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Sample records for acute radiation injury

  1. Hematological parameters after acute radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirashima, Kunitake

    1989-01-01

    According to clinical experiences of radiation accidents during the past two decades, utilization of measured hematologic changes as a direcrt indicator of the severity of radiation injury provides important information for diagnosis and prognostic evaluation in individual cases. Hematologic changes can be described in terms of prognostic categories based on the possible outcome of the acute radiation syndrome. The five categories suggested by Wald according to the grade of severity. By the actual application of this category to our experience of the 1971 Chiba accident of exposure to irridium 192, it was proved that the estimated dose was well correlated to the value by cytogenetic analysis and physical estimation used of thermo-luminescence phenomena. In hematological parameters, a decrease of lymphocytes occurs whithin 24 hours after the exposure. The level of this early lymphopenia is regarded as one of the best indicators of severity of radiation injury. For the decision of therapeutic procedures, however, the total granulocyte count and platelet count are more valuable to exclude severe infection and bleeding symptoms occurred one month after the exposure. The limitation of the approach by hematologic data must exist in the case exposed in a non-uniform fashion. To overwhelm this difficulty, the application of rapid marrow scanning by short-lived RI such as 52 Fe is expected and the bone marrow imaging by magnetic resonance studies is more exciting. For more sensitive and technically easy-drived methods detecting hematologic injury, our new method of detecting micro-nucleus in polychromatic erythroblasts from cultured erythroid colonies from peripheral blood is now developing. Preliminary data have shown the sensitivity of this method is comparable to the cytogenetic study of pheripheral lymphocytes. (author)

  2. Neurological aspects of acute radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torubarov, F.S.; Bushmanov, A.Yu.

    1999-01-01

    Results of the most important clinical studies of human nervous system reactions to acute radiation, carried out at Neurology Clinic of the State Research Center of Russia - Institute of Biophysics are presented. Clinical picture of changes in the nervous system in acute radiation disease caused by homologous and heterologous external irradiation is described. Main neurological syndrome of extremely severe acute radiation disease: acute radiation encephalopathy, radiation toxic encephalopathy, and hemorrhagic syndrome of the central nervous system is distinguished. Relationship between neurological disorders and the geometry of exposure are considered [ru

  3. Medical modification of human acute radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wald, N.; Watson, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    In weighing the benefits and risks of utilizing nuclear energy, there must be a continuing reassessment as nuclear technology develops and changes. The health effects of radiation accidents, as most important part of the risk, must also be reevaluated as our medical ability grows to modify and ameliorate the consequences. The therapeutic efforts were classified as minimal, supportive or heroic. Supportive treatment included reverse isolation, detailed clinical laboratory measurements copious antibiotics, and transfusions of various blood cells, electrolytes and nutrients. Heroic treatment added bone marrow transplantation, while minimal treatment included none of these. It was concluded that while the LD 50 for man is about 340 rads with only minimal treatment, it could be increased to 510 rads with supportive therapy and to over 1,000 rads with heroic treatment. Hematopoietic injury predominated in this exposure range. Finally an estimate of the medical facilities available in the United States to meet these potential clinical needs was made. The relationship of the medical care resources to the likely needs following a serious nuclear power plant accident will be discussed

  4. Radiation diagnosis of pelvic ring damages in acute injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dytalov, M.M.

    2000-01-01

    Data on 58 victims with multifocal damages to the pelvic ring were used to examine the diagnostic potentialities of different radiation diagnostic techniques and to compare their resolving power. The later was 65.1, 83.3 and 94.7% in plain and multidimensional X-ray studies, and computed tomography, respectively. Complex of signs is described closed sacral fractures on the plain and oblique pelvic inlet (caudal) radiograms proposed, which could improve the diagnosis of fractures by 8.8 times, and an original orthopedic gauze-plate for the detection and estimation of invisible pelvic bone displacement, and an original procedure for pelvic X-ray study with target load in acute injury. This all can improve the quality of examination of casualties substantially and define indications for different treatments more precise [ru

  5. Lung pathology in case of acute radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasov, P.A.; Kvacheva, Yu.V.

    1998-01-01

    Results of pathomorphological studies of 27 patients exposed to total external γ- and β-radiation resulted from the Chernobyl accident and lost due to the acute radiation disease in the first weeks following radiation exposure are discussed. Dose range is 3.7-13.7 Gy. Two groups of pathological changes in lungs are revealed, those are: infection (bacterial, viral and fungous) ones caused by acute radiation disease and signs of respiratory distress-syndrome in adults [ru

  6. Ileal perforation induced by acute radiation injury under gefitinib treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muraoka, Takayuki; Tsukuda, Kazunori; Toyooka, Shinichi

    2011-01-01

    Enteritis is one of the side effects of radiotherapy to the abdominal cavity. Radiation enteritis involves damage to mucous membranes in the acute phase and to stromal tissues in the late phase. Perforation of the intestine tends to occur in the late phase, and rarely in the acute phase. However, we describe here a case of intestinal perforation occurring in the acute phase after irradiation in a patient who received gefitinib treatment. Gefitinib, one of the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs), is widely used to treat non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, but is simultaneously known to inhibit wound healing. We suspect that gefitinib may affect regeneration of the small intestinal mucosa injured by irradiation. A 76-year-old woman had NSCLC with metastases to the 5th lumbar, sacral, and right iliac bones. To control the pain from bone metastasis, anterior-posterior opposing portal irradiation (total 35 Gy) was started, and was completed over 22 days. On day 25 after starting radiotherapy, the patient began to take gefitinib. On day 35, she presented with acute peritonitis, and an emergency laparotomy was performed. The terminal ileum was affected by radiation enteritis and there were two pin-hole perforations. In the surgical specimen, no cancerous lesions were detected, and immunohistochemical staining of phosphorylated EGFR (pEGFR) was negative. pEGFR has an important role in mucous membrane repair after irradiation. Intestinal perforation in the acute phase of radiation enteritis may be associated with impaired mucosal repair mechanisms due to the use of an EGFR-TKI such as gefitinib, as evidenced by the absence of pEGFR. (author)

  7. Radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubner, K.F.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation accidents and incidents continue to be of great interest and concern to the public. Issues such as the threat of nuclear war, the Chernobyl reactor accident, or reports of sporadic incidences of accidental radiation exposure keep this interest up and maintain a high level of fear among the public. In this climate of real concern and radiation phobia, physicians should not only be prepared to answer questions about acute or late effects of ionizing radiation, but also be able to participate in the initial assessment and management of individuals who have been exposed to ionizing radiation or contaminated with radioactive material. Some of the key facts about radiation injury and its medical treatment are discussed by the author

  8. Methods for assessing the extent of acute radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fliedner, T.M.

    1996-01-01

    Previous radiation accidents have shown that the medical management of exposed persons cannot be performed without the use of 'biological indicators' of effect and of repair. For the clinical management of a patient with the acute radiation syndrome, it is essential to obtain information on the subjective symptomatology as well as on laboratory parameters, especially during the first 3 to 6 days after exposure. The medical doctor responsible for the clinical care of patients has to rely on the use of what has been described as 'sequential diagnosis'. This approach consists essentially of the determination of a limited number of parameters as a function of time. From the analysis of the pattern of the determined and evaluated signs and symptoms in the first hours and days, one is able to characterize patients according to type and severity of symptomatology. This has been clearly demonstrated in the Moscow - Ulm Radiation Accident Database (MURAD) developed in a collaborative project between the Institute of Biophysics in Moscow and the Department of Clinical Physiology and Occupational Medicine of the University of Ulm. On the basis of the radiation accident clinical response pattern observed early after irradiation, one is able to develop a first approach for therapeutic strategies. It is the purpose of this contribution to outline the diagnostic and prognostic significance of blood cell changes and to discuss the following problem areas: significance and elements of a sequential diagnosis; significance of blood lymphocytes for radiation accident diagnosis; significance of blood granulocyte changes for the prognosis of the acute radiation syndrome; analysis of granulocyte changes by means of regulated system models; utilization of indicators of response and repair for planning therapeutic options

  9. Lithium stimulates the recovery of granulopoiesis following acute radiation injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallicchio, V S; Chen, M G; Watts, T D; Gamba-Vitalo, C

    1983-07-01

    Lithium (Li) is a known stimulator of steady-state granulopoiesis, influencing both pluripotential (CFUS) and granulocyte-macrophage committed stem cell (CFUGM) populations. Li has therefore been suggested to be an effective agent to reduce the neutropenia that often is seen after either cytotoxic chemotherapy or radiotherapy protocols. In this report, we have examined bone marrow and spleen cells for their recovery patterns of CFUS, CFUGM, CFUE, BFUE and 59Fe-incorporation, along with the usual peripheral blood indices (packed red cell volume, WBC and differential) from mice administered Li after receiving 200 rad whole body irradiation. Li increased granulopoietic recovery as measured by significant elevations in both marrow and spleen derived CFUGM compared to those values obtained from radiation controls. Significant elevation in the WBC, consisting mainly of neutrophils, was also observed. Bone marrow and splenic derived erythroid stem cells (CFUE, BFUE) and % 59Fe-incorporation measured from peripheral blood, femur and spleen were all slightly reduced, but not to a significant degree to alter the packed red cell volume. The CFUS populations from both irradiated groups (control and Li-treated) were depressed when compared to normal non-irr controls and this degree of suppression was greater in the Li-treated group. These results document the ability of Li to stimulate the recovery of granulopoiesis after radiation-induced hematopoietic injury and suggest Li may be useful in ameliorating the neutropenia that can often develop after routine radiotherapy protocols.

  10. Lithium stimulates the recovery of granulopoiesis following acute radiation injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallicchio, V.S.; Chen, M.G.; Watts, T.D.; Gamba-Vitalo, C.

    1983-07-01

    Lithium (Li) is a known stimulator of steady-state granulopoiesis, influencing both pluripotential (CFUS) and granulocyte-macrophage committed stem cell (CFUGM) populations. Li has therefore been suggested to be an effective agent to reduce the neutropenia that often is seen after either cytotoxic chemotherapy or radiotherapy protocols. In this report, bone marrow and spleen cells have been examined for their recovery patterns of CFUS, CFUGM, CFUE, BFUE and 59Fe-incorporation, along with the usual peripheral blood indices (packed red cell volume, WBC and differential) from mice administered Li after receiving 200 rad whole body irradiation. Li increased granulopoietic recovery as measured by significant elevations in both marrow and spleen derived CFUGM compared to those values obtained from radiation controls. Significant elevation in the WBC, consisting mainly of neutrophils, was also observed. Bone marrow and splenic derived erythroid stem cells (CFUE, BFUE) and % 59Fe-incorporation measured from peripheral blood, femur and spleen were all slightly reduced, but not to a significant degree to alter the packed red cell volume. The CFUS populations from both irradiated groups (control and Li-treated) were depressed when compared to normal non-irradiated controls and this degree of suppression was greater in the Li-treated group. These results document the ability of Li to stimulate the recovery of granulopoiesis after radiation-induced hematopoietic injury and suggest Li may be useful in ameliorating the neutropenia that can often develop after routine radiotherapy protocols.

  11. Successful Mitigation of Delayed Intestinal Radiation Injury Using Pravastatin is not Associated with Acute Injury Improvement or Tumor Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haydont, Valerie; Gilliot, Olivier; Rivera, Sofia; Bourgier, Celine; Francois, Agnes; Aigueperse, Jocelyne; Bourhis, Jean; Vozenin-Brotons, Marie-Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether pravastatin mitigates delayed radiation-induced enteropathy in rats, by focusing on the effects of pravastatin on acute cell death and fibrosis according to connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) expression and collagen inhibition. Methods and Materials: Mitigation of delayed radiation-induced enteropathy was investigated in rats using pravastatin administered in drinking water (30 mg/kg/day) 3 days before and 14 days after irradiation. The ileum was irradiated locally after surgical exteriorization (X-rays, 19 Gy). Acute apoptosis, acute and late histologic alterations, and late CTGF and collagen deposition were monitored by semiquantitative immunohistochemistry and colorimetric staining (6 h, 3 days, 14 days, 15 weeks, and 26 weeks after irradiation). Pravastatin antitumor action was studied in HT-29, HeLa, and PC-3 cells by clonogenic cell survival assays and tumor growth delay experiments. Results: Pravastatin improved delayed radiation enteropathy in rats, whereas its benefit in acute and subacute injury remained limited (6 h, 3 days, and 14 days after irradiation). Delayed structural improvement was associated with decreased CTGF and collagen deposition but seemed unrelated to acute damage. Indeed, the early apoptotic index increased, and severe subacute structural damage occurred. Pravastatin elicited a differential effect, protecting normal intestine but not tumors from radiation injury. Conclusion: Pravastatin provides effective protection against delayed radiation enteropathy without interfering with the primary antitumor action of radiotherapy, suggesting that clinical transfer is feasible

  12. Medical management of severe local radiation injury after acute X-ray exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushmanov, A.; Nadezhina, N.; Kretov, A.

    2008-01-01

    Medical management during acute period in a case of severe local radiation injury after acute X-ray exposure includes 3 stages. During the fist stage patient got conservative treatment according to the common pathogenetic mechanisms of LRI (dis aggregating therapy, stimulation of regeneration, dis intoxication therapy, antibiotic therapy, pain relief therapy, Local anti-burn therapy-specific non-adhesive bandage with antiseptic and anti-burn medicaments); estimation of severity, deepness and area of injury by clinical picture and dates of instrumental methods of examining; defining necessity and volume of surgical treatment; preparing arrangements for surgical treatment. This stage ends with forming of demarcation line of a very hard severity of a Local Radiation Injure. The second stage includes necrectomy of the area of a very hard severity with microsurgical plastic by re vascularized flap and auto dermoplastic. The third stage - adaptation of re vascularized flap and total epithelization of injured area. (author)

  13. Acute and delayed radiation injuries in the small intestine and colon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiss, H.

    1981-01-01

    The group of patients with severe actinic intestinal injuries consists of 67 patients, 46 female and 21 male. The main indication of irradiation were gynaecologic tumours with 67%. The irradiation was carried out with a telekobalt unit combined with radium. From the pathogenetic point of view, acute inflammation and necrobiotic processes in the intestinal mucosa and a restriction of the ability to regenerate are the main radiation-induced acute injuries; delayed injuries are mainly the narrowing and rarefaction of the vessels with lacking capillary budding. The cause of the completely different intervals of up to 26 years until the manifestation of the delayed injury remained unclear. The majority of the delayed symptoms were unspecific; therefore, the danger of misinterpretation was pointed out. A resection with primary anastomosis of the ends of the intestines is the goal to be reached operation-technically. The postoperative complication rate was 45.0%. The most frequent complications were the recurrence of a fistula and the formation of a new fistula, respectively, followed by anastomotic and wound insufficiency, and gastrointestinal bleedings. The postoperative lethality was 18.3%. The causes of death were, according to their frequency, peritonitis, acute failure of the coronary circulation, pneumonia, and massive bleedings. (orig./MG) [de

  14. Protective effects of seabuckthorn pulp and seed oils against radiation-induced acute intestinal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Jing; Wang, Lan; Lu, Yan; Ji, Yue; Wang, Yaqing; Dong, Ke; Kong, Xiangqing; Sun, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome, including nausea, diarrhea and dehydration, contributes to morbidity and mortality after medical or industrial radiation exposure. No safe and effective radiation countermeasure has been approved for clinical therapy. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential protective effects of seabuckthorn pulp and seed oils against radiation-induced acute intestinal injury. C57/BL6 mice were orally administered seabuckthorn pulp oil, seed oil and control olive oil once per day for 7 days before exposure to total-body X-ray irradiation of 7.5 Gy. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were used for the measurement of apoptotic cells and proteins, inflammation factors and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases. Seabuckthorn oil pretreatment increased the post-radiation survival rate and reduced the damage area of the small intestine villi. Both the pulp and seed oil treatment significantly decreased the apoptotic cell numbers and cleaved caspase 3 expression. Seabuckthorn oil downregulated the mRNA level of inflammatory factors, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. Both the pulp and seed oils elevated the level of phosphorylated extracellular-signal-regulated kinase and reduced the levels of phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38. Palmitoleic acid (PLA) and alpha linolenic acid (ALA) are the predominant components of pulp oil and seed oil, respectively. Pretreatment with PLA and ALA increased the post-radiation survival time. In conclusion, seabuckthorn pulp and seed oils protect against mouse intestinal injury from high-dose radiation by reducing cell apoptosis and inflammation. ALA and PLA are promising natural radiation countermeasure candidates.

  15. Does granulocyte colony-stimulating factor exacerbate radiation-induced acute lung injury in rats?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Gouji; Awaya, Hitomi; Matsumoto, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2000-01-01

    Radiation pneumonitis (RP) frequently occurs as a complication of thoracic irradiation. However, the mechanism of RP is not well known. Activated neutrophils are a possible pathogenesis of RP. Neutrophil activation induced by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may exacerbate RP. We studied the effects of recombinant human G-CSF on acute lung injury induced by thoracic irradiation using rats. Animals were divided into three groups: sham irradiation with saline control, irradiation alone, and irradiation with G-CSF. Actual irradiation was given as a single fraction of 16 Gy delivered to the right hemithorax. G-CSF at a dose of 12 μg/body was administered subcutaneously once a day from 14 to 18 days after actual irradiation. Lung injury was evaluated 21 days after irradiation by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid findings and the lung wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio. Neutrophil and lymphocyte counts in BAL fluid and the W/D ratio were significantly increased in the irradiation alone and the irradiation with G-CSF groups compared with those of the sham irradiation+saline control group. However, there was no significant difference observed between the irradiation alone and irradiation with G-CSF groups. In conclusion, this study suggests that postradiation administration of G-CSF does not exacerbate acute lung injury induced by thoracic irradiation in rats. (author)

  16. Does granulocyte colony-stimulating factor exacerbate radiation-induced acute lung injury in rats?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, Gouji; Awaya, Hitomi; Matsumoto, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Matsunaga, Naofumi [Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-08-01

    Radiation pneumonitis (RP) frequently occurs as a complication of thoracic irradiation. However, the mechanism of RP is not well known. Activated neutrophils are a possible pathogenesis of RP. Neutrophil activation induced by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may exacerbate RP. We studied the effects of recombinant human G-CSF on acute lung injury induced by thoracic irradiation using rats. Animals were divided into three groups: sham irradiation with saline control, irradiation alone, and irradiation with G-CSF. Actual irradiation was given as a single fraction of 16 Gy delivered to the right hemithorax. G-CSF at a dose of 12 {mu}g/body was administered subcutaneously once a day from 14 to 18 days after actual irradiation. Lung injury was evaluated 21 days after irradiation by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid findings and the lung wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio. Neutrophil and lymphocyte counts in BAL fluid and the W/D ratio were significantly increased in the irradiation alone and the irradiation with G-CSF groups compared with those of the sham irradiation+saline control group. However, there was no significant difference observed between the irradiation alone and irradiation with G-CSF groups. In conclusion, this study suggests that postradiation administration of G-CSF does not exacerbate acute lung injury induced by thoracic irradiation in rats. (author)

  17. Effect of BMPs on hematopoietic injury of acute radiation sickness in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Qiong; Zhang Shaozhang; Pu Qin; Zhang Fake; Hannah, X.H.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) on hematopoietic acute radiation sickness in mice. BMP, rhBMP-2m and PBK/hBMP-2-NIH3T3 cells were obtained separately by chemistry, molecule biological method and genetherapy method. In this study, the effect of BMPs on hematopoiesis was detected at postirradiation: some hematological parameters, 30 days the survival ratio and formation of bone marrow CFU-GM colony. The experiments indicate that when phBMP (purified bovine bone morphogenetic protein) can increase the formation of bone narrow CFU-GM colony (p<0.05) at 10th d after irradiation. Irradiation control group's mice died in 30 days, but effect of rhBMP-2m on the survival of mice after 7.5Gy irradiation, was detected whereas there were 10%, 15% and 35% all mice of survived after injection i.p. with 0.5 mg, 1.0 mg and 2.0 mg of rhBMP-2m respectively. All hematological parameters of treated mice were significantly higher than control group (p<0.01). PBK/hBMP-2-NIH3T3 cells were established and transplanted into mice irradiated by 7.0Gy r ray by i.p., the survival ratio of treated mice higher than negative control group (p<0.01), and all hematopoietic parameters were increased statistically significant (p<0.01). These data support the our hypothesis: BMPs can treat the acute radiation sickness. The results indicate that in adult mice, BMPs can recover or treat the hematopoietic injury of acute radiation sickness in mice. (author)

  18. [Acute kidney injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, D.; Kooman, J.P.; Lance, M.D.; van Heurn, L.W.; Snoeijs, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    - 'Acute kidney injury' is modern terminology for a sudden decline in kidney function, and is defined by the RIFLE classification (RIFLE is an acronym for Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss and End-stage kidney disease).- Acute kidney injury occurs as a result of the combination of reduced perfusion in the

  19. Combined Hydration and Antibiotics with Lisinopril to Mitigate Acute and Delayed High-dose Radiation Injuries to Multiple Organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Brian L; Gao, Feng; Narayanan, Jayashree; Bergom, Carmen; Jacobs, Elizabeth R; Cohen, Eric P; Moulder, John E; Orschell, Christie M; Medhora, Meetha

    2016-11-01

    The NIAID Radiation and Nuclear Countermeasures Program is developing medical agents to mitigate the acute and delayed effects of radiation that may occur from a radionuclear attack or accident. To date, most such medical countermeasures have been developed for single organ injuries. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have been used to mitigate radiation-induced lung, skin, brain, and renal injuries in rats. ACE inhibitors have also been reported to decrease normal tissue complication in radiation oncology patients. In the current study, the authors have developed a rat partial-body irradiation (leg-out PBI) model with minimal bone marrow sparing (one leg shielded) that results in acute and late injuries to multiple organs. In this model, the ACE inhibitor lisinopril (at ~24 mg m d started orally in the drinking water at 7 d after irradiation and continued to ≥150 d) mitigated late effects in the lungs and kidneys after 12.5-Gy leg-out PBI. Also in this model, a short course of saline hydration and antibiotics mitigated acute radiation syndrome following doses as high as 13 Gy. Combining this supportive care with the lisinopril regimen mitigated overall morbidity for up to 150 d after 13-Gy leg-out PBI. Furthermore, lisinopril was an effective mitigator in the presence of the growth factor G-CSF (100 μg kg d from days 1-14), which is FDA-approved for use in a radionuclear event. In summary, by combining lisinopril (FDA-approved for other indications) with hydration and antibiotics, acute and delayed radiation injuries in multiple organs were mitigated.

  20. Study on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in repairing of radiation induced acute liver injury of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Yongxing; Lou Fan; Zhao Huarong; Zhu Huhu; Ma Yan; Wen Hao

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of mesenchymal stem cells in the repair of radiation induced liver injury. Methods: 12 female SD rats were irradiated with 20 Gy 6 MV X-rays on the right lobe of the liver, to establish the model of radiation induced liver injury. The rats were divided randomly into two groups as invention group and control group, and transplanted with 1 ml male mesenchymal suspension or 1 ml normal saline in 4 hours after radiotherapy. The morphological changes of liver were observed. The existence of sex determining gene Y(SRY) and the level of alpha-smooth muscle actin (a-SMA) were detected. Results: Some injury of right lobe liver in two groups were observed, and the injury degree of right lobe liver in intervention group were lower than that of control group. The amount of SRY positive cells in the right lobe liver of intervention group was higher than that in the left lobe liver (t = 3.77, P <0.05). The positive expression rate of a-SMA in right lobe liver of intervention group was lower than that of control group. Conclusions: Acute radiation induced liver injury could lead BMSCs' homing in order to decrease the degree of liver fibrosis. (authors)

  1. Empirical study on protective effect of dendrobium candidum wall.ex lindl drop on acute radiation-injuried mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jingping; Zhang Guoqing

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the protective effect of Dendrobium candidum Wall.ex Lindl drop (DCWD) on acute radiation-injuried mice and the correlative mechanism. Methods: According to the body weight BALB/c mice were divided into the control group, radiation-injuried group and DCWD groups which were divided into two groups according to the dose of DCWD. Before whole-body irradiation with 4.0 Gy 6 MV X-rays, the BALB/c mice were supplied with DCWD every day. After being irradiated, these mice were continued to be given DCWD until they were killed. The DNA contents of bone marrow, the CD4 + /CD8 + ratios of peripheral blood and splenic cells, blastation of lymphocyte and the contents of IL-2 were observed. Results: DCWD hasincreased the DNA contents of bone marrow, the ability of blastation of lymphocyte and the IL-2 contents of irradiated mice. It has protected T leukomonocyte by accommodating the hyprotypes of T leukomonocyte. Conclusion: DCWD can protect the acute radiation-injuried mice which relates with protecting the hematopoiesis and the immune function etc. (authors)

  2. Pediatric acute lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dahlem, P.; van Aalderen, W. M. C.; Bos, A. P.

    2007-01-01

    Among ventilated children, the incidence of acute lung injury (ALI) was 9%; of that latter group 80% developed the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The population-based prevalence of pediatric ARDS was 5.5 cases/100.000 inhabitants. Underlying diseases in children were septic shock (34%),

  3. Ataxia Telangiectasia–Mutated Gene Polymorphisms and Acute Normal Tissue Injuries in Cancer Patients After Radiation Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Lihua; Cui, Jingkun; Tang, Fengjiao; Cong, Xiaofeng; Han, Fujun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Studies of the association between ataxia telangiectasia–mutated (ATM) gene polymorphisms and acute radiation injuries are often small in sample size, and the results are inconsistent. We conducted the first meta-analysis to provide a systematic review of published findings. Methods and Materials: Publications were identified by searching PubMed up to April 25, 2014. Primary meta-analysis was performed for all acute radiation injuries, and subgroup meta-analyses were based on clinical endpoint. The influence of sample size and radiation injury incidence on genetic effects was estimated in sensitivity analyses. Power calculations were also conducted. Results: The meta-analysis was conducted on the ATM polymorphism rs1801516, including 5 studies with 1588 participants. For all studies, the cut-off for differentiating cases from controls was grade 2 acute radiation injuries. The primary meta-analysis showed a significant association with overall acute radiation injuries (allelic model: odds ratio = 1.33, 95% confidence interval: 1.04-1.71). Subgroup analyses detected an association between the rs1801516 polymorphism and a significant increase in urinary and lower gastrointestinal injuries and an increase in skin injury that was not statistically significant. There was no between-study heterogeneity in any meta-analyses. In the sensitivity analyses, small studies did not show larger effects than large studies. In addition, studies with high incidence of acute radiation injuries showed larger effects than studies with low incidence. Power calculations revealed that the statistical power of the primary meta-analysis was borderline, whereas there was adequate power for the subgroup analysis of studies with high incidence of acute radiation injuries. Conclusions: Our meta-analysis showed a consistency of the results from the overall and subgroup analyses. We also showed that the genetic effect of the rs1801516 polymorphism on acute radiation injuries was

  4. Atomic bomb injury: radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunham, C L; Cronkite, E P; Le Roy, G V; Warren, S

    1959-01-01

    This document contains 3 reports. In the first report, the clinical diagnosis and treatment of radiation syndrome in survivors of the atomic explosions in Hiroshima and Nagasaki are described. The syndrome of acute radiation injury is applied to the symptom complex, or diseased state, which results from exposure of the whole body to the initial nuclear radiation of an atomic bomb. It is applied to injuries of the skin and subcutaneous tissues resulting from x-radiation or from contact with radioactive material. Internal radiation injury may result from the selective deposition, such as in bone or thyroid, of radioactive material that has been inhaled or absorbed through the gastrointestinal tract or wounds. Radiation syndrome is classified as very severe, severe, and mild. In the second report, a brief discussion is presented on the question of genetic effects in atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. In the third report, a study was carried out on 205 4-1/2 year old children who had been exposed to the atomic bomb blast during the first half of intra-uterine life. Correlation between head size and mental development of the child with distance from the hypocenter, symptoms of radiation effect and type of shielding of the mother is discussed. The conclusion drawn from the present study is that central nervous system defects can be produced in the fetus by atomic bomb radiation, provided that exposure occurs within approximately 1200 meters of the hypocenter and that no effective shielding, such as concrete, protects the fetus from direct irradiation.

  5. Probable reasons for the lower effectiveness of remedies for early treatment of acute radiation sickness accompanied by combination of radiation and thermal injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budagov, R.S.; Ul'yanova, L.P.

    2001-01-01

    Mechanism underlying a lower effectiveness of remedies for early treatment of acute radiation sickness in the case of combined radiation and thermal injuries are studied. Experiments were carried out on mice. Animals had been subjected to either a 3B degree thermal burn covering 10% of the body surface or a single whole body gamma-irradiation of 7 Gy dose or a combined injury (radiation exposure + burn), and changes of the blood serum level of interleukin-6 (IL-6) were investigated by means of ELISA kits. Modifying influence of remedies for early therapy (a synthetic analogue of dicorynomycolate trehalose and a preparation based on killed Lacobacillus acidophilus) on the endogenous serum level of IL-6 and on the 30-day survival was evaluated. In accordance with the degree and duration of increased levels of IL-6 in blood serum, the investigated groups of animals were ranged as follows: combined action > burn only > irradiation only. L. acidophilus based preparation rendered a transient modifying action on the IL-6 level at the combined injury and contributed to increasing the 30-day survival. Lower effectiveness of remedies for early treatment of acute radiation sickness may be associated with too excessive levels of IL-6 in the blood serum [ru

  6. The protective effects of resveratral on acute radiation injury in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Hao; Wang Hui; Zhang Heng

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the protective function of resveratrol on radiation-induced small intestine injury and lethal effect in mice. Methods: Mice were randomly divided into three groups: irradiation (IR) control, IR only, and IR+ resveratrol. 15 mice each group were irradiated on abdomen with 7.2 Gy γ-rays for cell lethal assay and 8 mice each group were irradiated with 6.5 Gy for small intestine injury assay. For the IR+ resveratrol group, the mouse was given resveratrol by intragastric administration 24 h before irradiation and then was fed with resveratrol daily for 5 days. The control and IR alone groups were fed with placebo. After 30 days of IR, mouse survival rate was detected. For small intestine injury experiments, 24 h after IR, the mice were terminated and the small intestines were treated with HE and immunohistochemical staining. Results: Compared with the irradiation group, resveratrol increased mouse survival by 33.3%, decreased apoptosis in intestinal crypt cells (t = 17.35, P < 0.05), and increased Ki67 expression (t = 13.62, P < 0.05). Conclusion: Resveratrol could protect small intestine injury from ionizing irradiation. (authors)

  7. Inhibitory effect of magnesium sulfate on reaction of lipid hyperoxidation after radiation-induced acute brain injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lili; Zhou Juying; Yu Zhiying; Qin Songbing; Xu Xiaoting; Li Li; Tu Yu

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the protection of magnesium sulfate (MgSO 4 ) on radiation-induced acute brain injuries. Methods: 60 maturity Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: blank control group, experimental control group and experimental-therapeutic group. The whole brain of SD rats of experimental control group and experimental-therapeutic group was irradiated to a dose of 20 Gy using 6 MeV electron. MgSO 4 was injected intraperitoneally into the rats of experimental-therapeutic group before and after irradiation for five times. At different time points ranging from the 1 d, 7 d, 14 d, 30 d after irradiation, the brain tissue were taken. The xanthine oxidase and colorimetric examination were used to measure the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malonyldialdehyde (MDA) respectively in the rat brain respectively. Results: Compared with blank control group, the SOD in brain of experimental control group decreased significantly (P 4 used in early stage can inhibit the lipid peroxidation after radiation-induced acute brain injuries and alleviate the damage induced by free radicals to brain tissue. (authors)

  8. Parenteral nutrition in experimental acute radiation injury of the abdominal cavity organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grozdov, S.P.; Moroz, B.B.; Fedorovskij, L.L.; Kendysh, I.N.; Vasilevskaya, V.V.

    1981-01-01

    The peculiarities of metabolism in rats after partial body irradiation of the abdomen in a high dose and the effect of parenteral nutrition (PN) with various compositions of diagrams on metabolic indexes with the aim of explaining diagram under conditions of intensive radiation injury of gastrointestinal tract, are investigated. Experiments have been carried out on male rats of the Vistar line, subjected to partial-body X-ray irradiation of the abdomen with the dose of 1400 R. It is shown that under conditions of radiation effect with predominnt unjury of the abdomen, considerable suppression of oxidation processes limits metabolism of nutritious substances. A decrease of glucose and amino acid content in PN produces a pronounced therapeutic effect under these conditions. The increase of lipid component in the PN composition and retabolile introduction increases PN therapeutic effect [ru

  9. Prevention of ionizing radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masashi

    1976-01-01

    In the first age (1895 - 1940), radiation injuries of skin (75% of death caused by RI injury) and chronic radiation injury of heamatopoietic organs (almost remains) appeared in radiologist and people engaged in RI treatment for medical use, and Ra poisoning appeared in workers who treated aluminous paint. As prevention of radiation injuries in this age, measurement of radiation dose, shelter effect and finding of injuries were studied, and internal radiation allowed level was determined. From 1942 to 1960, acute RI injuries due to exposure of large amount of RI by an accident and secondary leukemia appeared to workers of atomic-bomb industries and researcher of atomic energy. U and Pu poisoning accompanied with development of nuclear fuel industry appeared. This expanded industrial hygiene of this age together with epidemiological data of atomic-bomb exposed people. From 1960 onward, it is an age of industry for peaceful use of atomic energy, and manifestation of various kinds of delayed injuries, especially malignant tumor due to RI exposure, is recognized. Labourer has many opportunity to encounter dangerously with pollution and injuries by RI, and regional examination of RI enterprise and countermeasure to decrease exposure dose were mentioned as future theme from a viewpoint of exposure dose of nation. (Kanao, N.)

  10. Chemical and radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugo, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    The paper is a discussion of radiation injuries and the treatment thereof. Radiation injuries are mainly caused as a result of nuclear leaks or nuclear bomb explosions. Such an explosion is usually accompanied by a light flash, noise, heat radiation and nuclear radiation which can all caurse various types of injuries. The general effect of radioactive radiation is discussed. The seriousness of the situation where the whole body was exposed to nuclear radiation, depends on the total radiation dose received and varies from person to person. The progress of radiation sickness is described. Mention is also made of long term radiation effects. The emergency treatment of the injured before specialised aid is available, is discussed. The primary aim of treatment is to save life and to prevent further injuries and complications. Injured people must be removed as far as possible from the point of maximum radiation. Attention must also be given to decontamination

  11. Acute spinal cord injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Izunaga, H.; Sato, R.; Shinzato, I.; Korogi, Y.; Yamashita, Y.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on sequential MR images and neurologic findings that were correlated in 40 acute spinal cord injuries. Within 1 week after injury, frequent initial MR changes appeared isointense on both T1- and T2-weighted images and isointense on T1- and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. After 2 months, hypointensity appeared on T1-weighted images and hyperintensity persisted or appeared on T2-weighted images. Clinical improvements were observed in patients with isointensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images at the initial examination. A larger area of hyperintensity on subsequent T2-weighted images was correlated with no neurologic improvement. MR findings were good indicators of the spinal cord injury

  12. Treatment plan of acute radiation-induced skin injuries with special reference to an accidentally exposed case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, Yasuo; Kusama, Tomoko

    1977-01-01

    Description was made as to clinical cource of one case of acute radiation-induced skin injury and practical use of medical treatment plan for radiation-induced skin injuries. The accident occurred during the working (5 o'clock in the afternoon) on development of x-ray tube for x-ray fluorescent analysis apparatus. The condition of x-ray exposure was 50 KeV and 10 mA, and the window of x-ray tube was Be 0.3 mm in thickness. The exposure time was about 5 seconds, and the exposure dose on the palm of the right hand which was the maximum was estimated as 10,000 rads. In the next morning after the exposure, the patient complained of extension feeling and edema in the palm of the right hand, and redness and blister appeared. On 11 days after the exposure, blister and edematous swelling grew to the greatest, and pain was emphasized. On 15 days after the exposure, tendency of cure appeared, and on 20 days after, pigmentation became marked. Main symptoms of local findings of one year and half after the exposure were skin atrophy, dilatation of capillary vessels, and depigmentation. The strict local rest, the protection from stimulations outside, the use of medicines for external application in which additives were small in quantity, the frequent and detailed local observation and detailed life guidance were mentioned as basic policies in the early treatment. Avoidance of the skin dryness, local observation with proper frequency, protection from stimulations outside, and life guidance were mentioned as basic policies during the period while the symptoms were fixed. In case of acute exposure, the importance of early treatment and necessity of endeavour of preventing delayed disturbances such as chronic ulcer and carcinogenesis were mentioned. (Tsunoda, M.)

  13. Treatment plan of acute radiation-induced skin injuries with special reference to an accidentally exposed case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yashizawa, Y; Kusama, T [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1977-05-01

    Description was made as to clinical cource of one case of acute radiation-induced skin injury and practical use of medical treatment plan for radiation-induced skin injuries. The accident occurred during the working (5 o'clock in the afternoon) on development of x-ray tube for x-ray fluorescent analysis apparatus. The condition of x-ray exposure was 50 KeV and 10 mA, and the window of x-ray tube was Be 0.3 mm in thickness. The exposure time was about 5 seconds, and the exposure dose on the palm of the right hand which was the maximum was estimated at 10,000 rads. In the next morning after the exposure, the patient complained of extension feeling and edema in the palm of the right hand, and redness and blister appeared. On 11 days after the exposure, blister and edematous swelling grew to the greatest, and pain was emphasized. On 15 days after the exposure, tendency of cure appeared, and on 20 days after, pigmentation became marked. Main symptoms of local findings of one year and half after the exposure were skin atrophy, dilatation of capillary vessels, and depigmentation. The strict local rest, the protection from stimulations outside, the use of medicines for external application in which additives were small in quantity, the frequent and detailed local observation and detailed life guidance were mentioned as basic policies in the early treatment. Avoidance of the skin dryness, local observation with proper frequency, protection from stimulations outside, and life guidance were mentioned as basic policies during the period while the symptoms were fixed. In case of acute exposure, the importance of early treatment and necessity of endeavour of preventing delayed disturbances such as chronic ulcer and carcinogenesis were mentioned.

  14. Radiologic observations on pulmonary radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Yong

    1992-01-01

    Based on the data of pulmonary radiation injury in 16 cases, the relationship among the radiation dosage and field, the development and onset time of the pulmonary radiation injury were discussed, and the dynamic changes of pulmonary radiation injury in X-ray films were analysed. The author found that: (1) there was a close relationship between the development of radiation injury and radiation dosages and the size of radiation fields, i.e. for the large radiation field, a relatively small dosage was needed for developing radiation injury ; (2) most off acute radiation injury of the lungs appeared within one month of postirradiation therapy, and the chronic pulmonary fibrosis appeared at 4.23 months after radiation therapy, with a fibrosis rate of about 85.7% within a half year; (3) the clinical manifestations of pulmonary radiation injury were not parallel to the X-ray signs, namely the X-ray changes were more severe than clinical manifestations. On the basis of X-ray signs and the dynamic changes of pulmonary radiation injury, the differentiation of radiation injury from interstitial pulmonary metastasis, primary tumor, common pneumonia, and tumor recurrence after radiation therapy were discussed

  15. Injury by ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upton, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    In view of the vast amount of effort devoted to the study of radiation injury during the past century, it may be concluded that the effects of radiation are better understood than those of any other physical or chemical agent. To this extent, it is useful to review our experience with radiation in addressing health problems associated with other environmental agents

  16. An experimental study on acute brain radiation injury: Dynamic changes in proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the correlation with histopathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hui, E-mail: lihui@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Medical Imaging and Minimally Invasive Interventional Center, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Li, Jian-peng, E-mail: lijp@sysucc.org.cn [Department of Radiology, Dongguan People' s Hospital, Dongguan City (China); Lin, Cheng-guang, E-mail: linchg@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Xue-wen, E-mail: liuxw@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Medical Imaging and Minimally Invasive Interventional Center, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Geng, Zhi-jun, E-mail: gengzhj@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Medical Imaging and Minimally Invasive Interventional Center, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Mo, Yun-xian, E-mail: moyx@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Medical Imaging and Minimally Invasive Interventional Center, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, Rong, E-mail: zhangr@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Medical Imaging and Minimally Invasive Interventional Center, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Xie, Chuan-miao, E-mail: xchuanm@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Medical Imaging and Minimally Invasive Interventional Center, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the correlation between the alterations of single-voxel {sup 1}H MRS and the histopathological characteristics of radiation brain injury following radiation. Materials and methods: Twenty-seven rabbits were randomized into nine groups to receive radiation with a single dose of 25 Gy. The observation time points included a pre-radiation and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 wk following radiation. Each treatment group underwent conventional MRI and single-voxel {sup 1}H MRS, N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), and creatine (Cr) were observed over the region of interest, and the presence or absence of lactate (Lac) and lipid (Lip) was detected. Histological specimens of each group were obtained after image acquisition. Results: The values of Cho were significantly increased in the first 3 wk, and decreased over the following 5 wk after radiation. Levels of NAA showed a trend toward a decrease 5 wk after radiation. The levels of Cr were not changed between before and after radiation. The Cho/NAA metabolic ratio was significantly increased in weeks 6, 7, and 8 following irradiation, compared to pre-radiation values. Vascular and glial injury appeared on 2 wk after RT in the histology samples, until 4 wk after RT, necrosis of the oligodendrocytes, neuronal degeneration and demyelination could be observed. Conclusions: MRS is sensitive to detect metabolic changes following radiation, and can be used in the early diagnosis of radiation brain injury.

  17. Pediatric Acute Kidney Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragasso, Tiziana; Ricci, Zaccaria; Goldstein, Stuart L

    2018-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) in children is a serious condition with an important impact on morbidity and mortality. Onset can be insidious and it is frequently unrecognized in the early phase when the therapeutic opportunities are theoretically more effective. The present review focuses on the most recent epidemiology studies and the progress in pediatric AKI (pAKI) research. Standardization of definition (presented in the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) and novel biomarkers have been developed to help clinicians recognize kidney injury in a timely manner, both in adult and pediatric populations. Strengths and weaknesses of these diagnostic tools are discussed and the clinical scoring system (Renal Angina Index), which aims to provide a rational context for biomarker utilization, is also presented. Even if effective treatments are not currently available for established AKI, specific preventive approaches and some promising pharmacological treatments will be detailed. Renal replacement therapy is currently considered the most effective way to manage fluid balance when severe AKI occurs. Key Messages: Great efforts in pAKI research have today led to new strategies for early AKI detection and prevention strategies. Further studies have to be conducted in the next future in order to definitely improve the outcomes of pediatric patients experiencing this deadly syndrome. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Radiation injuries/ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gooden, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    This book was written to aid trial attorneys involved in radiation litigation. Radiologists and medical physicists will also find it helpful as they prepare for trial, either as a litigant or an expert witness. Two chapters present checklists to guide attorneys for both plaintiffs and defendants. Gooden titles these checklists Elements of Damages and Elements of Proof and leads the reader to conclusions about each of these. One section that will be particularly helpful to attorneys contains sample interrogatories associated with a case of alleged radiation exposure resulting in a late radiation injury. There are interrogatories for the plaintiff to ask the defendant and for the defendant to ask the plaintiff

  19. Preventive and therapeutic effects of lithium carbonate on acute radiation injury of hemopoietic system in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, X Y; Wang, Y F; Jia, T Z

    1991-01-01

    The administration of Li2CO3 to female LACA mice for three consecutive days before or after 4Gy whole body gamma-irradiation appeared to have both preventive and therapeutic effects on radiation-induced leucopenia, especially on the depression of CFU-GM. It is effective in small dosage, short course, and even when given 24 hours after irradiation.

  20. Diagnosis of Acute Groin Injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serner, Andreas; Tol, Johannes L; Jomaah, Nabil

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute groin injuries are common in high-intensity sports, but there are insufficient data on injury characteristics such as injury mechanisms and clinical and radiological findings. PURPOSE: To describe these characteristics in a cohort of athletes. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study......; Level of evidence, 3. METHODS: A total of 110 male athletes (mean age, 25.6 ± 4.7 years) with sports-related acute groin pain were prospectively included within 7 days of injury from August 2012 to April 2014. Standardized history taking, a clinical examination, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and....../or ultrasound (US) were performed. RESULTS: The most frequent injury mechanism in soccer was kicking (40%), and change of direction was most frequent in other sports (31%). Clinically, adductor injuries accounted for 66% of all injuries and primarily involved the adductor longus on imaging (91% US, 93% MRI...

  1. Radiation Injury to the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hits since January 2003 RADIATION INJURY TO THE BRAIN Radiation treatments affect all cells that are targeted. ... fractions, duration of therapy, and volume of [healthy brain] nervous tissue irradiated influence the likelihood of injury. ...

  2. Radiation sensitivity and the acute and chronical radiation injury of the liver. Strahlenempfindlichkeit und die akute und chronische Strahlenschaedigung der Leber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesch, R [Freiburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. Experimentelle Pathologie

    1976-01-01

    The extended German version of the contribution 'Radiation-induced injury of the liver' from the manual of experimental pharmacology, volume XVI, part 5 (p. 227-304), Springer Verlag, Berlin-Heidelberg-New York 1976, is dealt with here. Following a brief presentation of the radiation-induced change of the human liver by external and internal radiation source, experimental results in the latter case of the radiation effect on the regeneration behaviour of the liver particularly regarding the nucleic acid synthesis are indicated especially using findings after thorotrast application. Furthermore, effects on the metabolic activities and on the liver function with combined radiation drug application on test animals is shown.

  3. Hypopituitarism after acute brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Randall J

    2006-07-01

    Acute brain injury has many causes, but the most common is trauma. There are 1.5-2.0 million traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in the United States yearly, with an associated cost exceeding 10 billion dollars. TBI is the most common cause of death and disability in young adults less than 35 years of age. The consequences of TBI can be severe, including disability in motor function, speech, cognition, and psychosocial and emotional skills. Recently, clinical studies have documented the occurrence of pituitary dysfunction after TBI and another cause of acute brain injury, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). These studies have consistently demonstrated a 30-40% occurrence of pituitary dysfunction involving at least one anterior pituitary hormone following a moderate to severe TBI or SAH. Growth hormone (GH) deficiency is the most common pituitary hormone disorder, occurring in approximately 20% of patients when multiple tests of GH deficiency are used. Within 7-21 days of acute brain injury, adrenal insufficiency is the primary concern. Pituitary function can fluctuate over the first year after TBI, but it is well established by 1 year. Studies are ongoing to assess the effects of hormone replacement on motor function and cognition in TBI patients. Any subject with a moderate to severe acute brain injury should be screened for pituitary dysfunction.

  4. Morphological aspects of radiation injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Congdon, C C; Fliedner, T M

    1971-04-01

    The injury to haemopoietic and lymphatic tissues produced by ionizing irradiation in various species of mammals including man is one of the major features of the biological effects of radiation (Bond et al. 1965,' Cottier, 1961). At the moment of injury and for a short time thereafter relatively little morphological evidence of cell damage in bone marrow other than cessation of cell division and DNA synthesis is seen. Within a few hours, however, depending on the level of exposure, major destruction of red bone marrow tissue can occur. In this chapter the histologic changes in bone marrow are summarized for correlation with the functional aspects of the change in the target tissue, particularly its cell renewal features and where possible the remarkable flux or migration of cells through bone marrow and lymphatic tissues. This latter topic of cellular traffic represents the outcome of extensive physiological studies on haemopoiesis and lymphopoiesis by mammalian radiobiologists. The initial injury, the structural changes and the physiological consequences are the first half of the radiation injury sequence. Regeneration also has morphological features of major importance to the understanding of radiation haematology. It is common to discuss radiation effects on biological materials from the point of view of external or internal sources of exposure. In addition exposure rate, whole body or partial body, type and quality of the ionizing source are features that must be taken into account. While these features are extremely important, the simplest approach to understanding histologic effects on the bone marrow is to assume acute penetrating whole-body exposure in the lethal range. With this background the differences related to variations in the conditions of exposure can usually be understood. The individual human or animal organism receiving the exposure must also be considered in the final outcome of the experience because age, sex, nutritional status and presence

  5. Management of radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberto, Maria A.

    2003-01-01

    Injuries by exposure to ionizing radiation can be due to the detonation of a nuclear device in a military conflict, or it can occur following a large industrial accident (e.g. Chernobyl), or it can be the result of therapy (e.g. in a laboratory, in the case of cancer or other clinical situations). The severity of biological tissues damage depends on the energy deposited. The skin and subcutaneous tissue alone damaged may be related with an exposure to low energy radiation. In case of an exposure to high energy radiation the deeper structures will be involved. The treatment of the clinical situation after radiation requires special facilities (burn intensive care unit) and a massive support from a dedicated team. (author)

  6. Acute Kidney Injury in the Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Kader, Khaled; Palevsky, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis The aging kidney undergoes a number of important anatomic and physiologic changes that increase the risk of acute kidney injury (formerly acute renal failure) in the elderly. This article reviews these changes and discusses the diagnoses frequently encountered in the elderly patient with acute kidney injury. The incidence, staging, evaluation, management, and prognosis of acute kidney injury are also examined with special focus given to older adults. PMID:19765485

  7. Lysosomes and radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, D.K.

    1975-01-01

    Changes in activities of lysosomal enzymes following whole-body treatment with ionizing radiation have long been recognized (e.g., Douglass and Day 1955, Okada et al., 1957). Attempts to explain nuclear damage by cytoplasmic enzyme attack, concentrated most of the earlier work on DNASE II and acid RNASE. Lysosomal enzymes have subsequently been studied in many tissues following whole-body irradiation. The observations coupled with in vitro results from isolated lysosomes, and u.v. and visible light studies on cells in culture, have led to the presentation of tentative mechanisms of action. General methods of detecting lysosomal damage have utilized the consequent activation or leakage of acid hydrolases. As this is of a temporal nature following irradiation, direct damage to the lysosomal membrane has not as yet been measured and the primary lesion either in the membrane itself or at the hypothetical site of acid hydrolase-membrane attachment has still to be discovered. Despite the accumulating evidence of lysosome disruption subsequent to treatment with radiation of various qualities, the role (if any) of these organelles in cell killing remains obscure. In the following pages a review of the many aspects of radiation damage will be presented and an attempt will be made to correlate the results and to draw general conclusions where possible. A final short section will deal with thecontribution that lysosomal damage may make in cell death and tissue injury and possible implications in radiotherapy

  8. A clinical and pathological study of acute rectal injury by the radiation therapy of uterine cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honke, Yoshifumi; Katsuta, Shizutomo; Katayama, Hiroshi; Haruma, Ken; Fujiwara, Atsushi; Suenaga, Kenji.

    1983-01-01

    The clinical features, magnifying colonoscopic findings and pathological findings of acute radiation proctitis were investigated in 40 cases of uterine cervix cancer and the following results were obtained. 1)As a clinical simptom, diarrhea was observed in about half of all cases. 2)The value of serum total protein and number of leukocyte decreased until the dose of 30 Gy (3000 rads) and no remarkable change of them were observed afterwards. Hemoglobin value did not change throughout the whole clinical course. 3)Magnifying colonoscopic findings showed remarkable change with increase of the dose and especially irregularity of pit was observed in all cases. 4)In pathological findings, edema, degenerative change of epitherial cells and decreased number of goblet cells were observed from the beginning. In cases that received more than 50 Gy (5000 rads), fibrosis developed and the epithelium showed strong regeneration. Also Paneth cells were observed in 5 out of 40 cases. 5)Remarkable change was not observed before or after the radiation by barium enema. (author)

  9. Pathological characteristics of extremely severe acute radiation injury in a patient's legs and hands after a very uneven accidental exposure to an extremely high dose of 192Ir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qing; Li Guomin; Liu Shujun; Yang Yijing; Li Fumeng; Yang Junhua

    1997-01-01

    The pathological characteristics of an extremely high dose radiation in the legs and hands of a patient is reported. the patient was exposed to 192 Ir γ-rays for 9 hours and 20 minutes, the activity of which was 2.76 TBq. The amputations of the right thigh and left forearm had to be performed 8 days after the irradiation and the debridements and skin graftings were performed on the right hand and the inner side of left knee 55 days after the radiation. Microscopically, massive necrosis of cells of the epidermis, cutaneous appendages, hypodermics and skeletal muscles, and hemorrhage in the dermis, hypodermics and skeletal muscles were seen in the local irradiated parts of the right shank. But the arrector pili muscles in the dermis of the right shank remained. On the fingers and the palm of the left hand, vacuolar degeneration and massive necrosis of the cells of epidermis were present with extensive neutrophil infiltration. Cysts of large or small size were formed from the necrotic cells, separating epidermis from dermis. There were degeneration and necrosis of glandular epithelium cells of sweat glands. Hemorrhage was present in dermis and hypodermics. All the hematopoietic tissues in the bone marrow in the upper ends of the tibia and fibula and in the lower ends of the femur, the radius and the ulna disappeared. Acute radiation ulcers were present on the skin of the left knee and on the skin of the thumb, index finger and middle finger of the right hand. The extremely severe acute radiation injury caused by extremely high dose of 192 Ir led to the necrosis of the extensive soft tissues deep to skeletal muscles and the disappearance of the hematopoietic tissues in the bone marrow

  10. Radiation proctitis. Clinical and pathological manifestations, therapy and prophylaxis of acute and late injurious effects of radiation on the rectal mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, F.B.; Feldmann, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    Background: Often the rectum is the dose-limiting organ in curative radiation therapy of pelvic malignancies. It reacts with serous, mucoid, or more rarely bloody diarrhea. Methods: A research for reports on prophylactic and supportive therapies of radiation-induced proctitis was performed (Medline, Cancerlit, and others). Results: No proven effective prophylactic local or systemic therapies of radiation proctitis exist. Also, no reasonable causal medication is known. In the treatment of late radiation sequelae no clinically tested certain effective therapy exists, too. Antiinflammatory, steroidal or non-steroidal therapeutics as well as sucralfate can be used as topical measures. They will be successful in some patients. Side effects are rare and the therapy is cost-effective. Treatment failures can be treated by hyperbaric oxygen. This will achieve good clinical results in about 50% of the cases. Single or few mucosal telangiectasias with rectal bleeding can be treated sufficiently by endoscopic cautherization. Conclusion: Besides clinical studies acute proctitis should be treated just symptomatically. Radical surgery should be performed only when all conventional treatments have been uneffective, although no certain effective therapies of radiation-induced late proctitis exist. (orig.) [de

  11. Diuretics in acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigwekar, Sagar U; Waikar, Sushrut S

    2011-11-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in hospitalized patients and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The incidence of AKI is increasing and despite clinical advances there has been little change in the outcomes associated with AKI. A variety of interventions, including loop diuretics, have been tested for the prevention and treatment of AKI; however, none to date have shown convincing benefits in clinical studies, and the management of AKI remains largely supportive. In this article, we review the pharmacology and experimental and clinical evidence for loop diuretics in the management of AKI. In addition, we also review evidence for other agents with diuretic and/or natriuretic properties such as thiazide diuretics, mannitol, fenoldopam, and natriuretic peptides in both the prevention and treatment of AKI. Implications for current clinical practice are outlined to guide clinical decisions in this field. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Acute Kidney Injury in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jim, Belinda; Garovic, Vesna D

    2017-07-01

    Pregnancy-related acute kidney injury (AKI) has declined in incidence in the last three decades, although it remains an important cause of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Pregnancy-related causes of AKI such as preeclampsia, acute fatty liver of pregnancy, HELLP (Hemolysis, Elevated Liver function tests, Low Platelets) syndrome, and the thrombotic microangiopathies (thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome [HUS]) exhibit overlapping features and often present as diagnostic dilemmas. Differentiating among these conditions may be difficult or impossible based on clinical criteria only. In difficult and rare cases, a renal biopsy may need to be considered for the exact diagnosis and to facilitate appropriate treatment, but the risks and benefits need to be carefully weighed. The use of eculizumab for the treatment of atypical HUS has demonstrated efficacy in early case reports. Non-pregnancy related causes such as volume depletion and pyelonephritis require early and aggressive resuscitative as well as antibiotic measures respectively. We will discuss in this review the various etiologies of AKI in pregnancy, current diagnostic approaches, and the latest treatment strategies. Given the recent trends of increasing maternal age at the time of pregnancy, and the availability of modern reproductive methods increase the risks of AKI in pregnancy in the coming years. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Transfusion related acute lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Ratti

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI is an uncommon but potentially fatal adverse reaction to transfusion of plasma containing blood components. We describe a case of 10-year-old male child with aplastic anemia, platelet count of 7800/΅l, B positive blood group who developed fever (39.2΀C, difficulty in breathing and cyanosis within 2 hrs after transfusion of a random platelet concentrate. Despite the best resuscitative efforts, the child died within next 24 hrs. The present case highlights the fact that TRALI should be kept as a differential diagnosis in all patients developing acute respiratory discomfort within 6 hrs of transfusion. Without a ′gold standard′ the diagnosis of TRALI relies on a high index of suspicion and on excluding other types of transfusion reactions. Notification to transfusion services is crucial to ensure that a proper investigation is carried out and at-risk donor and recipients can be identified, and risk reduction measures can be adopted.

  14. Medical treatment of radiation injuries-Current US status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarrett, D.G. [OSA - CBD and CDP, 3050 Defense Pentagon, Room 3C257, Washington, DC 20301-3050 (United States)], E-mail: david.jarrett@us.army.mil; Sedlak, R.G.; Dickerson, W.E. [Uniformed Services University, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, 8901 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States); Reeves, G.I. [Northrop Grumman IT, 8211 Terminal Road, Lorton, VA 22079-1421 (United States)

    2007-07-15

    A nuclear incident or major release of radioactive materials likely would result in vast numbers of patients, many of whom would require novel therapy. Fortunately, the numbers of radiation victims in the United States (USA) have been limited to date. If a mass-casualty situation occurs, there will be a need to perform rapid, accurate dose estimates and to provide appropriate medications and other treatment to ameliorate radiation injury. The medical management of radiation injury is complex. Radiation injury may include acute radiation sickness (ARS) from external and/or internal radiation exposure, internal organ damage from incorporated radioactive isotopes, and cutaneous injury. Human and animal data have shown that optimal medical care may nearly double the survivable dose of ionizing radiation. Current treatment strategies for radiation injuries are discussed with concentration on the medical management of the hematopoietic syndrome. In addition, priority areas for continuing and future research into both acute deterministic injuries and also long-term stochastic sequelae of radiation exposure have been identified. There are several near-term novel therapies that appear to offer excellent prognosis for radiation casualties, and these are also described.

  15. Effect of MgSO4 on the contents of Ca2+ in brain cell and NO in brain tissue of rats with radiation-induced acute brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Wenjia; Cui Fengmei; Liu Ping; He Chao; Tu Yu; Wang Lili

    2009-01-01

    The work is to explore the protection of magnesium sulfate(MgSO 4 ) on radiation-induced acute brain injury. Thirty six mature Sprague-Dawley(SD) rats were randomly divided into 3 groups of control, experimental control and experimental therapy group. The whole brains of SD rats of experimental control and experimental therapy group were irradiated with a dose of 20 Gy using 6 MeV electron beam. MgSO 4 was injected into the abdomen of experimental therapy rats group 1 day before, immediately and continue for 5 days after irradiation respectively. The brain tissues were taken on 3, 10, 17 and 24 d after irradiation. Ca 2+ content in brain cell was measured by laser scanning confocal microscopy, and the NO content in brain tissue was detected by the method of nitric acid reductase. Compared with the blank control group, the contents of Ca 2+ in brain cell and NO in brain tissue of the experimental control group increase (P 4 used in early stage can inhibit the contents of Ca 2+ in brain cell and NO in brain tissue after radiation-induced acute brain injury. It means that MgSO 4 has a protective effect on radiation-induced acute brain injury. (authors)

  16. Radiation-induced heart injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yoshihiko; Niibe, Hideo

    1975-01-01

    In order to identify radiation-induced heart injury and to differentiate it from heart disease, an attempt was made to clarify post-irradiation heart injury by investigating the histological changes which occur during the internal between the irradiation and the time of demonstrable histological changes. A study was made of 83 autopsies in which most of the primary neoplasms were breast cancers, lung cancers and mediastinal tumors. In 43 of these autopsies the heart had been irradiated. Sixty eight dd-strain mice were also used for microautoradiographic study. Histological changes in the heart were observed in 27 of the 43 cases receiving irradiation. The limit of the tolerance dose to the heart for indicating histological changes was 1220 ret in humans. The latent period without histological changes was 2.7 months after initiation of radiation therapy. Greater heart injury was observed after re-irradiation or after the combined therapy of radiation and chemotherapy especially mitomycin (MMC). The histological findings after treatment with MMC were similar to those of radiation-induced heart injury. Results of the study indicate that the damage is secondary to radiation-induced changes of the vascula connective tissue. (Evans, G.)

  17. Automated acute kidney injury alerts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashani, Kianoush B

    2018-05-02

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the most common and probably one of the more consequential complications of critical illnesses. Recent information indicates that it is at least partially preventable; however, progress in its prevention, management, and treatment has been hindered by the scarcity of knowledge for effective interventions, inconsistencies in clinical practices, late identification of patients at risk for or with AKI, and limitations of access to best practices for prevention and management of AKI. Growing use of electronic health records has provided a platform for computer science to engage in data mining and processing, not only for early detection of AKI but also for the development of risk-stratification strategies and computer clinical decision-support (CDS) systems. Despite promising perspectives, the literature regarding the impact of AKI electronic alerts and CDS systems has been conflicting. Some studies have reported improvement in care processes and patient outcomes, whereas others have shown no effect on clinical outcomes and yet demonstrated an increase in the use of resources. These discrepancies are thought to be due to multiple factors that may be related to technology, human factors, modes of delivery of information to clinical providers, and level of expectations regarding the impact on patient outcomes. This review appraises the current body of knowledge and provides some outlines regarding research into and clinical aspects of CDS systems for AKI. Copyright © 2018 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Contribution of Neutrophils to Acute Lung Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Grommes, Jochen; Soehnlein, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of acute lung injury (ALI) and its most severe form, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), remain unsolved problems of intensive care medicine. ALI/ARDS are characterized by lung edema due to increased permeability of the alveolar-capillary barrier and subsequent impairment of arterial oxygenation. Lung edema, endothelial and epithelial injury are accompanied by an influx of neutrophils into the interstitium and broncheoalveolar space. Hence, activation and recruitment of neut...

  19. Radiation injuries and recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauly, H.

    1974-01-01

    In memory of Prof. Dr. Langendorff, a survey and a cross-section are given of the development of radiobiology during the last 40 years. The importance of radiobiology is shown using several examples. The mechanisms and effects of radiation on man, animals and plants are discussed. Effects of radiation and radiolesious are explained down ot the molecular field, and their importance is discussed quantitatively with stochastic considerations. Stress is laid upon recovering from radiolesious. It is tried to explain recovery quantitatively in all its several sorts. Using all these deliberations, the author also tries to give a wide spectrum for radiation protection. These fundamental deliberations and works of Prof. Dr. Langendorff are guidelines of great importance also for radiation protection in connection with the protection of the civil population. (GSE) [de

  20. Acute pulmonary injury: high-resolution CT and histopathological spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obadina, E T; Torrealba, J M

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury usually causes hypoxaemic respiratory failure and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Although diffuse alveolar damage is the hallmark of ARDS, other histopathological patterns of injury, such as acute and fibrinoid organising pneumonia, can be associated with acute respiratory failure. Acute eosinophilic pneumonia can also cause acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure and mimic ARDS. This pictorial essay reviews the high-resolution CT findings of acute lung injury and the correlative histopathological findings. PMID:23659926

  1. The acute radiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souhami Filho, L.

    1985-01-01

    Symptoms and signs from medical aspects resulting from whole body exposure, or in the main part, to ionizing radiation are described. The dose-response relationship is studied and the exposure is divided in three parts: central nervous system syndrome, gastrointestinal syndrome and hematopoietic syndrome. Brief comments about the treatment are reported. (M.A.C.) [pt

  2. MR imaging of acute cervical spine injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyu Hwa; Lee, Jung Hyung; Joo, Yang Goo [School of Medicine, Keimyung University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-01-15

    To describe magnetic resonance (MR) findings of the patients with acute cervical spinal injury and to assess the usefulness of the MR imagings. We retrospectively reviewed the MR images of 32 patients with acute cervical spinal injury. MR images were obtained with a 2.0 T superconductive MR imaging units (Spectro-20000, Gold-Star, Seoul), using spin-echo and gradient-echo technique. Most of patients were in their 3rd-4th decades and motor vehicle accident was the most frequent cause of acute cervical trauma. We assessed the MR findings with respect to the spinal cord, ligaments, paravertebral soft tissues, intervertebral disk, and bony spine. Spinal cord injury was the most common (65%), where cord swelling, edema, and/or hematoma were demonstrated most frequently at C5-6 level. Traumatic intervertebral disk herniations were the second most common (62.5%) and frequently occurred at the lower cervical levels, mostly at C5-6. Paravertebral soft tissue injury, vertebral body fracture, bone marrow edema and displacement were also well shown on MR images. MR imaging appears to be essential for the evaluation of traumatic disk herniations, spinal cord abnormalities, and injury of paravertebral soft tissue in the acute injury of the cervical spine.

