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Sample records for acute neuroleptic stimulates

  1. Acute cardiac failure in neuroleptic malignant syndrome.

    Sparrow, Patrick

    2012-02-03

    We present a case of rapid onset acute cardiac failure developing as part of neuroleptic malignant syndrome in a 35-year-old woman following treatment with thioridazine and lithium. Post mortem histology of cardiac and skeletal muscle showed similar changes of focal cellular necrosis and vacuolation suggesting a common disease process.

  2. Acute psychosis followed by fever: Malignant neuroleptic syndrome or viral encephalitis?

    Stojanović Zvezdana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome is rare, but potentially fatal idiosyncratic reaction to antipsychotic medications. It is sometimes difficult to diagnose some clinical cases as neuroleptic malignant syndrome and differentiate it from the acute viral encephalitis. Case report. We reported a patient diagnosed with acute psychotic reaction which appeared for the first time. The treatment started with typical antipsychotic, which led to febrility. The clinical presentation of the patient was characterised by the signs and symptoms that might have indicated the neuroleptic malignant syndrome as well as central nervous system viral disease. In order to make a detailed diagnosis additional procedures were performed: electroencephalogram, magnetic resonance imaging of the head, lumbar puncture and a serological test of the cerebrospinal fluid. Considering that after the tests viral encephalitis was ruled out and the diagnosis of neuroleptic malignant syndrome made, antipsychotic therapy was immediately stopped. The patient was initially treated with symptomatic therapy and after that with atypical antipsychotic and electroconvulsive therapy, which led to complete recovery. Conclusion. We present the difficulties of early diagnosis at the first episode of acute psychotic disorder associated with acute febrile condition. Concerning the differential diagnosis it is necessary to consider both neuroleptic malignant syndrome and viral encephalitis, i.e. it is necessary to make the neuroradiological diagnosis and conduct cerebrospinal fluid analysis and blood test. In neuroleptic malignant syndrome treatment a combined use of electroconvulsive therapy and low doses of atypical antipsychotic are confirmed to be successful.

  3. Malignant neuroleptic syndrome following deep brain stimulation surgery: a case report

    Stavrinou Lampis C

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The neuroleptic malignant syndrome is an uncommon but dangerous complication characterized by hyperthermia, autonomic dysfunction, altered mental state, hemodynamic dysregulation, elevated serum creatine kinase, and rigor. It is most often caused by an adverse reaction to anti-psychotic drugs or abrupt discontinuation of neuroleptic or anti-parkinsonian agents. To the best of our knowledge, it has never been reported following the common practice of discontinuation of anti-parkinsonian drugs during the pre-operative preparation for deep brain stimulation surgery for Parkinson's disease. Case presentation We present the first case of neuroleptic malignant syndrome associated with discontinuation of anti-parkinsonian medication prior to deep brain stimulation surgery in a 54-year-old Caucasian man. Conclusion The characteristic neuroleptic malignant syndrome symptoms can be attributed to other, more common causes associated with deep brain stimulation treatment for Parkinson's disease, thus requiring a high index of clinical suspicion to timely establish the correct diagnosis. As more centers become eligible to perform deep brain stimulation, neurologists and neurosurgeons alike should be aware of this potentially fatal complication. Timely activation of the deep brain stimulation system may be important in accelerating the patient's recovery.

  4. Malignant neuroleptic syndrome following deep brain stimulation surgery: a case report.

    Themistocleous, Marios S; Boviatsis, Efstathios J; Stavrinou, Lampis C; Stathis, Pantelis; Sakas, Damianos E

    2011-06-29

    The neuroleptic malignant syndrome is an uncommon but dangerous complication characterized by hyperthermia, autonomic dysfunction, altered mental state, hemodynamic dysregulation, elevated serum creatine kinase, and rigor. It is most often caused by an adverse reaction to anti-psychotic drugs or abrupt discontinuation of neuroleptic or anti-parkinsonian agents. To the best of our knowledge, it has never been reported following the common practice of discontinuation of anti-parkinsonian drugs during the pre-operative preparation for deep brain stimulation surgery for Parkinson's disease. We present the first case of neuroleptic malignant syndrome associated with discontinuation of anti-parkinsonian medication prior to deep brain stimulation surgery in a 54-year-old Caucasian man. The characteristic neuroleptic malignant syndrome symptoms can be attributed to other, more common causes associated with deep brain stimulation treatment for Parkinson's disease, thus requiring a high index of clinical suspicion to timely establish the correct diagnosis. As more centers become eligible to perform deep brain stimulation, neurologists and neurosurgeons alike should be aware of this potentially fatal complication. Timely activation of the deep brain stimulation system may be important in accelerating the patient's recovery.

  5. Effects of acute and long-term typical or atypical neuroleptics on morphine-induced behavioural effects in mice.

    Hollais, André W; Patti, Camilla L; Zanin, Karina A; Fukushiro, Daniela F; Berro, Laís F; Carvalho, Rita C; Kameda, Sonia R; Frussa-Filho, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    1. It has been suggested that the high prevalence of drug abuse in schizophrenics is related to chronic treatment with typical neuroleptics and dopaminergic supersensitivity that develops as a consequence. Within this context, atypical neuroleptics do not seem to induce this phenomenon. In the present study, we investigated the effects of acute administration or withdrawal from long-term administration of haloperidol and/or ziprasidone on morphine-induced open-field behaviour in mice. 2. In the first experiment, mice were given a single injection of haloperidol (1 mg/kg, i.p.) or several doses of ziprasidone (2, 4 or 6 mg/kg, i.p.) and motor activity was quantified by the open-field test. The aim of the second experiment was to verify the effects of an acute injection of haloperidol (1 mg/kg) or ziprasidone (6 mg/kg) on 20 mg/kg morphine-induced behaviours in the open-field test. In the third experiment, mice were treated with 1 mg/kg haloperidol and/or 2, 4 or 6 mg/kg ziprasidone for 20 days. Seventy-two hours after the last injection, mice were injected with 20 mg/kg, i.p., morphine and then subjected to the open-field test. Acute haloperidol or ziprasidone decreased spontaneous general activity and abolished morphine-induced locomotor stimulation. 3. Withdrawal from haloperidol or ziprasidone did not modify morphine-elicited behaviours in the open-field test. The results suggest that withdrawal from neuroleptic treatments does not contribute to the acute effect of morphine in schizophrenic patients. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Malignant Neuroleptic Syndrome following Deep Brain Stimulation Surgery of Globus Pallidus Pars Internus in Cerebral Palsy

    Jae Meen Lee

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS is a rare but potentially lethal outcome caused by sudden discontinuation or dose reduction of dopaminergic agents. We report an extremely rare case of NMS after deep brain stimulation (DBS surgery in a cerebral palsy (CP patient without the withdrawal of dopaminergic agents. A 19-year-old girl with CP was admitted for DBS due to medically refractory dystonia and rigidity. Dopaminergic agents were not stopped preoperatively. DBS was performed uneventfully under monitored anesthesia. Dopaminergic medication was continued during the postoperative period. She manifested spasticity and muscle rigidity, and was high fever resistant to anti-pyretic drugs at 2 h postoperative. At postoperative 20 h, she suffered cardiac arrest and expired, despite vigorous cardiopulmonary resuscitation. NMS should be considered for hyperthermia and severe spasticity in CP patients after DBS surgery, irrespective of continued dopaminergic medication.

  7. Malignant neuroleptic syndrome following deep brain stimulation surgery: a case report

    Themistocleous, Marios S; Boviatsis, Efstathios J; Stavrinou, Lampis C; Stathis, Pantelis; Sakas, Damianos E

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The neuroleptic malignant syndrome is an uncommon but dangerous complication characterized by hyperthermia, autonomic dysfunction, altered mental state, hemodynamic dysregulation, elevated serum creatine kinase, and rigor. It is most often caused by an adverse reaction to anti-psychotic drugs or abrupt discontinuation of neuroleptic or anti-parkinsonian agents. To the best of our knowledge, it has never been reported following the common practice of discontinuation of anti...

  8. Stimulation of (3H) spiroperidol binding after prolonged neuroleptic therapy by the cholecystokinin octapeptide analog cerulein

    Vasar, E.E.; Allikmets, L.K.; Maimets, O.O.; Nurk, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    Evidence has recently been obtained that cholecystokinin and its analog cerulein have marked antipsychotic action on patients with schizophrenia who are resistant to neuroleptics; this is the basis for interest in this study of the effect of cerulein, a high-affinity analog of the octapeptide cholecystokinin, on binding of tritium-spiroperidol in vivo. Considering the apormorphine-like action of cerulein, this biochemical analysis was undertaken in the form of a comparative study with N-propyl-norapomorphine, a high-affinity analogy of apomorphine

  9. Nociceptive thermal threshold testing in horses – effect of neuroleptic sedation and neuroleptanalgesia at different stimulation sites

    2013-01-01

    Background Aim of the study was to compare the effect of neuroleptic sedation with acepromazine and neuroleptanalgesia with acepromazine and buprenorphine on thermal thresholds (TT) obtained at the nostrils and at the withers. The study was carried out as a randomized, blinded, controlled trial with cross-over design. Thermal thresholds were determined by incremental contact heat applied to the skin above the nostril (N) or the withers (W). Eleven horses were treated with saline (S), acepromazine (0.05 mg/kg) (ACE) or acepromazine and buprenorphine (0.0075 mg/kg) (AB) intravenously (IV). Single stimulations were performed 15 minutes prior and 15, 45, 75, 105, 165, 225, 285, 405 and 525 minutes after treatment. Sedation score, gastrointestinal auscultation score and occurrence of skin lesions were recorded. Data were analysed with analysis of variance for repeated measurements. Results There were no significant differences in TT between N and W with all treatments. The TT remained constant after S and there was no difference in TT between S and ACE. After AB there was a significant increase above baseline in TT until 405 minutes after treatment. Restlessness occurred 30–90 minutes after AB in 7 horses. All horses had reduced to absent borborygmi after AB administration for 165 to 495 minutes. Conclusion Thermal stimulation at both described body areas gives comparable results in the assessment of cutaneous anti-nociception in horses. There is no differential influence of neuroleptic sedation or neuroleptanalgesia on TTs obtained at N or W. Buprenorphine combined with acepromazine has a long lasting anti-nociceptive effect associated with the typical opioid induced side effects in horses. PMID:23837730

  10. Vitamin B6 versus mianserin and placebo in acute neuroleptic-induced akathisia: a randomized, double-blind, controlled study.

    Miodownik, Chanoch; Lerner, Vladimir; Statsenko, Nikolay; Dwolatzky, Tzvi; Nemets, Boris; Berzak, Elina; Bergman, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Treatment strategies against acute neuroleptic-induced akathisia (NIA) include anticholinergic (antimuscarinic) agents, dopamine agonists, GABAergic agents, beta-blockers, benzodiazepines, and serotonin antagonists. However, many patients who have acute akathisia fail to respond. In previous studies, mianserin and vitamin B6 were found to be effective in the treatment of acute akathisia. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of B(6), mianserin and placebo in the treatment of acute NIA. Sixty schizophrenia and schizoaffective inpatients who have NIA were randomly divided to receive vitamin B(6) 1,200 mg/d, mianserin 15 mg/d, or placebo for 5 days, in a double-blind design. The Barnes Akathisia Rating Scale, Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, and Clinical Global Impression were used to assess the severity of NIA and psychotic symptoms. The assessment was made at baseline and daily for the duration of the study. Compared with the placebo group, the vitamin B(6)-treated and mianserin-treated patients showed a significant improvement in the subjective (P vitamin B(6) group (13/23, 56%) as well as in the mianserin groups (13/20, 65%), and in only one patient in the placebo group (1/17, 6%; P vitamin B(6) and mianserin suggests that the pathophysiology of acute NIA is heterogeneous with the various subtypes of acute NIA responding differently to the various pharmacological approaches.

  11. Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome

    ... such as neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Much of this research focuses on finding ways to prevent and treat the disorder. Show More Show Less Search Disorders SEARCH SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Neuroleptic malignant syndrome is ...

  12. Rhabdomyolysis and Acute Kidney Injury Requiring Dialysis as a Result of Concomitant Use of Atypical Neuroleptics and Synthetic Cannabinoids

    Aiyu Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of synthetic cannabinoids (SCBs is associated with many severe adverse effects that are not observed with marijuana use. We report a unique case of a patient who developed rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury (AKI requiring dialysis after use of SCBs combined with quetiapine. Causes for the different adverse effects profile between SCBs and marijuana are not defined yet. Cases reported in literature with SCBs use have been associated with reversible AKI characterized by acute tubular necrosis and interstitial nephritis. Recent studies have showed the involvement of cytochromes P450s (CYPs in biotransformation of SCBs. The use of quetiapine which is a substrate of the CYP3A4 and is excreted (73% as urine metabolites may worsen the side effect profiles of both quetiapine and K2. SCBs use should be included in the differential diagnosis of AKI and serum Creatinine Phosphokinase (CPK level should be monitored. Further research is needed to identify the mechanism of SCBs nephrotoxicity.

  13. Why are doctors still prescribing neuroleptics?

    Charlton, B G

    2006-06-01

    There are two main pharmacological methods of suppressing undesired behaviour: sedation or neuroleptics. Traditionally, the invention of neuroleptics has been hailed as one of the major clinical breakthroughs of the twentieth century, since they calmed agitation without (necessarily) causing sedation. The specifically neuroleptic form of behavioural control is achieved by making patients psychologically Parkinsonian, which entails emotional blunting and consequent demotivation. Furthermore, chronic neuroleptic usage creates dependence, so that in the long term, neuroleptics are doing most patients more harm than good. The introduction of 'atypical' neuroleptics (neuroleptically-weak but strongly sedative neuroleptics) has made only a difference in degree, and at the cost of a wide range of potentially fatal metabolic and other side-effects. For half a century, the creation of millions of Parkinsonian patients may have been misinterpreted as a 'cure' for schizophrenia. Such a wholesale re-interpretation of neuroleptic therapy represents an unprecedented disaster for the self-image and public reputation of both psychiatry and the whole medical profession. Nonetheless, except as a last resort, neuroleptics should swiftly be replaced by gentler and safer sedatives.

  14. Risk factors in neuroleptic malignant syndrome.

    Gupta, Vinay; Magon, Rakesh; Mishra, B P; Sidhu, G B S; Mahajan, Ranjiv

    2003-01-01

    Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is an uncommon but potentially serious idiosyncratic response to neuroleptic antipsychotics. It usually affects young males, but the risk has been seen to increase with certain factors including the administration practices of antipsychotic neuroleptics in these individuals. Even though no predictors for NMS are yet known, this article highlights the findings on certain risk factors as seen from a series of fifteen patients who developed NMS. Cautious use of neuroleptics in those at risk, early recognition and institution of immediate management is important.

  15. Acute Vagal Nerve Stimulation Lowers α2 Adrenoceptor Availability

    Landau, Anne M.; Dyve, Suzan; Jakobsen, Steen

    2015-01-01

    Background Vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) emerged as an anti-epileptic therapy, and more recently as a potential antidepressant intervention. Objective/hypothesis We hypothesized that salutary effects of VNS are mediated, at least in part, by augmentation of the inhibitory effects of cortical...... monoaminergic neurotransmission at appropriate receptors, specifically adrenoceptors. Our objective was to measure the effect of acute VNS on α2 adrenoceptor binding. Methods Using positron emission tomography (PET), we measured changes in noradrenaline receptor binding associated with acute VNS stimulation...... electrode in minipigs before and within 30 min of the initiation of 1 mA stimulation. Kinetic analysis with the Logan graphical linearization generated tracer volumes of distribution for each condition. We used an averaged value of the distribution volume of non-displaceable ligand (VND), to calculate...

  16. Organic anion and cation transport in vitro by dog choroid plexus: Effects of neuroleptics and tricyclic antidepressants

    Barany, E H [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    1979-01-01

    Dog lateral choroid plexus accumulates the cation /sup 14/C-emepronium and the divalent anion /sup 125/I-iodipamide in vitro. At 10 ..mu..M, high potency neuroleptics with a substituted piperazine side chain and also haloperidol depress only the uptake of the cation and even stimulate the uptake of the anion. In contrast, at 1-10..mu..M, the accumulation of both test substances is inhibited by neuroleptics and tricyclic antidepresssants with an aliphatic side chain. Such unspecific effects on seemingly unrelated transport systems at concentrations reached clinically in the CSF might explain some side actions of low potency neuroleptics and antidepressants.

  17. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome following catatonia: Vigilance is the price of antipsychotic prescription

    Thomas J Reilly

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To describe a case of neuroleptic malignant syndrome following antipsychotic treatment of catatonia, highlighting the potentially serious complications of this rare adverse drug reaction. Methods: We present a case report of a patient who developed this syndrome with various sequelae. Results: The patient developed neuroleptic after being treated with lorazepam and olanzapine for catatonia. He subsequently developed the complications of rhabdomyolysis, acute kidney injury, pulmonary embolism, urinary retention and ileus. He received high-dose lorazepam, anticoagulation and intravenous fluids. Antipsychotic medication in the form of haloperidol was reinstated with no adverse effect, and he went on to make a full recovery. Conclusions: This case illustrates the potential life-threatening complications of neuroleptic malignant syndrome and the need for a low index of clinical suspicion. It also highlights the lack of evidence for treatment of catatonia, including the use of antipsychotics.

  18. Mapping for Acute Transvenous Phrenic Nerve Stimulation Study (MAPS Study).

    Dekker, Lukas R C; Gerritse, Bart; Scheiner, Avram; Kornet, Lilian

    2017-03-01

    Central sleep apnea syndrome, correlated with the occurrence of heart failure, is characterized by periods of insufficient ventilation during sleep. This acute study in 15 patients aims to map the venous system and determine if diaphragmatic movement can be achieved by phrenic nerve stimulation at various locations within the venous system. Subjects underwent a scheduled catheter ablation procedure. During the procedural waiting time, one multielectrode electrophysiology catheter was subsequently placed at the superior and inferior vena cava and the junctions of the left jugular and left brachiocephalic vein and right jugular and right brachiocephalic vein, for phrenic nerve stimulation (1-2 seconds ON/2-3 seconds OFF, 40 Hz, pulse width 210 μs). Diaphragmatic movement was assessed manually and by a breathing mask. During a follow-up assessment between 2 and 4 weeks postprocedure, occurrence of adverse events was assessed. In all patients diaphragmatic movement was induced at one or more locations using a median threshold of at least 2 V and maximally 7.5 V (i.e., e 3.3 mA, 14.2 mA). The lowest median current to obtain diaphragmatic stimulation without discomfort was found for the right brachiocephalic vein (4.7 mA). In 12/15 patients diaphragmatic movement could be induced without any discomfort, but in three patients hiccups occurred. Diaphragmatic stimulation from the brachiocephalic and caval veins is feasible. Potential side effects should be eliminated by adapting the stimulation pattern. This information could be used to design a catheter, combining cardiac pacing with enhancing diaphragm movement during a sleep apnea episode. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. [Case with difficulty in differentiating between transient neuroleptic malignant syndrome and catatonia after neuroleptic analgesia].

    Yanagawa, Youichi; Miyazaki, Masaki

    2010-02-01

    An 18-year-old woman was treated with neuroleptic analgesia using fentanyl, morphine, droperidol and haloperidol for general anesthesia and pain control for her knee operation. Postoperatively, she showed emotional unstableness, following dyspnea, tachycardia, fever, hyperhydrosis, muscle rigidity and myoclonus like involuntary movement. She received infusion of 140 mg dantrolene in total under suspicion of having neuroleptic malignant syndrome, but her symptoms improved slightly. After being transferred to our hospital, she exhibited immobility, mutism, rigidity, and catalepsy, and she was suspected of having lethal catatonia. Infusion of diazepam 10 mg resulted in dramatical improvement of her symptoms. Differential diagnosis between neuroleptic malignant syndrome and catatonia is difficult; however, a first line therapy is differential diagnosis. Thus, physician should consider catatonia when treating neuroleptic malignant like syndrome.

  20. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (a case report.

    Patkar A

    1991-07-01

    Full Text Available An adult schizophrenic patient developed neuroleptic malignant syndrome following treatment with parenteral haloperidol. An early recognition of the syndrome, immediate discontinuation of the offending agent and prompt treatment with bromocriptine and lorazepam produced a good recovery. The various features of the case are discussed in view of the potential lethality of the syndrome.

  1. Delirium followed by neuroleptic malignant syndrome in ...

    Delirium and neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) are two uncommon syndromes that are often unrecognized or misdiagnosed by the primary physicians as functional psychiatric disorders. The infrequency and the heterogeneity of clinical manifestation, progression and outcome with which those diagnoses are ...

  2. Detection and management of the neuroleptic malignant syndrome.

    Bond, W S

    1984-01-01

    Two patients who developed the neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) are described, and pertinent literature is reviewed. A 30-year-old man developed NMS, apparently as a result of haloperidol treatment of chronic undifferentiated schizophrenia. Treatment with cooling blankets, acetaminophen, dantrolene sodium, and bromocriptine mesylate decreased abnormal vital signs, but catatonia continued. After 30 treatments with electroconvulsive therapy over a one-month period, the patient's catatonia was resolved, and he was discharged on no medication with the schizophrenia in remission. The second patient was a 22-year-old woman who developed NMS after five weeks of therapy with haloperidol and thiothixene for an acute episode of abnormal behavior. She did not respond to therapy with cooling blankets, acetaminophen, antibiotics, and amobarbital sodium. Dantrolene sodium therapy produced no improvement except for some relief of muscular rigidity. Electroconvulsive therapy (22 treatments over one month) successfully decreased the patient's elevated liver enzymes and leukocyte count, but periodic temperature elevations and catatonia continued. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of NMS are essential, as the mortality rate is 20%. Acute lethal catatonia and malignant hyperthermia are considered in differential diagnosis. Both central and peripheral pathophysiologic mechanisms are probably involved in NMS, and most cases are seen in patients with psychiatric illness. Onset of NMS does not seem related to duration of neuroleptic therapy and, in susceptible persons, additional factors may be required to trigger onset of NMS. Symptoms, including diffuse muscular rigidity, akinesia, and fever, develop within 24-72 hours. Neurologic symptoms may develop or worsen, and leukocytosis and elevated levels of liver enzymes occur. Death can result from respiratory or cardiovascular failure, and rhabdomyolysis can lead to acute renal failure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Acute stimulation of brain mu opioid receptors inhibits glucose-stimulated insulin secretion via sympathetic innervation.

    Tudurí, Eva; Beiroa, Daniel; Stegbauer, Johannes; Fernø, Johan; López, Miguel; Diéguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Rubén

    2016-11-01

    Pancreatic insulin-secreting β-cells express opioid receptors, whose activation by opioid peptides modulates hormone secretion. Opioid receptors are also expressed in multiple brain regions including the hypothalamus, where they play a role in feeding behavior and energy homeostasis, but their potential role in central regulation of glucose metabolism is unknown. Here, we investigate whether central opioid receptors participate in the regulation of insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis in vivo. C57BL/6J mice were acutely treated by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection with specific agonists for the three main opioid receptors, kappa (KOR), delta (DOR) and mu (MOR) opioid receptors: activation of KOR and DOR did not alter glucose tolerance, whereas activation of brain MOR with the specific agonist DAMGO blunted glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), reduced insulin sensitivity, increased the expression of gluconeogenic genes in the liver and, consequently, impaired glucose tolerance. Pharmacological blockade of α2A-adrenergic receptors prevented DAMGO-induced glucose intolerance and gluconeogenesis. Accordingly, DAMGO failed to inhibit GSIS and to impair glucose tolerance in α2A-adrenoceptor knockout mice, indicating that the effects of central MOR activation on β-cells are mediated via sympathetic innervation. Our results show for the first time a new role of the central opioid system, specifically the MOR, in the regulation of insulin secretion and glucose metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Short-term cognitive improvement in schizophrenics treated with typical and atypical neuroleptics.

    Rollnik, Jens D; Borsutzky, Marthias; Huber, Thomas J; Mogk, Hannu; Seifert, Jürgen; Emrich, Hinderk M; Schneider, Udo

    2002-01-01

    Atypical neuroleptics seem to be more beneficial than typical ones with respect to long-term neuropsychological functioning. Thus, most studies focus on the long-term effects of neuroleptics. We were interested in whether atypical neuroleptic treatment is also superior to typical drugs over relatively short periods of time. We studied 20 schizophrenic patients [10 males, mean age 35.5 years, mean Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) score at entry 58.9] admitted to our hospital with acute psychotic exacerbation. Nine of them were treated with typical and 11 with atypical neuroleptics. In addition, 14 healthy drug-free subjects (6 males, mean age 31.2 years) were enrolled in the study and compared to the patients. As neuropsychological tools, a divided attention test, the Vienna reaction time test, the Benton visual retention test, digit span and a Multiple Choice Word Fluency Test (MWT-B) were used during the first week after admission, within the third week and before discharge (approximately 3 months). Patients scored significantly worse than healthy controls on nearly all tests (except Vienna reaction time). Clinical ratings [BPRS and Positive and Negative Symptom Scale for Schizophrenia (PANSS)] improved markedly (p divided attention task (r = 0.705, p = 0.034). Neuropsychological functioning (explicit memory, p divided attention, p < 0.05) moderately improved for both groups under treatment but without a significant difference between atypical and typical antipsychotic drugs. Over short periods of time (3 months), neuropsychological disturbances in schizophrenia seem to be moderately responsive to both typical and atypical neuroleptics. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  5. Psychosocial stimulation interventions for children with severe acute malnutrition: a systematic review

    Daniel, Allison I.; Bandsma, Robert H.; Lytvyn, Lyubov; Voskuijl, Wieger P.; Potani, Isabel; van den Heuvel, Meta

    2017-01-01

    Background The WHO Guidelines for the inpatient treatment of severely malnourished children include a recommendation to provide sensory stimulation or play therapy for children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM). This systematic review was performed to synthesize evidence around this

  6. Low dosage of aripiprazole induced neuroleptic malignant syndrome after interaction with other neuroleptic drugs

    Albino Petrone

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Aripiprazole is a 2nd generation antipsychotic medication, atypical neuroleptic used for treatment of schizophrenia improving symptoms such as hallucinations, delusions, and disorganized thinking. A potentially fatal symptom complex sometimes referred to as neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS has been reported in association with administration of antipsychotic drugs, including aripiprazole. Rare cases of NMS occurred during aripiprazole treatment in the worldwide clinical database. The disease is characterized by a distinctive clinical syndrome of mental status change, rigidity, fever, and dysautonomia. We report on a 63-year old woman with depression syndrome who developed neuroleptic malignant syndrome after twelve days of aripripazole 5 mg per day. Our case is added to the small number already described and suggests the need for caution when aripripazole is added to increase the effect of other antipsychotics.

  7. Explanation of application standards of hematopoietic stimulating factors in the treatment of acute radiation sickness

    Xing Zhiwei; Jiang Enhai; Wang Guilin; Luo Qingliang

    2012-01-01

    Occupational standard of the Ministry of health-Application Standards of Hematopoietic Stimulating Factors in the Treatment of Acute Radiation Sickness has been completed as a draft standard. Based on the wide study and analysis of related animal experimental literature about hematopoietic stimulating factor in the treatment of acute radiation sickness and domestic and foreign clinical reports about application of hematopoietic stimulating factor in radiation accidents in the past decade, the standard was enacted according to the suggestions of International Atomic Energy Agency and the United States Strategic National Stockpile Radiation Working Group and European countries about the application of hematopoietic stimulating factor. It is mainly used for nuclear accident emergency and the treatment of the bone marrow form of acute radiation sickness caused by radiation accidents. It also applies to other hematopoietic failure diseases. In order to implement this standard correctly, the relevant contents of the standard were interpreted in this article. (authors)

  8. Olanzapine-Induced Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome

    Seyedhamze Hosseini

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS is a rare but life-threatening idiosyncratic side effect resulting from neuroleptic drugs. NMS mainly occurs in patients treated with high-potency typical antipsychotics, but rarely caused by atypical antipsychotics. Although NMS is less common with atypical antipsychotic, but it seems that its incidence is rising due to increased administration of such drugs. We present the case of a 27-year-old man with a history of paranoid schizophrenia that showed signs consistent with NMS that occurred after treatment with olanzapine. The patient was adherent to treatment. He had decreased level of consciousness, muscle rigidity, diaphoresis, fever, drooling, urinary incontinence, and high blood pressure. This patient illustrates that NMS can occur due to treatment with atypical antipsychotic drugs like olanzapine, particularly in the presence of risk factors. This phenomenon is often unrecognized, underdiagnosed, or not treated properly. Physicians should be aware that NMS with extrapyramidal syndrome could occur with olanzapine at steady state doses without recent dosage adjustments or titration. It is essential that adequate and safe dose of medication is chosen and the patient is monitored by the signs and symptoms of this lethal syndrome.

  9. Comparative study of ipsilesional and contralesional repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulations for acute infarction.

    Watanabe, Kosuke; Kudo, Yosuke; Sugawara, Eriko; Nakamizo, Tomoki; Amari, Kazumitsu; Takahashi, Koji; Tanaka, Osamu; Endo, Miho; Hayakawa, Yuko; Johkura, Ken

    2018-01-15

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is reported to improve chronic post-stoke hemiparesis. However, application of rTMS during the acute phase of post-stroke has not fully been investigated. We investigated the safety and the efficacy of intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS) of the affected motor cortex and 1-Hz stimulation of the unaffected hemisphere during the acute phase in patients with hemiparesis due to capsular infarction. Twenty one patients who met the study criteria were randomly assigned to receive, starting within 7days after stroke onset and for a period of 10days, iTBS of the affected motor cortex hand area (n=8), 1-Hz stimulation of the unaffected motor cortex hand area (n=7), or sham stimulation (n=6). Upper limb motor function was evaluated before rTMS and 12weeks after onset of the stroke. Evaluation was based on the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), Stroke Impairment Assessment Set (SIAS), Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), grip strength, and motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude in the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle. Both iTBS applied to the affected motor cortex hand area and 1-Hz stimulation applied to the unaffected motor cortex hand area enhanced motor recovery. In comparison to sham stimulation, iTBS increased the SIAS finger-function test score, and 1-Hz stimulation decreased the MAS wrist and finger score. Ipsilesional iTBS and contralesional 1-Hz stimulation applied during the acute phase of stroke have different effects: ipsilesional iTBS improves movement of the affected limb, whereas contralesional 1-Hz stimulation reduces spasticity of the affected limb. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Contribution of the central histaminergic transmission in the cataleptic and neuroleptic effects of haloperidol.

    Jain, Nishant S; Tandi, Lakshyapati; Verma, Lokesh

    2015-12-01

    The antipsychotic properties of haloperidol are primarily attributed to its ability to block dopamine D2 receptors. Histaminergic transmission modulates some of the behavioral effects of haloperidol. Hence, the present study investigated the contribution of central histaminergic transmission in the cataleptic and neuroleptic effect of haloperidol respectively, using bar test and conditioned avoidance response (CAR) in a two-way shuttle box. The studies revealed that haloperidol (0.50 or 1 mg/kg, i.p.) exhibited cataleptic behavior and inhibited conditioned avoidance response (CAR) in the doses 0.25 or 0.50 mg in rats. The rats, pretreated centrally (i.c.v.) with histamine precursor, L-histidine (1, 2.5 μg) or histamine neuronal inducer (H3 receptor antagonist), thioperamide (20, 50 μg/rat), showed an enhanced cataleptic effect with sub-maximal dose of haloperidol (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.). Similarly, the neuroleptic effect of haloperidol (0.25 mg/kg, i.p.) in CAR was also potentiated in the rats pretreated with L-histidine (2.5 μg) or thioperamide (50 μg/rat). Further, the cataleptic effect of haloperidol (1 mg/kg, i.p.) was attenuated in rats pretreated with the H1 receptor antagonist, chlorpheniramine (60, 80 μg/rat, i.c.v.) or H2 receptor antagonist, ranitidine (60 μg/rat, i.c.v.). However, the neuroleptic effect of haloperidol (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) was completely reversed by pretreatment with ranitidine (60 μg/rat, i.c.v.), and partially attenuated by chlorpheniramine (80 μg/rat, i.c.v.). These findings suggest the possible involvement of histaminergic transmission in the cataleptic and neuroleptic effects of haloperidol probably via H1 or H2 receptor stimulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Enhancement Of Motor Recovery Through Left Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Stimulation After Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Shahram Oveisgharan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Two previous studies, which investigated transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS use in motor recovery after acute ischemic stroke, did not show tDCS to be effective in this regard. We speculated that additional left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex ‎(DLPFC ‎stimulation may enhance post stroke motor recovery.  ‎ Methods: In the present randomized clinical trial, 20 acute ischemic stroke patients were recruited. Patients received real motor cortex (M1 stimulation in both arms of the trial. The two arms differed in terms of real vs. sham stimulation over the left DLPFC‎. Motor component of the Fugl-Meyer upper extremity assessment (FM and Action Research Arm Test (ARAT scores were used to assess primary outcomes, and non-linear mixed effects models were used for data analyses. Results: Primary outcome measures improved more and faster among the real stimulation group. During the first days of stimulations, sham group’s FM scores increased 1.2 scores per day, while real group’s scores increased 1.7 scores per day (P = 0.003. In the following days, FM improvement decelerated in both groups. Based on the derived models, a hypothetical stroke patient with baseline FM score of 15 improves to 32 in the sham stimulation group and to 41 in the real stimulation group within the first month after stroke. Models with ARAT scores yielded nearly similar results. Conclusion: The current study results showed that left DLPFC‎ stimulation in conjunction with M1 stimulation resulted in better motor recovery than M1 stimulation alone.

  12. Acute and chronic changes in brain activity with deep brain stimulation for refractory depression.

    Conen, Silke; Matthews, Julian C; Patel, Nikunj K; Anton-Rodriguez, José; Talbot, Peter S

    2018-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation is a potential option for patients with treatment-refractory depression. Deep brain stimulation benefits have been reported when targeting either the subgenual cingulate or ventral anterior capsule/nucleus accumbens. However, not all patients respond and optimum stimulation-site is uncertain. We compared deep brain stimulation of the subgenual cingulate and ventral anterior capsule/nucleus accumbens separately and combined in the same seven treatment-refractory depression patients, and investigated regional cerebral blood flow changes associated with acute and chronic deep brain stimulation. Deep brain stimulation-response was defined as reduction in Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale score from baseline of ≥50%, and remission as a Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale score ≤8. Changes in regional cerebral blood flow were assessed using [ 15 O]water positron emission tomography. Remitters had higher relative regional cerebral blood flow in the prefrontal cortex at baseline and all subsequent time-points compared to non-remitters and non-responders, with prefrontal cortex regional cerebral blood flow generally increasing with chronic deep brain stimulation. These effects were consistent regardless of stimulation-site. Overall, no significant regional cerebral blood flow changes were apparent when deep brain stimulation was acutely interrupted. Deep brain stimulation improved treatment-refractory depression severity in the majority of patients, with consistent changes in local and distant brain regions regardless of target stimulation. Remission of depression was reached in patients with higher baseline prefrontal regional cerebral blood flow. Because of the small sample size these results are preliminary and further evaluation is necessary to determine whether prefrontal cortex regional cerebral blood flow could be a predictive biomarker of treatment response.

  13. The effects of psychoactive drugs and neuroleptics on language in normal subjects and schizophrenic patients: a review.

    Salomé, F; Boyer, P; Fayol, M

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this survey is to present an overview of research into psychopharmacology as regards the effects of different psychoactive drugs and neuroleptics (NL) on language in normal subjects and schizophrenic patients. Eighteen studies that have investigated the effects of different drugs (alcohol, amphetamines, secobarbital, L-dopa, psilocybin, ketamine, fenfluramine) and neuroleptics (conventional and atypical) on language are reviewed. There are no studies concerning the effects of neuroleptics on language in healthy subjects. The results of the effects of other molecules indicate that language production can be increased (alcohol, amphetamine, secobarbital), rendered more complex (d-amphetamine), more focused (L-dopa) or more unfocused (psilocybin) and clearly impaired (ketamine). For schizophrenic patients, most studies show that conventional neuroleptic treatments, at a therapeutic dosage and in acute or chronic mode, reduce language disorders at all levels (clinic, linguistic, psycholinguistic). In conjunction with other molecules, the classical NL, when administered at a moderate dosage and in chronic mode, modify language in schizophrenia, either by improving the verbal flow and reducing pauses and positive thought disorder (NL + amphetamine) or by inducing an impairment in the language measurements (NL + fenfluramine). Clinical, methodological and theoretical considerations of results are debated in the framework of schizophrenic language disorders.

  14. Lithium stimulates the recovery of granulopoiesis following acute radiation injury.

    Gallicchio, V S; Chen, M G; Watts, T D; Gamba-Vitalo, C

    1983-07-01

    Lithium (Li) is a known stimulator of steady-state granulopoiesis, influencing both pluripotential (CFUS) and granulocyte-macrophage committed stem cell (CFUGM) populations. Li has therefore been suggested to be an effective agent to reduce the neutropenia that often is seen after either cytotoxic chemotherapy or radiotherapy protocols. In this report, we have examined bone marrow and spleen cells for their recovery patterns of CFUS, CFUGM, CFUE, BFUE and 59Fe-incorporation, along with the usual peripheral blood indices (packed red cell volume, WBC and differential) from mice administered Li after receiving 200 rad whole body irradiation. Li increased granulopoietic recovery as measured by significant elevations in both marrow and spleen derived CFUGM compared to those values obtained from radiation controls. Significant elevation in the WBC, consisting mainly of neutrophils, was also observed. Bone marrow and splenic derived erythroid stem cells (CFUE, BFUE) and % 59Fe-incorporation measured from peripheral blood, femur and spleen were all slightly reduced, but not to a significant degree to alter the packed red cell volume. The CFUS populations from both irradiated groups (control and Li-treated) were depressed when compared to normal non-irr controls and this degree of suppression was greater in the Li-treated group. These results document the ability of Li to stimulate the recovery of granulopoiesis after radiation-induced hematopoietic injury and suggest Li may be useful in ameliorating the neutropenia that can often develop after routine radiotherapy protocols.

  15. Lithium stimulates the recovery of granulopoiesis following acute radiation injury

    Gallicchio, V.S.; Chen, M.G.; Watts, T.D.; Gamba-Vitalo, C.

    1983-07-01

    Lithium (Li) is a known stimulator of steady-state granulopoiesis, influencing both pluripotential (CFUS) and granulocyte-macrophage committed stem cell (CFUGM) populations. Li has therefore been suggested to be an effective agent to reduce the neutropenia that often is seen after either cytotoxic chemotherapy or radiotherapy protocols. In this report, bone marrow and spleen cells have been examined for their recovery patterns of CFUS, CFUGM, CFUE, BFUE and 59Fe-incorporation, along with the usual peripheral blood indices (packed red cell volume, WBC and differential) from mice administered Li after receiving 200 rad whole body irradiation. Li increased granulopoietic recovery as measured by significant elevations in both marrow and spleen derived CFUGM compared to those values obtained from radiation controls. Significant elevation in the WBC, consisting mainly of neutrophils, was also observed. Bone marrow and splenic derived erythroid stem cells (CFUE, BFUE) and % 59Fe-incorporation measured from peripheral blood, femur and spleen were all slightly reduced, but not to a significant degree to alter the packed red cell volume. The CFUS populations from both irradiated groups (control and Li-treated) were depressed when compared to normal non-irradiated controls and this degree of suppression was greater in the Li-treated group. These results document the ability of Li to stimulate the recovery of granulopoiesis after radiation-induced hematopoietic injury and suggest Li may be useful in ameliorating the neutropenia that can often develop after routine radiotherapy protocols.

  16. Electrical somatosensory stimulation followed by motor training of the paretic upper limb in acute stroke

    Ghaziani, Emma; Couppé, Christian; Henkel, Cecilie

    2017-01-01

    functioning is most pronounced during the first 4 weeks post stroke, there are few studies investigating the effect of rehabilitation during this critical time window. The purpose of this trial is to determine the effect of electrical somatosensory stimulation (ESS) initiated in the acute stroke phase...

  17. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor in the Treatment of Acute Radiation Syndrome: A Concise Review

    Hofer, Michal; Pospíšil, Milan; Komůrková, Denisa; Hoferová, Zuzana

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 4 (2014), s. 4770-4778 ISSN 1420-3049 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/0128 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : granulocyte colony-stimulating factor * radiation accident s * acute radiation syndrome Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.416, year: 2014

  18. Side effects in preventive maintenance therapy with neuroleptics with special emphasis on tardive dyskinesia.

    Logothetis, J; Paraschos, A; Frangos, E

    1981-01-01

    Neuroleptics induce hypersensitivity reactions, and toxic, systemic and extrapyramidal manifestations. The latter mainly include acute dystonic reactions, other early dyskinesias, akathisia, parkinsonism and TD. These drugs have been implicated for DA antagonism exerted by an adenylate cyclase inhibition. Prolonged blockade of DA receptors is considered as the motivation for a counterbalancing mechanism inducing the DA supersensitivity from which TD results. Recent reports suggest cholinergic and GABA ergic insufficiency as secondary participants. The increasing frequency of TD calls for prevention by modifying treatment practices and searching for effective measures to combat the symptoms.

  19. Novel remodeling of the mouse heart mitochondrial proteome in response to acute insulin stimulation

    Pedersen, Brian A; Yazdi, Puya G; Taylor, Jared F; Khattab, Omar S; Chen, Yu-Han; Chen, Yumay; Wang, Ping H

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the pathophysiology of diabetic cardiomyopathy. The aim of this study was to investigate the acute changes in the mitochondrial proteome in response to insulin stimulation. Cardiac mitochondria from C57BL/6 mice after insulin stimulation were analyzed using two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis. MALDI-TOF MS/MS was utilized to identify differences. Two enzymes involved in metabolism and four structural proteins were identified. Succinyl-CoA ligase [ADP forming] subunit beta was identified as one of the differentially regulated proteins. Upon insulin stimulation, a relatively more acidic isoform of this protein was increased by 53% and its functional activity was decreased by ∼32%. This proteomic remodeling in response to insulin stimulation may play an important role in the normal and diabetic heart. PMID:26610654

  20. [Efficacy observation of dysphagia after acute stroke treated with acupuncture and functional electric stimulation].

    Chang, Ling; He, Peng-Lan; Zhou, Zhen-Zhong; Li, Yan-Hua

    2014-08-01

    To observe the impacts on the recovery of swallowing function in patients of dysphagia after acute stroke treated with acupuncture and functional electric stimulation. Seventy-four patients were randomized into an acupuncture plus electric stimulation group (38 cases) and an electric stimulation group (36 cases). The functional electric stimulator was used in the two groups. The electric pads were placed on the hyoid bone, the upper part of thyroid cartilage, the masseter muscle and the mandibular joint. The treatment lasted for 30 mm each time. In the acupuncture plus electric stimulation group, acupuncture was supplemented at motor area of Jiao's scalp acupuncture, lower 2/5 of sensory area, Baihui (CV 20), Lianquan (CV 23), Jinjin (EX-HN 12) and Yuye (EX-HN 13), 30 mm each time. The treatment was given once a day, 6 treatments for one session and there was 1 day at interval between the sessions, 4 sessions were required totally in the two groups. The dysphagia scale was adopted for efficacy evaluation before treatment and after 4 sessions of treatment in the two groups. The removal rate of nasal feeding tube was observed after treatment. The dysphagia score was increased apparently after treatment compared with that before treatment in the two groups (both P vs 6.73 +/- 1.36, P stroke and promotes the early removal of nasal feeding tube. The efficacy is better than that of the simple electric stimulation therapy.

  1. [Initial experiences with amisulpride, an in Germany novel, atypical neuroleptic drug in treatment of adolescents with psychiatric disorders].

    Göpel, C; Marcus, A

    2001-08-01

    In addition to conventional antipsychotic drugs, during the past decade an increasing number of atypical neuroleptics has been introduced in the treatment of juvenile schizophrenic and schizoaffective disorders. In 1999 Germany legalized the benzamide amisulpride for the treatment of acute and chronic schizophrenic symptoms. Preliminary treatment results are reported here. Ten adolescent cases are presented with regard to the efficacy, side effects and dosage of amisulpride. Preliminary results on the use of amisulpride are promising. The rate of side effects is tolerable. Amisulprise seems to constitute a useful alternative in the treatment of juvenile schizophrenia for those who suffer from intolerable side effects of classical or atypical neuroleptics. Controlled studies are warranted to further clarify its efficacy and safety in the treatment of adolescents.

  2. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation: nonparallel antinociceptive effects on chronic clinical pain and acute experimental pain.

    Cheing, G L; Hui-Chan, C W

    1999-03-01

    To investigate to what extent a single 60-minute session of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) would modify chronic clinical pain, acute experimental pain, and the flexion reflex evoked in chronic low back pain patients. Thirty young subjects with chronic low back pain were randomly allocated to two groups, receiving either TENS or placebo stimulation to the lumbosacral region for 60 minutes. The flexion reflex was elicited by an electrical stimulation applied to the subject's right sole and recorded electromyographically from the biceps femoris and the tibialis anterior muscles. Subjective sensation of low back pain and the electrically induced pain were measured by two separate visual analog scales, termed VAS(LBP) and VAS(FR), respectively. Data obtained before, during, and 60 minutes after TENS and placebo stimulations were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. The VAS(LBP) score was significantly reduced to 63.1% of the prestimulation value after TENS (pTENS protocol had different degrees of antinociceptive influence on chronic and acute pain in chronic low back pain patients.

  3. Can preoperative electrical nociceptive stimulation predict acute pain after groin herniotomy?

    Aasvang, Eske Kvanner; Hansen, J.B.; Kehlet, H.

    2008-01-01

    Preoperative identification of patients at risk for high-intensity postoperative pain may be used to predict patients at risk for development of a persistent pain state and allocate patients to more intensive specific pain therapy. Preoperative pain threshold to electrocutaneus stimulation has...... repair. The correlation between the pain data for electrical stimulation was compared with the postoperative pain during the first week in 165 patients, whereof 3 were excluded. Preoperative electrical pain detection threshold and electrical pain tolerance threshold did not correlate to postoperative...... pain (rho = -0.13, P = .09, and rho = -1.2, P = .4, respectively. PERSPECTIVE: Although preoperative electrical nociceptive stimulation may predict patients at risk of high-intensity acute pain after other surgical procedures, this was not the case in groin hernia repair patients receiving concomitant...

  4. Acute changes in motor cortical excitability during slow oscillatory and constant anodal transcranial direct current stimulation

    Bergmann, Til Ole; Groppa, Sergiu; Seeger, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Transcranial oscillatory current stimulation has recently emerged as a noninvasive technique that can interact with ongoing endogenous rhythms of the human brain. Yet, there is still little knowledge on how time-varied exogenous currents acutely modulate cortical excitability. In ten healthy...... individuals we used on-line single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to search for systematic shifts in corticospinal excitability during anodal sleeplike 0.8-Hz slow oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation (so-tDCS). In separate sessions, we repeatedly applied 30-s trials (two blocks...... at 20 min) of either anodal so-tDCS or constant tDCS (c-tDCS) to the primary motor hand area during quiet wakefulness. Simultaneously and time-locked to different phase angles of the slow oscillation, motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) as an index of corticospinal excitability were obtained...

  5. Psychosocial stimulation interventions for children with severe acute malnutrition: a systematic review.

    Daniel, Allison I; Bandsma, Robert H; Lytvyn, Lyubov; Voskuijl, Wieger P; Potani, Isabel; van den Heuvel, Meta

    2017-06-01

    The WHO Guidelines for the inpatient treatment of severely malnourished children include a recommendation to provide sensory stimulation or play therapy for children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM). This systematic review was performed to synthesize evidence around this recommendation. Specifically, the objective was to answer the question: "In children with severe acute malnutrition, does psychosocial stimulation improve child developmental, nutritional, or other outcomes?" A review protocol was registered on the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO 2016: CRD42016036403). MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, and PsycINFO were searched with terms related to SAM and psychosocial stimulation. Studies were selected if they applied a stimulation intervention in children with SAM and child developmental and nutritional outcomes were assessed. Findings were presented within a narrative synthesis and a summary of findings table. Quality of the evidence was evaluated using the Cochrane risk of bias tool and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Only two studies, both non-randomized controlled trials, met the selection criteria for this review. One was conducted in Jamaica (1975) with a follow-up period of 14 years; the other was done in Bangladesh (2002) with a six-month follow-up. At the individual study level, each of the included studies demonstrated significant differences in child development outcomes between intervention and control groups. Only the study conducted in Bangladesh demonstrated a clinically significant increase in weight-for-age z-scores in the intervention group compared to the control group. The evidence supporting the recommendation of psychosocial stimulation for children with SAM is not only sparse, but also of very low quality across important outcomes. High-quality trials are needed to determine the effects of psychosocial stimulation interventions on outcomes in children

  6. Psychosocial stimulation interventions for children with severe acute malnutrition: a systematic review

    Daniel, Allison I; Bandsma, Robert H; Lytvyn, Lyubov; Voskuijl, Wieger P; Potani, Isabel; van den Heuvel, Meta

    2017-01-01

    Background The WHO Guidelines for the inpatient treatment of severely malnourished children include a recommendation to provide sensory stimulation or play therapy for children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM). This systematic review was performed to synthesize evidence around this recommendation. Specifically, the objective was to answer the question: “In children with severe acute malnutrition, does psychosocial stimulation improve child developmental, nutritional, or other outcomes?” Methods A review protocol was registered on the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO 2016: CRD42016036403). MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, and PsycINFO were searched with terms related to SAM and psychosocial stimulation. Studies were selected if they applied a stimulation intervention in children with SAM and child developmental and nutritional outcomes were assessed. Findings were presented within a narrative synthesis and a summary of findings table. Quality of the evidence was evaluated using the Cochrane risk of bias tool and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Findings Only two studies, both non–randomized controlled trials, met the selection criteria for this review. One was conducted in Jamaica (1975) with a follow–up period of 14 years; the other was done in Bangladesh (2002) with a six–month follow–up. At the individual study level, each of the included studies demonstrated significant differences in child development outcomes between intervention and control groups. Only the study conducted in Bangladesh demonstrated a clinically significant increase in weight–for–age z–scores in the intervention group compared to the control group. Conclusions The evidence supporting the recommendation of psychosocial stimulation for children with SAM is not only sparse, but also of very low quality across important outcomes. High–quality trials are needed to determine the effects of

  7. A rare case of neuroleptic malignant syndrome presenting with serious hyperthermia treated with a non-invasive cooling device: a case report

    Storm Christian

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction A rare side effect of antipsychotic medication is neuroleptic malignant syndrome, mainly characterized by hyperthermia, altered mental state, haemodynamic dysregulation, elevated serum creatine kinase and rigor. There may be multi-organ dysfunction including renal and hepatic failure as well as serious rhabdomyolysis, acute respiratory distress syndrome and disseminated intravascular coagulation. The prevalence of neuroleptic malignant syndrome is between 0.02% and 2.44% for patients taking neuroleptics and it is not necessary to fulfil all cardinal features characterizing the syndrome to be diagnosed with neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Because of other different life-threatening diseases matching the various clinical findings, the correct diagnosis can sometimes be hard to make. A special problem of intensive care treatment is the management of severe hyperthermia. Lowering of body temperature, however, may be a major clinical problem because hyperthermia in neuroleptic malignant syndrome is typically unresponsive to antipyretic agents while manual cooling proves difficult due to peripheral vasoconstriction. Case presentation A 22-year-old Caucasian man was admitted unconscious with a body temperature of 42°C, elevated serum creatine phosphokinase, tachycardia and hypotonic blood pressure. In addition to intensive care standard therapy for coma and shock, a non-invasive cooling device (Arctic Sun 2000®, Medivance Inc., USA, originally designed to induce mild therapeutic hypothermia in patients after cardiopulmonary resuscitation, was used to lower body temperature. After successful treatment it became possible to obtain information from the patient about his recent ambulant treatment with Olanzapin (Zyprexa® for schizophrenia. Conclusion Numerous case reports have been published about patients who developed neuroleptic malignant syndrome due to Olanzapin (Zyprexa® medication. Frequently hyperthermia has been observed

  8. [Identification and evaluation of the neuroleptic activity of phenotropil].

    Akhapkina, V I; Akhapkin, R V

    2013-01-01

    The neuroleptic (antipsychotic) activity of phenotropil was studied in an experimental animal model. Phenotropil had a marked neuroleptic activity in models of positive (apomorphine-induced verticalization test) and negative (5-HTP-induced hyperkinesis test) symptoms of psychoses as well as in the m-cholinergic pathway hyperactivation (arecoline-induced tremor test). The compound markedly antagonized haloperidol catalepsy. Used in a single dose or as a course treatment, phenotropil did not provoke aggression nor intensify it. In contrast to typical and atypical antipsychotics, phenotropil had no sedative action and other adverse effects. It exhibited a positive effect on exploratory behavior and motor activity, had anxiolytic and antidepressant action.

  9. Atypical Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome Associated with Use of Clozapine

    Quevedo-Florez Leonardo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS is a medical emergency of infrequent presentation in the emergency department, which is associated with the use of psychiatric drugs, such as typical and atypical antipsychotics. Our case addresses a 55-year-old patient diagnosed with undifferentiated schizophrenia for 10 years, who had been receiving clozapine and clonazepam as part of their treatment. This patient presents the symptoms of Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome without fever, which improves with treatment especially with the withdrawal of clozapine. In the absence of fever and clinical improvement, the patient is considered to have an atypical presentation of this disease.

  10. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor in the Treatment of Acute Radiation Syndrome: A Concise Review

    Michal Hofer

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article concisely summarizes data on the action of one of the principal and best known growth factors, the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF, in a mammalian organism exposed to radiation doses inducing acute radiation syndrome. Highlighted are the topics of its real or anticipated use in radiation accident victims, the timing of its administration, the possibilities of combining G-CSF with other drugs, the ability of other agents to stimulate endogenous G-CSF production, as well as of the capability of this growth factor to ameliorate not only the bone marrow radiation syndrome but also the gastrointestinal radiation syndrome. G-CSF is one of the pivotal drugs in the treatment of radiation accident victims and its employment in this indication can be expected to remain or even grow in the future.

  11. The antiarrhythmic effect of vagal stimulation after acute coronary occlusion: Role of the heart rate.

    Manati, Waheed; Pineau, Julien; Doñate Puertas, Rosa; Morel, Elodie; Quadiri, Timour; Bui-Xuan, Bernard; Chevalier, Philippe

    2018-01-03

    Strong evidence suggests a causal link between autonomic disturbances and ventricular arrhythmias. However, the mechanisms underlying the antiarrhythmic effect of vagal stimulation are poorly understood. The vagal antiarrhythmic effect might be modulated by a decrease in heart rate. the proximal anterior interventricular artery was occluded in 16 pigs by clamping under general anaesthesia. Group 1: heart rates remained spontaneous (n = 6; 12 occlusions); Group 2: heart rates were fixed at 190 beats per minute (bpm) with atrial electrical stimulation (n = 10; 20 occlusions). Each pig received two occlusions, 30 min apart, one without and one with vagal stimulation (10 Hz, 2 ms, 5-20 mA). The antiarrhythmic effect of vagal activation was defined as the time to the appearance of ventricular fibrillation (VF) after occlusion. In Group 1, vagal stimulation triggered a significant decrease in basal heart rate (132 ± 4 vs. 110 ± 17 bpm, p coronary occlusion (1102 ± 85 vs. 925 ± 41 s, p acute coronary occlusion.

  12. Neuroleptic-induced deficit syndrome in bipolar disorder with psychosis

    Ueda S

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Satoshi Ueda,1 Takeshi Sakayori,1 Ataru Omori,2 Hajime Fukuta,3 Takashi Kobayashi,3 Kousuke Ishizaka,1 Tomoyuki Saijo,4 Yoshiro Okubo1 1Department of Neuropsychiatry, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan; 2Tamachuo Hospital, Tokyo, Japan; 3Kurumegaoka Hospital, Tokyo, Japan; 4Saijo Clinic, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Neuroleptics can induce not only physical adverse effects but also mental effects that produce deficit status in thought, affect, cognition, and behavior. This condition is known as neuroleptic-induced deficit syndrome (NIDS, which includes apathy, lack of initiative, anhedonia, indifference, blunted affect, and reduced insight into disease. Although this old concept now appears almost forgotten, neuroleptics, whether typical or atypical, can make depression or bipolar disorder resemble other more refractory conditions, readily leading to mistaken diagnosis and inappropriate treatment. The authors describe three cases of NIDS superimposed on depressive phase in bipolar disorder with psychosis, where the attending psychiatrist’s failure to recognize NIDS prevented patients from receiving effective treatment and achieving remission. All cases achieved remission after reduction of neuroleptics and intensive therapy, including electroconvulsive therapy, for bipolar depression. The concept of NIDS was originally introduced for schizophrenia, and it has rarely been highlighted in other diseases. In recent years, however, atypical antipsychotics are being more often administered to patients with bipolar disorder. Psychiatrists, therefore, should also remember and exercise caution regarding NIDS in the pharmacotherapy of bipolar disorder with and without psychosis. The authors believe that the concept of NIDS needs to be reappraised in current psychiatry. Keywords: neuroleptic-induced deficit syndrome (NIDS, bipolar disorder, psychosis, atypical antipsychotics, electroconvulsive therapy

  13. Diagnostic transcranial magnetic stimulation in children with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy

    V. B. Voitenkov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective of our work was to evaluate MEPs characteristics in children with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and evaluate usefulness of TMS as an additional diagnostic method in this disorder.Methods. 20 healthy children (7–14 years old, average 12 years, 7 females, 13 males without any signs of neurological disorders were enrolled as controls and 37 patients (8–13 years old, average 11 years, 19 females, 18 males with AIDP were enrolled as the main group. EMG and TMS were performed on 3–7 day from the onset of the first symptoms. Cortical and lumbar MEP`s latencies, shapes and amplitudes and CMCT were averaged and analyzed.Results. Significant differences between children with AIDP and controls on latencies of both cortical and lumbar MEPs were registered. Cortical MEPs shapes were disperse in 100% of the cases, and lumbar MEPs were disperse in 57% of the cases. Amplitudes changes for both lumbar and cortical MEPs were not significant.Conclusions. Diagnostic transcranial magnetic stimulation on the early stage of the acute demyelinating polyneuropathy in children may be implemented as the additional tool. Main finding in this population is lengthening of the latency of cortical and lumbar motor evoked potentials. Disperse shape of the lumbar MEPs may also be used as the early sign of the acute demyelization of the peripheral nerves.

  14. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation reduces acute low back pain during emergency transport.

    Bertalanffy, Alexander; Kober, Alexander; Bertalanffy, Petra; Gustorff, Burkhard; Gore, Odette; Adel, Sharam; Hoerauf, Klaus

    2005-07-01

    Patients with acute low back pain may require emergency transport because of pain and immobilization. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a nonpharmaceutical therapy for patients with low back pain. To evaluate the efficacy of paramedic-administered TENS in patients with acute low back pain during emergency transport. This was a prospective, randomized study involving 74 patients transported to hospital. The patients were randomly assigned to two groups: group 1 (n = 36) was treated with true TENS, while group 2 (n = 36) was treated with sham TENS. The authors recorded pain and anxiety as the main outcome variables using a visual analog scale (VAS). The authors recorded a significant (p pain reduction (mean +/- standard deviation) during transport in group 1 (79.2 +/- 6.5 mm VAS to 48.9 +/- 8.2 mm VAS), whereas pain scores remained unchanged in group 2 (75.9 +/- 16.4 mm VAS and 77.1 +/- 11.2 mm VAS). Similarly, the scores for anxiety were significantly reduced (p TENS was found to be effective and rapid in reducing pain during emergency transport of patients with acute low back pain and should be considered due to its ease of use and lack of side effects in the study population.

  15. Prevalence of neuroleptic-induced movement disorders in chronic schizophrenia inpatients.

    Janno, Sven; Holi, Matti; Tuisku, Katinka; Wahlbeck, Kristian

    2004-01-01

    Since most of the world's schizophrenia patients are treated with conventional antipsychotics, the authors evaluated various methods for establishing the prevalence of neuroleptic-induced movement disorders in these patients. DSM-IV criteria and established score thresholds on a movement disorder rating scale were used to identify cases of neuroleptic-induced movement disorder in a representative Estonian patient sample of 99 chronic institutionalized schizophrenia patients, 18-65 years old, treated with conventional neuroleptics (79.8%) or clozapine (20.2%). Neuroleptic-induced movement disorders according to DSM-IV criteria were found in 61.6% of the group: 31.3% had neuroleptic-induced akathisia, 23.2% had neuroleptic-induced parkinsonism, and 32.3% had neuroleptic-induced tardive dyskinesia. Prevalence rates for akathisia and tardive dyskinesia were similar when either DSM-IV criteria or rating scale scores were used, but the prevalence rate for parkinsonism was much lower per DSM-IV criteria than according to rating scale score. Nearly two-thirds of chronic schizophrenia patients suffered from a neuroleptic-induced movement disorder. Globally, extrapyramidal adverse effects still impose a huge burden on the majority of neuroleptic-treated individuals with schizophrenia. The discrepancy between the standard identification methods for neuroleptic-induced movement disorder indicate the need for further research.

  16. Effect of antidepressants and neuroleptics on phosphoinositide turnover in human platelets

    Pandey, S.C.; Davis, J.M.; Schwertz, D.; Pandey, G.N. (Illinois State Psychiatric Inst., Chicago (United States))

    1990-02-26

    The authors previously reported that tricyclic antidepressants and iprindole inhibit thrombin-stimulated formation of inositol-1, 4 bisphosphate (IP2) and inositol-1,4,5 triphosphate (IP3) but do not cause any change in inositol-1 phosphate (IP1). In order to examine if this decrease in IP2 and IP3 formation by antidepressants is related to the inhibition of the enzyme phospholipase C (PLC), the authors determined the effects of antidepressants and neuroleptics on the levels of 3(H) phosphotidylinositol (PI), 3(H) PI-4 phosphate (PIP), 3(H) PI-4, 5 bisphosphate (PIP2) in human platelets. The implications of the findings and their relevance to the mode of action of antidepressants are discussed.

  17. Acute Modulation of Brain Connectivity in Parkinson Disease after Automatic Mechanical Peripheral Stimulation: A Pilot Study.

    Quattrocchi, Carlo Cosimo; de Pandis, Maria Francesca; Piervincenzi, Claudia; Galli, Manuela; Melgari, Jean Marc; Salomone, Gaetano; Sale, Patrizio; Mallio, Carlo Augusto; Carducci, Filippo; Stocchi, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    The present study shows the results of a double-blind sham-controlled pilot trial to test whether measurable stimulus-specific functional connectivity changes exist after Automatic Mechanical Peripheral Stimulation (AMPS) in patients with idiopathic Parkinson Disease. Eleven patients (6 women and 5 men) with idiopathic Parkinson Disease underwent brain fMRI immediately before and after sham or effective AMPS. Resting state Functional Connectivity (RSFC) was assessed using the seed-ROI based analysis. Seed ROIs were positioned on basal ganglia, on primary sensory-motor cortices, on the supplementary motor areas and on the cerebellum. Individual differences for pre- and post-effective AMPS and pre- and post-sham condition were obtained and first entered in respective one-sample t-test analyses, to evaluate the mean effect of condition. Effective AMPS, but not sham stimulation, induced increase of RSFC of the sensory motor cortex, nucleus striatum and cerebellum. Secondly, individual differences for both conditions were entered into paired group t-test analysis to rule out sub-threshold effects of sham stimulation, which showed stronger connectivity of the striatum nucleus with the right lateral occipital cortex and the cuneal cortex (max Z score 3.12) and with the right anterior temporal lobe (max Z score 3.42) and of the cerebellum with the right lateral occipital cortex and the right cerebellar cortex (max Z score 3.79). Our results suggest that effective AMPS acutely increases RSFC of brain regions involved in visuo-spatial and sensory-motor integration. This study provides Class II evidence that automatic mechanical peripheral stimulation is effective in modulating brain functional connectivity of patients with Parkinson Disease at rest. Clinical Trials.gov NCT01815281.

  18. Acute Modulation of Brain Connectivity in Parkinson Disease after Automatic Mechanical Peripheral Stimulation: A Pilot Study

    Piervincenzi, Claudia; Galli, Manuela; Melgari, Jean Marc; Salomone, Gaetano; Sale, Patrizio; Mallio, Carlo Augusto; Carducci, Filippo; Stocchi, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study shows the results of a double-blind sham-controlled pilot trial to test whether measurable stimulus-specific functional connectivity changes exist after Automatic Mechanical Peripheral Stimulation (AMPS) in patients with idiopathic Parkinson Disease. Methods Eleven patients (6 women and 5 men) with idiopathic Parkinson Disease underwent brain fMRI immediately before and after sham or effective AMPS. Resting state Functional Connectivity (RSFC) was assessed using the seed-ROI based analysis. Seed ROIs were positioned on basal ganglia, on primary sensory-motor cortices, on the supplementary motor areas and on the cerebellum. Individual differences for pre- and post-effective AMPS and pre- and post-sham condition were obtained and first entered in respective one-sample t-test analyses, to evaluate the mean effect of condition. Results Effective AMPS, but not sham stimulation, induced increase of RSFC of the sensory motor cortex, nucleus striatum and cerebellum. Secondly, individual differences for both conditions were entered into paired group t-test analysis to rule out sub-threshold effects of sham stimulation, which showed stronger connectivity of the striatum nucleus with the right lateral occipital cortex and the cuneal cortex (max Z score 3.12) and with the right anterior temporal lobe (max Z score 3.42) and of the cerebellum with the right lateral occipital cortex and the right cerebellar cortex (max Z score 3.79). Conclusions Our results suggest that effective AMPS acutely increases RSFC of brain regions involved in visuo-spatial and sensory-motor integration. Classification of Evidence This study provides Class II evidence that automatic mechanical peripheral stimulation is effective in modulating brain functional connectivity of patients with Parkinson Disease at rest. Trial Registration Clinical Trials.gov NCT01815281 PMID:26469868

  19. Value of apparent diffusion coefficient calculation before and after gustatory stimulation in the diagnosis of acute or chronic parotitis

    Ries, T.; Arndt, C.; Regier, M.; Cramer, M.C.; Adam, G.; Habermann, C.R. [Diagnostic Center, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Graessner, J. [Medical Solutions Hamburg, Siemens AG, Hamburg (Germany); Reitmeier, F.; Jaehne, M. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Center of Head Care and Dermatology, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Hamburg (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the value of diffusion-weighted (DW) echo-planar imaging (EPI) for quantifying physiological changes of the parotid gland before and after gustatory stimulation in patients suffering from acute or chronic recurrent inflammation in comparison with healthy volunteers. Using a DW-EPI sequence at 1.5 T, parotid glands of 19 consecutive patients with acute (n = 14) and chronic (n=) inflammation of parotid glands and 52 healthy volunteers were examined. Magnetic-resonance (MR) images were obtained before and after gustatory stimulation with 5 cc of lemon juice. In volunteers mean ADC values of 1.14 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s before and 1.2 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s after gustatory stimulation were observed. In acute inflammation ADC values were higher before [1.22 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s (p = 0.006)] and after stimulation [1.32 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s (p<0.001)]. Before stimulation ADC differences between chronic inflammation (1.05 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) and healthy volunteers (p = 0.04) as well as between acute and chronic inflammation (p=0.005) were statistically significant. No differences were detected after stimulation between chronic inflammation (1.2 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) and healthy volunteers (p=0.94) and between acute and chronic inflammation (p=0.15), respectively. DW-EPI seems to display the physiological changes of the parotid gland in patients suffering from acute or chronic inflammation and might be useful for discriminating healthy from affected glands. (orig.)

