WorldWideScience

Sample records for acute necrotizing pancreatitis

  1. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. van Ooijen (Baan)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractThe specific aim of the present study was to investigate whether eicosanoids play a role in acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Because of the limited number of patients with acute pancreatitis admitted to the hospital each year, as well as the practical difficulties encountered in

  2. Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis Complicating Uteroplacental Apoplexy

    OpenAIRE

    Cheang, Chong-U; Ho, Sai-Wai; Tee, Yi-Torng; Su, Chi-Feng; Chen, Gin-Den

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Abruptio placentae induced by acute pancreatitis during pregnancy is very rare. We present a pregnant woman with a series of complications due to acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Case Report: Presented herein is a 21-year-old, nulliparous woman at 33 weeks' gestation. The initial episode of abdominal pain was thought to be acute appendicitis (which in actuality was identified to be acute pancreatitis) and was complicated with abruptio placentae, uteroplacental apoplexy, and intra...

  3. Acute hemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis in falciparum malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Felipe Reoyo-Pascual

    Full Text Available Malaria is a pathology caused by a parasite called Plasmodium, characteristic of tropical countries. The most frequent symptomatology includes cerebral malaria, jaundice, convulsive crisis, anemia, hypoglycemia, kidney failure and metabolic acidosis, among others. We are presenting the case of a patient diagnosed with malaria who suffered from acute hemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis and evolved poorly, as an example of this combination of symptoms, rarely found in our country.

  4. Antibiotics in acute necrotizing pancreatitis --- perspective of a developing country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.; Khan, S.

    2010-01-01

    Prophylactic antibiotics in acute necrotizing pancreatitis is controversial. The mortality of acute necrotizing pancreatitis is 8-25% in the western world. In view of the limited resources available for managing the complications of infected pancreatitis in developing countries, the use of prophylactic antibiotics may be recommended in selected cases. Various antibiotics show good penetration into the pancreatic tissue; imipenem and quinolones have better penetration. Clinical trials on the use of prophylactic antibiotics in necrotizing pancreatitis have been reviewed. Prophylactic antibiotics have been considered if greater than 30% pancreatic necrosis as documented by CT scan. Imipenem can be given for a duration of 10 to 14 days if no systemic complications are present. In a developing country where the cost of managing complications of pancreatitis can be a limiting factor for patients, the use of prophylactic antibiotics early on in the disease in selected cases can be beneficial. (author)

  5. Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis Complicating Uteroplacental Apoplexy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong-U Cheang

    2007-03-01

    Conclusion: Acute pancreatitis is difficult to diagnose during pregnancy. It presents as a systemic inflammatory response syndrome resulting in hemodynamic changes and may lead to abruptio placentae. Nonsurgical conservative treatment may be useful in such patients.

  6. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis complicated with pancreatic pseudoaneurysm of the superior mesenteric artery: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    He, Qing; Liu, Yue-Qin; Liu, Yuan; Guan, Yong-Song

    2008-01-01

    Acute necrotizing pancreatitis complicated with pancreatic pseudoaneurysm is a rare emergency associated with high mortality that demands immediate treatment to save the patient’s life. We treated a 64-year-old man who presented with a bleeding pseudoaneurysm of the superior mesenteric artery caused by acute pancreatitis, using interventional embolizing therapy. In the present report we show that interventional treatment is an effective therapeutic modality for patients with acute necrotizing...

  7. [Acute necrotizing pancreatitis and postmortem autolysis of pancreas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Guang-Hua; Zhang, Yi-Gu; Yu, Lin-Sheng; Li, Xing-Biao; Han, Jun-Ge

    2008-04-01

    To compare the pathomorphologic changes between the pancreas in acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) and that in acute deaths of rats (within 48 hours) so as to find the distinctions. The animal models of ANP and other acute deaths (electroshock, mechanic asphyxia/strangle, and acute poisoning with tetramine) were established according to the criteria. Half-quantitative grading and image quantitative analysis methods were employed to observe the gross and microscopic changes of the pancreases. Three features including inflammation infiltrate, fat necrosis and calcium deposit in the ANP group were considerably different from that in other acutely died rat group (Pautolysis.

  8. Percutaneous necrosectomy in patients with acute, necrotizing pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruennler, T.; Langgartner, J.; Lang, S.; Salzberger, B.; Schoelmerich, J. [University Hospital of Regensburg, Department of Internal Medicine 1, Regensburg (Germany); Zorger, N.; Herold, T.; Feuerbach, S.; Hamer, O.W. [University Hospital of Regensburg, Department of Radiology, Regensburg (Germany)

    2008-08-15

    The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the outcome of patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis treated by active percutaneous necrosectomy. By searching the radiological, surgical and internal medicine databases, all patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis treated by active percutaneous necrosectomy between 1992 and 2004 were identified. Demographic, laboratory, and clinical data, and details about invasive procedures were collected by reviewing patient charts, radiological and surgical reports. The computed tomography severity index (CTSI) scores were determined by reviewing CT images. Eighteen patients were identified. Median Ranson score on admission was 2. The Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score was median 22. Median CTSI score was 7. Initially all patients were treated with CT-guided drainage placement. Because passive drainage proved not to be effective, subsequent minimally invasive, percutaneous necrosectomy was performed. Eight out of 18 patients recovered fully without the need for surgery. Ten of 18 patients required additional surgical necrosectomy. For one of ten patients, percutaneous necrosectomy allowed postponing surgery by 39 days. Four of ten surgically treated patients died: three from septic multiorgan failure, one from pulmonary embolism. Percutaneous minimally invasive necrosectomy can be regarded as a safe and effective complementary treatment modality in patients with necrotizing pancreatitis. It is suitable for a subset of patients to avoid or delay surgery. (orig.)

  9. Patterns of Pathomorphological Changes in Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kovalska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acinar necrosis is the basic microscopic sign of acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP. Microcirculation disorder is one of the major factors in the pathogenesis and morphogenesis of ANP besides free radicals and damage of enzymatic origin. This study is dedicated to the description of microscopic changes in the pancreatic stroma in ANP, which leads to destruction of the exocrine pancreas with a putative mechanism of endocrine function preservation. This study has been carried out on histological samples of pancreas from 224 patients with ANP. Histological staining was performed with hematoxylin-eosin (H&E, Masson, Gomori methods, and PAS. Microscopy was performed with magnifications of 40×, 100×, and 400×. Vascular endothelial desquamation, stasis, and sludge are typical changes in microcirculation observed in early stages of ANP. Initially, parietal circular intravascular microthrombosis accompanied by endothelial desquamation as early as stromal swelling occurs with no detectable necrosis. Residual stroma appears between areas of necrosis and intact pancreatic tissue. Mucoid swelling is first seen in the perivascular spaces extending to the parenchyma and changing into fibrinoid imbibition causing further necrosis. Reticulin argyrophilic backbone surrounding the pancreatic acini and small ducts decompose. Pancreatic structures, which may be preserved in necrotic tissue, include nerves, major ducts, and Langerhans islets.

  10. Effects of Tempol on Experimental Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis Model in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbıs, Halil; Aykota, Muhammed Rasid; Ozturk, Bunyamin; Kabay, Burhan; Sungurtekin, Ugur; Ozden, Akın; Yenisey, Cigdem; Turk, Nilay Sen; Erdem, Ergun

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the effects of Tempol on local organ damage in an experimental acute pancreatitis model. This experimental study was conducted on 40 male Wistar- albino rats. The animals were randomly allocated into four groups: (i) Sham-operated group, laparotomies and cannulations of the pancreatic duct without acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) (n=10); (ii) Sham + Tempol group, identical to group 1 except for intravenous tempol treatment for 4 hours (n = 10); (iii) ANP group, glycodeoxycholic acid was infused into the pancreatic duct and cerulein was infused intravenously for 6 hours for development of ANP (n=10); and (iv) ANP + Tempol treated group, in addition to the procedure in group 3, rats were administered tempol intravenously for 4 hours (n = 10). Injury of the pancreas was evaluated histopathologically. Malondialdehyde and myeloperoxidase levels of the pancreatic tissue, blood gas analysis, leukocyte and hematocrit levels were measured. Wet/dry weight of pancreatic tissue was also measured. Serum amylase levels, pancreatic tissue malondialdehyde and myeloperoxidase levels, wet/dry weight ratio, pancreatic edema, acinar necrosis, fat necrosis and hemorrhage, inflammation and perivascular infiltration were significantly lower in the ANP + Tempol group compared with the ANP group. Tempol infusion reduced local organ damage due to acute necrotizing pancreatitis in this experimental study. These findings demonstrate that tempol has protective effects on local organ damage due to acute necrotizing pancreatitis in rats.

  11. Mental disorders in patients with acute necrotic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Dejan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The prognosis of patients with acute pancreatitis is still uncertain regardless of modern therapeutic procedures. It is even more emphasized if the acute pancreatitis is followed by psychic disorders. Objective The aim of the study was to provide an overview of the incidence of certain psychosomatic disorders in patients with acute pancreatitis and evaluate priority therapeutic procedures. Method In this study, we analyzed 16 patients with psychosomatic disorders followed by the episode of acute pancreatitis among 202 patients that were hospitalized in the period from 1993 until 2000. The diagnosis was based on anamnesis, clinical and laboratory findings and diagnostic procedures such as X-ray, US, CT and MRI. Results Among 16 patients with psychosomatic disorders followed by acute pancreatitis, 13 (81.25% patients were operated on and 3 (18.75% patients were medically treated. 6 patients experienced hallucinations, 5 memory deficiency, 16 disorientation and 14 confabulation. Conclusion Psychosomatic disorders in patients with acute pancreatitis require complex medical treatment. Due to the already mentioned complications, the management of these conditions is very difficult and with uncertain.

  12. Lung Inflammation Associated With Clinical Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrolyk, V; Wobeser, B K; Al-Dissi, A N; Carr, A; Singh, B

    2017-01-01

    Although dogs with acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) can develop respiratory complications, there are no data describing lung injury in clinical cases of ANP in dogs. Therefore, we conducted a study to characterize lung injury and determine if pulmonary intravascular macrophages (PIMs) are induced in dogs with ANP ( n = 21) compared with control dogs ( n = 6). Two pathologists independently graded histologic sections of pancreas from clinical cases to characterize the severity of ANP (total scores of 3-10) compared with controls showing histologically normal pancreas (total scores of 0). Based on histological grading, lungs from dogs with ANP showed inflammation (median score, 1.5; range, 0-3), but the scores did not differ statistically from the control lungs (median score, 0.5; range, 0-2). A grid intersects-counting method showed an increase in the numbers of MAC387-positive alveolar septal mononuclear phagocyte profiles in lungs of dogs with ANP (ratio median, 0.0243; range, 0.0093-0.0734, with 2 outliers at 0.1523 and 0.1978) compared with controls (ratio median, 0.0019; range, 0.0017-0.0031; P dogs with ANP showed labeling for von Willebrand factor in alveolar septal capillary endothelial cells, septal inflammatory cells, and alveolar macrophages. Toll-like receptor 4 and interleukin 6 were variably expressed in alveolar macrophages and septal inflammatory cells in lungs from both ANP and control dogs. Inducible nitric oxide synthase was detected in alveolar macrophages of dogs with ANP only. These data show that dogs with ANP have lung inflammation, including the recruitment of PIMs and expression of inflammatory mediators.

  13. Acute fulminant drug induced necrotizing pancreatitis in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Miramontes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced acute necrotizing pancreatitis is a rare adverse event, although it has been reported in association with different drugs, including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, and analgesic agents commonly used in rheumatology. In different reviews of the pancreotoxicity of drugs, infliximab and etanercept are mentioned among all medications implicated in drug-induced pancreatitis, but clinical cases of acute pancreatitis complicating treatment with these anti-TNF-α agents have been exceptionally reported. We describe a patient with ankylosing spondylitis treated with etanercept, who developed an acute fulminant necrotizing pancreatitis that resulted in death. Doctors should pay close attention to patients taking biologic drugs in which a complaint of abdominal pain lasting for several days with no apparent cause may require a prompt referral for medical consultation.

  14. Roux-en-Y drainage of a pancreatic fistula for disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome after acute necrotizing pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Erik G; Scaife, Courtney L; Mulvihill, Sean J; Glasgow, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    After acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP), a pancreatic fistula may occur from disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome (DPDS) where a segment of the pancreas is no longer in continuity with the main pancreatic duct. To study the outcome of patients treated using Roux-Y pancreatic fistula tract-jejunostomy for DPDS after ANP. Between 2002 and 2011, patients treated for DPDS in the setting of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) or magnetic resonance cholangiopanreatography (MRCP) documented main pancreatic duct disruption with Roux-Y pancreatic fistula tract-jejunostomy. In all, seven patients with DPDS were treated. The median age was 62 years (range 49-78) and five were men. The cause of ANP was gallstones (2), alcohol (1), ERCP (1) and idiopathic (3). Pancreatic necrosectomy was done in six patients. Time from onset of pancreatitis to fistula drainage was 270 days (164-365). Pancreatic fistulae arose from DPDS in the head/neck (4) and body/tail (3). Patients had a median fistula output of 140 ml (100-200) per day before surgery. The median operative time was 142 min (75-367) and estimated blood loss was 150 ml (25 to 500). Patients began an oral diet on post-operative day 4 (3-6) and were hospitalized for a median of 7 days (5-12). The median follow-up was 264 days (29-740). Subsequently, one patient required a distal pancreatectomy. After surgery, three patients required oral hypoglycaemics. No patient developed pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. Internal surgical drainage using Roux-en-Y pancreatic fistula tract-jejunostomy is a safe and definitive treatment for patients with DPDS. © 2011 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association.

  15. Laparoscopic necrosectomy in acute necrotizing pancreatitis: Our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittu John Mathew

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Pancreatic necrosis is a local complication of acute pancreatitis. The development of secondary infection in pancreatic necrosis is associated with increased mortality. Pancreatic necrosectomy is the mainstay of invasive management. Aims: Surgical approach has significantly changed in the last several years with the advent of enhanced imaging techniques and minimally invasive surgery. However, there have been only a few case series related to laparoscopic approach, reported in literature to date. Herein, we present our experience with laparoscopic management of pancreatic necrosis in 28 patients. Materials And Methods: A retrospective study of 28 cases [20 men, 8 women] was carried out in our institution. The medical record of these patients including history, clinical examination, investigations, and operative notes were reviewed. The mean age was 47.8 years [range, 23-70 years]. Twenty-one patients were managed by transgastrocolic, four patients by transgastric, two patients by intra-cavitary, and one patient by transmesocolic approach. Results: The mean operating time was 100.8 min [range, 60-120 min]. The duration of hospital stay after the procedure was 10-18 days. Two cases were converted to open (7.1% because of extensive dense adhesions. Pancreatic fistula was the most common complication (n = 8; 28.6% followed by recollection (n = 3; 10.7% and wound infection (n = 3; 10.7%. One patient [3.6%] died in postoperative period. Conclusions: Laparoscopic pancreatic necrosectomy is a promising and safe approach with all the benefits of minimally invasive surgery and is found to have reduced incidence of major complications and mortality.

  16. N-acetylcysteine amid reduces pancreatic damage in a rat model of acute necrotizing pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkyilmaz, Serdar; Usta, Arif; Cekic, Arif Burak; Alhan, Etem; Kural, Birgül Vanizor; Ercin, Cengiz

    2016-06-15

    Inflammatory explosion and oxidative stress are important mechanisms of injury in acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). This study investigated the effects of N-acetylcysteine amid (NACA), a novel cell-permeant antioxidant with anti-inflammatory activity, on experimental ANP in rats. Fifty-two adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were used, and ANP was induced by cerulein. The animals were divided into four groups which were sham + saline, sham + NACA, ANP + saline, and ANP + NACA. NACA (2.2 mg/kg, i.p) was administered for 6 h, after the induction of ANP. The extent of acinar cell injury, mortality, systemic cardiorespiratory variables, functional capillary density, renal/hepatic functions, and changes in some enzyme markers for pancreas and lung tissues were investigated. Induction of ANP increased mortality from 0% in the sham group to 43.75% in the ANP + saline group (P pancreatic necrosis, serum amylase, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), interleukin-6, LDH in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, serum urea, tissue myeloperoxidase in pancreas and lung tissues and malondialdehyde. There was less pronounced increase in these parameters in NACA treated group. Compared with ANP group, ANP + NACA group had lower levels of pancreatic necrosis (0.5 ± 0.2 versus 1.45 ± 0.2, P pancreatitis indicates its potential usefulness in the management of ANP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pathophysiological Effects of Pancreatic Sympathetic Denervation in Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junjun; Qi, Shifang; Liu, Weifeng; Xin, Shiyong; Chang, Yongchao; Yang, Yanhui; Zhou, Liqing; Zhang, Yuming; Chu, Zhijie

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the greater splanchnic nerve (GSN) transection on the pathophysiological process of acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). The dogs were divided into a sham operation (SO) group, ANP group, and ANP with bilateral GSN transection (GSNT) group. Dogs in the GSNT group underwent bilateral GSNT immediately after ANP induction. The levels of serum pancreatic amylase (AMY), calcium, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (HCRP), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 10 (IL-10), and neutrophile granulocyte (NEU) counts were monitored dynamically, and the pathological examinations of the pancreas was performed at postoperative day 7. All the parameters among the 3 groups showed no differences before the experiment (P > 0.05). At different postoperative times, the NEU count and serum AMY, TNF-α, HCRP, and IL-10 were significantly increased; however, the serum calcium had decreased in the ANP group versus SO (P 0.05). The pancreas pathological scoring of the GSNT group was lower versus the ANP group (P < 0.05). Greater splanchnic nerve transection can alleviate development of pathophysiological processes in ANP.

  18. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of acute haemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piironen, A.; Kivisaari, R.; Pitkaeranta, P.; Poutanen, V.P.; Laippala, P.; Laurila, P.; Kivisaari, L.

    1997-01-01

    Eleven piglets with haemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis and nine piglets with oedematous pancreatitis were imaged using a multi-breath-hold TurboFLASH (TR 6.5 ms, TE 3 ms, TI 300 ms, flip angle 8 , three slices) pre-excited T1-weighted sequence with an IV bolus injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA, 0.3 mmol/kg) as a contrast agent to show dynamic contrast enhancement of the pancreas by MRI. All piglets were imaged according to the same protocol before inducing the disease. Following the IV Gd-DTPA bolus, time-enhancement curve of the pancreas during haemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis was significantly lower than during oedematous pancreatitis. The enhancement curves for the healthy piglets and piglets with oedematous pancreatitis did not differ significantly. Each piglet served as its own control. Because the results of this initial study are similar to those obtained with contrast-enhanced CT, we conclude that our results may encourage further clinical trials, and contrast-enhanced dynamic MRI may be an alternative to the established method of CT for diagnosing acute haemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis. (orig.). With 3 figs

  19. Necrotizing pancreatitis: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bendersky VA

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Victoria A Bendersky,1 Mohan K Mallipeddi,2 Alexander Perez,2 Theodore N Pappas,2 1School of Medicine, 2Department of Surgery, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Acute pancreatitis is a common disease that can progress to gland necrosis, which imposes significant risk of morbidity and mortality. In general, the treatment for pancreatitis is a supportive therapy. However, there are several reasons to escalate to surgery or another intervention. This review discusses the pathophysiology as well as medical and interventional management of necrotizing pancreatitis. Current evidence suggests that patients are best served by delaying interventions for at least 4 weeks, draining as a first resort, and debriding recalcitrant tissue using minimally invasive techniques to promote or enhance postoperative recovery while reducing wound-related complications. Keywords: necrotizing pancreatitis, pancreatic necrosectomy, VARD, pancreatic debridement, pancreatic collections

  20. Staged multidisciplinary step-up management for necrotizing pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    da Costa, D. W.; Boerma, D.; van Santvoort, H. C.; Horvath, K. D.; Werner, J.; Carter, C. R.; Bollen, T. L.; Gooszen, H. G.; Besselink, M. G.; Bakker, O. J.

    2014-01-01

    Some 15 per cent of all patients with acute pancreatitis develop necrotizing pancreatitis, with potentially significant consequences for both patients and healthcare services. This review summarizes the latest insights into the surgical and medical management of necrotizing pancreatitis. General

  1. Acinar cell ultrastructure after taurine treatment in rat acute necrotizing pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ates, Y.; Mas, M. R.; Taski, I.; Comert, B.; Isik, A. T.; Mas, N. M.; Yener, N.

