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Sample records for acute paralysis virus

  1. Single Assay Detection of Acute Bee Paralysis Virus, Kashmir Bee Virus and Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francis, Roy Mathew; Kryger, Per

    2012-01-01

    A new RT-PCR primer pair designed to identify Acute Bee Paralysis Virus (ABPV), Kashmir Bee Virus (KBV) or Israeli Acute Bee Paralysis Virus (IAPV) of honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) in a single assay is described. These primers are used to screen samples for ABPV, KBV, or IAPV in a single RT-PCR ......-PCR reaction saving time and money. The primers are located in the predicted overlapping gene (pog/ORFX) which is highly conserved across ABPV, KBV, IAPV and other dicistroviruses of social insects. This study has also identified the first case of IAPV in Denmark....

  2. Assembly of recombinant Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus capsids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyuan Ren

    Full Text Available The dicistrovirus Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus (IAPV has been implicated in the worldwide decline of honey bees. Studies of IAPV and many other bee viruses in pure culture are restricted by available isolates and permissive cell culture. Here we show that coupling the IAPV major structural precursor protein ORF2 to its cognate 3C-like processing enzyme results in processing of the precursor to the individual structural proteins in a number of insect cell lines following expression by a recombinant baculovirus. The efficiency of expression is influenced by the level of IAPV 3C protein and moderation of its activity is required for optimal expression. The mature IAPV structural proteins assembled into empty capsids that migrated as particles on sucrose velocity gradients and showed typical dicistrovirus like morphology when examined by electron microscopy. Monoclonal antibodies raised to recombinant capsids were configured into a diagnostic test specific for the presence of IAPV. Recombinant capsids for each of the many bee viruses within the picornavirus family may provide virus specific reagents for the on-going investigation of the causes of honeybee loss.

  3. Varroa destructor, a potential vector of Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus in honey bees, Apis mellifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although the role of the parasitic mite, Varroa destructor, as a vector in transmission of viruses between honey bees is well established, no study has shown that it can similarly transmit Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus (IAPV), a virus that was found to be associated with Colony Collapse Disorder (CC...

  4. Israeli acute paralysis virus affects sucrose responsiveness and homing ability of forager bees, Apis mellifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    The honeybee virus, Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV), may be one of the most common stressors that are responsible for the colony losses reported worldwide in recent years. IAPV was found to be tightly correlated with honeybee Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) in the recent outbreak of CCD in the ...

  5. A potentially novel overlapping gene in the genomes of Israeli acute paralysis virus and its relatives

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    Price Nicholas

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV is a honeybee-infecting virus that was found to be associated with colony collapse disorder. The IAPV genome contains two genes encoding a structural and a nonstructural polyprotein. We applied a recently developed method for the estimation of selection in overlapping genes to detect purifying selection and, hence, functionality. We provide evolutionary evidence for the existence of a functional overlapping gene, which is translated in the +1 reading frame of the structural polyprotein gene. Conserved orthologs of this putative gene, which we provisionally call pog (predicted overlapping gene, were also found in the genomes of a monophyletic clade of dicistroviruses that includes IAPV, acute bee paralysis virus, Kashmir bee virus, and Solenopsis invicta (red imported fire ant virus 1.

  6. Response of the honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) proteome to Israeli acute paralysis virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent declines in honey bee populations worldwide have spurred significant research into the impact of pathogens on colony health. The role of the Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus (IAPV)on hive mortality has become of particular concern since being correlated with colony losses, although the pathogeni...

  7. Genetic analysis of Israel Acute Paralysis Virus: distinct clusters are circulating into the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel acute paralysis virus (IAPV) is associated with colony collapse disorder of honey bees. Nonetheless, its role in the pathogenesis of the disorder and its geographic distribution are unclear. Here, we report phylogenetic analysis of IAPV obtained from bees in the United States, Canada, Austral...

  8. Israeli acute paralysis virus: epidemiology, pathogenesis and implications for honey bee health and Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) is a widespread RNA virus that was linked with honey bee Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), the sudden and massive die-off of honey bee colonies in the U.S. in 2006-2007. Here we describe the transmission, prevalence and genetic diversity of IAPV, host transcripti...

  9. Genetic Analysis of Israel Acute Paralysis Virus: Distinct Clusters Are Circulating in the United States▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, G.; Hui, J.; Quan, P. L.; Kalkstein, A.; Honkavuori, K. S.; Bussetti, A. V.; Conlan, S.; Evans, J.; Chen, Y. P.; vanEngelsdorp, D.; Efrat, H.; Pettis, J.; Cox-Foster, D.; Holmes, E. C.; Briese, T.; Lipkin, W. I.

    2008-01-01

    Israel acute paralysis virus (IAPV) is associated with colony collapse disorder of honey bees. Nonetheless, its role in the pathogenesis of the disorder and its geographic distribution are unclear. Here, we report phylogenetic analysis of IAPV obtained from bees in the United States, Canada, Australia, and Israel and the establishment of diagnostic real-time PCR assays for IAPV detection. Our data indicate the existence of at least three distinct IAPV lineages, two of them circulating in the United States. Analysis of representatives from each proposed lineage suggested the possibility of recombination events and revealed differences in coding sequences that may have implications for virulence. PMID:18434396

  10. Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis and Implications for Honey Bee Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan Ping; Pettis, Jeffery S.; Corona, Miguel; Chen, Wei Ping; Li, Cong Jun; Spivak, Marla; Visscher, P. Kirk; DeGrandi-Hoffman, Gloria; Boncristiani, Humberto; Zhao, Yan; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Delaplane, Keith; Solter, Leellen; Drummond, Francis; Kramer, Matthew; Lipkin, W. Ian; Palacios, Gustavo; Hamilton, Michele C.; Smith, Barton; Huang, Shao Kang; Zheng, Huo Qing; Li, Ji Lian; Zhang, Xuan; Zhou, Ai Fen; Wu, Li You; Zhou, Ji Zhong; Lee, Myeong-L.; Teixeira, Erica W.; Li, Zhi Guo; Evans, Jay D.

    2014-01-01

    Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) is a widespread RNA virus of honey bees that has been linked with colony losses. Here we describe the transmission, prevalence, and genetic traits of this virus, along with host transcriptional responses to infections. Further, we present RNAi-based strategies for limiting an important mechanism used by IAPV to subvert host defenses. Our study shows that IAPV is established as a persistent infection in honey bee populations, likely enabled by both horizontal and vertical transmission pathways. The phenotypic differences in pathology among different strains of IAPV found globally may be due to high levels of standing genetic variation. Microarray profiles of host responses to IAPV infection revealed that mitochondrial function is the most significantly affected biological process, suggesting that viral infection causes significant disturbance in energy-related host processes. The expression of genes involved in immune pathways in adult bees indicates that IAPV infection triggers active immune responses. The evidence that silencing an IAPV-encoded putative suppressor of RNAi reduces IAPV replication suggests a functional assignment for a particular genomic region of IAPV and closely related viruses from the Family Dicistroviridae, and indicates a novel therapeutic strategy for limiting multiple honey bee viruses simultaneously and reducing colony losses due to viral diseases. We believe that the knowledge and insights gained from this study will provide a new platform for continuing studies of the IAPV–host interactions and have positive implications for disease management that will lead to mitigation of escalating honey bee colony losses worldwide. PMID:25079600

  11. Dynamics of the Presence of Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus in Honey Bee Colonies with Colony Collapse Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Chunsheng; Rivkin, Hadassah; Slabezki, Yossi; Chejanovsky, Nor

    2014-01-01

    The determinants of Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), a particular case of collapse of honey bee colonies, are still unresolved. Viruses including the Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) were associated with CCD. We found an apiary with colonies showing typical CCD characteristics that bore high loads of IAPV, recovered some colonies from collapse and tested the hypothesis if IAPV was actively replicating in them and infectious to healthy bees. We found that IAPV was the dominant pathogen and ...

  12. Acute flaccid paralysis due to West nile virus infection in adults: A paradigm shift entity

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    Boby Varkey Maramattom

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Three cases of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP with preceding fever are described. One patient had a quadriparesis with a florid meningoencephalitic picture and the other two had asymmetric flaccid paralysis with fasciculations at the onset of illness. Magnetic resonance imaging in two cases showed prominent hyperintensitities in the spinal cord and brainstem with prominent involvement of the grey horn (polio-myelitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF polymerase chain reaction was positive for West Nile virus (WNV in the index patient. All three cases had a positive WNV immunoglobulin M antibody in serum/CSF and significantly high titer of WNV neutralizing antibody in serum, clearly distinguishing the infection from other Flaviviridae such as Japanese encephalitis. WNV has been recognized in India for many decades; however, AFP has not been adequately described. WNV is a flavivirus that is spread by Culex mosquitoes while they take blood meals from humans and lineage 1 is capable of causing a devastating neuro-invasive disease with fatal consequences or severe morbidity. We describe the first three laboratory confirmed cases of WNV induced AFP from Kerala and briefly enumerate the salient features of this emerging threat.

  13. Metagenomic detection of viral pathogens in Spanish honeybees: co-infection by Aphid Lethal Paralysis, Israel Acute Paralysis and Lake Sinai Viruses.

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    Fredrik Granberg

    Full Text Available The situation in Europe concerning honeybees has in recent years become increasingly aggravated with steady decline in populations and/or catastrophic winter losses. This has largely been attributed to the occurrence of a variety of known and "unknown", emerging novel diseases. Previous studies have demonstrated that colonies often can harbour more than one pathogen, making identification of etiological agents with classical methods difficult. By employing an unbiased metagenomic approach, which allows the detection of both unexpected and previously unknown infectious agents, the detection of three viruses, Aphid Lethal Paralysis Virus (ALPV, Israel Acute Paralysis Virus (IAPV, and Lake Sinai Virus (LSV, in honeybees from Spain is reported in this article. The existence of a subgroup of ALPV with the ability to infect bees was only recently reported and this is the first identification of such a strain in Europe. Similarly, LSV appear to be a still unclassified group of viruses with unclear impact on colony health and these viruses have not previously been identified outside of the United States. Furthermore, our study also reveals that these bees carried a plant virus, Turnip Ringspot Virus (TuRSV, potentially serving as important vector organisms. Taken together, these results demonstrate the new possibilities opened up by high-throughput sequencing and metagenomic analysis to study emerging new diseases in domestic and wild animal populations, including honeybees.

  14. Importance of brood maintenance terms in simple models of the honeybee - Varroa destructor - acute bee paralysis virus complex

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    Hermann J. Eberl

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a simple mathematical model of the infestation of a honeybee colony by the Acute Paralysis Virus, which is carried by parasitic varroa mites (Varroa destructor. This is a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations for the dependent variables: number of mites that carry the virus, number of healthy bees and number of sick bees. We study this model with a mix of analytical and computational techniques. Our results indicate that, depending on model parameters and initial data, bee colonies in which the virus is present can, over years, function seemingly like healthy colonies before they decline and disappear rapidly (e.g. Colony Collapse Disorder, wintering losses. This is a consequence of the fact that a certain number of worker bees is required in a colony to maintain and care for the brood, in order to ensure continued production of new bees.

  15. Large-scale field application of RNAi technology reducing Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus Disease in honey bees (Apis mellifera, Hymenoptera; Apidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    We present the first successful use of RNAi under a large-scale real-world application for disease control. Israeli acute paralysis virus, IAPV, has been linked as a contributing factor in coolly collapse, CCD, of honey bees. IAPV specific homologous dsRNA were designed to reduce impacts from IAPV i...

  16. In vitro infection of pupae with Israeli acute paralysis virus suggests disturbance of transcriptional homeostasis in honey bees (Apis mellifera.

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    Humberto F Boncristiani

    Full Text Available The ongoing decline of honey bee health worldwide is a serious economic and ecological concern. One major contributor to the decline are pathogens, including several honey bee viruses. However, information is limited on the biology of bee viruses and molecular interactions with their hosts. An experimental protocol to test these systems was developed, using injections of Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus (IAPV into honey bee pupae reared ex-situ under laboratory conditions. The infected pupae developed pronounced but variable patterns of disease. Symptoms varied from complete cessation of development with no visual evidence of disease to rapid darkening of a part or the entire body. Considerable differences in IAPV titer dynamics were observed, suggesting significant variation in resistance to IAPV among and possibly within honey bee colonies. Thus, selective breeding for virus resistance should be possible. Gene expression analyses of three separate experiments suggest IAPV disruption of transcriptional homeostasis of several fundamental cellular functions, including an up-regulation of the ribosomal biogenesis pathway. These results provide first insights into the mechanisms of IAPV pathogenicity. They mirror a transcriptional survey of honey bees afflicted with Colony Collapse Disorder and thus support the hypothesis that viruses play a critical role in declining honey bee health.

  17. In vitro infection of pupae with Israeli acute paralysis virus suggests disturbance of transcriptional homeostasis in honey bees (Apis mellifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boncristiani, Humberto F; Evans, Jay D; Chen, Yanping; Pettis, Jeff; Murphy, Charles; Lopez, Dawn L; Simone-Finstrom, Michael; Strand, Micheline; Tarpy, David R; Rueppell, Olav

    2013-01-01

    The ongoing decline of honey bee health worldwide is a serious economic and ecological concern. One major contributor to the decline are pathogens, including several honey bee viruses. However, information is limited on the biology of bee viruses and molecular interactions with their hosts. An experimental protocol to test these systems was developed, using injections of Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus (IAPV) into honey bee pupae reared ex-situ under laboratory conditions. The infected pupae developed pronounced but variable patterns of disease. Symptoms varied from complete cessation of development with no visual evidence of disease to rapid darkening of a part or the entire body. Considerable differences in IAPV titer dynamics were observed, suggesting significant variation in resistance to IAPV among and possibly within honey bee colonies. Thus, selective breeding for virus resistance should be possible. Gene expression analyses of three separate experiments suggest IAPV disruption of transcriptional homeostasis of several fundamental cellular functions, including an up-regulation of the ribosomal biogenesis pathway. These results provide first insights into the mechanisms of IAPV pathogenicity. They mirror a transcriptional survey of honey bees afflicted with Colony Collapse Disorder and thus support the hypothesis that viruses play a critical role in declining honey bee health.

  18. Cryo-electron Microscopy Study of the Genome Release of the Dicistrovirus Israeli Acute Bee Paralysis Virus.

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    Mullapudi, Edukondalu; Füzik, Tibor; Přidal, Antonín; Plevka, Pavel

    2017-02-15

    Viruses of the family Dicistroviridae can cause substantial economic damage by infecting agriculturally important insects. Israeli acute bee paralysis virus (IAPV) causes honeybee colony collapse disorder in the United States. High-resolution molecular details of the genome delivery mechanism of dicistroviruses are unknown. Here we present a cryo-electron microscopy analysis of IAPV virions induced to release their genomes in vitro We determined structures of full IAPV virions primed to release their genomes to a resolution of 3.3 Å and of empty capsids to a resolution of 3.9 Å. We show that IAPV does not form expanded A particles before genome release as in the case of related enteroviruses of the family Picornaviridae The structural changes observed in the empty IAPV particles include detachment of the VP4 minor capsid proteins from the inner face of the capsid and partial loss of the structure of the N-terminal arms of the VP2 capsid proteins. Unlike the case for many picornaviruses, the empty particles of IAPV are not expanded relative to the native virions and do not contain pores in their capsids that might serve as channels for genome release. Therefore, rearrangement of a unique region of the capsid is probably required for IAPV genome release. Honeybee populations in Europe and North America are declining due to pressure from pathogens, including viruses. Israeli acute bee paralysis virus (IAPV), a member of the family Dicistroviridae, causes honeybee colony collapse disorder in the United States. The delivery of virus genomes into host cells is necessary for the initiation of infection. Here we present a structural cryo-electron microscopy analysis of IAPV particles induced to release their genomes. We show that genome release is not preceded by an expansion of IAPV virions as in the case of related picornaviruses that infect vertebrates. Furthermore, minor capsid proteins detach from the capsid upon genome release. The genome leaves behind empty

  19. Dynamics of the Presence of Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus in Honey Bee Colonies with Colony Collapse Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunsheng Hou

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The determinants of Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD, a particular case of collapse of honey bee colonies, are still unresolved. Viruses including the Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV were associated with CCD. We found an apiary with colonies showing typical CCD characteristics that bore high loads of IAPV, recovered some colonies from collapse and tested the hypothesis if IAPV was actively replicating in them and infectious to healthy bees. We found that IAPV was the dominant pathogen and it replicated actively in the colonies: viral titers decreased from April to September and increased from September to December. IAPV extracted from infected bees was highly infectious to healthy pupae: they showed several-fold amplification of the viral genome and synthesis of the virion protein VP3. The health of recovered colonies was seriously compromised. Interestingly, a rise of IAPV genomic copies in two colonies coincided with their subsequent collapse. Our results do not imply IAPV as the cause of CCD but indicate that once acquired and induced to replication it acts as an infectious factor that affects the health of the colonies and may determine their survival. This is the first follow up outside the US of CCD-colonies bearing IAPV under natural conditions.

  20. Dynamics of the presence of israeli acute paralysis virus in honey bee colonies with colony collapse disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Chunsheng; Rivkin, Hadassah; Slabezki, Yossi; Chejanovsky, Nor

    2014-05-05

    The determinants of Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), a particular case of collapse of honey bee colonies, are still unresolved. Viruses including the Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) were associated with CCD. We found an apiary with colonies showing typical CCD characteristics that bore high loads of IAPV, recovered some colonies from collapse and tested the hypothesis if IAPV was actively replicating in them and infectious to healthy bees. We found that IAPV was the dominant pathogen and it replicated actively in the colonies: viral titers decreased from April to September and increased from September to December. IAPV extracted from infected bees was highly infectious to healthy pupae: they showed several-fold amplification of the viral genome and synthesis of the virion protein VP3. The health of recovered colonies was seriously compromised. Interestingly, a rise of IAPV genomic copies in two colonies coincided with their subsequent collapse. Our results do not imply IAPV as the cause of CCD but indicate that once acquired and induced to replication it acts as an infectious factor that affects the health of the colonies and may determine their survival. This is the first follow up outside the US of CCD-colonies bearing IAPV under natural conditions.

  1. Echovirus 19 associated with a case of acute flaccid paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesson, Alison M; Choo, Chong Ming; Troedson, Christopher; Thorley, Bruce R; Roberts, Jason A

    2013-03-01

    Acute flaccid paralysis can be caused by many members of the enterovirus genus, most notably the three poliviruses types 1 to 3. We report the case of acute flaccid paralysis caused by echovirus 19. The Western Pacific region has been declared polio free by the WHO since 2000. Australia is now using inactivated polio vaccine in the National Immunization Schedule. This vaccine does not carry the extremely rare risk of vaccine associated acute flaccid paralysis but it does leave our newly vaccinated population open gastrointestinal infection with polioviruses and the risk of circulation of the wild-type virus. Continued surveillance of cases of acute flaccid paralysis is to detect polioviruses is essential until poliovirus is completely eradicated. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2012 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  2. Acute upper extremity flaccid paralysis in a 5year old child secondary to enterovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suneja, Upma; Castillo, Carlos; Disla, Abiezer; Buyukgoz, Cihangir; Burdea, Liliana; Sitnitskaya, Yekaterina; Agyare, Samuel; Gold, Menachem; Prokhorov, Sergey

    2017-10-01

    The incidence of acute flaccid paralysis has been on a declining trend with the global efforts on eradication of polio virus. A few scattered clusters of acute flaccid paralysis associated with pathogens like enterovirus other than polio virus and flaviviruses have recently come to limelight. This is a case of acute onset flaccid paralysis of left upper extremity in a fully immunized 5 year old child in New York. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Acute Flaccid Paralysis Epidemic Research in East Azerbaijan Province

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    FrouzVarshochiani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives : Current levels of AFP care system have created the possibility to demonstrate the significant decrease in pathogenesis of poliomyelitis. To ensure the success of polio eradication, intensification of AFP care system in a way that it can confirm the lack of polio virus outbreak in areas that have no reports of confirmed cases of this disease, seemed to be essential. This research aimed to represent some features of disease symptoms and final diagnosis of the reported cases and investigate the age, gender, time and geographical zone and the incidence of acute flaccid paralysis cases in the province within 2008-2011.     Material and Methods : Data for the cases of AFP were collected from all cities in the province from 20/3/2008- 19/3/2013 and were analyzed using descriptive methods (census method. Results: Discovery and reporting 95% of acute flaccid paralysis cases up to 7 days from the occurrence of paralysis, preparing two qualitative samples from 98% acute flaccid paralysis up to 14 days from the occurrence of paralysis, tracking and evaluating 100% of acute flaccid paralysis after 60 days of disease occurrence, on-time sending/receiving 98% of the samples to national laboratory, show the capabilities of provincial care system.   Conclusion : Despite the excellent care of acute flaccid paralysis in the East Azerbaijan, it seems that the role of health care facilities and rural and urban health centers and private clinics in identification and reporting of acute flaccid paralysis is non-significant since only 5% of the cases were reported at local levels.

  4. Acute Flaccid paralysis in adults: Our experience

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    Rupesh Kaushik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP is a complex clinical syndrome with a broad array of potential etiologies that vary with age. We present our experience of acute onset lower motor neuron paralysis. Materials and Methods: One hundred and thirty-three consecutive adult patients presenting with weakness of duration less than four weeks over 12 months period were enrolled. Detailed history, clinical examination, and relevant investigations according to a pre-defined diagnostic algorithm were carried out. The patients were followed through their hospital stay till discharge or death. Results: The mean age was 33.27 (range 13-89 years with male preponderance (67.7%. The most common etiology was neuroparalytic snake envenomation (51.9%, followed by Guillain Barre syndrome (33.1%, constituting 85% of all patients. Hypokalemic paralysis (7.5% and acute intermittent porphyria (4.5% were the other important conditions. We did not encounter any case of acute polio mylitis in adults. In-hospital mortality due to respiratory paralysis was 9%. Conclusion: Neuroparalytic snakebite and Guillain Barre syndrome were the most common causes of acute flaccid paralysis in adults in our study.

  5. Guillain Barre syndrome: the leading cause of acute flaccid paralysis in Hazara division.

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    Anis-ur-Rehman; Idris, Muhammad; Elahi, Manzoor; Jamshed; Arif, Adeel

    2007-01-01

    Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) can be caused by a number of conditions. A common preventable cause is poliomyelitis which is still being reported in Pakistan, Guillain Barre Syndrome (GBS), also known as Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy, is another common cause of acute flaccid paralysis. It is important to recognize GBS in childhood as parents consider all acute flaccid paralysis to be due to poliomyelitis. The present study was designed to know the frequency of different causes of acute flaccid paralysis in Hazara division. This is a retrospective analysis of cases of acute flaccid paralysis reported from various districts of Hazara division during the period January 2003 to December 2004. Acute flaccid paralysis was diagnosed clinically through history and clinical examination. The underlying cause of acute flaccid paralysis was investigated by appropriate laboratory tests, such as serum electrolytes, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, electromyogram, nerve conduction study and stool culture for polio virus and other enteroviruses. Diagnosis of Poliomyelitis was confirmed by stool testing for poliovirus. 74 patients presented with AFP during the study period. 36 were male and 38 were female. Guillain Barre syndrome and enteroviral encephalopathy were the two leading causes of acute flaccid paralysis. Majority of the cases were reported from Mansehra district. Children of age groups 12 to 24 months and > 96 months constituted the majority (20% each). Guillian Barre syndrome was the leading cause of acute flaccid paralysis reported from various parts of Hazara division.

  6. Large-scale field application of RNAi technology reducing Israeli acute paralysis virus disease in honey bees (Apis mellifera, Hymenoptera: Apidae.

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    Wayne Hunter

    Full Text Available The importance of honey bees to the world economy far surpasses their contribution in terms of honey production; they are responsible for up to 30% of the world's food production through pollination of crops. Since fall 2006, honey bees in the U.S. have faced a serious population decline, due in part to a phenomenon called Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD, which is a disease syndrome that is likely caused by several factors. Data from an initial study in which investigators compared pathogens in honey bees affected by CCD suggested a putative role for Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus, IAPV. This is a single stranded RNA virus with no DNA stage placed taxonomically within the family Dicistroviridae. Although subsequent studies have failed to find IAPV in all CCD diagnosed colonies, IAPV has been shown to cause honey bee mortality. RNA interference technology (RNAi has been used successfully to silence endogenous insect (including honey bee genes both by injection and feeding. Moreover, RNAi was shown to prevent bees from succumbing to infection from IAPV under laboratory conditions. In the current study IAPV specific homologous dsRNA was used in the field, under natural beekeeping conditions in order to prevent mortality and improve the overall health of bees infected with IAPV. This controlled study included a total of 160 honey bee hives in two discrete climates, seasons and geographical locations (Florida and Pennsylvania. To our knowledge, this is the first successful large-scale real world use of RNAi for disease control.

  7. Large-scale field application of RNAi technology reducing Israeli acute paralysis virus disease in honey bees (Apis mellifera, Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Wayne; Ellis, James; Vanengelsdorp, Dennis; Hayes, Jerry; Westervelt, Dave; Glick, Eitan; Williams, Michael; Sela, Ilan; Maori, Eyal; Pettis, Jeffery; Cox-Foster, Diana; Paldi, Nitzan

    2010-12-23

    The importance of honey bees to the world economy far surpasses their contribution in terms of honey production; they are responsible for up to 30% of the world's food production through pollination of crops. Since fall 2006, honey bees in the U.S. have faced a serious population decline, due in part to a phenomenon called Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), which is a disease syndrome that is likely caused by several factors. Data from an initial study in which investigators compared pathogens in honey bees affected by CCD suggested a putative role for Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus, IAPV. This is a single stranded RNA virus with no DNA stage placed taxonomically within the family Dicistroviridae. Although subsequent studies have failed to find IAPV in all CCD diagnosed colonies, IAPV has been shown to cause honey bee mortality. RNA interference technology (RNAi) has been used successfully to silence endogenous insect (including honey bee) genes both by injection and feeding. Moreover, RNAi was shown to prevent bees from succumbing to infection from IAPV under laboratory conditions. In the current study IAPV specific homologous dsRNA was used in the field, under natural beekeeping conditions in order to prevent mortality and improve the overall health of bees infected with IAPV. This controlled study included a total of 160 honey bee hives in two discrete climates, seasons and geographical locations (Florida and Pennsylvania). To our knowledge, this is the first successful large-scale real world use of RNAi for disease control.

  8. Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus in Honeybee Queens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amiri, Esmaeil; Meixner, Marina; Büchler, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) is known as a disease of worker honey bees. To investigate pathogenesis of the CBPV on the queen, the sole reproductive individual in a colony, we conducted experiments regarding the susceptibility of queens to CBPV. Results from susceptibility experiment showed...... a similar disease progress in the queens compared to worker bees after infection. Infected queens exhibit symptoms by Day 6 post infection and virus levels reach 1011 copies per head. In a transmission experiment we showed that social interactions may affect the disease progression. Queens with forced...... contact to symptomatic worker bees acquired an overt infection with up to 1011 virus copies per head in six days. In contrast, queens in contact with symptomatic worker bees, but with a chance to receive food from healthy bees outside the cage appeared healthy. The virus loads did not exceed 107...

  9. A Mathematical Model of the Honeybee-Varroa destructor-Acute Bee Paralysis Virus System with Seasonal Effects.

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    Ratti, Vardayani; Kevan, Peter G; Eberl, Hermann J

    2015-08-01

    A mathematical model for the honeybee-varroa mite-ABPV system is proposed in terms of four differential equations for the: infected and uninfected bees in the colony, number of mites overall, and of mites carrying the virus. To account for seasonal variability, all parameters are time periodic. We obtain linearized stability conditions for the disease-free periodic solutions. Numerically, we illustrate that, for appropriate parameters, mites can establish themselves in colonies that are not treated with varroacides, leading to colonies with slightly reduced number of bees. If some of these mites carry the virus, however, the colony might fail suddenly after several years without a noticeable sign of stress leading up to the failure. The immediate cause of failure is that at the end of fall, colonies are not strong enough to survive the winter in viable numbers. We investigate the effect of the initial disease infestation on collapse time, and how varroacide treatment affects long-term behavior. We find that to control the virus epidemic, the mites as disease vector should be controlled.

  10. Pediatric Acute Flaccid Paralysis: Enterovirus D68-Associated Anterior Myelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, James A; Lloyd, Michael; Zabrocki, Luke; Auten, Jonathan

    2017-07-01

    Enteroviral infections can cause acute flaccid paralysis secondary to anterior myelitis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is important in the diagnosis of this potentially devastating pediatric disease. Before the 2014 outbreak of Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68), the virus was considered a relatively benign disease. A fully immunized 8-year-old boy was brought to the emergency department complaining of a cough, headache, neck pain, and right arm pain and weakness. Deep tendon reflexes in the weak arm could not be elicited. MRI of the brain and cervical spine revealed anterior myelitis of the cervical spine. The patient was given intravenous antibiotics, acyclovir, and methylprednisolone with no initial improvement. He was then given intravenous immunoglobulin over 3 days with improvement in symptoms. Nasal swab polymerase chain reaction revealed EV-D68. Despite medical management, the child was left with long-term motor disability in the effected extremity. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Acute flaccid paralysis is a potential devastating complication of enteroviral infections. Extremity complaints in the clinical setting of central nervous system infection should raise concern for encephalomyelitis. MRI is extremely helpful in establishing this diagnosis. Prevalence of non-polio enteroviral paralytic events is increasing in the United States. Potential EV-D68 cases should be reported to local health departments. Emergency medicine providers should consider this complication in the child with acute, unexplained significant respiratory illness with new neurologic complaints. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Unusual case of West Nile Virus flaccid paralysis in a 10-year-old child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabet, Farouq I; Servinsky, Sarah E; Naz, Fareeha; Kovas, Teresa E; Raghib, Timur O

    2013-05-01

    West Nile virus infection is asymptomatic in most cases. West Nile virus neuroinvasive disease includes encephalitis, meningitis, and/or acute flaccid paralysis. In children, acute flaccid paralysis as the solo presentation of West Nile virus disease is rare. It develops abruptly and progresses rapidly early in the disease course. We report on a 10-year-old child who presented with a slowly progressive left leg flaccid paralysis over 4 weeks. He tested positive for West Nile virus in both blood and cerebrospinal fluid. Spinal MRI showed enhancement of the ventral nerve roots. This was also supported by electrophysiological studies. One week after the plateauing of his left leg paralysis, he was readmitted to the hospital with left hand weakness. Complete recovery of his recurrent weakness was observed after prompt 5-day course of intravenous immunoglobulin G therapy. However, no improvement was noticed in the left foot drop. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of West Nile virus disease in children presented with a slowly progressive flaccid paralysis, and a recurrent weakness recovered after intravenous immunoglobulin G administration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Acute Flaccid Paralysis Surveillance in Zambia: Progress towards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute Flaccid Paralysis Surveillance in Zambia: Progress towards the Polio End Game. I Mweene-Ndumba, ML Mazaba, B Matapo, MR Chirambo, P Mwambi, P Musumbu, F Masaninga, P. Songolo, J Mufunda, M Monze ...

  13. Detection of diphtheritic polyneuropathy by acute flaccid paralysis surveillance, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateen, Farrah J; Bahl, Sunil; Khera, Ajay; Sutter, Roland W

    2013-01-01

    Diphtheritic polyneuropathy is a vaccine-preventable illness caused by exotoxin-producing strains of Corynebacterium diphtheriae. We present a retrospective convenience case series of 15 children (6 girls)paralysis surveillance, which was designed to detect poliomyelitis in India during 2002-2008. We also report data on detection of diphtheritic polyneuropathy compared with other causes of acute flaccid paralysis identified by this surveillance system.

  14. Paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paralysis is the loss of muscle function in part of your body. It happens when something goes ... way messages pass between your brain and muscles. Paralysis can be complete or partial. It can occur ...

  15. Marek's disease virus induced transient paralysis--a closer look

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek’s Disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of domestic chickens caused by a highly cell-associated alpha herpesvirus, Marek’s disease virus (MDV). Clinical signs of MD include depression, crippling, weight loss, and transient paralysis (TP). TP is a disease of the central nervous system...

  16. Acute flaccid paralysis surveillance indicators in the Democratic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The last wild poliovirus (WPV) case in Africa was reported in July 2014, thus underscoring the tremendous progress towards polio eradication worldwide. This study aimed to analyze the results of a seven-year surveillance of Acute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP) in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and to ...

  17. Acute flaccid paralysis surveillance: looking beyond the global poliomyelitis eradication initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswathy, T S; Zahrin, H Nor; Apandi, M Y; Kurup, D; Rohani, J; Zainah, S; Khairullah, N S

    2008-11-01

    In 1992 surveillance of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) cases was introduced in Malaysia along with the establishment of a national referral laboratory at the Institute for Medical Research. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence, viral etiology and clinical picture of AFP cases below 15 years of age, reported from 2002 to 2007. Six hundred seventy-eight of 688 reported cases were confirmed as AFP by expert review. The clinical presentation of acute flaccid paralysis in these cases was diverse, the most commonly reported being Guillian-Barre syndrome (32.3%). Sixty-nine viruses were isolated in this study. They were Sabin poliovirus (25), Echovirus (22), Cocksackie B (11), EV71 (5), Cocksackie A (1), and untypable (5). Malaysia has been confirmed as free from wild polio since the surveillance was established.

  18. Acute flaccid paralysis in a patient with sacral dimple

    OpenAIRE

    Mostafa, Mohammed; Nasef, Nehad; Barakat, Tarik; El-Hawary, Amany K; Abdel-Hady, Hesham

    2013-01-01

    Sacral dimples are the most common cutaneous anomaly detected during neonatal spinal examination. Congenital dermal sinus tract, a rare type of spinal dysraphism, occurs along the midline neuraxis from occiput down to the sacral region. It is often diagnosed in the presence of a sacral dimple together with skin signs, local infection, meningitis, abscess, or abnormal neurological examination. We report a case of acute flaccid paralysis with sensory level in a 4 mo old female infant with sacra...

  19. [Scorpionism causing severe acute flaccid paralysis. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa-Manzano, Alberto I; Vázquez-Solís, Ma Guadalupe; Zamora-López, Xochitl Xitlalli; Arias-Corona, Fernando; Palomera-Ávila, Francisco Miguel; Pulido-Galaviz, Carlos; Pacifuentes-Orozco, Adán

    2016-01-01

    Scorpionism is a public health problem in various regions of the world, being Mexico the country with the highest number of cases. Clinical manifestations range from local symptoms to severe disease with an impact on cardiovascular, respiratory and neurological level, and even death. There are no reports of acute flaccid paralysis as a manifestation of the clinical picture of the scorpion sting of the Centruroides gender, Family Buthidae, highly toxic, causes high rates of morbidity and mortality in our region. We documented a case of scorpionism, caused by a scorpion gender Buthidae, Centruroides family, which caused acute flaccid paralysis, after resolution of other severe manifestations. There is only one case report of scorpionism that produces acute flaccid paralysis in the literature, but it is related to the Parabuthus scorpion, endemic of South Africa. The knowledge of this complication, new for our region, will maximize efforts to diagnose and appropriately manage this symptoms, with the adequate application of the specific fabotherapy and advanced life support for proper survival in the patients with compromise of vital functions and imminent risk of death mainly by respiratory failure.

  20. Human Enteroviruses isolated during acute flaccid paralysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Surveillance of acute flaccid surveillance (AFP) has been used world-wide to monitor the control and eradication of circulating wild polioviruses. The Polio Laboratory since its accreditation in 1996 has supported the Disease Surveillance Department for AFP surveillance. This study aims to isolate and ...

  1. Acute flaccid paralysis: a five–year review of cases managed by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kemrilib

    classification of AFP included traumatic sciatic nerve palsy, acute polyneuritis, neuropathy and anterior poliomyelitis [4]. Whatever the definition of acute flaccid paralysis, the physiotherapist plays a significant role in management of its clinical presentations. Several studies on prevalence of acute flaccid paralysis have been ...

  2. In-vitro infection of pupae with Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus suggests variation for susceptibility and disturbance of transcriptional homeostasis in honey bees (Apis mellifera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ongoing decline of honey bee health worldwide is a serious economic and ecological concern. One major contributor to the decline are pathogens, including several honey bee viruses. However, information is limited on the biology of bee viruses and molecular interactions with their hosts. An exper...

  3. Uncommon Disorders Masquerading as Acute Flaccid Paralysis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Meenal; Kulkarni, Shilpa D; Patil, Varsha; Sayed, Rafat; Hegde, Anaita Udwadia

    2017-04-01

    The syndrome of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) is a common medical emergency in children. In the era of poliomyelitis eradication, the common causes of AFP include Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), transverse myelitis and traumatic neuritis. However, many common diseases can uncommonly present as AFP and some uncommon diseases may also masquerade like it. Uncommon causes of AFP seen at a tertiary care pediatric hospital are discussed along with relevant points in diagnosis and management. Also, common pitfalls in diagnosis of pediatric AFP and an approach to investigations are discussed.

  4. First report of Israeli acute paralysis virus in asymptomatic hives of Argentina Primera comunciación del virus israelí de la parálisis aguda en colmenas asintomáticas de la República Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Reynaldi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Honey bee mortality has recently been associated with Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV, a proposed etiological agent for a new syndrome known as Colony Collapse Disorder. Bees infected with this virus show shivering wings, progress into paralysis, and finally die outside the hive. During the last years, honey bee mortality became a serious problem for Argentinean beekeepers. We herein report the preliminary results of a survey carried out to detect IAPV in samples taken from several Argentine provinces, by using a reverse transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction assay. Our data indicate the existence of high frequency of IAPV in asymptomatic hives of Argentina.Recientemente la mortalidad de las abejas melíferas ha sido asociada al virus israelí de la parálisis aguda (IAPV, propuesto como agente etiológico del denominado síndrome de despoblamiento de las colmenas. Las abejas infectadas con este virus presentan temblores en las alas que progresan hasta convertirse en parálisis, y finalmente mueren fuera de la colmena. Durante los últimos años, la mortalidad de las abejas melíferas se ha transformado en un serio problema para los productores de miel de la Argentina. Nosotros informamos aquí los resultados preliminares de un estudio realizado para detectar IAPV en muestras de colmenas provenientes de varias provincias argentinas utilizando la técnica de transcripción reversa-reacción en cadena de la polimerasa. Nuestros datos indican la presencia de IAPV en un alto porcentaje de las colonias estudiadas.

  5. Epidemiology and clinical findings associated with enteroviral acute flaccid paralysis in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angez Mehar

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enteroviruses are among the most common viruses infecting humans worldwide and they are associated with diverse clinical syndromes. Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP is a clinical manifestation of enteroviral neuropathy, transverse myelitis, Guillian-Barre Syndrome, Traumatic neuritis and many other nervous system disorders. The objective of this study was to understand the role of Non-Polio Enteroviruses (NPEV towards this crippling disorder. Methods Stool specimens of 1775 children, aged less than 15 years, suffering from acute flaccid paralysis were collected after informed consent within 14 days of onset of symptoms during January 2003 to September 2003. The specimens were inoculated on RD and L20B cells using conventional tube cell culture while micro-neutralization test was used to identify the non-polio enterovirus (NPEV serotypes. Detailed clinical information and 60-days follow-up reports were analyzed for NPEV-associated AFP cases. Results NPEV were isolated from 474 samples. The male to female ratio was 1.4:1. The isolation of NPEV decreased significantly with the increase in age. Cases associated with fever at the onset of NPEV-associated AFP were found to be 62%. The paralysis was found asymmetrical in 67% cases, the progression of paralysis to peak within 4 days was found in 72% cases and residual paralysis after 60 days of paralysis onset was observed in 39% cases associated with NPEV. A clinical diagnosis of Guillian-Barre syndrome was made in 32% cases. On Microneutralization assay, echo-6 (13% and coxsackievirus B (13% were the most commonly isolated serotypes of NPEV along with E-7, E-13, E-11, E-4 and E-30. The isolates (n = 181 found untypable by the antiserum pools were confirmed as NPEV by PCR using Pan-Enterovirus primers. Conclusion The present study suggests that NPEV are a dominant cause of AFP and different serotypes of NPEV are randomly distributed in Pakistan. The untypable isolates need further

  6. Epidemiology and clinical findings associated with enteroviral acute flaccid paralysis in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Mohsan; Zaidi, Sohail Z; Naeem, Asif; Masroor, Muhammad; Sharif, Salmaan; Shaukat, Shahzad; Angez, Mehar; Khan, Anis

    2007-02-15

    Enteroviruses are among the most common viruses infecting humans worldwide and they are associated with diverse clinical syndromes. Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) is a clinical manifestation of enteroviral neuropathy, transverse myelitis, Guillian-Barre Syndrome, Traumatic neuritis and many other nervous system disorders. The objective of this study was to understand the role of Non-Polio Enteroviruses (NPEV) towards this crippling disorder. Stool specimens of 1775 children, aged less than 15 years, suffering from acute flaccid paralysis were collected after informed consent within 14 days of onset of symptoms during January 2003 to September 2003. The specimens were inoculated on RD and L20B cells using conventional tube cell culture while micro-neutralization test was used to identify the non-polio enterovirus (NPEV) serotypes. Detailed clinical information and 60-days follow-up reports were analyzed for NPEV-associated AFP cases. NPEV were isolated from 474 samples. The male to female ratio was 1.4:1. The isolation of NPEV decreased significantly with the increase in age. Cases associated with fever at the onset of NPEV-associated AFP were found to be 62%. The paralysis was found asymmetrical in 67% cases, the progression of paralysis to peak within 4 days was found in 72% cases and residual paralysis after 60 days of paralysis onset was observed in 39% cases associated with NPEV. A clinical diagnosis of Guillian-Barre syndrome was made in 32% cases. On Microneutralization assay, echo-6 (13%) and coxsackievirus B (13%) were the most commonly isolated serotypes of NPEV along with E-7, E-13, E-11, E-4 and E-30. The isolates (n = 181) found untypable by the antiserum pools were confirmed as NPEV by PCR using Pan-Enterovirus primers. The present study suggests that NPEV are a dominant cause of AFP and different serotypes of NPEV are randomly distributed in Pakistan. The untypable isolates need further characterization and analysis in order to determine their

  7. Acute flaccid paralysis in a patient with sacral dimple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Mohammed; Nasef, Nehad; Barakat, Tarik; El-Hawary, Amany K; Abdel-Hady, Hesham

    2013-08-08

    Sacral dimples are the most common cutaneous anomaly detected during neonatal spinal examination. Congenital dermal sinus tract, a rare type of spinal dysraphism, occurs along the midline neuraxis from occiput down to the sacral region. It is often diagnosed in the presence of a sacral dimple together with skin signs, local infection, meningitis, abscess, or abnormal neurological examination. We report a case of acute flaccid paralysis with sensory level in a 4 mo old female infant with sacral dimple, diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging to be a paraspinal subdural abscess. Surgical exploration revealed a congenital dermal sinus tract extending from the subdural abscess down to the sacral dimple and open to the exterior with a minute opening.

  8. Host and viral translational mechanisms during cricket paralysis virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrey, Julianne L; Lee, Yun-Young; Au, Hilda H T; Bushell, Martin; Jan, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The dicistrovirus is a positive-strand single-stranded RNA virus that possesses two internal ribosome entry sites (IRES) that direct translation of distinct open reading frames encoding the viral structural and nonstructural proteins. Through an unusual mechanism, the intergenic region (IGR) IRES responsible for viral structural protein expression mimics a tRNA to directly recruit the ribosome and set the ribosome into translational elongation. In this study, we explored the mechanism of host translational shutoff in Drosophila S2 cells infected by the dicistrovirus, cricket paralysis virus (CrPV). CrPV infection of S2 cells results in host translational shutoff concomitant with an increase in viral protein synthesis. CrPV infection resulted in the dissociation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) and eIF4E early in infection and the induction of deIF2alpha phosphorylation at 3 h postinfection, which lags after the initial inhibition of host translation. Forced dephosphorylation of deIF2alpha by overexpression of dGADD34, which activates protein phosphatase I, did not prevent translational shutoff nor alter virus production, demonstrating that deIF2alpha phosphorylation is dispensable for host translational shutoff. However, premature induction of deIF2alpha phosphorylation by thapsigargin treatment early in infection reduced viral protein synthesis and replication. Finally, translation mediated by the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) and the IGR IRES were resistant to impairment of eIF4F or eIF2 in translation extracts. These results support a model by which the alteration of the deIF4F complex contribute to the shutoff of host translation during CrPV infection, thereby promoting viral protein synthesis via the CrPV 5'UTR and IGR IRES.

  9. Occurrence of Deformed wing virus, Chronic bee paralysis virus and mtDNA variants in haplotype K of Varroa destructor mites in Syrian apiaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbeaino, Toufic; Daher-Hjaij, Nouraldin; Ismaeil, Faiz; Mando, Jamal; Khaled, Bassem Solaiman; Kubaa, Raied Abou

    2016-05-01

    A small-scale survey was conducted on 64 beehives located in four governorates of Syria in order to assess for the first time the presence of honeybee-infecting viruses and of Varroa destructor mites in the country. RT-PCR assays conducted on 192 honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) using virus-specific primers showed that Deformed wing virus (DWV) was present in 49 (25.5%) of the tested samples and Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) in 2 (1.04%), whereas Acute bee paralysis virus, Sacbrood virus, Black queen cell virus and Kashmir bee virus were absent. Nucleotide sequences of PCR amplicons obtained from DWV and CBPV genomes shared 95-97 and 100% identity with isolates reported in the GenBank, respectively. The phylogenetic tree grouped the Syrian DWV isolates in one cluster, distinct from all those of different origins reported in the database. Furthermore, 19 adult V. destructor females were genetically analyzed by amplifying and sequencing four fragments in cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (cox1), ATP synthase 6 (atp6), cox3 and cytochrome b (cytb) mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genes. Sequences of concatenated V. destructor mtDNA genes (2696 bp) from Syria were similar to the Korean (K) haplotype and were found recurrently in all governorates. In addition, two genetic lineages of haplotype K with slight variations (0.2-0.3%) were present only in Tartous and Al-Qunaitra governorates.

  10. Fifteen years of acute flaccid paralysis surveillance in Hong Kong: findings from 1997 to 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance system was set up in Hong Kong in 1997 for World Health Organization's (WHO) certification of poliomyelitis eradication. This paper describes and reviews the demographic, clinical and virological characteristics of AFP cases reported to the system in its first 15 years. All patients aged under 15 years presented with acute onset of paralysis of any limbs reported to the Department of Health from January 1997 to December 2011 were reviewed. Data on demographic characteristics, vaccination history, clinical presentation and virological investigation on stool specimens collected during investigation were analysed with descriptive statistics. Of the 247 cases reported, about 45% were aged under five. All cases were classified as non-polio AFP according to WHO classification. About 60% were identified with neurological disorders, with Guillain-Barré syndrome (25.9%) and myelitis (13.4%) being the most common. Viruses were detected in 14.0% of the AFP cases, with non-polio enteroviruses (NPEV) (60.0%) and adenoviruses (31.4%) accounted for most of the positive detections. Most performance indicators set by the WHO were fulfilled. The AFP surveillance facilitated the clinical, virological and epidemiological examination of paediatric AFP cases. From 1997 to 2011, Guillain-Barré syndrome and myelitis were the most common among paediatric AFP cases in Hong Kong. NPEV and adenoviruses accounted for most of the positive viral detections. No wild poliovirus was detected, and all cases were classified as non-polio AFP. © 2014 The Author. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  11. When the bell tolls on Bell's palsy: finding occult malignancy in acute-onset facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesnel, Alicia M; Lindsay, Robin W; Hadlock, Tessa A

    2010-01-01

    This study reports 4 cases of occult parotid malignancy presenting with sudden-onset facial paralysis to demonstrate that failure to regain tone 6 months after onset distinguishes these patients from Bell's palsy patients with delayed recovery and to propose a diagnostic algorithm for this subset of patients. A case series of 4 patients with occult parotid malignancies presenting with acute-onset unilateral facial paralysis is reported. Initial imaging on all 4 patients did not demonstrate a parotid mass. Diagnostic delays ranged from 7 to 36 months from time of onset of facial paralysis to time of diagnosis of parotid malignancy. Additional physical examination findings, especially failure to regain tone, as well as properly protocolled radiologic studies reviewed with dedicated head and neck radiologists, were helpful in arriving at the diagnosis. An algorithm to minimize diagnostic delays in this subset of acute facial paralysis patients is presented. Careful attention to facial tone, in addition to movement, is important in the diagnostic evaluation of acute-onset facial paralysis. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterization of a novel enterovirus serotype and an enterovirus EV-B93 isolated from acute flaccid paralysis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahzad Shaukat

    Full Text Available Non-polio enteroviruses (NPEVs are among the most common viruses infecting humans worldwide. Most of these infections are asymptomatic but few can lead to systemic and neurological disorders like Acute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP. Acute Flaccid Paralysis is a clinical syndrome and NPEVs have been isolated frequently from the patients suffering from AFP but little is known about their causal relationship. The objective of this study was to identify and characterize the NPEV serotypes recovered from 184 stool samples collected from AFP patients in Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA in north-west of Pakistan. Overall, 44 (95.6 % isolates were successfully typed through microneutralization assay as a member of enterovirus B species including echovirus (E-2, E-3, E-4, E-6, E-7, E-11, E-13, E-14, E-21 and E-29 while two isolates (PAK NIH SP6545B and PAK NIH SP1202B remained untypeable. The VP1 and capsid regions analysis characterized these viruses as EV-B93 and EV-B106. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that PAK NIH isolates had high genetic diversity and represent distinct genotypes circulating in the country. Our findings highlight the role of NPEVs in AFP cases to be thoroughly investigated especially in high disease risk areas, with limited surveillance activities and health resources.

  13. Acute flaccid paralysis: a five–year review of cases managed by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 5-year (1999-2004) review of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) cases managed at the physiotherapy clinic of the University College Hospital, Ibadan Nigeria was carried out. Collection of data involved retrieving the records of all patients seen at the physiotherapy clinic during the study period, from which the paediatric cases ...

  14. Diabetic mice show an aggravated course of herpes-simplex virus-induced facial nerve paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esaki, Shinichi; Yamano, Koji; Kiguchi, Jun; Katsumi, Sachiyo; Keceli, Sumru; Okamoto, Hideyuki; Goshima, Fumi; Kimura, Hiroshi; Nishiyama, Yukihiro; Murakami, Shingo

    2012-10-01

    Bell's palsy is highly associated with diabetes mellitus. The cause of Bell's palsy in diabetes mellitus is not completely understood. Diabetic mononeuropathy or reactivation of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) may be responsible for the facial paralysis seen in diabetic patients. We previously reported transient and ipsilateral facial paralysis in mice inoculated with HSV-1. In this study, we examined the neuropathogenesis of HSV-1 in diabetic mice to clarify the relationship between Bell's palsy and diabetes mellitus. We compared the incidence and course of facial paralysis after HSV-1 inoculation in diabetic and nondiabetic mice groups. Diabetic mice were prepared by intraperitoneal streptozotocin injection. Facial nerve damage was assessed by electrophysiologic and histopathologic examinations. Compared with the nondiabetic group, the incidence of facial nerve paralysis was significantly increased in the diabetic mice. Electrophysiologic examinations and histopathologic changes also revealed that the facial nerve damage was more severe in the diabetic group. The aggravated course of HSV-1 infection in diabetes suggests that HSV-1 may be the main causative factor for the increased incidence of facial paralysis in diabetic patients.

  15. Acute Abducens Nerve Paralysis in the Pediatric Emergency Department: Analysis of 14 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teksam, Ozlem; Keser, Ayse Gultekingil; Konuskan, Bahadir; Haliloglu, Goknur; Oguz, Kader Karli; Yalnizoglu, Dilek

    2016-05-01

    Sixth cranial nerve (SCN) palsy is an uncommon but important neurological problem in patients admitted to pediatric emergency department. The underlying etiology of SCN palsy has a wide range from viral infections to intracranial tumors; therefore, a careful and systematic approach is necessary while examining these patients. Fourteen patients who presented with acute SCN paralysis to pediatric emergency department during the last 10 years were examined. The age at the time of admission ranged between 14 months and 16 years (median, 9.5 years). Of the 14 patients, 5 were girls and 9 were boys. A total of 3 of the 14 patients had bilateral cranial nerve VI paralysis, and 9 patients had additional abnormal findings on neurological examination. Neuroimaging studies included cranial tomography (n = 3) and brain magnetic resonance imaging in all patients. The underlying etiology was malignancy (n = 3); glioma, medulloblastoma, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and dural sinus thrombosis (n = 2); as well as Guillain-Barre syndrome (n = 2), multiple sclerosis (n = 1), pseudotumor cerebri (n = 1), and meningitis (n = 1). The remaining 4 patients had miscellaneous benign etiologies. Other lesions of primary brain tumors causing increased intracranial pressure constitute 50% of the underlying etiology, followed by Guillain-Barre syndrome (14.2%). However, these patients had neurological symptoms signs, in addition to diplopia or SCN paralysis. Patients admitted to pediatric emergency department with acute SCN paralysis should be examined in detail to disclose the underlying etiology especially if they present with additional clinical signs or symptoms.

  16. First molecular detection of Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus (CBPV in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modirrousta, H.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the viruses infecting honey bees, chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV is known to induce significant losses in honey bee colonies. CBPV is an unclassified polymorphic single stranded RNA virus. Using RT-PCR, the virus infections in honey bees can be detected in a rapid and accurate manner. Bee samples were collected from 23 provinces of Iran, between July-September 2011 and 2012. A total of 160 apiaries were sampled and submitted for virus screening. RNA extraction and RT-PCR were performed with QIAGEN kits. The primers lead to a fragment of 315 bp. The PCR products were electrophoresed in a 1.2 % agarose gel. Following the RT-PCR reaction with the specific primers, out of the 160 apiaries examined, 12 (7.5 % were infected with CBPV. This is the first study of CBPV detection in Iranian apiaries. We identified CBPV in the collected samples from different geographic regions of Iran.

  17. Acute flaccid paralysis surveillance indicators in the Democratic Republic of Congo during 2008-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Membo, Hugo Kavunga; Mweene, Aaron; Sadeuh-Mba, Serge Alain; Masumu, Justin; Yogolelo, Riziki; Ngendabanyikwa, Norbert; Sokolua, Eddy; Sagamiko, Fred; Simulundu, Edgar; Ahuka, Steve; Muyembe, Jean Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The last wild poliovirus (WPV) case in Africa was reported in July 2014, thus underscoring the tremendous progress towards polio eradication worldwide. This study aimed to analyze the results of a seven-year surveillance of Acute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP) in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and to identify potential gaps that need to be addressed. Epidemiological and virological data obtained from AFP surveillance among AFP cases less than 15 years from January 2008 to December 2014 in DRC were retrospectively considered and analyzed in this study. Of the 13,749 AFP cases investigated, 58.9% received at least three doses of oral polio vaccine (OPV), 7.3% never received OPV, while the status of 18.3% was unknown. Analysis of surveillance performances showed that all, but two, indicators were below the required WHO-specified targets. Non-polio enterovirus (NPEV) isolation rate was consistently below the minimum requirement at ≥10% and the proportions of stool specimens that reached the laboratory within 72 hours of being sent were always below 15% (WHO target is ≥80%). Virus isolation and differentiation showed that 1.5% of AFP cases were infected by WPVs, 5.5% by Sabin strains, 0.5% by vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPVs) and 7.2% by NPEVs. Our findings indicate that additional efforts are needed to address the timeliness of adequate stool specimens' arrival to the laboratory. It remains essential to maintain high polio vaccine coverage and high AFP surveillance standards to ensure rapid detection and containment of either WPV importation or VDPV re-emergence in DRC.

  18. [Efficacy observation of electroacupuncture intervention on severe acute pancreatitis at early stage complicated with intestinal paralysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yan-Hong; Zhong, Guang-Wei; Zhao, Shuang-Ping; Tang, Hong-Mei; Zhang, Li-Na

    2011-02-01

    To explore the clinical efficacy of electroacupuncture intervention on severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) at early stage complicated with intestinal paralysis. Sixty-eight cases of SAP were randomly divided into observation group (48 cases) and control group (20 cases). In observation group, according to the course of sickness, the early-stage subgroup (30 cases, hospitalized in 3 d) and late-stage subgroup (18 cases, hospitalized in 3-7 d) were subdivided. In control group, the conventional treatment was applied. In observation group, based on the same treatment as control group, electroacupuncture was supplemented at Zhongwan (CV 12), Zusanli (ST 36), Neiguan (PC 6), Hegu (LI 4), etc. Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II scores, the recovery time of intestinal paralysis and laboratory indices, complications, operation transfer rate, death rate and the admission time were compared among groups after treatment. The total effective rate was 83.3% (25/30) in early-stage subgroup, which was superior to 72.2% (13/18) in late-stage subgroup and 65.0% (13/20) in control group (P complications, operation transfer rate, death rate and admission time were all lower remarkably than those in late-stage subgroup and control group (P 0.05). The clinical efficacy of electroacupuncture intervention on SAP complicated with intestinal paralysis is superior remarkably to that of conventional treatment, and the efficacy of electroacupuncture intervention at early stage is better than that at late stage.

  19. Multiple Virus Infections and the Characteristics of Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus in Diseased Honey Bees (Apis Mellifera L. in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Yan Y.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available China has the largest number of managed honey bee colonies globally, but there is currently no data on viral infection in diseased A. mellifera L. colonies in China. In particular, there is a lack of data on chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV in Chinese honey bee colonies. Consequently, the present study investigated the occurrence and frequency of several widespread honey bee viruses in diseased Chinese apiaries, and we used the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR assay. Described was the relationship between the presence of CBPV and diseased colonies (with at least one of the following symptoms: depopulation, paralysis, dark body colorings and hairless, or a mass of dead bees on the ground surrounding the beehives. Phylogenetic analyses of CBPV were employed. The prevalence of multiple infections of honey bee viruses in diseased Chinese apiaries was 100%, and the prevalence of infections with even five and six viruses were higher than expected. The incidence of CBPV in diseased colonies was significantly higher than that in apparently healthy colonies in Chinese A. mellifera aparies, and CBPV isolates from China can be separated into Chinese-Japanese clade 1 and 2. The results indicate that beekeeping in China may be threatened by colony decline due to the high prevalence of multiple viruses with CBPV.

  20. The 5′ Untranslated Region of a Novel Infectious Molecular Clone of the Dicistrovirus Cricket Paralysis Virus Modulates Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Kerr, Craig H.; Wang, Qing S.; Keatings, Kathleen; Khong, Anthony; Allan, Douglas; Yip, Calvin K.; Foster, Leonard J.; Jan, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Dicistroviridae are a family of RNA viruses that possesses a single-stranded positive-sense RNA genome containing two distinct open reading frames (ORFs), each preceded by an internal ribosome entry site that drives translation of the viral structural and nonstructural proteins, respectively. The type species, Cricket paralysis virus (CrPV), has served as a model for studying host-virus interactions; however, investigations into the molecular mechanisms of CrPV and other dicistroviruses have ...

  1. Longitudinal Outcomes in the 2014 Acute Flaccid Paralysis Cluster in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yea, Carmen; Bitnun, Ari; Robinson, Joan; Mineyko, Aleksandra; Barton, Michelle; Mah, Jean K; Vajsar, Jiri; Richardson, Susan; Licht, Christoph; Brophy, Jason; Crone, Megan; Desai, Shalini; Hukin, Juliette; Jones, Kevin; Muir, Katherine; Pernica, Jeffrey M; Pless, Robert; Pohl, Daniela; Rafay, Mubeen F; Selby, Kathryn; Venkateswaran, Sunita; Bernard, Geneviève; Yeh, E Ann

    2017-03-01

    We describe the presenting features and long-term outcome of an unusual cluster of pediatric acute flaccid paralysis cases that occurred in Canada during the 2014 enterovirus D68 outbreak. Children (n = 25; median age 7.8 years) presenting to Canadian centers between July 1 and October 31, 2014, and who met diagnostic criteria for acute flaccid paralysis were evaluated retrospectively. The predominant presenting features included prodromal respiratory illness (n = 22), cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytic pleocytosis (n = 18), pain in neck/back (n = 14) and extremities (n = 10), bowel/bladder dysfunction (n = 9), focal central gray matter lesions found in all regions of the spinal cord within the cohort (n = 16), brain stem lesions (n = 8), and bulbar symptoms (n = 5). Enterovirus D68 was detectable in nasopharyngeal specimens (n = 7) but not in cerebrospinal fluid. Acute therapies (corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulins, plasmapheresis) were well tolerated with few side effects. Fourteen of 16 patients who were followed beyond 12 months post onset had neurologic deficits but showed ongoing clinical improvement and motor recovery.

  2. Establishing acute flaccid paralysis surveillance under difficult circumstances: lessons learned in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nareth, L; Aylward, R B; Sopal, O; Bassett, D; Vun, M C; Bilous, J

    1997-02-01

    The implementation of the World Health Organization's recommended strategies for polio eradication, particularly acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance, can be limited by difficult circumstances beyond the control of immunization personnel. In Cambodia, however, obstacles to establishing AFP surveillance were rapidly overcome using a strategy that improved reporting through active surveillance in a geographically limited area before gradually expanding to include the whole country. The success of the strategy was ensured by the timely provision of the resources that were needed to establish, expand, and monitor surveillance activities.

  3. Characterisation of Structural Proteins from Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus (CBPV Using Mass Spectrometry

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    Aurore Chevin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV is the etiological agent of chronic paralysis, an infectious and contagious disease in adult honeybees. CBPV is a positive single-stranded RNA virus which contains two major viral RNA fragments. RNA 1 (3674 nt and RNA 2 (2305 nt encode three and four putative open reading frames (ORFs, respectively. RNA 1 is thought to encode the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp since the amino acid sequence derived from ORF 3 shares similarities with the RdRP of families Nodaviridae and Tombusviridae. The genomic organization of CBPV and in silico analyses have suggested that RNA 1 encodes non-structural proteins, while RNA 2 encodes structural proteins, which are probably encoded by ORFs 2 and 3. In this study, purified CBPV particles were used to characterize virion proteins by mass spectrometry. Several polypeptides corresponding to proteins encoded by ORF 2 and 3 on RNA 2 were detected. Their role in the formation of the viral capsid is discussed.

  4. An epidemiological analysis of acute flaccid paralysis in Khuzestan Province, southwest Iran, from 2006 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momen, Ali Akbar; Shakurnia, Abdolhussein

    2016-01-01

    Investigations into the epidemiology of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) are an essential strategic component of the Global Poliomyelitis Eradication Initiative of the World Health Organization (WHO), and are part of the certification process for polio eradication worldwide. This is an epidemiological report of AFP incidence in children less than 15 years old in southwest Iran. This was a retrospective cohort study, carried out based on WHO guidelines, in which we reviewed non-polio AFP cases recorded from January 2006 to December 2010 in different regions of Khuzestan Province, southwest Iran. In this study, the records of all children under 15 years old with AFP were evaluated. During a 5-year period, 137 cases of AFP were reported (incidence rate, 2.21 per 100,000 children paralysis was Guillain-Barré syndrome (117 of 137). None of the cases were diagnosed with acute poliomyelitis. In this study, we found that the incidence rate of AFP in the region was almost in agreement with the expected incidence of AFP in children less than 15 years old; therefore, the AFP surveillance program in Khuzestan Province is satisfactory in terms of reliability and effectiveness. Nevertheless, routine vaccination against polio and ensuring that patients with AFP receive follow-up are essential for eradicating polio.

  5. The presence of Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus infection in Honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presence of Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) infection in the U.S. is reported for the first time. Using molecular methods, the evidence of infection of honey bees with CBPV has been detected in both symptomatic and asymptomatic bees. While our seven year’s survey showed that the CBPV infect...

  6. Chronic bee paralysis virus and Nosema ceranae experimental co-infection of winter honey bee workers (Apis mellifera L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) is an important viral disease of adult bees which induces significant losses in honey bee colonies. In this study winter worker bees were experimentally infected using three different experiments. Bees were inoculated orally or topically with CBPV to evaluate the l...

  7. A Prospective clinical and electrophysiological survey of acute flaccid paralysis in pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.; Iqbal, W.; Murtaza, S. M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Recognition of common causes of acute flaccid paralysis in children. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Combined Military Hospital Peshawar, from Aug 2009 to Jun 2012. Material and Methods: The demographic data including age, gender and clinical data including history of injection, stool results, and final diagnosis (polio, non-polio enterovirus, traumatic injection neuritis, GBS and an unknown group) were expressed in terms of frequencies and percentages. Chi-square test was applied for the association of age-groups with various causes of AFP. A p-value of less than 0.05 was taken as statistically significant. SPSS version 20 was used for statistical analyses. Results: Injection neuritis and post-viral paralysis (polio, non-polio enterovirus) were the common causes of AFP. Conclusion: As the study identified common causes of AFP which are essentially preventable, it highlighted certain issues during the process. First is the lack of nursing staff training or iatrogenic disability due to quackery, which requires urgent intervention to prevent it. Second is a deficiency in the WHO management protocol for AFP. NCS EMG proved to be a vital diagnostic tool for AFP, which is not included in the WHO AFP protocol at present.It is suggested that this diagnostic modality should be included in the AFP diagnostic protocol for better diagnostic yield. (author)

  8. Causation of Acute Flaccid Paralysis by Myelitis and Myositis in Enterovirus-D68 Infected Mice Deficient in Interferon αβ/γ Receptor Deficient Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrey, John D.; Wang, Hong; Hurst, Brett L.; Zukor, Katherine; Siddharthan, Venkatraman; Tarbet, E. Bart

    2018-01-01

    Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) caused a large outbreak in the summer and fall of 2014 in the United States. It causes serious respiratory disease, but causation of associated paralysis is controversial, because the virus is not routinely identified in cerebrospinal fluid. To establish clinical correlates with human disease, we evaluated EV-D68 infection in non-lethal paralysis mouse models. Ten-day-old mice lacking interferon responses were injected intraperitoneally with the virus. Paralysis developed in hindlimbs. After six weeks of paralysis, the motor neurons were depleted due to viral infection. Hindlimb muscles were also infected and degenerating. Even at the earliest stage of paralysis, muscles were still infected and were degenerating, in addition to presence of virus in the spinal cord. To model natural respiratory infection, five-day-old mice were infected intranasally with EV-D68. Two of the four infected mice developed forelimb paralysis. The affected limbs had muscle disease, but no spinal cord infection was detected. The unique contributions of this study are that EV-D68 causes paralysis in mice, and that causation by muscle disease, with or without spinal cord disease, may help to resolve the controversy that the virus can cause paralysis, even if it cannot be identified in cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:29329211

  9. Causation of Acute Flaccid Paralysis by Myelitis and Myositis in Enterovirus-D68 Infected Mice Deficient in Interferon αβ/γ Receptor Deficient Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Morrey

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68 caused a large outbreak in the summer and fall of 2014 in the United States. It causes serious respiratory disease, but causation of associated paralysis is controversial, because the virus is not routinely identified in cerebrospinal fluid. To establish clinical correlates with human disease, we evaluated EV-D68 infection in non-lethal paralysis mouse models. Ten-day-old mice lacking interferon responses were injected intraperitoneally with the virus. Paralysis developed in hindlimbs. After six weeks of paralysis, the motor neurons were depleted due to viral infection. Hindlimb muscles were also infected and degenerating. Even at the earliest stage of paralysis, muscles were still infected and were degenerating, in addition to presence of virus in the spinal cord. To model natural respiratory infection, five-day-old mice were infected intranasally with EV-D68. Two of the four infected mice developed forelimb paralysis. The affected limbs had muscle disease, but no spinal cord infection was detected. The unique contributions of this study are that EV-D68 causes paralysis in mice, and that causation by muscle disease, with or without spinal cord disease, may help to resolve the controversy that the virus can cause paralysis, even if it cannot be identified in cerebrospinal fluid.