  20. Catatonia versus neuroleptic malignant syndrome: the diagnostic dilemma and treatment.

    Sahoo, Manoj Kumar; Agarwal, Sanjay; Biswas, Harshita

    2014-01-01

    Catatonia is a syndrome, comprised of symptoms such as motor immobility, excessive motor activity, extreme negativism, and stereotyped movements. Neuroleptic is able to induce catatonia like symptoms, that is, the neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS). In NMS, patients typically show symptoms such as an altered mental state, muscle rigidity, tremor, tachycardia, hyperpyrexia, leukocytosis, and elevated serum creatine phosphorous kinase. Several researchers have reported studies on catatonia and the association between catatonia and NMS, but none were from this part of the eastern India. In our case, we observed overlapping symptoms of catatonia and NMS; we wish to present a case of this diagnostic dilemma in a patient with catatonia, where a detailed history, investigation, and symptom management added as a great contribution to the patient's rapid improvement.

  1. Catatonia versus neuroleptic malignant syndrome: the diagnostic dilemma and treatment

    Manoj Kumar Sahoo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Catatonia is a syndrome, comprised of symptoms such as motor immobility, excessive motor activity, extreme negativism, and stereotyped movements. Neuroleptic is able to induce catatonia like symptoms, that is, the neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS. In NMS, patients typically show symptoms such as an altered mental state, muscle rigidity, tremor, tachycardia, hyperpyrexia, leukocytosis, and elevated serum creatine phosphorous kinase. Several researchers have reported studies on catatonia and the association between catatonia and NMS, but none were from this part of the eastern India. In our case, we observed overlapping symptoms of catatonia and NMS; we wish to present a case of this diagnostic dilemma in a patient with catatonia, where a detailed history, investigation, and symptom management added as a great contribution to the patient′s rapid improvement.

  2. Measuring neuroleptic-induced akathisia by three-channel actometry.

    Tuisku, K; Lauerma, H; Holi, M; Markkula, J; Rimon, R

    1999-11-30

    Three-channel actometry was used to study neuroleptic-induced akathisia (NIA), a common and often serious disorder in association of traditional neuroleptic therapy. The aim was to explore the diagnostic possibilities of actometry in NIA and to examine in detail the motor phenomenology of the disorder in detail. The actometers were attached to the ankles and waists of ten patients, suffering from NIA, and to ten matched healthy controls. Five of the patients were changed to olanzapine treatment, and these patients were re-examined during the no-NIA condition. NIA was associated with manyfold movement activity during controlled rest (sitting) but not with increased daily overall motor activity. Movement frequencies in NIA seemed to be pathognomonic. Actometry is promising for investigation and clinical assessment of NIA. Olanzapine proved to be an adequate treatment choice for NIA patients.

  3. Acute effect of Vagus nerve stimulation parameters on cardiac chronotropic, inotropic, and dromotropic responses

    Ojeda, David; Le Rolle, Virginie; Romero-Ugalde, Hector M.; Gallet, Clément; Bonnet, Jean-Luc; Henry, Christine; Bel, Alain; Mabo, Philippe; Carrault, Guy; Hernández, Alfredo I.

    2017-11-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is an established therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy and depression, and is considered as a potential therapy for other pathologies, including Heart Failure (HF) or inflammatory diseases. In the case of HF, several experimental studies on animals have shown an improvement in the cardiac function and a reverse remodeling of the cardiac cavity when VNS is applied. However, recent clinical trials have not been able to reproduce the same response in humans. One of the hypothesis to explain this lack of response is related to the way in which stimulation parameters are defined. The combined effect of VNS parameters is still poorly-known, especially in the case of VNS synchronously delivered with cardiac activity. In this paper, we propose a methodology to analyze the acute cardiovascular effects of VNS parameters individually, as well as their interactive effects. A Latin hypercube sampling method was applied to design a uniform experimental plan. Data gathered from this experimental plan was used to produce a Gaussian process regression (GPR) model in order to estimate unobserved VNS sequences. Finally, a Morris screening sensitivity analysis method was applied to each obtained GPR model. Results highlight dominant effects of pulse current, pulse width and number of pulses over frequency and delay and, more importantly, the degree of interactions between these parameters on the most important acute cardiovascular responses. In particular, high interacting effects between current and pulse width were found. Similar sensitivity profiles were observed for chronotropic, dromotropic and inotropic effects. These findings are of primary importance for the future development of closed-loop, personalized neuromodulator technologies.

  4. Glucose-stimulated calcium dynamics in islets of Langerhans in acute mouse pancreas tissue slices.

    Andraž Stožer

    Full Text Available In endocrine cells within islets of Langerhans calcium ions couple cell stimulation to hormone secretion. Since the advent of modern fluorimetry, numerous in vitro studies employing primarily isolated mouse islets have investigated the effects of various secretagogues on cytoplasmic calcium, predominantly in insulin-secreting beta cells. Due to technical limitations, insights of these studies are inherently limited to a rather small subpopulation of outermost cells. The results also seem to depend on various factors, like culture conditions and duration, and are not always easily reconcilable with findings in vivo. The main controversies regard the types of calcium oscillations, presence of calcium waves, and the level of synchronized activity. Here, we set out to combine the in situ acute mouse pancreas tissue slice preparation with noninvasive fluorescent calcium labeling and subsequent confocal laser scanning microscopy to shed new light on the existing controversies utilizing an innovative approach enabling the characterization of responses in many cells from all layers of islets. Our experiments reproducibly showed stable fast calcium oscillations on a sustained plateau rather than slow oscillations as the predominant type of response in acute tissue slices, and that calcium waves are the mechanistic substrate for synchronization of oscillations. We also found indirect evidence that even a large amplitude calcium signal was not sufficient and that metabolic activation was necessary to ensure cell synchronization upon stimulation with glucose. Our novel method helped resolve existing controversies and showed the potential to help answer important physiological questions, making it one of the methods of choice for the foreseeable future.

  5. Muscarinic contribution to the acute cortical effects of vagus nerve stimulation

    Nichols, Justin A.

    2011-12-01

    Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve (VNS) has been used to treat more than 60,000 patients with drug-resistant epilepsy and is under investigation as a treatment for several other neurological disorders and conditions. Among these, VNS increases memory performance and enhances recovery of motor and cognitive function in animal models of traumatic brain injury. Recent research indicates that pairing brief VNS with tones multiple-times a day for several weeks induces long-term, input specific cortical plasticity, which can be used to re-normalize the pathological cortical reorganization and eliminate a behavioral correlate of chronic tinnitus in noise exposed rats. Despite the therapeutic potential, the mechanisms of action of VNS remain speculative. In chapter 2 of this dissertation, the acute effects of VNS on cortical synchrony, excitability, and temporal processing are examined. In anesthetized rats implanted with multi-electrode arrays, VNS increased and decorrelated spontaneous multi-unit activity, and suppressed entrainment to repetitive noise burst stimulation at 6 to 8 Hz, but not after systemic administration of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine. Chapter 3 focuses on VNS-tone pairing induced cortical plasticity. Pairing VNS with a tone one hundred times in anesthetized rats resulted in frequency specific plasticity in 31% of the auditory cortex sites. Half of these sites exhibited a frequency specific increase in firing rate and half exhibited a frequency specific decrease. Muscarinic receptor blockade with scopolamine almost entirely prevented the frequency specific increases, but not decreases. Collectively, these experiments demonstrate the capacity for VNS to not only acutely influence cortical synchrony, and excitability, but to also influence temporal and spectral tuning via muscarinic receptor activation. These results strengthen the hypothesis that acetylcholine and muscarinic receptors are involved in the mechanisms of action of VNS and

  6. Polysaccharide extract of Mimosa tenuiflora stem barks stimulates acute inflammatory response via nitric oxide

    Kaira Emanuella Sales da Silva-Leite

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mimosa tenuiflora (Mimosaceae or “jurema-preta” is well distributed in the northeast Brazil, being popularly used to treat skin lesions, burns and inflammation. The healing effect of the alcoholic extract prepared with its barks corroborates the popular use. This study aimed to evaluate the inflammatory response of polysaccharides extracted from M. tenuiflora barks (EP-Mt by methanol/NaOH and ethanol precipitation. Inflammatory activity was assessed in rat models of acute inflammation (paw edema and peritonitis, by the following parameters: edema, vascular permeability, leukocyte migration, myeloperoxidase activity and pharmacological modulation of nitric oxide and prostaglandins. EP-Mt presented 3.8% yield, 41% carbohydrate and 0.34% protein. EP-Mt (0.01, 0.1, 1.0 mg kg-1 injected by subcutaneous route elicited paw edema that lasted from 30-420 min, with maximal effect at 1 mg kg-1 (40x vs. saline, and was inhibited by L-NAME (52% and dexamethasone (26%. EP-Mt (1 mg kg-1, via intraperitoneal stimulated leukocytes migration (2.2x, mainly neutrophils (6.5x and MPO activity (96%. The leukocyte migration elicited by EP-Mt was inhibited by dexamethasone (39% and L-NAME (38%. EP-Mt containing high carbohydrate content induces acute inflammation via nitric oxide, which open perspectives of application in pathological conditions of immunosuppression.

  7. Does granulocyte colony-stimulating factor exacerbate radiation-induced acute lung injury in rats?

    Miura, Gouji; Awaya, Hitomi; Matsumoto, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2000-01-01

    Radiation pneumonitis (RP) frequently occurs as a complication of thoracic irradiation. However, the mechanism of RP is not well known. Activated neutrophils are a possible pathogenesis of RP. Neutrophil activation induced by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may exacerbate RP. We studied the effects of recombinant human G-CSF on acute lung injury induced by thoracic irradiation using rats. Animals were divided into three groups: sham irradiation with saline control, irradiation alone, and irradiation with G-CSF. Actual irradiation was given as a single fraction of 16 Gy delivered to the right hemithorax. G-CSF at a dose of 12 μg/body was administered subcutaneously once a day from 14 to 18 days after actual irradiation. Lung injury was evaluated 21 days after irradiation by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid findings and the lung wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio. Neutrophil and lymphocyte counts in BAL fluid and the W/D ratio were significantly increased in the irradiation alone and the irradiation with G-CSF groups compared with those of the sham irradiation+saline control group. However, there was no significant difference observed between the irradiation alone and irradiation with G-CSF groups. In conclusion, this study suggests that postradiation administration of G-CSF does not exacerbate acute lung injury induced by thoracic irradiation in rats. (author)

  8. Acute Exercise Stimulates Carnitine Biosynthesis and OCTN2 Expression in Mouse Kidney

    Tom L. Broderick

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Carnitine is essential for the transport of long-chain FAs (FA into the mitochondria for energy production. During acute exercise, the increased demand for FAs results in a state of free carnitine deficiency in plasma. The role of kidney in carnitine homeostasis after exercise is not known. Methods: Swiss Webster mice were sacrificed immediately after a 1-hour moderate intensity treadmill run, and at 4-hours and 8-hours into recovery. Non-exercising mice served as controls. Plasma was analyzed for carnitine using acetyltransferase and [14C] acetyl-CoA. Kidney was removed for gene and protein expression of butyrobetaine hydroxylase (γ-BBH, organic cation transporter (OCTN2, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARα, a regulator of fatty acid oxidation activated by FAs. Results: Acute exercise caused a decrease in plasma free carnitine levels. Rapid return of free carnitine to control levels during recovery was associated with increased γ-BBH expression. Both mRNA and protein levels of OCTN2 were detected in kidney after exercise and during recovery, suggesting renal transport mechanisms were stimulated. These changes were accompanied with a reciprocal increase in PPARα protein expression. Conclusions: Our results show that the decrease in free carnitine after exercise rapidly activates carnitine biosynthesis and renal transport mechanism in kidney to establish carnitine homeostasis.

  9. Effect of noninvasive vagus nerve stimulation on acute migraine: an open-label pilot study.

    Goadsby, P J; Grosberg, B M; Mauskop, A; Cady, R; Simmons, K A

    2014-10-01

    We sought to assess a novel, noninvasive, portable vagal nerve stimulator (nVNS) for acute treatment of migraine. Participants with migraine with or without aura were eligible for an open-label, single-arm, multiple-attack study. Up to four migraine attacks were treated with two 90-second doses, at 15-minute intervals delivered to the right cervical branch of the vagus nerve within a six-week time period. Subjects were asked to self-treat at moderate or severe pain, or after 20 minutes of mild pain. Of 30 enrolled patients (25 females, five males, median age 39), two treated no attacks, and one treated aura only, leaving a Full Analysis Set of 27 treating 80 attacks with pain. An adverse event was reported in 13 patients, notably: neck twitching (n = 1), raspy voice (n = 1) and redness at the device site (n = 1). No unanticipated, serious or severe adverse events were reported. The pain-free rate at two hours was four of 19 (21%) for the first treated attack with a moderate or severe headache at baseline. For all moderate or severe attacks at baseline, the pain-free rate was 12/54 (22%). nVNS may be an effective and well-tolerated acute treatment for migraine in certain patients. © International Headache Society 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  10. Does granulocyte colony-stimulating factor exacerbate radiation-induced acute lung injury in rats?

    Miura, Gouji; Awaya, Hitomi; Matsumoto, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Matsunaga, Naofumi [Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-08-01

    Radiation pneumonitis (RP) frequently occurs as a complication of thoracic irradiation. However, the mechanism of RP is not well known. Activated neutrophils are a possible pathogenesis of RP. Neutrophil activation induced by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may exacerbate RP. We studied the effects of recombinant human G-CSF on acute lung injury induced by thoracic irradiation using rats. Animals were divided into three groups: sham irradiation with saline control, irradiation alone, and irradiation with G-CSF. Actual irradiation was given as a single fraction of 16 Gy delivered to the right hemithorax. G-CSF at a dose of 12 {mu}g/body was administered subcutaneously once a day from 14 to 18 days after actual irradiation. Lung injury was evaluated 21 days after irradiation by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid findings and the lung wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio. Neutrophil and lymphocyte counts in BAL fluid and the W/D ratio were significantly increased in the irradiation alone and the irradiation with G-CSF groups compared with those of the sham irradiation+saline control group. However, there was no significant difference observed between the irradiation alone and irradiation with G-CSF groups. In conclusion, this study suggests that postradiation administration of G-CSF does not exacerbate acute lung injury induced by thoracic irradiation in rats. (author)

  11. Acute rCBF changes in depressed patients receiving repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS)

    Haindl, W.; Loo, C.; Mitchell, P.; Sachdev, P.; Zheng, X.; Som, S.; Walker, B.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Electroconvulsant therapy (ECT) is very effective in treatment resistant severe depression with response rates of 70-90%. However, ECT has major limitations including the need for anaesthesia, memory difficulties and public apprehension about its use. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been used as a diagnostic technique in neurology with recent reports of potential benefit in depressed patients. In this study, 5 patients (3 females, 2 males aged 36-66 years, mean 48.6 years) with major depression underwent SPET brain scanning using a Picker 3000 triple-headed camera. Each patient had a baseline rCBF scan with 500 MBq of 99 Tc m HMPAO injected intravenously during sham rTMS. On the following day, each patient received another 500 MBq of 99 Tc m HMPAo during rTMS to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex using a Magstim Super Rapid magnetic stimulator with a 70-mm figure eight coil. The stimulator parameters were 15 Hz, 90% of resting motor threshold, 1 s on 3 s off for 30 trains prior to injection and 15-30 trains following injection. Each patient continued to receive their usual medication during this period. The reconstructed SPET data sets were normalized to the global mean, registered to the Talairach template and analysed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM). Compared with the baseline group, the rTMS group showed a significant perfusion increase in the pre-frontal cortices, especially on the left, and also in the anterior left temporal lobe (P < 0.05). Frontal lobe perfusion reduction is a common finding in depression. This study demonstrates the ability of rTMS to acutely increase frontal lobe perfusion, and therefore a possible mechanism for its therapeutic use as an adjunct to pharmacological therapy or as an alternative to ECT in depression

  12. Stem cell mobilization by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for myocardial recovery after acute myocardial infarction: a meta-analysis

    Zohlnhofer, D.; Dibra, A.; Koppara, T.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the effect of stem cell mobilization by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on myocardial regeneration on the basis of a synthesis of the data generated by randomized, controlled clinical trials of G-CSF after acute...

  13. Regulation of activity-regulated cytoskeleton protein (Arc) mRNA after acute and chronic electroconvulsive stimulation in the rat

    Larsen, M H; Olesen, M; Woldbye, D P D

    2005-01-01

    The temporal profile of Arc gene expression after acute and chronic electroconvulsive stimulations (ECS) was studied using semi-quantitative in situ hybridisation in the rat cortex. A single ECS strongly and temporarily increased Arc mRNA levels in dentate granular cells with maximal induction seen...

  14. Phospholemman is not required for the acute stimulation of Na+-K+-ATPase α2-activity during skeletal muscle fatigue

    Manoharan, Palanikumar; Radzyukevich, Tatiana L.; Hakim Javadi, Hesamedin; Stiner, Cory A.; Landero Figueroa, Julio A.; Lingrel, Jerry B

    2015-01-01

    The Na+-K+-ATPase α2-isoform in skeletal muscle is rapidly stimulated during muscle use and plays a critical role in fatigue resistance. The acute mechanisms that stimulate α2-activity are not completely known. This study examines whether phosphorylation of phospholemman (PLM/FXYD1), a regulatory subunit of Na+-K+-ATPase, plays a role in the acute stimulation of α2 in working muscles. Mice lacking PLM (PLM KO) have a normal content of the α2-subunit and show normal exercise capacity, in contrast to the greatly reduced exercise capacity of mice that lack α2 in the skeletal muscles. Nerve-evoked contractions in vivo did not induce a change in total PLM or PLM phosphorylated at Ser63 or Ser68, in either WT or PLM KO. Isolated muscles of PLM KO mice maintain contraction and resist fatigue as well as wild type (WT). Rb+ transport by the α2-Na+-K+-ATPase is stimulated to the same extent in contracting WT and contracting PLM KO muscles. Phosphorylation of sarcolemmal membranes prepared from WT but not PLM KO skeletal muscles stimulates the activity of both α1 and α2 in a PLM-dependent manner. The stimulation occurs by an increase in Na+ affinity without significant change in Vmax and is more effective for α1 than α2. These results demonstrate that phosphorylation of PLM is capable of stimulating the activity of both isozymes in skeletal muscle; however, contractile activity alone is not sufficient to induce PLM phosphorylation. Importantly, acute stimulation of α2, sufficient to support exercise and oppose fatigue, does not require PLM or its phosphorylation. PMID:26468207

  15. Plasma homovanillic acid levels and therapeutic outcome in schizophrenics: comparisons of neuroleptic-naive first-episode patients and patients with disease exacerbation due to neuroleptic discontinuance.

    Akiyama, K; Tsuchida, K; Kanzaki, A; Ujike, H; Hamamura, T; Kondo, K; Mutoh, S; Miyanagi, K; Kuroda, S; Otsuki, S

    1995-11-15

    Plasma homovanillic acid (pHVA) levels were measured and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) scores were evaluated in 26 schizophrenic patients who had either never been medicated (neuroleptic-naive, first-episode subjects) or whose condition had become exacerbated following neuroleptic discontinuance (exacerbated subjects). All the subjects received medication with a fixed dose of a neuroleptic (haloperidol or fluphenazine, both 9 mg/day) for the first week and variable doses for the subsequent 4 weeks. In the neuroleptic-naive subjects, pHVA levels increased significantly 1 week after starting the protocol; this increase correlated significantly with clinical improvement of the BPRS positive symptom scores at week 5. In the neuroleptic-naive subjects, pHVA levels had declined to the baseline level by week 5. In the exacerbated subjects, there were no significant correlations between pHVA level changes at week 1 and later improvements of the BPRS positive symptom scores. These results suggest that the rise in pHVA levels occurring within 1 week after starting a fixed neuroleptic dose may predict a favorable clinical response in neuroleptic-naive schizophrenic patients.

  16. Acylation-stimulating protein is a surrogate biomarker for acute myocardial infarction: Role of statins

    Hayder M Al-Kuraishy

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: ASP levels are elevated in patients with acute MI and regarded as surrogate biomarker for acute MI also; therapy with statins leads to significant reduction in ASP levels compared to nonstatins-treated patients that presented with acute MI.

  17. Increased BOLD Signals Elicited by High Gamma Auditory Stimulation of the Left Auditory Cortex in Acute State Schizophrenia

    Hironori Kuga, M.D.

    2016-10-01

    We acquired BOLD responses elicited by click trains of 20, 30, 40 and 80-Hz frequencies from 15 patients with acute episode schizophrenia (AESZ, 14 symptom-severity-matched patients with non-acute episode schizophrenia (NASZ, and 24 healthy controls (HC, assessed via a standard general linear-model-based analysis. The AESZ group showed significantly increased ASSR-BOLD signals to 80-Hz stimuli in the left auditory cortex compared with the HC and NASZ groups. In addition, enhanced 80-Hz ASSR-BOLD signals were associated with more severe auditory hallucination experiences in AESZ participants. The present results indicate that neural over activation occurs during 80-Hz auditory stimulation of the left auditory cortex in individuals with acute state schizophrenia. Given the possible association between abnormal gamma activity and increased glutamate levels, our data may reflect glutamate toxicity in the auditory cortex in the acute state of schizophrenia, which might lead to progressive changes in the left transverse temporal gyrus.

  18. Use of 76Br-bromospiperone for the analysis of dopamine receptors in neuroleptic treated patients

    Maziere, B.; Cambon, H.; Baron, J.C.; Loc'h, C.

    1987-06-01

    The determination of the optimal prescription dosage of neuroleptic medications is of great importance to optimize the therapeutic response and to minimize the occurrence of tardive dyskinesia and other side-effects. PET, a non-invasive methodology which provides in-vivo the actual binding (occupation) of brain dopamine receptors, can be used as an in-vivo radioreceptor assay to indirectly estimate the neuroleptic tissue levels. In this study, 76Br-BSP was used in conjunction with PET to provide a semi-quantitative estimate of the neuroleptic (D2) binding sites occupancy rate during and following oral treatment by neuroleptics. On neuroleptic treatment, the fraction of unoccupied sites showed a striking dose-dependence ranging from .94 to .27 for lowest and highest doses. The CPZ equivalent daily oral doses occupying 50 and 100% of the neuroleptic sites were found to be respectively about 6 and 60 μmol/kg. The results establish that washout of neuroleptics from striatal binding sites is a rapid process that strongly suggest that the long-lasting remissions of psychotic patients following neuroleptic withdrawal are not due to persistent dopamine receptor occupation

  19. Ritanserin as add-on medication to neuroleptic therapy for patients with chronic or subchronic schizophrenia

    Den Boer, JA; Vahlne, JO; Post, P; Heck, AH; Daubenton, F; Olbrich, R

    The effect of ritanserin, a potent 5HT(2A/2C) receptor antagonist, used as an add-on medication to neuroleptic treatmentin patients with schizophrenia, was compared with that of placebo, in an international, double-blind, parallel-group study. Previously established neuroleptic therapy was

  20. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Indicators of Early Immune Stimulation: A Childhood Leukemia International Consortium Study

    Rudant, Jérémie; Lightfoot, Tracy; Urayama, Kevin Y.; Petridou, Eleni; Dockerty, John D.; Magnani, Corrado; Milne, Elizabeth; Spector, Logan G.; Ashton, Lesley J.; Dessypris, Nikolaos; Kang, Alice Y.; Miller, Margaret; Rondelli, Roberto; Simpson, Jill; Stiakaki, Eftichia; Orsi, Laurent; Roman, Eve; Metayer, Catherine; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    The associations between childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and several proxies of early stimulation of the immune system, that is, day-care center attendance, birth order, maternally reported common infections in infancy, and breastfeeding, were investigated by using data from 11 case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (enrollment period: 1980–2010). The sample included 7,399 ALL cases and 11,181 controls aged 2–14 years. The data were collected by questionnaires administered to the parents. Pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, study, maternal education, and maternal age. Day-care center attendance in the first year of life was associated with a reduced risk of ALL (odds ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval: 0.71, 0.84), with a marked inverse trend with earlier age at start (P < 0.0001). An inverse association was also observed with breastfeeding duration of 6 months or more (odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval: 0.79, 0.94). No significant relationship with a history of common infections in infancy was observed even though the odds ratio was less than 1 for more than 3 infections. The findings of this large pooled analysis reinforce the hypothesis that day-care center attendance in infancy and prolonged breastfeeding are associated with a decreased risk of ALL. PMID:25731888

  1. Resveratrol Downregulates Interleukin-6-Stimulated Sonic Hedgehog Signaling in Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Su, Yu-Chieh; Li, Szu-Chin; Wu, Yin-Chi; Wang, Li-Min; Chao, K. S. Clifford; Liao, Hui-Fen

    2013-01-01

    IL-6 and sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling molecules are considered to maintain the growth of cancer stem cells (CSCs). Resveratrol, an important integrant in traditional Chinese medicine, possesses certain antitumor effects. However, the mechanisms on regulating acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are unclear. This study first used human subjects to demonstrate that the plasma levels of IL-6 and IL-1β in AML patients were higher and lower, respectively, than healthy donors. The expression of Shh preproproteins, and C- and N-terminal Shh peptides increased in bone marrow and peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from AML patients, and the plasma N-Shh secretion was greater. To further clarify the effect of IL-6 and resveratrol in Shh signaling, human AML HL-60 cells were tested. IL-6 upregulated Shh and Gli-1 expression and was accompanied by an increase of cell viability. Resveratrol significantly decreased CSC-related Shh expression, Gli-1 nuclear translocation, and cell viability in IL-6-treated HL-60 cells and had synergistic effect with Shh inhibitor cyclopamine on inhibiting cell growth. Conclusions. IL-6 stimulated the growth of AML cells through Shh signaling, and this effect might be blocked by resveratrol. Further investigations of Shh as a prognostic marker and resveratrol as a therapeutic drug target to CSCs in AML are surely warranted. PMID:23533494

  2. Dataset of acute repeated sessions of bifrontal transcranial direct current stimulation for treatment of intractable tinnitus: A randomized controlled trial

    Ali Yadollahpour

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS has reportedly shown promising therapeutic effects for tinnitus (Forogh et al., 2016; Joos et al., 2014 [1,2]. Studies are ongoing to determine optimum treatment protocol and the site of stimulation. Findings of the early studies are heterogeneous and most studies have focused on single session tDCS and short follow-up periods. There is no study on repeated sessions of tDCS with long term follow-up. This study presents the results of a randomized clinical trial investigating the therapeutic effects of acute multi-session tDCS over dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC on tinnitus symptoms and comorbid depression and anxiety in patients with chronic intractable tinnitus. The dataset includes the demographic information, audiometric assessments, tinnitus specific characteristics, and the response variables of the study. The response variables included the scores of tinnitus handicap inventory (THI, tinnitus loudness and tinnitus related distress based on 0–10 numerical visual analogue scale (VAS scores, beck depression inventory (BDI-II and beck anxiety inventory (BAI scores. The dataset included the scores of THI pre and immediately post intervention, and at one month follow-up; the tinnitus loudness and distress scores prior to intervention, and immediately, one hour, one week, and at one month after the last stimulation session. In addition, the BDI-II, and BAI scores pre and post intervention are included. The data of the real (n=25 and sham tDCS (n=17 groups are reported. The main manuscript of this dataset is 'Acute repeated sessions of bifrontal transcranial direct current stimulation for treatment of intractable tinnitus: a randomized controlled trial' (Bayat et al., submitted for publication [3]. Keywords: Transcranial direct current stimulation, Acute stimulations, Tinnitus, Depression, Anxiety, DLPFC

  3. Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome: A Case Aimed at Raising Clinical Awareness

    Jad Al Danaf

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old man with a history of bipolar disorder on risperidone, bupropion, and escitalopram was admitted for community acquired streptococcal pneumonia. Four days later, he developed persistent hyperthermia, dysautonomia, rigidity, hyporeflexia, and marked elevation of serum creatine phosphokinase. He was diagnosed with neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS and improved with dantrolene, bromocriptine, and supportive therapy. This case emphasizes the importance of considering a broad differential diagnosis for fever in the ICU, carefully reviewing the medication list for all patients, and considering NMS in patients with fever and rigidity.

  4. Correlates of rapid neuroleptic response in male patients with schizophrenia.

    Petrie, E C; Faustman, W O; Moses, J A; Lombrozo, L; Csernansky, J G

    1990-08-01

    Correlates of neuroleptic response latency were assessed in 16 male schizophrenic inpatients during 4 weeks of fixed dose (20 mg/day) haloperidol treatment. Rapid responders showed a mean 40% reduction in Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) positive symptom scores by day 10 of treatment. Rapid responders had significantly lower plasma homovanillic acid (pHVA) concentrations compared to non-rapid responders during week 4 of haloperidol treatment. However, rapid versus non-rapid responders did not differ with respect to demographics, baseline positive or negative BPRS symptom scores, performance on tests of neuropsychological function, or mean plasma haloperidol concentrations.

  5. Increments in plasma homovanillic acid concentrations after neuroleptic discontinuation are associated with worsening of schizophrenic symptoms.

    Khan, R S; Amin, F; Powchik, P; Knott, P; Goldstein, M; Apter, S; Kerman, B; Jaff, S; Davidson, M

    1990-01-01

    1. Thirty-two male schizophrenic patients participated in this study. 2. Plasma concentrations of the dopamine metabolite, homovanillic acid (pHVA) were assessed once on neuroleptic medication and twice a week for a maximum of six weeks after its discontinuation. 3. Psychiatric symptomatology was assessed once on neuroleptic medication and once a week for a maximum of six weeks after its discontinuation, using the brief psychiatric rating scale (BPRS). 4. pHVA and total BPRS score increased significantly after discontinuation of neuroleptic as compared to baseline. 5. The magnitude of pHVA and BPRS increments after discontinuation of neuroleptic correlated significantly. 6. Results of this study suggest that worsening of schizophrenic symptoms after discontinuation of neuroleptic treatment is associated with increased pHVA concentrations.

  6. A pilot study of planar coil based magnetic stimulation using acute hippocampal slice in mice.

    Park, H J; Kang, H K; Wang, M; Jo, J; Chung, E; Kim, S

    2017-07-01

    Micromagnetic stimulation using small-sized implantable coils has recently been studied. The main advantage of this method is that it can provide sustainable stimulation performance even if a fibrotic encapsulation layer is formed around the implanted coil by inflammation response, because indirectly induced currents are used to induce neural responses. In previous research, we optimized the geometrical and control parameters used in implantable magnetic stimulation. Based on those results, we fabricated the planar coil and studied the LTP effect in the hippocampal slice by two different magnetic stimulation protocols using the quadripulse stimulation (QPS) pattern. We found that direct magnetic stimulation (DMS) induced insignificant LTP effect and priming magnetic stimulation (PMS) occluded LTP effect after tetanic stimulation, when QPS patterned magnetic stimulation with 1 A current pulse was applied to the planar coil.

  7. Insulin signaling in various equine tissues under basal conditions and acute stimulation by intravenously injected insulin.

    Warnken, Tobias; Brehm, Ralph; Feige, Karsten; Huber, Korinna

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze key proteins of the equine insulin signaling cascade and their extent of phosphorylation in biopsies from muscle tissue (MT), liver tissue (LT), and nuchal AT, subcutaneous AT, and retroperitoneal adipose tissues. This was investigated under unstimulated (B1) and intravenously insulin stimulated (B2) conditions, which were achieved by injection of insulin (0.1 IU/kg bodyweight) and glucose (150 mg/kg bodyweight). Twelve warmblood horses aged 15 ± 6.8 yr (yr), weighing 559 ± 79 kg, and with a mean body condition score of 4.7 ± 1.5 were included in the study. Key proteins of the insulin signaling cascade were semiquantitatively determined using Western blotting. Furthermore, modulation of the cascade was assessed. The basal expression of the proteins was only slightly influenced during the experimental period. Insulin induced a high extent of phosphorylation of insulin receptor in LT (P < 0.01) but not in MT. Protein kinase B and mechanistic target of rapamycin expressed a higher extent of phosphorylation in all tissues in B2 biopsies. Adenosine monophosphate protein kinase, as a component related to insulin signaling, expressed enhanced phosphorylation in MT (P < 0.05) and adipose tissues (nuchal AT P < 0.05; SCAT P < 0.01; retroperitoneal adipose tissue P < 0.05), but not in LT at B2. Tissue-specific variations in the acute response of insulin signaling to intravenously injected insulin were observed. In conclusion, insulin sensitivity in healthy horses is based on a complex concerted action of different tissues by their variations in the molecular response to insulin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Inhalation exposure to three-dimensional printer emissions stimulates acute hypertension and microvascular dysfunction.

    Stefaniak, A B; LeBouf, R F; Duling, M G; Yi, J; Abukabda, A B; McBride, C R; Nurkiewicz, T R

    2017-11-15

    Fused deposition modeling (FDM™), or three-dimensional (3D) printing has become routine in industrial, occupational and domestic environments. We have recently reported that 3D printing emissions (3DPE) are complex mixtures, with a large ultrafine particulate matter component. Additionally, we and others have reported that inhalation of xenobiotic particles in this size range is associated with an array of cardiovascular dysfunctions. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 3DPE aerosols via nose-only exposure for ~3h. Twenty-four hours later, intravital microscopy was performed to assess microvascular function in the spinotrapezius muscle. Endothelium-dependent and -independent arteriolar dilation were stimulated by local microiontophoresis of acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). At the time of experiments, animals exposed to 3DPE inhalation presented with a mean arterial pressure of 125±4mmHg, and this was significantly higher than that for the sham-control group (94±3mmHg). Consistent with this pressor response in the 3DPE group, was an elevation of ~12% in resting arteriolar tone. Endothelium-dependent arteriolar dilation was significantly impaired after 3DPE inhalation across all iontophoretic ejection currents (0-27±15%, compared to sham-control: 15-120±21%). Endothelium-independent dilation was not affected by 3DPE inhalation. These alterations in peripheral microvascular resistance and reactivity are consistent with elevations in arterial pressure that follow 3DPE inhalation. Future studies must identify the specific toxicants generated by FDM™ that drive this acute pressor response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone, White Matter Hyperintensities, and Functional Outcome in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients

    Christopher O. Leonards

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH concentrations are frequently altered in acute ischemic stroke patients. It is becoming increasingly apparent that various hormones in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis may be associated with functional stroke outcome. We have previously shown that white matter hyperintensities (WMH of presumed vascular origin are strong indicators of functional outcome. It is unclear whether an association exists between WMH and TSH. We therefore sought to determine whether TSH levels, measured in acute ischemic stroke patients, are associated with WMH and functional outcome. Methods: We analyzed all first ischemic stroke patients who participated in the Berlin ‘Cream & Sugar' Study (NCT 01378468 and completed a 1-year follow-up assessment from January 2009 to March 2013. Patients were stratified into 3 groups: (1 low TSH (0.1-0.44 μU/ml; (2 normal TSH (0.44-2.5 μU/ml, and (3 high TSH (2.5-20 μU/ml. WMH were assessed using the Fazekas and Wahlund visual rating scales. Functional outcome was assessed using the modified Rankin Scale and was performed via telephone at 1 year by a certified rater. Results: 183 patients were included [median age 66, interquartile range (IQR 54-75; 33% females; median National Institute of Health Stroke Scale 3, IQR 1-4, range 0-24]. Venous samples were collected a median of 4 days (IQR 3-5 following initial symptom onset between 8 and 9 a.m. following a 10-hour fast. Patients with normal TSH levels (n = 132; 72% had significantly higher rates of prestroke diabetes than patients with high TSH levels (normal TSH 17%; high TSH 1%; p = 0.03. Additionally, patients with normal TSH levels tended to have higher estimated glomerular filtration rates than patients with high and low TSH concentrations (normal TSH median estimated glomerular filtration rates: 83 ml/min/1.73 m2; high TSH median estimated glomerular filtration rates: 76 ml/min/1.73 m2; low TSH median: 78 ml/min/1.73 m2; p

  10. Quantitative structure-activity relationships of salicylamide neuroleptic agents.

    Gupta, S P; Saha, R N; Singh, P

    1990-05-01

    The in vitro antidopamine activity of substituted N-[(1-alkyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl]-6-methoxysalicylamides was found to be well correlated with the hydrophobic and electronic nature of substituents at the 3-position, and with the steric nature of groups replacing the hydrogen atom of the salicyl hydroxy group. In contrast, only the hydrophobic and steric characteristics were found to be important in the in vivo activity of these neuroleptics. This difference suggests that different mechanisms are probably involved in their in vitro and in vivo actions, and that the relevant receptors are slightly different in structure. The in vitro results suggest that electron donation by the 3-substituent strengthens the formation of a hydrogen bond between the carbonyl group of the amide moiety and a hydrogen of the receptor.

  11. Electrochemical behaviour of some neuroleptics: Haloperidol and its derivatives.

    Vire, J C; Fischer, M; Patriarche, G J; Christian, G D

    1981-05-01

    The electrochemical characteristics of Haloperidol and related compounds, representative neuroleptics of the butyrophenone family, have been investigated as a function of pH and concentration by direct-current, alternating-current and differential-pulse polarography and cyclic voltammetry at a hanging mercury drop electrode. A single cathodic wave representing an irreversible two-electron reduction is obtained, and its half-wave potential differs from that characteristic of aromatic ketone reduction. Adsorption processes disturb the wave behaviour and an adsorption prewave is observed at high concentrations. Quantitative measurements were successful in the concentration range 1 x 10(-4)-1 x 10(-6)M (0.4 mg/l.), the lower concentration representing the detection limit by differential-pulse polarography.

  12. Anaesthesia For ECT In Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome - What Is Ideal?

    Priyaneka Baskaran

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We report a case involving a 46 year old male with schizophrenia who presented with fever, inability to speak, sialorrhoea, limb stiffness, profuse sweating, tremors and rigidity of bilateral upper and lower limbs following an increase in dosage of his antipsychotics.  A provisional diagnosis of neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS was made based on the Levensen criteria. His anti psychotics were promptly discontinued and he was transferred to ICU for critical care support. We utilised lorazepam and prescribed bromocriptine and his NMS symptoms improved. However, in view of residual catatonic symptoms, decision was made to commence ECT. A combination of rocuronium sugammadex was used successfully in all his ECT procedures and found to be an excellent alternative to succinycholine in this patient.

  13. Optimization studies concerning the direct nucleophilic fluorination of butyrophenone neuroleptics

    Katsifis, A; Hamacher, K; Schnitter, J; Stoecklin, G [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Chemie 1 - Nuklearchemie

    1993-07-01

    Based on the direct nucleophilic aromatic substitution described previously for [[sup 18]F]N-methylspiperone the butyrophenone neuroleptics benperidol, droperidol, fluanisone and haloperidol were labelled with fluorine-18. The n.c.a. aromatic nucleophilic NO[sub 2] [yields] [sup 18]F substitution takes place in the presence of the moderately basic cryptate system consisting of Kryptofix 2.2.2., potassium oxalate and potassium carbonate. The one step labeling reaction was performed in different solvents and is equally successful in dimethylsulfoxide, dimethylformamide or dimethylacetamide yielding 25-35% (EOS) within a reaction time of 5-30 min in the range of 140-160[sup o]C at analytical activity levels. (author).

  14. [Selective attention and schizophrenia before the administration of neuroleptics].

    Lussier, I; Stip, E

    1999-01-01

    In recent years, the presence of attention deficits has been recognized as a key feature of schizophrenia. Past studies reveal that selective attention, or the ability to select relevant information while ignoring simultaneously irrelevant information, is disturbed in schizophrenic patients. According to Treisman feature-integration theory of selective attention, visual search for conjunctive targets (e.g., shape and color) requires controlled processes, that necessitate attention and operate in a serial manner. Reaction times (RTs) are therefore function of the number of stimuli in the display. When subjects are asked to detect the presence or absence of a target in an array of a variable number of stimuli, different performance patterns are expected for positive (present target) and negative trials (absent target). For positive trials, a self-terminating search is triggered, that is, the search is ended when the target is encountered. For negative trials, an exhaustive search strategy is displayed, where each stimulus is examined before the search can end; the RT slope pattern is thus double that of the positive trials. To assess the integrity of these processes, thirteen drug naive schizophrenic patients were compared to twenty normal control subjects. Neuroleptic naive patients were chosen as subjects to avoid the potential influence of medication and chronicity-related factors on performance. The subjects had to specify as fast as possible the presence or absence of the target in an array of a variable number of stimuli presented in a circular display, and comprising or not the target. Results showed that the patients can use self-terminating search strategies as well as normal control subjects. However, their ability to trigger exhaustive search strategies is impaired. Not only were patients slower than controls, but their pattern of RT results was different. These results argue in favor of an early impairment in selective attention capacities in

  15. Olanzapine-Induced Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome with Rhabdomyolysis: A Case Report

    Young Kyoung Sa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Atypical antipsychotics have replaced conventional antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia because they have less of a propensity to cause undesirable neurologic adverse events including extrapyramidal symptoms, tardive dyskinesia, and neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS. However, atypical antipsychotics have been known to result in various metabolic complications such as impaired glucose tolerance, diabetes and even diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA. In addition, a number of NMS cases have been reported in patients treated with atypical antipsychotics, although the absolute incidence of neurologic side effects is currently significantly low. Here, we report a patient who simultaneously developed DKA, acute renal failure and NMS with rhabdomyolysis after olanzapine treatment. Olanzapine-induced metabolic complications and NMS were dramatically improved with cessation of the olanzapine treatment and initiation of supportive management including fluid therapy, hemodialysis, and intensive glycemic control using insulin. At short-term follow-up, insulin secretion was markedly recovered as evidenced by a restoration of serum C-peptide level, and the patient no longer required any hypoglycemic medications. Despite the dramatic increase in the use of atypical antipsychotics treatment, individualized treatments along with careful monitoring may be prudent for high risk or vulnerable patients in order to avoid the development of metabolic side effects.

  16. Paliperidone Inducing Concomitantly Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone, Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome, and Rhabdomyolysis

    Jaspinder Kaur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Paliperidone, an active metabolite of risperidone, is a new atypical antipsychotic agent. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH, neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS, and rhabdomyolysis are the uncommon side effects of psychotropic drugs. We report a case of 35-year-old male with schizoaffective disorder who was admitted for acute-on-chronic exacerbation of his psychotic disorder for which intramuscular paliperidone 234 mg injection was given. Two days later, the patient developed hyponatremic seizures secondary to SIADH which was treated with hypertonic saline. On the third day, he developed high grade fever and severe muscle rigidity with raised creatine phosphokinase (CPK and liver enzymes levels. He was treated with dantrolene 100 mg, bromocriptine 2.5 mg, and lorazepam 2 mg. Our patient required management of the three rare conditions following treatment with paliperidone. This case highlights the need for health care providers to be aware of the rare, potentially life threatening but preventable hyponatremia, NMS, and rhabdomyolysis as a possible adverse effect of paliperidone.

  17. Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome After the Use of Venlafaxine in a Patient with Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    Tsung-Chien Lu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS is a potentially lethal adverse reaction to neuroleptics, which is characterized by hyperthermia, extrapyramidal symptoms, altered consciousness and autonomic dysfunction. Although NMS is most commonly induced by the high-potency neuroleptics, its development has also been associated with the use of non-neuroleptic agents that block central dopamine pathways. A 68-year-old man with generalized anxiety disorder and depressive symptoms presented at the emergency department (ED with high fever, tremor, muscle rigidity, rhabdomyolysis and altered mental status. NMS was considered to have been caused by the recent addition and subsequent dose increase in his treatment regimen of venlafaxine, a serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor. He was successfully treated with bromocriptine, lorazepam, and fluid hydration in the ED and intensive care unit.

  18. The effect of electrical stimulation in combination with Bobath techniques in the prevention of shoulder subluxation in acute stroke patients.

    Fil, Ayla; Armutlu, Kadriye; Atay, Ahmet Ozgur; Kerimoglu, Ulku; Elibol, Bulent

    2011-01-01

    To examine the efficiency of electrical stimulation in combination with Bobath techniques in the prevention of inferior and anterior shoulder subluxation in acute stroke patients. A prospective randomized controlled trial. Intensive care unit and inpatient clinics of neurology in a university hospital. Forty-eight patients with acute stroke, divided equally into control and study groups. Subjects in both groups were treated in accordance with the Bobath concept during the early hospitalization period. In addition to Bobath techniques, electrical stimulation was also applied to the supraspinatus muscle, mid and posterior portions of the deltoid muscle of patients in the study group. Two radiological methods were used to measure the horizontal, vertical and total asymmetry and vertical distance values of the shoulder joint. Motor functions of the arm were evaluated with the Motor Assessment Scale. The hospitalization period was 12.62 ± 2.24 days for the control group and 11.66 ± 1.88 days for the study group. Shoulder subluxation occurred in 9 (37.5%) subjects in the control group, whereas it was not observed in the study group. All shoulder joint displacement values were higher in the control group than in the study group (horizontal asymmetry P = 0.0001, vertical asymmetry P = 0.0001, total asymmetry P = 0.0001, vertical range P = 0.002). Application of electrical stimulation combined with the Bobath approach proved to be efficient in preventing inferior and anterior shoulder subluxation in the acute stages of stroke.

  19. Cure or curse? Ambivalent attitudes towards neuroleptic medication in schizophrenia and non-schizophrenia patients

    Dieter Naber; Peter Tonn; Azra Deljkovic; Anne Karow; Maarten J.V. Peters; Steffen Moritz

    2009-01-01

    Neuroleptic non-compliance remains a serious challenge for the treatment of psychosis. Non-compliance is predominantly attributed to side effects, lack of illness insight, reduced well-being or poor therapeutic alliance. However, other still neglected factors may also play a role. Further, little is known about whether psychiatric patients without psychosis who are increasingly prescribed neuroleptics differ in terms of medication compliance or about reasons for non-compliance by psychosis pa...

  20. Negative symptoms in nondeficit syndrome respond to neuroleptic treatment with changes in plasma homovanillic acid concentrations.

    Suzuki, E; Kanba, S; Koshikawa, H; Nibuya, M; Yagi, G; Asai, M

    1996-01-01

    Deficit syndrome (DS) in schizophrenia is characterized by serious, chronic, and primary negative symptoms. We investigated differences in response to neuroleptic treatment between 8 DS patients and 6 nondeficit syndrome (NDS) patients who had the selective dopamine-D2 receptor blocker bromperidol added to their neuroleptic regimens. First, 9 mg/d was administered for 4 weeks, followed by 18 mg/d for another 4 weeks. Plasma homovanillic acid (pHVA) and plasma bromperidol concentrations were m...

  1. Combining BMI stimulation and mathematical modeling for acute stroke recovery and neural repair

    Sara L Gonzalez Andino

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation is a neural plasticity-exploiting approach that forces undamaged neural circuits to undertake the functionality of other circuits damaged by stroke. It aims to partial restoration of the neural functions by circuit remodeling rather than by the regeneration of damaged circuits. The core hypothesis of the present paper is that - in stroke - Brain Machine Interfaces can be designed to target neural repair instead of rehabilitation. To support this hypothesis we first review existing evidence on the role of endogenous or externally applied electric fields on all processes involved in CNS repair. We then describe our own results to illustrate the neuroprotective and neuroregenerative effects of BMI- electrical stimulation on sensory deprivation-related degenerative processes of the CNS. Finally, we discuss three of the crucial issues involved in the design of neural repair-oriented BMIs: when to stimulate, where to stimulate and - the particularly important but unsolved issue of - how to stimulate. We argue that optimal parameters for the electrical stimulation can be determined from studying and modeling the dynamics of the electric fields that naturally emerge at the central and peripheral nervous system during spontaneous healing in both, experimental animals and human patients. We conclude that a closed-loop BMI that defines the optimal stimulation parameters from a priori developed experimental models of the dynamics of spontaneous repair and the on-line monitoring of neural activity might place BMIs as an alternative or complement to stem-cell transplantation or pharmacological approaches, intensively pursued nowadays.

  2. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome revisited in the perspective of pakistan

    Shakoor, A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a life threatening adverse reaction of antipsychotic drugs, especially of dopamine receptor antagonists (DRA's). In addition to clinical and pharmacological risk factors, legal and ethical risk factors may be contributory towards the incidence, diagnosis and prognosis of NMS in Pakistan. Study Design: Experimental case study. Place and Duration of Study: The department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences of Bahawal Victoria Hospital affiliated with Quaid-e-Azam Medical College, from July 2011 to October 2012. Subjects and Methods: All the patients with probable NMS, received consecutively at the inpatient department of psychiatry, were included and investigated to rule out any other medical condition mimicking the syndrome. The patients were treated till complete recovery from the syndrome. The psychiatric diagnoses were confirmed, during their hospital stay, according to ICD10 Diagnostic Criteria for Research, the residual symptoms were recorded and tabulated along with other important characteristics of the patients. Results: Reckless use of DRA's in the form of intramuscular depot injections or high initial oral doses, along with certain other previously perceived clinical risk factors, increased the chance of developing NMS. Female gender and younger age along with early detection and prudent management proved to be good pro-gnostic factors for NMS in our study. The diverse categories of the first hand attending health providers e.g. doctors, quacks and faith healers of our psychiatric patients frequently used antipsychotics. This scenario points towards the lapses in determination of pathways to care, legality and ethics governing the mental health care in Pakistan. Conclusion: Standard protocol must be followed to start antipsychotics in psychotic patients, especially while planning to use depot DRA's. The manic patients are even more sensitive to develop extrapyramidal side effects and neuroleptic

  3. Pre-stimulation of the kallikrein system in cisplatin-induced acute renal injury: An approach to renoprotection

    Aburto, Andrés [Program of M.Sc., Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia (Chile); Barría, Agustín [School of Biochemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia (Chile); Cárdenas, Areli [Ph.D. Program, Faculty of Sciences, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia (Chile); Carpio, Daniel; Figueroa, Carlos D. [Department of Anatomy, Histology and Pathology, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia (Chile); Burgos, Maria E. [Department of Nephrology, Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia (Chile); Ardiles, Leopoldo, E-mail: leopoldoardiles@gmail.com [Department of Nephrology, Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia (Chile)

    2014-10-15

    Antineoplastic treatment with cisplatin is frequently complicated by nephrotoxicity. Although oxidative stress may be involved, the pathogenic mechanisms responsible for renal damage have not been completely clarified. In order to investigate the role of the renal kinin system in this condition, a group of rats was submitted to high potassium diet to stimulate the synthesis and excretion of tissue kallikrein 1 (rKLK1) previous to an intraperitoneal injection of 7 mg/kg cisplatin. A significant reduction in lipoperoxidation, evidenced by urinary excretion of malondialdehyde and renal immunostaining of hidroxy-nonenal, was accompanied by a decline in apoptosis. Coincident with these findings we observed a reduction in the expression of renal KIM-1 suggesting that renoprotection may be occurring. Stimulation or indemnity of the renal kinin system deserves to be evaluated as a complementary pharmacological measure to diminish cisplatin nephrotoxicity. - Highlights: • Mechanisms of cisplatin-induced-renal damage have not been completely clarified. • Cisplatin induces oxidative stress and apoptosis. • The renal kallikrein-kinin system is protective in experimental acute renal damage. • Kallikrein stimulation reduces oxidative stress and apoptosis induced by cisplatin. • Protection of the kallikrein-kinin system may reduce cisplatin toxicity.

  4. Pre-stimulation of the kallikrein system in cisplatin-induced acute renal injury: An approach to renoprotection

    Aburto, Andrés; Barría, Agustín; Cárdenas, Areli; Carpio, Daniel; Figueroa, Carlos D.; Burgos, Maria E.; Ardiles, Leopoldo

    2014-01-01

    Antineoplastic treatment with cisplatin is frequently complicated by nephrotoxicity. Although oxidative stress may be involved, the pathogenic mechanisms responsible for renal damage have not been completely clarified. In order to investigate the role of the renal kinin system in this condition, a group of rats was submitted to high potassium diet to stimulate the synthesis and excretion of tissue kallikrein 1 (rKLK1) previous to an intraperitoneal injection of 7 mg/kg cisplatin. A significant reduction in lipoperoxidation, evidenced by urinary excretion of malondialdehyde and renal immunostaining of hidroxy-nonenal, was accompanied by a decline in apoptosis. Coincident with these findings we observed a reduction in the expression of renal KIM-1 suggesting that renoprotection may be occurring. Stimulation or indemnity of the renal kinin system deserves to be evaluated as a complementary pharmacological measure to diminish cisplatin nephrotoxicity. - Highlights: • Mechanisms of cisplatin-induced-renal damage have not been completely clarified. • Cisplatin induces oxidative stress and apoptosis. • The renal kallikrein-kinin system is protective in experimental acute renal damage. • Kallikrein stimulation reduces oxidative stress and apoptosis induced by cisplatin. • Protection of the kallikrein-kinin system may reduce cisplatin toxicity

  5. Major role of suckling stimulation for inhibition of estrous behaviors in lactating rabbits: acute and chronic effects.

    García-Dalmán, Cipatli; González-Mariscal, Gabriela

    2012-01-01

    Lactation in rabbits induces anestrus: sexual receptivity and scent-marking (chinning) are reduced despite the brevity of suckling (one daily nursing bout, lasting around 3 min). The mechanisms underlying this effect are unknown but, as chinning, lordosis, and ambulation in an open field are immediately inhibited by the peripheral stimulation received during mating we hypothesized that, across lactation, suckling stimulation would provoke a similar effect. To test this possibility we provided litters of 1, 3, 5, or 10 pups across lactation days 1-15 and quantified chinning and ambulation frequencies, the lordosis quotient, and milk output. Baseline chinning frequency, determined before the daily nursing bout, was low across lactation days 1-15 in does nursing 3, 5 or 10 pups but it increased steadily across days 1-10 in rabbits suckling one pup. Yet, a single young was sufficient to abolish chinning for about 1h, after which this behavior rose again. Suckling litters of all sizes reduced (but did not abolish) ambulation frequency, both chronically (baseline levels declined across days 1-5) and acutely. Sexual receptivity was significantly reduced on lactation day 15 only in does that had nursed 10 pups. Large litter size promoted a larger milk output and a normal duration of nursing episodes. Results support a major role of suckling stimulation for the suppression of estrous behaviors and ambulation through as yet unidentified mechanisms. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Predictors of response to neuroleptic treatment in schizophrenia.

    Stern, R G; Kahn, R S; Davidson, M

    1993-06-01

    Baseline symptom severity, early reduction in symptom severity, initial subjective response to neuroleptic treatment, the degree of brain atrophy, and early changes in pHVA levels appear to predict treatment outcome in schizophrenic patients. Computerized EEG results, neuropsychological and neurophysiologic tests, and baseline pHVA concentrations require further examination. Only a limited proportion of variance in treatment response, however, could be explained by either of the nine predictors alone or combined. Therefore, further research is necessary to discover yet unidentified determinants of treatment response. Future studies should test the validity and reliability of these five promising predictors in large groups of male and female patients, employ high standards for assessment reliability of clinical parameters, and use absolute rating scores on psychopathology as well as functional scales for the definition of good and poor treatment response. Furthermore, the statistical approach for data analysis should take in consideration the need for appropriate corrections when multiple correlations are performed and should test the extent to which these predictors are interdependent.

  7. Acute mucositis in the stimulated oral mucosa of patients during radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    Maciejewski, B.; Zajusz, A.; Pilecki, B.; Swiatnicka, J.; Skladowski, K.; Trott, K.R.

    1991-01-01

    In 16 patients treated for squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity or oropharynx with an accelerated split course regimen, acute mucosal reactions were significantly less in the left buccal mucosa which had been repeatedly painted with 2% silver-nitrate solution for several days before radiotherapy than in the unpainted right buccal mucosa. (author). 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  8. Stimulation of 5-HT2A receptors recovers sensory responsiveness in acute spinal neonatal rats.

    Swann, Hillary E; Kauer, Sierra D; Allmond, Jacob T; Brumley, Michele R

    2017-02-01

    Quipazine is a 5-HT 2A -receptor agonist that has been used to induce motor activity and promote recovery of function after spinal cord injury in neonatal and adult rodents. Sensory stimulation also activates sensory and motor circuits and promotes recovery after spinal cord injury. In rats, tail pinching is an effective and robust method of sacrocaudal sensory afferent stimulation that induces motor activity, including alternating stepping. In this study, responsiveness to a tail pinch following treatment with quipazine (or saline vehicle control) was examined in spinal cord transected (at midthoracic level) and intact neonatal rats. Rat pups were secured in the supine posture with limbs unrestricted. Quipazine or saline was administered intraperitoneally and after a 10-min period, a tail pinch was administered. A 1-min baseline period prior to tail-pinch administration and a 1-min response period postpinch was observed and hind-limb motor activity, including locomotor-like stepping behavior, was recorded and analyzed. Neonatal rats showed an immediate and robust response to sensory stimulation induced by the tail pinch. Quipazine recovered hind-limb movement and step frequency in spinal rats back to intact levels, suggesting a synergistic, additive effect of 5-HT-receptor and sensory stimulation in spinal rats. Although levels of activity in spinal rats were restored with quipazine, movement quality (high vs. low amplitude) was only partially restored. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Amino acids augment muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs during acute endotoxemia by stimulating mTOR-dependent translation initiation.

    Orellana, Renán A; Jeyapalan, Asumthia; Escobar, Jeffery; Frank, Jason W; Nguyen, Hanh V; Suryawan, Agus; Davis, Teresa A

    2007-11-01

    In skeletal muscle of adults, sepsis reduces protein synthesis by depressing translation initiation and induces resistance to branched-chain amino acid stimulation. Normal neonates maintain a high basal muscle protein synthesis rate that is sensitive to amino acid stimulation. In the present study, we determined the effect of amino acids on protein synthesis in skeletal muscle and other tissues in septic neonates. Overnight-fasted neonatal pigs were infused with endotoxin (LPS, 0 and 10 microg.kg(-1).h(-1)), whereas glucose and insulin were maintained at fasting levels; amino acids were clamped at fasting or fed levels. In the presence of fasting insulin and amino acids, LPS reduced protein synthesis in longissimus dorsi (LD) and gastrocnemius muscles and increased protein synthesis in the diaphragm, but had no effect in masseter and heart muscles. Increasing amino acids to fed levels accelerated muscle protein synthesis in LD, gastrocnemius, masseter, and diaphragm. LPS stimulated protein synthesis in liver, lung, spleen, pancreas, and kidney in fasted animals. Raising amino acids to fed levels increased protein synthesis in liver of controls, but not LPS-treated animals. The increase in muscle protein synthesis in response to amino acids was associated with increased mTOR, 4E-BP1, and S6K1 phosphorylation and eIF4G-eIF4E association in control and LPS-infused animals. These findings suggest that amino acids stimulate skeletal muscle protein synthesis during acute endotoxemia via mTOR-dependent ribosomal assembly despite reduced basal protein synthesis rates in neonatal pigs. However, provision of amino acids does not further enhance the LPS-induced increase in liver protein synthesis.

  10. Pilot acute study of feedback-controlled retrograde peristalsis invoked by neural gastric electrical stimulation

    Aelen, P; Jurkov, A; Aulanier, A; Mintchev, M P

    2009-01-01

    Neural gastric electrical stimulation (NGES) is a new method for invoking gastric contractions under microprocessor control. However, optimization of this technique using feedback mechanisms to minimize power consumption and maximize effectiveness has been lacking. The present pilot study proposes a prototype feedback-controlled neural gastric electric stimulator for the treatment of obesity. Both force-based and inter-electrode impedance-based feedback neurostimulators were implemented and tested. Four mongrel dogs (2 M, 2 F, weight 14.9 ± 2.3 kg) underwent subserosal implantation of two-channel, 1 cm, bipolar electrode leads and two force transducers in the distal antrum. Two of the dogs were stimulated with a force feedback system utilizing the force transducers, and the other two animals were stimulated utilizing an inter-electrode impedance-based feedback system utilizing the proximal electrode leads. Both feedback systems were able to recognize erythromycin-driven contractions of the stomach and were capable of overriding them with NGES-invoked retrograde contractions which exceeded the magnitudes of the erythromycin-driven contractions by an average of 100.6 ± 33.5% in all animals. The NGES-invoked contractions blocked the erythromycin-driven contractions past the proximal electrode pair and induced temporary gastroparesis in the vicinity of the distal force transducer despite the continuing erythromycin infusion. The amplitudes of the erythromycin-invoked contractions in the vicinity of the proximal force transducer decreased abruptly by an average of 47.9 ± 6.3% in all four dogs after triggering-invoked retrograde contractions, regardless of the specific feedback-controlled mechanism. The proposed technique could be helpful for retaining food longer in the stomach, thus inducing early satiety and diminishing food intake

  11. Acute exposure of mercury chloride stimulates the tissue regeneration program and reactive oxygen species production in the Drosophila midgut.

    Chen, Zhi; Wu, Xiaochun; Luo, Hongjie; Zhao, Lingling; Ji, Xin; Qiao, Xianfeng; Jin, Yaping; Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We used Drosophila as an animal model to study the digestive tract in response to the exposure of inorganic mercury (HgCl2). We found that after oral administration, mercury was mainly sequestered within the midgut. This resulted in increased cell death, which in turn stimulated the tissue regeneration program, including accelerated proliferation and differentiation of the intestinal stem cells (ISCs). We further demonstrated that these injuries correlate closely with the excessive production of the reactive oxygen species (ROS), as vitamin E, an antioxidant reagent, efficiently suppressed the HgCl2-induced phenotypes of midgut and improved the viability. We propose that the Drosophila midgut could serve as a suitable model to study the treatment of acute hydrargyrism on the digestive systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Subcutaneous injection of kisspeptin-54 acutely stimulates gonadotropin secretion in women with hypothalamic amenorrhea, but chronic administration causes tachyphylaxis.

    Jayasena, Channa N; Nijher, Gurjinder M K; Chaudhri, Owais B; Murphy, Kevin G; Ranger, Amita; Lim, Adrian; Patel, Daksha; Mehta, Amrish; Todd, Catriona; Ramachandran, Radha; Salem, Victoria; Stamp, Gordon W; Donaldson, Mandy; Ghatei, Mohammad A; Bloom, Stephen R; Dhillo, Waljit S

    2009-11-01

    Kisspeptin is a critical regulator of normal reproductive function. A single injection of kisspeptin in healthy human volunteers potently stimulates gonadotropin release. However, the effects of kisspeptin on gonadotropin release in women with hypothalamic amenorrhea (HA) and the effects of repeated administration of kisspeptin to humans are unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of acute and chronic kisspeptin administration on gonadotropin release in women with HA. We performed a prospective, randomized, double-blinded, parallel design study. Women with HA received twice-daily sc injections of kisspeptin (6.4 nmol/kg) or 0.9% saline (n = 5 per group) for 2 wk. Changes in serum gonadotropin and estradiol levels, LH pulsatility, and ultrasound measurements of reproductive activity were assessed. On the first injection day, potent increases in serum LH and FSH were observed after sc kisspeptin injection in women with HA (mean maximal increment from baseline within 4 h after injection: LH, 24.0 +/- 3.5 IU/liter; FSH, 9.1 +/- 2.5 IU/liter). These responses were significantly reduced on the 14th injection day (mean maximal increment from baseline within 4 h postinjection: LH, 2.5 +/- 2.2 IU/liter, P < 0.05; FSH, 0.5 +/- 0.5 IU/liter, P < 0.05). Subjects remained responsive to GnRH after kisspeptin treatment. No significant changes in LH pulsatility or ultrasound measurements of reproductive activity were observed. Acute administration of kisspeptin to women with infertility due to HA potently stimulates gonadotropin release, but chronic administration of kisspeptin results in desensitization to its effects on gonadotropin release. These data have important implications for the development of kisspeptin as a novel therapy for reproductive disorders in humans.

  13. Rocuronium-sugammadex for electroconvulsive therapy management in neuroleptic malignant syndrome: A case report.

    Casas Reza, P; Gestal Vázquez, M; Outeiro Rosato, Á; López Álvarez, S; Diéguez García, P

    2017-02-01

    Neuroleptics are a group of drugs widely used in the treatment of psychotic symptoms. Among their adverse effects is the ability to trigger a neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS). The diagnosis of NMS is determined by exclusion, and its initial therapeutic management should be the withdrawal of neuroleptics, the administration of benzodiazepines, and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). ECT is an effective treatment in these patients, and in those cases with a poor response to treatment with antipsychotic drugs. A review is presented on the treatment options and anaesthetic implications of ECT used to handle a patient diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia in the context of NMS. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Acute Stimulant Treatment and Reinforcement Increase the Speed of Information Accumulation in Children with ADHD.

    Fosco, Whitney D; White, Corey N; Hawk, Larry W

    2017-07-01

    The current studies utilized drift diffusion modeling (DDM) to examine how reinforcement and stimulant medication affect cognitive task performance in children with ADHD. In Study 1, children with (n = 25; 88 % male) and without ADHD (n = 33; 82 % male) completed a 2-choice discrimination task at baseline (100 trials) and again a week later under alternating reinforcement and no-reinforcement contingencies (400 trials total). In Study 2, participants with ADHD (n = 29; 72 % male) completed a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 0.3 and 0.6 mg/kg methylphenidate and completed the same task utilized in Study 1 at baseline (100 trials). Children with ADHD accumulated information at a much slower rate than controls, as evidenced by a lower drift rate. Groups were similar in nondecision time and boundary separation. Both reinforcement and stimulant medication markedly improved drift rate in children with ADHD (ds = 0.70 and 0.95 for reinforcement and methylphenidate, respectively); both treatments also reduced boundary separation (ds = 0.70 and 0.39). Reinforcement, which emphasized speeded accuracy, reduced nondecision time (d = 0.37), whereas stimulant medication increased nondecision time (d = 0.38). These studies provide initial evidence that frontline treatments for ADHD primarily impact cognitive performance in youth with ADHD by improving the speed/efficiency of information accumulation. Treatment effects on other DDM parameters may vary between treatments or interact with task parameters (number of trials, task difficulty). DDM, in conjunction with other approaches, may be helpful in clarifying the specific cognitive processes that are disrupted in ADHD, as well as the basic mechanisms that underlie the efficacy of ADHD treatments.

  15. Non-dirt house floor and the stimulant of environmental health decreased the risk Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI

    Putu Suriyasa

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The risk factors related to acute respiratory infection (ARI, among others, is house floor. The aim of this research was to identify the influence of the Family Health and Nutrition program (FHN and other risk factors related to ARI. Data was obtained from a survey conducted in 5 provinces in Indonesia, which received the project of Family Health and Nutrition (FHN in 2003. The number of subjects was 1,500 families, selected by stratified random sampling method. The questionnaire completion and the observation were done on the spot in the subject’s house by special trained interviewers. The use of non-dirt house floor built prior to the project of FHN decreased the risk of ARI cases of 51% than the use of dirt house floor [Odds Ratio (OR = 0.49; 95% Confidence Interval (CI = 0.25-0.96]. The risk of ARI decreased of 52% among those who received than those which never received the stimulant of environmental health Family Health and Nutrition program (OR = 0.48; 95% CI =0.33-0.70. To decrease the risks of ARI cases, the program of environmental health is necessarily continued. (Med J Indones 2006; 15:60-5Keywords: ARI, non-dirt house floor, and stimulant of environmental health

  16. Effects of motor imagery combined with functional electrical stimulation on upper limb motor function of patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Shou-feng LIU

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the effects of motor imagery (MI combined with the third generation functional electrical stimulation (FES on upper limb motor function in acute ischemic stroke patients with hemiplegia.  Methods Forty acute ischemic stroke patients, within 48 h of onset, were randomly divided into FES group (N = 20 and combination group (FES combined with motor imagery, N = 20. All patients received basic routine rehabilitation training, for example, good limb positioning, accepting braces, balance training and training in the activities of daily living (ADL. FES group received the third generation FES therapy and the combination group also received motor imagery for 2 weeks. All of the patients were assessed with Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA, Action Research Arm Test (ARAT and active range of motion (AROM of wrist dorsiflexion before and after 2 weeks of treatment.  Results After 2 weeks of treatment, the 2 groups had significantly higher FMA score, ARAT score and AROM of wrist dorsiflexion than that in pre-treatment (P = 0.000, for all. Besides, the FMA score (t = - 2.528, P = 0.016, ARAT score (t = - 2.562, P = 0.014 and AROM of wrist dorsiflexion (t = - 2.469, P = 0.018 in the combination group were significantly higher than that in the FES group. There were interactions of treatment methods with observation time points (P < 0.05, for all.  Conclusions Motor imagery combined with the third generation FES can effectively promote the recovery of upper limb motor function and motion range of wrist dorsiflexion in patients with acute ischemic stroke. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.03.008

  17. Cure or curse? Ambivalent attitudes towards neuroleptic medication in schizophrenia and non-schizophrenia patients.

    Moritz, Steffen; Peters, Maarten J V; Karow, Anne; Deljkovic, Azra; Tonn, Peter; Naber, Dieter

    2009-10-30

    Neuroleptic non-compliance remains a serious challenge for the treatment of psychosis. Non-compliance is predominantly attributed to side effects, lack of illness insight, reduced well-being or poor therapeutic alliance. However, other still neglected factors may also play a role. Further, little is known about whether psychiatric patients without psychosis who are increasingly prescribed neuroleptics differ in terms of medication compliance or about reasons for non-compliance by psychosis patients. As direct questioning is notoriously prone to social desirability biases, we conducted an anonymous survey. After a strict selection process blind to results, 95 psychiatric patients were retained for the final analyses (69 participants with a presumed diagnosis of schizophrenia psychosis, 26 without psychosis). Self-reported neuroleptic non-compliance was more prevalent in psychosis patients than non-psychosis patients. Apart from side effects and illness insight, main reasons for non-compliance in both groups were forgetfulness, distrust in therapist, and no subjective need for treatment. Other notable reasons were stigma and advice of relatives/acquaintances against neuroleptic medication. Gain from illness was a reason for non-compliance in 11-18% of the psychosis patients. Only 9% of all patients reported no side effects and full compliance and at the same time acknowledged that neuroleptics worked well for them. While pills were preferred over depot injections by the majority of patients, depot was judged as an alternative by a substantial subgroup. Although many patients acknowledge the need and benefits of neuroleptic medication, non-compliance was the norm rather than the exception in our samples.