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the organelle-based changes in acinar cells in experimental acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) after taurine treatment and the association of electron microscopic findings with histopathalogical changes and oxidative stress markers. The study was performed in February 2005at Gulhane School of Medicine and Hacettepe University, Turkey. Forty-five rats were divided into 3 groups. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis was induced in groups II and III. Groups I and II were treated with saline and Group III with taurine 1000mg/kg/day, i.p, for 48 hours. Histopathological and ultrastructural examinations were determined using one-way analysis of variance and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Histopathologic findings improved significantly after taurine treatment. Degree of injury in rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulums, Golgi apparatus, mitochondria and nucleus of acinar cells also decreased with taurine in correlation with biochemical and histological results. Taurine improves acinar cell organelle structure, and ultrastructural recovery in ANP reflects histological improvement. (author)

  2. Time-course proteomic analysis of taurocholate-induced necrotizing acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fétaud-Lapierre, Vanessa; Pastor, Catherine M; Jorge-Costa, Manuel; Hochstrasser, Denis F; Morel, Denis R; Frossard, Jean-Louis; Lescuyer, Pierre

    2013-06-24

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas, which varies greatly in course and severity. Severe forms are associated with serious local and/or systemic complications, and eventually death. The pathobiology of acute pancreatitis is complex. Animal models have been developed to investigate pathobiological processes and identify factors determining disease course. We performed a time-course proteomic analysis using a rat model of severe necrotizing acute pancreatitis induced by taurocholate perfusion in the pancreatic ducts. Results showed that levels of proteins associated to a given biological process changed in a coordinated fashion after disease onset. It was possible to follow the response of a particular pathobiological process to pancreatitis induction and to compare the course of protein pathways. Proteins involved in acinar cell secretion were found to follow a different kinetics than other cellular processes. After an initial decrease, secretory pathway-associated proteins raised again at 18 h post-induction. This phenomenon coincided with a burst in the expression of pancreatitis-associated protein (REG3A), an acute phase protein produced by the exocrine pancreas, and with the decrease of classical markers of pancreatic injury, suggesting that the expression of proteins associated to the secretory pathway may be a modulating factor of pancreas injury. Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a complex inflammatory disease, the pathobiology of which is not yet fully understood. Various animal models, relying on different mechanisms of disease induction, have been developed in order to investigate pathobiological processes of AP. In this study, we performed a time-course proteomic analysis to investigate changes of the pancreas proteome occurring in an experimental model of AP induced by perfusion of taurocholate, a bile acid, into the pancreatic duct. This experimental model is characterized by a severe disease with pancreatic necrosis and systemic

  3. Calendula officinalis ameliorates l-arginine-induced acute necrotizing pancreatitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jagdeep; Sidhu, Shabir; Chopra, Kanwaljit; Khan, M U

    2016-12-01

    Calendula officinalis L. (Asteraceae) has been traditionally used in treating inflammation of internal organs, gastrointestinal tract ulcers and wound healing. The present study investigates the effect of ethanol extract (95%) of Calendula officinalis flowers in l-arginine induced acute necrotizing pancreatitis in rats. Rats were divided into four groups: normal control, l-arginine control, Calendula officinalis extract (COE) treated and melatonin treated (positive control), which were further divided into subgroups (24 h, day 3 and 14) according to time points. Two injections of l-arginine 2 g/kg i.p. at 1 h intervals were administered in l-arginine control, COE and melatonin-treated groups to produce acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Biochemical parameters [serum amylase, lipase, pancreatic amylase, nucleic acid content, total proteins, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), collagen content, lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione and nitrite/nitrate] and histopathological studies were carried out. COE treatment (400 mg/kg p.o.) was found to be beneficial. This was evidenced by significantly lowered histopathological scores (2 at day 14). Nucleic acid content (DNA 21.1 and RNA 5.44 mg/g pancreas), total proteins (0.66 mg/mL pancreas) and pancreatic amylase (1031.3 100 SU/g pancreas) were significantly improved. Marked reduction in pancreatic oxidative and nitrosative stress; collagen (122 μmoles/100 mg pancreas) and TGF-β1 (118.56 pg/mL) levels were noted. Results obtained were comparable to those of positive control. The beneficial effect of COE may be attributed to its antioxidant, antinitrosative and antifibrotic actions. Hence, the study concludes that COE promotes spontaneous repair and regeneration of the pancreas.

  4. Staged multidisciplinary step-up management for necrotizing pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costa, D.W. da; Boerma, D.; Santvoort, H.C. van; Horvath, K.D.; Werner, J.; Carter, C.R.; Bollen, T.L.; Gooszen, H.G.; Besselink, M.G.; Bakker, O.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Some 15 per cent of all patients with acute pancreatitis develop necrotizing pancreatitis, with potentially significant consequences for both patients and healthcare services. METHODS: This review summarizes the latest insights into the surgical and medical management of necrotizing

  5. [Thrombotic microangiopathy in pregnancy complicated by acute hemorrhagic-necrotic pancreatitis during early puerperium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redechová, S; Féderová, L; Hammerová, L; Filkászová, A; Horváthová, D; Redecha, M

    2014-06-01

    Authors in the article describe a case of a patient with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpurain 37 weeks gestation complicated by acute severe hemorrhagic-necrotic pancreatitis during the early puerperium. Case report. Ist Department of gynaecology and obstetrics of the Comenius University Bratislava. 33-years-old patient in the 37 weeks gestation was admitted to our department with the signs of HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets). Due to the worsening clinical status, we have performed caesarean section. After the transient stabilization of the patient's clinical status, the hemolysis with severe thrombocytopenia reappeared. Based on the clinical signs of abdominal pain and computer tomography, the diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic-necrotic pancreatitis was set. The primary diagnosis was thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Therefore, therapeutic plasma exchange was performed with consequent improvement of the patients clinical state. Normalization of the platelet count was achieved after 4.plasma exchanges. Consequently 5 plasma exchanges were performed. However, one month later, the disease relapsed. Therapeutic plasma exchanges were needed again (4x), with anti CD 20 administration. This therapy had good clinical outcome, without the need for further plasma exchanges. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is highly lethal disease. Early diagnosis, treatment, and multidisciplinary approach are essential.

  6. [Prognostication of course and treatment of peripancreatic infiltrate in patients, suffering an acute necrotic pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susak, Ia M; Tkachenko, O A; Malysh, I R; Dirda, O O; Fedorchuk, O H

    2014-04-01

    Results of treatment of 229 patients, suffering an acute necrotic pancreatitis, complicated by peripancreatic infiltrate, were analyzed. To all the patients antibiotic prophylaxis and antibiotic therapy were conducted. In 63 (27.5%) patients the methods of extracorporal hemocorrection were applied, and in 108 (47.1%)--the "four--catheters" rule (catheter for epidural anesthesia, installment of the feeding intestinal probe further than the Treitz ligament level, the central vein catheterization, the programmed laparocentesis). In 31 (13.5%) patients there were determined the activity of mononuclear phagocytes and production of ROS (the oxygen active forms) by them in peripheral blood with objective for the purulent-septic complications prognostication. In 14 (6.1%) patients purulent--septic complications have occurred, postoperative lethality was 21.4%, general lethality--3.4%.

  7. Risk factors and outcome of splanchnic venous thrombosis in patients with necrotizing acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Ke, Lu; Tong, Zhihui; Li, Gang; Li, Weiqin; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2015-01-01

    Splanchnic venous thrombosis (SVT) is considered a rare but important complication in patients with acute pancreatitis (AP) and literatures regarding this topic were sparse. The aim of the present study was to investigate the risk factors of SVT in necrotizing acute pancreatitis (NAP) and assess the prognosis of these patients. Both univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were applied using 15 indices including age, gender, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores (APACHE II), CRP (C - reactive protein) levels, etc to explore potential risk factors for the development of SVT in NAP patients. Moreover, clinical outcome measures such as mortality, organ failure and length of hospital and ICU stay were also compared between NAP patients with or without SVT. According to the statistical results, only intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) was proved to be an independent risk factor for SVT (OR, 1.283; 95% CI, 1.091-1.509,P=0.003). In addition, Balthazar's CT score and occurrence of IPN (infected pancreatic necrosis) also reached statistical significance (P=0.040 and 0.047, respectively), but the 95% confidence interval shown in the multivariate logistic regression suggested that the observed ORs are not significant (1.326;95% CI 0.984-1.787 and 2.61;95 CI 0.972-7.352, respectively), which indicates weaker association between the two parameters and SVT. Regarding the clinical outcomes, patients with SVT showed higher mortality, longer hospital and intensive care unit duration, higher rates of a variety of complications and more utilization of invasive interventions. IAP is an independent risk factor for the development of SVT in patients with NAP, while Balthazar's CT score and occurrence of IPN are also associated with SVT, although not as strong as IAP. Moreover, occurrence of SVT relates with extremely poor prognosis in NAP patients, evidenced by increased mortality, morbidity and need for invasive interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier

  8. Colonic involvement in non-necrotizing acute pancreatitis: correlation of CT findings with the clinical course of affected patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesner, W.; Studler, U.; Buitrago-Tellez, C.H.; Steinbrich, W. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Basel, Petersgraben 4, 4031 Basel (Switzerland); Kocher, T. [Department of Surgery, University Hospital Basel, Petersgraben 4, 4031 Basel (Switzerland); Degen, L. [Institute of Gastroenterology, University of Basel, Petersgraben 4, 4031 Basel (Switzerland)

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe CT findings of colonic involvement in acute non-necrotizing pancreatitis and to analyze the correlation between colonic wall thickening at CT and the clinical course of these patients. The CT examinations of 19 consecutive patients with acute non-necrotizing pancreatitis who were not treated with antibiotics initially were analyzed retrospectively. The severity of acute pancreatitis was categorized according to the CT severity index (CTSI) and the presence of colonic wall thickening at the initial CT was compared with the clinical course of all patients. Seven of 11 patients with a CTSI of 4 showed a colonic wall thickening, whereas the remaining patients with a CTSI of 4 (n=4), CTSI of 3 (n=5), and CTSI of 2 (n=3) showed no colonic abnormalities at CT. Patients with colonic wall thickening presented more often with fever, showed higher levels of infectious parameters, needed more often antibiotic therapy, and had more requests for additional CT examinations and CT-guided fluid aspirations as well as a longer duration of hospital stay as compared with patients without colonic wall involvement, even if the latter presented with the same CTSI initially. It is well known that translocation of the colonic flora may significantly influence the clinical course of patients with acute pancreatitis, and our results indicate that patients with acute pancreatitis who present with colonic wall thickening at CT have an increased risk for a complicated clinical course regarding systemic infection. (orig.)

  9. A Rare Cause of Abdominal Pain in a Patient with Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana C. Branco

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Walled-off necrosis (WON is a potentially lethal late complication of acute pancreatitis (AP and occurs in less than 10% of AP cases. It can be located in or outside the pancreas. When infected, the mortality rate increases and can reach 100% if the collection is not drained. Its treatment is complex and includes, at the beginning, intravenous antibiotics, which permit sepsis control and a delay in the therapeutic intervention, like drainage. Nowadays, a minimally invasive approach is advised. Depending on the location of the collection, computed tomography (CT-guided drainage or endoscopic necrosectomy are the primary options, then complemented by surgical necrosectomy if needed. Infected WON of the abdominal wall has been rarely described in the literature and there is no report of any infection with Citrobacter freundii. Case: We present the case of a 61-year-old man with necrotizing AP complicated by WON of the left abdominal wall, infected with Citrobacter freundii that was successfully treated with CT-guided percutaneous drainage and intravenous antibiotics. Conclusion: Infected WON accounts for considerable mortality and its location in the abdominal wall is rare; it can be treated with antibiotics and CT-guided drainage with no need for further intervention.

  10. [PROGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF ELEMENTS OF THE MULTIORGAN INSUFFICIENCY SYNDROME AND ESTIMATION OF THE PATIENTS STATE SEVERITY IN ACCORDANCE TO INTEGRAL SCALES IN AN ACUTE NECROTIC PANCREATITIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomyak, I V; Rotar, O V; Rotar, V I; Petrovskiy, G G

    2015-09-01

    There were examined 113 patients, in whom an acute necrotic pancreatitis was diagnosed. While admittance to hospital a constant organ insufficiency was revealed in 50 (44%), a transient one--in 63 (56%) patients. In total 31 (27.4%) patients died. Respiratory insufficiency have occurred in 67% patients, and almost with similar rate--cardio-vascular (in 59%), renal (in 56%) and enteral (in 54%), dominating in the lethality structure. The BISAP (Bedcide Index for Severity in Acute Pancreatitis) scales applied permit with high probability to prognosticate the organ insufficiency and lethality in patients, suffering an acute necrotic pancreatitis.

  11. [The value of dual-source dual-energy CT with iodine overlay in the diagnosis of acute necrotizing pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yuan; Huang, Zi-Xing; Li, Zhen-Lin; Song, Bin; Deng, Li-Ping

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the clinical value of dual-source computed tomography dual-energy Iodine overlay technique in the imaging diagnosis of acute necrotizing pancreatitis. The imaging data were retrospectively analyzed in 67 cases of acute necrotizing pancreatitis underwent contrast-enhanced dual-source dual-energy CT in portal venous phase. The CT imaging parameters, including the difference of CT value between pancreatic parenchyma and necrotic lesion, contrast-to-noise ratio of pancreatic parenchyma-to-necrosis, area of pancreatic necrosis and score of subjective diagnosis, were measured and assessed on CT images of 80 kV, 140 kV, weighted-average 120 kV as well as Iodine overlay. The differences of CT value between pancreatic parenchyma and necrosis in the images of 80 kV, 140 kV, weighted-average 120 kV and Iodine overlay were (67.40 +/- 20.82) HU, (42.87 +/- 14.99) HU, (48.69 +/- 15.82) HU, (33.01 +/- 10.26) HU, respectively; contrast-to-noise ratios of pancreatic parenchyma-to-necrosis of each group were 8.36 +/- 3.58, 5.85 +/- 2.65, 7.68 +/- 3.51, 10.60 4.34; area of pancreatic necrosis of each group was (3.78 +/- 2.68) cm2, (3.28 +/- 2.59) cm2, (3.37 +/- 2.46) cm2, (2.42 +/- 1.98) cm2; the score of subjective diagnosis of each group was 3.88 +/- 0.33, 3.31 +/- 0.80, 3.58 +/- 0.66, 2.81 +/- 0.76, respectively. The four indexes in the images of Iodine overlay were significantly different from those of another three groups (P overlay was significantly higher than that of another three groups, while the difference of CT value, area of pancreatic necrosis and score of subjective diagnosis were lower. CONCLUSION; Dual-source CT dual-energy Iodine overlay is not helpful to improve subjective judgment in the diagnosis of pancreatic necrosis, but contributes to the display of hypoperfusion area around the necrosis.

  12. [Time of surgical treatment performance in patients with acute necrotic pancreatitis complicated by secondary pancreatic infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryvoruchko, I A; Boĭko, V V; Andreieshchev, S A

    2011-07-01

    Retrospective and prospective analysis of the surgical treatment results was conducted in 445 patients, suffering secondary pancreatic infection, ageing 18-83 yrs. Correlation connection was established between the terms of the operative intervention conduction and the patients mortality (r = -0.95, t = -18.7, P = 0.000). After the operation in 30 days from the admittance to the hospital the patients mortality was lesser.

  13. Imaging of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoeni, Ruedi F

    2015-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas. Several classification systems have been used in the past but were considered unsatisfactory. A revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was published that assessed the clinical course and severity of disease; divided acute pancreatitis into interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis; discerned an early phase (first week) from a late phase (after the first week); and focused on systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ failure. This article focuses on the revised classification of acute pancreatitis, with emphasis on imaging features, particularly on newly-termed fluid collections and implications for the radiologist. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... its blood vessels. This problem is called acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis affects men more often than women. Certain ... well it can be treated. Complications of acute pancreatitis may include: Acute kidney failure Long-term lung damage (ARDS) Buildup ...

  15. Surgical management of acute necrotizing pancreatitis: a 13-year experience and a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijs, V. B.; Besselink, M. G. H.; van Minnen, L. P.; Gooszen, H. G.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The course of acute pancreatitis (AP) is unpredictable and can vary from mild to lethal. Mortality varies from low ( <2%) in mild cases to high (20%-70%) in the case of infected pancreatic necrosis. Surgical management has not been investigated in well-designed trials. Based on

  16. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Acute Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is ... of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for ...

  17. Unusual tomographic findings of complicated necrotizing pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Maria Silveira Sigrist

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis (AP is a potential life-threatening disease, which originates from inflammatory involvement of the pancreas and surrounding tissues. Serious complications eventuate and treatment is difficult. AP is classified in both interstitial edematous pancreatitis, which occurs in 70-80% of patients, and necrotizing pancreatitis, which occurs in 20-30% of patients. Diagnosis is based on the presence of two of the following criteria: abdominal pain, increased serum determination of amylase and/or lipase more than three times the reference value, and characteristic tomographic findings. Among the latter, there is the pancreatic and surrounding tissue damage as well as that related to distant organ involvement. This case report shows the fatal case of a male patient with a history of heavy alcoholic abuse admitted with the diagnosis of necrotizing pancreatitis. The authors call attention to the unusual tomographic findings; namely, a huge duodenal hematoma and a large hemoperitoneum, ischemic involvement of the spleen and kidneys, as well as pancreatic and peripancreatic necrosis.

  18. Non-invasive detection of infection in acute pancreatic and acute necrotic collections with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: preliminary findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islim, Filiz; Salik, Aysun Erbahceci; Bayramoglu, Sibel; Guven, Koray; Alis, Halil; Turhan, Ahmet Nuray

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the contribution of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) to the detection of infection in acute pancreatitis-related collections. A total of 21 DW-MRI, and computed tomography (CT) were performed on 20 patients diagnosed as acute pancreatitis with acute peri-pancreatic fluid or necrotic collections. Collections were classified as infected or sterile according to the culture and follow-up results. Collections with gas bubbles on CT images were considered to be infected. Collections with peripheral bright signals on DW-MRI images were considered to be positive, whereas those without signals were considered to be negative. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the peripheral and central parts of the collections were measured. Student's t test was used to compare the means of ADC values of independent groups. Apart from one false positive result, the presence of infection was detected by DW-MRI with 95.2% accuracy. The sensitivity and accuracy of DW-MRI were higher than CT for the detection of infection. The ADC values in the central parts of the collections were significantly different between the infected and sterile groups. DW-MRI can be used as a non-invasive technique for the detection of infection in acute pancreatitis-associated collections.

  19. A case of severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis in a 38-year-old woman postpartum due to a parathyroid adenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupprecht, Holger

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Lethal necrotizing pancreatitis postpartum due to primary hyperparathyroidism caused by a parathyroid adenoma can be considered as a rarity. Due to the unspecific clinical signs and uncommonness this disorder may be overseen very easily. The reported case illustrates the very importance of early diagnosis of this endocrine disorder in pregnancy in order to avoid a lethal course.

  20. Beneficial effect of splanchnic nerve transection and harmful effect of vagotomy on acute necrotizing pancreatitis in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jun-Jun; Chu, Zhi-Jie; Zhang, Yu-Ming; Qi, Shi-Fang; Chang, Yong-Chao; Xin, Shi-Yong; Liu, Wei-Feng; Yang, Yan-Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Yang, Cheng; Yang, Tian-Bao

    2015-01-01

    The nervous system interacts dynamically with the immune system to modulate inflammation through humoral and neural pathways. However, the influence of visceral nerve (VN) on acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) has drawn little attention. To investigate the influence of VN on the pathophysiological process of ANP in dogs. The dogs were divided into a sham operation (SO) group, ANP group, ANP + vagal nerve trunk transection (VNTT) group, and ANP + greater splanchnic nerve transection (GSNT) group. The VNTT and GSNT groups underwent VNTT and GSNT respectively immediately after ANP induction. The levels of serum pancreatic amylase (AMY), calcium, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (HCRP), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-10 (IL-10) were monitored dynamically and the pathological examinations of the pancreas was performed at postoperative day 7. All serum parameters among the four groups showed no differences before the experiment (p > 0.05). At different postoperative times, the serum TNF-α, IL-1β, HCRP, and AMY were significantly increased, however, the serum calcium and IL-10 had dropped in the ANP group versus SO group (p < 0.05); an alike variation trend occurred between the VNTT group and ANP group (p < 0.05); an opposite variation trend occurred between the GSNT group and the ANP group (p < 0.05). The pancreas pathological scoring of VNTT group was highest in the four groups (p < 0.05) and GSNT group was lower versus ANP group (p < 0.05). The GSNT has been shown to alleviate development of ANP, however, VNTT may exacerbate the ANP.

  1. Infection increases mortality in necrotizing pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werge, Mikkel; Novovic, Srdjan; Schmidt, Palle N

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the influence of infection on mortality in necrotizing pancreatitis. METHODS: Eligible prospective and retrospective studies were identified through manual and electronic searches (August 2015). The risk of bias was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Meta...... sterile necrosis and organ failure was associated with a mortality of 19.8%. If the patients had infected necrosis without organ failure the mortality was 1.4%. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with necrotizing pancreatitis are more than twice as likely to die if the necrosis becomes infected. Both organ failure...... and infected necrosis increase mortality in necrotizing pancreatitis....

  2. [Identifying the severe acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo Tizón, Anais; Targarona Modena, Javier; Málaga Rodríguez, Germán; Barreda Cevasco, Luis

    2011-01-01

    To compare patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis without any additional complications during their hospital stay (Group A) versus patients with Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis with additional complications during their hospital stay (Group B). Data obtained from a pre-existing base from hospitalized patients with diagnosis of acute necrotizing pancreatitis in the specialized unit of "Unidad de Pancreatitis Aguda Grave del Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins" between 2000 and 2010. Data included patients with diagnosis of acute necrotizing pancreatitis, of ages 18 and over. Data from 215 patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis was included. Patients from Group A represented 32% (68) and from Group B 68% (147). Group A had a average of 39 hospitalized days and Group B had an average of 56 days (p=0.01). From Group A 22% had more than 50% of necrosis while 43% of Group B had this extension of necrosis (p pancreatitis, based on the presence of necrosis, behave likewise. It is an extended necrosis, described as more than 50% of pancreatic necrosis, and not the presence itself which will determine additional complications during the course of disease and a greater mortality.

