WorldWideScience

Sample records for acute psychiatric wards

  1. Occupational Therapy and Multidisciplinary Working on Acute Psychiatric Wards: The Tompkins Acute Ward Study

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, A.; Bowers, L.; J. Alexander; Ridley, C.; Warren, J.

    2005-01-01

    There is limited research into occupational therapy and interprofessional working on acute psychiatric wards. This study aimed to explore relations between occupational therapists and other members of the multidisciplinary team through structured interviews with 47 staff on 14 acute psychiatric wards. The study found that occupational therapists provided assessments, group activities and individual therapeutic work, with the assessment and development of activities of daily living being c...

  2. Adverse incidents, patient flow and nursing workforce variables on acute psychiatric wards: the Tompkins Acute Ward Study

    OpenAIRE

    Bowers, L.; Allan, T; Simpson, A.; Nijman, H.; Warren, J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Adverse incidents (violence, self-harm and absconding) can cause significant harm to patients and staff, are difficult to predict, and are driving an increase in security measures and defensive practice. Aims: To explore the relationship between adverse incidents on acute psychiatric wards, admissions and nursing workforce variables. Methods: A retrospective analysis of officially collected data covering a period of 30 months on 14 acute wards at three hospitals. This data...

  3. An observational study in psychiatric acute patients admitted to General Hospital Psychiatric Wards in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margari Francesco

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives this Italian observational study was aimed at collecting data of psychiatric patients with acute episodes entering General Hospital Psychiatric Wards (GHPWs. Information was focused on diagnosis (DSM-IV, reasons of hospitalisation, prescribed treatment, outcome of aggressive episodes, evolution of the acute episode. Methods assessments were performed at admission and discharge. Used psychometric scales were the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS, the Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS and the Nurses' Observation Scale for Inpatient Evaluation (NOSIE-30. Results 864 adult patients were enrolled in 15 GHPWs: 728 (320 M; mean age 43.6 yrs completed both admission and discharge visits. A severe psychotic episode with (19.1% or without (47.7% aggressive behaviour was the main reason of admission. Schizophrenia (42.8% at admission and 40.1% at discharge and depression (12.9% at admission and 14.7% at discharge were the predominant diagnoses. The mean hospital stay was 12 days. The mean (± SD total score of MOAS at admission, day 7 and discharge was, respectively, 2.53 ± 5.1, 0.38 ± 2.2, and 0.21 ± 1.5. Forty-four (6.0% patients had episodes of aggressiveness at admission and 8 (1.7% at day 7. A progressive improvement in each domain/item vs. admission was observed for MOAS and BPRS, while NOSIE-30 did not change from day 4 onwards. The number of patients with al least one psychotic drug taken at admission, in the first 7 days of hospitalisation, and prescribed at discharge, was, respectively: 472 (64.8%, 686 (94.2% and 676 (92.9%. The respective most frequently psychotic drugs were: BDZs (60.6%, 85.7%, 69.5%, typical anti-psychotics (48.3%, 57.0%, 49.6%, atypical anti-psychotics (35.6%, 41.8%, 39.8% and antidepressants (40.9%, 48.8%, 43.2%. Rates of patients with one, two or > 2 psychotic drugs taken at admission and day 7, and prescribed at discharge, were, respectively: 24.8%, 8.2% and 13.5% in mono-therapy; 22.0%, 20

  4. The relationship between leadership, teamworking, structure, burnout and attitude to patients on acute psychiatric wards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bowers, L.; Nijman, H.L.I.; Simpson, A.; Jones, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Conflict (aggression, substance use, absconding, etc.) and containment (coerced medication, manual restraint, etc.) threaten the safety of patients and staff on psychiatric wards. Previous work has suggested that staff variables may be significant in explaining differences between wards

  5. Duration of bed occupancy as calculated at a random chosen day in an acute care ward. Implications for the use of scarce resources in psychiatric care

    OpenAIRE

    Restan Asbjørn; Berg John E

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Psychiatric acute wards are obliged to admit patients without delay according to the Act on Compulsive Psychiatric Care. Residential long term treatment facilities and rehabilitation facilities may use a waiting list. Patients, who may not be discharged from the acute ward or should not wait there, then occupy acute ward beds. Materials and methods Bed occupancy in one acute ward at a random day in 2002 was registered (n = 23). Successively, the length of stay of all patie...

  6. Team climate and attitudes toward information and communication technology among nurses on acute psychiatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivunen, Marita; Anttila, Minna; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Katajisto, Jouko; Välimäki, Maritta

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the association of team climate with attitudes toward information and communication technology among nursing staff working on acute psychiatric wards. Background: Implementation of ICT applications in nursing practice brings new operating models to work environments, which may affect experienced team climate on hospital wards. Method: Descriptive survey was used as a study design. Team climate was measured by the Finnish modification of the Team Climate Inventory, and attitudes toward ICT by Burkes' questionnaire. The nursing staff (N = 181, n = 146) on nine acute psychiatric wards participated in the study. Results: It is not self-evident that experienced team climate associates with attitudes toward ICT, but there are some positive relationships between perceived team climate and ICT attitudes. The study showed that nurses' motivation to use ICT had statistically significant connections with experienced team climate, participative safety (p = 0.021), support for innovation (p = 0.042) and task orientation (p = 0.042). Conclusion: The results suggest that asserting team climate and supporting innovative operations may lead to more positive attitudes toward ICT. It is, in particular, possible to influence nurses' motivation to use ICT. More attention should be paid to psychosocial factors such as group education and co-operation at work when ICT applications are implemented in nursing. PMID:24393065

  7. Frequency and severity of aggressive incidents in acute psychiatric wards in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer Joachim E

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aggression and violence and negative consequences thereof are a major concern in acute psychiatric inpatient care globally. Variations in study designs, settings, populations, and data collection methods render comparisons of the incidence of aggressive behaviour in high risk settings difficult. Objective To describe the frequency and severity of aggressive incidents in acute psychiatric wards in the German speaking part of Switzerland. Methods We conducted a prospective multicentre study on 24 acute admission wards in 12 psychiatric hospitals in the German speaking part of Switzerland. Aggressive incidents were recorded by the revised Staff Observation Aggression Scale (SOAS-R and we checked the data collection for underreporting. Our sample comprised 2344 treatment episodes of 2017 patients and a total of 41'560 treatment days. Results A total of 760 aggressive incidents were registered. We found incidence rates per 100 treatment days between 0.60 (95% CI 0.10–1.78 for physical attacks and 1.83 (1.70–1.97 for all aggressive incidents (including purely verbal aggression. The mean severity was 8.80 ± 4.88 points on the 22-point SOAS-R-severity measure; 46% of the purely verbally aggression was classified as severe (≥ 9 pts.. 53% of the aggressive incidents were followed by a coercive measure, mostly seclusion or seclusion accompanied by medication. In 13% of the patients, one ore more incidents were registered, and 6.9% of the patients were involved in one ore more physical attack. Involuntary admission (OR 2.2; 1.6–2.9, longer length of stay (OR 2.7; 2.0–3.8, and a diagnosis of schizophrenia (ICH-10 F2 (OR 2.1; 1.5–2.9 was associated with a higher risk for aggressive incidents, but no such association was found for age and gender. 38% of the incidents were registered within the first 7 days after admission. Conclusion Aggressive incidents in acute admission wards are a frequent and serious problem. Due to the

  8. Mechanical and pharmacological restraints in acute psychiatric wards--why and how are they used?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutzen, Maria; Bjørkly, Stål; Eidhammer, Gunnar; Lorentzen, Steinar; Helen Mjøsund, Nina; Opjordsmoen, Stein; Sandvik, Leiv; Friis, Svein

    2013-08-30

    Restraint use has been reported to be common in acute psychiatry, but empirical research is scarce concerning why and how restraints are used. This study analysed data from patients' first episodes of restraint in three acute psychiatric wards during a 2-year study period. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify predictors for type and duration of restraint. The distribution of restraint categories for the 371 restrained patients was as follows: mechanical restraint, 47.2%; mechanical and pharmacological restraint together, 35.3%; and pharmacological restraint, 17.5%. The most commonly reported reason for restraint was assault (occurred or imminent). It increased the likelihood of resulting in concomitant pharmacological restraint. Female patients had shorter duration of mechanical restraint than men. Age above 49 and female gender increased the likelihood of pharmacological versus mechanical restraint, whereas being restrained due to assault weakened this association. Episodes with mechanical restraint and coinciding pharmacological restraint lasted longer than mechanical restraint used separately, and were less common among patients with a personality disorder. Diagnoses, age and reason for restraint independently increased the likelihood for being subjected to specific types of restraint. Female gender predicted type of restraint and duration of episodes.

  9. The permeable institution: an ethnographic study of three acute psychiatric wards in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Alan; Lelliott, Paul; Seale, Clive

    2006-10-01

    In Asylums, Goffman [1961. Asylums. London: Penguin] identified some permeable features of the old mental hospitals but presented them as exceptions to the rule and focused on their impermeable aspects. We argue that this emphasis is no longer valid and offer an alternative ideal type that better represents the reality of everyday life in contemporary 'bricks and mortar' psychiatric institutions. We call this the "permeable institution". The research involved participant observation of between 3 and 4 months and interviews with patients, patient advocates and staff on 3 psychiatric wards. Evidence for permeability includes that ward membership is temporary and changes rapidly (patients tend to have very short stays and staff turnover is high); patients maintain contact with the outside world during their stay; and institutional identities are blurred to the point where visitors or new patients can easily mistake staff and patients for one another. Permeability has both positive consequences (e.g., reduced risk of institutionalism), and negative consequences (e.g., unwanted people coming into hospital to cause trouble, and illicit drug use among patients). Staff employ various methods to regulate their ward's permeability, within certain parameters. The metaphor of the total/closed institution remains valuable, but it fails to capture the highly permeable nature of the psychiatric institutions we studied. Analysts may therefore find the permeable institution a more helpful reference point or ideal type against which to examine and compare empirical cases. Perhaps most helpful is to conceptualise a continuum of institutional permeability with total and permeable institutions at each extreme.

  10. Chronotherapeutics in a psychiatric ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Francesco; Barbini, Barbara; Colombo, Cristina; Smeraldi, Enrico

    2007-12-01

    Psychiatric chronotherapeutics is the controlled exposure to environmental stimuli that act on biological rhythms in order to achieve therapeutic effects in the treatment of psychiatric conditions. In recent years some techniques (mainly light therapy and sleep deprivation) have passed the experimental developmental phase and reached the status of powerful and affordable clinical interventions for everyday clinical treatment of depressed patients. These techniques target the same brain neurotransmitter systems and the same brain areas as do antidepressant drugs, and should be administered under careful medical supervision. Their effects are rapid and transient, but can be stabilised by combining techniques among themselves or together with common drug treatments. Antidepressant chronotherapeutics target the broadly defined depressive syndrome, with response and relapse rates similar to those obtained with antidepressant drugs, and good results are obtained even in difficult-to-treat conditions such as bipolar depression. Chronotherapeutics offer a benign alternative to more radical treatments of depression for the treatment of severe depression in psychiatric wards, but with the advantage of rapidity of onset.

  11. Substance abuse in patients admitted voluntarily and involuntarily to acute psychiatric wards: a national cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Opsal

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Substance abuse and mental disorder comorbidity is high among patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards. The aim of the study was to identify this co-occurrence as a reason for involuntary admission and if specific substance use-related diagnoses were associated with such admissions.Methods: The study was a part of a multicentre, cross-sectional national study carried out during 2005-2006 within a research network of acute mental health services. Seventy-five percent of Norwegian hospitals providing acute in-patient treatment participated. Substance use was measured using the Clinician Rating Scale and the ICD-10 diagnoses F10-19. Diagnostic assessments were performed by the clinicians during hospital stay.Results: Overall, 33.2% (n=1,187 of the total patient population (3,506 were abusing alcohol or drugs prior to admission according to the Clinician Rating Scale. No difference in the overall prevalence of substance abuserelated diagnoses between the two groups was found. Overall, 310 (26% of the admissions, 216 voluntarily and 94 involuntarily admitted patients received a double diagnosis. Frequent comorbid combinations among voluntarily admitted patients were; a combination of alcohol and either mood disorder (40% or multiple mental disorders (29%. Among involuntarily admitted patients, a combination of poly drug use and schizophrenia was most frequent (47%. Substance abusing patients diagnosed with mental and behavioral disorders due to the use of psychoactive stimulant substances had a significantly higher risk of involuntary hospitalization (OR 2.3.Conclusion: Nearly one third of substance abusing patients are involuntarily admitted to mental hospitals, in particular stimulant drug use was associated with involuntarily admissions.

  12. Characteristics of patients frequently subjected to pharmacological and mechanical restraint--a register study in three Norwegian acute psychiatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutzen, Maria; Bjørkly, Stål; Eidhammer, Gunnar; Lorentzen, Steinar; Mjøsund, Nina Helen; Opjordsmoen, Stein; Sandvik, Leiv; Friis, Svein

    2014-01-30

    This retrospective study from three catchment-area-based acute psychiatric wards showed that of all the pharmacologically and mechanically restrained patients (n=373) 34 (9.1%) had been frequently restrained (6 or more times). These patients accounted for 39.2% of all restraint episodes during the two-year study period. Adjusted binary logistic regression analyses showed that the odds for being frequently restrained were 91% lower among patients above 50 years compared to those aged 18-29 years; a threefold increase (OR=3.1) for those admitted 3 times or more compared to patients with only one stay; and, finally, a threefold increase (OR=3.1) if the length of stay was 16 days or more compared to those admitted for 0-4 days. Among frequently restrained patients, males (n=15) had significantly longer stays than women (n=19), and 8 of the females had a diagnosis of personality disorder, compared to none among males. Our study showed that being frequently restrained was associated with long inpatient stay, many admissions and young age. Teasing out patient characteristics associated with the risk of being frequently restraint may contribute to reduce use of restraint by developing alternative interventions for these patients.

  13. The impact of mindfulness meditation in promoting a culture of safety on a acute psychiatric ward

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijel, Berno van

    2012-01-01

    Deze pilot studie naar de effecten van een aangepast Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction programma in cursus vorm aangeboden aan medewerkers van een acute psychiatrische unit biedt een indicatie voor positieve effecten ten aanzien van stress, aandacht, concentratie en zelfbewustzijn van de deelnemers

  14. The Practice of Seclusion and Time-out on English Acute Psychiatric Wards: The City-128 Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bowers, L.; Merwe, M. van der; Nijman, H.L.I.; Hamilton, B.; Noorthoorn, E.O.; Stewart, D.; Muir-Cochrane, E.

    2010-01-01

    Background - Seclusion is widely used internationally to manage disturbed behavior by psychiatric patients, although many countries are seeking to reduce or eliminate this practice. Time-out has been little described and almost completely unstudied. Aim and method - To assess the relationship of sec

  15. Profiling psychotropic discharge medication from a children's psychiatric ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Gazala

    2015-10-01

    Background Community prescribing of medication to treat psychiatric illness in children is increasing. However, details about medication prescribed at discharge from psychiatric inpatient services for children are scarce. Objectives Characterise the nature of psychotropic medication prescribed on discharge from a children's psychiatric ward over a 15-year period. Method Retrospective analysis of discharge summary letters of all discharges occurring between Jan 1997 to Dec 2012. Results 234 children (152 males and 82 females) were discharged with 117 (50%) prescribed psychotropic medication at discharge. 133 medicines were prescribed (stimulants n = 49, antipsychotics n = 31, antidepressants n = 22, mood stabilisers n = 1, other ADHD medication n = 11, melatonin n = 10, benzodiazepines n = 7, other n = 2). Risperidone was the most popular antipsychotic at a mean daily dose of 1 mg (range 0.25-4 mg). Fifty per cent were given an unlicensed medicine or a licensed drug was used in an unlicensed manner, of which risperidone was the most common (n = 14). Sleep disturbance and tics were most often treated using unlicensed/off label medication (n = 10). Conclusion Psychotropic medication is routinely used in inpatient children's services, with the majority of use confined to stimulants and atypical antipsychotics. Much of the antipsychotic use is for unlicensed indications or at unlicensed doses. PMID:25893488

  16. Investigation of Seclusion in one of the Psychiatric Wards in Razi Teaching Hospital of Tabriz

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Vahidi; Mina Hosseinzadeh

    2014-01-01

    Seclusion is one of the methods in controlling violent behavior of inpatients in psychiatric wards. In current descriptive analytic study, data collection instrument included the seclusion list of inpatients by considering individual, social and clinical characteristics in one of the psychiatry wards In the Razi teaching hospital of Tabriz in the first six months of 2012. Among 264 admitted patients, 24 patients (9.1%) had been secluded and a total of 29 isolated incidents w...

  17. Psychiatric wards in general hospitals - the opinions of psychiatrists employed there

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Chojnowski

    2016-04-01

    The psychiatrists employed in the psychiatric wards in general hospitals in Poland evaluate this organisational model positively. However, the destabilisation of economic foundations of these wards reported in the world literature was also reflected in the results of a survey conducted in Poland. There is a need to develop standards for the organisation and financing departments of psychiatry in general hospitals providing them stable status in the healthcare system in Poland.

  18. [Effects of Ward Interventions on Repeated Critical Incidents in Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatient Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulke, Christine; Klein, Annette M; von Klitzing, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Effects of Ward Interventions on Repeated Critical Incidents in Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatient Care. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of several ward interventions (transition to an open ward concept, individualized treatment plans, tiered crisis-management, staff training, quality control) on repeated critical incidents, non-restrictive and restrictive measures. The outcome variables were compared in two time periods, 2007 and 2011. The study included 74 critical incident reports of 51 child and adolescent inpatients that had at least one hospital stay and one critical incident in the selected time periods. Aggressive, self-harming, and absconding incidents were included. The quantitative results suggest that ward interventions can contribute to a reduction of repeated critical incidents and restrictive measures. The qualitative evaluation suggests a cultural change of crisis management.

  19. Factors Associated with Readmission of Patients at a University Hospital Psychiatric Ward in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Barekatain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Readmission has a major role in the reduction of the quality of life and the increase in the years of lost life. The main objectives of this study were to answer to the following research questions. (a What was the readmission rate? (b What were the social, demographic, and clinical characteristics of patients admitted to the Psychiatric Emergency Service at Nour University Hospital, affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran? (c What were the effective factors on readmission? Method. This cross-sectional study was conducted on a total number of 3935 patients who were admitted to Isfahan University Hospital Psychiatric Ward in Isfahan, Iran, from 2004 to 2010. Gender, age, marital status, education, self-report history of previous admission, type of psychiatric disorder, substance misuse, suicide, and the length of the current psychiatric disorder were collected from the registered medical files of patients. The data were analysed using the negative binomial regression model. Results. We found that factors such as psychiatric anxiety disorder, bipolar I, bipolar II, psychotic disorder, depression, and self report history of previous admission were statistically significant in the number of readmissions using the negative binomial model. Conclusion. Readmission to the psychiatric ward is mainly predictable by the type of diagnosis and psychosocial supports.

  20. Factors associated with readmission of patients at a university hospital psychiatric ward in iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barekatain, Majid; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Hassannejad, Razeyeh; Hosseini, Reihane

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Readmission has a major role in the reduction of the quality of life and the increase in the years of lost life. The main objectives of this study were to answer to the following research questions. (a) What was the readmission rate? (b) What were the social, demographic, and clinical characteristics of patients admitted to the Psychiatric Emergency Service at Nour University Hospital, affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran? (c) What were the effective factors on readmission? Method. This cross-sectional study was conducted on a total number of 3935 patients who were admitted to Isfahan University Hospital Psychiatric Ward in Isfahan, Iran, from 2004 to 2010. Gender, age, marital status, education, self-report history of previous admission, type of psychiatric disorder, substance misuse, suicide, and the length of the current psychiatric disorder were collected from the registered medical files of patients. The data were analysed using the negative binomial regression model. Results. We found that factors such as psychiatric anxiety disorder, bipolar I, bipolar II, psychotic disorder, depression, and self report history of previous admission were statistically significant in the number of readmissions using the negative binomial model. Conclusion. Readmission to the psychiatric ward is mainly predictable by the type of diagnosis and psychosocial supports. PMID:24236285

  1. Investigation of Seclusion in one of the Psychiatric Wards in Razi Teaching Hospital of Tabriz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Vahidi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Seclusion is one of the methods in controlling violent behavior of inpatients in psychiatric wards. In current descriptive analytic study, data collection instrument included the seclusion list of inpatients by considering individual, social and clinical characteristics in one of the psychiatry wards In the Razi teaching hospital of Tabriz in the first six months of 2012. Among 264 admitted patients, 24 patients (9.1% had been secluded and a total of 29 isolated incidents were recorded. Most of secluded incidents occurred on weekdays (75.9%, first week of inpatient (87.7%, and during the evening shifts (48.3%. The results obtained in this study demonstrate that in 55.2% cases, the duration of isolation was two hours and the most common cause of seclusion was aggressive behaviors. Most of secluded patients (66.7% were diagnosed with mood disorders.

  2. Development and validation of scales to measure organisational features of acute hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, A; Bond, S; Arber, S

    1995-12-01

    In order to make comparisons between wards and explain variations in outcomes of nursing care, there is a growing need in nursing research for reliable and valid measures of the organisational features of acute hospital wards. This research developed The Ward Organisational Features Scales (WOFS); each set of six scales comprising 14 subscales which measure discrete dimensions of acute hospital wards. A study of a nationally representative sample of 825 nurses working in 119 acute wards in 17 hospitals, drawn from seven Regional Health Authorities in England provides evidence for the structure, reliability and validity of this comprehensive set of measures related to: the physical environment of the ward, professional nursing practice, ward leadership, professional working relationships, nurses' influence and job satisfaction. Implications for further research are discussed.

  3. The ward atmosphere important for the psychosocial work environment of nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wann-Hansson Christine

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nursing staff working in psychiatric care have a demanding work situation, which may be reflected in how they view their psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The aims of the present study were to investigate in what way different aspects of the ward atmosphere were related to the psychosocial work environment, as perceived by nursing staff working in psychiatric in-patient care, and possible differences between nurses and nurse assistants. Methods 93 nursing staff working at 12 general psychiatric in-patient wards in Sweden completed two questionnaires, the Ward Atmosphere Scale and the QPSNordic 34+. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, the Mann-Whitney U-test, Spearman rank correlations and forward stepwise conditional logistic regression analyses. Results The data revealed that there were no differences between nurses and nurse assistants concerning perceptions of the psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The ward atmosphere subscales Personal Problem Orientation and Program Clarity were associated with a psychosocial work environment characterized by Empowering Leadership. Program Clarity was related to the staff's perceived Role Clarity, and Practical Orientation and Order and Organization were positively related to staff perceptions of the Organizational Climate. Conclusions The results from the present study indicate that several ward atmosphere subscales were related to the nursing staff's perceptions of the psychosocial work environment in terms of Empowering Leadership, Role Clarity and Organizational Climate. Improvements in the ward atmosphere could be another way to accomplish improvements in the working conditions of the staff, and such improvements would affect nurses and nurse assistants in similar ways.

  4. The impact of facility relocation on patients' perceptions of ward atmosphere and quality of received forensic psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiou, Eirini; Degl' Innocenti, Alessio; Kullgren, Anette; Wijk, Helle

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, large groups of forensic psychiatric patients have been relocated into new medium- and maximum-security forensic psychiatric facilities in Sweden, where a psychosocial care approach is embedded. From this perspective and on the assumption that physical structures affect the therapeutic environment, a prospective longitudinal study was designed to investigate the impact of the facility relocation of three forensic psychiatric hospitals on patients' perceptions of ward atmosphere and quality of received forensic psychiatric care. Participants were patients over 18 years of age sentenced to compulsory forensic psychiatric treatment. Data were obtained by validated questionnaires. Overall, 58 patients (78%) answered the questionnaires at baseline with a total of 25 patients (34%) completing follow-up 1 at six months and 11 patients (15%) completing follow-up 2, one year after relocation. Approximately two-thirds of the participants at all time-points were men and their age range varied from 18 to 69. The results of this study showed that poor physical environment features can have a severe impact on care quality and can reduce the possibilities for person-centered care. Furthermore, the study provides evidence that the patients' perceptions of person-centered care in forensic psychiatric clinics are highly susceptible to factors in the physical and psychosocial environment. Future work will explore the staff's perception of ward atmosphere and the possibilities to adapt a person-centered approach in forensic psychiatric care after facility relocation. PMID:27213839

  5. The impact of facility relocation on patients' perceptions of ward atmosphere and quality of received forensic psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiou, Eirini; Degl' Innocenti, Alessio; Kullgren, Anette; Wijk, Helle

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, large groups of forensic psychiatric patients have been relocated into new medium- and maximum-security forensic psychiatric facilities in Sweden, where a psychosocial care approach is embedded. From this perspective and on the assumption that physical structures affect the therapeutic environment, a prospective longitudinal study was designed to investigate the impact of the facility relocation of three forensic psychiatric hospitals on patients' perceptions of ward atmosphere and quality of received forensic psychiatric care. Participants were patients over 18 years of age sentenced to compulsory forensic psychiatric treatment. Data were obtained by validated questionnaires. Overall, 58 patients (78%) answered the questionnaires at baseline with a total of 25 patients (34%) completing follow-up 1 at six months and 11 patients (15%) completing follow-up 2, one year after relocation. Approximately two-thirds of the participants at all time-points were men and their age range varied from 18 to 69. The results of this study showed that poor physical environment features can have a severe impact on care quality and can reduce the possibilities for person-centered care. Furthermore, the study provides evidence that the patients' perceptions of person-centered care in forensic psychiatric clinics are highly susceptible to factors in the physical and psychosocial environment. Future work will explore the staff's perception of ward atmosphere and the possibilities to adapt a person-centered approach in forensic psychiatric care after facility relocation.

  6. Symptoms of epilepsy and organic brain dysfunctions in patients with acute, brief depression combined with other fluctuating psychiatric symptoms: a controlled study from an acute psychiatric department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linaker Olav M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In psychiatric acute departments some patients present with brief depressive periods accompanied with fluctuating arrays of other psychiatric symptoms like psychosis, panic or mania. For the purpose of the present study we call this condition Acute Unstable Depressive Syndrome (AUDS. The aims of the present study were to compare clinical signs of organic brain dysfunctions and epilepsy in patients with AUDS and Major Depressive Episode (MDE. Methods Out of 1038 consecutive patients admitted to a psychiatric acute ward, 16 patients with AUDS and 16 age- and gender-matched MDE patients were included in the study. Using standardized instruments and methods we recorded clinical data, EEG and MRI. Results A history of epileptic seizures and pathologic EEG activity was more common in the AUDS group than in the MDE group (seizures, n = 6 vs. 0, p = 0.018; pathologic EEG activity, n = 8 vs. 1, p = 0.015. Five patients in the AUDS group were diagnosed as having epilepsy, whereas none of those with MDE had epilepsy (p = 0.043. There were no differences between the groups regarding pathological findings in neurological bedside examination and cerebral MRI investigation. Conclusion Compared to patients admitted with mood symptoms fulfilling DSM 4 criteria of a major depressive disorder, short-lasting atypical depressive symptoms seem to be associated with a high frequency of epileptic and pathologic EEG activity in patients admitted to psychiatric acute departments. Trial registration NCT00201474

  7. Ventilation of wards and nosocomial outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome among healthcare workers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江山平; 黄莉文; 陈锡龙; 王景峰; 伍卫; 尹松梅; 陈为宪; 詹俊; 严励; 马丽萍; 李建国; 黄子通

    2003-01-01

    Objective To identify valid measures for preventing outbreaks of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) among protected healthcare workers in isolation units.Methods Architectural factors, admitted SARS cases and infection of healthcare workers in different isolation wards between January 30 and March 30, 2003 were analyzed.Results Four types of isolation wards were analyzed, including the ward where the thirty-first bed was located on the twelfth floor, the laminar flow ward in the Intensive Care Unit where the tenth bed was located on the fifteenth floor, the ward where the twenty-seventh bed was located on the thirteenth floor of the Lingnan Building, and thirty wards on the fourteenth to eighteenth floors of the Zhongshan Building. The ratios (m2/m3) of the area of the ventilation windows to the volume of the rooms were 0, 0, 1∶ 95 and 1∶ 40, respectively. Numbers of SARS cases in the wards mentioned above were 1, 1, 1 and 96, respectively. Total times of hospitalization were 43, 168, 110 and 1272 hours, respectively. The infection rates of the healthcare workers in the areas mentioned above were 73.2%, 32.1%, 27.5% and 1.7%, respectively. The difference in the infection rates was of statistical significance.Conclusions Isolating SARS cases in wards with good ventilation could reduce the viral load of the ward and might be the key to preventing outbreaks of SARS among healthcare workers along with strict personal protection measures in isolation units.

  8. Prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder on a psychiatric inpatient ward and the value of a screening question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, David; Akyüz, Elvan U; Hodsoll, John

    2015-12-15

    The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) on an inpatient ward in the UK with a larger sample than previously studied and to investigate the value of a simple screening question during an assessment interview. Four hundred and thirty two consecutive admissions were screened for BDD on an adult psychiatric ward over a period of 13 months. Those who screened positive had a structured diagnostic interview for BDD. The prevalence of BDD was estimated to be 5.8% (C.I. 3.6-8.1%). Our screening question had a slightly low specificity (76.6%) for detecting BDD. The strength of this study was a larger sample size and narrower confidence interval than previous studies. The study adds to previous observations that BDD is poorly identified in psychiatric inpatients. BDD was identified predominantly in those presenting with depression, substance misuse or an anxiety disorder. The screening question could be improved by excluding those with weight or shape concerns. Missing the diagnosis is likely to lead to inappropriate treatment. PMID:26404769

  9. Acute and long-term psychiatric side effects of mefloquine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringqvist, Åsa; Bech, Per; Glenthøj, Birte;

    2015-01-01

    ), and vitality (VT) in the mefloquine group compared to matched controls. CONCLUSION: The most frequent acute psychiatric problems were anxiety, depression, and psychotic symptoms. Data indicated that subjects experiencing acute mefloquine adverse side effects may develop long-term mental health problems...... with a decreased sense of global quality of life with lack of energy, nervousness, and depression....

  10. Leadership support for ward managers in acute mental health inpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Gwen; McLaughlin, Sue

    2014-05-01

    This article shares findings of work undertaken with a group of mental health ward managers to consider their roles through workshops using an action learning approach. The tensions between the need to balance the burden of administrative tasks and act as clinical role models, leaders and managers are considered in the context of providing recovery-focused services. The group reviewed their leadership styles, broke down the administrative elements of their roles using activity logs, reviewed their working environments and considered how recovery focused they believed their wards to be. Findings support the notion that the ward manager role in acute inpatient settings is at times unmanageable. Administration is one aspect of the role for which ward managers feel unprepared and the high number of administrative tasks take them away from front line clinical care, leading to frustration. Absence from clinical areas reduces opportunities for role modeling good clinical practice to other staff. Despite the frustrations of administrative tasks, overall the managers thought they were supportive to their staff and that their wards were recovery focused. PMID:24779763

  11. Factors Associated with Readmission of Patients at a University Hospital Psychiatric Ward in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Majid Barekatain; Mohammad Reza Maracy; Razeyeh Hassannejad; Reihane Hosseini

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Readmission has a major role in the reduction of the quality of life and the increase in the years of lost life. The main objectives of this study were to answer to the following research questions. (a) What was the readmission rate? (b) What were the social, demographic, and clinical characteristics of patients admitted to the Psychiatric Emergency Service at Nour University Hospital, affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran? (c) What were the effective...

  12. Hostility and violence of acute psychiatric inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzoni Antonella

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The aim of the present study was to find out the extent of hostility and violence and the factors that are associated with such hostility and violence in a psychiatric intensive care unit. Methods Retrospective analysis of data prospectively collected in a 6-year period. Results No hostility was observed in 56.1%, hostility in 40.9%, and violence in 3.0% of the admitted cases. Seclusion was never used. Six cases (2,5‰ required physical restraint. Risk factors associated with violence were younger age, suicidal risk, and diagnosis of schizophrenia. Risk factors associated with hostile and violent behavior were younger age at the onset of the disorder, being single, having no children, lower GAF scores, higher BPRS hostility, SAPS, and CGI scores, lower BPRS anxiety-depression score, higher doses of psychoactive drugs, more frequent use of neuroleptics, diagnosis of mania, personality disorder, substance and alcohol related disorders, no diagnosis of depression. Conclusion The study confirms the low rate of violence among Italian psychiatric in-patients, the major relevance of clinical rather than socio-demographic factors in respect of aggressive behavior, the possibility of a no seclusion-no physical restraint policy, not associated either with higher rates of hostility or violence or with more severe drug side effects.

  13. Compassionate containment? Balancing technical safety and therapy in the design of psychiatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Sarah; Gesler, Wilbert; Wood, Victoria; Spencer, Ian; Mason, James; Close, Helen; Reilly, Joseph

    2013-11-01

    This paper contributes to the international literature examining design of inpatient settings for mental health care. Theoretically, it elaborates the connections between conceptual frameworks from different strands of literature relating to therapeutic landscapes, social control and the social construction of risk. It does so through a discussion of the substantive example of research to evaluate the design of a purpose built inpatient psychiatric health care facility, opened in 2010 as part of the National Health Service (NHS) in England. Findings are reported from interviews or discussion groups with staff, patients and their family and friends. This paper demonstrates a strong, and often critical awareness among members of staff and other participants about how responsibilities for risk governance of 'persons' are exercised through 'technical safety' measures and the implications for therapeutic settings. Our participants often emphasised how responsibility for technical safety was being invested in the physical infrastructure of certain 'places' within the hospital where risks are seen to be 'located'. This illuminates how the spatial dimensions of social constructions of risk are incorporated into understandings about therapeutic landscapes. There were also more subtle implications, partly relating to 'Panopticist' theories about how the institution uses technical safety to supervise its own mechanisms, through the observation of staff behaviour as well as patients and visitors. Furthermore, staff seemed to feel that in relying on technical safety measures they were, to a degree, divesting themselves of human responsibility for risks they are required to manage. However, their critical assessment showed their concerns about how this might conflict with a more therapeutic approach and they contemplated ways that they might be able to engage more effectively with patients without the imposition of technical safety measures. These findings advance our thinking

  14. Clinical features and therapeutic management of patients admitted to Italian acute hospital psychiatric units: the PERSEO (psychiatric emergency study and epidemiology survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russo Federico

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The PERSEO study (psychiatric emergency study and epidemiology is a naturalistic, observational clinical survey in Italian acute hospital psychiatric units, called SPDCs (Servizio Psichiatrico Diagnosi e Cura; in English, the psychiatric service for diagnosis and management. The aims of this paper are: (i to describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients, including sociodemographic features, risk factors, life habits and psychiatric diagnoses; and (ii to assess the clinical management, subjective wellbeing and attitudes toward medications. Methods A total of 62 SPDCs distributed throughout Italy participated in the study and 2521 patients were enrolled over the 5-month study period. Results Almost half of patients (46% showed an aggressive behaviour at admission to ward, but they engaged more commonly in verbal aggression (38%, than in aggression toward other people (20%. A total of 78% of patients had a psychiatric diagnosis at admission, most frequently schizophrenia (36%, followed by depression (16% and personality disorders (14%, and no relevant changes in the diagnoses pattern were observed during hospital stay. Benzodiazepines were the most commonly prescribed drugs, regardless of diagnosis, at all time points. Overall, up to 83% of patients were treated with neuroleptic drugs and up to 27% received more than one neuroleptic either during hospital stay or at discharge. Atypical and conventional antipsychotics were equally prescribed for schizophrenia (59 vs 65% during stay and 59 vs 60% at discharge, while atypical drugs were preferred in schizoaffective psychoses (72 vs 49% during stay and 70 vs 46% at discharge and depression (41 vs 32% during stay and 44 vs 25% at discharge. Atypical neuroleptics were slightly preferred to conventional ones at hospital discharge (52 vs 44%. Polypharmacy was in general widely used. Patient attitudes toward medications were on average positive and self

  15. Experiences of patients with acute abdominal pain in the ED or acute surgical ward --a qualitative comparative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Helen; Qvist, Niels; Backer Mogensen, Christian;

    2013-01-01

    The Danish health care system is currently establishing emergency departments (EDs) with an observation unit nationwide. The aim of the study was to investigate patients with acute abdominal pain and their experiences upon arrival and stay in an acute surgical ward (ASW) versus an ED...... with an observation unit. A phenomenological-hermeneutic comparative field study with participant observation and interviews was performed. The analysis showed five themes: Waiting, being placed on the edge, taking or not taking initiative, being the object of attention and being taken seriously. The conclusion...... was that the ED included a multidisciplinary team with nurses, who mainly had interactions with the patients before surgical assessment. In all, it resulted in fragmentation of care and a patient experience of repetition. In ASW, focus was on assessment by a senior physician, only, and the nurses' interaction...

  16. Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections in internal medicine wards: old and new drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Marco; Concia, Ercole; Giusti, Massimo; Mazzone, Antonino; Santini, Claudio; Stefani, Stefania; Violi, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are a common cause of hospital admission among elderly patients, and traditionally have been divided into complicated and uncomplicated SSTIs. In 2010, the FDA provided a new classification of these infections, and a new category of disease, named acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs), has been proposed as an independent clinical entity. ABSSSIs include three entities: cellulitis and erysipelas, wound infections, and major cutaneous abscesses This paper revises the epidemiology of SSTIs and ABSSSIs with regard to etiologies, diagnostic techniques, and clinical presentation in the hospital settings. Particular attention is owed to frail patients with multiple comorbidities and underlying significant disease states, hospitalized on internal medicine wards or residing in nursing homes, who appear to be at increased risk of infection due to multi-drug resistant pathogens and treatment failures. Management of ABSSSIs and SSTIs, including evaluation of the hemodynamic state, surgical intervention and treatment with appropriate antibiotic therapy are extensively discussed. PMID:27084183

  17. Acute psychiatric inpatient care: A cross-cultural comparison between two hospitals in Germany and Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Moriwaki, Kumi; Neuner, Tanja; Hübner-Liebermann, Bettina; Hausner, Helmut; Wittmann, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Background: Intercultural differences influence acute inpatient psychiatric care systems. Aims: To evaluate characteristics of acute inpatient care in a German and a Japanese hospital. Method: Based on a sample of 465 admissions to the Psychiatric State Hospital Regensburg (BKR) and 91 admissions to the Hirakawa Hospital (HH) over a six-month period in 2008, data from the psychiatric basic documentation system (BADO) were analysed with regard to socio-demographic characteristics, treatm...

  18. How common are errors in the medication process in a psychiatric hospital?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann Lykkegaard; Mainz, Jan; Lisby, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    frequency, type and potential clinical consequences of errors in all stages of the medication process in an inpatient psychiatric setting. Methods and materials: A cross-sectional study in two general psychiatric wards and one acute psychiatric ward. Participants were eligible psychiatric in......-hospital patients (n=67), physicians prescribing drugs and ward staff (nurses and nurses assistants) dispensing and administering drugs. The study was carried out using 3 methods of investigation – an observational study, an unannounced control visit and an audit of medical records. Medication errors were evaluated...

  19. Effects of a humor-centered activity on disruptive behavior in patients in a general hospital psychiatric ward

    OpenAIRE

    Higueras, Antonio; Carretero-Dios, Hugo; Mu??oz, Jos?? P.; Idini, Esther; Ortiz, Ana; Rinc??n, Francisco; Prieto-Merino, David

    2006-01-01

    This study would not have been possible without the professional collaboration and enthusiasm of the Titiritas Clown group, who were the stars of the humor-based activities on the ward. We offer special thanks to the members of this group: Jos?? P??rez de la Blanca, Francisco Parera, and Fernando P??rez de la Blanca.

  20. Training needs and role constraints of nurses and assistant nurses working in acute inpatients units of psychiatric hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Gonis

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the research was to record the main clinical problems that mental health nurses and assistant nurses encounter in everyday practice.Material-Method: Data collection based on semi-structured interviews and nurses’ quotes who work in psychiatric acute inpatient wards. Content analysis was carried out and data was categorized into main themes. The total sample consisted of 82 mental health nurses and assistant nurses.Results: Analysis of data revealed that: The constraints of nursing role include the lack of autonomy, the accountability, the medication administration and nursing interventions. Training and clinical needs concern the managing of crisis, the collaboration inside the therapeutic team, the lack of nursing staff that means less time spent with the patient, the security in the work place and the psychological support for nurses.Conclusions: The findings indicated that mental health nurses are called to undertake a demanding role in every day clinical practice with inadequate preparation and training.

  1. Improving smoking cessation policy by assessing user demand for an inpatient smoking cessation service in adult psychiatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kathy; Creamer, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Smoking rates are higher among people with mental health conditions compared to the general population. Smoking reduces physical, mental and financial well-being, and interacts with psychotropic drugs. An inpatient admission provides an opportunity to engage and support smokers in smoking cessation. Compliance with Trust/NICE smoking cessation guidelines was assessed in two inpatient wards, and a questionnaire evaluated user demand for an inpatient smoking cessation service. A need for improved documentation of smoking status to identify and treat smokers routinely was revealed. A new electronic health form was designed and introduced, and a clear pathway for onward referrals was developed. This intervention preceded the introduction of the Trust-wide smoke free policy from October 2014. The intervention doubled rates of documentation of smoking status, cessation advice and offer of NRT/referral. There were large differences between the two wards, highlighting the need for a tailored approach.

  2. Study of the outcome of suicide attempts: characteristics of hospitalization in a psychiatric ward group, critical care center group, and non-hospitalized group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemuyama Nobuo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The allocation of outcome of suicide attempters is extremely important in emergency situations. Following categorization of suicidal attempters who visited the emergency room by outcome, we aimed to identify the characteristics and potential needs of each group. Methods The outcomes of 1348 individuals who attempted suicide and visited the critical care center or the psychiatry emergency department of the hospital were categorized into 3 groups, "hospitalization in the critical care center (HICCC", "hospitalization in the psychiatry ward (HIPW", or "non-hospitalization (NH", and the physical, mental, and social characteristics of these groups were compared. In addition, multiple logistic analysis was used to extract factors related to outcome. Results The male-to-female ratio was 1:2. The hospitalized groups, particularly the HICCC group, were found to have biopsychosocially serious findings with regard to disturbance of consciousness (JCS, general health performance (GAS, psychiatric symptoms (BPRS, and life events (LCU, while most subjects in the NH group were women who tended to repeat suicide-related behaviors induced by relatively light stress. The HIPW group had the highest number of cases, and their symptoms were psychologically serious but physically mild. On multiple logistic analysis, outcome was found to be closely correlated with physical severity, risk factor of suicide, assessment of emergent medical intervention, and overall care. Conclusion There are different potential needs for each group. The HICCC group needs psychiatrists on a full-time basis and also social workers and clinical psychotherapists to immediately initiate comprehensive care by a medical team composed of multiple professionals. The HIPW group needs psychological education to prevent repetition of suicide attempts, and high-quality physical treatment and management skill of the staff in the psychiatric ward. The NH group subjects need a

  3. Clinical features and therapeutic management of patients admitted to Italian acute hospital psychiatric units: the PERSEO (psychiatric emergency study and epidemiology) survey

    OpenAIRE

    Russo Federico; Righi Roberto; Minervini Lina; Margari Francesco; Casacchia Massimo; Boncompagni Giancarlo; Boccalon Roberto M; Ballerini Andrea; Salteri Andrea; Frediani Sonia; Rossi Andrea; Scatigna Marco

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The PERSEO study (psychiatric emergency study and epidemiology) is a naturalistic, observational clinical survey in Italian acute hospital psychiatric units, called SPDCs (Servizio Psichiatrico Diagnosi e Cura; in English, the psychiatric service for diagnosis and management). The aims of this paper are: (i) to describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients, including sociodemographic features, risk factors, life habits and psychiatric diagnoses; and...

  4. Switch Function and Pathological Dissociation in Acute Psychiatric Inpatients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chui-De Chiu

    Full Text Available Swift switching, along with atypical ability on updating and inhibition, has been found in non-clinical dissociators. However, whether swift switching is a cognitive endophenotype that intertwines with traumatisation and pathological dissociation remains unknown. Unspecified acute psychiatric patients were recruited to verify a hypothesis that pathological dissociation is associated with swift switching and traumatisation may explain this relationship. Behavioural measures of intellectual function and three executive functions including updating, switching and inhibition were administered, together with standardised scales to evaluate pathological dissociation and traumatisation. Our results showed superior control ability on switching and updating in inpatients who displayed more symptoms of pathological dissociation. When all three executive functions were entered as predictors, in addition to intellectual quotient and demographic variables to regress upon pathological dissociation, switching rather than updating remained the significant predictor. Importantly, the relationship between pathological dissociation and switching became non-significant when the effect of childhood trauma were controlled. The results support a trauma-related switching hypothesis which postulates swift switching as a cognitive endophenotype of pathological dissociation; traumatisation in childhood may explain the importance of swift switching.

  5. Early Sleep Psychiatric Intervention for Acute Insomnia: Implications from a Case of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Abe, Yuichiro; Nishimura, Go; Endo, Takuro

    2012-01-01

    Insomnia is a common problem among patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and patients suffering from acute insomnia with psychiatric comorbidity are more likely to develop chronic insomnia without appropriate intervention. Here we report a case of obsessive-compulsive disorder with acute insomnia, successfully treated with early sleep psychiatric non-pharmacological intervention. The augmentation of medication runs a risk of exacerbating daytime impairment. Clinicians usually pre...

  6. Evaluation of the decision support system for antimicrobial treatment, TREAT, in an acute medical ward of a university hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arboe, Bente; Laub, Rasmus Rude; Kronborg, Gitte;

    2014-01-01

    of hospital stay, or hospital or 30-day mortality. Direct costs were significantly higher for TREAT advice than for local guidelines or the physician prescriptions (pcosts were lower for TREAT advice than for both local guidelines (p....247). The coverage of TREAT advice for the bacteraemia patients was non-inferior to the physicians (p=1.00). CONCLUSIONS: TREAT can potentially improve the ecological costs of empirical antimicrobial therapy for patients in acute medical wards, but provided lower coverage than local guidelines....... coverage rates were 65%, 51%, and 79%, respectively, and in the prospective part, 68%, 62%, and 77%, respectively. TREAT provided lower coverage than local guidelines (plength...

  7. [Treatment in psychiatric day hospital in comparison with inpatient wards in different European health care systems--objectives of EDEN project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiejna, Andrzej; Kallert, Thomas W; Rymaszewska, Joanna

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents the objectives and design of an ongoing multicenter randomized, controlled trial EDEN (European Day Hospital EvaluatioN). The EDEN-study aims to evaluate the efficacy of acute psychiatric treatment in a day hospital setting in five European centres: Dresden, London, Michalovce, Prague and Wroclaw. The main hypothesis is that day hospital treatment for acute psychiatric patients is as effective as conventional inpatient hospital care. The objectives of the study are to evaluate the viability and effectiveness of day hospitals for acute psychiatric treatment, to identify subgroups of patients with a more or less favourable outcome so that the treatment setting might be specifically applied and to ascertain the cost-effectiveness of day hospital treatment compared to conventional inpatient treatment. The study utilises a Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) design with repeated measures at a maximum of six time points: at admission (t1), one week after admission (t2), four weeks after admission (t3), discharge (t4), three months after discharge (t5), and 12 months after discharge (t6). A combination of well-established standardised assessment instruments and open questions is used in 6 time periods. If the findings accept the main hypothesis of the study, some practical consequences could be inevitable: at a mental health policy level, these results could lead to an increase in the capacity of day hospitals; at the clinical level clinicians could redefine their concepts of care to consider the day hospital as an alternative to conventional inpatient treatment; from economic point of view could lead to reduction of treatment costs.

  8. Nurses' experience of collaboration with relatives of frail elderly patients in acute hospital wards: A qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tove, Lindhardt; Hallberg, Ingalill Rahm; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Frail elderly people admitted to hospital often receive help from relatives in managing their daily lives. These relatives are likely to continue to feel responsible after admission, and to hold valuable knowledge, which may contribute to decision-making related to care and treatment....... OBJECTIVE: To illuminate nurses' experience of collaboration with relatives of frail elderly patients in acute hospital wards, and of the barriers and promoters for collaboration. DESIGN AND SETTING: The design was descriptive. Three acute units in a large Danish university hospital participated...... reflected the nurses' two sets of conflicting attitudes towards collaboration with relatives, one in accordance with professional nursing values, the other reflecting the values of every day practice. The dual attitudes were reflected in two themes The coincidental encounter-the collaboration and Relatives...

  9. Nurses' experience of collaboration with relatives of frail elderly patients in acute hospital wards: a qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt, Tommi Bo; Hallberg, I.R.; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Frail elderly people admitted to hospital often receive help from relatives in managing their daily lives. These relatives are likely to continue to feel responsible after admission, and to hold valuable knowledge, which may contribute to decision-making related to care and treatment....... OBJECTIVE: To illuminate nurses' experience of collaboration with relatives of frail elderly patients in acute hospital wards, and of the barriers and promoters for collaboration. DESIGN AND SETTING: The design was descriptive. Three acute units in a large Danish university hospital participated...... reflected the nurses' two sets of conflicting attitudes towards collaboration with relatives, one in accordance with professional nursing values, the other reflecting the values of every day practice. The dual attitudes were reflected in two themes The coincidental encounter-the collaboration and Relatives...

  10. The Impact of Cannabis Use on the Dosage of Antipsychotic Drugs in Patients Admitted on the Psychiatric Ward at the University Hospital of the West Indies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the impact of cannabis use on the efficacy of antipsychotic drugs in male subjects presenting to the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI with psychotic episodes. Methods: Male subjects, 18–40 years old, admitted to the psychiatric ward of the UHWI between February 2013 and May 2013, diagnosed with schizophrenia, schizophreniform disorder and who tested positive for ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol were recruited for the study. On day one, consenting subjects were assessed using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS. Patients were prescribed seven days of an oral antipsychotic medication (haloperidol, chlorpromazine, risperidone, quetiapine, olanzapine. Medicated subjects were then reassessed using the BPRS on days three and seven. Statistical analysis involved the use of Student’s t-test and repeated measure analysis of variance. Results: In total, 20 subjects were recruited (mean age = 26.00 ± 5.96 years. Subjects were grouped based on the daily chlorpromazine equivalent (CPZE dose given on day one into CPZE1 (CPZE dose of 100–300mg; n = 8 and CPZE2 (CPZE dose of 400–1250 mg; n = 12. There was no significant difference in the total BPRS score between the groups on day one (CPZE1 = 41.38 ± 16.47 versus CPZE2 = 49.42 ± 25.58; p = 0.44; similar findings were obtained for the positive (26.75 ± 9.27 versus 31.83 ± 17.30; p = 0.46 and negative (14.63 ± 7.73 versus 17.58 ± 9.74; p = 0.48 symptom component on the BPRS. For subjects in CPZE1, there was no significant decrease in total BPRS score [F(2,21 = 0.07, p = 0.93] over the study period. For CPZE2, significant reduction in total BPRS scores was achieved [F(2,33 =7.12, p = 0.01], contributed by significant decrease in the positive [F(2,33 = 5.64, p = 0.02 and negative [F(2,33 = 7.53, p = 0.01 symptom components of the BPRS. Conclusion: The findings of this study purport that male cannabis users presenting with psychotic disorders may not achieve optimal

  11. Nurse-police coalition: improves safety in acute psychiatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Diane E; Harris, Frank N; de Nesnera, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Although police officers protect and secure the safety of citizens everywhere, nurses are the primary guardians of patient safety within the treatment milieu. At New Hampshire Hospital, both nurses and police officers share ownership of this responsibility, depending on the needs that arise specific to each profession. Psychiatric nurses take pride in their ability to de-escalate agitated and potentially aggressive patients; however, times arise when the best efforts of nurses fail, or when a situation requires intervention from police officers. Nurses and police officers at New Hampshire Hospital have worked together for many years to develop a trusting, respectful alliance. This coalition has resulted in a safe, clear, orderly process for transfer of authority from nurses to police during violent, clinically unmanageable psychiatric emergencies. Nurses and police officers work collaboratively toward the common goal of ensuring safety for patients and staff, while also acknowledging the unique strengths of each profession.

  12. 精神科病房护士的心理压力源分析及改善方法%An Analysis and Improving Methods on Psychological Stress Source of Nurses in Psychiatric Ward

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王伟卓; 王莉; 王新福

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the psychological status of nurses in psychiatric ward, and analysis on sources of psychological stress, by that, proposed improving methods, improving work ef iciency. Methods Nurses in psychiatric ward of our hospital as the research object, Self-rating depression scale (SDS), Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) and Nurse Vocational Pressure Questionnaire (NVPQ) were used to investigate the psychological status, al data was processed by the data statistical software SPSS. Results The scores of SDS and SAS of nurses in psychiatric ward were significantly higher than that of ordinary people ( <0.01). Correlative analysis showed that there was a positive correlation between depression status and work pressure ( <0.01). 7 items of sources of work pressure were the main psychological pressure of nurses in psychiatric ward. Conclusion Take related measures, enhancing nurse psychological status, keeping them best working state, and improving nursing quality.%目的通过问卷调查了解精神科病房护士的心理状况,并对心理压力源进行分析,从而提出针对性的改善方法,提高工作效率。方法以我院精神科住院病房护士为研究对象,运用抑郁自评量表喳SDS札焦虑自评量表喳SAS札护士职业压力调查表等进行问卷调查,并对所得数据进行统计学处理。结果精神科病房护士SDS和SAS评分明显高于正常人,u值=5.28;值均<0.01差异有显著性意义抑郁状况与工作压力呈正相关,工作压力源有7项是精神科病房护士主要的心理压力源。结论采取针对性的相关措施,改善护理人员的心理状况,保持最佳的工作状态,提高护理质量。

  13. 医护联合查房在精神科临床实践中的应用%Application on nursing ward rounds with doctor in psychiatric clinical practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊建民

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨医护联合查房在精神科的临床应用效果.方法 自2005年以来在我院开展了医护联合查房,并对患者满意度、意外事件、患者或家属投诉3个方面进行了开展前后的对比.结果 开展医护联合查房后患者满意度提高(χ2=85.369,P=0.000),各类意外事件发生率、投诉率下降.结论 医护联合查房促进了"交流一协作-互补"型医护关系的建立,提高了患者满意度,减少了意外事件发生,提升了护士自身价值感.%Objective To discuss the impact on nursing ward rounds with doctor in psychiatric clinical practice.Methods Since 2005,our hospital has carried out the nursing ward rounds with doctor,it has compared with the three aspects of patient satisfaction,accidents,complaints of patients or their families foreand-aft.Results Patient satisfaction was improved(χ2=85.369,P=0.000),and varioustypes accidents and complaints dropped after the nursing ward rounds with doctor.Conclusions Nursing ward rounds with doctor promoted establishing"communication-collaboration-complement"relationship between nurses and doctors,improved patient satisfactions,reduced accidents,improved self-sense of worth of nurses.

  14. A systematic review of music therapy practice and outcomes with acute adult psychiatric in-patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Carr

    Full Text Available There is an emerging evidence base for the use of music therapy in the treatment of severe mental illness. Whilst different models of music therapy have been developed in mental health care, none have specifically accounted for the features and context of acute in-patient settings. This review aimed to identify how music therapy is provided for acute adult psychiatric in-patients and what outcomes have been reported.A systematic review using medical, psychological and music therapy databases. Papers describing music therapy with acute adult psychiatric in-patients were included. Analysis utilised narrative synthesis.98 papers were identified, of which 35 reported research findings. Open group work and active music making for nonverbal expression alongside verbal reflection was emphasised. Aims were engagement, communication and interpersonal relationships focusing upon immediate areas of need rather than longer term insight. The short stay, patient diversity and institutional structure influenced delivery and resulted in a focus on single sessions, high session frequency, more therapist direction, flexible use of musical activities, predictable musical structures, and clear realistic goals. Outcome studies suggested effectiveness in addressing a range of symptoms, but were limited by methodological shortcomings and small sample sizes. Studies with significant positive effects all used active musical participation with a degree of structure and were delivered in four or more sessions.No single clearly defined model exists for music therapy with adults in acute psychiatric in-patient settings, and described models are not conclusive. Greater frequency of therapy, active structured music making with verbal discussion, consistency of contact and boundaries, an emphasis on building a therapeutic relationship and building patient resources may be of particular importance. Further research is required to develop specific music therapy models for this

  15. Acute atropine intoxication with psychiatric symptoms by herbal infusion of Pulmonaria officinalis (Lungwort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Baca-García

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Lungwort infusion is a preparation extracted from Pulmonaria officinalis which is occasionally used as a folk remedy for the common cold. The current report aims to describe acute atropine intoxications with delirium caused by Lungwort infusion in several members of the same family. Methods: Description of three case reports. Search of literature through Medline. Results: Three generations of a same family presented acute and moderately severe atropine intoxications after drinking an infusion prepared with Pulmonaria officinalis. Conclusions: Despite the lack of scientific evidence for its clinical use, medicinal plants continue being widely used. In spite of severe adverse effects reported, the general thought is that herbal remedies are harmless. To our knowledge, this is the first report of acute atropine intoxications with psychiatric symptoms secondary to Pulmonaria officinalis in several members of a family. We suspect that the lungwort infusion may have been contaminated with some other substance with atropinic properties.

