Similarly, there was no significant reclassification of risk with the addition of CRP in the predictor model (net reclassification = 5.7 %, p = 0.15). Although CRP is associated with hospital outcomes, this inflammatory marker does not increase the prognostic value of the GRACE score.

  13. Changing patterns of acute phase proteins and inflammatory mediators in experimental caprine coccidiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemnia, Mohammad; Khodakaram-Tafti, Azizollah; Razavi, Seyed Mostafa; Nazifi, Saeed

    2011-09-01

    This experiment was conducted to assess the changing patterns and relative values of acute phase proteins and inflammatory cytokines in experimental caprine coccidiosis. Eighteen newborn kids were allocated to 3 equal groups. Two groups, A and B, were inoculated with a single dose of 1×10(3) and1×10(5) sporulated oocysts of Eimeria arloingi, respectively. The third group, C, received distilled water as the control. Blood samples were collected from the jugular vein of each kid in both groups before inoculation and at days 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 42 post-inoculation (PI), and the levels of haptoglobin (Hp), serum amyloid A (SAA), TNF-α, and IFN-γ were measured. For histopathological examinations, 2 kids were selected from each group, euthanized, and necropsied on day 42 PI. Mean Hp concentrations in groups A and B (0.34 and 0.68 g/L) at day 7 PI were 3.2 and 6.3 times higher than the levels before inoculation. The mean SAA concentrations in groups A and B (25.6 and 83.5 µg/ml) at day 7 PI were 4.2 and 13.7 times higher than the levels before inoculation. The magnitude and duration of the Hp and SAA responses correlated well with the inoculation doses and the severity of the clinical signs and diarrhea in kids. These results were consistent with the histopathological features, which showed advanced widespread lesions in group B. In both groups, significant correlations were observed for TNF-α and IFN-γ with SAA and Hp, respectively. In conclusion, Hp and SAA can be useful non-specific diagnostic indicators in caprine coccidiosis.

  14. Occupational exposure levels of bioaerosol components are associated with serum levels of the acute phase protein Serum Amyloid A in greenhouse workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anne Mette; Thilsing, Trine; Bælum, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Occupational exposure to particles may be associated with increased inflammation of the airways. Animal experiments suggest that inhaled particles also induce a pulmonary acute phase response, leading to systemic circulation of acute phase proteins. Greenhouse workers are exposed to e...

  15. Involvement of calcium and G proteins in the acute release of tissue- type plasminogen activator and von Willebrand factor from cultured human endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijnden-Schrauwen, Y. van den; Atsma, D.E.; Lupu, F.; Vries, R.E.M. de; Kooistra, T.; Emeis, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of Ca2+ and G proteins in thrombin-induced acute release (regulated secretion) of tissue-type plasminogen activator (TPA) and yon Willebrand factor (vWF), using a previously described system of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The acute

  16. Acute post-exercise myofibrillar protein synthesis is not correlated with resistance training-induced muscle hypertrophy in young men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron J Mitchell

    Full Text Available Muscle hypertrophy following resistance training (RT involves activation of myofibrillar protein synthesis (MPS to expand the myofibrillar protein pool. The degree of hypertrophy following RT is, however, highly variable and thus we sought to determine the relationship between the acute activation of MPS and RT-induced hypertrophy. We measured MPS and signalling protein activation after the first session of resistance exercise (RE in untrained men (n = 23 and then examined the relation between MPS with magnetic resonance image determined hypertrophy. To measure MPS, young men (24±1 yr; body mass index  = 26.4±0.9 kg•m² underwent a primed constant infusion of L-[ring-¹³C₆] phenylalanine to measure MPS at rest, and acutely following their first bout of RE prior to 16 wk of RT. Rates of MPS were increased 235±38% (P<0.001 above rest 60-180 min post-exercise and 184±28% (P = 0.037 180-360 min post exercise. Quadriceps volume increased 7.9±1.6% (-1.9-24.7% (P<0.001 after training. There was no correlation between changes in quadriceps muscle volume and acute rates of MPS measured over 1-3 h (r = 0.02, 3-6 h (r = 0.16 or the aggregate 1-6 h post-exercise period (r = 0.10. Hypertrophy after chronic RT was correlated (r = 0.42, P = 0.05 with phosphorylation of 4E-BP1(Thr37/46 at 1 hour post RE. We conclude that acute measures of MPS following an initial exposure to RE in novices are not correlated with muscle hypertrophy following chronic RT.

  17. Evaluation of global sequence comparison and one-to-one FASTA local alignment in regulatory allergenicity assessment of transgenic proteins in food crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ping; Herman, Rod A; Kumpatla, Siva

    2014-09-01

    To address the high false positive rate using >35% identity over 80 amino acids in the regulatory assessment of transgenic proteins for potential allergenicity and the change of E-value with database size, the Needleman-Wunsch global sequence alignment and a one-to-one (1:1) local FASTA search (one protein in the target database at a time) using FASTA were evaluated by comparing proteins randomly selected from Arabidopsis, rice, corn, and soybean with known allergens in a peer-reviewed allergen database (http://www.allergenonline.org/). Compared with the approach of searching >35%/80aa+, the false positive rate measured by specificity rate for identification of true allergens was reduced by a 1:1 global sequence alignment with a cut-off threshold of ≧30% identity and a 1:1 FASTA local alignment with a cut-off E-value of ≦1.0E-09 while maintaining the same sensitivity. Hence, a 1:1 sequence comparison, especially using the FASTA local alignment tool with a biological relevant E-value of 1.0E-09 as a threshold, is recommended for the regulatory assessment of sequence identities between transgenic proteins in food crops and known allergens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. High constitutive activity of a broad panel of housekeeping and tissue-specificcis-regulatory elements depends on a subset of ETS proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curina, Alessia; Termanini, Alberto; Barozzi, Iros; Prosperini, Elena; Simonatto, Marta; Polletti, Sara; Silvola, Alessio; Soldi, Monica; Austenaa, Liv; Bonaldi, Tiziana; Ghisletti, Serena; Natoli, Gioacchino

    2017-02-15

    Enhancers and promoters that control the transcriptional output of terminally differentiated cells include cell type-specific and broadly active housekeeping elements. Whether the high constitutive activity of these two groups of cis -regulatory elements relies on entirely distinct or instead also on shared regulators is unknown. By dissecting the cis -regulatory repertoire of macrophages, we found that the ELF subfamily of ETS proteins selectively bound within 60 base pairs (bp) from the transcription start sites of highly active housekeeping genes. ELFs also bound constitutively active, but not poised, macrophage-specific enhancers and promoters. The role of ELFs in promoting high-level constitutive transcription was suggested by multiple evidence: ELF sites enabled robust transcriptional activation by endogenous and minimal synthetic promoters, ELF recruitment was stabilized by the transcriptional machinery, and ELF proteins mediated recruitment of transcriptional and chromatin regulators to core promoters. These data suggest that the co-optation of a limited number of highly active transcription factors represents a broadly adopted strategy to equip both cell type-specific and housekeeping cis -regulatory elements with the ability to efficiently promote transcription. © 2017 Curina et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  19. Inability of a fusion protein of IL-2 and diphtheria toxin (Denileukin Diftitox, DAB389IL-2, ONTAK) to eliminate regulatory T lymphocytes in patients with melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attia, Peter; Maker, Ajay V; Haworth, Leah R; Rogers-Freezer, Linda; Rosenberg, Steven A

    2005-01-01

    Elimination of regulatory T lymphocytes may provide a way to break self-tolerance and unleash the anti-tumor properties of circulating lymphocytes. The use of fusion proteins, which link cytotoxic molecules to receptor targets, provides one approach to this problem. This study examined the ability of a fusion protein of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and diphtheria toxin (Denileukin Diftitox, DAB389IL-2, ONTAK) to eliminate regulatory T lymphocytes based on their expression of high-affinity IL-2 receptors. Thirteen patients (12 with metastatic melanoma, 1 with metastatic renal cell carcinoma) were treated at one of the two Food and Drug Administration-approved doses of Denileukin Diftitox (seven patients at 9 microg/kg, six patients at 18 microg/kg). None of the patients experienced an objective clinical response. Foxp3 expression did not decrease significantly overall, although it did decrease minimally among patients receiving 18 microg/kg (-2.01+/-0.618 copies of Foxp3/10(3) copies of beta-actin; P=0.031). Denileukin Diftitox did not decrease the suppressive ability of CD4CD25 cells as quantified by an in vitro co-culture suppression assay. Furthermore, the increased numbers of lymphocytes in patients resulting from treatment with IL-2 were not susceptible to Denileukin Diftitox. Administration of Denileukin Diftitox does not appear to eliminate regulatory T lymphocytes or cause regression of metastatic melanoma.

  20. Impact of protein D-containing pneumococcal conjugate vaccines on non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae acute otitis media and carriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Christopher; Bakaletz, Lauren O; Ruiz-Guiñazú, Javier; Borys, Dorota; Mrkvan, Tomas

    2017-07-01

    Protein D-containing vaccines may decrease acute otitis media (AOM) burden and nasopharyngeal carriage of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Protein D-containing pneumococcal conjugate vaccine PHiD-CV (Synflorix, GSK Vaccines) elicits robust immune responses against protein D. However, the phase III Clinical Otitis Media and PneumoniA Study (COMPAS), assessing PHiD-CV efficacy against various pneumococcal diseases, was not powered to demonstrate efficacy against NTHi; only trends of protective efficacy against NTHi AOM in children were shown. Areas covered: This review aims to consider all evidence available to date from pre-clinical and clinical phase III studies together with further evidence emerging from post-marketing studies since PHiD-CV has been introduced into routine clinical practice worldwide, to better describe the clinical utility of protein D in preventing AOM due to NTHi and its impact on NTHi nasopharyngeal carriage. Expert commentary: Protein D is an effective carrier protein in conjugate vaccines and evidence gathered from pre-clinical, clinical and observational studies suggest that it also elicits immune response that can help to reduce the burden of AOM due to NTHi. There remains a need to develop improved vaccines for prevention of NTHi disease, which could be achieved by combining protein D with other antigens.