  3. Effect of Chaiqin Chengqi Decoction on cholecystokinin receptor 1-mediated signal transduction of pancreatic acinar cells in acute necrotizing pancreatitis rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jia; Jin, Tao; Lin, Zi-Qi; Wang, Xiao-Xiang; Yang, Xiao-Nan; Xia, Qing; Xue, Ping

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of Chaiqin Chengqi Decoction (,CQCQD) on cholecystokinin receptor 1 (CCKR1)-mediated signal transduction of pancreatic acinar cell in rats with acute necrotic pancreatitis (ANP). Twenty-seven Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into three groups: the control group, the ANP group, and the CQCQD group (9 in each group). ANP rats were induced by two intraperitoneal injections of 8% L-arginine (pH=7.0, 4.4 g/kg) over a 2-h period. Rats were treated with 1.5 mL/100 g body weight of CQCQD (CQCQD group) or physiological saline (control and ANP groups) at 2 h interval. And 6 h after induction, pancreatic tissues were collected for histopathological examination. Pancreatic acinar cells were isolated for determination of CCKR1 mRNA and protein expression, phospholipase C (PLC) and inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3), and determination of fluorescence intensity (FI) as a measure of intracellular calcium ion concentration [Ca(2+)]i. The pancreatic histopathological score (6.2 ± 1.1) and the levels of PLC (1,187.2 ± 228.2 μg/mL) and IP3 (872.2 ± 88.4 μg/mL) of acinar cells in the ANP group were higher than those in the control (2.8 ± 0.4, 682.5 ± 121.8 μg/mL, 518.4 ± 115.8 μg/mL) and the CQCQD (3.8 ± 0.8, 905.3 ± 78.5 μg/mL, 611.0 ± 42.5 μg/mL) groups (Ppancreatic acinar cell CCKR1 mRNA in the ANP group was up-regulated (expression ratio=1.761; P=0.024) compared with the control group. The expression of pancreatic acinar cell CCKR1 mRNA in the CQCQD group was down-regulated (expression ratio=0.311; P=0.035) compared with the ANP group. The ratio of gray values of the CCKR1 and β-actin in the ANP group (1.43 ± 0.17) was higher than those in the control (0.70 ± 0.15) and CQCQD (0.79 ± 0.11) groups (PPancreatic acinar cell calcium overload of ANP induced by L-arginine was related to the up-regulated expressions of pancreatic acinar cell CCKR1 mRNA and protein. CQCQD can down-regulate expressions of pancreatic acinar cell CCKR1 mRNA and

  4. Staged multidisciplinary step-up management for necrotizing pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, D W; Boerma, D; van Santvoort, H C; Horvath, K D; Werner, J; Carter, C R; Bollen, T L; Gooszen, H G; Besselink, M G; Bakker, O J

    2014-01-01

    Some 15 per cent of all patients with acute pancreatitis develop necrotizing pancreatitis, with potentially significant consequences for both patients and healthcare services. This review summarizes the latest insights into the surgical and medical management of necrotizing pancreatitis. General management strategies for the treatment of complications are discussed in relation to the stage of the disease. Frequent clinical evaluation of the patient's condition remains paramount in the first 24-72 h of the disease. Liberal goal-directed fluid resuscitation and early enteral nutrition should be provided. Urgent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is indicated when cholangitis is suspected, but it is unclear whether this is appropriate in patients with predicted severe biliary pancreatitis without cholangitis. Antibiotic prophylaxis does not prevent infection of necrosis and antibiotics are not indicated as part of initial management. Bacteriologically confirmed infections should receive targeted antibiotics. With the more conservative approach to necrotizing pancreatitis currently advocated, fine-needle aspiration culture of pancreatic or extrapancreatic necrosis will less often lead to a change in management and is therefore indicated less frequently. Optimal treatment of infected necrotizing pancreatitis consists of a staged multidisciplinary 'step-up' approach. The initial step is drainage, either percutaneous or transluminal, followed by surgical or endoscopic transluminal debridement only if needed. Debridement is delayed until the acute necrotic collection has become 'walled-off'. Outcome following necrotizing pancreatitis has improved substantially in recent years as a result of a shift from early surgical debridement to a staged, minimally invasive, multidisciplinary, step-up approach. © 2013 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Surgical intervention in patients with necrotizing pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besselink, MG; de Bruijn, MT; Rutten, JP; Boermeester, MA; Hofker, HS; Gooszen, HG

    Background: This study evaluated the various surgical strategies for treatment of (suspected) infected necrotizing pancreatitis (INP) and patient referrals for this condition in the Netherlands. Methods: This retrospective study included all 106 consecutive patients who had surgical treatment for

  6. Medical image of the week: necrotizing pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desai H

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. A 60-year-old man with a past medical history significant for coronary artery disease status post percutaneous coronary intervention was admitted to Banner University Medical Center for acute pancreatitis complicated by a pericardial effusion requiring pericardiocentesis. The following day, the patient developed severe shortness of breath requiring increasing amounts of supplemental oxygen. The patient was emergently transferred to ICU for noninvasive bilevel positive airway pressure ventilation, but he subsequently required intubation. Throughout his worsening condition, he denied any abdominal pain, only relaying ongoing substernal chest pain. His troponins, however, remained negative and echocardiography failed to show any reaccumulation of the pericardial effusion. CT scan of the chest failed to show any pulmonary embolism. But, CT abdomen displayed acute pancreatitis complicated by peripancreatic gas consistent with necrotizing pancreatitis (Figure 1. Emergent laparotomy was completed. There were no signs of stomach or duodenal perforation. Purulent fluid was removed from the lesser sac and ...

  7. [Effects of continuous early enteral nutrition on the gut barrier function in dogs with acute necrotizing pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Wang, Xing-Peng; Liu, Pi; Wu, Ka; Xu, Min; Yu, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Gen-Sheng

    2004-10-17

    To evaluate the effects of continuous early enteral nutrition on the gut barrier function in acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). Thirty mongrel dogs underwent laparotomy and 5% mixed solution of sodium taurocholate with trypsin was infused into the pancreatic ducts so as to induce model of ANP. Permanent duodenal and jejunal fistulas were retained. Then the 30 dogs were randomly divided into 6 groups of 5 dogs: total parenteral nutrition (TPN) group, normal saline (NS) group, duodenal nutrison multifibre (DN) group, duodenal PEPTI-2000Varient (DP) group, jejunal nutrison multifibre (JN) group, and jejunal PEPTI-2000Varient (JP) group, the last 4 groups being called enteral nutrition (EN) group together. Infusion of nutritional solutions was performed via the duodenal or jejunal fistulas, beginning 24 hours after the operation and lasting for 5 days. The levels of endotoxin and D-(-)-lactate in the peripheral plasma were measured every day. On the days 2 and 5 after the operation test solution to measure the enteral permeability, containing lactulose and mannitol, was infused via the fistulas and then urine within 6 hours thereafter was collected to detect the concentrations of lactulose and mannitol and calculate the lactulose/mannitol ratio. Seven days after the operation the dogs were killed to take the pancreas and intestines to be examined by microscopy. Feces was collected. ERIC-PCR fingerprint method was used to examine the structure and distribution of ERIC series of the microbial communities in the gut. The plasma D-(-)-lactate of the NS group gradually increased and peaked on the 5th day after the operation, and that of the TPN group gradually increased too, however, lower than that of the NS group at any time points and was significantly lower on the 5th day (P dogs. However, the makeup and distribution of intestinal microbial in the TPN groups were quite different from those of the normal dogs. EN helps maintain gut mucosal barrier, decreases endotoxin

  8. Surgical Treatment of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Jens; Uhl, Waldemar; Büchler, Markus W.

    2003-10-01

    Patients with predicted severe necrotizing pancreatitis as diagnosed by C-reactive protein (>150 mg/L) and/or contrast-enhanced computed tomography should be managed in the intensive care unit. Prophylactic broad-spectrum antibiotics reduce infection rates and survival in severe necrotizing pancreatitis. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic sphincterotomy is a causative therapy for gallstone pancreatitis with impacted stones, biliary sepsis, or obstructive jaundice. Fine needle aspiration for bacteriology should be performed to differentiate between sterile and infected pancreatic necrosis in patients with sepsis syndrome. Infected pancreatic necrosis in patients with clinical signs and symptoms of sepsis is an indication for surgery. Patients with sterile pancreatic necrosis should be managed conservatively. Surgery in patients with sterile necrosis may be indicated in cases of persistent necrotizing pancreatitis and in the rare cases of "fulminant acute pancreatitis." Early surgery, within 14 days after onset of the disease, is not recommended in patients with necrotizing pancreatitis. The surgical approach should be organ-preserving (debridement/necrosectomy) and combined with a postoperative management concept that maximizes postoperative evacuation of retroperitoneal debris and exudate. Minimally invasive surgical procedures have to be regarded as an experimental approach and should be restricted to controlled trials. Cholecystectomy should be performed to avoid recurrence of gallstone-associated acute pancreatitis.

  9. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-21

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  10. Management of necrotizing pancreatitis in the third trimester of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducarme, Guillaume; Châtel, Paul; Alves, Arnaud; Hammel, Pascal; Luton, Dominique

    2009-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis during pregnancy is a severe disease with a high materno-fetal mortality, which recently decreased because of earlier diagnosis and improvement in maternal and neonatal intensive care. We describe a 19-year-old woman who presented at 37 weeks gestation with acute abdominal pain and attacks of vomiting. Obstetrical and fetal examinations were normal. Biochemical investigations and magnetic resonance imaging showed a gallstone migration with necrotizing pancreatitis (Balthazar 5 points). Our multidisciplinary team decided on nonsurgical conservative treatment including morphine administration and enteral feeding, and vaginal delivery which was possible 30 h after induction of labor. Follow up was uneventful with a resolution of pain and signs of pancreatitis on imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging can be useful and safe to estimate the severity of acute and necrotizing pancreatitis in the third trimester of pregnancy. In case of sterile necrotizing pancreatitis, nonsurgical conservative treatment and a vaginal delivery should be performed when possible in these patients to reduce the risk of maternal infection.

  11. Acute pancreatitis: staging with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gialeli, E.; Petrocheilou, G.; Georgaki, S.; Tzemailas, I.; Adraktas, A.; Charilas, G.; Patsiogiannis, V.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Computed Tomography (CT) is the imaging modality of choice for the diagnosis and staging of acute pancreatitis and its complications. Objectives and tasks: The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate the findings in CT images which are useful for staging acute pancreatitis according to Balthazar, their significance and restrictions. Materials and methods: CT images from patients who were referred to our Department for an abdominal CT scan for the diagnosis or/and staging of acute pancreatitis were retrospectively studied. Results: In acute pancreatitis, CT helps to stage the severity of inflammatory process, to detect pancreatic necrosis and to depict local complications. CT severity index (CTSI), which was proposed by Balthazar et al, combines the grade of pancreatitis with the extent of pancreatic necrosis assigning points to the patients in order to find the severity index which scales from 0-10. More points are given for a higher grade of pancreatitis and for more extensive necrosis. Types of pancreatitis according to CTSI are: interstitial (Balthazar grade A-C), exudative (Balthazar grade D or E), necrotising (Balthazar grade E, CTSI:10) and central gland necrotising. Patients with pancreatitis but no collections or necrosis have an interstitial (mild) pancreatitis. In exudative pancreatitis there is normal enhancement of the entire pancreas associated with extensive peripancreatic collections. Necrotizing (severe) pancreatitis is characterized by protacted clinical course, high incidence of local complications and high mortality rate. Central gland necrosis is a subtype of necrotizing pancreatitis. Conclusions: The combination of CT imaging and clinical and laboratory evaluation allows the early diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis may vary from a mild uneventful disease to a severe life-threatening illness with multisystemic organ failure. Thus, it is crucial to identify patients who are at high risk of severe

  12. Acute pancreatitis: clinical vs. CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.C.; Barkin, J.; Isikoff, M.B.; Silver stein, W.; Kalser, M.

    1982-01-01

    In a prospective study of 91 patients with acute pancreatitis, computed tomographic (CT) findings were correlated with the clinical type of acute pancreatitis. In acute edematous pancreatitis (63 patients; 16 with repeat CT), CT was normal (28%) or showed inflammation limited to the pancreas (61%). Phlegmonous changes were present in 11%, including one patient with focal pancreatic hemorrhage, indicating that clinically unsuspected hemorrhagic pancreatitis can occur. In acute necrotizing (hemorrhagic, suppurative) pancreatitis (nine patients; eight with repeat CT), no patient had a normal CT scan and 89% had phlegmonous changes. One patient had hemorrhagic pancreatitis and three had abscesses. In acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis (10 patients; three with repeat CT), there were pancreatic calcifications (70%), a focal mass (40%), and pancreatic ductal dilation (30%). On follow-up CT, the findings of acute pancreatitis did not always disappear with resolution of the clinical symptons. This was especialy true of phlegmonous pancreatitis, where the CT findings could persist for months

  13. Current trends in the management of infected necrotizing pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakorafas, George H; Lappas, Christos; Mastoraki, Aikaterini; Delis, Spiros G; Safioleas, Michael

    2010-02-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis is a potentially life-threatening disease. Pancreatic necrosis is associated with an aggravated prognosis, while superimposed infection is almost always lethal without surgery. Bacterial translocation mainly from the gut is the most widely accepted mechanism in the pathogenesis of infected pancreatic necrosis. Infected pancreatic necrosis should be suspected in the presence of the usual markers of systemic inflammation (i.e., fever and leukocytosis), organ failure, or a protracted severe clinical course. The diagnostic method of choice to confirm the diagnosis of pancreatic necrosis is contrast-enhanced computed tomography, where necrotic areas are evidenced as regions without enhancement. The presence of pancreatic necrotic infection should be based on a combination of clinical manifestations, results of laboratory investigation (mainly increased levels of CRP and / or procalcitonin), and can be confirmed by image-guided fine-needle aspiration and gram stain /culture of the aspirates. Surgery remains the treatment of choice for the management of infected pancreatic necrosis and involves open necrosectomy (debridement) and wide drainage of the peripancreatic areas, often in association with continuous irrigation. Planned reoperations may be required to achieve complete removal of the necrotic / infected material. The timing of surgery is of paramount importance; ideally, surgery should be performed after 2 or 3 weeks from the onset of pancreatitis. Recently, various minimally invasive approaches have been described, but they have not been compared in prospective trials with the classical open surgery. Antibiotic therapy is routinely used in patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis, in conjunction with surgical debridement; its role, however, in the management of patients with sterile necrosis is recently questioned. Nutritional support should be taken into consideration in these patients; enteral nutrition should be preferred over

  14. Effects of dexamethasone on intercellular adhesion molecule 1 expression and inflammatory response in necrotizing acute pancreatitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramudo, Laura; Yubero, Sara; Manso, Manuel A; Sanchez-Recio, Javier; Weruaga, Eduardo; De Dios, Isabel

    2010-10-01

    Adhesion molecules are involved in the inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis (AP). We investigated the effect of dexamethasone (Dx) on intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) expression during AP and its consequences on leukocyte recruitment and pancreatic damage. Acute pancreatitis was induced in rats by 3.5% sodium taurocholate for 3 hours and 6 hours. Dexamethasone (1 mg/kg) was administered either 30 minutes before or 1 hour after inducing AP. Messenger RNA ICAM-1 expression in pancreas and lung, membrane-bound ICAM-1 in acinar cells, and ICAM-1 plasma levels were analyzed. Histological examination of the pancreas and neutrophil infiltration in pancreas and lung were also measured. Prophylactic and therapeutic administration of Dx down-regulated ICAM-1 expression in pancreas and lung from early AP. Dexamethasone given before AP reduced the pancreatic damage, but lung inflammation was not prevented. Therapeutic Dx treatment was ineffective in avoiding leukocyte recruitment into the pancreas and lung in rats with AP. High ICAM-1 concentration was found in plasma during AP, which was not reduced by Dx treatments. Dexamethasone down-regulates ICAM-1 expression, but it does not completely prevent leukocyte recruitment during sodium taurocholate-induced AP.

  15. A Novel Biosensor for Evaluation of Apoptotic or Necrotic Effects of Nitrogen Dioxide during Acute Pancreatitis in Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Jacewicz

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The direct and accurate estimation of nitric dioxide levels is an extremely laborious and technically demanding procedure in the molecular diagnostics of inflammatory processes. The aim of this work is to demonstrate that a stop-flow technique utilizing a specific spectroscopic biosensor can be used for detection of nanomolar quantities of NO2 in biological milieu. The use of novel compound cis-[Cr(C2O4(AaraNH2(OH22]+ increases NO2 estimation accuracy by slowing down the rate of NO2 uptake. In this study, an animal model of pancreatitis, where nitrosative stress is induced by either 3g/kg bw or 1.5 g/kg bw dose of L-arginine, was used. Biochemical parameters and morphological characteristics of acute pancreatitis were monitored, specifically assessing pancreatic acinar cell death mode, NO2 generation and cellular glutathione level. The severity of the process correlated positively with NO2 levels in pancreatic acinar cell cytosol samples, and negatively with cellular glutathione levels.

  16. Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein-Angiopoietin-1 Has a Protective Effect of Vascular Endothelial Barrier in Rat With Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ya-Feng; Kong, Ping-Ting; Li, Hong-Chang; Fan, Xin-Juan; Tu, Jia-Min; Xie, Jin-Kun; Tian, Ji-Yun; Pan, Li-Yun; Chen, Teng; Cao, Yi-Jun; Yin, Pei-Hao; Peng, Wen; Feng, Dian-Xu

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the protective effect of angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) from capillary endothelial damage in rats with acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). 96 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly averaged and divided into control group, ANP group, Si-Ang-1 group, and COMP (cartilage oligomeric matrix protein)-Ang-1 group. Animals were killed at 6, 12, and 24 hours after molding. Levels of serum amylase, porcine endothelin 1, C-reactive protein, and Ang-1 were detected; histopathological changes in the pancreas were observed; capillary permeability and Ang-1 expression of the pancreatic tissue were detected by Evans Blue extravasation assay, immunohistochemistry, Western blot, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. (1) Levels of serum amylase, C-reactive protein, and porcine endothelin-1 increased and level of Ang-1 decrease in the ANP group and Si-Ang-1 group compared with the control group, whereas COMP-Ang-1 group could improve the changes. (2) The order of pancreas pathological changes (mild to severe) is: control group, COMP-Ang-1 group, ANP group, and Si-Ang-1 group. (3) Capillary permeability of the pancreatic tissue in the COMP-Ang-1 group was lower than that in the ANP group. (4) Ang-1 mRNA and protein expression in the COMP-Ang-1 group was significantly higher than in the ANP group. COMP-Ang-1 can upregulate the expression of Ang-1 protein to promote angiogenesis and improve early inflammatory and pathological damage in ANP group.

  17. Acute pancreatitis following medical abortion: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amini Hashem

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute pancreatitis rarely complicates pregnancy. Although most pregnant women with acute pancreatitis have associated gallstones, less common causes such as drugs have been reported. Case presentation We report the case of a 34-year-old woman who underwent medical abortion with mifepristone and gemeprost and received codeine as pain-relief during the induction of abortion. She developed a severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis which required 14 days of intensive care. Other possible etiological factors, i.e. gallstone, alcohol intake and hyperlipidemia, were excluded. Conclusions The reported case of acute pancreatitis was most likely drug-induced.

  18. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis. PMID:25778551

  19. Minimally invasive endoscopic treatment of necrotizing pancreatitis: A case report with images and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassia Lemos Moura

    Full Text Available Summary Necrotizing pancreatitis with fluid collections can occur as a complication of acute pancreatitis. The management of these patients depends on the severity and involves multiple medical treatment modalities, as clinical intensive care and surgical intervention. In this article, we show a severe case of walled-off pancreatic necrosis that was conducted by endoscopic drainage with great clinical outcome.

  20. Necrotizing Pancreatitis with Hypertriglyceridemia Development Results: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ižbrahim Yetim

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia is a relatively rare clinical entity. Acute pancreatic necrosis is a life threatening form of acute pancreatitis in which early recognition and treatment is important. Necrotising pancreatitis should be treated immediately. We presented a case of pancreatic necrosis due to hypert¬riglyceridemia which required surgical intervention. We performed necrosectomy. After surgery the patient recovered. We presented the case in order to mention necrotising pancreatitis arising from hypertriglyceridemia and requiring surgical exploration.

  1. Acute Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis (ANUG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas E. Kman

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available History of Present Illness: A 34-year-old HIV positive female presented to the emergency department with a three-week history of swollen, painful gums. She had difficulty eating and chewing, along with aches and general malaise. The patient was an everyday smoker and was not taking any antiretroviral medication. Significant findings: Physical examination revealed inflamed gingiva, ulceration, and soft tissue necrosis (Image 1 along with mandibular lymphadenopathy (not shown. Given her symptoms, poor oral care, and her immunocompromised state, she was given a diagnosis of Acute Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis (ANUG or Vincent’s Angina. Discussion: Acute Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis (ANUG, Vincent’s Angina, or Trench Mouth is the only periodontal disease in which bacteria invade non-necrotic tissue. The etiology is usually secondary to fusobacteria and spirochete overgrowth of bacteria which is normally present in the oral cavity. HIV infection, previous necrotizing gingivitis, poor oral hygiene, malnutrition, smoking, and stress are predisposing factors. Antibiotics and improved nutrition have significantly decreased the incidence of ANUG. The prevalence of ANUG among HIV infected patients varies from 4.3% to 16.0%. ANUG is 20.8 times more likely to be seen in AIDS patients with CD4 counts less than 200 cells/mm3. In developing countries, like those in Sub-Saharan Africa, incidence of ANUG is increasing among children with a prevalence as high as 23% in children under 10 years of age.1 Treatment for ANUG is multifactorial. Patients need good debridement under anesthesia so dental referral is imperative. Pain control with Ibuprofen or low dose opioids is indicated. Oral hygiene instructions include Chlorhexidine 0.12% twice daily, proper nutrition, appropriate fluid intake, and smoking cessation. For signs of systemic involvement, the recommended antibiotics are Amoxicillin and Metronidazole.2 If left untreated, ANUG may lead to rapid

  2. Endoscopic transpapillary stenting or conservative treatment for pancreatic fistulas in necrotizing pancreatitis: multicenter series and literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, O.J.; Baal, M.C. van; Santvoort, H.C. van; Besselink, M.G.; Poley, J.W.; Heisterkamp, J.; Bollen, T.L.; Gooszen, H.G.; Eijck, C.H. van

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Endoscopic transpapillary stenting (ETS) of the pancreatic duct facilitates ductal outflow and may reduce time to pancreatic fistula closure. However, data on the feasibility of ETS in patients with necrotizing pancreatitis are scarce. BACKGROUND: Pancreatic fistulas often occur after

  3. Surgery for Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Navadgi, Suresh; Pandanaboyana, Sanjay; Windsor, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Surgery for acute pancreatitis has undergone significant changes over the last 3 decades. A better understanding of the pathophysiology has contributed to this, but the greatest driver for change has been the rise of less invasive interventions in the fields of laparoscopy, endoscopy and radiology. Surgery has a very limited role in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. The most common indication for intervention in acute pancreatitis is for the treatment of complications and most notably the ...

  4. Pancreatic Juice Culture in Acute Pancreatitis and Other Pancreatic Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Masataka Kikuyama; Tatsunori Sato; Takafumi Kurokami; Yuji Ota; Yoshihiro Yokoi

    2016-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the results of pancreatic juice cultures of patients with acute pancreatitis and other pancreatic disorders. Methods Twenty patients who underwent pancreatic juice culture were studied. Nine had acute pancreatitis due to alcohol (n=5), idiopathic causes (n=2), drugs (n=1), or gallstones (n=1), and remaining 11 had other pancreatic disorders such as an intraductal papillary mucin-producing neoplasm (n=3) and main pancreatic duct dilatation with a stricture due to a...