  3. MR imaging of acute cervical spine injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyu Hwa; Lee, Jung Hyung; Joo, Yang Goo

    1995-01-01

    To describe magnetic resonance (MR) findings of the patients with acute cervical spinal injury and to assess the usefulness of the MR imagings. We retrospectively reviewed the MR images of 32 patients with acute cervical spinal injury. MR images were obtained with a 2.0 T superconductive MR imaging units (Spectro-20000, Gold-Star, Seoul), using spin-echo and gradient-echo technique. Most of patients were in their 3rd-4th decades and motor vehicle accident was the most frequent cause of acute cervical trauma. We assessed the MR findings with respect to the spinal cord, ligaments, paravertebral soft tissues, intervertebral disk, and bony spine. Spinal cord injury was the most common (65%), where cord swelling, edema, and/or hematoma were demonstrated most frequently at C5-6 level. Traumatic intervertebral disk herniations were the second most common (62.5%) and frequently occurred at the lower cervical levels, mostly at C5-6. Paravertebral soft tissue injury, vertebral body fracture, bone marrow edema and displacement were also well shown on MR images. MR imaging appears to be essential for the evaluation of traumatic disk herniations, spinal cord abnormalities, and injury of paravertebral soft tissue in the acute injury of the cervical spine

  4. Medical management of the acute radiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, M.; Martin, M.

    2011-01-01

    The acute radiation syndrome (ARS) occurs after whole-body or significant partial-body irradiation (typically at a dose of >1 Gy). ARS can involve the hematopoietic, cutaneous, gastrointestinal and the neurovascular organ systems either individually or in combination. There is a correlation between the severity of clinical signs and symptoms of ARS and radiation dose. Radiation induced multi-organ failure (MOF) describes the progressive dysfunction of two or more organ systems over time. Radiation combined injury (RCI) is defined as radiation injury combined with blunt or penetrating trauma, burns, blast, or infection. The classic syndromes are: hematopoietic (doses >2 - 3 Gy), gastrointestinal (doses 5- 12 Gy) and cerebrovascular syndrome (doses 10 - 20 Gy). There is no possibility to survive after doses >10 - 12 Gy. The Phases of ARS are - prodromal: 0 - 2 days from exposure, latent: 2 - 20 days, and manifest illness: 21 - 60 days from exposure. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) at a dose of 5 micro g/kg body weight per day subcutaneously has been recommended as treatment of neutropenia, and antibiotics, antiviral and antifungal agents for prevention or treatment of infections. If taken within the first hours of contamination, stable iodine in the form of nonradioactive potassium iodide (KI) saturates iodine binding sites within the thyroid and inhibits incorporation of radioiodines into the gland. Finally, if severe aplasia persists under cytokines for more than 14 days, the possibility of a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation should be evaluated. This review will focus on the clinical aspects of the ARS, using the European triage system (METREPOL) to evaluate the severity of radiation injury, and scoring groups of patients for the general and specific management of the syndrome. (authors)

  5. Stem cell-based therapies for acute radiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guha, Chandan

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation in the event of accidental or intentional incident such as nuclear/radiological terrorism can lead to debilitating injuries to multiple organs resulting in death within days depending on the amount of radiation dose and the quality of radiation. Unfortunately, there is not a single FDA-licensed drug approved against acute radiation injury. The RadStem Center for Medical Countermeasures against Radiation (RadStem CMGR) program at Einstein is developing stem cell-based therapies to treat acute radiation syndrome (ARS). We have demonstrated that intravenous transplantation of bone marrow-derived and adipose-derived stromal cells, consisting of a mixture of mesenchymal, endothelial and myeloid progenitors can mitigate mice exposed to whole body irradiation of 12 Gy or whole abdominal irradiation of up to 20 Gy. We identified a variety of growth and differentiation factors that individually is unable to improve survival of animals exposed to lethal irradiation, but when administered sequentially mitigates radiation injury and improves survival. We termed this phenomenon as synthetic survival and describe a new paradigm whereby the 'synthetic survival' of irradiated tissues can be promoted by systemic administration of growth factors to amplify residual stem cell clonogens post-radiation exposure, followed by a differentiation factor that favors tissue stem cell differentiation. Synthetic survival can be applied to mitigate lethal radiation injury in multiple organs following radiation-induced hematopoeitic, gastrointestinal and pulmonary syndromes. (author)

  6. Repeated radiation injuries by fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilenko, I.Ya.

    1986-01-01

    Attention is given to repeated radiation injuries during internal irradiation of theoretical and practical interest, particularly in case of the intake into organism of young products of nuclear fission (PNF). The results of experiments with dogs with repeated radioactive iodine injury the isotopes of which (131-135sub(I)) constitute a considerable part of PNF activity are discussed. The blood reaction and protein metabolism state have been studied. Observations for dogs have been continued for about 4 years. The doses for thyroid, gastrointestinal tract and liver subjected to the most intensive irradiation consituted in the first series of experiments after the first intake about 3;0.3;0.05 Gy, after the second - 5;0.5;0.08 Gy and in the second series of experiments - 3;0.3;0.05 Gy and 0.6;0.06;0.01 Gy, respectively. Hematologic factors,thyroid function, changes in exchange and immunologic reactivity have been studied. The dogs have been under observation for 5 years. It is shown in case of repeated intake of Isup(131) PNF into animals organism in quantity which does not cause during the acute period a clinically outlined sickness, substantial differences in the organism reaction as compared with the first intake of radionuclides have not been found. The presence of residual radiation injuries did not cause charging action during the acute period during PNF and repeated intake which in the author's opinion testifies to perfection of compensator mechanisms in case of intake of such quantities of radioactive products. At the remote periods blastomogenic action manifested which is estimated as a result of general biological action of radionuclides administered to the organism. The necessity in subsequent investigations for obtaining the data on organism reactivity, clinic and pathogenesis with the aim of prophylaxis and treatment of such injuries is indicated

  7. Cell membranes in radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeteles, G.J.

    1986-01-01

    Cell membrane-related phenomena caused by low linear energy transfer radiation with doses lower than those producing cell killing are outlined. Micromorphological alterations as well as functional activities appearing with the receptors and in binding sites render it possible to reveal early and temporary changes. The cell injuries are suggested to transfer damaging conditions to surviving cells and to contribute to further development of non-stochastic effects in tissues

  8. Radiation-induced brain injury: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eRobbins

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 100,000 primary and metastatic brain tumor patients/year in the US survive long enough (> 6 months to experience radiation-induced brain injury. Prior to 1970, the human brain was thought to be highly radioresistant; the acute CNS syndrome occurs after single doses > 30 Gy; white matter necrosis occurs at fractionated doses > 60 Gy. Although white matter necrosis is uncommon with modern techniques, functional deficits, including progressive impairments in memory, attention, and executive function have become important, because they have profound effects on quality of life. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Given its central role in memory and neurogenesis, the majority of these studies have focused on the hippocampus. Irradiating pediatric and young adult rodent brains leads to several hippocampal changes including neuroinflammation and a marked reduction in neurogenesis. These data have been interpreted to suggest that shielding the hippocampus will prevent clinical radiation-induced cognitive impairment. However, this interpretation may be overly simplistic. Studies using older rodents, that more closely match the adult human brain tumor population, indicate that, unlike pediatric and young adult rats, older rats fail to show a radiation-induced decrease in neurogenesis or a loss of mature neurons. Nevertheless, older rats still exhibit cognitive impairment. This occurs in the absence of demyelination and/or white matter necrosis similar to what is observed clinically, suggesting that more subtle molecular, cellular and/or microanatomic modifications are involved in this radiation-induced brain injury. Given that radiation-induced cognitive impairment likely reflects damage to both hippocampal- and non-hippocampal-dependent domains, there is a critical need to investigate the microanatomic and functional effects of radiation in various brain

  9. New biomarkers of acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruya Ozelsancak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury is a clinical syndrome which is generally defined as an abrupt decline in glomerular filtration rate causing accumulation of nitrogenous products and rapid development of fluid, electrolyte and acid-base disorders. It is an important clinical problem increasing mortality in patient with several co-morbid conditions. The frequency of acute kidney injury occurrence varies from 5% on the inpatients wards to 30-50% in patients from intensive care units. Serial measurement of creatinine and urine volume do not make it possible to diagnose acute kidney injury at early stages. Serum creatinine may be influenced by age, weight, hydration status and become apparent only when the kidneys have lost 50% of their function. For that reasons we need new markers. Here, we are reviewing the most promising new acute kidney injury markers, neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin, cystatin-C, kidney injury molecule-1, liver fatty acid binding proteins and IL-18. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(2.000: 221-229

  10. Acute kidney injury with hypoxic respiratory failure

    OpenAIRE

    Neubert, Zachary; Hoffmann, Paul; Owshalimpur, David

    2014-01-01

    A 27-year-old Caucasian man was transferred from a remote clinic with acute kidney injury for the prior 7–10 days preceded by gastroenteritis. His kidney biopsy showed non-specific mesangiopathic glomerular changes, minimal tubulointerstitial disease without sclerosis, crescents, nor evidence of vasculitis. On his third hospital day, he developed acute hypoxic respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. Pulmonary renal syndromes ranked highest on his differential diag...

  11. CT diagnosis of acute spinal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohhama, Mitsuru; Niimiya, Hikosuke; Kimura, Ko; Yamazaki, Gyoji; Nasu, Yoshiro; Shioya, Akihide

    1982-01-01

    CT pictures of 22 acute spinal injuries with damage of the spinal cord were evaluated. In the cases of spinal cord damage with bone injury, changes in the vertebral canal were fully observed by CT. In some of spinal cord damages without bone injury, narrowing of the vertebral canal was demonstrated by CT combined with CT myelography and reconstruction. Evaluation of CT number showed a high density area in damaged spinal cord in some cases. CT was thus considered to be useful as an adjunct diagnostic aid. (Ueda, J.)

  12. Acute lung injury induces cardiovascular dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suda, Koichi; Tsuruta, Masashi; Eom, Jihyoun

    2011-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is associated with systemic inflammation and cardiovascular dysfunction. IL-6 is a biomarker of this systemic response and a predictor of cardiovascular events, but its possible causal role is uncertain. Inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting β2 agonists (ICS/LABA) down-r...

  13. Causes and Outcome of Acute Kidney Injury: Gezira Experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: A precise operational definition of acute kidney injury remains elusive. Conceptually, acute kidney injury is defined as the loss of renal function, measured by decline in glomerular filtration rate, developing over a period of hours to days. Clinical manifestations of acute kidney injury (AKI) are highly variable; ...

  14. Radiation injury to the nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutin, P.H.; Leibel, S.A.; Sneline, G.E.

    1991-01-01

    This book is designed to describe to the radiation biologist, radiation oncologist, neurologist, neurosurgeon, medical oncologist, and neuro-oncologist, the current state of knowledge about the tolerance of the nervous system to various kinds of radiation, the mechanisms of radiation injury, and how nervous system tolerance and injury are related to the more general problem of radiation damage to normal tissue of all types. The information collected here should stimulate interest in and facilitate the growing research effort into radiation injury to the nervous system

  15. Differential diagnosis of radiation injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, F

    1971-04-01

    A single haematological alteration is not sufficient to diagnose whether it is a radiation-induced change or not. For the differential diagnosis of possibly radiation-induced changes in the peripheral blood and blood-forming organs, information on the radiation exposure in terms of time, quality, quantity and localization, and the clinical symptoms have to be taken into account. Ionizing radiation within the dosage range considered here produces cell division delay, mitotic inhibition, chromosomal damage or interphase cell death; it thereby interferes with the steady-state equilibria in the cell-renewal systems of the organism (Bond et al., 1965; Little, 1968). The cause of haematological changes appearing immediately after a short-term, external whole-body radiation exposure has been described and analysed elsewhere in this Manual. The critical cell component is the 'stem cell compartment' which is highly radiosensitive and suffers damage but, because stem cells cannot be identified morphologically, a direct study of stem cell injury is not possible.

  16. Extravascular Lung Water and Acute Lung Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Maharaj

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury carries a high burden of morbidity and mortality and is characterised by nonhydrostatic pulmonary oedema. The aim of this paper is to highlight the role of accurate quantification of extravascular lung water in diagnosis, management, and prognosis in “acute lung injury” and “acute respiratory distress syndrome”. Several studies have verified the accuracy of both the single and the double transpulmonary thermal indicator techniques. Both experimental and clinical studies were searched in PUBMED using the term “extravascular lung water” and “acute lung injury”. Extravascular lung water measurement offers information not otherwise available by other methods such as chest radiography, arterial blood gas, and chest auscultation at the bedside. Recent data have highlighted the role of extravascular lung water in response to treatment to guide fluid therapy and ventilator strategies. The quantification of extravascular lung water may predict mortality and multiorgan dysfunction. The limitations of the dilution method are also discussed.

  17. Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragaller Maximillian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Every year, more information accumulates about the possibility of treating patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome with specially designed mechanical ventilation strategies. Ventilator modes, positive end-expiratory pressure settings, and recruitment maneuvers play a major role in these strategies. However, what can we take from these experimental and clinical data to the clinical practice? In this article, we discuss substantial options of mechanical ventilation together with some adjunctive therapeutic measures, such as prone positioning and inhalation of nitric oxide.

  18. Acute alcohol-induced liver injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin Edward Arteel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol consumption is customary in most cultures and alcohol abuse is common worldwide. For example, more than 50% of Americans consume alcohol, with an estimated 23.1% of Americans participating in heavy and/or binge drinking at least once a month. A safe and effective therapy for alcoholic liver disease (ALD in humans is still elusive, despite significant advances in our understanding of how the disease is initiated and progresses. It is now clear that acute alcohol binges not only can be acutely toxic to the liver, but also can contribute to the chronicity of ALD. Potential mechanisms by which acute alcohol causes damage include steatosis, dysregulated immunity and inflammation and altered gut permeability. Recent interest in modeling acute alcohol exposure has yielded new insights into potential mechanisms of acute injury, that also may well be relevant for chronic ALD. Recent work by this group on the role of PAI-1 and fibrin metabolism in mediating acute alcohol-induced liver damage serve as an example of possible new targets that may be useful for alcohol abuse, be it acute or chronic.

  19. General aspects of radiation injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitabatake, T [Niigata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1974-12-01

    Radiation injury in living organisms was discussed. Physical effects of nuclear irradiation fell into two categories: early effects and late effects. The former occurred invariably by nuclear irradiation above a certain dose, but the latter occurred according to the probability based on the exposure dosage. Late effects included cancer and leukemia which had no specific pathology as compared with non-irradiation induced or leukemia, and their latent periods were long. Because of difficulty in clarifying the cause-and-effect relationship, etiological studies such as McKenzie's or Myrden's, were required. In their studies on the relationship between fluoroscopy and thoracic malignant tumors, prognoses of pulmonary tuberculosis patients who had or had not received multiple fluoroscopies during artificial pneumothorax treatment were followed. The results showed no significant difference between the two groups of patients. Nuclear radiation induced leukemia corresponded to the exposure dose. According to that, exposure dosage of radiological workers was reduced yearly. The latent period of people having low exposure was comparatively prolonged. Medical exposure in radiation therapy was confined to the affected areas and to a small number of patients, although the exposure dose was high. On the other hand, exposure for medical diagnosis was criticized because in spite of its low exposure dose, the exposed population was extremely large.

  20. Radiation injuries of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galantseva, G.F.

    1982-01-01

    The review is given of factors which cause the beginning of radiation injuries of oral cavity in oncologic patients following radiotherapy: dose rate absorbed with tumor and surrounding healthy tissues; irradiation procedures; size of irradiated volume. Pathogenesis and clinical picture are considered as well as prophylaxis and tactics of treatments of patients with radiation injuries of oral cavity

  1. Sodium hypochlorite-induced acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon W Peck

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sodium hypochlorite (bleach is commonly used as an irrigant during dental proce-dures as well as a topical antiseptic agent. Although it is generally safe when applied topically, reports of accidental injection of sodium hypochlorite into tissue have been reported. Local necrosis, pain and nerve damage have been described as a result of exposure, but sodium hypo-chlorite has never been implicated as a cause of an acute kidney injury (AKI. In this report, we describe the first case of accidental sodium hypochlorite injection into the infraorbital tissue during a dental procedure that precipitated the AKI. We speculate that oxidative species induced by sodium hypochlorite caused AKI secondary to the renal tubular injury, causing mild acute tubular necrosis.

  2. Contribution of neutrophils to acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grommes, Jochen; Soehnlein, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of acute lung injury (ALI) and its most severe form, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), remain unsolved problems of intensive care medicine. ALI/ARDS are characterized by lung edema due to increased permeability of the alveolar-capillary barrier and subsequent impairment of arterial oxygenation. Lung edema, endothelial and epithelial injury are accompanied by an influx of neutrophils into the interstitium and broncheoalveolar space. Hence, activation and recruitment of neutrophils are regarded to play a key role in progression of ALI/ARDS. Neutrophils are the first cells to be recruited to the site of inflammation and have a potent antimicrobial armour that includes oxidants, proteinases and cationic peptides. Under pathological circumstances, however, unregulated release of these microbicidal compounds into the extracellular space paradoxically can damage host tissues. This review focuses on the mechanisms of neutrophil recruitment into the lung and on the contribution of neutrophils to tissue damage in ALI.

  3. Fluid management in acute kidney injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, Anders; Prowle, John; Joannidis, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) and fluids are closely linked through oliguria, which is a marker of the former and a trigger for administration of the latter. Recent progress in this field has challenged the physiological and clinical rational of using oliguria as a trigger for the administration...... of crystalloids and colloids on kidney function and the effect of various resuscitation and de-resuscitation strategies on the course and outcome of AKI....

  4. Radiation-induced brain injury: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene-Schloesser, Dana; Robbins, Mike E.; Peiffer, Ann M.; Shaw, Edward G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest School of Medicine,, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Brain Tumor Center of Excellence, Wake Forest School of Medicine,, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Wheeler, Kenneth T. [Brain Tumor Center of Excellence, Wake Forest School of Medicine,, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Department of Radiology, Wake Forest School of Medicine,, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Chan, Michael D., E-mail: mrobbins@wakehealth.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest School of Medicine,, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Brain Tumor Center of Excellence, Wake Forest School of Medicine,, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2012-07-19

    Approximately 100,000 primary and metastatic brain tumor patients/year in the US survive long enough (>6 months) to experience radiation-induced brain injury. Prior to 1970, the human brain was thought to be highly radioresistant; the acute CNS syndrome occurs after single doses >30 Gy; white matter necrosis occurs at fractionated doses >60 Gy. Although white matter necrosis is uncommon with modern techniques, functional deficits, including progressive impairments in memory, attention, and executive function have become important, because they have profound effects on quality of life. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Given its central role in memory and neurogenesis, the majority of these studies have focused on the hippocampus. Irradiating pediatric and young adult rodent brains leads to several hippocampal changes including neuroinflammation and a marked reduction in neurogenesis. These data have been interpreted to suggest that shielding the hippocampus will prevent clinical radiation-induced cognitive impairment. However, this interpretation may be overly simplistic. Studies using older rodents, that more closely match the adult human brain tumor population, indicate that, unlike pediatric and young adult rats, older rats fail to show a radiation-induced decrease in neurogenesis or a loss of mature neurons. Nevertheless, older rats still exhibit cognitive impairment. This occurs in the absence of demyelination and/or white matter necrosis similar to what is observed clinically, suggesting that more subtle molecular, cellular and/or microanatomic modifications are involved in this radiation-induced brain injury. Given that radiation-induced cognitive impairment likely reflects damage to both hippocampal- and non-hippocampal-dependent domains, there is a critical need to investigate the microanatomic and functional effects of radiation in various brain regions as well as their

  5. Radiation-induced brain injury: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene-Schloesser, Dana; Robbins, Mike E.; Peiffer, Ann M.; Shaw, Edward G.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Chan, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 100,000 primary and metastatic brain tumor patients/year in the US survive long enough (>6 months) to experience radiation-induced brain injury. Prior to 1970, the human brain was thought to be highly radioresistant; the acute CNS syndrome occurs after single doses >30 Gy; white matter necrosis occurs at fractionated doses >60 Gy. Although white matter necrosis is uncommon with modern techniques, functional deficits, including progressive impairments in memory, attention, and executive function have become important, because they have profound effects on quality of life. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Given its central role in memory and neurogenesis, the majority of these studies have focused on the hippocampus. Irradiating pediatric and young adult rodent brains leads to several hippocampal changes including neuroinflammation and a marked reduction in neurogenesis. These data have been interpreted to suggest that shielding the hippocampus will prevent clinical radiation-induced cognitive impairment. However, this interpretation may be overly simplistic. Studies using older rodents, that more closely match the adult human brain tumor population, indicate that, unlike pediatric and young adult rats, older rats fail to show a radiation-induced decrease in neurogenesis or a loss of mature neurons. Nevertheless, older rats still exhibit cognitive impairment. This occurs in the absence of demyelination and/or white matter necrosis similar to what is observed clinically, suggesting that more subtle molecular, cellular and/or microanatomic modifications are involved in this radiation-induced brain injury. Given that radiation-induced cognitive impairment likely reflects damage to both hippocampal- and non-hippocampal-dependent domains, there is a critical need to investigate the microanatomic and functional effects of radiation in various brain regions as well as their

  6. Coronary heart disease is not significantly linked to acute kidney injury identified using Acute Kidney Injury Group criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yayan, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Patients with unstable angina or myocardial infarction are at risk of acute kidney injury, which may be aggravated by the iodine-containing contrast agent used during coronary angiography; however, the relationship between these two conditions remains unclear. The current study investigated the relationship between acute kidney injury and coronary heart disease prior to coronary angiography. All patients were evaluated after undergoing coronary angiography in the cardiac catheterization laboratory of the Vinzentius Hospital in Landau, Germany, in 2011. The study group included patients with both acute coronary heart disease and acute kidney injury (as defined according to the classification of the Acute Kidney Injury Group); the control group included patients without acute coronary heart disease. Serum creatinine profiles were evaluated in all patients, as were a variety of demographic and health characteristics. Of the 303 patients examined, 201 (66.34%) had coronary artery disease. Of these, 38 (18.91%) also had both acute kidney injury and acute coronary heart disease prior to and after coronary angiography, and of which in turn 34 (16.91%) had both acute kidney injury and acute coronary heart disease only prior to the coronary angiography. However, the occurrence of acute kidney injury was not significantly related to the presence of coronary heart disease (P = 0.95, Chi-square test). The results of this study indicate that acute kidney injury is not linked to acute coronary heart disease. However, physicians should be aware that many coronary heart patients may develop kidney injury while hospitalized for angiography.

  7. Radiation injury to skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persons, C.C.M.; Wondergem, J.; Leer, J.W.H.

    1997-01-01

    Radiotherapy of neoplasia has increased the mean life expectancy of cancer patients. On the other hand, more reports are published on morbidity of the treatment with regard to normal tissue. Studies on skeletal muscle injury specifically are scarce, but many clinical long term follow-up studies make note of side effects as muscle atrophy, fibrosis and limited function. Furthermore it is suggested that skeletal muscles of children are more prone to radiation injury than those of adult subjects. Effects of radiation on skeletal muscle were studied in rats. On hind limb of young (100 g) and adult (350 g) rats was irradiated with single doses (15-30 Gy), while the other served as control. Follow-up was up to 12 months post treatment. Muscular function in young rats was decreased significantly at 6 months post irradiation, but did not further decrease in the following 6 months. The amount of collagen, on the other hand, was not increased at 6 months, but became highly elevated at 12 months past treatment. This suggests that at 6 months, impaired muscular function may not be explained by increased fibrotic tissues. This is an agreement with results obtained in adult rats, where function was also impaired, without concomitant increase in collagen. In an earlier study, mitochondrial oxygen consumption was dose dependently decreased after irradiation, at 12 months, but not at 6 months post treatment. Furthermore, myosin-actin interaction was measured in skinned fibers. The first results of this study indicate changes in the interaction of contraction proteins, as early as 6 months post treatment. (authors)

  8. Preventive treatment of combined radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudagov, R.; Uljanova, L.; Makarov, G.

    1996-01-01

    The risk of sepsis development increases when thermal burns and other trauma occur in combination with exposure to radiation. Only surgical correction of the life-threatening state recommends within 48 hours after irradiation. All other arrangements have to carry out when hemopoiesis recovery will complete. However exposed patients with combined injuries (CI) die during the first two or three weeks mainly due to sepsis. Therefore prophylaxis and preventive therapy of infectious complications are need early. Actual difficulties in choice of valid treatment procedure for acute radiation syndrome (ARS) exhibit additional aggravation under CI. The available facts prove decreasing early therapy efficiency for rather high dose exposure and wound trauma occurrence. The own results showed that bacterial polysaccharide pyrogenal, glycopin (synthetic analogue of muramil-dipeptide), thymus preparations (thymozin, thymotropin, thymogen), tuftsin, heterologic human and bovine immunoglobulins did not modify the low values of 30-day survival under CI (irradiation + thermal burn). Single injection of prodigiozan, zymozan and some other yeast polysaccharides in 1 hr after CI resulted at moderate increasing of survival. The main purpose of this study, which bases upon our understanding of CI pathogenesis, was search more effective means for preventive treatment of combined radiation injuries. Two groups of remedies were under study. The first group included so called 'biological response modifiers' (BRM). These agents may increase host defences to infection, macrophage's activity and hemopoietic growth factor's secretion. The second group included antibiotics that should be directed against the potential gram-negative as well as gram-positive pathogens and simultaneously be useful for selective decontamination of gastrointestinal tract. (author)

  9. Interleukin-1 and acute brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie N Murray

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is the key host-defense response to infection and injury, yet also a major contributor to a diverse range of diseases, both peripheral and central in origin. Brain injury as a result of stroke or trauma is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide, yet there are no effective treatments, resulting in enormous social and economic costs. Increasing evidence, both preclinical and clinical, highlights inflammation as an important factor in stroke, both in determining outcome and as a contributor to risk. A number of inflammatory mediators have been proposed as key targets for intervention to reduce the burden of stroke, several reaching clinical trial, but as yet yielding no success. Many factors could explain these failures, including the lack of robust preclinical evidence and poorly designed clinical trials, in addition to the complex nature of the clinical condition. Lack of consideration in preclinical studies of associated co-morbidities prevalent in the clinical stroke population is now seen as an important omission in previous work. These co-morbidities (atherosclerosis, hypertension, diabetes, infection have a strong inflammatory component, supporting the need for greater understanding of how inflammation contributes to acute brain injury. Interleukin (IL-1 is the prototypical pro-inflammatory cytokine, first identified many years ago as the endogenous pyrogen. Research over the last 20 years or so reveals that IL-1 is an important mediator of neuronal injury and blocking the actions of IL-1 is beneficial in a number of experimental models of brain damage. Mechanisms underlying the actions of IL-1 in brain injury remain unclear, though increasing evidence indicates the cerebrovasculature as a key target. Recent literature supporting this and other aspects of how IL-1 and systemic inflammation in general contribute to acute brain injury are discussed in this review.

  10. Acute irradiation syndrome : radiation disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestries, J.C.; Multon, E.

    1995-01-01

    It is classically assumed that the symptomatology of the acute radiation syndrome is mainly due to stem and progenitor cells death in compartimentalized tissues, particularly in bone marrow and intestine. Our observations on baboons, irradiated with a mixed neutron/gamma or a gamma radiation, showed that the whole organism response plays a major role. There is an inflammatory syndrome, not only during the prodromal phase, but also a second one, that precedes and accompanies the manifest-illness phase. This inflammatory syndrome was associated with coagulation disorders which are largely responsible for bleeding. This syndrome makes the therapeutic approach more complicated since some cytokines, which could be able to improve the hematopoietic cells recovery (e.g. IL-6), exhibit pro-inflammatory activities as well. Regarding radiobiological triage, no biological marker has a prognosis value during the first days following a radiation exposure, for those individuals exposed to around a LD50. On the contrary, some inflammation markers allow to anticipate a fatal issue, without any treatment, as early as the beginning of the manifest-illness phase. (authors). 10 refs., 11 figs

  11. Acute liver failure and acute kidney injury: Definitions, prognosis, and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Włodzimirow, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to investigate definitions, prognostic indicators and their association with adverse events, mainly mortality for acute liver failure (ALF), acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) and acute kidney injury (AKI).

  12. Treatment and prevention of acute radiation dermatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benomar, S.; Hassam, B.; Boutayeb, S.; Errihani, H.; Lalya, I.; El Gueddari, B.K.

    2010-01-01

    Acute radiation dermatitis is a common side-effect of radiotherapy which often necessitates interruption of the therapy. Currently, there is no general consensus about its prevention or about the treatment of choice. The goal of this work was to focus on optimal methods to prevent and manage acute skin reactions related to radiation therapy and to determine if there are specific topical or oral agents for the prevention of this acute skin reaction. The prevention and the early treatment are the two focus points of the management of the acute radiation dermatitis. (authors)

  13. Acute injury of the ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    The diagnosis of lateral collateral ankle ligament trauma is based on patient history, clinical examination, and clinical stress tests. If the clinical stress test is positive, stress radiography could be performed. There is no consensus about the usefulness of stress radiography in acute ankle sprain, particularly about the cut-off talar tilt angle beyond which a two-ligament rupture would be certain, ranging from 5 to 30 . Today MRI is not used for this indication, although it allows, with controlled positioning of the foot and with defined sections, visualization of injured lateral collateral ankle ligaments. In ankle injuries, plain radiographs form the established basis of diagnostic imaging and can provide definitive answers in most cases. CT is used in complex fractures for complete visualization. MRI is the method of choice for several diagnostic problem cases, including occult fractures and post-traumatic avascular necrosis. In tendon injuries, MRI is important if ultrasound is not diagnostic. Generally, for the evaluation of acute ankle injuries, MRI is the most important second-step procedure when radiographs are nondiagnostic. (orig.) [de

  14. Management of acute unstable acromioclavicular joint injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros, Luis Natera; Reiriz, Juan Sarasquete

    2016-12-01

    Surgical management of acute unstable acromioclavicular joint injuries should be focused on realigning the torn ends of the ligaments to allow for healing potential. The most widely utilized treatment methods incorporate the use of metal hardware, which can alter the biomechanics of the acromioclavicular joint. This leads to a second surgical procedure for hardware removal once the ligaments have healed. Patients with unstable acromioclavicular joint injuries managed with arthroscopy-assisted procedures have shown good and excellent clinical outcomes, without the need for a second operation. These procedures incorporate a coracoclavicular suspension device aimed to function as an internal brace, narrowing the coracoclavicular space thus allowing for healing of the torn coracoclavicular ligaments. The lesser morbidity of a minimally invasive approach and the possibility to diagnose and treat concomitant intraarticular injuries; no obligatory implant removal, and the possibility of having a straight visualization of the inferior aspect of the base of the coracoid (convenient when placing coracoclavicular fixation systems) are the main advantages of the arthroscopic approach over classic open procedures. This article consists on a narrative review of the literature in regard to the management of acute acromioclavicular joint instability.

  15. Radiation injury claims: an overview and update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaffer, W.G.

    1984-01-01

    The author reviews the radiation injury claims problem and summarizes the legal framework in which the claims are presently brought. Two cases are reviewed in which the decisions are troubling. The implications of these decisions are discussed in the overall radiation injury claims problem. The author notes that in the largest radiation injury case tried in the United States, the court was unable to resolve the claims within the confines of the existing law. The disregard for established norms of adjudication and the resultant decline in predictability of outcome portends grave consequences, not only for the nuclear industry but for other industries involved with potentially toxic substances

  16. approach to and management of acute ankle ligamentous injuries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    Tibionavicular part. Medial (deltoid) ligament of ankle {. Table I. Differential diagnosis of acute ankle injury. ATFL sprain. CFL sprain. Syndesmosis sprain. Anterior process calcaneus fracture. Lateral process talus fracture. Fifth metatarsal base fracture. Subtalar injury. Peroneal tendon injury. Osteochondral injury of the talus.

  17. Acute kidney injury in the cancer patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, G Adam; Hu, Daniel; Okusa, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent and significant complication of cancer and cancer therapy. Cancer patients frequently encounter risk factors for AKI including older age, CKD, prerenal conditions, sepsis, exposure to nephrotoxins, and obstructive physiology. AKI can also be secondary to paraneoplastic conditions, including glomerulonephritis and microangiopathic processes. This complication can have significant consequences, including effects on patients' ability to continue to receive therapy for their malignancy. This review will serve to summarize potential etiologies of AKI that present in patients with cancer as well as to highlight specific patient populations, such as the critically ill cancer patient. Copyright © 2014 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Determinants of postoperative acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelha, Fernando José; Botelho, Miguela; Fernandes, Vera; Barros, Henrique

    2009-01-01

    Development of acute kidney injury (AKI) during the perioperative period is associated with increases in morbidity and mortality. Our aim was to evaluate the incidence and determinants of postoperative AKI after major noncardiac surgery in patients with previously normal renal function. This retrospective cohort study was carried out in the multidisciplinary Post-Anaesthesia Care Unit (PACU) with five intensive care beds. The study population consisted of 1166 patients with no previous renal insufficiency who were admitted to these intensive care unit (ICU) beds over 2 years. After admission patients were followed for the development of AKI, defined as proposed by The Acute Kidney Injury Network (increment of serum creatinine [greater than or equal to] 0.3 mg/dL or 50% from baseline within 48 hours or urine output 6 hours despite fluid resuscitation when applicable). Patient preoperative characteristics, intraoperative management and outcome were evaluated for associations with acute kidney injury using an univariate and multiple logistic regression model. A total of 1597 patients were admitted to the PACU and of these, 1166 met the inclusion criteria. Eighty-seven patients (7.5%) met AKI criteria. Univariate analysis identified age, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status, emergency surgery, high risk surgery, ischemic heart disease, congestive heart disease and Revised Cardiac Risk Index (RCRI) score as independent preoperative determinants for AKI in the postoperative period. Multivariate analysis identified ASA physical status, RCRI score, high risk surgery and congestive heart disease as preoperative determinants for AKI in the postoperative period. Patients that developed AKI had higher Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II, higher PACU length of stay (LOS), higher PACU mortality, higher hospital mortality and higher mortality at 6 months follow-up. AKI was an independent

  19. Carnosine may reduce lung injury caused by radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guney, Yildiz; Turkcu, Ummuhani Ozel; Hicsonmez, Ayse; Andrieu, Meltem Nalca; Guney, H Zafer; Bilgihan, Ayse; Kurtman, Cengiz

    2006-01-01

    Ionising radiation is known one of the most effective tools in the therapy of cancer but in many thoracic cancers, the total prescribed dose of radiation that can be safely administered to the target volume is limited by the risk of complications arising in the normal lung tissue. One of the major reasons for cellular injury after radiation is the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Radiation pneumonitis is an acute phase side-effect which generally subsides after a few weeks and is followed by a chronic phase characterized by inflammation and fibrosis, that can develop months or years after irradiation. Carnosine is a dipeptide composed by the amino acids beta-histidine and l-alanine. The exact biological role of carnosine is not totally understood, but several studies have demonstrated that it possesses strong and specific antioxidant properties, protects against radiation damage,and promotes wound healing. The antioxidant mechanism of carnosine is attributed to its chelating effect against metal ions, superoxide dismutase (SOD)-like activity, ROS and free radicals scavenging ability . Either its antioxidant or anti-inflammatuar properties, we propose that carnosine ameliorates irradiation-induced lung injury. Thus, supplementing cancer patients to whom applied radiation therapy with carnosine, may provide an alleviation of the symptoms due to radiation-induced lung injury. This issue warrants further studies.

  20. Combination of radiation injuries: pathogenesis, clinic, therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsyba, A.F.; Farshatova, M.N.

    1993-01-01

    Modern notions on combined radiation injuries (CRI) are presented. Characteristic of injurious factors of nuclear explosion and common regularities of the CRI origination is given. The data on the CRI clinical peculiarities, diagnostics and treatment, principles of medical assistance for the injured on the stages of medical evacuation and recommendations on rehabilitation are presented

  1. Human models of acute lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alastair G. Proudfoot

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury (ALI is a syndrome that is characterised by acute inflammation and tissue injury that affects normal gas exchange in the lungs. Hallmarks of ALI include dysfunction of the alveolar-capillary membrane resulting in increased vascular permeability, an influx of inflammatory cells into the lung and a local pro-coagulant state. Patients with ALI present with severe hypoxaemia and radiological evidence of bilateral pulmonary oedema. The syndrome has a mortality rate of approximately 35% and usually requires invasive mechanical ventilation. ALI can follow direct pulmonary insults, such as pneumonia, or occur indirectly as a result of blood-borne insults, commonly severe bacterial sepsis. Although animal models of ALI have been developed, none of them fully recapitulate the human disease. The differences between the human syndrome and the phenotype observed in animal models might, in part, explain why interventions that are successful in models have failed to translate into novel therapies. Improved animal models and the development of human in vivo and ex vivo models are therefore required. In this article, we consider the clinical features of ALI, discuss the limitations of current animal models and highlight how emerging human models of ALI might help to answer outstanding questions about this syndrome.

  2. HemaMax™, a recombinant human interleukin-12, is a potent mitigator of acute radiation injury in mice and non-human primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena A Basile

    Full Text Available HemaMax, a recombinant human interleukin-12 (IL-12, is under development to address an unmet medical need for effective treatments against acute radiation syndrome due to radiological terrorism or accident when administered at least 24 hours after radiation exposure. This study investigated pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and efficacy of m-HemaMax (recombinant murine IL-12, and HemaMax to increase survival after total body irradiation (TBI in mice and rhesus monkeys, respectively, with no supportive care. In mice, m-HemaMax at an optimal 20 ng/mouse dose significantly increased percent survival and survival time when administered 24 hours after TBI between 8-9 Gy (p<0.05 Pearson's chi-square test. This survival benefit was accompanied by increases in plasma interferon-γ (IFN-γ and erythropoietin levels, recovery of femoral bone hematopoiesis characterized with the presence of IL-12 receptor β2 subunit-expressing myeloid progenitors, megakaryocytes, and osteoblasts. Mitigation of jejunal radiation damage was also examined. At allometrically equivalent doses, HemaMax showed similar pharmacokinetics in rhesus monkeys compared to m-HemaMax in mice, but more robustly increased plasma IFN-γ levels. HemaMax also increased plasma erythropoietin, IL-15, IL-18, and neopterin levels. At non-human primate doses pharmacologically equivalent to murine doses, HemaMax (100 ng/Kg and 250 ng/Kg administered at 24 hours after TBI (6.7 Gy/LD(50/30 significantly increased percent survival of HemaMax groups compared to vehicle (p<0.05 Pearson's chi-square test. This survival benefit was accompanied by a significantly higher leukocyte (neutrophils and lymphocytes, thrombocyte, and reticulocyte counts during nadir (days 12-14 and significantly less weight loss at day 12 compared to vehicle. These findings indicate successful interspecies dose conversion and provide proof of concept that HemaMax increases survival in irradiated rhesus monkeys by promoting

  3. Hymenoptera Stings and the Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashad Dongol

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Hymenoptera stings are a health concern. Apidae (bees, Vespidae (hornets, yellow jackets and wasps and Formicidae (ants are medically-important stinging insects under the order Hymenoptera. Clinical features from simple skin manifestations to severe and fatal organ injury are due to the hypersensitivity reactions and/ or the toxic effects of the venom inoculated. Here we discuss on Hymenoptera stings involving apids (honey bees and vespids (wasps, hornets and yellow jackets and their effect on renal function and associated morphological changes in the kidney. Despite the differences in venom composition and quantity released per sting in two insect groups, both lead to similar medical consequences, such as localised normal allergic reactions, mild to severe anaphylaxis and shock and multiple organ and tissue injury leading to multiple organ failure. Acute kidney injury (AKI is one of the unusual complications of Hymenoptera stings and has the basis of both immune-mediated and toxic effects. Evidence has proven that supportive therapy along with the standard medication is very efficient in completely restoring the kidney function without any recurrence.

  4. Considerations on the classification of acute radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhajlov, M.A.; Andreev, E.

    1975-01-01

    Radiation disease is a well-defined and extensively studied entity with typical signs and symptomatology. A basic point in establishing a classification is dose absorbed by the organism. The pattern of pathology displayed will vary with dose distribution in time and space. Acute radiation disease after single, overall exposure to a radiation level ranging from 100 to 1000 rem and above may be manifested in four main forms, according to the prevailing pathogenetic mechanism: cerebral, toxemic, intestinal, and a typical form dominated by injury to the hematopoietic system. In the course of the disease, three major periods may be distinguished: development, recovery, and long-term effects and outcome. These three periods will not necessarily be represented in all forms of radiation disease. As for the clinical symptomatology of acute radiation disease, its evolution allows the delineation of four phases: primary general reactions, latent period, clinical manifestation, and apparent recovery. In a typical form of acute radiation disease, severity of effects is a function of dose. Chronic radiation disease may also be of two varieties, depending on space distribution of dose. In addition, a third variety has been distinguished, namely the case of a combination of external exposure with internal contamination. Similar to the acute radiation disease, periods and degrees of severity in chronic radiation disease will vary with cumulative radiation dose. In this case, degrees of severity overlap with phases in the development of the pathological process. A category by itself in the classification is alloted to combined lesions resulting from exposure to radiological plus nonradiological factors. (A.B.)

  5. Possible radiation injury at Koeberg Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Rensburg, L.C.J.; De Villiers, B.; Van Zyl, C.J.

    1986-01-01

    Any injured patient from Koeberg Nuclear Power Station will be treated in the conventional manner as an acute surgical emergency; this has priority over decontamination. The ideal situation is decontamination at Koeberg before ambulance transferral to the Tygerberg Radiation Casualty Facility, but if this is not possible or complete, decontamination can be accomplished by a trained team in the unit. Teamwork is the essence at the place of injury, during transfer, in the decontamination area, in the operating theatre and during the postoperative phase. No surgical management is appropriate or complete without the very necessary guidance and advice from a physicist and the Advisory Group for Radiation Casualties

  6. Is contrast-enhanced CT indicated in acute head injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauser, H.W.; Nieuwenhuizen, O. van; Veiga-Pires, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The authors discuss the value of intravenous contrast enhancement in CT scanning in acute head injury. In a series of seventy consecutive patients they conclude that no incremental information was obtained by performing contrast-enhanced CT scans in the acute phase of the head injury. (orig.)

  7. The history of knowledge on radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuettmann, W.

    1988-01-01

    The possible endangering with the peaceful utilization of nuclear energy and the fateful threat of mankind by nuclear weapons in a world-wide extent keep the discussion on problems of radiation injuries and the national and international activities to avoid them as well running. In view of the burning discussions, the impression may rise that radiation injuries became aware to the human-being only recently. Actually this knowledge dats back to the turn of the century. The development of the knowledge on radiation injuries originating immediately after discovery of W.C. Roentgen in 1895 is presented concisely. The application of radiotherapy is taken into consideration. A historical retrospect in various sections deals with the initial period of radiogenic skin injuries, with the recognition of radiation injuries at the internal organs, the proof of carcinogenic effects of ionizing radiations and its mutagenic influence. Finally it is presented how experience gained during decades, is used as a basis for the conception of present radiation protection. (author)

  8. Radiation injury caused by internal contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petyrek, P.

    1988-01-01

    Basic data are given of radiation injury of the respiratory organs, digestive tract, hematogenous tissues and the thyroid due to internal contamination. Attention is drawn to the complexity of the problem and to the effect of the various factors affecting the picture and course of the radiation damage. The treatment is based on the assumption that fundamental is the damage of the stem cells of the critical organs. Discussed are also the basic clinical pictures that can occur due to internal contamination with activities causing radiation injury. (B.S.). 27 refs

  9. Diagnosis and treatment of radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalci, D.; Doerter, G.; Gueclue, I.

    2005-01-01

    This publication is the translation of IAEA Safety Reports Series No.2 ,Diagnosis and Treatment of Radiation Injuries. This report is directed at medical professionals who may be involved in the management of radiation injuries starting from the first few hours or days after an exposure of undefined severity. The principal aim of this publication is to provide guidelines to enable medical professionals to carry out prompt diagnostic measure and to offer emergency treatment. This report provides information in tabulated form on clinical criteria for dose assesment. Additionally, it discusses the appropriate dose-effect relationship in cases of external radiation involving either total body or local exposures, as well as internal contamination

  10. Management of radiation injuries of vulva and vagina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraunholz, I.B.; Schopohl, B.; Boettcher, H.D.

    1998-01-01

    Background: Acute and late injuries of vulva and vagina are frequent and potentially serious complications in radiotherapy of gynecologic tumors. They still are reported poorly in literature. Methods: Based on a literature search a survey will be given of the modalities, which are used or recommended for prophylaxis or treatment of these radiation injuries. The principles of the different measures will be discussed with available study results. Results: Hygiene measures and the topical application of antimicrobial or granulation stimulating substances, which is mostly based on long standing clinical experience, are the principles of the treatment of acute reactions of vulva and vagina. The topical use of estrogen, which promotes proliferation of epithelium, is generally described in connection with treatment and prophylaxis of late radiation injuries. As a prophylaxis for the late reaction of vaginal stenosis, vaginal dilatation is recommended in literature. Conclusion: With the exception of a few reports on estrogen, there are no data about the effectiveness of the currently used medical substances. The local application of estrogen as prophylaxis of the acute reactions will therefore be examined in a prospective study. (orig.) [de

  11. A case of acute kidney injury by near-drowning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, A; Lee, Y L

    2013-01-01

    Acute kidney injury following immersion or near-drowning is rarely described and no data from Malaysia have been found. We report a case of acute kidney injury following a near-drowning event. A 20-year-old man who recovered from near-drowning in a swimming pool 5 days earlier presented to our clinic with abdominal pain, anorexia, nausea and polyuria. Dipstick urinalysis showed a trace of blood. The serum creatinine level was 10-fold higher than the normal range. A bedside ultrasound showed features suggestive of acute tubular necrosis. He is then referred to the hospital with the diagnosis of acute kidney injury with the possibility of acute tubular necrosis secondary to near-drowning. We suggest that any patient presenting after immersion or near-drowning to be should assessed for potential acute kidney injury.

  12. A case of acute kidney injury by near-drowning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirah Amir

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury following immersion or near-drowning is rarely described and no data from Malaysia have been found. We report a case of acute kidney injury following a near-drowning event. A 20-yearold man who recovered from near-drowning in a swimming pool 5 days earlier presented to our clinic with abdominal pain, anorexia, nausea and polyuria. Dipstick urinalysis showed a trace of blood. The serum creatinine level was 10-fold higher than the normal range. A bedside ultrasound showed features suggestive of acute tubular necrosis. He is then referred to the hospital with the diagnosis of acute kidney injury with the possibility of acute tubular necrosis secondary to near-drowning. We suggest that any patient presenting after immersion or near-drowning to be should assessed for potential acute kidney injury

  13. Nursing Activities Score and Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Utuari de Andrade Coelho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the nursing workload in intensive care patients with acute kidney injury (AKI. Method: A quantitative study, conducted in an intensive care unit, from April to August of 2015. The Nursing Activities Score (NAS and Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO were used to measure nursing workload and to classify the stage of AKI, respectively. Results: A total of 190 patients were included. Patients who developed AKI (44.2% had higher NAS when compared to those without AKI (43.7% vs 40.7%, p <0.001. Patients with stage 1, 2 and 3 AKI showed higher NAS than those without AKI. A relationship was identified between stage 2 and 3 with those without AKI (p = 0.002 and p <0.001. Conclusion: The NAS was associated with the presence of AKI, the score increased with the progression of the stages, and it was associated with AKI, stage 2 and 3.

  14. Aerosolized prostacyclin for acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions that are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Aerosolized prostacyclin has been used to improve oxygenation despite the limited evidence available so far.......Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are critical conditions that are associated with high mortality and morbidity. Aerosolized prostacyclin has been used to improve oxygenation despite the limited evidence available so far....

  15. Acute radiation syndrome caused by accidental radiation exposure - therapeutic principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dörr Harald

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fortunately radiation accidents are infrequent occurrences, but since they have the potential of large scale events like the nuclear accidents of Chernobyl and Fukushima, preparatory planning of the medical management of radiation accident victims is very important. Radiation accidents can result in different types of radiation exposure for which the diagnostic and therapeutic measures, as well as the outcomes, differ. The clinical course of acute radiation syndrome depends on the absorbed radiation dose and its distribution. Multi-organ-involvement and multi-organ-failure need be taken into account. The most vulnerable organ system to radiation exposure is the hematopoietic system. In addition to hematopoietic syndrome, radiation induced damage to the skin plays an important role in diagnostics and the treatment of radiation accident victims. The most important therapeutic principles with special reference to hematopoietic syndrome and cutaneous radiation syndrome are reviewed.

  16. Acute kidney injury: definition, diagnosis and epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossaint, Jan; Zarbock, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication in hospitalized patients and great efforts by leading experts have been made in order to establish common definitions of AKI. The clinical use of these consensus definitions has led to a substantially improved understanding of AKI. In addition, the consensus definitions allow to compare AKI incidence and outcomes between different patient populations. As a result, it has become evident that AKI in the Western population represents a clinical syndrome with an incidence close to that of myocardial infarction. The aim of this review is to revisit the current concepts and definitions of AKI, to highlight its diagnosis, and to emphasize its epidemiological characteristics. Here, we will focus on the available literature reporting the epidemiology of AKI in critically ill patients. Sepsis, major surgery, and nephrotoxic drugs are the main causes of AKI in these patients, and its occurrence is associated with an increased risk for sustained chronic kidney injury. We also discuss the concept of renal angina as a possible future concept for improved clinical risk stratification to detect AKI. In this regard, we emphasize the importance of the use of novel biomarkers in the diagnosis of AKI, as they hold the potential to improve early diagnosis and prevention in the clinical setting.

  17. Acute kidney injury: Global health alert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Kam Tao Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is increasingly prevalent in developing and developed countries and is associated with severe morbidity and mortality. Most etiologies of AKI can be prevented by interventions at the individual, community, regional and in-hospital levels. Effective measures must include community-wide efforts to increase an awareness of the devastating effects of AKI and provide guidance on preventive strategies, as well as early recognition and management. Efforts should be focused on minimizing causes of AKI, increasing awareness of the importance of serial measurements of serum creatinine in high risk patients, and documenting urine volume in acutely ill people to achieve early diagnosis; there is as yet no definitive role for alternative biomarkers. Protocols need to be developed to systematically manage prerenal conditions and specific infections. More accurate data about the true incidence and clinical impact of AKI will help to raise the importance of the disease in the community, increase awareness of AKI by governments, the public, general and family physicians and other health care professionals to help prevent the disease. Prevention is the key to avoid the heavy burden of mortality and morbidity associated with AKI.

  18. Cell kinetics and acute lung injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witschi, H.P.; Whitaker, M.S.

    1987-01-01

    In order to estimate whether acute lung injury is followed by a stereotype pattern of cell proliferation in the lungs, mice were treated with three cytostatic drugs: cyclophosphamide, busulfan, or 1,3-Bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU). The alveolar labeling index was measured following drug administration with a pulse of 3 H-labeled thymidine and autoradiography. In cyclophosphamide treated animals, peak alveolar cell proliferation was seen 5 days after injection of the drug. In animals treated with busulfan or BCNU, proliferation was even more delayed (occurring 2 to 3 wks after administration). In contrast, with oleic acid, the highest alveolar cell labeling was found 2 days after intravenous administration. In animals exposed to a cytostatic drug, proliferation of type II alveolar cells was never a prominent feature; whereas, in animals treated with oleic acid there was an initial burst of type II cell proliferation. It was concluded that the patterns of pulmonary repair vary between chemical designed to interfere with DNA replication as compared to agents which produce acute lung damage such as oleic acid

  19. Cerebrovascular Acute Radiation Syndrome : Radiation Neurotoxins, Mechanisms of Toxicity, Neuroimmune Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava

    Introduction: Cerebrovascular Acute Radiation Syndrome (CvARS) is an extremely severe in-jury of Central Nervous System (CNS) and Peripheral Nervous System (PNS). CvARS can be induced by the high doses of neutron, heavy ions, or gamma radiation. The Syndrome clinical picture depends on a type, timing, and the doses of radiation. Four grades of the CvARS were defined: mild, moderate, severe, and extremely severe. Also, four stages of CvARS were developed: prodromal, latent, manifest, outcome -death. Duration of stages depends on the types, doses, and time of radiation. The CvARS clinical symptoms are: respiratory distress, hypotension, cerebral edema, severe disorder of cerebral blood microcirculation, and acute motor weakness. The radiation toxins, Cerebro-Vascular Radiation Neurotoxins (SvARSn), determine development of the acute radiation syndrome. Mechanism of action of the toxins: Though pathogenesis of radiation injury of CNS remains unknown, our concept describes the Cv ARS as a result of Neurotoxicity and Excitotoxicity, cell death through apoptotic necrosis. Neurotoxicity occurs after the high doses radiation exposure, formation of radiation neuro-toxins, possible bioradicals, or group of specific enzymes. Intracerebral hemorrhage can be a consequence of the damage of endothelial cells caused by radiation and the radiation tox-ins. Disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB)and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCFB)is possibly the most significant effect of microcirculation disorder and metabolic insufficiency. NMDA-receptors excitotoxic injury mediated by cerebral ischemia and cerebral hypoxia. Dam-age of the pyramidal cells in layers 3 and 5 and Purkinje cell layer the cerebral cortex , damage of pyramidal cells in the hippocampus occur as a result of cerebral ischemia and intracerebral bleeding. Methods: Radiation Toxins of CV ARS are defined as glycoproteins with the molec-ular weight of RT toxins ranges from 200-250 kDa and with high enzymatic activity

  20. Notch signaling inhibitor DAPT provides protection against acute craniocerebral injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Mei Zhang

    Full Text Available Notch signaling pathway is involved in many physiological and pathological processes. The γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT inhibits Notch signaling pathway and promotes nerve regeneration after cerebral ischemia. However, neuroprotective effects of DAPT against acute craniocerebral injury remain unclear. In this study, we established rat model of acute craniocerebral injury, and found that with the increase of damage grade, the expression of Notch and downstream protein Hes1 and Hes5 expression gradually increased. After the administration of DAPT, the expression of Notch, Hes1 and Hes5 was inhibited, apoptosis and oxidative stress decreased, neurological function and cognitive function improved. These results suggest that Notch signaling can be used as an indicator to assess the severity of post-traumatic brain injury. Notch inhibitor DAPT can reduce oxidative stress and apoptosis after acute craniocerebral injury, and is a potential drug for the treatment of acute craniocerebral injury.

  1. Serum uric acid and acute kidney injury: A mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Hahn

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury causes great morbidity and mortality in both the community and hospital settings. Understanding the etiological factors and the pathophysiological principles resulting in acute kidney injury is essential in prompting appropriate therapies. Recently hyperuricemia has been recognized as a potentially modifiable risk factor for acute kidney injury, including that associated with cardiovascular surgery, radiocontrast administration, rhabdomyolysis, and associated with heat stress. This review discussed the evidence that repeated episodes of acute kidney injury from heat stress and dehydration may also underlie the pathogenesis of the chronic kidney disease epidemic that is occurring in Central America (Mesoamerican nephropathy. Potential mechanisms for how uric acid might contribute to acute kidney injury are also discussed, including systemic effects on renal microvasculature and hemodynamics, and local crystalline and noncrystalline effects on the renal tubules. Pilot clinical trials also show potential benefits of lowering uric acid on acute kidney injury associated with a variety of insults. In summary, there is mounting evidence that hyperuricemia may have a significant role in the development of acute kidney injury. Prospective, placebo controlled, randomized trials are needed to determine the potential benefit of uric acid lowering therapy on kidney and cardio-metabolic diseases.

  2. Stem cell, cytokine and plastic surgical management for radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akita, Sadanori; Hirano, Akiyoshi; Akino, Kozo

    2008-01-01

    Increasing concern on systemic and local radiation injuries caused by nuclear power plant accident, therapeutic irradiation or nuclear terrorism should be treated and prevented properly for life-saving and improved wound management. We therefore reviewed our therapeutic regimens and for local radiation injuries and propose surgical methods reflecting the importance of the systemic and general conditions. For local radiation injuries, after careful and complete debridement, sequential surgeries with local flap, arterialized or perforator flap and to free flap are used when the patients' general conditions allow. Occasionally, undetermined wound margins in acute emergency radiation injuries and the regenerative surgical modalities should be attempted with temporal artificial dermis impregnated and sprayed with angiogenic factor such as basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and secondary reconstruction can be a candidate for demarcation and saving the donor morbidity. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs), together with angiogenic and mitogenic factor of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and an artificial dermis were applied over the excised irradiated skin defect are tested for differentiation and local stimulation effects in the radiation-exposed wounds. The perforator flap and artificial dermal template with growth factor were successful for reconstruction in patients who are suffering from complex underlying disease. Patients were uneventfully treated with minimal morbidities. The hMSCs are strongly proliferative even after 20 Gy irradiation in vitro. Immediate artificial dermis application impregnated with hMSCs and bFGF over the 20 Gy irradiated skin and soft tissues demonstrated the significantly improved fat angio genesis, architected dermal reconstitution and less inflammatory epidermal recovery. Even though emergent cases are more often experienced, detailed understanding of underlying diseases and rational

  3. Stem cell, cytokine and plastic surgical management for radiation injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akita, Sadanori; Hirano, Akiyoshi [Dept. of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Nagasaki (Japan); Akino, Kozo [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Dept. of Neuroanatomy; Ohtsuru, Akira [Nagasaki Univ. Hospital (Japan). Takashi Nagai Memorial, International Hibakusha Medical Center; Yamashita, Shunichi [Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine (Japan). Atomic Bomb Disease Institute; World Health Organization (WHO), Nagasaki (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Increasing concern on systemic and local radiation injuries caused by nuclear power plant accident, therapeutic irradiation or nuclear terrorism should be treated and prevented properly for life-saving and improved wound management. We therefore reviewed our therapeutic regimens and for local radiation injuries and propose surgical methods reflecting the importance of the systemic and general conditions. For local radiation injuries, after careful and complete debridement, sequential surgeries with local flap, arterialized or perforator flap and to free flap are used when the patients' general conditions allow. Occasionally, undetermined wound margins in acute emergency radiation injuries and the regenerative surgical modalities should be attempted with temporal artificial dermis impregnated and sprayed with angiogenic factor such as basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and secondary reconstruction can be a candidate for demarcation and saving the donor morbidity. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs), together with angiogenic and mitogenic factor of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and an artificial dermis were applied over the excised irradiated skin defect are tested for differentiation and local stimulation effects in the radiation-exposed wounds. The perforator flap and artificial dermal template with growth factor were successful for reconstruction in patients who are suffering from complex underlying disease. Patients were uneventfully treated with minimal morbidities. The hMSCs are strongly proliferative even after 20 Gy irradiation in vitro. Immediate artificial dermis application impregnated with hMSCs and bFGF over the 20 Gy irradiated skin and soft tissues demonstrated the significantly improved fat angio genesis, architected dermal reconstitution and less inflammatory epidermal recovery. Even though emergent cases are more often experienced, detailed understanding of underlying diseases and rational

  4. Substances stimulating recovery for radiation injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, A; Yonezawa, M; Katoh, N [Radiation Center of Osaka Prefecture, Sakai (Japan)

    1978-11-01

    A relationship between radiation injury and its recovery (intracellular recovery, intercellular recovery, or individual recovery) was discussed. In addition to histological researches in Japan, some substances (free radicals, endotoxin, vaccine, crude drugs, tissue extracts, blood platelet, etc.) stimulating recovery for radiation injury were introduced, and the progress of the study by the authors was summarized. Effects of a root of Panax ginseng (it is believed to accelerate segmentation of marrow cells, and synthesis of DNA and protein in rats and men), methods of its extracting and administration, its influences upon hemogram and organ weight in animal experiments, exclusion of side effects, period of administration, and purification of its effective components were reported.

  5. Radiation-induced heart injury. Radiopathological study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Y; Niibe, H [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine

    1975-11-01

    In order to identify radiation-induced heart injury and to differentiate it from heart disease, an attempt was made to clarify post-irradiation heart injury by investigating the histological changes which occur during the interval between the irradiation and the time of demonstrable histological changes. A study was made of 83 autopsies in which most of the primary neoplasms were breast cancers, lung cancers and mediastinal tumors. In 43 of these autopsies the heart had been irradiated. Sixty eight dd-strain mice were also used for microautoradiographic study. Histological changes in the heart were observed in 27 of the 43 cases receiving irradiation. The limit of the tolerance dose to the heart for indicating histological changes was 1220 ret in humans. The latent period without histological changes was 2.7 months after initiation of radiation therapy. Greater heart injury was observed after re-irradiation or after the combined therapy of radiation and chemotherapy especially mitomycin (MMC). The histological findings after treatment with MMC were similar to those of radiation-induced heart injury. Results of the study indicate that the damage is secondary to radiation-induced changes of the vascula connective tissue.

  6. Surgical treatment of intestinal radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekelae, J.Ne.; Nevasaari, K.; Kairaluoma, M.I.

    1987-01-01

    A review of 43 consecutive patients requiring operation for serious intestinal radiation injury was undertaken to elucidate the efficacy of surgical treatment. The most common site of radiation injury was the rectum (19 cases), followed by the small bowel (13 cases), the colon (7 cases), and the combination of these (4 cases). The overall operative mortality was 14%; morbidity, 47%; and the postoperative symptom-free period, 18 +/- 30 months. Colostomy (N = 20) carried the lowest risk of mortality, 0%, as compared with resection (N = 17) and bypass procedure (N = 6), which were accompanied by the mortalities of 24% and 33%, respectively. During the follow-up (3-13 years) 12 patients (28%) died of recurrent cancer and 9 patients (21%) of persistent radiation injury, which yielded an overall mortality of 65% after resection and 50% and 65% after bypass and colostomy procedures, respectively. Continuing radiation damage led to 15 late reoperations. Ten of these were performed after colostomy, four after resection, and one after bypass. We conclude that colostomy cannot be regarded as a preferred operative method, because it does not prevent the progression of radiation injury and because it is, for this reason, associated with a higher late-complication rate. A more radical surgery is recommended but with the limitation that the operative method must be adapted to the operative finding

  7. Acute liver injury induced by weight-loss herbal supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gary C; Ramanathan, Vivek S; Law, David; Funchain, Pauline; Chen, George C; French, Samuel; Shlopov, Boris; Eysselein, Viktor; Chung, David; Reicher, Sonya; Pham, Binh V

    2010-11-27

    We report three cases of patients with acute liver injury induced by weight-loss herbal supplements. One patient took Hydroxycut while the other two took Herbalife supplements. Liver biopsies for all patients demonstrated findings consistent with drug-induced acute liver injury. To our knowledge, we are the first institute to report acute liver injury from both of these two types of weight-loss herbal supplements together as a case series. The series emphasizes the importance of taking a cautious approach when consuming herbal supplements for the purpose of weight loss.

  8. Impact of Acute Kidney Injury in Patients Hospitalized With Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Lakhmir S; Amdur, Richard L; Faselis, Charles; Li, Ping; Kimmel, Paul L; Palant, Carlos E

    2017-04-01

    Pneumonia is a common cause of hospitalization and can be complicated by the development of acute kidney injury. Acute kidney injury is associated with major adverse kidney events (death, dialysis, and durable loss of renal function [chronic kidney disease]). Because pneumonia and acute kidney injury are in part mediated by inflammation, we hypothesized that when acute kidney injury complicates pneumonia, major adverse kidney events outcomes would be exacerbated. We sought to assess the frequency of major adverse kidney events after a hospitalization for either pneumonia, acute kidney injury, or the combination of both. We conducted a retrospective database analysis of the national Veterans Affairs database for patients with a admission diagnosis of International Classification of Diseases-9 code 584.xx (acute kidney injury) or 486.xx (pneumonia) between October 1, 1999, and December 31, 2005. Three groups of patients were created, based on the diagnosis of the index admission and serum creatinine values: 1) acute kidney injury, 2) pneumonia, and 3) pneumonia with acute kidney injury. Patients with mean baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 45 mL/min/1.73 m were excluded. The primary endpoint was major adverse kidney events defined as the composite of death, chronic dialysis, or a permanent loss of renal function after the primary discharge. The observations of 54,894 subjects were analyzed. Mean age was 68.7 ± 12.3 years. The percentage of female was 2.4, 73.3% were Caucasian, and 19.7% were African-American. Differences across the three diagnostic groups were significant for death, 25% decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate from baseline, major adverse kidney events following admission, and major adverse kidney events during admission (all p pneumonia + acute kidney injury group (51% died and 62% reached major adverse kidney events). In both unadjusted and adjusted time to event analyses, patients with pneumonia + acute kidney injury

  9. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dushianthan, A; Grocott, M P W; Postle, A D; Cusack, R

    2011-09-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life threatening respiratory failure due to lung injury from a variety of precipitants. Pathologically ARDS is characterised by diffuse alveolar damage, alveolar capillary leakage, and protein rich pulmonary oedema leading to the clinical manifestation of poor lung compliance, severe hypoxaemia, and bilateral infiltrates on chest radiograph. Several aetiological factors associated with the development of ARDS are identified with sepsis, pneumonia, and trauma with multiple transfusions accounting for most cases. Despite the absence of a robust diagnostic definition, extensive epidemiological investigations suggest ARDS remains a significant health burden with substantial morbidity and mortality. Improvements in outcome following ARDS over the past decade are in part due to improved strategies of mechanical ventilation and advanced support of other failing organs. Optimal treatment involves judicious fluid management, protective lung ventilation with low tidal volumes and moderate positive end expiratory pressure, multi-organ support, and treatment where possible of the underlying cause. Moreover, advances in general supportive measures such as appropriate antimicrobial therapy, early enteral nutrition, prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism and gastrointestinal ulceration are likely contributory reasons for the improved outcomes. Although therapies such as corticosteroids, nitric oxide, prostacyclins, exogenous surfactants, ketoconazole and antioxidants have shown promising clinical effects in animal models, these have failed to translate positively in human studies. Most recently, clinical trials with β2 agonists aiding alveolar fluid clearance and immunonutrition with omega-3 fatty acids have also provided disappointing results. Despite these negative studies, mortality seems to be in decline due to advances in overall patient care. Future directions of research are likely to concentrate on identifying potential

  10. Lung injury in acute pancreatitis: mechanisms, prevention, and therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shields, Conor J

    2012-02-03

    Lung injury is the most pertinent manifestation of extra-abdominal organ dysfunction in pancreatitis. The propensity of this retroperitoneal inflammatory condition to engender a diffuse and life-threatening lung injury is significant. Approximately one third of patients will develop acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, which account for 60% of all deaths within the first week. The variability in the clinical course of pancreatitis renders it a vexing entity and makes demonstration of the efficacy of any specific intervention difficult. The distinct pathologic entity of pancreatitis-associated lung injury is reviewed with a focus on etiology and potential therapeutic maneuvers.