  1. Acute and long-term effects of resistance exercise with or without protein ingestion on muscle hypertrophy and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulmi, Juha J; Kovanen, Vuokko; Selänne, Harri; Kraemer, William J; Häkkinen, Keijo; Mero, Antti A

    2009-07-01

    The effects of timed ingestion of high-quality protein before and after resistance exercise are not well known. In this study, young men were randomized to protein (n = 11), placebo (n = 10) and control (n = 10) groups. Muscle cross-sectional area by MRI and muscle forces were analyzed before and after 21 weeks of either heavy resistance training (RT) or control period. Muscle biopsies were taken before, and 1 and 48 h after 5 x 10 repetition leg press exercise (RE) as well as 21 weeks after RT. Protein (15 g of whey both before and after exercise) or non-energetic placebo were provided to subjects in the context of both single RE bout (acute responses) as well as each RE workout twice a week throughout the 21-week-RT. Protein intake increased (P protein supplementation. Moreover, protein intake seemed to prevent 1 h post-RE decrease in myostatin and myogenin mRNA expression but did not affect activin receptor IIb, p21, FLRG, MAFbx or MyoD expression. In conclusion, protein intake close to resistance exercise workout may alter mRNA expression in a manner advantageous for muscle hypertrophy.

  2. Protein-energy malnutrition induces an aberrant acute-phase response and modifies the circadian rhythm of core temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Shari E; Ramos, Rafaela Andrade; Refinetti, Roberto; Farthing, Jonathan P; Paterson, Phyllis G

    2013-08-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM), present in 12%-19% of stroke patients upon hospital admission, appears to be a detrimental comorbidity factor that impairs functional outcome, but the mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Because ischemic brain injury is highly temperature-sensitive, the objectives of this study were to investigate whether PEM causes sustained changes in temperature that are associated with an inflammatory response. Activity levels were recorded as a possible explanation for the immediate elevation in temperature upon introduction to a low protein diet. Male, Sprague-Dawley rats (7 weeks old) were fed a control diet (18% protein) or a low protein diet (PEM, 2% protein) for either 7 or 28 days. Continuous core temperature recordings from bioelectrical sensor transmitters demonstrated a rapid increase in temperature amplitude, sustained over 28 days, in response to a low protein diet. Daily mean temperature rose transiently by day 2 (p = 0.01), falling to normal by day 4 (p = 0.08), after which mean temperature continually declined as malnutrition progressed. There were no alterations in activity mean (p = 0.3) or amplitude (p = 0.2) that were associated with the early rise in mean temperature. Increased serum alpha-2-macroglobulin (p protein diet had no effect on the signaling pathway of the pro-inflammatory transcription factor, NFκB, in the hippocampus. In conclusion, PEM induces an aberrant and sustained acute-phase response coupled with long-lasting effects on body temperature.

  3. Renal response to an acute protein challenge in pregnant women with borderline hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heguilén, Ricardo M; Liste, A Andres; Bellusci, Angel D; Lapidus, Alicia M; Bernasconi, Amelia R

    2007-06-01

    The renal reserve (RR), assessed after an oral protein challenge or the intravenous administration of amino acids, is still present in healthy pregnant women (NP), although resting glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal plasma flow (RPF) increase progressively throughout normal gestation. No studies have addressed this issue in hypertensive gravidas; the aim of this trial was to evaluate renal response to an acute protein load (PL) in NP and pregnant women with borderline hypertension (HP). Five NP, eight HP and eight healthy non-pregnant women (CG) were evaluated. After fasting overnight, all subjects received an oral water load (20 mL/kg of body weight), the urinary output was then replaced orally with equal volumes of water. After two 30 min periods, an 80 g PL was provided. Creatinine clearance (CCr) was measured every 30 min from 1 h before and for 4 h following PL. Participants remained recumbent during the study, bladder emptiness was assessed by ultrasound immediately after each micturition. Baseline CCr was taken as the average of two 30 min periods before PL and peak Ccr as the maximal CCr recorded thereafter. The groups were similar with regard to age, weight or gestation age. Baseline CCr (NP: 118.5+/-6.0, HP: 127.4+/-6.7 and CG: 99.8+/-2.9 mL/min, P=0.004 (CG vs NP and HP), increased after PL to NP: 223.5+/-9.8 to HP: 178.5+/-13 and to CG: 149.1+/-4.0 mL/min, Pvs HP, CG vs NP and NP vs HP)). Peak minus baseline CCr was 97.3+/-10.1; 46.3+/-12.7 and 48.3+/-4.8 for NP, HP and CG, respectively (Pvs CG and NP). The peak CCr was obtained significantly earlier in both pregnant groups (Period 3) compared with the healthy non-pregnant women (Period 5) (P=0.02). The fractional proximal reabsorption of sodium (FPRNa+) at peak CCr was similar in the groups (NP: 0.74+/-0.01 HP: 0.78+/-0.02 and CG: 0.74+/-0.03, P=not significant (NS)) as was the distal delivery of sodium (DDNa+) (NP: 5.8+/-0.5; HP: 4.1+/-0.5 and CG: 4.3+/-0.4 meq/min, P=NS). Fractional excretion

  4. The TEL-AML1 fusion protein of acute lymphoblastic leukemia modulates IRF3 activity during early B-cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laurentiis, A; Hiscott, J; Alcalay, M

    2015-12-03

    The t(12;21) translocation is the most common genetic rearrangement in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and gives rise to the TEL-AML1 fusion gene. Many studies on TEL-AML1 describe specific properties of the fusion protein, but a thorough understanding of its function is lacking. We exploited a pluripotent hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell line, EML1, and generated a cell line (EML-TA) stably expressing the TEL-AML1 fusion protein. EML1 cells differentiate to mature B-cells following treatment with IL7; whereas EML-TA display an impaired differentiation capacity and remain blocked at an early stage of maturation. Global gene expression profiling of EML1 cells at different stages of B-lymphoid differentiation, compared with EML-TA, identified the interferon (IFN)α/β pathway as a primary target of repression by TEL-AML1. In particular, expression and phosphorylation of interferon-regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) was decreased in EML-TA cells; strikingly, stable expression of IRF3 restored the capacity of EML-TA cells to differentiate into mature B-cells. Similarly, IRF3 silencing in EML1 cells by siRNA was sufficient to block B-lymphoid differentiation. The ability of TEL-AML1 to block B-cell differentiation and downregulate the IRF3-IFNα/β pathway was confirmed in mouse and human primary hematopoietic precursor cells (Lin- and CD34+ cells, respectively), and in a patient-derived cell line expressing TEL-AML1 (REH). Furthermore, treatment of TEL-AML1 expressing cells with IFNα/β was sufficient to overcome the maturation block. Our data provide new insight on TEL-AML1 function and may offer a new therapeutic opportunity for B-ALL.

  5. Acute Phase Proteins and their Relation to Energy Metabolites in Dairy Cows during the Pre- and Postpartal Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Kováč

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the concentrations of selected acute phase proteins – haptoglobin (Hp and serum amyloid A (SAA, and selected variables of energy metabolism in blood serum of dairy cows during different stages of the pre- and postpartal period. The analyses were performed in dairy cows of the Slovak spotted breed and its crossbreeds (n = 57. The cows were divided into 9 groups according to the evaluated part of reproduction cycle – from 4 weeks before parturition to 10 weeks after parturition. Significant differences were found in mean Hp and SAA concentrations during the monitored period (P P P P P P P < 0.001. Moreover, significant correlations were found between Hp and non-esterified fatty acids, Hp and β-hydroxybutyrate, as well as between SAA and non-esterified fatty acids. Our results indicate that the acute phase response occurs in cows around parturition, and suggest that there are relationships between mediators of immune response and several indices of energy metabolism. Our results also suggest that in cows with higher concentrations of non-esterified fatty acids, indicating a certain degree of lipid mobilisation, higher values of acute phase proteins may be found.

  6. Characterization of the contributions of Hp-MMP 9 to the serum acute phase protein response of lipopolysaccharide challenged calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, Charles A; Niehaus, Andrew J; Premanandan, Christopher; Rajala-Schultz, Paivi J; Rings, Donald M; Lakritz, Jeffrey

    2014-10-30

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is a costly feature of modern cattle production. Early and accurate detection of BRD may prove useful in the successful management of this disease. The primary objective of the study was to define the time course of covalent complexes of neutrophil, haptoglobin (Hp) and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (Hp-MMP 9) in serum after intravenous lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in comparison to traditional markers. Our hypothesis was that serum concentrations of neutrophil Hp-MMP 9 provides information distinct from traditional acute phase protein markers. To characterize the neutrophil responses to lipopolysaccharide (E. coli; O111:B4; 2.5 μg/kg body weight), nine healthy, Jersey calves (65-82 days of age; 74.5 ± 13.1 kg) were challenged and physiologic parameters, peripheral blood cell counts and serum cortisol (C), Hp-MMP 9, Hp, alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), serum amyloid A (SAA) were obtained starting 24 hours before to 96 hours post-LPS challenge. Physiologic parameters (temperature, pulse, respiratory rate) and attitude assessed at each time point indicated that LPS challenge resulted in rapid onset of depression, tachypnea, leukopenia, neutropenia and lymphopenia within 1 hour. Serum C concentrations were significantly increased by 1 hour post-LPS. Serum Hp-MMP 9 complexes were detectable in serum by 0.5 hours and peaked at 16 h, serum total Hp remained Hp, SAA and AGP remained significantly greater than baseline out to 96 hours post-LPS. The total systemic exposure to traditional makers is significantly greater than from Hp-MMP 9 CONCLUSION: Using a well described model for acute phase protein responses, the data demonstrate that serum neutrophil Hp-MMP 9 complexes appear sooner and decline more rapidly than other acute phase proteins (APP). Since Hp-MMP9 is stored pre-formed, it provides information specifically addressing the LPS-induced activation of bovine neutrophils. Contributions of Hp-MMP 9 to the serum acute phase protein response