  18. Receptor imaging of schizophrenic patients under treatment with typical and atypical neuroleptics

    Dresel, S.; Tatsch, K.; Meisenzahl, E.; Scherer, J.

    2002-01-01

    Schizophrenic psychosis is typically treated by typical and atypical neuroleptics. Both groups of drugs differ with regard to induction of extrapyramidal side effects. The occupancy of postsynaptic dopaminergic D2 receptors is considered to be an essential aspect of their antipsychotic properties. The dopamine D2 receptor status can be assessed by means of [I-123]IBZM SPECT. Studies on the typical neuroleptic haloperidol revealed an exponential dose response relationship measured by IBZM. Extrapyramidal side effects were presented by all patients below a threshold of the specific binding of IBZM below 0.4 (with one exception, norm value: >0.95). Also under treatment with the atypical neuroleptic clozapine an exponential dose response relationship was found. However, none of these patients showed extrapyramidal side effects. Recently introduced, new atypical neuroleptics such as risperidone and olanzapine again presented with an exponential relationship between daily dose and IBZM binding. The curves of the latter were in between the curves of haloperidol and clozapine. Extrapyramidal side effects were documented in a less number of patients treated with risperidone as compared to haloperidol, for olanzapine only one patient revealed these findings in our own patient group. The pharmacological profile of atypical neuroleptics shows - in addition to their binding to dopamine receptors - also high affinities to the receptors of other neurotransmitter systems, particularly the serotonergic system. Therefore, the lower incidence of extrapyramidal side effects seen by atypical in comparison to typical neuroleptics is at least in part most likely due to a complex interaction on a variety of neurotransmitter systems. (orig.) [de

  19. Cure or curse? Ambivalent attitudes towards neuroleptic medication in schizophrenia and non-schizophrenia patients

    Dieter Naber

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuroleptic non-compliance remains a serious challenge for the treatment of psychosis. Non-compliance is predominantly attributed to side effects, lack of illness insight, reduced well-being or poor therapeutic alliance. However, other still neglected factors may also play a role. Further, little is known about whether psychiatric patients without psychosis who are increasingly prescribed neuroleptics differ in terms of medication compliance or about reasons for non-compliance by psychosis patients. As direct questioning is notoriously prone to social desirability biases, we conducted an anonymous survey. After a strict selection process blind to results, 95 psychiatric patients were retained for the final analyses (69 participants with a presumed diagnosis of schizophrenia psychosis, 26 without psychosis. Self-reported neuroleptic non-compliance was more prevalent in psychosis patients than non-psychosis patients. Apart from side effects and illness insight, main reasons for non-compliance in both groups were forgetfulness, distrust in therapist, and no subjective need for treatment. Other notable reasons were stigma and advice of relatives/acquaintances against neuroleptic medication. Gain from illness was a reason for non-compliance in 11-18% of the psychosis patients. Only 9% of all patients reported no side effects and full compliance and at the same time acknowledged that neuroleptics worked well for them. While pills were preferred over depot injections by the majority of patients, depot was judged as an alternative by a substantial subgroup. Although many patients acknowledge the need and benefits of neuroleptic medication, non-compliance was the norm rather than the exception in our samples.

  20. Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome Caused by a Combination of Carbamazepine and Amitriptyline

    A. Bruce Janati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 32-year-old female, with a history of secondarily-generalized convulsive epilepsy, mental retardation, and a psychiatric illness, developed neuroleptic malignant syndrome while receiving carbamazepine and amitriptyline concurrently. We hypothesize that the addition of amitriptyline to carbamazepine caused a decrease in the serum level of carbamazepine, resulting in NMS. We conclude that combination therapy with carbamazepine and amitriptyline should be avoided in patients who are predisposed to NMS. The purpose of this paper is to warn physicians against combination therapy with carbamazepine and tricyclic antidepressants which may be conducive to neuroleptic malignant syndrome in susceptible patients.

  1. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome and subsequent clozapine-withdrawal effects in a patient with refractory schizophrenia

    Cheng MF

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Minfeng Cheng,* Huaying Gu,* Liangrong Zheng, Houliang Wang, Zhiyong Zhong, Shenglin Wen Department of Psychiatry, Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Here, we report a female patient developing neuroleptic malignant syndrome following the use of a combination of clozapine and haloperidol. Subsequently, the patient presented withdrawal effects after an abrupt discontinuation of clozapine. Psychiatrists not aware of possible clozapine-withdrawal effects may misdiagnose as a part of the primary mental illness or as the initial symptoms worsening, if unrecognized. Keywords: clozapine, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, withdrawal effect, schizophrenia

  2. [Use of lithium carbonate as a leukocyte stimulant in acute radiation sickness in humans].

    Konchalovskiĭ, M V; Shishkova, T V; Chotiĭ, V G; Baranov, A E

    1989-03-01

    A total of 50 patients, who had suffered from acute radiation sickness (I-III degree of severity) as a result of the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, were followed up for hematological changes. The absorbed dose of relatively even gamma-irradiation assessed by karyometry fluctuated from 0.5 to 5.7 Gy. In 17 of the patients the influence of lithium carbonate on the course of radiation neutropenia was evaluated. No appreciable effect of the agent administration in a dose of 900 mg/patient/day was recorder from 9 to 42 day after irradiation. The authors have also considered the correlations of the values of irradiation doses calculated by varying methods of biological dosimetry.

  3. Clinical predictors of acute response to transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in major depression.

    D'Urso, Giordano; Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Rossi, Rodolfo; Brunoni, Andre Russowsky; Bortolomasi, Marco; Ferrucci, Roberta; Priori, Alberto; de Bartolomeis, Andrea; Altamura, Alfredo Carlo

    2017-09-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a promising neuromodulation intervention for poor-responding or refractory depressed patients. However, little is known about predictors of response to this therapy. The present study aimed to analyze clinical predictors of response to tDCS in depressed patients. Clinical data from 3 independent tDCS trials on 171 depressed patients (including unipolar and bipolar depression), were pooled and analyzed to assess predictors of response. Depression severity and the underlying clinical dimensions were measured using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) at baseline and after the tDCS treatment. Age, gender and diagnosis (bipolar/unipolar depression) were also investigated as predictors of response. Linear mixed models were fitted in order to ascertain which HDRS factors were associated with response to tDCS. Age, gender and diagnosis did not show any association with response to treatment. The reduction in HDRS scores after tDCS was strongly associated with the baseline values of "Cognitive Disturbances" and "Retardation" factors, whilst the "Anxiety/Somatization" factor showed a mild association with the response. Open-label design, the lack of control group, and minor differences in stimulation protocols. No differences in response to tDCS were found between unipolar and bipolar patients, suggesting that tDCS is effective for both conditions. "Cognitive disturbance", "Retardation", and "Anxiety/Somatization", were identified as potential clinical predictors of response to tDCS. These findings point to the pre-selection of the potential responders to tDCS, therefore optimizing the clinical use of this technique and the overall cost-effectiveness of the psychiatric intervention for depressed patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Hydrotherapy as a possible neuroleptic and sedative treatment.

    Shevchuk, Nikolai A

    2008-01-01

    Psychotic symptoms such as delusions and hallucinations can have a devastating effect on a patient's social functioning. Since psychosis is rarely congenital, it is possible that lifestyle factors play a role in its etiology. This paper offers a hypothesis that some of these factors could be: (a) A lifestyle lacking evolutionarily conserved stressors such as frequent exposure to heat and/or cold, resulting in a lack of "thermal exercise" which could lead to malfunctioning of the brain. (b) Partial retention and absorption of toxic waste in the colon, as described in more detail below. (c) Genetic makeup that makes a person vulnerable to the above conditions. To test the hypothesis, three types of hydrotherapy are proposed (to be tested separately) as a putative neuroleptic treatment: head-out hot showers, adapted cold showers (twice daily each), and colon hydrotherapy (every 3-12 weeks, which also includes a dietary change according to Harvard's Healthy Eating Pyramid). The following is supporting evidence: Dopaminergic transmission in the mesolimbic pathway is involved in central processing of pain and negative stimuli (e.g. stress-induced analgesia) in addition to its role in the pathophysiology of psychosis. It is also known that if a neural pathway can perform two different functions, then the execution of one function will often suppress the other (e.g. gate control theory of pain). Thus, a pain-based therapy, such as a moderately hot shower, could have a "crowding out" effect on pathological processes within the mesolimbic system. In addition, hyperthermia is known to induce fatigue and depress activity of the frontal cortex (the sedative effect). As described previously, an adapted cold shower could work as a mild electroshock applied to the sensory cortex and, therefore, it might have an antipsychotic effect similar to that of electroconvulsive therapy. Additionally, a cold shower is a vivid example of stress-induced analgesia and would also be expected to

  5. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome during zuclopenthixol therapy in X-linked cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy.

    Rubio Gozalbo, M.E.; Waardenburg, D.A. van; Forget, P.P.; Spaapen, L.J.; Verrips, A.; Vroomen, P.C.

    2001-01-01

    An 8 year-old boy with X-ALD under treatment with simvastatin developed a severe adverse reaction when the dose of his other medication, zuclopenthixol was increased. Both drugs were withdrawn after a diagnosis of neuroleptic malignant syndrome was made.

  6. Afebrile Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome associated with Fluphenazine decanoate: A case report

    Marzieh Assareh

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available "nNeuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS is unusual but could be a lethal reaction associated with neuroleptic drugs. It occurs in almost 0.07-2.2% of patients under treatment with neuroleptics. There are some medical treatments that may also be helpful for its treatment, including dopamine agonists, muscle relaxants, and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT. We present this case to alert the clinicians to the potential for inducing afebrile NMS. Our case is a 41-year-old man with a history of schizophrenia showing signs and symptoms in accordance with NMS, 2 weeks after receiving one dose of 12.5 mg fluphenazine decanoate, abruptly following the 3rdsession of ECT. The patient presented with decreased level of consciousness, muscular rigidity, waxy flexibility, mutism ,generalized tremor, sever diaphoresis and tachycardia which progressed during the previous 24 h. Laboratory data indicated primarily leukocytosis, an increasing level of creatinine phosphokinase and hypokalemia during the next 72h. In patients receiving antipsychotics, any feature of NMS should carefully be evaluated whether it is usual or unusual particularly in patients receiving long acting neuroleptics.

  7. [Case of neuroleptic malignant syndrome following open heart surgery for thoracic aortic aneurysm with parkinson's disease].

    Shinoda, Maiko; Sakamoto, Mik; Shindo, Yuki; Ando, Yumi; Tateda, Takeshi

    2013-12-01

    An 80-year-old woman with Parkinson's disease was scheduled for open heart surgery to repair thoracic aortic aneurysm. Parkinson's symptoms were normally treated using oral levodopa (200 mg), selegiline-hydrochloride (5 mg), bromocriptine-mesilate (2 mg), and amantadine-hydrochloride (200 mg) daily. On the day before surgery, levodopa 50mg was infused intravenously. Another 25 mg of levodopa was infused immediately after surgery. Twenty hours later, the patient developed tremors, heyperventilation, but no obvious muscle rigidity. Two days after surgery, the patient exhibited high fever, hydropoiesis, elevated creatine kinase, and a rise in blood leukocytes. She was diagnosed with neuroleptic malignant syndrome. She was intubated, and received dantrolene sodium. Symptoms of neuroleptic malignant syndrome disappeared on the fourth postoperative day. The stress of open heart surgery, specifically extracorporeal circulation and concomitant dilution of levodopa, triggered neuroleptic malignant syndrome in this patient. Parkinson's patients require higher doses of levodopa prior to surgery to compensate and prevent neuroleptic malignant syndrome after surgery.

  8. Synthesis of a /sup 11/C-labelled neuroleptic drug: pimozide

    Crouzel, C; Mestelan, G; Kraus, E; Lecomte, J M; Comar, D [CEA, 91 - Orsay (France). Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot

    1980-09-01

    Pimozide, a neuroleptic drug which is one of the best ligands for brain dopaminergic receptors in mice in vivo, was labelled with /sup 11/C for eventual investigation in man. This synthesis was carried out in 30 min from phosgene as the /sup 11/C precursor. The synthesis, resulting specific activity and the tissue distribution kinetics in mice are presented and discussed.

  9. Sex differences in plasma homovanillic acid levels in schizophrenia and normal controls: relation to neuroleptic resistance.

    Sumiyoshi, T; Hasegawa, M; Jayathilake, K; Meltzer, H Y

    1997-03-01

    Plasma homovanillic acid (pHVA) levels were compared in a large number of neuroleptic-resistant and -responsive schizophrenic patients (male/female = 161/46) and normal controls (67/27), and correlated with various measures of psychopathology. Psychopathology was evaluated with the brief psychiatric rating scale, the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia-Change version (SADS-C) and SADS-C Global Assessment Scale, the Scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms, the Scale for Assessment of Positive Symptoms (SAPS), and the Quality of Life Scale. No significant differences in pHVA levels between neuroleptic-resistant (n = 104) or -responsive (n = 103) schizophrenic patients, and normal controls, were found; however, there was a main effect for sex, due to higher pHVA levels in women than men. There were no diagnosis x gender or age effects on pHVA levels. No significant correlations were observed between psychopathology ratings and baseline pHVA levels, except with the Hallucinations subscale of SAPS in neuroleptic-responsive patients. Neither duration of neuroleptic washout nor plasma prolactin levels correlated with pHVA levels. Further studies on the origin and significance of the gender difference in pHVA are indicated.

  10. Acute and chronic effects of hypercalcaemia on cortical excitability as studied by 5 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Iacovelli, Elisa; Gilio, Francesca; Mascia, Maria Lucia; Scillitani, Alfredo; Romagnoli, Elisabetta; Pichiorri, Floriana; Fucile, Sergio; Minisola, Salvatore; Inghilleri, Maurizio

    2011-04-01

    We designed the present study to disclose changes in cortical excitability in humans with hypercalcaemia, by delivering repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the primary motor area (M1). In 22 patients with chronic hypercalcaemia related to primary hyperparathyroidism and 22 age-matched healthy subjects 5 Hz-rTMS was delivered at rest and during a sustained voluntary contraction of the target muscle. Changes in the resting motor threshold (RMT), motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes and cortical silent period (CSP) duration were measured and compared in patients and healthy controls. Two of the 22 patients were re-tested after parathyroidectomy when serum calcium had normalized. In a subgroup of healthy subjects, changes in the rTMS parameters were tested before and after acute hypercalcaemia. No significant difference between healthy normocalcaemic subjects and chronic hypercalcaemic patients was found in the RMT values and MEP amplitude and CSP duration evoked by the first stimulus of the trains. During the course of 5 Hz-rTMS trains, MEP size increased significantly less in patients with chronic hypercalcaemia than in healthy subjects, whereas the CSP duration lengthened to a similar extent in both groups. In the two patients studied after parathyroidectomy, rTMS elicited a normal MEP amplitude facilitation. Our findings indicate that acute hypercalcaemia significantly decreased the MEP amplitude facilitation. Given that 5 Hz-rTMS modulates cortical excitability through mechanisms resembling short-term synaptic enhancement, the reduction of MEP amplitude facilitation by hypercalcaemia may be related to Ca2+-dependent changes in synaptic plasticity.

  11. Triiodothyronine Acutely Stimulates Glucose Transport into L6 Muscle Cells Without Increasing Surface GLUT4, GLUT1, or GLUT3

    Teixeira, Silvania Silva; Tamrakar, Akhilesh K.; Goulart-Silva, Francemilson; Serrano-Nascimento, Caroline; Klip, Amira

    2012-01-01

    Background Thyroid hormones (THs) act genomically to stimulate glucose transport by elevating glucose transporter (Slc2a) expression and glucose utilization by cells. However, nongenomic effects of THs are now emerging. Here, we assess how triiodothyronine (T3) acutely affects glucose transport and the content of GLUT4, GLUT1, and GLUT3 at the surface of muscle cells, and possible interactions between T3 and insulin action. Methods Differentiated L6 myotubes transfected with myc-tagged Slc2a4 (L6-GLUT4myc) or Slc2a1 (L6-GLUT1myc) and wild-type L6 myotubes were studied in the following conditions: control, hypothyroid (Tx), Tx plus T3, Tx plus insulin, and Tx plus insulin and T3. Results Glucose uptake and GLUT4 content at the cell surface decreased in the Tx group relative to controls. T3 treatment for 30 minutes increased glucose transport into L6-GLUT4myc cells without altering surface GLUT4 content, which increased only thereafter. The total amount of GLUT4 protein remained unchanged among the groups studied. The surface GLUT1 content of L6-GLUT1myc cells also remained unaltered after T3 treatment; however, in these cells glucose transport was not stimulated by T3. In wild-type L6 cells, although T3 treatment increased the total amount of GLUT3, it did not change the surface GLUT3 content. Moreover, within 30 minutes, T3 stimulation of glucose uptake was additive to that of insulin in L6-GLUT4myc cells. As expected, insulin elevated surface GLUT4 content and glucose uptake. However, interestingly, surface GLUT4 content remained unchanged or even dropped with T3 plus insulin. Conclusions These data reveal that T3 rapidly increases glucose uptake in L6-GLUT4myc cells, which, at least for 30 minutes, did not depend on an increment in GLUT4 at the cell surface yet potentiates insulin action. We propose that this rapid T3 effect involves activation of GLUT4 transporters at the cell surface, but cannot discount the involvement of an unknown GLUT. PMID:22663547

  12. Acute insulin resistance stimulates and insulin sensitization attenuates vascular smooth muscle cell migration and proliferation.

    Cersosimo, Eugenio; Xu, Xiaojing; Upala, Sikarin; Triplitt, Curtis; Musi, Nicolas

    2014-08-01

    Differential activation/deactivation of insulin signaling, PI-3K and MAP-K pathways by high glucose and palmitate, with/out the insulin sensitizer pioglitazone (PIO), have been previously shown in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). To determine the biological impact of these molecular changes, we examined VSMC migration and proliferation ("M"&"P") patterns in similar conditions. VSMCs from healthy human coronary arteries were incubated in growth medium and "M"&"P" were analyzed after exposure to high glucose (25 mmol/L) ± palmitate (200 μmol/L) and ± PIO (8 μmol/L) for 5 h. "M"&"P" were assessed by: (1) polycarbonate membrane barrier with chemo-attractants and extended cell protrusions quantified by optical density (OD595 nm); (2) % change in radius area (2D Assay) using inverted microscopy images; and (3) cell viability assay expressed as cell absorbance (ABS) in media. "M" in 25 mmol/L glucose media increased by ~25% from baseline and % change in radius area rose from ~20% to ~30%. The addition of PIO was accompanied by a significant decrease in "M" from 0.25 ± 0.02 to 0.19 ± 0.02; a comparable decline from 0.25 ± 0.02 to 0.18 ± 0.02 was also seen with 25 mmol/L of glucose +200 μmol/L of palmitate. When PIO was coincubated with high glucose plus palmitate there was a 50% reduction in % change in radius. A ~10% increase in ABS, reflecting augmented "P" in media with 25 mmol/L glucose versus control was documented. The addition of PIO reduced ABS from 0.208 ± 0.03 to 0.183 ± 0.06. Both high glucose and palmitate showed ABS of ~0.140 ± 0.02, which decreased with PIO to ~0.120 ± 0.02, indicating "P" was reduced. These results confirm that high glucose and palmitate stimulate VSMCs migration and proliferation in vitro, which is attenuated by coincubation with the insulin sensitizer PIO. Although, we cannot ascertain whether these functional changes are coincident with the activation/deactivation of signal molecules, our findings are consistent with the

  13. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor priming chemotherapy is more effective than standard chemotherapy as salvage therapy in relapsed acute myeloid leukemia.

    Shen, Ying; He, Aili; Wang, Fangxia; Bai, Ju; Wang, Jianli; Zhao, Wanhong; Zhang, Wanggang; Cao, Xingmei; Chen, Yinxia; Liu, Jie; Ma, Xiaorong; Chen, Hongli; Feng, Yuandong; Yang, Yun

    2017-12-29

    To improve the complete remission (CR) rate of newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and alleviate the severe side effects of double induction chemotherapy, we combined a standard regimen with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) priming chemotherapy to compose a new double induction regimen for AML patients who failed to achieve CR after the first course. Ninety-seven patients with AML who did not achieve CR after the first course of standard chemotherapy were enrolled. Among them, 45 patients received G-CSF priming combined with low-dose chemotherapy during days 20-22 of the first course of chemotherapy, serving as priming group, 52 patients were administered standard chemotherapy again, serving as control group. Between the two groups there were no differences in the French-American-British (FAB) classification, risk status, the first course of chemotherapy, blood cell count or blasts percentage of bone marrow before the second course. But the CR rate was significantly higher and the adverse effect was much lower in the priming group than the control group. Cox multivariate regression analysis showed that WBC level before the second course and the selection of the second chemotherapy regimen were two independent factors for long survival of patients. These results elucidate that standard chemotherapy followed by G-CSF priming new double induction chemotherapy is an effective method for AML patients to improve CR rate and reduce adverse effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. The role of the dopaminergic projections in MFB self-stimulation.

    Gallistel, C R

    1986-11-01

    Psychophysical experiments indicate that the first stage of the reward pathway in medial forebrain bundle self-stimulation consists of small myelinated descending axons. Pharmacological experiments show that neuroleptics attenuate or abolish the rewarding effect. This had led to the hypothesis that the descending myelinated axons synapse on an ascending dopaminergic second stage projection. 2-Deoxy-[14C]glucose autoradiography in self-stimulating animals or animals receiving automatically administered rewarding stimulation after treatment with reward-blocking doses of pimozide reveals activation of a descending myelinated system but no stimulation-produced activation of an ascending dopaminergic projection system, even though the autoradiographic method reveals the mild elevations and depressions of activity in dopaminergic terminal fields consequent upon injections of neuroleptics and amphetamine, respectively, and the strong activation of the nigrostriatal projection produced by stimulating directly in the substantia nigra. When the effects of neuroleptics and clonidine are measured by the psychophysical method (that is, by lateral shifts in the rate-frequency function), it is found that both drugs produce only gradual and rather small attenuations of rewarding efficacy up to doses at which it is no longer possible to measure their effects. It is suggested that, for neuroleptics at least, the rewarding effect abruptly fails at these doses. It is further suggested that these drugs do not act on the rewarding pathway itself, but on the process by which the rewarding signal is converted to an enduring rewarding effect.

  15. Sensitivity Analysis of Vagus Nerve Stimulation Parameters on Acute Cardiac Autonomic Responses: Chronotropic, Inotropic and Dromotropic Effects.

    David Ojeda

    Full Text Available Although the therapeutic effects of Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS have been recognized in pre-clinical and pilot clinical studies, the effect of different stimulation configurations on the cardiovascular response is still an open question, especially in the case of VNS delivered synchronously with cardiac activity. In this paper, we propose a formal mathematical methodology to analyze the acute cardiac response to different VNS configurations, jointly considering the chronotropic, dromotropic and inotropic cardiac effects. A latin hypercube sampling method was chosen to design a uniform experimental plan, composed of 75 different VNS configurations, with different values for the main parameters (current amplitude, number of delivered pulses, pulse width, interpulse period and the delay between the detected cardiac event and VNS onset. These VNS configurations were applied to 6 healthy, anesthetized sheep, while acquiring the associated cardiovascular response. Unobserved VNS configurations were estimated using a Gaussian process regression (GPR model. In order to quantitatively analyze the effect of each parameter and their combinations on the cardiac response, the Sobol sensitivity method was applied to the obtained GPR model and inter-individual sensitivity markers were estimated using a bootstrap approach. Results highlight the dominant effect of pulse current, pulse width and number of pulses, which explain respectively 49.4%, 19.7% and 6.0% of the mean global cardiovascular variability provoked by VNS. More interestingly, results also quantify the effect of the interactions between VNS parameters. In particular, the interactions between current and pulse width provoke higher cardiac effects than the changes on the number of pulses alone (between 6 and 25% of the variability. Although the sensitivity of individual VNS parameters seems similar for chronotropic, dromotropic and inotropic responses, the interacting effects of VNS parameters

  16. High Definition Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Induces Both Acute and Persistent Changes in Broadband Cortical Synchronization: a Simultaneous tDCS-EEG Study

    Roy, Abhrajeet; Baxter, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop methods for simultaneously acquiring electrophysiological data during high definition transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) using high resolution electroencephalography (EEG). Previous studies have pointed to the after effects of tDCS on both motor and cognitive performance, and there appears to be potential for using tDCS in a variety of clinical applications. However, little is known about the real-time effects of tDCS on rhythmic cortical activity in humans due to the technical challenges of simultaneously obtaining electrophysiological data during ongoing stimulation. Furthermore, the mechanisms of action of tDCS in humans are not well understood. We have conducted a simultaneous tDCS-EEG study in a group of healthy human subjects. Significant acute and persistent changes in spontaneous neural activity and event related synchronization (ERS) were observed during and after the application of high definition tDCS over the left sensorimotor cortex. Both anodal and cathodal stimulation resulted in acute global changes in broadband cortical activity which were significantly different than the changes observed in response to sham stimulation. For the group of 8 subjects studied, broadband individual changes in spontaneous activity during stimulation were apparent both locally and globally. In addition, we found that high definition tDCS of the left sensorimotor cortex can induce significant ipsilateral and contralateral changes in event related desynchronization (ERD) and ERS during motor imagination following the end of the stimulation period. Overall, our results demonstrate the feasibility of acquiring high resolution EEG during high definition tDCS and provide evidence that tDCS in humans directly modulates rhythmic cortical synchronization during and after its administration. PMID:24956615

  17. Neuroleptics as therapeutic compounds stabilizing neuromuscular transmission in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Patten, Shunmoogum A; Aggad, Dina; Martinez, Jose; Tremblay, Elsa; Petrillo, Janet; Armstrong, Gary Ab; La Fontaine, Alexandre; Maios, Claudia; Liao, Meijiang; Ciura, Sorana; Wen, Xiao-Yan; Rafuse, Victor; Ichida, Justin; Zinman, Lorne; Julien, Jean-Pierre; Kabashi, Edor; Robitaille, Richard; Korngut, Lawrence; Parker, J Alexander; Drapeau, Pierre

    2017-11-16

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rapidly progressing, fatal disorder with no effective treatment. We used simple genetic models of ALS to screen phenotypically for potential therapeutic compounds. We screened libraries of compounds in C. elegans, validated hits in zebrafish, and tested the most potent molecule in mice and in a small clinical trial. We identified a class of neuroleptics that restored motility in C. elegans and in zebrafish, and the most potent was pimozide, which blocked T-type Ca2+ channels in these simple models and stabilized neuromuscular transmission in zebrafish and enhanced it in mice. Finally, a short randomized controlled trial of sporadic ALS subjects demonstrated stabilization of motility and evidence of target engagement at the neuromuscular junction. Simple genetic models are, thus, useful in identifying promising compounds for the treatment of ALS, such as neuroleptics, which may stabilize neuromuscular transmission and prolong survival in this disease.

  18. Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome in a Patient with Tongue Cancer: A Report of a Rare Case

    Osamu Baba

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS is a rare but life-threatening complication of neuroleptic drugs, which are used widely in head and neck cancer (HANC patients who develop delirium. Methods and Results. Postoperative delirium in a 39-year-old man with tongue cancer was treated with haloperidol and chlorpromazine. Three days after the first administration of antipsychotics, the patient exhibited elevated body temperature, autonomic and extrapyramidal symptoms, and impaired consciousness. A definitive diagnosis was made using the research diagnostic criteria for NMS in the DSM-IV, and the antipsychotics were immediately discontinued. The patient was given dantrolene and bromocriptine to treat the NMS. The patient’s hyperthermia, elevated creatinin kinase (CK, and muscle rigidity improved gradually, with all symptoms of NMS resolving completely by 13 days after the diagnosis. Conclusions. HANC surgeons must be alert for early signs of NMS and use antipsychotics conservatively to avoid NMS and its potentially fatal outcome.

  19. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome: a case responding to electroconvulsive therapy plus bupropion

    Quintí Foguet-Boreu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS is a severe motor syndrome occurring as a consequence of neuroleptic treatment. We present a case of a 67-year-old Caucasian woman with a history of a major depressive disorder with psychotic features. During her third hospital admission, symptoms of autonomic instability, hyperpyrexia, severe extrapyramidal side effects, and delirium appeared, suggesting NMS due to concomitant treatment with risperidone and quetiapine, among other drugs. Despite several consecutive pharmacological treatments (lorazepam, bromocriptine and amantadine and prompt initiation of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT, clinical improvement was observed only after combining bupropion with ECT. The symptoms that had motivated the admission gradually remitted and the patient was discharged home. Bupropion increases dopaminergic activity in both the nucleus accumbens and the prefrontal cortex. Therefore, from a physiopathological standpoint, bupropion has a potential role in treating NMS. However, there is scarce evidence supporting this approach and therefore future cases should be carefully considered.

  20. Negative symptoms in nondeficit syndrome respond to neuroleptic treatment with changes in plasma homovanillic acid concentrations.

    Suzuki, E; Kanba, S; Koshikawa, H; Nibuya, M; Yagi, G; Asai, M

    1996-05-01

    Deficit syndrome (DS) in schizophrenia is characterized by serious, chronic, and primary negative symptoms. We investigated differences in response to neuroleptic treatment between 8 DS patients and 6 nondeficit syndrome (NDS) patients who had the selective dopamine-D2 receptor blocker bromperidol added to their neuroleptic regimens. First, 9 mg/d was administered for 4 weeks, followed by 18 mg/d for another 4 weeks. Plasma homovanillic acid (pHVA) and plasma bromperidol concentrations were measured, and psychiatric symptoms were scored. In the NDS patients, both positive and negative symptoms improved. However, only the positive symptom scores changed in the DS patients. On day 4, pHVA concentrations of the NDS patients alone were significantly elevated. Plasma bromperidol concentrations did not differ between the groups. These results suggest that bromperidol exerts different effects on negative symptoms and pHVA concentrations between NDS and DS patients, effects that are unrelated to plasma bromperidol concentrations.

  1. Actometry and Barnes Akathisia Rating Scale in neuroleptic-induced akathisia.

    Janno, Sven; Holi, Matti M; Tuisku, Katinka; Wahlbeck, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated Barnes Akathisia Rating Scale (BARS) and standardized lower limb actometry in quantifying neuroleptic-induced akathisia (NIA) in 99 schizophrenia patients. Both instruments discriminated well between NIA and non-NIA patients and they correlated weakly but significantly. BARS was superior to actometry in screening DSM-IV diagnosed NIA patients. The results of this methodological study provide BARS with objective validation through movement measuring, that it has been suggested to need.

  2. Role of dopamine receptor and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor blockade in the antiapomorphine action of neuroleptics

    Zharkovskii, A.M.; Langel, Yu.L.; Chereshka, K.S.; Zharkovskaya, T.A.

    1987-08-01

    The authors analyze the role of dopamine and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor blocking components in the antistereotypic action of neuroleptics with different chemical structure. To determine dopamine-blocking activity in vitro, binding of /sup 3/H-spiperone with membranes of the rat striatum was measured. To study the blocking action of the substances on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, binding of /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzylate with brain membranes was chosen.

  3. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome and subsequent clozapine-withdrawal effects in a patient with refractory schizophrenia

    Cheng, Minfeng; Gu, Huaying; Zheng, Liangrong; Wang, Houliang; Zhong, Zhiyong; Wen, Shenglin

    2016-01-01

    Minfeng Cheng,* Huaying Gu,* Liangrong Zheng, Houliang Wang, Zhiyong Zhong, Shenglin Wen Department of Psychiatry, Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Here, we report a female patient developing neuroleptic malignant syndrome following the use of a combination of clozapine and haloperidol. Subsequently, the patient presented withdrawal effects after an abrupt ...

  4. A Rare Case of Myxedema Coma with Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS)

    Dixit, Siddharth; Dutta, Manoj Kumar; Namdeo, Mayank

    2015-01-01

    Myxedema coma or hypothyroid crisis is an endocrine emergency and needs ICU management. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is another medical emergency which needs high degree of clinical suspicion else mortality can be high. There is a paradox in co existence of myxedema coma and NMS. While one is hypometabolic state another is hypermetabolic state and both can be precipitated by antipsychotics use. Hypothermia and flaccidity commonly expected in myxedema coma may mask fever and rigidity o...

  5. Neuroleptic-induced movement disorders in a naturalistic schizophrenia population: diagnostic value of actometric movement patterns

    Tuisku Katinka

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroleptic-induced movement disorders (NIMDs have overlapping co-morbidity. Earlier studies have described typical clinical movement patterns for individual NIMDs. This study aimed to identify specific movement patterns for each individual NIMD using actometry. Methods A naturalistic population of 99 schizophrenia inpatients using conventional antipsychotics and clozapine was evaluated. Subjects with NIMDs were categorized using the criteria for NIMD found in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders – Fourth Edition (DSM-IV. Two blinded raters evaluated the actometric-controlled rest activity data for activity periods, rhythmical activity, frequencies, and highest acceleration peaks. A simple subjective question was formulated to test patient-based evaluation of NIMD. Results The patterns of neuroleptic-induced akathisia (NIA and pseudoakathisia (PsA were identifiable in actometry with excellent inter-rater reliability. The answers to the subjective question about troubles with movements distinguished NIA patients from other patients rather well. Also actometry had rather good screening performances in distinguishing akathisia from other NIMD. Actometry was not able to reliably detect patterns of neuroleptic-induced parkinsonism and tardive dyskinesia. Conclusion The present study showed that pooled NIA and PsA patients had a different pattern in lower limb descriptive actometry than other patients in a non-selected sample. Careful questioning of patients is a useful method of diagnosing NIA in a clinical setting.

  6. Neuroleptic-induced movement disorders in a naturalistic schizophrenia population: diagnostic value of actometric movement patterns.

    Janno, Sven; Holi, Matti M; Tuisku, Katinka; Wahlbeck, Kristian

    2008-04-18

    Neuroleptic-induced movement disorders (NIMDs) have overlapping co-morbidity. Earlier studies have described typical clinical movement patterns for individual NIMDs. This study aimed to identify specific movement patterns for each individual NIMD using actometry. A naturalistic population of 99 schizophrenia inpatients using conventional antipsychotics and clozapine was evaluated. Subjects with NIMDs were categorized using the criteria for NIMD found in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders - Fourth Edition (DSM-IV).Two blinded raters evaluated the actometric-controlled rest activity data for activity periods, rhythmical activity, frequencies, and highest acceleration peaks. A simple subjective question was formulated to test patient-based evaluation of NIMD. The patterns of neuroleptic-induced akathisia (NIA) and pseudoakathisia (PsA) were identifiable in actometry with excellent inter-rater reliability. The answers to the subjective question about troubles with movements distinguished NIA patients from other patients rather well. Also actometry had rather good screening performances in distinguishing akathisia from other NIMD. Actometry was not able to reliably detect patterns of neuroleptic-induced parkinsonism and tardive dyskinesia. The present study showed that pooled NIA and PsA patients had a different pattern in lower limb descriptive actometry than other patients in a non-selected sample. Careful questioning of patients is a useful method of diagnosing NIA in a clinical setting.

  7. A case of neuroleptic malignant syndrome induced by risperidone in a schizophrenic woman.

    Gallelli, Luca; Spagnuolo, Vincenzo; Palleria, Caterina; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Ferraro, Maria

    2009-05-01

    We report a case of neuroleptic malignant syndrome in a woman who assumed risperidone for schizoaffective disorders. A 45-year-old woman affected by schizoaffective disorders was admitted to Infectious Disease unit of Crotone Hospital because of a diagnosis of a fever of unknown origin. Clinical evaluation documented confusion and dysphoria, whereas chemical blood evaluation revealed acidosis and liver dysfunction. After few days she was transferred to the Operative Unit of Internal Medicine of San Giovanni in Fiore Hospital because of an increase in liver transaminases. Clinical evaluation showed the persistence of fever (38.8 degrees Celsius), with an increase in CPK, and liver enzymes. Pharmacological evaluation indicated a probable relationship between risperidone and NMS and led to a diagnosis of neuroleptic malignant syndrome associated with risperidone in a woman with schizophrenia. About seven days later, we recorded a complete resolution of her psychiatric symptoms. We postulate a possible interaction between risperidone and neuroleptic malignant syndrome and we suggest to use risperidone with caution in both young and middle aged people.

  8. Effect of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Severely Affected Arm-Hand Motor Function in Patients After an Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Pilot Randomized Control Trial.

    Rabadi, Meheroz H; Aston, Christopher E

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this article was to determine whether cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (c-tDCS) to unaffected primary motor cortex (PMC) plus conventional occupational therapy (OT) improves functional motor recovery of the affected arm hand in patients after an acute ischemic stroke compared with sham transcranial direct current stimulation plus conventional OT. In this prospective, randomized, double-blinded, sham-controlled trial of 16 severe, acute ischemic stroke patients with severe arm-hand weakness were randomly assigned to either experimental (c-tDCS plus OT; n = 8) or control (sham transcranial direct current stimulation plus OT; n = 8) groups. All patients received a standard 3-hr in-patient rehabilitation therapy, plus an additional ten 30-min sessions of tDCS. During each session, 1 mA of cathodal stimulation to the unaffected PMC is performed followed by the patient's scheduled OT. The primary outcome measure was change in Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) total and subscores on discharge. Application of c-tDCS to unaffected PMC resulted in a clinically relevant 10-point improvement in the affected arm-hand function based on ARAT total score compared with a 2-point improvement in the control group. Application of 30-min of c-tDCS to the unaffected PMC showed a 10-point improvement in the ARAT score. This corresponds to a large effect size in improvement of affected arm-hand function in patients with severe, acute ischemic stroke. Although not statistically significant, this suggests that larger studies, enrolling at least 25 patients in each group, and with a longer follow-up are warranted.

  9. An Epstein-Barr virus encoded inhibitor of Colony Stimulating Factor-1 signaling is an important determinant for acute and persistent EBV infection.

    Makoto Ohashi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infection is the most common cause of Infectious Mononucleosis. Nearly all adult humans harbor life-long, persistent EBV infection which can lead to development of cancers including Hodgkin Lymphoma, Burkitt Lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, gastric carcinoma, and lymphomas in immunosuppressed patients. BARF1 is an EBV replication-associated, secreted protein that blocks Colony Stimulating Factor 1 (CSF-1 signaling, an innate immunity pathway not targeted by any other virus species. To evaluate effects of BARF1 in acute and persistent infection, we mutated the BARF1 homologue in the EBV-related herpesvirus, or lymphocryptovirus (LCV, naturally infecting rhesus macaques to create a recombinant rhLCV incapable of blocking CSF-1 (ΔrhBARF1. Rhesus macaques orally challenged with ΔrhBARF1 had decreased viral load indicating that CSF-1 is important for acute virus infection. Surprisingly, ΔrhBARF1 was also associated with dramatically lower virus setpoints during persistent infection. Normal acute viral load and normal viral setpoints during persistent rhLCV infection could be restored by Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus-induced immunosuppression prior to oral inoculation with ΔrhBARF1 or infection of immunocompetent animals with a recombinant rhLCV where the rhBARF1 was repaired. These results indicate that BARF1 blockade of CSF-1 signaling is an important immune evasion strategy for efficient acute EBV infection and a significant determinant for virus setpoint during persistent EBV infection.

  10. Changes in mitochondrial perilipin 3 and perilipin 5 protein content in rat skeletal muscle following endurance training and acute stimulated contraction.

    Ramos, S V; Turnbull, P C; MacPherson, R E K; LeBlanc, P J; Ward, W E; Peters, S J

    2015-04-01

    What is the central question of this study? The aim was to determine whether mitochondrial protein content of perilipin 3 (PLIN3) and perilipin 5 (PLIN5) is increased following endurance training and whether mitochondrial PLIN5 protein is increased to a greater extent in endurance-trained rats when compared with sedentary rats following acute contraction. What is the main finding and its importance? Mitochondrial PLIN3 but not PLIN5 protein was increased in endurance-trained compared with sedentary rats, suggesting a mitochondrial role for PLIN3 due to chronic exercise. Contrary to our hypothesis, acute mitochondrial PLIN5 protein was similar in both sedentary and endurance-trained rats. Endurance training results in an increased association between skeletal muscle lipid droplets and mitochondria. This association is likely to be important for the expected increase in intramuscular fatty acid oxidation that occurs with endurance training. The perilipin family of lipid droplet proteins, PLIN(2-5), are thought to play a role in skeletal muscle lipolysis. Recently, results from our laboratory demonstrated that skeletal muscle mitochondria contain PLIN3 and PLIN5 protein. Furthermore, 30 min of stimulated contraction induces an increased mitochondrial PLIN5 content. To determine whether mitochondrial content of PLIN3 and PLIN5 is altered with endurance training, Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into sedentary or endurance-trained groups for 8 weeks of treadmill running followed by an acute (30 min) sciatic nerve stimulation to induce lipolysis. Mitochondrial PLIN3 protein was ∼1.5-fold higher in red gastrocnemius of endurance-trained rats compared with sedentary animals, with no change in mitochondrial PLIN5 protein. In addition, there was an increase in plantaris intramuscular lipid storage. Acute electrically stimulated contraction in red gastrocnemius from sedentary and endurance-trained rats resulted in a similar increase of mitochondrial PLIN5 between

  11. Neuroleptic malignant-like syndrome with a slight elevation of creatine-kinase levels and respiratory failure in a patient with Parkinson's disease

    Wei L

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Li Wei,1,2 Yinghui Chen1,2 1Department of Neurology, Jinshan Hospital, 2Department of Neurology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China Abstract: Neuroleptic malignant-like syndrome (NMLS is a rare but catastrophic complication of drug treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD. Sudden withdrawal and abrupt reduction of antiparkinsonian drugs are major risk factors. Just as its name suggests, the clinical features of NMLS are similar to neuroleptic malignant syndrome, which is a dangerous adverse response to antipsychotic drugs. Both of these conditions can present with hyperthermia, marked muscle rigidity, altered consciousness, autonomic dysfunction, and elevated serum creatine-kinase (CK levels. However, we describe a special NMLS case with a slight elevation of CK levels and respiratory failure in the full course of her treatment. The patient, a 68-year-old woman with a 4-years history of Parkinson's disease, presented with hyperthermia and severe muscular rigidity. During the course of her treatment, her maximum temperature was extremely high (above 41°C. At the beginning, the diagnosis of NMLS secondary to dopamine decrease was difficult to make, because her initial blood examination revealed that her serum CK levels were mildly elevated and decreased to normal range rapidly. Although antiparkinsonian drugs and supportive treatment were applied, the patient developed an acute respiratory failure in the early course of treatment. This case report highlights that when confronted with Parkinson's patients with high body temperature and muscle rigidity, NMLS should be taken into consideration even if there is no CK elevation. Likewise, the need for supportive care is essential, because its complications are severe, even such as respiratory failure. Keywords: antiparkinsonian drugs, creatine kinase, parkinsonism–hyperpyrexia syndrome, respiratory failure

  12. Leucine supplementation stimulates protein synthesis and reduces degradation signal activation in muscle of newborn pigs during acute endotoxemia

    Sepsis disrupts skeletal muscle proteostasis and mitigates the anabolic response to leucine (Leu) in muscle of mature animals. We have shown that Leu stimulates muscle protein synthesis (PS) in healthy neonatal piglets. To determine if supplemental Leu can stimulate PS and reduce protein degradation...

  13. The effects of elevated levels of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO₃) on the acute power output and time to fatigue of maximally stimulated mouse soleus and EDL muscles.

    Higgins, M F; Tallis, J; Price, M J; James, R S

    2013-05-01

    This study examined the effects of elevated buffer capacity [~32 mM HCO₃(-)] through administration of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO₃) on maximally stimulated isolated mouse soleus (SOL) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles undergoing cyclical length changes at 37 °C. The elevated buffering capacity was of an equivalent level to that achieved in humans with acute oral supplementation. We evaluated the acute effects of elevated [HCO₃(-)] on (1) maximal acute power output (PO) and (2) time to fatigue to 60 % of maximum control PO (TLIM60), the level of decline in muscle PO observed in humans undertaking similar exercise, using the work loop technique. Acute PO was on average 7.0 ± 4.8 % greater for NaHCO₃-treated EDL muscles (P < 0.001; ES = 2.0) and 3.6 ± 1.8 % greater for NaHCO₃-treated SOL muscles (P < 0.001; ES = 2.3) compared to CON. Increases in PO were likely due to greater force production throughout shortening. The acute effects of NaHCO₃ on EDL were significantly greater (P < 0.001; ES = 0.9) than on SOL. Treatment of EDL (P = 0.22; ES = 0.6) and SOL (P = 0.19; ES = 0.9) with NaHCO₃ did not alter the pattern of fatigue. Although significant differences were not observed in whole group data, the fatigability of muscle performance was variable, suggesting that there might be inter-individual differences in response to NaHCO₃ supplementation. These results present the best indication to date that NaHCO₃ has direct peripheral effects on mammalian skeletal muscle resulting in increased acute power output.

  14. Acute Frontal Lobe Dysfunction Following Prefrontal Low-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in a Patient with Treatment-Resistant Depression

    Guilhem Carle

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The potential of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS to treat numerous neurological and psychiatric disorders has been thoroughly studied for the last two decades. Here, we report for the first time, the case of a 65-year-old woman suffering from treatment-resistant depression who developed an acute frontal lobe syndrome following eight sessions of low-frequency rTMS (LF-rTMS to the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex while also treated with sertraline and mianserin. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying such an unexpected acute frontal lobe dysfunction are discussed in relation to the therapeutic use of LF-rTMS in combination with pharmacotherapy in depressed patients.

  15. Acute but not chronic activation of brain glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors enhances glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in mice.

    Tudurí, E; Beiroa, D; Porteiro, B; López, M; Diéguez, C; Nogueiras, R

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the role of brain glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) in pancreatic β-cell function. To determine the role of brain GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) on β-cell function, we administered intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusions of GLP-1 or the specific GLP-1 antagonist exendin-9 (Ex-9), in both an acute and a chronic setting. We observed that acute i.c.v. GLP-1 infusion potentiates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) and improves glucose tolerance, whereas central GLP-1R blockade with Ex-9 impaired glucose excursion after a glucose load. Sustained activation of central nervous system GLP-1R, however, did not produce any effect on either GSIS or glucose tolerance. Similarly, ex vivo GSIS performed in islets from mice chronically infused with i.c.v. GLP-1 resulted in no differences compared with controls. In addition, in mice fed a high-fat diet we observed that acute i.c.v. GLP-1 infusion improved glucose tolerance without changes in GSIS, while chronic GLP-1R activation had no effect on glucose homeostasis. Our results indicate that, under non-clamped conditions, brain GLP-1 plays a functional neuroendocrine role in the acute regulation of glucose homeostasis in both lean and obese rodents. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A randomized controlled trial of surface neuromuscular electrical stimulation applied early after acute stroke: effects on wrist pain, spasticity and contractures.

    Malhotra, Shweta; Rosewilliam, Sheeba; Hermens, Hermie; Roffe, Christine; Jones, Peter; Pandyan, Anand David

    2013-07-01

    To investigate effects of surface neuromuscular electrical stimulation applied early after stroke to the wrist and finger extensor muscles on upper limb pain, spasticity and contractures in patients with no functional arm movement. Secondary analysis from a Phase II, randomized, controlled, single-blind study. An acute hospital stroke unit. Patients with no useful arm function within six weeks of a first stroke. Patients were randomized to treatment (30-minute sessions of surface neuromuscular stimulation to wrist and finger extensors and 45 minutes of physiotherapy) or control (45 minutes of physiotherapy) groups. All patients had access to routine care. Treatment was given for six weeks from recruitment. Ninety patients (49% male, median age 74 years (range 32-98), median time since stroke onset three weeks (range one to six weeks)) were included. Treatment compliance was variable (mean 28%). The treatment prevented the development of pain (mean difference in rate of change 0.4 units/week, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.09 to 0.6). Treatment may have prevented a deterioration in contractures (quantified by measuring passive range of movement) in severely disabled patients (mean rate of deterioration -0.5 deg/week; 95% CI -0.9 to -0.06). There were no significant changes in stiffness and spasticity. Surface neuromuscular electrical stimulation reduces pain in stroke patients with a non-functional arm. There was some evidence that treatment with electrical stimulation was beneficial in reducing contractures. Treatment had no effect on spasticity.

  17. Context-dependent efficacy of a counter-conditioning strategy with atypical neuroleptic drugs in mice previously sensitized to cocaine.

    Oliveira-Lima, A J; Marinho, Eav; Santos-Baldaia, R; Hollais, A W; Baldaia, M A; Talhati, F; Ribeiro, L T; Wuo-Silva, R; Berro, L F; Frussa-Filho, R

    2017-02-06

    We have previously demonstrated that treatment with ziprasidone and aripiprazole selectively inhibit the development of behavioral sensitization to cocaine in mice. We now investigate their effects on a counter-conditioning strategy in mice and the importance of the treatment environment for this phenomenon. Evaluate the context-specificity of ziprasidone and aripiprazole on conditioned locomotion to cocaine and cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion and behavioral sensitization in a counter-conditioning strategy in mice. Animals were sensitized with saline or cocaine injections in the open-field apparatus in a 15-day intermittent treatment and subsequently treated with vehicle, 5mg/kg ziprasidone or 0.1mg/kg aripiprazole paired to the open-field or the home-cage for 4 alternate days. Mice were then challenged with saline and cocaine in the open-field apparatus on subsequent days. While treatment with ziprasidone decreased spontaneous locomotion and conditioned locomotion alike, treatment with aripiprazole specifically attenuated the expression of conditioned hyperlocomotion to cocaine. Ziprasidone and aripiprazole had no effects on cocaine-induced conditioned hyperlocomotion observed during saline challenge after drug withdrawal. Treatment with either ziprasidone or aripiprazole when previously given in the cocaine-paired environment attenuated the subsequent expression of behavioral sensitization to cocaine. Animals treated with aripiprazole in the open-field, but not in the home-cage, showed a blunted response to cocaine when receiving a cocaine challenge for the first time. Both neuroleptic drugs showed a context-dependent effectiveness in attenuating long-term expression of cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization when administered in the cocaine-associated environment, with aripiprazole also showing effectiveness in blocking the expression of acute cocaine effects. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. A Mixed Presentation of Serotonin Syndrome vs Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome in a 12-Year-Old Boy.

    Sun, Christie; Sweet, Hannah; Minns, Alicia B; Shapiro, Desiree; Jenkins, Willough

    2018-04-24

    Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) and serotonin syndrome (SS) are serious medical conditions associated with commonly prescribed psychiatric medications. Although the mechanisms differ, they can be clinically difficult to distinguish. We report a case of a pediatric patient with complicated psychiatric history that developed features of both syndromes in the setting of polypharmacy. A 12-year-old boy with a history of developmental delay, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder presented to the emergency department with behavior changes consisting of delayed reactions, gait instability, drooling, and slowed movements. Ten days before presentation, his outpatient psychiatrist had made multiple medication changes including discontinuation of cyproheptadine (an appetite stimulant) and initiation of aripiprazole. On arrival, the patient was noted to be tachycardia and hypertensive for age. He was disoriented, intermittently agitated, and tremulous with increased tonicity, clonus in the lower extremities, and mydriasis. He was supportively treated with lorazepam and intravenous fluids while discontinuing potential offending agents. His course was complicated by hypertension and agitation managed with dexmedetomidine infusion and benzodiazepines. His mental status, tremors, and laboratory values began to improve over the next 2 days, and eventually transitioned to the inpatient psychiatric unit on hospital day 7. Diagnosis of NMS or SS can be difficult when there is overlap between syndromes, particularly in the setting of multiple potential offending agents or underlying developmental delay. In addition, pediatric patients may present atypically as compared with adult patients with the same condition. The use of antipsychotic medications for young children with behavioral problems has risen dramatically in the last decade, increasing their risk for developing SS or NMS.

  19. Pavor nocturnus: a complication of single daily tricyclic or neuroleptic dosage.

    Flemenbaum, A

    1976-05-01

    The author tested the hypothesis that a single bedtime dosage schedule of tricyclic or neuroleptic medication produces increased frequency of night terrors by administering a questionnaire to 30 medical patients who were not receiving such medications and 100 psychiatric patients on either multiple- or single-dosage schedules. Psychiatric patients on multiple-dosage schedules reported no more frightening dreams than the medical patients, whereas almost three-fourths of those receiving single bedtime doses had frightening dreams, a significant difference from the medical sample. This preliminary report is presented to call attention to the possible undesirable effects of a single dose schedule.

  20. Drug information update. Atypical antipsychotics and neuroleptic malignant syndrome: nuances and pragmatics of the association.

    Sarkar, Siddharth; Gupta, Nitin

    2017-08-01

    Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a rare but potentially fatal adverse event associated with the use of antipsychotics. Although atypical antipsychotics were initially considered to carry no risk of NMS, reports have accumulated over time implicating them in NMS causation. Almost all atypical antipsychotics have been reported to be associated with NMS. The clinical profile of NMS caused by certain atypical antipsychotics such as clozapine has been reported to be considerably different from the NMS produced by typical antipsychotics, with diaphoresis encountered more commonly, and rigidity and tremor encountered less frequently. This article briefly discusses the evidence relating to the occurrence, presentation and management of NMS induced by atypical antipsychotics.

  1. Progressive Encephalomyelitis with Rigidity and Myoclonus in an Intellectually Disabled Patient Mimicking Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome

    Zheyu Xu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of 32-year-old male with profound mental retardation and autism spectrum disorder who had presented with seizures, rigidity and elevated creatine kinase and was initially diagnosed as neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS. The patient subsequently had a complicated clinical course, developing refractory status epilepticus, which lead to the eventual diagnosis of progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM. We discuss the clinical similarities and differences between NMS and PERM, and highlight the need to consider alternative diagnoses when the clinical picture of NMS is atypical, particularly in this patient group where the history and clinical examination may be challenging.

  2. Patch-clamp recordings of rat neurons from acute brain slices of the somatosensory cortex during magnetic stimulation.

    Pashut, Tamar; Magidov, Dafna; Ben-Porat, Hana; Wolfus, Shuki; Friedman, Alex; Perel, Eli; Lavidor, Michal; Bar-Gad, Izhar; Yeshurun, Yosef; Korngreen, Alon

    2014-01-01

    Although transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a popular tool for both basic research and clinical applications, its actions on nerve cells are only partially understood. We have previously predicted, using compartmental modeling, that magnetic stimulation of central nervous system neurons depolarized the soma followed by initiation of an action potential in the initial segment of the axon. The simulations also predict that neurons with low current threshold are more susceptible to magnetic stimulation. Here we tested these theoretical predictions by combining in vitro patch-clamp recordings from rat brain slices with magnetic stimulation and compartmental modeling. In agreement with the modeling, our recordings demonstrate the dependence of magnetic stimulation-triggered action potentials on the type and state of the neuron and its orientation within the magnetic field. Our results suggest that the observed effects of TMS are deeply rooted in the biophysical properties of single neurons in the central nervous system and provide a framework both for interpreting existing TMS data and developing new simulation-based tools and therapies.

  3. Patch-clamp recordings of rat neurons from acute brain slices of the somatosensory cortex during magnetic stimulation

    Tamar ePashut

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Although transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is a popular tool for both basic research and clinical applications, its actions on nerve cells are only partially understood. We have previously predicted, using compartmental modeling, that magnetic stimulation of central nervous system neurons depolarized the soma followed by initiation of an action potential in the initial segment of the axon. The simulations also predict that neurons with low current threshold are more susceptible to magnetic stimulation. Here we tested these theoretical predictions by combining in vitro patch-clamp recordings from rat brain slices with magnetic stimulation and compartmental modeling. In agreement with the modeling, our recordings demonstrate the dependence of magnetic stimulation-triggered action potentials on the type and state of the neuron and its orientation within the magnetic field. Our results suggest that the observed effects of TMS are deeply rooted in the biophysical properties of single neurons in the central nervous system and provide a framework both for interpreting existing TMS data and developing new simulation-based tools and therapies.

  4. Imaging dopamine-2 receptors in cebus apella at PET with F-18 fluoropropylspiperone and F-18 fluorinated benzamide neuroleptic

    Mukherjee, J.; Yasillo, N.J.; Luh, K.E.; Diamond, M.; Levy, D.; Chen, C.T.; Cooper, M.

    1990-01-01

    Tardive dyskinesia (TD), an intractable disorder believed to involve dysfunction of dopamine D-2 receptors, often occurs with neuroleptic treatment in neuropsychiatric illness. This paper investigates the role of these receptors using a unique primate model of TD with newly developed (F-18) fluorinated radioligands. Two radioligands, (F-18)FPMB (one of a new class of fluorinated benzamide neuroleptics) have been used to image these receptors in a normal Cebus apella. Either (F-18)FPSP or (F-18)FPMB was administered intravenously to a normal Cebus, which was scanned for 2 hours in a PETT VI tomograph

  5. Study design for the fostering eating after stroke with transcranial direct current stimulation trial: a randomized controlled intervention for improving Dysphagia after acute ischemic stroke.

    Marchina, Sarah; Schlaug, Gottfried; Kumar, Sandeep

    2015-03-01

    Dysphagia is a major stroke complication but lacks effective therapy that can promote recovery. Noninvasive brain stimulation with and without peripheral sensorimotor activities may be an attractive treatment option for swallowing recovery but has not been systematically investigated in the stroke population. This article describes the study design of the first prospective, single-center, double-blinded trial of anodal versus sham transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) used in combination with swallowing exercises in patients with dysphagia from an acute ischemic stroke. The aim of this study is to gather safety data on cumulative sessions of tDCS in acute-subacute phases of stroke, obtain information about effects of this intervention on important physiologic and clinically relevant swallowing parameters, and examine possible dose effects. Ninety-nine consecutive patients with dysphagia from an acute unilateral hemispheric infarction with a Penetration and Aspiration Scale (PAS) score of 4 or more and without other confounding reasons for dysphagia will be enrolled at a single tertiary care center. Subjects will be randomized to either a high or low dose tDCS or a sham group and will undergo 10 sessions over 5 consecutive days concomitantly with effortful swallowing maneuvers. The main efficacy measures are a change in the PAS score before and after treatment; the main safety measures are mortality, seizures, neurologic, motor, and swallowing deterioration. The knowledge gained from this study will help plan a larger confirmatory trial for treating stroke-related dysphagia and advance our understanding of important covariates influencing swallowing recovery and response to the proposed intervention. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Stimulation of ganglionated plexus attenuates cardiac neural remodeling and heart failure progression in a canine model of acute heart failure post-myocardial infarction.

    Luo, Da; Hu, Huihui; Qin, Zhiliang; Liu, Shan; Yu, Xiaomei; Ma, Ruisong; He, Wenbo; Xie, Jing; Lu, Zhibing; He, Bo; Jiang, Hong

    2017-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with autonomic dysfunction. Vagus nerve stimulation has been shown to improve cardiac function both in HF patients and animal models of HF. The purpose of this present study is to investigate the effects of ganglionated plexus stimulation (GPS) on HF progression and autonomic remodeling in a canine model of acute HF post-myocardial infarction. Eighteen adult mongrel male dogs were randomized into the control (n=8) and GPS (n=10) groups. All dogs underwent left anterior descending artery ligation followed by 6-hour high-rate (180-220bpm) ventricular pacing to induce acute HF. Transthoracic 2-dimensional echocardiography was performed at different time points. The plasma levels of norepinephrine, B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and Ang-II were measured using ELISA kits. C-fos and nerve growth factor (NGF) proteins expressed in the left stellate ganglion as well as GAP43 and TH proteins expressed in the peri-infarct zone were measured using western blot. After 6h of GPS, the left ventricular end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume and ejection fraction showed no significant differences between the 2 groups, but the interventricular septal thickness at end-systole in the GPS group was significantly higher than that in the control group. The plasma levels of norepinephrine, BNP, Ang-II were increased 1h after myocardial infarction while the increase was attenuated by GPS. The expression of c-fos and NGF proteins in the left stellate ganglion as well as GAP43 and TH proteins in cardiac peri-infarct zone in GPS group were significantly lower than that in control group. GPS inhibits cardiac sympathetic remodeling and attenuates HF progression in canines with acute HF induced by myocardial infarction and ventricular pacing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Markovian Analysis of the Sequential Behavior of the Spontaneous Spinal Cord Dorsum Potentials Induced by Acute Nociceptive Stimulation in the Anesthetized Cat.

    Martin, Mario; Béjar, Javier; Esposito, Gennaro; Chávez, Diógenes; Contreras-Hernández, Enrique; Glusman, Silvio; Cortés, Ulises; Rudomín, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    In a previous study we developed a Machine Learning procedure for the automatic identification and classification of spontaneous cord dorsum potentials ( CDPs ). This study further supported the proposal that in the anesthetized cat, the spontaneous CDPs recorded from different lumbar spinal segments are generated by a distributed network of dorsal horn neurons with structured (non-random) patterns of functional connectivity and that these configurations can be changed to other non-random and stable configurations after the noceptive stimulation produced by the intradermic injection of capsaicin in the anesthetized cat. Here we present a study showing that the sequence of identified forms of the spontaneous CDPs follows a Markov chain of at least order one. That is, the system has memory in the sense that the spontaneous activation of dorsal horn neuronal ensembles producing the CDPs is not independent of the most recent activity. We used this markovian property to build a procedure to identify portions of signals as belonging to a specific functional state of connectivity among the neuronal networks involved in the generation of the CDPs . We have tested this procedure during acute nociceptive stimulation produced by the intradermic injection of capsaicin in intact as well as spinalized preparations. Altogether, our results indicate that CDP sequences cannot be generated by a renewal stochastic process. Moreover, it is possible to describe some functional features of activity in the cord dorsum by modeling the CDP sequences as generated by a Markov order one stochastic process. Finally, these Markov models make possible to determine the functional state which produced a CDP sequence. The proposed identification procedures appear to be useful for the analysis of the sequential behavior of the ongoing CDPs recorded from different spinal segments in response to a variety of experimental procedures including the changes produced by acute nociceptive stimulation. They

  8. Hematological remission and long term hematological control of acute myeloblastic leukemia induced and maintained by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) therapy.

    Xavier, Luciana; Cunha, Manuel; Gonçalves, Cristina; Teixeira, Maria dos Anjos; Coutinho, Jorge; Ribeiro, António Carlos Pinto; Lima, Margarida

    2003-12-01

    We describe a case of a patient with CD34+, TdT+, CD13-, CD33-, MPO- undifferentiated acute leukemia who refused chemotherapy and who achieved complete hematological remission 14 months after the diagnosis, during a short course of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for neutropenia and life threatening infection. Relapse occurred approximately one year later and G-CSF was reintroduced, being maintained for 4 months, at a dose and frequency adapted to maintain normal blood counts, a complete hematological remission being achieved again. Five months after withdrawing the G-CSF therapy a second relapse was observed; G-CSF was tried again with success, resulting in a very good hematological response that was sustained by G-CSF maintenance therapy. One year latter there was the need of increasing the doses of G-CSF in order to obtain the same hematological effect, at same time blast cells acquired a more mature CD34+, TdT-, CD13+, CD33-, MPO+ myeloid phenotype. Finally, the patient developed progressive neutropenia, anemia, thrombocytopenia and acute leukemia in spite of G-CSF therapy, dying 64 months after initial diagnosis (50 months after starting G-CSF therapy) with overt G-CSF resistant acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), after failure of conventional induction chemotherapy.

  9. Olanzapine and haloperidol for the treatment of acute symptoms of mental disorders induced by amphetamine-type stimulants: A randomized controlled trial.

    Xue, Xiaobin; Song, Yun; Yu, Xiaojie; Fan, Qiang; Tang, Jiyou; Chen, Xu

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to compare olanzapine and haloperidol efficacies in the treatment of acute psychiatric symptoms due to amphetamine-type stimulants (ATSs). The Zelen II design method was used; 124 patients with acute mental disorders due to amphetamine were randomly divided into olanzapine group (n = 63) and haloperidol group (n = 61). Then, a 4-week open-label medical therapy was performed. Clinical Global Impression Scale Item 2 was employed to evaluate the onset time; meanwhile, Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) was used at baseline and at posttreatment weeks 1, 2, and 4. Moreover, adverse reactions during the treatment were recorded. Onset time in the olanzapine group was significantly earlier than in the haloperidol group; BPRS scores in the olanzapine group were significantly lower than haloperidol group values at 1 and 2 weeks of treatment. The overall effective rates had no statistically significant difference. Short-term olanzapine and haloperidol treatments had equivalent efficacies in the treatment of acute symptoms of mental disorders due to ATSs; however, olanzapine administration resulted in relatively earlier disease onset, with less adverse reactions.

  10. The prognostic value of cortical magnetic stimulation in acute middle cerebral artery infarction compared to other parameters

    Timmerhuis, Th.P.J.; Hageman, G.; Oosterloo, Sebe J.; Rozeboom, A.R.

    1996-01-01

    The prognostic value of magnetic evoked potentials (MEP), somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP), age and radiological parameters was determined in 50 patients with acute middle cerebral artery infarction. We performed MEP and SSEP within 4 days and after 6 weeks and 3 months of the infarction and

  11. Non-invasive electrical brain stimulation: from acute to late-stage treatment of central nervous system damage

    Petra Henrich-Noack

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive brain current stimulation (NIBS is a promising and versatile tool for inducing neuroplasticity, protection and functional rehabilitation of damaged neuronal systems. It is technically simple, requires no surgery, and has significant beneficial effects. However, there are various technical approaches for NIBS which influence neuronal networks in significantly different ways. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS, alternating current stimulation (ACS and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS all have been applied to modulate brain activity in animal experiments under normal and pathological conditions. Also clinical trials have shown that tDCS, rTMS and ACS induce significant behavioural effects and can – depending on the parameters chosen – enhance or decrease brain excitability and influence performance and learning as well as rehabilitation and protective mechanisms. The diverse phaenomena and partially opposing effects of NIBS are not yet fully understood and mechanisms of action need to be explored further in order to select appropriate parameters for a given task, such as current type and strength, timing, distribution of current densities and electrode position. In this review, we will discuss the various parameters which need to be considered when designing a NIBS protocol and will put them into context with the envisaged applications in experimental neurobiology and medicine such as vision restoration, motor rehabilitation and cognitive enhancement.