  11. Parenteral nutrition in radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glants, R.M.

    1985-01-01

    Basing on the results of experiments on mice and rats and their clinical use in oncological patients treatment recommendations are given on use of parenteral nutrition in treatment of radiation disease

  12. Transfusion related acute lung injury presenting with acute dyspnoea: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haji Altaf

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Transfusion-related acute lung injury is emerging as a common cause of transfusion-related adverse events. However, awareness about this entity in the medical fraternity is low and it, consequently, remains a very under-reported and often an under-diagnosed complication of transfusion therapy. Case presentation We report a case of a 46-year old woman who developed acute respiratory and hemodynamic instability following a single unit blood transfusion in the postoperative period. Investigation results were non-specific and a diagnosis of transfusion-related acute lung injury was made after excluding other possible causes of acute lung injury. She responded to symptomatic management with ventilatory and vasopressor support and recovered completely over the next 72 hours. Conclusion The diagnosis of transfusion-related acute lung injury relies on excluding other causes of acute pulmonary edema following transfusion, such as sepsis, volume overload, and cardiogenic pulmonary edema. All plasma containing blood products have been implicated in transfusion-related acute lung injury, with the majority being linked to whole blood, packed red blood cells, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma. The pathogenesis of transfusion-related acute lung injury may be explained by a "two-hit" hypothesis, involving priming of the inflammatory machinery and then activation of this primed mechanism. Treatment is supportive, with prognosis being substantially better than for most other causes of acute lung injury.

  13. Melatonin as Protection Against Radiation Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zetner, D.; Andersen, L. P H; Rosenberg, J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Radiation is widely used in the treatment of various cancers and in radiological imaging procedures. Ionizing radiation causes adverse effects, leading to decreased quality of life in patients, by releasing free radicals that cause oxidative stress and tissue damage. The sleep......-hormone melatonin is a free radical scavenger, and induces several anti-oxidative enzymes. This review investigates the scientific literature on the protective effects of melatonin against exposure to ionizing radiation, and discusses the clinical potential of melatonin as prophylactic treatment against ionizing...... and protected against radiation enteritis. These protective effects were only documented when melatonin was administered prior to exposure to ionizing radiation. Discussion: This review documents that melatonin effectively protects animals against injury to healthy tissues from ionizing radiation. However...

  14. Snake-bite-induced Acute Kidney Injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical spectrum and outcome of patients presenting to a tertiary care kidney center, developing acute kidney injury (AKI) after snake-bite. Study Design: An observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Nephrology Department, Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation (SIUT), Karachi, from January 1990 to December 2014. Methodology: All patients coming to SIUT identified as having AKI after snake-bite during the study period were included. AKI was defined according to RIFLE criteria with sudden rise in creatinine or decline in urine output or both. Demographics, clinical presentation, laboratory profile, and final outcome was noted. Result: During the studied period, 115 cases of AKI, secondary to snake-bite, were registered at this institution. Median age of patients was 35.92 ±15.04 (range: 6 - 70) years and male to female ratio was 1.6:1. Time from bite and referral to this hospital ranged from 2 to 28 days (mean: 8.77 ±5.58 days). Oligo-anuria was the most common presentation, being found in 98 (93.90 percentage) patients. Bleeding diathesis was reported in 75 (65.21 percentage) patients on presentation. All patients had normal sized, non-obstructed kidneys on ultrasonography, with no previous comorbids. Renal replacement therapy (RRT) was required in 106 (92.17 percentage) patients. Complete recovery was seen in 59 (51.30 percentage), while 15 (13.04 percentage) patients expired during acute phase of illness, 4 (3.47 percentage) developed CKD, 11 (9.56 percentage) required dialysis beyond 90 days, and 26 (22.60 percentage) were lost to long-term follow-up. Conclusion: Snake-bite, leading to multiple complications including renal failure and death, is a major health issue in tropical countries. Late referral of these patients to specialized centres Result in undesirable outcome. (author)

  15. Acute spinal injury after centrifuge training in asymptomatic fighter pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kyung-Wook; Shin, Young Ho; Kang, Seungcheol

    2015-04-01

    Many countries have hypergravity training centers using centrifuges for pilots to cope with a high gravity (G) environment. The high G training carries potential risk for the development of spinal injury. However, no studies evaluated the influence of centrifuge training on the spines of asymptomatic fighter pilots on a large scale. Study subjects were 991 male fighter pilots with high G training at one institution. Subject variables included information about physical characteristics, flight hours of pilots prior to the training, and G force exposure related factors during training. The two dependent variables were whether the pilots developed acute spinal injury after training and the severity of the injury (major/minor). The incidence of acute spinal injury after high G training was 2.3% (23 of 991 subjects). There were 19 subjects who developed minor injury and 4 subjects who developed a herniated intervertebral disc, which is considered a major injury. In multivariate analysis, only the magnitude of G force during training was significantly related to the development of acute spinal injury. However, there was no significant factor related to the severity of the injury. These results suggest that high G training could cause negative effects on fighter pilots' spines. The magnitude of G force during training seemed to be the most significant factor affecting the occurrence of acute spinal injury.

  16. CT and MRI diagnosis of acute hepatic injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Rengui; Fumio Yamamoto; Pu Yonglin; Gao Yujie.

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate and compare MR and CT in diagnosis of acute traumatic hepatic laceration, ten patients with acute hepatic rupture underwent CT scan and/or MRI in the first 24 hours after injury. The injury was graded as mild ( 50% of one lobe). In the first 24 hours after injury, 33.3% (3/9) and 28.6%(2/7) of the hepatic injury demonstrated isodensity and isointensity on plain CT scan and T 1 -weighted images. All the lesions (100%) were clearly identified as marked hyperintensity on T 2 -weighted images. On T 2 WI, T 1 WI and non-contrast CT, 100%, 57.1% and 55.6% of the acute hepatic injuries could be graded respectively. Delayed complications occurred in four patients with deep hepatic injury about 1 to 3 weeks after injury. T 2 -weighted MR imaging is more sensitive and useful for detection of the type and severity of acute hepatic rupture. Follow-up MRI or CT within the first few weeks after injury is needed in patients with deep hepatic injury for detection of delayed complications

  17. Acute kidney injury secondary to iatrogenic bilateral ureteric ligation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute kidney injury secondary to iatrogenic bilateral ureteric ligation following emergency abdominal hysterectomy. Oluseyi A. Adejumo, Olurotimi S. Ogundiniyi, Ayodeji A. Akinbodewa, Lawrence A. Adesunloro, Oladimeji J. Olafisoye ...

  18. Acute Kidney Injury – An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Varrier

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome of acute kidney injury (AKI occurs frequently in hospitalised patients, leading to increased morbidity, mortality, and healthcare expenditure. In the context of a precipitating insult, disturbances in both global and microcirculatory renal blood flow, tubular cell damage, and activation of pro- inflammatory pathways lead to impairment of numerous elements of renal function. Classification systems, including the recent ‘Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes’ (KDIGO classification, typically define and stage AKI in terms of the magnitude of rise in serum creatinine (SCr and the presence of oliguria. At present there is no cure for AKI and the key principles of its management include early recognition, haemodynamic optimisation, correction of hypovolaemia, ceasing and avoidance of nephrotoxic medications, and treatment of the underlying cause. Recent data show that the type and volume of fluid therapy can affect renal function and that further guidance is required. In the future it is hoped that novel technologies, including biomarkers and real-time measurement of glomerular filtration rate will allow the earlier identification of patients with AKI, whilst a greater understanding of the pathogenesis of AKI will lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. Despite SCr usually recovering after an episode of AKI, there is growing recognition that survivors of AKI are at an increased risk of subsequent chronic kidney disease, including end-stage renal failure and premature death.

  19. Post-partum acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh Pahwa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the risk factors, course of hospital stay and mortality rate among women with post-partum acute kidney injury (AKI, we studied (of 752 patients with AKI admitted to a tertiary care center during the study period between November 2009 and August 2012 27 (3.59% women with post-partum AKI. The data regarding age, parity, cause of renal failure, course of hospital stay and requirement of dialysis were recorded. Sepsis was the major cause (70.3% of post-partum AKI. Other causes included disseminated intravascular coagulation (55.5%, pre-eclampsia/eclampsia (40.7%, ante- and post-partum hemorrhage (40.7% and 22.2% and hemolytic anemia and elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count syndrome (29.6%; most patients had more than one cause of AKI. We found a very high prevalence (18.5% of cortical necrosis in our study patients. A significant correlation was also found between the creatinine level on admission and the period of onset of disease after delivery. In conclusion, several factors are involved in causing post-partum AKI in our population, and sepsis was the most common of them.

  20. Acute kidney injury: definition, epidemiology, and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srisawat, Nattachai; Kellum, John A

    2011-12-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common clinical syndrome whose definition has standardized as a result of consensus by leading experts around the world. As a result of these definitions, reported AKI incidences can now be compared across different populations and settings. Evidence from population-based studies suggests that AKI is nearly as common as myocardial infarction, at least in the western world. This review aims to highlight the recent advances in AKI epidemiology as well as to suggest future directions for prevention and management. This review will focus on the recent studies exploring the AKI epidemiology in and outside the ICU. In particular, the risk of AKI in less severe sepsis is notable as is evidence linking AKI to chronic kidney disease. New emphasis on renal recovery is shaping current thinking as is the use and utility of new biomarkers. This article reviews the recent information about the definition, classification, and epidemiology of AKI. Although new biomarkers are being developed, the 'tried and true' markers of serum creatinine and urine output, disciplined by current criteria, will be important components in the definition and classification of AKI for some time to come.

  1. Acute injury of anterior cruciate ligament during karate training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuo-Chin; Hsu, Wei-Hsiu; Wang, Ting-Chung

    2007-06-01

    A 38-year-old black-belt karate practitioner presented with acute disabling injury of his knee after swift-withdrawal of a reverse-roundhouse-kick. Examination confirmed the diagnosis of grade III ACL tear. Although there are reports documenting injury rate in modern karate, no previous cases of karate-related ACL injuries have been reported. The trauma mechanism is different than ACL injuries during other non-contact and contact sports. The current case report indicates that ACL injury can occur without any contact of the lower limb as a result of dynamic muscular forces during karate training.

  2. Computed tomography: ocular manifestations in acute head injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Acute head injuries are common in the population. Associated ocular injuries are occasionally encountered and these are of varying nature and outcome. Methods: We reviewed 98 brain computed tomographic results retrospectively. These are cases that were done between Jan. 2013- Jan. 2014. Statistical ...

  3. Radiation hormesis and its potential to manage radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bala, Madhu; Mathew, Lazar

    2000-01-01

    The term radiation hormesis explains stimulatory or beneficial effects of low dose radiation exposure, which cannot be predicted by extrapolation of detrimental or lethal effects of high dose radiation exposure. Although beneficial effects of low doses of radiation were observed soon after discovery of x-rays and radioactivity, studies remained inconclusive until recently, due to (i) inadequate statistical planning of experiments conducted in early part of the 20th century; and (ii) poor dose monitoring. Recently (1980s onwards), large scale, systematic epidemiological and experimental studies with a number of diverse systems have demonstrated existence of radiation hormesis beyond doubt. It is pointed out that the hormetic effects of radiation have not been successfully exploited so far for human benefits, primarily because underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. It is argued that with more and more studies, it is becoming evident that radiation hormesis is not merely physiological adaptation, but a genetically regulated phenomenon and involves de novo synthesis of proteins. Role of these proteins in induction of radiation hormesis is the current area of research in a number of world-renowned laboratories. The first part of this review elucidates the shifts in paradigms on radiation effects in the 20th century and the later portion presents a brief on underlying molecular mechanisms of radiation hormesis and their implications towards management of radiation injuries. (author)

  4. Radiation injury to peripheral and cranial nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giese, W.L.; Kinsella, T.J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the results of laboratory and clinical investigations regarding the radiosensitivity of peripheral nerve are presented. Before outlining this research the authors briefly review peripheral neuroanatomy and physiology and then discuss variables associated with injury. It is important to remember that radiation injury is multifactorial in nature, and that the relative importance of individual factors is not well understood. Reports up through the middle of this century were fraught with rudimentary dosimetry, primitive investigative methods, and arbitrary endpoints that resulted in widely conflicting conclusions that continue to date

  5. Acute kidney injury in critically ill child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jboor, Wejdan; Almardini, Reham; Al Bderat, Jwaher; Frehat, Mahdi; Al Masri, Hazem; Alajloni, Mohammad Saleh

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and serious complication in patients in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). We conducted this study to estimate the incidence and the mortality rate of AKI in critically ill children as well as to describe some other related factors. A retrospective study was conducted at PICU of Queen Rania Abdulla Children Hospital, Amman, Jordan for the period extending from May 2011 to June 2013. The medical records of all patients admitted during this period, and their demographic data were reviewed. Patients with AKI were identified, and management and outcomes were reviewed and analyzed. AKI was evaluated according to modified RIFLE criteria. Of the 372 patients admitted to PICU, 64 (17.2%) patients developed AKI. Of these 64 patients who had AKI, 28 (43.7%) patients reached RIFLE max of risk, 21 (32.8%) patients reached injury, and 15 (23.4%) reached failure. Mean Pediatric Risk of Mortality II score at admission was significantly higher in patients with AKI than those without P <0.001. The age ranged between one month and 14 years with the median age as 5.4 year. Thirty-five (54.7%) were males. Sepsis was the most common cause of AKI. The mortality rate in critically ill children without AKI was 58.7%, whereas increased in children with AKI to 73.4%. The mortality rate in patients who received renal replacement therapy was 71.4% and was higher (81.5%) in patients who received mechanical ventilation (95%, [confidence interval (CI)] 79.3-83.4%) and was significantly higher in patients with multi-organ system dysfunction 90.3% (95%, [CI] 88.7-92.5%). The incidence of AKI in critically ill children is high and increased their mortality rate and higher mortality seen in the younger age group, especially those below one year. High mortality rate was associated with multi-organ system dysfunction and the need for mechanical ventilation.

  6. Evaluation and management of acute radiation dermatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modesto, A.; Faivre, J.C.; Granel-Brocard, F.; Tao, Y.G.; Pointreau, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Acute radiation dermatitis remains one of the most commonly observed side effect during radiation therapy leading to complication such as superinfection or treatment disruption. Its management is characterized by a great heterogeneity. Few strategies have demonstrated a benefit in preventing radiation dermatitis, which relies mostly on decreasing dose delivered to the skin and skin care practices. Simple emollients and use of topical steroids can be useful in early stages. The singularity of the skin toxicity seen with cetuximab and radiotherapy warrants a specific grading system and distinctive clinical treatment with use of antibiotics. (authors)

  7. An overview of strength training injuries: acute and chronic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallee, Mark E; Balam, Tucker

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces the history of strength training, explains the many different styles of strength training, and discusses common injuries specific to each style. Strength training is broken down into five disciplines: basic strength or resistance training, bodybuilding, power lifting, style-dependant strength sports (e.g., strongman competitions, Highland games, field events such as shot put, discus, hammer throw, and javelin), and Olympic-style weightlifting. Each style has its own principal injuries, both acute and chronic, related to the individual technique. Acute injuries should be further categorized as emergent or nonemergent. Specific age-related populations (i.e., the very young and the aging athlete) carry additional considerations.

  8. Acute injury and chronic disability resulting from surfboard riding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, D McD; Bennett, D; Carter, M; Garewal, D; Finch, C F

    2004-12-01

    We undertook a cross-sectional survey of surfers at eight Victorian beaches between February and May 2003 and analysed acute injury and chronic disability sustained while surfing during the preceding 12 months. Significant injuries were defined as requiring medical attention or time off surfing/work. 646 surfers were enrolled (90.2% male, median age 27 years, median years of surfing 10). 145 surfers sustained 168 significant acute injuries in the preceding 12 months (0.26 injuries/surfer/year, 95% CI 0.22-0.30). Most were caused by striking a surfboard or another surfer (45.2%, 95% CI 37.6-53.1), "wiping out" (36.3%, 95% CI 29.1-44.1) or striking the seabed (17.9%, 95% CI 12.6-24.7). Injuries included lacerations (46.4%, 95% CI 38.8-54.3), sprains (28.6%, 95% CI 22.0-36.1), dislocations (10.7%, 95% CI 6.7-16.6) and fractures (8.9%, 95% CI 5.3-14.6). Body parts most frequently injured were the lower limb (45.8%, 95% CI 38.2-53.7) and the head/face (26.2%, 95% CI 19.9-33.6). Surfing injuries that were treated in Victorian emergency departments over a six year period revealed a similar pattern, although there was a greater proportion of head/face injuries (42.0%, 95% CI 36.0-48.1, p = 0.001). 20 surfers reported long-term effects from acute injuries, mainly unstable/stiff/painful joints. 136 surfers reported chronic health problems not related to acute injury including chronic/recurrent otitis externa and exostoses, muscle and joint pain/stiffness and pterygium. Significant injury while surfing is not uncommon. Although head injury accounts for a considerable proportion, very few surfers wear protective headgear. Greater use of protective headgear should be considered.

  9. Nonlinear Dynamic Theory of Acute Cell Injuries and Brain Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Doaa; Anggraini, Fika; Degracia, Donald; Huang, Zhi-Feng

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral ischemia in the form of stroke and cardiac arrest brain damage affect over 1 million people per year in the USA alone. In spite of close to 200 clinical trials and decades of research, there are no treatments to stop post-ischemic neuron death. We have argued that a major weakness of current brain ischemia research is lack of a deductive theoretical framework of acute cell injury to guide empirical studies. A previously published autonomous model based on the concept of nonlinear dynamic network was shown to capture important facets of cell injury, linking the concept of therapeutic to bistable dynamics. Here we present an improved, non-autonomous formulation of the nonlinear dynamic model of cell injury that allows multiple acute injuries over time, thereby allowing simulations of both therapeutic treatment and preconditioning. Our results are connected to the experimental data of gene expression and proteomics of neuron cells. Importantly, this new model may be construed as a novel approach to pharmacodynamics of acute cell injury. The model makes explicit that any pro-survival therapy is always a form of sub-lethal injury. This insight is expected to widely influence treatment of acute injury conditions that have defied successful treatment to date. This work is supported by NIH NINDS (NS081347) and Wayne State University President's Research Enhancement Award.

  10. Chemotherapy of radiation injuries: research perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mynchev, N.

    1993-01-01

    The therapy of radiation injuries - single and combined with other physical trauma (burn or wound) - are considered. Anti-bacterial therapy of infections in irradiated mice, rats and dogs and in irradiated dogs inflicted with burns has been applied. The results demonstrate that radiation induced exogenous and endogenous infections can be treated successfully with proper antimicrobial agents. Some immunomodulators also are effective in treating endogenous infection. The synergy between antimicrobial and immuno-modulator therapy holds promise for increasing the survival of irradiated victims. The improvement of managing infections in immuno-compromised (irradiated and injured) hosts will require further research using these therapeutic modalities. (author)

  11. Acute irradiation injury and autonomic nervous system. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuu, Mutsumi; Sekine, Ichiro; Shichijo, Kazuko; Ito, Masahiro; Ikeda, Yuzi; Matsuzaki, Sumihiro; Zea-Iriate, W.-L.; Kondo, Takahito

    1996-01-01

    In order to elucidate the mechanism of occurrence of radiation sickness, whole body irradiation of various doses of X-ray was done on male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) whose sympathetic nervous system is functionally activated and on their original male Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) and the change of their body weights was examined. Further, changes of blood pressure in rats irradiated at 7.5 Gy, of norepinephrine contents in their gut as a parameter of sympathetic nervous function and of acetylcholine contents as that of parasympathetic nervous function were measured. Histopathological examinations were also performed. SHR died at smaller dose than WKY. The blood pressure as a parameter of systemic sympathetic nervous system varied greatly in SHR. Norepinephrine contents elevated rapidly and greatly in SHR after irradiation and acetylcholine contents rapidly elevated in WKY. Apoptosis was more frequently observed in the intestinal crypt of SHR. Participation of autonomic nervous system was thus shown in the appearance of acute radiation injury and sickness in SHR, which was thought to be a useful model for the investigation. (K.H.)

  12. Regulatory limits in radiation injury cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charnoff, G.

    1980-01-01

    Recent developments in the application of the principles of tort, and the impact of governmental regulations on tort law in the U.S.A. are summarised in relation to the following 1979 events raising the issue of liability for radiation injuries: Three Mile Island accident, the Karen Silkwood trial, nuclear weapons testing exposure cases, the use of uranium tailings in residential construction, and radon gas collected in old copper mines. (U.K.)

  13. Transient risk factors of acute occupational injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerlund, Anna H; Lander, Flemming; Nielsen, Kent

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to (i) identify transient risk factors of occupational injuries and (ii) determine if the risk varies with age, injury severity, job task, and industry risk level. Method A case-crossover design was used to examine the effect of seven specific transient...... risk factors (time pressure, disagreement with someone, feeling sick, being distracted by someone, non-routine task, altered surroundings, and broken machinery and materials) for occupational injuries. In the study, 1693 patients with occupational injuries were recruited from a total of 4002...... in relation to sex, age, job task, industry risk level, or injury severity. Conclusion Use of a case-crossover design identified several worker-related transient risk factors (time pressure, feeling sick, being distracted by someone) that led to significantly increased risks for occupational injuries...

  14. Acute sports injuries requiring hospital care.

    OpenAIRE

    Sandelin, J

    1986-01-01

    The present investigation reports 138 consecutive patients injured in sports, who needed treatment as in-patients in a one year period. More injuries were sustained in soccer than in other sports. The lower extremity was the site of most injuries, fractures and dislocations being the most common type of injury. At follow-up 50% of the patients complained of discomfort. The average stay in hospital after a sports injury requiring hospital care was 6 days. In 52% of the patients the duration of...

  15. Young Children's Acute Stress After a Burn Injury: Disentangling the Role of Injury Severity and Parental Acute Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Ann-Christin; Landolt, Markus A

    2017-09-01

    Although injury severity and parental stress are strong predictors of posttraumatic adjustment in young children after burns, little is known about the interplay of these variables. This study aimed at clarifying mediation processes between injury severity and mother's, father's, and young child's acute stress. Structural equation modeling was used to examine the relationships between injury severity and parental and child acute stress. Parents of 138 burn-injured children (ages 1-4 years) completed standardized questionnaires on average 19 days postinjury. Sixteen children (11.7%) met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition, preschool criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (excluding time criterion). The model revealed a significant mediation of maternal acute stress, with the effect of injury severity on a child's acute stress mediated by maternal acute stress. Paternal acute stress failed to serve as a mediating variable. Our findings confirm mothers' crucial role in the posttraumatic adjustment of young children. Clinically, mothers' acute stress should be monitored. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. MRI evaluation of acute articular cartilage injury of knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jun; Wu Zhenhua; Fan Guoguang; Pan Shinong; Guo Qiyong

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the MRI manifestation of acute articular cartilage injury of knee for evaluating the extension and degree of the injury and guiding treatment. Methods: MRI of 34 patients with acute articular cartilage injury of knee within one day to fifteen days confirmed by arthroscopy and arthrotomy was reviewed and analyzed, with emphasis on articular cartilage and subchondral lesion. And every manifestation on MRI and that of arthroscopy and operation was compared. Results: The articular cartilage injury was diagnosed on MRI in 29 of 34 cases. Cartilage signal changes were found only in 4. The changes of cartilage shape were variable. Thinning of focal cartilage was showed in 3, osteochondral impaction in 3, creases of cartilage in 3, disrupted cartilage with fissuring in 13, cracks cartilage in 2, and cracks cartilage with displaced fragment in 1. Bone bruise and occult fracture were found only on MRI. Conclusion: The assessment of MRI and arthroscopy in acute articular cartilage injury are consistent. Combined with arthroscopy, MRI can succeed in assessing the extension and degree of acute articular injury and allowing treatment planning

  17. Nursing Activities Score and Acute Kidney Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Filipe Utuari de Andrade; Watanabe, Mirian; Fonseca, Cassiane Dezoti da; Padilha, Katia Grillo; Vattimo, Maria de Fátima Fernandes

    2017-01-01

    to evaluate the nursing workload in intensive care patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). A quantitative study, conducted in an intensive care unit, from April to August of 2015. The Nursing Activities Score (NAS) and Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) were used to measure nursing workload and to classify the stage of AKI, respectively. A total of 190 patients were included. Patients who developed AKI (44.2%) had higher NAS when compared to those without AKI (43.7% vs 40.7%), p <0.001. Patients with stage 1, 2 and 3 AKI showed higher NAS than those without AKI. A relationship was identified between stage 2 and 3 with those without AKI (p = 0.002 and p <0.001). The NAS was associated with the presence of AKI, the score increased with the progression of the stages, and it was associated with AKI, stage 2 and 3. avaliar a carga de trabalho de enfermagem em pacientes de terapia intensiva com lesão renal aguda (LRA). estudo quantitativo, em Unidade de Terapia Intensiva, no período de abril a agosto de 2015. O Nursing Activities Score (NAS) e o Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) foram utilizados para medir a carga de trabalho de enfermagem e classificar o estágio da LRA, respectivamente. foram incluídos 190 pacientes. Os pacientes que desenvolveram LRA (44,2%) possuíam NAS superiores quando comparados aos sem LRA (43,7% vs 40,7%), p<0,001. Os pacientes com LRA nos estágios 1, 2 e 3 de LRA demonstraram NAS superiores aos sem LRA, houve relação entre os estágios 2 e 3 com os sem LRA, p=0,002 e p<0,001. o NAS apresentou associação com a existência de LRA, visto que seu valor aumenta com a progressão dos estágios, tendo associação com os estágios 2 e 3 de LRA.

  18. MRI of acute cervical injury: correlation with neurologic deficit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, Chang Dong; Kwon, Soon Tae; Lim, Seung Chul; Shin, Myung Jin; Han, Boo Kyung; Kim, Sang Joon; Park, Man Soo; Yoon, Hyun Ki; Suh, Dae Chul

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate MRI findings of spinal cord according to mechanism in acute cervical spinal injury. 25 patients under went MRI within 1 month after acute cervical trauma. Axial T1Wl (TR/TE: 500/20), gradient-echo (TR/TE: 300/14), sagittal T1Wl (TR/TE: 500/20), proton (TR/TE: 2000. 20 msec), T2Wl (TR/TE: 2000/80) were performed. In 11 patients, post-enhancement T1Wl was done. Change of spinal cord signal intensity on MRI in addition to the presence of abnormal changes of vertebral body, intervertebral disc and paraspinal soft tissue were evaluated. 15 patients had flexion injury, seven had extension injury and three had injury of unknown mechanism. Twelve patients showed iso-signal intensity on T2Wl and high signal intensity on T2Wl. Three patients showed low signal intensity on T1Wl and high signal intensity on T2Wl. Spinal cord hemorrhage occured in 10 patients. We found cord swelling in nine patients and cord compression in 12 patients. In nine patients with cord swelling, extent of cord injury was more than one segment of vertebral body. Ligamentous injury, disc injury, soft tissue injury occurred in 16 (64%), 17 (68%), 15 (60%) patients respectively. Vertebral body fracture was found in 17 patients (68%). The levels of fracture were C6 (eight patients) and C5 (five patients). MRI is valuable in exaluetion of the spinal cord, intervertebral disc, and soft tissue lesions in acute cervical spinal injury. Prognosis is worse in flexion injury than in extension injury, and is well correlated with cord hemorrhage and lesion extent

  19. Acute electrical injury: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor-Ahmad Latifi

    2017-01-01

    >Conclusions: High-voltage injury leads to greater morbidity and mortality than low-voltage one. Lightening has mortality of about 32%, higher rates of complications and specialty long-term complications. Strict multi-specialty treatment and rehabilitations are required for proper treatment of electrical injuries.

  20. Oral sucralfate in acute radiation oesophagitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sur, R.K. (Dept. of Radiotherapy, Postgraduate Inst. of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India)); Kochhar, R. (Dept. of Gastroenterology, Postgraduate Inst. of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India)); Singh, D.P. (Dept. of Radiotherapy, Postgraduate Inst. of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India))

    1994-01-01

    Eighty patients with carcinoma in the middle third of oesophagus and with acute radiation oesophagitis following external beam and intracavitary radiotherapy were managed by two different schedules. Group 1 (n = 40) received an antacid containing sodium alginate whereas Group 2 (n = 40) were given a 10% sucralfate suspension during 4 weeks. In Group 2, 32 patients had significant relief of symptoms within 7 days of treatment and most ulcers had healed by 12 days of treatment as seen on endoscopy. Patients in Group 1, on the other hand, showed little improvement of symptoms and had persistent ulcers even after 4 weeks of therapy. We conclude that sucralfate is useful in the management of acute radiation oesophagitis. (orig.).

  1. Oral sucralfate in acute radiation oesophagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sur, R.K.; Kochhar, R.; Singh, D.P.

    1994-01-01

    Eighty patients with carcinoma in the middle third of oesophagus and with acute radiation oesophagitis following external beam and intracavitary radiotherapy were managed by two different schedules. Group 1 (n = 40) received an antacid containing sodium alginate whereas Group 2 (n = 40) were given a 10% sucralfate suspension during 4 weeks. In Group 2, 32 patients had significant relief of symptoms within 7 days of treatment and most ulcers had healed by 12 days of treatment as seen on endoscopy. Patients in Group 1, on the other hand, showed little improvement of symptoms and had persistent ulcers even after 4 weeks of therapy. We conclude that sucralfate is useful in the management of acute radiation oesophagitis. (orig.)

  2. Diagnosis of moderate acute radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Shoucheng; Chen Zhijian; Chen Youxin

    1989-01-01

    Forty patients with malignant lymphoma were given 60 Co TLI. 21 cases received 6 Gy and 19 received 8 Gy. It was estimated that a single TLI of 6 and 8 Gy would correspond to TBI of 3.55 Gy and 4.25 Gy (average values) by analysing peripheral blood cell chromosome aberrations and 1.85-2.37 Gy by measuring red bone marrow stem cells clinically. Moderate acute radiation sickness with digestive tract reaction and hemopoietic and immunologic depression was observed. WBC and platelets decreased rapidly. Lymphocytes showed quantitative and qualitative changes even at early stage. All these indexes are significant for diagnosis. Besides, the degree of labial stimulation response, levels of C-reactive protein, corticoid, and urinal nucleoside and alkaloid base presented great changes both pre-and post-irradiation. Early diagnosis of moderate acute radiation sickness could be made in cancer patients subjected to 6-8 Gy TLI

  3. Studies of acute and chronic radiation injury at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 1970-1992: The JANUS Program Survival and Pathology Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grahn, D.; Wright, B.J.; Carnes, B.A.; Williamson, F.S.; Fox, C.

    1995-02-01

    A research reactor for exclusive use in experimental radiobiology was designed and built at Argonne National Laboratory in the 1960's. It was located in a special addition to Building 202, which housed the Division of Biological and Medical Research. Its location assured easy access for all users to the animal facilities, and it was also near the existing gamma-irradiation facilities. The water-cooled, heterogeneous 200-kW(th) reactor, named JANUS, became the focal point for a range of radiobiological studies gathered under the rubic of open-quotes the JANUS programclose quotes. The program ran from about 1969 to 1992 and included research at all levels of biological organization, from subcellular to organism. More than a dozen moderate- to large-scale studies with the B6CF 1 mouse were carried out; these focused on the late effects of whole-body exposure to gamma rays or fission neutrons, in matching exposure regimes. In broad terms, these studies collected data on survival and on the pathology observed at death. A deliberate effort was made to establish the cause of death. This archieve describes these late-effects studies and their general findings. The database includes exposure parameters, time of death, and the gross pathology and histopathology in codified form. A series of appendices describes all pathology procedures and codes, treatment or irradiation codes, and the manner in which the data can be accessed in the ORACLE database management system. A series of tables also presents summaries of the individual experiments in terms of radiation quality, sample sizes at entry, mean survival times by sex, and number of gross pathology and histopathology records

  4. Studies of acute and chronic radiation injury at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 1970-1992: The JANUS Program Survival and Pathology Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grahn, D.; Wright, B.J.; Carnes, B.A.; Williamson, F.S.; Fox, C.

    1995-02-01

    A research reactor for exclusive use in experimental radiobiology was designed and built at Argonne National Laboratory in the 1960`s. It was located in a special addition to Building 202, which housed the Division of Biological and Medical Research. Its location assured easy access for all users to the animal facilities, and it was also near the existing gamma-irradiation facilities. The water-cooled, heterogeneous 200-kW(th) reactor, named JANUS, became the focal point for a range of radiobiological studies gathered under the rubic of {open_quotes}the JANUS program{close_quotes}. The program ran from about 1969 to 1992 and included research at all levels of biological organization, from subcellular to organism. More than a dozen moderate- to large-scale studies with the B6CF{sub 1} mouse were carried out; these focused on the late effects of whole-body exposure to gamma rays or fission neutrons, in matching exposure regimes. In broad terms, these studies collected data on survival and on the pathology observed at death. A deliberate effort was made to establish the cause of death. This archieve describes these late-effects studies and their general findings. The database includes exposure parameters, time of death, and the gross pathology and histopathology in codified form. A series of appendices describes all pathology procedures and codes, treatment or irradiation codes, and the manner in which the data can be accessed in the ORACLE database management system. A series of tables also presents summaries of the individual experiments in terms of radiation quality, sample sizes at entry, mean survival times by sex, and number of gross pathology and histopathology records.

  5. Acute Lung Injury during Antithymocyte Globulin Therapy for Aplastic Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewan Christopher Goligher

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The case of a 33-year-old man with aplastic anemia who experienced recurrent episodes of hypoxemia and pulmonary infiltrates during infusions of antithymocyte globulin (ATG is described. With the use of high-dose corticosteroids, the patient’s original episodes resolved, and were subsequently prevented before additional administrations of ATG. Rare reports of an association between ATG and acute lung injury are found in the literature, but this is the first report of successful steroid-supported re-exposure. Although the mechanism of ATG-related acute lung injury remains uncertain, it may be parallel to the mechanism of transfusion-related acute lung injury because the pathogenesis of the latter relies, in part, on antileukocyte antibodies. ATG-related toxicity should be included in the differential diagnosis of new, infusion-associated pulmonary infiltrates, and corticosteroids may be a useful therapeutic consideration in the management.

  6. Perioperative aspirin and clonidine and risk of acute kidney injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garg, Amit X; Kurz, Andrea; Sessler, Daniel I

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Acute kidney injury, a common complication of surgery, is associated with poor outcomes and high health care costs. Some studies suggest aspirin or clonidine administered during the perioperative period reduces the risk of acute kidney injury; however, these effects are uncertain...... and each intervention has the potential for harm. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether aspirin compared with placebo, and clonidine compared with placebo, alters the risk of perioperative acute kidney injury. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A 2 × 2 factorial randomized, blinded, clinical trial of 6905...... patients undergoing noncardiac surgery from 88 centers in 22 countries with consecutive patients enrolled between January 2011 and December 2013. INTERVENTIONS: Patients were assigned to take aspirin (200 mg) or placebo 2 to 4 hours before surgery and then aspirin (100 mg) or placebo daily up to 30 days...

  7. Radioprotective effect of Rapana thomasiana hemocyanin in gamma induced acute radiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kindekov, Ivan; Vassilieva, Vladimir; Aljakova, Mitko; Mileva, Milka; Krastev, Dimo; Raynova, Yuliana; Idakieva, Krassimira; Doumanov, Lyuba

    2014-01-01

    The radioprotective effect of Rapana thomasiana hemocyanin (RtH) against radiation-induced injuries (stomach ulcers, survival time and endogenous haemopoiesis) and post-radiation recovery was investigated in male albino mice (C3H strain). Radiation course was in a dose of 7.5 Gy (LD 100/30 - dose that kills 100% of the mice at 30 days) from "1"3"7Cs with a dose of 2.05 Gy/ min. Radiation injuries were manifested by inducing 2 hematopoietic form of acute radiation syndrome. RtH was administered intraperitoneally in a single dose of 50, 100, 150 and 200 mg/kg body weight (b. w.) once a day for five consecutive days before irradiation. The results obtained showed that radiation exposure led to (1) 100% mortality rate, (2) ulceration in the stomach mucosa and (3) decrease formation of spleen colonies as a marker of endogenous haemopoiesis. Administration of RtH at a dose of 200 mg/kg provided better protection against radiation-induced stomach ulceration, mitigated the lethal effects of radiation exposure and recovered endogenous haemopoiesis versus irradiated but not supplemented mice. It could be expected that RtH will find a use in mitigating radiation induced injury and enhanced radiorecovery. Keywords: Rapana thomasiana hemocyanin; acute radiation syndrome; radioprotective effect; spleen colony assay; stomach ulcerations

  8. Radiation pancreatic death. A new radiation injury and its pathologic physiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsubouchi, Susumu [Fukui Medical School, Fukui (Japan)

    1982-03-01

    In lethal radiation injury, the organ which is responsible for gastrointestinal death was sought from the relationship between radiation dose and survival length of hamsters. In this research, a new plateau was found in the range of radiation dose from 30,000 to 60,000 rad. Histological examination revealed that the organ responsible to the survival of the animals in the plateau was Langerhans's (L.'s) island of the pancreas. Acute necrotic changes of L.'s islands was disclosed by blood glucose level, changes in granules of ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. cells, atrophy of L.'s islands, and by deficiency of blood insulin. The death of hamsters in the plateau is probably due to diabetic syndrome which was induced by the necrosis of L.'s island.

  9. Macrophage expression in acute radiation colitis in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadami, Tokuma; Shichijo, Kazuko; Matsuu, Mutsumi; Niino, Daisuke; Nakayama, Toshiyuki; Nakashima, Masahiro; Sekine, Ichiro

    2003-01-01

    Although radiation therapy is important in the treatment of tumors in pelvic and abdominal region, it may cause radiation injury as a side effect. But there is no effective way of preventing or curing the damages. The mechanism of acute radiation colitis has not been elucidated yet. Our previous reports have revealed that X-ray irradiation induce apoptosis of epithelial stem cells in colon. Then a hypothesis of the radiation colitis can be put forward, DNA damage by irradiation, apoptosis of mucosal epithelial stem cells and degeneration of epithelial gland structure, macrophages phagocyte the debris, being activated and secreting various inflammatory cytokines, infiltration of inflammatory cells. Several recent reports show that macrophages may play an important role in the process of inflammatory bowel diseases such ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. We studied radiation colitis using rat animal models. Male Wister rats were irradiated by a single fraction dose of 22.5 Gy X-ray at laparotomy, shielding except for an approximately 2.5 cm length of rectum. Histological changes and macrophage accumulation in the rectum mucosa were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and western blot method with the specimens which were taken on the 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, and 14th day after irradiation. Severe macrophage accumulation in the lamina propria of the rectum was observed on the 5th day. At the same time, severe destruction of mucosal structure and inflammatory cells infiltration were also observed. Based on the potent pro-inflammatory cytokine producing effects of macrophage in rat and the increased expression in inflammatory bowel disease patients, speculate that intervention in the macrophage-cytokine network could form a future target for the treatment of acute radiation colitis. (author)

  10. Montelukast induced acute hepatocellular liver injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harugeri A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A 46-year-old male with uncontrolled asthma on inhaled albuterol and formoterol with budesonide was commenced on montelukast. He developed abdominal pain and jaundice 48 days after initiating montelukast therapy. His liver tests showed an increase in serum total bilirubin, conjugated bilirubin, aspartate aminotranferase, alanine aminotranferase, and alkaline phosphatase. The patient was evaluated for possible non-drug related liver injury. Montelukast was discontinued suspecting montelukast induced hepatocellular liver injury. Liver tests began to improve and returned to normal 55 days after drug cessation. Causality of this adverse drug reaction by the Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences or Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method (CIOMS or RUCAM and Naranjo′s algorithm was ′probable′. Liver tests should be monitored in patients receiving montelukast and any early signs of liver injury should be investigated with a high index of suspicion for drug induced liver injury.

  11. Acute subdural hematoma, Head injury, Functional reco

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kim

    EVOLUTION DES HÉMATOMES SOUS-DURAUX AIGUS .... likelihood of functional recovery from traumatic brain injury. Howard et ... associated with decreased brainstem blood flow and that ishaemia rather than mechanical compression of.

  12. The Psychological Status of Patients with Acute Mandibular Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Pudov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to define the specific features of the psychological status of patients with acute mandibular injury, to compare a psychological reaction to injury in different age groups and in persons with signs of alcohol addiction. Subjects and methods. The study enrolled 37 patients of both sexes over 15 years of age. The patients were distributed by age and chronic alcohol intoxication. Psychological parameters were determined using personality questionnaires: Spielberg-Hanin, Zung, GHQ-28, and Wein ones. Results. The patients with mandibular injury were found to have higher levels of situational and personality anxiety. A state of depression as a response to acute mandibular injury of reactive genesis was found in 29.8% of cases. Autonomic dysfunction occurred in 62.2% of the patients with mandibular fractures. Occult pathopsychological states were detected in 35.1% of the study group patients. Conclusion. The main found peculiarities of the psychological status of the patients with acute mandibular injury were high anxiety and the considerable incidence of autonomic dysfunction syndrome. There were no great age differences in psychological status and the direction of reactions. The patients with chronic alcohol intoxication more frequently developed a depressive state, but the autonomic dysfunction syndrome was just less often encountered and pathopsychological states were less frequently found. Key words: acute low anxiety depression alcohol abuse, psychological status.

  13. Suggested classification of acute radiation sickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Guo; Mingyue, Zhu; Zhiqin, Zhao

    1984-08-01

    Acute radiation sickness is usually classified into three types. Over the last decade, we have been engaged in experimental studies on the classification of this syndrome. Our findings from these studies, however, point to the fact that between the hemopoietic and intestinal types, and between the intestinal and cerebral types there are transitive forms, namely, hemopoieto-intestinal type and cardio-vascular type, respectively. In this article the required radiation doses and the clinical courses of these transitive forms with special emphasis on their histological and clinical manifestations are described. In case of the hemopoieto-intestinal form, histological examination may reveal residual crypts and typical ''abnormal cells'' in the intestinal mucosa, and clinical manifestations include almost the whole spectrum of symptoms and signs of infection and hemorrhage. The watery stool in pink colour may be specific and helpful in diagnosis. In case of the cardio-vascular form, shock may occur immediately after exposure, and histological examination may show myocardial edema, hemorrhage, cell-infiltration and even necrosis. We propose that the acute radiation sickness should be divided into 5 forms, namely, hemopoietic, hemopoieto-intestinal, intestinal, cardio-vascular and cerebral types. Accurate diagnosis can only be made by taking an comprehensive view of radiation dose, clinical course, clinical manifestations and histological findings. (author).

  14. A suggested classification of acute radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yao; Zhu Mingyue; Zhao Zhiqin

    1984-01-01

    Acute radiation sickness is usually classified into three types. Over the last decade, we have been engaged in experimental studies on the classification of this syndrome. Our findings from these studies, however, point to the fact that between the hemopoietic and intestinal types, and between the intestinal and cerebral types there are transitive forms, namely, hemopoieto-intestinal type and cardio-vascular type, respectively. In this article the required radiation doses and the clinical courses of these transitive forms with special emphasis on their histological and clinical manifestations are described. In case of the hemopoieto-intestinal form, histological examination may reveal residual crypts and typical ''abnormal cells'' in the intestinal mucosa, and clinical manifestations include almost the whole spectrum of symptoms and signs of infection and hemorrhage. The watery stool in pink colour may be specific and helpful in diagnosis. In case of the cardio-vascular form, shock may occur immediately after exposure, and histological examination may show myocardial edema, hemorrhage, cell-infiltration and even necrosis. We propose that the acute radiation sickness should be divided into 5 forms, namely, hemopoietic, hemopoieto-intestinal, intestinal, cardio-vascular and cerebral types. Accurate diagnosis can only be made by taking an comprehensive view of radiation dose, clinical course, clinical manifestations and histological findings. (author)

  15. Therapeutic effect of bee pollens on acute radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mingsuo; Huang Chaoqun; Chen Zhen; Huang Meiying; Jiang Ying; Wang Tao

    1997-09-01

    The therapeutic effect of bee pollens on acute radiation sickness were evaluated by observing the changes in the peripheral white blood cell (PWBC) count, the total activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the levels of lipid peroxides (LPO) in sera of the irradiated rats following P.O. administration of bee pollens. It was found that bee pollens could remarkably help irradiated rats recover from radiation-induced injury. The functions of bee pollens might be summarized as follows: (1) Stimulating Proliferation of PWBC. The PWBC count of the bee pollens group showed no significant difference as compared with the normal control group on the 30 th day postirradiation. (2) Enhancing antioxidative effect of clearing free radicals. The total activity of serum SOD in the bee pollens group increased by 6.48% as compared with the normal control group on the 30 th day after irradiation, and the LPO levels i.e. MDA and POV in sera of the irradiated rats decreased by 54.73% and 21.60% respectively. The result suggests that using bee pollens as antiradiation and health-promoting agents in clinical treatment of acute radiation sickness and during radiotherapy of patients with tumors may has certain practical value. (12 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.)

  16. Induced hypernatraemia is protective in acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihari, Shailesh; Dixon, Dani-Louise; Lawrence, Mark D; Bersten, Andrew D

    2016-06-15

    Sucrose induced hyperosmolarity is lung protective but the safety of administering hyperosmolar sucrose in patients is unknown. Hypertonic saline is commonly used to produce hyperosmolarity aimed at reducing intra cranial pressure in patients with intracranial pathology. Therefore we studied the protective effects of 20% saline in a lipopolysaccharide lung injury rat model. 20% saline was also compared with other commonly used fluids. Following lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury, male Sprague Dawley rats received either 20% hypertonic saline, 0.9% saline, 4% albumin, 20% albumin, 5% glucose or 20% albumin with 5% glucose, i.v. During 2h of non-injurious mechanical ventilation parameters of acute lung injury were assessed. Hypertonic saline resulted in hypernatraemia (160 (1) mmol/l, mean (SD)) maintained through 2h of ventilation, and in amelioration of lung oedema, myeloperoxidase, bronchoalveolar cell infiltrate, total soluble protein and inflammatory cytokines, and lung histological injury score, compared with positive control and all other fluids (p ≤ 0.001). Lung physiology was maintained (conserved PaO2, elastance), associated with preservation of alveolar surfactant (p ≤ 0.0001). Independent of fluid or sodium load, induced hypernatraemia is lung protective in lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Patient Satisfaction in the Treatment of Acute Hamstring Strain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LingLing- Lai

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The impact of musculoskeletal injuries often caused loss time in sport participation. Athletes who suffered from these injuries experienced a decrease in performance and physical disability. Although a variety of treatments have been implemented to the muscle injuries, the administration of autologous blood injection is replacing the conventional rehabilitation to expedite the process of muscle recovery. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP is relatively new in muscle injury treatment and there is lack of evidence of the satisfaction of PRP treatment in muscle injuries. Purposes: The study aimed to investigate the patient satisfaction in the administration of PRP treatment and rehabilitation program for acute hamstring strain injury. Methods: Participants (competitive, semi-competitive and recreational athletes with acute hamstring strain injury (Grade II were recruited. Participants were randomly divided into either the PRP treatment or rehabilitation program. Participants were required to attend weekly follow up assessment for recovery evaluation. All the participants were required to complete a patient satisfaction questionnaire (PSQ-18 at the end of study.  The questionnaire is divided into seven sub-scales: general satisfaction, technical quality, interpersonal manner, communication, financial aspect, time spent with doctor, accessibility and convenience. Results: Participants were 22.35 ± 3.41 years. Duration from injury to first presentation in clinic ranged from two to ten days. Mean duration of recovery was 5.64 weeks. No statistically significant difference in the patient satisfaction sub-scales score between the two groups (p>0.05. Conclusion: The present study demonstrates that PRP treatment is as satisfactory as conventional rehabilitation program in managing acute hamstring strain injury. Both  modalities are correspondingly safe and have high degree of satisfaction. Given the acceptable outcomes, patients are likely to

  18. Acute hand and wrist injuries in athletes: evaluation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, W J; Slowman, L S

    2001-01-01

    Acute hand and wrist injuries in the athlete constitute a unique orthopaedic challenge. Because of the particular demands on the athlete (e.g., financial implications, coaching and administration pressures, self-esteem issues), a specialized management approach is often necessary. Common sites of injury include the ulnar collateral ligament of the thumb metacarpophalangeal joint, proximal interphalangeal joint, metacarpals and phalanges, scaphoid, hamate, and distal radius. Treatment of these injuries varies depending on the patient's age, sport, position played, and level of competition, but departures from standard practice as regards surgery, rehabilitation, and return to competition should never compromise care.

  19. Combined therapy of urinary bladder radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaderin, V.P.; Polyanichko, M.F.

    1982-01-01

    A scheme of therapy of radiation cystitis is suggested. It was developed on the basis of evaluation of literature data and clinical of 205 patients with radiation injury of the urinary bladder. The method is based on general and local therapy of damaged tissues by antiinflammatory drugs, anesthetics and stimulators of reparative regeneration. Severe ulcerative and incrustation cystites, refractory to conservative therapy, were treated by surgery, using antiseptics and reparation stimulators before, during and after operation. As a result, there were hardly any complications after reconstruction of the bladder with intestinal and peritoneal tissues. 104 patients (96.1%) were cured completely and ability to work was restored in 70 patients (76.9%) [ru

  20. Diagnosis and treatment of radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This publication is directed at medical professionals who may be involved in the management of radiation injuries starting from the first few hours or days after an exposure of undefined severity (i.e. those handling the emergency situation may not know the extent and severity of the accident). Experience has shown that in addition to occupational physicians, the complete management of an emergency case involves other professionals such as haematologists, oncologists, plastic surgeons, dermatologists, vascular surgeons, psychiatrists and consultants in other medical specialities. The principal aim of this publication is to provide guidelines to enable medical professionals to carry out prompt diagnostic measures and to offer emergency treatment. This report provides information in tabulated form on clinical criteria for dose assessment. Additionally, it discusses the appropriate dose-effect relationship in cases of external radiation involving either total body or local exposures, as well as internal contamination

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute spinal-cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Hideki; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Yamada, Takahisa; Iwata, Kinjiro; Okumura, Terufumi; Hoshino, Daisaku.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a noninvasive and very important method of investigating spinal-cord injuries. By means of MRI we examined 36 patients with spinal injuries, 34 of them in the acute stage. 19 cases had complete spinal-cord injury with paraplegia, while 17 cases had incomplete spinal-cord injury. MRI showed the injured spinal-cord in the acute stage to be partially swollen, with a high signal intensity in the T 2 -weighted images. In the chronic stage, the injured cord may show atrophic changes with a post-traumatic cavity or myelomalacia, which appears as a high-signal-intensity lesion in the T 2 -weighted images and as a low-signal intensity in the T 1 -weighted images. The cases with complete spinal injuries showed a high signal intensity at the wide level, and these prognoses were poor. The cases with incomplete injuries showed normal findings or a high-signal-intensity spot. In the Gd-DTPA enhanced images, the injured cords were enhanced very well in the subchronic stage. MRI is thus found to be useful in the diagnosis of spinal injuries; it also demonstrates a potential for predicting the neurological prognosis. (author)

  2. Acute radiation syndrones and their management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronkite, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation syndromes produced by large doses of ionizing radiation are divided into three general groups depending on dose of radiation and time after exposure. The CNS syndrome requires many thousands of rad, appears in minutes to hours, and kills within hours to days. The GIS appears after doses of a few hundred to 2000 rad. It is characterized by nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and disturbances of water and electrolyte metabolism. It has a high mortality in the first week after exposure. Survivors will then experience the HS as a result of marrow aplasia. Depending on dose, survival is possible with antibiotic and transfusion therapy. The relationship of granulocyte depression to mortality in dogs and human beings is illustrated. The role of depth dose pattern of mortality of radiation exposure is described and used as an indication of why air exposure doses may be misleading. The therapy of radiation injury is described based on antibiotics, transfusion therapy, and use of molecular regulators. The limited role of matched allogenic bone marrow transplants is discussed. 52 refs., 13 figs.

  3. Acute radiation syndrones and their management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronkite, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation syndromes produced by large doses of ionizing radiation are divided into three general groups depending on dose of radiation and time after exposure. The CNS syndrome requires many thousands of rad, appears in minutes to hours, and kills within hours to days. The GIS appears after doses of a few hundred to 2000 rad. It is characterized by nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and disturbances of water and electrolyte metabolism. It has a high mortality in the first week after exposure. Survivors will then experience the HS as a result of marrow aplasia. Depending on dose, survival is possible with antibiotic and transfusion therapy. The relationship of granulocyte depression to mortality in dogs and human beings is illustrated. The role of depth dose pattern of mortality of radiation exposure is described and used as an indication of why air exposure doses may be misleading. The therapy of radiation injury is described based on antibiotics, transfusion therapy, and use of molecular regulators. The limited role of matched allogenic bone marrow transplants is discussed. 52 refs., 13 figs

  4. Health Impacts from Acute Radiation Exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2003-09-30

    Absorbed doses above1-2 Gy (100-200 rads) received over a period of a day or less lead to one or another of the acute radiation syndromes. These are the hematopoietic syndrome, the gastrointestinal (GI) syndrome, the cerebrovascular (CV) syndrome, the pulmonary syndrome, or the cutaneous syndrome. The dose that will kill about 50% of the exposed people within 60 days with minimal medical care, LD50-60, is around 4.5 Gy (450 rads) of low-LET radiation measured free in air. The GI syndrome may not be fatal with supportive medical care and growth factors below about 10 Gy (1000 rads), but above this is likely to be fatal. Pulmonary and cutaneous syndromes may or may not be fatal, depending on many factors. The CV syndrome is invariably fatal. Lower acute doses, or protracted doses delivered over days or weeks, may lead to many other health outcomes than death. These include loss of pregnancy, cataract, impaired fertility or temporary or permanent sterility, hair loss, skin ulceration, local tissue necrosis, developmental abnormalities including mental and growth retardation in persons irradiated as children or fetuses, radiation dermatitis, and other symptoms listed in Table 2 on page 12. Children of parents irradiated prior to conception may experience heritable ill-health, that is, genetic changes from their parents. These effects are less strongly expressed than previously thought. Populations irradiated to high doses at high dose rates have increased risk of cancer incidence and mortality, taken as about 10-20% incidence and perhaps 5-10% mortality per sievert of effective dose of any radiation or per gray of whole-body absorbed dose low-LET radiation. Cancer risks for non-uniform irradiation will be less.

  5. Acute Radiation Effects Resulting from Exposure to Solar Particle Event-Like Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann; Cengel, Keith

    2012-07-01

    A major solar particle event (SPE) may place astronauts at significant risk for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS), which may be exacerbated when combined with other space flight stressors, such that the mission or crew health may be compromised. The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) Center of Acute Radiation Research (CARR) is focused on the assessment of risks of adverse biological effects related to the ARS in animal models exposed to space flight stressors combined with the types of radiation expected during an SPE. As part of this program, FDA-approved drugs that may prevent and/or mitigate ARS symptoms are being evaluated. The CARR studies are focused on the adverse biological effects resulting from exposure to the types of radiation, at the appropriate energies, doses and dose-rates, present during an SPE (and standard reference radiations, gamma rays or electrons). The ARS is a phased syndrome which often includes vomiting and fatigue. Other acute adverse biologic effects of concern are the loss of hematopoietic cells, which can result in compromised bone marrow and immune cell functions. There is also concern for skin damage from high SPE radiation doses, including burns, and resulting immune system dysfunction. Using 3 separate animal model systems (ferrets, mice and pigs), the major ARS biologic endpoints being evaluated are: 1) vomiting/retching and fatigue, 2) hematologic changes (with focus on white blood cells) and immune system changes resulting from exposure to SPE radiation with and without reduced weightbearing conditions, and 3) skin injury and related immune system functions. In all of these areas of research, statistically significant adverse health effects have been observed in animals exposed to SPE-like radiation. Countermeasures for the management of ARS symptoms are being evaluated. New research findings from the past grant year will be discussed. Acknowledgements: This research is supported by the NSBRI Center of Acute

  6. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (Bone marrow syndrome, Aplastic Anemia): Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri

    Key Words: Aplastic Anemia (AA), Pluripotential Stem Cells (PSC) Introduction: Aplastic Anemia (AA) is a disorder of the pluripotential stem cells involve a decrease in the number of cells of myeloid, erythroid and megakaryotic lineage [Segel et al. 2000 ]. The etiology of AA include idiopathic cases and secondary aplastic anemia after exposure to drugs, toxins, chemicals, viral infections, lympho-proliferative diseases, radiation, genetic causes, myelodisplastic syndromes and hypoplastic anemias, thymomas, lymphomas. [Brodskyet al. 2005.,Modan et al. 1975., Szklo et al. 1975]. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (or Bone marrow syndrome, or Radiation-Acquired Aplastic Anemia) is the acute toxic syndrome which usually occurs with a dose of irradiation between 0.7 and 10 Gy (70- 1000 rads), depending on the species irradiated. [Waselenko et al., 2004]. The etiology of bone morrow damage from high-level radiation exposure results depends on the radiosensitivity of certain bone marrow cell lines. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Aplastic anemia after radiation exposure is a clinical syndrome that results from a marked disorder of bone marrow blood cell production. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Radiation hematotoxicity is mediated via genotoxic and other specific toxic mechanisms, leading to aplasia, cell apoptosis or necrosis, initiation via genetic mechanisms of clonal disorders, in cases such as the acute radiation-acquired form of AA. AA results from radiation injury to pluripotential and multipotential stem cells in the bone marrow. The clinical signs displayed in reticulocytopenia, anemia, granulocytopenia, monocytopenia, and thrombocytopenia. The number of marrow CD34+ cells (multipotential hematopoietic progenitors) and their derivative colony-forming unit{granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) and burst forming unit {erythroid (BFU{E) are reduced markedly in patients with AA. [Guinan 2011, Brodski et al. 2005, Beutler et al.,2000] Cells expressing CD34 (CD34+ cell) are normally

  7. Pediatric thermal injury: acute care and reconstruction update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Alexis D; Billmire, David A

    2009-07-01

    The acute and reconstructive care of each pediatric burn patient presents unique challenges to the plastic surgeon and the burn care team. : The purpose of this review article is to highlight the interdependence between the acute and reconstructive needs of pediatric burn patients as it pertains to each anatomical site. Relevant principles of acute pediatric burn care and burn reconstruction are outlined, based on the authors' experience and review of the literature. The need for late reconstruction in pediatric burn survivors is significantly influenced by the acute surgical and rehabilitative treatments. With their vulnerability to airway swelling, hypothermia, pulmonary edema, and ischemia-reperfusion injury, pediatric patients with large burns require precise, life-saving treatment in the acute phase. Decision-making in pediatric burn reconstruction must take into account the patient's future growth, maturity, and often lack of suitable donor sites. Appropriately selected reconstructive techniques are essential to optimize function, appearance, and quality of life in pediatric burn survivors.

  8. Acute kidney injury from Paraquat poisoning: a case report. | Slater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute kidney injury from Paraquat poisoning: a case report. H. E. Slater, O.C.A. Okoye, O. Okperi, N. Rajora. Abstract. Paraquat is a salt widely used as a herbicide. Although paraquat poisoning is rare in the general population, it may be considered as one of the most toxic poisons frequently used for suicide attempts, and is ...

  9. Stem cells in sepsis and acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cribbs, Sushma K; Matthay, Michael A; Martin, Greg S

    2010-12-01

    Sepsis and acute lung injury continue to be major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide despite advances in our understanding of pathophysiology and the discovery of new management strategies. Recent investigations show that stem cells may be beneficial as prognostic biomarkers and novel therapeutic strategies in these syndromes. This article reviews the potential use of endogenous adult tissue-derived stem cells in sepsis and acute lung injury as prognostic markers and also as exogenous cell-based therapy. A directed systematic search of the medical literature using PubMed and OVID, with particular emphasis on the time period after 2002, was done to evaluate topics related to 1) the epidemiology and pathophysiology of sepsis and acute lung injury; and 2) the definition, characterization, and potential use of stem cells in these diseases. DATA SYNTHESIS AND FINDINGS: When available, preferential consideration was given to prospective nonrandomized clinical and preclinical studies. Stem cells have shown significant promise in the field of critical care both for 1) prognostic value and 2) treatment strategies. Although several recent studies have identified the potential benefit of stem cells in sepsis and acute lung injury, further investigations are needed to more completely understand stem cells and their potential prognostic and therapeutic value.

  10. Transfusion-related acute lung injury: a change of perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaar, A. P.; Schultz, M. J.; Juffermans, N. P.

    2009-01-01

    Two decades ago, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) was considered a rare complication of transfusion medicine. Nowadays, TRALI has emerged as the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality, presumably as a consequence of reaching international agreement on defining TRALI with

  11. Computed Tomography: Ocular Manifestations In Acute Head Injury

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Methods: We reviewed 98 brain computed tomographic results retrospectively. ... was also performed to compare the difference of the ocular findings and sexes. ... Ocular findings were more in males and the severity of the ocular findings was .... Male. Female. Indications. Acute mild closed head injury. 12(15.0). 1(5.6).

  12. Determinants of modality of management of acute kidney injury in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The cost of taking care of children with acute kidney injury (AKI) is enormous and beyond the reach of many caregivers in sub-Saharan Africa which are largely resource poor. It is therefore imperative to determine those who may benefit from conservative management which is comparatively cheaper to the ...

  13. Assessment of knowledge of acute kidney injury among non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Adequate knowledge of acute kidney injury (AKI) among doctors is essential for its prevention, early diagnosis and management. Assessing knowledge of AKI among doctors is necessary to identify areas of deficiencies and key areas to be emphasized when organizing educational programs aimed at ...

  14. Outcome of pregnancy related acute kidney injury requiring ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pregnancy related acute kidney injury (AKI) severe enough to require dialysis is now rare in developed countries but is still a significant cause of maternal mortality in many resource constrained countries. However, there is scanty information from many sub-Saharan countries about outcomes of patient who ...

  15. Prevalence and outcomes of acute kidney injury in term neonates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The kidney is the most damaged organ in asphyxiated full-term infants. The severity of its damage is correlated with the severity of neurological damage. We determined the prevalence of perinatal asphyxia-associated acute kidney injury (AKI). Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study including 60 ...

  16. Delayed radiation injury to the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Shingo; Yoshii, Yoshihiko; Okazaki, Masao; Nose, Tadao; Aida, Shinsuke

    1989-01-01

    The authors report four cases of delayed radiation injury to the brain. One case was diagnosed histologically, and the other three cases, by means of serial CT scans and clinical symptoms. In all cases, a low-density area was observed 4-15 months after radiotherapy, then the contrast-enhanced area appeared within the low-density area about 4 months later. The enhanced area was distant from the original tumor, but within the field of radiotherapy. In the relationship between CT scans and superimposed dose distributions, the enhanced area and the low-density area were always observed within a zone of more than 80% of the total doses, and, as for the irradiated doses, there was no difference between the two areas. However, a distinct difference between these two areas was noted in the MRI scans and histopathology. The enhanced area was imaged as an area of a high signal by means of Gd-DTPA enhanced T 1 -weighted images in two cases. In the one histologically verified case, the fibrinoid necrosis of the blood vessel and demyelination appeared significantly higher in the enhanced area than in the low-density area. In conclusion, when a low-density area was observed by CT scan within the field of radiotherapy, we also suspected radiation injury and considered steroid or anticoagulant therapy in order to reverse it. However, if an enhanced area appeared within the injured lesion, the area seemed to have become irreversible and surgical therapy might also be needed. (author)

  17. Bile loss in the acute intestinal radiation syndrome in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraci, J.P.; Dunston, S.G.; Jackson, K.L.; Mariano, M.S.; Holeski, C.; Eaton, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of bile duct ligation (BDL), choledochostomy, bile acid sequestering within the intestinal lumen by cholestyramine, and fluid and electrolyte replacement on survival time and development of diarrhea after whole-body exposure to doses of ionizing radiation that result in death from acute intestinal injury were studied. BDL significantly prolonged survival and delayed the onset of diarrhea after exposure to 137 Cs gamma rays, fission neutrons, or cyclotron-produced neutrons in the range of doses that produce intestinal death or death from a combination of intestinal and hematopoietic injuries. Cannulation of the bile duct with exteriorized bile flow (choledochostomy) to protect the irradiated intestine from the mucolytic action of bile salts did not duplicate the effect of BDL in increasing survival time. Choledochostomy without fluid replacement eliminated the occurrence of diarrhea in 15.4 Gy irradiated rats. Diarrhea did occur in irradiated animals with choledochostomy if they received duodenal injections of fluid and electrolytes to replace the fluid lost as a result of bile drainage. Duodenal injection of fluid and electrolytes had no significant effect on survival time in irradiated rats. Injection of fluid and electrolytes into the peritoneal cavity of irradiated rats resulted in an increase in survival time that was comparable to that observed after BDL. Addition of antibiotics to the peritoneally injected fluid and electrolytes further increased survival time (up to 9 days). This survival time approached that seen in animals receiving the same radiation dose but which had the intestine exteriorized and shielded to minimize radiation injury to the intestine. Postmortem histological examinations of the irradiated small intestine showed mucosal regeneration in these long-term survivors receiving fluid and antibiotic therapy

  18. ACUTE CAUSTIC SODA INJURIES OF THE OESOPHAGUS·

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of severe oesophageal injury the primary dysphagia, due essentially to ... Pharyngeal burns are of greater significance, but their ..... scope must be passed into the stomach before the gullet ... When the whole circumference is ... strictures associated with severe tubular strictures of ... The growth of epithelium only proceeds.