  10. A cluster of acute flaccid paralysis and cranial nerve dysfunction temporally associated with an outbreak of enterovirus D68 in children in Colorado, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messacar, Kevin; Schreiner, Teri L; Maloney, John A; Wallace, Adam; Ludke, Jan; Oberste, M Stephen; Nix, W Allan; Robinson, Christine C; Glodé, Mary P; Abzug, Mark J; Dominguez, Samuel R

    2015-04-25

    Clusters of acute flaccid paralysis or cranial nerve dysfunction in children are uncommon. We aimed to assess a cluster of children with acute flaccid paralysis and cranial nerve dysfunction geographically and temporally associated with an outbreak of enterovirus-D68 respiratory disease. We defined a case of neurological disease as any child admitted to Children's Hospital Colorado (Aurora, CO, USA) with acute flaccid paralysis with spinal-cord lesions involving mainly grey matter on imaging, or acute cranial nerve dysfunction with brainstem lesions on imaging, who had onset of neurological symptoms between Aug 1, 2014, and Oct 31, 2014. We used Poisson regression to assess whether the numbers of cases during the outbreak period were significantly greater than baseline case numbers from a historical control period (July 31, 2010, to July 31, 2014). 12 children met the case definition (median age 11·5 years [IQR 6·75-15]). All had a prodromal febrile illness preceding neurological symptoms by a median of 7 days (IQR 5·75-8). Neurological deficits included flaccid limb weakness (n=10; asymmetric n=7), bulbar weakness (n=6), and cranial nerve VI (n=3) and VII (n=2) dysfunction. Ten (83%) children had confluent, longitudinally extensive spinal-cord lesions of the central grey matter, with predominant anterior horn-cell involvement, and nine (75%) children had brainstem lesions. Ten (91%) of 11 children had cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis. Nasopharyngeal specimens from eight (73%) of 11 children were positive for rhinovirus or enterovirus. Viruses from five (45%) of 11 children were typed as enterovirus D68. Enterovirus PCR of cerebrospinal fluid, blood, and rectal swabs, and tests for other causes, were negative. Improvement of cranial nerve dysfunction has been noted in three (30%) of ten children. All ten children with limb weakness have residual deficits. We report the first geographically and temporally defined cluster of acute flaccid paralysis and cranial

  11. Surgical Treatment for Epstein-Barr Virus Otomastoiditis Complicated by Facial Nerve Paralysis: A Case Report of Two Young Brothers and Review of Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eeten, E. van; Faber, H.T.; Kunst, D.

    2017-01-01

    We report the case of two young brothers with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) otomastoiditis complicated by a facial nerve paralysis. The boys, aged 7 months (patient A) and 2 years and 8 months (patient B), were diagnosed with a facial nerve paralysis House-Brackmann (HB) grade IV (A) and V (B). After

  12. Epidemiology of acute flaccid paralysis in Kermanshah province, 2004-2009

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    Keyghobad Ghadiri

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine epidemiologic features of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP during 2004-2009 in Kermanshah province. This cross-sectional descriptive study was done based on data records from Kermanshah health care center. In total 89 patients, 0-14 years old were enrolled study, which 36 of them were male and 53 were female. 50.6% of subjects were diagnosed as Guillain-barre, 6.7% transverse synovitis and 5.6% as arthritis. No any cases of poliomyelitis were diagnosed. The prevalence of reported of AFP during 2004-2009 in Kermanshah province was more than expected rate of 1 per 100000 according to WHO.

  13. Analysis of new aphid lethal paralysis virus (ALPV) isolates suggests evolution of two ALPV species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sijun; Vijayendran, Diveena; Carrillo-Tripp, Jimena; Miller, W Allen; Bonning, Bryony C

    2014-12-01

    Aphid lethal paralysis virus (ALPV; family Dicistroviridae) was first isolated from the bird cherry-oat aphid, Rhopalosiphum padi. ALPV-like virus sequences have been reported from many insects and insect predators. We identified a new isolate of ALPV (ALPV-AP) from the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, and a new isolate (ALPV-DvV) from western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera. ALPV-AP has an ssRNA genome of 9940 nt. Based on phylogenetic analysis, ALPV-AP was closely related to ALPV-AM, an ALPV isolate from honeybees, Apis mellifera, in Spain and Brookings, SD, USA. The distinct evolutionary branches suggested the existence of two lineages of the ALPV virus. One consisted of ALPV-AP and ALPV-AM, whilst all other isolates of ALPV grouped into the other lineage. The similarity of ALPV-AP and ALPV-AM was up to 88 % at the RNA level, compared with 78-79 % between ALPV-AP and other ALPV isolates. The sequence identity of proteins between ALPV-AP and ALPV-AM was 98-99 % for both ORF1 and ORF2, whilst only 85-87 % for ORF1 and 91-92 % for ORF2 between ALPV-AP and other ALPV isolates. Sequencing of RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) products and cDNA clones of the virus genome revealed sequence variation in the 5' UTRs and in ORF1, indicating that ALPV may be under strong selection pressure, which could have important biological implications for ALPV host range and infectivity. Our results indicated that ALPV-like viruses infect insects in the order Coleoptera, in addition to the orders Hemiptera and Hymenoptera, and we propose that ALPV isolates be classified as two separate viral species. © 2014 The Authors.

  14. Characterization of group B coxsackieviruses isolated from non-polio acute flaccid paralysis patients in Pakistan: vital assessment before polio eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angez, M; Shaukat, S; Zahra, R; Alam, M M; Sharif, S; Khurshid, A; Arshad, Y; Suleman, M; Mujtaba, G; Zaidi, S S Z

    2017-09-01

    Pakistan is at the verge of polio eradication but isolation of non-polio enteroviruses (NPEVs) from acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) cases may result in serious or even fatal outcome. Many enteroviruses share similar symptoms and epidemiology as is the case with poliovirus and coxsackievirus (CV). The present study was designed to genetically characterize coxsackievirus B (CV-B) serotypes isolated from non-polio acute flaccid paralytic children, as well as to understand their probable role in paralysis. A total of 63 (20·1%) out of 313 stool samples during 2013 were found positive for NPEVs in rhabdomyosarcoma cells. Only 24 (38·0%) NPEVs were typed as CV-B by microneutralization assay and were further characterized by sequencing of the viral protein 1 (VP1) gene. Molecular phylogenetic analyses classified the study strains into six coxsackievirus B serotypes (coxsackievirus B1 to B6) with their respective prototype strains with evidence of epidemiological linkage and distinct clusters. Moreover, four major differences were found within the amino acid sequences of BC-loop in VP1 of CV-B strains. In conclusion, this study presented the molecular evolutionary genetic overview and distinct phylogenetic pattern of CV-B isolates from AFP cases in Pakistan, and explored the possible link between CV-B infections and AFP cases. Furthermore, our data reveal that these viruses might contribute to the incidence of paralysis in population and there is need of time to establish an enterovirus surveillance system for better understanding of epidemiological and virological characteristics of NPEV infections associated with AFP cases in the country.

  15. MRI findings of spine: acute flaccid paralysis associated with enterovirus 71 infected hand-foot-mouth disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Hua; Peng Yun; Duan Xiaomin; Wang Xu; Zeng Jinjin; Sun Guoqiang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the characteristics of spinal MR images in acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) associated with enterovirus 71 infected hand-foot-mouth disease. Methods: The spinal MR images of eight infants with AFP and positive EV71 cultures were analyzed during an outbreak of hand-foot-mouth disease in China in 2008. Results: Acute paralysis was observed in one lower limb in 4 of the 8 patients, in four limbs in 2 patients, in one upper limb and both lower limbs in 1 patient, 2 of the 8 patients also had brain stem encephalitis. Lesions were identified in anterior horn regions of spinal cord with hyperintensity on T 2 -weighted images and hypointensity on T 1 -weighted images. Location of the lesions included C3 to C7 (1 case), T10 extending to conus medullaris (5 cases) and a combination of the above (2 cases). Five of the 8 patients presented with unilateral paralysis. Two of the 5 cases showed unilateral hyperintense lesions in anterior horn regions and the remaining 3 cases showed bilateral hyperintense lesions in anterior horn regions with a unilateral predominance. One of the 3 patients with bilateral lesions showed slight enhancement of anterior horn with prominent enhancement of ventral roots after intravenous injections of contrast medium. Three of the 8 patients with bilateral paralysis showed bilateral hyperintensity in both anterior horn regions. Conclusion: MR is the imaging modality of choice for the detection of radiculomyelitis of AFP associated with EV71 infection. (authors)

  16. ACUTE FLACCID PARALYSIS SURVEILLANCE: A 5 YEARS STUDY OF BANNU, PAKISTAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faheem, Muhammad Umer; Haroon, Muhammad Zeeshan; Khan, Aftab Alam; Shaukat, Maryum; Anwar, Sved Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) is clinical presentation marked by acute onset of weakness and reduced tone. Aetiologies of AFP are diverse including infectious agents, trauma or autoimmune reaction. Currently only three countries in the world that are Nigeria, Pakistan and Afghanistan have endemic poliomyelitis. Pakistan's polio crisis represents one of the last hurdles in a 23-year campaign run by the World Health Organization. Bannu due to its geographical location stands out to be one of highest risk areas for Poliomyelitis. The objective of this study was to determine frequency of AFP and their aetiologies in District of Bannu during time period of four years from 2007 to 2011. It was a cross-sectional descriptive study. Data was collected from EDO office District Bannu and analysed using Microsoft Excel 2007. Results: During this period there were 180 cases of AFP in district Bannu. 15% of cases were diagnosed as Guillian Barre Syndrome, making it the leading aetiology. Only 3 (1.66%) cases were diagnosed with Poliomyelitis. Out of 180 AFP cases 104 cases were male and 76 cases were female. Bannu needs enthusiastic educational and vaccination campaigns to eradicate Polio from the area and henceforth from the Pakistan.

  17. Enterovirus 71 infection-associated acute flaccid paralysis: a case series of long-term neurologic follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsiu-Fen; Chi, Ching-Shiang

    2014-10-01

    The authors undertook long-term neurologic outcomes of 27 patients aged 0 to 15 years with enterovirus 71-related acute flaccid paralysis from June 1998 to July 2012. Motor function outcome was graded from class I (complete recovery) to class V (permanent paralytic limbs). Twelve of 20 patients (60%) who received intravenous immunoglobulin for treatment of acute flaccid paralysis had motor function outcomes in classes III to V. The median duration of follow-up was 6 months, during which time 7 of 13 patients (54%) with central nervous system infection, 3 of 6 patients (50%) with autonomic nervous system dysregulation, and 3 of 8 patients (37%) with heart failure showed motor function outcomes in classes III to V. These findings suggested that the usage of intravenous immunoglobulin and the severity of disease staging at disease onset might not be able to predict long-term motor function outcomes. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. PENGKAJIAN DATA RUMAH SAKIT (HOSPITAL RECORD REVIEW KASUS ACUTE FLACCID PARALYSIS (AFP TAHUN 1999-2000 DI JAWA TIMUR

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    Cholis Bachroen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This survey was the evaluation of the program on Polio Eradication through Acute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP Surveillance especially Hospital Based Surveillance. The evaluation was done by reviewing the Hospitals' Record (Hospital Based Survey. The objective of the survey was to estimate the under reported of routine reporting system, which the data of the survey used as a gold standard. The results showed that due to incomplete of the records in several hospitals, some of AFP cases might be could not be covered. However the under reported of the routine surveillance system was more than 50%. It seems that the strengthening of supervision was still needed to increase coverage of the routine surveillance system.   Keywords: hospitals; medical record; acute flocid paralysis

  19. 'Silent' and 'noisy' areas: acute flaccid paralysis surveillance at subnational level, Australia, 2001-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Michelle; Paterson, Beverley J; Martin, Nicolee; Hobday, Linda; Thorley, Bruce; Durrheim, David N

    2017-05-01

    Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance rates are used as an indicator of surveillance sensitivity to detect poliomyelitis with an expected rate of ≥1 case per 100 000 population in children under 15 years of age. The Australian AFP detection rates at sub-national (statistical local area) level were analysed using χ2 goodness of fit tests and exact Poisson probabilities for the combined years 2001-2015 to detect 'silent areas', which may require improved AFP detection efforts, and areas with greater than expected rates, which may indicate unexplained clusters such as those due to enterovirus infection. Eight (n=8/87, 9%) local areas had AFP surveillance detection rates that were less than expected, and eighteen local areas (n=18/87, 21%) had rates that were greater than expected. However, based on available evidence, it is unlikely that these indicated previously unidentified, enterovirus clusters. While Australia has regularly met the national AFP surveillance performance indicators, at the subnational level nine per cent of local areas demonstrated statistically significant lower AFP detection rates. All countries, even those with relatively small populations, should actively identify silent AFP areas to prompt surveillance improvements. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. The critical role of acute flaccid paralysis surveillance in the Global Polio Eradication Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangermann, Rudolf H; Lamoureux, Christine; Tallis, Graham; Goel, Ajay

    2017-05-01

    Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance is a key strategy used by the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) to measure progress towards reaching the global eradication goal. Supported by a global polio laboratory network, AFP surveillance is conducted in 179 of 194 WHO member states. Active surveillance visits to priority health facilities are used to assure all children <15 years with AFP are detected, followed by stool specimen collection and testing for poliovirus in WHO-accredited polio laboratories. The quality of AFP surveillance is regularly monitored with standardized surveillance quality indicators. In highest risk countries and areas, the sensitivity of AFP surveillance is enhanced by environmental surveillance (testing of sewage samples). Genetic sequencing of detected poliovirus isolates yields programmatically important information on polio transmission pathways. AFP surveillance is one of the most valuable assets of the GPEI, with the potential to serve as a platform to build integrated disease surveillance systems. Continued support to maintain AFP surveillance systems will be essential, to reliably monitor the completion of global polio eradication, and to assure that a key resource for building surveillance capacity is transitioned post-eradication to support other health priorities. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Using Acute Flaccid Paralysis Surveillance as a Platform for Vaccine-Preventable Disease Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassilak, Steven G F; Williams, Cheryl L; Murrill, Christopher S; Dahl, Benjamin A; Ohuabunwo, Chima; Tangermann, Rudolf H

    2017-07-01

    Surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) is a fundamental cornerstone of the global polio eradication initiative (GPEI). Active surveillance (with visits to health facilities) is a critical strategy of AFP surveillance systems for highly sensitive and timely detection of cases. Because of the extensive resources devoted to AFP surveillance, multiple opportunities exist for additional diseases to be added using GPEI assets, particularly because there is generally 1 district officer responsible for all disease surveillance. For this reason, integrated surveillance has become a standard practice in many countries, ranging from adding surveillance for measles and rubella to integrated disease surveillance for outbreak-prone diseases (integrated disease surveillance and response). This report outlines the current level of disease surveillance integration in 3 countries (Nepal, India, and Nigeria) and proposes that resources continue for long-term maintenance in resource-poor countries of AFP surveillance as a platform for surveillance of vaccine-preventable diseases and other outbreak-prone diseases. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  2. Surveillance of poliomyelitis in Northern Italy: Results of acute flaccid paralysis surveillance and environmental surveillance, 2012-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrinelli, Laura; Bubba, Laura; Primache, Valeria; Pariani, Elena; Battistone, Andrea; Delogu, Roberto; Fiore, Stefano; Binda, Sandro

    2017-02-01

    Although in the last years poliovirus (PV) transmission has been reported at the lowest levels ever recorded, the spread of virus from endemic countries endures; the high levels of immigration flows across the Mediterranean Sea jeopardize Italy for PV reintroduction. The World Health Organization (WHO) strategic plan for global poliomyelitis (polio) eradication indicates the nationwide surveillance of Acute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP) as the gold standard for detecting cases of polio. In addition, the Environmental Surveillance (ES), seeking the presence of PV and Non-Polio Enterovirus (NPEV) in sewage, is recognized as a powerful tool to confirm PV circulation in absence of AFP cases, especially in polio-free countries. Here we report the results of AFP surveillance (AFPS) and ES in Lombardy (Northern Italy) from 2012 to 2015. Forty-eight AFP cases were identified during the study period. No AFP case was caused by PV infection. NPEVs were identified in 6.3% (3/48) of AFP cases. The annual AFP incidence rate was 0.87/100'000 children <15 y in 2012, 1.42/100'000 in 2013, 1.02/100'000 in 2014, and 0.47/100'000 in 2015; according to WHO indicators, the sensitivity of AFPS was adequate in 2013 and 2014. Completeness of case investigation raised progressively during the study period to achieve the WHO standards in 2014 (92.3%) and 2015 (100%). Completeness of follow-up increased from 72.7% in 2012 to 100% in 2014. In the framework of the ES conducted in Milan, 268 wastewater samples were collected from 2012 to 2015 and no PVs were isolated. In contrast, NPEVs were detected in 65.3% (175/268) of samples. All NPEVs characterized belonged to enterovirus species B: echovirus type 11, 6 and 3 were the most frequently detected viruses, representing 29.1% (41/141), 20.6% (29/141) and 9.2% (13/141) of genotyped NPEVs, respectively. Keeping strong and encouraging both AFPS and ES is crucial to ensure that PV will not return unnoticed in Italy - as well as in other polio

  3. MRI findings in children with acute flaccid paralysis and cranial nerve dysfunction occurring during the 2014 enterovirus D68 outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, J A; Mirsky, D M; Messacar, K; Dominguez, S R; Schreiner, T; Stence, N V

    2015-02-01

    Enterovirus D68 was responsible for widespread outbreaks of respiratory illness throughout the United States in August and September 2014. During this time, several patients presented to our institution with acute flaccid paralysis and cranial nerve dysfunction. The purpose of this report is to describe the unique imaging findings of this neurologic syndrome occurring during an enterovirus D68 outbreak. Patients meeting a specific case definition of acute flaccid paralysis and/or cranial nerve dysfunction and presenting to our institution during the study period were included. All patients underwent routine MR imaging of the brain and/or spinal cord, including multiplanar T1, T2, and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging. Eleven patients met the inclusion criteria and underwent MR imaging of the brain and/or spinal cord. Nine patients presented with brain stem lesions, most commonly involving the pontine tegmentum, with bilateral facial nerve enhancement in 1 patient. Ten patients had longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions; those imaged acutely demonstrated involvement of the entire central gray matter, and those imaged subacutely showed lesions restricted to the anterior horn cells. Ventral cauda equina nerve roots enhanced in 4 patients, and ventral cervical nerve roots enhanced in 3, both only in the subacute setting. Patients presenting with acute flaccid paralysis and/or cranial nerve dysfunction during the recent enterovirus D68 outbreak demonstrate unique imaging findings characterized by brain stem and gray matter spinal cord lesions, similar to the neuroimaging findings described in previous outbreaks of viral myelitis such as enterovirus 71 and poliomyelitis. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  4. The IRES5?UTR of the dicistrovirus cricket paralysis virus is a type III IRES containing an essential pseudoknot structure

    OpenAIRE

    Gross, Lauriane; Vicens, Quentin; Einhorn, Evelyne; Noireterre, Audrey; Schaeffer, Laure; Kuhn, Lauriane; Imler, Jean-Luc; Eriani, Gilbert; Meignin, Carine; Martin, Franck

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Cricket paralysis virus (CrPV) is a dicistrovirus. Its positive-sense single-stranded RNA genome contains two internal ribosomal entry sites (IRESs). The 5? untranslated region (5?UTR) IRES5?UTR mediates translation of non-structural proteins encoded by ORF1 whereas the well-known intergenic region (IGR) IRESIGR is required for translation of structural proteins from open reading frame 2 in the late phase of infection. Concerted action of both IRES is essential for host translation s...

  5. Clinical and neuroimaging features of enterovirus71 related acute flaccid paralysis in patients with hand-foot-mouth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Li, Jian-Jun; Liu, Tao; Wen, Guo-Qiang; Xiang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    To investigate clinical and neuroimaging features of enterovirus71 (EV71) related acute flaccid paralysis in patients with hand-foot-mouth disease. Nine patients with acute flaccid paralysis met the criterion of EV71 induced hand-foot-mouth disease underwent spinal and brain MR imaging from May 2008 to Sep 2012. One extremity flaccid was found in four cases (3 with lower limb, 1 with upper limb), two limbs flaccid in three cases (2 with lower limbs, 1 with upper limbs), and four limbs flaccid in two cases. Spinal MRI studies showed lesion with high signal in T2-weighted images (T2WI) and low signal T1-weighted images (T1WI) in the spinal cord of all nine cases, and the lesions were mainly in bilateral and unilateral anterior horn of cervical spinal cord and spinal cord below thoracic 9 (T9) level. In addition, the midbrain, pons, and medulla, which were involved in 3 cases with brainstem encephalitis, demonstrated abnormal signal. Moreover, spinal cord contrast MRI studies showed mild enhancement in corresponding anterior horn of the involved side, and strong enhancement in its ventral root. EV71 related acute flaccid paralysis in patients with hand-foot-mouth disease mainly affected the anterior horn regions and ventral root of cervical spinal cord and spinal cord below T9 level. MR imaging could efficiently show the characteristic pattern and extent of the lesions which correlated well with the clinical features. Copyright © 2013 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The cricket paralysis virus suppressor inhibits microRNA silencing mediated by the Drosophila Argonaute-2 protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Besnard-Guérin

    Full Text Available Small RNAs are potent regulators of gene expression. They also act in defense pathways against invading nucleic acids such as transposable elements or viruses. To counteract these defenses, viruses have evolved viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs. Plant viruses encoded VSRs interfere with siRNAs or miRNAs by targeting common mediators of these two pathways. In contrast, VSRs identified in insect viruses to date only interfere with the siRNA pathway whose effector Argonaute protein is Argonaute-2 (Ago-2. Although a majority of Drosophila miRNAs exerts their silencing activity through their loading into the Argonaute-1 protein, recent studies highlighted that a fraction of miRNAs can be loaded into Ago-2, thus acting as siRNAs. In light of these recent findings, we re-examined the role of insect VSRs on Ago-2-mediated miRNA silencing in Drosophila melanogaster. Using specific reporter systems in cultured Schneider-2 cells and transgenic flies, we showed here that the Cricket Paralysis virus VSR CrPV1-A but not the Flock House virus B2 VSR abolishes silencing by miRNAs loaded into the Ago-2 protein. Thus, our results provide the first evidence that insect VSR have the potential to directly interfere with the miRNA silencing pathway.

  7. [Etiological monitoring and analysis of cases of acute flaccid paralysis in Hebei Province in 2011-2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M; Cui, Z Q; Li, J; Zhao, N; Zhang, J M; Guo, Y; Zhang, Z G; Li, Q

    2016-09-06

    Objective: To identify poliomyelitis(polio)virus, the VP1 gene, and its nucleotide sequence in fecal samples from patients with acute flaccid paralysis(AFP)in Hebei Province in 2011-2014. Methods: A surveillance system for AFP was established in Hebei Province in 2011-2014 and registered in 2014. Stool samples, each weighing 5 g, were collected from 1 504, 15-year-old symptomatic patients with AFP, resulting in a total of 3 001 samples(1 497 patients provided duplicate samples and 7 provided single specimens). Poliovirus nucleic acid was extracted, the RNA was reverse transcribed, and a VP1 gene fragment was amplified with real-time PCR. The PCR products were sequenced to construct a phylogenetic tree and check the relatedness of the strains to the Sabin vaccine strain. A χ 2 test was used to compare the differences in the incidence of infection in different years. Results: Poliovirus was isolated from 50(1.7%)of the 3 001 stool samples, 10 of which were type Ⅰ strains, 15 were type Ⅱ strains, 16 were type Ⅲ strains, and 9 were mixed-type strains. The positive rates for poliovirus in the years 2011-2014 were 1.0%(9/890), 1.5%(12/824), 2.2%(17/770), and 2.3%(12/517), respectively(χ 2 =2.24, P =0.525). Analyses of the VP1 nucleotide and amino acid sequence homologies revealed that the type Ⅰ, type Ⅱ, and type Ⅲ poliovirus strains shared nucleotide sequence homologies with the Sabin vaccine strain of 98.8%- 100%, 99.1%- 100%, and 99.2%- 100%, respectively, and amino acid sequence homologies of 98.6%- 100%, 98.3%-100% and 98.6%-100%, respectively. A VP1-based phylogenetic analysis showed that the variation rates for the poliovirus type Ⅰ, type Ⅱ, and type Ⅲ strains were 0.66%, 0.66%, and 0.55%, respectively. Conclusion: Only one poliovirus strain was detected in Hebei Province in 2011-2014, except for the type Ⅱ vaccine-derived poliovirus. The remaining strains were all similar to the Sabin vaccine strain, with high VP1 homology.

  8. Chlamydia pneumoniae infection-related hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and acute encephalitis and poliomyelitis-like flaccid paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Kanae; Kano, Gen; Shibata, Mayumi; Sakamoto, Izumi; Matsui, Hirofumi; Imashuku, Shinsaku

    2011-05-01

    A 3-year-old male presented with Chlamydia pneumoniae infection-related hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). The patient developed an episode of HLH with severe skin eruption following C. pneumoniae pneumonia. Symptoms responded to steroid/cyclosporine A therapy, but the patient slowly lost consciousness and developed systemic flaccid paralysis. He was diagnosed with encephalitis/myelitis by brain and spinal MRI. Neurological symptoms and signs gradually resolved. We thought that the immune response to C. pneumoniae infection triggered the development of HLH, associated with unusual neurological complications. This report describes a novel case of C. pneumoniae-associated HLH and with poliomyelitis like flaccid paralysis. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Using short-message-service notification as a method to improve acute flaccid paralysis surveillance in Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Siddhartha Sankar; Ropa, Berry; Sui, Gerard Pai; Khattar, Ramzi; Krishnan, Ravi Shankar Santhana Gopala; Okayasu, Hiromasa

    2016-05-17

    High quality acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance is required to maintain polio-free status of a country. Papua New Guinea (PNG) is considered as one of the highest risk countries for polio re-importation and circulation in the Western Pacific Region (WPRO) of the World Health Organization due to poor healthcare infrastructure and inadequate performance in AFP surveillance. The Government of PNG, in collaboration with WHO, piloted the introduction of short-message-service (SMS) to sensitize pediatricians and provincial disease control officers on AFP and to receive notification of possible AFP cases to improve surveillance quality in PNG. Ninety six health care professionals were registered to receive SMS reminders to report any case of acute flaccid paralysis. Fourteen SMS messages were sent to each participant from September 2012 to November 2013. The number of reported AFP cases were compared before and after the introduction of SMS. Two hundred fifty three unique responses were received with an overall response rate of 21 %. More than 80 % of responses were reported within 3 days of sending the SMS. The number of reported AFP cases increased from 10 cases per year in 2009-2012 to 25 cases per year during the study period and correlated with provincial participation of the health care professionals. Combined with improved sensitization of health care professionals on AFP reporting criteria and sample collection, SMS messaging provides an effective means to increase timely reporting and improve the availability of epidemiologic information on polio surveillance in PNG.

  10. Paralysis: Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 5pm ET. 1-800-539-7309 ☰ Living with Paralysis Get Support Get Involved Research Events Blog & Forum About Us Donate Living with Paralysis > Rehabilitation Rehabilitation Rehabilitation and exercise are key to ...

  11. Tick Paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tick Paralysis: Deer tick, dog tick, Rocky Mtn. wood tick, Lone Star tick What is Tick Paralysis? ... Medical Malpractice Center Contact Us Phillip J. Baker, Ph.D., Executive Director, P.O. Box 466, Lyme, ...

  12. Facial paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... develops slowly. Symptoms can include headaches, seizures, or hearing loss. In newborns, facial paralysis may be caused by ... may refer you to a physical, speech, or occupational therapist. If facial paralysis from Bell palsy lasts ...

  13. Characterization of a rare natural intertypic type 2/type 3 penta-recombinant vaccine-derived poliovirus isolated from a child with acute flaccid paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Wang, Haiyan; Zhu, Shuangli; Li, Yan; Song, Lizhi; Liu, Yao; Liu, Guifang; Nishimura, Yorihiro; Chen, Li; Yan, Dongmei; Wang, Dongyan; An, Hongqiu; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Xu, Aiqiang; Xu, Wenbo

    2010-02-01

    A type 2 vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV) (strain CHN1025), with a 1.1 % (10/903) difference from Sabin strain in the VP1 coding region, was isolated from a child with poliomyelitis caused by a poliovirus variant infection. The patient was from Shandong Province of China and developed acute flaccid paralysis in 1997. The child was infected with a rare and complicated penta-recombinant poliovirus with the uncommon genomic recombinant organization S2/S3/S1/S3/S1/S3. At least five successive rounds of recombination occurred in the VP1 capsid coding region and in the 2C, 3C (twice) and 3D(pol) non-capsid coding regions, respectively, during virus evolution. Strain CHN1025 had most of the characteristics of the type 2 vaccine strain; it had Sabin-specific epitopes, suggesting that the virus was antigenically indistinguishable from the Sabin 2 reference strain. Typical mutations in the 5'-untranslated region and VP1 associated with reversion to neurovirulence for Sabin 2 poliovirus were found, and the virus showed moderate neurovirulence in transgenic mice. A few nucleotide substitutions were located in the donor sequences, and two donor sequences contained no nucleotide substitutions, suggesting that these sequences were relatively new. The appearance of these mutations within approximately 192 days of at least five successive rounds of recombination events derived from a single ancestral infection illustrates the rapid emergence of new recombinants among VDPVs. This is the first report on the isolation of a type 2/type 3 poliovirus capsid recombinant with one of the five crossover sites located in the VP1 coding region.

  14. The 5′ Untranslated Region of a Novel Infectious Molecular Clone of the Dicistrovirus Cricket Paralysis Virus Modulates Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Craig H.; Wang, Qing S.; Keatings, Kathleen; Khong, Anthony; Allan, Douglas; Yip, Calvin K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dicistroviridae are a family of RNA viruses that possesses a single-stranded positive-sense RNA genome containing two distinct open reading frames (ORFs), each preceded by an internal ribosome entry site that drives translation of the viral structural and nonstructural proteins, respectively. The type species, Cricket paralysis virus (CrPV), has served as a model for studying host-virus interactions; however, investigations into the molecular mechanisms of CrPV and other dicistroviruses have been limited as an established infectious clone was elusive. Here, we report the construction of an infectious molecular clone of CrPV. Transfection of in vitro-transcribed RNA from the CrPV clone into Drosophila Schneider line 2 (S2) cells resulted in cytopathic effects, viral RNA accumulation, detection of negative-sense viral RNA, and expression of viral proteins. Transmission electron microscopy, viral titers, and immunofluorescence-coupled transwell assays demonstrated that infectious viral particles are released from transfected cells. In contrast, mutant clones containing stop codons in either ORF decreased virus infectivity. Injection of adult Drosophila flies with virus derived from CrPV clones but not UV-inactivated clones resulted in mortality. Molecular analysis of the CrPV clone revealed a 196-nucleotide duplication within its 5′ untranslated region (UTR) that stimulated translation of reporter constructs. In cells infected with the CrPV clone, the duplication inhibited viral infectivity yet did not affect viral translation or RNA accumulation, suggesting an effect on viral packaging or entry. The generation of the CrPV infectious clone provides a powerful tool for investigating the viral life cycle and pathogenesis of dicistroviruses and may further understanding of fundamental host-virus interactions in insect cells. IMPORTANCE Dicistroviridae, which are RNA viruses that infect arthropods, have served as a model to gain insights into fundamental host-virus

  15. The 5' untranslated region of a novel infectious molecular clone of the dicistrovirus cricket paralysis virus modulates infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Craig H; Wang, Qing S; Keatings, Kathleen; Khong, Anthony; Allan, Douglas; Yip, Calvin K; Foster, Leonard J; Jan, Eric

    2015-06-01

    Dicistroviridae are a family of RNA viruses that possesses a single-stranded positive-sense RNA genome containing two distinct open reading frames (ORFs), each preceded by an internal ribosome entry site that drives translation of the viral structural and nonstructural proteins, respectively. The type species, Cricket paralysis virus (CrPV), has served as a model for studying host-virus interactions; however, investigations into the molecular mechanisms of CrPV and other dicistroviruses have been limited as an established infectious clone was elusive. Here, we report the construction of an infectious molecular clone of CrPV. Transfection of in vitro-transcribed RNA from the CrPV clone into Drosophila Schneider line 2 (S2) cells resulted in cytopathic effects, viral RNA accumulation, detection of negative-sense viral RNA, and expression of viral proteins. Transmission electron microscopy, viral titers, and immunofluorescence-coupled transwell assays demonstrated that infectious viral particles are released from transfected cells. In contrast, mutant clones containing stop codons in either ORF decreased virus infectivity. Injection of adult Drosophila flies with virus derived from CrPV clones but not UV-inactivated clones resulted in mortality. Molecular analysis of the CrPV clone revealed a 196-nucleotide duplication within its 5' untranslated region (UTR) that stimulated translation of reporter constructs. In cells infected with the CrPV clone, the duplication inhibited viral infectivity yet did not affect viral translation or RNA accumulation, suggesting an effect on viral packaging or entry. The generation of the CrPV infectious clone provides a powerful tool for investigating the viral life cycle and pathogenesis of dicistroviruses and may further understanding of fundamental host-virus interactions in insect cells. Dicistroviridae, which are RNA viruses that infect arthropods, have served as a model to gain insights into fundamental host-virus interactions in

  16. Viral Aetiology of Acute Flaccid Paralysis Surveillance Cases, before and after Vaccine Policy Change from Oral Polio Vaccine to Inactivated Polio Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Saraswathy Subramaniam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 1992, surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis (AFP cases was introduced in Malaysia along with the establishment of the National Poliovirus Laboratory at the Institute for Medical Research. In 2008, the Ministry of Health, Malaysia, approved a vaccine policy change from oral polio vaccine to inactivated polio vaccine (IPV. Eight states started using IPV in the Expanded Immunization Programme, followed by the remaining states in January 2010. The objective of this study was to determine the viral aetiology of AFP cases below 15 years of age, before and after vaccine policy change from oral polio vaccine to inactivated polio vaccine. One hundred and seventy-nine enteroviruses were isolated from the 3394 stool specimens investigated between 1992 and December 2012. Fifty-six out of 107 virus isolates were polioviruses and the remaining were non-polio enteroviruses. Since 2009 after the sequential introduction of IPV in the childhood immunization programme, no Sabin polioviruses were isolated from AFP cases. In 2012, the laboratory AFP surveillance was supplemented with environmental surveillance with sewage sampling. Thirteen Sabin polioviruses were also isolated from sewage in the same year, but no vaccine-derived poliovirus was detected during this period.

  17. Acute Flaccid Paralysis by Enterovirus D68 Infection: First Italian Description in Adult Patient and Role of Electrophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Ceccanti

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A Peruvian woman was admitted to the Emergency Department, due to an acute flaccid paralysis (AFP of the upper limbs that progressively involved also lower limbs and respiratory muscles. She previously suffered from non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and had to undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. A magnetic resonance imaging showed a T2 hyperintensity in the anterior and central region of the cervical segment with an elective involvement of gray matter. This finding, combined with other clinical, laboratory, and electrophysiological data, led to a diagnosis of AFP. Enterovirus D68 was isolated in the patient’s cerebrospinal fluid, plasma, and throat swab. To our knowledge, this is the first Italian case of AFP by Enterovirus D68 infection in an adult. The diagnostic assessment and management of AFP by Enterovirus D68 are discussed.

  18. Genetic diversity of cosaviruses in nonpolio acute flaccid paralysis cases of undefined etiology, Northern India, 2010-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maan, Harjeet Singh; Chowdhary, Rashmi; Shakya, Akhalesh Kumar; Dhole, Tapan N

    2013-09-01

    No cases of wild poliovirus have been reported for more than one and a half years from India. Cases of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) of undefined etiology continue to occur in the region. Despite the recent discovery of the human Cosavirus (HCoSV) in the feces of children from developing countries, there have been no studies of cosavirus infection in India. To detect and characterize HCoSVs in stool specimens of nonpolio AFP cases by RT-PCR followed by sequencing. A total of 387 fecal samples collected from AFP cases in Uttar Pradesh, India, between May 2010 and April 2011, tested negative on cell culture according to WHO algorithm, were subjected to 5'-UTR region specific RT-PCR followed by sequencing to detect HCoSV. Molecular characterization of HCoSV strains was done by sequencing followed by phylogenetic analysis. 123 (32%) samples tested positive for cosaviruses and 87 (70.7%) were identified for genetic variants by sequencing a 316-nucleotide interval in the partial 5'-UTR region. Cosavirus strains were characterized as putative species HCoSV-A (n=70; 82%), HCoSV-B (n=7; 8%), HCoSV-C (n=1; 1.1) and HCoSV-D (n=4; 4.5%) while 5 (5%) strains remain uncharacterized. The cosavirus infection appeared highest (63.5%) in younger children, and showed a distinct seasonality, with a late summer peak and winter low. This study demonstrates a diversity of cosavirus strains in circulation, and reports the first investigation of HCoSV infection in children with nonpolio acute flaccid paralysis in India. Currently, this study provides baseline data for further studies of HCoSV infections in children with common enteric infections in India. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Using short-message-service notification as a method to improve acute flaccid paralysis surveillance in Papua New Guinea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddhartha Sankar Datta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High quality acute flaccid paralysis (AFP surveillance is required to maintain polio-free status of a country. Papua New Guinea (PNG is considered as one of the highest risk countries for polio re-importation and circulation in the Western Pacific Region (WPRO of the World Health Organization due to poor healthcare infrastructure and inadequate performance in AFP surveillance. The Government of PNG, in collaboration with WHO, piloted the introduction of short-message-service (SMS to sensitize pediatricians and provincial disease control officers on AFP and to receive notification of possible AFP cases to improve surveillance quality in PNG. Methods Ninety six health care professionals were registered to receive SMS reminders to report any case of acute flaccid paralysis. Fourteen SMS messages were sent to each participant from September 2012 to November 2013. The number of reported AFP cases were compared before and after the introduction of SMS. Results Two hundred fifty three unique responses were received with an overall response rate of 21 %. More than 80 % of responses were reported within 3 days of sending the SMS. The number of reported AFP cases increased from 10 cases per year in 2009–2012 to 25 cases per year during the study period and correlated with provincial participation of the health care professionals. Conclusions Combined with improved sensitization of health care professionals on AFP reporting criteria and sample collection, SMS messaging provides an effective means to increase timely reporting and improve the availability of epidemiologic information on polio surveillance in PNG.

  20. Etiological spectrum of hypokalemic paralysis: A retrospective analysis of 29 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra Kumar Garg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypokalemic paralysis is characterized by episodes of acute muscle weakness associated with hypokalemia. In this study, we evaluated the possible etiological factors in patients of hypokalemic paralysis. Materials and Methods: We reviewed the records of 29 patients who were admitted with a diagnosis of hypokalemic paralysis. Modified Guillain-Barre΄ Syndrome disability scale was used to grade the disability. Results: In this study, 15 (51.7% patients had secondary causes of hypokalemic paralysis and 14 patients (42.3% had idiopathic hypokalemic paralysis. Thyrotoxicosis was present in six patients (20.6%, dengue infection in four patients (13.7%, distal renal tubular acidosis in three patients (10.3%, Gitelman syndrome in one patient (3.4%, and Conn′s syndrome in one patient (3.4%. Preceding history of fever and rapid recovery was seen in dengue infection-induced hypokalemic paralysis. Approximately 62% patients had elevated serum creatinine phosphokinase. All patients had recovered completely following potassium supplementation. Patients with secondary causes were older in age, had significantly more disability, lower serum potassium levels, and took longer time to recover. Conclusion: In conclusion, more than half of patients had secondary causes responsible for hypokalemic paralysis. Dengue virus infection was the second leading cause of hypokalemic paralysis, after thyrotoxicosis. Presence of severe disability, severe hypokalemia, and a late disease onset suggested secondary hypokalemic paralysis.

  1. Etiological spectrum of hypokalemic paralysis: A retrospective analysis of 29 patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Malhotra, Hardeep Sing; Verma, Rajesh; Sharma, Pawan; Singh, Maneesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hypokalemic paralysis is characterized by episodes of acute muscle weakness associated with hypokalemia. In this study, we evaluated the possible etiological factors in patients of hypokalemic paralysis. Materials and Methods: We reviewed the records of 29 patients who were admitted with a diagnosis of hypokalemic paralysis. Modified Guillain-Barre´ Syndrome disability scale was used to grade the disability. Results: In this study, 15 (51.7%) patients had secondary causes of hypokalemic paralysis and 14 patients (42.3%) had idiopathic hypokalemic paralysis. Thyrotoxicosis was present in six patients (20.6%), dengue infection in four patients (13.7%), distal renal tubular acidosis in three patients (10.3%), Gitelman syndrome in one patient (3.4%), and Conn's syndrome in one patient (3.4%). Preceding history of fever and rapid recovery was seen in dengue infection-induced hypokalemic paralysis. Approximately 62% patients had elevated serum creatinine phosphokinase. All patients had recovered completely following potassium supplementation. Patients with secondary causes were older in age, had significantly more disability, lower serum potassium levels, and took longer time to recover. Conclusion: In conclusion, more than half of patients had secondary causes responsible for hypokalemic paralysis. Dengue virus infection was the second leading cause of hypokalemic paralysis, after thyrotoxicosis. Presence of severe disability, severe hypokalemia, and a late disease onset suggested secondary hypokalemic paralysis. PMID:24101818

  2. Reasons and circumstances for the late notification of Acute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP) cases in health facilities in Luanda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macama, Arciolanda; Okeibunor, Joseph; Grando, Silvia; Djibaoui, Karim; Yameogo, Robert Koudounoaga; Morais, Alda; Gasasira, Alex Ntale; Mbaye, Salla; Mihigo, Richard; Nshimirimana, Deo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction As the polio eradication effort enters the end game stage, surveillance for Acute Flaccid Paralysis in children becomes a pivotal tool. Thus given the gaps in AFP surveillance as identified in the cases of late notification, this study was designed to explore the reasons and circumstances responsible for late notification of AFP and collection of inadequate stools (more than 14 days of onset of paralysis until collection of the 2nd stool specimen) of AFP cases in health facilities equipped to manage AFP cases. Methods Eleven AFP cases with inadequate stools were reported from January 2 to July 8, 2012 - Epidemiological Weeks 1-27. The families of these cases were interviewed with an in-depth interview guide. The staff of the seven health units, where they later reported, was also enlisted for the study which used in-depth interview guide in eliciting information from them. Results Ignorance and wrong perception of the etiology of the cases as well as dissatisfaction with the health units as the major reasons for late reporting of AFP cases. The first port of call is usually alternative health care system such as traditional healers and spiritualists because the people hold the belief that the problem is spiritually induced. The few, who make it to health units, are faced with ill equipped rural health workers who wait for the arrival of more qualified staff, who may take days to do so. Conclusion An understanding of the health seeking behavior of the population is germane to effective AFP surveillance. There is thus a need to tailor AFP surveillance to the health seeking behavior of the populations and expand it to community structures. PMID:25426197

  3. Causes of Paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donate Living with Paralysis > Health > Causes of paralysis Causes of paralysis There are many conditions that can lead to paralysis. Learn more about the causes of paralysis, including symptoms, research and resources. > Amyotrophic ...

  4. Todd's Paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neurons or in the motor centers of the brain. It is important to distinguish Todd's paralysis from a stroke, which it can resemble, because ... neurons or in the motor centers of the brain. It is important to distinguish Todd's paralysis from a stroke, which it can resemble, because ...

  5. The IRES5'UTR of the dicistrovirus cricket paralysis virus is a type III IRES containing an essential pseudoknot structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Lauriane; Vicens, Quentin; Einhorn, Evelyne; Noireterre, Audrey; Schaeffer, Laure; Kuhn, Lauriane; Imler, Jean-Luc; Eriani, Gilbert; Meignin, Carine; Martin, Franck

    2017-09-06

    Cricket paralysis virus (CrPV) is a dicistrovirus. Its positive-sense single-stranded RNA genome contains two internal ribosomal entry sites (IRESs). The 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) IRES5'UTR mediates translation of non-structural proteins encoded by ORF1 whereas the well-known intergenic region (IGR) IRESIGR is required for translation of structural proteins from open reading frame 2 in the late phase of infection. Concerted action of both IRES is essential for host translation shut-off and viral translation. IRESIGR has been extensively studied, in contrast the IRES5'UTR remains largely unexplored. Here, we define the minimal IRES element required for efficient translation initiation in drosophila S2 cell-free extracts. We show that IRES5'UTR promotes direct recruitment of the ribosome on the cognate viral AUG start codon without any scanning step, using a Hepatitis-C virus-related translation initiation mechanism. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that IRES5'UTR recruits eukaryotic initiation factor 3, confirming that it belongs to type III class of IRES elements. Using Selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension and DMS probing, we established a secondary structure model of 5'UTR and of the minimal IRES5'UTR. The IRES5'UTR contains a pseudoknot structure that is essential for proper folding and ribosome recruitment. Overall, our results pave the way for studies addressing the synergy and interplay between the two IRES from CrPV. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Acute flaccid paralysis and its differential diagnosis in in kurdistan province, Western iran; an 11-year surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Jafar; Esmailnasab, Nader; Roshani, Daem; Karimi, Mohamad; Amjadi, Mohamad-Jamil

    2014-04-01

    The surveillance of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) is a key strategy for monitoring the progress of poliomyelitis eradication and is a sensitive measure for detecting potential cases of poliomyelitis and poliovirus infection. This study was conducted to describe the characteristics of patients reported with AFP, and to evaluate the performance of the surveillance system in Kurdistan province, western Iran, using indicators recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). This observational study was conducted from January 2000 to December 2010 at the Kurdistan Center for Disease Control and the Department of Pediatrics. All children who fulfilled the WHO definition for AFP were included in our study. The stool samples of all the children were sent for poliovirus isolation. All the patients were evaluated for 60 days after the onset of symptoms to identify the signs of residual weakness. One-hundred thirty nine children aged Kurdistan during the study period, we achieved the WHO target for AFP surveillance. All performance indicators but one consistently met the WHO requirements and therefore demonstrated the effectiveness of the AFP surveillance program in Kurdistan. The effective surveillance system in Kurdistan and its evaluation may serve as a model for the surveillance of other infectious diseases.

  7. Detection of three honeybee viruses simultaneously by a single ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A single multiplex reverse transcriptase (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for the simultaneous detection of three honeybee viruses: acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV), sacbrood virus (SBV) and black queen cell virus (BQCV). Unique PCR primers were designed from the complete genome ...

  8. Surveillance of Acute Flaccid Paralysis in the Netherlands 1992-1994

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostvogel PM; Conyn-van Spaendonck MAE; Hirasing RA; van Loon AM; LIO; CIE; Nederlands Signalerings Centrum Kindergeneeskunde (NSCK); TNO

    1996-01-01

    Surveillance van acute slappe verlamming (ASV) bij kinderen in Nederland vindt plaats in het kader van het mondiale uitroeiingsinitiatief van poliomyelitis van de Wereld Gezondheidsorganisatie. Ervaring elders leert dat de incidentie van ASV, in afwezigheid van poliomyelitis, ongeveer 1 op de

  9. Surgical Treatment for Epstein-Barr Virus Otomastoiditis Complicated by Facial Nerve Paralysis: A Case Report of Two Young Brothers and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eeten, Evelien van; Faber, Hubert; Kunst, Dirk

    2017-04-01

    We report the case of two young brothers with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) otomastoiditis complicated by a facial nerve paralysis. The boys, aged 7 months (patient A) and 2 years and 8 months (patient B), were diagnosed with a facial nerve paralysis House-Brackmann (HB) grade IV (A) and V (B). After unsuccessful pharmacological treatment, patient A underwent mastoidectomy and atticoantrotomy and patient B underwent a transmastoidal surgical decompression of the facial nerve. They recovered to HB grades I and II facial nerve palsy (FNP), respectively. Although rare and relatively unknown, EBV should be considered in the differential diagnosis of children with FNP of unknown cause. Surgical intervention may be a viable therapy with good recovery.

  10. Host and Viral Translational Mechanisms during Cricket Paralysis Virus Infection ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Garrey, Julianne L.; Lee, Yun-Young; Au, Hilda H. T.; Bushell, Martin; Jan, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The dicistrovirus is a positive-strand single-stranded RNA virus that possesses two internal ribosome entry sites (IRES) that direct translation of distinct open reading frames encoding the viral structural and nonstructural proteins. Through an unusual mechanism, the intergenic region (IGR) IRES responsible for viral structural protein expression mimics a tRNA to directly recruit the ribosome and set the ribosome into translational elongation. In this study, we explored the mechanism of host...

  11. Surveillance of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) in Lombardy, Northern Italy, from 1997 to 2011 in the context of the national AFP surveillance system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrinelli, Laura; Primache, Valeria; Fiore, Lucia; Amato, Concetta; Fiore, Stefano; Bubba, Laura; Pariani, Elena; Amendola, Antonella; Barbi, Maria; Binda, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    An Acute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP) surveillance system was set up in Lombardy (Northern Italy) in 1997 in the framework of the national AFP surveillance system, as part of the polio eradication initiative by the World Health Organization (WHO). This surveillance system can now be used to detect Poliovirus (PV) reintroductions from endemic countries. This study aimed at describing the results of the AFP surveillance in Lombardy, from 1997 to 2011. Overall, 131 AFP cases in Lombardy were reported with a mean annual incidence rate of 0.7/100 000 children Paralysis (VAPP) cases were reported in 1997 when the Sabin oral polio vaccine (OPV) was still being administered in Italy. Since a surveillance system is deemed sensitive if at least one case of AFP per 100,000 children <15 years of age is detected each year, our surveillance system needs some improvement and must be maintained until global poliovirus eradication will be declared. PMID:25483546

  12. MRI findings in acute Hendra virus meningoencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakka, P.; Amos, G.J. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Qld 4102 (Australia); Saad, N., E-mail: nivena100@hotmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Qld 4102 (Australia); Jeavons, S. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Qld 4102 (Australia)

    2012-05-15

    Aim: To describe serial changes in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in acute human infection from two outbreaks of Hendra virus (HeV), relate these changes to disease prognosis, and compare HeV encephalitis to reported cases of Nipah virus encephalitis. Materials and methods: The MRI images of three human cases (two of which were fatal) of acute HeV meningoencephalitis were reviewed. Results: Cortical selectivity early in the disease is evident in all three patients, while deep white matter involvement appears to be a late and possibly premorbid finding. This apparent early grey matter selectivity may be related to viral biology or ribavirin pharmacokinetics. Neuronal loss is evident at MRI, and the rate of progression of MRI abnormalities can predict the outcome of the infection. In both fatal cases, the serial changes in the MRI picture mirrored the clinical course. Conclusion: This is the first comprehensive report of serial MRI findings in acute human cerebral HeV infection from two outbreaks. The cortical selectivity appears to be an early finding while deep white matter involvement a late, and possibly premorbid, finding. In both fatal cases, the serial changes in MRI mirrored the clinical course.

  13. [A case of brachial plexus neuropathy who presented with acute paralysis of the hand after sleep].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Makiko; Okuma, Yasuyuki; Ohizumi, Hideki; Fujishima, Kenji; Goto, Keigo; Mizuno, Yoshikuni

    2002-09-01

    We report a 46-year-old woman who presented with acute paresis of the right hand and arm. She was well until when she noted a paresis and dysesthesia in her right hand in the morning. Neurological examination revealed weakness in the muscles which were supplied by lower cervical segments, with increased deep tendon reflexes in the right arm. Allen's test and Wright's test were positive. The nerve conduction studies disclosed a reduced CMAPs more severely by right median than ulnar nerve stimulation. The frequency and amplitude of the F waves was also reduced. Needle electromyogram showed a mild neurogenic pattern in the right hand muscles. Digital subtraction angiography revealed a tapering of the subclavian artery when the right arm was abducted. She underwent decompression surgery. A remarkable improvement of the symptoms was observed after surgery. Our patient suggests that brachial plexus neuropathy should be considered in the acute paresis of the hand after sleep, and that surgical procedure would lead to a successful outcome.

  14. Facial paralysis induced by ear inoculation of herpes simplex virus in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takashi; Matsuda, Seiji; Tanaka, Junya; Hato, Naohito

    2017-02-01

    Bell's palsy is caused by the reactivation of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Using Balb/c mice inoculated with the KOS strain of HSV-1, we previously developed an animal disease model that simulated mild Bell's palsy. The current study developed an animal disease model of more severe facial palsy than that seen in the mouse model. Three-week-old female Wister rats weighing 60-80g were inoculated on the auricle with HSV-1 and acyclovir was administered intraperitoneally to deactivate the infected HSV-1. Instead of HSV-1, phosphate-buffered saline was used for inoculation as a negative control. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), behavior testing (blink reflex), electroneuronography, histopathology of the peripheral nerve, and immunohistochemistry of the facial nerve nucleus were evaluated. Facial palsy occurred 3-5 days after virus inoculation, and the severity of the facial palsy progressed for up to 7 days. Quantitative PCR showed an increase in HSV-1 DNA copies in the facial nerve from 24 to 72h, suggesting that HSV-1 infection occurred in the nerve. Electroneuronography values were 33.0±15.3% and 110.0±18.0% in HSV-1-inoculated and control rats, respectively. The histopathology of the peripheral nerve showed demyelination and loss of the facial nerve, and the facial nerve nucleus showed degeneration. Facial palsy developed in Wister rats following inoculation of the KOS strain of HSV-1 onto the auricles. The behavioral, histopathological, and electroneuronography data suggested that the severity of facial palsy was greater in our rats than in animals in the previous mouse disease model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Living with Paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events Blog & Forum About Us Donate Living with Paralysis You have questions. We have answers. Whether you ... caregivers > About the Paralysis Resource Center Explore our paralysis resources > Health > Causes of paralysis > Secondary conditions > Costs ...

  16. Virus elimination in acute lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection. Correlation with virus-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity rather than cytotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Volkert, M; Bro-Jørgensen, K

    1983-01-01

    The immunological effector mechanism responsible for the elimination of virus in murine acute non-fatal extracranial lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection was studied. In this infection virus clearance is generally regarded as the result of a direct action of virus-specific cytotoxic T cells...

  17. [Evolution and prognosis of the acute flaccid paralysis associated with enterovirus 71 infection evaluated through a clinical and magnetic resonance imaging follow-up study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Bing-wei; Du, Zhi-hong; Li, Xiao-jing; Lin, Hai-sheng; Liu, Hong-sheng; Chen, Wen-xiong; Mai, Jian-ning; Liang, Hui-ci

    2012-04-01

    To explore the development and prognosis of the acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) associated with enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection through clinical follow-up study for clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features based on the research progress of virology and pathology. Sixteen children with HFMD associated with AFP in hospital from May 1, 2011 to August 31, 2011 were investigated and the patients received intensive rehabilitation training. The 16 cases were divided into two groups (the recovery or the sequela) by if the muscle strength recovered to level 4 after intensive rehabilitation. The MRI findings of 15 children were analyzed and among them, 6 patients were reexamined after one month. The clinical markers were compared between groups including course of disease, WBC, WBC in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), ventilator support, therapy, the worst muscle strength, the initial tendon reflex, the muscle atrophy, and multi-limb paralysis. The data were analyzed by t test and χ2 test with SPSS10.0. All the 16 children were infected with enterovirus 71 (EV71). The myodynamia of 7 children were level 0, 4 children had serious upper limbs paralysis. The neck muscle in 3 cases and the brain stem motor ruckus in 4 cases were involved. The ankle clonus of non-completely paralyzed limbs in 14 cases occurred during rehabilitation. Eight children had the better prognosis, the other 8 children had sequela. 0 level muscle strength (0 case vs. 7 cases, χ2=12.4), the initial tendon reflex (2 cases vs. 8 cases, χ2=9.6), obvious muscle atrophy (0 case vs. 8 cases, χ2=16), were significantly different in the children with the recovery when compared to the sequela (Pparalysis had the worse prognosis than the severe lower limbs paralysis. MR imaging showed signs of spinal nerve root inflammation and the bilateral hyperintense lesions, symmetrical in the posterior portions of the medulla, pons, and asymmetrical in the ventral horns of cervical spinal cord. Signal enhancement

  18. Acute viral hemorrhage disease: A summary on new viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsri Wiwanitkit

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute hemorrhagic disease is an important problem in medicine that can be seen in many countries, especially those in tropical world. There are many causes of acute hemorrhagic disease and the viral infection seems to be the common cause. The well-known infection is dengue, however, there are many new identified viruses that can cause acute hemorrhagic diseases. In this specific short review, the authors present and discuss on those new virus diseases that present as “acute hemorrhagic fever”.

  19. Gamma interferon (IFN-γ) receptor restricts systemic dengue virus replication and prevents paralysis in IFN-α/β receptor-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestwood, Tyler R; Morar, Malika M; Zellweger, Raphaël M; Miller, Robyn; May, Monica M; Yauch, Lauren E; Lada, Steven M; Shresta, Sujan

    2012-12-01

    We previously reported that mice lacking alpha/beta and gamma interferon receptors (IFN-α/βR and -γR) uniformly exhibit paralysis following infection with the dengue virus (DENV) clinical isolate PL046, while only a subset of mice lacking the IFN-γR alone and virtually no mice lacking the IFN-α/βR alone develop paralysis. Here, using a mouse-passaged variant of PL046, strain S221, we show that in the absence of the IFN-α/βR, signaling through the IFN-γR confers approximately 140-fold greater resistance against systemic vascular leakage-associated dengue disease and virtually complete protection from dengue-induced paralysis. Viral replication in the spleen was assessed by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry, which revealed a reduction in the number of infected cells due to IFN-γR signaling by 2 days after infection, coincident with elevated levels of IFN-γ in the spleen and serum. By 4 days after infection, IFN-γR signaling was found to restrict DENV replication systemically. Clearance of DENV, on the other hand, occurred in the absence of IFN-γR, except in the central nervous system (CNS) (brain and spinal cord), where clearance relied on IFN-γ from CD8(+) T cells. These results demonstrate the roles of IFN-γR signaling in protection from initial systemic and subsequent CNS disease following DENV infection and demonstrate the importance of CD8(+) T cells in preventing DENV-induced CNS disease.

  20. An Acute Hemorrhagic Infectious Disease: Ebola Virus Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIAO Lei

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus disease (EVD is an acute hemorrhagic infectious disease caused by ebola virus, with high infectivity and fatality rate. At present, it mainly occurs in areas of Central Africa and West Africa and no effective vaccine and antiviral drugs are available for the clinical treatment.

  1. Importance of Respiratory Viruses in Acute Otitis Media

    OpenAIRE

    Heikkinen, Terho; Chonmaitree, Tasnee

    2003-01-01

    Acute otitis media is usually considered a simple bacterial infection that is treated with antibiotics. However, ample evidence derived from studies ranging from animal experiments to extensive clinical trials supports a crucial role for respiratory viruses in the etiology and pathogenesis of acute otitis media. Viral infection of the upper respiratory mucosa initiates the whole cascade of events that finally leads to the development of acute otitis media as a complication. The pathogenesis o...

  2. Frequency of isolation of polioviruses and non polio enteroviruses from patients with acute flaccid paralysis, enterovirus infection and children from groups at risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Romanenkova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the frequency of isolation of polioviruses and non polio enteroviruses from different categories of the investigated children. The percentage of detection of polioviruses from the patients with acute flaccid paralysis was lower than that from the children from groups at risk. Among the patients with the enterovirus infection the polioviruses were rarely revealed. The frequency of isolation of non polio enteroviruses from these patients was significantly higher than that from the other categories of investigated persons. The improvement of poliomyelitis surveillance and the reinforcement of virological surveillance of children from groups at risk and those with enterovirus infection will provide the important data for Global Polio Eradication Initiative and the maintenance of polio free status of the Russian Federation.

  3. Value of electroneurography as a prognostic indicator for recovery in acute severe inflammatory facial paralysis: a prospective study of Bell's palsy and Ramsay Hunt syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Hayoung; Cho, Yang-Sun; Jang, Jeon Yeob; Chung, Kyu Whan; Hwang, Soojin; Chung, Won-Ho; Hong, Sung Hwa

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the prognostic and predictive value of electroneuronography (ENoG) in acute severe inflammatory facial paralysis, including Bell's palsy and Ramsay Hunt syndrome (RHS). Prospective observational study. Patients with acute severe facial paralysis of House-Brackmann (H-B) grade IV or worse and diagnosed with Bell's palsy or RHS were enrolled from August 2007 to July 2011. After treatment with oral corticosteroid, antiviral agent, and protective eye care, patients were followed up until recovery or 12 months from onset. Sixty-six patients with Bell's palsy and 22 with RHS were included. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed significant effect of ENoG value on recovery in both Bell's palsy and RHS. Values of ENoG were significantly worse in RHS than Bell's palsy. Chance of early recovery within 6 weeks after correction of ENoG effect was still significantly worse in RHS. Logistic regression analysis showed 90% chance of recovery within 6 months, expected with ENoG values of 69.2% degeneration (Bell's palsy) and 59.3% (RHS). The receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves showed ENoG values of 82.5% (Bell's palsy) and 78.0% (RHS) as a critical cutoff value of nonrecovery until 1 year, with the best sensitivity and specificity. A higher chance of recovery was expected with better ENoG in Bell's palsy and RHS. Based on our data, nonrecovery is predicted in patients with ENoG value greater than 82.5% in Bell's palsy, and 78% in RHS. 4. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. Israeli acute paralysis virus in Africanized honey bees in southeastern Brazilian Apiaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey bee losses in Brazil have been observed over the past few years. These losses share somewhat similar symptoms with the syndrome known as Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) in the USA. After more than a half century of introgression from Apis mellifera subsp. scutellata, Africanized honey bees have...

  5. Human Hendra virus infection causes acute and relapsing encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, K T; Robertson, T; Ong, B B; Chong, J W; Yaiw, K C; Wang, L F; Ansford, A J; Tannenberg, A

    2009-06-01

    To study the pathology of two cases of human Hendra virus infection, one with no clinical encephalitis and one with relapsing encephalitis. Autopsy tissues were investigated by light microscopy, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. In the patient with acute pulmonary syndrome but not clinical acute encephalitis, vasculitis was found in the brain, lung, heart and kidney. Occasionally, viral antigens were demonstrated in vascular walls but multinucleated endothelial syncytia were absent. In the lung, there was severe inflammation, necrosis and viral antigens in type II pneumocytes and macrophages. The rare kidney glomerulus showed inflammation and viral antigens in capillary walls and podocytes. Discrete necrotic/vacuolar plaques in the brain parenchyma were associated with antigens and viral RNA. Brain inflammation was mild although CD68(+) microglia/macrophages were significantly increased. Cytoplasmic viral inclusions and antigens and viral RNA in neurones and ependyma suggested viral replication. In the case of relapsing encephalitis, there was severe widespread meningoencephalitis characterized by neuronal loss, macrophages and other inflammatory cells, reactive blood vessels and perivascular cuffing. Antigens and viral RNA were mainly found in neurones. Vasculitis was absent in all the tissues examined. The case of acute Hendra virus infection demonstrated evidence of systemic infection and acute encephalitis. The case of relapsing Hendra virus encephalitis showed no signs of extraneural infection but in the brain, extensive inflammation and infected neurones were observed. Hendra virus can cause acute and relapsing encephalitis and the findings suggest that the pathology and pathogenesis are similar to Nipah virus infection.

  6. 8. Echoviruses diagnosed in two Children presenting with Acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ESEM

    ABSTRACT. Background: The Enteric Cytopathic Human. Orphan virus commonly referred to by the acronym. ECHO virus has been known to cause acute flaccid paralysis (AFP). Zambia has since 1993 run a national AFP surveillance program to primarily detect and confirm poliomyelitis cases. Through this program other ...

  7. Support for children identified with acute flaccid paralysis under the global polio eradication programme in Uttar Pradesh, India: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yotsu Rie R

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cases of polio in India declined after the implementation of the polio eradication programme especially in these recent years. The programme includes surveillance of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP to detect and diagnose cases of polio at early stage. Under this surveillance, over 40,000 cases of AFP are reported annually since 2007 regardless of the number of actual polio cases. Yet, not much is known about these children. We conducted a qualitative research to explore care and support for children with AFP after their diagnosis. Methods The research was conducted in a district of western Uttar Pradesh classified as high-risk area for polio. In-depth interviews with parents of children with polio (17, with non-polio AFP (9, healthcare providers (40, and key informants from community including international and government officers, religious leaders, community leaders, journalists, and academics (21 were performed. Results Minimal medicine and attention were provided at government hospitals. Therefore, most parents preferred private-practice doctors for their children with AFP. Many were visited at homes to have stool samples collected by authorities. Some were visited repetitively following the sample collection, but had difficulty in understanding the reasons for these visits that pertained no treatment. Financial burden was a common concern among all families. Many parents expressed resentment for their children's disease, notably have been affected despite receiving multiple doses of polio vaccine. Both parents and healthcare providers lacked information and knowledge, furthermore poverty minimised the access to available healthcare services. Medicines, education, and transportation means were identified as foremost needs for children with AFP and residual paralysis. Conclusions Despite the high number of children diagnosed with AFP as part of the global polio eradication programme, we found they were not provided with

  8. Cross-species transmission of honey bee viruses in associated arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Abby L; Singh, Rajwinder; Cox-Foster, Diana L; Rajotte, Edwin; Hoover, Kelli; Ostiguy, Nancy; Holmes, Edward C

    2013-09-01

    There are a number of RNA virus pathogens that represent a serious threat to the health of managed honey bees (Apis mellifera). That some of these viruses are also found in the broader pollinator community suggests the wider environmental spread of these viruses, with the potential for a broader impact on ecosystems. Studies on the ecology and evolution of these viruses in the arthropod community as a whole may therefore provide important insights into these potential impacts. We examined managed A. mellifera colonies, nearby non-Apis hymenopteran pollinators, and other associated arthropods for the presence of five commonly occurring picorna-like RNA viruses of honey bees - black queen cell virus, deformed wing virus, Israeli acute paralysis virus, Kashmir bee virus and sacbrood virus. Notably, we observed their presence in several arthropod species. Additionally, detection of negative-strand RNA using strand-specific RT-PCR assays for deformed wing virus and Israeli acute paralysis virus suggests active replication of deformed wing virus in at least six non-Apis species and active replication of Israeli acute paralysis virus in one non-Apis species. Phylogenetic analysis of deformed wing virus also revealed that this virus is freely disseminating across the species sampled in this study. In sum, our study indicates that these viruses are not specific to the pollinator community and that other arthropod species have the potential to be involved in disease transmission in pollinator populations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Virus infections of honeybees Apis Mellifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Tantillo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The health and vigour of honeybee colonies are threatened by numerous parasites (such as Varroa destructor and Nosema spp. and pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, protozoa. Among honeybee pathogens, viruses are one of the major threats to the health and wellbeing of honeybees and cause serious concern for researchers and beekeepers. To tone down the threats posed by these invasive organisms, a better understanding of bee viral infections will be of crucial importance in developing effective and environmentally benign disease control strategies. Here we summarize recent progress in the understanding of the morphology, genome organization, transmission, epidemiology and pathogenesis of eight honeybee viruses: Deformed wing virus (DWV and Kakugo virus (KV; Sacbrood virus (SBV; Black Queen cell virus (BQCV; Acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV; Kashmir bee virus (KBV; Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus (IAPV; Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV. The review has been designed to provide researchers in the field with updated information about honeybee viruses and to serve as a starting point for future research.

  10. Virus Infections of Honeybees Apis Mellifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantillo, Giuseppina; Bottaro, Marilisa; Di Pinto, Angela; Martella, Vito; Di Pinto, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    The health and vigour of honeybee colonies are threatened by numerous parasites (such as Varroa destructor and Nosema spp.) and pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, protozoa. Among honeybee pathogens, viruses are one of the major threats to the health and well-being of honeybees and cause serious concern for researchers and beekeepers. To tone down the threats posed by these invasive organisms, a better understanding of bee viral infections will be of crucial importance in developing effective and environmentally benign disease control strategies. Here we summarize recent progress in the understanding of the morphology, genome organization, transmission, epidemiology and pathogenesis of eight honeybee viruses: Deformed wing virus (DWV) and Kakugo virus (KV); Sacbrood virus (SBV); Black Queen cell virus (BQCV); Acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV); Kashmir bee virus (KBV); Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus (IAPV); Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV). The review has been designed to provide researchers in the field with updated information about honeybee viruses and to serve as a starting point for future research. PMID:27800411

  11. [Hypoglycaemic periodic paralysis in hyperthyroidism patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratochvíl, J; Masopust, J; Martínková, V; Charvát, J

    2008-11-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HPP) is a rare disorder characterised by acute, potentially fatal atacks of muscle weakness or paralysis. Massive shift of potassium into cells is caused by elevated levels of insulin and catecholamines in the blood. Hypophosphatemia and hypomagnesemia may be also present. Acidobasic status usually is not impaired. HPP occurs as familiar (caused by ion channels inherited defects) or acquired (in patients with hyperthyroidism). On the basis of two clinical cases we present a review of hypokalemic periodic paralysis in hyperthyroid patients. We discuss patogenesis, clinical and laboratory findings as well as the principles of prevention and treatment of this rare disorder.

  12. Acute hepatitis with nontyphoidal salmonella and hepatitis E virus coinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ting Kuo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year-old Taiwanese man presented with dark urine for 5 days before admission to hospital and with fever on the 2nd day of admission to hospital. Laboratory studies showed acute hepatitis with hyperbilirubinemia. Acute hepatitis with nontyphoidal salmonella and hepatitis E virus coinfection was diagnosed. The fever subsided after treatment with ceftriaxone and cefepime. His serum bilirubin reached its peak value on the 3rd week after admission to hospital and then gradually returned to the normal range. To the best of our knowledge, acute hepatitis E coinfection with nontyphoidal salmonella has not been reported previously.