  12. Sulpiride and the role of dopaminergic receptor blockade in the antipsychotic activity of neuroleptics

    Memo, M; Battaini, F; Spano, P F; Trabucchi, M [University of Brescia, (Italy). Dept. of Pharmacology

    1981-01-01

    It is now generally recognized that dopamine receptors excist in the CNS as different subtypes: D/sub 1/ receptors, associated with adenylyl cyclase activity, and D/sub 2/ receptor, uncoupled to a cyclic AMP generating system. In order to understand the role of D/sub 1/ and D/sub 2/ receptors in the antipsychotic action of neuroleptics, we have performed subchronic treatment with haloperidol, a drug which acts on D/sub 1/ receptors, and sulpiride, a selective antagonist to D/sub 2/ receptors. Long-term treatment with haloperidol does not induce significant supersensitivity of the D/sub 2/ receptors. In fact under these conditions /sup 3/H-(-)-sulpiride binding, which is a marker of D/sub 2/ receptor function, does not increase in rat striatum, while the long-term administration of sulpiride, itself produces supersensitivity of D/sub 2/ receptors. Moreover, sulpiride does not induce supersensitivity of the D/sub 1/ receptors, characterized by /sup 3/H-spiroperidol binding. These data suggest that both types of dopamine receptors may be involved in the clinical antipsychotic effects of neuroleptics. Unilateral leison of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway produces an increase of striatal dopaminergic receptors, measured either by /sup 3/H-spiroperidol and /sup 3/H-(-)-sulpiride binding. These findings suggest that D/sub 1/ and D/sub 2/ receptors are present in postsynaptic membranes while it is still not known whether they exist in the same cellular elements.

  13. Sulpiride and the role of dopaminergic receptor blockade in the antipsychotic activity of neuroleptics

    Memo, M.; Battaini, F.; Spano, P.F.; Trabucchi, M.

    1981-01-01

    It is now generally recognized that dopamine receptors excist in the CNS as different subtypes: D 1 receptors, associated with adenylyl cyclase activity, and D 2 receptor, uncoupled to a cyclic APM generating system. In order to understand the role of D 1 and D 2 receptors in the antipsychotic action of neuroleptics, we have performed subchronic treatment with haloperidol, a drug which acts on D 1 receptors, and sulpiride, a selective antagonist to D 2 receptors. Long-term treatment with haloperidol does not induce significant supersensitivity of the D 2 receptors. In fact under these conditions 3 H-(-)-sulpiride binding, which is a marker of D 2 receptor function, does not increase in rat striatum, while the long-term administration of sulpiride, itself produces supersensitivity of D 2 receptors. Moreover, sulpiride does not induce supersensitivity of the D 1 receptors, characterized by 3 H-spiroperidol binding. These data suggest that both types of dopamine receptors may be involved in the clinical antipsychotic effects of neuroleptics. Unilateral leison of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway produces an increase of striatal dopaminergic receptors, measured either by 3 H-spiroperidol and 3 H-(-)-sulpiride binding. These findings suggest that D 1 and D 2 receptors are present in postsynaptic membranes while it is still not known whether they exist in the same cellular elements. (author)

  14. Granulocytopenia associated with neuroleptic therapy in a patient with benign familial leukopenia.

    Reznik, Ilya; Loewenthal, Ron; Kotler, Moshe; Apter, Inna; Mester, Roberto; Weizman, Abraham

    2003-01-01

    Benign familial leukopenia (BFL) has been reported in several ethnic groups, including Ethiopians of Jewish origin. To date, there are no reported cases of patients with BFL developing granulocytopenia following administration of neuroleptics. We report a case of a young Ethiopian Jew suffering from schizophrenia, who exhibited premorbid benign reduced white blood cells (WBC) count and developed leukopenia and neutropenia following exposure to typical (zuclopentixol, perphenazine, haloperidol) antipsychotics and the atypical antipsychotic risperidone. The diagnosis of BFL was established and tissue typing of the patient was determined. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of leukopenia with neutropenia in an ethnically susceptible (due to BFL) schizophrenia patient following exposure to typical and atypical antipsychotics. HLA typing of this patient was distinct from that reported in patients susceptible to clozapine-induced agranulocytosis. Further extensive investigations including HLA typing in a larger cohort of schizophrenic patients is needed in order to define the association between HLA haplotypes and neuroleptic-induced hematological reactions and to identify the potentially vulnerable individuals.

  15. The Gottingen minipig is a model of the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome: G-colony stimulating factor stimulates hematopoiesis and enhances survival from lethal total-body γ-irradiation.

    Moroni, Maria; Ngudiankama, Barbara F; Christensen, Christine; Olsen, Cara H; Owens, Rossitsa; Lombardini, Eric D; Holt, Rebecca K; Whitnall, Mark H

    2013-08-01

    We are characterizing the Gottingen minipig as an additional large animal model for advanced drug testing for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to enhance the discovery and development of novel radiation countermeasures. Among the advantages provided by this model, the similarities to human hematologic parameters and dynamics of cell loss/recovery after irradiation provide a convenient means to compare the efficacy of drugs known to affect bone marrow cellularity and hematopoiesis. Male Gottingen minipigs, 4 to 5 months old and weighing 9 to 11 kg, were used for this study. We tested the standard off-label treatment for ARS, rhG-CSF (Neupogen, 10 μg/kg/day for 17 days), at the estimated LD70/30 total-body γ-irradiation (TBI) radiation dose for the hematopoietic syndrome, starting 24 hours after irradiation. The results indicated that granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced survival, stimulated recovery from neutropenia, and induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, the administration of G-CSF resulted in maturation of monocytes/macrophages. These results support continuing efforts toward validation of the minipig as a large animal model for advanced testing of radiation countermeasures and characterization of the pathophysiology of ARS, and they suggest that the efficacy of G-CSF in improving survival after total body irradiation may involve mechanisms other than increasing the numbers of circulating granulocytes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. The Gottingen Minipig Is a Model of the Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome: G-Colony Stimulating Factor Stimulates Hematopoiesis and Enhances Survival From Lethal Total-Body γ-Irradiation

    Moroni, Maria, E-mail: maria.moroni@usuhs.edu [Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Ngudiankama, Barbara F. [Laboratory of Viral Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Christensen, Christine [Division of Comparative Pathology, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Olsen, Cara H. [Biostatistics Consulting Center, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Owens, Rossitsa [Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Lombardini, Eric D. [Veterinary Medicine Department, Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Bangkok (Thailand); Holt, Rebecca K. [Veterinary Science Department, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Whitnall, Mark H. [Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: We are characterizing the Gottingen minipig as an additional large animal model for advanced drug testing for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to enhance the discovery and development of novel radiation countermeasures. Among the advantages provided by this model, the similarities to human hematologic parameters and dynamics of cell loss/recovery after irradiation provide a convenient means to compare the efficacy of drugs known to affect bone marrow cellularity and hematopoiesis. Methods and Materials: Male Gottingen minipigs, 4 to 5 months old and weighing 9 to 11 kg, were used for this study. We tested the standard off-label treatment for ARS, rhG-CSF (Neupogen, 10 μg/kg/day for 17 days), at the estimated LD70/30 total-body γ-irradiation (TBI) radiation dose for the hematopoietic syndrome, starting 24 hours after irradiation. Results: The results indicated that granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced survival, stimulated recovery from neutropenia, and induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, the administration of G-CSF resulted in maturation of monocytes/macrophages. Conclusions: These results support continuing efforts toward validation of the minipig as a large animal model for advanced testing of radiation countermeasures and characterization of the pathophysiology of ARS, and they suggest that the efficacy of G-CSF in improving survival after total body irradiation may involve mechanisms other than increasing the numbers of circulating granulocytes.

  17. The Gottingen Minipig Is a Model of the Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome: G-Colony Stimulating Factor Stimulates Hematopoiesis and Enhances Survival From Lethal Total-Body γ-Irradiation

    Moroni, Maria; Ngudiankama, Barbara F.; Christensen, Christine; Olsen, Cara H.; Owens, Rossitsa; Lombardini, Eric D.; Holt, Rebecca K.; Whitnall, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We are characterizing the Gottingen minipig as an additional large animal model for advanced drug testing for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to enhance the discovery and development of novel radiation countermeasures. Among the advantages provided by this model, the similarities to human hematologic parameters and dynamics of cell loss/recovery after irradiation provide a convenient means to compare the efficacy of drugs known to affect bone marrow cellularity and hematopoiesis. Methods and Materials: Male Gottingen minipigs, 4 to 5 months old and weighing 9 to 11 kg, were used for this study. We tested the standard off-label treatment for ARS, rhG-CSF (Neupogen, 10 μg/kg/day for 17 days), at the estimated LD70/30 total-body γ-irradiation (TBI) radiation dose for the hematopoietic syndrome, starting 24 hours after irradiation. Results: The results indicated that granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced survival, stimulated recovery from neutropenia, and induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, the administration of G-CSF resulted in maturation of monocytes/macrophages. Conclusions: These results support continuing efforts toward validation of the minipig as a large animal model for advanced testing of radiation countermeasures and characterization of the pathophysiology of ARS, and they suggest that the efficacy of G-CSF in improving survival after total body irradiation may involve mechanisms other than increasing the numbers of circulating granulocytes

  18. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) Targeting Left Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Modulates Task-Induced Acute Pain in Healthy Volunteers.

    Mariano, Timothy Y; Van't Wout, Mascha; Garnaat, Sarah L; Rasmussen, Steven A; Greenberg, Benjamin D

    2016-04-01

    Current chronic pain treatments target nociception rather than affective "suffering" and its associated functional and psychiatric comorbidities. The left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) has been implicated in affective, cognitive, and attentional aspects of pain and is a primary target of neuromodulation for affective disorders. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can non-invasively modulate cortical activity. The present study tests whether anodal tDCS targeting the left DLPFC will increase tolerability of acute painful stimuli vs cathodal tDCS. Forty tDCS-naive healthy volunteers received anodal and cathodal stimulation targeting the left DLPFC in two randomized and counterbalanced sessions. During stimulation, each participant performed cold pressor (CP) and breath holding (BH) tasks. We measured pain intensity with the Defense and Veterans Pain Rating Scale (DVPRS) before and after each task. Mixed ANOVA revealed no main effect of stimulation polarity for mean CP threshold, tolerance, or endurance, or mean BH time (allP > 0.27). However, DVPRS rise associated with CP was significantly smaller with anodal vs cathodal tDCS (P = 0.024). We further observed a significant tDCS polarity × stimulation order interaction (P = 0.042) on CP threshold, suggesting task sensitization. Although our results do not suggest that polarity of tDCS targeting the left DLPFC differentially modulates the tolerability of CP- and BH-related pain distress in healthy volunteers, there was a significant effect on DVPRS pain ratings. This contrasts with our previous findings that tDCS targeting the left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex showed a trend toward higher mean CP tolerance with cathodal vs anodal stimulation. The present results may suggest tDCS-related effects on nociception or DLPFC-mediated attention, or preferential modulation of the affective valence of pain as captured by the DVPRS. Sham-controlled clinical studies are needed. © 2015

  19. Acute total sleep deprivation potentiates amphetamine-induced locomotor-stimulant effects and behavioral sensitization in mice.

    Saito, Luis P; Fukushiro, Daniela F; Hollais, André W; Mári-Kawamoto, Elisa; Costa, Jacqueline M; Berro, Laís F; Aramini, Tatiana C F; Wuo-Silva, Raphael; Andersen, Monica L; Tufik, Sergio; Frussa-Filho, Roberto

    2014-02-01

    It has been demonstrated that a prolonged period (48 h) of paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) potentiates amphetamine (AMP)-induced behavioral sensitization, an animal model of addiction-related neuroadaptations. In the present study, we examined the effects of an acute short-term deprivation of total sleep (TSD) (6h) on AMP-induced behavioral sensitization in mice and compared them to the effects of short-term PSD (6 h). Three-month-old male C57BL/6J mice underwent TSD (experiment 1-gentle handling method) or PSD (experiment 2-multiple platforms method) for 6 h. Immediately after the sleep deprivation period, mice were tested in the open field for 10 min under the effects of saline or 2.0 mg/kg AMP. Seven days later, to assess behavioral sensitization, all of the mice received a challenge injection of 2.0 mg/kg AMP and were tested in the open field for 10 min. Total, peripheral, and central locomotion, and grooming duration were measured. TSD, but not PSD, potentiated the hyperlocomotion induced by an acute injection of AMP and this effect was due to an increased locomotion in the central squares of the apparatus. Similarly, TSD facilitated the development of AMP-induced sensitization, but only in the central locomotion parameter. The data indicate that an acute period of TSD may exacerbate the behavioral effects of AMP in mice. Because sleep architecture is composed of paradoxical and slow wave sleep, and 6-h PSD had no effects on AMP-induced hyperlocomotion or sensitization, our data suggest that the deprivation of slow wave sleep plays a critical role in the mechanisms that underlie the potentiating effects of TSD on both the acute and sensitized addiction-related responses to AMP. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Acute running stimulates hippocampal dopaminergic neurotransmission in rats, but has no influence on brain-derived neurotrophic factor

    Goekint, Maaike; Bos, Inge; Heyman, Elsa; Meeusen, Romain; Michotte, Yvette; Sarre, Sophie

    2011-01-01

    Hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein is increased with exercise in rats. Monoamines seem to play a role in the regulation of BDNF, and monoamine neurotransmission is known to increase with exercise. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of acute exercise on monoaminergic neurotransmission and BDNF protein concentrations. Hippocampal microdialysis was performed in rats that were subjected to 60 min of treadmill running at 20 m/min or rest. Two hours pos...

  1. Resting-state fMRI study of acute migraine treatment with kinetic oscillation stimulation in nasal cavity

    Tie-Qiang Li

    2016-01-01

    The result of this study confirms the efficacy of KOS treatment for relieving acute migraine symptoms and reducing attack frequency. Resting-state fMRI measurements demonstrate that migraine is associated with aberrant intrinsic functional activity in the limbic and primary sensory systems. KOS in the nasal cavity gives rise to the adjustment of the intrinsic functional activity in the limbic and primary sensory networks and restores the physiological homeostasis in the autonomic nervous system.

  2. Electrical and transcranial magnetic stimulation of the facial nerve: diagnostic relevance in acute isolated facial nerve palsy.

    Happe, Svenja; Bunten, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    Unilateral facial weakness is common. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) allows identification of a conduction failure at the level of the canalicular portion of the facial nerve and may help to confirm the diagnosis. We retrospectively analyzed 216 patients with the diagnosis of peripheral facial palsy. The electrophysiological investigations included the blink reflex, preauricular electrical stimulation and the response to TMS at the labyrinthine part of the canalicular proportion of the facial nerve within 3 days after symptom onset. A similar reduction or loss of the TMS amplitude (p facial palsy without being specific for Bell's palsy. These data shed light on the TMS-based diagnosis of peripheral facial palsy, an ability to localize the site of lesion within the Fallopian channel regardless of the underlying pathology. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Rocuronium and sugammadex: An alternative to succinylcholine for electro convulsive therapy in patients with suspected neuroleptic malignant syndrome.

    Ramamoorthy, Karthik G

    2012-01-31

    We report a case of presumptive neuroleptic malignant syndrome requiring muscle relaxation for electro-convulsive therapy. short acting muscle relaxation without the use of succinylcholine was achieved using rocvronivm reversed with the novel reversal agent sugammadex. We suggest that this combination is a safe and effective alternative to succinylcholine in such cases.

  4. Rocuronium and sugammadex: An alternative to succinylcholine for electro convulsive therapy in patients with suspected neuroleptic malignant syndrome

    Karthik G Ramamoorthy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of presumptive neuroleptic malignant syndrome requiring muscle relaxation for electro-convulsive therapy. short acting muscle relaxation without the use of succinylcholine was achieved using rocvronivm reversed with the novel reversal agent sugammadex. We suggest that this combination is a safe and effective alternative to succinylcholine in such cases.

  5. Neuroleptics and β-carbolines displace (3H)imipramine from its binding sites in human and rat tissues

    Rommelspacher, H.; Strauss, S.

    1985-01-01

    Most investigations dealing with the pharmacological characterization of ( 3 H)imipramine binding sites focus on tricyclic antidepressants (TCA). This approach seemed to be justified since imipramine belongs to that chemical group. Langer and coworkers, however, introduced a tetrahydro-β-carboline (THβC) as a possible endogenous ligand. Thus, the high affinity of imipramine towards the binding sites might not be due to its special chemical structure but due to its tricyclic nature. In the present paper the structure-activity-relationships of neuroleptics and β-carbolines were investigated and compared with that of tricyclic antidepressants. Among the tricyclic neuroleptics those with an electron attracting substituent (-Cl) exerted highest affinity. The effect was attenuated by a long, cyclic side chain. The affinity of tricyclic neuroleptics was only slightly weaker than that of 6-Meo-THβC the suggested endogenous ligand. The experiments with other THβCs supported the observation that an electron attracting substituent increases the affinity of a compound to the ( 3 H)imipramine binding sites. Comparison of the binding characteristics of ( 3 H)imipramine to membranes of human brain and thrombocytes as well as those of rat brain and thrombocytes revealed no differences among both species. Furthermore, the displacing potencies of neuroleptics were very similar with only slightly more activity in human tissue. As a methodological aspect the applicability of the 'Lowry' method to determine the protein concentration is discussed. (Author)

  6. The anti-(+-methamphetamine monoclonal antibody mAb7F9 attenuates acute (+-methamphetamine effects on intracranial self-stimulation in rats.

    Andrew C Harris

    Full Text Available Passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against (+-methamphetamine (METH is being evaluated for the treatment of METH addiction. A human/mouse chimeric form of the murine anti-METH mAb7F9 has entered clinical trials. This study examined the effects of murine mAb7F9 on certain addiction-related behavioral effects of METH in rats as measured using intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS. Initial studies indicated that acute METH (0.1-0.56 mg/kg, s.c. lowered the minimal (threshold stimulation intensity that maintained ICSS. METH (0.3 mg/kg, s.c. also blocked elevations in ICSS thresholds (anhedonia-like behavior during spontaneous withdrawal from a chronic METH infusion (10 mg/kg/day x 7 days. In studies examining effects of i.v. pretreatment with mAb7F9 (at 30, 100, or 200 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg blocked the ability of an initial injection of METH (0.3 mg/kg, s.c. to reduce baseline ICSS thresholds, but was less capable of attenuating the effect of subsequent daily injections of METH. MAb7F9 (200 mg/kg also produced a small but significant reduction in the ability of METH (0.3 mg/kg, s.c. to reverse METH withdrawal-induced elevations in ICSS thresholds. These studies demonstrate that mAb7F9 can partially attenuate some addiction-related effects of acute METH in an ICSS model, and provide some support for the therapeutic potential of mAb7F9 for the treatment of METH addiction.

  7. Epigenetic regulation of Arc and c-Fos in the hippocampus after acute electroconvulsive stimulation in the rat

    Dyrvig, Mads; Hansen, Henrik H; Christiansen, Søren Hofman Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS) remains one of the most effective treatments of major depression. However, the underlying molecular changes still remain to be elucidated. Since ECS causes rapid and significant changes in gene expression we have looked at epigenetic regulation of two important...... of the important epigenetic marks associated with gene activation. We show increased H4Ac at the c-Fos promoter at 1 h post-ECS. Surprisingly, we also observed a significant increase in DNA methylation of the Arc gene promoter at 24 h post-ECS. DNA methylation, which is responsible for gene silencing, is a rather...

  8. Clinical outcome after stem cell mobilization with granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor after acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction:

    Ripa, Rasmus S; Jørgensen, Erik; Kastrup, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Background. Granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been investigated in trials aiming to promote recovery of myocardial function after myocardial infarction. Long-term safety-data have never been reported. A few studies indicated an increased risk of in-stent re-stenosis. We aimed to i.......8; 0.3). Conclusions. We found no indication of increased risk of adverse events up to 5 years after G-CSF treatment. These results support the continued investigation of G-CSF for cardiac therapy....

  9. Transcranial magnetic stimulation probes the excitability of the primary motor cortex: A framework to account for the facilitating effects of acute whole-body exercise on motor processes

    Karen Davranche

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of exercise on decision-making performance have been studied using a wide variety of cognitive tasks and exercise interventions. Although the current literature supports a beneficial influence of acute exercise on cognitive performance, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon have not yet been elucidated. We review studies that used single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS to probe the excitability of motor structures during whole-body exercise and present a framework to account for the facilitating effects of acute exercise on motor processes. Recent results suggest that, even in the absence of fatigue, the increase in corticospinal excitability classically reported during submaximal and exhausting exercises may be accompanied by a reduction in intracortical inhibition. We propose that reduced intracortical inhibition elicits an adaptive central mechanism that counteracts the progressive reduction in muscle responsiveness caused by peripheral fatigue. Such a reduction would render the motor cortex more sensitive to upstream influences, thus causing increased corticospinal excitability. Furthermore, reduction of intracortical inhibition may account for the more efficient descending drive and for the improvement of reaction time performance during exercise. The adaptive modulation in intracortical inhibition could be implemented through a general increase in reticular activation that would further account for enhanced sensory sensitivity.

  10. Early low volume oral synbiotic/prebiotic supplemented enteral stimulation of the gut in patients with severe acute pancreatitis: a prospective feasibility study.

    Plaudis, H; Pupelis, G; Zeiza, K; Boka, V

    2012-01-01

    Experience with administration of synbiotics (prebiotics/probiotics) in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) has demonstrated immunomodulatory capacity. The aim of this trial was evaluation of the feasibility and perspective of early clinical application of oral synbiotic/prebiotic supplements in patients with SAP. 90 SAP patients were enrolled during the period from 2005-2008. Patients were stratified according to the feeding mode. CONTROL (n = 32) group received standard whole protein feeding formula. SYNBIO (n = 30) and FIBRE groups (n = 28) received early (within first 24-48 hours) synbiotic or prebiotic supplements. Oral administration of synbiotics or prebiotics was commenced when patients were able to sip water. Daily provided average volume and calories of synbiotic/prebiotic blends were smaller compared to the CONTROL, p = 0.001. Oral administration of synbiotic/prebiotic supplements was associated with lower infection rate (pancreatic and peripancreatic necrosis) compared to the CONTROL, (p = 0.03; p = 0.001), lower rate of surgical interventions, p = 0.005, shorter ICU (p = 0.05) and hospital stay (p = 0.03). Synbiotic supplemented enteral stimulation of the gut resulted in reduced mortality rate compared to the CONTROL, p = 0.02. Early low volume oral synbiotic/prebiotic supplemented enteral stimulation of the gut seems to be a potentially valuable complement to the routine treatment protocol of SAP.

  11. Expression profiling of skeletal muscle following acute and chronic β2-adrenergic stimulation: implications for hypertrophy, metabolism and circadian rhythm

    Lynch Gordon S

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic administration of β-adrenoceptor (β-AR agonists has been found to induce skeletal muscle hypertrophy and significant metabolic changes. In the context of energy homeostasis, the importance of β-AR signaling has been highlighted by the inability of β1-3-AR-deficient mice to regulate energy expenditure and susceptibility to diet induced obesity. However, the molecular pathways and gene expression changes that initiate and maintain these phenotypic modulations are poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify differential changes in gene expression in murine skeletal muscle associated with systemic (acute and chronic administration of the β2-AR agonist formoterol. Results Skeletal muscle gene expression (from murine tibialis anterior was profiled at both 1 and 4 hours following systemic administration of the β2-AR agonist formoterol, using Illumina 46K mouse BeadArrays. Illumina expression profiling revealed significant expression changes in genes associated with skeletal muscle hypertrophy, myoblast differentiation, metabolism, circadian rhythm, transcription, histones, and oxidative stress. Differentially expressed genes relevant to the regulation of muscle mass and metabolism (in the context of the hypertrophic phenotype were further validated by quantitative RT-PCR to examine gene expression in response to both acute (1-24 h and chronic administration (1-28 days of formoterol at multiple timepoints. In terms of skeletal muscle hypertrophy, attenuation of myostatin signaling (including differential expression of myostatin, activin receptor IIB, phospho-Smad3 etc was observed following acute and chronic administration of formoterol. Acute (but not chronic administration of formoterol also significantly induced the expression of genes involved in oxidative metabolism, including hexokinase 2, sorbin and SH3 domain containing 1, and uncoupling protein 3. Interestingly, formoterol

  12. Two-dimensional zymography differentiates gelatinase isoforms in stimulated microglial cells and in brain tissues of acute brain injuries.

    Chen, Shanyan; Meng, Fanjun; Chen, Zhenzhou; Tomlinson, Brittany N; Wesley, Jennifer M; Sun, Grace Y; Whaley-Connell, Adam T; Sowers, James R; Cui, Jiankun; Gu, Zezong

    2015-01-01

    Excessive activation of gelatinases (MMP-2/-9) is a key cause of detrimental outcomes in neurodegenerative diseases. A single-dimension zymography has been widely used to determine gelatinase expression and activity, but this method is inadequate in resolving complex enzyme isoforms, because gelatinase expression and activity could be modified at transcriptional and posttranslational levels. In this study, we investigated gelatinase isoforms under in vitro and in vivo conditions using two-dimensional (2D) gelatin zymography electrophoresis, a protocol allowing separation of proteins based on isoelectric points (pI) and molecular weights. We observed organomercuric chemical 4-aminophenylmercuric acetate-induced activation of MMP-2 isoforms with variant pI values in the conditioned medium of human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. Studies with murine BV-2 microglial cells indicated a series of proform MMP-9 spots separated by variant pI values due to stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The MMP-9 pI values were shifted after treatment with alkaline phosphatase, suggesting presence of phosphorylated isoforms due to the proinflammatory stimulation. Similar MMP-9 isoforms with variant pI values in the same molecular weight were also found in mouse brains after ischemic and traumatic brain injuries. In contrast, there was no detectable pI differentiation of MMP-9 in the brains of chronic Zucker obese rats. These results demonstrated effective use of 2D zymography to separate modified MMP isoforms with variant pI values and to detect posttranslational modifications under different pathological conditions.

  13. Markovian Analysis of the Sequential Behavior of the Spontaneous Spinal Cord Dorsum Potentials Induced by Acute Nociceptive Stimulation in the Anesthetized Cat

    Mario Martin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In a previous study we developed a Machine Learning procedure for the automatic identification and classification of spontaneous cord dorsum potentials (CDPs. This study further supported the proposal that in the anesthetized cat, the spontaneous CDPs recorded from different lumbar spinal segments are generated by a distributed network of dorsal horn neurons with structured (non-random patterns of functional connectivity and that these configurations can be changed to other non-random and stable configurations after the noceptive stimulation produced by the intradermic injection of capsaicin in the anesthetized cat. Here we present a study showing that the sequence of identified forms of the spontaneous CDPs follows a Markov chain of at least order one. That is, the system has memory in the sense that the spontaneous activation of dorsal horn neuronal ensembles producing the CDPs is not independent of the most recent activity. We used this markovian property to build a procedure to identify portions of signals as belonging to a specific functional state of connectivity among the neuronal networks involved in the generation of the CDPs. We have tested this procedure during acute nociceptive stimulation produced by the intradermic injection of capsaicin in intact as well as spinalized preparations. Altogether, our results indicate that CDP sequences cannot be generated by a renewal stochastic process. Moreover, it is possible to describe some functional features of activity in the cord dorsum by modeling the CDP sequences as generated by a Markov order one stochastic process. Finally, these Markov models make possible to determine the functional state which produced a CDP sequence. The proposed identification procedures appear to be useful for the analysis of the sequential behavior of the ongoing CDPs recorded from different spinal segments in response to a variety of experimental procedures including the changes produced by acute nociceptive

  14. Kinetic modeling of receptor-ligand binding applied to positron emission tomographic studies with neuroleptic tracers

    Logan, J; Wolf, A P; Shiue, C Y; Fowler, J S

    1987-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) with labeled neuroleptics has made possible the study of neurotransmitter-receptor systems in vivo. In this study we investigate the kinetics of the 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethylamine (dopamine) receptor-ligand binding using PET data from a series of experiments in the baboon with the /sup 18/F-labeled drugs spiperone, haloperidol, and benperidol. Models used to describe these systems are based on first-order kinetics which applies at high specific activity (low receptor occupancy). The parameters governing the uptake and loss of drug from the brain were found by fitting PET data from regions with little or no receptor concentration (cerebellum) and from experiments in which specific binding was blocked by pretreatment with the drug (+)-butaclamol. Receptor constants were determined by fitting data from receptor-containing structures. Correcting the arterial plasma activities (the model driving function) for the presence of drug metabolites was found to be important in the modeling of these systems.

  15. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome in an elderly with quetiapine: A case report and review of literature

    Devakshi Dua

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, there is an increase in the prescription of antipsychotics among elderly patients, and these are used for various clinical indications such as psychotic disorders, affective disorders, behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia and delirium. Quetiapine is one of the preferred antipsychotics among elderly because of its safety profile. However, quetiapine has been rarely been associated with the development of neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS among elderly. In this report, we discuss a case of NMS in a 70-year-old female, who developed symptoms of NMS at the dose of 200 mg/day, while quetiapine was being used along with lithium. A review of literature suggests that there are 12 cases of NMS reported in subjects older than 55 years of age.

  16. A Rare Case of Myxedema Coma with Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS).

    Dixit, Siddharth; Dutta, Manoj Kumar; Namdeo, Mayank

    2015-05-01

    Myxedema coma or hypothyroid crisis is an endocrine emergency and needs ICU management. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is another medical emergency which needs high degree of clinical suspicion else mortality can be high. There is a paradox in co existence of myxedema coma and NMS. While one is hypometabolic state another is hypermetabolic state and both can be precipitated by antipsychotics use. Hypothermia and flaccidity commonly expected in myxedema coma may mask fever and rigidity of classical NMS contributing to diagnostic problem and treatment delay. Scientific literature on coexistance of myxedema coma and NMS is sparse. We hereby report first case with coexisting myxedema coma and NMS in a patient of schizophrenia treated with antipsychotic, where classical symptoms of NMS were masked by myxedema coma. Prompt diagnosis and effective management by a team resulted in favourable outcome in our patient. This case is reported to alert intensive care physicians to atypical manifestations of NMS in presence of hypothyroidism.

  17. Plasma prolactin and homovanillic acid as markers for psychopathology and abnormal movements after neuroleptic dose decrease.

    Newcomer, J W; Riney, S J; Vinogradov, S; Csernansky, J G

    1992-01-01

    Plasma prolactin concentration (pPRL), plasma homovanillic acid concentration (pHVA), and symptomatology were measured in 24 male subjects with schizophrenia during maintenance haloperidol treatment. Fourteen subjects subsequently underwent 50 percent dose decreases under placebo-controlled, double-blind conditions. At baseline, a significant inverse correlation was found between pPRL and both tardive dyskinesia (TD) and "thinking disorder"; pPRL was directly correlated with negative symptoms. No such relationship was found with pHVA. In the patients who underwent a dose decrease, no relationship was found between baseline pPRL or pHVA and any clinical variable after the decrease. These data do not support the use of baseline pPRL or pHVA as markers of central dopamine function subsequent to a neuroleptic dose decrease.

  18. Cost-effectiveness of gammaCore (non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation) for acute treatment of episodic cluster headache.

    Mwamburi, Mkaya; Liebler, Eric J; Tenaglia, Andrew T

    2017-11-01

    Cluster headache is a debilitating disease characterized by excruciatingly painful attacks that affects 0.15% to 0.4% of the US population. Episodic cluster headache manifests as circadian and circannual seasonal bouts of attacks, each lasting 15 to 180 minutes, with periods of remission. In chronic cluster headache, the attacks occur throughout the year with no periods of remission. While existing treatments are effective for some patients, many patients continue to suffer. There are only 2 FDA-approved medications for episodic cluster headache in the United States, while others, such as high-flow oxygen, are used off-label. Episodic cluster headache is associated with comorbidities and affects work, productivity, and daily functioning. The economic burden of episodic cluster headache is considerable, costing more than twice that of nonheadache patients. gammaCore adjunct to standard of care (SoC) was found to have superior efficacy in treatment of acute episodic cluster headaches compared with sham-gammaCore used with SoC in ACT1 and ACT2 trials. However, the economic impact has not been characterized for this indication. We conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis of gammaCore adjunct to SoC compared with SoC alone for the treatment of acute pain associated with episodic cluster headache attacks. The model structure was based on treatment of acute attacks with 3 outcomes: failures, nonresponders, and responders. The time horizon of the model is 1 year using a payer perspective with uncertainty incorporated. Parameter inputs were derived from primary data from the randomized controlled trials for gammaCore. The mean annual costs associated with the gammaCore-plus-SoC arm was $9510, and mean costs for the SoC-alone arm was $10,040. The mean quality-adjusted life years for gammaCore-plus-SoC arm were 0.83, and for the SoC-alone arm, they were 0.74. The gammaCore-plus-SoC arm was dominant over SoC alone. All 1-way and multiway sensitivity analyses were cost

  19. Síndrome neuroléptico maligno Neuroleptic malignant syndrome

    Ricardo J. Toro

    1989-02-01

    Full Text Available

    El síndrome neuroléptico maligno (SNM es una complicación rara, idiosincrática y potencialmente fatal, relacionada con el uso de drogas que afectan el sistema dopaminérgico; su cuadro clínico consiste en síntomas extrapiramidales, signos de disfunción autonómica y trastornos en el estado de conciencia, asociados a leucocitosis ya cifras muy elevadas de creatina fosfoquinasa. Reportamos el caso de un hombre de 32 años que presentó un síndrome catatónico severo después del uso intrahospitalario de antipsicóticos potentes a altas dosis para el control de una depresión psicótica. Se discuten las características clínicas del paciente y los hallazgos comunes en el SNM.

    The Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS Is a rare, idiosyncratic and potentially fatal complication of therapy with many drugs affecting the dopaminergic system; It Includes extrapyramidal symptoms, signs of autonomic dysfunction, disorders of consciousness, leucocytosis and an increase in serum creatine phosphokinase .We report the case of a 32 years old man, who developed a severe catatonic syndrome after receiving high doses of potent neuroleptics to control a psychotic depression. Clinical features of this case and common findings of NMS are discussed.

  20. Mechanisms for greater insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in normal and insulin-resistant skeletal muscle after acute exercise

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced skeletal muscle and whole body insulin sensitivity can persist for up to 24–48 h after one exercise session. This review focuses on potential mechanisms for greater postexercise and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (ISGU) by muscle in individuals with normal or reduced insulin sensitivity. A model is proposed for the processes underlying this improvement; i.e., triggers initiate events that activate subsequent memory elements, which store information that is relayed to mediators, which translate memory into action by controlling an end effector that directly executes increased insulin-stimulated glucose transport. Several candidates are potential triggers or memory elements, but none have been conclusively verified. Regarding potential mediators in both normal and insulin-resistant individuals, elevated postexercise ISGU with a physiological insulin dose coincides with greater Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160) phosphorylation without improved proximal insulin signaling at steps from insulin receptor binding to Akt activity. Causality remains to be established between greater AS160 phosphorylation and improved ISGU. The end effector for normal individuals is increased GLUT4 translocation, but this remains untested for insulin-resistant individuals postexercise. Following exercise, insulin-resistant individuals can attain ISGU values similar to nonexercising healthy controls, but after a comparable exercise protocol performed by both groups, ISGU for the insulin-resistant group has been consistently reported to be below postexercise values for the healthy group. Further research is required to fully understand the mechanisms underlying the improved postexercise ISGU in individuals with normal or subnormal insulin sensitivity and to explain the disparity between these groups after similar exercise. PMID:26487009

  1. Challenges in comparing the acute cognitive outcomes of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (HF-rTMS) vs. electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in major depression: A systematic review.

    Kedzior, Karina Karolina; Schuchinsky, Maria; Gerkensmeier, Imke; Loo, Colleen

    2017-08-01

    The present study aimed to systematically compare the cognitive outcomes of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (HF-rTMS) and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in head-to-head studies with major depression (MDD) patients. A systematic literature search identified six studies with 219 MDD patients that were too heterogeneous to reliably detect meaningful differences in acute cognitive outcomes after ECT vs. HF-rTMS. Cognitive effects of brain stimulation vary depending on the timeframe and methods of assessment, stimulation parameters, and maintenance treatment. Thus, acute and longer-term differences in cognitive outcomes both need to be investigated at precisely defined timeframes and with similar instruments assessing comparable functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A randomised, blinded, placebo-controlled trial in dementia patients continuing or stopping neuroleptics (the DART-AD trial.

    Clive Ballard

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There have been increasing concerns regarding the safety and efficacy of neuroleptics in people with dementia, but there are very few long-term trials to inform clinical practice. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of long-term treatment with neuroleptic agents upon global cognitive decline and neuropsychiatric symptoms in patients with Alzheimer disease. METHODS AND FINDINGS: DESIGN: Randomised, blinded, placebo-controlled parallel two-group treatment discontinuation trial. SETTING: Oxfordshire, Newcastle and Gateshead, London and Edinburgh, United Kingdom. PARTICIPANTS: Patients currently prescribed the neuroleptics thioridazine, chlorpromazine, haloperidol trifluoperazine or risperidone for behavioural or psychiatric disturbance in dementia for at least 3 mo. INTERVENTIONS: Continue neuroleptic treatment for 12 mo or switch to an identical placebo. OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcome was total Severe Impairment Battery (SIB score. Neuropsychiatric symptoms were evaluated with the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI. RESULTS: 165 patients were randomised (83 to continue treatment and 82 to placebo, i.e., discontinue treatment, of whom 128 (78% commenced treatment (64 continue/64 placebo. Of those, 26 were lost to follow-up (13 per arm, resulting in 51 patients per arm analysed for the primary outcome. There was no significant difference between the continue treatment and placebo groups in the estimated mean change in SIB scores between baseline and 6 mo; estimated mean difference in deterioration (favouring placebo -0.4 (95% confidence interval [CI] -6.4 to 5.5, adjusted for baseline value (p = 0.9. For neuropsychiatric symptoms, there was no significant difference between the continue treatment and placebo groups (n = 56 and 53, respectively in the estimated mean change in NPI scores between baseline and 6 mo; estimated mean difference in deterioration (favouring continue treatment -2.4 (95% CI -8.2 to 3.5, adjusted for

  3. Higher Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone, Triiodothyronine and Thyroxine Values Are Associated with Better Outcome in Acute Liver Failure.

    Anastasiou, Olympia; Sydor, Svenja; Sowa, Jan-Peter; Manka, Paul; Katsounas, Antonios; Syn, Wing-Kin; Führer, Dagmar; Gieseler, Robert K; Bechmann, Lars P; Gerken, Guido; Moeller, Lars C; Canbay, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Changes in thyroid hormone levels, mostly as non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS), have been described in many diseases. However, the relationship between acute liver failure (ALF) and thyroid hormone levels has not yet been clarified. The present study evaluates potential correlations of select thyroid functional parameters with ALF. 84 consecutively recruited ALF patients were grouped according to the outcome of ALF (spontaneous recovery: SR; transplantation or death: NSR). TSH, free thyroxine (fT4), free triiodothyronine (fT3), T4, and T3 were determined. More than 50% of patients with ALF presented with abnormal thyroid parameters. These patients had greater risk for an adverse outcome than euthyroid patients. SR patients had significantly higher TSH, T4, and T3 concentrations than NSR patients. Albumin concentrations were significantly higher in SR than in NSR. In vitro T3 treatment was not able to rescue primary human hepatocytes from acetaminophen induced changes in mRNA expression. In patients with ALF, TSH and total thyroid hormone levels differed significantly between SR patients and NSR patients. This might be related to diminished liver-derived transport proteins, such as albumin, in more severe forms of ALF. Thyroid parameters may serve as additional indicators of ALF severity.

  4. Effects of Low-Level Autonomic Stimulation on Prevention of Atrial Fibrillation Induced by Acute Electrical Remodeling

    Yubi Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Rapid atrial pacing (RAP can induce electrical and autonomic remodeling and facilitate atrial fibrillation (AF. Recent reports showed that low-level vagosympathetic nerve stimulation (LLVNS can suppress AF, as an antiarrhythmic effect. We hypothesized that LLVNS can reverse substrate heterogeneity induced by RAP. Methods and Results. Mongrel dogs were divided into (LLVNS+RAP and RAP groups. Electrode catheters were sutured to multiple atrial sites, and LLVNS was applied to cervical vagosympathetic trunks with voltage 50% below the threshold slowing sinus rate by ⩽30 msec. RAP induced a significant decrease in effective refractory period (ERP and increase in the window of vulnerability at all sites, characterized by descending and elevated gradient differences towards the ganglionic plexi (GP sites, respectively. The ERP dispersion was obviously enlarged by RAP and more significant when the ERP of GP-related sites was considered. Recovery time from AF was also prolonged significantly as a result of RAP. LLVNS could reverse all these changes induced by RAP and recover the heterogeneous substrate to baseline. Conclusions. LLVNS can reverse the electrical and autonomic remodeling and abolish the GP-central gradient differences induced by RAP, and thus it can recover the homogeneous substrate, which may be the underlying mechanism of its antiarrhythmic effect.

  5. Adenylyl cylases 1 and 8 mediate select striatal-dependent behaviors and sensitivity to ethanol stimulation in the adolescent period following acute neonatal ethanol exposure.

    Susick, Laura L; Lowing, Jennifer L; Bosse, Kelly E; Hildebrandt, Clara C; Chrumka, Alexandria C; Conti, Alana C

    2014-08-01

    Neonatal alcohol exposure in rodents causes dramatic neurodegenerative effects throughout the developing nervous system, particularly in the striatum, acutely after exposure. These acute neurodegenerative effects are augmented in mice lacking adenylyl cyclases 1 and 8 (AC1/8) as neonatal mice with a genetic deletion of both AC isoforms (DKO) have increased vulnerability to ethanol-induced striatal neurotoxicity compared to wild type (WT) controls. While neonatal ethanol exposure is known to negatively impact cognitive behaviors, such as executive functioning and working memory in adolescent and adult animals, the threshold of ethanol exposure required to impinge upon developmental behaviors in mice has not been extensively examined. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the behavioral effects of neonatal ethanol exposure using various striatal-dependent developmental benchmarks and to assess the impact of AC1/8 deletion on this developmental progression. WT and DKO mice were treated with 2.5 g/kg ethanol or saline on postnatal day (P)6 and later subjected to the wire suspension, negative geotaxis, postural reflex, grid hang, tail suspension and accelerating rotarod tests at various time points. At P30, mice were evaluated for their hypnotic responses to 4.0 g/kg ethanol by using the loss of righting reflex assay and ethanol-induced stimulation of locomotor activity after 2.0 g/kg ethanol. Ethanol exposure significantly impaired DKO performance in the negative geotaxis test while genetic deletion of AC1/8 alone increased grid hang time and decreased immobility time in the tail suspension test with a concomitant increase in hindlimb clasping behavior. Locomotor stimulation was significantly increased in animals that received ethanol as neonates, peaking significantly in ethanol-treated DKO mice compared to ethanol-treated WT controls, while sedation duration following high-dose ethanol challenge was unaffected. These data indicate that the

  6. Effect of high-voltage electrical stimulation on the albumin and histamine serum concentrations, edema, and pain in acute joint inflammation of rats

    Maria C. Sandoval

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mechanism by which high-voltage electrical stimulation (HVPC acts on edema reduction is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of HVPC with negative polarity (- applied to the ankle of rats with acute joint inflammation. METHOD: Sixty-four rats were divided into four groups (n=16: inflamed+HVPC(-, 0.03 mL application of ι-carrageenan (3% to the tibiotarsal joint plus HVPC(-; inflamed+HVPC placebo, carrageenan application and HVPC placebo; normal+HVPC(-, HVPC application(-; and normal control, no intervention. The HVPC(- 100 Hz at a submotor level was applied daily for 45 min on three consecutive days. The variables were pain, hind-foot volume, and serum histamine and albumin assessed before and during the 48 hours following inflammation. The variables were compared using the t test, one-way ANOVA, nested ANOVA for repeated measures, and the post hoc Bonferroni test. Analysis of covariance was applied to adjust the effects of HVPC(- by measurements of pain, inflammation, albumin, and histamine at 24 h, and the final weight was compared to the other groups. The significance level was set at p0.05. Albumin was reduced in the groups that received the intervention, but there was no differences between them. There was only a 24 hour increase in histamine with the normal+HVPC(- (p=0.0001 and inflamed+HVPC placebo groups (p=0.01 compared to the normal control group. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the present study suggest that HVPC(- with the parameters employed did not reduce pain or edema and did not change serum albumin or histamine levels,, which indicates the inability of this resource to have a positive effect when treating treat acute joint inflammation.

  7. Therapy with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in the chronic stage, but not in the acute stage, improves experimental autoimmune myocarditis in rats via nitric oxide.

    Shimada, Kana; Okabe, Taka-aki; Mikami, Yu; Hattori, Miki; Fujita, Masatoshi; Kishimoto, Chiharu

    2010-09-01

    We systematically investigated serial efficacy of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) therapy upon experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) in rats treated with and without the inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) with the analyses of tissue regeneration. G-CSF could mobilize multipotent progenitor cells of bone marrow into the peripheral blood and may improve ventricular function. A rat model of porcine myosin-induced EAM was used. After the immunization of myosin, G-CSF (10 microg/kg/day) or saline was injected intraperitoneally on days 0-21 in experiment 1 and on days 21-42 in experiment 2. Additional myosin-immunized rats were orally given 25 mg/kg/day of N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methylester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), in each experiment (each group; n=8-21). Serum cytokines and peripheral blood cell counts were measured in each group. In experiment 1, G-CSF treatment aggravated cardiac pathology associated with increased macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels and enhanced superoxide production. In experiment 2, G-CSF treatment reduced the severity of myocarditis with increased capillary density and improved left ventricular ejection fraction. In the rats with EAM treated with G-CSF associated with oral L-NAME treatment in experiment 2, the severity of myocarditis was not reduced. Myocardial c-kit(+) cells were demonstrated only in G-CSF-treated group in experiment 2 but not in other groups. G-CSF has differential effects on EAM in rats associated with the modulation of cytokine network. The overwhelming superoxide production by G-CSF administration in the acute stage may worsen the disease. G-CSF therapy improved cardiac function via NO system in a rat model of myocarditis in the chronic stage, but not in the acute stage, possibly through the myocardial regeneration and acceleration of healing process. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Glucose-stimulated insulin response in pregnant sheep following acute suppression of plasma non-esterified fatty acid concentrations

    Sriskandarajah Nadarajah

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA concentrations in non-pregnant animals have been reported to decrease pancreatic responsiveness. As ovine gestation advances, maternal insulin concentrations fall and NEFA concentrations increase. Experiments were designed to examine if the pregnancy-associated rise in NEFA concentration is associated with a reduced pancreatic sensitivity to glucose in vivo. We investigated the possible relationship of NEFA concentrations in regulating maternal insulin concentrations during ovine pregnancy at three physiological states, non-pregnant, non-lactating (NPNL, 105 and 135 days gestational age (dGA, term 147+/- 3 days. Methods The plasma concentrations of insulin, growth hormone (GH and ovine placental lactogen (oPL were determined by double antibody radioimmunoassay. Insulin responsiveness to glucose was measured using bolus injection and hyperglycaemic clamp techniques in 15 non-pregnant, non-lactating ewes and in nine pregnant ewes at 105 dGA and near term at 135 dGA. Plasma samples were also collected for hormone determination. In addition to bolus injection glucose and insulin Area Under Curve calculations, the Mean Plasma Glucose Increment, Glucose Infusion Rate and Mean Plasma Insulin Increment and Area Under Curve were determined for the hyperglycaemic clamp procedures. Statistical analysis of data was conducted with Students t-tests, repeated measures ANOVA and 2-way ANOVA. Results Maternal growth hormone, placental lactogen and NEFA concentrations increased, while basal glucose and insulin concentrations declined with advancing gestation. At 135 dGA following bolus glucose injections, peak insulin concentrations and insulin area under curve (AUC profiles were significantly reduced in pregnant ewes compared with NPNL control ewes (p Conclusions Results suggest that despite an acute suppression of circulating NEFA concentrations during pregnancy, the associated steroids and hormones

  9. Electroacupuncture Ameliorates Acute Renal Injury in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Rabbits via Induction of HO-1 through the PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 Pathways.

    Yu, Jian-Bo; Shi, Jia; Zhang, Yuan; Gong, Li-Rong; Dong, Shu-An; Cao, Xin-Shun; Wu, Li-Li; Wu, Li-Na

    2015-01-01

    Electroacupuncture at select acupoints have been verified to protect against organ dysfunctions during endotoxic shock. And, heme oxygenase (HO)-1 as a phase II enzyme and antioxidant contributed to the protection of kidney in septic shock rats. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt pathway mediated the activation of NF-E2 related factor-2 (Nrf2), which was involved in HO-1 induction. To understand the efficacy of electroacupuncture stimulation in ameliorating acute kidney injury (AKI) through the PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 pathway and subsequent HO-1 upregulation, a dose of LPS 5mg/kg was administered intravenously to replicate the rabbit model of AKI induced by endotoxic shock. Electroacupuncture pretreatment was handled bilaterally at Zusanli and Neiguan acupoints for five consecutive days while sham electroacupuncture at non-acupoints as control. Results displayed that electroacupuncture stimulation significantly alleviated the morphologic renal damage, attenuated renal tubular apoptosis, suppressed the elevated biochemical indicators of AKI caused by LPS, enhanced the expressions of phospho-Akt, HO-1protein, Nrf2 total and nucleoprotein, and highlighted the proportions of Nrf2 nucleoprotein as a parallel. Furthermore, partial protective effects of elecroacupuncture were counteracted by preconditioning with wortmannin (the selective PI3K inhibitor), indicating a direct involvement of PI3K/Akt pathway. Inconsistently, wortmannin pretreatment made little difference to the expressions of HO-1, Nrf2 nucleoprotein and total protein, which indicated that PI3K/Akt may be not the only pathway responsible for electroacupuncture-afforded protection against LPS-induced AKI. These findings provide new insights into the potential future clinical applications of electroacupuncture for AKI induced by endotoxic shock instead of traditional remedies.

  10. Acute effects of transcutaneous electrical diaphragmatic stimulation on respiratory pattern in COPD patients: cross-sectional and comparative clinical trial

    Karina M. Cancelliero-Gaiad

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcutaneous electrical diaphragmatic stimulation (TEDS has been used to improve respiratory muscle strength in patients with respiratory muscle weakness. However, this physical therapy resource has not been studied in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the respiratory pattern during one session of TEDS in COPD patients. METHOD: Fifteen COPD patients participated in one TEDS session for plethysmographic analysis and assessment of peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2 and heart rate (HR. After the session, patients were divided into two groups: Responder (R; n=9 and Non-Responder (NR; n=6 to TEDS. Statistic analysis was performed using the Shapiro-Wilk normality test and two-way ANOVA. For the parameters that showed interaction, the Student t test was used (P<0.05. RESULTS: R group consisted mainly of men, with lower SpO2 and higher HR than NR group. When time (before and during and groups (R and NR were compared (interaction, there were differences in the parameters minute ventilation (Vent, inspiratory tidal volume (ViVol, expiratory tidal volume (VeVol, and respiratory rate (Br/M. In the intergroup comparison, differences were observed in the parameters Vent, ViVol, and VeVol. A significant effect was also observed for time in change in end-expiratory lung volume level (qDEEL, phase relation during inspiration (PhRIB; phase relation during expiration (PhREB; phase relation of entire breath (PhRTB, and phase angle (PhAng. During TEDS, there was an increase in SpO2 and a reduction in HR in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: The most hypoxemic group with greater HR responded to TEDS and there was interaction between group and time of analysis for the pulmonary volumes. The time factor had an influence on the two groups with an increase in thoracoabdominal asynchrony.

  11. Acute changes in mood induced by subthalamic deep brain stimulation in Parkinson disease are modulated by psychiatric diagnosis.

    Eisenstein, Sarah A; Dewispelaere, William B; Campbell, Meghan C; Lugar, Heather M; Perlmutter, Joel S; Black, Kevin J; Hershey, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) reduces Parkinson disease (PD) motor symptoms but has unexplained, variable effects on mood. The study tested the hypothesis that pre-existing mood and/or anxiety disorders or increased symptom severity negatively affects mood response to STN DBS. Thirty-eight PD participants with bilateral STN DBS and on PD medications were interviewed with Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Axis I Disorders (SCID) and completed Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory (SSAI) self-reports. Subsequently, during OFF and optimal ON (clinical settings) STN DBS conditions and while off PD medications, motor function was assessed with the United Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS, part III), and participants rated their mood with Visual Analogue Scales (VAS), and again completed SSAI. VAS mood variables included anxiety, apathy, valence and emotional arousal. STN DBS improved UPDRS scores and mood. Unexpectedly, PD participants diagnosed with current anxiety or mood disorders experienced greater STN DBS-induced improvement in mood than those diagnosed with remitted disorders or who were deemed as having never met threshold criteria for diagnosis. BDI and SSAI scores did not modulate mood response to STN DBS, indicating that clinical categorical diagnosis better differentiates mood response to STN DBS than self-rated symptom severity. SCID diagnosis, BDI and SSAI scores did not modulate motor response to STN DBS. PD participants diagnosed with current mood or anxiety disorders are more sensitive to STN DBS-induced effects on mood, possibly indicating altered basal ganglia circuitry in this group. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Combined with Methylprednisolone Improves Functional Outcomes in Rats with Experimental Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    William Gemio Jacobsen Teixeira

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects of combined treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF and methylprednisolone in rats subjected to experimental spinal cord injury. METHODS: Forty Wistar rats received a moderate spinal cord injury and were divided into four groups: control (no treatment; G-CSF (G-CSF at the time of injury and daily over the next five days; methylprednisolone (methylprednisolone for 24 h; and G-CSF/Methylprednisolone (methylprednisolone for 24 h and G-CSF at the time of injury and daily over the next five days. Functional evaluation was performed using the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan score on days 2, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42 following injury. Motor-evoked potentials were evaluated. Histological examination of the spinal cord lesion was performed immediately after euthanasia on day 42. RESULTS: Eight animals were excluded (2 from each group due to infection, a normal Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan score at their first evaluation, or autophagy, and 32 were evaluated. The combination of methylprednisolone and G-CSF promoted greater functional improvement than methylprednisolone or G-CSF alone (p<0.001. This combination also exhibited a synergistic effect, with improvements in hyperemia and cellular infiltration at the injury site (p<0.001. The groups displayed no neurophysiological differences (latency p=0.85; amplitude p=0.75. CONCLUSION: Methylprednisolone plus G-CSF promotes functional and histological improvements superior to those achieved by either of these drugs alone when treating spinal cord contusion injuries in rats. Combining the two drugs did have a synergistic effect.

  13. The rapid synthesis of high purity [{sup 18}F]butyrophenone neuroleptics from nitro precursors for PET study

    Hashizume, Kazunari; Hashimoto, Naoto; Kato, Hiroo; Cork, D G; Miyake, Yoshihiro [National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    1995-04-01

    We have completed rapid syntheses of [{sup 18}F]butyrophenone neuroleptics ([{sup 18}F]haloperidol and [{sup 18}F]spiperone) from their nitro precursors in high radiochemical yields (up to 21%) by combining a one-step nitro-fluoro exchange reaction and a novel high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation method. The synthesis time was ca. 95 min and both the radiochemical and chemical purities of the labeled products were over 99%. (author).

  14. Making Sense of the 'Chemical Revolution'. Patients' Voices on the Introduction of Neuroleptics in the 1950s.

    Majerus, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    The so-called chemical revolution has produced a vast historiographical corpus. Yet the patient's voice remains surprisingly absent from these stories. Based on the archives of the Institut de Psychiatrie (Brussels), this paper traces the introduction of Largactil as recounted in patient letters, physician records and nurse notes. The paper thus contributes to the history of therapies from below, but also participates in the historiographical debate about whether the introduction of neuroleptics can indeed be considered a revolution.

  15. Analysis of adrenocortical secretory responses during acute an prolonged immune stimulation in inflammation-susceptible and -resistant rat strains.

    Andersson, I M; Lorentzen, J C; Ericsson-Dahlstrand, A

    2000-11-01

    Endogenous corticosterone secreted during immune challenge restricts the inflammatory process and genetic variations in this neuroendocrine-immune dialogue have been suggested to influence an individuals sensitivity to develop chronic inflammatory disorders. We have tested inflammation-susceptible Dark Agouti (DA) rats and resistant, MHC-identical, PVG.1AV1 rats for their abilities to secrete corticosterone in response to acute challenge with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or a prolonged activation of the nonspecific immune system with arthritogenic yeast beta-glucan. Intravenous injection of LPS triggered equipotent secretion of corticosterone in both rat strains. Interestingly, peak concentrations of corticosterone did not differ significantly between the strains. Intradermal injection of beta-glucan caused severe, monophasic, polyarthritis in DA rats while PVG.1AV1 responded with significantly milder joint inflammation. Importantly, serial sampling of plasma from glucan-injected DA and PVG.1AV1 rats did not reveal elevated concentrations of plasma corticosterone at any time from days 1-30 postinjection compared to preinjection values, in spite of the ongoing inflammatory process. Interestingly, adrenalectomized, beta-glucan-challenged DA rats responded with an aggravated arthritic process, indicating an anti-inflammatory role for the basal levels of corticosterone that were detected in intact DA rats challenged with beta-glucan. Moreover, substitution with subcutaneous corticosterone-secreting pellets, yielding moderate stress-levels, significantly attenuated the arthritic response. In contrast, adrenalectomized and glucan-challenged PVG.1AV1 rats did not respond with an elevated arthritic response, suggesting that these rats contain the arthritic process via corticosterone-independent mechanisms. In conclusion, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in both rat strains exhibited strong activation after challenge with LPS. This contrasted to the basal

  16. Predicting acute side effects of stimulant medication in pediatric attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder: data from quantitative electroencephalography, event-related potentials, and a continuous-performance test

    Ogrim G

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Geir Ogrim,1–3 Knut A Hestad,3,4 Jan Ferenc Brunner,3,5,6 Juri Kropotov3,7,8 1Neuropsychiatric Unit, Østfold Hospital Trust, Fredrikstad, Norway; 2National Resource Center for ADHD, Tourettes' Syndrome and Narcolepsy, Oslo, Norway; 3Institute of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU, Trondheim, Norway; 4Division of Mental Health, Innlandet Hospital Trust, Brumunddal, Norway; 5Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, St Olav's Hospital, Trondheim, Norway; 6Department of Neuroscience, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway; 7Institute of the Human Brain, Russian Academy of Sciences, Saint Petersburg, Russia; 8Department of Neuropsychology, Andrzej Frycz Modrzewski Krakow University, Krakow, Poland Background: The aim of this study was to search for predictors of acute side effects of stimulant medication in pediatric attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, emphasizing variables from quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG, event-related potentials (ERPs, and behavior data from a visual continuous-performance test (VCPT. Methods: Seventy medication-naïve ADHD patients aged 7–16 years were tested with QEEG, including a go/no-go task condition (VCPT from which behavior data and ERPs were extracted, followed by a systematic trial on stimulant medication lasting at least 4 weeks. Based on data from rating scales and interviews, two psychologists who were blind to the QEEG/ERP test results independently rated the patients as having no or small side effects (n = 37 or troublesome side effects (n = 33. We determined if the side effects were related to sex, age, IQ, ADHD subtype, comorbidities, clinical outcome, and variables in QEEG, ERPs, and VCPT. Results: There was a moderate negative correlation between clinical outcome and side effects. Three variables were significantly associated with side effects in a multivariate logistic regression analysis. In the ERP independent component – contingent negative variation

  17. Granulocyte Colony-stimulating Factor-primed Bone Marrow: An Excellent Stem-cell Source for Transplantation in Acute Myelocytic Leukemia and Chronic Myelocytic Leukemia

    Yuhang Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Steady-state bone marrow (SS-BM and granulocyte colony-stimulating growth factor-primed BM/peripheral blood stem-cell (G-BM/G-PBSC are the main stem-cell sources used in allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Here, we evaluated the treatment effects of SS-BM and G-BM/G-PBSC in human leucocyte antigen (HLA-identical sibling transplantation. Methods: A total of 226 patients (acute myelogenous leukemia-complete remission 1, chronic myelogenous leukemia-chronic phase 1 received SS-BM, G-BM, or G-PBSC from an HLA-identical sibling. Clinical outcomes (graft-versus-host disease [GVHD], overall survival, transplant-related mortality [TRM], and leukemia-free survival [LFS] were analyzed. Results: When compared to SS-BM, G-BM gave faster recovery time to neutrophil or platelet (P 0.05. Conclusions: G-CSF-primed bone marrow shared the advantages of G-PBSC and SS-BM. We conclude that G-BM is an excellent stem-cell source that may be preferable to G-PBSC or SS-BM in patients receiving HLA-identical sibling hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

  18. Age-dependent effects of acute methylphenidate on amygdala reactivity in stimulant treatment-naive patients with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Bottelier, Marco A; Schrantee, Anouk; Ferguson, Bart; Tamminga, Hyke G H; Bouziane, Cheima; Kooij, J J Sandra; de Ruiter, Michiel B; Reneman, Liesbeth

    2017-11-30

    In the present study, we investigate whether methylphenidate (MPH) affects emotional processing and whether this effect is modulated by age. We measured amygdala reactivity with functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) during processing of angry and fearful facial expressions in male stimulant treatment-naive patients with ADHD (N = 35 boys; N = 46 men) and 23 healthy control subjects (N = 11 boys; N = 12 men). In ADHD patients, we also measured amygdala reactivity 90min after an acute oral challenge with MPH (0.5mg/kg). Mean amygdala reactivity was analyzed for all subjects using a repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Whole-brain maps were analyzed for the patients only. At baseline, we found a age*diagnosis effect approaching significance (p = 0.05) in the right amygdala due to lower reactivity in children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) vs. controls (-31%), but higher reactivity in adults with ADHD vs. controls (+31%). MPH significantly reduced right amygdala reactivity in all patients, resulting in further reductions in children. In the left amygdala, reduction of amygdala reactivity was confined to adult ADHD patients whereas there was no change in children with ADHD. MPH-induced decrease of amygdala reactivity in adults might be a promising avenue for managing emotional dysregulation when replicated for chronic MPH treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Skeletal effects of central nervous system active drugs: anxiolytics, sedatives, antidepressants, lithium and neuroleptics.

    Vestergaard, Peter

    2008-09-01

    Many central nervous system active drugs can alter postural balance, increasing the risk of fractures. Anxiolytics and sedatives include the benzodiazepines, and these have been associated with a limited increase in the risk of fractures, even at low doses, probably from an increased risk of falls. No systematic differences have been shown between benzodiazepines with long and short half-lives. Although the increase in risk of fractures was limited, care must still be taken when prescribing for older fall-prone subjects at risk of osteoporosis. Neuroleptics may be associated with a decrease in bone mineral density and a very limited increase in fracture risk. Antidepressants are associated with a dose-dependent increase in the risk of fractures. The increase in relative risk of fractures seems to be larger with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) than with tricyclic antidepressants. The reason for this is not known but may be linked to serotonin effects on bone cells and the risk of falls. With the wide use of SSRIs, more research is needed. Lithium is associated with a decrease in the risk of fractures. This may be linked to its effects on the Wnt glycoprotein family, which is a specialised signalling system for certain cell types.

  20. [Applying Neuman's Systems Model to a neuroleptic malignant syndrome psychiatric patient and his caregiver].

    Wang, Shu-Mi; Lai, Chien-Yu

    2010-04-01

    This article describes a nurse's experience using Neuman's Systems Model to care for a chronic psychiatric patient and his caregiver. The patient was diagnosed as suffering from neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS). Nursing care described in this article was administered from October 23 to December 4, 2007. The patient developed NMS in the third month of a three-month period of hospitalization, which endangered his life as well as the health of his caregiver. Nursing care was provided to the patient and his caregiver based on Neuman's Systems Model, which included assessments of intrapersonal, interpersonal, and extra-personal forces as well as of environmental factors affecting the health of the patient and his caregiver. The four nursing care issues identified included: existing self-care deficit, sensory/perceptual alteration, sleep pattern disturbance, and caregiver role strain. Following Neuman's systems model, primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention were used to strengthen the flexible lines of defense, internal lines of resistance, and supporting existing strengths of both patient and caregiver, as well as to conserve client system energy. Significant improvements in patient and caregiver abilities were apparent in nursing intervention outcomes. This experience shows the Neuman's systems model to be an efficient model in psychiatric nursing care.

  1. Olanzapine versus typical neuroleptics for schizophrenia: evaluation of social and economic costs

    Giorgio Mariani

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available An important number of publications is reporting results from health outcomes studies comparing atypical antipsychotics (AA with typical neuroleptics (TN over 1 year of observation. Our study has prolonged the period observation of the economical and social outcomes to 4 years: 31 patients with schizophrenia were observed retrospectively during two years of TN treatment and then followed during 2 more years of olanzapine treatment after naturalistic switch. The results show a general reduction of health care interventions (territory and hospital during the olanzapine treatment period. Global costs during olanzapine treatment were lower than during TN treatment (10506 euros with TN vs 6193 euros with olanzapine over 2 years. The social outcome, measured through the registration of the number of working days in the two periods of the study (retrospective with TN and prospective with olanzapine, was better during olanzapine treatment, probably due to increased patient compliance to the rehabilitative activities offered by the Department of Mental Health. In our experience, olanzapine appeared to dominate TN treatment, as its higher acquisition costs were offset by the reduction of territorial and nosocomial health care interventions over two years of observation, and associated with higher involvement in rehabilitative and social activities.

  2. Stem cell mobilization induced by subcutaneous granulocyte-colony stimulating factor to improve cardiac regeneration after acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction: result of the double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled stem cells in myocardial infarction (STEMMI) trial

    Ripa, RS; Jorgensen, E; Wang, Y

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phase 1 clinical trials of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment after myocardial infarction have indicated that G-CSF treatment is safe and may improve left ventricular function. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial aimed to assess the efficacy of......: Bone marrow stem cell mobilization with subcutaneous G-CSF is safe but did not lead to further improvement in ventricular function after acute myocardial infarction compared with the recovery observed in the placebo group...

  3. Dietary β-glucan stimulate complement and C-reactive protein acute phase responses in common carp (Cyprinus carpio) during an Aeromonas salmonicida infection.

    Pionnier, Nicolas; Falco, Alberto; Miest, Joanna; Frost, Patrick; Irnazarow, Ilgiz; Shrive, Annette; Hoole, Dave

    2013-03-01

    The effect of β-glucans as feed additive on the profile of C-reactive protein (CRP) and complement acute phase responses was studied in common carp Cyprinus carpio after exposition to a bacterial infection with Aeromonas salmonicida. Carp were orally administered with β-glucan (MacroGard®) for 14 days with a daily β-glucan intake of 6 mg per kg body weight. Fish were then intraperitoneally injected with either PBS or 1 × 10⁸ bacteria per fish and sampled at time 0, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72, 96 and 120 h post-injection (p.i.) for serum and head kidney, liver and mid-gut tissues. CRP levels and complement activity were determined in the serum samples whilst the gene expression profiles of CRP and complement related genes (crp1, crp2, c1r/s, bf/c2, c3 and masp2) were analysed in the tissues by quantitative PCR. Results obtained showed that oral administration of β-glucan for 14 days significantly increased serum CRP levels up to 2 fold and serum alternative complement activity (ACP) up to 35 fold. The bacterial infection on its own (i.e. not combined with a β-glucan feeding) did have significant effects on complement response whilst CRP was not detectably induced during the carp acute phase reaction. However, the combination of the infection and the β-glucan feeding did show significant effects on both CRP and complement profiles with higher serum CRP levels and serum ACP activity in the β-glucan fed fish than in the control fed fish. In addition, a distinct organ and time dependent expression profile pattern was detected for all the selected genes: a peak of gene expression first occurred in the head kidney tissue (6 h p.i. or 12 h p.i.), then an up-regulation in the liver several hours later (24 h p.i.) and finally up- or down-regulations in the mid-gut at 24 h p.i. and 72 h p.i. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that MacroGard® stimulated CRP and complement responses to A. salmonicida infection in common carp. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All

  4. Feeding common carp Cyprinus carpio with β-glucan supplemented diet stimulates C-reactive protein and complement immune acute phase responses following PAMPs injection.