  19. [The catalase inhibitor aminotriazole alleviates acute alcoholic liver injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Qing; Ge, Pu; Dai, Jie; Liang, Tian-Cai; Yang, Qing; Lin, Ling; Zhang, Li

    2015-02-25

    In this study, the effects of catalase (CAT) inhibitor aminotriazole (ATZ) on alcohol-induced acute liver injury were investigated to explore the potential roles of CAT in alcoholic liver injury. Acute liver injury was induced by intraperitoneal injection of alcohol in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats, and various doses of ATZ (100-400 mg/kg) or vehicle were administered intraperitoneally at 30 min before alcohol exposure. After 24 h of alcohol exposure, the levels of aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in plasma were determined. The degree of hepatic histopathological abnormality was observed by HE staining. The activity of hepatic CAT, hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) level and malondialdehyde (MDA) content in liver tissue were measured by corresponding kits. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in plasma were determined by ELISA method. The results showed that treatment with ATZ dose-dependently suppressed the elevation of ALT, AST and LDH levels induced by alcohol exposure, and that ATZ alleviated alcohol-induced histopathological alterations. Furthermore, ATZ inhibited the activity of CAT, reduced hepatic levels of H₂O₂and MDA in alcohol exposed rats. ATZ also decreased the levels of plasma TNF-α and IL-6 in rats with alcohol exposure. These results indicated that ATZ attenuated alcohol-induced acute liver injury in rats, suggesting that CAT might play important pathological roles in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver injury.

  20. Acute kidney injury from herbal vaginal remedy in Ilorin: a case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute kidney injury from herbal vaginal remedy in Ilorin: a case report. TO Olanrewaju, A Chijioke, IQ Ameh, AA Adewale. Abstract. The use of traditional herbal remedy is very common worldwide, and it is associated with complications such as acute kidney injury. Herbal remedy accounts for 35% of acute kidney injury in ...

  1. Manipulation of nitric oxide in an animal model of acute liver injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We evaluated the impact of altering nitric oxide release on acute liver injury, the associated gut injury and bacterial translocation, at different time intervals. Methods: An acute rat liver injury model induced by D-galactosamine was used. Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four main groups: normal control, acute liver ...

  2. Reduction of radiation injury of fresh agricultural products by saccharide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Toru; Todoroki, Setsuko

    1998-01-01

    To establish irradiation technologies as one of alternative technology of methyl bromide fumigation, radiation sensitivities for each kind of fresh agricultural products and reduction of radiation injury were investigated. Fresh vegetables and flowers such as cabbage, sprouts, asparagus, lettuce, chrysanthemum, carnation, rose, etc. were used and irradiated with 750 Gy γ-ray. Flowers received radiation injury were soaked into various kinds of solutions for one night, then they were irradiated with 500 Gy γ-ray. They showed different radiation sensitivities. Cruciferae plant showed radioresistance and Compositae plant radiosensitivity. A keeping quality agent for cut flowers indicated protection effect on radiation injury. (S.Y.)

  3. Reduction of radiation injury of fresh agricultural products by saccharide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Toru; Todoroki, Setsuko [National Food Research Inst., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    To establish irradiation technologies as one of alternative technology of methyl bromide fumigation, radiation sensitivities for each kind of fresh agricultural products and reduction of radiation injury were investigated. Fresh vegetables and flowers such as cabbage, sprouts, asparagus, lettuce, chrysanthemum, carnation, rose, etc. were used and irradiated with 750 Gy {gamma}-ray. Flowers received radiation injury were soaked into various kinds of solutions for one night, then they were irradiated with 500 Gy {gamma}-ray. They showed different radiation sensitivities. Cruciferae plant showed radioresistance and Compositae plant radiosensitivity. A keeping quality agent for cut flowers indicated protection effect on radiation injury. (S.Y.)

  4. Evaluation of the hamstring muscle complex following acute injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koulouris, George; Connell, David

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the imaging findings following acute hamstring injury. We retrospectively reviewed the imaging findings of hamstring muscle complex (HMC) strain in 170 patients referred to our institution over a 3-year period. A total of 179 injuries to the HMC were demonstrated in 170 patients (154 male, 16 female, mean age 28.2 years). The mean duration of symptoms was 4.7 days (range 1-10 days). MR imaging was performed in 97 cases and sonography in 102 cases (both modalities were performed in 20 examinations). Attention was directed to the frequency of muscle involvement, the location of the injury within the muscle-tendon unit, the extent of the injury and discriminating avulsion from muscle injury. Twenty-one patients had proximal tendon injury, with sixteen avulsions and five partial tears. Sixteen of these patients had surgical confirmation of hamstring avulsion from the ischial tuberosity (14 conjoint, 2 biceps femoris alone) and all were reliably diagnosed with MR imaging (16/16), but less so with sonography (7/12). Four distal tendon avulsions were also observed (three semitendinosus, one biceps femoris). With respect to muscle injury, the biceps femoris was most commonly injured (124/154). Semimembranosus was an uncommon muscle injury (21/154) and semitendinosus rare (9/154). Imaging can discriminate a hamstring tendon avulsion from musculotendinous strain and helps identify which patients necessitate surgical management as opposed to conservative treatment. (orig.)

  5. Evaluation of the hamstring muscle complex following acute injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koulouris, George; Connell, David [Department of Radiology, St Francis X Cabrini, Wattletree Rd, 3144, Malvern, Victoria (Australia)

    2003-10-01

    To evaluate the imaging findings following acute hamstring injury. We retrospectively reviewed the imaging findings of hamstring muscle complex (HMC) strain in 170 patients referred to our institution over a 3-year period. A total of 179 injuries to the HMC were demonstrated in 170 patients (154 male, 16 female, mean age 28.2 years). The mean duration of symptoms was 4.7 days (range 1-10 days). MR imaging was performed in 97 cases and sonography in 102 cases (both modalities were performed in 20 examinations). Attention was directed to the frequency of muscle involvement, the location of the injury within the muscle-tendon unit, the extent of the injury and discriminating avulsion from muscle injury. Twenty-one patients had proximal tendon injury, with sixteen avulsions and five partial tears. Sixteen of these patients had surgical confirmation of hamstring avulsion from the ischial tuberosity (14 conjoint, 2 biceps femoris alone) and all were reliably diagnosed with MR imaging (16/16), but less so with sonography (7/12). Four distal tendon avulsions were also observed (three semitendinosus, one biceps femoris). With respect to muscle injury, the biceps femoris was most commonly injured (124/154). Semimembranosus was an uncommon muscle injury (21/154) and semitendinosus rare (9/154). Imaging can discriminate a hamstring tendon avulsion from musculotendinous strain and helps identify which patients necessitate surgical management as opposed to conservative treatment. (orig.)

  6. Synergistic impact of acute kidney injury and high level of cervical spinal cord injury on the weaning outcome of patients with acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wen-Kuang; Ko, Hsin-Kuo; Ho, Li-Ing; Wang, Jia-Horng; Kou, Yu Ru

    2015-07-01

    Respiratory neuromuscular impairment severity is known to predict weaning outcome among patients with cervical spinal cord injury; however, the impact of non-neuromuscular complications remains unexplored. This study was to evaluate possible neuromuscular and non-neuromuscular factors that may negatively impact weaning outcome. From September 2002 to October 2012, acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury patients who had received mechanical ventilation for >48h were enrolled and divided into successful (n=54) and unsuccessful weaning groups (n=19). Various neuromuscular, non-neuromuscular factors and events during the intensive care unit stay were extracted from medical charts and electronic medical records. Variables presenting with a significant difference (pspinal cord injury (C1-3), lower pulse rates, and lower Glasgow Coma Scale score on admission, higher peak blood urea nitrogen, lower trough albumin, and lower trough blood leukocyte counts. Furthermore, unsuccessful weaning patients had a higher incidence of pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, shock and acute kidney injury during the intensive care unit stay. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed acute kidney injury and high level of cervical spinal cord injury were independent risk factors for failure of weaning. Importantly, patients with both risk factors showed a large increase in odds ratio for unsuccessful weaning from mechanical ventilation (pinjury during the intensive care unit stay and high level of cervical spinal injury are two independent risk factors that synergistically work together producing a negative impact on weaning outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Alpha-tocopherol succinate- and AMD3100-mobilized progenitors mitigate radiation combined injury in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Vijay K.; Wise, Stephen Y.; Fatanmi, Oluseyi O.; Beattie, Lindsay A.; Ducey, Elizabeth J.; Seed, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the role of alpha-tocopherol succinate (TS)- and AMD3100-mobilized progenitors in mitigating combined injury associated with acute radiation exposure in combination with secondary physical wounding. CD2F1 mice were exposed to high doses of cobalt-60 gamma-radiation and then transfused intravenously with 5 million peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from TS- and AMD3100-injected mice after irradiation. Within 1 h after irradiation, mice were exposed to secondary wounding. Mice were observed for 30 d after irradiation and cytokine analysis was conducted by multiplex Luminex assay at various time-points after irradiation and wounding. Our results initially demonstrated that transfusion of TS-mobilized progenitors from normal mice enhanced survival of acutely irradiated mice exposed 24 h prior to transfusion to supralethal doses (11.5–12.5 Gy) of 60 Co gamma-radiation. Subsequently, comparable transfusions of TS-mobilized progenitors were shown to significantly mitigate severe combined injuries in acutely irradiated mice. TS administered 24 h before irradiation was able to protect mice against combined injury as well. Cytokine results demonstrated that wounding modulates irradiation-induced cytokines. This study further supports the conclusion that the infusion of TS-mobilized progenitor-containing PBMCs acts as a bridging therapy in radiation-combined-injury mice. We suggest that this novel bridging therapeutic approach involving the infusion of TS-mobilized hematopoietic progenitors following acute radiation exposure or combined injury might be applicable to humans. (author)

  8. Surgical Treatment Results of Acute Acromioclavicular Injuries

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    Mahmoud Jabalameli

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Different methods of surgical treatment for acromioclavicular(ACjoint injury were considered in the literature. The purpose of the study was to compare intra- articular AC repair technique with the extra-articular coracoclavicular repair technique for the patients with Rockwood type III and VAC joint injury when indicated.Methods: Nineteen consecutive patients with Rockwood type III and VAC joint injury  were treated with intra-articular (Group I - 12 cases and extra-articular (Group II - 7cases repair technique between 1380 - 1386, and the results reviewed. When the diagnosis was established, the mean age of the patients was 32.5 years (Range, 18 - 60; group I and II 31.8 years (Range, 18 - 60 and 34 years (Range, 22 - 58 respectively. The mean duration of postoperative follow - up was 24 months. The Constant shoulder scoring system was applied to obtain clinical results.   Results: Only in group I, the post-surgical complication was associated with fiber allergy, wound infection and pin site infection in two patients respectively. No pain was detected in fourteen cases. Four patients in group I had occasional mild pain during sport activity, while one case in this group reported severe pain during resting which prevented the patient from activity. Also, there was an ossification in thirteen patients particularly in group I. Clinical results showed the mean constant shoulder score was 93.4 in group I and 97.1 in group II.Conclusion: At the time of the follow - up, there was a clear difference between both groups regarding to postoperative pain and discomfort.Therefore, it seemed that potential cause of pain was due to postoperative complications. An interesting postoperative complication without interfere in the functional outcome was coracoclavicular space ossification in most cases. This was probably because of soft tissue injury during the operation.It seemed that surgical treatment of Rockwood type III and VAC joint injuries

  9. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports

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    Fong Daniel TP

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprain injury, prescribing orthosis decreases the risk while increased exercise intensity in soccer raises the risk. For intrinsic factors, a foot size with increased width, an increased ankle eversion to inversion strength, plantarflexion strength and ratio between dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength, and limb dominance could increase the ankle sprain injury risk. Players with a previous sprain history, players wearing shoes with air cells, players who do not stretch before exercising, players with inferior single leg balance, and overweight players are 4.9, 4.3, 2.6, 2.4 and 3.9 times more likely to sustain an ankle sprain injury. The aetiology of most ankle sprain injuries is incorrect foot positioning at landing – a medially-deviated vertical ground reaction force causes an explosive supination or inversion moment at the subtalar joint in a short time (about 50 ms. Another aetiology is the delayed reaction time of the peroneal muscles at the lateral aspect of the ankle (60–90 ms. The failure supination or inversion torque is about 41–45 Nm to cause ligamentous rupture in simulated spraining tests on cadaver. A previous case report revealed that the ankle joint reached 48 degrees inversion and 10 degrees internal rotation during an accidental grade I ankle ligamentous sprain injury during a dynamic cutting trial in laboratory. Diagnosis techniques and grading systems vary, but the management of ankle ligamentous sprain injury is mainly conservative

  10. The modes of death in mammals exposed to whole body radiation (acute radiation syndromes)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, O.R. dos.

    1990-07-01

    When an animal is exposed to a sufficient amount of radiation, there will be changes in many organs of the body, and as a result of either the effects in one particular organ or the interaction of effects in several organs, the animal as a whole will show characteristic syndromes. Some syndromes result inevitably in death. Others may or may not be lethal, depending on the extent of the tissue damage. The time of appearance of the syndromes, their duration, and the survival of the organism depend on many factors. Whole body acute doses of radiation produce the same spectrum of Central Nervous System (CNS), Gastrointestinal (GI) and Bone Marrow (BM) injury in man as was described for animals. Damage to the skin, ovary and testis are an integral and important part of the symptoms. (author) [pt

  11. Hypothyroidism causing paralytic ileus and acute kidney injury - case report

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    Rodrigo Chaturaka

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a patient with severe hypothyroidism complicated by paralytic ileus and acute kidney injury. A 65 year old male patient, diagnosed with hypothyroidism one year ago was transferred to our unit in a state of drowsiness and confusion. He was severely hypothyroid and had paralytic ileus and impaired renal function at the time of transfer. Hypokalaemia was present, and was likely to have contributed to the paralytic ileus and this together with dehydration was likely to have contributed to renal injury. Nonetheless, hypothyroidism is very likely to have been the principal precipitant of both these complications, and both paralytic ileus and acute kidney injury improved with thyroxine replacement. Unfortunately, the patient died unexpectedly eight days after admission to the unit. Hypothyroidism may induce de novo acute kidney injury or it may exacerbate ongoing chronic kidney disease. This rare complication is assumed to be due to the hypodynamic circulatory state created by thyroid hormone deficiency. Paralytic ileus is an even rarer fatal manifestation of hypothyroidism and is thought to be due to an autonomic neuropathy affecting the intestines that is reversible with thyroxine replacement. To our knowledge, both these complications have not been observed in a single patient so far. It is important that clinicians are aware of these rare manifestations of hypothyroidism as in most occasions, thyroxine deficiency may be missed, and treatment can reverse the complications.

  12. Acute lung injury and the acute respiratory distress syndrome in the injured patient

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    Bakowitz Magdalena

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome are clinical entities of multi-factorial origin frequently seen in traumatically injured patients requiring intensive care. We performed an unsystematic search using PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews up to January 2012. The purpose of this article is to review recent evidence for the pathophysiology and the management of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome in the critically injured patient. Lung protective ventilation remains the most beneficial therapy. Future trials should compare intervention groups to controls receiving lung protective ventilation, and focus on relevant outcome measures such as duration of mechanical ventilation, length of intensive care unit stay, and mortality.

  13. Renal Support for Acute Kidney Injury in the Developing World

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    Rajeev A. Annigeri

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available There is wide variation in the management of acute kidney injury (AKI and the practice of renal replacement therapy (RRT around the world. Clinicians in developing countries face additional challenges due to limited resources, reduced availability of trained staff and equipment, cultural and socioeconomic aspects, and administrative and governmental barriers. In this article, we report the consensus recommendations from the 18th Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative conference in Hyderabad, India. We provide the minimal requirements for provision of acute RRT in developing countries, including patient selection, choice of RRT modality and monitoring, transition, and termination of acute RRT. We also discuss areas of uncertainty and propose themes for future research. These recommendations can serve as a foundation for clinicians to implement renal support for AKI in low resource settings.

  14. Postural control deficit in acute QTF grade II whiplash injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehner, Christoph; Heym, Birgit; Maier, Dirk; Sander, Silvia; Arand, Markus; Elbel, Martin; Hartwig, Erich; Kramer, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Experimental in vivo study. The objective was to investigate the balance control in patients with acute QTF grade II whiplash injuries of the cervical spine. Tetra-ataxiametric posturography in chronic pain patients after whiplash injuries of the cervical spine has revealed an impaired regulation of balance. However, so far it is unclear if this is caused by the accident or other factors that are associated with the pain chronification process. 40 patients with acute QTF grade II whiplash injuries and 40 healthy matched controls were examined on a posturography platform. The stability index ST(Sigma) and the Fourier analysis FA(Sigma) (0.10-1.00Hz) were established for eight standing positions and sum scores were calculated. The pain index was established using a visual analog scale ranging from 0 to 100. A follow-up examination was conducted for the patients after 2 months. The patients with acute whiplash injuries of the cervical spine achieved significantly poorer results for both ST(Sigma) and FA(Sigma) than the healthy controls. There were no differences between the eight standing positions for both ST(Sigma) and FA(Sigma). After 2 months, 17 patients had no change in the pain development, 21 patients showed an improvement in pain intensity and 2 patients had deteriorated. The subgroup of patients with improvement in pain intensity showed a significant improvement in balance control concerning the FA(Sigma) compared to patients with unchanged pain intensity. Patients with acute whiplash injuries have a reduced balance control as compared to matched controls. This study gives an indication that post-traumatic neck pain is associated with impairments of postural control.

  15. Acute Radiation Syndrome. Consequences and outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okladnikova, N.D.; Pesternikova, V.S.; Sumina, M.V.; Azizova, T.V.; Yurkov, N.N.

    2000-01-01

    The consequences and outcomes of an Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS), induced by external gamma radiation for 59 persons (49 men and 10 women) have been estimated. All incidents have taken place more than 40 years ago in the yearly years of adjustment of an atomic industry (1950-1953-38 persons, 1954-1958-21 persons). According to the degree of severity ARS 5 groups are selected: the severest degree - 7 individuals (average dose in group 43.8±12.8 Sv), severe - 4 individuals (9.3±1.5 Sv), medium - 14 individuals (2.2±0.8 Sv), a light degree - 15 individuals (0.93±0.13 Sv), ''erased'' from - 19 individuals (0.85±0.07 Sv). In all cases, except for lethal (the severest degree), the characteristics of morphological composition of the peripheral blood were restored in the first year after ARS and now correspond to physiological standard. In 2 cases the moderate hypoplasia of granulocytopoiesis was diagnosed. A marker of the acute exposure was the chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes of the peripheral blood. The frequency of chromosome aberrations correlates with severity degree of ARS (from 3-7 up to 35-50 stable aberrations per 100 cells). In cases of ARS with severe degree the early development of a cerebral atherosclerosis is detected. The radiation cataract was diagnosed in 5 patients (an exposure doses 4.0-9.8 Sv, a period of development 2-5 years). During the first years after ARS in 80% of cases the complete labour rehabilitation is reached. Of 53 patients with known vital status by 45 year of monitoring 19 persons (35.8%) have died, of these in 2 cases the causes of death are not determined. In remaining cases the causes of death were ARS of severest degree (7 persons), Ischemic Heart Disease (5 persons), malignant tumors (4 persons), accidents and traumas (2 persons). (author)

  16. General discussion about enzymes activities of radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vucicevic, M.; Sukalo, I.

    1989-01-01

    Researching reliable and practical indicators of radiation injury, however, is very interesting and considerable department of scientific studies, practical and theoretical. Enzymes activities are among biochemical indicators which are changed after radiation injury. Activity of these specific proteins is important in regulation of every biochemical reaction in existing beings. Biological macromolecules can be damaged by radiation or the cell permeability can be changed. All of these influence directly on enzymes activities. In this paper we present the review of the all important enzymes, indicators of the radiation injury, which variances on reference to normal values are significant of the functional and the structural changes of essential organs (author)

  17. General discussion about enzymes activities of radiation injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vucicevic, M; Sukalo, I [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1989-07-01

    Researching reliable and practical indicators of radiation injury, however, is very interesting and considerable department of scientific studies, practical and theoretical. Enzymes activities are among biochemical indicators which are changed after radiation injury. Activity of these specific proteins is important in regulation of every biochemical reaction in existing beings. Biological macromolecules can be damaged by radiation or the cell permeability can be changed. All of these influence directly on enzymes activities. In this paper we present the review of the all important enzymes, indicators of the radiation injury, which variances on reference to normal values are significant of the functional and the structural changes of essential organs (author)

  18. Integrative Metabolic Signatures for Hepatic Radiation Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irwin Jack Kurland

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced liver disease (RILD is a dose-limiting factor in curative radiation therapy (RT for liver cancers, making early detection of radiation-associated liver injury absolutely essential for medical intervention. A metabolomic approach was used to determine metabolic signatures that could serve as biomarkers for early detection of RILD in mice.Anesthetized C57BL/6 mice received 0, 10 or 50 Gy Whole Liver Irradiation (WLI and were contrasted to mice, which received 10 Gy whole body irradiation (WBI. Liver and plasma samples were collected at 24 hours after irradiation. The samples were processed using Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry and Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry.Twenty four hours after WLI, 407 metabolites were detected in liver samples while 347 metabolites were detected in plasma. Plasma metabolites associated with 50 Gy WLI included several amino acids, purine and pyrimidine metabolites, microbial metabolites, and most prominently bradykinin and 3-indoxyl-sulfate. Liver metabolites associated with 50 Gy WLI included pentose phosphate, purine, and pyrimidine metabolites in liver. Plasma biomarkers in common between WLI and WBI were enriched in microbial metabolites such as 3 indoxyl sulfate, indole-3-lactic acid, phenyllactic acid, pipecolic acid, hippuric acid, and markers of DNA damage such as 2-deoxyuridine. Metabolites associated with tryptophan and indoles may reflect radiation-induced gut microbiome effects. Predominant liver biomarkers in common between WBI and WLI were amino acids, sugars, TCA metabolites (fumarate, fatty acids (lineolate, n-hexadecanoic acid and DNA damage markers (uridine.We identified a set of metabolomic markers that may prove useful as plasma biomarkers of RILD and WBI. Pathway analysis also suggested that the unique metabolic changes observed after liver irradiation was an integrative response of the intestine, liver and kidney.

  19. MRI in acute phase of whiplash injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagerlund, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden); Bjoernebrink, J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden); Pettersson, K. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Univ. Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden); Hildingsson, C. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Univ. Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden)

    1995-11-01

    A prospective MRI study of 39 whiplash patients was performed and the results were compared with the clinical findings within 15 days after trauma. The MRI parameters included disc bulging either with impingement on the anterior epidural space or with medullary compression, foraminal stenosis, dorsal ligament thickening, osteophyte extension and intramedullary or paravertebral soft tissue injury. All changes were graded visually on a four-point scale (no, some, moderate or extensive changes). After the MRI evaluation was made the clinical findings were analysed by two orthopaedic surgeons using a specially designed protocol. With MRI 29 patients (74 %) showed no or only slight changes, and were thus regarded as normal variations. Of these, 10 of 29 patients (34 %) had as the only symptom pain in the head or in the neck, 19 of 29 patients (66 %) showed neurological changes, either paresthesias, sensory deficits or weakness of upper extremities. In 10 (26 %) patients with moderate or extensive MRI changes, 3 of 10 (33 %) had only head or neck pain, or both, and 7 of 10 (66 %) had neurological changes. Use of MRI in whiplash injury is helpful, but it is not the first-choice radiological examination method. Despite neurological changes, the frequency of true traumatic lesions is low. There is no clear correlation between the patients` subjective symptoms or clinical signs and the findings with MRI. However, MRI can be used to find patients with disk herniation that can be treated surgically. (orig.)

  20. MRI in acute phase of whiplash injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fagerlund, M.; Bjoernebrink, J.; Pettersson, K.; Hildingsson, C.

    1995-01-01

    A prospective MRI study of 39 whiplash patients was performed and the results were compared with the clinical findings within 15 days after trauma. The MRI parameters included disc bulging either with impingement on the anterior epidural space or with medullary compression, foraminal stenosis, dorsal ligament thickening, osteophyte extension and intramedullary or paravertebral soft tissue injury. All changes were graded visually on a four-point scale (no, some, moderate or extensive changes). After the MRI evaluation was made the clinical findings were analysed by two orthopaedic surgeons using a specially designed protocol. With MRI 29 patients (74 %) showed no or only slight changes, and were thus regarded as normal variations. Of these, 10 of 29 patients (34 %) had as the only symptom pain in the head or in the neck, 19 of 29 patients (66 %) showed neurological changes, either paresthesias, sensory deficits or weakness of upper extremities. In 10 (26 %) patients with moderate or extensive MRI changes, 3 of 10 (33 %) had only head or neck pain, or both, and 7 of 10 (66 %) had neurological changes. Use of MRI in whiplash injury is helpful, but it is not the first-choice radiological examination method. Despite neurological changes, the frequency of true traumatic lesions is low. There is no clear correlation between the patients' subjective symptoms or clinical signs and the findings with MRI. However, MRI can be used to find patients with disk herniation that can be treated surgically. (orig.)

  1. Utilization and cost of a new model of care for managing acute knee injuries: the Calgary acute knee injury clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau Breda HF

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs affect a large proportion of the Canadian population and present a huge problem that continues to strain primary healthcare resources. Currently, the Canadian healthcare system depicts a clinical care pathway for MSDs that is inefficient and ineffective. Therefore, a new inter-disciplinary team-based model of care for managing acute knee injuries was developed in Calgary, Alberta, Canada: the Calgary Acute Knee Injury Clinic (C-AKIC. The goal of this paper is to evaluate and report on the appropriateness, efficiency, and effectiveness of the C-AKIC through healthcare utilization and costs associated with acute knee injuries. Methods This quasi-experimental study measured and evaluated cost and utilization associated with specific healthcare services for patients presenting with acute knee injuries. The goal was to compare patients receiving care from two clinical care pathways: the existing pathway (i.e. comparison group and a new model, the C-AKIC (i.e. experimental group. This was accomplished through the use of a Healthcare Access and Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (HAPSQ. Results Data from 138 questionnaires were analyzed in the experimental group and 136 in the comparison group. A post-hoc analysis determined that both groups were statistically similar in socio-demographic characteristics. With respect to utilization, patients receiving care through the C-AKIC used significantly less resources. Overall, patients receiving care through the C-AKIC incurred 37% of the cost of patients with knee injuries in the comparison group and significantly incurred less costs when compared to the comparison group. The total aggregate average cost for the C-AKIC group was $2,549.59 compared to $6,954.33 for the comparison group (p Conclusions The Calgary Acute Knee Injury Clinic was able to manage and treat knee injured patients for less cost than the existing state of healthcare delivery. The

  2. Acute respiratory distress syndrome assessment after traumatic brain injury

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    Shahrooz Kazemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is one of the most important complications associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI. ARDS is caused by inflammation of the lungs and hypoxic damage with lung physiology abnormalities associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Aim of this study is to determine the epidemiology of ARDS and the prevalence of risk factors. Methods: This prospective study performed on patients with acute traumatic head injury hospitalization in the intensive care unit of the Shohaday-e Haftom-e-Tir Hospital (September 2012 to September 2013 done. About 12 months, the data were evaluated. Information including age, sex, education, employment, drug and alcohol addiction, were collected and analyzed. The inclusion criteria were head traumatic patients and exclusion was the patients with chest trauma. Questionnaire was designed with doctors supervision of neurosurgery. Then the collected data were analysis. Results: In this study, the incidence of ARDS was 23.8% and prevalence of metabolic acidosis was 31.4%. Most injury with metabolic acidosis was Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH 48 (60% and Subdural hemorrhage (SDH was Next Level with 39 (48% Correlation between Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS and Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS were significantly decreased (P< 0.0001. The level of consciousness in patients with skull fractures significantly lower than those without fractures (P= 0.009 [(2.3±4.6 vs (4.02±7.07]. Prevalence of metabolic acidosis during hospitalization was 80 patients (31.4%. Conclusion: Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a common complication of traumatic brain injury. Management and treatment is essential to reduce the mortality. In this study it was found the age of patients with ARDS was higher than patients without complications. ARDS risk factor for high blood pressure was higher in men. Most victims were pedestrians. The most common injury associated with ARDS was SDH. Our analysis

  3. Plastic and reconstructive surgical treatment of the radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Nobutaka; Ogo, Ken; Uchiyama, Kanenari; Fukushima, Hisaki

    1977-01-01

    Eleven cases of radiation injury are reported. Three of them were relatively superficial ''radiation dermatitis''. They received radical excision and free skin-grafting to the cosmetic and functional satisfaction. Eight patients had deeper injury, ''radiation ulcer''. Six cases were treated by ''local flap''. The local flap technique is the simplest and the most effective way to treat the radiation ulcer. The reason is 1) it is a one stage operation, 2) it has a permanent pedicle supplying good blood flow, 3) it has very close texture and color match to the area. However, a skin-grafting performed on one patient of radiation ulcer ended up with failure. The indication of the skin-grafting and the local flap was discussed from the point of the stage or degree of radiation injuries and the recommendable method is the skin-grafting to the radiation dermatitis and the local flap to the radiation ulcer. (auth.)

  4. The acute radiation syndrome: A study of ten cases and a review of the problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hempelmann, L.H.; Lisco, H.

    1950-03-17

    In this report ten cases of acute radiation syndrome are described resulting from two accidents occurring at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory of unique nature involving fissionable material. These cases are described in considerable detail. The report comprises ten sections. This volume, part II of the report, is comprised of sections entitled: (1) the Biological Basis for the Clinical Response seen in the Acute radiation Syndrome, (2) Clinical Signs and Symptoms, (3) Discussion of Hematological Findings, (4) Chemistry of the Blood and Urine, (5) Discussion of Pathological Findings, and (6) Reconsiderations of the Calculated Radiation Doses in Terms of the Observed Biological Response of the Patients. This report was prepared primarily for the clinician who is interested in radiation injuries and therefore emphasis has been placed on the correlation of clinical and pathological changes with the type of cytogenetic change known to be produced by ionizing radiation.

  5. Synthetic marijuana and acute kidney injury: an unforeseen association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazory, Amir; Aiyer, Ravi

    2013-06-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) have emerged as drugs of abuse with increasing popularity among young adults. The potential renal complication related to the abuse of SC was not recognized until recently. Here, we present a case of severe acute kidney injury (AKI) that developed after inhalation of SC in an otherwise healthy young patient. A kidney biopsy revealed severe acute tubular necrosis, and supportive management resulted in the recovery of the kidney function. Herein, we briefly summarize the only two previous reports (a total of 21 cases) on the association between SC abuse and renal dysfunction and identify the common aspects in all observations.

  6. Computed tomography in acute head injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, T; Inagawa, T; Yamada, T; Sota, K [Shimane Prefectural Central Hospital (Japan)

    1981-01-01

    After the introduction of CT (GE-CT/T) in January, 1980, we experienced 81 cases of head injury. We diagnosed these cases into normal in 50 cases, epidural hematoma in 8 cases, subdural hematoma in 5 cases, intracerebral hematoma in 3 cases, cerebral contusion or cerebral swelling in 14 cases and combined hematoma in 1 case, based on CT findings. We diagnose normal, when no abnormal finding is present intracranially. Epidural hematoma is visualized as a bicrescent-shaped high density area on CT scan. Subdural hematoma appears as a crescent-shaped high density area on CT finding. Intracranial hematoma is visualized as a high density area in the brain tissue on CT scan. Cerebral contusion presents as salt and pepper appearance on CT scan representing area of high and low density complex. Brain swelling is visualized as disappearance or compression of ventricles, cisterns, sulci and gyri.

  7. In vivo evidence for an endothelium-dependent mechanism in radiation-induced normal tissue injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rannou, Emilie; François, Agnès; Toullec, Aurore; Guipaud, Olivier; Buard, Valérie; Tarlet, Georges; Mintet, Elodie; Jaillet, Cyprien; Iruela-Arispe, Maria Luisa; Benderitter, Marc; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Milliat, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanism involved in side effects of radiation therapy, and especially the role of the endothelium remains unclear. Previous results showed that plasminogen activator inhibitor-type 1 (PAI-1) contributes to radiation-induced intestinal injury and suggested that this role could be driven by an endothelium-dependent mechanism. We investigated whether endothelial-specific PAI-1 deletion could affect radiation-induced intestinal injury. We created a mouse model with a specific deletion of PAI-1 in the endothelium (PAI-1KOendo) by a Cre-LoxP system. In a model of radiation enteropathy, survival and intestinal radiation injury were followed as well as intestinal gene transcriptional profile and inflammatory cells intestinal infiltration. Irradiated PAI-1KOendo mice exhibited increased survival, reduced acute enteritis severity and attenuated late fibrosis compared with irradiated PAI-1flx/flx mice. Double E-cadherin/TUNEL labeling confirmed a reduced epithelial cell apoptosis in irradiated PAI-1KOendo. High-throughput gene expression combined with bioinformatic analyses revealed a putative involvement of macrophages. We observed a decrease in CD68+cells in irradiated intestinal tissues from PAI-1KOendo mice as well as modifications associated with M1/M2 polarization. This work shows that PAI-1 plays a role in radiation-induced intestinal injury by an endothelium-dependent mechanism and demonstrates in vivo that the endothelium is directly involved in the progression of radiation-induced enteritis. PMID:26510580

  8. Studies on radiation injury of the kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Akio

    1982-01-01

    According to many experimental reports on the radiation renal injuries, the influences of irradiation were observed not only in the irradiated kidney, but also in the contralateral kidney. However, its mechanism has not yet been demonstrated clearly. In order to clarify the mechanism of development of pathophysiological changes seen on the kidney of non-irradiated side, a study was made of function and pathological condition of a remaining kidney after the enucleation of ir radiated side kidney after irradiation. Twenty-eitht rabbits were divided into 4 groups. A: 14 rabbits were irradiated on their left kidney with 60 Co- gamma ray 50 Gy doses. B: 6 rabbits were nephrectomized of their left kidney on the first day after 50 Gy irradiation. C: 4 rabbits were nephrectomized of their left kidney on the eighth day after 50 Gy irradiation. D: 4 rabbits were simple nephrectomized. The results suggest that changes on the irradiated side of kidney bring about effect to the contra-lateral kidney at an early stage after the irradiation. (J.P.N.)

  9. First Patagonian Course on 'Diagnosis and Therapy of Injuries Induced by Ionizing Radiation'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellotti, Mariela I.

    2013-01-01

    In Patagonia there are academic centers, health and industrial facilities that use ionizing radiations in its usual practices. However, they do not have protocols that respond to local needs. For this reason was held from October 5 to November 10, 2012 in Bariloche Atomic Center, a training course for health personnel. The range of topics covered ranged from the definition of dosimetry quantities, types of radiation and biological dosimetry, biological effects, radiation acute syndrome, radiation-induced cutaneous syndrome, internal contamination, screening in radiological emergencies, etc.The course provided a theoretical and practical guide about how to recognize and treat people exposed to radiations, guidelines for acting in radiological emergencies and a perception of the psychosocial impact of the radiation accidents.The result was a pocket book for health personnel that will be used in case of having a patient with radiation induced injury

  10. Radiation injuries in atomic bomb survivors, chapter 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Atomic bombs, for the first time in human history, were dropped on Hiroshima in August 6, and on Nagasaki on August 9, 1945. Though the powers of these bombs were small as compared with those of present day nuclear weapons, the atomic bombs claimed many lives instantaneously, damaged human bodies, and destroyed all objects, annihilating the urban areas. Even today, the dreadful consequences of the bombings still remain in both body and mind of the victims. Meanwhile, the experiences of atomic bomb disasters are fading constantly. In order to maintain the vivid information, in Part 2 ''Bodily injuries'', the following matters are described: early bodily injuries such as burns, (blast) external wounds, radiation injuries, and pathology in bodily injuries; later bodily injuries such as keloids, injuries to blood and eyes, injuries in exposed women, injuries in growth, aging and life, injuries in mental/nervous system, malignant tumors, and changes in chromosomes; and genetic effects. (J.P.N.)

  11. Acute Kidney Injury Classification in Neuro-ICU Patient Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canan Akıncı

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the role of acute kidney injury (AKI classification system for kidney injury outcome in neuro-Intensive care unit (ICU patients. Material and Method: Total 432 patients who admitted to ICU between 2005 and 2009 evaluated in this study. All patients’ AKI stage, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE-II, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment Score (SOFA, Glasgow Coma Score (GCS, Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS, mortality rate, length of ICU stay, need for intubation, and mechanical ventilation were recorded. Results: AKI was found in 24 of all 432 patents’ (5.5%. We found that, patients with AKI had higher APHACE-II score, SOFA score and mortality rates; longer ICU stay, duration of mechanical ventilation and intubation and lower GCS and GOS than without AKI group. Conclusion: Length of ICU stay and mortality rate were higher in AKI positive group.

  12. Effect of heme oxygenase-1 on radiation-induced skin injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Chuanjun; Meng Xingjun; Xie Ling; Chen Qing; Zhou Jundong; Zhang Shuyu; Wu Jinchang

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) on the acute radiation-induced skin injury by gene transfer. Methods: Thirty-three male SD rats were randomly divided into three groups as PBS-injected group, Ad-EGFP-injected group and Ad-HO-1-injected group (n=11). In each group, three rats were used for determining the expression of target gene and the other rats were irradiated on the buttock skin with 40 Gy electron beam generated by a linear accelerator. Immediately after irradiation, rats were administered with a subcutaneous injection of PBS, Ad-EGFP or Ad-HO-1, respectively. Subsequently, the skin reactions were measured twice a week using the semi-quantitative skin injury scale. Results: The strong positive expression of HO-1 was observed in subcutaneous dermal tissue after injection of Ad-HO-1. Compared to the PBS-injected group or the Ad-EGFP-injected group, a significant mitigation of skin injury was observed in Ad-HO-1-injected mice 14 d after irradiation (q=0.000-0.030, P<0.05). Conclusions: HO-1 could significantly mitigate radiation-induced acute skin injury and Ad-HO-1 could be used to treat radiation-induced skin injury. (authors)

  13. Prenatal radiation injury and immune development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nold, J.B.; Miller, G.K.; Benjamin, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated a significant reduction in thymic medullary and epithelial volumes in irradiated canine fetuses. The present study was performed to determine if this prenatal radiation-induced damage persists and is accompanied by functional immune abnormalities after birth. Six pregnant beagle dogs received sham-irradiation or single abdominal exposures to 200R of 60Co radiation at 35 days gestation. The mean fetal dose was approximately 1.5 Gy. Half the dogs of each litter were sacrificed at birth; half were sacrificed at 24 weeks of age. Following sacrifice, thymus sections from each dog were examined morphometrically. The following in vitro and in vivo assays were performed at selected times; lymphocyte blastogenesis, hematology, bone marrow progenitor cell (CFU-GM) colony growth, humoral antibody response to sheep red blood cells, dinitrochloro-benzene skin sensitization, and gross and histopathology. When compared with age-matched controls, thymic medullary volumes in irradiated dogs were significantly reduced at birth; but, by 24 weeks of age, were similar to control values. At 12-16 weeks of age irradiated dogs showed a significant decrease in humoral antibody responses to inoculated sheep red blood cells. In vitro culture of bone marrow demonstrated a significant reduction of CFU-GM colony growth in irradiated dogs at 24 weeks of age. This was accompanied by a reduction in peripheral white blood cell counts in these dogs from 12-24 weeks of age. These data suggest that radiation injury to the fetal lymphohematopoietic system results in significant postnatal immunologic and hematopoietic defects

  14. Suramin protects from cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupre, Tess V.; Doll, Mark A.; Shah, Parag P.; Sharp, Cierra N.; Kiefer, Alex; Scherzer, Michael T.; Saurabh, Kumar; Saforo, Doug; Siow, Deanna; Casson, Lavona; Arteel, Gavin E.; Jenson, Alfred Bennett; Megyesi, Judit; Schnellmann, Rick G.; Beverly, Levi J.

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin, a commonly used cancer chemotherapeutic, has a dose-limiting side effect of nephrotoxicity. Approximately 30% of patients administered cisplatin suffer from kidney injury, and there are limited treatment options for the treatment of cisplatin-induced kidney injury. Suramin, which is Federal Drug Administration-approved for the treatment of trypanosomiasis, improves kidney function after various forms of kidney injury in rodent models. We hypothesized that suramin would attenuate cisplatin-induced kidney injury. Suramin treatment before cisplatin administration reduced cisplatin-induced decreases in kidney function and injury. Furthermore, suramin attenuated cisplatin-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and apoptosis in the kidney cortex. Treatment of mice with suramin 24 h after cisplatin also improved kidney function, suggesting that the mechanism of protection is not by inhibition of tubular cisplatin uptake or its metabolism to nephrotoxic species. If suramin is to be used in the context of cancer, then it cannot prevent cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity of cancer cells. Suramin did not alter the dose-response curve of cisplatin in lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro. In addition, suramin pretreatment of mice harboring lung adenocarcinomas did not alter the initial cytotoxic effects of cisplatin (DNA damage and apoptosis) on tumor cells. These results provide evidence that suramin has potential as a renoprotective agent for the treatment/prevention of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury and justify future long-term preclinical studies using cotreatment of suramin and cisplatin in mouse models of cancer. PMID:26661653

  15. Acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in HCV transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, Takeki; Kosyk, Oksana; Jeannot, Emmanuelle; Bradford, Blair U.; Tech, Katherine; Macdonald, Jeffrey M.; Boorman, Gary A.; Chatterjee, Saurabh; Mason, Ronald P.; Melnyk, Stepan B.; Tryndyak, Volodymyr P.; Pogribny, Igor P.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    The exact etiology of clinical cases of acute liver failure is difficult to ascertain and it is likely that various co-morbidity factors play a role. For example, epidemiological evidence suggests that coexistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection increased the risk of acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury, and was associated with an increased risk of progression to acute liver failure. However, little is known about possible mechanisms of enhanced acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in HCV-infected subjects. In this study, we tested a hypothesis that HCV-Tg mice may be more susceptible to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, and also evaluated the mechanisms of acetaminophen-induced liver damage in wild type and HCV-Tg mice expressing core, E1 and E2 proteins. Male mice were treated with a single dose of acetaminophen (300 or 500 mg/kg in fed animals; or 200 mg/kg in fasted animals; i.g.) and liver and serum endpoints were evaluated at 4 and 24 h after dosing. Our results suggest that in fed mice, liver toxicity in HCV-Tg mice is not markedly exaggerated as compared to the wild-type mice. In fasted mice, greater liver injury was observed in HCV-Tg mice. In fed mice dosed with 300 mg/kg acetaminophen, we observed that liver mitochondria in HCV-Tg mice exhibited signs of dysfunction showing the potential mechanism for increased susceptibility. -- Highlights: ► Acetaminophen-induced liver injury is a significant clinical challenge. ► HCV-infected subjects may be at higher risk for acetaminophen-induced liver injury. ► We used HCV transgenics to test if liver injury due to acetaminophen is exacerbated.

  16. Acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in HCV transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uehara, Takeki; Kosyk, Oksana; Jeannot, Emmanuelle; Bradford, Blair U. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Tech, Katherine; Macdonald, Jeffrey M. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Boorman, Gary A. [Covance, Chantilly, VA 20151 (United States); Chatterjee, Saurabh; Mason, Ronald P. [Laboratory of Toxicology and Pharmacology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, RTP, NC 27713 (United States); Melnyk, Stepan B. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72201 (United States); Tryndyak, Volodymyr P.; Pogribny, Igor P. [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Rusyn, Ivan, E-mail: iir@unc.edu [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    The exact etiology of clinical cases of acute liver failure is difficult to ascertain and it is likely that various co-morbidity factors play a role. For example, epidemiological evidence suggests that coexistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection increased the risk of acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury, and was associated with an increased risk of progression to acute liver failure. However, little is known about possible mechanisms of enhanced acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in HCV-infected subjects. In this study, we tested a hypothesis that HCV-Tg mice may be more susceptible to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, and also evaluated the mechanisms of acetaminophen-induced liver damage in wild type and HCV-Tg mice expressing core, E1 and E2 proteins. Male mice were treated with a single dose of acetaminophen (300 or 500 mg/kg in fed animals; or 200 mg/kg in fasted animals; i.g.) and liver and serum endpoints were evaluated at 4 and 24 h after dosing. Our results suggest that in fed mice, liver toxicity in HCV-Tg mice is not markedly exaggerated as compared to the wild-type mice. In fasted mice, greater liver injury was observed in HCV-Tg mice. In fed mice dosed with 300 mg/kg acetaminophen, we observed that liver mitochondria in HCV-Tg mice exhibited signs of dysfunction showing the potential mechanism for increased susceptibility. -- Highlights: ► Acetaminophen-induced liver injury is a significant clinical challenge. ► HCV-infected subjects may be at higher risk for acetaminophen-induced liver injury. ► We used HCV transgenics to test if liver injury due to acetaminophen is exacerbated.

  17. Vildagliptin-induced acute lung injury: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Nobumasa; Kaneko, Masanori; Sato, Kazuhiro; Maruyama, Ryoko; Furukawa, Tomoyasu; Tanaka, Junta; Kaneko, Kenzo; Kamoi, Kyuzi

    2016-08-12

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors are a class of oral hypoglycemic drugs and are used widely to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus in many countries. Adverse effects include nasopharyngitis, headache, elevated serum pancreatic enzymes, and gastrointestinal symptoms. In addition, a few cases of interstitial pneumonia associated with their use have been reported in the Japanese literature. Here we describe a patient who developed drug-induced acute lung injury shortly after the administration of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor vildagliptin. A 38-year-old Japanese woman with diabetes mellitus developed acute respiratory failure 1 day after administration of vildagliptin. Chest computed tomography revealed nonsegmental ground-glass opacities in her lungs. There was no evidence of bacterial pneumonia or any other cause of her respiratory manifestations. After discontinuation of vildagliptin, she recovered fully from her respiratory disorder. She received insulin therapy for her diabetes mellitus, and her subsequent clinical course has been uneventful. The period of drug exposure in previously reported cases of patients with drug-induced interstitial pneumonia caused by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor varied from several days to over 6 months. In the present case, our patient developed interstitial pneumonia only 1 day after the administration of vildagliptin. The precise mechanism of her vildagliptin-induced lung injury remains uncertain, but physicians should consider that dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor-induced lung injury, although rare, may appear acutely, even within days after administration of this drug.

  18. Pathogenesis and symptomatics of the acute radiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fliedner, T.M.; Haen, M.; Carbonell, F.

    1980-01-01

    The pathogenesis and symptomatics of the acute radiation syndrome are discussed. Diagnosis and therapy would be impossible without detailed knowledge in these fields. The concept of acute radiation syndrome is explained, and a pathophysiological analysis of the various forms of radiation syndrome - haematological, intestinal and affecting the central nervous system is attempted. The developments in the diagnosis and therapy of acute radiation syndrome since its first description - 35 years ago - are reviewed. Today, whole-body doses of 100 rd and more can be treated by radiotherapy. (orig./MG) [de

  19. Metabolomic profiling to characterize acute intestinal ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel G Khadaroo

    Full Text Available Sepsis and septic shock are the leading causes of death in critically ill patients. Acute intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (AII/R is an adaptive response to shock. The high mortality rate from AII/R is due to the severity of the disease and, more importantly, the failure of timely diagnosis. The objective of this investigation is to use nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR analysis to characterize urine metabolomic profile of AII/R injury in a mouse model. Animals were exposed to sham, early (30 min or late (60 min acute intestinal ischemia by complete occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery, followed by 2 hrs of reperfusion. Urine was collected and analyzed by NMR spectroscopy. Urinary metabolite concentrations demonstrated that different profiles could be delineated based on the duration of the intestinal ischemia. Metabolites such as allantoin, creatinine, proline, and methylamine could be predictive of AII/R injury. Lactate, currently used for clinical diagnosis, was found not to significantly contribute to the classification model for either early or late ischemia. This study demonstrates that patterns of changes in urinary metabolites are effective at distinguishing AII/R progression in an animal model. This is a proof-of-concept study to further support examination of metabolites in the clinical diagnosis of intestinal ischemia reperfusion injury in patients. The discovery of a fingerprint metabolite profile of AII/R will be a major advancement in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of systemic injury in critically ill patients.

  20. Acute posterior cruciate ligament injuries: effect of location, severity, and associated injuries on surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark A; Simeone, F Joseph; Palmer, William E; Chang, Connie Y

    2018-06-01

    To correlate MRI findings of patients with posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury and surgical management. A retrospective search yielded 79 acute PCL injuries (36 ± 16 years old, 21 F, 58 M). Two independent readers graded PCL tear location (proximal, middle, or distal third) and severity (low-grade or high-grade partial/complete) and evaluated injury of other knee structures. When available, operative reports were examined and the performed surgical procedure was compared with injury grade, location, and presence of associated injuries. The most commonly injured knee structures in acute PCL tears were posterolateral corner (58/79, 73%) and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) (48/79, 61%). Of the 64 patients with treatment information, 31/64 (48%) were managed surgically: 12/31 (39%) had PCL reconstruction, 13/31 (42%) had ACL reconstruction, 10/31 (32%) had posterolateral corner reconstruction, 9/31 (29%) had LCL reconstruction, 8/31 (26%) had meniscectomy, and 8/31 (26%) had fixation of a fracture. Proximal third PCL tear and multiligamentous injury were more commonly associated with surgical management (P < 0.05). Posterolateral and posteromedial corner, ACL, collateral ligament, meniscus, patellar retinaculum, and gastrocnemius muscle injury, and fracture were more likely to result in surgical management (P < 0.05). Patients with high-grade partial/complete PCL tear were more likely to have PCL reconstruction as a portion of surgical management (P < 0.05). Location of PCL tear and presence of other knee injuries were associated with surgical management while high-grade/complete PCL tear grade was associated with PCL reconstruction. MRI reporting of PCL tear location, severity, and of other knee structure injuries is important for guiding clinical management.

  1. Deltoid ligament in acute ankle injury: MR imaging analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Min Sun; Choi, Yun Sun; Kim, Yun Jung; Jung, Yoon Young [Eulji University, Department of Radiology, Eulji Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won [Eulji University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Eulji Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    To identify the pattern of deltoid ligament injury after acute ankle injury and the relationship between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirty-six patients (32 male, and 4 female; mean age, 29.8 years) with acute deltoid ligament injury who had undergone MRI participated in this study. The deltoid ligament was classified as having 3 superficial and 2 deep components. An image analysis included the integrity and tear site of the deltoid ligament, and other associated injuries. Association between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear was assessed using Fisher's exact test (P < 0.05). Of the 36 patients, 21 (58.3 %) had tears in the superficial and deep deltoid ligaments, 6 (16.7 %) in the superficial ligaments only, and 4 (11.1 %) in the deep ligaments only. The most common tear site of the three components of the superficial deltoid and deep anterior tibiotalar ligaments was their proximal attachments (94 % and 91.7 % respectively), and that of the deep posterior tibiotalar ligament (pTTL) was its distal attachment (82.6 %). The common associated injuries were ankle fracture (63.9 %), syndesmosis tear (55.6 %), and lateral collateral ligament complex tear (44.4 %). All the components of the deltoid ligament were frequently torn in patients with ankle fractures (tibionavicular ligament, P = 0.009). The observed injury pattern of the deltoid ligament was complex and frequently associated with concomitant ankle pathology. The most common tear site of the superficial deltoid ligament was the medial malleolar attachment, whereas that of the deep pTTL was near its medial talar insertion. (orig.)

  2. Deltoid ligament in acute ankle injury: MR imaging analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Min Sun; Choi, Yun Sun; Kim, Yun Jung; Jung, Yoon Young; Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won

    2014-01-01

    To identify the pattern of deltoid ligament injury after acute ankle injury and the relationship between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirty-six patients (32 male, and 4 female; mean age, 29.8 years) with acute deltoid ligament injury who had undergone MRI participated in this study. The deltoid ligament was classified as having 3 superficial and 2 deep components. An image analysis included the integrity and tear site of the deltoid ligament, and other associated injuries. Association between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear was assessed using Fisher's exact test (P < 0.05). Of the 36 patients, 21 (58.3 %) had tears in the superficial and deep deltoid ligaments, 6 (16.7 %) in the superficial ligaments only, and 4 (11.1 %) in the deep ligaments only. The most common tear site of the three components of the superficial deltoid and deep anterior tibiotalar ligaments was their proximal attachments (94 % and 91.7 % respectively), and that of the deep posterior tibiotalar ligament (pTTL) was its distal attachment (82.6 %). The common associated injuries were ankle fracture (63.9 %), syndesmosis tear (55.6 %), and lateral collateral ligament complex tear (44.4 %). All the components of the deltoid ligament were frequently torn in patients with ankle fractures (tibionavicular ligament, P = 0.009). The observed injury pattern of the deltoid ligament was complex and frequently associated with concomitant ankle pathology. The most common tear site of the superficial deltoid ligament was the medial malleolar attachment, whereas that of the deep pTTL was near its medial talar insertion. (orig.)

  3. Radiation resistance and injury of Yersinia enterocolitica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Zawahry, Y.A.; Rowley, D.B.

    1979-01-01

    The D values of Yersinia enterocolitica strains IP134, IP107, and WA, irradiated at 25/sup 0/C in Trypticase soy broth, ranged from 9.7 to 11.8 krad. When irradiated in ground beef at 25 and -30/sup 0/C, the D value of strain IP107 and 19.5 and 38.8 krad, respectively. Cells suspended in Trypticase soy broth were more sensitive to storage at -20/sup 0/C than those mixed in ground beef. The percentages of inactivation and of injury (inability to form colonies in the presence of 3.0% NaCl) of cells stored in ground beef for 10 days at -20/sup 0/C were 70 and 23%, respectively. Prior irradiation did not alter the cell's sensitivity to storage at -20/sup 0/C, nor did storage at -20/sup 0/C alter the cell's resistance to irradiation at 25/sup 0/C. Added NaCl concentrations of up to 4.0% in Trypticase soy agar (TSA) (which contains 0.5% NaCl) had little effect on colony formation at 36/sup 0/C of unirradiated Y. enterocolitica. With added 4.0% NaCl, 79% of the cells formed colonies at 36/sup 0/C; with 5.0% NaCl added, no colonies were formed. Although 2.5% NaCl added to ground beef did not sensitize Y. enterocolitica cells to irradiation, when added to TSA it reduced the number of apparent radiation survivors. Cells uninjured by irradiation formed colonies on TSA when incubated at either 36 or 5/sup 0/C. More survivors of an exposure to 60 krad were capable of recovery and forming colonies on TSA when incubated at 36/sup 0/C for 1 day than at 5/sup 0/C for 14 days. This difference in count was considered a manifestation of injury to certain survivors of irradiation.

  4. Radiation resistance and injury of Yersinia enterocolitica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Zawahry, Y.A.; Rowley, D.B.

    1979-01-01

    The D values of Yersinia enterocolitica strains IP134, IP107, and WA, irradiated at 25 0 C in Trypticase soy broth, ranged from 9.7 to 11.8 krad. When irradiated in ground beef at 25 and -30 0 C, the D value of strain IP107 and 19.5 and 38.8 krad, respectively. Cells suspended in Trypticase soy broth were more sensitive to storage at -20 0 C than those mixed in ground beef. The percentages of inactivation and of injury (inability to form colonies in the presence of 3.0% NaCl) of cells stored in ground beef for 10 days at -20 0 C were 70 and 23%, respectively. Prior irradiation did not alter the cell's sensitivity to storage at -20 0 C, nor did storage at -20 0 C alter the cell's resistance to irradiation at 25 0 C. Added NaCl concentrations of up to 4.0% in Trypticase soy agar (TSA) (which contains 0.5% NaCl) had little effect on colony formation at 36 0 C of unirradiated Y. enterocolitica. With added 4.0% NaCl, 79% of the cells formed colonies at 36 0 C; with 5.0% NaCl added, no colonies were formed. Although 2.5% NaCl added to ground beef did not sensitize Y. enterocolitica cells to irradiation, when added to TSA it reduced the number of apparent radiation survivors. Cells uninjured by irradiation formed colonies on TSA when incubated at either 36 or 5 0 C. More survivors of an exposure to 60 krad were capable of recovery and forming colonies on TSA when incubated at 36 0 C for 1 day than at 5 0 C for 14 days. This difference in count was considered a manifestation of injury to certain survivors of irradiation

  5. Clinical application of magnetic resonance in acute traumatic brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, Dionei F.; Gaia, Felipe F.P. [Hospital de Base de Sao Jose do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil). Servico de Neurocirurgia]. E-mail: centro@cerebroecoluna.com.br; Spotti, Antonio R.; Tognola, Waldir A. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Neurologicas; Andrade, Almir F. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. de Neurocirurgia da Emergencia

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with acute traumatic brain injury (TBI): to identify the type, quantity, severity; and improvement clinical-radiological correlation. Method: Assessment of 55 patients who were imaged using CT and MRI, 34 (61.8%) males and 21 (38.2%) females, with acute (0 to 5 days) and closed TBI. Results: Statistical significant differences (McNemar test): occurred fractures were detected by CT in 29.1% and by MRI in 3.6% of the patients; subdural hematoma by CT in 10.9% and MRI in 36.4 %; diffuse axonal injury (DAI) by CT in 1.8% and MRI in 50.9%; cortical contusions by CT in 9.1% and MRI in 41.8%; subarachnoid hemorrhage by CT in 18.2% and MRI in 41.8%. Conclusion: MRI was superior to the CT in the identification of DAI, subarachnoid hemorrhage, cortical contusions, and acute subdural hematoma; however it was inferior in diagnosing fractures. The detection of DAI was associated with the severity of acute TBI. (author)

  6. Clinical application of magnetic resonance in acute traumatic brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morais, Dionei F.; Gaia, Felipe F.P.; Spotti, Antonio R.; Tognola, Waldir A.; Andrade, Almir F.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with acute traumatic brain injury (TBI): to identify the type, quantity, severity; and improvement clinical-radiological correlation. Method: Assessment of 55 patients who were imaged using CT and MRI, 34 (61.8%) males and 21 (38.2%) females, with acute (0 to 5 days) and closed TBI. Results: Statistical significant differences (McNemar test): occurred fractures were detected by CT in 29.1% and by MRI in 3.6% of the patients; subdural hematoma by CT in 10.9% and MRI in 36.4 %; diffuse axonal injury (DAI) by CT in 1.8% and MRI in 50.9%; cortical contusions by CT in 9.1% and MRI in 41.8%; subarachnoid hemorrhage by CT in 18.2% and MRI in 41.8%. Conclusion: MRI was superior to the CT in the identification of DAI, subarachnoid hemorrhage, cortical contusions, and acute subdural hematoma; however it was inferior in diagnosing fractures. The detection of DAI was associated with the severity of acute TBI. (author)

  7. Systematic review of severe acute liver injury caused by terbinafine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jun; Wang, Xiaolin; Chen, Shengli

    2014-08-01

    Terbinafine is an effective antimicrobial agent against dermatophytes, cryptococcus and other fungi. It is the preferred drug to treat onychomycosis. However, severe acute hepatitis from oral terbinafine administration has been recently reported. To describe a representative case, and review the literature regarding the best evidence on treatment and prognosis of severe acute hepatitis caused by oral terbinafine. The literature was searched for publications on severe hepatitis caused by terbinafine using MEDLINE, China Biology Medicine Disc, and the VIP Medical Information Resource System. Related references were searched manually. Seventeen English and three Chinese references of case reports were included after eliminating duplicate publications. No randomized control studies were found. Liver enzyme levels were found to have been increased significantly. Abdominal ultrasound demonstrated cholestasis. Severe acute liver injury is a known, but unusual complication of terbinafine exposure. The prognosis is often good with appropriate treatment. Liver function assessment before treatment and periodic monitoring 4-6 weeks after initiation of treatment is recommended.

  8. Fatal acute pulmonary injury associated with everolimus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depuydt, Pieter; Nollet, Joke; Benoit, Dominique; Praet, Marleen; Caes, Frank

    2012-03-01

    To report a case of fatal alveolar hemorrhage associated with the use of everolimus in a patient who underwent a solid organ transplant. In a 71-year-old cardiac transplant patient, cyclosporine was replaced with everolimus because of worsening renal function. Over the following weeks, the patient developed nonproductive cough and increasing dyspnea. His condition deteriorated to acute respiratory failure with hemoptysis, requiring hospital admission. Bilateral patchy alveolar infiltrates were apparent on chest X-ray and computed tomography. Cardiac failure was ruled out and empiric antimicrobial therapy was initiated. Additional extensive workup could not document opportunistic infection. Everolimus was discontinued and high-dose corticosteroid therapy was initiated. Despite this, the patient required invasive mechanical ventilation and died because of refractory massive hemoptysis. Autopsy revealed diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. Everolimus is a mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor approved for use as an immunosuppressant and antineoplastic agent. Its main advantage over calcineurin inhibitors (tacrolimus and cyclosporine) is a distinct safety profile. Although it has become clear that everolimus induces pulmonary toxicity more frequently than initially thought, most published cases thus far represented mild and reversible disease, and none was fatal. Here, we report a case of pulmonary toxicity developing over weeks following the introduction of everolimus, in which a fatal outcome could not be prevented by drug withdrawal and corticosteroid treatment. The association of everolimus and this syndrome was probable according to the Naranjo probability scale. This case indicates that with the increasing use of everolimus, clinicians should be aware of the rare, but life-threatening manifestation of pulmonary toxicity.

  9. Radiation-induced skin injury in the animal model of scleroderma: implications for post-radiotherapy fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sanath; Kolozsvary, Andrew; Kohl, Robert; Lu, Mei; Brown, Stephen; Kim, Jae Ho

    2008-01-01

    Radiation therapy is generally contraindicated for cancer patients with collagen vascular diseases (CVD) such as scleroderma due to an increased risk of fibrosis. The tight skin (TSK) mouse has skin which, in some respects, mimics that of patients with scleroderma. The skin radiation response of TSK mice has not been previously reported. If TSK mice are shown to have radiation sensitive skin, they may prove to be a useful model to examine the mechanisms underlying skin radiation injury, protection, mitigation and treatment. The hind limbs of TSK and parental control C57BL/6 mice received a radiation exposure sufficient to cause approximately the same level of acute injury. Endpoints included skin damage scored using a non-linear, semi-quantitative scale and tissue fibrosis assessed by measuring passive leg extension. In addition, TGF-β1 cytokine levels were measured monthly in skin tissue. Contrary to our expectations, TSK mice were more resistant (i.e. 20%) to radiation than parental control mice. Although acute skin reactions were similar in both mouse strains, radiation injury in TSK mice continued to decrease with time such that several months after radiation there was significantly less skin damage and leg contraction compared to C57BL/6 mice (p < 0.05). Consistent with the expected association of transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1) with late tissue injury, levels of the cytokine were significantly higher in the skin of the C57BL/6 mouse compared to TSK mouse at all time points (p < 0.05). TSK mice are not recommended as a model of scleroderma involving radiation injury. The genetic and molecular basis for reduced radiation injury observed in TSK mice warrants further investigation particularly to identify mechanisms capable of reducing tissue fibrosis after radiation injury

  10. Thermal injury lowers the threshold for radiation-induced neuroinflammation and cognitive dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Jonathan D; Williams, Jacqueline P; O'Banion, M Kerry; Olschowka, John A

    2013-10-01

    The consequences of radiation exposure alone are relatively well understood, but in the wake of events such as the World War II nuclear detonations and accidents such as Chernobyl, other critical factors have emerged that can substantially affect patient outcome. For example, ~70% of radiation victims from Hiroshima and Nagasaki received some sort of additional traumatic injury, the most common being thermal burn. Animal data has shown that the addition of thermal insult to radiation results in increased morbidity and mortality. To explore possible synergism between thermal injury and radiation on brain, C57BL/6J female mice were exposed to either 0 or 5 Gy whole-body gamma irradiation. Irradiation was immediately followed by a 10% total-body surface area full thickness thermal burn. Mice were sacrificed 6 h, 1 week or 6 month post-injury and brains and plasma were harvested for histology, mRNA analysis and cytokine ELISA. Plasma analysis revealed that combined injury synergistically upregulates IL-6 at acute time points. Additionally, at 6 h, combined injury resulted in a greater upregulation of the vascular marker, ICAM-1 and TNF-α mRNA. Enhanced activation of glial cells was also observed by CD68 and Iba1 immunohistochemistry at all time points. Additionally, doublecortin staining at 6 months showed reduced neurogenesis in all injury conditions. Finally, using a novel object recognition test, we observed that only mice with combined injury had significant learning and memory deficits. These results demonstrate that thermal injury lowers the threshold for radiation-induced neuroinflammation and long-term cognitive dysfunction.

  11. Characteristics of acute groin injuries in the hip flexor muscles - a detailed MRI study in athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serner, A; Weir, A; Tol, J L

    2018-01-01

    acute hip flexor muscle injury were included. A total of 156 athletes presented with acute groin pain of which 33 athletes were included, median age 26 years (range 18-35). There were 16 rectus femoris, 12 iliacus, 7 psoas major, 4 sartorius, and 1 tensor fascia latae injury. Rectus femoris injuries...