  13. Vaccination against acute respiratory virus infections and measles in man.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); P. de Vries (Petra)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractSeveral viruses may cause more or less severe acute respiratory infections in man, some of which are followed by systemic infection. Only for influenza and measles are licensed vaccines available at present. The protection induced by influenza vaccines, which are based on inactivated

  14. Paralysis: Secondary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 5pm ET. 1-800-539-7309 ☰ Living with Paralysis Get Support Get Involved Research Events Blog & Forum About Us Donate Living with Paralysis > Health > Secondary conditions Secondary conditions Secondary conditions refer ...

  15. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have a family history of periodic paralysis or thyroid disorders. Emergency symptoms include: Difficulty breathing, speaking, or swallowing ... Prevention Genetic counseling may be advised. Treating the thyroid disorder prevents attacks of weakness. Alternative Names Periodic paralysis - ...

  16. Ticks and tick paralysis: imaging findings on cranial MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, Michael S.; Fordham, Lynn Ansley; Hamrick, Harvey J.

    2005-01-01

    Tick paralysis is an acute, progressive, and potentially fatal muscle paralysis secondary to a toxin secreted by a pregnant tick during a bite. Although tick bites can occur anywhere on the body, ticks are frequently overlooked on the scalp because of overlying hair. Children with acute neurologic symptoms frequently undergo MR scanning that may incidentally reveal the offending tick. Timely identification and removal of the tick leads to rapid recovery from tick paralysis. We report the MRI findings at 1.5 T of tick paralysis with an attached tick. (orig.)

  17. Ticks and tick paralysis: imaging findings on cranial MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Michael S.; Fordham, Lynn Ansley [University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, UNC School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, NC (United States); Hamrick, Harvey J. [University of North Carolina Hospitals, Department of Pediatrics, Chapel Hill (United States)

    2005-02-01

    Tick paralysis is an acute, progressive, and potentially fatal muscle paralysis secondary to a toxin secreted by a pregnant tick during a bite. Although tick bites can occur anywhere on the body, ticks are frequently overlooked on the scalp because of overlying hair. Children with acute neurologic symptoms frequently undergo MR scanning that may incidentally reveal the offending tick. Timely identification and removal of the tick leads to rapid recovery from tick paralysis. We report the MRI findings at 1.5 T of tick paralysis with an attached tick. (orig.)

  18. Cytokine Signatures Discriminate Highly Frequent Acute Hepatitis a Virus and Hepatitis E Virus Coinfections from Monoinfections in Mexican Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Realpe-Quintero, Mauricio; Copado-Villagrana, Edgar Daniel; Trujillo-Ochoa, Jorge Luis; Alvarez, Angel Hilario; Panduro, Arturo; Fierro, Nora Alma

    2017-07-01

    The frequency of hepatitis A virus and hepatitis E virus infections and their cytokine profiles were analyzed in Mexican pediatric patients with acute hepatitis. A high frequency of coinfections was found. Significant overexpression of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-12, IL-13 and interferon-gamma during hepatitis A virus monoinfections and limited secretion of cytokines in hepatitis E virus infections were observed.

  19. The IRES5′UTR of the dicistrovirus cricket paralysis virus is a type III IRES containing an essential pseudoknot structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Lauriane; Einhorn, Evelyne; Noireterre, Audrey; Schaeffer, Laure; Kuhn, Lauriane; Imler, Jean-Luc; Eriani, Gilbert; Meignin, Carine

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Cricket paralysis virus (CrPV) is a dicistrovirus. Its positive-sense single-stranded RNA genome contains two internal ribosomal entry sites (IRESs). The 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR) IRES5′UTR mediates translation of non-structural proteins encoded by ORF1 whereas the well-known intergenic region (IGR) IRESIGR is required for translation of structural proteins from open reading frame 2 in the late phase of infection. Concerted action of both IRES is essential for host translation shut-off and viral translation. IRESIGR has been extensively studied, in contrast the IRES5′UTR remains largely unexplored. Here, we define the minimal IRES element required for efficient translation initiation in drosophila S2 cell-free extracts. We show that IRES5′UTR promotes direct recruitment of the ribosome on the cognate viral AUG start codon without any scanning step, using a Hepatitis-C virus-related translation initiation mechanism. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that IRES5′UTR recruits eukaryotic initiation factor 3, confirming that it belongs to type III class of IRES elements. Using Selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension and DMS probing, we established a secondary structure model of 5′UTR and of the minimal IRES5′UTR. The IRES5′UTR contains a pseudoknot structure that is essential for proper folding and ribosome recruitment. Overall, our results pave the way for studies addressing the synergy and interplay between the two IRES from CrPV. PMID:28911115

  20. Glucocorticoid Induced Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis in Subclinical Hyperthyroidism: Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Genek, Dilek Gibyeli; Huddam, Bülent; Karakuş, Volkan; Yıldırım, Birdal; Gazezoğlu, Okşan Uyar

    2016-01-01

    Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP), the most commonly seen disorder among Asian men, is characterized by abrupt onset of hypokalemia and paralysis. The underlying hyperthyroidism is often subtle, which causes difficulty in early diagnosis. Factors such as high-carbohydrate eating habit, excessive exercise, use of steroid, and stress can precipitate a TPP attack. We, hereby, present a young Turkish man who developed acute paralysis after receiving intravenously applied dexamethasone for weeve...

  1. [Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy associated with Coxsackie virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debray, A; Ollier, V; Coutard, A; Arditty, F; Bekkar, S; Bodemer, C; Leruez-Ville, M; Mirand, A; Lesage, F; Foucaud, P

    2017-12-01

    Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy is a rare but benign vasculitis occurring in infants aged from 4 to 24 months. Skin lesions can take various forms, including extensive hemorrhagic purpura, and can therefore be mistaken for purpura fulminans if associated with fever, which leads to initiating broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment. In the present case, we describe a 7-month-old boy with acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy and rapidly extensive purpura lesions that led to intravenous cefotaxime and amikacin treatment. Diagnosis was made on the next day by a dermatologist, based on the typical aspect of skin lesions, hemodynamic stability, and negative bacteriological samples. Coxsackie virus B5, a pathogenic enterovirus, was found by specific PCR in cerebrospinal fluid. The outcome was spontaneously favorable after discontinuation of antibiotics on day 2. We discuss the imputability of the enterovirus in triggering this case of acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Hysterical conversion paralysis in an adolescent boy with lumbar spondylolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Tadahiro; Tonogai, Ichiro; Sakai, Toshinori; Takata, Yoichiro; Goda, Yuichiro; Abe, Mitsunobu; Jha, Subash C; Fukuta, Shoji; Higashino, Kosaku; Nagamachi, Akihiro; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-05-01

    We describe a case of recurrent hysterical paralysis triggered by low back pain because of lumbar spondylolysis. A 16-year-old male soccer player was referred to our institution with five previous episodes of acute paralysis triggered by severe low back pain. We performed direct surgical repair of the terminal-stage bilateral spondylolysis at L4 using a hook-rod system. His chronic low back pain was completely resolved, and no further episodes of hysterical paralysis have occurred after surgery. Spine surgeons should be aware of possible hysterical conversion paralysis when there is discrepancy between radiological and neurological findings.

  3. Isolated sleep paralysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sawant, Neena S.; Parkar, Shubhangi R.; Tambe, Ravindra

    2005-01-01

    Sleep paralysis (SP) is a cardinal symptom of narcolepsy. However, little is available in the literature about isolated sleep paralysis. This report discusses the case of a patient with isolated sleep paralysis who progressed from mild to severe SP over 8 years. He also restarted drinking alcohol to be able to fall asleep and allay his anxiety symptoms. The patient was taught relaxation techniques and he showed complete remission of the symptoms of SP on follow up after 8 months.

  4. Analysis of Aichi virus and Saffold virus association with pediatric acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li-Li; Liu, Na; Yu, Jei-Mei; Ao, Yuan-Yun; Li, Shan; Stine, O Colin; Duan, Zhao-Jun

    2017-02-01

    Aichi virus (AiV) and Saffold virus (SAFV) have been reported in children with acute gastroenteritis and respiratory disease worldwide; however, their causative role in acute gastroenteritis remains ambiguous. To assess the clinical association of AiV and SAFV with acute gastroenteritis in the pediatric population. A case-control study involving 461 paired stool samples from pediatric cases with diarrhea and healthy controls was conducted in China. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to screen AiV and SAFV. In the 461 paired samples, AiV and SAFV were more prevalent among asymptomatic children than children with acute gastroenteritis (0.87% vs. 0.43% and 2.8% vs. 1.5%, respectively), with no significant differences between groups (p=0.142 and p=0.478, respectively). Cox regression model analysis revealed no correlation between AiV (odds ratio, OR=2.24; 95% confidence interval, CI, 0.76-6.54) or SAFV infection (OR=1.36; 95% CI, 0.86-2.15) and diarrhea. High viral loads were found in both AiV- and SAFV-positive groups, with no significant difference in viral load between the groups (p=0.507 and p=0.677, respectively). No other known enteric pathogens were found in the AiV-positive samples but common in SAFV-positive cases. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all 6 AiV subjects clustered with genotype B. All 7 SAFV-positive cases and 8 of 13 SAFV-positive controls were genotyped successfully; the genotypes identified included SAFV-1, SAFV-2 SAFV-3, and SAFV-6. Our study revealed no association of these viruses in acute gastroenteritis in children. These viruses may have the ability to replicate in humans; however, the infections are usually asymptomatic. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Sleep paralysis and psychopathology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    with sleep paralysis.3,4 These are visual, somatic, auditory or other hallucinations, usually brief though sometimes prolonged, that occur at the transition from wakefulness to sleep (hypnagogic hallucinations) or from sleep to wakefulness (hypnopompic hallucinations). Sleep paralysis may occur during the transition from ...

  6. Vertical transmission of honey bee viruses in a Belgian queen breeding program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravoet, Jorgen; De Smet, Lina; Wenseleers, Tom; de Graaf, Dirk C

    2015-03-14

    The Member States of European Union are encouraged to improve the general conditions for the production and marketing of apicultural products. In Belgium, programmes on the restocking of honey bee hives have run for many years. Overall, the success ratio of this queen breeding programme has been only around 50%. To tackle this low efficacy, we organized sanitary controls of the breeding queens in 2012 and 2014. We found a high quantity of viruses, with more than 75% of the egg samples being infected with at least one virus. The most abundant viruses were Deformed Wing Virus and Sacbrood Virus (≥40%), although Lake Sinai Virus and Acute Bee Paralysis Virus were also occasionally detected (between 10-30%). In addition, Aphid Lethal Paralysis Virus strain Brookings, Black Queen Cell Virus, Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus and Varroa destructor Macula-like Virus occurred at very low prevalences (≤5%). Remarkably, we found Apis mellifera carnica bees to be less infected with Deformed Wing Virus than Buckfast bees (p Colony Collapse Disorder. Moreover, negative-strand detection of Sacbrood Virus in eggs was demonstrated for the first time. High pathogen loads were observed in this sanitary control program. We documented for the first time vertical transmission of some viruses, as well as significant differences between two honey bee races in being affected by Deformed Wing Virus. Nevertheless, we could not demonstrate a correlation between the presence of viruses and queen breeding efficacies.

  7. Paralysis Episodes in Carbonic Anhydrase II Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ibrahim, Alia; Al-Harbi, Mosa; Al-Musallam, Sulaiman

    2003-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder manifest by osteopetrosis, renal tubular acidosis, and cerebral calcification. Other features include growth failure and mental retardation. Complications of the osteopetrosis include frequent bone fractures, cranial nerve compression, and dental mal-occlusion. A hyper-chloremic metabolic acidosis, sometimes with hypokalemia, occurs due to renal tubular acidosis that may be proximal, distal, or more commonly, the combined type. Such patients may present with global hypotonia, muscle weakness or paralysis. We report a case of CA II deficiency with recurrent attacks of acute paralysis which was misdiagnosed initially as Guillian-Barre syndrome.

  8. Rapid and Massive Virus-Specific Plasmablast Responses during Acute Dengue Virus Infection in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onlamoon, Nattawat; Akondy, Rama S.; Perng, Guey C.; Polsrila, Korakot; Chandele, Anmol; Kwissa, Marcin; Pulendran, Bali; Wilson, Patrick C.; Wittawatmongkol, Orasri; Yoksan, Sutee; Angkasekwinai, Nasikarn; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Ahmed, Rafi

    2012-01-01

    Humoral immune responses are thought to play a major role in dengue virus-induced immunopathology; however, little is known about the plasmablasts producing these antibodies during an ongoing infection. Herein we present an analysis of plasmablast responses in patients with acute dengue virus infection. We found very potent plasmablast responses that often increased more than 1,000-fold over the baseline levels in healthy volunteers. In many patients, these responses made up as much 30% of the peripheral lymphocyte population. These responses were largely dengue virus specific and almost entirely made up of IgG-secreting cells, and plasmablasts reached very high numbers at a time after fever onset that generally coincided with the window where the most serious dengue virus-induced pathology is observed. The presence of these large, rapid, and virus-specific plasmablast responses raises the question as to whether these cells might have a role in dengue immunopathology during the ongoing infection. These findings clearly illustrate the need for a detailed understanding of the repertoire and specificity of the antibodies that these plasmablasts produce. PMID:22238318

  9. Purpura fulminans associated with acute West Nile virus encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sheevam; Fite, Laura Paul; Lane, Natalie; Parekh, Palak

    2016-02-01

    Purpura fulminans is a progressive thrombotic disorder that presents with widespread purpura due to deficiency or dysfunction of protein C or protein S. Lesions present as well-demarcated erythematous macules that progress to irregular areas of hemorrhagic necrosis.West Nile virus is a member of the Flaviviridae family transmitted to humans through the bite of various mosquito species. It manifests as West Nile fever in 25% of those infected and less commonly as neuroinvasive disease. An African American man in his fortiespresented with altered mental status and was noted to have evidence of disseminated intravascular coagulation according to his lab data. He then developed dusky skin discoloration and systemic flaccid bullae with desquamation. Biopsy was consistent with purpura fulminans and the patient eventually developed symmetric peripheral gangrene, requiring amputations of all four extremities. Infectious work up revealed positive testing for IgM and IgG antibodies in serum and cerebrospinal fluid leading to the diagnosis of acute West Nile Virus encephalitis. We present this case to describe the rarely reported association of purpura fulminans with West Nile Virus infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Acute exacerbation in chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Vieira Santos

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available A case of an acute exacerbation of liver injury in a chronic HBV infected young male is reported. The correlation between the severe symptomatic hepatitis is done with the histopathologic findings of extense areas of bridging necrosis on the Iwer biopsy. The serological pattern for markers of HBV (HBsAg +, anti HBs g -, HBeAg -, anti HBe +, anti HBcIgG + and IgM - confirm a chronic infection, ana the authors propose that the episode of severe hepatitis relates to the recent spontaneous seroconvertion of HBe Ag to anti HBe. Other causes of hepatitis were excluded, and the control liver biopsy (6 months later showed normalization of hepatic architecture and absence of markers of viral replication in tissue and serum. A review of literature is done in an attempt to elucidate the diagnostic possibilities in this case, with emphasis on new immunoassays useful in differentiating between acute hepatitis B and acute exacerbation of a chronic hepatitis by the same virus.

  11. MAIT cells are activated in acute Dengue virus infection and after in vitro Zika virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquin-Proulx, Dominic; Avelino-Silva, Vivian I; Santos, Bianca A N; Silveira Barsotti, Nathália; Siroma, Fabiana; Fernandes Ramos, Jessica; Coracini Tonacio, Adriana; Song, Alice; Maestri, Alvino; Barros Cerqueira, Natalia; Felix, Alvina Clara; Levi, José Eduardo; Greenspun, Benjamin C; de Mulder Rougvie, Miguel; Rosenberg, Michael G; Nixon, Douglas F; Kallas, Esper G

    2018-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) and Zika virus (ZIKV) are members of the Flaviviridae and are predominantly transmitted via mosquito bites. Both viruses are responsible for a growing number of infections in tropical and subtropical regions. DENV infection can cause lethargy with severe morbidity and dengue shock syndrome leading to death in some cases. ZIKV is now linked with Guillain-Barré syndrome and fetal malformations including microcephaly and developmental disorders (congenital Zika syndrome). The protective and pathogenic roles played by the immune response in these infections is unknown. Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are a population of innate T cells with potent anti-bacterial activity. MAIT cells have also been postulated to play a role in the immune response to viral infections. In this study, we evaluated MAIT cell frequency, phenotype, and function in samples from subjects with acute and convalescent DENV infection. We found that in acute DENV infection, MAIT cells had elevated co-expression of the activation markers CD38 and HLA-DR and had a poor IFNγ response following bacterial stimulation. Furthermore, we found that MAIT cells can produce IFNγ in response to in vitro infection with ZIKV. This MAIT cell response was independent of MR1, but dependent on IL-12 and IL-18. Our results suggest that MAIT cells may play an important role in the immune response to Flavivirus infections.

  12. MAIT cells are activated in acute Dengue virus infection and after in vitro Zika virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Paquin-Proulx

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV and Zika virus (ZIKV are members of the Flaviviridae and are predominantly transmitted via mosquito bites. Both viruses are responsible for a growing number of infections in tropical and subtropical regions. DENV infection can cause lethargy with severe morbidity and dengue shock syndrome leading to death in some cases. ZIKV is now linked with Guillain-Barré syndrome and fetal malformations including microcephaly and developmental disorders (congenital Zika syndrome. The protective and pathogenic roles played by the immune response in these infections is unknown. Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT cells are a population of innate T cells with potent anti-bacterial activity. MAIT cells have also been postulated to play a role in the immune response to viral infections. In this study, we evaluated MAIT cell frequency, phenotype, and function in samples from subjects with acute and convalescent DENV infection. We found that in acute DENV infection, MAIT cells had elevated co-expression of the activation markers CD38 and HLA-DR and had a poor IFNγ response following bacterial stimulation. Furthermore, we found that MAIT cells can produce IFNγ in response to in vitro infection with ZIKV. This MAIT cell response was independent of MR1, but dependent on IL-12 and IL-18. Our results suggest that MAIT cells may play an important role in the immune response to Flavivirus infections.

  13. Stats About Paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resulting in difficulty or inability to move the upper or lower extremities. The leading cause of paralysis was stroke (33.7 percent), followed by spinal cord injury (27.3 percent) and multiple sclerosis (18.6 ...

  14. Occurrence of Six Honeybee Viruses in Diseased Austrian Apiaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berényi, Olga; Bakonyi, Tamás; Derakhshifar, Irmgard; Köglberger, Hemma; Nowotny, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    The occurrence, prevalence, and distribution patterns of acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV), black queen cell virus (BQCV), chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV), deformed wing virus (DWV), Kashmir bee virus (KBV), and sacbrood virus (SBV) were investigated in 90 Austrian honeybee colonies suffering from symptoms of depopulation, sudden collapse, paralysis, or dark coloring by employing reverse transcription-PCR. Infestation with parasites was also recorded. The samples originated from all parts of Austria. The most prevalent virus was DWV, present in 91% of samples, followed by ABPV, SBV, and BQCV (68%, 49%, and 30%, respectively). CBPV was detected in 10% of colonies, while KBV was not present in any sample. In most samples, more than one virus was identified. The distribution pattern of ABPV, BQCV, CBPV, and SBV varied considerably in the different geographic regions investigated, while DWV was widespread in all Austrian federal states. In bees that showed dark coloring and disorientation, CBPV was always detected. Simultaneous infections of DWV and ABPV were most frequently observed in colonies suffering from weakness, depopulation, and sudden collapse. Bees obtained from apparently healthy colonies within the same apiaries showed a similar distribution pattern of viruses; however, the relative virus load was 10 to 126 times lower than in bees from diseased colonies. A limited number of bee samples from surrounding central European countries (Germany, Poland, Hungary, and Slovenia) were also tested for the presence of the above viruses. Variances were found in the distribution of BQCV and SBV. PMID:16597939

  15. Neurotoxin-induced paralysis: a case of tick paralysis in a 2-year-old child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taraschenko, Olga D; Powers, Karen M

    2014-06-01

    Tick paralysis is an arthropod-transmitted disease causing potentially lethal progressive ascending weakness. The presenting symptoms of tick paralysis overlap those of acute inflammatory diseases of the peripheral nervous system and spinal cord; thus, the condition is often misdiagnosed, leading to unnecessary treatments and prolonged hospitalization. A 2-year-old girl residing in northern New York and having no history of travel to areas endemic to ticks presented with rapidly progressing ascending paralysis, hyporeflexia, and intact sensory examination. Investigation included blood and serum toxicology screens, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and brain imaging. With all tests negative, the child's condition was initially mistaken for botulism; however, an engorged tick was later found attached to the head skin. Following tick removal, the patient's weakness promptly improved with no additional interventions. Our patient illustrates the importance of thorough skin examination in all cases of acute progressive weakness and the necessity to include tick paralysis in the differential diagnosis of paralysis, even in nonendemic areas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nasopharyngeal Protein Biomarkers of Acute Respiratory Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W. Burke

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Infection of respiratory mucosa with viral pathogens triggers complex immunologic events in the affected host. We sought to characterize this response through proteomic analysis of nasopharyngeal lavage in human subjects experimentally challenged with influenza A/H3N2 or human rhinovirus, and to develop targeted assays measuring peptides involved in this host response allowing classification of acute respiratory virus infection. Unbiased proteomic discovery analysis identified 3285 peptides corresponding to 438 unique proteins, and revealed that infection with H3N2 induces significant alterations in protein expression. These include proteins involved in acute inflammatory response, innate immune response, and the complement cascade. These data provide insights into the nature of the biological response to viral infection of the upper respiratory tract, and the proteins that are dysregulated by viral infection form the basis of signature that accurately classifies the infected state. Verification of this signature using targeted mass spectrometry in independent cohorts of subjects challenged with influenza or rhinovirus demonstrates that it performs with high accuracy (0.8623 AUROC, 75% TPR, 97.46% TNR. With further development as a clinical diagnostic, this signature may have utility in rapid screening for emerging infections, avoidance of inappropriate antibacterial therapy, and more rapid implementation of appropriate therapeutic and public health strategies.

  17. Sudden flaccid paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Mohammad; Peshin, Rohit; Ellis, Oliver; Grover, Karan

    2015-01-07

    Periodic thyrotoxic paralysis is a genetic condition, rare in the West and in Caucasians. Thyrotoxicosis, especially in western hospitals, is an easily overlooked cause of sudden-onset paralysis. We present a case of a 40-year-old man who awoke one morning unable to stand. He had bilateral lower limb flaccid weakness of 0/5 with reduced reflexes and equivocal plantars; upper limbs were 3/5 with reduced tone and reflexes. ECG sinus rhythm was at a rate of 88/min. PR interval was decreased and QT interval increased. Bloods showed potassium of 1.8 mEq/L (normal range 3.5-5), free T4 of 29.2 pmol/L (normal range 6.5-17) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) of paralysis. He was discharged on carbimazole and propanolol, and follow-up was arranged in the endocrinology clinic. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  18. Facial nerve paralysis after cervical traction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Edmund Cheung

    2010-10-01

    Cervical traction is a frequently used treatment in rehabilitation clinics for cervical spine problems. This modality works, in principle, by decompressing the spinal cord or its nerve roots by applying traction on the cervical spine through a harness placed over the mandible (Olivero et al., Neurosurg Focus 2002;12:ECP1). Previous reports on treatment complications include lumbar radicular discomfort, muscle injury, neck soreness, and posttraction pain (LaBan et al., Arch Phys Med Rehabil 1992;73:295-6; Lee et al., J Biomech Eng 1996;118:597-600). Here, we report the first case of unilateral facial nerve paralysis developed after 4 wks of intermittent cervical traction therapy. Nerve conduction velocity examination revealed a peripheral-type facial nerve paralysis. Symptoms of facial nerve paralysis subsided after prednisolone treatment and suspension of traction therapy. It is suspected that a misplaced or an overstrained harness may have been the cause of facial nerve paralysis in this patient. Possible causes were (1) direct compression by the harness on the right facial nerve near its exit through the stylomastoid foramen; (2) compression of the right external carotid artery by the harness, causing transient ischemic injury at the geniculate ganglion; or (3) coincidental herpes zoster virus infection or idiopathic Bell's palsy involving the facial nerve.

  19. Sudden flaccid paralysis

    OpenAIRE

    Tariq, Mohammad; Peshin, Rohit; Ellis, Oliver; Grover, Karan

    2015-01-01

    Periodic thyrotoxic paralysis is a genetic condition, rare in the West and in Caucasians. Thyrotoxicosis, especially in western hospitals, is an easily overlooked cause of sudden-onset paralysis. We present a case of a 40-year-old man who awoke one morning unable to stand. He had bilateral lower limb flaccid weakness of 0/5 with reduced reflexes and equivocal plantars; upper limbs were 3/5 with reduced tone and reflexes. ECG sinus rhythm was at a rate of 88/min. PR interval was decreased and ...

  20. [Poliomyelitis in Tajikistan. Protection of Russia from emergence and spread of wild poliomyelitis virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishchenko, G G; Ezhlova, E B; Mel'nikova, A A; Lazikova, G F; Demina, Iu V; Frolova, N V

    2011-01-01

    Problem of emergence and spread of poliomyelitis in Russian Federation and neighboring states is examined. Measures taken in Russian Federation to prevent emergence of poliomyelitis cases caused by wild type virus are discussed, as well as treaties and agreements between Russia, Commonwealth of Independent States, Shanghai Cooperation Organization states regarding epidemiological control of poliomyelitis and acute flaccid paralysis. Measure planned by Federal Service for Surveillance for Protection of Consumers Rights and Human Welfare to prevent emergence of poliomyelitis and acute flaccid paralysis cases in Russian Federation and neighboring countries are presented.

  1. Virus Type and Genomic Load in Acute Bronchiolitis: Severity and Treatment Response With Inhaled Adrenaline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skjerven, Håvard O; Megremis, Spyridon; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G; Mowinckel, Petter; Carlsen, Kai-Håkon; Lødrup Carlsen, Karin C

    2016-03-15

    Acute bronchiolitis frequently causes infant hospitalization. Studies on different viruses or viral genomic load and disease severity or treatment effect have had conflicting results. We aimed to investigate whether the presence or concentration of individual or multiple viruses were associated with disease severity in acute bronchiolitis and to evaluate whether detected viruses modified the response to inhaled racemic adrenaline. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from 363 infants with acute bronchiolitis in a randomized, controlled trial that compared inhaled racemic adrenaline versus saline. Virus genome was identified and quantified by polymerase chain reaction analyses. Severity was assessed on the basis of the length of stay and the use of supportive care. Respiratory syncytial virus (83%) and human rhinovirus (34%) were most commonly detected. Seven other viruses were present in 8%-15% of the patients. Two or more viruses (maximum, 7) were detected in 61% of the infants. Virus type or coinfection was not associated with disease severity. A high genomic load of respiratory syncytial virus was associated with a longer length of stay and with an increased frequency of oxygen and ventilatory support use. Treatment effect of inhaled adrenaline was not modified by virus type, load or coinfection. In infants hospitalized with acute bronchiolitis, disease severity was not associated with specific viruses or the total number of viruses detected. A high RSV genomic load was associated with more-severe disease. NCT00817466 and EudraCT 2009-012667-34. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Lower Extremity Paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glancy, D Luke; Subramaniam, Pramilla N; Rodriguez, Juan F

    2016-11-15

    Severe hypokalemia in the absence of other electrolyte abnormalities, the result of diarrhea, caused striking electrocardiographic changes, generalized weakness, flaccid paralysis of the lower extremities, and biochemical evidence of mild skeletal and cardiac rhabdomyolysis in a 33-year-old man. Repletion of potassium reversed all abnormalities in 24 hours. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Price of Paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thweatt, Steven C.

    2009-01-01

    There are situations in which people feel that it is perfectly acceptable to take no action at all, given a certain set of circumstances. Not only is this a generally unacceptable approach to problem solving, but this type of paralysis can have far reaching and unintended consequences. Since childhood, one has at times held out hope that if he/she…

  4. Sleep Paralysis and Hallucinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Stores

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sleep paralysis is one of the many conditions of which visual hallucinations can be a part but has received relatively little attention. It can be associated with other dramatic symptoms of a psychotic nature likely to cause diagnostic uncertainty. Methods and results: These points are illustrated by the case of a young man with a severe bipolar affective disorder who independently developed terrifying visual, auditory and somatic hallucinatory episodes at sleep onset, associated with a sense of evil influence and presence. The episodes were not obviously related to his psychiatric disorder. Past diagnoses included nightmares and night terrors. Review provided no convincing evidence of various other sleep disorders nor physical conditions in which hallucinatory experiences can occur. A diagnosis of predormital isolated sleep paralysis was made and appropriate treatment recommended. Conclusions: Sleep paralysis, common in the general population, can be associated with dramatic auxiliary symptoms suggestive of a psychotic state. Less common forms are either part of the narcolepsy syndrome or (rarely they are familial in type. Interestingly, sleep paralysis (especially breathing difficulty features prominently in the folklore of various countries.

  5. Acute exacerbation in chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Vieira Santos

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available A case of an acute exacerbation of liver injury in a chronic HBV infected young male is reported. The correlation between the severe symptomatic hepatitis is done with the histopathologic findings of extense areas of bridging necrosis on the Iwer biopsy. The serological pattern for markers of HBV (HBsAg +, anti HBs g -, HBeAg -, anti HBe +, anti HBcIgG + and IgM - confirm a chronic infection, ana the authors propose that the episode of severe hepatitis relates to the recent spontaneous seroconvertion of HBe Ag to anti HBe. Other causes of hepatitis were excluded, and the control liver biopsy (6 months later showed normalization of hepatic architecture and absence of markers of viral replication in tissue and serum. A review of literature is done in an attempt to elucidate the diagnostic possibilities in this case, with emphasis on new immunoassays useful in differentiating between acute hepatitis B and acute exacerbation of a chronic hepatitis by the same virus.Descreve-se um caso de exacerbação aguda sintomática em um paciente cronicamente infectado pelo VHB, mostrando-se correlação entre o quadro clínico grave (com insuficiência hepática transitória e os achados histopatológicos de hepatite severa com extensas áreas de necrose em ponte. O perfil sorológico para marcadores do VHB (Ag HB S +, anti HB S Ag HBe -, anti HBe +, anti HB C IgG + IgM - confirmou infecção crônica, e os autores levantam a hipótese de que a hepatite tenha se coiTelacionado â recente soroconversão Ag HBe para anti-HBe. Outras etiologias possíveis foram descartadas e se contou com biópsia controle 6 meses depois, mostrando normalização da arquitetura hepática e ausência de marcadores de replicação viral no tecido e no soro. Revisa-se a literatura sobre o diagnóstico diferencial cabível nesta situação, dando ênfase a novos ensaios sorológicos úteis na diferenciação entre infecção aguda pelo VHB e exacerbação aguda de uma hepatite cr

  6. Sleep Paralysis and psychopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celestine Okorome Mume

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of sleep paralysis in the absence of narcolepsy is not uncommon in the population. A good number of normal individuals sometimes report the experience of episodes of profound muscular paralysis on waking from sleep in the morning or during the night. These episodes are very disturbing, especially since the individual is generally unable to breathe deeply or voluntarily. Previous studies have suggested an association between isolated sleep paralysis and adverse psychosocial situations though not with any specific condition. A test of the hypothesis that its prevalence may be affected by stressful life situations is presented in this study using orthopaedic patients (suffering from physical injuries and patients with multiple somatic complaints (suffering from psychological disorders as examples of individuals undergoing stressful life experiences. Objectives: The objectives of this study were to find out the prevalence of sleep paralysis in samples of orthopaedic patients and patients who presented with multiple somatic complaints and determine if these rates were significantly higher than the rate in healthy individuals. This study also aimed at determining if there was evidence of psychopathology among orthopaedic patients, and if so to find out if there was significant difference in the degree of psychopathology between the orthopaedic patients and patients with multiple somatic complaints. Materials and Methods: Samples of healthy individuals, orthopaedic patients and patients with multiple somatic complaints were asked to fill out a survey that determined the three - month prevalence of isolated sleep paralysis. They were also scored on the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS. Results: Isolated sleep paralysis was reported by 28% of the healthy subjects, 44% of orthopaedic patients and 56% of the patients with multiple somatic complaints. The degree of psychopathology (as shown by scores on the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale in

  7. Patterns of hepatitis C virus RNA levels during acute infection: the InC3 study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hajarizadeh, Behzad; Grady, Bart; Page, Kimberly; Kim, Arthur Y.; McGovern, Barbara H.; Cox, Andrea L.; Rice, Thomas M.; Sacks-Davis, Rachel; Bruneau, Julie; Morris, Meghan; Amin, Janaki; Schinkel, Janke; Applegate, Tanya; Maher, Lisa; Hellard, Margaret; Lloyd, Andrew R.; Prins, Maria; Dore, Gregory J.; Grebely, Jason; Lauer, Georg; Shoukry, Naglaa H.; Hahn, Judy; Shiboski, Steve; Alavi, Maryam; Bouchard, Rachel; Evans, Jennifer; May, Linda; Aneja, Jasneet; Teutsch, Suzy; White, Bethany; Wells, Brittany; Zang, Geng; Matthews, Gail; Yeung, Barbara; Prince, Leslie Erin; Roy, Elise; Bates, Anna; Enriquez, Jarliene; Chow, Sammy; McCredie, Luke; Aitken, Campbell; Doyle, Joseph; Spelman, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the patterns of HCV RNA levels during acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection provides insights into immunopathogenesis and is important for vaccine design. This study evaluated patterns of HCV RNA levels and associated factors among individuals with acute infection. Data were from an

  8. Nuevos virus asociados con gastroenteritis New viruses associated with acute diarrheal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Aguirre

    1992-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Se hace un resumen de las características comunes y específicas de los diversos virus asociados con enfermedad diarreica aguda, con énfasis en la importancia que tienen en la génesis de este síndrome y en el hecho de que la mayoría de los casos, aunque sean severos, pueden ser manejados adecuadamente mediante el reemplazo de líquidos y electrolitos.

    A synopsis of the common and specific features of the various viruses associated with acute diarrheal disease is presented; emphasis Is made on their importance as etiologic agents of this syndrome and on the fact that most cases, even If they are severe, can be appropriately treated by fluid and electrolyte replacement.

  9. A young man presenting with paralysis after vigorous exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubran, Christopher; Narain, Rajay; Malik, Luqmaan; Saeed, Saad Aldeen

    2012-08-27

    Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) is a rare metabolic disorder characterised by muscular weakness and paralysis in predisposed thyrotoxic patients. Although patients with TPP are almost uniformly men of Asian descent, cases have been reported in Caucasian and other ethnic populations. The rapid increase in ethnic diversity in Western and European nations has led to increase in TPP reports, where it was once considered exceedingly rare. Correcting the hypokalaemic and hyperthyroid state tends to reverse the paralysis. However, failure to recognise the condition may lead to delay in diagnosis and serious consequences including respiratory failure and death. We describe a young man who was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism who presented with acute paralysis. The clinical characteristics, pathophysiology and management of TTP are reviewed.

  10. Three atypical lethal cases associated with acute Zika virus infection in Suriname

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    Rens Zonneveld

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute Zika virus infection usually presents with a self-limiting triad of fever, rash and arthritis. There is limited information on severe or lethal cases. We report three cases of lethal acute Zika infection, confirmed with polymerase chain reaction, in adult patients with some co-morbidities. The patients showed rapid clinical deterioration with hemorrhagic and septic shock, and exaggerated acute and innate inflammatory responses with pronounced coagulopathy, and died soon after admission to the hospital. It remains unclear whether the fatal outcomes were due to acute Zika virus infection alone or to the combination with exacerbated underlying prior disease or co-infection. Nonetheless, the severity of these cases implies that increased awareness for atypical presentations of Zika virus infection, and careful clinical assessment of patients with symptoms of Zika, is warranted during current and future outbreaks.

  11. Three atypical lethal cases associated with acute Zika virus infection in Suriname.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonneveld, Rens; Roosblad, Jimmy; Staveren, Jan Willem van; Wilschut, Jan C; Vreden, Stephen G S; Codrington, John

    2016-01-01

    Acute Zika virus infection usually presents with a self-limiting triad of fever, rash and arthritis. There is limited information on severe or lethal cases. We report three cases of lethal acute Zika infection, confirmed with polymerase chain reaction, in adult patients with some co-morbidities. The patients showed rapid clinical deterioration with hemorrhagic and septic shock, and exaggerated acute and innate inflammatory responses with pronounced coagulopathy, and died soon after admission to the hospital. It remains unclear whether the fatal outcomes were due to acute Zika virus infection alone or to the combination with exacerbated underlying prior disease or co-infection. Nonetheless, the severity of these cases implies that increased awareness for atypical presentations of Zika virus infection, and careful clinical assessment of patients with symptoms of Zika, is warranted during current and future outbreaks.

  12. [Molecular genetic characteristics of the virus isolated from patients with human acute encephalomyelitis and multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barinsky, I F; Grebennikova, T V; Alkhovsky, S V; Kochergin-Nikitsky, K S; Sergeyev, O V; Gribencha, S V; Raev, S A

    2015-01-01

    The study of the antigenic and molecular genetic structure of human acute encephalomyelitis virus (HAEV) showed a high similarity of the HAEV N gene with the homologous gene of the fixed rabies virus strain. The results of the nucleotide sequence analysis indicate that HAEV belongs to the lyssavirus genotype 1. The N gene sequence is the closest to those of the ERA-CB20-M and RV-97 strains of the rabies virus. The need for further research into the role of the human acute encephalomyelitis virus in human pathology stems from past surveys that revealed the presence of the VNAs against this virus in 6 per cent of the blood received from donors in the USA and in each third among the patients with multiple sclerosis in the former USSR.

  13. Mouse model for acute Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, Tristan; Weber, Timm; Kracker, Sven; Sommermann, Thomas; Rajewsky, Klaus; Yasuda, Tomoharu

    2016-11-29

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) infects human B cells and drives them into continuous proliferation. Two key viral factors in this process are the latent membrane proteins LMP1 and LMP2A, which mimic constitutively activated CD40 receptor and B-cell receptor signaling, respectively. EBV-infected B cells elicit a powerful T-cell response that clears the infected B cells and leads to life-long immunity. Insufficient immune surveillance of EBV-infected B cells causes life-threatening lymphoproliferative disorders, including mostly germinal center (GC)-derived B-cell lymphomas. We have modeled acute EBV infection of naive and GC B cells in mice through timed expression of LMP1 and LMP2A. Although lethal when induced in all B cells, induction of LMP1 and LMP2A in just a small fraction of naive B cells initiated a phase of rapid B-cell expansion followed by a proliferative T-cell response, clearing the LMP-expressing B cells. Interfering with T-cell activity prevented clearance of LMP-expressing B cells. This was also true for perforin deficiency, which in the human causes a life-threatening EBV-related immunoproliferative syndrome. LMP expression in GC B cells impeded the GC reaction but, upon loss of T-cell surveillance, led to fatal B-cell expansion. Thus, timed expression of LMP1 together with LMP2A in subsets of mouse B cells allows one to study major clinically relevant features of human EBV infection in vivo, opening the way to new therapeutic approaches.

  14. Unilateral paralysis associated with profound hypokalemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Wen-Fang; Yeh, Fu-Chiang; Lin, Shih-Hua

    2012-11-01

    Unilateral paralysis is rarely reported to be primary presentation of severe hypokalemia. We describe a 24-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department with sudden onset of right-sided weakness. Neurologic examination revealed diminished muscle strength and tendon reflexes over the right limbs. Computed tomography of the brain showed no organic brain lesion. However, laboratory data showed hypokalemia (K+ 2.0 mmol/L) with metabolic acidosis (HCO3 − 19 mmol/L). She needed a total of 260 mmol K+ to achieve complete recovery of muscle strength at a serum K+ level of 3.2 mmol/L and was proved to have distal renal tubular acidosis. Severe hypokalemia must be kept in mind as a cause of acute unilateral paralysis without organic lesions to avoid unnecessary examination and potentially life-threatening complications.

  15. Laryngeal paralysis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Ralph P; Tobias, Karen M

    2009-05-01

    Laryngeal paralysis is a common cause of upper airway obstruction in older, large-breed dogs and is likely associated with a generalized polyneuropathy in most animals. Surgical therapy is frequently indicated, and UAL is currently the recommended treatment. Respiratory signs significantly improve in most patients after surgery; however, postoperative complication rates can be high, and patients have a lifelong risk of developing respiratory tract disease.

  16. Sleep paralysis and folklore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Ann M

    2015-07-01

    Sleep paralysis is a relatively new term to describe what for hundreds of years many believed to be a visitation by a malevolent creature which attacked its victims as they slept. The first clinical description of sleep paralysis was published in 1664 in a Dutch physician's case histories, where it was referred to as, 'Incubus or the Night-Mare [sic]'. In 1977, it was discovered more than 100 previously healthy people from various South East Asian communities had died mysteriously in their sleep. The individuals affected were dying at a rate of 92/100,000 from Sudden Unexplained Nocturnal Death Syndrome. No underlying cause was ever found, only that subsequent studies revealed a high rate of sleep paralysis and belief in the dab tsog (nightmare spirit) amongst members of the community. The nightmare/succubus is descended from Lilith. The earliest reference to Lilith is found in the Sumerian King list of 2400 BC known as Lilitu or she-demon, she bore children from her nocturnal unions with men. In other derivations, she was Adam's first wife who rather than 'obey' became a demon that preyed on women during childbirth. In modern Middle Eastern maternity wards, some women still wear amulets for protection. Today, clinical cause of these disturbances is sleep paralysis due to the unsuitable timing of REM sleep. During the 'Nightmare' episode, the sleeper becomes partially conscious during REM cycle, leaving the individual in a state between dream and wakefulness. For some, culture and the tradition of the nightmare is explanation enough.

  17. Effect of acute Zika virus infection on sperm and virus clearance in body fluids: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joguet, Guillaume; Mansuy, Jean-Michel; Matusali, Giulia; Hamdi, Safouane; Walschaerts, Marie; Pavili, Lynda; Guyomard, Stefanie; Prisant, Nadia; Lamarre, Pierre; Dejucq-Rainsford, Nathalie; Pasquier, Christophe; Bujan, Louis

    2017-11-01

    Evidence of human sexual transmission during Zika virus emergence is a matter of concern, particularly in procreation, but to date, kinetics of seminal shedding and the effects of infection on human reproductive function have not been described. To investigate the effects of Zika virus infection on semen and clearance of Zika virus from semen and body fluids, we aimed to study a cohort of Zika virus-infected men. This prospective observational study recruited men presenting with acute Zika virus infection at Pointe-à-Pitre University Hospital in Guadeloupe, French Caribbean, where a Zika virus outbreak occurred between April and November, 2016. Blood, urine, and semen were collected at days 7, 11, 20, 30, 60, 90, and 120 after symptom onset, and semen characteristics, such as total sperm count, sperm motility, vitality, and morphology, and reproductive hormone concentrations, such as testosterone, inhibin, follicle-stimulating hormone, and luteinising hormone, were assessed. At days 7, 11, and 20, semen was processed to isolate motile spermatozoa. Zika virus RNA was detected by RT-PCR using whole blood, serum, urine, seminal plasma, semen cells, and motile spermatozoa fractions. Zika virus was isolated from different sperm fractions on Vero E6 cultures. 15 male volunteers (mean age 35 years [SD 5; range 25-44) with acute Zika virus infection and positive Zika virus RNA detection in blood or urine were enrolled. Total sperm count was decreased from median 119 × 10 6 spermatozoa (IQR 22-234) at day 7 to 45·2 × 10 6 (16·5-89·6) at day 30 and 70 × 10 6 (28·5-81·4) at day 60, respectively, after Zika virus infection. Inhibin values increased from 93·5 pg/mL (IQR 55-162) at day 7 to 150 pg/mL (78-209) at day 120 when total sperm count recovered. In motile spermatozoa obtained after density gradient separation, Zika virus RNA was found in three of 14 patients at day 7, four of 15 at day 11, and four of 15 at day 20, and replication-competent virus was

  18. Sudden flaccid paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Mohammad; Peshin, Rohit; Ellis, Oliver; Grover, Karan

    2015-01-01

    Periodic thyrotoxic paralysis is a genetic condition, rare in the West and in Caucasians. Thyrotoxicosis, especially in western hospitals, is an easily overlooked cause of sudden-onset paralysis. We present a case of a 40-year-old man who awoke one morning unable to stand. He had bilateral lower limb flaccid weakness of 0/5 with reduced reflexes and equivocal plantars; upper limbs were 3/5 with reduced tone and reflexes. ECG sinus rhythm was at a rate of 88/min. PR interval was decreased and QT interval increased. Bloods showed potassium of 1.8 mEq/L (normal range 3.5–5), free T4 of 29.2 pmol/L (normal range 6.5–17) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) of <0.01 mIU/L (normal range 0.35–4.94). Random urinary potassium was 8.8 mEq/L (normal range 12.5–62.5). The patient was admitted initially to intensive therapy unit and given intravenous potassium. His symptoms resolved within 24 h. He was diagnosed with thyrotoxic periodic paralysis. He was discharged on carbimazole and propanolol, and follow-up was arranged in the endocrinology clinic. PMID:25566931

  19. Acute kidney injury in symptomatic primary Epstein-Barr virus infectious mononucleosis: Systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Milena; Lava, Sebastiano A G; Zgraggen, Lorenzo; Simonetti, Giacomo D; Kottanattu, Lisa; Bianchetti, Mario G; Milani, Gregorio P

    2017-06-01

    Textbooks and reviews do not mention the association of symptomatic primary Epstein-Barr virus infectious mononucleosis with acute kidney injury in subjects without immunodeficiency or autoimmunity. Stimulated by our experience with two cases, we performed a review of the literature. The literature documents 38 cases (26 male and 12 female individuals ranging in age from 0.3 to 51, median 18 years) of symptomatic primary Epstein-Barr virus infectious mononucleosis complicated by acute kidney injury: 27 acute interstitial nephritides, 1 jaundice-associated nephropathy, 7 myositides and 3 hemolytic uremic syndromes. Acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy was observed in 18 (47%) cases. Acute kidney injury did not resolve in one patient with acute interstitial nephritis. Two patients died because of systemic complications. The remaining 35 cases fully recovered. In individuals with acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infectious mononucleosis, a relevant kidney injury is rare but the outcome potentially fatal. It results from interstitial nephritis, myositis-associated acute kidney injury, hemolytic uremic syndrome or jaundice-associated nephropathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Respiratory viruses in children hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwofie, Theophilus B; Anane, Yaw A; Nkrumah, Bernard; Annan, Augustina; Nguah, Samuel B; Owusu, Michael

    2012-04-10

    Acute respiratory tract infections are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality among young children in developing countries. Information on the viral aetiology of acute respiratory infections in developing countries is very limited. The study was done to identify viruses associated with acute lower respiratory tract infection among children less than 5 years. Nasopharyngeal samples and blood cultures were collected from children less than 5 years who have been hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection. Viruses and bacteria were identified using Reverse Transcriptase Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction and conventional biochemical techniques. Out of 128 patients recruited, 33(25.88%%, 95%CI: 18.5% to 34.2%) were positive for one or more viruses. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) was detected in 18(14.1%, 95%CI: 8.5% to 21.3%) patients followed by Adenoviruses (AdV) in 13(10.2%, 95%CI: 5.5% to 16.7%), Parainfluenza (PIV type: 1, 2, 3) in 4(3.1%, 95%CI: 0.9% to 7.8%) and influenza B viruses in 1(0.8%, 95%CI: 0.0 to 4.3). Concomitant viral and bacterial co-infection occurred in two patients. There were no detectable significant differences in the clinical signs, symptoms and severity for the various pathogens isolated. A total of 61.1% (22/36) of positive viruses were detected during the rainy season and Respiratory Syncytial Virus was the most predominant. The study has demonstrated an important burden of respiratory viruses as major causes of childhood acute respiratory infection in a tertiary health institution in Ghana. The data addresses a need for more studies on viral associated respiratory tract infection.

  1. Respiratory viruses in children hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwofie Theophilus B

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute respiratory tract infections are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality among young children in developing countries. Information on the viral aetiology of acute respiratory infections in developing countries is very limited. The study was done to identify viruses associated with acute lower respiratory tract infection among children less than 5 years. Method Nasopharyngeal samples and blood cultures were collected from children less than 5 years who have been hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection. Viruses and bacteria were identified using Reverse Transcriptase Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction and conventional biochemical techniques. Results Out of 128 patients recruited, 33(25.88%%, 95%CI: 18.5% to 34.2% were positive for one or more viruses. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV was detected in 18(14.1%, 95%CI: 8.5% to 21.3% patients followed by Adenoviruses (AdV in 13(10.2%, 95%CI: 5.5% to 16.7%, Parainfluenza (PIV type: 1, 2, 3 in 4(3.1%, 95%CI: 0.9% to 7.8% and influenza B viruses in 1(0.8%, 95%CI: 0.0 to 4.3. Concomitant viral and bacterial co-infection occurred in two patients. There were no detectable significant differences in the clinical signs, symptoms and severity for the various pathogens isolated. A total of 61.1% (22/36 of positive viruses were detected during the rainy season and Respiratory Syncytial Virus was the most predominant. Conclusion The study has demonstrated an important burden of respiratory viruses as major causes of childhood acute respiratory infection in a tertiary health institution in Ghana. The data addresses a need for more studies on viral associated respiratory tract infection.

  2. Human immunodeficiency virus seroconversion presenting with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sloan Derek J

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Acute Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection is associated with a range of neurological conditions. Guillain-Barré syndrome is a rare presentation; acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is the commonest form of Guillain-Barré syndrome. Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy has occasionally been reported in acute Immunodeficiency Virus infection but little data exists on frequency, management and outcome. Case presentation We describe an episode of Guillain-Barré syndrome presenting as acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in a 30-year-old man testing positive for Immunodeficiency Virus, probably during acute seroconversion. Clinical suspicion was confirmed by cerebrospinal fluid analysis and nerve conduction studies. Rapid clinical deterioration prompted intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and early commencement of highly active anti-retroviral therapy. All symptoms resolved within nine weeks. Conclusion Unusual neurological presentations in previously fit patients are an appropriate indication for Immunodeficiency-Virus testing. Highly active anti-retroviral therapy with adequate penetration of the central nervous system should be considered as an early intervention, alongside conventional therapies such as intravenous immunoglobulin.

  3. Virus Status, Varroa Levels, and Survival of 20 Managed Honey Bee Colonies Monitored in Luxembourg Between the Summer of 2011 and the Spring of 2013

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    Clermont Antoine

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Twenty managed honey bee colonies, split between 5 apiaries with 4 hives each, were monitored between the summer of 2011 and spring of 2013. Living bees were sampled in July 2011, July 2012, and August 2012. Twenty-five, medium-aged bees, free of varroa mites, were pooled per colony and date, to form one sample. Unlike in France and Belgium, Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus (CBPV has not been found in Luxembourg. Slow Bee Paralysis Virus (SBPV and Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus (IAPV levels were below detection limits. Traces of Kashmir Bee Virus (KBV were amplified. Black Queen Cell Virus (BQCV, Varroa destructor Virus-1 (VDV-1, and SacBrood Virus (SBV were detected in all samples and are reported from Luxembourg for the first time. Varroa destructor Macula- Like Virus (VdMLV, Deformed Wing Virus (DWV, and Acute Bee Paralysis Virus (ABPV were detected at all locations, and in most but not all samples. There was a significant increase in VDV-1 and DWV levels within the observation period. A principal component analysis was unable to separate the bees of colonies that survived the following winter from bees that died, based on their virus contents in summer. The number of dead varroa mites found below colonies was elevated in colonies that died in the following winter. Significant positive relationships were found between the log-transformed virus levels of the bees and the log-transformed number of mites found below the colonies per week, for VDV-1 and DWV. Sacbrood virus levels were independent of varroa levels, suggesting a neutral or competitive relationship between this virus and varroa.

  4. For Parents: Children and Teens with Paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Send us your question Have a question about paralysis? Our information specialists are available to help by ... mentors are people living with or impacted by paralysis. Free services and downloads > Paralysis Resource Guide Our ...

  5. Prevalence of non-influenza respiratory viruses in acute respiratory infection cases in Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Fernandes-Matano

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory infections are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although a viral aetiological agent is estimated to be involved in up to 80% of cases, the majority of these agents have never been specifically identified. Since 2009, diagnostic and surveillance efforts for influenza virus have been applied worldwide. However, insufficient epidemiological information is available for the many other respiratory viruses that can cause Acute respiratory infections.This study evaluated the presence of 14 non-influenza respiratory viruses in 872 pharyngeal exudate samples using RT-qPCR. All samples met the operational definition of a probable case of an influenza-like illness or severe acute respiratory infection and had a previous negative result for influenza by RT-qPCR.The presence of at least one non-influenza virus was observed in 312 samples (35.8%. The most frequent viruses were rhinovirus (RV; 33.0%, human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV; 30.8% and human metapneumovirus (HMPV; 10.6%. A total of 56 cases of co-infection (17.9% caused by 2, 3, or 4 viruses were identified. Approximately 62.5% of all positive cases were in children under 9 years of age.In this study, we identified 13 non-influenza respiratory viruses that could occur in any season of the year. This study provides evidence for the prevalence and seasonality of a wide range of respiratory viruses that circulate in Mexico and constitute a risk for the population. Additionally, our data suggest that including these tests more widely in the diagnostic algorithm for influenza may reduce the use of unnecessary antibiotics, reduce the hospitalisation time, and enrich national epidemiological data with respect to the infections caused by these viruses.

  6. Prevalence of non-influenza respiratory viruses in acute respiratory infection cases in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes-Matano, Larissa; Monroy-Muñoz, Irma Eloísa; Angeles-Martínez, Javier; Sarquiz-Martinez, Brenda; Palomec-Nava, Iliana Donají; Pardavé-Alejandre, Hector Daniel; Santos Coy-Arechavaleta, Andrea; Santacruz-Tinoco, Clara Esperanza; González-Ibarra, Joaquín; González-Bonilla, Cesar Raúl; Muñoz-Medina, José Esteban

    2017-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although a viral aetiological agent is estimated to be involved in up to 80% of cases, the majority of these agents have never been specifically identified. Since 2009, diagnostic and surveillance efforts for influenza virus have been applied worldwide. However, insufficient epidemiological information is available for the many other respiratory viruses that can cause Acute respiratory infections. This study evaluated the presence of 14 non-influenza respiratory viruses in 872 pharyngeal exudate samples using RT-qPCR. All samples met the operational definition of a probable case of an influenza-like illness or severe acute respiratory infection and had a previous negative result for influenza by RT-qPCR. The presence of at least one non-influenza virus was observed in 312 samples (35.8%). The most frequent viruses were rhinovirus (RV; 33.0%), human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV; 30.8%) and human metapneumovirus (HMPV; 10.6%). A total of 56 cases of co-infection (17.9%) caused by 2, 3, or 4 viruses were identified. Approximately 62.5% of all positive cases were in children under 9 years of age. In this study, we identified 13 non-influenza respiratory viruses that could occur in any season of the year. This study provides evidence for the prevalence and seasonality of a wide range of respiratory viruses that circulate in Mexico and constitute a risk for the population. Additionally, our data suggest that including these tests more widely in the diagnostic algorithm for influenza may reduce the use of unnecessary antibiotics, reduce the hospitalisation time, and enrich national epidemiological data with respect to the infections caused by these viruses.

  7. Comprehensive detection of viruses in pediatric patients with acute liver failure using next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takako; Kawada, Jun-Ichi; Okuno, Yusuke; Hayano, Satoshi; Horiba, Kazuhiro; Torii, Yuka; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Umetsu, Syuichiro; Sogo, Tsuyoshi; Inui, Ayano; Ito, Yoshinori

    2017-11-01

    Pediatric acute liver failure (PALF) is a rare and severe syndrome that frequently requires liver transplantation. Viruses are one of the most frequent causes of this disease, however, pathogenic viruses are not determined in many patients. Recently next-generation sequencing (NGS) has been applied to comprehensively detect pathogens of infectious diseases of unknown etiology. To evaluate an NGS-based approach for detecting pathogenic viruses in patients with PALF or acute hepatitis of unknown etiology. To detect virus-derived DNA and RNA sequences existing in sera/plasma from patients, both DNA and RNA sequencing were performed. First, we validated the ability of NGS to detect viral pathogens in clinical serum/plasma samples, and compared different commercial RNA library preparation methods Then, serum/plasma of fourteen patients with PALF or acute hepatitis of unknown etiology were evaluated using NGS. Among three RNA library preparation methods, Ovation RNA-Seq System V2 had the highest sensitivity to detect RNA viral sequences. Among fourteen patients, sequence reads of torque teno virus, adeno-associated virus, and stealth virus were found in the sera of one patient each, however, the pathophysiological role of these three viruses was not clarified. Significant virus reads were not detected in the remaining 11 patients. This finding might be due to low virus titer in blood at the time of referral or a non-infectious cause might be more frequent. These results suggest an NGS-based approach has potential to detect viral pathogens in clinical samples and would contribute to clarification of the etiology of PALF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Hepatitis E virus is the leading cause of acute viral hepatitis in Lothian, Scotland

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    I. Kokki

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute viral hepatitis affects all ages worldwide. Hepatitis E virus (HEV is increasingly recognized as a major cause of acute hepatitis in Europe. Because knowledge of its characteristics is limited, we conducted a retrospective study to outline demographic and clinical features of acute HEV in comparison to hepatitis A, B and C in Lothian over 28 months (January 2012 to April 2014. A total of 3204 blood samples from patients with suspected acute hepatitis were screened for hepatitis A, B and C virus; 913 of these samples were also screened for HEV. Demographic and clinical information on patients with positive samples was gathered from electronic patient records. Confirmed HEV samples were genotyped. Of 82 patients with confirmed viral hepatitis, 48 (59% had acute HEV. These patients were older than those infected by hepatitis A, B or C viruses, were more often male and typically presented with jaundice, nausea, vomiting and/or malaise. Most HEV cases (70% had eaten pork or game meat in the few months before infection, and 14 HEV patients (29% had a recent history of foreign travel. The majority of samples were HEV genotype 3 (27/30, 90%; three were genotype 1. Acute HEV infection is currently the predominant cause of acute viral hepatitis in Lothian and presents clinically in older men. Most of these infections are autochthonous, and further studies confirming the sources of infection (i.e. food or blood transfusion are required.

  9. A Paralysis of Social Policy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Joel

    1992-01-01

    Reviews paralysis of U.S. social policy. Notes that, although federal government has implemented new social programs, programs either are provided on condition of willingness to work or are modest in scope. Linking paralysis with literature on government ineffectuality, traces origins of ineffectuality of political/economic policies of past 20…

  10. Acute and latent infection in mice with a virulent strain of Aujeszky?s disease virus

    OpenAIRE

    Flatschart Roberto B.; Resende Maurício

    2000-01-01

    Acute and latent infections with the Brazilian LA031 strain of Aujeszky’s disease virus (ADV) were established in mice. Ultraviolet irradiated ADV administered subcutaneously was a successful way to establish latent infection. The presence of ADV was detected by PCR. Two sets of 22-mer primers were synthesized and used to amplify gG glycoprotein gene sequences in acute and latent infected trigeminal nerve ganglia. The specificity of the amplification was verified by dot-blot hybridization.

  11. Acute and latent infection in mice with a virulent strain of Aujeszky’s disease virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto B. Flatschart

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute and latent infections with the Brazilian LA031 strain of Aujeszky’s disease virus (ADV were established in mice. Ultraviolet irradiated ADV administered subcutaneously was a successful way to establish latent infection. The presence of ADV was detected by PCR. Two sets of 22-mer primers were synthesized and used to amplify gG glycoprotein gene sequences in acute and latent infected trigeminal nerve ganglia. The specificity of the amplification was verified by dot-blot hybridization.

  12. Acute and latent infection in mice with a virulent strain of Aujeszky?s disease virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flatschart Roberto B.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute and latent infections with the Brazilian LA031 strain of Aujeszky?s disease virus (ADV were established in mice. Ultraviolet irradiated ADV administered subcutaneously was a successful way to establish latent infection. The presence of ADV was detected by PCR. Two sets of 22-mer primers were synthesized and used to amplify gG glycoprotein gene sequences in acute and latent infected trigeminal nerve ganglia. The specificity of the amplification was verified by dot-blot hybridization.

  13. Some points of the X-ray pattern of acute viral primary pneumonia caused by acute respiratory disease viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoyanov, V.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis is made of the results of the X-ray studies as well as of the virological and serological tests in 225 out-patients consulted in the first days of their complaints. A predominance of the viral (70.2%) over the viral-bacterial primary pneumonia is established. The acute viral primary pneumonia are caused mostly by single influenza viruses and more rarely - by single respiratory viruses; in the cases of combined influenza viruses influenza-influenza viruses prevail over the influenza-respiratory ones. The morphological changes in pneumonia due to isolated single influenza viruses involve mostly the interstitium and are projected on X-ray as patchy and stripped densities. The inflamatory changes in pneumonia caused by combined influenza viruses affect both ihe interstitium and the broncho-alveolar substrate of the lungs; they are manifested in two roentgenologic forms: creeping (migrating) and fusing (confluent). In viral-bacterial pneumonia the changes affect mostly the lobe. The right lung and the lower parts of the both lungs are affected in most cases. 5 figs., 21 refs

  14. Transient muscle paralysis degrades bone via rapid osteoclastogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliprantis, Antonios O.; Stolina, Marina; Kostenuik, Paul J.; Poliachik, Sandra L.; Warner, Sarah E.; Bain, Steven D.; Gross, Ted S.

    2012-01-01

    A unilateral injection of botulinum toxin A (BTxA) in the calf induces paralysis and profound loss of ipsalateral trabecular bone within days. However, the cellular mechanism underlying acute muscle paralysis-induced bone loss (MPIBL) is poorly understood. We hypothesized that MPIBL arises via rapid and extensive osteoclastogenesis. We performed a series of in vivo experiments to explore this thesis. First, we observed elevated levels of the proosteoclastogenic cytokine receptor activator for nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) within the proximal tibia metaphysis at 7 d after muscle paralysis (+113%, Pparalysis (P=0.04) and MPIBL was completely blocked by treatment with human recombinant osteoprotegerin (hrOPG). Further, conditional deletion of nuclear factor of activated T-cells c1 (NFATc1), the master regulator of osteoclastogenesis, completely inhibited trabecular bone loss (−2.2±11.9%, Pparalysis induced acute RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis resulting in profound local bone resorption. Elucidation of the pathways that initiate osteoclastogenesis after paralysis may identify novel targets to inhibit bone loss and prevent fractures.—Aliprantis, A. O., Stolina, M., Kostenuik, P. J., Poliachik, S. L., Warner, S. E., Bain, S. D., Gross, T. S. Transient muscle paralysis degrades bone via rapid osteoclastogenesis. PMID:22125315

  15. [Viruses and clinical features associated with hospitalized children with acute respiratory infections in Lhasa, Tibet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong; Deng, Jie; Qian, Yuan; Zhu, Ru-nan; Sun, Yu; Zhao, Lin-qing; Wang, Fang; Shan, Min-na; Deji, Mei-duo

    2012-10-01

    To investigate the viral etiology and clinical features of hospitalized children with acute respiratory tract infections in Tibet. Nasopharyngeal aspirate samples were collected from children with acute respiratory tract infection hospitalized at the department of Pediatrics, Tibet Autonomous Region People's Hospital from April to July, 2011. The specimens of nasopharyngeal aspirate were screened for antigens of 7 common respiratory viruses by direct immunofluorescence (DIF) [respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), adenovirus (ADV), parainfluenza viruses type I-III, influenza virus A and B] and human metapneumovirus. Clinical data of the children were analyzed by statistical software SPSS16. A total of 167 children with acute respiratory tract infections hospitalized from April to July 2011 were enrolled in this investigation. Sixty-five out of 167 specimens were positive for viral antigens. The virus positive rate for specimens was 38.9% (65/167). Two of 65 positive specimens were positive for 2 virus antigens (RSV + influenza B) and (hMPV + parainfluenza virus type III), respectively. RSV was detected in 45 cases (67.2%, 45/67) which was the most predominant, followed by parainfluenza virus type III detected in 7 cases (10.4%, 7/67), ADV in 6 cases (9.0%, 6/67), parainfluenza virus type I in 4 cases (6.0%, 4/67), influenza virus type B in 3 cases (4.5%, 3/67), and hMPV in 2 cases (3.0%, 2/67). In addition to clinical manifestations of pneumonia, such as cough and shortness of breath, only 3 virus positive cases (6.67%) presented with wheezing, but the signs of severe cyanosis, fine rales in lung were common. Most of the children in this study recovered soon, only a few younger children with underlying diseases or complications had severe illness. Virus is an important pathogen for acute respiratory infections for hospitalized children in Tibet. RSV was the most predominant etiological agent, especially for those younger than 3 years old.

  16. [Fulminant myocarditis and acute gastroenteritis due to Coxsackie virus B6].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Málaga, Germán; Gayoso, Oscar; Lazo, María de Los Angeles; Torres, Nancy

    2011-03-01

    We present the case of a young woman who suffered cardiogenic due to by Coxsackie virus B6. The patient attended a private clinic with an acute gastroenteritis and after one hour of receiving hydratation,she developed hypotension and shock, severe hypoxemia and bilateral lung infiltrate. The patient entered the Intensive Care Unit, where she received hemodynamic support. Due to the clinical picture and cardiac enzymes increase, a cardiac failure was suspected and the echocardiographic findings suggested "myocarditis". The evolution was successful and Coxsackie B6 virus infection diagnosis was made during the follow up by increase of the levels of antibodies for virus Coxsackie B6.

  17. Studies on the role of mononuclear phagocytes in resistance to acute lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Volkert, M

    1983-01-01

    killer response was also unimpaired by this treatment. Taken together, these findings suggest that resident macrophages constitute a barrier to the initial multiplication of LCMV. A breakdown of this macrophage barrier results in a more disseminated infection, which the specific immune response has...... with early events in the host response to the virus. Correspondingly, carrageenan enhanced early virus multiplication. Pretreatment with carrageenan apparently did not inhibit induction of the T-cell response and had little or no direct effect on T-cell-dependent anti-viral activity. The LCMV-induced natural......The role of mononuclear phagocytes in various phases of the acute lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection was studied. The anti-macrophage agent carrageenan delayed virus clearance. Carrageenan was most effective when given before virus inoculation, suggesting that it interfered...