    Pionnier, Nicolas; Falco, Alberto; Miest, Joanna J; Shrive, Annette K; Hoole, Dave

    2014-08-01

    The effect of β-glucan as a feed additive on the serum and gene profile of C-reactive protein (CRP) and complement acute phase responses was ascertained in common carp Cyprinus carpio. In addition effects of subsequent intraperitoneal injections of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), i.e. LPS or poly(I:C), to mimic bacterial or viral infection respectively, were studied. Carp were first orally fed with β-glucan (MacroGard®) with a daily β-glucan intake of 6 mg per kg body weight or with control food for 25 days and then injected with PBS containing either LPS (4 mg/kg) or poly(I:C) (5 mg/kg) or PBS alone. Fish were sampled during the 25 days of the feeding period and up to 7 days post-PAMPs injections for serum and liver, head kidney and mid-gut tissues. Oral administration of β-glucan for 25 days significantly increased serum CRP levels and alternative complement activity (ACP). In addition, the subsequent LPS and poly(I:C) challenges significantly affected CRP and complement related gene expression profiles (crp1, crp2, c1r/s, bf/c2, c3 and masp2), with the greatest effects observed in the β-glucan fed fish. However, in fish fed β-glucan the PAMPs injections had less effects on CRP levels and complement activity in the serum than in control fed fish, suggesting that the 25 days of β-glucan immunostimulation was sufficient enough to reduce the effects of LPS and poly(I:C) injections. Results suggest that MacroGard® stimulated CRP and complement responses to PAMPs immunological challenges in common carp thus highlighting the beneficial β-glucan immunostimulant properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Toll-like receptor 7/8 agonists stimulate plasmacytoid dendritic cells to initiate TH17-deviated acute contact dermatitis in human subjects.

    Garzorz-Stark, Natalie; Lauffer, Felix; Krause, Linda; Thomas, Jenny; Atenhan, Anne; Franz, Regina; Roenneberg, Sophie; Boehner, Alexander; Jargosch, Manja; Batra, Richa; Mueller, Nikola S; Haak, Stefan; Groß, Christina; Groß, Olaf; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Theis, Fabian J; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten B; Biedermann, Tilo; Eyerich, Stefanie; Eyerich, Kilian

    2018-04-01

    A standardized human model to study early pathogenic events in patients with psoriasis is missing. Activation of Toll-like receptor 7/8 by means of topical application of imiquimod is the most commonly used mouse model of psoriasis. We sought to investigate the potential of a human imiquimod patch test model to resemble human psoriasis. Imiquimod (Aldara 5% cream; 3M Pharmaceuticals, St Paul, Minn) was applied twice a week to the backs of volunteers (n = 18), and development of skin lesions was monitored over a period of 4 weeks. Consecutive biopsy specimens were taken for whole-genome expression analysis, histology, and T-cell isolation. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) were isolated from whole blood, stimulated with Toll-like receptor 7 agonist, and analyzed by means of extracellular flux analysis and real-time PCR. We demonstrate that imiquimod induces a monomorphic and self-limited inflammatory response in healthy subjects, as well as patients with psoriasis or eczema. The clinical and histologic phenotype, as well as the transcriptome, of imiquimod-induced inflammation in human skin resembles acute contact dermatitis rather than psoriasis. Nevertheless, the imiquimod model mimics the hallmarks of psoriasis. In contrast to classical contact dermatitis, in which myeloid dendritic cells sense haptens, pDCs are primary sensors of imiquimod. They respond with production of proinflammatory and T H 17-skewing cytokines, resulting in a T H 17 immune response with IL-23 as a key driver. In a proof-of-concept setting systemic treatment with ustekinumab diminished imiquimod-induced inflammation. In human subjects imiquimod induces contact dermatitis with the distinctive feature that pDCs are the primary sensors, leading to an IL-23/T H 17 deviation. Despite these shortcomings, the human imiquimod model might be useful to investigate early pathogenic events and prove molecular concepts in patients with psoriasis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier

  6. Non-opiate [beta]-endorphin fragments and dopamine--III [gamma]-type endorphins and various neuroleptics counteract the hypoactivity elicited by injection of apomorphine into the nucleus accumbens

    Ree, J.M. van; Caffe, A.R.; Wolterink, G.

    1982-01-01

    The hypoactivity in rats induced by small doses of apomorphine, injected bilaterally into the nucleus accumbens area of the brain, could be antagonized by pretreatment with the neuroleptic-like neuropeptide des-enkephalin-γ-endorphin (DEγE, β-endorphin 6–17) as well as with the neuroleptic drugs

  7. Relationship of neuromotor disturbances to psychosis symptoms in first-episode neuroleptic-naive schizophrenia patients.

    Cortese, Leonardo; Caligiuri, Michael P; Malla, Ashok K; Manchanda, Rahul; Takhar, Jatinder; Haricharan, Raj

    2005-06-01

    From the very inception of the modern diagnostic scheme for psychotic disorders, abnormalities in motor function have been observed in these conditions. Despite convergence from multiple areas of research supporting the notion that multiple frontal-subcortical circuits regulate motor and limbic behavior, the precise relationship between motor abnormalities and psychopathology has not been elucidated. The goals of this study were to examine the prevalence of extrapyramidal signs (EPS) in first-episode schizophrenia patients and their relationships to three psychopathological dimensions (positive psychosis syndrome, negative syndrome, and disorganization). We assessed EPS using traditional observer-based as well as quantitative instrumental measures in 39 neuroleptic-naive first-episode schizophrenia subjects. Subjects were followed for 6 months after initiating antipsychotic treatment to examine the stability of motor-limbic relationships. Four main findings emerged from this study. First, depending on the measure used the prevalence of dyskinesia prior to treatment ranged from 13% to 20%. The prevalence of parkinsonism ranged from 18% to 28%. Second, severity of dyskinesia was associated with the positive psychotic syndrome; whereas parkinsonism was associated with the positive psychosis, negative syndrome and disorganization. Third, psychopathology improved significantly across all symptom dimensions following antipsychotic treatment, while EPS remained stable. This suggests that some motor abnormalities in schizophrenia may reflect trait characteristics. Fourth, abnormalities on the pre-treatment instrumental measure of parkinsonism predicted greater improvement on positive psychosis symptoms following treatment (p=0.008). Our findings support the notion that neuromotor disturbances may be a core feature of schizophrenia in a substantial proportion of patients and implicate multiple fronto-striatal circuits regulating limbic and neuromotor behavior in

  8. Assessment of dopamine receptor blockade by neuroleptic drugs in the living human brain

    Wong, D.F.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Coyle, J.

    1985-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) makes it possible to attempt to relate directly the antipsychotic effect of neuroleptic drugs and their blocking effect on dopamine receptors (D2) in vivo. The authors have examined the ability of haloperidol (HAL) and molindone (MOL) to block the binding of C-11 n-methylspiperone (NMSP) in 6 normal subjects. A dose of 0.05 mg/kg of HAL resulted in a 68% drop in the slope of the caudate/cerebellum (Ca/Cb) vs. time. This slope is related to the rate of specific binding of NMSP to the receptor. A dose response was seen with both drugs. With increasing doses of HAL from .05 to 0.082 mg/kg, CA/Cb vs. time slope fell from .235 to .156/min. (N=4), progressively. Similarly with increasing doses of MOL of .16-.44 mg/kg slopes decreased from .0335 to .0155/min. (N=4). Similar degrees of post injection Ca/Cb ratio were produced with quantities of MOL and HAL administered in the oral dose ratio of doses 3-5:1 times greater than HAL. This is also the dose ratio at which we found similar dopamine receptor blockade by PET in vivo. A question that arises is why the in vitro affinity of HAL for D2 is 30 times greater than that of MOL in the human brain. The results raise the possibility that MOL metabolites are not only active in blocking D2 but indeed may possibly be more potent than MOL itself. It also helps confirm the site of action of MOL and its in vivo metabolites

  9. Evaluation of health resources expenditure in two groups of psychotic patients treated with olanzapine and typical neuroleptics in a Italian Mental Health Department in Calabria Region

    Anna Caputo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous Italian and international trials have studied the global costs of treatment with olanzapine and typical neuroleptics. Our analysis confirms those results. In our study, treatment with olanzapine, as compared to typical neuroleptics, was associated with a greater reduction in emergency interventions (hospitalisations, with an increased use of rehabilitation services and with a small increase in the number of working days. The differences between the two groups for this variable were not great, while the differences in the assessment scores appeared important and statistically significant. The results of present study are relative to the practice of one Italian Mental Health Department and, for this reason, cannot be generalized. Anyway, they are another indication of increased efficiency of atypicals treatment over older neuroleptics in schizophrenia.

  10. D2 dopamine receptors in neuroleptic-naive schizophrenic patients. A positron emission tomography study with [11C]raclopride

    Farde, L.; Wiesel, F.A.; Stone-Elander, S.; Halldin, C.; Nordstroem, A.L.H.; Hall, H.; Sedvall, G.

    1990-01-01

    Several groups have reported increased densities of D2 dopamine receptors in the basal ganglia of schizophrenic brains postmortem. The significance of this finding has been questioned, since an upregulation of receptor number may be a neuronal response to neuroleptic drug treatment. We have used positron emission tomography and [ 11 C]raclopride to examine central D2 dopamine receptor binding in 20 healthy subjects and 18 newly admitted, young, neuroleptic-naive patients with schizophrenia. An in vivo saturation procedure was applied for quantitative determination of D2 dopamine receptor density (Bmax) and affinity (Kd). When the two groups were compared, no significant difference in Bmax or Kd values was found in the putamen or the caudate nucleus. The hypothesis of generally elevated central D2 dopamine receptor densities in schizophrenia was thus not supported by the present findings. In the patients but not in the healthy controls, significantly higher densities were found in the left than in the right putamen but not in the caudate nucleus

  11. Temporal changes in serum creatine kinase concentration and degree of muscle rigidity in 24 patients with neuroleptic malignant syndrome

    Nisijima K

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Koichi Nisijima, Katutoshi ShiodaDepartment of Psychiatry, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi, JapanAbstract: Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS is a dangerous adverse response to antipsychotic drugs. It is characterized by the four major clinical symptoms of hyperthermia, severe muscle rigidity, autonomic dysfunction, and altered mental state. Serum creatine kinase (CK elevation occurs in over 90% of NMS cases. In the present study, the detailed temporal changes in serum CK and degree of muscle rigidity, and the relationship between CK concentration and degree of muscle rigidity over the time course from fever onset, were evaluated in 24 affected patients. The results showed that serum CK peaked on day 2 after onset of fever and returned to within normal limits at day 12. Mild muscle rigidity was observed before the onset of fever in 17 of 24 cases (71%. Muscle rigidity was gradually exacerbated and worsened until day 4 after onset of fever. These findings confirm physicians' empirical understanding of serum CK concentrations and muscle rigidity in NMS based on data accumulated from numerous patients with the syndrome, and they indicate that serum CK may contribute to the early detection of NMS.Keywords: neuroleptic malignant syndrome, creatine kinase, muscle rigidity

  12. Comparison of three /sup 18/F-labeled butyrophenone neuroleptic drugs in the baboon using positron emission tomography

    Arnett, C D; Shiue, C Y; Wolf, A P; Fowler, J S; Logan, J; Watanabe, M

    1985-03-01

    The butyrophenone neuroleptics spiroperidol, benperidol, and haloperidol were radiolabeled with fluorine-/sup 18/ and studied in baboon brain using positron emission transaxial tomography (PETT). Pretreatment of the baboon with a high pharmacological dose of (+)-butaclamol reduced the specifically bound component of radioactivity distribution in the striatum to approximately the radioactivity distribution found in the cerebellum. Comparative studies of brain distribution kinetics over a 4-h period indicated that either (/sup 18/F)spiroperidol or (/sup 18/F)benperidol may be suitable for specific labeling of neuroleptic receptors. In an 8-h study with (/sup 18/F)spiroperidol, striatal radioactivity did not decline, suggesting that spiroperidol either has a very slow dissociation rate or that it binds irreversibly to these receptors in vivo. (/sup 18/F)Haloperidol may not be suitable for in vivo PETT studies, because of a relatively high component of nonspecific distribution and a faster dissociation from the receptor. Analysis of /sup 18/F in plasma after injection of (/sup 18/F)spiroperidol indicated rapid metabolism to polar and acidic metabolites, with only 40% of the total radioactivity being present as unchanged drug after 30 min. Analysis of the metabolic stability of the radioactively labeled compound in rat striatum indicated that greater than 95% of (/sup 18/F)spiroperidol remains unchanged after 4 h.

  13. Timing of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor treatment after acute myocardial infarction and recovery of left ventricular function: results from the STEMMI trial

    Overgaard, Mikkel; Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Wang, Yongzhong

    2010-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) therapy after ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) have not demonstrated impact on systolic recovery compared to placebo. However, recent studies suggest that timing of G-CSF therapy is crucial.......Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) therapy after ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) have not demonstrated impact on systolic recovery compared to placebo. However, recent studies suggest that timing of G-CSF therapy is crucial....

  14. Immunohistochemical evidence for the involvement of gonadotropin releasing hormone in neuroleptic and cataleptic effects of haloperidol in mice.

    Fegade, Harshal A; Umathe, Sudhir N

    2016-04-01

    Blockade of dopamine D2 receptor by haloperidol is attributed for neuroleptic and cataleptic effects; and also for the release of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) from the hypothalamus. GnRH agonist is reported to exhibit similar behavioural effects as that of haloperidol, and pre-treatment with GnRH antagonist is shown to attenuate the effects of haloperidol, suggesting a possibility that GnRH might mediate the effects of haloperidol. To substantiate such possibility, the influence of haloperidol on GnRH immunoreactivity (GnRH-ir) in the brain was studied in vehicle/antide pre-treated mice by peroxidase-antiperoxidase method. Initially, an earlier reported antide-haloperidol interaction in rat was confirmed in mice, wherein haloperidol (250μg/kg, i.p.) exhibited suppression of conditioned avoidance response (CAR) on two-way shuttle box, and induced catalepsy in bar test; and pre-treatment with antide (50μg/kg, s.c., GnRH antagonist) attenuated both effects of haloperidol. Immunohistochemical study was carried out to identify GnRH-ir in the brain, isolated 1h after haloperidol treatment to mice pre-treated with vehicle/antide. The morphometric analysis of microphotographs of brain sections revealed that haloperidol treatment increased integrated density units of GnRH-ir in various regions of the limbic system. Considering basal GnRH-ir in vehicle treated group as 100%, the increase in GnRH-ir after haloperidol treatment was by 100.98% in the medial septum; 54.26% in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis; 1152.85% in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus; 120.79% in the preoptic area-organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis and 138.82% in the arcuate nucleus. Antide did not influence basal and haloperidol induced increase in GnRH-ir in any of the regions. As significant increase in GnRH-ir after haloperidol treatment was observed in such regions of the brain which are reported to directly or indirectly communicate with the hippocampus and basal

  15. Computationally Developed Sham Stimulation Protocol for Multichannel Desynchronizing Stimulation

    Magteld Zeitler

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A characteristic pattern of abnormal brain activity is abnormally strong neuronal synchronization, as found in several brain disorders, such as tinnitus, Parkinson's disease, and epilepsy. As observed in several diseases, different therapeutic interventions may induce a placebo effect that may be strong and hinder reliable clinical evaluations. Hence, to distinguish between specific, neuromodulation-induced effects and unspecific, placebo effects, it is important to mimic the therapeutic procedure as precisely as possibly, thereby providing controls that actually lack specific effects. Coordinated Reset (CR stimulation has been developed to specifically counteract abnormally strong synchronization by desynchronization. CR is a spatio-temporally patterned multichannel stimulation which reduces the extent of coincident neuronal activity and aims at an anti-kindling, i.e., an unlearning of both synaptic connectivity and neuronal synchrony. Apart from acute desynchronizing effects, CR may cause sustained, long-lasting desynchronizing effects, as already demonstrated in pre-clinical and clinical proof of concept studies. In this computational study, we set out to computationally develop a sham stimulation protocol for multichannel desynchronizing stimulation. To this end, we compare acute effects and long-lasting effects of six different spatio-temporally patterned stimulation protocols, including three variants of CR, using a no-stimulation condition as additional control. This is to provide an inventory of different stimulation algorithms with similar fundamental stimulation parameters (e.g., mean stimulation rates but qualitatively different acute and/or long-lasting effects. Stimulation protocols sharing basic parameters, but inducing nevertheless completely different or even no acute effects and/or after-effects, might serve as controls to validate the specific effects of particular desynchronizing protocols such as CR. In particular, based on

  16. Olanzapine-induced neuroleptic malignant syndrome in a patient with bipolar affective disorder: Does quetiapine holds the solution?

    Praveen Tripathi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS is a rare, severe and life threatening condition induced by antipsychotic medications. It is commonly encountered with the use of first generation antipsychotics, however cases of NMS have been reported with the use of second generation antipsychotics like Olanzapine, Risperidone, Paliperidone, Aripiprazole, Ziprasidone, Amisulpride, Quetiapine and Clozapine, though the incidence of such reports is rare. Due to decreased use of first generation antipsychotics, NMS is reported less frequently now a days. In this case report- we highlight the management issues of a patient suffering from bipolar affective disorder, who had developed NMS following intramuscular injection of haloperidol, which was withdrawn and olanzapine was given later on. The patient had again developed NMS with olanzapine. Finally the patient was managed with modified electroconvulsive therapy and discharged on Lithium carbonate and Quetiapine.

  17. Catatonia, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, and cotard syndrome in a 22-year-old woman: a case report.

    Weiss, C; Santander, J; Torres, R

    2013-01-01

    The following case study describes a 22-year-old woman with depression and symptoms of psychosis who developed neuroleptic malignant syndrome after using Risperidone, thus requiring life support equipment and Bromocriptine, later recovering after seven days. From a psychiatric and neurological point of view, however, the persistence of catatonic syndrome and Cotard syndrome delusions was observed, based on assertions such as "I do not have a heart," "my heart is not beating," "I can not breathe," "I am breaking apart," "I have no head" (ideas of negation) and statements about the patient being responsible for the "death of the whole world" (ideas of enormity). Brain NMR revealed leukoencephalopathy, interpreted as scar lesions caused by perinatal neurological damage, after discarding other pathologies. The patient responded well to electroconvulsive therapy after 11 sessions. Organic vulnerability to these syndromes, as well as their coexistence and clinical differentiation is discussed in the light of the data observed.

  18. [Treatment of attention deficit disorders in adulthood using psychostimulants and low-dose neuroleptics--a critical case report].

    Schmidt, L G; Schlünder, M; Reischies, F M

    1988-03-01

    Psychiatric research and therapy recently evinced increasing interest in patients suffering from attention deficit disorder. "Attention deficit disorder" is a category of mental disorders listed in DSM III, with a separate diagnostic subgroup for attention deficit disorders persisting in adults who had been hyperkinetic in childhood ("attention deficit disorder-residual type"); however, this does not feature in a corresponding manner in the ICD 9 version. Since there are practically no therapy studies in existence within the ICD range that can be relevant for such disorders, we studied the treatment of an adult patient with the psychostimulant fenetylline under clinical conditions and found a significant improvement in attention performance. However, on integration in a long-term day-clinic rehabilitation programme we found that low-dose neuroleptic treatment was on the whole of greater benefit than fenetylline treatment.

  19. Age Differences of Salivary Alpha-Amylase Levels of Basal and Acute Responses to Citric Acid Stimulation Between Chinese Children and Adults.

    Yang, Ze-Min; Chen, Long-Hui; Zhang, Min; Lin, Jing; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Wei-Wen; Yang, Xiao-Rong

    2015-01-01

    It remains unclear how salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) levels respond to mechanical stimuli in different age groups. In addition, the role played by the sAA gene (AMY1) copy number and protein expression (glycosylated and non-glycosylated) in sAA activity has also been rarely reported. In this study, we analyzed saliva samples collected before and after citric acid stimulation from 47 child and 47 adult Chinese subjects. We observed that adults had higher sAA activity and sAA glycosylated levels (glycosylated sAA amount/total sAA amount) in basal and stimulated saliva when compared with children, while no differences were found in total or glycosylated sAA amount between them. Interestingly, adults showed attenuated sAA activity levels increase over those of children after stimulation. Correlation analysis showed that total sAA amount, glycosylated sAA amount, and AMY1 copy number × total sAA amount were all positively correlated with sAA activity before and after stimulation in both groups. Interestingly, correlation r between sAA levels (glycosylated sAA amount and total sAA amount) and sAA activity decreased after stimulation in children, while adults showed an increase in correlation r. In addition, the correlation r between AMY1 copy number × total sAA amount and sAA activity was higher than that between AMY1 copy number, total sAA amount, and sAA activity, respectively. Taken together, our results suggest that total sAA amount, glycosylated sAA amount, and the positive interaction between AMY1 copy number and total sAA amount are crucial in influencing sAA activity before and after stimulation in children and adults.

  20. Age differences of salivary alpha-amylase levels of basal and acute responses to citric acid stimulation between Chinese children and adults

    Zemin eYang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available It remains unclear how salivary alpha-amylase (sAA levels respond to mechanical stimuli in different age groups. In addition, the role played by the sAA gene (AMY1 copy number and protein expression (glycosylated and non-glycosylated in sAA activity has also been rarely reported. In this study, we analyzed saliva samples collected before and after citric acid stimulation from 47 child and 47 adult Chinese subjects. We observed that adults had higher sAA activity and sAA glycosylated levels (glycosylated sAA amount/total sAA amount in basal and stimulated saliva when compared with children, while no differences were found in total or glycosylated sAA amount between them. Interestingly, adults showed attenuated sAA activity levels increase over those of children after stimulation. Correlation analysis showed that total sAA amount, glycosylated sAA amount, and AMY1 copy number×total sAA amount were all positively correlated with sAA activity before and after stimulation in both groups. Interestingly, correlation r between sAA levels (glycosylated sAA amount and total sAA amount and sAA activity decreased after stimulation in children, while adults showed an increase in correlation r. In addition, the correlation r between AMY1 copy number×total sAA amount and sAA activity was higher than that between AMY1 copy number, total sAA amount and sAA activity, respectively. Taken together, our results suggest that total sAA amount, glycosylated sAA amount, and the positive interaction between AMY1 copy number and total sAA amount are crucial in influencing sAA activity before and after stimulation in children and adults.

  1. Value of different modalities of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor applied during or after induction therapy of acute myeloid leukemia

    Lowenberg, B; Boogaerts, MA; Daenen, SMGJ; Verhoef, GEG; Hagenbeek, A; Vellenga, E; Ossenkoppele, GJ; Huijgens, PC; Verdonck, LF; vanderLelie, J; Wielenga, JJ; Gmur, J; Gratwohl, A; Hess, U; Fey, MF; vanPutten, WLJ

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The hematopoietic growth factors (HGFs) introduced into induction chemotherapy (CT) of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) might be of benefit to treatment outcome by at least two mechanisms. HGFs given on days simultaneously with CT might sensitize the leukemic cells and enhance their

  2. Age-dependent effects of acute methylphenidate on amygdala reactivity in stimulant treatment-naive patients with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Bottelier, Marco A.; Schrantee, Anouk; Ferguson, Bart; Tamminga, Hyke G. H.; Bouziane, Cheima; Kooij, J. J. Sandra; de Ruiter, Michiel B.; Reneman, Liesbeth

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate whether methylphenidate (MPH) affects emotional processing and whether this effect is modulated by age. We measured amygdala reactivity with functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) during processing of angry and fearful facial expressions in male stimulant

  3. Differential acute and chronic response of protein kinase C in cultured neonatal rat heart myocytes to alpha 1-adrenergic and phorbol ester stimulation.

    Henrich, C J; Simpson, P C

    1988-12-01

    Both alpha 1-adrenergic agonists (e.g. norepinephrine, NE*) and tumor-promoting phorbol esters (e.g. phorbol myristate acetate, PMA) are known to activate protein kinase C (PKC) (Abdel-Latif, 1986, Niedel and Blackshear, 1986). However, alpha 1 agonists and PMA produce very different effects on cardiac function (see Simpson, 1985; Benfey, 1987; Meidell et al., 1986; Leatherman et al., 1987; Yuan et al., 1987; for examples). PKC activation in heart cells has been studied only for PMA treated perfused heart (Yuan et al., 1987). Therefore, acute activation and chronic regulation of PKC by NE and PMA were compared in cultured neonatal rat heart myocytes. NE acutely and transiently activated PKC, as measured by translocation of PKC activity to the cell particulate fraction (Niedel and Blackshear, 1986). Particulate PKC activity peaked at 23% of total after NE for 30 s, as compared with 8% for control (P less than 0.001). By contrast, acute PKC activation by PMA was more pronounced and persistent, with particulate PKC activity 62% of total at 5 min (P less than 0.001). Calcium/lipid-independent kinase activity increased acutely with PMA, but not with NE. Chronic treatment with NE (24 to 48 h) increased total per cell PKC activity and 3H-phorbol dibutyrate (PDB) binding sites, an index of the number of PKC molecules (Niedel and Blackshear, 1986), by 30 to 60% over control (all P less than 0.05 to 0.01). In contrast with NE, chronic treatment with PMA down-regulated PKC, reducing total per cell PKC activity and 3H-PDB binding sites to 3% and 12% of control, respectively (P less than 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Diagnosis and management of acute movement disorders.

    Dressler, D; Benecke, R

    2005-11-01

    Most movement disorders, reflecting degenerative disorders, develop in a slowly progressive fashion. Some movement disorders, however, manifest with an acute onset. We wish to give an overview of the management and therapy of those acute-onset movement disorders.Drug-induced movement disorders are mainly caused by dopamine-receptor blockers (DRB) as used as antipsychotics (neuroleptics) and antiemetics. Acute dystonic reactions usually occur within the first four days of treatment. Typically, cranial pharyngeal and cervical muscles are affected. Anticholinergics produce a prompt relief. Akathisia is characterized by an often exceedingly bothersome feeling of restlessness and the inability to remain still. It is a common side effect of DRB and occurs within few days after their initiation. It subsides when DRB are ceased. Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome is a rare, but life-threatening adverse reaction to DRB which may occur at any time during DRB application. It is characterised by hyperthermia, rigidity, reduced consciousness and autonomic failure. Therapeutically immediate DRB withdrawal is crucial. Additional dantrolene or bromocriptine application together with symptomatic treatment may be necessary. Paroxysmal dyskinesias are childhood onset disorders characterised by dystonic postures, chorea, athetosis and ballism occurring at irregular intervals. In Paroxysmal Kinesigenic Dyskinesia they are triggered by rapid movements, startle reactions or hyperventilation. They last up to 5 minutes, occur up to 100 times per day and are highly sensitive to anticonvulsants. In Paroxysmal Non-Kinesiogenic Dyskinesia they cannot be triggered, occur less frequently and last longer. Other paroxysmal dyskinesias include hypnogenic paroxysmal dyskinesias, paroxysmal exertional dyskinesia, infantile paroxysmal dystonias, Sandifer's syndrome and symptomatic paroxysmal dyskinesias. In Hereditary Episodic Ataxia Type 1 attacks of ataxia last for up to two minutes, may be accompanied

  5. Tratamento farmacológico de acatisia induzida por antipsicóticos Pharmacological treatment of neuroleptic-induced akathisia

    Adriano Resende Lima

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A acatisia induzida por antipsicóticos é um transtorno de movimento relacionado ao sistema motor e caracterizado por sensação subjetiva de inquietude interna, irritabilidade ou disforia que podem ser intensas. Associa-se à sensação física e objetiva de desassossego e a movimentos não discinéticos. Esse efeito adverso pode predispor à pobre adesão ao tratamento e, conseqüentemente, favorecer recaídas. Assim, a escolha do melhor tratamento contribui para o alívio do sofrimento dos pacientes e favorece o melhor prognóstico. OBJETIVOS: Avaliar a eficácia e a tolerabilidade dos betabloqueadores, benzodiazepínicos e anticolinérgicos, comparados ao placebo e entre si, no tratamento de acatisia induzida por antipsicóticos, independente de idade ou diagnóstico psiquiátrico. MÉTODOS: Todos os estudos controlados, obtidos a partir das estratégias de busca que compararam betabloqueadores de ação central, benzodiazepínicos ou anticolinérgicos ao placebo e entre si, independente de sexo, idade ou diagnóstico psiquiátrico, foram considerados para esta atualização. Até março de 1999, foram consultadas sete bases de dados eletrônicos, sendo também examinadas as referências bibliográficas dos artigos selecionados. RESULTADOS: São apresentados 22 estudos controlados, sendo 13 comparando betabloqueadores, benzodiazepínicos e anticolinérgicos ao placebo e nove comparando diretamente as intervenções entre si. CONCLUSÕES: As três intervenções farmacológicas demonstraram eficácia superior comparadas ao placebo. Betabloqueadores de ação central mostraram-se mais eficazes, quando comparados a betabloqueadores de ação periférica, benzodiazepínicos e anticolinérgicos.INTRODUCTION: Neuroleptic-induced akathisia is a movement disorder related to the motor system characterized by complaints of inner restlessness, mental uneasiness, or dysphoria, all of which can be intense. Restlessness and non

  6. Feeding common carp Cyprinus carpio with b-glucan supplemented \\ud diet stimulates C-reactive protein and complement immune acute\\ud phase responses following PAMPs injection

    Pionnier, Nicolas; Falco, Alberto; Miest, Joanna J.; Shrive, Annette K.; Hoole, Dave

    2014-01-01

    The effect of β-glucan as a feed additive on the serum and gene profile of C-reactive protein (CRP) and complement acute phase responses was ascertained in common carp Cyprinus carpio. In addition effects of subsequent intraperitoneal injections of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), i.e. LPS or poly(I:C), to mimic bacterial or viral infection respectively, were studied. Carp were first orally fed with β-glucan (MacroGard®) with a daily β-glucan intake of 6 mg per kg body weight o...

  7. Nerve growth factor (NGF) immunoreactive neurons in the juvenile rat hippocampus: response to acute and long-term high-light open-field (HL-OF) or forced swim (FS) stress stimulation.

    Badowska-Szalewska, E; Spodnik, E; Ludkiewicz, B; Klejbor, I; Moryś, J

    2011-12-29

    This study aimed at examining and comparing the influence of two different stress stimuli on the density (number of cells/mm²) of nerve growth factor (NGF) containing neurons in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cell layers and the dentate gyrus (DG) granule cell layer in juvenile rats (P28; P-postnatal day). The high-light open-field (HL-OF) test and forced swim (FS) test were employed to investigate the effects of a single, 15-min acute exposure and repeated (15 min daily for 21 days) long-term exposure to stress. In order to detect NGF-ir neurons, immunohistochemical (-ir) techniques were used. In comparison with nonstressed animals, acute and long-term HL-OF or FS stimulation resulted in a marked increase (P<0.001) in the density of NGF-ir containing cells in all the hippocampal structures. The frequency of stress application (acute vs. long-term), however, did not have a substantial impact on the studied parameter, with the exception of the CA3 sector, where a decreased density (P<0.001) of NGF-ir neurons was observed after long-term exposure to FS. It may be concluded that a rise in the density of NGF-ir neurons in the juvenile rat hippocampus after exposure to HL-OF or FS stressors could have affected the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) stress axis. Prolonged HL-OF or FS stress was probably aggravating enough not to trigger the habituation process. The type of stressor applied (HL-OF vs. FS) was not essentially a factor determining the density of NGF-ir cells in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Aloe vera oral administration accelerates acute radiation-delayed wound healing by stimulating transforming growth factor-β and fibroblast growth factor production.

    Atiba, Ayman; Nishimura, Mayumi; Kakinuma, Shizuko; Hiraoka, Takeshi; Goryo, Masanobu; Shimada, Yoshiya; Ueno, Hiroshi; Uzuka, Yuji

    2011-06-01

    Delayed wound healing is a significant clinical problem in patients who have had previous irradiation. This study investigated the effectiveness of Aloe vera (Av) on acute radiation-delayed wound healing. The effect of Av was studied in radiation-exposed rats compared with radiation-only and control rats. Skin wounds were excised on the back of rats after 3 days of local radiation. Wound size was measured on days 0, 3, 6, 9, and 12 after wounding. Wound tissues were examined histologically and the expressions of transforming growth factor β-1 (TGF-β-1) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) were examined by immunohistochemistry and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Wound contraction was accelerated significantly by Av on days 6 and 12 after wounding. Furthermore, the inflammatory cell infiltration, fibroblast proliferation, collagen deposition, angiogenesis, and the expression levels of TGF-β-1 and bFGF were significantly higher in the radiation plus Av group compared with the radiation-only group. These data showed the potential application of Av to improve the acute radiation-delayed wound healing by increasing TGF-β-1 and bFGF production. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Safety and acceptability of transcranial direct current stimulation for the acute treatment of major depressive episodes: Analysis of individual patient data.

    Moffa, Adriano H; Brunoni, André R; Fregni, Felipe; Palm, Ulrich; Padberg, Frank; Blumberger, Daniel M; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Bennabi, Djamila; Haffen, Emmanuel; Alonzo, Angelo; Loo, Colleen K

    2017-10-15

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation modality that has been increasingly used for major depressive disorder (MDD) treatment. Although studies in healthy volunteers showed that the technique is well-tolerated, tDCS safety and acceptability have not been sufficiently explored in patients with MDD. We collected individual patient data from 6 randomized clinical trials that had been previously identified in a systematic review and meta-analysis. Primary outcomes were safety (rate of adverse events) and acceptability (rate of dropouts). Secondary outcomes were clinical, demographic and treatment predictors of the primary outcomes. Dropout rates between active (8.8%) and sham (12%) groups were not significantly different (OR= 0.7, p=0.38). Adverse event rates between active (73.5%) and sham (68.3%) groups were not significantly different (OR= 1.4, p= 0.23). Higher current densities were associated with lower adverse event rates. Dropout reasons were not systematically reported and adverse events were not collected using questionnaires standardized across studies. Active tDCS is as acceptable and safe as sham tDCS, as found in randomized clinical trials of MDD. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Catatonia, Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome, and Cotard Syndrome in a 22-Year-Old Woman: A Case Report

    C. Weiss

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The following case study describes a 22-year-old woman with depression and symptoms of psychosis who developed neuroleptic malignant syndrome after using Risperidone, thus requiring life support equipment and Bromocriptine, later recovering after seven days. From a psychiatric and neurological point of view, however, the persistence of catatonic syndrome and Cotard syndrome delusions was observed, based on assertions such as “I do not have a heart,” “my heart is not beating,” “I can not breathe,” “I am breaking apart,” “I have no head” (ideas of negation and statements about the patient being responsible for the “death of the whole world” (ideas of enormity. Brain NMR revealed leukoencephalopathy, interpreted as scar lesions caused by perinatal neurological damage, after discarding other pathologies. The patient responded well to electroconvulsive therapy after 11 sessions. Organic vulnerability to these syndromes, as well as their coexistence and clinical differentiation is discussed in the light of the data observed.

  11. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome: A review of the clinical/diagnostic features and report of a case without fever

    Okwudili Obayi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS is an uncommon but potentially fatal idiosyncratic reaction characterized by the development of altered consciousness, hyperthermia, autonomic dysfunction, and muscular rigidity on exposure to antipsychotic (or some other psychotropic medications. It is a medical emergency that requires early prompt identification and intervention. Fever is a predominant symptom in NMS. However, there have been reports that the classical high temperature usually associated with NMS may, on rare occasions, be absent. Case presentation This review and case report focus on the clinical/diagnostic features of NMS and a report of an unusual case without the classical high grade fever in a 27- year old male patient with schizophrenia who had been on high doses of multiple typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs. Conclusion This case report serves to remind clinicians of the essential features in the diagnosis of NMS and supports earlier reports that the classical high temperature usually associated with NMS may, on rare occasions, be absent and that would not exclude the diagnosis.

  12. Autoradiographic analysis of regional alterations in brain receptors following chronic administration and withdrawal of typical and atypical neuroleptics in rats

    See, R.E.; Ellison, G.; Toga, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    Rats were administered haloperidol, clozapine, raclopride, or no drug for 28 days or 8 months. Following a 3 week withdrawal period, in vitro autoradiography was utilized to examine receptor binding for dopamine D2([ 3 H]spiperone and [ 3 H]raclopride), dopamine D1([ 3 H]SCH23390), GABA A ([ 3 H]muscimol), benzodiazepine ([ 3 H]RO15-1788), and muscarinic ACh receptors ([ 3 H]QNB). [ 3 H]spiperone was elevated in striatal subregions only in haloperidol-treated rats, with the largest increases seen in the 8 month duration animals. Striatal [ 3 H]raclopride binding was increased after both short- and long-term treatment in both haloperidol and raclopride, but not clozapine-treated animals. Clozapine-treated rats showed significant increases in [ 3 H]SCH23390 in the nucleus accumbens after 28-day administration; otherwise no changes were seen for this ligand in any other groups. Increases in [ 3 H]muscimol binding in the substantia nigra reticulata were seen in haloperidol-treated rats after 8 month treatment. Binding of [ 3 H]QNB and [ 3 H]RO15-1788 were not significantly different from control for any of the drug-treated groups. These data suggest that persisting alterations in receptor binding are primarily seen in dopamine D2 and GABA receptors after withdrawal from chronic administration of haloperidol but not the atypical neuroleptics, clozapine and raclopride. (Authors)

  13. A retrospective analysis of cases with neuroleptic malignant syndrome and an evaluation of risk factors for mortality.

    Sahin, Aynur; Cicek, Mustafa; Gonenc Cekic, Ozgen; Gunaydin, Mucahit; Aykut, Demet Saglam; Tatli, Ozgur; Karaca, Yunus; Arici, Mualla Aylin

    2017-12-01

    Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a neurological emergency rarely encountered in clinical practice but with a high mortality rate. Cases associated with atypical antipsychotic use or termination of dopamine agonists have been seen in recent years. The purpose of this study was to assess the presence of risk factors for mortality by investigating all clinical and laboratory characteristics of cases with NMS. This descriptive, cross-sectional study retrospectively investigated all clinical and laboratory characteristics by scanning the ICD-10 codes of patients presenting to the XXXX Faculty of Medicine Emergency Department and diagnosed with NMS between 2006 and 2016. Patients were divided into surviving and non-surviving groups, and the data elicited were subjected to statistical comparisons. The mean age of the 18 patients diagnosed with NMS was 46.9 ± 4.8 years, and 50% were women. In addition to antipsychotics among the drugs leading to NMS, the syndrome also developed as a result of levodopa withdrawal in three patients and metoclopramide use in one patient. Statistically significant differences were determined between the surviving and non-surviving patients in terms of blood pressure, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatine kinase (CK) and mean platelet volume (MPV) values (p ≤ 0.05). In this study the most common agent that cause NMS was atypical antipsychotics. Also advanced age, increased blood pressure and serum CK, BUN and MPV values were identified as potential risk factors for mortality in NMS.

  14. Inhibition of post-traumatic septic proteolysis and ureagenesis and stimulation of hepatic acute-phase protein production by branched-chain amino acid TPN.

    Chiarla, C; Siegel, J H; Kidd, S; Coleman, B; Mora, R; Tacchino, R; Placko, R; Gum, M; Wiles, C E; Belzberg, H

    1988-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that severe sepsis after major trauma results in the reprioritization of release of hepatic acute-phase proteins (APP). They suggest competition for leucine for nutritional utilization may be responsible. To test this hypothesis, a branched-chain enriched (46.6%) amino acid mixture (BCAA) was administered on a prospective randomized basis with standard TPN therapy to 16 septic post-trauma patients. After sepsis was diagnosed, a randomized therapy (control-TPN or BCAA-TPN) was given for 12 days, or until death occurred. Total calories and amino acid nitrogen (N) administered were not different in the two groups (t-test) and q 8 h (347 study periods) amino acid clearances, urinary urea nitrogen excretion, muscle proteolysis from 3-methyl-histidine (3-MH) excretion, and standard indices of sepsis severity and hepatic function were measured, as well as platelets (PLAT), leucocytes (WBC), albumin (ALB), and six acute-phase proteins: C-reactive protein (CRP), alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1TRIP), fibrinogen (FIBRIN), alpha-2-macroglobulin (AMACRO), ceruloplasmin (CERUL), and transferrin (TRANS). Using Scheffé analysis of all contrasts the data showed: BCAA resulted in a fall in 24-hour urea N excretion (24.0 to 20.0 gm/24 hr) and in proteolysis (138 to 126 gm/24 hr) (p less than 0.0001). Prestudy CRP levels were all elevated, but compared to control where APP reprioritization occurred, over the initial 10 days of therapy BCAA patients had a more rapid fall in CRP with a more rapid rise in FIBRIN, TRANS, CERUL, ALBUMIN, AMACRO, and A1TRIP (all p less than 0.0001) relative to CRP. Also, the sepsis-reduced clearances of glutamine and glutamate, alanine, and proline were increased (p less than 0.0001) during BCAA even though urea nitrogen production was reduced (p less than 0.0001). The increase in leucine clearance with BCAA-enriched TPN was positively correlated (r2 = 0.601; p less than 0.0001) with the increase in the sum of all APP and ALB and was

  15. Atrial fibrillation associated with a thyroid stimulating hormone-secreting adenoma of the pituitary gland leading to a presentation of acute cardiac decompensation: A case report

    George Jyothis T

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hyperthyroidism is a well established cause of atrial fibrillation (AF. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone-secreting pituitary tumours are rare causes of pituitary hyperthyroidism. Whilst pituitary causes of hyperthyroidism are much less common than primary thyroid pathology, establishing a clear aetiology is critical in minimising complications and providing appropriate treatment. Measuring Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH alone to screen for hyperthyroidism may be insufficient to appropriately evaluate the thyroid status in such cases. Case presentation A 63-year-old Caucasian man, previously fit and well, presented with a five-day history of shortness of breath associated with wheeze and dry cough. He denied symptoms of hyperthyroidism and his family, social and past history were unremarkable. Initial investigation was in keeping with a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (AF with fast ventricular response leading to cardiac decompensation. TSH 6.2 (Normal Range = 0.40 – 4.00 mU/L, Free T3 of 12.5 (4.00 – 6.8 pmol/L and Free T4 51(10–30 pmol/L. Heterophilic antibodies were ruled out. Testosterone was elevated at 43.10 (Normal range: 10.00 – 31.00 nmol/L with an elevated FSH, 18.1 (1.0–7.0 U/L and elevated LH, 12.4 (1.0–8.0 U/L. Growth Hormone, IGF-1 and prolactin were normal. MRI showed a 2.4 cm pituitary macroadenoma. Visual field tests showed a right inferotemporal defect. While awaiting neurosurgical removal of the tumour, the patient was commenced on antithyroid medication (carbimazole and maintained on this until successful trans-sphenoidal excision of the macroadenoma had been performed. AF persisted post-operatively, but was electrically cardioverted subsequently and he remains in sinus rhythm at twelve months follow-up off all treatment. Conclusion This case reiterates the need to evaluate thyroid function in all patients presenting with atrial fibrillation. TSH-secreting pituitary adenomas must be considered

  16. Effects on steroid hormones secretion resulting from the acute stimulation of sectioning the superior ovarian nerve to pre-pubertal rats

    Morales-Ledesma Leticia

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the adult rat, neural signals arriving to the ovary via the superior ovarian nerve (SON modulate progesterone (P4, testosterone (T and estradiol (E2 secretion. The aims of the present study were to analyze if the SON in the pre-pubertal rat also modulates ovarian hormone secretion and the release of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH and luteinizing (LH hormone. P4, T, E2, FSH and LH serum levels were measured 30 or 60 minutes after sectioning the SON of pre-pubertal female rats. Our results indicate that the effects on hormone levels resulting from unilaterally or bilaterally sectioning the SON depends on the analyzed hormone, and the time lapse between surgery and autopsy, and that the treatment yielded asymmetric results. The results also suggest that in the pre-pubertal rat the neural signals arriving to the ovaries via the SON regulate the enzymes participating in P4, T and E2 synthesis in a non-parallel way, indicating that the mechanisms regulating the synthesis of each hormone are not regulated by the same signals. Also, that the changes in the steroids hormones are not explained exclusively by the modifications in gonadotropins secretion. The observed differences in hormone levels between rats sacrificed 30 and 60 min after surgery reflect the onset of the compensatory systems regulating hormones secretion.

  17. Impact of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES) on 90-Day Episode Costs and Post-Acute Care Utilization in Total Knee Replacement Patients with Disuse Atrophy.

    Pal, Sarmistha; Chughtai, Morad; Sultan, Assem A; Khlopas, Anton; Sodhi, Nipun; George, Nicole E; Etcheson, Jennifer I; Gwam, Chukwuweike U; Newman, Jared M; Samuel, Linsen T; Bhave, Anil; DaVanzo, Joan E; Mont, Michael A

    2017-12-22

    This study evaluated differences in: 1) total episode payments, 2) probability of hospital readmission, 3) probability of inpatient rehab facility (IRF) and utilization, and 4) probability of skilled nursing care facility (SNF) utilization in patients who had disuse atrophy and underwent a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and either did, or did not, receive preoperative home-based neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) therapy. We used the Medicare limited dataset for a 5% sample of beneficiaries from 2014 and 2015 to construct episodes-of-care for TKA (DRG-470) patients with disuse atrophy who underwent a TKA during the 30 days prior to hospital admission and 90 days post-discharge. Patients were stratified into those who either did or did not receive pre- and postoperative NMES therapy. An ordinary least square (OLS) model was used to estimate the impact of NMES on total episode. Linear probability models were used to estimate the impact of NMES on SNF or IRF utilization and readmission. A $3,274 reduction in episode payments for patients who used preoperative NMES versus those who did not (ptotal episode payments and SNF utilization for TKA patients with disuse atrophy who had NMES therapy was demonstrated.

  18. Receptor imaging of schizophrenic patients under treatment with typical and atypical neuroleptics; Nuklearmedizinische Rezeptordiagnostik bei schizophrenen Patienten unter Therapie mit typischen und atypischen Neuroleptika

    Dresel, S.; Tatsch, K. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Meisenzahl, E. [Psychiatrische Klinik der Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Scherer, J. [Bezirkskrankenhaus Haar (Germany)

    2002-09-01

    Schizophrenic psychosis is typically treated by typical and atypical neuroleptics. Both groups of drugs differ with regard to induction of extrapyramidal side effects. The occupancy of postsynaptic dopaminergic D2 receptors is considered to be an essential aspect of their antipsychotic properties. The dopamine D2 receptor status can be assessed by means of [I-123]IBZM SPECT. Studies on the typical neuroleptic haloperidol revealed an exponential dose response relationship measured by IBZM. Extrapyramidal side effects were presented by all patients below a threshold of the specific binding of IBZM below 0.4 (with one exception, norm value: >0.95). Also under treatment with the atypical neuroleptic clozapine an exponential dose response relationship was found. However, none of these patients showed extrapyramidal side effects. Recently introduced, new atypical neuroleptics such as risperidone and olanzapine again presented with an exponential relationship between daily dose and IBZM binding. The curves of the latter were in between the curves of haloperidol and clozapine. Extrapyramidal side effects were documented in a less number of patients treated with risperidone as compared to haloperidol, for olanzapine only one patient revealed these findings in our own patient group. The pharmacological profile of atypical neuroleptics shows - in addition to their binding to dopamine receptors - also high affinities to the receptors of other neurotransmitter systems, particularly the serotonergic system. Therefore, the lower incidence of extrapyramidal side effects seen by atypical in comparison to typical neuroleptics is at least in part most likely due to a complex interaction on a variety of neurotransmitter systems. (orig.) [German] Die pharmakologische Therapie von Erkrankungen aus dem schizophrenen Formenkreis erfolgt durch typische und atypische Neuroleptika. Beide Gruppen unterscheiden sich klinsich im Wesentlichen durch die Eigenschaft, extrapyramidal

  19. Cytotoxic capacity of IL-15-stimulated cytokine-induced killer cells against human acute myeloid leukemia and rhabdomyosarcoma in humanized preclinical mouse models

    Eva eRettinger

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT has become an important treatment modality for patients with high risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML and is also under investigation for soft tissue sarcomas. The therapeutic success is still limited by minimal residual disease (MRD status ultimately leading to patients’ relapse. Adoptive donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI based on MRD status using IL-15-expanded cytokine-induced killer (CIK cells may prevent relapse without causing graft-versus-host-disease (GvHD. To generate preclinical data we developed mouse models to study anti-leukemic- and anti-tumor-potential of CIK cells in vivo. Immunodeficient mice (NOD/SCID/IL2Rγc-, NSG were injected intravenously with human leukemic cell lines THP-1, SH-2 and with human rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS cell lines RH41 and RH30 at minimal doses required for leukemia or tumor engraftment. Mice transplanted with THP-1 or RH41 cells were randomly assigned for analysis of CIK cell treatment. Organs of mice were analyzed by flow cytometry as well as quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR for engraftment of malignant cells and CIK cells. Potential of CIK cells to induce GvHD was determined by histological analysis. Tissues of the highest degree of THP-1 cell expansion included bone marrow (BM followed by liver, lung, spleen, peripheral blood (PB, and brain. RH30 and RH41 engraftment mainly took place in liver and lung, but was also detectable in spleen and PB. In spite of delayed CIK cell expansion compared with malignant cells, CIK cells injected at an effector to target cell (E:T ratio of 1:1 were sufficient for significant reduction of RH41 cells, whereas against fast-expanding THP-1 cells an E:T ratio of 250:1 was needed to achieve comparable results. Our preclinical in vivo mouse models showed a reliably 100% engraftment of malignant cells which is essential for analysis of anti-cancer therapy. Furthermore our data demonstrated that IL-15-activated CIK cells

  20. Cytotoxic Capacity of IL-15-Stimulated Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells Against Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Rhabdomyosarcoma in Humanized Preclinical Mouse Models

    Rettinger, Eva; Meyer, Vida; Kreyenberg, Hermann [Department of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Hemostaseology, University Children’s Hospital of Frankfurt/Main, Goethe-University Frankfurt/Main, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Volk, Andreas [Chemotherapeutisches Forschungsinstitut, Georg-Speyer-Haus, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Kuçi, Selim; Willasch, Andre [Department of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Hemostaseology, University Children’s Hospital of Frankfurt/Main, Goethe-University Frankfurt/Main, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Koscielniak, Ewa [Department of Pediatric Oncology and Hematology, Olgahospital Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany); Fulda, Simone [Institute for Experimental Cancer Research in Pediatrics, Goethe-University Frankfurt/Main, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Wels, Winfried S. [Chemotherapeutisches Forschungsinstitut, Georg-Speyer-Haus, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Boenig, Halvard [Institute for Transfusion Medicine and Immunohematology, Goethe-University Frankfurt/Main, Division for Cell Processing, German Red Cross Blood Donor Service Baden-Württemberg-Hessen, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Klingebiel, Thomas; Bader, Peter, E-mail: eva.rettinger@kgu.de, E-mail: peter.bader@kgu.de [Department of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Hemostaseology, University Children’s Hospital of Frankfurt/Main, Goethe-University Frankfurt/Main, Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2012-04-09

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) has become an important treatment modality for patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is also under investigation for soft tissue sarcomas. The therapeutic success is still limited by minimal residual disease (MRD) status ultimately leading to patients’ relapse. Adoptive donor lymphocyte infusions based on MRD status using IL-15-expanded cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells may prevent relapse without causing graft-versus-host-disease (GvHD). To generate preclinical data we developed mouse models to study anti-leukemic- and anti-tumor-potential of CIK cells in vivo. Immunodeficient mice (NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγc{sup −}, NSG) were injected intravenously with human leukemic cell lines THP-1, SH-2 and with human rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cell lines RH41 and RH30 at minimal doses required for leukemia or tumor engraftment. Mice transplanted with THP-1 or RH41 cells were randomly assigned for analysis of CIK cell treatment. Organs of mice were analyzed by flow cytometry as well as quantitative polymerase chain reaction for engraftment of malignant cells and CIK cells. Potential of CIK cells to induce GvHD was determined by histological analysis. Tissues of the highest degree of THP-1 cell expansion included bone marrow followed by liver, lung, spleen, peripheral blood (PB), and brain. RH30 and RH41 engraftment mainly took place in liver and lung, but was also detectable in spleen and PB. In spite of delayed CIK cell expansion compared with malignant cells, CIK cells injected at equal amounts were sufficient for significant reduction of RH41 cells, whereas against fast-expanding THP-1 cells 250 times more CIK than THP-1 cells were needed to achieve comparable results. Our preclinical in vivo mouse models showed a reliable 100% engraftment of malignant cells which is essential for analysis of anti-cancer therapy. Furthermore our data demonstrated that IL-15-activated CIK cells have potent cytotoxic capacity

  1. Autoradiographic analysis of regional alterations in brain receptors following chronic administration and withdrawal of typical and atypical neuroleptics in rats

    See, R E; Ellison, G; Toga, A W [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (USA). School of Medicine

    1990-01-01

    Rats were administered haloperidol, clozapine, raclopride, or no drug for 28 days or 8 months. Following a 3 week withdrawal period, in vitro autoradiography was utilized to examine receptor binding for dopamine D2(({sup 3}H)spiperone and ({sup 3}H)raclopride), dopamine D1(({sup 3}H)SCH23390), GABA{sub A}(({sup 3}H)muscimol), benzodiazepine (({sup 3}H)RO15-1788), and muscarinic ACh receptors (({sup 3}H)QNB). ({sup 3}H)spiperone was elevated in striatal subregions only in haloperidol-treated rats, with the largest increases seen in the 8 month duration animals. Striatal ({sup 3}H)raclopride binding was increased after both short- and long-term treatment in both haloperidol and raclopride, but not clozapine-treated animals. Clozapine-treated rats showed significant increases in ({sup 3}H)SCH23390 in the nucleus accumbens after 28-day administration; otherwise no changes were seen for this ligand in any other groups. Increases in ({sup 3}H)muscimol binding in the substantia nigra reticulata were seen in haloperidol-treated rats after 8 month treatment. Binding of ({sup 3}H)QNB and ({sup 3}H)RO15-1788 were not significantly different from control for any of the drug-treated groups. These data suggest that persisting alterations in receptor binding are primarily seen in dopamine D2 and GABA receptors after withdrawal from chronic administration of haloperidol but not the atypical neuroleptics, clozapine and raclopride. (Authors).

  2. A retrospective analysis of cases with neuroleptic malignant syndrome and an evaluation of risk factors for mortality

    Aynur Sahin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS is a neurological emergency rarely encountered in clinical practice but with a high mortality rate. Cases associated with atypical antipsychotic use or termination of dopamine agonists have been seen in recent years. The purpose of this study was to assess the presence of risk factors for mortality by investigating all clinical and laboratory characteristics of cases with NMS. Material and methods: This descriptive, cross-sectional study retrospectively investigated all clinical and laboratory characteristics by scanning the ICD-10 codes of patients presenting to the XXXX Faculty of Medicine Emergency Department and diagnosed with NMS between 2006 and 2016. Patients were divided into surviving and non-surviving groups, and the data elicited were subjected to statistical comparisons. Results: The mean age of the 18 patients diagnosed with NMS was 46.9 ± 4.8 years, and 50% were women. In addition to antipsychotics among the drugs leading to NMS, the syndrome also developed as a result of levodopa withdrawal in three patients and metoclopramide use in one patient. Statistically significant differences were determined between the surviving and non-surviving patients in terms of blood pressure, blood urea nitrogen (BUN, creatine kinase (CK and mean platelet volume (MPV values (p ≤ 0.05. Conclusion: In this study the most common agent that cause NMS was atypical antipsychotics. Also advanced age, increased blood pressure and serum CK, BUN and MPV values were identified as potential risk factors for mortality in NMS.

  3. Antipsychotic dose escalation as a trigger for Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS: literature review and case series report

    Langan Julie

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background “Neuroleptic malignant syndrome” (NMS is a potentially fatal idiosyncratic reaction to any medication which affects the central dopaminergic system. Between 0.5% and 1% of patients exposed to antipsychotics develop the condition. Mortality rates may be as high as 55% and many risk factors have been reported. Although rapid escalation of antipsychotic dose is thought to be an important risk factor, to date it has not been the focus of a published case series or scientifically defined. Description We aimed to identify cases of NMS and review risk factors for its development with a particular focus on rapid dose escalation in the 30 days prior to onset. A review of the literature on rapid dose escalation was undertaken and a pragmatic definition of “rapid dose escalation” was made. NMS cases were defined using DSM-IV criteria and systematically identified within a secondary care mental health service. A ratio of titration rate was calculated for each NMS patient and “rapid escalators” and “non rapid escalators” were compared. 13 cases of NMS were identified. A progressive mean dose increase 15 days prior to the confirmed episode of NMS was observed (241.7 mg/day during days 1–15 to 346.9 mg/day during days 16–30 and the mean ratio of dose escalation for NMS patients was 1.4. Rapid dose escalation was seen in 5/13 cases and non rapid escalators had markedly higher daily cumulative antipsychotic dose compared to rapid escalators. Conclusions Rapid dose escalation occurred in less than half of this case series (n = 5, 38.5%, although there is currently no consensus on the precise definition of rapid dose escalation. Cumulative antipsychotic dose – alongside other known risk factors - may also be important in the development of NMS.

  4. growth stimulant

    Effects of timing and duration of supplementation of LIVFIT VET ® (growth stimulant) as substitute for fish meal on the growth performance, haematology and clinical enzymes concentration of growing pigs.

  5. Comparison of autologous cell therapy and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) injection vs. G-CSF injection alone for the treatment of acute radiation syndrome in a non-human primate model

    Bertho, Jean-Marc; Frick, Johanna; Prat, Marie; Demarquay, Christelle; Dudoignon, Nicolas; Trompier, Francois; Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Thierry, Dominique; Gourmelon, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the efficacy of autologous cell therapy after irradiation combined with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) injections with G-CSF treatment alone in a heterogeneous model of irradiation representative of an accidental situation. Material and Methods: Non-human primates were irradiated at 8.7 Gy whole-body dose with the right arm shielded to receive 4.8 Gy. The first group of animals received G-CSF (lenograstim) injections starting 6 h after irradiation, and a second group received a combination of G-CSF (lenograstim) injections and autologous expanded hematopoietic cells. Animals were followed up for blood cell counts, circulating progenitors, and bone marrow cellularity. Results: No significant differences were seen between the two treatment groups, whatever the parameter observed: time to leukocyte or platelet recovery and duration and severity of aplasia. Conclusion: Our results indicated that identical recovery kinetic was observed when irradiated animals are treated with G-CSF independently of the reinjection of ex vivo expanded autologous hematopoietic cells. Thus G-CSF injections might be chosen as a first-line therapeutic strategy in the treatment of accidental acute radiation victims

  6. [Association polymorphic variants of GRIN2B gene with paranoid schizophrenia and response to common neuroleptics in Russians and Tatars from Bashkortostan Republic].

    Gareeva, A E; Zakirov, D F; Khusnutdinova, E K

    2013-09-01

    An analysis of the association of paranoid schizophrenia seeking with polymorphic variants of GRIN2B gene was performed in order to identify genetic risk factors of disease development and genetic markers of the response to therapy by neuroleptics in Russian and Tatar patients from Bashkortostan Republic (BB). In the course of the analysis, we revealed the following: 1) genetic markers of increased risk of developing paranoid schizophrenia in various ethnic groups, including, in Tatars, the GRIN2B* T/*Tgenotype (p = 0.003; OR = 2.33) and GRIN2B*T allele (p = 0.001; OR = 2.36), rs1805247; in Russians, the GRIN2B*T/*T genotype (p = 0.038; OR = 2.12) and GRIN2B* T allele (p = 0.028; OR = 2.03), rs1805247, genotype GRIN2B*A/*A (p = 0.042; OR = 2.12), rs1805476; 2) genetic markers of the reduced risk of developing paranoid schizophrenia; 3) genetic markers of therapy response and the risk of side effects development during neuroleptics (haloperidol) treatment in Bashkortostan. The significant interethnic diversity of genetic factors related to the risk of this disease development was noted.

  7. Radiosynthesis and pharmacokinetics of high specific activity /sup 75,77/Br-bromperidol, a potent butyrophenone neuroleptic

    Moerlein, S.M.; Stocklin, G.

    1984-01-01

    Bromperidol, 4-[4-(4-bromophenyl)-4-hydroxypiperidino]-4'- fluorobutyrophenone, is a potent neuroleptic which has found clinical use in the treatment of schizophrenia. Of the major dopaminergic receptor-binding ligands, bromperidol has the greatest specificity for binding to cerebral dopamine receptors (K/sub i/ = 3.7 nM) relative to competitive cerebral serotonin (K/sub i/ = 26 nM), α-adrenergic (K/sub i/ = 100 nM) or histamine (K/sub i/ = 700 nM) receptors. The authors have therefore prepared bromperidol labelled with no-carrier-added (n.c.a.) /sup 75/Br (t/sub 1/2/ = 1.6 hr β/sup +/) or /sup 77/Br (t/sub 1/2/ = 52 hr EC) for evaluation as a radiopharmaceutical for mapping cerebral dopamine receptor areas with PECT technology, as well as for non-invasive pharmacodynamic studies in man with conventional nuclear medicine equipment. 4-[4-(4-trimethylstannylphenyl)-4-hydroxypiperidino]-4'- fluorobutyrophenone, TMSn-P, was synthesized in 40% chemical yield by reaction of trimethylstannyl sodium with bromperidol. TMSn-P was purified by preparative HPLC and characterized by /sup 1/H-NMR and GC-MS. TMSn-P was radiobrominated in methanol using n.c.a. /sup 75/Br/sup -/ or /sup 77/Br/sup -/ and dichloramine-T as oxidizing agent. Product /sup 75,77/Br-bromperidol was separated from impurities, including chlorinated side-product halo-peridol, using HPLC (RP-18; MeOH/H/sub 2/O/Et/sub 3/N = 70/30/0.3). For a reaction time of 5 minutes, and an overall radiopharmaceutical production time of 30 minutes, /sup 75,77/Br-bromperidol was obtained in physiological saline solution with 40% radiochemical yield and a specific activity > 10,000 Ci/mmole. The pharmacokinetics in rodents and PECT studies in primates using /sup 75,77/Br-bromperidol are compared with that of previously-reported /sup 75,77/Br-brombenperidol

  8. Brain Stimulation Therapies

    ... Magnetic Seizure Therapy Deep Brain Stimulation Additional Resources Brain Stimulation Therapies Overview Brain stimulation therapies can play ... for a shorter recovery time than ECT Deep Brain Stimulation Deep brain stimulation (DBS) was first developed ...

  9. N-acetylaspartate (NAA) levels in selected areas of the brain in patients with chronic schizophrenia treated with typical and atypical neuroleptics: a proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) study.

    Szulc, Agata; Galińska, Beata; Tarasów, Eugeniusz; Kubas, Bozena; Dzienis, Wojciech; Konarzewska, Beata; Poplawska, Regina; Tomczak, Anna A; Czernikiewicz, Andrzej; Walecki, Jerzy

    2007-05-01

    NAA, marker of neurons integrity and viability, is one of the most important brain metabolites visible in 1H MRS. In most studies of schizophrenia, the decrease of NAA level was observed in the temporal, frontal lobes and in the thalamus. This finding was observed more often among chronic patients, what suggests the influence of disease duration or the effect of neuroleptic treatment. The aim of the present study was the comparison of NAA levels in brain of schizophrenic patients taking typical and atypical neuroleptics. We analyzed the NAA levels in selected brain areas in 58 schizophrenic patients and 21 healthy controls. 10 patients were treated with typical neuroleptics, 10 patients with clozapine, 17 received olanzapine and 21 - risperidone. 1H MRS was performed on a 1,5 MR scanner with PRESS sequence. Voxels of 2x2x2 cm were localized in the left frontal, left temporal lobe and left thalamus. There were no differences in NAA levels between patients on typical and atypical medications analyzed together and separately (olanzapine, clozapine and risperidone groups). We also did not find any differences between patients taking selected atypical neuroleptics and controls. The NAA level in the thalamus in the group of patients receiving typical antipsychotics was the lowest among all groups and differed significantly from healthy controls. The results of our study suggest that atypical neuroleptics may have favorable effect on NAA concentration in brain of schizophrenic patients. Decrease in NAA level in patients taking typical medication may be caused by the progression of the disease or by the direct action of these drugs.

  10. Regional blockade by neuroleptic drugs of in vivo /sup 3/H-spiperone binding in the rat brain. Relation to blockade of apomorphine induced hyperactivity and stereotypies

    Koehler, C; Haglund, L; Oegren, S O; Aengeby, T [Astra Lackemedel AB, Soedertaelje (Sweden). Dept. of Pharmacology

    1981-01-01

    The regional prevention by neuroleptic drugs of specific in vivo /sup 3/H-spiperone binding was studied in the rat brain. L-sulpiride, thioridazine and clozapine were found to reduce the /sup 3/H-spiperone bindings selectively in the olfactory tubercle, septum, substantia nigra and frontal cortex but not the striatum at dose levels which preferentially block apomorphine (APO) induced hyperactivity. The maximal prevention of specific /sup 3/H-spiperone binding by l-sulpiride and clozapine reached 60-80% in the former structures while the displacement of striatal /sup 3/H-spiperone binding did not exceed 40%. In contrast to l-sulpiride, thioridazine and clozapine both chlorpromazine and haloperidol reduced the /sup 3/H-spiperone binding to the same extent in all regions studied. Chlorpromazine and haloperidol were potent in prevention of striatal /sup 3/H-spiperone binding in vivo which reached 60-80% in this structure.

  11. Regional blockade by neuroleptic drugs of in vivo 3H-spiperone binding in the rat brain. Relation to blockade of apomorphine induced hyperactivity and stereotypies

    Koehler, C.; Haglund, L.; Oegren, S.-O.; Aengeby, T.

    1981-01-01

    The regional prevention by neuroleptic drugs of specific in vivo 3 H-spiperone binding was studied in the rat brain. L-sulpiride, thioridazine and clozapine were found to reduce the 3 H-spiperone bindings selectively in the olfactory tubercle, septum, substantia nigra and frontal cortex but not the striatum at dose levels which preferentially block apomorphine (APO) induced hyperactivity. The maximal prevention of specific 3 H-spiperone binding by l-sulpiride and clozapine reached 60-80% in the former structures while the displacement of striatal 3 H-spiperone binding did not exceed 40%. In contrast to l-sulpiride, thioridazine and clozapine both chlorpromazine and haloperidol reduced the 3 H-spiperone binding to the same extent in all regions studied. Chlorpromazine and haloperidol were potent in prevention of striatal 3 H-spiperone binding in vivo which reached 60-80% in this structure. (Author)

  12. Treatment of generalized anxiety disorder: comparison of a new beta-blocking drug (CGP 361 A), low-dose neuroleptic (flupenthixol), and placebo.

    Bjerrum, H; Allerup, P; Thunedborg, K; Jakobsen, K; Bech, P

    1992-09-01

    In an attempt to evaluate an alternative drug treatment to benzodiazepines in generalized anxiety disorders, a placebo controlled trial was carried out with a new beta-adrenergic blocker (CPG 361 A). A low-dosage neuroleptic (flupenthixol) was included as a reference drug. Depending on the clinical assessment scales the placebo treatment resulted in moderate to excellent improvement in 36% to 56% of the patients after four weeks of treatment. The active drugs generally had a higher improvement range (from 31% to 80%). The global improvement scale was found to be better than the other scales in discriminating between placebo (50% improvement) and the active drugs (CGP 361 A brought about 78% improvement and flupenthixol brought about 80% improvement). However, only for flupenthixol was the difference of statistical significance.

  13. Effects of acute feed restriction combined with targeted use of increasing luteinizing hormone content of follicle-stimulating hormone preparations on ovarian superstimulation, fertilization, and embryo quality in lactating dairy cows

    Bender, R. W.; Hackbart, K. S.; Dresch, A. R.; Carvalho, P. D.; Vieira, L. M.; Crump, P. M.; Guenther, J. N.; Fricke, P. M.; Shaver, R. D.; Combs, D. K.; Wiltbank, M. C.