  12. Glutamine Attenuates Acute Lung Injury Caused by Acid Aspiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Cheng Lai

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Inadequate ventilator settings may cause overwhelming inflammatory responses associated with ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. Here, we examined potential benefits of glutamine (GLN on a two-hit model for VILI after acid aspiration-induced lung injury in rats. Rats were intratracheally challenged with hydrochloric acid as a first hit to induce lung inflammation, then randomly received intravenous GLN or lactated Ringer’s solution (vehicle control thirty min before different ventilator strategies. Rats were then randomized to receive mechanical ventilation as a second hit with a high tidal volume (TV of 15 mL/kg and zero positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP or a low TV of 6 mL/kg with PEEP of 5 cm H2O. We evaluated lung oxygenation, inflammation, mechanics, and histology. After ventilator use for 4 h, high TV resulted in greater lung injury physiologic and biologic indices. Compared with vehicle treated rats, GLN administration attenuated lung injury, with improved oxygenation and static compliance, and decreased respiratory elastance, lung edema, extended lung destruction (lung injury scores and lung histology, neutrophil recruitment in the lung, and cytokine production. Thus, GLN administration improved the physiologic and biologic profiles of this experimental model of VILI based on the two-hit theory.

  13. Mass casualties of radiation injuries after nuclear weapon explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messerschmidt, O.

    1980-01-01

    Burns, mechanical lesions, radiation injuries as well as combinations of these types of injuries as a consequence of a nuclear explosion demand different basic lines of triage. The lack of a suitable physical dosimetry is a special problem for the evaluation of radiation injuries. While in cases of wounds and burns treatment, like surgery, is recommended to take place early, for example, within hours or days after those injuries, treatment of radiation victims is necessary only in the stage of severe haematologic changes including disturbances of coagulation and occurrence of high fever which appears after one or two weeks subsequent to exposure. The lack of medical personnel and medical equipment result in even a worse prognosis for the various injuries than in peace time accidents. (orig.) [de

  14. TH-E-BRF-09: Gaussian Mixture Model Analysis of Radiation-Induced Parotid-Gland Injury: An Ultrasound Study of Acute and Late Xerostomia in Head-And-Neck Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, T [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory Univ, Atlanta, GA (United States); Yu, D; Beitler, J; Curran, W; Yang, X [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Tridandapani, S [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Bruner, D [School of Nursing and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory Univesity, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Xerostomia (dry mouth), secondary to parotid-gland injury, is a distressing side-effect in head-and-neck radiotherapy (RT). This study's purpose is to develop a novel ultrasound technique to quantitatively evaluate post-RT parotid-gland injury. Methods: Recent ultrasound studies have shown that healthy parotid glands exhibit homogeneous echotexture, whereas post-RT parotid glands are often heterogeneous, with multiple hypoechoic (inflammation) or hyperechoic (fibrosis) regions. We propose to use a Gaussian mixture model to analyze the ultrasonic echo-histogram of the parotid glands. An IRB-approved clinical study was conducted: (1) control-group: 13 healthy-volunteers, served as the control; (2) acutetoxicity group − 20 patients (mean age: 62.5 ± 8.9 years, follow-up: 2.0±0.8 months); and (3) late-toxicity group − 18 patients (mean age: 60.7 ± 7.3 years, follow-up: 20.1±10.4 months). All patients experienced RTOG grade 1 or 2 salivary-gland toxicity. Each participant underwent an ultrasound scan (10 MHz) of the bilateral parotid glands. An echo-intensity histogram was derived for each parotid and a Gaussian mixture model was used to fit the histogram using expectation maximization (EM) algorithm. The quality of the fitting was evaluated with the R-squared value. Results: (1) Controlgroup: all parotid glands fitted well with one Gaussian component, with a mean intensity of 79.8±4.9 (R-squared>0.96). (2) Acute-toxicity group: 37 of the 40 post-RT parotid glands fitted well with two Gaussian components, with a mean intensity of 42.9±7.4, 73.3±12.2 (R-squared>0.95). (3) Latetoxicity group: 32 of the 36 post-RT parotid fitted well with 3 Gaussian components, with mean intensities of 49.7±7.6, 77.2±8.7, and 118.6±11.8 (R-squared>0.98). Conclusion: RT-associated parotid-gland injury is common in head-and-neck RT, but challenging to assess. This work has demonstrated that the Gaussian mixture model of the echo-histogram could quantify acute and

  15. TH-E-BRF-09: Gaussian Mixture Model Analysis of Radiation-Induced Parotid-Gland Injury: An Ultrasound Study of Acute and Late Xerostomia in Head-And-Neck Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, T; Yu, D; Beitler, J; Curran, W; Yang, X; Tridandapani, S; Bruner, D

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Xerostomia (dry mouth), secondary to parotid-gland injury, is a distressing side-effect in head-and-neck radiotherapy (RT). This study's purpose is to develop a novel ultrasound technique to quantitatively evaluate post-RT parotid-gland injury. Methods: Recent ultrasound studies have shown that healthy parotid glands exhibit homogeneous echotexture, whereas post-RT parotid glands are often heterogeneous, with multiple hypoechoic (inflammation) or hyperechoic (fibrosis) regions. We propose to use a Gaussian mixture model to analyze the ultrasonic echo-histogram of the parotid glands. An IRB-approved clinical study was conducted: (1) control-group: 13 healthy-volunteers, served as the control; (2) acutetoxicity group − 20 patients (mean age: 62.5 ± 8.9 years, follow-up: 2.0±0.8 months); and (3) late-toxicity group − 18 patients (mean age: 60.7 ± 7.3 years, follow-up: 20.1±10.4 months). All patients experienced RTOG grade 1 or 2 salivary-gland toxicity. Each participant underwent an ultrasound scan (10 MHz) of the bilateral parotid glands. An echo-intensity histogram was derived for each parotid and a Gaussian mixture model was used to fit the histogram using expectation maximization (EM) algorithm. The quality of the fitting was evaluated with the R-squared value. Results: (1) Controlgroup: all parotid glands fitted well with one Gaussian component, with a mean intensity of 79.8±4.9 (R-squared>0.96). (2) Acute-toxicity group: 37 of the 40 post-RT parotid glands fitted well with two Gaussian components, with a mean intensity of 42.9±7.4, 73.3±12.2 (R-squared>0.95). (3) Latetoxicity group: 32 of the 36 post-RT parotid fitted well with 3 Gaussian components, with mean intensities of 49.7±7.6, 77.2±8.7, and 118.6±11.8 (R-squared>0.98). Conclusion: RT-associated parotid-gland injury is common in head-and-neck RT, but challenging to assess. This work has demonstrated that the Gaussian mixture model of the echo-histogram could quantify acute and

  16. Ninety-nine years of radiation injuries in dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Kadzuo

    1994-01-01

    A German dentist, F.O. Walkhoff, has started dental radiography as early as two weeks after Roentgen's discovery on November 8, 1895. The purpose of this paper is to revisit radiation injuries by dividing the era into the era of Kells (before World War II) and the era of low exposure doses (after World War II). Edmund Kells (1856-1928), a pioneer of dental radiologist in the United States, has later become a victim of radiation injuries. During the era of Kells, skin radiation injuries were frequent among the group of dental and medical personnels. In the era of low exposure doses, cancers, leukemia, and genetic effects have begun to receive attention. Radiation injuries occurring in a dental practice are discussed in the context of the two eras. (N.K.) 43 refs

  17. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Severe Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Churlyaev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS in victims with isolated severe brain injury (SBI. Subject and methods. 171 studies were performed in 16 victims with SBI. Their general condition was rated as very critical. The patients were divided into three groups: 1 non-ARDS; 2 Stage 1 ARDS; and 3 Stage 2 ARDS. The indicators of Stages 1 and 2 were assessed in accordance with the classification proposed by V. V. Moroz and A. M. Golubev. Intracranial pressure (ICP, extravascular lung water index, pulmonary vascular permeability, central hemodynamics, oxygenation index, lung anastomosis, the X-ray pattern of the lung and brain (computed tomography, and its function were monitored. Results. The hemispheric cortical level of injury of the brain with function compensation of its stem was predominantly determined in the controls; subcompensation and decompensation were ascertained in the ARDS groups. According to the proposed classification, these patients developed Stages 1 and 2 ARDS. When ARDS developed, there were rises in the level of extravascular lung fluid and pulmonary vascular permeability, a reduction in the oxygenation index (it was 6—12 hours later as compared with them, increases in a lung shunt and ICP; X-ray study revealed bilateral infiltrates in the absence of heart failure in Stage 2 ARDS. The correlation was positive between ICP and extravascular lung water index, and lung vascular permeability index (r>0.4;p<0.05. Conclusion. The studies have indicated that the classification proposed by V. V. Moroz and A. M. Golubev enables an early diagnosis of ARDS. One of its causes is severe brainstem injury that results in increased extravascular fluid in the lung due to its enhanced vascular permeability. The ICP value is a determinant in the diagnosis of secondary brain injuries. Key words: acute respiratory distress syndrome, extravascu-lar lung fluid, pulmonary vascular permeability, brain injury

  18. Explanation of nurse standard of external exposure acute radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xiuling; Jiang Enhai; Sun Feifei; Zhang Bin; Wang Xiaoguang; Wang Guilin

    2012-01-01

    National occupational health standard-Nurse Standard of External Exposure Acute Radiation Sickness has been approved and issued by the Ministry of Health. Based on the extensive research of literature, collection of the previous nuclear and radiation accidents excessive exposed personnel data and specific situations in China, this standard was enacted according to the current national laws, regulations, and the opinions of peer experts. It is mainly used for care of patients with acute radiation sickness, and also has directive significance for care of patients with iatrogenic acute radiation sickness which due to the hematopoietic stem cell transplantation pretreatment. To correctly carry out this standard and to reasonably implement nursing measures for patients with acute radiation sickness, the contents of this standard were interpreted in this article. (authors)

  19. Alternative and Natural Therapies for Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipul J. Patel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is a complex clinical syndrome characterized by acute inflammation, microvascular damage, and increased pulmonary vascular and epithelial permeability, frequently resulting in acute respiratory failure and death. Current best practice for ARDS involves “lung-protective ventilation,” which entails low tidal volumes and limiting the plateau pressures in mechanically ventilated patients. Although considerable progress has been made in understanding the pathogenesis of ARDS, little progress has been made in the development of specific therapies to combat injury and inflammation. Areas Covered. In recent years, several natural products have been studied in experimental models and have been shown to inhibit multiple inflammatory pathways associated with acute lung injury and ARDS at a molecular level. Because of the pleiotropic effects of these agents, many of them also activate antioxidant pathways through nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2, thereby targeting multiple pathways. Several of these agents are prescribed for treatment of inflammatory conditions in the Asian subcontinent and have shown to be relatively safe. Expert Commentary. Here we review natural remedies shown to attenuate lung injury and inflammation in experimental models. Translational human studies in patients with ARDS may facilitate treatment of this devastating disease.

  20. Effect of radiation sickness on the progress and treatment of mechanical and thermal injuries. [In German

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, K

    1964-04-01

    It has been estimated that 70 or 75% of persons exposed to atomic weapons would suffer mechanical and thermal injuries, and that 30% receive radiation injuries. Of the total persons injured, 75% would suffer combinations of these injuries. As a result the various injurious agents, complexes of injury conditions, would be observed. These include leukopenia and impaired resistance to infection, shortened delay in appearance o irradiation symptoms, intensified evidence of shock, and an increased tendency toward hemorrhage, with increased sensitivity to blood loss. The author discusses a wide range of general and specific medical procedures and drugs that can be used to treat and support recovery of persons with combined radiation and mechanical or thermal injuries. Some general treatment procedures include absolute isolation and rest, special dietetic supplementation, strict medical supervision to prevent acute hemorrhage or circulatory failure, and parenteral administration of fluids. Other special measures include treatment of the primary reactions to injury by antihistamines, sedatives, antibiotics, hormones, support of circulation, blood transfusions, etc.

  1. Expression of apoptosis-related genes in acute β-irradiated skin injury in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xiaoyu; He Hanliang; Qi Qiang; Lin Wei; Shen Guoliang

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the dynamic expression of apoptosis-related genes Bcl-2, Bax and P53 in acute radiation-induced skin ulcers, and to explore the underlying mechanism involved in retarded healing of the ulcer. Methods: Fifty-four female SD rats were divided into 3 groups. The model of acute radiation-induced skin injury, in rats was replicated with 45 Gy electron accelerator β-ray to the skin as radiation group (n=24); the model of deep second degree scald in rats was established as burn group (n=24); 6 normal rats were served as normal control group. From different periods skin wounds, the expression of Bcl-2, Bax and P53 were respectively assessed by means of immunohistochemical technique and. apoptosis was observed by TUNEL assay. Results: (1) The result of the TUNEL manifested that the integral absorbance (IA) of the radiation group was much higher than that of the control group. There is statistical significance between the two groups (P<0.05). (2) 0, 1, 2, 3 weeks after wound emerging, the Bax and P53 integral absorbance (IA) in radiation group was much higher than that of the control group. The Bcl-2 integral absorbance (IA) in bum group was much higher than that of the radiation group. There is statistical significance between the two groups (P<0.05). Conclusions: It was shown that apoptosis of β radiation manifested three typical characteristics, namely early occurrence, high frequency and delayed disappearance after radiation, which might explain the delayed wound healing caused by β radiation. (authors)

  2. Further approaches to biological indicators of radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeteles, G.J.; Kormos, C.; Kerekes, J.; Sztanyik, L.B.

    1988-01-01

    Despite of the decades-long investigations, the search for proper biological indicator of radiation injuries did not result in techniques fulfilling all the requirements. So far, the most reliable assay is the dicentric chromosome aberration analysis. New developments have been made recently on a cytogenetic technique, the micronucleus assay, and for local injuries on the application of thermography

  3. Glibenclamide for the Treatment of Acute CNS Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Marc Simard

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available First introduced into clinical practice in 1969, glibenclamide (US adopted name, glyburide is known best for its use in the treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2, where it is used to promote the release of insulin by blocking pancreatic KATP [sulfonylurea receptor 1 (Sur1-Kir6.2] channels. During the last decade, glibenclamide has received renewed attention due to its pleiotropic protective effects in acute CNS injury. Acting via inhibition of the recently characterized Sur1-Trpm4 channel (formerly, the Sur1-regulated NCCa-ATP channel and, in some cases, via brain KATP channels, glibenclamide has been shown to be beneficial in several clinically relevant rodent models of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, neonatal encephalopathy of prematurity, and metastatic brain tumor. Glibenclamide acts on microvessels to reduce edema formation and secondary hemorrhage, it inhibits necrotic cell death, it exerts potent anti-inflammatory effects and it promotes neurogenesis—all via inhibition of Sur1. Two clinical trials, one in TBI and one in stroke, currently are underway. These recent findings, which implicate Sur1 in a number of acute pathological conditions involving the CNS, present new opportunities to use glibenclamide, a well-known, safe pharmaceutical agent, for medical conditions that heretofore had few or no treatment options.

  4. Rhabdomyolysis-Associated Acute Kidney Injury With Normal Creatine Phosphokinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Faisal; Snook, Lindsay; Saikumar, Jagannath H

    2018-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a syndrome characterized by the breakdown of skeletal muscle and leakage of intracellular myocyte contents, such as creatine phosphokinase (CPK) and myoglobin, into the interstitial space and plasma resulting in acute kidney injury (AKI). Elevated CPK of at least 5 times the upper limit of normal is an important diagnostic marker of Rhabdomyolysis. We present a case of rhabdomyolysis with severe AKI with a normal CPK at presentation. A 32-year-old man presented with acute respiratory failure and AKI after an overdose of recreational drugs. Urinalysis at presentation showed trace amounts of blood, identified as rare red blood cells under microscopy. CPK was 156 U/L at presentation. Workup for glomerulonephritis and vasculitis was negative. He was initiated on renal replacement therapy, and a kidney biopsy showed severe acute tubular injury with positive myoglobin casts. Supportive management and renal replacement therapy was provided, and renal function spontaneously improved after a few weeks. This is an uncommon clinical presentation of severe rhabdomyolysis complicated by AKI. This suggests that CPK alone may not be a sensitive marker for rhabdomyolysis-induced AKI in some cases. Copyright © 2018 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Radiation injuries of plasmatic membrane and lethal action of radiation on cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fomenko, B S; Akoev, I G [AN SSSR, Pushchino-na-Oke. Inst. Biologicheskoj Fiziki

    1984-01-01

    Data on modification of procaryotes and eukaryotes cell injuries using preparations not penetrating into cells and also membrane-specific drugs localized in cells in a lipid phase are generalized. A conclusion is drawn that radiation injuries of plasmatic membrane of prokaryotes and eukaryotes contribute considerably to lethal action of radiation on cells.

  6. Radiation injuries of plasmatic membrane and lethal action of radiation on cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fomenko, B.S.; Akoev, I.G.

    1984-01-01

    Data on modification of procaryotes and eukaryotes cell injuries using preparations not penetrating into cells and also membrane-specific drugs localized in cells in a lipid phase are generalized. A conclusion is drawn that radiation injuries of plasmatic membrane of prokaryotes and eukaryotes contribute considerably to lethal action of radiation on cells

  7. Inhaled nitric oxide for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and acute lung injury in children and adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Arash; Brok, Jesper; Møller, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure (AHRF), defined as acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), are critical conditions. AHRF results from a number of systemic conditions and is associated with high mortality and morbidity in all ages. Inhaled nitric oxide (INO) has...

  8. Avoidance of radiation injuries from medical interventional procedures, ICRP Publication 85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentin, J.

    2000-01-01

    Interventional radiology (fluoroscopically-guided) techniques are being used by an increasing number of clinicians not adequately trained in radiation safety or radiobiology. Many of these interventionists are not aware of the potential for injury from these procedures or the simple methods for decreasing their incidence. Many patients are not being counselled on the radiation risks, nor followed up when radiation doses from difficult procedures may lead to injury. Some patients are suffering radiation-induced skin injuries and younger patients may face an increased risk of future cancer. Interventionists are having their practice limited or suffering injury, and are exposing their staff to high doses. In some interventional procedures, skin doses to patients approach those experienced in some cancer radiotherapy fractions. Radiation-induced skin injuries are occurring in patients due to the use of inappropriate equipment and, more often, poor operational technique. Injuries to physicians and staff performing interventional procedures have also been observed. Acute radiation doses (to patients) may cause erythema at 2 Gy, cataract at 2 Gy, permanent epilation at 7 Gy, and delayed skin necrosis at 12 Gy. Protracted (occupational) exposures to the eye may cause cataract at 4 Gy if the dose is received in less than 3 months, at 5.5 Gy if received over a period exceeding 3 months. Practical actions to control dose to the patient and to the staff are listed. The absorbed dose to the patient in the area of skin that receives the maximum dose is of priority concern. Each local clinical protocol should include, for each type of interventional procedure, a statement on the cumulative skin doses and skin sites associated with the various parts of the procedure. Interventionists should be trained to use information on skin dose and on practical techniques to control dose. Maximum cumulative absorbed doses that appear to approach or exceed 1 Gy (for procedures that may be

  9. Avoidance of radiation injuries from medical interventional procedures, ICRP Publication 85

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentin, J

    2000-06-01

    Interventional radiology (fluoroscopically-guided) techniques are being used by an increasing number of clinicians not adequately trained in radiation safety or radiobiology. Many of these interventionists are not aware of the potential for injury from these procedures or the simple methods for decreasing their incidence. Many patients are not being counselled on the radiation risks, nor followed up when radiation doses from difficult procedures may lead to injury. Some patients are suffering radiation-induced skin injuries and younger patients may face an increased risk of future cancer. Interventionists are having their practice limited or suffering injury, and are exposing their staff to high doses. In some interventional procedures, skin doses to patients approach those experienced in some cancer radiotherapy fractions. Radiation-induced skin injuries are occurring in patients due to the use of inappropriate equipment and, more often, poor operational technique. Injuries to physicians and staff performing interventional procedures have also been observed. Acute radiation doses (to patients) may cause erythema at 2 Gy, cataract at 2 Gy, permanent epilation at 7 Gy, and delayed skin necrosis at 12 Gy. Protracted (occupational) exposures to the eye may cause cataract at 4 Gy if the dose is received in less than 3 months, at 5.5 Gy if received over a period exceeding 3 months. Practical actions to control dose to the patient and to the staff are listed. The absorbed dose to the patient in the area of skin that receives the maximum dose is of priority concern. Each local clinical protocol should include, for each type of interventional procedure, a statement on the cumulative skin doses and skin sites associated with the various parts of the procedure. Interventionists should be trained to use information on skin dose and on practical techniques to control dose. Maximum cumulative absorbed doses that appear to approach or exceed 1 Gy (for procedures that may be

  10. National Veterans Health Administration inpatient risk stratification models for hospital-acquired acute kidney injury

    OpenAIRE

    Cronin, Robert M; VanHouten, Jacob P; Siew, Edward D; Eden, Svetlana K; Fihn, Stephan D; Nielson, Christopher D; Peterson, Josh F; Baker, Clifton R; Ikizler, T Alp; Speroff, Theodore; Matheny, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hospital-acquired acute kidney injury (HA-AKI) is a potentially preventable cause of morbidity and mortality. Identifying high-risk patients prior to the onset of kidney injury is a key step towards AKI prevention.

  11. 9 Expression in Rats with Acute Spinal Cord Injury by Cantharidin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To demonstrate the anti-apoptotic effects of cantharidin in mice with acute spinal cord injury. (ASCI). Methods: In total, 30 ... were obtained from the Shanghai Laboratory .... prevent the development of secondary spinal injury in mice ...

  12. PAI-1-dependent endothelial cell death determines severity of radiation-induced intestinal injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rym Abderrahmani

    Full Text Available Normal tissue toxicity still remains a dose-limiting factor in clinical radiation therapy. Recently, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (SERPINE1/PAI-1 was reported as an essential mediator of late radiation-induced intestinal injury. However, it is not clear whether PAI-1 plays a role in acute radiation-induced intestinal damage and we hypothesized that PAI-1 may play a role in the endothelium radiosensitivity. In vivo, in a model of radiation enteropathy in PAI-1 -/- mice, apoptosis of radiosensitive compartments, epithelial and microvascular endothelium was quantified. In vitro, the role of PAI-1 in the radiation-induced endothelial cells (ECs death was investigated. The level of apoptotic ECs is lower in PAI-1 -/- compared with Wt mice after irradiation. This is associated with a conserved microvascular density and consequently with a better mucosal integrity in PAI-1 -/- mice. In vitro, irradiation rapidly stimulates PAI-1 expression in ECs and radiation sensitivity is increased in ECs that stably overexpress PAI-1, whereas PAI-1 knockdown increases EC survival after irradiation. Moreover, ECs prepared from PAI-1 -/- mice are more resistant to radiation-induced cell death than Wt ECs and this is associated with activation of the Akt pathway. This study demonstrates that PAI-1 plays a key role in radiation-induced EC death in the intestine and suggests that this contributes strongly to the progression of radiation-induced intestinal injury.

  13. Establishing a cat model of acute optic nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In order to investigate the progress in optic nerve injury and the following regeneration and repair, many kinds of animal models of optic nerve injury have been established, such as models of acute and chronic ocular hypertension, compression, amputating wound, ischemia reperfusion or hypoxia,intravitreal injection of excitatory amino acids, etc. However, most of these models are established by squeezing intraorbital optic nerve, and suitable for ophthalmology, and there are fewer models suitable for the acute cranial contusion in neurosurgery.OBJECTIVE: To observe the changes of optic nerve after acute injury, and the characteristics of methods for establishing model of acute optic nerve injury in cats.DESIGN: A complete randomized grouping and controlled animal trial.SETTING: Department of Neurosurgery, General Hospital of Ji'nan Military Area Command of Chinese PLA.MATERIALS: Twenty-eight healthy adult cats, common degree, either sex, weighing 2.0 - 3.5 kg, were provided by the animal experimental center of Fudan University. The cats were randomly divided into control group (n =3) and model group (n =25), and 5 cats in the model group were observed at 6 hours and 1,3, 7 and 14 days after injury respectively. JX-2000 biological signal processing system (Department of Physiology, Second Military Medical University of Chinese PLA, Shanghai); Inverted phase contrast microscope (Olympus); Axioplan 2 imaging microgram analytical system (Labsystems).METHODS: The experiments were carried out in the Department of Neurosurgery, General Hospital of Jinan Military Area Command of Chinese PLA from June 2004 to June 2005. The cats in the model groups were made into models of acute optic nerve injury: The cats were anesthetized, then the limbs were fixed in a lateral recumbent position. Pterion approach in human was imitated, the operative incision was made along the line between lateral canthus and tragus, and it could be seen deep along the skull base that white

  14. Acute injuries in soccer, ice hockey, volleyball, basketball, judo, and karate: analysis of national registry data.

    OpenAIRE

    Kujala, U. M.; Taimela, S.; Antti-Poika, I.; Orava, S.; Tuominen, R.; Myllynen, P.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the acute injury profile in each of six sports and compare the injury rates between the sports. DESIGN--Analysis of national sports injury insurance registry data. SETTING--Finland during 1987-91. SUBJECTS--621,691 person years of exposure among participants in soccer, ice hockey, volleyball, basketball, judo, or karate. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Acute sports injuries requiring medical treatment and reported to the insurance company on structured forms by the patients and...

  15. STUDY OF ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY IN SNAKE BITE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suma Dasaraju

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Snake venom is well known to cause toxic damage to the kidneys (Schreiner and Maher, 1965. This study is an attempt to evaluate the snakebite-induced Acute Kidney Injury (AKI. MATERIALS AND METHODS 50 patients with snakebite-induced acute kidney injury were selected randomly and their clinical profile was assessed. Acute kidney injury was evaluated using noninvasive laboratory methods. Inclusion Criteria- 1. History of snakebite; 2. Presence of AKI. Exclusion Criteria- Pre-existing renal diseases, after establishing the diagnosis, patients were started on conservative treatment including ASV, blood/blood products and haemodialysis as required. RESULTS Out of 50 patients included in the study, majority of them were males (62% with mean age of presentation 43.8 ± 12.63 years. The mean interval between snakebite and presentation to hospital was 15.37 hours. In them, 98% patients presented with local signs of inflammation, 52% of patients presented with coagulation abnormality and 60% with decreased urine output. Comparison between good outcome (recovered from AKI and poor outcome (not recovered from AKI shows significant pvalue for ‘lapse of time in hours’ in presenting to the hospital after snakebite (p value 0.005 and ‘alternative treatment taken’ before coming to the hospital (p value 0.001. CONCLUSION Poisonous snakebites have common manifestations of cellulitis, abnormal coagulation profile and decreased urine output. Overall mortality due to snakebite-induced AKI is 6%. Patients who did not recover from AKI had lapse of time in presenting to the hospital and abnormal coagulation profile.

  16. [Acute and overuse injuries of the shoulder in sports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyscher, R; Kraus, K; Finke, B; Scheibel, M

    2014-03-01

    During sports the shoulder complex is exposed to considerable load especially where throwing is important and various pathological changes can occur. In the last two decades the shoulder in athletes has become a special term in clinical sports medicine Selective literature review in PubMed and consideration of personal experience, research results as well as national and international recommendations In general acute lesions of the shoulder caused by sudden sport injuries, such as traumatic luxation, acromioclavicular (AC) joint disruption, traumatic tendon ruptures, labral lesions, cartilage defects and fractures have to be distinguished from chronic or long-standing pathologies due to recurrent microtrauma, such as overuse bursitis and tendinitis, as well as secondary forms of impingement along with rotator cuff tears and labral lesions. Besides common pathological changes that can be observed in almost all overhead-sports, there are also injuries that are more sport-specific due to the particular load profile in each sport. These injuries are especially common in racquet and throwing sports (e.g. golf, tennis, handball and volleyball) as well as in individual and artistic sports (e.g. swimming, gymnastics, dancing and rowing), contact and extreme sports (e.g. judo, mixed martial arts, bodybuilding, weightlifting, motocross and downhill mountain biking). Knowledge about sport-specific load profiles as well as about the variety of treatment options is crucial for successful treatment of these injuries.

  17. Improving acute kidney injury diagnostics using predictive analytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Rajit K; Gist, Katja; Wheeler, Derek S

    2015-12-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a multifactorial syndrome affecting an alarming proportion of hospitalized patients. Although early recognition may expedite management, the ability to identify patients at-risk and those suffering real-time injury is inconsistent. The review will summarize the recent reports describing advancements in the area of AKI epidemiology, specifically focusing on risk scoring and predictive analytics. In the critical care population, the primary underlying factors limiting prediction models include an inability to properly account for patient heterogeneity and underperforming metrics used to assess kidney function. Severity of illness scores demonstrate limited AKI predictive performance. Recent evidence suggests traditional methods for detecting AKI may be leveraged and ultimately replaced by newer, more sophisticated analytical tools capable of prediction and identification: risk stratification, novel AKI biomarkers, and clinical information systems. Additionally, the utility of novel biomarkers may be optimized through targeting using patient context, and may provide more granular information about the injury phenotype. Finally, manipulation of the electronic health record allows for real-time recognition of injury. Integrating a high-functioning clinical information system with risk stratification methodology and novel biomarker yields a predictive analytic model for AKI diagnostics.

  18. Rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeiras, Rita; Mourelo, Mónica; Pértega, Sonia; Lista, Amanda; Ferreiro, Mª Elena; Salvador, Sebastián; Montoto, Antonio; Rodríguez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCIs) exhibit factors that, in other populations, have been associated with rhabdomyolysis. Purpose: The aim of the study is to determine the incidence of rhabdomyolysis in patients with acute traumatic SCI admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), as well as the development of secondary acute kidney injury and associated factors. Study Design and Setting: This was an observational, retrospective study. Patient Sample: All adult patients admitted to the ICU with acute traumatic SCI who presented rhabdomyolysis, diagnosed through creatine phosphokinase (CPK) levels >500 IU/L. Outcome Measures: Incidence of rhabdomyolysis and subsequent renal dysfunction was calculated. Materials and Methods: Data about demographic variables, comorbidity, rhabdomyolysis risk factors, and variables involving SCI, severity scores, and laboratory parameters were obtained from clinical records. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify renal injury risk factors. Results: In 2006–2014, 200 patients with acute SCI were admitted to ICU. Of these, 103 had rhabdomyolysis (incidence = 51.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 44.3%–58.7%). The most typical American Spinal Injury Association classification was A (70.3%). The injury severity score was 30.3 ± 12.1 and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score was 5.6 ± 3.3 points. During their stay, 57 patients (55.3%; 95% CI: 45.2%–65.4%) presented renal dysfunction (creatinine ≥1.2 mg/dL). In the multivariate analysis, variables associated with renal dysfunction were creatinine at admission (odds ratio [OR] = 9.20; P = 0.006) and hemodynamic SOFA score the day following admission (OR = 1.33; P = 0.024). Creatinine was a better predictor of renal dysfunction than the peak CPK value during the rhabdomyolysis (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve: 0.91 vs. 0.63, respectively). Conclusions: Rhabdomyolysis is a frequent condition in patients

  19. Proposed revised nomenclature for transfusion-related acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toy, Pearl; Kleinman, Steven H; Looney, Mark R

    2017-03-01

    A decade ago, definitions of "transfusionߚrelated acute lung injury (TRALI)" and "possible TRALI" were standardized for research and clinical diagnosis. Since then, evidence has confirmed that TRALI is often due to transfusion of white blood cell antibodies to at-risk patients, and the term "TRALI, antibody mediated" is appropriate for such cases. Other TRALI cases are non-antibody mediated. Because specific, nonantibody transfusion factors have not yet been confirmed to cause TRALI in humans, the general term "TRALI, non-antibody mediated" is appropriate for such cases. In contrast, evidence is against possible TRALI being due to transfusion with the more likely cause of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) being the alternative ARDS risk factor present in these patients. We propose to drop the misleading term "possible TRALI" and to rename this category of cases as "transfused ARDS." These nomenclature updates will more accurately categorize ARDS cases that develop after transfusion. © 2016 AABB.

  20. Metformin-Associated Acute Kidney Injury and Lactic Acidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Arroyo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Metformin is the preferred oral antidiabetic agent for type 2 diabetes. Lactic acidosis is described as a rare complication, usually during an acute kidney injury (AKI. Material and Methods. We conducted a prospective observational study of metformin-associated AKI cases during four years. 29 cases were identified. Previous renal function, clinical data, and outcomes were recorded. Results. An episode of acute gastroenteritis precipitated the event in 26 cases. Three developed a septic shock. Three patients died, the only related factor being liver dysfunction. More severe metabolic acidosis hyperkalemia and anemia were associated with higher probabilities of RRT requirement. We could not find any relationship between previous renal dysfunction and the outcome of the AKI. Conclusions. AKI associated to an episode of volume depletion due to gastrointestinal losses is a serious complication in type 2 diabetic patients on metformin. Previous renal dysfunction (mild-to-moderate CKD has no influence on the severity or outcome.

  1. Acute spinal cord injuries in the Lebanon War, 1982.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohry, A; Rozin, R

    1984-04-01

    Our experience with 17 patients with spinal cord injuries (SCI) acquired in the Lebanon War, 1982, is described. The SCI were due to gunshot wounds in 12 patients and to other causes in 5. Two laparotomies and one thoracotomy were performed. Corticosteroids were not seen to influence recovery, nor was laminectomy, which was performed in three cases. Complications such as pressure sores, hydronephrosis, ileus and deep vein thrombosis were rare or did not occur. Three high quadriplegics died. Based on our experience, we recommend conservative treatment and rehabilitation in acute SCI.

  2. The cognitive profile of children treated with radiation for acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The cognitive profile of children treated with radiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. ... to disrupt the myelination and integrity of white matter tracts in the brain. ... The current study focused on the assessment of memory and learning, two ...

  3. Severe acute dehydration in a desert rodent elicits a transcriptional response that effectively prevents kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacManes, Matthew David

    2017-08-01

    Animals living in desert environments are forced to survive despite severe heat, intense solar radiation, and both acute and chronic dehydration. These animals have evolved phenotypes that effectively address these environmental stressors. To begin to understand the ways in which the desert-adapted rodent Peromyscus eremicus survives, reproductively mature adults were subjected to 72 h of water deprivation, during which they lost, on average, 23% of their body weight. The animals reacted via a series of changes in the kidney, which included modulating expression of genes responsible for reducing the rate of transcription and maintaining water and salt balance. Extracellular matrix turnover appeared to be decreased, and apoptosis was limited. In contrast to the canonical human response, serum creatinine and other biomarkers of kidney injury were not elevated, suggesting that changes in gene expression related to acute dehydration may effectively prohibit widespread kidney damage in the cactus mouse. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Occurrence and treatment of radiation injuries following radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Masao

    1978-01-01

    General side effects recognized in digestive organ and hematopoietic organ during radiotherapy were described, and curative medicines for them were mentioned. Countermeasures for dermatitis, reactions of oral, pharyngeal or espophageal mucosae, radiation pneumonitis, radiation enteritis, urinary tract injuries which appeared during radiotherapy were described, and curative medicines for them were mentioned. Skin ulcer, ulcers in oral cavity, and larynx, edema in larynx and lower larynx, bone necrosis, necrosis of thyroid cartilage, injuries of eyeball, radiation damage in lung, delayed injuries following radiotherapy for uterine cancer, nervous system disorder, and lymphatic system disorder were mentioned as main delayed local injuries, and countermeasures for them were described. Lastly, a mental attitude for radiotherapy was described. (Serizawa, K.)

  5. Training loads and injury risk in Australian football—differing acute: chronic workload ratios influence match injury risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, David L; Blanch, Peter; Ong, Kok-Leong; Crossley, Kay M; Crow, Justin; Morris, Meg E

    2017-01-01

    Aims (1) To investigate whether a daily acute:chronic workload ratio informs injury risk in Australian football players; (2) to identify which combination of workload variable, acute and chronic time window best explains injury likelihood. Methods Workload and injury data were collected from 53 athletes over 2 seasons in a professional Australian football club. Acute:chronic workload ratios were calculated daily for each athlete, and modelled against non-contact injury likelihood using a quadratic relationship. 6 workload variables, 8 acute time windows (2–9 days) and 7 chronic time windows (14–35 days) were considered (336 combinations). Each parameter combination was compared for injury likelihood fit (using R2). Results The ratio of moderate speed running workload (18–24 km/h) in the previous 3 days (acute time window) compared with the previous 21 days (chronic time window) best explained the injury likelihood in matches (R2=0.79) and in the immediate 2 or 5 days following matches (R2=0.76–0.82). The 3:21 acute:chronic workload ratio discriminated between high-risk and low-risk athletes (relative risk=1.98–2.43). Using the previous 6 days to calculate the acute workload time window yielded similar results. The choice of acute time window significantly influenced model performance and appeared to reflect the competition and training schedule. Conclusions Daily workload ratios can inform injury risk in Australian football. Clinicians and conditioning coaches should consider the sport-specific schedule of competition and training when choosing acute and chronic time windows. For Australian football, the ratio of moderate speed running in a 3-day or 6-day acute time window and a 21-day chronic time window best explained injury risk. PMID:27789430

  6. Imaging of Spinal Cord Injury: Acute Cervical Spinal Cord Injury, Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy, and Cord Herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talekar, Kiran; Poplawski, Michael; Hegde, Rahul; Cox, Mougnyan; Flanders, Adam

    2016-10-01

    We review the pathophysiology and imaging findings of acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), cervical spondylotic myelopathy, and briefly review the much less common cord herniation as a unique cause of myelopathy. Acute traumatic SCI is devastating to the patient and the costs to society are staggering. There are currently no "cures" for SCI and the only accepted pharmacologic treatment regimen for traumatic SCI is currently being questioned. Evaluation and prognostication of SCI is a demanding area with significant deficiencies, including lack of biomarkers. Accurate classification of SCI is heavily dependent on a good clinical examination, the results of which can vary substantially based upon the patient׳s condition or comorbidities and the skills of the examiner. Moreover, the full extent of a patients׳ neurologic injury may not become apparent for days after injury; by then, therapeutic response may be limited. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the best imaging modality for the evaluation of spinal cord parenchyma, conventional MR techniques do not appear to differentiate edema from axonal injury. Recently, it is proposed that in addition to characterizing the anatomic extent of injury, metrics derived from conventional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging, in conjunction with the neurological examination, can serve as a reliable objective biomarker for determination of the extent of neurologic injury and early identification of patients who would benefit from treatment. Cervical spondylosis is a common disorder affecting predominantly the elderly with a potential to narrow the spinal canal and thereby impinge or compress upon the neural elements leading to cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy. It is the commonest nontraumatic cause of spinal cord disorder in adults. Imaging plays an important role in grading the severity of spondylosis and detecting cord abnormalities suggesting myelopathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  7. Splenectomy exacerbates lung injury after ischemic acute kidney injury in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés-Hernando, Ana; Altmann, Christopher; Ahuja, Nilesh; Lanaspa, Miguel A.; Nemenoff, Raphael; He, Zhibin; Ishimoto, Takuji; Simpson, Pete A.; Weiser-Evans, Mary C.; Bacalja, Jasna

    2011-01-01

    Patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) have increased serum proinflammatory cytokines and an increased occurrence of respiratory complications. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of renal and extrarenal cytokine production on AKI-mediated lung injury in mice. C57Bl/6 mice underwent sham surgery, splenectomy, ischemic AKI, or ischemic AKI with splenectomy and kidney, spleen, and liver cytokine mRNA, serum cytokines, and lung injury were examined. The proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, CXCL1, IL-1β, and TNF-α were increased in the kidney, spleen, and liver within 6 h of ischemic AKI. Since splenic proinflammatory cytokines were increased, we hypothesized that splenectomy would protect against AKI-mediated lung injury. On the contrary, splenectomy with AKI resulted in increased serum IL-6 and worse lung injury as judged by increased lung capillary leak, higher lung myeloperoxidase activity, and higher lung CXCL1 vs. AKI alone. Splenectomy itself was not associated with increased serum IL-6 or lung injury vs. sham. To investigate the mechanism of the increased proinflammatory response, splenic production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was determined and was markedly upregulated. To confirm that splenic IL-10 downregulates the proinflammatory response of AKI, IL-10 was administered to splenectomized mice with AKI, which reduced serum IL-6 and improved lung injury. Our data demonstrate that AKI in the absence of a counter anti-inflammatory response by splenic IL-10 production results in an exuberant proinflammatory response and lung injury. PMID:21677145

  8. Acute radiation proctitis. A clinical, histopathological and histochemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovdenak, Nils

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study is: 1) A sequential description of the clinical course of acute radiation proctitis during pelvic RT. 2) A sequential description of the rectal mucosal histopathology during pelvic RT as a possible substrate for clinical toxicity. 3) To assess the mucosal protease activity during RT as a possible explanation of the observed tissue changes. 4) To assess the efficacy of prophylactic sucralfate in acute radiation proctitis a randomised study was initiated and carried out together with a meta-analysis of previously available data. 5) Most studies on clinical acute toxicity in pelvic RT use either the RTOG/EORTC score system or focus on diarrhoea/stool frequency. A more differentiated and sensitive recording was developed and tested to pick up symptoms escaping the commonly used scores. 6) Study the relation between histopathological findings and the clinical picture. 4 papers presenting various studies are included. The titles are: 1) Acute radiation proctitis: a sequential clinicopathologic study during pelvic radiotherapy. 2) Clinical significance of increased gelatinolytic activity in the rectal mucosa during external beam radiation therapy of prostate cancer. 3) Profiles and time course of acute radiation toxicity symptoms during conformal radiotherapy for cancer of the prostate. 4) Sucralfate does not ameliorate acute radiation proctitis. Some future prospects are discussed

  9. Acute radiation proctitis. A clinical, histopathological and histochemical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovdenak, Nils

    2004-07-01

    The aim of the study is: 1) A sequential description of the clinical course of acute radiation proctitis during pelvic RT. 2) A sequential description of the rectal mucosal histopathology during pelvic RT as a possible substrate for clinical toxicity. 3) To assess the mucosal protease activity during RT as a possible explanation of the observed tissue changes. 4) To assess the efficacy of prophylactic sucralfate in acute radiation proctitis a randomised study was initiated and carried out together with a meta-analysis of previously available data. 5) Most studies on clinical acute toxicity in pelvic RT use either the RTOG/EORTC score system or focus on diarrhoea/stool frequency. A more differentiated and sensitive recording was developed and tested to pick up symptoms escaping the commonly used scores. 6) Study the relation between histopathological findings and the clinical picture. 4 papers presenting various studies are included. The titles are: 1) Acute radiation proctitis: a sequential clinicopathologic study during pelvic radiotherapy. 2) Clinical significance of increased gelatinolytic activity in the rectal mucosa during external beam radiation therapy of prostate cancer. 3) Profiles and time course of acute radiation toxicity symptoms during conformal radiotherapy for cancer of the prostate. 4) Sucralfate does not ameliorate acute radiation proctitis. Some future prospects are discussed.

  10. Exposed persons at the Chernobyl Atomic Power Station accident: acute radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gus'kova, A.K.; Baranov, A.E.; Barabanova, A.V.

    1987-01-01

    Observation made over 115 patients with acute radiation sickness due to exposure external γ- and β-rays confirmed high efficiency of the earlier proposed principles of prognostication of the degree of severity by clinical manifestations of the primary disease response and those of separate syndromes, using the methods of hematological and cytogenetic analyses. Out of 115 victims, 56 persons had radiation burns (RB), 17 intestinal syndrome (IS), 80 - oropharengeal syndrome (ORS), 7 - interstitial radiation pneumonitis (IRP). In thanatogenesis, of prime importance were: RB (more than 40% of the body surface) - 19 persons and IRP - 7 persons. A severe course of intestinal and oropharengeal syndromes was combined with other fatal manifestations of radiation injury. Early isolation of patients (2-4 stages), selective decontamination of the intestine, prescription of a wide spectrum antibiotics, antimycotic and antiviral drugs, as well as γ-globulin could practically remove the risk of the development of fatal infectious complications during a medullary andtransitory forms of radiation sickness

  11. Surgical management of radiation injury to the small intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swan, R.W.; Fowler, W.C. Jr., Boronow, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    Severe injury of the small intestine represents one of the most tragic complications of radiation of the pelvis and abdomen. Not uncommonly, patients die from the radiation or the treatment of its intestinal complications. More commonly, patients become intestinal cripples, secondary to chronic partial obstruction of the small intestine and malnutrition associated with the stagnant loop syndrome, as previously reported by one of us. Management results have been discouraging, usually because of a general lack of clinical recognition and understanding of radiation injury to the intestine. Medical management has not been satisfactory. It may provide temporary relief from symptoms, but not long-lasting. Surgical management, although frequently curative, has been associated with high death and morbidity rates. Many surgical procedures have been used in treating radiation injury to the small intestine. Generally, these fall into two categories: first, intestinal resection with primary anastomosis; and second, enteroenteric or enterocolic bypass. In the literature are reflected advocates for each method of surgical management.

  12. Relationship between acute and late normal tissue injury after postoperative radiotherapy in endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A.; Jassem, Jacek; Badzio, Andrzej

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between acute and late normal tissue reactions in 317 consecutive endometrial cancer patients treated with surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT). Methods: The data of 317 patients (staging according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) treated with postoperative RT were analyzed. Both low-dose-rate brachytherapy and external beam RT were applied in 247 patients (78%); brachytherapy only in 49 (15%) and external beam irradiation only in 21 (7%). The median follow-up was 7.3 years (range 4-21). The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group system with elements of the late effects of normal tissue, subjective, objective, management, analytic (LENT/SOMA) scale was used to score the RT reactions. The correlation between the occurrence and severity of acute and late bowel and bladder toxicity, as well as the relationship between the severity of acute effects and time to occurrence of late reactions, were assessed using linear and logistic regression analyses. Results: Of the 317 patients, 268 (85%) experienced acute RT reactions of any grade. Severe acute bowel reactions were observed in 15 patients (5%), urinary bladder complications in 1 patient (0.5%), cutaneous in 1 patient (0.5%), and vaginal in 1 patient (0.5%). Severe acute hematologic toxicity was seen in 3 patients (1%). A total of 158 patients (51%) experienced late RT reactions of any grade. Severe late bowel reactions were observed in 19 patients (6%), urinary bladder in 5 (2%), vaginal in 3 (1%), and bone in 10 (4%). When all toxic events were considered, there was a highly significant correlation between the acute and late bowel reactions (p <0.001), but the acute and late urinary bladder reactions did not correlate (p=0.64). The grade of acute toxicity was found to predict the grade of late toxicity for the bowel but not for the bladder (p<0.001 and p=0.47, respectively). The severity of acute

  13. Acute kidney injury and edaravone in acute ischemic stroke: the Fukuoka Stroke Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamouchi, Masahiro; Sakai, Hironori; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Minematsu, Kazuo; Hayashi, Kunihiko; Kitazono, Takanari

    2013-11-01

    A free radical scavenger, edaravone, which has been used for the treatment of ischemic stroke, was reported to cause acute kidney injury (AKI) as a fatal adverse event. The aim of the present study was to clarify whether edaravone is associated with AKI in patients with acute ischemic stroke. From the Fukuoka Stroke Registry database, 5689 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke who were hospitalized within 24 hours of the onset of symptoms were included in this study. A logistic regression analysis for the Fukuoka Stroke Registry cohort was done to identify the predictors for AKI. A propensity score-matched nested case-control study was also performed to elucidate any association between AKI and edaravone. Acute kidney injury occurred in 128 of 5689 patients (2.2%) with acute ischemic stroke. A multivariate analysis revealed that the stroke subtype, the basal serum creatinine level, and the presence of infectious complications on admission were each predictors of developing AKI. In contrast, a free radical scavenger, edaravone, reduced the risk of developing AKI (multivariate-adjusted odds ratio [OR] .45, 95% confidence interval [CI] .30-.67). Propensity score-matched case-control study confirmed that edaravone use was negatively associated with AKI (propensity score-adjusted OR .46, 95% CI .29-.74). Although AKI has a significant impact on the clinical outcome of hospital inpatients, edaravone has a protective effect against the development of AKI in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of radiation, burn and combined radiation-burn injury on hemodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Benlan; Cheng Tianming; Xiao Jiasi

    1996-01-01

    Changes in hemodynamics after radiation, burn and combined radiation burn injury within eight hours post injury were studied. The results indicate: (1) Shock of rats in the combined injury group is more severe than that in the burn group. One of the reasons is that the blood volume in the combined injury group is less than that in the burn group. Radiation injury plays an important role in this effect, which enhances the increase in vascular permeability and causes the loss of plasma. (2) Decrease in cardiac output and stroke work and increase in vascular resistance in the combined radiation burn group are more drastic than those in the burn group, which may cause and enhance shock. Replenishing fluid is useful for recovery of hemodynamics. (3) Rb uptake is increased in the radiation group which indicates that compensated increase of myocardial nutritional blood flow may take place before the changes of hemodynamics and shock. Changes of Rb uptake in the combined injury group is different from that in the radiation groups and in the burn group. The results also suggest that changes of ion channel activities may occur to a different extent after injury. (4) Verapamil is helpful to the recovery of hemodynamics post injury. It is better to combine verapamil with replenishing fluid

  15. Preemptive mechanical ventilation can block progressive acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowitz, Benjamin; Jain, Sumeet; Kollisch-Singule, Michaela; Satalin, Joshua; Andrews, Penny; Habashi, Nader; Gatto, Louis A; Nieman, Gary

    2016-02-04

    Mortality from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains unacceptable, approaching 45% in certain high-risk patient populations. Treating fulminant ARDS is currently relegated to supportive care measures only. Thus, the best treatment for ARDS may lie with preventing this syndrome from ever occurring. Clinical studies were examined to determine why ARDS has remained resistant to treatment over the past several decades. In addition, both basic science and clinical studies were examined to determine the impact that early, protective mechanical ventilation may have on preventing the development of ARDS in at-risk patients. Fulminant ARDS is highly resistant to both pharmacologic treatment and methods of mechanical ventilation. However, ARDS is a progressive disease with an early treatment window that can be exploited. In particular, protective mechanical ventilation initiated before the onset of lung injury can prevent the progression to ARDS. Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) is a novel mechanical ventilation strategy for delivering a protective breath that has been shown to block progressive acute lung injury (ALI) and prevent ALI from progressing to ARDS. ARDS mortality currently remains as high as 45% in some studies. As ARDS is a progressive disease, the key to treatment lies with preventing the disease from ever occurring while it remains subclinical. Early protective mechanical ventilation with APRV appears to offer substantial benefit in this regard and may be the prophylactic treatment of choice for preventing ARDS.

  16. Mechanisms of alveolar fibrosis after acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, W A; Henke, C A; Harmon, K R; Hertz, M I; Bitterman, P B

    1990-12-01

    In patients who die after severe acute lung injury, a dramatic fibroproliferative response occurs within the alveolar air space, interstitium, and microvessels. Profound shunt physiology, dead space ventilation, and pulmonary hypertension are the physiologic consequences of this fibroproliferative response. The anatomic pattern of the response is unique within each alveolar compartment. For example, the air space is obliterated by granulation tissue, with replicating mesenchymal cells, their connective tissue products, and an expanding network of intra-alveolar capillaries. In contrast, the vascular fibroproliferative response is dominated by mesenchymal cell replication and connective tissue deposition within the walls of microvessels. Despite the unique anatomic features of these fibroproliferative processes, the regulatory signals involved are likely to be similar. Although our current understanding of the signals regulating the fibroproliferative response to acute lung injury is limited, inferences can be made from in vitro studies of mesenchymal cell behavior and several better understood fibroproliferative processes, including wound healing and chronic fibrotic lung diseases. As clinicians, our future ability to enhance effective lung repair will likely utilize therapeutic strategies specifically targeted to the signals that regulate the fibroproliferative process within the alveolar microenvironment.

  17. Acute Kidney Injury by Radiographic Contrast Media: Pathogenesis and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faga, Teresa; Pisani, Antonio; Michael, Ashour

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that iodinated radiographic contrast media may cause kidney dysfunction, particularly in patients with preexisting renal impairment associated with diabetes. This dysfunction, when severe, will cause acute renal failure (ARF). We may define contrast-induced Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) as ARF occurring within 24–72 hrs after the intravascular injection of iodinated radiographic contrast media that cannot be attributed to other causes. The mechanisms underlying contrast media nephrotoxicity have not been fully elucidated and may be due to several factors, including renal ischaemia, particularly in the renal medulla, the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), reduction of nitric oxide (NO) production, and tubular epithelial and vascular endothelial injury. However, contrast-induced AKI can be prevented, but in order to do so, we need to know the risk factors. We have reviewed the risk factors for contrast-induced AKI and measures for its prevention, providing a long list of references enabling readers to deeply evaluate them both. PMID:25197639

  18. Acute kidney injury complicating bee stings – a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Geraldo Bezerra; Vasconcelos, Adolfo Gomes; Rocha, Amanda Maria Timbó; de Vasconcelos, Vanessa Ribeiro; de Barros, João; Fujishima, Julye Sampaio; Ferreira, Nathália Barros; Barros, Elvino José Guardão; Daher, Elizabeth De Francesco

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bee stings can cause severe reactions and have caused many victims in the last years. Allergic reactions can be triggered by a single sting and the greater the number of stings, the worse the prognosis. The poisoning effects can be systemic and can eventually cause death. The poison components are melitin, apamin, peptide 401, phospholipase A2, hyaluronidase, histamine, dopamine, and norepinephrine, with melitin being the main lethal component. Acute kidney injury (AKI) can be observed in patients suffering from bee stings and this is due to multiple factors, such as intravascular hemolysis, rhabdomyolysis, hypotension and direct toxicity of the venom components to the renal tubules. Arterial hypotension plays an important role in this type of AKI, leading to ischemic renal lesion. The most commonly identified biopsy finding in these cases is acute tubular necrosis, which can occur due to both, ischemic injury and the nephrotoxicity of venom components. Hemolysis and rhabdomyolysis reported in many cases in the literature, were demonstrated by elevated serum levels of indirect bilirubin and creatine kinase. The severity of AKI seems to be associated with the number of stings, since creatinine levels were higher, in most cases, when there were more than 1,000 stings. The aim of this study is to present an updated review of AKI associated with bee stings, including the currently advised clinical approach. PMID:28591253

  19. Acute kidney injury complicating bee stings - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Geraldo Bezerra da; Vasconcelos, Adolfo Gomes; Rocha, Amanda Maria Timbó; Vasconcelos, Vanessa Ribeiro de; Barros, João de; Fujishima, Julye Sampaio; Ferreira, Nathália Barros; Barros, Elvino José Guardão; Daher, Elizabeth De Francesco

    2017-06-01

    Bee stings can cause severe reactions and have caused many victims in the last years. Allergic reactions can be triggered by a single sting and the greater the number of stings, the worse the prognosis. The poisoning effects can be systemic and can eventually cause death. The poison components are melitin, apamin, peptide 401, phospholipase A2, hyaluronidase, histamine, dopamine, and norepinephrine, with melitin being the main lethal component. Acute kidney injury (AKI) can be observed in patients suffering from bee stings and this is due to multiple factors, such as intravascular hemolysis, rhabdomyolysis, hypotension and direct toxicity of the venom components to the renal tubules. Arterial hypotension plays an important role in this type of AKI, leading to ischemic renal lesion. The most commonly identified biopsy finding in these cases is acute tubular necrosis, which can occur due to both, ischemic injury and the nephrotoxicity of venom components. Hemolysis and rhabdomyolysis reported in many cases in the literature, were demonstrated by elevated serum levels of indirect bilirubin and creatine kinase. The severity of AKI seems to be associated with the number of stings, since creatinine levels were higher, in most cases, when there were more than 1,000 stings. The aim of this study is to present an updated review of AKI associated with bee stings, including the currently advised clinical approach.

  20. Development and Characterization of VEGF165-Chitosan Nanoparticles for the Treatment of Radiation-Induced Skin Injury in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daojiang Yu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced skin injury, which remains a serious concern in radiation therapy, is currently believed to be the result of vascular endothelial cell injury and apoptosis. Here, we established a model of acute radiation-induced skin injury and compared the effect of different vascular growth factors on skin healing by observing the changes of microcirculation and cell apoptosis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF was more effective at inhibiting apoptosis and preventing injury progression than other factors. A new strategy for improving the bioavailability of vascular growth factors was developed by loading VEGF with chitosan nanoparticles. The VEGF-chitosan nanoparticles showed a protective effect on vascular endothelial cells, improved the local microcirculation, and delayed the development of radioactive skin damage.

  1. Drug induced acute kidney injury: an experimental animal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.W.A.; Khan, B.T.; Qazi, R.A.; Ashraf, M.; Waqar, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To assess the extent of drug induced nephrotoxicity in laboratory animals for determining the role and extent of iatrogenic kidney damage in patients exposed to nephrotoxic drugs in various clinical setups. Study Design: Randomized control trail. Place and Duration of study: Pharmacology department and animal house of Army Medical College from Jan 2011 to Aug 2011. Material and Methods: Thirty six mixed breed rabbits were used in this study. Animals were randomly divided into six groups consisting of six rabbits in each. Groups were named A, B, C, D, E and F. Group A was control group. Group B was given 0.9% normal saline. Group C rabbits were given acute nephrotoxic single dose of amphotericin B deoxycholate. Group D received 0.9% normal saline 10ml/kg followed by amphotericin B infusion. Group E was injected acute nephrotoxic regimen of cyclosporine and amphotericin B infusion. Group F received saline loading along with acute nephrotoxic regimen of cyclosporine and amphotericin B infusion. Results: Biochemical and histopathological analysis showed significant kidney injury in rabbits exposed to acute nephrotoxic doses of amphotericin B and cyclosporine. Toxicity was additive when the two drugs were administered simultaneously. Group of rabbits with saline loading had significantly lesser kidney damage. Conclusion: Iatrogenic acute kidney damage is a major cause of morbidity in experimental animals exposed to such nephrotoxic drugs like amphotericin B and cyclosporine, used either alone or in combination. Clinical studies are recommended to assess the extent of iatrogenic renal damage in patients and its economic burden. Efficient and cost effective protective measure may be adopted in clinical setups against such adverse effects. (author)

  2. Assessment of radiation injuries: role of nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khushu, Subhash; Rana, Poonam

    2014-01-01

    In the event of an intentional or accidental release of ionizing radiation, timely assessment of the radiation exposure is critical for the triage and to facilitate timely and optimal medical care to the effected population. In addition to mild to severe injuries to tissues and organs, radiation injury can also cause cognitive decline, depressive behavior and affective state disturbances following exposure to both high and low doses of radiation. These may be even seen without evident tissue injury within hours to days or months to years after exposure to low doses of radiation. In this study, we exploited the multi-parametric contrast of NMR/MRI and its potential to assess radiation dose absorbed and radiation sickness thereof. High resolution NMR spectroscopy experiments were conducted on urine and serum samples collected from mice irradiated (whole body and focal irradiation) with 3, 5 and 8 Gray of γ-radiation at different time points post irradiation. Irradiated mice serum and urine showed distinct metabolic phenotypes and revealed dose and time dependent clustering of irradiated groups depicting different phases of radiation sickness. Increased concentration of urine metabolites related to gut microflora and energy metabolism were observed during different phases of radiation sickness. On the other hand serum spectra reflected changes associated with lipid, energy and membrane metabolism during radiation sickness. In vivo NMR spectroscopy and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) was also performed in different regions of brain post irradiation in animal model, which showed radiation induced metabolite changes in hippocampus region. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) also demonstrated dose related changes in various brain regions which corroborated well with the behavioral parameters. The results of the present work lay a scientific foundation for development of high throughput radiation bio-dosimetry. This could further be useful in development

  3. Therapy of combined radiation injuries with hemopoietic growth factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudagov, R.; Oulianova, L.

    1996-01-01

    Radiation accidents of the 5-7 th levels according to IAEA scale lead to life-threatening acute radiation syndrome and many patients will probably suffer from additional thermal burns. These combined injuries (CI) will be among the most difficult to achieve survival. Present therapeutic means need to augment with new approaches to stimulate host defence mechanisms, blood system recovery and to enhance survival. The evaluation of therapeutic properties of human recombinant G-CSF, IL-1,IL-2 and other so called 'biological response modifiers' on survival and blood recovery after CI was the purpose of this work. Experiments carried out with mice CBA x C57BL6 receiving 7 Gy total body irradiation followed by a full-thickness thermal bum of 10% of body surface. It established that G-CSF does not exhibit a positive modifying action on the damage level and on hematopoietic recovery. I.p two-four/fold infusion of IL-2 during the initial 2 days has provided a significant statistically survival increase from 40% (untreated mice with CI) to 86%. Single s.c IL-1 injection resulted in abrupt deterioration of the outcome when dealing with CI; three/fold administration of IL-1 in 2,4 and 6 days after CI did not increase survival. Extracellular yeast polysaccharides resulted only a 15 to 30% increase in survival it given 1 h after CI. The best results obtained when mixture of heat-killed L.acidophilus injected s.c immediately alter CI - survival has increased from 27% (untreated mice) to 80%. Revealed beneficial effects of IL-2 and biological response modifiers did not accompany by a corresponding correction of depressed hematological parameters

  4. Rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury in the injured war fighter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elterman, Joel; Zonies, David; Stewart, Ian; Fang, Raymond; Schreiber, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a recognized complication of traumatic injury. The correlation of an elevated creatine kinase (CK) level and the development of acute kidney injury (AKI) has been studied in the civilian population. We sought to review the prevalence of rhabdomyolysis in injured war fighters and determine if peak CK levels correlate with AKI. This is a retrospective cohort study of patients admitted at a US military treatment facility from January to November 2010. Inclusion criteria were active duty patients transported after explosive, penetrating, or blunt injury. Patients with burns or non-trauma-related admissions were excluded. Rhabdomyolysis was defined as a CK level greater than 5,000 U/L. AKI was defined using the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes classification. Mann-Whitney U-tests were used to determine the significance for continuous data. Correlations were determined using Spearman's ρ. Significance was set at p Rhabdomyolysis developed in 79 patients (24.8%). The median peak CK for all patients was 4,178 U/L and ranged from 208 U/L to 120,000 U/L. Stage 1, 2, and 3 AKI developed in 56 (17.6%), 3 (0.9%), and 7 (2.2%) patients, respectively. There was a weak but statistically significant correlation between peak CK and AKI (r = 0.26, p rhabdomyolysis in combat casualties and would allow for standardized comparisons in future work. Epidemiologic/prognostic study, level III.

  5. Chernobyl 1996. New materials concerning acute radiation syndrome around Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupandin, Vladimir M.

    2016-01-01

    In 1996 we have succeeded in getting reliable data on radiation situation in the Khoiniki district. These were data of Civil Defence Headquarters of the Khoiniki district, remaining in private notes of the Chief of the Headquarters. Including the other data or materials, radiation syndromes in particular the acute are described. (J.P.N.)

  6. Modification of Acute Radiation Response in Different Demographic Age Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-25

    greater radiosensitivity. Other studies provided further mechanistic insight into the observed age effect of radiation responses. For example ...DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. October 2017 HDTRA1-14-0003; 0005 Prepared by: Applied ... Research Associates, Inc. 801 N. Quincy Street Suite 700 Arlington, VA 22203 Modification of Acute Radiation Response in Different Demographic Age

  7. Early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Wu-song; Zheng, Ping; Xu, Jun-fa; Guo, Yi-jun; Zeng, Jing-song; Yang, Wen-jin; Li, Gao-yi; He, Bin; Yu, Hui [Pudong New Area People' s Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Shanghai (China)

    2011-05-15

    Since progressive hemorrhagic injury (PHI) was introduced in neurosurgical literatures, several studies have been performed, the results of which have influenced doctors but do not define guidelines for the best treatment of PHI. PHI may be confirmed by a serial computerized tomography (CT) scan, and it has been shown to be associated with a fivefold increase in the risk of clinical worsening and is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality as well. So, early detection of PHI is practically important in a clinical situation. To analyze the early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) and explore their clinical significances, PHI was confirmed by comparing the first and repeated CT scans. Data were analyzed and compared including times from injury to the first CT and signs of the early CT scan. Logistic regression analysis was used to show the risk factors related to PHI. A cohort of 630 TBI patients was evaluated, and there were 189 (30%) patients who suffered from PHI. For patients with their first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, there were 116 (77.25%) cases who suffered from PHI. The differences between PHIs and non-PHIs were significant in the initial CT scans showing fracture, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), brain contusion, epidural hematoma (EDH), subdural hematoma (SDH), and multiple hematoma as well as the times from injury to the first CT scan (P < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis showed that early CT scans (EDH, SDH, SAH, fracture, and brain contusion) were predictors of PHI (P < 0.01). For patients with the first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, a follow-up CT scan should be performed promptly. If the initial CT scan shows SAH, brain contusion, and primary hematoma with brain swelling, an earlier and dynamic CT scan should be performed for detection of PHI as early as possible and the medical intervention would be enforced in time. (orig.)

  8. Early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, Wu-song; Zheng, Ping; Xu, Jun-fa; Guo, Yi-jun; Zeng, Jing-song; Yang, Wen-jin; Li, Gao-yi; He, Bin; Yu, Hui

    2011-01-01

    Since progressive hemorrhagic injury (PHI) was introduced in neurosurgical literatures, several studies have been performed, the results of which have influenced doctors but do not define guidelines for the best treatment of PHI. PHI may be confirmed by a serial computerized tomography (CT) scan, and it has been shown to be associated with a fivefold increase in the risk of clinical worsening and is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality as well. So, early detection of PHI is practically important in a clinical situation. To analyze the early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) and explore their clinical significances, PHI was confirmed by comparing the first and repeated CT scans. Data were analyzed and compared including times from injury to the first CT and signs of the early CT scan. Logistic regression analysis was used to show the risk factors related to PHI. A cohort of 630 TBI patients was evaluated, and there were 189 (30%) patients who suffered from PHI. For patients with their first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, there were 116 (77.25%) cases who suffered from PHI. The differences between PHIs and non-PHIs were significant in the initial CT scans showing fracture, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), brain contusion, epidural hematoma (EDH), subdural hematoma (SDH), and multiple hematoma as well as the times from injury to the first CT scan (P < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis showed that early CT scans (EDH, SDH, SAH, fracture, and brain contusion) were predictors of PHI (P < 0.01). For patients with the first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, a follow-up CT scan should be performed promptly. If the initial CT scan shows SAH, brain contusion, and primary hematoma with brain swelling, an earlier and dynamic CT scan should be performed for detection of PHI as early as possible and the medical intervention would be enforced in time. (orig.)