  18. MARATHON DESPITE UNILATERAL VOCAL FOLD PARALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Echternach

    2008-06-01

    vocal fold paralysis for the first time. Although a marathon race is an endurance exertion without maximum acute strain on the respiratory system (McArdle et al., 2001, the sport medical examinations also showed no restriction at maximum exertion, neither expiratory nor inspiratory. An unilateral vocal fold paralysis is apparently not such a serious obstacle to the respiratory tract that one would have to reckon with a clear-cut respiratory deficit. Exercise testing of larger samples of patients with vocal fold paralysis should be performed concerning their capacity to endure exertion.The question in the present case thus remains the causal connection between the paralysis and unspecific respiratory complaints. The laryngological examination speaks against an acute event. A possible cause of the vocal fold paralysis is the thoracotomy or the pleuritis in childhood; Due to the time lapse of over 40 years, this cannot be proven. The entire diagnostic spectrum excluded another organic cause for her respiratory complaints, so that we tend to assume a functional or psychosomatic nature. As the symptoms vanished spontaneously, no further proof of this can be offered

  19. Miller Fisher syndrome presenting as palate paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noureldine, Mohammad Hassan A; Sweid, Ahmad; Ahdab, Rechdi

    2016-09-15

    We report a 63-year old patient who presented to our care initially with a hypernasal voice followed by ataxia, ptosis, dysphonia, and paresthesias. The patient's history, physical examination, and additional tests led to a Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) diagnosis. Palatal paralysis as an inaugurating manifestation of MFS is quite rare and requires special attention from neurologists and otolaryngologists. Although it may present as benign as an acute change in voice, early diagnosis and prompt management may prevent further complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Nation-wide surveillance of human acute respiratory virus infections between 2013 and 2015 in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Min; Jung, Hee-Dong; Cheong, Hyang-Min; Lee, Anna; Lee, Nam-Joo; Chu, Hyuk; Kim, Sung Soon; Choi, Jang-Hoon

    2018-02-28

    The prevalence of eight respiratory viruses detected in patients with acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in Korea was investigated through analysis of data recorded by the Korea Influenza and Respiratory Viruses Surveillance System (KINRESS) from 2013 to 2015. Nasal aspirate and throat swabs specimens were collected from 36,915 patients with ARIs, and viral nucleic acids were detected by real-time (reverse-transcription) polymerase chain reaction for eight respiratory viruses, including human respiratory syncytial viruses (HRSVs), influenza viruses (IFVs), human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs), human coronaviruses (HCoVs), human rhinovirus (HRV), human adenovirus (HAdV), human bocavirus (HBoV), and human metapneumovirus (HMPV). The overall positive rate of patient specimens was 49.4% (18,236/36,915), 5% of which carried two or more viruses simultaneously. HRV (15.6%) was the most predominantly detected virus, followed by IFVs (14.6%), HAdV (7.5%), HPIVs (5.8%), HCoVs (4.2%), HRSVs (3.6%), HBoV (1.9%), and HMPV (1.6%). Most of the ARIs were significantly correlated with clinical symptoms of fever, cough, and runny nose. Although HRV and HAdV were frequently detected throughout the year in patients, other respiratory viruses showed apparent seasonality. HRSVs and IFVs were the major causative agents of acute respiratory diseases in infants and young children. Overall, this study demonstrates a meaningful relationship between viral infection and typical manifestations of known clinical features as well as seasonality, age distribution, and co-infection among respiratory viruses. Therefore, these data could provide useful information for public health management and to enhance patient care for primary clinicians. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevalence of hepatitis A virus, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, hepatitis D virus and hepatitis E virus as causes of acute viral hepatitis in North India: a hospital based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, P; Prakash, S; Gupta, S; Singh, K P; Shrivastava, S; Singh, D D; Singh, J; Jain, A

    2013-01-01

    Acute viral hepatitis (AVH) is a major public health problem and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. The aim of the present study is to determine the prevalence of hepatitis A virus (HAV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D virus (HDV) and hepatitis E virus (HEV) as causes of AVH in a tertiary care hospital of North India. Blood samples and clinical information was collected from cases of AVH referred to the Grade I viral diagnostic laboratory over a 1-year period. Samples were tested for hepatitis B surface antigen, anti-HCV total antibodies, anti-HAV immunoglobulin M (IgM) and anti-HEV IgM by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PCR for nucleic acid detection of HBV and HCV was also carried out. Those positive for HBV infection were tested for anti-HDV antibodies. Fisher's exact test was used and a P hepatitis cases, 62 (23.22%) patients presented as acute hepatic failure. HAV (26.96%) was identified as the most common cause of acute hepatitis followed by HEV (17.97%), HBV (16.10%) and HCV (11.98%). Co-infections with more than one virus were present in 34 cases; HAV-HEV co-infection being the most common. HEV was the most important cause of acute hepatic failure followed by co-infection with HAV and HEV. An indication towards epidemiological shift of HAV infection from children to adults with a rise in HAV prevalence was seen. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report indicating epidemiological shift of HAV in Uttar Pradesh.

  2. Quantitation of respiratory viruses in relation to clinical course in children with acute respiratory tract infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Rogier R.; Schinkel, Janke; dek, Irene; Koekkoek, Sylvie M.; Visser, Caroline E.; de Jong, Menno D.; Molenkamp, Richard; Pajkrt, Dasja

    2010-01-01

    Quantitation of respiratory viruses by PCR could potentially aid in clinical interpretation of PCR results. We conducted a study in children admitted with acute respiratory tract infections to study correlations between the clinical course of illness and semiquantitative detection of 14 respiratory

  3. Sleep paralysis as spiritual experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufford, David J

    2005-03-01

    This article presents an overview of the sleep paralysis experience from both a cultural and a historical perspective. The robust, complex phenomenological pattern that represents the subjective experience of sleep paralysis is documented and illustrated. Examples are given showing that, for a majority of subjects, sleep paralysis is taken to be a kind of spiritual experience. This is, in part, because of the very common perception of a non-physical 'threatening presence' that is part of the event. Examples from various cultures, including mainstream contemporary America which has no widely known tradition about sleep paralysis, are used to show that the complex pattern and spiritual interpretation are not dependent on cultural models or prior learning. This is dramatically contrary to conventional explanations of apparently 'direct' spiritual experiences, explanations that are summed up as the 'Cultural Source Hypothesis.' This aspect of sleep paralysis was not recognized through most of the twentieth century. The article examines the way that conventional modern views of spiritual experience, combined with medical ideas that labeled 'direct' spiritual experiences as psychopathological, and mainstream religious views of such experiences as heretical if not pathological, suppressed the report and discussion of these experiences in modern society. These views have resulted in confusion in the scientific literature on sleep paralysis with regard to its prevalence and core features. The article also places sleep paralysis in the context of other 'direct' spiritual experiences and offers an 'Experiential Theory' of cross-culturally distributed spiritual experiences.

  4. Clinical Features of Adult Patients with Acute Hepatitis B Virus Infection Progressing to Chronic Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kojiro Michitaka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Information regarding the progression of acute hepatitis B virus (HBV infection to chronic infection in adults is scarce. Methods. Twenty-five adult patients with acute HBV infection (14 men and 11 women, 18–84 years old, whose clinical features progressed to those of chronic infection (group A or did not (group B, were studied retrospectively. Results. There were 3 and 22 patients in groups A and B, respectively. Two of the 3 patients of group A lacked the typical symptoms of acute hepatitis. No differences were found between groups with respect to age, sex, or HBV genotypes. However, total bilirubin and alanine aminotransaminase levels were significantly lower in group A. Conclusions. Three of the 25 adult patients with acute HBV infection progressed to chronic infection. Hepatitis was mild in these patients. Patients with mild acute hepatitis B or unapparent HBV infection may have a higher risk of progressing to chronic infection.

  5. MAIT cells are activated in acute Dengue virus infection and after in vitro Zika virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Paquin-Proulx, Dominic; Avelino-Silva, Vivian I.; Santos, Bianca A. N.; Silveira Barsotti, Nathália; Siroma, Fabiana; Fernandes Ramos, Jessica; Coracini Tonacio, Adriana; Song, Alice; Maestri, Alvino; Barros Cerqueira, Natalia; Felix, Alvina Clara; Levi, José Eduardo; Greenspun, Benjamin C.; de Mulder Rougvie, Miguel; Rosenberg, Michael G.

    2018-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) and Zika virus (ZIKV) are members of the Flaviviridae and are predominantly transmitted via mosquito bites. Both viruses are responsible for a growing number of infections in tropical and subtropical regions. DENV infection can cause lethargy with severe morbidity and dengue shock syndrome leading to death in some cases. ZIKV is now linked with Guillain-Barré syndrome and fetal malformations including microcephaly and developmental disorders (congenital Zika syndrome). The...

  6. MAIT cells are activated in acute Dengue virus infection and after in vitro Zika virus infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Dominic Paquin-Proulx; Vivian I Avelino-Silva; Bianca A N Santos; Nathália Silveira Barsotti; Fabiana Siroma; Jessica Fernandes Ramos; Adriana Coracini Tonacio; Alice Song; Alvino Maestri; Natalia Barros Cerqueira; Alvina Clara Felix; José Eduardo Levi; Benjamin C Greenspun; Miguel de Mulder Rougvie; Michael G Rosenberg

    2018-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) and Zika virus (ZIKV) are members of the Flaviviridae and are predominantly transmitted via mosquito bites. Both viruses are responsible for a growing number of infections in tropical and subtropical regions. DENV infection can cause lethargy with severe morbidity and dengue shock syndrome leading to death in some cases. ZIKV is now linked with Guillain-Barré syndrome and fetal malformations including microcephaly and developmental disorders (congenital Zika syndrome). The...

  7. Multiple Evanescent White Dot Syndrome following Acute Epstein-Barr Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chang-Sue; Hsieh, Ming-Hung; Su, Huan-I; Kuo, Yih-Shiuan

    2017-10-11

    To investigate the association between multiple evanescent white dot syndrome (MEWDS) and Epstein-Barr (EB) virus infection. A prospective, consecutive case series study was performed in patients with the characteristic findings of MEWDS. Patients received EB viral-specific antibody serologic tests. Five cases of MEWDS who had prodromal flu-like symptoms were enrolled, comprising 2 women and 3 men with a mean age of 34. Mean diopter of myopia was -7.5. During acute onset of MEWDS, EB virus infection was confirmed by positive EB virus serology test. One showed positive EB viral capsid antigen (EB-VCA) IgM, and the other four showed highly elevated titer of EB-VCA IgG more than 1:160. Two months later, paired serum virus serology data showed negative EB-VCA IgM, or prior EB-VCA IgG titer decreased four-fold in the recovery stage. MEWDS may be associated with acute systemic EB virus infection. Ocular symptoms might develop due to this infection or represent virus-induced autoimmune inflammatory retinitis.

  8. Replication Capacity of Viruses from Acute Infection Drives HIV-1 Disease Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selhorst, Philippe; Combrinck, Carina; Ndabambi, Nonkululeko; Ismail, Sherazaan D; Abrahams, Melissa-Rose; Lacerda, Miguel; Samsunder, Natasha; Garrett, Nigel; Abdool Karim, Quarraisha; Abdool Karim, Salim S; Williamson, Carolyn

    2017-04-15

    The viral genotype has been shown to play an important role in HIV pathogenesis following transmission. However, the viral phenotypic properties that contribute to disease progression remain unclear. Most studies have been limited to the evaluation of Gag function in the context of a recombinant virus backbone. Using this approach, important biological information may be lost, making the evaluation of viruses obtained during acute infection, representing the transmitted virus, a more biologically relevant model. Here, we evaluate the roles of viral infectivity and the replication capacity of viruses from acute infection in disease progression in women who seroconverted in the CAPRISA 004 tenofovir microbicide trial. We show that viral replication capacity, but not viral infectivity, correlates with the set point viral load (Spearman r = 0.346; P = 0.045) and that replication capacity (hazard ratio [HR] = 4.52; P = 0.01) can predict CD4 decline independently of the viral load (HR = 2.9; P = 0.004) or protective HLA alleles (HR = 0.61; P = 0.36). We further demonstrate that Gag-Pro is not the main driver of this association, suggesting that additional properties of the transmitted virus play a role in disease progression. Finally, we find that although viruses from the tenofovir arm were 2-fold less infectious, they replicated at rates similar to those of viruses from the placebo arm. This indicates that the use of tenofovir gel did not select for viral variants with higher replication capacity. Overall, this study supports a strong influence of the replication capacity in acute infection on disease progression, potentially driven by interaction of multiple genes rather than a dominant role of the major structural gene gag IMPORTANCE HIV disease progression is known to differ between individuals, and defining which fraction of this variation can be attributed to the virus is important both clinically and epidemiologically. In this study, we show that the replication

  9. Etiologic and therapeutic analysis in patients with hypokalemic nonperiodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Chih-Chien; Cheng, Chih-Jen; Chiang, Wen-Fang; Chau, Tom; Hsu, Yu-Juei; Yang, Sung-Sen; Lin, Shih-Hua

    2015-03-01

    Hypokalemic nonperiodic paralysis represents a group of heterogeneous disorders with a large potassium (K(+)) deficit. Rapid diagnosis of curable causes with appropriate treatment is challenging to avoid the sequelae of hypokalemia. We prospectively analyzed the etiologies and therapeutic characteristics of hypokalemic nonperiodic paralysis. Over an 8-year period, patients with hypokalemic nonperiodic paralysis were enrolled by excluding those with hypokalemic periodic paralysis due to acute shift of K(+) into cells. Blood and spot urine samples were collected for the measurements of electrolytes, pH, and biochemistries. Intravenous potassium chloride (KCl) at a rate of 10-20 mmol/h was administered until muscle strength recovered. We had identified 58 patients with hypokalemic nonperiodic paralysis from 208 consecutive patients with hypokalemic paralysis, and their average K(+) concentration was 1.8 ± 0.2 mmol/L. Among patients with low urinary K(+) excretion (n = 17), chronic alcoholism, remote diuretic use, and anorexia/bulimia nervosa were the most common causes. Among patients with high urinary K(+) excretion (n = 41) and metabolic acidosis, renal tubular acidosis and chronic toluene abuse were the main causes, while primary aldosteronism, Gitelman syndrome, and diuretics were the leading diagnoses with metabolic alkalosis. The average KCl dose needed to restore muscle strength was 3.8 ± 0.8 mmol/kg. Initial lower plasma K(+), volume depletion, and high urinary K(+) excretion were associated with higher recovery KCl dosage. During therapy, patients with paradoxical hypokalemia (n = 32) who required more KCl supplementation than patients without (4.1 ± 0.7 vs 3.4 ± 0.7 mmol/kg, P paralysis may aid in early diagnosis. Patients with initial lower plasma K(+), renal K(+) wasting, and hypovolemia required higher recovery K(+) dosage. Paradoxical hypokalemia is prone to develop in hypovolemic patients even during K(+) supplementation with volume repletion

  10. Severe Transient Pharyngeal Paralysis Following C2 Fracture Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumpston, Evan C; Bock, Jonathan M

    2015-08-01

    We report a case of isolated pharyngeal plexus injury following posterior plating of a C2 fracture in an 84-year-old white male. Methods include a case report with literature review. The patient presented with dense pharyngeal paralysis and inability to initiate swallowing but maintained true vocal cord movement. The patient required gastrostomy tube feeding for 3 months but eventually recovered his swallowing function. Prior literature on acute pharyngeal paralysis following upper cervical spine fracture repairs is reviewed with recommendations for care of this unique patient population. Traumatic C2 fracture repair can lead to isolated dense pharyngeal paralysis due to pharyngeal plexus injury with subsequent severe dysphagia. Observation may be appropriate in this population, with consideration of tracheotomy for recurrent aspiration. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. MR features in patients with residual paralysis following aseptic meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Dae Chul; Park, Young Seo [College of Medicine, Asan Meidcal Center, University of Ulsan, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-01-15

    MR studies were performed in three patients with paralysis in the lower extremities. Poliomyelitis-like paralysis can be caused by neurovirulent strains of nonpolioenteroviruses. Entervirus 71 (EV 71) is documented as one of the potentially neurovirulent strains and a causative agent of some epidemics (1-7). The clinical manifestations associated with the EV 71 infection include aseptic meningitis, hand-food-mouth disease (HFMD), acute respiratory illness and gastrointestinal disease(6). Although rarely fatal, flaccidparalysis can be followed by EV 71 induced aseptic meningitis. Anterior horn cell necrosis was suggested on MR in two patients with residual paralysis (7). MR features, however, have not yet been described in detail. In this report we present three cases of patients with clinical evidence of EV 71 induced aseptic meningitis whose MR studies showed residual changes in spinal cord.

  12. MR features in patients with residual paralysis following aseptic meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Dae Chul; Park, Young Seo

    1991-01-01

    MR studies were performed in three patients with paralysis in the lower extremities. Poliomyelitis-like paralysis can be caused by neurovirulent strains of nonpolioenteroviruses. Entervirus 71 (EV 71) is documented as one of the potentially neurovirulent strains and a causative agent of some epidemics (1-7). The clinical manifestations associated with the EV 71 infection include aseptic meningitis, hand-food-mouth disease (HFMD), acute respiratory illness and gastrointestinal disease(6). Although rarely fatal, flaccidparalysis can be followed by EV 71 induced aseptic meningitis. Anterior horn cell necrosis was suggested on MR in two patients with residual paralysis (7). MR features, however, have not yet been described in detail. In this report we present three cases of patients with clinical evidence of EV 71 induced aseptic meningitis whose MR studies showed residual changes in spinal cord

  13. A case of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis with respiratory failure in an African American woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Denise L

    2015-05-01

    Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis is an acute endocrine emergency characterized by hyperthyroidism, profound muscle weakness and/or paralysis, and hypokalemia that is not due to potassium deficiency. Typically described in young males of Asian descent, it is becoming increasingly recognized outside of this demographic group and is believed to be an underrecognized cause of symptomatic hypokalemia. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis usually manifests as acute onset of symmetrical distal extremity weakness and is treated with careful potassium replacement and nonselective β-blockers. In this case, a 43-year-old African American woman with thyrotoxic periodic paralysis had recurrent lower extremity myopathy and acute respiratory failure precipitated by noncompliance with treatment for Graves disease. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  14. Molecular evolution of GB virus B hepatitis virus during acute resolving and persistent infections in experimentally infected tamarins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takikawa, Shingo; Engle, Ronald E; Faulk, Kristina N

    2010-01-01

    GB virus B (GBV-B) causes acute hepatitis in experimentally infected tamarins. We compared evolutionary features in acute resolving and persistent GBV-B infection. We detected no evidence of evolution in four animals with clearance during weeks 9-12, whereas three animals with clearance during...... weeks 13-26 had several substitutions in their polyprotein sequence. A single tamarin had long-term GBV-B viraemia; analysis of virus recovered at weeks 2, 5, 12, 20, 26, 52 and 104 demonstrated that mutations accumulated over time. Overall, the amino acid substitution rate was 3.5x10(-3) and 1.1x10......(-3) substitutions per site year(-1) during weeks 1-52 and 53-104, respectively. Thus, there was a significant decrease in evolution over time, as found for hepatitis C virus. The rate of non-synonymous substitution per non-synonymous site compared with that of synonymous substitution per synonymous site decreased...

  15. Idiopathic diaphragmatic paralysis: Bell's palsy of the diaphragm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crausman, Robert S; Summerhill, Eleanor M; McCool, F Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Idiopathic diaphragm paralysis is probably more common and responsible for more morbidity than generally appreciated. Bell's palsy, or idiopathic paralysis of the seventh cranial nerve, may be seen as an analogous condition. The roles of zoster sine herpete and herpes simplex have increasingly been recognized in Bell's palsy, and there are some data to suggest that antiviral therapy is a useful adjunct to steroid therapy. Thus, we postulated that antiviral therapy might have a positive impact on the course of acute idiopathic diaphragm paralysis which is likely related to viral infection. Three consecutive patients with subacute onset of symptomatic idiopathic hemidiaphragm paralysis were empirically treated with valacyclovir, 1,000 mg twice daily for 1 week. Prior to therapy, diaphragmatic function was assessed via pulmonary function testing and two-dimensional B-mode ultrasound, with testing repeated 1 month later. Diaphragmatic function pre- and post-treatment was compared to that of a historical control group of 16 untreated patients. All three subjects demonstrated ultrasound recovery of diaphragm function 4-6 weeks following treatment with valacyclovir. This recovery was accompanied by improvements in maximum inspiratory pressure (PI(max)) and vital capacity (VC). In contrast, in the untreated cohort, diaphragm recovery occurred in only 11 subjects, taking an average of 14.9 +/- 6.1 months (mean +/- SD). The results of this small, preliminary study suggest that antiviral therapy with valacyclovir may be helpful in the treatment of idiopathic diaphragm paralysis induced by a viral infection.

  16. Inuit interpretations of sleep paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Samuel; Kirmayer, Laurence J

    2005-03-01

    Traditional and contemporary Inuit concepts of sleep paralysis were investigated through interviews with elders and young people in Iqaluit, Baffin Island. Sleep paralysis was readily recognized by most respondents and termed uqumangirniq (in the Baffin region) or aqtuqsinniq (Kivalliq region). Traditional interpretations of uqumangirniq referred to a shamanistic cosmology in which the individual's soul was vulnerable during sleep and dreaming. Sleep paralysis could result from attack by shamans or malevolent spirits. Understanding the experience as a manifestation of supernatural power, beyond one's control, served to reinforce the experiential reality and presence of the spirit world. For contemporary youth, sleep paralysis was interpreted in terms of multiple frameworks that incorporated personal, medical, mystical, traditional/shamanistic, and Christian views, reflecting the dynamic social changes taking place in this region.

  17. Defining nervous system susceptibility during acute and latent herpes simplex virus-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, Chandra M; Carr, Daniel J J

    2017-07-15

    Herpes simplex viruses are neurotropic human pathogens that infect and establish latency in peripheral sensory neurons of the host. Herpes Simplex Virus-1 (HSV-1) readily infects the facial mucosa that can result in the establishment of a latent infection in the sensory neurons of the trigeminal ganglia (TG). From latency, HSV-1 can reactivate and cause peripheral pathology following anterograde trafficking from sensory neurons. Under rare circumstances, HSV-1 can migrate into the central nervous system (CNS) and cause Herpes Simplex Encephalitis (HSE), a devastating disease of the CNS. It is unclear whether HSE is the result of viral reactivation within the TG, from direct primary infection of the olfactory mucosa, or from other infected CNS neurons. Areas of the brain that are susceptible to HSV-1 during acute infection are ill-defined. Furthermore, whether the CNS is a true reservoir of viral latency following clearance of virus during acute infection is unknown. In this context, this review will identify sites within the brain that are susceptible to acute infection and harbor latent virus. In addition, we will also address findings of HSV-1 lytic gene expression during latency and comment on the pathophysiological consequences HSV-1 infection may have on long-term neurologic performance in animal models and humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. STUDIES ON PSEUDORABIES (INFECTIOUS BULBAR PARALYSIS, MAD ITCH) : II. ROUTES OF INJECTION IN THE RABBIT, WITH REMARKS ON THE RELATION OF THE VIRUS TO OTHER VIRUSES AFFECTING THE NERVOUS SYSTEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, E W

    1934-05-31

    After intramuscular, intradermal and subcutaneous inoculation, the pseudorabies virus reaches the central nervous system by way of the peripheral nerves, although it is circulating in the blood. Centrifugal spread from the infected nervous tissues by the neural route also occurs. After intracerebral inoculation the virus passes in the reverse direction, down the nervous axis. The Aujeszky strain invades the blood stream more readily than does the Iowa strain; but possibly with repeated passage the latter is approximating in this respect more closely the classical Aujeszky strain. After intravenous inoculation, effective with even small doses, virus is rapidly removed from the blood, and multiple infective foci are established in various organs; thence ascent of the virus by the peripheral nerves leads to infection of the central nervous system, the symptomatology differing according to whether the spinal cord or the medulla is first reached. The lack of evidence that the virus can penetrate directly the hemato-encephalic barrier deserves emphasis. When subcutaneous inoculation is practised in an area deprived of its nerve supply, the ability of the virus to invade the blood stream permits it to establish infective foci in the various viscera, and, after a predictable delay, the course of infection resembles that following intravenous injection. The pseudorabies virus is pantropic; i.e., it readily attacks cells derived from any embryonic layer. Lesions in the adrenal gland following intravenous inoculation are very like those due to herpes virus similarly introduced, this being one point of similarity in the pathogenic action of the two organisms. The relation of the pseudorabies virus to other viruses affecting the central nervous system is discussed.

  19. [A new case of acute transverse myelitis following hepatitis A virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemiri, M; Ouederni, M; Barsaoui, S

    2007-04-01

    Transverse myelitis is a rare manifestation of hepatitis A virus infection. We report the case of an eleven-year-old girl who presented a progressive flabby paraplegia with sphincter incontinence, superficial hypoesthesia, without deep involvement. Medullar MRI was suggestive of myelitis. Despite the absence of jaundice and hepatic cytolysis, the serology yielded a high rate of anti-hepatitis A immunoglobulin M. Neurological disorders disappeared within 15 days, after treating with a high dose of corticosteroids and physical rehabilitation. 24 months later she was asymptomatic. Screening for hepatitis A virus infection in patients with acute transverse myelitis should be indicated specially in endemic countries were vaccinal prophylaxis is not common practice.

  20. First Cases of Severe Flaccid Paralysis Associated With Enterovirus D68 Infection in Spain, 2015-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrerizo, María; García-Iñiguez, Juan Pablo; Munell, Francina; Amado, Alfonso; Madurga-Revilla, Paula; Rodrigo, Carlos; Pérez, Sonia; Martínez-Sapiña, Ana; Antón, Andrés; Suárez, Gerardo; Rabella, Nuria; Del Campo, Víctor; Otero, Almudena; Masa-Calles, Josefa

    2017-12-01

    Enterovirus D68 was known to be the cause of mild to severe respiratory infections, but in the last few years, it has also been associated with myelitis and paralysis. This report describes the first Enterovirus D68 detections in acute flaccid paralysis cases occurring between December 2015 and March 2016 in Spain.

  1. Clinical and biochemical spectrum of hypokalemic paralysis in North: East India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok K Kayal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute hypokalemic paralysis, characterized by acute flaccid paralysis is primarily a calcium channelopathy, but secondary causes like renal tubular acidosis (RTA, thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP, primary hyperaldosteronism, Gitelman′s syndrome are also frequent. Objective: To study the etiology, varied presentations, and outcome after therapy of patients with hypokalemic paralysis. Materials And Methods: All patients who presented with acute flaccid paralysis with hypokalemia from October 2009 to September 2011 were included in the study. A detailed physical examination and laboratory tests including serum electrolytes, serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK, urine analysis, arterial blood gas analysis, thyroid hormones estimation, and electrocardiogram were carried out. Patients were further investigated for any secondary causes and treated with potassium supplementation. Result: The study included 56 patients aged 15-92 years (mean 36.76 ± 13.72, including 15 female patients. Twenty-four patients had hypokalemic paralysis due to secondary cause, which included 4 with distal RTA, 4 with Gitelman syndrome, 3 with TPP, 2 each with hypothyroidism, gastroenteritis, and Liddle′s syndrome, 1 primary hyperaldosteronism, 3 with alcoholism, and 1 with dengue fever. Two female patients were antinuclear antibody-positive. Eleven patient had atypical presentation (neck muscle weakness in 4, bladder involvement in 3, 1 each with finger drop and foot drop, tetany in 1, and calf hypertrophy in 1, and 2 patient had respiratory paralysis. Five patients had positive family history of similar illness. All patients improved dramatically with potassium supplementation. Conclusion: A high percentage (42.9% of secondary cause for hypokalemic paralysis warrants that the underlying cause must be adequately addressed to prevent the persistence or recurrence of paralysis.

  2. Lower virus infections in Varroa destructor-infested and uninfested brood and adult honey bees (Apis mellifera) of a low mite population growth colony compared to a high mite population growth colony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emsen, Berna; Hamiduzzaman, Mollah Md; Goodwin, Paul H; Guzman-Novoa, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    A comparison was made of the prevalence and relative quantification of deformed wing virus (DWV), Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV), black queen cell virus (BQCV), Kashmir bee virus (KBV), acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV) and sac brood virus (SBV) in brood and adult honey bees (Apis mellifera) from colonies selected for high (HMP) and low (LMP) Varroa destructor mite population growth. Two viruses, ABPV and SBV, were never detected. For adults without mite infestation, DWV, IAPV, BQCV and KBV were detected in the HMP colony; however, only BQCV was detected in the LMP colony but at similar levels as in the HMP colony. With mite infestation, the four viruses were detected in adults of the HMP colony but all at higher amounts than in the LMP colony. For brood without mite infestation, DWV and IAPV were detected in the HMP colony, but no viruses were detected in the LMP colony. With mite infestation of brood, the four viruses were detected in the HMP colony, but only DWV and IAPV were detected and at lower amounts in the LMP colony. An epidemiological explanation for these results is that pre-experiment differences in virus presence and levels existed between the HMP and LMP colonies. It is also possible that low V. destructor population growth in the LMP colony resulted in the bees being less exposed to the mite and thus less likely to have virus infections. LMP and HMP bees may have also differed in susceptibility to virus infection.

  3. Pancreatitis and cholecystitis in primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection - Systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottanattu, Lisa; Lava, Sebastiano A G; Helbling, Rossana; Simonetti, Giacomo D; Bianchetti, Mario G; Milani, Gregorio P

    2016-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis and acalculous cholecystitis have been occasionally reported in primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection. We completed a review of the literature and retained 48 scientific reports published between 1966 and 2016 for the final analysis. Acute pancreatitis was recognized in 14 and acalculous cholecystitis in 37 patients with primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection. In all patients, the features of acute pancreatitis or acalculous cholecystitis concurrently developed with those of primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection. Acute pancreatitis and acalculous cholecystitis resolved following a hospital stay of 25days or less. Acalculous cholecystitis was associated with Gilbert-Meulengracht syndrome in two cases. In conclusion, this thorough analysis indicates that acute pancreatitis and acalculous cholecystitis are unusual but plausible complications of primary acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infection. Pancreatitis and cholecystitis deserve consideration in cases with severe abdominal pain. These complications are usually rather mild and resolve spontaneously without sequelae. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Relapsing acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with chronic Epstein-Barr virus infection: MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoji, H.; Kusuhara, T.; Honda, Y.; Hino, H. (1. Dept. (Neurology) of Internal Medicine, Kurume Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)); Kojima, K.; Abe, T. (Dept. of Radiology, Kurume Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)); Watanabe, M. (Dept. of Neurosurgery, Koyanagi Hospital, Saga (Japan))

    1992-08-01

    A 25-year-old women had a fever, left cervical lymphadenopathy, neurological symptoms and signs, CSF pleocytosis and persistent high serum antibodies to the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV); she had a recurrence 1 year later. She was thought to have relapsing acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with chronic EBV infection. MRI revealed abnormalities, mainly in the right basal ganglia and left midbrain. At the time of the recurrence, further abnormalities appeared in the opposite basal ganglia and right cerebral white matter. (orig.).

  5. Feline immunodeficiency virus can be experimentally transmitted via milk during acute maternal infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Sellon, R K; Jordan, H L; Kennedy-Stoskopf, S; Tompkins, M B; Tompkins, W A

    1994-01-01

    Postnatal transmission of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) in neonates nursed by acutely infected mothers and infection resulting from oral inoculation of kittens with FIV were evaluated. Ten of 16 kittens nursed by four queens with FIV infection established immediately postpartum developed FIV infection. Five of 11 neonates orally administered cell-free FIV culture supernatant developed FIV infection. Kittens that developed FIV infection had greater proportions of CD4+ and Pan-T+ lymphocy...

  6. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Caused by Influenza B Virus Infection in a Patient with Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio A. Ñamendys-Silva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza B virus infections are less common than infections caused by influenza A virus in critically ill patients, but similar mortality rates have been observed for both influenza types. Pneumonia caused by influenza B virus is uncommon and has been reported in pediatric patients and previously healthy adults. Critically ill patients with pneumonia caused by influenza virus may develop acute respiratory distress syndrome. We describe the clinical course of a critically ill patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma nongerminal center B-cell phenotype who developed acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by influenza B virus infection. This paper emphasizes the need to suspect influenza B virus infection in critically ill immunocompromised patients with progressive deterioration of cardiopulmonary function despite treatment with antibiotics. Early initiation of neuraminidase inhibitor and the implementation of guidelines for management of severe sepsis and septic shock should be considered.

  7. Infection with hepatitis A, B, C, and delta viruses among patients with acute hepatitis in Mongolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsatsralt-Od, Bira; Takahashi, Masaharu; Endo, Kazunori; Buyankhuu, Osorjin; Baatarkhuu, Oidov; Nishizawa, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2006-05-01

    One hundred ten consecutive patients (60 males and 50 females; age, mean +/- standard deviation [SD], 22.6 +/- 6.4 years; range 16-48 years) who were clinically diagnosed with sporadic acute hepatitis between December 2004 and January 2005 in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, were studied. IgM antibodies to hepatitis A virus were detected in 18 patients (16.4%), IgM antibodies to hepatitis B core (anti-HBc IgM) in 38 patients (34.5%) including two patients with concurrent hepatitis delta virus (HDV) infection, and hepatitis C virus RNA in nine patients (8.2%). There were 30 hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers who had detectable hepatitis B surface antigen and antibodies to HDV but were negative for anti-HBc IgM, suggesting that they acquired type D acute hepatitis due to superinfection of HDV on a background of chronic HBV infection. None had IgM antibodies to hepatitis E virus (HEV). Consequently, 16.4, 32.7, 6.4, 1.8, and 27.3% of the patients were diagnosed as having acute hepatitis of type A, B, C, type B + D (HBV/HDV coinfection), and type D (superinfection of HDV), respectively. The cause of hepatitis was not known in the remaining 17 patients (15.5%). All 18 HAV isolates were genotyped as IA, all 9 HCV isolates were genotyped as 1b, and all 32 HDV isolates were classified into genotype I. The distribution of HBV genotypes among the 67 HBV isolates was A (1.5%, n = 1) and D (98.5%, n = 66). The present study indicates that de novo infections of HAV, HBV, HCV, and HDV are prevalent among young adults in Mongolia. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Muscle paralysis induces bone marrow inflammation and predisposition to formation of giant osteoclasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausk, Brandon J; Worton, Leah E; Smigiel, Kate S; Kwon, Ronald Y; Bain, Steven D; Srinivasan, Sundar; Gardiner, Edith M; Gross, Ted S

    2017-11-01

    Transient muscle paralysis engendered by a single injection of botulinum toxin A (BTxA) rapidly induces profound focal bone resorption within the medullary cavity of adjacent bones. While initially conceived as a model of mechanical disuse, osteoclastic resorption in this model is disproportionately severe compared with the modest gait defect that is created. Preliminary studies of bone marrow following muscle paralysis suggested acute upregulation of inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α and IL-1. We therefore hypothesized that BTxA-induced muscle paralysis would rapidly alter the inflammatory microenvironment and the osteoclastic potential of bone marrow. We tested this hypothesis by defining the time course of inflammatory cell infiltration, osteoinflammatory cytokine expression, and alteration in osteoclastogenic potential in the tibia bone marrow following transient muscle paralysis of the calf muscles. Our findings identified inflammatory cell infiltration within 24 h of muscle paralysis. By 72 h, osteoclast fusion and pro-osteoclastic inflammatory gene expression were upregulated in tibia bone marrow. These alterations coincided with bone marrow becoming permissive to the formation of osteoclasts of greater size and greater nuclei numbers. Taken together, our data are consistent with the thesis that transient calf muscle paralysis induces acute inflammation within the marrow of the adjacent tibia and that these alterations are temporally consistent with a role in mediating muscle paralysis-induced bone resorption. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Viruses in nondisinfected drinking water from municipal wells and community incidence of acute gastrointestinal illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchardt, Mark A; Spencer, Susan K; Kieke, Burney A; Lambertini, Elisabetta; Loge, Frank J

    2012-09-01

    Groundwater supplies for drinking water are frequently contaminated with low levels of human enteric virus genomes, yet evidence for waterborne disease transmission is lacking. We related quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)-measured enteric viruses in the tap water of 14 Wisconsin communities supplied by nondisinfected groundwater to acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) incidence. AGI incidence was estimated from health diaries completed weekly by households within each study community during four 12-week periods. Water samples were collected monthly from five to eight households per community. Viruses were measured by qPCR, and infectivity assessed by cell culture. AGI incidence was related to virus measures using Poisson regression with random effects. Communities and time periods with the highest virus measures had correspondingly high AGI incidence. This association was particularly strong for norovirus genogroup I (NoV-GI) and between adult AGI and enteroviruses when echovirus serotypes predominated. At mean concentrations of 1 and 0.8 genomic copies/L of NoV-GI and enteroviruses, respectively, the AGI incidence rate ratios (i.e., relative risk) increased by 30%. Adenoviruses were common, but tap-water concentrations were low and not positively associated with AGI. The estimated fraction of AGI attributable to tap-water-borne viruses was between 6% and 22%, depending on the virus exposure-AGI incidence model selected, and could have been as high as 63% among children water. The majority of groundwater-source public water systems in the United States produce water without disinfection, and our findings suggest that populations served by such systems may be exposed to waterborne viruses and consequent health risks.

  10. The Honey Bee Pathosphere of Mongolia: European Viruses in Central Asia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaliunaa Tsevegmid

    Full Text Available Parasites and pathogens are apparent key factors for the detrimental health of managed European honey bee subspecies, Apis mellifera. Apicultural trade is arguably the main factor for the almost global distribution of most honey bee diseases, thereby increasing chances for multiple infestations/infections of regions, apiaries, colonies and even individual bees. This imposes difficulties to evaluate the effects of pathogens in isolation, thereby creating demand to survey remote areas. Here, we conducted the first comprehensive survey for 14 honey bee pathogens in Mongolia (N = 3 regions, N = 9 locations, N = 151 colonies, where honey bee colonies depend on humans to overwinter. In Mongolia, honey bees, Apis spp., are not native and colonies of European A. mellifera subspecies have been introduced ~60 years ago. Despite the high detection power and large sample size across Mongolian regions with beekeeping, the mite Acarapis woodi, the bacteria Melissococcus plutonius and Paenibacillus larvae, the microsporidian Nosema apis, Acute bee paralysis virus, Kashmir bee virus, Israeli acute paralysis virus and Lake Sinai virus strain 2 were not detected, suggesting that they are either very rare or absent. The mite Varroa destructor, Nosema ceranae and four viruses (Sacbrood virus, Black queen cell virus, Deformed wing virus (DWV and Chronic bee paralysis virus were found with different prevalence. Despite the positive correlation between the prevalence of V. destructor mites and DWV, some areas had only mites, but not DWV, which is most likely due to the exceptional isolation of apiaries (up to 600 km. Phylogenetic analyses of the detected viruses reveal their clustering and European origin, thereby supporting the role of trade for pathogen spread and the isolation of Mongolia from South-Asian countries. In conclusion, this survey reveals the distinctive honey bee pathosphere of Mongolia, which offers opportunities for exciting future research.

  11. The Honey Bee Pathosphere of Mongolia: European Viruses in Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsevegmid, Khaliunaa; Neumann, Peter; Yañez, Orlando

    2016-01-01

    Parasites and pathogens are apparent key factors for the detrimental health of managed European honey bee subspecies, Apis mellifera. Apicultural trade is arguably the main factor for the almost global distribution of most honey bee diseases, thereby increasing chances for multiple infestations/infections of regions, apiaries, colonies and even individual bees. This imposes difficulties to evaluate the effects of pathogens in isolation, thereby creating demand to survey remote areas. Here, we conducted the first comprehensive survey for 14 honey bee pathogens in Mongolia (N = 3 regions, N = 9 locations, N = 151 colonies), where honey bee colonies depend on humans to overwinter. In Mongolia, honey bees, Apis spp., are not native and colonies of European A. mellifera subspecies have been introduced ~60 years ago. Despite the high detection power and large sample size across Mongolian regions with beekeeping, the mite Acarapis woodi, the bacteria Melissococcus plutonius and Paenibacillus larvae, the microsporidian Nosema apis, Acute bee paralysis virus, Kashmir bee virus, Israeli acute paralysis virus and Lake Sinai virus strain 2 were not detected, suggesting that they are either very rare or absent. The mite Varroa destructor, Nosema ceranae and four viruses (Sacbrood virus, Black queen cell virus, Deformed wing virus (DWV) and Chronic bee paralysis virus) were found with different prevalence. Despite the positive correlation between the prevalence of V. destructor mites and DWV, some areas had only mites, but not DWV, which is most likely due to the exceptional isolation of apiaries (up to 600 km). Phylogenetic analyses of the detected viruses reveal their clustering and European origin, thereby supporting the role of trade for pathogen spread and the isolation of Mongolia from South-Asian countries. In conclusion, this survey reveals the distinctive honey bee pathosphere of Mongolia, which offers opportunities for exciting future research. PMID:26959221

  12. Twenty years' delay of fellow eye involvement in herpes simplex virus type 2-associated bilateral acute retinal necrosis syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlingemann, R. O.; Bruinenberg, M.; Wertheim-van Dillen, P.; Feron, E.

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe a case of acute retinal necrosis with concurrent encephalitis and determine the causative virus. The patient had a history of presumed acute retinal necrosis in the left eye at the age of 8 years and recurrent genital herpes. METHODS: Diagnostic anterior chamber puncture of the

  13. Severity of acute Zika virus infection: A prospective emergency room surveillance study during the 2015–2016 outbreak in Suriname

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroon, P. (Pieter); Roosblad, J. (Jimmy); Poese, F. (Fauzia); J.C. Wilschut (Jan C.); Codrington, J. (John); Vreden, S. (Stephen); Zonneveld, R. (Rens)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractAcute Zika virus (ZIKV) infection is usually mild and self-limiting. Earlier, we reported three cases of fatal acute ZIKV infection in patients without typical signs of ZIKV, but rather with criteria of systemic inflammation response syndrome (SIRS). To follow up these observations, we

  14. Angiographic Features and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients With First-Time Acute Coronary Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Andreas; Mathiasen, Anders B; Worck, R.H.

    2013-01-01

    A matched cohort study was conducted comparing patients with first-time acute coronary syndromes infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to non-HIV-infected patients with and without diabetes matched for smoking, gender, and type of acute coronary syndrome who underwent first-time corona...

  15. Prevalence of human cosavirus and saffold virus with an emergence of saffold virus genotype 6 in patients hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Chiang Mai, Thailand, 2014-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menage, Lucy; Yodmeeklin, Arpaporn; Khamrin, Pattara; Kumthip, Kattareeya; Maneekarn, Niwat

    2017-09-01

    Human cosavirus and saffold virus are both newly discovered members of the Picornaviridae family. It has been suggested that these viruses may be the causative agents of acute gastroenteritis. In this study, 1093 stool samples collected from patients with acute gastroenteritis between January 2014 and December 2016, were screened for cosavirus and saffold virus using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The viral genotypes were then established via nucleotide sequencing. Here, cosavirus was detected in 16 of 1093 stool samples (1.5%) and saffold virus was detected in 18 of 1093 stool samples (1.6%). The saffold virus genotypes 1 (16.7%), 2 (50%) and 6 (33.3%), and the cosavirus genetic groups A (87.5%), C (6.25%) and D (6.25%), were all identified across the three-year study period. Interestingly, saffold virus genotype 6 has now been detected for the first time in Thailand. The present study provides the prevalence of cosavirus and saffold virus with the emergence of saffold virus genotype 6 in Thailand. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Pharyngeal-cervical-brachial variant of pediatric Guillain-Barré syndrome with antecedent acute hepatitis A virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Rajoo; Biswas, Biawajit; Mallick, Debkrishna; Mukherjee, Swapan

    2009-07-01

    Pharyngeal-cervical-brachial weakness is considered a variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome with limited oropharyngeal, neck, and upper limb muscle involvement. The authors report on a 7-year-old boy, who developed pharyngeal-cervical-brachial type of Guillain-Barré syndrome following an antecedent episode of acute hepatitis A virus infection, 2 weeks prior to admission. The presentation was characterized by acute onset dysphagia, loss of head control, and bilateral arm weakness. The diagnosis was confirmed by acute motor axonal changes in the arm and albuminocytologic dissociation of the cerebrospinal fluid. The child was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin, which resulted in gradual improvement over 3 weeks. Documented instances of this form of Guillain-Barré syndrome remain rare in the pediatric age group, with none existing following antecedent hepatitis A virus infection. The authors emphasize that acute hepatitis A virus infection be included in the triggers responsible for Guillain-Barré syndrome in children.

  17. Clinical implications of hepatitis A virus ribonucleic acid detection and genotyping in acute liver failure in children in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasbón, Jorge S; Buamscha, Daniel; Gianivelli, Silvina; Imventarza, Oscar; Devictor, Denis; Moreiro, Rita; Cambaceres, Carlos; Salip, Gonzalo; Ciocca, Mirta; Cuarterolo, Miriam; Vladimirsky, Sara; Otegui, Lucio; Castro, Raúl; Brajterman, Leonardo; Soto, Sonia; González, Jorge; Munné, María S

    2010-05-01

    To investigate the detection of hepatitis A virus ribonucleic acid in patients with acute liver failure and to assess if the results have any clinical implications for the evolution of acute liver failure in children. Hepatitis A infection, a vaccine-preventable disease, is an important cause of acute liver failure in children in Argentina. Universal vaccination in 1-yr-old children was implemented in June 2005. Observational study in which patients were divided into Group 1 consisting of positive hepatitis A virus ribonucleic acid and Group 2 consisting of negative hepatitis A virus ribonucleic acid. Pediatric intensive care unit in National Pediatric Hospital "Dr. J. P. Garrahan," Buenos Aires, Argentina. Thirty-three patients with the diagnosis of acute liver failure secondary to hepatitis A virus infection and admitted to the Garrahan Pediatric Hospital between September 2003 and September 2005 were enrolled in the study. Twenty of these children were admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit. None. Samples for total ribonucleic acid detection and genotyping were obtained from serum and/or stools on admission. We found positive hepatitis A virus ribonucleic acid in 13 patients and negative hepatitis A virus ribonucleic acid in 20 patients. The following clinical variables were evaluated: time of evolution, hospital stay, admission to the pediatric intensive care unit, pediatric intensive care unit stay, time on mechanical ventilation, criteria for orthotopic liver transplantation, and mortality. Characterization of the isolates did not reveal differences related to genotype; all cases were IA. No statistical significance was found as to the variables. However, positive hepatitis A virus ribonucleic acid showed lower percentages of pediatric intensive care unit admissions, criteria for orthotopic liver transplantation, number of orthotopic liver transplantation, and mortality than the group of patients with negative hepatitis A virus ribonucleic acid

  18. Relevance of sleep paralysis and hypnic hallucinations to psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangdev, Prakash

    2004-03-01

    To describe a patient who presented with psychopathology in the wake of sleep paralysis and hypnopompic hallucinations, and to discuss the importance of these phenomena to psychiatric diagnoses. Case report. A 25-year-old black South African woman developed paranoid beliefs and a sad and anxious mood in the wake of her first experience of sleep paralysis and hypnic hallucinations. She had no history of other sleep-related events. Reassurance, explanation of the physiological basis of her experience, and a short course of low-dose diazepam were provided. Her mood and sleep improved promptly and she no longer held paranoid beliefs. She did not experience further episodes of sleep paralysis or hypnic hallucinations and improvement was sustained at 6 months. It pays to probe for the core experiences or events that patients may be explaining by devising "delusions". Acute, nocturnal-onset, first-time psychopathology warrants inquiry for sleep paralysis and hypnic hallucinations. Sleep-related side-effects of psychotropic medications need to be studied more closely.

  19. An unusual case of acute wandering paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Bianchi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors reported on a 63-year-old diabetic male who developed a strange wandering hemiparesis affecting first left side and then right side, not consistent with a right parasagittal meningioma nor with ischemic stroke. The subsequent rapid worsening of clinical picture, with occurrence of paraparesis, urinary incontinence and midthoracic sensory level, together with the evidence of leucocytosis, led to the diagnosis of a T6-T7 spondylodiscitis with spinal cord compression. The authors underlied the difficulties in diagnosing this condition in the setting of general hospital practice and the importance of clinical and neurological examination.

  20. Hypokalemic paralysis and acid-base balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Casagranda

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Three cases of hypokalemic paralysis are reported, presenting to the Emergency Department. The first is a patient with a hypokalemic periodic paralysis with a normal acid-base status, the second is a case of hypokalemic flaccid paralysis of all extremities with a normal anion gap metabolic acidosis, the last is a patient with a hypokalemic distal paralysis of right upper arm with metabolic alkalosis. Afterwards some pathophysiologic principles and the clinical aspects of hypokalemia are discussed and an appropriate approach to do in Emergency Department, to identify the hypokalemic paralysis etiologies in the Emergency Department, is presented, beginning from the evaluation of acid-base status.

  1. Elevation of Serum Acid Sphingomyelinase Activity in Children with Acute Respiratory Syncytial Virus Bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Shuichiro; Noguchi, Atsuko; Kikuchi, Wataru; Fukaya, Hiroshi; Igarashi, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Tsutomu

    2017-12-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is a lysosomal enzyme that hydrolyzes sphingomyelin into ceramide, a bioactive lipid to regulate cellular physiological functions. Thus, ASM activation has been reported as a key event in pathophysiological reactions including inflammation, cytokine release, oxidative stress, and endothelial damage in human diseases. Since ASM activation is associated with extracellular ASM secretion through unknown mechanisms, it can be detected by recognizing the elevation of secretory ASM (S-ASM) activity. Serum S-ASM activity has been reported to increase in chronic diseases, acute cardiac diseases, and systemic inflammatory diseases. However, the serum S-ASM has not been investigated in common acute illness. This study was designed to evaluate serum S-ASM activity in children with common acute illness. Fifty children with common acute illness and five healthy children were included in this study. The patients were categorized into five groups based on clinical diagnoses: acute respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis, adenovirus infection, streptococcal infection, asthma, and other infections due to unknown origin. The serum S-ASM activity was significantly elevated at 6.9 ± 1.6 nmol/0.1 mL/6 h in the group of acute RSV bronchiolitis patients compared with healthy children who had a mean level of 1.8 ± 0.8 nmol/0.1 mL/6 h (p ASM activity was not significantly elevated. The results suggest an association of ASM activation with RSV infection, a cause for common acute illness. This is the first report to describe the elevation of serum S-ASM activity in respiratory tract infection.

  2. Cross reactivity of commercial anti-dengue immunoassays in patients with acute Zika virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Alvina Clara; Souza, Nathalia C Santiago; Figueiredo, Walter M; Costa, Angela A; Inenami, Marta; da Silva, Rosangela M G; Levi, José Eduardo; Pannuti, Claudio Sergio; Romano, Camila Malta

    2017-08-01

    Several countries have local transmission of multiple arboviruses, in particular, dengue and Zika viruses, which have recently spread through many American countries. Cross reactivity among Flaviviruses is high and present a challenge for accurate identification of the infecting agent. Thus, we evaluated the level of cross reactivity of anti-dengue IgM/G Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISA) from three manufacturers against 122 serum samples obtained at two time-points from 61 patients with non-dengue confirmed Zika virus infection. All anti-dengue ELISAs cross reacted with serum from patients with acute Zika infection at some level and a worrisome number of seroconversion for dengue IgG and IgM was observed. These findings may impact the interpretation of currently standard criteria for dengue diagnosis in endemic regions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Detection of respiratory viruses and Bordetella bronchiseptica in dogs with acute respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, B S; Kurz, S; Weber, K; Balzer, H-J; Hartmann, K

    2014-09-01

    Canine infectious respiratory disease (CIRD) is an acute, highly contagious disease complex caused by a variety of infectious agents. At present, the role of viral and bacterial components as primary or secondary pathogens in CIRD is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2), canine influenza virus (CIV), canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV), canine herpes virus-1 (CHV-1), canine distemper virus (CDV) and Bordetella bronchiseptica in dogs with CIRD and to compare the data with findings in healthy dogs. Sixty-one dogs with CIRD and 90 clinically healthy dogs from Southern Germany were prospectively enrolled in this study. Nasal and pharyngeal swabs were collected from all dogs and were analysed for CPIV, CAV-2, CIV, CRCoV, CHV-1, CDV, and B. bronchiseptica by real-time PCR. In dogs with acute respiratory signs, 37.7% tested positive for CPIV, 9.8% for CRCoV and 78.7% for B. bronchiseptica. Co-infections with more than one agent were detected in 47.9% of B. bronchiseptica-positive, 82.6% of CPIV-positive, and 100% of CRCoV-positive dogs. In clinically healthy dogs, 1.1% tested positive for CAV-2, 7.8% for CPIV and 45.6% for B. bronchiseptica. CPIV and B. bronchiseptica were detected significantly more often in dogs with CIRD than in clinically healthy dogs (P infectious agents in dogs with CIRD in Southern Germany. Mixed infections with several pathogens were common. In conclusion, clinically healthy dogs can carry respiratory pathogens and could act as sources of infection for susceptible dogs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalized danish children with acute respiratory tract infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Henrik Larsen, Hans; Koch, Anders

    2004-01-01

    The newly discovered human metapneumovirus (hMPV) has been shown to be associated with respiratory illness. We determined the frequencies and clinical features of hMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in 374 Danish children with 383 episodes of acute respiratory tract infection...... children 1-6 months of age. Asthmatic bronchitis was diagnosed in 66.7% of hMPV and 10.6% of RSV-infected children (p respiratory support. hMPV is present in young...

  5. Viruses and bacteria in acute asthma exacerbations - A GA(2) LEN-DARE* systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadopoulos, N G; Christodoulou, I; Rohde, G

    2011-01-01

    less or not clearly associated. Mycoplasma and Chlamydophila pneumoniae seem to be involved more with asthma persistence rather than with disease exacerbations. Recent data suggest that common bacteria may also be involved, but this should be confirmed. Although current information is considerable...... and bacteria in acute asthma exacerbations - A GA(2) LEN-DARE systematic review. Allergy 2010; DOI: 10.1111/j.1398-9995.2010.02505.x. ABSTRACT: A major part of the burden of asthma is caused by acute exacerbations. Exacerbations have been strongly and consistently associated with respiratory infections....... Respiratory viruses and bacteria are therefore possible treatment targets. To have a reasonable estimate of the burden of disease induced by such infectious agents on asthmatic patients, it is necessary to understand their nature and be able to identify them in clinical samples by employing accurate...

  6. Varicella zoster virus acute retinal necrosis following eye contusion: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovařík Zdeněk

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute retinal necrosis is a sight-threatening disease caused by the group of herpesviruses. The aim of this paper is to report a case of acute retinal necrosis following ocular trauma in a patient initially treated with vaso-active drugs and corticosteroids for presumed ocular ischemic syndrome. Case presentation A 51-years-old otherwise healthy man, who suffered from sudden visual loss in the left eye following contusion, was commenced on vaso-active drugs and systemic corticosteroids for suspected ocular ischemic syndrome with extensive swelling of the optic disc and macular edema. Subsequently, vision in the initially uninvolved right eye decreased. Polymerase chain reaction of vitreous samples and retinal biopsy confirmed varicella zoster virus. Despite intensive treatment with intravenous antiviral medication, the patient became completely blind in both eyes. Conclusion Initial treatment of acute, unexplained visual decrease with systemic corticosteroids may lead to visual loss in patients with developing acute retinal necrosis. Ocular trauma could have induced and corticosteroid treatment promoted reactivation of a latent viral infection in our patient.

  7. Epstein-Barr virus associated acute hepatitis with cross-reacting antibodies to other herpes viruses in immunocompetent patients: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ekta; Bhatia, Vikram; Choudhary, Aashish; Rastogi, Archana; Gupta, Naveen L

    2013-03-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis (IM) which is characterized by the triad of fever, sore throat, and lymphadenopathy. Self-limited, mild liver function test abnormalities are seen in IM. Acute hepatitis in primary EBV infection is uncommon. Serum transaminases are elevated but are less than fivefold the normal levels in most cases and rarely exceed 10 times the normal levels in primary EBV infections especially in elderly. Laboratory diagnosis of acute EBV infection is by serological assays confirming the presence of EBV viral capsid antigen (VCA) IgM antibodies. Due to antigenic cross-reactivity with Herpes viruses, serological assays lack specificity; hence specific molecular diagnostic methods are required for confirmation of the etiology. The present report describes two cases of acute hepatitis caused by infection with EBV which had indistinguishable clinical features and biochemical markers from acute hepatitis caused by hepatotropic viruses such as hepatitis viruses A-E. The diagnosis of infection by EBV was confirmed by detection of EBV DNA in blood of both the patients and EBV DNA in the liver tissue of one of the patients. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Respiratory viruses in young South African children with acute lower respiratory infections and interactions with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalay, Alicia A; Abbott, Salome; Sikazwe, Chisha; Khoo, Siew-Kim; Bizzintino, Joelene; Zhang, Guicheng; Laing, Ingrid; Chidlow, Glenys R; Smith, David W; Gern, James; Goldblatt, Jack; Lehmann, Deborah; Green, Robin J; Le Souëf, Peter N

    2016-08-01

    Human rhinovirus (RV) is the most common respiratory virus and has been associated with frequent and severe acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI). The prevalence of RV species among HIV-infected children in South Africa is unknown. To describe the prevalence of respiratory viruses, including RV species, associated with HIV status and other clinical symptoms in children less than two years of age with and without ALRI in Pretoria, South Africa. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from 105 hospitalized ALRI cases and 53 non-ALRI controls less than two years of age. HIV status was determined. Common respiratory viruses were identified by PCR, and RV species and genotypes were identified by semi-nested PCR, sequencing and phylogenetic tree analyses. Respiratory viruses were more common among ALRI cases than controls (83.8% vs. 69.2%; p=0.041). RV was the most commonly identified virus in cases with pneumonia (45.6%) or bronchiolitis (52.1%), regardless of HIV status, as well as in controls (39.6%). RV-A was identified in 26.7% of cases and 15.1% of controls while RV-C was identified in 21.0% of cases and 18.9% of controls. HIV-infected children were more likely to be diagnosed with pneumonia than bronchiolitis (pHIV-infected cases (n=15) compared with 30.6% of HIV-uninfected cases (n=85, p=0.013), and was identified more frequently in bronchiolitis than in pneumonia cases (43.8% vs. 12.3%; pHIV infection may be protective against RSV and bronchiolitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Liver and spleen MRI findings in virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome in a patient with acute lymphocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zilkha, A.; Madan, V.; Leonidas, J.C.; Valderrama, E.

    1998-01-01

    Virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome is characterized by the phagocytosis of erthythrocytes and other blood elements in multiple organ systems, especially the liver and spleen. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can suggest this diagnosis in the proper clinical setting by demonstrating multiple, rounded signal voids in the spleen corresponding to hemosiderin deposition. We report a patient with virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome during the course of acute lymphocytic leukemia and MRI findings that suggested the preoperative diagnosis. (orig.)

  10. Liver and spleen MRI findings in virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome in a patient with acute lymphocytic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zilkha, A.; Madan, V.; Leonidas, J.C. [Division of Pediatric Radiology, Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY (United States); Valderrama, E. [Department of Pathology, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY (United States)

    1998-12-01

    Virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome is characterized by the phagocytosis of erthythrocytes and other blood elements in multiple organ systems, especially the liver and spleen. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can suggest this diagnosis in the proper clinical setting by demonstrating multiple, rounded signal voids in the spleen corresponding to hemosiderin deposition. We report a patient with virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome during the course of acute lymphocytic leukemia and MRI findings that suggested the preoperative diagnosis. (orig.) With 1 fig., 4 refs.

  11. Medical image of the week: bilateral vocal cord paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Hook CJ

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A 59-year-old morbidly obese woman with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure secondary to pulmonary emboli required emergency intubation. She was described by the anesthesiologist as having a difficult airway. The patient was liberated from the ventilator after two days. Following extubation she complained of hoarse voice and dyspnea. Physical exam revealed audible stridor. The upper airway was normal by CAT imaging. Flow-volume curve demonstrated marked flattening of both the inspiratory and expiratory limbs, consistent with a fixed extra-thoracic obstruction (Figure 1. Endoscopy revealed the vocal cords to be in the adducted position, with minimal movement throughout the respiratory cycle, consistent with bilateral vocal cord paralysis (Figure 2. Traumatic intubation follows thyroid surgery as the most common cause of bilateral vocal cord paralysis (1. In a minority of patients spontaneous recovery may occur. Surgical treatment options include cordotomy or tracheostomy. Nocturnal BIPAP has been used in patients who decline surgery (2.

  12. Accommodation Paralysis after Pheniramine Maleate Injection: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingol Kiziltunc, Pinar; Atilla, Huban; Yalcindag, F Nilufer

    2013-01-01

    We present a case in which Gilbert syndrome was diagnosed following a neuro-ophthalmic complaint. Adverse effects of drugs as well as various systemic, neurological, and local ocular pathologies can cause accommodative insufficiency and loss of accommodation. A 29-year-old man was admitted to an ophthalmology department with blurred vision and diagnosed as suffering from acute accommodation paralysis. He had a history of being given a pheniramine maleate injection for pruritus 20 days previously. Symptoms began immediately following the injection. After systemic evaluation and laboratory tests, he was diagnosed as having Gilbert syndrome. His complaints and symptoms recovered in approximately a further 10 days. Metabolism of pheniramine maleate can be impaired in Gilbert syndrome and anticholinergic effects can cause accommodation paralysis.

  13. Familial congenital peripheral facial paralysis

    OpenAIRE

    Portillo Vallenas, Roberto; Aldave, Raquel; Reyes, Juan; Castañeda, César; Vera, José

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study 29 individuals belonging to four familiar generations in whom 9 cases of facial paralysis was found in 2 generations. Setting: Neurophysiology Service, Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen National Hospital. Material and Methods: Neurological exam and electrophysiologic (EMG and VCN), otorrhinolaryngologic, radiologic, electroencephalographic, dermatoglyphic and laboratory studies were performed in 7 of the 9 patients (5 men and 2 women). Results: One case of right peripheral facia...

  14. Atypical periodic paralysis and myalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Matthews, Emma; Neuwirth, Christoph; Jaffer, Fatima; Scalco, Renata S.; Fialho, Doreen; Parton, Matt; Raja Rayan, Dipa; Suetterlin, Karen; Sud, Richa; Spiegel, Roland; Mein, Rachel; Houlden, Henry; Schaefer, Andrew; Healy, Estelle; Palace, Jacqueline

    2018-01-01

    Objective To characterize the phenotype of patients with symptoms of periodic paralysis (PP) and ryanodine receptor (RYR1) gene mutations. Methods Cases with a possible diagnosis of PP but additional clinicopathologic findings previously associated with RYR1-related disorders were referred for a tertiary neuromuscular clinical assessment in which they underwent detailed clinical evaluation, including neurophysiologic assessment, muscle biopsy, and muscle MRI. Genetic analysis with next-genera...

  15. Superiority of West Nile Virus RNA Detection in Whole Blood for Diagnosis of Acute Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustig, Yaniv; Mannasse, Batya; Koren, Ravit; Katz-Likvornik, Shiri; Hindiyeh, Musa; Mandelboim, Michal; Dovrat, Sara; Sofer, Danit; Mendelson, Ella

    2016-09-01

    The current diagnosis of West Nile virus (WNV) infection is primarily based on serology, since molecular identification of WNV RNA is unreliable due to the short viremia and absence of detectable virus in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Recent studies have shown that WNV RNA can be detected in urine for a longer period and at higher concentrations than in plasma. In this study, we examined the presence of WNV RNA in serum, plasma, whole-blood, CSF, and urine samples obtained from patients diagnosed with acute WNV infection during an outbreak which occurred in Israel in 2015. Our results demonstrate that 33 of 38 WNV patients had detectable WNV RNA in whole blood at the time of diagnosis, a higher rate than in any of the other sample types tested. Overall, whole blood was superior to all other samples, with 86.8% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% positive predictive value, and 83.9% negative predictive value. Interestingly, WNV viral load in urine was higher than in whole blood, CSF, serum, and plasma despite the lower sensitivity than that of whole blood. This study establishes the utility of whole blood in the routine diagnosis of acute WNV infection and suggests that it may provide the highest sensitivity for WNV RNA detection in suspected cases. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Fast-tracked Rehabilitation and Return to Sport of an Elite Rugby Player with a Complicated Posterolateral Corner Injury and Associated Peroneal Paralysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paget, L. D. A.; Kuijer, P. P. F. M.; Maas, M.; Kerkhoffs, G. M. M. J.

    2017-01-01

    Acute posterolateral corner injuries of the knee with associated hamstring avulsions and peroneal paralysis are rare in rugby. Regain of motor function following a complete paralysis is documented to be 38%. To our knowledge, only one case describes return to preinjury level of competitive sport

  17. Acute respiratory distress syndrome after convalescent plasma use: treatment of a patient with Ebola virus disease contracted in Madrid, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Rillo, Marta; Arsuaga, Marta; Ramírez-Olivencia, Germán; de la Calle, Fernando; Borobia, Alberto M; Sánchez-Seco, Paz; Lago, Mar; Figueira, Juan C; Fernández-Puntero, Belén; Viejo, Aurora; Negredo, Anabel; Nuñez, Concepción; Flores, Eva; Carcas, Antonio J; Jiménez-Yuste, Victor; Lasala, Fátima; García-de-Lorenzo, Abelardo; Arnalich, Francisco; Arribas, Jose R

    2015-07-01

    In the current epidemic of Ebola virus disease, health-care workers have been transferred to Europe and the USA for optimised supportive care and experimental treatments. We describe the clinical course of the first case of Ebola virus disease contracted outside of Africa, in Madrid, Spain. Herein we report clinical, laboratory, and virological findings of the treatment of a female nurse assistant aged 44 years who was infected with Ebola virus around Sept 25-26, 2014, while caring for a Spanish missionary with confirmed Ebola virus disease who had been medically evacuated from Sierra Leone to La Paz-Carlos III University Hospital, Madrid. We also describe the use of experimental treatments for Ebola virus disease in this patient. The patient was symptomatic for 1 week before first hospital admission on Oct 6, 2014. We used supportive treatment with intravenous fluids, broad-spectrum antibiotics, and experimental treatments with convalescent plasma from two survivors of Ebola virus disease and high-dose favipiravir. On day 10 of illness, she had acute respiratory distress syndrome, possibly caused by transfusion-related acute lung injury, which was managed without mechanical ventilation. Discharge was delayed because of the detection of viral RNA in several bodily fluids despite clearance of viraemia. The patient was discharged on day 34 of illness. At the time of discharge, the patient had possible subacute post-viral thyroiditis. None of the people who had contact with the patient before and after admission became infected with Ebola virus. This report emphasises the uncertainties about the efficacy of experimental treatments for Ebola virus disease. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of transfusion-related acute lung injury when using convalescent plasma for the treatment of Ebola virus disease. La Paz-Carlos III University Hospital. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Carnosine markedly ameliorates H9N2 swine influenza virus-induced acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tong; Wang, Cunlian; Zhang, Ruihua; Xu, Mingju; Liu, Baojian; Wei, Dong; Wang, Guohua; Tian, Shufei

    2015-10-01

    Oxidative stress injury is an important pathogenesis of influenza virus in critically ill patients. The present study investigated the efficacy of carnosine, an antioxidant and free radical scavenger, on a model of acute lung injury (ALI) induced by H9N2 swine influenza virus. Female specific-pathogen-free BALB/c mice were randomized into four groups and treated as follows: (1) H9N2 group, (2) mock control group, (3) H9N2+carnosine group and (4) carnosine control group. The H9N2 group mice were inoculated intranasally with A/Swine/Hebei/012/2008/ (H9N2) virus (100 μl) in allantoic fluid (AF), whilst mock-infected animals were intranasally inoculated with non-infectious AF. Carnosine [10 mg (kg body mass)- 1] was administered orally (100 μl) for 7 days consecutively. The survival rate, lung water content, TNF-α and IL-1β levels, lung histopathology, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 levels were determined at 2, 4, 6, 8 and 14 days after inoculation. Carnosine treatment effectively decreased the mortality (43 versus 75 %, P lungs and decreased the lung wet/dry mass ratio (P lungs of infected mice (P < 0.05), which supported the use of carnosine for managing severe influenza cases.

  19. Prevalence of IgG Autoantibodies against GD3 Ganglioside in Acute Zika Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nico, Dirlei; Conde, Luciana; Rivera-Correa, Juan L.; Vasconcelos-dos-Santos, Andréia; Mesentier-Louro, Louise; Freire-de-Lima, Leonardo; Arruda, Mônica Barcellos; Freire-de-Lima, Celio Geraldo; Ferreira, Orlando da Costa; Lopes Moreira, Maria Elisabeth; Zin, Andrea Araújo; Vasconcelos, Zilton Farias Meira; Otero, Rosalia Mendez; Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa Beatriz; Tanuri, Amilcar; Todeschini, Adriane Regina; Savino, Wilson; Rodriguez, Ana; Morrot, Alexandre

    2018-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) disease has become a global health emergency with devastating effects on public health. Recent evidences implicate the virus as an emergent neuropathological agent promoting serious pathologies of the human nervous system, that include destructive and malformation consequences such as development of ocular and fetal brain lesions, microcephaly in neonates, and Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) in adults. These neurological disorders of both central and peripheral nervous systems are thought to be associated to the neurotropic properties of the virus that has ability to infect neural stem cells as well as peripheral neurons, a hallmark of its pathogenicity. The presence of autoantibodies against gangliosides plays a pivotal role in the etiogenesis of GBS and a variety of neurological disorders. Gangliosides are a class of galactose-containing cerebrosides mainly expressed in nervous system tissues playing a critical role in the physiology of neural cells and neurogenesis. Herein, our findings indicate that patients at acute phase of ZIKV infection without any neurological signs show increased levels of IgG autoantibody against GD3 gangliosides, a class of glycolipid found to be highly expressed in neural stem cell acting in the maintenance of their self-renewal cellular capacity. It is possible that a pathological threshold of these antibodies is only acquired in secondary or subsequent infections. In the light of these evidences, we propose that the target of GD3 by autoimmune responses may possibly has an effect in the neuropathy and neurogenesis disorder seen during ZIKV infection. PMID:29594116

  20. Immune profile and Epstein-Barr virus infection in acute interstitial nephritis: an immunohistochemical study in 78 patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mansur, Abdurrezagh

    2011-01-01

    Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) is a common cause of acute kidney injury and is characterised by a dense interstitial cellular infiltrate, which has not been well defined. Previous studies have demonstrated a correlation between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and AIN. The purpose of our study was to define the nature of the interstitial immune infiltrate and to investigate the possibility of renal infection with EBV.