    2018-01-01

    Multiple metabolic and hormonal factors can affect the success of protocols for ovarian superstimulation. In this study, the effect of acute feed restriction and increased LH content in the superstimulatory FSH preparation on numbers of ovulations, fertilization, and embryo quality in lactating dairy cows was evaluated. Two experiments were performed using a Latin square design with treatments arranged as a 2 × 2 factorial: feed restriction (FR; 25% reduction in dry matter intake) compared with ad libitum (AL) feeding, combined with high (H) versus low (L) LH in the last 4 injections of the superstimulatory protocol. As expected, FR decreased circulating insulin concentrations (26.7 vs. 46.0 μU/mL). Two analyses were performed: one that evaluated the complete Latin square in experiment 2 and a second that evaluated only the first periods of experiments 1 and 2. For both analyses, follicle numbers, ovulation rates, and corpora lutea on d 7 were not different. In the first period analysis of experiments 1 and 2, we observed an interaction between feed allowance and amount of LH on fertilization rates, percentage of embryos or oocytes that were quality 1 and 2 embryos, and number of embryos or oocytes that were degenerate. Fertilization rates were greater for the AL-L (89.4%) and FR-H (80.1%) treatments compared with the AL-H (47.9%) and FR-L (59.9%) treatments. Similarly, the proportion of total embryos or oocytes designated as quality 1 and 2 embryos was greater for AL-L (76.7%) and FR-H (73.4%) treatments compared with AL-H (35.6%) and FR-L (47.3%) treatments. In addition, the number of degenerate embryos was decreased for AL-L (1.3) and FR-H (0.4) treatments compared with the AL-H (2.6) and FR-L (2.3) treatments. Thus, cows with either too low (FR-L) or too high (AL-H) insulin and LH stimulation had lesser embryo production after superstimulation because of reduced fertilization rate and increased percentage of degenerate embryos. Therefore, interaction of the

  14. Use of recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor during and after remission induction chemotherapy in patients aged 61 years and older with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) : Final report of AML-11, a phase III randomized study of the Leukemia Cooperative Group of European Organisation for the Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC-LCG) and the Dutch Belgian Hemato-Oncology Cooperative Group (HOVON)

    Lowenberg, B; Suciu, S; Archimbaud, E; Ossenkoppele, G; Verhoef, GEG; Vellenga, E; Wijermans, P; Berneman, Z; Dekker, AW; Stryckmans, P; Jehn, U; Muus, P; Sonneveld, P; Dardenne, M; Zittoun, R

    1997-01-01

    We conducted a prospective randomized multicenter clinical trial comparing the effects of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) as an adjunct to intensive chemotherapy in patients of 61 years and older with untreated newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Patients were

  15. Consensus paper: combining transcranial stimulation with neuroimaging

    Siebner, Hartwig R; Bergmann, Til O; Bestmann, Sven

    2009-01-01

    neuroimaging (online approach), TMS can be used to test how focal cortex stimulation acutely modifies the activity and connectivity in the stimulated neuronal circuits. TMS and neuroimaging can also be separated in time (offline approach). A conditioning session of repetitive TMS (rTMS) may be used to induce...... information obtained by neuroimaging can be used to define the optimal site and time point of stimulation in a subsequent experiment in which TMS is used to probe the functional contribution of the stimulated area to a specific task. In this review, we first address some general methodologic issues that need......In the last decade, combined transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)-neuroimaging studies have greatly stimulated research in the field of TMS and neuroimaging. Here, we review how TMS can be combined with various neuroimaging techniques to investigate human brain function. When applied during...

  16. Droperidol for acute psychosis.

    Cure, S; Rathbone, J; Carpenter, S

    2004-10-18

    People suffering from acute psychotic illnesses, especially those associated with agitated or violent behaviour, may require urgent pharmacological tranquillisation or sedation. Droperidol, a butyrophenone neuroleptic, has been used for this purpose in several countries. To estimate the effects of droperidol compared to other treatments for controlling disturbed behaviour and reducing psychotic symptoms for people with suspected acute psychotic illnesses. We updated previous searches by searching the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Register (September 2003). References of all identified studies were searched for further trial citations and authors of trials were contacted. Twenty-one other databases were also searched as part of a broader project and this composite database was searched for this review. This was supplemented by hand searching reference lists and contacting both the pharmacological industry and relevant authors. The review included randomised controlled trials comparing droperidol to any other treatment for people with suspected acute psychotic illnesses, including schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, mixed affective disorders, the manic phase of bipolar disorder or a brief psychotic episode. Relevant studies were selected for inclusion, their quality was assessed and data extracted. Data were excluded when more than 50% of participants were lost to follow up. For binary outcomes, standard estimates of risk ratio (RR) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Where possible, weighted number needed to treat or harm statistics (NNT, NNH), and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI), were calculated. We identified only two relevant trials. One additional study focused on outcomes at 30 days rather than at a few hours. One small (n = 41) randomised trial compared intravenous (iv) droperidol (10 mg) with iv placebo and found that people allocated to droperidol were significantly less likely to need additional

  17. Preliminary data concerning the reliability and psychometric properties of the Greek translation of the 20-item Subjective Well-Being Under Neuroleptic Treatment Scale (SWN-20

    Arapidis Konstantinos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 20-item Subjective Well-Being Under Neuroleptic Treatment Scale (SWN-20 is a self-report scale developed in order to assess the well-being of patients receiving antipsychotic medication independent of the improvement in their psychotic symptoms. The current study reports on the reliability and the psychometric properties of the Greek translation of the SWN-20. Methods A total of 100 inpatients or outpatients with schizophrenia (79 males and 21 females, aged 42.6 ± 11.35 years old from 3 different facilities were assessed with the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS, the Calgary Depression Scale and the Simpson-Angus Scale, and completed the SWN-20. The statistical analysis included the calculation of Pearson product moment correlation coefficient, the Cronbach α and factor analysis with Varimax normalised rotation. Results The SWN-20 had an α value equal to 0.79 and all the items were equal. The factor analysis revealed the presence of seven factors explaining 66% of total variance. The correlation matrix revealed a moderate relationship of the SWN-20 and its factors with the PANSS-Negative (PANSS-N, PANSS-General Psychopathology (PANSS-G, the Simpson-Angus and the Calgary scales, and no relationship to age, education and income class. Discussion The Greek translation of the SWN-20 is reliable, with psychometric properties close to the original scale.

  18. Influence of synchronous and sequential stimulation on muscle fatigue

    Thomsen, M.; Thomsen, M.; Veltink, Petrus H.

    1997-01-01

    In acute experiments the sciatic nerve of the rat is electrically stimulated to induce fatigue in the medial Gastrocnemius muscle. Fatigue tests are carried out using intermittent stimulation of different compartments (sequential) or a single compartment (synchronous) of the sciatic nerve. The

  19. Effects of acute and chronic attenuation of postprandial hyperglycemia on postglucose-load endothelial function in insulin resistant individuals: is stimulation of first phase insulin secretion beneficial for the endothelial function?

    Major-Pedersen, A; Ihlemann, N; Hermann, T S

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study is to determine if attenuation of postprandial hyperglycemia, by acutely and chronically enhancing postprandial insulin secretion in insulin-resistant individuals, improves the endothelial dysfunction. We assessed postoral glucose-load endothelial function in 56 insulin....... We found no relationship between postprandial hyperglycemia and post-OGL FMD....

  20. Mesolimbic dopamine function is not altered during continuous chronic treatment of rats with typical or atypical neuroleptic drugs

    Rupniak, N M.J.; Hall, M D; Kelly, E; Fleminger, S; Kilpatrick, G; Jenner, P; Marsden, C D

    1985-01-01

    Rats were treated continuously for up to 20 months with either haloperidol (1.4-1.6 mg/kg/day), sulpiride (102-109 mg/kg/day) or clozapine (24-27 mg/kg/day). Bsub(max) for specific mesolimbic binding of TH-spiperone, TH-N, n-propylnorapomorphine or TH-piflutixol did not differ in tissue taken from animals treated for up to 12 months with haloperidol, sulpiride or clozapine by comparison to age-matched control rats. Mesolimbic dopamine (50 M)-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was not altered in any drug treatment group. Spontaneous locomotor activity was transiently decreased during treatment with haloperidol for 1 or 3 months, but not by chronic sulpiride or clozapine treatment. Locomotor activity was not consistently increased in any drug treatment group. After 20 months of continuous drug treatment, focal bilateral application of dopamine (12.5 or 25 g) into the nucleus accumbens caused equivalent increases in locomotor activity in control rats and in animals receiving haloperidol, sulpiride of clozapine. These findings suggest that dopamine receptor blockade is not maintained in the mesolimbic area following chronic treatment with haloperidol, sulpiride or clozapine, and indicate that, under these conditions, clozapine and sulpiride may not act selectively on mesolimbic dopamine receptors. (Author).

  1. Mesolimbic dopamine function is not altered during continuous chronic treatment of rats with typical or atypical neuroleptic drugs

    Rupniak, N.M.J.; Hall, M.D.; Kelly, E.; Fleminger, S.; Kilpatrick, G.; Jenner, P.; Marsden, C.D.

    1985-01-01

    Rats were treated continuously for up to 20 months with either haloperidol (1.4-1.6 mg/kg/day), sulpiride (102-109 mg/kg/day) or clozapine (24-27 mg/kg/day). Bsub(max) for specific mesolimbic binding of 3 H-spiperone, 3 H-N, n-propylnorapomorphine or 3 H-piflutixol did not differ in tissue taken from animals treated for up to 12 months with haloperidol, sulpiride or clozapine by comparison to age-matched control rats. Mesolimbic dopamine (50 μM)-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was not altered in any drug treatment group. Spontaneous locomotor activity was transiently decreased during treatment with haloperidol for 1 or 3 months, but not by chronic sulpiride or clozapine treatment. Locomotor activity was not consistently increased in any drug treatment group. After 20 months of continuous drug treatment, focal bilateral application of dopamine (12.5 or 25 μg) into the nucleus accumbens caused equivalent increases in locomotor activity in control rats and in animals receiving haloperidol, sulpiride of clozapine. These findings suggest that dopamine receptor blockade is not maintained in the mesolimbic area following chronic treatment with haloperidol, sulpiride or clozapine, and indicate that, under these conditions, clozapine and sulpiride may not act selectively on mesolimbic dopamine receptors. (Author)

  2. Stem cell mobilization induced by subcutaneous granulocyte-colony stimulating factor to improve cardiac regeneration after acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction: result of the double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled stem cells in myocardial infarction (STEMMI) trial

    Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Jørgensen, Erik; Wang, Yongzhong

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phase 1 clinical trials of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment after myocardial infarction have indicated that G-CSF treatment is safe and may improve left ventricular function. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial aimed to assess the efficacy...... hours after symptom onset. Patients were randomized to double-blind treatment with G-CSF (10 microg/kg of body weight) or placebo for 6 days. The primary end point was change in systolic wall thickening from baseline to 6 months determined by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An independent core...

  3. Acute nephritic syndrome

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes in children ...

  4. Spinal cord stimulation

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007560.htm Spinal cord stimulation To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Spinal cord stimulation is a treatment for pain that uses ...

  5. Feldspar, Infrared Stimulated Luminescence

    Jain, Mayank

    2014-01-01

    This entry primarily concerns the characteristics and the origins of infrared-stimulated luminescence in feldspars.......This entry primarily concerns the characteristics and the origins of infrared-stimulated luminescence in feldspars....

  6. Growth hormone stimulation test

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003377.htm Growth hormone stimulation test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone (GH) stimulation test measures the ability of ...

  7. PRESYNAPTIC DOPAMINE MODULATION BY STIMULANT SELF ADMINISTRATION

    España, Rodrigo A.; Jones, Sara R.

    2013-01-01

    The mesolimbic dopamine system is an essential participant in the initiation and modulation of various forms of goal-directed behavior, including drug reinforcement and addiction processes. Dopamine neurotransmission is increased by acute administration of all drugs of abuse, including the stimulants cocaine and amphetamine. Chronic exposure to these drugs via voluntary self-administration provides a model of stimulant abuse that is useful in evaluating potential behavioral and neurochemical adaptations that occur during addiction. This review describes commonly used methodologies to measure dopamine and baseline parameters of presynaptic dopamine regulation, including exocytotic release and reuptake through the dopamine transporter in the nucleus accumbens core, as well as dramatic adaptations in dopamine neurotransmission and drug sensitivity that occur with acute non-contingent and chronic, contingent self-administration of cocaine and amphetamine. PMID:23277050

  8. Clinical features and therapeutic management of patients admitted to Italian acute hospital psychiatric units: the PERSEO (psychiatric emergency study and epidemiology survey

    Russo Federico

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The PERSEO study (psychiatric emergency study and epidemiology is a naturalistic, observational clinical survey in Italian acute hospital psychiatric units, called SPDCs (Servizio Psichiatrico Diagnosi e Cura; in English, the psychiatric service for diagnosis and management. The aims of this paper are: (i to describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients, including sociodemographic features, risk factors, life habits and psychiatric diagnoses; and (ii to assess the clinical management, subjective wellbeing and attitudes toward medications. Methods A total of 62 SPDCs distributed throughout Italy participated in the study and 2521 patients were enrolled over the 5-month study period. Results Almost half of patients (46% showed an aggressive behaviour at admission to ward, but they engaged more commonly in verbal aggression (38%, than in aggression toward other people (20%. A total of 78% of patients had a psychiatric diagnosis at admission, most frequently schizophrenia (36%, followed by depression (16% and personality disorders (14%, and no relevant changes in the diagnoses pattern were observed during hospital stay. Benzodiazepines were the most commonly prescribed drugs, regardless of diagnosis, at all time points. Overall, up to 83% of patients were treated with neuroleptic drugs and up to 27% received more than one neuroleptic either during hospital stay or at discharge. Atypical and conventional antipsychotics were equally prescribed for schizophrenia (59 vs 65% during stay and 59 vs 60% at discharge, while atypical drugs were preferred in schizoaffective psychoses (72 vs 49% during stay and 70 vs 46% at discharge and depression (41 vs 32% during stay and 44 vs 25% at discharge. Atypical neuroleptics were slightly preferred to conventional ones at hospital discharge (52 vs 44%. Polypharmacy was in general widely used. Patient attitudes toward medications were on average positive and self

  9. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    ... Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as ... pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for almost 1 ...

  10. Acute pancreatitis.

    Talukdar, Rupjyoti; Vege, Santhi S

    2015-09-01

    To summarize recent data on classification systems, cause, risk factors, severity prediction, nutrition, and drug treatment of acute pancreatitis. Comparison of the Revised Atlanta Classification and Determinant Based Classification has shown heterogeneous results. Simvastatin has a protective effect against acute pancreatitis. Young black male, alcohol, smoldering symptoms, and subsequent diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis are risk factors associated with readmissions after acute pancreatitis. A reliable clinical or laboratory marker or a scoring system to predict severity is lacking. The PYTHON trial has shown that oral feeding with on demand nasoenteric tube feeding after 72 h is as good as nasoenteric tube feeding within 24 h in preventing infections in predicted severe acute pancreatitis. Male sex, multiple organ failure, extent of pancreatic necrosis, and heterogeneous collection are factors associated with failure of percutaneous drainage of pancreatic collections. The newly proposed classification systems of acute pancreatitis need to be evaluated more critically. New biomarkers are needed for severity prediction. Further well designed studies are required to assess the type of enteral nutritional formulations for acute pancreatitis. The optimal minimally invasive method or combination to debride the necrotic collections is evolving. There is a great need for a drug to treat the disease early on to prevent morbidity and mortality.

  11. Patterns and determinants of acute psychiatric readmissions

    Graham Michael Behr

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives . Deinstitutionalisation and shortage of psychiatric beds worldwide has led to extensive research into the risk fac- tors and interventions associated with rapid and recurrent admission to hospital. Little research of this nature has taken place in South Africa, particularly with regard to acute hospital admissions. This study attempted primarily to assess the effect of length of stay and administration of depot antipsychotics in hospital on time to readmission. Design. A retrospective cohort of 180 admissions was fol- lowed up for 12 months, after an index discharge, by means of multiple hospital and community-based record reviews. Each readmission was analysed as an event using a survival analysis model. Setting. Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital, Gauteng. Subjects. A random sample of patients admitted during a 6-month period in 1996. Outcome measures. Time to readmission. Results. Two hundred and eighty-four admissions were analysed. The only factor that provided a significant protective effect was being married or cohabiting ( P = 0.015. Clinic attendance showed a slight protective effect early on but con- ferred a significantly higher risk of readmission on those who had been out of hospital for a long period ( P = 0.001. Only 21% of discharged patients ever attended a clinic. The overall risk of readmission was significantly higher in the first 90 days post discharge. Conclusions. The lack of impact of length of hospital stay and use of depot neuroleptics on time to readmission may indicate that patients are being kept for appropriate duration and that the most ill patients are receiving depot medication. Several sampling and statistical artefacts may explain some of our findings. These results confirm the worldwide difficulty in finding consistent and accurate predictors of readmission. Low rates of successful referral to community aftercare need to be addressed before their effectiveness can be reasonably assessed. The inherent

  12. Effects and significance of electrical stimulation Of the vagus nerve on plasma levels of nitric oxide and endothelin in severe acute pancreatitis in rats%电刺激迷走神经对大鼠重症急性胰腺炎血浆内皮素和一氧化氮水平的影响及意义

    金鑫; 冯利; 胡永毅; 陶坤; 赵国海

    2013-01-01

    目的 观察电刺激迷走神经对大鼠重症急性胰腺炎(SAP)血浆内皮素、一氧化氮的影响.方法 将SD大鼠80只随机分为假手术(Sham)组8只、SAP组24只、迷走神经切断(VNC)组24只和迷走神经刺激(VNS)组24只.其中SAP组、VNC组和VNS组根据1、3、6小时不同取材时间各自分3小组,每组8只.经胆胰管逆行注入5%牛磺胆酸钠建立大鼠SAP组模型;SAP组制模后,立即切断双颈部迷走神经建立VNC组模型;VNC组造模后,立即予以左迷走神经近心端以5V,2 ms和1Hz强度的电流持续刺激20 min产生VNS组模型.l、3、6h剖杀各组大鼠.检测各组大鼠血浆中ET和NO水平,观察胰腺病理改变.结果:SAP组和VNC组ET、NO、ET/NO比值和胰腺病理组织学评分较Sham组均显著增高(P<0.05).相比SAP组,VNC组NO含量降低,ET/NO比值及胰腺病理组织学评分显著上升(P<0.05).VNS组ET/NO和胰腺病理组织学评分显著下降,NO含量明显升高,较SAP组和VNC组(P<0.05).结论 迷走神经刺激可增加一氧化氮合成或释放,减轻ET/NO比值失衡,改善微循环,减轻大鼠重症胰腺炎胰腺病理损害.%Objective To investigate the effects of electrical stimulation of vagus nerve on plasma levels of nitric oxide( NO) and endothelin (ET) in severe acute pancreatitis in rats. Methods Eighty adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into 4 groups: shame-operation group (n=8) , severe acute pancreatitis group (n =24) , vagus nerve cut group (n =24) and vagus nerve stimulation group ( n = 24) . And severe acute pancreatitis group, vagus nerve cut group and vagus nerve stimulation group respectively divivded into lh,3h and 6h group(n =8). The SAP models of rats was induced by retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate into biliopancreatic duct in rats. The VNC models of rats were established by bilateral cervical vagotomy after SAP induction. The VNS models of rats was made by constant electric stimulation(5V,2ms,1HZ) to

  13. Class side effects: decreased pressure in the lower oesophageal and the pyloric sphincters after the administration of dopamine antagonists, neuroleptics, anti-emetics, L-NAME, pentadecapeptide BPC 157 and L-arginine.

    Belosic Halle, Zeljka; Vlainic, Josipa; Drmic, Domagoj; Strinic, Dean; Luetic, Kresimir; Sucic, Mario; Medvidovic-Grubisic, Maria; Pavelic Turudic, Tatjana; Petrovic, Igor; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2017-05-17

    The ulcerogenic potential of dopamine antagonists and L-NAME in rats provides unresolved issues of anti-emetic neuroleptic application in both patients and experimental studies. Therefore, in a 1-week study, we examined the pressures within the lower oesophageal and the pyloric sphincters in rats [assessed manometrically (cm H 2 O)] after dopamine neuroleptics/prokinetics, L-NAME, L-arginine and stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 were administered alone and/or in combination. Medication (/kg) was given once daily intraperitoneally throughout the 7 days, with the last dose at 24 h before pressure assessment. Given as individual agents to healthy rats, all dopamine antagonists (central [haloperidol (6.25 mg, 16 mg, 25 mg), fluphenazine (5 mg), levomepromazine (50 mg), chlorpromazine (10 mg), quetiapine (10 mg), olanzapine (5 mg), clozapine (100 mg), sulpiride (160 mg), metoclopramide (25 mg)) and peripheral(domperidone (10 mg)], L-NAME (5 mg) and L-arginine (100 mg) decreased the pressure within both sphincters. As a common effect, this decreased pressure was rescued, dose-dependently, by BPC 157 (10 µg, 10 ng) (also note that L-arginine and L-NAME given together antagonized each other's responses). With haloperidol, L-NAME worsened both the lower oesophageal and the pyloric sphincter pressure, while L-arginine ameliorated lower oesophageal sphincter but not pyloric sphincter pressure, and antagonized L-NAME effect. With domperidone, L-arginine originally had no effect, while L-NAME worsened pyloric sphincter pressure. This effect was opposed by L-arginine. All these effects were further reversed towards a stronger beneficial effect, close to normal pressure values, by the addition of BPC 157. In addition, NO level was determined in plasma, sphincters and brain tissue. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were also assessed. Haloperidol increased NO levels (in both sphincters, the plasma and brain), consistently producing increased

  14. Cytogenetics of acute leukaemia

    Rowley, J D

    1978-06-01

    The study of chromosomal abnormalities in patients with acute leukemia, begun just 20 years ago, has provided haematologists with new insights into the nature of this disease. It soon became evident that the modal chromosomal number and the chromosomal pattern (karyotype) appeared to be quite variable. Moreover, a number of patients appeared to have a normal karyotype. The early studies were frequently carried out using mitogen-stimulated peripheral blood cells, and one could argue that the analysis was not based on the leukemic cells. Since many of the patients with abnormalities were examined prior to treatment, the aberrations were not induced by therapy. It was noted quite early that the morphology of chromosomes from the leukemic cells was very fuzzy as compared with the chromosomes from the normal marrow cells. The reason for the poor morphology is still not understood. The results of chromosomal analysis of bone marrow-derived cells obtained from patients with acute leukemia appear to have prognostic significance, although this information is not currently being used in making decisions regarding the treatment of individual patients. The data from analyses with banding techniques reveal that there are non-random patterns of abnormalities, which supports the concept proposed by Boveri in 1914 that chromosomal aberrations are among the fundamental changes associated with malignancy. The acute non-lymphocytic leukemias (ANLL) of adults are one of the most thoroughly studied of human malignancies. Presentation of the results of cytogenetic analysis with banding of myeloid cells from these patients forms the major portion of this chapter. Recent reports on banding studies in acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) will be discussed and results will be compared with ANLL. Although there are very few data on the karyotypes of leukemia occurring as a second malignancy, the abnormalities seen show some distinct differences from ANLL that arises de novo.

  15. Acute febrile encephalopathy in adults from Northwest India

    Bhalla Ashish

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Acute onset fever with altered mentation is a common problem encountered by the physician practicing in tropical countries. Central nervous system (CNS infections are the most common cause resulting in fever with altered mentation in children. Aim : In this study, we have tried to analyze the cause of encephalopathy following short febrile illness in adults presenting to a tertiary care center in Northwestern part of India. Setting and Design : A prospective observational study carried out in a tertiary care center in the Northwestern India over a period of 1 year. Material and Methods : A total of 127 patients with fever of less than 2 weeks duration along with alteration in mentation were studied prospectively over a period of 12 months. The demographic variables were recorded in detail. In addition to routine investigations, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, noncontrast- and contrast-enhanced computed tomography, along with magnetic resonance imaging were performed in all the subjects. Statistical Analysis : The results were analyzed using SPSS statistical software. The values were expressed as mean with standard deviation for contiguous variable as percentage for the others. Results and Conclusion : Out of these, 70% had primary CNS infection as the etiology. A total of 33% patients had meningitis, 29.9% had evidence of meningoencephalitis, and 12.7% were diagnosed as sepsis-associated encephalopathy. These were followed by cerebral malaria, leptospirosis, and brain abscess as the cause of febrile encephalopathy in adults. Among the noninfectious causes, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, cortical venous thrombosis, and neuroleptic malignant syndrome were documented in 2.36% each. In 11% of the patients, the final diagnosis could not be made in spite of the extensive investigations. Our study demonstrates that acute febrile encephalopathy in adults is a heterogeneous syndrome with primary CNS infections being the commonest

  16. [Transcranial magnetic stimulation].

    Tormos, J M; Catalá, M D; Pascual-Leone, A

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) permits stimulation of the cerebral cortex in humans without requiring open access to the brain and is one of the newest tools available in neuroscience. There are two main types of application: single-pulse TMS and repetitive TMS. The magnetic stimulator is composed of a series of capacitors that store the voltage necessary to generate a stimulus of the sufficient intensity of generate an electric field in the stimulation coil. The safety of TMS is supported by the considerable experience derived from studies involving electrical stimulation of the cortex in animals and humans, and also specific studies on the safety of TMS in humans. In this article we review historical and technical aspects of TMS, describe its adverse effects and how to avoid them, summarize the applications of TMS in the investigation of different cerebral functions, and discuss the possibility of using TMS for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  17. Acute Pancreatitis

    Bertilsson, Sara; Håkansson, Anders; Kalaitzakis, Evangelos

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We aimed to evaluate the potential relation between the incidence of (alcoholic and non-alcoholic) acute pancreatitis (AP) and alcohol consumption in the general population, and whether the occurrence of AP shows any seasonal variation, particularly in relation to periods with expected...... consumption in the general population do not appear to be related to changes in the incidence of AP and there are no significant seasonal differences in the occurrence of AP in Sweden. Short summary: The incidence of acute pancreatitis (AP) is increasing, and alcohol is still recognized as one of the most...

  18. Electroconvulsive stimulation reverses anhedonia and cognitive impairments in rats exposed to chronic mild stress

    K, Henningsen,; Woldbye, David Paul Drucker; Wiborg, Ove

    2013-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy remains the most effective treatment for depression including a fast onset of action. However, this therapeutic approach suffers from some potential drawbacks. In the acute phase this includes amnesia. Electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS) has previously been shown...

  19. Allicin Protects against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung ...

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of allicin, an active component of garlic, on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- induced acute lung injury. Methods: Wistar rats were subjected to LPS intravenous injection with or without allicin treatment to induce acute lung injury (ALI) model. Also, A549 cells were stimulated with LPS in the ...

  20. Music acupuncture stimulation method.

    Brătilă, F; Moldovan, C

    2007-01-01

    Harmonic Medicine is the model using the theory that the body rhythms synchronize to an outer rhythm applied for therapeutic purpose, can restores the energy balance in acupuncture channels and organs and the condition of well-being. The purpose of this scientific work was to demonstrate the role played by harmonic sounds in the stimulation of the Lung (LU) Meridian (Shoutaiyin Feijing) and of the Kidney (KI) Meridian (Zushaoyin Shenjing). It was used an original method that included: measurement and electronic sound stimulation of the Meridian Entry Point, measurement of Meridian Exit Point, computer data processing, bio feed-back adjustment of the music stimulation parameters. After data processing, it was found that the sound stimulation of the Lung Meridian Frequency is optimal between 122 Hz and 128 Hz, with an average of 124 Hz (87% of the subjects) and for Kidney Meridian from 118 Hz to 121 Hz, with an average of 120 Hz (67% of the subjects). The acupuncture stimulation was more intense for female subjects (> 7%) than for the male ones. We preliminarily consider that an informational resonance phenomenon can be developed between the acupuncture music stimulation frequency and the cellular dipole frequency, being a really "resonant frequency signature" of an acupoint. The harmonic generation and the electronic excitation or low-excitation status of an acupuncture point may be considered as a resonance mechanism. By this kind of acupunctural stimulation, a symphony may act and play a healer role.

  1. Serotonergic stimulation of the rat hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis

    Mikkelsen, Jens D; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Kiss, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    Acute stimulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is mediated by several postsynaptic 5-HT receptor subtypes. Activation of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) receptors increases plasma corticosterone levels, and it is likely that these recept...

  2. Acute abdomen

    Wig J

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available 550 cases of acute abdomen have been analysed in detail includ-ing their clinical presentation and operative findings. Males are more frequently affected than females in a ratio of 3: 1. More than 45% of patients presented after 48 hours of onset of symptoms. Intestinal obstruction was the commonest cause of acute abdomen (47.6%. External hernia was responsible for 26% of cases of intestinal obstruction. Perforated peptic ulcer was the commonest cause of peritonitis in the present series (31.7% while incidence of biliary peritonitis was only 2.4%.. The clinical accuracy rate was 87%. The mortality in operated cases was high (10% while the over-all mortality rate was 7.5%.

  3. Acute Blindness.

    Meekins, Jessica M

    2015-09-01

    Sudden loss of vision is an ophthalmic emergency with numerous possible causes. Abnormalities may occur at any point within the complex vision pathway, from retina to optic nerve to the visual center in the occipital lobe. This article reviews specific prechiasm (retina and optic nerve) and cerebral cortical diseases that lead to acute blindness. Information regarding specific etiologies, pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis for vision is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Acupuncture for acute hordeolum

    Cheng, Ke; Law, Andrew; Guo, Menghu; Wieland, L. Susan; Shen, Xueyong; Lao, Lixing

    2017-01-01

    Background Hordeolum is an acute, purulent inflammation of the eyelid margin usually caused by obstructed orifices of the sebaceous glands of the eyelid. The condition, which affects sebaceous glands internally or externally, is common. When the meibomian gland in the tarsal plate is affected, internal hordeolum occurs, while when the glands of Zeis or Moll associated with eyelash follicles are affected, external hordeolum, or stye occurs. The onset of hordeolum is usually self limited, and may resolve in about a week with spontaneous drainage of the abscess. When the condition is severe, it can spread to adjacent glands and tissues. Recurrences are very common. As long as an internal hordeolum remains unresolved, it can develop into a chalazion or generalized eyelid cellulitis. Acupuncture is a traditional Chinese medical therapy aimed to treat disease by using fine needles to stimulate specific points on the body. However, it is unclear if acupuncture is an effective and safe treatment for acute hordeolum. Objectives The objective of this review was to investigate the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture to treat acute hordeolum compared with no treatment, sham acupuncture, or other active treatment. We also compared the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture plus another treatment with that treatment alone. Search methods We searched CENTRAL, Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE, Embase, PubMed, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS), three major Chinese databases, as well as clinical trial registers all through 7 June 2016. We reviewed the reference lists from potentially eligible studies to identify additional randomised clinical trials (RCTs). Selection criteria We included RCTs of people diagnosed with acute internal or external hordeola. We included RCTs comparing acupuncture with sham acupuncture or no treatment, other active treatments, or

  5. Human milk proresolving mediators stimulate resolution of acute inflammation.

    Arnardottir, Hildur; Orr, Sarah K; Dalli, Jesmond; Serhan, Charles N

    2016-05-01

    Human milk contains nutrients and bioactive products relevant to infant development and immunological protection. Here, we investigated the proresolving properties of milk using human milk lipid mediator isolates (HLMIs) and determined their impact on resolution programs in vivo and with human macrophages. HLMIs reduced the maximum neutrophil numbers (14.6±1.2 × 10(6)-11.0±1.0 × 10(6) cells per exudate) and shortened the resolution interval (Ri; 50% neutrophil reduction) by 54% compared with peritonitis. Using rigorous liquid-chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS)-based lipid mediator (LM) metabololipidomics, we demonstrated that human milk possesses a proresolving LM-specialized proresolving mediator (LM-SPM) signature profile, containing SPMs (e.g. resolvins (Rv), protectins (PDs), maresins (MaRs), and lipoxins (LXs)) at bioactive levels (pico-nanomolar concentrations) that enhanced human macrophage efferocytosis and bacterial containment. SPMs identified in human milk included D-series Rvs (e.g., RvD1, RvD2, RvD3, AT-RvD3, and RvD4), PD1, MaR1, E-series Rvs (e.g. RvE1, RvE2, and RvE3), and LXs (LXA4 and LXB4). Of the SPMs identified in human milk, RvD2 and MaR1 (50 ng per mouse) individually shortened Ri by ∼75%. Milk from mastitis gave higher leukotriene B4 and prostanoids and lower SPM levels. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that human milk has proresolving actions via comprehensive LM-SPM profiling, describing a potentially novel mechanism in maternal-infant biochemical imprinting.

  6. New York Canyon Stimulation

    Raemy, Bernard

    2012-06-21

    The New York Canyon Stimulation Project was to demonstrate the commercial application of Enhanced Geothermal System techniques in Buena Vista Valley area of Pershing County, Nevada. From October 2009 to early 2012, TGP Development Company aggressively implemented Phase I of Pre-Stimulation and Site/Wellbore readiness. This included: geological studies; water studies and analyses and procurement of initial permits for drilling. Oversubscription of water rights and lack of water needed for implementation of EGS were identified and remained primary obstacles. Despite extended efforts to find alternative solutions, the water supply circumstances could not be overcome and led TGP to determine a "No Go" decision and initiate project termination in April 2012.

  7. Acute Appendicitis

    Tind, Sofie; Qvist, Niels

    2017-01-01

    and treatment of AA it is important that the classifications are consistent. Furthermore, in the clinical settings, incorrect classification might lead to over diagnosing and a prolonged antibiotic treatment. The aim of our study was to investigate the concordance between perioperative diagnosis made......BACKGROUND: The classification of acute appendicitis (AA) into various grades is not consistent, partly because it is not clear whether the perioperative or the histological findings should be the foundation of the classification. When comparing results from the literature on the frequency...

  8. Corticostriatal Regulation of Acute Pain

    Erik Martinez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms for acute pain regulation in the brain are not well understood. The prefrontal cortex (PFC provides top-down control of emotional processes, and it projects to the nucleus accumbens (NAc. This corticostriatal projection forms an important regulatory pathway within the brain’s reward system. Recently, this projection has been suggested to control both sensory and affective phenotypes specifically associated with chronic pain. As this projection is also known to play a role in the transition from acute to chronic pain, we hypothesized that this corticostriatal circuit can also exert a modulatory function in the acute pain state. Here, we used optogenetics to specifically target the projection from the PFC to the NAc. We tested sensory pain behaviors with Hargreaves’ test and mechanical allodynia, and aversive pain behaviors with conditioned place preference (CPP test. We found that the activation of this corticostriatal circuit gave rise to bilateral relief from peripheral nociceptive inputs. Activation of this circuit also provided important control for the aversive response to transient noxious stimulations. Hence, our results support a novel role for corticostriatal circuitry in acute pain regulation.

  9. Acute-phase proteins: As diagnostic tool

    Sachin Jain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The varied reactions of the host to infection, inflammation, or trauma are collectively known as the acute-phase response and encompass a wide range of pathophysiological responses such as pyrexia, leukocytosis, hormone alterations, and muscle protein depletion combining to minimize tissue damage while enhancing the repair process. The mechanism for stimulation of hepatic production of acute-phase proteins is by proinflammatory cytokines. The functions of positive acute-phase proteins (APP are regarded as important in optimization and trapping of microorganism and their products, in activating the complement system, in binding cellular remnants like nuclear fractions, in neutralizing enzymes, scavenging free hemoglobin and radicals, and in modulating the host′s immune response. APP can be used as diagnostic tool in many diseases like bovine respiratory syncytial virus, prostate cancer, bronchopneumonia, multiple myeloma, mastitis, Streptococcus suis infection, starvation, or lymphatic neoplasia. Thus, acute-phase proteins may provide an alternative means of monitoring animal health.

  10. Hematopoietic growth factors and human acute leukemia.

    Löwenberg, B; Touw, I

    1988-10-22

    The study of myelopoietic maturation arrest in acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) has been eased by availability of the human recombinant hemopoietic growth factors, macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), granulocyte-(G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage-(GM-CSF) and multilineage stimulating factor (IL-3). Nonphysiological expansion of the leukemic population is not due to escape from control by these factors. Proliferation in vitro of AML cells is dependent on the presence of one or several factors in most cases. The pattern of factor-dependency does not correlate with morphological criteria in individual cases, and may thus offer a new tool for classification of AML. Overproduction of undifferentiated cells is not due to abnormal expression of receptors for the stimulating factors acting at an immature level. Rather, autocrine secretion of early acting lymphokines maintains proliferation of the leukemic clone. When looking at causes of leukemic dysregulation, yet undefined inhibitors of differentiation probably are of equal importance as dysequilibrated stimulation by lymphokines.

  11. Proinflammatory mediators stimulate neutrophil-directed angiogenesis.

    McCourt, M

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF; vascular permeability factor) is one of the most potent proangiogenic cytokines, and it plays a central role in mediating the process of angiogenesis or new blood vessel formation. Neutrophils (PMNs) recently have been shown to produce VEGF. HYPOTHESIS: The acute inflammatory response is a potent stimulus for PMN-directed angiogenesis. METHODS: Neutrophils were isolated from healthy volunteers and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and anti-human Fas monoclonal antibody. Culture supernatants were assayed for VEGF using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Culture supernatants from LPS- and TNF-alpha-stimulated PMNs were then added to human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human microvessel endothelial cells and assessed for endothelial cell proliferation using 5-bromodeoxyuridine labeling. Tubule formation was also assessed on MATRIGEL basement membrane matrix. Neutrophils were lysed to measure total VEGF release, and VEGF expression was detected using Western blot analysis. RESULTS: Lipopolysaccharide and TNF-alpha stimulation resulted in significantly increased release of PMN VEGF (532+\\/-49 and 484+\\/-80 pg\\/mL, respectively; for all, presented as mean +\\/- SEM) compared with control experiments (32+\\/-4 pg\\/mL). Interleukin 6 and Fas had no effect. Culture supernatants from LPS- and TNF-alpha-stimulated PMNs also resulted in significant increases (P<.005) in macrovascular and microvascular endothelial cell proliferation and tubule formation. Adding anti-human VEGF-neutralizing polyclonal antibody to stimulated PMN supernatant inhibited these effects. Total VEGF release following cell lysis and Western blot analysis suggests that the VEGF is released from an intracellular store. CONCLUSION: Activated human PMNs are directly angiogenic by releasing VEGF, and this has important implications for inflammation, capillary leak syndrome

  12. IDEA: Stimulating Oral Production.

    Easley, Jacob J.

    1995-01-01

    Presents daily activities that facilitate complete sentence response, promote oral production, and aid the learning of vocabulary in foreign-language classes. Because speech is the primary form of communication in the foreign-language classroom, it is important to stimulate students to converse as soon as possible. (Author/CK)

  13. stimulated BV2 Microglial

    2012-03-26

    Mar 26, 2012 ... 2), in LPS-stimulated BV2 microglial cells. The level of NO production was analyzed using Griess reaction. The release of PGE2 was determined using sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay ...

  14. Brain stimulation in migraine.

    Brighina, Filippo; Cosentino, Giuseppe; Fierro, Brigida

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is a very prevalent disease with great individual disability and socioeconomic burden. Despite intensive research effort in recent years, the etiopathogenesis of the disease remains to be elucidated. Recently, much importance has been given to mechanisms underlying the cortical excitability that has been suggested to be dysfunctional in migraine. In recent years, noninvasive brain stimulation techniques based on magnetic fields (transcranial magnetic stimulation, TMS) and on direct electrical currents (transcranial direct current stimulation, tDCS) have been shown to be safe and effective tools to explore the issue of cortical excitability, activation, and plasticity in migraine. Moreover, TMS, repetitive TMS (rTMS), and tDCS, thanks to their ability to interfere with and/or modulate cortical activity inducing plastic, persistent effects, have been also explored as potential therapeutic approaches, opening an interesting perspective for noninvasive neurostimulation for both symptomatic and preventive treatment of migraine and other types of headache. In this chapter we critically review evidence regarding the role of noninvasive brain stimulation in the pathophysiology and treatment of migraine, delineating the advantages and limits of these techniques together with potential development and future application. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Gamma-radiation-induced chromosal aberration in human lymphocytes: dose-rate effects in stimulated and non-stimulated cells

    Liniecki, J.; Bajerska, A.; Wyszynska, K.; Cisowska, B.

    1977-01-01

    Stimulated and non-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes were irradiated acutely and chronically, over 24 h. Dose-effect relationships for dicentric chromosomes were established and various models were fitted to the data. At prolonged irradiations, the yield decreased in basic agreement with the linear-quadratic model of aberration induction. Dose-protraction experiments on PHA + and PHA - lymphocytes, irradiated under various conditions of oxygenation and suspension (culture medium, whole blood) showed that the rejoining time increased from about 3 h in non-stimulated cells to about 10 h after PHA stimulation, and that this retarded rejoining was most likely due to blastic transformation itself and not to other conditions of irradiation

  16. Gamma radiation induced chromosal aberration in human lymphocytes: dose-rate effects in stimulated and non-stimulated cells

    Liniecki, J; Bajerska, A; Wyszynska, K [School of Medicine, Lodz (Poland). Div. of Nuclear Medicine and Radiobiology. Medical Research Center; Cisowska, B [Copernicus Municipal Hospital, Lodz (Poland). Oncology Center. Radiotherapy Dept.

    1977-05-01

    Stimulated and non-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes were irradiated acutely and chronically, over 24 h. Dose-effect relationships for dicentric chromosomes were established and various models were fitted to the data. At prolonged irradiations, the yield decreased in basic agreement with the linear-quadratic model of aberration induction. Dose-protraction experiments on PHA/sup +/ and PHA/sup -/ lymphocytes, irradiated under various conditions of oxygenation and suspension (culture medium, whole blood) showed that the rejoining time increased from about 3 h in non-stimulated cells to about 10 h after PHA stimulation, and that this retarded rejoining was most likely due to blastic transformation itself and not to other conditions of irradiation.

  17. Acute lower extremity ischaemia

    Acute lower extremity ischaemia. Acute lower limb ischaemia is a surgical emergency. ... is ~1.5 cases per 10 000 persons per year. Acute ischaemia ... Table 2. Clinical features discriminating embolic from thrombotic ALEXI. Clinical features.

  18. Acute kidney failure

    ... Renal failure - acute; ARF; Kidney injury - acute Images Kidney anatomy References Devarajan P. Biomarkers for assessment of renal function during acute kidney injury. In: Alpern RJ, Moe OW, Caplan M, ...

  19. [Transcranial magnetic stimulation and motor cortex stimulation in neuropathic pain].

    Mylius, V; Ayache, S S; Teepker, M; Kappus, C; Kolodziej, M; Rosenow, F; Nimsky, C; Oertel, W H; Lefaucheur, J P

    2012-12-01

    Non-invasive and invasive cortical stimulation allows the modulation of therapy-refractory neuropathic pain. High-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the contralateral motor cortex yields therapeutic effects at short-term and predicts the benefits of epidural motor cortex stimulation (MCS). The present article summarizes the findings on application, mechanisms and therapeutic effects of cortical stimulation in neuropathic pain.

  20. Non-invasive quick diagnosis of cardiovascular problems from visible and invisible abnormal changes with increased cardiac troponin I appearing on cardiovascular representation areas of the eyebrows, left upper lip, etc. of the face & hands: beneficial manual stimulation of hands for acute anginal chest pain, and important factors in safe, effective treatment.

    Omura, Yoshiaki; Jones, Marilyn K; Duvvi, Harsha; Shimotsuura, Yasuhiro; Ohki, Motomu; Rodriques, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Our previous study indicated that there are at least 7 cardiovascular representation areas on the face, including the "Eyebrows", both sides of the "Nose", "Lelt Upper Lip" and the "Outside of the corner of both sides of the mouth," in addition to 2 areas in each hand. When there are cardiovascular problems, some of the heart representation areas of these areas often show the following changes: 1) Most distinctive visible changes such as the initial whitening with or without long white hair, then hair loss and complete disappearance of the hairs of the heart representation area of "Eyebrows" 2) Invisible biochemical changes that happen in heart representation areas at the "Left Upper Lips", 3) "Nose" below eye level as well as 4) "3rd segment of Middle Finger of Hands." Most distinctive visible & invisible changes are found in heart representation areas on the "Eyebrow", located nearest to the midline of face, where the color of the hairs becomes white compared with the rest of the Eyebrow. Then the cardiovascular problem advances, and hair starts disappearing. When there are no hairs at the heart representation areas of the Eyebrow, usually Cardiac Troponin I is increased to a very serious, abnormal high value. Most of the cardiovascular representation areas of the face show, regardless of presence or absence of visible change. When there is a cardiovascular problem, not only simple Bi-Digital O-Ring Test can detect without using any instrument in several minutes but also, corresponding biochemical changes of abnormally increased Cardiac Troponin I level can often be detected non-invasively from these Organ Representation Areas of Face & Hands, although changes in Eyebrows, L-Upper Lip & 3rd segment of middle fingers are clinically the most reliable changes & easy to identify the locations. Manual Stimulation of Hand's heart representation areas often eliminated acute anginal chest pain before medical help became available. Important factors for safe, effective

  1. Cluster headache attack remission with sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation

    Barloese, Mads C J; Jürgens, Tim P; May, Arne

    2016-01-01

    collected at regular clinic visits. The time point “after remission” was defined as the first visit after the end of the remission period. Results: Thirty percent (10/33) of enrolled patients experienced at least one period of complete attack remission. All remission periods followed the start of SPG...... stimulation, with the first period beginning 134 ± 86 (range 21-272) days after initiation of stimulation. On average, each patient’s longest remission period lasted 149 ± 97 (range 62-322) days. The ability to treat acute attacks before and after remission was similar (37 % ± 25 % before, 49 % ± 32 % after...

  2. Stimulation of the sphenopalatine ganglion in intractable cluster headache

    Jürgens, Tim P; Schoenen, Jean; Rostgaard, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    , but only very few randomized controlled studies exist in the field of neuromodulation for the treatment of drug-refractory headaches. Based on the prominent role of the cranial parasympathetic system in acute cluster headache attacks, high-frequency sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) stimulation has been shown...... patients and the first commercially available CE-marked SPG neurostimulator system has been introduced for cluster headache, patient selection and care should be standardized to ensure maximal efficacy and safety. As only limited data have been published on SPG stimulation, standards of care based...

  3. Grating stimulated echo

    Dubetsky, B.; Berman, P.R.; Sleator, T.

    1992-01-01

    A theory of a grating simulated echo (GTE) is developed. The GSE involves the sequential excitation of atoms by two counterpropagating traveling waves, a standing wave, and a third traveling wave. It is shown that the echo signal is very sensitive to small changes in atomic velocity, much more sensitive than the normal stimulated echo. Use of the GSE as a collisional probe or accelerometer is discussed

  4. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor

    Murat Tuncel

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR plays a pivotal role in thyroid hormone metabolism. It is a major controller of thyroid cell function and growth. Mutations in TSHR may lead to several thyroid diseases, most commonly hyperthyroidism. Although its genetic and epigenetic alterations do not directly lead to carcinogenesis, it has a crucial role in tumor growth, which is initiated by several oncogenes. This article will provide a brief review of TSHR and related diseases.

  5. Biological treatment of acute agitation or aggression with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder in the inpatient setting.

    Correll, Christoph U; Yu, Xin; Xiang, Yutao; Kane, John M; Masand, Prakash

    2017-05-01

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorders are chronic illnesses that commonly present with symptoms of acute agitation and aggression. These symptoms must be managed rapidly to prevent potential harm to the patient and others, including their caregivers, peers, and health care workers. A number of treatment options are available to clinicians to manage acute agitation and aggression, including non-pharmacologic behavioral and environmental de-escalation strategies, as well as biological treatment options such as pharmacologic agents and electroconvulsive therapy. We summarize the available biological treatment options for patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder presenting with acute agitation or aggression in the inpatient setting, focusing on antipsychotics. The following searches were used in PubMed to obtain the most relevant advances in treating schizophrenia or bipolar disorder with acute agitation and aggression: (agitation, agitated, aggression, aggressive, hostile, hostility, violent, or violence) and (schizophr*, psychosis, psychot*, psychos*, mania, manic, or bipolar) and (*pharmacologic, antipsychotic*, neuroleptic*, antiepileptic*, anti-seizure*, mood stabilizer*, lithium, benzodiazepine*, beta blocker, beta-blocker, alpha2, alpha-2, *histamine*, electroconvulsive, ECT, shock, or transcranial). Individual searches were performed for each drug class. The studies were limited to peer-reviewed, English-language, and human studies. Most were placebo-controlled randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or meta-analyses. Among pharmacologic agents, antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, anticonvulsants, and lithium have been studied in randomized trials. Some typical and, more recently, atypical antipsychotics are available as both oral and short-acting intramuscular (IM) formulations, with 1 typical antipsychotic also available as an inhalable formulation. Among the pharmacologic agents studied in RCTs, atypical antipsychotics have the best evidence to support

  6. Prediction of Neurocognitive Deficits by Parkinsonian Motor Impairment in Schizophrenia: A Study in Neuroleptic-Naïve Subjects, Unaffected First-Degree Relatives and Healthy Controls From an Indigenous Population.

    Molina, Juan L; González Alemán, Gabriela; Florenzano, Néstor; Padilla, Eduardo; Calvó, María; Guerrero, Gonzalo; Kamis, Danielle; Stratton, Lee; Toranzo, Juan; Molina Rangeon, Beatriz; Hernández Cuervo, Helena; Bourdieu, Mercedes; Sedó, Manuel; Strejilevich, Sergio; Cloninger, Claude Robert; Escobar, Javier I; de Erausquin, Gabriel A

    2016-11-01

    Neurocognitive deficits are among the most debilitating and pervasive symptoms of schizophrenia, and are present also in unaffected first-degree relatives. Also, multiple reports reveal parkisonian motor deficits in untreated subjects with schizophrenia and in first-degree relatives of affected subjects. Yet, the relation between motor and cognitive impairment and its value as a classifier of endophenotypes has not been studied. To test the efficacy of midbrain hyperechogenicity (MHE) and parkinsonian motor impairment (PKM) as predictors of neurocognitive impairment in subjects with or at risk for schizophrenia, that could be used to segregate them from first-degree relatives and healthy controls. Seventy-six subjects with chronic schizophrenia never exposed to antipsychotic medication, 106 unaffected first-degree relatives, and 62 healthy controls were blindly assessed for cognitive and motor function, and transcranial ultrasound. Executive function, fluid intelligence, motor planning, and hand coordination showed group differences. PKM and MHE were significantly higher in untreated schizophrenia and unaffected relatives. Unaffected relatives showed milder impairment, but were different from controls. PKM and MHE predict cognitive impairment in neuroleptic-naive patients with schizophrenia and their unaffected first-degree relatives and may be used to segregate them from first-degree relatives and healthy controls. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Acute Pancreatitis in acute viral hepatitis

    S K.C.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The association of acute viral hepatitis and acute pancreatitis is well described. This study was conducted to find out the frequency of pancreatic involvement in acute viral hepatitis in the Nepalese population. Methods: Consecutive patients of acute viral hepatitis presenting with severe abdominal pain between January 2005 and April 2010 were studied. Patients with history of significant alcohol consumption and gall stones were excluded. Acute viral hepatitis was diagnosed by clinical examination, liver function test, ultrasound examination and confirmed by viral serology. Pancreatitis was diagnosed by clinical presentation, biochemistry, ultrasound examination and CT scan. Results: Severe abdominal pain was present in 38 of 382 serologically-confirmed acute viral hepatitis patients. Twenty five patients were diagnosed to have acute pancreatitis. The pancreatitis was mild in 14 and severe in 11 patients. The etiology of pancreatitis was hepatitis E virus in 18 and hepatitis A virus in 7 patients. Two patients died of complications secondary to shock. The remaining patients recovered from both pancreatitis and hepatitis on conservative treatment. Conclusions: Acute pancreatitis occurred in 6.5 % of patients with acute viral hepatitis. Cholelithiasis and gastric ulcers are the other causes of severe abdominal pain. The majority of the patients recover with conservative management. Keywords: acute viral hepatitis, acute pancreatitis, pain abdomen, hepatitis E, hepatitis A, endemic zone

  8. Low intensity transcranial electric stimulation

    Antal, Andrea; Alekseichuk, I; Bikson, M

    2017-01-01

    Low intensity transcranial electrical stimulation (TES) in humans, encompassing transcranial direct current (tDCS), transcutaneous spinal Direct Current Stimulation (tsDCS), transcranial alternating current (tACS), and transcranial random noise (tRNS) stimulation or their combinations, appears...

  9. Acute abdomen

    Beger, H.G.; Kern, E.

    1987-01-01

    The book first presents the anatomy and physiology of the abdomen and continues with chapters discussing clinical and laboratory aspects and a suitable order of diagnostic examinations with reference to the acute processes, explaining the diagnostic tools: ultrasonography, radiography including angiography and CT, tapping techniques and endoscopy together with their basic principles, examination techniques, and diagnosis. One chapter presents a complete survey of the processes involving the entire abdomen - as e.g. peritonitis, ileus, abdominal trauma, intraperitoneal hemorrage. This chapter profoundly discusses the diagnostics and therapies including emergency measures and surgery. Problems requiring consultation among varous specialists, in internal medicine, gynecology, urology, or pediatrics, are discussed in great detail. Information for the anesthetist is given for cases of emergency. More than one third of the book is devoted to organ-specific information, dicussing the pathogenesis, diagnostics, and therapy of the oesophagus, stomach, large and small intestine, bile ducts, pankreas, liver, spleen, and the abdominal vessels and the abdominal wall. (orig.) With 153 figs., 90 tabs [de

  10. Effects of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin 6 on the growth of leukemic blasts in suspension culture.

    Tsao, C J; Cheng, T Y; Chang, S L; Su, W J; Tseng, J Y

    1992-05-01

    We examined the stimulatory effects of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin 6 (IL)-6 on the in vitro proliferation of leukemic blast cells from patients with acute leukemia. Bone marrow or peripheral blood leukemic blast cells were obtained from 21 patients, including 14 cases of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), four cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), two cases of acute undifferentiated leukemia, and one case of acute mixed-lineage leukemia. The proliferation of leukemic blast cells was evaluated by measuring the incorporation of 3H-thymidine into cells incubated with various concentrations of cytokines for 3 days. GM-CSF stimulated the DNA synthesis (with greater than 2.0 stimulation index) of blast cells in 9 of 14 (64%) AML cases, two cases of acute undifferentiated leukemia and one case of acute mixed-lineage leukemia. Only two cases of AML blasts responded to IL-6 to grow in the short-term suspension cultures. GM-CSF and IL-6 did not display a synergistic effect on the growth of leukemic cells. Moreover, GM-CSF and IL-6 did not stimulate the proliferation of ALL blast cells. Binding study also revealed the specific binding of GM-CSF on the blast cells of acute undifferentiated leukemia and acute mixed-lineage leukemia. Our results indicated that leukemic blast cells of acute undifferentiated leukemia and acute mixed-lineage leukemia possessed functional GM-CSF receptors.

  11. Acute otitis externa

    Hui, Charles PS

    2013-01-01

    Acute otitis externa, also known as ‘swimmer’s ear’, is a common disease of children, adolescents and adults. While chronic suppurative otitis media or acute otitis media with tympanostomy tubes or a perforation can cause acute otitis externa, both the infecting organisms and management protocol are different. This practice point focuses solely on managing acute otitis externa, without acute otitis media, tympanostomy tubes or a perforation being present.

  12. Spinal Cord Stimulation

    Meier, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a surgical treatment for chronic neuropathic pain that is refractory to other treatment. Originally described by Shealy et al. in 1967(1), it is used to treat a range of conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS I)(2), angina pectoris(3), radicular...... pain after failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS)(4), pain due to peripheral nerve injury, stump pain(5), peripheral vascular disease(6) and diabetic neuropathy(7,8); whereas phantom pain(9), postherpetic neuralgia(10), chronic visceral pain(11), and pain after partial spinal cord injury(12) remain more...

  13. Ecstasy-induced acute coronary syndrome: something to rave about.

    Hoggett, Kerry; McCoubrie, David; Fatovich, Daniel M

    2012-06-01

    Ecstasy or 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine is a commonly used illicit recreational drug, enjoying popularity for its stimulant effects. Although acute coronary syndrome is recognized after cocaine and methamphetamine use, association with Ecstasy use has rarely been reported. We report three cases of significantly delayed acute coronary syndrome and ST elevation myocardial infarction related to ingestion of Ecstasy. © 2012 The Authors. EMA © 2012 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  14. Long-term effectiveness of sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation for cluster headache

    Jürgens, Tim P; Barloese, Mads; May, Arne

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) plays a pivotal role in cluster headache (CH) pathophysiology as the major efferent parasympathetic relay. We evaluated the long-term effectiveness of SPG stimulation in medically refractory, chronic CH patients. Methods Thirty-three patients were...... attacks (180.5 ± 344.8, range 2-1581 per patient) were evaluated. At 24 months, 45% ( n = 15) of patients were acute responders. Among acute responders, a total of 4340 attacks had been treated, and in 78% of these, effective therapy was achieved using only SPG stimulation (relief from moderate or greater...... response through the 24-month evaluation. Conclusions In the population of disabled, medically refractory chronic CH patients treated in this study, SPG stimulation is an effective acute therapy in 45% of patients, offering sustained effectiveness over 24 months of observation. In addition, a maintained...

  15. A distributed current stimulator ASIC for high density neural stimulation.

    Jeong Hoan Park; Chaebin Kim; Seung-Hee Ahn; Tae Mok Gwon; Joonsoo Jeong; Sang Beom Jun; Sung June Kim

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a novel distributed neural stimulator scheme. Instead of a single stimulator ASIC in the package, multiple ASICs are embedded at each electrode site for stimulation with a high density electrode array. This distributed architecture enables the simplification of wiring between electrodes and stimulator ASIC that otherwise could become too complex as the number of electrode increases. The individual ASIC chip is designed to have a shared data bus that independently controls multiple stimulating channels. Therefore, the number of metal lines is determined by the distributed ASICs, not by the channel number. The function of current steering is also implemented within each ASIC in order to increase the effective number of channels via pseudo channel stimulation. Therefore, the chip area can be used more efficiently. The designed chip was fabricated with area of 0.3 mm2 using 0.18 μm BCDMOS process, and the bench-top test was also conducted to validate chip performance.

  16. Pre-hospital management and outcome of acute poisonings by ambulances in Yekaterinburg, Russia.

    Krayeva, Yulia V; Brusin, Konstantin M; Bushuev, Alexander V; Kondrashov, Dmitriy L; Sentsov, Valentin G; Hovda, Knut Erik

    2013-01-01

    Large, prospective pre-hospital studies of acute poisonings are scarce. We present the epidemiology of the pre-hospital poisonings, the treatment given, the complications of the poisoning itself and the treatment, predictors for hospitalization, and the safety of the present approach in a large industrial Russian city. Data were collected from March 2009 to March 2010. All adult (≥ 16 years) acute poisonings in the city of Yekaterinburg, Russia were included. The prospective cohort inclusion of data included age, gender, simple clinical features (including consciousness, respiratory status, circulatory status, convulsions, etc.), main toxic agent, reason why poisoning was suspected, treatment given, and outcome. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with hospitalization of the patients. In total, 1795/2536 patients (71%) were brought to hospitals, 736/2536 (29%) were discharged by the ambulance, and 5/2536 (0.2%) died on scene. The most frequent main agents were opioids (25%), ethanol (9%), benzodiazepines (8%), corrosive substances (7%), carbon monoxide (5%), and neuroleptics (5%). Pre-hospital treatment was given to 73% of patients; 3% were intubated, and antidotes were given in 27% (naloxone 24%, atropine 2%, and flumazenil 0.2%). Gastric lavage was performed in 34%, but only 20% within the first hour after ingestion; 49% had a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS)treatment practice in most places, especially concerning the use of gastric lavage. Whether the current practice led to an increased morbidity and mortality is uncertain, but it justifies the need for thorough evaluation of clinical practice. These findings highlight the importance of studies like the present to improve diagnostics, triage, and treatment in acute poisonings.

  17. Stimulated Thomson scattering

    Spencer, R.L.

    1979-03-01

    The theory of stimulated Thomson scattering is investigated both quantum mechanically and classically. Two monochromatic electromagnetic waves of like polarization travelling in opposite directions are allowed to interact for a time tau with the electrons in a collisionless plasma. The electromagnetic waves have frequencies well above the plasma frequency, and their difference frequency is allowed to range upward from the plasma frequency. With the difference frequency well above the plasma frequency, the rate at which energy is transferred from one wave to the other is calculated quantum mechanically, classically from a fluid theory, and classically from an independent electron theory. The rate is calculated in both the homogeneously broadened limit, and in the inhomogeneously broadened limit

  18. Engagement sensitive visual stimulation

    Deepesh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is one of leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Early detection during golden hour and treatment of individual neurological dysfunction in stroke using easy-to-access biomarkers based on a simple-to-use, cost-effective, clinically-valid screening tool can bring a paradigm shift in healthcare, both urban and rural. In our research we have designed a quantitative automatic home-based oculomotor assessment tool that can play an important complementary role in prognosis of neurological disorders like stroke for the neurologist. Once the patient has been screened for stroke, the next step is to design proper rehabilitation platform to alleviate the disability. In addition to the screening platform, in our research, we work in designing virtual reality based rehabilitation exercise platform that has the potential to deliver visual stimulation and in turn contribute to improving one’s performance.

  19. Comparison of conventional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry versus microflow liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry within the framework of full method validation for simultaneous quantification of 40 antidepressants and neuroleptics in whole blood.

    Steuer, Andrea E; Poetzsch, Michael; Koenig, Magdalena; Tingelhoff, Eva; Staeheli, Sandra N; Roemmelt, Andreas T; Kraemer, Thomas

    2015-02-13

    Microflow liquid chromatography (MFLC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) is claimed to improve analysis throughput, reduce matrix effects and lower mobile phase consumption. This statement was checked within the framework of method validation of a multi-analyte procedure in clinical and forensic toxicology employing MFLC-MS/MS and conventional LC-MS/MS. 200 μL whole blood were spiked with 50 μL internal standard mixture and extracted by protein precipitation. The concentrated extract was separated into two vials. One was analyzed using a Thermo Fisher Ultimate liquid chromatography system coupled to an ABSciex 5500 QTrap mass spectrometer (LC-MS/MS) and one by an ABSciex Eksigent Microflow LC system coupled to an ABSciex 4500 linear ion trap quadrupole MS (MFLC-MS/MS). Both methods were fully validated and compared in terms of selectivity, stability, limits, calibration model, recovery (RE), matrix effects (ME), bias, imprecision and beta tolerance interval for 40 antidepressants and neuroleptics including 9 metabolites. Both methods had comparable LODs, LOQs and calibration models with some exceptions. The MFLC system showed slightly higher coefficients of variation (CVs) in the RE experiments. ME were reproducible in both systems but with lower CVs in the conventional LC system. Acceptance criteria for imprecision and bias were fulfilled for 32 analytes on the LC and for 28 analytes on the MFLC system. Beta tolerance intervals indicated better reproducibility in terms of narrower intervals for the conventional LC system. The advantages of the MFLC system were low mobile phase consumption, short run time, and better peak separation. The systems were comparable in terms of peak interference, LOD, ME, bias and imprecision. The advantages of the conventional LC system were more data points per peak, linear calibration models, stable retention times and better beta tolerance intervals. Due to higher robustness, the conventional LC system was finally chosen for

  20. Stimulated coherent transition radiation

    Hung-chi Lihn.

    1996-03-01

    Coherent radiation emitted from a relativistic electron bunch consists of wavelengths longer than or comparable to the bunch length. The intensity of this radiation out-numbers that of its incoherent counterpart, which extends to wavelengths shorter than the bunch length, by a factor equal to the number of electrons in the bunch. In typical accelerators, this factor is about 8 to 11 orders of magnitude. The spectrum of the coherent radiation is determined by the Fourier transform of the electron bunch distribution and, therefore, contains information of the bunch distribution. Coherent transition radiation emitted from subpicosecond electron bunches at the Stanford SUNSHINE facility is observed in the far-infrared regime through a room-temperature pyroelectric bolometer and characterized through the electron bunch-length study. To measure the bunch length, a new frequency-resolved subpicosecond bunch-length measuring system is developed. This system uses a far-infrared Michelson interferometer to measure the spectrum of coherent transition radiation through optical autocorrelation with resolution far better than existing time-resolved methods. Hence, the radiation spectrum and the bunch length are deduced from the autocorrelation measurement. To study the stimulation of coherent transition radiation, a special cavity named BRAICER is invented. Far-infrared light pulses of coherent transition radiation emitted from electron bunches are delayed and circulated in the cavity to coincide with subsequent incoming electron bunches. This coincidence of light pulses with electron bunches enables the light to do work on electrons, and thus stimulates more radiated energy. The possibilities of extending the bunch-length measuring system to measure the three-dimensional bunch distribution and making the BRAICER cavity a broadband, high-intensity, coherent, far-infrared light source are also discussed

  1. Electrical Stimulation Promotes Cardiac Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Damián Hernández

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs are an attractive source of cardiomyocytes for cardiac repair and regeneration. In this study, we aim to determine whether acute electrical stimulation of human iPSCs can promote their differentiation to cardiomyocytes. Methods. Human iPSCs were differentiated to cardiac cells by forming embryoid bodies (EBs for 5 days. EBs were then subjected to brief electrical stimulation and plated down for 14 days. Results. In iPS(Foreskin-2 cell line, brief electrical stimulation at 65 mV/mm or 200 mV/mm for 5 min significantly increased the percentage of beating EBs present by day 14 after plating. Acute electrical stimulation also significantly increased the cardiac gene expression of ACTC1, TNNT2, MYH7, and MYL7. However, the cardiogenic effect of electrical stimulation was not reproducible in another iPS cell line, CERA007c6. Beating EBs from control and electrically stimulated groups expressed various cardiac-specific transcription factors and contractile muscle markers. Beating EBs were also shown to cycle calcium and were responsive to the chronotropic agents, isoproterenol and carbamylcholine, in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusions. Our results demonstrate that brief electrical stimulation can promote cardiac differentiation of human iPS cells. The cardiogenic effect of brief electrical stimulation is dependent on the cell line used.

  2. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and leukemogenesis

    Lorena Lobo de Figueiredo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available THE granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF plays an important role in normal granulopoiesis. Its functions are mediated by specific receptors on the surface of responsive cells and, upon ligand binding, several cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases are activated. The cytoplasmic region proximal to the membrane of the G-CSF receptor (G-CSF-R transduces proliferative and survival signals, whereas the distal carboxy-terminal region transduces maturation signals and suppresses the receptor's proliferative signals. Mutations in the G-CSF-R gene resulting in truncation of the carboxy-terminal region have been detected in a subset of patients with severe congenital neutropenia who developed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML. In addition, the AML1-ETO fusion protein, expressed in leukemic cells harboring the t(8;21, disrupt the physiological function of transcription factors such as C/EBPα and C/EBPε, which in turn deregulate G-CSF-R expression. The resulting high levels of G-CSF-R and G-CSF-dependent cell proliferation may be associated with pathogenesis of AML with t(8;21. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that G-CSF may act as a co-stimulus augmenting the response of PML-RARα acute promyelocytic leukemia cells to all-trans-retinoic acid treatment. Finally, in the PLZF-RARα acute promyelocytic leukemia transgenic model, G-CSF deficiency suppressed leukemia development. Altogether, these data suggest that the G-CSF signaling pathway may play a role in leukemogenesis.

  3. Ultrasound stimulation on bone healing. The optimization of stimulation time

    Rosim, R.C.; Paulin, J.B.P.; Goncalves, R.P.

