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Sample records for acute non-hemolytic transfusion

  1. Descriptions of acute transfusion reactions in the teaching hospitals of kermanshah university of medical sciences, iran.

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    Payandeh, Mehrdad; Zare, Mohammad Erfan; Kansestani, Atefeh Nasir; Pakdel, Shirin Falah; Jahanpour, Firuzeh; Yousefi, Hoshang; Soleimanian, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01

    Transfusion services rely on transfusion reaction reporting to provide patient care and protect the blood supply. Unnecessary discontinuation of blood is a major wastage of scarce blood, as well as man, hours and funds. The aim of the present study was to describe the main characteristics of acute transfusion reactions reported in the 4 hospital of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (KUMS), Kermanshah, Iran. The study was carried out at 4 teaching hospital of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran, over18 months from April 2010. All adult patients on admission in the hospitals who required blood transfusion and had establish diagnosis and consented were included in the study. In the year 2010 until 2012, a total of 6238 units of blood components were transfused. A total of 59 (0.94%) cases of transfusion reaction were reported within this 3 years period. The commonest were allergic reactions which presented with various skin manifestations such as urticarial, rashes and pruritus (49.2%), followed by increase in body temperature of > 1°C from baseline which was reported as febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reaction (37.2%). pain at the transfusion site (6.8%) and hypotension (6.8%). It is important that each transfusion of blood components to be monitor carefully. Many transfusion reactions are not recognized, because signs and symptoms mimic other clinical conditions. Any unexpected symptoms in a transfusion recipient should at least be considered as a possible transfusion reaction and be evaluated. Prompt recognition and treatment of acute transfusion reaction are crucial and would help in decreasing transfusion related morbidity and mortality, but prevention is preferable.

  2. Blood transfusion for the treatment of acute anaemia in inflammatory bowel disease and other digestive diseases

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    García-Erce, José Antonio; Gomollón, Fernando; Muñoz, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) is frequently used as the first therapeutic option for the treatment of acute anaemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), especially when it developed due to gastrointestinal or perioperative blood loss, but is not risk-free. Adverse effects of ABT include, but are not limited to, acute hemolytic reaction (wrong blood or wrong patient), febrile non-hemolytic transfusional reaction, bacterial contamination, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion associated circulatory overload, transfusion-related immuno-modulation, and transmission of almost all infectious diseases (bacteria, virus, protozoa and prion), which might result in increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, the main physiological goal of ABT, i.e. to increase oxygen consumption by the hypoxic tissues, has not been well documented. In contrast, the ABT is usually misused only to increase the haemoglobin level within a fixed protocol [mostly two by two packed red blood cell (PRC) units] independently of the patient’s tolerance to normovolemic anaemia or his clinical response to the transfusion of PRC units according to a “one-by-one” administration schedule. Evidence-based clinical guidelines may promote best transfusion practices by implementing restrictive transfusion protocols, thus reducing variability and minimizing the avoidable risks of transfusion, and the use of autologous blood and pharmacologic alternatives. In this regard, preoperative autologous blood donation (PABD) consistently diminished the frequency of ABT, although its contribution to ABT avoidance is reduced when performed under a transfusion protocol. In addition, interpretation of utility of PABD in surgical IBD patients is hampered by scarcity of published data. However, the role of autologous red blood cells as drug carriers is promising. Finally, it must be stressed that a combination of methods used within well-constructed protocols will offer better

  3. Transfusion-related acute lung injury: a change of perspective

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    Vlaar, A. P.; Schultz, M. J.; Juffermans, N. P.

    2009-01-01

    Two decades ago, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) was considered a rare complication of transfusion medicine. Nowadays, TRALI has emerged as the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality, presumably as a consequence of reaching international agreement on defining TRALI with

  4. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI – acase report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Łata

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion-related acute lung injury is defined as acute respiratory failure which develops during or within 6 hours after transfusion of a blood component in a patient with no risk factors for respiratory insufficiency. Transfusion-related acute lung injury is diagnosed based on clinical manifestation and by excluding other causes of acute lung injury. Unambiguous diagnosis is difficult. Looking for anti-HLA and/or anti-HNA antibodies in donors and sometimes in recipients plays an important role in lab tests. Negative antibody findings, either in a donor or in a recipient, do not exclude transfusion-related acute lung injury, which, however, does not exempt from performing leukocyte antibody tests since they are extremely important for transfusion-related acute lung injury prophylaxis. The ways to prevent this reaction include: disqualifying donors with anti-HLA/HNA antibodies, screening for antibodies in multiparous women and in individuals after transfusion, modifying the way blood components are prepared and limiting blood transfusion in clinical practice. The paper presents a case of a 38-year-old woman with acute myeloid leukaemia, hospitalised at the Department of Internal Diseases and Haematology of the Military Institute of Medicine for subsequent courses of chemotherapy. During treatment, the patient had red cells and platelets concentrates transfused several times with no transfusion-related reactions. Eight days after the last chemotherapy infusion, the patient developed high temperature and her platelet count was 14 × 103 /mL. Therefore, the patient received a platelet concentrate again. About 1 hour after transfusion, the patient complained about chest pain and dyspnoea. She needed oxygen therapy. Chest X-ray revealed lung oedema with no signs of left ventricular failure. Once other causes of acute lung injury were excluded, transfusion-related acute lung injury was diagnosed.

  5. Blood transfusion : Transfusion-related acute lung injury: back to basics

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    Peters, A.L.

    2017-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a life-threatening disease affecting the lungs. TRALI can develop within 6 hours after transfusion and almost all patients with TRALI require mechanical ventilation at the intensive care department. Nevertheless up to 40% of patients do not recover

  6. Recognition, Investigation and Management of Acute Transfusion Reactions

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    Al-Riyami, Arwa Z.; Al-Hashmi, Sabria; Al-Arimi, Zainab; Wadsworth, Louis D.; Al-Rawas, Abdulhakim; Al-Khabori, Murtadha; Daar, Shahina

    2014-01-01

    The recognition and management of transfusion reactions (TRs) are critical to ensure patient safety during and after a blood transfusion. Transfusion reactions are classified into acute transfusion reactions (ATRs) or delayed transfusion reactions, and each category includes different subtypes. Different ATRs share common signs and symptoms which can make categorisation difficult at the beginning of the reaction. Moreover, TRs are often under-recognised and under-reported. To ensure uniform practice and safety, it is necessary to implement a national haemovigilance system and a set of national guidelines establishing policies for blood transfusion and for the detection and management of TRs. In Oman, there are currently no local TR guidelines to guide physicians and hospital blood banks. This paper summarises the available literature and provides consensus guidelines to be used in the recognition, management and reporting of ATRs. PMID:25097764

  7. Estimation of the prevalence and rate of acute transfusion reactions occurring in Windhoek, Namibia

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    Meza, Benjamin P.L.; Lohrke, Britta; Wilkinson, Robert; Pitman, John P.; Shiraishi, Ray W.; Bock, Naomi; Lowrance, David W.; Kuehnert, Matthew J.; Mataranyika, Mary; Basavaraju, Sridhar V.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute transfusion reactions are probably common in sub-Saharan Africa, but transfusion reaction surveillance systems have not been widely established. In 2008, the Blood Transfusion Service of Namibia implemented a national acute transfusion reaction surveillance system, but substantial under-reporting was suspected. We estimated the actual prevalence and rate of acute transfusion reactions occurring in Windhoek, Namibia. Methods The percentage of transfusion events resulting in a reported acute transfusion reaction was calculated. Actual percentage and rates of acute transfusion reactions per 1,000 transfused units were estimated by reviewing patients’ records from six hospitals, which transfuse >99% of all blood in Windhoek. Patients’ records for 1,162 transfusion events occurring between 1st January – 31st December 2011 were randomly selected. Clinical and demographic information were abstracted and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Healthcare Safety Network criteria were applied to categorize acute transfusion reactions1. Results From January 1 – December 31, 2011, there were 3,697 transfusion events (involving 10,338 blood units) in the selected hospitals. Eight (0.2%) acute transfusion reactions were reported to the surveillance system. Of the 1,162 transfusion events selected, medical records for 785 transfusion events were analysed, and 28 acute transfusion reactions were detected, of which only one had also been reported to the surveillance system. An estimated 3.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.3–4.4) of transfusion events in Windhoek resulted in an acute transfusion reaction, with an estimated rate of 11.5 (95% CI: 7.6–14.5) acute transfusion reactions per 1,000 transfused units. Conclusion The estimated actual rate of acute transfusion reactions is higher than the rate reported to the national haemovigilance system. Improved surveillance and interventions to reduce transfusion-related morbidity and mortality

  8. Measuring the impact of a restrictive transfusion guideline in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeg, R T; Leinoe, E B; Andersen, P

    2013-01-01

    Interventions to change physician transfusion behavior are often evaluated by examining the amount of red blood cell (RBC) units transfused or the proportion of patients transfused before and after the intervention. The pre-transfusion haemoglobin concentration is a sensitive measure of transfusion...... practice, but has not been used to evaluate behavioral interventions. We examined the effect of a Danish National Board of Health December 2007 transfusion guideline on the behavior of clinicians treating acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). We compared the effect of the guideline on pre-transfusion haemoglobin...... concentrations with other measures of transfusion behavior, including use of RBC units and proportion of patients transfused. No change in transfusion behavior could be demonstrated by examining amount of RBC units transfused and proportion of patients transfused. Conversely, the pre-transfusion haemoglobin...

  9. Transfusion-related acute lung injury : etiological research and its methodological challenges

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    Middelburg, Rutger Anton

    2011-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the most common serious side effect of blood transfusion. TRALI could be caused by donor leukocyte antibodies, present primarily in female and transfused donors (Chapters 1 and 2). In The Netherlands this led to the exclusion of female and transfused

  10. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injured (TRALI): Current Concepts

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    Álvarez, P; Carrasco, R; Romero-Dapueto, C; Castillo, R.L

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a life-threatening intervention that develops within 6 hours of transfusion of one or more units of blood, and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality resulting from transfusion. It is necessary to dismiss other causes of acute lung injury (ALI), like sepsis, acute cardiogenic edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or bacterial infection. There are two mechanisms that lead to the development of this syndrome: immune-mediated and no immune- mediated TRALI. A common theme among the experimental TRALI models is the central importance of neutrophils in mediating the early immune response, and lung vascular injury. Central clinical symptoms are dyspnea, tachypnea, tachycardia, cyanosis and pulmonary secretions, altogether with other hemodynamic alterations, such as hypotension and fever. Complementary to these clinical findings, long-term validated animal models for TRALI should allow the determination of the cellular targets for TRALI-inducing alloantibodies as well as delineation of the underlying pathogenic molecular mechanisms, and key molecular mediators of the pathology. Diagnostic criteria have been established and preventive measures have been implemented. These actions have contributed to the reduction in the overallnumber of fatalities. However, TRALI still remains a clinical problem. Any complication suspected of TRALI should immediately be reported. PMID:26312100

  11. Disseminated fusariosis and endogenous fungal endophthalmitis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia following platelet transfusion possibly due to transfusion-related immunomodulation

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    Yong Ku

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report a case of disseminated fusariosis with endogenous endophthalmitis in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Transfusion-associated immune modulation secondary to platelet transfusion could play an important role in the pathophysiology of this case. Case Presentation A 9 year-old male with acute lymphoblastic leukemia complicated by pancytopenia and disseminated Intravascular coagulation was given platelet transfusion. He developed disseminated fusariosis and was referred to the ophthalmology team for right endogenous endophthalmitis. The infection was controlled with aggressive systemic and intravitreal antifungals. Conclusion Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia are predisposed to endogenous fungal endophthalmitis. Transfusion-associated immune modulation may further increase host susceptibility to such opportunistic infections.

  12. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury : The role of donor antibodies

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    D. Mathijssen-van Stein (Danielle)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a serious complication of blood transfusion, which causes serious morbidity and is the leading cause of transfusion-associated mortality according to the FDA. The majority of TRALI cases (up to 89%) are thought to be

  13. FIRST REPORT OF TRANSFUSION-RELATED ACUTE LUNG INJURY (TRALI)IN SLOVENIA

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    Vesna Galvani; Slavica Maver; Gordana Soldatović; Irena Kramar

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a major cause of lethal side effects associated with transfusion of blood and blood components. TRALI is defined as a new acutenoncardiogenic pulmonary oedema as seen on the frontal radiography of lungs, manifested with the shortness of breath, hypoxemia, hypotension and fever, all occurring duringor within 6 h after transfusion.TRALI is rarely diagnosed and can be confused with other causes of acute respiratoryfailure. It occurs ...

  14. Lesão pulmonar aguda associada à transfusão Transfusion-related acute lung injury

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    Antonio Fabron Junior

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Lesão pulmonar aguda associada à transfusão (transfusion-related acute lung injury, TRALI é uma complicação clínica grave relacionada à transfusão de hemocomponentes que contêm plasma. Recentemente, TRALI foi considerada a principal causa de morte associada à transfusão nos Estados Unidos e Reino Unido. É manifestada tipicamente por dispnéia, hipoxemia, hipotensão, febre e edema pulmonar não cardiogênico, que ocorre durante ou dentro de 6 h, após completada a transfusão. Embora o exato mecanismo não tenha sido totalmente elucidado, postula-se que TRALI esteja associada à infusão de anticorpos contra antígenos leucocitários (classes I ou II ou aloantígenos específicos de neutrófilos e a mediadores biologicamente ativos presentes em componentes celulares estocados. A maioria dos doadores implicados em casos da TRALI são mulheres multíparas. TRALI, além de ser pouco diagnosticada, pode ainda ser confundida com outras situações de insuficiência respiratória aguda. Um melhor conhecimento sobre TRALI pode ser crucial na prevenção e tratamento desta severa complicação transfusional.Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI is a serious clinical syndrome associated with the transfusion of plasma-containing blood components. Recently, TRALI has come to be recognized as the leading cause of transfusion-related death in the United States and United Kingdom. This complication typically presents as shortness of breath, hypoxemia, hypotension, fever and noncardiogeneic pulmonary edema, all occurring during or within 6 h after transfusion. Although the mechanism of TRALI has not been fully elucidated, it has been associated with human leukocyte antigen antibodies (class I, class II or neutrophil alloantigens and with biologically active mediators in stored cellular blood components. Most of the donors implicated in cases of TRALI are multiparous women. Rarely diagnosed, TRALI can be confused with other causes of acute

  15. Recognition, Investigation and Management of Acute Transfusion Reactions; Consensus guidelines for Oman

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    Arwa Z. Al-Riyami

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The recognition and management of transfusion reactions (TRs are critical to ensure patient safety during and after a blood transfusion. Transfusion reactions are classified into acute transfusion reactions (ATRs or delayed transfusion reactions, and each category includes different subtypes. Different ATRs share common signs and symptoms which can make categorisation difficult at the beginning of the reaction. Moreover, TRs are often under-recognised and under-reported. To ensure uniform practice and safety, it is necessary to implement a national haemovigilance system and a set of national guidelines establishing policies for blood transfusion and for the detection and management of TRs. In Oman, there are currently no local TR guidelines to guide physicians and hospital blood banks. This paper summarises the available literature and provides consensus guidelines to be used in the recognition, management and reporting of ATRs.

  16. Perioperative red blood cell transfusion in orofacial surgery.

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    Park, So-Young; Seo, Kwang-Suk; Karm, Myong-Hwan

    2017-09-01

    In the field of orofacial surgery, a red blood cell transfusion (RBCT) is occasionally required during double jaw and oral cancer surgery. However, the question remains whether the effect of RBCT during the perioperative period is beneficial or harmful. The answer to this question remains challenging. In the field of orofacial surgery, transfusion is performed for the purpose of oxygen transfer to hypoxic tissues and plasma volume expansion when there is bleeding. However, there are various risks, such as infectious complications (viral and bacterial), transfusion-related acute lung injury, ABO and non-ABO associated hemolytic transfusion reactions, febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reactions, transfusion associated graft-versus-host disease, transfusion associated circulatory overload, and hypersensitivity transfusion reaction including anaphylaxis and transfusion-related immune-modulation. Many studies and guidelines have suggested RBCT is considered when hemoglobin levels recorded are 7 g/dL for general patients and 8-9 g/dL for patients with cardiovascular disease or hemodynamically unstable patients. However, RBCT is occasionally an essential treatment during surgeries and it is often required in emergency cases. We need to comprehensively consider postoperative bleeding, different clinical situations, the level of intra- and postoperative patient monitoring, and various problems that may arise from a transfusion, in the perspective of patient safety. Since orofacial surgery has an especially high risk of bleeding due to the complex structures involved and the extensive vascular distribution, measures to prevent bleeding should be taken and the conditions for a transfusion should be optimized and appropriate in order to promote patient safety.

  17. Blood Transfusion and the Risk of Acute Kidney Injury Among Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

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    Karrowni, Wassef; Vora, Amit Navin; Dai, David; Wojdyla, Daniel; Dakik, Habib; Rao, Sunil V

    2016-09-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) complicating percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is associated with adverse clinical outcomes. To date, no studies have evaluated the association of blood transfusion with AKI in patients undergoing PCI. We used a retrospective cohort study of all patients with acute coronary syndrome undergoing PCI from CathPCI Registry (n=1 756 864). The primary outcome was AKI defined as the rise in serum creatinine post procedure ≥0.5 mg/dL or ≥25% above baseline values. AKI developed in 9.0% of study sample. Patients with AKI were older, more often women, and had high prevalence of comorbidities, including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and advanced stages of chronic kidney disease at baseline. Blood transfusion was utilized in 2.2% of patients. In the overall sample, AKI developed in 35.1% of patients who received transfusion versus 8.4% of patients without transfusion (adjusted odds ratio, 4.87 [4.71-5.04]). In the subgroup of patients who sustained bleeding event and received transfusion, the rate of AKI was significantly increased across all preprocedure hemoglobin levels versus no blood transfusion. Similar findings were seen in the subgroup of patients with no bleeding event. Blood transfusion is strongly associated with AKI in patients with acute coronary syndrome undergoing PCI. Further investigation is needed to determine whether a restrictive blood transfusion strategy might improve PCI outcomes by reducing the risk of AKI. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Non-polar lipids accumulate during storage of transfusion products and do not contribute to the onset of transfusion-related acute lung injury

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    Peters, A. L.; Vervaart, M. A. T.; van Bruggen, R.; de Korte, D.; Nieuwland, R.; Kulik, W.; Vlaar, A. P. J.

    2017-01-01

    Background and ObjectivesThe accumulation of non-polar lipids arachidonic acid, 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE), 12-HETE and 15-HETE during storage of transfusion products may play a role in the onset of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), a syndrome of respiratory distress after

  19. Incidence, risk factors, and outcome of transfusion-related acute lung injury in critically ill children: a retrospective study

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    Mulder, Hilde D.; Augustijn, Quinten J. J.; van Woensel, Job B.; Bos, Albert P.; Juffermans, Nicole P.; Wösten-van Asperen, Roelie M.

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) that develops within 6 hours after transfusion (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality. Both incidence and patient and transfusion-related risk factors are well studied in the adult critically ill patient population. Clinical data on TRALI

  20. Effect of Transfusion Strategy in Acute Non-variceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

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    Fabricius, Rasmus; Svenningsen, Peter; Hillingsø, Jens

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) is a common cause of admissions as well as aggressive transfusion of blood products. Whether the transfusion strategy in NVUGIB impacts on hemostasis is unknown and constitutes the focus of this study. METHOD: Retrospective......-existing medical conditions. RESULTS: 5107 patients received 10783 therapeutic endoscopic interventions. Units of PRBC transfused were identified as a predictor of re-endoscopy, surgery, and 30-day mortality with odds ratio (OR) 1.08 (1.06-1.09, p

  1. Potential contribution of mitochondrial DNA damage associated molecular patterns in transfusion products to the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome after multiple transfusions.

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    Simmons, Jon D; Lee, Yann-Leei L; Pastukh, Viktor M; Capley, Gina; Muscat, Cherry A; Muscat, David C; Marshall, Michael L; Brevard, Sidney B; Gillespie, Mark N

    2017-06-01

    Massive transfusions are accompanied by an increased incidence of a particularly aggressive and lethal form of acute lung injury (delayed transfusion-related acute lung injury) which occurs longer than 24 hours after transfusions. In light of recent reports showing that mitochondrial (mt)DNA damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are potent proinflammatory mediators, and that their abundance in the sera of severely injured or septic patients is predictive of clinical outcomes, we explored the idea that mtDNA DAMPs are present in transfusion products and are associated with the occurrence of delayed transfusion-related acute lung injury. We prospectively enrolled fourteen consecutive severely injured patients that received greater than three units of blood transfusion products and determined if the total amount of mtDNA DAMPs delivered during transfusion correlated with serum mtDNA DAMPs measured after the last transfusion, and whether the quantity of mtDNA DAMPs in the serum-predicted development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We found detectable levels of mtDNA DAMPs in packed red blood cells (3 ± 0.4 ng/mL), fresh frozen plasma (213.7 ± 65 ng/mL), and platelets (94.8 ± 69.2), with the latter two transfusion products containing significant amounts of mtDNA fragments. There was a linear relationship between the mtDNA DAMPs given during transfusion and the serum concentration of mtDNA fragments (R = 0.0.74, p DAMPs in serum measured at 24 hours after transfusion predicted the occurrence of ARDS (9.9 ± 1.4 vs. 3.3 ± 0.9, p DAMPs administered during transfusion may be a determinant of serum mtDNA DAMP levels, and that serum levels of mtDNA DAMPs after multiple transfusions may predict the development of ARDS. Collectively, these findings support the idea that mtDNA DAMPs in transfusion products significantly contribute to the incidence of ARDS after massive transfusions. Prognostic study, level II; therapeutic study, level II.

  2. A retrospective analysis of the effect of blood transfusion on cerebral oximetry entropy and acute kidney injury.

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    Engoren, Milo; Brown, Russell R; Dubovoy, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Acute anemia is associated with both cerebral dysfunction and acute kidney injury and is often treated with red blood cell transfusion. We sought to determine if blood transfusion changed the cerebral oximetry entropy, a measure of the complexity or irregularity of the oximetry values, and if this change was associated with subsequent acute kidney injury. This was a retrospective, case-control study of patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass at a tertiary care hospital, comparing those who received a red blood cell transfusion to those who did not. Acute kidney injury was defined as a perioperative increase in serum creatinine by ⩾26.4 μmol/L or by ⩾50% increase. Entropy was measured using approximate entropy, sample entropy, forbidden word entropy and basescale4 entropy in 500-point sets. Forty-four transfused patients were matched to 88 randomly selected non-transfused patients. All measures of entropy had small changes in the transfused group, but increased in the non-transfused group (pentropy (odds ratio = 1.609, 95% confidence interval = 1.057-2.450, p = 0.027) and the interaction between basescale entropy and transfusion were significantly associated with subsequent development of acute kidney injury. The transfusion of red blood cells was associated with a smaller rise in entropy values compared to non-transfused patients, suggesting a change in the regulation of cerebral oxygenation, and these changes in cerebral oxygenation are also associated with acute kidney injury.

  3. Impact of Acute Normovolemic Hemodilution with Autoplasma Transfusion on Hemostatic Parameters during Abdominal Delivery

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    T. V. Sheikina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the impact of acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH with autoplasma transfusion on hemostatic parameters during cesarean section. Subjects and methods. The study covered 119 patients in whom ANH was used during cesarean section. Group 1 included 62 women undergoing ANH with autoplasma transfusion; Group 2 (control comprised 57 pregnant women receiving ANH only. Examination of the hemostatic system involved studies of the plasma link, thromboelastogram readings, vascular platelet hemostasis and evaluation of intravascular thrombogenesis. Results. Transfusion of stored autoplasma as a hemostatic component during ANH favored the development of moderate hypercoagulation due to a significant increase in fibrinogen concentrations by 8%, r+k shortening by 11%, and a rise in the thrombodynamic potential index by 12%. A statistically significant difference has been found in the results between the groups at a stage of surgical hemostasis, which proves the best hemostat-ic effect of ANH used with autoplasma transfusion. Conclusion. The study has demonstrated that the combined use of ANH and autoplasma transfusion contributes to the stabilization of the blood coagulation potential during cesarean section and extends the feasibilities of ANH when the volume of intraoperative blood loss is as high as 25% of the circulating blood volume. Key words: cesarean section, acute normovolemic hemodilution, autoplasma transfusion, coagulation potential.

  4. Supportive transfusion therapy in cancer patients with acquired defects of hemostasis.

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    Federici, Augusto B; Intini, Daniela; Lattuada, Antonella; Vanelli, Chiara; Arrigoni, Luisa; Sacchi, Elisabetta; Russo, Umberto

    2014-05-01

    Bleeding occurs in approximately 10% of patients with cancer: supportive transfusion therapy with Platelets Concentrates (PC), Fresh Frozen Plasma (FFP) and plasma-derived or recombinant concentrates is often required for the cessation and prevention of the bleeding episodes. The most frequent causes of bleeding in cancer is thrombocytopenia followed by liver insufficiency with or without vitamin K deficiency, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and the inappropriate or excessive use of anticoagulants. Other acquired hemostatic defects such as acquired hemophilia (AHA) and acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS) are rare but they can be life-threatening. Thrombocytopenia in cancer patients may be the consequence of marrow invasion, chemotherapy or platelet auto-antibodies; patients with severe hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia, must be treated with PC and carefully followed to assess refractoriness to PC. The management of the other acquired defects of hemostasis usually requires the use of FFP and specific plasma-derived or recombinant concentrates. PC, FFP and plasma-derived concentrates can induce complications and/or adverse events in cancer patients: these include mainly allergic (ALR) or anaphylactic reactions (ANR), Transfusion-Associated Graft-Versus-Host Disease (TA-GVHD), Trasfusion-transmitted bacteriemia (TTB), Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI), Acute Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions (AHTR), Febrile Non Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions (FNHTR). Therefore, modifications such as leukocyte-reduction and irradiation of the blood components to be transfused in cancer patients are recommended to reduce the risk of these complications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Haemostatic function and biomarkers of endothelial damage before and after platelet transfusion in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia

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    Larsen, A M; Leinøe, E B; Johansson, P I

    2015-01-01

    and after platelet transfusion in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Blood was sampled before, 1 and 24 h after platelet transfusion. Primary and secondary haemostasis was evaluated by whole blood aggregometry (Multiplate) and thromboelastography (TEG). Endothelial biomarkers (s......·005). CONCLUSION: Platelet transfusion improved haemostasis, whereas post-transfusion increases in sCD40L were associated with endothelial damage, indicating that transfused platelets and platelet-derived pro-inflammatory mediators may have opposite effects on the endothelium....

  6. [Acute adverse effects in transfusion. Proposals for the hemosurveillance system].

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    Baptista González, Héctor

    2013-01-01

    The management model based on risk prevention has become a major influence in shaping policies for transfusion safety. There are approximately sixty interactions between the health worker and the patient during the transfusion process,representing the number of times where you have the opportunity to make a mistake.We present an analysis of the weaknesses of the National Blood System, with particular attention to the haemovigilance donor and patient. The proposals include the implementation of the National Blood containing the need to establish from the National Blood Safety, significant changes in the regulatory framework and the internal regulations of the Ministry of Health, the CNTS and COFEPRIS. Is required to promote and coordinate the collection of accurate information from the committees of transfusion medicine, which will be accompanied by an initial diagnosis from the National Survey of Blood. Requires notice to other forms of funding to ensure the viability of the projects operating blood bank. Finally, as a strategic resource, the blood is of public, so access should not be restricted.

  7. Best practices in the differential diagnosis and reporting of acute transfusion reactions

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    Hillis CM

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Christopher M Hillis,1–3,* Andrew W Shih,1,3,* Nancy M Heddle1,3,4 1Department of Medicine, 2Department of Oncology, 3McMaster Transfusion Research Program, McMaster University, Hamilton, 4Centre for Innovation, Canadian Blood Services, Ottawa, ON, Canada  *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: An acute transfusion reaction (ATR is any reaction to blood, blood components, or plasma derivatives that occurs within 24 hours of a transfusion. The frequencies of ATRs and the associated symptoms, reported by the sentinel sites of the Ontario Transfusion Transmitted Injuries Surveillance System from 2008 to 2012, illustrate an overlap in presenting symptoms. Despite this complexity, the differential diagnosis of an ATR can be determined by considering predominant signs or symptoms, such as fever, dyspnea, rash, and/or hypotension, as these signs and symptoms guide further investigations and management. Reporting of ATRs locally and to hemovigilance systems enhances the safety of the blood supply. Challenges to the development of an international transfusion reaction reporting system are discussed, including the issue of jurisdiction and issues of standardization for definitions, investigations, and reporting requirements. This review discusses a symptom-guided approach to the differential diagnosis of ATRs, the evolution of hemovigilance systems, an overview of the current Canadian system, and proposes a best practice model for hemovigilance based on a World Health Organization patient safety framework. Keywords: blood transfusion, blood components, hemovigilance

  8. Reporting transfusion-related acute lung injury by clinical and preclinical disciplines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Anna L.; van de Weerdt, Emma K.; Goudswaard, Eline J.; Binnekade, Jan M.; Zwaginga, Jaap J.; Beckers, Erik A. M.; Zeerleder, Sacha S.; van Kraaij, Marian G. J.; Juffermans, Nicole P.; Vlaar, Alexander P. J.

    2017-01-01

    Disciplines involved in diagnosing transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) report according to a "one-hit" theory. However, studies showed that patients with an underlying condition are at increased risk of the development of TRALI. We investigated whether accumulating evidence on the

  9. Hemoglobin concentrations and RBC transfusion thresholds in patients with acute brain injury: an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badenes, Rafael; Oddo, Mauro; Suarez, José I; Antonelli, Massimo; Lipman, Jeffrey; Citerio, Giuseppe; Taccone, Fabio Silvio

    2017-06-17

    The optimal hemoglobin (Hb) threshold at which to initiate red blood cell (RBC) transfusion in patients with acute brain injury is unknown. The aim of this survey was to investigate RBC transfusion practices used with these patients. We conducted a web-based survey within various societies of critical care medicine for intensive care unit (ICU) physicians who currently manage patients with primary acute brain injury. A total of 868 responses were obtained from around the world, half of which (n = 485) were from European centers; 204 (24%) respondents had a specific certificate in neurocritical care, and most were specialists in anesthesiology or intensive care and had less than 15 years of practice experience. Four hundred sixty-six respondents (54%) said they used an Hb threshold of 7-8 g/dl to initiate RBC transfusion after acute brain injury, although half of these respondents used a different threshold (closer to 9 g/dl) in patients with traumatic brain injury, subarachnoid hemorrhage, or ischemic stroke. Systemic and cerebral factors were reported as influencing the need for higher Hb thresholds. Most respondents agreed that a randomized clinical trial was needed to compare two different Hb thresholds for RBC transfusion, particularly in patients with traumatic brain injury, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and ischemic stroke. The Hb threshold used for RBC transfusion after acute brain injury was less than 8 g/dl in half of the ICU clinicians who responded to our survey. However, more than 50% of these physicians used higher Hb thresholds in certain conditions.

  10. Acute iatrogenic polycythemia induced by massive red blood cell transfusion during subtotal abdominal colectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Chiapaikeo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A 46 year old man was transfused ten units of packed red blood cells during subtotal colectomy after intraoperative point-of-care testing values demonstrated hemoglobin values less than seven grams per deciliter (g/dL. A post-operative hemoglobin analyzed in a standard hematologic laboratory revealed a hemoglobin value of 27.8 g/dL. He underwent emergent red blood cell depletion therapy which decreased his hemoglobin to 7.5 g/dL. The physiologic consequences of iatrogenic polycythemia caused by massive transfusion during major abdominal surgery must take into account the fluid shifts that interplay between the osmotic load, viscosity of blood, and postoperative third spacing of fluid. Treatment of acute iatrogenic polycythemia can be effectively accomplished by red blood cell depletion therapy. However, fluid shifts caused by massive transfusion followed by rapid red cell depletion produce a unique physiologic state that is without a well-described algorithm for management.

  11. Preoperative Acute Normovolemic Hemodilution for Minimizing Allogeneic Blood Transfusion: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xuelong; Zhang, Chenjing; Wang, Yin; Yu, Lina; Yan, Min

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have evaluated the efficacy of preoperative acute normovolemic hemodilution (PANH) in reducing the need for allogeneic blood transfusion. However, the results to date have been controversial. In this study, we sought to reassess the efficacy and safety of PANH based on newly emerging evidence. Medline, EMBASE, ISI Web of Knowledge, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases were searched using the key words "hemodilution," "autotransfusion," or "hemorrhage" to retrieve all randomized controlled trials examining the benefits of PANH compared with control patients not undergoing PANH in any type of surgery. Sixty-three studies involving 3819 patients were identified. The risk of requiring an allogeneic blood transfusion and the overall volume of allogeneic red blood cell transfused during the perioperative period were reduced in the PANH group compared with the control group (relative risk, 0.74; 95% confidence interval, 0.63 to 0.88; P = 0.0006; weighted mean difference, -0.94 units; 95% confidence interval, -1.27 to -0.61 units; P transfusion. Perioperative blood loss, adverse events, and the length of hospitalization were comparable between these groups. Although these results suggest that PANH is effective in reducing allogeneic blood transfusion, we identified significant heterogeneity and publication bias, which raises concerns about the true efficacy of PANH.

  12. Blood transfusion improves renal oxygenation and renal function in sepsis-induced acute kidney injury in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zafrani, Lara; Ergin, Bulent; Kapucu, Aysegul; Ince, Can

    2016-01-01

    The effects of blood transfusion on renal microcirculation during sepsis are unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effect of blood transfusion on renal microvascular oxygenation and renal function during sepsis-induced acute kidney injury. Twenty-seven Wistar albino rats were randomized into

  13. Blood transfusion improves renal oxygenation and renal function in sepsis-induced acute kidney injury in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Zafrani (Lara); B. Ergin (Bulent); Kapucu, A. (Aysegul); C. Ince (Can)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The effects of blood transfusion on renal microcirculation during sepsis are unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effect of blood transfusion on renal microvascular oxygenation and renal function during sepsis-induced acute kidney injury. Methods: Twenty-seven Wistar

  14. Platelet transfusion versus standard care after acute stroke due to spontaneous cerebral haemorrhage associated with antiplatelet therapy (PATCH): a randomised, open-label, phase 3 trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baharoglu, M. Irem; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; de Gans, Koen; Koopman, Maria M.; Brand, Anneke; Majoie, Charles B.; Beenen, Ludo F.; Marquering, Henk A.; Vermeulen, Marinus; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; de Haan, Rob J.; Roos, Yvo B.; Reitsma, J. B.; Kamphuisen, P. W.; Touzé, E.; Lasne, D.; François, A.; Baharoglu, Irem; Zinkstok, Sanne; Coutinho, Jonathan; Boers, Merel; Geuskens, Ralph; Hart, Groene; Bloodbank, Sanquin; Koopman, Rianne; de Graaf, Reinier; Aerden, Leo; Vermeer, Sarah; Schreuder, Tobien; Schuiling, Wouter; Haag, Den; Bienfait, Henriette; Bakker, Stef; Ziekenhuis, Canisius Wilhelmina; Klijn, Catharina; Bronner, Irene; Ziekenhuis, St Elisabeth; de Kort, Paul; Raaijmakers, Dianne; Visser, Marieke; Ziekenhuis, Catharina; Keizer, Koos; Jansen, Ben; Ziekenhuis, Kruis; van der, Willem; Rooyer, Fergus; Verhey, Hans; Macleod, Mary Joan; Joyson, Anu; Reed, Matthew; Burgess, Seona; Mead, Gillian; Hart, Simon; Muir, Keith; Welch, Angela; Baird, Sally; Smith, Wilma; Huang, Xuya; Moreton, Fiona; Cheripelli, Bharath; El Tawil, Salwa; Baird, Tracey; Duncan, George; Nazir, Fozia; Birschel, Phil; Selvarajah, Johann; Dennis, Martin; Samarasekera, Neshika; Ramsay, Scott; Jackson, Katherine; Ferrigno, Marc; Susen, Sophie; Rossi, Costanza; Dequatre-Ponchelle, Nelly; Bodenant, Marie; Jacquet, Clémence; Oune, Fanny Ben; Ouk, Thavarak; Guégan-Massardier, Evelyne; Ozkul, Ozlem; Fetter, Damien; Duchez, Veronique Le Cam; Soufi, Hicham; Sibon, Igor; Desbruxelles, Sabrina; Renou, Pauline; Ledure, Sylvain; Neau, Philippe; Lamy, Matthias; Timsit, Serge; Viakhireva, Irina; Zuber, Mathieu; Tamazyan, Ruben; Lambert, Claire Join; Alamowitch, Sonia; Favrole, Pascal; Gerotziafas, Grigorios; Mazighi, Mikael; Stapf, Christian; Béjot, Yannick; Giroud, Maurice; Daubail, Benoit; Delpont, Benoit; Resch, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Platelet transfusion after acute spontaneous primary intracerebral haemorrhage in people taking antiplatelet therapy might reduce death or dependence by reducing the extent of the haemorrhage. We aimed to investigate whether platelet transfusion with standard care, compared with standard care alone,

  15. Comparison of intensive light-emitting diode and intensive compact fluorescent phototherapy in non-hemolytic jaundice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Takcı, Sahin; Yiğit, Sule; Bayram, Gülperi; Korkmaz, Ayşe; Yurdakök, Murat

    2013-01-01

    ...: intensive compact fluorescent tube (CFT) and intensive light-emitting diode (LED) phototherapy. Forty-three infants over 35 weeks of gestation with severe non-hemolytic hyperbilirubinemia were enrolled in the prospective study...

  16. Non-polar lipids accumulate during storage of transfusion products and do not contribute to the onset of transfusion-related acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, A L; Vervaart, M A T; van Bruggen, R; de Korte, D; Nieuwland, R; Kulik, W; Vlaar, A P J

    2017-01-01

    The accumulation of non-polar lipids arachidonic acid, 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE), 12-HETE and 15-HETE during storage of transfusion products may play a role in the onset of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), a syndrome of respiratory distress after transfusion. We investigated non-polar lipid accumulation in red blood cells (RBCs) stored for 42 days, plasma stored for 7 days at either 4 or 20°C and platelet (PLT) transfusion products stored for 7 days. Furthermore, we investigated whether transfusion of RBCs with increased levels of non-polar lipids induces TRALI in a 'two-hit' human volunteer model. All products were produced following Dutch Blood Bank protocols and are according to European standards. Non-polar lipids were measured with high-performance liquid chromotography followed by mass spectrometry. All non-polar lipids increased in RBCs after 21 days of storage compared to baseline. The non-polar lipid concentration in plasma increased significantly, and the increase was even more pronounced in products stored at 20°C. In platelets, baseline levels of 5-HETE and 15-HETE were higher than in RBCs or plasma. However, the non-polar lipids did not change significantly during storage of PLT products. Infusion of RBCs with increased levels of non-polar lipids did not induce TRALI in LPS-primed human volunteers. We conclude that non-polar lipids accumulate in RBC and plasma transfusion products and that accumulation is temperature dependent. Accumulation of non-polar lipids does not appear to explain the onset of TRALI (Dutch Trial Register - NTR4455). © 2016 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  17. Antiplatelet antibody may cause delayed transfusion-related acute lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torii Y

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Yoshitaro Torii1, Toshiki Shimizu1, Takashi Yokoi1, Hiroyuki Sugimoto1, Yuichi Katashiba1, Ryotaro Ozasa1, Shinya Fujita1, Yasushi Adachi2, Masahiko Maki3, Shosaku Nomura11The First Department of Internal Medicine, Kansai Medical University, Osaka, 2Department of Clinical Pathology, Toyooka Hospital, Hyogo, 3First Department of Pathology, Kansai Medical University, Osaka, JapanAbstract: A 61-year-old woman with lung cancer developed delayed transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI syndrome after transfusion of plasma- and leukoreduced red blood cells (RBCs for gastrointestinal bleeding due to intestinal metastasis. Acute lung injury (ALI recurred 31 days after the first ALI episode. Both ALI episodes occurred 48 hours after transfusion. Laboratory examinations revealed the presence of various antileukocyte antibodies including antiplatelet antibody in the recipient's serum but not in the donors' serum. The authors speculate that antiplatelet antibodies can have an inhibitory effect in the recipient, which can modulate the bona fide procedure of ALI and lead to a delay in the onset of ALI. This case illustrates the crucial role of a recipient's platelets in the development of TRALI.Keywords: delayed TRALI syndrome, recurrence, anti-platelet antibody

  18. Prvi primer s transfuzijo povezane akutne poškodbe pljuč (TRALI) v Sloveniji: First report of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) in Slovenia:

    OpenAIRE

    Galvani, Vesna; Kramar, Irena; Maver, Slavica; Soldatović, Gordana

    2008-01-01

    Background Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a major cause of lethal side effects associated with transfusion of blood and blood components.TRALI is defined as a new acute noncardiogenic pulmonary oedema as seen on the frontal radiography of lungs, manifested with the shortness of breath, hypoxemia, hypotension and fever, all occurring during or within 6h after transfusion. TRALI is rarely diagnosed and can be confused with other causes of acute respiratory failure. It occurs a...

  19. Risk factors and outcome of transfusion-related acute lung injury in the critically ill: A nested case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaar, Alexander P. J.; Binnekade, Jan M.; Prins, David; van Stein, Danielle; Hofstra, Jorrit J.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Juffermans, Nicole P.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the incidence, risk factors, and outcome of transfusion-related acute lung injury in a cohort of critically ill patients. Design: In a retrospective cohort study, patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury were identified using the consensus criteria of acute lung

  20. Acute haemolysis, DIC and renal failure after transfusion of uncross-matched blood during trauma resuscitation: illustrative case and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorellino, J; Elahie, A L; Warkentin, T E

    2018-02-19

    The aims of this study were to report a patient with acute haemolytic transfusion reaction (HTR) after transfusing uncross-matched red blood cell (RBC) units and to identify the frequency of this complication. Uncross-matched RBC units are commonly transfused in emergencies, but the frequency of acute HTR is unknown. We describe a male stabbing victim who received three units of uncross-matched RBC units complicated by acute intravascular HTR, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and renal failure. We identified 14 studies evaluating the frequency of acute HTR post-emergency transfusion of uncross-matched RBC units. Acute HTR was shown by haemoglobinuria, free-plasma haemoglobin and methemalbumin, with anti-K and anti-Fy a eluted from recipient red cells; acute DIC featured severe hypofibrinogenemia, thrombocytopenia, elevated fibrin D-dimer and multiple bilateral renal infarcts. Two of the three transfused units reacted with pre-existing RBC alloantibodies [anti-K (titre, 128), anti-Fy a (titre, 512)], explained by transfusion 25 years earlier. Our literature review found the frequency of acute HTR following emergency transfusion of uncross-matched RBC units to be 2/3998 [0·06% (95% CI, 0·01-0·21%)]. Although emergency transfusion of uncross-matched blood is commonly practiced at trauma centres worldwide, with low risk of acute HTR (acute HTR with severe complications. © 2018 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  1. Prevention of immune-mediated transfusion-related acute lung injury; from bloodbank to patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Műller, Marcella C A; Porcelijn, Leendert; Vlaar, Alexander P J

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion related morbidity and mortality. Immune-mediated TRALI is caused by leucocyte and neutrophil antibodies in the transfused blood products that react with white blood cell antigens of the recipient, hereby inducing endothelial damage and lung injury. About two thirds of TRALI cases are thought to be immune-mediated. Both Human Leucocyte Antibodies (HLA Class I and II) and Human Neutrophil Antibodies (HNA) are involved in TRALI. Most antibodies result from allo-exposure of the blood donor, with multiparous donors having the highest incidence of antibodies. Detection of anti-leucocyte and anti-neutrophil antibodies is complex and many uncertainties still exist regarding the interpretation of the test results. In this review we discuss the evidence and effectiveness of measurements to prevent immune-mediated TRALI from a bloodbank and bedside perspective. From a bloodbank perspective various preventive measures have been implicated. In some countries bloodbanks have successfully implemented donor selection strategies, ranging from testing of allo-exposed donors for leucocyte antibodies to the exclusion of all females from donating high plasma volume products. Another strategy involves dilution of antibodies present by pooling of plasma donations of multiple donors. From a bedside view, the most important measure to prevent TRALI is to limit patients' exposure to allogenic bloodproducts. Furthermore recognition and awareness of the syndrome need to be heightened among clinicians.

  2. Detection of acute traumatic coagulopathy and massive transfusion requirements by means of rotational thromboelastometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagemo, Jostein S; Christiaans, Sarah C; Stanworth, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to re-evaluate the findings of a smaller cohort study on the functional definition and characteristics of acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC). We also aimed to identify the threshold values for the most accurate identification of ATC and prediction...... of massive transfusion (MT) using rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) assays. METHODS: In this prospective international multicentre cohort study, adult trauma patients who met the local criteria for full trauma team activation from four major trauma centres were included. Blood was collected on arrival...

  3. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI in two thalassaemia patients caused by the same multiparous blood donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George J Kontoghiorghes

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Two separate episodes of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI in thalassaemia patients caused by red blood cell transfusions from the same multiparous blood donor are reported. Both cases had the same symptomatology and occurred 10-60 minutes of transfusion. The patients presented dyspnea, sweating, fatigue, dizziness, fever, and sense of losing consciousness. The chest x-ray showed a pulmonary oedema-like picture with both lungs filled with fluid. The patients were treated in the intensive therapy unit. They were weaned off the ventilator and discharged following hospitalization 7 and 9 days respectively. The TRALI syndrome was diagnosed to be associated with HLA-specific donor antibodies against mismatched HLA-antigens of the transfused patients. Haemovigilance improvements are essential for reducing the morbidity and mortality in transfused patients. Blood from multiparous donors should be tested for the presence of IgG HLA-Class I and –Class II antibodies before being transfused in thalassaemia and other chronically transfused patients.

  4. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI) in two Thalassaemia Patients Caused by the Same Multiparous Blood Donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolnagou, Annita; Kontoghiorghe, Christina N; Kontoghiorghes, George J

    2017-01-01

    We report two separate episodes of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) in two thalassaemia patients who received red blood cell transfusions from the same multiparous donor. Both cases had the same symptomatology and occurred within 60 minutes of transfusion. The patients presented dyspnoea, sweating, fatigue, dizziness, fever, and sense of losing consciousness. The chest x-ray showed a pulmonary oedema-like picture with both lungs filled with fluid. The patients were treated in the intensive therapy unit. They were weaned off the ventilator and discharged following hospitalization 7 and 9 days respectively. The TRALI syndrome was diagnosed to be associated with HLA-specific donor antibodies against mismatched HLA-antigens of the transfused patients. Haemovigilance improvements are essential for reducing the morbidity and mortality in transfused patients. Blood from multiparous donors should be tested for the presence of IgG HLA-Class I and -Class II antibodies before being transfused in thalassaemia and other chronically transfused patients.

  5. Blood transfusion improves renal oxygenation and renal function in sepsis-induced acute kidney injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafrani, Lara; Ergin, Bulent; Kapucu, Aysegul; Ince, Can

    2016-12-20

    The effects of blood transfusion on renal microcirculation during sepsis are unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effect of blood transfusion on renal microvascular oxygenation and renal function during sepsis-induced acute kidney injury. Twenty-seven Wistar albino rats were randomized into four groups: a sham group (n = 6), a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) group (n = 7), a LPS group that received fluid resuscitation (n = 7), and a LPS group that received blood transfusion (n = 7). The mean arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, and renal microvascular oxygenation within the kidney cortex were recorded. Acute kidney injury was assessed using the serum creatinine levels, metabolic cost, and histopathological lesions. Nitrosative stress (expression of endothelial (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)) within the kidney was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Hemoglobin levels, pH, serum lactate levels, and liver enzymes were measured. Fluid resuscitation and blood transfusion both significantly improved the mean arterial pressure and renal blood flow after LPS infusion. Renal microvascular oxygenation, serum creatinine levels, and tubular damage significantly improved in the LPS group that received blood transfusion compared to the group that received fluids. Moreover, the renal expression of eNOS was markedly suppressed under endotoxin challenge. Blood transfusion, but not fluid resuscitation, was able to restore the renal expression of eNOS. However, there were no significant differences in lactic acidosis or liver function between the two groups. Blood transfusion significantly improved renal function in endotoxemic rats. The specific beneficial effect of blood transfusion on the kidney could have been mediated in part by the improvements in renal microvascular oxygenation and sepsis-induced endothelial dysfunction via the restoration of eNOS expression within the kidney.

  6. [Etiologies of non-hemolytic jaundice in infants: a retrospective analysis of 3113 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiaorong; Xu, Hongmei

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the causes of non-hemolytic jaundice among infants in Chongqing, China from the period of 1982 to 2011 and to determine whether the etiologies have changed over the past 30 years. The medical records of 3 113 infants,aged 1 month to 1 year,admitted to our hospital with non-hemolytic jaundice were collected and stratified according to decade-long time periods: group A (1982-1991), n=537; group B (1992-2001), n=786; group C (2002-2011), n=1 790. Data on sex, age, etiology and bilirubin level were retrospectively assessed using the chi-square test. In the three groups, boys consistently accounted for the majority of cases (group A:74.3%, group B:66.7%, group C:62.6%). In group A, 52% of the patients were 1-2 months of age; the peak age of patients in both group B and C was 2-3 months (group B:67.8%, group C:61.0%). Group A showed the highest level of patients with mildly elevated total bilirubin level (80.3%); however, moderately elevated total bilirubin level was most frequent in group B (53.4%) and group C (49.7%). The main etiologic diagnoses of the patients in group A were cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection (31.7%), sepsis (18.2%), hepatitis B virus (HBV) (1.3%), and biliary tract anomalies (1.3%); 46.6% of the cases had unclear cause. The main etiologic diagnoses of the cases in group B were CMV infection (36.0%), sepsis (21.5%), breast milk jaundice (2.0%), and HBV (1.9%); 37.9% of the cases had unclear cause. The main etiologic diagnoses of the cases in group C were CMV infection (42.6%), sepsis (7.5%), breast milk jaundice (17.7%), and biliary tract anomalies (2.46%); 29.1% of the cases had unclear cause. In Chongqing, infective factors, especially CMV, remain the main cause of nonhemolytic jaundice in infants, but bacterial etiologies have declined over the past 30 years.Non-infective factors, such as biliary tract anomalies and inherited metabolic diseases, have trended upwards. Although there has been great progress in the clinical management of

  7. Appropriate blood component therapy can reduce postcardiac surgery acute kidney injury through packed cell transfusion reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kianoush Saberi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI can happen due to different factors such as anemia. Packed cell (PC transfusion is an important cause of AKI occurrence. The aim of the study is to investigate whether appropriate blood component (BC therapy can reduce blood transfusion and it would result in AKI decreasing. Materials and Methods: We conducted a cohort study of 1388 patients who underwent cardiac surgery in one university hospital. A serum creatinine higher than 2 mg/dl, renal disease history, renal replacement therapy (chronic dialysis were our exclusion criteria. Results: from our 1088 samples, 701 (64.43% patients had normal kidney function, 277 (25.45% were in the AKI-1 group, 84 (7.72% had an AKI-2 function, and the rest of patients were classified as end stage. A mean of more than three PC units were transfused for the second and third stage of AKI, which was significantly higher than other AKI groups (P = 0.009; this higher demand of blood product was also true about the fresh frozen plasma, platelet, and fibrinogen. However, there were no needs of fibrinogen in the patients with normal kidney function. The cardiopulmonary bypass time had an average of 142 ± 24.12, which obviously was higher than other groups (P = 0.032. Total mortality rate was 14 out of 1088 (1.28%, and expiration among the AKI stages 2 and 3 was meaningfully (P = 0.001 more than the other groups. Conclusion: A more occurrence of AKI reported for the patients who have taken more units of blood. However, BC indicated to be safer for compensating blood loss because of low AKI occurrence among our patients.

  8. Recurrent acute hemolytic transfusion reactions by antibodies against Doa antigens, not detected by cross-matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, Ruben; van Gelder, Warry; van Wintershoven, Joyce; Maaskant-Van Wijk, Petra A; Beckers, Erik A M

    2006-02-01

    An 81-year-old male patient suffered from recurrent acute hemolytic transfusion reactions after transfusion with phenotyped cross-match-negative red blood cells (RBCs). Extensive posttransfusion workup eventually revealed Dombrock (a) (Do(a)) antibodies. Because commercially available cell panels do not allow for identification of anti-Do(a) and owing to the lack of Do(a) typing serum samples, selection of matched units of RBCs is dependent on negative cross-match results. In this case, selection of Do(a-) units by cross-matching failed, indicating that serologic methods were not reliable. A polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific priming assay was used to detect DOA and DOB alleles, which encode Do(a) and Do(b) antigens, respectively. The patient was confirmed to be DOB/DOB by DNA sequencing. Furthermore, the involved mismatched units in each of the three hemolytic episodes were shown to be Do(a+). In the presenting case, DNA typing appeared to be superior to serologic methods in selecting matched RBC units in the presence of anti-Do(a).

  9. The Epidemiology of Transfusion-related Acute Lung Injury Varies According to the Applied Definition of Lung Injury Onset Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Vusse, Lisa K; Caldwell, Ellen; Tran, Edward; Hogl, Laurie; Dinwiddie, Steven; López, José A; Maier, Ronald V; Watkins, Timothy R

    2015-09-01

    Research that applies an unreliable definition for transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) may draw false conclusions about its risk factors and biology. The effectiveness of preventive strategies may decrease as a consequence. However, the reliability of the consensus TRALI definition is unknown. To prospectively study the effect of applying two plausible definitions of acute respiratory distress syndrome onset time on TRALI epidemiology. We studied 316 adults admitted to the intensive care unit and transfused red blood cells within 24 hours of blunt trauma. We identified patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, and defined acute respiratory distress syndrome onset time two ways: (1) the time at which the first radiographic or oxygenation criterion was met, and (2) the time both criteria were met. We categorized two corresponding groups of TRALI cases transfused in the 6 hours before acute respiratory distress syndrome onset. We used Cohen's kappa to measure agreement between the TRALI cases and implicated blood components identified by the two acute respiratory distress syndrome onset time definitions. In a nested case-control study, we examined potential risk factors for each group of TRALI cases, including demographics, injury severity, and characteristics of blood components transfused in the 6 hours before acute respiratory distress syndrome onset. Forty-two of 113 patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome were TRALI cases per the first acute respiratory distress syndrome onset time definition and 63 per the second definition. There was slight agreement between the two groups of TRALI cases (κ = 0.16; 95% confidence interval, -0.01 to 0.33) and between the implicated blood components (κ = 0.15, 95% confidence interval, 0.11-0.20). Age, Injury Severity Score, high plasma-volume components, and transfused plasma volume were risk factors for TRALI when applying the second acute respiratory distress syndrome onset time definition

  10. The incidence, risk factors, and outcome of transfusion-related acute lung injury in a cohort of cardiac surgery patients: a prospective nested case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaar, Alexander P. J.; Hofstra, Jorrit J.; Determann, Rogier M.; Veelo, Denise P.; Paulus, Frederique; Kulik, Wim; Korevaar, Johanna; de Mol, Bas A.; Koopman, Marianne M. W.; Porcelijn, Leendert; Binnekade, Jan M.; Vroom, Margreeth B.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Juffermans, Nicole P.

    2011-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality. Both antibodies and bioactive lipids that have accumulated during storage of blood have been implicated in TRALI pathogenesis. In a single-center, nested, case-control study, patients

  11. The incidence, risk factors, and outcome of transfusion-related acute lung injury in a cohort of cardiac surgery patients: a prospective nested case-control study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaar, A.P.J.; Hofstra, J.J.; Determann, R.M.; Veelo, D.P.; Paulus, F.; Kulik, W.; Korevaar, J.; Mol, B.A. de; Koopman, M.M.W.; Porcelijn, L.; Binnekade, J.M.; Vroom, M.B.; Schultz, M.J.; Juffermans, N.P.

    2011-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality. Both antibodies and bioactive lipids that have accumulated during storage of blood have been implicated in TRALI pathogenesis. In a single-center, nested, case-control study, patients

  12. Acute Fetal Anemia Diagnosed by Middle Cerebral Artery Doppler Velocimetry in Stage V Twin–Twin Transfusion Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Salcedo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In stage V twin–twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS, up to 50% of surviving twins die or experience permanent disabilities, likely due to acute intertwin hemorrhage resulting in sudden severe anemia of the survivor. Although fetal middle cerebral artery (MCA Doppler studies demonstrate strong correlation with fetal hemoglobin values, acute hemorrhagic events are more difficult to diagnose, and optimal timing of delivery of the survivor poses an obstetric dilemma. We report a case of newly diagnosed stage V TTTS at 28 weeks gestation, complicated by acute severe anemia diagnosed by significantly abnormal fetal MCA Doppler studies. The anemic twin was urgently delivered and is doing well without significant sequelae.

  13. Concerted action of sphingomyelinase and non-hemolytic enterotoxin in pathogenic Bacillus cereus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria M Doll

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus causes food poisoning and serious non-gastrointestinal-tract infections. Non-hemolytic enterotoxin (Nhe, which is present in most B. cereus strains, is considered to be one of the main virulence factors. However, a B. cereus ΔnheBC mutant strain lacking Nhe is still cytotoxic to intestinal epithelial cells. In a screen for additional cytotoxic factors using an in vitro model for polarized colon epithelial cells we identified B. cereus sphingomyelinase (SMase as a strong inducer of epithelial cell death. Using single and double deletion mutants of sph, the gene encoding for SMase, and nheBC in B. cereus we demonstrated that SMase is an important factor for B. cereus cytotoxicity in vitro and pathogenicity in vivo. SMase substantially complemented Nhe induced cytotoxicity in vitro. In addition, SMase but not Nhe contributed significantly to the mortality rate of larvae in vivo in the insect model Galleria mellonella. Our study suggests that the role of B. cereus SMase as a secreted virulence factor for in vivo pathogenesis has been underestimated and that Nhe and SMase complement each other significantly to cause full B. cereus virulence hence disease formation.

  14. Non-hemolytic enterotoxin of Bacillus cereus induces apoptosis in Vero cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoye; Ding, Shuangyang; Shi, Peijie; Dietrich, Richard; Märtlbauer, Erwin; Zhu, Kui

    2017-04-01

    Bacillus cereus is an opportunistic pathogen that often causes foodborne infectious diseases and food poisoning. Non-hemolytic enterotoxin (Nhe) is the major toxin found in almost all enteropathogenic B. cereus and B. thuringiensis isolates. However, little is known about the cellular response after Nhe triggered pore formation on cell membrane. Here, we demonstrate that Nhe induced cell cycle arrest at G 0 /G 1 phase and provoked apoptosis in Vero cells, most likely associated with mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and death receptor pathways. The influx of extracellular calcium ions and increased level of reactive oxygen species in cytoplasm were sensed by apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) and p38 MAPK. Extrinsic death receptor Fas could also promote the activation of p38 MAPK. Subsequently, ASK1 and p38 MAPK triggered downstream caspase-8 and 3 to initiate apoptosis. Our results clearly demonstrate that ASK1, and Fas-p38 MAPK-mediated caspase-8 dependent pathways are involved in apoptotic cell death provoked by the pore-forming enterotoxin Nhe. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Concerted Action of Sphingomyelinase and Non-Hemolytic Enterotoxin in Pathogenic Bacillus cereus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Viktoria M.

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus cereus causes food poisoning and serious non-gastrointestinal-tract infections. Non-hemolytic enterotoxin (Nhe), which is present in most B. cereus strains, is considered to be one of the main virulence factors. However, a B. cereus ΔnheBC mutant strain lacking Nhe is still cytotoxic to intestinal epithelial cells. In a screen for additional cytotoxic factors using an in vitro model for polarized colon epithelial cells we identified B. cereus sphingomyelinase (SMase) as a strong inducer of epithelial cell death. Using single and double deletion mutants of sph, the gene encoding for SMase, and nheBC in B. cereus we demonstrated that SMase is an important factor for B. cereus cytotoxicity in vitro and pathogenicity in vivo. SMase substantially complemented Nhe induced cytotoxicity in vitro. In addition, SMase but not Nhe contributed significantly to the mortality rate of larvae in vivo in the insect model Galleria mellonella. Our study suggests that the role of B. cereus SMase as a secreted virulence factor for in vivo pathogenesis has been underestimated and that Nhe and SMase complement each other significantly to cause full B. cereus virulence hence disease formation. PMID:23613846

  16. Acute lung injury after platelet transfusion in a patient with dengue fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu Karoli

    2014-01-01

    ventilation. Greater knowledge and increased awareness especially amongst the clinicians regarding TRALI is needed for prevention and treatment of this potentially severe complication of blood/component transfusion.

  17. Incompatible blood transfusion: Challenging yet lifesaving in the management of acute severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sudipta Sekhar; Zaman, Rafiq Uz; Safi, Mohammad

    2014-07-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is characterized by the production of autoantibodies directed against red cell antigens. Most patients of AIHA arrive in the emergency or out-patient department (OPD) with severe anemia requiring urgent blood transfusion. Here we share our experience of managing these patients with incompatible blood transfusions and suggest the minimal test required to assure patient safety. A total of 14 patients admitted with severe anemia, diagnosed with AIHA and requiring blood transfusion urgently were included in the study. A series of immunohematological investigations were performed to confirm the diagnosis and issue best match packed red blood cells (PRBC) to these patients. A total of 167 PRBC units were crossmatched for 14 patients of which 46 units (28%) were found to be best match ones and 26 (56.5%) of these units were transfused. A mean turn around time of 222 min was observed in issuing the "best match" blood. Severe hemolysis was observed in all patients with a median hemoglobin increment of 0.88 g/dl after each unit PRBC transfusion. Decision to transfuse in AIHA should be based on the clinical condition of the patient. No critical patient should be denied blood transfusion due to serological incompatibility. Minimum investigations such as direct antiglobulin test (DAT), antibody screening and autocontrol should be performed to ensure transfusion safety in patients. All transfusion services should be capable of issuing "best match" PRBCs in AIHA.