  1. Clinical and laboratory diagnosis of congenital Zika virus syndrome and diaphragmatic unilateral palsy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Sandro Rolland Souza

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: several birth defects associated to congenital Zika virus infection have been reported, although the clinical features have not been fully characterized. Description: this is the first case report on unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis diagnosed on a neonate with congenital Zika confirmed by the examination of the amniotic fluid through polymerase chain reaction (ZIKV RT-PCR and the examination of cerebrospinal fluid by serological test (IgM ZIKV-ELISA after birth. The main manifestations detected by intrauterine ultrasound were: microcephaly, ventriculomegaly, intracranial calcifications, enlarged cisterna magna, increased amniotic fluid index and fetal akinesia syndrome. The newborn had acute respiratory failure in the first hours of life, requiring mechanical ventila-tion. The X- ray of the chest showed unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis and cardiomegaly. Discussion: diaphragmatic palsy in congenital Zika has not been previously reported, the etiopathogenic mechanisms of this event in congenital Zika virus needs to be elucidated.

  2. Sleep Paralysis: phenomenology, neurophysiology and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Solomonova, Elizaveta

    2017-01-01

    Sleep paralysis is an experience of being temporarily unable to move or talk during the transitional periods between sleep and wakefulness: at sleep onset or upon awakening. Feeling of paralysis may be accompanied by a variety of vivid and intense sensory experiences, including mentation in visual, auditory, and tactile modalities, as well as a distinct feeling of presence. This chapter discusses a variety of sleep paralysis experiences from the perspective of enactive cognition and cultural ...

  3. Acute renal failure in a child with thrombocytopenic purpura caused by acute Epstein-Barr virus infection after treatment with anti-D immunoglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossiva, Lydia; Kyriakou, Dimitrios; Mitsioni, Andromachi; Garoufi, Anastasia

    2013-06-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in children is usually a benign, self-limiting disorder. An acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection usually causes atypical lymphocytosis and mild decrease in platelets. Severe thrombocytopenia is an extremely rare complication. Anti-D immunoglobulin has been used for treatment of ITP in Rh(D)-positive nonsplenectomized patients. Severe hemolysis and acute renal failure are extremely rare complications that may be aggravated by the presence of an acute EBV infection. It is believed that anti-D immunoglobulin triggers an unusual virus-induced immune response causing hemolysis. We present a 4-year-old girl with ITP caused by an acute EBV infection that developed acute kidney injury following treatment with anti-D immunoglobulin. The patient recovered completely from thrombocytopenia and renal dysfunction. Intravascular hemolysis and acute kidney injury are consistent with anti-D immunoglobulin mechanism of action. Pediatric patients treated with anti-D immunoglobulin for ITP should be closely monitored for signs and symptoms of hemolysis that may be aggravated by the presence of EBV infection leading to impaired renal function.

  4. Comparative studies on virus detection in acute respiratory diseases in humans by means of RIA and cultivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlicher, L.

    1982-01-01

    In winter 1981, 146 patients with an acute respiratory infection were examined. Nasopharyngeal specimens were obtained by intranasal catheter. Comparative investigations were performed by cultivation in tissue culture and by a four-layer radioimmunoassay. In the radioimmunoassay, polystyrene beads were used as the solid phase, ginea pig antivirus immunoglobulins as the captive antibodies, rabbit anti-virus immunoglobulins as the secondary antibodies and 125 I-labelled sheep anti-rabbit immunoglobulins were used as the indicator antibodies. The radioimmunoassay was developed for the detection of adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B virus and parainfluenza type 1, type 2 and type 3 virus. Tissue culture seems to be more sensitive for detection of adenovirus and influenza A virus, though some infections with influenza A virus could only be diagnosed by the radioimmunoassay. In other cases (respiratory syncytial virus, influenza B virus) antigen detection by radioimmunoassay is more efficient. Presently the combination of both antigen-detection-systems still is the optimal diagnostic procedure for detecting virus infections of the respiratory tract. (orig./MG) [de

  5. Sequential bottlenecks drive viral evolution in early acute hepatitis C virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowena A Bull

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C is a pandemic human RNA virus, which commonly causes chronic infection and liver disease. The characterization of viral populations that successfully initiate infection, and also those that drive progression to chronicity is instrumental for understanding pathogenesis and vaccine design. A comprehensive and longitudinal analysis of the viral population was conducted in four subjects followed from very early acute infection to resolution of disease outcome. By means of next generation sequencing (NGS and standard cloning/Sanger sequencing, genetic diversity and viral variants were quantified over the course of the infection at frequencies as low as 0.1%. Phylogenetic analysis of reassembled viral variants revealed acute infection was dominated by two sequential bottleneck events, irrespective of subsequent chronicity or clearance. The first bottleneck was associated with transmission, with one to two viral variants successfully establishing infection. The second occurred approximately 100 days post-infection, and was characterized by a decline in viral diversity. In the two subjects who developed chronic infection, this second bottleneck was followed by the emergence of a new viral population, which evolved from the founder variants via a selective sweep with fixation in a small number of mutated sites. The diversity at sites with non-synonymous mutation was higher in predicted cytotoxic T cell epitopes, suggesting immune-driven evolution. These results provide the first detailed analysis of early within-host evolution of HCV, indicating strong selective forces limit viral evolution in the acute phase of infection.

  6. Sequential bottlenecks drive viral evolution in early acute hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Rowena A; Luciani, Fabio; McElroy, Kerensa; Gaudieri, Silvana; Pham, Son T; Chopra, Abha; Cameron, Barbara; Maher, Lisa; Dore, Gregory J; White, Peter A; Lloyd, Andrew R

    2011-09-01

    Hepatitis C is a pandemic human RNA virus, which commonly causes chronic infection and liver disease. The characterization of viral populations that successfully initiate infection, and also those that drive progression to chronicity is instrumental for understanding pathogenesis and vaccine design. A comprehensive and longitudinal analysis of the viral population was conducted in four subjects followed from very early acute infection to resolution of disease outcome. By means of next generation sequencing (NGS) and standard cloning/Sanger sequencing, genetic diversity and viral variants were quantified over the course of the infection at frequencies as low as 0.1%. Phylogenetic analysis of reassembled viral variants revealed acute infection was dominated by two sequential bottleneck events, irrespective of subsequent chronicity or clearance. The first bottleneck was associated with transmission, with one to two viral variants successfully establishing infection. The second occurred approximately 100 days post-infection, and was characterized by a decline in viral diversity. In the two subjects who developed chronic infection, this second bottleneck was followed by the emergence of a new viral population, which evolved from the founder variants via a selective sweep with fixation in a small number of mutated sites. The diversity at sites with non-synonymous mutation was higher in predicted cytotoxic T cell epitopes, suggesting immune-driven evolution. These results provide the first detailed analysis of early within-host evolution of HCV, indicating strong selective forces limit viral evolution in the acute phase of infection.

  7. Swine influenza H1N1 virus induces acute inflammatory immune responses in pig lungs: a potential animal model for human H1N1 influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Mahesh; Dwivedi, Varun; Krakowka, Steven; Manickam, Cordelia; Ali, Ahmed; Wang, Leyi; Qin, Zhuoming; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J; Lee, Chang-Won

    2010-11-01

    Pigs are capable of generating reassortant influenza viruses of pandemic potential, as both the avian and mammalian influenza viruses can infect pig epithelial cells in the respiratory tract. The source of the current influenza pandemic is H1N1 influenza A virus, possibly of swine origin. This study was conducted to understand better the pathogenesis of H1N1 influenza virus and associated host mucosal immune responses during acute infection in humans. Therefore, we chose a H1N1 swine influenza virus, Sw/OH/24366/07 (SwIV), which has a history of transmission to humans. Clinically, inoculated pigs had nasal discharge and fever and shed virus through nasal secretions. Like pandemic H1N1, SwIV also replicated extensively in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts, and lung lesions were typical of H1N1 infection. We detected innate, proinflammatory, Th1, Th2, and Th3 cytokines, as well as SwIV-specific IgA antibody in lungs of the virus-inoculated pigs. Production of IFN-γ by lymphocytes of the tracheobronchial lymph nodes was also detected. Higher frequencies of cytotoxic T lymphocytes, γδ T cells, dendritic cells, activated T cells, and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were detected in SwIV-infected pig lungs. Concomitantly, higher frequencies of the immunosuppressive T regulatory cells were also detected in the virus-infected pig lungs. The findings of this study have relevance to pathogenesis of the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in humans; thus, pigs may serve as a useful animal model to design and test effective mucosal vaccines and therapeutics against influenza virus.

  8. Hamstring transfer for quadriceps paralysis in post polio residual paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadish J Patwa

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: H to Q transfer in the presence of quadriceps paralysis with good power in hamstring is a better alternative than supracondylar osteotomy because it is a dynamic correction and it produces some degree of recurvatum with increasing stability of knee in extension while walking. While inserting hamstring over patella the periosteum is not cut in an I-shaped fashion to create a flap which gives additional strength to new insertion and also patella act as a fulcrum during the extension of knee by producing the bowstring effect.

  9. (18)F-FDG PET/CT Findings in Acute Epstein-Barr Virus Infection Mimicking Malignant Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørbæk, Mathilde; Graff, Jesper; Markova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    We present a case demonstrating the diagnostic work-up and follow-up of a patient with acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in which the clinical picture and imaging on (18)F-FDG PET/CT mimicked malignant lymphoma. Follow-up (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan in the patient performed 7 weeks after...

  10. Elevation of soluble VCAM-1 plasma levels in children with acute dengue virus infection of varying severity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koraka, P.; Murgue, B.; Deparis, X.; Gorp, E. van; Setiati, T.E.; Osterhaus, A.D.; Groen, J.

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 1,000 million infections with dengue viruses are estimated to occur annually. The majority of the cases develop mild disease, whereas only small proportion of the infected individuals develop severe hemorrhagic manifestations at the end of the acute phase of illness. In this study, the

  11. Facial paralysis due to Ramsay Hunt syndrome - A rare condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Lariessy Campos Paiva

    Full Text Available Summary Ramsay Hunt syndrome (or herpes zoster oticus is a rare complication of herpes zoster in which reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus infection in the geniculate ganglion occurs. Usually, there are auricular vesicles and symptoms and signs such otalgia and peripheral facial paralysis. In addition, rarely, a rash around the mouth can be seen. Immunodeficient patients are more susceptible to this condition. Diagnosis is essentially based on symptoms. We report the case of a diabetic female patient who sought the emergency department with a complaint of this rare entity.

  12. Case control study to identify risk factors for acute hepatitis C virus infection in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandeel Amr M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of risk factors of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in Egypt is crucial to develop appropriate prevention strategies. Methods We conducted a case–control study, June 2007-September 2008, to investigate risk factors for acute HCV infection in Egypt among 86 patients and 287 age and gender matched controls identified in two infectious disease hospitals in Cairo and Alexandria. Case-patients were defined as: any patient with symptoms of acute hepatitis; lab tested positive for HCV antibodies and negative for HBsAg, HBc IgM, HAV IgM; and 7-fold increase in the upper limit of transaminase levels. Controls were selected from patients’ visitors with negative viral hepatitis markers. Subjects were interviewed about previous exposures within six months, including community-acquired and health-care associated practices. Results Case-patients were more likely than controls to have received injection with a reused syringe (OR=23.1, CI 4.7-153, to have been in prison (OR=21.5, CI 2.5-479.6, to have received IV fluids in a hospital (OR=13.8, CI 5.3-37.2, to have been an IV drug user (OR=12.1, CI 4.6-33.1, to have had minimal surgical procedures (OR=9.7, CI 4.2-22.4, to have received IV fluid as an outpatient (OR=8, CI 4–16.2, or to have been admitted to hospital (OR=7.9, CI 4.2-15 within the last 6 months. Multivariate analysis indicated that unsafe health facility practices are the main risk factors associated with transmission of HCV infection in Egypt. Conclusion In Egypt, focusing acute HCV prevention measures on health-care settings would have a beneficial impact.

  13. Interferon lambda 3 genotype predicts hepatitis C virus RNA levels in early acute infection among people who inject drugs: the InC(3) study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hajarizadeh, Behzad; Grady, Bart; Page, Kimberly; Kim, Arthur Y.; McGovern, Barbara H.; Cox, Andrea L.; Rice, Thomas M.; Sacks-Davis, Rachel; Bruneau, Julie; Morris, Meghan; Amin, Janaki; Schinkel, Janke; Applegate, Tanya; Maher, Lisa; Hellard, Margaret; Lloyd, Andrew R.; Prins, Maria; Geskus, Ronald B.; Dore, Gregory J.; Grebely, Jason; Lauer, Georg; Shoukry, Naglaa H.; Hahn, Judy; Shiboski, Steve; Alavi, Maryam; Bouchard, Rachel; Evans, Jennifer; Aneja, Jasneet; Teutsch, Suzy; White, Bethany; Wells, Brittany; Zang, Geng; Matthews, Gail; Marks, Pip; Yeung, Barbara; Prince, Leslie Erin; Roy, Elise; Bates, Anna; Enriquez, Jarliene; Chow, Sammy; McCredie, Luke; Aitken, Campbell; Doyle, Joseph; Spelman, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA level in acute HCV infection is predictive of spontaneous clearance. This study assessed factors associated with HCV RNA levels during early acute infection among people who inject drugs with well-defined acute HCV infection. Data were from International Collaboration of

  14. Prognostic factors for patients with hepatitis B virus-related acute-on-chronic liver failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Ying

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the prognostic factors for patients with hepatitis B virus-related acute-on-chronic liver failure, and to provide a basis for clinical diagnosis and treatment. MethodsA total of 172 patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV-related acute-on-chronic liver failure who were admitted to The First Hospital of Jilin University from January 1, 2006 to January 1, 2016 and had complete medical records and follow-up data were enrolled, and a retrospective analysis was performed for their clinical data and laboratory markers to determine prognostic factors. The independent-samples t test was used for comparison of continuous data between groups, the chi-square test was used for comparison of categorical data between groups, and a multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed for the indices determined to be statistically significant by the univariate analysis to screen out independent risk factors for the prognosis of patients with HBV-related acute-on-chronic liver failure. ResultsThe multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed for the indices determined to be statistically significant by the univariate analysis, and the results showed that the prognostic factors were total bilirubin (TBil, prothrombin time activity (PTA, Na+, total cholesterol (TC, Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP score, age ≥50 years, the presence of liver cirrhosis, bilirubin-enzyme separation, and complications. The multivariate regression analysis was performed for the complications determined to affect prognosis by the univariate analysis, and the results showed that the complications as risk factors were hepatic encephalopathy, hepatorenal syndrome, and infection. ConclusionTBil, PTA, Na+, TC, CTP score, age ≥50 years, the presence of liver cirrhosis, bilirubin-enzyme separation, and complications are independent risk factors for the prognosis of patients with HBV-related acute-on-chronic liver failure. Liver failure patients with hepatic

  15. Laryngeal Electromyography for Prognosis of Vocal Fold Paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo-Maza, Adriana; García-Lopez, Isabel; Santiago-Pérez, Susana; Gavilán, Javier

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the value of laryngeal electromyography in the prognosis of vocal fold paralysis. This is a retrospective descriptive study. This study included 80 patients diagnosed with unilateral or bilateral vocal fold paralysis on flexible laryngoscopy between 2002 and 2014 in a tertiary medical center. Laryngeal electromyography using a standardized protocol was performed; the outcome measures were classified and analyzed into two groups according to the degree of injury. Group 1 included patients with mild to moderate injury, and group 2 included patients with severe to complete injury. Prognosis was correlated with vocal fold motion recovery status with a minimum of 6 months of follow-up since the symptoms onset using positive and negative predictive values. Sixty patients showed acute or chronic recurrent laryngeal neuropathy in laryngeal electromyography. Twelve of 41 patients included in group 1 recovered motion, and 30 of 35 patients included in group 2 did not recover, resulting in 88.2% of positive predictive value and 35.7% of negative predictive value. Our data confirm that laryngeal electromyography is a useful clinical tool in predicting poor recovery in patients with vocal fold paralysis. It allows identification of candidates for early intervention. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Acute diarrhea in West African children: diverse enteric viruses and a novel parvovirus genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Tung G; Vo, Nguyen P; Bonkoungou, Isidore J O; Kapoor, Amit; Barro, Nicolas; O'Ryan, Miguel; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Wang, Chunling; Delwart, Eric

    2012-10-01

    Parvoviruses cause a variety of mild to severe symptoms or asymptomatic infections in humans and animals. During a viral metagenomic analysis of feces from children with acute diarrhea in Burkina Faso, we identified in decreasing prevalence nucleic acids from anelloviruses, dependoviruses, sapoviruses, enteroviruses, bocaviruses, noroviruses, adenoviruses, parechoviruses, rotaviruses, cosavirus, astroviruses, and hepatitis B virus. Sequences from a highly divergent parvovirus, provisionally called bufavirus, were also detected whose NS1 and VP1 proteins showed parvoviruses. Four percent of the fecal samples were PCR positive for this new parvovirus, including a related bufavirus species showing only 72% identity in VP1. The high degree of genetic divergence of these related genomes from those of other parvoviruses indicates the presence of a proposed new Parvoviridae genus containing at least two species. Studies of the tropism and pathogenicity of these novel parvoviruses will be facilitated by the availability of their genome sequences.

  17. Kyrieleis plaques associated with Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 acute retinal necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Goel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 55-year-old immunocompetent male who presented with features typical of acute retinal necrosis (ARN. Polymerase chain reaction of the aqueous tap was positive for Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV – 1. Following therapy with intravenous Acyclovir, followed by oral Acyclovir and steroids, there was marked improvement in the visual acuity and clinical picture. At one week after initiation of treatment, Kyrieleis plaques were observed in the retinal arteries. They became more prominent despite resolution of the vitritis, retinal necrosis and vasculitis and persisted till six weeks of follow-up, when fluorescein angiography was performed. The appearance of this segmental retinal periarteritis also known as Kyrieleis plaques has not been described in ARN due to HSV-1 earlier.

  18. Acute acalculous cholecystitis by Epstein-Barr virus infection: a rare association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Branco

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC is a rare complication of Epstein Barr virus (EBV infection, with only a few cases reported among pediatric population. This clinical condition is frequently associated with a favorable outcome and, usually, a surgical intervention is not required. We report a 16-year-old girl who presented with AAC following primary EBV infection. The diagnosis of AAC was documented by clinical and ultrasonographic examination, whereas EBV infection was confirmed serologically. A conservative treatment was performed, with a careful monitoring and serial ultrasonographic examinations, which led to the clinical improvement of the patient. Pediatricians should be aware of the possible association between EBV and AAC, in order to offer the patients an appropriate management strategy.

  19. Some Aspects of Facial Nerve Paralysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1973-01-06

    Jan 6, 1973 ... births. Facial palsy at birth must be differentiated from agenesis of facial muscles. Trauma: fractures of the base of the skull; facial in- juries; penetrating injury of middle ear; and altitude paralysis. Neurologic causes: Landry-Guillain-Barre ascending paralysis; multiple sclerosis; myasthenia gravis; opercular.

  20. Amblyopia Associated with Congenital Facial Nerve Paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamura, Hitoshi; Kondo, Kenji; Sawamura, Hiromasa; Baba, Shintaro; Yasuhara, Kazuo; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    The association between congenital facial paralysis and visual development has not been thoroughly studied. Of 27 pediatric cases of congenital facial paralysis, we identified 3 patients who developed amblyopia, a visual acuity decrease caused by abnormal visual development, as comorbidity. These 3 patients had facial paralysis in the periocular region and developed amblyopia on the paralyzed side. They started treatment by wearing an eye patch immediately after diagnosis and before the critical visual developmental period; all patients responded to the treatment. Our findings suggest that the incidence of amblyopia in the cases of congenital facial paralysis, particularly the paralysis in the periocular region, is higher than that in the general pediatric population. Interestingly, 2 of the 3 patients developed anisometropic amblyopia due to the hyperopia of the affected eye, implying that the periocular facial paralysis may have affected the refraction of the eye through yet unspecified mechanisms. Therefore, the physicians who manage facial paralysis should keep this pathology in mind, and when they see pediatric patients with congenital facial paralysis involving the periocular region, they should consult an ophthalmologist as soon as possible. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Sleep paralysis and psychopathology | Mume | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Sleep paralysis in the absence of narcolepsy is common. Individuals experience episodes of profound muscular paralysis on waking from sleep in the morning or during the night. These episodes are disturbing, especially because they often involve feeling unable to breathe deeply or voluntarily. Previous ...

  2. Cruciate paralysis secondary to traumatic atlantooccipital dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Jennifer; Ammerman, Joshua; Deshmukh, Vivek; White, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Cruciate paralysis is a clinical phenomenon thought to result from injury to decussating pyramidal tract fibers at the cervicomedullary junction, producing clinical findings of upper-extremity weakness out of proportion to the lower extremities. The authors present, to their knowledge, the first reported case of cruciate paralysis resulting from atlantooccipital dislocation.

  3. Effect of acute Plasmodium falciparum malaria on reactivation and shedding of the eight human herpes viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Chêne

    Full Text Available Human herpes viruses (HHVs are widely distributed pathogens. In immuno-competent individuals their clinical outcomes are generally benign but in immuno-compromised hosts, primary infection or extensive viral reactivation can lead to critical diseases. Plasmodium falciparum malaria profoundly affects the host immune system. In this retrospective study, we evaluated the direct effect of acute P. falciparum infection on reactivation and shedding of all known human herpes viruses (HSV-1, HSV-2, VZV, EBV, CMV, HHV-6, HHV-7, HHV-8. We monitored their presence by real time PCR in plasma and saliva of Ugandan children with malaria at the day of admission to the hospital (day-0 and 14 days later (after treatment, or in children with mild infections unrelated to malaria. For each child screened in this study, at least one type of HHV was detected in the saliva. HHV-7 and HHV-6 were detected in more than 70% of the samples and CMV in approximately half. HSV-1, HSV-2, VZV and HHV-8 were detected at lower frequency. During salivary shedding the highest mean viral load was observed for HSV-1 followed by EBV, HHV-7, HHV-6, CMV and HHV-8. After anti-malarial treatment the salivary HSV-1 levels were profoundly diminished or totally cleared. Similarly, four children with malaria had high levels of circulating EBV at day-0, levels that were cleared after anti-malarial treatment confirming the association between P. falciparum infection and EBV reactivation. This study shows that acute P. falciparum infection can contribute to EBV reactivation in the blood and HSV-1 reactivation in the oral cavity. Taken together our results call for further studies investigating the potential clinical implications of HHVs reactivation in children suffering from malaria.

  4. Effect of Acute Plasmodium falciparum Malaria on Reactivation and Shedding of the Eight Human Herpes Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chêne, Arnaud; Nylén, Susanne; Donati, Daria; Bejarano, Maria Teresa; Kironde, Fred; Wahlgren, Mats; Falk, Kerstin I.

    2011-01-01

    Human herpes viruses (HHVs) are widely distributed pathogens. In immuno-competent individuals their clinical outcomes are generally benign but in immuno-compromised hosts, primary infection or extensive viral reactivation can lead to critical diseases. Plasmodium falciparum malaria profoundly affects the host immune system. In this retrospective study, we evaluated the direct effect of acute P. falciparum infection on reactivation and shedding of all known human herpes viruses (HSV-1, HSV-2, VZV, EBV, CMV, HHV-6, HHV-7, HHV-8). We monitored their presence by real time PCR in plasma and saliva of Ugandan children with malaria at the day of admission to the hospital (day-0) and 14 days later (after treatment), or in children with mild infections unrelated to malaria. For each child screened in this study, at least one type of HHV was detected in the saliva. HHV-7 and HHV-6 were detected in more than 70% of the samples and CMV in approximately half. HSV-1, HSV-2, VZV and HHV-8 were detected at lower frequency. During salivary shedding the highest mean viral load was observed for HSV-1 followed by EBV, HHV-7, HHV-6, CMV and HHV-8. After anti-malarial treatment the salivary HSV-1 levels were profoundly diminished or totally cleared. Similarly, four children with malaria had high levels of circulating EBV at day-0, levels that were cleared after anti-malarial treatment confirming the association between P. falciparum infection and EBV reactivation. This study shows that acute P. falciparum infection can contribute to EBV reactivation in the blood and HSV-1 reactivation in the oral cavity. Taken together our results call for further studies investigating the potential clinical implications of HHVs reactivation in children suffering from malaria. PMID:22039454

  5. Cortical Bone Resorption Following Muscle Paralysis is Spatially Heterogeneous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausk, Brandon J.; Huber, Philippe; Poliachik, Sandra L.; Bain, Steven D.; Srinivasan, Sundar; Gross, Ted S.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical loading of the skeleton, as induced by muscle function during activity, plays a critical role in maintaining bone homeostasis. It is not understood, however, whether diminished loading (and thus diminished mechanical stimuli) directly mediates the bone resorption that is associated with disuse. Our group has recently developed a murine model in which we have observed rapid and profound bone loss in the tibia following transient paralysis of the calf muscles. As cortical bone loss is achieved via rapid endocortical expansion without alterations in periosteal morphology, we believe this model holds unique potential to explore the spatial relation between altered mechanical stimuli and subsequent bone resorption. Given the available literature, we hypothesized that endocortical resorption following transient muscle paralysis would be spatially homogeneous. To test this hypothesis, we first validated an image registration algorithm that quantified site-specific cortical bone alterations with high precision and accuracy. We then quantified endocortical expansion in the tibial diaphysis within 21 days following transient muscle paralysis and found that, within the analyzed mid-diaphyseal region (3.15 mm), site-specific bone loss was focused on the anterior surface in the proximal region but shifted to the posterior surface at the distal end of the analyzed volume. This site-specific, but highly repeatable biologic response suggests active osteoclast chemotaxis or focal activation of osteoclastic resorption underlies the spatially consistent endocortical resorption induced by transient muscle paralysis. Clarifying this relation holds potential to yield unique insight into how the removal of factors critical for bone homeostasis acutely precipitates local modulation of cellular responses within bone. PMID:21920486

  6. Tick paralysis: development of a vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masina, S; Broady, K W

    1999-04-01

    The paralysis tick of Australia, Ixodes holocyclus, causes a severe toxicosis in domestic animals such as dogs and cats, livestock, and in some cases, humans. It is characterised by a rapidly ascending flaccid paralysis. The causative agent of the toxicosis is a neurotoxin(s) produced in the tick salivary glands. The current treatment for tick paralysis is in the form of a polyclonal dog antiserum. This antiserum treatment is expensive and effective only in the early stages of paralysis. The aim of current research is to develop a recombinant veterinary vaccine based on the tick neurotoxin peptide sequence. A successful vaccine would provide cost-effective, long-term protective immunity against tick-induced paralysis.

  7. Molecular characterization of hepatitis E virus in patients with acute hepatitis in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Cristina Gutiérrez; Sánchez, Doneyla; Villalba, Maria Caridad Montalvo; Pujol, Flor Helene; de Los Ángeles Rodríguez Lay, Licel; Pinto, Belquis; Chacón, Elsa Patricia; Guzmán, Maria Guadalupe

    2012-07-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes a common infection in developing countries. HEV infection occurs as outbreaks, as sporadic clinical cases and as large epidemics in endemic areas. The objective of this study was to determine the presence of HEV infection in patients with clinical suspicion of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection, referred to the Instituto Nacional de Higiene "Rafael Rangel" in Venezuela. Seventy-four sera were tested for anti-HAV and anti-HEV IgM antibodies. HEV-RNA was amplified from anti-HEV IgM positive sera using nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for ORF1 (RNA dependent RNA polymerase region) and the amplicons sequenced for phylogenetic analysis. The frequency of anti-HEV IgM was 22/74 (30%) in the samples tested. Dual infection with HAV and HEV was found in 31% (12/39) of anti-HAV IgM positive patients. Viremia was detected in 3/22 (14%) of sera positive for anti-HEV IgM. Two HEV strains were classified as genotype 1 and one as genotype 3, which were closely related to Yam 67 (north of India) and US1 isolates from the USA, respectively. These findings suggest that HEV is an important cause of acute viral hepatitis in Venezuela as a single infection or co-infection with HAV, with high morbidity in children and young adults suggesting that this infection is endemic in Venezuela. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Increased vagal tone accounts for the observed immune paralysis in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kox, M.; Pompe, J.C.; Pickkers, P.; Hoedemaekers, C.W.E.; Vugt, A.B. van; Hoeven, J.G. van der

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability, especially in the younger population. In the acute phase after TBI, patients are more vulnerable to infection, associated with a decreased immune response in vitro. The cause of this immune paralysis is poorly understood. Apart

  9. Unilateral traumatic oculomotor nerve paralysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asari, Syoji; Satoh, Toru; Yamamoto, Yuji

    1982-01-01

    The present authors report a case of unilateral traumatic oculomotor nerve paralysis which shows interesting CT findings which suggest its mechanism. A 60-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a cerebral concussion soon after a traffic accident. A CT scan was performed soon after admission. A high-density spot was noted at the medial aspect of the left cerebral peduncle, where the oculomotor nerve emerged from the midbrain, and an irregular, slender, high-density area was delineated in the right dorsolateral surface of the midbrain. Although the right hemiparesis had already improved by the next morning, the function of the left oculomotor nerve has been completely disturbed for the three months since the injury. In our case, it is speculated that an avulsion of the left oculomotor nerve rootlet occurred at the time of impact as the mechanism of the oculomotor nerve paralysis. A CT taken soon after the head injury showed a high-density spot; this was considered to be a hemorrhage occurring because of the avulsion of the nerve rootlet at the medial surface of the cerebral peduncle. (J.P.N.)

  10. Atypical periodic paralysis and myalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuwirth, Christoph; Jaffer, Fatima; Scalco, Renata S.; Fialho, Doreen; Parton, Matt; Raja Rayan, Dipa; Suetterlin, Karen; Sud, Richa; Spiegel, Roland; Mein, Rachel; Houlden, Henry; Schaefer, Andrew; Healy, Estelle; Palace, Jacqueline; Quinlivan, Ros; Treves, Susan; Holton, Janice L.; Jungbluth, Heinz; Hanna, Michael G.

    2018-01-01

    Objective To characterize the phenotype of patients with symptoms of periodic paralysis (PP) and ryanodine receptor (RYR1) gene mutations. Methods Cases with a possible diagnosis of PP but additional clinicopathologic findings previously associated with RYR1-related disorders were referred for a tertiary neuromuscular clinical assessment in which they underwent detailed clinical evaluation, including neurophysiologic assessment, muscle biopsy, and muscle MRI. Genetic analysis with next-generation sequencing and/or targeted Sanger sequencing was performed. Results Three cases with episodic muscle paralysis or weakness and additional findings compatible with a RYR1-related myopathy were identified. The McManis test, used in the diagnosis of PP, was positive in 2 of 3 cases. Genetic analysis of known PP genes was negative. RYR1 analysis confirmed likely pathogenic variants in all 3 cases. Conclusions RYR1 mutations can cause late-onset atypical PP both with and without associated myopathy. Myalgia and cramps are prominent features. The McManis test may be a useful diagnostic tool to indicate RYR1-associated PP. We propose that clinicopathologic features suggestive of RYR1-related disorders should be sought in genetically undefined PP cases and that RYR1 gene testing be considered in those in whom mutations in SCN4A, CACNA1S, and KCNJ2 have already been excluded. PMID:29298851

  11. Report of ischemic stroke mimicking isolated ulnar nerve paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çetin Kürşad Akpınar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The cortical motor hand area is the precentral gyrus. Small cortical infarcts of this area can caused isolated hand weakness. Weakness can consist of either all fingers or ulnar-sided fingers. A 71-year-old man admitted to the emergency department with sudden weakness of the right fourth and fifth fingers Diffusion-weighted brain imaging of a magnetic resonance imaging scan revealed acute infarction of right precentral gyrus. Cardioembolus is the determined ischemic stroke subtype. This report presented a case of ischemic stroke mimicking isolated ulnar nerve paralysis.

  12. Recurrent Vocal Fold Paralysis and Parsonage-Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Vinicius Pinto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Parsonage-Turner syndrome, or neuralgic amyotrophy (NA, is an acute brachial plexus neuritis that typically presents with unilateral shoulder pain and amyotrophy but also can affect other peripheral nerves, including the recurrent laryngeal nerve. Idiopathic vocal fold paralysis (VFP represents approximately 12% of the VFP cases and recurrence is extremely rare. Methods and Results. We report a man with isolated recurrent unilateral right VFP and a diagnosis of NA years before. Conclusions. We emphasize that shoulder pain and amyotrophy should be inquired in any patient suffering from inexplicable dysphonia, and Parsonage-Turner syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of idiopathic VFP.

  13. Hepatitis E Virus Induced Acute Liver Failure with Scrub Typhus Coinfection in a Pregnant Woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Nipun; Sharma, Megha; Biswal, Manisha; Taneja, Sunil; Batra, Nitya; Kumar, Abhay; Dhiman, Radha K

    2017-06-01

    Coinfections contribute significantly to diagnostic challenges of acute febrile illnesses, especially in endemic areas. The confusion caused by overlapping clinical features impedes timely management. Herein, we report an unusual, previously unreported case of a pregnant woman suffering from a coinfection of scrub typhus and hepatitis E virus. A 25-year-old, 31-week pregnant woman presented with jaundice for 5 days and altered sensorium for 2 days. She had features of both viral acute liver failure (ALF) and tropical infections mimicking ALF, including hyperbilirubinemia, coagulopathy, anemia, thrombocytopenia, intravascular hemolysis, and hepatosplenomegaly. Etiological workup revealed rare coinfection of hepatitis E and scrub typhus. Despite all supportive measures, the patient succumbed to her illness (i.e., absent brainstem reflexes and intracranial bleed secondary to coagulopathy) and had poor fetal outcome, which resulted in stillbirth. ALF in a pregnant woman is a medical and obstetric emergency. It can result from varied etiologies that though differ in their incidence, mode of occurrence, and pregnancy outcome, can clinically masquerade as each other, causing diagnostic dilemma. This unusual case report highlights the significance of keeping all such possibilities in mind while managing a pregnant woman with ALF, especially in a country like India where maternal and perinatal mortality rates, the core indicators of national health, are still among the highest in the world.

  14. CD80 Regulates Th17 Cell Differentiation in Coxsackie Virus B3-Induced Acute Myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanlan; Li, Yong; Wei, Bin; Wu, Weifeng; Gao, Xingcui

    2018-02-01

    The cluster of differentiation protein complex, CD80/CD86, regulates Th1/Th2 differentiation in autoimmune disease. In order to establish the effects of CD80/CD86 on Th17 cell differentiation in acute viral myocarditis (VMC), we infected C57BL/6 mice with Coxsackie virus B3 (CVB3) and examined the effects of the treatment with anti-CD80/CD86 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) on Th17 cell differentiation in vivo. The effects of anti-CD80/CD86 mAbs on Th17 cell differentiation were further evaluated in vitro. The treatment with anti-CD80 mAb induced marked suppression of Th17 cell differentiation and ROR-γt mRNA expression, whereas anti-CD86 mAb alone had no effect, both in vivo and in vitro. Our finding that CD80 regulates Th17 differentiation supports the potential utility of anti-CD80 mAb as an effective new immunotherapeutic target in acute VMC.

  15. Acute hepatitis A virus infection is associated with a limited type I interferon response and persistence of intrahepatic viral RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanford, Robert E; Feng, Zongdi; Chavez, Deborah; Guerra, Bernadette; Brasky, Kathleen M; Zhou, Yan; Yamane, Daisuke; Perelson, Alan S; Walker, Christopher M; Lemon, Stanley M

    2011-07-05

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is an hepatotropic human picornavirus that is associated only with acute infection. Its pathogenesis is not well understood because there are few studies in animal models using modern methodologies. We characterized HAV infections in three chimpanzees, quantifying viral RNA by quantitative RT-PCR and examining critical aspects of the innate immune response including intrahepatic IFN-stimulated gene expression. We compared these infection profiles with similar studies of chimpanzees infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), an hepatotropic flavivirus that frequently causes persistent infection. Surprisingly, HAV-infected animals exhibited very limited induction of type I IFN-stimulated genes in the liver compared with chimpanzees with acute resolving HCV infection, despite similar levels of viremia and 100-fold greater quantities of viral RNA in the liver. Minimal IFN-stimulated gene 15 and IFIT1 responses peaked 1-2 wk after HAV challenge and then subsided despite continuing high hepatic viral RNA. An acute inflammatory response at 3-4 wk correlated with the appearance of virus-specific antibodies and apoptosis and proliferation of hepatocytes. Despite this, HAV RNA persisted in the liver for months, remaining present long after clearance from serum and feces and revealing dramatic differences in the kinetics of clearance in the three compartments. Viral RNA was detected in the liver for significantly longer (35 to >48 wk) than HCV RNA in animals with acute resolving HCV infection (10-20 wk). Collectively, these findings indicate that HAV is far stealthier than HCV early in the course of acute resolving infection. HAV infections represent a distinctly different paradigm in virus-host interactions within the liver.

  16. Robot-Assisted Rehabilitation of Hand Paralysis After Stroke Reduces Wrist Edema and Pain: A Prospective Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borboni, Alberto; Villafañe, Jorge H; Mullè, Chiara; Valdes, Kristin; Faglia, Rodolfo; Taveggia, Giovanni; Negrini, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether passive robotic-assisted hand motion, in addition to standard rehabilitation, would reduce hand pain, edema, or spasticity in all patients following acute stroke, in patients with and without hand paralysis. Thirty-five participants, aged 45 to 80 years, with functional impairments of their upper extremities after a stroke were recruited for the study from September 2013 to October 2013. One group consisted of 16 patients (mean age ± SD, 68 ± 9 years) with full paralysis and the other groups included 14 patients (mean age ± SD, 67 ± 8 years) with partial paralysis. Patients in the both groups used the Gloreha device for passive mobilization of the hand twice a day for 2 consecutive weeks. The primary outcome measure was hand edema. Secondary outcome measures included pain intensity and spasticity. All outcome measures were collected at baseline and immediately after the intervention (2 weeks). Analysis of variance revealed that the partial paralysis group experienced a significantly greater reduction of edema at the wrist (P = .005) and pain (P = .04) when compared with the full paralysis group. Other outcomes were similar for the groups. The results of the current study suggest that the partial paralysis group experienced a significantly greater reduction of edema at the wrist and pain when compared with the full paralysis group. The reduction in pain did not meet the threshold of a minimal clinically important difference. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Sin nombre virus (SNV) Ig isotype antibody response during acute and convalescent phases of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostik, P; Winter, J; Ksiazek, T G; Rollin, P E; Villinger, F; Zaki, S R; Peters, C J; Ansari, A A

    2000-01-01

    Serum samples from 22 hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) patients were tested for Sin Nombre virus (SNV)-reactive antibodies. In the acute phase of HPS, 100% and 67% of the samples tested positive for SNV-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) M and IgA, respectively. Among the virus-specific IgG antibodies, the most prevalent were IgG3 (in 97% of samples), followed by IgG1 (70%), IgG2 (30%), and IgG4 (3%).

  18. Functional limb weakness and paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, J; Aybek, S

    2016-01-01

    Functional (psychogenic) limb weakness describes genuinely experienced limb power or paralysis in the absence of neurologic disease. The hallmark of functional limb weakness is the presence of internal inconsistency revealing a pattern of symptoms governed by abnormally focused attention. In this chapter we review the history and epidemiology of this clinical presentation as well as its subjective experience highlighting the detailed descriptions of authors at the end of the 19th and early 20th century. We discuss the relevance that physiological triggers such as injury and migraine and psychophysiological events such as panic and dissociation have to understanding of mechanism and treatment. We review many different positive diagnostic features, their basis in neurophysiological testing and present data on sensitivity and specificity. Diagnostic bedside tests with the most evidence are Hoover's sign, the hip abductor sign, drift without pronation, dragging gait, give way weakness and co-contraction. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Efficacy of immunization against hepatitis B virus infection in acute leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuphan Kanti Dolai

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the antibody response to combined passive-active immunization versus active immunization against hepatitis B in 71 patients with acute leukemia with negative hepatitis B virus serology at presentation. Materials and Methods: The first group (n=28 received a double dose of hepatitis B vaccine at 0, 1, 2 and 6 months and immunoglobin (HBIG at 0 and 1 month concurrently with vaccine but at a different intramuscular site. The second group (n=43 received double dose of hepatitis B vaccine at 0, 1, 2, and 6 months. HBsAg and anti-HBs titers were determined one month after the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th doses of vaccine. Results: In the vaccine-only group, 2.56%, 8.33%, 14.28% and 34.29% of patients developed anti-HBs titer ≥10 IU/L after the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th doses of vaccine, respectively. In the HBIG group, 91.30%, 91.30%, 69.56% and 73.91% of patients developed anti-HBs titer ≥10 IU/L after the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th doses of vaccine, respectively. Those in the vaccine-HBIG group maintained their anti-HBs titer ≥10 IU/L from the 1st to the 4th doses. In the vaccine-only group, 34.29% of patients gained protective antibody titer after receiving the 4th dose of vaccine. Subgroup analysis of age (pediatric vs adult and disease (acute lymphoblastic leukemia vs acute myeloid leukemia groups showed no effect of either on the development of protective antibody titer. The incidence of HBsAg positivity one month after the 4th dose of vaccine was 8.62%. No patient became positive for anti-HCV or HIV antibody before or after chemo therapy.Conclusion: Combined HBIG and vaccine may protect acute leukemia patients during the intensive chemotherapy period.

  20. Immune and inflammatory response in pigs during acute influenza caused by H1N1 swine influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomorska-Mól, Małgorzata; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Kwit, Krzysztof; Czyżewska, Ewelina; Dors, Arkadiusz; Rachubik, Jarosław; Pejsak, Zygmunt

    2014-10-01

    Swine influenza (SI) is an acute respiratory disease of pigs, caused by swine influenza virus (SIV). Little is known about the inflammatory response in the lung during acute SI and its correlation with clinical signs or lung pathology. Moreover, until now there has been a limited amount of data available on the relationship between the concentrations of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the lungs and the serum concentration of acute-phase proteins (APPs) in SIV-infected pigs. In the present study, the porcine inflammatory and immune responses during acute influenza caused by H1N1 SIV (SwH1N1) were studied. Nine pigs were infected intratracheally, and five served as controls. Antibodies against SIV were measured by haemagglutination inhibition assay, and the influenza-virus-specific T-cell response was measured using a proliferation assay. C-reactive protein (CRP), haptoglobin (Hp), serum amyloid A (SAA), and pig major acute-phase protein (Pig-MAP) the concentrations in serum and concentration of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-α and IFN-γ in lung tissues were measured using commercial ELISAs.

  1. Prevalence of hepatitis viruses in patients with acute hepatitis and characterization of the detected genotype 4 hepatitis E virus sequences in Mongolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsatsralt-Od, Bira; Baasanjav, Nachin; Nyamkhuu, Dulmaa; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Masaharu; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis E is considered to be a worldwide public health problem. Although the prevalence of hepatitis E virus (HEV) antibodies in healthy individuals is noted to be 11%, no patients with acute hepatitis E have previously been identified in Mongolia. Three hundred two consecutive patients (183 males and 119 females; median age of 22.0 [Interquartile range: 18.3-25.0] years) who were clinically diagnosed with sporadic acute hepatitis during 2012-2013 in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, were studied. By serological and/or molecular approaches, 77 (25.5%), 93 (30.8%), 19 (6.3%), 48 (15.9%), and 12 (4.0%) of the patients were diagnosed with acute hepatitis of types A, B, C, D (superinfection of hepatitis delta virus on a background of chronic hepatitis B virus infection) and E, respectively, while the cause of hepatitis was unknown in the remaining 53 patients (17.5%). The 12 hepatitis E patients had no history of travel abroad in the 3 months before the onset of disease, and lived separately in fixed or movable houses with water supplied via pipe, tank or well, denying transmission from a common water supply. The 12 HEV isolates obtained from the patients showed high nucleotide identities of 99.7-100%, and a representative HEV isolate, MNE13-227, was closest to the Chinese isolates of genotype 4, with the highest identity of 97.3% in the 304-nt ORF2 sequence and 92.1% over the entire genome. The present study revealed the occurrence of autochthonous acute hepatitis E in Mongolia, caused by a monophyletic genotype 4 HEV strain. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Does Fasciola hepatica infection modify the response of acute hepatitis C virus infection to IFN-α treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Mehmet; Isler, Mehmet; Senol, Altug; Demirci, Mustafa; Aydın, Zeynep Dilek

    2005-01-01

    Immunologic response to acute hepatitis C is mainly a Th1 response, whereas fasciolopsiasis is associated with a diverse T-cell response. Interferon-alpha has immunomodulatory effects and enhances Th1 immune response. Fasciola infection could theoretically interfere with the Th1 immune response, even when acquired after an initial response to interferon-alpha treatment for acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We report here the case of a male patient who acquired Fasciola hepatica infection after an initial response to IFN-alpha therapy with a favorable outcome PMID:16437701

  3. Angiographic Features and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients With First-Time Acute Coronary Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Andreas; Mathiasen, Anders B; Worck, R.H.

    2013-01-01

    A matched cohort study was conducted comparing patients with first-time acute coronary syndromes infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to non-HIV-infected patients with and without diabetes matched for smoking, gender, and type of acute coronary syndrome who underwent first-time coronary...... angiography. A total of 48 HIV-infected patients were identified from a national database. Coronary angiography showed that the HIV-infected patients had significantly fewer lesions with classification B2/C than the 2 control groups (p...

  4. Complete paralysis of the quadriceps secondary to post-traumatic iliopsoas hematoma: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, N; Bohu, Y; Klouche, S; Chemla, N; Herman, S

    2015-01-01

    Paralysis of the femoral nerve secondary to compression by a hematoma of the iliopsoas is rarely post-traumatic. The acute surgical removal of hematoma seems the treatment of choice. The main objective of this systematic review was to determine the optimal delay between the trauma and surgery, to obtain a total functional recovery. A search was performed via PubMed. The inclusion criteria were the studies in English language, reporting the results of the treatment of femoral nerve palsy secondary to compression by a post-traumatic hematoma of the iliopsoas. The primary evaluation criterion was the clinical recovery of femoral nerve function. The secondary criteria were the delay of recovery and the delay between the trauma and surgery. Thirteen studies were identified, only case reports. Sixteen patients were included, mean age 16.6 ± 3.4 years, 11 men and 5 women. The injury was associated with the sports practice in 12/16 (75 %) cases. Neurological symptoms developed about 5 days after injury. Femoral palsy was complete in 8 patients and partial in 8 patients. The mean delay between the injury and the diagnosis was 7.3 (2-25) days in conservative group and 17.8 (4-45) days in surgical group. Seven patients were managed conservatively, 6 partial paralysis and 1 total paralysis, and 9 surgically, 7 total paralysis and 2 partial paralysis. The recovery was total in 13/14 patients (seven surgical treatment and six conservative management) and partial in one patient who was managed conservatively despite a total paralysis. The delay of total recovery varied from 1 month to 6 weeks in conservative group and 3 months to 2 years in surgical group. This systematic review seems to indicate that whatever the delay, surgery is necessary in case of complete paralysis of the femoral nerve secondary to compression from a post-traumatic hematoma of the iliopsoas muscle.

  5. Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy associated with pegylated interferon α 2a therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Khiani, Vijay; Kelly, Thomas; Shibli, Adeel; Jensen, Donald; Mohanty, Smruti R

    2008-01-01

    The combination of pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN) and ribavirin is the standard of care for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection treatment. In general, common side effects related to this combination therapy are mild and are very well tolerated. However, peripheral neuropathy including demyelinating polyneuropathy related to Peg-IFN is extremely rare. We present the first case of an acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) associated with Peg-IFN-α 2a (Pegasys) after 16 wk ...

  6. A Potent Virus-Specific Antibody-Secreting Cell Response to Acute Enterovirus 71 Infection in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuan-Ying Arthur; Lin, Jainn-Jim; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Yang, Shuan; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Lin, Tzou-Yien

    2015-09-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) remains a leading pathogen for acute infectious diseases in children, especially in Asia. The cellular basis for establishing a virus-specific antibody response to acute EV71 infections is unclear in children. We studied the magnitude of virus-specific antibody-secreting B cells (ASCs) and its relationship with serological response, clinical parameters, and virological parameters among children with laboratory-confirmed EV71 infection. A potent EV71 genogroup B- and virus-specific ASC response was detected in the first week of illness among genotype B5 EV71-infected children. The cross-reactive EV71-specific ASC response to genogroup C viral antigens composed about 10% of the response. The EV71-specific ASC response in children aged ≥3 years produced immunoglobulin G predominantly, but immunoglobulin M was predominant in younger children. Proliferation marker was expressed by the majority of circulating ASCs in the acute phase of EV71 infection. Virus-specific ASC responses significantly correlated with throat viral load, fever duration, and serological genogroup-specific neutralization titer. The presence of a virus-specific ASC response serves an early cellular marker of an EV71-specific antibody response. Further detailed study of EV71-specific ASCs at the monoclonal level is crucial to delineate the specificity and function of antibody immunity in children. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Acute Kidney Injury and Urinary Biomarkers in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Cryptococcal Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutz, Charlotte; Boulware, David R; Huppler-Hullsiek, Katherine; von Hohenberg, Maximilian; Rhein, Joshua; Taseera, Kabanda; Thienemann, Friedrich; Muzoora, Conrad; Meya, David B; Meintjes, Graeme

    2017-01-01

    Cryptococcus is the most common etiology of adult meningitis in Africa. Amphotericin B deoxycholate remains paramount to treatment, despite toxicities, including acute kidney injury (AKI). We assessed the ability of the following urine markers to predict AKI in patients who received amphotericin B: urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), cystatin C (CysC), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 (TIMP-2), and protein. One hundred and thirty human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected participants with cryptococcal meningitis were enrolled and received amphotericin and fluconazole for 2 weeks. We defined AKI as glomerular filtration rate (GFR) < 60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 ; measured urine NGAL, CysC, TIMP-2, and protein; and explored AKI incidence, risk factors, and associations with mortality using Cox proportional hazards models. Participants were 48% female with a median age of 35 years, a median CD4 count of 21 cells/μL, and 44% died within 12 months. Incident AKI occurred in 42% and was associated with mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 2.8; P < .001). Development of AKI was associated with female sex ( P = .04) and with higher CD4 count (49 vs 14 cells/μL; P < .01). Urine protein level in the highest quartile independently predicted AKI and mortality (aHR = 1.64, P = .04; aHR = 2.13, P = .02, respectively). Urine NGAL levels in the highest quartile independently predicted AKI (aHR = 1.65; P = .04). Acute kidney injury occurred in 42% of patients, and AKI was associated with mortality. Urine biomarkers, specifically urine protein, may be useful for antecedent prediction of amphotericin-associated AKI but need further evaluation.

  8. Concurrent hypokalemic periodic paralysis and bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Lin Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary periodic paralysis is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of ion-channel dysfunction, manifested by episodic flaccid paresis secondary to abnormal sarcolemma excitability. Membrane destabilization involving Na, K-ATPase has been hypothesized to be a biological etiology of the bipolar disorder (BD and the mechanisms underlying lithium therapy have been linked to it. To date, there has been only one reported case of BD comorbid with periodic paralysis. Herein, we reported another case of concurrent bipolar mania and hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HPP, one special form of periodic paralysis. Consistent with the previous case, our patient responded well to lithium treatment for both bipolar mania and HPP. This might provide some support to the hypothesis that the therapeutic effects of lithium in both BD and HPP could be due to the correction of the underlying common pathophysiology.

  9. Voltage Sensors in Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Researchers at the National Hospital, Queen Square, London, UK, conducted automated DNA sequencing of the S4 regions of CACNA1S and SCN4A in 83 patients with hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP.

  10. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody dynamics following acute HCV infection and reinfection among HIV-infected men who have sex with men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanhommerig, Joost W.; Thomas, Xiomara V.; van der Meer, Jan T. M.; Geskus, Ronald B.; Bruisten, Sylvia M.; Molenkamp, Richard; Prins, Maria; Schinkel, Janke; Arends, J.; van Baarle, D.; van den Berk, G.; Brinkman, K.; Coutinho, R.; van den Ende, M.; Grady, B.; Gras, L.; Ho, C.; Kwa, D.; van de Laar, T.; Lambers, F.; Mulder, J.; Reesink, H.; Smit, C.; van der Valk, M.; van der Veldt, W.; Karlas, J.; Bakker, M.; Visser, G.; Buswell, C.

    2014-01-01

    A decline of hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody titers (anti-HCV), ultimately resulting in seroreversion, has been reported following clearance of viremia in both acute and chronic HCV infection. However, frequency of seroreversion remains unknown in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV-coinfected

  11. The serological markers of acute infection with hepatitis A, B, C, D, E and G viruses revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pondé, Robério Amorim de Almeida

    2017-12-01

    Viral hepatitis is a liver infection caused by one of the six hepatitis viruses: hepatitis A, B, C, D, E, and G virus (HAV to HEV and HGV). These agents differ in their biological, immunological, pathological and epidemiological characteristics. They cause infections that, when symptomatic, lead to clinical manifestations and laboratory findings that are not specific to a particular virus, often making differential diagnosis difficult, especially when no knowledge is available regarding the patient's medical history or the epidemiological background. A number of acute-phase serological markers, such as anti-HAV, anti-HBc, anti-HDV and anti-HEV IgM antibodies, are able to provide a clear indication of an infection caused by HAV, HBV, HDV or HEV. Anti-HCV antibodies and HGV/RNA are used for the diagnosis of HCV and HGV infections. The importance of each of these markers will be reviewed, and different factors that can interfere with the diagnosis of acute infections caused by these viruses will be described.

  12. Immunohistochemical detection of virus through its nuclear cytopathic effect in idiopathic interstitial pneumonia other than acute exacerbation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.C. dos Santos

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias include complex diseases that have a strong interaction between genetic makeup and environmental factors. However, in many cases, no infectious agent can be demonstrated, and these clinical diseases rapidly progress to death. Theoretically, idiopathic interstitial pneumonias could be caused by the Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, adenovirus, hepatitis C virus, respiratory syncytial virus, and herpesvirus, which may be present in such small amounts or such configuration that routine histopathological analysis or viral culture techniques cannot detect them. To test the hypothesis that immunohistochemistry provides more accurate results than the mere histological demonstration of viral inclusions, this method was applied to 37 open lung biopsies obtained from patients with idiopathic interstitial pneumonias. As a result, immunohistochemistry detected measles virus and cytomegalovirus in diffuse alveolar damage-related histological patterns of acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia in 38 and 10% of the cases, respectively. Alveolar epithelium infection by cytomegalovirus was observed in 25% of organizing pneumonia patterns. These findings were coincident with nuclear cytopathic effects but without demonstration of cytomegalovirus inclusions. These data indicate that diffuse alveolar damage-related cytomegalovirus or measles virus infections enhance lung injury, and a direct involvement of these viruses in diffuse alveolar damage-related histological patterns is likely. Immunohistochemistry was more sensitive than the histological demonstration of cytomegalovirus or measles virus inclusions. We concluded that all patients with diffuse alveolar damage-related histological patterns should be investigated for cytomegalovirus and measles virus using sensitive immunohistochemistry in conjunction with routine procedures.

  13. Gd-DTPA-enhanced MR imaging in facial nerve paralysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tien, R.D.; Dillon, W.P.

    1989-01-01

    GD-DTPA-enhanced MR imaging was used to evaluate 11 patients with facial nerve paralysis (five acute idiopathic facial palsy (Bell palsy), three chronic recurrent facial palsy, one acute facial palsy after local radiation therapy, one chronic facial dyskinesia, and one facial neuroma). In eight of 11 patients, there was marked enhancement of the infratemporal facial nerve from the labyrinthine segment to the stylomastoid foramen. Two patients had additional contrast enhancement in the internal auditory canal segment. In one patient, enhancement persisted (but to a lesser degree) 8 weeks after symptoms had resolved. In one patient, no enhancement was seen 15 months after resolution of Bell palsy. The facial neuroma was seen as a focal nodular enhancement in the mastoid segment of the facial nerve

  14. Dominant cross-reactive B cell response during secondary acute dengue virus infection in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Zompi

    Full Text Available The four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV cause dengue fever (DF and dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS. Severe disease has been associated with heterotypic secondary DENV infection, mediated by cross-reactive antibodies (Abs and/or cross-reactive T cells. The role of cross-reactive immunity in mediating enhanced disease versus cross-protection against secondary heterotypic DENV infection is not well defined. A better understanding of the cross-reactive immune response in natural infections is critical for development of safe and effective tetravalent vaccines. We studied the B cell phenotype of circulating B cells in the blood of pediatric patients suspected of dengue during the 2010-2011 dengue season in Managua, Nicaragua (n  =  216, which was dominated by the DENV-3 serotype. We found a markedly larger percentage of plasmablast/plasma cells (PB/PCs circulating in DENV-positive patients as compared to patients with Other Febrile Illnesses (OFIs. The percentage of DENV-specific PB/PCs against DENV-3 represented 10% of the circulating antibody-producing cells (ASCs in secondary DENV-3 infections. Importantly, the cross-reactive DENV-specific B cell response was higher against a heterotypic serotype, with 46% of circulating PB/PCs specific to DENV-2 and 10% specific to DENV-3 during acute infection. We also observed a higher cross-reactive DENV-specific IgG serum avidity directed against DENV-2 as compared to DENV-3 during acute infection. The neutralization capacity of the serum was broadly cross-reactive against the four DENV serotypes both during the acute phase and at 3 months post-onset of symptoms. Overall, the cross-reactive B cell immune response dominates during secondary DENV infections in humans. These results reflect our recent findings in a mouse model of DENV cross-protection. In addition, this study enabled the development of increased technical and research capacity of Nicaraguan scientists and the

  15. Hepatitis E Virus Genotype 3 in Sewage and Genotype 1 in Acute Hepatitis Cases, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Daniela; Manor, Yossi; Gozlan, Yael; Schwartz, Eli; Ben-Ari, Ziv; Mendelson, Ella; Mor, Orna

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emerging infectious agent in developed countries. HEV genotypes 1 (G1) and 3 (G3) have been identified in environmental and clinical samples in Europe. In Israel, the overall prevalence of anti-HEV IgG antibodies was found to be 10.6%; however, reports of HEV infection are scarce. In this study, the presence of HEV in Israel was investigated using 169 sewage samples from 32 treatment facilities and 49 samples from acute hepatitis patients, all collected between 2013 and 2015. Fourteen sewage samples, from Haifa (11/18 samples), Tel Aviv (2/29 samples), and Beer Sheva (1/17 samples), regions with good sanitary conditions and middle-high socioeconomic populations, were HEV positive. Among the patient samples, 6.1% (3/49) were HEV positive, all returning travelers from India. Genotype analysis revealed G1 HEV in patients and G3 HEV sequences in sewage. Evidence that HEV could be establishing itself in our region may justify more active surveillance to monitor its spread. PMID:27246446

  16. Screening for acute human immunodeficiency virus infection in Baltimore public testing sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin, Elizabeth; Marsiglia, Vincent C; Hague, Christian; Erbelding, Emily

    2011-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA testing of pooled HIV antibody-negative specimens can identify acute HIV infection (AHI) and trigger interventions to reduce transmission during this highly infectious period. A Baltimore, MD program serving sexually transmitted disease clinics and other high-risk sites combined HIV testing by third-generation enzyme immunoassay (EIA) with RNA testing of pooled antibody-negative specimens. Laboratory and Disease Intervention Specialists' records were reviewed for program evaluation. A cost analysis was performed. In 22 months, we tested 60,695 specimens for HIV. Of these, 1766 (2.9%) tested positive by EIA. Pooled HIV RNA testing of 58,925 EIA-negative specimens detected 7 cases of AHI (0.01%). Reflex HIV RNA testing of EIA-reactive, Western blot-indeterminate specimens confirmed 4 additional AHI cases (total AHI, 0.02%). Contact tracing detected no additional previously unknown cases of HIV infection. The utility of pooled HIV RNA testing may be limited by advances in HIV testing technology that reduce the seronegative window period and by characteristics of the local HIV epidemic.

  17. ACUTE RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS INFECTION IN CHILDREN IN THE AGE ASPECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Rovny

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical features of laboratory-confirmed acute respiratory syncytial virus infection (ARSVI are described in 221 children of the age from 1 month to 5 years. Febrile fever has been recorded in 76% of patients with ARSVI, and significantly more often in children in the second year of life (92%, but the difference in the temerature or duration has not been found. 98% of children have had symptoms of the lower respiratory tract lesions. The most common ARSVI manifestations in the patients of the first year of life were obstructive diseases of the lower respiratory tract (obstructive bronchitis in 53% and bronchiolitis in 11% of children, in the patients of the second year of life — pneumonia (28%, p < 0,05 and catarrhal otitis (26%; p < 0,05. Bronchial obstruction syndrome in children of the first year of life was characterized by the significantly higher frequency (73% and the maximal duration (9,7 ± 1,08 days. The largest number of cases of the severe respiratory failure has been recorded among patients of the second year of life (3 degree of respiratory failure in 22% of patients, p < 0,05.

  18. [Acute outbreak of hepatitis C in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Rebollar, Maria; Mallolas, Josep; Pérez, Iñaki; González-Cordón, Ana; Loncà, Montserrat; Torres, Berta; Rojas, Jhon-Fredy; Monteiro, Polyana; Blanco, José-Luis; Martínez, Esteban; Gatell, José-María; Laguno, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies suggest an increased incidence of acute infection with hepatitisC virus (AHC) in men who have sex with men (MSM) co-infected with HIV. Early treatment with interferon-alpha, alone or in combination with ribavirin, significantly reduces the risk of chronic evolution. This retrospective study includes all HIV patients with AHC in our centre from 2003 to March 2013. AHC was defined by seroconversion of HCV antibodies and detection of serum HCV RNA. 93 episodes of AHC were diagnosed in 89 patients. All but three were MSM with a history of unprotected sex. Thirty-seven (40%) patients had other associated sexually transmitted disease. The 29% (27) had any symptoms suggestive of AHC. HCV genotype 4 was the most common (41%), followed by genotype1. Seventy patients started treatment with interferon-alfa and weight-adjusted ribavirin. Currently 46 have completed treatment and follow-up, reaching 26 of them (56.5%) sustained viral response. The incidence of AHC in HIV MSM patients from our centre has increased exponentially in recent years; sexual transmission remains the main route of infection. Early treatment with interferon-alpha and ribavirin achieved a moderate response in these patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  19. Acute and Chronic Hepatitis E Virus Infection in HIV-Infected United States Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuniholm, Mark H.; Ong, Edgar; Hogema, Boris M.; Koppelman, Marco; Anastos, Kathryn; Peters, Marion G.; Seaberg, Eric C.; Chen, Yue; Nelson, Kenrad E.; Linnen, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to hepatitis E virus (HEV) is common in the United States (US) but there are few data on prevalence of HEV/HIV co-infection in US populations. We tested 2,919 plasma samples collected from HIV-infected (HIV+) women and men enrolled in US cohort studies for HEV viremia using a high-throughput nucleic acid testing (NAT) platform. NAT+ samples were confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Samples were selected for testing primarily on the basis of biomarkers of liver disease and immune suppression. Prevalence of HEV viremia was 3/2,606 and 0/313 in tested plasma samples collected from HIV+ women and men, respectively. All HEV isolates were genotype 3a. Based on follow-up testing of stored samples, one woman had chronic HEV infection for >4 years while 2 women had acute HEV detectable at only a single study visit. Conclusion To our knowledge this is the first reported case of chronic HEV infection in an HIV+ US individual. We also confirm that chronic HEV infection can persist despite a CD4+ count >200 cells/mm3. These data suggest that HEV infection is rare in the HIV+ US population. PMID:26646162

  20. A diagnostic score for the prediction of spontaneous resolution of acute hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinhardt, Sandra; Payer, Berit Anna; Datz, Christian; Strasser, Michael; Maieron, Andreas; Dorn, Livia; Grilnberger-Franz, Evelyn; Dulic-Lakovic, Emina; Stauber, Rudolf; Laferl, Hermann; Aberle, Judith H; Holzmann, Heidemarie; Krall, Christoph; Vogel, Wolfgang; Ferenci, Peter; Hofer, Harald

    2013-11-01

    IL28B polymorphisms, jaundice, decline in HCV-RNA, IP-10, and gender have been proposed to be indicative of spontaneous clearance of acute hepatitis C virus infection. The aim of this study was to define a score enabling the discrimination of patients with spontaneous clearance of HCV from those with development of viral persistence and need for early antiviral treatment. 136 patients (74 male; 35 ± 15 years) were analyzed. From variables predictive of spontaneous clearance, calculated by univariate analysis, three scores were built. Analogous cut-offs were evaluated by computing area under the receiver operating characteristic curves. Candidate variables and cut-offs were: (I) presence of IL28B C/C (p=0.027), (II) age (p=0.031; cut-off: 35 years), (III) peak-bilirubin (p=0.018; cut-off: 6 mg/dl), (IV) HCV-RNA decline within 4 weeks (p2.5 log), (V) serum IP-10 (p=0.003; cut-off: 546 pg/ml), (VI) presence of CD4(+) Th1 cells (p=0.024). Each variable was allocated to 0 or 1 point, an HCV-RNA decline of ≥ 1 log 10 but discrimination between AHC-patients with high potential for spontaneous clearance from candidates for early therapeutic intervention due to marginal chance of spontaneous resolution. Copyright © 2013 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Infection of rhesus macaques with a pool of simian immunodeficiency virus with the envelope genes from acute HIV-1 infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Kendall C; Tian, Meijuan; Asmal, Mohammed; Ling, Binhua; Nelson, Kenneth; Henry, Kenneth; Gibson, Richard; Li, Yuejin; Han, Weining; Shattock, Robin J; Veazey, Ronald S; Letvin, Norman; Arts, Eric J; Gao, Yong

    2016-11-25

    New simian-human immunodeficiency chimeric viruses with an HIV-1 env (SHIVenv) are critical for studies on HIV pathogenesis, vaccine development, and microbicide testing. Macaques are typically exposed to single CCR5-using SHIVenv which in most instances does not reflect the conditions during acute/early HIV infection (AHI) in humans. Instead of individual and serial testing new SHIV constructs, a pool of SHIVenv_B derived from 16 acute HIV-1 infections were constructed using a novel yeast-based SHIV cloning approach and then used to infect macaques. Even though none of the 16 SHIVenvs contained the recently reported mutations in env genes that could significantly enhance their binding affinity to RhCD4, one SHIVenv (i.e. SHIVenv_B3-PRB926) established infection in macaques exposed to this pool. AHI SHIVenv_B viruses as well as their HIVenv_B counterparts were analyzed for viral protein content, function, and fitness to identify possible difference between SHIVenv_B3-PRB926 and the other 15 SHIVenvs in the pool. All of the constructs produced SHIV or HIV chimeric with wild type levels of capsid (p27 and p24) content, reverse transcriptase (RT) activity, and expressed envelope glycoproteins that could bind to cell receptors CD4/CCR5 and mediate virus entry. HIV-1env_B chimeric viruses were propagated in susceptible cell lines but the 16 SHIVenv_B variants showed only limited replication in macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and 174×CEM.CCR5 cell line. AHI chimeric viruses including HIVenv_B3 showed only minor variations in cell entry efficiency and kinetics as well as replicative fitness in human PBMCs. Reduced number of N-link glycosylation sites and slightly greater CCR5 affinity/avidity was the only distinguishing feature of env_B3 versus other AHI env's in the pool, a feature also observed in the HIV establishing new infections in humans. Despite the inability to propagate in primary cells and cell lines, a pool of 16 SHIVenv viruses could

  2. The effects of female sex, viral genotype, and IL28B genotype on spontaneous clearance of acute hepatitis C virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grebely, Jason; Page, Kimberly; Sacks-Davis, Rachel; van der Loeff, Maarten Schim; Rice, Thomas M.; Bruneau, Julie; Morris, Meghan D.; Hajarizadeh, Behzad; Amin, Janaki; Cox, Andrea L.; Kim, Arthur Y.; McGovern, Barbara H.; Schinkel, Janke; George, Jacob; Shoukry, Naglaa H.; Lauer, Georg M.; Maher, Lisa; Lloyd, Andrew R.; Hellard, Margaret; Dore, Gregory J.; Prins, Maria; Lauer, Georg; Morris, Meghan; Hahn, Judy; Rilla, Megan; Alavi, Maryam; Bouchard, Rachel; Evans, Jennifer; Grady, Bart; Aneja, Jasneet; Teutsch, Suzy; White, Bethany; Wells, Brittany; Zang, Geng; Applegate, Tanya; Matthews, Gail; Yeung, Barbara; Prince, Leslie Erin; Roy, Elise; Bates, Anna; Enriquez, Jarliene; Chow, Sammy; McCredie, Luke; Aitken, Campbell; Doyle, Joseph; Spelman, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Although 20%-40% of persons with acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection demonstrate spontaneous clearance, the time course and factors associated with clearance remain poorly understood. We investigated the time to spontaneous clearance and predictors among participants with acute HCV using Cox

  3. Severity of acute Zika virus infection: A prospective emergency room surveillance study during the 2015-2016 outbreak in Suriname.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vroon, Pieter; Roosblad, Jimmy; Poese, Fauzia; Wilschut, Jan; Codrington, John; Vreden, Stephen; Zonneveld, Rens

    2017-01-01

    Acute Zika virus (ZIKV) infection is usually mild and self-limiting. Earlier, we reported three cases of fatal acute ZIKV infection in patients without typical signs of ZIKV, but rather with criteria of systemic inflammation response syndrome (SIRS). To follow up these observations, we prospectively included patients at the emergency room with temperature instability and suspected to have acute ZIKV infection, SIRS, or both. A total of 102 patients were included of whom N = 21 (21%) were suspected of acute ZIKV infection, N = 56 (55%) of acute ZIKV infection with SIRS criteria, and N = 25 (24%) of SIRS alone. ZIKV-PCR was positive in N = 21 (20%) patients. Eight (38%) ZIKV-positive patients needed admission to the hospital of whom four (50%) presented with SIRS alone. One ZIKV-positive patient had vascular co-morbidity and died following shock and severe coagulopathy. We confirm the hypothesis that acute ZIKV infection can present atypical and severely with systemic inflammation and have lethal course particularly amongst patients with significant prior disease.