  5. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liqun; Li, Weiqin; Geng, Yanxia; Shen, Bo; Li, Jieshou

    2011-06-01

    The highest maternal-fetal risk from pancreatitis in pregnancy is likely to be posed by the most severe cases, which we have compared with mild cases. Retrospective observational study. A general surgery department of a university referral hospital in Nanjing, China. Eighteen pregnancies complicated with severe acute pancreatitis and 51 pregnancies complicated with mild acute pancreatitis. Medical records were reviewed for every pregnant woman with mild or severe acute pancreatitis during January 1999 to December 2009. Information on demographics, clinical and laboratory data, maternal and fetal outcomes. Gestational age of onset was significantly higher in the severe acute pancreatitis group than in the mild acute pancreatitis group. Severe hypertriglyceridemia was considered the main cause of severe acute pancreatitis (OR 20.7; 95% CI 4.6-92.4, ppancreatitis (OR 7.3; 95% CI 1.8-30.1, ppancreatitis and biliary pancreatitis are the main causes of severe and mild disease, respectively. Severe acute pancreatitis in pregnancy usually occurs in the third trimester, and the affected severe patients are more liable to develop a critical condition that results in higher risk of intrauterine fetal death. © 2011 The Authors Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica © 2011 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  6. Imaging of acute pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkle, Elmar M.; Goerich, Johannes [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Ulm, Steinhoevel Strasse 9, 89075 Ulm (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis is defined as an acute inflammatory process of the pancreas with variable involvement of peripancreatic tissues or remote organ systems. This article reports the current classification, definition and terminology, epidemiology and etiology, pathogenesis and pathological findings, clinical and laboratory findings, and finally imaging findings of acute pancreatitis with emphasis on cross-sectional imaging modalities such as ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  7. Minimally invasive 'step-up approach' versus maximal necrosectomy in patients with acute necrotising pancreatitis (PANTER trial) : Design and rationale of a randomised controlled multicenter trial [ISRCTN38327949

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G. Besselink (Marc); H.C. van Santvoort (Hjalmar); V.B. Nieuwenhuijs (Vincent); M.A. Boermeester (Marja); T.L. Bollen (Thomas); E. Buskens (Erik); C.H. Dejong (Cees); C.H.J. van Eijck (Casper); H. van Goor (Harry); S. Hofker (Sijbrand); J.S. Laméris (Johan ); M.S. Leeuwen (Maarten); R.J. Ploeg (Rutger); B. van Ramshorst (Bert); A.F.M. Schaapherder (Alexander); M.A. Cuesta (Miguel); E.C. Consten (Esther); D.J. Gouma (Dirk); E. van der Harst (Erwin); E.J. Hesselink (Eric); L.P.J. Houdijk (Lex P.); T.M. Karsten (Thomas); C.J. van Laarhoven (Cees); J.-P.E.N. Pierie (Jean-Pierre); C. Rosman (Camiel); E.J.S. Bilgen; R. Timmer (Robin); I. van der Tweel (Ingeborg); R.J. de Wit (Ralph ); B.J.M. Witteman (Ben); H.G. Gooszen (Hein)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The initial treatment of acute necrotizing pancreatitis is conservative. Intervention is indicated in patients with (suspected) infected necrotizing pancreatitis. In the Netherlands, the standard intervention is necrosectomy by laparotomy followed by continuous postoperative

  8. Percutaneous transgastric irrigation drainage in combination with endoscopic necrosectomy in necrotizing pancreatitis (with videos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raczynski, Susanne; Teich, Niels; Borte, Gudrun; Wittenburg, Henning; Mössner, Joachim; Caca, Karel

    2006-09-01

    Endoscopic drainage of pancreatic acute and chronic pseudocysts and pancreatic necrosectomy have been shown to be beneficial for critically ill patients, with complete endoscopic resolution rates of around 80%. Our purpose was to describe an improved endoscopic technique used to treat pancreatic necrosis. Case report. University hospital. Two patients with large retroperitoneal necroses were treated with percutaneous transgastric retroperitoneal flushing tubes and a percutaneous transgastric jejunal feeding tube by standard percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy access in addition to endoscopic necrosectomy. Intensive percutaneous transgastric flushing in combination with percutaneous normocaloric enteral nutrition and repeated endoscopic necrosectomy led to excellent outcomes in both patients. Small number of patients. The "double percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy" approach for simultaneous transgastric drainage and normocaloric enteral nutrition in severe cases of pancreatic necroses is safe and effective. It could be a promising improvement to endoscopic transgastric treatment options in necrotizing pancreatitis.

  9. Necrotizing pancreatitis due to hypercalcemia in a hemodialysis patient with pica

    OpenAIRE

    Brener, Zachary Z.; Bergman, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Pica refers to the persistent, compulsive craving for and ingestion of nonfood items and certain food items. Pica is quite common among dialysis patients. The nutrient composition of some of the substances ingested may contribute to severe metabolic and mineral disturbances and other serious medical complications. We report the first case of a hemodialysis patient with chalk pica associated hypercalcemia who developed acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Hydration, nutritional support and hemodial...

  10. [ACUTE PANCREATITIS OF PREGNANCY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khvorostukhina, N F; Salov, L A; Novichkov, D A

    2015-01-01

    The study included 78 pregnant women with acute pancreatiis. Group 1 contained 43 4-37 weeks pregnant women and group 2 35 non-pregnant women. Control group was comprised of 30 women with physiological pregnancy. Comparative analysis of peculiarities of the clinical course of acute pancreatitis showed its similar manifestations in all three groups. However pregnancy itself variability of pancreatitis symptoms and their similarity to those of other acute surgical and obstetric pathologies, high (25.6) percent ofpainlessforms, late detection and inadequate treatment pose difficultiesfor diagnostics and delay the onset of pathogenetic therapy. The study of endogenous intoxication markers (leukocytic index, medium molecular weight molecules, circulating immune complexes, total endotoxins) revealed endotoxicosis in the pregnant women with acute pancreatitis that has negative effect on the fetoplacental complex and the development of pregnancy; moreover pancreatitis increases the risk of premature delivery up to 79.21%. The results of the study dictate the necessity of the searchfor new safe treatment and rehabilitation modalities for ptregnant women with acute pancreatitis.

  11. Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis Followed by Duodenal Necrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Hierro, Piedad Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis is an uncommon pathology, characterized by endoscopic finding of diffuse black coloration in esophageal mucosa and histological presence of necrosis in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The first case of acute necrotizing esophagitis followed by duodenal necrosis, in 81 years old woman with a positive history of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Hypertension, and usual intake of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory drugs, is reported. Although its etiology remains unknown, the duodenal necrosis suggests that ischemia could be the main cause given that the branches off the celiac axis provide common blood supply to the distal esophageal and duodenal tissue. The massive gastroesophagic reflux and NSAID intake could be involved. PMID:27957030

  12. Ny klassifikation af pancreatitis acuta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Benny Østerbye; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad

    2011-01-01

    The course of acute pancreatitis is in the initial phase dominated by a systemic inflammatory response, later by local complications. A new classification defines three specific types of pancreatitis: 1) interstitial oedematous pancreatitis and 2) necrotizing pancreatitis with pancreatic...

  13. Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Max

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:24490104

  14. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A. Eland (Ingo)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractAcute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas with sudden onset. The severity of acute pancreatitis may vary from mild to life threatening. There are many risk factors for acute pancreatitis, among which gallstones and alcohol abuse are most widely known. Drugs are

  15. Acute pancreatitis during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimac, Davor; Stimac, Tea

    2011-10-01

    Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is a rare condition estimated to occur in 1 per 1000 to 1 per 12,000 pregnancies. The most frequent etiology in pregnancy is biliary, followed by hyperlipidemia and/or alcohol abuse. Abdominal ultrasound and endoscopic ultrasound are ideal imaging techniques for diagnosing disease because they have no radiation risk. Computed tomography, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography should be used with caution. Treatment could be conservative or surgical, and standard algorithms are slightly modified in pregnant women. In the last decades the outcome of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is much better, and perinatal mortality is less than 5%.

  16. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2013-10-01

    The present article analyzes the main presentations on acute pancreatitis (AP) in Digestive Disease Week 2013. Perfusion computed tomography allows early diagnosis of pancreatic necrosis. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin predicts the development of acute renal failure, severe AP and death. Factors associated with greater fluid sequestration in AP are alcoholic etiology, an elevated hematocrit, and the presence of criteria of systemic inflammatory response syndrome; fluid sequestration is associated with a worse outcome. True pseudocysts (fluid collections without necrosis for more than 4 weeks) are a highly infrequent complication in AP. Patients with necrotic collections have a poor prognosis, especially if associated with infection. A meta-analysis on fluid therapy suggests that early aggressive fluid administration is associated with higher mortality and more frequent respiratory complications. According to a meta-analysis, enteral nutrition initiated within 24 hours of admission improves the outcome of AP compared with later initiation of enteral nutrition. Pentoxifylline could be a promising alternative in AP; a double-blind randomized study showed that this drug reduced the length of hospital and intensive care unit stay, as well as the need for intensive care unit admission. The association of octreotide and celecoxib seems to reduce the frequency of organ damage compared with octreotide alone. Mild AP can be managed in the ambulatory setting through hospital-at-home units after a short, 24-hour admission. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  17. Fatal hemorrhagic–necrotizing pancreatitis associated with pancreatic and hepatic lipidosis in an obese Asian palm civet (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bongiovanni Laura

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Asian palm civets (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus, or toddy cats, belong to the family Viverridae. Little is known about the pathology of these animals and few articles have been published, mainly concerning their important role as wild reservoir hosts for severe infectious diseases of domestic animals and human beings. A 4-year-old, female Asian palm civet was found dead by the owner. At necropsy, large amount of adipose tissue was found in the subcutis and in the peritoneal cavity. Most of the pancreas appeared red, translucent. Hepatomegaly, discoloration of the liver were evident, with multifocal areas of degeneration, characterized by white nodular lesions. Histologically, the pancreas showed severe interstitial and perilobular necrosis and extensive haemorrhages, with separation of the interstitium, mild reactive inflammation at the periphery of the pancreatic lobules. Liver showed multifocal foci of vacuolar degeneration, lipidic accumulation, sometimes associated to hepatocyte necrosis. A diagnosis of acute severe hemorrhagic-necrotizing pancreatitis (or acute pancreatic necrosis associated with pancreatic and hepatic lipidosis was made. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first case report of acute lethal pancreatitis in an Asian palm civet. Although the exact cause of the disease remains undetermined, a hypothesis of the cause and pathogenesis is discussed, pointing out dietary indiscretion and consequent overweight as possible important risk factors.

  18. Fatal hemorrhagic-necrotizing pancreatitis associated with pancreatic and hepatic lipidosis in an obese Asian palm civet (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura, Bongiovanni; Nicola, Di Girolamo; Alessandro, Montani; Leonardo, Della Salda; Paolo, Selleri

    2014-05-01

    Asian palm civets (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus), or toddy cats, belong to the family Viverridae. Little is known about the pathology of these animals and few articles have been published, mainly concerning their important role as wild reservoir hosts for severe infectious diseases of domestic animals and human beings. A 4-year-old, female Asian palm civet was found dead by the owner. At necropsy, large amount of adipose tissue was found in the subcutis and in the peritoneal cavity. Most of the pancreas appeared red, translucent. Hepatomegaly, discoloration of the liver were evident, with multifocal areas of degeneration, characterized by white nodular lesions. Histologically, the pancreas showed severe interstitial and perilobular necrosis and extensive haemorrhages, with separation of the interstitium, mild reactive inflammation at the periphery of the pancreatic lobules. Liver showed multifocal foci of vacuolar degeneration, lipidic accumulation, sometimes associated to hepatocyte necrosis. A diagnosis of acute severe hemorrhagic-necrotizing pancreatitis (or acute pancreatic necrosis) associated with pancreatic and hepatic lipidosis was made. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first case report of acute lethal pancreatitis in an Asian palm civet. Although the exact cause of the disease remains undetermined, a hypothesis of the cause and pathogenesis is discussed, pointing out dietary indiscretion and consequent overweight as possible important risk factors.

  19. Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI in a juvenile miniature schnauzer dog with concurrent hypertriglyceridemia, necrotizing pancreatitis, and diabetic ketoacidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Mayrim L; Kridel, Heather A; Gallagher, Alex; Sheppard, Barbara J; Reese, Shona; Kondo, Hirotaka; Alleman, Rick; Giger, Urs

    2015-03-01

    A 7-month-old, neutered male miniature schnauzer dog with a history of cryptorchidism and umbilical hernia was referred for diabetic ketoacidosis. Clinical evaluation revealed stunted growth, skeletal abnormalities, hypertriglyceridemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, and acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Further testing was diagnostic for mucopolysaccharidosis type VI causing the stunted growth and skeletal deformities, but no connection between mucopolysaccharidosis type VI, hypertriglyceridemia, and pancreatic diseases was found.

  20. [Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldivar-Rodríguez, D; Treviño-Montemayor, O R; Guzmán-López, A; Treviño-Martínez, G; Flores-Acosta, C C

    2016-02-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease that affects the pancreatic tissue, which have been proposed numerous causes, with unpredictable results, it appears as a complication of rare occurrence, so the information on maternal and fetal complications is limited. Objective: Exposing obstetric and perinatal outcomes of patients diagnosed with pancreatitis complicating pregnancy. A retrospective, observational, transverse and descriptive study; data were obtained and analyzed by reviewing medical records of patients diagnosed with pancreatitis and pregnancy. A total of 9 cases were included, corresponding to an incidence of 39/100,000 live births in the time period analyzed. The median age was 22, the mean gestational age at diagnosis was 31 weeks. 4 patients had cesarean delivery and 2 patients natural delivery. 3 patients had Ranson 3, a 2 and other Ranson Ranson 1 the remaining 4 Ranson 0. All products had adequate evolution. A case of maternal death as a complication of the disease was presented, because of metabolic acidosis and ARDS. Acute pancreatitis is an entity of variable incidence, which increases their appearance with advancing pregnancy, and can lead to serious complications for pregnant women. It is extremely important to pay attention to early symptoms of the disease, and achieve an accurate diagnosis and provide adequate multidisciplinary management for a better prognosis for maternal-fetal binomial.

  1. [Peculiarities of terminology and classification of an acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriushchenko, D B

    2014-11-01

    The expediency of application of a term "an acute complicated pancreatitis", as well as the terms "biliary pancreatitis" and "necrotic pancreatitis", was substantiated, basing on analysis of the literature data and results of surgical treatment in 125 patients, suffering an acute pancreatitis (AP).A profound characteristic of an AP local complications in accordance to morphological, toporgapho-anatomical and quantitative features with their further systematization was accomplished. The methods of operative correction of various complications of the disease were adduced. The investigation results obtained would promote realization of the unified treatment-tactical approaches for an AP.

  2. Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah, Bahiyah; Kathiresan Pillai, Thanikasalam; Cheen, Lim Huay; Ryan, Ray Joshua

    2015-01-01

    This is a case of a pregnant lady at 8 weeks of gestation, who presented with acute abdomen. She was initially diagnosed with ruptured ectopic pregnancy and ruptured corpus luteal cyst as the differential diagnosis. However she then, was finally diagnosed as acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis with spontaneous complete miscarriage. This is followed by review of literature on this topic. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is not uncommon. The emphasis on high index of suspicion of acute pancreatitis i...

  3. Acute pancreatitis: Etiology and common pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Guo-Jun; Gao, Chun-Fang; Wei, Dong; Wang, Cun; Ding, Si-Qin

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas. The etiology and pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis have been intensively investigated for centuries worldwide. Many causes of acute pancreatitis have been discovered, but the pathogenetic theories are controversial. The most common cause of acute pancreatitis is gallstone impacting the distal common bile-pancreatic duct. The majority of investigators accept that the main factors for acute billiary pancreatitis are pancreatic hype...

  4. Acute Pancreatitis in acute viral hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K.C.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The association of acute viral hepatitis and acute pancreatitis is well described. This study was conducted to find out the frequency of pancreatic involvement in acute viral hepatitis in the Nepalese population. Methods: Consecutive patients of acute viral hepatitis presenting with severe abdominal pain between January 2005 and April 2010 were studied. Patients with history of significant alcohol consumption and gall stones were excluded. Acute viral hepatitis was diagnosed by clinical examination, liver function test, ultrasound examination and confirmed by viral serology. Pancreatitis was diagnosed by clinical presentation, biochemistry, ultrasound examination and CT scan. Results: Severe abdominal pain was present in 38 of 382 serologically-confirmed acute viral hepatitis patients. Twenty five patients were diagnosed to have acute pancreatitis. The pancreatitis was mild in 14 and severe in 11 patients. The etiology of pancreatitis was hepatitis E virus in 18 and hepatitis A virus in 7 patients. Two patients died of complications secondary to shock. The remaining patients recovered from both pancreatitis and hepatitis on conservative treatment. Conclusions: Acute pancreatitis occurred in 6.5 % of patients with acute viral hepatitis. Cholelithiasis and gastric ulcers are the other causes of severe abdominal pain. The majority of the patients recover with conservative management. Keywords: acute viral hepatitis, acute pancreatitis, pain abdomen, hepatitis E, hepatitis A, endemic zone

  5. Walled-off pancreatic necrosis and other current concepts in the radiological assessment of acute pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, Elen Freitas de Cerqueira; Rocha, Manoel de Souza; Pereira, Fabio Payao; Blasbalg, Roberto; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition caused by intracellular activation and extravasation of inappropriate proteolytic enzymes determining destruction of pancreatic parenchyma and peripancreatic tissues. This is a fairly common clinical condition with two main presentations, namely, endematous pancreatitis - a less severe presentation - and necrotizing pancreatitis - the most severe presentation that affects a significant part of patients. The radiological evaluation, particularly by computed tomography, plays a fundamental role in the definition of the management of severe cases, especially regarding the characterization of local complications with implications in the prognosis and in the definition of the therapeutic approach. New concepts include the subdivision of necrotizing pancreatitis into the following presentations: pancreatic parenchymal necrosis with concomitant peripancreatic tissue necrosis, and necrosis restricted to peripancreatic tissues. Moreover, there was a systematization of the terms acute peripancreatic fluid collection, pseudocyst, post-necrotic pancreatic/peripancreatic fluid collections and walled-off pancreatic necrosis. The knowledge about such terms is extremely relevant to standardize the terminology utilized by specialists involved in the diagnosis and treatment of these patients. (author)

  6. Walled-off pancreatic necrosis and other current concepts in the radiological assessment of acute pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Elen Freitas de Cerqueira [Image Memorial/DASA and Diagnoson Medicina Diagnostica, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Rocha, Manoel de Souza; Pereira, Fabio Payao; Blasbalg, Roberto; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/USPU), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2014-05-15

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition caused by intracellular activation and extravasation of inappropriate proteolytic enzymes determining destruction of pancreatic parenchyma and peripancreatic tissues. This is a fairly common clinical condition with two main presentations, namely, endematous pancreatitis - a less severe presentation - and necrotizing pancreatitis - the most severe presentation that affects a significant part of patients. The radiological evaluation, particularly by computed tomography, plays a fundamental role in the definition of the management of severe cases, especially regarding the characterization of local complications with implications in the prognosis and in the definition of the therapeutic approach. New concepts include the subdivision of necrotizing pancreatitis into the following presentations: pancreatic parenchymal necrosis with concomitant peripancreatic tissue necrosis, and necrosis restricted to peripancreatic tissues. Moreover, there was a systematization of the terms acute peripancreatic fluid collection, pseudocyst, post-necrotic pancreatic/peripancreatic fluid collections and walled-off pancreatic necrosis. The knowledge about such terms is extremely relevant to standardize the terminology utilized by specialists involved in the diagnosis and treatment of these patients. (author)

  7. The Association of Computed Tomography-Assessed Body Composition with Mortality in Patients with Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Grinsven, Janneke; van Vugt, Jeroen L. A.; Gharbharan, Arvind; Bollen, Thomas L.; Besselink, Marc G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; van Eijck, Casper H. J.; Boerma, Djamila

    2017-01-01

    Identification of patients with necrotizing pancreatitis at high risk for a complicated course could facilitate clinical decision-making. In multiple diseases, several parameters of body composition are associated with impaired outcome, but studies in necrotizing pancreatitis are lacking. A post hoc

  8. A conservative and minimally invasive approach to necrotizing pancreatitis improves outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Bakker, Olaf J.; Bollen, Thomas L.; Besselink, Marc G.; Ahmed Ali, Usama; Schrijver, A. Marjolein; Boermeester, Marja A.; van Goor, Harry; Dejong, Cornelis H.; van Eijck, Casper H.; van Ramshorst, Bert; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; van der Harst, Erwin; Hofker, Sijbrand; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Brink, Menno A.; Kruyt, Philip M.; Manusama, Eric R.; van der Schelling, George P.; Karsten, Tom; Hesselink, Eric J.; van Laarhoven, Cornelis J.; Rosman, Camiel; Bosscha, Koop; de Wit, Ralph J.; Houdijk, Alexander P.; Cuesta, Miguel A.; Wahab, Peter J.; Gooszen, Hein G.; Bollen, T. L.; Dejong, C. H.; van Eijck, C. H.; van Goor, H.; Gooszen, H. G.; Hofker, H. S.; Laméris, J. S.; van Leeuwen, M. S.; Schaapherder, A. F.; Timmer, R.; Nieuwenhuijs, V. B.; van Dam, R. M.; Rutten, J. P.; Stoot, J. H.; Keulemans, Y.; Vliegen, R.; Roeterdink, A.; Zeguers, V.; Rijnhart, H. G.; Cirkel, G. A.; van Erpecum, K. J.; Vleggaar, F. P.; van Baal, M.; Akkermans, L. M.; Wiezer, M. J.; Weusten, B. L.; Biemond, H. D.; Ploeg, R. J.; Buitenhuis, H. T.; van Vliet, S. U.; Ramcharan, S.; van Dullemen, H. M.; van Ruler, O.; Laméris, W.; Gouma, D. J.; Busch, O. R.; Fockens, P.; Haasnoot, A.; Veenendaal, R.; Witteman, B. J.; Pierie, J. P.; Spoelstra, P.; Dol, J. A.; Gerritsen, R. T.; Lange, J. F.; Wijffels, N. A.; van Walraven, L. A.; Coene, P. P.; Kubben, F. J.; Wijsman, J. H.; Crolla, R. M.; van Milligen de Wit, A. W.; Rijk, M. C.; Stassen, L. P.; Buscher, H.; Heisterkamp, J.; van Oostvogel, H.; Grubben, M. J.; Tan, A. c; van der Wal, J. B.; Morak, M. J.; Hermans, J. J.; Kuipers, E. J.; Poley, J. W.; Bruno, M.; Jansen, J. B.; Strijk, S. P.; Lips, D.; Olsman, J. G.; van Munster, I. P.; Kolkman, J. J.; Huisman, A. B.; Tuynman, H. A.; Wiarda, B. M.; Consten, E. J.; Schwartz, M. P.; van der Peet, D. L.; Mulder, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of patients with necrotizing pancreatitis has become more conservative and less invasive, but there are few data from prospective studies to support the efficacy of this change. We performed a prospective multicenter study of treatment outcomes among patients with necrotizing pancreatitis.