  7. Reducing TNF receptor 2+ regulatory T cells via the combined action of azacitidine and the HDAC inhibitor, panobinostat for clinical benefit in acute myeloid leukemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindaraj, Chindu; Tan, Peter; Walker, Patricia; Wei, Andrew; Spencer, Andrew; Plebanski, Magdalena

    2014-02-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) provides an environment that enables immune suppression, resulting in functionally defective effector T cells; regulatory T cells (Treg) are significant contributors to the impaired antitumor immune response. As TNF is present at high levels in AML and TNF receptor-2 (TNFR2)-expressing Tregs identify highly functional Tregs, we examine the hypothesis that TNFR2(+) Tregs are a relevant Treg subset in this cancer. We also determine the effect of the novel combinatorial therapy of the demethylating agent, azacitidine with the histone deacetylase inhibitor, panobinostat on Tregs, particularly TNFR2(+) Tregs. Thirty healthy donors and 14 patients with AML were enrolled in this study. Patients were treated with azacitidine and panobinostat for 28-day cycles. The frequency and functional relevance of TNFR2(+) Tregs were analyzed subsequently. We report that TNFR2(+) Tregs are increased in AML and have a high migration potential toward the bone marrow. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the level of TNFR2(+) Tregs in the peripheral blood and the bone marrow of patients are decreased in vivo after exposure to panobinostat and azacitidine. Reductions in TNFR2(+) Tregs were associated with increases in Interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-2 production by effector T cells within the bone marrow and beneficial clinical responses. In vitro mechanistic studies indicated panobinostat as the primary driver for the reduction of Tregs. Our study provides for the first time, in vivo validation of the ability of panobinostat in combination with azacitidine to suppress prevalent TNFR2(+) Tregs, resulting in clinical benefits within patients with AML. ©2013 AACR.

  8. Acute bout of exercise induced prolonged muscle glucose transporter-4 translocation and delayed counter-regulatory hormone response in type 1 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Sato

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated that an acute bout of aerobic exercise induces a subsequent delayed onset of hypoglycemia among patients with type 1 diabetes. However, the mechanisms of exercise-induced hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes are still unclear. Streptozotocin (STZ was injected to 6-week-old male Wistar rats, and three days after STZ injection, animals were randomly assigned into 2 groups: STZ with insulin only (STZ and STZ with insulin and exercise (STZ+EX. Normal Wistar rats with exercise were used as control (CON+EX. Insulin was intraperitoneally injected (0.5 U/kg to both STZ groups (-0.5 h, and a bout of aerobic exercise (15 m/min for 30 min was conducted at euglycemic conditions (0 h. Blood was collected at 0, 1, 3, and 5 h after exercise from the carotid artery. While the blood glucose level was stable during the post-exercise period (0-5 h in the STZ and CON+EX groups, it decreased significantly only in the STZ+EX group at 3 h. Plasma glucagon, adrenalin, and noradrenalin levels significantly increased at 1 h in the STZ group, whereas significant hormonal responses were observed at 5 h in the STZ+EX group. In skeletal muscle glucose metabolism-related pathway, the level of glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4 translocation was significantly higher at 1 h in the CON and STZ groups. However, in the STZ+EX group, these activations were maintained by 5 h, indicating a sustained glucose metabolism in the STZ+EX group. A single bout of aerobic exercise induced a delayed onset of hypoglycemia in STZ-treated rats. A prolonged enhancement of GLUT-4 translocation and delayed counter-regulatory hormone responses may have contributed to the induction of hypoglycemia.

  9. Protection of Mice from Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease Requires CD28 Co-stimulation on Donor CD4+ Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Uri

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGvHD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell plus T cell transplantation (allo-HSCT. In this study, we investigated the requirement for CD28 co-stimulation of donor CD4+ conventional (CD4+CD25−Foxp3−, Tconv and regulatory (CD4+CD25+Foxp3+, Treg T cells in aGvHD using tamoxifen-inducible CD28 knockout (iCD28KO or wild-type (wt littermates as donors of CD4+ Tconv and Treg. In the highly inflammatory C57BL/6 into BALB/c allo-HSCT transplantation model, CD28 depletion on donor CD4+ Tconv reduced clinical signs of aGvHD, but did not significantly prolong survival of the recipient mice. Selective depletion of CD28 on donor Treg did not abrogate protection of recipient mice from aGvHD until about day 20 after allo-HSCT. Later, however, the pool of CD28-depleted Treg drastically declined as compared to wt Treg. Consequently, only wt, but not CD28-deficient, Treg were able to continuously suppress aGvHD and induce long-term survival of the recipient mice. To our knowledge, this is the first study that specifically evaluates the impact of CD28 expression on donor Treg in aGvHD. Moreover, the delayed kinetics of aGvHD lethality after transplantation of iCD28KO Treg provides a novel animal model for similar disease courses found in patients after allo-HSCT.

  10. Hepatic overexpression of idol increases circulating protein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 in mice and hamsters via dual mechanisms: sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 and low-density lipoprotein receptor-dependent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Makoto; Terao, Yoshio; Ayaori, Makoto; Uto-Kondo, Harumi; Iizuka, Maki; Yogo, Makiko; Hagisawa, Kosuke; Takiguchi, Shunichi; Yakushiji, Emi; Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Ogura, Masatsune; Komatsu, Tomohiro; Ikewaki, Katsunori

    2014-06-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) is degraded by inducible degrader of LDLR (Idol) and protein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9), thereby regulating circulating LDL levels. However, it remains unclear whether, and if so how, these LDLR degraders affect each other. We therefore investigated effects of liver-specific expression of Idol on LDL/PCSK9 metabolism in mice and hamsters. Injection of adenoviral vector expressing Idol (Ad-Idol) induced a liver-specific reduction in LDLR expression which, in turn, increased very-low-density lipoprotein/LDL cholesterol levels in wild-type mice because of delayed LDL catabolism. Interestingly, hepatic Idol overexpression markedly increased plasma PCSK9 levels. In LDLR-deficient mice, plasma PCSK9 levels were already elevated at baseline and unchanged by Idol overexpression, which was comparable with the observation for Ad-Idol-injected wild-type mice, indicating that Idol-induced PCSK9 elevation depended on LDLR. In wild-type mice, but not in LDLR-deficient mice, Ad-Idol enhanced hepatic PCSK9 expression, with activation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 and subsequently increased expression of its target genes. Supporting in vivo findings, Idol transactivated PCSK9/LDLR in sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2/LDLR-dependent manners in vitro. Furthermore, an in vivo kinetic study using (125)I-labeled PCSK9 revealed delayed clearance of circulating PCSK9, which could be another mechanism. Finally, to extend these findings into cholesteryl ester transfer protein-expressing animals, we repeated the above in vivo experiments in hamsters and obtained similar results. A vicious cycle in LDLR degradation might be generated by PCSK9 induced by hepatic Idol overexpression via dual mechanisms: sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2/LDLR. Furthermore, these effects would be independent of cholesteryl ester transfer protein expression. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Dimethylarginines, blood glucose, and C-reactive protein in patients with acute myocardial infarction

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    Aurélie Gudjoncik

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: Our study showed that in patients with acute MI, SDMA, and only weakly ADMA, are associated with admission blood glucose, beyond traditional dimethylarginine determinants and may therefore have biological activity beyond renal function.

  12. TRAP1 and the proteasome regulatory particle TBP7/Rpt3 interact in the endoplasmic reticulum and control cellular ubiquitination of specific mitochondrial proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoroso, M R; Matassa, D S; Laudiero, G; Egorova, A V; Polishchuk, R S; Maddalena, F; Piscazzi, A; Paladino, S; Sarnataro, D; Garbi, C; Landriscina, M; Esposito, F

    2012-04-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein-1 (TRAP1) is a mitochondrial (MITO) antiapoptotic heat-shock protein. The information available on the TRAP1 pathway describes just a few well-characterized functions of this protein in mitochondria. However, our group's use of mass-spectrometric analysis identified TBP7, an AAA-ATPase of the 19S proteasomal subunit, as a putative TRAP1-interacting protein. Surprisingly, TRAP1 and TBP7 colocalize in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), as demonstrated by biochemical and confocal/electron microscopic analyses, and interact directly, as confirmed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis. This is the first demonstration of TRAP1's presence in this cellular compartment. TRAP1 silencing by short-hairpin RNAs, in cells exposed to thapsigargin-induced ER stress, correlates with upregulation of BiP/Grp78, thus suggesting a role of TRAP1 in the refolding of damaged proteins and in ER stress protection. Consistently, TRAP1 and/or TBP7 interference enhanced stress-induced cell death and increased intracellular protein ubiquitination. These experiments led us to hypothesize an involvement of TRAP1 in protein quality control for mistargeted/misfolded mitochondria-destined proteins, through interaction with the regulatory proteasome protein TBP7. Remarkably, expression of specific MITO proteins decreased upon TRAP1 interference as a consequence of increased ubiquitination. The proposed TRAP1 network has an impact in vivo, as it is conserved in human colorectal cancers, is controlled by ER-localized TRAP1 interacting with TBP7 and provides a novel model of the ER-mitochondria crosstalk.