  18. Leukoreduction program for red blood cell transfusions in coronary surgery: association with reduced acute kidney injury and in-hospital mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Gianpaolo; Mastroianni, Ciro; Bancone, Ciro; Della Corte, Alessandro; Galdieri, Nicola; Nappi, Gianantonio; De Santo, Luca Salvatore

    2010-07-01

    Leukocytes in allogeneic blood transfusions cause several immunomodulatory events. This before-and-after cohort study evaluated clinical outcomes after adoption of prestorage leukoreduction program for blood transfusions, with particular focus on acute kidney injury. One thousand thirty-four consecutive patients who underwent on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting between January 2004 and December 2007 were included. Propensity score analysis for transfusion was performed in the whole population; patients who were actually transfused were then divided according to leukoreduction. From these 2 groups, 147 pairs matched for propensity score were considered to evaluate with bivariate and multivariable analyses the effects of leukoreduction, with all-cause in-hospital mortality and morbidity as main outcomes. Unadjusted in-hospital mortalities were 6.6% for the entire cohort and 44.2% for those with acute kidney injury. In the matched population, after introduction of leukoreduction, mortality rates decreased to 5.4% (vs 11.4%) and acute kidney injury (RIFLE [Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of function, End-stage renal disease] class R or greater) dropped from 51.7% to 41.5% (relative risk -20%, P < .045). No difference emerged regarding other major complications. At multivariable analysis, intra-aortic balloon pump, RIFLE score, and propensity score for transfusion proved independent predictors of in-hospital mortality. Intra-aortic balloon pump and nonleukodepleted transfusion emerged as independent predictors of acute kidney injury. Multivariable analysis on the overall cohort of transfused patients confirmed that nonleukodepleted transfusion was an independent predictor of acute kidney injury. Leukoreduction of allogeneic blood products is associated with decreased acute kidney injury and mortality in highly transfused patients. 2010 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Are polymorphisms of the immunoregulatory factor CD40LG implicated in acute transfusion reactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloui, Chaker; Sut, Caroline; Prigent, Antoine; Fagan, Jocelyne; Cognasse, Fabrice; Granados-Herbepin, Viviana; Touraine, Renaud; Pozzetto, Bruno; Aouni, Mahjoub; Fendri, Chedlia; Hassine, Mohsen; Chakroun, Tahar; Jemni-Yacoub, Saloua; Garraud, Olivier; Laradi, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    The CD40 ligand (CD40L/CD154), a member of TNF superfamily, is notably expressed on activated CD4+ T-cells and stimulated platelets. CD40L is linked to a variety of pathologies and to acute transfusion reactions (ATR). Mutations in this gene (CD40LG) lead to X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome. Some CD40LG polymorphisms are associated with variable protein expression. The rationale behind this study is that CD40L protein has been observed to be involved in ATR. We wondered whether genetic polymorphisms are implicated. We investigated genetic diversity in the CD40LG using DHPLC and capillary electrophoresis for screening and genotyping (n = 485 French and Tunisian blood donors). We identified significant difference in the CD40LG linkage pattern between the two populations. Variant minor alleles were significantly over-represented in Tunisian donors (P<0.0001 to 0.0270). We found higher heterogeneity in the Tunisian, including three novel low frequency variants. As there was not a particular pattern of CD40LG in single apheresis donors whose platelet components induced an ATR, we discuss how this information may be useful for future disease association studies on CD40LG. PMID:25430087

  20. Transfusion-related acute lung injury em pós-operatório de neurocirurgia: relato de caso Transfusion-related acute lung injury after following neurosurgery: case report

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    Salomón Soriano Ordinola Rojas

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: O Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI, é definido como um edema pulmonar não cardiogênico, relacionado à transfusão de sangue ou derivados, evoluindo com necessidade de ventilação mecânica na grande maioria dos casos. O objetivo deste estudo foi apresentar um caso de TRALI em pós-operatório imediato de neurocirurgia. RELATO DO CASO: Paciente do sexo masculino, 69 anos, sem comprometimento pulmonar prévio, foi submetido à ressecção cirúrgica de glioblastoma multiforme, apresentando complicações intra-operatórias (broncoespasmo e diminuição da saturação de oxigênio, após ter recebido plasma fresco congelado, sendo diagnosticado TRALI. O paciente foi mantido sedado, sob ventilação mecânica e monitorização hemodinâmica invasiva, com melhora progressiva do quadro, recebendo alta da unidade de terapia intensiva (UTI no 8º dia de pós-operatório. CONCLUSÕES: O TRALI deve ser investigado nos pacientes que recebem hemoderivados e apresentam alterações pulmonares.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI, is defined as noncardiogenic pulmonary edema temporally related to transfusion therapy, evolving with ventilation necessity mechanics in the great majority of the cases. This objective of this study was to present case of TRALI in the immediate postoperative of neurosurgery. CASE REPORT: We describe the case of a patient who presented broncoespasm and decreased oxygen saturation after to have received fresh-frozen plasma in the neurosurgery, who presented TRALI. The patient was submitted a invasive hemodynamic monitoring, sedation and supplemental oxygen with mechanical ventilation, with gradual improvement, leaving the intensive care unit in the eight day of postoperative. CONCLUSIONS: The TRALI must be investigated in the patients who receive transfusion therapy and present lung injury.

  1. ACUTE LUNG INJURY COMPLICATING BLOOD TRANSFUSION IN POST-PARTUM HEMORRHAGE: INCIDENCE AND RISK FACTORS.

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    Luciana Teofili

    2014-10-01

    Conclusions. Patients suffering from PPH represent a high-risk population for TRALI. In particular, patients with gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia   have the highest risk, particularly if they are not receiving anti-hypertensive therapy. A careful monitoring of these patients after transfusions is therefore recommended.

  2. Some cases of transfusion-related acute lung injury in clinical practice

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    B. B. Bakhovadinov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Preparation of this publication was motivated by a desire to present contemporary authors look at one of the most important branches of critical care medicine - transfusion therapy and related complications, such as transfusion-related lung injury (TRALI. The article describes the causes, pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy of TRALI patients in critical condition. In this article attention is paid to the diagnosis of TRALI, associated with transfusion of blood components, modern diagnosis criteria. The authors describe the clinical symptoms, treatment schema and propose prevention protocol of TRALI. In order to determine the incidence of TRALI in medical practice transfusion therapy data in 1900 patients was analyzed. The development of this complication was found in 12 patients, 5 patients had «possible TRALI», which is comparable with the literature data. In 5 patients and 11 donors at a laboratory study anti-leukocyte antibodies were found. The important role of prevention, based on the immune mechanisms of the pathogenesis of TRALI is marked.

  3. Delaying blood transfusion in experimental acute anemia with a perfluorocarbon emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrales, Pedro; Carlos Briceño, Juan

    2011-04-01

    To avoid unnecessary blood transfusions, physiologic transfusion triggers, rather than exclusively hemoglobin-based transfusion triggers, have been suggested. The objective of this study was to determine systemic and microvascular effects of using a perfluorocarbon-based oxygen carrier (PFCOC) to maintain perfusion and oxygenation during extreme anemia. The hamster (weight, 55-65 g) window chamber model was used. Two isovolemic hemodilution steps were performed using hydroxyethyl starch, 10%, at normoxic conditions to a hematocrit of 19% (hemoglobin, 5.5 g/dl), the point at which the transfusion trigger was reached. Two additional hemodilution exchanges using the PFCOC (Oxycyte) and increasing the fraction of inspired oxygen to 1.0 were performed to reduce the hematocrit to 11% (hemoglobin, 3.8 g/dl) and 6% (hemoglobin, 2.0 g/dl), respectively. No control group was used in the study because this concentration of hemodilution is lethal with conventional plasma expanders. Systemic parameters, microvascular perfusion, functional capillary density, and oxygen tensions across the microvascular network were measured. At 6% hematocrit, the PFCOC maintained mean arterial pressure, cardiac output, systemic oxygen delivery, and oxygen consumption. As hematocrit was decreased from 11% to 6%, functional capillary density, calculated microvascular oxygen delivery, and oxygen consumption decreased; and the oxygen extraction ratio was close to 100%. Peripheral tissue oxygenation was not predicted by systemic oxygenation. The PFCOC, in conjunction with hyperoxia, was able to sustain organ function and partially provide systemic oxygenation during extreme anemia during the observation period. The PFCOC can work as a bridge until erythrocytes are available for transfusion or when additional oxygen is required, despite the possible limitations in peripheral tissue oxygenation.

  4. Respiratory transfusion reactions

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    Ivica Marić

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory transfusion-related reactions are not very frequent, partly also because recognition and reporting transfusion reactions is still underemphasized. Tis article describes the most important respiratory transfusion reactions, their pathophysiology, clinical picture and treatment strategies. Respiratory transfusion related reactions can be primary or secondary. The most important primary transfusion-related reactions are TRALI - transfusion-related acute lung injury, TACO – transfusion-associated circulatory overload, and TAD - transfusion-associated dyspnea. TRALI is immuneassociated injury of alveolar basal membrane, which becomes highly permeable and causes noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. Treatment of TRALI is mainly supportive with oxygen, fluids (in case of hypotension and in cases of severe acute respiratory failure also mechanic ventilation. TACO is caused by volume overload in predisposed individuals, such as patients with heart failure, the elderly, infants, patients with anemia and patients with positive fluid balance. Clinical picture is that of a typical pulmonary cardiogenic edema, and the therapy is classical: oxygen and diuretics, and in severe cases also non-invasive or invasive mechanical ventilation. TAD is usually a mild reaction of unknown cause and cannot be classified as TACO or TRALI, nor can it be ascribed to patient’s preexisting diseases. Although the transfusion-related reactions are not very common, knowledge about them can prevent serious consequences. On the one hand preventive measures should be sought, and on the other early recognition is beneficial, so that proper treatment can take place.

  5. Benefit of transfusion-related acute lung injury risk-minimization measures--German haemovigilance data (2006-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, M B; Guenay, S; Lohmann, A; Henseler, O; Heiden, M; Hanschmann, K M O; Keller-Stanislawski, B

    2012-05-01

    Based on the frequency of immune-mediated and non-immune-mediated transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), the effect of risk-minimization measures was evaluated during a period of 5 years (2006-2010). Risk-minimization measures were implemented in 2008/2009, consisting of exclusion of female donors with a history of pregnancy or exclusion of female donors with human leucocyte antigen (HLA)/human neutrophil alloantigen (HNA) antibodies. TRALI was confirmed according to the criteria of the International Haemovigilance Network. Based upon the results of donor testing of white-blood-cell antibodies (WBC-Ab) against HLA or HNAs, confirmed cases were classified as immune- or non-immune-mediated TRALI. Reporting rates were calculated on the basis of the annually transfused blood components, and pre- and post-implementation periods were compared. In total, 60 immune-mediated (75%) and 20 non-immune-mediated (25%) TRALI reactions were confirmed. A total of 68 (64 women and four men) donors were involved: seven red-blood-cell concentrates donors (13%), six platelet concentrate donors (10%), and 48 fresh frozen plasma (FFP) donors (77%). The reporting rate of immune-mediated TRALI caused by FFP decreased continuously; from 12·71 per million units in 2006/2007 to 6·81 per million units in 2008/2009 and no case in 2010. The comparison of the pre- and the post-implementation period demonstrated a significantly reduced risk of TRALI events comparing 2006/2007 with 2010 (P-value: <0·01). Furthermore, no case of TRALI-induced fatality occurred after the implementation of risk-minimization measures. © 2011 The Author(s). Vox Sanguinis © 2011 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  6. Transfusion-related acute lung injury: critical neutrophil activation by anti-HLA-A2 antibodies for endothelial permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoy, Kathy; Nguyen, Minh Vu Chuong; Masson, Dominique; Bardy, Béatrice; Drouet, Christian; Paclet, Marie-Hélène

    2017-07-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a major complication of hemotherapy that may occur after the transfusion of any blood type component. Several clinical reports have suggested the presence of anti-HLA antibodies in the blood product. This study sought to examine the role of anti-HLA-A2 antibodies in polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) activation and thus in endothelial permeability. PMN activation was assessed by both nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NADPH oxidase) activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. A coculture assay of EA.hy926 endothelial cells with PMNs or differentiated-PLB-985 cells, a model of neutrophil-like cells, was performed to estimate the impact of ROS on endothelial permeability. Anti-HLA-A2 antibodies significantly increased PMN activation, with subsequent endothelial dysfunction. Phagocyte NADPH oxidase (NOX2) activity was shown to be involved in this process and ROS themselves were demonstrated to induce VE-cadherin cleavage and endothelial permeability. Our data may support the existence of a critical anti-HLA-A2 antibody threshold for PMN activation, with NOX2 activity and subsequent endothelial permeability in the two-hit model of TRALI. © 2017 AABB.

  7. Comparison of intensive light-emitting diode and intensive compact fluorescent phototherapy in non-hemolytic jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takcı, Sahin; Yiğit, Sule; Bayram, Gülperi; Korkmaz, Ayşe; Yurdakök, Murat

    2013-01-01

    In severe and rapidly increasing jaundice, the use of intensive phototherapy provides greater effectiveness and a faster decrement in bilirubin levels compared to conventional phototherapy. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of two types of intensive phototherapy: intensive compact fluorescent tube (CFT) and intensive light-emitting diode (LED) phototherapy. Forty-three infants over 35 weeks of gestation with severe non-hemolytic hyperbilirubinemia were enrolled in the prospective study. All infants received multidirectional (circular-shaped) intensive phototherapy. Of these, 20 infants received CFT while 23 infants received LED phototherapy. Bilirubin levels and body temperatures were measured periodically, and the rates of bilirubin decrement were calculated. Mean serum bilirubin level of the 43 infants was 20.5±1.5 mg/dl at the beginning of the therapy and mean duration of phototherapy was 20.6±1.1 hours. The rate of mean bilirubin decline was 47.2% and the decrease was more prominent in the first four hours (0.84 ± 0.41 mg/dl/h). The rates of bilirubin decrement were comparable between the LED and CFT groups. Slightly elevated mean body temperature (37.1ºC) was determined in the CFT group (p<0.05). Intensive phototherapy units with both LED and CFT were effective, showing a decline of half the initial value of bilirubin during the study period in infants with non-hemolytic jaundice. This study shows that intensive phototherapy with either CFT or LED can provide rapid decrease in bilirubin levels in the first few hours. This rapid decline is important in cases that have high risk of bilirubin encephalopathy.

  8. Acute Compartment Syndrome of the right lower extremity following Autologous Blood transfusion: A Case report

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    Feridun Sabzi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Compartment syndrome (CS is an extremely rare complication during cardiac surgery and rare case reports have been linked to coronary artery bypass surgery.We report one case of right lower extremity compartment syndrome (CS following inadvertent blood transfusion through a catheter which was inserted into a vein in the related extremity. Forceful pushing of blood through a delicate vein led to rupture of the vein wall and subsequent extravasation of blood into the perivascular tissue as into an intra-compartment portion of the lower extremity.Late detection of this complication led to compartment syndrome. The patient underwent emergency fasciotomy and concomitant removal of intra compartment and subcutaneous blood and fluids. After fasciotomy, the normal color of skin and pulse were recovered.

  9. Blood transfusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000431.htm Blood transfusions To use the sharing features on this page, ... There are many reasons you may need a blood transfusion: After knee or hip replacement surgery, or other ...

  10. Relationship between red blood cell transfusion requirements and severity of renal disease during the acute stage of hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobeñas, Carlos J; Bresso, Paula S; Lombardi, Laura L; Amoreo, Oscar R; Ruscasso, Javier D; Spizzirri, Ana P; Del C Suarez, Ângela; Zalba, Javier H; Rahman, Ricardo C; Risso, Paula

    2015-12-01

    We performed a retrospective evaluation of patients with diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (D + HUS) with the aims of: (1) determining the rate of red blood cell (RBC) transfusions; (2) establishing the relationship between need for RBC transfusion and severity of renal involvement; (3) determining whether precise measurements of lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) levels can predict the rate of hemolysis and severity of renal disease. A total of 288 patients with D + HUS were retrospectively divided into three groups based on dialysis treatment: group 1, no dialysis treatment (144 patients); group 2, dialysis for 1-10 days (67 patients); group 3, dialysis for ≥11 days (77 patients). Of the patients in groups 1, 2 and 3, 73.6, 86.5 and 83.1%, respectively, required at least one RBC transfusion. The number of RBC transfusions in groups 1, 2 and 3 was 163, 107 and 162, respectively. Comparison of the groups revealed that the number of RBC transfusions was significantly higher in patients in groups 2 and 3 than in those in group 1 (p = 0.0001). Most RBC transfusions (94.2%) occurred during the first 2 weeks of the disease. The median peak LDH level was 2091 U/l in 32 patients with no RBC transfusion (group A), 3900 U/l in 73 patients with one transfusion (group B) and 6378 U/l in 62 patients with two or more transfusions (group C). Patients who received two or more RBC transfusions had a significantly higher median peak LDH level than those who did not receive RBC transfusions or received only one transfusion. This difference was also observed between patients who received only one RBC transfusion and those who did not receive any transfusions (p renal disease. The median peak LDH level in patients of group 1, 2 and 3 was 3538 (range 756-9373), 5165 (451-9205) and 7510 (1,145-16,340) U/l, respectively. Patients with >10 days of dialysis (group 3) had the highest LDH levels, followed by patients with 1-10 days of dialysis (group 2) and then by patients with

  11. Acute intravascular hemolysis in two patients transfused with dry-platelet units obtained from the same ABO incompatible donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valbonesi, M; De Luigi, M C; Lercari, G; Florio, G; Bruni, R; Van Lint, M T; Occhini, D

    2000-09-01

    Since 1989 we have been collecting dry-platelets on a routine basis. Dry-platelets are those collected along with 25-30 ml of contaminating plasma cell with separators such as the Amicus, AS 104 and the Excel Pro. Platelets are resuspended in non plasma media for storage and for at least 60 hours their viability and functionality are not impaired. In this article we report on two hemolytic crises determined by two O Rh D + units of single donor platelets (SPD) taken from the same donor in a double-apheresis session. The two split units were administered to two A Rh D + patients suffering from metastatic breast cancer and severe aplastic anemia (SAA) respectively. In both cases the hemolytic reaction was of the intravascular type, with a drop in hemoglobin (Hgb) level from 8.6 to 5.4 and from 8.8 down to 5.3 g/dl respectively. From the patients' RBC only alpha agglutinins were eluted and donor's indirect antiglobulin test (IAT) was negative with extended panel RBCs. In the first case the clinical course after erythroexchange (Erex) was uneventful whereas in the second one, that suffering from SAA, after Erex, acute renal failure and shock did complicate the clinical course and the patient died seven days after the incriminated platelet transfusion.

  12. Transfusion practices in trauma

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    V Trichur Ramakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Resuscitation of a severely traumatised patient with the administration of crystalloids, or colloids along with blood products is a common transfusion practice in trauma patients. The determination of this review article is to update on current transfusion practices in trauma. A search of PubMed, Google Scholar, and bibliographies of published studies were conducted using a combination of key-words. Recent articles addressing the transfusion practises in trauma from 2000 to 2014 were identified and reviewed. Trauma induced consumption and dilution of clotting factors, acidosis and hypothermia in a severely injured patient commonly causes trauma-induced coagulopathy. Early infusion of blood products and early control of bleeding decreases trauma-induced coagulopathy. Hypothermia and dilutional coagulopathy are associated with infusion of large volumes of crystalloids. Hence, the predominant focus is on damage control resuscitation, which is a combination of permissive hypotension, haemorrhage control and haemostatic resuscitation. Massive transfusion protocols improve survival in severely injured patients. Early recognition that the patient will need massive blood transfusion will limit the use of crystalloids. Initially during resuscitation, fresh frozen plasma, packed red blood cells (PRBCs and platelets should be transfused in the ratio of 1:1:1 in severely injured patients. Fresh whole blood can be an alternative in patients who need a transfusion of 1:1:1 thawed plasma, PRBCs and platelets. Close monitoring of bleeding and point of care coagulation tests are employed, to allow goal-directed plasma, PRBCs and platelets transfusions, in order to decrease the risk of transfusion-related acute lung injury.

  13. Association of Prehospital Blood Product Transfusion During Medical Evacuation of Combat Casualties in Afghanistan With Acute and 30-Day Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackelford, Stacy A; Del Junco, Deborah J; Powell-Dunford, Nicole; Mazuchowski, Edward L; Howard, Jeffrey T; Kotwal, Russ S; Gurney, Jennifer; Butler, Frank K; Gross, Kirby; Stockinger, Zsolt T

    2017-10-24

    Prehospital blood product transfusion in trauma care remains controversial due to poor-quality evidence and cost. Sequential expansion of blood transfusion capability after 2012 to deployed military medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) units enabled a concurrent cohort study to focus on the timing as well as the location of the initial transfusion. To examine the association of prehospital transfusion and time to initial transfusion with injury survival. Retrospective cohort study of US military combat casualties in Afghanistan between April 1, 2012, and August 7, 2015. Eligible patients were rescued alive by MEDEVAC from point of injury with either (1) a traumatic limb amputation at or above the knee or elbow or (2) shock defined as a systolic blood pressure of less than 90 mm Hg or a heart rate greater than 120 beats per minute. Initiation of prehospital transfusion and time from MEDEVAC rescue to first transfusion, regardless of location (ie, prior to or during hospitalization). Transfusion recipients were compared with nonrecipients (unexposed) for whom transfusion was delayed or not given. Mortality at 24 hours and 30 days after MEDEVAC rescue were coprimary outcomes. To balance injury severity, nonrecipients of prehospital transfusion were frequency matched to recipients by mechanism of injury, prehospital shock, severity of limb amputation, head injury, and torso hemorrhage. Cox regression was stratified by matched groups and also adjusted for age, injury year, transport team, tourniquet use, and time to MEDEVAC rescue. Of 502 patients (median age, 25 years [interquartile range, 22 to 29 years]; 98% male), 3 of 55 prehospital transfusion recipients (5%) and 85 of 447 nonrecipients (19%) died within 24 hours of MEDEVAC rescue (between-group difference, -14% [95% CI, -21% to -6%]; P = .01). By day 30, 6 recipients (11%) and 102 nonrecipients (23%) died (between-group difference, -12% [95% CI, -21% to -2%]; P = .04). For the 386 patients without missing

  14. Swiss Haemovigilance Data and Implementation of Measures for the Prevention of Transfusion Associated Acute Lung Injury (TRALI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutzi, Markus; Levy, Guy; Taleghani, Behrouz Mansouri

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY: In Switzerland, blood donations are collected exclusively from healthy non-remunerated voluntary blood donors mainly by 13 regional Blood Transfusion Services throughout the country. Thereby, self-sufficient blood supply for a population of about 7.5 million is achieved, and approximately 300,000 units of red cells, 75,000 therapeutic units of fresh plasma, and 20,000 therapeutic units of platelets are transfused annually. Reporting to Swissmedic (the Swiss agency for therapeutic products) of all suspected adverse transfusion events on a standardised form is mandatory. Data are then analysed to estimate the risks of the most serious transfusion events. Together with transfusion of an incorrect blood component and bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates, TRALI is a significant risk of transfusion in Switzerland and occurs in approximately every 8,000-20,000 FFP transfusions according to current haemovigilance data. Among 25 reported cases between 2002 and November 2007, 4 are proven immune TRALI, 2 are highly likely immune TRALI, 10 are possibly immune TRALI, 8 are non-immune TRALI, and 1 is a suspected case which could not be confirmed as TRALI. Based on the hypothesis of an immunological trigger of TRALI, an exclusion of the transfusion of plasma from female donors can be considered as a precautionary measure which might have prevented 4 cases of proven immune TRALI, 2 cases of highly likely immune TRALI, and an unknown number of the 10 cases of possibly immune TRALI. Based on these data and encouraging preliminary reports of the effects of comparable measures in other countries, the decision was made that starting with January 1st 2007 the production of quarantined FFP is restricted to donations from men or from women confirming that they have never been pregnant (to their knowledge) or with negative tests for antibodies against HLA class I and II. The analysis of further vigilance data is needed to elucidate the efficacy of this preventive

  15. Enhancing Transfusion Safety: Nurse’s Role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyriazi Vasiliki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite strict clinical measures, there are distinct steps in transfusion process which require acute attention.The nurse is responsible for insuring that the right unit is administered to the right patient. Knowledge of risks is essential toadminister and monitor transfusions safely.Aim: This study summarizes the available data concerning transfusion adverse events and provides theoretical and technicalaspects for improving transfusion practice.Methodology: A systematic review in PubMed, MedLine and MDConsult database was conducted. The research limitsincluded English texts, referring to transfusion risks and technological means aiming at transfusion safety.Results: Blood transfusion is a medical intervention that saves lives and improves the quality of life. The regulations forensuring the availability and assuring the quality of the blood component cannot avoid transfusion errors, placing patients atrisk. Most frequent errors are attributed to practitioners involved in the clinical transfusion process. Based on reports toSerious Hazards of Transfusion (SHOT the risk of transfusion error is estimated at 1:16,500. Over the last years severalcommittees have recommended guidance for enhancing the safety of blood ordering and administration. Moreover, newtechnology like barcode on patient wristband manages to improve the performance in each step.Conclusion: Safe transfusion process depends on a series of linked processes and nurses should take specific measuresreferring to pre- and post-transfusion stage. Technological innovations could help patients in need of transfusion therapy.

  16. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI): a review of investigations by the National Tissue Typing Laboratory of cases reported in New Zealand since June 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Paul; Dinesh, Dorothy

    2008-06-20

    To review investigations of reported cases of Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI) performed by the National Tissue Typing laboratory since 2004. Donors associated with reported cases of TRALI are recalled for white cell antibody tests. A donor is implicated if found to have neutrophil or HLA antibodies with specificity against one of the recipient's HLA antigens, or a positive white cell crossmatch. A retrospective review of investigations performed by the Tissue Typing Laboratory on TRALI cases from June 2004 to June 2007 was undertaken. Seventeen cases of TRALI had tests performed by the Tissue Typing Laboratory over the 3-year period. A total of 67 donors were tested. Twenty-nine donors had a positive HLA-antibody screen and the majority of these were female (86%, with fresh frozen plasma (FFP) the commonest component type (41%). In 15 (88%) cases, HLA antibodies were found in donor sera and nine of these had specificity against patient HLA antigen or a positive crossmatch. Preliminary data on TRALI investigations concur with overseas studies. Raising awareness of this hazard of transfusion and a consistent approach in investigation of TRALI will allow us to gain further insight into this complication in New Zealand and consequently explore strategies to prevent such adverse transfusion reactions.

  17. Transfusion Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smit Sibinga CT

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cees Th. Smit Sibinga ID Consulting, Zuidhorn, The NetherlandsTransfusion Medicine is a bridging science, spanning the evidence-based practice at the bedside with the social sciences in the community.     Transfusion Medicine starts at the bedside. Surprisingly, only recently that has become rediscovered with the development of ‘patient blood management’ and ‘patient centered’ approaches to allow the growth of an optimal and rational patient care through supportive hemotherapy – safe and effective, affordable and accessible.1    Where transfusion of blood found its origin in the need of a patient, it has drifted away for a long period of time from the bedside and has been dominated for almost a century by laboratory sciences. At least the first ten editions of the famous and well reputed textbook Mollison’s Blood Transfusion in Clinical Medicine contained only a fraction on the actual bedside practice of transfusion medicine and did not focus at all on patient blood management.2    This journal will focus on all aspects of the transfusion chain that immediately relate to the bedside practice and clinical use of blood and its components, and plasma derivatives as integral elements of a human transplant tissue. That includes legal and regulatory aspects, medical, ethical and cultural aspects, pure science and pathophysiology of disease and the impact of transfusion of blood, as well as aspects of the epidemiology of blood transfusion and clinical indications, and cost-effectiveness. Education through timely and continued transfer of up to date knowledge and the application of knowledge in clinical practice to develop and maintain clinical skills and competence, with the extension of current educational approaches through e-learning and accessible ‘apps’ will be given a prominent place.

  18. Impact of acute blood loss anemia and red blood cell transfusion on mortality after percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Peter; Dixon, Simon; Eisenbrey, A Bradley; O'Malley, Barbara; Boura, Judy; O'Neill, William

    2007-10-01

    The clinical impact of increasing levels of blood loss has been shown to increase morbidity and mortality after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The impact of red blood cell (RBC) transfusion for severe bleeding is unknown. We systematically collected baseline and 8-h postprocedure hematocrit (HCT) values on patients undergoing PCI. The incidence of adverse events, including death and recurrent myocardial infarction, was correlated to increasing blood loss. A total of 6,799 patients undergoing PCI (January 2000 to April 2002) had serial HCT levels. Negligible, mild, moderate, and severe blood loss occurred in 43, 25, 25, and 8% of patients, respectively. In-hospital mortality was 0.3, 0.5, 1.4, and 5.7% (p 35 days old had significantly worse 1-year survival rates compared with patients receiving blood <35 days old and patients not transfused (36 vs. 24 vs. 10%, p < 0.0001). In a general PCI population, increasing levels of blood loss are associated with an increased incidence of major adverse cardiac events and in-hospital mortality. RBC transfusion in the setting of severe bleeding is associated with an increased risk of 1-year mortality. Transfusion of aged RBCs may also be detrimental in this setting.

  19. Prediction of escape red blood cell transfusion in expectantly managed women with acute anaemia after postpartum haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prick, B. W.; Schuit, E.; Mignini, L.; Jansen, A. J. G.; van Rhenen, D. J.; Steegers, E. A. P.; Mol, B. W.; Duvekot, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    To determine clinical predictors of escape red blood cell (RBC) transfusion in postpartum anaemic women, initially managed expectantly, and the additional predictive value of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) measures. Secondary analysis of women after postpartum haemorrhage, either randomly

  20. Prediction of escape red blood cell transfusion in expectantly managed women with acute anaemia after postpartum haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prick, B. W.; Schuit, E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341652385; Mignini, L.; Jansen, A. J. G.; van Rhenen, D. J.; Steegers, E. A. P.; Mol, B. W.; Duvekot, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    ObjectiveTo determine clinical predictors of escape red blood cell (RBC) transfusion in postpartum anaemic women, initially managed expectantly, and the additional predictive value of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) measures. DesignSecondary analysis of women after postpartum haemorrhage,

  1. Types of Blood Transfusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Blood Transfusion Blood Transfusion What Is A blood transfusion is a safe, ... store your blood for your use. Alternatives to Blood Transfusions Researchers are trying to find ways to make ...

  2. Blood Transfusions (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Situations Talking to Your Parents - or Other Adults Blood Transfusions KidsHealth > For Teens > Blood Transfusions Print A A ... his or her body. continue What Is a Blood Transfusion? A transfusion is a simple medical procedure that ...

  3. Adverse events related to blood transfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Sahu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The acute blood transfusion reactions are responsible for causing most serious adverse events. Awareness about various clinical features of acute and delayed transfusion reactions with an ability to assess the serious reactions on time can lead to a better prognosis. Evidence-based medicine has changed today′ s scenario of clinical practice to decrease adverse transfusion reactions. New evidence-based algorithms of transfusion and improved haemovigilance lead to avoidance of unnecessary transfusions perioperatively. The recognition of adverse events under anaesthesia is always challenging. The unnecessary blood transfusions can be avoided with better blood conservation techniques during surgery and with anaesthesia techniques that reduce blood loss. Better and newer blood screening methods have decreased the infectious complications to almost negligible levels. With universal leukoreduction of red blood cells (RBCs, selection of potential donors such as use of male donors only plasma and restriction of RBC storage, most of the non-infectious complications can be avoided.

  4. No early effect of storage time of transfused red blood cells on fatigue and plasma cytokines in patients with anaemia from non-acute gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mynster, Tommie; Dziegiel, Morten H; Kofoed, Kristian

    2007-01-01

    Background: Fatigue in anaemia is empirically reduced by blood transfusion. Long storage time of red cells may be associated with immunomodulatory effects, and blood stored for a long time may cause tissue hypoxia upon transfusion. Patients and Methods: 22 patients admitted with haemoglobin ... relieved self-estimated fatigue, independent of blood storage time. Thrombocyte count decreased after transfusion, probably due to dilution by transfused blood. Aged red cells may not, or only sparsely, directly trigger the interleukin cascade....

  5. An acute hemolytic transfusion reaction due to anti-IH in a patient with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, S A; Shirey, R S; King, K E; Ness, P M

    2000-07-01

    A hemolytic transfusion reaction (HTR) due to anti-IH is reported in a patient with sickle cell disease (SCD). An 18-year-old woman with SCD and a complete phenotype on file had been identified as group B-positive with negative antibody-screening tests and had received 1 unit of packed RBCs. Ten days later, she was readmitted in painful crisis with a Hb of 4.2 g per dL. Antibody-screening tests and panel cells were positive at all test phases with a negative autocontrol, which suggested alloantibodies. Phenotypically matched group O RBCs were issued emergently. After the transfusion of 100 mL, the patient had an HTR with chills, fever, and tachycardia and laboratory findings of hemoglobinemia, hemoglobinuria, and negative DATs. A high-titer, IgM anti-IH with a high thermal amplitude (reactive with group O, but not group B RBCs at 37 degrees C) was identified. Autologous RBCs appeared to have normal I antigen expression, but less H antigen than pooled group B RBCs. She was given group B RBCs, uneventfully, by use of a blood warmer. This is a rare case of anti-IH as the cause of a HTR, as a serologic problem that may be seen in SCD, and as an autoantibody that may mimic an alloantibody. Ironically, this HTR resulted from the effort to provide phenotypically matched RBCs, which necessitated the selection of group O RBCs.

  6. PHYSIOLOGIC TRANSFUSION TRIGGERS AND MASSIVE TRANSFUSION

    OpenAIRE

    Tánczos Krisztian; Molnár Zsolt

    2013-01-01

    Blood transfusion is often a life saving intervention, but can also be harmful. Restrictive transfusion protocols have recently been developed with a post transfusion target haemoglobin level of 70-100 g/l. Whether haemoglobin level on its own is enough to guide our transfusion policy is an important issue. This review was aimed to look at other possible, so called physiological indicators of blood transfusion what clinicians can be used in addition to haemoglobin during their everyday practi...

  7. Platelet transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The statement printed below was agreed at a consensus conference on platelet transfusion organised by the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh and held in Edinburgh in November 1997. We publish this statement at the request of the organising committee to bring it to the attention of physicians who do not read the haematological literature. The statement will also appear in the British Journal of Haematology in 1998 with the scientific evidence upon which it is based.

  8. Transfusion medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murawski, K.; Peetoom, F.

    1986-01-01

    These proceedings contain 24 selections, including papers presented at the conference of American Red Cross held in May 1985, on the Subject of transfusion medicine. Some of the titles are: Fluosol/sup R/-DA in Radiation Therapy; Expression of Cloned Human Factor VIII and the Molecular Basis of Gene Defects that Cause Hemophilia; DNA-Probing Assay in the Detection of Hepatitis B Virus Genome in Human Peripheral Blood Cells; and Monoclonal Antibodies: Convergence of Technology and Application.

  9. Epidemiology of massive transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halmin, M A; Chiesa, F; Vasan, S K

    2015-01-01

    .4% among women transfused for obstetrical bleeding. Mortality increased gradually with age and among all patients massively transfused at age 80 years, only 26% were alive [TABLE PRESENTED] after 5 years. The relative mortality, early after transfusion, was high and decreased with time since transfusion...... transfusion due to obstetrical bleeding constituted 2.6%. Median age at massive transfusion was 67 years and two thirds of the patients were male. The median number of blood components transfused per massive transfusion episode was 22. RBCs formed the majority of blood components transfused. However...

  10. Maternal Perception of Decreased Fetal Movement in One Twin: A Clue Leading to the Early Detection of Absent Variability due to Acute Twin-to-Twin Transfusion Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotada Suzuki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Decreased fetal movement (DFM perceived by pregnant women sometimes indicates imminent fetal jeopardy. It is unknown whether this also holds true for twin pregnancy. A 27-year-old primiparous woman with monochorionic diamniotic (MD pregnancy had a slight difference of amniotic fluid volume at 312/7 weeks of gestation. DFM only in one twin at 314/7 weeks of gestation prompted her to receive urgent consultation. Since cardiotocogram indicated absent variability of one twin, we performed Cesarean section. Male infants weighing 2060 g and 1578 g were delivered; hemoglobin was 20.7 versus 10.8 g/dL, respectively; cardiothoracic ratio was 70% versus 44%, respectively, indicating acute twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS. The recipient infant had heart failure, which was still observed at 1 month postpartum. In conclusion, maternal perception of DFM indicated imminent fetal death or jeopardy caused by acute TTTS, suggesting that education regarding DFM for women with twin pregnancy may be clinically important.

  11. Ten years of hemovigilance reports of transfusion-related acute lung injury in the United Kingdom and the impact of preferential use of male donor plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Catherine E; Stainsby, Dorothy; Jones, Hilary; Love, Elizabeth; Massey, Edwin; Win, Nay; Navarrete, Cristina; Lucas, Geoff; Soni, Neil; Morgan, Cliff; Choo, Louise; Cohen, Hannah; Williamson, Lorna M

    2009-03-01

    From 1996 through 2006, 195 cases were reported as transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) to the Serious Hazards of Transfusion scheme and from 1999 onward classified by probability, using clinical features and HLA and/or HNA typing. From late 2003, the National Blood Service provided 80 to 90 percent of fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) and plasma for platelet (PLT) pools from male donors. Forty-nine percent of reports were highly likely/probable TRALI, and 51 percent possible/unlikely. Of 96 investigations, donor antibodies recognizing recipient antigens were found in 73 cases (65%), with HLA Class I in 25 of those (40%), HLA Class II antibodies in 38 (62%), and granulocyte antibodies in 12 (17%). A review in 2003 revealed that the TRALI risk/component was 6.9 times higher for FFP and 8.2 times higher for PLTs than for red blood cells, and that in donors of implicated FFP/PLTs, white blood cell antibodies were found 3.6 times more often than by chance (p male plasma was associated with a reduction in TRALI reports from 36 in 2003 to 23 in each of 2004 and 2005 and 10 in 2006. Highly likely/probable cases reduced from 22 in 2003 to 13, 6, and 3 [corrected] in the 3 subsequent years, with cases implicating FFP or PLTs with positive donor serology [corrected] falling from 16 to 9, 3, and 1 respectively. The risk of highly likely/probable TRALI due to FFP has fallen from 15.5 per million units issued during 1999 through 2004 to 3.2 per million during 2005 through 2006 (p = 0.0079) and from 14.0 per million to 5.8 per million for PLTs.

  12. Blood Transfusion Delay and Outcome in County Hospitals in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Julius; Ayieko, Philip; Ogero, Morris; Gachau, Susan; Makone, Boniface; Nyachiro, Wycliffe; Mbevi, George; Chepkirui, Mercy; Malla, Lucas; Oliwa, Jacquie; Irimu, Grace; English, Mike

    2017-02-08

    Severe anemia is a leading indication for blood transfusion and a major cause of hospital admission and mortality in African children. Failure to initiate blood transfusion rapidly enough contributes to anemia deaths in sub-Saharan Africa. This article examines delays in accessing blood and outcomes in transfused children in Kenyan hospitals. Children admitted with nonsurgical conditions in 10 Kenyan county hospitals participating in the Clinical Information Network who had blood transfusion ordered from September 2013 to March 2016 were studied. The delay in blood transfusion was calculated from the date when blood transfusion was prescribed to date of actual transfusion. Five percent (2,875/53,174) of admissions had blood transfusion ordered. Approximately half (45%, 1,295/2,875) of children who had blood transfusion ordered at admission had a documented hemoglobin transfusions, 82% were administered and documented in clinical records, and three-quarters of these (75%, 1,760/2,352) were given on the same day as ordered but these proportions varied from 71% to 100% across the 10 hospitals. Children who had a transfusion ordered but did not receive the prescribed transfusion had a mortality of 20%, compared with 12% among those transfused. Malaria-associated anemia remains the leading indication for blood transfusion in acute childhood illness admissions. Delays in transfusion are common and associated with poor outcomes. Variance in delay across hospitals may be a useful indicator of health system performance. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  13. Analysis of pediatric adverse reactions to transfusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vossoughi, Sarah; Perez, Gabriela; Whitaker, Barbee I; Fung, Mark K; Stotler, Brie

    2018-01-01

    Children are known to be physiologically and biochemically different from adults. However, there are no multi-institutional studies examining the differences in the frequency, type, and severity of transfusion reactions in pediatric versus adult patients. This study aims to characterize differences between pediatric and adult patients regarding adverse responses to transfusions. This is a retrospective data analysis of nine children's hospitals and 35 adult hospitals from January 2009 through December 2015. Included were pediatric and adult patients who had a reported reaction to transfusion of any blood component. Rates are reported as per 100,000 transfusions for comparison between pediatric and adult patients. Pediatric patients had an overall higher reaction rate compared to adults: 538 versus 252 per 100,000 transfusions, notably higher for red blood cell (577 vs. 278 per 100,000; p reactions, febrile nonhemolytic reactions, and acute hemolytic reactions were observed in pediatric patients. Adults had a higher rate of delayed serologic transfusion reactions, delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions, and transfusion-associated circulatory overload. Pediatric patients had double the rate of transfusion reactions compared to adults. The nationally reported data on reaction rates are consistent with this study's findings in adults but much lower than the observed rates for pediatric patients. Future studies are needed to address the differences in reaction rates, particularly in allergic and febrile reactions, and to further address blood transfusion practices in the pediatric patient population. © 2017 AABB.

  14. Blood Transfusion (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Late for the Flu Vaccine? Eating Disorders Arrhythmias Blood Transfusions KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Transfusions Print A A ... and help put your child at ease. About Blood Transfusions Blood is like the body's transportation system. As ...

  15. Blood Transfusion and Donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people in the United States receive life-saving blood transfusions. During a transfusion, you receive whole blood or ... have liver failure or a severe infection. Most blood transfusions go very smoothly. Some infectious agents, such as ...

  16. Enfermedad injerto vs hospedero postransfusional en un paciente con leucemia linfoblástica aguda Graft vs host disease after transfusion in a patient with acute linfoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TR Nijamin

    Full Text Available La enfermedad injerto vs hospedero (EICH es un proceso inmunológico, desencadenado por linfocitos T de un donante inmunocompetente, que reaccionan contra los tejidos de un receptor inmunocomprometido. Esto origina daño multiorgánico severo en el agente receptor. Las manifestaciones cutáneas son un signo clínico relevante en períodos tempranos. La EICH postranfusional (EICH-PT es una entidad poco frecuente y con alta tasa de mortalidad, que se observa en pacientes luego de transfusiones con hemoderivados no irradiados. Los corticoides son el pilar fundamental del tratamiento, una vez instalado el cuadro. La prevención con leucorreducción e irradiación de los componentes sanguíneos, constituye el sustento primordial para evitar su desarrollo. Presentamos un paciente de 5 años de edad, con un diagnóstico de leucemia linfoblástica aguda de alto riesgo, de múltiples transfusiones de glóbulos rojos sin tratamiento radiante previo, a quien se le realiza el diagnóstico dermatológico e histopatológico de EICH aguda postransfusional.Graft vs host disease (GVHD is a process triggered by immune T cells, that react immunocompetent donor tissue against a recipient immunocompromised. This causes severe multiorgan damage in the receiving agent. Cutaneous manifestations are an important clinical sign in early periods. Postranfusional GVHD (GVHD-PT is a rare entity with high mortality rate, observed in patients after transfusion with blood products not previously irradiated. Corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment after installation of the box, however prevention with leukoreduction and irradiation of blood components remains the mainstay to prevent its development. We present a patient 5 years of age, diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia at high risk with a history of multiple transfusions of red blood cells without prior radiation treatment, who is performed dermatological and histopathological diagnosis posttransfusion acute GVHD.

  17. Mismatched transfusion of 8 AB0-incompatible units of packed red blood cells in a patient with acute intermittent porphyria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkard Rudlof

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on a patient with acute intermittent porphyria, who received 8 AB0 incompatible units of packed red blood cells in an emergency situation. She never showed any signs of severe intravascular haemolysis. The patient died after four weeks because of a multi-organ failure caused from the malpractice of the porphyria. The problems of bedside testing, mixing field reaction, fresh frozen plasma and molecular-genetic determination of bloodgroup were discussed.

  18. Serious Hazards of Transfusion (SHOT) haemovigilance and progress is improving transfusion safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton-Maggs, Paula H B; Cohen, Hannah

    2013-11-01

    The Serious Hazards of Transfusion (SHOT) UK confidential haemovigilance reporting scheme began in 1996. Over the 16 years of reporting, the evidence gathered has prompted changes in transfusion practice from the selection and management of donors to changes in hospital practice, particularly better education and training. However, half or more reports relate to errors in the transfusion process despite the introduction of several measures to improve practice. Transfusion in the UK is very safe: 2·9 million components were issued in 2012, and very few deaths are related to transfusion. The risk of death from transfusion as estimated from SHOT data in 2012 is 1 in 322,580 components issued and for major morbidity, 1 in 21,413 components issued; the risk of transfusion-transmitted infection is much lower. Acute transfusion reactions and transfusion-associated circulatory overload carry the highest risk for morbidity and death. The high rate of participation in SHOT by National Health Service organizations, 99·5%, is encouraging. Despite the very useful information gained about transfusion reactions, the main risks remain human factors. The recommendations on reduction of errors through a 'back to basics' approach from the first annual SHOT report remain absolutely relevant today. © 2013 The Authors. British Journal of Haematology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Transfusion Related Emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Boysen Osborn

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This exercise is appropriate for all emergency medicine learners (residents and medical students and learners from other specialties (internal medicine, family medicine, anesthesia. Introduction: About 85 million red blood cell units are transfused worldwide each year. Transfusion reactions can complicate up to 8% of blood transfusions and can range from benign to life threatening. An emergency physician must be able to discuss the risks and benefits of blood transfusion with patients, as well as manage the associated complications of blood transfusion. Objectives: At the end of this didactic session, the learner will be able to: 1 list the various transfusion reactions and their approximate incidence; 2 understand the pathophysiology behind each transfusion reaction; 3 describe the management for each type of transfusion reaction; and 4 discuss the plan for prevention of future transfusion reactions. Method: This is a classic team based learning exercise (cTBL.

  20. PHYSIOLOGIC TRANSFUSION TRIGGERS AND MASSIVE TRANSFUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tánczos Krisztián

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood transfusion is often a life saving intervention, but can also be harmful. Restrictive transfusion protocols have recently been developed with a post transfusion target haemoglobin level of 70–100 g/l. Whether haemoglobin level on its own is enough to guide our transfusion policy is an important issue. This review was aimed to look at other possible, so called physiological indicators of blood transfusion what clinicians can be used in addition to haemoglobin during their everyday practice. In the second part of the paper the problems of the management of massive bleeding are reviewed. In both cases, a complex approach is requiredtaking into consideration physiological changes in order to individualize treatment and hence avoid harm that can be caused by unnecessary transfusion of blood products.

  1. Epidemiology of Massive Transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halmin, Märit; Chiesa, Flaminia; Vasan, Senthil K

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There is an increasing focus on massive transfusion, but there is a paucity of comprehensive descriptions of the massively transfused patients and their outcomes. The objective of this study is to describe the incidence rate of massive transfusion, patient characteristics, and the mort...

  2. Reappraising the concept of massive transfusion in trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanworth, Simon J; Morris, Timothy P; Gaarder, Christine

    2010-01-01

    transfusion requirements could allow early activation of blood bank protocols. METHODS : Datasets on trauma admissions over a 1 or 2-year period were obtained from the trauma registries of five large trauma research networks. A fractional polynomial was used to model the transfusion-associated probability...... transfusion as a concept in trauma has limited utility, and emphasis should be placed on identifying patients with massive hemorrhage and acute traumatic coagulopathy....

  3. Survival after blood transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Ahlgren, Martin; Rostgaard, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    of transfusion recipients in Denmark and Sweden followed for up to 20 years after their first blood transfusion. Main outcome measure was all-cause mortality. RESULTS: A total of 1,118,261 transfusion recipients were identified, of whom 62.0 percent were aged 65 years or older at the time of their first...... the SMR remained significantly 1.3-fold increased. CONCLUSION: The survival and relative mortality patterns among blood transfusion recipients were characterized with unprecedented detail and precision. Our results are relevant to assessments of the consequences of possible transfusion-transmitted disease...... as well as for cost-benefit estimation of new blood safety interventions....

  4. Post-transfusion red cell alloimmunisation in patients with acute disorders and medical emergencies Aloimunização após transfusão de concentrado de hemácias em pacientes atendidos em um serviço de emergência

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco W. R. Santos

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Alloimmunisation following red cell transfusion is a complication in patients with chronic diseases requiring multiple transfusions. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of alloimmunisation, to identify involved alloantibodies, to establish risk factors and to quantify the alloimmunisation risk in patients with acute disorders who received red cell transfusion at the Instituto Dr. José Frota from January 1999 to January 2001. Of the 5,690 recipients who received 16,547 units of red blood cells, 4,025 were men and 1,665 were women. Recipients with previous alloimmunisation or with time of hospital stay less than one week were excluded (n = 501. Red cell alloantibodies were detected in 120 recipients (2.1%: 60 men (1.49% and 60 women (3.60%. Alloimmunisation was 2.4 fold more frequent in women and 93.33% of the women were pregnant prevously. The average number of units transfused in the alloimmunised recipients was 4.68: 4.97 units in men and 4.40 units in women. In non-alloimmunised recipients the average was 2.87 units and the risk of alloimmunisation was 0.83%: 0.59% in men and 1.44% in women. The most frequent allo-antibodies were: anti-E (18.25% and anti-D (16.06% from a total of 137 allo-antibodies detected. The median time for detection of allo-antibodies was 20.88 days. The risk of alloimmunisation detected was high considering the average number of units transfused. The age of recipients and the longer life expectancy increase the probability of further transfusion requirements in this group. Our findings point out the necessity of modifications in the current medical transfusion support indication, including in patients with acute disorders in order to prevent alloimmunisation.A aloimunização eritrocitária após transfusão de concentrado de hemácias é uma complicação em pacientes com doenças crônicas que necessitam de transfusões de repetição. Esse estudo objetivou determinar a freqüência de aloimuniza

  5. Transfusion of 35-Day Stored RBCs in the Presence of Endotoxemia Does Not Result in Lung Injury in Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Anna L.; van Hezel, Maike E.; Cortjens, Bart; Tuip-de Boer, Anita M.; van Bruggen, Robin; de Korte, Dirk; Jonkers, René E.; Bonta, Peter I.; Zeerleder, Sacha S.; Lutter, Rene; Juffermans, Nicole P.; Vlaar, Alexander P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. Preclinical studies have shown that aged RBCs can induce transfusion-related acute lung injury in the presence of a "first hit" (e.g., sepsis). Clinical studies, however, show conflicting results on this

  6. audit of blood transfusion practices in the paediatric medical ward of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-01-01

    Jan 1, 2013 ... from the medical case notes and nurses records in the paediatric wards of UNTH. The adequacy of the volume of blood transfused was compared with the expected volume calculated using the standard formula (14). Acute transfusion reactions that is, events during transfusion and within 24 hours post.

  7. Transfusion-Associated Immunomodulation:Experimental Facts and Clinical Reality – New Perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    , that blood component transfusion may lead to certain acute side effects with a frequency of 0.5-2% depending on the specific component transfused. In addition, homologous blood component transfusion seems to be associated with increased frequency of bacterial infectious complication after operation...

  8. Preoperative blood transfusions for sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estcourt, Lise J; Fortin, Patricia M; Trivella, Marialena; Hopewell, Sally

    2016-01-01

    ongoing trials identified. These trials were conducted between 1988 and 2011. The majority of people included had haemoglobin (Hb) SS SCD. The majority of surgical procedures were considered low or intermediate risk for developing sickle cell-related complications. Aggressive versus simple red blood cell transfusions One trial (551 participants) compared an aggressive transfusion regimen (decreasing sickle haemoglobin to less than 30%) to a simple transfusion regimen (increasing haemoglobin to 100 g/l). This trial re-randomised participants and therefore quantitative analysis was only possible on two subsets of data: participants undergoing cholecystectomy (230 participants); and participants undergoing tonsillectomy or adenoidectomy surgeries (107 participants). Data were not combined as we do not know if any participant received both surgeries. Overall, the quality of the evidence was very low across different outcomes according to GRADE methodology. This was due to the trial being at high risk of bias primarily due to lack of blinding, indirectness and the outcome estimates being imprecise. Cholecystectomy subgroup results are reported in the abstract. Results for both subgroups were similar. There was no difference in all-cause mortality between people receiving aggressive transfusions and those receiving conservative transfusions. No deaths occurred in either subgroup. There were no differences between the aggressive transfusion group and conservative transfusion group in the number of people developing: an acute chest syndrome, risk ratio 0.84 (95% confidence interval 0.38 to 1.84) (one trial, 230 participants, very low quality evidence);vaso-occlusive crisis, risk ratio 0.30 (95% confidence interval 0.09 to 1.04) (one trial, 230 participants, very low quality evidence);serious infection, risk ratio 1.75 (95% confidence interval 0.59 to 5.18) (one trial, 230 participants, very low quality evidence);any perioperative complications, risk ratio 0.75 (95% confidence

  9. Platelet alloimmunization after transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taaning, E; Simonsen, A C; Hjelms, E

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The frequency of platelet-specific antibodies after one series of blood transfusions has not been reported, and in multiply transfused patients is controversial. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied the frequency of alloimmunization against platelet antigens in 117 patients...... who received a single series of blood transfusions. They received mostly saline-adenine-glucose+mannitol red blood cell components (poor in leukocytes and platelets) in connection with cardiac surgery. Platelet-specific antibodies were detected with the platelet ELISA and the monoclonal...... immunization. CONCLUSION: There was a low incidence of platelet-specific antibodies after one series of blood transfusions in this group of patients. This is similar to the results of some previous studies in multiply transfused patients, but not with those of others who found a higher incidence....

  10. Detection of adverse events of transfusion in a teaching hospital in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu-Ofori, A K; Owusu-Ofori, S P; Bates, I

    2017-06-01

    Monitoring the whole chain of events from the blood donors to recipients, documenting any undesirable or untoward effects and introducing measures to prevent their recurrence if possible are components of haemovigilance systems. Only few sub-Saharan African countries have haemovigilance systems, and there are very little data on adverse events of transfusion. Adverse events monitoring is an integral part of a haemovigilance system. Our study aimed to establish the incidence and types of adverse events of transfusions in Ghana and to identify interventions to improve effectiveness. This prospective observational 1-year study enrolled 372 recipients of 432 transfusions in a Ghanaian teaching hospital. Vital signs were monitored at 15, 30 and 60 min intervals during the transfusion, then 8 h until 24 h post-transfusion. Three investigators independently classified any new signs and symptoms according to Serious Hazards of Transfusion definitions. The adverse events incidence was 21·3% (92/432), predominantly mild acute transfusion reactions (84%). A total of 20 transfusions (4·6%) were stopped before completion, 60% of them for mild febrile reactions, which could have been managed with transfusion in situ. This prospective study indicates a high incidence of adverse events of transfusion in Kumasi, Ghana. The significant numbers of discontinued transfusions suggest that guidelines on how to manage transfusion reactions would help preserve scarce blood stocks. Gradual implementation of a haemovigilance system, starting with monitoring adverse transfusion events, is a pragmatic approach in resource-limited settings. © 2017 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  11. Soluble CD40 ligand accumulates in stored blood components, primes neutrophils through CD40, and is a potential cofactor in the development of transfusion-related acute lung injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Samina Yasmin; Kelher, Marguerite R.; Heal, Joanna M.; Blumberg, Neil; Boshkov, Lynn K.; Phipps, Richard; Gettings, Kelly F.; McLaughlin, Nathan J.; Silliman, Christopher C.

    2006-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a form of posttransfusion acute pulmonary insufficiency that has been linked to the infusion of biologic response modifiers (BRMs), including antileukocyte antibodies and lipids. Soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) is a platelet-derived proinflammatory mediator that accumulates during platelet storage. We hypothesized that human polymorpho-nuclear leukocytes (PMNs) express CD40, CD40 ligation rapidly primes PMNs, and sCD40L induces PMN-mediated cytotoxicity of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs). Levels of sCD40L were measured in blood components and in platelet concentrates (PCs) implicated in TRALI or control PCs that did not elicit a transfusion reaction. All blood components contained higher levels of sCD40L than fresh plasma, with apheresis PCs evidencing the highest concentration of sCD40L followed by PCs from whole blood, whole blood, and packed red blood cells (PRBCs). PCs implicated in TRALI reactions contained significantly higher sCD40L levels than control PCs. PMNs express functional CD40 on the plasma membrane, and recombinant sCD40L (10 ng/mL-1 μg/mL) rapidly (5 minutes) primed the PMN oxidase. Soluble CD40L promoted PMN-mediated cytotoxicity of HMVECs as the second event in a 2-event in vitro model of TRALI. We concluded that sCD40L, which accumulates during blood component storage, has the capacity to activate adherent PMNs, causing endothelial damage and possibly TRALI in predisposed patients. PMID:16772606

  12. Comparing transfusion reaction risks for various plasma products - an analysis of 7 years of ISTARE haemovigilance data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadah, Nicholas H; van der Bom, Johanna G; Wiersum-Osselton, Johanna C; Richardson, Clive; Middelburg, Rutger A; Politis, Constantina; Renaudier, Philippe; Robillard, Pierre; Schipperus, Martin R

    2018-01-09

    Plasma transfusions may result in transfusion reactions. We used the International Surveillance of Transfusion-Associated Reactions and Events (ISTARE) database, containing yearly reported national annual aggregate data on transfusion reactions from participating countries, to investigate risks of plasma transfusion reactions and compare transfusion reaction risks for different plasma types. We calculated risks for plasma transfusion reactions and compared transfusion reaction risks between plasma types using random effects regression on repeated measures. The ISTARE database contains data from 23 countries, reporting units issued and/or transfused and transfusion reactions observed for some portion of 7 years (2006-2012). Interquartile ranges (IQRs) of plasma transfusion reaction risks were: allergic reactions (5·6-72·2 reactions/105 units transfused); febrile non-haemolytic transfusion reactions (0-9·1); transfusion-associated circulatory overload (0-1·9); transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) (0-1·2); and hypotensive reactions (0-0·6). Apheresis plasma was associated with more allergic reactions [odds ratio (OR) = 1·29 (95% confidence interval: 1·19-1·40)] and hypotensive reactions [OR = 2·17 (1·38-3·41)] than whole blood-derived plasma. Pathogen-inactivated plasma was associated with fewer transfusion reactions than untreated plasma. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Serious hazards of transfusion - conference report: celebration of 20 years of UK haemovigilance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton-Maggs, P H B

    2017-12-01

    The Annual SHOT Report for incidents in 2016 was published on July 12 and celebrated of 20 years of UK haemovigilance. Components are very safe, related in part to risk-reduction measures triggered by SHOT reporting. Transfusion-related acute lung injury is now very rare (all plasma components are provided from male donors), and infection transmission is also uncommon - a single transmission of hepatitis E in 2016 and no bacterial transmissions. Human factors (errors) account for 87% of all reports. Deaths and major morbidity most often result from transfusion-associated circulatory overload. Wrong transfusions and deaths from ABO-incompatible transfusion can be reduced by correct bedside checks. It is notable that information technology systems may not be safe. Standardisation is required for flags and alerts. SHOT key recommendations include: assess patients for transfusion-associated circulatory overload prior to transfusion. Be like a pilot - use a bedside checklist when setting up the transfusion. © 2017 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  14. Transfusion-transmitted infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihl, Florian; Castelli, Damiano; Marincola, Francesco; Dodd, Roger Y; Brander, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Although the risk of transfusion-transmitted infections today is lower than ever, the supply of safe blood products remains subject to contamination with known and yet to be identified human pathogens. Only continuous improvement and implementation of donor selection, sensitive screening tests and effective inactivation procedures can ensure the elimination, or at least reduction, of the risk of acquiring transfusion transmitted infections. In addition, ongoing education and up-to-date information regarding infectious agents that are potentially transmitted via blood components is necessary to promote the reporting of adverse events, an important component of transfusion transmitted disease surveillance. Thus, the collaboration of all parties involved in transfusion medicine, including national haemovigilance systems, is crucial for protecting a secure blood product supply from known and emerging blood-borne pathogens. PMID:17553144

  15. Transfusion-transmitted infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dodd Roger Y

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although the risk of transfusion-transmitted infections today is lower than ever, the supply of safe blood products remains subject to contamination with known and yet to be identified human pathogens. Only continuous improvement and implementation of donor selection, sensitive screening tests and effective inactivation procedures can ensure the elimination, or at least reduction, of the risk of acquiring transfusion transmitted infections. In addition, ongoing education and up-to-date information regarding infectious agents that are potentially transmitted via blood components is necessary to promote the reporting of adverse events, an important component of transfusion transmitted disease surveillance. Thus, the collaboration of all parties involved in transfusion medicine, including national haemovigilance systems, is crucial for protecting a secure blood product supply from known and emerging blood-borne pathogens.

  16. Blood transfusion in developing countries: problems, priorities and practicalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wake, D J; Cutting, W A

    1998-01-01

    The acute medical services could not exist without blood transfusions--life-savers in many situations. But transfusions can also be a quick and easy route for the transmission of infectious agents such as HIV, HBV, HCV and malaria. Infection through blood supply is a major issue in all countries but particularly in those with economic constraints which limit safety. This study was carried out in India (March-May 1997) and involved centres in Delhi, Calcutta and Vellore. It examined many aspects of blood transfusion including donor screening, use of professional donors, blood testing and criteria for blood use. The many problems in Indian blood transfusion services are mirrored in other countries. Here we examine the problems, priorities and practicalities of blood transfusion particularly in developing countries.

  17. Ensemble learning approaches to predicting complications of blood transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphree, Dennis; Ngufor, Che; Upadhyaya, Sudhindra; Madde, Nagesh; Clifford, Leanne; Kor, Daryl J; Pathak, Jyotishman

    2015-08-01

    Of the 21 million blood components transfused in the United States during 2011, approximately 1 in 414 resulted in complication [1]. Two complications in particular, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO), are especially concerning. These two alone accounted for 62% of reported transfusion-related fatalities in 2013 [2]. We have previously developed a set of machine learning base models for predicting the likelihood of these adverse reactions, with a goal towards better informing the clinician prior to a transfusion decision. Here we describe recent work incorporating ensemble learning approaches to predicting TACO/TRALI. In particular we describe combining base models via majority voting, stacking of model sets with varying diversity, as well as a resampling/boosting combination algorithm called RUSBoost. We find that while the performance of many models is very good, the ensemble models do not yield significantly better performance in terms of AUC.