    1990-01-01

    Previous works in ultrasonic simulation of bone healing dealt with parameters optimization. Albertin (1983) studied the stimulation time and found forty minutes as ideal. However, this stimulation time was the largest one employed and remained some doubt about the most appropriated value. 30, 40, 50 and 60 minutes of stimulation time were selected, while others parameters were held constant with: pulse width in 200 μs, repetition rate in 1000 pulses per second and amplitude in 30 V. Partial incomplete transverse osteotomies were done in the middle third of radio in the right forearm of rabbits. Twenty four animals divided in four subgroups, with 6 animals each were stimulated. The daily stimulation time for each subgroup was 30, 40, 50 and minutes respectively, during 15 consecutive days. The stimulation procedure started 24 hours after surgery. After the stimulation period, radiological, histological and morphometric evaluations were done and greater bone healing was found for the 50 minutes stimulation subgroup, in them new bone was also prominent. (author)

  4. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000103.htm Acute respiratory distress syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening lung ...

  5. Transcranial brain stimulation: closing the loop between brain and stimulation

    Karabanov, Anke; Thielscher, Axel; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2016-01-01

    -related and state-related variability. Fluctuations in brain-states can be traced online with functional brain imaging and inform the timing or other settings of transcranial brain stimulation. State-informed open-loop stimulation is aligned to the expression of a predefined brain state, according to prespecified......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To discuss recent strategies for boosting the efficacy of noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation to improve human brain function. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent research exposed substantial intra- and inter-individual variability in response to plasticity-inducing transcranial brain...... stimulation. Trait-related and state-related determinants contribute to this variability, challenging the standard approach to apply stimulation in a rigid, one-size-fits-all fashion. Several strategies have been identified to reduce variability and maximize the plasticity-inducing effects of noninvasive...

  6. Interaction of metabolic and respiratory acidosis with α and β-adrenoceptor stimulation in rat myocardium.

    Biais, Matthieu; Jouffroy, Romain; Carillion, Aude; Feldman, Sarah; Jobart-Malfait, Aude; Riou, Bruno; Amour, Julien

    2012-12-01

    The effects of acute respiratory versus metabolic acidosis on the myocardium and their consequences on adrenoceptor stimulation remain poorly described. We compared the effects of metabolic and respiratory acidosis on inotropy and lusitropy in rat myocardium and their effects on the responses to α- and β-adrenoceptor stimulations. The effects of acute respiratory and metabolic acidosis (pH 7.10) and their interactions with α and β-adrenoceptor stimulations were studied in isolated rat left ventricular papillary muscle (n=8 per group). Intracellular pH was measured using confocal microscopy and a pH-sensitive fluorophore in isolated rat cardiomyocytes. Data are mean percentages of baseline±SD. Respiratory acidosis induced more pronounced negative inotropic effects than metabolic acidosis did both in isotonic (45±3 versus 63±6%, Prespiratory or metabolic acidosis. The inotropic response to β-adrenergic stimulation was impaired only in metabolic acidosis (137±12 versus 200±33%, Pacidosis. The lusitropic response to β-adrenergic stimulation was not modified by respiratory or metabolic acidosis. Acute metabolic and respiratory acidosis induce different myocardial effects related to different decreases in intracellular pH. Only metabolic acidosis impairs the positive inotropic effect of β-adrenergic stimulation.

  7. AcuTable

    Dibbern, Simon; Rasmussen, Kasper Vestergaard; Ortiz-Arroyo, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we describe AcuTable, a new tangible user interface. AcuTable is a shapeable surface that employs capacitive touch sensors. The goal of AcuTable was to enable the exploration of the capabilities of such haptic interface and its applications. We describe its design and implementation...

  8. Acute mastoiditis in children

    Anthonsen, Kristian; Høstmark, Karianne; Hansen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Conservative treatment of acute otitis media may lead to more complications. This study evaluates changes in incidence, the clinical and microbiological findings, the complications and the outcome of acute mastoiditis in children in a country employing conservative guidelines in treating acute...

  9. Dopamine and reward: the anhedonia hypothesis 30 years on.

    Wise, Roy A

    2008-10-01

    The anhedonia hypothesis--that brain dopamine plays a critical role in the subjective pleasure associated with positive rewards--was intended to draw the attention of psychiatrists to the growing evidence that dopamine plays a critical role in the objective reinforcement and incentive motivation associated with food and water, brain stimulation reward, and psychomotor stimulant and opiate reward. The hypothesis called to attention the apparent paradox that neuroleptics, drugs used to treat a condition involving anhedonia (schizophrenia), attenuated in laboratory animals the positive reinforcement that we normally associate with pleasure. The hypothesis held only brief interest for psychiatrists, who pointed out that the animal studies reflected acute actions of neuroleptics whereas the treatment of schizophrenia appears to result from neuroadaptations to chronic neuroleptic administration, and that it is the positive symptoms of schizophrenia that neuroleptics alleviate, rather than the negative symptoms that include anhedonia. Perhaps for these reasons, the hypothesis has had minimal impact in the psychiatric literature. Despite its limited heuristic value for the understanding of schizophrenia, however, the anhedonia hypothesis has had major impact on biological theories of reinforcement, motivation, and addiction. Brain dopamine plays a very important role in reinforcement of response habits, conditioned preferences, and synaptic plasticity in cellular models of learning and memory. The notion that dopamine plays a dominant role in reinforcement is fundamental to the psychomotor stimulant theory of addiction, to most neuroadaptation theories of addiction, and to current theories of conditioned reinforcement and reward prediction. Properly understood, it is also fundamental to recent theories of incentive motivation.

  10. Acute effects of hemodialysis on salivary flow rate and composition

    Bots, C. P.; Brand, H. S.; Veerman, E. C. I.; Valentijn-Benz, M.; Henskens, Y. M. C.; Valentijn, R. M.; Vos, P. F.; Bijlsma, J. A.; ter Wee, P. M.; van Amerongen, B. M.; Nieuw Amerongen, A. V.

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate acute effects of hemodialysis (HD) on the salivary flow rate, pH and biochemical composition before, during and after completion of a dialysis session. Unstimulated whole saliva (UWS) and chewing-stimulated whole saliva (CH-SWS) were collected in 94 HD patients. Salivary flow rate, pH,

  11. EOR by stimulated microflora

    Svarovskaya, L.I.; Altunina, L.K.; Rozhenkova, Z.A.; Bulavin, V.D. [Institute of Petroleum Chemistry, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    A combined microbiological and physico-chemical method for EOR has been developed for flooded West Siberia oil fields with formation temperature of 45{degrees}-95{degrees}C (318-365K). Formation water includes rich and various biocenoses numbering up to 2 x 10{sup 7} cells per ml. Representatives of genera, i.e, Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Actinomyces, Micrococcus, Mycobacterium, Sarcina, etc. were found to be the most widely distributed microorganisms. The method is based on injection of systems exhibiting high oil displacing capacity and at the same time being an additional nitrous nutrient for endemic populations of microorganisms. Their injection into formation water favors biomass growth by 4-6 orders and promotes syntheses of biosurfactants, biopolymers, acids, etc., and gaseous products. The features of residual oil displacement have been studied on laboratory models using a combined microbiological and physico-chemical method. A curve for the yield of residual oil is presented by two peaks. The first peak is stipulated by the washing action of oil displacement system, and the second one by the effect of metabolites produced at stimulation of biogenic processes. Oil displacement index increases by 15%-30%.

  12. Phenotypic characterization of neurotensin messenger RNA-expressing cells in the neuroleptic-treated rat striatum: a detailed cellular co-expression study

    Emson, P.C.; Westmore, K.; Augood, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    The chemical phenotype of proneurotensin messenger RNA-expressing cells was determined in the acute haloperidol-treated rat striatum using a combination of [ 35 S]-labelled and alkaline phosphatase-labelled oligonucleotides. Cellular sites of proneurotensin messenger RNA expression were visualized simultaneously on tissue sections processed to reveal cellular sites of preproenkephalin A messenger RNA or the dopamine and adenylate cyclase phosphoprotein-32, messenger RNA. The cellular co-expression of preproenkepahlin A and preprotachykinin messenger RNA was also examined within forebrain structures. Cellular sites of preproenkephalin A and dopamine and adenylate cyclase phosphoprotein-32 messenger RNAs were visualized using alkaline phosphatase-labelled oligonucleotides whilst sites of preprotachykinin and proneurotensin messenger RNA expression were detected using [ 35 S]-labelled oligos. Cellular sites of enkephalin and dopamine and adenylate cyclase phosphoprotein-32 gene expression were identified microscopically by the concentration of purple alkaline phosphatase reaction product within the cell cytoplasm, whereas sites of substance P and proneurotensin gene expression were identified by the dense clustering of silver grains overlying cells.An intense hybridization signal was detected for all three neuropeptide messenger RNAs in the striatum, the nucleus accumbens and septum. Dopamine and adenylate cyclase phosphoprotein-32 messenger RNA was detected within the neostriatum but not within the septum. In all forebrain regions examined, with the exception of the islands of Cajella, the cellular expression of enkephalin messenger RNA and substance P messenger RNA was discordant; the two neuropeptide messenger RNAs were detected essentially in different cells, although in the striatum and nucleus accumbens occasional isolated cells were detected which contained both hybridization signals; dense clusters of silver grains overlay alkaline phosphatase-positive cells

  13. Phenotypic characterization of neurotensin messenger RNA-expressing cells in the neuroleptic-treated rat striatum: a detailed cellular co-expression study

    Emson, P C; Westmore, K; Augood, S J [MRC Molecular Neuroscience Group, The Department of Neurobiology, The Babraham Institute, Babraham, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-11

    The chemical phenotype of proneurotensin messenger RNA-expressing cells was determined in the acute haloperidol-treated rat striatum using a combination of [{sup 35}S]-labelled and alkaline phosphatase-labelled oligonucleotides. Cellular sites of proneurotensin messenger RNA expression were visualized simultaneously on tissue sections processed to reveal cellular sites of preproenkephalin A messenger RNA or the dopamine and adenylate cyclase phosphoprotein-32, messenger RNA. The cellular co-expression of preproenkepahlin A and preprotachykinin messenger RNA was also examined within forebrain structures. Cellular sites of preproenkephalin A and dopamine and adenylate cyclase phosphoprotein-32 messenger RNAs were visualized using alkaline phosphatase-labelled oligonucleotides whilst sites of preprotachykinin and proneurotensin messenger RNA expression were detected using [{sup 35}S]-labelled oligos. Cellular sites of enkephalin and dopamine and adenylate cyclase phosphoprotein-32 gene expression were identified microscopically by the concentration of purple alkaline phosphatase reaction product within the cell cytoplasm, whereas sites of substance P and proneurotensin gene expression were identified by the dense clustering of silver grains overlying cells.An intense hybridization signal was detected for all three neuropeptide messenger RNAs in the striatum, the nucleus accumbens and septum. Dopamine and adenylate cyclase phosphoprotein-32 messenger RNA was detected within the neostriatum but not within the septum. In all forebrain regions examined, with the exception of the islands of Cajella, the cellular expression of enkephalin messenger RNA and substance P messenger RNA was discordant; the two neuropeptide messenger RNAs were detected essentially in different cells, although in the striatum and nucleus accumbens occasional isolated cells were detected which contained both hybridization signals; dense clusters of silver grains overlay alkaline phosphatase

  14. Subliminal Stimulation: Hoax or Reality?

    Trank, Douglas M.

    Subliminal stimulation is defined as that which is perceived by an individual below the threshold of awareness or cognizance. This article traces the history of research in subliminal stimulation to illustrate that under certain circumstances and conditions, this behavioral phenomenon does occur. Although subliminal stimuli do affect human…

  15. Stimulating Language: Insights from TMS

    Devlin, Joseph T.; Watkins, Kate E.

    2007-01-01

    Fifteen years ago, Pascual-Leone and colleagues used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate speech production in pre-surgical epilepsy patients and in doing so, introduced a novel tool into language research. TMS can be used to non-invasively stimulate a specific cortical region and transiently disrupt information processing. These…

  16. An intermediate animal model of spinal cord stimulation

    Thomas Guiho

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injuries (SCI result in the loss of movement and sensory feedback as well as organs dysfunctions. For example, nearly all SCI subjects loose their bladder control and are prone to kidney failure if they do not proceed to intermittent (self- catheterization. Electrical stimulation of the sacral spinal roots with an implantable neuroprosthesis is a promising approach, with commercialized products, to restore continence and control micturition. However, many persons do not ask for this intervention since a surgical deafferentation is needed and the loss of sensory functions and reflexes become serious side effects of this procedure. Recent results renewed interest in spinal cord stimulation. Stimulation of existing pre-cabled neural networks involved in physiological processes regulation is suspected to enable synergic recruitment of spinal fibers. The development of direct spinal stimulation strategies aiming at bladder and bowel functions restoration would therefore appear as a credible alternative to existent solutions. However, a lack of suitable large animal model complicates these kinds of studies. In this article, we propose a new animal model of spinal stimulation -pig- and will briefly introduce results from one first acute experimental validation session.

  17. Vagal nerve stimulation therapy: what is being stimulated?

    Kember, Guy; Ardell, Jeffrey L; Armour, John A; Zamir, Mair

    2014-01-01

    Vagal nerve stimulation in cardiac therapy involves delivering electrical current to the vagal sympathetic complex in patients experiencing heart failure. The therapy has shown promise but the mechanisms by which any benefit accrues is not understood. In this paper we model the response to increased levels of stimulation of individual components of the vagal sympathetic complex as a differential activation of each component in the control of heart rate. The model provides insight beyond what is available in the animal experiment in as much as allowing the simultaneous assessment of neuronal activity throughout the cardiac neural axis. The results indicate that there is sensitivity of the neural network to low level subthreshold stimulation. This leads us to propose that the chronic effects of vagal nerve stimulation therapy lie within the indirect pathways that target intrinsic cardiac local circuit neurons because they have the capacity for plasticity.

  18. Vagal nerve stimulation therapy: what is being stimulated?

    Guy Kember

    Full Text Available Vagal nerve stimulation in cardiac therapy involves delivering electrical current to the vagal sympathetic complex in patients experiencing heart failure. The therapy has shown promise but the mechanisms by which any benefit accrues is not understood. In this paper we model the response to increased levels of stimulation of individual components of the vagal sympathetic complex as a differential activation of each component in the control of heart rate. The model provides insight beyond what is available in the animal experiment in as much as allowing the simultaneous assessment of neuronal activity throughout the cardiac neural axis. The results indicate that there is sensitivity of the neural network to low level subthreshold stimulation. This leads us to propose that the chronic effects of vagal nerve stimulation therapy lie within the indirect pathways that target intrinsic cardiac local circuit neurons because they have the capacity for plasticity.

  19. Electrical stimulation in exercise training

    Kroll, Walter

    1994-01-01

    Electrical stimulation has a long history of use in medicine dating back to 46 A.D. when the Roman physician Largus found the electrical discharge of torpedo fishes useful in the treatment of pain produced by headache and gout. A rival Greek physician, Dioscorides, discounted the value of the torpedo fish for headache relief but did recommend its use in the treatment of hemorrhoids. In 1745, the Leyden jar and various sized electrostatic generators were used to treat angina pectoris, epilepsy, hemiplegia, kidney stones, and sciatica. Benjamin Franklin used an electrical device to treat successfully a young woman suffering from convulsive fits. In the late 1800's battery powered hydroelectric baths were used to treat chronic inflammation of the uterus while electrified athletic supporters were advertised for the treatment of male problems. Fortunately, such an amusing early history of the simple beginnings of electrical stimulation did not prevent eventual development of a variety of useful therapeutic and rehabilitative applications of electrical stimulation. Over the centuries electrical stimulation has survived as a modality in the treatment of various medical disorders with its primary application being in the rehabilitation area. Recently, a surge of new interest in electrical stimulation has been kindled by the work of a Russian sport scientist who reported remarkable muscle strength and endurance improvements in elite athletes. Yakov Kots reported his research on electric stimulation and strength improvements in 1977 at a Canadian-Soviet Exchange Symposium held at Concordia University in Montreal. Since then an explosion of new studies has been seen in both sport science and in medicine. Based upon the reported works of Kots and the present surge of new investigations, one could be misled as to the origin of electrical stimulation as a technique to increase muscle strength. As a matter of fact, electric stimulation has been used as a technique to improve

  20. Does case-mix based reimbursement stimulate the development of process-oriented care delivery?

    Vos, L.; Dückers, M.L.A.; Wagner, C.; Merode, G.G. van

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Reimbursement based on the total care of a patient during an acute episode of illness is believed to stimulate management and clinicians to reduce quality problems like waiting times and poor coordination of care delivery. Although many studies already show that this kind of case-mix

  1. A clinical repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation service in Australia: 6 years on.

    Galletly, Cherrie A; Clarke, Patrick; Carnell, Benjamin L; Gill, Shane

    2015-11-01

    There is considerable research evidence for the effectiveness of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in the treatment of depression. However, there is little information about its acceptability and outcomes in clinical settings. This naturalistic study reports on a clinical repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation service that has been running in Adelaide, South Australia (SA), for 6 years. During this time, 214 complete acute courses were provided to patients with treatment-resistant Major Depressive Disorder. Patients received either sequential bilateral or right unilateral repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation treatment involving either 18 or 20 sessions given over 6 or 4 weeks respectively. Data included patient demographic details, duration of depression, and medication at the beginning of their repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation course. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale was used to assess response to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. Of those undergoing a first-time acute treatment course of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (N = 167), 28% achieved remission, while a further 12% met the criteria for a response to treatment. Most patients (N = 123, 77%) had previously been treated with five or more antidepressant medications, and 77 (47%) had previously received electroconvulsive therapy. Referral rates remained high over the 6 years, indicating acceptance of the treatment by referring psychiatrists. There were no significant adverse events, and the treatment was generally well tolerated. In all, 41 patients (25%) had a second course of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and 6 (4%) patients had a third course; 21 patients subsequently received maintenance repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. This naturalistic study showed that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation was well accepted by both psychiatrists and patients, and has good efficacy and safety. Furthermore

  2. Neuroprotective effect of cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation in a rat stroke model.

    Notturno, Francesca; Pace, Marta; Zappasodi, Filippo; Cam, Etrugul; Bassetti, Claudio L; Uncini, Antonino

    2014-07-15

    Experimental focal brain ischemia generates in the penumbra recurrent depolarizations which spread across the injured cortex inducing infarct growth. Transcranial direct current stimulation can induce a lasting, polarity-specific, modulation of cortical excitability. To verify whether cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation could reduce the infarct size and the number of depolarizations, focal ischemia was induced in the rat by the 3 vessels occlusion technique. In the first experiment 12 ischemic rats received cathodal stimulation (alternating 15 min on and 15 min off) starting 45 min after middle cerebral artery occlusion and lasting 4 h. In the second experiment 12 ischemic rats received cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation with the same protocol but starting soon after middle cerebral artery occlusion and lasting 6 h. In both experiments controls were 12 ischemic rats not receiving stimulation. Cathodal stimulation reduced the infarct volume in the first experiment by 20% (p=0.002) and in the second by 30% (p=0.003). The area of cerebral infarction was smaller in animals receiving cathodal stimulation in both experiments (p=0.005). Cathodal stimulation reduced the number of depolarizations (p=0.023) and infarct volume correlated with the number of depolarizations (p=0.048). Our findings indicate that cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation exert a neuroprotective effect in the acute phase of stroke possibly decreasing the number of spreading depolarizations. These findings may have translational relevance and open a new avenue in neuroprotection of stroke in humans. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Multielectrode intrafascicular and extraneural stimulation

    Veltink, Petrus H.; van Alste, Jan A.; Boom, H.B.K.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between nerve stimulation, pulse amplitude and isometric muscle force was measured to investigate recruitment of motor units. Force addition experiments were performed to obtain insight in the intersection of motor unit groups recruited by different electrodes. Intrafascicular and

  4. Noninvasive Stimulation of the Human Brain

    Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Rothwell, John; Capogna, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Noninvasive brain stimulation methods, such as transcranial electric stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation are widely used tools for both basic research and clinical applications. However, the cortical circuits underlying their effects are poorly defined. Here we review the current...

  5. Regulation of autophagy in human skeletal muscle: effects of exercise, exercise training and insulin stimulation

    Fritzen, Andreas Mæchel; Madsen, Agnete Louise Bjerregaard; Kleinert, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Studies in rodent muscle suggest that autophagy is regulated by acute exercise, exercise training and insulin stimulation. However, little is known about the regulation of autophagy in human skeletal muscle. Here we investigate the autophagic response to acute one-legged exercise, one-legged exer......Studies in rodent muscle suggest that autophagy is regulated by acute exercise, exercise training and insulin stimulation. However, little is known about the regulation of autophagy in human skeletal muscle. Here we investigate the autophagic response to acute one-legged exercise, one......-legged exercise training as well as in response to subsequent insulin stimulation in exercised and non-exercised human muscle. Acute one-legged exercise decreased (phuman muscle....... The decrease in LC3-II/LC3-I ratio did not correlate with activation of AMPK trimer complexes in human muscle. Consistently, pharmacological AMPK activation with AICAR in mouse muscle did not affect the LC3-II/LC3-I ratio. Four hours after exercise, insulin further reduced (p

  6. Economics of nuclear gas stimulation

    Frank, G W [Austral Oil Company Incorporated, Houston, TX (United States); Coffer, H F; Luetkehans, G R [CER Geonuclear Corporation, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1970-05-01

    Nuclear stimulation of the Mesaverde Formation in the Piceance Basin appears to be the only available method that can release the contained gas economically. In the Rulison Field alone estimates show six to eight trillion cubic feet of gas may be made available by nuclear means, and possibly one hundred trillion cubic feet could be released in the Piceance Basin. Several problems remain to be solved before this tremendous gas reserve can be tapped. Among these are (1) rates of production following nuclear stimulation; (2) costs of nuclear stimulation; (3) radioactivity of the chimney gas; and (4) development of the ideal type of device to carry out the stimulations. Each of these problems is discussed in detail with possible solutions suggested. First and foremost is the rate at which gas can be delivered following nuclear stimulation. Calculations have been made for expected production behavior following a 5-kiloton device and a 40-kiloton device with different permeabilities. These are shown, along with conventional production history. The calculations show that rates of production will be sufficient if costs can be controlled. Costs of nuclear stimulation must be drastically reduced for a commercial process. Project Rulison will cost approximately $3.7 million, excluding lease costs, preliminary tests, and well costs. At such prices, nothing can possibly be commercial; however, these costs can come down in a logical step-wise fashion. Radiation contamination of the gas remains a problem. Three possible solutions to this problem are included. (author)

  7. Economics of nuclear gas stimulation

    Frank, G.W.; Coffer, H.F.; Luetkehans, G.R.

    1970-01-01

    Nuclear stimulation of the Mesaverde Formation in the Piceance Basin appears to be the only available method that can release the contained gas economically. In the Rulison Field alone estimates show six to eight trillion cubic feet of gas may be made available by nuclear means, and possibly one hundred trillion cubic feet could be released in the Piceance Basin. Several problems remain to be solved before this tremendous gas reserve can be tapped. Among these are (1) rates of production following nuclear stimulation; (2) costs of nuclear stimulation; (3) radioactivity of the chimney gas; and (4) development of the ideal type of device to carry out the stimulations. Each of these problems is discussed in detail with possible solutions suggested. First and foremost is the rate at which gas can be delivered following nuclear stimulation. Calculations have been made for expected production behavior following a 5-kiloton device and a 40-kiloton device with different permeabilities. These are shown, along with conventional production history. The calculations show that rates of production will be sufficient if costs can be controlled. Costs of nuclear stimulation must be drastically reduced for a commercial process. Project Rulison will cost approximately $3.7 million, excluding lease costs, preliminary tests, and well costs. At such prices, nothing can possibly be commercial; however, these costs can come down in a logical step-wise fashion. Radiation contamination of the gas remains a problem. Three possible solutions to this problem are included. (author)

  8. Acute Idiopathic Scrotal Edema

    Micheál Breen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of acute idiopathic scrotal edema (AISE in a 4-year-old boy who presented with acute scrotal pain and erythema. The clinical features, ultrasound appearance, and natural history of this rare diagnosis are reviewed. In this report, we highlight the importance of good ultrasound technique in differentiating the etiology of the acute scrotum and demonstrate the color Doppler “Fountain Sign” that is highly suggestive of AISE.

  9. Biomarkers and Stimulation Algorithms for Adaptive Brain Stimulation

    Kimberly B. Hoang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this review is to describe in what ways feedback or adaptive stimulation may be delivered and adjusted based on relevant biomarkers. Specific treatment mechanisms underlying therapeutic brain stimulation remain unclear, in spite of the demonstrated efficacy in a number of nervous system diseases. Brain stimulation appears to exert widespread influence over specific neural networks that are relevant to specific disease entities. In awake patients, activation or suppression of these neural networks can be assessed by either symptom alleviation (i.e., tremor, rigidity, seizures or physiological criteria, which may be predictive of expected symptomatic treatment. Secondary verification of network activation through specific biomarkers that are linked to symptomatic disease improvement may be useful for several reasons. For example, these biomarkers could aid optimal intraoperative localization, possibly improve efficacy or efficiency (i.e., reduced power needs, and provide long-term adaptive automatic adjustment of stimulation parameters. Possible biomarkers for use in portable or implanted devices span from ongoing physiological brain activity, evoked local field potentials (LFPs, and intermittent pathological activity, to wearable devices, biochemical, blood flow, optical, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI changes, temperature changes, or optogenetic signals. First, however, potential biomarkers must be correlated directly with symptom or disease treatment and network activation. Although numerous biomarkers are under consideration for a variety of stimulation indications the feasibility of these approaches has yet to be fully determined. Particularly, there are critical questions whether the use of adaptive systems can improve efficacy over continuous stimulation, facilitate adjustment of stimulation interventions and improve our understanding of the role of abnormal network function in disease mechanisms.

  10. Non invasive brain stimulation to enhance post-stroke recovery

    Nathalie Kubis

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Brain plasticity after stroke remains poorly understood. Patients may improve spontaneously within the first 3 months and then more slowly in the coming year. The first days, decreased edema and reperfusion of the ischemic penumbra may possibly account for these phenomena, but the improvement during the next weeks suggests plasticity phenomena and cortical reorganization of the brain ischemic areas and of more remote areas. Indeed, the injured ischemic motor cortex has a reduced cortical excitability at the acute phase and a suspension of the topographic representation of affected muscles, whereas the contralateral motor cortex has an increased excitability and an enlarged somatomotor representation; furthermore, contralateral cortex exerts a transcallosal interhemispheric inhibition on the ischemic cortex. This results from the imbalance of the physiological reciprocal interhemispheric inhibition of each hemisphere on the other, contributing to worsening of neurological deficit. Cortical excitability is measurable through transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS and prognosis has been established according to the presence of motor evoked potentials (MEP at the acute phase of stroke, which is predictive of better recovery. Conversely, the lack of response to early stimulation is associated with a poor functional outcome. Non-invasive stimulation techniques such as repetitive TMS (rTMS or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS have the potential to modulate brain cortical excitability with long lasting effects. In the setting of cerebrovascular disease, around 1000 stroke subjects have been included in placebo-controlled trials so far, most often with an objective of promoting motor recovery of the upper limb. High frequency repetitive stimulation (> 3 Hz rTMS, aiming to increase excitability of the ischemic cortex, or low frequency repetitive stimulation (≤ 1 Hz, aiming to reduce excitability of the contralateral homonymous cortex, or

  11. 'Pseudofailure' of spinal cord stimulation for neuropathic pain following a new severe noxious stimulus: learning points from a case series of failed spinal cord stimulation for complex regional pain syndrome and failed back surgery syndrome.

    Muquit, Samiul; Moussa, Ahmad Abdelhai; Basu, Surajit

    2016-05-01

    Failure of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) may be due to hardware problems, migration of electrodes and, in the long-term, plasticity in the spinal cord with habituation to the stimulation current. We describe a series of seven patients who experienced acute therapeutic loss of SCS effects following an acute nociceptive event unrelated to primary pathology. There were no hardware problems. We called this 'Pseudofailure', as the effective stimulation returned in all patients following a period off stimulation or reprogramming. This phenomenon has not been reported previously in the literature. Over a 4-year period, we managed seven patients with this feature: four had received SCS for complex regional pain syndrome and three for failed back surgery syndrome. In all seven cases, there was cessation of the pain relief afforded by SCS following an acute painful event: four patients had trauma, two patients had domestic electric shock and one patient suffered shingles (varicella zoster infection). We excluded hardware-related problems in all cases. In two patients, SCS effects could be regained by an initial attempt at reprogramming. In the remaining five cases reprogramming was unsuccessful, and stimulation was switched off for several months before recommencing, when we discovered a return of good therapeutic effect. We conclude that SCS may seem to fail following a separate strong nociceptive stimulus. Stimulation may be regained with reprogramming or following a period with stimulation switched off. We would, therefore, advise against removal of SCS hardware in the first instance.

  12. High-Frequency Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Increases Anabolic Signaling.

    Mettler, Joni A; Magee, Dillon M; Doucet, Barbara M

    2018-03-16

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is commonly used in rehabilitation settings to increase muscle mass and strength. However, the effects of NMES on muscle growth are not clear and no human studies have compared anabolic signaling between low-frequency (LF-) and high-frequency (HF-) NMES. The purpose of this study was to determine the skeletal muscle anabolic signaling response to an acute bout of LF- and HF-NMES. Eleven young healthy volunteers (6 men; 5 women) received an acute bout of LF- (20 Hz) and HF- (60 Hz) NMES. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle prior to the first NMES treatment and 30-mins following each NMES treatment. Phosphorylation of the following key anabolic signaling proteins was measured by Western blot and proteins are expressed as a ratio of phosphorylated to total: mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), p70-S6 kinase 1 (S6K1), and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1). Compared to Pre-NMES, phosphorylation of mTOR was upregulated 40.2% for LF-NMES (P = 0.018) and 68.4% for HF-NMES (P 0.05). There were no differences between treatment conditions for 4E-BP1 phosphorylation (P > 0.05). An acute bout of LF- and HF-NMES upregulated anabolic signaling with HF-NMES producing a greater anabolic response compared to LF-NMES, suggesting that HF-stimulation may provide a stronger stimulus for processes that initiate muscle hypertrophy. Additionally, the stimulation frequency parameter should be considered by clinicians in the design of optimal NMES treatment protocols.

  13. Acute stress may induce ovulation in women

    Cano Antonio

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aims to gather information either supporting or rejecting the hypothesis that acute stress may induce ovulation in women. The formulation of this hypothesis is based on 2 facts: 1 estrogen-primed postmenopausal or ovariectomized women display an adrenal-progesterone-induced ovulatory-like luteinizing hormone (LH surge in response to exogenous adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH administration; and 2 women display multiple follicular waves during an interovulatory interval, and likely during pregnancy and lactation. Thus, acute stress may induce ovulation in women displaying appropriate serum levels of estradiol and one or more follicles large enough to respond to a non-midcycle LH surge. Methods A literature search using the PubMed database was performed to identify articles up to January 2010 focusing mainly on women as well as on rats and rhesus monkeys as animal models of interaction between the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axes. Results Whereas the HPA axis exhibits positive responses in practically all phases of the ovarian cycle, acute-stress-induced release of LH is found under relatively high plasma levels of estradiol. However, there are studies suggesting that several types of acute stress may exert different effects on pituitary LH release and the steroid environment may modulate in a different way (inhibiting or stimulating the pattern of response of the HPG axis elicited by acute stressors. Conclusion Women may be induced to ovulate at any point of the menstrual cycle or even during periods of amenorrhea associated with pregnancy and lactation if exposed to an appropriate acute stressor under a right estradiol environment.

  14. Diagnosis of moderate acute radiation sickness

    Yu Shoucheng; Chen Zhijian; Chen Youxin

    1989-01-01

    Forty patients with malignant lymphoma were given 60 Co TLI. 21 cases received 6 Gy and 19 received 8 Gy. It was estimated that a single TLI of 6 and 8 Gy would correspond to TBI of 3.55 Gy and 4.25 Gy (average values) by analysing peripheral blood cell chromosome aberrations and 1.85-2.37 Gy by measuring red bone marrow stem cells clinically. Moderate acute radiation sickness with digestive tract reaction and hemopoietic and immunologic depression was observed. WBC and platelets decreased rapidly. Lymphocytes showed quantitative and qualitative changes even at early stage. All these indexes are significant for diagnosis. Besides, the degree of labial stimulation response, levels of C-reactive protein, corticoid, and urinal nucleoside and alkaloid base presented great changes both pre-and post-irradiation. Early diagnosis of moderate acute radiation sickness could be made in cancer patients subjected to 6-8 Gy TLI

  15. Transcranial magnetic stimulation for the treatment of major depression

    Janicak, Philip G; Dokucu, Mehmet E

    2015-01-01

    Major depression is often difficult to diagnose accurately. Even when the diagnosis is properly made, standard treatment approaches (eg, psychotherapy, medications, or their combination) are often inadequate to control acute symptoms or maintain initial benefit. Additional obstacles involve safety and tolerability problems, which frequently preclude an adequate course of treatment. This leaves an important gap in our ability to properly manage major depression in a substantial proportion of patients, leaving them vulnerable to ensuing complications (eg, employment-related disability, increased risk of suicide, comorbid medical disorders, and substance abuse). Thus, there is a need for more effective and better tolerated approaches. Transcranial magnetic stimulation is a neuromodulation technique increasingly used to partly fill this therapeutic void. In the context of treating depression, we critically review the development of transcranial magnetic stimulation, focusing on the results of controlled and pragmatic trials for depression, which consider its efficacy, safety, and tolerability. PMID:26170668

  16. Transcranial magnetic stimulation: applications in basic neuroscience and neuropsychopharmacology.

    Lisanby, Sarah H.; Luber, Bruce; Perera, Tarique; Sackeim, Harold A.

    2000-09-01

    Introduced 15 years ago, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive means of stimulating the cortex that has proved to be a unique tool for probing brain-behaviour relationships. While a therapeutic role for TMS in neuropsychiatry is uncertain, the utility of TMS in studying brain function has been demonstrated in diverse neuroscience applications. We review studies in animals on the mechanisms of action of TMS, and present a summary of the applications of TMS in basic neuroscience. TMS is still a relatively young technique, and unanswered questions remain regarding its acute and chronic impact on neural excitability and various aspects of brain function. Nonetheless, recent work with TMS has demonstrated its unique role in complementing other tools for studying brain function. As a brain intervention tool, TMS holds the promise of moving beyond correlative studies to help define the functional role of cortical regions in selected cognitive and affective processes.

  17. Redox signaling in acute oxygen sensing

    Lin Gao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute oxygen (O2 sensing is essential for individuals to survive under hypoxic conditions. The carotid body (CB is the main peripheral chemoreceptor, which contains excitable and O2-sensitive glomus cells with O2-regulated ion channels. Upon exposure to acute hypoxia, inhibition of K+ channels is the signal that triggers cell depolarization, transmitter release and activation of sensory fibers that stimulate the brainstem respiratory center to produce hyperventilation. The molecular mechanisms underlying O2 sensing by glomus cells have, however, remained elusive. Here we discuss recent data demonstrating that ablation of mitochondrial Ndufs2 gene selectively abolishes sensitivity of glomus cells to hypoxia, maintaining responsiveness to hypercapnia or hypoglycemia. These data suggest that reactive oxygen species and NADH generated in mitochondrial complex I during hypoxia are signaling molecules that modulate membrane K+ channels. We propose that the structural substrates for acute O2 sensing in CB glomus cells are “O2-sensing microdomains” formed by mitochondria and neighboring K+ channels in the plasma membrane. Keywords: Hypoxia, Acute oxygen sensing, Peripheral chemoreceptors, Carotid body, Adrenal medulla, Mitochondrial complex I, Reactive oxygen species (ROS, Pyridine nucleotides

  18. Blood Pressure Responses to Endovascular Stimulation: A Potential Therapy for Autonomic Disorders With Vasodilatation.

    Naksuk, Niyada; Killu, Ammar M; Yogeswaran, Vidhushei; Desimone, Christopher V; Suddendorf, Scott H; Ladewig, Dorothy J; Powers, Joanne M; Weber, Sarah; Madhavan, Malini; Cha, Yong-Mei; Kapa, Suraj; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2016-09-01

    We have previously shown that sympathetic ganglia stimulation via the renal vein rapidly increases blood pressure. This study further investigated the optimal target sites and effective energy levels for stimulation of the renal vasculatures and nearby sympathetic ganglia for rapid increase in blood pressure. The pre-study protocol for endovascular stimulations included 2 minutes of stimulation (1-150 V and 10 pulses per second) and at least 2 minutes of rest during poststimulation. If blood pressure and/or heart rate were changed during the stimulation, time to return to baseline was allowed prior to the next stimulation. In 11 acute canine studies, we performed 85 renal artery, 30 renal vein, and 8 hepatic vasculature stimulations. The mean arterial pressure (MAP) rapidly increased during stimulation of renal artery (95 ± 18 mmHg vs. 103 ± 15 mmHg; P vein (90 ± 16 mmHg vs. 102 ± 20 mmHg; P = 0.001), and hepatic vasculatures (74 ± 8 mmHg vs. 82 ± 11 mmHg; P = 0.04). Predictors of a significant increase in MAP were energy >10 V focused on the left renal artery, bilateral renal arteries, and bilateral renal veins (especially the mid segment). Overall, heart rate was unchanged, but muscle fasciculation was observed in 22.0% with an output >10 V (range 15-150 V). Analysis after excluding the stimulations that resulted in fasciculation yielded similar results to the main findings. Stimulation of intra-abdominal vasculatures promptly increased the MAP and thus may be a potential treatment option for hypotension in autonomic disorders. Predictors of optimal stimulation include energy delivery and the site of stimulation (for the renal vasculatures), which informs the design of subsequent research. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Electrical stimulation and motor recovery.

    Young, Wise

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several investigators have successfully regenerated axons in animal spinal cords without locomotor recovery. One explanation is that the animals were not trained to use the regenerated connections. Intensive locomotor training improves walking recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) in people, and >90% of people with incomplete SCI recover walking with training. Although the optimal timing, duration, intensity, and type of locomotor training are still controversial, many investigators have reported beneficial effects of training on locomotor function. The mechanisms by which training improves recovery are not clear, but an attractive theory is available. In 1949, Donald Hebb proposed a famous rule that has been paraphrased as "neurons that fire together, wire together." This rule provided a theoretical basis for a widely accepted theory that homosynaptic and heterosynaptic activity facilitate synaptic formation and consolidation. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord has a locomotor center, called the central pattern generator (CPG), which can be activated nonspecifically with electrical stimulation or neurotransmitters to produce walking. The CPG is an obvious target to reconnect after SCI. Stimulating motor cortex, spinal cord, or peripheral nerves can modulate lumbar spinal cord excitability. Motor cortex stimulation causes long-term changes in spinal reflexes and synapses, increases sprouting of the corticospinal tract, and restores skilled forelimb function in rats. Long used to treat chronic pain, motor cortex stimuli modify lumbar spinal network excitability and improve lower extremity motor scores in humans. Similarly, epidural spinal cord stimulation has long been used to treat pain and spasticity. Subthreshold epidural stimulation reduces the threshold for locomotor activity. In 2011, Harkema et al. reported lumbosacral epidural stimulation restores motor control in chronic motor complete patients. Peripheral nerve or functional electrical

  20. Pediatric acute lung injury

    Dahlem, P.; van Aalderen, W. M. C.; Bos, A. P.

    2007-01-01

    Among ventilated children, the incidence of acute lung injury (ALI) was 9%; of that latter group 80% developed the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The population-based prevalence of pediatric ARDS was 5.5 cases/100.000 inhabitants. Underlying diseases in children were septic shock (34%),

  1. Acute hamstringblessures bij sporters

    Reurink, Gustaaf; Tol, Johannes L.; de Vos, Robert-Jan

    2014-01-01

    Acute hamstring injuries are the most common injuries in participants in popular sports such as football and track and field athletics. The diagnosis is made if there is a history of acute-onset pain in the posterior thigh, and presence of the triad of pain on contraction, stretching and palpation.

  2. ACUTE COMPARTMENT SYNDROME

    muscle destruction, muscle fibrosis, contractures and permanent disability and at worst case scenario of amputation (3,4). As reported by Frink et al (3) on their study on acute compartment syndrome it can occur even when there is no fracture. Also general surgeons have reported acute compartment syndrome.

  3. [Acute kidney injury

    Hageman, D.; Kooman, J.P.; Lance, M.D.; van Heurn, L.W.; Snoeijs, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    - 'Acute kidney injury' is modern terminology for a sudden decline in kidney function, and is defined by the RIFLE classification (RIFLE is an acronym for Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss and End-stage kidney disease).- Acute kidney injury occurs as a result of the combination of reduced perfusion in the

  4. Leukocytosis in acute stroke

    Kammersgaard, L P; Jørgensen, H S; Nakayama, H

    1999-01-01

    Leukocytosis is a common finding in the acute phase of stroke. A detrimental effect of leukocytosis on stroke outcome has been suggested, and trials aiming at reducing the leukocyte response in acute stroke are currently being conducted. However, the influence of leukocytosis on stroke outcome has...

  5. Evoked Electromyographically Controlled Electrical Stimulation

    Mitsuhiro Hayashibe

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Time-variant muscle responses under electrical stimulation (ES are often problematic for all the applications of neuroprosthetic muscle control. This situation limits the range of ES usage in relevant areas, mainly due to muscle fatigue and also to changes in stimulation electrode contact conditions, especially in transcutaneous ES. Surface electrodes are still the most widely used in noninvasive applications.Electrical field variations caused by changes in the stimulation contact condition markedly affect the resulting total muscle activation levels. Fatigue phenomena under functional electrical stimulation (FES are also well known source of time-varying characteristics coming from muscle response under ES. Therefore it is essential to monitor the actual muscle state and assess the expected muscle response by ES so as to improve the current ES system in favour of adaptive muscle-response-aware FES control. To deal with this issue, we have been studying a novel control technique using evoked electromyography (eEMG signals to compensate for these muscle time-variances under ES for stable neuroprosthetic muscle control. In this perspective article, I overview the background of this topic and highlight important points to be aware of when using ES to induce the desired muscle activation regardless of the time-variance. I also demonstrate how to deal with the common critical problem of ES to move toward robust neuroprosthetic muscle control with the Evoked Electromyographically Controlled Electrical Stimulation paradigm.

  6. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Neuroleptic malignant syndrome in adolescents

    autonomic instability, fever, and cognitive disturbance.1 It is a rare but potentially ... (antipsychotic) drug therapy, with a mortality rate of 5 - 25%2 and an incidence ... managed at, a rehabilitation unit for adolescents with psychosis at. Lentegeur ...

  7. Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) on Pain Distress Tolerance: A Preliminary Study.

    Mariano, Timothy Y; van't Wout, Mascha; Jacobson, Benjamin L; Garnaat, Sarah L; Kirschner, Jason L; Rasmussen, Steven A; Greenberg, Benjamin D

    2015-08-01

    Pain remains a critical medical challenge. Current treatments target nociception without addressing affective symptoms. Medically intractable pain is sometimes treated with cingulotomy or deep brain stimulation to increase tolerance of pain-related distress. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) may noninvasively modulate cortical areas related to sensation and pain representations. The present study aimed to test the hypothesis that cathodal ("inhibitory") stimulation targeting left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) would increase tolerance to distress from acute painful stimuli vs anodal stimulation. Forty healthy volunteers received both anodal and cathodal stimulation. During stimulation, we measured pain distress tolerance with three tasks: pressure algometer, cold pressor, and breath holding. We measured pain intensity with a visual-analog scale before and after each task. Mixed ANOVA revealed that mean cold pressor tolerance tended to be higher with cathodal vs anodal stimulation (P = 0.055) for participants self-completing the task. Pressure algometer (P = 0.81) and breath holding tolerance (P = 0.19) did not significantly differ. The pressure algometer exhibited a statistically significant order effect irrespective of stimulation polarity (all P tDCS (P = 0.072). Although our primary results were nonsignificant, there is a preliminary suggestion that cathodal tDCS targeting left dACC may increase pain distress tolerance to cold pressor. Pressure algometer results are consistent with task-related sensitization. Future studies are needed to refine this novel approach for pain neuromodulation. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Intracochlear electrical stimulation suppresses apoptotic signaling in rat spiral ganglion neurons after deafening in vivo.

    Kopelovich, Jonathan C; Cagaanan, Alain P; Miller, Charles A; Abbas, Paul J; Green, Steven H

    2013-11-01

    To establish the intracellular consequences of electrical stimulation to spiral ganglion neurons after deafferentation. Here we use a rat model to determine the effect of both low and high pulse rate acute electrical stimulation on activation of the proapoptotic transcription factor Jun in deafferented spiral ganglion neurons in vivo. Experimental animal study. Hearing research laboratories of the University of Iowa Departments of Biology and Otolaryngology. A single electrode was implanted through the round window of kanamycin-deafened rats at either postnatal day 32 (P32, n = 24) or P60 (n = 22) for 4 hours of stimulation (monopolar, biphasic pulses, amplitude twice electrically evoked auditory brainstem response [eABR] threshold) at either 100 or 5000 Hz. Jun phosphorylation was assayed by immunofluorescence to quantitatively assess the effect of electrical stimulation on proapoptotic signaling. Jun phosphorylation was reliably suppressed by 100 Hz stimuli in deafened cochleae of P32 but not P60 rats. This effect was not significant in the basal cochlear turns. Stimulation frequency may be consequential: 100 Hz was significantly more effective than was 5 kHz stimulation in suppressing phospho-Jun. Suppression of Jun phosphorylation occurs in deafferented spiral ganglion neurons after only 4 hours of electrical stimulation. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that electrical stimulation can decrease spiral ganglion neuron death after deafferentation.

  9. Stimulation of the peripheral nervous system for pain control.

    Long, D M

    1983-01-01

    Transcutaneous stimulation is a proven effective way to relieve pain. Its optimal use requires an accurate patient diagnosis. Treatment of pain as a symptom only is likely to fail. There must be a careful psychosocial evaluation, for the majority of patients who come to the doctor complaining of pain have major psychological, social, or behavioral factors that are most important in the genesis of the complaint. Drug abuse must be corrected. Related symptoms, such as anxiety and depression, must be treated. Then, a thorough trail of transcutaneous stimulation is mandatory. A desultory use will undoubtedly lead to failure. This trial must begin with patient education by experienced personnel. Then the electrodes must be properly applied, and there must be a regular follow-up of stimulation to be certain the patient is utilizing it correctly. The patient must be supported through an adequate trial which should extend over 2-4 weeks before purchase of the device is contemplated. Furthermore, all related nursing and physician personnel must be educated in the proper use of the technique. The uninformed professional who denigrates the therapy is a very effective deterrent to appropriate use. In this situation, transcutaneous electrical stimulation will be of great value in the treatment of acute musculoskeletal injury and acute postoperative pain. It will be effective in the treatment of peripheral nerve injury pain, chronic musculoskeletal abnormalities, chronic pain in the patient who has undergone multiple operations upon the low back and neck, visceral pain, some of the reflex sympathetic dystrophies, and postherpetic neuralgia. Stimulation will not help a complaint which is psychosomatic in origin. It will not influence drug addiction. It is not likely to be useful in any situation where secondary gain is important. The metabolic neuropathies, pain of spinal cord injury, and pain from cerebrovascular accident will not respond frequently enough to warrant more than

  10. Noninvasive Transcranial Brain Stimulation and Pain

    Rosen, Allyson C.; Ramkumar, Mukund; Nguyen, Tam; Hoeft, Fumiko

    2009-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are two noninvasive brain stimulation techniques that can modulate activity in specific regions of the cortex. At this point, their use in brain stimulation is primarily investigational; however, there is clear evidence that these tools can reduce pain and modify neurophysiologic correlates of the pain experience. TMS has also been used to predict response to surgically implanted stimulation for the tre...

  11. Postfatigue potentiation of the paralyzed soleus muscle: evidence for adaptation with long-term electrical stimulation training

    Shields, Richard K.; Dudley-Javoroski, Shauna; Littmann, Andrew E.

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the torque output behavior of paralyzed muscle has important implications for the use of functional neuromuscular electrical stimulation systems. Postfatigue potentiation is an augmentation of peak muscle torque during repetitive activation after a fatigue protocol. The purposes of this study were 1) to quantify postfatigue potentiation in the acutely and chronically paralyzed soleus and 2) to determine the effect of long-term soleus electrical stimulation training on the potent...

  12. Chronic electrical stimulation with a suprachoroidal retinal prosthesis: a preclinical safety and efficacy study.

    David A X Nayagam

    Full Text Available To assess the safety and efficacy of chronic electrical stimulation of the retina with a suprachoroidal visual prosthesis.Seven normally-sighted feline subjects were implanted for 96-143 days with a suprachoroidal electrode array and six were chronically stimulated for 70-105 days at levels that activated the visual cortex. Charge balanced, biphasic, current pulses were delivered to platinum electrodes in a monopolar stimulation mode. Retinal integrity/function and the mechanical stability of the implant were assessed monthly using electroretinography (ERG, optical coherence tomography (OCT and fundus photography. Electrode impedances were measured weekly and electrically-evoked visual cortex potentials (eEVCPs were measured monthly to verify that chronic stimuli were suprathreshold. At the end of the chronic stimulation period, thresholds were confirmed with multi-unit recordings from the visual cortex. Randomized, blinded histological assessments were performed by two pathologists to compare the stimulated and non-stimulated retina and adjacent tissue.All subjects tolerated the surgical and stimulation procedure with no evidence of discomfort or unexpected adverse outcomes. After an initial post-operative settling period, electrode arrays were mechanically stable. Mean electrode impedances were stable between 11-15 kΩ during the implantation period. Visually-evoked ERGs & OCT were normal, and mean eEVCP thresholds did not substantially differ over time. In 81 of 84 electrode-adjacent tissue samples examined, there were no discernible histopathological differences between stimulated and unstimulated tissue. In the remaining three tissue samples there were minor focal fibroblastic and acute inflammatory responses.Chronic suprathreshold electrical stimulation of the retina using a suprachoroidal electrode array evoked a minimal tissue response and no adverse clinical or histological findings. Moreover, thresholds and electrode impedance remained

  13. Nonpainful remote electrical stimulation alleviates episodic migraine pain.

    Yarnitsky, David; Volokh, Lana; Ironi, Alon; Weller, Boaz; Shor, Merav; Shifrin, Alla; Granovsky, Yelena

    2017-03-28

    To evaluate the efficacy of remote nonpainful electrical upper arm skin stimulation in reducing migraine attack pain. This is a prospective, double-blinded, randomized, crossover, sham-controlled trial. Migraineurs applied skin electrodes to the upper arm soon after attack onset for 20 minutes, at various pulse widths, and refrained from medications for 2 hours. Patients were asked to use the device for up to 20 attacks. In 71 patients (299 treatments) with evaluable data, 50% pain reduction was obtained for 64% of participants based on best of 200-μs, 150-μs, and 100-μs pulse width stimuli per individual vs 26% for sham stimuli. Greater pain reduction was found for active stimulation vs placebo; for those starting at severe or moderate pain, reduction (1) to mild or no pain occurred in 58% (25/43) of participants (66/134 treatments) for the 200-μs stimulation protocol and 24% (4/17; 8/29 treatments) for placebo ( p = 0.02), and (2) to no pain occurred in 30% (13/43) of participants (37/134 treatments) and 6% (1/17; 5/29 treatments), respectively ( p = 0.004). Earlier application of the treatment, within 20 minutes of attack onset, yielded better results: 46.7% pain reduction as opposed to 24.9% reduction when started later ( p = 0.02). Nonpainful remote skin stimulation can significantly reduce migraine pain, especially when applied early in an attack. This is presumably by activating descending inhibition pathways via the conditioned pain modulation effect. This treatment may be proposed as an attractive nonpharmacologic, easy to use, adverse event free, and inexpensive tool to reduce migraine pain. NCT02453399. This study provides Class III evidence that for patients with an acute migraine headache, remote nonpainful electrical stimulation on the upper arm skin reduces migraine pain. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  14. [Acute anal pain].

    Pittet, Olivier; Demartines, Nicolas; Hahnloser, Dieter

    2013-07-01

    Acute anal pain is a common proctological problem. A detailed history together with the clinical examination are crucial for the diagnosis. An acute perianal vein thrombosis can be successfully excised within the first 72 hours. Acute anal fissures are best treated conservatively using stool regulation and topical medications reducing the sphincter spasm. A chronic anal fissure needs surgery. Perianal abscesses can very often be incised and drained in local anesthesia. Proctalgia fugax and the levator ani syndrome are exclusion diagnoses and are treated symptomatically.

  15. Acute oncological emergencies.

    Gabriel, J

    2012-01-01

    The number of people receiving systemic anti-cancer treatment and presenting at emergency departments with treatment-related problems is rising. Nurses will be the first point of contact for most patients and need to be able to recognise oncological emergencies to initiate urgent assessment of patients and referral to the acute oncology team so that the most appropriate care can be delivered promptly. This article discusses the role of acute oncology services, and provides an overview of the most common acute oncological emergencies.

  16. Stimulating effects of ionizing radiation

    Jaworowski, Z.

    1995-01-01

    The influence of low doses on human organism is not definite known up to now. The worldwide discussion on this topic has been presented. A lot of analysed statistical data proved that the stimulating effect of low doses of ionizing radiation really exists and can have a beneficial influence on human health. 43 refs, 4 figs, 6 tabs

  17. Ovarian stimulation and embryo quality

    Baart, Esther; Macklon, Nick S.; Fauser, Bart J. C. M.

    To Study the effects of different ovarian stimulation approaches on oocyte and embryo quality, it is imperative to assess embryo quality with a reliable and objective method. Embryos rated as high quality by standardized morphological assessment are associated with higher implantation and pregnancy

  18. Enteral feeding without pancreatic stimulation

    Kaushik, Neeraj; Pietraszewski, Marie; Holst, Jens Juul

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: All forms of commonly practiced enteral feeding techniques stimulate pancreatic secretion, and only intravenous feeding avoids it. In this study, we explored the possibility of more distal enteral infusions of tube feeds to see whether activation of the ileal brake mechanism can result...

  19. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in schizophrenia.

    Zaman, Rashid; Thind, Dilraj; Kocmur, Marga

    2008-11-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive and painless way of stimulating the neural tissue (cerebral cortex, spinal roots, and cranial and peripheral nerves). The first attempts at stimulating the neural tissue date back to 1896 by d'Arsonval; however, it was successfully carried out by Barker and colleagues in Sheffield, UK, in 1985. It soon became a useful tool in neuroscience for neurophysiologists and neurologists and psychiatrists. The original single-pulse TMS, largely used as an investigative tool, was further refined and developed in the early 1990s into what is known as repetitive TMS (rTMS), having a frequency range of 1-60 Hz. The stimulation by both TMS and rTMS of various cortical regions displayed alteration of movement, mood, and behavior, leading researchers to investigate a number of psychiatric and neuropsychiatric disorders, as well as to explore its therapeutic potential. There is now a large amount of literature on the use of TMS/rTMS in depression; however, its use in schizophrenia, both as an investigative and certainly as a therapeutic tool is relatively recent with a limited but increasing number of publications. In this article, we will outline the principles of TMS/rTMS and critically review their use in schizophrenia both as investigative and potential therapeutic tools.

  20. Aversive Stimulation -- Criteria for Application.

    O'Donnell, Patrick A.; Ohlson, Glenn A.

    Criteria for applying aversive stimulation with severely handicapped children are examined, and practical and ethical issues are considered. Factors seen to influence punishment outcomes include timing, intensity, and schedule of reinforcement. Suggested is the need for further research on the comparative effectiveness of positive and negative…

  1. Thalamic stimulation in absence epilepsy

    Luttjohann, A.K.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The site specific effects of two different types of electrical stimulation of the thalamus on electroencephalic epileptic activity as generated in the cortico-thalamo-cortical system were investigated in genetic epileptic WAG/Rij rats, a well characterized and validated absence

  2. Acute acalculous cholecystitis complicating chemotherapy for acute myeloblastic leukemia

    Olfa Kassar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a rare complication in the treatment of acute myeloblastic leukemia. Diagnosis of acute acalculous cholecystitis remains difficult during neutropenic period. We present two acute myeloblastic leukemia patients that developed acute acalculous cholecystitis during chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. They suffered from fever, vomiting and acute pain in the epigastrium. Ultrasound demonstrated an acalculous gallbladder. Surgical management was required in one patient and conservative treatment was attempted in the other patient. None treatment measures were effective and two patients died. Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a serious complication in neutropenic patients. Earlier diagnosis could have expedited the management of these patients.

  3. Stimulation of phagocytosis by sulforaphane

    Suganuma, Hiroyuki; Fahey, Jed W.; Bryan, Kelley E.; Healy, Zachary R.; Talalay, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Sulforaphane stimulates the phagocytosis of RAW 264.7 macrophages under conditions of serum deprivation. → This effect does not require Nrf2-dependent induction of phase 2 genes. → Inactivation of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) by sulforaphane may be involved in stimulation of phagocytosis by sulforaphane. -- Abstract: Sulforaphane, a major isothiocyanate derived from cruciferous vegetables, protects living systems against electrophile toxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, and radiation. A major protective mechanism is the induction of a network of endogenous cytoprotective (phase 2) genes that are regulated by transcription factor Nrf2. To obtain a more detailed understanding of the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of sulforaphane, we evaluated its effect on the phagocytosis activity of RAW 264.7 murine macrophage-like cells by measuring the uptake of 2-μm diameter polystyrene beads. Sulforaphane raised the phagocytosis activity of RAW 264.7 cells but only in the absence or presence of low concentrations (1%) of fetal bovine serum. Higher serum concentrations depressed phagocytosis and abolished its stimulation by sulforaphane. This stimulation did not depend on the induction of Nrf2-regulated genes since it occurred in peritoneal macrophages of nrf2 -/- mice. Moreover, a potent triterpenoid inducer of Nrf2-dependent genes did not stimulate phagocytosis, whereas sulforaphane and another isothiocyanate (benzyl isothiocyanate) had comparable inducer potencies. It has been shown recently that sulforaphane is a potent and direct inactivator of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), an inflammatory cytokine. Moreover, the addition of recombinant MIF to RAW 264.7 cells attenuated phagocytosis, but sulforaphane-inactivated MIF did not affect phagocytosis. The inactivation of MIF may therefore be involved in the phagocytosis-enhancing activity of sulforaphane.

  4. Stimulation of phagocytosis by sulforaphane

    Suganuma, Hiroyuki, E-mail: hsuganu1@jhmi.edu [Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman Cancer Chemoprotection Center, Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 725 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Fahey, Jed W., E-mail: jfahey@jhmi.edu [Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman Cancer Chemoprotection Center, Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 725 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Bryan, Kelley E., E-mail: kbryanm1@jhmi.edu [Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman Cancer Chemoprotection Center, Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 725 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Healy, Zachary R., E-mail: zhealy1@jhmi.edu [Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman Cancer Chemoprotection Center, Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 725 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Talalay, Paul, E-mail: ptalalay@jhmi.edu [Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman Cancer Chemoprotection Center, Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 725 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)

    2011-02-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Sulforaphane stimulates the phagocytosis of RAW 264.7 macrophages under conditions of serum deprivation. {yields} This effect does not require Nrf2-dependent induction of phase 2 genes. {yields} Inactivation of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) by sulforaphane may be involved in stimulation of phagocytosis by sulforaphane. -- Abstract: Sulforaphane, a major isothiocyanate derived from cruciferous vegetables, protects living systems against electrophile toxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, and radiation. A major protective mechanism is the induction of a network of endogenous cytoprotective (phase 2) genes that are regulated by transcription factor Nrf2. To obtain a more detailed understanding of the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of sulforaphane, we evaluated its effect on the phagocytosis activity of RAW 264.7 murine macrophage-like cells by measuring the uptake of 2-{mu}m diameter polystyrene beads. Sulforaphane raised the phagocytosis activity of RAW 264.7 cells but only in the absence or presence of low concentrations (1%) of fetal bovine serum. Higher serum concentrations depressed phagocytosis and abolished its stimulation by sulforaphane. This stimulation did not depend on the induction of Nrf2-regulated genes since it occurred in peritoneal macrophages of nrf2{sup -/-} mice. Moreover, a potent triterpenoid inducer of Nrf2-dependent genes did not stimulate phagocytosis, whereas sulforaphane and another isothiocyanate (benzyl isothiocyanate) had comparable inducer potencies. It has been shown recently that sulforaphane is a potent and direct inactivator of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), an inflammatory cytokine. Moreover, the addition of recombinant MIF to RAW 264.7 cells attenuated phagocytosis, but sulforaphane-inactivated MIF did not affect phagocytosis. The inactivation of MIF may therefore be involved in the phagocytosis-enhancing activity of sulforaphane.

  5. Effects of cocaine on norepinephrine stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis and locomotor activity in rat

    Mosaddeghi, M.

    1989-01-01

    The function of α 1 -adrenoceptors was determined by stimulating cortical tissue slices, which were pre-labeled with [ 3 H]inositol, with norepinephrine (NE) in the presence of 8 mM LiCl. Results of in vitro studies showed that cocaine 10 μM potentiated maximal NE-stimulated PI hydrolysis by 30%. In addition, the EC 50 was decreased from 3.93 ± 0.42 to 1.91 ± 0.31 μM NE. Concentrations of 0.1-100 μM and 0.1-10 μM cocaine enhanced PI hydrolysis stimulated by 0.3 and 3 μM NE, respectively. The concentration-effect curves for NE-stimulated PI hydrolysis were shifted to the right 100-fold in the presence of 0.1 μM prazosin. Cocaine (10 μM) did not potentiate NE-stimulated PI hydrolysis in the presence of 0.1 μM prazosin. [ 3 H]Prazosin saturation and NE [ 3 H]prazosin competition binding studies using crude membrane preparations showed that 10 μM cocaine did not alter binding parameters B max , K d , Hill slope, and IC 50 . Together, these results implied that cocaine in vitro potentiated NE-stimulated PI hydrolysis by blocking NE reuptake. For in vivo studies, the locomotor activity was determined after an acute or chronic injections of either cocaine or saline. Cocaine or saline-treated rats were killed after measurement of the locomotor activity, and NE-stimulated PI hydrolysis was measured. Acute administration of cocaine 3.2-42 mg/kg (i.p.) produced an inverted U shaped dose-response curve on locomotor activity. The peak increase in locomotor activity was at 32 mg/kg cocaine. A dose of 42 mg/kg cocaine produced a significant depression of maximal NE-stimulated PI hydrolysis

  6. Effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on pain distress tolerance: a preliminary study

    Mariano, Timothy Y.; Wout, Mascha van’t; Jacobson, Benjamin L.; Garnaat, Sarah L.; Kirschner, Jason L.; Rasmussen, Steven A.; Greenberg, Benjamin D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pain remains a critical medical challenge. Current treatments target nociception without addressing affective symptoms. Medically intractable pain is sometimes treated with cingulotomy or deep brain stimulation to increase tolerance of pain-related distress. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) may noninvasively modulate cortical areas related to sensation and pain representations. The present study aimed to test the hypothesis that cathodal (“inhibitory”) stimulation targeting left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) would increase tolerance to distress from acute painful stimuli versus anodal stimulation. Methods Forty healthy volunteers received both anodal and cathodal stimulation. During stimulation, we measured pain distress tolerance with three tasks: pressure algometer, cold pressor, and breath holding. We measured pain intensity with a visual-analog scale before and after each task. Results Mixed ANOVA revealed that mean cold pressor tolerance tended to be higher with cathodal versus anodal stimulation (p = 0.055) for participants self-completing the task. Pressure algometer (p = 0.81) and breath holding tolerance (p = 0.19) did not significantly differ. The pressure algometer exhibited a statistically significant order effect irrespective of stimulation polarity (all p Pain intensity ratings increased acutely after cold pressor and pressure algometer tasks (both p pain ratings tended to rise less after cathodal versus anodal tDCS (p = 0.072). Conclusions Although our primary results were nonsignificant, there is a preliminary suggestion that cathodal tDCS targeting left dACC may increase pain distress tolerance to cold pressor. Pressure algometer results are consistent with task-related sensitization. Future studies are needed to refine this novel approach for pain neuromodulation. PMID:26115372

  7. The Impact of Stimulation Induced Short Term Synaptic Plasticity on Firing Patterns in the Globus Pallidus of the Rat

    Jenia eBugaysen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Electrical stimulation in the globus pallidus (GP leads to complex modulations of neuronal activity in the stimulated nucleus. Multiple in-vivo studies have demonstrated the modulation of both firing rates and patterns during and immediately following the GP stimulation. Previous in-vitro studies, together with computational studies, have suggested the involvement of short-term synaptic plasticity (STP during the stimulation. The aim of the current study was to explore in-vitro the effects of STP on neuronal activity of GP neurons during local repetitive stimulation. We recorded synaptic potentials and assessed the modulations of spontaneous firing in a postsynaptic neuron in acute brain slices via a whole-cell pipette. Low-frequency repetitive stimulation locked the firing of the neuron to the stimulus. However, high-frequency repetitive stimulation in the GP generated a biphasic modulation of the firing frequency consisting of inhibitory and excitatory phases. Using blockers of synaptic transmission, we show that GABAergic synapses mediated the inhibitory and glutamatergic synapses the excitatory part of the response. Furthermore, we report that at high stimulation frequencies both types of synapses undergo short-term depression leading to a time dependent modulation of the neuronal firing. These findings indicate that STP modulates the dynamic responses of pallidal activity during electrical stimulation, and may contribute to a better understanding of the mechanism underlying deep brain stimulation (DBS like protocols.

  8. Acute Liver Failure

    ... can cause acute liver failure. It is an industrial chemical found in refrigerants and solvents for waxes, varnishes ... measures when spraying insecticides, fungicides, paint and other toxic chemicals. Follow product instructions carefully. Watch what gets on ...

  9. Acute Coronary Syndrome

    ... heart cells are dying. An electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) can diagnose an acute coronary syndrome by measuring ... Privacy Policy Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Heart Attack Symptoms ...

  10. Acute postirradiation nephropathy

    Trojanowski, Z.

    1982-01-01

    The pathogenesis, morphological and clinical signs of acute postirradiation nephropathy are described with particular attention paid to the relationship between the clinical signs of renal involvement and the dose of radiation. (author)

  11. Acute Intermittent Porphyria (AIP)

    ... the Healthcare Professionals area of our site. PBS Documentary AIP Diagnosis Stories **Diagnostic Testing for the Acute ... be administered only by physicians experienced in the management of porphyrias in a hospital setting. Panhematin is ...

  12. Acute nutritional axonal neuropathy.

    Hamel, Johanna; Logigian, Eric L

    2018-01-01

    This study describes clinical, laboratory, and electrodiagnostic features of a severe acute axonal polyneuropathy common to patients with acute nutritional deficiency in the setting of alcoholism, bariatric surgery (BS), or anorexia. Retrospective analysis of clinical, electrodiagnostic, and laboratory data of patients with acute axonal neuropathy. Thirteen patients were identified with a severe, painful, sensory or sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy that developed over 2-12 weeks with sensory ataxia, areflexia, variable muscle weakness, poor nutritional status, and weight loss, often with prolonged vomiting and normal cerebrospinal fluid protein. Vitamin B6 was low in half and thiamine was low in all patients when obtained before supplementation. Patients improved with weight gain and vitamin supplementation, with motor greater than sensory recovery. We suggest that acute or subacute axonal neuropathy in patients with weight loss or vomiting associated with alcohol abuse, BS, or dietary deficiency is one syndrome, caused by micronutrient deficiencies. Muscle Nerve 57: 33-39, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Acute Pancreatitis in Children

    ... a feeding tube or an IV to prevent malnutrition and improve healing. Does my child have to ... Acute Pancreatitis in Children Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Childhood Inherited Disorders Pancreatic Cancer Pancreatic Cancer Risks and ...

  14. Acute incidents during anaesthesia

    management of acute incidents and the prevention of ... High or total (complete) spinal blocks in obstetric .... Pain and opioid analgesics lead to delayed ... Step up postoperative care and use ... recognise suprasternal and supraclavicular.