  9. Modification of Measures of Acute Kidney Injury to Risk Stratify Combat Casualties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-26

    REPORT TYPE 08/26/2017 Poster 4. TJTLE AND SUBTITLE t\\.1odification of l’vfeasures,of Acute Kidney Injury to Risk Stratify Cotnbat Casualties 6...profiles and potential future conflicts , identifying acute kidney injury (AKI) early can help us determine the need for rapidity of evacuation

  10. Transplantation of Kidneys From Donors With Acute Kidney Injury: Friend or Foe?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boffa, C.; van de Leemkolk, F.; Curnow, E.; Homan van der Heide, J.; Gilbert, J.; Sharples, E.; Ploeg, R. J.

    2017-01-01

    The gap between supply and demand in kidney transplantation has led to increased use of marginal kidneys; however, kidneys with acute kidney injury are often declined/discarded. To determine whether this policy is justified, we analyzed outcomes of donor kidneys with acute kidney injury (AKI) in a

  11. Perioperative Aspirin and Clonidine and Risk of Acute Kidney Injury A Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garg, Amit X.; Kurz, Andrea; Sessler, Daniel I.; Cuerden, Meaghan; Robinson, Andrea; Mrkobrada, Marko; Parikh, Chirag R.; Mizera, Richard; Jones, Philip M.; Tiboni, Maria; Font, Adrià; Cegarra, Virginia; Gomez, Maria Fernanda Rojas; Meyhoff, Christian S.; VanHelder, Tomas; Chan, Matthew T. V.; Torres, David; Parlow, Joel; de Nadal Clanchet, Miriam; Amir, Mohammed; Bidgoli, Seyed Javad; Pasin, Laura; Martinsen, Kristian; Malaga, German; Myles, Paul; Acedillo, Rey; Roshanov, Pavel S.; Walsh, Michael; Dresser, George; Kumar, Priya; Fleischmann, Edith; Villar, Juan Carlos; Painter, Thomas; Biccard, Bruce; Bergese, Sergio; Srinathan, Sadeesh; Cata, Juan P.; Chan, Vincent; Mehra, Bhupendra; Wijeysundera, Duminda N.; Leslie, Kate; Forget, Patrice; Whitlock, Richard; Yusuf, Salim; Devereaux, P. J.; Alvarez, A.; Bulach, R.; Hannon, S.; Ives, K.; de Hert, S.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Acute kidney injury, a common complication of surgery, is associated with poor outcomes and high health care costs. Some studies suggest aspirin or clonidine administered during the perioperative period reduces the risk of acute kidney injury; however, these effects are uncertain and each

  12. The cellular basis of renal injury by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.V.

    1986-01-01

    This review with substantial bibliography summarises renal assay techniques available and discusses the histological and functional studies leading to differing opinions between the belief that vascular injury provides a general explanation of the late effects of radiotherapy and the opposing view that parenchymal cell damage is more important. It is proposed that the link between glomerular and tubular function obscures the primary site of injury and that radiation injury will result in a reduction of functioning nephron mass by primary damage to the tubules or glomeruli. Compensatory renal vasodilation would close a positive feedback loop. Radiation could also cause direct vascular injury; decreased renal perfusion and hypertension would result. Again sensitisation to hypertensive vascular damage would close a feedback loop. (UK)

  13. Relation between radiotherapy-induced acute injury of mucosa of nasopharyngeal carcinoma and p53 polymorphisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Changsheng; Xiao Shaowen; Zhang Shanwen

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relation between p53 genetic polymorphisms and radiotherapy-induced acute injury of mucosa of oral cavity mucosa. Methods: The total of 56 patients with NPC treated by radiotherapy alone or with chemoradiotherapy synchronically were genotyped for the p53 codon 72 pro-Arg SNP using PCR-RFLP assays, and were ranked according to the acute injury of oral cavity mucosa. Results: There was no difference in acute injury of oral cavity mucosa between the p53 Pro allele carriers and the other carriers (P>0.05); the high single dose (P<0.01) and concomitant chemoradiotherapy (P<0.05) resulted in increase in acute injury of oral cavity mucosa. Conclusion: Those results suggest that p53 SNP may not associate with radiotherapeutic acute injury of oral cavity mucosa. (authors)

  14. Urinary NGAL in patients with and without acute kidney injury in a cardiology intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Mirian; Silva, Gabriela Fulan e; da Fonseca, Cassiane Dezoti; Vattimo, Maria de Fatima Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the diagnostic and prognostic efficacy of urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin in patients admitted to an intensive care unit. Methods Longitudinal, prospective cohort study conducted in a cardiology intensive care unit. The participants were divided into groups with and without acute kidney injury and were followed from admission to the intensive care unit until hospital discharge or death. Serum creatinine, urine output and urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin were measured 24 and 48 hours after admission. Results A total of 83 patients admitted to the intensive care unit for clinical reasons were assessed, most being male (57.8%). The participants were divided into groups without acute kidney injury (N=18), with acute kidney injury (N=28) and with severe acute kidney injury (N=37). Chronic diseases, mechanical ventilation and renal replacement therapy were more common in the groups with acute kidney injury and severe acute kidney injury, and those groups exhibited longer intensive care unit stay and hospital stay and higher mortality. Serum creatinine did not change significantly in the group with acute kidney injury within the first 24 hours of admission to the intensive care unit, although, urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin was high in the groups with acute kidney injury and severe acute kidney injury (p<0.001). Increased urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin was associated with death. Conclusion An increase in urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin precedes variations in serum creatinine in patients with acute kidney injury and may be associated with death. PMID:25607262

  15. Anesthesia for plastic reconstruction surgery of radiation injury of neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yafen; Zhang Junmin; Huang Zhiqin

    1993-01-01

    The management of anesthesia used in the plastic reconstruction of 18 cases of radiation injury of neck is reported. 17 cases were malignant tumor patients. After radiotherapy, their general condition was weak. The injury of neck skin and surrounding tissues was severe. Most operations were excision of the focus and repairing the wound using adjacent flap. The choice of anesthesia depended on the general condition, degree of injury and the procedure. Good pre-operative preparation, close monitoring and satisfactory airway control during operation are very important

  16. Development of Novel Local Analgesics for Management of Acute Tissue Injury Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Project Manager Boston Biomedical Innovation Center 215 First Street, Suite 500; Cambridge, MA 02142 857-307-2441 | rblackman1@partners.org | b...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0480 TITLE: Development of Novel Local Analgesics for Management of Acute Tissue Injury Pain PRINCIPAL...31/2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Development of Novel Local Analgesics for Management of Acute Tissue Injury Pain 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Tissue Injury

  17. Rhabdomyolysis and Acute Kidney Injury Associated with Hypothyroidism and Statin Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Pyoung; Min, Hyun-Jun; Park, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Byoung-Mu; Choi, Myung-Jin; Yoon, Jong-Woo; Koo, Ja-Ryong

    2013-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a syndrome involving the breakdown of skeletal muscle that causes myoglobin and other intracellular proteins to leak into the circulatory system, resulting in organ injury including acute kidney injury. We report a case of statin-induced rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury that developed in a 63-year-old woman with previously undiagnosed hypothyroidism. Untreated hypothyroidism may have caused her hypercholesterolemia requiring statin treatment, and it is postulated that ...

  18. Management of radiation injuries of 10 cases of gastrointestinal tracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomida, Takashi; Yano, Takashi; Hidaka, Naoaki; Okada, Yoshikatsu; Iwasaki, Makoto; Goshima, Hiromichi.

    1984-01-01

    Ten cases of delayed radiation injuries of the gastrointestinal tracts (consisting of 2 with peptic ulcer, 4 with intestinal obstruction, and 4 with rectal bleeding) are reported. Although conservative therapy or artificial colostomy was undertaken in all cases, satisfactory results were not obtained. In four cases in which subsequent resection of the gastrointestinal tracts was performed, the prognosis was favorable, but various symptoms still continued in the other non-resected cases. Delayed radiation injuries are progressive lesions involving the vasculo-connective tissue, so that cure can not be achieved. Resection of the damaged gastrointestinal tract is recommended, however, this is difficult to do in many cases. (Namekawa, K.)

  19. Management of radiation injuries of 10 cases of gastrointestinal tracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomida, Takashi; Yano, Takashi; Hidaka, Naoaki; Okada, Yoshikatsu; Iwasaki, Makoto; Goshima, Hiromichi

    1984-11-01

    Ten cases of delayed radiation injuries of the gastrointestinal tracts (consisting of 2 with peptic ulcer, 4 with intestinal obstruction, and 4 with rectal bleeding) are reported. Although conservative therapy or artificial colostomy was undertaken in all cases, satisfactory results were not obtained. In four cases in which subsequent resection of the gastrointestinal tracts was performed, the prognosis was favorable, but various symptoms still continued in the other non-resected cases. Delayed radiation injuries are progressive lesions involving the vasculo-connective tissue, so that cure can not be achieved. Resection of the damaged gastrointestinal tract is recommended, however, this is difficult to do in many cases. (Namekawa, K.).

  20. Haemopoietic recovery during radiation disease: Comments on combined-injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, A.F.G.

    1981-01-01

    The regenerative ability of haemopoietic organs during combined radiation injuries has not been adequately investigated. Interactions among individual factors can critically influence the processes involved in haemopoietic recovery. An overview of radiation injuries is given, and a concept towards a hypothetical mode of action at the cellular level is presented. The influence which interacting factors can have on the concentration of pluripotential haemopoietic stem cells is demonstrated by results from an initial experiment. The importance of synergistic and antagonistic reactions is emphasised and commented upon. (orig.) [de

  1. Diagnosis of Acute Groin Injuries: A Prospective Study of 110 Athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serner, Andreas; Tol, Johannes L.; Jomaah, Nabil; Weir, Adam; Whiteley, Rodney; Thorborg, Kristian; Robinson, Matthew; Hölmich, Per

    2015-01-01

    Acute groin injuries are common in high-intensity sports, but there are insufficient data on injury characteristics such as injury mechanisms and clinical and radiological findings. To describe these characteristics in a cohort of athletes. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 110

  2. Acute Stress Decreases but Chronic Stress Increases Myocardial Sensitivity to Ischemic Injury in Rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Eisenmann, Eric D.; Rorabaugh, Boyd R.; Zoladz, Phillip R.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the largest cause of mortality worldwide, and stress is a significant contributor to the development of cardiovascular disease. The relationship between acute and chronic stress and cardiovascular disease is well-evidenced. Acute stress can lead to arrhythmias and ischemic injury. However, recent evidence in rodent models suggests that acute stress can decrease sensitivity to myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. Conversely, chronic stress is arrythmogenic and incr...

  3. Predictors of Renal Replacement Therapy in Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Koziolek

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds: Criteria that may guide early renal replacement therapy (RRT initiation in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI currently do not exist. Methods: In 120 consecutive patients with AKI, clinical and laboratory data were analyzed on admittance. The prognostic power of those parameters which were significantly different between the two groups was analyzed by receiver operator characteristic curves and by leave-1-out cross validation. Results: Six parameters (urine albumin, plasma creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, daily urine output, fluid balance and plasma sodium were combined in a logistic regression model that estimates the probability that a particular patient will need RRT. Additionally, a second model without daily urine output was established. Both models yielded a higher accuracy (89 and 88% correct classification rate, respectively than the best single parameter, cystatin C (correct classification rate 74%. Conclusions: The combined models may help to better predict the necessity of RRT using clinical and routine laboratory data in patients with AKI.

  4. Hypothyroidism and acute kidney injury: an unusual association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Precil Diego Miranda de Menezes; Bridi, Ramaiane Aparecida; Balbi, André Luis; Ponce, Daniela

    2013-08-09

    Association between severe hypothyroidism and acute kidney injury (AKI) is rare. A 40-year-old woman presented with 15 days history of generalised muscle pain, weakness, weight gain and oedema. hypertension and hypothyroidism. dry skin, peripheral/periorbital oedema, slow thought and speaking, thyroid increased. Laboratory examinations: high levels of creatine kinase , creatinine, uric acid and lactate dehydrogenase. Free T4 was very low (hypothyroidism-induced rhabdomyolysis. Intravenous fluids were started, urinary alkalisation and increased l-thyroxine dose replacement. On the day after admission, forced diuresis with furosemide was introduced leading to a progressive improvement of symptoms. Although hypothyroidism and AKI is unusual, it should be suspected in patients presenting decrease of renal function and high creatine kinase in the absence of other causes of rhabdomyolysis.

  5. Biomarkers of acute lung injury: worth their salt?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Proudfoot Alastair G

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The validation of biomarkers has become a key goal of translational biomedical research. The purpose of this article is to discuss the role of biomarkers in the management of acute lung injury (ALI and related research. Biomarkers should be sensitive and specific indicators of clinically important processes and should change in a relevant timeframe to affect recruitment to trials or clinical management. We do not believe that they necessarily need to reflect pathogenic processes. We critically examined current strategies used to identify biomarkers and which, owing to expedience, have been dominated by reanalysis of blood derived markers from large multicenter Phase 3 studies. Combining new and existing validated biomarkers with physiological and other data may add predictive power and facilitate the development of important aids to research and therapy.

  6. [Star fruit as a cause of acute kidney injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaranello, Karilla Lany; Alvares, Valeria Regina de Cristo; Carneiro, Daniely Maria Queiroz; Barros, Flávio Henrique Soares; Gentil, Thais Marques Sanches; Thomaz, Myriam José; Pereira, Benedito Jorge; Pereira, Mariana Batista; Leme, Graziella Malzoni; Diz, Mary Carla Esteves; Laranja, Sandra Maria Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    The star fruit belongs to the family Oxalidacea, species Averrhoa carambola. It is rich in minerals, vitamin A, C, B complex vitamins and oxalic acid. Recent studies show that the toxicity of the fruit differs between the patients and may be explained by single biological responses, age, and the intake quantity of the neurotoxin in each fruit in addition to glomerular filtration rate given by each patient. Additionally, the nephrotoxicity caused by the fruit is dose-dependent and may lead to the deposition of crystals of calcium oxalate intratubular, as well as by direct injury to the renal tubular epithelium, leading to apoptosis of the same. We report the case of a patient who after ingestion of the juice and fresh fruit, developed acute renal failure requiring dialysis, evolving with favourable outcome and recovery of renal function.

  7. Self-esteem and coping responses of athletes with acute versus chronic injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasley, D; Lox, C L

    1998-06-01

    Self-esteem and coping strategies have been important factors in athletes' response to injury and subsequent rehabilitation. Specifically, athletic injury has been negatively associated with self-esteem, while certain coping strategies may enhance adherence to rehabilitation (1, 4). Little is known, however, concerning the effect of acute (sudden specific event) versus chronic injury (repetitive injury over a prolonged period of time) on self-esteem and coping strategies. The Rosenberg Self-esteem Inventory (3), selected subscales of the Ways of Coping Questionnaire (2), and a demographic questionnaire were administered. The subscales of Ways of Coping Questionnaire employed were Seeking Social Support, Accepting Responsibility for the injury, and Escape Avoidance of the injury. To assess the influence of acute versus chronic injury status, effect sizes (ES) were calculated. Although no difference was found for Accepting Responsibility, chronically injured athletes scored higher on Escape/Avoidance (M = 2.4 vs 1.9, SD = 1.2 vs .6, ES = .52) and lower on Seeking Social Support (M = 2.5 vs 2.8, SD = .6 vs .4, ES = .47) than athletes with acute injuries. Those with chronic injuries also second more negatively on self-esteem (M = 6.2 vs 4.4, SD = 1.2 vs 1.2, ES = 1.30) than acutely injured athletes. These preliminary results suggest the type of injury may differentially affect self-esteem and coping behavior. As self-esteem is theorized to be relatively stable construct, it is perhaps not surprising that chronic injuries have a greater effect than acute injuries. Chronically injured athletes also sought social support less and engaged in more escape/avoidance behavior, suggesting that they cope with injury differently than those with acute injuries.

  8. Acute kidney injury associated with ingestion of star fruit: Acute oxalate nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, A K; Goel, R; Sharma, M; Mahanta, P J

    2016-01-01

    Starfruit ( Averrhoa carambola ) and its juice are popular in the Indian subcontinent as an indigenous medicine. Oxalate concentration in this fruit and it's freshly prepared juice is very high. We present a report of patients presenting with acute kidney injury due to oxalate nephropathy admitted in a single center. All patients had history of ingesting star fruit. Patients became symptomatic after 10-12 h of eating and main symptoms were pain abdomen and decrease in urine output. Three patients needed hemodialysis. All improved with complete renal recovery. Taking star fruit in large amount on an empty stomach and in a dehydrated state is a risk factor for nephrotoxicity.

  9. Molecular Mechanisms of Curcumin Renoprotection in Experimental Acute Renal Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youling Fan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available As a highly perfused organ, the kidney is especially sensitive to ischemia and reperfusion. Ischemia-reperfusion (IR-induced acute kidney injury (AKI has a high incidence during the perioperative period in the clinic and is an important link in ischemic acute renal failure (IARF. Therefore, IR-induced AKI has important clinical significance and it is necessary to explore to develop drugs to prevent and alleviate IR-induced AKI. Curcumin [diferuloylmethane, 1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxiphenyl-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione] is a polyphenol compound derived from Curcuma longa (turmeric and was shown to have a renoprotective effect on ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI in a previous study. However, the specific mechanisms underlying the protective role of curcumin in IR-induced AKI are not completely understood. APPL1 is a protein coding gene that has been shown to be involved in the crosstalk between the adiponectin-signaling and insulin-signaling pathways. In the study, to investigate the molecular mechanisms of curcumin effects in kidney ischemia/reperfusion model, we observed the effect of curcumin in experimental models of IR-induced AKI and we found that curcumin treatment significantly increased the expression of APPL1 and inhibited the activation of Akt after IR treatment in the kidney. Our in vitro results showed that apoptosis of renal tubular epithelial cells was exacerbated with hypoxia-reoxygenation (HR treatment compared to sham control cells. Curcumin significantly decreased the rate of apoptosis in renal tubular epithelial cells with HR treatment. Moreover, knockdown of APPL1 activated Akt and subsequently aggravated apoptosis in HR-treated renal tubular epithelial cells. Conversely, inhibition of Akt directly reversed the effects of APPL1 knockdown. In summary, our study demonstrated that curcumin mediated upregulation of APPL1 protects against ischemia reperfusion induced AKI by inhibiting Akt phosphorylation.

  10. Study of collagen metabolism after β radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yinghui; Xulan; Wu Shiliang; Zhang Xueguang; Chen Liesong

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the change of collagen metabolism and it's regulation after β radiation. Method: The animal model of β radiation injury was established by the β radiation produced by the linear accelerator; and irradiated NIH 3T3 cells were studied. In the experiment the contents of total collagen, collagen type I and type III were measured. The activity of MMPs-1 was tested. The contents of TGF-β 1 , IL-6 were also detected. Results: After exposure to β radiation, little change was found in the content of total collagen, but the content of collagen I decreased and the content of collagen III, MMPs-1 activity increased; the expression of TGF-β 1 , IL-6 increased. Conclusion: The changes in the metabolism of collagen play an important role in the irradiated injury of the skin; TGF-β 1 and IL-6 may be essential in the regulation of the collagen metabolism

  11. Acute kidney injury in children – not just for the nephrologist

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    REVIEW. Introduction. The phrase “acute renal failure” has given way to the term “acute ... The staging of AKI is based on the estimated glomerular filtration rate and urine output. AKI from any .... a non-specific predictor of AKI in critically ill children with septic .... KDIGO clinical practice guidelines for acute kidney injury.

  12. 植物凝集素PHA-L对小鼠急性辐射防护作用%Protective effects of the plant lectin PHA-L on acute radiation injuries in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张广慧; 吴红英; 靳瑾; 周则卫; 刘培勋; 龙伟

    2016-01-01

    The aim is to observe the protective effects of plant lectin PHA-L against radiation injuries and the relative mechanism. 30 d survival experiment was used to observe the survival condition of mice 30 d after irradiation with 7.2 Gy γ-rays. Blood and immunological experiments of mice were carried out to observe WBC (White blood cell), femoral nucleated cells, bone marrow DNA content and organs index after irradiation with 7.2 Gy γ-rays. Intestine pathological section of mice irradiated on abdomen with 9.0 Gy γ-rays was prepared to observe the pathology of intestine. The results showed that compared with the irradiation group, the survival rate of mice treated with PHA-L increased, especially for the high dose group (60% lifted); compared with the irradiation group, white blood cell count, bone marrow DNA content and spleen nodules of mice administered with high dose group increased from 0.74±0.16, 1.02±0.17 and 9.80±6.46 to 1.18±0.40, 1.22±0.17 and 18.10±6.87 respectively, which were statistically significant (p<0.05). Moreover, PHA-L also had some protective effect on the organ. In pathology observation, the intestines of mice treated with PHA-L recovered significantly as well. Therefore, plant lectin PHA-L can protect mice from radiation injuries, yet the mechanism needs further study.%观察植物凝集素PHA-L对小鼠急性辐射损伤的保护作用及相关机制.采用动物30 d存活率实验,即小鼠全身辐照至吸收剂量为7.2 Gy后观察其存活情况;利用外周血和免疫学实验,小鼠全身照射至吸收剂量为7.2 Gy后测外周血白细胞数(White blood cell,WBC)、股骨有核细胞数(The number of nucleated cells in bone marrow,BMNC)、骨髓DNA含量以及各脏器指数;对小鼠进行9.0 Gy腹部照射,取小肠组织做病理切片观察.结果显示,照射给药组小鼠30 d存活率比单纯照射组均有提高,特别是高剂量组提高约60%;与单纯照射组相比,照射给药高剂量组的白细胞数、骨

  13. Diagnosis of acute radiation disease by Enzyme Immune-Assay (EIA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, D.; Maliev, V.; Jones, J.; Gonta, S.; Prasad, K.; Rachal, C.

    2006-01-01

    Diagnosis of the acute radiation disease by the method of immune enzyme assay is a simple and efficient tool of evaluating and biological dosimetry and forecasting of development of the acute radiation defeats as at group of population so at individuals locating in the zone polluted by the radiation. We use as biological markers the group of essential radiotoxins - high molecular mass glycoprotein ( molecular mass - 200 - 250 kDa ) - radiation antigens (S.D.R. - specific radiation determinant ) accumulated in the lymphoid system, with epitopes specific to each form of radiation syndrome, after animals have been irradiated in doses inducing the development of the cerebral (1), toxic ( 2), gastrointestinal ( 3 ) and typical ( 4 ) forms of acute radiation sickness. These two phenomena allowed us to develop a technologies for diagnosis, prophylaxis and therapy of radiation disease - enzyme immune assay ( EIA ), anti radiation vaccine, anti radiation serum, method of immune - lymph - plasma-sorption. The important first step in effectiveness of therapy is an accurate assessment of severity of disease in early period after irradiation. The ideal markers for early and accurate assessment is high weight glycoprotein with specifics radiation induced features (S.D.R.) mentioned above. This biology active substance isolated from lymph can induct the symptoms of radiation syndrome without previously radiation when it is administrated intra-muscularly or intravenously to healthy animals. Enzyme immune assay (EIA) allowed researchers to indicate the significant levels of different forms of S.D.R. in peripheral blood of animals in first 24 hours after radiation. Indication of high level of S.D.R. -1 allowed to forecast a fast development of cerebral form of acute radiation disease. Determination of high levels of S.D.R.-2, S.D.R.-3 and S.D.R.-4 in peripheral blood allowed to recognize early periods of toxic, gastrointestinal and typical forms of acute radiation sickness

  14. Diagnosis of acute radiation disease by Enzyme Immune-Assay (EIA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popov, D.; Maliev, V. [Russian Academy of Science, Vladicaukas (Russian Federation); Jones, J.; Gonta, S. [NASA -Johnson Spa ce Center, Houston (United States); Prasad, K. [Antioxidant Research Institute, Premier Micrinutrient corporation, Novato (United States); Rachal, C. [Univercity Space Research Assotiation, Colorado (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Diagnosis of the acute radiation disease by the method of immune enzyme assay is a simple and efficient tool of evaluating and biological dosimetry and forecasting of development of the acute radiation defeats as at group of population so at individuals locating in the zone polluted by the radiation. We use as biological markers the group of essential radiotoxins - high molecular mass glycoprotein ( molecular mass - 200 - 250 kDa ) - radiation antigens (S.D.R. - specific radiation determinant ) accumulated in the lymphoid system, with epitopes specific to each form of radiation syndrome, after animals have been irradiated in doses inducing the development of the cerebral (1), toxic ( 2), gastrointestinal ( 3 ) and typical ( 4 ) forms of acute radiation sickness. These two phenomena allowed us to develop a technologies for diagnosis, prophylaxis and therapy of radiation disease - enzyme immune assay ( EIA ), anti radiation vaccine, anti radiation serum, method of immune - lymph - plasma-sorption. The important first step in effectiveness of therapy is an accurate assessment of severity of disease in early period after irradiation. The ideal markers for early and accurate assessment is high weight glycoprotein with specifics radiation induced features (S.D.R.) mentioned above. This biology active substance isolated from lymph can induct the symptoms of radiation syndrome without previously radiation when it is administrated intra-muscularly or intravenously to healthy animals. Enzyme immune assay (EIA) allowed researchers to indicate the significant levels of different forms of S.D.R. in peripheral blood of animals in first 24 hours after radiation. Indication of high level of S.D.R. -1 allowed to forecast a fast development of cerebral form of acute radiation disease. Determination of high levels of S.D.R.-2, S.D.R.-3 and S.D.R.-4 in peripheral blood allowed to recognize early periods of toxic, gastrointestinal and typical forms of acute radiation sickness

  15. Possibilities for prognostication of radiation injury in rats by leucocyte nucleic acid levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minkova, M.; Pantev, T.

    1988-01-01

    The possibilities to prognosticate acute radiation injury by the changes in the amount of nucleic acids in the leucocytes was studied. Experiments were carried out on male Wistar albino rats, gamma-irradiated with nonlethal and sublethal doses of 0.5, 2 and 4 Gy and lethal dose of 8 Gy (LD 90/30 ). The nucleic acid content and the total leucocyte count were determined at definite intervals on days 1-30. The changes in the nucleic acids in nonlethally and sublethally irradiated animals had phase nature, with a clear-cut abortive increase in their amount on days 7-10. In lethally irradiated animals the phase character of the changes was lost and the abortive peak disappeared. By reducing the effectiveness of the lethal radiation dose survival of the population increased from 10-75% through physical and from 10-70% - through chemical protection. The nucleic acid dynamics showed features typical for an injury with possible survival - appearance of abortive peak and resumption of their normal values. It is assumed that determination of leucocyte nucleic acid content may be used for early prognostication of radiation injury, as it allows keen differentiation of the lethal from nonlethal outcome of radiation sickness. The absence of abortive peak (over 50%) by day 14 post-irradiation is a poor prognostic sign

  16. Effect of gene time on acute radiation mucositis and dermatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Suyan; Gao Li; Yin Weibo; Xu Guozhen; Xiao Guangli

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of recombinant human epidermal growth factor (Gene Time) on acute mucositis and dermatitis induced by radiation. Methods: 120 head and neck cancer patients were randomized into 3 groups: 1. Mucositis prophylactic application (MPA) group with control, 2. Mucositis therapeutic application (MTA) group with control and 3. Dermatitis therapeutic application (DTA) group with control. Prophylactic application of drug consisted of spraying the Gene Time preparation on the irradiated skin or mucous membrane as radiotherapy was being carried out. This was compared with control patients who received routine conventional skin care. Therapeutic application was started as grade I radiation mucositis or dermatitis appeared. The evaluation of acute radiation mucositis and dermatitis was done according to the systems proposed by RTOG or EORTC. Results: The results showed that in the MPA group, the rate of radiation mucositis at ≤10 Gy was 20% (4/20) as compared to the 70% (14/20) of the control (P = 0.004). During the course of radiation, the incidences of grade III, IV acute radiation mucositis and dermatitis were always lower than the control. In therapeutic application of Gene Time, the response rate of acute radiation mucositis was also better than the control (90% vs 50%) (P = 0.016) and that of acute dermatitis was similar (95% vs 50%) (P = 0.005). Moreover, the ≤3 d rate of healing of grade III dermatitis in the application group was 3/7 as compared to the 0/14 of the control. Conclusion: Prophylactic application of recombinant human epidermal growth factor is able to postpone the development of radiation mucositis. This preparation is also able to lower the incidence of grade III, IV mucositis and dermatitis both by therapeutic and prophylactic application in addition to the hastened healing of grade III dermatitis

  17. Risk Predictors for Postcontrast Acute Kidney Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Trudy Millard; Ukhanova, Maria; Lee Revere, Frances; Finkel, Kevin W

    2018-05-22

    To evaluate risk predictors of acute kidney injury (AKI) after contrast-media procedures in a broader cohort of patients than previously reported. Comprehensive medical and pharmacy commercial claims data from 2012 to 2014. Claims associated with contrast-media procedures for 2,737,020 persons between January 1, 2012 and November 30, 2014, were reviewed. The overall incidence of AKI after a contrast-media procedure was 0.85%. AKI occurred in 26% of cases that had two or more contrast procedures within 30 days, compared with 9% of non-AKI cases. Although the incidence of postcontrast AKI was low, 10% of patients who developed AKI had a recent previous episode of AKI. In cases when AKI had occurred within 180 days of contrast administration, the odds of subsequent kidney injury was 9.39. Overall, there is a low risk (0.85%) of developing an AKI after a procedure with contrast-media consistent with several recent studies. However, in adults with a recent history of AKI, physicians must consider this history as a risk factor for subsequent AKI. Copyright © 2018 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Imaging of acute cervical spine injuries: review and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tins, B.J.; Cassar-Pullicino, V.N.

    2004-01-01

    Advances in imaging technology have been successfully applied in the emergency trauma setting with great benefit providing early, accurate and efficient diagnoses. Gaps in the knowledge of imaging acute spinal injury remain, despite a vast wealth of useful research and publications on the role of CT and MRI. This article reviews in a balanced manner the main questions that still face the attending radiologist by embracing the current and evolving concepts to help define and provide answers to the following; Imaging techniques - strengths and weaknesses; what are the implications of a missed cervical spine injury?; who should be imaged?; how should they be imaged?; spinal immobilisation - help or hazard?; residual open questions; what does all this mean?; and what are the implications for the radiologist? Although there are many helpful guidelines, the residual gaps in the knowledge base result in incomplete answers to the questions posed. The identification of these gaps in knowledge however should act as the initiating stimulus for further research. All too often there is a danger that the performance and productivity of the imaging modalities is the main research focus and not enough attention is given to the two fundamental prerequisites to the assessment of any imaging technology - the clinical selection criteria for imaging and the level of expertise of the appropriate clinician interpreting the images

  19. Early urinary biomarkers of acute kidney injury in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Mina; Brophy, Patrick D; Giannone, Peter J; Joshi, Mandar S; Bauer, John A; RamachandraRao, Satish

    2016-08-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) in the neonatal intensive care setting is multifactorial and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. This study evaluates the utility of novel urinary biomarkers to predict the development and/or severity AKI in preterm infants. We performed a case-control study on a prospective cohort of preterm infants (<32 wk), to compare seven urine biomarkers between 25 infants with AKI and 20 infants without AKI. Infants with AKI had significantly higher neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) (median, control (CTRL) vs. AKI; 0.598 vs. 4.24 µg/ml; P < 0.0001). In contrast, urinary epidermal growth factor (EGF) levels were significantly lower in infants who developed AKI compared to controls (median, CTRL vs. AKI; 0.016 vs. 0.006 µg/ml; P < 0.001). The area under the curve (AUC) for NGAL for prediction of stage I AKI on the day prior to AKI diagnosis (day-1) was 0.91, and for the prediction of stage II/III, AKI was 0.92. Similarly, urine EGF was a predictor of renal injury on day -1 (AUC: 0.97 for stage I and 0.86 for stage II/III AKI). Urinary biomarkers may be useful to predict AKI development prior to changes in serum creatinine (SCr) in preterm infants.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute joint injuries of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, R.; Ragozzino, A.; Romano, L.; Del Vecchio, E.; Accarino, B.; Barile, V.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging was employed to evaluate muscoloskeletal pathoanathomy, and proved to be extremely useful in characterizing knee pathology. Between October 1986 and Novembre 1987, 24 patients with suspected traumatic ligament injuries were examined with high resolution MR imaging in the RMRC diagnostic center, Naples, with a 0.5T superconducting magnet ( 5000 Magniscan CGR) using a surface coil and a 500/28 (repetition time: TR: ms/echo time: TE-ms), 1200-1600/35-105 spin-echo pulse sequence. Nineteen patients with positive MR imaging exams underwent diagnostic and/or therapeutic arthroscopy. Arthroscopy confirmed MR diagnosis in the whole of cases. In 6 patients with negative MR findings no arthroscopy followed and the patients' successful outcome confirmed the accuracy of MR negative predictive value. Such results prove MR imaging to have a high diagnostic accuracy in the evaluation of acute joint injuries of the knee.Moreover, MR imaging-an uninvasive screening technique-appears to have high potentials for the evaluation of those cases where diagnostic arthroscopy is not required

  1. Acute Kidney Injury: Epidemiology, Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Briosa Neves

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common problem highly associated with hospitalisation. AKI is the cause of harmful short-term consequences: longer hospital stays, greater disability after discharge, and greater risk of in-hospital mortality, as well as adverse long-term outcomes, such as progression to chronic kidney disease, development of cardiovascular disease, and increased risk of long-term mortality. The concept of AKI has changed since the introduction of the ‘Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function, End-stage kidney disease’ (RIFLE classification. More recently, the ‘Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes’ (KDIGO classification appears to have provided increased diagnostic sensitivity and outcome-prediction capability. Novel biomarkers and further research on the role of the immune system in AKI may help improve the diagnosis, severity, outcome evaluation, and treatment of the condition. In this review we describe the epidemiology, diagnosis, and prognosis of AKI, as well as possible future directions for its clinical management.

  2. Imaging of acute cervical spine injuries: review and outlook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tins, B.J. [Department of Radiology, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry (United Kingdom); Cassar-Pullicino, V.N. [Department of Radiology, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: Victor.Pullicino@rjah.nhs.uk

    2004-10-01

    Advances in imaging technology have been successfully applied in the emergency trauma setting with great benefit providing early, accurate and efficient diagnoses. Gaps in the knowledge of imaging acute spinal injury remain, despite a vast wealth of useful research and publications on the role of CT and MRI. This article reviews in a balanced manner the main questions that still face the attending radiologist by embracing the current and evolving concepts to help define and provide answers to the following; Imaging techniques - strengths and weaknesses; what are the implications of a missed cervical spine injury?; who should be imaged?; how should they be imaged?; spinal immobilisation - help or hazard?; residual open questions; what does all this mean?; and what are the implications for the radiologist? Although there are many helpful guidelines, the residual gaps in the knowledge base result in incomplete answers to the questions posed. The identification of these gaps in knowledge however should act as the initiating stimulus for further research. All too often there is a danger that the performance and productivity of the imaging modalities is the main research focus and not enough attention is given to the two fundamental prerequisites to the assessment of any imaging technology - the clinical selection criteria for imaging and the level of expertise of the appropriate clinician interpreting the images.

  3. Acute kidney injury in septua- and octogenarians after cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid Christof

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increasing number of septua- and octogenarians undergo cardiac surgery. Acute kidney injury (AKI still is a frequent complication after surgery. We examined the incidence of AKI and its impact on 30-day mortality. Methods A retrospective study between 01/2006 and 08/2009 with 299 octogenarians, who were matched for gender and surgical procedure to 299 septuagenarians at a university hospital. Primary endpoint was AKI after surgery as proposed by the RIFLE definition (Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, End-stage kidney disease. Secondary endpoint was 30-day mortality. Perioperative mortality was predicted with the logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE. Results Octogenarians significantly had a mean higher logistic EuroSCORE compared to septuagenarians (13.2% versus 8.5%; p -1 × 1.73 m-2. In contrast, septuagenarians showed a slightly higher median body mass index (28 kg × m-2 versus 26 kg × m-2 and were more frequently active smoker at time of surgery (6.4% versus 1.6%, p The RIFLE classification provided accurate risk assessment for 30-day mortality and fair discriminatory power. Conclusions The RIFLE criteria allow identifying patients with AKI after cardiac surgery. The high incidence of AKI in septua- and octogenarians after cardiac surgery should prompt the use of RIFLE criteria to identify patients at risk and should stimulate institutional measures that target AKI as a quality improvement initiative for patients at advanced age.

  4. Biomarkers of acute kidney injury in neonatal encephalopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweetman, D U

    2013-03-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication of neonatal encephalopathy (NE). The accurate diagnosis of neonatal AKI, irrespective of the cause, relies on suboptimal methods such as identification of rising serum creatinine, decreased urinary output and glomerular filtration rate. Studies of AKI biomarkers in adults and children have shown that biomarkers can improve the early diagnosis of AKI. Hypoxia-ischaemia is the proposed aetiological basis of AKI in both NE and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). However, there is a paucity of studies examining the role of AKI biomarkers specifically in NE. Urinary cystatin C (CysC), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), interleukin-18, kidney injury molecule-1, liver-type fatty acid-binding protein, serum CysC and serum NGAL all show good ability to predict early AKI in a heterogeneous critically ill neonatal population including infants post-CPB. Moreover, serum and urinary NGAL and urinary CysC are early predictors of AKI secondary to NE. These findings are promising and open up the possibility of biomarkers playing a significant role in the early diagnosis and treatment of NE-related AKI. There is an urgent need to explore the role of AKI biomarkers in infants with NE as establishing the diagnosis of AKI earlier may allow more timely intervention with potential for improving long-term outcome.

  5. Postconditioning attenuates acute intestinal ischemia–reperfusion injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilker Sengul

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that postconditioning (POC would reduce the detrimental effects of the acute intestinal ischemia–reperfusion (I/R compared to those of the abrupt onset of reperfusion. POC has a protective effect on intestinal I/R injury by inhibiting events in the early minutes of reperfusion in rats. Twenty-four Wistar–Albino rats were subjected to the occlusion of superior mesenteric artery for 30 minutes, then reperfused for 120 minutes, and randomized to the four different modalities of POC: (1 control (no intervention; (2 POC-3 (three cycles of 10 seconds of reperfusion–reocclusion, 1 minute total intervention; (3 POC-6 (six cycles of 10 seconds of reperfusion–reocclusion, 2 minutes total intervention; and (4 sham operation (laparotomy only. The arterial blood samples [0.3 mL total creatine kinase (CK and 0.6 mL malondialdehyde (MDA] and the intestinal mucosal MDA were collected from each after reperfusion. POC, especially POC-6, was effective in attenuating postischemic pathology by decreasing the intestinal tissue MDA levels, serum total CK activity, inflammation, and total histopathological injury scores. POC exerted a protective effect on the intestinal mucosa by reducing the mesenteric oxidant generation, lipid peroxidation, and neutrophil accumulation. The six-cycle algorithm demonstrated the best protection.

  6. Venous thromboembolism in acute spinal cord injury patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saraf Shyam

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The western literature on deep vein thrombosis (DVT and pulmonary embolism (PE following spinal cord injury (SCI report an alarmingly high incidence, necessitating thromboprophylaxis. The literature on incidence from the Asian subcontinent is scanty and from India is almost nonexistent. Materials and Methods : Seventy hospitalized acute SCI patients presenting within five days of the injury were included in the present analysis. Forty-two cases were subjected to color Doppler studies and 28 cases had to be subjected to venography due to lack of facility at some point of time. The clinical course of the patients was closely observed during the period of hospitalization. All except 14 were managed nonoperatively. Thromboprophylaxis was not given to any patient at any stage; however, treatment was instituted in those showing the features of DVT on investigations. Results : Twelve patients died during the period of hospitalization. Deep vein thrombosis could be detected in seven patients only, three in the proximal and four in the distal segment of the lower limb and of these three died. Based on the clinical course and positive investigation report in favor of DVT, we presumed that the cause of death in these three patients was pulmonary embolism. In the other nine, in the absence of an autopsy report, the cause of deaths was considered as pulmonary infection, asphyxia, diaphragmatic paralysis, hematemesis, cervicomedullary paralysis etc. Clinical features to diagnose DVT were of little help. Conclusions : There is a much lower incidence (10% of DVT and PE following spinal cord injury (SCI in India than what is reported from the western countries. Higher age group and quadriplegia were the only factors which could be correlated. Deep vein thrombosis extending proximal to the knee was significant. In the absence of autopsy and other screening tests like D-dimer test or 125I fibrogen uptake study, the true incidence of venous

  7. Acute kidney injury in liver cirrhosis: new definition and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Wong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The traditional diagnostic criteria of renal dysfunction in cirrhosis are a 50% increase in serum creatinine (SCr with a final value above 1.5 mg/dL. This means that patients with milder degrees of renal dysfunction are not being diagnosed, and therefore not offered timely treatment. The International Ascites Club in 2015 adapted the term acute kidney injury (AKI to represent acute renal dysfunction in cirrhosis, and defined it by an increase in SCr of 0.3 mg/dL (26.4 µmoL/L in <48 hours, or a 50% increase in SCr from a baseline within ≤3 months. The severity of AKI is described by stages, with stage 1 represented by these minimal changes, while stages 2 and 3 AKI by 2-fold and 3-fold increases in SCr respectively. Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS, renamed AKI-HRS, is defined by stage 2 or 3 AKI that fulfils all other diagnostic criteria of HRS. Various studies in the past few years have indicated that these new diagnostic criteria are valid in the prediction of prognosis for patients with cirrhosis and AKI. The future in AKI diagnosis may include further refinements such as inclusion of biomarkers that can identify susceptibility for AKI, differentiating the various prototypes of AKI, or track its progression.

  8. Autophagy, Innate Immunity and Tissue Repair in Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu Duann

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Kidney is a vital organ with high energy demands to actively maintain plasma hemodynamics, electrolytes and water homeostasis. Among the nephron segments, the renal tubular epithelium is endowed with high mitochondria density for their function in active transport. Acute kidney injury (AKI is an important clinical syndrome and a global public health issue with high mortality rate and socioeconomic burden due to lack of effective therapy. AKI results in acute cell death and necrosis of renal tubule epithelial cells accompanied with leakage of tubular fluid and inflammation. The inflammatory immune response triggered by the tubular cell death, mitochondrial damage, associative oxidative stress, and the release of many tissue damage factors have been identified as key elements driving the pathophysiology of AKI. Autophagy, the cellular mechanism that removes damaged organelles via lysosome-mediated degradation, had been proposed to be renoprotective. An in-depth understanding of the intricate interplay between autophagy and innate immune response, and their roles in AKI pathology could lead to novel therapies in AKI. This review addresses the current pathophysiology of AKI in aspects of mitochondrial dysfunction, innate immunity, and molecular mechanisms of autophagy. Recent advances in renal tissue regeneration and potential therapeutic interventions are also discussed.

  9. Risk Factors for Acute Kidney Injury in Severe Rhabdomyolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Eva; Soler, María J.; Rap, Oana; Barrios, Clara; Orfila, María A.; Pascual, Julio

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a life-threatening complication of severe rhabdomyolysis. This study was conducted to assess risk factors for AKI and to develop a risk score for early prediction. Methods Retrospective observational cohort study with a 9-year follow-up, carried out in an acute-care teaching-affiliated hospital. A total of 126 patients with severe rhabdomyolysis defined as serum creatine kinase (CK) > 5,000 IU/L fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Univariate and logistic regression analyses were performed to determine risk factors for AKI. Based on the values obtained for each variable, a risk score and prognostic probabilities were estimated to establish the risk for developing AKI. Results The incidence of AKI was 58%. Death during hospitalization was significantly higher among patients with AKI, compared to patients without AKI (19.2% vs 3.6%, p = 0.008). The following variables were independently associated with AKI: peak CK (odds ratio [OR] 4.9, 95%CI 1.4-16.8), hypoalbuminemia (rhabdomyolysis may be useful in clinical practice, particularly to implement early preventive measures. PMID:24367578

  10. Acute Kidney Injury and Atypical Features during Pediatric Poststreptococcal Glomerulonephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose M. Ayoob

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common acute glomerulonephritis in children is poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (PSGN usually occurring between 3 and 12 years old. Hypertension and gross hematuria are common presenting symptoms. Most PSGN patients do not experience complications, but rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and hypertensive encephalopathy have been reported. This paper reports 17 patients seen in 1 year for PSGN including 4 with atypical PSGN, at a pediatric tertiary care center. Seventeen children (11 males, mean age of 8 years, were analyzed. Ninety-four percent had elevated serum BUN levels and decreased GFR. Four of the hospitalized patients had complex presentations that included AKI along with positive ANA or ANCAs. Three patients required renal replacement therapy and two were thrombocytopenic. PSGN usually does not occur as a severe nephritis. Over the 12-month study period, 17 cases associated with low serum albumin in 53%, acute kidney injury in 94%, and thrombocytopenia in 18% were treated. The presentation of PSGN may be severe and in a small subset have associations similar to SLE nephritis findings including AKI, positive ANA, and hematological anomalies.

  11. VEGF Promotes Malaria-Associated Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carapau, Daniel; Pena, Ana C.; Ataíde, Ricardo; Monteiro, Carla A. A.; Félix, Nuno; Costa-Silva, Artur; Marinho, Claudio R. F.; Dias, Sérgio; Mota, Maria M.

    2010-01-01

    The spectrum of the clinical presentation and severity of malaria infections is broad, ranging from uncomplicated febrile illness to severe forms of disease such as cerebral malaria (CM), acute lung injury (ALI), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) or severe anemia (SA). Rodent models that mimic human CM, PAM and SA syndromes have been established. Here, we show that DBA/2 mice infected with P. berghei ANKA constitute a new model for malaria-associated ALI. Up to 60% of the mice showed dyspnea, airway obstruction and hypoxemia and died between days 7 and 12 post-infection. The most common pathological findings were pleural effusion, pulmonary hemorrhage and edema, consistent with increased lung vessel permeability, while the blood-brain barrier was intact. Malaria-associated ALI correlated with high levels of circulating VEGF, produced de novo in the spleen, and its blockage led to protection of mice from this syndrome. In addition, either splenectomization or administration of the anti-inflammatory molecule carbon monoxide led to a significant reduction in the levels of sera VEGF and to protection from ALI. The similarities between the physiopathological lesions described here and the ones occurring in humans, as well as the demonstration that VEGF is a critical host factor in the onset of malaria-associated ALI in mice, not only offers important mechanistic insights into the processes underlying the pathology related with malaria but may also pave the way for interventional studies. PMID:20502682

  12. Sucralfate does not ameliorate acute radiation proctitis: randomised study and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovdenak, N; Sørbye, H; Dahl, O

    2005-09-01

    During pelvic radiotherapy, many patients develop radiation-induced gastrointestinal symptoms, which may interfere with treatment. Prophylaxis during radiotherapy should ideally prevent acute reaction and the development of delayed injury. Sucralfate, an aluminium sucrose octasulphate, has been used for acute and delayed radiation side-effects. However, conflicting results have been published. We report here a prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled study of prophylactic sucralfate during pelvic radiotherapy. In addition, a meta-analysis of available data from the literature has been carried out. Fifty-one patients with localised pelvic tumours scheduled for curative conformal pelvic radiotherapy (total dose 64-70 Gy over 6.5-7 weeks in 2 Gy daily fractions) were included. Peroral sucralfate 2 g three times daily, or identically appearing placebo tablets, was given during the course of radiotherapy. Symptom registration, endoscopy and biopsies were carried out immediately before radiotherapy, 2 weeks and 6 weeks into the treatment course, and 2 weeks after completing radiotherapy. Mucosal cup forceps biopsies were obtained through a rigid proctoscope. Graded endoscopic appearance and quantitative histology were registered. On the basis of previously published negative reports, an unplanned interim analysis of 44 evaluable patients showed significantly increased diarrhoea in the sucralfate group and the trial was stopped. No difference was seen in other symptoms, endoscopic appearance or histology. A meta-analysis comprising five published studies showed no statistically significant beneficial effect of sucralfate on acute symptoms. Sucralfate cannot be recommended for prophylaxis of acute radiation proctopathy and may even worsen the symptoms.

  13. Radiation injury in the digestive system after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horie, Yoshiaki; Mishima, Yoshio; Hara, Kosuke; Tomiyama, Jiro; Nakano, Haruo

    1975-01-01

    This paper described the investigation of 18 patients with injury in the digestive system who received surgical procedure after radiotherapy of cancer for the past ten years. The patients consisted of 6 males and 12 females with the age ranging 21 to 66 years old. Primary diseases were 9 cancers of the cervix of the uterus, seminoma and cancer of the ovary, the rectum and the other regions. Radiotherapy was applicable to each of the diseases, and more than 3,000 rads of irradiation given for over a month. Symptoms developed 3 months to 4 and a half years after irradiation and the mean period was about a year except one patient in whom cancer of the colon occurred after 13 years. Operation was performed about several months after the onset of disease in the average. Of 18 patients who received operation, cancer was suspected at preoperative diagnosis in all of 3 patients in whom gastric lesion was resected, 3 of 4 in whom the colon was resected, 1 with small intestine lesion and 1 of 4 with rectum lesion. It was characteristic of these lesions that recurrence of cancer was preoperatively suspected in most of the patients. In the patient with rectum lesion, steroids suppository was given postoperatively. In addition, historical background of radiation injury, difference in period of the occurrence of radiation injury, local injury in delayed period, predisposing cause, classification, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of radiation injury were also mentioned. (Kanao, N.)

  14. Radiation injury in the digestive system after radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horie, Y; Mishima, Y; Hara, K; Tomiyama, J; Nakano, H [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1975-03-01

    This paper described the investigation of 18 patients with injury in the digestive system who received surgical procedure after radiotherapy of cancer for the past ten years. The patients consisted of 6 males and 12 females with the age ranging 21 to 66 years old. Primary diseases were 9 cancers of the cervix of the uterus, seminoma and cancer of the ovary, the rectum and the other regions. Radiotherapy was applicable to each of the diseases, and more than 3,000 rads of irradiation given for over a month. Symptoms developed 3 months to 4 and a half years after irradiation and the mean period was about a year except one patient in whom cancer of the colon occurred after 13 years. Operation was performed about several months after the onset of disease in the average. Of 18 patients who received operation, cancer was suspected at preoperative diagnosis in all of 3 patients in whom gastric lesion was resected, 3 of 4 in whom the colon was resected, 1 with small intestine lesion and 1 of 4 with rectum lesion. It was characteristic of these lesions that recurrence of cancer was preoperatively suspected in most of the patients. In the patient with rectum lesion, steroids suppository was given postoperatively. In addition, historical background of radiation injury, difference in period of the occurrence of radiation injury, local injury in delayed period, predisposing cause, classification, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of radiation injury were also mentioned.

  15. Acute injury of the ankle joint; Akutes Trauma des Sprunggelenks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breitenseher, M.J. [Univ. Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Abt. fuer Osteologie und Besondere Klinische Einrichtung Magnet Resonanz, AKH, Wien (Austria)]|[Ludwig-Boltzmann-Institut fuer Radiologisch-Physikalische Tumordiagnostik, Vienna (Austria)

    1999-01-01

    The diagnosis of lateral collateral ankle ligament trauma is based on patient history, clinical examination, and clinical stress tests. If the clinical stress test is positive, stress radiography could be performed. There is no consensus about the usefulness of stress radiography in acute ankle sprain, particularly about the cut-off talar tilt angle beyond which a two-ligament rupture would be certain, ranging from 5 to 30 . Today MRI is not used for this indication, although it allows, with controlled positioning of the foot and with defined sections, visualization of injured lateral collateral ankle ligaments. In ankle injuries, plain radiographs form the established basis of diagnostic imaging and can provide definitive answers in most cases. CT is used in complex fractures for complete visualization. MRI is the method of choice for several diagnostic problem cases, including occult fractures and post-traumatic avascular necrosis. In tendon injuries, MRI is important if ultrasound is not diagnostic. Generally, for the evaluation of acute ankle injuries, MRI is the most important second-step procedure when radiographs are nondiagnostic. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Diagnose einer lateralen Bandverletzung beim frischen Sprunggelenkstrauma fusst auf der Anamnese, der klinischen Untersuchung und klinischen Stresstests. Bei positiven klinischen Stresstests kann eine Stressradiographie durchgefuehrt werden. Es gibt keine Uebereinstimmung fuer den Wert der Stressradiographie beim frischen Supinationstrauma des Sprunggelenks, insbesonders fuer den Winkel der Aufklappbarkeit bei einer Zweibandverletzung, der von 5 -30 reicht. Die MRT wird zur Zeit bei dieser Indikation nur in Einzelfaellen benutzt, obwohl sie mit definierter Fusspositionierung und Ausrichtung der Untersuchungsebene eine ausgezeichnete Beurteilung der Sprunggelenksbaende erlaubt. Bei knoecherner Sprunggelenksverletzungen ist die Verwendung des konventionellen Roentgen die etablierte Methode und meist

  16. Acute kidney injury in pediatric patients: diagnosis and management in the emergency department [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohrer, Daniel; Langhan, Melissa; Chaudhari, Pradip

    2017-05-22

    Pediatric acute kidney injury is a condition that is underdiagnosed among children seen in the emergency department, and it has been associated with significant morbidity and mortality, including increased risk for chronic kidney disease. The most common etiologies in pediatric patients are now known to be due to hypovolemia, sepsis, shock, and cardiac dysfunction. This issue compares 3 classification systems for the diagnosis and staging of acute kidney injury and reviews the etiologies that lead to kidney injury in children. The management of pediatric acute kidney injury focuses on identifying patients at high risk, monitoring intravascular volume status, avoiding nephrotoxic medication exposure, and involving a pediatric nephrologist once acute kidney injury is diagnosed. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice].

  17. Effects of Pharmacological Inhibition and Genetic Deficiency of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abderrahmani, Rym; Francois, Agnes; Buard, Valerie; Benderitter, Marc; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Crandall, David L.; Milliat, Fabien

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate effects of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) genetic deficiency and pharmacological PAI-1 inhibition with PAI-039 in a mouse model of radiation-induced enteropathy. Methods and Materials: Wild-type (Wt) and PAI-1 -/- knockout mice received a single dose of 19 Gy to an exteriorized localized intestinal segment. Sham and irradiated Wt mice were treated orally with 1 mg/g of PAI-039. Histological modifications were quantified using a radiation injury score. Moreover, intestinal gene expression was monitored by real-time PCR. Results: At 3 days after irradiation, PAI-039 abolished the radiation-induced increase in the plasma active form of PAI-1 and limited the radiation-induced gene expression of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), CTGF, PAI-1, and COL1A2. Moreover, PAI-039 conferred temporary protection against early lethality. PAI-039 treatment limited the radiation-induced increase of CTGF and PAI-1 at 2 weeks after irradiation but had no effect at 6 weeks. Radiation injuries were less severe in PAI-1 -/- mice than in Wt mice, and despite the beneficial effect, 3 days after irradiation, PAI-039 had no effects on microscopic radiation injuries compared to untreated Wt mice. Conclusions: A genetic deficiency of PAI-1 is associated with amelioration of late radiation enteropathy. Pharmacological inhibition of PAI-1 by PAI-039 positively impacts the early, acute phase increase in plasma PAI-1 and the associated radiation-induced gene expression of inflammatory/extracellular matrix proteins. Since PAI-039 has been shown to inhibit the active form of PAI-1, as opposed to the complete loss of PAI-1 in the knockout animals, these data suggest that a PAI-1 inhibitor could be beneficial in treating radiation-induced tissue injury in acute settings where PAI-1 is elevated.

  18. Changing Interdigestive Migrating Motor Complex in Rats under Acute Liver Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal motility disorder is a major clinical manifestation of acute liver injury, and interdigestive migrating motor complex (MMC is an important indicator. We investigated the changes and characteristics of MMC in rats with acute liver injury. Acute liver injury was created by D-galactosamine, and we recorded the interdigestive MMC using a multichannel physiological recorder and compared the indexes of interdigestive MMC. Compared with normal controls, antral MMC Phase I duration was significantly prolonged and MMC Phase III duration was significantly shortened in the rats with acute liver injury. The duodenal MMC cycle and MMC Phases I and IV duration were significantly prolonged and MMC Phase III duration was significantly shortened in the rats with acute liver injury. The jejunal MMC cycle and MMC Phases I and IV duration were significantly prolonged and MMC Phase III duration was significantly shortened in the rats with acute liver injury compared with normal controls. Compared with the normal controls, rats with acute liver injury had a significantly prolonged interdigestive MMC cycle, related mainly to longer MMC Phases I and IV, shortened MMC Phase III, and MMC Phase II characterized by increased migrating clustered contractions, which were probably major contributors to the gastrointestinal motility disorders.

  19. Radiation injuries to the skeleton and their orthopedic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franz, R.; Rahnfeld, R.

    1978-01-01

    70 patients subjected to orthopedic treatment and radiotherapy for skeletal tumors have been examined. It was found that serious radiation injuries frequently occurred. Above all there were contractures, disordered healing of wounds, ulcerations, and scolioses and kyphoses of the growing skeleton. Therefore, in the case of diseases of the skeleton, it is recommended to restrain radiotherapy. It has to be rejected in child's age

  20. Antiradiation Vaccine: Immunological neutralization of Radiation Toxins at Acute Radiation Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava

    Introduction: Current medical management of the Acute Radiation Syndromes (ARS) does not include immune prophylaxis based on the Antiradiation Vaccine. Existing principles for the treatment of acute radiation syndromes are based on the replacement and supportive therapy. Haemotopoietic cell transplantation is recomended as an important method of treatment of a Haemopoietic form of the ARS. Though in the different hospitals and institutions, 31 pa-tients with a haemopoietic form have previously undergone transplantation with stem cells, in all cases(100%) the transplantants were rejected. Lethality rate was 87%.(N.Daniak et al. 2005). A large amount of biological substances or antigens isolated from bacterias (flagellin and derivates), plants, different types of venom (honeybees, scorpions, snakes) have been studied. This biological active substances can produce a nonspecific stimulation of immune system of mammals and protect against of mild doses of irradiation. But their radioprotection efficacy against high doses of radiation were not sufficient. Relative radioprotection characteristics or adaptive properties of antioxidants were expressed only at mild doses of radiation. However antioxidants demonstrated a very low protective efficacy at high doses of radiation. Some ex-periments demonstrated even a harmful effect of antioxidants administered to animals that had severe forms of the ARS. Only Specific Radiation Toxins roused a specific antigenic stim-ulation of antibody synthesis. An active immunization by non-toxic doses of radiation toxins includes a complex of radiation toxins that we call the Specific Radiation Determinant (SRD). Immunization must be provided not less than 24 days before irradiation and it is effective up to three years and more. Active immunization by radiation toxins significantly reduces the mortality rate (100%) and improves survival rate up to 60% compare with the 0% sur-vival rate among the irradiated animals in control groups

  1. Acute kidney injury in symptomatic primary Epstein-Barr virus infectious mononucleosis: Systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Milena; Lava, Sebastiano A G; Zgraggen, Lorenzo; Simonetti, Giacomo D; Kottanattu, Lisa; Bianchetti, Mario G; Milani, Gregorio P

    2017-06-01

    Textbooks and reviews do not mention the association of symptomatic primary Epstein-Barr virus infectious mononucleosis with acute kidney injury in subjects without immunodeficiency or autoimmunity. Stimulated by our experience with two cases, we performed a review of the literature. The literature documents 38 cases (26 male and 12 female individuals ranging in age from 0.3 to 51, median 18 years) of symptomatic primary Epstein-Barr virus infectious mononucleosis complicated by acute kidney injury: 27 acute interstitial nephritides, 1 jaundice-associated nephropathy, 7 myositides and 3 hemolytic uremic syndromes. Acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy was observed in 18 (47%) cases. Acute kidney injury did not resolve in one patient with acute interstitial nephritis. Two patients died because of systemic complications. The remaining 35 cases fully recovered. In individuals with acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infectious mononucleosis, a relevant kidney injury is rare but the outcome potentially fatal. It results from interstitial nephritis, myositis-associated acute kidney injury, hemolytic uremic syndrome or jaundice-associated nephropathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Prone positioning ventilation for treatment of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Mei-juan; He, Xiao-di

    2009-08-01

    Patients who are diagnosed with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) usually have ventilation-perfusion mismatch, severe decrease in lung capacity, and gas exchange abnormalities. Health care workers have implemented various strategies in an attempt to compensate for these pathological alterations. By rotating patients with ALI/ARDS between the supine and prone position, it is possible to achieve a significant improvement in PaO2/FiO2, decrease shunting and therefore improve oxygenation without use of expensive, invasive and experimental procedures. Prone positioning is a safe and effective way to improve ventilation when conventional strategies fail to initiate a patient response. Because a specific cure for ARDS is not available, the goal is to support the patients with therapies that cause the least amount of injury while the lungs have an opportunity to heal. Based on current data, a trial of prone positioning ventilation should be offered to the patients who have ALI/ARDS in the early course of the disease. Published studies exhibit substantial heterogeneity in clinical results, suggesting that an adequately sized study optimizing the duration of proning ventilation strategy is warranted to enable definitive conclusions to be drawn.

  3. Acute Osteomyelitis in the Hand Due to Dog Bite Injury: A Report of 3 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryun Lee

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available As many people keep small dogs as pets, dog bites are common injuries, accounting for approximately 80%–90% of all animal bite injuries. These injuries usually occur on the upper extremities, most commonly on the fingers. Most of these injuries appear as simple lacerations or abrasions of the skin. Common symptoms include inflammatory reactions of the soft tissue, such as pain, swelling, erythema, and cellulitis. However, the complications of small dog bites may include joint or cartilage injuries, including acute osteomyelitis. Once osteomyelitis develops, it is difficult to diagnose since it has a latency period of approximately 2 weeks. Plain radiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and 3-phase bone scans should be performed when acute osteomyelitis is suspected, and broad-spectrum empiric antibiotic treatment should be administered for approximately 8–12 weeks. We report 3 very rare cases of acute osteomyelitis that occurred after a dog bite injury.

  4. Nicaraven attenuates radiation-induced injury in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miho Kawakatsu

    Full Text Available Nicaraven, a chemically synthesized hydroxyl radical-specific scavenger, has been demonstrated to protect against ischemia-reperfusion injury in various organs. We investigated whether nicaraven can attenuate radiation-induced injury in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, which is the conmen complication of radiotherapy and one of the major causes of death in sub-acute phase after accidental exposure to high dose radiation. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 1 Gy γ-ray radiation daily for 5 days in succession (a total of 5 Gy, and given nicaraven or a placebo after each exposure. The mice were sacrificed 2 days after the last radiation treatment, and the protective effects and relevant mechanisms of nicaraven in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells with radiation-induced damage were investigated by ex vivo examination. We found that post-radiation administration of nicaraven significantly increased the number, improved the colony-forming capacity, and decreased the DNA damage of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. The urinary levels of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine, a marker of DNA oxidation, were significantly lower in mice that were given nicaraven compared with those that received a placebo treatment, although the levels of intracellular and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in the bone marrow cells did not differ significantly between the two groups. Interestingly, compared with the placebo treatment, the administration of nicaraven significantly decreased the levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α in the plasma of mice. Our data suggest that nicaraven effectively diminished the effects of radiation-induced injury in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, which is likely associated with the anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties of this compound.

  5. X-ray and radium gamma radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fokkema, R.E.

    1993-05-01

    During the period 1896-1939 a number of maxima could be distinguished in the incidence of X-ray and radium gamma ray injuries in patients. An explanation for these fluctuations is investigated in this study. The first distinguishable maximum in the number of reported cases of X-ray injuries can be found in the period 1896-1897 and mainly concerns skin lesions, caused by the lack of shielding and ignorance of the effects. In the period 1904-1905 there was once again an apparent prevalence of radiation injuries to patients. After 1905 the incidence of radiation injuries decreased due to a wider use of dosimetric methods. The third phase of increased injuries may be subdivided into three components. In diagnostic roentgenology from 1896 to 1926 a number of causes of roentgen burns persisted: multiple or long exposures, the use of a short focus-skin-distance and a lack of suitable dosimetric methods. The reduction of complications after 1923 can be attributed to several factors: systematic training of physics who wished to become roentgenologists, greater care of doctors, the use of an alternative method of radiotherapy according to Coutard's method, the introduction of dosimetry with ionization chambers (after 1924), the consensus reached over the roentgen as a unit of applied dosage (in 1928), and the introduction of absorption curves for radiation quality (in 1933). Around 1920 a high complication rate arose as a result of exposure to radiation emitted by radium. In 1922 the first reliable radium dosimetry method came available. This applied to external radium therapy by regular shaped applicators. After 1938 reliable dosimetry was achieved in the field of interstitial radium therapy (brachytherapy). Injuries from radium therapy, however, persisted till about 1940, caused not only by the delayed availability of radium dosimetry, but also to the use of radium therapy by poorly trained radium therapists. 28 figs., 5 tabs

  6. Acute Liver Injury Is Independent of B Cells or Immunoglobulin M.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A Richards

    Full Text Available Acute liver injury is a clinically important pathology and results in the release of Danger Associated Molecular Patterns, which initiate an immune response. Withdrawal of the injurious agent and curtailing any pathogenic secondary immune response may allow spontaneous resolution of injury. The role B cells and Immunoglobulin M (IgM play in acute liver injury is largely unknown and it was proposed that B cells and/or IgM would play a significant role in its pathogenesis.Tissue from 3 models of experimental liver injury (ischemia-reperfusion injury, concanavalin A hepatitis and paracetamol-induced liver injury and patients transplanted following paracetamol overdose were stained for evidence of IgM deposition. Mice deficient in B cells (and IgM were used to dissect out the role B cells and/or IgM played in the development or resolution of injury. Serum transfer into mice lacking IgM was used to establish the role IgM plays in injury.Significant deposition of IgM was seen in the explanted livers of patients transplanted following paracetamol overdose as well as in 3 experimental models of acute liver injury (ischemia-reperfusion injury, concanavalin A hepatitis and paracetamol-induced liver injury. Serum transfer into IgM-deficient mice failed to reconstitute injury (p = 0.66, despite successful engraftment of IgM. Mice deficient in both T and B cells (RAG1-/- mice (p<0.001, but not B cell deficient (μMT mice (p = 0.93, were significantly protected from injury. Further interrogation with T cell deficient (CD3εKO mice confirmed that the T cell component is a key mediator of sterile liver injury. Mice deficient in B cells and IgM mice did not have a significant delay in resolution following acute liver injury.IgM deposition appears to be common feature of both human and murine sterile liver injury. However, neither IgM nor B cells, play a significant role in the development of or resolution from acute liver injury. T cells appear to be key

  7. Clinico-morphological characteristics of reparation of acute radiation ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrik, V.D.; Yakovleva, N.D.; Bardychev, M.S.