  18. Intraoperative transfusion practices in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, J; Filipescu, D; Kozek-Langenecker, S

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transfusion of allogeneic blood influences outcome after surgery. Despite widespread availability of transfusion guidelines, transfusion practices might vary among physicians, departments, hospitals and countries. Our aim was to determine the amount of packed red blood cells (p......RBC) and blood products transfused intraoperatively, and to describe factors determining transfusion throughout Europe. METHODS: We did a prospective observational cohort study enrolling 5803 patients in 126 European centres that received at least one pRBC unit intraoperatively, during a continuous three month...... period in 2013. RESULTS: The overall intraoperative transfusion rate was 1.8%; 59% of transfusions were at least partially initiated as a result of a physiological transfusion trigger- mostly because of hypotension (55.4%) and/or tachycardia (30.7%). Haemoglobin (Hb)- based transfusion trigger alone...

  19. Unchanging attitudes to autologous transfusion in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torella, F; Haynes, S L; Lardi, A; O'Dwyer, S T; McCollum, C N

    2001-02-01

    Our aim was to assess changes in attitudes to autologous transfusion amongst surgeons over a 10-year period in response to scientific evidence, public awareness, published guidelines, management and the increasing cost of blood products. Surgeons across the north-west of England completed questionnaires on knowledge, experience and attitude towards autologous transfusion in 1990, 1994 and 1999. Main outcome measures were changes in knowledge, experience and utilization of autologous transfusion; perceived advantages of autologous transfusion, obstacles to its implementation in surgical practice and preferences for specific techniques (preoperative autologous donation, acute normovolaemic haemodilution, intraoperative and postoperative cell salvage). There has been little change in practice over 10 years. Many more surgeons were keen to employ autologous transfusion than were using it. Autologous transfusion was only used in general, orthopaedic and cardiothoracic surgery. Safety and patient preference were the main arguments for implementation and logistics the main obstacles. Autologous transfusion was used sporadically in surgical practice. Clinical trials are needed to guide clinicians in the choice of transfusion techniques.

  20. A Predictive Model for Massive Transfusion in Combat Casualty Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    addition to acute hemorrhage, hypothermia, acido - sis, and coagulopathy have been demonstrated to perpetu- ate the ongoing cycle of bleeding.17 Recent...massively transfused trauma patient: hypothermia and acidoses revisited. J Trauma. 1997;42:857–862. 18. Brohi K, Singh J, Heron M, Coats T. Acute

  1. POST-TRANSFUSION VIRAL HEPATITIS IN SICKLE CELL ANAEMIA:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty ( 13.2%) had not received blood transfusion and no case of acute viral hepatitis (AVH) was recorded in them. One hundred and thirty one (86.8%) had received an average of 4.2 pints of blood as at the time of study. Sixteen (12.3%) of these developed post-transfusion hepatitis (PTH) out of which 8(50%) were ...

  2. Metabolomics in transfusion medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemkov, Travis; Hansen, Kirk C; Dumont, Larry J; D'Alessandro, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    Biochemical investigations on the regulatory mechanisms of red blood cell (RBC) and platelet (PLT) metabolism have fostered a century of advances in the field of transfusion medicine. Owing to these advances, storage of RBCs and PLT concentrates has become a lifesaving practice in clinical and military settings. There, however, remains room for improvement, especially with regard to the introduction of novel storage and/or rejuvenation solutions, alternative cell processing strategies (e.g., pathogen inactivation technologies), and quality testing (e.g., evaluation of novel containers with alternative plasticizers). Recent advancements in mass spectrometry-based metabolomics and systems biology, the bioinformatics integration of omics data, promise to speed up the design and testing of innovative storage strategies developed to improve the quality, safety, and effectiveness of blood products. Here we review the currently available metabolomics technologies and briefly describe the routine workflow for transfusion medicine-relevant studies. The goal is to provide transfusion medicine experts with adequate tools to navigate through the otherwise overwhelming amount of metabolomics data burgeoning in the field during the past few years. Descriptive metabolomics data have represented the first step omics researchers have taken into the field of transfusion medicine. However, to up the ante, clinical and omics experts will need to merge their expertise to investigate correlative and mechanistic relationships among metabolic variables and transfusion-relevant variables, such as 24-hour in vivo recovery for transfused RBCs. Integration with systems biology models will potentially allow for in silico prediction of metabolic phenotypes, thus streamlining the design and testing of alternative storage strategies and/or solutions. © 2015 AABB.

  3. The German Haemovigilance System--reports of serious adverse transfusion reactions between 1997 and 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller-Stanislawski, B; Lohmann, A; Günay, S; Heiden, M; Funk, M B

    2009-12-01

    Data of the German Haemovigilance System were collected from 1997 to 2007 and assessed on the basis of pre-defined safety standards. Suspected cases of serious adverse reactions following transfusions reported to the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut were evaluated on the basis of national criteria, and the definitions of International Society of Blood Transfusion (ISBT) in compliance with defined causality criteria. The suspected cases were rated as confirmed and unconfirmed transfusion reactions. Assessment of causality took into consideration the clinical course of the adverse reaction and, if necessary, information about donation and manufacturing. Of the 5128 suspected serious adverse reactions, 1603 could be confirmed. Referring to the absolute figures, acute transfusion reactions (e.g. allergic reactions, hypotension and dyspnoea) were recorded most frequently, followed by transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), haemolytic reactions, transfusion-related bacterial infections and virus infections. The majority of the 52 transfusion-related fatalities (14 each) were due to TRALI and acute transfusion reactions (mostly severe allergic reactions). Referred to the blood products administered, immune TRALI cases and TRALI-related fatal courses were most frequently reported after administration of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) (15/10(6) and 3.5/10(6) units, respectively), transfusion-related bacterial infections after administration of platelet concentrates (7/10(6) units), acute haemolytic transfusion reactions after administration of red blood cell concentrates (2.3/10(6)units) and acute transfusion reactions after administration of red blood cell or platelet concentrates (7.8/10(6) and 13/10(6) units, respectively). Despite the high safety standard required for blood products in Germany, there is still room for reducing the frequency of isolated cases of transfusion reactions by targeted action.

  4. Prevalence of HLA antibodies in remotely transfused or alloexposed volunteer blood donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakaiya, Ram M.; Triulzi, Darrell J.; Wright, David J.; Steele, Whitney R.; Kleinman, Steven H.; Busch, Michael P.; Norris, Philip J.; Hillyer, Christopher D.; Gottschall, Jerome L.; Rios, Jorge A.; Carey, Patricia; Glynn, Simone A.

    2010-01-01

    Background HLA antibody testing of previously transfused or pregnant donors may help reduce the risk of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). However, the prevalence of HLA antibodies in transfused donors has not been well characterized. Methods Transfusion and pregnancy history was obtained from consenting donors. HLA Class I & II antibody testing was performed by multi-antigen bead Luminex platform. Cut off values for class I & II antibodies used normalized background ratio of 10.8 and 6.9 respectively. Linear probability models were used to evaluate potential associations between HLA alloimmunization and donor characteristics. Results 7,920 donors (2,086 males and 5,834 females) were tested. HLA antibody prevalence did not significantly differ between 895 transfused (1.7%) and 1138 non-transfused males (1.0%), [odds ratio (OR) 1.75; 95% CI 0.80, 3.82]. Prevalence in 45 transfused nulliparous females (4.4%, 95% CI 0.1%, 11.8%) was not statistically different from the 1.6% prevalence in 1732 non-transfused nulliparous females (odds ratio 2.94, 95% CI 0.68, 12.74). Transfused parous females had higher prevalence than non-transfused counterparts (p=0.004), odds ratio 1.39 (95% CI 1.07, 1.80). In a linear probability model, the estimated additive risk of transfusion-induced alloimmunization was only 0.8% (95% CI -0.2%, 1.8%), (p=0.10). Donor transfusion history showed that 58% of transfusions occurred >10 years previously. Conclusion Transfused volunteer blood donors do not appear to have a significantly higher prevalence of HLA antibodies than their non-transfused counterparts. Thus, in an effort to reduce TRALI risk, ascertaining past history of transfusion and testing these donors for HLA antibodies is not necessary. PMID:20070615

  5. Intraoperative transfusion practices in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meier, J.; Filipescu, D.; Kozek-Langenecker, S.; Llau Pitarch, J.; Mallett, S.; Martus, P.; Matot, I.; Accurso, Giuseppe; Ahrens, Norbert; Akan, Mert; Åkeröy, Kristin; Aksoy, Omur; Alanoğlu, Zekeriyye; Alfredo, Merten; Alkis, Neslihan; Almeida, Valentina; Alousi, Mohammed; Alves, Claudia; Amaral, Joana; Ambrosi, Xavier; Ana, Izquierdo; Anastase, Denisa; Andersson, Mona; Andreou, Antonis; Anthopoulos, Georgios; Apanaviciute, Daiva; Arbelaez, Alejandro; Arcade, Anne-Laure; Arion-Balescu, Carmen; Arun, Oguzhan; Azenha, Marta; Bacalbasa, Nicolae; Baeten, Wannes; Balandin, Alina; Barquero López, Marta; Barsan, Victoria; Bascuas, Begona; Basora, Misericordia; Baumann, Holger; Bayer, Andreas; Bell, Andrea; Belmonte Cuenca, Julio; Bengisun, Zuleyha Kazak; Bento, Carlos; Beran, Maud; Bermudez Lopez, Maria; Bernardino, Ana; Berthelsen, Kasper Gymoese; Bigat, Zekiye; Bilshiene, Diana; Bilska, Marcela; Bisbe Vives, Elvira; Biscioni, Tamara; Björn, Heyse; Blom, Tommi; Bogdan Prodan, Alexandru; Bogdanovic Dvorscak, Matea; Boisson, Matthieu; Bolten, Jens; Bona, Francesco; Borg, Francis; Boros, Cristian; Borys, Michał; Boveroux, Pierre; Boztug Uz, Neval; Brettner, Florian; Brisard, Laurent; Britta, De Waal; Browne, Gail; Budow, Kristin; Buerkle, Hartmut; Buggy, Donal; Cain, Alistair; Calancea, Esenia; Calarasu, Florenta; Calder, Verity; Camci, Ali Emre; Campiglia, Laura; Campos, Beatriz; Camps, Angela; Carlos, Delgado; Carreira, Claudia; Carrilho, Alexandre; Carvalho, Peter; Cassinello, Concepcion; Cattan, Anat; Cenni, Leonardo; Cerny, Vladimir; Ceyda Meço, Başak; Chesov, Ion; Chishti, Ahmed; Chupin, Anne-Marie; Cikova, Andrea; Cindea, Iulia; Cintula, Daniel; Ciobanasu, Roxana; Clements, Deborah; Cobiletchi, Serghei; Coburn, Mark; Coghlan, Liz; Collyer, Thomas; Copotoiu, Sanda Maria; Copotoiu, Ruxandra; Corneci, Dan; Cortegiani, Andrea; Coskunfirat, O. Koray; Costea, Dan; Czuczwar, Mirosław; Davies, Katy; de Baerdemaeker, Luc; de Hert, Stefan; Debernardi, Felicino; Decagny, Sylvie; Deger Coskunfirat, Nesil; Diana, Toma; Diana, Gómez Martinez; Dias, Sandra; Dickinson, Matthew; Dobisova, Anna; Dragan, Anca; Droc, Gabriela; Duarte, Sonia; Dunk, Nigel; Ekelund, Kim; Ekmekçi, Perihan; Elena, Ciobanu; Ellimah, Tracey; Espie, Laura; Everett, Lynn; Ferguson, Andrew; Fernandes, Melissa; Fernández, J. A.; Ferner, Marion; Ferreira, Daniel; Ferrie, Rosemary; Filipescu, Daniela; Flassikova, Zora; Fleischer, Andreas; Font, A.; Galkova, Katarina; Garcia, Irene; Garner, Matt; Gasenkampf, Andrey; Gelmanas, Arunas; Gherghina, Viorel; Gilsanz, Fernando; Giokas, George; Goebel, Ulrich; Gomes, Piedade; Gonçalves Aguiar, José Manuel; Gonzalez Monzon, Veronica; Gottschalk, André; Gouraud, Jean-Pierre; Gramigni, Elena; Grintescu, Ioana; Grynyuk, Andriy; Grytsan, Alexey; Guasch, Emilia; Gustin, Denis; Hans, Grégory; Harazim, Hana; Hervig, Tore; Hidalgo, Francisco; Higham, Charley; Hirschauer, Nicola; Hoeft, Andreas; Innerhofer, Petra; Innerhofer-Pompernigg, Nicole; Jacobs, Stefan; Jakobs, Nicolas; Jamaer, Luc; James, Sarah; Jawad, Monir; Jesus, Joana; Jhanji, Shaman; Jipa Lavina, Nicoleta; Jokinen, Johanna; Jovanovic, Gordana; Jubera, Maria Pilar; Kahn, David; Karjagin, Juri; Kasnik, Darja; Katsanoulas, Konstantinos; Kelle, Hened; Kelleher, Mortimer; Kessler, Florian; Kirigin, Borana; Kiskira, Olga; Kivik, Peeter; Klimi, Pelagia; Klučka, Jozef; Koers, Lena; Kontrimaviciut, Egle; Koopman-van Gemert, A. W. M. M.; Korfiotis, Demetrios; Kosinová, Martina; Koursoumi, Eygenia; Kozek Langenecker, Sibylle; Kranke, Peter; Kresic, Marina; Krobot, Renatas; Kropman, Lucienne; Kulikov, Alexander; Kvolik, Slavica; Kvrgic, Ivana; Kyttari, Aikaterini; Lagarto, Filipa; Lance, Marcus D.; Laufenberg, Rita; Lauwick, Severine; Lecoq, Jean-Pierre; Leech, Leech; Lidzborski, Lionel; Liliana, Henao; Linda, Filipe; Llau Pitarch, Juan Vicente; Lopes, Ana; Lopez, Luis; Lopez Alvarez, Alexo; Lorenzi, Irene; Lorre, Gilbert; Lucian, Horhota; Lupis, Tamara; Lupu, Mary Nicoleta; Macas, Andrius; Macedo, Ana; Maggi, Genaro; Mallett, Susan; Mallor, Thomas; Manoleli, Alexandra; Manolescu, Rely; Manrique, Susana; Maquoi, Isabelle; Marios-Konstantinos, Tasoulis; Markovic Bozic, Jasmina; Markus W, Hollmann; Marques, Margarida; Martinez, Raul; Martinez, Ever; Martínez, Esther; Martinho, Helder; Martins, Diogo; Martires, Emilia; Martus, Peter; Matias, Francisco; Matot, Idit; Mauff, Susanne; Meale, Paula; Meier, Jens; Merz, Hannah; Meybohm, Patrick; Militello, Maria Grazia; Mincu, Natalia; Miranda, Maria Lina; Mirea, Liliana; Moghildea, Victoria; Moise, Alida; Molano Diaz, Pablo; Moltó, Luís; Monedero, Pablo; Moral, Victoria; Moreira, Zélia; Moret, Enrique; Mulders, Freya; Munteanu, Anna Maria; Nadia Diana, Kinast; Nair, Ashok; Neskovic, Vojislava; Ninane, Vincent; Nitu, Denisa; Oberhofer, Dagmar; Odeberg-Wernerman, Suzanne; Oganjan, Juri; Omur, Dilek; Orallo Moran, Marian Angeles; Ozkardesler, Sevda; Pacasová, Rita; Paklar, Nataša; Pandazi, Ageliki; Papaspyros, Fotios; Paraskeuopoulos, Tilemachos; Parente, Suzana; Paunescu, Marilena Alina; Pavičić Šarić, Jadranka; Pereira, Filipa; Pereira, Elizabete; Pereira, Luciane; Perry, Chris; Petri, Attila; Petrovic, Uros; Pica, Silvia; Pinheiro, Filipe; Pinto, José; Pinto, Fernando; Piwowarczyk, Paweł; Platteau, Sofie; Poeira, Rita; Popescu, Ravzan; Popica, Georgian; Poredos, Peter; Prasser, Christopher; Preckel, Benedikt; Prospiech, Audrey; Pujol, Roger; Raimundo, Ana; Raineri, Santi Maurizio; Rakic, Dragana; Ramadan, Mohammed; Ramazanoğlu, Atilla; Rantis, Athanasios; Raquel, Ferrandis; Rätsep, Indrek; Real, Catia; Reikvam, Tore; Reis, Ligia; Rigal, Jean-Christophe; Rohner, Anne; Rokk, Alar; Roman Fernandez, Adriana; Rosenberger, Peter; Rossaint, Rolf; Rozec, Bertrand; Rudolph, Till; Saeed, Yousif; Safonov, Sergej; Saka, Esra; Samama, Charles Marc; Sánchez López, Óscar; Sanchez Perez, David; Sanchez Sanchez, Yvan Enrique; Sandeep, Varma; Sandu, Madalina Nina; Sanlı, Suat; Saraiva, Alexandra; Scarlatescu, Ecaterina; Schiraldi, Renato; Schittek, Gregor; Schnitter, Bettina; Schuster, Michael; Seco, Carlos; Selvi, Onur; Senard, Marc; Serra, Sofia; Serrano, Helena; Shmigelsky, Alexander; Silva, Luisa; Simeson, Karen; Singh, Rita; Sipylaite, Jurate; Skitek, Kornel; Skok, Ira; Smékalová, Olga; Smirnova, Nadezda; Sofia, Machado; Soler Pedrola, Maria; Söndergaard, Sören; Sõrmus, Alar; Sørvoll, Ingvild Hausberg; Soumelidis, Christos; Spindler Yesel, Alenka; Stefan, Mihai; Stevanovic, Ana; Stevikova, Jordana; Stivan, Sabina; Štourač, Petr; Striteska, Jana; Strys, Lydia; Suljevic, Ismet; Tania, Moreno; Tareco, Gloria; Tena, Beatriz; Theodoraki, Kassiani; Tifrea, Marius; Tikuisis, Renatas; Tolós, Raquel; Tomasi, Roland; Tomescu, Dana; Tomkute, Gabija; Tormos, Pilar; Trepenaitis, Darius; Troyan, Galina; Unic-Stojanovic, Dragana; Unterrainer, Axel; Uranjek, Jasna; Valsamidis, Dimitrios; van Dasselaar, Nick; van Limmen, Jurgen; van Noord, Peter; van Poorten, J. F.; Vanderlaenen, Margot; Varela Garcia, Olalla; Velasco, Ana; Veljovic, Milic; Vera Bella, Jorge; Vercauteren, Marcel; Verdouw, Bas; Verenkin, Vladimir; Veselovsky, Tomas; Vieira, Helena; Villar, Tania; Visnja, Ikic; Voje, Minca; von Dossow-Hanfstingl, Vera; Von Langen, Daniel; Vorotyntsev, Sergiy; Vujanovič, Vojislav; Vukovic, Rade; Watt, Philip; Werner, Eva; Wernerman, Jan; Wittmann, Maria; Wright, Margaret; Wunder, Christian; Wyffels, Piet; Yakymenko, Yevgen; Yıldırım, Çiğdem; Yılmaz, Hakan; Zacharowski, Kai; Záhorec, Roman; Zarif, Maged; Zielinska-Skitek, Ewa; Zsisku, Lajos

    2016-01-01

    Background: Transfusion of allogeneic blood influences outcome after surgery. Despite widespread availability of transfusion guidelines, transfusion practices might vary among physicians, departments, hospitals and countries. Our aim was to determine the amount of packed red blood cells (pRBC) and

  6. Comparing transfusion reaction rates for various plasma types: a systematic review and meta-analysis/regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadah, Nicholas H; van Hout, Fabienne M A; Schipperus, Martin R; le Cessie, Saskia; Middelburg, Rutger A; Wiersum-Osselton, Johanna C; van der Bom, Johanna G

    2017-09-01

    We estimated rates for common plasma-associated transfusion reactions and compared reported rates for various plasma types. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of peer-reviewed articles that reported plasma transfusion reaction rates. Random-effects pooled rates were calculated and compared between plasma types. Meta-regression was used to compare various plasma types with regard to their reported plasma transfusion reaction rates. Forty-eight studies reported transfusion reaction rates for fresh-frozen plasma (FFP; mixed-sex and male-only), amotosalen INTERCEPT FFP, methylene blue-treated FFP, and solvent/detergent-treated pooled plasma. Random-effects pooled average rates for FFP were: allergic reactions, 92/10 5 units transfused (95% confidence interval [CI], 46-184/10 5 units transfused); febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTRs), 12/10 5 units transfused (95% CI, 7-22/10 5 units transfused); transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO), 6/10 5 units transfused (95% CI, 1-30/10 5 units transfused); transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), 1.8/10 5 units transfused (95% CI, 1.2-2.7/10 5 units transfused); and anaphylactic reactions, 0.8/10 5 units transfused (95% CI, 0-45.7/10 5 units transfused). Risk differences between plasma types were not significant for allergic reactions, TACO, or anaphylactic reactions. Methylene blue-treated FFP led to fewer FNHTRs than FFP (risk difference = -15.3 FNHTRs/10 5 units transfused; 95% CI, -24.7 to -7.1 reactions/10 5 units transfused); and male-only FFP led to fewer cases of TRALI than mixed-sex FFP (risk difference = -0.74 TRALI/10 5 units transfused; 95% CI, -2.42 to -0.42 injuries/10 5 units transfused). Meta-regression demonstrates that the rate of FNHTRs is lower for methylene blue-treated compared with FFP, and the rate of TRALI is lower for male-only than for mixed-sex FFP; whereas no significant differences are observed between plasma types for allergic reactions, TACO

  7. 14 Prediction of massive blood transfusion in battlefield trauma: development and validation of the military acute severe haemorrhage (MASH) score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclennan, Jackie; Smith, Jason; Mackway-Jones, Kevin

    2017-12-01

    The predominant cause of preventable death from trauma is bleeding. Many patients need resuscitation with massive blood transfusion (MBT). In some theatres of military operation there is limited blood product availability and walking donor panels can be required. This study aimed to produce a tool to predict the need for MBT using information available on patient arrival at the ED for patients sustaining battlefield trauma. A retrospective database analysis was undertaken using the UK Joint Theatre Trauma Registry (JTTR) to provide derivation and validation datasets. Regression analysis of potential predictive factors was performed. MBT was defined either as receiving 6 or more units of red blood cells (RBCs) in 4 hours or 10 units of RBCs in 24 hours. Predictive factors were analysed through multi-logistic regression analysis to build predictive models; sensitivity and specificity of these models was assessed, and the best fit models were analysed in the validation dataset. The derivation dataset was made up of 1298 casualties with a massive blood transfusion rate of 21.2% (n=275). The validation dataset contained 1186; MBT rate 6.7% (n=79). The majority of patients were young, male and with penetrating injury. Univariate regression analyses showing the predictive value of the variables within the MASH score are shown in table 1. A decision rule was produced using a combination of injury pattern, clinical observations and pre-hospital interventions. The test characteristics for three cut off thresholds for the rule are shown in Table 2 alongside the sensitivity analysis. The proposed rule, using a score of 3 or greater, demonstrated a sensitivity of 82.7% and a specificity of 88.8% for prediction of MBT, with an AUROC of 0.93 (95% CI:0.91 to 0.95).emermed;34/12/A869-b/T1F1T1Table 1Univariate regression analysis of variables included in the MASH score in the derivation dataset which predict the requirement for 6 units of pRBCs in 4 hours or 10 units of pRBCs in

  8. Update on massive transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, H P; Shaz, B H

    2013-12-01

    Massive haemorrhage requires massive transfusion (MT) to maintain adequate circulation and haemostasis. For optimal management of massively bleeding patients, regardless of aetiology (trauma, obstetrical, surgical), effective preparation and communication between transfusion and other laboratory services and clinical teams are essential. A well-defined MT protocol is a valuable tool to delineate how blood products are ordered, prepared, and delivered; determine laboratory algorithms to use as transfusion guidelines; and outline duties and facilitate communication between involved personnel. In MT patients, it is crucial to practice damage control resuscitation and to administer blood products early in the resuscitation. Trauma patients are often admitted with early trauma-induced coagulopathy (ETIC), which is associated with mortality; the aetiology of ETIC is likely multifactorial. Current data support that trauma patients treated with higher ratios of plasma and platelet to red blood cell transfusions have improved outcomes, but further clinical investigation is needed. Additionally, tranexamic acid has been shown to decrease the mortality in trauma patients requiring MT. Greater use of cryoprecipitate or fibrinogen concentrate might be beneficial in MT patients from obstetrical causes. The risks and benefits for other therapies (prothrombin complex concentrate, recombinant activated factor VII, or whole blood) are not clearly defined in MT patients. Throughout the resuscitation, the patient should be closely monitored and both metabolic and coagulation abnormalities corrected. Further studies are needed to clarify the optimal ratios of blood products, treatment based on underlying clinical disorder, use of alternative therapies, and integration of laboratory testing results in the management of massively bleeding patients.

  9. Restrictive versus liberal transfusion strategy for red blood cell transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Lars B; Petersen, Marie W; Haase, Nicolai

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the benefit and harm of restrictive versus liberal transfusion strategies to guide red blood cell transfusions. DESIGN: Systematic review with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses of randomised clinical trials. DATA SOURCES: Cochrane central register of controlled...... differences with 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: 31 trials totalling 9813 randomised patients were included. The proportion of patients receiving red blood cells (relative risk 0.54, 95% confidence interval 0.47 to 0.63, 8923 patients, 24 trials) and the number of red blood cell units transfused (mean...... were associated with a reduction in the number of red blood cell units transfused and number of patients being transfused, but mortality, overall morbidity, and myocardial infarction seemed to be unaltered. Restrictive transfusion strategies are safe in most clinical settings. Liberal transfusion...

  10. Lack of effect of unrefrigerated young whole blood transfusion on patient outcomes after massive transfusion in a civilian setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kwok M; Leonard, Anton D

    2011-08-01

    Warm fresh whole blood has been advocated for critical bleeding in the military setting. This study assessed whether unrefrigerated young whole blood transfusion, from donation to transfusion less than 24 hours, could reduce mortality of patients with critical bleeding in a civilian setting. A linked data cohort study was conducted on a total of 353 consecutive patients requiring massive transfusion, defined as 10 units or more of red blood cells or whole blood transfusion within 24 hours, in a quaternary health care center in Australia. Of the 353 patients with massive blood transfusion in the study, 77 received unrefrigerated young whole blood transfusion (mean, 4.0 units; interquartile range, 2-6). The diagnosis, severity of acute illness, age, sex, and ABO blood group were not significantly different between the patients who received unrefrigerated young whole blood and those who did not. Unrefrigerated young whole blood transfusions were associated with a slightly improved coagulation profile (lowest fibrinogen concentrations 1.7g/L vs. 1.4g/L, p=0.006; worst international normalization ratio, 2.4 vs. 2.8, p=0.05) but did not reduce the total utilization of allogeneic blood products and subsequent use of recombinant Factor VIIa (27% vs. 22%, p=0.358). Thirty-day mortality and 8-year survival after hospital discharge (hazard ratio, 1.05; 95% confidence interval, 0.41-2.65; p=0.93) were also not different after the use of unrefrigerated young whole blood transfusion. Unrefrigerated young whole blood transfusion was not associated with a reduced mortality of patients requiring massive transfusion in a civilian setting when other blood products were readily available. © 2010 American Association of Blood Banks.

  11. Adverse effects to transfusion with red donor blood cells are frequent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Nørgaard, Astrid; Burcharth, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Adverse effects to transfusion with red donor blood cells are potentially life-threatening. Due to screening, transmission of infectious diseases has decreased; however, the risk is still present. Various immune reactions are common including simple allergic reactions as well as devastating...... conditions such as transfusion-related acute lung injury and circulatory overload in patients with heart disease. Knowledge of the clinical signs of transfusion-related complications is important for clinicians in order to provide the best possible treatment....

  12. [Adverse effects to transfusion with red donor blood cells are frequent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Nørgaard, Astrid; Burcharth, Jakob; Larsen, Rune; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-03-31

    Adverse effects to transfusion with red donor blood cells are potentially life-threatening. Due to screening, transmission of infectious diseases has decreased; however, the risk is still present. Various immune reactions are common including simple allergic reactions as well as devastating conditions such as transfusion-related acute lung injury and circulatory overload in patients with heart disease. Knowledge of the clinical signs of transfusion-related complications is important for clinicians in order to provide the best possible treatment.

  13. Higher vs. lower haemoglobin threshold for transfusion in septic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rygård, S L; Holst, L B; Wetterslev, J

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Using a restrictive transfusion strategy appears to be safe in sepsis, but there may be subgroups of patients who benefit from transfusion at a higher haemoglobin level. We explored if subgroups of patients with septic shock and anaemia had better outcome when transfused at a higher vs....... a lower haemoglobin threshold. METHODS: In post-hoc analyses of the full trial population of 998 patients from the Transfusion Requirements in Septic Shock (TRISS) trial, we investigated the intervention effect on 90-day mortality in patients with severe comorbidity (chronic lung disease, haematological...... malignancy or metastatic cancer), in patients who had undergone surgery (elective or acute) and in patients with septic shock as defined by the new consensus definition: lactate above 2 mmol/l and the need for vasopressors to maintain a mean arterial pressure above 65 mmHg. RESULTS: The baseline...

  14. Blood management in total hip replacement: an analysis of factors associated with allogenic blood transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Samuel; Tang, Howard; de Steiger, Richard

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to audit the blood transfusion practice throughout the Epworth Healthcare Hospitals for patients undergoing primary total hip replacement (THR). We determined if blood-saving techniques were having an impact on the risk of allogenic blood transfusion and which patients were at risk of receiving allogenic blood transfusion. This study uses a retrospective audit of 787 patients who had undergone primary THR surgery at three Melbourne hospitals: Epworth Richmond, Epworth Eastern and Epworth Freemasons in 2010. Patient demographics, transfusion requirements and blood-conserving techniques were recorded. One hundred and eighty (23%) patients received allogenic blood transfusion and 18 (2.3%) patients received autologous blood transfusion. On multivariate analysis, preoperative anaemia (odds ratio (OR) 4.7, P blood transfusion. Use of spinal anaesthetic was found to be associated with lower risk of transfusion (OR 0.6, P = 0.0180) compared with general anaesthetic alone. Cell saver, acute normovolaemic haemodilution and re-infusion drain tube usage did not have a significant impact on reducing the risk of allogenic blood transfusion. Identification of patients at risk of blood transfusion, correction of preoperative anaemia and a restrictive transfusion policy are important factors to consider in effective perioperative blood management. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  15. Pediatric Patient Blood Management Programs: Not Just Transfusing Little Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Ruchika; Cushing, Melissa M; Tobian, Aaron A R

    2016-10-01

    disease. Perioperative blood management strategies include minimizing blood draws, restricting transfusions, intraoperative cell salvage, acute normovolemic hemodilution, antifibrinolytic agents, and using point-of-care tests to guide transfusion decisions. However, further research is needed for the use of intravenous iron, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, and possible use of whole blood and pathogen inactivation. There are numerous areas where newly formed collaborations could be used to investigate pediatric transfusion, and these studies would provide critical data to support vital pediatric PBM programs to optimize neonatal and pediatric care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cryoprecipitate transfusion: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong H

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Henna Wong, Nicola Curry Oxford Haemophilia and Thrombosis Centre, Churchill Hospital, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK Abstract: Cryoprecipitate is prepared by controlled thawing of frozen plasma and is a rich source of fibrinogen, FVIII, von Willebrand factor, Factor XIII, and fibronectin. It is mainly transfused in Western countries as a concentrated source of fibrinogen replacement for acquired hypofibrinogenemia. During major bleeding, fibrinogen is the first clotting protein to be depleted to critically low levels. Increasing recognition of the importance of maintaining fibrinogen levels in bleeding has led to significant interest in appropriate fibrinogen supplementation. This review presents an overview of the indications, use and evidence for cryoprecipitate transfusion in hemorrhage, how it may promote hemostasis, and recent developments in extended thaw cryoprecipitate. Keywords: cryoprecipitate, fibrinogen, hypofibrinogenemia, major hemorrhage, bleeding

  17. The Mutation Glu151Asp in the B-Component of the Bacillus cereus Non-Hemolytic Enterotoxin (Nhe) Leads to a Diverging Reactivity in Antibody-Based Detection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didier, Andrea; Jeßberger, Nadja; Krey, Victoria; Dietrich, Richard; Scherer, Siegfried; Märtlbauer, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    The ability of Bacillus cereus to cause foodborne toxicoinfections leads to increasing concerns regarding consumer protection. For the diarrhea-associated enterotoxins, the assessment of the non-hemolytic enterotoxin B (NheB) titer determined by a sandwich enzyme immunoassay (EIA) correlates best with in vitro cytotoxicity. In general, the regulation of enterotoxin expression of B. cereus is a coordinately-regulated process influenced by environmental, and probably also by host factors. As long as these factors are not completely understood, the currently-applied diagnostic procedures are based on indirect approaches to assess the potential virulence of an isolate. To date, sandwich EIA results serve as a surrogate marker to categorize isolates as either potentially low or highly toxic. Here, we report on a single amino acid exchange in the NheB sequence leading to an underestimation of the cytotoxic potential in a limited number of strains. During the screening of a large panel of B. cereus isolates, six showed uncommon features with low sandwich EIA titers despite high cytotoxicity. Sequence analysis revealed the point-mutation Glu151Asp in the potential binding region of the capture antibody. Application of this antibody also results in low titers in an indirect EIA format and shows variable detection intensities in Western-immunoblots. A commercially-available assay based on a lateral flow device detects all strains correctly as NheB producers in a qualitative manner. In conclusion, isolates showing low NheB titers should additionally be assayed in an indirect EIA or for their in vitro cytotoxicity to ensure a correct classification as either low or highly toxic. PMID:26569304

  18. The Mutation Glu151Asp in the B-Component of the Bacillus cereus Non-Hemolytic Enterotoxin (Nhe Leads to a Diverging Reactivity in Antibody-Based Detection Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Didier

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability of Bacillus cereus to cause foodborne toxicoinfections leads to increasing concerns regarding consumer protection. For the diarrhea-associated enterotoxins, the assessment of the non-hemolytic enterotoxin B (NheB titer determined by a sandwich enzyme immunoassay (EIA correlates best with in vitro cytotoxicity. In general, the regulation of enterotoxin expression of B. cereus is a coordinately-regulated process influenced by environmental, and probably also by host factors. As long as these factors are not completely understood, the currently-applied diagnostic procedures are based on indirect approaches to assess the potential virulence of an isolate. To date, sandwich EIA results serve as a surrogate marker to categorize isolates as either potentially low or highly toxic. Here, we report on a single amino acid exchange in the NheB sequence leading to an underestimation of the cytotoxic potential in a limited number of strains. During the screening of a large panel of B. cereus isolates, six showed uncommon features with low sandwich EIA titers despite high cytotoxicity. Sequence analysis revealed the point-mutation Glu151Asp in the potential binding region of the capture antibody. Application of this antibody also results in low titers in an indirect EIA format and shows variable detection intensities in Western-immunoblots. A commercially-available assay based on a lateral flow device detects all strains correctly as NheB producers in a qualitative manner. In conclusion, isolates showing low NheB titers should additionally be assayed in an indirect EIA or for their in vitro cytotoxicity to ensure a correct classification as either low or highly toxic.

  19. Transfusion support in liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TVSP Murthy

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid-organ transplantation continues to grow as a treatment modality. Transfusion support remains an integral part of solid-organ transplantation, imparting demands on the transfusion service not only quantitatively in terms of blood product support, but also due to the unique requirements for specialized blood components, the complex serologic problems, and the immunologic effects of transfusion on both the allograft and the recipient.

  20. Transfusion support in liver transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    TVSP Murthy

    2007-01-01

    Solid-organ transplantation continues to grow as a treatment modality. Transfusion support remains an integral part of solid-organ transplantation, imparting demands on the transfusion service not only quantitatively in terms of blood product support, but also due to the unique requirements for specialized blood components, the complex serologic problems, and the immunologic effects of transfusion on both the allograft and the recipient.

  1. Transfusion Management of Trauma Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Shaz, Beth H.; Christopher J. Dente; Harris, Robert S.; MacLeod, Jana B.; Hillyer, Christopher D.

    2009-01-01

    The management of massively transfused trauma patients has improved with a better understanding of trauma-induced coagulopathy, the limitations of crystalloid infusion, and the implementation of massive transfusion protocols (MTPs), which encompass transfusion management and other patient care needs to mitigate the “lethal triad” of acidosis, hypothermia, and coagulopathy. MTPs are currently changing in the United States and worldwide because of recent data showing that earlier and more aggre...

  2. Red blood cell transfusion in preterm neonates: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirico G

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Gaetano ChiricoNeonatology and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Children Hospital, Spedali Civili, Brescia, ItalyAbstract: Preterm neonates, especially very low birth weight infants, remain a category of patients with high transfusion needs; about 90% of those with <1,000 g birth weight may be transfused several times during their hospital stay. However, neonatal red blood cells (RBC transfusion is not without risks. In addition to well-known adverse events, several severe side effects have been observed unique to preterm infants, such as transfusion-related acute gut injury, intraventricular hemorrhage, and increased mortality risk. It is therefore important to reduce the frequency of RBC transfusion in critically ill neonates, by delayed clamping or milking the umbilical cord, using residual cord blood for initial laboratory investigations, reducing phlebotomy losses, determining transfusion guidelines, and ensuring the most appropriate nutrition, with the optimal supplementation of iron, folic acid, and vitamins. Ideally, RBC transfusion should be tailored to the individual requirements of the single infant. However, many controversies still remain, and the decision on whether to transfuse or not is often made on an empirical basis. Recently, a few clinical trials have been performed with the aim to compare the risk/benefit ratio of restrictive versus liberal transfusion criteria. No significant differences in short-term outcomes were observed, suggesting that the restrictive criteria may reduce the need for transfusion and the related side effects. Neurodevelopmental long-term outcome seemed more favorable in the liberal group at first evaluation, especially for boys, and significantly better in the restrictive group at a later clinical investigation. Magnetic resonance imaging scans, performed at an average age of 12 years, showed that intracranial volume was substantially smaller in the liberal group compared with controls. When sex effects

  3. [Transfusion safety and haemovigilance committees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, J-F; Canivet, N; Courbil, R; Raucoules-Aimé, M

    2007-05-01

    Transfusion safety and haemovigilance committees (TSHC) were initially created in the public health care sector. Nowadays, they are also a mandatory committee of private health care institutions. The members of the TSHC, as well as the way the committee is driven and organized, are defined by law. The aim of the committee is focused on the management of transfusion safety and haemovigilance. The TSHC takes part in the improvement of the safety of transfused patients, and monitors the applying of haemovigilance rules. It also handles the training of all staff members involved in the blood transfusion process.

  4. An active haemovigilance programme characterizing the safety profile of 7437 platelet transfusions prepared with amotosalen photochemical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osselaer, J C; Cazenave, J P; Lambermont, M; Garraud, O; Hidajat, M; Barbolla, L; Tardivel, R; Defoin, L; Waller, C; Mendel, I; Raidot, J P; Kandel, G; De Meuter, R; Fabrigli, P; Dehenau, D; Arroyo, J L; Padrón, F; Gouezec, H; Corral, M; Jacquet, M; Sundin, D; Lin, L; Corash, L

    2008-05-01

    An active haemovigilance programme was implemented to survey adverse events (AE) associated with transfusion of platelets photochemically treated with amotosalen and ultraviolet A (PCT-PLT). The results of 5106 transfusions have already been reported. Here we report the results of an additional 7437 PCT-PLT transfusions. The focus of this ongoing haemovigilance programme is to document all AEs associated with PCT-PLT transfusion. Data collected for AEs include: time of event after starting transfusion, clinical descriptions, vital signs, results from radiographs and bacterial cultures, event severity (Grade 0-4) and causal relationship to PCT-PLT transfusion. One thousand four hundred patients (mean 60 years, range 1-96) received PCT-PLT transfusions. The majority of the patients (53.4%) had haematology-oncology diseases and required conventional chemotherapy (44.8%) or stem cell transplantation (8.6%). Sixty-eight PCT-PLT transfusions were associated with AE. Acute transfusion reactions (ATR), classified as an AE possibly related, probably related, or related to PCT-PLT transfusions were infrequent (n = 55, 55/7437 = 0.7%) and most were of Grade 1 severity. Thirty-nine patients (39/1400 = 2.8%) experienced one or more ATRs. The most frequently reported signs/symptoms were chills, fever, urticaria, dyspnoea, nausea and vomiting. Five AEs were considered severe (> or = Grade 2); however, no causal relationship to PCT-PLT transfusion was found. Repeated exposure to PCT-PLT did not increase the likelihood of an ATR. No cases of transfusion-related acute lung injury and no deaths due to PCT-PLT transfusions were reported. Routine transfusion of PCT-PLT is well-tolerated in a wide range of patients. ATRs related to PCT-PLT transfusion were infrequent and most were of mild severity.

  5. transfusion transmissible viral infections among potential blood

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    Key words: Transfusion Transmissible Infections, HIV, Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, Blood Donors,. University College Hospital (UCH), ELISA. INTRODUCTION. The most common diseases transmitted in blood transfusions are viral infections. Transfusion- transmissible infectious agents such as human immunodeficiency virus ...

  6. Blood transfusion and the World Wars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulton, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes the remarkable development in the science and practice of blood transfusion during the 20 years either side of 1900, progressing through the challenges of surgical vascular access, the propensity of shed blood to clot and the more mysterious apparently arbitrary acute reactions (later revealed as due to blood group incompatibility), to describe in more detail, the developments at the Western Front, then giving a précis of the advances in the interwar years through to the mid-twentieth-century 'blood-banking'.

  7. Immunological aspects of blood transfusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, A

    2000-09-01

    Donor selection based on blood group phenotypes, and blood processing such as leukocyte-depletion, gamma-irradiation or washing to remove plasma, are approaches for therapeutic or preventive use to manage the immunological complications of transfusion. Indications for specific components are prescribed in guidelines provided by (inter)national Transfusion Societies. Although the use of guidelines and protocols is in line with modern medicine, these can create a state of tension with the political sense of values to improve the viral safety of blood products and with the commercial exploitation of pooled plasma-products.A century of blood transfusion therapy has facilitated cancer treatment and advanced surgical interventions. The transfusion product has improved progressively, although mostly in response to disasters such as wars and AIDS. Every blood transfusion interacts with the immune system of the recipient. There are, however, very few quantitative figures to estimate the consequences. This review is based on the available literature on the clinical consequences of transfusion induced immunization and modulation. To a large degree the clinical consequences of transfusion induced immune effects are still a mystery.A blood transfusion is a medical intervention, which in many cases remains experimental with respect to the benefit/risk ratio. Ideally, this uncertainty should be communicated to patients and every transfusion included in a study. Such studies preferentially should be randomized because the perceived need for transfusion is associated with clinical conditions with a worse prognosis than those that do not receive transfusion. This difference may mask the interpretation of the transfusion effect. Since the blood supply services in almost all Western countries have been reorganized and nationalized, or at least operate to national quality standards, the measurement of risk: benefit of transfusion, whether political or evidence-based, needs to be

  8. Red blood cell storage time and transfusion: current practice, concerns and future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Roa, María; del Carmen Vicente-Ayuso, María; Bobes, Alejandro M.; Pedraza, Alexandra C.; González-Fernández, Ataúlfo; Martín, María Paz; Sáez, Isabel; Seghatchian, Jerard; Gutiérrez, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) units are the most requested transfusion product worldwide. Indications for transfusion include symptomatic anaemia, acute sickle cell crisis, and acute blood loss of more than 30% of the blood volume, with the aim of restoring tissue oxygen delivery. However, stored RBCs from donors are not a qualitative equal product, and, in many ways, this is a matter of concern in the transfusion practice. Besides donor-to-donor variation, the storage time influences the RBC unit at the qualitative level, as RBCs age in the storage bag and are exposed to the so-called storage lesion. Several studies have shown that the storage lesion leads to post-transfusion enhanced clearance, plasma transferrin saturation, nitric oxide scavenging and/or immunomodulation with potential unwanted transfusion-related clinical outcomes, such as acute lung injury or higher mortality rate. While, to date, several studies have claimed the risk or deleterious effects of “old” vs “young” RBC transfusion regimes, it is still a matter of debate, and consideration should be taken of the clinical context. Transfusion-dependent patients may benefit from transfusion with “young” RBC units, as it assures longer inter-transfusion periods, while transfusion with “old” RBC units is not itself harmful. Unbiased Omics approaches are being applied to the characterisation of RBC through storage, to better understand the (patho)physiological role of microparticles (MPs) that are found naturally, and also on stored RBC units. Perhaps RBC storage time is not an accurate surrogate for RBC quality and there is a need to establish which parameters do indeed reflect optimal efficacy and safety. A better Omics characterisation of components of “young” and “old” RBC units, including MPs, donor and recipient, might lead to the development of new therapies, including the use of engineered RBCs or MPs as cell-based drug delivering tools, or cost-effective personalised transfusion

  9. Restrictive versus liberal transfusion strategy for red blood cell transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Lars B; Petersen, Marie W; Haase, Nicolai

    2015-01-01

    titles and abstracts of trials identified, and relevant trials were evaluated in full text for eligibility. Two reviewers then independently extracted data on methods, interventions, outcomes, and risk of bias from included trials. random effects models were used to estimate risk ratios and mean...... differences with 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: 31 trials totalling 9813 randomised patients were included. The proportion of patients receiving red blood cells (relative risk 0.54, 95% confidence interval 0.47 to 0.63, 8923 patients, 24 trials) and the number of red blood cell units transfused (mean...... were associated with a reduction in the number of red blood cell units transfused and number of patients being transfused, but mortality, overall morbidity, and myocardial infarction seemed to be unaltered. Restrictive transfusion strategies are safe in most clinical settings. Liberal transfusion...

  10. The Effects of Blood Transfusion on Delirium Incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zanden, Vera; Beishuizen, Sara J; Scholtens, Rikie M; de Jonghe, Annemarieke; de Rooij, Sophia E; van Munster, Barbara C

    2016-08-01

    Both anemia and blood transfusion could be precipitating factors for delirium; hence in postoperative patients with anemia at high risk for delirium, it is controversial whether transfusion is the best option. The aim of this study is to investigate the association of anemia and delirium and the role of blood transfusion within the multicomponent prevention strategy of delirium. We conducted a substudy of a multicenter randomized controlled trial. Four hundred fifteen patients aged 65 to 102 years old admitted for hip fracture surgery were enrolled. Delirium was assessed daily using criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition. Data on hemoglobin values and transfusion were collected from the electronic medical records. One hundred fifteen (32.5%) patients experienced delirium during hospitalization, 238 (57.5%) had a hemoglobin level ≤ 6.0 mmol/L (9.7 g/dL) at any time during hospitalization, and 140 (33.7%) received a blood transfusion. Anemia (a hemoglobin level ≤ 6.0 mmol/L [9.7 g/dL]) was associated with delirium (odds ratio, 1.81; 95% confidence interval, 1.15-2.86). Blood transfusion was a protective factor for delirium in patients with the lowest measured hemoglobin level ≤ 6.0 mmol/L (9.7 g/dL) (odds ratio, 0.26; 95% confidence interval, 0.10-0.70). Low hemoglobin level is associated with delirium, and receiving a blood transfusion is associated with a lower delirium incidence. It would be interesting to investigate the effect of blood transfusion as part of the multicomponent treatment of delirium in patients with anemia. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Fatal Clostridium perfringens sepsis from a pooled platelet transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, C P; Hartley, S; Orchard, K; Hughes, G; Brett, M M; Hewitt, P E; Barbara, J A

    1998-03-01

    A male patient with acute myeloid leukaemia received a pooled platelet preparation prepared by Optipress system on the last day of its shelf life. The patient collapsed after two-thirds of the contents had been transfused. Clostridium perfringens was isolated from the platelet bag within 18 h of the acute event. Metronidazole, gentamicin and Clostridium antiserum were then administered in addition to the broad spectrum antibiotics started previously. However, the patient died 4 days after the platelets were transfused. The cause of death was given as cardiovascular shock, entirely compatible with an overwhelming bacteraemic and septic episode. A coroner's verdict of accidental death due to transfusion of a contaminated unit of platelets was recorded. On subsequent investigation Cl. perfringens type A serotype PS68,PS80 (identical to that found in the platelet bag) was cultured from the venepuncture site of the arm of one of the donors who contributed towards the platelet pool. The donor had two young children and frequently changed nappies. Faecal contamination of the venepuncture site was the suspected source for the transmission of Cl. perfringens, an organism commonly found in the soil and intestinal tract of humans. This case dramatically highlights the consequences of transfusing a bacterially contaminated unit. It is vital that such incidents are investigated and reported so that the extent of transfusion-associated bacterial transmission can be monitored and preventative measures taken if possible.

  12. Features of transfusion therapy in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Kucher

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is to identify factors influencing the safety and efficacy of the transfusion therapy with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. From January 1 to December 31, 2015, 329 patients with hematologic diseases and malignancies who had undergone 367 HSCT were included into the study. Transfusion therapy was conducted in 345 HSCT – 94 % of cases. Totally, 9074 cases of transfusion of blood components were recorded: red blood cellcontaining – 2378 (26.2 %, plateletcontaining – 6255 (68.9 %, fresh frozen plasma – 441 (4.9 %. АВ0incompatibility between the donor and recipient was determined in 60.4 % of cases (n=154 in HSCT from allogeneic donor. Acute «graft versus host disease» was observed in 34.9 % of cases (n=89. Hemorrhagic complications were in 46 cases (12.5 %, mainly nasal, gastrointestinal bleeding and hemorrhagic cystitis. Pprevention and treatment of anemic and hemorrhagic complications in HSCT requires longterm and massive transfusion therapy with the availability of АВ0-incompatibility. The use of leukofiltrated, γ - or x-ray irradiated, individually and immunologically compatible blood components can reduce the risk of development of acute and delayed transfusion reactions in HSCT. 

  13. Blood transfusion exposure in Denmark and Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Edgren, Gustaf; Rostgaard, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Although essential for the evaluation of blood transfusion safety, the prevalence of blood transfusion in the general population is not presently known. This study estimated the exposure to blood transfusion in the general Scandinavian population.......Although essential for the evaluation of blood transfusion safety, the prevalence of blood transfusion in the general population is not presently known. This study estimated the exposure to blood transfusion in the general Scandinavian population....

  14. Analysis of leucocyte antibodies, cytokines, lysophospholipids and cell microparticles in blood components implicated in post-transfusion reactions with dyspnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maślanka, K; Uhrynowska, M; Łopacz, P; Wróbel, A; Smoleńska-Sym, G; Guz, K; Lachert, E; Ostas, A; Brojer, E

    2015-01-01

    Post-transfusion reactions with dyspnoea (PTR) are major causes of morbidity and death after blood transfusion. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) are most dangerous, while transfusion-associated dyspnoea (TAD) is a milder respiratory distress. We investigated blood components for immune and non-immune factors implicated in PTR. We analysed 464 blood components (RBCs, PLTs, L-PLTs, FFP) transfused to 271 patients with PTR. Blood components were evaluated for 1/antileucocyte antibodies, 2/cytokines: IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, sCD40L, 3/lysophosphatidylcholines (LysoPCs), 4/microparticles (MPs) shed from plateletes (PMPs), erythrocytes (EMPs) and leucocytes (LMPs). Anti-HLA class I/II antibodies or granulocyte-reactive anti-HLA antibodies were detected in 18.2% of blood components (RBC and FFP) transfused to TRALI and in 0.5% of FFP transfused to TAD cases. Cytokines and LysoPCs concentrations in blood components transfused to PTR patients did not exceed those in blood components transfused to patients with no PTR. Only EMPs percentage in RBCs transfused to patients with TRALI was significantly higher (P Blood Transfusion.

  15. Transfusion medicine on American television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, J K

    2014-02-01

    Television is a beloved American pastime and a frequent American export. As such, American television shapes how the global public views the world. This study examines how the portrayal of blood transfusion and blood donation on American television may influence how domestic and international audiences perceive the field of transfusion medicine. American television programming of the last quarter-century was reviewed to identify programmes featuring topics related to blood banking/transfusion medicine. The included television episodes were identified through various sources. Twenty-seven television episodes airing between 1991 and 2013 were identified as featuring blood bank/transfusion medicine topics. Although some accurate representations of the field were identified, most television programmes portrayed blood banking/transfusion medicine inaccurately. The way in which blood banking/transfusion medicine is portrayed on American television may assist clinicians in understanding their patient's concerns about blood safety and guide blood collection organisations in improving donor recruitment. © 2013 The Author. Transfusion Medicine © 2013 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  16. HAEMOVIGILANCE AND SAFE BLOOD TRANSFUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjeta Potočnik

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Haemovigilance is a system consisting of the detection, collecting and analysis of information regarding unwanted and unexpected effects of blood transfusion that make it possible to take action in order to improve blood trasfusion safety. In a broader sense, it is defined as a set of surveillance procedures covering the whole transfusion chain from the collection of blood to the follow-up of recipients. In some European countries a haemovigilance system based on legislation was introduced during the last ten years, European Haemovigilance Network was organised and some results from the existing surveillance systems were reported. The paper presents haemovigilance activities in Slovenia.Conclusions. In Slovenia, many elements of haemovigilance are already included in the blood transfusion chain, but no unique system of data collection exists. We expect a new legislation on blood transfusion to help us with introducing a data collection system, analysis and activities in order to further improve blood transfusion safety.

  17. Transfusion in critically ill children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, E L; Stensballe, J; Afshari, A

    2013-01-01

    Transfusion of blood products is a cornerstone in managing many critically ill children. Major improvements in blood product safety have not diminished the need for caution in transfusion practice. In this review, we aim to discuss the interplay between benefits and potential adverse effects...... of transfusion in critically ill children by including 65 papers, which were evaluated based on previously agreed selection criteria. Current practice on transfusing critically ill children is mainly founded on the basis of adult studies, common practices with cut-off values, and expert opinions, rather than...... evidence-based medicine. Paediatric patients have explicit physiological challenges and requirements to be addressed. Critically ill children often suffer from anaemia, have substantial iatrogenic blood loss with subsequent transfusions, and are at a higher risk of complications, often due to human errors...

  18. Blood Transfusion Strategies for Hemostatic Resuscitation in Massive Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Caroline

    2016-03-01

    Massive transfusion practices were transformed during the 1970s without solid evidence supporting the use of component therapy. A manual literature search was performed for all references to the lethal triad, acute or early coagulopathy of trauma, fresh whole blood, and component transfusion therapy in massive trauma, and damage control resuscitation. Data from recent wars suggest traditional component therapy causes a nonhemostatic resuscitation worsening the propagation of the lethal triad hastening death. These same studies also indicate the advantage of fresh whole blood over component therapy even when administered in a 1:1:1 replacement ratio. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Low vs. high haemoglobin trigger for transfusion in vascular surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, A; Nielsen, H B; Wetterslev, J

    2017-01-01

    for Vascular Surgery. Restricting RBC transfusion may affect blood O2 transport with a risk for development of tissue ischaemia and postoperative complications. METHODS: In a single-centre, open-label, assessor blinded trial, 58 vascular surgical patients (> 40 years of age) awaiting open surgery...... of the infrarenal aorta or infrainguinal arterial bypass surgery undergo a web-based randomisation to one of two groups: perioperative RBC transfusion triggered by hb ...-infrared spectroscopy determines tissue oxygenation. Serious adverse event rates are: myocardial injury (troponin-I ≥ 45 ng/l or ischaemic electrocardiographic findings at day 30), acute kidney injury, death, stroke and severe transfusion reactions. A follow-up visit takes place 30 days after surgery and a follow...

  20. Transfusion-related adverse reactions: From institutional hemovigilance effort to National Hemovigilance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudev, Rahul; Sawhney, Vijay; Dogra, Mitu; Raina, Tilak Raj

    2016-01-01

    In this study we have evaluated the various adverse reactions related to transfusion occurring in our institution as a pilot institutional effort toward a hemovigilance program. This study will also help in understanding the problems faced by blood banks/Transfusion Medicine departments in implementing an effective hemovigilance program. All the adverse reactions related to transfusion of whole blood and its components in various clinical specialties were studied for a period of 1 year. Any transfusion-related adverse event was worked up in accordance with guidelines laid down by the Directorate General of Health Services (DGHS) and departmental standard operating procedures. During the study period from November 1, 2011 to October 31, 2012, 45812 components were issued [30939 WB/PRBC; 12704 fresh frozen plasma (FFP); 2169 platelets]. Risk estimation per 1000 units of red cells (WB/PRBC) transfused was estimated to be: 0.8 for febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reaction (FNHTR), 0.7 for allergic reaction, 0.19 for acute hemolytic transfusion reaction (AcHTR), 0.002 for anaphylactoid reactions, 0.1 for bacterial sepsis, and 0.06 for hypervolemia and hypocalcemia. 0.09 is the risk for delayed transfusion reaction and 0.03 is the risk for transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). Risk estimate per 1,000 units of platelets transfused was estimated to be 1.38 for FNHTR, 1.18 for allergic reaction, and 1 in case of bacterial sepsis. Risk estimation per 1,000 units of FFP was estimated to be 0.15 for FNHTR and 0.2 for allergic reactions. Factors such as clerical checks at various levels, improvement in blood storage conditions outside blood banks, leukodepletion, better inventory management, careful donor screening, bedside monitoring of transfusion, and documentation of adverse events may decrease transfusion-related adverse events. Better coordination between transfusion specialists and various clinical specialties is the need of the hour and it will help in making

  1. Transfusion-related adverse reactions: From institutional hemovigilance effort to National Hemovigilance program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Vasudev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: In this study we have evaluated the various adverse reactions related to transfusion occurring in our institution as a pilot institutional effort toward a hemovigilance program. This study will also help in understanding the problems faced by blood banks/Transfusion Medicine departments in implementing an effective hemovigilance program. Materials and Methods: All the adverse reactions related to transfusion of whole blood and its components in various clinical specialties were studied for a period of 1 year. Any transfusion-related adverse event was worked up in accordance with guidelines laid down by the Directorate General of Health Services (DGHS and departmental standard operating procedures. Results: During the study period from November 1, 2011 to October 31, 2012, 45812 components were issued [30939 WB/PRBC; 12704 fresh frozen plasma (FFP; 2169 platelets]. Risk estimation per 1000 units of red cells (WB/PRBC transfused was estimated to be: 0.8 for febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reaction (FNHTR, 0.7 for allergic reaction, 0.19 for acute hemolytic transfusion reaction (AcHTR, 0.002 for anaphylactoid reactions, 0.1 for bacterial sepsis, and 0.06 for hypervolemia and hypocalcemia. 0.09 is the risk for delayed transfusion reaction and 0.03 is the risk for transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI. Risk estimate per 1,000 units of platelets transfused was estimated to be 1.38 for FNHTR, 1.18 for allergic reaction, and 1 in case of bacterial sepsis. Risk estimation per 1,000 units of FFP was estimated to be 0.15 for FNHTR and 0.2 for allergic reactions. Conclusions: Factors such as clerical checks at various levels, improvement in blood storage conditions outside blood banks, leukodepletion, better inventory management, careful donor screening, bedside monitoring of transfusion, and documentation of adverse events may decrease transfusion-related adverse events. Better coordination between transfusion specialists and various clinical

  2. Truth about Transfusions (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people with certain types of cancers or bleeding problems. Not Just Any Blood Will Do Hospitals have to be careful when they give a blood transfusion. People have different blood types — and not all ...

  3. HAEMOVIGILANCE AND SAFE BLOOD TRANSFUSION

    OpenAIRE

    Marjeta Potočnik

    2004-01-01

    Background. Haemovigilance is a system consisting of the detection, collecting and analysis of information regarding unwanted and unexpected effects of blood transfusion that make it possible to take action in order to improve blood trasfusion safety. In a broader sense, it is defined as a set of surveillance procedures covering the whole transfusion chain from the collection of blood to the follow-up of recipients. In some European countries a haemovigilance system based on legislation was i...

  4. Building a New Transfusion Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, John R; Hayden, Brenda K; Cruz-Cody, Virginia G; Louzon, Max J; Tuott, Erin E; Sen, Nina E; Gary, Roxann; Ramos, Patrick J; Daniel-Johnson, Jennifer A; Metcalf, Ryan A; Pagano, Monica B

    2017-08-01

    For over 60 years, Harborview Medical Center (HMC) in Seattle has received its blood components and pretransfusion testing from a centralized transfusion service operated by the regional blood supplier. In 2011, a hospital-based transfusion service (HBTS) was activated. After 5 years of operation, we evaluated the effects of the HBTS by reviewing records of hospital blood use, quality system events, blood product delivery times, and costs. Furthermore, the effects of in-house expertise on laboratory medicine resident and medical laboratory scientist student training, as well as regulatory and accrediting agency concerns, were reviewed. Blood use records from 2003 to 2015 demonstrated large reductions in blood component procurement, allocation, transfusion, and wastage with decreases in costs temporally related to the change in service. The turnaround time for thawed plasma for trauma patients decreased from 90 to 3 minutes. Transfusion medicine education metrics for residents and laboratory technology students improved significantly. HMC researchers brought in $2 million in transfusion research funding. HMC successfully transitioned to an HBTS, providing world-class primary transfusion support to a level 1 trauma center. Near-term benefits in patient care, education, and research resulted. Blood support became faster, safer, and cheaper.

  5. Massive transfusion in traumatic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmer, Jonathan; Wilcox, Susan R; Raja, Ali S

    2013-04-01

    Hemorrhage after trauma is a common cause of death in the United States and globally. The primary goals when managing traumatic shock are the restoration of oxygen delivery to end organs, maintenance of circulatory volume, and prevention of ongoing bleeding through source control and correction of coagulopathy. Achieving these goals may require massive transfusion of blood products. Although use of blood products may be lifesaving, dose-related adverse effects are well described. Complications of massive transfusion include interdependent derangements such as coagulopathy, hypothermia, acidosis, and electrolyte abnormalities, as well as infectious and immunomodulatory phenomena. This article explores the pathogenesis, implications, prevention, and treatment of these complications through the use of massive transfusion protocols. Particular attention is given to the optimal ratio of blood products transfused in large volume resuscitation and prevention of secondary coagulopathy. Observational data indicate that the development and use of a massive transfusion protocol may reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with large-volume resuscitation of patients with hemorrhagic shock. Such protocols should include a pre-defined ratio of packed red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma, and platelets transfused; most commonly, the ratio used is 1:1:1. Additionally, such protocols should monitor for and correct hypothermia, hypofibrinogenemia, and electrolyte disturbances such as hypocalcemia and hyperkalemia. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Transfusion management of trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaz, Beth H; Dente, Christopher J; Harris, Robert S; MacLeod, Jana B; Hillyer, Christopher D

    2009-06-01

    The management of massively transfused trauma patients has improved with a better understanding of trauma-induced coagulopathy, the limitations of crystalloid infusion, and the implementation of massive transfusion protocols (MTPs), which encompass transfusion management and other patient care needs to mitigate the "lethal triad" of acidosis, hypothermia, and coagulopathy. MTPs are currently changing in the United States and worldwide because of recent data showing that earlier and more aggressive transfusion intervention and resuscitation with blood components that approximate whole blood significantly decrease mortality. In this context, MTPs are a key element of "damage control resuscitation," which is defined as the systematic approach to major trauma that addresses the lethal triad mentioned above. MTPs using adequate volumes of plasma, and thus coagulation factors, improve patient outcome. The ideal amounts of plasma, platelet, cryoprecipitate and other coagulation factors given in MTPs in relationship to the red blood cell transfusion volume are not known precisely, but until prospective, randomized, clinical trials are performed and more clinical data are obtained, current data support a target ratio of plasma:red blood cell:platelet transfusions of 1:1:1. Future prospective clinical trials will allow continued improvement in MTPs and thus in the overall management of patients with trauma.