  4. N-acetyl-l-cystine (NAC) protects against H9N2 swine influenza virus-induced acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui-Hua; Li, Chun-Hong; Wang, Cun-Lian; Xu, Ming-Ju; Xu, Tong; Wei, Dong; Liu, Bao-Jian; Wang, Guo-Hua; Tian, Shu-Fei

    2014-09-01

    The antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) had been shown to inhibit replication of seasonal human influenza A viruses. Here, the effects of NAC on H9N2 swine influenza virus-induced acute lung injury (ALI) were investigated in mice. BALB/c mice were inoculated intranasally with 10(7) 50% tissue culture infective doses (TCID(50)) of A/swine/HeBei/012/2008/(H9N2) viruses with or without NAC treatments to induce ALI model. The result showed that pulmonary inflammation, pulmonary edema, MPO activity, total cells, neutrophils, macrophages, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and CXCL-10 in BALF were attenuated by NAC. Moreover, our data showed that NAC significantly inhibited the levels of TLR4 protein and TLR4 mRNA in the lungs. Pharmacological inhibitors of TLR4 (E5564) exerted similar effects like those determined for NAC in H9N2 swine influenza virus-infected mice. These results suggest that antioxidants like NAC represent a potential additional treatment option that could be considered in the case of an influenza A virus pandemic. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A Cross-Sectional Analysis of Acute Hepatitis B Virus Reported to the Vancouver Coastal Health Authority from 2000 to 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvette Leung

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute hepatitis B virus (HBV transmission remains a significant public health problem despite effective vaccination and prophylaxis strategies. Vancouver, British Columbia, has a large ethnic community from endemic areas, which may further impact on the epidemiology of acute HBV. A cross-sectional study of factors associated with acute HBV cases reported to the Vancouver Coastal Health Authority (Vancouver, British Columbia from 2000 to 2003 is reported.

  6. Dialysis-Requiring Acute Kidney Injury among Hospitalized Adults with Documented Hepatitis C Virus Infection: A Nationwide Inpatient Sample Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Girish N; Patel, Achint; Simoes, Priya K; Yacoub, Rabi; Annapureddy, Narender; Kamat, Sunil; Konstantinidis, Ioannis; Perumalswami, Ponni; Branch, Andrea; Coca, Steven G; Wyatt, Christina M

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection may cause kidney injury, particularly in the setting of cryoglobulinemia or cirrhosis; however, few studies have evaluated the epidemiology of acute kidney injury in patients with HCV. We aimed to describe national temporal trends of incidence and impact of severe AKI requiring renal replacement (“dialysis-requiring AKI”) in hospitalized adults with HCV. We extracted our study cohort from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project using data from 2004–2012. We defined HCV and dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury based on previously validated ICD-9-CM codes. We analyzed temporal changes in the proportion of hospitalizations complicated by dialysis-requiring AKI and utilized survey multivariable logistic regression models to estimate its impact on in-hospital mortality. We identified a total of 4,603,718 adult hospitalizations with an associated diagnosis of HCV from 2004–2012, of which 51,434 (1.12%) were complicated by dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury. The proportion of hospitalizations complicated by dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury increased significantly from 0.86% in 2004 to 1.28% in 2012. In-hospital mortality was significantly higher in hospitalizations complicated by dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury vs. those without (27.38% vs. 2.95%; adjusted odds ratio 2.09, 95% Confidence Interval 1.74–2.51). The proportion of HCV hospitalizations complicated by dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury increased significantly between 2004–2012. Similar to observations in the general population, dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury was associated with a two-fold increase in odds of in-hospital mortality in adults with HCV. These results highlight the burden of acute kidney injury in hospitalized adults with HCV infection. PMID:26189719

  7. The functional anatomy of suggested limb paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeley, Quinton; Oakley, David A; Toone, Brian; Bell, Vaughan; Walsh, Eamonn; Marquand, Andre F; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Michael J; Williams, Steven C R; Mehta, Mitul A; Halligan, Peter W

    2013-02-01

    Suggestions of limb paralysis in highly hypnotically suggestible subjects have been employed to successfully model conversion disorders, revealing similar patterns of brain activation associated with attempted movement of the affected limb. However, previous studies differ with regard to the executive regions involved during involuntary inhibition of the affected limb. This difference may have arisen as previous studies did not control for differences in hypnosis depth between conditions and/or include subjective measures to explore the experience of suggested paralysis. In the current study we employed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the functional anatomy of left and right upper limb movements in eight healthy subjects selected for high hypnotic suggestibility during (i) hypnosis (NORMAL) and (ii) attempted movement following additional left upper limb paralysis suggestions (PARALYSIS). Contrast of left upper limb motor function during NORMAL relative to PARALYSIS conditions revealed greater activation of contralateral M1/S1 and ipsilateral cerebellum, consistent with the engagement of these regions in the completion of movements. By contrast, two significant observations were noted in PARALYSIS relative to NORMAL conditions. In conjunction with reports of attempts to move the paralysed limb, greater supplementary motor area (SMA) activation was observed, a finding consistent with the role of SMA in motor intention and planning. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, BA 24) was also significantly more active in PARALYSIS relative to NORMAL conditions - suggesting that ACC (BA 24) may be implicated in involuntary, as well as voluntary inhibition of prepotent motor responses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Miocarditis fulminante y enfermedad diarreica aguda por Coxsackie virus B6 Fulminant myocarditis and acute gastroenteritis due to Coxsackie virus B6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán Málaga

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Presentamos el caso de una paciente joven que presentó choque cardiogénico por virus Coxsakie B6. La paciente acudió a una clínica particular con un cuadro clínico compatible con gastroenterocolitis aguda a la que después de una hora de estar recibiendo hidratación y manejo del cuadro diagnosticado, se agregó hipotensión que llegó al estado de choque, hipoxemia severa y compromiso pulmonar bilateral intersticial por lo que ingresó a Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos, donde recibió manejo de soporte. Debido al cuadro clínico y elevación de enzimas cardiacas se sospechó de compromiso cardiaco, la ecocardiografía evidenció cambios sugerentes de miocarditis. La evolución fue favorable y se le pudo dar de alta después de una semana. El diagnóstico etiológico del cuadro se hizo en el seguimiento, presentando serología con elevación de títulos para virus Coxsakie B6.We present the case of a young woman who suffered cardiogenic due to by Coxsackie virus B6. The patient attended a private clinic with an acute gastroenteritis and after one hour of receiving hydratation,she developed hypotension and shock, severe hypoxemia and bilateral lung infiltrate. The patient entered the Intensive Care Unit, where she received hemodynamic support. Due to the clinical picture and cardiac enzymes increase, a cardiac failure was suspected and the echocardiographic findings suggested "myocarditis". The evolution was successful and Coxsackie B6 virus infection diagnosis was made during the follow up by increase of the levels of antibodies for virus Coxsackie B6.

  9. Acute mucosal pathogenesis of feline immunodeficiency virus is independent of viral dose in vaginally infected cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egan Erin A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mucosal pathogenesis of HIV has been shown to be an important feature of infection and disease progression. HIV-1 infection causes depletion of intestinal lamina propria CD4+ T cells (LPL, therefore, intestinal CD4+ T cell preservation may be a useful correlate of protection in evaluating vaccine candidates. Vaccine studies employing the cat/FIV and macaque/SIV models frequently use high doses of parenterally administered challenge virus to ensure high plasma viremia in control animals. However, it is unclear if loss of mucosal T cells would occur regardless of initial viral inoculum dose. The objective of this study was to determine the acute effect of viral dose on mucosal leukocytes and associated innate and adaptive immune responses. Results Cats were vaginally inoculated with a high, middle or low dose of cell-associated and cell-free FIV. PBMC, serum and plasma were assessed every two weeks with tissues assessed eight weeks following infection. We found that irrespective of mucosally administered viral dose, FIV infection was induced in all cats. However, viremia was present in only half of the cats, and viral dose was unrelated to the development of viremia. Importantly, regardless of viral dose, all cats experienced significant losses of intestinal CD4+ LPL and CD8+ intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL. Innate immune responses by CD56+CD3- NK cells correlated with aviremia and apparent occult infection but did not protect mucosal T cells. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in viremic cats were more likely to produce cytokines in response to Gag stimulation, whereas aviremic cats T cells tended to produce cytokines in response to Env stimulation. However, while cell-mediated immune responses in aviremic cats may have helped reduce viral replication, they could not be correlated to the levels of viremia. Robust production of anti-FIV antibodies was positively correlated with the magnitude of viremia. Conclusions Our results indicate

  10. Hypokalemic paralysis in a young obese female.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Wen-Fang; Hsu, Yu-Juei; Chang, Chin-Chun; Lin, Shih-Hua

    2012-08-16

    Profound hypokalemia with paralysis usually poses a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. We report on a 28-y-old obese Chinese female presenting with sudden onset of flaccid quadriparesis upon awaking in the morning. There is no family history of hyperthyroidism. She experienced body weight loss of 7 kg in 2 months. The most conspicuous blood biochemistry is marked hypokalemia (1.8 mmol/l) and hypophosphatemia (0.5 mmol/l) associated with low urine K(+) and phosphate excretion. Surreptitious laxatives and/or diuretics abuse-related hypokalemic paralysis were tentatively made. However, her relatively normal blood acid-base status and the absence of low urine Na(+) and/or Cl(-) excretion made these diagnoses unlikely. Furthermore, she developed rebound hyperkalemia (5.7 mmol/l) after only 80 mmol K(+) supplementation. Thyroid function test confirmed hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease. Control of the hyperthyroidism completely abolished her periodic paralysis. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) should be kept in mind as a cause of paralysis in female, even with obesity, despite its predominance in adult males. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Hypokalemic paralysis in a professional bodybuilder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Florian B; Domanovits, Hans; Laggner, Anton N

    2012-09-01

    Severe hypokalemia is a potentially life-threatening disorder and is associated with variable degrees of skeletal muscle weakness, even to the point of paralysis. On rare occasions, diaphragmatic paralysis from hypokalemia can lead to respiratory arrest. There may also be decreased motility of smooth muscle, manifesting with ileus or urinary retention. Rarely, severe hypokalemia may result in rhabdomyolysis. Other manifestations of severe hypokalemia include alteration of cardiac tissue excitability and conduction. Hypokalemia can produce electrocardiographic changes such as U waves, T-wave flattening, and arrhythmias, especially if the patient is taking digoxin. Common causes of hypokalemia include extrarenal potassium losses (vomiting and diarrhea) and renal potassium losses (eg, hyperaldosteronism, renal tubular acidosis, severe hyperglycemia, potassium-depleting diuretics) as well as hypokalemia due to potassium shifts (eg, insulin administration, catecholamine excess, familial periodic hypokalemic paralysis, thyrotoxic hypokalemic paralysis). Although the extent of diuretic misuse in professional bodybuilding is unknown, it may be regarded as substantial. Hence, diuretics must always be considered as a cause of hypokalemic paralysis in bodybuilders.

  12. Motor inhibition in hysterical conversion paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojan, Yann; Waber, Lakshmi; Carruzzo, Alain; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2009-09-01

    Brain mechanisms underlying hysterical conversion symptoms are still poorly known. Recent hypotheses suggested that activation of motor pathways might be suppressed by inhibitory signals based on particular emotional situations. To assess motor and inhibitory brain circuits during conversion paralysis, we designed a go-nogo task while a patient underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Preparatory activation arose in right motor cortex despite left paralysis, indicating preserved motor intentions, but with concomitant increases in vmPFC regions that normally mediate motivational and affective processing. Failure to execute movement on go trials with the affected left hand was associated with activations in precuneus and ventrolateral frontal gyrus. However, right frontal areas normally subserving inhibition were activated by nogo trials for the right (normal) hand, but not during go trials for the left hand (affected by conversion paralysis). By contrast, a group of healthy controls who were asked to feign paralysis showed similar activation on nogo trials and left-go trials with simulated weakness, suggesting that distinct inhibitory mechanisms are implicated in simulation and conversion paralysis. In the patient, right motor cortex also showed enhanced functional connectivity with the posterior cingulate cortex, precuneus, and vmPFC. These results suggest that conversion symptoms do not act through cognitive inhibitory circuits, but involve selective activations in midline brain regions associated with self-related representations and emotion regulation.

  13. [Bilateral vocal cord paralysis in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamatsu, I

    1996-01-01

    Eighteen infantile cases with bilateral vocal cord paralysis were treated at our hospital from 1970 to 1993. All cases were diagnosed using a flexible fiberscope to examine the larynx. Direct laryngoscopy was performed under general anesthesia for the definite diagnosis and differential diagnosis from laryngomalacia, subglottic stenosis, tracheal stenosis, or laryngeal web. Bilateral vocal cord paralysis in children is a rare disease, there have been few and reported cases. Eight cases were male and 10 cases were female. Thirteen cases were congenital, 4 cases acquired and 1 case was unknown. The characteristic symptoms of bilateral vocal cord paralysis include normal or near normal phonation with inspiratory stridor which may progress to complete respiratory obstruction. Associated anomalies and diseases included 3 cases of immature infant, 2 of myelomeningocele, and single cases of Arnold-Chiari malformation, cerebral palsy, hydrocephalus, laryngomalacia, William's syndrome, Wiedemann-Beckwith syndrome, hypoxia, esophageal hiatus hernia, gastroesophageal reflex, spina bifida, COFS syndrome, and cerebral atrophy. Laryngeal function was completely recovered in seven cases following growth of the children incompletely recovered in five cases, and 2 cases retained right vocal cord paralysis. Tracheostomy was performed in 2 cases. One case died from the original disease, and the other one case was unknown. Swallowing function, phonation and development were good. Our experience suggests that the airway with bilateral vocal cord paralysis in children can be managed well without the need for tracheostomy.

  14. Bone blood flow after spinal paralysis in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, H.; Yamamuro, T.; Okumura, H.; Kasai, R.; Tada, K.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the acute and chronic effects of paralysis induced by spinal cord section or sciatic neurotomy on bone blood flow in the rat. Regional bone blood flow was measured in the early stage with the hydrogen washout technique and the change of whole bone blood flow was measured in the early and the late stages with the radioactive microsphere technique. Four to 6 h after cordotomy at the level of the 13th thoracic vertebra, the regional bone blood flow in the denervated tibia increased significantly (p less than 0.01). After hemicordotomy with rhizotomy at the same level, the regional bone blood flow in the denervated tibia increased significantly (p less than 0.05) 6 h postoperatively. The whole bone blood flow in the denervated tibia had also increased significantly (p less than 0.05) at 6 h and at 4 and 12 weeks postoperatively. After sciatic neurotomy, the regional and the whole bone blood flow in the paralytic tibia did not change significantly. The present study demonstrated that monoplegic paralysis caused an increase in bone blood flow in the denervated hind limb from a very early stage. It was suggested that the spinal nervous system contributed to the control of bone blood flow

  15. WITHDRAWN: Aciclovir or valaciclovir for Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, David; Dunn, Louisa

    2009-04-15

    The most common disorder of the facial nerve is acute idiopathic facial paralysis or Bell's palsy and there may be significant morbidity or incomplete recovery associated with severe cases. To assess the efficacy of aciclovir or similar agents for treating Bell's palsy. We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group register (searched April 2003), MEDLINE (from January 1966 to April 2003), EMBASE (from January 1980 to April 2003) and LILACS (from January 1982 to April 2003). We also contacted authors of identified trials. Randomised or quasi-randomised trials of aciclovir or valaciclovir therapy, alone or in combination with any other drug, in patients with Bell's palsy. We identified six randomised trials. Three studies met our inclusion criteria, including 246 patients. One study evaluated aciclovir with corticosteroid versus corticosteroid alone, another study evaluated aciclovir alone versus corticosteroid and a further study evaluated valaciclovir with corticosteroid versus corticosteroid alone or versus placebo alone. Incomplete recovery after one year: data were not available. An analysis was performed on data reported at the end of the study period in each trial. The results from one study four months after the start of treatment significantly favoured the treatment group, whilst the results of the study three months after the start of treatment significantly favoured the control group. The results from the second study at four months showed no statistically significant difference between the three groups.Adverse events: relevant data were not reported in any of the three trials.Complete facial paralysis six months after start of treatment: only one patient had complete paralysis upon entering one of the studies. This patient was assigned to the control group and the level of recovery attained was not reported.Motor synkinesis or crocodile tears one year after start of treatment: data were available up to a maximum of four months after onset of

  16. Upper airway obstruction in canine laryngeal paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amis, T C; Smith, M M; Gaber, C E; Kurpershoek, C

    1986-05-01

    The type and the severity of airway obstruction in 30 dogs with bilateral laryngeal paralysis was assessed, using tidal breathing flow-volume loop (TBFVL) analysis. The dogs had clinical evidence of mild-to-severe upper airway obstruction (ie, respiratory distress, exercise intolerance, stridor). Seventeen dogs had TBFVL consistent with a nonfixed (inspiratory) obstruction, 10 had TBFVL indicative of a fixed (inspiratory/expiratory) obstruction, and 3 had normal TBFVL. Analysis of TBFVL confirmed that dogs with laryngeal paralysis have upper airway obstruction that differs in type and severity. Use of TBFVL provided a quantitative evaluation of airway obstruction and demonstrated the effects of bilateral laryngeal paralysis on the breathing patterns of dogs.

  17. Ulnar nerve paralysis after forearm bone fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Roberto Schwartsmann

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Paralysis or nerve injury associated with fractures of forearm bones fracture is rare and is more common in exposed fractures with large soft-tissue injuries. Ulnar nerve paralysis is a rare condition associated with closed fractures of the forearm. In most cases, the cause of paralysis is nerve contusion, which evolves with neuropraxia. However, nerve lacerations and entrapment at the fracture site always need to be borne in mind. This becomes more important when neuropraxia appears or worsens after reduction of a closed fracture of the forearm has been completed. The importance of diagnosing this injury and differentiating its features lies in the fact that, depending on the type of lesion, different types of management will be chosen.

  18. Intraoperative neuromuscular monitoring site and residual paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thilen, Stephan R; Hansen, Bradley E; Ramaiah, Ramesh; Kent, Christopher D; Treggiari, Miriam M; Bhananker, Sanjay M

    2012-11-01

    Residual paralysis is common after general anesthesia involving administration of neuromuscular blocking drugs (NMBDs). Management of NMBDs and reversal is frequently guided by train-of-four (TOF) monitoring. We hypothesized that monitoring of eye muscles is associated with more frequent residual paralysis than monitoring at the adductor pollicis. This prospective cohort study enrolled 180 patients scheduled for elective surgery with anticipated use of NMBDs. Collected variables included monitoring site, age, gender, weight, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status class, type and duration of surgery, type of NMBDs, last and total dose administered, TOF count at time of reversal, dose of neostigmine, and time interval between last dose of NMBDs to quantitative measurement. Upon postanesthesia care unit admission, we measured TOF ratios by acceleromyography at the adductor pollicis. Residual paralysis was defined as a TOF ratio less than 90%. Multivariable logistic regression was used to account for unbalances between the two groups and to adjust for covariates. 150 patients received NMBDs and were included in the analysis. Patients with intraoperative TOF monitoring of eye muscles had significantly greater incidence of residual paralysis than patients monitored at the adductor pollicis (P paralysis was observed in 51/99 (52%) and 11/51 (22%) of patients, respectively. The crude odds ratio was 3.9 (95% CI: 1.8-8.4), and the adjusted odds ratio was 5.5 (95% CI: 2.1-14.5). Patients having qualitative TOF monitoring of eye muscles had a greater than 5-fold higher risk of postoperative residual paralysis than those monitored at the adductor pollicis.

  19. Deformed wing virus implicated in overwintering honeybee colony losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highfield, Andrea C; El Nagar, Aliya; Mackinder, Luke C M; Noël, Laure M-L J; Hall, Matthew J; Martin, Stephen J; Schroeder, Declan C

    2009-11-01

    The worldwide decline in honeybee colonies during the past 50 years has often been linked to the spread of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and its interaction with certain honeybee viruses. Recently in the United States, dramatic honeybee losses (colony collapse disorder) have been reported; however, there remains no clear explanation for these colony losses, with parasitic mites, viruses, bacteria, and fungal diseases all being proposed as possible candidates. Common characteristics that most failing colonies share is a lack of overt disease symptoms and the disappearance of workers from what appears to be normally functioning colonies. In this study, we used quantitative PCR to monitor the presence of three honeybee viruses, deformed wing virus (DWV), acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV), and black queen cell virus (BQCV), during a 1-year period in 15 asymptomatic, varroa mite-positive honeybee colonies in Southern England, and 3 asymptomatic colonies confirmed to be varroa mite free. All colonies with varroa mites underwent control treatments to ensure that mite populations remained low throughout the study. Despite this, multiple virus infections were detected, yet a significant correlation was observed only between DWV viral load and overwintering colony losses. The long-held view has been that DWV is relatively harmless to the overall health status of honeybee colonies unless it is in association with severe varroa mite infestations. Our findings suggest that DWV can potentially act independently of varroa mites to bring about colony losses. Therefore, DWV may be a major factor in overwintering colony losses.

  20. Vocal Cord Paralysis and its Etiologies: A Prospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Javad Seyed Toutounchi; Mahmood Eydi; Samad EJ Golzari; Mohammad Reza Ghaffari; Nashmil Parvizian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Vocal cord paralysis is a common symptom of numerous diseases and it may be due to neurogenic or mechanical fixation of the cords. Paralysis of the vocal cords is just a symptom of underlying disease in some cases; so, clinical diagnosis of the underlying cause leading to paralysis of the vocal cords is important. This study evaluates the causes of vocal cord paralysis. Methods: In a prospective study, 45 patients with paralyzed vocal cord diagnosis were examined by tests such a...

  1. Metagenomic analysis of RNA viruses in a fresh water lake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Appolinaire Djikeng

    Full Text Available Freshwater lakes and ponds present an ecological interface between humans and a variety of host organisms. They are a habitat for the larval stage of many insects and may serve as a medium for intraspecies and interspecies transmission of viruses such as avian influenza A virus. Furthermore, freshwater bodies are already known repositories for disease-causing viruses such as Norwalk Virus, Coxsackievirus, Echovirus, and Adenovirus. While RNA virus populations have been studied in marine environments, to this date there has been very limited analysis of the viral community in freshwater. Here we present a survey of RNA viruses in Lake Needwood, a freshwater lake in Maryland, USA. Our results indicate that just as in studies of other aquatic environments, the majority of nucleic acid sequences recovered did not show any significant similarity to known sequences. The remaining sequences are mainly from viral types with significant similarity to approximately 30 viral families. We speculate that these novel viruses may infect a variety of hosts including plants, insects, fish, domestic animals and humans. Among these viruses we have discovered a previously unknown dsRNA virus closely related to Banna Virus which is responsible for a febrile illness and is endemic to Southeast Asia. Moreover we found multiple viral sequences distantly related to Israeli Acute Paralysis virus which has been implicated in honeybee colony collapse disorder. Our data suggests that due to their direct contact with humans, domestic and wild animals, freshwater ecosystems might serve as repositories of a wide range of viruses (both pathogenic and non-pathogenic and possibly be involved in the spread of emerging and pandemic diseases.

  2. Some Aspects of Facial Nerve Paralysis. Part III. Complications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some Aspects of Facial Nerve Paralysis. Part III. Complications, Prognosis and management. ... It should be possible to set a definite prognosis within 2 weeks after the onset of facial paralysis, and in many cases even sooner. In the prognosis of facial paralysis the aetiological and time factors involved, the completeness of ...

  3. The Entire Nucleotide Sequence of Friend-Related and Paralysis-Inducing PVC-441 Murine Leukemia Virus (MuLV) and Its Comparison with Those of PVC-211 MuLV and Friend MuLV

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Oka, Kiyomasa; Tanaka, Keiji; Jinno, Atsushi; Ruscetti, Sandra K.; Kai, Kazushige

    1998-01-01

    PVC-441 murine leukemia virus (MuLV) is a member of the PVC group of Friend MuLV (F-MuLV)-derived neuropathogenic retroviruses. In order to determine the molecular basis for the difference in neuropathogenicity between PVC-441 and the previously characterized PVC-211 MuLVs, the entire nucleotide sequence of PVC-441 MuLV was determined and compared with those of PVC-211 and F-MuLV. The results suggest that PVC-441 and PVC-211 MuLVs were formed as a result of random mutations of F-MuLV and deve...

  4. Partial regulatory T cell depletion prior to acute feline immunodeficiency virus infection does not alter disease pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rochelle Mikkelsen

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV infection in cats follows a disease course similar to HIV-1, including a short acute phase characterized by high viremia, and a prolonged asymptomatic phase characterized by low viremia and generalized immune dysfunction. CD4(+CD25(hiFoxP3(+ immunosuppressive regulatory T (Treg cells have been implicated as a possible cause of immune dysfunction during FIV and HIV-1 infection, as they are capable of modulating virus-specific and inflammatory immune responses. Additionally, the immunosuppressive capacity of feline Treg cells has been shown to be increased during FIV infection. We have previously shown that transient in vivo Treg cell depletion during asymptomatic FIV infection reveals FIV-specific immune responses suppressed by Treg cells. In this study, we sought to determine the immunological influence of Treg cells during acute FIV infection. We asked whether Treg cell depletion prior to infection with the highly pathogenic molecular clone FIV-C36 in cats could alter FIV pathogenesis. We report here that partial Treg cell depletion prior to FIV infection does not significantly change provirus, viremia, or CD4(+ T cell levels in blood and lymphoid tissues during the acute phase of disease. The effects of anti-CD25 mAb treatment are truncated in cats acutely infected with FIV-C36 as compared to chronically infected cats or FIV-naïve cats, as Treg cell levels were heightened in all treatment groups included in the study within two weeks post-FIV infection. Our findings suggest that the influence of Treg cell suppression during FIV pathogenesis is most prominent after Treg cells are activated in the environment of established FIV infection.

  5. Partial regulatory T cell depletion prior to acute feline immunodeficiency virus infection does not alter disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, S Rochelle; Long, Julie M; Zhang, Lin; Galemore, Erin R; VandeWoude, Sue; Dean, Gregg A

    2011-02-25

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection in cats follows a disease course similar to HIV-1, including a short acute phase characterized by high viremia, and a prolonged asymptomatic phase characterized by low viremia and generalized immune dysfunction. CD4(+)CD25(hi)FoxP3(+) immunosuppressive regulatory T (Treg) cells have been implicated as a possible cause of immune dysfunction during FIV and HIV-1 infection, as they are capable of modulating virus-specific and inflammatory immune responses. Additionally, the immunosuppressive capacity of feline Treg cells has been shown to be increased during FIV infection. We have previously shown that transient in vivo Treg cell depletion during asymptomatic FIV infection reveals FIV-specific immune responses suppressed by Treg cells. In this study, we sought to determine the immunological influence of Treg cells during acute FIV infection. We asked whether Treg cell depletion prior to infection with the highly pathogenic molecular clone FIV-C36 in cats could alter FIV pathogenesis. We report here that partial Treg cell depletion prior to FIV infection does not significantly change provirus, viremia, or CD4(+) T cell levels in blood and lymphoid tissues during the acute phase of disease. The effects of anti-CD25 mAb treatment are truncated in cats acutely infected with FIV-C36 as compared to chronically infected cats or FIV-naïve cats, as Treg cell levels were heightened in all treatment groups included in the study within two weeks post-FIV infection. Our findings suggest that the influence of Treg cell suppression during FIV pathogenesis is most prominent after Treg cells are activated in the environment of established FIV infection.

  6. The use of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase for the taxonomic assignment of Picorna-like viruses (order Picornavirales infecting Apis mellifera L. populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schroeder Declan C

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-stranded RNA viruses, infectious to the European honeybee, Apis mellifera L. are known to reside at low levels in colonies, with typically no apparent signs of infection observed in the honeybees. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR of regions of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp is often used to diagnose their presence in apiaries and also to classify the type of virus detected. Results Analysis of RdRp conserved domains was undertaken on members of the newly defined order, the Picornavirales; focusing in particular on the amino acid residues and motifs known to be conserved. Consensus sequences were compiled using partial and complete honeybee virus sequences published to date. Certain members within the iflaviruses, deformed wing virus (DWV, Kakugo virus (KV and Varroa destructor virus (VDV; and the dicistroviruses, acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV, Israeli paralysis virus (IAPV and Kashmir bee virus (KBV, shared greater than 98% and 92% homology across the RdRp conserved domains, respectively. Conclusion RdRp was validated as a suitable taxonomic marker for the assignment of members of the order Picornavirales, with the potential for use independent of other genetic or phenotypic markers. Despite the current use of the RdRp as a genetic marker for the detection of specific honeybee viruses, we provide overwhelming evidence that care should be taken with the primer set design. We demonstrated that DWV, VDV and KV, or ABPV, IAPV and KBV, respectively are all recent descendents or variants of each other, meaning caution should be applied when assigning presence or absence to any of these viruses when using current RdRp primer sets. Moreover, it is more likely that some primer sets (regardless of what gene is used are too specific and thus are underestimating the diversity of honeybee viruses.

  7. Transient muscle paralysis disrupts bone homeostasis by rapid degradation of bone morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poliachik, Sandra L.; Bain, Steven D.; Threet, DeWayne; Huber, Philippe; Gross, Ted S.

    2009-01-01

    We have previously shown that transient paralysis of murine hindlimb muscles causes profound degradation of both trabecular and cortical bone in the adjacent skeleton within 3 weeks. Morphologically, the acute loss of bone tissue appeared to arise primarily due to osteoclastic bone resorption. Given that the loss of muscle function in this model is transient, we speculated that the stimulus for osteoclastic activation would be rapid and morphologic evidence of bone resorption would appear before 21 d. We therefore utilized high-resolution in vivo serial micro-CT to assess longitudinal alterations in lower hindlimb muscle volume, proximal tibia trabecular and tibia middiaphysis cortical bone morphology in 16 wk old female C57 mice following transient calf paralysis from a single injection of botulinum toxin A (BtA; 2U/100g body weight). In an acute study, we evaluated muscle and bone alterations at d 0, 3, 5 and 12 following transient calf paralysis. In a chronic study, following d 0 imaging, we assessed the recovery of these tissues following the maximum observed trabecular degradation (d 12) through d 84 post-paralysis. The time course and degree of recovery of muscle, trabecular and cortical bone varied substantially. Significant atrophy of lower limb muscle was evident by d 5 of paralysis, maximal at d 28 (−34.1 ± 0.9%) and partially recovered by d 84. Trabecular degradation within the proximal tibia metaphysis occurred more rapidly, with significant reduction in BV/TV by d 3, maximal loss at d 12 (−76.8 ± 2.9%) with only limited recovery by d 84 (−51.7 ± 5.1% vs. d 0). Significant cortical bone volume degradation at the tibia mid-diaphysis was first identified at d 12, was maximal at d 28 (−9.6 ± 1.2%), but completely recovered by d 84. The timing, magnitude and morphology of the observed bone erosion induced by transient muscle paralysis was consistent with a rapid recruitment and prolific activation of osteoclastic resorption. In a broader context

  8. Equine infectious anemia virus replication is upregulated during differentiation of blood monocytes from acutely infected horses.

    OpenAIRE

    Sellon, D C; Walker, K M; Russell, K E; Perry, S T; Covington, P; Fuller, F J

    1996-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus is a lentivirus that replicates in mature tissue macrophages of horses. Ponies were infected with equine infectious anemia virus. During febrile episodes, proviral DNA was detectable, but viral mRNA was not detectable. As cultured blood monocytes from these ponies differentiated into macrophages, viral expression was upregulated. In situ hybridization confirmed that viral transcription occurred in mature macrophages.

  9. GOLD WEIGHTS IN FACIAL PARALYSIS (REVISITED)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZECHA, PJ; ROBINSON, PH; VANOORT, RP; COENRAADS, PJ

    A retrospective study of 11 patients with facial paralysis was undertaken. Correction of lagophthalmos was accomplished by inserting a dental gold weight into the upper eyelid. All weights were assessed and adjusted to fit the patient's individual need. The primary objective was to achieve adequate

  10. Some Aspects of Facial Nerve Paralysis*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In 1872 Duchenne described the technique of nerve ex- citability testing for facial paralysis. According to the severity of the condition, peripheral nerve lesions can be classified on the bases of electrical tests, as: (a) neurapraxia; (b) axonotmesis; and (c) neurot- mesis. This classification for peripheral nerve lesions was intro-.

  11. Assessment of thyroplasty for vocal fold paralysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Ågot Møller; Faber, Christian; Jakobsen, John

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Thyroplasty with silicone rubber implantation is a surgical procedure for treatment of patients with vocal fold paralysis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the outcome of the operation and to monitor which of the analyses were the more beneficial. MATERIAL AND METHODS...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... particular ethnic groups? Genetic Changes Mutations in the CACNA1S or SCN4A gene can cause hypokalemic periodic paralysis . ... positively charged atoms (ions) into muscle cells. The CACNA1S and SCN4A proteins form channels that control the ...

  13. Some Aspects of Facial Nerve Paralysis*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The submaxillary salivary flow test gives reliable in- formation as to whether neurapraxia, axono:mesis, or neurotmesis of the facial nerve is present. This can be corroborated by electrical studies. This test can make an important contribution to the topognosis and prognosis of facial paralysis, especially when elaborate.

  14. Some Aspects of Facial Nerve Paralysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1973-01-20

    Jan 20, 1973 ... We have no test in facial paralysis to tell us the moment axonotmesis takes place, and because of this we cannot know for certain when to decompress the facial nerve. When axonotmesis sets in, complications follow in all cases to a greater or lesser degree. It should be possible to set a definite prognosis ...

  15. Cultural variation in the clinical presentation of sleep paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Joop T V M

    2005-03-01

    Sleep paralysis is one of the lesser-known and more benign forms of parasomnias. The primary or idiopathic form, also called isolated sleep paralysis, is illustrated by showing how patients from different cultures weave the phenomenology of sleep paralysis into their clinical narratives. Clinical case examples are presented of patients from Guinea Bissau, the Netherlands, Morocco, and Surinam with different types of psychopathology, but all accompanied by sleep paralysis. Depending on the meaning given to and etiological interpretations of the sleep paralysis, which is largely culturally determined, patients react to the event in specific ways.

  16. Follow-up after acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by influenza a (H1N1 virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Toufen Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are no reports on the long-term follow-up of patients with swine-origin influenza A virus infection that progressed to acute respiratory distress syndrome. METHODS: Four patients were prospectively followed up with pulmonary function tests and high-resolution computed tomography for six months after admission to an intensive care unit. RESULTS: Pulmonary function test results assessed two months after admission to the intensive care unit showed reduced forced vital capacity in all patients and low diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide in two patients. At six months, pulmonary function test results were available for three patients. Two patients continued to have a restrictive pattern, and none of the patients presented with abnormal diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide. All of them had a diffuse ground-glass pattern on high-resolution computed tomography that improved after six months. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the marked severity of lung disease at admission, patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by swine-origin influenza A virus infection presented a late but substantial recovery over six months of follow-up.

  17. Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Attenuate Immune-Mediated Liver Injury and Compromise Virus Control During Acute Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Mengmeng; Yuan, Xu; Liu, Dan; Ma, Yuhong; Zhu, Jun; Cui, Jun; Yu, Mengxue; Li, Changyong; Guo, Deyin

    2017-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used as therapeutic tools not only for their ability to differentiate toward different cells, but also for their unique immunomodulatory properties. However, it is still unknown how MSCs may affect immunity during hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. This study was designed to explore the effect of bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) on hepatic natural killer (NK) cells in a mouse model of acute HBV infection. Mice were injected with 1 × 10 6 BM-MSCs, which stained with chloromethyl derivatives of fluorescein diacetate fluorescent probe, 24 h before hydrodynamic injection of viral DNA (pHBV1.3) through the tail vein. In vivo imaging system revealed that BM-MSCs were accumulated in the injured liver, and they attenuated immune-mediated liver injury during HBV infection, as shown by lower alanine aminotransferase levels, reduced proinflammatory cytokine production, and decreased inflammatory cell infiltration in the liver. Importantly, administration of BM-MSCs restrained the increased expression of natural-killer group 2, member D (NKG2D), an important receptor required for NK cell activation in the liver from HBV-infected mice. BM-MSCs also reduced NKG2D expression on NK cells and suppressed the cytotoxicity of NK cells in vitro. Furthermore, BM-MSC-derived transforming growth factor-β1 suppressed NKG2D expression on NK cells. As a consequence, BM-MSC treatment enhanced HBV gene expression and replication in vivo. These results demonstrate that adoptive transfer of BM-MSCs influences innate immunity and limits immune-mediated liver injury during acute HBV infection by suppressing NK cell activity. Meanwhile, the effect of BM-MSCs on prolonging virus clearance needs to be considered in the future.

  18. Acute retinal necrosis results in low vision in a young patient with a history of herpes simplex virus encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Sanjeet K

    2017-05-01

    Acute retinal necrosis (ARN), secondary to herpes simplex encephalitis, is a rare syndrome that can present in healthy individuals, as well as immuno-compromised patients. Most cases are caused by a secondary infection from the herpes virus family, with varicella zoster virus being the leading cause of this syndrome. Potential symptoms include blurry vision, floaters, ocular pain and photophobia. Ocular findings may consist of severe uveitis, retinal vasculitis, retinal necrosis, papillitis and retinal detachment. Clinical manifestations of this disease may include increased intraocular pressure, optic disc oedema, optic neuropathy and sheathed retinal arterioles. A complete work up is essential to rule out cytomegalovirus retinitis, herpes simplex encephalitis, herpes virus, syphilis, posterior uveitis and other conditions. Depending on the severity of the disease, the treatment options consist of anticoagulation therapy, cycloplegia, intravenous acyclovir, systemic steroids, prophylactic laser photocoagulation and pars plana vitrectomy with silicon oil for retinal detachment. An extensive history and clinical examination is crucial in making the correct diagnosis. Also, it is very important to be aware of low vision needs and refer the patients, if expressing any sort of functional issues with completing daily living skills, especially reading. In this article, we report one case of unilateral ARN 20 years after herpetic encephalitis. © 2016 Optometry Australia.

  19. Multiploid CD61+ Cells Are the Pre-Dominant Cell Lineage Infected during Acute Dengue Virus Infection in Bone Marrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kristina B.; Noisakran, Sansanee; Onlamoon, Nattawat; Hsiao, Hui-Mien; Roback, John; Villinger, Francois; Ansari, Aftab A.; Perng, Guey Chuen

    2012-01-01

    Depression of the peripheral blood platelet count during acute infection is a hallmark of dengue. This thrombocytopenia has been attributed, in part, to an insufficient level of platelet production by megakaryocytes that reside in the bone marrow (BM). Interestingly, it was observed that dengue patients experience BM suppression at the onset of fever. However, few studies focus on the interaction between dengue virus (DENV) and megakaryocytes and how this interaction can lead to a reduction in platelets. In the studies reported herein, BM cells from normal healthy rhesus monkeys (RM) and humans were utilized to identify the cell lineage(s) that were capable of supporting virus infection and replication. A number of techniques were employed in efforts to address this issue. These included the use of viral RNA quantification, nonstructural protein and infectivity assays, phenotypic studies utilizing immunohistochemical staining, anti-differentiation DEAB treatment, and electron microscopy. Cumulative results from these studies revealed that cells in the BM were indeed highly permissive for DENV infection, with human BM having higher levels of viral production compared to RM. DENV-like particles were predominantly observed in multi-nucleated cells that expressed CD61+. These data suggest that megakaryocytes are likely the predominant cell type infected by DENV in BM, which provides one explanation for the thrombocytopenia and the dysfunctional platelets characteristic of dengue virus infection. PMID:23300812

  20. Analysis of plasma viral RNA levels during acute dengue virus infection using quantitative competitor reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudiro, T M; Zivny, J; Ishiko, H; Green, S; Vaughn, D W; Kalayanarooj, S; Nisalak, A; Norman, J E; Ennis, F A; Rothman, A L

    2001-01-01

    There is increasing recognition of the potential importance of viral burden in the pathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). There is little data available, however, describing the kinetics of viral replication in humans with natural dengue virus (DV) infection. Standard procedures for measuring titers of infectious virus in clinical specimens are either laborious or insensitive. We developed a method for measurement of DV RNA in plasma samples based on reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using a mutant RNA target as a competitor. This technique was reproducible and accurate for samples containing any of the four DV serotypes, and could be applied to samples containing as few as 250 copies of RNA per reaction. We examined plasma viral RNA levels in 80 children with acute DV infection; sequential plasma samples were tested in 34 of these children. Plasma viral RNA levels ranged as high as 10(9) RNA copies/ml, and correlated with titers of infectious virus measured in mosquitoes (r= 0.69). Plasma viral RNA levels fell rapidly during the last several days of the febrile period. We did not find a significant difference in maximal plasma viral RNA levels between children with DHF and children with dengue fever, but peak viral RNA levels were identified in only 16 subjects. We conclude that this quantitative RT-PCR method will be valuable for further studies of natural DV infections.

  1. Serum levels of chicken mannan-binding lectin (MBL) during virus infections; indication that chicken MBL is an acute phase reactant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O.L.; Jensenius, J. C.; Jørgensen, Poul Henrik

    1999-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) is a serum collectin which is believed to be an opsonin of the innate immune defence against various microorganisms. MBL is a minor acute phase reactant in man. We investigated the concentration of serum MBL in chickens infected with infectious bronchitis virus (IBV...... levels returned to normal values 6-10 days after infection. The results indicated that MBL is a minor acute phase reactant in chickens....

  2. A polymorphism near IL28B is associated with spontaneous clearance of acute hepatitis C virus and jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, Hans L; Thompson, Alex J; Patel, Keyur; Wiese, Manfred; Tenckhoff, Hannelore; Nischalke, Hans D; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Kullig, Ulrike; Göbel, Uwe; Capka, Emanuela; Wiegand, Johannes; Schiefke, Ingolf; Güthoff, Wolfgang; Grüngreiff, Kurt; König, Ingrid; Spengler, Ulrich; McCarthy, Jeanette; Shianna, Kevin V; Goldstein, David B; McHutchison, John G; Timm, Jörg; Nattermann, Jacob

    2010-11-01

    A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) upstream of the IL28B gene has been associated with response of patients with chronic hepatitis C to therapy with pegylated interferon and ribavirin and also with spontaneous clearance of acute hepatitis C in a heterogeneous population. We analyzed the association between IL28B and the clinical presentation of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in a homogeneous population. We analyzed the SNP rs12979860 in 190 women from the German anti-D cohort (infected with HCV genotype 1b via contaminated rhesus prophylaxis) and its association with spontaneous clearance. Clinical data were available in 136 women with acute infection who were also evaluated for IL28B genotype. Based on results of a TaqMan polymerase chain reaction assay, the rs12979860 SNP genotypes studied were C/C, C/T, or T/T. Spontaneous clearance was more common in patients with the C/C genotype (43/67; 64%) compared with C/T (22/90; 24%) or T/T (2/33; 6%) (P Jaundice during acute infection was more common among patients with C/C genotype (32.7%) than non-C/C patients (with C/T or T/T) (16.1%; P = .032). In C/C patients, jaundice during acute infection was not associated with an increased chance of spontaneous clearance (56.3%) compared with those without jaundice (60.6%). In contrast, in non-C/C patients, jaundice was associated with a higher likelihood of spontaneous clearance (42.9%) compared with those without jaundice (13.7%). The SNP rs12979860 upstream of IL28B is associated with spontaneous clearance of HCV. Women with the C/T or T/T genotype who did not develop jaundice had a lower chance of spontaneous clearance of HCV infection. Copyright © 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Preliminary evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction associated with post-infective fatigue after acute infection with Epstein Barr Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hickie Ian B

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute infectious diseases are typically accompanied by non-specific symptoms including fever, malaise, irritability and somnolence that usually resolve on recovery. However, in some individuals these symptoms persist in what is commonly termed post-infective fatigue. The objective of this pilot study was to determine the gene expression correlates of post-infective fatigue following acute Epstein Barr virus (EBV infection. Methods We followed 5 people with acute mononucleosis who developed post-infective fatigue of more than 6 months duration and 5 HLA-matched control subjects who recovered within 3 months. Subjects had peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC samples collected at varying time points including at diagnosis, then every 2 weeks for 3 months, then every 3 months for a year. Total RNA was extracted from the PBMC samples and hybridized to microarrays spotted with 3,800 oligonucleotides. Results Those who developed post-infective fatigue had gene expression profiles indicative of an altered host response during acute mononucleosis compared to those who recovered uneventfully. Several genes including ISG20 (interferon stimulated gene, DNAJB2 (DnaJ [Hsp40] homolog and CD99, CDK8 (cyclin-dependent kinase 8, E2F2 (E2F transcription factor 2, CDK8 (cyclin-dependent kinase 8, and ACTN2 (actinin, alpha 2, known to be regulated during EBV infection, were differentially expressed in post-infective fatigue cases. Several of the differentially expressed genes affect mitochondrial functions including fatty acid metabolism and the cell cycle. Conclusion These preliminary data provide insights into alterations in gene transcripts associated with the varied clinical outcomes from acute infectious mononucleosis.

  4. IAPV, a bee-affecting virus associated with Colony Collapse Disorder can be silenced by dsRNA ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maori, E; Paldi, N; Shafir, S; Kalev, H; Tsur, E; Glick, E; Sela, I

    2009-02-01

    Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) has been associated with Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV). CCD poses a serious threat to apiculture and agriculture as a whole, due to the consequent inability to provide the necessary amount of bees for pollination of critical crops. Here we report on RNAi-silencing of IAPV infection by feeding bees with double-stranded RNA, as an efficient and feasible way of controlling this viral disease. The association of CCD with IAPV is discussed, as well as the potential of controlling CCD.

  5. Characterization of thymus-associated lymphoid depletion in bovine calves acutely or persistently infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus 1, bovine viral diarrhea 2 or HoBi-like pestivirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viruses from recognized pestivirus species bovine viral diarrhea 1 (BVDV-1) and BVDV-2 and the proposed pestivirus species HoBi-like virus infect primarily cattle. Exposure of cattle to these viruses can lead to either acute or persistent infections depending on the timing and status of the animal ...

  6. Mesenchymal stromal cell treatment prevents H9N2 avian influenza virus-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Xu, Jun; Shi, Weiqing; Chen, Cheng; Shao, Yan; Zhu, Limei; Lu, Wei; Han, XiaoDong

    2016-10-28

    The avian influenza virus (AIV) can cross species barriers and expand its host range from birds to mammals, even humans. Avian influenza is characterized by pronounced activation of the proinflammatory cytokine cascade, which perpetuates the inflammatory response, leading to persistent systemic inflammatory response syndrome and pulmonary infection in animals and humans. There are currently no specific treatment strategies for avian influenza. We hypothesized that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) would have beneficial effects in the treatment of H9N2 AIV-induced acute lung injury in mice. Six- to 8-week-old C57BL/6 mice were infected intranasally with 1 × 10 4 MID 50 of A/HONG KONG/2108/2003 [H9N2 (HK)] H9N2 virus to induce acute lung injury. After 30 min, syngeneic MSCs were delivered through the caudal vein. Three days after infection, we measured the survival rate, lung weight, arterial blood gas, and cytokines in both bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and serum, and assessed pathological changes to the lungs. MSC administration significantly palliated H9N2 AIV-induced pulmonary inflammation by reducing chemokines and proinflammatory cytokines levels, as well as reducing inflammatory cell recruit into the lungs. Thus, H9N2 AIV-induced lung injury was markedly alleviated in mice treated with MSCs. Lung histopathology and arterial blood gas analysis were improved in mice with H9N2 AIV-induced lung injury following MSC treatment. MSC treatment significantly reduces H9N2 AIV-induced acute lung injury in mice and is associated with reduced pulmonary inflammation. These results indicate a potential role for MSC therapy in the treatment of clinical avian influenza.

  7. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Involved in Severe Acute Respiratory Disease in Northern Italy during the Pandemic and Postpandemic Period (2009–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Pariani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 2009 pandemic, international health authorities recommended monitoring severe and complicated cases of respiratory disease, that is, severe acute respiratory infection (SARI and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. We evaluated the proportion of SARI/ARDS cases and deaths due to influenza A(H1N1pdm09 infection and the impact of other respiratory viruses during pandemic and postpandemic period (2009–2011 in northern Italy; additionally we searched for unknown viruses in those cases for which diagnosis remained negative. 206 respiratory samples were collected from SARI/ARDS cases and analyzed by real-time RT-PCR/PCR to investigate influenza viruses and other common respiratory pathogens; also, a virus discovery technique (VIDISCA-454 was applied on those samples tested negative to all pathogens. Influenza A(H1N1pdm09 virus was detected in 58.3% of specimens, with a case fatality rate of 11.3%. The impact of other respiratory viruses was 19.4%, and the most commonly detected viruses were human rhinovirus/enterovirus and influenza A(H3N2. VIDISCA-454 enabled the identification of one previously undiagnosed measles infection. Nearly 22% of SARI/ARDS cases did not obtain a definite diagnosis. In clinical practice, great efforts should be dedicated to improving the diagnosis of severe respiratory disease; the introduction of innovative molecular technologies, as VIDISCA-454, will certainly help in reducing such “diagnostic gap.”

  8. Equine infectious anemia virus replication is upregulated during differentiation of blood monocytes from acutely infected horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellon, D C; Walker, K M; Russell, K E; Perry, S T; Covington, P; Fuller, F J

    1996-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus is a lentivirus that replicates in mature tissue macrophages of horses. Ponies were infected with equine infectious anemia virus. During febrile episodes, proviral DNA was detectable, but viral mRNA was not detectable. As cultured blood monocytes from these ponies differentiated into macrophages, viral expression was upregulated. In situ hybridization confirmed that viral transcription occurred in mature macrophages. PMID:8523576

  9. A case of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis as initial manifestation of Graves' disease in a 16-year-old Korean adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se Yong Jung

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP is a rare complication of hyperthyroidism, with recurrent muscle paralysis and hypokalemia that are caused by an intracellular shift of potassium. TPP is relatively common in Asian males, but is extremely rare in children and adolescents, even for those of Asian descent. We describe a 16-year-old Korean adolescent presenting with a two-week history of episodic leg weakness in the morning. He showed sinus tachycardia, lower leg weakness, and hypokalemia. Thyroid function test showed hyperthyroidism, and thyroid ultrasonography revealed a diffuse enlarged thyroid with increased vascularity, consistent with Graves' disease. He was treated with β-adrenergic blocker and antithyroid drugs. He has been symptom free for one year, as his hyperthyroidism has been controlled well with antithyroid drugs. TPP should be considered in children and adolescents with acute paralysis of the lower extremities and hypokalemia.

  10. Difficulty swallowing and lack of receipt of highly active antiretroviral therapy predict acute weight loss in human immunodeficiency virus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Denise L; Bica, Ioana; Knox, Tamsin A; Wanke, Christine; Tchetgen, Eric; Spiegelman, Donna; Silva, Marisela; Gorbach, Sherwood; Wilson, Ira B

    2003-11-15

    In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease, symptoms of underlying illness may promote weight loss through decreased caloric intake, increased metabolic needs, or nutrient malabsorption. We evaluated disease symptoms as predictors of acute weight loss (i.e., loss of > or =5% of weight). HIV-infected men and women (n=415) were telephoned every 5 weeks to obtain information about weight and recent symptoms. Weight change between each pair of consecutive calls (telephone intervals, 2814) was calculated. Acute weight loss occurred across 4.5% of intervals and among 24% of individuals. Patients reported > or =1 symptom before 58% of telephone intervals. The most common symptoms or symptom complexes before intervals were diarrhea (21% of patients), anorexia (17%), upper respiratory symptoms (16%), skin symptoms (12%), and abdominal pain (12%). Trouble swallowing (6%) and oral symptoms (7%) were less common. Risk of acute weight loss was significantly increased when oral symptoms or trouble swallowing were present, and it was decreased when highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was used or when diarrhea was not present. Even when HAART is being administered, clinicians should remain vigilant regarding weight loss, oral symptoms, and trouble swallowing.

  11. An Outbreak of Acute Hepatitis Caused by Genotype IB Hepatitis A Viruses Contaminating the Water Supply in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchusatsawat, Kriangsak; Wongpiyabovorn, Jongkonnee; Kawidam, Chonthicha; Thiemsing, Laddawan; Sangkitporn, Somchai; Yoshizaki, Sayaka; Tatsumi, Masashi; Takeda, Naokazu; Ishii, Koji

    2016-01-01

    In 2000, an outbreak of acute hepatitis A was reported in a province adjacent to Bangkok, Thailand. To investigate the cause of the 2000 hepatitis A outbreaks in Thailand using molecular epidemiological analysis. Serum and stool specimens were collected from patients who were clinically diagnosed with acute viral hepatitis. Water samples from drinking water and deep-drilled wells were also collected. These specimens were subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and sequencing of the VP1/2A region of the hepatitis A virus (HAV) genome. The entire genome sequence of one of the fecal specimens was determined and phylogenetically analyzed with those of known HAV sequences. Eleven of 24 fecal specimens collected from acute viral hepatitis patients were positive as determined by semi- nested reverse transcription PCR targeting the VP1/2A region of HAV. The nucleotide sequence of these samples had an identical genotype IB sequence, suggesting that the same causative agent was present. The complete nucleotide sequence derived from one of the samples indicated that the Thai genotype IB strain should be classified in a unique phylogenetic cluster. The analysis using an adjusted odds ratio showed that the consumption of groundwater was the most likely risk factor associated with the disease. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Features of Vocal Fold Adductor Paralysis and the Management of Posterior Muscle in Thyroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konomi, Ujimoto; Tokashiki, Ryoji; Hiramatsu, Hiroyuki; Motohashi, Ray; Sakurai, Eriko; Toyomura, Fumimasa; Nomoto, Masaki; Kawada, Yuri; Suzuki, Mamoru

    2016-03-01

    To present the pathologic characteristics of unilateral recurrent nerve adductor branch paralysis (AdBP), and to investigate the management of posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) muscle on the basis of our experience of surgical treatment for AdBP. This is a retrospective review of clinical records Four cases of AdBP, in which surgical treatment was performed, are presented. AdBP shows disorders of vocal fold adduction because of paralysis of the thyroarytenoid and lateral cricoarytenoid muscles. The PCA muscle, dominated by the recurrent nerve PCA muscle branch, does not show paralysis. Thus, this type of partial recurrent nerve paresis retains the abductive function and is difficult to distinguish from arytenoid cartilage dislocation because of their similar endoscopic findings. The features include acute onset, and all cases were idiopathic etiology. Thyroarytenoid muscle paralysis was determined by electromyography and stroboscopic findings. The adduction and abduction of paralytic arytenoids were evaluated from 3 dimensional computed tomography (3DCT). In all cases, surgical treatments were arytenoid adduction combined with thyroplasty. When we adducted the arytenoid cartilage during inspiration, strong resistance was observed. In the two cases where we could cut the PCA muscle sufficiently, the maximum phonation time was improved to ≥30 seconds after surgery, from 2 to 3 seconds preoperatively, providing good postoperative voices. In contrast, in the two cases of insufficient resection, the surgical outcomes were poorer. Because the preoperative voice in AdBP patients is typically very coarse, surgical treatment is needed, as well as ordinary recurrent nerve paralysis. In our experience, adequate PCA muscle resection might be helpful in surgical treatment of AdBP. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Protective Capacity of the Human Anamnestic Antibody Response during Acute Dengue Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Meihui; Züst, Roland; Toh, Ying Xiu; Pfaff, Jennifer M; Kahle, Kristen M; Davidson, Edgar; Doranz, Benjamin J; Velumani, Sumathy; Tukijan, Farhana; Wang, Cheng-I; Fink, Katja

    2016-12-15

    Half of the world's population is exposed to the risk of dengue virus infection. Although a vaccine for dengue virus is now available in a few countries, its reported overall efficacy of about 60% is not ideal. Protective immune correlates following natural dengue virus infection remain undefined, which makes it difficult to predict the efficacy of new vaccines. In this study, we address the protective capacity of dengue virus-specific antibodies that are produced by plasmablasts a few days after natural secondary infection. Among a panel of 18 dengue virus-reactive human monoclonal antibodies, four groups of antibodies were identified based on their binding properties. While antibodies targeting the fusion loop of the glycoprotein of dengue virus dominated the antibody response, two smaller groups of antibodies bound to previously undescribed epitopes in domain II of the E protein. The latter, largely serotype-cross-reactive antibodies, demonstrated increased stability of binding at pH 5. These antibodies possessed weak to moderate neutralization capacity in vitro but were the most efficacious in promoting the survival of infected mice. Our data suggest that the cross-reactive anamnestic antibody response has a protective capacity despite moderate neutralization in vitro and a moderate decrease of viremia in vivo IMPORTANCE: Antibodies can protect from symptomatic dengue virus infection. However, it is not easy to assess which classes of antibodies provide protection because in vitro assays are not always predictive of in vivo protection. During a repeat infection, dengue virus-specific immune memory cells are reactivated and large amounts of antibodies are produced. By studying antibodies cloned from patients with heterologous secondary infection, we tested the protective value of the serotype-cross-reactive "recall" or "anamnestic" response. We found that results from in vitro neutralization assays did not always correlate with the ability of the antibodies to

  14. Pharyngolaryngeal paralysis in a patient with pharyngeal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohki, Masafumi; Komiyama, Sakurako; Tayama, Niro

    2015-02-01

    Pharyngeal tuberculosis is a rare disease, and its commonly reported symptoms include sore throat, dysphagia, and throat discomfort. The dysphagia in pharyngeal tuberculosis cases is not due to pharyngolaryngeal paralysis but due to odynophagia. Herein, we describe the first case of dysphagia caused by pharyngolaryngeal paralysis secondary to pharyngeal tuberculosis. An irregular mass at the right nasopharynx was detected in a 57-year-old female patient, along with dysphagia and hoarseness. She had poor right soft palate elevation, inadequate right velopharyngeal closure, poor constrictor pharyngus muscle contraction, and an immobilized right vocal cord, which collectively indicate right pharyngolaryngeal paralysis. Pathological examination and culture testing revealed pharyngeal tuberculosis. She was diagnosed with pharyngolaryngeal paralysis secondary to pharyngeal tuberculosis. The pharyngolaryngeal paralysis resolved after beginning anti-tuberculous treatment. Right pharyngolaryngeal paralysis was attributed to glossopharyngeal and vagus nerve impairment in the parapharyngeal space. Prior reports indicate that peripheral nerve paralysis, including recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis caused by tuberculous lymphadenitis, often recovers after anti-tuberculous treatment. Pharyngeal tuberculosis rarely causes dysphagia and hoarseness attributable to pharyngolaryngeal paralysis. The neuropathy may recover after anti-tuberculous treatment. Pharyngeal tuberculosis is a new potential differential diagnosis in pharyngolaryngeal paralysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dynamics of Persistent and Acute Deformed Wing Virus Infections in Honey Bees, Apis mellifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay D. Evans

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of viruses are critical to our understanding of disease pathogenesis. Using honey bee Deformed wing virus (DWV as a model, we conducted field and laboratory studies to investigate the roles of abiotic and biotic stress factors as well as host health conditions in dynamics of virus replication in honey bees. The results showed that temperature decline could lead to not only significant decrease in the rate for pupae to emerge as adult bees, but also an increased severity of the virus infection in emerged bees, partly explaining the high levels of winter losses of managed honey bees, Apis mellifera, around the world. By experimentally exposing adult bees with variable levels of parasitic mite Varroa destructor, we showed that the severity of DWV infection was positively correlated with the density and time period of Varroa mite infestation, confirming the role of Varroa mites in virus transmission and activation in honey bees. Further, we showed that host conditions have a significant impact on the outcome of DWV infection as bees that originate from strong colonies resist DWV infection and replication significantly better than bee originating from weak colonies. The information obtained from this study has important implications for enhancing our understanding of host‑pathogen interactions and can be used to develop effective disease control strategies for honey bees.

  16. Acute hepatitis B virus infection with simultaneous high HBsAg and high anti-HBs signals in a previously HBV vaccinated HIV-1 positive patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dommelen, Laura; Verbon, Annelies; van Doorn, H. Rogier; Goossens, Valère J.

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of a clinical manifest hepatitis B virus infection and a potentially misleading HBV serological profile in an HIV-1 positive patient despite previous HBV vaccination. The patient presented with an acute hepatitis B and there was no indication of chronic HBV infection or the

  17. Global, regional, and national disease burden estimates of acute lower respiratory infections due to respiratory syncytial virus in young children in 2015 : A systematic review and modelling study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shi, Ting; McAllister, David A.; O'Brien, Katherine L.; Simoes, Eric A. F.; Madhi, Shabir A.; Gessner, Bradford D.; Polack, Fernando P.; Balsells, Evelyn; Acacio, Sozinho; Aguayo, Claudia; Alassani, Issifou; Ali, Asad; Antonio, Martin; Awasthi, Shally; Awori, Juliet O.; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Baggett, Henry C.; Baillie, Vicky L.; Balmaseda, Angel; Barahona, Alfredo; Basnet, Sudha; Bassat, Quique; Basualdo, Wilma; Bigogo, Godfrey; Bont, Louis; Breiman, Robert F.; Brooks, W. Abdullah; Broor, Shobha; Bruce, Nigel; Bruden, Dana; Buchy, Philippe; Campbell, Stuart; Carosone-Link, Phyllis; Chadha, Mandeep; Chipeta, James; Chou, Monidarin; Clara, Wilfrido; Cohen, Cheryl; de Cuellar, Elizabeth; Dang, Duc Anh; Dash-yandag, Budragchaagiin; Deloria-Knoll, Maria; Dherani, Mukesh; Eap, Tekchheng; Ebruke, Bernard E.; Echavarria, Marcela; de Freitas Lázaro Emediato, Carla Cecília; Fasce, Rodrigo A.; Feikin, Daniel R.; Feng, Luzhao; Gentile, Angela; Gordon, Aubree; Goswami, Doli; Goyet, Sophie; Groome, Michelle J; Halasa, Natasha; Hirve, Siddhivinayak; Homaira, Nusrat; Howie, Stephen R.C.; Jara, Jorge; Jroundi, Imane; Kartasasmita, Cissy B.; Khuri-Bulos, Najwa; Kotloff, Karen L.; Krishnan, Anand; Libster, Romina; Lopez, Olga; Lucero, Marilla G.; Lucion, Florencia; Lupisan, Socorro P.; Marcone, Debora N.; McCracken, John P.; Mejia, Mario; Moisi, Jennifer C.; Montgomery, Joel M.; Moore, David P.; Moraleda, Cinta; Moyes, Jocelyn; Munywoki, Patrick; Mutyara, Kuswandewi; Nicol, Mark P.; Nokes, D. James; Nymadawa, Pagbajabyn; da Costa Oliveira, Maria Tereza; Oshitani, Histoshi; Pandey, Nitin; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Phillips, Lia N.; Picot, Valentina Sanchez; Rahman, Mustafizur; Rakoto-Andrianarivelo, Mala; Rasmussen, Zeba A.; Rath, Barbara A.; Robinson, Annick; Romero, Candice; Russomando, Graciela; Salimi, Vahid; Sawatwong, Pongpun; Scheltema, Nienke; Schweiger, Brunhilde; Scott, J. Anthony G.; Seidenberg, Phil; Shen, Kunling; Singleton, Rosalyn; Sotomayor, Viviana; Strand, Tor A.; Sutanto, Agustinus; Sylla, Mariam; Tapia, Milagritos D.; Thamthitiwat, Somsak; Thomas, Elizabeth D.; Tokarz, Rafal; Turner, Claudia; Venter, Marietjie; Waicharoen, Sunthareeya; Wang, Jianwei; Watthanaworawit, Wanitda; Yoshida, Lay Myint; Yu, Hongjie; Zar, Heather J.; Campbell, Harry; Nair, Harish

    2017-01-01

    Background: We have previously estimated that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was associated with 22% of all episodes of (severe) acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI) resulting in 55 000 to 199 000 deaths in children younger than 5 years in 2005. In the past 5 years, major research activity on

  18. Acute exacerbation of chronic hepatitis B virus infection in renal transplant patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christini Takemi Emori

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions: Acute exacerbation was a frequent and severe event in HBV-infected renal transplant patients. Prophylactic/preemptive therapy with antiviral drugs should be indicated for all HBsAg-positive renal transplant patients.

  19. [Gao Yuchun's experience of facial paralysis treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanjun; Cui, Linhua; Yuan, Jun; He, Li; Xie, Zhanqing; Xue, Weihua; Li, Mei; Zhang, Zhenwei; Gao, Yuchun; Kang, Suobin

    2015-05-01

    To introduce professor Gao Yuchun's clinical experience and treating characteristics of facial paralysis treated with acupuncture and moxibustion. Professor Gao pays attention to yangming when he selects acupoints for clinical syndrome, and directs acupoints selection based on syndrome differentiation in different levels of jingjin, meridians and zangfu; he praises opposing needling technique and reinforcing the deficiency and reducing the excess highly; the acupuncture manipulation is gentle,shallow and slow for reducing the healthy side and reinforcing the affected side, and through losing its excess to complement its deficiency; besides, he stresses needle retaining time and distinguishes reinforcing and reducing. Facial paralysis is treated with key factors such as acupoints selecting based on yangming, acupuncture manipulation, needle retaining time, etc. And the spleen and stomach is fine and good at transportation and transformation; the meridians is harmonious; the qi and blood is smooth. The clinical efficacy is enhanced finally.

  20. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U06239-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ig VV78X074213.4, whole genome... 42 7.2 2 ( AF486073 ) Acute bee paralysis virus isolate Poland 1, compl......us molossinus DNA, clone:MSMg01-106N17.... 32 8.4 2 ( AY053376 ) Acute bee paralysis... virus isolate Poland 4 capsid... 32 8.7 2 ( AF264692 ) Acute bee paralysis virus isolate ballapv12 struc...... 32 8.8 2 ( AF264691 ) Acute bee paralysis virus isolate ballapv8 struct... 32 8.8 2 ( AF264690 ) Acute bee paralysis... virus isolate ballapv7 struct... 32 8.8 2 ( AF264689 ) Acute bee paralysis virus isolate ballap

  1. An uncommon case of dyspnea with unilateral laryngeal paralysis in acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerat, Justine; Lacoste, Marie; Prechoux, Jean-Marc; Aubry, Karine; Nadalon, Sylvie; Ly, Kim Heang; Bessede, Jean-Pierre

    2016-02-01

    A 61-year-old man with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and normal BMI complained of dyspnea. Nasofibroscopy revealed a global and major oedema of the glottis and supraglottis and also a paralysis of the left vocal fold. CT-scan pointed out a spontaneous hyperdensity of the left arytenoid cartilage. A tracheostomy was performed. Clinical examination revealed large hands and macroglossy with high IGF1 rate. MRI confirmed a supracentimetric pituitary adenoma. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a case of acute respiratory distress due to unilateral larynx paralysis leading to acromegaly diagnosis. This is due to submucosal hypertrophy and vocal cord immobility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Focal epileptic seizures mimicking sleep paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimberti, Carlo Andrea; Ossola, Maria; Colnaghi, Silvia; Arbasino, Carla

    2009-03-01

    Sleep paralysis (SP) is a common parasomnia. The diagnostic criteria for SP, as reported in the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, are essentially clinical, as electroencephalography (EEG)-polysomnography (PSG) is not mandatory. We describe a subject whose sleep-related events fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for SP, even though her visual hallucinations were elementary, repetitive and stereotyped, thus differing from those usually reported by patients with SP. Video/EEG-PSG documented the focal epileptic nature of the SP-like episodes.