  13. Exercise, but not acute sleep loss, increases salivary antimicrobial protein secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillum, Trevor L; Kuennen, Matthew R; Castillo, Micaela N; Williams, Nicole L; Jordan-Patterson, Alex T

    2015-05-01

    Sleep deficiencies may play a role in depressing immune parameters. Little is known about the impact of exercise after sleep deprivation on mucosal immunity. The purpose of this study was to quantify salivary antimicrobial proteins (AMPs) in response to sleep loss before and after exercise. Four men and 4 women (age: 22.8 ± 2; : 49.1 ± 7.1 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1)) completed 2 exercise trials consisting of 45 minutes of running at 75% VO2peak after a normal night of sleep (CON) and after a night without sleep (WS). Exercise trials were separated by 10 ± 3 days. Saliva was collected before, immediately after, and 1 hour after exercise. LL-37, HNP1-3, Lactoferrin (Lac), and Lysozyme (Lys) were measured. Sleep loss did not affect the concentration or secretion rate of AMPs before or in response to exercise. However, exercise increased the concentration from pre- to post-exercise of LL-37 (pre: 15.5 ± 8.7; post: 22.3 ± 16.2 ng · ml(-1)), HNP1-3 (pre: 2.2 ± 2.3; post: 3.3 ± 2.5 µg · ml(-1)), Lac (pre: 5,234 ± 4,202; post: 12,283 ± 10,995 ng · ml(-1)), and Lys (pre: 5,831 ± 4,465; post: 12,542 ± 10,755 ng · ml(-1)), p exercise compared with before exercise for LL-37 (pre: 3.1 ± 2.1; post: 5.1 ± 3.7; +1: 6.9 ± 8.4 ng · min(-1)), HNP1-3 (pre: 0.38 ± 0.38; post: 0.80 ± 0.75; +1: 0.84 ± 0.67 µg · min(-1)), Lac (pre: 1,096 ± 829; post: 2,948 ± 2,923; +1: 2,464 ± 3,785 ng · min(-1)), and Lys (pre: 1,534 ± 1,790; post: 3,042 ± 2,773; +1: 1,916 ± 1,682 ng · min-(1)), p sleep loss and by exercise after acute sleep loss. Exercise increased the concentration and secretion rate of each AMP suggesting enhanced immunity and control of inflammation, despite limited sleep.

  14. Nitrosylation of Nitric-Oxide-Sensing Regulatory Proteins Containing [4Fe-4S] Clusters Gives Rise to Multiple Iron-Nitrosyl Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, Pauline N. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis CA 95616 USA; Wang, Hongxin [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis CA 95616 USA; Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA 94720 USA; Crack, Jason C. [Centre for Molecular and Structural Biochemistry, School of Chemistry, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park Norwich NR4 7TJ UK; Prior, Christopher [Centre for Molecular and Structural Biochemistry, School of Chemistry, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park Norwich NR4 7TJ UK; Hutchings, Matthew I. [School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ UK; Thomson, Andrew J. [Centre for Molecular and Structural Biochemistry, School of Chemistry, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park Norwich NR4 7TJ UK; Kamali, Saeed [University of Tennessee Space Institute, Tullahome TN 37388-9700 USA; Yoda, Yoshitaka [Research and Utilization Division, SPring-8/JASRI, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo Hyogo 679-5198 Japan; Zhao, Jiyong [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Hu, Michael Y. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Alp, Ercan E. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Oganesyan, Vasily S. [Centre for Molecular and Structural Biochemistry, School of Chemistry, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park Norwich NR4 7TJ UK; Le Brun, Nick E. [Centre for Molecular and Structural Biochemistry, School of Chemistry, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park Norwich NR4 7TJ UK; Cramer, Stephen P. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis CA 95616 USA; Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA 94720 USA

    2016-10-25

    The reaction of protein-bound iron–sulfur (Fe-S) clusters with nitric oxide (NO) plays key roles in NO-mediated toxicity and signaling. Elucidation of the mechanism of the reaction of NO with DNA regulatory proteins that contain Fe-S clusters has been hampered by a lack of information about the nature of the iron-nitrosyl products formed. Herein, we report nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations that identify NO reaction products in WhiD and NsrR, regulatory proteins that use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to sense NO. This work reveals that nitrosylation yields multiple products structurally related to Roussin's Red Ester (RRE, [Fe2(NO)4(Cys)2]) and Roussin's Black Salt (RBS, [Fe4(NO)7S3]. In the latter case, the absence of 32S/34S shifts in the Fe-S region of the NRVS spectra suggest that a new species, Roussin's Black Ester (RBE), may be formed, in which one or more of the sulfide ligands is replaced by Cys thiolates.

  15. Expanded roles of leucine-responsive regulatory protein in transcription regulation of the Escherichia coli genome: Genomic SELEX screening of the regulation targets

    OpenAIRE

    Shimada, Tomohiro; Saito, Natsumi; Maeda, Michihisa; Tanaka, Kan; Ishihama, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) is a transcriptional regulator for the genes involved in transport, biosynthesis and catabolism of amino acids in Escherichia coli. In order to identify the whole set of genes under the direct control of Lrp, we performed Genomic SELEX screening and identified a total of 314 Lrp-binding sites on the E. coli genome. As a result, the regulation target of Lrp was predicted to expand from the hitherto identified genes for amino acid metabolism to a set ...

  16. Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 1a Regulates Hepatic Fatty Acid Partitioning by Activating Acetyl Coenzyme A Carboxylase 2 ▿ ‡

    OpenAIRE

    Im, Seung-Soon; Hammond, Linda E.; Yousef, Leyla; Nugas-Selby, Cherryl; Shin, Dong-Ju; Seo, Young-Kyo; Fong, Loren G.; Young, Stephen G.; Osborne, Timothy F.

    2009-01-01

    We generated a line of mice in which sterol regulatory element binding protein 1a (SREBP-1a) was specifically inactivated by insertional mutagenesis. Homozygous mutant mice were completely viable despite expressing SREBP-1a mRNA below 5% of normal, and there were minimal effects on expression of either SREBP-1c or -2. Microarray expression studies in liver, where SREBP-1a mRNA is 1/10 the level of the highly similar SREBP-1c, demonstrated that only a few genes were affected. The only downregu...

  17. The level of neuron-specific enolase and S-100 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with acute bacterial meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Sokhan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic role of neuron-specific enolase (NSE and S-100 protein levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of patients with acute bacterial meningitis in the course of the disease. Materials and Methods. 54 cases of acute bacterial meningitis were analyzed, among them – 26 with pneumococcal and 28 with meningococcal etiology. Patients were divided into groups depending on the severity and etiology of disease. In addition to routine laboratory methods, we analyzed the CSF levels of S-100 protein and NSE at admission and after 10 – 12 days of treatment. 12 patients with acute respiratory infections and meningism were examined as a comparison group. Results. In all patients with acute bacterial meningitis CSF NSE and protein S-100 levels were significantly higher than in the control group (P <0,05. CSF neuro specific proteins level was in direct dependence on severity of the disease, and in patients with severe disease was significantly higher than in patients with moderate severity and in the control group (P <0,01. After 10 – 12 days of treatment, the level of the NSE and S-100 protein decreased, but in severe cases was still higher than in the control group (P <0,05. Conclusions. Increased cerebrospinal fluid NSE and S – 100 protein levels shows the presence and value of neurons and glial cells damage in patients with acute bacterial meningitis. CSF S-100 protein and neuron-specific enolase levels help to determine the severity of neurons destruction and glial cells in patients with acute bacterial meningitis. Level of neurospecific protein is in direct proportion to the severity of the disease and is the highest in patients with severe cases (P<0,05. It confirms the diagnostic and prognostic value of CSF neurospecific protein determination in patients with bacterial meningitis.

  18. A Systematic Review of the Usefulness of Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein for Predicting Acute Intracranial Lesions following Head Trauma

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    Teemu M. Luoto

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe extensive use of computed tomography (CT after acute head injury is costly and carries potential iatrogenic risk. This systematic review examined the usefulness of blood-based glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP for predicting acute trauma-related CT-positive intracranial lesions following head trauma. The main objective was to summarize the current evidence on blood-based GFAP as a potential screening test for acute CT-positive intracranial lesions following head trauma.MethodsWe screened MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychInfo, CINAHL, Web of Science, the Cochrane Database, Scopus, Clinical Trials, OpenGrey, ResearchGate, and the reference lists of eligible publications for original contributions published between January 1980 and January 2017. Eligibility criteria included: (i population: human head and brain injuries of all severities and ages; (ii intervention: blood-based GFAP measurement ≤24 h post-injury; and (iii outcome: acute traumatic lesion on non-contrast head CT ≤24 h post-injury. Three authors completed the publication screening, data extraction, and quality assessment of eligible articles.ResultsThe initial search identified 4,706 articles, with 51 eligible for subsequent full-text assessment. Twenty-seven articles were ultimately included. Twenty-four (89% studies reported a positive association between GFAP level and acute trauma-related intracranial lesions on head CT. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for GFAP prediction of intracranial pathology ranged from 0.74 to 0.98 indicating good to excellent discrimination. GFAP seemed to discriminate mass lesions and diffuse injury, with mass lesions having significantly higher GFAP levels. There was considerable variability between the measured GFAP averages between studies and assays. No well-designed diagnostic studies with specific GFAP cutoff values predictive of acute traumatic intracranial lesions have been published

  19. The vasa regulatory region mediates germline expression and maternal transmission of proteins in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae: a versatile tool for genetic control strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burt Austin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Germline specific promoters are an essential component of potential vector control strategies which function by genetic drive, however suitable promoters are not currently available for the main human malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. Results We have identified the Anopheles gambiae vasa-like gene and found its expression to be specifically localized to both the male and female gonads in adult mosquitoes. We have functionally characterised using transgenic reporter lines the regulatory regions required for driving transgene expression in a pattern mirroring that of the endogenous vasa locus. Two reporter constructs indicate the existence of distinct vasa regulatory elements within the 5' untranslated regions responsible not only for the spatial and temporal but also for the sex specific germline expression. vasa driven eGFP expression in the ovary of heterozygous mosquitoes resulted in the progressive accumulation of maternal protein and transcript in developing oocytes that were then detectable in all embryos and neonatal larvae. Conclusion We have characterized the vasa regulatory regions that are not only suited to drive transgenes in the early germline of both sexes but could also be utilized to manipulate the zygotic genome of developing embryos via maternal deposition of active molecules. We have used computational models to show that a homing endonuclease-based gene drive system can function in the presence of maternal deposition and describe a novel non-invasive control strategy based on early vasa driven homing endonuclease expression.