  9. Probiotics and Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Raffaele Pezzilli; Lorenzo Fantini

    2006-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis is frequently associated with necrosis of the gland, and the principal late complication is infection of the necrosis. The gut barrier plays an important role in severe acute pancreatitis; in fact, gut barrier integrity prevents bacteria translocation resulting from an atrophic and leaky gut, and reduces the systemic inflammatory syndrome of the pancreatitis from gut atrophy. The maintenance of gut barrier integrity is one of the goals in the treatment of severe acut...

  10. Acute hyperlipidemic pancreatitis in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisan, Luminita S; Steidl, Erin T; Rivera-Alsina, Manuel E

    2008-05-01

    Pancreatitis in pregnancy remains a rare event and is most often associated with gallstone disease. Hyperlipidemic gestational pancreatitis usually occurs in women with a preexisting abnormality of the lipid metabolism and poses particular problems in diagnosis and clinical management. We describe 5 patients with acute episodes of pancreatitis during pregnancy caused by hyperlipidemia. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy causes significant morbidity. Even though it is often associated with gallstones, we describe 5 cases in which the etiology of the pancreatitis was maternal hyperlipidemia. Etiology, diagnosis, and management will be discussed.

  11. Acute Pancreatitis Associated with Ifosfamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao-Chiu Hung

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is a rare complication during chemotherapy for pediatric patients with solid tumors. We report a 9-year-old boy with osteosarcoma who experienced 2 episodes of pancreatitis 1 day and 48 days after infusion of ifosfamide (IFOS, respectively. From a MEDLINE search, this is the 3rd reported case and 2nd reported pediatric case of IFOS-induced pancreatitis, and only this case experienced late-onset pancreatitis.

  12. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The present article analyses the main presentations on acute pancreatitis at Digestive Disease Week 2015. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis (incidence 0.7%) and mortality from this cause is currently anecdotal. Diabetes mellitus has little impact on the clinical course of acute pancreatitis, unlike cirrhosis, which doubles the risk of mortality. Intake of unsaturated fat could be associated with an increased severity of acute pancreatitis and is a confounding factor in studies evaluating the relationship between obesity and morbidity and mortality. PET-CT (positron emission tomography-computed tomography) could be a non-invasive tool to detect infection of collections in acute pancreatitis. Peripancreatic fat necrosis is less frequent than pancreatic fat necrosis and is associated with a better clinical course. If the clinical course is poor, increasing the calibre of the percutaneous drains used in the treatment of infected necrosis can avoid surgery in 20% of patients. The use of low molecular-weight heparin in moderate or severe pancreatitis could be associated with a better clinical course, specifically with a lower incidence of necrosis. In acute recurrent pancreatitis, simvastatin is a promising drug for prophylaxis of new episodes of acute pancreatitis. Nutritional support through a nasogastric tube does not improve clinical course compared with oral nutrition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Early management of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepers, Nicolien J; Besselink, Marc G H; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Bakker, Olaf J; Bruno, Marco J

    2013-10-01

    Acute pancreatitis is the most common gastro-intestinal indication for acute hospitalization and its incidence continues to rise. In severe pancreatitis, morbidity and mortality remains high and is mainly driven by organ failure and infectious complications. Early management strategies should aim to prevent or treat organ failure and to reduce infectious complications. This review addresses the management of acute pancreatitis in the first hours to days after onset of symptoms, including fluid therapy, nutrition and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. This review also discusses the recently revised Atlanta classification which provides new uniform terminology, thereby facilitating communication regarding severity and complications of pancreatitis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Bahiyah; Kathiresan Pillai, Thanikasalam; Cheen, Lim Huay; Ryan, Ray Joshua

    2015-01-01

    This is a case of a pregnant lady at 8 weeks of gestation, who presented with acute abdomen. She was initially diagnosed with ruptured ectopic pregnancy and ruptured corpus luteal cyst as the differential diagnosis. However she then, was finally diagnosed as acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis with spontaneous complete miscarriage. This is followed by review of literature on this topic. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is not uncommon. The emphasis on high index of suspicion of acute pancreatitis in women who presented with acute abdomen in pregnancy is highlighted. Early diagnosis and good supportive care by multidisciplinary team are crucial to ensure good maternal and fetal outcomes. PMID:25628906

  15. Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahiyah Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case of a pregnant lady at 8 weeks of gestation, who presented with acute abdomen. She was initially diagnosed with ruptured ectopic pregnancy and ruptured corpus luteal cyst as the differential diagnosis. However she then, was finally diagnosed as acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis with spontaneous complete miscarriage. This is followed by review of literature on this topic. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is not uncommon. The emphasis on high index of suspicion of acute pancreatitis in women who presented with acute abdomen in pregnancy is highlighted. Early diagnosis and good supportive care by multidisciplinary team are crucial to ensure good maternal and fetal outcomes.

  16. Efficacy of serum nitric oxide level estimation in assessing the severity of necrotizing pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettu, Srinivas Reddy; Wig, Jai Dev; Khullar, Madhu; Singh, Gurpreet; Gupta, Rajesh

    2003-01-01

    The role of nitric oxide in the pathophysiology of necrotizing pancreatitis is unclear. In a prospective study, the clinical course of 40 patients diagnosed as having acute necrotizing pancreatitis was followed using computed tomography severity score (CTSS) and serial APACHE II scoring. The serum nitric oxide levels in the form of reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI) were estimated on admission and on day 3. Occurrence of complications, need for intervention, incidence of organ failure, and outcome were noted. The efficacy of CTSS, APACHE II scores, and RNI levels in predicting morbidity and mortality was assessed. The correlation between CTSS, APACHE II scores, and RNI levels was studied. The study group showed significantly higher levels of RNI as compared with the control group (159.1 vs. 106.0 nmol/ml, p RNI levels were not affected by the occurrence of local complications or distant-organ failure. The RNI levels on admission were significantly higher in the subset of patients who developed bacterial sepsis (195.5 vs. 134.7 nmol/ml, p RNI levels on admission in the non-survivors were higher as compared with those of the survivors (216.0 vs. 140.1 nmol/ml, p RNI levels and the CTSS in these patients (p RNI levels and APACHE II scores. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis is associated with raised serum nitric oxide levels at its early stage. Patients with higher serum nitric oxide levels are at a significantly higher risk of sepsis and mortality. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel and IAP

  17. Treatment options for acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Olaf J.; Issa, Yama; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Besselink, Marc G.; Schepers, Nicolien J.; Bruno, Marco J.; Boermeester, Marja A.; Gooszen, Hein G.

    2014-01-01

    This Review covers the latest developments in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. The Atlanta Classification of acute pancreatitis has been revised, proposing several new terms and abandoning some of the old and confusing terminology. The 2012 Revised Atlanta Classification and the

  18. Early management of acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, Nicolien J.; Besselink, Marc G. H.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Bakker, Olaf J.; Bruno, Marco J.

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is the most common gastro-intestinal indication for acute hospitalization and its incidence continues to rise. In severe pancreatitis, morbidity and mortality remains high and is mainly driven by organ failure and infectious complications. Early management strategies should aim to

  19. Endoscopic Treatment of Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis and Smoldering Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rohit; Yadav, Dhiraj; Papachristou, Georgios I

    2015-10-01

    Recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) is a challenging condition that can lead to chronic pancreatitis and long-term morbidity. Etiology-based treatment can potentially have an impact on the natural history of RAP and its progression to chronic pancreatitis. In cases of divisum-associated RAP and idiopathic RAP, several studies have been performed to evaluate the efficacy of endoscopic therapy in alleviation of symptoms and frequency of AP events. This review discusses the literature available on these topic as well as touching on the role of endoscopic therapy in smoldering acute pancreatitis. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Swinging heart in acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamparter, Steffen; Sundermann, Henrike

    2013-08-01

    Pleural effusions and ascites are not uncommon in acute pancreatitis; however, pericardial effusions complicated by cardiac tamponade are extremely rare and definite treatment has yet to be established. This case report illustrates the findings in a 57-year-old patient, who was diagnosed of an acute alcoholic pancreatitis. The clinical course was complicated by recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis, and eventually, the patient developed acute circulatory failure that was caused by cardiac tamponade. The patient was successfully treated by an emergency pericardiocentesis; however, although the patient was treated with intrapericardial triamcinolone and octreotide, pericardial effusion reoccurred. Eventually, a pancreaticopericardial fistula was diagnosed by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography, and after successful stent placement in a disrupted pancreatic duct, the clinical recovery was uneventful. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of a successful endoscopic treatment of a pancreaticopericardial fistula complicated by cardiac tamponade in a patient with acute pancreatitis.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging for acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bo; Zhang, Xiao-Ming

    2010-08-28

    Acute pancreatitis is characterized by acute chemical injury of the pancreatic parenchyma and peripancreatic tissue. The increased frequency of death in acute pancreatitis is directly correlated with the degree and progress of pancreatic necrosis. Moreover, the occurrence of some local complications in acute pancreatitis, such as pancreatic hemorrhage, peripancreatic abscess or large pseudocyst, and pseudoaneurysm, could influence the choice of treatment for these patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to help evaluate the presence and degree of pancreatic necrosis, and is crucial for identifying complications of acute pancreatitis and predicting prognosis. The purpose of this article is to describe MRI techniques for acute pancreatitis, to review the spectrum of pancreatic and peripancreatic patterns, as well as to survey various complications secondary to acute pancreatitis on MRI. The role of MRI in the initial evaluation and staging of acute pancreatitis is emphasized.

  2. Acute Pancreatitis: Surgery, Pathophysiology and Probiotic Prophylaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minnen, L.P. van

    2006-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a challenging disease with a clinical course that is often difficult to predict. In severe acute pancreatitis, mortality increases significantly if intestinal bacteria translocate from the intestine and infect pancreatic necrosis. Surgical and prophylactic treatment strategies

  3. Dual drainage using a percutaneous pancreatic duct technique contributed to resolution of severe acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Tatsunori; Kikuyama, Masataka; Yokoi, Yoshihiro; Kawaguchi, Shinya

    2017-04-01

    A 66-year-old man was admitted for severe acute alcoholic pancreatitis with infected pancreatic necrosis (IPN). Abdominal computed tomography revealed an inflamed pancreatic head, a dilated main pancreatic duct (MPD), and a large cavity with heterogeneous fluid containing gas adjacent to the pancreatic head, and extending to the pelvis. The cavity was drained percutaneously near the pancreatic head on admission; another tube was inserted into the pelvic cavity on hospital day 3. The drained fluid contained pus with high amylase concentration. Nasopancreatic drainage tube placement was unsuccessfully attempted on hospital day 9. On hospital day 23, percutaneous puncture of the MPD and placement of a pancreatic duct drainage tube was performed. Pancreatography revealed major extravasation from the pancreatic head. The IPN cavity receded; the percutaneous IPN drainage tube was removed on hospital day 58. On hospital day 83, the pancreatic drainage was changed to a transpapillary pancreatic stent, and the patient was discharged. Measuring the amylase concentration of peripancreatic fluid collections can aid in the diagnosis of pancreatic duct disruption; moreover, dual percutaneous necrotic cavity drainage plus pancreatic duct drainage may be essential for treating IPN. If transpapillary drainage tube placement is difficult, percutaneous pancreatic duct drainage may be feasible.

  4. Metabolic syndrome and acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolasevic, I; Milic, S; Orlic, L; Poropat, G; Jakopcic, I; Franjic, N; Klanac, A; Kristo, N; Stimac, D

    2016-07-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of metabolic syndrome on the course of acute pancreatitis determined by disease severity, the presence of local and systemic complications and survival rate. 609 patients admitted to our hospital in the period from January 1, 2008 up to June 31, 2015 with the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis were analyzed. The diagnosis and the severity of acute pancreatitis were made according to the revised Atlanta classification criteria from 2012. Of 609 patients with acute pancreatitis, 110 fulfilled the criteria for metabolic syndrome. Patients with metabolic syndrome had statistically significantly higher incidence of moderately severe (38.2% vs. 28.5%; p=0.05) and severe (22.7% vs. 12.8%; p=0.01) acute pancreatitis in comparison to those without metabolic syndrome, while patients without metabolic syndrome had higher incidence of mild acute pancreatitis in comparison to those patients with metabolic syndrome (58.7% vs. 39.1%; pacute pancreatitis. Comparing survival rates, patients suffering from metabolic syndrome had a higher death rate compared to patients without metabolic syndrome (16% vs. 4.5%; pacute pancreatitis, as well as higher mortality rate. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [Acute pancreatitis associated with hypercalcaemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tun-Abraham, Mauro Enrique; Obregón-Guerrero, Gabriela; Romero-Espinoza, Larry; Valencia-Jiménez, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Hypercalcaemia due to primary hyperparathyroidism is a rare cause of acute pancreatitis, with a reported prevalence of 1.5 to 8%. There is no clear pathophysiological basis, but elevated parathyroid hormone and high serum calcium levels could be responsible for calcium deposit in the pancreatic ducts and activation of pancreatic enzymes, which may be the main risk factor for developing acute pancreatitis. The aim of this report is to describe four cases. Four cases are reported of severe pancreatitis associated with hypercalcaemia secondary to primary hyperparathyroidism; three of them with complications (two pseudocysts and one pancreatic necrosis). Cervical ultrasound, computed tomography, and scintigraphy using 99mTc-Sestambi, studies showed the parathyroid adenoma. Surgical resection was the definitive treatment in all four cases. None of the patients had recurrent acute pancreatitis events during follow-up. Acute pancreatitis secondary to hypercalcaemia of primary hyperparathyroidism is rare; however, when it occurs it is associated with severe pancreatitis. It is suspected in patients with elevated serum calcium and high parathyroid hormone levels. Imaging techniques such as cervical ultrasound, computed tomography, and scintigraphy using 99mTc-Sestambi, should be performed, to confirm clinical suspicion. Surgical resection is the definitive treatment with excellent results. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  6. Pharmacological approach to acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Ulrich-Christian; Semb, Synne; Nojgaard, Camilla

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge regarding pharmacological prevention and treatment of acute pancreatitis (AP) based on experimental animal models and clinical trials. Somatostatin (SS) and octreotide inhibit the exocrine production of pancreatic enzymes and may...

  7. Late infection of pancreatic necrosis: A separate entity in necrotizing pancreatitis with low mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qiang; Li, Ang; Xia, Qing; Hu, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have examined on the timing of the onset of infected necrosis and organ failure. The duration of these two complications and the effects of different durations of these two complications have not been mentioned. Our aim was to investigate the durations of these two complications and the corresponding effects of the different durations. A post-hoc analysis was performed on a prospective database containing 578 patients with necrotizing pancreatitis. The patients who received intervention were divided into subgroups based on different durations of the two complications, and the outcomes were compared. The mortality rate in patients with late infection (occurred after 30 days) was lower than in the early (infection occurred within 30 days) group (3% vs. 22%, P 7 days) of infection before intervention was similar with those patients with short duration (≤7 days) of infection (6/27 vs. 11/74; P = 0.38). The mortality rate in patients with long duration (>7 days) of organ failure before intervention was higher than in patients with short duration (≤7 days) of organ failure (31/99 vs. 18/184; P infection of pancreatic necrosis showed significantly better prognosis than patients with early infection. The duration of organ failure before intervention was correlated with mortality of necrotizing pancreatitis. Copyright © 2015 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A step-up approach or open necrosectomy for necrotizing pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.C. van Santvoort (Hjalmar); M.G. Besselink (Marc); O.J. Bakker (Olaf ); H.S. Hofker (Sijbrand); M.A. Boermeester (Marja); C.H. Dejong (Cees); H. van Goor (Harry); A.F.M. Schaapherder (Alexander); C.H.J. van Eijck (Casper); T.L. Bollen (Thomas); B. van Ramshorst (Bert); V.B. Nieuwenhuijs (Vincent); R. Timmer (Robin); J.S. Laméris (Johan ); Ph.M. Kruyt (Philip); E.R. Manusama (Eric); E. van der Harst (Erwin); G. van der Schelling; T.M. Karsten (Thomas); E.J. Hesselink (Eric); C.J. van Laarhoven (Cees); C. Rosman (Camiel); K. Bosscha (Koop); R.J. de Wit (Ralph ); A.P. Houdijk (Alexander); M.S. Leeuwen (Maarten); E. Buskens (Erik); H.G. Gooszen (Hein)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Necrotizing pancreatitis with infected necrotic tissue is associated with a high rate of complications and death. Standard treatment is open necrosectomy. The outcome may be improved by a minimally invasive step-up approach. Methods: In this multicenter study, we randomly

  9. A Step-up Approach or Open Necrosectomy for Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Besselink, Marc G.; Bakker, Olaf J.; Hofker, H. Sijbrand; Boermeester, Marja A.; Dejong, Cornelis H.; van Goor, Harry; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; van Eijck, Casper H.; Bollen, Thomas L.; van Ramshorst, Bert; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Timmer, Robin; Lameris, Johan S.; Kruyt, Philip M.; Manusama, Eric R.; van der Harst, Erwin; van der Schelling, George P.; Karsten, Tom; Hesselink, Eric J.; van Laarhoven, Cornelis J.; Rosman, Camiel; Bosscha, Koop; de Wit, Ralph J.; Houdijk, Alexander P.; van Leeuwen, Maarten S.; Buskens, Erik; Gooszen, Hein G.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Necrotizing pancreatitis with infected necrotic tissue is associated with a high rate of complications and death. Standard treatment is open necrosectomy. The outcome may be improved by a minimally invasive step-up approach. METHODS In this multicenter study, we randomly assigned 88

  10. A step-up approach or open necrosectomy for necrotizing pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Besselink, Marc G.; Bakker, Olaf J.; Hofker, H. Sijbrand; Boermeester, Marja A.; Dejong, Cornelis H.; van Goor, Harry; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; van Eijck, Casper H.; Bollen, Thomas L.; van Ramshorst, Bert; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Timmer, Robin; Laméris, Johan S.; Kruyt, Philip M.; Manusama, Eric R.; van der Harst, Erwin; van der Schelling, George P.; Karsten, Tom; Hesselink, Eric J.; van Laarhoven, Cornelis J.; Rosman, Camiel; Bosscha, Koop; de Wit, Ralph J.; Houdijk, Alexander P.; van Leeuwen, Maarten S.; Buskens, Erik; Gooszen, Hein G.; Bollen, T. L.; Buskens, E.; Dejong, C. H.; van Eijck, C. H.; van Goor, H.; Gooszen, H. G.; Hofker, H. S.; van Leeuwen, M. S.; Nieuwenhuijs, V. B.; Ploeg, R. J.; van Ramshorst, B.; Schaapherder, A. F.; Timmer, R.; Moll, F. L.; Moons, K. G.; Prokop, M.; Samsom, M.; Soeters, P. B.; vd Tweel, I.; Oors, J.; van Dam, R. M.; Rutten, J. P.; Stoot, J. H.; Keulemans, Y.; Vliegen, R.; Roeterdink, A.; Zeguers, V.; Ahmed Ali, U.; Rijnhart, H. G.; Cirkel, G. A.; van Erpecum, K. J.; Vleggaar, F. P.; van Baal, M.; Schrijver, M.; Akkermans, L. M.; Hazebroek, E. J.; Wiezer, M. J.; Weusten, B. L.; Biemond, H. D.; Buitenhuis, H. T.; van Vliet, S. U.; Ramcharan, S.; van Dullemen, H. M.; van Ruler, O.; Laméris, W.; Gouma, D. J.; Busch, O. R.; Fockens, P.; Haasnoot, A.; Veenendaal, R.; Witteman, B. J.; Pierie, J. P.; Spoelstra, P.; Dol, J. A.; Gerritsen, R. T.; Lange, J. F.; Wijffels, N. A.; van Walraven, L. A.; Coene, P. P.; Kubben, F. J.; Wijsman, J. H.; Crolla, R. M.; van Milligen de Wit, A. W.; Rijk, M. C.; Stassen, L. P.; Buscher, H.; Heisterkamp, J.; van Oostvogel, H.; Grubben, M. J.; Tan, A. C.; van der Wal, J. B.; Morak, M. J.; Pek, C. J.; Hermans, J. J.; Kuipers, E. J.; Poley, J. W.; Bruno, M.; Jansen, J. B.; Strijk, S. P.; Lips, D.; Olsman, J. G.; van Munster, I. P.; Kolkman, J. J.; Huisman, A. B.; Tuynman, H. A.; Wiarda, B. M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Necrotizing pancreatitis with infected necrotic tissue is associated with a high rate of complications and death. Standard treatment is open necrosectomy. The outcome may be improved by a minimally invasive step-up approach. METHODS: In this multicenter study, we randomly assigned 88

  11. Validation of ‘Moderately Severe Acute Pancreatitis’ in patients with Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paleswan Joshi Lakhey

    2013-12-01

    Conclusions: This study showed that moderately severe acute pancreatitis exists as a separate group different from mild acute pancreatitis and severe acute pancreatitis with no mortality as in mild acute pancreatitis. Keywords: moderately severe acute pancreatitis; Atlanta classification; outcome.

  12. Pancreatic Panniculitis: A rare manifestation of Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ronak Patel; Ali Safdar Khan; Sami Naveed; Jason Brazleton; Mel Wilcox

    2015-01-01

    Context Pancreatic panniculitis is a very rare complication associated with pancreatic disease and perhaps even a presage to pancreatic pathology. Case report We present a case of pancreatic panniculitis in a 61 year old patient who was treated for sudden onset of abdominal pain associated with nausea and vomiting secondary to acute pancreatitis of unknown etiology. He subsequently developed skin lesions consistent with pancreatic panniculitis which gradually improved after resolution of his ...

  13. Food-Induced Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Murli; Verma, Alok K; Upparahalli Venkateshaiah, Sathisha; Goyal, Hemant; Mishra, Anil

    2017-12-01

    Food allergy, a commonly increasing problem worldwide, defined as an adverse immune response to food. A variety of immune-related effector cells such as mast cells, eosinophils, neutrophils, and T cells are involved in food-related allergic responses categorized as IgE mediated, non-IgE mediated, and mixed (IgE and non-IgE) depending upon underlying immunological mechanisms. The dietary antigens mainly target the gastrointestinal tract including pancreas that gets inflamed due to food allergy and leads acute pancreatitis. Reports indicate several food proteins induce pancreatitis; however, detailed underlying mechanism of food-induced pancreatitis is unexplored. The aim of the review is to understand and update the current scenario of food-induced pancreatitis. A comprehensive literature search of relevant research articles has been performed through PubMed, and articles were chosen based on their relevance to food allergen-mediated pancreatitis. Several cases in the literature indicate that acute pancreatitis has been provoked after the consumption of mustard, milk, egg, banana, fish, and kiwi fruits. Food-induced pancreatitis is an ignored and unexplored area of research. The review highlights the significance of food in the development of pancreatitis and draws the attention of physicians and scientists to consider food allergies as a possible cause for initiation of pancreatitis pathogenesis.