  16. READMIT: a clinical risk index to predict 30-day readmission after discharge from acute psychiatric units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigod, Simone N; Kurdyak, Paul A; Seitz, Dallas; Herrmann, Nathan; Fung, Kinwah; Lin, Elizabeth; Perlman, Christopher; Taylor, Valerie H; Rochon, Paula A; Gruneir, Andrea

    2015-02-01

    Our aim was to create a clinically useful risk index, administered prior to discharge, for determining the probability of psychiatric readmission within 30 days of hospital discharge for general psychiatric inpatients. We used population-level sociodemographic and health administrative data to develop a predictive model for 30-day readmission among adults discharged from an acute psychiatric unit in Ontario, Canada (2008-2011), and converted the final model into a risk index system. We derived the predictive model in one-half of the sample (n = 32,749) and validated it in the other half of the sample (n = 32,750). Variables independently associated with 30-day readmission (forming the mnemonic READMIT) were: (R) Repeat admissions; (E) Emergent admissions (i.e. harm to self/others); (D) Diagnoses (psychosis, bipolar and/or personality disorder), and unplanned Discharge; (M) Medical comorbidity; (I) prior service use Intensity; and (T) Time in hospital. Each 1-point increase in READMIT score (range 0-41) increased the odds of 30-day readmission by 11% (odds ratio 1.11, 95% CI 1.10-1.12). The index had moderate discriminative capacity in both derivation (C-statistic = 0.631) and validation (C-statistic = 0.630) datasets. Determining risk of psychiatric readmission for individual patients is a critical step in efforts to address the potentially avoidable high rate of this negative outcome. The READMIT index provides a framework for identifying patients at high risk of 30-day readmission prior to discharge, and for the development, evaluation and delivery of interventions that can assist with optimizing the transition to community care for patients following psychiatric discharge.

  17. Treatment needs, diagnoses and use of services for acutely admitted psychiatric patients in northwest Russia and northern Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sørgaard Knut W

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We compared demography, diagnoses and clinical needs in acutely admitted psychiatric hospital patients in northwest Russia and northern Norway. Method All acutely admitted psychiatric patients in 1 psychiatric hospital in north-west Russia and 2 in northern Norway were in a three months period assessed with HoNOS and a Norwegian form developed to study acute psychiatric services (MAP. Data from a total of 841 patients were analysed (377 Norwegian, 464 Russian with univariate and multivariate statistics. Results Russian patients were more often males who had paid work. 2/3 were diagnosed with alcohol and organic disorders, and 70% reported problems related to sleep. Depression was widespread, as were problems associated with occupation. Many more Norwegian patients were on various forms of social security and lived in community supported homes. They had a clinical profile of affective disorders, use of drugs, suicidality and problems with activities involved of daily life. Slightly more Norwegian patients were involuntary admitted. Conclusion Acutely admitted psychiatric patients in North West Russia and Northern Norwegian showed different clinical profiles: alcohol, depression and organic disorders characterised Russian patients, affective disorders, suicidality and use of drugs characterised the Norwegians. Whereas Norwegian patients are mainly referred from GPs the Russians come via 1.line psychiatric services (“dispensaries”. Average length of stay for Russian patients was 2.5 times longer than that of the Norwegian.

  18. Application of high quality of nursing service in psychiatric ward%优质护理服务在精神科病房的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔静怡; 崔界峰; 张研洁; 王秋萍

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨为精神科住院患者提供优质护理服务,对提高患者生活质量,增强患者自信心、自尊心和满意度的效果。方法选择精神科住院患者48例,实施优质护理服务,即“以患者为中心”为整体护理理念,在基础护理、病情观察、治疗护理、用药康复训练以及健康教育等方面全面落实责任制护理。实施优质护理服务活动前后采用生活质量量表、自尊量表和满意度调查表测评患者生活质量和满意度。结果实施优质护理服务活动3个月后,患者的生活质量中心理与社会分量表得分为(27.33±22.33),动力与精力量表得分为(33.54±18.12),均低于实施前,差异有统计学意义(t值分别为2.054,2.033;P<0.05);自尊量表得分(25.85±11.27),高于实施前,差异有统计学意义(t=2.236, P<0.05);实施优质护理服务前后,患者护理满意度得分分别为(11.79±4.64)分和(13.79±3.41)分,差异有统计学意义(t=2.582,P<0.05)。结论开展优质护理服务活动,提高了精神科患者的生活质量,增强了患者自尊心和战胜疾病的自信心,提高了患者满意度。%Objective To explore the effect of high quality of nursing service on increasing the life quality of patient, confidence, self-esteem and patient satisfaction in psychiatric ward .Methods Forty-eight patients in hospital in the department of psychiatry were chosen , were carried out the high quality of nursing service, that is the concept of “take the patient as the center” by way of holistic nursing, and were fully implemented the responsibility nursing in basic nursing , disease observation, treatment nursing, rehabilitation training of drug and health education .The life quality and satisfaction of patients were evaluated by quality of life scale, self esteem scale and satisfaction questionnaire before and

  19. Emergency room referral to internal medicine wards or to coronary care units of patients with first acute myocardial infarction. Israel Study Group on First Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drory, Y; Shapira, I; Goldbourt, U; Fisman, E Z; Villa, Y; Tenenbaum, A; Pines, A

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the study was to assess factors associated with ward assignment in the emergency room for patients assignment (coronary care unit versus internal ward). Eight major centrally located Israeli hospitals provided data during one year. The study population included 1252 patients, of whom 83% were men, 37% were hypertensives, 22% were diabetics, and 14% had previous anginal syndrome. Most patients (83%) were admitted to the coronary care unit. Internal medicine ward assignment was significantly associated with advanced age, history of hypertension or diabetes, a longer time from appearance of symptoms to arrival at the hospital, and myocardial infarction type (non-Q-wave or non-anterior). The likelihood of medical ward referral increased stepwise with the increasing number of a patient's predictive factors: those with > or = 4 factors had a > 30% chance of being assigned to a medical ward compared to a decision making in the emergency room are needed to resolve this paradoxical situation. PMID:10998758

  20. Short-Term Diagnostic Stability of Acute Psychosis: Data from a Tertiary Care Psychiatric Center in South India

    OpenAIRE

    Narayanaswamy, Janardhanan C.; Virupaksha Harave Shanmugam; Dhanya Raveendranathan; Biju Viswanath; Kesavan Muralidharan

    2012-01-01

    Context: Studies on acute psychosis in patients from India report good outcome. A small proportion of these patients may suffer relapses or other develop major psychiatric disorders later. Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the diagnostic stability of acute psychosis in patients from India. Materials and Methods: The records of patients who presented with the first episode of acute and transient psychotic disorder (n=57) over 1 year (2004) were analyzed, and the follow-up data at the e...

  1. Application of high quality nursing service to the open psychiatric wards%优质护理服务在精神科开放式病房中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王垭; 杨涛; 黄秀梅; 宋小珍

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨优质护理服务在精神科开放式病房中的应用效果.方法:学习领会优质护理服务示范工程精神实质,改善住院环境,规范服务流程,改革护士排班模式,实施小组责任制护理,夯实基础护理,规范康复治疗,改革护理质量控制等措施创建精神科优质护理服务示范病房,创建前(2010年2~7月)后(2010年7~12月)采用我院护理工作满意度调查表进行调查、比较.结果:创建优质护理服务示范病房后患者总满意度及对护理服务、护理技术、护士态度、病房环境维度的满意度与实施前比较差异均有统计学意义(P<0.01).结论:创建优质护理服务示范病房,护士服务由被动变主动,可有效地提高护理质量,提高患者满意度,同时能提升护士自我价值感.%Objective: To probe into the effect of high quality nursing service in the open psychiatric wards. Methods: We studied and understood the essence of demonstration project of high quality nursing service in order to improve hospital environment, standardize service processes and reform scheduling model of nurse s shift. Accordingly the group care responsibility and nursing quality control were implemented to create demonstration ward with high quality nursing service in the psychiatric department. The questionnaire designed by our hospital was used to conduct a survey and compare the degree of patients satisfaction with nursing service before! February to July ,2010 ) and after the creation of the demonstration ward ( July to December 2010 ). Results: There were statistically significant differences in the comparison of the overall degree of the patient s satisfaction, the patient s satisfaction at the dimensions of nursing service, nursing skills, attitude of nurses and environment of ward before and after the creation of the demonstration ward ( P < 0.01 ). Conclusion: By creating demonstration ward with high quality nursing service, the nursing service

  2. "We Have to Be Satisfied with the Scraps": South African Nurses' Experiences of Care on Adult Psychiatric Intellectual Disability Inpatient Wards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capri, Charlotte; Buckle, Chanellé

    2015-01-01

    Background: Migrating nursing labour inadvertently reinforces South Africa's care drain, contributes to a global care crisis and forces us to reconsider migration motivation. This paper highlights issues that complicate psychiatric intellectual disability nursing care and identifies loci for change in an attempt to redress this care challenge.…

  3. Effect of nurse-led medication reviews in psychiatric patients - an interventional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann Lykkegaard; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Poulsen, Birgitte Klindt;

    2013-01-01

    and conducting systematic medication reviews using computer based screening. The effect is evaluated in a controlled interventional study. METHODS: An interventional study including 2 acute psychiatric wards. In one ward nurses’ will receive pharmacological training and the other ward will function as a control...... of the interratervariability between the two professions. RESULTS: The hypothesis is that nurse-led medication reviews will reduce potential inappropriate prescribing and that training will increase nurses’ ability to identify and report potential inappropriate prescribing. It is assumed that this intervention, in addition...

  4. Psychiatric Wards Nursing Management Responsibility in Grouping Application Significance to Explore the Nursing Mode%精神科病房护理管理中责任分组护理模式的应用意义探究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张凤坤

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analysis the psychiatric ward nursing management responsibility group nursing mode application significance. Methods In February 2012 -March 2015 treated in our hospital during the period of psychiatric patients, 102 cases as the research object, by using the method to computer group 51 cases were divided into observation group and con-trol group in 51 cases. The observation group patients' responsibility group nursing mode, control group patients give the traditional model of nursing. Comparative analysis of two groups of patients nursing satisfaction. Results After different nursing mode, the observation group of patients nursing satisfaction was 96.1% (49/51); The control group patients nursing satisfaction was 70.6% (36/51);The observation group was better than control group (P<0.05), the more significant differ-ence between the two groups. Conclusion Grouping responsibility nursing model was applied to the psychiatric ward nurs-ing management can improve the patient's nursing satisfaction, while increasing patients compliance, has high practical val-ue, can promote in clinical use.%目的 分析精神科病房护理管理中责任分组护理模式的应用意义. 方法 选取该院精神科2012年2月-2015年3月收治的102例患者为研究对象,采用电脑分组将其随机分为观察组和对照组,各51例患者. 观察组给予责任分组护理,对照组给予传统护理.对比分析两组患者的护理满意度.结果经过不同模式的护理,观察组和对照组患者的护理满意度分别为96.1%(49/51)和70.6%(36/51);观察组明显优于对照组(P<0.05),两组间比较差异有统计学意义.结论 将责任分组护理模式应用于精神科病房护理管理中能够使患者的护理满意度提升,同时使患者的依从性增加,具有良好的实用价值,临床中可推广使用.

  5. The application of nursing model with grouping responsibility system in the psychiatric wards%小组责任制护理模式在精神科病房中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周勤玲; 林素英; 高镇松; 郑素燕; 陈友兰; 黄琼娇

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨小组责任制护理模式在精神科示范病房中的应用效果.方法 对优质护理服务示范工程男女两个试点病区实行小组责任制护理,在实施前及实施一年后各抽取120例患者(男女各半)对护理工作满意度进行评价比较,并于实施后调查医生、护士对小组责任制护理的满意度.结果 实施一年后,2个试点病区患者对护理工作满意度显著高于实施前(P< 0.05或P< 0.01),护士总满意率为93.2%,医生总满意率为95.8%.结论 对精神病患者实施小组责任制护理能密切护患关系,增强患者对护理的依从性,促进患者精神康复,有效提高了护士的整体水平和综合素质、树立医院形象.%Objective To explore the implementation effect of nursing model with grouping responsibility system in the psychiatric wards.Methods Patients in male and female pilot wards of quality nursing care demonstration project were practised nursing model with grouping responsibility system.Before and after one year's practice,120 patients (by halves as sex) were randomly sampled to compare nursing satisfaction.After practice,doctors and nurses were investigated to measure satisfaction about implementation of grouping responsibility system.Results After one year' s practice,the nursing care satisfaction rates of two pilot wards patients showed significantly higher than that before practice( P< 0.05 ).The total satisfaction rate was 93.2% in nurse,and 95.8% in doctor.Conclusions Grouping responsibility system nursing care services for patients with mental illness can close nurse-patient relationship,enhance patient nursing compliance,promote patients mental recovery,raise nurse nursing level,multiple qualifications,and set up a better image of the hospital.

  6. Psychiatric nurse practitioners’ experiences of working with mental health care users presenting with acute symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kgalabi J. Ngako

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric nurse practitioners (PNPs working with mental health care users presenting with acute symptoms work in a complex environment. This environment is characterised by mental health care users who may present with a history of violence, sexual assault and substance misuse.The objectives of this study were twofold: firstly, to explore and describe the experiences of PNPs working with mental health care users (MHCUs presenting with acute symptoms; and secondly, to make recommendations for the advanced PNPs to facilitate promotion of the mental health of PNPs with reference to nursing practice, research and education.A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual design was used. The target population was PNPs working with MHCUs presenting with acute symptoms in a public mental health care institution in Gauteng. Data were collected by means of four focus group interviews involving 21 PNPs. The researcher made use of drawings, naïve sketches and field notes for the purpose of data triangulation. Data were analysed in accordance with Tesch’s method of open coding.The three themes that emerged were: PNPs experienced working with these MHCUs as entering an unsafe world where care became a burden; they experienced negative emotional reactions and attitudes towards these MHCUs that compromised quality nursing care; and they made a plea for a nurturing environment that would enhance quality nursing care.The PNPs suggest skills and competency development, organisational support, and a need for external resources. Creation of a positive environment and mobilisation of resources as well as the identification and bridging of obstacles are essential in the promotion of the overall wellbeing and mental health of PNPs. 

  7. The application of humane care concept in the management of psychiatric ward%人文关怀理念在精神科病房管理中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜杨

    2014-01-01

    介绍日本及我国香港和台湾地区医院精神科病房如何通过提高员工的人文素养、改进病房环境设计、保护患者权益等措施来体现人文关怀,彰显了只有确保患者与员工的安全才是完整的医疗行为。安全、舒适、便捷的工作环境与职业情感、团队协作精神的有机结合,是精神科人文关怀的最好体现。启示我们须加强对人文关怀的理解,注重人文关怀能力的教育。%To introduce Japan, as well as some Chinese regions such as Hong Kong and Taiwan relfected the requirements of humane care,by improving the quality of psychiatric staff,ward environment design, facilities transitions, and rights protection of the patients for tangible and intangible services .The idea highlightens the importance of medical activities in a safe, comfortable and convenientenviroment The combination of safe, comfortable and convenient working environment with occupational emotion, and collaborative teamwork is the best embodiment of humanistic care in psychiatry.

  8. Clinical, Paraclinical, and Antimicrobial Resistance Features of Community-Acquired Acute Bacterial Meningitis at a Large Infectious Diseases Ward in Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Behrooz; Khalili, Hossein; Karimzadeh, Iman; Emadi-Kochak, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    In this study demographic, clinical, paraclinical, microbiological, and therapeutic features of patients with community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to a referral center for infectious diseases in Iran, have been evaluated. Medical records of adult (> 18 years) individuals with confirmed diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis during a 4-year period were retrospectively reviewed. All required data were obtained from patients' medical charts. Available findings about antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated bacteria from CSF and/or blood were also collected. Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method was used to determine their antimicrobial susceptibility profile. Details of medical management including antibiotic regimen, duration, patients' outcome, and possible sequelae of meningitis were recorded. The most commonly isolated microorganism from CSF or blood of patients was Streptococcus pneumonia (33.33%) followed by Neisseria meningitidis (27.78%) and Haemophilus influenza (16.67%). The most common antimicrobial regimen was ceftriaxone plus vancomycin (69.44%) followed by ceftriaxone plus vancomycin plus ampicillin (11.11%). Neurological sequelae of meningitis including cranial nerve palsy, deafness, and hemiparesis were identified in 4 (11.11%), 2 (5.56%), and 1 (2.78%) subjects, respectively. Regarding mortality, only 3 (8.33%) patients died from bacterial meningitis and the remaining 33 individuals discharged from the hospital. In conclusion, findings of the current study demonstrated that the mean incidence of acute bacterial meningitis in a referral infectious diseases ward in Iran was 9 episodes per year. The majority cases of community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to our center had negative CSF culture and classic triad of meningitis was absent in them. PMID:27610176

  9. An open randomized controlled trial of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation in patients of acute on chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure in a general respiratory ward setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad R

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To compare the standard medical therapy (SMT and noninvasive posi-tive pressure ventilation (NPPV in acute on chronic hypercapnic respiratory fail-ure due to exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Method : Between June 2002 and May 2003, 19 patients with acute on chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure were prospectively and randomly recruited to re-ceive either SMT (n=10 or NPPV plus SMT (n=9 in a general respiratory ward and followed up after 4 to 6 weeks after discharge. NPPV was given with a silicone cushioned nasal mask via a bilevel ventilator with initial pressure support of 5 cm of H 2 O. Results : At the time of randomization there was no significant difference in respiratory rate, PaO 2 , PaCO 2 , pH and HCO3 - , between the two groups. At 2 hours with SMT, there was significant improvement only in respiratory rate (p = 0.0000 and PaO 2 (p=0.0014. However with NPPV, respiratory rate (p=0.0000, PaO2 (p=0.0011, pH (0.0002, pulse rate (p=0.0329 and mean arterial pressure (p=0.0096 improved significantly at 2 hours while PaCO2 (p=0.0008 significantly improved at24 hours. Hospital stay was significantly shorter for NPPV group as compared to SMT group (9.63 + 1.4 days vs. 13.33 + 4.69 days, p < 0.05. There was 1 failure (12.5% in NPPV group as compared to 2 failures (20% in SMT group of which one was salvaged by NPPV. Conclusion : The study suggests that early application of NPPV in acute on chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure due to COPD facilitates improvement, favors early mobiliation and discharge from hospital.

  10. Can patients with moderate to severe acute respiratory failure from COPD be treated safely with noninvasive mechanical ventilation on the ward?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalcinsoy M

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Murat Yalcinsoy,1 Cuneyt Salturk,2 Selahattin Oztas,2 Sinem Gungor,2 Ipek Ozmen,2 Feyyaz Kabadayi,2 Aysem Askim Oztim,2 Emine Aksoy,2 Nalan Adıguzel,2 Ozlem Oruc,2 Zuhal Karakurt2 1Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Inonu University Medical Faculty, Turgut Ozal Medical Center, Malatya, 2Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Sureyyapaşa Chest Diseases and Thoracic Surgery Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey Purpose: Noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV usage outside of intensive care unit is not recommended in patients with COPD for severe acute respiratory failure (ARF. We assessed the factors associated with failure of NIMV in patients with ARF and severe acidosis admitted to the emergency department and followed on respiratory ward.Patients and methods: This is a retrospective observational cohort study conducted in a tertiary teaching hospital specialized in chest diseases and thoracic surgery between June 1, 2013 and May 31, 2014. COPD patients who were admitted to our emergency department due to ARF were included. Patients were grouped according to the severity of acidosis into two groups: group 1 (pH=7.20–7.25 and group 2 (pH=7.26–7.30.Results: Group 1 included 59 patients (mean age: 70±10 years, 30.5% female and group 2 included 171 patients (mean age: 67±11 years, 28.7% female. On multivariable analysis, partial arterial oxygen pressure to the inspired fractionated oxygen (PaO2/FiO2 ratio <200, delta pH value <0.30, and pH value <7.31 on control arterial blood gas after NIMV in the emergency room and peak C-reactive protein were found to be the risk factors for NIMV failure in COPD patients with ARF in the ward.Conclusion: NIMV is effective not only in mild respiratory failure but also with severe forms of COPD patients presenting with severe exacerbation. The determination of the failure criteria of NIMV and the expertise of the team is critical for treatment success. Keywords: noninvasive mechanical ventilation

  11. 老年精神科病房意外风险因素及防范措施%Unexpected risk factors and preventive measures in senile psy-chiatric ward

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许洪英

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the unexpected risk factors in senile psychiatric ward and put forward relative nursing supervision countermeasures and preven-tive measures.Methods Retrospective analyses of clinical data were carried out in 18 senile mental pa-tients who developed accident events.Results The main unexpected risk factors in senile mental patients were falling,falling down from bed,burn,aspiration,mistaken eating,chokes,asphyxia,pressure sore, self-inflicted wound and self-abandon,impulsion and attacking person,escaping,loss,overdose,missed drug,drug reaction,mixed infection and so on.Conclusion Risk preventive consciousness should be en-hanced,the ability of identification and precluding risk boosted,and prevention is first to ensure patients’ safety.%目的:探讨老年精神科病房的意外风险因素,提出相应的护理管理对策及防范措施。方法对18例老年精神病患者发生意外事件的临床资料进行回顾性分析。结果老年精神病患者意外风险因素主要有跌倒、坠床、烫伤、误吸、误食、噎食、窒息、压疮、自伤自弃、冲动伤人、外逃、走失、多服药、漏服药、药物反应、交叉感染等。结论加强风险防范意识,提高鉴别和化解风险的能力,做到预防为主,保证患者的安全。

  12. Stepping Back and Listening: Staff Experiences of Using a Coaching Approach in an Acute Rehabilitation Ward for Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Debra; Ross, Kirsty; Prat-Sala, Merce; Kibble, Sharon; Harden, Beverley

    2016-08-01

    Previous research has highlighted that acute care provision can lead to a loss of confidence, control, and independent functioning in older adult patients. In addition, it is recognized that interactions between patients and health care staff are central to the prevention of functional decline in patients. In this study, we aimed to affect the staff-patient relationship by implementing a coaching intervention in an older adult acute care setting. Here, we report on staff experiences of this coaching approach. Data were collected from 16 members of staff via semi-structured interviews, which were analyzed using thematic analysis. Four themes were identified: Putting a Label on It, Stepping Back and Listening, Identifying the Opportunities, and Working as Team. Our findings show that a coaching approach can be successful in getting staff to reconsider their interactions with patients and to focus on strategies that foster the independence and autonomy of older adult patients. PMID:26481943

  13. Investigation the effects of professionalized nursing health education on psychiatric patients in ward%专职化护理健康教育对住院精神病患者的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑慧芳; 姜海涛

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨专职化护理健康教育对住院精神病患者的影响及效果.方法 将在我院的住院精神病患者212例,随机分为研究组105例和对照组107例.研究组实施专职化护理健康教育,对照组实施常规健康教育,比较两组患者在干预前及干预10周后患者对治疗的依从性,护理满意度、健康教育内容的掌握程度以及希望获得健康教育的途径.结果 研究组对治疗的依从性,护理满意度、健康教育内容的掌握程度均高于对照组,差异有统计学意义.两组患者均希望以更多的传播形式来获得健康教育知识.结论 实施专职化护理健康教育能提高住院精神病患者对治疗的依从性、密切护患关系,提高满意度.%Objective To investigate the effects of professionalized nursing health education on psychiatric patients in ward.Methods 212 patents,recruited from April,2009 to December,2010,were randomized to study group(105)and control group(107).Patients in study group received professionalized health education,and the 0nes in control group got regular health education.After 10-week intervention,treatment compliance,nursing satisfaction,health knowledge,and understanding of health information pathway were systemically compared between study group and control group.Results The rating scores of treatment compliance,nursing satisfaction,and health knowledge from study group were significantly higher than those scores from control group.Furthermore,patients in beth groups demonstrated the importance of health education in various ways.Conclusions Professionalized health nursing education is able to improve treatment compliance,relationship of patients and nurses, nursing satisfaction, and health-related knowledge.The pathways of health education need to be developed in diverse directions so as to maximize the effects of nursing health education.

  14. Psychiatric side effects of acute high-dose corticosteroid therapy in neurological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotan, Itay; Fireman, Liora; Benninger, Felix; Weizman, Abraham; Steiner, Israel

    2016-07-01

    It has been implied that high-dose corticosteroids (CSs) commonly cause psychiatric side effects. Here, we examined the rate and risk factors of psychiatric side effects during high-dose CS treatment in patients with neurological disorders. Patients treated with high-dose intravenous CSs for neurological disorders were evaluated for depression, mania, and psychosis using the Beck Depression Inventory, the Geriatric Depression Scale, the Young Mania Rating Scale, and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale before CS treatment, immediately after, and 1 month following treatment. Forty-nine consecutive patients were monitored. There was a reduction in the Beck Depression Inventory and Geriatric Depression Scale scores as well as in the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale scores throughout the study period and a transitory increase in the Young Mania Rating Scale score immediately after CS administration. Thus, a tendency to develop transient mild euphoria during high-dose CS treatment exists, but is reversible at 1 month, whereas a reduction in depressive symptoms tended to persist. Overall, our data indicate that high-dose CS treatment for neurological diseases is relatively safe with respect to psychiatric complications. PMID:26938038

  15. Treatments for common psychiatric conditions among adults during acute, rehabilitation, and reintegration phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Difede, Joann; Cukor, Judith; Lee, Francis; Yurt, Roger

    2009-12-01

    Common and pernicious adult psychiatric disorders consequent to burn injury include post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depressive disorder (MDD), and new-onset substance abuse disorder. Diagnosing and treating these disorders is complicated by the complex psychosocial issues associated with burns including grief, pain, role impairment, disfigurement, dysfunction, stigma, as well as financial and legal issues. Additionally, pre-morbid psychiatric and neurological illnesses are risk factors for burns, adding to the challenge of diagnosis and treatment. This article will focus on the diagnosis and treatment of PTSD and MDD consequent to burn trauma, as these are the major psychiatric outcomes, addressing the attendant psychosocial problems as threads in this post-trauma tapestry.

  16. Identifying Patients in the Acute Psychiatric Hospital Who May Benefit From a Palliative Care Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, M Caroline; Warren, Mark; Cha, Stephen S; Stevens, Maria; Blommer, Megan; Kung, Simon; Lapid, Maria I

    2016-04-01

    Identifying patients who will benefit from a palliative care approach is the first critical step in integrating palliative with curative therapy. Criteria are established that identify hospitalized medical patients who are near end of life, yet there are no criteria with respect to hospitalized patients with psychiatric disorders. The records of 276 consecutive patients admitted to a dedicated inpatient psychiatric unit were reviewed to identify prognostic criteria predictive of mortality. Mortality predictors were 2 or more admissions in the past year (P = .0114) and older age (P = .0006). Twenty-two percent of patients met National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization noncancer criteria for dementia. Palliative care intervention should be considered when treating inpatients with psychiatric disorders, especially older patients who have a previous hospitalization or history of dementia.

  17. Locked doors in acute inpatient psychiatry: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Merwe, M; Bowers, L; Jones, J; Simpson, A; Haglund, K

    2009-04-01

    Many acute inpatient psychiatric wards in the UK are permanently locked, although this is contrary to the current Mental Health Act Code of Practice. To conduct a literature review of empirical articles concerning locked doors in acute psychiatric inpatient wards, an extensive literature search was performed in SAGE Journals Online, EBM Reviews, British Nursing Index, CINAHL, EMBASE Psychiatry, International Bibliography of the Social Sciences, Ovid MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Google, using the search terms 'open$', 'close$', '$lock$', 'door', 'ward', 'hospital', 'psychiatr', 'mental health', 'inpatient' and 'asylum'. A total of 11 empirical papers were included in the review. Both staff and patients reported advantages (e.g. preventing illegal substances from entering the ward and preventing patients from absconding and harming themselves or others) and disadvantages (e.g. making patients feel depressed, confined and creating extra work for staff) regarding locked doors. Locked wards were associated with increased patient aggression, poorer satisfaction with treatment and more severe symptoms. The limited literature available showed the urgent need for research to determine the real effects of locked doors in inpatient psychiatry.

  18. Locked doors in acute inpatient psychiatry: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Merwe, M; Bowers, L; Jones, J; Simpson, A; Haglund, K

    2009-04-01

    Many acute inpatient psychiatric wards in the UK are permanently locked, although this is contrary to the current Mental Health Act Code of Practice. To conduct a literature review of empirical articles concerning locked doors in acute psychiatric inpatient wards, an extensive literature search was performed in SAGE Journals Online, EBM Reviews, British Nursing Index, CINAHL, EMBASE Psychiatry, International Bibliography of the Social Sciences, Ovid MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Google, using the search terms 'open$', 'close$', '$lock$', 'door', 'ward', 'hospital', 'psychiatr', 'mental health', 'inpatient' and 'asylum'. A total of 11 empirical papers were included in the review. Both staff and patients reported advantages (e.g. preventing illegal substances from entering the ward and preventing patients from absconding and harming themselves or others) and disadvantages (e.g. making patients feel depressed, confined and creating extra work for staff) regarding locked doors. Locked wards were associated with increased patient aggression, poorer satisfaction with treatment and more severe symptoms. The limited literature available showed the urgent need for research to determine the real effects of locked doors in inpatient psychiatry. PMID:19291159

  19. Challenges in Obtaining HIV Testing in an Acute Involuntary Inpatient Psychiatric Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Jennifer; Levitt, Gwen; Myers, Robert; Riley, Aaron; Gesmundo, Celsius-Kit

    2016-01-01

    Even in health care professions, a stigma remains for patients with co-occurring HIV and serious mental illness. Researchers at a large, urban medical center encountered this stigma when they attempted to initiate a study of cognition in psychiatric inpatients with and without HIV who were seen as vulnerable in the context of research. Education efforts and advocacy on the part of the research team was instrumental and resulted in system-wide changes in the hospital, including the addition of HIV testing to the psychiatric admission laboratory panel. Within the first year that routine laboratory orders included an HIV test, the rate of testing ordered by inpatient-attending psychiatrists reached 60% of admissions. As of 2014, 13 HIV tests were found to be HIV seropositive in inpatients, with four of those cases classified as new-onset, as opposed to two positive tests in the year prior to our study. PMID:27426407

  20. An Evaluative Study of the WOW Program on Patients' Satisfaction in Acute Psychiatric Units

    OpenAIRE

    Xie Huiting; Li Ziqiang

    2013-01-01

    Background: Patient satisfaction is one of the key evidence of the quality of health-care delivery in nursing. Nursing is a patient-centered activity; although nurse-patient interaction is one of the key tenets of mental health nursing, a structured program to enhance this interaction is lacking. To address the gap, the WOW program was developed in a psychiatric hospital but its effectivenesss had not been evaluated.Objective: This study aims to compare satisfaction levels between patients wh...

  1. Effects of psychiatric disorders on Type A acute aortic dissection pathogenesis and analysis of follow-up results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Nardi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aims: A connection between psychiatric disorders (PDs and Type A acute aortic dissection (AAD has not been shown. The aim of this study was to define the psychological profile of patients treated for AAD, and to analyze the prevalence of PDs in their medical histories, in the immediate postoperative period, and at a mid-term follow-up. Patients and Methods: From March 2005 to October 2014, 240 consecutive patients underwent surgery for AAD. 60 patients (mean age 60+/-13 years; 43 males underwent psychiatric consultation postoperatively, and they represent the subjects of our retrospective study. Ascending aorta +/- arch replacement was performed in 43 patients, whereas the Bentall procedure +/- arch replacement was performed in 17. Data were retrospectively analyzed. Follow-ups were completed in 59 patients (mean duration 35+/-23 months. Results: PDs were present in the medical histories of 34 patients. Postoperatively, in 28 cases, a definitive diagnosis of PD (group PD was made in agreement with the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders-IV criteria, including: Major depression (n=13, anxious-depressive syndrome (n=6, bipolar disorder Type 2 (n=4, panic attacks (n=2, paranoid schizophrenia (n=1, and anxiety (n=2. 32 patients without a definitive psychiatric diagnosis were classified as Group non-PD. In the postoperative period, clinical manifestations of PDs, including delirium, persistent spatio-temporal disorientation, and psychomotor agitation were evident in 22 patients (78% in group PD versus 8 patients (25% in group non-PD (P<0.0001. During follow-up, only one death for non-cardiac reasons occurred in group PD. There were no suicides; only 10 patients of group PD required PD treatment (P<0.0001 vs. early postoperative findings; 4 patients in group non-PD required PD treatment. Conclusion: Our findings suggest a strong relationship between PD and AAD. Because the psychiatric conditions appeared to be largely stable after

  2. Comparing the Obvious: Interactional characteristics of staff in acute mental health nursing and forensic psychiatric nursing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, Lise; Alkier Gildberg, Frederik; Bradley, S. K.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on and compares two separate studies of the interactional characteristics of forensic mental health staff and acute mental health staff as they interact with inpatients, respectively. Both studies were conducted using participant observation, along with informal and formal...... interviews. Findings show that both acute and forensic mental health nursing practice is characterized by two overriding themes; ‘trust and relationship-enabling care’ and ‘behavior and perception-corrective care.’ The comparison of the two studies shows no major differences in the characteristics of staff...... interactions with patients or in the overall meanings ascribed by staff in the different practice settings....

  3. Comparing the Obvious: Interactional characteristics of staff in acute mental health nursing and forensic psychiatric nursing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gildberg, Frederik Alkier; Bradley, Stephen K.; Hounsgaard, Lise

    2013-01-01

    interviews. Findings show that both acute and forensic mental health nursing practice is characterized by two overriding themes; ‘trust and relationship-enabling care’ and ‘behavior and perception-corrective care.’ The comparison of the two studies shows no major differences in the characteristics of staff...

  4. Violence in psychiatric inpatient care

    OpenAIRE

    Omérov, Majda

    2004-01-01

    This thesis investigates incidents of violence in two psychosis wards, analyses types of violence and the staff s emotional reaction to violence, assesses a new pharmacological treatment strategy of acutely disturbed psychotic patients. One of aims was to investigate the efficiency of violence prevention programme in a new ward for 12 acute psychotic patients. Furthermore, the staff members' and psychotic patients' experiences of one and the same violent incident was compare...

  5. Language, subjectivity and participation in psychiatric institutions in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringer, Agnes

    psychiatric facilities in Denmark: an outpatient psychiatric long-term treatment clinic and a closed psychiatric ward. The applied methods are participant observation, interviews with patients and professionals and analysis of documents. Employing discursive and narrative approaches, the aim of the project...... is to shed light on how the professionals and patients construct patient identities within the institution. How are the psychiatric patients and the professionals positioned in their interactions? How are concepts such as psychiatric diagnosis and mental illness negotiated? Which possibilities...

  6. Characteristics and dying trajectories of adult hospital patients from acute care wards who die following review by the rapid response team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, M A; Nelson, K; Psirides, A J; Suter, N; Pedersen, A

    2016-03-01

    A third of patients reviewed by rapid response teams (RRT) require end-of-life care. However, little is known about the characteristics and management of these patients following RRT review. This paper presents results of a retrospective, descriptive audit that explored the dying trajectory of adult ward inpatients who died outside of intensive care following RRT review. The study setting was a 430-bed tertiary New Zealand hospital during 2013. RRT, inpatient databases and hospital notes were used to identify 100 consecutive adult inpatients who died subsequent to RRT review. Outcome measures included time from RRT review to death, place of death, pre-existing co-morbidities and frequency of medical review. Results demonstrated that patients were old (median 77 years, IQR 63-85years), emergency admissions (n=100) and admitted under a medical specialty (n=71). All but one of the cohort had pre-existing co-morbidities (mean 3.2, SD 1.7), almost a third (n=31) had cancer and 51% had 1-4 previous inpatient admissions within the previous 12 months. The mean length of stay prior to RRT review was 4.9 days (SD 5.5) during which patients were frequently reviewed by senior medical staff (mean 6.8 times, SD 6.9, range 0-44). Twenty per cent of patients died after their first RRT review with a further 40% receiving treatment limitation/palliation. Fifty-two per cent of patients had a pre-existing DNAR. Eighty per cent of patients died in hospital. Whilst the RRT fulfils an unmet need in decision-making at end of life, there is a need to understand what RRT, instead of ward-based or palliative care teams, offers dying patients. PMID:27029659

  7. Transmission of endemic ST22-MRSA-IV on four acute hospital wards investigated using a combination of spa, dru and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Creamer, E

    2012-11-01

    The transmission of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) between individual patients is difficult to track in institutions where MRSA is endemic. We investigated the transmission of MRSA where ST22-MRSA-IV is endemic on four wards using demographic data, patient and environmental screening, and molecular typing of isolates. A total of 939 patients were screened, 636 within 72 h of admission (on admission) and 303 >72 h after admission, and 1,252 environmental samples were obtained. Isolates were typed by spa, dru and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing. A composite dendrogram generated from the three sets of typing data was used to divide isolates into \\'dendrogram groups\\' (DGs). Ten percent of patients (92\\/939) were MRSA-positive; 7 % (44\\/636) on admission and 16 % (48\\/303) >72 h after admission (p = 0.0007). MRSA was recovered from 5 % of environmental specimens (65\\/1,252). Most isolates from patients (97 %, 85\\/88) and the environment (97 %, 63\\/65) exhibited the ST22-MRSA-IV genotype. Four DGs (DG1, DG4, DG16 and DG17) accounted for 58 % of ST22-MRSA-IV isolates from patients. Epidemiological evidence suggested cross-transmission among 44\\/92 patients (48 %) but molecular typing confirmed probable cross-transmission in only 11 instances (13 %, 11\\/88), with the majority of cross-transmission (64 %; 7\\/11) occurring on one ward. In the setting of highly clonal endemic MRSA, the combination of local epidemiology, PFGE, spa and dru typing provided valuable insights into MRSA transmission.

  8. Effects of music therapy on self- and experienced stigma in patients on an acute care psychiatric unit: a randomized three group effectiveness study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    Stigma is a major social barrier that can restrict access to and willingness to seek psychiatric care. Psychiatric consumers may use secrecy and withdrawal in an attempt to cope with stigma. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of music therapy on self- and experienced stigma in acute care psychiatric inpatients using a randomized design with wait-list control. Participants (N=83) were randomly assigned by cluster to one of three single-session group-based conditions: music therapy, education, or wait-list control. Participants in the music therapy and education conditions completed only posttests while participants in the wait-list control condition completed only pretests. The music therapy condition was a group songwriting intervention wherein participants composed lyrics for "the stigma blues." Results indicated significant differences in measures of discrimination (experienced stigma), disclosure (self-stigma), and total stigma between participants in the music therapy condition and participants in the wait-list control condition. From the results of this randomized controlled investigation, music therapy may be an engaging and effective psychosocial technique to treat stigma. Limitations, suggestions for future research, and implications for clinical practice and psychiatric music therapy research are provided. PMID:24070990

  9. Effects of music therapy on self- and experienced stigma in patients on an acute care psychiatric unit: a randomized three group effectiveness study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    Stigma is a major social barrier that can restrict access to and willingness to seek psychiatric care. Psychiatric consumers may use secrecy and withdrawal in an attempt to cope with stigma. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of music therapy on self- and experienced stigma in acute care psychiatric inpatients using a randomized design with wait-list control. Participants (N=83) were randomly assigned by cluster to one of three single-session group-based conditions: music therapy, education, or wait-list control. Participants in the music therapy and education conditions completed only posttests while participants in the wait-list control condition completed only pretests. The music therapy condition was a group songwriting intervention wherein participants composed lyrics for "the stigma blues." Results indicated significant differences in measures of discrimination (experienced stigma), disclosure (self-stigma), and total stigma between participants in the music therapy condition and participants in the wait-list control condition. From the results of this randomized controlled investigation, music therapy may be an engaging and effective psychosocial technique to treat stigma. Limitations, suggestions for future research, and implications for clinical practice and psychiatric music therapy research are provided.

  10. A memorable ward round

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Douglas Seaton

    2009-01-01

    @@ Some 25 years ago, I was a young consultant physician about to start an early morning ward round with my usual team of registrar,senior house officer, and preregistration house physician. All started according to plan except that the SHO was absent. I knew her to be diligent, so I assumed she had probably been distracted by some other pressing call of duty. By the time we had progressed to our third patient, however, I was starting to feel uneasy about her continued absence. Suddenly it came to me: a colleague had mentioned that she was using a novel device to infuse insulin continuously-she was diabetic. We broke off the round and conferred in the ward sister'a office. We knew that our SHO lived with her husband out of town and that he was also a junior doctor, but at another large hospital about 50 miles away.

  11. Clinical Risk Factors of Death From Pneumonia in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition in an Urban Critical Care Ward of Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammod Jobayer Chisti; Mohammed Abdus Salam; Hasan Ashraf; Faruque, Abu S. G.; Pradip Kumar Bardhan; Md Iqbal Hossain; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Shahunja, K. M.; Sumon Kumar Das; Gazi Imran; Tahmeed Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Risks of death are high when children with pneumonia also have severe acute malnutrition (SAM) as a co-morbidity. However, there is limited published information on risk factors of death from pneumonia in SAM children. We evaluated clinically identifiable factors associated with death in under-five children who were hospitalized for the management of pneumonia and SAM. METHODS: For this unmatched case-control design, SAM children of either sex, aged 0-59 months, admitted to the Dh...

  12. Computerized Psychiatric Diagnostic Interview

    OpenAIRE

    Zetin, Mark; Warren, Stacey; Lanssens, Ed; Tominaga, Doris

    1987-01-01

    A computerized psychiatric diagnostic interview was developed and administered to 121 adult acute psychiatric inpatients. Data on the 100 completers was evaluated for sensitivity and specificity of the computer diagnostic evaluation relative to the hospital discharge diagnosis and revealed sensitivity greater than 70% for major depression, alcohol/substance abuse, adjustment disorder, bipolar/mania, dependent personaltiy disorder, and histrionic personality disorder. Specificity was greater t...

  13. Splitting Ward identity

    CERN Document Server

    Safari, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Within the background field framework we present a path integral derivation of the splitting Ward identity for the one-particle irreducible effective action in the presence of an infrared regulator, and make connection with earlier works on the subject. The approach is general in the sense that it does not rely on how the splitting is performed. This identity is then used to address the problem of background dependence of the effective action at an arbitrary energy scale. We finally introduce the modified master equation and emphasize its role in constraining the effective action.

  14. Splitting Ward identity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safari, Mahmoud [Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), School of Particles and Accelerators, P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Within the background-field framework we present a path integral derivation of the splitting Ward identity for the one-particle irreducible effective action in the presence of an infrared regulator, and make connection with earlier works on the subject. The approach is general in the sense that it does not rely on how the splitting is performed. This identity is then used to address the problem of background dependence of the effective action at an arbitrary energy scale. We next introduce the modified master equation and emphasize its role in constraining the effective action. Finally, application to general gauge theories within the geometric approach is discussed. (orig.)

  15. The Amsterdam Studies of Acute Psychiatry - II (ASAP-II: a comparative study of psychiatric intensive care units in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Venrooij Janine

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of patients in whom mental illness progresses to stages in which acute, and often forced treatment is warranted, is on the increase across Europe. As a consequence, more patients are involuntarily admitted to Psychiatric Intensive Care Units (PICU. From several studies and reports it has become evident that important dissimilarities exist between PICU's. The current study seeks to describe organisational as well as clinical and patient related factors across ten PICU's in and outside the Amsterdam region, adjusted for or stratified by level of urbanization. Method/Design This paper describes the design of the Amsterdam Studies of Acute Psychiatry II (ASAP-II. This study is a prospective observational cohort study comparing PICU's in and outside the Amsterdam region on various patient characteristics, treatment aspects and recovery related variables. Dissimilarities were measured by means of collecting standardized forms which were filled out in the framework of care as usual, by means of questionnaires filled out by mental health care professionals and by means of extracting data from patient files for every consecutive patient admitted at participating PICU's during a specific time period. Urbanization levels for every PICU were calculated conform procedures as proposed by the Dutch Central Bureau for Statistics (CBS. Discussion The current study may provide a deeper understanding of the differences between psychiatric intensive care units that can be used to promote best practice and benchmarking procedures, and thus improve the standard of care.

  16. A study into ward traffic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Hardcatle

    1982-09-01

    Full Text Available The study was undertaken in 1980 and was prompted by a need to highlight some of the problems associated with the ward milieu, both for patient care and for nurse teaching. Being associated at that time with the clinical teaching department the author was very interested in looking into the amount of traffic entering the ward area. It seemed that the ward sister had a very difficult task in providing a therapeutic environment for her patients, and that patient care was always being criticised with little thought to what was actually occurring in the ward.

  17. Being in a process of transition to psychosis, as narrated by adults with psychotic illnesses acutely admitted to hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Sebergsen, K; Norberg, A; Talseth, A-G

    2014-01-01

    Accessible summary Early intervention to prevent and reduce new episodes of psychosis involves patients, relatives and mental health personnel recognizing the early signs of psychosis. Twelve participants with psychotic illnesses narrated how they experienced becoming psychotic before they were admitted to acute psychiatric wards. The results of this study demonstrate that participants and their close others who sensed, understood and articulated experienced changes as signs of psychosis esta...

  18. Clinical risk factors of death from pneumonia in children with severe acute malnutrition in an urban critical care ward of Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammod Jobayer Chisti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Risks of death are high when children with pneumonia also have severe acute malnutrition (SAM as a co-morbidity. However, there is limited published information on risk factors of death from pneumonia in SAM children. We evaluated clinically identifiable factors associated with death in under-five children who were hospitalized for the management of pneumonia and SAM. METHODS: For this unmatched case-control design, SAM children of either sex, aged 0-59 months, admitted to the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b during April 2011 to July 2012 with radiological pneumonia were studied. The SAM children with pneumonia who had fatal outcome constituted the cases (n = 35, and randomly selected SAM children with pneumonia who survived constituted controls (n = 105. RESULTS: The median (inter-quartile range age (months was comparable among the cases and the controls [8.0 (4.9, 11.0 vs. 9.7 (5.0, 18.0; p = 0.210]. In logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders, such as vomiting, abnormal mental status, and systolic hypotension (<70 mm of Hg in absence of dehydration, fatal cases of severely malnourished under-five children with pneumonia were more often hypoxemic (OR = 23.15, 95% CI = 4.38-122.42, had clinical dehydration (some/severe (OR = 9.48, 95% CI = 2.42-37.19, abdominal distension at admission (OR = 4.41, 95% CI = 1.12-16.52, and received blood transfusion (OR = 5.50, 95% CI = 1.21-24.99 for the management of crystalloid resistant systolic hypotension. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: We identified hypoxemia, clinical dehydration, and abdominal distension as the independent predictors of death in SAM children with pneumonia. SAM children with pneumonia who required blood transfusion for the management of crystalloid resistant systolic hypotension were also at risk for death. Thus, early identification and prompt management of these simple clinically

  19. Acute and chronic effects of cannabinoids on human brain: gene-environment interactions related to psychiatric disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Batalla Cases, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Tesi realitzada a l'Institut Clínic de Neurociències / Hospital Clínic 1) Introduction Cannabis use has been associated to mental health problems and worsened outcome of established psychiatric disorders. Disturbances of the endocannabinoid system may be responsible for long-lasting effects, such as neuropsychological deficits and morphological brain alterations. As not all the exposed individuals are equally affected, proneness to cannabis induced impairment may rely on key factors su...

  20. Caregivers' perceptions of coercion in psychiatric hospital admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Veronica; Madigan, Kevin; Roche, Eric; Bainbridge, Emma; McGuinness, David; Tierney, Kevin; Feeney, Larkin; Hallahan, Brian; McDonald, Colm; O'Donoghue, Brian

    2015-08-30

    While knowledge on service users' perspective on their admissions to psychiatric wards has improved substantially in the last decade, there is a paucity of knowledge of the perspectives of caregivers. This study aimed to determine caregiver's perception of the levels of perceived coercion, perceived pressures and procedural justice experienced by service users during their admission to acute psychiatric in-patient units. The perspective of caregivers were then compared to the perspectives of their related service users, who had been admitted to five psychiatric units in Ireland. Caregivers were interviewed using an adapted version of the MacArthur admission experience interview. Sixty-six caregivers participated in this study and the majority were parents. Seventy one percent of service users were admitted involuntarily and nearly half had a diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Caregivers of involuntarily admitted individuals perceived the service users' admission as less coercive than reported by the service users. Caregivers also perceived a higher level of procedural justice in comparison to the level reported by service users. Reducing the disparity of perceptions between caregivers and service users could result in caregivers having a greater understanding of the admission process and why some service users may be reluctant to be admitted. PMID:26163727

  1. Experiences of nursing staff on psychiatric care of depressed patients

    OpenAIRE

    Suutarinen, Kreetta-Maija

    2012-01-01

    The thesis researched the views and experiences of nursing staff of psychiatric special care ward on psychiatric care of depressed patients. Because caring is patient/client oriented profession, it is essential to include patients and nursing staff in the development work. This assumption was basis for the thesis. The thesis aimed to add knowledge on the views of the nursing staff and to show how this knowledge can be used in development of psychiatric care. The thesis also pursue...

  2. Characteristics of psychiatric admissions and aspects of overcrowding at the general Hospital, Kuala Lumpur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, C N; Kadir, A B; Jeyarajah, S

    1993-06-01

    This study examined admissions, final diagnoses and mean duration of stay of patients in the Psychiatric Wards at the General Hospital, Kuala Lumpur. The male ward was severely overcrowded by 125% over the maximum bed capacity. The majority were psychotic, mainly schizophrenic. The female ward had 76% occupancy, also mainly psychotic. Neurotics, alcohol dependents and personality disorders formed less than 5% of the admissions. There was no difference in the mean duration of stay of patients of both UKM and GHKL Units stratified for diagnosis and disposal except for newly diagnosed schizophrenics. There is an urgent need for more male psychiatric beds/wards.

  3. A 5-year retrospective study of demographic, anamnestic, and clinical factors related to psychiatric hospitalizations of adolescent patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Lorenzo R

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rosaria Di Lorenzo,1 Nina Cimino,2 Elena Di Pietro,3 Gabriella Pollutri,4 Vittoria Neviani,5 Paola Ferri2 1Service of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment, Department of Mental Health, AUSL Modena, Modena, 2School of Nursing, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, 3School of Neuro-Psychiatry, 4School of Psychiatry, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, 5 “The Medlar”, Villa Igea Hospital, Modena, Italy Background: Psychiatric emergencies of children and adolescents have greatly increased during the last years, but this phenomenon has not been studied in detail. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between acute psychiatric hospitalizations of adolescents and selected variables to highlight risk factors for psychiatric emergencies. Methods: This retrospective research was conducted in the acute psychiatric public ward, Service of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment (SPDT, and in the residential facility for adolescents, “The Medlar”, located in Modena. The sample was constituted by all adolescent patients (n=101, age range 14–18 who had acute hospitalizations (n=140 in SPDT and had been successively transferred to “The Medlar” (n=83, from February 2, 2010 to January 31, 2015. From clinical charts, we extracted demographic and anamnestic characteristics of patients and clinical variables related to hospitalizations. Data were statistically analyzed. Results: Sixty-one percent of our patients lived with one divorced parent, with adoptive or immigrant family, or in institutions; 51% had experienced stressful events during childhood; 81% had a normal intellective level, but only 6% presented regular school performance. Parental psychiatric illness was negatively related, in a statistically significantly way, with onset age of adolescent mental disorders (coefficient -2.28, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -3.53 to 1.01, P<0.001, single linear regression; odds ratio: 4.39, 95% CI: 1.43–13.47, P<0.010, single logistic

  4. PSYCHIATRIC DISORDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    2004536 Association study of clinical presentation in first-episode schizophrenia and possible candidate genes in chromosome 22. MA Xiaohong (马小红), et al. Dept Psychiatr, West China Hosp, Sichuan U-niv, Chengdu 610041. Chin J Psychiatr 2004;37(3): 145-148.

  5. Assesment of psychosocial work conditions of nurses at selected hospital wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Rotter

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Good organisation of work, clear division of responsibilities, support from superiors are factors that positively influence the satisfaction of the profession. The purpose of the work was the assessment of psychosocial working conditions of nurses. Material and Methods: The research included 388 nurses working at surgical wards, medical treatment wards, and psychiatric wards. The research method was a diagnostic survey carried out by means of a questionnaire called Psychosocial Work Conditions. The obtained results were statistically analysed. Results: Nearly a half of the nurses considers the requirements at work as moderate, and 36.66% as high. Nurses from medical treatment wards indicate the highest level of requirements. Nurses working at psychiatric wards and in a shift system significantly more often feel the requirements relating to overload and resulting from a conflict of roles. Nurses working in the profession for more than 10 years considerably more often describe the level of behavioural control as high in comparison to those working for a shorter time. Regardless of the character of a ward, nurses most often (44.33% assess the support from co-workers as average, and 1/5 considered this as low. Conclusions: The results indicate the correctness of introducing psychosocial training for professionally active nurses. Med Pr 2014;65(2:173–179

  6. Prevalence of delirium among patients at a cancer ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandahl, Mia Gall; Nielsen, Svend Erik; Kørner, Ejnar Alex;

    2016-01-01

    Background Delirium is a frequent psychiatric complication to cancer, but rarely recognized by oncologists. Aims 1. To estimate the prevalence of delirium among inpatients admitted at an oncological cancer ward 2. To investigate whether simple clinical factors predict delirium 3. To examine...... the value of cognitive testing in the assessment of delirium. Methods On five different days, we interviewed and assessed patients admitted to a Danish cancer ward. The World Health Organization International Classification of Diseases Version 10, WHO ICD-10 Diagnostic System and the Confusion Assessment...... Method (CAM) were used for diagnostic categorization. Clinical information was gathered from medical records and all patients were tested with Mini Cognitive Test, The Clock Drawing Test, and the Digit Span Test. Results 81 cancer patients were assessed and 33% were diagnosed with delirium. All delirious...

  7. Role of individual psychotherapy of people diagnosed with schizophrenia in the Polish system of psychiatric care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Cichocki

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper takes up the subject of the place and role of individual psychotherapy of people diagnosed with schizophrenia in the Polish system of psychiatric care. It describes various therapeutic contexts in which such psychotherapy can take place: inpatient ward, outpatient ward, ambulatory care, community care team. It also touches upon the issue of psychotherapy in contact with a chronically ill patient who participates in rehabilitation at occupational therapy workshops or at a day care center. It discusses various needs of patients at specific stages of illness: acute psychosis, postpsychotic depression, symptomatic remission, and a possible response to these needs offered by psychiatric treatment. The paper emphasizes the importance of long-term therapeutic contact for recovery process, which includes the patient’s self-knowledge and awareness of the capability to influence their own life, gained during psychotherapy. The central idea of this paper is the connection of psychotherapy and organizational solutions which would enable its broadest and most effective usage in daily practice. An important element is a reflection concerning the relationships between psychotherapy of people suffering from schizophrenia and usually concurrently administered pharmacotherapy.