  3. Imaging evaluation of vocal cord paralysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Marcelo de Mattos; Magalhaes, Fabiana Pizanni; Dadalto, Gabriela Bijos; Moura, Marina Vimieiro Timponi de [Axial Centro de Imagem, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: marcelomgarcia@superig.com.br, e-mail: ce@axialmg.com.br

    2009-09-15

    Vocal cord paralysis is a common cause of hoarseness. It may be secondary to many types of lesions along the cranial nerve X pathway and its branches, particularly the laryngeal recurrent nerves. Despite the idiopathic nature of a great number of cases, imaging methods play a very significant role in the investigation of etiologic factors, such as thyroid and esophagus neoplasias with secondary invasion of the laryngeal recurrent nerves. Other conditions such as aortic and right subclavian artery aneurysms also may be found. The knowledge of local anatomy and related diseases is of great importance for the radiologist, so that he can tailor the examination properly to allow an appropriate diagnosis and therapy planning. Additionally, considering that up to 35% of patients with vocal cord paralysis are asymptomatic, the recognition of radiological findings indicative of this condition is essential for the radiologist who must warn the referring physician on the imaging findings. In the present study, the authors review the anatomy and main diseases related to vocal cord paralysis, demonstrating them through typical cases evaluated by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, besides describing radiological findings of laryngeal abnormalities indicative of this condition. (author)

  4. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerebellar ataxia; Ataxia - acute cerebellar; Cerebellitis; Post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia; PVACA ... Acute cerebellar ataxia in children, particularly younger than age 3, may occur several weeks after an illness caused by a virus. ...

  5. Acute phase protein response during subclinical infection of pigs with H1N1 swine influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomorska-Mól, Małgorzata; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Pejsak, Zygmunt

    2012-10-12

    In the present study acute phase proteins (APPs) responses in pigs after subclinical infection with H1N1 swine influenza virus (SwH1N1) were evaluated. Fourteen 5 weeks old, seronegative piglets, both sexes were used. Ten of them were infected intranasally with SwH1N1. C-reactive protein (CRP), haptoglobin (Hp), serum amyloid A (SAA) and pig major acute phase protein (Pig-MAP) concentrations in serum were measured using commercial ELISAs. No significant clinical signs were observed in any of the infected pigs, however, all infected animals developed specific antibodies against SwH1N1 and viral shedding was observed from 2 to 5 dpi. Only concentrations of Hp and SAA were significantly induced after infection, with mean maximum levels from days 1 to 2 post infection (dpi). The concentrations of CRP and Pig-MAP remained generally unchanged, however in half of infected pigs the concentration of CRP tended to increase at 1 dpi (but without statistical significance). The results of our study confirmed that monitoring of APPs may be useful for detection of subclinically infected pigs. The use of SAA or Hp and Pig-MAP may be a valuable in combination [i.e. Hp (increased concentration) and Pig-MAP (unchanged concentration)] to detect subclinically SIV infected pigs, or to identify pigs actually producing a large amount of virus. Additional studies need to be done in order to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Plasma levels of inter-α inhibitor proteins in children with acute dengue virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Koraka (Penelope); Y.P. Lim; M.D. Shin (Michael); T.E. Setiati (Tatty); A.T.A. Mairuhu; E.C.M. van Gorp (Eric); A. Soemantri (Augustinus); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); B.E.E. Martina (Byron)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Inter-α inhibitor proteins (IaIp) belong to a family of protease inhibitors that are involved in the haemostatic and the vascular system. Dengue viruses (DENV) infections are characterized by coagulopathy and increased vascular permeability. In this study we measured the

  7. Detection of immune-complex-dissociated nonstructural-1 antigen in patients with acute dengue virus infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Koraka (Penelope); C.P. Burghoorn-Maas; A. Falconar; T.E. Setiati (Tatty); K. Djamiatun; J. Groen (Jan); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractAccurate and timely diagnosis of dengue virus (DEN) infections is essential for the differential diagnosis of patients with febrile illness and hemorrhagic fever. In the present study, the diagnostic value of a newly developed immune-complex dissociated nonstructural-1 (NS-1) antigen dot

  8. Detection of immune-complex-dissociated nonstructural-1 antigen in patients with acute dengue virus infections.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koraka, P.; Burghoorn-Maas, C.P.; Falconar, A.; Setiati, T.E.; Djamiatun, K.; Groen, J.; Osterhaus, A.D.

    2003-01-01

    Accurate and timely diagnosis of dengue virus (DEN) infections is essential for the differential diagnosis of patients with febrile illness and hemorrhagic fever. In the present study, the diagnostic value of a newly developed immune-complex dissociated nonstructural-1 (NS-1) antigen dot blot

  9. A systematic review of variables associated with sleep paralysis

    OpenAIRE

    Denis, Dan; French, Christopher C.; Gregory, Alice M.

    2017-01-01

    Sleep paralysis is a relatively common but under-researched phenomenon. While the causes are unknown, a number of studies have investigated potential risk factors. In this article, we conducted a systematic review on the available literature regarding variables associated with both the frequency and intensity of sleep paralysis episodes. A total of 42 studies met the inclusion criteria. For each study, sample size, study site, sex and age of participants, sleep paralysis measure, and results ...

  10. Vocal cord paralysis and its etiologies: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyed Toutounchi, Seyed Javad; Eydi, Mahmood; Golzari, Samad Ej; Ghaffari, Mohammad Reza; Parvizian, Nashmil

    2014-01-01

    Vocal cord paralysis is a common symptom of numerous diseases and it may be due to neurogenic or mechanical fixation of the cords. Paralysis of the vocal cords is just a symptom of underlying disease in some cases; so, clinical diagnosis of the underlying cause leading to paralysis of the vocal cords is important. This study evaluates the causes of vocal cord paralysis. In a prospective study, 45 patients with paralyzed vocal cord diagnosis were examined by tests such as examination of the pharynx, larynx, esophagus, thyroid, cervical, lung, and mediastinum, brain and heart by diagnostic imaging to investigate the cause vocal cord paralysis. The study was ended by diagnosing the reason of vocal cord paralysis at each stage of the examination and the clinical studies. The mean duration of symptoms was 18.95±6.50 months. The reason for referral was phonation changes (97.8%) and aspiration (37.8%) in the subjects. There was bilateral paralysis in 6.82%, left paralysis in 56.82% and right in 63.36% of subjects. The type of vocal cord placement was midline in 52.8%, paramedian in 44.4% and lateral in 2.8% of the subjects. The causes of vocal cords paralysis were idiopathic paralysis (31.11%), tumors (31.11%), surgery (28.89%), trauma, brain problems, systemic disease and other causes (2.2%). An integrated diagnostic and treatment program is necessary for patients with vocal cord paralysis. Possibility of malignancy should be excluded before marking idiopathic reason to vocal cord paralysis.

  11. Vocal Cord Paralysis and its Etiologies: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Javad Seyed Toutounchi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vocal cord paralysis is a common symptom of numerous diseases and it may be due to neurogenic or mechanical fixation of the cords. Paralysis of the vocal cords is just a symptom of underlying disease in some cases; so, clinical diagnosis of the underlying cause leading to paralysis of the vocal cords is important. This study evaluates the causes of vocal cord paralysis.Methods: In a prospective study, 45 patients with paralyzed vocal cord diagnosis were examined by tests such as examination of the pharynx, larynx, esophagus, thyroid, cervical, lung, and mediastinum, brain and heart by diagnostic imaging to investigate the cause vocal cord paralysis. The study was ended by diagnosing the reason of vocal cord paralysis at each stage of the examination and the clinical studies.Results: The mean duration of symptoms was 18.95±6.50 months. The reason for referral was phonation changes (97.8% and aspiration (37.8% in the subjects. There was bilateral paralysis in 6.82%, left paralysis in 56.82% and right in 63.36% of subjects. The type of vocal cord placement was midline in 52.8%, paramedian in 44.4% and lateral in 2.8% of the subjects. The causes of vocal cords paralysis were idiopathic paralysis (31.11%, tumors (31.11%, surgery (28.89%, trauma, brain problems, systemic disease and other causes (2.2%.Conclusion: An integrated diagnostic and treatment program is necessary for patients with vocal cord paralysis. Possibility of malignancy should be excluded before marking idiopathic reason to vocal cord paralysis.

  12. Strategic Paralysis: An Airpower Theory for the Present

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-01

    DATE MAY 1992 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Strategic Paralysis: An Airpower Theory for the Present 5a... Strategic Paralysis 12 3. Choosing the Right Targets 34 4. More Targeting Theories 61 5. The National Elements of Value Model 77 6. Conclusions...introduces the theory of Strategic Paralysis and presents a framework for understanding where it fits into the most commonly accepted strategies for war

  13. Characterization of thymus-associated lymphoid depletion in bovine calves acutely or persistently infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus 1, bovine viral diarrhea virus 2 or HoBi-like pestivirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenberg, Shollie M; Bauermann, Fernando V; Ridpath, Julia F

    2017-11-01

    Naïve pregnant cattle exposed to pestiviruses between 40-125 days of gestation can give birth to persistently infected (PI) calves. Clinical presentation and survivability, in PI cattle, is highly variable even with the same pestivirus strain whereas the clinical presentation in acute infections is more uniform with severity of symptoms being primarily a function of virulence of the infecting virus. The aim of this study was to compare thymic depletion, as measured by comparing the area of the thymic cortex to the medulla (corticomedullary ratio), in acute and persistent infections of the same pestivirus isolate. The same general trends were observed with each pestivirus isolate. Thymic depletion was observed in both acutely and persistently infected calves. The average thymic depletion observed in acutely infected calves was greater than that in age matched PI calves. PI calves, regardless of infecting virus, revealed a greater variability in amount of depletion compared to acutely infected calves. A trend was observed between survivability and depletion of the thymus, with PI calves surviving less than 5 weeks having lower corticomedullary ratios and greater depletion. This is the first study to compare PI and acutely infected calves with the same isolates as well as to evaluate PI calves based on survivability. Further, this study identified a quantifiable phenotype associated with potential survivability.

  14. Effect of high-dose dexamethasone on the outcome of acute encephalitis due to Japanese encephalitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoke, C H; Vaughn, D W; Nisalak, A; Intralawan, P; Poolsuppasit, S; Jongsawas, V; Titsyakorn, U; Johnson, R T

    1992-04-01

    Death due to Japanese encephalitis usually occurs in the first 5 days of hospitalization as a result of deepening coma with respiratory arrest. Death may result from edema-induced increases in intracranial pressure that might be reduced by the administration of steroids. Sixty-five patients presenting in Thailand to four hospitals with a diagnosis of acute Japanese encephalitis were randomized in a double-masked fashion and stratified by initial mental status into a placebo group (saline) or a treatment group (dexamethasone 0.6 mg/kg intravenously as a loading dose followed by 0.2 mg/kg every 6 h for 5 days). Fifty-five of the 65 had confirmed Japanese encephalitis as demonstrated by detection of virus or by Japanese encephalitis virus-specific IgM antibody. Important outcome measures included mortality (24%, treatment group; 27%, control group), days to alert mental status (3.9 vs. 6.2), and neurologic status 3 months after discharge (45% abnormal in each group). No statistically significant benefit of high-dose dexamethasone could be detected.

  15. Effect of Maxing Shigan Tang on H1N1 Influenza A Virus-Associated Acute Lung Injury in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yanchun; Zhou, Jie; Liang, Ning; Liu, Bihao; Lu, Ruirui; He, Yu; Liang, Chunlin; Wu, Junbiao; Zhou, Yuan; Hu, Miaomiao; Zhou, Jiuyao

    2016-01-01

    This study is aimed at examining the effects of Maxing Shigan Tang (MST) treatment on H1N1-associated acute lung injury (ALI) and exploring the possible mechanism. Mice were randomly divided into a control group, model group, peroxisomal proliferator activator receptor γ (PPARγ) inhibition group (PPARγ-), PPARγ activation group (PPARγ+), and MST group. Influenza A (H1N1) virus of the Fort Monmouth 1 (FM1) strain was used to induce an ALI mice model. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed to investigate the effect of MST treatment on H1N1-associated ALI. Cell apoptosis of lung tissues of each group were conducted through transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling methods. Moreover, the expression level of caspase 3, activity of caspase 3, and serum level of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α of each group were also analyzed. Finally, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting analysis were carried out to detect angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4) expression level. We found that mice infected with the FM1 strain of H1N1 influenza A virus developed severe ALI, and MST could improve H1N1-induced ALI. Moreover, MST decreased lung cell apoptosis and reduced the serum content of TNF-α. In addition, MST significantly induced the ANGPTL4 expression in H1N1-induced ALI. MST improves H1N1-associated ALI maybe through targeting ANGPTL4 in mice. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Detection of influenza C viruses among outpatients and patients hospitalized for severe acute respiratory infection, Minnesota, 2013-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielen, Beth K; Friedlander, Hannah; Bistodeau, Sarah; Shu, Bo; Lynch, Brian; Martin, Karen; Bye, Erica; Como-Sabetti, Kathyrn; Boxrud, David; Strain, Anna K; Chaves, Sandra S; Steffens, Andrea; Fowlkes, Ashley L; Lindstrom, Stephen; Lynfield, Ruth

    2017-10-23

    Existing literature suggests that influenza C typically causes mild respiratory tract disease. However, clinical and epidemiological data are limited. Four outpatient clinics and three hospitals submitted clinical data and respiratory specimens through a surveillance network for acute respiratory infection (ARI) during May 2013 through December 2016. Specimens were tested using multi-target nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT) for 19-22 respiratory pathogens, including influenza C. Influenza C virus was detected among 59 of 10,202 (0.58%) hospitalized SARI cases and 11 of 2,282 (0.48%) outpatients. Most detections occurred from December to March, with 73% during the 2014-2015 season. Influenza C detections occurred among patients of all ages, with similar rates between inpatients and outpatients. The highest rate of detection occurred among children aged 6 to 24 months (1.2%). Among hospitalized cases, seven required intensive care. Medical co-morbidities were reported in 58% of hospitalized cases and all who required intensive care. At least one other respiratory pathogen was detected in 40 (66%) cases, most commonly rhinovirus/enterovirus (25%) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (20%). The hemagglutinin-esterase-fusion (HEF) gene was sequenced in 37 specimens, and both C/Kanagawa and C/Sao Paulo lineages were detected in inpatients and outpatients. We found seasonal circulation of influenza C with year-to-year variability. Detection was most frequent among young children, but occurred in all ages. Some cases positive for influenza C, particularly those with co-morbid conditions, had severe disease, suggesting a need for further study of the role of influenza C virus in the pathogenesis of respiratory disease.

  17. Acute Ebola virus disease patient treatment and health-related quality of life in health care professionals: A controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Marco; Bruenahl, Christian A; Addo, Marylyn M; Becker, Stephan; Schmiedel, Stefan; Lohse, Ansgar W; Schramm, Christoph; Löwe, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to identify predictors of health-related quality of life (HrQoL) and to investigate infection-related concerns in health professionals during the acute treatment episode for one Ebola virus disease (EVD) patient in tertiary care. In a cross-sectional controlled study, validated self-report questionnaires were completed by three groups of health care professionals: (1) staff from standard internal medicine inpatient wards of a tertiary care center, (2) staff from the isolation unit of the same center responsible for Ebola patient treatment, and (3) staff from a research laboratory with contact to the Ebola virus and other highly infectious pathogens. Outcomes were HrQoL (SF-12), infection-related concerns, global health status, fatigue (FACIT), depression (PHQ-9), anxiety (GAD-7), and somatic symptoms (SSS-8). Comparisons between groups (n1=42, n2=32, n3=12) yielded no significant differences in HrQoL, subjective risk of infection, and most other psychosocial variables. However, the Ebola patient treatment group experienced significantly higher levels of social isolation than both other groups. The best predictors of poor physical and mental HrQoL were perceived lack of knowledge about the Ebola virus disease (physical: B=-1.2, p=0.05; mental: B=-1.3, p=0.03) and fatigue (physical: B=-0.3, p=0.02; mental: B=-0.53, p<0.001). Ebola patient treatment in tertiary care does not seem to be associated with lower HrQoL and enhanced subjective risk of infection, but seems to yield feelings of social isolation in health-care professionals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Preliminary analysis on respiratory syncytial virus identified in children with acute respiratory infections in Tibet Autonomous Region, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jie; Zhu, Ru-Nan; Qian, Yuan; Sun, Yu; Zhao, Lin-Qing; Wang, Fang; Wu, Hong; Shan, Min-Na; Deji, Mei-Duo

    2012-03-01

    To understand the role of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in children with acute respiratory infections (ARI) in Tibet Autonomous Region and the contribution of two major groups of RSV, nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPA) were collected from hospitalized children with ARI in Department of Pediatrics, Tibet People's Hospital in Lasa, Tibet from April to July in 2011 and tested for seven common respiratory viruses and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) by direct immunofluorescence assay (DFA). Total RNAs were extracted from RSV positive samples by DFA and reverse transcripted to cDNA. Nested-PCR was employed to determine the genogroups of RSV, which were confirmed by real time-PCR and sequence analysis for G protein encoding gene. The Characteristics and variations of G genes from RSV in this project were identified by sequence comparison with those G genes in GenBank. Out of 167 samples, 65 were positive for respiratory viruses with a total positive rate of 38.9%, including 45 (69.2%, 45/65)positive samples for RSV. Among 42 samples that were positive for RSV and genotyped, 40 were identified as group A and 2 as group B. Sequence analysis of full-length G genes for 7 RSV of group A indicated that all of these belonged to subgroup GA2. The nucleotide identities between RSVs from Tibet and prototype A2 strain were 90.7%-91.8%, with 86.5%-87.2% identities of amino acid. The mutations of amino acids were mainly located in both ends of a highly conserved region in the ectodomain of the G proteins. The data indicated that RSV was the most important viral etiologic agent of ARI in spring of 2011 in Tibet and group A of RSV was predominant during the study period. High divergence existed in the ectodomain of G proteins of RSVs from Tibet.

  19. Malignant pleural effusion in acute myeloid leukemia with hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suharti, C; Santosa; Setiawan, Budi

    2015-04-01

    Pleural effusions can be the first presentation of a hematologic malignancy. The most common disorders with pleural effusion are Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma with a frequency of 20 to 30%, especially if mediastinal involvement. Acute and chronic leukemia are rarely accompanied by pleural involvement. We describe a 46-year-old female with history of progressive dyspnoea. Physical examination was revealed massive left pleural effusion. Complete blood count revealed anemia, trombositopenia and normal leucocyte count. Viral serology test shown positive of HBsAg and total antiHBc. Chest X-ray revealed left pleural effusion. Pleural fluid cytology was myeloblast consistent with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Bone marrow aspiration smear, bone marrow biopsy smear, and flow cytometry analysis were consistent with acute myeloid leukemia without maturation (AML M0-FAB classification).

  20. Facial-paralysis diagnostic system based on 3D reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairunnisaa, Aida; Basah, Shafriza Nisha; Yazid, Haniza; Basri, Hassrizal Hassan; Yaacob, Sazali; Chin, Lim Chee

    2015-05-01

    The diagnostic process of facial paralysis requires qualitative assessment for the classification and treatment planning. This result is inconsistent assessment that potential affect treatment planning. We developed a facial-paralysis diagnostic system based on 3D reconstruction of RGB and depth data using a standard structured-light camera - Kinect 360 - and implementation of Active Appearance Models (AAM). We also proposed a quantitative assessment for facial paralysis based on triangular model. In this paper, we report on the design and development process, including preliminary experimental results. Our preliminary experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of our quantitative assessment system to diagnose facial paralysis.

  1. Neuromuscular compensation mechanisms in vocal fold paralysis and paresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewan, Karuna; Vahabzadeh-Hagh, Andrew; Soofer, Donna; Chhetri, Dinesh K

    2017-07-01

    Vocal fold paresis and paralysis are common conditions. Treatment options include augmentation laryngoplasty and voice therapy. The optimal management for this condition is unclear. The objective of this study was to assess possible neuromuscular compensation mechanisms that could potentially be used in the treatment of vocal fold paresis and paralysis. In vivo canine model. In an in vivo canine model, we examined three conditions: 1) unilateral right recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) paresis and paralysis, 2) unilateral superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) paralysis, and 3) unilateral vagal nerve paresis and paralysis. Phonatory acoustics and aerodynamics were measured in each of these conditions. Effective compensation was defined as improved acoustic and aerodynamic profile. The most effective compensation for all conditions was increasing RLN activation and decreasing glottal gap. Increasing RLN activation increased the percentage of possible phonatory conditions that achieved phonation onset. SLN activation generally led to decreased number of total phonation onset conditions within each category. Differential effects of SLN (cricothyroid [CT] muscle) activation were seen. Ipsilateral SLN activation could compensate for RLN paralysis; normal CT compensated well in unilateral SLN paralysis; and in vagal paresis/paralysis, contralateral SLN and RLN displayed antagonistic relationships. Methods to improve glottal closure should be the primary treatment for large glottal gaps. Neuromuscular compensation is possible for paresis. This study provides insights into possible compensatory mechanisms in vocal fold paresis and paralysis. NA Laryngoscope, 127:1633-1638, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. Prevalence and Causes of Paralysis-United States, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Brian S; Courtney-Long, Elizabeth A; Fox, Michael H; Fredine, Heidi; Cahill, Anthony

    2016-10-01

    To estimate the prevalence and causes of functional paralysis in the United States. We used the 2013 US Paralysis Prevalence & Health Disparities Survey to estimate the prevalence of paralysis, its causes, associated sociodemographic characteristics, and health effects among this population. Nearly 5.4 million persons live with paralysis. Most persons with paralysis were younger than 65 years (72.1%), female (51.7%), White (71.4%), high school graduates (64.8%), married or living with a partner (47.4%), and unable to work (41.8%). Stroke is the leading cause of paralysis, affecting 33.7% of the population with paralysis, followed by spinal cord injury (27.3%), multiple sclerosis (18.6%), and cerebral palsy (8.3%). According to the functional definition, persons living with paralysis represent a large segment of the US population, and two thirds of them are between ages 18 and 64 years. Targeted health promotion that uses inclusion strategies to account for functional limitations related to paralysis can be undertaken in partnership with state and local health departments.

  3. Lifetime prevalence rates of sleep paralysis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpless, Brian A; Barber, Jacques P

    2011-10-01

    To determine lifetime prevalence rates of sleep paralysis. Keyword term searches using "sleep paralysis", "isolated sleep paralysis", or "parasomnia not otherwise specified" were conducted using MEDLINE (1950-present) and PsychINFO (1872-present). English and Spanish language abstracts were reviewed, as were reference lists of identified articles. Thirty five studies that reported lifetime sleep paralysis rates and described both the assessment procedures and sample utilized were selected. Weighted percentages were calculated for each study and, when possible, for each reported subsample. Aggregating across studies (total N=36,533), 7.6% of the general population, 28.3% of students, and 31.9% of psychiatric patients experienced at least one episode of sleep paralysis. Of the psychiatric patients with panic disorder, 34.6% reported lifetime sleep paralysis. Results also suggested that minorities experience lifetime sleep paralysis at higher rates than Caucasians. Sleep paralysis is relatively common in the general population and more frequent in students and psychiatric patients. Given these prevalence rates, sleep paralysis should be assessed more regularly and uniformly in order to determine its impact on individual functioning and better articulate its relation to psychiatric and other medical conditions. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Fatal acute hepatic failure in a family infected with the hepatitis A virus subgenotype IB: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yuichi; Okada, Yohei; Suzuki, Akiko; Kakisaka, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Yasuhiro; Miyasaka, Akio; Takikawa, Yasuhiro; Nishizawa, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2017-09-01

    Hepatitis A viral infection is a well-known cause of subclinical or acute self-limited hepatitis. Few cases of hepatitis A virus (HAV)-associated acute liver failure (ALF) have been reported in low HAV endemic countries annually. To investigate the possible factors that affected the severity of HAV infection, a family cluster infected with the HAV subgenotype IB strain, which is not common in Japan, was described. This family consisted of five members who all were infected with HAV. Four of the five patients hospitalized except for an asymptomatic patient. Two of the five patients, men in their 50s and 60s, developed ALF, and one patient died. Various host factors, including sex (male), age, and a high bilirubin level, may affect the outcomes. Based on viral factors, HAV RNA was higher in the fatal case compared with others, and it decreased within a short period of time. The similarity of the nucleotide sequences was 99.9% among the HAV isolates based on an entire genomic sequence. Deletions and/or insertions on the HAV protein-coding sequences that caused a frameshift were found in surviving cases but not in the fatal case. The rapid clearance of increased HAV and the absence of defective HAV might be closely associated with the onset of liver failure.

  5. Respiratory syncytial virus-induced acute and chronic airway disease is independent of genetic background: An experimental murine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramilo Octavio

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the leading respiratory viral pathogen in young children worldwide. RSV disease is associated with acute airway obstruction (AO, long-term airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR, and chronic lung inflammation. Using two different mouse strains, this study was designed to determine whether RSV disease patterns are host-dependent. C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice were inoculated with RSV and followed for 77 days. RSV loads were measured by plaque assay and polymerase chain reaction (PCR in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL and whole lung samples; cytokines were measured in BAL samples. Lung inflammation was evaluated with a histopathologic score (HPS, and AO and AHR were determined by plethysmography. Results Viral load dynamics, histopathologic score (HPS, cytokine concentrations, AO and long-term AHR were similar in both strains of RSV-infected mice, although RSV-infected C57BL/6 mice developed significantly greater AO compared with RSV-infected BALB/c mice on day 5. PCR detected RSV RNA in BAL samples of RSV infected mice until day 42, and in whole lung samples through day 77. BAL concentrations of cytokines TNF-α, IFN-γ, and chemokines MIG, RANTES and MIP-1α were significantly elevated in both strains of RSV-infected mice compared with their respective controls. Viral load measured by PCR significantly correlated with disease severity on days 14 and 21. Conclusion RSV-induced acute and chronic airway disease is independent of genetic background.

  6. Independent lung ventilation in a newborn with asymmetric acute lung injury due to respiratory syncytial virus: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Nardo Matteo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Independent lung ventilation is a form of protective ventilation strategy used in adult asymmetric acute lung injury, where the application of conventional mechanical ventilation can produce ventilator-induced lung injury and ventilation-perfusion mismatch. Only a few experiences have been published on the use of independent lung ventilation in newborn patients. Case presentation We present a case of independent lung ventilation in a 16-day-old infant of 3.5 kg body weight who had an asymmetric lung injury due to respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis. We used independent lung ventilation applying conventional protective pressure controlled ventilation to the less-compromised lung, with a respiratory frequency proportional to the age of the patient, and a pressure controlled high-frequency ventilation to the atelectatic lung. This was done because a single tube conventional ventilation protective strategy would have exposed the less-compromised lung to a high mean airways pressure. The target of independent lung ventilation is to provide adequate gas exchange at a safe mean airways pressure level and to expand the atelectatic lung. Independent lung ventilation was accomplished for 24 hours. Daily chest radiograph and gas exchange were used to evaluate the efficacy of independent lung ventilation. Extubation was performed after 48 hours of conventional single-tube mechanical ventilation following independent lung ventilation. Conclusion This case report demonstrates the feasibility of independent lung ventilation with two separate tubes in neonates as a treatment of an asymmetric acute lung injury.

  7. Hepatitis B virus (HBV genotypes in Egyptian pediatric cancer patients with acute and chronic active HBV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Mohsen M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are eight genotypes of hepatitis B virus (A-H and subgenotypes are recognized. Genotyping can be accomplished based on a partial sequence of HBV genome such as the pre-S or S gene. Several methods have been developed and used for HBV genotyping. This study was undertaken to determine the HBV genotypes in Egyptian pediatric cancer patients with acute and chronic liver disease. Methods HBV genotypes were determined in 22 patients who had acute forms of liver disease (AH and in 48 patients with chronic active hepatitis (CAH. A type-specific primer based the nested-PCR method was employed in the HBV genotyping. Results This study showed that HBV infections in pediatric cancer patients are attributed predominantly to viral genotypes D and B that constituted 37.1% and 25.7%, respectively of the total infections. In addition, there was a relatively high prevalence of mixed infections of 15.7% among the studied group especially mixed A/D genotype infections. Genotype D was found significantly more often in patients with CAH than in patients with AH [23/48(47.9% v 3/22 (13.6%]. Conclusion These findings show the distribution of HBV A-D genotypes in pediatric cancer Egyptian patients. Furthermore, our results indicate a markedly high prevalence of mixed A/D genotype infections in subjects with CAH and a possible association of mixed infections with the severity of liver diseases.

  8. Hepatitis E virus as a Cause of Acute Hepatitis in The Netherlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aletta T R Tholen

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that 27% of Dutch blood donors have evidence of past infection with HEV. However, the low number of diagnosed HEV infections indicates either an asymptomatic course or under diagnosis.We investigated whether HEV is a cause of acute hepatitis in Dutch patients and which diagnostic modality (serology or PCR should be used for optimal detection.Serum samples were retrospectively selected from non-severely immuno-compromised patients from a university hospital population, suspected of having an infectious hepatitis. Criteria were: elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT> 34 U/l and request for antibody testing for CMV, EBV or Hepatitis A (HAV.All samples were tested for HEV using ELISA and PCR. Ninety patients/sera were tested, of which 22% were HEV IgG positive. Only one serum was IgM positive. HEV PCR was positive in two patients: one patient was both HEV IgM and IgG positive, the other patient was only IgG positive. Both HEV RNA positive samples belonged to genotype 3. Evidence of recent infection with CMV, EBV and HAV was found in 13%, 10% and 3% respectively.Although our study is limited by small numbers, we conclude that HEV is a cause of acute hepatitis in hospital associated patients in The Netherlands. Moreover, in our study population the prevalence of acute HAV (3% was almost similar to acute HEV (2%. We propose to incorporate HEV testing in panels for acute infectious hepatitis. Negative results obtained for HEV IgM in a HEV PCR positive patient, indicates that antibody testing alone may not be sufficient and argues for PCR as a primary diagnostic tool in hospital associated patients. The high percentage of HEV IgG seropositivity confirms earlier epidemiological studies.

  9. [Herpes simplex virus bronchopneumonitis in patient with acute respiratory failure after surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Montesinos-De la Peña, M; Oteiza-López, L; Aldunate-Calvo, S; Gómez-Sánchez, M J; Sáenz-Bañuelos, J J; Tihista-Jiménez, J A

    2010-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus bronchopneumonitis is a clinical entity described in critically ill patients and classically associated to immunosuppression. Recent reports have shown a higher frequency of virus detection from samples obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage of immunocompetent critically ill patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. This fact suggests its role as an independent pathogenic substrate. We report the case of a female patient who was admitted after an elective surgery of rectal tumor with suspected bronchoaspiration during anesthetic induction. The patient presented persistent fever despite broad spectrum antibiotic treatment. All cultures were negative for bacterial growth. The chest X-ray did not show opacifities. Prolonged mechanical ventilation with repeated failures to wean made it mandatory to perform percutaneous tracheostomy. A fibrobronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage, performed previously, showed positive result for herpes simplex virus (PCR and specific nuclear inclusions in cells). Thus, treatment was initiated with acyclovir, with clinical improvement and weaning from mechanical ventilation. Copyright 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  10. Barium-induced skeletal muscle paralysis in the rat, and its relationship to human familial periodic paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, G. D.; McArdle, B.

    1974-01-01

    An in vivo study of skeletal muscle paralysis induced by intravenous barium chloride has been made in curarized and non-curarized rats. The influence of potassium and calcium chlorides, propranolol, ouabain, and prior adrenalectomy on the paralysis has also been studied. Paralysis is found to be due to a direct effect on skeletal muscle, and to correlate well with the development of hypokalaemia. Possible mechanisms of action of barium are discussed, and attention is drawn to the similarity between barium poisoning and hypokalaemic familial periodic paralysis. PMID:4813426

  11. Impact of determination of hepatitis B virus subgenotype and pre-core/core-promoter mutation for the prediction of acute exacerbation of asymptomatic carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Tadashi; Matsuki, Yasuhiko; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Mizokami, Masashi; Honda, Akira; Hirayama, Takeshi; Saito, Yoshifumi; Matsuzaki, Yasushi

    2009-04-01

    A large cohort study in Japan revealed that the specific viral profile may influence the fulminant outcome in acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections, while the genetic influence on outcome has not been clarified in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic liver disease caused by HBV. We experienced a case of fatal liver failure that developed as the result of chronic HBV infection. To determine possible genetic factor involving acute exacerbation, genetic analysis of serum from the patient and his siblings was performed. HBV subgenotype as well as pre-core/core-promoter mutations of samples mentioned above were determined. Patient had HBV-Bj with pre-core (1896/1899) and core-promoter (1762/1764) mutations, the genomic profile frequently seen in fulminant hepatitis caused by acute HBV infection. This result suggests that determination of the HBV subgenotype and pre-core/core promoter mutations could provide a rationale for development of a treatment strategy in asymptomatic HBV carriers.

  12. Prolonged activation of virus-specific CD8+T cells after acute B19 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isa, Adiba; Kasprowicz, Victoria; Norbeck, Oscar

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human parvovirus B19 (B19) is a ubiquitous and clinically significant pathogen, causing erythema infectiosum, arthropathy, transient aplastic crisis, and intrauterine fetal death. The phenotype of CD8+ T cells in acute B19 infection has not been studied previously. METHODS AND FINDINGS......: The number and phenotype of B19-specific CD8+ T cell responses during and after acute adult infection was studied using HLA-peptide multimeric complexes. Surprisingly, these responses increased in magnitude over the first year post-infection despite resolution of clinical symptoms and control of viraemia......, with T cell populations specific for individual epitopes comprising up to 4% of CD8+ T cells. B19-specific T cells developed and maintained an activated CD38+ phenotype, with strong expression of perforin and CD57 and downregulation of CD28 and CD27. These cells possessed strong effector function...

  13. Upper Extremity Assessment in Tetraplegia: The Importance of Differentiating Between Upper and Lower Motor Neuron Paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryden, Anne M; Hoyen, Harry A; Keith, Michael W; Mejia, Melvin; Kilgore, Kevin L; Nemunaitis, Gregory A

    2016-06-01

    Scientific advances are increasing the options for improved upper limb function in people with cervical level spinal cord injury (SCI). Some of these interventions rely on identifying an aspect of paralysis that is not uniformly assessed in SCI: the integrity of the lower motor neuron (LMN). SCI can damage both the upper motor neuron and LMN causing muscle paralysis. Differentiation between these causes of paralysis is not typically believed to be important during SCI rehabilitation because, regardless of the cause, the muscles are no longer under voluntary control by the patient. Emerging treatments designed to restore upper extremity function (eg, rescue microsurgical nerve transfers, motor learning-based interventions, functional electrical stimulation) all require knowledge of LMN status. The LMN is easily evaluated using surface electrical stimulation and does not add significant time to the standard clinical assessment of SCI. This noninvasive evaluation yields information that contributes to the development of a lifetime upper extremity care plan for maximizing function and quality of life. Given the relative simplicity of this assessment and the far-reaching implications for treatment and function, we propose that this assessment should be adopted as standard practice for acute cervical SCI. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Multiple immune factors are involved in controlling acute and chronic chikungunya virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee Suan Poo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent epidemic of the arthritogenic alphavirus, chikungunya virus (CHIKV has prompted a quest to understand the correlates of protection against virus and disease in order to inform development of new interventions. Herein we highlight the propensity of CHIKV infections to persist long term, both as persistent, steady-state, viraemias in multiple B cell deficient mouse strains, and as persistent RNA (including negative-strand RNA in wild-type mice. The knockout mouse studies provided evidence for a role for T cells (but not NK cells in viraemia suppression, and confirmed the role of T cells in arthritis promotion, with vaccine-induced T cells also shown to be arthritogenic in the absence of antibody responses. However, MHC class II-restricted T cells were not required for production of anti-viral IgG2c responses post CHIKV infection. The anti-viral cytokines, TNF and IFNγ, were persistently elevated in persistently infected B and T cell deficient mice, with adoptive transfer of anti-CHIKV antibodies unable to clear permanently the viraemia from these, or B cell deficient, mice. The NOD background increased viraemia and promoted arthritis, with B, T and NK deficient NOD mice showing high-levels of persistent viraemia and ultimately succumbing to encephalitic disease. In wild-type mice persistent CHIKV RNA and negative strand RNA (detected for up to 100 days post infection was associated with persistence of cellular infiltrates, CHIKV antigen and stimulation of IFNα/β and T cell responses. These studies highlight that, secondary to antibodies, several factors are involved in virus control, and suggest that chronic arthritic disease is a consequence of persistent, replicating and transcriptionally active CHIKV RNA.

  15. Initial weight and virus dose: two factors affecting the onset of acute coxsackievirus B3 myocarditis in C57BL/6 mouse--a histopathology-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Minghui; Wang, Xinggang; Xie, Yuquan; Xie, Yeqing; Zhang, Xian; Zou, Yunzeng; Ge, Junbo; Chen, Ruizhen

    2013-01-01

    C57BL/6 mice have been considered resistant to cardiotropic coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3)-induced myocarditis. However, establishment of viral myocarditis model in C57BL/6 mouse is still a necessity. Here, we discuss the effects of mouse initial body weight and different virus inoculation doses on the onset of acute viral myocarditis in C57BL/6 mouse. According to initial body weight, mice were grouped into group A (3-4 weeks, 11-15 g) and group B (5-6 weeks, 18-20 g). Then, each group was divided into three subgroups inoculated with different virus doses: 1000 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID(50))/ml, 10,000 TCID(50)/ml, and 100,000 TCID(50)/ml. Virus existence and myocardium inflammatory infiltration conditions were observed and evaluated 7 days postinfection. Immunohistochemistry staining showed that virus capsid protein VP1 appeared in the myocardia of virus-infected mice. Three subgroups in the lower-body-weight group (group A) came out with a higher mortality (40%-100%), while the higher-body-weight group (group B) showed a tendency for body weight decline. Histopathologically, myocardia of the survival cases in the lower-initial-body-weight group got inflammatory infiltration, while almost no inflammation appeared in the dead cases. In the higher-body-weight group, myocardium inflammatory infiltration deteriorated with the increase of virus doses and bared a relatively sound survival rate. This study indicated that the initial body weight and virus infection dose are two factors affecting the onset of viral myocarditis in C57BL/6 mice. Accordingly, initial body weight of 18-20 g and an inoculation dose of 100,000 TCID(50)/ml × 0.3 ml CVB3 might be an optimal choice to induce acute viral myocarditis in C57BL/6 mice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of the prevalence of respiratory viruses in patients with acute respiratory infections at different hospital settings in North China, 2012-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jianxing; Xie, Zhengde; Zhang, Tiegang; Lu, Yanqin; Fan, Hongwei; Yang, Donghong; Bénet, Thomas; Vanhems, Philippe; Shen, Kunling; Huang, Fang; Han, Jinxiang; Li, Taisheng; Gao, Zhancheng; Ren, Lili; Wang, Jianwei

    2018-02-08

    Acute respiratory infections (ARIs) are a great public health challenge globally. The prevalence of respiratory viruses in patients with ARIs attending at different hospital settings is fully undetermined. Laboratory-based surveillance for ARIs was conducted at inpatient and outpatient settings of 11 hospitals in North China. The first 2-5 patients with ARIs were recruited in each hospital weekly from 2012 through 2015. The presence of respiratory viruses was screened by PCR assays. The prevalence of respiratory viruses was determined and compared between patients at different hospital settings. A total of 3487 hospitalized cases and 6437 outpatients/Emergency Department (ED) patients were enrolled. The most commonly detected viruses in the hospitalized cases were respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, 33.3%) in children less than two years old, adenoviruses (13.0%) in patients 15-34 years old, and influenza viruses (IFVs, 9.6%) in patients ≥65 years. IFVs were the most common virus in outpatient/ED patients across all age groups (22.7%). After controlling for the confounders caused by other viruses and covariates, adenoviruses (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 3.97, 99% confidence interval [99% CI]: 2.19-7.20) and RSV (aOR: 2.04, 99% CI: 1.34-3.11) were independently associated with increased hospitalization in children, as well as adenoviruses in adults (aOR: 2.14, 99% CI: 1.19-3.85). Additionally, co-infection of RSV with IFVs was associated with increased hospitalization in children (aOR: 12.20, 99% CI: 2.65-56.18). A substantial proportion of ARIs was associated with respiratory viruses in North China. RSV, adenoviruses, and co-infection of RSV and IFVs were more frequent in hospitalized children (or adenoviruses in adults), which might predict the severity of ARIs. Attending clinicians should be more vigilant of these infections.

  17. Letter: Transient peripheral facial nerve paralysis after local anesthetic procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmaninho, Aristóteles; Lobo, Inês; Caetano, Mónica; Taipa, Ricardo; Magalhães, Marina; Costa, Virgílio; Selores, Manuela

    2012-04-15

    Complications may arise after laser therapy of the face. The most common ones are bleeding and infections; facial nerve paresis or paralysis is rarely reported. We describe a case of a transient peripheral facial nerve paralysis after laser therapy of an epidermal verrucous nevus localized at the left preauricular area.

  18. Some Aspects of Facial Nerve Paralysis | Potgieter | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paralysis of the facial nerve can cause a great deal of anxiety and discomfort to the patient, as it is intimately involved in emotional expression. A lesion anywhere on its entire course can usually be pinpointed and this is important in the treatment and prognosis. A uniform way of expressing the degree of facial paralysis is ...

  19. Vocal cord paralysis associated with Ramsay Hunt syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Eva Rye; Mey, Kristianna

    2014-01-01

    Ramsay Hunt syndrome is defined by herpes zoster oticus and peripheral facial nerve palsy which is often associated with otalgia. The syndrome is, in rare cases, associated with other cranial nerve paralyses including the vagal nerve causing unilateral vocal cord paralysis. Vocal cord paralysis...

  20. Viruses of managed alfalfa leafcutting bees (Megachille rotundata Fabricus) and honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) in Western Canada: Incidence, impacts, and prospects of cross-species viral transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melathopoulos, Andony; Ovinge, Lynae; Veiga, Patricia Wolf; Castillo, Carlos; Ostermann, David; Hoover, Shelley

    2017-06-01

    We examined whether alfalfa leafcutting bees (ALCB, Megachille rotundata) experienced a higher incidence of seven viruses commonly found honey bees (Apis mellifera) when placed alongside honey bees for hybrid canola seed pollination. Although two viruses - sacbrood virus (SBV) and deformed wing virus (DWV) - were detected in ALCB adults, their presence appeared independent of whether honey bees were present in the same field or not. A further survey of viruses among ALCB adults in three different alfalfa seed growing regions in Western Canada confirmed the ubiquity of sacbrood virus (SBV) as well as the infrequent presence of acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV), both of which had not been previously reported on ALCB. Moreover, SBV and ABPV were detected in the cocoon stage and only in one region. Co-infection among pools of ALCB adults with both of these viruses was more closely correlated with decreasing levels of cocoon viability than infection levels in cocoons themselves. This research suggests ongoing viral transmission between honey bees and ALCB in the same fields is likely low but that co-infection with these viruses may lower ALCB productivity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Surveillance of acute flaccid paralysis in Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: This study showed high levels of surveillance performance with some challenges in reverse the cold chain system, the continuation and sustained AFP case detection, prompt investigation and response, improvement in the reserve cold chain system would achieve optimal standards recommended by WHO and ...

  2. Acute Flaccid Paralysis Surveillance in Zambia: Progress towards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    enterovirus 71 (E71) which is implicated in persistent. 14. AFP in ... rendered to children diagnosed and confirmed with wild polio and ... METHODS. This study used secondary data from a case control study design which was aimed at assessing the association of. NPEVs with AFP. However, this particular study aimed at.

  3. Isolated vagus nerve paralysis associated with internal carotid artery dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Hideki; Kusuyama, Toshiyuki; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2014-02-01

    Dysphagia and hoarseness caused by laryngopharyngeal paralysis associated with internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection is rare. We reported a case which recovered spontaneously. A 57-year old man visited our hospital complaining of dysphagia and hoarseness lasting for two weeks. Paralysis of right vocal fold and rotational movement of the posterior pharyngeal wall toward the left side during swallowing were observed. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed under diagnosis of isolated right vagus nerve paralysis, and dissection of the right ICA was revealed. He was treated conservatively, and both of laryngopharyngeal movement and the ICA dissection were improved completely. There is a possibility that laryngeal paralysis caused by ICA dissection has been misdiagnosed as an idiopathic paralysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Corticosteroid treatment ameliorates acute lung injury induced by 2009 swine origin influenza A (H1N1 virus in mice.

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    Chenggang Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The 2009 influenza pandemic affected people in almost all countries in the world, especially in younger age groups. During this time, the debate over whether to use corticosteroid treatment in severe influenza H1N1 infections patients resurfaced and was disputed by clinicians. There is an urgent need for a susceptible animal model of 2009 H1N1 infection that can be used to evaluate the pathogenesis and the therapeutic effect of corticosteroid treatment during infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We intranasally inoculated two groups of C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice (using 4- or 6-to 8-week-old mice to compare the pathogenesis of several different H1N1 strains in mice of different ages. Based on the results, a very susceptible 4-week-old C57BL/6 mouse model of Beijing 501 strain of 2009 H1N1 virus infection was established, showing significantly elevated lung edema and cytokine levels compared to controls. Using our established animal model, the cytokine production profile and lung histology were assessed at different times post-infection, revealing increased lung lesions in a time-dependent manner. In additional,the mice were also treated with dexamethasone, which significantly improved survival rate and lung lesions in infected mice compared to those in control mice. Our data showed that corticosteroid treatment ameliorated acute lung injury induced by the 2009 A/H1N1 virus in mice and suggested that corticosteroids are valid drugs for treating 2009 A/H1N1 infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using the established, very susceptible 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1 mouse model, our studies indicate that corticosteroids are a potential therapeutic remedy that may address the increasing concerns over future 2009 A/H1N1 pandemics.

  5. Frequency of viruses associated with acute respiratory infections in children younger than five years of age at a locality of Mexico City

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    C Cabello

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available A locality in the district of Tlalpan, Mexico City, was selected in order to identify the viral agents in children younger than 5 years of age with acute respiratory infection (ARI. A total of 300 children were randomly selected and were included in this study for a period of 13 months. During this period nasopharyngeal exudates were collected for the isolation of viral agents. Monoclonal fluorescent antibodies were used for viral identification after cell culture. Viral infection was detected in 65% of the specimens. The respiratory syncytial virus (RSV was the most common virus agent detected. Children required an average of two consultations during the study period. Two high incidence peaks were observed, one during the summer and the other during winter; the most frequent viruses during these seasons were influenza A and RSV, respectively. The largest number of viruses was isolated in the group of children between 1 and 2 years of age and in the group between 4 and 5 years of age. This study demonstrated the presence of ARI and of different viruses in a period of 13 months, as well as the most frequent viruses in children younger than 5 years of age from a community of Mexico City.

  6. Acute meningoencephalomyelitis due to varicella-zoster virus in an AIDS patient: report of a case and review of the literature

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    Marcelo Corti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Varicella-zoster virus (VZV meningoencephalomyelitis is a rare but severe neurological complication of VZV reactivation in immunocompromised patients. We report the case of an HIV-infected individual who developed an acute and severe meningoencephalomyelitis accompanied by a disseminated cutaneous eruption due to VZV. The presence of VZV DNA in cerebrospinal fluid was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR technique. The patient started undergoing an intravenous acyclovir therapy with a mild recovery of neurological manifestations. Varicella-zoster virus should be included as a cause of acute meningoencephalomyelitis in patients with AIDS. Early diagnosis followed by specific therapy should modify the rapid and fulminant course for this kind of patients.

  7. Isolated sleep paralysis elicited by sleep interruption.

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    Takeuchi, T; Miyasita, A; Sasaki, Y; Inugami, M; Fukuda, K

    1992-06-01

    We elicited isolated sleep paralysis (ISP) from normal subjects by a nocturnal sleep interruption schedule. On four experimental nights, 16 subjects had their sleep interrupted for 60 minutes by forced awakening at the time when 40 minutes of nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep had elapsed from the termination of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in the first or third sleep cycle. This schedule produced a sleep onset REM period (SOREMP) after the interruption at a high rate of 71.9%. We succeeded in eliciting six episodes of ISP in the sleep interruptions performed (9.4%). All episodes of ISP except one occurred from SOREMP, indicating a close correlation between ISP and SOREMP. We recorded verbal reports about ISP experiences and recorded the polysomnogram (PSG) during ISP. All of the subjects with ISP experienced inability to move and were simultaneously aware of lying in the laboratory. All but one reported auditory/visual hallucinations and unpleasant emotions. PSG recordings during ISP were characterized by a REM/W stage dissociated state, i.e. abundant alpha electroencephalographs and persistence of muscle atonia shown by the tonic electromyogram. Judging from the PSG recordings, ISP differs from other dissociated states such as lucid dreaming, nocturnal panic attacks and REM sleep behavior disorders. We compare some of the sleep variables between ISP and non-ISP nights. We also discuss the similarities and differences between ISP and sleep paralysis in narcolepsy.

  8. Cerebral hemorrhage without manifest motor paralysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taketani, Torao; Dohi, Ichiro; Miyazaki, Tadahiko; Handa, Akihisa

    1982-01-01

    Before the introduction of computerized tomography (CT) there were some cases of intracerebral bleeding who were wrongly diagnosed as hypertensive encephalopathy or senile psychosis. We here report 5 cases who did not show any sign of motor paralysis. The clinical aspects of these cases were nausea and vomiting with dizziness (case 1), nausea and vomiting with slight headache (case 2), agnosia of left side with several kinds of disorientation (case 3), nausea and vomiting (case 4), and visual disturbance of right, lower quadrant (case 5). All of these cases showed no motor paralysis or abnormal reflex activities. By examination with CT each of them exhibited a high density area in the subcortical area of the right parietal lobe, the subcortical area of the right occipital lobe, the right temporal and parietal lobe, rather small portion of the left putamen and external capsule, and the subcortical area of left occipital lobe, respectively. Patients of cerebral hemorrhage without motor or sensory disturbances might often be taken for some psychic abnormality. We here have emphasized the importance of CT in such a group of patients. But for this technique, most of them would not be given adequate treatment and might be exposed to lifethreatening situations. (author)

  9. Middle ear barotrauma causing transient facial nerve paralysis after scuba diving.

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    Carmichael, Matthew Lee; Boyev, K Paul

    2016-12-01

    Middle ear barotrauma is a well known entity with typical injury occurring when diving or ascending in a commercial jetliner. Patients often present with symptoms of acute onset otalgia, hearing loss and sometimes haemotympanum (with or without tympanic membrane perforation). On rare occasions, facial nerve paralysis can occur when the tympanic segment of the facial nerve is dehiscent within the middle ear. We present a case of spontaneously resolving facial nerve palsy associated with middle ear barotrauma following a brief, shallow dive. Prompt and astute diagnosis leads to proper management with simple myringotomy and can prevent unnecessary testing and other misguided treatments.

  10. Pseudobulbar paralysis in the Renaissance: Cosimo I de' Medici case.

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    Arba, F; Inzitari, D; Lippi, D

    2014-07-01

    Cosimo I de' Medici (1519-1574) was the first Grand Duke of Tuscany. He was one of the most important members of the Medici family. He was an excellent conqueror and a good politician. Moreover, he was able to attract and encourage artists, scientists and architects to promote Florence as the cultural capital of the Italian Renaissance. Historical chronicles report that he suffered from a stroke when he was 49 years old. Together with the acute manifestation of stroke, he displayed peculiar symptoms. He had gait disturbances and sphincter dysfunctions. His language became poor and hard to understand. His mood was very fluctuating and in the last years of his life he was a short-tempered man. In addition, he had a characteristic symptom, so-called pathological laughing and crying. The course of his disease was slow and stuttering. Taken together, these data seem to be one of the first reports of pseudobulbar paralysis. The disease of Cosimo I was probably due to a chronic cerebral vasculopathy, known as small vessels disease. We discuss this hypothesis regarding an ancient clinical case, with the support of current studies.

  11. Prognostic factors of the short-term outcomes of patients with hepatitis B virus-associated acute-on-chronic liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Qing; Ao, Kangjian; Zhang, Yinhua; Ma, Deqiang; Ding, Deping; Ke, Changzheng; Chen, Yue; Luo, Jie; Meng, Zhongji

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the impact of the baseline status of patients with hepatitis B virus-associated acute-on-chronic liver failure on short-term outcomes. A retrospective study was conducted that included a total of 138 patients with hepatitis B virus-associated acute-on-chronic liver failure admitted to the Department of Infectious Diseases, Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, from November 2013 to October 2016. The patients were divided into a poor prognosis group (74 patients) and a good prognosis group (64 patients) based on the disease outcome. General information, clinical indicators and prognostic scores of the patients' baseline status were analyzed, and a prediction model was established accordingly. Elder age, treatment with artificial liver support systems and the frequency of such treatments, high levels of white blood cells, neutrophils, neutrophil count/lymphocyte count ratio, alanine aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, total bilirubin, urea, and prognostic scores as well as low levels of albumin and sodium were all significantly associated with the short-term outcomes of hepatitis B virus-associated acute-on-chronic liver failure. The predictive model showed that logit (p) = 3.068 + 1.003 × neutrophil count/lymphocyte count ratio - 0.892 × gamma-glutamyl transferase - 1.138 × albumin - 1.364 × sodium + 1.651 × artificial liver support therapy. The neutrophil count/lymphocyte count ratio and serum levels of gamma-glutamyl transferase, albumin and sodium were independent risk factors predicting short-term outcomes of hepatitis B virus-associated acute-on-chronic liver failure, and the administration of multiple treatments with artificial liver support therapy during the early stage is conducive to improved short-term outcomes.

  12. Acute reactogenicity after intramuscular immunization with recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus is linked to production of IL-1β.

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    Kathleen Athearn

    Full Text Available Vaccines based on live viruses are attractive because they are immunogenic, cost-effective, and can be delivered by multiple routes. However, live virus vaccines also cause reactogenic side effects such as fever, myalgia, and injection site pain that have reduced their acceptance in the clinic. Several recent studies have linked vaccine-induced reactogenic side effects to production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β in humans. Our objective was therefore to determine whether IL-1β contributed to pathology after immunization with recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV vaccine vectors, and if so, to identify strategies by which IL-1β mediated pathology might be reduced without compromising immunogenicity. We found that an rVSV vaccine induced local and systemic production of IL-1β in vivo, and that accumulation of IL-1β correlated with acute pathology after rVSV immunization. rVSV-induced pathology was reduced in mice deficient in the IL-1 receptor Type I, but the IL-1R-/- mice were fully protected from lethal rechallenge with a high dose of VSV. This result demonstrated that IL-1 contributed to reactogenicity of the rVSV, but was dispensable for induction of protective immunity. The amount of IL-1β detected in mice deficient in either caspase-1 or the inflammasome adaptor molecule ASC after rVSV immunization was not significantly different than that produced by wild type animals, and caspase-1-/- and ASC-/- mice were only partially protected from rVSV-induced pathology. Those data support the idea that some of the IL-1β expressed in vivo in response to VSV may be activated by a caspase-1 and ASC-independent mechanism. Together these results suggest that rVSV vectors engineered to suppress the induction of IL-1β, or signaling through the IL-1R would be less reactogenic in vivo, but would retain their immunogenicity and protective capacity. Such rVSV would be highly desirable as either vaccine vectors or

  13. Shedding of soluble glycoprotein 1 detected during acute Lassa virus infection in human subjects

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    Momoh Mambu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lassa hemorrhagic fever (LHF is a neglected tropical disease with significant impact on the health care system, society, and economy of Western and Central African nations where it is endemic. With a high rate of infection that may lead to morbidity and mortality, understanding how the virus interacts with the host's immune system is of great importance for generating vaccines and therapeutics. Previous work by our group identified a soluble isoform of the Lassa virus (LASV GP1 (sGP1 in vitro resulting from the expression of the glycoprotein complex (GPC gene 12. Though no work has directly been done to demonstrate the function of this soluble isoform in arenaviral infections, evidence points to immunomodulatory effects against the host's immune system mediated by a secreted glycoprotein component in filoviruses, another class of hemorrhagic fever-causing viruses. A significant fraction of shed glycoprotein isoforms during viral infection and biogenesis may attenuate the host's inflammatory response, thereby enhancing viral replication and tissue damage. Such shed glycoprotein mediated effects were previously reported for Ebola virus (EBOV, a filovirus that also causes hemorrhagic fever with nearly 90% fatality rates 345. The identification of an analogous phenomenon in vivo could establish a new correlate of LHF infection leading to the development of sensitive diagnostics targeting the earliest molecular events of the disease. Additionally, the reversal of potentially untoward immunomodulatory functions mediated by sGP1 could potentiate the development of novel therapeutic intervention. To this end, we investigated the presence of sGP1 in the serum of suspected LASV patients admitted to the Kenema Government Hospital (KGH Lassa Fever Ward (LFW, in Kenema, Sierra Leone that tested positive for viral antigen or displayed classical signs of Lassa fever. Results It is reasonable to expect that a narrow window exists for

  14. Elevated levels of cell-free circulating DNA in patients with acute dengue virus infection.

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    Tran Thi Ngoc Ha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Apoptosis is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of severe dengue and the release of cell-free DNA into the circulatory system in several medical conditions. Therefore, we investigated circulating DNA as a potential biomarker for severe dengue. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A direct fluorometric degradation assay using PicoGreen was performed to quantify cell-free DNA from patient plasma. Circulating DNA levels were significantly higher in patients with dengue virus infection than with other febrile illnesses and healthy controls. Remarkably, the increase of DNA levels correlated with the severity of dengue. Additionally, multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that circulating DNA levels independently correlated with dengue shock syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Circulating DNA levels were increased in dengue patients and correlated with dengue severity. Additional studies are required to show the benefits of this biomarker in early dengue diagnosis and for the prognosis of shock complication.

  15. Zika Virus Tissue and Blood Compartmentalization in Acute Infection of Rhesus Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Lark L; Pesavento, Patricia A; Keesler, Rebekah I; Singapuri, Anil; Watanabe, Jennifer; Watanabe, Rie; Yee, JoAnn; Bliss-Moreau, Eliza; Cruzen, Christina; Christe, Kari L; Reader, J Rachel; von Morgenland, Wilhelm; Gibbons, Anne M; Allen, A Mark; Linnen, Jeff; Gao, Kui; Delwart, Eric; Simmons, Graham; Stone, Mars; Lanteri, Marion; Bakkour, Sonia; Busch, Michael; Morrison, John; Van Rompay, Koen K A

    2017-01-01

    Animal models of Zika virus (ZIKV) are needed to better understand tropism and pathogenesis and to test candidate vaccines and therapies to curtail the pandemic. Humans and rhesus macaques possess similar fetal development and placental biology that is not shared between humans and rodents. We inoculated 2 non-pregnant rhesus macaques with a 2015 Brazilian ZIKV strain. Consistent with most human infections, the animals experienced no clinical disease but developed short-lived plasma viremias that cleared as neutralizing antibody developed. In 1 animal, viral RNA (vRNA) could be detected longer in whole blood than in plasma. Despite no major histopathologic changes, many adult tissues contained vRNA 14 days post-infection with highest levels in hemolymphatic tissues. These observations warrant further studies to investigate ZIKV persistence and its potential clinical implications for transmission via blood products or tissue and organ transplants.

  16. Zika Virus Tissue and Blood Compartmentalization in Acute Infection of Rhesus Macaques.

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    Lark L Coffey

    Full Text Available Animal models of Zika virus (ZIKV are needed to better understand tropism and pathogenesis and to test candidate vaccines and therapies to curtail the pandemic. Humans and rhesus macaques possess similar fetal development and placental biology that is not shared between humans and rodents. We inoculated 2 non-pregnant rhesus macaques with a 2015 Brazilian ZIKV strain. Consistent with most human infections, the animals experienced no clinical disease but developed short-lived plasma viremias that cleared as neutralizing antibody developed. In 1 animal, viral RNA (vRNA could be detected longer in whole blood than in plasma. Despite no major histopathologic changes, many adult tissues contained vRNA 14 days post-infection with highest levels in hemolymphatic tissues. These observations warrant further studies to investigate ZIKV persistence and its potential clinical implications for transmission via blood products or tissue and organ transplants.

  17. Acute virulent infection with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) results in lymphomagenesis via an indirect mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magden, Elizabeth; Miller, Craig; MacMillan, Martha; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Avery, Anne; Quackenbush, Sandra L; Vandewoude, Sue

    2013-02-20

    Four cats (24%) experimentally infected with FIV unexpectedly developed neoplastic changes within four months of inoculation. While FIV has previously been associated with neoplasia, the rapidity and high attack rate seen here is highly unusual. PCR for antigen receptor rearrangements (PARR) detected clonally rearranged T cells in two animals diagnosed with B cell follicular lymphoma by classical means. All cats were negative for feline leukemia virus; gamma-herpesvirus DNA was not amplified using degenerate primers. FIV proviral load in neoplastic tissue was two orders of magnitude lower than in the periphery, lower in neoplastic vs non-neoplastic lymph node, and clonal integration was not detected. We hypothesize that neoplasia was secondary to FIV immune dysregulation, and show that PARR can augment our capacity to phenotype these tumors and distinguish follicular hyperplasia from lymphoma. Age of exposure and relative virulence of the inoculum likely contributed to this unusual presentation of FIV infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. RNA viruses in hymenopteran pollinators: evidence of inter-Taxa virus transmission via pollen and potential impact on non-Apis hymenopteran species.

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    Rajwinder Singh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Although overall pollinator populations have declined over the last couple of decades, the honey bee (Apis mellifera malady, colony collapse disorder (CCD, has caused major concern in the agricultural community. Among honey bee pathogens, RNA viruses are emerging as a serious threat and are suspected as major contributors to CCD. Recent detection of these viral species in bumble bees suggests a possible wider environmental spread of these viruses with potential broader impact. It is therefore vital to study the ecology and epidemiology of these viruses in the hymenopteran pollinator community as a whole. We studied the viral distribution in honey bees, in their pollen loads, and in other non-Apis hymenopteran pollinators collected from flowering plants in Pennsylvania, New York, and Illinois in the United States. Viruses in the samples were detected using reverse transcriptase-PCR and confirmed by sequencing. For the first time, we report the molecular detection of picorna-like RNA viruses (deformed wing virus, sacbrood virus and black queen cell virus in pollen pellets collected directly from forager bees. Pollen pellets from several uninfected forager bees were detected with virus, indicating that pollen itself may harbor viruses. The viruses in the pollen and honey stored in the hive were demonstrated to be infective, with the queen becoming infected and laying infected eggs after these virus-contaminated foods were given to virus-free colonies. These viruses were detected in eleven other non-Apis hymenopteran species, ranging from many solitary bees to bumble bees and wasps. This finding further expands the viral host range and implies a possible deeper impact on the health of our ecosystem. Phylogenetic analyses support that these viruses are disseminating freely among the pollinators via the flower pollen itself. Notably, in cases where honey bee apiaries affected by CCD harbored honey bees with Israeli Acute Paralysis virus (IAPV, nearby

  19. RNA viruses in hymenopteran pollinators: evidence of inter-Taxa virus transmission via pollen and potential impact on non-Apis hymenopteran species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajwinder; Levitt, Abby L; Rajotte, Edwin G; Holmes, Edward C; Ostiguy, Nancy; Vanengelsdorp, Dennis; Lipkin, W Ian; Depamphilis, Claude W; Toth, Amy L; Cox-Foster, Diana L

    2010-12-22

    Although overall pollinator populations have declined over the last couple of decades, the honey bee (Apis mellifera) malady, colony collapse disorder (CCD), has caused major concern in the agricultural community. Among honey bee pathogens, RNA viruses are emerging as a serious threat and are suspected as major contributors to CCD. Recent detection of these viral species in bumble bees suggests a possible wider environmental spread of these viruses with potential broader impact. It is therefore vital to study the ecology and epidemiology of these viruses in the hymenopteran pollinator community as a whole. We studied the viral distribution in honey bees, in their pollen loads, and in other non-Apis hymenopteran pollinators collected from flowering plants in Pennsylvania, New York, and Illinois in the United States. Viruses in the samples were detected using reverse transcriptase-PCR and confirmed by sequencing. For the first time, we report the molecular detection of picorna-like RNA viruses (deformed wing virus, sacbrood virus and black queen cell virus) in pollen pellets collected directly from forager bees. Pollen pellets from several uninfected forager bees were detected with virus, indicating that pollen itself may harbor viruses. The viruses in the pollen and honey stored in the hive were demonstrated to be infective, with the queen becoming infected and laying infected eggs after these virus-contaminated foods were given to virus-free colonies. These viruses were detected in eleven other non-Apis hymenopteran species, ranging from many solitary bees to bumble bees and wasps. This finding further expands the viral host range and implies a possible deeper impact on the health of our ecosystem. Phylogenetic analyses support that these viruses are disseminating freely among the pollinators via the flower pollen itself. Notably, in cases where honey bee apiaries affected by CCD harbored honey bees with Israeli Acute Paralysis virus (IAPV), nearby non

  20. Geldanamycin Reduces Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Promotes the Survival of Mice Infected with the Highly Virulent H5N1 Influenza Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengmin; Liu, Pengpeng; Luo, Jing; Ding, Hua; Gao, Yan; Sun, Lei; Luo, Fubing; Liu, Xiaodong; He, Hongxuan

    2017-01-01

    Infections with lethal influenza viruses lead to acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which may be related to the activation of the host's immune system. Here, in our study, male C57BL/6 mice were infected with 10 LD 50 of the H5N1 influenza virus and treated with geldanamycin or oseltamivir 2 h after infection. Lung injury was assessed by histopathology on days 4 and 7. The viral load was quantified by measuring the NP gene expression level on days 2, 4, and 7. Levels of cytokines and chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids and inflammatory cells were analyzed at different time points. Geldanamycin administration prolonged survival in mice and dramatically reduced lung injury and pulmonary inflammatory compared with other mice. Viral loads in geldanamycin-treated mice also significantly reduced compared with non-treated mice, but not to the extent as the oseltamivir-treated mice. Furthermore, the geldanamycin treatment markedly reduced the production of major proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines and attenuated the infiltration and activation of immune cells, but it did not alter the generation of virus-neutralizing antibodies. In conclusion, geldanamycin plays an important role in attenuating virus infection-induced ALI/ARDS by reducing the host's inflammatory responses and may provide an important reference for clinical treatments.

  1. Recombinant VP1 protein as a potential marker for the diagnosis of acute hepatitis A virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Junior, Haroldo Cid; da Silva, Edimilson Domingos; Lewis-Ximenez de Souza Rodrigues, Lia Laura; Medeiros, Marco Alberto

    2017-07-01

    Since hepatitis A virus (HAV) production is time-consuming and expensive, the use of recombinant proteins may represent an alternative source of antigens for diagnostic purposes. The present study aimed to express, purify and evaluate the potential of recombinant VP1 protein (rVP1) as a marker for the diagnosis of acute HAV infection. The rVP1 was expressed and purified successfully from Escherichia coli. The purified rVP1 was used to establish an in-house enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA-rVP1) for detection of IgM antibodies in sera from HAV-positive patients. For a cut-off point of 0.351, the sensitivity and specificity of ELISA-rVP1 were 100.0% and 95.0%, respectively. These results indicate that rVP1 may be a useful antigen for detection of IgM antibodies against HAV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Acute phase protein changes in calves during an outbreak of respiratory disease caused by bovine respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orro, Toomas; Pohjanvirta, Tarja; Rikula, Ulla; Huovilainen, Anita; Alasuutari, Sakari; Sihvonen, Liisa; Pelkonen, Sinikka; Soveri, Timo

    2011-01-01

    Bovine acute phase proteins (APPs), lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP), serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin (Hp) and alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein (AGP) were evaluated as inflammatory markers during an outbreak of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) caused by bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV). Calves (n = 10) presented mild to moderate signs of respiratory disease. Secondary bacterial infections, Pasteurella multocida and Mycoplasma dispar as major species, were detected in tracheobronchial lavage samples. Concentrations of SAA and LBP increased at week 1 had the highest values at week 3 and decreased at week 4 of outbreak. Some calves had high Hp concentrations at week 3, but AGP concentrations did not rise during respiratory disease. Higher SAA, LBP and Hp concentrations at a later stage of BRD (week 3) were associated with the low BRSV-specific IgG(1) production, suggesting that these calves had enhanced inflammatory response to the secondary bacterial infection. In conclusion, APPs (especially SAA and LBP) are sensitive markers of respiratory infection, and they may be useful to explore host response to the respiratory infections in clinical research. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Transient widespread cortical and splenial lesions in acute encephalitis/encephalopathy associated with primary Epstein–Barr virus infection

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    Shuo Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV is very common and usually occurs in childhood or early adulthood. Encephalitis/encephalopathy is an uncommon but serious neurological complication of EBV. A case of EBV-associated encephalitis/encephalopathy with involvement of reversible widespread cortical and splenial lesions is presented herein. An 8-year-old Chinese girl who presented with fever and headache, followed by seizures and drowsiness, was admitted to the hospital. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed high signal intensities on diffusion-weighted imaging in widespread cortical and splenial lesions. The clinical and laboratory examination results together with the unusual radiology findings suggested acute encephalitis/encephalopathy due to primary EBV infection. After methylprednisolone pulse therapy together with ganciclovir, the patient made a full recovery without any brain lesions. The hallmark clinical–radiological features of this patient included severe encephalitis/encephalopathy at onset, the prompt and complete recovery, and rapidly reversible widespread involvement of the cortex and splenium. Patients with EBV encephalitis/encephalopathy who have multiple lesions, even with the widespread involvement of cortex and splenium of the corpus callosum, may have a favorable outcome with complete disappearance of all brain lesions.