  7. Transmission of GB Virus Type C via Transfusion in a Cohort of HIV-Infected Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, M.; Rutherford, G.; Busch, M.; Assmann, S.; Stapleton, J. T.; Custer, B.

    2012-01-01

    Background. GB virus C (GBV-C) infection is transmitted by blood exposure and associated with lower human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) load and slower HIV disease progression. Few studies describe predictors of acute GBV-C infection following transfusion in HIV-infected patients. Methods. We used a limited-access database from the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute’s Viral Activation Transfusion Study, a randomized controlled trial of leukoreduced versus nonleukoreduced transfusions received by HIV-infected, transfusion-naive patients. Blood samples from 489 subjects were tested for GBV-C markers in pretransfusion and posttransfusion samples. We estimated the risk of acquiring GBV-C RNA and predictors of GBV-C acquisition, using pooled logistic regression. Results. GBV-C RNA was detected ≤120 days following the first transfusion in 22 (7.5%) of 294 subjects who were GBV-C negative before transfusion. The risk of GBV-C RNA acquisition increased with each unit transfused (odds ratio, 1.09; 95% confidence interval, 1.06–1.11). Lower baseline HIV load and use of antiretroviral therapy were associated with subsequent GBV-C RNA acquisition, after control for units of blood transfused. Leukoreduced status of transfused units was not associated with GBV-C transmission. Conclusions. Blood transfusion is associated with a significant risk of GBV-C acquisition among HIV-infected patients. Transmission of GBV-C by blood transfusion was inversely related to HIV load. PMID:22438325

  8. Transfusion policy after severe postpartum haemorrhage: a randomised non-inferiority trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prick, B. W.; Jansen, A. J. G.; Steegers, E. A. P.; Hop, W. C. J.; Essink-Bot, M. L.; Uyl-de Groot, C. A.; Akerboom, B. M. C.; van Alphen, M.; Bloemenkamp, K. W. M.; Boers, K. E.; Bremer, H. A.; Kwee, A.; van Loon, A. J.; Metz, G. C. H.; Papatsonis, D. N. M.; van der Post, J. A. M.; Porath, M. M.; Rijnders, R. J. P.; Roumen, F. J. M. E.; Scheepers, H. C. J.; Schippers, D. H.; Schuitemaker, N. W. E.; Stigter, R. H.; Woiski, M. D.; Mol, B. W. J.; van Rhenen, D. J.; Duvekot, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    To assess the effect of red blood cell (RBC) transfusion on quality of life in acutely anaemic women after postpartum haemorrhage. Randomised non-inferiority trial. Thirty-seven Dutch university and general hospitals. Women with acute anaemia (haemoglobin 4.8-7.9 g/dl [3.0-4.9 mmol/l] 12-24 hours

  9. Neonatal thrombocytopenia and platelets transfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neonates often develop thrombocytopenia at some time during hospital stay. Platelet transfusion are frequently given to them and are likely to result in unnecessary transfusion. Material and Methods: Thus, we analyzed thrombocytopenia in neonates, its prevalence, and relationship if any, between clinical condition and platelet transfusion in neonates, which would have been helpful in developing guidelines and/or protocols for platelet transfusion (and reducing the donor exposure in neonates. Results: A total of 870 neonates who were admitted in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU with various morbidities had platelets count done; of these, 146 (16.7% neonate revealed thrombocytopenia. Discussion: Low birth weight babies (P 0.009 and babies born with mother having hypertension (P 0.04 showed significant thrombocytopenia. Neonates with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR diagnosed during antenatal screening showed lower platelet count (P 0.022. Neonates having associated illness, such as sepsis, gastrointestinal, and respiratory problems, and on vasopressor drugs were found to be associated with low platelet count. Conclusion: In our study, 16.40% of thrombocytopenic neonates required platelet transfusion either alone or with other blood component during their stay in NICU.

  10. Transfusion-related adverse reactions in pediatric and surgical patients at a tertiary care teaching hospital in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghataliya, Kunal J; Kapadia, Jigar D; Desai, Mira K; Mehariya, K M; Rathod, G H; Bhatnagar, Nidhi; Gajjar, M D

    2017-01-01

    Use of blood and its components is lifesaving. However, their use is often associated with adverse events. To analyze the pattern of adverse reactions associated with transfusion of blood and its components in pediatric and surgical patients at a tertiary care teaching hospital. Patients receiving transfusion of blood or its components in a randomly selected unit each from Departments of Pediatrics, including thalassemia OPD and surgery, were monitored intensively for a period of 6 months. Clinical course, management, outcome, causality, severity, seriousness, and preventability of observed transfusion reactions (TRs) were analyzed. A total of 411 pediatric and 433 surgical patients received 594 and 745 transfusions respectively during the study period. Of these, TRs were observed in 69 (11.6%) children and 63 (8.4%) surgical patients. Majority of reactions in children (48, 69.5%) and surgical patients (51, 80.9%) were acute, developing within 24 h of transfusion. TRs were observed with packed cells (13.2%), cryoprecipitate (10%), platelet concentrate (14.3%) and fresh frozen plasma (1.3%) in pediatric patients and with packed cells (7.2%), whole blood (25%) and platelet concentrate (62.5%) in surgical patients. Most common TRs included febrile nonhemolytic TRs (FNHTRs) and allergic reactions. Reactions were more frequent in patients with a previous history of transfusion or those receiving more than one transfusion and in children, when transfusion was initiated after 30 min of issue of blood component. Majority of reactions were managed with symptomatic treatment, were nonserious, moderately severe, probably preventable and probably associated with the suspect blood component in both populations. Transfusion reactions in children and surgical patients are commonly observed with cellular blood components. Majority of reactions are acute and nonserious. FNHTRs and allergic reactions are the most common transfusion reactions. Risk of transfusion reactions is more in

  11. [Transfusion safety: state of the arts (ART)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Romdhane, Neila; Baccouche, Hela; Mahjoub, Sonia; Khayati, Adel

    2012-05-01

    Blood transfusion is a high risk activity. To evaluate transfusion safety in planned cardiac surgery. This study was conducted in the blood bank of the Rabta Hospital in two phases: a phase to observe transfusion acts followed by corrective actions and a phase to evaluate the impacts of these corrections on the transfusion practices. Characteristics of the potentially transfused patients, the eventually prescribed, dispensed and transfused blood products and transfusion practices were studied. During the observation phase, 70 patients were enrolled, 51 potentially transfused. Weaknesses concerned the mention of phenotype and transfusion history when ordering blood components as well as the double ABO/D group typing, the phenotype and the cross match performing. Final bedside controls were done in a wrong way. The distribution and the blood administration were established respectively for 208 and 232 blood products. The traceability was established for 86 blood products. During the evaluation phase, 30 patients were enrolled, 15 potentially transfused. Improvement was achieved in the transfusion history notification, phenotype and antibodies screen performing and cross matching. Optimisation of blood transfusion can be conceived only with collaboration between the different transfusion structures.

  12. Transfusion medicine in American undergraduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Julie K; Weston, Christine M; King, Karen E

    2011-11-01

    Blood transfusion is the most common procedure performed in American hospitals, and transfusions are commonly ordered by physicians without formal training in transfusion medicine. Several transfusion medicine curricula have been proposed, including those developed through the Transfusion Medicine Academic Awards (TMAA). To our knowledge, no comprehensive study has assessed how transfusion medicine is incorporated into undergraduate medical education. We conducted an online survey to determine the manner in which transfusion medicine is incorporated into American undergraduate medical education. The survey was e-mailed to administrators of medical education at all of the 129 American medical schools accredited by the Association of American Medical Colleges. Eighty-six (67%) of the 129 identified medical school administrators responded. Seventy-one (83%) of the 86 administrators reported that their undergraduate medical education curriculum provides didactic lectures in transfusion medicine, with 48% of medical schools providing 1 or 2 hours of lecture-based instruction. A minority reported small group sessions devoted to transfusion medicine topics. While a slim majority reported the availability of transfusion medicine electives, only one of 84 administrators reported that such a rotation is required. Seventy-six of 83 (92%) administrators were unfamiliar with either the 1989 or the 1995 TMAA transfusion medicine curricula. Transfusion medicine content in American undergraduate medical education is variable and the influence of the TMAA program on contemporary medical school curricula is questionable. Future efforts in this area should focus on standardizing and improving undergraduate medical education in transfusion medicine. © 2011 American Association of Blood Banks.

  13. What Are the Risks of a Blood Transfusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Blood Transfusion Blood Transfusion What Is A blood transfusion is a safe, ... store your blood for your use. Alternatives to Blood Transfusions Researchers are trying to find ways to make ...

  14. Blood transfusion practices in sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TVSP Murthy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a clinical syndrome characterised by systemic inflammation due to infection. There is a spectrum with severity ranging from sepsis to severe sepsis and septic shock. Even with optimal treatment, mortality due to severe sepsis or septic shock is significant and poses a challenge to management. Antibiotics, source control, resuscitation with fluids, vasopressor and inotropic agents are the main-stay of treatment for septic shock. These may be supplemented with transfusion of red blood cells and or blood products, in the case of anaemia to sustain sufficient oxygen delivery [1] or to manage associated haematological issues. Transfusion in sepsis has always been a debatable issue, especially in relation to choice of the fluid and the role of blood or blood product transfusion.

  15. A prospective, active haemovigilance study with combined cohort analysis of 19 175 transfusions of platelet components prepared with amotosalen–UVA photochemical treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, F; Osselaer, J; Pierelli, L; Lozano, M; Cid, J; Tardivel, R; Garraud, O; Hervig, T; Domanovic, D; Cukjati, M; Gudmundson, S; Hjalmarsdottir, I B; Castrillo, A; Gonzalez, R; Brihante, D; Santos, M; Schlenke, P; Elliott, A; Lin, J-S; Tappe, D; Stassinopoulos, A; Green, J; Corash, L

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives A photochemical treatment process (PCT) utilizing amotosalen and UVA light (INTERCEPT™ Blood System) has been developed for inactivation of viruses, bacteria, parasites and leucocytes that can contaminate blood components intended for transfusion. The objective of this study was to further characterize the safety profile of INTERCEPT-treated platelet components (PCT-PLT) administered across a broad patient population. Materials and Methods This open-label, observational haemovigilance programme of PCT-PLT transfusions was conducted in 21 centres in 11 countries. All transfusions were monitored for adverse events within 24 h post-transfusion and for serious adverse events (SAEs) up to 7 days post-transfusion. All adverse events were assessed for severity (Grade 0–4), and causal relationship to PCT-PLT transfusion. Results Over the course of 7 years in the study centres, 4067 patients received 19 175 PCT-PLT transfusions. Adverse events were infrequent, and most were of Grade 1 severity. On a per-transfusion basis, 123 (0·6%) were classified an acute transfusion reaction (ATR) defined as an adverse event related to the transfusion. Among these ATRs, the most common were chills (77, 0·4%) and urticaria (41, 0·2%). Fourteen SAEs were reported, of which 2 were attributed to platelet transfusion (haemovigilance safety programme to monitor PCT-PLT transfusions demonstrated a low rate of ATRs, and a safety profile consistent with that previously reported for conventional platelet components. PMID:25981525

  16. Benchmarking: applications to transfusion medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apelseth, Torunn Oveland; Molnar, Laura; Arnold, Emmy; Heddle, Nancy M

    2012-10-01

    Benchmarking is as a structured continuous collaborative process in which comparisons for selected indicators are used to identify factors that, when implemented, will improve transfusion practices. This study aimed to identify transfusion medicine studies reporting on benchmarking, summarize the benchmarking approaches used, and identify important considerations to move the concept of benchmarking forward in the field of transfusion medicine. A systematic review of published literature was performed to identify transfusion medicine-related studies that compared at least 2 separate institutions or regions with the intention of benchmarking focusing on 4 areas: blood utilization, safety, operational aspects, and blood donation. Forty-five studies were included: blood utilization (n = 35), safety (n = 5), operational aspects of transfusion medicine (n = 5), and blood donation (n = 0). Based on predefined criteria, 7 publications were classified as benchmarking, 2 as trending, and 36 as single-event studies. Three models of benchmarking are described: (1) a regional benchmarking program that collects and links relevant data from existing electronic sources, (2) a sentinel site model where data from a limited number of sites are collected, and (3) an institutional-initiated model where a site identifies indicators of interest and approaches other institutions. Benchmarking approaches are needed in the field of transfusion medicine. Major challenges include defining best practices and developing cost-effective methods of data collection. For those interested in initiating a benchmarking program, the sentinel site model may be most effective and sustainable as a starting point, although the regional model would be the ideal goal. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Blood transfusion practice: facts and fallacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, M

    1976-01-24

    Practical problems and potential dangers associated with blood transfusion have led to the introduction of modifications in transfusion practice and the search for blood substitutes. Many of these changes, promoted by the pharmaceutical industry, have been of questionable value.

  18. Incidence and pattern of 12 years of reported transfusion adverse events in Zimbabwe: a retrospective analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafirakureva, Nyashadzaishe; Khoza, Star; Mvere, David A.; Chitiyo, McLeod E.; Postma, Maarten J.; van Hulst, Marinus

    2014-01-01

    Background Haemovigilance hinges on a systematically structured reporting system, which unfortunately does not always exist in resource-limited settings. We determined the incidence and pattern of transfusion-related adverse events reported to the National Blood Service Zimbabwe. Materials and methods A retrospective review of the transfusion-event records of the National Blood Service Zimbabwe was conducted covering the period from 1 January 1999 to 31 December 2011. All transfusion-related event reports received during the period were analysed. Results A total of 308 transfusion adverse events (0.046%) were reported for 670,625 blood components distributed. The majority (61.6%) of the patients who experienced an adverse event were female. The median age was 36 years (range, 1–89 years). The majority (68.8%) of the adverse events were acute transfusion reactions consisting of febrile non-haemolytic transfusion reactions (58.5%), minor allergies (31.6%), haemolytic reactions (5.2%), severe allergic reactions (2.4%), anaphylaxis (1.4%) and hypotension (0.9%). Two-thirds (66.6%) of the adverse events occurred following administration of whole blood, although only 10.6% of the blood was distributed as whole blood. Packed cells, which accounted for 75% of blood components distributed, were associated with 20.1% of the events. Discussion The incidence of suspected transfusion adverse events was generally lower than the incidences reported globally in countries with well-established haemovigilance systems. The administration of whole blood was disproportionately associated with transfusion adverse events. The pattern of the transfusion adverse events reported here highlights the probable differences in practice between different settings. Under-reporting of transfusion events is rife in passive reporting systems. PMID:24887217

  19. Best practices for transfusion for patients with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted Wun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The beta-globin gene mutation in sickle cell anemia results in anemia and repeated bouts of vascular occlusion. The cumulative effect of these vasocclusive events is progressive damage to many organs including the kidneys, lungs, and brain. The transfusion of red blood cells (RBC can ameliorate many of these complications, but can be associated with both acute and chronic complications, including iron overload. The objective of the Best Practices in Transfusion Medicine for Patients with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD Conference was to review the available published evidence and clinical experience surrounding the use of RBC transfusions for sickle cell disease by a panel of experts. The expert panel developed explicit clinical guidelines for the use of RBC in SCD patients. The panel also made recommendations for further research.  A set of guidelines were produced for dissemination to pertinent stakeholders. If implemented, these clinical pathways have the potential to optimize the use of red blood cell transfusions in SCD.

  20. Proposed Formulae for Determining Blood Transfusion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Blood replacement remains a crucial component of the treatment of severe anaemia irrespective of the cause. The transfusion of an adequate amount of blood is important to prevent under- or over-transfusion. Existing formulae used for the calculation of blood transfusion requirements, while being useful, still ...

  1. Analysis of complications after blood components' transfusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timler, Dariusz; Klepaczka, Jadwiga; Kasielska-Trojan, Anna; Bogusiak, Katarzyna

    2015-04-01

    Complications after blood components still constitute an important clinical problem and serve as limitation of liberal-transfusion strategy. The aim of the study was to present the 5-year incidence of early blood transfusions complications and to assess their relation to the type of the transfused blood components. 58,505 transfusions of blood components performed in the years 2006-2010 were retrospectively analyzed. Data concerning the amount of the transfused blood components and the numbers of adverse transfusion reactions reported to the Regional Blood Donation and Treatment Center (RBDTC) was collected. 95 adverse transfusion reactions were reportedto RBDTC 0.16% of alldonations (95/58 505) - 58 after PRBC transfusions, 28 after platelet concentrate transfusions and 9 after FFP transfusion. Febrile nonhemolytic and allergic reactions constitute respectively 36.8% and 30.5% of all complications. Nonhemolyticand allergic reactions are the most common complications of blood components transfusion and they are more common after platelet concentrate transfusions in comparison to PRBC and FFP donations.

  2. Health economics of blood transfusion safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulst, Marinus van

    2008-01-01

    The HIV/AIDS disaster in transfusion medicine shaped the future agendas for blood transfusion safety. More than ever before, the implementation of interventions which could improve blood transfusion safety was driven merely by availability of technology. The introduction of new expensive

  3. Transfusion data: from collection to reflection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoeven, L.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/410959243

    2017-01-01

    Blood transfusion is an important medical treatment for many and diverse patients groups, saving lives but sometimes also causing adverse transfusion reactions in transfusion recipients. For this reason blood use should ideally be as low as possible. The fact that significant differences exist in

  4. Transfusion Practice in Military Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    acido - sis (Cosgriff et al., 1997; Brohi et al., 2007). Extensive injury causes consumption of coagulation factors and platelets, so that in polytrauma...transfused trauma patient: hypothermia and acidoses revisited. Journal of Trauma, 42, 857 861. Counts, R.B., Haisch, C., Simon, T.L., Maxwell, N.G

  5. Patient Safety in Transfusion Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Isabel Simão Teles

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Patient safety is a new area gaining ground and many followers. In the past two decades, many international organizations have developed initiatives to increase knowledge in this area. We might consider that patient safety focuses on the study of the impact of adverse events resulting from the provision of health care for patients. This dimension cuts across all healthcare areas because every care is always underlying the risk-benefit binomial. Transfusional medicine is no exception. Transfusion safety includes not only the safety of blood and blood components as a therapeutic product, but also the safety of the transfusion process. The transfusion process involves a large set of steps and actors, which generates a complex network of processes’ interactions and multidisciplinary professionals. This complexity provides an environment prone to the occurrence of adverse events. The majority of these events are the result of errors occurring throughout the transfusion chain and may have a negative impact on the health of the patient. Errors can trigger adverse reactions in patients with varying consequences, which can range from 'minor' situations, through various states of morbidity and even death.

  6. Transfusion-transmitted infectious diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allain, Jean-Pierre; Stramer, Susan L.; Carneiro-Proietti, A. B. F.; Martins, M. L.; Lopes da Silva, S. N.; Ribeiro, M.; Proietti, F. A.; Reesink, Henk W.

    2009-01-01

    A spectrum of blood-borne infectious agents is transmitted through transfusion of infected blood donated by apparently healthy and asymptomatic blood donors. The diversity of infectious agents includes hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV-1/2), human

  7. What Is a Blood Transfusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... condition also can cause anemia. There are many types of anemia, including aplastic , Fanconi , hemolytic , i ron-deficiency , and sickle cell anemias and thalassemia (thal-ah-SE-me-ah). A bleeding disorder, such as ... transfusion, a technician tests your blood to find out what blood type you have (that is, A, B, AB, or ...

  8. Blood transfusion and hepatitis viruses

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    virus in blood donors: investigation of type-specific differences in serologic reactivity and rate of alanine aminotransferase abnormalities. Transfusion 1993;. 33: 7-13. 45. McFarlane IG, Smith HM, Johnson PJ, Bray GP, Vergani 0, Williams R. Hepatitis. C virus antibodies in chronic active hepatitis: pathogenetic factor or false-.

  9. Restrictive versus liberal red blood cell transfusion strategy after hip surgery: a decision model analysis of healthcare costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusaro, Mario V; Nielsen, Nathan D; Nielsen, Alexandra; Fontaine, Magali J; Hess, John R; Reed, Robert M; DeLisle, Sylvain; Netzer, Giora

    2017-02-01

    Red blood cell transfusion related to select surgical procedures accounts for approximately 2.8 million transfusions in the United States yearly and occurs commonly after hip fracture surgeries. Randomized controlled trials have demonstrated lack of clinical benefit with higher versus lower transfusion thresholds in postoperative hip fracture repair patients with cardiac disease or risk factors for cardiac disease. The economic implications of a higher versus lower hemoglobin (Hb) threshold have not yet been investigated. A decision tree analysis was constructed to estimate differences in healthcare costs and charges between a Hb transfusion threshold strategy of 8 g/dL versus 10 g/dL from the perspective of both Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) as well as hospitals. Secondary outcome measures included differences in transfusion-related adverse events. Among the 133,697 Medicare beneficiaries undergoing hip fracture repair in 2012, we estimated that 45,457 patients would be anemic and at risk for transfusion. CMS would save an estimated $11.3 million to $24.3 million in payments, while hospitals would reduce charges by an estimated $52.7 million to $93.6 million if the restrictive transfusion strategy were to be implemented nationally. Additionally, rates of transfusion-associated circulatory overload, transfusion-related acute lung injury, acute transfusion reactions, length of stay, and mortality would be reduced. This model suggests that the uniform adoption of a restrictive transfusion strategy among patients with cardiac disease and risk factors for cardiac disease undergoing hip fracture repair would result in significant reductions in clinically important outcomes with significant cost savings. © 2016 AABB.

  10. [Transfusion problems in surgery and anesthesiology. The causes, consequences, prevention and treatment of perioperative anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    István, Pénzes; Regöly-Mérei, János; Telek, Géza; Madách, Krisztina

    2003-10-26

    The classical indication for blood transfusion is the correction of oxygen delivery failure, and the elimination of tissue ischaemia. Such indications in the surgical and anesthesiological practice are the acute haemorrhagic states (trauma, acute gastrointestinal bleeding, intraoperative hemorrhage), as well as diseases associated with chronic blood loss (occult bleeding caused by malignancies, and ulcerating processes etc.). The traditional surgical and anesthesiological viewpoint has adopted a remarkably liberal approach to the indication of blood transfusion, and a whole range of its subtle, medium-long term adverse effects has been taken into account only recently. The purpose of this review was to analyze the causes and pathophysiological consequences of perioperative anemia and blood loss, as well as to reconsider the proper indications of blood transfusion in the view of immunological sequela. The most recent data on the transfusion related immuno-depression and immunomodulation are summarized. The authors wish to provide clues for the definition of "transfusion trigger", in addition, methods available for the clinical practice to reduce blood demand and to restore oxygen transport capacity during surgical and anesthesiological interventions are revisited. Based on the review of the literature and the personal experience of the authors the practical recommendations concerning the administration of blood and blood products should be summarized as follows: 1. Blood transfusion is rarely indicated if the hemoglobin level is above 10 g/dl, and in fact always necessary if it is less than 6 g/dl, especially, if the anemia developed acutely. 2. The "transfusion trigger" is subject to continued debate, and whether a particular patient with intermediary (6-10 g/dl) Hb levels should be transfused or not must be assessed in the perspective of the potential complications initiated by the inadequate oxygenation. 3. If major co-morbidity (e.g. emphysema, ischaemic heart

  11. Transfusion-transmitted parasitic infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Gagandeep

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The transmission of parasitic organisms through transfusion is relatively rare. Of the major transfusion-transmitted diseases, malaria is a major cause of TTIP in tropical countries whereas babesiosis and Chagas′ disease pose the greatest threat to donors in the USA In both cases, this is due to the increased number of potentially infected donors. There are no reliable serologic tests available to screen donors for any of these organisms and the focus for prevention remains on adherence to donor screening guidelines that address travel history and previous infection with the etiologic agent. One goal is the development of tests that are able to screen for and identify donors potentially infectious for parasitic infections without causing the deferral of a large number of non-infectious donors or significantly increasing costs. Ideally, methods to inactivate the infectious organism will provide an element of added safety to the blood supply.

  12. Red blood cell transfusion in septic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosland, Ragnhild G; Hagen, Marte U; Haase, Nicolai

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treating anaemia with red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is frequent, but controversial, in patients with septic shock. Therefore we assessed characteristics and outcome associated with RBC transfusion in this group of high risk patients. METHODS: We did a prospective cohort study at 7...... general intensive care units (ICUs) including all adult patients with septic shock in a 5-month period. RESULTS: Ninety-five of the 213 included patients (45%) received median 3 (interquartile range 2-5) RBC units during shock. The median pre-transfusion haemoglobin level was 8.1 (7.4-8.9) g...... and SAPS II and SOFA-score on day 1. CONCLUSIONS: The decision to transfuse patients with septic shock was likely affected by disease severity and bleeding, but haemoglobin level was the only measure that consistently differed between transfused and non-transfused patients....

  13. Cancer incidence in blood transfusion recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjalgrim, Henrik; Edgren, Gustaf; Rostgaard, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blood transfusions may influence the recipients' cancer risks both through transmission of biologic agents and by modulation of the immune system. However, cancer occurrence in transfusion recipients remains poorly characterized. METHODS: We used computerized files from Scandinavian...... blood banks to identify a cohort of 888,843 cancer-free recipients transfused after 1968. The recipients were followed from first registered transfusion until the date of death, emigration, cancer diagnosis, or December 31, 2002, whichever came first. Relative risks were expressed as ratios......, the standardized incidence ratios for cancers of the tongue, mouth, pharynx, esophagus, liver, and respiratory and urinary tracts and for squamous cell skin carcinoma remained elevated beyond 10 years after the transfusion. CONCLUSIONS: The marked increase in cancer risk shortly after a blood transfusion may...

  14. Autologous blood transfusion - a review | Charles | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The discovery of HIV and other transfusion-transmissible infections has increased the demand for alternatives to allogeneic blood transfusion. One such alternative is autologous transfusion. This review presents an analysis of autologous transfusion. We conclude that autologous transfusion should form part of a strategy to ...

  15. Septic transfusion case caused by a platelet pool with visible clotting due to contamination with Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loza-Correa, Maria; Kou, Yuntong; Taha, Mariam; Kalab, Miloslav; Ronholm, Jennifer; Schlievert, Patrick M; Cahill, Michael P; Skeate, Robert; Cserti-Gazdewich, Christine; Ramirez-Arcos, Sandra

    2017-05-01

    Contamination of platelet concentrates (PCs) with Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most significant ongoing transfusion safety risks in developed countries. This report describes a transfusion reaction in an elderly patient diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia, transfused with a 4-day-old buffy coat PC through a central venous catheter. The transfusion was interrupted when a large fibrous clot in the PC obstructed infusion pump flow. Shortly afterward, a red blood cell (RBC) unit transfusion started. After septic symptoms were developed, the RBC transfusion was also interrupted. While the RBC unit tested negative for bacterial contamination, the PC and the patient samples were found to be contaminated with a S. aureus strain that exhibited the same phenotypic and genome sequencing profiles. The isolated S. aureus forms biofilms and produces the superantigen enterotoxin-like U, which was detected in a sample of the transfused PCs. The patient received posttransfusion antibiotic treatment and had her original central line removed and replaced. As the implicated PC had been tested for bacterial contamination during routine screening yielding negative results, this is a false-negative transfusion sepsis case. Using a point-of-care test could have prevented the transfusion reaction. This report highlights the increasing incidence of S. aureus as a major PC contaminant with grave clinical implications. Importantly, S. aureus is able to interact with platelet components resulting in visible changes in PCs. Visual inspection of blood components before transfusion is an essential safety practice to interdict the transfusion of bacterially contaminated units. © 2017 AABB.

  16. Advantages of outsourcing the transfusion service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triulzi, D J

    1997-12-01

    Pressures to reduce costs are forcing hospitals to examine alternative delivery systems for transfusion services. An outsourcing arrangement for the transfusion service can be an attractive option, providing benefits not only in terms of economics, but also in terms of quality and medical support. Successful centralized testing models in Pittsburgh and Seattle have demonstrated the feasibility of this approach. When properly implemented, an outsourcing arrangement for transfusion services can improve patient care and reduce costs.

  17. Cancer incidence in blood transfusion recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjalgrim, Henrik; Edgren, Gustaf; Rostgaard, Klaus; Reilly, Marie; Tran, Trung Nam; Titlestad, Kjell Einar; Shanwell, Agneta; Jersild, Casper; Adami, Johanna; Wikman, Agneta; Gridley, Gloria; Wideroff, Louise; Nyrén, Olof; Melbye, Mads

    2007-12-19

    Blood transfusions may influence the recipients' cancer risks both through transmission of biologic agents and by modulation of the immune system. However, cancer occurrence in transfusion recipients remains poorly characterized. We used computerized files from Scandinavian blood banks to identify a cohort of 888,843 cancer-free recipients transfused after 1968. The recipients were followed from first registered transfusion until the date of death, emigration, cancer diagnosis, or December 31, 2002, whichever came first. Relative risks were expressed as ratios of the observed to the expected numbers of cancers, that is, standardized incidence ratios (SIRs), using incidence rates for the general Danish and Swedish populations as a reference. All statistical tests were two-sided. During 5,652,918 person-years of follow-up, 80,990 cancers occurred in the transfusion recipients, corresponding to a SIR of 1.45 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.44 to 1.46). The SIR for cancer overall decreased from 5.36 (95% CI = 5.29 to 5.43) during the first 6 months after transfusion to 1.10 or less for follow-up periods more than 2 years after the transfusion. However, the standardized incidence ratios for cancers of the tongue, mouth, pharynx, esophagus, liver, and respiratory and urinary tracts and for squamous cell skin carcinoma remained elevated beyond 10 years after the transfusion. The marked increase in cancer risk shortly after a blood transfusion may reflect the presence of undiagnosed occult cancers with symptoms that necessitated the blood transfusion. The continued increased risk of tobacco- and alcohol-related cancers suggests that lifestyle and other risk factors related to conditions prompting transfusion rather than transfusion-related exposures per se are important to the observed cancer occurrence in the recipients.

  18. Prevention of Post Transfusion Hepatitis Employing Sensitive Assay for Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Screening(Topics in Transfusion Medicine 1990 : Autologous Transfusion and Post-Transfusion Hepatitis)

    OpenAIRE

    小島, 秀男; 大竹, 幸子; 富樫, 和枝; 石口, 重子; 山田, 恵子; 品田, 章二; Kojima, Hideo; Ohtake, Sachiko; Togashi, Kazue; Ishiguchi, Shigeko; Yamada, Keiko; Shinada, Shoji

    1990-01-01

    Post transfusion Hepatitis (PTH) is one of serious side effects and some times lead to fulminant hepatic failure in case transfused blood contain very low level (under the sensitivity of usual screening method) of hepatitis B virus (HBV). Redcross blood center and blood transfusion devision of our hospital have been employed reverse passive hemmaglutination method (RPHA) for HBsAg screening. Authors employed EIA for sensitive HBsAg test system and compared with RPHA method. Of 2,255 sera from...

  19. Patterns of Adverse Transfusion Reactions in a Tertiary Care Centre of North India: A Step Towards Hemovigilance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Rajni; Aggarwal, Shikha; Bhardwaj, Kanchan; Thakur, Kusum K

    2017-06-01

    Transfusion of blood and blood products is a double edged sword, so it should be used judiciously. The primary aim of the centralized Haemovigilance Program is to improve transfusion safety. To determine the incidence of adverse transfusion reactions (ATRs) in recipients of blood and blood components. Prospective study from January 2014 till April 2015 was done. ATRs reported to the Department of Transfusion Medicine were recorded and analyzed on the basis of their clinical features and lab tests. During the study period 25,099 units of blood and blood components were transfused and 100 ATRs (0.40 %) were reported. The incidence of febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTR) was maximum (73 %) followed by allergic reactions (24 %), bacterial sepsis (1 %), hypotension due to ACE inhibitors (1 %) and acute hemolytic transfusion reaction (AHTR) (1 %). Of all the reported ATRs, 76 % occurred with packed red cells, 15 % occurred with whole blood, while platelets and Fresh Frozen Plasma transfusions were responsible for 8 % and 1 %, respectively. The majority of the reactions were FNHTRs followed by allergic reactions. Reporting of all adverse events and continuous medical education to medical and paramedical staff will help in strengthening hemovigilance system.

  20. Pictorial representation of transfusion over the years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Danic, Bruno

    2009-05-01

    The writings of the 17th and 19th centuries about experiments and debates about transfusion were often analyzed and discussed in articles and books, but an analysis of illustrations of transfusion during this pioneering epoch can throw new light on the subject. The first transfusion attempts were as sensational as they were spectacular, and their illustration permitted both focusing attention and giving a scientific iconography, almost technical, to doctors and scholars of the time. We describe several illustrations of historical transfusions and point out common characteristics and differences, through the major elements used by illustrators. Nineteen illustrations are shown and commented upon. The transfusion imagery, through the representation of the three actors of transfusion (recipient, donor, doctor) varied considerably over time, as did representation of the procedures of transfusion. This series of illustrations over three centuries reveals what the use and function of picturing transfusion over the course of time were: on the one hand, a didactic intent, in offering a documentary source concerning procedures and necessary instruments, and on the other, the function of legitimization, representing the act with a subtext such as numbered titles or in a scientific article, brought transfusion into the category of technical practices that were regulated by rules.

  1. Current good manufacturing practices for transfusion medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazama, K

    1996-10-01

    Transfusion medicine is most tightly controlled in the US by CGMPs that are written as regulations, guidances, and quality management documents. Because the US regulatory scheme requires that each unit of human blood donated for transfusion (and other purposes) be documented from the moment of donor registration until the last component of that donation is finally disposed of, there is precious little that remains solely within the discretion of the treating physician who orders transfusions for her or his patients. An additional complication for transfusion medicine specialists is that the search for the requirements must extend to all possible areas of information, including the possibly unexpected source within the private sector.

  2. Evaluation of Risk Minimisation Measures for Blood Components - Based on Reporting Rates of Transfusion-Transmitted Reactions (1997-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Markus B; Heiden, Margarethe; Volkers, Peter; Lohmann, Annette; Keller-Stanislawski, Brigitte

    2015-07-01

    To assess the impact of safety measures, we compared reporting rates of transfusion-related reactions before and after the implementation of six measures in 1999, 2004, 2006, 2008 and 2009. Reporting rates of transfusion-transmitted bacterial infection (TTBI), viral infection (TTVI) and immune-mediated transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) were calculated on the basis of confirmed annual reports and distributed blood components. The introduction of HCV NAT testing caused a significant reduction of HCV reporting rate from 1:0.6 to 1:83.16 million administered blood components (p haemovigilance data, a significant benefit could be demonstrated for four of six implemented safety measures.

  3. Is exchange transfusion a possible treatment for neonatal hemochromatosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpani, Giuseppina; Foti, Francesca; Nicolò, Antonino; Nicotina, Pier Antonio; Nicastro, Emanuele; Iorio, Raffaele

    2007-11-01

    Neonatal hemochromatosis is a rare congenital disorder of the liver associated to a poor prognosis. Liver transplantation is often required, since no effective medical treatment has been found. Despite mounting evidence of an alloimmune etiology of this condition, exchange transfusion has never been proposed as a specific treatment for neonatal hemochromatosis. Here we describe two siblings affected by neonatal hemochromatosis. The first, a female, died at 18 days of severe coagulopathy and acute renal failure, diagnosed as affected by neonatal hemochromatosis only when the second sibling was suspected as being affected by the same disease. The second child showed a rapidly worsening coagulopathy which was treated with two exchange transfusions, followed by rapid clinical and laboratory improvement, before reaching a definite diagnosis of neonatal hemochromatosis. He is healthy at present after a follow-up of 12 months. Although exchange transfusion has never been considered as treatment for neonatal hemochromatosis, this case suggests that it could be a feasible treatment option for children affected by this disease, as for other alloimmune conditions.

  4. [Blood transfusion and infectious diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaguchi, Isao

    2013-05-01

    Blood transfusion is essential in current medical treatment. In the era of selling blood, around 50% of recipients seemed to be infected by hepatitis virus. After the establishment of the blood donation system and many safety measures, the risk of blood contamination has decreased markedly; however, blood products still have a risk of known and unknown pathogens. In this manuscript, we discuss the remaining problems of HBV and HIV-1. As emerging infectious diseases, we examine Trypanosoma crusi, West Nile virus, Chikungunya virus, and Dengue virus. Finally, XMRV is exemplified as a rumored virus. Gathering accurate information about pathogens and preparing for outbreaks in advance are crucial for blood safety.

  5. INFECTIOUS-DISEASE TESTING FOR BLOOD-TRANSFUSIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DESFORGES, JF; ATHARI, F; COOPER, ES; JOHNSON, CS; LEMON, SM; LINDSAY, KL; MCCULLOUGH, J; MCINTOSH, K; ROSS, RK; WHITSETT, CF; WITTES, J; WRIGHT, TL

    1995-01-01

    Objective.-To provide physicians and other transfusion medicine professionals with a current consensus on infectious disease testing for blood transfusions. Participants.-A nonfederal, nonadvocate, 12-member consensus panel representing the fields of hematology, infectious disease, transfusion

  6. Operative blood transfusion quality improvement audit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Sohaibani, Mazen; Al Malki, Assaf; Pogaku, Venumadhav; Al Dossary, Saad; Al Bernawi, Hanan

    2014-01-01

    Context: To determine how current anesthesia team handless the identification of surgical anaesthetized patient (right patient). And the check of blood unit before collecting and immediately before blood administration (right blood) in operating rooms where nurses have minimal duties and responsibility to handle blood for transfusion in anaesthetized patients. Aims: To elicit the degree of anesthesia staff compliance with new policies and procedures for anaesthetized surgical patient the blood transfusion administration. Settings and Design: Setting: A large tertiary care reference and teaching hospital. Design: A prospective quality improvement. Elaboration on steps for administration of transfusion from policies and procedures to anaesthetized patients; and analysis of the audit forms for conducted transfusions. Subjects and Methods: An audit form was used to get key performance indicators (KPIs) observed in all procedures involve blood transfusion and was ticked as item was met, partially met, not met or not applicable. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistics as number and percentage Microsoft excel 2003. Central quality improvement committee presented the results in number percentage and graphs. Results: The degree of compliance in performing the phases of blood transfusion by anesthesia staff reached high percentage which let us feel certain that the quality is assured that the internal policy and procedures (IPP) are followed in the great majority of all types of red cells and other blood products transfusion from the start of requesting the blood or blood product to the prescript of checking the patient in the immediate post-transfusion period. Conclusions: Specific problem area of giving blood transfusion to anaesthetized patient was checking KPI concerning the phases of blood transfusion was audited and assured the investigators of high quality performance in procedures of transfusion. PMID:25886107

  7. Blood transfusion and coagulopathy in geriatric trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mador, Brett; Nascimento, Bartolomeu; Hollands, Simon; Rizoli, Sandro

    2017-03-29

    Trauma resuscitation has undergone a paradigm shift with new emphasis on the early use of blood products and increased proportions of plasma and platelets. However, it is unclear how this strategy is applied or how effective it is in the elderly population. The study aim is to identify differences in transfusion practices and the coagulopathy of trauma in the elderly. Data was prospectively collected on all consecutive patients that met trauma activation criteria at a Level I trauma centre. Data fields included patient demographics, co-morbidities, injury and resuscitation data, laboratory values, thromboelastography (TEG) results, and outcome measures. Elderly patients were defined as those 55 and older. Propensity-score matched analysis was completed for patients receiving blood product transfusion. Patients were matched by gender, mechanism, injury severity score (ISS), head injury, and time from injury. Total of 628 patients were included, of which 142 (23%) were elderly. Elderly patients were more likely to be female (41% vs. 24%), suffer blunt mechanism of trauma (96% vs. 80%), have higher ISS scores (mean 25.4 vs. 21.6) and mortality (19% vs. 8%). Elderly patients were significantly more likely to receive a blood transfusion (42% vs. 30%), specifically for red cells and plasma. Propensity-matched analysis resulted in no difference in red cell transfusion or mortality. Despite the broad similarities between the matched cohorts, trauma coagulopathy as measured by TEG was less commonly observed in the elderly. Our results suggest that elderly trauma patients are more likely to receive blood products when admitted to a trauma centre, though this may be attributed to under-triage. The results also suggest an altered coagulopathic response to traumatic injury which is partially influenced by increased anticoagulant and antiplatelet medication use in the geriatric population. It is not clear whether the acute coagulopathy of trauma is equivalent in geriatric

  8. A prospective, active haemovigilance study with combined cohort analysis of 19,175 transfusions of platelet components prepared with amotosalen-UVA photochemical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, F; Osselaer, J; Pierelli, L; Lozano, M; Cid, J; Tardivel, R; Garraud, O; Hervig, T; Domanovic, D; Cukjati, M; Gudmundson, S; Hjalmarsdottir, I B; Castrillo, A; Gonzalez, R; Brihante, D; Santos, M; Schlenke, P; Elliott, A; Lin, J-S; Tappe, D; Stassinopoulos, A; Green, J; Corash, L

    2015-11-01

    A photochemical treatment process (PCT) utilizing amotosalen and UVA light (INTERCEPT(™) Blood System) has been developed for inactivation of viruses, bacteria, parasites and leucocytes that can contaminate blood components intended for transfusion. The objective of this study was to further characterize the safety profile of INTERCEPT-treated platelet components (PCT-PLT) administered across a broad patient population. This open-label, observational haemovigilance programme of PCT-PLT transfusions was conducted in 21 centres in 11 countries. All transfusions were monitored for adverse events within 24 h post-transfusion and for serious adverse events (SAEs) up to 7 days post-transfusion. All adverse events were assessed for severity (Grade 0-4), and causal relationship to PCT-PLT transfusion. Over the course of 7 years in the study centres, 4067 patients received 19,175 PCT-PLT transfusions. Adverse events were infrequent, and most were of Grade 1 severity. On a per-transfusion basis, 123 (0.6%) were classified an acute transfusion reaction (ATR) defined as an adverse event related to the transfusion. Among these ATRs, the most common were chills (77, 0.4%) and urticaria (41, 0.2%). Fourteen SAEs were reported, of which 2 were attributed to platelet transfusion (haemovigilance safety programme to monitor PCT-PLT transfusions demonstrated a low rate of ATRs, and a safety profile consistent with that previously reported for conventional platelet components. © 2015 The Authors ISBT Science Series published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  9. Haemovigilance and transfusion safety in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouger, P; Noizat-Pirenne, F; Le Pennec, P Y

    2000-01-01

    The risks associated to red cell and platelet transfusions are essentially bound to the polymorphism of blood group antigens and to transfusion transmitted agents including virus, bacterias.... In France, the haemovigilance system and several investigations allowed to measure these different kinds of risks. We also developed analysis of failures in order to prevent errors and accidents to increase blood safety.

  10. PROGRESS IN BLOOD TRANSFUSION SERVICES IN KENYA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-12-02

    Dec 2, 2009 ... blood transfusion services in Nairobi region and to oversee all the regional and satellite blood transfusion ... national and regional BTC's satellite centres were operating along the Trans African highway in ... clinics units. Recruitment unit carries out donor education, mobilisation, recruitment and retention of.

  11. Perioperative Haemorrhage and Transfusion in Musculoskeletal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Objectives: Musculoskeletal tumor surgery in the West African subregion is rapidly evolving. These procedures are associated with significant blood losses necessitating large amount of transfusion, of which there is inadequate documentation. Allogeneic blood transfusion has been associated with ...

  12. [Transfusion in elderly: Take account frailty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, R; Novella, J-L; Jaïdi, Y

    2017-09-01

    The conjunction of the demographic aging and the increase in the frequency of anemia with the advancing age, mean that the number of globular concentrates delivered each year increases with a consequent heavy pressure on blood collection. The etiologies of anemia in the elderly are often multifactorial and their investigation is an indispensable step and prior to any treatment. Transfusion thresholds, particularly in the elderly, are gradually evolving and a so-called restrictive strategy is now favored. Immediate and delayed complications of transfusion are more frequent in the elderly due to vulnerability factors associated with frailty and the risk of multiple transfusions. The screening of complications related to transfusion of RBCs is essential and makes it possible to avoid their recurrence. The impact of transfusion on the quality of life of elderly patients is not obvious and is a controversial issue. In addition, transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) is accompanied by an increase in health expenditure and an increase in morbidity and mortality, whose risks can be reduced through alternatives to transfusion. Longitudinal studies, including elderly subjects, would allow a better understanding of the issues involved in the transfusion of RBCs in this population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Knowledge and Acceptance of Autologous Blood Transfusion.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Homologous blood transfusion carries a well-documented array of risks especially in an HIV endemic environment like Nigeria. It is therefore imperative to consider other forms of restoring blood volume in surgical patients. Autologous blood transfusion (ABT) is one of the ways the problem of HIV transmission ...

  14. Evidence Based Studies in Clinical Transfusion Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.G. Jansen (Gerard)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAfter the introduction of blood component therapy in the 1960s, more and more attention is given to clinical transfusion medicine. Although blood transfusion is an important treatment in different clinical settings, there are still lack of much randomized clinical trials. Nowadays

  15. Blood Transfusion and Donation - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Blood Transfusion and Donation URL of this page: https://medlineplus. ... T U V W XYZ List of All Topics All Blood Transfusion and Donation - Multiple Languages To use the sharing ...

  16. Twin to Twin Transfusion Syndrom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusrawati .

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakPeningkatan mortalitas pada kembar monokorion disebabkan oleh adanya anastomosis vaskuler pada plasenta yang menyebabkan Twin to Twin Transfussion syndrome.Berikut laporan kasus yang ditangani di RS. DR. M. Djamil Padang. Kasus 1: Seorang pasien usia 28 tahun dengan diagnosa MP3 gravid preterm 33-34 minggu dengan Twin To Twin Transfusion Syndrom, Dari pemeriksaan USG didapatkan kesan: Gemelli, gravid 33-34 minggu dengan TTTS. Pasien diterminasi secara SCTPP. Bayi pertama lahir perempuan, dengan: BB: 1400 grams, PB: 44 cm, A / S: 8/9, Bayi ke II: perempuan, BB: 1000 grams, PB: 38 cm, A / S: 6/7, Hb janin I: 16,9 g/dl dan Hb janin II : 11,3 g/dl. Kedua bayi dirawat di bagian perinatology. Bayi pertama bertahan hidup dengan beberapa kelainan kongenital yaitu VSD dan Hemangioma Orbita. Bayi kedua meninggal pada usia 7 hari dengan susp. Sepsis. Hingga saat ini, bayi ini masih kontrol rutin ke poliklinik RS. DR. M. Djamil Padang. Kasus 2: Seorang pasien usia 31 tahun dengan diagnosa MP5 parturient aterm kala II dengan gemelli. Pasien melahirkan spontan. Bayi pertama lahir perempuan dengan: BB: 3200 grams, PB: 48cm, A / S: 8/9, Bayi ke II perempuan : BB: 2100 grams, PB: 44 cm, A / S: 7/8. Kadar Hb bayi I : 17,6 g/dl dan bayi II: 14,1 g/dl. Plasenta lahir secara spontan lengkap 1 buah, berat 1150 gr, ukuran 20x19 x3 cm, panjang kedua tali pusat masing-masing 60 cm, insersi paracentralis,Monokhorion-Monoamnion. Kesan: TTTS.Kata kunci: twin to twin transfusion sindrom, ultrasonografi, monokorionAbstractIncreased mortality in monochorionic fetus caused by vascular anastomosis in the placenta that causes Twin to Twin Transfusion Syndromes (TTTS. Reporting two cases experienced and taken care in our hospital. Case1: a woman 28 years old was diagnosed with MP3 preterm pregnancy 33-34 weeks with Twin to Twin Transfusion Syndromes.Ultrasound impression: Gemelli gravid 33-34 weeks with TTTS. The patient was terminated by SCTPP. The first baby was female

  17. Patient inclusion in transfusion medicine: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedman MT

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mark T Friedman,1 Peyman Bizargity,1 Sandra Gilmore,2 Arnold Friedman3 1Blood Bank and Transfusion Medicine Service, Department of Pathology, Mount Sinai St Luke's–Roosevelt Hospital Center, 2Patient Blood Management Program, Center for Blood Management and Bloodless Medicine and Surgery, Mount Sinai Beth Israel Medical Center, 3Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Science, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Patients may have differing perceptions about blood transfusions based on their backgrounds, values, education levels, or cultural or religious beliefs, which may or may not be accurate. Unfortunately, despite the fact that transfusions are associated with a number of infectious and noninfectious risks, and in spite of the fact that there are ethical, accreditation, and regulatory requirements to provide information regarding transfusion risks, benefits, and alternatives to patients, transfusion consent remains inconsistently obtained. This can partly be attributed to the fact that clinicians may take on a paternalistic approach to transfusion decisions as well as to the fact that many clinicians have knowledge gaps in transfusion medicine that prevent them from obtaining transfusion consent adequately. As a result, unlike the case with other medical and surgical therapies, most patients are not included in the making of informed decisions regarding the need for transfusion versus alternative therapies, leading to many situations in which the transfusions provide little benefit to them. Recently however, a number of organizations, such as the American Association of Blood Banks and The Joint Commission in the US, have promoted multidisciplinary, evidence-based treatment strategies that aim to minimize the need for blood transfusion, the so-called patient blood management (PBM protocols. PBM strategies are expected to improve blood utilization through optimization of patients who may need

  18. [Documents and transfusion acts: heterogeneous practices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damais-Cépitélli, A; Lassale, B

    2014-11-01

    Blood transfusion is currently a delegated medical act in patient care services. Blood transfusion safety depends on the strict respect of processes from the prescription of blood products and required patient immuno-hematology exams to the administration of blood products and follow-up of the patient. We conducted a survey among haemovigilance correspondents to establish the documents needed to practice blood transfusion. Blood products delivery depends on the hospitals local organizations and blood products traceability relies on hospitals levels of computerization. We notice heterogeneous practices. Consequently, an updating of the December 15th 2003 circular relative to the transfusion act seems necessary and could thus lead to blood transfusions homogenous practices. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Incidence and patterns of hemolytic anemia in acute dapsone overdose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Yong Sung; Kim, Hyun; Kim, Juwon; Kim, Oh Hyun; Kim, Hyung Il; Cha, KyoungChul; Lee, Kang Hyun; Hwang, Sung Oh

    2016-03-01

    Hemolytic anemia is one of the complications related to the chronic consumption of dapsone. However, in acute dapsone overdose, there have been few case reports regarding hemolytic anemia. Herein, we reported the prevalence and patterns of hemolytic anemia in acute dapsone overdose, and compared clinical features including mortality in the non-hemolytic anemia and the hemolytic anemia groups. We conducted a retrospective review of 43 consecutive acute dapsone overdose cases that were diagnosed and treated at the emergency department of the Wonju Severance Christian Hospital between January 2006 and January 2014. There were 13 male patients (30.2%) and the ages of all patients ranged from 18 to 93 years with a median of 67 years. The ingested dose varied from a minimum of two 100-mg tablet to a maximum of twenty five 100-mg tablets. All patients had methemoglobinemia irrespective of the presence of hemolytic anemia. Among 43 patients, 30 patients (69.8%) were shown to have hemolytic anemia and hemolytic anemia developed the day after admission and persisted for more than 6 days after admission. Even though mortality rate was not significantly higher in the hemolytic anemia group, the hemolytic anemia group had significantly longer total admission and intensive care unit admission stays than the non-hemolytic group. A significant proportion of the patients with acute dapsone overdose is associated with occurrence of hemolytic anemia. Hemolytic anemia may be developed the day after admission and persisted for more than 6 days after admission. Therefore, monitoring of serum hemoglobin level is necessary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The transfusion medicine we want.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The Associação Brasileira de Hematologia e Hemoterapia (ABHH), through its Board of Directors, hosted a national symposium called "Forum: The Transfusion Medicine we want", to discuss proposed policies and techniques related to the area. This meeting was held in São Paulo on August 19 and 20, 2010, with the participation of experts, authorities and representatives of organized groups of patients and users. The discussions were organized around three specific issues selected from over 100 suggestions sent to the ABHH through public consultation on the web: 1. Strategies; 2. Financing; 3. Blood products. A plenary session, held at the end of the meeting, adopted recommendations that are relevant to the different discussion topics.This document contains actions proposed by the ABHH to meet the demands discussed.

  1. Transfusion regimens in thalassemia intermedia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Karakas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Thalassemia intermedia (TI is a heterogeneous disease, in terms of both clinical manifestations and underlying molecular defects. Some TI patients are asymptomatic until adult life, whereas others are symptomatic from early childhood. In contrast with patients with Thalassemia major (TM, the severity of anemia is less and the patients do not require transfusions during at least the first few years of life. Many patients with TI, especially older ones, have been exposed to the multiple long-term effects of chronic anemia and tissue hypoxia and their compensatory reactions, including enhanced erythropoiesis and increased iron absorption. Bone marrow expansion and extramedullary hematopoiesis lead to bone deformities and liver and spleen enlargement. Therapeutic strategies in TI are not clear and different criteria are used to decide the initiation of transfusion and chelation therapy, modulation of fetal hemoglobin production, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation on an individual basis. The clinical picture of well-treated TM patients with regular transfusionchelation therapy is better from TI patients who have not received adequate transfusion therapy. There is a significant role of early blood transfusion to prevent and treat complications commonly associated with TI, such as extramedullary erythropoiesis and bone deformities, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, leg ulcers, gallstones, pseudoxantoma elasticum, hyperuricosuria, gout and pulmonary hypertension, which are rarely seen in thalassemia major. Nowadays, indications of transfusion in patients with TI are chronic anemia (Hb < 7 g/dL, bone deformities, growth failure, extramedullary erythropoiesis, heart failure, pregnancy and preparation for surgical procedures. Conclusion: Adequate (regular or tailored transfusion therapy is an important treatment modality for increasing the quality of life in patients with thalassemia intermedia during childhood. 就临床表象和潜在的分子缺

  2. Highly Efficient Prion Transmission by Blood Transfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andréoletti, Olivier; Litaise, Claire; Simmons, Hugh; Corbière, Fabien; Lugan, Séverine; Costes, Pierrette; Schelcher, François; Vilette, Didier; Grassi, Jacques; Lacroux, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    It is now clearly established that the transfusion of blood from variant CJD (v-CJD) infected individuals can transmit the disease. Since the number of asymptomatic infected donors remains unresolved, inter-individual v-CJD transmission through blood and blood derived products is a major public health concern. Current risk assessments for transmission of v-CJD by blood and blood derived products by transfusion rely on infectious titers measured in rodent models of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSE) using intra-cerebral (IC) inoculation of blood components. To address the biological relevance of this approach, we compared the efficiency of TSE transmission by blood and blood components when administrated either through transfusion in sheep or by intra-cerebral inoculation (IC) in transgenic mice (tg338) over-expressing ovine PrP. Transfusion of 200 µL of blood from asymptomatic infected donor sheep transmitted prion disease with 100% efficiency thereby displaying greater virulence than the transfusion of 200 mL of normal blood spiked with brain homogenate material containing 103ID50 as measured by intracerebral inoculation of tg338 mice (ID50 IC in tg338). This was consistent with a whole blood titer greater than 103.6 ID50 IC in tg338 per mL. However, when the same blood samples were assayed by IC inoculation into tg338 the infectious titers were less than 32 ID per mL. Whereas the transfusion of crude plasma to sheep transmitted the disease with limited efficacy, White Blood Cells (WBC) displayed a similar ability to whole blood to infect recipients. Strikingly, fixation of WBC with paraformaldehyde did not affect the infectivity titer as measured in tg338 but dramatically impaired disease transmission by transfusion in sheep. These results demonstrate that TSE transmission by blood transfusion can be highly efficient and that this efficiency is more dependent on the viability of transfused cells than the level of infectivity measured by IC

  3. 42 CFR 493.1103 - Standard: Requirements for transfusion services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... of transfusion reactions on a continuous basis through a CLIA-certified laboratory or a laboratory... transfusion reactions. The facility must have procedures for preventing transfusion reactions and when necessary, promptly identify, investigate, and report blood and blood product transfusion reactions to the...

  4. Urticarial Reactions In Multi Transfused Patients In University Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The study was aimed at determining the pattern of urticarial transfusion reactions (UTR) among patients who received multiple blood transfusions at the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital (UMTH) from 1997 2001. Materials and Methods: A total of 154 multi transfused patients who received transfusions ...

  5. Indications for Blood Transfusion among Children in a Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Anaemia is prevalent among children in our environment, often necessitating blood transfusions. Knowledge of the common reasons for blood transfusion and institution of preventive measures is likely to reduce transfusion rate in the region. We undertook a review of indications for blood transfusion in children ...

  6. Hemoglobin levels and blood transfusion in patients with sepsis in Internal Medicine Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muady, Gassan Fuad; Bitterman, Haim; Laor, Arie; Vardi, Moshe; Urin, Vitally; Ghanem-Zoubi, Nesrin

    2016-10-13

    Acute reduction in hemoglobin levels is frequently seen during sepsis. Previous studies have focused on the management of anemia in patients with septic shock admitted to intensive care units (ICU's), including aggressive blood transfusion aiming to enhance tissue oxygenation. To study the changes in hemoglobin concentrations during the first week of sepsis in the setting of Internal Medicine (IM) units, and their correlation to survival. Observational prospective study. We recorded hemoglobin values upon admission and throughout the first week of hospital stay in a consecutive cohort of septic patients admitted to IM units at a community hospital, the patients were enrolled into a prospective registry. Data on blood transfusions was also collected, we examined the correlation between hemoglobin concentrations during the first week of sepsis and survival, the effect of blood transfusion was also assessed. Eight hundred and fifteen patients (815) with sepsis were enrolled between February 2008 to January 2009. More than 20 % of them had hemoglobin levels less than 10g/dL on admission, a rate that was doubled during the first week of sepsis. Overall, 68 (8.3 %) received blood transfusions, 14 of them (20.6 %) due to bleeding. Typically, blood transfusion was given to older patients with a higher rate of malignancy and lower hemoglobin levels. While hemoglobin concentration on admission had strong correlation with in-hospital mortality (O.R-0.83 [95 % C.I. 0.74-0.92], blood transfusion was not found to be an independent predicting factor for mortality. Anemia is very common in sepsis. While hemoglobin level on admission exhibit independent correlation with survival, blood transfusion do not.

  7. PREVENTIVE MEASURES FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF THE SAFETY OF BLOOD TRANSFUSION AND VIRTUAL TRANSFUSION LABORATORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Primož Rožman

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Even though blood transfusion is a relatively safe form of therapy, because of the eventual administrative errors in the transfusion chain between the blood donor and the recipient of blood, transfusion errors still occur. Therefore, it is imperative to ensure an utmost extent of safety and reliability of all transfusion related procedures. The safety of blood transfusion can be improved by preventive actions, i.e. implementation of the total quality management concept, haemovigilance and virtual transfusion laboratory. In the resulting system, the information web, robotics, computer sciences and communication technologies ensure safe and reliable identification of the patients, blood donors, corresponding test samples and blood products. Apart form this; the modern technologies enable the automation of laboratory testing, the integrity of laboratory results and enable an optimal use of blood.Conclusions. For an improved transfusion safety in Slovenia, adoption of corresponding prevention as well as haemovigilance is necessary. Identification errors can be prevented by implementation of the wristbands systems with the code bars for the tagging of the patient and his biological samples, whereas the administrative errors in the blood bank and transfusion laboratory can be prevented by implementation of information systems and automation.We assume that the virtual transfusion laboratory will become an integral part of the new Slovenian transfusion web and will speed up, unify and simplify today’s methods of ordering and administering blood products. To the attending physician, it will enable the choice of optimal transfusion therapy schedule and at the same time, it will enable the supervision of individual orders, deviations and indications, all of which is needed in order to analyse and improve the quality and the costs of the treatment. These services represent the first obligatory step for the modernisation of the transfusion

  8. Serial haematology results in transfused and non-transfused dogs naturally infected with Babesia rossi

    OpenAIRE

    Scheepers, E.; A.L. Leisewitz; P.N. Thompson; M. M. Christopher

    2011-01-01

    This prospective longitudinal study investigated the progression of haematological changes in 32 transfused and 54 non-transfused dogs naturally infected with Babesia rossi over the 1st 6 days following diagnosis and treatment. The effect of patient age on the results of complete blood counts was determined. Haematology data were analysed at presentation and at 24 hours, 3 days and 6 days after presentation. Dogs were treated with diminazene aceturate at diagnosis and a blood transfusion was ...

  9. Transfusion transmitted diseases in perioperative and intensive care settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients in the perioperative period and intensive care unit are commonly exposed to blood transfusion (BT. They are at increased risk of transfusion transmitted bacterial, viral and protozoal diseases. The risk of viral transmission has decreased steadily, but the risk of bacterial transmission remains same. Bacterial contamination is more in platelet concentrates than in red cells and least in plasma. The chances of sepsis, morbidity and mortality depend on the number of transfusions and underlying condition of the patient. Challenges to safe BT continue due to new emerging pathogens and various management problems. Strategies to restrict BT, optimal surgical and anaesthetic techniques to reduce blood loss and efforts to develop transfusion alternatives should be made. Literature search was performed using search words/phrases blood transfusion, transfusion, transfusion transmitted diseases, transfusion transmitted bacterial diseases, transfusion transmitted viral diseases, transfusion transmitted protozoal diseases or combinations, on PubMed and Google Scholar from 1990 to 2014.