    1979-01-01

    The mechanism of reparative processes under the effect of various drugs was studied in experimental acute radiation ulcer of rats. It was established that at the stage of marked exudative-necrotic processes the use of antiinflammatory and antiexudative substances (bariz, dimethylsulfoxyde) led to normalization of the microcirculation that reduced the time of radiation ulcer healing. The use of anabolic steroids (retabolil) intensified metabolism that also produced a favourable effect on the reparative processes

  8. The Urine Proteome as a Biomarker of Radiation Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mukut; Halligan, Brian D.; Wakim, Bassam T.; Savin, Virginia J.; Cohen, Eric P.; Moulder, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Terrorist attacks or nuclear accidents could expose large numbers of people to ionizing radiation, and early biomarkers of radiation injury would be critical for triage, treatment and follow-up of such individuals. However, no such biomarkers have yet been proven to exist. We tested the potential of high throughput proteomics to identify protein biomarkers of radiation injury after total body X-ray irradiation in a rat model. Subtle functional changes in the kidney are suggested by an increased glomerular permeability for macromolecules measured within 24 hours after TBI. Ultrastructural changes in glomerular podocytes include partial loss of the interdigitating organization of foot processes. Analysis of urine by LC-MS/MS and 2D-GE showed significant changes in the urine proteome within 24 hours after TBI. Tissue kallikrein 1-related peptidase, cysteine proteinase inhibitor cystatin C and oxidized histidine were found to be increased while a number of proteinase inhibitors including kallikrein-binding protein and albumin were found to be decreased post-irradiation. Thus, TBI causes immediately detectable changes in renal structure and function and in the urinary protein profile. This suggests that both systemic and renal changes are induced by radiation and it may be possible to identify a set of biomarkers unique to radiation injury. PMID:19746194

  9. Radiation injury to the temporal bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guida, R.A.; Finn, D.G.; Buchalter, I.H.; Brookler, K.H.; Kimmelman, C.P.

    1990-01-01

    Osteoradionecrosis of the temporal bone is an unusual sequela of radiation therapy to the head and neck. Symptoms occur many years after the radiation is administered, and progression of the disease is insidious. Hearing loss (sensorineural, conductive, or mixed), otalgia, otorrhea, and even gross tissue extrusion herald this condition. Later, intracranial complications such as meningitis, temporal lobe or cerebellar abscess, and cranial neuropathies may occur. Reported here are five cases of this rare malady representing varying degrees of the disease process. They include a case of radiation-induced necrosis of the tympanic ring with persistent squamous debris in the external auditory canal and middle ear. Another case demonstrates the progression of radiation otitis media to mastoiditis with bony sequestration. Further progression of the disease process is seen in a third case that evolved into multiple cranial neuropathies from skull base destruction. Treatment includes systemic antibiotics, local wound care, and debridement in cases of localized tissue involvement. More extensive debridement with removal of sequestrations, abscess drainage, reconstruction with vascularized tissue from regional flaps, and mastoid obliteration may be warranted for severe cases. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy has provided limited benefit

  10. Injury to skeletal muscle of mice following acute and sub-acute pregabalin exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Moshiri

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Pregabalin (PGB is a new antiepileptic drug that has received FDA approval for patient who suffers from central neuropathic pain, partial seizures, generalized anxiety disorder, fibromyalgia and sleep disorders. This study was undertaken to evaluate the possible adverse effects of PGB on the muscular system of mice. Materials and Methods: To evaluate the effect of PGB on skeletal muscle, the animals were exposed to a single dose of 1, 2 or 5 g /kg or daily doses of 20, 40 or 80 mg/kg for 21 days, intraperitoneally (IP. Twaenty-four hr after the last drug administration, all animals were sacrificed. The level of fast-twitch skeletal muscle troponin I and CK-MM activity were evaluated in blood as an indicator of muscle injury. Skeletal muscle pathological findings were also reported as scores ranging from 1 to 3 based on the observed lesion. Results: In the acute and sub-acute toxicity assay IP injection of PGB significantly increased the activity and levels of CK-MM and fsTnI compared to the control group. Sub-acute exposure to PGB caused damages that include muscle atrophy, infiltration of inflammatory cells and cell degeneration. Conclusion: PGB administration especially in long term care causes muscle atrophy with infiltration of inflammatory cells and cell degeneration. The fsTnI and CK-MM are reliable markers in PGB-related muscle injury. The exact mechanisms behind the muscular damage are unclear and necessitate further investigations.

  11. Radiation risk in the context of liability for injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, Peter

    2003-01-01

    It is perceived by the man in the street that low-level radiation from a nuclear facility is more dangerous than that from other practices. The radiation protection system, in particular the ALARA principle, leads to concerns that even the smallest exposure to radiation is abnormal and dangerous. Public perception of the radiation risk leads to fear in the minds of the public. A consequence of this fear itself may be damage to health in the form of psychological damage or nervous shock. The paper draws attention to the liability for damages by radiation, in particular under the common law of the UK and US, and how liability, determined by the court, is not necessarily influenced by scientific rationality. A natural conclusion may be that a claimant suffering injury of the type caused by radiation and who had been exposed to radiation, no matter how small a dose, that could be shown to come from a nuclear installation would be awarded damages against the licensee of the site of the installation unless it could be shown that the injury was predominantly caused by another source (radioactive or otherwise)

  12. Study of collagen metabolism and regulation after β radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Yinghui; Xu Lan; Wu Shiliang; Qiu Hao; Jiang Zhi; Tu Youbin; Zhang Xueguang

    2001-01-01

    The animal model of β radiation injury was established by the β radiation produced by the linear accelerator; and irradiated NIH 3T3 cells were studied. In the experiment the contents of total collagen, collagen type I and type III were measured. The activity of MMPs-1 were tested. The contents of TGF-β 1 , IL-6 were also detected. The results showed that after exposure to β radiation, little change was found in the content of total collagen, but the content of collagen I decreased and the content of collagen III, MMPs-1 activity increased; the expression of TGF-β 1 , IL-6 increased. The results suggest that changes in the metabolism of collagen play an important role in the irradiated injury of the skin; TGF-β 1 , IL-6 may be essential in the regulation of the collagen metabolism

  13. Study of collagen metabolism and regulation after {beta} radiation injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yinghui, Zhou; Lan, Xu; Shiliang, Wu; Hao, Qiu; Zhi, Jiang; Youbin, Tu; Xueguang, Zhang [Suzhou Medical College (China)

    2001-04-01

    The animal model of {beta} radiation injury was established by the {beta} radiation produced by the linear accelerator; and irradiated NIH 3T3 cells were studied. In the experiment the contents of total collagen, collagen type I and type III were measured. The activity of MMPs-1 were tested. The contents of TGF-{beta}{sub 1}, IL-6 were also detected. The results showed that after exposure to {beta} radiation, little change was found in the content of total collagen, but the content of collagen I decreased and the content of collagen III, MMPs-1 activity increased; the expression of TGF-{beta}{sub 1}, IL-6 increased. The results suggest that changes in the metabolism of collagen play an important role in the irradiated injury of the skin; TGF-{beta}{sub 1}, IL-6 may be essential in the regulation of the collagen metabolism.

  14. Training loads and injury risk in Australian football-differing acute: chronic workload ratios influence match injury risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, David L; Blanch, Peter; Ong, Kok-Leong; Crossley, Kay M; Crow, Justin; Morris, Meg E

    2017-08-01

    (1) To investigate whether a daily acute:chronic workload ratio informs injury risk in Australian football players; (2) to identify which combination of workload variable, acute and chronic time window best explains injury likelihood. Workload and injury data were collected from 53 athletes over 2 seasons in a professional Australian football club. Acute:chronic workload ratios were calculated daily for each athlete, and modelled against non-contact injury likelihood using a quadratic relationship. 6 workload variables, 8 acute time windows (2-9 days) and 7 chronic time windows (14-35 days) were considered (336 combinations). Each parameter combination was compared for injury likelihood fit (using R 2 ). The ratio of moderate speed running workload (18-24 km/h) in the previous 3 days (acute time window) compared with the previous 21 days (chronic time window) best explained the injury likelihood in matches (R 2 =0.79) and in the immediate 2 or 5 days following matches (R 2 =0.76-0.82). The 3:21 acute:chronic workload ratio discriminated between high-risk and low-risk athletes (relative risk=1.98-2.43). Using the previous 6 days to calculate the acute workload time window yielded similar results. The choice of acute time window significantly influenced model performance and appeared to reflect the competition and training schedule. Daily workload ratios can inform injury risk in Australian football. Clinicians and conditioning coaches should consider the sport-specific schedule of competition and training when choosing acute and chronic time windows. For Australian football, the ratio of moderate speed running in a 3-day or 6-day acute time window and a 21-day chronic time window best explained injury risk. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. New strategies for the prevention of radiation injury. Possible implications for countering radiation hazards of long-term space travel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seed, T.; Kumar, S.; Whitnall, M.

    2002-01-01

    New strategies for the prevention of radiation injuries are currently being explored with the ultimate aim of developing globally radioprotective, nontoxic pharmacologics. The prophylactic treatments under review encompass such diverse pharmacologic classes as novel immunomodulators, nutritional antioxidants, and cytokines. An immunomodulator that shows promise is 5-androstenediol (AED), a well-tolerated, long-acting and rostene steroid with broad-spectrum radioprotective attributes that include not only protection against acute tissue injury, but also reduced susceptibility to infectious agents, as well as reduced rates of neoplastic transformation. Other potentially useful radioprotectants currently under study include the nutraceutical vitamin E and analogs, a chemically-engineered cytokine, interleukin-1β, and a sustained-release formulation of an aminothiol, amifostine. Results suggest that a new paradigm is evolving for the prophylaxes of radiation injuries, based on use of newly identified, nontoxic, broad-spectrum prophylactic agents whose protective action may be leveraged by subsequent postexposure use of cytokines with organ-specific reparative functions. (author)

  16. New strategies for the prevention of radiation injury. Possible implications for countering radiation hazards of long-term space travel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seed, T.; Kumar, S.; Whitnall, M. [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States). Radiation Casualty Management] [and others

    2002-12-01

    New strategies for the prevention of radiation injuries are currently being explored with the ultimate aim of developing globally radioprotective, nontoxic pharmacologics. The prophylactic treatments under review encompass such diverse pharmacologic classes as novel immunomodulators, nutritional antioxidants, and cytokines. An immunomodulator that shows promise is 5-androstenediol (AED), a well-tolerated, long-acting and rostene steroid with broad-spectrum radioprotective attributes that include not only protection against acute tissue injury, but also reduced susceptibility to infectious agents, as well as reduced rates of neoplastic transformation. Other potentially useful radioprotectants currently under study include the nutraceutical vitamin E and analogs, a chemically-engineered cytokine, interleukin-1{beta}, and a sustained-release formulation of an aminothiol, amifostine. Results suggest that a new paradigm is evolving for the prophylaxes of radiation injuries, based on use of newly identified, nontoxic, broad-spectrum prophylactic agents whose protective action may be leveraged by subsequent postexposure use of cytokines with organ-specific reparative functions. (author)

  17. Prognosis of Acute Kidney Injury and Hepatorenal Syndrome in Patients with Cirrhosis: A Prospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S. Allegretti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. Acute kidney injury is a common problem for patients with cirrhosis and is associated with poor survival. We aimed to examine the association between type of acute kidney injury and 90-day mortality. Methods. Prospective cohort study at a major US liver transplant center. A nephrologist’s review of the urinary sediment was used in conjunction with the 2007 Ascites Club Criteria to stratify acute kidney injury into four groups: prerenal azotemia, hepatorenal syndrome, acute tubular necrosis, or other. Results. 120 participants with cirrhosis and acute kidney injury were analyzed. Ninety-day mortality was 14/40 (35% with prerenal azotemia, 20/35 (57% with hepatorenal syndrome, 21/36 (58% with acute tubular necrosis, and 1/9 (11% with other (p=0.04 overall. Mortality was the same in hepatorenal syndrome compared to acute tubular necrosis (p=0.99. Mortality was lower in prerenal azotemia compared to hepatorenal syndrome (p=0.05 and acute tubular necrosis (p=0.04. Ten participants (22% were reclassified from hepatorenal syndrome to acute tubular necrosis because of granular casts on urinary sediment. Conclusions. Hepatorenal syndrome and acute tubular necrosis result in similar 90-day mortality. Review of urinary sediment may add important diagnostic information to this population. Multicenter studies are needed to validate these findings and better guide management.

  18. The effect of pentoxifylline on early and late radiation injury following fractionated irradiation in C3H mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dion, M.W.; Hussey, D.H.; Osborne, J.W.

    1989-07-01

    An experiment was performed to test the effectiveness of pentoxifylline in reducing late radiation injury. One hundred and four C3H mice were randomized into eight groups of 13 mice each, and the right hind limbs were irradiated with 4000, 5000, 6000, or 7000 cGy in ten fractions. Each group was treated with once daily injections of either pentoxifylline or saline for 30+ weeks. An additional ten mice received daily injections of pentoxifylline or saline, but no irradiation. The pentoxifylline animals demonstrated significantly less late injury than the saline treated animals. The most obvious differences were observed in the 5000 and 6000 cGy groups. There were seven radiation related deaths in the saline treated control groups, but only one radiation related death in the pentoxifylline treated groups. Whereas 42% (20/48) of the saline treated animals had a late injury score of 3.0 or greater, only 8% (4/51) of the pentoxifylline treated animals had a late skin score as high as 3.0. Pentoxifylline had no effect on the acute radiation injury scores. The drug was well tolerated with no toxic effects noted. Pentoxifylline is a methyl xanthine derivative that is used to treat vascular occlusive disease in humans. It improves perfusion through small capillaries by improving the deformability of red blood cells, inhibiting platelet aggregation, and stimulating the release of prostacyclin. This study shows that the prophylactic administration of pentoxifylline can modify late radiation induced injury in the mouse extremity. It may have value in the prevention or treatment of late radiation induced injury in humans, and it could be a useful tool to help define the mechanisms of late radiation injury in specific organs.

  19. The effect of pentoxifylline on early and late radiation injury following fractionated irradiation in C3H mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dion, M.W.; Hussey, D.H.; Osborne, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    An experiment was performed to test the effectiveness of pentoxifylline in reducing late radiation injury. One hundred and four C3H mice were randomized into eight groups of 13 mice each, and the right hind limbs were irradiated with 4000, 5000, 6000, or 7000 cGy in ten fractions. Each group was treated with once daily injections of either pentoxifylline or saline for 30+ weeks. An additional ten mice received daily injections of pentoxifylline or saline, but no irradiation. The pentoxifylline animals demonstrated significantly less late injury than the saline treated animals. The most obvious differences were observed in the 5000 and 6000 cGy groups. There were seven radiation related deaths in the saline treated control groups, but only one radiation related death in the pentoxifylline treated groups. Whereas 42% (20/48) of the saline treated animals had a late injury score of 3.0 or greater, only 8% (4/51) of the pentoxifylline treated animals had a late skin score as high as 3.0. Pentoxifylline had no effect on the acute radiation injury scores. The drug was well tolerated with no toxic effects noted. Pentoxifylline is a methyl xanthine derivative that is used to treat vascular occlusive disease in humans. It improves perfusion through small capillaries by improving the deformability of red blood cells, inhibiting platelet aggregation, and stimulating the release of prostacyclin. This study shows that the prophylactic administration of pentoxifylline can modify late radiation induced injury in the mouse extremity. It may have value in the prevention or treatment of late radiation induced injury in humans, and it could be a useful tool to help define the mechanisms of late radiation injury in specific organs

  20. Application of Multivariate Modeling for Radiation Injury Assessment: A Proof of Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Bolduc

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multivariate radiation injury estimation algorithms were formulated for estimating severe hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome (H-ARS injury (i.e., response category three or RC3 in a rhesus monkey total-body irradiation (TBI model. Classical CBC and serum chemistry blood parameters were examined prior to irradiation (d 0 and on d 7, 10, 14, 21, and 25 after irradiation involving 24 nonhuman primates (NHP (Macaca mulatta given 6.5-Gy 60Co Υ-rays (0.4 Gy min−1 TBI. A correlation matrix was formulated with the RC3 severity level designated as the “dependent variable” and independent variables down selected based on their radioresponsiveness and relatively low multicollinearity using stepwise-linear regression analyses. Final candidate independent variables included CBC counts (absolute number of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and platelets in formulating the “CBC” RC3 estimation algorithm. Additionally, the formulation of a diagnostic CBC and serum chemistry “CBC-SCHEM” RC3 algorithm expanded upon the CBC algorithm model with the addition of hematocrit and the serum enzyme levels of aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase. Both algorithms estimated RC3 with over 90% predictive power. Only the CBC-SCHEM RC3 algorithm, however, met the critical three assumptions of linear least squares demonstrating slightly greater precision for radiation injury estimation, but with significantly decreased prediction error indicating increased statistical robustness.

  1. Acute cervical spine injuries: prospective MR imaging assessment at a level 1 trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzberg, R W; Benedetti, P F; Drake, C M; Ivanovic, M; Levine, R A; Beatty, C S; Nemzek, W R; McFall, R A; Ontell, F K; Bishop, D M; Poirier, V C; Chong, B W

    1999-10-01

    To determine the weighted average sensitivity of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the prospective detection of acute neck injury and to compare these findings with those of a comprehensive conventional radiographic assessment. Conventional radiography and MR imaging were performed in 199 patients presenting to a level 1 trauma center with suspected cervical spine injury. Weighted sensitivities and specificities were calculated, and a weighted average across eight vertebral levels from C1 to T1 was formed. Fourteen parameters indicative of acute injury were tabulated. Fifty-eight patients had 172 acute cervical injuries. MR imaging depicted 136 (79%) acute abnormalities and conventional radiography depicted 39 (23%). For assessment of acute fractures, MR images (weighted average sensitivity, 43%; CI: 21%, 66%) were comparable to conventional radiographs (weighted average sensitivity, 48%; CI: 30%, 65%). MR imaging was superior to conventional radiography in the evaluation of pre- or paravertebral hemorrhage or edema, anterior or posterior longitudinal ligament injury, traumatic disk herniation, cord edema, and cord compression. Cord injuries were associated with cervical spine spondylosis (P < .05), acute fracture (P < .001), and canal stenosis (P < .001). MR imaging is more accurate than radiography in the detection of a wide spectrum of neck injuries, and further study is warranted of its potential effect on medical decision making, clinical outcome, and cost-effectiveness.

  2. Pressure injuries in elderly with acute myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komici K

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Klara Komici,1 Dino F Vitale,2 Dario Leosco,1 Angela Mancini,1 Graziamaria Corbi,3 Leonardo Bencivenga,1 Alessandro Mezzani,4 Bruno Trimarco,5 Carmine Morisco,5 Nicola Ferrara,1,2 Giuseppe Rengo1,2 1Division of Geriatrics, Department of Translational Medical Sciences, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy; 2Cardiac Rehabilitation Division, Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, IRCCS, Scientific Institute of Telese Terme (BN, Telese Terme, Italy; 3Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Molise Campobasso, Campobasso, Italy; 4Cardiac Rehabilitation Division, Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, IRCCS, Scientific Institute of Veruno, Veruno, Italy; 5Division of Cardiology, Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy Objectives: To assess pressure injury (PI incidence among patients hospitalized for acute myocardial infarction (AMI in an intensive coronary care unit (ICCU and to detect the impact of specific risk factors on the development of PI in this clinical setting.Patients and methods: Prospective cohort study in ICCU setting. Patients admitted for AMI: patients mean age 67.5±11.5 years (n=165. Norton Scale, Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA, demographic, clinical and biochemical data collected at the time of ICCU admission have been tested in a logistic model to assess the odds ratios (ORs of PI risk development. The jackknifed area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC and the decision curve analysis have been employed to assess the additive predictive value of a factor.Results: Twenty-seven (16.3% patients developed PIs. An increased PI risk was associated with advanced age (OR =2.5 every 10-year increase; 95% CI =1.1–5.7, while probability of PI development was reduced in patients with higher left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF (OR =0.4 every 5% increase; 95% CI =0.24–0.66, MNA score (OR =0.65 every unit change; 95% CI =0.44–0.95 and Norton Scale score

  3. Developing diagnostic guidelines for the acute radiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Densow, D.; Fliedner, T.M.; Kindler, H.

    1996-01-01

    Diagnostic guidelines seem to be promising for improving medical care. One aspect of a diagnostic guideline for the acute radiation syndrome has been tested against an extensive case history database. Subsequently, the guideline has been optimized for a small set of case histories. The improved performance has been proven by a test against the rest of the case history database

  4. Acute injuries in soccer, ice hockey, volleyball, basketball, judo, and karate: analysis of national registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujala, U. M.; Taimela, S.; Antti-Poika, I.; Orava, S.; Tuominen, R.; Myllynen, P.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the acute injury profile in each of six sports and compare the injury rates between the sports. DESIGN--Analysis of national sports injury insurance registry data. SETTING--Finland during 1987-91. SUBJECTS--621,691 person years of exposure among participants in soccer, ice hockey, volleyball, basketball, judo, or karate. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Acute sports injuries requiring medical treatment and reported to the insurance company on structured forms by the patients and their doctors. RESULTS--54,186 sports injuries were recorded. Injury rates were low in athletes aged under 15, while 20-24 year olds had the highest rates. Differences in injury rates between the sports were minor in this adult age group. Overall injury rates were higher in sports entailing more frequent and powerful body contact. Each sport had a specific injury profile. Fractures and dental injuries were most common in ice hockey and karate and least frequent in volleyball. Knee injuries were the most common cause of permanent disability. CONCLUSIONS--Based on the defined injury profiles in the different sports it is recommended that sports specific preventive measures should be employed to decrease the number of violent contacts between athletes, including improved game rules supported by careful refereeing. To prevent dental injuries the wearing of mouth guards should be encouraged, especially in ice hockey, karate, and basketball. PMID:8520333

  5. Acute injuries in soccer, ice hockey, volleyball, basketball, judo, and karate: analysis of national registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujala, U M; Taimela, S; Antti-Poika, I; Orava, S; Tuominen, R; Myllynen, P

    1995-12-02

    To determine the acute injury profile in each of six sports and compare the injury rates between the sports. Analysis of national sports injury insurance registry data. Finland during 1987-91. 621,691 person years of exposure among participants in soccer, ice hockey, volleyball, basketball, judo, or karate. Acute sports injuries requiring medical treatment and reported to the insurance company on structured forms by the patients and their doctors. 54,186 sports injuries were recorded. Injury rates were low in athletes aged under 15, while 20-24 year olds had the highest rates. Differences in injury rates between the sports were minor in this adult age group. Overall injury rates were higher in sports entailing more frequent and powerful body contact. Each sport had a specific injury profile. Fractures and dental injuries were most common in ice hockey and karate and least frequent in volleyball. Knee injuries were the most common cause of permanent disability. Based on the defined injury profiles in the different sports it is recommended that sports specific preventive measures should be employed to decrease the number of violent contacts between athletes, including improved game rules supported by careful refereeing. To prevent dental injuries the wearing of mouth guards should be encouraged, especially in ice hockey, karate, and basketball.

  6. MODELING ACUTE EXPOSURE TO SOLAR RADIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of the major technical challenges in calculating solar flux on the human form has been the complexity of the surface geometry (i.e., the surface normal vis a vis the incident radiation). The American Cancer Society reports that over 80% of skin cancers occur on the face, he...

  7. Acute kidney injury in stable COPD and at exacerbation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barakat MF

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available MF Barakat,1 HI McDonald,1 TJ Collier,1 L Smeeth,1 D Nitsch,1 JK Quint1,2 1Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, 2Department of Respiratory Epidemiology, Occupational Medicine and Public Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, UK Background: While acute kidney injury (AKI alone is associated with increased mortality, the incidence of hospital admission with AKI among stable and exacerbating COPD patients and the effect of concurrent AKI at COPD exacerbation on mortality is not known.Methods: A total of 189,561 individuals with COPD were identified from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Using Poisson and logistic regressions, we explored which factors predicted admission for AKI (identified in Hospital Episode Statistics in this COPD cohort and concomitant AKI at a hospitalization for COPD exacerbation. Using survival analysis, we investigated the effect of concurrent AKI at exacerbation on mortality (n=36,107 and identified confounding factors.Results: The incidence of AKI in the total COPD cohort was 128/100,000 person-years. The prevalence of concomitant AKI at exacerbation was 1.9%, and the mortality rate in patients with AKI at exacerbation was 521/1,000 person-years. Male sex, older age, and lower glomerular filtration rate predicted higher risk of AKI or death. There was a 1.80 fold (95% confidence interval: 1.61, 2.03 increase in adjusted mortality within the first 6 months post COPD exacerbation in patients suffering from AKI and COPD exacerbation compared to those who were AKI free.Conclusion: In comparison to previous studies on general populations and hospitalizations, the incidence and prevalence of AKI is relatively high in COPD patients. Coexisting AKI at exacerbation is prognostic of poor outcome. Keywords: acute renal failure, mortality, emphysema, chronic bronchitis, prognosis

  8. Acute kidney injury in pregnancy-specific disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Prakash

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of acute kidney injury in pregnancy (P-AKI has declined significantly over the last three decades in developing countries. However, it is still associated with significant fetomaternal mortality and morbidity. The diagnosis of P-AKI is based on the serum creatinine increase. The usual formulas for estimating glomerular filtration rate (GFR are not validated in this population. The incidence of P-AKI with respect to total AKI cases has decreased in the last three decades from 25% in 1980s to 9% in 2000s at our centre. During the first trimester of gestation, AKI develops most often due to septic abortion or hyperemesis gravidarum. Septic abortion related AKI with respect to total AKI decreased from 9% to 5% in our study. Prevention of unwanted pregnancy and avoidance of septic abortion are keys to eliminate abortion associated AKI in early pregnancy. However, we have not seen AKI on account of hyperemesis gravidarum over a period of 33 years at our center. In the third trimester, the differential diagnosis of AKI in association with pregnancy specific conditions namely preeclampsia/HELLP syndrome, acute fatty liver of pregnancy and thrombotic microangiopathies of pregnancy (P-TMA is more challenging, because these 3 conditions share several clinical features of thrombotic microangiopathy which makes the diagnosis very difficult on clinical grounds. It is imperative to distinguish these conditions to make appropriate therapeutic decisions. Typically, AFLP and HELLP syndrome improve after delivery of the fetus, whereas plasma exchange is the first-line treatment for pregnancy associated thrombotic microangioathies (P-TMA. We observed that preclampsia/eclampsia is the most common cause of AKI in late third trimester and postpartum periods followed by puerperal sepsis and postpartum hemorrhage. Pregnancy-associated thrombotic microangiopathies (aHUS/TTP and AFLP are rare causes of AKI during pregnancy in developing countries.

  9. Acute Kidney Injury in Pregnancy-specific Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, J; Ganiger, V C

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of acute kidney injury in pregnancy (P-AKI) has declined significantly over the last three decades in developing countries. However, it is still associated with significant fetomaternal mortality and morbidity. The diagnosis of P-AKI is based on the serum creatinine increase. The usual formulas for estimating glomerular filtration rate (GFR) are not validated in this population. The incidence of P-AKI with respect to total AKI cases has decreased in the last three decades from 25% in 1980s to 9% in 2000s at our centre. During the first trimester of gestation, AKI develops most often due to septic abortion or hyperemesis gravidarum. Septic abortion related AKI with respect to total AKI decreased from 9% to 5% in our study. Prevention of unwanted pregnancy and avoidance of septic abortion are keys to eliminate abortion associated AKI in early pregnancy. However, we have not seen AKI on account of hyperemesis gravidarum over a period of 33 years at our center. In the third trimester, the differential diagnosis of AKI in association with pregnancy specific conditions namely preeclampsia/HELLP syndrome, acute fatty liver of pregnancy and thrombotic microangiopathies of pregnancy (P-TMA) is more challenging, because these 3 conditions share several clinical features of thrombotic microangiopathy which makes the diagnosis very difficult on clinical grounds. It is imperative to distinguish these conditions to make appropriate therapeutic decisions. Typically, AFLP and HELLP syndrome improve after delivery of the fetus, whereas plasma exchange is the first-line treatment for pregnancy associated thrombotic microangioathies (P-TMA). We observed that preclampsia/eclampsia is the most common cause of AKI in late third trimester and postpartum periods followed by puerperal sepsis and postpartum hemorrhage. Pregnancy-associated thrombotic microangiopathies (aHUS/TTP) and AFLP are rare causes of AKI during pregnancy in developing countries.

  10. Late radiation injury to muscle and peripheral nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillette, E. L.; Mahler, P. A.; Powers, B. E.; Gillette, S. M.; Vujaskovic, Z.

    1995-01-01

    Late radiation injury to muscles and peripheral nerves is infrequently observed. However, the success of radiation oncology has led to longer patient survival, providing a greater opportunity for late effects to develop, increase in severity and, possibly, impact the quality of life of the patient. In addition, when radiation therapy is combined with surgery and/or chemotherapy, the risk of late complications is likely to increase. It is clear that the incidence of complications involving muscles and nerves increases with time following radiation. The influence of volume has yet to be determined; however, an increased volume is likely to increase the risk of injury to muscles and nerves. Experimental and clinical studies have indicated that the (α(β)) ratio for muscle is approximately 4 Gy and, possibly, 2 Gy for peripheral nerve, indicating the great influence of fractionation on response of these tissues. This is of concern for intraoperative radiation therapy, and for high dose rate brachytherapy. This review of clinical and experimental data discusses the response of muscle and nerves late after radiation therapy. A grading system has been proposed and endpoints suggested

  11. Acute Kidney Injury: It's not just the 'big' burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, L A; Wilson, S; Walker, R G; Singer, Y; Cleland, H

    2018-02-01

    Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) complicates the management of at least 25% of patients with severe burns and is associated with long term complications. Most research focuses on the patients with more severe burns, and whether the same factors are associated with the development of AKI in patients with burns between 10 and 19% total body surface area (TBSA) is unknown. The aims of this study were to examine the incidence of, and factors associated with, the development of AKI in patients with %TBSA≥10, as well as the relationship with hospital metrics such as length of stay (LOS). Retrospective medical record review of consecutive burns patients admitted to The Alfred Hospital, the major adult burns centre in Victoria, Australia. Demographic and injury details were recorded. Factors associated with AKI were determined using multiple logistic regression. Between 2010 and June 2014, 300 patients were admitted with burn injury and data on 267 patients was available for analysis. Median age was 54.5 years with 78% being male. Median %TBSA was 15 (IQR 12, 20). The AKI incidence, as measured by the RIFLE criteria, was 22.5%, including 15% (27/184) in patients with %TBSA 10-19. Factors associated with AKI included increasing age and %TBSA (OR 1.05 p<0.001) as well as increased surgeries (p<0.041) and a cardiac comorbidity (p<0.01). All patients with renal comorbidity developed AKI. In the %TBSA 10-19 cohort, only increasing age (OR 1.05 p<0.001) was associated with AKI. After accounting for confounding factors, the probability of discharge from hospital in Non-AKI group was greater than for the AKI patients at all time points (P<0.001). This is the first study to show an association between patients with %TBSA 10-19 and AKI. Given the association between AKI and complications, prospective research is needed to further understand AKI in burns with the aim of risk reduction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. ECSS Position Statement 2009: Prevention of acute sports injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steffen, K.; Andersen, T.E.; Krosshaug, T.; van Mechelen, W.; Myklebust, G.; Verhagen, E.A.L.M.; Bahr, R.

    2010-01-01

    To maximize the health benefits of sports and exercise and to minimize the direct and indirect costs associated with injuries, developing and adopting injury prevention strategies is an important goal. The aim of this ECSS consensus paper on injury prevention is to review current evidence on injury

  13. Fatal radiation pneumonia following subclinical busulfan injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soble, A.R.; Perry, H.

    1977-01-01

    A patient with polycythemia vera received a moderate dose (480 mg) of busulfan intermittently over a 6 year period and later developed Hodgkin's disease. Following split-course upper mantle, chest irradiation, he developed rapidly progressive, fatal pneumonia and bone marrow hypoplasia. It is postulated that the hyperacute organ failures (lung and bone marrow) resulted from augmentation of subclinical busulfan-induced damage of these organs by additive radiation effect. It is recommended that in patients who have had antineoplastic chemotherapy, major radiotherapy to the cervicothoracic region be accompanied by careful monitoring of respiratory and hematopoietic function, both before and during radiotherapy

  14. Acute kidney injury due to tropical infectious diseases and animal venoms: a tale of 2 continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdmann, Emmanuel A; Jha, Vivekanand

    2017-05-01

    South and Southeast Asia and Latin American together comprise 46 countries and are home to approximately 40% of the world population. The sociopolitical and economic heterogeneity, tropical climate, and malady transitions characteristic of the region strongly influence disease behavior and health care delivery. Acute kidney injury epidemiology mirrors these inequalities. In addition to hospital-acquired acute kidney injury in tertiary care centers, these countries face a large preventable burden of community-acquired acute kidney injury secondary to tropical infectious diseases or animal venoms, affecting previously healthy young individuals. This article reviews the epidemiology, clinical picture, prevention, risk factors, and pathophysiology of acute kidney injury associated with tropical diseases (malaria, dengue, leptospirosis, scrub typhus, and yellow fever) and animal venom (snakes, bees, caterpillars, spiders, and scorpions) in tropical regions of Asia and Latin America, and discusses the potential future challenges due to emerging issues. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Antioxidant protection of statins in acute kidney injury induced by sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franciele do Nascimento Santos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective Evaluating the effect of preconditioning with simvastatin in acute kidney injury induced by sepsis. Method Male adult Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: SHAM (control; SHAM+Statin (0.5 mg/kg simvastatin, orally; Sepsis (cecal puncture ligation – CPL; Sepsis+Statin. Physiological parameters, peritoneal fluid culture, renal function, oxidative metabolites, severity of acute kidney injury and animal survival were evaluated. Results The treatment with simvastatin in induced sepsis showed elevation of creatinine clearance with attenuation of generation of oxidative metabolites, lower severity of acute kidney injury and reduced mortality. Conclusion This investigation confirmed the renoprotection with antioxidant principle of the simvastatin in acute kidney injury induced by sepsis in an experimental model.

  16. Diagnostic value of low-field MRI for acute poisoning brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Lianrong; He Qinyi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of low-field MIR in diagnosis of acute CO poisoning brain injury. Methods: The brain MIR and clinical data of 110 patients with acute CO poisoning brain injury confirmed by clinical examination were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Long T1 and T2 signal intensity was showed on MRI in cerebral hemispheres and globus pallidus symmetrically. There were three basic types of MIR manifestations, white matter of brain type, globus pallidus type and brain mixed type. Conclusions: MRI could be used for confirming the degree and range of acute CO poisoning brain injury. It has important clinical value in the diagnosis, staging and prognosis of patients with acute CO poisoning brain injury. (authors)

  17. The protective effect of lycopene against radiation injury to the small intestine of abdominally radiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Youko; Kurabe, Teruhisa; Ishiguchi, Tsuneo

    2004-01-01

    To reduce the side effects of radiotherapy, radioprotective effects of lycopene on villi and crypts in the small intestine of abdominally radiated mice (15 Gy) were examined with administration pre-, continuous and post-radiation. In the lycopene group, the ratio of the villus length to the crypt was significantly increased in comparison with the radiation only group at 2 days after radiation. At 7 days after radiation, the ratio of necrotic cells in crypt/total was significantly decreased and the ratio of necrotic cells in villus/total was significantly increased by lycopene administration, which indicated an acceleration of the recovery from the radiation injury with lycopene. Each lycopene administered group showed a significant radioprotective effect, with the pre-radiation administration inducing a smaller effect than that of continuous and post-radiation administration. Radiation induced apoptosis was also decreased by lycopene administration. It is concluded that pre-, continuous and post-radiation administration of lycopene protects against radiation injury of the small intestine and accelerate the recovery. (author)

  18. Rhabdomyolysis and Acute Kidney Injury Associated with Hypothyroidism and Statin Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pyoung Ahn

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyolysis is a syndrome involving the breakdown of skeletal muscle that causes myoglobin and other intracellular proteins to leak into the circulatory system, resulting in organ injury including acute kidney injury. We report a case of statin-induced rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury that developed in a 63-year-old woman with previously undiagnosed hypothyroidism. Untreated hypothyroidism may have caused her hypercholesterolemia requiring statin treatment, and it is postulated that statin-induced muscle injury was aggravated by hypothyroidism resulting in her full-blown rhabdomyolysis. Although this patient was successfully treated with continuous venovenous hemofiltration and L-thyroxin replacement, rhabdomyolysis with acute kidney injury is a potentially life-threatening disorder. Physicians must pay special attention to the possible presence of subclinical hypothyroidism when administering statins in patients with hypercholesterolemia.

  19. [Expression of various matrix metalloproteinases in mice with hyperoxia-induced acute lung injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiang-feng; Ding, Shao-fang; Gao, Yuan-ming; Liang, Ying; Foda, Hussein D

    2006-08-01

    To investigate the role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury induced by hyperoxia. Fifty four mice were exposed in sealed cages to >98% oxygen (for 24-72 hours), and another 18 mice to room air. The severity of lung injury was assessed, and the expression of mRNA and protein of MMP-2, MMP-9 and EMMPRIN in lung tissue, after exposure for 24, 48 and 72 hours of hyperoxia were studied by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. Hyperoxia caused acute lung injury; this was accompanied by increased expression of an upregulation of MMP-2, MMP-9 and EMMPRIN mRNA and protein in lung tissues. Hyperoxia causes acute lung injury in mice; increases in MMP-2, MMP-9 and EMMPRIN may play an important role in the development of hyperoxia induced lung injury in mice.

  20. Two cases of acute leukemia developed after therapeutic radiation for malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Naoki; Matsuo, Kakaru; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Tsuno, Sumio; Toyoda, Shigeki

    1978-01-01

    Report was made as to two cases of acute leukemia developed after therapeutic radiation for malignant tumors. Both cases were exposed to atomic-bomb at the places 4 and 3 km far from the center of explosion, and they did not suffer from injuries and acute symptoms due to radiation. Case 1. -A 78 year old man had a mass in a right hypogastric region in April of 1975. In March of 1976, he received laparotomy and was diagnosed as malignant schwannoma. He received radiation therapy with 4,600 R and MFC therapy. In February of 1977, a clinical diagnosis of erythroleukemia was made according to the findings by bone marrow puncture, and he died in March. Postmortem examination revealed that main lesions were malignant schwannoma, its metastases, and leukemia. Case 2. -A 51 year old woman had a finger-tip sized tumor in the left breast in November of 1965, and had a radical operation on the basis of a diagnosis of comedo sarcoma. After that she received 60 Co irradiation with 18,800 R, and she was admitted in December of 1971, because she was suspected of having leukemia. She died in January of 1972. Postmortem examination revealed acute myelocytic leukemia. It is suspected that the onset of erythroleukemia within one year after irradiation would be influenced by MFC therapy in addition to radiotherapy. It was thought that leukemia in Case 2 was influenced by radiotherapy rather than atomic-bomb radioactivity. (Serizawa, K.)

  1. Community-acquired acute kidney injury in adults in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adu, Dwomoa; Okyere, Perditer; Boima, Vincent; Matekole, Michael; Osafo, Charlotte

    We review recent published data on demographics, causes, diagnoses, treatment, and outcome of acute kidney injury (AKI) in Africa. A review of the incidence, etiology, diagnoses, and treatment of AKI in adults in Africa from studies published between the years 2000 and 2015. The incidence of AKI in hospitalized patients in Africa ranges from 0.3 to 1.9% in adults. Between 70 and 90% of cases of AKI are community acquired. Most patients with AKI are young with a weighted mean age of 41.3 standard deviation (SD) 9.3 years, and a male to female ratio of 1.2 : 1.0. Medical causes account for between 65 and 80% of causes of AKI. This is followed by obstetric causes in 5 - 27% of cases and surgical causes in 2 - 24% of cases. In the reported studies, between 17 and 94% of patients who needed dialysis received this. The mortality of AKI in adults in Africa ranged from 11.5 to 43.5%. Most reported cases of AKI in Africa originate in the community. The low incidence of hospital-acquired AKI is likely to be due to under ascertainment. Most patients with AKI in Africa are young and have a single precipitating cause. Prominent among these are infection, pregnancy complications and nephrotoxins. Early treatment can improve clinical outcomes.

  2. Bath salt intoxication causing acute kidney injury requiring hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regunath, Hariharan; Ariyamuthu, Venkatesh Kumar; Dalal, Pranavkumar; Misra, Madhukar

    2012-10-01

    Traditional bath salts contain a combination of inorganic salts like Epsom salts, table salt, baking soda, sodium metaphosphate, and borax that have cleansing properties. Since 2010, there have been rising concerns about a new type of substance abuse in the name of "bath salts." They are beta-ketone amphetamine analogs and are derivates of cathinone, a naturally occurring amphetamine analog found in the "khat" plant (Catha edulis). Effects reported with intake included increased energy, empathy, openness, and increased libido. Serious adverse effects reported with intoxication included cardiac, psychiatric, and neurological signs and symptoms. Not much is known about the toxicology and metabolism of these compounds. They inhibit monoamine reuptake (dopamine, nor epinephrine, etc.) and act as central nervous system stimulants with high additive and abuse potential because of their clinical and biochemical similarities to effects from use of cocaine, amphetamine, and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine. Deaths associated with use of these compounds have also been reported. We report a case of acute kidney injury associated with the use of "bath salt" pills that improved with hemodialysis. © 2012 The Authors. Hemodialysis International © 2012 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  3. Rare acute kidney injury secondary to hypothyroidism-induced rhabdomyolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ying; Tang, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) caused by hypothyroidism-induced rhabdomyolysis is a rare and potentially life-threatening syndrome. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical characteristics of such patients. We retrospectively analyzed five patients treated at the Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University with AKI secondary to hypothyroidism- induced rhabdomyolysis from January 2006 to December 2010. Of the five cases reviewed (4 males, age range of 37 to 62 years), adult primary hypothyroidism was caused by amiodarone (1 case), chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (1 case), and by uncertain etiologies (3 cases). All patients presented with facial and lower extremity edema. Three patients presented with weakness, while two presented with blunted facies and oliguria. Only one patient reported experiencing myalgia and proximal muscle weakness, in addition to fatigue and chills. Creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and renal function normalized after thyroid hormone replacement, except in two patients who improved through blood purification. Hypothyroidism should be considered in patients presenting with renal impairment associated with rhabdomyolysis. Moreover, further investigation into the etiology of the hypothyroidism is warranted.

  4. Are diuretics harmful in the management of acute kidney injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejaz, A Ahsan; Mohandas, Rajesh

    2014-03-01

    To assess the role of diuretics in acute kidney injury (AKI) and their effectiveness in preventing AKI, achieving fluid balance, and decreasing progression to chronic kidney disease (CKD). Diuretics are associated with increased risk for AKI. The theoretical advantage of diuretic-induced preservation of renal medullary oxygenation to prevent AKI has not been proven. A higher cumulative diuretic dose during the dialysis period can cause hypotension and increase mortality in a dose-dependent manner. Data on the use of forced euvolemic diuresis to prevent AKI remains controversial. Positive fluid balance has emerged as an independent predictor of adverse outcomes. Post-AKI furosemide dose had a favorable effect on mortality due in part to the reduction of positive fluid balance. There are exciting experimental data suggesting that spironolactone may prevent AKI once an ischemic insult has occurred and thus prevent the progression to CKD. Diuretics are ineffective and even detrimental in the prevention and treatment of AKI, and neither shorten the duration of AKI, nor reduce the need for renal replacement therapy. Diuretics have an important role in volume management in AKI, but they are not recommended for the prevention of AKI. There is increased emphasis on the prevention of progression of AKI to CKD.

  5. Acute Cholangitis After Bilioenteric Anastomosis for Bile Duct Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Brizuela, Edgar; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Manzur-Sandoval, Daniel; Terán-Ellis, Santiago Mier Y; Ponce-de-León, Sergio; Torres-González, Pedro; Mercado, Miguel Ángel

    2017-10-01

    The study aims to describe the clinical features, microbiology, and associated factors of acute cholangitis (AC) after bilioenteric anastomosis (BEA) for biliary duct injury (BDI). Additionally, we assessed the performance of the Tokyo Guidelines 2013 (TG13) recommendations in these patients. We conducted a case-control study of 524 adults with a history of BEA for BDI from January 2000 to January 2014. A propensity score adjustment was performed for the analysis of the independent role of the main factors identified during the univariate logistic regression procedure. We identified 117 episodes of AC in 70 patients; 51.3% were definitive AC according to the TG13 diagnostic criteria, and 39.3% did not fulfill the imaging criteria of AC. A history of post-operative biliary complications (OR 2.55, 95% CI 1.38-4.70) and the bile duct confluence preservation (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.24-0.87) were associated with AC. Eighty-nine percent of the microorganisms were Enterobacteriaceae; of them, 28% were extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producers. AC is a common complication after BEA and must be suspected even in the absence of imaging findings, particulary in patients with a history of post-operative biliary complications, and/or without bile duct confluence preserved. An empirical treatment for ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae may be appropriate in patients living in countries with a high rate of bacterial drug resistance.

  6. Prediction and Prevention of Acute Kidney Injury after Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Rin Shin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery (CS-AKI ranges from 33% to 94% and is associated with a high incidence of morbidity and mortality. The etiology is suggested to be multifactorial and related to almost all aspects of perioperative management. Numerous studies have reported the risk factors and risk scores and novel biomarkers of AKI have been investigated to facilitate the subclinical diagnosis of AKI. Based on the known independent risk factors, many preventive interventions to reduce the risk of CS-AKI have been tested. However, any single preventive intervention did not show a definite and persistent benefit to reduce the incidence of CS-AKI. Goal-directed therapy has been considered to be a preventive strategy with a substantial level of efficacy. Many pharmacologic agents were tested for any benefit to treat or prevent CS-AKI but the results were conflicting and evidences are still lacking. The present review will summarize the current updated evidences about the risk factors and preventive strategies for CS-AKI.

  7. Risk factors associated with acute kidney injury in newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad E Ghobrial

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI in the newborn is a common problem in the neonatal intensive care unit with many underlying factors such as asphyxia, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS, and urogenital anomalies. The aim of this study is to highlight possible risk factors and profile of neonates developing AKI in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU of Cairo University Pediatric Hospital. The study was carried out on 90 neonates (30 patients and 60 controls, among neonates admitted to NICU. The study was done over two months, from January 2015 to March 2015. Our study showed that sepsis was detected in 53.3%, prematurity in 46.67%, RDS in 43.3%, congenital heart disease in 20%, and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy in 6.67% of patients. Maternal illness and low body temperature were both significant risk factors of AKI in neonates. History of maternal illness, low body temperature, sepsis, prematurity, and respiratory distress can contribute to the development of AKI in neonates.

  8. Hospital Mortality in the United States following Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremiah R. Brown

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common reason for hospital admission and complication of many inpatient procedures. The temporal incidence of AKI and the association of AKI admissions with in-hospital mortality are a growing problem in the world today. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology of AKI and its association with in-hospital mortality in the United States. AKI has been growing at a rate of 14% per year since 2001. However, the in-hospital mortality associated with AKI has been on the decline starting with 21.9% in 2001 to 9.1 in 2011, even though the number of AKI-related in-hospital deaths increased almost twofold from 147,943 to 285,768 deaths. We discuss the importance of the 71% reduction in AKI-related mortality among hospitalized patients in the United States and draw on the discussion of whether or not this is a phenomenon of hospital billing (coding or improvements to the management of AKI.

  9. Methylprednisolone for acute spinal cord injury: an increasingly philosophical debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Christian A; Kundu, Bornali; Hawryluk, Gregory W J

    2016-06-01

    Following publication of NASCIS II, methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS) was hailed as a breakthrough for patients with acute spinal cord injury (SCI). MPSS use for SCI has since become very controversial and it is our opinion that additional evidence is unlikely to break the stalemate amongst clinicians. Patient opinion has the potential to break this stalemate and we review our recent findings which reported that spinal cord injured patients informed of the risks and benefits of MPSS reported a preference for MPSS administration. We discuss the implications of the current MPSS debate on translational research and seek to address some misconceptions which have evolved. As science has failed to resolve the MPSS debate we argue that the debate is an increasingly philosophical one. We question whether SCI might be viewed as a serious condition like cancer where serious side effects of therapeutics are tolerated even when benefits may be small. We also draw attention to the similarity between the side effects of MPSS and isotretinoin which is prescribed for the cosmetic disorder acne vulgaris. Ultimately we question how patient autonomy should be weighed in the context of current SCI guidelines and MPSS's status as a historical standard of care.

  10. Acute Kidney Injury: Definition, Pathophysiology and Clinical Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, Konstantinos; Spanou, Loukia

    2016-05-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a clinical syndrome that complicates the course and worsens the outcome in a significant number of hospitalised patients. Recent advances in clinical and basic research will help with a more accurate definition of this syndrome and in the elucidation of its pathogenesis. With this knowledge we will be able to conduct more accurate epidemiologic studies in an effort to gain a better understanding of the impact of this syndrome. AKI is a syndrome that rarely has a sole and distinct pathophysiology. Recent evidence, in both basic science and clinical research, is beginning to change our view for AKI from a single organ failure syndrome to a syndrome where the kidney plays an active role in the progress of multi-organ dysfunction. Accurate and prompt recognition of AKI and better understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the various clinical phenotypes are of great importance to research for effective therapeutic interventions. In this review we provide the most recent updates in the definition, epidemiology and pathophysiology of AKI.

  11. Lung-protective mechanical ventilation does not protect against acute kidney injury in patients without lung injury at onset of mechanical ventilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortjens, Bart; Royakkers, Annick A. N. M.; Determann, Rogier M.; van Suijlen, Jeroen D. E.; Kamphuis, Stephan S.; Foppen, Jannetje; de Boer, Anita; Wieland, Cathrien W.; Spronk, Peter E.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Bouman, Catherine S. C.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Preclinical and clinical studies suggest that mechanical ventilation contributes to the development of acute kidney injury (AKI), particularly in the setting of lung-injurious ventilator strategies. Objective: To determine whether ventilator settings in critically ill patients without

  12. Repair of acute injuries of the lateral ligament complex of the ankle by suture anchors

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiang-Fei; Fang, Yang; Cao, Zhong-Hua; Li, Guang-Feng; Yang, Guo-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical curative effect of stage I repair of acute injuries of the lateral ligament complex of the ankle by the application of suture anchors. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 18 cases of III degree acute injuries of the lateral ligament complex of the ankle. Results: There were statistically significant differences in preoperative and last follow-up VAS pain scores and AOFAS ankle hind-foot function scores. The X-ray talus di...

  13. Targeting Extracellular Histones with Novel RNA Bio drugs for the Treatment of Acute Lung Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0179 TITLE: Targeting Extracellular Histones with Novel RNA Bio -drugs for the Treatment of Acute Lung Injury...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting Extracellular Histones with Novel RNA Bio -drugs for the Treatment of Acute Lung Injury 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...and field situations. To accomplish this goal, we developed novel bio -reagents (RNA aptamers) that bind to those histones known to cause MODS/ARDS and

  14. Acute Kidney Injury as a Risk Factor for Delirium and Coma during Critical Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siew, Edward D; Fissell, William H; Tripp, Christina M; Blume, Jeffrey D; Wilson, Matthew D; Clark, Amanda J; Vincz, Andrew J; Ely, E Wesley; Pandharipande, Pratik P; Girard, Timothy D

    2017-06-15

    Acute kidney injury may contribute to distant organ dysfunction. Few studies have examined kidney injury as a risk factor for delirium and coma. To examine whether acute kidney injury is associated with delirium and coma in critically ill adults. In a prospective cohort study of intensive care unit patients with respiratory failure and/or shock, we examined the association between acute kidney injury and daily mental status using multinomial transition models adjusting for demographics, nonrenal organ failure, sepsis, prior mental status, and sedative exposure. Acute kidney injury was characterized daily using the difference between baseline and peak serum creatinine and staged according to Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes criteria. Mental status (normal vs. delirium vs. coma) was assessed daily with the Confusion Assessment Method for the ICU and Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale. Among 466 patients, stage 2 acute kidney injury was a risk factor for delirium (odds ratio [OR], 1.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-2.26) and coma (OR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.25-3.34) as was stage 3 injury (OR for delirium, 2.56; 95% CI, 1.57-4.16) (OR for coma, 3.34; 95% CI, 1.85-6.03). Daily peak serum creatinine (adjusted for baseline) values were also associated with delirium (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.18-1.55) and coma (OR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.20-1.74). Renal replacement therapy modified the association between stage 3 acute kidney injury and daily peak serum creatinine and both delirium and coma. Acute kidney injury is a risk factor for delirium and coma during critical illness.

  15. Main stages in the development of radiation immunology: from immunochemical analysis of injury to monitored radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarilin, A.A.; Kashkin, K.P.

    1982-01-01

    The results of research of the radiation action on immunity are presented. The results of immunochemical investigation of radiation tissue injuries are considered. Much attention is given to the problem of radiation injury and repair of the lymphoid system. It is shown that the next stage of development of radiation immunology is immunologic control of radiotherapy of oncologic patients

  16. Immuno-therapy of Acute Radiation Syndromes : Extracorporeal Immuno-Lympho-Plasmo-Sorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava

    Methods Results Summary and conclusions Introduction: Existing Medical Management of the Acute Radiation Syndromes (ARS) does not include methods of specific immunotherapy and active detoxication. Though the Acute Radiation Syndromes were defined as an acute toxic poisonous with development of pathological processes: Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS), Toxic Multiple Organ Injury (TMOI), Toxic Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome(TMODS), Toxic Multiple Organ Failure (TMOF). Radiation Toxins of SRD Group play an important role as the trigger mechanisms in development of the ARS clinical symptoms. Methods: Immuno-Lympho-Plasmo-Sorption is a type of Immuno-therapy which includes prin-ciples of immunochromato-graphy, plasmopheresis, and hemodialysis. Specific Antiradiation Antitoxic Antibodies are the active pharmacological agents of immunotherapy . Antiradia-tion Antitoxic Antibodies bind selectively to Radiation Neurotoxins, Cytotoxins, Hematotox-ins and neutralize their toxic activity. We have developed the highly sensitive method and system for extracorporeal-immune-lypmh-plasmo-sorption with antigen-specific IgG which is clinically important for treatment of the toxic and immunologic phases of the ARS. The method of extracorporeal-immune-lypmh-plasmo-sorption includes Antiradiation Antitoxic Antibodies (AAA) immobilized on microporous polymeric membranes with a pore size that is capable to provide diffusion of blood-lymph plasma. Plasma of blood or lymph of irradiated mammals contains Radiation Toxins (RT) that have toxic and antigenic properties. Radiation Toxins are Antigen-specific to Antitoxic blocking antibodies (Immunoglobulin G). Plasma diffuses through membranes with immobilized AAA and AA-antibodies bind to the polysaccharide chain of tox-ins molecules and complexes of AAA-RT that are captured on membrane surfaces. RT were removed from plasma. Re-transfusion of plasma of blood and lymph had been provided. We show a statistical significant

  17. Diagnostic value of urinary kidney injury molecule 1 for acute kidney injury: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinghua Shao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Urinary Kidney Injury Molecule 1 (KIM-1 is a proximal tubular injury biomarker for early detection of acute kidney injury (AKI, with variable performance characteristics depending on clinical and population settings. METHODS: Meta-analysis was performed to assess the diagnostic value of urinary KIM-1 in AKI. Relevant studies were searched from MEDLINE, EMBASE, Pubmed, Elsevier Science Direct, Scopus, Web of Science, Google Scholar and Cochrane Library. Meta-analysis methods were used to pool sensitivity and specificity and to construct summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC curves. RESULTS: A total of 2979 patients from 11 eligible studies were enrolled in the analysis. Five prospective cohorts, two cross-sectional and four case-control studies were identified for meta-analysis. The estimated sensitivity of urinary KIM-1 for the diagnosis of AKI was 74.0% (95% CI, 61.0%-84.0%, and specificity was 86.0% (95% CI, 74.0%-93.0%. The SROC analysis showed an area under the curve of 0.86(0.83-0.89. Subgroup analysis suggested that population settings and detection time were the key factors affecting the efficiency of KIM-1 for AKI diagnosis. LIMITATION: Various population settings, different definition of AKI and Serum creatinine level used as the standard might have influence on AKI diagnosis. The relatively small number of studies and heterogeneity between them also affected the evaluation. CONCLUSION: Urinary KIM-1 may be a promising biomarker for early detection of AKI with considerable predictive value, especially for cardiac surgery patients, and its potential value needs to be validated in large studies and across a broader scope of clinical settings.

  18. Facet joint injuries in acute cervical spine trauma : evaluation with CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Jeon Ju; Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Jeong Hwa; Lee, Keon; Kwon, Hyeok Po; Kwon, Jung Hyeok; Yun, Seong Mun [Dongkang General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-05-01

    To evaluate injury patterns of facet joints and associated soft tissue injuries in patients with acute traumatic cervical facet joint injuries. From among patients with cervical spine trauma, 27 with facet joint injuries, as seen on CT and MRI, were chosen for this study. CT scans were analyzed with regard to the location of facet joint injury, the presence or absence of facet dislocation or fracture, and other associated fractures. MR images were analyzed with regard to ligament injury, intervertebral disc injury, intervertebral disc herniation, and spinal cord injury. The most common location of facet joint injury was C6-7 level(n=10), followed by C5-6(n=8). Among these 27 patients with facet joint injuries, 12(44%) had bilateral injuries and 15(56%) unilateral injuries. Facet fractures were present in 17 cases(63%) and the fracture of inferior facet was more frequent than superior. Patterns of fracture were vertical, transverse, or comminuted, but vertical fracture was the most common. Various degrees of dislocation were observed in patients with facet fractures. Fractures other than facet included pillar(n=11), lamina(n=6), transverse process(n=14), body(n=13), and spinous process(n=3). On MR images, anterior longitudinal ligament injury was found in 8 patients(30%), posterior longitudinal ligament injury in 4(15%), and interspinous ligament injury in 20(74%). Twelve patients(44%) had spinal cord injuries including edema(n=8) and hemorrhage(n=4). Among patients with disc abnormalities, 11(41%) had intervertebral disc injuries, and traumatic disc herniations were found in nine. Traumatic cervical facet joint injuries were manifested as various patterns and frequently associated with other fractures or soft tissue injuries. Analysis of CT and MR findings of these injury patterns helped formulate a therapeutic plan and determine of prognosis.

  19. Diseases induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    The instruction sheet for medical examinations presents information on clinical symptoms and diagnostic procedures relating to the following cases: 1. Acute radiation injury due to whole-body exposure; 2. acute, local radiation injury due to partial body exposure; 3. chronic general affections due to whole-body exposure; 4. chronic, local affections due to partial body exposure; 5. delayed radiation effects. (HP) [de

  20. Acute alcohol intoxication in patients with mild traumatic brain injury : Characteristics, recovery, and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheenen, Myrthe E.; de Koning, Myrthe E.; van der Horn, Harm J.; Roks, C.M.A.A.; Yilmaz, Tansel; van der Naalt, Joukje; Spikman, Jacoba M.

    2016-01-01

    A substantial number of patients (30% to 50%) sustains a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) while they are under the influence of alcohol. An acute alcohol intoxication (AAI) at the time of injury has been subject of research in severe TBI, but little is known about the relation between AAI and

  1. Acute Alcohol Intoxication in Patients with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury : Characteristics, Recovery, and Outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheenen, Myrthe E.; de Koning, Myrthe E.; van der Horn, Harm; Roks, Gerwin; Yilmaz, Tansel; van der Naalt, Joukje; Spikman, Jacoba M.

    2016-01-01

    A substantial number of patients (30% to 50%) sustains a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) while they are under the influence of alcohol. An acute alcohol intoxication (AAI) at the time of injury has been subject of research in severe TBI, but little is known about the relation between AAI and

  2. Detrusor Acontractility after Acute Spinal Cord Injury-Myth or Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bywater, Mirjam; Tornic, Jure; Mehnert, Ulrich; Kessler, Thomas M

    2018-01-17

    We assessed urodynamic parameters within the first 40 days after spinal cord injury to investigate whether the detrusor is acontractile during the acute phase of spinal cord injury. We performed a prospective cohort study in 54 patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction due to acute spinal cord injury who underwent urodynamic investigation within the first 40 days after injury at a single university spinal cord injury center. Urodynamic investigation revealed an acontractile detrusor in only 20 of the 54 patients (37%) but unfavorable urodynamic parameters in 34 (63%). We found detrusor overactivity in 32 patients, detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia in 25, maximum storage detrusor pressure greater than 40 cm H 2 O in 17, vesicoureteral reflux in 3 and low bladder compliance (less than 20 ml/cm H 2 O) in 1. More than 1 unfavorable urodynamic parameter per patient was possible. In contrast to the common notion of an acontractile detrusor during acute spinal cord injury, almost two-thirds of our patients showed unfavorable urodynamic parameters within the first 40 days after spinal cord injury. Considering that early treatment of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction in patients with acute spinal cord injury might improve the long-term urological outcome, urodynamic investigation should be performed timely to optimize patient tailored therapy. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The prognostic value of MRI in determining reinjury risk following acute hamstring injury: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heumen, Moniek; Tol, Johannes L.; de Vos, Robert-Jan; Moen, Maarten H.; Weir, Adam; Orchard, John; Reurink, Gustaaf

    2017-01-01

    A challenge for sports physicians is to estimate the risk of a hamstring re-injury, but the current evidence for MRI variables as a risk factor is unknown. To systematically review the literature on the prognostic value of MRI findings at index injury and/or return to play for acute hamstring

  4. Histamine is not released in acute thermal injury in human skin in vivo: a microdialysis study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars Jelstrup; Pedersen, Juri Lindy; Skov, Per Stahl

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Animal models have shown histamine to be released from the skin during the acute phase of a burn injury. The role of histamine during the early phase of thermal injuries in humans remains unclear. PURPOSE: The objectives of this trial were to study histamine release in human skin during...

  5. Acute radiation sickness - morphology of CNS syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamarad, V.

    1989-01-01

    The effect was studied of supralethal doses of 60 Co gamma radiation on morphological changes in the brains of laboratory animals. For experiments, female rats irradiated with doses of 15 to 960 Gy, female mice irradiated with doses of 50 to 300 Gy and dogs irradiated with 6 to 500 Gy were used. For evaluation of the changes, light microscopy, electron microscopy and histochemistry were employed. The findings generally agreed with the results by other authors whose numerous studies are reviewed in detail. They included brain edema, alterations in enzyme activities, dystrophic changes and hemorrhages in nerve cells, marked structural changes in blood capillaries, damage of endothelial cells, etc. The observed changes in the activities of blood-brain barrier enzymes, increased pinocytotic activity and the formation of endothelial tunnels accompanied with necrosis of part of endothelial cells are clear morphological manifestations of marked alterations in the function of the blood-brain barrier that result in brain edema development. The increased permeability of the blood-brain barrier significantly worsens primary changes induced by radiation, especially in nerve cels, and adversely affects possible repair processes. (L.O.). 146 figs., 8 tabs., 352 refs

  6. Central nervous system radiation injury in small animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogel, A.J. van der

    1991-01-01

    Experimental studies on radiation injury in the central nervous system have been carried out in many species ranging from mouse to monkey. This review is restricted to studies in rodents irradiated with low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. In this paper, the various rodent models of brain and spinal cord injury are described with particular emphasis on the pathology of different types of lesions and theories of their pathogenesis. Many of the initial studies were limited to relatively high single doses, but in later work more clinically relevant fractionated irradiation schemes were employed. This has led to the recognition of various types of early and late delayed injury that are analogous to the syndromes observed in humans. Two main pathways have been suggested for the pathogenesis, one involving predominantly the progressive loss of glial cells and the other involving vascular injury. The relative importance of both mechanisms will be discussed with respect to treatment conditions and to dose level in particular. An hypothesis is presented concerning the possible role of different cell types in the development of specific syndromes

  7. Ibuprofen-associated acute kidney injury in dehydrated children with acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestracci, Alejandro; Ezquer, Mauricio; Elmo, María Eugenia; Molini, Andrea; Thorel, Claudia; Torrents, Milagros; Toledo, Ismael

    2015-10-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) induce acute kidney injury (AKI) in volume-depleted patients; however the prevalence of this complication is likely underestimated. We assessed the impact of ibuprofen exposure on renal function among dehydrated children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) to further characterize NSAID-associated AKI. Over a 1-year period dehydrated children with AGE (n = 105) were prospectively enrolled and grouped as cases, presenting with AKI (n = 46) or controls, not presenting with AKI (n = 59). AKI was defined by pediatric RIFLE (pRIFLE) criteria. Among the children enrolled in the study, AKI prevalence was 44 %, and 34 (54 %) of the 63 patients who received ibuprofen developed renal impairment. Relative to the controls, children presenting with AKI were younger (median age 0.66 vs. 1.74 years; p dehydration, ibuprofen exposure remained an independent risk factor for AKI (p dehydrated children with AGE. Drug exposure increased the risk for developing AKI by more than twofold, independent of the magnitude of the dehydration.