  8. [DRGs in psychiatric hospital financing exemplified by Hungary. A model for Germany?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maylath, E

    2000-12-01

    One of the most important provisions incorporated in the reform of the German health sector has been the introduction of a per case prospective payment system for hospitals with the exception of admissions to psychiatric care. The reasons for the exclusion of psychiatric care are unclear, but it is as a result all the more interesting to look at the experience of Hungary, where in-patient psychiatric care has been financed on the basis of diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) for the past seven years. The article describes how in the early 1990's the funding of the Hungarian health service was reorganized from being a state-financed system with a set budget to a system financed by contributions. Parallel to this development, service-related financing was introduced. In the hospital sector this involved DRGs. At the beginning of 1993 the Hungarian DRGs comprised only 437 categories, but this has since increased to 758. Furthermore, other characteristics are listed which, apart from the number of groups, differentiate the Hungarian DRGs from the AP-DRGs. Among other things, service-related financing includes non-typical areas such as psychiatry. In this case, it covers in-patient psychiatric care in an unusual combination of DRGs in the acute case category (50% of all beds in psychiatric units in Hungary are for acute cases) with daily nursing charges in the chronic case category. An analysis is given in the article of 16 homogeneous diagnostic categories in psychiatric care, followed by experiences gathered in conjunction with the application of this approach in this particular sphere, with special reference to three problem areas. These are as follows: the trend towards diagnoses with a relatively high weighting; the practice of charging for psychiatric DRGs in somatic wards; and, finally, the perpetuation of poor service structures and practices through DRGs. In general, evidently the introduction of psychiatric DRGs may also be recommended in Germany because of the

  9. Food hygiene on the wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuer, Walter

    2007-09-13

    A PROBLEM THAT IS OFTEN OVERLOOKED OR SIMPLY NOT GIVEN ENOUGH ATTENTION: the food served to patients from the kitchen is not sterile. If food is allowed to stand at room temperature for a long time, both in the case of food cooked for lunch and of food intended for supper which has been previously chilled, there is the possibility of massive spore germination or of dangerous toxin formation. Therefore regulations on how to handle food and beverages (e.g. tea) must be set out in the infection control policy, and checks carried out to monitor compliance with the rules relating to temperature checks, duration and type of storage, need for reheating, etc. Making staff aware of the issues involved is of paramount importance. These include monitoring hygiene standards in the ward kitchen, formulation of a cleaning policy, periodic bacteriological checks (not only of workstations but also of the dishwasher results), whenever possible the use of disposable cloths for working surfaces and equipment, changing cleaning cloths at least once daily and hygienic hand disinfection before and after handing out food. Foodstuffs brought in by visitors represent a special hygienic and organizational problem because in many cases they already have a high baseline microbial count. Visitors must be made aware that, for example, slices of cake left in the patient's room and often eaten only hours later can pose a risk of infection.In summary, the following principles of food hygiene must be observed on the wards:Maintenance of the cold-hot chainNot only reheat food, but ensure it is well heated throughout Avoid situations giving rise to spore germination in foodstuffs brought in by visitorsCleanliness and minimal contamination of kitchen worktopsCleanliness of crockery and kitchen towels Do not allow food to stand at room temperature for a long time, in particular desserts and confectionery A standard policy must be enforced to define the hygienic status and organization for food

  10. Anatomy of the ward round.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Hare, James A

    2008-07-01

    The ward round has been a central activity of hospital life for hundreds of years. It is hardly mentioned in textbooks. The ward round is a parade through the hospital of professionals where most decision making concerning patient care is made. However the traditional format may be intimidating for patients and inadequate for communication. The round provides an opportunity for the multi-disciplinary team to listen to the patient\\'s narrative and jointly interpret his concerns. From this unfolds diagnosis, management plans, prognosis formation and the opportunity to explore social, psychological, rehabilitation and placement issues. Physical examination of the patient at the bedside still remains important. It has been a tradition to discuss the patient at the bedside but sensitive matters especially of uncertainty may better be discussed elsewhere. The senior doctor as round leader must seek the input of nursing whose observations may be under-appreciated due to traditional professional hierarchy. Reductions in the working hours of junior doctors and shortened length of stay have reduced continuity of patient care. This increases the importance of senior staff in ensuring continuity of care and the need for the joint round as the focus of optimal decision making. The traditional round incorporates teaching but patient\\'s right to privacy and their preferences must be respected. The quality and form of the clinical note is underreported but the electronic record is slow to being accepted. The traditional multi-disciplinary round is disappearing in some centres. This may be regrettable. The anatomy and optimal functioning of the ward round deserves scientific scrutiny and experimentation.

  11. Determinants of Seclusion After Aggression in Psychiatric Inpatients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vruwink, F.J.; Noorthoorn, E.O.; Nijman, H.L.I.; Nagel, J.E.L. van der; Hox, J.J.C.M.; Mulder, C.L.

    2012-01-01

    ome aggressive incidents in psychiatric wards result in seclusion, whereas others do not. We used the Staff Observation Aggression Scale-Revised and the mental health trust's database to identify determinants that predicted seclusion after aggression. These consisted of demographic, diagnostic, cont

  12. 万级层流病房对初发急性白血病患者诱导化疗期间医院感染发病率的影响%Effect of class 10000 laminar flow ward on the incidence of healthcare-as-sociated infection in patients with initial occurrence of acute leukemia dur-ing induction chemotherapy period

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑宇; 李啸扬; 李军民

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of class 10000 laminar flow ward on the incidence of healthcare-asso-ciated infection (HAI)in patients with initial occurrence of acute leukemia during induction chemotherapy period. Methods Patients with initial occurrence of acute leukemia admitted to a hematological department of a hospital be-tween October 2013 and June 2014 were investigated retrospectively,patients in class 10000 laminar flow ward was as trial group,in general ward was as control group. All patients received standard induction chemotherapy and the same nursing measures,the incidence of HAI between two groups of patients,and ward air cleanliness were com-pared.Results A total of 79 patients with initial acute leukemia were received (trial group,n= 39;control group, n= 40). The average air cleanliness value in rooms and corridors of laminar flow wards were both significantly dif-ferent with general ward (3.57×106/m3 vs 149.36×106/m3 ,t= 45.80,P<0.001;24.46×106/m3 vs 15854.38 ×106/m3 ,t= 108.70,P<0.001). Incidence of HAI between trial group and control group was significantly differ-ent (23.08% [9/39]vs 45.00% [18/40],χ2= 4.219,P= 0.040). The main infection site in trial group was gastro-intestinal tract (n= 5 ),in control group was lower respiratory tract (n= 8 ). The duration of fever,duration and cost of antimicrobial use in trial group were (6.20±2.10)d,(9.35±2.12)d,and (27113.79±1559.03)yuan re-spectively,in control group were (10.20±2.90)d,(14.15±3.14)d,and (58566.29±2217.54)yuan respectively, difference in duration of fever and cost of antimicrobial use between two groups were all significant(t= 1.021, 1377.45,both P<0.05).Conclusion Laminar flow ward can reduce the incidence of HAI in patients with initial occurrence of acute leukemia,and decrease cost of antimicrobial use.%目的 探讨万级层流病房对初发急性白血病患者诱导化疗期间医院感染发病率的影响.方法 回顾性调查2013年10月—2014年6月某院血液

  13. Psychiatric emergencies (part I): psychiatric disorders causing organic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, A; Giannuzzi, R; Sollazzo, F; Petrongolo, L; Bernardini, L; Daini, S

    2013-02-01

    Psychiatric emergencies are conditions that mostly destabilize the already frenetic activity of the Emergency Department. Sometimes the emergency is clearly referable to primitive psychiatric illness. Other times, psychiatric and organic symptoms can independently coexist (comorbidity), or develop together in different conditions of substance abuse, including alcohol and prescription drugs. Differentiating between substance induced and pre-existing psychiatric disorder (dual diagnosis) may be difficult, other than controversial issue. Finally, an organic disease can hide behind a psychiatric disorder (pseudopsychiatric emergency). In this review (part I), psychiatric disorders that occur with organic symptoms are discussed. They include: (1) anxiety, conversion and psychosomatic disorders, and (2) simulated diseases. The physiologic mechanisms of the stress reaction, divided into a dual neuro-hormonal response, are reviewed in this section: (1) activation of the sympathetic nervous system and adrenal medulla with catecholamine production (rapid response), and (2) activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis with cortisol production (slow response). The concept of the fight-or-flight response, its adaptive significance and the potential evolution in paralyzing response, well showing by Yerkes-Dodson curve, is explained. Abnormal short- and long-term reactions to stress evolving toward well codified cluster of trauma and stressor-related disorders, including acute stress disorder, adjustment disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder, are examined. A brief review of major psychiatric disorder and related behaviour abnormalities, vegetative symptoms and cognitive impairment, according to DMS IV-TR classification, are described. Finally, the reactive psychic symptoms and behavioral responses to acute or chronic organic disease, so called "somatopsychic disorders", commonly occurring in elderly and pediatric patients, are presented. The specific conditions of

  14. Prevalence of Childhood Physical and Sexual Abuse in Veterans With Psychiatric Diagnoses

    OpenAIRE

    Koola, Maju Mathew; Qualls, Clifford; Kelly, Deanna L.; Skelton, Kelly; Bradley, Bekh; Amar, Richard; Duncan, Erica J.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the prevalence of childhood (≤18 years) physical and sexual abuse reported among patients admitted to the psychiatric inpatient service and the differential rates of this abuse associated with psychiatric diagnoses. This study consisted of a retrospective chart review of 603 patients admitted to a psychiatric ward during a period of 1 year at Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center who had data on childhood physical and sexual abuse. The prevalence of reported childhood physical o...

  15. Is it possible to strengthen psychiatric nursing staff's clinical supervision?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonge, Henrik; Buus, Niels

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To test the effects of a meta-supervision intervention in terms of participation, effectiveness and benefits of clinical supervision of psychiatric nursing staff. BACKGROUND: Clinical supervision is regarded as a central component in developing mental health nursing practices, but the evidence...... supporting positive outcomes of clinical supervision in psychiatric nursing is not convincing. DESIGN: The study was designed as a randomized controlled trial. All permanently employed nursing staff members at three general psychiatric wards at a Danish university hospital (n = 83) were allocated to either...

  16. PSYCHIATRIC DISORDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    14.1 Schizophrenia2007133 A comparative study of intramuscular ziprasidone and haloperidol in treating acute agitation in schizophrenia. LI Lehua(李乐华), et al. Mental Health Insit, 2nd Xiangya Hosp, Centr South Univ, Changsha 410011. Chin J Psychiat 2006;39(4):216-219. Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of injection ziprasidone in the treatment of acute agitation behavior in schizophrenia.

  17. Light atmosphere in hospital wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone Mandrup

    Atmosphere’ is explored using methods in the practice of lighting design where qualitative and quantitative methods are used to qualify important aspects of a lighting design. Measurable parameters such as the amount of Lux, composition of CRI and degree of Kelvin is well described so the designer can handle......Sociocultural aspects of light are important for the user experience of the atmosphere in a ward. According to the Danish Regulation for light in hospitals (DS703, 1983), a home-like feeling is required to support the patients, as they needa pleasant environment for their recovery. The term ‘Light...... the requirements. What does it mean to create a 'home-like' and 'pleasant or appealing' light in this context? Does the composition of CRI and degree of Kelvin tell it all? Is it enough information to provide a proper illumination in which the patient can have a homely and pleasant experience? The 'Model of Light...

  18. Implementing a Music Therapy Program at a New 72-Hour Acute Psychiatric Admissions Unit: A Case Study of a Patient Who Was Malingering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Because of the relatively poor treatment available, the high financial costs of hospitalization, multiple and complex issues of persons with severe mental illnesses, and advancements in pharmacotherapy, psychiatric patients are often only hospitalized for a few days before they are discharged. Thus, brief psychosocial interventions for persons who…

  19. Psychiatric Disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    2009477 The efficacy and safety of flexible doses of paliperidone extended-release tablets in the treatment of acute schizophrenia:a randomized,double blind olanzapine-controlled study.ZHANG Hongyan,et al.Peking Univ Ment Health Instit,Beijing 100191. Chin J Psychiat 2009;42(3):153-156.

  20. Practice of Acute and Maintenance Electroconvulsive Therapy in the Psychiatric Clinic of a University Hospital from Turkey: between 2007 and 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Sengul, Melike Ceyhan Balci; Kenar, Ayse Nur Inci; Hanci, Ezgi; Sendur, İbrahim; Sengul, Cem; Herken, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) can be given as the form of acute, continuation or maintenance ECT according to the process of administration. We report our 7 years’ observation with acute and maintenance ECT in a university hospital in Turkey. Methods The medical records of the hospitalized patients treated with acute or maintenance ECT between the years 2007 and 2013 was retrospectively analyzed. The sociodemographic characteristics, diagnosis, data of ECT and the co-administered ...

  1. Ken Kimes & Sandra Ward: New Natives Farm

    OpenAIRE

    Farmer, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Both Ken Kimes and Sandra Ward grew up in Southern California. They met in the Los Angeles area, but moved to Santa Cruz in 1980. Together they founded New Natives Farm, a greenhouse-based farm certified by California Certified Organic Farmers in 1983, and located in Corralitos, California. There they tend organic sprouts, including alfalfa, wheat grass, pea shoots, sunflower sprouts, broccoli, and beans. In addition to managing their farm full time, Kimes and Ward are both outspoken activist...

  2. Factors affecting staff morale on inpatient mental health wards in England: a qualitative investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Moli

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Good morale among staff on inpatient psychiatric wards is an important requirement for the maintenance of strong therapeutic alliances and positive patient experiences, and for the successful implementation of initiatives to improve care. More understanding is needed of mechanisms underlying good and poor morale. Method We conducted individual and group interviews with staff of a full range of disciplines and levels of seniority on seven NHS in-patient wards of varying types in England. Results Inpatient staff feel sustained in their potentially stressful roles by mutual loyalty and trust within cohesive ward teams. Clear roles, supportive ward managers and well designed organisational procedures and structures maintain good morale. Perceived threats to good morale include staffing levels that are insufficient for staff to feel safe and able to spend time with patients, the high risk of violence, and lack of voice in the wider organisation. Conclusions Increasing employee voice, designing jobs so as to maximise autonomy within clear and well-structured operational protocols, promoting greater staff-patient contact and improving responses to violence may contribute more to inpatient staff morale than formal support mechanisms.

  3. Acute intermittent porphyria in the puerperium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sparić Radmila

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute intermittent porphyria emerges as a result of partial defect of porphobilinogen deaminase and is manifested by repeated episodes of somatic, psychiatric and neurological disorders. The disease is conducted via the autosomaldominant gene of variable penetration, so most of the carriers never experience seizures. Timely making of diagnosis, screening of blood relatives of the patient and education of patients on avoidance of provoking factors are the key to adequate treatment. Case Outline. A 23-year-old patient having born the third child was hospitalized due to pains in the abdomen and convulsive seizures nine days after the vaginal delivery. At admittance, she suffered a generalized convulsive seizure of clonic-tonic type. The patient immediately underwent a complete clinical, laboratory, bacteriological and ultrasound examination. Bearing in mind the fact that the patient had several convulsive seizures even after the given neurological therapy, haem-arginate was introduced into therapy during four days. The administration of haem-arginate led to the normalization of blood pressure, pulse and bowel function. The administration of haem-arginate led to the normalization of blood pressure, pulse and bowel function. The patient was treated by a team of doctors, in the intensive care ward, with the use of medicaments, which are allowed in the case of acute porphyria. Sixteen days after the admittance, with clean neurological status and gynaecological and ultra-sound findings, she was released for ambulatory treatment. Conclusion. The presented case exhibits the gravity of making a diagnosis of acute intermittent porphyria in puerperium and the necessity of multi-disciplinary approach in treating this disease. Acute intermittent porphyria should be considered in cases of ambiguous abdominal pain, as well as in patients having abdominal pains followed by neuro-psychiatric disorders.

  4. Anomalous N = 2 superconformal Ward identities

    CERN Document Server

    Ketov, S V

    2000-01-01

    The N=2 superconformal Ward identities and their anomalies are discussed in N=2 superspace (including N=2 harmonic superspace), at the level of the low-energy effective action (LEEA) in four-dimensional N=2 supersymmetric field theories. The (first) chiral N=2 supergravity compensator is related to the known N=2 anomalous Ward identity in the N=2 (abelian) vector mulitplet sector. As regards the hypermultiplet LEEA given by the N=2 non-linear sigma-model (NLSM), a new anomalous N=2 superconformal Ward identity is found, whose existence is related to the (second) analytic compensator in N=2 supergravity. The celebrated solution of Seiberg and Witten is known to obey the (first) anomalous Ward identity in the Coulomb branch. We find a few solutions to the new anomalous Ward identity, after making certain assumptions about unbroken internal symmetries. Amongst the N=2 NLSM target space metrics governing the hypermultiplet LEEA are the SU(2)-Yang-Mills-Higgs monopole moduli-space metrics that can be encoded in te...

  5. Relation between parasuicide, suicide, psychiatric admissions, and socioeconomic deprivation.

    OpenAIRE

    Gunnell, D. J.; Peters, T. J.; Kammerling, R M; Brooks, J.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the relations between parasuicide, suicide, psychiatric inpatient admissions, and socioeconomic deprivation. DESIGN--Ecological analysis with data from routine information systems and the 1991 census. SETTING--24 localities in the area covered by the Bristol and District Health Authority (population 817,000), consisting of aggregations of neighbouring wards, with an average population of 34,000. SUBJECTS--6089 subjects aged over 10 years admitted to hospital after parasu...

  6. Elements of Successful School Reentry after Psychiatric Hospitalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Elysia V.; Welfare, Laura E.; Williams, Amy M.

    2011-01-01

    Psychiatric hospitalization is an intensive intervention designed to stabilize adolescents who are experiencing an acute mental health crisis. Reintegrating to school after discharge from psychiatric hospitalization can be overwhelming for many adolescents (E. V. Clemens, L. E. Welfare, & A. M. Williams, 2010). The authors used a consensual…

  7. Psychosocial functioning of individuals with schizophrenia in community housing facilities and the psychiatric hospital in Zurich.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Matthias; Briner, David; Kawohl, Wolfram; Seifritz, Erich; Baumgartner-Nietlisbach, Gabriela

    2015-12-15

    Individuals with severe mental illness frequently have difficulties in obtaining and maintaining adequate accommodation. If they are not willing or able to adapt to requirements of traditional supported housing institutions they may live in sheltered and emergency accommodation. Adequate mental health services are rarely available in these facilities. The aim of the present study was to evaluate mental health, functional and social status of individuals living in community sheltered housing facilities. A cross-sectional survey of n=338 individuals in sheltered housing compared to a sample of patients at intake in acute inpatient psychiatry (n=619) concerning clinical and social variables was carried out in the catchment area of Zurich. Matched subsamples of individuals with schizophrenia (n=168) were compared concerning functioning and impairments on the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS). Individuals with schizophrenia in sheltered housing (25% of the residents) have significantly more problems concerning substance use, physical illness, psychopathological symptoms other than psychosis and depression, and relationships, daily activities and occupation than patients with schizophrenia at intake on an acute psychiatric ward. Community sheltered accommodation although conceptualized to prevent homelessness in the general population de facto serve as housing facilities for individuals with schizophrenia and other severe mental illness. PMID:26416587

  8. Psychiatric Disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    15.1 Schizophrenia2007274 Effect and safety of combination therapy of valproate with lithium on recurrent mania. XU Wenwei(徐文炜), et al. Dept Psychiat, Wuxi Ment Health Center, Wuxi 214151. Chin J Psychiat 2007;40(2):86-89. Objective The study was to explore the effectiveness and safety of chronic combination reatment of valproate with lithium on recurrent mania. Method All 105 patients with mania-onset were andomly assigned to receive sodium valproate plus lithium (n=35), and monotherapy with lithium n=35) or sodium valproate (n=35), and were followed up for 5 years. At baseline, the symptom was valuated with the Bech-Rafaelsen Mania Rating Scale (BRMS). The drug dosage, times of relapse, effects nd safcty was compared among the three groups. Results After the acute therapy, the reductions in BRMS core were(43±29)% in lithium group, (42±27)% in valproate group, and (58±25)% in combination roup, respectively, with significant differences between the three groups (F=3.579, P=0.031). At ollowed-up, tile relapse times was significantly less in combination group than that in lithium and valproate roup(mean times of 2.0±1.5, 3.5±1.8, and 3.5±2.2, P=0.001). The combination therapy had etter effectiveness especially in patients with rapid cycling bipolar disorder(F=4.120, P=0.033) than the ther two monotherapy group. The mean dosage of single drug in combination group was significantly lower han that in lithium and valproate group (P<0.01; P<0.001). There were no significantly statistic differences on side-effects among three groups. Conclusion The efficacy of combination therapy of valproate with lithium on mania is better than the monotherapy of lithium or valproate in the light of safety and reduced occurrence.

  9. Psychiatric disorders in bone marrow transplant patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To identify the psychiatric illnesses in patients with hematological/oncological disorders encountered during blood and bone marrow transplantation. All consecutive patients, aged 15 years and above, who fulfilled inclusion and exclusion criteria and underwent blood and bone marrow transplantation, were enrolled in this study. Psychiatric assessment comprised of a semi-structured interview based on Present Status Examination (PSE). The psychiatric diagnosis was made on the basis of International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) system of classification devised by W.H.O. Eighty patients, who fulfilled the inclusion criteria, were inducted in this study. Thirty (37.5%) cases were found to have psychiatric disorders. Out of the total, 60 (75%) were males and 20 (25%) females. Adjustment disorder was the most frequent diagnosis (n=12), followed by major depression (n=7). Rest of the diagnoses made were generalized anxiety disorder, acute psychotic disorder, delirium and depressive psychosis. High psychiatric morbidity associated with blood and bone marrow transplantation was observed. It indicates the importance of psychiatric intervention during the isolation period of BMT as well as pre-transplant psychiatric assessment and counseling regarding procedure. (author)

  10. Psychiatric disorders after radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review focuses on the mental and psychological effects of medical radiation exposure, the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island, the Chernobyl disaster, atomic bomb explosions at Nagasaki and Hiroshima, and accidents at nuclear power plants and nuclear waste plants. Studies have shown that anxiety about the adverse effects of radiation in medicine (such as infertility, carcinogenicity, and genotoxicity) and fear for exposure has caused psychiatric disorders. Several studies on the mental health effects of the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island were conducted, and the results indicated that psychiatric distress persisted for a certain period of time, particularly in pregnant women and women who have children, even when no evidence of substantial of radiation exposure is seen clinically. The psychological consequences of the Chernobyl disaster have been investigated continuously, and various problems, e.g., acute stress reaction, neurosis, and psychosis, have been identified, although no physical damage due to the radiation or PTSD have been reported. By contrast, PTSD has been seen in survivors of the Nagasaki and Hiroshima nuclear explosions. A study in Ohio, (United States), which has a nuclear waste plant, investigated PTSD in people living near the plant and found that the symptom level was mild. In general, the most common symptoms among people with mental and psychological disorders due to radiation exposure are depression and anxiety, with many people having associated somatoform disorders, and some people complain of PTSD. Vague anxiety and fear of sequelae, regardless of the exposure dose, appears to cause such psychiatric disorders. Although it is rare for psychiatrists to see such cases of psychiatric disorders due to radiation exposure, their number may increase as psychiatric services become more widely available. (K.H.)

  11. Psychiatric disorders after radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokai, Masahiro [Hyogo Coll. of Medicine, Nishinomiya (Japan); Soejima, Toshinori; Wang, Shangdong; Shinfuku, Naotaka

    2001-04-01

    This review focuses on the mental and psychological effects of medical radiation exposure, the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island, the Chernobyl disaster, atomic bomb explosions at Nagasaki and Hiroshima, and accidents at nuclear power plants and nuclear waste plants. Studies have shown that anxiety about the adverse effects of radiation in medicine (such as infertility, carcinogenicity, and genotoxicity) and fear for exposure has caused psychiatric disorders. Several studies on the mental health effects of the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island were conducted, and the results indicated that psychiatric distress persisted for a certain period of time, particularly in pregnant women and women who have children, even when no evidence of substantial of radiation exposure is seen clinically. The psychological consequences of the Chernobyl disaster have been investigated continuously, and various problems, e.g., acute stress reaction, neurosis, and psychosis, have been identified, although no physical damage due to the radiation or PTSD have been reported. By contrast, PTSD has been seen in survivors of the Nagasaki and Hiroshima nuclear explosions. A study in Ohio, (United States), which has a nuclear waste plant, investigated PTSD in people living near the plant and found that the symptom level was mild. In general, the most common symptoms among people with mental and psychological disorders due to radiation exposure are depression and anxiety, with many people having associated somatoform disorders, and some people complain of PTSD. Vague anxiety and fear of sequelae, regardless of the exposure dose, appears to cause such psychiatric disorders. Although it is rare for psychiatrists to see such cases of psychiatric disorders due to radiation exposure, their number may increase as psychiatric services become more widely available. (K.H.)

  12. Limits of Freedom: The Ward Churchill Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Nell, Robert M.

    2006-01-01

    The University of Colorado's Ward Churchill is but the latest in a long line of professors whose volatile statements have created controversy for themselves and their universities. Specific personnel matters in the case have been meticulously addressed in Boulder, but several larger questions have been curiously neglected. One might well ask, for…

  13. "Ward v. Wilbanks": Counselor Educators Respond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, David; Hall, Stephanie F.; Burkholder, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    This article investigated 71 counselor educators' perspectives and pedagogical practices related to "Ward v. Wilbanks" (2009) and the American Counseling Association (ACA) response to the case. The authors used qualitative content analysis to identify 6 themes from survey data: (a) views on gatekeeping and student training; (b)…

  14. A Note on Ward's Chiral Model

    OpenAIRE

    Ioannidou, Theodora; Zakrzewski, Wojtek

    1998-01-01

    A one parameter generalization of Ward's chiral model in 2+1 dimensions is given. Like the original model the present one is integrable and possesses a positive-definite and conserved energy and $y$-momentum. The details of the scattering depend on the value of the parameter of the generalisation.

  15. Solutions of ward's modified chiral model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the adaptation of Uhlenbeck's method of solving the chiral model in 2 Euclidean dimensions to Ward's modified chiral model in (2+1) dimensions. We show that the method reduces the problem of solving the second-order partial differential equations for the chiral field to solving a sequence of first-order partial differential equations for time dependent projector valued fields

  16. The patient's perspective on "providing structure" in psychiatric inpatient care: an interview study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, L.A.; Goossens, P.J.J.; Nugter, A.; Achterberg, T. van

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To gain insight into the patients' experiences on providing structure (PS) as a nursing intervention during psychiatric inpatient care. DESIGN AND METHOD: Interviews were conducted with patients (n = 17) from two inpatient wards within a mental healthcare organization. For data analysis, a

  17. An observational study of providing structure as a psychiatric nursing intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, L.A.; Goossens, P.J.J.; Nugter, A.; Achterberg, T. van

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To observe the actions of psychiatric nurses when providing structure and identify results in order to better understand providing structure as a complex nursing intervention. DESIGN AND METHOD: Participant observation data were collected on a dual diagnosis ward and a crisis intervention w

  18. [Discharge Dynamics and Related Factors of Long-stay Patients in Psychiatric Hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Toshiaki; Shiraishi, Hiromi; Tachimori, Hisateru; Koyama, Asuka; Naganuma, Yoichi; Takeshima, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    significantly correlated with the diagnosis, district, hospital founder, and presence of psychiatric emergency or acute-phase treatment (acute-phase-type) wards in hospitals, but not with the hospitalization type, presence of psychiatric long-term care wards, or presence of senile dementia wards. The probability of discharge (odds ratio [95% confidence interval]) regarding the diagnosis was higher in dementia (2.47 [2.23-2.74]), alcoholism (2.09 [1.71-2.55]), depression (2.07 [1.65-2.59]), and bipolar disorder (1.70 [1.35-2.16]) than in schizophrenia (reference). Regarding the district, the probability was higher in Kinki (1.32 [1.12-1.54]) and Kyushu (1.27 [1.14-1.42]) than Kanto (reference). The probability was also lower in private hospitals (0.58 [0.51-0.66]) than in public/university hospitals (reference), and higher in hospitals with acute-phase-type wards (1.24 [1.14-1.35]) than in those without them (reference). The most common residential setting post-discharge for the total sample of weighted Group B patients was temporary hospitalization in another department prearranging psychiatric readmission (THAD, 35.8%), followed by death (18.2%), living with families/relatives (LF/R, 11.3%), a residential care facility for the aged (RCF-A, 9.5%), residential care facility for the disabled (RCF-D, 8.6%), hospitalization in another psychiatric hospital (7.4%), living alone (LA, 4.3%), permanent hospitalization in another department (PHAD, 4.3%), and others (0.7%). In dementia, death was common (31.0%) ; LF/R (1.8%) and LA (0.0%) were rare. As the age increased, the proportions of LF/R, LA, RCF-D, RCF-A, PHAD, and death changed; particularly, LA decreased and death increased markedly with age. Additionally, THAD amounted to approximately 40% in every age class of 40 years or older, contrasting with 11.4% in those under 40 years. The study's limitations include a low response rate, the elapsed time after the survey, and lack of attention paid to symptom severity. Nevertheless, it

  19. Protocol for an exploration of knowledge sharing for improved discharge from a mental health ward

    OpenAIRE

    Rowley, Emma; Wright, Nicola; Waring, Justin; Gregoriou, Kyri; Chopra, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Strategies to reduce hospital admissions for mental health service users have received vast amounts of attention, yet the transfer of care from hospital to the community has been ignored. The discharge process is complex, messy, disjointed and inefficient, relying on cross-agency and organisational working. Focusing on one acute mental health admission ward, we will investigate whether the discharge process for people with severe mental health problems can be enhanced through the...

  20. Ward identities for amplitudes with reggeized gluons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartles, J. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso (Chile). Dept. de Fisica; Lipatov, L.N. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Vacca, G.P. [INFN, Sezione di Bologna (Italy)

    2012-05-15

    Starting from the effective action of high energy QCD we derive Ward identities for Green's functions of reggeized gluons. They follow from the gauge invariance of the effective action, and allow to derive new representations of amplitudes containing physical particles as well as reggeized gluons. We explicitly demonstrate their validity for the BFKL kernel, and we present a new derivation of the kernel.

  1. Improving fluid balance monitoring on the wards

    OpenAIRE

    Jeyapala, Sobanakumari; Gerth, Alice; Patel, Aarti; Syed, Nazia

    2015-01-01

    Clinical experience and nursing metrics have consistently identified poor documentation of fluid balance monitoring at Milton Keynes University Hospital, compromising patient safety and quality of care. This project aimed to increase the percentage of fluid balance charts correctly completed on the wards. Three areas for improvement were identified: understanding the importance of good fluid balance monitoring, correct identification of patients requiring monitoring, and ease of completion of...

  2. [Comment on “Ward Off?”] More on Ward Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Dennis W.

    The May 23rd Eos “In Brief” could have been considerably more informative about Ward Valley and the work of the NAS panel in reviewing issues raised about the proposed site. The article should have included more comprehensive discussion by the scientific participants who reviewed the technical issues involved. In addition, the article raised two very different subjects—safety issues at Ward Valley and alleged bias of NAS panels—but did not separate the subjects well. Readers may not have distinguished between the Ward Valley panel and the NAS Board on Radioactive Waste Management in the question of bias. In addition, the nature of the reported-on attacks on scientific and personal integrity of the scientists may well discourage qualified but thinner-skinned geoscientists from public service on panels.

  3. Primary Psychiatric Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Mercan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of these dermatological diseases is entirely psychiatric origin. These patients show overconcern to their skin or self inflicted dermatoses unconsciously instead of facing with their real problems. In this group, delusions, dermatitis artefacta, trichotillomania, body dysmorphic disorder can be seen. They use denial as defence mechanism to their real psychiatric problems and prefer to apply dermatology instead of psychiatry. Dermatologist should be very careful before asking psychiatric consultation. Denial mechanism help patients to overcome agressive impulses like suicide or prevent further psychiatric damage like psychosis. Dermatologist should see these patients with short and frequent intervals with a good empathic approach. This will help to progress a powerful patient doctor relationship which will lead to a psychiatric evaluation.

  4. Neurobiology of psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đokić Gorica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurobiologically spoken, the supstrate of the mind is formed by neuronal networks, and dysregulated neurocircuitry can cause psychiatric disorders. Psychiatric disorders are diagnosed by symptom clusters that are the result of abnormal brain tissue, and/or activity in specialized areas of the brain. Dysregulated circuitry results from abnormal neural function, or abnormal neural connections from one brain area to another, which leads to neurotransmitter imbalances. Each psychiatric disorder has uniquely dysregulated circuitry and thereby unique neurotransmitter imbalance, such as: prefrontal cortical-limbic pathways in depression or prefrontal cortical-striatal pathways in schizophrenia ie. serotonin-norepinephrin-dopamin imbalance in depression, or dopamine hyperactivity in schizophrenia. Biological psychiatry has completely changed the farmacological treatment of psychiatric disorders, and new foundings in that field are supportive to futher more neuropsychopharmacological and nonpharmacological therapy studies, whish has as a result more safe and effective therapy for psychiatric disorders.

  5. Psychiatric patients turnaround times in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohlmeier Martin

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To analyze the turnaround times of psychiatric patients within the Emergency Department (ED from registration to discharge or hospitalization in a University Hospital in 2002. Methods Data from a one-year period of psychiatric admissions to the emergency service at a University Hospital were monitored and analyzed focused on turnaround times within the ED. Information on patients variables such as age, sex, diagnosis, consultations and diagnostic procedures were extracted from the patients' charts. Results From 34.058 patients seen in the ED in 2002, 2632 patients were examined by psychiatrists on duty. Mean turnaround time in the ED was 123 (SD 97 minutes (median 95. Patients to be hospitalized on a psychiatric ward stayed shorter within the ED, patients who later were admitted to another faculty, were treated longer in the ED. Patients with cognitive or substance related disorders stayed longer in the ED than patients with other psychiatric diagnoses. The number of diagnostic procedures and consultations increased the treatment time significantly. Conclusion As the number of patients within the examined ED increases every year, the relevant variables responsible for longer or complicated treatments were assessed in order to appropriately change routine procedures without loss of medical standards. Using this basic data, comparisons with the following years and other hospitals will help to define where the benchmark of turnaround times for psychiatric emergency services might be.

  6. Noncompliance and its Causes Resulting in Psychiatric Readmissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Yaghoubi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available "n  "n Objective: "n We aimed to describe psychiatrists' attributions on non-compliance related issues resulting in re-hospitalizations of psychiatric patients. "nMethod: In a cross sectional study, we included 500 randomly selected psychiatric readmitted patients and registered their demographic data (including age, sex, job, marital status, and educational level, and psychiatric clinical data including diagnosis, medications, and presence of psychiatric disorders in family members. Possible noncompliance issues by means of type and causes were asked through a structured interview by a psychiatrist. "nResults: Non-compliance was reported as a possible cause of admission in 441 88.2 of the re-hospitalized cases. No insight to disease (n=295; 59%, and feeling of cure (n=138; 27.6% were the 2 most prevalent causes for noncompliance of the patients . "nConclusion: It seems that non-compliance, as a prevalent factor, possibly causes readmission in psychiatric wards. Providing a better insight to disease and to instruct patients to take their medications even if they have some feeling of cure is important to decrease such problems.

  7. Design Proposal for Pleasurable Light Atmosphere in Hospital Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Fisker, Anna Marie;

    2010-01-01

    When constructing and designing Danish hospitals for the future, patients, staff and guests are in focus. It is found important to have a starting point in healing architecture and create an environment with knowledge of users sensory and functionally needs and looks at how hospital wards can sup...... parameters for achieving pleasurable light atmosphere in hospital wards and outlines a specific design proposal for an experimental case study in a hospital ward....

  8. The transition from staff nurse to ward leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Caroline; Al-Sadoon, Tara; Hemmings, Laura; Jackson, Karen; Mulligan, Paul

    Moving from the staff nurse to ward sister role involves acquiring a range of skills to lead and motivate a team and ensure standards of care are high. Recognising new ward sisters' need for support, a trust developed a training programme to enable them to develop the necessary skills and provide mutual support. This article discusses the development of the programme and offers the reflections of three ward sisters who participated in it. PMID:26012049

  9. Oxytocin and Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokce Nur Say

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Oxytocin is a neuropeptide that plays critical role in mother-infant bonding, pair bonding and prosocial behaviors. Several neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism, schizophrenia, affective disorders, anxiety disorders, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, alcohol/substance addiction, aggression, suicide, eating disorders and personality disorders show abnormalities of oxytocin system. These findings have given rise to the studies searching therapeutic use of oxytocin for psychi-atric disorders. The studies of oxytocin interventions in psychiatric disorders yielded potentially promising findings. This paper reviews the role of oxytocin in emotions, behavior and its effects in psychiatric disorders. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(2: 102-113

  10. Investigation on the nutriture of the working staff in the severe acute respiratory syndrome ward Expression and evaluation of special need of quantity and quality of protein%传染性非典型肺炎工作群体营养状态调查蛋白质特殊需求量及质量的表达与评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕利; 杜金赞; 管晓萍; 王环宇

    2005-01-01

    质量均可以充分满足该群体在抗传染性非典型肺炎热环境、强体力消耗状态下的特殊需要,并能发挥最佳生物效能,是科学合理的.%BACKGROUND: The hot environmental condition of the isolated severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) ward makes the protein transformation of the medical personnel accelerated. The dietary protein should make up the special consumption and improve the immunity in addition to guaranteeing the normal metabolism for the purpose to promote the organic endurance and resist the communicable disease.OBJECTIVE: To study the scientific mode of quality and quantity of protein supply for the medical staff working in the SARS ward.DESIGN: A cross section analysis.SETTING: Trophological Department, General Hospital of Chinese People's Armed Police Forces.PARTICIPANTS: The 64 healthy doctors and nurses, 22 males and 42females, aged 29 averagely, worked in the SARS ward from May 1st to 20th 2003, were the volunteers to join the observation.METHODS: The weighing method was applied to measure the quantity of various food supplied by recipe and actually taken and the nutrition software was used to analyze the quantity of protein and amino acid contained in the food. The quantity of protein supply (taking male as standard) calculated according to the heavy consumption, 1.5 g/kg.d, in the hot environment was compared with the estimated consumption, male (108.00±12.63) g and female (85.21±9.55) g, and with the actual intake analyzed by computer. The corrected scoring of digestibility was employed to evaluate the reasonability of intake of various essential amino acids. The quantity of essential amino acids contained in every gram of protein of recipe/the amino acids contained in Reference Mode of Chinese Food × 93% being higher than 1.0 was said to be the quality protein meeting the need of human body.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ① The quantity and composition of protein supplied by the recipe. ② The quantity and

  11. Ideal ward round making in neurosurgical practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathak A

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available The success of a perfect ward round lies in the role of the consultant leading the ′round making group′ (RMG as well as the hallmark of effective questioning and participation of each member. Twelve senior consultants with more than 10 years′ experience in neurosurgical practice at three different university hospitals were observed during round making by a participant observer. Observations were made on the group climate of the RMG, the leadership pattern and language expressed by the clinician conducting the round and the effectiveness in his performance as a leader during clinical discussions. The group climate showed evidence of good productivity and flexibility with 92% and 75% consultants, pleasantness of climate was above average with only 50% (6/12 and poor objectivity with 42% (5/12 consultants. Forty two percent of the consultants were not always very well comprehensible, while only 50% (6/12 spoke exactly fitting the occasion. Only 33% (4/12 of the consultants used humour effectively, while 42% (5/12 spoke unnecessarily in between discussion and were poor in introducing the problems of patient to the round making group. Ward round making in neurosurgical practice needs a holistic approach with motivation, planning, leadership skills and structured curriculum to fulfill its objectives.

  12. Radiation shielding of 131I therapeutic ward in department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To rebuild an 131I therapeutic ward of the department of nuclear medicine in the hospital, and design the radiation shielding to make the radiation safety achieve the national standards. Methods: According to the protection demands of national relating standards, the design of the ward was based on the basic principles and methods of radiation shielding of 131I, and combined the distribution of radioactive sources, rooms and people. Results: The design parameters and radioprotection data of the rebuilt ward were obtained and the radiation shielding was safe by monitoring. Conclusion: The design of the 131I therapeutic ward achieved the anticipated target that the radiation safety could be controlled. (authors)

  13. The importance of relationships in mental health care: A qualitative study of service users' experiences of psychiatric hospital admission in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slade Mike

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While a number of studies have looked at life on service users' experiences of life on psychiatric wards, no research exists that have approached these experiences from the user perspective since the introduction of community care. Methods This user-led study uses a participatory approach to develop an understanding of the processes and themes which define the user experience of hospitalisation. Nineteen service users who had all had inpatient stays in psychiatric hospitals in London were interviewed in the community. Results Relationships formed the core of service users' experiences. Three further codes, treatment, freedom and environment defined the role of hospital and its physical aspects. Themes of communication, safety, trust, coercion, and cultural competency contributed to the concept of relationships. Conclusion Relationships with an individual which comprised effective communication, cultural sensitivity, and the absence of coercion resulted in that person being attributed with a sense of trust. This resulted in the patient experiencing the hospital as a place of safety in terms of risk from other patients and staff. Barriers to positive relationships included ineffective and negative communication, a lack of trust, a lack of safety in terms of staff as ineffective in preventing violence, and as perpetrators themselves, and the use of coercion by staff. This unique perspective both acts as a source of triangulation with previous studies and highlights the importance of the therapeutic relationship in providing a safe and therapeutic milieu for the treatment of people with acute mental health problems.

  14. Occupational Psychiatric Disorders in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Kyeong-Sook; Kang, Seong-Kyu

    2010-01-01

    We searched databases and used various online resources to identify and systematically review all articles on occupational psychiatric disorders among Korean workers published in English and Korean before 2009. Three kinds of occupational psychiatric disorders were studied: disorders related to job stress and mental illness, psychiatric symptoms emerging in victims of industrial injuries, and occupational psychiatric disorders compensated by Industrial Accident Compensation Insurance (IACI). ...

  15. Hyperthyroidism and psychiatric morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Frans; Thvilum, Marianne; Pedersen, Dorthe Almind;

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are essential for the normal development of the fetal brain, while hyperthyroidism in adults is associated with mood symptoms and reduced quality of life. We aimed to investigate the association and temporal relation between hyperthyroidism and psychiatric morbidity.......Thyroid hormones are essential for the normal development of the fetal brain, while hyperthyroidism in adults is associated with mood symptoms and reduced quality of life. We aimed to investigate the association and temporal relation between hyperthyroidism and psychiatric morbidity....

  16. URINARY INCONTINENCE IN ACUTE PSYCHOSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Choudhury, S.; Augustine, M.

    1993-01-01

    SUMMARY A prospective two year study of consecutive admissions (n=984) to a psychiatry ward revealed that the incidence of temporary urinary incontinence in psychiatric patients without delirium or dementia was 1.63% (n=l6). When compared with controls (n=64) the incontinent patients were more often psychotic, gave a history of childhood enuresis and a past history of temporary incontinence during psychosis. Compared with psychotic controls (n=26), incontinent patients (n=16) had been exposed...

  17. Nurse rostering at a Danish ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæklund, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers a nurse rostering problem from a ward at a Danish hospital.  The problem is highly constrained and comprises a large set of different constraints. A branch-and-price method for solving the problem exactly is proposed. The master problem is to assign schedules to the nurses......, and its linear relaxation is solved by means of column generation. The pricing sub-problem is to generate feasible schedules for the nurses and -- as a couple of different constraints including several special Danish regulations have to be observed -- is solved by constraint programming. A number...... of specific algorithms for handling these constraints are proposed. The method is very flexible regarding the rules a schedule should comply with, which is a key concern when creating solution methods for nurse rostering problems.  Computational tests show that optimal solutions can be found for instances...

  18. Chiral susceptibility and the scalar Ward identity.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, L.; Liu, Y.-X.; Roberts, C. D.; Shi, Y.-M.; Sun, W.-M.; Zong, H.-S.; Physics; Inst. of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics; Peking Univ.; National Lab. of Heavy Ion Accelerator; Univ. of New South Wales; Nanjing Univ.; Joint Center for Particle, Nuclear Physics and Cosmology

    2009-03-01

    The chiral susceptibility is given by the scalar vacuum polarization at zero total momentum. This follows directly from the expression for the vacuum quark condensate so long as a nonperturbative symmetry preserving truncation scheme is employed. For QCD in-vacuum the susceptibility can rigorously be defined via a Pauli-Villars regularization procedure. Owing to the scalar Ward identity, irrespective of the form or Ansatz for the kernel of the gap equation, the consistent scalar vertex at zero total momentum can automatically be obtained and hence the consistent susceptibility. This enables calculation of the chiral susceptibility for markedly different vertex Ansaetze. For the two cases considered, the results were consistent and the minor quantitative differences easily understood. The susceptibility can be used to demarcate the domain of coupling strength within a theory upon which chiral symmetry is dynamically broken. Degenerate massless scalar and pseudoscalar bound-states appear at the critical coupling for dynamical chiral symmetry breaking.

  19. Aggressive behaviors in the psychiatric emergency service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Chaput

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Yves Chaput1, Lucie Beaulieu2, Michel Paradis3, Edith Labonté41Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal (presently in private practice; 2Department of Psychiatry, Haut Richelieu Hospital, Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec; 3Department of Psychiatry, University of Montreal, Montreal; 4Department of Psychiatry, Laval University, Quebec, CanadaIntroduction: Studies of aggressive behaviors in a nonforensic mental health setting have focused primarily on the inpatient ward and, on event prediction, using behavior-based clinical rating scales. Few studies have specifically targeted aggressive behaviors in the psychiatric emergency service or determined whether assessing the demographic and clinical characteristics of such patients might prove useful for their more rapid identification.Methods: We used a prospectively acquired database of over 20,900 visits to four services in the province of Quebec, Canada, over a two-year period from September 2002 onwards. A maximum of 72 variables could be acquired per visit. Visits with aggression (any verbally or physically intimidating behavior, both present and past, were tagged. Binary logistic regressions and cross-tabulations were used to determine whether the profile of a variable differed in visits with aggression from those without aggression.Results: About 7% of visits were marked by current aggression (verbal 49%, physical 12%, verbal and physical 39%. Including visits with a “past only” history of aggression increased this number to 20%. Variables associated with aggression were gender (male, marital status (single/separated, education (high school or less, employment (none, judicial history (any type, substance abuse (prior or active, medication compliance (poor, type of arrival to psychiatric emergency services (involuntary, police, judiciary, landlord, reason for referral (behavioral dyscontrol, diagnosis (less frequent in anxiety disorders, and outcome (more frequently placed under

  20. Air monitoring in radioiodine therapy ward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In Radioiodine therapy wards, in general the radiation exposure due to air borne activity from patients administered with 925MBq-7.4GBq (25-200mCi) of 131I has to be kept under regulatory limits. The purpose of conducting an air monitoring in our setup was to assess air borne activity levels. If the levels are high then it may lead to increased exposure to the occupational workers and patient's attendants. A total of 22.2GBq (600 mCi) 131I is administered every week to our patients in the isolation ward. After administered of 131I in the dose administration room, patients occupy their respective beds. The isolation beds are provided with attached toilet facility. Six air samples were collected from various regions (high dose room, low dose room, dose administration room, special room, corridor and entrance) in the vacuumized vials (9 ml) using 16 G needle at the breathing zone level. One control sample was also collected from the area with no possible 131I air-contamination. The vials were then counted in the pre-calibrated NaI well counter (known efficiency). The maximum air borne radioiodine concentration was found to be 1.999x10-6 ?Ci/cm3 in the high dose room (which keeps on decreasing with time, being maximum on second day and zero on third and subsequent days). We measured the thyroid counts of the staff and patient's attendants, routinely. The estimated thyroid activity never showed any significant increase in the thyroid uptake of the staff and patient's attendants. In our setup, air monitoring is strictly followed and performed periodically. We conclude that air monitoring program is only one element of the comprehensive radiation protection program and should be a made mandatory practice. (author)

  1. 34 CFR 300.45 - Ward of the State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... child resides, is— (1) A foster child; (2) A ward of the State; or (3) In the custody of a public child welfare agency. (b) Exception. Ward of the State does not include a foster child who has a foster parent who meets the definition of a parent in § 300.30. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1401(36))...

  2. Ward leadership: balancing the clinical and managerial roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firth, Kate

    2002-04-01

    This qualitative study investigated ward managers' experiences of combining a clinical leadership role with the managerial and administrative parts of their job. Ward managers saw their main task as one of developing their staff and improving the quality of their service, yet found balancing their different roles problematic.

  3. The opinion of patients with mental disorder about tobacco and its prohibition in psychiatric hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Marques de Oliveira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the opinion of patients with mental disorder about tobacco and its prohibition during psychiatric hospitalization. Method: An exploratory study with 96 patients smokers with mental disorders hospitalized in a psychiatric ward of a general hospital. The interviews were conducted individually, using an instrument designed for this study. The content from the interviews was recorded, transcribed and submitted to a thematic content analysis. Results: The patients with mental disorder were identified as perceiving smoking during the psychiatric hospitalization as a help to support the difficulties in socialization and in the lack of activities. The permission for smoking is seen as a signal of respect to their needs. The subjects mentioned to not accept the total smoking prohibition. Conclusion: Tobacco helps to face difficulties and conflicts in the psychiatric hospitalization. There is resistance regarding the possibility to totally withdraw the smoking permission during hospitalization.

  4. Usage of psychiatric emergency services by asylum seekers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reko, Amra; Bech, Per; Wohlert, Cathrine;

    2015-01-01

    predominantly male and married. The group consisted primarily (61%) of failed asylum seekers. Most patients (81%) presented with relevant mental health problems. The main reasons for presenting to the acute psychiatric emergency service were suicidal ideation and/or behaviour (60%). The most frequent diagnosis...... by asylum seekers in Denmark shows some of the acute mental health needs asylum seekers present with. The findings of high levels of suicidal ideation and possible diagnostic difficulties are discussed, as well as possible improvements of the referral and psychiatric evaluation processes....

  5. Negotiating clinical knowledge: a field study of psychiatric nurses' everyday communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels

    2008-01-01

    Nursing practices at psychiatric hospitals have changed significantly over the last decades. In this paper, everyday nursing practices were interpreted in light of these institutional changes. The objective was to examine how mental health nurses' production of clinical knowledge was influenced...... by the particular social relations on hospital wards. Empirical data stemming from an extended fieldwork at two Danish psychiatric hospital wards were interpreted using interactionistic theory and the metaphor: 'the game of clinical knowledge'. The results indicated that the nurses' production of clinical knowledge...... was highly dependent on the individual nurses' practical ability to participate in the game. Furthermore, the nurses colluded in their mutual communication to enable the collective display and sense of knowing that protected them against explicit signs of uncertainty about the clinic. The game of clinical...

  6. Transporting Forensic Psychiatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dike, Charles C; Nicholson, Elizabeth; Young, John L

    2015-12-01

    Patients in a forensic psychiatric facility often require escorted transport to medical facilities for investigations or treatments of physical health ailments. Transporting these patients presents significant safety and custody challenges because of the nature of patients housed in forensic psychiatric facilities. A significant proportion of these patients may be transfers from the Department of Corrections (DOC) under legal mandates for psychiatric evaluation and treatment better provided in a hospital setting, and most of them will return to the DOC. Although departments of correction have protocols for escorting these potentially dangerous individuals, it is unclear whether receiving psychiatric hospitals have established procedures for maintaining the safety of others and custody of these individuals during transportation outside the hospital facility. The literature is sparse on precautions to be observed when transporting dangerous forensic psychiatric patients, including those with high escape risk. In this article, we describe one forensic inpatient facility's procedure for determining the appropriate level needed to transport these individuals outside of the forensic facility. We also describe the risk assessment procedure for determining level of transport. These are quality improvement measures resulting from a critical review of an incident of escape from the forensic facility several years ago. PMID:26668224

  7. Psychiatric Aspects of Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacer Sezgin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Infertility can be defined as a crisis with cultural, religious, and class related aspects, which coexists with medical, psychiatric, psychological, and social problems. Relation between psychiatric and psychological factors stem from a mutual interaction of both. Family is an important institution in maintaining human existence and raising individuals in line with society's expectations. Fertility and reproduction are seen as universal functions unique to women with raising children as the expected result of the family institution. Incidence of infertility has increased recently and can become a life crisis for a couple. Even though not being able to have a child affects both sexes emotionally, women feel greater amounts of stress, pressure, anxiety, and depression.Consequences of infertility arise from short and long-term devastating effects on both individual's physical and mental health, and marital system. Many studies focus on infertility related psychological and psychiatric disorders (depression, anxiety, grief, marital conflict, gender differences, relation between the causes of infertility and psychopathology, the effects of psychiatric evaluation and intervention -when necessaryon the course of infertility treatment, pregnancy rates, and childbirth. The most important underlying causes of high levels of stress and anxiety that infertile women experience are the loss of maternity, reproduction, sense of self, and genetic continuity. In this review article is to investigate the relationship between medically unexplained symptoms and psychiatric symptoms. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(2.000: 165-185

  8. Creutzfeldt-Jacob’s Disease Presenting with Psychiatric Symptomsand Severe Itching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Rabia Koç

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is a rare and fatal neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by the accumulation of abnormal prion-like proteins in the central nervous system. Clinical features, electroencephalography, brain magnetic resonance imaging and protein 14.3.3 is useful in diagnosis. Protein 14.3.3 may be negative in the early or late stages of the disease. Presentation with psychiatric symptoms and itching is not typical in the beginning of the disease In this paper, we present a patient who was first accepted to the pschiatry ward because of his psychiatric symtpoms and had severe itching, resistant to antihistaminic drugs.

  9. FORGING PSYCHIATRIC CATEGORIES: A Philosophical Examination of the Creation and Stabilization of Diagnostic Knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Roome, Benjamin Reynolds

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation explores the entanglement of ethics and epistemology in the domain of psychiatric research, considering the ways that measurement practices and ethical values interrelate. If psychiatric clinicians, researchers, and patients are not acutely aware of the relationship between experimental configurations and the meaning of scientific data, unhealthy realities that take psychiatric constructs as fixed parts of nature will persist.The core of this work consists of case studies o...

  10. Emergency care of the elderly in the short-stay ward of the accident and emergency department.

    OpenAIRE

    Harrop, S.N.; Morgan, W J

    1985-01-01

    Review of a consecutive series of the elderly patients who presented unheralded to the Accident and Emergency Department of the Royal Gwent Hospital showed that a relative minority (11%) were difficult to manage because they had no obvious acute medical condition or injury which qualified them for admission by the firms to whom they were first referred. The difficulty was compounded by the shortage of geriatric beds. Judicious use of short-stay ward beds in the accident and emergency departme...

  11. Audit of hand hygiene at Broadmoor, a high secure psychiatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, K

    2010-06-01

    Increased security measures at high secure psychiatric hospitals can complicate hand hygiene. This audit assessed the availability of appropriate hand hygiene equipment and the practice of good hand hygiene at Broadmoor Hospital using the local hand hygiene policy as the standard for comparison. A data collection tool used to audit the hand hygiene equipment on 23 wards in the hospital showed that there were significant deficits in the supply of hand hygiene equipment on the wards. In addition, a staff survey was conducted using a questionnaire designed to assess awareness, training and hand decontamination practice among nursing staff. This survey identified a need to increase awareness of the hand hygiene policy and the appropriate timing of hand decontamination procedures. As a result of the audit, appropriate equipment was ordered and the duties of infection prevention link nurses on each ward were made more explicit; namely, to check and order equipment for hand hygiene as necessary, to conduct regular reminder sessions of the hand decontamination procedure and to raise awareness of hand hygiene policy. Posters were also placed on wards in patient areas to increase awareness of hand hygiene among patients, and alcohol gel dispensers were introduced into nursing stations. Similar audits may prove beneficial at other psychiatric hospitals. PMID:20304525

  12. Use and performance of non-invasive ventilation in Internal Medicine ward: a real-life study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Ventrella

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlled trials demonstrated efficacy and safety of non-invasive ventilation (NIV in treatment of acute respiratory failure, initially in Intensive Care Units, then in other care settings (semi-intensive care units, emergency departments, and also in the wards, more often pneumological ones. Few studies have been published about NIV in Italian wards of Internal Medicine with full self-management of NIV by internists in a normal ward setting. We performed a prospective real-life study about the use of NIV in Internal Medicine ward devoid of a critical area of semi-intensive therapy, with the aim of confirming, in this setting, the effectiveness of NIV. During a period of 13 months, 42 patients with hypercapnic respiratory failure of different etiology and acidosis (pH<7.25were treated by NIV. NIV was successful in 81% of patients. In-hospital mortality was 9.5%. Safety of NIV is demonstrated by the absence of serious complications: only 7 patients showed poor compliance and 2 patients had facial pressure ulcer due to the mask. There were not statistical differences in success rate of NIV according to severity of acidosis at admission (pH<7.25 vs pH>7.25, neither according to the acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score and the national early warning score, but the modified early warning score only showed statistically significant difference with lower values in the success group: 2.82±1.57 vs 4.13±1.46 (P<0.05. NIV has proven to be effective and safe in Internal Medicine ward.