  10. Transfusion transmitted diseases in perioperative and intensive care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rekha; Hansda, Upendra

    2014-09-01

    Patients in the perioperative period and intensive care unit are commonly exposed to blood transfusion (BT). They are at increased risk of transfusion transmitted bacterial, viral and protozoal diseases. The risk of viral transmission has decreased steadily, but the risk of bacterial transmission remains same. Bacterial contamination is more in platelet concentrates than in red cells and least in plasma. The chances of sepsis, morbidity and mortality depend on the number of transfusions and underlying condition of the patient. Challenges to safe BT continue due to new emerging pathogens and various management problems. Strategies to restrict BT, optimal surgical and anaesthetic techniques to reduce blood loss and efforts to develop transfusion alternatives should be made. Literature search was performed using search words/phrases blood transfusion, transfusion, transfusion transmitted diseases, transfusion transmitted bacterial diseases, transfusion transmitted viral diseases, transfusion transmitted protozoal diseases or combinations, on PubMed and Google Scholar from 1990 to 2014.

  11. [Artificial oxygen carriers as an alternative to red blood cell transfusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habler, O; Pape, A; Meier, J; Zwissler, B

    2005-08-01

    The expected cost-explosion in transfusion medicine (increasing imbalance between donors and recipients, treatment of transfusion-associated complications) increases the socio-economic significance of the development of safe and effective synthetic oxygen carriers as an alternative to the transfusion of allogeneic red blood cells. Currently two types of artificial oxygen carriers have been tested for safety and efficacy in cases of severe anemia otherwise requiring transfusion. Solutions based on human or bovine hemoglobin (HBOC) possess vasoconstrictor properties in addition to their oxygen transport capacity. The impact of vasoconstriction on tissue perfusion and organ function is however not yet fully understood. Nevertheless, in 2001 the bovine HBOC Hemopure was approved in South Africa for treatment of acutely anemic surgical patients. The purely synthetic perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsions increase the physically dissolved portion of arterial oxygen content. Due to their particulate nature (emulsion droplets) PFCs may only be infused in low doses to avoid overload and malfunction of phagocytic cells of the reticulo-endothelial system. As part of a multimodal blood conservation program (including normovolemic hemodilution and hyperoxia) the low-dose administration of Oxygent effectively increases intraoperative anemia tolerance. Although reduction of perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion has already been demonstrated for HBOC and PFC, the global clinical establishment of artificial oxygen carriers is not to be expected in the near future.

  12. Relationship between Stroke Volume Variation and Blood Transfusion during Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae Moon; Lee, Yoon Kyung; Yoo, Hwanhee; Lee, Sukyung; Kim, Hee Yeong; Kim, Young-Kug

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative blood transfusion increases the risk for perioperative mortality and morbidity in liver transplant recipients. A high stroke volume variation (SVV) method has been proposed to reduce blood loss during living donor hepatectomy. Herein, we investigated whether maintaining high SVV could reduce the need for blood transfusion and also evaluated the effect of the high SVV method on postoperative outcomes in liver transplant recipients. We retrospectively analyzed 332 patients who underwent liver transplantation, divided into control (maintaining blood transfusion requirement and hemodynamic parameters, including SVV, as well as postoperative outcomes, such as incidences of acute kidney injury, durations of postoperative intensive care unit and hospital stay, and rates of 1-year mortality. Mean SVV values were 7.0% ± 1.3% in the control group (n = 288) and 11.2% ± 1.8% in the high SVV group (n = 44). The median numbers of transfused packed red blood cells and fresh frozen plasmas in the high SVV group were significantly lower than those in control group (0 vs. 2 units, P = 0.003; and 0 vs. 3 units, P = 0.033, respectively). No significant between-group differences were observed for postoperative outcomes. Maintaining high SVV can reduce the blood transfusion requirement during liver transplantation without worsening postoperative outcomes. These findings provide insights into improving perioperative management in liver transplant recipients.

  13. Effect of Blood Transfusions on the Outcome of Very Low Body Weight Preterm Infants under Two Different Transfusion Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Lin Chen

    2009-06-01

    Conclusion: Both criteria of PRBC transfusion had similar clinical outcomes, although liberal transfusion resulted in a greater amount of blood transfused and a low reticulocyte count at 30 days of age. We suggest restrictive criteria for minimizing the overall amount of transfusion to less than 30 mL may be a better way of preventing CLD in VLBW infants.

  14. Transfusion syndromes in monochorionic multiplets: An overview ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twin‑to‑twin transfusion syndromes (TTTS) are unique prenatal complications of monochorionic multiplets and manifest as twin oligohydramnios polyhydramnios sequence (TOPS), twin anaemia polyhydramnios sequence (TAPS) and twin reversed arterial perfusion syndrome (TRAPS). These grave complications are ...

  15. Blood transfusion practices in obstetric anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Jadon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood transfusion is an essential component of emergency obstetric care and appropriate blood transfusion significantly reduces maternal mortality. Obstetric haemorrhage, especially postpartum haemorrhage, remains one of the major causes of massive haemorrhage and a prime cause of maternal mortality. Blood loss and assessment of its correct requirement are difficult in pregnancy due to physiological changes and comorbid conditions. Many guidelines have been used to assess the requirement and transfusion of blood and its components. Infrastructural, economic, social and religious constraints in blood banking and donation are key issues to formulate practice guidelines. Available current guidelines for transfusion are mostly from the developed world; however, they can be used by developing countries keeping available resources in perspective.

  16. Allogeneic red blood cell transfusions: efficacy, risks, alternatives and indications

    OpenAIRE

    Madjdpour, C.; Spahn, D. R.

    2017-01-01

    Careful assessment of risks and benefits has to precede each decision on allogeneic red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. Currently, a number of key issues in transfusion medicine are highly controversial, most importantly the influence of different transfusion thresholds on clinical outcome. The aim of this article is to review current evidence on blood transfusions, to highlight ‘hot topics' with respect to efficacy, outcome and risks, and to provide the reader with transfusion guidelines. In a...

  17. Massive transfusion and nonsurgical hemostatic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Jeremy G; Cap, Andrew P; Weiss, Brendan M; Reid, Thomas J; Bolan, Charles D; Bolan, Charles E

    2008-07-01

    Hemorrhage in trauma is a significant challenge, accounting for 30% to 40% of all fatalities, second only to central nervous system injury as a cause of death. However, hemorrhagic death is the leading preventable cause of mortality in combat casualties and typically occurs within 6 to 24 hrs of injury. In cases of severe hemorrhage, massive transfusion may be required to replace more than the entire blood volume. Early prediction of massive transfusion requirements, using clinical and laboratory parameters, combined with aggressive management of hemorrhage by surgical and nonsurgical means, has significant potential to reduce early mortality. Although the classification of massive transfusion varies, the most frequently used definition is ten or more units of blood in 24 hrs. Transfusion of red blood cells is intended to restore blood volume, tissue perfusion, and oxygen-carrying capacity; platelets, plasma, and cryoprecipitate are intended to facilitate hemostasis through prevention or treatment of coagulopathy. Massive transfusion is uncommon in civilian trauma, occurring in only 1% to 3% of trauma admissions. As a result of a higher proportion of penetrating injury in combat casualties, it has occurred in approximately 8% of Operation Iraqi Freedom admissions and in as many as 16% during the Vietnam conflict. Despite its potential to reduce early mortality, massive transfusion is not without risk. It requires extensive blood-banking resources and is associated with high mortality. This review describes the clinical problems associated with massive transfusion and surveys the nonsurgical management of hemorrhage, including transfusion of blood products, use of hemostatic bandages/agents, and treatment with hemostatic medications.

  18. Risk factors for blood transfusion after shoulder arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padegimas, E M; Clyde, C T; Zmistowski, B M; Restrepo, C; Williams, G R; Namdari, S

    2016-02-01

    Currently, there is little information about the need for peri-operative blood transfusion in patients undergoing shoulder arthroplasty. The purpose of this study was to identify the rate of transfusion and its predisposing factors, and to establish a blood conservation strategy. We identified all patients who had undergone shoulder arthroplasty at our hospital between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2013. The rate of transfusion was determined from the patient's records. While there were exceptions, patients typically underwent transfusion if they had a level of haemoglobin of transfusion. High- and low-risk cohorts for transfusion were identified from a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Of 1174 shoulder arthroplasties performed on 1081 patients, 53 cases (4.5%) required transfusion post-operatively. Predictors of blood transfusion were a lower pre-operative haematocrit (p transfusion. In total 48 of the 436 (11%) shoulder arthroplasties with a pre-operative haematocrit transfusion compared with five of the 738 (0.70%) shoulder arthroplasties with a haematocrit above this level. We found that transfusion was needed less frequently than previously described for shoulder arthroplasty. Patients with a pre-operative haematocrit blood transfusion, while those with a haematocrit above this level are unlikely to require transfusion. The rate of transfusion after shoulder arthroplasty is under 5%, and those with a pre-operative haematocrit greater than or equal to 39.6% have a very low likelihood (transfusion. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  19. [Blood components and good practices in transfusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu, Georges

    2015-02-01

    Each year, more than three millions of blood components are transfused to more than five hundred thousand patients in France. The optimal use of blood components requires that physicians prescribing blood components master the clinical indications of red blood cells concentrates, platelet concentrates and fresh frozen plasma. In addition, physicians in charge of blood component prescription should provide adequate pre- and post-transfusion information to their patients. Compliance of blood components administration in patients with safety guidelines contributes as well to their optimal use. In addition, for each blood component transfused, a proper evaluation of its safety and its efficacy should be done. Finally, a regular evaluation of transfusion practice in hospital services were blood components are used, through audits made in cooperation with their blood component provider, either blood transfusion centre or the hospital blood bank, enables to appreciate the level of compliance with safety and clinical guidelines, and more globally how the transfusion process is mastered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Platelet transfusion for patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Craig H; DomBourian, Melkon G; Millward, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusion is a critical and often necessary aspect of managing cancer. Low platelet counts frequently lead to bleeding complications; however, the drugs used to combat malignancy commonly lead to decreased production and destruction of the very cell whose function is essential to stop bleeding. The transfusion of allogeneic platelet products helps to promote hemostasis, but alloimmunization may make it difficult to manage other complications associated with cancer. The literature relating to platelet transfusion in patients with cancer was reviewed. Platelet storage, dosing, transfusion indications, and transfusion response are essential topics for health care professionals to understand because many patients with cancer will require platelet transfusions during the course of treatment. The workup and differentiation of non-immune-mediated compared with immune-mediated platelet refractoriness are vital because platelet management is different between types of refractoriness. A combination of appropriate utilization of platelet inventory and laboratory testing coupled with communication between those caring for patients with cancer and those providing blood products is essential for effective patient care.

  1. Twin-twin transfusion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, A C; D'addario, V

    2009-04-01

    Twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) is a condition unique to monochorionic pregnancies, although very few case reports described the syndrome in dichorionic placentas. The aetiology of TTTS relies in the presence of at least 1 arterio-venous placental anastomosis, through which unequal blood exchange from one twin (donor) to the co-twin (recipient) occurs. The diagnosis of TTTS relies on the sonographic detection of oligohydramnios in the donor's sac and polyhydramnios in the recipient's sac in the second trimester, although signs of TTTS are present since the first trimester. Treatment options for TTTS include serial amnioreduction, septostomy, selective feticide of the apparently sick twin, and selective photocoagulation of placental vessels (SLPCV). Because of the growing evidence that SLPCV is the most efficacious therapy compared to amnioreduction with/without septostomy, the authors reviewed in details the effects of SLPCV on fetal growth and circulation. The authors further explore literature with regard to the prognostic factors. Finally, because Quintero staging system is actually under debate, they discuss the most recent findings on this topic and propose a new staging system to assess severity of TTTS at presentation (Rossi staging system). New topics for future research, which would probably further clarify the natural history of TTTS, are also proposed.

  2. Desmopressin for minimising perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, D A; Moxey, A J; Carless, P A; O'Connell, D; McClelland, B; Henderson, K M; Sly, K; Laupacis, A; Fergusson, D

    2001-01-01

    Public concerns regarding the safety of transfused blood have prompted re-consideration of the use of allogeneic (from an unrelated donor) red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, and a range of techniques designed to minimise transfusion requirements. To examine the evidence for the efficacy of desmopressin (1-deamino-8-D-arginine-vasopressin), in reducing perioperative blood loss and the need for red cell transfusion in patients who do not have congenital bleeding disorders. Articles were identified by: computer searches of OVID MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Current Contents (to August 2000) and web sites of international health technology assessment agencies (to May 1998). References in the identified trials and review articles were checked and authors contacted to identify additional studies. Randomised controlled parallel group trials in which adult patients, scheduled for non-urgent surgery, were randomised to DDAVP, or to a control group, who did not receive the intervention. Trial quality was assessed using criteria proposed by Schulz et al. (1995) and Jadad et al. (1996). The principal outcomes were: the number of patients exposed to red cells, and the amount of blood transfused. Other clinical outcomes are detailed in the review. Fourteen trials of DDAVP (N=1034) reported data on the proportion of patients exposed to allogeneic RBC transfusion. In subjects treated with DDAVP the relative risk of exposure to peri-operative allogeneic blood transfusion was 0.98 (95%CI: 0.88 to 1.10) compared with control. In DDAVP-treated patients the relative risk of requiring re-operation due to bleeding was 0.56 (95%CI: 0.18 to 1.73). There was no statistically significant effect overall for mortality and non-fatal myocardial infarction in DDAVP-treated patients compared with control (RR=1.53: 95%CI: 0.58 to 4.05) and (RR=1.52: 95%CI: 0.67 to 3.49) respectively. There is no convincing evidence that desmopressin minimises perioperative allogeneic RBC transfusion in patients who do not

  3. Transfusion of red cells in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (TRIST: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinmouth Alan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insight regarding transfusion practices in Hematopoietic Stem cell Transplantation (HSCT are lacking and the impact of red cell transfusion in this high risk group on outcomes following HSCT are not well appreciated. Red blood cell transfusion can be life-saving, however, liberal use of transfusion in critically ill patients failed to demonstrate significant clinical benefit. A large number of other observational studies have also demonstrated an association between red blood cell transfusions and increased morbidity such as infections and multi organ failure as well as increased mortality. The role of red cell transfusion on the clinical outcomes observed in patients undergoing HSCT remains poorly understood and a prospective randomized study of transfusion is required to gain insight and knowledge on best transfusion practices in this high risk population. Methods This report describes the design and methodological issues of a randomized pilot study evaluating red cell transfusion triggers in the setting of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. This study has been funded by a peer review grant from the Canadian Blood Services and is registered on Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01237639. Results In 3 Canadian centres, 100 patients undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation will be randomized to either a restrictive (target hemoglobin of 70-90 g/L or liberal (target hemoglobin of 90-110 g/L red cell transfusion strategy, based daily hemoglobin values up to 100 days post-transplant. The study will stratify participants by centre and type of transplant. The primary goal is to demonstrate study feasibility and we will collect clinical outcomes on 1 Transfusion Requirements, 2 Transplant Related Mortality, 3 Maximum grade of acute Graft versus Host Disease, 4 Veno-occlusive Disease, 5 Serious Infections, 6 Bearman Toxicity Score, 7 Bleeding, 8 Quality of Life, 9 Number of Hospitalizations and 10 Number of Intensive Care Unit

  4. Definition and drivers of acute traumatic coagulopathy: clinical and experimental investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frith, Christopher Donald; Goslings, J C; Gaarder, C

    2010-01-01

    Acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) is an impairment of hemostasis that occurs early after injury and is associated with a 4-fold higher mortality, increased transfusion requirements and organ failure.......Acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) is an impairment of hemostasis that occurs early after injury and is associated with a 4-fold higher mortality, increased transfusion requirements and organ failure....

  5. Quality indicators for Transfusion Medicine in Spain: a survey among hospital transfusion services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romon, Iñigo; Lozano, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Background Transfusion services in the European Union must implement quality management systems to improve quality. Quality indicators (QI) play a key role in quality management because they can supply important information about the performance of the transfusion service, which can then be used for benchmarking. However, little is known about the actual use of QI in hospitals. We tried to ascertain the use and characteristics of QI in Spanish hospital transfusion services. Materials and methods We performed a survey among transfusion services in order to learn which QI they use. We classified indicators into categories and concepts, according to the steps of the transfusion process or the activities the indicators referred to. Results Seventy-six hospitals (17.9% of the hospitals actively transfusing in the country) reported 731 QI. Twenty-two of them (29%) were tertiary level hospitals. The number of indicators per hospital and by activity varied greatly. QI were assigned to some basic categories: transfusion process (23% of indicators), transfusion activity and stock management (22%), haemovigilance (20%), stem cell transplantation (9%), transfusion laboratory (9%), quality management system (8%), blood donation (3.4%), apheresis and therapeutic activities (2.5%) and immunohaematology of pregnancy (2%). Discussion Although most hospitals use QI in their quality management system and share a core group of indicators, we found a great dispersion in the number and characteristics of the indicators used. The use of a commonly agreed set of QI could be an aid to benchmarking among hospitals and to improving the transfusion process. PMID:27483486

  6. Blood utilization: fostering an effective hospital transfusion culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Carolyn Hyatt; Macivor, Duncan C

    2012-03-01

    An effective hospital transfusion culture should encourage clinicians to consider the possibility of transfusion in their patients well before the need actually arises, and to plan ahead in an attempt to use blood products most efficiently. Strategies for improved blood utilization include timely and adequate preoperative assessment of risk, optimization of baseline hemoglobin, anticipation of potential transfusion problems, intraoperative techniques to minimize blood loss, blood conservation technologies, transfusion guidelines and targeted therapy, point of care testing, and massive transfusion protocols. Attention to these elements promotes a safe and cost-effective transfusion culture. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. MOBILE MULTIMEDIA TERMINAL IN TRANSFUSION PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Meža

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Due to the administrative errors in the transfusion chain between the blood donor and the patient, transfusion errors still occur. Usually, they are caused by the misidentifications of the patient, his blood samples and respective blood components. A reliable identification can only be reached by an appropriate informatization of the whole process by implementation of information networks and communication technologies.Methods. An information system covering all modern standards of safety and enabling integrity of patient records as well as faster and efficient transfusion was prepared. The system is enabling the rational use of the blood as well as assuring the obligatory haemoviligilance, as foreseen by the current law. The whole system is modular, consisting of terminals, supportive equipment, networking systems and servers. Additional hardware are the electronic code bar readers. Mobile terminals (Palm Pocket PCs are wirelessly connected to the data network using the IEEE 802.11b WLAN technology in a wireless connection. All elements are included into the communication network with the servers contain data bases of blood donors, blood components and the patients; they execute the algorithms of the blood transfusion process support and enable the authentication. At the same time they enable the corresponding interfaces adapted to the users and terminals. For the connection of elements, corresponding interfaces are used.Results. The application is supporting the whole system of ordering, issuing and transfusion of a blood component. Its main characteristics are the bar-coded wristband for patient identification, coding of the blood samples with the same bar code that is unmistakably connected with the patient, and electronic ordering of blood component via a handheld device at the patient’s side. By means of which identity of the patient and the blood component can be matched right before the intended transfusion. Similarly, the

  8. Transfusion and blood donation on the screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danic, Bruno; Lefrère, Jean-Jacques

    2008-05-01

    In the 20th century, blood transfusion has become an indispensable therapy in carrying out and improving many medical and surgical applications. Its scope of influence goes well beyond that of medicine, because blood donation, an action with high social significance, is completely connected to progress in the field. The purpose of this research was to study, through films that show transfusion or blood donation, the impression that has been given to the public in the course of the 20th century and its sociologic impact. To accomplish this, we have used various sources from Histories of Cinema and from the Internet to identify films from different countries and from different epochs that touch on this theme. With these two components, the act of donation and the act of transfusion, the relatively short history of blood transfusion is distinguished by upheavals in both the medical and the sociopolitical fields of the past century. Movies, the most commonly shared cultural event and mirror of society, have simultaneously gone through their first century by showing the diversity of our feelings and the human condition. Through various cinematographic references, the authors offer an analysis of the use, by the Seventh Art, of values and illustrations that use blood donation and transfusion.

  9. Blood transfusion safety: a new philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, I M

    2012-12-01

    Blood transfusion safety has had a chequered history, and there are current and future challenges. Internationally, there is no clear consensus for many aspects of the provision of safe blood, although pan-national legislation does provide a baseline framework in the European Union. Costs are rising, and new safety measures can appear expensive, especially when tested against some other medical interventions, such as cancer treatment and vaccination programmes. In this article, it is proposed that a comprehensive approach is taken to the issue of blood transfusion safety that considers all aspects of the process rather than considering only new measures. The need for an agreed level of safety for specified and unknown risks is also suggested. The importance of providing care and support for those inadvertently injured as a result of transfusion problems is also made. Given that the current blood safety decision process often uses a utilitarian principle for decision making--through the calculation of Quality Adjusted Life Years--an alternative philosophy is proposed. A social contract for blood safety, based on the principles of 'justice as fairness' developed by John Rawls, is recommended as a means of providing an agreed level of safety, containing costs and providing support for any adverse outcomes. © 2012 The Author. Transfusion Medicine © 2012 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  10. Transfusion and blood donation in comic strips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Danic, Bruno

    2013-07-01

    The representation of blood transfusion and donation of blood in the comic strip has never been studied. The comic strip, which is a relatively recent art, emerged in the 19th century before becoming a mass medium during the 20th century. We have sought, by calling on collectors and using the resources of Internet, comic strips devoted, wholly or in part, to the themes of transfusion and blood donation. We present some of them here in chronologic order, indicating the title, country of origin, year of publication, and names of authors. The theme of the superhero using transfusion to transmit his virtues or his powers is repeated throughout the 20th century in North American comic strips. More recently, comic strips have been conceived from the outset with a promotional aim. They perpetuate positive images and are directed toward a young readership, wielding humor to reduce the fear of venipuncture. Few comic strips denounce the abuse of the commercialization of products derived from the human body. The image of transfusion and blood donation given by the comic strips is not to be underestimated because their readership is primarily children, some of whom will become blood donors. Furthermore, if some readers are transfused during their lives, the impact of a memory more or less conscious of these childhood readings may resurface, both in hopes and in fears. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Behandling af akut myeloid leukæmi uden transfusion af blodprodukter hos et medlem af Jehovas Vidner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Christian; Jensen, Morten Krogh

    2011-01-01

    We present a case in which a young woman was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia, FAB-classification type M2. As a member of Jehovah's Witnesses she refused to accept any treatment involving blood transfusions. A modified induction and consolidation chemotherapy regimen was applied, tailored...

  12. Effect of Plasma and Red Blood Cell Transfusions on Survival in Patients with Combat Related Traumatic Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    fibrinogen and prothrombin complex concentrate used to reverse dilutional coagulopathy—a porcine model. Br J Anaesth. 2006;97:460–467. 44. Fries D...with acute myocardial infarction . N Engl J Med. 2001;345:1230–1236. 65. Fergusson D, Khanna MP, Tinmouth A, Hébert PC. Transfusion of leukoreduced red

  13. Transfusion of platelets, but not of red blood cells, is independently associated with nosocomial infections in the critically ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engele, Leo J; Straat, Marleen; van Rooijen, Ingeborg H M; de Vooght, Karen M K; Cremer, Olaf L; Schultz, Marcus J; Bos, Lieuwe D J; Juffermans, Nicole P

    2016-12-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion has been associated with nosocomial infection in the critically ill patients. However, this association may be confounded by length of stay, as prolonged intensive care unit (ICU stay) increases both risk of infection and risk of transfusion. Also, it is not known whether specific blood products have differential risks. In this prospective multicentre cohort study, the risk of bacterial infections associated with transfusion products in critically ill (ICU) patients was determined in an integrated statistical model, using Cox proportional hazard analysis to account for attrition bias. In all acutely admitted patients with a length of stay of >48 h between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2012, the occurrence of nosocomial infections in the ICU was prospectively monitored using CDC criteria. Of 3502 screened patients, 476 (13.6 %) developed a nosocomial infection. These patients had higher APACHE IV scores, had longer ICU length of stay and were more frequently transfused compared to patients without an infection. Logistic regression showed that RBC transfusion was a risk factor for infection [odds ratio (OR) 1.98, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.54-2.55, p infection [hazard ratio (HR) 1.36, 95 % CI 1.10-1.69, p = 0.004] and between platelet transfusion and infection (HR 1.46, 95 % CI 1.18-1.81, p infection independently from other transfusion products (HR 1.40, 95 % CI 1.03-1.90, p = 0.03). In critically ill patients, transfusion of platelets, but not of RBCs and plasma, is an independent risk factor for acquiring a nosocomial infection.

  14. Liberal versus restrictive transfusion thresholds for patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Jeffrey L; Brooks, Maria Mori; Abbott, J Dawn; Chaitman, Bernard; Kelsey, Sheryl F; Triulzi, Darrell J; Srinivas, Vankeepuram; Menegus, Mark A; Marroquin, Oscar C; Rao, Sunil V; Noveck, Helaine; Passano, Elizabeth; Hardison, Regina M; Smitherman, Thomas; Vagaonescu, Tudor; Wimmer, Neil J; Williams, David O

    2013-06-01

    Prior trials suggest it is safe to defer transfusion at hemoglobin levels above 7 to 8 g/dL in most patients. Patients with acute coronary syndrome may benefit from higher hemoglobin levels. We performed a pilot trial in 110 patients with acute coronary syndrome or stable angina undergoing cardiac catheterization and a hemoglobin <10 g/dL. Patients in the liberal transfusion strategy received one or more units of blood to raise the hemoglobin level ≥10 g/dL. Patients in the restrictive transfusion strategy were permitted to receive blood for symptoms from anemia or for a hemoglobin <8 g/dL. The predefined primary outcome was the composite of death, myocardial infarction, or unscheduled revascularization 30 days post randomization. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups except age (liberal, 67.3; restrictive, 74.3). The mean number of units transfused was 1.6 in the liberal group and 0.6 in the restrictive group. The primary outcome occurred in 6 patients (10.9%) in the liberal group and 14 (25.5%) in the restrictive group (risk difference = 15.0%; 95% confidence interval of difference 0.7% to 29.3%; P = .054 and adjusted for age P = .076). Death at 30 days was less frequent in liberal group (n = 1, 1.8%) compared to restrictive group (n = 7, 13.0%; P = .032). The liberal transfusion strategy was associated with a trend for fewer major cardiac events and deaths than a more restrictive strategy. These results support the feasibility of and the need for a definitive trial. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Quality indicators for the hospital transfusion chain : A national survey conducted in 100 dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlker-Jansen, Pauline Y.; Janssen, M. P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304818208; van Tilborgh-de Jong, A. J W; Schipperus, M. R.; Wiersum-Osselton, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The 2011 Dutch Blood Transfusion Guideline for hospitals incorporates seven internal quality indicators for evaluation of the hospital transfusion chain. The indicators aim to measure guideline compliance as shown by the instatement of a hospital transfusion committee and transfusion

  16. [Blood transfusion and supply chain management safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Jean-François; Caldani, Cyril; Cabaud, Jean-Jacques; Chavarin, Patricia; Rochette-Eribon, Sandrine

    2015-02-01

    The level of safety attained in blood transfusion now makes this a discipline better managed care activities. This was achieved both by scientific advances and policy decisions regulating and supervising the activity, as well as by the quality system, which we recall that affects the entire organizational structure, responsibilities, procedures, processes and resources in place to achieve quality management. So, an effective quality system provides a framework within which activities are established, performed in a quality-focused way and continuously monitored to improve outcomes. This system quality has to irrigate all the actors of the transfusion, just as much the establishments of blood transfusion than the health establishments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Transfusion medicine in trauma patients: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthi, Sarah B; Stansbury, Lynn G; Dutton, Richard P; Edelman, Bennett B; Scalea, Thomas M; Hess, John R

    2011-10-01

    In 2008, we reviewed the practical interface between transfusion medicine and the surgery and critical care of severely injured patients. Reviewed topics ranged from epidemiology of trauma to patterns of resuscitation to the problems of transfusion reactions. In the interim, trauma specialists have adopted damage control resuscitation and become much more knowledgeable and thoughtful about the use of blood products. This new understanding and the resulting changes in clinical practice have raised new concerns. In this update, we focus on which patients need damage control resuscitation, current views on the optimal form of damage control resuscitation with blood products, the roles of newer blood products, and appropriate transfusion triggers in the postinjury setting. We will also review the role of new technology in patient assessment, therapy and monitoring.

  18. Intrauterine Transfusion in Maternal Rh Immunization

    OpenAIRE

    Cabral Antonio Carlos Vieira; Taveira Marcos Roberto; Lopes Ana Paula Brum Miranda; Pereira Alamanda Kfoury; Leite Henrique Vitor

    2001-01-01

    Objetivos: avaliar os resultados do tratamento intra-útero de fetos anêmicos devido a isoimunização materna pelo fator Rh. Pacientes e Métodos: foram acompanhados 61 fetos submetidos a transfusão intra-uterina seja por via intraperitoneal, intravascular ou combinada. Os casos de fetos hidrópicos corresponderam a 19,7% do total, sendo que nestes a via de tratamento sempre foi a intravascular. Foram realizadas em média 2,7 transfusões por feto, com um total de 163 procedimentos. A indicação par...

  19. Quality Control Approach to Anticoagulants and Transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean, Erin

    2016-06-01

    Quality can be defined by processes of care and by the characteristics of the care and its outcomes. In terms of blood loss and transfusion, otolaryngologists should be aware of available guidelines, standards for use of blood products, devices and hemostatic agents, outcomes metrics relevant to patients, and tools for implementing quality improvements. This article reviews the definition of health care quality, and discusses the data regarding anticoagulant medications (particularly new oral anticoagulants) and guidelines for blood product transfusion. A brief outline of quality tools is provided to help otolaryngologists create quality plans for themselves and their institutions/systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Indications and surveillance of platelet transfusions in surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffe, C; Bardiaux, L; Couteret, Y; Devillers, M; Leroy, M; Morel, P; Pouthier-Stein, F; Hervé, P

    1995-01-01

    Surgery, after hematology, is the biggest consumer of homologous platelet concentrates. Platelet transfusion is indicated to prevent or control bleeding associated with deficiencies in platelet number or function. In surgery, general patterns (in function of pre-surgery platelet count) can be adopted in most of the indications for platelets. In emergency situations, and in some particular cases (related to the patient, the type of operation, etc.), the transfusion procedure depends on the team's experience, the results of the available clinical and biological tests, and the drugs. Strict monitoring is required during the transfusion procedure. The efficacy of the transfusion must be controlled 1 h and 24 hours after the transfusion, and a number of factors must be assessed, namely the immunological impact of the transfusion (on red blood cells, leukocytes and platelets) and the occurrence of infectious diseases transmitted via transfusion. In addition, for a possible future transfusion, a strategy must be proposed.

  1. Association of blood transfusion with increased mortality in myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatterjee, Saurav; Wetterslev, Jørn; Sharma, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    The benefit of blood transfusion in patients with myocardial infarction is controversial, and a possibility of harm exists.......The benefit of blood transfusion in patients with myocardial infarction is controversial, and a possibility of harm exists....

  2. Neurological Complications following Blood Transfusions in Sickle Cell Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawar, Nayaab; Kulpa, Jolanta; Bellin, Anne; Proteasa, Simona; Sundaram, Revathy

    2017-01-01

    In Sickle Cell Anemia (SCA) patient blood transfusions are an important part of treatment for stroke and its prevention. However, blood transfusions can also lead to complications such as Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome (RPLS). This brief report highlights two cases of SCA who developed such neurological complications after a blood transfusion. RLPS should be considered as the cause of neurologic finding in patients with SCA and hypertension following a blood transfusion. PMID:28127478

  3. Characterization of transfusion-derived iron deposition in childhood cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruccione, Kathleen S; Wood, John C; Sposto, Richard; Malvar, Jemily; Chen, Cheng; Freyer, David R

    2014-09-01

    Childhood cancer survivors (CCS) receiving packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusions may have increased risk for vital organ iron deposition causing serious late effects. This cross-sectional cohort study of a CCS cohort quantified organ iron content by magnetic resonance imaging. Iron status by serum markers and hemochromatosis gene mutation status were assessed. Seventy-five patients who had received a range (0-392 mL/kg) of cumulative PRBC transfusion volumes were enrolled (median age 14 years, range 8-25.6 years at evaluation). Median follow-up time was 4.4 years, and median time since last transfusion was 4.9 years. Cancer diagnoses included acute lymphoblastic or myelogenous leukemia (ALL/AML; n = 33) and solid tumors (n = 42). Liver and pancreatic iron concentrations were elevated in 36 of 73 (49.3%) and 19 of 72 (26.4%) subjects, respectively. Cardiac iron concentration was not increased in this cohort. In multivariate analysis, cumulative PRBC volume (P cancer and is associated with cumulative PRBC transfusion volume and age at diagnosis. These findings have implications for development of monitoring and management guidelines for cancer patients and survivors at risk for IO, exploration of the additive risk of liver/pancreatic damage from chemotherapeutic exposures, and health education to minimize further liver/pancreatic damage from exposures such as excessive alcohol intake and hepatotoxic medications. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Spine tumor resection among patients who refuse blood product transfusion: a retrospective case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisilevsky, Alexandra E; Stobart, Liam; Roland, Kristine; Flexman, Alana M

    2016-12-01

    To describe the perioperative blood conservation strategies and postoperative outcomes in patients who undergo complex spinal surgery for tumor resection and who also refuse blood product transfusion. A retrospective case series. A single-center, tertiary care and academic teaching hospital in Canada. All adult patients undergoing elective major spine tumor resection and refusing blood product transfusion who were referred to our institutional Blood Utilization Program between June 1, 2004, and May 9, 2014. Data on the use of iron, erythropoietin, preoperative autologous blood donation, acute normovolemic hemodilution, antifibrinolytic therapy, cell salvage, intraoperative hypotension, and active warming techniques were collected. Data on perioperative hemoglobin nadir, adverse outcomes, and hospital length of stay were also collected. Four patients who refused blood transfusion (self-identified as Jehovah's Witnesses) underwent non-emergent complex spine surgery for recurrent chondrosarcoma, meningioma, metastatic adenocarcinoma, and metastatic malignant melanoma. All patients received 1 or more perioperative blood conservation strategy including preoperative iron and/or erythropoietin, intraoperative antifibrinolytic therapy, and cell salvage. No patients experienced severe perioperative anemia (average hemoglobin nadir, 124 g/L) or anemia-related postoperative complications. Patients who decline blood product transfusion can successfully undergo major spine tumor resection. Careful patient selection and timely referral for perioperative optimization such that the risk of severe anemia is minimized are important for success. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Anemia of prematurity : time for a change in transfusion management?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khodabux, Chantal Muriel

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we investigated clinical effects of allogeneic red blood cell (RBC) transfusions in premature infants, different transfusion volumes in relation to neonatal outcome in premature infants and the use of autologous cord blood (CB) as an alternative for allogeneic transfusions. Despite

  6. Perioperative transfusion threshold and ambulation after hip revision surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kamilla; Johansson, Pär I; Dahl, Benny

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transfusion with red blood cells (RBC) may be needed during hip revision surgery but the appropriate haemoglobin concentration (Hb) threshold for transfusion has not been well established. We hypothesized that a higher transfusion threshold would improve ambulation after hip revision ...

  7. Liberal transfusion strategies still the trend in burn surgery | Allorto ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Blood is a limited resource in middle-income countries such as South Africa. Transfusion is associated with complications and expense. We aimed to understand our transfusion practices in burn surgery as well as ascertain the opinion of a broader group of surgeons and anaesthetists regarding transfusion ...

  8. Red blood cell transfusion during septic shock in the ICU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Smith, S H; Carlsen, S

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) remains controversial in patients with septic shock, but current practice is unknown. Our aim was to evaluate RBC transfusion practice in septic shock in the intensive care unit (ICU), and patient characteristics and outcome associated with RBC transfusion....

  9. Blood Transfusion Strategies in Patients Undergoing Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoung Soo Kim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO is frequently associated with bleeding and coagulopathy complications, which may lead to the need for transfusion of multiple blood products. However, blood transfusions are known to increase morbidity and mortality, as well as hospital cost, in critically ill patients. In current practice, patients on ECMO receive a transfusion, on average, of 1-5 packed red blood cells (RBCs/day, with platelet transfusion accounting for the largest portion of transfusion volume. Generally, adult patients require more transfusions than neonates or children, and patients receiving venovenous ECMO for respiratory failure tend to need smaller transfusion volumes compared to those receiving venoarterial ECMO for cardiac failure. Observation studies have reported that a higher transfusion volume was associated with increased mortality. To date, the evidence for transfusion in patients undergoing ECMO is limited; most knowledge on transfusion strategies was extrapolated from studies in critically ill patients. However, current data support a restrictive blood transfusion strategy for ECMO patients, and a low transfusion trigger seems to be safe and reasonable.

  10. Review of autologous blood transfusion at the Kenyatta National ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autologous blood transfusion refers to transfusion of blood and/or blood components that are donated by the intended recipient (1). It is considered as one of the safest methods of blood transfusion (1,2). Different types of autologous blood include: preoperative blood deposit, preoperative haemodilution,intraope.

  11. Blood Transfusion In Surgical Children: The Advantages And Hazards

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The increasing opposition to blood transfusion makes the management of surgical children who require blood very challenging. This retrospective study reviews records of blood transfusion so as to determine the advantages and hazards in surgical children. The advantages and hazards of blood transfusion in surgical ...

  12. Survey of blood transfusion needs in a tertiary Nigerian institute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Inappropriate blood transfusion has been reported from all over the world. Objectives: This survey examined the use of blood and blood products in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital with a view of assessing appropriateness of transfusion, so as to suggest ways of minimizing inappropriate transfusion if they occur ...

  13. For assessment of changes in intraoperative red blood cell transfusion practices over time, the pooled incidence of transfusion correlates highly with total units transfused.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Franklin; Epstein, Richard H

    2017-06-01

    Multiple studies nationwide and at single hospitals have examined changes over time in the incidence of perioperative red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. However, the cost of RBC transfusions is related to the number of RBC units transfused, not to the incidence. We evaluate whether the readily available incidence of RBC transfusion can be used as a valid surrogate measure. Observational retrospective study. One tertiary, academic hospital. 394,789 cases of 1885 procedures over N=42 quarters of the year. None. Incidence and number of RBC units transfused intraoperatively. The number of RBC units transfused per case did not follow a Poisson distribution, confirming that the number of units and incidence of transfusion are not interchangeable for analyzing decisions by case. However, with all cases of each quarter combined, the Spearman correlation was 0.98±0.01 between each quarter's incidence of RBC transfusion and mean RBC units transfused per case (Punits transfused. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Twin-twin transfusion syndrome: mathematical modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P. H. M.; Umur, Asli; Ross, Michael G.; van Gemert, Martin J. C.

    2008-01-01

    Twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) represents a pregnancy complication with a high risk for perinatal mortality and postnatal morbidity. Mathematical models have been utilized to examine the mechanisms of disease and potential treatment modalities. We developed four consecutive models based on

  15. Transfusion Transmissible Infections among Voluntary Blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: HIV1&2, HBsAg, anti-HCV and syphilis antibody are mandatory disease marker tests of Transfusion Transmissible Infections (TTIs) conducted on every donated unit of blood in Zambia. Blood is donated by first time voluntary donors and repeat/regular donors of ages between 16 and 65 years. Both first time ...

  16. 1. Transfusion Transmissible Infections among Voluntary Blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    ABSTRACT. Background: HIV1&2, HBsAg, anti-HCV and syphilis antibody are mandatory disease marker tests of Transfusion Transmissible Infections (TTIs) conducted on every donated unit of blood in Zambia. Blood is donated by first time voluntary donors and repeat/regular donors ofages between 16 and 65 years.

  17. Twin-twin transfusion syndrome modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Wiyngaard, Jeroen P. H. M.; Ross, Michael G.; van Gemert, Martin J. C.

    2007-01-01

    The twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) is a severe complication occurring in monochorionic twins, and untreated, causes high rates of mortality and morbidity. In TTTS, five consecutive stages of increasing severity can be distinguished: first, the oligopolyhydramnios sequence; second, anuria in

  18. Massive transfusion protocols: current best practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu YM

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Yen-Michael S Hsu,1 Thorsten Haas,2 Melissa M Cushing1 1Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA; 2Department of Anesthesia, University Children's Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland Abstract: Massive transfusion protocols (MTPs are established to provide rapid blood replacement in a setting of severe hemorrhage. Early optimal blood transfusion is essential to sustain organ perfusion and oxygenation. There are many variables to consider when establishing an MTP, and studies have prospectively evaluated different scenarios and patient populations to establish the best practices to attain improved patient outcomes. The establishment and utilization of an optimal MTP is challenging given the ever-changing patient status during resuscitation efforts. Much of the MTP literature comes from the trauma population, due to the fact that massive hemorrhage is the leading cause of preventable trauma-related death. As we come to further understand the positive and negative clinical impacts of transfusion-related factors, massive transfusion practice can be further refined. This article will first discuss specific MTPs targeting different patient populations and current relevant international guidelines. Then, we will examine a wide selection of therapeutic products to support MTPs, including newly available products and the most suitable of the traditional products. Lastly, we will discuss the best design for an MTP, including ratio-based MTPs and MTPs based on the use of point-of-care coagulation diagnostic tools. Keywords: hemorrhage, MTP, antifibrinolytics, coagulopathy, trauma, ratio, logistics, guidelines, hemostatic

  19. Transfusion in the age of molecular diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Marion E

    2009-01-01

    DNA-based tests are increasingly being used to predict a blood group phenotype to improve transfusion medicine. This is possible because genes encoding 29 of the 30 blood group systems have been cloned and sequenced, and the molecular bases associated with most antigens have been determined. RBCs carrying a particular antigen, if introduced into the circulation of an individual who lacks that antigen (through transfusion or pregnancy), can elicit an immune response. It is the antibody from such an immune response that causes problems in clinical practice and the reason why antigen-negative blood is required for safe transfusion. The classical method of testing for blood group antigens and antibodies is hemagglutination; however, it has certain limitations, some of which can be overcome by testing DNA. Such testing allows conservation of antibodies for confirmation by hemagglutination of predicted antigen-negativity. High-throughput platforms provide a means to test relatively large numbers of donors, thereby opening the door to change the way antigen-negative blood is provided to patients and to prevent immunization. This review summarizes how molecular approaches, in conjunction with conventional hemagglutination, can be applied in transfusion medicine.

  20. Red blood cell alloimmunization after blood transfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schonewille, Henk

    2008-01-01

    Current pretransfusion policy requires the patients’ serum to be tested for the presence of irregular red blood cell antibodies. In case of an antibody, red blood cells lacking the corresponding antigen are transfused after an antiglobulin crossmatch. The aim of the studies in this thesis is

  1. TRANSFUSION- TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS IN HAEMOPHILIA PATIENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Zhubi, Bukurije; Mekaj, Ymer; Baruti, Zana; Bunjaku, Ilirijane; Belegu, Mazllum

    2009-01-01

    One of the largest therapeutic problem during the continuous treatment of the patients with Hemophilia A and B, are viral infections as Hepatitis B and C, and HIV, and the other infective diseases, which can be transmitted by the transfusion of blood products.

  2. European strategies against the parasite transfusion risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reesink, H. W.

    2005-01-01

    Protozoal infections are endemic in mainly tropical low income countries, affecting millions of people. Malaria, American trypanosomiasis (Trypanosoma cruzi/Chagas disease) and protozoal tickborne diseases (e.g. Babesia) can be efficiently transmitted by transfusion of cellular blood components. In

  3. editorial emerging alternatives to allogeneic blood transfusions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    3. Chan K. Blood Supply: FDA Oversight and Remaining Issues of. Safety. Washington DC, US General Accounting Office, 1997. 4. Steward W.P. Considerations in the use of blood transfusions in anaemic cancerpatients. Monograph of the l 5 International Cancer. Congress, Saturday 18 August 1990, Hamburg, Germany.

  4. PROGRESS IN BLOOD TRANSFUSION SERVICES IN KENYA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-12-02

    Dec 2, 2009 ... guidelines as well as development of haemovigilance manual for hospital use. ACHIEVEMENTS OF THE BLOOD. TRANSFUSION SERVICE. (i) Over the years blood donations from voluntary non-remunerated donors has increased from merely 6,000 units per year in 2002 to 130,000 units in 2007.

  5. Residual infectious risks in blood transfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lieshout-Krikke, R.W.

    2016-01-01

    Blood transfusion in developed countries is extremely safe. However, a residual risk remains of infectious donations slipping through, because of imperfect donor selection and the diagnostic window period. A myriad of regulations and safety measures is in place to guarantee the high level of safety.

  6. Intraoperative transfusion threshold and tissue oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K; Dahl, B; Johansson, P I

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion with allogeneic red blood cells (RBCs) may be needed to maintain oxygen delivery during major surgery, but the appropriate haemoglobin (Hb) concentration threshold has not been well established. We hypothesised that a higher level of Hb would be associated with improved subcutaneous...

  7. Predonated autologous blood transfusion in elective orthopaedic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The use of homologous blood carries significant risk of viral infections and immune-mediated reactions. Preoperative autologous blood donation is an attractive alternative to homologous transfusion and has become common in elective orthopaedic surgery. Objective: To present our experience with the use of ...

  8. Preoperative Anaemia and Blood Transfusion Requirements in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Anaemia prevalence among children in Nigeria is a serious morbidity although it's prevalence in Benin has not been determined in recent times. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of preoperative anaemia, its' associated factors and blood transfusion requirements in children ...

  9. Prevalence of exchange blood transfusion in severe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Exchange blood transfusion (EBT) is carried out for the treatment of conditions presenting with severe hyperbilirubinaemia and anaemia, such as ABO incompatibility, sepsis, prematurity and birth trauma among others. While it is fast being abandoned as treatment modality for severe neonatal jaundice in the ...

  10. Utilization Management in the Blood Transfusion Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Jeremy Ryan Andrew; Dzik, Walter “Sunny”

    2015-01-01

    The scope of activity of the Blood Transfusion Service (BTS) makes it unique among the clinical laboratories. The combination of therapeutic and diagnostic roles necessitates a multi-faceted approach to utilization management in the BTS. We present our experience in utilization management in large academic medical center. PMID:24080431

  11. Epidemiology of transfusion-transmitted infections among multi-transfused patients in seven hospitals in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguna-Torres, V A; Pérez-Bao, J; Chauca, G; Sovero, M; Blichtein, D; Chunga, A; Flores, W; Retamal, A; Mendoza, S; Cruz, M; Monge, Z; Lavalle, M; Gutiérrez, J; Málaga, J; Soto, E; Loayza, N; Bolívar, D; Reyna, R; Mendoza, C; Oré, M; González, J; Suárez, M; Montano, S M; Sánchez, J L; Sateren, W; Bautista, C T; Olson, J G; Xueref, S

    2005-12-01

    Transfusion-transmitted infections (TTIs) constitute a major health problem worldwide where routine screening of blood or blood products is improperly done, and where non-medical injecting medications and/or drug use are prevalent. Prevalence and risk factors vary by geographic location and by the specific TTI (including HIV-1, HBV, HCV and HTLV-I). To determine the prevalence and risk factors associated with TTIs among a sample of multi-transfused adult patients in Peru. A cross-sectional multi-center study was conducted across seven major hospitals in Peru from February 2003 to September 2004. Self-reported behavior information (medical procedures, number of sexual partners, and drug use history) was analyzed, along with a review of exposure history from hospital medical records. Prevalences were calculated by TTI for different exposures, along with unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios for infection risk. Overall, 192 (54.7%) of 351 multi-transfused patients were found infected with one or more TTIs. Number of transfusion units, years of transfusion history (6 or more), and number of treatment facilities (2 or more) were associated with HCV infection. Hemodialysis history was a common risk factor associated with HBV, HCV and HTLV-I infection. HIV infection was associated only with total number of transfusion units received. High prevalences of HBV and HCV infection were found among Peruvian multi-transfused patients and were associated with a past history and number of blood transfusions, as well as with past hemodialysis procedures. TTIs continue to represent a significant public health problem in Peru. Continued vigilant attention to blood safety procedures, including universal screening and health care provider education, is recommended.

  12. Transfusion Therapy in Critically Ill Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Tsung Chang

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Critically ill children in pediatric intensive care units are commonly indicated for blood transfusion due to many reasons. Children are quite different from adults during growth and development, and that should be taken into consideration. It is very dif-ficult to establish a universal transfusion guideline for critically ill children, especially preterm neonates. Treating underlying disease and targeted replacement therapy are the most effective approaches. Red blood cells are the first choice for replacement therapy in decompensated anemic patients. The critical hemoglobin concentration may be higher in critically ill children for many reasons. Whole blood is used only in the following conditions or diseases: (1 exchange transfusion; (2 after cardiopulmonary bypass; (3 extracorporeal membrane oxygenation; (4 massive transfusion, especially in multiple component deficiency. The characteristics of hemorrhagic diseases are so varied that their therapy should depend on the specific needs associated with the underlying disease. In general, platelet transfusion is not needed when a patient has platelet count greater than 10,000/mm3 and is without active bleeding, platelet functional deficiency or other risk factors such as sepsis. Patients with risk factors or age less than 4 months should be taken into special consideration, and the critical thrombocyte level will be raised. Platelet transfusion is not recommended in patients with immune-mediated thrombocytopenia or thrombocytopenia due to acceleration of platelet destruction without active bleeding or life-threatening hemorrhage. There are many kinds of plasma-derived products, and recombinant factors are commonly used for hemorrhagic patients due to coagulation factor deficiency depending on the characteristics of the diseases. The most effective way to correct disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC is to treat the underlying disease. Anticoagulant ther-apy is very important; heparin is the

  13. Direct costs of transfusion reactions - an expert judgement approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, M P; van Tilborgh, A J W; de Vooght, K M K; Bokhorst, A G; Wiersum-Osselton, J C

    2017-11-09

    Despite increasingly meticulous haemovigilance reporting throughout the world, a systematic assessment of the cost of transfusion reactions is still lacking. This is partly caused by the fact that such an assessment requires a subjective expert assessment of the additional costs linked to the adverse reaction. Data on the cost of transfusion reactions could support decision-making regarding blood transfusion safety measures. Thirteen experts from nine hospitals were asked to estimate the additional care required following various types of transfusion reactions. Additional care was quantified as the proportion of reactions requiring care, and the amount of care required (e.g. hospitalization days, additional physician's time). Experts were also asked to provide, per type of transfusion reaction, an estimate of the proportion of transfusion reactions preventable. Structured quantitative expert elicitation methods were applied to obtain and combine expert estimates. The estimated annual in-hospital cost of transfusion reactions in the Netherlands is €933 356 per year (€1.52 per transfusion). Two-thirds (64%) of these are incurred by non-serious transfusion reactions. Circulatory overload, TRALI and anaphylaxis clearly dominate the costs of serious adverse transfusion reactions (66% in total); non-haemolytic transfusion reactions incur 46% of the cost of non-serious transfusion reactions. Additional safety measures targeting circulatory overload and new antibody formation potentially offer the highest cost reduction. In-hospital costs of transfusion reactions are substantial but contribute to less than 1% of the total cost of transfusion in the Netherlands. A considerable part of these costs (24%) might be preventable. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  14. Serial haematology results in transfused and non-transfused dogs naturally infected with Babesia rossi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Scheepers

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This prospective longitudinal study investigated the progression of haematological changes in 32 transfused and 54 non-transfused dogs naturally infected with Babesia rossi over the 1st 6 days following diagnosis and treatment. The effect of patient age on the results of complete blood counts was determined. Haematology data were analysed at presentation and at 24 hours, 3 days and 6 days after presentation. Dogs were treated with diminazene aceturate at diagnosis and a blood transfusion was given if deemed clinically required. Mildly to moderately regenerative normocytic normochromic anaemia was observed in all dogs throughout the study period. Transfused dogs more often had an inflammatory leukogram at presentation and at 24 hours, than dogs that were not transfused. In dogs with a left shift, a concurrent normal or decreased segmented neutrophil count was found more commonly than neutrophilia. Severe thrombocytopenia that resolved within a week was common. Blood transfusion alleviated the anaemia, but had no significant effect on white blood cell or platelet responses. Blood cell responses were not significantly influenced by age. In conclusion, the red blood cell and white blood cell responses were less than expected in dogs with babesiosis, given the degree of anaemia and inflammation present. The magnitude of thrombocytopenia and rapid return of the platelet count to normal suggested a possible immune-mediated mechanism for the thrombocytopenia.

  15. Serial haematology results in transfused and non-transfused dogs naturally infected with Babesia rossi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheepers, E; Leisewitz, A L; Thompson, P N; Christopher, M M

    2011-09-01

    This prospective longitudinal study investigated the progression of haematological changes in 32 transfused and 54 non-transfused dogs naturally infected with Babesia rossi over the 1st 6 days following diagnosis and treatment. The effect of patient age on the results of complete blood counts was determined. Haematology data were analysed at presentation and at 24 hours, 3 days and 6 days after presentation. Dogs were treated with diminazene aceturate at diagnosis and a blood transfusion was given if deemed clinically required. Mildly to moderately regenerative normocytic normochromic anaemia was observed in all dogs throughout the study period. Transfused dogs more often had an inflammatory leukogram at presentation and at 24 hours, than dogs that were not transfused. In dogs with a left shift, a concurrent normal or decreased segmented neutrophil count was found more commonly than neutrophilia. Severe thrombocytopenia that resolved within a week was common. Blood transfusion alleviated the anaemia, but had no significant effect on white blood cell or platelet responses. Blood cell responses were not significantly influenced by age. In conclusion, the red blood cell and white blood cell responses were less than expected in dogs with babesiosis, given the degree of anaemia and inflammation present. The magnitude of thrombocytopenia and rapid return of the platelet count to normal suggested a possible immune-mediated mechanism for the thrombocytopenia.

  16. The risk of transfusion-transmitted viral infections at the Gabonese National Blood Transfusion Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rerambiah, Leonard Kounegnigan; Rerambiah, Laurence Essola; Bengone, Calixte; Djoba Siawaya, Joel F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Blood transfusions carry the risk of transmitting blood-borne infections. In contrast to the situation in the developed world, there is a limited number of studies examining this problem in sub-Saharan Africa. In this study we aimed to calculate the risks of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection from units of blood issued by the Gabonese Blood Transfusion Centre between 2009 and 2011. Materials and methods All the donations were tested for infectious diseases and the seroconversion incidence rates of HIV, HBV and HCV were calculated. The residual risk of transfusion-associated transmission for each virus was calculated by multiplying the seroconversion rates by the window period expressed in fractions of a year. Results The risks of becoming infected with HIV, HCV, and HBV in subjects receiving units of blood from the Gabonese Blood Transfusion Centre were 64.7, 207.94 and 534.53 per million donations, respectively. Conclusions This study, which is the first to quantify the true risks of transfusion-transmitted infections in Gabon, reveals and confirms the need to reinforce preventative and screening strategies to improve transfusion safety in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24333085

  17. Transfusão de concentrado de hemácias na unidade de terapia intensiva Red blood cells transfusion in intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Emanuelle Volpato

    2009-12-01

    patients who under go red blood cell transfusion are several: acute loss of blood after trauma, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, surgery amongst others. Currently, few studies are available regarding the use of blood components in patients at intensive care unit. Although blood transfusions are frequent in intensive care unit, the optimized criteria for handling are not clearly defined, with no available guidelines. OBJECTIVES: To analyze the clinical indications of the use of the red blood cell in the intensive care unit. METHODS: The clinical history of the patients admitted in the intensive care unit were analyzed, revisiting which had have red blood cell transfusion in the period between January 1st 2005 and December 31 2005. The study was accepted by the Research Ethics Committee - Comitê de Ética em Pesquisa (CEP - of the University of South of Santa Catarina (UNISUL. RESULTS: The transfusion rate was 19,33, and the majority of the patients were of the male gender. Their age prevalence was of 60 years old or older. The mortality rate among patients who under went red blood cell transfusion died was of 38,22%. The transfusions criterias were low serum hemoglobin (78% and the hemoglobin pre - transfusion was 8,11 g/dL. CONCLUSIONS: Politrauma and sepsis/sepsis chock were the pre diagnosis criteria. A low hemoglobin level is the main clinical criteria with average hemoglobin pre - transfusion was 8,11 g/dL.

  18. Ranitidine prevents postoperative transfusion-induced depression of delayed hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Hammer, J H; Moesgaard, F

    1989-01-01

    The influence of perioperative blood transfusion on postoperative depression of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) and the effect of ranitidine on transfusion-induced changes in postoperative CMI were investigated. CMI was assessed preoperatively and postoperatively by skin testing with seven common...... ranitidine therapy, and whole blood transfusion was given to 24 of these patients. Postoperative skin test response was more reduced in transfused vs nontransfused patients (-57% vs -38%, p less than 0.0001). Fourteen of the 24 patients receiving blood transfusion could be exactly matched to 14 patients...

  19. Indications and Effects of Plasma Transfusions in Critically Ill Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karam, Oliver; Demaret, Pierre; Shefler, Alison

    2015-01-01

    (INR) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) values were 1.5 and 48, respectively. After plasma transfusion, the median INR and aPTT changes were -0.2 and -5, respectively. Plasma transfusion significantly improved INR only in patients with a baseline INR greater than 2.5. CONCLUSIONS: One......-third of transfused patients were not bleeding and had no planned procedure. In addition, in most patients, coagulation tests are not sensitive to increases in coagulation factors resulting from plasma transfusion. Studies assessing appropriate plasma transfusion strategies are urgently needed....

  20. Anemia and Blood Transfusions in Critically Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kamran Athar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anemia is common in critically ill patients. As a consequence packed red blood cell (PRBC transfusions are frequent in the critically ill. Over the past two decades a growing body of literature has emerged, linking PRBC transfusion to infections, immunosuppression, organ dysfunction, and a higher mortality rate. However, despite growing evidence that risk of PRBC transfusion outweighs its benefit, significant numbers of critically ill patients still receive PRBC transfusion during their intensive care unit (ICU stay. In this paper, we summarize the current literature concerning the impact of anemia on outcomes in critically ill patients and the potential complications of PRBC transfusions.

  1. Transfusion recipient epidemiology and outcomes research: possibilities for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillyer, Christopher D; Blumberg, Neil; Glynn, Simone A; Ness, Paul M

    2008-08-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) supports major research programs related to the field of transfusion medicine, which encompass blood banking, the practice of transfusion medicine itself, and cellular therapies. Specific programmatic elements have included 1) the Transfusion Medicine/Hemostasis Clinical Trials Network (TMH CTN) charged with conducting clinical trials in transfusion medicine and hemostasis; 2) the Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study-II (REDS-II), which includes domestic and international efforts dedicated to blood donor safety and blood availability issues; 3) the Specialized Centers of Clinically Oriented Research (SCCOR) in Transfusion Biology and Medicine that include two major projects, the Biologic and Immunologic Aspects of Transfusion Medicine Program and the Transfusion and Lung Injury Program, and 4) the Transfusion Therapy Trial for Functional Outcomes in Cardiovascular Patients Undergoing Surgical Hip Fracture Repair (FOCUS), a Phase III clinical trial that has as its major goal to determine whether a more aggressive transfusion strategy in surgery patients with cardiovascular disease (or risk factors) is associated with improved functional recovery and decreased risk of adverse postoperative outcomes. Notably, none of these programs supports epidemiologic and clinical outcomes research focused on transfusion recipients. Thus, on October 31, 2007, a Working Group on Transfusion Recipient Epidemiology and Outcomes Research was convened by the NHLBI. This group was asked to discuss the current status of the field, identify critical research needs, and make recommendations to the NHLBI program staff.

  2. Blood Transfusions in Dogs and Cats Receiving Hemodialysis: 230 Cases (June 1997-September 2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langston, C; Cook, A; Eatroff, A; Mitelberg, E; Chalhoub, S

    2017-03-01

    Multiple factors exist that contribute to anemia in dogs and cats receiving hemodialysis, can necessitate transfusion. To describe blood product usage in dogs and cats with acute and chronic kidney disease that were treated with intermittent hemodialysis to determine risk factors associated with the requirement for blood product transfusion. 83 cats and 147 dogs undergoing renal replacement therapy at the Animal Medical Center for acute or chronic kidney disease. Retrospective medical record review of all dogs and cats receiving renal replacement therapy for kidney disease, from June 1997 through September 2012. Blood products (whole blood, packed RBCs, or stromal-free hemoglobin) were administered to 87% of cats and 32% of dogs. The number of dialysis treatments was associated with the requirement for transfusion in cats (adjusted OR 2.21, 95% CI 1.13, 4.32), but not in dogs (adjusted OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.95, 1.03). Administration of a blood product was associated with a higher likelihood of death in dogs (OR 3.198, 95% CI 1.352, 7.565; P = .0098), but not in cats (OR 1.527, 95% CI 0.5404, 4.317, P = .2). Veterinary hospitals with a hemodialysis unit should have reliable and rapid access to safe blood products in order to meet the needs of dogs and cats receiving dialysis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  3. Cancer risk among 21st century blood transfusion recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T O; Cairns, B J; Reeves, G K; Green, J; Beral, V

    2017-02-01

    Some carcinogenic viruses are known to be transmissible by blood transfusion. Intensive viral screening of transfused blood now exists in most countries. In the UK, high-sensitivity nucleic acid amplification tests for hepatitis C virus were introduced in 1999 and it was thought that this would reduce, and possibly eliminate, transfusion-related liver cancer. We aimed to investigate cancer risk in recipients of blood transfusion in 2000 or after. A total of 1.3 million UK women recruited in 1998 on average were followed for hospital records of blood transfusion and for cancer registrations. After excluding women with cancer or precancerous conditions before or at the time of transfusion, Cox regression yielded adjusted relative risks of 11 site-specific cancers for women with compared to without prior blood transfusion. During follow up, 11 274 (0.9%) women had a first recorded transfusion in 2000 or after, and 1648 (14.6%) of them were subsequently diagnosed with cancer, a mean 6.8 years after the transfusion. In the first 5 years after transfusion there were significant excesses for most site-specific cancers examined, presumably because some had preclinical cancer. However, 5 or more years (mean 8 years) after blood transfusion, there were significant excess risks only for liver cancer (adjusted relative risk = 2.63, 95%CI 1.45-4.78) and for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (adjusted relative risk = 1.74, 1.21-2.51). When analyses were restricted to those undergoing hip or knee replacement surgery, the commonest procedure associated with transfusion, these relative risks were not materially altered. In a large cohort of UK women, transfusions in the 21st century were associated with long-term increased risks of liver cancer and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Some of these malignancies may have been caused by carcinogenic agents that are not currently screened for in transfused blood.