  20. Cyclooxygenase-2 and hypoxia-regulated proteins are modulated by basic fibroblast growth factor in acute renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Villanueva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute renal failure (ARF can be caused by injuries that induce tissue hypoxia, which in turn can trigger adaptive or inflammatory responses. We previously showed the participation of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2 in renal repair. Based on this, the aim of this study was to analyze the effect of FGF-2 signaling pathway manipulation at hypoxia-induced protein levels, as well as in key proteins from the vasoactive systems of the kidney. We injected rat kidneys with FGF-2 recombinant protein (r-FGF or FGF-2 receptor antisense oligonucleotide (FGFR2-ASO after bilateral ischemia, and evaluated the presence of iNOS, EPO and HO-1, in representation of hypoxia-induced proteins, as well as COX-2, renin, kallikrein, and B2KR, in representation of the vasoactive systems of the kidney. A reduction in iNOS, HO-1, EPO, renin, kallikrein, B2KR, and in renal damage was observed in animals treated with r-FGF. The opposite effect was found with FGF-2 receptor down-regulation. In contrast, COX-2 protein levels were higher in kidneys treated with r-FGF and lower in those that received FGFR2-ASO, as compared to saline treated kidneys. These results suggest that the protective role of FGF-2 in the pathogenesis of ARF induced by I/R is a complex process, through which a differential regulation of metabolic pathways takes place.

  1. Prognostic value of sustained elevated C-reactive protein levels in patients with acute aortic intramural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitai, Takeshi; Kaji, Shuichiro; Kim, Kitae; Ehara, Natsuhiko; Tani, Tomoko; Kinoshita, Makoto; Furukawa, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    The appropriate management of aortic intramural hematoma is still controversial, because a variety of aortic events can arise during follow-up in some patients. However, simplified identification of these patients remains challenging. The present study aimed to determine the prognostic significance of serial C-reactive protein measurements for the prediction of adverse events in patients with acute aortic intramural hematoma. A total of 180 patients with aortic intramural hematoma were retrospectively reviewed. The C-reactive protein data were obtained at admission and 2 days, 1 week, and 2 weeks from the onset, and the maximum value was obtained during the acute phase. Adverse aorta-related events were defined by a composite of aortic rupture, aortic aneurysm, and surgical or endovascular aortic repair. The C-reactive protein value was 3.0 ± 4.6, 8.7 ± 5.9, 9.0 ± 5.5, and 5.7 ± 4.5 mg/dL on admission and 2 days, 1 week, and 2 weeks from the onset, respectively. The maximal value of C-reactive protein was 12.4 ± 6.3 mg/dL at a mean of 4 days from the onset. Patients with elevated C-reactive protein levels (≥7.2 mg/dL) at 2 weeks had significantly greater rates of aorta-related events (P analysis, an elevated C-reactive protein level at 2 weeks (hazard ratio, 3.16; P value compared with the development of an ulcer-like projection (chi-square, 16.94 for ulcer-like projection only vs 34.32 with the addition of C-reactive protein at 2 weeks, P < .001). C-reactive protein was a simple and useful marker providing incremental prognostic information compared with the development of an ulcer-like projection in patients with aortic intramural hematoma. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The dengue vector Aedes aegypti contains a functional high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein with a unique regulatory C-terminus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Fabio Schneider; de Abreu da Silva, Isabel Caetano; Carneiro, Vitor Coutinho; Belgrano, Fabrício dos Santos; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo; de Andrade Rosa, Ivone; Benchimol, Marlene; Souza, Nathalia Rocha Quintino; Mesquita, Rafael Dias; Sorgine, Marcos Henrique Ferreira; Gazos-Lopes, Felipe; Vicentino, Amanda Roberta Revoredo; Wu, Wenjie; de Moraes Maciel, Renata; da Silva-Neto, Mario Alberto Cardoso; Fantappié, Marcelo Rosado

    2012-01-01

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti can spread the dengue, chikungunya and yellow fever viruses. Thus, the search for key molecules involved in the mosquito survival represents today a promising vector control strategy. High Mobility Group Box (HMGB) proteins are essential nuclear factors that maintain the high-order structure of chromatin, keeping eukaryotic cells viable. Outside the nucleus, secreted HMGB proteins could alert the innate immune system to foreign antigens and trigger the initiation of host defenses. In this work, we cloned and functionally characterized the HMGB1 protein from Aedes aegypti (AaHMGB1). The AaHMGB1 protein typically consists of two HMG-box DNA binding domains and an acidic C-terminus. Interestingly, AaHMGB1 contains a unique alanine/glutamine-rich (AQ-rich) C-terminal region that seems to be exclusive of dipteran HMGB proteins. AaHMGB1 is localized to the cell nucleus, mainly associated with heterochromatin. Circular dichroism analyses of AaHMGB1 or the C-terminal truncated proteins revealed α-helical structures. We showed that AaHMGB1 can effectively bind and change the topology of DNA, and that the AQ-rich and the C-terminal acidic regions can modulate its ability to promote DNA supercoiling, as well as its preference to bind supercoiled DNA. AaHMGB1 is phosphorylated by PKA and PKC, but not by CK2. Importantly, phosphorylation of AaHMGB1 by PKA or PKC completely abolishes its DNA bending activity. Thus, our study shows that a functional HMGB1 protein occurs in Aedes aegypt and we provide the first description of a HMGB1 protein containing an AQ-rich regulatory C-terminus.

  3. The dengue vector Aedes aegypti contains a functional high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 protein with a unique regulatory C-terminus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Schneider Ribeiro

    Full Text Available The mosquito Aedes aegypti can spread the dengue, chikungunya and yellow fever viruses. Thus, the search for key molecules involved in the mosquito survival represents today a promising vector control strategy. High Mobility Group Box (HMGB proteins are essential nuclear factors that maintain the high-order structure of chromatin, keeping eukaryotic cells viable. Outside the nucleus, secreted HMGB proteins could alert the innate immune system to foreign antigens and trigger the initiation of host defenses. In this work, we cloned and functionally characterized the HMGB1 protein from Aedes aegypti (AaHMGB1. The AaHMGB1 protein typically consists of two HMG-box DNA binding domains and an acidic C-terminus. Interestingly, AaHMGB1 contains a unique alanine/glutamine-rich (AQ-rich C-terminal region that seems to be exclusive of dipteran HMGB proteins. AaHMGB1 is localized to the cell nucleus, mainly associated with heterochromatin. Circular dichroism analyses of AaHMGB1 or the C-terminal truncated proteins revealed α-helical structures. We showed that AaHMGB1 can effectively bind and change the topology of DNA, and that the AQ-rich and the C-terminal acidic regions can modulate its ability to promote DNA supercoiling, as well as its preference to bind supercoiled DNA. AaHMGB1 is phosphorylated by PKA and PKC, but not by CK2. Importantly, phosphorylation of AaHMGB1 by PKA or PKC completely abolishes its DNA bending activity. Thus, our study shows that a functional HMGB1 protein occurs in Aedes aegypt and we provide the first description of a HMGB1 protein containing an AQ-rich regulatory C-terminus.

  4. Regulatory agencies and regulatory risk

    OpenAIRE

    Knieps, Günter; Weiß, Hans-Jörg

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show that regulatory risk is due to the discretionary behaviour of regulatory agencies, caused by a too extensive regulatory mandate provided by the legislator. The normative point of reference and a behavioural model of regulatory agencies based on the positive theory of regulation are presented. Regulatory risk with regard to the future behaviour of regulatory agencies is modelled as the consequence of the ex ante uncertainty about the relative influence of inter...

  5. [Effect of Heat Shock Protein 90 Inhibitor 17-DMAG on Proliferation and Apoptosis of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Cell Line Jurkat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Fang-Fang; Guo, Rong; Tian, Wen-Liang; Gao, Feng-Cai; Sun, Ling; Jiang, Zhong-Xing

    2017-08-01

    To explore the effect of heat shock protein 90(HSP90) inhibitor 17-DMAG, an inhibitor specific for heat shock protein 90, on the proliferation and apoptosis of acute lymphocytic leukemia cell lines Jurkat. Jurkat cells were collected, then were treated with 17-DMAG. The expression of HSP90 was examined by semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis, the effect of 17-DMAG on cell proliferation were detected by using WST, and cell apoptosis were detected by using flow cytometry with Annexin V/PI double stenining. After Jurkat cells were treated with different concentrations of 17-DMAG for 48 hours, the HSP90 mRNA expression decreased significantly in dose dependent manner (r=0.9530, PJurkat cells were treated with 17-DMAG for 48 h; after treating Jurkat cell with 17-DMAG, the cell proliferation was inhibited(r=0.9903, PJurkat cell proliferation and induce the Jurkat cell apoptosis.

  6. Regulatory-associated protein of TOR (RAPTOR) alters the hormonal and metabolic composition of Arabidopsis seeds, controlling seed morphology, viability and germination potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Mohamed A; Li, Yan; Wiszniewski, Andrew; Giavalisco, Patrick

    2017-11-01

    Target of Rapamycin (TOR) is a positive regulator of growth and development in all eukaryotes, which positively regulates anabolic processes like protein synthesis, while repressing catabolic processes, including autophagy. To better understand TOR function we decided to analyze its role in seed development and germination. We therefore performed a detailed phenotypic analysis using mutants of the REGULATORY-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN OF TOR 1B (RAPTOR1B), a conserved TOR interactor, acting as a scaffold protein, which recruits substrates for the TOR kinase. Our results show that raptor1b plants produced seeds that were delayed in germination and less resistant to stresses, leading to decreased viability. These physiological phenotypes were accompanied by morphological changes including decreased seed-coat pigmentation and reduced production of seed-coat mucilage. A detailed molecular analysis revealed that many of these morphological changes were associated with significant changes of the metabolic content of raptor1b seeds, including elevated levels of free amino acids, as well as reduced levels of protective secondary metabolites and storage proteins. Most of these observed changes were accompanied by significantly altered phytohormone levels in the raptor1b seeds, with increases in abscisic acid, auxin and jasmonic acid, which are known to inhibit germination. Delayed germination and seedling growth, observed in the raptor1b seeds, could be partially restored by the exogenous supply of gibberellic acid, indicating that TOR is at the center of a regulatory hub controlling seed metabolism, maturation and germination. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Chemotherapeutic treatment reduces circulating levels of surfactant protein-D in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathe, Mathias; Sorensen, Grith L.; Wehner, Peder S.