  4. Acute Interstitial Nephritis Proteinuria and Herpes Simplex Virus Hepatitis in Pregnancy Mimic HELLP Syndrome (Hemolysis, Elevated Liver Enzymes, Low Platelets

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    Wendy M. White

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Elevated transaminases, hemolysis, and thrombocytopenia in pregnancy are most often caused by a preeclampsia variant—HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets. In atypical cases, it is important to consider other causes, such as herpes simplex virus (HSV hepatitis. Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN-induced proteinuria can make distinguishing HELLP from its mimics more difficult. A 43-year-old G4P3 gestational carrier at 28 weeks had abnormal laboratory findings consistent with HELLP, including proteinuria. However, she was normotensive and febrile, prompting an investigation into other possible causes of her signs and symptoms. She ultimately was diagnosed with disseminated HSV infection, started on definitive therapy, and allowed to continue her pregnancy to term. The proteinuria was attributed to AIN. AIN can cause proteinuria in the critically ill pregnant patient. When mimics of HELLP syndrome, such as disseminated HSV infection, are the cause of critical illness, the presence of AIN-induced proteinuria may falsely implicate a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy, resulting in iatrogenic premature delivery of the fetus and failure to initiate definitive potential lifesaving treatment.

  5. [Acute renal failure after dengue virus infection: A pediatric case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolon, C; Broustal, E

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is an emerging, rapidly expanding disease, whose clinical and biological manifestations vary. Kidney injury is not usual but can be severe, and it is most often associated with dengue hemorrhagic fever or shock. Guadeloupe, which is located in an endemic area, experienced an epidemic from 2013 to 2014. During this outbreak, a case of renal failure during dengue was observed in a 10-year-old child. No evidence of dengue hemorrhagic fever or shock syndrome was found. The clinical and biological course improved with symptomatic treatment. The association of acute renal failure with hemolytic anemia suggested a diagnosis of hemolytic uremic syndrome. However, this could not be confirmed in the absence of thrombocytopenia and cytopathologic evidence. This case illustrates the diversity of clinical presentations of dengue, and the possibility of severe renal impairment unrelated to the usual factors encountered in dengue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Acute exacerbation of chronic hepatitis B virus infection in renal transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emori, Christini Takemi; Perez, Renata Melo; Matos, Carla Adriana Loureiro de; Uehara, Silvia Naomi Oliveira; Pereira, Patricia da Silva Fucuta; Feldner, Ana Cristina Amaral; Carvalho-Filho, Roberto José de; Silva, Ivonete Sandra de Souza e; Silva, Antonio Eduardo Benedito; Ferraz, Maria Lucia Gomes

    2014-01-01

    There is scarce information regarding clinical evolution of HBV infection in renal transplant patients. To evaluate the prevalence of acute exacerbation in HBV-infected renal transplant patients and its association with the time after transplantation, presence of viral replication, clinical evolution, and use of antiviral prophylaxis. HBV infected renal transplant patients who underwent regular follow-up visits at 6-month intervals were included in the study. The criteria adopted to characterize exacerbation were: ALT >5× ULN and/or >3× baseline level. Predictive factors of exacerbation evaluated were age, gender, time on dialysis, type of donor, post-transplant time, ALT, HBeAg, HBV-DNA, HCV-RNA, immunosuppressive therapy, and use of antiviral prophylaxis. 140 HBV-infected renal transplant patients were included (71% males; age 46 ± 10 years; post-renal transplant time 8 ± 5 years). During follow-up, 25% (35/140) of the patients presented exacerbation within 3.4 ± 3 years after renal transplant. Viral replication was observed in all patients with exacerbation. Clinical and/or laboratory signs of hepatic insufficiency were present in 17% (6/35) of the patients. Three patients died as a consequence of liver failure. In univariate analysis variables associated with exacerbation were less frequent use of prophylactic/preemptive lamivudine and of mycophenolate mofetil. Lamivudine use was the only variable independently associated with exacerbation, with a protective effect. Acute exacerbation was a frequent and severe event in HBV-infected renal transplant patients. Prophylactic/preemptive therapy with antiviral drugs should be indicated for all HBsAg-positive renal transplant patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. [Discussion on acupuncture for flaccid paralysis from "treating flaccid paralysis by yangming alone"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Shendan; Zong, Lei

    2015-09-01

    Theories regarding"treating flaccid paralysis by yangming alone" are summarized, and the treatment effects of "yangming is the sea of five viscera and six organs", "yangming is in charge of smoothing the tendon and muscle, while tendon and muscle is in charge of connecting bones and movement" and "tendon and muscle is the crossing point of yin meridians and yang meridians, which is converged in yangming" are explained. With medical cases from later generations, it is summarized that besides "using yangming alone", "mainly using yang-ming" and "multiple meridians and acupoints" can also be recommend, indicating that focus should be paid not only on yangming, but also on,syndrome differentiation and treatment, and accompanying symptoms should be emphasized to regulate the body. The commonly used acupoints for flaccid paralysis are summarized to guide the clinical treatment and manipulation.

  8. Isolated sleep paralysis and fearful isolated sleep paralysis in outpatients with panic attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpless, Brian A; McCarthy, Kevin S; Chambless, Dianne L; Milrod, Barbara L; Khalsa, Shabad-Ratan; Barber, Jacques P

    2010-12-01

    Isolated sleep paralysis (ISP) has received scant attention in clinical populations, and there has been little empirical consideration of the role of fear in ISP episodes. To facilitate research and clinical work in this area, the authors developed a reliable semistructured interview (the Fearful Isolated Sleep Paralysis Interview) to assess ISP and their proposed fearful ISP (FISP) episode criteria in 133 patients presenting for panic disorder treatment. Of these, 29.3% met lifetime ISP episode criteria, 20.3% met the authors' lifetime FISP episode criteria, and 12.8% met their recurrent FISP criteria. Both ISP and FISP were associated with minority status and comorbidity. However, only FISP was significantly associated with posttraumatic stress disorder, body mass, anxiety sensitivity, and mood and anxiety disorder symptomatology. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Specific features of vocal fold paralysis in functional computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskowska, K.; Mackiewicz-Nartowicz, H.; Serafin, Z.; Nawrocka, E.

    2008-01-01

    Vocal fold paralysis is usually recognized in laryngological examination, and detailed vocal fold function may be established based on laryngovideostroboscopy. Additional imaging should exclude any morphological causes of the paresis, which should be treated pharmacologically or surgically. The aim of this paper was to analyze the computed tomography (CT) images of the larynx in patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis. CT examinations of the larynx were performed in 10 patients with clinically defined unilateral vocal fold paralysis. The examinations consisted of unenhanced acquisition and enhanced 3-phased acquisition: during free breathing, Valsalva maneuver, and phonation. The analysis included the following morphologic features of the paresis.the deepened epiglottic vallecula, the deepened piriform recess, the thickened and medially positioned aryepiglottic fold, the widened laryngeal pouch, the anteriorly positioned arytenoid cartilage, the thickened vocal fold, and the filled infraglottic space in frontal CT reconstruction. CT images were compared to laryngovideostroboscopy. The most common symptoms of vocal cord paralysis in CT were the deepened epiglottic vallecula and piriform recess, the widened laryngeal pouch with the filled infraglottic space, and the thickened aryepiglottic fold. Regarding the efficiency of the paralysis determination, the three functional techniques of CT larynx imaging used did not differ significantly, and laryngovideostroboscopy demonstrated its advantage over CT. CT of the larynx is a supplementary examination in the diagnosis of vocal fold paralysis, which may enable topographic analysis of the fold dysfunction. The knowledge of morphological CT features of the paralysis may help to prevent false-positive diagnosis of laryngeal cancer. (author)

  10. Comparative study of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis from idiopathic hypokalemic periodic paralysis: An experience from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Kalita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: There is paucity of reports on thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP from India. We report the patients with TPP and compare them with idiopathic hypokalemic periodic paralysis (IHPP. Materials and Methods: Patients with hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HPP treated during the past 11 years were evaluated retrospectively. Their demographic parameters, family history, clinical features, precipitating factors, severity of weakness, laboratory parameters and rapidity of recovery were recorded. The demographic, clinical and laboratory parameters of TPP and IHPP were compared. Results: During the study period, we managed 52 patients with HPP; nine (17.3% of whom had TPP and 27 (52% had IHPP. The demographic, precipitating factors, number of attacks and severity of limb weakness were similar between the TPP and IHPP groups, except in the IHPP group, bulbar weakness was present in four and respiratory paralysis in six, needing artificial ventilation in two patients. Serum potassium was significantly lower in TPP (2.21 ± 0.49 compared with IHPP (2.67 ± 0.59, P = 0.04. Four patients with TPP had subclinical thyrotoxicosis and two had subclinical hyperthyroidism. Rebound hyperkalemia occurred in both TPP and IHPP (three versus eight patients. The recovery was faster in IHPP (26.7 ± 15.4 h compared with TPP (34.0 ± 14.0 h, but was statistically insignificant. Conclusion: TPP constitutes 17.3% of HPP, and absence of clinical features of thyrotoxicosis and subclinical hyperthyroidism in TPP is not uncommon. Clinical features, demographic profile and rebound hyperkalemia are similar in both TPP and IHPP. The serum potassium level is significantly low in the TPP compared with the IHPP group.

  11. Tissue Sites of Persistent Infection and Active Replication of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus during Acute Disease and Asymptomatic Infection in Experimentally Infected Equids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrold, Sharon M.; Cook, Sheila J.; Cook, R. Frank; Rushlow, Keith E.; Issel, Charles J.; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2000-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infection of horses is characterized by recurring cycles of disease and viremia that typically progress to an inapparent infection in which clinical symptoms are absent as host immune responses maintain control of virus replication indefinitely. The dynamics of EIAV viremia and its association with disease cycles have been well characterized, but there has been to date no comprehensive quantitative analyses of the specific tissue sites of EIAV infection and replication in experimentally infected equids during acute disease episodes and during asymptomatic infections in long-term inapparent carriers. To characterize the in vivo site(s) of viral infection and replication, we developed a quantitative competitive PCR assay capable of detecting 10 copies of viral DNA and a quantitative competitive reverse transcription-PCR assay with a sensitivity of about 30 copies of viral singly spliced mRNA. Animals were experimentally infected with one of two reference viruses: the animal-passaged field isolate designated EIAVWyo and the virulent cell-adapted strain designated EIAVPV. Tissues and blood cells were isolated during the initial acute disease or from asymptomatic animals and analyzed for viral DNA and RNA levels by the respective quantitative assays. The results of these experiments demonstrated that the appearance of clinical symptoms in experimentally infected equids coincided with rapid widespread seeding of viral infection and replication in a variety of tissues. During acute disease, the predominant cellular site of viral infection and replication was the spleen, which typically accounted for over 90% of the cellular viral burden. In asymptomatic animals, viral DNA and RNA persisted in virtually all tissues tested, but at extremely low levels, a finding indicative of tight but incomplete immune control of EIAV replication. During all disease states, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were found to harbor less than 1% of

  12. Analysis of Antiviral Properties of Hexoral In Vitro against Some Viruses that Cause Acute Respiratory Infections and Herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deryabin, P G; Galegov, G A; Andronova, V A; Botikov, A G

    2016-01-01

    Antiviral properties of Hexoral (0.1% solution and 0.2% aerosol for local application) and its constituent hexetidine against viruses causing human respiratory tract infections and herpes virus were studied in vitro. It was found that non-cytotoxic concentrations of hexetidine (alone and as a component of Hexoral) attenuated infectious properties of highly virulent influenza virus A/H5N1, pandemic influenza virus A/H1N1pdm, respiratory syncytial virus, and herpes simplex virus type 1 after a short-term exposure (30 sec) by 100 or more times. It was found that hexidine mostly contributes to the virucidal effect of Hexoral.

  13. Human respiratory syncytial virus load normalized by cell quantification as predictor of acute respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Novo, Miriam; Boga, José A; Álvarez-Argüelles, Marta E; Rojo-Alba, Susana; Fernández, Ana; Menéndez, María J; de Oña, María; Melón, Santiago

    2018-01-05

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a common cause of respiratory infections. The main objective is to analyze the prediction ability of viral load of HRSV normalized by cell number in respiratory symptoms. A prospective, descriptive, and analytical study was performed. From 7307 respiratory samples processed between December 2014 to April 2016, 1019 HRSV-positive samples, were included in this study. Low respiratory tract infection was present in 729 patients (71.54%). Normalized HRSV load was calculated by quantification of HRSV genome and human β-globin gene and expressed as log10 copies/1000 cells. HRSV mean loads were 4.09 ± 2.08 and 4.82 ± 2.09 log10 copies/1000 cells in the 549 pharyngeal and 470 nasopharyngeal samples, respectively (P respiratory tract infection and 4.22 ± 2.28 log10 copies/1000 cells with upper respiratory tract infection or febrile syndrome (P < 0.05). A possible cut off value to predict LRTI evolution was tentatively established. Normalization of viral load by cell number in the samples is essential to ensure an optimal virological molecular diagnosis avoiding that the quality of samples affects the results. A high viral load can be a useful marker to predict disease progression. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The association of Varicella zoster virus reactivation with Bell's palsy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Aziz, Mosaad; Azab, Noha A; Khalifa, Badwy; Rashed, Mohammed; Naguib, Nader

    2015-03-01

    Bell's palsy is considered the most common cause of facial nerve paralysis in children. Although different theories have been postulated for its diagnosis, reactivation of the Varicella zoster virus (VZV) has been implicated as one of the causes of Bell's palsy. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association of Varicella-zoster virus infection with Bell's palsy and its outcome in children. A total of 30 children with Bell's palsy were recruited and were assayed for evidence of VZV infection. The severity of facial nerve dysfunction and the recovery rate were evaluated according to House-Brackmann Facial Nerve Grading Scale (HB FGS). Paired whole blood samples from all patients were obtained at their initial visit and 3 weeks later, and serum samples were analyzed for VZV IgG and IgM antibodies using ELISA. A significantly higher percentage of Bell's palsy patients were seropositive for VZV IgM antibodies than controls (36.6% of patients vs 10% of controls) while for VZV IgG antibodies the difference was statistically nonsignificant. HB FGS in Bell's palsy patients with serologic evidence of VZV recent infection or reactivation showed a statistiacally significant less cure rate than other patients. VZV reactivation may be an important cause of acute peripheral facial paralysis in children. The appropriate diagnosis of VZV reactivation should be done to improve the outcome and the cure rate by the early use of antiviral treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Isolated Sleep Paralysis: Fear, Prevention, and Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpless, Brian Andrew; Grom, Jessica Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Relatively little is known about isolated sleep paralysis (ISP), and no empirically supported treatments are available. This study aims to determine: the clinical impact of ISP, the techniques used to prevent or disrupt ISP, and the effectiveness of these techniques. 156 undergraduates were assessed with lifetime ISP using a clinical interview. 75.64% experienced fear during ISP, and 15.38% experienced clinically significant distress/interference, while 19.23% attempted to prevent ISP, and 79.31% of these believed their methods were successful. Regarding disruption, 69.29% made attempts, but only 54.12% reported them effective. Disruption was more common than prevention, but several techniques were useful. Encouraging individuals to utilize these techniques and better monitor their symptoms may be an effective way to manage problematic ISP.

  16. Brain-machine interface (BMI) in paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, U; Birbaumer, N; Curado, M R

    2015-02-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) use brain activity to control external devices, facilitating paralyzed patients to interact with the environment. In this review, we focus on the current advances of non-invasive BMIs for communication in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and for restoration of motor impairment after severe stroke. BMI represents a promising strategy to establish communication with paralyzed ALS patients as it does not need muscle engagement for its use. Distinct techniques have been explored to assess brain neurophysiology to control BMI for patients' communication, especially electroencephalography (EEG) and more recently near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Previous studies demonstrated successful communication with ALS patients using EEG-BMI when patients still showed residual eye control, but patients with complete paralysis were unable to communicate with this system. We recently introduced functional NIRS (fNIRS)-BMI for communication in ALS patients in the complete locked-in syndrome (i.e., when ALS patients are unable to engage any muscle), opening new doors for communication in ALS patients after complete paralysis. In addition to assisted communication, BMI is also being extensively studied for motor recovery after stroke. BMI for stroke motor recovery includes intensive BMI training linking brain activity related to patient's intention to move the paretic limb with the contingent sensory feedback of the paretic limb movement guided by assistive devices. BMI studies in this area are mainly focused on EEG- or magnetoencephalography (MEG)-BMI systems due to their high temporal resolution, which facilitates online contingency between intention to move and sensory feedback of the intended movement. EEG-BMI training was recently demonstrated in a controlled study to significantly improve motor performance in stroke patients with severe paresis. Neural basis for BMI-induced restoration of motor function and perspectives for future

  17. A rare case of unilateral adrenal hyperplasia accompanied by hypokalaemic periodic paralysis caused by a novel dominant mutation in CACNA1S: features and prognosis after adrenalectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Yang, Yuan; Tu, Wenling; Shen, Ying; Dong, Qiang

    2014-11-28

    Acute hypokalaemic paralysis is characterised by acute flaccid muscle weakness and has a complex aetiological spectrum. Herein we report, for the first time, a case of unilateral adrenal hyperplasia accompanied by hypokalaemic periodic paralysis type I resulting from a novel dominant mutation in CACNA1S. We present the clinical features and prognosis after adrenalectomy in this case. A 43-year-old Han Chinese male presented with severe hypokalaemic paralysis that remitted after taking oral potassium. The patient had suffered from periodic attacks of hypokalaemic paralysis for more than 20 years. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen showed a nodular mass on the left adrenal gland, although laboratory examination revealed the patient had not developed primary aldosteronism. The patient underwent a left adrenalectomy 4 days after admission, and the pathological examination further confirmed a 1.1 cm benign nodule at the periphery of the adrenal gland. Three months after the adrenalectomy, a paralytic attack recurred and the patient asked for assistance from the Department of Medical Genetics. His family history showed that two uncles, one brother, and a nephew also had a history of periodic paralysis, although their symptoms were milder. The patient's CACNA1S and SCN4A genes were sequenced, and a novel missense mutation, c.1582C > T (p.Arg528Cys), in CACNA1S was detected. Detection of the mutation in five adult male family members, including three with periodic paralysis and two with no history of the disease, indicated that this mutation caused hypokalaemic periodic paralysis type I in his family. Follow-up 2 years after adrenalectomy showed that the serum potassium concentration was increased between paralyses and the number and severity of paralytic attacks were significantly decreased. We identified a novel dominant mutation, c.1582C > T (p.Arg528Cys), in CACNA1S that causes hypokalaemic periodic paralysis. The therapeutic effect of adrenalectomy

  18. Ebola virus and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus display late cell entry kinetics: evidence that transport to NPC1+ endolysosomes is a rate-defining step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingo, Rebecca M; Simmons, James A; Shoemaker, Charles J; Nelson, Elizabeth A; Schornberg, Kathryn L; D'Souza, Ryan S; Casanova, James E; White, Judith M

    2015-03-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) causes hemorrhagic fevers with high mortality rates. During cellular entry, the virus is internalized by macropinocytosis and trafficked through endosomes until fusion between the viral and an endosomal membrane is triggered, releasing the RNA genome into the cytoplasm. We found that while macropinocytotic uptake of filamentous EBOV viruslike particles (VLPs) expressing the EBOV glycoprotein (GP) occurs relatively quickly, VLPs only begin to enter the cytoplasm after a 30-min lag, considerably later than particles bearing the influenza hemagglutinin or GP from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, which enter through late endosomes (LE). For EBOV, the long lag is not due to the large size or unusual shape of EBOV filaments, the need to prime EBOV GP to the 19-kDa receptor-binding species, or a need for unusually low endosomal pH. In contrast, since we observed that EBOV entry occurs upon arrival in Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1)-positive endolysosomes (LE/Lys), we propose that trafficking to LE/Lys is a key rate-defining step. Additional experiments revealed, unexpectedly, that severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) S-mediated entry also begins only after a 30-min lag. Furthermore, although SARS does not require NPC1 for entry, SARS entry also begins after colocalization with NPC1. Since the only endosomal requirement for SARS entry is cathepsin L activity, we tested and provide evidence that NPC1(+) LE/Lys have higher cathepsin L activity than LE, with no detectable activity in earlier endosomes. Our findings suggest that both EBOV and SARS traffic deep into the endocytic pathway for entry and that they do so to access higher cathepsin activity. Ebola virus is a hemorrhagic fever virus that causes high fatality rates when it spreads from zoonotic vectors into the human population. Infection by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) causes severe respiratory distress in infected patients. A devastating outbreak of EBOV occurred in West

  19. [Lower lymphocyte response in severe cases of acute bronchiolitis due to respiratory syncytial virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Fernández, José Miguel; Moreno-Pérez, David; Antúnez-Fernández, Cristina; Milano-Manso, Guillermo; Cordón-Martínez, Ana María; Urda-Cardona, Antonio

    2017-08-14

    Acute bronchiolitis (AB) of the infant has a serious outcome in 6-16% of the hospital admitted cases. Its pathogenesis and evolution is related to the response of the T lymphocytes. The objective of the present study is to determine if the lower systemic lymphocytic response is related to a worse outcome of AB in hospitalised infants. Retrospective observational-analytical study of cases-controls nested in a cohort of patients admitted due to RSV-AB between the period from October 2010 to March 2015. Those with a full blood count in the first 48hours of respiratory distress were included. Infants with underlying disease, bacterial superinfection, and premature infants <32 weeks of gestation were excluded. The main dichotomous variable was PICU admission. Other variables were: gender, age, post-menstrual age, gestational and post-natal tobacco exposure, admission month, type of lactation, and days of onset of respiratory distress. Lymphocyte counts were categorised by quartiles. Bivariate analysis was performed with the main variable and then by logistic regression to analyse confounding factors. The study included 252 infants, of whom 6.6% (17) required PICU admission. The difference in mean±SD of lymphocytes for patients admitted to and not admitted to PICU was 4,044±1755 and 5,035±1786, respectively (Student-t test, P<.05). An association was found between PICU admission and lymphocyte count <3700/ml (Chi-squared, P=.019; OR: 3.2) and it was found to be maintained in the logistic regression, regardless of age and all other studied factors (Wald 4.191 P=.041, OR: 3.8). A relationship was found between lymphocytosis <3700/ml in the first days of respiratory distress and a worse outcome in previously healthy infants <12 months and gestational age greater than 32 weeks with RSV-AB. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  20. The management of peripheral facial nerve palsy: "paresis" versus "paralysis" and sources of ambiguity in study designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Thomas E; Abdelkafy, Wael; Cavero-Vanek, Sandra

    2010-02-01

    Conservative management of idiopathic or herpetic acute peripheral facial palsy (herpes zoster oticus, HZO) often leads to a favorable outcome. However, recent multicenter studies have challenged the necessity of antivirals. Whereas large numbers of patients are required to reveal statistical differences in a disease with an overall positive outcome, surprisingly few studies differentiate between patients with paresis and paralysis. Analyzing our own prospective cohort of patients and reviewing the current literature on conservative treatment of Bell's palsy and HZO, we reveal the importance of initial baseline assessment of the disease course to predict the outcome and to validate the impact of medical treatment options. STUDY DESIGN AND DATA SOURCE: Prospective analysis of consecutive patients referred to 2 tertiary referral centers and research on the Cochrane Library for current updates of their previous reviews and search of MEDLINE (1976-2009) for randomized trials on conservative treatment of acute facial palsy were conducted. One hundred ninety-six patients with Bell's palsy or HZO were followed up prospectively until complete recovery or at least for 12 months. The numeric Fisch score (FS) was used to classify facial function, and patients were separated between incomplete palsy (=paresis) and complete paralysis. Electroneuronography (ENoG) was used to further subdivide patients with paralysis. The treatment protocol was independent of the ongoing investigation including prednisone and valacyclovir in most patients. A total of 250 previous studies on facial palsy outcome were evaluated regarding their distinction between different severity scores at baseline and its impact on treatment outcome. Trials not making the distinction between paresis and paralysis at baseline and with an insufficient follow-up of less than 12 months were excluded. In the Bell's and HZO paresis group, all except 1 patient recovered completely, most of them within 3 months

  1. IRF9 Prevents CD8+T Cell Exhaustion in an Extrinsic Manner during Acute Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Magdalena; Suprunenko, Tamara; Ashhurst, Thomas; Marbach, Felix; Raifer, Hartmann; Wolff, Svenja; Strecker, Thomas; Viengkhou, Barney; Jung, So Ri; Obermann, Hannah-Lena; Bauer, Stefan; Xu, Haifeng C; Lang, Philipp A; Tom, Adomati; Lang, Karl S; King, Nicholas J C; Campbell, Iain L; Hofer, Markus J

    2017-11-15

    Effective CD8 + T cell responses play an important role in determining the course of a viral infection. Overwhelming antigen exposure can result in suboptimal CD8 + T cell responses, leading to chronic infection. This altered CD8 + T cell differentiation state, termed exhaustion, is characterized by reduced effector function, upregulation of inhibitory receptors, and altered expression of transcription factors. Prevention of overwhelming antigen exposure to limit CD8 + T cell exhaustion is of significant interest for the control of chronic infection. The transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 9 (IRF9) is a component of type I interferon (IFN-I) signaling downstream of the IFN-I receptor (IFNAR). Using acute infection of mice with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) strain Armstrong, we show here that IRF9 limited early LCMV replication by regulating expression of interferon-stimulated genes and IFN-I and by controlling levels of IRF7, a transcription factor essential for IFN-I production. Infection of IRF9- or IFNAR-deficient mice led to a loss of early restriction of viral replication and impaired antiviral responses in dendritic cells, resulting in CD8 + T cell exhaustion and chronic infection. Differences in the antiviral activities of IRF9- and IFNAR-deficient mice and dendritic cells provided further evidence of IRF9-independent IFN-I signaling. Thus, our findings illustrate a CD8 + T cell-extrinsic function for IRF9, as a signaling factor downstream of IFNAR, in preventing overwhelming antigen exposure resulting in CD8 + T cell exhaustion and, ultimately, chronic infection. IMPORTANCE During early viral infection, overwhelming antigen exposure can cause functional exhaustion of CD8 + T cells and lead to chronic infection. Here we show that the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 9 (IRF9) plays a decisive role in preventing CD8 + T cell exhaustion. Using acute infection of mice with LCMV strain Armstrong, we found that IRF9

  2. [The diagnostics and treatment of bilateral paralysis of the larynx].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirasirova, E A; Piminidi, O K; Lafutkina, N V; Mamedov, R F; Rezakov, R A; Kuzina, E A

    The objective of the present study was to consider the currently available methods for the diagnostics and treatment of the patients presenting with bilateral paralysis of the larynx of various etiologies. We undertook the analysis of the publications in the domestic and foreign scientific literature concerning diagnosis and treatment of bilateral paralysis of the larynx. It was found that despite the existing modern high-tech diagnostic technologies and the variety of surgical methods for the treatment of this condition, the problem of diagnostics, management, and rehabilitation of the patients suffering from bilateral paralysis of the larynx remains a serious challenge for the researchers and clinicians that requires further investigation of this pathology. For the correct and timely diagnosis of bilateral paralysis of the larynx, the comprehensive evaluation of the functional state of the neuromuscular apparatus of the larynx is necessary. The key prerequisites for the success of the surgical intervention are its timeliness and the choice of the optimal surgical modalities.

  3. Neonatal bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis caused by brain stem haemorrhage.

    OpenAIRE

    Blazer, S; Hemli, J A; Sujov, P O; Braun, J

    1989-01-01

    We describe a neonate with severe bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis caused by haemorrhage in the lower brain stem. To our knowledge this association has not been previously reported in the English medical literature.

  4. Onset Dynamics of Type A Botulinum Neurotoxin-Induced Paralysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lebeda, Frank J; Adler, Michael; Erickson, Keith; Chushak, Yaroslav

    2008-01-01

    .... We tested the hypothesis that mathematical models having a minimal number of reactions and reactants can simulate published data concerning the onset of paralysis of skeletal muscles induced by BoNT...

  5. Global Insurgency: A Prescription for Imposing Strategic Paralysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Katka, Michael B

    2008-01-01

    .... Some argue that this threat constitutes a global insurgency. This Strategy Research Project examines the nature of this 21st century threat and analyzes the option of "strategic paralysis" to counter...

  6. Laryngeal paralysis in dogs: An update on recent knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriaan M. Kitshoff

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Laryngeal paralysis is the effect of an inability to abduct the arytenoid cartilages during inspiration, resulting in respiratory signs consistent with partial airway obstruction. The aetiology of the disease can be congenital (hereditary laryngeal paralysis or congenital polyneuropathy, or acquired (trauma, neoplasia, polyneuropathy, endocrinopathy. The most common form of acquired laryngeal paralysis (LP is typically seen in old, large breed dogs and is a clinical manifestation of a generalised peripheral polyneuropathy recently referred to as geriatric onset laryngeal paralysis polyneuropathy. Diagnosing LP based on clinical signs, breed and history has a very high sensitivity (90% and can be confirmed by laryngeal inspection. Prognosis after surgical correction depends on the aetiology: traumatic cases have a good prognosis, whereas tumour-induced or polyneuropathy-induced LP has a guarded prognosis. Acquired idiopathic LP is a slow progressive disease, with dogs reaching median survival times of 3–5 years after surgical correction.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: infantile-onset ascending hereditary spastic paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 years of life, the initial symptoms of infantile-onset ascending hereditary spastic paralysis appear. Early symptoms include exaggerated reflexes (hyperreflexia) and recurrent muscle spasms in the legs. As the condition progresses, affected ...

  8. Periodic Paralysis and Encephalopathy as Initial Manifestations of Graves' Disease: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsironis, Theocharis; Tychalas, Athanasios; Kiourtidis, Dimitrios; Kountouras, Jannis; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Rudolf, Jobst; Deretzi, Georgia

    2017-07-01

    Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) is an uncommon complication of Graves' disease, characterized by the triad of acute hypokalemia without total body potassium deficit, episodic muscle paralysis, and thyrotoxicosis. Graves' encephalopathy is an extremely rare form of encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease (EAATD), characterized by neuropsychiatric symptoms, increased antithyroid antibodies and cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration, nonspecific electroencephalogram abnormalities, and cortico-responsiveness. Coexistence of both these complications in the same patient has not been reported before. We herein present a 48-year-old white male patient with TPP and encephalopathy as initial presentations of Graves' disease. Flaccid tetraparesis was reversed a few hours after potassium level correction and the patient did not suffer any relapse with the successful pharmaceutical management of the thyroid function. One month later, the patient presented with dizziness and behavioral symptoms, such as inappropriate laughter and anger. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed meningeal enhancement and cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed a mild protein increase, with a blood-brain barrier disruption. With the suspicion of EAATD, the patient was treated with high doses of corticosteroids and improved dramatically. To our knowledge this is the first reported coexistence of potentially treatable TPP and EAATD as initial neurological manifestations of Graves' disease, thereby underscoring the necessity of suspicion of possible underlying Graves' disease in patients with acute paralysis and encephalopathy of unclear origin.

  9. Full-length genome characterization and genetic relatedness analysis of hepatitis A virus outbreak strains associated with acute liver failure among children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Gilberto; Forbi, Joseph C; Xia, Guo-Liang; Fonseca-Ford, Maureen; Vazquez, Roberto; Khudyakov, Yury E; Montiel, Sonia; Waterman, Steve; Alpuche, Celia; Gonçalves Rossi, Livia Maria; Luna, Norma

    2014-02-01

    Clinical infection by hepatitis A virus (HAV) is generally self-limited but in some cases can progress to liver failure. Here, an HAV outbreak investigation among children with acute liver failure in a highly endemic country is presented. In addition, a sensitive method for HAV whole genome amplification and sequencing suitable for analysis of clinical samples is described. In this setting, two fatal cases attributed to acute liver failure and two asymptomatic cases living in the same household were identified. In a second household, one HAV case was observed with jaundice which resolved spontaneously. Partial molecular characterization showed that both households were infected by HAV subtype IA; however, the infecting strains in the two households were different. The HAV outbreak strains recovered from all cases grouped together within cluster IA1, which contains closely related HAV strains from the United States commonly associated with international travelers. Full-genome HAV sequences obtained from the household with the acute liver failure cases were related (genetic distances ranging from 0.01% to 0.04%), indicating a common-source infection. Interestingly, the strain recovered from the asymptomatic household contact was nearly identical to the strain causing acute liver failure. The whole genome sequence from the case in the second household was distinctly different from the strains associated with acute liver failure. Thus, infection with almost identical HAV strains resulted in drastically different clinical outcomes. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Hepatitis B Virus-Specific CD8+ T Cells Maintain Functional Exhaustion after Antigen Reexposure in an Acute Activation Immune Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Pan, Wen; Liu, Yanan; Luo, Jinzhuo; Zhu, Dan; Lu, Yinping; Feng, Xuemei; Yang, Xuecheng; Dittmer, Ulf; Lu, Mengji; Yang, Dongliang; Liu, Jia

    2018-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is characterized by the presence of functionally exhausted HBV-specific CD8+ T cells. To characterize the possible residual effector ability of these cells, we reexposed CD8+ T cells from chronically HBV replicating mice to HBV antigens in an acute activation immune environment. We found that after transfer into naive mice, exhausted CD8+ T cells reexpanded in a comparable magnitude as naive CD8+ T cells in response to acute HBV infection; however, their proliferation intensity was significantly lower than that of CD8+ T cells from acute-resolving HBV replicating mice (AR mice). The differentiation phenotypes driven by acute HBV replication of donor exhausted and naive CD8+ T cells were similar, but were different from those of their counterparts from AR mice. Nevertheless, exhausted CD8+ T cells maintained less activated phenotype, an absence of effector cytokine production and poor antiviral function after HBV reexposure in an acute activation immune environment. We thus conclude that exhausted CD8+ T cells undergo a stable form of dysfunctional differentiation during chronic HBV replication and switching immune environment alone is not sufficient for the antiviral functional reconstitution of these cells.

  11. Adaptive immunity is the primary force driving selection of equine infectious anemia virus envelope SU variants during acute infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mealey, Robert H; Leib, Steven R; Pownder, Sarah L; McGuire, Travis C

    2004-09-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a lentivirus that causes persistent infection in horses. The appearance of antigenically distinct viral variants during recurrent viremic episodes is thought to be due to adaptive immune selection pressure. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated envelope SU cloned sequences from five severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) foals infected with EIAV. Within the SU hypervariable V3 region, 8.5% of the clones had amino acid changes, and 6.4% had amino acid changes within the known cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope Env-RW12. Of all the SU clones, only 3.1% had amino acid changes affecting potential N-linked glycosylation sites. In contrast, a much higher degree of variation was evident in SU sequences obtained from four EIAV-infected immunocompetent foals. Within V3, 68.8% of the clones contained amino acid changes, and 50% of the clones had amino acid changes within the Env-RW12 CTL epitope. Notably, 31.9% of the clones had amino acid changes affecting one or more glycosylation sites. Marked amino acid variation occurred in cloned SU sequences from an immune-reconstituted EIAV-infected SCID foal. Of these clones, 100% had amino acid changes within V3, 100% had amino acid changes within Env-RW12, and 97.5% had amino acid changes affecting glycosylation sites. Analysis of synonymous and nonsynonymous nucleotide substitutions revealed statistically significant differences between SCID and immunocompetent foals and between SCID foals and the reconstituted SCID foal. Interestingly, amino acid selection at one site occurred independently of adaptive immune status. Not only do these data indicate that adaptive immunity primarily drives the selection of EIAV SU variants, but also they demonstrate that other selective forces exist during acute infection.

  12. Neonatal peripheral facial paralysis' evaluation with photogrammetry: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fonseca Filho, Gentil Gomes; de Medeiros Cirne, Gabriele Natane; Cacho, Roberta Oliveira; de Souza, Jane Carla; Nagem, Danilo; Cacho, Enio Walker Azevedo; Moran, Cristiane Aparecida; Abreu, Bruna; Pereira, Silvana Alves

    2015-12-01

    Facial paralysis in newborns can leave functional sequelae. Determining the evolution and amount of functional losses requires consistent evaluation methods that measure, quantitatively, the evolution of clinical functionality. This paper reports an innovative method of facial assessment for the case of a child 28 days of age with unilateral facial paralysis. The child had difficulty breast feeding, and quickly responded to the physical therapy treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Transient paralysis shortly after anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji-dong; Xia, Qun; Ji, Ning; Liu, Yan-cheng; Han, Yue; Ning, Shang-long

    2013-02-01

    To report three cases of transient paralysis shortly after (within 4 hours) anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF), and investigate the possible causes. Clinical and radiological data of three cases (two men and one woman, aged 41-61 years) were analyzed retrospectively. All three patients underwent ACCF for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. The decompressed segments were located in C(5) , C(6) and C(5) + C(6-7) discs, respectively. Paralysis occurred from 30 minutes to 4 hours after surgery. In two cases the paralysis was complete; it was incomplete in the third. All patients received immediate dehydration, neurotrophic drugs and high-dose methylprednisolone therapy upon recognition of their paralysis. Meanwhile, cervical MRIs were performed and showed no significant hematomas compressing the cervical spinal cord; spinal cord edema was clearly evident in all cases. In two cases the paralysis resolved within 2 hours of diagnosis and immediate medication. In the third case, because the neurological symptoms were incompletely resolved 24 hours after beginning medication, a second laminoplasty was performed. During decompression, tremendous pressure was released from the cervical spinal cord. The neurological symptoms had resolved completely by 1 week after decompression. The precise cause for transient paralysis after these anterior cervical surgeries is not yet clear. Spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury is generally regarded as the most likely cause. Therefore, a combination of cervical spinal cord edema and limited anterior decompression space may have been the main contributing factors to the paralysis reported here. Early diagnosis and early intervention to relieve the paralysis can restore spinal cord function and result in a satisfactory prognosis. © 2013 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Transient post-traumatic hemidiaphragmatic paralysis in two cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignoli, M; Toniato, M; Rossi, F; Terragni, R; Manzini, M; Franchi, A; Pozzi, L

    2002-07-01

    A diagnosis of post-traumatic hemidiaphragmatic paralysis was made in two cats. Both cats had a history of trauma and paradoxical inward movement of the abdominal wall at inspiration. Thoracic radiographs were taken at inspiration and expiration. Although the images were suggestive of hemidiaphragmatic paralysis, definitive diagnosis was reached by fluoroscopy in one cat and by ultrasonography in the second. Both cases resolved spontaneously and diaphragmatic function was normal at follow-up.

  15. Anaesthetic management of a patient with familial normokalaemic periodic paralysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, F

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: We describe the anaesthetic management of a patient with the autosomal dominant inherited disease, normokalaemic periodic paralysis. The disease results in intermittent bouts of limb and respiratory muscular weakness in association with hypothermia, stress, prolonged fasting or exercise. Unlike hypokalaemic and hyperkalaemic periodic paralysis, the more common variants of the disease, normokalaemic periodic paralysis is not accompanied by alterations in the plasma potassium concentration. CLINICAL FEATURES: A five-year-old boy presented for emergency scrotal exploration. He had a family history of periodic paralysis and had experienced previous episodes of weakness, two of which had required hospitalization for respiratory distress. On admission there was no evidence of weakness and serum potassium concentration was 4.2 mMol.L-1. A spinal anaesthetic was performed and the procedure was uncomplicated by muscle paralysis above the level of the spinal block. CONCLUSION: Avoidance of known precipitating factors and judicious use of neuromuscular blocking drugs has been advocated in patients with this disorder presenting for surgery. In appropriate circumstances, spinal anaesthesia represents a useful option in patients with normokalaemic periodic paralysis.

  16. Sleep paralysis, sexual abuse, and space alien abduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Richard J; Clancy, Susan A

    2005-03-01

    Sleep paralysis accompanied by hypnopompic ('upon awakening') hallucinations is an often-frightening manifestation of discordance between the cognitive/perceptual and motor aspects of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Awakening sleepers become aware of an inability to move, and sometimes experience intrusion of dream mentation into waking consciousness (e.g. seeing intruders in the bedroom). In this article, we summarize two studies. In the first study, we assessed 10 individuals who reported abduction by space aliens and whose claims were linked to apparent episodes of sleep paralysis during which hypnopompic hallucinations were interpreted as alien beings. In the second study, adults reporting repressed, recovered, or continuous memories of childhood sexual abuse more often reported sleep paralysis than did a control group. Among the 31 reporting sleep paralysis, only one person linked it to abuse memories. This person was among the six recovered memory participants who reported sleep paralysis (i.e. 17% rate of interpreting it as abuse-related). People rely on personally plausible cultural narratives to interpret these otherwise baffling sleep paralysis episodes.

  17. A systematic review of variables associated with sleep paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Dan; French, Christopher C; Gregory, Alice M

    2018-04-01

    Sleep paralysis is a relatively common but under-researched phenomenon. While the causes are unknown, a number of studies have investigated potential risk factors. In this article, we conducted a systematic review on the available literature regarding variables associated with both the frequency and intensity of sleep paralysis episodes. A total of 42 studies met the inclusion criteria. For each study, sample size, study site, sex and age of participants, sleep paralysis measure, and results of analyses looking at the relationship(s) between sleep paralysis and associated variable(s) were extracted. A large number of variables were associated with sleep paralysis and a number of themes emerged. These were: substance use, stress and trauma, genetic influences, physical illness, personality, intelligence, anomalous beliefs, sleep problems and disorders (both in terms of subjective sleep quality and objective sleep disruption), symptoms of psychiatric illness in non-clinical samples (particularly anxiety symptoms), and psychiatric disorders. Sleep paralysis appears to be particularly prevalent in post-traumatic stress disorder, and to a less degree, panic disorder. Limitations of the current literature, directions for future research, and implications for clinical practice are discussed. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. The CT features of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Bin; Peng Weijun; Gu Yajia; Yang Tianxi; Wang Hongshi

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To describe the CT appearance of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis, discuss the anatomic and pathologic basis of this paralysis, and evaluate CT diagnosis. Methods: 32 cases of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis clinical confirmed were analyzed retrospectively. All of these patients had the CT scans from the level of hyoid bone to the upper thorax, the slice and interval are 5 mm. Results: CT findings of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis included: oblique of aryepiglottic fold, dislocation of arytenoid cartilage and cricoarytenoid joint, dilation and relaxation of piriform sinus for 27 cases (84.4%); wide and asymmetrical ventricle of larynx for 16 cases (50.0%); asymmetrical and fix of vocal fold for 11 cases (34.4%) et al. Conclusion: The recurrent laryngeal nerve innervate all the intrinsic muscles of the larynx except cricothyroid muscle, paralysis of the nerve leads to atrophy of related muscles. CT scan demonstrate the larynx morphologic changes of recurrent nerve paralysis and is helpful to identify the etiology. (authors)

  19. Old Stroke as an Independent Risk Etiology for Todd's Paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kenichiro; Arai, Noritoshi; Hida, Ayumi; Takeuchi, Sousuke

    2017-08-01

    Todd's paralysis (TP) is a well-known postictal paresis in which patients present with transient weakness in their limb(s) after seizures. Although recognized as a stroke mimic in clinical practice, the pathophysiological mechanism and clinical features of TP remain unknown. Furthermore, its diagnosis can be erroneous in neurological emergency practice. We aimed to illustrate the clinical features and identify factors associated with TP. This single-center, retrospective observational study included consecutive adult patients who presented with convulsive seizure and were referred to an urban tertiary care emergency department between August 2010 and April 2016. The diagnosis of TP was set as the primary outcome measure. Clinical and laboratory variables were evaluated. Of 1381 eligible convulsive seizures in 1187 patients, TP was observed in 89 seizures (6.4%) in 75 patients. Patients with TP were significantly older, more likely to have convulsive status epilepticus, and had a longer duration of convulsion than patients without TP. TP was found in 19.7% (39 of 198) of convulsive seizures with remote etiologies including those due to old stroke. These etiologies were identified as independent significant risk factors for TP compared with seizures with cryptogenic etiology. The positive likelihood ratio of TP seizures was 11.2 for remote seizure etiologies. Our results indicated that the diagnosis of TP highly suggests premorbid or comorbid structural lesions in the central nervous system, including old stroke. This consideration in seizure etiology may help in reducing the risk of misdiagnosis of acute stroke in emergency settings and further antiepileptic treatment. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of thymus-associated lymphoid depletion in bovine calves acutely or persistently infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus 1, bovine viral diarrhea virus 2 or HoBi-like pestivirus

    OpenAIRE

    Falkenberg, Shollie M.; Bauermann, Fernando V.; Ridpath, Julia F.

    2017-01-01

    Naïve pregnant cattle exposed to pestiviruses between 40-125 days of gestation can give birth to persistently infected (PI) calves. Clinical presentation and survivability, in PI cattle, is highly variable even with the same pestivirus strain whereas the clinical presentation in acute infections is more uniform with severity of symptoms being primarily a function of virulence of the infecting virus. The aim of this study was to compare thymic depletion, as measured by comparing the area of th...

  1. The effect of irradiation on demyelination induced by a virulent Semliki Forest virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chew-Lim, M.; Webb, H.E.; Jagelma, S.

    1977-01-01

    A dose of 500 rad total body irradiation before Semliki Forest virus infection was the most effective in producing multiple foci of demyelination in Swiss mice. Animals receiving this dose had the highest virus titre of Semliki Forest virus persisting in the brain and a delayed antibody response. In spite of extensive demyelination no obvious clinical signs such as paralysis were observed. (author)

  2. Acute Hepatitis E Virus infection with coincident reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus infection in an immunosuppressed patient with rheumatoid arthritis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultze, Detlev; Mani, Bernhard; Dollenmaier, Günter; Sahli, Roland; Zbinden, Andrea; Krayenbühl, Pierre Alexandre

    2015-10-29

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the most recently discovered of the hepatotropic viruses, and is considered an emerging pathogen in developed countries with the possibility of fulminant hepatitis in immunocompromised patients. Especially in the latter elevated transaminases should be taken as a clue to consider HEV infection, as it can be treated by discontinuation of immunosuppression and/or ribavirin therapy. To our best knowledge, this is a unique case of autochthonous HEV infection with coincident reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in an immunosuppressed patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A 68-year-old Swiss woman with RA developed hepatitis initially diagnosed as methotrexate-induced liver injury, but later diagnosed as autochthonous HEV infection accompanied by reactivation of her latent EBV infection. She showed confounding serological results pointing to three hepatotropic viruses (HEV, Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and EBV) that could be resolved by detection of HEV and EBV viraemia. The patient recovered by temporary discontinuation of immunosuppressive therapy. In immunosuppressed patients with RA and signs of liver injury, HEV infection should be considered, as infection can be treated by discontinuation of immunosuppression. Although anti-HEV-IgM antibody assays can be used as first line virological tools, nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT) for detection of HEV RNA are recommended--as in our case--if confounding serological results from other hepatotropic viruses are obtained. After discontinuation of immunosuppressive therapy, our patient recovered from both HEV infection and reactivation of latent EBV infection without sequelae.

  3. Neuromuscular Manifestations of West Nile Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arturo eLeis

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The most common neuromuscular manifestation of West Nile virus (WNV infection is a poliomyelitis syndrome with asymmetric paralysis variably involving one (monoparesis to four limbs (quadriparesis, with or without brainstem involvement and respiratory failure. This syndrome of acute flaccid paralysis may occur without overt fever or meningoencephalitis. Although involvement of anterior horn cells in the spinal cord and motor neurons in the brainstem are the major sites of pathology responsible for neuromuscular signs, inflammation also may involve skeletal or cardiac muscle (myositis, myocarditis, motor axons (polyradiculitis, peripheral nerve (Guillain-Barré syndrome, brachial plexopathy. In addition, involvement of spinal sympathetic neurons and ganglia provides a plausible explanation for autonomic instability seen in some patients. Many patients also experience prolonged subjective generalized weakness and disabling fatigue. Despite recent evidence that WNV may persist long term in the central nervous system or periphery in animals, the evidence in humans is controversial. WNV persistence would be of great concern in immunosuppressed patients or in those with prolonged or recurrent symptoms. Support for the contention that WNV can lead to autoimmune disease arises from reports of patients presenting with various neuromuscular diseases that presumably involve autoimmune mechanisms (GBS, other demyelinating neu¬ropathies, myasthenia gravis, brachial plexopathies, stiff-person syndrome, and delayed or recurrent symptoms. Although there is no specific treatment or vaccine currently approved in humans, and the standard remains supportive care, drugs that can alter the cascade of immunobiochemical events leading to neuronal death may be potentially useful (high-dose corticosteroids, interferon preparations, and intravenous immune globulin containing WNV-specific antibodies. Human experience with these agents seems promising based on anecdotal

  4. Direct brain control and communication in paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birbaumer, Niels; Gallegos-Ayala, Guillermo; Wildgruber, Moritz; Silvoni, Stefano; Soekadar, Surjo R

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable growth in the field of brain-computer or brain-machine interface (BCI/BMI) research reflected in several hundred publications each year, little progress was made to enable patients in complete locked-in state (CLIS) to reliably communicate using their brain activity. Independent of the invasiveness of the BCI systems tested, no sustained direct brain control and communication was demonstrated in a patient in CLIS so far. This suggested a more fundamental theoretical problem of learning and attention in brain communication with BCI/BMI, formulated in the extinction-of-thought hypothesis. While operant conditioning and goal-directed thinking seems impaired in complete paralysis, classical conditioning of brain responses might represent the only alternative. First experimental studies in CLIS using semantic conditioning support this assumption. Evidence that quality-of-life in locked-in-state is not as limited and poor as generally believed draise doubts that "patient wills" or "advanced directives"signed long-before the locked-in-state are useful. On the contrary, they might be used as an excuse to shorten anticipated long periods of care for these patients avoiding associated financial and social burdens. Current state and availability of BCI/BMI systems urge a broader societal discourse on the pressing ethical challenges associated with the advancements in neurotechnology and BCI/BMI research.

  5. Brain-computer interface in paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birbaumer, Niels; Murguialday, Ander Ramos; Cohen, Leonardo

    2008-12-01

    Communication with patients suffering from locked-in syndrome and other forms of paralysis is an unsolved challenge. Movement restoration for patients with chronic stroke or other brain damage also remains a therapeutic problem and available treatments do not offer significant improvements. This review considers recent research in brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) as promising solutions to these challenges. Experimentation with nonhuman primates suggests that intentional goal directed movements of the upper limbs can be reconstructed and transmitted to external manipulandum or robotic devices controlled from a relatively small number of microelectrodes implanted into movement-relevant brain areas after some training, opening the door for the development of BCI or brain-machine interfaces in humans. Although noninvasive BCIs using electroencephalographic recordings or event-related-brain-potentials in healthy individuals and patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or stroke can transmit up to 80 bits/min of information, the use of BCIs - invasive or noninvasive - in severely or totally paralyzed patients has met some unforeseen difficulties. Invasive and noninvasive BCIs using recordings from nerve cells, large neuronal pools such as electrocorticogram and electroencephalography, or blood flow based measures such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and near-infrared spectroscopy show potential for communication in locked-in syndrome and movement restoration in chronic stroke, but controlled phase III clinical trials with larger populations of severely disturbed patients are urgently needed.

  6. Timing of spontaneous sleep-paralysis episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Todd A; Cheyne, J Allan

    2006-06-01

    The objective of this prospective naturalistic field study was to determine the distribution of naturally occurring sleep-paralysis (SP) episodes over the course of nocturnal sleep and their relation to bedtimes. Regular SP experiencers (N = 348) who had previously filled out a screening assessment for SP as well as a general sleep survey were recruited. Participants reported, online over the World Wide Web, using a standard reporting form, bedtimes and subsequent latencies of spontaneous episodes of SP occurring in their homes shortly after their occurrence. The distribution of SP episodes over nights was skewed to the first 2 h following bedtime. Just over one quarter of SP episodes occurred within 1 h of bedtime, although episodes were reported throughout the night with a minor mode around the time of normal waking. SP latencies following bedtimes were moderately consistent across episodes and independent of bedtimes. Additionally, profiles of SP latencies validated self-reported hypnagogic, hypnomesic, and hypnopompic SP categories, as occurring near the beginning, middle, and end of the night/sleep period respectively. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that SP timing is controlled by mechanisms initiated at or following sleep onset. These results also suggest that SP, rather than uniquely reflecting anomalous sleep-onset rapid eye movement (REM) periods, may result from failure to maintain sleep during REM periods at any point during the sleep period. On this view, SP may sometimes reflect the maintenance of REM consciousness when waking and SP hallucinations the continuation of dream experiences into waking life.

  7. Fatal acute myocarditis and fulminant hepatic failure in an infant with pandemic human influenza A, H1N1 (2009 virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortada H.F. El-Shabrawi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We report the clinical presentation of a 10 month-old infant who succumbed with acute myocarditis and fulminant hepatic failure associated with a virologically confirmed human influenza A, H1N1 (2009 virus infection. To date, this is the first pediatric patient presenting with this fatal combination of complications during the current H1N1 pandemic. Therefore, we recommend meticulous assessment and follow up of the cardiac status, liver enzymes and coagulation profile in all pediatric patients with severe H1N1 influenza infection.

  8. Preventing acute rejection, Epstein-Barr virus infection, and posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders after kidney transplantation: Use of aciclovir and mycophenolate mofetil in a steroid-free immunosuppressive protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkeland, S.A.; Andersen, H.K.; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen Jacques

    1999-01-01

    Background: A widely held view is that any increase in the potency of an immunosuppressive agent will lead to an increase in infection and malignancy, such as life-threatening Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) induced posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD), We tested this paradigm by studying......; the effect of adding mofetil to a steroid-free protocol under cover of high-dose aciclovir prophylaxis on the number of acute rejections, EBV infections and PTLDs after kidney transplantation. Methods: EBV serology was performed in 267 consecutive renal transplantations (1990-1997), All were treated...

  9. Karyotype analysis of the acute fibrosarcoma from chickens infected with subgroup J avian leukosis virus associated with v-src oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xuan; Ju, Sidi; Chen, Junxia; Meng, Fanfeng; Sun, Peng; Li, Yang; Wang, Xin; Wang, Yixin; Liu, Juan; Chang, Shuang; Zhao, Peng; Cui, Zhizhong

    2016-01-01

    To understand the cytogenetic characteristics of acute fibrosarcoma in chickens infected with the subgroup J avian leukosis virus associated with the v-src oncogene, we performed a karyotype analysis of fibrosarcoma cell cultures. Twenty-nine of 50 qualified cell culture spreads demonstrated polyploidy of some macrochromosomes, 21 of which were trisomic for chromosome 7, and others were trisomic for chromosomes 3, 4, 5 (sex chromosome w), and 10. In addition, one of them was trisomic for both chromosome 7 and the sex chromosome 5 (w). In contrast, no aneuploidy was found for 10 macrochromosomes of 12 spreads of normal chicken embryo fibroblast cells, although aneuploidy for some microchromosomes was demonstrated in five of the 12 spreads. The cytogenetic mosaicism or polymorphism of the aneuploidy in the acute fibrosarcoma described in this study suggests that the analysed cells are polyclonal.

  10. Up-regulation of serum periostin and squamous cell carcinoma antigen levels in infants with acute bronchitis due to respiratory syncytial virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Nakamura

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Periostin and squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA are involved in the pathogenesis of asthma. Acute bronchitis due to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infection during infancy exhibits an asthma-like pathogenesis, suggesting that it may be associated with the subsequent development of asthma. However, the mechanism by which RSV infection leads to development of asthma has not yet been fully elucidated. Methods: Infants younger than 36 months were enrolled and classified into three groups. Group I included patients hospitalized with RSV-induced bronchitis. These patients were further stratified into two sub-groups according to whether the criteria for the modified Asthma Predictive Index (mAPI had been met: Group I consisted of mAPI (+ and mAPI (− patients; Group II included patients with food allergy as a positive control group; and Group III included children with no allergy as a negative control group. Serum periostin and SCCA levels were measured in the groups. This study was registered as a clinical trial (UMIN000012339. Results: We enrolled 14 subjects in Group I mAPI (+, 22 in Group I mAPI (−, 18 in Group II, and 18 in Group III. In Group I, the serum periostin and SCCA levels were significantly higher during the acute phase compared with the recovery phase. However, no significant differences were found between Group I mAPI (+ and mAPI (−. Conclusions: The serum periostin and SCCA levels increased during acute RSV bronchitis. Both periostin and SCCA may play a role in the pathogenesis of acute bronchitis due to RSV. Keywords: Infants, Periostin, Respiratory syncytial virus, Squamous cell carcinoma antigen, T-helper 2 cell cytokines

  11. Deletion of the complement C5a receptor alleviates the severity of acute pneumococcal otitis media following influenza A virus infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Hua Tong

    Full Text Available There is considerable evidence that influenza A virus (IAV promotes adherence, colonization, and superinfection by S. pneumoniae (Spn and contributes to the pathogenesis of otitis media (OM. The complement system is a critical innate immune defense against both pathogens. To assess the role of the complement system in the host defense and the pathogenesis of acute pneumococcal OM following IAV infection, we employed a well-established transtympanically-induced mouse model of acute pneumococcal OM. We found that antecedent IAV infection enhanced the severity of acute pneumococcal OM. Mice deficient in complement C1qa (C1qa-/- or factor B (Bf -/- exhibited delayed viral and bacterial clearance from the middle ear and developed significant mucosal damage in the eustachian tube and middle ear. This indicates that both the classical and alternative complement pathways are critical for the oto-immune defense against acute pneumococcal OM following influenza infection. We also found that Spn increased complement activation following IAV infection. This was characterized by sustained increased levels of anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a in serum and middle ear lavage samples. In contrast, mice deficient in the complement C5a receptor (C5aR demonstrated enhanced bacterial clearance and reduced severity of OM. Our data support the concept that C5a-C5aR interactions play a significant role in the pathogenesis of acute pneumococcal OM following IAV infection. It is possible that targeting the C5a-C5aR axis might prove useful in attenuating acute pneumococcal OM in patients with influenza infection.

  12. C-reactive protein, haptoglobin and Pig-Major acute phase protein profiles of pigs infected experimentally by different isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saco, Y; Martínez-Lobo, F; Cortey, M; Pato, R; Peña, R; Segalés, J; Prieto, C; Bassols, A

    2016-02-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus (PRRSV) is the etiologic agent of PRRS, one of the most important diseases in swine worldwide. In the present work, the effects of different PRRSV strains were tested on a piglet experimental model to study the induced acute phase response. For this purpose, pigs (n=15 for each group) were intranasally inoculated with one of five PRRSV strains (isolates EU10, 12, 17, 18 from genotype 1 and isolate JA-142 from genotype 2). The acute phase response was monitored by measuring acute phase proteins (APPs). Specifically, the serum concentration of haptoglobin (Hp), C-reactive protein (CRP) and Pig-Major Acute Protein (Pig-MAP) was determined at 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18 and 21 days p.i. Clinical signs and growth performance were also monitored during the experiment. All animals became viremic after inoculation during the study period. The APP response was heterogeneous and dependent on the strain, being strains EU10, EU 18 and JA-142 those that induced the highest response and the strongest clinical signs. In general, Hp was the most sensitive biomarker for PRRSV infection, CRP behaved as moderate and Pig-MAP was the less responsive during the course of PRRSV experimental infection. Hp and CRP were significantly discriminatory between infected and control pigs, but not Pig-MAP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A picorna-like virus from the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta: initial discovery, genome sequence, and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valles, Steven M.; Strong, Charles A.; Dang, Phat M.; Hunter, Wayne B.; Pereira, Roberto M.; Oi, David H.; Shapiro, Alexandra M.; Williams, David F.

    2004-01-01

    We report the first discovery and genome sequence of a virus infecting the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. The 8026 nucleotide, polyadenylated, RNA genome encoded two large open reading frames (ORF1 and ORF2), flanked and separated by 27, 223, and 171 nucleotide untranslated regions, respectively. The predicted amino acid sequence of the 5' proximal ORF1 (nucleotides 28 to 4218) exhibited significant identity and possessed consensus sequences characteristic of the helicase, cysteine protease, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase sequence motifs from picornaviruses, picorna-like viruses, comoviruses, caliciviruses, and sequiviruses. The predicted amino acid sequence of the 3' proximal ORF2 (nucleotides 4390-7803) showed similarity to structural proteins in picorna-like viruses, especially the acute bee paralysis virus. Electron microscopic examination of negatively stained samples from virus-infected fire ants revealed isometric particles with a diameter of 31 nm, consistent with Picornaviridae. A survey for the fire ant virus from areas around Florida revealed a pattern of fairly widespread distribution. Among 168 nests surveyed, 22.9% were infected. The virus was found to infect all fire ant caste members and developmental stages, including eggs, early (1st-2nd) and late (3rd-4th) instars, worker pupae, workers, sexual pupae, alates ( male and female ), and queens. The virus, tentatively named S. invicta virus (SINV-1), appears to belong to the picorna-like viruses. We did not observe any perceptible symptoms among infected nests in the field. However, in every case where an SINV-1-infected colony was excavated from the field with an inseminated queen and held in the laboratory, all of the brood in these colonies died within 3 months

  14. Surveillance for highly pathogenic H5 avian influenza virus in synanthropic wildlife associated with poultry farms during an acute outbreak

    Science.gov (United States)

    In November 2014, a Eurasian strain H5N8 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus was detected in poultry in Canada. Introduced viruses were soon detected in the United States and within six months had spread to 21 states with more than 48 million poultry affected. In an effort to study potential mec...

  15. A neutralizing human monoclonal antibody protects against lethal disease in a new ferret model of acute nipah virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine N Bossart

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Nipah virus is a broadly tropic and highly pathogenic zoonotic paramyxovirus in the genus Henipavirus whose natural reservoirs are several species of Pteropus fruit bats. Nipah virus has repeatedly caused outbreaks over the past decade associated with a severe and often fatal disease in humans and animals. Here, a new ferret model of Nipah virus pathogenesis is described where both respiratory and neurological disease are present in infected animals. Severe disease occurs with viral doses as low as 500 TCID(50 within 6 to 10 days following infection. The underlying pathology seen in the ferret closely resembles that seen in Nipah virus infected humans, characterized as a widespread multisystemic vasculitis, with virus replicating in highly vascular tissues including lung, spleen and brain, with recoverable virus from a variety of tissues. Using this ferret model a cross-reactive neutralizing human monoclonal antibody, m102.4, targeting the henipavirus G glycoprotein was evaluated in vivo as a potential therapeutic agent. All ferrets that received m102.4 ten hours following a high dose oral-nasal Nipah virus challenge were protected from disease while all controls died. This study is the first successful post-exposure passive antibody therapy for Nipah virus using a human monoclonal antibody.

  16. Peripheral and Central Venous Blood Glucose Concentrations in Dogs and Cats with Acute Arterial Thromboembolism

    OpenAIRE

    Klainbart, S.; Kelmer, E.; Vidmayer, B.; Bdolah?Abram, T.; Segev, G.; Aroch, I.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute limb paralysis because of arterial thromboembolism (ATE) occurs in cats and less commonly in dogs. ATE is diagnosed based on physical examination findings and, occasionally, advanced imaging. Hypothesis/Objectives Peripheral, affected limb venous glucose concentration is decreased in ATE, whereas its systemic concentration is within or above reference interval. Animals Client?owned cats and dogs were divided into 3 respective groups: acute limb paralysis because of ATE (22 ca...

  17. Physical therapy for Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Lázaro J; Valbuza, Juliana S; Prado, Gilmar F

    2011-12-07

    meta analysis.Acupuncture studies did not provide useful data as all were short and at high risk of bias. None of the studies included adverse events as an outcome. There is no high quality evidence to support significant benefit or harm from any physical therapy for idiopathic facial paralysis. There is low quality evidence that tailored facial exercises can help to improve facial function, mainly for people with moderate paralysis and chronic cases. There is low quality evidence that facial exercise reduces sequelae in acute cases. The suggested effects of tailored facial exercises need to be confirmed with good quality randomised controlled trials.

  18. The natural history of West Nile virus infection presenting with West Nile virus meningoencephalitis in a man with a prolonged illness: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wood James B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Estimates indicate that West Nile virus infects approximately one and a half million people in the United States of America. Up to 1% may develop West Nile virus neuroinvasive disease, in which infected patients develop any combination of meningitis, encephalitis, or acute paralysis. Case presentation A 56-year-old African-American man presented to our hospital with headache, restlessness, fever, myalgias, decreased appetite, and progressive confusion. A cerebrospinal fluid examination showed mild leukocytosis and an elevated protein level. Testing for routine infections was negative. Brain T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans showed marked enlargement of caudate nuclei and increased intensity within the basal ganglia and thalami. A West Nile virus titer was positive, and serial brain magnetic resonance imaging scans showed resolving abnormalities that paralleled his neurological examination. Conclusion This report is unusual as it portrays the natural history and long-term consequences of West Nile virus meningoencephalitis diagnosed on the basis of serial brain images.

  19. A 10-year analysis of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis in 135 patients: focus on symptomatology and precipitants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chin-Chun; Cheng, Chih-Jen; Sung, Chih-Chien; Chiueh, Tzong-Shi; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Chau, Tom; Lin, Shih-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Background A comprehensive analysis has not been performed on patients with thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) characterized by acute hypokalemia and paralysis in the setting of thyrotoxicosis. Purpose The aim of this study was to analyze the detailed symptomatology of thyrotoxicosis and precipitating factors for the attack in a large cohort of TPP patients. Patients and methods A prospective observational study enrolled patients with TPP consecutively over 10 years at an academic medical center. Clinical features, including signs/symptoms of thyrotoxicosis and precipitating factors, were analyzed. The Wayne's index was used to assess the severity of thyrotoxicosis at presentation. Patients who agreed to receive an oral glucose-loading test after recovery were evaluated. Results Among the 135 TPP patients (male:female, 130:5), 70% of paralytic attacks occurred in the morning, especially during the seasons of summer and fall. Two-thirds of patients did not have a known family or personal history of hyperthyroidism. Only 17% of TPP patients manifested overt signs/symptoms of thyrotoxicosis (Wayne's index >19). A clear precipitating factor, such as high carbohydrate load, acute upper respiratory tract infection, strenuous exercise, high-salt diet, or the use of steroids or bronchodilators, was identified in only 34% of TPP patients. A glucose load to stimulate insulin secretion induced acute hypokalemia (K+2.47±0.6 mmol/l) with reparalysis in only 18% (10/55) of TPP patients. Conclusions Most TPP patients have only subtle clinical signs/symptoms of thyrotoxicosis and only a small fraction has clear precipitating factors. In addition to the effects of hyperinsulinemia, other insulin-independent mechanisms may participate in the pathogenesis of TPP. PMID:23939916

  20. Radiology findings in adult patients with vocal fold paralysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, S. [Helsinki Medical Imaging Centre, University of Helsinki, Haartmaninkatu, Helsinki (Finland)]. E-mail: s.robinson@dzu.at; Pitkaeranta, A. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Haartmaninkatu, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-10-15

    Aim: To compile imaging findings in patients with vocal fold paralysis. Materials and methods: A retrospective analysis of the medical charts of 100 consecutive patients, admitted to our department with vocal fold paralysis was undertaken. After laryngoscopy, patients were referred for radiological work-up depending on their clinical history and clinical findings. Ultrasound of the neck and/or contrast-enhanced spiral computed tomography (CT) of the neck and mediastinum was performed, extending to include the whole chest if necessary. In one patient, CT of the brain and in two patients, magnetic resonance angiography was undertaken. Analysis of the clinical and radiological data was performed to assess the most frequent causes for vocal fold paralysis. Results: In 66% of patients, the paralysis was related to previous surgery. Thirty-four percent of cases were labelled idiopathic after clinical examination. After imaging and follow-up, only 8% remained unexplained. Nine patients suffered from neoplasms, four from vascular disease, and 12 from infections. One patient developed encephalomyelitis disseminata on follow-up. Conclusion: Thorough radiological work-up helps to reduce the amount of idiopathic cases of vocal fold paralysis and guides appropriate therapy.