  4. Infections in acute leukemia in Indian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Roy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: In the present study acute leukemic children were studied to determine the incidence and principal site of infection, correlation with absolute neutrophil count, causative organisms and to standardize the initial empirical anti microbial therapy. Materials and methods: A total 40 children in the age group 6 month to 12 year with acute leukemia relapse were included in this study. A total 82 infectious episodes including 61 febrile episodes were investigated for infectious etiology. Results: We found that the frequency of infections increased significantly with the degree of immunocompromisation specially neutropenia (ANC < 500/cmm. The skin and soft tissue was the commonest site of infection (26.83%, followed by respiratory tract (21.95%. Staphylococcus nonhemolytic coagulase-negative (34%, followed by Klebsiella (17% were the most common organisms isolated from blood. Staphylococcus non-hemolytic coagulase-negative was also the commonest isolate (26% from other sites of infection. Most strains were sensitive to Cloxacillin, cephalosporin and aminoglycosides. Conclusion: For the treatment of febrile episodes, empirical use of beta-lactamase resistant penicillin e.g. Cloxacillin or cephalosporin combined with an aminoglycosides with a broad spectrum antifungal like fluconazole in selective cases at the first sign of infection is recommended. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2013, Vol-9, No-1, 40-47 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v9i1.9672

  5. Perflubron emulsion delays blood transfusions in orthopedic surgery. European Perflubron Emulsion Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahn, D R; van Brempt, R; Theilmeier, G; Reibold, J P; Welte, M; Heinzerling, H; Birck, K M; Keipert, P E; Messmer, K; Heinzerling, H; Birck, K M; Keipert, P E; Messmer, K

    1999-11-01

    Fluorocarbon emulsions have been proposed as temporary artificial oxygen carriers. The aim of the present study is to compare the effectiveness of perflubron emulsion with the effectiveness of autologous blood or colloid infusion for reversal of physiologic transfusion triggers. A multinational, multicenter, randomized, controlled, single-blind, parallel group study was performed in 147 orthopedic patients. Patients underwent acute normovolemic hemodilution with colloid to a target hemoglobin of 9 g/dl with an inspiratory oxygen fraction (FIO2) of 0.40. Patients were then randomized into one of four treatment groups after having reached any of the protocol-defined transfusion triggers including tachycardia (heart rate > 125% of posthemodilution rate or > 110 bpm), hypotension (mean arterial pressure 150% of posthemodilution level) or decreased mixed venous oxygen partial pressure (PVO2; emulsion with colloid (total = 450 ml) at FIO2 = 1.0; and 1.8 g/kg perflubron emulsion with colloid (total = 450 ml) at FIO2 = 1.0. The primary endpoint was duration of transfusion-trigger reversal. A secondary end-point was percentage of transfusion-trigger reversal. Perflubron emulsion was well tolerated with no serious adverse event attributed to drug treatment. Duration of reversal was longest in the 1.8 g/kg perflubron group (median, 80 min; 95% confidence interval, 60-100 min; P = 0.014 vs. autologous blood, P emulsion (1.8 g/kg) combined with 100% oxygen ventilation is more effective than autologous blood or colloid infusion in reversing physiologic transfusion triggers.

  6. Transfusion support in patients with dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Paramjit; Kaur, Gagandeep

    2014-09-01

    Dengue fever has emerged as a global public health problem in the recent decades. The clinical spectrum of the disease ranges from dengue fever to dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. The disease is characterized by increased capillary permeability, thrombocytopenia and coagulopathy. Thrombocytopenia with hemorrhagic manifestations warrants platelet transfusions. There is lack of evidence-based guidelines for transfusion support in patients with dengue fever. This contributes to inappropriate use of blood components and blood centers constantly face the challenge of inventory management during dengue outbreaks. The current review is aimed to highlight the role of platelets and other blood components in the management of dengue. The review was performed after searching relevant published literature in PubMed, Science Direct, Google scholar and various text books and journal articles.

  7. Detrimental effects of perioperative blood transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    1995-01-01

    Evidence suggests that perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion increases the risk of infectious complications after major surgery and of cancer recurrence after curative operation. This has been attributed to immunosuppression. Several authors have suggested that filtered whole blood and/or red...... cell concentrate, or leucocyte- and buffy coat-reduced red cells in artificial medium or their own plasma, may reduce postoperative immunosuppression. It was also anticipated that the use of autologous blood might minimize the risk of perioperative transfusion, but studies have unexpectedly shown...... similar postoperative infectious complications and cancer recurrence and/or survival rates in patients receiving autologous blood donated before operation and those receiving allogeneic blood. Future studies should identify common risk factors associated with blood storage....

  8. Photodynamic decontamination of blood for transfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Hur, Ehud; Margolis-Nunno, H.; Gottlieb, P.; Lustigman, S.; Horowitz, Bernard

    1995-01-01

    Currently transfused cellular components of blood are not available in a sterile form and carry a small risk of transmitting viral and parasite diseases. Using phthalocyanines and red light, lipid enveloped viruses, e.g., HIV-1, can be inactivated in red blood cell concentrates (RBCC). Under conditions leading to virus sterilization the blood borne parasites Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas disease) and Plasmodium falciparum (malaria) could be eliminated to undetectable levels (> 4 log10 kill). RBC damage during treatment could be avoided by increasing the light fluence rate to 80 mW/cm2, and by including the free radical scavenger glutathione and the vitamin E derivative Trolox during light exposure. Similar sterilization of platelet concentrates was achieved with the psoralen derivative AMT and UVA light. Platelet damage due to PUVA treatment was avoided by including the plant flavonoid rutin during irradiation. It is concluded that elimination of the risk of transmitting pathogens during blood transfusion is feasible with photochemical treatments.

  9. [Blood transfusion - safety of the inventory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Danic, Bruno; Schneider, Thierry

    2015-02-01

    Over the years, transfusion medicine has been faced to many different problems, notably those related to transmission of pathogens. Major progresses have been accomplished in terms of security. However, nowadays, the discipline is confronted to the day-to-day variability and availability of blood products. More and more donors are excluded from blood donation due to various reasons, and the donor selection criteria have increased over the years, influencing the number of donors able to give blood. This paradox represents one of the constraints that transfusion medicine should resolve in the future. This paper presents some aspects either common or different between France and Switzerland. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Changing blood transfusion policy and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupnyckyj, Catherine; Smolarek, Sheryl; Reeves, Colleen; McKeith, Judith; Magnan, Morris

    2014-12-01

    It is often an accepted practice that a 20-gauge-or-larger catheter is used for the safe transfusion of blood in adult patients, but it is unclear what evidence supports this practice. This article tells the story of how a small team of oncology nurses designed and implemented an evidence-based practice project to challenge that convention. A literature search and a consultation with the standards of the American Association of Blood Banks and the Infusion Nurses Society determined that a smaller-than-20-gauge catheter can be used safely to transfuse blood in adults, a discovery that led to a change in policy and practice at the authors' institution.

  11. Transmission of Neurodegenerative Disorders Through Blood Transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgren, Gustaf; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Rostgaard, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    : Multivariable Cox regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios for dementia of any type, Alzheimer disease, and Parkinson disease in patients receiving blood transfusions from donors who were later diagnosed with any of these diseases versus patients who received blood from healthy donors. Whether...... excess occurrence of neurodegenerative disease occurred among recipients of blood from a subset of donors was also investigated. As a positive control, transmission of chronic hepatitis before and after implementation of hepatitis C virus screening was assessed. RESULTS: Among included patients, 2.......9% received a transfusion from a donor diagnosed with one of the studied neurodegenerative diseases. No evidence of transmission of any of these diseases was found, regardless of approach. The hazard ratio for dementia in recipients of blood from donors with dementia versus recipients of blood from healthy...

  12. Prevention of Transfusion-Transmitted Infections: Dilemmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans L. Zaaijer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available To make blood components and blood products safe, many safety measures are applied to avoid transfusion-transmitted infections. Defining a balanced safety policy is not easy, we face several dilemmas: How safe should blood be? Should we opt for maximal or optimal safety? Are perceived threats real and relevant? Should blood be clean while food, air, or mosquitoes are not? Is vCJD still a threat? It seems wise to discuss these issues more in the open.

  13. Blood transfusions in severe burn patients: Epidemiology and predictive factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guosheng; Zhuang, Mingzhu; Fan, Xiaoming; Hong, Xudong; Wang, Kangan; Wang, He; Chen, Zhengli; Sun, Yu; Xia, Zhaofan

    2016-12-01

    Blood is a vital resource commonly used in burn patients; however, description of blood transfusions in severe burns is limited. The purpose of this study was to describe the epidemiology of blood transfusions and determine factors associated with increased transfusion quantity. This is a retrospective study of total 133 patients with >40% total body surface area (TBSA) burns admitted to the burn center of Changhai hospital from January 2008 to December 2013. The study characterized blood transfusions in severe burn patients. Univariate and Multivariate regression analyses were used to evaluate the association of clinical variables with blood transfusions. The overall transfusion rate was 97.7% (130 of 133). The median amount of total blood (RBC and plasma), RBC and plasma transfusions was 54 units (Interquartile range (IQR), 20-84), 19 units (IQR, 4-37.8) and 28.5 units (IQR, 14.8-51.8), respectively. The number of RBC transfusion in and outside operation room was 7 (0, 14) and 11 (2, 20) units, and the number of plasma was 6 (0.5, 12) and 21 (11.5, 39.3) units. A median of one unit of blood was transfused per TBSA and an average of 4 units per operation was given in the series. The consumption of plasma is higher than that of RBC. On multivariate regression analysis, age, full-thickness TBSA and number of operations were significant independent predictors associated with the number of RBC transfusion, and coagulopathy and ICU length showed a trend toward RBC consumption. Predictors for increased plasma transfusion were female, high full-thickness TBSA burn and more operations. Severe burn patients received an ample volume of blood transfusions. Fully understanding of predictors of blood transfusions will allow physicians to better optimize burn patients during hospitalization in an effort to use blood appropriately. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  14. Risk Factors for Blood Transfusion With Primary Posterior Lumbar Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basques, Bryce A; Anandasivam, Nidharshan S; Webb, Matthew L; Samuel, Andre M; Lukasiewicz, Adam M; Bohl, Daniel D; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2015-11-01

    Retrospective cohort study. To identify factors associated with blood transfusion for primary posterior lumbar fusion surgery, and to identify associations between blood transfusion and other postoperative complications. Blood transfusion is a relatively common occurrence for patients undergoing primary posterior lumbar fusion. There is limited information available describing which patients are at increased risk for blood transfusion, and the relationship between blood transfusion and short-term postoperative outcomes is poorly characterized. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database was used to identify patients undergoing primary posterior lumbar fusion from 2011 to 2013. Multivariate analysis was used to find associations between patient characteristics and blood transfusion, along with associations between blood transfusion and postoperative outcomes. Out of 4223 patients, 704 (16.7%) had a blood transfusion. Age 60 to 69 (relative risk [RR] 1.6), age greater than equal to 70 (RR 1.7), American Society of Anesthesiologists class greater than equal to 3 (RR 1.1), female sex (RR 1.1), pulmonary disease (RR 1.2), preoperative hematocrit less than 36.0 (RR 2.0), operative time greater than equal to 310 minutes (RR 2.9), 2 levels (RR 1.6), and 3 or more levels (RR 2.1) were independently associated with blood transfusion. Interbody fusion (RR 0.9) was associated with decreased rates of blood transfusion. Receiving a blood transfusion was significantly associated with any complication (RR 1.7), sepsis (RR 2.6), return to the operating room (RR 1.7), deep surgical site infection (RR 2.6), and pulmonary embolism (RR 5.1). Blood transfusion was also associated with an increase in postoperative length of stay of 1.4 days (P blood transfusion while undergoing primary posterior lumbar fusion, and risk factors for these occurrences were characterized. Strategies to minimize blood loss might be considered in these

  15. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: transfusion challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barros MM

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Melca M O Barros, Dante M Langhi Jr, José O Bordin Department of Clinical and Experimental Oncology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is defined as the increased destruction of red blood cells (RBCs in the presence of anti-RBC autoantibodies and/or complement. Classification of AIHA is based on the optimal auto-RBC antibody reactivity temperatures and includes warm, cold-reactive, mixed AIHA, and drug-induced AIHA subtypes. AIHA is a rare disease, and recommendations for transfusion are based mainly on results from retrospective data and relatively small cohort studies, including heterogeneous patient samples or single case reports. In this article, we will review the challenges and solutions to safely transfuse AIHA patients. We will reflect on the indication for transfusion in AIHA and the difficulty in the accomplishment of immunohematological procedures for the selection of the safest and most compatible RBC units. Keywords: hemolytic anemia, RBC autoantibodies, autoimmunity, hemolysis, direct ­antiglobulin test

  16. Paul Holland: contributions to transfusion medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Leo J

    2013-07-01

    Paul Holland began his career in transfusion medicine in 1963 as an assistant to Dr. Paul Schmidt in the Blood Bank at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). He served at the NIH for 20 years and retired in 1983 with the rank of Captain in the Public Health Service. He subsequently became the Medical Director/CEO of the Sacramento Medical Foundation Blood Center, now Blood Source, a position he held for the next 21 years. Paul Holland has authored/co-authored 265 articles, chapters and monographs, mostly concerning issues relating to either viral hepatitis or HIV. In addition to his research career, Paul was a very active educator, having contributed importantly to the development of many current thought leaders in transfusion medicine. His distinguished career also included important administrative roles in national and international organizations relevant to transfusion medicine. He also was the recipient of many honors and awards which has won him wide-spread renown and the respect of his many colleagues. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Sixty years of blood transfusion: a memoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Paul J

    2012-07-01

    Paul Schmidt was born in 1925 into the Greatest Generation. Events during military service decided him on the study of medicine. Early research training in red cell preservation that continued during his medical studies opened a 20-year career at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Beginning in 1954 at the Blood Bank of the NIH Clinical Center, he had exposure to the pioneers who had translated transfusion's wartime beginnings into civilian applications. Work inside the unique NIH clinical research atmosphere together with many of his students provided a fertile field for the growth of what has become transfusion medicine. Topics described range from early studies on platelets and on hepatitis to the background in Washington health politics leading to the National Blood Policy. National and global organizational activity and a second career in community blood service added to his 65 years of experience. The story as transfusion history is presented as a template for future progress. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Reappraising the concept of massive transfusion in trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanworth, Simon J; Morris, Timothy P; Gaarder, Christine

    2010-01-01

    transfusion requirements could allow early activation of blood bank protocols. METHODS : Datasets on trauma admissions over a 1 or 2-year period were obtained from the trauma registries of five large trauma research networks. A fractional polynomial was used to model the transfusion-associated probability...... of death. A logistic regression model for the prediction of massive transfusion, defined as 10 or more units of red cell transfusions, was developed. RESULTS : In total, 5,693 patient records were available for analysis. Mortality increased as transfusion requirements increased, but the model indicated...... no threshold effect. Mortality was 9% in patients who received none to five PRBC units, 22% in patients receiving six to nine PRBC units, and 42% in patients receiving 10 or more units. A logistic model for prediction of massive transfusion was developed and validated at multiple sites but achieved only...

  19. Blood transfusion reactions in two neonatal intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Jair Ortiz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Given the advances in neonatology have increased survival of premature infants, an increase in transfusions and thus their effects. Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional observational study. We included neonates transfused with 2 red blood units in infants of Popayan for a year. We register demographic data, laboratory and hemodynamic before, during and in the first 24 hours post transfusion and adverse reactions. Results: The prevalence of transfusion was 17.3%. 50% were children, the average age at which transfusion was performed was 22 days, the average weight was 1350 g., Mean gestational age 30 weeks, 71% of the children had sepsis. 96.8% had a transfusion event, 85.5% had adverse reactions: metabolic rate 45.1% and 21% overload. Considering the attribution definite reaction was determined by 35.5%. Significant association was found (p

  20. Blood transfusion indications in neurosurgical patients: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagwe, Shefali; Chung, Lawrance K; Lagman, Carlito; Voth, Brittany L; Barnette, Natalie E; Elhajjmoussa, Lekaa; Yang, Isaac

    2017-04-01

    Neurosurgical procedures can be complicated by significant blood losses that have the potential to decrease tissue perfusion to critical brain tissue. Red blood cell transfusion is used in a variety of capacities both inside, and outside, of the operating room to prevent untoward neurologic damage. However, evidence-based guidelines concerning thresholds and indications for transfusion in neurosurgery remain limited. Consequently, transfusion practices in neurosurgical patients are highly variable and based on institutional experiences. Recently, a paradigm shift has occurred in neurocritical intensive care units, whereby restrictive transfusion is increasingly favored over liberal transfusion but the ideal strategy remains in clinical equipoise. The authors of this study perform a systematic review of the literature with the objective of capturing the changing landscape of blood transfusion indications in neurosurgical patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A liberal strategy of red blood cell transfusion reduces cardiogenic shock in elderly patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Rosana Ely; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Fukushima, Julia Tizue; de Almeida, Juliano Pinheiro; Franco, Rafael Alves; Lee Park, Clarice; Osawa, Eduardo Atsushi; Pinto Silva, Carolina Maria; Costa Auler, Jose Otavio; Landoni, Giovanni; Barbosa Gomes Galas, Filomena Regina; Filho, Roberto Kalil; Hajjar, Ludhmila Abrahao

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare outcomes in patients undergoing cardiac surgery who are aged 60 years or more or less than 60 years after implementation of a restrictive or a liberal transfusion strategy. This is a substudy of the Transfusion Requirements After Cardiac Surgery (TRACS) randomized controlled trial. In this subgroup analysis, we separated patients into those aged 60 years or more (elderly) and those aged less than 60 years randomized to a restrictive or a liberal strategy of red blood cell transfusion. The primary outcome was a composite defined as a combination of 30-day all-cause mortality and severe morbidity. Of the 502 patients included in the Transfusion Requirements After Cardiac Surgery study, 260 (51.8%) were aged 60 years or more and 242 (48.2%) were aged less than 60 years and were included in this study. The primary end point occurred in 11.9% of patients in the liberal strategy group and 16.8% of patients in the restrictive strategy group (P = .254) for those aged 60 years or more and in 6.8% of patients in the liberal strategy group and 5.6% of patients in the restrictive strategy group for those aged less than 60 years (P = .714). However, in the older patients, cardiogenic shock was more frequent in patients in the restrictive transfusion group (12.8% vs 5.2%, P = .031). Thirty-day mortality, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and acute renal injury were similar in the restrictive and liberal transfusion groups in both age groups. Although there was no difference between groups regarding the primary outcome, a restrictive transfusion strategy may result in an increased rate of cardiogenic shock in elderly patients undergoing cardiac surgery compared with a more liberal strategy. Cardiovascular risk of anemia may be more harmful than the risk of blood transfusion in older patients. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Triggers for blood transfusionGatilhos para transfusão sanguínea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Menezes Bochio

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Anemia is an important condition that is found in the internal medicine, either in humans and animals, especially in critically ill patients. The clinical signs of anemia are usually related to a poor tissue oxygenation or the compensatory mechanisms associated with it. Blood transfusion aims to prevent hypoxic damage in critically ill patients. However, once the blood transfusion is associated to some risks, it should just be done if really necessary. Several factors influence blood transfusion decision. The aim of this study was to review the major studies about transfusion triggers. Among laboratory tests, the hemoglobin (Hb is the main trigger but it depends on patient age and concomitant disease. In addition, electrocardiogram (ECG and serum lactate with Hb can help to decide when to transfuse. A anemia é uma importante afecção encontrada na medicina e na clínica de animais de companhia, principalmente nos pacientes críticos. As alterações clínicas da anemia geralmente estão relacionadas à menor oxigenação dos tecidos ou aos mecanismos compensatórios a ela associados. A transfusão sanguínea tem o objetivo de impedir os danos de hipóxia causados pela anemia em pacientes criticamente enfermos. Porém, uma vez que a transfusão está sujeita a diversos riscos, ela só deve ser realizada quando realmente necessária. Diversos fatores influenciam a decisão para realização da transfusão sanguínea. O objetivo deste trabalho foi fornecer uma revisão dos principais estudos realizados sobre possíveis gatilhos transfusionais. Entre os exames laboratoriais, o valor de hemoglobina (Hb é o principal gatilho, variando de acordo com idade do paciente e doenças concomitantes. Além disso, o eletrocardiograma e a dosagem sérica de lactato, associados à Hb, podem ajudar na decisão de quando transfundir.

  3. Transfusion transmitted diseases in perioperative and intensive care settings

    OpenAIRE

    Rekha Das; Upendra Hansda

    2014-01-01

    Patients in the perioperative period and intensive care unit are commonly exposed to blood transfusion (BT). They are at increased risk of transfusion transmitted bacterial, viral and protozoal diseases. The risk of viral transmission has decreased steadily, but the risk of bacterial transmission remains same. Bacterial contamination is more in platelet concentrates than in red cells and least in plasma. The chances of sepsis, morbidity and mortality depend on the number of transfusions and u...

  4. Promoting a Restrictive Intraoperative Transfusion Strategy: The Influence of a Transfusion Guideline and a Novel Software Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picton, Paul; Starr, Jordan; Kheterpal, Sachin; Thompson, Aleda M L; Housey, Michelle; Sathishkumar, Subramanian; Dubovoy, Timur; Kirkpatrick, Nathan; Tremper, Kevin K; Engoren, Milo; Ramachandran, Satya Krishna

    2017-12-15

    The effect of neither transfusion guidelines nor decision support tools on intraoperative transfusion has been previously evaluated. The University of Michigan introduced a transfusion guideline in 2009, and in 2011, the Department of Anesthesiology developed a transfusion decision support tool. The primary aim of this study was to assess the associations of the transfusion guideline and the optional use of the software transfusion tool with intraoperative behaviors; pretransfusion hematocrit assessment (whether or not a hematocrit was checked before each red cell unit) and restrictive red cell use (withholding transfusion unless the hematocrit was ≤21%). This was a before-after retrospective study without a concurrent control group of patients transfused 1-3 units of red cells intraoperatively. Three phases were studied to provide data both before and after the implementation of the transfusion guideline and the intraoperative software tool. Within each phase, trends of checking hematocrits before transfusion and restrictive transfusion were charted against time. F tests were used to measure differences of slopes. The difference between means of each phase was measured using Mann-Whitney U tests. Independent associations were measured using mixed-effects multivariable logistic regression. A secondary outcome analysis was conducted for 30-day mortality, myocardial infarction, renal injury, and their combination. The transfusion guideline was associated with increased pretransfusion hematocrit evaluation (67.4%, standard deviation [SD] 3.9 vs 76.5%, SD 2.7; P < .001) and restrictive transfusion practice (14.0%, SD 7.4 vs 33.3%, SD 4.4; P = .001). After adjustment for confounders, the guideline phase was independently associated with increased hematocrit checking (odds ratio, 1.72; 95% confidence interval, 1.46-2.03; P < .001) and restrictive red cell transfusion (odds ratio, 2.95; 95% confidence interval, 2.46-3.54; P < .001). The software tool was not associated

  5. Hydroxyurea for reducing blood transfusion in non-transfusion dependent beta thalassaemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foong, Wai Cheng; Ho, Jacqueline J; Loh, C Khai; Viprakasit, Vip

    2016-10-18

    Non-transfusion dependent beta thalassaemia is a subset of inherited haemoglobin disorders characterised by reduced production of the beta globin chain of the haemoglobin molecule leading to anaemia of varying severity. Although blood transfusion is not a necessity for survival, it is required when episodes of chronic anaemia occur. This chronic anaemia can impair growth and affect quality of life. People with non-transfusion dependent beta thalassaemia suffer from iron overload due to their body's increased capability of absorbing iron from food sources. Iron overload becomes more pronounced in those requiring blood transfusion. People with a higher foetal haemoglobin level have been found to require fewer blood transfusions. Hydroxyurea has been used to increase foetal haemoglobin level; however, its efficacy in reducing transfusion, chronic anaemia complications and its safety need to be established. To assess the effectiveness, safety and appropriate dose regimen of hydroxyurea in people with non-transfusion dependent beta thalassaemia (haemoglobin E combined with beta thalassaemia and beta thalassaemia intermedia). We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of relevant journals. We also searched ongoing trials registries and the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews.Date of last search: 30 April 2016. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials of hydroxyurea in people with non-transfusion dependent beta thalassaemia comparing hydroxyurea with placebo or standard treatment or comparing different doses of hydroxyurea. Two authors independently applied the inclusion criteria in order to select trials for inclusion. Both authors assessed the risk of bias of trials and extracted the data. A third author verified these assessments. No trials comparing hydroxyurea with placebo or standard care were found. However, we included

  6. Two samples for blood transfusion: single centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, W; Davies, J; Asamoah, A; Scott-Molloy, C; Sansom, V; Kerr, J

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the introduction of two-sample policy for transfusion at our hospital and reduction of the risk of ABO incompatible transfusion. ABO incompatible transfusion can be a fatal but avoidable event. Wrong blood in tube is a cause of ABO incompatible transfusion and there are various strategies available to try and expunge this event. Survey of policy/practice before and after the introduction of a two-sample policy. Staff training is inadequate in reducing the risk of ABO incompatible transfusion. A two-sample policy was introduced and does not significantly increase workload or use of group O blood and does not compromise patient safety by causing delay in blood provision. Post hoc analysis confirms good understanding of the policy by medical staff. Observation of medical staff taking transfusion samples demonstrated consistent deviation from policy, enforcing the need for confirmatory samples. A two-sample policy adds an extra layer of safety to transfusion practice and can be introduced without creating new problems. © 2014 The Authors. Transfusion Medicine © 2014 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  7. One-year period prevalence of blood transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, J T; Kimper-Karl, M L; Sprogøe, U

    2010-01-01

    was 9.2/1000 citizens. Most of the transfused patients had a main diagnosis of neoplasm (22% of recipients), diseases of the circulatory system (15%), the digestive system (15%), injuries (13%) and diseases of the blood (8%). Age standardization reversed the relation between sex specific 1-YPPRs...... and patient data were retrospectively combined to calculate sex and diagnosis specific and age standardized 1-YPPR s of RBC transfusion for the complete population in a Danish county. During the calendar year of 2006, 4427 patients received RBC transfusion in Funen County. The crude 1-YPPR of RBC transfusion...

  8. Predicting blood transfusion in patients undergoing minimally invasive oesophagectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Crispin; Boddy, Alex P; Fukuta, Junaid; Groom, William D; Streets, Christopher G

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate predictors of allogenic blood transfusion requirements in patients undergoing minimal invasive oesophagectomy at a tertiary high volume centre for oesophago-gastric surgery. Retrospective analysis of all patients undergoing minimal access oesophagectomy in our department between January 2010 and December 2011. Patients were divided into two groups depending on whether they required a blood transfusion at any time during their index admission. Factors that have been shown to influence perioperative blood transfusion requirements in major surgery were included in the analysis. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the impact of patient and perioperative characteristics on transfusion requirements during the index admission. A total of 80 patients underwent minimal access oesophagectomy, of which 61 patients had a laparoscopic assisted oesophagectomy and 19 patients had a minimal invasive oesophagectomy. Perioperative blood transfusion was required in 28 patients at any time during hospital admission. On binary logistic regression analysis, a lower preoperative haemoglobin concentration (p blood transfusion requirements. It has been reported that requirement for blood transfusion can affect long-term outcomes in oesophageal cancer resection. Two factors which could be addressed preoperatively; haemoglobin concentration and type of oesophageal resection, may be valuable in predicting blood transfusions in patients undergoing minimally invasive oesophagectomy. Our analysis revealed that preoperative haemoglobin concentration, occurrence of significant complications and type of minimal access oesophagectomy predicted blood transfusion requirements in the patient population examined. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Transfusion Medicine in Sub-Saharan Africa: Conference Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzik, Walter Sunny; Kyeyune, Dorothy; Otekat, Grace; Natukunda, Bernard; Hume, Heather; Kasirye, Phillip G; Ddungu, Henry; Kajja, Isaac; Dhabangi, Aggrey; Mugyenyi, Godfrey R; Seguin, Claire; Barnes, Linda; Delaney, Meghan

    2015-07-01

    In November 2014, a 3-day conference devoted to transfusion medicine in sub-Saharan Africa was held in Kampala, Uganda. Faculty from academic institutions in Uganda provided a broad overview of issues pertinent to transfusion medicine in Africa. The conference consisted of lectures, demonstrations, and discussions followed by 5 small group workshops held at the Uganda Blood Transfusion Service Laboratories, the Ugandan Cancer Institute, and the Mulago National Referral Hospital. Highlighted topics included the challenges posed by increasing clinical demands for blood, the need for better patient identification at the time of transfusion, inadequate application of the antiglobulin reagent during pretransfusion testing, concern regarding proper recognition and evaluation of transfusion reactions, the expanded role for nurse leadership as a means to improve patient outcomes, and the need for an epidemiologic map of blood usage in Africa. Specialty areas of focus included the potential for broader application of transcranial Doppler and hydroxyurea therapy in sickle cell disease, African-specific guidelines for transfusion support of cancer patients, the challenges of transfusion support in trauma, and the importance of African-centered clinical research in pediatric and obstetric transfusion medicine. The course concluded by summarizing the benefits derived from an organized quality program that extended from the donor to the recipient. As an educational tool, the slide-audio presentation of the lectures will be made freely available at the International Society of Blood Transfusion Academy Web site: http://www.isbtweb.org/academy/. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Predictors of Early Acute Lung Injury at a Combat Support Hospital: A Prospective Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    FWB) are associated with immunosuppression ,8 transfusion- related acute lung injury (TRALI), and worse outcomes following trauma.9 Of these, TRALI...Trauma. 2003;54:898–907. 9. Marik PE, Raghavan M. Anemia, allogenic blood transfusion, and immunomodulation in the critically ill. Chest. 2005;127:295

  11. Desmopressin use for minimising perioperative blood transfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desborough, Michael J; Oakland, Kathryn; Brierley, Charlotte; Bennett, Sean; Doree, Carolyn; Trivella, Marialena; Hopewell, Sally; Stanworth, Simon J; Estcourt, Lise J

    2017-01-01

    Background Blood transfusion is administered during many types of surgery, but its efficacy and safety are increasingly questioned. Evaluation of the efficacy of agents, such as desmopressin (DDAVP; 1-deamino-8-D-arginine-vasopressin), that may reduce perioperative blood loss is needed. Objectives To examine the evidence for the efficacy of DDAVP in reducing perioperative blood loss and the need for red cell transfusion in people who do not have inherited bleeding disorders. Search methods We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (2017, issue 3) in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (from 1937), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1980), and ongoing trial databases (all searches to 3 April 2017). Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials comparing DDAVP to placebo or an active comparator (e.g. tranexamic acid, aprotinin) before, during, or immediately after surgery or after invasive procedures in adults or children. Data collection and analysis We used the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Main results We identified 65 completed trials (3874 participants) and four ongoing trials. Of the 65 completed trials, 39 focused on adult cardiac surgery, three on paediatric cardiac surgery, 12 on orthopaedic surgery, two on plastic surgery, and two on vascular surgery; seven studies were conducted in surgery for other conditions. These trials were conducted between 1986 and 2016, and 11 were funded by pharmaceutical companies or by a party with a commercial interest in the outcome of the trial. The GRADE quality of evidence was very low to moderate across all outcomes. No trial reported quality of life. DDAVP versus placebo or no treatment Trial results showed considerable heterogeneity between surgical settings for total volume of red cells transfused (low

  12. Alloimmunization screening after transfusion of red blood cells in a prospective study Pesquisa de aloimunização após transfusão de concentrados de hemácias em um estudo prospectivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Mendonça Alves

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several irregular red blood cell alloantibodies, produced by alloimmunization of antigens in transfusions or pregnancies, have clinical importance because they cause hemolysis in the fetus and newborn and in transfused patients. OBJECTIVE: a prospective analysis of patients treated by the surgical and clinical emergency services of Hospital de Clínicas of the Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro (HC/UFTM, Brazil was performed to correlate alloimmunization to clinical and epidemiological data. METHODS: Blood samples of 143 patients with initial negative antibody screening were collected at intervals for up to 15 months after the transfusion of packed red blood cells. Samples were submitted to irregular antibody testing and, when positive, to the identification and serial titration of alloantibodies. The Fisher Exact test and Odds Ratio were employed to compare proportions. RESULTS: Fifteen (10.49% patients produced antibodies within six months of transfusion. However, for 60% of these individuals, the titers decreased and disappeared by 15 months after transfusion. Anti-K antibodies and alloantibodies against antigens of the Rh system were the most common; the highest titer was 1:32 (anti-K. There was an evident correlation with the number of transfusions. CONCLUSIONS: Given the high incidence of clinically important red blood cell alloantibodies in patients transfused in surgical and clinical emergency services, we suggest that phenotyping and pre-transfusion compatibilization for C, c, E, e (Rh system and K (Kell system antigens should be extended to all patients with programmed surgeries or acute clinical events that do not need emergency transfusions.OBJETIVO: Vários aloanticorpos irregulares antieritrocitários, produzidos por sensibilizações a antígenos estranhos durante gestações ou transfusões, possuem importância clínica por provocarem hemólise no feto ou recém-nascido e/ou no receptor de sangue. Diante

  13. Blood transfusion for preventing primary and secondary stroke in people with sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estcourt, Lise J; Fortin, Patricia M; Hopewell, Sally; Trivella, Marialena; Wang, Winfred C

    2017-01-01

    hydroxyurea (hydroxycarbamide) and phlebotomy to long-term transfusions and iron chelation therapy: one in primary prevention (children); and one in secondary prevention (children and adolescents). The quality of the evidence was very low to moderate across different outcomes according to GRADE methodology. This was due to the trials being at a high risk of bias due to lack of blinding, indirectness and imprecise outcome estimates. Red cell transfusions versus standard care Children with no previous long-term transfusions Long-term transfusions probably reduce the incidence of clinical stroke in children with a higher risk of stroke (abnormal transcranial doppler velocities or previous history of silent cerebral infarct), risk ratio 0.12 (95% confidence interval 0.03 to 0.49) (two trials, 326 participants), moderate quality evidence. Long-term transfusions may: reduce the incidence of other sickle cell disease-related complications (acute chest syndrome, risk ratio 0.24 (95% confidence interval 0.12 to 0.48)) (two trials, 326 participants); increase quality of life (difference estimate -0.54, 95% confidence interval -0.92 to -0.17) (one trial, 166 participants); but make little or no difference to IQ scores (least square mean: 1.7, standard error 95% confidence interval -1.1 to 4.4) (one trial, 166 participants), low quality evidence. We are very uncertain whether long-term transfusions: reduce the risk of transient ischaemic attacks, Peto odds ratio 0.13 (95% confidence interval 0.01 to 2.11) (two trials, 323 participants); have any effect on all-cause mortality, no deaths reported (two trials, 326 participants); or increase the risk of alloimmunisation, risk ratio 3.16 (95% confidence interval 0.18 to 57.17) (one trial, 121 participants), very low quality evidence. Children and adolescents with previous long-term transfusions (one trial, 79 participants) We are very uncertain whether continuing long-term transfusions reduces the incidence of: stroke, risk ratio 0.22 (95

  14. Transfusion Practices Committee of a public blood bank network in Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Ricardo Vilas Freire; Brener, Stela; Ferreira, Angela Melgaço; do Valle, Marcele Cunha Ribeiro; Moraes-Souza, Helio

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to verify the performance of blood transfusion committees in transfusion services linked to the public blood bank network of the state of Minas Gerais. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted between 2007 and 2008 using questionnaires and proficiency tests to evaluate the reporting and investigation of transfusion reactions comparing transfusion services with and without transfusion committees in the public transfusion services of the state of Minas Gerais. Nineteen of Hemominas own transfusion services and 207 that contracted the services of the foundation located in 178 municipalities were visited between 2007 and 2008. Established transfusion committees were present in 63.4% of the services visited. Transfusion incidents were reported by 53 (36.8%) transfusion services with transfusion committees and by eight (9.6%) without transfusion committees (p < 0.001) with 543 (97.5%) and 14 (2.5%) notifications, respectively. Of the reported transfusion incidents, 40 (75.5%) transfusion services with transfusion committees and only two (25%) of those without transfusion committees investigated the causes. The incidence of notification and investigation of the causes of transfusion reactions was higher in transfusion services where a transfusion committee was present. Despite these results, the performance of these committees was found to be incipient and a better organization and more effective operation are required.

  15. Liposome-encapsulated hemoglobin transfusion rescues rats undergoing progressive hemodilution from lethal organ hypoxia without scavenging nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogami, Yashiro; Kinoshita, Manabu; Takase, Bonpei; Ogata, Yoshitaka; Saitoh, Daizoh; Kikuchi, Makoto; Ishihara, Masayuki; Maehara, Tadaaki

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the efficacy of liposome-encapsulated hemoglobin (LHb) transfusion in rats undergoing lethal progressive hemodilution. Unlike other acellular hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers, LHb has lipid bilayer membranes that are similar to mammalian red blood cells (RBCs), which prevent hemoglobin from having any direct contact with the blood components and the endothelium. Acellular hemoglobin has a high affinity for nitric oxide (NO), and because they are reported to behave as NO scavengers, acellular hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers could have pressor effects on the peripheral vessels. During a massive hemorrhage, acellular hemoglobin caused vasoconstriction could decrease peripheral perfusion, thereby leading to diminished oxygen delivery. Rats were subjected to blood withdrawal (0.2 mL/min) with a simultaneous resuscitation using an isovolemic fluid transfusion that contained LHb, 5% albumin, or washed rat RBCs for 150 minutes (n = 15 in each group). All rats transfused with LHb or RBCs were rescued from lethal progressive hemodilution, whereas none of the albumin-transfused rats survived. LHb did not affect the plasma NO metabolite levels, suggesting it was not a potent NO scavenger. LHb also improved hemodilution-induced metabolic acidosis, and reduced exaggerated neuroendocrine responses and injuries to the heart, liver, and kidney. It suppressed expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha in the liver and kidney, suggesting improvement of hypoxia at molecular response levels. However, neither transfused LHb nor RBCs improved the acute lung injury that occurs after progressive hemodilution. LHb transfusion is effective in rescuing rats undergoing progressive hemodilution from lethal organ hypoxia without scavenging NO.

  16. Effects of blood transfusion on exercise capacity in thalassemia major patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetto, Daniela; Rao, Carmelo Massimo; Cefalù, Claudia; Aguglia, Demetrio Oreste; Cattadori, Gaia; D'Ascola, Domenico Giuseppe; Benedetto, Frank Antonio; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Sciomer, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Anemia has an important role in exercise performance. However, the direct link between rapid changes of hemoglobin and exercise performance is still unknown.To find out more on this topic, we studied 18 beta-thalassemia major patients free of relevant cardiac dysfunction (age 33.5±7.2 years,males = 10). Patients performed a maximal cardiopulmolmonary exercise test (cycloergometer, personalized ramp protocol, breath-by-breath measurements of expired gases) before and the day after blood transfusion (500 cc of red cell concentrates). After blood transfusion, hemoglobin increased from 10.5±0.8 g/dL to 12.1±1.2 (panaerobic threshold from 965 to 1024mL/min (pexercise or at anaerobic threshold. Similarly, no relevant changes were observed in ventilation efficiency, as evaluated by the ventilation vs. carbon dioxide production relationship, or in O2 delivery to the periphery as analyzed by the VO2 vs. workload relationship. The relationship between hemoglobin and VO2 changes showed, for each g/dL of hemoglobin increase, a VO2 increase = 82.5 mL/min and 35 mL/min, at peak exercise and at anaerobic threshold, respectively. In beta-thalassemia major patients, an acute albeit partial anemia correction by blood transfusion determinates a relevant increase of exercise performance, observed both at peak exercise and at anaerobic threshold.

  17. Lung function, transfusion, pulmonary capillary blood volume and sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunt, Alan; McGhee, Emily; Robinson, Polly; Rees, David; Height, Susan; Greenough, Anne

    2016-02-01

    Lung function abnormalities occur in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) and may be associated with elevated pulmonary blood volume. To investigate that association, we determined whether blood transfusion in SCD children acutely increased pulmonary capillary blood volume (PCBV) and increased respiratory system resistance (Rrs5). Measurements of Rrs5 and spirometry were made before and after blood transfusion in 18 children, median age 14.2 (6.6-18.5) years. Diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide and nitric oxide were assessed to calculate the PCBV. Post transfusion, the median Rrs5 had increased from 127.4 to 141.3% predicted (pvolume from 39.7 to 64.1 ml/m2 (pvolume in one second (p=0.0056) and vital capacity (p=0.0008) decreased. The increase in Rrs5 correlated with the increase in PCBV (r=0.50, p=0.0493). Increased pulmonary capillary blood volume may at least partially explain the lung function abnormalities in SCD children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Anemia, bleeding, and blood transfusion in the intensive care unit: causes, risks, costs, and new strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, Michael T; Shander, Aryeh

    2013-11-01

    The definition of anemia is controversial and varies with the sex, age, and ethnicity of the patient. Anemia afflicts half of hospitalized patients and most elderly hospitalized patients. Acute anemia in the operating room or intensive care unit is associated with increased morbidity as well as other adverse outcomes, including death. The risks of anemia are compounded by the added risks associated with transfusion of red blood cells, the most common treatment for severe anemia. The causes of anemia in hospitalized patients include iron deficiency, suppression of erythropoietin and iron transport, trauma, phlebotomy, coagulopathies, adverse effects of and reactions to medications, and stress-induced gastrointestinal bleeding. The types and causes of anemia and the increased health care utilization and costs associated with anemia and undetected internal bleeding are described. The potential benefits and risks associated with transfusion of red blood cells also are explored. Last, the strategies and new tools to help prevent anemia, allow earlier detection of internal bleeding, and avoid unnecessary blood transfusions are discussed.

  19. Simulation-based education for transfusion medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Shanna; Rioux-Masse, Benjamin; Oancea, Cristina; Cohn, Claudia; Harmon, James; Konia, Mojca

    2015-04-01

    The administration of blood products is frequently determined by physicians without subspecialty training in transfusion medicine (TM). Education in TM is necessary for appropriate utilization of resources and maintaining patient safety. Our institution developed an efficient simulation-based TM course with the goal of identifying key topics that could be individualized to learners of all levels in various environments while also allowing for practice in an environment where the patient is not placed at risk. A 2.5-hour simulation-based educational activity was designed and taught to undergraduate medical students rotating through anesthesiology and TM elective rotations and to all Clinical Anesthesia Year 1 (CA-1) residents. Content and process evaluation of the activity consisted of multiple-choice tests and course evaluations. Seventy medical students and seven CA-1 residents were enrolled in the course. There was no significant difference on pretest results between medical students and CA-1 residents. The posttest results for both medical students and CA-1 residents were significantly higher than pretest results. The results of the posttest between medical students and CA-1 residents were not significantly different. The TM knowledge gap is not a trivial problem as transfusion of blood products is associated with significant risks. Innovative educational techniques are needed to address the ongoing challenges with knowledge acquisition and retention in already full curricula. Our institution developed a feasible and effective way to integrate TM into the curriculum. Educational activities, such as this, might be a way to improve the safety of transfusions. © 2014 AABB.

  20. Blood transfusion trigger in burns: a four-year retrospective analysis of blood transfusions in eleven burn centers in Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuzaylov, G.; Anderson, R.; Lee, J.; Slesarenko, S.; Nagaychuk, V.; Grigorieva, T.; Kozinec, G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary One focus of improvement of burn care in Ukraine was the management of blood loss and blood transfusions in burn patients. The aim of this project was to analyze blood transfusion triggers in burn patients and outcomes at eleven major burn centers in Ukraine. This multicenter retrospective study reviewed four years of data on blood-transfused burn patients admitted to eleven major burn centers in Ukraine. Data analyzed included: demographics, characteristics of the burns, complications of burn injury, triggers for blood transfusions and outcomes. A total of 928 burn patients who received 2,693 blood transfusions from 11 major burn centers over a four-year period, were studied. Regardless of the total body surface area (TBSA) that was burned, blood transfusions were administered with a hemoglobin (Hb) trigger value of around 9 g/dL. Roughly one third (30.5%) of all transfusions were given in patients with a TBSA ≤ 10%. We demonstrated that Ukrainian doctors were using the same Hb trigger for blood transfusions for all Ukrainian burn patients, which suggested a need to change blood transfusion policy. PMID:27279803

  1. Blood and blood component transfusion in large animals/ Transfusão de sangue e seus derivados em grandes animais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Cezar de Oliveira Dearo

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available The article desribes the indications for blood and blood component transfusion in large animals, also tracing coments on choosing a blood donor and blood compatibility testing, blood collection, the transfusion and possible adverse reactions.O artigo descreve as indicações para a transfusão de sangue e seus derivados em grandes animais, abordando também a escolha de doadores e testes de compatibilidade sangüínea, a colheita de sangue, a transfusão propriamente dita e possíveis reações adversas.

  2. Cerebral Oximetry in Ugandan Children With Severe Anemia: Clinical Categories and Response to Transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhabangi, Aggrey; Ainomugisha, Brenda; Cserti-Gazdewich, Christine; Ddungu, Henry; Kyeyune, Dorothy; Musisi, Ezra; Opoka, Robert; Stowell, Christopher P; Dzik, Walter H

    2016-10-01

    Severe anemia, defined as a hemoglobin level of less than 5.0 g/dL, affects millions of children worldwide. The brain has a high basal demand for oxygen and is especially vulnerable to hypoxemia. Previous studies have documented neurocognitive impairment in children with severe anemia. Data on cerebral tissue oxygenation in children with severe anemia and their response to blood transfusion are limited. To measure hemoglobin saturation in cerebral tissue (cerebral tissue oxygen saturation [tSo2]) before, during, and after blood transfusion in a cohort of children presenting to hospital with severe anemia. This was a prospective, observational cohort study conducted from February 2013 through May 2015 and analyzed in July 2015 at a university hospital pediatric acute care facility in Kampala, Uganda, of 128 children, ages 6 to 60 months who were enrolled in a larger clinical trial, with a presenting hemoglobin level of less than 5.0 g/dL and a blood lactate level greater than 5mM. Most children had either malaria or sickle cell disease. Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion given as 10 mL/kg over 120 minutes. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of children with pretransfusion cerebral tSo2 levels less than 65%, 65% to 75%, and greater than 75%. Change in cerebral tSo2 as a result of transfusion. Of 128 children included in the study, oximetry results in 8 cases were excluded owing to motion artifacts; thus, 120 were included in this analysis. Cerebral tSo2 values prior to transfusion ranged from 34% to 87% (median, 72%; interquartile range [IQR], 65%-76%). Eighty-one children (67%) demonstrated an initial cerebral tSo2 level (≤75%) corresponding to an oxygen extraction ratio greater than 0.36. Patients with sickle cell disease (n = 17) and malaria (n = 15) contributed in nearly equal numbers to the subgroup with an initial cerebral tSo2 (children failed to achieve a tSo2 level greater than 75%. Severe anemia in children is frequently associated with low

  3. Liberal or restrictive transfusion in high-risk patients after hip surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Jeffrey L; Terrin, Michael L; Noveck, Helaine; Sanders, David W; Chaitman, Bernard R; Rhoads, George G; Nemo, George; Dragert, Karen; Beaupre, Lauren; Hildebrand, Kevin; Macaulay, William; Lewis, Courtland; Cook, Donald Richard; Dobbin, Gwendolyn; Zakriya, Khwaja J; Apple, Fred S; Horney, Rebecca A; Magaziner, Jay

    2011-12-29

    The hemoglobin threshold at which postoperative red-cell transfusion is warranted is controversial. We conducted a randomized trial to determine whether a higher threshold for blood transfusion would improve recovery in patients who had undergone surgery for hip fracture. We enrolled 2016 patients who were 50 years of age or older, who had either a history of or risk factors for cardiovascular disease, and whose hemoglobin level was below 10 g per deciliter after hip-fracture surgery. We randomly assigned patients to a liberal transfusion strategy (a hemoglobin threshold of 10 g per deciliter) or a restrictive transfusion strategy (symptoms of anemia or at physician discretion for a hemoglobin level of <8 g per deciliter). The primary outcome was death or an inability to walk across a room without human assistance on 60-day follow-up. A median of 2 units of red cells were transfused in the liberal-strategy group and none in the restrictive-strategy group. The rates of the primary outcome were 35.2% in the liberal-strategy group and 34.7% in the restrictive-strategy group (odds ratio in the liberal-strategy group, 1.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84 to 1.22), for an absolute risk difference of 0.5 percentage points (95% CI, -3.7 to 4.7). The rates of in-hospital acute coronary syndrome or death were 4.3% and 5.2%, respectively (absolute risk difference, -0.9%; 99% CI, -3.3 to 1.6), and rates of death on 60-day follow-up were 7.6% and 6.6%, respectively (absolute risk difference, 1.0%; 99% CI, -1.9 to 4.0). The rates of other complications were similar in the two groups. A liberal transfusion strategy, as compared with a restrictive strategy, did not reduce rates of death or inability to walk independently on 60-day follow-up or reduce in-hospital morbidity in elderly patients at high cardiovascular risk. (Funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; FOCUS ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00071032.).

  4. Liberal or Restrictive Transfusion in High-Risk Patients after Hip Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Jeffrey L.; Terrin, Michael L.; Noveck, Helaine; Sanders, David W.; Chaitman, Bernard R.; Rhoads, George G.; Nemo, George; Dragert, Karen; Beaupre, Lauren; Hildebrand, Kevin; Macaulay, William; Lewis, Courtland; Cook, Donald Richard; Dobbin, Gwendolyn; Zakriya, Khwaja J.; Apple, Fred S.; Horney, Rebecca A.; Magaziner, Jay

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The hemoglobin threshold at which postoperative red-cell transfusion is warranted is controversial. We conducted a randomized trial to determine whether a higher threshold for blood transfusion would improve recovery in patients who had undergone surgery for hip fracture. METHODS We enrolled 2016 patients who were 50 years of age or older, who had either a history of or risk factors for cardiovascular disease, and whose hemoglobin level was below 10 g per deciliter after hip-fracture surgery. We randomly assigned patients to a liberal transfusion strategy (a hemoglobin threshold of 10 g per deciliter) or a restrictive transfusion strategy (symptoms of anemia or at physician discretion for a hemoglobin level of <8 g per deciliter). The primary outcome was death or an inability to walk across a room without human assistance on 60-day follow-up. RESULTS A median of 2 units of red cells were transfused in the liberal-strategy group and none in the restrictive-strategy group. The rates of the primary outcome were 35.2% in the liberal-strategy group and 34.7% in the restrictive-strategy group (odds ratio in the liberal-strategy group, 1.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84 to 1.22), for an absolute risk difference of 0.5 percentage points (95% CI, −3.7 to 4.7). The rates of in-hospital acute coronary syndrome or death were 4.3% and 5.2%, respectively (absolute risk difference, −0.9%; 99% CI, −3.3 to 1.6), and rates of death on 60-day follow-up were 7.6% and 6.6%, respectively (absolute risk difference, 1.0%; 99% CI, −1.9 to 4.0). The rates of other complications were similar in the two groups. CONCLUSIONS A liberal transfusion strategy, as compared with a restrictive strategy, did not reduce rates of death or inability to walk independently on 60-day follow-up or reduce in-hospital morbidity in elderly patients at high cardiovascular risk. (Funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; FOCUS ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00071032.) PMID

  5. Sustained endothelial dependent dilation in pial arterioles after crosslinked hemoglobin transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulatowski, J A; Asano, Y; Koehler, R C; Traystman, R J; Bucci, E

    1997-01-01

    completely blocked at 10(-5)M hemoglobin. This finding implies negligible permeation of the blood-brain barrier by crosslinked hemoglobin acutely after the transfusion.

  6. Severe iron intoxication treated with exchange transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsson, M; Cortes, D; Jepsen, S

    2009-01-01

    An 18-month-old previous healthy girl who had ingested 442 mg elemental iron/kg was admitted to a paediatric intensive care unit. The child was treated with gastric lavage, whole bowel irrigation and intravenous deferoxamine. After 2 h of standard therapy serum iron had risen threefold to 1362 µg....../dl (244 µmol/l). The child was treated with exchange transfusion (ET; 52 ml/kg) and serum iron fell to 134 µg/dl (24 µmol/l). The patient made an uncomplicated recovery. ET should be considered in severe iron poisoning when standard therapy is inadequate....

  7. Severe iron intoxication treated with exchange transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsson, Marcella; Cortes, Dina; Jepsen, Søren

    2008-01-01

    An 18-month-old previous healthy girl who had ingested 442 mg elemental iron/kg was admitted to a paediatric intensive care unit. The child was treated with gastric lavage, whole bowel irrigation and intravenous deferoxamine. After 2 h of standard therapy serum iron had risen threefold to 1362 mi...... microg/dl (244 micromol/l). The child was treated with exchange transfusion (ET; 52 ml/kg) and serum iron fell to 134 microg/dl (24 micromol/l). The patient made an uncomplicated recovery. ET should be considered in severe iron poisoning when standard therapy is inadequate....

  8. Long-term detection of microchimaerism in peripheral blood after pretransplantation blood transfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervoordeldonk, S. F.; Doumaid, K.; Remmerswaal, E. B.; ten Berge, I. J.; Wilmink, J. M.; de Waal, L. P.; Boog, C. J.

    1998-01-01

    Renal allograft survival is prolonged after pretransplantation blood transfusion. The aim of this study was to test retrospectively the development and persistence of microchimaerism after pretransplantation blood transfusion and to assess whether the type of blood transfusion (partially matched [=

  9. Transfusion interventions in critical bleeding requiring massive transfusion: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuilten, Zoe K; Crighton, Gemma; Engelbrecht, Sunelle; Gotmaker, Robert; Brunskill, Susan J; Murphy, Michael F; Wood, Erica M

    2015-04-01

    Critical bleeding (CB) requiring massive transfusion (MT) can occur in a variety of clinical contexts and is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity. In 2011, the Australian National Blood Authority (NBA) published patient blood management guidelines for CB and MT, which found limited high-quality evidence from which only 2 recommendations could be made. The aim of this systematic review (SR) was to update these guidelines and identify evidence gaps still to be addressed. A comprehensive search was performed for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and SRs using MeSH index and free text terms in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library (Issue 11, 2012), EMBASE, CINHAL, PUBMED, and the Transfusion Evidence Library up to July 15, 2014. The evidence was grouped according to 4 questions based on the original guideline relating to transfusion interventions: (1) effect of dose, timing, and ratio of red blood cells (RBCs) to component therapy on patient outcomes; (2) effect of RBC transfusion on patient outcomes; (3) effect of fresh frozen plasma, platelet, cryoprecipitate, fibrinogen concentrate, and prothrombin complex concentrate on patient outcomes; and (4) effect of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) on patient outcomes. From this search, 19 studies were identified: 6 RCTs and 13 SRs. Two of the RCTs were pilot/feasibility studies, 3 were investigating rFVIIa, and 1 compared restrictive versus liberal RBC transfusion in upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Overall, limited new evidence was identified and substantial evidence gaps remain, particularly with regard to the effect of component therapies, including ratio of RBC to component therapies, on patient outcomes. Clinical trials to address these questions are required. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Autologous blood transfusion for kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, H; Chikaraishi, T; Furuhata, S; Tsutsumi, H; Miyano, S; Nakazawa, R; Nakano, T; Kudo, H; Kitajima, K; Takahashi, T; Satoh, Y; Kimura, K

    2008-06-01

    Autologous blood transfusion (ABT) is rarely employed in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD); these patients are usually anemic. Since 1998, we have attempted ABT for ESRD patients undergoing living-related kidney transplantation. Among 20 patients enrolled in this study the preoperative hemoglobin and hematocrit levels were 10.0 +/- 1.2 mg/dL (range, 8.1-11.7) and 30.0 +/- 3.7% (range, 24.7-34.3), respectively. Blood volume collected on each occasion was 235.7 +/- 57.7 mL (range, 200-400), and the number of blood collections was 2.45 +/- 0.9 (range, 1-4). Total collected volume was 567.5 +/- 157.5 mL (range, 400-800). Symptomatic hypotension was seen in two patients, but vital signs recovered spontaneously. No other problems related to blood collection were observed. Allogeneic transfusion was need in only one patient (5%). ABT was safe and efficacious in ESRD patients scheduled for living-related kidney transplantation.

  11. Contemporary issues in transfusion medicine informatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Transfusion Medicine Service (TMS covers diverse clinical and laboratory-based services that must be delivered with accuracy, efficiency and reliability. TMS oversight is shared by multiple regulatory agencies that cover product manufacturing and validation standards geared toward patient safety. These demands present significant informatics challenges. Over the past few decades, TMS information systems have improved to better handle blood product manufacturing, inventory, delivery, tracking and documentation. Audit trails and access to electronic databases have greatly facilitated product traceability and biovigilance efforts. Modern blood bank computing has enabled novel applications such as the electronic crossmatch, kiosk-based blood product delivery systems, and self-administered computerized blood donor interview and eligibility determination. With increasing use of barcoding technology, there has been a marked improvement in patient and specimen identification. Moreover, the emergence of national and international labeling standards such as ISBT 128 have facilitated the availability, movement and tracking of blood products across national and international boundaries. TMS has only recently begun to leverage the electronic medical record to address quality issues in transfusion practice and promote standardized documentation within institutions. With improved technology, future growth is expected in blood bank automation and product labeling with applications such as radio frequency identification devices. This article reviews several of these key informatics issues relevant to the contemporary practice of TMS.

  12. Contemporary issues in transfusion medicine informatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Parwani, Anil V.; Raval, Jay S.; Triulzi, Darrell J.; Benjamin, Richard J.; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2011-01-01

    The Transfusion Medicine Service (TMS) covers diverse clinical and laboratory-based services that must be delivered with accuracy, efficiency and reliability. TMS oversight is shared by multiple regulatory agencies that cover product manufacturing and validation standards geared toward patient safety. These demands present significant informatics challenges. Over the past few decades, TMS information systems have improved to better handle blood product manufacturing, inventory, delivery, tracking and documentation. Audit trails and access to electronic databases have greatly facilitated product traceability and biovigilance efforts. Modern blood bank computing has enabled novel applications such as the electronic crossmatch, kiosk-based blood product delivery systems, and self-administered computerized blood donor interview and eligibility determination. With increasing use of barcoding technology, there has been a marked improvement in patient and specimen identification. Moreover, the emergence of national and international labeling standards such as ISBT 128 have facilitated the availability, movement and tracking of blood products across national and international boundaries. TMS has only recently begun to leverage the electronic medical record to address quality issues in transfusion practice and promote standardized documentation within institutions. With improved technology, future growth is expected in blood bank automation and product labeling with applications such as radio frequency identification devices. This article reviews several of these key informatics issues relevant to the contemporary practice of TMS. PMID:21383927

  13. French Haemovigilance Data on Platelet Transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willaert, Béatrice; Vo Mai, Mai-Phuong; Caldani, Cyril

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY: The Agence Française de Securite Sanitaire des Produits de Santé (Afssaps; French Health Products Safety Agency) is responsible, through its hemovigilance unit, for the organization and the functioning of the national hemovigilance network. In accordance with the French law, it receives all data on adverse transfusion reactions regardless of their severity. With the aim of evaluating the tolerance of two kinds of labile blood products (LBP), pooled platelet concentrates (PP) and apheresis platelet concentrates (APC), we screened the French national database from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2006. We observed that the number of transfusion incident reports is more than twice as high with APC (8.61:1,000 LBP) than with PP (4.21:1,000 LBP). The difference between these two ratios is statistically significant as shown by chi-square test (e = 21.00 with α = 5%). The risk to suffer adverse reactions of any type, except for alloimmunization, is higher with APC, and the major type of diagnosis related to APC is allergic reaction (1:200 APC issued) even if those allergic reactions are rarely serious. The new French National Hemovigilance Commission should impel a working group evaluating this topic and above all the impact of additive solutions which have been used since 2005 to put forward preventives measures.

  14. Profiles of blood and blood component transfusion recipients in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mafirakureva, Nyashadzaishe; Khoza, Star; Hassall, Oliver; Faragher, Brian E.; Kajja, Isaac; Mvere, David A.; Emmanuel, Jean C.; Postma, Maarten J.; van Hulst, Marinus

    2015-01-01

    Background. There are limited published data on the characteristics of blood transfusion recipients in sub-Saharan Africa. This study describes the demographic characteristics of blood transfusion recipients and patterns of blood and blood component use in Zimbabwe. Materials and methods. Data on

  15. Simulated sequential laser therapy of twin-twin transfusion syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gemert, M. J. C.; van den Wijngaard, J. P. H. M.; Lopriore, E.; Lewi, L.; Deprest, J.; Vandenbussche, F. P. H. A.

    2008-01-01

    Sequential laser therapy of twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) includes laser obliteration of arteriovenous (AV) anastomoses from donor to recipient (AVDR) before obliterating AV anastomoses from recipient to donor (AVRD). This strategy allows for a beneficial intra-operative transfusion of blood

  16. Blood transfusion and hepatitis viruses | Bird | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transmission of hepatitis viruses has been recognised as an undesirable effect of blood transfusion since the 1940s, when large outbreaks occurred following inoculation with a yellow fever vaccine which contained pooled human plasma. Further reports followed of jaundice occurring several months after transfusions with ...

  17. Post-transfusion viral hepatitis in sickle Cell Anaemia: Retrospective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several complications of sickle cell anaemia (SCA) are well known including hepatobiliary dysfunction. We here present a study 151 randomly selected SCA patients to highlight the contributory role of blood transfusion to the development of viral hepatitis in them. Twenty (13.2%) had not received blood transfusion and no ...

  18. Prevention and management of transfusion-induced alloimmunization: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Hauck-Dlimi B; Achenbach S; Strobel J; Eckstein R; Zimmermann R

    2014-01-01

    Barbara Hauck-Dlimi, Susanne Achenbach, Julian Strobel, Reinhold Eckstein, Robert Zimmermann Department of Transfusion Medicine and Haemostaseology, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany Abstract: Transfusion of blood components, transplantations, and exchange of blood between mother and child during pregnancy or at birth can lead to alloimmunization. Because of its clinical relevance, this review brings into focus alloimmunization against red blood cells, human platelet antigens, ...

  19. Delayed haemolytic transfusion reactions in patients with sickle cell disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Cummins, D; Webb, G.; Shah, N; Davies, S C

    1991-01-01

    We describe two cases which illustrate the difficult diagnostic and therapeutic problems posed by delayed haemolytic transfusion reactions in patients with sickle-cell disease. The cases emphasize the need for meticulous phenotypic and serological assessment of sickle-cell patients prior to transfusion therapy.