    2017-01-01

    with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). PROCEDURE: In a prospective study, 43 children receiving treatment for ALL were monitored for mucosal toxicity from diagnosis through the induction phase of treatment. Serial blood draws were taken to determine the levels of SP-D, interleukin-6 (IL-6), C...

  8. Induction of Regulatory T Cells and Its Regulation with Insulin-like Growth Factor/Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein-4 by Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagawa, Ippei; Nakayamada, Shingo; Nakano, Kazuhisa; Yamagata, Kaoru; Sakata, Kei; Yamaoka, Kunihiro; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2017-09-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent and exert anti-inflammatory effects, but the underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated. In the current study, we investigated the regulatory mechanism of regulatory T cell (Treg) induction through the growth factors released by human MSCs. Human naive CD4 + T cells were stimulated with anti-CD3/28 Abs and cocultured with human MSC culture supernatant for 48 h. The proliferation and cytokine production of CD4 + T cells and surface molecule expression on CD4 + T cells were evaluated. The proliferation of anti-CD3/28 Abs-stimulated CD4 + T cells was suppressed by the addition of human MSC culture supernatant; in addition, the production of IL-10 and IL-4 increased. The human MSC culture supernatant induced CD4 + FOXP3 + Tregs that expressed CD25, CTLA-4, glucocorticoid-induced TNFR-related protein, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1R, and IGF-2R, showing antiproliferative activity against CD4 + T cells. In addition, the induction of Tregs by human MSC culture supernatant was enhanced by the addition of IGF and suppressed by the inhibition of IGF-1R. In contrast, a significant amount of IGF binding protein (IGFBP)-4, an inhibitor of IGF action, was detected in the human MSC culture supernatant. After neutralization of IGFBP-4 in the human MSC culture supernatant by anti-IGFBP-4 Ab, Treg numbers increased significantly. Thus, our results raise the possibility that human MSC actions also involve a negative-regulatory mechanism that suppresses Treg proliferation by releasing IGFBP-4. The results of this study suggest that regulation of IGF may be important for treatments using human MSCs. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. Lrp, a major regulatory protein in Escherichia coli, bends DNA and can organize the assembly of a higher-order nucleoprotein structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q; Calvo, J M

    1993-06-01

    Lrp (Leucine-responsive regulatory protein) is a global regulatory protein that controls the expression of many operons in Escherichia coli. One of those operons, ilvIH, contains six Lrp binding sites located within a several hundred base pair region upstream of the promoter region. Analysis of the binding of Lrp to a set of circularly permuted DNA fragments from this region indicates that Lrp induces DNA bending. The results of DNase I footprinting experiments suggest that Lrp binding to this region facilitates the formation of a higher-order nucleoprotein structure. To define more precisely the degree of bending associated with Lrp binding, one or two binding sites were separately cloned into a pBend vector and analyzed. Lrp induced a bend of approximately 52 degrees upon binding to a single binding site, and the angle of bending is increased to at least 135 degrees when Lrp binds to two adjacent sites. Lrp-induced DNA bending, and a natural sequence-directed bend that exists within ilvIH DNA, may be architectural elements that facilitate the assembly of a nucleoprotein complex.

  10. Phenylarsine Oxide Binding Reveals Redox-Active and Potential Regulatory Vicinal Thiols on the Catalytic Subunit of Protein Phosphatase 2A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melideo, Scott L.; Healey, Adriana E.; Lucas, Eugene J.; Koval, Jason A.

    2011-01-01

    Our earlier finding that the activity of protein phosphatase 2A from rat brain is inhibited by micromolar concentrations of the dithiol cross-linking reagent phenylarsine oxide (PAO) has encouraged the hypothesis that the catalytic subunit (PP2Ac) of PP2A contains one or more pairs of closely-spaced (vicinal) thiol pairs that may contribute to regulation of the enzyme. The results of the present study demonstrate using immobilized PAO-affinity chromatography that PP2Ac from rat brain formed stable DTT-sensitive adducts with PAO with or without associated regulatory subunits. In addition, a subset of the PAO-binding vicinal thiols of PP2Ac was readily oxidized to disulfide bonds in vitro. Importantly, a small fraction of PP2Ac was still found to contain disulfide bonds after applying stringent conditions designed to prevent protein disulfide bond formation during homogenization and fractionation of the brains. These findings establish the presence of potentially regulatory and redox-active PAO-binding vicinal thiols on the catalytic subunit of PP2A and suggest that a population of PP2Ac may contain disulfide bonds in vivo. PMID:21080067

  11. Variations at regulatory regions of the milk protein genes are associated with milk traits and coagulation properties in the Sarda sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noce, A; Pazzola, M; Dettori, M L; Amills, M; Castelló, A; Cecchinato, A; Bittante, G; Vacca, G M

    2016-12-01

    Regulatory variation at the ovine casein genes could have important effects on the composition and coagulation properties of milk. Herewith, we have partially resequenced the promoters and the 3'-UTR of the four casein genes in 25 Sarda sheep. Alignment of these sequences allowed us to identify a total of 29 SNPs. This level of polymorphism (one SNP every 250 bp) is remarkably high if compared with SNP densities estimated in human genic regions (approximately one SNP per bp). The 29 SNPs identified in our resequencing experiment, plus three previously reported SNPs mapping to the lactalbumin, alpha (LALBA) and β-lactoglobulin (BLG, also known as progestagen-associated endometrial protein, PAEP) genes, were genotyped with a multiplex TaqMan Open Array Real-Time PCR assay in 760 Sarda sheep with records for milk composition and coagulation properties. Association analysis revealed the existence of significant associations of CSN1S2 and CSN3 genotypes with milk protein and casein contents. Moreover, genotypes at CSN1S1 were significantly associated with rennet coagulation time, curd firming time and curd firmness, whereas CSN2 was associated with curd firming time. These results suggest that SNPs mapping to the promoters and 3'-UTRs of ovine casein genes may exert regulatory effects on gene expression and that they could be used for improving sheep milk quality and technological traits at the population level through marker assisted selection. © 2016 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  12. Increased levels of proteins of the acute inflammatory phase in the peritoneal fluid of women with advanced stages of endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Grzegorz; Barczyński, Bartłomiej; Bednarek, Wiesława; Kwaśniewski, Wojciech; Wertell, Iwona; Derewianka-Polak, Magdalena; Makara-Studzińska, Marta; Kotarski, Jan

    2015-06-01

    Most investigators agree that endometriosis is associated with a state of subclinical, non-infectious peritoneal inflammation. The objective of the study was to assess concentrations of two markers of the acute inflammatory phase proteins, haptoglobin and ceruloplasmin, in peritoneal fluid of endometriotic women. 229 women who underwent diagnostic or therapeutic laparoscopy were included in the study Minimal, mild, moderate and severe endometriosis according to ASRM was confirmed in 119 women (study groups), whereas 110 patients suffered from simple serous or dermoid ovarian cysts (reference groups). Haptoglobin and ceruloplasmin concentrations in the peritoneal fluid samples aspirated during laparoscopy were measured using commercially available radial immunodiffusion kits. The concentration of haptoglobin in the peritoneal fluid of women with endometriosis was significantly higher as compared to patients with serous and dermoid ovarian cysts. Significantly higher haptoglobin level was observed in patients with severe and moderate endometriosis as compared to women from both reference groups. No significant difference in the peritoneal fluid ceruloplasmin levels was found between patients with endometriosis and women from reference groups. However, it was noted that ceruloplasmin levels are higher in the subgroup of patients with severe endometriosis as compared to both reference groups and women with mild disease. Our results support the hypothesis that endometriosis is associated with subclinical inflammation within the peritoneal cavity It may be speculated that pro-inflammatory stimuli strong enough to cause an increase in acute inflammatory phase proteins peritoneal fluid concentrations are observed only in the advanced stages of the disease.

  13. Overexpression of IL-38 protein in anticancer drug-induced lung injury and acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Masaki; Okamoto, Masaki; Kawayama, Tomotaka; Matsuoka, Masanobu; Kaieda, Shinjiro; Sakazaki, Yuki; Kinoshita, Takashi; Mori, Daisuke; Inoue, Akira; Hoshino, Tomoaki

    2017-09-01

    Interleukin (IL)-38, a member of the IL-1 family, shows high homology to IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) and IL-36 receptor antagonist (IL-36Ra). Its function in interstitial lung disease (ILD) is still unknown. To determine the expression pattern of IL-38 mRNA, a panel of cDNAs derived from various tissues was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. Immunohistochemical reactivity with anti-human IL-38 monoclonal antibody (clone H127C) was evaluated semi-quantitatively in lung tissue samples from 12 patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis/usual interstitial pneumonia (IPF/UIP), 5 with acute exacerbation of IPF, and 10 with anticancer drug-induced ILD (bleomycin in 5 and epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor in 5). Control lung tissues were obtained from areas of normal lung in 22 lung cancer patients who underwent extirpation surgery. IL-38 transcripts were strongly expressed in the lung, spleen, synoviocytes, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and at a lower level in pancreas and muscle. IL-38 protein was not strongly expressed in normal pulmonary alveolar tissues in all 22 control lungs. In contrast, IL-38 was overexpressed in the lungs of 4 of 5 (80%) patients with acute IPF exacerbation and 100% (10/10) of the patients with drug-induced ILD. IL-38 overexpression was limited to hyperplastic type II pneumocytes, which are considered to reflect regenerative change following diffuse alveolar damage in ILD. IL-38 may play an important role in acute and/or chronic inflammation in anticancer drug-induced lung injury and acute exacerbation of IPF. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Respiratory Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Elevation of intact and proteolytic fragments of acute phase proteins constitutes the earliest systemic antiviral response in HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger B Kramer

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The earliest immune responses activated in acute human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection (AHI exert a critical influence on subsequent virus spread or containment. During this time frame, components of the innate immune system such as macrophages and DCs, NK cells, beta-defensins, complement and other anti-microbial factors, which have all been implicated in modulating HIV infection, may play particularly important roles. A proteomics-based screen was performed on a cohort from whom samples were available at time points prior to the earliest positive HIV detection. The ability of selected factors found to be elevated in the plasma during AHI to inhibit HIV-1 replication was analyzed using in vitro PBMC and DC infection models. Analysis of unique plasma donor panels spanning the eclipse and viral expansion phases revealed very early alterations in plasma proteins in AHI. Induction of acute phase protein serum amyloid A (A-SAA occurred as early as 5-7 days prior to the first detection of plasma viral RNA, considerably prior to any elevation in systemic cytokine levels. Furthermore, a proteolytic fragment of alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT, termed virus inhibitory peptide (VIRIP, was observed in plasma coincident with viremia. Both A-SAA and VIRIP have anti-viral activity in vitro and quantitation of their plasma levels indicated that circulating concentrations are likely to be within the range of their inhibitory activity. Our results provide evidence for a first wave of host anti-viral defense occurring in the eclipse phase of AHI prior to systemic activation of other immune responses. Insights gained into the mechanism of action of acute-phase reactants and other innate molecules against HIV and how they are induced could be exploited for the future development of more efficient prophylactic vaccine strategies.