  14. Peritoneal lavage in acute pancreatitis. An experimental and clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hee, R; Van Elst, F; Van Rooy, F; Van Haasen, R; Hubens, A

    1981-01-01

    Experiments were performed to evaluate the use of peritoneal lavage in dogs, in which an acute non fatal necrotic-hemorrhagic pancreatitis was obtained by means of intraductal sodium-taurocholate injection. A single lavage of 2 liters of a balanced solution 6 hours after the pancreatitis onset produced a temporary biochemical improvement, as evidenced by the amylase, lipase and alcaline phosphatase values. Triple lavage with or without heparin, performed after 6, 18 and 24 hours, produced on the other hand clearcut reduction in mortality rates and long lasting improvement of the biochemical parameters. Two patients with operatively confirmed necrotic hemorrhagic pancreatitis were treated by the lavage method during three days. The treatment resulted in a significant improvement of the clinical condition and the biochemical parameters of both patients.

  15. Pharmacological approach to acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Ulrich-Christian; Semb, Synne; Nojgaard, Camilla

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge regarding pharmacological prevention and treatment of acute pancreatitis (AP) based on experimental animal models and clinical trials. Somatostatin (SS) and octreotide inhibit the exocrine production of pancreatic enzymes and may...... be useful as prophylaxis against post endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis (PEP). The protease inhibitor gabexate mesilate (GM) is used routinely as treatment to AP in some countries, but randomized clinical trials and a meta-analysis do not support this practice. Nitroglycerin (NGL...

  16. Acute pancreatitis complicating excessive intake of phenolphthalein.

    OpenAIRE

    Lambrianides, A. L.; Rosin, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    A case is described in which a patient presented with acute pancreatitis following inadvertent ingestion of large quantities of phenolphthalein for the treatment of his chronic constipation. There was complete recovery and no sequelae from the acute attack of pancreatitis.

  17. Pharmacologic therapy for acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambhampati, Swetha; Park, Walter; Habtezion, Aida

    2014-01-01

    While conservative management such as fluid, bowel rest, and antibiotics is the mainstay of current acute pancreatitis management, there is a lot of promise in pharmacologic therapies that target various aspects of the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Extensive review of preclinical studies, which include assessment of therapies such as anti-secretory agents, protease inhibitors, anti-inflammatory agents, and anti-oxidants are discussed. Many of these studies have shown therapeutic benefit and improved survival in experimental models. Based on available preclinical studies, we discuss potential novel targeted pharmacologic approaches that may offer promise in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. To date a variety of clinical studies have assessed the translational potential of animal model effective experimental therapies and have shown either failure or mixed results in human studies. Despite these discouraging clinical studies, there is a great clinical need and there exist several preclinical effective therapies that await investigation in patients. Better understanding of acute pancreatitis pathophysiology and lessons learned from past clinical studies are likely to offer a great foundation upon which to expand future therapies in acute pancreatitis. PMID:25493000

  18. Acute Pancreatitis: Etiology, Pathology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Shirin; Golembioski, Adam; Wilson, Stephen L; Thompson, Errington C

    2017-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a fascinating disease. In the United States, the two most common etiologies of acute pancreatitis are gallstones and excessive alcohol consumption. The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis is made with a combination of history, physical examination, computed tomography scan, and laboratory evaluation. Differentiating patients who will have a benign course of their pancreatitis from patients who will have severe pancreatitis is challenging to the clinician. C-reactive protein, pro-calcitonin, and the Bedside Index for Severity of Acute Pancreatitis appeared to be the best tools for the early and accurate diagnosis of severe pancreatitis. Early laparoscopic cholecystectomy is indicated for patients with mild gallstone pancreatitis. For patients who are going to have a prolonged hospitalization, enteral nutrition is preferred. Total parenteral nutrition should be reserved for patients who cannot tolerate enteral nutrition. Prophylactic antibiotics are not indicated for patients with pancreatic necrosis. Surgical intervention for infected pancreatic necrosis should be delayed as long as possible to improve patient outcomes.

  19. Splenic Artery Embolization for the Treatment of Gastric Variceal Bleeding Secondary to Splenic Vein Thrombosis Complicated by Necrotizing Pancreatitis: Report of a Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Joon Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Splenic vein thrombosis is a relatively common finding in pancreatitis. Gastric variceal bleeding is a life-threatening complication of splenic vein thrombosis, resulting from increased blood flow to short gastric vein. Traditionally, splenectomy is considered the treatment of choice. However, surgery in necrotizing pancreatitis is dangerous, because of severe inflammation, adhesion, and bleeding tendency. In the Warshaw operation, gastric variceal bleeding is rare, even though splenic vein is resected. Because the splenic artery is also resected, blood flow to short gastric vein is not increased problematically. Herein, we report a case of gastric variceal bleeding secondary to splenic vein thrombosis complicated by necrotizing pancreatitis successfully treated with splenic artery embolization. Splenic artery embolization could be the best treatment option for gastric variceal bleeding when splenectomy is difficult such as in case associated with severe acute pancreatitis or associated with severe adhesion or in patients with high operation risk.

  20. Ny klassifikation af pancreatitis acuta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Benny Østerbye; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad

    2011-01-01

    The course of acute pancreatitis is in the initial phase dominated by a systemic inflammatory response, later by local complications. A new classification defines three specific types of pancreatitis: 1) interstitial oedematous pancreatitis and 2) necrotizing pancreatitis with pancreatic...... parenchymal necrosis, or 3) peripancreatic necrosis alone. The classification also defines four types of collections: 1) Acute peripancreatic fluid collection, 2) pseudocyst, 3) acute post-necrotic collection, and 4) walled-off necrosis. This article summarizes the terminology of the revised Atlanta...

  1. Valsartan-induced acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Burak; Sali, Mursel; Batman, Adnan; Yilmaz, Hasan; Korkmaz, Ugur; Celebi, Altay; Senturk, Omer; Hulagu, Sadettin

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal toxicity is uncommon among patients treated with angiotensin II receptor antagonists. A 58-year-old man presented with nausea, vomiting and constant pain in the epigastrium that radiated to the flanks. He received treatment with valsartan (160 mg daily) for hypertension. The clinical, biochemical and radiological findings were compatible with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. After the patient achieved a clinical and biochemical recovery, the valsartan therapy was started again. Six weeks later, he returned to the hospital with an attack of pancreatitis. Subsequently, he returned with repeated attacks of pancreatitis twice, and the valsartan was discontinued. Ten months after the treatment, the patient had no complaints. When severe abdominal symptoms occur for no apparent reason during treatment with valsartan, a diagnosis of pancreatitis should be considered.

  2. The role of pancreatic ductal secretion in protection against acute pancreatitis in mice*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallagi, Petra; Balla, Zsolt; Singh, Anurag K; Dósa, Sándor; Iványi, Béla; Kukor, Zoltán; Tóth, Adél; Riederer, Brigitte; Liu, Yongjian; Engelhardt, Regina; Jármay, Katalin; Szabó, Andrea; Janovszky, Agnes; Perides, George; Venglovecz, Viktória; Maléth, József; Wittmann, Tibor; Takács, Tamás; Gray, Mike A; Gácser, Attila; Hegyi, Péter; Seidler, Ursula; Rakonczay, Zoltán

    2014-03-01

    A common potentially fatal disease of the pancreas is acute pancreatitis, for which there is no treatment. Most studies of this disorder focus on the damage to acinar cells since they are assumed to be the primary target of multiple stressors affecting the pancreas. However, increasing evidence suggests that the ducts may also have a crucial role in induction of the disease. To test this hypothesis, we sought to determine the specific role of the duct in the induction of acute pancreatitis using well-established disease models and mice with deletion of the Na/H exchanger regulatory factor-1 that have selectively impaired ductal function. Randomized animal study. Animal research laboratory. Wild-type and Na/H exchanger regulatory factor-1 knockout mice. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis was induced by i.p. administration of cerulein or by intraductal administration of sodium taurocholate. The pancreatic expression of Na/H exchanger regulatory factor-1 and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (a key player in the control of ductal secretion) was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. In vivo pancreatic ductal secretion was studied in anesthetized mice. Functions of pancreatic acinar and ductal cells as well as inflammatory cells were analyzed in vitro. Deletion of Na/H exchanger regulatory factor-1 resulted in gross mislocalization of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, causing marked reduction in pancreatic ductal fluid and bicarbonate secretion. Importantly, deletion of Na/H exchanger regulatory factor-1 had no deleterious effect on functions of acinar and inflammatory cells. Deletion of Na/H exchanger regulatory factor-1, which specifically impaired ductal function, increased the severity of acute pancreatitis in the two mouse models tested. Our findings provide the first direct evidence for the crucial role of ductal secretion in protecting the pancreas from acute pancreatitis and strongly suggest that improved ductal function should be an

  3. The role of melatonin in pancreatic protection: could melatonin be used in the treatment of acute pancreatitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworek, Jolanta; Leja-Szpak, Anna; Kot, Michalina; Jaworek, Andrzej; Nawrot-Porbka, Katarzyna; Bonior, Joanna; Szklarczyk, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a disease, which could be manifested as either a mild edematous form or a more severe necrotizing pancreatitis which has a poor prognosis. The etiology and pathogenesis of this ailment is not completely clear. Melatonin is an indoleamine which is produced from L-tryptophan in the pineal gland and in the other tissue including gastrointestinal tract. Both melatonin and its precursor have been demonstrated to protect the pancreas against acute pancreatitis and to attenuate pancreatic tissue damage. In the pancreas melatonin and L-tryptophan activate complex mechanisms which involve direct scavenging of the radical oxygen and nitrogen species, activation of antioxidant enzymes (catalase, superoxide dysmutase, glutation peroxidase), reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandins, activation of heat shock protein, and a decrease of necrosis and increase of regeneration in the pancreas. There are several arguments for the idea that endogenous melatonin produced in the pineal gland and in the gastrointestinal system could be the part of a native mechanisms for protecting the pancreas against acute damage: 1/ the melatonin precursor L-tryptophan exerts similar protective effect as melatonin, 2/ application of the melatonin receptor antagonist, luzindole aggravates acute pancreatitis, 3/ pinealectomy results in the exacerbation of acute pancreatitis, 4/ low melatonin plasma levels are associated with an increased risk of severe acute pancreatitis. These observations leads to the idea that perhaps melatonin could be used in clinical trials as supportive therapy in acute pancreatitis.

  4. Short article: Presence, extent and location of pancreatic necrosis are independent of aetiology in acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdonk, Robert C; Sternby, Hanna; Dimova, Alexandra; Ignatavicius, Povilas; Koiva, Peter; Penttila, Anne K; Ilzarbe, Lucas; Regner, Sara; Rosendahl, Jonas; Bollen, Thomas L

    2018-03-01

    The most common aetiologies of acute pancreatitis (AP) are gallstones, alcohol and idiopathic. The impact of the aetiology of AP on the extent and morphology of pancreatic and extrapancreatic necrosis (EXPN) has not been clearly established. The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of aetiology on the presence and location of pancreatic necrosis in patients with AP. We carried out a post-hoc analysis of a previously established multicentre cohort of patients with AP in whom a computed tomography was available for review. Clinical data were obtained from the medical records. All computed tomographies were revised by the same expert radiologist. The impact of aetiology on pancreatic and EXPN was calculated. In total, 159 patients with necrotizing pancreatitis were identified from a cohort of 285 patients. The most frequent aetiologies were biliary (105 patients, 37%), followed by alcohol (102 patients, 36%) and other aetiologies including idiopathic (78 patients, 27%). No relationship was found between the aetiology and the presence of pancreatic necrosis, EXPN, location of pancreatic necrosis or presence of collections. We found no association between the aetiology of AP and the presence, extent and anatomical location of pancreatic necrosis.

  5. The role of transpapillary drainage in management of patients with pancreatic fluid collections and pancreatic duct disruption as a consequences of severe acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagielski, Mateusz; Smoczyński, Marian; Adrych, Krystian

    In last thirty years we have been observing significant development of an endoscopic treatment of pancreatic fluid collections, including transmural drainage of walled-off pancreatic necrosis. Simultaneously, the use of endotherapy in treatment of main pancreatic ducts disruptions has increased. Despite many publications available in current literature, concerning the endoscopic treatment of consequences of acute necrotizing pancreatitis, the role of transpapillary drainage in management of patients with pancreatic fluid collections and pancreatic duct disruption as an after-effect of severe acute pancreatitis remains unclear and is still a current problem. This publication includes comment on the article entitled 'Early dual drainage combining transpapillary endotherapy and percutaneous catheter drainage in patients with pancreatic fistula associated with severe acute pancreatitis' published by Yokoi et al. in the July-August 2016 issue of Pancreatology together with questions to the authors. Furthermore, in the article we did pay particular attention to the role of transpapillary drainage in management of pancreatic fluid collections, especially of walled-of pancreatic necrosis. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Surgical and interventional management of complications caused by acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakayali, Feza Y

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders worldwide. It requires acute hospitalization, with a reported annual incidence of 13 to 45 cases per 100000 persons. In severe cases there is persistent organ failure and a mortality rate of 15% to 30%, whereas mortality of mild pancreatitis is only 0% to 1%. Treatment principles of necrotizing pancreatitis and the role of surgery are still controversial. Despite surgery being effective for infected pancreatic necrosis, it carries the risk of long-term endocrine and exocrine deficiency and a morbidity and mortality rate of between 10% to 40%. Considering high morbidity and mortality rates of operative necrosectomy, minimally invasive strategies are being explored by gastrointestinal surgeons, radiologists, and gastroenterologists. Since 1999, several other minimally invasive surgical, endoscopic, and radiologic approaches to drain and debride pancreatic necrosis have been described. In patients who do not improve after technically adequate drainage, necrosectomy should be performed. When minimal invasive management is unsuccessful or necrosis has spread to locations not accessible by endoscopy, open abdominal surgery is recommended. Additionally, surgery is recognized as a major determinant of outcomes for acute pancreatitis, and there is general agreement that patients should undergo surgery in the late phase of the disease. It is important to consider multidisciplinary management, considering the clinical situation and the comorbidity of the patient, as well as the surgeons experience. PMID:25309073

  7. Treatment of severe acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praznik Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammatory process of the pancreas with variable involvement of other regional tissues or other organ systems. The severe form of the disease occurs in 10-20% of cases, and usually requires prolonged hospitalization due to a frequent local and systemic complications. Additionally, considerable mortality despite diagnostic and therapeutic advances, makes this disease a serious health problem nowadays. The aim of this study was to conduct a review of randomized controlled trials to determine differences in the efficiency between standard methods of treatment for severe acute pancreatitis and new treatment ways in terms of decreased mortality. Search of the 'Medline' database of original scientific papers and systematic review articles was made, using a combination of the following keywords: acute pancreatitis, treatment, mortality. In total 914 papers were found, published in the last 13 years; 14 of 64 randomized controlled clinical trials met the selection criteria and were eligible for inclusion. From a total of 16 papers, the conservative treatment was related to 11, which includes some of the new treatment methods, while the effects of new methods of treatment have been the subject of research in the four studies. Combined endoscopic and surgical treatment was applied in only one study. The largest sample of 290 patients was included in the study with platelet activation factor antagonist, while the smallest sample of 22 patients was used in the study that compared total parenteral with enteral nutrition. Continuous regional arterial infusion of protease inhibitors in combination with antibiotics, intravenous supplementation of alanyl-glutamine dipeptide and the early, high-volume continuous veno-venous hemofiltration showed the best results in the treatment of patients with severe acute pancreatitis. Also, the use of low molecular weight heparin and enteral nutrition significantly reduced mortality.

  8. Case-matched comparison of the retroperitoneal approach with laparotomy for necrotizing pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Besselink, Marc G.; Bollen, Thomas L.; Buskens, Erik; van Ramshorst, Bert; Gooszen, Hein G.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Minimally invasive necrosectomy through a retroperitoneal approach is gaining popularity for the treatment of necrotizing pancreatitis. There is, however, no substantial evidence from comparative studies in favor of this technique over laparotomy. The aim of this case-matched study was

  9. A Conservative and Minimally Invasive Approach to Necrotizing Pancreatitis Improves Outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Bakker, Olaf J.; Bollen, Thomas L.; Besselink, Marc G.; Ali, Usama Ahmed; Schrijver, A. Marjolein; Boermeester, Marja A.; Goor ,van Harry; Dejong, Cornelis H.; van Eijck, Casper H.; van Ramshorst, Bert; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; van der Harst, Erwin; Hofker, Hendrik; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Brink, Menno A.; Kruyt, Philip M.; Manusama, Eric R.; van der Schelling, George P.; Karsten, Tom; Hesselink, Eric J.; van Laarhoven, Cornelis J.; Rosman, Camiel; Bosscha, Koop; de Wit, Ralph J.; Houdijk, Alexander P.; Cuesta, Miguel A.; Wahab, Peter J.; Gooszen, Hein G.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Treatment of patients with necrotizing pancreatitis has become more conservative and less invasive, but there are few data from prospective studies to support the efficacy of this change. We performed a prospective multicenter study of treatment outcomes among patients with

  10. Acute pancreatitis: recent advances through randomised trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Sven M.; Hallensleben, Nora D. L.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Fockens, Paul; van Goor, Harry; Bruno, Marco J.; Besselink, Marc G.

    2017-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common GI conditions requiring acute hospitalisation and has a rising incidence. In recent years, important insights on the management of acute pancreatitis have been obtained through numerous randomised controlled trials. Based on this evidence, the treatment

  11. Pharmacological interventions for acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moggia, Elisabetta; Koti, Rahul; Belgaumkar, Ajay P; Fazio, Federico; Pereira, Stephen P; Davidson, Brian R; Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan

    2017-04-21

    In people with acute pancreatitis, it is unclear what the role should be for medical treatment as an addition to supportive care such as fluid and electrolyte balance and organ support in people with organ failure. To assess the effects of different pharmacological interventions in people with acute pancreatitis. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, 2016, Issue 9), MEDLINE, Embase, Science Citation Index Expanded, and trial registers to October 2016 to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We also searched the references of included trials to identify further trials. We considered only RCTs performed in people with acute pancreatitis, irrespective of aetiology, severity, presence of infection, language, blinding, or publication status for inclusion in the review. Two review authors independently identified trials and extracted data. We did not perform a network meta-analysis as planned because of the lack of information on potential effect modifiers and differences of type of participants included in the different comparisons, when information was available. We calculated the odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the binary outcomes and rate ratios with 95% CIs for count outcomes using a fixed-effect model and random-effects model. We included 84 RCTs with 8234 participants in this review. Six trials (N = 658) did not report any of the outcomes of interest for this review. The remaining 78 trials excluded 210 participants after randomisation. Thus, a total of 7366 participants in 78 trials contributed to one or more outcomes for this review. The treatments assessed in these 78 trials included antibiotics, antioxidants, aprotinin, atropine, calcitonin, cimetidine, EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid), gabexate, glucagon, iniprol, lexipafant, NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), octreotide, oxyphenonium, probiotics, activated protein C, somatostatin, somatostatin plus omeprazole, somatostatin

  12. Drug induced acute pancreatitis: Does it exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenner, Scott

    2014-01-01

    As the incidence of acute pancreatitis continues to rise, establishing the etiology in order to prevent recurrence is important. Although the etiology of acute pancreatitis is not difficult in the majority of patients, almost a quarter of patients are initially labeled as having idiopathic acute pancreatitis. When confronted with a patient with acute pancreatitis and no clear etiology defined as an absence alcoholism, gallstones (ultrasound and/or MRI), a normal triglyceride level, and absence of tumor, it often appears reasonable to consider a drug as the cause of acute pancreatitis. Over 100 drugs have been implicated by case reports as causing acute pancreatitis. While some of these case reports are well written, many case reports represent poorly written experiences of the clinician simply implicating a drug without a careful evaluation. Over-reliance on case reports while ignoring randomized clinical trials and large pharmacoepidemiologic surveys has led to confusion about drug induced acute pancreatitis. This review will explain that drug induced acute pancreatitis does occur, but it is rare, and over diagnosis leads to misconceptions about the disease resulting in inappropriate patient care, increased litigation and a failure to address the true entity: idiopathic acute pancreatitis. PMID:25469020

  13. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Issa, Yama; Hagenaars, Julia C.; Bakker, Olaf J.; van Goor, Harry; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Bollen, Thomas L.; van Ramshorst, Bert; Witteman, Ben J.; Brink, Menno A.; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; Dejong, Cornelis H.; Spanier, B. W. Marcel; Heisterkamp, Joos; van der Harst, Erwin; van Eijck, Casper H.; Besselink, Marc G.; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis can develop recurrent or chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, little is known about the incidence or risk factors for these events. We performed a cross-sectional study of 669 patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis admitted to 15 Dutch

  14. [Correlation between hyperamylasemia and acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, R; Durante, E; Pampolini, M; Tioli, P

    1981-05-31

    It is often difficult to differentiate acute pancreatitis (A.P.) from some other acute abdominal diseases, when there is an elevated serum amylase. In contrast, the renal clearance of amylase, expressed as a percentage of creatinine clearance, can separate patients with A.P. from patients with acute colecistitis, common duct stone without pancreatitis, hyperamylasemia after biliary surgery, acute peptic ulcer and acute salivary diseases.

  15. Luminal lactate in acute pancreatitis - validation and relation to disease severity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pynnönen, Lauri; Minkkinen, Minna; Räty, Sari

    2012-01-01

    and systemic inflammation. In acute pancreatitis (AP) bacterial translocation is considered as the key event leading to infection of necrotic pancreatic tissue and high severity of illness. METHODS: We used rectal luminal equilibration dialysis for the measurement of gut luminal lactate in 30 consecutive...... patients admitted to hospital due to acute pancreatitis to test the hypothesis that a single measurement of rectal luminal lactate predicts the severity of acute pancreatitis, the length of hospital stay, the need of intensive care and ultimately, mortality. We also tested the physiological validity...... the physiological validity of the method. Rectal luminal lactate at the hospital admission was not associated with the first day or the highest SOFA score, CRP level, hospital length of stay, length of stay in intensive care or mortality. In this cohort of unselected consecutive patients with acute pancreatitis we...