  15. Acute interstitial pneumonia

    Cuervo M, Francisco; Carrillo Bayona, Jorge; Ojeda, Paulina

    2004-01-01

    The paper refers to a 71 year-old patient, to who is diagnosed acute interstitial pneumonia; with square of 20 days of evolution of cough dry emetizant, fever, general uneasiness, migraine, progressive dyspnoea and lost of weight

  16. Acute generalised exanthematous pustulosis

    Criton S

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute generalised exanthernatous pustulosis (AGEP is a condition characterised by sudden onset of non-follicular aseptic pustules all over the body. It is distinct from pustular psoriasis with characteristic morphology, histopathology and evolution.

  17. Acute generalised exanthematous pustulosis.

    Criton, S; Sofia, B

    2001-01-01

    Acute generalised exanthernatous pustulosis (AGEP) is a condition characterised by sudden onset of non-follicular aseptic pustules all over the body. It is distinct from pustular psoriasis with characteristic morphology, histopathology and evolution.

  18. Acute coronary syndrome

    ... Have plenty of fruits, veggies, whole grains, and lean meats. Try to limit foods high in cholesterol ... et al. 2014 AHA/ACC guideline for the management of patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary ...

  19. Acute mountain sickness

    ... GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Acute mountain sickness URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/ ...

  20. Raclopride or high-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus stops cocaine-induced motor stereotypy and restores related alterations in prefrontal basal ganglia circuits.

    Aliane, Verena; Pérez, Sylvie; Deniau, Jean-Michel; Kemel, Marie-Louise

    2012-11-01

    Motor stereotypy is a key symptom of various neurological or neuropsychiatric disorders. Neuroleptics or the promising treatment using deep brain stimulation stops stereotypies but the mechanisms underlying their actions are unclear. In rat, motor stereotypies are linked to an imbalance between prefrontal and sensorimotor cortico-basal ganglia circuits. Indeed, cortico-nigral transmission was reduced in the prefrontal but not sensorimotor basal ganglia circuits and dopamine and acetylcholine release was altered in the prefrontal but not sensorimotor territory of the dorsal striatum. Furthermore, cholinergic transmission in the prefrontal territory of the dorsal striatum plays a crucial role in the arrest of motor stereotypy. Here we found that, as previously observed for raclopride, high-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (HFS STN) rapidly stopped cocaine-induced motor stereotypies in rat. Importantly, raclopride and HFS STN exerted a strong effect on cocaine-induced alterations in prefrontal basal ganglia circuits. Raclopride restored the cholinergic transmission in the prefrontal territory of the dorsal striatum and the cortico-nigral information transmissions in the prefrontal basal ganglia circuits. HFS STN also restored the N-methyl-d-aspartic-acid-evoked release of acetylcholine and dopamine in the prefrontal territory of the dorsal striatum. However, in contrast to raclopride, HFS STN did not restore the cortico-substantia nigra pars reticulata transmissions but exerted strong inhibitory and excitatory effects on neuronal activity in the prefrontal subdivision of the substantia nigra pars reticulata. Thus, both raclopride and HFS STN stop cocaine-induced motor stereotypy, but exert different effects on the related alterations in the prefrontal basal ganglia circuits. © 2012 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2012 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Acute liver failure

    Larsen, Fin Stolze; Bjerring, Peter Nissen

    2011-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) results in a multitude of serious complications that often lead to multi-organ failure. This brief review focuses on the pathophysiological processes in ALF and how to manage these.......Acute liver failure (ALF) results in a multitude of serious complications that often lead to multi-organ failure. This brief review focuses on the pathophysiological processes in ALF and how to manage these....

  2. Acute poisoning with emamectin benzoate.

    Yen, Tzung-Hai; Lin, Ja-Liang

    2004-01-01

    Emamectin benzoate is the 4'-deoxy-4'-epi-methyl-amino benzoate salt of avermectin B1 (abamectin), which is similar structurally to natural fermentation products of Streptomyces avermitilis. Emamectin benzoate is being developed as a newer broad-spectrum insecticide for vegetables and has a very low application rate. The mechanism of action involves stimulation of high-affinity GABA receptors and a consequent increase in membrane chloride ion permeability. Animal studies indicate a wide margin of safety because mammalian species are much less sensitive due to lower GABA receptor affinities and relative impermeability of the blood-brain barrier. Notably, the literature has not reported human exposure resulting in toxicity. This paper describes a case of acute poisoning with Proclaim insecticide (Syngenta, Taiwan), consisting of 2.15% w/w emamectin benzoate in 2, 6-bis (1, 1-dimethylethyl)-4-methyl-phenol and 1-hexanol. The clinical manifestation was transient gastrointestinal upset with endoscopy-proven gastric erosion and superficial gastritis, mild central nervous system depression, and aspiration pneumonia. No specific antidote exists for emamectin benzoate intoxication; this patient was treated successfully with gastric lavage, administration of activated charcoal, and empiric antibiotics. Drugs that enhance GABA activity such as barbiturates and benzodiazepines were avoided.

  3. A trial of scheduled deep brain stimulation for Tourette syndrome: moving away from continuous deep brain stimulation paradigms.

    Okun, Michael S; Foote, Kelly D; Wu, Samuel S; Ward, Herbert E; Bowers, Dawn; Rodriguez, Ramon L; Malaty, Irene A; Goodman, Wayne K; Gilbert, Donald M; Walker, Harrison C; Mink, Jonathan W; Merritt, Stacy; Morishita, Takashi; Sanchez, Justin C

    2013-01-01

    To collect the information necessary to design the methods and outcome variables for a larger trial of scheduled deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Tourette syndrome. We performed a small National Institutes of Health-sponsored clinical trials planning study of the safety and preliminary efficacy of implanted DBS in the bilateral centromedian thalamic region. The study used a cranially contained constant-current device and a scheduled, rather than the classic continuous, DBS paradigm. Baseline vs 6-month outcomes were collected and analyzed. In addition, we compared acute scheduled vs acute continuous vs off DBS. A university movement disorders center. Five patients with implanted DBS. A 50% improvement in the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS) total score. RESULTS Participating subjects had a mean age of 34.4 (range, 28-39) years and a mean disease duration of 28.8 years. No significant adverse events or hardware-related issues occurred. Baseline vs 6-month data revealed that reductions in the YGTSS total score did not achieve the prestudy criterion of a 50% improvement in the YGTSS total score on scheduled stimulation settings. However, statistically significant improvements were observed in the YGTSS total score (mean [SD] change, -17.8 [9.4]; P=.01), impairment score (-11.3 [5.0]; P=.007), and motor score (-2.8 [2.2]; P=.045); the Modified Rush Tic Rating Scale Score total score (-5.8 [2.9]; P=.01); and the phonic tic severity score (-2.2 [2.6]; P=.04). Continuous, off, and scheduled stimulation conditions were assessed blindly in an acute experiment at 6 months after implantation. The scores in all 3 conditions showed a trend for improvement. Trends for improvement also occurred with continuous and scheduled conditions performing better than the off condition. Tic suppression was commonly seen at ventral (deep) contacts, and programming settings resulting in tic suppression were commonly associated with a subjective feeling of calmness. This study provides

  4. [Acute agitation conditions].

    Mavrogiorgou, P; Juckel, G

    2015-09-01

    Acute agitation psychiatric emergencies as frequently occur in psychiatric as well as in non-psychiatric settings, such as general hospitals, specialized clinics, emergency services and private practices. Psychiatric emergencies can be life-threatening and necessitate immediate treatment. This article presents the core symptomatology, differential diagnoses and treatment options of acute agitation emergencies. Case control studies and reliable data regarding prevalence and treatment of acute agitation in psychiatric and general hospitals or private practices are sparse. Existing evidence suggests that optimization of diagnosis and therapy of psychiatric emergencies, such as acute agitation is warranted. Treatment of acute agitation, psychological distress and other psychiatric emergencies are highly demanding regarding psychiatric expertise and concerning the personality and behavior of the therapist. The basis of therapy comprises the ability to form a stable and trustworthy relationship with the patient as well as to patiently calm down agitated patients. Unambiguous and rapid decision-making that takes effective pharmacological treatment options into account usually leads to swift amelioration of the acute symptomatology.

  5. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Gocek, Elzbieta; Marcinkowska, Ewa

    2011-01-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17)(q22;q12) chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 (1,25D) is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs) which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML

  6. Acute Cold / Restraint Stress in Castrated Rats

    Farideh Zafari Zangeneh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study aimed to determine whether castration altered osmotically stimulated vasopressin (VP release and urinary volume and what is the role of endocrine-stress axis in this process.Materials and methods: Totally 108 mice were studied in two main groups of castrated (n=78 and control (n=30. Each group was extracted by acute cold stress (4◦C for 2h/day, restraint stress (by syringes 60cc 2h/day and cold/restraint stress. The castrated group was treated in sub groups of testosterone, control (sesame oil as vehicle of testosterone. Propranolol as blocker of sympathetic nervous system was given to both groups of castrated mice and main control.Results: Our results showed that, there is interactions between testosterone and sympathetic nervous system on vasopressin, because urine volume was decreased only in testoctomized mice with cold/restraint and cold stress (P<0.001; propranolol as the antagonist of sympathetic nervous system could block and increase urine volume in castrated mice. This increased volume of urine was due to acute cold stress, not restraint stress (p<0.001. The role of testosterone, noradrenalin (NA and Vasopressin (VP in the acute cold stress is confirmed, because testosterone could return the effect of decreased urine volume in control group (P<0.001. Conclusion: Considering the effect of cold/restraint stress on urinary volume in castrated mice shows that there is interaction between sex hormone (testosterone, vasopressin and adrenergic systems.

  7. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Gocek, Elzbieta; Marcinkowska, Ewa, E-mail: ema@cs.uni.wroc.pl [Department of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, ul Tamka 2, Wroclaw 50-137 (Poland)

    2011-05-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17)(q22;q12) chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D) is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs) which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML.

  8. Effects of electrical stimulation on House-Brackmann scores in early Bell's palsy.

    Alakram, Prisha; Puckree, Threethambal

    2010-04-22

    ABSTRACT Limited evidence may support the application of electrical stimulation in the subacute and chronic stages of facial palsy, yet some physiotherapists in South Africa have been applying this modality in the acute stage in the absence of published evidence of clinical efficacy. This preliminary study's aim was to determine the safety and potential efficacy of applying electrical stimulation to the facial muscles during the early phase of Bells palsy. A pretest posttest control vs. experimental groups design composed of 16 patients with Bell's palsy of less than 30 days' duration. Adult patients with clinical diagnosis of Bell's palsy were systematically (every second patient) allocated to the control and experimental groups. Each group (n = 8) was pretested and posttested using the House-Brackmann index. Both groups were treated with heat, massage, exercises, and a home program. The experimental group also received electrical stimulation. The House-Brackmann Scale of the control group improved between 17% and 50% with a mean of 30%. The scores of the experimental group ranged between 17% and 75% with a mean of 37%. The difference between the groups was not statistically significant (two-tailed p = 0.36). Electrical stimulation as used in this study during the acute phase of Bell's palsy is safe but may not have added value over spontaneous recovery and multimodal physiotherapy. A larger sample size or longer stimulation time or both should be investigated.

  9. Transcranial magnetic stimulation for the treatment of major depression

    Janicak PG

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Philip G Janicak, Mehmet E DokucuDepartment of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Major depression is often difficult to diagnose accurately. Even when the diagnosis is properly made, standard treatment approaches (eg, psychotherapy, medications, or their combination are often inadequate to control acute symptoms or maintain initial benefit. Additional obstacles involve safety and tolerability problems, which frequently preclude an adequate course of treatment. This leaves an important gap in our ability to properly manage major depression in a substantial proportion of patients, leaving them vulnerable to ensuing complications (eg, employment-related disability, increased risk of suicide, comorbid medical disorders, and substance abuse. Thus, there is a need for more effective and better tolerated approaches. Transcranial magnetic stimulation is a neuromodulation technique increasingly used to partly fill this therapeutic void. In the context of treating depression, we critically review the development of transcranial magnetic stimulation, focusing on the results of controlled and pragmatic trials for depression, which consider its efficacy, safety, and tolerability.Keywords: electroconvulsive therapy, treatment-resistant depression, major depression, transcranial magnetic stimulation

  10. ERAASR: an algorithm for removing electrical stimulation artifacts from multielectrode array recordings

    O'Shea, Daniel J.; Shenoy, Krishna V.

    2018-04-01

    Objective. Electrical stimulation is a widely used and effective tool in systems neuroscience, neural prosthetics, and clinical neurostimulation. However, electrical artifacts evoked by stimulation prevent the detection of spiking activity on nearby recording electrodes, which obscures the neural population response evoked by stimulation. We sought to develop a method to clean artifact-corrupted electrode signals recorded on multielectrode arrays in order to recover the underlying neural spiking activity. Approach. We created an algorithm, which performs estimation and removal of array artifacts via sequential principal components regression (ERAASR). This approach leverages the similar structure of artifact transients, but not spiking activity, across simultaneously recorded channels on the array, across pulses within a train, and across trials. The ERAASR algorithm requires no special hardware, imposes no requirements on the shape of the artifact or the multielectrode array geometry, and comprises sequential application of straightforward linear methods with intuitive parameters. The approach should be readily applicable to most datasets where stimulation does not saturate the recording amplifier. Main results. The effectiveness of the algorithm is demonstrated in macaque dorsal premotor cortex using acute linear multielectrode array recordings and single electrode stimulation. Large electrical artifacts appeared on all channels during stimulation. After application of ERAASR, the cleaned signals were quiescent on channels with no spontaneous spiking activity, whereas spontaneously active channels exhibited evoked spikes which closely resembled spontaneously occurring spiking waveforms. Significance. We hope that enabling simultaneous electrical stimulation and multielectrode array recording will help elucidate the causal links between neural activity and cognition and facilitate naturalistic sensory protheses.

  11. Evaluation of high-perimeter electrode designs for deep brain stimulation

    Howell, Bryan; Grill, Warren M.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective treatment for movement disorders and a promising therapy for treating epilepsy and psychiatric disorders. Despite its clinical success, complications including infections and mis-programing following surgical replacement of the battery-powered implantable pulse generator adversely impact the safety profile of this therapy. We sought to decrease power consumption and extend battery life by modifying the electrode geometry to increase stimulation efficiency. The specific goal of this study was to determine whether electrode contact perimeter or area had a greater effect on increasing stimulation efficiency. Approach. Finite-element method (FEM) models of eight prototype electrode designs were used to calculate the electrode access resistance, and the FEM models were coupled with cable models of passing axons to quantify stimulation efficiency. We also measured in vitro the electrical properties of the prototype electrode designs and measured in vivo the stimulation efficiency following acute implantation in anesthetized cats. Main results. Area had a greater effect than perimeter on altering the electrode access resistance; electrode (access or dynamic) resistance alone did not predict stimulation efficiency because efficiency was dependent on the shape of the potential distribution in the tissue; and, quantitative assessment of stimulation efficiency required consideration of the effects of the electrode-tissue interface impedance. Significance. These results advance understanding of the features of electrode geometry that are important for designing the next generation of efficient DBS electrodes.

  12. Somato stimulation and acupuncture therapy.

    Zhao, Jing-Jun; Rong, Pei-Jing; Shi, Li; Ben, Hui; Zhu, Bing

    2016-05-01

    Acupuncture is an oldest somato stimulus medical technique. As the most representative peripheral nerve stimulation therapy, it has a complete system of theory and application and is applicable to a large population. This paper expounds the bionic origins of acupuncture and analyzes the physiological mechanism by which acupuncture works. For living creatures, functionally sound viscera and effective endurance of pain are essential for survival. This paper discusses the way in which acupuncture increases the pain threshold of living creatures and the underlying mechanism from the perspective of bionics. Acupuncture can also help to adjust visceral functions and works most effectively in facilitating the process of digestion and restraining visceral pain. This paper makes an in-depth overview of peripheral nerve stimulation therapy represented by acupuncture. We look forward to the revival of acupuncture, a long-standing somato stimulus medicine, in the modern medical systems.

  13. Femtosecond Broadband Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy

    Lee, Soo-Y; Yoon, Sagwoon; Mathies, Richard A

    2006-01-01

    Femtosecond broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) is a new technique where a narrow bandwidth picosecond Raman pump pulse and a red-shifted broadband femtosecond Stokes probe pulse (with or without time delay between the pulses) act on a sample to produce a high resolution Raman gain spectrum with high efficiency and speed, free from fluorescence background interference. It can reveal vibrational structural information and dynamics of stationary or transient states. Here, the quantum picture for femtosecond broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) is used to develop the semiclassical coupled wave theory of the phenomenon and to derive an expression for the measurable Raman gain in FSRS. The semiclassical theory is applied to study the dependence of lineshapes in FSRS on the pump-probe time delay and to deduce vibrational dephasing times in cyclohexane in the ground state

  14. Vagal stimulation in heart failure.

    De Ferrari, Gaetano M

    2014-04-01

    Heart failure (HF) is accompanied by an autonomic imbalance that is almost always characterized by both increased sympathetic activity and withdrawal of vagal activity. Experimentally, vagal stimulation has been shown to exert profound antiarrhythmic activity and to improve cardiac function and survival in HF models. A open-label pilot clinical study in 32 patients with chronic HF has shown safety and tolerability of chronic vagal stimulation associated with subjective (improved quality of life and 6-min walk test) and objective improvements (reduced left ventricular systolic volumes and improved left ventricular ejection fraction). Three larger clinical studies, including a phase III trial are currently ongoing and will evaluate the clinical role of this new approach.

  15. Differentiating Acute Otitis Media and Acute Mastoiditis in Hospitalized Children.

    Laulajainen-Hongisto, Anu; Aarnisalo, Antti A; Jero, Jussi

    2016-10-01

    Acute otitis media is a common infection in children. Most acute otitis media episodes can be treated at an outpatient setting with antimicrobials, or only expectant observation. Hospital treatment with parenteral medication, and myringotomy or tympanostomy, may be needed to treat those with severe, prolonged symptoms, or with complications. The most common intratemporal complication of acute otitis media is acute mastoiditis. If a child with acute mastoiditis does not respond to this treatment, or if complications develop, further examinations and other surgical procedures, including mastoidectomy, are considered. Since the treatment of complicated acute otitis media and complicated acute mastoiditis differs, it is important to differentiate these two conditions. This article focuses on the differential diagnostics of acute otitis media and acute mastoiditis in children.

  16. Tactile Stimulation and Consumer Response.

    Hornik, Jacob

    1992-01-01

    Tactile behavior is a basic communication form as well as an expression of interpersonal involvement. This article presents three studies offering evidence for the positive role of casual interpersonal touch on consumer behavior. More specifically, it provides initial support for the view that tactile stimulation in various consumer behavior situations enhances the positive feeling for and evaluation of both the external stimuli and the touching source. Further, customers touched by a request...

  17. Resonant Impulsive Stimulated Raman Scattering

    Mokhtari, A; Chesnoy, J

    1988-03-15

    Using a femtosecond dye laser, we observe in real-time vibrational oscillations excited by impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS) close to an electronic resonance. We perform single-beam Raman excitation and probe the driven coherence by a polarization-sensitive detection. We demonstrate for the first time impulsively Raman-induced dichroism, birefringence as well as frequency and time delay shifts. We analyse the characteristics of resonant ISRS on a vibrational mode of a dye molecule (malachite green) in solution.

  18. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Children

    Garvey, Marjorie A.; Mall, Volker

    2008-01-01

    Developmental disabilities (e.g. attention deficit disorder; cerebral palsy) are frequently associated with deviations of the typical pattern of motor skill maturation. Neurophysiologic tools, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which probe motor cortex function, can potentially provide insights into both typical neuromotor maturation and the mechanisms underlying the motor skill deficits in children with developmental disabilities. These insights may set the stage for finding ef...

  19. Resonant Impulsive Stimulated Raman Scattering

    Mokhtari, A.; Chesnoy, J.

    1988-01-01

    Using a femtosecond dye laser, we observe in real-time vibrational oscillations excited by impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS) close to an electronic resonance. We perform single-beam Raman excitation and probe the driven coherence by a polarization-sensitive detection. We demonstrate for the first time impulsively Raman-induced dichroism, birefringence as well as frequency and time delay shifts. We analyse the characteristics of resonant ISRS on a vibrational mode of a dye molecule (malachite green) in solution

  20. Optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating

    Banerjee, D.

    1999-01-01

    Since the pioneering work by Huntley et al. (1985), optical dating is being increasingly recognised as an important technique for establishing a time frame of deposition of sediments (Aitken, 1998). Optical dating differs from thermoluminescence (TL) dating in that visible/infrared light from lasers or LEDs (light-emitting-diodes) is used as a means of stimulation, in contrast to thermal stimulation. It has several advantages over TL dating: (i) the resetting of the OSL (optically stimulated luminescence) clock is more effective than that of TL clock; for sediments transported under water or in other situations where the sediment grains have undergone inhomogeneous bleaching, this property ensures that ages based on optical dating are generally more reliable than TL ages, (ii) the optical dating technique is non-destructive, and multiple readouts of the optical signal is possible; this feature has resulted in the development of single-aliquot and single-grain protocols (Murray and Wintle, 1999; Banerjee et al. 1999), (iii) the sample is not heated as in TL; thus, spurious luminescence is avoided and there is a significant reduction in blackbody radiation. Dating of materials which change phase on heating is also practical, and finally, (iv) thermal quenching of luminescence is negligible, allowing accurate estimation of kinetic parameters using standard techniques and providing access to deep OSL traps. This characteristic may be helpful in extending the limits of optical dating beyond the last 150 ka from a global point of view

  1. Performance Enhancement by Brain Stimulation

    Parisa Gazerani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Number of substances and strategies are available to increase performance in sport (Catlin and Murray, 1996. Since 2004, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA posts an updated list of substances and methods prohibited to athletes. Drugs (e.g., steroids, stimulants are a major part of this list; however, technologies and methods (e.g., gene doping are increasingly being identified and added (WADA, 2017. Among technologies and methods that might exert a potential effect on athletic performance, brain stimulation has recently been subjected to extensive discussion. Neuro-enhancement for doping purposes has been termed “neurodoping” in the literature (Davis, 2013; however, this concept needs further documentation before the term “neurodoping” can be used properly. Two major non-invasive techniques of brain stimulations are transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS (Hallett, 2007; Rossi et al., 2009, and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS (Stagg and Nitsche, 2011. In TMS, an electric coil held over the head applies magnetic pulses to create currents in the brain. In tDCS, a low, continuous electrical current is delivered to the brain by using surface electrodes attached on the scalp. TMS and tDCS have been used in both research and clinic (Shin and Pelled, 2017 for example to examine alterations in cognitive function or motor skills or to assist in recovering motor function after a stroke (Gomez Palacio Schjetnan et al., 2013 or reducing fatigue in patients with multiple sclerosis (Saiote et al., 2014. In an opinion paper, it was proposed that use of emerging brain stimulation techniques might also enhance physical and mental performance in sports (Davis, 2013. The assumption was based on several reports. For example some studies have shown that TMS could shorten reaction times to visual, auditory and touch stimuli, reduce tremor, and enhance the acquisition of complex motor skills. Based on the current evidence, a recent review (Colzato

  2. Cortical stimulation and neuropathic pain

    Cristiane Cagnoni Ramos

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2015v28n2p1 This paper is a review of physiological and behavioral data on motor cortex stimulation (MCS and its role in persistent neuropathic pain. MCS has been widely used in clinical medicine as a tool for the management of pain that does not respond satisfactorily to any kind of conventional analgesia. Some important mechanisms involved in nociceptive modulation still remains unclear. The aim of this study was to describe the mechanisms involved in neuropathic pain and introduce the effectiveness of electrical stimulation of the motor cortex used in the treatment of this disease. The ascending pain pathways are activated by peripheral receptors, in which there is the transduction of a chemical, physical or mechanical stimulus as a nerve impulse, where this impulse is transmitted to the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, which connects with second-order neurons and ascends to different locations in the central nervous system where the stimulus is perceived as pain. Because MCS has been proved to modulate this pathway in the motor cortex, it has been studied to mimic its effects in clinical practice and improve the treatments used for chronic pain. MCS has gained much attention in recent years due to its action in reversing chronic neuropathic pain, this being more effective than electrical stimulation at different locations and related pain nuclei.

  3. Cortical stimulation and neuropathic pain

    Cristiane Cagnoni Ramos

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a review of physiological and behavioral data on motor cortex stimulation (MCS and its role in persistent neuropathic pain. MCS has been widely used in clinical medicine as a tool for the management of pain that does not respond satisfactorily to any kind of conventional analgesia. Some important mechanisms involved in nociceptive modulation still remains unclear. The aim of this study was to describe the mechanisms involved in neuropathic pain and introduce the effectiveness of electrical stimulation of the motor cortex used in the treatment of this disease. The ascending pain pathways are activated by peripheral receptors, in which there is the transduction of a chemical, physical or mechanical stimulus as a nerve impulse, where this impulse is transmitted to the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, which connects with second-order neurons and ascends to different locations in the central nervous system where the stimulus is perceived as pain. Because MCS has been proved to modulate this pathway in the motor cortex, it has been studied to mimic its effects in clinical practice and improve the treatments used for chronic pain. MCS has gained much attention in recent years due to its action in reversing chronic neuropathic pain, this being more effective than electrical stimulation at different locations and related pain nuclei.

  4. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) blood test

    ... ency/article/003710.htm Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) blood test measures the level of FSH in blood. FSH ...

  5. Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Treating Epilepsy

    ... and their FAMILIES VAGUS NERVE STIMULATION FOR TREATING EPILEPSY This information sheet is provided to help you ... how vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) may help treat epilepsy. The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) is the ...

  6. A Chip for an Implantable Neural Stimulator

    Gudnason, Gunnar; Bruun, Erik; Haugland, Morten

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a chip for a multichannel neural stimulator for functional electrical stimulation (FES). The purpose of FES is to restore muscular control in disabled patients. The chip performs all the signal processing required in an implanted neural stimulator. The power and digital data...

  7. Frequency shifts in stimulated Raman scattering

    Zinth, W.; Kaiser, W.

    1980-01-01

    The nonresonant contributions to the nonlinear susceptibility chisup(()3) produce a frequency chirp during stimulated Raman scattering. In the case of transient stimulated Raman scattering, the spectrum of the generated Stokes pulse is found at higher frequencies than expected from spontaneous Raman data. The frequency difference can be calculated from the theory of stimulated Raman scattering. (orig.)

  8. Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer

    1980-05-01

    Each of the following types of well stimulation techniques are summarized and explained: hydraulic fracturing; thermal; mechanical, jetting, and drainhole drilling; explosive and implosive; and injection methods. Current stimulation techniques, stimulation techniques for geothermal wells, areas of needed investigation, and engineering calculations for various techniques. (MHR)

  9. Optical stimulator for vision-based sensors

    Rössler, Dirk; Pedersen, David Arge Klevang; Benn, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    We have developed an optical stimulator system for vision-based sensors. The stimulator is an efficient tool for stimulating a camera during on-ground testing with scenes representative of spacecraft flights. Such scenes include starry sky, planetary objects, and other spacecraft. The optical...

  10. Time and frequency-dependent modulation of local field potential synchronization by deep brain stimulation.

    Clinton B McCracken

    Full Text Available High-frequency electrical stimulation of specific brain structures, known as deep brain stimulation (DBS, is an effective treatment for movement disorders, but mechanisms of action remain unclear. We examined the time-dependent effects of DBS applied to the entopeduncular nucleus (EP, the rat homolog of the internal globus pallidus, a target used for treatment of both dystonia and Parkinson's disease (PD. We performed simultaneous multi-site local field potential (LFP recordings in urethane-anesthetized rats to assess the effects of high-frequency (HF, 130 Hz; clinically effective, low-frequency (LF, 15 Hz; ineffective and sham DBS delivered to EP. LFP activity was recorded from dorsal striatum (STR, ventroanterior thalamus (VA, primary motor cortex (M1, and the stimulation site in EP. Spontaneous and acute stimulation-induced LFP oscillation power and functional connectivity were assessed at baseline, and after 30, 60, and 90 minutes of stimulation. HF EP DBS produced widespread alterations in spontaneous and stimulus-induced LFP oscillations, with some effects similar across regions and others occurring in a region- and frequency band-specific manner. Many of these changes evolved over time. HF EP DBS produced an initial transient reduction in power in the low beta band in M1 and STR; however, phase synchronization between these regions in the low beta band was markedly suppressed at all time points. DBS also enhanced low gamma synchronization throughout the circuit. With sustained stimulation, there were significant reductions in low beta synchronization between M1-VA and STR-VA, and increases in power within regions in the faster frequency bands. HF DBS also suppressed the ability of acute EP stimulation to induce beta oscillations in all regions along the circuit. This dynamic pattern of synchronizing and desynchronizing effects of EP DBS suggests a complex modulation of activity along cortico-BG-thalamic circuits underlying the therapeutic

  11. Transient hypoxia stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis in brain subcortex by a neuronal nitric oxide synthase-dependent mechanism

    The adaptive mechanisms that protect brain metabolism during and after hypoxia, for instance, during hypoxic preconditioning, are coordinated in part by nitric oxide (NO). We tested the hypothesis that acute transient hypoxia stimulates NO synthase (NOS)-activated mechanisms of m...

  12. Masking of infrared neural stimulation (INS) in hearing and deaf guinea pigs

    Kadakia, Sama; Young, Hunter; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2013-03-01

    Spatial selective infrared neural stimulation has potential to improve neural prostheses, including cochlear implants. The heating of a confined target volume depolarizes the cell membrane and results in an action potential. Tissue heating may also results in thermal damage or the generation of a stress relaxation wave. Stress relaxation waves may result in a direct mechanical stimulation of remaining hair cells in the cochlea, so called optophony. Data are presented that quantify the effect of an acoustical stimulus (noise masker) on the response obtained with INS in normal hearing, acutely deafened, and chronic deaf animals. While in normal hearing animals an acoustic masker can reduce the response to INS, in acutely deafened animals the masking effect is reduced, and in chronic deaf animals this effect has not been detected. The responses to INS remain stable following the different degrees of cochlear damage.

  13. Sympathetic stimulation alters left ventricular relaxation and chamber size.

    Burwash, I G; Morgan, D E; Koilpillai, C J; Blackmore, G L; Johnstone, D E; Armour, J A

    1993-01-01

    Alterations in left ventricular (LV) contractility, relaxation, and chamber dimensions induced by efferent sympathetic nerve stimulation were investigated in nine anesthetized open-chest dogs in sinus rhythm. Supramaximal stimulation of acutely decentralized left stellate ganglia augmented heart rate, LV systolic pressure, and rate of LV pressure rise (maximum +dP/dt, 1,809 +/- 191 to 6,304 +/- 725 mmHg/s) and fall (maximum -dP/dt, -2,392 +/- 230 to -4,458 +/- 482 mmHg/s). It also reduced the time constant of isovolumic relaxation, tau (36.5 +/- 4.8 to 14.9 +/- 1.1 ms). Simultaneous two-dimensional echocardiography recorded reductions in end-diastolic and end-systolic LV cross-sectional chamber areas (23 and 31%, respectively), an increase in area ejection fraction (32%), and increases in end-diastolic and end-systolic wall thicknesses (14 and 13%, respectively). End-systolic and end-diastolic wall stresses were unchanged by stellate ganglion stimulation (98 +/- 12 to 95 +/- 9 dyn x 10(3)/cm2; 6.4 +/- 2.4 to 2.4 +/- 0.3 dyn x 10(3)/cm2, respectively). Atrial pacing to similar heart rates did not alter monitored indexes of contractility. Dobutamine and isoproterenol induced changes similar to those resulting from sympathetic neuronal stimulation. These data indicate that when the efferent sympathetic nervous system increases left ventricular contractility and relaxation, concomitant reductions in systolic and diastolic dimensions of that chamber occur that are associated with increasing wall thickness such that LV wall stress changes are minimized.

  14. Acute reperfusion without recanalization

    Makris, Nikolaos; Chamard, Leila; Mikkelsen, Irene K

    2017-01-01

    Acute reperfusion despite persistent arterial occlusion may occur in up to 30% of ischemic stroke patients. Recruitment of leptomeningeal collaterals may explain this phenomenon. Using dynamic susceptibility-contrast perfusion imaging (DSC-PI), we assessed acute changes in collateral flow among...... patients without recanalization. From a multicenter prospective database (I-KNOW), 46 patients with magnetic resonance angiography visible occlusion in whom both reperfusion and recanalization were assessed within 6 h of onset were identified. Maps of collateral flow at arterial, capillary and late venous...... phases were generated from DSC-PI through inter-frame registration, baseline signal subtraction and temporal summation, and graded blind to all other relevant clinical and radiological data using the Higashida scale. Flow direction and the acute evolution of collaterals were evaluated against...

  15. Rat Brain Biogenic Amine Levels during Acute and Sub- acute ...

    User

    2011-05-20

    May 20, 2011 ... substances in rat brain regions are altered during acute and sub-acute .... Different areas of the brain such as cerebral cortex (CC), cerebellum (CB), .... dopamine metabolism and differential motor behavioral tolerance.

  16. Efficient Healing Takes Some Nerve: Electrical Stimulation Enhances Innervation in Cutaneous Human Wounds.

    Emmerson, Elaine

    2017-03-01

    Cutaneous nerves extend throughout the dermis and epidermis and control both the functional and reparative capacity of the skin. Denervation of the skin impairs cutaneous healing, presenting evidence that nerves provide cues essential for timely wound repair. Sebastian et al. demonstrate that electrical stimulation promotes reinnervation and neural differentiation in human acute wounds, thus accelerating wound repair. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Acute abdomen in AIDS

    Kuhlman, J.E.; Fishman, E.K.

    1989-01-01

    The CT scans of 80 patients with both AIDS and acute abdominal pain were reviewed. CT identifiable causes of pain included perforation (four); colitides (15); septic infarctions (six); abscesses (10); bowel obstruction due to tumor (four); ascending cholangitis (two); enterovesical fistula (one); and sacral osteomyelitis (one). CT affected management in 40% of patients by narrowing diagnostic possibilities, triaging between surgical versus nonsurgical emergencies, and directing diagnostic procedures. CT was an expeditious triage modality for evaluating the critically ill patient with AIDS and acute abdominal pain

  18. [Acute intoxication with fenspiride].

    Chodorowski, Zygmunt; Sein Anand, Jacek; Korolkiewicz, Roman

    2004-01-01

    According to the best of our knowledge this is the first publication in medical literature about the acute intoxication with fenspiride. The two cases of a young female patients, intoxicated with Eurespal, were described. The orthostatic hypotonia with the blood pressure about 105-115/70 mm Hg in the horizontal position and 70-80/40 mm Hg in the sitting position was dominating. The heart rate was 100-110/min. when lying and 130-140/min. when sitting. The main symptoms were probably caused by inhibition of alpha1 adrenergic receptors. Main clinical manifestations make us reconsider the opinion about safety of fenspiride especially after acute intoxication.

  19. Acute calcific retropharyngeal tendinitis

    Gonzalez, I.; Mendoza, M.; Aperribay, M.; Recondo, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    Acute calcific tendinitis results from the deposition of calcium hydroxyapatite crystals in peri articular muscular attachments. It usually develops in extremities, most often in shoulders and hips. Although the incidence is much lower, it has been reported to occur in the neck region, where it involves the tendons insertion of the longs colli muscle. We present a case of acute neck pain caused by a calcareous deposition in the tendon of the longs colli muscle, producing inflammation. We describe the clinical and radiologic features (plain radiography, CT,MRI) associated with this entire. (Author) 7 refs

  20. Acute urinary retention in a young man secondary to colonic irrigation: a case report

    Raheem Omer A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Autonomic innervation of the bladder is complex and regulated by a hierarchy of mechanisms of the central nervous system. Any dysfunction in these regulatory mechanisms can lead to acute urinary retention. Case presentation A 36-year-old Caucasian man presented with acute urinary retention following extensive bowel irrigation. His urinary bladder was decompressed and his normal voiding mechanism was restored thereafter. Conclusion We postulate that prolonged anorectal and sigmoid dilatation can stimulate the recto-vesicourethral reflex and lead to acute urinary retention via autonomic dysfunction.

  1. Stimulation of hair cells with ultraviolet light

    Azimzadeh, Julien B.; Fabella, Brian A.; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2018-05-01

    Hair bundles are specialized organelles that transduce mechanical inputs into electrical outputs. To activate hair cells, physiologists have resorted to mechanical methods of hair-bundle stimulation. Here we describe a new method of hair-bundle stimulation, irradiation with ultraviolet light. A hair bundle illuminated by ultraviolet light rapidly moves towards its tall edge, a motion typically associated with excitatory stimulation. The motion disappears upon tip-link rupture and is associated with the opening of mechanotransduction channels. Hair bundles can be induced to move sinusoidally with oscillatory modulation of the stimulation power. We discuss the implications of ultraviolet stimulation as a novel hair-bundle stimulus.

  2. Thermally stimulated scattering in plasmas

    Dysthe, K. B.; Mjølhus, E.; Pécseli, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    this experiment local heat conduction is of little importance and the dynamic evolution for the electron temperature is dominated by heating and energy exchange with the ion component. These features are incorporated in the analysis. The resulting set of equations gives a growth rate and characteristic scale size......A theory for stimulated scattering of a laser beam is formulated where the dominant nonlinearity is the ohmic heating of the plasma. The analysis is carried out with particular reference to experimental investigations of CO2 laser heating of linear discharge plasma. In the conditions characterizing...

  3. Functional response of white rats isolated heart to the stimulation of adrenergic receptors after gamma-irradiation in low doses

    Antonenko, A.N.; Lobanok, L.M.

    1999-01-01

    It was investigated the effects of acute gamma-irradiation on bio mechanical activity of rats heart isolated by Langendorf's method in early and delayed terms after exposure to gamma-rays. Intra ventricle pressure and the rate of its growth, volumetric rate of coronal flow, frequency of heart contraction were registered. Stimulation of alpha-adrenergic receptors was conducted by means of specific agonist mesatone and stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors was made by means of isoprenaline. The study has shown that acute irradiation of rats caused the decrease of both contractile ability and relaxation of myocardium in a 10 days after exposure. In delayed period bio mechanical activity of isolated heart was restored. Functional response of heart to the stimulation of alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptors was decreased in all terms of investigation

  4. Evaluation of different types of rooting stimulators

    Petr Salaš

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the assessment of selected stimulators, especially from Rhizopon product line, which are used for rooting and root system enhancement in various ornamental woody species. Two available methods of cuttings stimulation were selected from the available range of rooting stimulators: stimulation by long-term immersion in solutions or treatment of cuttings with powder stimulators. The experiment involved stimulators with two active components, currently the most commonly used phytohormones for this purpose – IBA and NAA – that were applied in different concentrations. The experiment took place in three propagation terms with twelve coniferous and deciduous shrub varieties. The results of the experiment show the different reactions of the individual species as well as varieties on the respective term of propagation and used form of stimulator.

  5. The Effects of Compensatory Auditory Stimulation and High-Definition Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (HD-tDCS) on Tinnitus Perception - A Randomized Pilot Study.

    Henin, Simon; Fein, Dovid; Smouha, Eric; Parra, Lucas C

    2016-01-01

    Tinnitus correlates with elevated hearing thresholds and reduced cochlear compression. We hypothesized that reduced peripheral input leads to elevated neuronal gain resulting in the perception of a phantom sound. The purpose of this pilot study was to test whether compensating for this peripheral deficit could reduce the tinnitus percept acutely using customized auditory stimulation. To further enhance the effects of auditory stimulation, this intervention was paired with high-definition transcranial direct current stimulation (HD-tDCS). A randomized sham-controlled, single blind study was conducted in a clinical setting on adult participants with chronic tinnitus (n = 14). Compensatory auditory stimulation (CAS) and HD-tDCS were administered either individually or in combination in order to access the effects of both interventions on tinnitus perception. CAS consisted of sound exposure typical to daily living (20-minute sound-track of a TV show), which was adapted with compressive gain to compensate for deficits in each subject's individual audiograms. Minimum masking levels and the visual analog scale were used to assess the strength of the tinnitus percept immediately before and after the treatment intervention. CAS reduced minimum masking levels, and visual analog scale trended towards improvement. Effects of HD-tDCS could not be resolved with the current sample size. The results of this pilot study suggest that providing tailored auditory stimulation with frequency-specific gain and compression may alleviate tinnitus in a clinical population. Further experimentation with longer interventions is warranted in order to optimize effect sizes.

  6. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) - children

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow. Bone marrow is the soft tissue inside ... develops quickly. Both adults and children can get acute myeloid leukemia ( AML ). This article is about AML in children.

  7. Acute vs. chronic conditions (image)

    ... describe anything from a broken bone to an asthma attack. A chronic condition, by contrast is a long- ... a broken bone, an acute condition. An acute asthma attack occurs in the midst of the chronic disease ...

  8. ARDS (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome)

    ... Also known as What Is ARDS, or acute respiratory distress syndrome, is a lung condition that leads ... treat ARDS. Other Names Acute lung injury Adult respiratory distress syndrome Increased-permeability pulmonary edema Noncardiac pulmonary ...

  9. Braille line using electrical stimulation

    Puertas, A; Pures, P; Echenique, A M; Ensinck, J P Graffigna y G

    2007-01-01

    Conceived within the field of Rehabilitation Technologies for visually impaired persons, the present work aims at enabling the blind user to read written material by means of a tactile display. Once he is familiarized to operate this system, the user will be able to achieve greater performance in study, academic and job activities, thus achieving a rapid and easier social inclusion. The devise accepts any kind of text that is computer-loadable (documents, books, Internet information, and the like) which, through digital means, can be read as Braille text on the pad. This tactile display is composed of an electrodes platform that simulate, through stimulation the writing/reading Braille characters. In order to perceive said characters in similar way to the tactile feeling from paper material, the skin receptor of fingers are stimulated electrically so as to simulate the same pressure and depressions as those of the paper-based counterpart information. Once designed and developed, the display was tested with blind subjects, with relatively satisfactory results. As a continuing project, this prototype is currently being improved as regards

  10. Braille line using electrical stimulation

    Puertas, A.; Purés, P.; Echenique, A. M.; Ensinck, J. P. Graffigna y. G.

    2007-11-01

    Conceived within the field of Rehabilitation Technologies for visually impaired persons, the present work aims at enabling the blind user to read written material by means of a tactile display. Once he is familiarized to operate this system, the user will be able to achieve greater performance in study, academic and job activities, thus achieving a rapid and easier social inclusion. The devise accepts any kind of text that is computer-loadable (documents, books, Internet information, and the like) which, through digital means, can be read as Braille text on the pad. This tactile display is composed of an electrodes platform that simulate, through stimulation the writing/reading Braille characters. In order to perceive said characters in similar way to the tactile feeling from paper material, the skin receptor of fingers are stimulated electrically so as to simulate the same pressure and depressions as those of the paper-based counterpart information. Once designed and developed, the display was tested with blind subjects, with relatively satisfactory results. As a continuing project, this prototype is currently being improved as regards.

  11. Transcranial magnetic stimulation: language function.

    Epstein, C M

    1998-07-01

    Studies of language using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) have focused both on identification of language areas and on elucidation of function. TMS may result in either inhibition or facilitation of language processes and may operate directly at a presumptive site of language cortex or indirectly through intracortical networks. TMS has been used to create reversible "temporary lesions," similar to those produced by Wada tests and direct cortical electrical stimulation, in cerebral cortical areas subserving language function. Rapid-rate TMS over the left inferior frontal region blocks speech output in most subjects. However, the results are not those predicted from classic models of language organization. Speech arrest is obtained most easily over facial motor cortex, and true aphasia is rare, whereas right hemisphere or bilateral lateralization is unexpectedly prominent. A clinical role for these techniques is not yet fully established. Interfering with language comprehension and verbal memory is currently more difficult than blocking speech output, but numerous TMS studies have demonstrated facilitation of language-related tasks, including oral word association, story recall, digit span, and picture naming. Conversely, speech output also facilitates motor responses to TMS in the dominant hemisphere. Such new and often-unexpected findings may provide important insights into the organization of language.

  12. Braille line using electrical stimulation

    Puertas, A; Pures, P; Echenique, A M; Ensinck, J P Graffigna y G [Gabinete de TecnologIa Medica. Universidad N. de San Juan (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    Conceived within the field of Rehabilitation Technologies for visually impaired persons, the present work aims at enabling the blind user to read written material by means of a tactile display. Once he is familiarized to operate this system, the user will be able to achieve greater performance in study, academic and job activities, thus achieving a rapid and easier social inclusion. The devise accepts any kind of text that is computer-loadable (documents, books, Internet information, and the like) which, through digital means, can be read as Braille text on the pad. This tactile display is composed of an electrodes platform that simulate, through stimulation the writing/reading Braille characters. In order to perceive said characters in similar way to the tactile feeling from paper material, the skin receptor of fingers are stimulated electrically so as to simulate the same pressure and depressions as those of the paper-based counterpart information. Once designed and developed, the display was tested with blind subjects, with relatively satisfactory results. As a continuing project, this prototype is currently being improved as regards.

  13. Feasibility of transcranial direct current stimulation use in children aged 5 to 12 years.

    Andrade, Agnes Carvalho; Magnavita, Guilherme Moreira; Allegro, Juleilda Valéria Brasil Nunes; Neto, Carlos Eduardo Borges Passos; Lucena, Rita de Cássia Saldanha; Fregni, Felipe

    2014-10-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation is a noninvasive brain stimulation technique that has been studied for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders in adults, with minimal side effects. The objective of this study is to report the feasibility, tolerability, and the short-term adverse effects of transcranial direct current stimulation in children from 5 to 12 years of age. It is a naturalistic study of 14 children who underwent 10 sessions of transcranial direct current stimulation as an alternative, off-label, and open-label treatment for various languages disorders. Frequency, intensity, adverse effects, and perception of improvement reported by parents were collected. The main side effects detected were tingling (28.6%) and itching (28.6%), acute mood changes (42.9%), and irritability (35.7%). Transcranial direct current stimulation is a feasible and tolerable technique in children, although studies regarding plastic and cognitive changes in children are needed to confirm its safety. In conclusion, this is a naturalistic report in which we considered transcranial direct current stimulation as feasible in children. © The Author(s) 2013.

  14. Auditory brainstem activity and development evoked by apical versus basal cochlear implant electrode stimulation in children.

    Gordon, K A; Papsin, B C; Harrison, R V

    2007-08-01

    The role of apical versus basal cochlear implant electrode stimulation on central auditory development was examined. We hypothesized that, in children with early onset deafness, auditory development evoked by basal electrode stimulation would differ from that evoked more apically. Responses of the auditory nerve and brainstem, evoked by an apical and a basal implant electrode, were measured over the first year of cochlear implant use in 50 children with early onset severe to profound deafness who used hearing aids prior to implantation. Responses at initial stimulation were of larger amplitude and shorter latency when evoked by the apical electrode. No significant effects of residual hearing or age were found on initial response amplitudes or latencies. With implant use, responses evoked by both electrodes showed decreases in wave and interwave latencies reflecting decreased neural conduction time through the brainstem. Apical versus basal differences persisted with implant experience with one exception; eIII-eV interlatency differences decreased with implant use. Acute stimulation shows prolongation of basally versus apically evoked auditory nerve and brainstem responses in children with severe to profound deafness. Interwave latencies reflecting neural conduction along the caudal and rostral portions of the brainstem decreased over the first year of implant use. Differences in neural conduction times evoked by apical versus basal electrode stimulation persisted in the caudal but not rostral brainstem. Activity-dependent changes of the auditory brainstem occur in response to both apical and basal cochlear implant electrode stimulation.

  15. Optical stimulation of the hearing and deaf cochlea under thermal and stress confinement condition

    Schultz, M.; Baumhoff, P.; Kallweit, N.; Sato, M.; Krüger, A.; Ripken, T.; Lenarz, T.; Kral, A.

    2014-03-01

    There is a controversy, to which extend cochlear stimulation with near infrared laser pulses at a wavelength of 1860 nm is based on optoacoustic stimulation of intact hair cells or -in contrast- is based on direct stimulation of the nerve cells in absence of functional hair cells. Thermal and stress confinement conditions apply, because of the pulse duration range (5 ns, 10 μs-20 ms) of the two lasers used. The dependency of the signal characteristics on pulse peak power and pulse duration was investigated in this study. The compound action potential (CAP) was measured during stimulation of the cochlea of four anaesthetized guinea pigs, which were hearing at first and afterwards acutely deafened using intracochlear neomycin-rinsing. For comparison hydrophone measurements in a water tank were performed to investigate the optoacoustic signals at different laser interaction regimes. With rising pulse peak power CAPs of the hearing animals showed first a threshold, then a positively correlated and finally a saturating dependency. CAPs also showed distinct responses at laser onset and offset separated with the pulse duration. At pulse durations shorter than physiological response times the signals merged. Basically the same signal characteristics were observed in the optoacoustic hydrophone measurements, scaled with the sensitivity and response time of the hydrophone. Taking together the qualitative correspondence in the signal response and the absence of any CAPs in deafened animals our results speak in favor of an optoacoustic stimulation of intact hair cells rather than a direct stimulation of nerve cells.

  16. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in the treatment of chronic widespread pain: a randomized controlled study.

    Avery, David H; Zarkowski, Paul; Krashin, Daniel; Rho, Wang-Ku; Wajdik, Chandra; Joesch, Jutta M; Haynor, David R; Buchwald, Dedra; Roy-Byrne, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Our objective was to assess transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in the treatment of chronic widespread pain. Nineteen participants were randomized into 2 groups: one group receiving active TMS (n = 7) and another group receiving sham stimulation (n = 11) applied to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. During sham stimulation, subjects heard a sound similar to the sound heard by those receiving the active treatment and received an active electrical stimulus to the scalp. The stimulation protocol consisted of 15 sessions completed within a 4-week period. Blind assessments were done at baseline and after each 5 sessions followed by blind assessments at 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months after the last TMS sessions. The primary outcome variable was a pain measure, the Gracely Box Intensity Scale (BIRS). The percentage of subjects who guessed that they were receiving TMS was similar in the 2 groups. Both the TMS group and the sham group showed a statistically significant reduction in the BIRS scores from baseline during the acute phase of treatment and the follow-up phase. However, the TMS and sham groups did not differ in the change in the BIRS scores. Although some previous clinical studies and basic science studies of TMS in treating pain are promising, this study found no difference in the analgesic effect of TMS and sham stimulation. Future studies should use a sham condition that attempts to simulate the sound and sensation of the TMS stimulation. Stimulus location and other stimulus parameters should be explored in future studies.

  17. Stimulant and motivational effects of alcohol: lessons from rodent and primate models.

    Brabant, Christian; Guarnieri, Douglas J; Quertemont, Etienne

    2014-07-01

    In several animal species including humans, the acute administration of low doses of alcohol increases motor activity. Different theories have postulated that alcohol-induced hyperactivity is causally related to alcoholism. Moreover, a common biological mechanism in the mesolimbic dopamine system has been proposed to mediate the stimulant and motivational effects of alcohol. Numerous studies have examined whether alcohol-induced hyperactivity is related to alcoholism using a great variety of animal models and several animal species. However, there is no review that has summarized this extensive literature. In this article, we present the various experimental models that have been used to study the relationship between the stimulant and motivational effects of alcohol in rodents and primates. Furthermore, we discuss whether the theories hypothesizing a causal link between alcohol-induced hyperactivity and alcoholism are supported by published results. The reviewed findings indicate that animal species that are stimulated by alcohol also exhibit alcohol preference. Additionally, the role of dopamine in alcohol-induced hyperactivity is well established since blocking dopaminergic activity suppresses the stimulant effects of alcohol. However, dopamine transmission plays a much more complex function in the motivational properties of alcohol and the neuronal mechanisms involved in alcohol stimulation and reward are distinct. Overall, the current review provides mixed support for theories suggesting that the stimulant effects of alcohol are related to alcoholism and highlights the importance of animal models as a way to gain insight into alcoholism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Yang, Jun J; Hunger, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To review the impact of collaborative studies on advances in the biology and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children and adolescents. METHODS: A review of English literature on childhood ALL focusing on collaborative studies was performed. The resulting article...

  19. Bifrontal acute subdural hematoma

    Suryapratap Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Though, acute subdural hematoma (ASDH is one of the most common emergencies in neurological surgery practice, bilateral bifrontal ASDH is uncommon and may constitute diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have important roles in the diagnosis of ASDH. We present a case of bifrontal ASDH that was successfully managed in our institution.

  20. acute psychiatric readmissions

    atric institutions and long hospital admissions towards acute, short hospital stays and ... large urban environments.8,9. Illness-related variables ... admissions, and if more than one diagnosis was present in the ... Both the full model and a ...

  1. Low back pain - acute

    Backache; Low back pain; Lumbar pain; Pain - back; Acute back pain; Back pain - new; Back pain - short-term; Back strain - new ... lower back supports most of your body's weight. Low back pain is the number two reason that Americans see ...

  2. Secondary acute pneumonias

    Rozenshtraukh, L.C.; Rybakova, N.I.; Vinner, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Pathological changes, promoting the development of secondary pneumonias, are investigated. To this group belong: blood circulation disturbance in small circle, bronchial passability disturbance, aspiration of liquids, gases and vapors, infections and purulent processes, intoxications, injuries, operative interference. Roetgenologic symptomatics of each secondary acute pneumonia form is presented in detail

  3. Acute severe childhood asthma

    Attending school regularly. • Sleeping well at night ... and children must know exactly what to do when an acute attack occurs, and when to ... peak flow reading that is 30% below the expected level, are ... oxygen saturations < 94%, should receive high-flow oxygen ... usual of the metered dose inhaler are required to achieve.

  4. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ... that may increase the risk of acute lymphocytic leukemia include: Previous cancer treatment. Children and adults who've had certain types of chemotherapy and radiation therapy for other kinds of cancer may have an increased ... leukemia. Exposure to radiation. People exposed to very high ...

  5. Acute liver failure

    Bernal, William; Lee, William M; Wendon, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Over the last three decades acute liver failure (ALF) has been transformed from a rare and poorly understood condition with a near universally fatal outcome, to one with a well characterized phenotype and disease course. Complex critical care protocols are now applied and emergency liver...

  6. Acute dental pain II

    Jonasson, Peter; Kirkevang, Lise-Lotte; Rosen, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Acute dental pain most often occurs in relation to inflammatory conditions in the dental pulp or in the periradicular tissues surrounding a tooth, but it is not always easy to reach a diagnose and determine what treatment to perform. The anamnesis and the clinical examination provide valuable...

  7. Acute hemiplegia in childhood

    Okuno, Takehiko; Takao, Tatsuo; Itoh, Masatoshi; Konishi, Yukuo; Nakano, Shozo

    1983-01-01

    The results of CT in 100 patients with acute hemiplegia in childhood are reported here. The etiology was various: 2 patients had infratentorial brain tumors, 56 had cerebral vascular diseases, 3 had head injuries, 16 had intracranial infectious diseases, one had postinfectious encephalomyelitis, one had multiple sclerosis, 2 had epilepsy, and the diagnosis of 19 were unknown. Eleven patients had a normal CT and a good prognosis. As for the type of onset, there were patients of type 1 with fever and 42 with convulsions and unconsciousness; those of type 2 with convulsions and unconsciousness were 12, and those of type 3 without fever and convulsions were 46. This classification is assumed to be useful, as the type of onset is characteristic of the etiology. Six patients were diagnosed correctly by repeated examinations, although the first CT did not reveal any remarkable findings. Capsular infarction, occlusion of the posterior cerebral artery in acute hemiplegia in childhood, abnormal findings of the internal capsule, thalamus, and midbrain in a patient with postinfectious encephalomyelitis, and a diffuse low density in the CT of the unilateral hemisphere in the patients with acute encephalopathy and acute hemiplegia of an obscure origin have been found after the introduction of computerized tomography. (author)

  8. Acute periodontal lesions.

    Herrera, David; Alonso, Bettina; de Arriba, Lorenzo; Santa Cruz, Isabel; Serrano, Cristina; Sanz, Mariano

    2014-06-01

    This review provides updates on acute conditions affecting the periodontal tissues, including abscesses in the periodontium, necrotizing periodontal diseases and other acute conditions that cause gingival lesions with acute presentation, such as infectious processes not associated with oral bacterial biofilms, mucocutaneous disorders and traumatic and allergic lesions. A periodontal abscess is clinically important because it is a relatively frequent dental emergency, it can compromise the periodontal prognosis of the affected tooth and bacteria within the abscess can spread and cause infections in other body sites. Different types of abscesses have been identified, mainly classified by their etiology, and there are clear differences between those affecting a pre-existing periodontal pocket and those affecting healthy sites. Therapy for this acute condition consists of drainage and tissue debridement, while an evaluation of the need for systemic antimicrobial therapy will be made for each case, based on local and systemic factors. The definitive treatment of the pre-existing condition should be accomplished after the acute phase is controlled. Necrotizing periodontal diseases present three typical clinical features: papilla necrosis, gingival bleeding and pain. Although the prevalence of these diseases is not high, their importance is clear because they represent the most severe conditions associated with the dental biofilm, with very rapid tissue destruction. In addition to bacteria, the etiology of necrotizing periodontal disease includes numerous factors that alter the host response and predispose to these diseases, namely HIV infection, malnutrition, stress or tobacco smoking. The treatment consists of superficial debridement, careful mechanical oral hygiene, rinsing with chlorhexidine and daily re-evaluation. Systemic antimicrobials may be used adjunctively in severe cases or in nonresponding conditions, being the first option metronidazole. Once the acute

  9. Pituitary Apoplexy After Thyrotropin-releasing Hormone Stimulation Test in a Patient with Pituitary Macroadenoma

    Huei-Fang Wang

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary apoplexy is a rare complication of pituitary tumors. We report a case of a 41-year-old female with acromegaly due to a pituitary macroadenoma, who developed pituitary apoplexy after a thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH 200 mg intravenous injection stimulation test. Neither emergency computed tomography (CT scans nor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, performed 6 hours and 12 hours, respectively, after the active episode, disclosed the evidence of acute hemorrhage or infarction. Two days later, the pituitary mass, removed by transsphenoidal approach, showed ischemic necrosis and acute hemorrhage. The TRH test is generally safe for evaluating pituitary function, but pituitary apoplexy may occur after the procedure. CT and MRI may miss the diagnosis of pituitary apoplexy, especially if performed immediately after the acute episode.

  10. [Deep brain stimulation in parkinsonian patients with dopa intolerance].

    García-Ruiz, Pedro J; Feliz-Feliz, Cici; Ayerbe Gracia, Joaquín; Matías Arbelo, José; Salvador, Carlos; Val Fernández, Javier Del; García-Caldentey, Juan

    2017-10-28

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is at present, a useful treatment for patients with advanced Parkinson's disease and motor complications. The crucial step toward consistent DBS outcomes remains careful patient selection; several conditions must be fulfilled including excellent levo dopa response. We report two cases of early onset Parkinson's disease with severe intolerance to levo dopa but excellent and sustained response to DBS. DBS can be a useful alternative for parkinsonian patients with severe intolerance to levo dopa, provided a positive acute response to levo dopa or apomorphine is obtained. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) in dentistry- A review.

    Kasat, Vikrant; Gupta, Aditi; Ladda, Ruchi; Kathariya, Mitesh; Saluja, Harish; Farooqui, Anjum-Ara

    2014-12-01

    Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) is a non-pharmacological method which is widely used by medical and paramedical professionals for the management of acute and chronic pain in a variety of conditions. Similarly, it can be utilized for the management of pain during various dental procedures as well as pain due to various conditions affecting maxillofacial region. This review aims to provide an insight into clinical research evidence available for the analgesic and non analgesic uses of TENS in pediatric as well as adult patients related to the field of dentistry. Also, an attempt is made to briefly discuss history of therapeutic electricity, mechanism of action of TENS, components of TENs equipment, types, techniques of administration, advantages and contradictions of TENS. With this we hope to raise awareness among dental fraternity regarding its dental applications thereby increasing its use in dentistry. Key words:Dentistry, pain, TENS.

  12. Acute pyelonephritis in ER

    Giovanni Volpicelli

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Symptoms and signs of acute pyelonephritis sometimes are subtle and emergency physicians attending overcrowded and busy institutions could easily miss the right diagnosis. The presence of a renal damage is decisive in the therapeutic choice. Aims of our study are: 1 to assess prevalence of renal damage in patients presenting to our ED with symptoms and signs of primary urinary tract infection (UTI; 2 to evaluate the reliability of such symptoms and signs in predicting a renal damage; 3 to assess accuracy of the contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS in the ED diagnosis of renal damage due to acute uncomplicated pyelonephritis. We studied 54 patients with suspected UTI. Each patient underwent clinical examination, routine blood and urine sampling and conventional renal ultrasound (US. 23 patients had confirmation of acute primary UTI, and performed renal magnetic resonance (MR to rule out renal parenchymal involvement. In 16 patients (69,6% one or more parenchymal lesions were visualized at MR, and diagnosis of acute uncomplicated pyelonephritis was confirmed (group A. The other 7 patients had a diagnosis of UTI without renal involvement (group B. Some of 23 patients presented with few atypical symptoms. Lumbar pain was the most frequent symptom (n = 21, without a statistically significant difference between group A and B (P 0,958; p = 0,328. No other symptom or sign has demonstrated statistically valid in predicting the renal involvement. Renal US was positive in only 3 patients of group A (18,7%. During this first part of our study, CEUS was performed in a limited number of patients (n = 8, and in 7 examinations data were concordant with MR. In conclusion, analysis of our preliminary data confirms that a distinction between patients with different extension of the UTI is not possible through the simple clinical examination and routine tests. CEUS is very promising and its routine employment in the ED could simplify the diagnostic practice in

  13. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis

    I.A. Eland (Ingo)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractAcute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas with sudden onset. The severity of acute pancreatitis may vary from mild to life threatening. There are many risk factors for acute pancreatitis, among which gallstones and alcohol abuse are most widely known. Drugs are

  14. Morning administration of oral methamphetamine dose-dependently disrupts nighttime sleep in recreational stimulant users.

    Herrmann, Evan S; Johnson, Patrick S; Bruner, Natalie R; Vandrey, Ryan; Johnson, Matthew W

    2017-09-01

    Use of amphetamine-type stimulants (e.g., methamphetamine) is associated with acute sleep disruptions. No prior reports have characterized the acute effects of methamphetamine on sleep using polysomnography, the gold standard for objective sleep monitoring. Recreational stimulant users (n=19) completed a baseline assessment, which included questionnaires assessing demographic and substance use characteristics, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), which assesses sleep quality over the past month. Participants were administered 0mg (placebo), 20mg, or 40mg oral methamphetamine at 08:15h on study days, using a double-blind, randomized, within-subjects design. Sleep was monitored using polysomnography from 22:20 that evening until 06:15 the following morning. PSQI scores indicated more than half of participants reported poor sleep quality at baseline. Methamphetamine dose-dependently increased sleep latency, and decreased total sleep time, sleep efficiency, time in NREM 2 sleep, number of REM periods, and total time in REM sleep. Sleep under placebo conditions was consistent with what would be expected from healthy adults. Morning oral administration of methamphetamine produces robust disruptions in nighttime sleep. Future research should examine relations between stimulant use and sleep disruption in naturalistic settings, with regard to both stimulant abuse and licit prescription use. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Neuromodulation of detrusor hyper-reflexia by functional magnetic stimulation of the sacral roots.

    Sheriff, M K; Shah, P J; Fowler, C; Mundy, A R; Craggs, M D

    1996-07-01

    To investigate the acute effects of functional magnetic stimulation (FMS) on detrusor hyper-reflexia using a multi-pulse magnetic stimulator. Seven male patients with established and intractable detrusor hyper-reflexia following spinal cord injury were studied. No patient was on medication and none had had previous surgery for detrusor hyper-reflexia. After optimization of magnetic stimulation of S2-S4 sacral anterior roots by recording toe flexor electromyograms, unstable detrusor activity was provoked during cystometry by rapid infusion of fluid into the bladder. The provocation test produced consistent and predictable detrusor hyper-reflexia. On some provocations, supramaximal FMS at 20 pulses/s for 5 s was applied at detrusor pressures which were > 15 cmH2O. Following FMS there was an obvious acute suppression of detrusor hyper-reflexia. There was a profound reduction in detrusor contraction, as assessed by the area under the curves of detrusor pressure with time. Functional magnetic stimulation applied over the sacrum can profoundly suppress detrusor hyper-reflexia in man. It may provide a non-invasive method of assessing patients for implantable electrical neuromodulation devices and as a therapeutic option in its own right.

  16. Design, implementation and testing of an implantable impedance-based feedback-controlled neural gastric stimulator

    Arriagada, A J; Jurkov, A S; Mintchev, M P; Neshev, E; Andrews, C N; Muench, G

    2011-01-01

    Functional neural gastrointestinal electrical stimulation (NGES) is a methodology of gastric electrical stimulation that can be applied as a possible treatment for disorders such as obesity and gastroparesis. NGES is capable of generating strong lumen-occluding local contractions that can produce retrograde or antegrade movement of gastric content. A feedback-controlled implantable NGES system has been designed, implemented and tested both in laboratory conditions and in an acute animal setting. The feedback system, based on gastric tissue impedance change, is aimed at reducing battery energy requirements and managing the phenomenon of gastric tissue accommodation. Acute animal testing was undertaken in four mongrel dogs (2 M, 2 F, weight 25.53 ± 7.3 kg) that underwent subserosal two-channel electrode implantation. Three force transducers sutured serosally along the gastric axis and a wireless signal acquisition system were utilized to record stimulation-generated contractions and tissue impedance variations respectively. Mechanically induced contractions in the stomach were utilized to indirectly generate a tissue impedance change that was detected by the feedback system. Results showed that increasing or decreasing impedance changes were detected by the implantable stimulator and that therapy can be triggered as a result. The implantable feedback system brings NGES one step closer to long term treatment of burdening gastric motility disorders in humans

  17. Interleukin-6 and interleukin-1 production in acute leukemia with monocytoid differentiation

    van der Schoot, C. E.; Jansen, P.; Poorter, M.; Wester, M. R.; von dem Borne, A. E.; Aarden, L. A.; van Oers, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    Several authors have reported the in vitro production of colony-stimulating factors (CSF) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) by the neoplastic cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Using a sensitive bioassay for IL-6, the capacity of the leukemic cells of 30 patients with AML to produce IL-6

  18. [Pathophysiology of hormonal, immune, metabolic changes in acute and chronic pancreatitis. Experimental and clinical studies].

    Trubitsyna, I E; Chikunova, B Z; Tkachenko, E V; Tsaregorodtseva, T M; Vinokurova, L V; Varvanina, G G

    2008-01-01

    There is literature review of the acute and chronic pancreatitis experimental models. Patogenetic necrosis mechanisms with fibrosis progress in pancreas were revealed. The stimulation of the proteolytic enzymes synthesis and secretion, that was examined in experiments were compared with clinical examinations. The patients with chronic pancreatitis were investigated in the Central Research Institute of Gastroenterology.

  19. Multisensory stimulation in stroke rehabilitation

    Barbro Birgitta Johansson

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The brain has a large capacity for automatic simultaneous processing and integration of sensory information. Combining information from different sensory modalities facilitates our ability to detect, discriminate, and recognize sensory stimuli, and learning is often optimal in a multisensory environment. Currently used multisensory stimulation methods in stroke rehabilitation include motor imagery, action observation, training with a mirror or in a virtual environment, or various kinds of music therapy. Several studies have shown positive effects been reported but to give general recommendation more studies are needed. Patient heterogeneity and the interactions of age, gender, genes and environment are discussed. Randomized controlled longitudinal trials starting earlier post stroke are needed. The advance in brain network science and neuroimaging enabling longitudinal studies of structural and functional networks are likely to have an important impact on patient selection for specific interventions in future stroke rehabilitation.

  20. Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    Bahiyah Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case of a pregnant lady at 8 weeks of gestation, who presented with acute abdomen. She was initially diagnosed with ruptured ectopic pregnancy and ruptured corpus luteal cyst as the differential diagnosis. However she then, was finally diagnosed as acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis with spontaneous complete miscarriage. This is followed by review of literature on this topic. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is not uncommon. The emphasis on high index of suspicion of acute pancreatitis in women who presented with acute abdomen in pregnancy is highlighted. Early diagnosis and good supportive care by multidisciplinary team are crucial to ensure good maternal and fetal outcomes.