  15. Increased expression and purification of soluble iron-regulatory protein 1 from Escherichia coli co-expressing chaperonins GroES and GroEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Carvalho

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential metal for all living organisms. However, iron homeostasis needs to be tightly controlled since iron can mediate the production of reactive oxygen species, which can damage cell components and compromise the integrity and/or cause DNA mutations, ultimately leading to cancer. In eukaryotes, iron-regulatory protein 1 (IRP1 plays a central role in the control of intracellular iron homeostasis. This occurs by interaction of IRP1 with iron-responsive element regions at 5' of ferritin mRNA and 3' of transferrin mRNA which, respectively, represses translation and increases mRNA stability. We have expressed IRP1 using the plasmid pT7-His-hIRP1, which codifies for human IRP1 attached to an NH2-terminal 6-His tag. IRP1 was expressed in Escherichia coli using the strategy of co-expressing chaperonins GroES and GroEL, in order to circumvent inclusion body formation and increase the yield of soluble protein. The protein co-expressed with these chaperonins was obtained mostly in the soluble form, which greatly increased the efficiency of protein purification. Metal affinity and FPLC ion exchange chromatography were used in order to obtain highly purified IRP1. Purified protein was biologically active, as assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and could be converted to the cytoplasmic aconitase form. These results corroborate previous studies, which suggest the use of folding catalysts as a powerful strategy to increase protein solubility when expressing heterologous proteins in E. coli.

  16. Regulatory elements in the promoter region of the rat gene encoding the acyl-CoA-binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elholm, M; Bjerking, G; Knudsen, J

    1996-01-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) is an ubiquitously expressed 10-kDa protein which is present in high amounts in cells involved in solute transport or secretion. Rat ACBP is encoded by a gene containing the typical hallmarks of a housekeeping gene. Analysis of the promoter region of the rat ACBP g...

  17. Adult patients are more catabolic than children during acute phase after burn injury: a retrospective analysis on muscle protein kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuvdendorj, Demidmaa; Chinkes, David L; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Ferrando, Arny A; Elijah, Itoro E; Mlcak, Ronald P; Finnerty, Celeste C; Wolfe, Robert R; Herndon, David N

    2011-08-01

    This study was performed to determine if there is an age-related specificity in the response of muscle protein metabolism to severe burn injury during acute hospitalization. This is a retrospective analysis of previously published data. Nineteen adult and 58 pediatric burn-injured patients (age 43.3 ± 14.3 vs. 7.2 ± 5.3 years, adult vs. children) participated in stable isotope [ring-(2)H(5)]phenylalanine (Phe) infusion studies. Femoral arterial and venous blood samples and muscle biopsy samples were collected throughout the study. Data are presented as means ± standard deviation (SD). A p value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Muscle net protein balance (NB) was higher in children (adult vs. children, -43 ± 61 vs. 8 ± 68 nmol Phe/min/100 ml leg volume, p 0.05); synthesis rate was 134 ± 96 and 192 ± 128 nmol Phe/min/100 ml leg volume in adults and children, respectively (p = 0.07). Age significantly correlated with muscle protein NB (p = 0.01) and FSR (p = 0.02); but not with breakdown (p = 0.67) and synthesis (p = 0.07) rates measured by using a three-pool model. In burn injury, the muscle protein breakdown may be affected to the same extent in adults and children, whereas synthesis may have age-related specificities, resulting in a better but still low NB in children.

  18. C-fos protein expression in central nervous system. Effects of acute whole-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, C.; Chollat, S.; Mahfoudi, H.; Lambert, F.; Baille Le Crom, V.; Fatome, M.

    1995-01-01

    Study of c-Fos protein expression in the rat striatum after gamma or (neutron-gamma) irradiation was carried on. c-Fos protein is expressed one hour after gamma exposure at the dose of 15 Gy but specificity of the response must be verified. (author)

  19. CAT‐2003: A novel sterol regulatory element‐binding protein inhibitor that reduces steatohepatitis, plasma lipids, and atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E*3‐Leiden mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bista, Pradeep; Benson, Ericka L.; Lee, Diana Y.; Liu, Feng; Picarella, Dominic; Vega, Rick B.; Vu, Chi B.; Yeager, Maisy; Ding, Min; Liang, Guosheng; Horton, Jay D.; Kleemann, Robert; Kooistra, Teake; Morrison, Martine C.; Wielinga, Peter Y.; Milne, Jill C.; Jirousek, Michael R.; Nichols, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    CAT‐2003 is a novel conjugate of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and niacin designed to be hydrolyzed by fatty acid amide hydrolase to release EPA inside cells at the endoplasmic reticulum. In cultured liver cells, CAT‐2003 blocked the maturation of sterol regulatory element‐binding protein (SREBP)‐1 and SREBP‐2 proteins and decreased the expression of multiple SREBP target genes, including HMGCR and PCSK9. Consistent with proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) reduction, both low‐density lipoprotein receptor protein at the cell surface and low‐density lipoprotein particle uptake were increased. In apolipoprotein E*3‐Leiden mice fed a cholesterol‐containing western diet, CAT‐2003 decreased hepatic inflammation and steatosis as evidenced by fewer inflammatory cell aggregates in histopathologic sections, decreased nuclear factor kappa B activity in liver lysates, reduced inflammatory gene expression, reduced intrahepatic cholesteryl ester and triglyceride levels, and decreased liver mass. Plasma PCSK9 was reduced and hepatic low‐density lipoprotein receptor protein expression was increased; plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels were lowered. Aortic root segments showed reduction of several atherosclerotic markers, including lesion size, number, and severity. CAT‐2003, when dosed in combination with atorvastatin, further lowered plasma cholesterol levels and decreased hepatic expression of SREBP target genes. Conclusion: SREBP inhibition is a promising new strategy for the prevention and treatment of diseases associated with abnormal lipid metabolism, such as atherosclerosis and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. (Hepatology Communications 2017;1:311–325) PMID:29404461

  20. Lung Surfactant Protein D (SP-D) Response and Regulation During Acute and Chronic Lung Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaunsbaek, Maria Quisgaard; Rasmussen, Karina Juhl; Beers, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    in three murine models of lung injury, using a validated ELISA technology for estimation of SP-D levels. METHODS: Mice were exposed to lipopolysaccharide, bleomycin, or Pneumocystis carinii (Pc) and sacrificed at different time points. RESULTS: In lipopolysaccharide-challenged mice, the level of SP...... injury, with a sustained increment during chronic inflammation compared with acute inflammation. A quick upregulation of SP-D in serum in response to acute airway inflammation supports the notion that SP-D translocates from the airways into the vascular system, in favor of being synthesized systemically....... The study also confirms the concept of using increased SP-D serum levels as a biomarker of especially chronic airway inflammation....

  1. Complementary transcriptomic and proteomic analyses reveal regulatory mechanisms of milk protein production in dairy cows consuming different forages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wenting; Chen, Qiong; Wang, Quanjuan; White, Robin R.; Liu, Jianxin; Liu, Hongyun

    2017-01-01

    Forage plays a critical role in the milk production of dairy cows; however, the mechanisms regulating bovine milk synthesis in dairy cows fed high forage rations with different basal forage types are not well-understood. In the study, rice straw (RS, low-quality) and alfalfa hay (AH, high-quality) diets were fed to lactating cows to explore how forage quality affected the molecular mechanisms regulating milk production using RNA-seq transcriptomic method with iTRAQ proteomic technique. A total of 554 transcripts (423 increased and 131 decreased) and 517 proteins (231 up-regulated and 286 down-regulated) were differentially expressed in the mammary glands of the two groups. The correlation analysis demonstrated seven proteins (six up-regulated and one down-regulated) had consistent mRNA expression. Functional analysis of the differentially expressed transcripts/proteins suggested that enhanced capacity for energy and fatty acid metabolism, increased protein degradation, reduced protein synthesis, decreased amino acid metabolism and depressed cell growth were related to RS consumption. The results indicated cows consuming RS diets may have had depressed milk protein synthesis because these animals had decreased capacity for protein synthesis, enhanced proteolysis, inefficient energy generation and reduced cell growth. Additional work evaluating RS- and AH-based rations may help better isolate molecular adaptations to low nutrient availability during lactation. PMID:28290485

  2. Complementary transcriptomic and proteomic analyses reveal regulatory mechanisms of milk protein production in dairy cows consuming different forages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wenting; Chen, Qiong; Wang, Quanjuan; White, Robin R; Liu, Jianxin; Liu, Hongyun

    2017-03-14

    Forage plays a critical role in the milk production of dairy cows; however, the mechanisms regulating bovine milk synthesis in dairy cows fed high forage rations with different basal forage types are not well-understood. In the study, rice straw (RS, low-quality) and alfalfa hay (AH, high-quality) diets were fed to lactating cows to explore how forage quality affected the molecular mechanisms regulating milk production using RNA-seq transcriptomic method with iTRAQ proteomic technique. A total of 554 transcripts (423 increased and 131 decreased) and 517 proteins (231 up-regulated and 286 down-regulated) were differentially expressed in the mammary glands of the two groups. The correlation analysis demonstrated seven proteins (six up-regulated and one down-regulated) had consistent mRNA expression. Functional analysis of the differentially expressed transcripts/proteins suggested that enhanced capacity for energy and fatty acid metabolism, increased protein degradation, reduced protein synthesis, decreased amino acid metabolism and depressed cell growth were related to RS consumption. The results indicated cows consuming RS diets may have had depressed milk protein synthesis because these animals had decreased capacity for protein synthesis, enhanced proteolysis, inefficient energy generation and reduced cell growth. Additional work evaluating RS- and AH-based rations may help better isolate molecular adaptations to low nutrient availability during lactation.