  16. Plasma Sphingolipids in Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Konończuk

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis (AP is a prevalent gastrointestinal disorder associated with systemic inflammatory response syndrome and, in the case of severe AP, a mortality rate ranging from 36% to 50%. Standard clinical treatment of AP includes intensive hydration, analgesia, and management of complications. Unfortunately, the direct treatment of AP at the level of its molecular pathomechanism has not yet been established. Recent studies indicate that the sphingolipid signaling pathway may be one of the important factors contributing to the development of inflammation in pancreatic diseases. In the current study, we sought to investigate this promising route. We examined the plasma sphingolipid profile of 44 patients with acute pancreatitis, dividing them into three groups: mild, moderate and severe AP. Samples were collected from these groups at days 1, 3 and 7 following their hospital admission. We demonstrated significant changes in blood plasma sphingolipids in relation to the time course of AP. We also found an inhibition of de novo ceramide synthesis in mild and moderate AP. However, the most important and novel finding was a significant elevation in sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P (a downstream metabolite of ceramide in mild AP, as well as a dramatic reduction in the lipid molecule content in the early stage (days 1 and 3 of severe AP. This strongly indicates that plasma S1P could serve as a prognostic marker of AP severity.

  17. Acute Pancreatitis in Pediatric Patients: Demographics, Etiology, and Diagnostic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Ricardo; Hagerott, Heidi E; Kulkarni, Sakil; Yasrebi, Mona; Lee, Edward Y

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this article is to provide updates on acute pancreatitis in children regarding the imaging findings, causes, and complications based on a review of the current studies in the pediatrics literature. We discuss the epidemiology of acute pancreatitis, the role of imaging and imaging findings in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis, and the causes and complications of acute pancreatitis. The incidence of acute pancreatitis is increasing in children. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis because imaging findings can be used to establish the cause of acute pancreatitis, evaluate for complications of acute pancreatitis, and possibly predict the course of the disease.

  18. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency following acute pancreatitis: Systematic review and study level meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollemans, Robbert A; Hallensleben, Nora D L; Mager, David J; Kelder, Johannes C; Besselink, Marc G; Bruno, Marco J; Verdonk, Robert C; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C

    2018-04-01

    This study systematically explores the prevalence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) after acute pancreatitis in different subgroups of etiology (biliary/alcoholic/other), disease severity and follow-up time ( 36 months after index admission). PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched, 32 studies were included in this study level meta-analysis. In a total of 1495 patients with acute pancreatitis, tested at a mean of 36 months after index admission, the pooled prevalence of PEI was 27.1% (95%-confidence interval [CI]: 20.3%-35.1%). Patients from seven studies (n = 194) underwent direct tests with pooled prevalence of 41.7% [18.5%-69.2%]. Patients from 26 studies (n = 1305) underwent indirect tests with pooled prevalence of 24.4% [18.3%-31.8%]. In subgroup analyses on patients that underwent fecal elastase-1 tests, PEI occurred more often in alcoholic pancreatitis (22.7% [16.6%-30.1%]) than in biliary pancreatitis (10.2% [6.2%-16.4%]) or other etiology (13.4% [7.7%-22.4%]; P = 0.02). Pooled prevalence of PEI after mild and severe pancreatitis was 19.4% [8.6%-38.2%] and 33.4% [22.6%-46.3%] respectively in studies using fecal elaste-1 tests (P = 0.049). Similar results were seen in patients without (18.9% [9.3%-34.6%]) and with necrotizing pancreatitis (32.0% [18.2%-49.8%]; P = 0.053). Over time, the prevalence of PEI decreased in patients who underwent the fecal elastase-1 test and increased in patients who underwent the fecal fat analysis. After acute pancreatitis, a quarter of all patients develop PEI during follow-up. Alcoholic etiology and severe and necrotizing pancreatitis are associated with higher risk of PEI. The prevalence of PEI may change as time of follow-up increases. Copyright © 2018 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Acute pancreatitis: a rare cause of acute abdomen in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Smiti; Gupta, Anjali; Dora, Anjali; Gupta, Anshu

    2009-04-01

    Pancreatitis in pregnancy is rare and occurs in approximately 1 in 1,000 to 1 in 10,000 births. Acute pancreatitis rarely complicates pregnancy, can occur during any trimester but over half (52%) occur during the third trimester and rarely during post-partum period. A case of idiopathic pancreatitis in pregnancy has been reported. Pancreatitis often presents as an acute abdomen and can have lethal effect on the mother and the fetus.

  20. Effects of disease severity and necrosis on pancreatic dysfunction after acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garip, Gokhan; Sarandöl, Emre; Kaya, Ekrem

    2013-11-28

    To evaluate the effects of disease severity and necrosis on organ dysfunctions in acute pancreatitis (AP). One hundred and nine patients treated as AP between March 2003 and September 2007 with at least 6 mo follow-up were included. Patients were classified according to severity of the disease, necrosis ratio and localization. Subjective clinical evaluation and fecal pancreatic elastase-I (FPE-I) were used for exocrine dysfunction evaluation, and oral glucose tolerance test was completed for endocrine dysfunction. The correlation of disease severity, necrosis ratio and localization with exocrine and endocrine dysfunction were investigated. There were 58 male and 51 female patients, and mean age was 56.5 ± 15.7. Of the patients, 35.8% had severe AP (SAP) and 27.5% had pancreatic necrosis. Exocrine dysfunction was identified in 13.7% of the patients [17.9% were in SAP, 11.4% were in mild AP (MAP)] and 34.7% of all of the patients had endocrine dysfunction (56.4% in SAP and 23.2% in MAP). In patients with SAP and necrotizing AP (NAP), FPE-Ilevels were lower than the others (P pancreatic head necrosis or near total necrosis, FPE-1 levels were lower than 200 μg/g stool. Forty percent of the patients who had undergone necrosectomy developed exocrine dysfunction. Endocrine dysfunction was more significant in patients with SAP and NAP (P pancreatic head necrosis and necrosectomy should be followed for pancreatic functions.

  1. Obestatin Accelerates the Recovery in the Course of Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Bukowczan

    Full Text Available Several previous studies have shown that obestatin exhibits protective and regenerative effects in some organs including the stomach, kidney, and the brain. In the pancreas, pretreatment with obestatin inhibits the development of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, and promotes survival of pancreatic beta cells and human islets. However, no studies investigated the effect of obestatin administration following the onset of experimental acute pancreatitis.The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of obestatin therapy in the course of ischemia/reperfusion-induced pancreatitis. Moreover, we tested the influence of ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute pancreatitis and administration of obestatin on daily food intake and pancreatic exocrine secretion.Acute pancreatitis was induced by pancreatic ischemia followed by reperfusion of the pancreas. Obestatin (8 nmol/kg/dose was administered intraperitoneally twice a day, starting 24 hours after the beginning of reperfusion. The effect of obestatin in the course of necrotizing pancreatitis was assessed between 2 and 14 days, and included histological, functional, and biochemical analyses. Secretory studies were performed on the third day after sham-operation or induction of acute pancreatitis in conscious rats equipped with chronic pancreatic fistula.Treatment with obestatin ameliorated morphological signs of pancreatic damage including edema, vacuolization of acinar cells, hemorrhages, acinar necrosis, and leukocyte infiltration of the gland, and led to earlier pancreatic regeneration. Structural changes were accompanied by biochemical and functional improvements manifested by accelerated normalization of interleukin-1β level and activity of myeloperoxidase and lipase, attenuation of the decrease in pancreatic DNA synthesis, and by an improvement of pancreatic blood flow. Induction of acute pancreatitis by pancreatic ischemia followed by reperfusion significantly decreased daily food intake and

  2. Obestatin Accelerates the Recovery in the Course of Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowczan, Jakub; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Tomaszewska, Romana

    2015-01-01

    Objective Several previous studies have shown that obestatin exhibits protective and regenerative effects in some organs including the stomach, kidney, and the brain. In the pancreas, pretreatment with obestatin inhibits the development of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, and promotes survival of pancreatic beta cells and human islets. However, no studies investigated the effect of obestatin administration following the onset of experimental acute pancreatitis. Aim The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of obestatin therapy in the course of ischemia/reperfusion-induced pancreatitis. Moreover, we tested the influence of ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute pancreatitis and administration of obestatin on daily food intake and pancreatic exocrine secretion. Methods Acute pancreatitis was induced by pancreatic ischemia followed by reperfusion of the pancreas. Obestatin (8nmol/kg/dose) was administered intraperitoneally twice a day, starting 24 hours after the beginning of reperfusion. The effect of obestatin in the course of necrotizing pancreatitis was assessed between 2 and 14 days, and included histological, functional, and biochemical analyses. Secretory studies were performed on the third day after sham-operation or induction of acute pancreatitis in conscious rats equipped with chronic pancreatic fistula. Results Treatment with obestatin ameliorated morphological signs of pancreatic damage including edema, vacuolization of acinar cells, hemorrhages, acinar necrosis, and leukocyte infiltration of the gland, and led to earlier pancreatic regeneration. Structural changes were accompanied by biochemical and functional improvements manifested by accelerated normalization of interleukin-1β level and activity of myeloperoxidase and lipase, attenuation of the decrease in pancreatic DNA synthesis, and by an improvement of pancreatic blood flow. Induction of acute pancreatitis by pancreatic ischemia followed by reperfusion significantly decreased daily food

  3. [Clinical analysis of acute hyperlipidemic pancreatitis during pregnancy and postpartum period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-liang; Jiang, Yuan-hui; Wei, Yuan; Zhao, Yang-yu; Zhu, Xi; Yao, Gai-qi

    2014-02-18

    To describe the characteristics of acute pancreatitis during pregnancy and postpartum. From 1994 to 2012, 18 cases of gravida and postpartum women complicated with acute pancreatitis were treated at Peking University Third Hospital and retrospective analysis was performed. The admission rate due to acute pancreatitis was 41.24 per 100 000 admission. The median age was 32.0 (28.0, 34.7) years, with the onset of acute pancreatitis on 35.0 (23.5, 37.0) weeks'gestation. Of all the cases, 13 (72.2%) were interstitial edematous acute pancreatitis, and 5 (27.8%) were necrotizing. Nine (50.0%) were caused by hyperlipidemia, of which 7 (38.9%) were caused by gallstones, and 2 (1.1%) were idiopathic. Stratified by severity, 6 (33.3%) were mild, 7 (38.9%) were moderately severe and 5 (27.8%) were severe, of which 8 were transferred to Intensive Care Unit. Compared with non-hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis, cases caused by hyperlipidemia were more severe, however, the prognoses of mothers and infants were good. The incidence of acute pancreatitis during pregnancy and postpartum was similar to that of the regular population, and mostly caused by gallstones and hyperlipidemia. Although acute hyperlipidemic pancreatitis is more severe, the morbidity and mortality of maternal and perinatal could be decreased by aggressive therapy.

  4. IAP/APA evidence-based guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    There have been substantial improvements in the management of acute pancreatitis since the publication of the International Association of Pancreatology (IAP) treatment guidelines in 2002. A collaboration of the IAP and the American Pancreatic Association (APA) was undertaken to revise these guidelines using an evidence-based approach. Twelve multidisciplinary review groups performed systematic literature reviews to answer 38 predefined clinical questions. Recommendations were graded using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. The review groups presented their recommendations during the 2012 joint IAP/APA meeting. At this one-day, interactive conference, relevant remarks were voiced and overall agreement on each recommendation was quantified using plenary voting. The 38 recommendations covered 12 topics related to the clinical management of acute pancreatitis: A) diagnosis of acute pancreatitis and etiology, B) prognostication/predicting severity, C) imaging, D) fluid therapy, E) intensive care management, F) preventing infectious complications, G) nutritional support, H) biliary tract management, I) indications for intervention in necrotizing pancreatitis, J) timing of intervention in necrotizing pancreatitis, K) intervention strategies in necrotizing pancreatitis, and L) timing of cholecystectomy. Using the GRADE system, 21 of the 38 (55%) recommendations, were rated as 'strong' and plenary voting revealed 'strong agreement' for 34 (89%) recommendations. The 2012 IAP/APA guidelines provide recommendations concerning key aspects of medical and surgical management of acute pancreatitis based on the currently available evidence. These recommendations should serve as a reference standard for current management and guide future clinical research on acute pancreatitis. Copyright © 2013 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [Acute pancreatitis during chemotherapy of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia complicated with pseudocyst].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorska-Fic, Barbara; Stańczak, Elzbieta; Matysiak, Michał; Kamiński, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of pancreatitis in patients with haematopoetic neoplasms who are treated with L-asparaginase is fom 2 to 24%. In majority of cases the pancreatitis is oedematous and self-limiting. Acute haemorrhagic or necrotizing pancreatitis caused by L-asparaginase is rare but potentially life-threatening complication. We present 2 cases of acute pancreatitis in children aged 2 and 4 years. They were diagnosed to have acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and were treated according to the ALLLIC BFM 2002 protocol. Acute pancreatitis developed in these children after induction therapy and was followed by formation of a pseudocyst. In both cases the diagnosis of this complication was made directly after phase I of the protocol I (after eighth dose of L-Asparaginase). In the first case the course of acute pancreatitis was mild. Normalization of the amylase levels occurred after 7 days and the diagnosis of post inflammatory cyst was made 15 days after the first signs of the disease. But thereafter, during the additional complication (pneumonia with Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriemia) the pancreatic cyst became infected. In the second case acute pancreatitis had a severe course and the child required treatment in the Intensive Care Unit for 21 days. The cyst was diagnosed after 20 days from the beginning of symptoms. The surgical procedure, applied in both cases was internal drainage by anastomosis of the cyst with the back wall of the stomach. Antileukaemic treatment was recommenced after 6-8 weeks when complications resolved. Currently both children are well and remain in haematological remission and continue maintenance chemotherapy.

  6. Acute Pancreatitis: Demographics, aetiological factors and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. The spectrum of aetiologies and outcomes of acute pancreatitis in South African settings is under-reported. We report our experience at a regional hospital and compare it with international norms. Patients and methods. Data were prospectively collected on all admissions of patients with acute pancreatitis to a ...

  7. Cytokines and organ failure in acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmstrøm, Marie Louise; Hansen, Mark Berner; Andersen, Anders Møller

    2012-01-01

    We aimed at synchronously examining the early time course of 4 proinflammatory cytokines as predictive factors for development of organ failure in patients with acute pancreatitis (AP).......We aimed at synchronously examining the early time course of 4 proinflammatory cytokines as predictive factors for development of organ failure in patients with acute pancreatitis (AP)....

  8. Prevention and Intervention Strategies in Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besselink, M.G.H.

    2008-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common, costly, potentially lethal, and poorly understood disease, mostly caused by gallstones. In the past decade the incidence of acute pancreatitis in the Netherlands increased by 50% to over 3400 admissions in 2006, most likely due to an increase of gallstone disease.

  9. Nutrition in acute pancreatitis: a critical review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lodewijkx, Piet J.; Besselink, Marc G.; Witteman, Ben J.; Schepers, Nicolien J.; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Bakker, Olaf J.

    2016-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis poses unique nutritional challenges. The optimal nutritional support in patients with severe acute pancreatitis has been a subject of debate for decades. This review provides a critical review of the available literature. According to current literature, enteral nutrition

  10. Nutrition in acute pancreatitis: a critical review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lodewijkx, Piet J.; Besselink, Marc G.; Witteman, Ben J.; Schepers, Nicolien J.; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304821721; Bakker, Olaf J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314099050

    Severe acute pancreatitis poses unique nutritional challenges. The optimal nutritional support in patients with severe acute pancreatitis has been a subject of debate for decades. This review provides a critical review of the available literature. According to current literature, enteral nutrition

  11. Acute pancreatitis complicating excessive intake of phenolphthalein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrianides, A. L.; Rosin, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    A case is described in which a patient presented with acute pancreatitis following inadvertent ingestion of large quantities of phenolphthalein for the treatment of his chronic constipation. There was complete recovery and no sequelae from the acute attack of pancreatitis. PMID:6463003

  12. Moderate acute pancreatitis with pleural effusion and impaired kidney functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumbantoruan, O. H.; Dairi, L. B.

    2018-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a pancreatic inflammatory reaction that is clinically characterized by acute abdominal pain accompanied by elevated amylase and lipase enzymes. A 57-year-old female patient came to the emergency department with the main complaint of localized pain in the epigastric region within the last three days. Blood pressure 130/90mmHg, pulse 90x/i, RR 20x/i, temperature 37°C, sub-icteric on the eyes and tenderness in the epigastric region. Laboratory findings were leukocytosis, increased amylase, and lipase, elevated liver enzymes, hypoalbuminemia, elevated Kidney Functions, acidosis, and hypoglycemia. Abdominal CT-Scan revealed a partially lobulated edge with solid and necrotic components of the caput pancreas and widespread suspicion to the pancreatic corpus. The mass appeared to cause widening of the biliary and intrahepatic systems with minimal right pleural effusion. The liverwas slightly enlarged. The patient was with acute pancreatitis and treated with the installation of an open nasogastric tube, and resuscitated with ringer lactate fluid followed by IVFD D5%. Patients fasted for three days before giving a low fat, protein diet, antibiotic and proton pump inhibitors for seven days. After nine days, amylase and lipase levels decreased with significant clinical improvement. The next three days, the patient was discharged.

  13. Acute pancreatitis in five European countries: etiology and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullo, Lucio; Migliori, Marina; Oláh, Attila; Farkas, Gyula; Levy, Philippe; Arvanitakis, Constantine; Lankisch, Paul; Beger, Hans

    2002-04-01

    In recent years, many advances have been made in the diagnosis and treatment of acute pancreatitis that have lead to a significant reduction in both morbidity and mortality; however, knowledge of the etiology and of the relation between etiology and mortality is far from complete. To obtain a more comprehensive view of the etiology and mortality of acute pancreatitis in Europe than has been given by previous single-center studies. The study comprised 1,068 patients in five European countries who were admitted to hospitals for acute pancreatitis from January 1990 to December 1994. Data for each patient were collected on a standardized form. Of the 1,068 patients (692 men, 376 women; mean age, 52.8 years; range, 10-95 years), 589 had edematous pancreatitis, and 479 the necrotic form. Cholelithiasis (37.1%) and alcohol (41.0%) were the most frequent etiologic factors. In Germany, cholelithiasis and alcohol occurred with similar frequency (34.9 and 37.9%, respectively); in Hungary, alcohol predominates over cholelithiasis (60.7 vs. 24.0%); in France, a small predominance of alcohol was seen (38.5 vs. 24.6%); and in Greece and Italy, there was a clear predominance of cholelithiasis over alcohol (71.4 vs. 6.0% and 60.3 vs. 13.2%, respectively). The differences in the frequency of cholelithiasis and alcohol between Greece and Italy and the other countries were statistically significant (p relationship between mortality and age.

  14. Acute suppuration of the pancreatic duct associated with pancreatic ductal obstruction due to pancreas carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Yoshitsugu; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Susumu, Seiya; Tsutsumi, Ryuji; Kitasato, Amane; Adachi, Tomohiko; Mishima, Takehiro; Kanematsu, Takashi

    2006-08-01

    Acute obstructive suppurative cholangitis is a well-known clinical entity; however, acute suppuration of the pancreatic duct in the setting of pancreatic ductal obstruction is an uncommon pancreatic disorder. We report a case of acute suppuration of the pancreatic duct without either a concomitant pancreatic abscess or an infected pseudocyst, presenting as acute relapsing pancreatitis. In this case, the underlying cause of suppuration of the pancreatic duct was pancreatic ductal obstruction and chronic pancreatitis secondary to pancreas head carcinoma along with infection of Escherichia coli. Endoscopic placement of a pancreatic stent resulted in an evacuation of grayish thick pus from the distal pancreatic duct with a dramatic improvement of the disease. This case proposes the concept that acute suppuration of the pancreatic duct is a complex process involving the chronically damaged pancreas, pancreatic outflow obstruction, and subsequent bacterial infection. Antibiotic treatment is effective but temporary; therefore, the immediate drainage of the infected pancreatic duct is mandatory.