  13. Children and adolescents in the Psychiatric Emergency Department: a 10-year survey in Copenhagen County

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taastrøm, Annette; Klahn, Julie; Staal, Nina;

    2014-01-01

    Background: Knowledge on psychiatric emergencies in children and adolescents is limited. The Psychiatric Emergency Departments (PED) in Copenhagen enable the acute examination of children and adolescents 24 h a day, 7 days a week. However, very little is known about who presents to the PED...

  14. [Neurologic and psychiatric manifestations of Lyme disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, F

    2007-01-01

    The neurological and psychiatric manifestations of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato are so numerous that Borrelia is also called the "new great imitator". Thus knowing about the multiple clinical aspects of neuroborreliosis is necessary for the clinician. We reviewed literature for "classical" neuroborreliosis such as acute meningoradiculitis or chronicle encephalomyelitis, but also for encephalitis, myelitis, polyneuritis, radiculitis and more controversial disorders such as chronic neurological disorders, ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, and motor neuron disease. We specified every time on which basis each disorder was attributed to Lyme disease, particularly if European or American criteria were met. Every part of the nervous system can be involved: from central to peripheral nervous system, and even muscles. In endemic areas, Lyme serology must be assessed in case of unexplained neurological or psychiatric disorder. In case of positive serology, CSF assessment with intrathecal anti-Borrelia antibody index will be more efficient to prove the diagnosis. PMID:17350199

  15. Congenital cataract screening in maternity wards is effective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson, Gunilla; Bizjajeva, Svetlana; Haargaard, Birgitte;

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To study which eye-screening protocol prevails in Swedish maternity/neonatal wards, evaluate efficacy in a prospective study, and compare results with earlier Swedish retrospective results. METHODS: Surveys were sent in 2006 to maternity/neonatal and women's health departments regarding...... with earlier retrospective results was performed. RESULTS: Eye screening is routine protocol at a rate of 90% of Swedish maternity wards. Sixty-one children were included in the study. An increase was shown in case referrals from maternity wards compared to ten years ago (64% versus 50%). Detection...

  16. Psychiatric personnel, risk management and the new institutionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazelton, M

    1999-12-01

    This article reports the findings of a series of ethnographic research interviews conducted with psychiatric personnel in one region of Tasmania between 1995 and 1997. These interviews formed part of a more wide-ranging project examining changes in the regulatory practices of psychiatric personnel in the light of the professional, media and policy discourses that inform them, especially in relation to the impact of social justice reforms spelt out in recent Australian mental health policy. In discussing the nature of psychiatric work the personnel interviewed returned repeatedly to the themes of safety and risk management. The study presents an analysis of discourses deployed around these themes and argues that concerns over safety and risk are central to the emergence of a new institutionalism in acute in-patient psychiatric services.

  17. CANNABIS AND PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS

    OpenAIRE

    Loga, Slobodan; Loga-Zec, Svjetlana; Spremo, Mira

    2010-01-01

    There are connection between use of cannabis and many psychiatric disturbances in adolescents, especially “cannabis psychosis", depression, panic attacks and suicide. Negative effects could occur either as a result of a specific pharmacological effect of cannabis, or as the result of stressful experiences during the intoxication of cannabis in young people. Potentially is very dangerous high frequency suicidal ideation among cannabis users.

  18. Pathological Gambling: Psychiatric Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, James R.

    2008-01-01

    Three psychiatric conceptual models: addictive, obsessive-compulsive spectrum and mood spectrum disorder have been proposed for pathological gambling. The objectives of this paper are to (1) evaluate the evidence base from the most recent reviews of each model, (2) update the evidence through 2007 and (3) summarize the status of the evidence for…

  19. Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reighley, Joan

    A description is provided of a course, "Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing," designed to teach students at Level 3 of a two-year college nursing program about the role of the nurse in a psychiatric setting and about concepts of mental health and psychiatric disorders, using both classroom and clinical instruction. The first section of the course…

  20. Psychosocial and medical factors affecting treatment compliance in patients attending psychiatric hospital: a study from Kashmir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Shoib

    2014-02-01

    Results: Out of 200 respondents studied in the study 41.5 % were males and 58.5% were females. Maximum number of patients (31.5% studied were in the age group below the 30 years. 3.5% of respondents were in the age group above 70 years. Out of total 200 respondents in the study 74 % of the respondents are in compliance with recommended medicine whereas non-compliance was found in the 26% of studied population. Complications (13.46% ascending out by usage of psychiatric medicine can be attributed as one of the major case of treatment non-compliance in psychiatric patients, among the psychiatric patients. Accessibility of psychiatric medicine and Financial constrain was also one of the reasons behind the medicine non-compliance (7.69%. Patients with no insight to psychiatric disease also include a good percentage of (5.76 % of medicine non- compliance. Conclusions: Non-compliance is a dominant factor which causes possibly causes readmission in psychiatric wards. Compliance in psychiatric patients in general could be enhanced and improved by adequate intervention via patient counselling and patient medicinal care and education. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(1.000: 220-224

  1. Psychiatric and Medical Management of Marijuana Intoxication in the Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Quan M Bui; Simpson, Scott; Nordstrom, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    We use a case report to describe the acute psychiatric and medical management of marijuana intoxication in the emergency setting. A 34-year-old woman presented with erratic, disruptive behavior and psychotic symptoms after recreational ingestion of edible cannabis. She was also found to have mild hypokalemia and QT interval prolongation. Psychiatric management of cannabis psychosis involves symptomatic treatment and maintenance of safety during detoxification. Acute medical complications of m...

  2. Psychiatric morbidity in patients of pulmonary tuberculosis-an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalit Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A lot of stigma and misconceptions about pulmonary tuberculosis still persist, in spite of the advances in treatment. Thus, a mere diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis can be a psychological trauma to an individual. The situation has aggravated with the association of tuberculosis with HIV infection. Aim: To study the psychiatric morbidity due to the various psychological stresses faced by a patient of pulmonary tuberculosis. Materials and Methods: The study group consisted of 100 inpatients admitted to pulmonary ward with diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. The control group consisted of 100 inpatients admitted to pulmonary ward with nontuberculous pulmonary diseases. Psychiatric history and mental status were recorded on a specially designed proforma and diagnosis of any psychiatric illness, if present, arrived at as per International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10. The psychiatric tests applied were beck's depression inventory (BDI and Taylor's Manifest Anxiety Scale (TMAS. Results: Of the patients of pulmonary tuberculosis, 24% could be given a diagnostic category, as per ICD-10, as compared to only 8% of the controls (P < 0.005. On BDI, 44% of patients of pulmonary tuberculosis showed depression as compared to 27% of the controls (P < 0.02. On TMAS, 38% of patients of pulmonary tuberculosis showed anxiety as compared to 24% of controls (P < 0.05. A greater incidence of depression (on BDI and anxiety (on TMAS was seen in those with longer duration of illness (P < 0.02 and in those with greater severity of illness (P < 0.02. Conclusion: In view of the high psychiatric morbidity associated with pulmonary tuberculosis, there is enough scope for psychiatric services to be made available to these patients. In addition, personnel involved in the treatment of these patients should be trained for early detection of psychiatric symptoms.

  3. Paediatric early warning scores on a children's ward: a quality improvement initiative.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ennis, Linda

    2014-09-09

    The aim of this quality improvement initiative was to incorporate a paediatric early warning score (PEWS) and track and trigger system in the routine care of children in an acute general children\\'s ward at a regional hospital in the Republic of Ireland. In the absence of a nationally recommended specific PEWS strategy, a local plan was developed. The experience of structuring and implementing the PEWS and track and trigger system is presented in this article. Data from the first year of use were collected to evaluate the clinical utility and effectiveness of this system. In the busy acute children\\'s service, the PEWS initiative was found to benefit processes of early detection, prompt referral and timely, appropriate management of children at potential risk of clinical deterioration. Nursing staff were empowered and supported to communicate concerns immediately and to seek rapid medical review, according to an agreed PEWS escalation plan. Outcomes were significantly improved.

  4. Middle-Age Fitness Helps Ward Off Stroke Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159287.html Middle-Age Fitness Helps Ward Off Stroke Later Study finds this ... 2016 THURSDAY, June 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physical fitness in middle age may lower your risk of ...

  5. Developing skills in clinical leadership for ward sisters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Katherine; Phillips, Natasha

    The Francis report has called for a strengthening of the ward sister's role. It recommends that sisters should operate in a supervisory capacity and should not be office bound. Effective ward leadership has been recognised as being vital to high-quality patient care and experience, resource management and interprofessional working. However, there is evidence that ward sisters are ill equipped to lead effectively and lack confidence in their ability to do so. University College London Hospitals Foundation Trust has recognised that the job has become almost impossible in increasingly large and complex organisations. Ward sisters spend less than 40% of their time on clinical leadership and the trust is undertaking a number of initiatives to support them in this role.

  6. Pharmacovigilance Among Surgeons and in Surgical Wards: Overlooked or Axiomatic?

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Gabriel Sunil; Khan, Sohil Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    To review the status of pharmacovigilance system among surgeons and in surgical wards with recommendations. Literature search using MEDLINE, cross-reference of published data and review of World Health Organization—Pharmacovigilance transcripts. Pharmacovigilance system is still in its infancy among surgeons and in surgical wards. No major studies have been published addressing this issue, till date. Surgeons are professionals least likely to report adverse drug reactions. Moreover widespread...

  7. Ward Identities for Scale and Special Conformal Transformations in Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Kundu, Nilay; Trivedi, Sandip P

    2016-01-01

    We derive the general Ward identities for scale and special conformal transformations in theories of single field inflation. Our analysis is model independent and based on symmetry considerations alone. The identities we obtain are valid to all orders in the slow roll expansion. For special conformal transformations, the Ward identities include a term which is non-linear in the fields that arises due to a compensating spatial reparametrization. Some observational consequences are also discussed.

  8. Psychiatric adverse effects of pediatric corticosteroid use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdowicz, Linda B; Bostwick, J Michael

    2014-06-01

    Corticosteroids, highly effective drugs for myriad disease states, have considerable neuropsychiatric adverse effects that can manifest in cognitive disorders, behavioral changes, and frank psychiatric disease. Recent reviews have summarized these effects in adults, but a comprehensive review on corticosteroid effects in children has not been published since 2005. Here, we systematically review articles published since then that, we find, naturally divide into 3 main areas: (1) chronic effects of acute prenatal and neonatal exposure associated with prematurity and congenital conditions; (2) immediate behavioral effects of acute exposure via oncological protocols; and (3) acute behavioral effects of sporadic use in children and adolescents with other conditions. PsycInfo, MEDLINE, Embase, and Scopus were queried to identify articles reporting psychiatric adverse effects of corticosteroids in pediatric patients. Search terms included corticosteroids, adrenal cortex hormones, steroid psychosis, substance-induced psychoses, glucocorticoids, dexamethasone, hydrocortisone, prednisone, adverse effects, mood disorders, mental disorders, psychosis, psychotic, psychoses, side effect, chemically induced, emotions, affective symptoms, toxicity, behavior, behavioral symptoms, infant, child, adolescent, pediatric, paediatric, neonatal, children, teen, and teenager. Following guidelines for systematic reviews from the Potsdam Consultation on Meta-Analysis, we have found it difficult to draw specific conclusions that are more than general impressions owing to the quality of the available studies. We find a mixed picture with neonates exposed to dexamethasone, with some articles reporting eventual deficits in neuropsychiatric functioning and others reporting no effect. In pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, corticosteroid use appears to correlate with negative psychiatric and behavioral effects. In children treated with corticosteroids for noncancer conditions

  9. Study of the effect of humanistic nursing care model wards in Children Caring Ward School on the nurses' caring ability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiao He; De-Ying Hu; Yi-Lan Liu; Li-Fen Wu; Lian Liu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To understand the effect of humanistic nursing care model wards in Children Caring Ward School (CCWS) on the nurses' caring ability. Methods: Questionnaire 25 nurses of humanistic nursing care model wards in CCWS using the Nkongho Caring Ability Inventory (CAI) before and after implement the humanistic nursing care model, including reform the systems of nursing care, introduce humanistic care model, implement the humanistic care, to measure the nurses' caring ability. Results: The nurses' caring ability had significantly developed on total, cognition dimension, courage dimension and patience dimension after all measures considered (p Conclusions: The humanistic nursing care model wards in CCWS has a positive effect on the nurses' caring ability, not only to help build great relationships between nurses and patients but also to enhance the patients' satisfaction.

  10. [Psychiatric treatment sentences.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevens, Hanne; Nordentoft, Merete; Agerbo, Esben;

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Previous Danish studies of the increasing number of sentences to psychiatric treatment (SPT) have compared prevalent populations of persons undergoing treatment with incident measures of reported crimes. Examining the period 1990-2006, we studied incident sentences, taking the type...... to violent offending, and that particularly assaults against public servants have contributed to the development. CONCLUSION: Regarding violent offences against private persons, the time-trends for SPT are parallel to the time-trends for suspended and custodial sentences, which may indicate that the same...... societal factors, including propensity to report, police priorities and court practices, are involved both generally and amongst psychiatric patients. Conversely, the rise in violent offences against public servants is higher amongst SPTs. This can conceivably be connected to both conditions, leading...

  11. Ward pharmacy: a foundation for prescribing audit?

    OpenAIRE

    Batty, R; Barber, N

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To determine the extent and nature of prescription monitoring incidents by hospital pharmacists and to derive a performance indicator to allow prescription monitoring to be compared among hospitals in North West Thames region. DESIGN--Survey of all self recorded prescription monitoring incidents for one week in June 1990. SETTING--All (31) acute hospitals in the region with pharmacy departments on site, covering 10,337 beds. SUBJECTS--210 pharmacists. MAIN MEASURES--Number of pres...

  12. Culture and psychiatric diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Aggarwal, Neil Krishan

    2013-01-01

    Since the publication of DSM-IV in 1994, neurobiologists and anthropologists have criticized the rigidity of its diagnostic criteria that appear to exclude whole classes of alternate illness presentations, as well as the lack of attention in contemporary psychiatric nosology to the role of contextual factors in the emergence and characteristics of psychopathology. Experts in culture and mental health have responded to these criticisms by revising the very process of diagnosis for DSM-5. Specifically, the DSM-5 Cultural Issues Subgroup has recommended that concepts of culture be included more prominently in several areas: an introductory chapter on Cultural Aspects of Psychiatric Diagnosis - composed of a conceptual introduction, a revised Outline for Cultural Formulation, a Cultural Formulation Interview that operationalizes this Outline, and a glossary on cultural concepts of distress - as well as material directly related to culture that is incorporated into the description of each disorder. This chapter surveys these recommendations to demonstrate how culture and context interact with psychiatric diagnosis at multiple levels. A greater appreciation of the interplay between culture, context, and biology can help clinicians improve diagnostic and treatment planning.

  13. HIV prevention among psychiatric inpatients: a pilot risk reduction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, I; Cournos, F; Empfield, M; Agosin, B; Floyd, P

    1992-01-01

    An HIV prevention program was piloted on an acute inpatient admission ward. Patients who volunteered to participate had significantly higher rates of histories of substance use than non-participants, suggesting that patients participated based on rational concerns about past HIV risk behavior. The program consisted of 75 minute sessions once a week for seven weeks and was co-led by an HIV counselor and the ward's social worker. Each session focused on a specific topic and included a short presentation of informational material, viewing of an educational videotape, a discussion, and role play and other educational games. In spite of a wide range in functioning among the participants, discussion was lively and participation was good. The pilot program demonstrates that chronic mentally ill patients can engage in, and benefit from, risk reduction programs and that frank and explicit discussion of sexual issues is well tolerated. Recommendations for improvement in the program are discussed. PMID:1488461

  14. Epidemiological, clinical anf pathogenetic studies of acute intermittent porphyria

    OpenAIRE

    Bylesjö, Ingemar

    2008-01-01

    Porphyrias are inherited metabolic disorders characterised by an impairment of heme biosynthesis. Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is the most common of the acute porphyrias in Sweden. Acute attacks of AIP are characterised by neuro-psychiatric symptoms, including epileptic seizures. Environmental and acquired factors are related to the induction of symptoms. Acute attacks of AIP are treated with high doses of glucose and/or hematin infusions. The pathogenesis of the neuro-psychiatric sympt...

  15. Processes of In-Hospital Psychiatric Care and Subsequent Criminal Behaviour Among Patients With Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Charlotte Gjørup; Olrik Wallenstein Jensen, Signe; Johnsen, Søren Paaske;

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: It is unknown whether evidence-based, in-hospital processes of care may influence the risk of criminal behaviour among patients with schizophrenia. Our study aimed to examine the association between guideline recommended in-hospital psychiatric care and criminal behaviour among patients...... with schizophrenia. Methods: Danish patients with schizophrenia (18 years or older) discharged from a psychiatric ward between January 2004 and March 2009 were identified using a national population-based schizophrenia registry (n = 10 757). Data for in-hospital care and patient characteristics were linked with data...... and staff contact with relatives. Conclusions: High-quality, in-hospital psychiatric care was associated with a lower risk of criminal behaviour after discharge among patients with schizophrenia....

  16. Clinical assessment and treatment in paediatric wards in the north-east of the United Republic of Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reyburn, Hugh; Mwakasungula, Emmanuel; Chonya, Semkini;

    2008-01-01

    .g. of 895 children with a history of fever, temperature was measured in 57%, and of 657 of children with cough or dyspnoea only 57 (9%) were examined for respiratory rate. Among 509 inpatients weight was recorded in the case notes in 250 (49%), respiratory rate in 54 (11%) and mental state in 47 (9...... outpatient consultations were observed, and a record of care was extracted from the case notes of children on the paediatric ward. Additional data were collected from inspection of ward supplies and hospital reports. FINDINGS: Of 1181 outpatient consultations, basic clinical signs were often not checked; e......%). Of 206 malaria diagnoses, 123 (60%) were with a negative or absent slide result, and of these 44 (36%) were treated with quinine only. Malnutrition was diagnosed in 1% of children admitted while recalculation of nutritional Z-scores suggested that between 5% and 10% had severe acute malnutrition...

  17. To be strategically struggling against resignation: the lived experience of being cared for in forensic psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörberg, Ulrica; Sjögren, Reet; Dahlberg, Karin

    2012-11-01

    To be referred to care in forensic psychiatric services can be seen as one of the most comprehensive encroachments society can impose upon a person's life, as it entails a limitation of the individual's freedom with no time limit. This study focuses upon patients' experiences of their life situation in forensic psychiatric wards. Using a Reflective Lifeworld Research approach founded in phenomenology, we analysed 11 qualitative interviews with patients cared for on a maximum security unit in a Swedish forensic psychiatric service. Results show how forensic psychiatric care can be non-caring with only moments of good care, from the patient's perspective. By using different strategies, the patients attempt to adapt to the demands of the caregivers in order to gain privileges. At the same time the patients are lacking meaningful and close relationships and long to get away from the system of forensic care. Being cared for entails struggling against an approaching overwhelming sense of resignation. PMID:23146008

  18. Occurrence of hypoxia in the wards of a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Appearance of hypoxia in a patient may be an indicator of a serious medical condition that can have grave consequences. Clinical evaluation fails to detect majority of the patients of hypoxia, and therefore, it may remain unnoticed in the wards. We planned to assess the magnitude of hypoxia in different wards of our tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: We studied all the patients admitted in various medical and surgical wards during 1 week of study. Oxygen saturation (SpO 2 was measured with the help of a pulse oximeter in all the patients who remained admitted for at least 24 h. Hypoxia was diagnosed in a patient when he had SpO 2 less than 90%. Results: During the study period, 1167 patients were admitted in various wards of the hospital. Hypoxia was detected in 121 patients (10.36%. Among them, 7 (0.59% patients were already having a diagnosis of respiratory failure, but were not on oxygen therapy while 5 (0.42% patients were having SpO 2 less than 90% despite of oxygen therapy. In 109 (9.34% patients, hypoxia was detected incidentally. Conclusion: Unnoticed hypoxia was detected in a significant number of the patients admitted in the wards of the hospital. Therefore, it is concluded that oxygen saturation measurements should be included with other vital parameters like pulse, temperature, and blood pressure, in the monitoring chart of all the admitted patients.

  19. Ward Valley status report: Science versus politics. Which will win?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasternak, A.D. [California Radioactive Materials Management Forum, Lafayette, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The State of California has issued a license to US Ecology, Inc. to construct and operate a disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) at the remote, arid Ward Valley site in the Mojave Desert. The license and certification of the associated environmental documentation have been upheld by the California courts. The Ward Valley license is the first and, so far, only license to be issued for a new LLRW disposal facility pursuant to the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act enacted in 1980 and amended in 1985. However, the dates of construction and operation of the disposal facility are uncertain because the federal government has refused to sell land in Ward Valley to the State of California for the site of the Southwestern Compact`s regional disposal facility. The Clinton Administration`s repeated excuses for delaying the land transfer, and the circumstances of these delays, indicate that prospects for success of the Ward Valley project, and perhaps the Policy Act itself, depend on the outcome of a battle between science and politics. In view of these delays by the administration, Congressional action to Transfer the Ward Valley lands to California will serve both state and federal goals for safe disposal of LLRW.

  20. Broader Indications for Psychiatric Consultation

    OpenAIRE

    Steinberg, Paul

    1987-01-01

    A liaison approach to psychiatric consultation increases the patient population who can benefit from psychiatric assessment during hospitalization for medical or surgical conditions. It also broadens the scope of the psychiatric investigation of the individual patient. The meaning of the illness to the patient, and the patient's present methods of adapting to his or her illness are important considerations. Unconscious concerns, which interfere with the patient's compliance to medical treatme...

  1. Psychiatric Comorbidity and Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Michael J; Aplasca, Alexis; Morales-Theodore, Rosa; Zaharakis, Nikola; Linker, Julie

    2016-07-01

    This article highlights the prevalence of co-occurring disorders among adolescents and underscores the complexity and opportunities of treating these patients in a systematic, comprehensive approach. As evidenced by this review, the need exists to develop and test models of care that integrate co-occurring disorders into both psychiatric and substance abuse treatment settings. The challenge for pediatric practitioners is to provide detailed assessments linked to evidence-based treatment plans to account for the variations in adolescent development and the unique risk factor profile of each patient. The issues related to co-morbidity are vast and continue to grow with rapidly increasing research literature. PMID:27338972

  2. Psychiatric assessment in transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messias Erick

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of the presumptive donor law in Brazil is expected to increase the availability of organs for transplantation. As medical management of end-stage organ dysfunction continues to improve, increasing numbers of potential transplant recipients will be available to meet this supply. There is mounting evidence that supports the involvement of skilled psychiatric practitioners in the selection of transplant candidates. Data supporting the influence of psychosocial factors on compliance and therefore medical outcomes continues to grow. The literature review allows delineating the components and rationale for comprehensive psychosocial evaluations as a component of preoperative transplantation evaluation.

  3. Ward Identity Constraints on Ladder Kernels in Transport Coefficient Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagnon, J.-S. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Jeon, S. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, H3A 2T8 (Canada)

    2007-03-15

    Using diagrammatic methods, we show how the Ward identity can be used to constrain the ladder kernel in transport coefficients calculations. More specifically, we use the Ward identity to determine the necessary diagrams that must be resummed (using the usual integral equation). Our main result is an equation relating the kernel of the integral equation with functional derivatives of the full (imaginary) self-energy; it is similar to what is obtained with 2PI effective action methods. However, since we use the Ward identity as our starting point, gauge invariance is preserved. Using power counting arguments, we also show which self-energies must be included in the resummation at leading order, including 2 to 2 scatterings and 1 to 2 collinear scatterings with the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal (LPM) effect. In this study we restrict our discussion to electrical conductivity and shear viscosity in QED, but our method can in principles be generalized to other transport coefficients and other theories.

  4. Medically unexplained illness and the diagnosis of hysterical conversion reaction (HCR in women’s medicine wards of Bangladeshi hospitals: a record review and qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendall Emily A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frequent reporting of cases of hysterical conversion reaction (HCR among hospitalized female medical patients in Bangladesh’s public hospital system led us to explore the prevalence of “HCR” diagnoses within hospitals and the manner in which physicians identify, manage, and perceive patients whom they diagnose with HCR. Methods We reviewed admission records from women’s general medicine wards in two public hospitals to determine how often and at what point during hospitalization patients received diagnoses of HCR. We also interviewed 13 physicians about their practices and perceptions related to HCR. Results Of 2520 women admitted to the selected wards in 2008, 6% received diagnoses of HCR. HCR patients had wide-ranging symptoms including respiratory distress, headaches, chest pain, convulsions, and abdominal complaints. Most doctors diagnosed HCR in patients who had any medically-unexplained physical symptom. According to physician reports, women admitted to medical wards for HCR received brief diagnostic evaluations and initial treatment with short-acting tranquilizers or placebo agents. Some were referred to outpatient psychiatric treatment. Physicians reported that repeated admissions for HCR were common. Physicians noted various social factors associated with HCR, and they described failures of the current system to meet psychosocial needs of HCR patients. Conclusions In these hospital settings, physicians assign HCR diagnoses frequently and based on vague criteria. We recommend providing education to increase general physicians’ awareness, skill, and comfort level when encountering somatization and other common psychiatric issues. Given limited diagnostic capacity for all patients, we raise concern that when HCR is used as a "wastebasket" diagnosis for unexplained symptoms, patients with treatable medical conditions may go unrecognized. We also advocate introducing non-physician hospital personnel to address

  5. Electronic prescribing - how does it affect the ward pharmacist?

    OpenAIRE

    Franklin, B D; O'Grady, K.; Donyai, P.; Jacklin, A.; Barber, N

    2005-01-01

    It is likely that electronic prescribing will be a common feature in tomorrow’s hospitals. However, we do not yet know how its introduction will affect the practice of hospital pharmacists. We are evaluating a closed-loop electronic prescribing, automated dispensing, bar-coded administration system (ServeRx) on one surgical ward. As part of this evaluation, we wanted to explore its impact on the ward pharmacist. Our objectives were to assess the impact of ServeRx on the time spent providing a...

  6. The holographic ward identity: examples from 2+1 gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banados, Maximo [Departamento de Fisica, P. Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile)]. E-mail: mbanados@fis.puc.cl; Caro, Rodrigo [Departamento de Fisica, P. Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile)]. E-mail: mbanados@fis.puc.cl

    2004-12-01

    In the AdS/CFT correspondence the boundary Ward identities are encoded in the bulk constraints. We study the three-dimensional version of this result using the Chern-Simons formulation of gravity. Due to the metric boundary conditions the conformal identities cannot be derived in a straightforward way from the chiral ones. We pay special attention to this case and find the necessary modifications to the chiral currents in order to find the two Virasoro operators. The supersymmetric Ward identities are studied as well. (author)

  7. Severe exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: management with noninvasive ventilation on a general medicine ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirio Fiorino

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recent evidence suggests that, with a well-trained staff, severe exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD with moderate respiratory acidosis (pH > 7.3 can be successfully treated with noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV on a general respiratory care ward. We conducted an open prospective study to evaluate the efficacy of this approach on a general medicine ward. Material and methods: This study population consisted in 27 patients admitted to a general medicine ward (median nurse:patient ratio 1:12 December 1, 2004 May 31, 2006 for acute COPD exacerbation with hypercapnic respiratory failure and acidosis (arterial pH < 7.34, PaC02 > 45 mmHg. All received assist-mode NIMV (average 12 h / day via oronasal masks (inspiratory pressure 10-25 cm H2O, expiratory pressure 4-6 cm H2O to maintain O2 saturation at 90-95%. Treatment was supervised by an experienced pulmonologist, who had also provided specific training in NIMV for medical and nursing staffs (90-day course followed by periodic refresher sessions. Arterial blood pressure, O2 saturation, and respiratory rate were continuously monitored during NIMV. Based on baseline arterial pH, the COPD was classified as moderate (7.25-7.34 or severe (< 7.25. Results: In patients with moderate and severe COPD, significant improvements were seen in arterial pH after 2 (p < 0.05 and 24 h (p< 0.05 of NIMV and in the PaC02 after 24 hours (p < 0.05. Four (15% of the 27 patients died during the study hospitalization (in-hospital mortality 15%, in 2 cases due to NIMV failure. For the other 23, mean long-term survival was 14.5 months (95% CI 10.2 to 18.8, and no significant differences were found between the moderate and severe groups. Over half (61% the patients were alive 1 year after admission. Conclusions: NIMV can be a cost-effective option for management of moderate or severe COPD on a general medicine ward. Its proper use requires: close monitoring of ventilated subjects

  8. Psychiatric Comorbidities in Restless Legs Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallweit, Ulf; Werth, Esther; Seiz, Angela; Sefidan, Sandra; Dahmen, Norbert; Manconi, Mauro; Ehlert, Ulrike; Bassetti, Claudio L A

    2016-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a neurological sleep disorder with frequent (39%) coexisting psychiatric comorbidities. Patients with any psychiatric comorbidity had fewer periodic leg movements in sleep. Psychiatric disorders should be taken into account in patients with RLS. PMID:27019065

  9. College Students with Psychiatric Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Delar K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on college students with psychiatric disabilities. It defines and discusses various psychiatric conditions such as mood disorders, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, and personality disorders. It concludes with accommodations that a college professor can make to help these students succeed in higher education. (Contains 1…

  10. Admission to a psychiatric unit and changes in tobacco smoking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owens David

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Smoking and withdrawal from smoking complicates the assessment and treatment of mental illness. We aimed to establish whether psychiatric inpatients smoke different amounts after admission than beforehand and, if so, to find out why. Forty-three inpatients on a working age adult psychiatry ward completed self-report questionnaires about smoking habits. Those who smoked a different amount after admission had a follow-up interview to find out why they thought this had occurred. The interview incorporated qualitative and quantitative aspects which were analysed accordingly. Fifty-six percent of participants were smokers before admission, rising to 70% afterwards. Of the smokers, 17% smoked less after admission, and 63% smoked more. The average number of cigarettes smoked per person per day increased from five to thirteen. The main reasons for smoking more were boredom, stress and the wish to socialise.

  11. Psychiatric aspects of burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalal P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Burn injuries and their subsequent treatment cause one of the most excruciating forms of pain imaginable. The psychological aspects of burn injury have been researched in different parts of the world, producing different outcomes. Studies have shown that greater levels of acute pain are associated with negative long-term psychological effects such as acute stress disorder, depression, suicidal ideation, and post-traumatic stress disorder for as long as 2 years after the initial burn injury. The concept of allostatic load is presented as a potential explanation for the relationship between acute pain and subsequent psychological outcomes. A biopsychosocial model is also presented as a means of obtaining better inpatient pain management and helping to mediate this relationship.

  12. Psychiatric morbidities in postpartum females: a prospective follow-up during puerperium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adya Shanker Srivastava

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aims and objectives: Postpartum psychiatric disturbances pose a significant mental health problem in community because of their impact on parent-infant and couple relationship. This study was carried out with the aim to find out psychiatric morbidities in postpartum females during puerperium so that a proper assessment of mental health and comprehensive management can be planned. Methodology: Hundred females who had delivered in maternity ward of obstetrics and gynaecology department of Sir Sunderlal Hospital, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi were evaluated for mental status on day one (i.e. day of delivery, and followed-up till four weeks postpartum period. Psychiatric evaluation was done on the basis of structured proforma containing socio-demographic details and the text revision of the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria for diagnosis. Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS, and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HDRS were used to assess the severity of the respective conditions. Result: Psychiatric evaluation during postpartum puerperal stage revealed that 16 (16% females had developed psychiatric morbidity. Twelve (12% cases fulfilled the criteria for major depressive disorder and four (four per cent patients had features of anxiety disorder. In 84 (84% cases, postpartum period was uneventful and no psychiatric disturbance was found.Seventy five per cent females had joint family and good family support. Conclusion: Major depressive disorder is the most common psychiatric morbidity observed in postpartum females during puerperium. The careful observation of females during postpartum puerperal stage may help in identification and proper management of mental state of such females, and also proper care of newborn.perspective.

  13. Accounting for Inpatient Wards When Developing Master Surgical Schedules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanberkel, Peter T.; Boucherie, Richard J.; Hans, Erwin W.; Hurink, Johann L.; Lent, van Wineke A.M.; Harten, van Wim H.

    2011-01-01

    Background:As the demand for health care services increases, the need to improve patient flow between departments has likewise increased. Understanding how the master surgical schedule (MSS) affects the inpatient wards and exploiting this relationship can lead to a decrease in surgery cancellations,

  14. Modelling of coughed droplets in a hospital ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadrizadeh, Sasan; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    2016-01-01

    Coughing and its importance for spreading respiratory infectious diseases has been confirmed in many previous studies. The dispersion process of respiratory droplets released by the coughing of a patient in a hospital ward was studied using computational fluid dynamics simulation. Two relatively ...

  15. Structure of Fluctuation Terms in the Trace Dynamics Ward Identity

    OpenAIRE

    Adler, Stephen L.

    2005-01-01

    We give a detailed analysis of the anti-self-adjoint operator contribution to the fluctuation terms in the trace dynamics Ward identity. This clarifies the origin of the apparent inconsistency between two forms of this identity discussed in Chapter 6 of our recent book on emergent quantum theory.

  16. Ward Identities, B-> \\rho Form Factors and |V_ub|

    CERN Document Server

    Gilani, A H S; Riazuddin, M; Gilani, Amjad Hussain Shah

    2003-01-01

    The exclusive FCNC beauty semileptonic decay B-> \\rho is studied using Ward identities in a general vector meson dominance framework, predicting vector meson couplings involved. The long distance contributions are discussed which results to obtain form factors and |V_ub|. A detailed comparison is given with other approaches.

  17. Structure of fluctuation terms in the trace dynamics Ward identity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, Stephen L [Institute for Advanced Study Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2006-02-10

    We give a detailed analysis of the anti-self-adjoint operator contribution to the fluctuation terms in the trace dynamics Ward identity. This clarifies the origin of the apparent inconsistency between two forms of this identity discussed in chapter 6 of our recent book on emergent quantum theory.

  18. Transverse Ward-Takahashi Relation to One Loop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Han-Xin

    2005-01-01

    We calculate the transverse Ward-Takahashi relation for the vector vertex in momentum space at one-loop order in four-dimensional Abelian gauge theory. We demonstrate explicitly that the result is exactly the same as that derived by using one-loop vector vertex calculations.

  19. The impact of psychiatric comorbidity on Medicare reimbursement for inpatient medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, R J; Daly, J; Golinger, R C

    1994-01-01

    Funding for psychiatric consultation-liaison (C-L) services has been a difficult problem. It has been suggested that the identification of psychiatric co-morbidities in Medicare patients on medical services could generate incremental hospital revenue by moving patients from a lower to a higher paying Diagnostic Related Group (DRG). This increased revenue could be used as a means of supporting the psychiatric C-L service. This study documents the financial impact of screening for and documenting psychiatric co-morbidities on a general acute medical service. We clinically assessed 100 consecutive Medicare admissions and found 25 psychiatric co-morbidities in 20 patients. In only one case did the psychiatric diagnosis result in moving the case to a higher DRG. However, the need for psychiatric consultation remains evident as there was significant lack of recognition and documentation of the psychiatric diagnoses by the medical team. The authors discuss both the financial and clinical implications of screening medical inpatients for psychiatric co-morbidities and propose directions for further studies in this area.

  20. Maintaining connections: some thoughts on the value of intensive care unit rounding for general medicine ward teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Joel D

    2011-09-01

    When established ward patients are unexpectedly transferred to an intensive care unit (ICU), the ward team should continue to follow them. Although there may be reasons not to do so, the advantages outweigh the obstacles. Great pedagogic value can be gained from following patients after acute decompensation, but a more important reason is that by following patients into the ICU, the ward team can enact for both patients and their families the twin virtues of caring and continuity. Doing so also demonstrates the highest ideals of medicine-that we are focused not on defined areas of turf, but on our patient's well-being. It shows that we are not merely doing narrowly defined "shift work," but that we truly care about our patients. Rounding on established patients who have been transferred into the ICU is the sort of behavior that undergirds the fundamental bases of professionalism. It takes a few minutes from a busy day, but it can be incredibly beneficial for families, patients, and the ideals of medicine.

  1. Psychiatric Comorbidity and Quality of Life in Patients with Dermatologic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayede Ghaninejad

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "n Objective: "n "nThe aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence ofpsychiatric disorders in patients with dermatologic disease and its relationship to the patients' quality of life. "nMethod: This study was cross-sectional. A total of 414 patients with various dermatologic diseases participated in this study. The participants were recruited from an outpatient clinic and inpatient ward of a referral dermatologic hospital using a simple random sampling method. Demographic variables, duration and characteristics of disease and admission status were recorded. Patients were asked to complete two questionnaires: GHQ-28 (General Health Questionnaire ,and DLQI (Dermatologic Life Quality Index. "nResults: The estimated prevalence of psychiatric comorbidity in dermatologic patients was %51.3.There was a significant relationship between GHQ score and educational level, marriage statues, type and course of dermatologic disease and admission status (p<0.05. The probability of psychiatric disorders increased among patients with lower educational level, married subjects, patients with relapse of the disease and those having some special skin diseases such as Psoriasis and Pemphigus. However, no significant relationship was observed between the GHQ score and duration of disease and sex. Moreover, there was a significant relationship between quality of life and educational level, marriage status, type of dermatologic disease, course of disease and admission status (p<0.05. Higher quality of life was observed among participants with higher educational level, those who were unmarried, patients with first episode and milder diseases. This study shows a significant relationship between quality of life and mental health (p<0.05. The lower probability of concomitant mental disorder, the higher the quality of life. "nConclusion: Psychiatric disorders are frequent among patients with dermatologic diseases. These disorders have a negative effect on quality

  2. Demographic and clinical characteristics of patients referred to psychiatric unit in a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Very few studies from Pakistan have examined the profile of patients seen by psychiatrists in general hospital. The aim of this research is to describe the clinical and demographic characteristics of patients referred to the psychiatric unit of a general hospital over a one year period. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted at the Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad, from January 1st to December 31st 2012. All patients being referred to psychiatry were included in the study over one year period. The information was recorded on a structured questionnaire and analysed the data using SPSS-19.0. Results: Out of the 105 patients referred to the psychiatric unit, 74 (72.3%) were females. A total of 69 (68.5%) patients were married. More than half were uneducated and only number 4 (3%) patients had university qualification. Housewives made up 64.4% of the patient population followed by students (11%). Majority 55 (53%) had less than Rs. 5000/ monthly income. About 30% patients were shifted to psychiatry ward while, nearly one tenth were discharged. In 35% cases the psychiatrist was asked to help in the management, while in 50% cases only opinion was sought. Aggressive and threatening behaviour was source of concern in majority of patients for the primary team while 34% exhibited suicidal behaviour. Depression was most frequent diagnosis in 45 43% patients, followed by conversion disorder 19 (17%) and delirium 16 (14%). Conclusion: The rate of psychiatric referrals is dismal with only one third of the patients being transferred to the psychiatric ward. The major psychiatric diagnosis was depression. Patients with aggressive and threatening behaviour were more frequently referred. (author)

  3. Prevalence of delirium among patients at a cancer ward: Clinical risk factors and prediction by bedside cognitive tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandahl, Mia Gall; Nielsen, Svend Erik; Koerner, Ejnar Alex; Schultz, Helga Holm; Arnfred, Sidse Marie

    2016-08-01

    Background Delirium is a frequent psychiatric complication to cancer, but rarely recognized by oncologists. Aims 1. To estimate the prevalence of delirium among inpatients admitted at an oncological cancer ward 2. To investigate whether simple clinical factors predict delirium 3. To examine the value of cognitive testing in the assessment of delirium. Methods On five different days, we interviewed and assessed patients admitted to a Danish cancer ward. The World Health Organization International Classification of Diseases Version 10, WHO ICD-10 Diagnostic System and the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) were used for diagnostic categorization. Clinical information was gathered from medical records and all patients were tested with Mini Cognitive Test, The Clock Drawing Test, and the Digit Span Test. Results 81 cancer patients were assessed and 33% were diagnosed with delirium. All delirious participants were CAM positive. Poor performance on the cognitive tests was associated with delirium. Medical records describing CNS metastases, benzodiazepine or morphine treatment were associated with delirium. Conclusions Delirium is prevalent among cancer inpatients. The Mini Cognitive Test, The Clock Drawing Test, and the Digit Span Test can be used as screening tools for delirium among inpatients with cancer, but even in synergy, they lack specificity. Combining cognitive testing and attention to nurses' records might improve detection, yet further studies are needed to create a more detailed patient profile for the detection of delirium. PMID:26882016

  4. [Challenges for the future of psychiatry and psychiatric medical care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Teruhiko

    2013-01-01

    situation, is the fact that the "psychiatry exception" system (unbalanced ratio of staff to psychiatric patients) is still present today. (2) To reach a fundamental solution, the policy of low fees for psychiatric services has to be abolished. (3) Multi-disciplinary medical teams, as practiced in other developed countries, is not yet adequately applied in Japan. From the aspect of medical fees, it is not adequately encouraged either. The only place where team medicine is actually practiced is in the "forced hospitalization" ward, but, as stated in the supplementary resolution of the Japanese diet (national assembly), high-quality medicine should not only be practiced in the "forced hospitalization" ward, but also in general psychiatry. (4) The policy of transition from hospitalization-centered to community-centered medical care, which was initiated a long time ago by the Japanese government, is not proceeding in reality, and it is time that we put our heads together and find ways to overcome this problem. It is significant that "psychiatric disorders" have been included as one of the "five diseases," (a system adopted by the government concerning community health care), and now we have the best opportunity to improve community-centered psychiatric care.

  5. Quality of interactions influences everyday life in psychiatric inpatient care—patients’ perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Molin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Everyday life consists of daily activities that are taken for granted. It forms the foundation for human efforts and contains elements of both comfort and boredom. Because everyday life escapes no one, life in a psychiatric ward will become ordinary while staying there. This study aims to explore everyday life in psychiatric inpatient care based on patients’ experiences. We individually interviewed 16 participants with experiences of psychiatric inpatient care and analysed the data in accordance with the methods of grounded theory. Data collection and analysis continued in parallel in accordance with the method. Our results showed that everyday life is linked to the core category quality of interactions influences everyday life, and three constructed categories—staff makes the difference, looking for shelter in a stigmatizing environment, and facing a confusing care content—were related to the core category. Our results highlight the importance of ordinary relationships between staff and patients in psychiatric inpatient care. These results can be used to develop nursing interventions to improve psychiatric inpatient care and might also be used as a basis for reflective dialogues among staff.

  6. [Ground-based speleo-climatic wards and the experience with their use in bronchial asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnoshteĭn, A E; Barannikov, V G; Shchekotov, V V; Lebedeva, T M; Bitinskaia, L N; Khasanova, R B; Surovtseva, M V; Mezentseva, E V; Isaevich, A G; Lysenko, D I

    1999-01-01

    Ambient air in ground wards made to contain natural potassium-sodium salt is close in characteristics to the atmosphere of underground wards but has a number of specificities: daily fluctuations of concentrations of light aeroions and aerosol particles, elevated concentration of light aeroions concentration, low radiation background, minimal bacterial contamination. The stay in ground wards brings great benefit for patients with bronchial asthma. Ground speleo-climatic wards are perspective in nonpharmacological treatment of patients with allergic respiratory diseases. PMID:10429568

  7. The cerebellum and psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph ePhillips

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum has been considered for a long time to play a role solely in motor coordination. However, studies over the past two decades have shown that the cerebellum also plays a key role in many motor, cognitive, and emotional processes. In addition, studies have also shown that the cerebellum is implicated in many psychiatric disorders including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders. In this review, we discuss existing studies reporting cerebellar dysfunction in various psychiatric disorders. We will also discuss future directions for studies linking the cerebellum to psychiatric disorders.

  8. Psychiatric disorders in myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Inés Ybarra

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG. METHOD: Forty-one patients with MG answered to a structured psychiatric interview (MINI-Plus. RESULTS: Eleven (26.1% patients were diagnosed with a depressive disorder and 19 (46.3% were diagnosed with an anxiety disorder. Patients with dysthymia were older (p=0.029 and had longer disease duration (p=0.006. Patients with social phobia also had longer disease duration (p=0.039. CONCLUSION: Psychiatric disorders in MG are common, especially depressive and anxiety disorders.

  9. [Psychiatric complications of cannabis use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscas, Sarah; Benyamina, Amine; Reynaud, Michel; Karila, Laurent

    2013-12-01

    Cannabis is the most widely used illicit substance, especially among young people. Cannabis use is extremely commonplace and frequently comorbid with psychiatric disorders that raise questions about the etiology. The use of cannabis is an aggravating factor of all psychiatric disorders. Psychiatric complications are related to the age of onset, duration of exposure and individual risk factors of the individual (mental and social health). The panic attack is the most common complication. The link with psychosis is narrow that leads to increased prevention for vulnerable populations. Cannabis is also an indicator of increased depressive vulnerability and an aggravating factor for bipolar disorder. PMID:24579344

  10. 75 FR 81269 - Ward Transformer Superfund Site Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of Settlements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ... AGENCY Ward Transformer Superfund Site Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of Settlements AGENCY... Ward Transformer Superfund Site located in Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina for publication. DATES... your comments, identified by Docket ID No. EPA-RO4- SFUND-2010-1053 or Site name Ward...

  11. 78 FR 14543 - Ward Transformer Superfund Site; Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-06

    ... AGENCY Ward Transformer Superfund Site; Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Agency has entered into a settlement at the Ward Transformer Superfund Site located in Raleigh, Wake... EPA Region 4 contact Ms. Paula V. Painter. Submit your comments by Site name Ward...

  12. Care systematization in psychiatric nursing within the psychiatric reform context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirdes, A; Kantorski, L P

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this study was to approach care systematization in psychiatric nursing in two psychiatric disorder patients who attended 'Nossa Casa', São Lourenço do Sul, RS, Brazil. Nossa Casa services psychiatric patients in the community, focussing on: (i) permanence in their environment, allowing patients to remain close to their families and social spheres; (ii) integral attendance to meet individual needs; (iii) respecting individual differences; (iv) rehabilitation practices; and (v) social reinsertion. Concepts and assumptions of the psychiatric reform and the Irving's nursing process were used as theoretical-methodological references to elaborate this systematization. A therapeutic project for the psychiatric patient was elaborated, in accordance with the interdisciplinary proposal accepted by Nossa Casa. Interdisciplinary team intervention, guided by a previously discussed common orientation and defined through an individualized therapeutic project, allowed for an effective process of psychosocial rehabilitation. The authors concluded that a therapeutic project based on the mentioned premises leads to consistent, comprehensive, dialectical and ethical assistance in mental health, thereby reinstating the citizenship of psychiatric patients.

  13. Leadership by fragmented destruction after a merger: an example from a facility of acute psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, John E; Grimeland, Jorid

    2013-09-01

    Hospitals are labor intensive facilities based on highly skilled employees. A merger of hospitals is an effort to increase and rationalize this production. Decisions behind a merger are made at the top leadership level. How this might be done is demonstrated by examples from a 36 bed acute psychiatric facility. The aim of the study was to calculate the hidden costs of fragmented destruction of parts of a total hospital supply to patients after a merger. Fragmented destruction is the deliberate stopping of activities deemed not part of the core activities of the hospital without due consideration of the impact on core activities. The proposed changes to operational expenses at a single acute psychiatric hospital were materials for the study. The changes included activities as a reduction in local laboratory service, cleaning services, closure of physiotherapy unit, closing of cultural activities and reduced productivity. The selected activities are calculated as giving an imputed gain of € 630,000 as indicated by the leadership. The not calculated costs of reducing or removing the selected activities are estimated at € 1,955,640. The cost of staff disappointment after a merger is difficult to assess, but is probably higher than assumed in the present calculations. Imputed cost containment is not attained. The calculations indicate that implemented changes may increase cost, contrary to the belief of the leadership at both the hospital level and further up in the hospital trust. Arguments in favor of a merger have to be scrutinized thoroughly for optimistic neglect of uncalculated costs of mergers. Future hospital mergers and selected fragmentation of productive tasks at ward or hospital levels should include calculations of unavoidable costs as shown in the present paper. PMID:25478133

  14. Leadership by fragmented destruction after a merger: an example from a facility of acute psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorid Grimeland

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hospitals are labor intensive facilities based on highly skilled employees. A merger of hospitals is an effort to increase and rationalize this production. Decisions behind a merger are made at the top leadership level. How this might be done is demonstrated by examples from a 36 bed acute psychiatric facility. The aim of the study was to calculate the hidden costs of fragmented destruction of parts of a total hospital supply to patients after a merger. Fragmented destruction is the deliberate stopping of activities deemed not part of the core activities of the hospital without due consideration of the impact on core activities. The proposed changes to operational expenses at a single acute psychiatric hospital were materials for the study. The changes included activities as a reduction in local laboratory service, cleaning services, closure of physiotherapy unit, closing of cultural activities and reduced productivity. The selected activities are calculated as giving an imputed gain of € 630,000 as indicated by the leadership. The not calculated costs of reducing or removing the selected activities are estimated at € 1,955,640. The cost of staff disappointment after a merger is difficult to assess, but is probably higher than assumed in the present calculations. Imputed cost containment is not attained. The calculations indicate that implemented changes may increase cost, contrary to the belief of the leadership at both the hospital level and further up in the hospital trust. Arguments in favor of a merger have to be scrutinized thoroughly for optimistic neglect of uncalculated costs of mergers. Future hospital mergers and selected fragmentation of productive tasks at ward or hospital levels should include calculations of unavoidable costs as shown in the present paper.

  15. Obstructive lung disease in acute medical patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Seemungal, T.; Harrinarine, R.; Rios, M.; Abiraj, V.; Ali, A.; Lacki, N.; Mahabir, N.; Ramoutar, V.; King, C. P.; Bhowmik, A.; Wedzicha, J A

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the proportion of adult medical patients who have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), using the Global initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease guidelines (GOLD), and its relation to vascular disease. METHODS: This is a prospective cross-sectional study of adult patients admitted to acute medical wards. Interviewer administered questionnaire, anthropometric and spirometric measurements were done. RESULTS: Spirometry was performed in 720 acute admissio...

  16. Suicide among older psychiatric inpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlangsen, Annette; Zarit, Steven H; Tu, Xin;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Older adults have elevated suicide rates, especially in the presence of a psychiatric disorder, yet not much is known about predictors for suicide within this high-risk group. The current study examines the characteristics associated with suicide among older adults who are admitted...... to a psychiatric hospital. METHOD: All persons aged 60 and older living in Denmark who were hospitalized with psychiatric disorders during 1990-2000 were included in the study. Using a case-control design and logistic regression analysis, the authors calculated the suicide risk associated with specific patient...... characteristics. RESULTS: Affective disorders were found to be associated with an almost twofold higher risk of suicide among psychiatric inpatients than other types of disorders (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5-2.6). Patients with dementia had a significantly lower risk ratio of 0.2 (95% CI: 0...

  17. A STUDY OF CUTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF PATIENTS WITH PSYCHIATRIC DISORDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanmugasundaram

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Skin is an organ that has a primary function of tactile receptivity and reacts to both external and internal emotional stimuli. Dermatological practice certainly embeds a psychosomatic dimension. A relationship between psychological factors and skin diseases has long been hypothesized. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES The aim of present study is to evaluate the prevalence of cutaneous manifestations in patients with psychiatric disorder. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty five psychiatric in-patients admitted in the psychiatry ward of a Tertiary Care Hospital were examined for the presence of cutaneous manifestation over a period of 6 months. Appropriate laboratory investigations such as scraping for Acarus, skin biopsy etc. were performed wherever required. The observations were noted. RESULTS The commonest cutaneous manifestations seen in this study were (i Parasitic infestations like scabies (20%, pediculosis capitis (16%, (ii Xerosis (28 %, (iii Prurigo nodularis (4%, (iv Lichen simplex chronicus (4%, (v Venereophobia (4% and (vi Delusion of parasitosis (4%. CONCLUSION A high incidence of parasitic infestations was noted in our study. The healthcare personnel should be sensitized on the significance of such parasitic infestations in institutionalized patients and the importance of early detection and treatment.

  18. Sleep disorders in psychiatric practice

    OpenAIRE

    Szelenberger, Waldemar; SOLDATOS, CONSTANTIN

    2005-01-01

    Over the last years, a large body of evidence has accumulated showing that complaints of disordered sleep are quite prevalent in the community. Insomnia is by far the most common disturbance and is often associated with concurrent psychiatric illness, in particular anxiety and mood disorders. On the other hand, sleep complaints are frequently present among psychiatric patients and have been incorporated in the official diagnostic criteria for many mental disorders, such as m...

  19. Effects and impacts of Productive Ward from a nursing perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mark; Waldron, Michelle

    The Productive Ward: releasing time to care (PW) initiative is predominantly a nurse-led quality improvement (QI) offering, designed to streamline ward work processes and clinical environments in an attempt to 'release time to care'. It has been implemented widely in the UK, recently attracting international interest. This paper systematically reviews the literature relating to the PW initiative, highlights and ranks the reported effects and impacts from a nursing perspective. Nine themes emerged from our content analysis. This paper examines the three most reported themes-empowerment, leadership and engagement-exploring how they may influence the opportunities for implementing and sustaining the initiative. This study brings some experience, learning and insight from the PW initiative to those currently involved in implementation. It also highlights some elements of change not being delivered by PW. The comprehensive list of reported impacts and effects, from a nursing perspective, adds value to senior nurses attempting to cultivate a culture of QI.

  20. Noether's Second Theorem and Ward Identities for Gauge Symmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Avery, Steven G

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a number of new Ward identities for large gauge transformations and large diffeomorphisms have been discovered. Some of the identities are reinterpretations of previously known statements, while some appear to be genuinely new. We use Noether's second theorem with the path integral as a powerful way of generating these kinds of Ward identities. We reintroduce Noether's second theorem and discuss how to work with the physical remnant of gauge symmetry in gauge fixed systems. We illustrate our mechanism in Maxwell theory, Yang-Mills theory, p-form field theory, and Einstein-Hilbert gravity. We comment on multiple connections between Noether's second theorem and known results in the recent literature. Our approach suggests a novel point of view with important physical consequences.

  1. Drug dispensing errors in a ward stock system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Ejdrup

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of drug dispensing errors in a traditional ward stock system operated by nurses and to investigate the effect of potential contributing factors. This was a descriptive study conducted in a teaching hospital from January 2005 to June 2007. In five....... These results indicate that strategies to reduce dispensing errors should address polypharmacy and focus on high-risk units. This should, however, be substantiated by a future trial....

  2. Ward-Takahashi Identity on the Light-Front

    CERN Document Server

    Naus, H W L; Frederico, T

    1998-01-01

    The Ward-Takahashi identity, reflecting local gauge invariance, is perturbatively verified for a boson model in light front field theory. A careful integration over the light front energy, corresponding to exactly taking into account pair terms, which are the contributions of the zero longitudinal momentum mode, is crucial to obtain this result. Furthermore, the one-loop boson form factors are calculated for arbitrary off-shell momenta.