  20. Autologous and allogeneic blood transfusions in colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.R.C. Busch (Olivier)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractSince blood transfusion became a therapeutical option in patient care, the surgical possibilities have increased tremendously. Since the problems of anticoagulation and blood group typing were largely resolved, blood transfusions were in only a minority of cases directly lethal. However,

  1. Ranitidine prevents postoperative transfusion-induced depression of delayed hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Hammer, J H; Moesgaard, F

    1989-01-01

    The influence of perioperative blood transfusion on postoperative depression of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) and the effect of ranitidine on transfusion-induced changes in postoperative CMI were investigated. CMI was assessed preoperatively and postoperatively by skin testing with seven common...

  2. Cardiovascular responses to blood transfusion in children with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: This study evaluated the cardiovascular responses to blood transfusion in children with anemic heart failure using mostly clinical parameters. Materials and Methods: Consecutive patients with anemic heart failure presenting to a childrenfs emergency room and requiring blood transfusion were assessed for ...

  3. Transfusion practice in hip arthroplasty - a nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jans, Øivind; Kehlet, H; Hussain, Zubair Butt

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives The optimal transfusion strategy in hip arthroplasty remains controversial despite existing guidelines. The aim of this study was to evaluate the transfusion practice in patients undergoing primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) or revision total hip arthroplasty (RTHA) in...

  4. Collection and Transfusion of Blood in Jos University Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... that blood collection and transfusion in JUTH is on the increase with anti- HIV positivity still being high. There is therefore, an urgent need to further improve the safety of blood transfused through provision of appropriate screening methods, encouragement of autologous donations and ensuring good laboratory practice.

  5. 'Blind' transfusion of blood products in exsanguinating trauma patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geeraedts, L.M.G.; Demiral, H.; Schaap, N.P.M.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Pompe, J.C.; Frolke, J.P.M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In trauma, as interventions are carried out to stop bleeding, ongoing resuscitation with blood products is of vital importance. As transfusion policy in exsanguinating patients cannot be based on laboratory tests, transfusion of blood products is performed empirically or 'blindly'. The

  6. Rhesus Negative Woman Transfused With Rhesus Positive Blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinicians sometimes are confronted with the challenge of transfusing haemorrhaging Rhesus (Rh) D negative patients with Rh D positive blood to save their lives. There are concerns about alloimmunization and future haemolytic disease of the newborn in women of the reproductive age. Another fear is transfusion reaction ...

  7. Transfusion transmitted malaria in three major blood banks of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malaria is one of the most important transfusion associated infections in many parts of the world, particularly the developing countries where it is endemic. This study estimates the risk of acquiring malaria from a single unit of blood in North of Pakistan. A prospective study was conducted to investigate transfusion transmitted ...

  8. The new Scandinavian Donations and Transfusions database (SCANDAT2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgren, Gustaf; Rostgaard, Klaus; Vasan, Senthil K

    2015-01-01

    over 40 million person-years, with possibility for future extension. Data quality is generally high with 96% of all transfusions being traceable to their respective donation(s) and a very high (>97%) concordance with official statistics on annual number of blood donations and transfusions. CONCLUSIONS...

  9. Knowledge and acceptance of cord blood transfusion as an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Voluntary Adult blood donor panel is low in Nigeria. Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a common chronic disease which requires regular blood transfusion. Cord blood has been shown to be physiologically suitable as an alternative to adult blood transfusion. Aim: To assess the knowledge and acceptance of cord ...

  10. Residual risk of transmission of HIV through blood transfusion in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Residual risk of transmission of HIV through blood transfusion in South Africa. F Sitas, A.F. Fleming, J Morris. Abstract. Despite the ongoing review of donor recruitment criteria by local blood transfusion services and the developmnt of highly sensitive and specific testing for the presence of antibodies to HIV in blood and ...

  11. Blood Transfusion in Surgery in Africa | Jani | East and Central ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many changes have occurred in transfusion practices in Africa and in Western countries since this topic was first reviewed in 2005. Blood transfusion remains a key component in the resuscitation of surgical patients suffering, whether from operative losses, trauma, GI bleeding, or obstetrics. Nothing has replaced the ...

  12. Overview of Blood Transfusion in Orthopaedic Trauma in Ilorin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Blood transfusion in orthopaedic trauma is very important, its safety and risks are to be balanced. Objective: To determine the blood transfusion rate of orthopaedic trauma requiring operations. Method: All patients admitted to Ela Memorial Medical Centre, Ilorin from 1st January, 2001 to 31st May 2006 were ...

  13. Blood transfusion requirement in surgery for femoral artery aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi, N; Schroeder, T V

    1997-01-01

    Audit of blood usage in various surgical specialities have shown that over-ordering of blood is widespread, causing unnecessary pressure on the transfusion facilities and giving growing concern over the expense of cross-matching blood. The aim of this study was to assess the blood transfusion...

  14. Audit of blood transfusion practice during anaesthesia for spine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Blood loss during spine surgery is often considerable, necessitating blood transfusion. The elective nature and other peculiarities of most spine surgeries, however, make them amenable to several blood conservation techniques, such that reduction in allogeneic blood transfusion is considered high priority in ...

  15. Hepatitis C and blood transfusion among children attending the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) accounts for 90% of post-transfusion hepatitis. In Uganda, there has been limited research of prevalence of HCV among sickle cell anaemia (SS) patients, a group at risk for multiple transfusions. Objectives: To establish prevalence of HCV infection and determine whether blood ...

  16. Blood transfusion in obstetrics: attitude and perceptions of pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Obstetrics haemorrhage is the leading cause of preventable maternal deaths worldwide. Blood transfusion is pivotal to death reduction, but are the women aware of its importance? Objectives: The study investigated the view of a population of pregnant women on obstetrics related blood transfusion. Methods: ...

  17. Cardiovascular responses to blood transfusion in children with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-02-02

    Feb 2, 2012 ... in sub-Saharan Africa.[1-7] In cases of severe anemia, blood transfusion has been known to be life saving.[8] However, there are reports of cardiac failure, pulmonary edema, and mortality following blood transfusion with whole blood or packed cells in adults and older children.[8,9] These untoward effects ...

  18. [Importance of haemovigilance and reports on transfusion reaction in blood component therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujić, Jasmina; Gulan, Zdravko; Budakov, Zorana

    2012-01-01

    Application of blood and blood components throughout decades is very successful and mostly safe procedure in patients' therapy. However, it may lead to unfavourable effects, such as transfusion reactions. In the period from 2000 to 2009, 180 transfusion reactions were reported at the Department of Clinical Transfusion of the Service for Blood Transfusion of Vojvodina in Novi Sad. The aetiology of transfusion reactions was determined by examining pre-transfusion and post-transfusion sample of patient's blood and by examining the unit of blood component that induced reaction. Out of 180 reported transfusion reactions, 98 (54.4%) were febrile non-haemolytic transfusion reactions, 69 (38.3%) allergic reactions and 2 (1.11%) haemolytic reactions. Blood components that caused most of transfusion reactions were erythrocytes (62.4%), fresh frozen plasma (11.2%) and platelets (14.4%). All patients underwent multiple transfusions. The fact that only 0.13% transfusion reactions were reported, compared with data from literature (2-15%), points to the lack of regular reporting of transfusion reactions, as well as the fact that there is only one report of delayed transfusion reaction. To improve and make blood transfusion safer it is necessary to respect all pre-transfusion procedures, constant follow up of blood transfusion must be done and patients with diagnosed non-haemolytic transfusion reaction should be given leukocyte reduced blood components.

  19. Use of perflubron emulsion to decrease allogeneic blood transfusion in high-blood-loss non-cardiac surgery: results of a European phase 3 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahn, Donat R; Waschke, Klaus F; Standl, Thomas; Motsch, Johann; Van Huynegem, Léone; Welte, Martin; Gombotz, Hans; Coriat, Pierre; Verkh, Lev; Faithfull, Simon; Keipert, Peter

    2002-12-01

    This single-blind randomized study in general surgery evaluated the efficacy of perflubron emulsion (PFC) as an artificial oxygen carrier being used to augment preoperative acute normovolemic hemodilution to reduce and avoid transfusion of both allogeneic erythrocytes and erythrocytes from preoperative autologous donation compared with standard of care. Subjects (N = 492) with hemoglobin concentrations of 12-15 g/dl undergoing noncardiac surgical procedures with 20 ml/kg or greater expected blood loss were randomized into two groups. Control patients were transfused intraoperatively at a hemoglobin concentration less than 8.0 +/- 0.5 g/dl or at protocol-defined, physiologic triggers. PFC-treated patients first underwent acute normovolemic hemodilution to hemoglobin of 8.0 +/- 0.5 g/dl, followed by dosing with perflubron emulsion (1.8 g/kg). When hemoglobin reached less than 6.5 +/- 0.5 g/dl, an additional 0.9-g/kg dose was given. PFC patients were transfused at hemoglobin less than 5.5 +/- 0.5 g/dl or at predefined physiologic triggers. After surgery, hemoglobin was maintained at 8.5 +/- 0.5 g/dl or greater in all patients until discharge. Efficacy endpoints included the number of allogeneic and preoperative autologous donation units transfused and the percentage of subjects avoiding transfusion. Both groups had similar hemoglobin concentrations at screening (13.5 +/- 1.0 g/dl) and at discharge: 10.8 +/- 1.2 g/dl (PFC) and 11.1 +/- 1.3 g/dl (control). At 24 h, more patients in the PFC group avoided allogeneic and preoperative autologous donation erythrocyte transfusions (53% vs. 43%, or = 20 ml/kg), significantly greater avoidance of any erythrocyte transfusion was maintained through day of hospital discharge (26% vs. 16% in the PFC and control groups, respectively; P < 0.05), and there was also a significant reduction in the number of erythrocyte units transfused (3.4 +/- 2.9 vs. 4.9 +/- 2.4 units; median 2 vs. 4 units; P < 0.001). Adverse events rates were

  20. The increasing importance of Intellectual Property in Transfusion Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardie, Ian D; Rooney, Catherine

    2011-08-01

    The Scottish National Blood Transfusion Service (SNBTS) originated in Edinburgh in the 1920's by dentist Jack Copland. Since that time the scope of Transfusion Medicine has broadened significantly to accommodate advances in technologies such as cell isolation, culture and manipulation. Many transfusion services, including SNBTS, now provide expertise both in the traditional field of blood transfusion and the newer, wider field of human cell (including 'adult' and embryonic stem cells) and tissue procurement and culture - in all the new science of "regenerative medicine". This paper describes the importance of Intellectual Property in the provision of Transfusion Medicine today and provides guidance on the management of Intellectual Property so that advances in the field have the best chance of successful translation into clinical practice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Prediction of postpartum blood transfusion – risk factors and recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikkelsø, Anne J; Hjortøe, Sofie; Gerds, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim was to find clinically useful risk factors for postpartum transfusion and to assess the joint predictive value in a population of women with a first and second delivery. METHODS: All Danish women with a first and second delivery from January 2001 to September 2009 who gave birth...... in a hospital that reported transfusion of red blood cells to a national database: A total of 96 545 women were included. RESULTS: Retained placental tissue explained more than all other risk factors in vaginal deliveries. Retained placental tissue at first delivery was associated with postpartum transfusion...... transfusion is difficult. Retained placental tissue is the strongest predictor of postpartum blood transfusion in vaginal deliveries. Retained placental tissue is usually diagnosed for the first time when the bleeding starts, which limits the clinical value of prediction. We need tools for an early diagnosis...

  2. Acute hyperkalemia as a complication of intravenous therapy with epsilon-aminocaproic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Arna; Stoica, Cristina; Walia, Ann

    2011-11-01

    Epsilon-aminocaproic acid (EACA) is used frequently during surgery as prophylaxis to decrease blood loss and transfusion requirements. A rare complication of EACA induced acute hyperkalemia in a patient undergoing total hip replacement is presented. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. HIV Infection in hospitalized under-5 children with acute watery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Ezechukwu

    2011-12-31

    Dec 31, 2011 ... Five of them presented within 48 hours of diarrhoea . Associated illness. Three had malaria while two had acute respiratory infec- tion in addition to acute diarrhea. Past Medical History. Two had been admitted earlier for febrile illness but no previous history of blood transfusion. None had a chronic illness.

  4. Restrictive blood transfusion protocol in liver resection patients reduces blood transfusions with no increase in patient morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehry, John; Cannon, Robert; Scoggins, Charles R; Puffer, Lisa; McMasters, Kelly M; Martin, Robert C G

    2015-02-01

    Management of anemia in surgical oncology patients remains one of the key quality components in overall care and cost. Continued reports demonstrate the effects of hospital transfusion, which has been demonstrated to lead to a longer length of stay, more complications, and possibly worse overall oncologic outcomes. The hypothesis for this study was that a dedicated restrictive transfusion protocol in patients undergoing hepatectomy would lead to less overall blood transfusion with no increase in overall morbidity. A cohort study was performed using our prospective database from January 2000 to June 2013. September 2011 served as the separation point for the date of operation criteria because this marked the implementation of more restrictive blood transfusion guidelines. A total of 186 patients undergoing liver resection were reviewed. The restrictive blood transfusion guidelines reduced the percentage of patients that received blood from 31.0% before January 9, 2011 to 23.3% after this date (P = .03). The liver procedure that was most consistently associated with higher levels of transfusion was a right lobectomy (16%). Prior surgery and endoscopic stent were the 2 preoperative interventions associated with receiving blood. Patients who received blood before and after the restrictive period had similar predictive factors: major hepatectomies, higher intraoperative blood loss, lower preoperative hemoglobin level, older age, prior systemic chemotherapy, and lower preoperative nutritional parameters (all P blood did not have worse overall progression-free survival or overall survival. A restrictive blood transfusion protocol reduces the incidence of blood transfusions and the number of packed red blood cells transfused. Patients who require blood have similar preoperative and intraoperative factors that cannot be mitigated in oncology patients. Restrictive use of blood transfusions can reduce cost and does adversely affect patients undergoing liver resection

  5. Transfusion therapy in paediatric trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nystrup, Kristin Brønnum; Stensballe, Jakob; Bøttger, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Haemorrhage is a leading cause of death in paediatric trauma patients. Predefined massive transfusion protocols (MTP) have the potential to significantly reduce mortality by treating haemorrhagic shock and coagulopathy, in adhering to the principles of haemostatic resuscitation with rapid...... in paediatric trauma patients is challenging, and the optimal blood product ratio that will increase survival in massively bleeding paediatric trauma patients has yet to be determined. To date, only a few small descriptive studies and case reports have investigated the use of predefined MTP in paediatric trauma...... patients.MTP with increased FFP or PLT to RBC ratios combined with viscoelastic haemostatic assay (VHA) guided haemostatic resuscitation have not yet been tested in paediatric populations but based on results from adult trauma patients, this therapeutic approach seems promising.Considering the high...

  6. Preventing blood transfusion failures: FMEA, an effective assessment method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Zhila; Hasoumi, Mojtaba; Behzadi, Faranak; Mohamadi, Efat; Jafary, Mohamadreza; Saeedi, Morteza

    2017-06-30

    Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) is a method used to assess the risk of failures and harms to patients during the medical process and to identify the associated clinical issues. The aim of this study was to conduct an assessment of blood transfusion process in a teaching general hospital, using FMEA as the method. A structured FMEA was recruited in our study performed in 2014, and corrective actions were implemented and re-evaluated after 6 months. Sixteen 2-h sessions were held to perform FMEA in the blood transfusion process, including five steps: establishing the context, selecting team members, analysis of the processes, hazard analysis, and developing a risk reduction protocol for blood transfusion. Failure modes with the highest risk priority numbers (RPNs) were identified. The overall RPN scores ranged from 5 to 100 among which, four failure modes were associated with RPNs over 75. The data analysis indicated that failures with the highest RPNs were: labelling (RPN: 100), transfusion of blood or the component (RPN: 100), patient identification (RPN: 80) and sampling (RPN: 75). The results demonstrated that mis-transfusion of blood or blood component is the most important error, which can lead to serious morbidity or mortality. Provision of training to the personnel on blood transfusion, knowledge raising on hazards and appropriate preventative measures, as well as developing standard safety guidelines are essential, and must be implemented during all steps of blood and blood component transfusion.

  7. Predeposit autologous blood transfusion: Do we require to promote it?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurjit Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Safest blood a patient can receive is his own. Quest for safe blood transfusion has remained of prime concern. To meet this aspiration, various forms of autologous blood transfusions can be practiced. It is especially suitable for patients with rare blood groups and religious sects such as Jehovah′s witness autologous transfusion is extremely safe. Cross matching is not required; iso-immunization to a foreign body is excluded. Fear of transfusion transmissible disease can be ignored. Therefore, autologous blood transfusion is required to be revisited. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective study carried out at Padmashree Dr. D. Y. Patil Medical College, Hospital and Research Centre, Pune between July 2010 and May 2012. Study comprised of 100 patients divided into two groups, autologous and homologous. Benefits of autologous transfusion were studied. Results: There was no significant change in hematocrit and blood parameters after blood donation. That is mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (P < 0.001 after blood donation. Only one complication of vasovagal syncope was observed at the time of blood donation. Conclusion: Autologous blood transfusion is safe. Easy alternative to be practiced in elective surgeries, especially in patients with rare blood group or believers of Jehovah′s witness faith. It helps to reduce the shortfall in national blood inventory. Autologous blood donation should be practiced whenever possible.

  8. Electrolyte and acid-base disturbances caused by blood transfusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linko, K; Saxelin, I

    1986-02-01

    The effect of blood transfusions on the electrolyte, metabolic and hemodynamic status of 31 patients undergoing major laparotomies was studied. Two groups were compared: Group I, 11 patients receiving continuous intraoperative blood transfusions exceeding 5 units at a rate over 0.3 ml/kg/min, and Group II, 20 patients receiving transfusions of 1-5 units at a rate below the limit. Transiently increased potassium values (5.2 +/- 0.3 mmol/l) were found in Group I during the rapid transfusion phase. The difference was statistically significant (P less than 0.05) when compared to Group II (4.3 +/- 0.2 mmol/l). There was also a significant correlation (r = 0.64; P less than 0.05) between the increase in serum potassium concentrations and the respective potassium load caused by the blood transfused. Most of the hyperpotassemic patients had surgery of the abdominal aorta. During the rapid transfusion, the patients in Group I had significantly lower concentrations of serum ionized calcium (P less than 0.05) and higher central venous pressures (P less than 0.05), but more periods of hypotension when compared to Group II. After the transfusion the massively transfused patients had slight metabolic alcalosis, the BE and pH differing significantly (P less than 0.05) from the values of Group II. It is concluded that hyperpotassemia may occur during rapid transfusions (over 0.4 ml/kg/min) of stored blood, especially in patients undergoing surgery of the abdominal aorta, even without simultaneous shock, acidosis or hypothermia. Calcium administration may be of benefit especially in situations where combined hyperpotassemia and hypocalcemia reduce the myocardial performance.

  9. Profiles of blood and blood component transfusion recipients in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafirakureva, Nyashadzaishe; Khoza, Star; Hassall, Oliver; Faragher, Brian E.; Kajja, Isaac; Mvere, David A.; Emmanuel, Jean C.; Postma, Maarten J.; van Hulst, Marinus

    2015-01-01

    Background There are limited published data on the characteristics of blood transfusion recipients in sub-Saharan Africa. This study describes the demographic characteristics of blood transfusion recipients and patterns of blood and blood component use in Zimbabwe. Materials and methods Data on the characteristics of the blood transfusion recipients (age, sex, blood group), blood components received (type, quantity), discharge diagnoses and outcomes following transfusion (discharge status, duration of stay in hospital), were retrospectively collected from four major hospitals for the period from January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012. Diagnoses were grouped into broad categories according to the disease headings of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Surgical procedures were grouped into broad categories according to organ system using ICD-9. Results Most of the 1,793 transfusion recipients studied were female (63.2%) and in the reproductive age group, i.e. 15–49 years (65.3%). The median age of the recipients was 33 years (range, 0–93). The majority of these recipients (n=1,642; 91.6%) received a red blood cell transfusion. The majority of the patients were diagnosed with conditions related to pregnancy and childbirth (22.3%), and diseases of blood and blood-forming organs (17.7%). The median time spent in hospital was 8 days (range, 0–214) and in-hospital mortality was 15.4%. Discussion Our sample of blood transfusion recipients were fairly young and most of them received red blood cell transfusions. The majority of patients in the reproductive age group received blood transfusions for pregnancy and childbirth-related diagnoses. PMID:26192782

  10. Evaluation of Risk Minimisation Measures for Blood Components – Based on Reporting Rates of Transfusion-Transmitted Reactions (1997-2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Markus B.; Heiden, Margarethe; Volkers, Peter; Lohmann, Annette; Keller-Stanislawski, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background To assess the impact of safety measures, we compared reporting rates of transfusion-related reactions before and after the implementation of six measures in 1999, 2004, 2006, 2008 and 2009. Methods Reporting rates of transfusion-transmitted bacterial infection (TTBI), viral infection (TTVI) and immune-mediated transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) were calculated on the basis of confirmed annual reports and distributed blood components. Results The introduction of HCV NAT testing caused a significant reduction of HCV reporting rate from 1:0.6 to 1:83.16 million administered blood components (p haemovigilance data, a significant benefit could be demonstrated for four of six implemented safety measures. PMID:26557816

  11. Is haemovigilance improving transfusion practice?--The european experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strengers, P F W

    2007-01-01

    Improving transfusion practice for a donor means a safer donation process and maximal use of the donation. From the clinical perspective, it includes the production of the right type of blood component of adequate quality, administered at the right dose at the right moment to the right patient in order to obtain the expected or anticipated effect in absence of harm. Transfusion practice involves not only the complete blood chain, i.e. from the donation to clinical usage, but also the input from the competent authority that bears responsibility for the concepts of improving health care practice. In Europe, experience has shown that haemovigilance offers an effective tool in improving transfusion practice.

  12. Errors in transfusion medicine: have we learned our lesson?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fastman, Barbara Rabin; Kaplan, Harold S

    2011-01-01

    The phrase "patient safety" represents freedom from accidental or preventable harm due to events occurring in the healthcare setting. Practitioners aim to reduce, if not prevent, medical errors and adverse outcomes. Yet studies performed from many perspectives show that medical error constitutes a serious worldwide problem. Transfusion medicine, with its interdisciplinary intricacies and the danger of fatal outcomes, serves as an exemplar of lessons learned. Opportunity for error in complex systems is vast, and although errors are traditionally blamed on humans, they are often set up by preexisting factors. Transfusion has inherent hazards such as clinical vulnerabilities (eg, contracting an infectious agent or experiencing a transfusion reaction), but there also exists the possibility of hazards associated with process errors. Sample collection errors, or preanalytic errors, may occur when samples are drawn from donors during blood donation, as well as when drawn from patients prior to transfusion-related testing, and account for approximately one-third of events in transfusion. Errors in the analytic phase of the transfusion chain, slips and errors in the laboratory, comprise close to one-third of patient safety-related transfusion events. As many as 40% of mistransfusions are due to errors in the postanalytic phase: often failures in the final check of the right blood and the right patient at the bedside. Bar-code labels, radiofrequency identification tags, and even palm vein-scanning technology are increasingly being utilized in patient identification. The last phase of transfusion, careful monitoring of the recipient for adverse signs or symptoms, when performed diligently can help prevent or manage a potentially fatal reaction caused by an earlier process error or an unavoidable physiologic condition. Ways in which we can and do deal with potential hazards of transfusion are discussed, including a method of hazard reduction termed inherently safer design

  13. The prevalence and assessment of blood transfusions in newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajieh Borna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blood transfusion is common in infants. Due to the weakened immune system of newborns and the risk of blood transfusion complications, it is necessary to pay more attention following or after to blood transfusion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and risk factors of blood transfusions in hospitalized neonates. Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed on 1106 infants admitted in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU of Mustafa Khomeini University Hospital, Tehran, Iran, from spring 2009 to 2012. Frequency and the reason for of blood components transfusion including fresh frozen plasma, platelets, whole blood, packed red blood cells, cryoprecipitate and relationship with gestational age, sex, birth weight, Apgar score, duration of hospitalization, use of mechanical ventilation were assessed. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS statistical software, version 16 (IBM, Armonk, NY, USA and statistical test, chi-square test, independent t-test and analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results: Among 1106 infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit, 221 infants (%19.98 received blood products. 82 of all (37% were female and 139 (%63 were female. 113 (51% of neonate were preterm and 108 (48% were term. From 361 times of blood transfusions, 121 infant (54.75% received at least one blood product. The frequency of blood transfusion was between 39 and 1 times, with an average of 3.65 times per infant. Frequency of fresh frozen plasma infusion was 173 (47.9%, packed cell 122 (33%, platelet 32 (8.8%, cryoprecipitate 20 (5.1% and whole blood 3 unit (0.83%. The most common causes for fresh frozen plasma transfusion was replacement therapy 140 (80%, for packed cell, to correct symptomatic anemia 68 (55.6%, for platelet transfusions was to prevent bleeding in  neonates with thrombocytopenia 20 (62.5% and cryoprecipitate for bleeding caused by DIC in 18 infant (90%. There was significant relation between frequency of

  14. Blood transfusion in children with sickle cell disease undergoing tonsillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Carlyn M; Gnagi, Sharon H; Teufel, Ronald J; Nguyen, Shaun A; White, David R

    2017-12-01

    Tonsillectomy is the second most common surgery in children with sickle cell disease. These children are at an increased risk of perioperative complications due to vaso-occlusive events. Although controversial, preoperative blood transfusions are sometimes given in an effort to prevent such complications. The purpose of this study is to analyze trends in the use of blood transfusion for management of children with sickle cell disease (SCD) undergoing tonsillectomy in a national database. Patients in the 1997-2012 KID with a primary procedure matching the ICD-9 procedure code for tonsillectomy (28.2-28.3) and diagnosis code for SCD (282.60-282.69) were examined. Patients were split into groups by blood transfusion status and compared across variables including complication rate, length of stay (LOS), and hospital charges. Statistical analysis included chi-square test for trend, Mann-Whitney U test, and independent t-test. 1133 patients with SCD underwent tonsillectomy. There was a strong positive correlation between increasing chronologic year and the proportion of patients receiving blood transfusions, 47 (30.1%) in 1997 to 78 (42.5%) in 2012 (r = 0.94, p = 0.005). During this period, there was no significant change in the rate of complications (r = -0.1, p = 0.87). Overall, patients receiving blood transfusion had a longer mean LOS (3.1 ± 2.4 days vs. 2.5 ± 2.2 days, p blood transfusion. The rate of complications in the transfusion group, 18 of 352(5.1%), was not significantly different (p = 0.48) from the group without transfusion, 40 of 626 (6.4%). From 1997 to 2012, there was a significant increase in the proportion of patients with SCD receiving perioperative blood transfusions for tonsillectomy. While the frequency of transfusion rose, those who received a transfusion had similar complication rates with increased charges and length of hospital stays compared to those who did not receive a transfusion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All

  15. Protocol for a national blood transfusion data warehouse from donor to recipient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoeven, Loan R|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/410959243; Hooftman, Babette H; Janssen, Mart P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304818208; de Bruijne, Martine C; de Vooght, Karen M K|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304817961; Kemper, Peter|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325854742; Koopman, Maria M W

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Blood transfusion has health-related, economical and safety implications. In order to optimise the transfusion chain, comprehensive research data are needed. The Dutch Transfusion Data warehouse (DTD) project aims to establish a data warehouse where data from donors and transfusion

  16. Risk factors for the failure to achieve normal albumin serum levels after albumin transfusion in neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadya Arafuri

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions Failure to achieve normal albumin levels after transfusion in neonates was significantly associated with low albumin level prior to transfusion, critical illness, sepsis, and >24-hour interval between transfusion and post-transfusion albumin examination.[Paediatr Indones. 2016;56:129-33.].

  17. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with gross hematuria

    OpenAIRE

    Kalbani, Naifain Al; Weitzman, Sheila; Abdelhaleem, Mohamed; Carcao, Manuel; Abla, Oussama

    2007-01-01

    A case of a six-year-old boy presenting with gross hematuria is reported. Investigations revealed the etiology of the hematuria to be thrombocytopenia in the setting of newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The diagnosis of leukemia was confirmed by bone marrow examination. The patient’s hematuria completely resolved with platelet transfusions. Although thrombocytopenia is a very common presenting feature of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, gross hematuria is exceedingly rare. Thus, thro...

  18. Postnatal cytomegalovirus infection: a pilot comparative effectiveness study of transfusion safety using leukoreduced-only transfusion strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Meghan; Mayock, Dennis; Knezevic, Andrea; Norby-Slycord, Colette; Kleine, Elizabeth; Patel, Ravi; Easley, Kirk; Josephson, Cassandra

    2016-08-01

    The optimal mitigation strategy to prevent transfusion transmission of cytomegalovirus (TT-CMV) in preterm very low birthweight infants remains debated. Hospitals caring for this patient population have varied practices. A prospective observational comparative effectiveness pilot study was conducted to determine the feasibility for a larger study. The pilot was carried out at hospitals using a leukoreduction (LR)-only transfusion strategy. Specimen and data collection for this study was performed in a similar approach to a study completed at Emory University that employed the CMV-seronegative plus LR approach. All testing was performed at one laboratory. The rates of TT-CMV using the two transfusion strategies were compared. Zero incidence of TT-CMV was detected in infants (n = 20) transfused with LR-only blood (0/8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0-25.3%) and is consistent with the previously reported zero incidence of TT-CMV finding in a cohort of infants transfused with CMV-negative plus LR blood (0/310; 95% CI, 0%-0.9%). The seroprevalence rate among enrolled mothers (n = 17) was 60%. Forty percent of those infants (8/20) received 43 transfusions; five were transfused with one or more CMV-seropositive blood components. One infant had tested positive for CMV before receiving blood transfusions; the infant's mother was CMV immunoglobulin (Ig)G positive and IgM negative. Using the LR-only transfusion approach, zero cases of TT-CMV were detected in this pilot study. A larger study is needed to reliably determine the most effective strategy for prevention of TT-CMV in this population. © 2016 AABB.

  19. Transfusion Reactions as an Indicator of Service Quality of Blood Transfusion in Sanglah General Hospital Denpasar Bali-Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NK Mulyantari

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the fatal side effects of transfusion is transfusion reactions. The incidence of transfusion reaction in Sanglah Hospital is still relatively high and far from national target which is 0.01%. To achieve the target of quality, it is necessary to set up an active program so that the number of incidence of transfusion reactions can be decreased. Methods: Pre and posttest interventional study was conducted for 6 months in Sanglah Hospital Bali. All nurses in wards which is blood product frequently used was involved in this study. The intervention in this study was in the form of education and training programs on the application of the closed system and cold chain in the distribution of blood products as well as improved service system. Results: The results showed a decline in the incidence of transfusion reactions occurred every month during the study. The incidence of transfusion reactions occurred each month was 0.77%, 0.56%, 0.5%, 0.49%, 0.45% and 0.38% respectively. The average reduction in the incidence of transfusion reactions was 0.08% every month. The type of transfusion reaction that occurred was 59% urticaria, 29% fever, 7% shortness of breath, 4% fever and chills, and 1% shock. Conclusion: Education and training programs on the application of the cold chain system and closed system in the distribution of blood products as well as the improvement of service system helped reduce the number of the incidence of transfusion reactions in Sanglah Hospital Bali. 

  20. Investigation of the status quo of massive blood transfusion in China and a synopsis of the proposed guidelines for massive blood transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiang-Cun; Wang, Qiu-Shi; Dang, Qian-Li; Sun, Yang; Xu, Cui-Xiang; Jin, Zhan-Kui; Ma, Ting; Liu, Jing

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to provide an overview of massive transfusion in Chinese hospitals, identify the important indications for massive transfusion and corrective therapies based on clinical evidence and supporting experimental studies, and propose guidelines for the management of massive transfusion. This multiregion, multicenter retrospective study involved a Massive Blood Transfusion Coordination Group composed of 50 clinical experts specializing in blood transfusion, cardiac surgery, anesthesiology, obstetrics, general surgery, and medical statistics from 20 tertiary general hospitals across 5 regions in China. Data were collected for all patients who received ≥10 U red blood cell transfusion within 24 hours in the participating hospitals from January 1 2009 to December 31 2010, including patient demographics, pre-, peri-, and post-operative clinical characteristics, laboratory test results before, during, and after transfusion, and patient mortality at post-transfusion and discharge. We also designed an in vitro hemodilution model to investigate the changes of blood coagulation indices during massive transfusion and the correction of coagulopathy through supplement blood components under different hemodilutions. The experimental data in combination with the clinical evidence were used to determine the optimal proportion and timing for blood component supplementation during massive transfusion. Based on the findings from the present study, together with an extensive review of domestic and international transfusion-related literature and consensus feedback from the 50 experts, we drafted the guidelines on massive blood transfusion that will help Chinese hospitals to develop standardized protocols for massive blood transfusion.

  1. Seroprevalence of transfusion transmissible infections (TTI), in first ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Transfusion transmissible infections, such as HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis are ... 130 first time blood donors were tested for the presence of HIV, HBsAg, HCV antibodies and Treponema palidium antibodies using EIA based rapid ...

  2. Transfusion medicine in Norway: new problems and new opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flesland, O; Seghatchian, J

    2006-10-01

    During 2005 Norwegian Transfusion Medicine has faced some new problems, sought new solutions and gained strength. Interactions with the public and the health authorities have been important issues for consideration, which are discussed below.

  3. Prevention and management of transfusion-induced alloimmunization: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauck-Dlimi B

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Barbara Hauck-Dlimi, Susanne Achenbach, Julian Strobel, Reinhold Eckstein, Robert Zimmermann Department of Transfusion Medicine and Haemostaseology, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany Abstract: Transfusion of blood components, transplantations, and exchange of blood between mother and child during pregnancy or at birth can lead to alloimmunization. Because of its clinical relevance, this review brings into focus alloimmunization against red blood cells, human platelet antigens, human leukocyte antigens, and human neutrophil antigens. In principle, an individual is able to develop antibodies after exposure to a nonautogenous antigen, but these cells actually induce alloimmunization only for a minority of patients. An individual producing alloantibodies after having contact with foreign antigens depends on various factors, such as genetic predisposition, underlying diseases, the patient's immune status, and clinical immune modulation. When alloimmunization has occurred, it could lead to problems for future transfusions or transplantations. Keywords: transfusion, alloimmunization, prevention

  4. Lower versus Higher Hemoglobin Threshold for Transfusion in Septic Shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Lars B; Haase, Nicolai; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blood transfusions are frequently given to patients with septic shock. However, the benefits and harms of different hemoglobin thresholds for transfusion have not been established. METHODS: In this multicenter, parallel-group trial, we randomly assigned patients in the intensive care...... unit (ICU) who had septic shock and a hemoglobin concentration of 9 g per deciliter or less to receive 1 unit of leukoreduced red cells when the hemoglobin level was 7 g per deciliter or less (lower threshold) or when the level was 9 g per deciliter or less (higher threshold) during the ICU stay...... were similar in the two intervention groups. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with septic shock, mortality at 90 days and rates of ischemic events and use of life support were similar among those assigned to blood transfusion at a higher hemoglobin threshold and those assigned to blood transfusion...

  5. Soluble vascular endothelial growth factor in various blood transfusion components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Werther, K; Mynster, T

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blood transfusion may reduce survival after curative surgery for solid tumors. This may be related to extracellular content of cancer growth factors present in transfusion components. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent stimulator of angiogenesis in solid tumors....... The potential content of VEGF in various blood components for transfusion was evaluated. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Soluble VEGF (sVEGF, isotype 165) was determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EIA) in serum and plasma samples and in lysed cells from healthy volunteers. Subsequently, total content......-reduced PRP. The sVEGF accumulated significantly in WB, SAGM blood, and BCP pools, depending on the storage time. CONCLUSION: The sVEGF (isotype 165) appears to be present in various blood transfusion components, depending on storage time....

  6. Utilisation of blood transfusion service in north eastern Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . However, people still die or remain at risk of transfusion-transmissible infections due to poor donor recruitment and selection, use of poorly screened blood and inappropriate use of blood and blood components. Objectives: To evaluate the ...

  7. Efficiency and Cost Analysis of Cell Saver Auto Transfusion System in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Bilgili, Mustafa Gökhan; Erçin, Ersin; Peker, Gökhan; Kural, Cemal; Başaran, Serdar Hakan; Duramaz, Altuğ; Avkan, Cevdet

    2014-01-01

    Background: Blood loss and replacement is still a controversial issue in major orthopaedic surgery. Allogenic blood transfusion may cause legal problems and concerns regarding the transmission of transfusion-related diseases. Cellsaver Systems (CSS) were developed as an alternative to allogenic transfusion but CSS transfusion may cause coagulation, infection and haemodynamic instability. Aims: Our aim was to analyse the efficiency and cost analysis of a cell saver auto-transfusion system ...

  8. Transfusion-related mortality after primary hip arthroplasty - an analysis of mechanisms and confounders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jans, O; Kehlet, H; Johansson, P I

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Bleeding and postoperative anaemia after total hip arthroplasty (THA) may trigger transfusion of red blood cells (RBC). However, large observational studies have reported associations between RBC transfusion and increased postoperative morbidity and mortality. As major...... bleeding or severe postoperative anaemia is intrinsically linked with RBC transfusion, direct causality between transfusion and adverse outcomes remains unclear. This study aimed to identify possible relations between RBC transfusion, severe bleeding or anaemia and mortality in all patients who died...

  9. Transfusion requirements in elective cardiopulmonary bypass surgery patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivapalan, Praleene; Bäck, Anne Caroline; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye

    2017-01-01

    Managing haemostasis in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery remains a challenge. There is no established laboratory test to predict transfusion requirements in cardiac surgery. We investigated whether preoperative Thromboelastography (TEG) with Platelet Mapping Assay (PMA......) or Multiple Electrode Aggrometry (MEA) could predict transfusion requirements in patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or combined CABG with aortic or mitral valve replacement. We prospectively investigated 199 patients undergoing elective CABG or combined procedures. PMA and MEA...

  10. Fluid Resuscitation and Massive Transfusion Protocol in Pediatric Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Marjanović Vesna; Budić Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Trauma is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children due to the occurrence of hemorrhagic shock. Hemorrhagic shock and its consequences, anemia and hypovolemia, decrease oxygen delivery, due to which appropriate transfusion and volume resuscitation are critical. Guidelines for massive transfusion, in the pediatric trauma, have not been defined yet. Current data indicate that early identification of coagulopathy and its treatment with RBSs, plasma and platelets in a 1:1:1 unit ra...

  11. [Transfusion and its specific problems in pediatrics and neonatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérel, Y; Runel, C; Huguenin, Y; Renesme, L; Aladjidi, N

    2017-09-01

    Principles of transfusion strategy have been used for neonates and children similar to adults. However, due to substantial discrepancies between physiology/pathology in children and in their adult counterparts, decisions, indications, and doses are different from those of adults, especially in neonates. Specific data and practice guidelines for blood product transfusion are reported owing to the experience of pediatrics and neonatology units and partners of the French Blood product bank. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  12. Hemovigilanca in varna transfuzija krvi: Haemovigilance and safe blood transfusion:

    OpenAIRE

    Potočnik, Marjeta

    2004-01-01

    Background. Haemovigilance is a system consisting of the detection, collectingand analysis of information regarding unwanted and unexpected effects of blood transfusion that make it possible to take action in order to improve blood trasfusion safety. In a broader sense, it is defined as a set ofsurveillance procedures covering the whole transfusion chain from the collection of blood to the follow-up of recipients. In some European countriesa haemovigilance system based on legislation was intr...

  13. Pratique de la transfusion sanguine perioperatoire au Togo: etude ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    But: relever les différents types, les indications, les modalités et les complications de la transfusion sanguine périopératoire. Patients et méthodes : étude prospective, descriptive multicentrique sur 6 mois (1er août 2013 au 31 janvier 2014) sur les transfusions sanguines faites durant la préparation pré opératoire, en per ...

  14. Improving blood safety: Errors management in transfusion medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bujandrić Nevenka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The concept of blood safety includes the entire transfusion chain starting with the collection of blood from the blood donor, and ending with blood transfusion to the patient. The concept involves quality management system as the systematic monitoring of adverse reactions and incidents regarding the blood donor or patient. Monitoring of near-miss errors show the critical points in the working process and increase transfusion safety. Objective. The aim of the study was to present the analysis results of adverse and unexpected events in transfusion practice with a potential risk to the health of blood donors and patients. Methods. One-year retrospective study was based on the collection, analysis and interpretation of written reports on medical errors in the Blood Transfusion Institute of Vojvodina. Results. Errors were distributed according to the type, frequency and part of the working process where they occurred. Possible causes and corrective actions were described for each error. The study showed that there were not errors with potential health consequences for the blood donor/patient. Errors with potentially damaging consequences for patients were detected throughout the entire transfusion chain. Most of the errors were identified in the preanalytical phase. The human factor was responsible for the largest number of errors. Conclusion. Error reporting system has an important role in the error management and the reduction of transfusion-related risk of adverse events and incidents. The ongoing analysis reveals the strengths and weaknesses of the entire process and indicates the necessary changes. Errors in transfusion medicine can be avoided in a large percentage and prevention is costeffective, systematic and applicable.

  15. Impact of perioperative blood transfusion on immune function and prognosis in colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Li; Wang, Dao-Rong; Zhang, Xiang-Yun; Gao, Shan; Li, Xiao-Xia; Sun, Gong-Ping; Lu, Xiao-Bo

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the impacts of perioperative blood transfusion on the immune function and prognosis in colorectal cancer (CC) patients. A retrospective analysis was conducted in 1404 CC patients, including 1223 sporadic colorectal cancer (SCC) patients and 181 hereditary colorectal cancer (HCC) patients. Among them, 701 SCC and 102 HCC patients received perioperative blood transfusion. The amount of T lymphocyte subsets and natural killer (NK) cells was measured. All patients received a 10-year follow-up and relapse, metastasis and curative conditions were recorded. In SCC group, mortality, local recurrence and distant metastasis rate of transfused patients were significantly higher than non-transfused patients (all P transfused patients than non-transfused patients (P = 0.002). SCC patients transfused with ≥3 U of blood had significantly higher mortality than patients transfused with blood transfusion in SCC and HCC patients (all P blood transfusion (P blood transfusion had markedly lower 10-year survival rates as compared with those who did not receive (both P transfused with ≥3 U of blood had remarkably lower survival rates compared with SCC patients transfused with blood transfusion could impact immune function, increased postoperative mortality, local recurrence rate and distant metastasis rate in CC patients; and survival rate of CC patients is negatively related to blood transfusion volume. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. [Allergic transfusion reactions in a patient with multiple food allergies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, E; Schöniger, M; Münz, M; Hiefinger-Schindlbeck, R

    2012-07-01

    A 13-year-old girl with an osteosarcoma was treated by surgery and chemotherapy. During three transfusions of apheresis platelet concentrates allergic reactions occurred, partly in spite of premedication with an antihistamine and a corticoid. As the patient declared to be allergic to some foods, in-vitro tests for allergen-specific IgE antibodies were performed and showed markedly positive results for specific IgE to carrot and celery, less so to hazelnut, peanut and a lot of other food antigens. The donor of one of the unsuitable platelet concentrates remembered when questioned, that he had eaten carrots and chocolate with hazelnuts during the evening before platelet donation. Two washed platelet concentrates were transfused without any problem. Furthermore, transfusions of nine red blood cell concentrates and one unit of virus-inactivated frozen pooled plasma were well tolerated. Patients should be asked for allergies previous to transfusions to be alert to allergic reactions in patients with a positive history of food or drug allergies. If premedication with antihistamines does not prevent severe allergic transfusion reactions, transfusion of washed platelet concentrates and of virus-inactivated frozen pooled plasma can be considered. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. [Kinetic and organization of granulocytes transfusion: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamure, S; Latry, P; Kanouni, T; Hicheri, Y; Sirvent, A; Lenglet, A; Mathieu-Daude, D; Cazal, P; Cartron, G

    2014-12-01

    Therapeutic granulocyte transfusion remains an indication for neutropenic sepsis associated with prolonged neutropenia. However, harvest complexity and lack of proved efficacy mark the limits of its development. A 58-year old man received allogeneic stem cell transplantation for osteomyelofibrosis. Six months later, after a transplant rejection, he presented with perineal cellulitis from hemorrhoid origin, without any microbiological documentation. The evolution was unfavorable despite antibiotic and antifungal therapy. A set of seven granulocytes transfusions was initiated. Re-circulation of granulocytes analysis showed an initial increase (H2) followed by a decrease (H8) reaching the basal rate at H16. No toxicity has been reported during or following the transfusions. Clinical improvement has been reported five days after the first transfusion, scaring over at D15, without any neutrophil recovery. In 2014, granulocyte transfusion therapy is indicated for severe infection associated with long-term neutropenia. Minimal circulation of transfused cells in our observation and fast clinical improvement suggest the concentration of granulocytes on the infected area. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Zika virus and blood transfusion: the experience of French Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierlaire, Damien; Mauguin, Sylvie; Broult, Julien; Musso, Didier

    2017-03-01

    Between October 2013 and March 2014, French Polynesia experienced the largest Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak ever described before the emergence of ZIKV in the Americas in 2015. As arbovirus transfusion-transmitted (TT) infections have been previously reported, we hypothesized that transfusion of blood products could also transmit ZIKV. Mitigation strategies to prevent ZIKV-TT infections included nonspecific measures and the implementation of a laboratory developed ZIKV-specific nucleic acid testing (NAT) assay. Donor sera were tested in pools of 3 and constitutive sera of ZIKV-reactive pools were tested individually. Donor sera were tested prospectively and retrospectively. A posttransfusion follow-up of a patient transfused with ZIKV RNA-reactive blood products was implemented. NAT detected 42 blood donor sera as ZIKV RNA reactive of 1505 tested (2.8%). Thirty ZIKV RNA-reactive blood products collected before the implementation of NAT were transfused to 26 recipients. Posttransfusion investigations were conducted by the hemovigilance unit and data were available for 12 recipients. Symptomatic ZIKV-TT infections were not reported. Predonation screening of blood donors, postdonation information, products discard, and quarantine of blood products were not effective enough to prevent transfusion of ZIKV RNA-reactive blood products. ZIKV NAT was an effective measure once implemented to prevent transfusion of ZIKV RNA-reactive blood products but it is difficult to evaluate the effectiveness of this measure to prevent ZIKV-TT infection, which is a rare event. © 2017 AABB.

  19. Blood transfusion safety; current status and challenges in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aneke, John C.; Okocha, Chide E.

    2017-01-01

    The attainment of blood transfusion safety in Nigeria (and probably the rest of Sub-Saharan Africa) remains an uphill task due to a number of factors, ranging from shortage of blood, poor implementation of blood transfusion guidelines, infrastructural deficits to high prevalence of transfusion-transmissible infections (TTIs), particularly hepatitis and human immune deficiency viruses. We reviewed available data on blood transfusion practices and safety in Nigeria using the PubMed, PubMed Central, Google Scholar, and African Index Medicus search engines, through a combination of word and phrases relevant to the subject. The World Health Organization has been in the forefront of efforts to establish safe, available, and affordable blood transfusion services in most parts of Africa through encouraging adequate blood donor recruitment, donor blood testing, and collection as well developing strategies for the rational use of blood. Even though modest improvement has been recorded, particularly with regards to donor blood screening for common TTIs, considerable efforts are needed in the form of robust public enlightenment campaigns (on blood donation) and continuous system improvement to drive the current transfusion practices in the country toward safety and self-sustenance. PMID:28316432

  20. Leukocyte and plasma activation profiles in chronically transfused patients with a history of allergic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Magali J; Shih, Hank; Schubert, Richard; Wong, Wendy; Andrews, Jennifer; Jeng, Michael; Tirouvanziam, Rabindra

    2017-11-01

    Allergic transfusion reactions are drawbacks to the benefits of transfusion. Classically, allergic transfusion reactions depend on histamine release from mast cells or basophils, but other leukocyte subsets may also be important. Thus, we propose to better define the exact leukocyte subsets involved in allergic transfusion reactions. The overall objective of the current study was to compare the activation of specific peripheral blood leukocyte subsets (monocytes, neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils) in a cohort of 13 patients who received chronic transfusions and had a history of allergic transfusion reactions compared with a control group of patients who received chronic transfusions and had no history of allergic transfusion reactions. Leukocyte subsets were analyzed by flow cytometry at baseline and after red blood cell transfusion, and cytokine levels in platelet-free plasma collected at the same time points were measured by Luminex assay. Flow cytometry and cytokine profiles before and after transfusion did not differ significantly between patients who did and did not have a history of allergic transfusion reactions (p > 0.05). However, post-transfusion samples from both groups showed a decrease in CD63 expression in basophils, monocytes, and eosinophils and a decrease in CD45 expression in all leukocyte subsets compared with pretransfusion samples. Interleukin 10 levels increased after transfusion in the group with a history of allergic transfusion reactions (p = 0.0469), and RANTES (regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted) was significantly decreased post-transfusion in all patients (p = 0.0122). None of the leukocyte subsets from patients who had a history of allergic transfusion reactions significantly increased in activation either before or after transfusion. All leukocyte subsets from patients who did and did not have a history of allergic transfusion reactions decreased in their activation profile upon

  1. Study on effectiveness of transfusion program in thalassemia major patients receiving multiple blood transfusions at a transfusion centre in Western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Neeraj

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Children suffering from beta-thalassemia major require repeated blood transfusions which may be associated with dangers like iron overload and contraction of infections such as HIV, HCV, and HBsAg which ultimately curtail their life span. On the other hand, inadequate transfusions lead to severe anemia and general fatigue and debility. Materials and Methods: Data were obtained from 142 beta-thalassemia major patients aged 3 years or more receiving regular blood transfusions at a transfusion centre in Western India from 1 April 2009 to 30 June 2009. The clinical data and laboratory results were subsequently analyzed. Results: Of the 142 patients, 76 (53.5% were undertransfused (mean Hb <10 gm%. 96 (67% of the patients were taking some form of chelation therapy but out of them only 2 (2% were adequately chelated (S. ferritin <1000 ng/ml. 5 (3.5% of the patients were known diabetics on insulin therapy. 103 (72% of the patients were retarded in terms of growth. The prevalence of transfusion-transmitted infections (TTIs such as HCV, HIV, and HBsAg was respectively 45%, 2%, and 2%, with the prevalence of HCV being significantly more than the general population. The HCV prevalence showed positive correlation with the age of the patients and with the total no of blood transfusions received. As many as 15% (6 out of 40 children who were born on or after 2002 were HCV positive despite the blood they received being subjected to screening for HCV. Conclusions: The study suggests the need to step up the transfusions to achieve hemoglobin goal of 10 gm% (as per the moderate transfusion regimen and also to institute urgent and effective chelation measures with the aim of keeping serum ferritin levels below 1000 ng/ml to avoid the systemic effects of iron overload. In addition, strict monitoring of the children for endocrinopathy and other systemic effects of iron overload should be done. Rigid implementation of quality control measures for the

  2. Red blood cell transfusion for people undergoing hip fracture surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunskill, Susan J; Millette, Sarah L; Shokoohi, Ali; Pulford, E C; Doree, Carolyn; Murphy, Michael F; Stanworth, Simon

    2015-04-21

    The incidence of hip fracture is increasing and it is more common with increasing age. Surgery is used for almost all hip fractures. Blood loss occurs as a consequence of both the fracture and the surgery and thus red blood cell transfusion is frequently used. However, red blood cell transfusion is not without risks. Therefore, it is important to identify the evidence for the effective and safe use of red blood cell transfusion in people with hip fracture. To assess the effects (benefits and harms) of red blood cell transfusion in people undergoing surgery for hip fracture. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register (31 October 2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library, 2014, Issue 10), MEDLINE (January 1946 to 20 November 2014), EMBASE (January 1974 to 20 November 2014), CINAHL (January 1982 to 20 November 2014), British Nursing Index Database (January 1992 to 20 November 2014), the Systematic Review Initiative's Transfusion Evidence Library, PubMed for e-publications, various other databases and ongoing trial registers. Randomised controlled trials comparing red blood cell transfusion versus no transfusion or an alternative to transfusion, different transfusion protocols or different transfusion thresholds in people undergoing surgery for hip fracture. Three review authors independently assessed each study's risk of bias and extracted data using a study-specific form. We pooled data where there was homogeneity in the trial comparisons and the timing of outcome measurement. We used GRADE criteria to assess the quality (low, moderate or high) of the evidence for each outcome. We included six trials (2722 participants): all compared two thresholds for red blood cell transfusion: a 'liberal' strategy to maintain a haemoglobin concentration of usually 10 g/dL versus a more 'restrictive' strategy based on symptoms of anaemia or a lower haemoglobin concentration, usually 8 g/dL. The exact

  3. Incidence of blood transfusion requirement and factors associated with transfusion following liver lobectomy in dogs and cats: 72 cases (2007-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Kayla R; Pigott, Armi M; J Linklater, Andrew K

    2017-10-15

    OBJECTIVE To determine the incidence of blood transfusion, mortality rate, and factors associated with transfusion in dogs and cats undergoing liver lobectomy. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 63 client-owned dogs and 9-client owned cats that underwent liver lobectomy at a specialty veterinary practice from August 2007 through June 2015. PROCEDURES Medical records were reviewed and data extracted regarding dog and cat signalment, hematologic test results before and after surgery, surgical method, number and identity of lobes removed, concurrent surgical procedures, hemoabdomen detected during surgery, incidence of blood transfusion, and survival to hospital discharge (for calculation of mortality rate). Variables were compared between patients that did and did not require transfusion. RESULTS 11 of 63 (17%) dogs and 4 of 9 cats required a blood transfusion. Mortality rate was 8% for dogs and 22% for cats. Pre- and postoperative PCV and plasma total solids concentration were significantly lower and mortality rate significantly higher in dogs requiring transfusion than in dogs not requiring transfusion. Postoperative PCV was significantly lower in cats requiring transfusion than in cats not requiring transfusion. No significant differences in any other variable were identified between dogs and cats requiring versus not requiring transfusion. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Dogs and cats undergoing liver lobectomy had a high requirement for blood transfusion, and a higher requirement for transfusion should be anticipated in dogs with perioperative anemia and cats with postoperative anemia. Veterinarians performing liver lobectomies in dogs and cats should have blood products readily available.

  4. Single-center transfusion rate for 555 consecutive liver transplantations: impact of two eras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coêlho, G R; Feitosa Neto, B A; de G Teixeira, C C; Marinho, D S; Rangel, M L M; Garcia, J H P

    2013-11-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is the treatment of choice for patients with acute or chronic end-stage liver disease, irresectable primary liver tumor, and metabolic disorders. Historically, OLT has been associated with considerable blood loss and the need for transfusions. However, over the years there has been reduction is need for blood products. The aim of this article was to compare two distinct eras for perioperative blood transfusion rate among patients undergoing OLT; Era I, 200 transplantations in 188 patients, and Era II, 355 transplantations in 339 patients. The donor mean age was 33.70 (Era I) versus 35.34 (Era II). Cause of death in both eras was traumatic brain injury followed by cerebral vascular accident. Organ recipient data showed a mean age of 48.87 (Era I) versus 46.49 (Era II). During Era I patients with Child B (56.8%) prevailed, followed by Child C (35.4%) and Child A (7.8%). In Era II also patients with Child B (53.1%) prevailed, followed by Child C (39.6%) and Child A (7.3%). The prevalence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) during Era I was 9% (18) and in Era II 20% (71). The use of blood products in the perioperative period: was as follows packed red blood cells 1.76 (Era I) versus 0.57 (Era II) units; fresh frozen plasma 1.89 (Era I) versus 0.49 (Era II) units; platelets 2.16 (Era I) versus 0.28 (Era II) units; and cryoprecipitate 0.08 (Era I) versus 0.03 (Era II) units. OLT using the piggyback technique was performed with a transfusion rate below <30%, and it reduced blood loss and prevented severe hemodynamic instability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Blood transfusion at the time of the First World War--practice and promise at the birth of transfusion medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulton, F; Roberts, D J

    2014-12-01

    The centenary of the start of the First World War has stirred considerable interest in the political, social, military and human factors of the time and how they interacted to produce and sustain the material and human destruction in the 4 years of the war and beyond. Medical practice may appear distant and static and perhaps seems to have been somewhat ineffectual in the face of so much trauma and in the light of the enormous advances in medicine and surgery over the last century. However, this is an illusion of time and of course medical, surgical and psychiatric knowledge and procedures were developing rapidly at the time and the war years accelerated implementation of many important advances. Transfusion practice lay at the heart of resuscitation, and although direct transfusion from donor to recipient was still used, Geoffrey Keynes from Britain, Oswald Robertson from America and his namesake Lawrence Bruce Robertson from Canada, developed methods for indirect transfusion from donor to recipient by storing blood in bottles and also blood-banking that laid the foundation of modern transfusion medicine. This review explores the historical setting behind the development of blood transfusion up to the start of the First World War and on how they progressed during the war and afterwards. A fresh look may renew interest in how a novel medical speciality responded to the needs of war and of post-war society. © 2015 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  6. [Assessment of transfusion practice: assessing nurses' knowledge in transfusion medicine at Mohamed VI Hematology and Oncology Center of Marrakesh, Morocco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahlimi, F Z; Tazi, I; Sifsalam, M; Bouchtia, M; Mahmal, L

    2015-03-01

    Blood transfusion is a complex activity, involving many actors. It is a high-risk activity which could not be controlled without the use of specific methods. Health care workers beliefs and organizational factors are two major issues for the blood transfusion safety. In our medical center, transfusion medicine care practices were evaluated by testing the nursing staff with a list of questions. We carried out a cross-sectional study. The information was gathered by using an anonymous questionnaire. The latter was developed by foreign teams and adapted to the local context. Forty-two nurses have participated to study. Only 25% have appropriate knowledge and practice with no negative consequences for the patient safety. In our sample, poor knowledge and practice concerned mainly (1) pre-transfusion compatibility check when receiving blood units (30%); (2) delay in preservation of blood unit in the ward (65%); and (3) recognition of abnormal reactions after transfusion (40%). These results showed on which topics the teaching program should emphasize so as to improve the quality of blood transfusion in the medical centers according to legal obligations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Blood transfusion practice: a survey in Sichuan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Lin, Jia; Zhong, Ling; He, Yi; Yang, Jia; Wu, Yanhong; Yang, Jing; Li, Qian; Wang, Jingxing; Rao, Shaoqin

    2015-02-01

    To get full knowledge of current conditions and development in the past seven years of clinical transfusion practice in Sichuan, China. This survey was performed by means of a questionnaire which consisted of three parts of questions including basic conditions of blood banks in the hospitals, procedures for clinical blood transfusion and the utilization of different types of blood products. Thirty-five representative hospitals from different geographic locations in Sichuan province participated in this survey. All of the 35 hospitals returned the questionnaires and 33 hospitals (94.3%) answered the questions completely. The blood bank information system began to be used by more hospitals from 2006 (21.21%, 7/33) to 2012 (48.48%, 16/33). Automated grouping and cross-matching systems have not been used in level 2 hospitals and only 3 level 3 hospitals used automated systems in 2012. Still less common were procedures for evaluation of blood order forms for appropriateness (2/33, 6.06%) and evaluation of appropriateness and effect of blood component transfusion (8/33, 24.2%), and all the hospitals having these procedures are level 3 hospitals. The percentage of whole blood usage in the volume of all types of blood products used decreased a lot from 7.45% in 2006 to 0.16% in 2010. Technological instruments for bedside checking are not used by any of the hospitals. The transfusion service degree of the hospitals in Sichuan, China, has developed a lot in the past seven years; however, there are still some problems including whole blood still being used, albeit decreasing; lack of independent blood banks within the hospitals; lack of dedicated personnel for the transfusion services; lack of education; lack of blood bank information systems and automation; lack of screening for appropriateness for blood orders. Thus, the quality control center of clinical blood transfusion (QCCCBT) of Sichuan province should help the transfusion departments to attract more investment in

  8. Acute reversible Charles Bonnet syndrome precipitated by sudden severe anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Pierre-Francois; Borruat, Francois-Xavier

    2009-01-01

    To report the sudden onset of reversible Charles Bonnet syndrome precipitated byacute severe anemia. The charts of three patients (Usher syndrome, bilateral macular degeneration, and bilateral retinal vein occlusion) with acute Charles Bonnet syndrome in the setting of severe anemia were reviewed. Anemia resulted from bladder surgery, recto-colitis, and severe urinary tract infection. Hemoglobin ranged from 78 to 86 g/L. Decreased visual acuity and formed visual hallucinations (giants, flowers, animals) were present in all three patients. Rapid reversal of Charles Bonnet syndrome and visual acuity improvement followed blood transfusion. Acute severe anemia can precipitate Charles Bonnet syndrome, which may be reversible by blood transfusion.

  9. Transfusion transmitted infections - a retrospective analysis from the National Blood Transfusion Service in Eritrea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessehaye, Nahom; Naik, Durgadas; Fessehaye, Tesfay

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of transfusion transmitted infection (TTI) especially HIV/AIDS has created a huge obstacle in ensuring blood safety. To assess the situation in Eritrea, we carried out a retrospective study of 29,501 blood donors for the prevalence of TTI's i.e. HIV, HBV, HCV and Syphilis. The study population included all donors who donated blood from January 2006 to November 2009. The data was collected from the National Blood Transfusion Services (NTBS) of Eritrea and includes category of donor and result for TTI markers. A total of 29,501 units of blood were collected from 23,385(79%) voluntary blood donors and the rest 6,116(21%) units were collected from family replacement donors. The over all prevalence of TTI's were 3.8% with 3.5% in voluntary blood donors and 5.1% in family replacement donors. The sero-prevalence for TTI markers were 0.18% HIV, 2.58% HBV, 0.57% HCV and 0.49% Syphilis. In conclusion, even if the TTI prevalence rate among Eritrean blood donors is low, ensuring blood safety has a long way to go.