  3. IgG responses to Pneumococcal and Haemophilus influenzae protein antigens are not impaired in children with a history of recurrent acute otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiertsema, Selma P; Corscadden, Karli J; Mowe, Eva N; Zhang, Guicheng; Vijayasekaran, Shyan; Coates, Harvey L; Mitchell, Timothy J; Thomas, Wayne R; Richmond, Peter C; Kirkham, Lea-Ann S

    2012-01-01

    Vaccines including conserved antigens from Streptococcus pneumoniae and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) have the potential to reduce the burden of acute otitis media. Little is known about the antibody response to such antigens in young children with recurrent acute otitis media, however, it has been suggested antibody production may be impaired in these children. We measured serum IgG levels against 4 pneumococcal (PspA1, PspA 2, CbpA and Ply) and 3 NTHi (P4, P6 and PD) proteins in a cross-sectional study of 172 children under 3 years of age with a history of recurrent acute otitis media (median 7 episodes, requiring ventilation tube insertion) and 63 healthy age-matched controls, using a newly developed multiplex bead assay. Children with a history of recurrent acute otitis media had significantly higher geometric mean serum IgG levels against NTHi proteins P4, P6 and PD compared with healthy controls, whereas there was no difference in antibody levels against pneumococcal protein antigens. In both children with and without a history of acute otitis media, antibody levels increased with age and were significantly higher in children colonised with S. pneumoniae or NTHi compared with children that were not colonised. Proteins from S. pneumoniae and NTHi induce serum IgG in children with a history of acute otitis media. The mechanisms in which proteins induce immunity and potential protection requires further investigation but the dogma of impaired antibody responses in children with recurrent acute otitis media should be reconsidered.

  4. Chronic exposure of HIT cells to high glucose concentrations paradoxically decreases insulin gene transcription and alters binding of insulin gene regulatory protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, L K; Redmon, J B; Towle, H C; Robertson, R P

    1993-07-01

    Chronically culturing HIT-T15 cells in media containing high glucose concentrations leads to decreased insulin mRNA levels, insulin content, and insulin secretion. These changes can be prevented by culturing the cells in media containing lower glucose levels (Robertson, R. P., H.-J. Zhang, K. L. Pyzdrowski, and T. F. Walseth. 1992. J. Clin. Invest. 90:320-325). The mechanism of this seemingly paradoxical phenomenon was examined by transiently transfecting HIT cells with a chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) reporter gene controlled by the 5'-regulatory domain of the human insulin gene (INSCAT). Early passages of HIT cells readily expressed INSCAT, whereas late passages of cells chronically cultured in 11.1 mM glucose expressed only 28.7 +/- 2.3% (mean +/- SEM) of the CAT activity expressed in early passages. In contrast, late passages of HIT cells chronically cultured in 0.8 mM glucose retained the ability to express the INSCAT reporter gene to 69.6 +/- 10.0% of the CAT activity observed in early passages. The decrease in INSCAT expression in late passages of cells serially cultured in 11.1 mM glucose was associated with the inability to form a specific nuclear protein-DNA complex with the CT motifs of the human insulin promoter. Formation of this specific protein-DNA complex was preserved in late passages of HIT cells when serially cultured in 0.8 mM glucose. Mutations of the CT motifs caused markedly diminished CAT activity in all passages examined. These data indicate that chronic exposure of the beta cell to high glucose concentrations can paradoxically decrease insulin gene transcription, in part, by altering the ability of a regulatory protein (GSTF) to interact with the insulin gene promoter. This provides a potential mechanism for glucotoxic effects on the beta cell at the level of the insulin gene.

  5. Role of calpain in eccentric contraction-induced proteolysis of Ca2+-regulatory proteins and force depression in rat fast-twitch skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzaki, Keita; Watanabe, Daiki; Kuratani, Mai; Yamada, Takashi; Matsunaga, Satoshi; Wada, Masanobu

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the in vivo effects of eccentric contraction (ECC) on calpain-dependent proteolysis of Ca 2+ -regulatory proteins and force production in fast-twitch skeletal muscles. Rat extensor digitorum longus muscles were exposed to 200 repeated ECC in situ and excised immediately [recovery 0 (REC0)] or 3 days [recovery 3 (REC3)] after cessation of ECC. Calpain inhibitor (CI)-treated rats were intraperitoneally injected with MDL-28170 before ECC and during REC3. Tetanic force was markedly reduced at REC0 and remained reduced at REC3. CI treatment ameliorated the ECC-induced force decline but only at REC3. No evidence was found for proteolysis of dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR), junctophilin (JP)1, JP2, ryanodine receptor (RyR), sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase (SERCA)1a, or junctional face protein-45 at REC0. At REC3, ECC resulted in decreases in DHPR, JP1, JP2, RyR, and SERCA1a. CI treatment prevented the decreases in DHPR, JP1, and JP2, whereas it had little effect on RyR and SERCA1a. These findings suggest that DHPR, JP1, and JP2, but not RyR and SERCA1a, undergo calpain-dependent proteolysis in in vivo muscles subjected to ECC and that impaired function of DHPR and/or JP might cause prolonged force deficits with ECC. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Calpain-dependent proteolysis is one of the contributing factors to muscle damage that occurs with eccentric contraction (ECC). It is unclear, however, whether calpains account for proteolysis of Ca 2+ -regulatory proteins in in vivo muscles subjected to ECC. Here, we provide evidence that dihydropyridine receptor and junctophilin, but not ryanodine receptor and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase, undergo calpain-dependent proteolysis. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  6. ChIPBase v2.0: decoding transcriptional regulatory networks of non-coding RNAs and protein-coding genes from ChIP-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ke-Ren; Liu, Shun; Sun, Wen-Ju; Zheng, Ling-Ling; Zhou, Hui; Yang, Jian-Hua; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2017-01-04

    The abnormal transcriptional regulation of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and protein-coding genes (PCGs) is contributed to various biological processes and linked with human diseases, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we developed ChIPBase v2.0 (http://rna.sysu.edu.cn/chipbase/) to explore the transcriptional regulatory networks of ncRNAs and PCGs. ChIPBase v2.0 has been expanded with ∼10 200 curated ChIP-seq datasets, which represent about 20 times expansion when comparing to the previous released version. We identified thousands of binding motif matrices and their binding sites from ChIP-seq data of DNA-binding proteins and predicted millions of transcriptional regulatory relationships between transcription factors (TFs) and genes. We constructed 'Regulator' module to predict hundreds of TFs and histone modifications that were involved in or affected transcription of ncRNAs and PCGs. Moreover, we built a web-based tool, Co-Expression, to explore the co-expression patterns between DNA-binding proteins and various types of genes by integrating the gene expression profiles of ∼10 000 tumor samples and ∼9100 normal tissues and cell lines. ChIPBase also provides a ChIP-Function tool and a genome browser to predict functions of diverse genes and visualize various ChIP-seq data. This study will greatly expand our understanding of the transcriptional regulations of ncRNAs and PCGs. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Acute phase protein response during subclinical infection of pigs with H1N1 swine influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomorska-Mól, Małgorzata; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Pejsak, Zygmunt

    2012-10-12

    In the present study acute phase proteins (APPs) responses in pigs after subclinical infection with H1N1 swine influenza virus (SwH1N1) were evaluated. Fourteen 5 weeks old, seronegative piglets, both sexes were used. Ten of them were infected intranasally with SwH1N1. C-reactive protein (CRP), haptoglobin (Hp), serum amyloid A (SAA) and pig major acute phase protein (Pig-MAP) concentrations in serum were measured using commercial ELISAs. No significant clinical signs were observed in any of the infected pigs, however, all infected animals developed specific antibodies against SwH1N1 and viral shedding was observed from 2 to 5 dpi. Only concentrations of Hp and SAA were significantly induced after infection, with mean maximum levels from days 1 to 2 post infection (dpi). The concentrations of CRP and Pig-MAP remained generally unchanged, however in half of infected pigs the concentration of CRP tended to increase at 1 dpi (but without statistical significance). The results of our study confirmed that monitoring of APPs may be useful for detection of subclinically infected pigs. The use of SAA or Hp and Pig-MAP may be a valuable in combination [i.e. Hp (increased concentration) and Pig-MAP (unchanged concentration)] to detect subclinically SIV infected pigs, or to identify pigs actually producing a large amount of virus. Additional studies need to be done in order to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Acute and Long-Term Impact of High-Protein Diets on Endocrine and Metabolic Function, Body Composition, and Exercise-Induced Adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Flor E; Tinsley, Grant M; Gordon, Paul M

    2017-01-01

    High-protein diets have been shown to improve body composition through alterations in satiety, muscle protein synthesis, and the thermic effect of food. Given these findings, the purpose of this review is to discuss the integration of the specific hormonal and metabolic effects of high-protein diets following both acute and long-term usage, especially with regard to body composition. Full-text articles were obtained through PubMed by using the terms "high-protein diet and body composition," "high-protein diet and exercise," "high-protein diet risk," "high-protein diet side effects," "protein quality PDCAAS," "RDA for protein," and "daily protein recommendation." Articles were initially screened according to their title and abstract; careful evaluation of the full ma