  3. Psychotherapy in older adults with major depression in psychogeriatric ward

    OpenAIRE

    Wojciech Mateusz Rachel; Agnieszka Turkot

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Psychotherapy of the elderly appears to be a very important part of comprehensive treatment, and its character should be based on a holistic vision of the patient. The effectiveness of the individual Cognitive-Behavioral Psychotherapy (CBT) and Problem Solving Therapy (PST) is well establish in clinical trial. In treating patients at the psycho geriatric ward, on account of the described clinical state placed in the article, we apply Supportive Therapy (ST) and existential approa...

  4. Shielding estimation for nuclear medicine therapy ward: our experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The aim of this study was to calculate and estimate the shielding thickness for a new Nuclear Medicine Therapy Ward. Parameters available for shielding calculation were: ground plan of the ward, radionuclides planned for use, maximum administered activity of I-131, maximum delivered activity of I-131 to the ward per week, average time spent in the hospital after the treatment. The most hazardous and most commonly used radioisotope is I-131. The target dose that needs to be met for occupationally exposed workers is 0.3 mSv per year. There are several factors that could be changed in order to achieve this value: distance from the source, shielding thickness, angle of incidence, occupational and usage factors. The maximum dose rate at 1 meter from the thyroid gland of the patient was considered to be 100 mSv/h. The distances and incidence angles could not be changed since these vales were predetermined in the ground plan. Different usage and occupational factors were used for different rooms in the ward. We used occupational factor 1 for the bed and 1/6 for the bathroom, and usage factor 1 for nurses' room and patient room and 1/6 for the corridors, etc. The easiest way of calculating dose attenuation in material was by introducing the HVL and TVL for broad beams. TVL and HVL were taken from the graph.The results show that shielding thickness should be in the range of 3 mmPb for room doors to 30 mmPb for the wall adjacent to the nurse's office. Most of the walls are 20 mmPb thick. These values were calculated using conservative assumptions and are more then enough to protect staff, patients and public from external radiation. If the construction cannot support the weight of lead some rearrangements regarding patient positions could be made. (author)

  5. Ward Identities for Transport in 2+1 Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyos, Carlos; Oz, Yaron

    2015-01-01

    We use the Ward identities corresponding to general linear transformations, and derive relations between transport coefficients of $(2+1)$-dimensional systems. Our analysis includes relativistic and Galilean invariant systems, as well as systems without boost invariance such as Lifshitz theories. We consider translation invariant, as well as broken translation invariant cases, and include an external magnetic field. Our results agree with effective theory relations of incompressible Hall fluid, and with holographic calculations in a magnetically charged black hole background.

  6. Ward identities and relations between conductivities and viscosities in holography

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyos, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    We derive relations between viscosities and momentum conductivity in $2+1$ dimensions by finding a generalization of holographic Ward identities for the energy-momentum tensor. The generalization is novel in the sense that it goes beyond the usual identities obtained from holographic renormalization. Our results are consistent with previous field theory analysis. The main tools we use are a constant `probability current' in the gravity dual, that we are able to define for any system of linear ODEs, and parity symmetry.

  7. Words in Maternity Wards: An Aproximation to Perinatal Psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Alicia Oiberman

    2016-01-01

    The acknowledgment that just born babies interact with human and physical contexts originated changes in behaviors of health teems working in maternity wards settings. Concepts such as initial interactions, attachment, dyads, maternal vulnerability, behavioral competences of the just born babies and their applications to perinatal psychology, marked a transformation in different professionals involved in birth’s approaches. From one side, it can be said that medicalization of the birth act in...

  8. Medical academia clinical experiences of Ward Round Teaching curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Haghani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical students spend most of their time in hospital wards and it is necessary to study clinical educational opportunities. This study was aimed to explore faculty members′ experience on Ward Round Teaching content. Methods and Materials: This qualitative study was conducted by purposive sampling with the maximum variation of major clinical departments faculty members in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (n = 9. Data gathering was based on deep and semi-structured interviews. Data gathering continued till data saturation.Data was analyzed through the Collaizzi method and validated. Strategies to ensure trustworthiness of data (credibility, dependability, conformability, transferability were employed (Guba and Lincoln. Results: Basic codes extracted from the analyzed data were categorized into two main themes and related subthemes, including (1 tangible teachings (analytic intelligence, technical intelligence, legal duties and (2 implied teachings (professionalism, professional discipline, professional difficulties. Conclusion: Ward round teaching is a valuable opportunity for learners to learn not only patient care aspects but also ethical values. By appropriate planning, opportunities can be used to teach capabilities that are expected of general practitioners.

  9. The medication process in a psychiatric hospital: are errors a potential threat to patient safety?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soerensen AL

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ann Lykkegaard Soerensen,1,2 Marianne Lisby,3 Lars Peter Nielsen,4 Birgitte Klindt Poulsen,4 Jan Mainz5,6 1Faculty of Social Sciences and of Health Sciences, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark; 2Department of Nursing, University College of Northern Denmark, Aalborg, Denmark; 3Research Centre of Emergency Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 4Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 5Aalborg Psychiatric University hospital, Aalborg, Denmark; 6Department for Health Services Research, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark Purpose: To investigate the frequency, type, and potential severity of errors in several stages of the medication process in an inpatient psychiatric setting. Methods: A cross-sectional study using three methods for detecting errors: (1 direct observation; (2 unannounced control visits in the wards collecting dispensed drugs; and (3 chart reviews. All errors, except errors in discharge summaries, were assessed for potential consequences by two clinical pharmacologists. Setting: Three psychiatric wards with adult patients at Aalborg University Hospital, Denmark, from January 2010–April 2010. The observational unit: The individual handling of medication (prescribing, dispensing, and administering. Results: In total, 189 errors were detected in 1,082 opportunities for error (17% of which 84/998 (8% were assessed as potentially harmful. The frequency of errors was: prescribing, 10/189 (5%; dispensing, 18/189 (10%; administration, 142/189 (75%; and discharge summaries, 19/189 (10%. The most common errors were omission of pro re nata dosing regime in computerized physician order entry, omission of dose, lack of identity control, and omission of drug. Conclusion: Errors throughout the medication process are common in psychiatric wards to an extent which resembles error rates in somatic care. Despite a substantial proportion of errors with potential to harm patients, very

  10. Satisfaction of patients hospitalised in psychiatric hospitals: a randomised comparison of two psychiatric-specific and one generic satisfaction questionnaires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cléopas Agatta

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While there is interest in measuring the satisfaction of patients discharged from psychiatric hospitals, it might be important to determine whether surveys of psychiatric patients should employ generic or psychiatry-specific instruments. The aim of this study was to compare two psychiatric-specific and one generic questionnaires assessing patients' satisfaction after a hospitalisation in a psychiatric hospital. Methods We randomised adult patients discharged from two Swiss psychiatric university hospitals between April and September 2004, to receive one of three instruments: the Saphora-Psy questionnaire, the Perceptions of Care survey questionnaire or the Picker Institute questionnaire for acute care hospitals. In addition to the comparison of response rates, completion time, mean number of missing items and mean ceiling effect, we targeted our comparison on patients and asked them to answer ten evaluation questions about the questionnaire they had just completed. Results 728 out of 1550 eligible patients (47% participated in the study. Across questionnaires, response rates were similar (Saphora-Psy: 48.5%, Perceptions of Care: 49.9%, Picker: 43.4%; P = 0.08, average completion time was lowest for the Perceptions of Care questionnaire (minutes: Saphora-Psy: 17.7, Perceptions of Care: 13.7, Picker: 17.5; P = 0.005, the Saphora-Psy questionnaire had the largest mean proportion of missing responses (Saphora-Psy: 7.1%, Perceptions of Care: 2.8%, Picker: 4.0%; P P Conclusion Despite differences in the intended target population, content, lay-out and length of questionnaires, none appeared to be obviously better based on our comparison. All three presented advantages and drawbacks and could be used for the satisfaction evaluation of psychiatric inpatients. However, if comparison across medical services or hospitals is desired, using a generic questionnaire might be advantageous.

  11. Addressing psychiatric comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, G E; McLellan, A T; O'Brien, C P; Luborsky, L

    1991-01-01

    Research studies indicate that addressing psychiatric comorbidity can improve treatment for selected groups of substance-abusing patients. However, the chances for implementing the necessary techniques on a large scale are compromised by the absence of professional input and guidance within programs. This is especially true in public programs, which treat some of the most disadvantaged, disturbed, and socially destructive individuals in the entire mental health system. One starting point for upgrading the level of knowledge and training of staff members who work in this large treatment system could be to develop a better and more authoritative information dissemination network. Such a system exists in medicine; physicians are expected to read appropriate journals and to guide their treatment decisions using the data contained in the journals. Standards of practice and methods for modifying current practice are within the tradition of reading new facts, studying old ones, and comparing treatment outcome under different conditions with what is actually being done. No such general system of information-gathering or -sharing exists, particularly in public treatment programs. One of the most flagrant examples of this "educational shortfall" can be found among those methadone programs that adamantly insist on prescribing no more than 30 to 35 mg/day for all patients, in spite of the overwhelming evidence that these dose levels generally are inadequate. In some cases, program directors are unaware of studies that have shown the relationship between dose and outcome. In other cases, they are aware of the studies but do not modify their practices accordingly. This example of inadequate dosing is offered as an example of one situation that could be improved by adherence to a system of authoritative and systematic information dissemination. Many issues in substance abuse treatment do not lend themselves to information dissemination as readily as that of methadone dosing

  12. OCCUPATIONAL ROLE AFTER PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITALIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GH.R GHASSEMI

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Severe Psychiatricillness is accompanied by gross disturbances in patient's occupational role. This study presents a comparative picture of work performance before and after psychiatric hospitalization. Method: Subjects comprised 440 psychiatric admitters from Noor Medical center - Isfahan - Iran, who were followed from November 1999 to November 2000. Their work adjustment was measured by means of Weiss man's index. Data were computer analyzed using SPSS by running paired t- student and ANOVA. Results: Majority of the patients (53 % were without permanent sources of income before psychiatric hospitalization, about 12 percent of those who were working prior to hospitalization lost their job after being discharged from hospital. Better work adjustment before hospitalization was positively correlated with better work adjustment after discharge for working patients (r =0/66. Working ability of the patients after discharge was lesser than before the attack f9r patients with regular and irregular job (P < 001. Discussion: Job loss or poor working ability after psychiatric admission reported by several researchers and has bean confirmed in this study as well. These observatoins have been discussed in view of the current socio economic problems in the society and nature of psychiatric disturbances.

  13. Excited delirium: Consideration of selected medical and psychiatric issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Samuel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Edith Samuel1, Robert B Williams1, Richard B Ferrell21Department of Psychology, Atlantic Baptist University, Moncton, New Brunswick Canada; 2Department of Psychiatry, Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, New Hampshire, USAAbstract: Excited delirium, sometimes referred to as agitated or excited delirium, is the label assigned to the state of acute behavioral disinhibition manifested in a cluster of behaviors that may include bizarreness, aggressiveness, agitation, ranting, hyperactivity, paranoia, panic, violence, public disturbance, surprising physical strength, profuse sweating due to hyperthermia, respiratory arrest, and death. Excited delirium is reported to result from substance intoxication, psychiatric illness, alcohol withdrawal, head trauma, or a combination of these. This communication reviews the history of the origins of excited delirium, selected research related to its causes, symptoms, management, and the links noted between it and selected medical and psychiatric conditions. Excited delirium involves behavioral and physical symptoms that are also observed in medical and psychiatric conditions such as rhabdomyolysis, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, and catatonia. A useful contribution of this communication is that it links the state of excited delirium to conditions for which there are known and effective medical and psychiatric interventions.Keywords: excited delirium, excited states, cocaine misuse, restraint or in custody deaths

  14. Delivery of pharmaceutical services at ward level in a teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellack, N; Martins, V; Botha, N; Meyer, J C

    2009-03-01

    Poor management of pharmaceuticals could lead to wastage of financial resources and poor services in the public sector. The main aim of the study was to investigate the quality of pharmaceutical services at ward level in a teaching hospital. The design of the study was descriptive. Three data collection instruments were designed and pilot-tested prior to the actual data collection. Two structured questionnaires were used to interview the sister-in-charge of each ward and the stock and drug controller at the pharmacy. A checklist for the management of pharmaceuticals was completed for each ward. Descriptive statistics were used to describe and summarise the data. Sisters-in-charge of 30 wards and the stock and drug controller at the pharmacy participated in the study. The relationship with the pharmacy was perceived to be average by 54% (n = 30) of the sisters-in-charge of the wards. Communication with the pharmacy was mainly by telephone and 57% of the sisters-in-charge mentioned that they experienced difficulties in conveying messages to the pharmacy. Ten of the wards received regular ward visits by a pharmacist. Expiry dates were checked by all wards but at different intervals. The majority of the wards (90%) used patient cards, which refer to prescription charts, for stock control and ordering from the pharmacy. Fridge temperatures were checked and charted on a daily basis by 30% of the wards. Written standard operating procedures (SOPs) were used by the pharmacy for issuing ward stock. Although 83% of the wards indicated that they used SOPs, evidence of written SOPs was not available. The results indicated that the management of pharmaceutical services at ward level could be improved. Implementation of appropriate communication systems will enhance cooperation between the pharmacy and the wards. A uniform ward stock control system, either by computer or stock cards, should be introduced. Regular ward visits by a pharmacist to oversee ward stock management are

  15. Psychiatric Adverse Effects of Dermatological Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine Özmen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Dermatological drugs, mostly corticosteroids and isotretinoin, cause different psychiatric adverse effects. During steroid therapy, a wide range of psychiatric conditions, from minor clinical symptoms like insomnia and anxiety to serious psychiatric syndromes like psychosis and delirium might be seen. In medical literature, a causal connection is usually suggested between “isotretinoin”, which is used for treatment of acne vulgaris and depression and suicide attempts. However, there are no statistically significant double-blind randomized studies that support this connection. Clinicians must know patient’s psychiatric history before using any dermatological treatment known as causing psychiatric adverse effects, and psychiatric consultation should be established whenever necessary.

  16. [Movement disorders is psychiatric diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidasi, Zoltan; Salacz, Pal; Csibri, Eva

    2014-12-01

    Movement disorders are common in psychiatry. The movement disorder can either be the symptom of a psychiatric disorder, can share a common aetiological factor with it, or can be the consequence of psychopharmacological therapy. Most common features include tic, stereotypy, compulsion, akathisia, dyskinesias, tremor, hypokinesia and disturbances of posture and gait. We discuss characteristics and clinical importance of these features. Movement disorders are frequently present in mood disorders, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, catatonia, Tourette-disorder and psychogenic movement disorder, leading to differential-diagnostic and therapeutical difficulties in everyday practice. Movement disorders due to psychopharmacotherapy can be classified as early-onset, late-onset and tardive. Frequent psychiatric comorbidity is found in primary movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, Wilson's disease, Huntington's disease, diffuse Lewy-body disorder. Complex neuropsychiatric approach is effective concerning overlapping clinical features and spectrums of disorders in terms of movement disorders and psychiatric diseases. PMID:25577484

  17. Cost prediction of antipsychotic medication of psychiatric disorder using artificial neural network model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Mirabzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antipsychotic monotherapy or polypharmacy (concurrent use of two or more antipsychotics are used for treating patients with psychiatric disorders (PDs. Usually, antipsychotic monotherapy has a lower cost than polypharmacy. This study aimed to predict the cost of antipsychotic medications (AM of psychiatric patients in Iran. Materials and Methods: For this purpose, 790 patients with PDs who were discharged between June and September 2010 were selected from Razi Psychiatric Hospital, Tehran, Iran. For cost prediction of AM of PD, neural network (NN and multiple linear regression (MLR models were used. Analysis of data was performed with R 2.15.1 software. Results: Mean ± standard deviation (SD of the duration of hospitalization (days in patients who were on monotherapy and polypharmacy was 31.19 ± 15.55 and 36.69 ± 15.93, respectively (P < 0.001. Mean and median costs of medication for monotherapy (n = 507 were $8.25 and $6.23 and for polypharmacy (n =192 were $13.30 and $9.48, respectively (P = 0.001. The important variables for cost prediction of AM were duration of hospitalization, type of treatment, and type of psychiatric ward in the MLR model, and duration of hospitalization, type of diagnosed disorder, type of treatment, age, Chlorpromazine dosage, and duration of disorder in the NN model. Conclusion: Our findings showed that the artificial NN (ANN model can be used as a flexible model for cost prediction of AM.

  18. Effects of a humor-centered activity on disruptive behavior in patients in a general hospital psychiatric ward

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Higueras; Hugo Carretero-Dios; José P. Muñoz; Esther Idini; Ana Ortiz; Francisco Rincón; David Prieto-Merino; María M. Rodríguez del Águila

    2006-01-01

    El objetivo de este estudio cuasi-experimental es analizar lo efectos de una actividad centrada en el humor sobre las conductas disruptivas de pacientes hospitalizados en un servicio de Psiquiatría. Se han comparado, teniendo en cuenta dos grupos homogéneos de pacientes hospitalizados en un servicio de Psiquiatría de hospital general (unidad de agudos), dos periodos temporales de 83 días cada uno, siendo el período 1 el de línea base, y el período 2, el de intervención. Para am...

  19. Effects of a humor-centered activity on disruptive behavior in patients in a general hospital psychiatric ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Higueras

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este estudio cuasi-experimental es analizar lo efectos de una actividad centrada en el humor sobre las conductas disruptivas de pacientes hospitalizados en un servicio de Psiquiatría. Se han comparado, teniendo en cuenta dos grupos homogéneos de pacientes hospitalizados en un servicio de Psiquiatría de hospital general (unidad de agudos, dos periodos temporales de 83 días cada uno, siendo el período 1 el de línea base, y el período 2, el de intervención. Para ambos periodos, se codificaron y registraron un total de diez conductas disruptivas. En los 83 días del periodo de intervención, y con una frecuencia de dos días semanales, dos actores profesionales llevaban a cabo las actividades centradas en el humor. Se calculó un Indice de Disrupción Global (IGD, teniendo en cuenta conjuntamente todas las conductas disruptivas, al igual que un Indice de Disrupción Específico (IDE para cada una de las conductas disruptivas. Usando para las comparaciones la corrección de Bonferroni, los resultados indican que el IGD descendió significativamente durante el periodo de intervención, siendo tres las conductas disruptivas que mostraron un descenso significativo (intentos de fuga, autolesiones y peleas.

  20. [From monologue towards therapeutic dialogue. Same remarks about systemic family consultation in a psychiatric in-patient ward].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostworowska, Maria; Opoczyńska, Małgorzata

    2008-01-01

    Basing on the example of one patient and her family, the system family consultation--as a way towards therapeutic dialogue--is presented. The patient was hospitalised due to schizophrenia. In the given example, the psychiatrist was an observer of the consultation conducted by the psychologist. A system therapy consultation allowed a "multiple-picture" to be obtained: the family members and the patient presented their own understanding of the situation. This new multi-perspective description--showing the patient's symptoms functionality caused diagnostic uncertainty in the psychiatrist--how far is the diagnosis of schizophrenia a justifiable one. According to the authors, the systemic consultation, giving the possibility to empathize with existential, psychological and family problems of the patient, leads to a dialogue with his/her family and it plays one of the most important roles in the therapeutic and diagnostic process. PMID:18567401

  1. Religious ideas and psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beit-Hallahmi, B; Argyle, M

    1977-01-01

    The evidence presented above points to the need for considering factors other than purely religious ones in determining the role of religious ideas in psychiatric disorders. The occurrence of religious ideas as part of the content of individual delusional systems in psychiatric patients can be explained on the basis of exposure to religious ideas through the social environment. It may be also related to the prominence of religion, vis-a-vis other belief systems, in the social envirnment. When considering psychopathological explanations for intense religious experiences, one has to be conscious again of the social factors involved. When an unusual experience having religious content becomes normative in a certain group (for whatever reasons), trying to explain its appearance on the basis of individual psychodynamics or psychopathology becomes very difficult. There seems to be an inverse relationship between the social nature of a religious experience and its psychopathological nature, i.e., there is more psychopathology in individuals reporting solitary religious experiences, or individual religious ideas. Thus the solitary experience seems to be more influenced by disturbed individual dynamics, but in other cases social factors seem to be crucial. Our overall conclusion is that a psychiatric analysis of the role of religious factors in psychopathology has to be first a social-psychiatric analysis. An individual presenting psychiatric symptoms and religious ideas has to be evaluated in light of his social background, since the specific content of psychiatric symptoms seems to be determined by social background factors. Individual psychodynamics determine the appearance of symptoms, but their particular form will be the result of these background factors, one of which is religion. PMID:863602

  2. The nature of psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, Kenneth S

    2016-02-01

    A foundational question for the discipline of psychiatry is the nature of psychiatric disorders. What kinds of things are they? In this paper, I review and critique three major relevant theories: realism, pragmatism and constructivism. Realism assumes that the content of science is real and independent of human activities. I distinguish two "flavors" of realism: chemistry-based, for which the paradigmatic example is elements of the periodic table, and biology-based, for which the paradigm is species. The latter is a much better fit for psychiatry. Pragmatism articulates a sensible approach to psychiatric disorders just seeking categories that perform well in the world. But it makes no claim about the reality of those disorders. This is problematic, because we have a duty to advocate for our profession and our patients against other physicians who never doubt the reality of the disorders they treat. Constructivism has been associated with anti-psychiatry activists, but we should admit that social forces play a role in the creation of our diagnoses, as they do in many sciences. However, truly socially constructed psychiatric disorders are rare. I then describe powerful arguments against a realist theory of psychiatric disorders. Because so many prior psychiatric diagnoses have been proposed and then abandoned, can we really claim that our current nosologies have it right? Much of our current nosology arose from a series of historical figures and events which could have gone differently. If we re-run the tape of history over and over again, the DSM and ICD would not likely have the same categories on every iteration. Therefore, we should argue more confidently for the reality of broader constructs of psychiatric illness rather than our current diagnostic categories, which remain tentative. Finally, instead of thinking that our disorders are true because they correspond to clear entities in the world, we should consider a coherence theory of truth by which disorders

  3. The nature of psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, Kenneth S

    2016-02-01

    A foundational question for the discipline of psychiatry is the nature of psychiatric disorders. What kinds of things are they? In this paper, I review and critique three major relevant theories: realism, pragmatism and constructivism. Realism assumes that the content of science is real and independent of human activities. I distinguish two "flavors" of realism: chemistry-based, for which the paradigmatic example is elements of the periodic table, and biology-based, for which the paradigm is species. The latter is a much better fit for psychiatry. Pragmatism articulates a sensible approach to psychiatric disorders just seeking categories that perform well in the world. But it makes no claim about the reality of those disorders. This is problematic, because we have a duty to advocate for our profession and our patients against other physicians who never doubt the reality of the disorders they treat. Constructivism has been associated with anti-psychiatry activists, but we should admit that social forces play a role in the creation of our diagnoses, as they do in many sciences. However, truly socially constructed psychiatric disorders are rare. I then describe powerful arguments against a realist theory of psychiatric disorders. Because so many prior psychiatric diagnoses have been proposed and then abandoned, can we really claim that our current nosologies have it right? Much of our current nosology arose from a series of historical figures and events which could have gone differently. If we re-run the tape of history over and over again, the DSM and ICD would not likely have the same categories on every iteration. Therefore, we should argue more confidently for the reality of broader constructs of psychiatric illness rather than our current diagnostic categories, which remain tentative. Finally, instead of thinking that our disorders are true because they correspond to clear entities in the world, we should consider a coherence theory of truth by which disorders

  4. Optogenetics in psychiatric animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentz, Christian T; Oettl, Lars-Lennart; Kelsch, Wolfgang

    2013-10-01

    Optogenetics is the optical control of neuronal excitability by genetically delivered light-activated channels and pumps and represents a promising tool to fuel the study of circuit function in psychiatric animal models. This review highlights three developments. First, we examine the application of optogenetics in one of the neuromodulators central to the pathophysiology of many psychiatric disorders, the dopaminergic system. We then discuss recent work in translating functional magnetic resonance imaging in small animals (in which optogenetics can be employed to reveal physiological mechanisms underlying disease-related alterations in brain circuits) to patients. Finally, we describe emerging technological developments for circuit manipulation in freely behaving animals.

  5. Words in Maternity Wards: An Aproximation to Perinatal Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Oiberman

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The acknowledgment that just born babies interact with human and physical contexts originated changes in behaviors of health teems working in maternity wards settings. Concepts such as initial interactions, attachment, dyads, maternal vulnerability, behavioral competences of the just born babies and their applications to perinatal psychology, marked a transformation in different professionals involved in birth’s approaches. From one side, it can be said that medicalization of the birth act in Western societies had allowed to minimize risk factors. But this progress had been carried out without taking into account emotional expressions. The introduction of psychological interventions in neonatal periods is a new field of knowledge. History shows that in different periods and cultures there were amulets, potions and other elements associated with magic that were used to swear baby or mother’s death risk during childbirth. All these practices were taken the place of words, in a hard emotional moment: parturition. It was necessary to walk a long and difficult road for Perinatal Psycholy to recuperate the ancient place of old good women and incorporate words in maternity wards, knowing that the main scenery is first occupied by the mother’s body and then by the baby. Our daily job in a maternity ward, working together with pediatricians and neonatologists, allowed us to verify that words come out when psychologists themselves “include their body” as well as do mothers, babies and the medical teem. Words contribute to facilitate emotional expressions related to motherhood and place the baby in the family history, making able his or her “psychological birth”. 

  6. Incidence of violent behavior among patients in Psychiatric Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina C. Iversen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Both psychiatric acute units and psychiatric intensive care units (PICUs focus on acute treatment of behavioral disturbances such as violence and aggressive threats and acts. The aim of the present study is to describe the frequency of violent behavior; such as verbal or physical threats and physical attacks, among patients admitted to psychiatric intensive care unit (PICU. In addition the relationship between the episodes of threats and/or attacks in relation to time of the day, days of the week, and their seasonal variations was explored. Methods: All violent behavior was continuously assessed at the psychiatric emergency department. Data were collected during the period from May 2010 to May 2012. Results: Patients with only one hospitalization were less violent than those who have had two hospitalizations. There was a statistically significant difference in violence among patients without formal secondary education and those who have not formal education. Violent behavior showed two peaks during the day; the first occurring at 1 pm and the second at 8 pm. In regard to seasonality, summer had a higher incidence of violence. The most peaceful seasons of the year were spring and autumn. Conclusions: Violent behavior shows variation in daytime, days of the week and season in acute psychiatric intensive care. Daytime variation shows two peaks of violence at 1 pm and 8 pm, Sundays and Wednesdays being the quietest days regarding violence both in winter and summer. Patient's level of education and hospitalization status partially explain the variation.

  7. Validation of the Excited Component of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS-EC in a naturalistic sample of 278 patients with acute psychosis and agitation in a psychiatric emergency room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    San Luis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the wide use of the Excited Component of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS-EC in a clinical setting to assess agitated patients, a validation study to evaluate its psychometric properties was missing. Methods Data from the observational NATURA study were used. This research describes trends in the use of treatments in patients with acute psychotic episodes and agitation seen in emergency departments. Exploratory principal component factor analysis was performed. Spearman's correlation and regression analyses (linear regression model as well as equipercentile linking of Clinical Global Impression of Severity (CGI-S, Agitation and Calmness Evaluation Scale (ACES and PANSS-EC items were conducted to examine the scale's diagnostic validity. Furthermore, reliability (Cronbach's alpha and responsiveness were evaluated. Results Factor analysis resulted in one factor being retained according to eigenvalue ≥1. At admission, the PANSS-EC and CGI-S were found to be linearly related, with an average increase of 3.4 points (p Conclusions The factorial analyses confirm the unifactorial structure of the PANSS-EC subscale. The PANSS-EC showed a strong linear correlation with rating scales such as CGI-S and ACES. PANSS-EC has also shown an excellent capacity to detect real changes in agitated patients.

  8. Measuring the impact of modern matrons in the ward setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, Oliver

    With the The NHS Plan (Department of Health, 2000) the government made it clear there was a need to reintroduce the role of matron to establish a clear responsibility for standards in the ward setting. The role of modern matron is now considered to be a fundamental part of clinical governance, ensuring the quality of the care provided is of the highest standard. Staff at South Essex Partnership NHS Trust instituted an audit to provide an accurate picture of the impact of modern matrons. PMID:15552487

  9. Divergent IR gluon propagator from Ward-Slavnov-Taylor identities?

    CERN Document Server

    Boucaud, P; Lokhov, A Y; Micheli, J; Pène, O; Rodríguez-Quintero, J; Roiesnel, C; Yaouanc, A L; Boucaud, Ph.

    2007-01-01

    We exploit the Ward-Slavnov-Taylor identity relating the 3-gluons to the ghost-gluon vertices to conclude either that the ghost dressing function is finite and non vanishing at zero momentum while the gluon propagator diverges (although it may do so weakly enough not to be in contradiction with current lattice data) or that the 3-gluons vertex is non-regular when one momentum goes to zero. We stress that those results should be kept in mind when one studies the Infrared properties of the ghost and gluon propagators, for example by means of Dyson-Schwinger equations.

  10. The educational value of ward rounds for junior trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faidon-Marios Laskaratos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The ward round (WR is a complex task and medical teachers are often faced with the challenge of finding a balance between service provision and clinical development of learners. The educational value of WRs is an under-researched area. This short communication aims to evaluate the educational role of WRs for junior trainees and provides insight into current practices. It also identifies obstacles to effective teaching/training in this setting and provides suggestions for improving the quality of WR teaching.

  11. Lighting quality in hospital wards - State of the art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Fisker, Anna Marie

    When constructing and designing hospitals for the future, patients, staff and guests are in focus. Designing a healing hospital environment is a very important factor when planning new hospitals. How can aspects such as design, architecture, arts, lights, sounds and materials support and improve...... and a multitude of users with many different needs and requirements. It is a public domain with many references to the design of homes in the private sphere. The aim of the report is to display the existing research in the area of lighting design in hospital wards, and to present new lighting design strategies...

  12. Dealing with conflict - The role of the ward sister

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.M. Cremer

    1980-09-01

    Full Text Available In the course of her duties, the ward sister has to contend with many forms of conflict, discord and dissension. These involve conflict of the intrapersonal, interpersonal and intergroup varieties. Conflict is in the main, disruptive and dysfunctional. Skilful management, however, embodying cooperative effort in its reduction can produce constructive and positive results. Conflict management strategies are therefore either restrictive or constructive. Persons in serious conflict suffer varied degrees of personality disequilibrium, which necessitates emotional first aid or crisis intervention. Such primary preventive care is applicable to patients, their relatives, and members of the nursing staff in such need.

  13. Ward identities and chiral anomalies for coupled fermionic chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, L. C.; Ferraz, A.; Mastropietro, Vieri

    2013-12-01

    Coupled fermionic chains are usually described by an effective model written in terms of bonding and anti-bonding fermionic fields with linear dispersion in the vicinities of the respective Fermi points. We derive for the first time exact Ward Identities (WI) for this model, proving the existence of chiral anomalies which verify the Adler-Bardeen non-renormalization property. Such WI are expected to play a crucial role in the understanding of the thermodynamic properties of the system. Our results are non-perturbative and are obtained analyzing Grassmann functional integrals by means of constructive quantum field theory methods.

  14. Biofeedback for psychiatric disorders: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenberg, P.L.; David, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    Biofeedback potentially provides non-invasive, effective psychophysiological interventions for psychiatric disorders. The encompassing purpose of this review was to establish how biofeedback interventions have been used to treat select psychiatric disorders [anxiety, autistic spectrum disorders, dep

  15. Alcohol Abuse and Other Psychiatric Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) Main Menu Search Search form ... Health & Health Disparities Other Psychiatric Disorders Other Substance Abuse HIV/AIDS Other Psychiatric Disorders In the current ...

  16. Alcohol Abuse and Other Psychiatric Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Disparities Other Psychiatric Disorders Other Substance Abuse HIV/AIDS Other Psychiatric Disorders In the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), alcohol abuse and other substance abuse ...

  17. How to evacuate a psychiatric hospital: a Hurricane Katrina success story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Joan; Lackey, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the successful evacuation of an entire psychiatric hospital from New Orleans, Louisiana, to Memphis, Tennessee, on a weekend night. The destination site was 400 miles away and buses were used for transport. The evacuation occurred shortly before Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans and included 73 adult, adolescent, and child acute psychiatric patients. Thirty-five staff members also participated in the evacuation with their families and pets. This report is significant because little is known about how to implement a disaster plan that involves the transport of an entire psychiatric hospital-patients, nurses, physicians, staff, and family members--to another city. The knowledge gained can also benefit psychiatric nurses and their organizations when establishing or modifying their disaster plans. PMID:18251350

  18. Restless Legs Syndrome and Psychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, Susan; Winkelman, John W

    2015-09-01

    There are strong epidemiologic ties between restless legs syndrome (RLS) and a wide array of psychiatric conditions. Although the mechanism of this association is not fully understood, there are likely bidirectional cause-and-effect relationships. Appreciation of psychiatric comorbidity is an essential component of the treatment of RLS. Clinicians should be prepared to facilitate appropriate psychiatric treatment and consider the complex interactions between psychiatric medications, RLS medications, and the clinical course of both illnesses.

  19. Legal Considerations of Psychiatric Nursing Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barloon, Linda Funk; Hilliard, Wanda

    2016-06-01

    There are major legal issues that affect psychiatric nursing and guidelines for practicing in a legal and responsible manner. Advances in understanding of psychiatric conditions and developments in how nurses care for psychiatric patients result in changes in regulations, case law, and policies that govern nursing practice. Professional development, keeping abreast of current research and literature regarding clinical practice and trends, and involvement in professional organizations are some of the ways that psychiatric nurses can meet the challenges of their profession. PMID:27229273

  20. Oral Health in Psychiatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Gurbuz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Although oral health is a major determinant of general health and quality of life, it has a low priority in the context of mental illness. Chronic mental illness and its treatment carry inherent risks for significant oral diseases. Both the disease itself and its various pharmacologic management modalities lead to a range of oral complications and side effects, with caries, periodontal disease and xerostomia being encountered most frequently. Older age, female gender, length of hospitalization, duration of mental illness, psychiatric diagnosis are the most discussed predictors for adverse dental outcomes in the reviewed studies. Poor oral hygiene, higher intake of carbonates, smoking, poor perception of oral health self-needs, length of psychiatric disorder, length of psychotropic treatment, and less access to dental care pose at high risk for poor oral health among this population. This article emphasizes the importance of preventive dentistry programs to improve dental healthcare psychiatric chronic inpatients and the signifance of bridging dental health education to psychiatric rehabilitation programs. In this review, general information concerning the oral manifestations of mental illness, effect of medication of mental illness on oral health, the factors affecting oral health among this special population have been provided.

  1. Functional and psychiatric vestibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staab, J P

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral factors have long been recognized as affecting spatial orientation and balance function. Neuroanatomic and neurophysiologic studies conducted worldwide over the last 30 years have substantially advanced our knowledge about the inherently strong connectivity among threat/anxiety, vestibular, visual, and somatosensory systems in the brain. Clinical investigations have shed greater light on the nature of functional and psychiatric disorders that manifest or magnify vestibular morbidity. Concepts of these syndromes have changed over 150 years. Even their nomenclature has had different meanings in different eras. This chapter will review functional and psychiatric vestibular disorders. Terminology will follow the International Classification of Diseases, 11th edition, beta draft and the International Classification of Vestibular Disorders. Anxiety plays a central role in behavioral vestibular morbidity. Anxiety, traumatic stress, obsessive, and depressive disorders may be primary causes of episodic and chronic vestibular symptoms or secondary complications of other vestibular disorders. These psychiatric illnesses affect 30-50% of patients who consult neurologists or otologists for vestibular symptoms. Coexisting psychiatric disorders adversely affect treatment for patients with structural vestibular diseases, especially when unrecognized. Persistent postural-perceptual dizziness is the leading cause of long-term vestibular disability. Fortunately, pharmacologic, psychotherapeutic, and rehabilitative treatments of these illnesses have improved in recent years. PMID:27638082

  2. Implementing ward based clinical pharmacy services in an Ethiopian University Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Mekonnen AB; Yesuf EA; Odegard PS; Wega SS

    2013-01-01

    Background: Clinical pharmacy practice has developed internationally to expand the role of a pharmacist well beyond the traditional roles of compounding, dispensing and supplying drugs to roles more directly in caring for patients. Studies on the activities of the clinical pharmacist in an inpatient ward in resource constrained settings are scarce, however.Objective: To assess ward based clinical pharmacy services in an internal medicine ward of Jimma University Specialized Hospital. Methods:...

  3. Guidance and Orientation Manual : Internal Diseases Ward 11 - Central Finland Central Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Hirjaba, Marina

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this Bachelor’s Thesis is to create an initiation manual for the foreign students, foreign visitors or anyone else interested about Internal Diseases ward 11, Central Finland Central Hospital. The aim of the guidance material is to help the foreign students, who are practicing on ward 11, to become acquainted with the Finnish Healthcare System, Central Finland Central Hospital and to offer orientation upon the nursing and organisation of Internal Diseases ward 11. It is taken i...

  4. Psychiatric morbidity in dermatology patients: Frequency and results of consultations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyhan Muammer

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dermatological patients quite commonly depict psychiatric morbidity. PURPOSES: To study the psychiatric morbidity among skin patients of our clinic. METHODS: In the present study, the patients who were treated in the Dermatology Clinic of Inonu University Medical Faculty were evaluated retrospectively. The age, gender, marital status, habits, dermatological and systemic diseases, previously used drugs, current therapy and psychiatric diagnosis of each patient were recorded. FINDINGS: Of 636 patients involved in the study, 15.3% had psychopathological problems, which were depression (32.0%, adjustment difficulty (15.5%, anxiety (13.4%, psychosomatic disorders (10.3%, obsessive-compulsive disorder and conversion (5.1%, dysthymic disorder (4.1%, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (2.1%, panic attack (1.0%, premenstrual syndrome, schizophrenia, somatization disorder, insomnia, alcohol dependency, bipolar affective disorder, mental retardation, agoraphobia, social phobia and dementia. The dermatological diseases defined for the patients with psychopathology diagnosis were chronic urticaria (25.8%; psoriasis (15.5%; alopecia areata, totalis and iniversalis (11.3%; acute urticaria, neurodermatitis and Behcet′s disease (5.1%; atopic dermatitis and drug eruptions (4.1%; pemphigus (3.1%; angioedema, contact dermatitis and generalized pruritus (2.1%; folliculitis and the others (1.0%. CONCLUSIONS: Psychiatric morbidity has an affect on the course of dermatological diseases. When required, psychiatric consultation should be sought by dermatology clinics and patients should be followed with the cooperation of dermatologists and psychiatrists. LIMITATION: The indoor-based study had not included any control group and any domicillary patient.

  5. Continuity of pharmaceutical care for psychiatric patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdullah-Koolmees, Heshu

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric diseases are common. The effective treatment of a psychiatric disease, its (somatic) side effects and any concurrent somatic diseases is important for the patient’s overall health and wellbeing. The studies conducted in psychiatric patients generally focus on the continuation of psychiat

  6. Dilemmas in private psychiatric practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanasaheb M Patil

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A practicing psychiatrist faces dilemmas on a number of occasions, in deciding the best course of action he/she needs to undertake while treating a patient. At times, this choice may not be in accordance with the ethical and moral principles and may in fact appear to violate patient′s autonomy and rights. Aim: To study the nature of psychiatric practice by the practicing psychiatrist in the areas of admission, discharge, consent, physical restraint, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT, certification, treatment, suicide and psychotherapy. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional observational study. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight psychiatrists gave consent to participate in the study. A special proforma was prepared, which addresses the common dilemmas in the clinical psychiatric practice. All the psychiatrists were given specially designed profoma and were requested to fill the proforma with appropriate answers. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS software. Results: There were 42 male and 6 female psychiatrists. The age of the psychiatrists ranged from 28 to 65 years with a mean of 43.08 years. The mean duration of practice of these psychiatrists was 14.81΁11.07 years. Question and answers related to admission, discharge, consent, physical restraint, ECT, certification, treatment, suicide and psychotherapy are discussed. Conclusions: The present standard and practice especially in private psychiatric set-up does not confirm to the rules, recommendations, and regulations suggested by Mental Health Act 1987, Mental Health Authorities and various guidelines of practice. Indian Psychiatric Society and other professional bodies need to take steps to prepare guidelines for a good psychiatric practice.

  7. Psychotherapy in older adults with major depression in psychogeriatric ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Mateusz Rachel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Psychotherapy of the elderly appears to be a very important part of comprehensive treatment, and its character should be based on a holistic vision of the patient. The effectiveness of the individual Cognitive-Behavioral Psychotherapy (CBT and Problem Solving Therapy (PST is well establish in clinical trial. In treating patients at the psycho geriatric ward, on account of the described clinical state placed in the article, we apply Supportive Therapy (ST and existential approach. An important element of therapy is a holistic approach to the needs of the patient, an attempt to understand their internal conflicts, a focus on long-term therapy and the setting of realistic goals tailored to the patient's abilities. A positive change in thinking can bear fruit in the patient’s everyday life, their functioning, and in their relationships with other people. It seems, that at elderly people, choice of the psychotherapeutic method should adapt individually to the clinical state, therapeutic readiness to work and one's situation in life of the patient In this article, the authors share their own experiences and reflections from the use of individual and group psychotherapy with elderly patients in the psychogeriatric ward.

  8. How Can Ward Teaching Be Made More Systematic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    : Editor's note: From its first issue in 1900 through to the present day, AJN has unparalleled archives detailing nurses' work and lives over more than a century. These articles not only chronicle nursing's growth as a profession within the context of the events of the day, but they also reveal prevailing societal attitudes about women, health care, and human rights. Today's nursing school curricula rarely include nursing's history, but it's a history worth knowing. To this end, From the AJN Archives highlights articles selected to fit today's topics and times.This month's article, from the June 1926 issue, offers ideas "by which we hope to make ward experiences of more value to the student." Author Mina A. McKay originally presented this material at a meeting of the Massachusetts State League of Nursing Education. She calls for more comprehensive morning and evening reports ("not just a mere reading of… orders"), the use of student experience records, ward clinics ("the type of bedside talk which supplements class room lectures"), and case reports presented by the students themselves. Efforts to improve clinical nursing education are ongoing, and in "'Flipping' the Classroom" in this month's AJN, Diane M. Billings describes a relatively new way of translating clinical concepts into practice.

  9. A comparison of social skills training and contingent attention to improve behavioural deficits of chronic psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, J L; Zeiss, A M; Zeiss, R A; Bowman, W

    1980-02-01

    Twelve chronic psychiatric patients were treated with either social skills training or contingent attention to improve behavioural assets or deficits noted on the ward by independently trained raters blind to experimental conditions. Treatment was applied across groups using a multiple-baseline format. Inspection of the data revealed that clinically significant improvements in socially appropriate assets and deficits observed on the ward resulted with social skills training but no substantiative change accrued due to the contingent attention. The behaviours selected for treatment were those which staff were most willing to reinforce. This variable may account, in part at least, for the generalization of treatment effects to the natural environment with persons who received social skills training. PMID:7357230

  10. Perceptions of nursing students trained in a new model teaching ward in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bvumbwe, Thokozani

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the perceptions of nursing students trained in a new model teaching ward in Malawi. A total of 90students from five nursing colleges were randomly assigned to one model ward and two ordinary wards in a single teaching hospital. The students were administered a revised version of the Student Evaluation of Clinical Education Environment questionnaire. Significant differences among the three wards were found in all items in the communication/feedback subscale, with the exception of the item "nursing staff provided constructive feedback" (P=0.162). Within the learning opportunities subscale all items showed significant differences among the three wards, whereas 50% of the items in the learning support/assistance subscale had significantly different responses among the three wards. Within the department atmosphere subscale, no significant differences were found in the items assessing whether an adequate number and variety of patients were present in the ward (P=0.978). The strategies that are being implemented to improve the educational environment showed positive results. Students scored the model teaching ward highly. Students who underwent precepting in the model teaching wards reported having more learning opportunities and a positive learning environment. PMID:26639604

  11. Job enrichment, work motivation, and job satisfaction in hospital wards: testing the job characteristics model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivimäki, M; Voutilainen, P; Koskinen, P

    1995-03-01

    This study investigated work motivation and job satisfaction at hospital wards with high and low levels of job enrichment. Primary nursing was assumed to represent a highly enriched job, whereas functional nursing represented a job with a low level of enrichment. Five surgical wards were divided into these two categories based on the structured interviews with head nurses. Work motivation and job satisfaction among ward personnel were assessed by a questionnaire. The ward personnel occupying highly enriched jobs reported significantly higher work motivation and satisfaction with the management than the personnel occupying jobs with a low level of enrichment. PMID:7735655

  12. Nursing interventions in crisis-oriented and long-term psychiatric home care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomsma, J.; Dassen, T.WN; Dingemans, T.; van den Heuvel, W.J.A.

    1999-01-01

    Psychiatric nurses in The Netherlands are moving out of residential mental health institutions and are pioneering home care for the acutely and chronically mentally ill. The purpose of this study was to identify the interventions nurses currently use and to describe the differences between crisis-or

  13. An Unusual Psychiatric Emergency: Herpes Simplex Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Doyle

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of fatal herpes simplex virus (HSV encephalitis, presenting as a psychiatric emergency, is reported. The possibility of HSV encephalitis presenting mainly or solely with psychiatric symptoms is highlighted. HSV can cause a severe form of encephalitis which may present with mainly psychiatric symptoms in some cases. Early treatment with anti-viral agents can reduce mortality and morbidity, but accurate early diagnosis may be very difficult. HSV encephalopathy may mimic psychiatric illness and has been likened to syphilis as the great imitator. The case presented here should serve to raise awareness of the psychiatric features and the need to consider this diagnosis in patients with atypical behavioural disturbance.

  14. Medical management of acute severe anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrington, Amy; Stanley, Ruth; Tremlett, Michael; Birrell, Ginny

    2012-04-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a common condition affecting young people. The medical management of AN on a general paediatric ward is challenging. It is important to identify young people who are at risk of medical complications, so early intervention can be instigated. This article aims to review the clinical practice and evidence supporting the current medical management of young people with AN. It provides a system-based approach to potential complications of the disease, guidance on feeding and the management of re-feeding syndrome. Approaches to legal and ethical challenges are also considered. While the importance of psychiatric treatment is recognised, the same is not discussed within this article.

  15. [Authority in the psychiatric clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laemmel, K

    1983-01-01

    Although considerable progress was made as far as therapy and individual rights of the patients are concerned today the psychiatric hospital is more than ever the butt of open citicism. One of the reasons for that is the odium of involuntarity and authority surrounding it. It is based on the ill-fame and dubious reputation of the nineteenth century "asylum". The problem of authority concerns today's hospitals as much as ever. How the hospital is run depends naturally in the first place on the personality of it's director his views on authority, as much as on his understanding and ability to handle the intensive dynamic processes in the institution. Recognizing the boundaries of his actual knowledge and training, his "authoritative authority", makes him wisely limit his goals and activities. Power or "authoritarian authority" must be employed with restraint and moderation but without hesitancy when necessary. The clinic represents for the patient a total milieu. It's therapeutic effect relies a great deal on the regulatory influence of the daily routine based on the authority of the treatment team. Jones' ideas of the "Therapeutic Community" have only limited value for today's psychiatric hospital. Even less significant contributions have been made by the antipsychiatric movement or the Marxist-inspired reformers of the last decades. Only that is therapeutic which in the final analysis helps the patient to cope successfully with reality. Even today the use of involuntary measures-seclusion and medication etc. remain a necessary tool for the treatment of some patients. As every institution is always part of a public or private structure, it's authority is always bridled by these. Ethical clinical psychiatry requires an ethical political state, if it is not to become it's henchman. Even in democratic countries problems may arise around involuntary hospitalization, the care of psychiatrically ill criminals or the legalities around medicating the uncooperative psychotic

  16. Ending preventable child deaths in South Africa: What role can ward-based outreach teams play?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Tanya; Kroon, Max; Rhoda, Natasha; Sanders, David

    2016-07-01

    South Africa (SA) has emerged from the Millennium Development Goal era with a mixture of success and failure. The successful national scale-up of prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV services with increasingly efficacious antiretroviral regimens has reduced the mother-to-child transmission rate dramatically; however, over the same period there appears to have been no progress in coverage of high-impact interventions for pneumonia and diarrhoea, which are now leading causes of under-5 mortality. SA embarked on a strategy to re-engineer the primary healthcare system in 2011, which included the creation of ward-based outreach teams consisting of community health workers (CHWs). In this article we argue that the proposed ratio of CHWs to population is too low for public health impact and that the role and scope of CHWs should be extended beyond giving of health information to include assessment and treatment of childhood illnesses (particularly diarrhoea and suspected pneumonia). Evidence and experience amply demonstrate that CHWs in sufficient density can have a rapid and positive impact on neonatal and young child mortality, especially when they are allowed to treat common acute conditions. SA's mediocre performance in child survival could be dramatically improved if there were more CHWs who were allowed to do more. PMID:27384356

  17. Ending preventable child deaths in South Africa: What role can ward-based outreach teams play?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Tanya; Kroon, Max; Rhoda, Natasha; Sanders, David

    2016-07-01

    South Africa (SA) has emerged from the Millennium Development Goal era with a mixture of success and failure. The successful national scale-up of prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV services with increasingly efficacious antiretroviral regimens has reduced the mother-to-child transmission rate dramatically; however, over the same period there appears to have been no progress in coverage of high-impact interventions for pneumonia and diarrhoea, which are now leading causes of under-5 mortality. SA embarked on a strategy to re-engineer the primary healthcare system in 2011, which included the creation of ward-based outreach teams consisting of community health workers (CHWs). In this article we argue that the proposed ratio of CHWs to population is too low for public health impact and that the role and scope of CHWs should be extended beyond giving of health information to include assessment and treatment of childhood illnesses (particularly diarrhoea and suspected pneumonia). Evidence and experience amply demonstrate that CHWs in sufficient density can have a rapid and positive impact on neonatal and young child mortality, especially when they are allowed to treat common acute conditions. SA's mediocre performance in child survival could be dramatically improved if there were more CHWs who were allowed to do more.

  18. Psychiatric Aspects of Childhood Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Pattanayak, Raman Deep; Sagar, Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    How to Cite this Article: Pattanayak RD, Sagar R. Psychiatric Aspects of Childhood Epilepsy. Iran J Child Neurol 2012;6(2):9-18.Childhood epilepsy is a chronic, recurrent disorder of unprovoked seizures. Theonset of epilepsy in childhood has significant implications for brain growth anddevelopment. Seizures may impair the ongoing neurodevelopmental processes and compromise the child’s intellectual and cognitive functioning, leading totremendous cognitive, behavioral and psychosocial consequen...

  19. Imaging genetics and psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, R; Ohi, K; Yamamori, H; Yasuda, Y; Fujimoto, M; Umeda-Yano, S; Watanabe, Y; Fukunaga, M; Takeda, M

    2015-01-01

    Imaging genetics is an integrated research method that uses neuroimaging and genetics to assess the impact of genetic variation on brain function and structure. Imaging genetics is both a tool for the discovery of risk genes for psychiatric disorders and a strategy for characterizing the neural systems affected by risk gene variants to elucidate quantitative and mechanistic aspects of brain function implicated in psychiatric disease. Early studies of imaging genetics included association analyses between brain morphology and single nucleotide polymorphisms whose function is well known, such as catechol-Omethyltransferase (COMT) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). GWAS of psychiatric disorders have identified genes with unknown functions, such as ZNF804A, and imaging genetics has been used to investigate clues of the biological function of these genes. The difficulty in replicating the findings of studies with small sample sizes has motivated the creation of largescale collaborative consortiums, such as ENIGMA, CHARGE and IMAGEN, to collect thousands of images. In a genome-wide association study, the ENIGMA consortium successfully identified common variants in the genome associated with hippocampal volume at 12q24, and the CHARGE consortium replicated this finding. The new era of imaging genetics has just begun, and the next challenge we face is the discovery of small effect size signals from large data sets obtained from genetics and neuroimaging. New methods and technologies for data reduction with appropriate statistical thresholds, such as polygenic analysis and parallel independent component analysis (ICA), are warranted. Future advances in imaging genetics will aid in the discovery of genes and provide mechanistic insight into psychiatric disorders.

  20. PSYCHIATRIC COMORBIDITY IN FORENSIC PSYCHIATRY

    OpenAIRE

    Žarkovic Palijan, Tija; Mužinić, Lana; Radeljak, Sanja

    2009-01-01

    For the past several years a numerous studies in the field of forensic psychiatry confirmed a close relationship between violent offenders and comorbid substance abuse. The comorbid substance abuse in violent offenders was usually unrecognized and misdiagnosed. Furthermore, comorbidity in forensic psychiatry describes the co-occurrence of two or more conditions or psychiatric disorder known in the literature as dual diagnosis and defined by World Health Organization (WHO). In fact, many vi...

  1. Psychiatric classification and subjective experience

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    This article does not directly consider the feelings and emotions that occur in mental illness. Rather, it concerns a higher level methodological question: To what extent is an analysis of feelings and felt emotions of importance for psychiatric classification? Some claim that producing a phenomenologically informed descriptive psychopathology is a prerequisite for serious taxonomic endeavor. Others think that classifications of mental disorders may ignore subjective experience. A middle view...

  2. Psychiatric Thoughts in Ancient India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Abhyankar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of the literature regarding psychiatric thoughts in ancient India is attempted. Besides interesting reading, many of the concepts are still relevant and can be used in day-to-day practice especially towards healthy and happy living. Certain concepts are surprisingly contemporary and valid today. They can be used in psychotherapy and counselling and for promoting mental health. However, the description and classification of mental illness is not in tune with modern psychiatry.

  3. Clinical ethics ward rounds: building on the core curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Lisa; Watts, Lisa; Scicluna, Helen

    2012-08-01

    The clinical years of medical student education are an ideal time for students to practise and refine ethical thinking and behaviour. We piloted a new clinical ethics teaching activity this year with undergraduate medical students within the Rural Clinical School at the University of New South Wales. We used a modified teaching ward round model, with students bringing deidentified cases of ethical interest for round-table discussion. We found that students were more engaged in the subject of clinical ethics after attending the teaching sessions and particularly appreciated having structured time to listen to and learn from their peers. Despite this, we found no change in student involvement in managing or planning action in situations that they find ethically challenging. A key challenge for educators in clinical ethics is to address the barriers that prevent students taking action.

  4. Christmas cards workshop in a Restricted Access Ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa García

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The Christmas cards workshop is an intervention study made in the Restricted Access Ward (RAW of Hospital Gregorio Marañón (Madrid, in December 2001, from the 5th to the 22nd. The object of this study was to assess the effectiveness of this workshop to improve the quality of the RAW patients´ hospital day, through their participation. They made 47 cards, the mean per patient was 1,52. Participation: 91,2% of the patients that fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Drawings and texts alluded to the convict´s perspective of Christmas time, from their own experience. The Christmas cards were exhibited in the hospital and they also were sent to different penitentiary institutions in Madrid, to make the RAW known. The course “Education for health for interdisciplinary projects in penitentiary institutions” was the frame of this workshop.

  5. Nursing safety management in onco-hematology pediatric wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelle Miranda da Silva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at identifying how safety management is applied by nurses to manage the nursing care, and at analyzing their challenges in onco-hematology pediatric wards. Descriptive and qualitative research, conducted at the Instituto Estadual de Hematologia Arthur de Siqueira Cavalcanti, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in August 2013. Six nurses were interviewed, and the content analysis was used. The key aspects relate to the importance of training and continuing education, teamwork, with the challenges in the care of hospitalized children and particularities of the disease, and the systematization, use of instruments and protocols. For child safety, the relationship between the administration and support is critical to the quality of care.

  6. The full Ward-Takahashi Identity for colored tensor models

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Sánchez, Carlos I

    2016-01-01

    We derive the full $\\mathrm{U}(\\infty)$-Ward-Takahashi Identities for random colored tensor models. The strategy is to expand the free energy in boundary graphs that determine the combinatorics of the sources. This contributes to the organization of the correlation functions of colored tensor models and is carried out for arbitrary interactions of any rank, $D$, with subsequent focus on the $\\varphi^4$-theories. The result is that the boundary sector of quartic melonic interactions suffices to generate all $D$-colored graphs. For the rank-$3$ $\\varphi^4$-theory we derive the exact integral-like equation for the 2-point function. Our results hold for some Group Field Theories as well. Altogether, our non-perturbative approach trades graph theory for analytical methods.