  10. Transfusion transmitted infections – A retrospective analysis from the National Blood Transfusion Service in Eritrea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessehaye, Nahom; Naik, Durgadas; Fessehaye, Tesfay

    2011-01-01

    Background The emergence of transfusion transmitted infection (TTI) especially HIV/AIDS has created a huge obstacle in ensuring blood safety. To assess the situation in Eritrea, we carried out a retrospective study of 29,501 blood donors for the prevalence of TTI's i.e. HIV, HBV, HCV and Syphilis. Methods The study population included all donors who donated blood from January 2006 to November 2009. The data was collected from the National Blood Transfusion Services (NTBS) of Eritrea and includes category of donor and result for TTI markers. Results A total of 29,501 units of blood were collected from 23,385(79%) voluntary blood donors and the rest 6,116(21%) units were collected from family replacement donors. The over all prevalence of TTI's were 3.8% with 3.5% in voluntary blood donors and 5.1% in family replacement donors. The sero-prevalence for TTI markers were 0.18% HIV, 2.58% HBV, 0.57% HCV and 0.49% Syphilis. Conclusion In conclusion, even if the TTI prevalence rate among Eritrean blood donors is low, ensuring blood safety has a long way to go. PMID:22145069

  11. Monitoring compliance with transfusion guidelines in hospital departments by electronic data capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norgaard, Astrid; De Lichtenberg, Trine Honnens; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The practice of transfusing red blood cells is still liberal in some centres suggesting a lack of compliance with guidelines recommending transfusion of red blood cells at haemoglobin levels of 6-8 g/dL in the non-bleeding patient. Few databases provide ongoing feedback of data on pre......-transfusion haemoglobin levels at the departmental level. In a tertiary care hospital, no such data were produced before this study. Our aim was to establish a Patient Blood Management database based on electronic data capture in order to monitor compliance with transfusion guidelines at departmental and hospital levels.......5% of the cases, transfusion was initiated at 7.3 g/dL or lower as recommended by the Danish national transfusion guideline. In 27% of the cases, transfusion was initiated when the haemoglobin level was 9.3 g/dL or higher, which is not recommended. A median of two units was transfused per transfusion episode...

  12. Risk Factors of Red Blood Cell Transfusion in Isolate off Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eui Suk; Park, Kay-Hyun; Lim, Cheong; Choi, Jinho

    2012-10-01

    Perioperative transfusion of red blood cell (RBC) may cause adverse effects. Bloodless-cardiac surgery has been spotlighted to avoid those problems. Off pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) surgery can decrease the transfusion. However, the risk factors of transfusions in OPCAB have not been investigated properly. One hundred and thirteen patients (male:female=35:78, mean age=66.7±9.9 years) who received isolated OPCAB were retrospectively analyzed from March 2006 to September 2007. The threshold of RBC transfusion was 28.0% of hematocrit. Bilateral internal thoracic arteries graft were used for 99 patients (87.6%). One hundred and three (91.1%) and 35 patients (31.5%) took aspirin and clopidogrel just before surgery. Sixty-five patients (47.5%) received the RBC transfusion (mean 2.2±3.2 units). Mortality and major complications were not different between transfusion and no-transfusion group. But, ventilator support time, intensive care unit stay and hospitalization period had been reduced in no-transfusion group (ptransfusion were preoperative low hematocrit (75 minutes) and total operation time (>5.5 hours, ptransfusion according to transfusion guideline; over 40% cases could conduct the OPCAB without transfusion. There were no differences in major clinical results between transfusion and non-transfusion group. In addition, when used together with accurate understanding of transfusion risk factors, it is expected to increase the proportion of patients that do not undergo transfusions.

  13. ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease following exchange transfusion 96 newborn

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    Khatami S.F

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease of the newborn is a common cause of clinical jaundice and causes two-thirds of the hemolytic disease in newborns. This study was undertaken to determine the frequency of ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease and its complications in newborns undergoing exchange transfusion.Methods: This prospective and descriptive study was performed in jaundiced newborn infants during a three-year period. Inclusion criteria were: maternal blood type O, newborn blood type A or B, rising indirect hyperbilirubinemia in the first two days of life, positive immunohematologic test for newborns and exchange transfusion. Exclusion criteria were: incomplete information, other accompanying diseases that induce hyperbilirubinemia. All newborn infants received phototherapy before and after exchange transfusion. We did not use intravenous immunoglobulin, hemoxygenase inhibitor drugs and blood products before exchange transfusion.Results: Double-volume exchange transfusion via umbilical cord catheter was performed in 96 patients, 19 (20% of whom suffered from ABO incompatibility. Of these 19 newborns, two-thirds (13 were preterm infants. The minimum level of serum bilirubin was 10 mg/dl and the maximum serum bilirubin level was 35 mg/dl. In six patients (32% serum bilirubin levels were >25mg/dl. The most common blood group was type A for newborns. Immunohematologic tests were positive in 84% of the mothers. ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease was the fourth and second most common reasons for blood exchange transfusion in preterm and term infants, respectively. Laboratory complications were more common than clinical complications. The etiology of 48% of the alloimmunization and 42% of the hemolytic disease in these newborns was ABO incompatibility.Conclusions: Mothers with blood group O and newborns with blood group A or B with positive immunohematologic tests in first hours of life are at high risk for hemolytic disease

  14. Haemovigilance: an effective tool for improving transfusion practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, R R P; Faber, J-C; Strengers, P F W

    2011-01-01

    Haemovigilance is a tool to improve the quality of the blood transfusion chain, primarily focusing on safety. In this review we discuss the history and present state of this relatively new branch of transfusion medicine as well as some developments that we foresee in the near future. The top 10 results and conclusions are: (1) Haemovigilance systems have shown that blood transfusion is relatively safe compared with the use of medicinal drugs and that at least in Europe blood components have reached a high safety standard. (2) The majority of the serious adverse reactions and events occur in the hospital. (3) The majority of preventable adverse reactions are due to clerical errors. (4) Some adverse reactions such as anaphylactic reactions often are not avoidable and therefore have to be considered as an inherent risk of blood transfusion. (5) Well-functioning haemovigilance systems have not only indicated how safety should be improved, but also documented the success of various measures. (6) The type of organisation of a haemovigilance system is of relative value, and different systems may have the same outcome. (7) International collaboration has been extremely useful. (8) Haemovigilance systems may be used for the vigilance and surveillance of alternatives for allogeneic blood transfusion such as cell savers. (9) Haemovigilance systems and officers may be used to improve the quality of aspects of blood transfusion other than safety, such as appropriate use. (10) Haemovigilance systems will be of benefit also for vigilance and surveillance of the treatment with other human products such as cells, tissues and organs. © 2010 The Author(s). Vox Sanguinis © 2010 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  15. Anemia and red blood cell transfusion in neurocritical care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Andreas H; Zygun, David A

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Anemia is one of the most common medical complications to be encountered in critically ill patients. Based on the results of clinical trials, transfusion practices across the world have generally become more restrictive. However, because reduced oxygen delivery contributes to 'secondary' cerebral injury, anemia may not be as well tolerated among neurocritical care patients. Methods The first portion of this paper is a narrative review of the physiologic implications of anemia, hemodilution, and transfusion in the setting of brain-injury and stroke. The second portion is a systematic review to identify studies assessing the association between anemia or the use of red blood cell transfusions and relevant clinical outcomes in various neurocritical care populations. Results There have been no randomized controlled trials that have adequately assessed optimal transfusion thresholds specifically among brain-injured patients. The importance of ischemia and the implications of anemia are not necessarily the same for all neurocritical care conditions. Nevertheless, there exists an extensive body of experimental work, as well as human observational and physiologic studies, which have advanced knowledge in this area and provide some guidance to clinicians. Lower hemoglobin concentrations are consistently associated with worse physiologic parameters and clinical outcomes; however, this relationship may not be altered by more aggressive use of red blood cell transfusions. Conclusions Although hemoglobin concentrations as low as 7 g/dl are well tolerated in most critical care patients, such a severe degree of anemia could be harmful in brain-injured patients. Randomized controlled trials of different transfusion thresholds, specifically in neurocritical care settings, are required. The impact of the duration of blood storage on the neurologic implications of transfusion also requires further investigation. PMID:19519893

  16. Transfusion-transmitted infections in haemophilia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhubi, Bukurije; Mekaj, Ymer; Baruti, Zana; Bunjaku, Ilirijane; Belegu, Mazllum

    2009-11-01

    One of the largest therapeutic problem during the continuous treatment of the patients with Hemophilia A and B, are viral infections as Hepatitis B and C, and HIV, and the other infective diseases, which can be transmitted by the transfusion of blood products. The aim of this study is to analyze the complications of the hemophiliacs in Kosovo which have been treated with fresh frozen plasma, cryoprecipitate and concentrated products of FVIII and FIX. We have tested 75 patients with hemophilia A or B and there were used enzyme immunoassay test-Elisa method for the following: anti-HCV, HBsAg, HIV and TPHA.The serological data showed that HCV infection was positive in 29 cases or 38,7%, whereas infection with HBV and HIV were present in a smaller percentage of the patients (2,7% HBV and 1,4% for HIV). HCV infection was present only in 9,5% of the cases of the age group under 18 years. Infected hemophiliacs with one or two infective agents were found in 34,7%, respectively 4%. Infection with T. pallidum was present at none of the examined patients with hemophilia. HCV infection was higher in severe forms of hemophilia B (44,4%), compared with severe form of hemophilia A (30%).Based on our results, despite the infrequent application of FVIII and FIX concentrates, and other anti hemophilic preparations used in treating hemophilia patients, the number of infected hemophiliacs with blood-transmittable infectious agents was substantially high, especially with hepatitis C virus.

  17. Transfusão de plaquetas: do empirismo ao embasamento científico Platelet transfusion: from empiricism to scientific evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline A. Ferreira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite major advances in Brazilian blood transfusion therapy with a growing number of scientific publications, an increased number of repeat donors and a decline in serological ineligibility, a lack of conformity in the application of pre-transfusion tests that may compromise transfusion safety is still observed at transfusion agencies in the fringes of the blood transfusion therapy system. Additionally, although high rates of platelet transfusion refractoriness and significant rates of alloimmunization have been demonstrated in the international literature, few Brazilian centers have been concerned with the study of platelet alloimmunization and even fewer centers have evaluated the efficacy of platelet concentrate transfusion. As more than one million Brazilians, including many repeat blood donors, are listed in the National Bone Marrow Donor Registry (Redome, why not grant transfusion therapy services access to the HLA typing of these blood and marrow donors after obtaining their consent? And why not make use of the Redome data to evaluate the HLA compatibility of donors for alloimmunized patients who are candidates for bone marrow transfusion and who have already been typed? These measures, together with the identification of ABO and HPA antigens, will permit a complete assessment of platelet immunology, will guarantee the transfusion safety of this blood component, and will put Brazil at the same level as the so-called developed countries in terms of transfusion medicine.

  18. Profile of Blood Transfusion Requests from Hospitals to Bandung Blood Transfusion Unit, Indonesian Red Cross in 2011

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    Syahla Nisaa Amalia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blood transfusion as a part health services should be provided under appropriate indications and in a safe manner. In Indonesia, blood collection is run by the Blood Transfusion Unit of Indonesian Red Cross, where the blood is screened, processed into blood components, and finally distributed to hospitals. The purpose of this study was to describe the profile of blood transfusion requests from hospitals that do not have blood bank facility to the Bandung Blood Transfusion Unit, Indonesian Red Cross. Methods: A descriptive study was carried out using secondary data from Bandung Blood Transfusion Unit Indonesian Red Cross (UTD PMI Bandung. All blood request forms from hospitals during 2011 were collected and analyzed. Variables in this study were the amount of blood units, blood components, blood type, and indications of blood transfusion. Results: The number of blood units requested by hospitals were 35,841 units. The most blood units requested was in August 2011. The blood component requested was the packed red cell (61.1%, whole blood (17.4%, thrombocyte concentrate (10.6%, and fresh frozen plasma (7%. The total percentage of O, A, B and AB blood types were 36.1%, 28.6%, 27.5%, and 7.9% respectively. The most frequent indication for transfusion was anemia (61.7%, followed by surgery and other causes of bleeding. Conclusions: The total blood units requested by hospitals vary each month. The most blood component requested is Packed Red Cell and the type of blood is O blood type. The most frequent indication is anemia.

  19. Appropriateness of Plasma Transfusion: A College of American Pathologists Q-Probes Study of Guidelines, Waste, and Serious Adverse Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcorn, Kirsten; Ramsey, Glenn; Souers, Rhona; Lehman, Christopher M

    2017-03-01

    - Plasma transfusion guidelines support patient care and safety, management of product wastage, and compliance; yet, there is little information across multiple institutions about use of and adherence to plasma transfusion guidelines. - To survey multiple institutions regarding their plasma transfusion guidelines and compliance, plasma wastage rates, and incidence of transfusion reactions associated with plasma transfusion. - The College of American Pathologists Q-Probes model was used to collect data from 89 participating institutions. Each site was asked to provide data relevant to its most recent 40 adult patient plasma transfusion episodes, and complete a questionnaire regarding plasma transfusion guidelines, utilization and wastage of plasma, and transfusion reactions related to plasma transfusion. - The participating institutions reported a total of 3383 evaluable plasma transfusion episodes with transfusion of 9060 units of plasma. Compliance with institution-specific guidelines was seen in 3018 events (89%). Pretransfusion and posttransfusion coagulation testing was done in 3281 (97%) and 3043 (90%) of these episodes, respectively. Inappropriate criteria were noted for more than 100 transfusion episodes. Thirty-two plasma transfusion episodes (1%) were associated with a transfusion reaction. Serious and fatal reactions were reported. Median plasma wastage rate for the year preceding the study was 4.5%. - Most participating institutions are compliant with plasma transfusion guidelines based on published references, supported by appropriate testing. With transfusions for indications that lack evidence of efficacy and incidence of transfusion reactions, there is an ongoing role for transfusion service leaders to continue to update and monitor plasma transfusion practices.

  20. Decreasing Prevalence of Transfusion Transmitted Infection in Indian Scenario

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    Tulika Chandra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion transmitted infections are major problem associated with blood transfusion. Accurate estimates of risk of TTIs are essential for monitoring the safety of blood supply and evaluating the efficacy of currently employed screening procedures. The present study was carried out to assess the percentage of voluntary donors and replacement donors and to find out prevalence and changing trends of various TTIs blood donors in recent years. A study was carried out on blood units of voluntary and replacement donors which were collected from January 2008 to December 2012. On screening of 180,371 replacement units, seropositivity of transfusion transmitted disease in replacement donors was 0.15% in HIV, 1.67% in hepatitis B surface antigen, 0.49% in hepatitis C virus, 0.01% in VDRL, and 0.009% in malaria. Of 11,977 voluntary units, seropositivity of transfusion transmitted disease in voluntary donors was 0.08% in HIV, 0.24% in hepatitis B surface antigen, 0.001% in hepatitis C virus, 0.008% in VDRL (sexually transmitted disease, and 0.01% in malaria. From results it has been concluded that prevalence of transfusion transmitted infection (HIV, HBV, HCV, VDRL, and malaria was more in replacement donors in comparison to voluntary donors. Extensive donor selection and screening procedures will help in improving the blood safety.

  1. The use of big data in transfusion medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendry, K

    2015-06-01

    'Big data' refers to the huge quantities of digital information now available that describe much of human activity. The science of data management and analysis is rapidly developing to enable organisations to convert data into useful information and knowledge. Electronic health records and new developments in Pathology Informatics now support the collection of 'big laboratory and clinical data', and these digital innovations are now being applied to transfusion medicine. To use big data effectively, we must address concerns about confidentiality and the need for a change in culture and practice, remove barriers to adopting common operating systems and data standards and ensure the safe and secure storage of sensitive personal information. In the UK, the aim is to formulate a single set of data and standards for communicating test results and so enable pathology data to contribute to national datasets. In transfusion, big data has been used for benchmarking, detection of transfusion-related complications, determining patterns of blood use and definition of blood order schedules for surgery. More generally, rapidly available information can monitor compliance with key performance indicators for patient blood management and inventory management leading to better patient care and reduced use of blood. The challenges of enabling reliable systems and analysis of big data and securing funding in the restrictive financial climate are formidable, but not insurmountable. The promise is that digital information will soon improve the implementation of best practice in transfusion medicine and patient blood management globally. © 2015 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  2. The effect of blood storage age on treatment of lactic acidosis by transfusion in children with severe malarial anaemia: a pilot, randomized, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhabangi Aggrey

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe malarial anaemia requiring blood transfusion is a life-threatening condition affecting millions of children in sub-Saharan Africa. Up to 40% of children with severe malarial anaemia have associated lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis in these children is strongly associated with fatal outcomes and is corrected by blood transfusion. However, it is not known whether the storage age of blood for transfusion affects resolution of lactic acidosis. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the effect of blood storage age on resolution of lactic acidosis in children with severe malarial anaemia and demonstrate feasibility of conducting a large trial. Methods Children aged six to 59 months admitted to Acute Care Unit of Mulago Hospital (Kampala, Uganda with severe malarial anaemia (haemoglobin ≤ 5 g/dL and lactic acidosis (blood lactate ≥5 mmol/L, were randomly assigned to receive either blood of short storage age (one to 10 days or long storage age (21–35 days by gravity infusion. Seventy-four patients were enrolled and randomized to two equal-sized study arms. Physiological measurements, including blood lactate, oxygen saturation, haemoglobin, and vital signs, were taken at baseline, during and after transfusion. The primary outcome variable was the proportion of children whose lactic acidosis resolved by four hours after transfusion. Results Thirty-four of 37 (92% of the children in the short storage treatment arm compared to 30/37 (81% in the long storage arm achieved a blood lactate Conclusion Pilot data suggest that among children with severe malarial anaemia and lactic acidosis transfused with packed red blood cells, the storage age of blood does not affect resolution of lactic acidosis. The results support a larger and well-powered study which is under way. Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT01580111

  3. Supernatant of Aged Erythrocytes Causes Lung Inflammation and Coagulopathy in a "Two-Hit" In Vivo Syngeneic Transfusion Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaar, Alexander P. J.; Hofstra, Jorrit J.; Levi, Marcel; Kulik, Willem; Nieuwland, Rienk; Tool, Anton T. J.; Schultz, Marcus J.; de Korte, Dirk; Juffermans, Nicole P.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Transfusion of erythrocytes is associated with increased morbidity in certain patient groups. Storage time of erythrocytes may contribute to respiratory complications. Using a syngeneic in vivo transfusion model, we investigated whether transfusion of stored rat erythrocytes causes lung

  4. Blood transfusion in patients with sickle cell disease requiring laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Amr Mostafa; Meshikhes, Abdul-Wahed N

    2011-01-01

    Surgery in patients with sickle cell disease is associated with high morbidity. To reduce this high morbidity, different preoperative transfusion regimens were introduced. However, blood transfusion is associated with problems. This prospective study aims to establish the safety of conducting laparoscopic cholecystectomy without transfusion in sickle cell disease patients. Forty patients (16 males and 24 females; mean age 26.6 years) undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy for cholelithiasis were divided into 2 matched groups: Group I "no transfusion" (n=24 patients; 60%) and Group II "transfusion" (n=16; 40%). In Group II, 9 patients (22.5%) received a simple transfusion and 7 (17.5%) a partial exchange transfusion. Group II patients had significantly higher levels of Hb-S prior to transfusion. They developed a significantly higher complication rate (25% vs. 0%) and subsequently longer hospital stay (3.9±2 vs. 2.1±1.4). Moreover, there was no significant difference in the complications between the simple transfusion and partial exchange transfusion subgroups. Surgery in SCD patients is safe without a preoperative blood transfusion. Moreover, preoperative blood transfusion is associated with significantly higher postoperative complications and longer hospital stay. Hence, a "no transfusion" policy is recommended.

  5. [Effects of blood transfusion on vital signs and heart function in preterm infants with anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Ying-Nian; Tong, Xiao-Mei; Liu, Yun-Feng

    2015-04-01

    To explore the effects of blood transfusion on the vital signs and heart function in preterm infants with anemia. A total of 40 anemic preterm infants with gestational age less than 34 weeks who accepted blood transfusion one week after birth were enrolled for a prospective cohort study. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), fractional shortening (FS), stroke volume (SV), and cardiac output (CO) were determined with portable ultrasonic equipment before blood transfusion and within 24 hours after blood transfusion. Apnea was detected and the times of apnea were recorded within 24 hours before and after blood transfusion. The resting body temperature and blood pressure were also determined before and after blood transfusion. Additionally the resting heart rate, respiratory rate, and transcutaneous oxygen saturation were recorded within 4 hours before and after blood transfusion. The heart rate and respiratory rate decreased significantly within 4 hours after blood transfusion (Pblood transfusion, and nobody had apnea within 24 hours after blood transfusion. The systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, mean arterial pressure, and body temperature showed no significant changes after blood transfusion (P>0.05), and the LVEF, SV, CO, and FS showed no significant changes after blood transfusion as well (P>0.05). Blood transfusion can improve the clinical symptoms and shows no significant effect on the heart function in preterm infants with anemia.

  6. Hospital Blood Transfusion Patterns During Major Noncardiac Surgery and Surgical Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Alicia; Trivedi, Amal N; Jiang, Lan; Vezeridis, Michael; Henderson, William G; Wu, Wen-Chih

    2015-08-01

    We retrospectively examined intraoperative blood transfusion patterns at US veteran's hospitals through description of national patterns of intraoperative blood transfusion by indication for transfusion in the elderly; assessment of temporal trends in the use of intraoperative blood transfusion; and relationship of institutional use of intraoperative blood transfusion to hospital 30-day risk-adjusted postoperative mortality rates.Limited data exist on the pattern of intraoperative blood transfusion by indication for transfusion at the hospital level, and the relationship between intraoperative transfusion rates and institutional surgical outcomes.Using the Department of Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program database, we assigned 424,015 major noncardiac operations among elderly patients (≥65 years) in 117 veteran's hospitals, from 1997 to 2009, into groups based on indication for intraoperative blood transfusion according to literature and clinical guidelines. We then examined institutional variations and temporal trends in surgical blood use based on these indications, and the relationship between these institutional patterns of transfusion and 30-day postoperative mortality.Intraoperative transfusion occurred in 38,056/424,015 operations (9.0%). Among the 64,390 operations with an indication for transfusion, there was wide variation (median: 49.9%, range: 8.7%-76.2%) in hospital transfusion rates, a yearly decline in transfusion rates (average 1.0%/y), and an inverse relationship between hospital intraoperative transfusion rates and hospital 30-day risk-adjusted mortality (adjusted mortality of 9.8 ± 2.8% vs 8.3 ± 2.1% for lowest and highest tertiles of hospital transfusion rates, respectively, P = 0.02). In contrast, for the 225,782 operations with no indication for transfusion, there was little variation in hospital transfusion rates (median 0.7%, range: 0%-3.4%), no meaningful temporal change in transfusion (average 0.0%/y), and

  7. Transfusion of shed mediastinal blood reduces the use of allogenic blood transfusion without increasing complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkersen, Lars; Tang, Mariann; Grunnet, Niels; Jakobsen, Carl-Johan

    2011-03-01

    Reduced use of allogenic blood components is a key issue in cardiac surgery. Several methods to conserve blood have been used; reinfusion of shed mediastinal blood (RSMB) has found widespread acceptance, but the efficacy and safety are still debated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of RSMB on the use of allogenic blood components and selected complications. Six hundred and twenty-three consecutive cardiac surgery patients in three successive periods, of whom patients in the middle period did not receive RSMB due to manufacturer delivery problems, were evaluated. Patients and procedures were characterized by EuroSCORE. Prospective collected data were: units of transfused allogenic blood, fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and platelets, postoperative blood loss and postoperative complications such as dialysis, re-operation due to bleeding, sternal infection and stroke. Length of stay in ICU was used as a general indicator of perioperative complications. The number of patients receiving allogenic blood in periods with RSMB was significantly lower (36.5% versus 54.9%, ptransfused blood units was lower in patients receiving RSMB (2.07 versus 3.41, p=0.029), while FFP (1.34 versus 2.01, p=0.11) and platelets (0.58 versus 0.95, p=0.05) were not statistically significantly different. Postoperative bleeding was lower (759 versus 967 ml, p=0.032) in the periods with RSMB. Patients receiving RSMB were less transfused with allogenic blood and had less postoperative drainage, while the frequency of observed postoperative complications was not different from patients who did not receive RSMB.

  8. Problems and Approaches for Blood Transfusion in the Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, David J; Field, Stephen; Delaney, Meghan; Bates, Imelda

    2016-04-01

    A safe supply of blood and the knowledge, skill, and resources for the appropriate use of blood are essential for medical services. Many problems are faced in the development of transfusion services in low- or medium-income countries (LMICs). Unfortunately, in many countries, providing safe blood is made more difficult by a lack of blood donors and the high frequency of transfusion-transmissible infections. The problems are compounded by the frequent need for urgent life-saving transfusions. This article examines the problems in supply, safety, and use of blood and how they are being addressed in LMICs, predominantly focusing on sub-Saharan Africa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Blood transfusion - the value of Research and Development programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garraud, Olivier; Morel, Pascal; Coste, Joliette; Tiberghien, Pierre; Fournier-Wirth, Chantal

    2015-02-01

    Transfusion is a mixed discipline which includes the production of blood components, applied biology aiming in particular at establishing the highest compatibility for immunological characteristics between blood components to be delivered to patients and recipients, and, finally translational medicine to evaluate the effectiveness of the transfused products and to proactively avoid hazards, at least those that are preventible and can be anticipated. The whole chain takes place with the concern of continuous improvement of quality and safety. These two principles (quality/safety) have been and still are concerns of constant progress applicable to all the transfusion chain steps; they benefit from programs of Research and Development (R&D). Fundamental research, basic but also applied and clinical research, accompanies, in a constantly joint manner, scientific and medical progresses by providing new solutions to dampen the current problems and to prepare the future. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  10. Desmopressin use for minimising perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carless, Paul A; Stokes, Barrie J; Moxey, Annette J; Henry, David A

    2014-01-01

    Background Public concerns regarding the safety of blood have prompted reconsideration of the use of allogeneic blood (blood from an unrelated donor) transfusion and a range of techniques designed to minimise transfusion requirements. Objectives To examine the efficacy of desmopressin acetate (1-deamino-8-D-arginine-vasopressin) in reducing peri-operative blood loss and the need for red blood cell (RBC) transfusion in patients who do not have congenital bleeding disorders. Search methods We identified studies by searching CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2008, Issue 1), MEDLINE (1950 to 2008), EMBASE (1980 to 2008), the Internet (to May 2008), and bibliographies of published articles. Selection criteria Controlled parallel-group trials in which adult patients scheduled for non-urgent surgery were randomised to desmopressin (DDAVP) or to a control group that did not receive DDAVP treatment. Trials were eligible for inclusion if they reported data on the number of patients exposed to allogeneic red cell transfusion or the volume of blood transfused. Data collection and analysis Primary outcomes were: the number of patients exposed to allogeneic red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, and the amount of blood transfused. Other outcomes measured were: blood loss, re-operation for bleeding, post-operative complications (thrombosis, myocardial infarction, stroke), mortality, and length of hospital stay. Treatment effects were pooled using a random-effects model. Main results Nineteen trials that included a total of 1387 patients reported data on the number of patients exposed to allogeneic RBC transfusion. DDAVP did not significantly reduce the risk of exposure to allogeneic RBC transfusion (relative risk (RR) 0.96, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.87 to 1.06). However, the use of DDAVP significantly reduced total blood loss (weighted mean difference (WMD) −241.78 ml, 95% CI −387.55 to −96.01 ml). Although DDAVP appeared to reduce the overall volume of allogeneic blood

  11. Thromboelastography in Orthopaedic Trauma Acute Pelvic Fracture Resuscitation: A Descriptive Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamczak, Christiaan N; Maloney, Megan; Fritz, Braxton; Boyer, Bryan; Thomas, Scott; Evans, Ed; Ploplis, Victoria A; Castellino, Francis J; McCollester, Jonathon; Walsh, Mark

    2016-06-01

    To describe the adjunctive use of thromboelastography (TEG) in directing initial blood component therapy resuscitation of patients with polytrauma with acute pelvic/acetabular fractures. Retrospective cohort review. Level-2 trauma center. Forty adult trauma activations with acute pelvic and/or acetabular fractures were treated with standard fracture care and TEG with adjuvant platelet mapping (TEG/PM) analysis to guide their initial 24-hour resuscitation. TEG with PM provided goal-directed hemostatic resuscitation using component blood products and an established hospital transfusion protocol. Transfusions were triggered by abnormal TEG/PM results and/or the presence of active hemorrhage, persistent hemorrhagic shock, and abnormal base deficit levels. The correction of trauma-induced coagulopathy was determined by the return of a normal TEG/PM tracing. The numbers of component blood products transfused in the first 24 hours using TEG/PM were calculated. Subgroup analysis of transfusion requirements and differences between pelvic ring and acetabular fracture patterns were determined. More than 90% of patients received a transfusion of at least 1 blood product with 84% of transfusions occurring within 6 hours of admission. TEG/PM-guided resuscitation yielded greater volumes of platelets and packed red blood cells (PRBCs) versus fresh frozen plasma (FFP) (P = 0.018) with an average transfusion ratio of 2.5:1:2.8 (PRBC:FFP:platelet). There was a trend toward greater transfusion requirements in combined injuries versus pelvic ring or acetabular fractures (P = 0.08). TEG with PM is a valuable adjunct to guide the acute phase of resuscitation in patients with polytrauma with pelvic injuries because it allows a real-time assessment of the coagulation status. The routine use of TEG/PM may result in transfusion ratios of blood products different from those of the current empiric 1:1:1 guidelines. Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description

  12. How do we reduce plasma transfusion in Rhode Island?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Christian P; Tavares, Maria F; Sweeney, Joseph D

    2017-08-01

    Plasma transfusions are given to patients with coagulopathy, either prophylactically, before an invasive procedure; or therapeutically, in the presence of active bleeding; and as an exchange fluid in therapeutic plasma exchange for disorders such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. There is consensus that many prophylactic plasma transfusions are non-efficacious, and the misdiagnosis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura results in unnecessary therapeutic plasma exchange. Beginning in 2001, programs to reduce plasma transfusion in the three major teaching hospitals in Rhode Island were initiated. The programs evolved through the establishment of guidelines, education for key prescribers of plasma, screening of plasma prescriptions, and engagement of individual prescribing physicians for out-of-guidelines prescriptions with modification or cancellation. Establishment of an in-house ADAMTS13 (ADAM metallopeptidase with thrombospondin type 1, motif 13) assay in 2013 was used to prevent therapeutic plasma exchange in patients with non-thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura microangiopathy. Transfusion service data were gathered at the hospital level regarding blood component use, hospital data for discharges, inpatient mortality, and mean case-mix index, and, at the state level, for units of plasma shipped from the community blood center to in-state hospitals. Between 2006 and 2016, a reduction in plasma use from 11,805 to 2677 units (a 77% decrease) was observed in the three hospitals and was mirrored in the state as a whole. This decline was not associated with any increase in red blood cell transfusion. Inpatient mortality either declined or was unchanged. An active program focused on education and interdiction can achieve a large decrease in plasma transfusions without evidence of patient harm. © 2017 AABB.

  13. Study of behavioral problems in multi-transfused thalassemic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongally, Chandrashekar; Benakappa, Asha D; Reena, Shankar

    2012-10-01

    Beta-thalassemia major is a chronic disorder of blood, having an extensive impact on the affected child. It involves lifelong therapeutic regime, with repeated blood transfusions. With improved life expectancy, due to improved medical management psychosocial aspects of thalassemia are gaining importance. To assess the behavioral problems in multi-transfused thalassemic children and psychosocial factors affecting them. The study was conducted in a tertiary care level hospital and research institute catering mainly to a population of low socioeconomic status. The study was a cross-sectional study involving 50 multi-transfused thalassemic children of age 5-10 years. Fifty multi-transfused thalassemic children, aged 5-10 years, not suffering from any other major medical illness, were included. Child Behavior Check List (Achenbach) (CBCL) was used to collect data from each parent regarding the child's behavior. Parental Attitude Scale (Rangaswamy 1989) was applied. Descriptive statistical analysis was used with analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student's t test to find the significance of data. The CBCL total scores were high in 32% patients, indicating the presence of behavioral problems. Higher CBCL scores were found in children of older age group, those with poor school performance, whose mothers' education was more than eighth standard, had history of death of thalassemic relative in family, greater duration of diagnosed illness, poor pre-transfusion hemoglobin level, and who had longer periods of school absenteeism. Behavioral problems are common in multi-transfused thalassemic children. Early diagnosis and intervention of behavioral problems in these children would make them cope with thalassemia better.

  14. Antibody screening in multitransfused patients: a prerequisite before each transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamba, Divjot S; Mittal, Kshitija; Sood, Tanvi; Bedi, Ravneet Kaur; Kaur, Paramjit; Kaur, Gagandeep

    2014-10-01

    Life-long red blood cell (RBC) transfusions remain the main treatment for severe thalassemia. We hereby report a case of anti S and anti Lu(a) in a β-thalassemia major patient detected incidentally on antibody screening. The patient was a known case of β-thalassemia major and was on regular blood transfusion every 3 weeks from the institute from the age of 6 months. Subsequently, on one occasion, patient's crossmatch was compatible despite positive antibody screen using microcolumn gel technique. Autocontrol and direct antiglobulin test were negative on microcolumn gel. Anti S and anti Lu(a) antibodies were identified. Blood unit found compatible was negative for S and Lu(a) antigens. Antibody titers were 1:1 for both anti S and anti Lu(a) in AHG phase using tube technique and antibodies were of IgG type. Blood unit was transfused uneventfully to the patient. Donors were traced back (last three donations) and called for repeat blood sample testing for S and Lu(a) antigen. Two out of three donors were found to be S antigen positive and one out of these two was Lu(a) antigen positive. Anti S and anti Lu(a) antibodies were again identified on patient's subsequent visit for transfusion. The present case re-emphasize the importance of antibody screening at each visit in earlier detection of antibodies in multi transfused patients. Encouraging patients to receive transfusion from one center and dedicating donors could reduce alloimmunization rate but larger studies are required. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Ratio of erythrocyte and plasma in massive blood transfusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xian-Hui; Liu, Feng-Xia; Zhang, Jun-Hua; Gui, Rong

    2014-06-01

    This study was purposed to explore the suitable ratio between fresh frozen plasma and erythrocyte by retrospective analysis of coagulation in patients with massive blood transfusion. The clinical data of 151 cases with massive blood transfusion from January 2011 to January 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. According to coagulation, patients were divided into coagulation normal group (138 cases) and coagulation dysfunction group (13 cases). Based on the ratio of 1:1 of fresh frozen plasma and erythrocyte, the patients were divided into high plasma group(2:1), medium plasma group (1:1) and low plasma (blood transfusion. The results showed that prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and thrombin time (TT) were prolonged, fibrinogen (FIB) level decreased significantly (all P blood transfusion 24 h; the high plasma and the medium plasma group of coagulation normal group had no significant changes in coagulation (P > 0.05); prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time and fibrinogen level in the medium plasma and low plasma subgroup of coagulation dysfunction group after massive transfusion was still in abnormal levels (P > 0.05), coagulation function in high plasma subgroup was improved significantly (P blood transfusion, the ratio between fresh frozen plasma and erythrocyte is recommended to be 2:1 in patients of coagulation dysfunction in order to improve the patient's coagulation function and to reduce the incidence of adverse event, the ratio of fresh frozen plasma to erythrocyte is recommended to be 1:1 in patients with normal coagulation so as to reduce the dilutional coagulopathy and hypervolemia of blood.

  16. Platelet transfusion—the new immunology of an old therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz eStolla

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Platelet transfusion has been a vital therapeutic approach in patients with hematologic malignancies for close to half a century. Randomized trials show that prophylactic platelet transfusions mitigate bleeding in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. However, even with prophylactic transfusions, as many as 75% of patients experience hemorrhage. While platelet transfusion efficacy is modest, questions and concerns have arisen about the risks of platelet transfusion therapy. The acknowledged serious risks of platelet transfusion include viral transmission, bacterial sepsis, and acute lung injury. Less serious adverse effects include allergic and non-hemolytic febrile reactions. Rare hemolytic reactions have occurred due to a common policy of transfusing without regard to ABO type. In the last decade or so, new concerns have arisen; platelet derived lipids are implicated in transfusion related acute lung injury after transfusion. With the recognition that platelets are immune cells came the discoveries that supernatant IL-6, IL-27 sCD40L, and OX40L are closely linked to febrile reactions and sCD40L with acute lung injury. Platelet transfusions are pro-inflammatory, and may be pro-thrombotic. Anti-A and anti-B can bind to incompatible recipient or donor platelets and soluble antigens, impair hemostasis and thus increase bleeding. Finally, stored platelet supernatants contain biological mediators such as VEGF and TGF-β1 that may compromise the host versus tumor response. This is particularly of concern in patients receiving many platelet transfusions, as for acute leukemia. New evidence suggests that removing stored supernatant will improve clinical outcomes.This new view of platelets as pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory agents suggests that innovative approaches to improving platelet storage and pre-transfusion manipulations to reduce toxicity could substantially improve the efficacy and safety of this long employed therapy.

  17. Detection of alloimmunization to ensure safer transfusion practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Sood

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Serological safety is an integral part of overall safety for blood banks. Emphasis is on the use of routinue Red Blood Cell (RBC antibody screen test, at set time intervals, to reduce risks related to alloantibodies. Also emphasis is on importance of issuing antigen negative blood to alloantibody positive patients. Effect of using leucodepleted blood on the rate of alloimmunization is highlighted. The concept of provision of phenotypically matched blood is suggested. Materials and Methods: Antibody screen test is important to select appropriate blood for transfusion. Repeat antibody screen testing, except if time interval between the earlier and subsequent transfusion was less than 72 hours, followed by antibody identification, if required, was performed in patients being treated with repeat multiple blood transfusions. Between February 2008 and June 2009, repeat samples of 306 multi-transfused patients were analyzed. Search for irregular antibodies and reading of results was conducted using RBC panels (three-cell panel of Column Agglutination Technology (CAT and two cell panel of the Solid Phase Red Cell Adherence Technology (SPRCAT. Specificities of antibodies were investigated using appropriate panels, 11 cell panel of CAT and 16 cell panel of SPRCA. These technologies, detecting agglutination in columns and reactions in solid phase, evaluate the attachment of irregular incomplete antibody to antigen in the first phase of immunological reaction more directly and hence improve the reading of agglutination. Three to four log leuco reduced red blood cells were transfused to patients in the study using blood collection bags with integral filters. Results: Alloimmunization rate of 4.24% was detected from 306 multiply transfused patients tested and followed up. The Transfusion therapy may become significantly complicated. Conclusion: Red cell antibody screening and identification and subsequent issue of antigen negative blood have a

  18. Direct antiglobulin test positivity in multi-transfused thalassemics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Jain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Red cell allo- and auto-immunization is a well recognized problem in multi-transfused thalassemic patients. We conducted this study on 301 multi-transfused thalassemic patients under the Thalassemia Transfusion Programme of Advanced Pediatric Centre of PGIMER. Aims and Objectives: The study was designed to determine the frequency of alloimmunization and autoimmunization in multi-transfused thalassemic patients and to establish the specificity of alloantibody to red cell antigens, if alloimmunization is detected. Materials and Methods: The antibody screening was performed by the conventional tube technique using commercially available three cell screening panel (Diamed Switzerland by saline, low ionic strength solution (LISS and albumin indirect antiglobulin test (IAT. Samples with alloantibodies were then tested with red cell identification panel to determine the alloantibody specificity. Autoantibody screening was performed by direct antiglobulin test (DAT during pre-transfusion testing. Results: Of the 301 patients, 52 (17.28% were found to have antibodies (-allo and –autoantibodies. A total of 11 red cell alloantibodies were detected in 10 patients and the specificities were anti-Kell in 6(54.5%, anti-D in 2(18.2%, anti-c in 1(9.1% and a combination of anti-E (9.1% and anti-Jkb in 1 (9.1% patients. DAT was positive in 48 (15.9% patients. The frequency of autoantibody was significantly higher in alloimmunized group as compared to non-alloimmunized group (60% V/s 14.4%. Also, the pre-transfusion hemoglobin was significantly lower in the immunized group (8.5 gm/dl V/s 9.0 gm/dl; p=0.03 than the non-immunized group. Conclusion: Based on these observations, we suggest antigen typing of all thalassemia major patients for ABO, Rh and Kell antigens before initiating transfusion therapy. Also, screening for allo- and auto-antibodies at regular intervals should be done prior to each transfusion.

  19. Fluid Resuscitation and Massive Transfusion Protocol in Pediatric Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanović Vesna

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Trauma is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children due to the occurrence of hemorrhagic shock. Hemorrhagic shock and its consequences, anemia and hypovolemia, decrease oxygen delivery, due to which appropriate transfusion and volume resuscitation are critical. Guidelines for massive transfusion, in the pediatric trauma, have not been defined yet. Current data indicate that early identification of coagulopathy and its treatment with RBSs, plasma and platelets in a 1:1:1 unit ratio, and limited use of crystalloids may improve survival in pediatric trauma patients.

  20. Age of transfused blood is not associated with increased postoperative adverse outcome after cardiac surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKenny, M

    2011-05-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that storage age of transfused red blood cells (RBCs) is associated with adverse outcome after cardiac surgery, and examined association between volume of RBC transfusions and outcome after cardiac surgery.

  1. Screening for hemosiderosis in patients receiving multiple red blood cell transfusions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jongh, Adriaan D; van Beers, E J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314670793; de Vooght, K M K|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304817961; Schutgens, R E G|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/258752084

    2017-01-01

    Background: The dramatic impact of hemosiderosis on survival in chronically transfused patients with hereditary anemia is well known. We evaluated whether patients receiving multiple red blood cell (RBC) transfusions are adequately screened for hemosiderosis. Methods: We retrospectively assessed

  2. Reporting adverse transfusion reactions: A retrospective study from tertiary care hospital from New Delhi, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Pahuja

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Awareness should be increased among clinicians to correctly prevent, identify, and report transfusion-related adverse events. These measures should be implemented to increase blood transfusion quality and safety.

  3. Effectiveness of autologous transfusion system in primary total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Schneider, Marco M

    2014-01-01

    Autologous transfusion has become a cost-efficient and useful option in the treatment of patients with high blood loss following major orthopaedic surgery. However, the effectiveness of autologous transfusion in total joint replacement remains controversial.

  4. Blood transfusions for severe malaria-related anemia in Africa: a decision analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.O. Obonyo; E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); A.J. Oloo; J.D.F. Habbema (Dik)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractSevere childhood malarial anemia is commonly treated using blood transfusion. Although transfusion may decrease short-term mortality, the risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission is considerable in Africa. We constructed a decision tree to

  5. Successful Treatment of Twin—Twin Transfusion Syndrome by Occlusion of Placental Vessel Anastomoses Using Enbucrilate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Yu Yang

    2008-09-01

    Conclusion: Targeted therapeutic ablation of vessel anastomoses involved in twin—twin transfusion syndrome using color Doppler ultrasonographic guidance is minimally invasive and may effectively obliterate interfetal transfusion, contributing to the survival of both twins.

  6. Thrombelastography (TEG) or thromboelastometry (ROTEM) to monitor haemotherapy versus usual care in patients with massive transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Arash; Wikkelsø, Anne; Brok, Jesper Sune

    2011-01-01

    Severe bleeding and coagulopathy as a result of massive transfusion are serious clinical conditions that are associated with high mortality. Thromboelastography (TEG) and thromboelastometry (ROTEM) are increasingly used to guide transfusion strategy but their roles remain disputed....

  7. Transfusion practice in coronary artery bypass surgeri in Denmark: a multicenter audit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jan J.; Westen, Mikkel; Pallesen, Peter A.

    2007-01-01

    of antifibrinolytic drugs, use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), cross-clamp time, time on CPB, lowest hemoglobin during CPB, and number of distal anastomoses. The percentage of patients transfused with allogeneic red blood cells ranged from 30.0% to 64.2%. Several patients (12.1-42.7%) transfused with red blood cells...... were discharged with a hemoglobin concentration >7 mmol/l, indicating inappropriate transfusions. The relative risk of receiving an allogeneic blood transfusion was 2.1 (95% CI: 1.6-2.7) in the hospital with the highest transfusion rate, after adjustment for patient-, drug-, and procedure......Transfusion rates in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) continue to vary substantially, although guidelines for allogeneic transfusion have been developed. In order to evaluate ongoing transfusion practices, we performed a multicenter audit in four Danish hospitals regarding the use...

  8. Point-of-care washing of allogeneic red blood cells for the prevention of transfusion-related respiratory complications (WAR-PRC): a protocol for a multicenter randomised clinical trial in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Matthew A; Welsby, Ian J; Norris, Phillip J; Silliman, Christopher C; Armour, Sarah; Wittwer, Erica D; Santrach, Paula J; Meade, Laurie A; Liedl, Lavonne M; Nieuwenkamp, Chelsea M; Douthit, Brian; van Buskirk, Camille M; Schulte, Phillip J; Carter, Rickey E; Kor, Daryl J

    2017-08-18

    The transfusion-related respiratory complications, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO), are leading causes of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality. At present, there are no effective preventive strategies with red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. Although mechanisms remain incompletely defined, soluble biological response modifiers (BRMs) within the RBC storage solution may play an important role. Point-of-care (POC) washing of allogeneic RBCs may remove these BRMs, thereby mitigating their impact on post-transfusion respiratory complications. This is a multicenter randomised clinical trial of standard allogeneic versus washed allogeneic RBC transfusion for adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery testing the hypothesis that POC RBC washing is feasible, safe, and efficacious and will reduce recipient immune and physiologic responses associated with transfusion-related respiratory complications. Relevant clinical outcomes will also be assessed. This investigation will enrol 170 patients at two hospitals in the USA. Simon's two-stage design will be used to assess the feasibility of POC RBC washing. The primary safety outcomes will be assessed using Wilcoxon Rank-Sum tests for continuous variables and Pearson chi-square test for categorical variables. Standard mixed modelling practices will be employed to test for changes in biomarkers of lung injury following transfusion. Linear regression will assess relationships between randomised group and post-transfusion physiologic measures. Safety oversight will be conducted under the direction of an independent Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB). Approval of the protocol was obtained by the DSMB as well as the institutional review boards at each institution prior to enrolling the first study participant. This study aims to provide important information regarding the feasibility of POC washing of allogeneic RBCs and its potential impact on ameliorating

  9. Transfusion practices in a neonatal intensive care unit in a city in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Portugal, Carolina Augusta Arantes; Paiva, Amanda Póvoa De; Freire,Érika Santos; Chaoubah,Alfredo; Duarte, Marta Cristina; Hallack Neto, Abrahão Elias

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Newborn infants are the most heavily transfused population inside intensive care units. The hemoglobin level used to indicate the need of transfusions is not well established. The aim of this study was to evaluate transfusional practices in newborns in the neonatal intensive care units of one specific city. METHODS: Red blood cell transfusion practices of all transfused newborns in all five of the neonatal intensive care units of the city were analyzed. Data are reported as de...

  10. Transfusion Medicine Problems and Solutions for the Pediatric Hematologist/Oncologist

    OpenAIRE

    Luban, Naomi L.C.; McBride, Eileen; Ford, Jason C.; Gupta, Sumit

    2012-01-01

    Blood component transfusion is an integral part of the care of children with oncologic and hematologic conditions. The complexity of transfusion medicine may however lead to challenges for pediatric hematologists/oncologists. In this review, three commonly encountered areas of transfusion medicine are explored. The approach to the investigation and management of suspected platelet refractoriness is reviewed. The unique transfusion related challenges encountered by children undergoing stem cel...

  11. Effect of perioperative blood transfusion on clinical outcomes in hepatic surgery for cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Boni, Luigi; Rovera, Francesca; Rausei, Stefano; Cuffari, Salvatore; Cantone, Giovanni; Bacuzzi, Alessandro; Dionigi, Renzo

    2009-01-01

    Allogeneic blood transfusion during liver resection for malignancies has been associated with an increased incidence of different types of complications: infectious complications, tumor recurrence, decreased survival. Even if there is clear evidence of transfusion-induced immunosuppression, it is difficult to demonstrate that transfusion is the only determinant factor that decisively affects the outcome. In any case there are several motivations to reduce the practice of blood transfusion. Th...

  12. The majority of patients in septic shock are transfused with fresh-frozen plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiter, Nanna; Wesche, Nikolaj; Perner, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) transfusion may be widely used in patients in septic shock, but the use is not well-described. Our aim was to describe the current use of FFP transfusion in medical patients with septic shock.......Fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) transfusion may be widely used in patients in septic shock, but the use is not well-described. Our aim was to describe the current use of FFP transfusion in medical patients with septic shock....

  13. [Chagas' disease in patients in chronic hemodialysis. Prevalence and risk of transmission by blood transfusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorca, M; Lorca, E; Atías, A; Plubins, L

    1989-06-01

    A serologic study of Chagas disease was performed in 110 patients submitted to chronic hemodialisis and blood transfusions. Immunofluorescence antibody testing (IgG and IgM) was positive in 6 out of 62 patients receiving multiple blood transfusions (9.7%), but negative in all 48 subjects without transfusions. Thus, repeated blood transfusion is a significant risk for T cruzi infection in chronic hemodialized patients.

  14. Red cell exchange to mitigate a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction in a patient transfused with incompatible red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, Mehraboon S; Karafin, Matthew S; Ernster, Luke

    2017-02-01

    A red cell exchange was performed to prevent a potentially fatal hemolytic transfusion reaction in a patient with anti-e who was transfused with e-antigen unscreened red blood cells during liver transplant surgery. A 64-year-old woman with cirrhosis due to hepatitis C was scheduled to receive a liver transplant. She had a previously documented anti-e, an antibody to the Rh(e)-antigen that is known to cause delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions. Pre-operatively and intra-operatively, she had massive hemorrhage which required transfusion of 34 e-antigen unscreened red blood cells (RBCs) most of which were incompatible. The hemoglobin dropped from 9.1 g/dL on post-operative day (POD)1 to 6.6 g/dL on POD6, with no evidence of blood loss. The bilirubin also increased from 5.0 mg/dL on POD 1 to 11.0 mg/dL on POD 6. As she was also becoming more hemodynamically unstable, a red cell exchange with 10 units of e-negative RBCs was performed on POD 6. She improved clinically and was extubated the following day. A few residual transfused e-positive red cells were detected after the red cell exchange until POD 13. This case illustrates how a red cell exchange can mitigate the potentially harmful effects of a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction caused by red cell antibodies. With massive intraoperative blood loss it may not be possible to have antigen-negative RBCs immediately available, particularly for the e-antigen, which is present in 98% of the donor population. The ability to perform such a procedure may be life-saving in such patients. J. Clin. Apheresis 32:59-61, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. A case of platelet refractoriness in a patient with acute myelogenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rivers, Nigeria. ABSTRACT: Background: Acute myelogenous leukaemia is a type of acute leukaemia more commonly seen in adults than in children and usually presents with features of anaemia, neutropoenia and thrombocytopoenia (pancytopoenia). Red cell transfusions and the use of granulocyte colony stimulating ...

  16. A case of platelet refractoriness in a patient with acute myelogenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Acute myelogenous leukaemia is a type of acute leukaemia more commonly seen in adults than in children and usually presents with features of anaemia, neutropoenia and thrombocytopoenia (pancytopoenia). Red cell transfusions and the use of granulocyte colony stimulating factor usually correct the ...

  17. Prevalence of IgG and IgM anti-Toxoplasma gondii Antibodies in Blood Donors at Urmia Blood Transfusion Organization, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappeh, Khosrow Hazrati; Musavi, Jalil; Safa, Mohammad Baradaran; Galavani, Hosein; Alizadeh, Hamid

    2017-03-01

    The importance of toxoplasmosis lies in its global spread, opportunistic nature, and causative role in abortion or irreparable adverse effects on infants of infected pregnant women. Toxoplasma gondii has different transmission routes to humans, including blood transfusion. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of IgG and IgM antibodies specific for T. gondii in blood donors at the Urmia Blood Transfusion Organization in west Azerbaijan, Iran. The present analytical, descriptive study evaluated the plasma of 270 randomly selected blood bags donated in 2013. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test was employed to measure anti-T. gondii IgG and IgM antibodies. The results of the ELISA test showed that 102 samples (37.8%) from 270 blood bags had IgG antibodies in their plasma and none of them were IgM-positive, whereas 98 were men and four were women. Any increase in the level of IgM antibodies indicates the presence of an acute disease because the parasite is inside white blood cells and contaminates blood transfusion. Fortunately, all samples were IgM-negative. However, a province-wide seroepidemiological study is required for the Blood Transfusion Organization to consider including screening for anti-T. gondii antibodies in its screening programs.

  18. Blood transfusion practices in obstetric care at a tertiary referral hospital in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyashadzaishe Mafirakureva, N.; Mberi, Y.T.; Khoza, S.; Mvere, D.A.; Emmanuel, J.C.; Postma, M.J.; Van Hulst, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Blood transfusions are an essential element of obstetric care and may have a role in reducing maternal mortality, if used appropriately. Monitoring of transfusion practices provides information on current and future needs of blood. It may also lead to rational use of blood transfusions.

  19. Screening for hemosiderosis in patients receiving multiple red blood cell transfusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jongh, Adriaan D; van Beers, Eduard J; de Vooght, Karen M K; Schutgens, Roger E G

    2017-05-01

    The dramatic impact of hemosiderosis on survival in chronically transfused patients with hereditary anemia is well known. We evaluated whether patients receiving multiple red blood cell (RBC) transfusions are adequately screened for hemosiderosis. We retrospectively assessed hemosiderosis screening and prevalence in adult patients that received over twenty RBC units in the University Medical Centre Utrecht from 2010 till 2015. Hemosiderosis was defined as ferritin ≥1000 μg/L. Adequate screening for chronically transfused patients was defined as any ferritin determined up to 3 months before or any moment after the last transfusion, while for patients that received all transfusions within 3 months (bulk transfusion), ferritin had to be determined after at least twenty transfusions. Of 471 patients, only 38.6% was adequately screened and hemosiderosis prevalence was 46.7%. Hemosiderosis prevalence was 47% in the chronic transfusion group and 12% in the bulk transfusion group. In patients transfused because of hematological malignancy or cardiothoracic surgery, respectively, 74% and 31% were adequately screened and hemosiderosis prevalence was 53% and 13%, respectively. Hemosiderosis screening in our routine practice is suboptimal. Hemosiderosis is not an exclusive complication of multiple transfusions in the hematology ward. We recommend screening for hemosiderosis in all patients receiving multiple transfusions. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Haematology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Red cell alloimmunization in multi‑transfused patients with sickle cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is an inherited hemoglobin disorder characterized by chronic anemia and occasional crises. Clinical features are variable. While some individuals are relatively stable and rarely require blood transfusion, others often require blood transfusion. Multiple blood transfusion is associated ...

  1. Effect of perioperative blood transfusions on long term graft outcomes in renal transplant patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, Frank J

    2012-06-01

    It is established that blood transfusions will promote sensitization to human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antigens, increase time spent waiting for transplantation and may lead to higher rates of rejection. Less is known about how perioperative blood transfusion influence patient and graft outcome. This study aims to establish if there is an association between perioperative blood transfusion and graft or patient survival.

  2. Bedside practice of blood transfusion in a large teaching hospital in Uganda : an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, J D; Kajja, I; Bimenya, G S; Postma, Maarten; Smit Sibinga, C.Th.

    BACKGROUND: Adverse transfusion reactions can cause morbidity and death to patients who receive a blood transfusion. Blood transfusion practice in Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda is analyzed to see if and when these practices play a role in the morbidity and mortality of patients. MATERIALS AND

  3. Intra-operative blood transfusion among adult surgical patients in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This retrospective study was designed to audit the pattern of intra-operative whole blood transfusion among adult surgical patients over a two-year period. Data were collected on the rate of intra-operative transfusion, estimated blood loss, units of donor blood transfused, pattern of use of autologous blood and circumstances ...

  4. Assessment of the clinical transfusion practice at a regional referral hospital in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Natukunda, B.; Schonewille, H.; Smit Sibinga, C. Th.

    The aim of this study was to determine the indications for transfusion, blood ordering practices and post-transfusion complications, and to assess the clinical transfusion practice at Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital (MRRH) in Mbarara, Uganda. There are no guidelines on the appropriate use of

  5. Feasibility of Early Diagnosis and Treatment of Acute Chest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute chest syndrome is a serious complication and one of the causes of mortality in sickle cell disease. Twenty eight year old male was admitted in our hospital with fever, severe chest pain and haemolytic crisis. He was treated with intravenous antibiotics, fluids, parenteral analgesics and blood transfusion. Severe ...

  6. Serum hepcidin level and disease course of acute leukemia in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute leukemia (AL) is a heterogeneous group of hematopoietic neoplasms and it is the most common childhood malignancy. Many patients with AL develop severe anemia that requires multiple blood transfusions. Hepcidin expression may play a role in anemia which is often seen in these patients. The aim of this study is ...

  7. Prevalence of Blood Pathogens among Transfused Patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With the advent of 21st century technology that has resulted in the development of sophisticated equipments, blood supply is thought to be safer than ever. This study therefore, investigates the incidence and prevalence of transfusion transmitted infections in patients. The study was carried out on 55 hospitalized cohorts who ...

  8. T-REC: Strengthening capacity for blood transfusion research in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    T-REC provides funding and support for PhD students undertaking research addressing the highest priority needs of the transfusion services, a Professional Diploma course in Project Design and Management to build the competence and confidence of health service professionals in research and drive the development of ...

  9. Blood transfusion malaria: A literature review | Faruk | Annals of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    malaria” and “transfusion.” The search results were perused and studies relevant to the subject matter and that available in full text were retrieved. The retrieved studies were then grouped, based on the type of study, into systematic reviews, ...

  10. Eradication of Transfusion-Induced Malaria by In vitro Processing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The determined lethal dose of chloroquine was safe to all constituents of the stored blood. CONCLUSION: For eradication of transfusion induced malaria by in vitro processing of donors blood, chloroquine is effective and safe drug. We recommend application of the optimal dose of chloroquine (626.1g/L) to the components ...

  11. Transfusion autologue differee: Etude prospective de 70 cas a l ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No incident in connection with the ABT was recorded. In conclusion, the ABT is a feasible, effective and secure method in the context of a small african hospital. It may be a solution to the problems of shortage of blood products and transfusion safety. Training and motivation are necessary for its successful implementation.

  12. Impact of Transfusion on Cancer Growth and Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi A. Goubran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For many years, transfusion of allogeneic red blood cells, platelet concentrates, and plasma units has been part of the standard therapeutic arsenal used along the surgical and nonsurgical treatment of patients with malignancies. Although the benefits of these blood products are not a matter of debate in specific pathological conditions associated with life-threatening low blood cell counts or bleeding, increasing clinical evidence is nevertheless suggesting that deliberate transfusion of these blood components may actually lead to negative clinical outcomes by affecting patient's immune defense, stimulating tumor growth, tethering, and dissemination. Rigorous preclinical and clinical studies are needed to dimension the clinical relevance, benefits, and risks of transfusion of blood components in cancer patients and understand the amplitude of problems. There is also a need to consider validating preparation methods of blood components for so far ignored biological markers, such as microparticles and biological response modifiers. Meanwhile, blood component transfusions should be regarded as a personalized medicine, taking into careful consideration the status and specificities of the patient, rather than as a routine hospital procedure.

  13. Policy and decision making by blood transfusion services in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-04-18

    Apr 18, 2006 ... The other example is the recent confrontation between gay and lesbian associations and the blood transfusion services. Men who have had sex with another man are universally barred as blood donors because this is recognised as high-risk behaviour for HIV infection and transmission. The issue was.

  14. Real-Time Clinical Decision Support Decreases Inappropriate Plasma Transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Neil; Baker, Steven A; Spain, David; Shieh, Lisa; Shepard, John; Hadhazy, Eric; Maggio, Paul; Goodnough, Lawrence T

    2017-08-01

    To curtail inappropriate plasma transfusions, we instituted clinical decision support as an alert upon order entry if the patient's recent international normalized ratio (INR) was 1.7 or less. The alert was suppressed for massive transfusion and within operative or apheresis settings. The plasma order was automatically removed upon alert acceptance while clinical exception reasons allowed for continued transfusion. Alert impact was studied comparing a 7-month control period with a 4-month intervention period. Monthly plasma utilization decreased 17.4%, from a mean ± SD of 3.40 ± 0.48 to 2.82 ± 0.6 plasma units per hundred patient days (95% confidence interval [CI] of difference, -0.1 to 1.3). Plasma transfused below an INR of 1.7 or less decreased from 47.6% to 41.6% (P = .0002; odds ratio, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.69-0.89). The alert recommendation was accepted 33% of the time while clinical exceptions were chosen in the remaining cases (active bleeding, 31%; other clinical indication, 33%; and apheresis, 2%). Alert acceptance rate varied significantly among different provider specialties. Clinical decision support can help curtail inappropriate plasma use but needs to be part of a comprehensive strategy including audit and feedback for comprehensive, long-term changes.

  15. The PROTON study : profiles of transfusion recipients in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borkent-Raven, B.A.

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis, Barbara Borkent presents the results of the PROTON study. PROTON is a (Dutch) acronym for PROfiles of TransfusiON recipients. The aim of this study was to describe the distribution of blood products over various patient groups in the Netherlands. Quantitative information on

  16. Hepatitis C and blood transfusion among children attending the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    2013-06-02

    Jun 2, 2013 ... Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) accounts for 90% of post-transfusion hepatitis. In Uganda, there has been limited research ... African Health Sciences 2013; 13(2): 255 - 260 http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ahs.v13i2.8. *Corresponding author: ... 6.4 computer software package. Analysis was done using SPSS ...

  17. Transfusion transmitted malaria in three major blood banks of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-08-16

    Aug 16, 2010 ... into the circulatory system of one person from another person. In transfusion, the recipients receive whole blood or parts of blood like red blood cells (RBCs), platelets plasma or other components of the blood. Blood trans-. *Corresponding author. E-mail: j62ahmed@yahoo.com. Tel: +92-91-9217703.

  18. rhesus negative woman transfused with rhesus positive blood

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-03-01

    Mar 1, 2015 ... reproductive age. Another fear is transfusion reaction if they receive another Rh D positive blood in future. We present a 32-year-old Rh D negative woman, who had postpartum ... cluded intramuscular oxytocin 10IU, intravenous fluid. (IVF) 1000ml ..... 8. Westhoff CM. The structure and function of the.

  19. Cost effectiveness of autologous blood transfusion -— A developing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cipients (P=0.009). The rate of infection was 85.7% for ho- mologous blood recipients and 14.3% for autologous blood recipients. There was no significant difference in the means hospital charges, length of hospital stay and rate of infection in the entire population of patients who received blood transfusion when analysed ...

  20. National strategy for the prevention and management of transfusion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. The incidence of transfusion-associated hepatitis (fAH) has ..... measurements. Ten to fifteen per cent of subjects who clear the virus during therapy may relapse. This is more common in immunosuppressed subjects and those with variant viruses or ... cost, potential risks and benefits of therapy, and the risks of.