  8. Total ginsenosides synergize with ulinastatin against septic acute lung injury and acute respir atory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rongju; Li, Yana; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Fei; Li, Tanshi

    2015-01-01

    Total ginsenosides synergize with ulinastatin (UTI) against septic acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We randomly divided 80 cases of severe sepsis-induced ALI and ARDS into a UTI group and a ginsenosides (GS)+UTI group. Continuous electrocardiac monitoring of pulse, respiratory rate, blood pressure, and heart rate; invasive hemodynamic monitoring; ventilator-assisted breathing and circulation support; and anti-infection as well as UTI treatment were given in the UTI group with GS treatment added for 7 consecutive days in the GS+UTI group. The indicators of pulmonary vascular permeability, pulmonary circulation, blood gases, and hemodynamics as well as APACHE II and ALI scores were detected on days 1, 3, and 7. The ALI score in the GS+UTI group was significantly decreased (P UTI group, and the indicators of pulmonary capillary permeability such as pulmonary vascular permeability index, extravascular lung water index, and oxygenation index, in the GS+UTI group improved significantly more than that of the UTI group. The indicators of hemodynamics and pulmonary circulation such as cardiac index, intrathoracic blood volume index, and central venous pressure improved significantly (P UTI group was lower than that of the UTI group. GS can effectively collaborate with UTI against ALI and/or ARDS. PMID:26261640

  9. Cytokines in therapy of radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neta, R.; Oppenheim, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    Repeated injections or infusion of hematopoietic growth factors, such as interleukin-3 (IL-3), granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), or granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), accelerate restoration of hematopoiesis in animals compromised by sublethal doses of cytotoxic drugs or irradiation. Previous work by the investigators has shown that IL-1 induced circulating CSF in normal mice and, when used after sublethal irradiation, accelerated the recovery of endogenous splenic colonies. Therefore, IL-1, as well as IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), G-CSF, and GM-CSF, were evaluated as potential therapeutic agents in irradiated C3H-HeN mice. A single intraperitoneal injection, administered within three hours after a lethal dose (LD)95/30 of irradiation that would kill 95% of mice within 30 days, protected in a dose-dependent manner up to 100% of mice from radiation-induced death due to hematopoietic syndrome. Significant therapeutic effects were also achieved with a single dose of IFN-gamma or of TNF. In contrast, GM-CSF and G-CSF, administered shortly after irradiation, had no effect in the doses used on mice survival

  10. Restoration of radiation injury by ginseng, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Atsuhiko; Katoh, Norio; Yonezawa, Morio

    1982-01-01

    Radiation protection by post-irradiation injection of a thermostable fraction of the ginseng extract in mice, rats and guinea pigs was studied. The thermostable fraction lost ''by-effects'' of decrease in body weight and splenic hyperplasia which were caused in injected mice by the original ginseng extract. The fraction protected mice (male) irradiated with 720 R of X-rays and rats (male) irradiated with 825 R with the dose about 6 mg per 100 g of body weight. The fraction also protected guinea pigs, both female and male, irradiated with 325 R with the dose about 80 mg per 300 g of body weight. The thermostable fraction stimulated recovery of thrombocyte and erythrocyte counts, but not leukocyte counts, in 550-R irradiated mice. Recovery of all the three blood cell counts was stimulated by the fraction in rats irradiated with 630 R and guinea pigs irradiated with 200 R. Comparison of stimulated recovery by the thermostable fraction of the ginseng extract among the three blood cell counts showed that restoring action was the most marked on thrombocyte counts, commonly in the three species of the animals. (author)

  11. Experimental model of cutaneous radiation injury in rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meirelles, Rafael Panisi de Campos [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina; Hochman, Bernardo [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina. Dept. de Cirurgia; Helene Junior, Americo; Fraga, Murillo Francisco Pires [Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas da Santa Casa de Sao Paulo (FCMSCSP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Cirurgia. Divisao de Cirurgia Plastica; Lellis, Rute [Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas da Santa Casa de Sao Paulo (FCMSCSP), SP (Brazil). Divisao de Patologia; Ferreira, Lydia Masako, E-mail: rpcmeirelles@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: lydia.dcir@epm.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Mediciana. Divisao de Cirugia Plastica

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: to describe an experimental model of cutaneous radiation injury in rabbits. Methods: on this study eight six-month-old New Zealand male rabbits, with an average weight of 2.5kg were used. They were distributed in four groups (n=2 per group). The control group did not receive radiotherapy and the others received one radiotherapy session of 2000, 3000 and 4500 cGy, respectively. Photographic analysis and histopathological evaluation of the irradiated areas were carried out. Results: after 30 days, the animals from the control group had all their hair grown. In spite of that, the animals from group 2000 cGy had a 60-day alopecia and from group 3000 cGy, a 90-day alopecia. After the 30th day, the 3000cGy group demonstrated 90-day cutaneous radiation injuries, graded 3 and 4. One of the animals from group 4500 cGy died on the 7th day with visceral necrosis. The other from the same group had total skin necrosis. A progressive reduction of glands and blood vessels count and an increase on collagen deposition was observed. Conclusion: The proposed experimental model is reproducible. This study suggests that the dosage 4500cGy is excessive and the 3000 cGy is the most effective for this experimental model of cutaneous radiation injury in rabbits. (author)

  12. Bone marrow transplantation and other treatment after radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balner, H.

    1977-01-01

    This review deals mainly with current concepts about bone marrow transplantation as therapy for serious radiation injury. Such injury can be classified according to the following broadly defined dose ranges: (1) the supralethal range, leading mainly to the cerebral and intestinal syndromes; (2) the potentially lethal or therapeutic range which causes the bone marrow syndrome, and (3) the sublethal range which rarely leads to injury requiring therapy. The bone marrow syndrome of man and animals is discussed in detail. The optimal therapy for this syndrome is bone marrow transplantation in conjunction with conventional supportive treatment. The principal complications of such therapy are Graft versus Host Disease and a slow recovery of the recipient's immune system. Concerted research activities in a number of institutions have led to considerable progress in the field of bone marrow transplantation. Improved donor selection, new techniques for stem-cell separation and preservation, as well as effective barrier-nursing and antibiotic decontamination, have made bone marrow transplantation an accepted therapy for marrow depression, including the aplasia caused by excessive exposure to radiation. The review also contains a number of guidelines for the handling of serious radiation accidents. (Auth.)

  13. Transfusion-related acute lung injury: Current understanding and preventive strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaar, A. P. J.

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the most serious complication of transfusion medicine. TRALI is defined as the onset of acute hypoxia within 6 hours of a blood transfusion in the absence of hydrostatic pulmonary oedema. The past decades have resulted in a better understanding of the

  14. Obeticholic acid protects against carbon tetrachloride-induced acute liver injury and inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Da-Gang; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Jun-Xian; Wang, Bi-Wei; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Lu, Yan; Tao, Li; Wang, Jian-Qing; Chen, Xi; Xu, De-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that plays important roles in regulating bile acid homeostasis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of obeticholic acid (OCA), a novel synthetic FXR agonist, carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 )-induced acute liver injury. Mice were intraperitoneally injected with CCl 4 (0.15 ml/kg). In CCl 4 + OCA group, mice were orally with OCA (5 mg/kg) 48, 24 and 1 h before CCl 4 . As expected, hepatic FXR was activated by OCA. Interestingly, OCA pretreatment alleviated CCl 4 -induced elevation of serum ALT and hepatic necrosis. Moreover, OCA pretreatment inhibited CCl 4 -induced hepatocyte apoptosis. Additional experiment showed that OCA inhibits CCl 4 -induced hepatic chemokine gene Mcp-1, Mip-2 and Kc. Moreover, OCA inhibits CCl 4 -induced hepatic pro-inflammatory gene Tnf-α and Il-1β. By contrast, OCA pretreatment elevated hepatic anti-inflammatory gene Il-4. Further analysis showed that OCA pretreatment inhibited hepatic IκB phosphorylation and blocked nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and p50 subunits during CCl 4 -induced acute liver injury. In addition, OCA pretreatment inhibited hepatic Akt, ERK and p38 phosphorylation in CCl 4 -induced acute liver injury. These results suggest that OCA protects against CCl 4 -induced acute liver injury and inflammation. Synthetic FXR agonists may be effective antidotes for hepatic inflammation during acute liver injury. - Highlights: • OCA pretreatment activates hepatic FXR. • FXR activation protects against CCl 4 -induced acute liver injury. • FXR activation inhibits hepatocyte apoptosis during CCl 4 -induced liver injury. • FXR activation differentially regulates hepatic inflammatory genes. • Synthetic FXR agonists are effective antidotes for acute liver injury.

  15. Obeticholic acid protects against carbon tetrachloride-induced acute liver injury and inflammation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Da-Gang [First Affiliated Hospital, Anhui Medical University, Hefei 230022 (China); Zhang, Cheng [Department of Toxicology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei 230032 (China); Wang, Jun-Xian [First Affiliated Hospital, Anhui Medical University, Hefei 230022 (China); Wang, Bi-Wei; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Chen, Yuan-Hua [Department of Toxicology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei 230032 (China); Lu, Yan; Tao, Li; Wang, Jian-Qing [Second Affiliated Hospital, Anhui Medical University, Hefei 230601 (China); Chen, Xi [First Affiliated Hospital, Anhui Medical University, Hefei 230022 (China); Xu, De-Xiang, E-mail: xudex@126.com [Department of Toxicology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei 230032 (China)

    2017-01-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that plays important roles in regulating bile acid homeostasis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of obeticholic acid (OCA), a novel synthetic FXR agonist, carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4})-induced acute liver injury. Mice were intraperitoneally injected with CCl{sub 4} (0.15 ml/kg). In CCl{sub 4} + OCA group, mice were orally with OCA (5 mg/kg) 48, 24 and 1 h before CCl{sub 4}. As expected, hepatic FXR was activated by OCA. Interestingly, OCA pretreatment alleviated CCl{sub 4}-induced elevation of serum ALT and hepatic necrosis. Moreover, OCA pretreatment inhibited CCl{sub 4}-induced hepatocyte apoptosis. Additional experiment showed that OCA inhibits CCl{sub 4}-induced hepatic chemokine gene Mcp-1, Mip-2 and Kc. Moreover, OCA inhibits CCl{sub 4}-induced hepatic pro-inflammatory gene Tnf-α and Il-1β. By contrast, OCA pretreatment elevated hepatic anti-inflammatory gene Il-4. Further analysis showed that OCA pretreatment inhibited hepatic IκB phosphorylation and blocked nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and p50 subunits during CCl{sub 4}-induced acute liver injury. In addition, OCA pretreatment inhibited hepatic Akt, ERK and p38 phosphorylation in CCl{sub 4}-induced acute liver injury. These results suggest that OCA protects against CCl{sub 4}-induced acute liver injury and inflammation. Synthetic FXR agonists may be effective antidotes for hepatic inflammation during acute liver injury. - Highlights: • OCA pretreatment activates hepatic FXR. • FXR activation protects against CCl{sub 4}-induced acute liver injury. • FXR activation inhibits hepatocyte apoptosis during CCl{sub 4}-induced liver injury. • FXR activation differentially regulates hepatic inflammatory genes. • Synthetic FXR agonists are effective antidotes for acute liver injury.

  16. Reduction in radiation-induced brain injury by use of pentobarbital or lidocaine protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldfield, E.H.; Friedman, R.; Kinsella, T.; Moquin, R.; Olson, J.J.; Orr, K.; DeLuca, A.M.

    1990-01-01

    To determine if barbiturates would protect brain at high doses of radiation, survival rates in rats that received whole-brain x-irradiation during pentobarbital- or lidocaine-induced anesthesia were compared with those of control animals that received no medication and of animals anesthetized with ketamine. The animals were shielded so that respiratory and digestive tissues would not be damaged by the radiation. Survival rates in rats that received whole-brain irradiation as a single 7500-rad dose under pentobarbital- or lidocaine-induced anesthesia was increased from between from 0% and 20% to between 45% and 69% over the 40 days of observation compared with the other two groups (p less than 0.007). Ketamine anesthesia provided no protection. There were no notable differential effects upon non-neural tissues, suggesting that pentobarbital afforded protection through modulation of ambient neural activity during radiation exposure. Neural suppression during high-dose cranial irradiation protects brain from acute and early delayed radiation injury. Further development and application of this knowledge may reduce the incidence of radiation toxicity of the central nervous system (CNS) and may permit the safe use of otherwise unsafe doses of radiation in patients with CNS neoplasms

  17. Hyperglycemia and acute kidney injury in critically ill children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordillo R

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Roberto Gordillo,1 Tania Ahluwalia,2 Robert Woroniecki3 1Department of Pediatrics, Division of Nephrology, 2Department of Pediatrics, University of Illinois College of Medicine, Peoria, IL, USA; 3Division of Pediatric Nephrology and Hypertension, Stony Brook Children’s Hospital, Stony Brook, NY, USA Background: Hyperglycemia and acute kidney injury (AKI are common in critically ill children and have been associated with higher morbidity and mortality. The incidence of AKI in children is difficult to estimate because of the lack of a standard definition for AKI. The pediatric RIFLE (Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function, and End-stage kidney disease criteria can be used to define AKI in children. Various biomarkers in urine and blood have been studied to detect AKI in critically ill children. However, it is not clear whether hyperglycemia is associated with AKI. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of hyperglycemia on kidney function and its effect on neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL in children. Methods: We studied retrospective and prospective cohorts of pediatric critically ill subjects admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU. We analyzed data from admission that included estimated glomerular filtration rate, plasma and urine NGAL, serum glucose and peak glycemia (highest glycemia during PICU admission, and length of hospital and PICU stay from two different institutions. Results: We found that the prevalence of hyperglycemia was 89% in the retrospective cohort and 86% in the prospective cohort, P=0.99. AKI was associated with peak glycemia, P=0.03. There was a statistically significant correlation between peak glycemia and hospital and PICU stays, P=<0.001 and P<0.001, respectively. Urine NGAL and plasma NGAL were not statistically different in subjects with and without hyperglycemia, P=0.99 and P=0.85, respectively. Subjects on vasopressors had lower estimated glomerular filtration rate and higher

  18. Urine stability studies for novel biomarkers of acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Chirag R; Butrymowicz, Isabel; Yu, Angela; Chinchilli, Vernon M; Park, Meyeon; Hsu, Chi-Yuan; Reeves, W Brian; Devarajan, Prasad; Kimmel, Paul L; Siew, Edward D; Liu, Kathleen D

    2014-04-01

    The study of novel urinary biomarkers of acute kidney injury has expanded exponentially. Effective interpretation of data and meaningful comparisons between studies require awareness of factors that can adversely affect measurement. We examined how variations in short-term storage and processing might affect the measurement of urine biomarkers. Cross-sectional prospective. Hospitalized patients from 2 sites: Yale New Haven Hospital (n=50) and University of California, San Francisco Medical Center (n=36). We tested the impact of 3 urine processing conditions on these biomarkers: (1) centrifugation and storage at 4°C for 48 hours before freezing at -80°C, (2) centrifugation and storage at 25°C for 48 hours before freezing at -80°C, and (3) uncentrifuged samples immediately frozen at -80°C. Urine concentrations of 5 biomarkers: neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), interleukin 18 (IL-18), kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM-1), liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), and cystatin C. We measured urine biomarkers by established enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods. Biomarker values were log-transformed, and agreement with a reference standard of immediate centrifugation and storage at -80°C was compared using concordance correlation coefficients (CCCs). Neither storing samples at 4°C for 48 hours nor centrifugation had a significant effect on measured levels, with CCCs higher than 0.9 for all biomarkers tested. For samples stored at 25°C for 48 hours, excellent CCC values (>0.9) also were noted between the test sample and the reference standard for NGAL, cystatin C, L-FABP and KIM-1. However, the CCC for IL-18 between samples stored at 25°C for 48 hours and the reference standard was 0.81 (95% CI, 0.66-0.96). No comparisons to fresh, unfrozen samples; no evaluation of the effect of protease inhibitors. All candidate markers tested using the specified assays showed high stability with both short-term storage at 4°C and without centrifugation

  19. Nonoperative treatment of acute traumatic spinal injuries: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-04-17

    Apr 17, 2014 ... only to the patients, their relatives and caregivers, but to the society in ... clinical effects are from primary injury as well as secondary injury that results .... cord syndrome and Brown‑Sequard syndrome (BSS) had best outcome.

  20. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) treatment of sports-related severe acute hamstring injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillodo, Yannick; Madouas, Gwénaelle; Simon, Thomas; Le Dauphin, Hermine; Saraux, Alain

    2015-01-01

    hamstring injury is the most common musculoskeletal disorder and one of the main causes of missed sporting events. Shortening the time to return to play (TTRTP) is a priority for athletes and sports medicine practitioners. platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection at the site of severe acute hamstring injury increases the healing rate and shortens the TTRTP. Cohort study. all patients with ultrasonography and MRI evidence of severe acute hamstring injury between January 2012 and March 2014 were offered PRP treatment. Those who accepted received a single intramuscular PRP injection within 8 days post-injury; the other patients served as controls. The same standardized rehabilitation program was used in both groups. A physical examination and ultrasonography were performed 10 and 30 days post-injury, then a phone interview 120 days post-injury, to determine the TTRTP at the pre-injury level. of 34 patients, 15 received PRP and 19 did not. Mean TTRTP at the pre-injury level was 50.9±10.7 days in the PRP group and 52.8±15.7 days in the control group. The difference was not statistically significant. a single intramuscular PRP injection did not shorten the TTRTP in sports people with severe acute hamstring injuries.

  1. Nurses' knowledge to identify early acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Roseli Aparecida Matheus do; Assunção, Murillo Santucci Cesar; Silva, João Manoel; Amendola, Cristina Prata; Carvalho, Taysa Martindo de; Lima, Emerson Quintino; Lobo, Suzana Margareth Ajeje

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the knowledgeof nurses on early identification of acute kidney injury (AKI) in intensive care, emergency and hospitalization units. A prospective multi-center study was conducted with 216 nurses, using a questionnaire with 10 questions related to AKI prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. 57.2% of nurses were unable to identify AKI clinical manifestations, 54.6% did not have knowledge of AKI incidence in patients admitted to the ICU, 87.0% of the nurses did not know how to answer as regards the AKI mortality rate in patients admitted to the ICU, 67.1% answered incorrectly that slight increases in serum creatinine do not have an impact on mortality, 66.8% answered incorrectly to the question on AKI prevention measures, 60.4% answered correctly that loop diuretics for preventing AKI is not recommended, 77.6% answered correctly that AKI does not characterize the need for hemodialysis, and 92.5% said they had no knowledge of the Acute Kidney Injury Networkclassification. Nurses do not have enough knowledge to identify early AKI, demonstrating the importance of qualification programs in this field of knowledge. Avaliar o conhecimento do enfermeiro na identificação precoce da Injúria Renal Aguda (IRA) em Unidade de Terapia Intensiva, Unidade de Internação e Emergência. Estudo multicêntrico, prospectivo.Participaram do estudo 216 enfermeiros,por meio de questionário com 10 questões relacionadas à prevenção, ao diagnóstico e ao tratamento da IRA. 57,2% não souberam identificar as manifestações clínicas da IRA, 54,6% não têm conhecimento da incidência de IRA em pacientes internados na UTI, 87,0% dos enfermeiros não souberam responder ao índice de mortalidade de IRA em pacientes internados na UTI, 67,1% responderam incorretamente que aumentos discretos da creatinina sérica não têm impacto na mortalidade, 66,8% responderam incorretamente à questão sobre as medidas de prevenção da IRA, 60,4% acertaram quando responderam que não

  2. Prophylactic measures of radiation injuries by natural herbs and neutraceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, P.K., E-mail: pkgoyal2002@gmail.com [Radiation and Cancer Biology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur (India)

    2014-07-01

    The application of radiation biology has gained greater relevance and significance in health and environmental issues. In the present time, nuclear terrorism and weapon related effects are raising much alarm and concern to public health. Obviously, radiation biology research has great potential in diagnosis, therapy and establishing standards for assessment risk from radiation exposure. The development of effective medical countermeasures against nuclear biological and chemical weapons is of immense importance to the defense of all nations and especially to those threatened by international terrorism. Chemical radiation protection is an important strategy to protect living being against deleterious effects of radiation. Earlier the synthetic chemical substances, which could minimize the pathological changes in the living system after exposure to ionizing radiation, were looked into. Medicinal plants are the local heritage with global importance. World is enclosed with a rich wealth of medicinal plants. Herbs have always been the principle form of medicine in India and presently they become popular. Over the last few years, interest in evaluating oriental medicinal herbs and edible phyto products for the use in anti-radiation strategies is encouraging and emerging as an acceptable approach for preventing the radiation induced lesions in many countries. Several Indian medicinal plants (Emblica officinalis, Rosemarinus officinalis, Trigonella foenum-graecum, Alstonia scholaris, Tinospora cordifolia, Phyllanthus niruri, Syzygium cumini, Aegle marmelos, Panax ginseng, Linum usitatissimum, Delonix regia etc) and antioxidant vitamins (C and E) have been tested in this laboratory by taking various biological end points for the possible use of natural products and phytochemicals to serve as radio protectors for medical countermeasures against radiation injuries, and the results obtained from such studies are highly encouraging and fruitful. It opens new avenues for the

  3. Prophylactic measures of radiation injuries by natural herbs and neutraceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, P.K.

    2014-01-01

    The application of radiation biology has gained greater relevance and significance in health and environmental issues. In the present time, nuclear terrorism and weapon related effects are raising much alarm and concern to public health. Obviously, radiation biology research has great potential in diagnosis, therapy and establishing standards for assessment risk from radiation exposure. The development of effective medical countermeasures against nuclear biological and chemical weapons is of immense importance to the defense of all nations and especially to those threatened by international terrorism. Chemical radiation protection is an important strategy to protect living being against deleterious effects of radiation. Earlier the synthetic chemical substances, which could minimize the pathological changes in the living system after exposure to ionizing radiation, were looked into. Medicinal plants are the local heritage with global importance. World is enclosed with a rich wealth of medicinal plants. Herbs have always been the principle form of medicine in India and presently they become popular. Over the last few years, interest in evaluating oriental medicinal herbs and edible phyto products for the use in anti-radiation strategies is encouraging and emerging as an acceptable approach for preventing the radiation induced lesions in many countries. Several Indian medicinal plants (Emblica officinalis, Rosemarinus officinalis, Trigonella foenum-graecum, Alstonia scholaris, Tinospora cordifolia, Phyllanthus niruri, Syzygium cumini, Aegle marmelos, Panax ginseng, Linum usitatissimum, Delonix regia etc) and antioxidant vitamins (C and E) have been tested in this laboratory by taking various biological end points for the possible use of natural products and phytochemicals to serve as radio protectors for medical countermeasures against radiation injuries, and the results obtained from such studies are highly encouraging and fruitful. It opens new avenues for the

  4. Choice of Reference Serum Creatinine in Defining Acute Kidney Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siew, Edward D; Matheny, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    The study of acute kidney injury (AKI) has expanded with the increasing availability of electronic health records and the use of standardized definitions. Understanding the impact of AKI between settings is limited by heterogeneity in the selection of reference creatinine to anchor the definition of AKI. In this mini-review, we discuss different approaches used to select reference creatinine and their relative merits and limitations. We reviewed the literature to obtain representative examples of published baseline creatinine definitions when pre-hospital data were not available, as well as literature evaluating the estimation of baseline renal function, using PubMed and reference back-tracing within known works. (1) Pre-hospital creatinine values are useful in determining reference creatinine, and in high-risk populations, the mean outpatient serum creatinine value 7-365 days before hospitalization closely approximates nephrology adjudication, (2) in patients without pre-hospital data, the eGFR 75 approach does not reliably estimate true AKI incidence in most at-risk populations, (3) using the lowest inpatient serum creatinine may be reasonable, especially in those with preserved kidney function, but may generously estimate AKI incidence and severity and miss community-acquired AKI that does not fully resolve, (4) using more specific definitions of AKI (e.g., KIDGO stages 2 and 3) may help to reduce the effects of misclassification when using surrogate values and (5) leveraging available clinical data may help refine the estimate of reference creatinine. Choosing reference creatinine for AKI calculation is important for AKI classification and study interpretation. We recommend obtaining data on pre-hospital kidney function, wherever possible. In studies where surrogate estimates are used, transparency in how they are applied and discussion that informs the reader of potential biases should be provided. Further work to refine the estimation of reference creatinine

  5. ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY IN PATIENTS WITH CIRRHOSIS- CAUSES AND OUTCOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Hanmant Shejal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Acute Kidney Injury (AKI is a common complication in patients with cirrhosis leading to high mortality. Creatinine-based criteria for defining AKI are validated in general hospitalised patients, but their application to cirrhotic patients is less certain. This study was undertaken to evaluate current definition of AKI by International Club of Ascites (ICA and assess clinical course of hospitalised cirrhosis patients with AKI and to study the impact of AKI on mortality. MATERIALS AND METHODS We prospectively studied patients with AKI and cirrhosis for a period of 1 year and assessed the association between AKI severity and progression with complications, including death. RESULTS 48 cirrhotic patients with AKI were enrolled in the study period. Mean age of patients was 56.81 ± 9.78 years. The aetiology of cirrhosis included alcohol (52.1%, HBV (2.2%, HCV (4.2%, NASH (27.1% and cryptogenic (14.6%. 13 patients (27.1% had mortality while 35 patients (72.9% survived. 39 patients (81.25% had AKI at admission while 9 patients (18.75% developed later after admission. Patients achieved a peak severity of AKI stage 1, 10.41%; stage 2, 60.41%; and stage 3, 37.5%. The incidence of mortality, increased with severity of AKI in stepwise manner with peak AKI stage 1 has no mortality; stage 2 has 4 (30.76%; stage 3, 9 (69.23%. SIRS was present in 17 patients (35.4% and was significantly associated with mortality. CONCLUSION AKI, as defined by new ICA criteria, in patients with cirrhosis is associated with mortality in a stage-dependent fashion. Early intervention and preventing progression by timely and specific treatment may improve outcomes.

  6. Validation of an electronic surveillance system for acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herasevich, Vitaly; Yilmaz, Murat; Khan, Hasrat; Hubmayr, Rolf D; Gajic, Ognjen

    2009-06-01

    Early detection of acute lung injury (ALI) is essential for timely implementation of evidence-based therapies and enrollment into clinical trials. We aimed to determine the accuracy of computerized syndrome surveillance for detection of ALI in hospitalized patients and compare it with routine clinical assessment. Using a near-real time copy of the electronic medical records, we developed and validated a custom ALI electronic alert (ALI "sniffer") based on the European-American Consensus Conference Definition and compared its performance against provider-derived documentation. A total of 3,795 consecutive critically ill patients admitted to nine multidisciplinary intensive care units (ICUs) of a tertiary care teaching institution were included. ALI developed in 325 patients and was recognized by bedside clinicians in only 86 (26.5%). Under-recognition of ALI was associated with not implementing protective mechanical ventilation (median tidal volumes of 9.2 vs. 8.0 ml/kg predicted body weight, P sniffer" demonstrated excellent sensitivity of 96% (95% CI 94-98) and moderate specificity of 89% (95% CI 88-90) with a positive predictive value ranging from 24% (95% CI 13-40) in the heart-lung transplant ICU to 64% (95% CI 55-71) in the medical ICU. The computerized surveillance system accurately identifies critically ill patients who develop ALI syndrome. Since the lack of ALI recognition is a barrier to the timely implementation of best practices and enrollment into research studies, computerized syndrome surveillance could be a useful tool to enhance patient safety and clinical research.

  7. R1 autonomic nervous system in acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering, Dagmara; Winklewski, Pawel J

    2017-02-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a rapid loss of kidney function resulting in accumulation of end metabolic products and associated abnormalities in fluid, electrolyte and acid-base homeostasis. The pathophysiology of AKI is complex and multifactorial involving numerous vascular, tubular and inflammatory pathways. Neurohumoral activation with heightened activity of the sympathetic nervous system and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system play a critical role in this scenario. Inflammation and/or local renal ischaemia are underlying mechanisms triggering renal tissue hypoxia and resultant renal microcirculation dysfunction; a common feature of AKI occurring in numerous clinical conditions leading to a high morbidity and mortality rate. The contribution of renal nerves to the pathogenesis of AKI has been extensively demonstrated in a series of experimental models over the past decades. While this has led to better knowledge of the pathogenesis of human AKI, therapeutic approaches to improve patient outcomes are scarce. Restoration of autonomic regulatory function with vagal nerve stimulation resulting in anti-inflammatory effects and modulation of centrally-mediated mechanisms could be of clinical relevance. Evidence from experimental studies suggests that a therapeutic splenic ultrasound approach may prevent AKI via activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. This review briefly summarizes renal nerve anatomy, basic insights into neural control of renal function in the physiological state and the involvement of the autonomic nervous system in the pathophysiology of AKI chiefly due to sepsis, cardiopulmonary bypass and ischaemia/reperfusion experimental model. Finally, potentially preventive experimental pre-clinical approaches for the treatment of AKI aimed at sympathetic inhibition and/or parasympathetic stimulation are presented. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Allopurinol attenuates acute kidney injury following Bothrops jararaca envenomation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Henrique França Gois

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Snakebites have been recognized as a neglected public health problem in several tropical and subtropical countries. Bothrops snakebites frequently complicate with acute kidney injury (AKI with relevant morbidity and mortality. To date, the only treatment available for Bothrops envenomation is the intravenous administration of antivenom despite its several limitations. Therefore, the study of novel therapies in Bothrops envenomation is compelling. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of Allopurinol (Allo in an experimental model of Bothrops jararaca venom (BJ-associated AKI. Five groups of Wistar rats were studied: Sham, Allo, BJ, BJ+Allo, BJ+ipAllo. BJ (0.25 mg/kg was intravenously injected during 40'. Saline at same dose and infusion rate was administered to Sham and Allo groups. Allo and BJ+Allo groups received Allo (300 mg/L in the drinking water 7 days prior to Saline or BJ infusion respectively. BJ+ipAllo rats received intraperitoneal Allo (25 mg/Kg 40' after BJ infusion. BJ rats showed markedly reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR, inulin clearance associated with intense renal vasoconstriction, hemolysis, hemoglobinuria, reduced glutathione and increased systemic and renal markers of nitro-oxidative stress (Nitrotyrosine. Allo ameliorated GFR, renal blood flow (RBF, renal vascular resistance and arterial lactate levels. In addition, Allo was associated with increased serum glutathione as well as reduced levels of plasma and renal Nitrotyrosine. Our data show that Allo attenuated BJ-associated AKI, reduced oxidative stress, improved renal hemodynamics and organ perfusion. It might represent a novel adjuvant approach for Bothrops envenomation, a new use for an old and widely available drug.

  9. Allopurinol attenuates acute kidney injury following Bothrops jararaca envenomation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martines, Monique Silva; Ferreira, Daniela; Volpini, Rildo; Canale, Daniele; Malaque, Ceila; Crajoinas, Renato; Girardi, Adriana Castello Costa; Massola Shimizu, Maria Heloisa; Seguro, Antonio Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Snakebites have been recognized as a neglected public health problem in several tropical and subtropical countries. Bothrops snakebites frequently complicate with acute kidney injury (AKI) with relevant morbidity and mortality. To date, the only treatment available for Bothrops envenomation is the intravenous administration of antivenom despite its several limitations. Therefore, the study of novel therapies in Bothrops envenomation is compelling. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of Allopurinol (Allo) in an experimental model of Bothrops jararaca venom (BJ)-associated AKI. Five groups of Wistar rats were studied: Sham, Allo, BJ, BJ+Allo, BJ+ipAllo. BJ (0.25 mg/kg) was intravenously injected during 40’. Saline at same dose and infusion rate was administered to Sham and Allo groups. Allo and BJ+Allo groups received Allo (300 mg/L) in the drinking water 7 days prior to Saline or BJ infusion respectively. BJ+ipAllo rats received intraperitoneal Allo (25 mg/Kg) 40’ after BJ infusion. BJ rats showed markedly reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR, inulin clearance) associated with intense renal vasoconstriction, hemolysis, hemoglobinuria, reduced glutathione and increased systemic and renal markers of nitro-oxidative stress (Nitrotyrosine). Allo ameliorated GFR, renal blood flow (RBF), renal vascular resistance and arterial lactate levels. In addition, Allo was associated with increased serum glutathione as well as reduced levels of plasma and renal Nitrotyrosine. Our data show that Allo attenuated BJ-associated AKI, reduced oxidative stress, improved renal hemodynamics and organ perfusion. It might represent a novel adjuvant approach for Bothrops envenomation, a new use for an old and widely available drug. PMID:29155815

  10. Acute kidney injury is independently associated with higher mortality after cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandler, Kristian; Jensen, Mathias E; Nilsson, Jens C

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the incidence of acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery and its association with mortality in a patient population receiving ibuprofen and gentamicin perioperatively. DESIGN: Retrospective study with Cox regression analysis to control for possible preoperative......, intraoperative and postoperative confounders. SETTING: University hospital-based single-center study. PARTICIPANTS: All patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting ± valve surgery during 2012. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENT AND MAIN RESULTS: Acute surgery within 24 hours of coronary angiography.......21-4.51, p = 0.011) and 5.62 (95% CI: 2.42-13.06), psurgery developed AKI in this contemporary cohort. Furthermore, acute kidney injury was an independent...

  11. Role of radiation in the treatment of acute myelogenous leukaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honeyman, L D; Morgan, D E [Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    1982-06-01

    The article deals with the radiation treatment of acute myelogenous leukaemia. The contribution of radiotherapy can be considered in three parts: a) irradiation of blood packs for patient support; b) irradiation of laboratory animals in order to improve existing knowledge and techniques; c) total body irradiation of the patient on the day of the transplant using a dose large enough to destroy the bone marrow and the immune system. The radiation effects, post graft immunosuppression and the supporting of the patient after transplantation are also discussed.

  12. Hematological observations on two cases of acute radiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Benrong; Wang Guilin; Huang Shimin

    1990-01-01

    The hematological changes of two cases of acute radiation syndrome were observed. The physical doses of patients Liang and Yan were 3.5 Gy and 2.6 Gy respectively. According to the changes in WBC and platelet counts and the absolute count of lymphocytes and in comparison with the hematological data of the victims of Y-12 accident in USA in 1958 and those of previous accidents in China, Liang suffered from a moderate or moderate to severe degree, and Yan suffered from a moderate or moderate mild degree of hemopoietic form of acute radiation syndrome. This estimation was consistent with their clinical course and physical doses. Some blood cells appeared in the cytoplasm of megakaryocytes in bone marrow smears of those two cases. The mechanism of this phenomenon is discussed and its clinical significance remains to be studied

  13. Acute stress decreases but chronic stress increases myocardial sensitivity to ischemic injury in rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric D Eisenmann

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the largest cause of mortality worldwide, and stress is a significant contributor to the development of cardiovascular disease. The relationship between acute and chronic stress and cardiovascular disease is well-evidenced. Acute stress can lead to arrhythmias and ischemic injury. However, recent evidence in rodent models suggests that acute stress can decrease sensitivity to myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. Conversely, chronic stress is arrythmogenic and increases sensitivity to myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. Few studies have examined the impact of validated animal models of stress-related psychological disorders on the ischemic heart. This review examines the work that has been completed using rat models to study the effects of stress on myocardial sensitivity to ischemic injury. Utilization of animal models of stress-related psychological disorders is critical in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disorders in patients experiencing stress-related psychiatric conditions.

  14. Proximal Tubular Injury in Medullary Rays Is an Early Sign of Acute Tacrolimus Nephrotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Cosner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tacrolimus (FK506 is one of the principal immunosuppressive agents used after solid organ transplantations to prevent allograft rejection. Chronic renal injury induced by tacrolimus is characterized by linear fibrosis in the medullary rays; however, the early morphologic findings of acute tacrolimus nephrotoxicity are not well characterized. Kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1 is a specific injury biomarker that has been proven to be useful in the diagnosis of mild to severe acute tubular injury on renal biopsies. This study was motivated by a patient with acute kidney injury associated with elevated serum tacrolimus levels in whom KIM-1 staining was present only in proximal tubules located in the medullary rays in the setting of otherwise normal light, immunofluorescent, and electron microscopy. We subsequently evaluated KIM-1 expression in 45 protocol and 39 indicated renal transplant biopsies to determine whether higher serum levels of tacrolimus were associated with acute segment specific injury to the proximal tubule, as reflected by KIM-1 staining in the proximal tubules of the cortical medullary rays. The data suggest that tacrolimus toxicity preferentially affects proximal tubules in medullary rays and that this targeted injury is a precursor lesion for the linear fibrosis seen in chronic tacrolimus toxicity.

  15. Thioredoxin mitigates radiation-induced hematopoietic stem cell injury in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasupathi Sundaramoorthy

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation exposure poses a significant threat to public health. Hematopoietic injury is one of the major manifestations of acute radiation sickness. Protection and/or mitigation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs from radiation injury is an important goal in the development of medical countermeasure agents (MCM. We recently identified thioredoxin (TXN as a novel molecule that has marked protective and proliferative effects on HSCs. In the current study, we investigated the effectiveness of TXN in rescuing mice from a lethal dose of total body radiation (TBI and in enhancing hematopoietic reconstitution following a lethal dose of irradiation. Methods We used in-vivo and in-vitro methods to understand the biological and molecular mechanisms of TXN on radiation mitigation. BABL/c mice were used for the survival study and a flow cytometer was used to quantify the HSC population and cell senescence. A hematology analyzer was used for the peripheral blood cell count, including white blood cells (WBCs, red blood cells (RBCs, hemoglobin, and platelets. Colony forming unit (CFU assay was used to study the colongenic function of HSCs. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was used to determine the bone marrow cellularity. Senescence-associated β-galactosidase assay was used for cell senescence. Western blot analysis was used to evaluate the DNA damage and senescence protein expression. Immunofluorescence staining was used to measure the expression of γ-H2AX foci for DNA damage. Results We found that administration of TXN 24 h following irradiation significantly mitigates BALB/c mice from TBI-induced death: 70% of TXN-treated mice survived, whereas only 25% of saline-treated mice survived. TXN administration led to enhanced recovery of peripheral blood cell counts, bone marrow cellularity, and HSC population as measured by c-Kit+Sca-1+Lin– (KSL cells, SLAM + KSL cells and CFUs. TXN treatment reduced cell senescence and radiation

  16. Intact thrombin generation and decreased fibrinolytic capacity in patients with acute liver injury or acute liver failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisman, T.; Bakhtiari, K.; Adelmeijer, J.; Meijers, J. C. M.; Porte, R. J.; Stravitz, R. T.

    2012-01-01

    . Background: It has been well established that hemostatic potential in patients with chronic liver disease is in a rebalanced status due to a concomitant decrease in pro- and antihemostatic drivers. The hemostatic changes in patients with acute liver injury/failure (ALI/ALF) are similar but not

  17. Intact thrombin generation and decreased fibrinolytic capacity in patients with acute liver injury or acute liver failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisman, T.; Bakhtiari, K.; Adelmeijer, J.; Meijers, J. C. M.; Porte, R. J.; Stravitz, R. T.

    . Background: It has been well established that hemostatic potential in patients with chronic liver disease is in a rebalanced status due to a concomitant decrease in pro- and antihemostatic drivers. The hemostatic changes in patients with acute liver injury/failure (ALI/ALF) are similar but not

  18. Endocrine factors influencing radiation injury to central nervous tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aristizabal, S.A.; Boone, M.L.; Laguna, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    Corticosteroids have been shown experimentally to lower the tolerance of various normal tissues (lung, kidney, intestine) to irradiation. Pre-existing hypertension also modified the effect of irradiation on the rat spinal cord and brain. Hypercorticism and hypertension co-exist in patients with Cushing's disease. Although these patients are often approached therapeutically by irradiation, no reports concerning differences in the radiation sensitivity of nervous tissue between normal subjects (non-functioning pituitary adenomas) and those with hormonal imbalance and/or hypertension appear to be available. A comprehensive review of the literature revealed 14 patients with radiation damage to brain or to optic pathways following moderate doses for pituitary adenomas. Seven of the 14 patients (50%) had Cushing's disease. This apparent higher incidence of radiation injury is significant if we consider that less than 5% of all patients receiving irradiation for pituitary adenomas have Cushing's disease

  19. Elemental diet as prophylaxis against radiation injury. Histological and ultrastructural studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McArdle, A.H.; Wittnich, C.; Freeman, C.R.; Duguid, W.P.

    1985-01-01

    The authors investigated whether elemental diet feeding would protect the intestine from radiation injury. Five dogs were fed an elemental diet for three days before receiving pelvic irradiation (500 rad/day for four days) and were maintained on the diet during the days of irradiation. These dogs were compared with five dogs that were fed normal kennel ration, but were treated similarly otherwise. One day and five days following completion of the radiation treatment, the dogs were anesthetized and a biopsy specimen of terminal ileum was taken for histologic and electron microscopic studies. In the dogs fed the elemental diet, there was no significant damage to the intestine seen on histological examination, and electron microscopy disclosed elongated microvilli and no organelle damage. However, both histological and electron microscopic examination of the intestine from dogs maintained on normal kennel ration showed that severe damage had occurred from the irradiation procedure. It seems, therefore, that the feeding of an elemental diet to dogs as a prophylaxis can afford protection to the intestine from the acute phase of radiation injury

  20. Transcutaneous electrical neurostimulation in musculoskeletal pain of acute spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, R R; Meyer, P R; Cerullo, L J

    1980-01-01

    Cervical, thoracic, thoracolumbar, and lumbar fractures associated with physiologic complete or incomplete spinal cord injuries frequently have severe soft-tissue injury as well as severe pain associated with the site or area of injury. Transcutaneous electrical neurostimulation has proved effective in the treatment of various causes of severe acute and chronic intractable pains. We applied this modality to a group of 20 patients who had acute spinal cord injuries and pain associated with severe, extensive soft-tissue injury. Its advantages include ease of application, lack of major complications, increased intestinal peristalsis, and avoidance of narcotic analgesic medications. It also produced significant (greater than 50%) pain relief in 75% of patients treated by transcutaneous electrical neurostimulation.

  1. The Protective Role of Ginkgo Biloba against Radiation Induced Injury on Rat Gastro-intestinal Tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Ghazaly, M.A.; Gharib, O.A.; El-Sheikh, M.M.; Khayyal, M.T.

    2015-01-01

    Ginkgo Biloba extract (EGb 761) is an antioxidant substance exhibits a wide variety of biological activities. The present study was performed to evaluate oxidative stress and inflammatory parameters of gastrointestinal injury induced by exposing rats to acute doses of γ-rays and the potential value of EGb 761 in preventing changes in these parameters. Male albino rats were treated orally with the extract in a dose of 100 mg/ kg for 7 successive days before whole body exposure to acute radiation levels of 2 and 6 Gray (Gy). Control groups were run concurrently. The rats were sacrificed 3 days after irradiation. Various inflammatory mediators and biochemical parameters were determined in the stomach and intestine. Both tissues were also examined histopathologically. Exposure to radiation led to dose dependent changes in the level of oxidative stress biomarkers (elevation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) and nitrite associated with a glutathione (GSH) decrease as well as in the level of inflammatory parameters (elevation of Tumour necrosis factorα (TNF-α) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) associated with depletion of prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ). Pre-treatment with EGb 761 protected against the changes in both oxidative stress biomarkers and inflammatory mediators. EGb 761 exerted a protective effect against the radiation induced gastrointestinal damage, possibly through its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties.

  2. Diagnosis of acute radiation disease by enzyme immune-assay (EIA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, D.; Maliev, V.

    2005-01-01

    of high levels of SDR-2, SDR-3 and SDR-4 in peripheral blood allowed to recognize early periods of toxic, gastrointestinal and typical forms of acute radiation sickness. Recognition of significantly high levels of SDR-4 is important for assessing radiation risks of mild typical radiation diseases (SDR-4/1), of moderate typical radiation diseases (SDR-4/2), of severe typical radiation diseases (SDR-4/3), of extremely severe typical radiation diseases (SDR-4/4). The important goal of early assessment with enzyme immune assay is the accurate description of started disease and most effectively managed therapy. The SDR EIA kit is a complete kit for the quantitative determination of different forms and levels of SDR-1, SDR-2, SDR-3, SDR-4 in a serum. This kit is a solid phase sandwich ELISA using 4 kinds of high specific antibodies. Visual assessment utilizes a 4 point scale (++++). The test was considered positive if the assessment was (++) or higher. Positive test allowed us to detect the presence and severity of radiation injury by identifying SDR forms and each from them was specific for different radiation energy and dependent on a volume of absorbed doses of radiation. (author)

  3. The prognostic value of MRI in determining reinjury risk following acute hamstring injury: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heumen, Moniek; Tol, Johannes L; de Vos, Robert-Jan; Moen, Maarten H; Weir, Adam; Orchard, John; Reurink, Gustaaf

    2017-09-01

    A challenge for sports physicians is to estimate the risk of a hamstring re-injury, but the current evidence for MRI variables as a risk factor is unknown. To systematically review the literature on the prognostic value of MRI findings at index injury and/or return to play for acute hamstring re-injuries. Databases of PubMed, Embase, MEDLINE, Scopus, CINAHL, Google Scholar, Web of Science, LILACS, SciELO, ScienceDirect, ProQuest, SPORTDiscus and Cochrane Library were searched until 20 June 2016. Studies evaluating MRI as a prognostic tool for determining the risk of re-injury for athletes with acute hamstring injuries were eligible for inclusion. Two authors independently screened the search results and assessed risk of bias using standardised criteria from a consensus statement. A best-evidence synthesis was used to identify the level of evidence. Post hoc analysis included correction for insufficient sample size. Of the 11 studies included, 7 had a low and 4 had a high risk of bias. No strong evidence for any MRI finding as a risk factor for hamstring re-injury was found. There was moderate evidence that intratendinous injuries were associated with increased re-injury risk. Post hoc analysis showed moderate evidence that injury to the biceps femoris was a moderate to strong risk factor for re-injury. There is currently no strong evidence for any MRI finding in predicting hamstring re-injury risk. Intratendinous injuries and biceps femoris injuries showed moderate evidence for association with a higher re-injury risk. Registration in the PROSPERO International prospective register of systematic reviews was performed prior to study initiation (registration number CRD42015024620). © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Acute Gastrocnemius-Soleus Complex Injuries in National Football League Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Brian C; Belkin, Nicole S; Kennelly, Steve; Weiss, Leigh; Barnes, Ronnie P; Potter, Hollis G; Warren, Russell F; Rodeo, Scott A

    2017-01-01

    Lower extremity muscle injuries are common in professional football. Although less common than hamstring or quadriceps injuries in National Football League (NFL) athletes, calf injuries occur with relative frequency and have not previously been studied. To evaluate gastrocnemius-soleus complex muscle injuries over the past 13 years from a single NFL team to determine the incidence of such injuries, their imaging characteristics, and return to play after such injuries and any correlation between imaging findings and prolonged return to play. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A retrospective review of all acute calf muscle injuries on a single NFL team from 2003 to 2015 was performed. Player demographics and return-to-play data were obtained from the medical records. All available magnetic resonance images (MRIs) were reviewed by a musculoskeletal radiologist for specific imaging findings that correlated with return to play. A total of 27 calf injuries in 24 NFL players were reviewed, yielding an incidence of 2.3 acute calf injuries per year on a single NFL team. Of these 27 injuries, 20 (74%) were isolated injuries to the gastrocnemius muscle, 4 (15%) were isolated injuries to the soleus muscle, and the remaining 3 injuries (11%) involved both. Defensive players were more likely to sustain injuries ( P = .043). The mean time to return to play for all 27 players was 17.4 ± 14.6 days (range, 3-62 days). MRIs were available in 14 of the 27 injuries. The average size of the fascial defect ( P = .032) and the presence of a fluid collection ( P = .031) both correlated with return to play of longer than 2 weeks. Although less common than hamstring or quadriceps muscle injuries, calf muscle injuries occur with relative frequency in the NFL, and more so in defensive players. The majority of these injuries occur in the gastrocnemius and result in significant disability, with at least 2 weeks of missed playing time on average. MRI may have an important role in the evaluation

  5. The Epidemiology of Transfusion-related Acute Lung Injury Varies According to the Applied Definition of Lung Injury Onset Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Vusse, Lisa K; Caldwell, Ellen; Tran, Edward; Hogl, Laurie; Dinwiddie, Steven; López, José A; Maier, Ronald V; Watkins, Timothy R

    2015-09-01

    Research that applies an unreliable definition for transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) may draw false conclusions about its risk factors and biology. The effectiveness of preventive strategies may decrease as a consequence. However, the reliability of the consensus TRALI definition is unknown. To prospectively study the effect of applying two plausible definitions of acute respiratory distress syndrome onset time on TRALI epidemiology. We studied 316 adults admitted to the intensive care unit and transfused red blood cells within 24 hours of blunt trauma. We identified patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, and defined acute respiratory distress syndrome onset time two ways: (1) the time at which the first radiographic or oxygenation criterion was met, and (2) the time both criteria were met. We categorized two corresponding groups of TRALI cases transfused in the 6 hours before acute respiratory distress syndrome onset. We used Cohen's kappa to measure agreement between the TRALI cases and implicated blood components identified by the two acute respiratory distress syndrome onset time definitions. In a nested case-control study, we examined potential risk factors for each group of TRALI cases, including demographics, injury severity, and characteristics of blood components transfused in the 6 hours before acute respiratory distress syndrome onset. Forty-two of 113 patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome were TRALI cases per the first acute respiratory distress syndrome onset time definition and 63 per the second definition. There was slight agreement between the two groups of TRALI cases (κ = 0.16; 95% confidence interval, -0.01 to 0.33) and between the implicated blood components (κ = 0.15, 95% confidence interval, 0.11-0.20). Age, Injury Severity Score, high plasma-volume components, and transfused plasma volume were risk factors for TRALI when applying the second acute respiratory distress syndrome onset time definition

  6. An anatomo-pathological study of injury development in the pig following acute local irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefaix, J.L.; Daburon, F.; Tricaud, Y.; Haag, J.; Verola, O.; Brocheriou, C.

    1984-01-01

    The clinical and anatomo-pathological evolution of the injuries due to acute collimated exposure ( 192 Ir) of pigs' thigh has been studied. After a first stage of superficial injuries -coagulation and ischemic necrosis- spreading on during the first three weeks, there followed a stage of fast extension of deep injuries, especially at the beginning of the third month following exposure. Together with the destructive injuries, a very large mutilating sclerosis developed from the fourth week; its particular characteristics -pseudosarcomatous aspect and anarchistic vascularization- did not allow to stop the evolution of tissular impairment [fr

  7. The Diagnostic and Prognostic Value of Ultrasonography in Soccer Players With Acute Hamstring Injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jesper; Thorborg, Kristian; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An injury to the hamstring muscle complex is the most common injury in soccer. Ultrasound of acute hamstring injuries is often used as a clinical tool for diagnosing hamstring injuries and guiding players in when they can return to play. PURPOSE: To (1) investigate the characteristic......) to investigate if ultrasonography can be used as a prognostic indicator of time to return to play. STUDY DESIGN: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. METHODS: Players from 50 teams participating in 1 of the top 5 Danish soccer divisions were followed in the period from January to December 2008. Of 67 players...

  8. Open lung approach vs acute respiratory distress syndrome network ventilation in experimental acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieth, P M; Güldner, A; Carvalho, A R; Kasper, M; Pelosi, P; Uhlig, S; Koch, T; Gama de Abreu, M

    2011-09-01

    Setting and strategies of mechanical ventilation with positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) in acute lung injury (ALI) remains controversial. This study compares the effects between lung-protective mechanical ventilation according to the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network recommendations (ARDSnet) and the open lung approach (OLA) on pulmonary function and inflammatory response. Eighteen juvenile pigs were anaesthetized, mechanically ventilated, and instrumented. ALI was induced by surfactant washout. Animals were randomly assigned to mechanical ventilation according to the ARDSnet protocol or the OLA (n=9 per group). Gas exchange, haemodynamics, pulmonary blood flow (PBF) distribution, and respiratory mechanics were measured at intervals and the lungs were removed after 6 h of mechanical ventilation for further analysis. PEEP and mean airway pressure were higher in the OLA than in the ARDSnet group [15 cmH(2)O, range 14-18 cmH(2)O, compared with 12 cmH(2)O; 20.5 (sd 2.3) compared with 18 (1.4) cmH(2)O by the end of the experiment, respectively], and OLA was associated with improved oxygenation compared with the ARDSnet group after 6 h. OLA showed more alveolar overdistension, especially in gravitationally non-dependent regions, while the ARDSnet group was associated with more intra-alveolar haemorrhage. Inflammatory mediators and markers of lung parenchymal stress did not differ significantly between groups. The PBF shifted from ventral to dorsal during OLA compared with ARDSnet protocol [-0.02 (-0.09 to -0.01) compared with -0.08 (-0.12 to -0.06), dorsal-ventral gradients after 6 h, respectively]. According to the OLA, mechanical ventilation improved oxygenation and redistributed pulmonary perfusion when compared with the ARDSnet protocol, without differences in lung inflammatory response.

  9. Legislation and litigation related to low-level radiation injury claims

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCraw, T.

    1985-01-01

    Current legislation and litigation related to radiation exposure will have an enormous impact on the radiation protection and monitoring requirements of the future. A brief review of some proposed injury compensation bills for veterans and a recent court decision for low-level radiation injury claims are reviewed

  10. Chronic consequences of acute injuries: worse survival after discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafi, Shahid; Renfro, Lindsay A; Barnes, Sunni; Rayan, Nadine; Gentilello, Larry M; Fleming, Neil; Ballard, David

    2012-09-01

    The Trauma Quality Improvement Program uses inhospital mortality to measure quality of care, which assumes patients who survive injury are not likely to suffer higher mortality after discharge. We hypothesized that survival rates in trauma patients who survive to discharge remain stable afterward. Patients treated at an urban Level I trauma center (2006-2008) were linked with the Social Security Administration Death Master File. Survival rates were measured at 30, 90, and 180 days and 1 and 2 years from injury among two groups of trauma patients who survived to discharge: major trauma (Abbreviated Injury Scale score ≥ 3 injuries, n = 2,238) and minor trauma (Abbreviated Injury Scale score ≤ 2 injuries, n = 1,171). Control groups matched to each trauma group by age and sex were simulated from the US general population using annual survival probabilities from census data. Kaplan-Meier and log-rank analyses conditional upon survival to each time point were used to determine changes in risk of mortality after discharge. Cox proportional hazards models with left truncation at the time of discharge were used to determine independent predictors of mortality after discharge. The survival rate in trauma patients with major injuries was 92% at 30 days posttrauma and declined to 84% by 3 years (p > 0.05 compared with general population). Minor trauma patients experienced a survival rate similar to the general population. Age and injury severity were the only independent predictors of long-term mortality given survival to discharge. Log-rank tests conditional on survival to each time point showed that mortality risk in patients with major injuries remained significantly higher than the general population for up to 6 months after injury. The survival rate of trauma patients with major injuries remains significantly lower than survival for minor trauma patients and the general population for several months postdischarge. Surveillance for early identification and treatment of

  11. Andrographolide protects against radiation-induced lung injury in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang Yahui; Wang Jinfeng; Zhang Qu; Huang Guanhong; Ma Jianxin; Yang Baixia; He Xiangfeng; Wang Zhongming

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the protective effect of andrographolide against radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) in C57BL/6 mice. Methods: Eighty C57BL mice were randomly divided into four groups: un-irradiated and normal saline-treated group (n = 20, control group), un-irradiated and andrographolide-treated group (n = 20, drug group), radiation plus normal saline-treated group (n = 20, radiation group) and radiation plus andrographolide-treated group (n = 20, treatment group). Before radiation, the mice in drug group and treatment group were administered daily via gavage with andrographolide (20 mg·kg -1 ·d -1 )) for 30 d, while the same volume of normal saline solution was given daily in the control and radiation groups. The model of RILI in C57BL mice was established by irradiating whole mouse chest with a single dose of 15 Gy of 6 MV X-rays. The pathological changes of the lung stained with HE/Masson were observed with a light microscope. The transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in serum were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The activities of malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the content of hydroxyproline in lung tissues were examined by corresponding kits. Results: Compared with radiation group, there was an obvious amelioration in pathological injury of lung tissue in the treatment group. The lung coefficient, the activities of lung tissue MDA, the content of Hyp, the serum content of hydroxide free radical, and the serum levels of TGF-β1 and TNF-α in the treatment group were significantly lower than those in radiation group at 24 th week, (t lung coefficient = 1.60, t MDA = 7.06, t Hyp = 17.44, t TGF-β1 = 16.67, t TNF-α = 14.03, P < 0.05), while slightly higher than those in control group. The activity of SOD was significantly higher in the treatment group than that in radiation group (t = 60.81, P < 0.05), while lower than those in control group and drug group. There were no

  12. Management of radiation injuries by natural herbs and neutraceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, P.K.

    2013-01-01

    In the era of expanding nuclear energy program all over world, the role of radiation biology has acquired greater relevance and significance in addressing the health and environment issues. In view of constant human exposure to background radiation both naturally and man made e.g nuclear power plants and weapons testing, consumer products, medical X-ray, uranium mining and milling etc., the radiobiological research has been devoted to induction of cancer and evaluation of genetic effects. In the present time, nuclear terrorism and weapon related effects are raising much alarm and concern to public health. Obviously, radiation biology research has great potential in diagnosis, therapy and establishing standards for assessment risk from radiation exposure. The development of effective medical countermeasures to protect, mitigate, and treat normal tissue injury needs urgent investigation for basic molecular mechanisms and developing appropriate ready to-use kits using relevant cellular, animal model and clinical trails for practical purposes. Since the use of synthetic compounds is associated with the inherent toxicity, attention in recent years has been directed towards developing radiation countermeasure agents from the natural sources and/or nature-identical molecules. The rich biodiversity available in the Indian subcontinent has yielded several new drugs that find application in the modern medicine and there is a like hood of discovering many more, Over the last few years, interest in evaluating oriental medicinal herbs and edible phyto products for the use in anti-radiation strategies is encouraging and emerging as an acceptable approach for preventing the radiation induced lesions in many countries. Several Indian medicinal plants (Emblica officinalis, Rosemarinus officinalis, Trigonella foenum-graecum, Alstonia scholaris, Tinospora cordifolia, Phyllanthus niruri, Svzvgiumcumini, Aegle marmelos etc) and antioxidant vitamins (C and E) have been tested in this

  13. Management of radiation injuries by natural herbs and neutraceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, P.K., E-mail: pkgoyal2002@gmail.com [Radiation and Cancer Biology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur (India)

    2013-10-15

    In the era of expanding nuclear energy program all over world, the role of radiation biology has acquired greater relevance and significance in addressing the health and environment issues. In view of constant human exposure to background radiation both naturally and man made e.g nuclear power plants and weapons testing, consumer products, medical X-ray, uranium mining and milling etc., the radiobiological research has been devoted to induction of cancer and evaluation of genetic effects. In the present time, nuclear terrorism and weapon related effects are raising much alarm and concern to public health. Obviously, radiation biology research has great potential in diagnosis, therapy and establishing standards for assessment risk from radiation exposure. The development of effective medical countermeasures to protect, mitigate, and treat normal tissue injury needs urgent investigation for basic molecular mechanisms and developing appropriate ready to-use kits using relevant cellular, animal model and clinical trails for practical purposes. Since the use of synthetic compounds is associated with the inherent toxicity, attention in recent years has been directed towards developing radiation countermeasure agents from the natural sources and/or nature-identical molecules. The rich biodiversity available in the Indian subcontinent has yielded several new drugs that find application in the modern medicine and there is a like hood of discovering many more, Over the last few years, interest in evaluating oriental medicinal herbs and edible phyto products for the use in anti-radiation strategies is encouraging and emerging as an acceptable approach for preventing the radiation induced lesions in many countries. Several Indian medicinal plants (Emblica officinalis, Rosemarinus officinalis, Trigonella foenum-graecum, Alstonia scholaris, Tinospora cordifolia, Phyllanthus niruri, Svzvgiumcumini, Aegle marmelos etc) and antioxidant vitamins (C and E) have been tested in this

  14. Multifocal atherosclerosis in patient after acute first degree radiation sickness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metlyaeva N.A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: assessment the heavy psychosomatic and all-somatic cardiovascular and cerebrovascular pathology of patient, transferred an acute I degree radiation sickness, from the general evenly gamma-beta radiation. Conclusions. The subdepressive and disturbing-depressive syndrome of patient, transferred an acute radiation sickness (ARS of I degree, from the general evenly gamma-beta radiation, was independent risk factor of development of multifocal atherosclerosis; Features of development of all-somatic and psychosomatic pathology of patient are based on a combination of genetic prerequisites, environment influences (the stress caused by accident on the ChNPP and social factors, influencing on him during a course of life, especially during early socialization. Thus at development of psychosomatic frustration the combination of feature of the mental reaction connected with the personal characteristic and special relationship between mental (stress and physiological (somatic by aspects of reaction which led to metabolism violation, to aging, decrease in adaptation opportunities of an organism and development age — dependent pathology took place.

  15. The Development of a Machine Learning Inpatient Acute Kidney Injury Prediction Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyner, Jay L; Carey, Kyle A; Edelson, Dana P; Churpek, Matthew M

    2018-03-28

    To develop an acute kidney injury risk prediction model using electronic health record data for longitudinal use in hospitalized patients. Observational cohort study. Tertiary, urban, academic medical center from November 2008 to January 2016. All adult inpatients without pre-existing renal failure at admission, defined as first serum creatinine greater than or equal to 3.0 mg/dL, International Classification of Diseases, 9th Edition, code for chronic kidney disease stage 4 or higher or having received renal replacement therapy within 48 hours of first serum creatinine measurement. None. Demographics, vital signs, diagnostics, and interventions were used in a Gradient Boosting Machine algorithm to predict serum creatinine-based Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes stage 2 acute kidney injury, with 60% of the data used for derivation and 40% for validation. Area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) was calculated in the validation cohort, and subgroup analyses were conducted across admission serum creatinine, acute kidney injury severity, and hospital location. Among the 121,158 included patients, 17,482 (14.4%) developed any Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes acute kidney injury, with 4,251 (3.5%) developing stage 2. The AUC (95% CI) was 0.90 (0.90-0.90) for predicting stage 2 acute kidney injury within 24 hours and 0.87 (0.87-0.87) within 48 hours. The AUC was 0.96 (0.96-0.96) for receipt of renal replacement therapy (n = 821) in the next 48 hours. Accuracy was similar across hospital settings (ICU, wards, and emergency department) and admitting serum creatinine groupings. At a probability threshold of greater than or equal to 0.022, the algorithm had a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 85% for stage 2 acute kidney injury and predicted the development of stage 2 a median of 41 hours (interquartile range, 12-141 hr) prior to the development of stage 2 acute kidney injury. Readily available electronic health record data can be used

  16. Acute injuries of the spinal cord and spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinemann, U.; Freund, M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinal injuries may result in severe neurological deficits, especially if the spinal cord or spinal nerve roots are involved. Patients may even die of a spinal shock. Besides presenting the important embryologic and anatomical basis underlying the typical radiological findings of spinal trauma, the trauma mechanisms and the resulting injuries are correlated. Special situations, such as the involvement of the alar ligaments and typical injuries in children, will be discussed as well as specific traumatic patters relevant for imaging. Based on the actual literature and recommendations of professional organizations, an approach is provided to the radiologic evaluation of spinal injuries. Advantages and disadvantages of the individual imaging modalities are presented and discussed. (orig.)

  17. Mechanisms of decreased intestinal epithelial proliferation and increased apoptosis in murine acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Kareem D; Stromberg, Paul E; Woolsey, Cheryl A; Turnbull, Isaiah R; Dunne, W Michael; Javadi, Pardis; Buchman, Timothy G; Karl, Irene E; Hotchkiss, Richard S; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2005-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of acute lung injury on the gut epithelium and examine mechanisms underlying changes in crypt proliferation and apoptosis. The relationship between severity and timing of lung injury to intestinal pathology was also examined. Randomized, controlled study. University research laboratory. Genetically inbred mice. Following induction of acute lung injury, gut epithelial proliferation and apoptosis were assessed in a) C3H/HeN wild-type and C3H/HeJ mice, which lack functional Toll-like receptor 4 (n = 17); b) C57Bl/6 mice that received monoclonal anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha or control antibody (n = 22); and c) C57Bl/6 wild-type and transgenic mice that overexpress Bcl-2 in their gut epithelium (n = 21). Intestinal epithelial proliferation and death were also examined in animals with differing degrees of lung inflammation (n = 24) as well as in a time course analysis following a fixed injury (n = 18). Acute lung injury caused decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis in crypt epithelial cells in all animals studied. C3H/HeJ mice had higher levels of proliferation than C3H/HeN animals without additional changes in apoptosis. Anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha antibody had no effect on gut epithelial proliferation or death. Overexpression of Bcl-2 did not change proliferation despite decreasing gut apoptosis. Proliferation and apoptosis were not correlated to severity of lung injury, as gut alterations were lost in mice with more severe acute lung injury. Changes in both gut epithelial proliferation and death were apparent within 12 hrs, but proliferation was decreased 36 hrs following acute lung injury while apoptosis returned to normal. Acute lung injury causes disparate effects on crypt proliferation and apoptosis, which occur, at least in part, through differing mechanisms involving Toll-like receptor 4 and Bcl-2. Severity of lung injury does not correlate with perturbations in proliferation or death in the