  7. Ward identities and gauge independence in general chiral gauge theories

    CERN Document Server

    Anselmi, Damiano

    2015-01-01

    Using the Batalin-Vilkovisky formalism, we study the Ward identities and the equations of gauge dependence in potentially anomalous general gauge theories, renormalizable or not. A crucial new term, absent in manifestly nonanomalous theories, is responsible for interesting effects. We prove that gauge invariance always implies gauge independence, which in turn ensures perturbative unitarity. Precisely, we consider potentially anomalous theories that are actually free of gauge anomalies thanks to the Adler-Bardeen theorem. We show that when we make a canonical transformation on the tree-level action, it is always possible to re-renormalize the divergences and re-fine-tune the finite local counterterms, so that the renormalized $\\Gamma $ functional of the transformed theory is also free of gauge anomalies, and is related to the renormalized $\\Gamma $ functional of the starting theory by a canonical transformation. An unexpected consequence of our results is that the beta functions of the couplings may depend on...

  8. Tobacco and psychiatric dual disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Noni A; Frost-Pineda, Kimberly; Gold, Mark S

    2007-01-01

    Smoking is a leading cause of morbidity and premature mortality in the United States. The relationship between tobacco smoking and several forms of cancer, heart disease, stroke, chronic lung disease, and other medical diseases is well recognized and accepted. Recent epidemiological studies are now focusing on the link between tobacco use and psychiatric diseases. Experts now suggest that in the differential diagnosis of "smoker," depression, alcohol dependence, and schizophrenia are highest on the list. Studies are also focusing on the role of secondhand tobacco exposure, either in utero or during childhood, in the risk of dual disorders. Prenatal exposure may alter gene expression and change the risk for a variety of life-long psychiatric diseases, e.g., ADD/ADHD, antisocial personality disorders, substance use disorders, and major depression. Considerable time and effort have been devoted to studying the link between smoking and depression and also schizophrenia. We will focus on less well-studied areas in tobacco use and psychiatric dual disorders (including eating disorders), prenatal and early childhood secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure, and the relationship to the genesis of these dual disorders. PMID:19283970

  9. Adult Neurogenesis and Psychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eunchai; Wen, Zhexing; Song, Hongjun; Christian, Kimberly M; Ming, Guo-Li

    2016-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders continue to be among the most challenging disorders to diagnose and treat because there is no single genetic or anatomical locus that is causative for the disease. Current treatments are often blunt tools used to ameliorate the most severe symptoms, at the risk of disrupting functional neural systems. There is a critical need to develop new therapeutic strategies that can target circumscribed functional or anatomical domains of pathology. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis may be one such domain. Here, we review the evidence suggesting that adult hippocampal neurogenesis plays a role in emotional regulation and forms of learning and memory that include temporal and spatial memory encoding and context discrimination, and that its dysregulation is associated with psychiatric disorders, such as affective disorders, schizophrenia, and drug addiction. Further, adult neurogenesis has proven to be an effective model to investigate basic processes of neuronal development and converging evidence suggests that aberrant neural development may be an etiological factor, even in late-onset diseases. Constitutive neurogenesis in the hippocampus of the mature brain reflects large-scale plasticity unique to this region and could be a potential hub for modulation of a subset of cognitive and affective behaviors that are affected by multiple psychiatric disorders. PMID:26801682

  10. Cross Infection in a Hospital Ward and Deposition of Particles Exhaled from a Source Manikin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Li, Yuguo; Buus, Morten;

    2009-01-01

    The cross infection in a hospital ward is studied. Deposition of particles exhaled from a source manikin is investigated in a full-scale hospital ward ventilated by downward directed ventilation. Deposition on vertical surfaces close to the source shows distribution of particles directed upwards...

  11. Mobile and fixed computer use by doctors and nurses on hospital wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Pia; Lindgaard, Anne-Mette; Prgomet, M.;

    2009-01-01

    , clinical task, and selection of a computer hardware device in hospital wards. METHODS: Twenty-seven nurses and eight doctors were observed for a total of 80 hours as they used a range of computing devices to access a computerized provider order entry system on two wards at a major Sydney teaching hospital...

  12. Validation of a checklist to assess ward round performance in internal medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Kirsten; Ringsted, Charlotte; Dolmans, Diana

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ward rounds are an essential responsibility for doctors in hospital settings. Tools for guiding and assessing trainees' performance of ward rounds are needed. A checklist was developed for that purpose for use with trainees in internal medicine. OBJECTIVE: To assess the content and co...

  13. An Abelian Ward identity and the vertex corrections to the color superconducting gap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Hao-Jie; WANG Qun

    2009-01-01

    We derive an Abelian-like Ward identity in the color superconducting phase and calculate vertex corrections to the color superconducting gap. Making use of the Ward identity, we show that subleading order contributions to the gap from vertices are absent for gapped excitations.

  14. Acute Psychosis Associated with Subcortical Stroke: Comparison between Basal Ganglia and Mid-Brain Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Aaron McMurtray; Ben Tseng; Natalie Diaz; Julia Chung; Bijal Mehta; Erin Saito

    2014-01-01

    Acute onset of psychosis in an older or elderly individual without history of previous psychiatric disorders should prompt a thorough workup for neurologic causes of psychiatric symptoms. This report compares and contrasts clinical features of new onset of psychotic symptoms between two patients, one with an acute basal ganglia hemorrhagic stroke and another with an acute mid-brain ischemic stroke. Delusions and hallucinations due to basal ganglia lesions are theorized to develop as a result ...

  15. Psychiatric and Medical Management of Marijuana Intoxication in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bui, Quan M.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We use a case report to describe the acute psychiatric and medical management of marijuana intoxication in the emergency setting. A 34-year-old woman presented with erratic, disruptive behavior and psychotic symptoms after recreational ingestion of edible cannabis. She was also found to have mild hypokalemia and QT interval prolongation. Psychiatric management of cannabis psychosis involves symptomatic treatment and maintenance of safety during detoxification. Acute medical complications of marijuana use are primarily cardiovascular and respiratory in nature; electrolyte and electrocardiogram monitoring is indicated. This patient’s psychosis, hypokalemia and prolonged QTc interval resolved over two days with supportive treatment and minimal intervention in the emergency department. Patients with cannabis psychosis are at risk for further psychotic sequelae. Emergency providers may reduce this risk through appropriate diagnosis, acute treatment, and referral for outpatient care. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(3:414–417.

  16. Psychiatric and medical management of marijuana intoxication in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Quan M; Simpson, Scott; Nordstrom, Kimberly

    2015-05-01

    We use a case report to describe the acute psychiatric and medical management of marijuana intoxication in the emergency setting. A 34-year-old woman presented with erratic, disruptive behavior and psychotic symptoms after recreational ingestion of edible cannabis. She was also found to have mild hypokalemia and QT interval prolongation. Psychiatric management of cannabis psychosis involves symptomatic treatment and maintenance of safety during detoxification. Acute medical complications of marijuana use are primarily cardiovascular and respiratory in nature; electrolyte and electrocardiogram monitoring is indicated. This patient's psychosis, hypokalemia and prolonged QTc interval resolved over two days with supportive treatment and minimal intervention in the emergency department. Patients with cannabis psychosis are at risk for further psychotic sequelae. Emergency providers may reduce this risk through appropriate diagnosis, acute treatment, and referral for outpatient care. PMID:25987916

  17. The Brazilian psychiatric reform: historical and technical-supportive aspects of experiences carried out in the cities of São Paulo, Santos and Campinas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Amélia Luzio

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian psychiatric reform: historical and technical-supportive aspects of experiences carried out in the cities of São Paulo (capital, Santos and Campinas, in order to understand their material, social and political impacts, the progress in the process of breaking away from the psychiatric ward model, and the establishment of creative and productive groups, required to build up the psychosocial treatment in regard to mental health, as well as to evaluate the contribution that the SUS (Brazilian Public Health System had on the psychiatric reform in the mentioned cities. The research, which is the basis of this paper, is part of a thesis regarding mental health care, whereby the innovative projects implemented in those cities served as framework and basis for comparison to analyze mental health policy in small and medium-sized cities and towns in the state of São Paulo.

  18. Sociodemographic characteristics and frequency of psychiatric disorders in Turkish pilgrims attended to psychiatry outpatient clinics during Hajj

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şakir Özen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The psychiatric problems of pilgrims fromnon-Arabic speaking countries have not been investigatedsufficiently. The aim of this study was to investigate thefrequency of psychiatric disorders and socio-demographiccharacteristics of Turkish pilgrims in psychiatry departmentof Turkish Mecca Hospital.Methods: A detailed psychiatric interview was performedon 294 Turkish Pilgrims who attended the outpatient clinicof the psychiatric unit at the Turkish hospital in Mecca,Saudi Arabia, during 2008 Hajj period. Information wascollected by using a semi-structured form and the patients’diagnoses were done according to the DSM-IV-TRcriteria.Results: The study group consisted of 175 women (59.5% and 119 men (40.5 % with the mean age of 53.0±13years. A total of 71 % patients had not traveled abroadpreviously, and 60% had received a former psychiatrictreatment. The commonest disorders were found asdepression (26.5%, adjustment disorder with anxiety(16.3% and panic disorder (14% in the patients. Anxietydisorders alone or co-morbid with any other psychiatricdisorder were found in 49% of the patients. Nine percentof the patients had symptoms of acute psychosis, schizophrenia,dementia or mania which could prevent pilgrimsfrom performing Hajj rituals. Suicide attempt, alcohol andillicit drug use were not detected.Conclusions: Previous psychiatric admission and absenceof any foreign travel experience were commonamong Turkish pilgrims who had sought psychiatric helpduring the Hajj. Psychiatric disorders seems to be relatedwith older age, low educational level, and having previousmedical and psychiatric problems.

  19. [Psychiatric rehabilitation from the viewpoint of a large psychiatric facility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregor, R

    1990-06-01

    The paper makes the reader familiar with the results of activities of the central rehabilitation department in the Psychiatric Sanatorium in Kromĕríz. It postulates views regarding the technique of work with patients and pays special attention to the rehabilitation of patients with schizophrenic psychosis. In these patients the results of rehabilitation care at different rating levels were evaluated. In the field of ergotherapy the schizophrenic patients were evaluated by the therapists and instructors of occupational therapy on entry of and departure from the workshop or class, using the Engelsman--Hájek scale. Based on the results the hypothesis was confirmed of a lower working performance of patients with schizophrenic psychosis, as compared with other diagnostic groups. In the field of remedial exercise and special forms of psychiatric rehabilitation, such as educational and recreational activities, patients with schizophrenic psychosis were evaluated by a doctor and psychologist of the rehabilitation department of the psychiatric sanatorium for after--treatment of psychoses. The patients were evaluated by Wing's scale for chronic schizophrenia and by means of the Scale for Evaluation of Working Performance and Behaviour. According to the results of both scales no significant differences were found between the experimental groups where different forms of rehabilitation were accentuated, as compared with the control group engaged only in occupational therapy. Both scales revealed in both experimental groups highly significant improvement as regards resocialization within a very short period during which the patients were subjected to intense rehabilitation. Based on these results the author recommends further rehabilitation provisions. PMID:2225189

  20. Non-invasive mechanic ventilation in treating acute respiratory failure

    OpenAIRE

    Federico Lari; Novella Scandellari; Ferdinando De Maria; Virna Zecchi; Gianpaolo Bragagni; Fabrizio Giostra; Nicola DiBattista

    2009-01-01

    Non invasive ventilation (NIV) in acute respiratory failure (ARF) improve clinical parameters, arterial blood gases, decrease mortality and endo tracheal intubation (ETI) rate also outside the intensive care units (ICUs). Objective of this study is to verify applicability of NIV in a general non respiratory medical ward. We enrolled 68 consecutive patients (Pts) with Hypoxemic or Hyper capnic ARF: acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema (ACPE), exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease ...

  1. “They can do whatever they want”: Meanings of receiving psychiatric care based on a common staff approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Enarsson

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This study deepens our understanding of how patients, when cared for in a psychiatric ward, experience situations that involve being handled according to a common staff approach. Interviews with nine former psychiatric in-patients were analyzed using a phenomenological–hermeneutic method to illuminate the lived experience of receiving care based on a common staff approach. The results revealed several meanings: discovering that you are as subjected to a common staff approach, becoming aware that no one cares, becoming aware that your freedom is restricted, being afflicted, becoming aware that a common staff approach is not applied by all staff, and feeling safe because someone else is responsible. The comprehensive understanding was that the patient's understanding of being cared for according to a common staff approach was to be seen and treated in accordance with others’ beliefs and valuations, not in line with the patients’ own self-image, while experiencing feelings of affliction.

  2. A STUDY OF PSYCHIATRIC FACTORS IN PATIENTS PRESENTED WITH ATTEMPTED SUICIDE IN A STATE CAPITAL MEDICAL COLLEGE HOSPITAL IN CENTRAL INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Suicide is one of the commonest psychiatric emergencies. According to WHO report, 1999 suicide was one of the top three leading causes of death among people aged 15-34 years in all countries. In recent years, attempted suicide has become the focus of research as it has been found to be the predictor of suicide. Psychiatric factors are one of the important determinants in attempted suicide. OBEJCTIVES The aim of the present study was to analyse the psychiatric factors in attempted suicide. METHODS The present study was conducted in the Department of Medicine and Department of Psychiatry, Gandhi Medical College and associated Hamidia Hospital Bhopal. Study based on the patients admitted in Medicine/Psychiatry ward or attending Out Patients Department with history of suicidal attempts, during the period December 2006 to November 2007. RESULTS Psychiatric disorders were present in 74.25%, while no psychiatric disorder was present in rest of 25.75%. CONCLUSION Major depressive disorder accounting for 34.69% cases, was the most common concurrent psychiatric illness among the study group.

  3. The day-to-day acute effect of wake therapy in patients with major depression using the HAM-D6 as primary outcome measure: results from a randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Martiny

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This paper reports day-to-day data for from a one-week intervention phase, part of a 9-weeks randomised parallel study with patient having major depression (data from weekly visits have been reported. Wake therapy (sleep deprivation has an established antidepressant effect with onset of action within hours. Deterioration on the following night's sleep is, however, common, and we used daily light therapy and sleep time stabilisation as a preventive measure. In particular, we evaluated the day-to-day acute effect of and tolerance to sleep deprivation and examined predictors of response. METHODS: Patients were assessed at psychiatric inpatient wards. In the wake group (n = 36, patients did three wake therapies in combination with light therapy each morning together with sleep time stabilisation. In the exercise group (n = 38, patients did daily exercise. Hamilton subscale scores were primary outcome (not blinded, secondary outcome was self-assessment data from the Preskorn scale and sleep. RESULTS: Patients in the wake therapy group had an immediate, large, stable, and statistically significant better antidepressant effect than patients in the exercise group with response rates at day5 of 75.0%/25.1% and remission rates of 58.6%/6.0%, respectively. The response and remission rates were diminished at day8 with response rates of 41.9%/10.1% and remission rates of 19.4%/4.7%, respectively. Patients and ward personnel found the method applicable with few side effects. Positive diurnal variation (mood better in the evening predicted a larger response to wake therapy. In the wake group napping on days after intervention predicted greater deterioration on day8. CONCLUSIONS: The intervention induced an acute antidepressant response without relapse between wake nights but with a diminishing effect after intervention. Development is still needed to secure maintenance of response. Avoiding napping in the days after wake therapy is

  4. Feasibility of Progressive Strength Training Implemented in the Acute Ward after Hip Fracture Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Lise; Bandholm, Thomas; Palm, Henrik;

    2014-01-01

    . RESULTS: The strength training was commenced at a mean of 2.4 (0.7) days after surgery. The training loads (kilograms lifted) increased from 1.6 (0.8) to 4.3 (1.7) kg over 4.3 (2.2) training sessions (P

  5. Relatives' view on collaboration with nurses in acute wards: development and testing of a new measure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt, Tove; Nyberg, Per; Hallberg, Ingalill Rahm

    2008-01-01

    , before testing it among 156 relatives. Construct validity was assessed by principal component analysis and test for correlation between factors. Predictive validity was assessed by comparing factor scores with scores in outcome measures. Internal consistency was assessed by Cronbach's alpha for factors...... Cronbach's alpha values between .83 and .94. Correlation between factors showed coefficients between .16 and .60. Item-to-total correlation values ranged between .34 and .83 and mean inter-item-correlation coefficients between .40 and .56. Predictive validity was indicated. Systematic internal dropout...

  6. Establishment of a local psychiatric service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, A G

    1981-01-01

    The Faroe Islands are a group of islands in the North Atlantic Ocean between Norway and Iceland inhabited by about 42,000 people. They are considered a nation with home rule within the Danish Kingdom. A Psychiatric Department was not established on the islands until 1969. Before this, psychiatric...... of senile psychoses. The total increase amounts to 2.4 times the admission rates of psychiatric cases to the General Hospital and 4.4 times the admission rates to the Psychiatric Hospital in Nykøbing in the last years prior to the start of the local service. The outpatient department has grown steadily...

  7. Martyrs of the psychiatric hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serra Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on the history of an Italian psychiatric hospital (Arezzo that closed in 1989 and was turned into a university. The illegal and inhumane treatment in asylum-type institutions is condemned. In particular the treatment of those patients who, according to the analysis, hospital directors referred to as “social cases.” These individuals did not stay in hospital because of health problems but only due to the lack of social care by the state. AS a consequence they are condemned to be “prisoners” without committing any crimes.

  8. Psychiatric Emergencies in the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, Veronica; Kalra, S; Galwankar, Sagar; Sagar, Galwankar

    2015-11-01

    With the increasing life expectancy, the geriatric population has been increasing over the past few decades. By the year 2050, it is projected to compose more than a fifth of the entire population, representing a 147% increase in this age group. There has been a steady increase in the number of medical and psychiatric disorders, and a large percentage of geriatric patients are now presenting to the emergency department with such disorders. The management of our progressively complex geriatric patient population will require an integrative team approach involving emergency medicine, psychiatry, and hospitalist medicine.

  9. GENERAL PRACTITIONERS' ATTITUDE TOWARDS PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS AND PSYCHIATRIC PATIENTS: A SURVEY OF JAIPUR CITY

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Ishwar Dayal; Gautam, Shiv; Kamal, Preet

    1992-01-01

    A survey of 40 randomly selected general practitioners was carried out to find out their attitudes towards psychiatric disorders and psychiatric patients by administering a specially designed proforma which recorded sociodemographic characteristics as well as attitudes. Majority of GPs were of the opinion that psychiatric disorders are inherited, can occur in any normal person living under stress, are treatable. They had positive attitude towards psychiatric illness but showed more social dis...

  10. Holomorphic Vector Bundles Corresponding to some Soliton Solutions of the Ward Equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holomorphic vector bundles corresponding to the static soliton solution of the Ward equation were explicitly presented by Ward in terms of a meromorphic framing. Bundles (for simplicity, “bundle” is to be taken throughout to mean “holomorphic vector bundle”) corresponding to all Ward k-soliton solutions whose extended solutions have only simple poles, and some Ward 2-soliton solutions whose extended solutions have only a second-order pole, were explicitly described by us in a previous paper. In this paper, we go on to present some bundles corresponding to soliton-antisoliton solutions of the Ward equation, and Ward 3-soliton solutions whose extended solutions have a simple pole and a double pole. To give some more interpretation of the bundles, we study the second Chern number of the corresponded bundles and find that it can be obtained directly from the patching matrices. We also point out some information about bundles corresponding to Ward soliton solutions whose extended solutions have general pole data at the end of the paper

  11. Students' Perceptions on an Interprofessional Ward Round Training – A Qualitative Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikendei, C.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ward rounds are an essential activity for interprofessional teams in hospital settings and represent complex tasks requiring not only medical knowledge but also communication skills, clinical technical skills, patient management skills and team-work skills. The present study aimed to analyse final year students’, nurses’ as well as physiotherapists’ views on a simulation-based interprofessional ward round training.Methods: In two successive passes a total number of 29 final year students, nursing students and physiotherapy students (16 in the first run, 13 in the second volunteered to participate in two standardized patient ward round scenarios: (1 patient with myocardial infarction, and (2 patient with poorly controlled diabetes. Views on the interprofessional ward round training were assessed using focus groups.Results: Focus group based feedback contained two main categories (A ward round training benefits and (B difficulties. Positive aspects enfolded course preparation, setting of the training, the involvement of the participants during training and the positive learning atmosphere. Difficulties were seen in the flawed atmosphere and realization of ward rounds in the daily clinical setting with respect to inter-professional aspects, and course benefit for the different professional groups.Conclusion: The presented inter-professional ward round training represents a well received and valuable model of interprofessional learning. Further research should assess its effectiveness, processes of interprofessional interplay and transfer into clinical practice.

  12. Holomorphic Vector Bundles Corresponding to some Soliton Solutions of the Ward Equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiujuan, E-mail: yzzhuxiujuan@sina.com [Jiangsu Second Normal University, School of Mathematics and Information Technology (China)

    2015-12-15

    Holomorphic vector bundles corresponding to the static soliton solution of the Ward equation were explicitly presented by Ward in terms of a meromorphic framing. Bundles (for simplicity, “bundle” is to be taken throughout to mean “holomorphic vector bundle”) corresponding to all Ward k-soliton solutions whose extended solutions have only simple poles, and some Ward 2-soliton solutions whose extended solutions have only a second-order pole, were explicitly described by us in a previous paper. In this paper, we go on to present some bundles corresponding to soliton-antisoliton solutions of the Ward equation, and Ward 3-soliton solutions whose extended solutions have a simple pole and a double pole. To give some more interpretation of the bundles, we study the second Chern number of the corresponded bundles and find that it can be obtained directly from the patching matrices. We also point out some information about bundles corresponding to Ward soliton solutions whose extended solutions have general pole data at the end of the paper.

  13. ASD, a Psychiatric Disorder, or Both? Psychiatric Diagnoses in Adolescents with High-Functioning ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazefsky, Carla A.; Oswald, Donald P.; Day, Taylor N.; Eack, Shaun M.; Minshew, Nancy J.; Lainhart, Janet E.

    2012-01-01

    Varied presentations of emotion dysregulation in autism complicate diagnostic decision making and may lead to inaccurate psychiatric diagnoses or delayed autism diagnosis for high-functioning children. This pilot study aimed to determine the concordance between prior psychiatric diagnoses and the results of an autism-specific psychiatric interview…

  14. Nursing care process for releasing psychiatric inpatients from long-term seclusion in Japan: modified grounded theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Yutaka; Hasegawa, Masami

    2014-09-01

    Based on a modified grounded theory approach, in this study, we sought to elucidate the nursing care process used to guide psychiatric inpatients in long-term seclusion towards release from seclusion. Participant observations and interviews were conducted with a total of 18 nurses from three long-term psychiatric wards at two institutions from September 2011 to November 2012, to collect data on the nursing care they provided for psychiatric patients in long-term seclusion. Consequently, four categories and 15 concepts were extracted. The nurses viewed "a mature therapeutic environment that utilizes flexible apportionment of care" as the foundation (i.e. the core category) in guiding psychiatric inpatients towards release from long-term seclusion. The results revealed a care structure in which nurses in such a treatment environment provided care by flexible apportionment of three types of care: care aimed at avoiding mental and physical exhaustion, standardized care that does not confer a disadvantage to patients, and immediately responding to prevent problematic behaviors.

  15. [Mental capacity of psychiatric patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kevin Chien-Chang

    2010-12-01

    Nearly every society maintains legal norms that define those members of society qualified to participate in social affairs. Mental capacity and legal competence are deemed necessary conditions for legal actions to have legal validity. On Nov. 23, 2009, newly revised adult guardianship provisions came into effect in Taiwan. However, there has been lack of discussion with regard to how assessments of mental capacity and legal competence should be conducted on psychiatric patients. This paper reviewed relevant overseas literature on this subject and followed common practice in separating legal mental capacity into causal and functional components. The causal component predicates the diseases and illnesses that render the disability, while the functional component represents legally substantial impairments in terms of cognition, emotion and behavior. The paper explored functional component contents, including finance management, individual health care, independence in daily life, interpersonal relationships and communing. Findings pointed out that in setting up competence standards, a trade-off between respect for autonomy and beneficence is unavoidable. As Taiwan does not have rich empirical data on competence assessments and decisions, collaboration between the legal and psychiatric professions is recommended to engage in relevant research to enhance legal consistencies and the science of competence assessment.

  16. Psychotherapy in Contemporary Psychiatric Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjipavlou, George; Hernandez, Carlos A Sierra; Ogrodniczuk, John S

    2015-01-01

    Objective: American data suggest a declining trend in the provision of psychotherapy by psychiatrists. Nevertheless, the extent to which such findings generalize to psychiatric practice in other countries is unclear. We surveyed psychiatrists in British Columbia to examine whether the reported decline in psychotherapy provision extends to the landscape of Canadian psychiatric practice. Method: A survey was mailed to the entire population of fully licensed psychiatrists registered in British Columbia (n = 623). The survey consisted of 30 items. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the sample and psychotherapy practice patterns. Associations between variables were evaluated using nonparametric tests. Results: A total of 423 psychiatrists returned the survey, yielding a response rate of 68%. Overall, 80.9% of psychiatrists (n = 342) reported practicing psychotherapy. A decline in the provision of psychotherapy was not observed; in fact, there was an increase in psychotherapy provision among psychiatrists entering practice in the last 10 years. Individual therapy was the predominant format used by psychiatrists. The most common primary theoretical orientation was psychodynamic (29.9%). Regarding actual practice, supportive psychotherapy was practiced most frequently. Professional time constraints were perceived as the most significant barrier to providing psychotherapy. The majority (85%) of clinicians did not view remuneration as a significant barrier to treating patients with psychotherapy. Conclusions: Our findings challenge the prevailing view that psychotherapy is in decline among psychiatrists. Psychiatrists in British Columbia continue to integrate psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy in clinical practice, thus preserving their unique place in the spectrum of mental health services. PMID:26175328

  17. Time Perception and Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Ceviz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Time perception is an ability which we use in every moment of daily life, that guides the formation and continuation of our behaviors and from an evolutionary perspective ensures survival. Internal clock models help us to understand time perception. Time perception is known to vary between individuals and particular situations. This variability is explained with the mechanisms which is associated with the processes related to attention, the speed of the internal clock and the memory unit. It is suggested that time perception is mainly associated with the activities of dopamine and acetylcholine. Some dopaminergic psychoactive substances like cocaine and amphetamine have all been shown to change time perception by increasing the speed of internal clock while on the other hand some antipsychotic drugs make an opposite change in time perception by descreasing the speed of the clock. Similarly, time perception is affected in some psychiatric disorders and an ethiopathological relationship between time perception disturbances and psychiatric disorders is suggested. In this article time perception changes in schizophrenia, attention deficit/hyperactivity syndrome, depression, anxiety disorders and personality disorders are briefly reviewed.

  18. Psychiatric disorders and sexual dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldinger, Marcel D

    2015-01-01

    Sexual problems are highly prevalent among patients with psychiatric disorders. They may be caused by the psychopathology of the psychiatric disorder but also by its pharmacotherapy. Both positive symptoms (e.g., psychosis, hallucinations) as well as negative symptoms (e.g., anhedonia) of schizophrenia may negatively interfere with interpersonal and sexual relationships. Atypical antipsychotics have fewer sexual side-effects than the classic antipsychotics. Mood disorders may affect libido, sexual arousal, orgasm, and erectile function. With the exception of bupropion, agomelatine, mirtazapine, vortioxetine, amineptine, and moclobemide, all antidepressants cause sexual side-effects. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may particularly delay ejaculation and female orgasm, but also can cause decreased libido and erectile difficulties. SSRI-induced sexual side-effects are dose-dependent and reversible. Very rarely, their sexual side-effects persist after SSRI discontinuation. This is often preceded by genital anesthesia. Some personality characteristics are a risk factor for sexual dysfunction. Also patients with eating disorders may suffer from sexual difficulties. So far, research into psychotropic-induced sexual side-effects suffers from substantial methodologic limitations. Patients tend not to talk with their clinician about their sexual life. Psychiatrists and other doctors need to take the initiative to talk about the patient's sexual life in order to become informed about potential medication-induced sexual difficulties. PMID:26003261

  19. Acute Dystonia Due to Citalopram Treatment: A Case Series

    OpenAIRE

    Moosavi, S. Mohammad; Ahmadi, Mahshid; Monajemi, Mani B.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Abnormal movements such as acute dystonia, dyskinesia, parkinsonism, exacerbation of Parkinson disease, akathisia and possibly neuroleptic malignant syndrome may be associated with the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) rarely. Citalopram, a typical SSRI, used in serotonergic dysfunction related disorders, potentially can cause extrapyramidal symptoms such as acute dystonia. Methods: In a retrospective survey on patients referred to psychiatric clinic between...

  20. Cannabis abuse : a phenomenological study of the causative factors as perceived by patients with a history of Cannabis use, admitted at Bophelong Psychiatric Hospital in the North West Province / Boitumelo Susan Patricia Ramphomane

    OpenAIRE

    Ramphomane, Boitumelo Susan Patricia

    2005-01-01

    A phenomenological study was carried out to find out from patients with a history of cannabis use. admitted at Bophelong Psychiatric Hospital, reasons or factors that caused them to use/abuse cannabis. An original sample of 30 male patients between the ages of 16-30 years was selected from chronic (rehabilitation) wards of mentally stable patients awaiting discharge. Out of the 30 subjects, 10 protocols were selected for phenomenological explication. An unstructured type of interview was c...

  1. Antimicrobial stewardship: Improving antibiotic prescribing practice in a respiratory ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Jing Ming

    2016-01-01

    International efforts have mandated guidelines on antibiotic use and prescribing, therefore the focus is now on encouraging positive behavioral changes in antibiotic prescribing practice. Documentation of indication and intended duration of antibiotic use in drug charts is an evidence-based method of reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescribing. It is also a standard detailed in our local antimicrobial guidelines. We collected baseline data on compliance with documentation of indication and duration in drug charts in a respiratory ward which revealed compliance rates of 24% and 39% respectively. We introduced interventions to improve accessibility to the guideline and to increase awareness by distributing antibiotic guardian pocket cards with a three-point checklist and strategically-placed mini-posters. We also aim to increase team motivation by obtaining their feedback in multidisciplinary team meetings and by introducing certificates for their involvement in the quality improvement process. The results of the second cycle post-intervention showed an increase in compliance rates for documentation of indication and duration of 97% and 69% respectively. After a further awareness and discussion session at the multidisciplinary team meeting with the local antimicrobial management team audit nurses, a third cycle showed compliance rates of 94% and 71% for indication and duration respectively. This project has highlighted the importance of improving accessibility and of encouraging interventions that would bring about a change in personal value and subsequently in behavior and individual practice. PMID:26893898

  2. Antimicrobial stewardship: Improving antibiotic prescribing practice in a respiratory ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Jing Ming

    2016-01-01

    International efforts have mandated guidelines on antibiotic use and prescribing, therefore the focus is now on encouraging positive behavioral changes in antibiotic prescribing practice. Documentation of indication and intended duration of antibiotic use in drug charts is an evidence-based method of reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescribing. It is also a standard detailed in our local antimicrobial guidelines. We collected baseline data on compliance with documentation of indication and duration in drug charts in a respiratory ward which revealed compliance rates of 24% and 39% respectively. We introduced interventions to improve accessibility to the guideline and to increase awareness by distributing antibiotic guardian pocket cards with a three-point checklist and strategically-placed mini-posters. We also aim to increase team motivation by obtaining their feedback in multidisciplinary team meetings and by introducing certificates for their involvement in the quality improvement process. The results of the second cycle post-intervention showed an increase in compliance rates for documentation of indication and duration of 97% and 69% respectively. After a further awareness and discussion session at the multidisciplinary team meeting with the local antimicrobial management team audit nurses, a third cycle showed compliance rates of 94% and 71% for indication and duration respectively. This project has highlighted the importance of improving accessibility and of encouraging interventions that would bring about a change in personal value and subsequently in behavior and individual practice.

  3. Caring for cancer patients on non-specialist wards.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gill, Finola

    2012-02-01

    As cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide, every nurse will be required to care for patients with the condition at some point in his\\/her career. However, non-specialized oncology nurses are often ill-prepared to nurse patients suffering from cancer. This literature review aims to provide an overview of current trends and developments in cancer care nursing in an attempt to identify the range of previous research pertaining to caring for patients with cancer on non-specialist wards. The review finds that non-specialized cancer nurses report a lack of education and training with regard to cancer care and cancer treatments, which acts as a barrier to providing quality nursing care. Emotional and communication issues with patients and their families can also cause non-specialist nurses significant distress. International research has shown that specialist oncology nurses make a considerable difference to physical and psychosocial patient care. It is therefore paramount that non-speciality nurses\\' educational needs are met to develop clinical competence and to provide supportive holistic care for both patients and their families.

  4. BED UTILIZATION IN CARDIO VASCULAR AND THORACIC SURGERY WARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishtyak

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Of all the subsystems of a hospital, inpatient care occupies prime place in terms of resource consumed, use of specialized technical man power, technology and skill. In spite of the huge investment of money, material and the manpower at times even the basic needs of patients are not met. AIMS: The study was conducted, to observe the average length of stay (ALS of patients in cardio vascular and thoracic Surgery (CVTS ward, and to find out the bed occupancy rate. METHODS: The admission and discharge record of all the patients was recorded from the report books, hospital files of all the patients were checked to know complete biodata. Medical record section was consulted and admission discharge register/files were recorded to know the symptomatology, clinical findings, diagnosis and the management thereof. Mortality and morbidity was recorded from admission files. RESULTS: A total of 732 patients were admitted on a bed complement of 11712 days having 8639 bed days. 84.28% of the patients underwent surgical procedures. Daily average beds occupied were 23.60 beds per day, average length of stay was 11.23 days, and 73.76% was the bed occupancy rate. CONCLUSION: Patients having major operations had more length of stay compared to patients who were admitted after pre anesthetic checkup and full planning from outdoor departments. Preadmission evaluation, pre anesthetic checkup and preventing post-operative morbidity decrease length of stay

  5. Ward identities and gauge independence in general chiral gauge theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmi, Damiano

    2015-07-01

    Using the Batalin-Vilkovisky formalism, we study the Ward identities and the equations of gauge dependence in potentially anomalous general gauge theories, renormalizable or not. A crucial new term, absent in manifestly nonanomalous theories, is responsible for interesting effects. We prove that gauge invariance always implies gauge independence, which in turn ensures perturbative unitarity. Precisely, we consider potentially anomalous theories that are actually free of gauge anomalies thanks to the Adler-Bardeen theorem. We show that when we make a canonical transformation on the tree-level action, it is always possible to re-renormalize the divergences and re-fine-tune the finite local counterterms, so that the renormalized Γ functional of the transformed theory is also free of gauge anomalies, and is related to the renormalized Γ functional of the starting theory by a canonical transformation. An unexpected consequence of our results is that the beta functions of the couplings may depend on the gauge-fixing parameters, although the physical quantities remain gauge independent. We discuss nontrivial checks of high-order calculations based on gauge independence and determine how powerful they are.

  6. Food work and feeding assistance on hospital wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaven, Ben; Bamford, Claire; May, Carl; Moynihan, Paula

    2013-05-01

    Approximately 60 per cent of UK patients aged 65 years or older are at risk of malnutrition or their situation worsening while in hospital. We report the results of a qualitative study embedded in research to prevent malnutrition in older people in hospital (the mappmal study). Our aim was to understand and describe processes that promote or inhibit nutrition in hospital. Throughout 2009 we examined meal services at four UK hospital sites across two regional locations, focusing on older patients admitted with dementia, for stroke or for fractured neck of femur. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with National Health Service staff (n = 54), stakeholders (n = 6), and a focus group with former patients and carers (n = 5). We identified ward-based food work as a technical and interpersonal challenge in narratives around malnutrition. Food work constituted two overlapping spheres of activity: interpersonal engagement through feeding assistance and reassurance and the arrangement of resources that facilitate meals such as the preparation of food trolleys. Our analysis is framed by the literature on emotional labour, dirty work and the professionalisation of nursing. We demonstrate how food work is overlooked by being conceptualised as common sense and as one of the most mundane and elementary tasks in hospitals.

  7. Strange and Charm Quark Spins from Anomalous Ward Identity

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Ming; Alexandru, Andrei; Draper, Terrence; Liu, Keh-Fei

    2015-01-01

    We present a calculation of the strange and charm quark contributions to the nucleon spin from anomalous Ward identity (AWI). It is performed with overlap valence quarks on 2+1-flavor domain-wall fermion gauge configurations on a $24^3 \\times 64$ lattice with the light sea mass at $m_{\\pi} = 330$ MeV. To satisfy the AWI, the overlap fermion for the pseudoscalar density and the overlap Dirac operator for the topological density, which do not have multiplicative renormalization, are used to renormalize the form factor of the local axial-vector current at finite $q^2$. For the charm quark, we find the positive pseudoscalar term almost cancels the negative topological term for each $q^2$, leading to a very small net contribution. For the strange quark, the pseudoscalar term is less positive than that of the charm and this results in a negative strange quark spin when combined with the topological contribution. The $g_A(q^2)$ at $q^2 =0$ is obtained by a global fit of the pseudoscalar and the topological form fact...

  8. Acute psychosis induced by isotretinoin

    OpenAIRE

    Rajagopal, Sundararajan

    2014-01-01

    Isotretinoin is used for the treatment of severe acne. Psychiatric side-effects, particularly depression, have been well-documented. This dramatic case report is about a young male patient who developed acute psychosis within a few days of starting isotretinoin. Due to his persecutory delusions, the patient, who was an Indian engineer working in Germany, decided to immediately return to India fearing for his life in Germany. Careful history taking established the cause of the psychosis. Isotr...

  9. [The onset of psychiatric disorders and Wilson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhamla, T; Tirouche, Y D; Abaoub-Germain, A; Theodore, F

    2007-12-01

    Wilson's disease is an infrequent, autosomic recessive pathology, resulting from a loss of function of an adenosine triphosphatase (ATP7B or WDNP), secondarily to a change (more than 60 are described currently), insertion or deletion of the ATP7B gene located on the chromosome 13q14.3-q21.1, which involves a reduction or an absence of the transport of copper in the bile and its accumulation in the body, notably the brain. Wilson's disease is transmitted by an autosomic recessive gene located on the long arm of chromosome 13. The prevalence of the heterozygote is evaluated at 1/90 and the homozygote at 1/30,000. Consanguinity, frequent in the socially geographically isolated populations, increases the prevalence of the disease. The toxic quantities of copper, which accumulate in the liver since early childhood and perhaps before, remain concentrated in the body for years. Hence, cytological and histological modifications can be detected in the biopsies, before the appearance of clinical or biological symptoms of hepatic damage. The accumulation of copper in the liver is due to a defect in the biliary excretion of metal and is accompanied invariably by a deficit in ceruloplasmin; protein synthesized from a transferred ATP7B gene, which causes retention of the copper ions in the liver. The detectable cellular anomalies are of two types: hepatic lesions resulting in acute hepatic insufficiency, acute hepatitis and finally advanced cirrhosis and lesions of the central nervous system responsible for the neurological and psychiatric disorders. In approximately 40-50% of the patients, the first manifestation of Wilson's disease affects the central nervous system. Although copper diffuses in the liver towards the blood and then towards other tissues, it has disastrous consequences only in the brain. It can therefore cause either a progressive neurological disease, or psychiatric disorders. Wilson's disease begins in the form of a hepatic, neurological, or psychiatric

  10. Application of the MIT two-channel model to predict flow recirculation in WARD 61-pin blanket tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preliminary application of MIT TWO-CHANNEL MODEL to WARD sodium blanket tests was presented in this report. Our criterion was employed to predict the recirculation for selected completed (transient and steady state) and proposed (transient only) tests. The heat loss was correlated from the results of the WARD zero power tests. The calculational results show that our criterion agrees with the WARD tests except for WARD RUN 718 for which the criterion predicts a different result from WARD data under bundle heat loss condition. However, if the test assembly is adiabatic, the calculations predict an operating point which is marginally close to the mixed-to-recirculation transition regime

  11. Application of the MIT two-channel model to predict flow recirculation in WARD 61-pin blanket tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preliminary application of MIT two-channel model to WARD sodium blanket tests was presented in this report. The criterion was employed to predict the recirculation for selected completed (transient and steady state) and proposed (transient only) tests. The heat loss was correlated from the results of the WARD zero power tests. The calculational results show that the criterion agrees with the WARD tests except for WARD RUN 718 for which the criterion predicts a different result from WARD data under bundle heat loss condition. However, if the test assembly is adiabatic, the calculations predict an operating point which is marginally close to the mixed-to-recirculation transition regime

  12. Structure and process factors that influence patients' perception of inpatient psychiatric nursing care at Mathari Hospital, Nairobi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoro, M C A; Othieno, C J; Musandu, J; Karani, A

    2008-04-01

    To explore structure and process factors which influence patients' perception of quality inpatient psychiatric nursing care at Mathari hospital. This was a cross-sectional study of 236 inpatients selected by stratified random sampling. Competence to give consent was determined by a minimum score of 24 on Mini Mental State Examination. Patients were interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire. Differences in proportions of variables were determined by calculating confidence interval and summary chi-squared statistics. P-values of < or =0.05 were considered significant. Majority of patients (87%) were aged 20-49 years with 43% having stayed in the ward for over a month. Structure factors related to patients' perception of care included physical environment, being happy with the way the ward looked was significantly related to satisfaction with care (chi(2) = 5.506, P = 0002). Process factors significantly related to patients' satisfaction with care included nurses providing patients with information on prescribed medicines (chi(2) = 10.50, P = 00012). Satisfaction with care was positively related to ability to recommend someone for admission in the same ward (chi(2) = 20.2, P = 00001). Structure and process factors identified as influencing patients' perception of care were physical environment and nurses' qualities that fit within the characteristics of Peplau's Interpersonal Relations Theory. PMID:18307654

  13. Cardiovascular Disease and Psychiatric Comorbidity: The Potential Role of Perseverative Cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta A. Larsen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The high comorbidity between psychiatric disorders and cardiovascular disease has received increasing attention, yet little is known about the processes linking the two. One plausible contributing mechanism is the tendency of those with psychiatric disorders to ruminate on stressful events. This phenomenon, sometimes called perseverative cognition, can extend the psychological and physiological effects of stress, which could contribute to cardiovascular disease etiology. In this paper, we discuss the potential role of perseverative cognition in mediating the relationship between psychiatric illness and cardiovascular disease. Rumination can delay physiological recovery from acute stress, which in turn has been found to predict future cardiovascular health. This delayed recovery could act as a mechanism in the longitudinal link between worry and cardiovascular health. The cognitive inflexibility that characterizes mood and anxiety disorders may then contribute to disease not by producing greater reactivity, but instead through extending activation, increasing the risks for cardiovascular damage.

  14. Assessment of the early effectiveness of a stroke unit in comparison to the general ward

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马锐华; 王拥军; 曲辉; 杨中华

    2004-01-01

    Background Stroke unit is the most effective treatment method to benefit stroke patients. Our study is to evaluate the early effectiveness of a hospital stroke unit (SU). Methods Three hundred and ninety-two patients who had suffered from acute strokes and who were admitted to our hospital between December 2001 and January 2003 were recruited for this controlled study. All patients were sent at random to either the SU or the general ward (GW) for treatment. The following indices were measured by: Barthel Index (BI), National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), Oxford Handicap Scale (OHS). Results The mean change in BI score between the day of admission and the day of discharge was 20.00±24.36 for the SU group and 10.63±23.59 for the GW group. A difference that is statistically significant (P=0.000). The mean change in NIHSS score was -2.01±6.61 for the SU group and 0.55±7.44 for the GW group. A difference that is also statistically significant (P=0.000). Finally, the mean change in OHS score was -0.74±1.04 for the SU group and -0.28±0.98 for the GW group, also a statistically significant difference (P=0.000). Among SU patients, patient satisfaction was higher (P=0.000), the rehabilitation success rate was higher (P=0.000), and there were fewer complications (P=0.000).Conclusion Compared to GW patients, stroke patients treated in a special SU were able to return to normal daily activities earlier, with better social abilities, and have reduced neurological defects, without increasing the overall economic burden.

  15. Cultural Issues in Psychiatric Administration and Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Neil Krishan

    2015-09-01

    This paper addresses cultural issues in psychiatric administration and leadership through two issues: (1) the changing culture of psychiatric practice based on new clinician performance metrics and (2) the culture of psychiatric administration and leadership in light of organizational cultural competence. Regarding the first issue, some observers have discussed the challenges of creating novel practice environments that balance business values of efficient performance with fiduciary values of treatment competence. This paper expands upon this discussion, demonstrating that some metrics from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, the nation's largest funder of postgraduate medical training, may penalize clinicians for patient medication behaviors that are unrelated to clinician performance. A focus on pharmacotherapy over psychotherapy in these metrics has unclear consequences for the future of psychiatric training. Regarding the second issue, studies of psychiatric administration and leadership reveal a disproportionate influence of older men in positions of power despite efforts to recruit women, minorities, and immigrants who increasingly constitute the psychiatric workforce. Organizational cultural competence initiatives can diversify institutional cultures so that psychiatric leaders better reflect the populations they serve. In both cases, psychiatric administrators and leaders play critical roles in ensuring that their organizations respond to social challenges.

  16. Smartphone apps as a new psychiatric treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalum, Anette Ellegaard; Arnfred, Sidse Marie

    2014-01-01

    Søg 1 - 1 ud af 1 Smartphone apps as a new psychiatric treatment. Anette Ellegaard Dalum, Sidse Arnfred, 2014, vol. 176, nummer 34, 2014. Ugeskrift for laeger Artikel Importer Fjern......Søg 1 - 1 ud af 1 Smartphone apps as a new psychiatric treatment. Anette Ellegaard Dalum, Sidse Arnfred, 2014, vol. 176, nummer 34, 2014. Ugeskrift for laeger Artikel Importer Fjern...

  17. Perceived sleep quality of psychiatric patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Niet, G. J. (Gerrit); Tiemens, B. G. (Bea); Lendemeijer, H. H. G. M. (Bert); Hutschemaekers, G. J. M. (Giel)

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims at acquiring knowledge about the quality of sleep of adult and elderly psychiatric patients who receive clinical or outpatient nursing care, and identifying key factors in perceiving a sleep problem. To do so, a sample of 1699 psychiatric patients were asked whether they perceived a

  18. Nursing 302: An Introduction to Psychiatric Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaustein, Jenna Rose

    A description is provided of "Introduction to Psychiatric Nursing," a 7-week course offered to juniors and seniors in a bachelor of science nursing program. The first sections present information on curricular placement, time assignments, and the targeted student population, and define psychiatric/mental health nursing. Next, the course…

  19. Establishment of a local psychiatric service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, A G

    1981-01-01

    The Faroe Islands are a group of islands in the North Atlantic Ocean between Norway and Iceland inhabited by about 42,000 people. They are considered a nation with home rule within the Danish Kingdom. A Psychiatric Department was not established on the islands until 1969. Before this, psychiatric...

  20. Psychiatric disorders in women with fertility problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldur-Felskov, Birgitte; Kjaer, S K; Albieri, V;

    2013-01-01

    Do women who don't succeed in giving birth after an infertility evaluation have a higher risk of psychiatric disorders compared with women who do?......Do women who don't succeed in giving birth after an infertility evaluation have a higher risk of psychiatric disorders compared with women who do?...

  1. Responses and Results to Ethical Problems by Psychiatric Nurses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Michiyo; Kawano, Masashi

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the responses of Japanese psychiatric nurses to ethical problems, and the results of those issues. The participants were 130 nurses who worked in psychiatry wards in a hospital. The nurses answered the question "how did you respond when you faced an ethical problem and what results did you get?" in free description. Seven categories were selected qualitatively from their responses: "Lack of action and no change," "Experiencing problems and feeling gloomy," "Pointing out misconduct and being hurt," "Consultation among staff and resolution or not," "Consultation with physicians and getting positive or negative responses," and "Searching for and providing evidence-based care," and "Thinking for themselves." The facts that some nurses do not cope with ethical problems and some face moral distress without knowing what to do suggest that "improvement of moral efficacy to cope with ethical problems", "proposing resolution methods", and "organizational ethics support" may be useful.

  2. Responses and Results to Ethical Problems by Psychiatric Nurses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Michiyo; Kawano, Masashi

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the responses of Japanese psychiatric nurses to ethical problems, and the results of those issues. The participants were 130 nurses who worked in psychiatry wards in a hospital. The nurses answered the question "how did you respond when you faced an ethical problem and what results did you get?" in free description. Seven categories were selected qualitatively from their responses: "Lack of action and no change," "Experiencing problems and feeling gloomy," "Pointing out misconduct and being hurt," "Consultation among staff and resolution or not," "Consultation with physicians and getting positive or negative responses," and "Searching for and providing evidence-based care," and "Thinking for themselves." The facts that some nurses do not cope with ethical problems and some face moral distress without knowing what to do suggest that "improvement of moral efficacy to cope with ethical problems", "proposing resolution methods", and "organizational ethics support" may be useful. PMID:27654232

  3. Validation of a checklist to assess ward round performance in internal medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Kirsten; Ringsted, Charlotte; Dolmans, Diana

    2004-01-01

    construct validity, an observer assessed 4 groups of doctors during performance of a complete ward round (n = 32). The nurse who accompanied the doctor on rounds made a global assessment of the performance. RESULTS: The response rate to the questionnaire was 80.7%. The respondents found that all 10 items on...... supported by the higher scores of experienced doctors compared to those with less experience and the significant correlation between the observer's and nurses' global scores. The developed checklist should be valuable in guiding and assessing trainees on ward round performance.......BACKGROUND: Ward rounds are an essential responsibility for doctors in hospital settings. Tools for guiding and assessing trainees' performance of ward rounds are needed. A checklist was developed for that purpose for use with trainees in internal medicine. OBJECTIVE: To assess the content and...

  4. Participatory Action Research in clinical nursing practice in a medical ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjerholt, Mette; Wagner, Lis; Lindhardt, Tove;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Action research with a participatory approach (PAR) was used as research design in a medical ward but stopped midway because of lack of active actor participation in the actions. Aim: To describe challenges and barriers influencing lack of participation. Setting: A medical hospital ward...... roles, responsibility. Conclusion: Before using PAR it is crucial to investigate if the organization and the participants at all levels are suited and agree to participate actively. The findings indicate, that to carry out PAR in a busy medical ward, it is necessary to evaluate whether the necessary...... framework and conditions are present not only prior to but during the entire project process. Implications. The study shows that PAR is not always suitable as research approach in a busy hospital ward. Furthermore, the study outlines methodological questions in relation to use of PAR....

  5. Particle Removal Efficiency of the Portable HEPA Air Cleaner in a Simulated Hospital Ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qian, Hua; Li, Yuguo; Sun, Hequan;

    2010-01-01

    Use of a HEPA (high efficiency particulate air) filter in a room is believed to assist in reducing the risk of transmission of infectious diseases through removing the particles or large droplets to which pathogens may be attached. Use of a portable HEPA filter(s) in hospital wards is hypothesized...... of beds in an isolation ward is insufficient. An experiment was conducted in a full scale experimental ward with a dimension of 6.7 m × 6 m × 2.7 m and 6 beds to test these hypotheses for a portable HEPA filter. The removal efficiency for different size particles was measured at different locations...... filter (for particle removal only) is from 2.7 to 5.6 ACH in the ward. The strong supply air jet from the portable HEPA filter interacted with the room airflow pattern and became dominate, introducing global airflow mixing in the room. Background noise levels were also measured and noise level...

  6. Supporting Information Access in a Hospital Ward by a Context-Aware Mobile Electronic Patient Record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Mikael B.; Høegh, Rune Thaarup

    2006-01-01

    Ward is to support nurses in conducting morning procedures in a hospital ward. MobileWard is context-aware as it is able to discover and react autonomously according to changes in the environment and since it integrates the ability to provide information and services to the user where the relevancy depends......Context-awareness holds promise for improving the utility of software products. Context-aware mobile systems encompass the ability to automatically discover and react to changes in an environment. Most contemporary context-aware mobile systems aim to support users in private situations, for example......, as tourist guides. Thus, we still lack an understanding of the impact of context-awareness in professional work situations. In this paper, we explore context-awareness for mobile electronic patient records through the design of a context-aware mobile prototype called MobileWard. The aim of Mobile...

  7. Classifying nursing organization in wards in Norwegian hospitals: self-identification versus observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helgeland Jon

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The organization of nursing services could be important to the quality of patient care and staff satisfaction. However, there is no universally accepted nomenclature for this organization. The objective of the current study was to classify general hospital wards based on data describing organizational practice reported by the ward nurse managers, and then to compare this classification with the name used in the wards to identify the organizational model (self-identification. Methods In a cross-sectional postal survey, 93 ward nurse managers in Norwegian hospitals responded to questions about nursing organization in their wards, and what they called their organizational models. K-means cluster analysis was used to classify the wards according to the pattern of activities attributed to the different nursing roles and discriminant analysis was used to interpret the solutions. Cross-tabulation was used to validate the solutions and to compare the classification obtained from the cluster analysis with that obtained by self-identification. The bootstrapping technique was used to assess the generalizability of the cluster solution. Results The cluster analyses produced two alternative solutions using two and three clusters, respectively. The three-cluster solution was considered to be the best representation of the organizational models: 32 team leader-dominated wards, 23 primary nurse-dominated wards and 38 wards with a hybrid or mixed organization. There was moderate correspondence between the three-cluster solution and the models obtained by self-identification. Cross-tabulation supported the empirical classification as being representative for variations in nursing service organization. Ninety-four per cent of the bootstrap replications showed the same pattern as the cluster solution in the study sample. Conclusions A meaningful classification of wards was achieved through an empirical cluster solution; this was, however, only

  8. The influence of dysfunctional impulsivity and alexithymia on aggressive behavior of psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Schutter, Marja A M; Kramer, Hein J M Th; Franken, Ernest J F; Lodewijkx, Hein F M; Kleinepier, Tom

    2016-09-30

    Current approaches in Dutch mental health care institutions towards inpatients' aggression have focused predominantly on environmental factors, such as training the staff in aggression management. However, personality traits might be an important factor in patients' aggression - as shown by incidents in the wards. This study explores the influence of dysfunctional impulsivity and alexithymia on psychiatric patients' aggressive behavior, through self-reports and through involvement in aggressive incidents. Personality traits influencing patients' aggression emphasize the importance of a more direct approach to their aggression. Clinical patients at Dutch mental health care institution Emergis (n=84) filled out questionnaires about their aggressiveness (using Buss and Perry's Aggression Questionnaire Short Form), dysfunctional impulsivity and alexithymia. Multiple regression analyses indicated that dysfunctional impulsivity positively related to self-reported aggressive behavior. The relationship, however, could not be confirmed for inpatients' aggression as reported by the staff on the wards. Unexpectedly affective alexithymia negatively related to hostility. Gender differences in self-reported aggression were found. Female patients showed higher levels of hostility. Regression analyses indicated that the male gender positively related to physical aggression. Findings emphasize the importance of a new approach in Dutch mental health care, in which patients may engage in aggression-regulation training programs. PMID:27387554

  9. Prevalence of Elder Abuse and Neglect in Seniors with Psychiatric Morbidity - Example from Central Moravia, Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Luzny

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Elder abuse and neglect (EAN comprises emotional, financial, physical, and sexual abuse, neglect by other individuals, and self-neglect. Elder abuse and neglect in seniors with psychiatric morbidity was not monitored in the Czech Republic at all, despite the literature shows mental morbidity as one of the important risk factor for developing elder abuse and neglect.Methods: We designed comparative cross sectional study comprising 305 seniors hospitalized in Mental Hospital Kromeriz in June 2011 - group of 202 seniors hospitalized due to mental disorder in psychogeriatric ward and group of 103 seniors hospitalized due to somatic disorder in internal ward. Content analysis of medical records was done in both groups of seniors, with regards to symptoms of elder abuse. Then, we discussed the topic of elder abuse with 30 nurses of psychogeriatric ward in focus group interview.Results: Between two compared groups of seniors we detected statistically higher prevalence of elder abuse in seniors with psychiatric morbidity (48 cases, 23.8% prevalence of EAN, compared to somatically ill seniors (3 cases, 2.9%. As for nursing staff, 5 from 30 nurses (16.7% have never heard about symptoms of elder abuse and neglect, 10 from 30 nurses (33.3% had just a partial knowledge about elder abuse and neglect and its symptoms, the rest of nurses (15 from 30 nurses, 50.0% had good knowledge about elder abuse and neglect and its symptoms.Conclusion: Elder abuse and neglect seems to be a relevant problem in senior population with mental disorders. Development of educational programs for nursing and medical staff about Elder abuse and neglect (symptoms of EAN, early detection of EAN, knowledge how to report cases of EAN could improve the situation and help mentally ill seniors to better quality of life.

  10. Ontology-Based Model For The "Ward-round" Process in Healthcare (OMWRP)

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Abid

    2010-01-01

    Abstract In the current arena, rapid changes are required to address dynamic patient’s treatment process needs according to the patient’s demand in the healthcare sector. This research work addresses existing problems about information flow in ward-round, what is the optimal information need for an individual with his/her competences according to their role during ward-round in healthcare area. This work also mentions what are the certain activities which are required during the patient treat...

  11. Training program conference of "Good Pain Management Ward" was launched in Wuhan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Cheng

    2012-01-01

    @@ On March 6th, the training program conference of "Good Pain Management Ward" (GPM ward) was launched in the conference hall of Westin Hotel, Wuhan.The conference was hosted by Clinics Medical Secretary, Ministry of Health, and undertaken by CSCO and Mundipharma (China) Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd.Three hundreds experts, doctors and nurses, from departments of oncology, pain, anesthesiology and pharmacy, in 6 provinces (including Hubei, Hunan, Jiangxi, Shanxi, Shanxi, Henan), attended the conference.

  12. Closed pelvic fractures: characteristics and outcomes in older patients admitted to medical and geriatric wards

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, R.; Sonibare, A.; Green, D.; Masud, T.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate the characteristics and outcomes of older patients with pelvic fracture admitted to medical and geriatric wards.
METHODS—All patients admitted to medical and geriatric wards with a pelvic fracture over a four year period were identified using the hospital clinical coding database. Data were collected from casenotes, hospital and Family Health Services Authority databases. Where available, pelvic radiographs were graded according to the Singh index.
RESULTS—The casenot...

  13. Medication prescribing errors and associated factors at the pediatric wards of Dessie Referral Hospital, Northeast Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Zeleke, Abebe; Chanie, Tesfahun; Woldie, Mirkuzie

    2014-01-01

    Background Medication error is common and preventable cause of medical errors and occurs as a result of either human error or a system flaw. The consequences of such errors are more harmful and frequent among pediatric patients. Objective To assess medication prescribing errors and associated factors in the pediatric wards of Dessie Referral Hospital, Northeast Ethiopia. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out in the pediatric wards of Dessie Referral Hospital from February 17 to Marc...

  14. Ward Identities and Integrable Differential Equations in the Ising Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Fonseca, P

    2003-01-01

    We show that the celebrated Painleve equations for the Ising correlation functions follow in a simple way from the Ward Identities associated with local Integrals of Motion of the doubled Ising field theory. We use these Ward Identities to derive the equations determining the matrix elements of the product $\\sigma(x)\\sigma(x')$ between any particle states. The result is then applied in evaluating the leading mass corrections in the Ising field theory perturbed by an external magnetic field.

  15. Comparison of maternal anxiety scores in pediatric intensive care unit and general ward parents

    OpenAIRE

    Lie Affendi Kartikahadi; Soetjiningsih,; I Gusti Ayu Endah Ardjana; I Gusti Ayu Trisna Windiani

    2012-01-01

    Background Hospitalization of a child is known to be a dreadful and stressful situation for parents. One study reported that admitting a child to a general ward caused mild anxiety to mothers, while admitting a child to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) caused moderate anxiety to mothers. Objective To compare Hamilton anxiety scores of mothers whose children were admitted to the PICU to those of mothers whose children were admitted to the general ward. Methods A cross-sectional stu...

  16. Neonatal abstinence syndrome: Diagnostic dilemmas in the maternity ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazić-Mitrović Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS refers to a newborn neurological, gastrointestinal and/or respiratory disorder if a newborn was exposed to psychoactive substances in the intrauterine period. NAS is difficult to diagnose due to unreliability of the data on addictive substances use during pregnancy, limited possibilities of the prenatal exposure diagnosis and postnatal substance detection, which all lead to diagnostic dilemmas. Objective. The aim of this study was to indicate the problems in patients with early NAS diagnosis in the maternity ward and the importance of clinical presentation used as a guide toward the diagnosis. Methods. This retrospective study included five term eutrophic newborns with high Apgar score, good adaptation in the first day and with clinical presentation of NAS during the second day of life. The clinical presentation was dominated by irritability, increased wakefulness, increased muscle tone, shrilly crying, tremors, problems with accepting food, tachypnea, subfebrility and hyperhidrosis. Finnegan scale was introduced in order to diagnose NAS and apply the therapy. Single-medication therapy of phenobarbitone was applied in four cases and a combination of phenobarbitone and morphine in one case. For toxicological analysis newborns’ urine samples were used. Results. Conditions such as perinatal asphyxia, infection, hunger, polycythemia, hypoglycemia or hypocalcemia were excluded. Finnegan score implied that pharmacological treatment had to be administered. The discrepancy between the NAS anamnesis and toxicological analysis existed. Response to the treatment was positive in all cases. Conclusion. NAS is a multisystemic disorder and should be suspected when it is noticed that children exhibit characteristic signs. However, other pathological conditions have to be excluded. Quantification according to the adopted scales for NAS leads toward appropriate treatment and recovery of the newborns.

  17. Psoriasis and Associated Psychiatric Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, José Luís Pio Da Costa; Reis, José Pedro Gaspar Dos; Figueiredo, Américo Manuel Da Costa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and objective: Psoriasis is a chronic skin disease with a high impact on self-esteem and patients’ health-related quality of life. In the last decades some studies have pointed out mental disorders associated with psoriasis and the etiopathogenic mechanisms behind that co-existence. This work compiles psychopathology associated with psoriasis and further analyzes the etiopathogenesis of psoriasis and mental disorders. Methods: A systematic review of the literature was conducted based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) and using the “5S” levels of organization of evidence from healthcare research, as previously described. Results: Psoriasis is linked with many mental disorders, both in the psychotic and neurotic sprectrum. Chronic stress diminishes hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and upregulates sympathetic-adrenal-medullary responses, stimulating pro-inflammatory cytokines. Then, it maintains and exacerbates psoriasis and some of its mental disorders. High levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines connect psoriasis, psychiatric conditions, and other comorbidities of psoriasis (such as atherosclerosis) within a vicious cycle. Furthermore, the etiopathogenesis of the link between each psychiatric comorbidity and psoriasis has its own subtleties, including the cooccurrence of other comorbidities, the parts of the body affected by psoriasis, treatments, and biological and psychosocial factors. Conclusion: The study of psychopathology can amplify our understanding about the etiopathogenesis of psoriasis and associated mental disorders. Patients would benefit from a psychodermatologic approach. The adequate treatment should take into account the mental disorders associated with psoriasis as well as the circumstances under which they occur.

  18. Cognitive changes in patients with acute phase psychosis - Effects of illicit drug use

    OpenAIRE

    Helle, Siri; Gjestad, Rolf; Johnsen, Erik; Kroken, Rune; Jørgensen, Hugo A; Løberg, Else-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Illicit drug use may influence cognition in non-affective psychosis. Previous studies have shown better cognition in psychosis with illicit drug use as compared to psychosis only. Possibly, illicit drug using patients have more transient drug-related cognitive deficits. Thus, the aim of the present study was to examine cognitive change the first weeks after admission to a psychiatric emergency ward, expecting more cognitive improvement at follow-up in the illicit drug group as compared to psy...

  19. Ophthalmology hospital wards contamination to pathogenic free living Amoebae in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasjerdi, Zohreh; Niyyati, Maryam; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; Haghighi, Ali; Taghipour, Niloofar

    2015-09-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the occurrence of potentially pathogenic free-living amoeba in ophthalmology wards in reference hospitals in Iran. Since an increasing number of Acanthamoeba Keratitis cases after eye surgery and eye trauma have been recently observed in this country, it could be possible that the disinfection procedures undertaken in the clinical setting may not have a good hygiene and disinfection procedures, hence the aim of this study. Therefore, 42 dust and biofilm samples were collected from different areas of ophthalmology wards and checked for the presence of FLA using morphological criteria, PCR based analysis and DNA sequencing. Of the 42 samples from dust and biofilm sources, 18(42.86%) isolates were found to contain FLA and 12(92.3%) isolates belonged to Acanthamoeba T4 genotype. Isolation of the pathogenic genotype T4 from medical instruments, including slit lamp in corneal wards, may be a threat for patients undergoing eye surgery in these wards. Other FLA isolated in this study included Acanthamoeba genotype T5, Vahlkampfia sp, Naegleria australiensis, Vermamoeba vermiformis and Echinamoeba exudans. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the presence of potentially pathogenic FLA in ophthalmology wards in Iran. Improved disinfection methods and monitoring of hospitals ward are thus necessary in this area in order to minimize the risk of infection in patients.

  20. [Airborne Fungal Aerosol Concentration and Distribution Characteristics in Air- Conditioned Wards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua-ling; Feng, He-hua; Fang, Zi-liang; Wang, Ben-dong; Li, Dan

    2015-04-01

    The effects of airborne fungus on human health in the hospital environment are related to not only their genera and concentrations, but also their particle sizes and distribution characteristics. Moreover, the mechanisms of aerosols with different particle sizes on human health are different. Fungal samples were obtained in medicine wards of Chongqing using a six-stage sampler. The airborne fungal concentrations, genera and size distributions of all the sampling wards were investigated and identified in detail. Results showed that airborne fungal concentrations were not correlated to the diseases or personnel density, but were related to seasons, temperature, and relative humidity. The size distribution rule had roughly the same for testing wards in winter and summer. The size distributions were not related with diseases and seasons, the percentage of airborne fungal concentrations increased gradually from stage I to stage III, and then decreased dramatically from stage V to stage VI, in general, the size of airborne fungi was a normal distribution. There was no markedly difference for median diameter of airborne fungi which was less 3.19 μm in these wards. There were similar dominant genera in all wards. They were Aspergillus spp, Penicillium spp and Alternaria spp. Therefore, attention should be paid to improve the filtration efficiency of particle size of 1.1-4.7 μm for air conditioning system of wards. It also should be targeted to choose appropriate antibacterial methods and equipment for daily hygiene and air conditioning system operation management.

  1. Assessing and Treating the Patient with Acute Psychotic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Lisa; Clough, Rebecca

    2016-06-01

    Patients with acute psychosis often present to emergency departments. Management of acute agitation and psychosis can be a challenge for the staff. Medical stabilization, appropriate assessment, and diagnosis are important. Verbal de-escalation and other psychosocial interventions are helpful in creating a safe and therapeutic environment. Psychiatric and emergency room nurses are poised to treat patients presenting with acute psychosis and must be knowledgeable of evidence-based approaches to treat these complex disorders. PMID:27229275

  2. Connectomics in psychiatric research: advances and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao M

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Miao Cao,* Zhijiang Wang,* Yong He State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning and IDG/McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Psychiatric disorders disturb higher cognitive functions and severely compromise human health. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying psychiatric disorders are very complex, and understanding these mechanisms remains a great challenge. Currently, many psychiatric disorders are hypothesized to reflect “faulty wiring” or aberrant connectivity in the brains. Imaging connectomics is arising as a promising methodological framework for describing the structural and functional connectivity patterns of the human brain. Recently, alterations of brain networks in the connectome have been reported in various psychiatric disorders, and these alterations may provide biomarkers for disease diagnosis and prognosis for the evaluation of treatment efficacy. Here, we summarize the current achievements in both the structural and functional connectomes in several major psychiatric disorders (eg, schizophrenia, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and autism based on multi-modal neuroimaging data. We highlight the current progress in the identification of these alterations and the hypotheses concerning the aberrant brain networks in individuals with psychiatric disorders and discuss the research questions that might contribute to a further mechanistic understanding of these disorders from a connectomic perspective.Keywords: psychiatric disorders, connectome, graph theory, functional connectivity, structural connectivity

  3. Brain tumors in patients primarly treated psychiatrically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignjatović-Ristić Dragana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Psychiatric symptoms are not rare manifestations of brain tumors. Brain tumors presented by symptoms of raised intracranial pressure, focal neurological signs, or convulsions are usually first seen by the neurologist or less frequently by the neurosurgeon in routine diagnostic procedures. On the other hand, when psychiatric symptoms are the first manifestation in “neurologically silent” brain tumors, the patients are sent to the psychiatrist for the treatment of psychiatric symptoms and brain tumors are left misdiagnosed for a long period of time. Case Report. We presented three patients with the diagnosed brain tumor where psychiatrist had been the first specialist to be consulted. In all three cases neurological examination was generally unremarkable with no focal signs or features of raised intracranial pressure. CT scan demonstrated right insular tumor in a female patient with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD; right parietal temporal tumor in a patient with delusions and depression and left frontal tumor in a patient with history of alcohol dependency. Conclusion. Psychiatric symptoms/disorders in patients with brain tumors are not specific enough and can have the same clinical presentation as the genuine psychiatric disorder. Therefore, we emphasize the consideration of neuroimaging in patients with abrupt beginning of psychiatric symptoms, in those with a change in mental status, or when headaches suddenly appear or in cases of treatment resistant psychiatric disorders regardless the lack of neurological symptoms.

  4. Technological Advances in Psychiatric Nursing: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostrom, Andrea C

    2016-06-01

    Understanding and treating mental illness has improved in many ways as a result of the fast pace of technological advances. The technologies that have the greatest potential impact are those that (1) increase the knowledge of how the brain functions and changes based on interventions, (2) have the potential to personalize interventions based on understanding genetic factors of drug metabolism and pharmacodynamics, and (3) use information technology to provide treatment in the absence of an adequate mental health workforce. Technologies are explored for psychiatric nurses to consider. Psychiatric nurses are encouraged to consider the experiences of psychiatric patients, including poor health, stigmatization, and suffering.

  5. Workroles of staff nurses in psychiatric settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, E G; Shealy, A H; Kowalski, C; LaMont, J; Range, B A

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to operationalize Peplau's workroles of the psychiatric staff nurse. Thirty registered nurses audiotaped one-to-one interactions with 62 adult, child, and adolescent psychiatric patients. Content analysis was used to identify role behaviors and to identify roles that were different from those outlined by Peplau. The counselor role was the most frequently occurring primary workrole. Overlap was found between behaviors indicative of autocratic leader versus surrogate and those of resource person versus teacher. The findings supported Peplau's contention that the counselor role is central to the practice of psychiatric nursing.

  6. Affective responses across psychiatric disorders-A dimensional approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägele, Claudia; Friedel, Eva; Schlagenhauf, Florian; Sterzer, Philipp; Beck, Anne; Bermpohl, Felix; Stoy, Meline; Held-Poschardt, Dada; Wittmann, André; Ströhle, Andreas; Heinz, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Studying psychiatric disorders across nosological boundaries aims at a better understanding of mental disorders by identifying comprehensive signatures of core symptoms. Here, we studied neurobiological correlates of emotion processing in several major psychiatric disorders. We assessed differences between diagnostic groups, and investigated whether there is a psychopathological correlate of emotion processing that transcends disorder categories. 135 patient with psychiatric disorders (alcohol dependence, n=29; schizophrenia, n=37; major depressive disorder (MDD), n=25; acute manic episode of bipolar disorder, n=12; panic disorder, n=12, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), n=20) and healthy controls (n=40) underwent an functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment with affectively positive, aversive and neutral pictures from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS). Between-group differences were assessed with full-factorial ANOVAs, with age, gender and smoking habits as covariates. Self-ratings of depressed mood and anxiety were correlated with activation clusters showing significant stimulus-evoked fMRI activation. Furthermore, we examined functional connectivity with the amygdala as seed region during the processing of aversive pictures. During the presentation of pleasant stimuli, we observed across all subjects significant activation of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), bilateral middle temporal gyrus and right precuneus, while a significant activation of the left amygdala and the bilateral middle temporal gyrus was found during the presentation of aversive stimuli. We did neither find any significant interaction with diagnostic group, nor any correlation with depression and anxiety scores at the activated clusters or with amygdala connectivity. Positive and aversive IAPS-stimuli were consistently processed in limbic and prefrontal brain areas, irrespective of diagnostic category. A dimensional correlate of these

  7. Bullying behaviour in relation to psychiatric disorders, suicidality and criminal offences:a study of under-age adolescent inpatients in Northern Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Luukkonen, A.-H. (Anu-Helmi)

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Bullying behaviour is present in the daily life of many adolescents, but research into the serious problems related to this behaviour is still scarce. The aim of this work was to investigate the putative associations of bullying behaviour with psychiatric disorders, substance use, suicidality and criminal offences in a sample of under-age adolescent inpatients in Northern Finland. The epidemiologically unselected sample of 12–17-year-old inpatients in need of acute psychiatr...

  8. Acute Bronchitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis get better within several days. But your cough ... that cause colds and the flu often cause acute bronchitis. These viruses spread through the air when people ...

  9. Prevalence of the catatonic syndrome in an acute inpatient sample

    OpenAIRE

    Mirella eStuivenga; Manuel eMorrens

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In this exploratory open label study we investigated the prevalence of catatonia in an acute psychiatric inpatient population. In addition, differences in symptom presentation of catatonia depending on the underlying psychiatric illness were investigated.METHODS: 130 patients were assessed with the Bush-Francis Catatonia Rating Scale (BFCRS), the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) and the Simpson-Angus Scale (SAS). A factor analysis wa...

  10. Medical and surgical ward rounds in teaching hospitals of Kuwait University: students’ perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AlMutar S

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sara AlMutar,1 Lulwa AlTourah,1 Hussain Sadeq,2 Jumanah Karim,2 Yousef Marwan3 1Department of Medicine, 2Department of Pediatrics, Mubarak Al-Kabeer Hospital, 3Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Al-Razi Orthopedic Hospital, Kuwait City, Kuwait Background: Teaching sessions for medical students during ward rounds are an essential component of bedside teaching, providing students with the opportunity to regard patients as actual people, and to observe their physical conditions directly, allowing a better understanding of illnesses to be developed. We aim to explore medical students’ perceptions regarding medical and surgical ward rounds within the Faculty of Medicine at Kuwait University, and to evaluate whether this teaching activity is meeting the expectation of learners. Methods: A pretested questionnaire was used to collect data from 141 medical students during the 2012–2013 academic year. They were asked to provide their current and expected ratings about competencies that were supposed to be gained during ward rounds, on a scale from 1 (lowest to 5 (highest. Mean scores were calculated, and the Student t-test was used to compare results. P < 0.05 was the cut-off level for significance. Results: Only 17 students (12.1% declined to participate in the study. The students' current competency scores (for competencies taught within both disciplines – medical and surgical were significantly lower than the scores indicating students’ expectations (P < 0.001. The best-taught competency was bedside examination, in both medical (mean: 3.45 and surgical (mean: 3.05 ward rounds. However, medical ward rounds were better than surgical rounds in covering some competencies, especially the teaching of professional attitude and approach towards patients (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Both medical and surgical ward rounds were deficient in meeting the students’ expectations. Medical educators should utilize the available literature to improve the bedside

  11. Inpatient Psychiatric Prospective Payment System (IPF PPS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This file contains case level data for inpatient psychiatric stays and is derived from 2011 MEDPAR data file and the latest available provider specific file. The...

  12. Chromosomal abnormalities in a psychiatric population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, K.E.; Lubetsky, M.J.; Wenger, S.L.; Steele, M.W. [Univ. of Pittsburgh Medical Center, PA (United States)

    1995-02-27

    Over a 3.5 year period of time, 345 patients hospitalized for psychiatric problems were evaluated cytogenetically. The patient population included 76% males and 94% children with a mean age of 12 years. The criteria for testing was an undiagnosed etiology for mental retardation and/or autism. Cytogenetic studies identified 11, or 3%, with abnormal karyotypes, including 4 fragile X positive individuals (2 males, 2 females), and 8 with chromosomal aneuploidy, rearrangements, or deletions. While individuals with chromosomal abnormalities do not demonstrate specific behavioral, psychiatric, or developmental problems relative to other psychiatric patients, our results demonstrate the need for an increased awareness to order chromosomal analysis and fragile X testing in those individuals who have combinations of behavioral/psychiatric, learning, communication, or cognitive disturbance. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  13. [Psychiatric manifestations due to abnormal glucocorticoid levels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lommerse, K M; Dijkstra, F N; Boeke, A J P; Eekhoff, E M W; Jacobs, G E

    2016-01-01

    This clinical case presentation describes the disease trajectory in two patients who presented with psychiatric symptoms as a result of abnormal serum glucocorticoid levels. One case involves a 58-year-old man with hypercortisolism, the other case concerns a 55-year-old woman with hypocortisolism. In both cases there was a considerable diagnostic delay in recognizing the underlying adrenal gland pathology. Abnormal glucocorticoid levels, caused by endocrine disorders, often results in psychiatric symptoms. Delay in diagnosis may have adverse consequences. Hyper- or hypocortisolism should be considered in patients who present with an atypical presentation of psychiatric symptoms. Moreover, the absence of specific physical signs or symptoms at first presentation in such patients does not exclude an underlying endocrinological cause. Therefore, physical and psychiatric reassessment of such patients should be considered at regular intervals. PMID:27507414

  14. Supported Education for youth with psychiatric disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Korevaar, Lies

    2014-01-01

    Higher and advanced vocational education prepare young adults for a career and enhance their life goals.The onset of mental illness generally occurs between 17 and 25 years. For young adults with psychiatric disabilities, educational resources are largely unavailable

  15. Supported education for youth with psychiatric disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korevaar, E.L.

    2014-01-01

    Higher and advanced vocational education prepare young adults for a career and enhance their life goals.The onset of mental illness generally occurs between 17 and 25 years. For young adults with psychiatric disabilities, educational resources are largely unavailable

  16. Barriers in the treatment of psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric illnesses are very common in prevalence. But not everyone who has a mental illness gets a psychiatric consultation. The causes are many. First, many time people don’t recognise and accept mental illnesses in them as a result of lack of insight and awareness. Secondly, even if they know they have a mental illness, they don’t feel comfortable in disclosing it. Third, after knowing that they have some problems which require help from a doctor, they don’t know whom to consult, where to consult, and how to consult. Fourth, in spite of all possible awareness, there may not be psychiatric facilities nearby. Thus, it becomes utmost necessary to discuss those factors which stop people with psychiatric illnesses to get adequate help so that remedial steps could be taken.

  17. Neuroreceptor imaging in psychiatric disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular imaging, the study of receptors, transporters and enzymes, as well as other cellular processes, has grown in recent years to be one of the most active neuroimaging areas. The application of single photon emission tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) techniques to the study of psychiatric illness has lead to increased understanding of disease processes as well as validated, in vivo, theories of illness etiology. Within the field of psychiatry these techniques have been applied most widely to the study of schizophrenia. Studies within schizophrenia are largely limited to either the dopamine or serotonin system. This is due in large part to the availability of suitable radiotracers as well as the current theories on the etiology of the illness. Two basic study designs are used when studying schizophrenia using molecular imaging and make up the majority of studies reviewed in this manuscript. The first type, termed ''clinical studies'', compares the findings from PET and SPECT studies in those with schizophrenia to normal controls in an attempt to understand the pathophysiology of the illness. The second study design, termed ''occupancy studies'', uses these techniques to enhance the understanding of the mechanism of action of the medications used in treating this illness. This review will focus on the findings of molecular imaging studies in schizophrenia, focusing, for the most part, on the serotonin and dopamine systems. Emphasis will be placed on how these findings and techniques are currently being used to inform the development of novel treatments for schizophrenia. (author)

  18. Post-partum psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanvi Vijay Tuteja

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Post-partum period is demanding period characterized by overwhelming biological, social and emotional changes. It requires significant personal and interpersonal adaptation, especially in case of primigravida. Childbearing from the standpoint of psychological medicine is the most complex event in human experience. Traditionally Inwood has classified post-partum psychiatric disorders (PPPD as maternity blues, post-partum (postnatal depression and puerperal psychosis (PP. However the spectrum of postpartum phenomenology is widely characterized by range of emotions from transient mood liability, irritability and weepiness to marked agitation, delusions, confusion and delirium. Untreated post-partum depression can have adverse long term effects. For the mother, the episode can be the precursor of chronic recurrent depression. For her children a mother's ongoing depression can contribute to emotional, cognitive and interpersonal problems in later life. And therefore a thorough knowledge of the same is important for all obstetrician and gynecologists. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(8.000: 2497-2502

  19. Psychological aspects of acute low back pain in general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Iain C.

    1983-01-01

    A prospective controlled study of acute low back pain in general practice was carried out. The presence of psychiatric illness was measured by use of the general health questionnaire (GHQ), by clinical assessment, and personality factors by use of the Eysenck personality inventory (EPI). It was found that overall the amount of psychiatric illness did not differ between patients with back pain and their controls at the time of presentation, although there was a higher prevalence of previous psychiatric illness in the back-pain group. The only difference in the personality factors measured was a higher degree of extraversion in the back-pain patients. PMID:6224930

  20. Psychiatric Conditions in Parkinson Disease: A Comparison With Classical Psychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buoli, Massimiliano; Caldiroli, Alice; Altamura, Alfredo Carlo

    2016-03-01

    Psychiatric conditions often complicate the outcome of patients affected by Parkinson disease (PD), but they differ from classical psychiatric disorders in terms of underlying biological mechanisms, clinical presentation, and treatment response. The purpose of the present review is to illustrate the biological and clinical aspects of psychiatric conditions associated with PD, with particular reference to the differences with respect to classical psychiatric disorders. A careful search of articles on main databases was performed in order to obtain a comprehensive review about the main psychiatric conditions associated with PD. A manual selection of the articles was then performed in order to consider only those articles that concerned with the topic of the review. Psychiatric conditions in patients with PD present substantial differences with respect to classical psychiatric disorders. Their clinical presentation does not align with the symptom profiles represented by Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders and International Classification of Diseases. Furthermore, psychiatry treatment guidelines are of poor help in managing psychiatric symptoms of patients with PD. Specific diagnostic tools and treatment guidelines are needed to allow early diagnosis and adequate treatment of psychiatric conditions in comorbidity with PD.

  1. Resilience of 'Nightingale' hospital wards in a changing climate

    OpenAIRE

    Lomas, K. J.; Giridharan, R; Short, C. A.; Fair, Alistair

    2012-01-01

    The National Health Service (NHS) Estate in England comprises more than 30 Mm2 with 18.83 Mm2 of acute hospital accommodation on 330 sites. There is concern about the resilience of these buildings in a changing climate, informed by the experience of recent heatwaves. However, the widespread installation of air conditioning would disrupt the achievement of ambitious energy reduction targets. The research project ‘Design and Delivery of Robust Hospital Environments in a Changing Climate’ is att...

  2. Psychiatric morbidity among inmates of leprosy homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K C Jindal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Leprosy affected people are having high psychological distress and it in turn leads to psychiatric disorders. There is a paucity of literature from our country in this significant health problem. Aims: The aim of this study was to find the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity and its association with sociodemographic and clinical factors among the inmates of leprosy homes. Settings and Design: Study sample was obtained from individuals residing in two leprosy homes of malwa belt of Punjab. Materials and Methods: In screening stage, the study subjects were administered sociodemographic proforma and general health questionnaire (GHQ-12. In the confirmation stage, the study subjects were interviewed in detail and disability assessment was done using World Health Organization disability scale. Final psychiatric diagnosis was made as per ICD-10 criteria′s. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was performed using the descriptive statistics, Chi-square test, analysis of variance, and correlation analysis. Results: Majority of the subjects was in the age group 41-50 years, female, married, illiterate, Hindu and were from nuclear families. Nearly, 50.38% of subjects were having GHQ-12 score more than twelve. Nearly, 55.6% subjects were having psychiatric disorders out of which a large number of patients was diagnosed as having dysthymia. The other psychiatric disorders found in the study population were moderate depressive episode, generalized anxiety disorder, mixed anxiety and depressive disorder and schizophrenia unspecified. Psychiatric morbidity was found to be significantly related to age, family status, and duration of leprosy illness and presence of deformities among inmates. Conclusions: This study highlighted that psychiatric disorders were found in a large number among inmates of leprosy homes. Leprosy eradication program must place specific emphasis on psychiatric care of these patients.

  3. Liver Transplant—Psychiatric and Psychosocial Aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Grover, Sandeep; Sarkar, Siddharth

    2012-01-01

    Liver transplantation is a life saving surgical procedure that is associated with improved longevity and enhanced quality of life. The number of successful liver transplants is growing worldwide. The procedure requires a dedicated and trained team of experts. A psychiatrist plays an important role in such a team. Psychiatric and psychosocial assessment is considered imperative to evaluate the candidate's suitability as a transplant recipient. Many psychiatric disorders may lead to the need fo...

  4. The Geriatric Population and Psychiatric Medication

    OpenAIRE

    Sannidhya Varma; Himanshu Sareen; JK Trivedi

    2010-01-01

    With improvement in medical services in the last few years, there has been a constant rise in the geriatric population throughout the world, more so in the developing countries. The elderly are highly prone to develop psychiatric disorders, probably because of age related changes in the brain, concomitant physical disorders, as well as increased stress in later life. Psychiatric disorders in this population may have a different presentation than in other groups and some of psychopathologies m...

  5. Psychiatric disorders in general paediatric referrals.

    OpenAIRE

    Garralda, M E; Bailey, D.

    1989-01-01

    Detailed interviews with parents of 128 children aged 7 to 12 years consecutively referred to general paediatric clinics identified psychiatric disturbance in 36 (28%) of the children. Emotional disorders were the commonest psychiatric diagnoses (present in two thirds); less frequent diagnoses were conduct disorders (5/36, 14%), mixed conduct/emotional disorders (six, 17%), and hyperkinetic syndrome (three, 8%). Disturbance was related to level of energy, with disturbed children being describ...

  6. Insomnia comorbid to severe psychiatric illness

    OpenAIRE

    Soehner, Adriane M.; Kaplan, Katherine A; Harvey, Allison G.

    2013-01-01

    In psychiatric illness, there is a growing body of evidence indicating that sleep disturbances exert a detrimental influence on the course of these disorders and contribute to impaired function. Even when psychiatric disorders are successfully treated or stabilized, insomnia and other sleep disturbances often fail to remit. The present review focuses on sleep in two severe mental illnesses, namely bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. This article discusses the role of sleep disturbances and al...

  7. Psychiatric Morbidity Among Inmates of Leprosy Homes

    OpenAIRE

    K C Jindal; Gurvinder Pal Singh; Varinder Mohan; Mahajan, B. B.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Leprosy affected people are having high psychological distress and it in turn leads to psychiatric disorders. There is a paucity of literature from our country in this significant health problem. Aims: The aim of this study was to find the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity and its association with sociodemographic and clinical factors among the inmates of leprosy homes. Settings and Design: Study sample was obtained from individuals residing in two leprosy homes of malwa belt of Pu...

  8. Forensic Psychiatric Aspects of Impulse Control Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Soysal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Impulse control disorders is an important psychiatric disorder group which draws attention in recent years. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and other classical disorders like pyromania, kleptomania, intermittent explosive disorder and compulsive buying could be evasuated under this topic. The aim of this article is to review forensic psychiatric aspects of impulse control disorders and evaluate the disorders in terms of their legal status. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2015; 7(1: 16-29

  9. Caring potentials in the shadows of power, correction, and discipline - Forensic psychiatric care in the light of the work of Michel Foucault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörberg, Ulrica; Dahlberg, Karin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to shed light on contemporary forensic psychiatric care through a philosophical examination of the empirical results from two lifeworld phenomenological studies from the perspective of patients and carers, by using the French philosopher Michel Foucault's historical-philosophical work. Both empirical studies were conducted in a forensic psychiatric setting. The essential results of the two empirical studies were reexamined in a phenomenological meaning analysis to form a new general structure in accordance with the methodological principles of Reflective Lifeworld Research. This general structure shows how the caring on the forensic psychiatric wards appears to be contradictory, in that it is characterized by an unreflective (non-)caring attitude and contributes to an inconsistent and insecure existence. The caring appears to have a corrective approach and thus lacks a clear caring structure, a basic caring approach that patients in forensic psychiatric services have a great need of. To gain a greater understanding of forensic psychiatric caring, the new empirical results were further examined in the light of Foucault's historical-philosophical work. The philosophical examination is presented in terms of the three meaning constituents: Caring as correction and discipline, The existence of power, and Structures and culture in care. The philosophical examination illustrates new meaning nuances of the corrective and disciplinary nature of forensic psychiatric care, its power, and how this is materialized in caring, and what this does to the patients. The examination reveals embedded difficulties in forensic psychiatric care and highlights a need to revisit the aim of such care.

  10. Caring potentials in the shadows of power, correction, and discipline—Forensic psychiatric care in the light of the work of Michel Foucault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörberg, Ulrica; Dahlberg, Karin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to shed light on contemporary forensic psychiatric care through a philosophical examination of the empirical results from two lifeworld phenomenological studies from the perspective of patients and carers, by using the French philosopher Michel Foucault's historical–philosophical work. Both empirical studies were conducted in a forensic psychiatric setting. The essential results of the two empirical studies were reexamined in a phenomenological meaning analysis to form a new general structure in accordance with the methodological principles of Reflective Lifeworld Research. This general structure shows how the caring on the forensic psychiatric wards appears to be contradictory, in that it is characterized by an unreflective (non-)caring attitude and contributes to an inconsistent and insecure existence. The caring appears to have a corrective approach and thus lacks a clear caring structure, a basic caring approach that patients in forensic psychiatric services have a great need of. To gain a greater understanding of forensic psychiatric caring, the new empirical results were further examined in the light of Foucault's historical–philosophical work. The philosophical examination is presented in terms of the three meaning constituents: Caring as correction and discipline, The existence of power, and Structures and culture in care. The philosophical examination illustrates new meaning nuances of the corrective and disciplinary nature of forensic psychiatric care, its power, and how this is materialized in caring, and what this does to the patients. The examination reveals embedded difficulties in forensic psychiatric care and highlights a need to revisit the aim of such care. PMID:26319100

  11. Caring potentials in the shadows of power, correction, and discipline—Forensic psychiatric care in the light of the work of Michel Foucault

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrica Hörberg

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to shed light on contemporary forensic psychiatric care through a philosophical examination of the empirical results from two lifeworld phenomenological studies from the perspective of patients and carers, by using the French philosopher Michel Foucault's historical–philosophical work. Both empirical studies were conducted in a forensic psychiatric setting. The essential results of the two empirical studies were reexamined in a phenomenological meaning analysis to form a new general structure in accordance with the methodological principles of Reflective Lifeworld Research. This general structure shows how the caring on the forensic psychiatric wards appears to be contradictory, in that it is characterized by an unreflective (non-caring attitude and contributes to an inconsistent and insecure existence. The caring appears to have a corrective approach and thus lacks a clear caring structure, a basic caring approach that patients in forensic psychiatric services have a great need of. To gain a greater understanding of forensic psychiatric caring, the new empirical results were further examined in the light of Foucault's historical–philosophical work. The philosophical examination is presented in terms of the three meaning constituents: Caring as correction and discipline, The existence of power, and Structures and culture in care. The philosophical examination illustrates new meaning nuances of the corrective and disciplinary nature of forensic psychiatric care, its power, and how this is materialized in caring, and what this does to the patients. The examination reveals embedded difficulties in forensic psychiatric care and highlights a need to revisit the aim of such care.

  12. Persistence of Impaired Functioning and Psychological Distress After Medical Hospitalization for Men with Co-Occurring Psychiatric and Substance Use Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Brenda M; Blow, Frederic C; Loveland Cook, Cynthia A

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To measure the persistence of impaired health-related quality of life (HRQL) and psychological distress associated with co-occurring psychiatric and substance use disorders in a longitudinal sample of medically hospitalized male veterans. DESIGN A random sample followed observationally for 1 year after study enrollment. SETTING Inpatient medical and surgical wards at three university-affiliated Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers. PATIENTS/PARTICIPANTS A random sample of 1,007 admissions to medical and surgical inpatient services, excluding women and admissions for psychiatric reasons. A subset of participants (n = 736) was designated for longitudinal follow-up assessments at 3 and 12 months after study enrollment. This subset was selected to include all possible participants with study-administered psychiatric diagnoses (52%) frequency-matched by date of study enrollment to approximately equivalent numbers of participants without psychiatric diagnoses (48%). MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS All participants were administered a computerized structured psychiatric diagnostic interview for 13 psychiatric (include substance use) disorders and received longitudinal assessments at 3 and 12 months on a multidimensional measure of HRQL, the SF-36, and a measure of psychological distress, the Symptom Checklist, 90-item version. On average, HRQL declined and psychological distress increased over time (P < .05). Psychiatric disorders were associated with significantly greater impairments in functioning and increased distress on all measures (P < .001) except physical functioning (P < .05). These results were replicated in the patients (n = 130) who received inpatient or outpatient mental health or substance abuse services. CONCLUSIONS General medical physicians need to evaluate the mental health status of their hospitalized and seriously ill patients. Effective mental health interventions can be initiated posthospitalization, either immediately in primary

  13. Caring potentials in the shadows of power, correction, and discipline - Forensic psychiatric care in the light of the work of Michel Foucault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörberg, Ulrica; Dahlberg, Karin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to shed light on contemporary forensic psychiatric care through a philosophical examination of the empirical results from two lifeworld phenomenological studies from the perspective of patients and carers, by using the French philosopher Michel Foucault's historical-philosophical work. Both empirical studies were conducted in a forensic psychiatric setting. The essential results of the two empirical studies were reexamined in a phenomenological meaning analysis to form a new general structure in accordance with the methodological principles of Reflective Lifeworld Research. This general structure shows how the caring on the forensic psychiatric wards appears to be contradictory, in that it is characterized by an unreflective (non-)caring attitude and contributes to an inconsistent and insecure existence. The caring appears to have a corrective approach and thus lacks a clear caring structure, a basic caring approach that patients in forensic psychiatric services have a great need of. To gain a greater understanding of forensic psychiatric caring, the new empirical results were further examined in the light of Foucault's historical-philosophical work. The philosophical examination is presented in terms of the three meaning constituents: Caring as correction and discipline, The existence of power, and Structures and culture in care. The philosophical examination illustrates new meaning nuances of the corrective and disciplinary nature of forensic psychiatric care, its power, and how this is materialized in caring, and what this does to the patients. The examination reveals embedded difficulties in forensic psychiatric care and highlights a need to revisit the aim of such care. PMID:26319100

  14. Connectomics in psychiatric research: advances and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Miao; Wang, Zhijiang; He, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders disturb higher cognitive functions and severely compromise human health. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying psychiatric disorders are very complex, and understanding these mechanisms remains a great challenge. Currently, many psychiatric disorders are hypothesized to reflect "faulty wiring" or aberrant connectivity in the brains. Imaging connectomics is arising as a promising methodological framework for describing the structural and functional connectivity patterns of the human brain. Recently, alterations of brain networks in the connectome have been reported in various psychiatric disorders, and these alterations may provide biomarkers for disease diagnosis and prognosis for the evaluation of treatment efficacy. Here, we summarize the current achievements in both the structural and functional connectomes in several major psychiatric disorders (eg, schizophrenia, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and autism) based on multi-modal neuroimaging data. We highlight the current progress in the identification of these alterations and the hypotheses concerning the aberrant brain networks in individuals with psychiatric disorders and discuss the research questions that might contribute to a further mechanistic understanding of these disorders from a connectomic perspective. PMID:26604764

  15. Norms, Reliability, and Item Analysis of the Hopelessness Scale in General Psychiatric, Forensic Psychiatric, and College Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Thomas W.

    1982-01-01

    Administered the Hopelessness Scale to criminal psychiatric inpatients, general psychiatric inpatients, and college students. Both psychiatric groups endorsed significantly more items in the hopeless direction. Found the scale more reliable with the psychiatric patients. Item analysis of the Hopelessness Scale suggests that three items were not…

  16. Interprofessional communication between surgery trainees and nurses in the inpatient wards: Why time and space matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Oshan; Coburn, Natalie G; Nathens, Avery B; Hallet, Julie; Ahmed, Najma; Conn, Lesley Gotlib

    2016-09-01

    Optimal interprofessional communication (IPC) is broadly viewed as a prerequisite to providing quality patient care. In this study, we explored the enablers and barriers to IPC between surgical trainees and ward nurses with a view towards improving IPC and the quality of surgical patient care. We conducted an ethnography in two academic centres in Canada totalling 126 hours of observations and 32 semi-structured interviews with trainees and nurses. Our findings revealed constraints on IPC between trainees and nurses derived from contested meanings of space and time. Trainees experienced the contested spatial boundaries of the surgical ward when they perceived nurses to project a sense of territoriality. Nurses expressed difficulty getting trainees to respond and attend to pages from the ward, and to have a poor understanding of the nurses' role. Contestations over time spent in training and patient care were found in trainee-nurse interactions, wherein trainees perceived seasoned nurses to devalue their clinical knowledge on the ward. Nurses viewed the limited time that trainees spent in clinical rotation in the ward as adversely affecting communication. This study underscores that challenges to enhancing IPC at academic health centres are rooted in team and professional cultures. Efforts to improve IPC should therefore: identify and target the social and cultural dimensions of healthcare team member relations; recognise how power is deployed and experienced in ways that negatively impact IPC; and enhance an understanding and appreciation in the temporal and spatial dimensions of IPC. PMID:27315592

  17. Interprofessional communication between surgery trainees and nurses in the inpatient wards: Why time and space matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Oshan; Coburn, Natalie G; Nathens, Avery B; Hallet, Julie; Ahmed, Najma; Conn, Lesley Gotlib

    2016-09-01

    Optimal interprofessional communication (IPC) is broadly viewed as a prerequisite to providing quality patient care. In this study, we explored the enablers and barriers to IPC between surgical trainees and ward nurses with a view towards improving IPC and the quality of surgical patient care. We conducted an ethnography in two academic centres in Canada totalling 126 hours of observations and 32 semi-structured interviews with trainees and nurses. Our findings revealed constraints on IPC between trainees and nurses derived from contested meanings of space and time. Trainees experienced the contested spatial boundaries of the surgical ward when they perceived nurses to project a sense of territoriality. Nurses expressed difficulty getting trainees to respond and attend to pages from the ward, and to have a poor understanding of the nurses' role. Contestations over time spent in training and patient care were found in trainee-nurse interactions, wherein trainees perceived seasoned nurses to devalue their clinical knowledge on the ward. Nurses viewed the limited time that trainees spent in clinical rotation in the ward as adversely affecting communication. This study underscores that challenges to enhancing IPC at academic health centres are rooted in team and professional cultures. Efforts to improve IPC should therefore: identify and target the social and cultural dimensions of healthcare team member relations; recognise how power is deployed and experienced in ways that negatively impact IPC; and enhance an understanding and appreciation in the temporal and spatial dimensions of IPC.

  18. Acquired CNS Demyelinating Syndrome in Children Referred to Shiraz Pediatric Neurology Ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroor INALOO*

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Inaloo S, Haghbin S, Moradi M, Dashti H, Safari N. Acquired CNS Demyelinating Syndrome in Children Referred to Shiraz Pediatric Neurology Ward. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Spring; 8(2:18-23.ObjectiveIncidence of CNS acquired demyelinating syndrome (ADS, especially multiple sclerosis (MS in children, appears to be on the rise worldwide. The objective of this study was to determine prevalence, clinical presentation, neuroimagingfeatures, and prognosis of different types of ADS in Iranian children.Materials & MethodsDuring the period 2002-2012, all the patients (aged 1-18 years with ADS, such as MS, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM, optic neurotic (ON, Devic disease, and transverse myelitis (TM, referred to the pediatric neurology ward, Nemazee Hospital, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, were includedin this study. Demographic data, clinical signs and symptoms, past and family history, preclinical findings, clinical course, and outcome were obtained.ResultsWe identified 88 patients with ADS in our center. The most prevalent disease was MS with 36.5% (n=32, followed by AEDM 26.1% (n=31, ON 17% (n=13, TM 15.9% (n=14, and Devic disease 4.5% (n=4. MS, ON, TM were morecommon among females while ADEM was more common in males. Children with ADEM were significantly younger than those with other types of ADS.Family history was positive in 10% of patients with MS.Previous history of recent infection was considerably seen in cases with ADEM.Clinical presentation and prognosis in this study was in accordance with those in previous studies on children.ConclusionIn this study, the most common type of ADS was MS, which was more common in female and older age cases. ADEM was more common in male and younger children. ADEM and ON had the best and Devic disease had the worst prognosis.References1. Longer-Gould A, Zhaug JL, Chung J, Yeung Y, Wanbant E, Yao J. Incidence of acquired CNS demyelinating syndrome in a

  19. A study of suicide and attempted suicide by self-immolation in an Irish psychiatric population: an increasing problem.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donoghue, J M

    2012-02-03

    In the Western World self-immolation is an uncommon but dramatic method of attempting suicide. In-patients who attempt suicide by fire-setting tend to be female with severe psychopathology. In a previous study from the South of Ireland, seven cases from a psychiatric and prison population were identified in a five year period from 1984 to 1989. This would represent an annual rate of 1.07 per cent of burns treated in the burns unit at Cork University Hospital. In this study 12 cases were identified for the years 1994 and 1995. This represents an increase of 3.5 per cent from 1.07 to 4.6 per cent of all burns treated at the same institution. Ten of these patients had a previous psychiatric history and eight of them were resident on a psychiatric ward when they committed the act. Seven of the patients were found to have a high degree of suicide intent of whom four died of their injuries, which gives a mortality rate for this group of 33 per cent. Effective prevention policies are necessary if this increasing problem is to be curtailed.

  20. Neuroreceptor imaging in psychiatric disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankle, W.G. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY, (United States). Coll. of Physicians and Surgeons; Laruelle, M. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). New York State Psychiatric Inst.

    2002-11-01

    Molecular imaging, the study of receptors, transporters and enzymes, as well as other cellular processes, has grown in recent years to be one of the most active neuroimaging areas. The application of single photon emission tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) techniques to the study of psychiatric illness has lead to increased understanding of disease processes as well as validated, in vivo, theories of illness etiology. Within the field of psychiatry these techniques have been applied most widely to the study of schizophrenia. Studies within schizophrenia are largely limited to either the dopamine or serotonin system. This is due in large part to the availability of suitable radiotracers as well as the current theories on the etiology of the illness. Two basic study designs are used when studying schizophrenia using molecular imaging and make up the majority of studies reviewed in this manuscript. The first type, termed ''clinical studies'', compares the findings from PET and SPECT studies in those with schizophrenia to normal controls in an attempt to understand the pathophysiology of the illness. The second study design, termed ''occupancy studies'', uses these techniques to enhance the understanding of the mechanism of action of the medications used in treating this illness. This review will focus on the findings of molecular imaging studies in schizophrenia, focusing, for the most part, on the serotonin and dopamine systems. Emphasis will be placed on how these findings and techniques are currently being used to inform the development of novel treatments for schizophrenia. (author)

  1. Engram Formation in Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Gebicke-Haerter

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Environmental factors substantially influence beginning and progression of mental illness, reinforcing or reducing the consequences of genetic vulnerability. Often initiated by early traumatic events, engrams or memories are formed that may give rise to a slow and subtle progression of psychiatric disorders. The large delay between beginning and time of onset (diagnosis may be explained by efficient compensatory mechanisms observed in brain metabolism that use optional pathways in highly redundant molecular interactions.To this end, research has to deal with mechanisms of learning and long-term memory formation, which involves a epigenetic changes, b altered neuronal activities and c changes in neuron-glia communication. On the epigenetic level, apparently DNA-methylations are more stable than histone modifications, although both closely interact. Neuronal activities basically deliver digital information, which clearly can serve as basis for memory formation (LTP. However, research in this respect has long time neglected the importance of glia. They are more actively involved in the control of neuronal activities than thought before. They can both reinforce and inhibit neuronal activities by transducing neuronal information from frequency-encoded to amplitude and frequency-modulated calcium wave patterns spreading in the glial syncytium by use of gap junctions. In this way, they serve integrative functions. In conclusion, we are dealing with two concepts of encoding information that mutually control each other and synergize: a digital (neuronal and a wave-like (glial computing, forming neuron-glia functional units with inbuilt feedback loops to maintain balance of excitation and inhibition. To better understand mental illness, we have to gain more insight into the dynamics of adverse environmental impact on those cellular and molecular systems. This report summarizes existing knowledge and draws some outline about further research in molecular

  2. Outbreak of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in immunocompromised adults on a hematology ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Tomas Ostergaard; Stelzer-Braid, Sacha; Willenborg, Christiana; Cheung, Carol; Andresen, David; Rawlinson, William; Clezy, Kate

    2016-10-01

    We describe an outbreak of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection on a hematology ward without allogeneic stem cell transplant patients. Twelve patients and one staff member infected with RSV were identified from the laboratory database. Five patients had lower respiratory tract infection, seven had upper respiratory tract infection, one was asymptomatic, and there were two (15.4%) deaths. Most patients had overlapping periods of potential infectiousness on the ward. Sequencing was possible on eight specimens and five of these had identical sequences. Results were consistent with transmission occurring both on the ward and by introduction of RSV from the community. J. Med. Virol. 88:1827-1831, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990584

  3. Implementation and Evaluation of a Ward-Based eLearning Program for Trauma Patient Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Kate; Wiseman, Taneal; Kennedy, Belinda; Kourouche, Sarah; Goldsmith, Helen

    2016-01-01

    The majority of trauma nursing education is focused on the emergency phases of care. We describe the development and evaluation of a trauma eLearning module for the ward environment. The module was developed using adult learning principles and implemented in 2 surgical wards. There were 3 phases of evaluation: (1) self-efficacy of nurses; (2) relevance and usability of the module and; (3) application of knowledge learnt. The majority indicated they had applied new knowledge, particularly when performing a physical assessment (85.7%), communicating (91.4%), and identifying risk of serious illness (90.4%). Self-efficacy relating to confidence in caring for patients, communication, and escalating clinical deterioration improved (p = .023). An eLearning trauma patient assessment module for ward nursing staff improves nursing knowledge and self-efficacy. PMID:26745537

  4. The effects of introducing a clinical pharmacist on orthopaedic wards in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buck, Thomas Croft; Brandstrup, Lene; Brandslund, Ivan;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects and cost effects of introducing clinical pharmacists on hospital wards. METHODS: Comparative prospective study on four orthopaedic surgical wards in two hospitals. The primary effect variables were 10 target areas widely considered to be indicators of good...... sub-optimal prescriptions were changed, 43% resulted in cost reductions. The reductions achieved could cover 47% of the costs of clinical pharmacy service. CONCLUSION: Clinical pharmacy services offered to four orthopaedic surgical wards resulted in reduction of sub-optimal prescriptions. Every time...... the pharmacist screened seven patients one sub-optimal prescription was found and adjusted. The reduction in medicine costs due to adjusted sub-optimal prescriptions could not cover the whole cost of clinical pharmacy service....

  5. Psychiatric Aspects of Childhood Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raman Deep PATTANAYAK

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite this Article: Pattanayak RD, Sagar R. Psychiatric Aspects of Childhood Epilepsy. Iran J Child Neurol 2012;6(2:9-18.Childhood epilepsy is a chronic, recurrent disorder of unprovoked seizures. Theonset of epilepsy in childhood has significant implications for brain growth anddevelopment. Seizures may impair the ongoing neurodevelopmental processes and compromise the child’s intellectual and cognitive functioning, leading totremendous cognitive, behavioral and psychosocial consequences. Children with epilepsy are at increased risk for emotional and behavioral problems. In addition to the direct effects of epilepsy, there are multiple contributory factors including the underlying neurological abnormalities and adverse effects of medication. This review discusses the current understanding of various psychiatric aspects of childhood epilepsy, including the neuropsychological, behavioral and psychosocial concomitants of childhood epilepsy.References1. Shinnar S, Pellock JM. Update on the epidemiology and prognosis of pediatric epilepsy. J Child Neurol 2002;7 suppl 1:4-17.2. Murphy CC, Trevathan E, Yeargin-Allsopp M. Prevalence of epilepsy and epileptic seizures in 10-year-old children: results from the Metropolitan Atlanta Developmental Disabilities Study. Epilepsia 1995;36(9:866-72.3. Placencia M, Shorvon SD, Paredes V, Bimos C, Sander JW, Suarez J, et al. Epileptic seizures in an Andean region of Ecuador ncidence and prevalence and regional variation. Brain 1992;115:771-82.4. Henkin Y, Sadeh M, Kivity S, Shabtai E, KishonRabin L, Gadoth N. Cognitive function in idiopathic generalized epilepsy of childhood. Dev Med Child Neurol 2005;47:126-32.5. Rodenburg R, Stams GJ, Meijer AM, Aldenkamp AP, Dekovic M. Psychopathology in children with epilepsy: a meta-analysis. J Pediatr Psychol 2005;30(6:453-68.6. Caplan R, Siddarth P, Gurbani S, Ott D, Sankar R, Shields WD. Psychopathology and pediatric complex partial seizures: seizure

  6. Aggressive behaviors in the psychiatric emergency service

    OpenAIRE

    Yves Chaput; Lucie Beaulieu; Michel Paradis; et al, ...

    2011-01-01

    Yves Chaput1, Lucie Beaulieu2, Michel Paradis3, Edith Labonté41Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal (presently in private practice); 2Department of Psychiatry, Haut Richelieu Hospital, Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec; 3Department of Psychiatry, University of Montreal, Montreal; 4Department of Psychiatry, Laval University, Quebec, CanadaIntroduction: Studies of aggressive behaviors in a nonforensic mental health setting have focused primarily on the inpatient ward ...

  7. Clinically useful predictors for premature mortality among psychiatric patients visiting a psychiatric emergency room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jørgen; Buus, Niels; Wernlund, Andreas Glahn;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine changes in the distribution of causes of death and mortality rates among psychiatric patients visiting a psychiatric emergency room (PER), to determine clinically useful predictors for avoiding premature mortality among these patients and to discuss...

  8. Does doctors’ workload impact supervision and ward activities of final-year students? A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celebi Nora

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospital doctors face constantly increasing workloads. Besides caring for patients, their duties also comprise the education of future colleagues. The aim of this study was to objectively investigate whether the workload arising from increased patient care interferes with student supervision and is associated with more non-medical activities of final-year medical students. Methods A total of 54 final-year students were asked to keep a diary of their daily activities over a three-week period at the beginning of their internship in Internal Medicine. Students categorized their activities – both medical and non-medical - according to whether they had: (1 only watched, (2 assisted the ward resident, (3 performed the activity themselves under supervision of the ward resident, or (4 performed the activity without supervision. The activities reported on a particular day were matched with a ward specific workload-index derived from the hospital information system, including the number of patients treated on the corresponding ward on that day, a correction factor according to the patient comorbidity complexity level (PCCL, and the number of admissions and discharges. Both students and ward residents were blinded to the study question. Results A total of 32 diaries (59 %, 442 recorded working days were handed back. Overall, the students reported 1.2 ± 1.3 supervised, 1.8 ±1.6 medical and 3.6 ± 1.7 non-medical activities per day. The more supervised activities were reported, the more the number of reported medical activities increased (p  Conclusions There was a significant association between ward doctors’ supervision of students and the number of medical activities performed by medical students. The workload had no significant effect on supervision or the number of medical or non-medical activities of final-year students.

  9. [The leadership style exercised by nurses in surgical wards focuses on situational leadership].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvão, C M; Trevizan, M A; Sawada, N O; Fávero, N

    1997-04-01

    The present study was oriented to the leadership theme focussing nurses inside surgical ward unities. As a theoretical reference, the authors used the Situational Leadership Model proposed by Hersey and Blanchard. This study aimed at analysing the correspondence between the opinions of nurses and auxiliary personnel about the leadership style exerted by nurses in the surgical ward unit regarding the six categories of the assistance activity that were studied. Authors noticed that nurses, from the two studied hospitals, adopted the directive leadership styles (E2/selling or E1/telling) with the auxiliary personnel.

  10. Predicting Spatial Distribution of Infection Risk of Airborne Transmission Diseases in a Hospital Ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qian, Hua; Li, Yuguo; Nielsen, Peter V.;

    2007-01-01

    This study attempt to integrate the Wells-Riley equation and computational fluid dynamics for analyzing the risk of airborne transmission diseases in a building. The new method can predict the spatial distribution of the infection risk of the airborne transmission diseases in a large hospital ward......, while the Wells-Riley equation alone can only predict the overall infection risk in the whole building assuming a uniform distribution of the droplet nuclei concentration. This new method is applied to analyze the transmission risk in the well documented 8A ward SARS outbreak in a Hong Kong hospital...

  11. Functional flows in QED and the modified Ward-Takahashi identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Yuji; Itoh, Katsumi; Pawlowski, Jan M.

    2016-10-01

    In the functional renormalisation group approach to gauge theory, the Ward-Takahashi identity is modified due to the presence of an infrared cutoff term. It take the most accessible form for the Wilsonian effective action. In the present work we solve these identities, partially, for the Wilsonian effective action of QED. In particular, we compute the longitudinal part of the photon two point vertex function as a momentum-dependent function in the presence of the cutoff k. The resultant Wilsonian effective action carries form factors that originate from the modified Ward-Takahashi identity. We show how this result carries over to the one-particle-irreducible effective action.

  12. Functional flows in QED and the modified Ward-Takahashi identity

    CERN Document Server

    Igarashi, Yuji; Pawlowski, Jan M

    2016-01-01

    In the functional renormalisation group approach to gauge theory, the Ward-Takahashi identity is modified due to the presence of an infrared cutoff term. It take the most accessible form for the Wilsonian effective action. In the present work we solve these identities, partially, for the Wilson effective action of QED. In particular, we compute the longitudinal part of the photon two point vertex function as a momentum- dependent function in the presence of the cutoff k. The resultant Wilsonian effective action carries form factors that originate from the modified Ward-Takahashi identity. We show how this result carries over to the one-particle-irreducible effective action.

  13. Risk Factors and Scoring System for Predicting Bacterial Resistance to Cefepime as Used Empirically in Haematology Wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicham El Maaroufi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Bacterial resistance is of growing concern in haematology wards. As the inappropriate administration of empirical antibacterial may alter survival, we studied risk factors for resistance to our usual empirical first-line antibacterial therapy, cefepime. Methods. We retrospectively studied 103 first episodes of bacteraemia recorded in our haematology department over 2.5 years. Risk factors for cefepime-resistance were identified by multivariate logistic regression with backward selection (P<0.05. A scoring system for predicting cefepime-resistance was built on independent factor, with an internal validation by the bootstrap resampling technique. Results. 38 (37% episodes were due to Gram-negative bacteria. Fifty (49% were due to bacteria resistant to cefepime. Cefepime resistance was significantly associated with a decreased survival at day 30 (P<0.05. Three risk factors were independently associated with cefepime-resistance: acute lymphoblastic leukaemia; ≥18 days since hospital admission; and receipt of any β-lactam in the last month. Patients with ≥2 of these risk factors had a probability of 86% (CI 95%, 25 to 100% to carry a cefepime-resistant strain. Conclusion. Using our scoring system should reduce the indication of very broad antibacterial regimens in the empirical, first-line treatment of febrile hematology patients in more than 80% of the cases.

  14. Less is more: a project to reduce the number of PIMs (potentially inappropriate medications) on an elderly care ward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Tin Htun; Judith Beck, Adèle; Siese, Thomas; Berrisford, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Potentially inappropriate prescribing in healthcare of the elderly (HCE) is associated with avoidable adverse drug events (ADEs).1,2 A recent set of prescribing criteria has been designed and validated, called “Screening Tool of Older Persons' Prescriptions” (STOPP), to rationalise prescribing in hospitalised patients on HCE wards.1,3 The aim of this quality improvement project was to identify how many potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) were prescribed on these wards, and remove them. This was executed by implementing a ward round checklist, which incorporated STOPP criteria, for the twice weekly, consultant led ward rounds. This quality improvement project was carried out over four months. In a pilot study, we identified eight inappropriate medical prescriptions among 148 medications (5.4% ) prescribed on one ward. After applying a checklist for a structured ward round, we reviewed the medications prescribed on that ward, and found 10 PIMs out of 192 (5.2% ). Utilising the increasingly recognised “plan, do, study, act” (PDSA) cycle,4 we implemented departmental teaching and meetings with other members of the multidisciplinary team, which raised awareness of PIMs among junior doctors, as well as involving our pharmacists in drug chart screening. During this process we continued with a further six cycles on a bi-weekly basis, and saw a gradual decrease in PIM to 1.5%. In conclusion, a structured ward round, facilitated by a checklist that included review of drug charts based on STOPP criteria, demonstrated a considerable reduction of PIMs. It would be interesting to apply this quality improvement project to non-HCE wards, including general surgical wards or adult psychiatry wards, as a means of not only reducing the effects of ADEs, but also the expenditure associated with unnecessary drug prescriptions, and the costs associated with additional care arising from associated ADEs. PMID:27096089

  15. Clinical impact of potentially inappropriate medications during hospitalization of acutely ill older patients with multimorbidity

    OpenAIRE

    Kersten, Hege; Hvidsten, Lara T; Gløersen, Gløer; Wyller, Torgeir Bruun; Wang-Hansen, Marte Sofie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs), to compare drug changes between geriatric and other medical wards, and to investigate the clinical impact of PIMs in acutely hospitalized older adults. Setting and subjects: Retrospective study of 232 home-dwelling, multimorbid older adults (aged ≥75 years) acutely admitted to Vestfold Hospital Trust, Norway. Main outcome measures. PIMs were identified by Norwegian general practice (NORGEP) criteria and Beers’ 2012 criteria....

  16. Survey of the management of acute asthma in children.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Widger, J

    2009-12-01

    Acute asthma is one of the most common reasons for children presenting to the emergency department. International guidelines for the management of acute paediatric asthma are widely available. In this study we examined how acute asthma in children is managed across hospitals in Ireland and compared Irish practice with standard international guidelines. We surveyed 54 paediatricians across 18 centres in Ireland. A total of 30 (55.5%) individual paediatricians across 17 (94%) centres replied. The majority of centres had a written protocol for the management of acute asthma. A large number of centres use MDI and spacer devices in acute management although doses used varied widely. Only 29% of centres had written asthma action plans available from the emergency department and 53% had plans available from the ward. Irish practice is largely inline with established guidelines. A national asthma strategy could further help to improve asthma care.

  17. The serotonin transporter in psychiatric disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spies, Marie; Knudsen, Karen Birgitte Moos; Lanzenberger, Rupert;

    2015-01-01

    and might therefore be relevant for stratification of patients into clinical subsets. PET has enabled the elucidation of mechanisms of response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and hence provides a basis for rational pharmacological treatment of major depressive disorder. Such imaging......Over the past 20 years, psychotropics affecting the serotonergic system have been used extensively in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. Molecular imaging, in particular PET, has allowed for elucidation of the essential contribution of the serotonin transporter to the pathophysiology...... of various psychiatric disorders and their treatment. We review studies that use PET to measure cerebral serotonin transporter activity in psychiatric disorders, focusing on major depressive disorder and antidepressant treatment. We also discuss opportunities and limitations in the application...

  18. Regionalization of psychiatric services for the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, K I

    1991-02-01

    This overview addresses issues related to psychiatric services for the elderly in Canada. The author reviews the developments in the United Kingdom that have led to the establishment of guiding principles which may be applied to the Canadian health care system. These include the clear definition of a target population, a comprehensive approach to services, availability and accessibility, and clear accountability. A model for the establishment of regionalized psychiatric services is proposed, including the integration of hospital-based and community-based services with clearly defined areas of responsibility. In light of the changing demographics in Canada and the prevalence of psychiatric illness in the elderly, this is a matter of growing urgency for the health care system. PMID:2029681

  19. Defining the psychiatric role in spastic dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, B I; Wallack, J J; Srain, J J; Biller, H F

    1988-03-01

    The authors evaluated 11 surgically-treated patients with spastic dysphonia, a phonation disorder of unclear etiology. The results indicate that the illness does not appear to be a somatoform disorder, but that stress may play a role in its expression, and that there may be secondary depression and anxiety. The experience of spastic dysphonics suggests that psychiatric treatments may be inappropriately applied to an illness without clear organic etiology, whereas, conversely, a proper psychiatric role may be rejected when effective medical or surgical treatment is available. The authors recommend that psychiatrists evaluating patients with illnesses of unclear etiology should be cautious in making a primary psychiatric diagnosis unless DSM-III criteria are met.

  20. Negative rumor: contagion of a psychiatric department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novac, Andrei; McEwan, Stephanie; Bota, Robert G

    2014-01-01

    Over the past few decades, a sizable body of literature on the effects of rumors and gossip has emerged. Addressing rumors in the workplace is an important subject, as rumors have a direct impact on the quality of the work environment and also on the productivity and creativity of the employees. To date, little has been written on the effect of rumors and gossip in psychiatric hospitals. This article presents case vignettes of rumors spread in psychiatric hospitals and the impact on team cohesion and morale among the staff implicated in these, too often, neglected occurrences. Dynamic aspects with particular focus on rumors in psychiatric units and suggestions for remedy and treatment are presented. PMID:25133051

  1. Parental psychiatric hospitalisation and offspring schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Holger J; Mortensen, Erik L; Reinisch, June M;

    2009-01-01

    of schizophrenia and a range of psychotic and non-psychotic psychiatric diagnoses in parents. Psychiatric admission data after 1969 were available for 7047 cohort members born between 1959 and 1961, and for 7006 mothers and 6993 fathers. Univariate analysis showed that neurosis, alcohol and substance dependence...... in both parents were associated with elevated risk of offspring schizophrenia; in addition, maternal schizophrenia, affective disorder and personality disorder were associated with elevated risk. Controlling for parental age, parental social status, and parental psychiatric co-diagnosis, offspring risk...... of schizophrenia was associated with maternal schizophrenia (OR = 15.41 with 95% CI 5.96-39.81) and, independently, with paternal hospitalisation with neurosis (OR = 5.90 with 95% CI 2.23-15.62). The risk of schizophrenia associated with paternal neurosis remained significant after excluding offspring of parents...

  2. Ethical Challenges in Psychiatric Administration and Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffic, H Steven; Saeed, Sy Atezaz; Silver, Stuart; Koh, Steve

    2015-09-01

    As with all professional ethical principles, those in psychiatry have to evolve over time and societal changes. The current ethical challenges for psychiatric administration and leadership, especially regarding for-profit managed care, need updated solutions. One solution resides in the development by the American Association of Psychiatric Administrators (AAPA) of the first set of ethical principles designed specifically for psychiatric administrators. These principles build on prior Psychological Theories of leadership, such as those of Freud, Kernberg, and Kohut. Supplementing these theories are the actual real life models of psychiatrist leadership as depicted in the memoirs of various psychiatrists. Appreciating these principles, theories, and models may help emerging leaders to better recognize the importance of ethical challenges. A conclusion is that psychiatrists should have the potential to assume more successful leadership positions once again. In such positions, making the skills and well-being of all in the organization seems now to be the foremost ethical priority.

  3. Ethical Challenges in Psychiatric Administration and Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffic, H Steven; Saeed, Sy Atezaz; Silver, Stuart; Koh, Steve

    2015-09-01

    As with all professional ethical principles, those in psychiatry have to evolve over time and societal changes. The current ethical challenges for psychiatric administration and leadership, especially regarding for-profit managed care, need updated solutions. One solution resides in the development by the American Association of Psychiatric Administrators (AAPA) of the first set of ethical principles designed specifically for psychiatric administrators. These principles build on prior Psychological Theories of leadership, such as those of Freud, Kernberg, and Kohut. Supplementing these theories are the actual real life models of psychiatrist leadership as depicted in the memoirs of various psychiatrists. Appreciating these principles, theories, and models may help emerging leaders to better recognize the importance of ethical challenges. A conclusion is that psychiatrists should have the potential to assume more successful leadership positions once again. In such positions, making the skills and well-being of all in the organization seems now to be the foremost ethical priority. PMID:26024739

  4. The role of Tc-99m HMPAO brain perfusion SPECT in the psychiatric disability evaluation of patients with chronic traumatic brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, Young [Nuclear Medicne, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kang Wook; Lee, Sun Woo; Ghi, Lek Sung; Song, Chang June [College of Medicine, Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-08-01

    We studied whether brain perfusion SPECT is useful in the psychiatric disability evaluation of patients with chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI). Sixty-nine patients (M:F=58:11, age 39 {+-} 14 years) who underwent Tc-99m HMPAO brain SPECT, brain MRI and neuropsychological (NP) tests during hospitalization in psychiatric wards for the psychiatric disability evaluation were included; the severity of injury was mild in 31, moderate in 17 and severe in 21. SPECT, MRI, NP tests were performed 6 {approx} 61 months (mean 23 months) post-injury. Diagnostic accuracy of SPECT and MRI to show hypoperfusion or abnormal signal intensity in patients with cognitive impairment represented by NP test results were compared. Forty-two patients were considered to have cognitive impairment on NP tests and 27 not. Brain SPECT showed 71% sensitivity and 85% specificity, while brain MRI showed 62% sensitivity and 93% specificity (p>0.05, McNemar test). SPECT found more cortical lesions and MRI was superior in detecting white matter lesions. sensitivity and specificity of 31 mild TBI patients were 45%, 90% for SPECT and 27%, 100% for MRI (p>0.05, McNemar test). Among 41 patients with normal brain MRI, SEPCT showed 63% sensitivity (50% for mild TBI) and 88% specificity (85% for malingerers). Brain SPECT has a supplementary role to neuropsychological tests in the psychiatric disability evaluation of chronic TBI patients by detecting more cortical lesions than MRI.

  5. The role of Tc-99m HMPAO brain perfusion SPECT in the psychiatric disability evaluation of patients with chronic traumatic brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied whether brain perfusion SPECT is useful in the psychiatric disability evaluation of patients with chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI). Sixty-nine patients (M:F=58:11, age 39 ± 14 years) who underwent Tc-99m HMPAO brain SPECT, brain MRI and neuropsychological (NP) tests during hospitalization in psychiatric wards for the psychiatric disability evaluation were included; the severity of injury was mild in 31, moderate in 17 and severe in 21. SPECT, MRI, NP tests were performed 6 ∼ 61 months (mean 23 months) post-injury. Diagnostic accuracy of SPECT and MRI to show hypoperfusion or abnormal signal intensity in patients with cognitive impairment represented by NP test results were compared. Forty-two patients were considered to have cognitive impairment on NP tests and 27 not. Brain SPECT showed 71% sensitivity and 85% specificity, while brain MRI showed 62% sensitivity and 93% specificity (p>0.05, McNemar test). SPECT found more cortical lesions and MRI was superior in detecting white matter lesions. sensitivity and specificity of 31 mild TBI patients were 45%, 90% for SPECT and 27%, 100% for MRI (p>0.05, McNemar test). Among 41 patients with normal brain MRI, SEPCT showed 63% sensitivity (50% for mild TBI) and 88% specificity (85% for malingerers). Brain SPECT has a supplementary role to neuropsychological tests in the psychiatric disability evaluation of chronic TBI patients by detecting more cortical lesions than MRI

  6. Diagnosis and management of acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ural, Dilek; Çavuşoğlu, Yüksel; Eren, Mehmet; Karaüzüm, Kurtuluş; Temizhan, Ahmet; Yılmaz, Mehmet Birhan; Zoghi, Mehdi; Ramassubu, Kumudha; Bozkurt, Biykem

    2015-11-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is a life threatening clinical syndrome with a progressively increasing incidence in general population. Turkey is a country with a high cardiovascular mortality and recent national statistics show that the population structure has turned to an 'aged' population.As a consequence, AHF has become one of the main reasons of admission to cardiology clinics. This consensus report summarizes clinical and prognostic classification of AHF, its worldwide and national epidemiology, diagnostic work-up, principles of approach in emergency department,intensive care unit and ward, treatment in different clinical scenarios and approach in special conditions and how to plan hospital discharge. PMID:26574757

  7. The effect of an out-of-hours reform on attendance at casualty wards. The Danish example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsted, Peter; Christensen, Morten Bondo

    2001-01-01

    in the attendance rate with casualty wards after the reform was statistically insignificant. CONCLUSIONS: The decrease in the total number of contacts with the out-of-hours primary health care after the reform was not met by a corresponding increase in casualty ward contacts. A clear-cut significant increase...

  8. The effect of multi-professional education on the recognition and outcome of patients at risk on general wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrmann, L.; Perner, A.; Klausen, T.W.;

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of multi-professional full-scale simulation-based education of staff on the mortality and staff awareness of patients at risk on general wards. DESIGN, SETTINGS AND PATIENTS: A prospective before-and-after study conducted on four general wards...

  9. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Acute Pancreatitis > Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy test Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is ... of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for ...

  10. Psychobiotics: An emerging probiotic in psychiatric practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kali, Arunava

    2016-06-01

    Intestinal microbial flora plays critical role in maintenance of health. Probiotic organisms have been recognized as an essential therapeutic component in the treatment of intestinal dysbiosis. Current research suggests their health benefits extends beyond intestinal disorders. The neuroactive molecules produced by the gut microbiota has been found to modulate neural signals which affect neurological and psychiatric parameters like sleep, appetite, mood and cognition. Use of these novel probiotics opens up the possibility of restructuring of intestinal microbiota for effective management of various psychiatric disorders. PMID:27621125

  11. 综合医院老年住院患者联络会诊精神医学服务模式探讨%Consultation-liaison psychiatric service for elderly inpatients in a general hospital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪霞; 赵晓晖; 曾平; 史丽丽; 曹锦亚; 魏镜

    2015-01-01

    psychiatric service for these patients. Methods All the patients over 65 years old or more hospitalized in the demonstration wards of a general hospital during September 2009 to August 2012 were recruited in this study. They were assessed with CGA by Zung’s Self-rating Depression Scale and Zung’s Self-rating Anxiety Scale at admission. Ward round by geriatric multidisciplinary team and CLPS were offered when necessary. Psychiatric diagnoses were made by a psychiatrist according to the International Classification of Diseases-10 (ICD-10). Their outcomes were compared with those of the elderly inpatients aged 65 years old or more in other wards in the same time frame (control group). Results There were 146 patients from geriatric ward receiving psychiatric service, with a consultation rate of 28.2%, while 520 patients from the other wards receiving the service, with a rate of 1.5% (P=0.000). In geriatric ward, the top 3 reasons for referral were emotional problems (44.5%), follow-up problems (16.4%), and medical unexplained symptoms (10.3%). But for those of other wards, the reasons were emotional problems (37.9%), psychiatric problems (20.4%) and medical unexplained symptoms (10.1%) (P=0.000). The major psychiatric diagnoses were neurosis and stress related disorders (29.7%), mood disorders (26.9%) and organic psychiatric disorders (21.4%) in geriatric ward; while, neurosis and stress related disorders (35.0%), organic psychiatric disorders (28.8%) and mood disorders (16.5%) in other wards (P=0.001). Conclusion CLPS based on CGA, psychiatric consultation and ward round of multidisciplinary team can promote consultation rate for psychiatric consultation in the elderly inpatients in a general hospital, and worth of wildly application in clinical practice.

  12. Ward identities and the vanishing theorem for loop amplitudes of the closed N=2 string

    CERN Document Server

    Jünemann, K; Junemann, Klaus; Lechtenfeld, Olaf

    2000-01-01

    The existence of a ground ring of ghost number zero operators in the chiral BRST cohomology of the N=2 string is used to derive an infinite set of Ward identities for the closed-string scattering amplitudes at arbitrary genus. These identities are sufficient to rederive the well known vanishing theorem for loop amplitudes with more than three external legs.

  13. Audit of a ward-based patient-controlled epidural analgesia service in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tan, T

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Ward-based patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) for postoperative pain control was introduced at our institution in 2006. We audited the efficacy and safety of ward-based PCEA from January 2006 to December 2008. METHOD: Data were collected from 928 patients who received PCEA in general surgical wards for postoperative analgesia using bupivacaine 0.125% with fentanyl 2 mug\\/mL. RESULTS: On the first postoperative day, the median visual analogue pain score was 2 at rest and 4 on activity. Hypotension occurred in 21 (2.2%) patients, excessive motor blockade in 16 (1.7%), high block in 5 (0.5%), nausea in 5 (0.5%) and pruritus in only 1 patient. Excessive sedation occurred in two (0.2%) patients but no intervention was required. There were no serious complications such as epidural abscess, infection or haematoma. CONCLUSION: Effective and safe postoperative analgesia can be provided with PCEA in a general surgical ward without recourse to high-dependency supervision.

  14. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nurses Working in an Open Ward: Stress and Work Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Feeley, Nancy; Lavigne, Geneviève L; Genest, Christine; Robins, Stéphanie; Fréchette, Julie

    2016-01-01

    There is some research on the impact of open-ward unit design on the health of babies and the stress experienced by parents and nurses in neonatal intensive care units. However, few studies have explored the factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in open-ward neonatal intensive care units. The purpose of this study was to examine what factors are associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in an open-ward neonatal intensive care unit. A cross-sectional correlational design was used in this study. Participants were nurses employed in a 34-bed open-ward neonatal intensive care unit in a major university-affiliated hospital in Montréal, Quebec, Canada. A total of 94 nurses were eligible, and 86 completed questionnaires (91% response rate). Descriptive statistics were computed to describe the participants' characteristics. To identify factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction, correlational analysis and multiple regression analyses were performed with the Nurse Stress Scale and the Global Work Satisfaction scores as the dependent variables. Different factors predict neonatal intensive care unit nurses' stress and job satisfaction, including support, family-centered care, performance obstacles, work schedule, education, and employment status. In order to provide neonatal intensive care units nurses with a supportive environment, managers can provide direct social support to nurses and influence the culture around teamwork. PMID:27455363

  15. Incidence of nutritional support complications in patient hospitalized in wards. multicentric study

    OpenAIRE

    Gloria María Agudelo Ochoa; Nubia Amparo Giraldo Giraldo; Nora Luz Aguilar; Beatriz Elena Restrepo; Marcela Vanegas; Sandra Alzate; Mónica Martínez; Sonia Patriacia Gamboa; Eliana Castaño; Janeth Barbosa; Juliana Román; Angela María Serna; Gloria Marcela Hoyos

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Nutritional support generates complications that must be detected and treated on time. Objective: To estimate the incidence of some complications of nutritional support in patients admitted to general hospital wards who received nutritional support in six high-complexity institutions. Methods: Prospective, descriptive and multicentric study in patients with nutritional support; the variables studied were medical diagnosis, nutritional condition, nutritional support duration, app...

  16. Potentially pathogenic free-living amoebae isolated from hospital wards with immunodeficient patients in Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasjerdi, Zohreh; Niyyati, Maryam; Haghighi, Ali; Shahabi, Saed; Biderouni, Farid Tahvildar; Taghipour, Niloofar; Eftekhar, Mohamad; Nazemalhosseini Mojarad, Ehsan

    2011-09-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of free-living amoebae (FLA) in immunodeficiency wards of hospitals in Tehran, Iran. A total of 70 dust and biofilm samples from wards serving transplant, pediatric (malignancies), HIV, leukemia and oncology patients of five university hospitals were collected and examined for the presence of FLA using culturing and molecular approaches. Based on the morphology of the amoebae in plate cultures, primer sets were applied for molecular identification of Acanthamoeba, vahlkampfiid amoebae and Hartmannella. Out of 70 samples, 37 (52.9%) were positive for FLA. Acanthamoeba belonged to the T4 genotype was the most prevalent isolate. Presence of the T4 genotype on medical instruments, including an oxygen mask in an isolation room of an immunodeficiency pediatric ward, should be of concern for health authorities. Acanthamoeba T5 genotypes, Hartmannella vermiformis, and Vahlkampfia avara were also present. These results highlight a clear need for greater attention to improved disinfection, especially where susceptible patients, such as those who are immune-suppressed, are served. To our knowledge, this is the first report of these FLA in immunodeficiency wards in Iran, and also the first to identify Acanthamoeba T5, Hartmannella, and Vahlkampfia in moist habitats, such as biofilms, in this country.

  17. Constructing and Evaluating a Validity Argument for the Final-Year Ward Simulation Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, Hettie; Ker, Jean; Myford, Carol; Stirling, Kevin; Mires, Gary

    2015-01-01

    The authors report final-year ward simulation data from the University of Dundee Medical School. Faculty who designed this assessment intend for the final score to represent an individual senior medical student's level of clinical performance. The results are included in each student's portfolio as one source of evidence of the student's…

  18. Psychological Evaluation of Patients in Critical Care/Intensive Care Unit and Patients Admitted in Wards

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma B, Gaurav; EVS, Maben; MS, Kotian; B., Ganaraja

    2014-01-01

    Background: Psychological assessment for depression, anxiety and stress among ICU patients and the patients admitted to ward in a hospital in India. This aspect did not get much attention in India so far. Such studies were common in developed countries. Therefore we decided in this study, to analyse the psychological status responses from the hospitalised patients in Mangalore using a validated questionnaire.

  19. Changes in Emotion Work at Interdisciplinary Conferences Following Clinical Supervision in a Palliative Outpatient Ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete

    2008-01-01

    In this article, I describe changes in emotion work at weekly interdisciplinary conferences in a palliative1 outpatient ward following clinical supervision (CS). I conceive emotions as constantly negotiated in interaction, and I researched the similarity between how this is done during CS and at ...... conclude that CS enhances professional development and may prevent burnout in palliative care....

  20. HRM and strategic climates in hospitals: does the message come accross at the ward level?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veld, M.; Paauwe, J.; Boselie, J.P.P.E.F.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined how employees perceive intended strategic goals and HRM at the ward level, and if these perceptions generate the desired effects. The qualitative part of the research reveals that the hospital pursues two strategic goals (i.e. quality and safety). Analysis of the questionnaire da

  1. SUSY Ward identities for multi-gluon helicity amplitudes with massive quarks

    OpenAIRE

    Schwinn, Christian; Weinzierl, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    We use supersymmetric Ward identities to relate multi-gluon helicity amplitudes involving a pair of massive quarks to amplitudes with massive scalars. This allows to use the recent results for scalar amplitudes with an arbitrary number of gluons obtained by on-shell recursion relations to obtain scattering amplitudes involving top quarks.

  2. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nurses Working in an Open Ward: Stress and Work Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Feeley, Nancy; Lavigne, Geneviève L; Genest, Christine; Robins, Stéphanie; Fréchette, Julie

    2016-01-01

    There is some research on the impact of open-ward unit design on the health of babies and the stress experienced by parents and nurses in neonatal intensive care units. However, few studies have explored the factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in open-ward neonatal intensive care units. The purpose of this study was to examine what factors are associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in an open-ward neonatal intensive care unit. A cross-sectional correlational design was used in this study. Participants were nurses employed in a 34-bed open-ward neonatal intensive care unit in a major university-affiliated hospital in Montréal, Quebec, Canada. A total of 94 nurses were eligible, and 86 completed questionnaires (91% response rate). Descriptive statistics were computed to describe the participants' characteristics. To identify factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction, correlational analysis and multiple regression analyses were performed with the Nurse Stress Scale and the Global Work Satisfaction scores as the dependent variables. Different factors predict neonatal intensive care unit nurses' stress and job satisfaction, including support, family-centered care, performance obstacles, work schedule, education, and employment status. In order to provide neonatal intensive care units nurses with a supportive environment, managers can provide direct social support to nurses and influence the culture around teamwork.

  3. Missed Opportunities for Nutritional Rehabilitation in Children Admitted to Surgical Wards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Pooja; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar; Phatak, Ajay; Desai, Rajendra; Srivastava, Shirish

    2016-01-01

    Background. Malnutrition in children has serious health and economic consequences. We studied documentation of malnutrition, actual prevalence, and treatment given in children admitted to surgical wards. Methods. Retrospective study of 154 patients aged <5 yrs admitted to general surgical, orthopedic, and otorhinolaryngology wards. Records were evaluated for completeness of data, way of documentation, and data quality. Descriptive analysis was done. If malnutrition was not identified and/or proper action was not taken, it was defined as a “missed opportunity.” Results. Of 154 records audited, 100 (64.94%) were males, 108 (70.13%) were from general surgery ward, and 78 (50.65%) were residing in suburban area. The mean (SD) age of the study population was 2.32 (1.16) years whereas mean (SD) duration of stay was 5.84 (6.29) days. Weight and height were mentioned in 116 (75.32%) and 8 (5.19%) records, respectively, mostly by nonsurgical personnel. Documentation and treatment of malnutrition were poor. Out of 106 apparently correct weight records, 19 (17.93%) children were severely undernourished and 30 (28.30%) were moderately undernourished whereas 20 (18.87%) children were not undernourished but required nutritional attention. Conclusion. There is poor documentation of nutritional indicators of children admitted to surgical wards. From data that was available, it is apparent that malnutrition is at high levels. “Identification” and hence management of malnutrition need more attention.

  4. Proposed Reference Model for Guiding Teachers to Perform Ward Round Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Alberto Corona Martínez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ward round teaching is an essential professional medical activity as an organizational form of teaching in undergraduate medical education. Its great importance for shaping a professional "personality" is well recognized by the faculty; as well as its extremely complex implementation and development of the necessary skills. The problem to be solved in this paper is related to the need to help younger clinical teachers in undergraduate medical education to develop the skills to conduct ward round teaching; which would be achieved through appropriate guidance on how to perform this activity. Based on this, the teaching staff in the Department of Clinical Sciences of the Dr. Raúl Dorticós Torrado Faculty of Medical Sciences in Cienfuegos has designed a model or representation of ward round teaching to be used as a guide. The main results include the development of a model with two variants, according to the care provided to a recently admitted patient or an already known patient; and the definition of conditions, both in practical and educational areas, which should be considered for the proper implementation of the activity. The model is not a complete representation of the ward round teaching, thus the proposal is open to review and improvement; and its use is based on its adaptation to the particularities of the different disciplines and learning scenarios.

  5. Information Needs Assessment for a Medicine Ward-Focused Rounding Dashboard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aakre, Christopher A; Chaudhry, Rajeev; Pickering, Brian W; Herasevich, Vitaly

    2016-08-01

    To identify the routine information needs of inpatient clinicians on the general wards for the development of an electronic dashboard. Survey of internal medicine and subspecialty clinicians from March 2014-July 2014 at Saint Marys Hospital in Rochester, Minnesota. An information needs assessment was generated from all unique data elements extracted from all handoff and rounding tools used by clinicians in our ICUs and general wards. An electronic survey was distributed to 104 inpatient medical providers. 89 unique data elements were identified from currently utilized handoff and rounding instruments. All data elements were present in our multipurpose ICU-based dashboard. 42 of 104 (40 %) surveys were returned. Data elements important (50/89, 56 %) and unimportant (24/89, 27 %) for routine use were identified. No significant differences in data element ranking were observed between supervisory and nonsupervisory roles. The routine information needs of general ward clinicians are a subset of data elements used routinely by ICU clinicians. Our findings suggest an electronic dashboard could be adapted from the critical care setting to the general wards with minimal modification. PMID:27307266

  6. As His Day in Court Arrives, Ward Churchill Is Depicted in Sharply Different Lights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The trial in Ward Churchill's lawsuit against the University of Colorado got under way here last week with lawyers for the opposing sides painting starkly different pictures of both the controversial ethnic-studies professor and the circumstances surrounding his dismissal by the university in 2007. In delivering their opening remarks in a crowded…

  7. "Living My Native Life Deadly": Red Lake, Ward Churchill, and the Discourses of Competing Genocides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Jodi A.

    2007-01-01

    In an attempt to understand how rival narratives of genocide compete even at the cost of disavowing other historical experiences, this article considers how the U.S. national media represented and framed Red Lake in the wake of Ward Churchill's emergence on the national radar. The first section of this article examines how nineteenth-century…

  8. [Medical economics in tuberculosis management: what will come after the TB ward?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yotsumoto, Hideki

    2009-11-01

    Current unprofitability of medical services in tuberculosis (TB) ward in Japan has been induced by low medical fee and long-term hospital stays, aggravated by unoccupied beds due to the decrease in the number of patients. For the solution of this issue, the increase of medical fee, shortening of the length of hospital stay and drastic reduction of oversupplied beds are essential. An increment of medical fee by the change in the system would be appreciated, but even under the current system, the balance between revenue and expenditure could be obtained by reducing the length of hospital stay toward 4 weeks, and the elimination of deficit in TB ward could be accomplished by these efforts; shortening of length of hospital stay and reduction of TB beds. Although the latter might result in the difficulty of sustaining TB wards, these patients could be treated in the infectious disease ward. The integration of TB Control Law to Infectious Disease Control Law suggests that TB is not a special disease in Japan. If a true "short course therapy" era would be realized by novel anti-tuberculosis drugs, a dramatic change in TB management would occur in the near future. PMID:19999596

  9. Vertices RR$\\to$RP and RR$\\to$RRP with Ward identities

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, M A

    2016-01-01

    Ward identities for reggeons are studied in the framework of effective action approach to the QCD in Regge kinematics. It is shown that they require introduction of new contributions not present in the reggeon diagrams initially. Application to vertices RR$\\to$RP and RR$\\to$RRP are considered and diagrams which have to be added to the QCD ones are found.

  10. Inappropriate use of urinary catheters and its common complications in different hospital wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parivash Davoodian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Inappropriate use of indwelling urinary catheters (IUCs and their related complications is one of the most important problems in hospital wards. The aim of this study was to evaluate inappropriate use of IUCs and their complications among patients in Tehran, Iran. Two hundred and six consecutive patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit (ICU as well as medical and surgical wards at the Shahid Mohammadi Hospital in Bandarabbas from September 1 to 30, 2005 and in whom IUCs were used, were studied. Data collected included age of the patients, diagnoses, reason for use of IUC and the complications related to it. Overall, 164 patients (79.6% had IUCs used appropriately while 42 of them (20.6% were catheterized unjustifiably. Inappropriate use of IUCs in the ICU, medical and surgical wards was reported in 12 (18.5%, 16 (19.0% and 14 patients (24.6%, respectively. The most common complication of IUCs was urinary tract infection, which occurred in 91 patients (44.2% and hematuria, which was seen in 3.9% of the patients. Our study suggests that inappropriate use of IUCs is prevalent, particularly in the surgical wards, and the most common complication observed was catheter-associated urinary tract infection.

  11. The Impact of Psychiatric Patient Boarding in Emergency Departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Nicks

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Studies have demonstrated the adverse effects of emergency department (ED boarding. This study examines the impact of resource utilization, throughput, and financial impact for psychiatric patients awaiting inpatient placement. Methods. The authors retrospectively studied all psychiatric and non-psychiatric adult admissions in an Academic Medical Center ED (>68,000 adult visits from January 2007-2008. The main outcomes were ED length of stay (LOS and associated reimbursement. Results. 1,438 patients were consulted to psychiatry with 505 (35.1% requiring inpatient psychiatric care management. The mean psychiatric patient age was 42.5 years (SD 13.1 years, with 2.7 times more women than men. ED LOS was significantly longer for psychiatric admissions (1089 min, CI (1039–1140 versus 340 min, CI (304–375; <0.001 when compared to non-psychiatric admissions. The financial impact of psychiatric boarding accounted for a direct loss of ($1,198 compared to non-psychiatric admissions. Factoring the loss of bed turnover for waiting patients and opportunity cost due to loss of those patients, psychiatric patient boarding cost the department $2,264 per patient. Conclusions. Psychiatric patients awaiting inpatient placement remain in the ED 3.2 times longer than non-psychiatric patients, preventing 2.2 bed turnovers (additional patients per psychiatric patient, and decreasing financial revenue.

  12. Bronchitis - acute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acute bronchitis is swelling and inflammation in the main passages ... present only for a short time. Causes When acute bronchitis occurs, it almost always comes after having a ...

  13. Improving the communication between teams managing boarded patients on a surgical specialty ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puvaneswaralingam, Shobitha; Ross, Daniella

    2016-01-01

    Transferring patients from the ward of their specialty or consultant is described as boarding. 1 Boarding patients is becoming increasingly prevalent due to greater pressure on hospital capacity. This practice compromises patient safety through delayed investigations, prolonged hospital stays, and increased risk of hospital-acquired infections. 1 2 We evaluated how regularly boarded patients were reviewed, and how effectively information regarding their management was communicated from their primary specialty to ward staff. We aimed to improve the frequency of patient reviews by ensuring that each patient was reviewed every weekday and increase communication between primary specialty, and medical and nursing teams by 20% from baseline during the data collection period. The project was based in the Otolaryngology ward in Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, where there was a high prevalence of boarded patients. Baseline data showed a clear deficit in communication between the primary specialty and ward staff with only 31% of patient reviews being communicated to ward doctors. We designed and implemented a communication tool, in the form of a sticker, to be inserted into patients' medical notes for use by the primary specialty. Implementation of the sticker improved communication between teams as stickers were completed in 93% of instances. In 88% of patient reviews, the junior doctor was informed of the management plan, showing a large increase from baseline. Through PDSA cycles, we aimed to increase the sustainability and reliability of the sticker; however, we faced challenges with sustainability of sticker insertion. We aim to engage more stakeholders to raise awareness of the problem, brainstorm solutions together, and review the production and implementation of stickers with senior hospital management to discuss the potential use of this tool within practice. There is potentially a large scope for utilisation of this communication tool on a local level, which we hope

  14. Improving the communication between teams managing boarded patients on a surgical specialty ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puvaneswaralingam, Shobitha; Ross, Daniella

    2016-01-01

    Transferring patients from the ward of their specialty or consultant is described as boarding. 1 Boarding patients is becoming increasingly prevalent due to greater pressure on hospital capacity. This practice compromises patient safety through delayed investigations, prolonged hospital stays, and increased risk of hospital-acquired infections. 1 2 We evaluated how regularly boarded patients were reviewed, and how effectively information regarding their management was communicated from their primary specialty to ward staff. We aimed to improve the frequency of patient reviews by ensuring that each patient was reviewed every weekday and increase communication between primary specialty, and medical and nursing teams by 20% from baseline during the data collection period. The project was based in the Otolaryngology ward in Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, where there was a high prevalence of boarded patients. Baseline data showed a clear deficit in communication between the primary specialty and ward staff with only 31% of patient reviews being communicated to ward doctors. We designed and implemented a communication tool, in the form of a sticker, to be inserted into patients' medical notes for use by the primary specialty. Implementation of the sticker improved communication between teams as stickers were completed in 93% of instances. In 88% of patient reviews, the junior doctor was informed of the management plan, showing a large increase from baseline. Through PDSA cycles, we aimed to increase the sustainability and reliability of the sticker; however, we faced challenges with sustainability of sticker insertion. We aim to engage more stakeholders to raise awareness of the problem, brainstorm solutions together, and review the production and implementation of stickers with senior hospital management to discuss the potential use of this tool within practice. There is potentially a large scope for utilisation of this communication tool on a local level, which we hope

  15. Improving the communication between teams managing boarded patients on a surgical specialty ward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puvaneswaralingam, Shobitha; Ross, Daniella

    2016-01-01

    Transferring patients from the ward of their specialty or consultant is described as boarding. 1 Boarding patients is becoming increasingly prevalent due to greater pressure on hospital capacity. This practice compromises patient safety through delayed investigations, prolonged hospital stays, and increased risk of hospital-acquired infections. 1 2 We evaluated how regularly boarded patients were reviewed, and how effectively information regarding their management was communicated from their primary specialty to ward staff. We aimed to improve the frequency of patient reviews by ensuring that each patient was reviewed every weekday and increase communication between primary specialty, and medical and nursing teams by 20% from baseline during the data collection period. The project was based in the Otolaryngology ward in Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, where there was a high prevalence of boarded patients. Baseline data showed a clear deficit in communication between the primary specialty and ward staff with only 31% of patient reviews being communicated to ward doctors. We designed and implemented a communication tool, in the form of a sticker, to be inserted into patients' medical notes for use by the primary specialty. Implementation of the sticker improved communication between teams as stickers were completed in 93% of instances. In 88% of patient reviews, the junior doctor was informed of the management plan, showing a large increase from baseline. Through PDSA cycles, we aimed to increase the sustainability and reliability of the sticker; however, we faced challenges with sustainability of sticker insertion. We aim to engage more stakeholders to raise awareness of the problem, brainstorm solutions together, and review the production and implementation of stickers with senior hospital management to discuss the potential use of this tool within practice. There is potentially a large scope for utilisation of this communication tool on a local level, which we hope

  16. Acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Bo-Guang Fan; Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2010-01-01

    Background : Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims : The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods : We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline) addressing pancreatitis. Results : Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingest...

  17. Acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Bo-Guang Fan; Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2010-01-01

    Background: Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims: The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods: We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline) addressing pancreatitis. Results: Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion....

  18. Psychiatric and family functioning in children with leukemia and their parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodarzi A

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports data from a cross-sectional investigation of the psychiatric and psychosocial functioning of 55 children diagnosed with acute lymphocytic leukemia and their families at three points in time: diagnosis (newly diagnosed, 1 year postdiagnosis, and 1 year after the completion of chemotherapy (offtherapy. Results reveal minimal psychopathology in these children and their parents based on self-and informantreports and structured diagnostic interviews. These families appear to be functioning adequately and report more family cohesiveness and marital satisfaction after chemotherapy was completed. Coping strategies commonly used by children and their parents include problem solving, a positive outlook, and good communication. Implications for psychiatric consultation are presented.

  19. Basics of acute stroke treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute stroke presents an emergency that requires immediate referral to a specialized hospital, preferably with a stroke unit. Disability and mortality are reduced by 30% in patients treated in stroke units compared to those treated on regular wards, even if a specialized team is present on the ward. Systolic blood pressure may remain high at 200-220 mmHg in the acute phase and should not be lowered too quickly. Further guidelines for basic care include: optimal O2 delivery, blood sugar levels below 100-150 mg%, and lowering body temperature below 37.5 C using physical means or drugs. Increased intracranial pressure should be treated by raising the upper body of the patient, administration of glycerol, mannitol, and/or sorbitol, artificial respiration, and special monitoring of Tris buffer. Decompressive craniectomy may be considered in cases of ''malignant'' media stroke and expansive cerebellar infarction. Fibrinolysis is the most effective stroke treatment and is twice as effective in the treatment of stroke than myocardial infarction. Fibrinolysis may be initiated within 3 h of a stroke in the anterior circulation. If a penumbra is detectable by ''PWI-DWI mismatch MRI,'' specialized hospitals may perform fibrinolysis up to 6 h after symptom onset. In cases of stroke in the basilar artery, fibrinolysis may be performed even later after symptom onset. Intra-arterial fibrinolysis is performed in these cases using rt-PA or urokinase. Follow-up treatment of stroke patients should not only address post-stroke depression and neuropsychological deficits, but also include patient education about risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, and cardiac arrhythmias. (orig.)

  20. Psychiatric home care: a new tool for crisis intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiro, A H

    1994-03-01

    The cost of psychiatric care has been rapidly increasing in recent years. Between 1984 and 1987, there was a 46 percent increase in psychiatric hospitals beds and a 60 percent increase in psychiatric units in general hospitals. This reflected a recognition by many health care systems that psychiatric patients were a good source of revenue. With this push toward more and more inpatient programs, crucial aspects of psychiatric care were left behind. Specifically, the limitations of inpatient therapy have not been recognized. Within the past five years, a new program has been developed and pioneered to use home care to prevent psychiatric hospitalizations and to also prevent the difficult transitions for psychiatric patients. Over a two-year period, this program was studied for its impact on the quality and cost of psychiatric care.

  1. Acute psychological stress reduces working memory-related activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, S.; Hermans, E.J.; Marle, H.J.F. van; Luo, J.; Fernandez, G.S.E.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute psychological stress impairs higher-order cognitive function such as working memory (WM). Similar impairments are seen in various psychiatric disorders that are associated with higher susceptibility to stress and with prefrontal cortical dysfunctions, suggesting that acute stress m

  2. Psychiatric Nursing Care for Adult Survivors of Child

    OpenAIRE

    Zalm, Yvonne van der; Nugteren, Willem; Hafsteinsdóttir, Thóra van der; Venne, Cokky van der; Kool, Nienke; van Meijel, Berno

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine what is known from the literature about nursing care of psychiatric patients with a history of child maltreatment. CONCLUSIONS: Psychiatric nurses underline the importance of a routine inquiry of child abuse on admission of patients to psychiatric care, but are reluctant to ask about child abuse. They often feel insufficiently competent to respond effectively to patients with a history of child maltreatment. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Psychiatric nurses need training in how ...

  3. Educational Needs in the Psychiatric Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluckin, Andy; Hanna, Bob

    1991-01-01

    Case studies in Norwich, England, identified issues in the provision of adult education in psychiatric settings: differing definitions of the role of adult education; role conflict between adult educators and health professionals; and opposing beliefs about outsiders entering an institution. The cases also affirmed the therapeutic value of…

  4. Psychiatric disorders and traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Schwarzbold

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Marcelo Schwarzbold1, Alexandre Diaz1, Evandro Tostes Martins2, Armanda Rufino1, Lúcia Nazareth Amante1,3, Maria Emília Thais1, João Quevedo4, Alexandre Hohl1, Marcelo Neves Linhares1,5,6, Roger Walz1,61Núcleo de Pesquisas em Neurologia Clínica e Experimental (NUPNEC, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Hospital Universitário, UFSC, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil; 2Unidade de Terapia Intensiva, Hospital Governador Celso Ramos, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil; 3Departamento de Enfermagem, UFSC, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil; 4Laboratório de Neurociências, UNESC, Criciúma, SC, Brazil; 5Departamento de Cirurgia, Hospital Universitário, UFSC, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil; 6Centro de Cirurgia de Epilepsia de Santa Catarina (CEPESC, Hospital Governador Celso Ramos, Florianópolis, SC, BrazilAbstract: Psychiatric disorders after traumatic brain injury (TBI are frequent. Researches in this area are important for the patients’ care and they may provide hints for the comprehension of primary psychiatric disorders. Here we approach epidemiology, diagnosis, associated factors and treatment of the main psychiatric disorders after TBI. Finally, the present situation of the knowledge in this field is discussed.Keywords: psychiatric disorders, traumatic brain injury, neuropsychiatry, diagnostic, epidemiology, pathophysiology

  5. [The architectural design of psychiatric care buildings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunet, Lionel

    2012-01-01

    The architectural design of psychiatric care buildings. In addition to certain "classic" creations, the Dunet architectural office has designed several units for difficult patients as well as a specially adapted hospitalisation unit. These creations which are demanding in terms of the organisation of care require close consultation with the nursing teams. Testimony of an architect who is particularly engaged in the universe of psychiatry.

  6. [Physical activities, psychiatric care and mental health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davanture, Olivier

    2014-02-01

    At Ville-Evrard psychiatric hospital, sports activities are used as one of several therapeutic tools. The day-long multi-sport sessions, led notably by a nurse, form part of the care programme. Sport not only enables the patients to exert themselves, it is above all a form of therapeutic mediation which encourages verbal and non-verbal communication.

  7. Childhood Maltreatment, Emotional Dysregulation, and Psychiatric Comorbidities

    OpenAIRE

    Dvir, Yael; Ford, Julian D.; Hill, Michael; Frazier, Jean A.

    2014-01-01

    Affect dysregulation, defined as the impaired ability to regulate and/or tolerate negative emotional states, and has been associated with interpersonal trauma and post-traumatic stress. Affect regulation difficulties also play a role in many other psychiatric conditions, including anxiety disorders and mood disorders, specifically major depression in youth and bipolar disorder throughout the life span.

  8. Psychopsychiatry: Can psychosocial factors cause psychiatric disorders?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Praag, H.M. van

    1979-01-01

    It is a widely accepted view today that psychosocial factors can cause psychiatric disorders. However, this view has, as yet, no firm foundation of verifiable facts. This paper outlines some research strategies that can provide data in favor of or against this theory: (1) systematic analysis of life

  9. Sleep disordered breathing in community psychiatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirstie N. Anderson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Sleep disturbance is prominent in many neuropsychiatric disorders and may precipitate or exacerbate a range of psychiatric conditions. Few studies have investigated sleep disordered breathing and in particular obstructive sleep apnoea in community psychiatric patients and the commonly used screening instruments have not been evaluated in patients with psychiatric disorders. The objective is to evaluate the prevalence of sleep disordered breathing in a community cohort with chronic mental illness on long term psychotropic medication, and to assess the effectiveness of commonly used screening instruments to detect abnormal sleep. Methods: 52 patients completed sleep questionnaires and 50 undertook overnight oximetry. Results: 52% (n = 26 had sleep-disordered breathing; 20% (n = 10 had moderate/severe sleep apnoea. The Epworth Sleepiness Score and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Inventory did not predict sleep disordered breathing. Conclusions: Patients with psychiatric disorders in the community have a high rate of undiagnosed sleep disordered breathing, which is not reliably detected by established sleep disorder screening questionnaires.

  10. Psychological testing of the psychiatrically injured worker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthaler, E S

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to provide the occupational health worker with an overview of psychological testing, including the rationale for utilizing psychological testing, the psychometric foundations of psychological tests, the types of psychological tests, and the issues related to the psychological assessment of work-related psychiatric and neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:3067394

  11. Psychiatric illness in the New Zealand Maori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdev, P S

    1989-12-01

    This paper compares psychiatric illness in the contemporary Maori with that in the non-Maori New Zealander. The ethnic data available are all from secondary sources. The limitations of this and the problems of achieving a satisfactory definition of "a Maori" are discussed. The data suggest that the Maori have a slightly greater risk of psychiatric hospitalization than the non-Maori. First admission rates for schizophrenia are higher for the Maori, as are the readmission rates. First admission rates for major affective illness are roughly comparable in the two groups, and those for neuroses and neurotic depression are lower in the Maori. Rates of admission for alcohol abuse, alcohol dependence and personality disorders are much higher for the Maori male aged 20-40 years and this group is at greatest risk of psychiatric hospitalization. A larger proportion of Maori are admitted involuntarily, especially under the Criminal Justice Act. The median stay in hospital is not longer for the Maori but their re-admissions are more frequent. The Maori have shown an increase in first psychiatric admission rates since the 1950s, with rapid increases in the early 60s and the 80s. The rates for psychotic disorders have been relatively constant and the most significant changes have been for alcohol abuse, alcohol dependence and personality disorders. The author relates this historical change to socioeconomic and politico-cultural factors, particularly the stress of rapid urbanization. PMID:2610653

  12. 21.PSYCHIATRIC DISORDER 21.2.Schizophrenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    920198 Kinetic observation of serum thyr-onormone level in schizophrenics.WANGXueyi (王学义),et al.Psychiatr Hosp,KailuanCoal Mining Administration,Tangshan,063001.Chin J Neurol & Psychiat 1991; 24 (5): 268-271.Measurements of serum T3,T4,RUR and FT4I

  13. Chronic psychiatric status and satisfaction with life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arrindell, W.A.; van Nieuwenhuizen, Ch; Luteijn, F.

    2001-01-01

    The present study represents the first to administer the Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS) as part of a. semi-structured interview to a large sample of psychiatric patients with severe mental illness. psychometric appraisal of the SWLS demonstrated that figures on its internal structure were quite

  14. Prosecuting Assaultive Forensic and Psychiatric Inpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Kerri C.; Reddon, John R.; Chudleigh, Michele D.

    2008-01-01

    Inpatient assault of forensic and psychiatric staff is a complex and multifaceted issue. Hence, the consequences reported in the literature regarding prosecuting assaultive inpatients are quite variable. In this article, issues pertaining to the prosecution of violent inpatients are reviewed. Illustrative cases, challenges of prosecution,…

  15. 42 CFR 415.184 - Psychiatric services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Psychiatric services. 415.184 Section 415.184 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM SERVICES FURNISHED BY PHYSICIANS IN PROVIDERS, SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS...

  16. Sexual Attitude Reassessment for Psychiatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dincin, Jerry; Wise, Shirley

    1979-01-01

    Sexuality programs are one part of the program at Thresholds, a rehabilitation center for psychiatric patients (17 to 50 years old). A 16 week sexuality group includes seven phases: initial interview; beginning group development (health care, contraception, reproduction, sexuality); masturbation; intercourse; homosexuality; coed group discussion;…

  17. CANNABIS RELATED PSYCHIATRIC SYNDROMES: A SELECTIVE REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Basu, Debasish; Malhotra, Anil; Varma, Vijoy K.

    1994-01-01

    Association between cannabis use and various psychiatric syndromes does exist, but their nature remains elusive. Cannabis intoxication, ‘cannabis psychosis’ and certain other conditions related with cannabis use like flashbacks and prolonged depersonalization are discussed in this paper. The controversial nature of the cannabis - schizophrenia link is noted, and various methodological issues in clinical cannabis research are highlighted.

  18. Sexual Health Education: A Psychiatric Resident's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waineo, Eva; Arfken, Cynthia L.; Morreale, Mary K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This report discusses psychiatric residents' perceptions of sexual health education and their opinions regarding curricular improvements. Methods: An anonymous, web-based survey was sent to residents in one general psychiatry program (N = 33). The response rate was 69.7%. Results: Residents reported inadequate experience in multiple…

  19. Decreasing Psychiatric Admission Wait Time in the Emergency Department by Facilitating Psychiatric Discharges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, Pamela R; Harpin, Scott

    2015-12-01

    Limited capacity in a psychiatric unit contributes to long emergency department (ED) admission wait times. Regulatory and accrediting agencies urge hospitals nationally to improve patient flow for better access to care for all types of patients. The purpose of the current study was to decrease psychiatric admission wait time from 10.5 to 8 hours and increase the proportion of patients discharged by 11 a.m. from 20% to 50%. The current study compared pre- and post-intervention data. Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles aimed to improve discharge processes and timeliness through initiation of new practices. Admission wait time improved to an average of 5.1 hours (t = 3.87, p = 0.006). The proportion of discharges occurring by 11 a.m. increased to 46% (odds ratio = 3.42, p planning processes and timeliness in a psychiatric unit significantly decreased admission wait time from the ED, improving access to psychiatric care. PMID:26505524

  20. STUDY ON PSYCHIATRIC CO - MORBIDITY IN PSORIASIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikant B.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is relatively common , chronic inflammatory and hyper - proliferative skin disease that affects 1.4% to 2.0% of the population. Presence of itching , chronic recurrent course of disease and incomplete cure may contribute to great deal of psychiatric co - morbidity in these patients. the most persuasive indications of a link between stress and psoriasis comes from patients themselves , with studies illustrating that the majority of patients believe that stress or psychological distress is a factor in the manifestations of their condition . Depression and anxiety are the most common disorders that are associated with psoriasis , but the proportion of patient also having other psychiatric co - morbid diseases which include social phobia , generalize anxiety disorder , panic disorder , psychotic diso rder , etc. Moreover , symptoms of psoriasis , especially pruritus , are related to depression. OBJECTIVES : To evaluate different psychiatric illnesses their prevalence and severity in psoriasis patients. METHODOLOGY : This was cross - sectional observational stu dy comprised of 70 consecutive patients of psoriasis attending the out - patient department of Dermatology. All the patients were subjected to detailed examinations including the elicitation of dermatological and psychiatric profile after getting written con sent for study . Data was collected using self - developed , pre tested , semi structured Pro format by interview method. RESULTS : The profile of psychiatric diagnoses obtained in the present study depressive disorder 31.4% {18.57% depression , 12.85% Depression with anxiety symptoms} , anxiety disorder 25.7% (7.14% GAD , 8.17% panic disorder , 5.71% social phobia , 4.28 specific phobia. Severity of major depressive disorder was determined with HAM - D score 53.8% had mild depression , 30.7% moderate depression and 15. 5% severe depression. Similarly when HAM - A scale was used to determined severity of generalized