  15. Hipertriglyceridemia induced acute pancreatitis in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mañas García, María Dolores; Marchán Carranza, Enrique; Galiana Gómez Del Pulgar, Jesús; Fernández de Bobadilla Pascual, Belén

    Hypertrigliceridemia is the third most common cause of acute pancreatitis. The risk of developing acute pancreatitis is 5% in healthy patients and 4% during pregnancy with triglyceride levels >1,000mg/dl. During pregnancy there are changes in the lipid profile that increase between two and four times triglyceride levels. Its increase in excessive form produces an oxidative environment with injury of the endothelium and appearance of complications such as preeclampsia or pancreatitis. We present the case of a pregnant woman with pancreatitis secondary to hypertriglyceridemia. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood: a Turkish case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olcay Unver

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood (ANEC is a rare form of acute encephalopathy of unknown etiology characterized by typical symmetrical lesions in the thalami, with variable involvement of the white matter, brainstem and cerebellum. Clinically there is a rapid neurologic deterioration after a short period of a nonspecific viral-like illness associated with gastrointestinal or respiratory signs. Asian children are especially affected. Here we present a 3-year-old boy admitted to our hospital with fever and deterioration of consciousness. The diagnosis of ANEC was made by radiologic findings [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(3.000: 641-645

  17. Acute necrotizing mediastinits: a series of four patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banazadeh M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1":*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Acute Necrotizing Mediastinitis (ANM is a lethal disease that without antibiotic therapy and surgical Intervention has a mortality rate about 40% in best medical centers. With development of imaging technology (spiral CT- Scan and shortening in time of diagnosis and surgery, the outcome and prognosis of the patients are improved. The surgical modalities are trans- cervical and trans- thoracic approaches. "n"nCase series: We present a series of four patients with acute necrotizing mediastinitis that admitted to thoracic surgery ward in vali-e-asr Hospital in Tehran, Iran, during years 2009 and 2010. A 31years old woman and three male patients with ages 21, 25 and 63 years. Odontogenic infection was the cause in two cases while pharyngeal perforation and cervical esophageal perforation were the causes of acute necrotizing mediastinitis the others."n"nResults: Mean±SD of hospitalization time was 24±6 days. Infection of cervical space (periviceral spaces and the superior mediastinum were found in all patients while extension of infection below the carina was found in two of them. All patients were operated by trans- cervical approach. One patient was operated by trans- thoracic

  18. Contemporary management of infected necrosis complicating severe acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamdar, Saurabh; Siriwardena, Ajith K

    2006-01-01

    Pancreatic necrosis complicating severe acute pancreatitis is a challenging scenario in contemporary critical care practice; it requires multidisciplinary care in a setting where there is a relatively limited evidence base to support decision making. This commentary provides a concise overview of current management of patients with infected necrosis, focusing on detection, the role of pharmacologic intervention, and the timing and nature of surgical interventions. Fine-needle aspiration of necrosis remains the mainstay for establishment of infection. Pharmacological intervention includes antibiotic therapy as an adjunct to surgical debridement/drainage and, more recently, drotrecogin alfa. Specific concerns remain regarding the suitability of drotrecogin alfa in this setting. Early surgical intervention is unhelpful; surgery is indicated when there is strong evidence for infection of necrotic tissue, with the current trend being toward 'less drastic' surgical interventions. PMID:16356213

  19. Acute pancreatitis: recent advances through randomised trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Sven M; Hallensleben, Nora D L; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Fockens, Paul; van Goor, Harry; Bruno, Marco J; Besselink, Marc G

    2017-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common GI conditions requiring acute hospitalisation and has a rising incidence. In recent years, important insights on the management of acute pancreatitis have been obtained through numerous randomised controlled trials. Based on this evidence, the treatment of acute pancreatitis has gradually developed towards a tailored, multidisciplinary effort, with distinctive roles for gastroenterologists, radiologists and surgeons. This review summarises how to diagnose, classify and manage patients with acute pancreatitis, emphasising the evidence obtained through randomised controlled trials. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. [Fluid therapy in acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2013-12-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (AP) is associated with an increased need for fluids due to fluid sequestration and, in the most severe cases, with decreased peripheral vascular tone. For several decades, clinical practice guidelines have recommended aggressive fluid therapy to improve the prognosis of AP. This recommendation is based on theoretical models, animal studies, and retrospective studies in humans. Recent studies suggest that aggressive fluid administration in all patients with AP could have a neutral or harmful effect. Fluid therapy based on Ringer's lactate could improve the course of the disease, although further studies are needed to confirm this possibility. Most patients with AP do not require invasive monitoring of hemodynamic parameters to guide fluid therapy administration. Moreover, the ability of these parameters to improve prognosis has not been demonstrated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  1. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Issa, Yama; Hagenaars, Julia C.; Bakker, Olaf J.; van Goor, Harry; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Bollen, Thomas L.; van Ramshorst, Bert; Witteman, Ben J.; Brink, Menno A.; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; Dejong, Cornelis H.; Spanier, B. W Marcel; Heisterkamp, Joos; van der Harst, Erwin; van Eijck, Casper H.; Besselink, Marc G.; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims: Patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis can develop recurrent or chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, little is known about the incidence or risk factors for these events. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study of 669 patients with a first episode of acute

  2. Risk of Pancreatic Cancer After a Primary Episode of Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijkers, Anton P.; Bakker, Olaf J.; Ahmed Ali, Usama; Hagenaars, Julia C. J. P.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Besselink, Marc G.; Bollen, Thomas L.; van Eijck, Casper H.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Acute pancreatitis may be the first manifestation of pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the risk of pancreatic cancer after a first episode of acute pancreatitis. Methods Between March 2004 and March 2007, all consecutive patients with a first episode of acute

  3. B cell activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF behaves as an acute phase reactant in acute pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Pongratz

    Full Text Available To determine if B cell activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF acts as an acute phase reactant and predicts severity of acute pancreatitis.40 patients with acute pancreatitis were included in this single center cohort pilot study. Whole blood and serum was analyzed on day of admission and nine consecutive days for BAFF, c-reactive protein (CRP, interleukin-6 (IL-6, procalcitonin (PCT, and leucocyte numbers. Different severity Scores (Ranson, APACHE II, SAPS II, SAPS III and the clinical course of the patient (treatment, duration of stay, duration ICU were recorded.Serum BAFF correlates with CRP, an established marker of severity in acute pancreatitis at day of admission with a timecourse profil similar to IL-6 over the first nine days. Serum BAFF increases with Ranson score (Kruskal-Wallis: Chi2 = 10.8; p = 0.03 similar to CRP (Kruskal-Wallis: Chi2 = 9.4; p = 0.05 . Serum BAFF, IL-6, and CRP levels are elevated in patients that need intensive care for more than seven days and in patients with complicated necrotizing pancreatitis. Discriminant analysis and receiver operator characteristics show that CRP (wilks-lambda = 0.549; ROC: AUC 0.948 and BAFF (wilks-lambda = 0.907; ROC: AUC 0.843 serum levels at day of admission best predict severe necrotizing pancreatitis or death, outperforming IL-6, PCT, and number of leucocytes.This study establishes for the first time BAFF as an acute phase reactant with predictive value for the course of acute pancreatitis. BAFF outperforms established markers in acute pancreatitis, like IL-6 and PCT underscoring the important role of BAFF in the acute inflammatory response.

  4. B cell activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF) behaves as an acute phase reactant in acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongratz, Georg; Hochrinner, Hannah; Straub, Rainer H; Lang, Stefanie; Brünnler, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    To determine if B cell activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF) acts as an acute phase reactant and predicts severity of acute pancreatitis. 40 patients with acute pancreatitis were included in this single center cohort pilot study. Whole blood and serum was analyzed on day of admission and nine consecutive days for BAFF, c-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), procalcitonin (PCT), and leucocyte numbers. Different severity Scores (Ranson, APACHE II, SAPS II, SAPS III) and the clinical course of the patient (treatment, duration of stay, duration ICU) were recorded. Serum BAFF correlates with CRP, an established marker of severity in acute pancreatitis at day of admission with a timecourse profil similar to IL-6 over the first nine days. Serum BAFF increases with Ranson score (Kruskal-Wallis: Chi2 = 10.8; p = 0.03) similar to CRP (Kruskal-Wallis: Chi2 = 9.4; p = 0.05 ). Serum BAFF, IL-6, and CRP levels are elevated in patients that need intensive care for more than seven days and in patients with complicated necrotizing pancreatitis. Discriminant analysis and receiver operator characteristics show that CRP (wilks-lambda = 0.549; ROC: AUC 0.948) and BAFF (wilks-lambda = 0.907; ROC: AUC 0.843) serum levels at day of admission best predict severe necrotizing pancreatitis or death, outperforming IL-6, PCT, and number of leucocytes. This study establishes for the first time BAFF as an acute phase reactant with predictive value for the course of acute pancreatitis. BAFF outperforms established markers in acute pancreatitis, like IL-6 and PCT underscoring the important role of BAFF in the acute inflammatory response.

  5. Polypharmacy and risk of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Dan; Lindblad, Mats; Bexelius, Tomas; Oskarsson, Viktor; Sadr-Azodi, Omid; Ljung, Rickard

    2016-11-01

    Drug-induced pancreatitis is receiving increased medical and epidemiological attention. However, as no study has examined the role of polypharmacy per se in the development of acute pancreatitis, we examined the association between polypharmacy and risk of acute pancreatitis. A nationwide case-control study was conducted between 2006 and 2008 of Swedish people aged 40-84 years. The Swedish Patient Register was used to identify 6161 cases of first-episode acute pancreatitis. The Swedish Register of the Total Population was used to randomly select 61 637 controls from the general population using frequency-based density sampling, matched for age, sex, and calendar year. The Swedish Prescribed Drug Register was used to assess polypharmacy, defined as the number of unique drugs prescribed during the last 6 months before the index date (i.e. the date of acute pancreatitis for cases and a random date for controls). Odds ratios (ORs), with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), of acute pancreatitis were estimated by unconditional logistic regression, adjusted for matching variables and potential confounding factors. The number of prescribed drugs was associated with a dose-dependent increase in the risk of acute pancreatitis. In the multivariable-adjusted model, compared to those without any prescriptions, the OR was 1.69 (95%CI: 1.55-1.86) for persons with 1-2 drugs, 2.40 (2.20-2.62) for 3-5 drugs, 3.17 (2.88-3.48) for 6-9 drugs, and 4.57 (4.12-5.06) for 10 or more drugs. This population-based case-control study shows a dose-dependent association between increasing polypharmacy and risk of acute pancreatitis. These findings provide further insights into drug-induced pancreatitis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpytis, Mindaugas; Karosas, Vytautas; Tamosauskas, Rokas; Dementaviciene, Jurate; Strupas, Kestutis; Sileikis, Audrius; Sipylaite, Jurate

    2012-11-10

    Hypertriglyceridemia is a well known phenomenon of pregnancy occurring due to physiologic changes in sex hormone levels. Occasionally, it could lead to development of acute pancreatitis. Gestational hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis occurs in pregnant women usually with preexisting abnormalities of the lipid metabolism and is associated with additional diagnostic and therapeutic challenges related to hypertriglyceridemia and pregnancy. We present a case of the hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis in pregnant woman with no previous history of lipid abnormality and pregnancy as the only known triggering factor for hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis is a rare complication of pregnancy; however, it should be suspected in all pregnant patients admitted for nonobsteric abdominal pain.

  7. Urinary trypsinogen-2 dipstick in acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Møller; Novovic, Srdan; Ersbøll, Annette Kjaer

    2010-01-01

    In acute pancreatitis (AP), rapid diagnosis and early treatment are of importance for clinical outcome. Urinary trypsinogen-2 has been suggested as a promising diagnostic marker; however, studies using the urinary trypsinogen-2 dipstick test (UTDT) have provided varying results.......In acute pancreatitis (AP), rapid diagnosis and early treatment are of importance for clinical outcome. Urinary trypsinogen-2 has been suggested as a promising diagnostic marker; however, studies using the urinary trypsinogen-2 dipstick test (UTDT) have provided varying results....

  8. [Type IA glycogenosis with acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, T E

    1995-01-01

    Type IA glycogenosis, or von Gierke disease, is the most common among the glycogenoses with enlarged liver. Acute pancreatitis is a rare manifestation of type IA glycogenosis and has been attributed to elevated serum fat levels. We report a case of type IA glycogenosis with acute pancreatitis. The radiologists should be familiar with the computed tomography findings in this rare complications of type IA glycogenosis.

  9. Two cases of severe acute pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yutaka; Takada, Shinichi; Morita, Yoku; Taoka, Yoshio

    1987-01-01

    We report two cases of severe acute pancreatitis; a 53-year-old man (Case 1) and a 60-year-old woman (Case 2). Case 1 was classified as ''severe'' according to the Ranson's criteria and he died of MOF on the 21st hospital day. Case 2 was classified as ''moderate'', but a large pancreatic abscess was observed by CT scan. She died of this abscess complicated with duodenal perforation on the 33rd hospital day. CT findings showed that this case was not ''moderate'' but ''severe''. Therefore, we believe that the findings of CT scan are an important factor for assessment of the severity of acute pancreatitis. (author)

  10. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Efstathios P; Sarigianni, Maria; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Mamopoulos, Apostolos; Karagiannis, Vasilios

    2011-12-01

    Acute pancreatitis is rare in pregnancy but it is associated with increased incidence of maternal and fetal mortality. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of upper quadrant abdominal pain with or without nausea and vomiting. The commonest identified causes of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy are gallstones, alcohol and hypertriglyceridemia. The main laboratory finding is increased amylase activity. Appropriate investigations include ultrasound of the right upper quadrant and measurement of serum triglycerides and ionized calcium. Management of gallstone pancreatitis is controversial, although laparoscopic cholecystectomy and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) are often used and may be associated with lower complication rates. In hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis ω-3 fatty acids and even therapeutic plasma exchange can be used. We also discuss preventive measures. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Childhood acute pancreatitis in a children's hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, S K; Chui, C H; Jacobsen, A S

    2003-09-01

    To analyse the cases of acute pancreatitis presented to a children's hospital in Singapore. Clinical charts of all children, aged under 18 years, who presented to our hospital for the first time with pancreatitis (ICD search criteria = 577.x) between the period of 1998 and mid-2002 were reviewed. Parameters analysed included presenting features, aetiology of the acute pancreatitis, length of hospital stay, complications, treatment and outcome. There were 12 cases in the review period, and the attributable causes in these cases were, in descending order, trauma, drug-induced, anatomical anomalies, poisoning and idiopathic. Of interest were two patients whose pancreatitis were results of child abuse. The most common symptoms were abdominal pain (n=11) and vomiting (n=7), though only five patients localised the pain to the epigastrium. Abdominal tenderness could be elicited in all the patients. Eleven had evidence of acute pancreatitis from computerised tomography (CT) whilst the twelfth was diagnosed with ultrasonography. The peak amylase levels amongst these patients were not high, with a median of 512.5 U/L. In the acute stage, only one patient required operative intervention whilst the remainder were managed conservatively. The mean length of hospital stay was 12.41 +/- 4.54 days. The complications encountered included pseudocyst formation, ascites, hypocalcaemia, pleural effusion and coagulopathy. The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis in children can be difficult. This is often due to ambiguous symptoms, signs and laboratory results. CT and ultrasound are essential investigations in the diagnosis and subsequent follow-up.

  12. Tamoxifen-induced acute pancreatitis – a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Czyżykowski

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Tamoxifen is a selective estrogen receptor modulator used for the treatment of oestrogen/progesterone receptor positive breast cancer. It has antagonistic or agonistic activity depending on the tissue location. Generally it causes mild and reversible side effects, however more serious ones including cardiovascular and thromboembolic adverse events, uterine cancer or acute pancreatitis can also occur. Tamoxifen, like oestrogens, increases the plasma level of TG and liver secretion of VLDL. Moreover, it inhibits the key enzymes of triglyceride metabolism. In this report we present a case of a 55-year-old woman with a history of a poorly controlled hypertriglyceridaemia diagnosed with breast cancer. She was treated with surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormonotherapy with tamoxifen. About three months after hormonal treatment, her triglyceride level increased. Five months later she developed an acute necrotic pancreatitis that required hospitalization. Her serum samples on admission were highly lipemic. An abdominal ultrasound showed no evidence of gallstones or dilation of the bile ducts. There was no history of alcohol abuse or abdominal trauma. Tamoxifen was suspected as a trigger factor for pancreatitis. After the drug withdrawal and administration of the conservative management the patient’s medical condition improved. Due to a postmenopausal status of the patient and no harmful effect on serum lipids, an adjuvant hormonotherapy with aromatase inhibitor was started.

  13. Treatment of severe acute pancreatitis and its complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerem, Enver

    2014-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), which is the most serious type of this disorder, is associated with high morbidity and mortality. SAP runs a biphasic course. During the first 1-2 wk, a pro-inflammatory response results in systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). If the SIRS is severe, it can lead to early multisystem organ failure (MOF). After the first 1-2 wk, a transition from a pro-inflammatory response to an anti-inflammatory response occurs; during this transition, the patient is at risk for intestinal flora translocation and the development of secondary infection of the necrotic tissue, which can result in sepsis and late MOF. Many recommendations have been made regarding SAP management and its complications. However, despite the reduction in overall mortality in the last decade, SAP is still associated with high mortality. In the majority of cases, sterile necrosis should be managed conservatively, whereas in infected necrotizing pancreatitis, the infected non-vital solid tissue should be removed to control the sepsis. Intervention should be delayed for as long as possible to allow better demarcation and liquefaction of the necrosis. Currently, the step-up approach (delay, drain, and debride) may be considered as the reference standard intervention for this disorder. PMID:25320523

  14. Biliary tract and pancreatic surgery complicated by acute pancreatitis: a clinical analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Chenggang; Li, Xin; Sun, Jintang; Zou, Peng; Gao, Shubo; Zhang, Peixun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical treatment features of biliary tract and pancreatic surgery complicated by acute pancreatitis. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 21 cases of biliary tract and pancreatic surgery complicated by acute pancreatitis in the Department of General Surgery in our hospital during May 2005 to July 2011 was performed; the clinical treatment features were analyzed in terms of surgical option, onset interval of acute pancreatitis after last surgery, length of stay in hos...

  15. Acute pancreatitis-induced thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura with recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Yasuhisa; Inoue, Yoshihiro; Onodera, Makoto; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Sato, Masayuki; Kojika, Masahiro; Sato, Hisaho; Suzuki, Keijiro; Matsumoto, Masanori

    2016-04-01

    Recent successive reports on acute pancreatitis-induced thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) have revealed that TTP-related microvascular damage is an aggravating factor of acute pancreatitis. Here, we report the case of a 26-year-old man diagnosed with acute pancreatitis due to high alcohol consumption. The patient was unconscious as he had taken an overdose of medication, and presented with fever and renal failure due to acute pancreatitis on admission. Although the pancreatitis subsequently improved, the symptoms were still observed; on the next day, he exhibited hemoglobinuria, anemia, and thrombocytopenia. Moreover, general blood examinations indicated the presence of schistocytes and reduced activity of ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin-like metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type 1 motif 13) to 47 %. Thus, the patient was diagnosed with TTP, and plasma exchange was performed. After the development of TTP, the acute pancreatitis recurred, but a severe pathogenesis was prevented by plasma exchange. Thus, ADAMTS13 activity may be useful for predicting a severe pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. In ADAMTS13-deficient cases, plasma exchange may be an effective technique for preventing aggravation of acute pancreatitis.

  16. Immunomodulatory therapies for acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Yang, Wen-Juan; Huang, Lu-Ming; Tang, Cheng-Wei

    2014-01-01

    It is currently difficult for conventional treatments of acute pancreatitis (AP), which primarily consist of anti-inflammatory therapies, to prevent the progression of AP or to improve its outcome. This may be because the occurrence and progression of AP, which involves various inflammatory cells and cytokines, includes a series of complex immune events. Considering the complex immune system alterations during the course of AP, it is necessary to monitor the indicators related to immune cells and inflammatory mediators and to develop more individualized interventions for AP patients using immunomodulatory therapy. This review discusses the recent advances in immunomodulatory therapies. It has been suggested that overactive inflammatory responses should be inhibited and excessive immunosuppression should be avoided in the early stages of AP. The optimal duration of anti-inflammatory therapy may be shorter than previously expected (< 24 h), and appropriate immunostimulatory therapies should be administered during the period from the 3rd d to the 14th d in the course of AP. A combination therapy of anti-inflammatory and immune-stimulating drugs would hopefully constitute an alternative to anti-inflammatory drug monotherapy. Additionally, the detection of the genotypes of critical inflammatory mediators may be useful for screening populations of AP patients at high risk of severe infections to enable the administration of early interventions to improve their prognosis. PMID:25493006

  17. Acute pancreatitis induced by mycophenolate mofetil in a kidney transplant patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einollahi Behzad

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is a rare life-threatening complication in patients after kidney transplantation. Here we described a 56-year-old man who had received a living related kidney transplant for an end-stage renal disease. In his regular follow-up, his serum creatinine was gradually increased and he underwent an allograft biopsy, which revealed an interstitial nephritis/tubular atrophy grade II. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF was prescribed to control chronic allograft nephropathy. He presented with complaints of severe abdominal pain, vomiting, loss of appetite and fever requiring hospital admission twelve days later. Acute pancreatitis was diagnosed on the basis of laboratory data and imaging findings during hospital admission. There was no history of alcohol consumption in our patient. Unfortunately he died one week later and autopsy findings demonstrated acute necrotizing pancreatitis. The bladder drainage of this patients was normal. Laboratory findings in this patient did not endorse infections and other possibilities regarding the etiology of acute pancreatitis in this patient. Therefore, we concluded that acute pancreatitis in near the patient was induced by drugs and basis on our evidence, MMF is the most important suspect. This study suggests that acute pancreatitis can be considered as a side effect of MMF.

  18. Acute pancreatitis: international classification and nomenclature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollen, T L

    2016-02-01

    The incidence of acute pancreatitis (AP) is increasing and it is associated with a major healthcare concern. New insights in the pathophysiology, better imaging techniques, and novel treatment options for complicated AP prompted the update of the 1992 Atlanta Classification. Updated nomenclature for pancreatic collections based on imaging criteria is proposed. Adoption of the newly Revised Classification of Acute Pancreatitis 2012 by radiologists should help standardise reports and facilitate accurate conveyance of relevant findings to referring physicians involved in the care of patients with AP. This review will clarify the nomenclature of pancreatic collections in the setting of AP. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Acute recurrent pancreatitis: Etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) refers to a clinical entity characterized by episodes of acute pancreatitis which occurs on more than one occasion. Recurrence of pancreatitis generally occurs in a setting of normal morpho-functional gland, however, an established chronic disease may be found either on the occasion of the first episode of pancreatitis or during the follow-up. The aetiology of ARP can be identified in the majority of patients. Most common causes include common bile duct stones or sludge and bile crystals; sphincter of oddi dysfunction; anatomical ductal variants interfering with pancreatic juice outflow; obstruction of the main pancreatic duct or pancreatico-biliary junction; genetic mutations; alcohol consumption. However, despite diagnostic technologies, the aetiology of ARP still remains unknown in up to 30% of cases: in these cases the term “idiopathic” is used. Because occult bile stone disease and sphincter of oddi dysfunction account for the majority of cases, cholecystectomy, and eventually the endoscopic biliary and/or pancreatic sphincterotomy are curative in most of cases. Endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy appeared to be a curative procedure per se in about 80% of patients. Ursodeoxycholic acid oral treatment alone has also been reported effective for treatment of biliary sludge. In uncertain cases toxin botulin injection may help in identifying some sphincter of oddi dysfunction, but this treatment is not widely used. In the last twenty years, pancreatic endotherapy has been proven effective in cases of recurrent pancreatitis depending on pancreatic ductal obstruction, independently from the cause of obstruction, and has been widely used instead of more aggressive approaches. PMID:25493002

  20. Acute pancreatitis complicating choledochal cysts in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthucumaru, Mathievathaniy; Ljuhar, Damir; Panabokke, Gayathri; Paul, Eldho; Nataraja, Ramesh; Ferguson, Peter; Dagia, Charuta; Clarnette, Tom; King, Sebastian

    2017-03-01

    To analyse the characteristics of patients with choledochal cysts presenting with acute pancreatitis. Multicenter retrospective review of all paediatric patients (pancreatitis, one having had an ante-natally diagnosed choledochal cyst. Patients presenting with pancreatitis were older when compared to the non-pancreatitis group (5.1 vs. 1.2 years, P = 0.005). Nine out of 16 (53%) patients with Type IV-A cysts presented with pancreatitis compared to five (33%) of Type I fusiform and three (17%) of Type I cystic. There was however no statistically significant association between Todani types and the development of pancreatitis (Type I fusiform, P = 1.0; Type I cystic, P = 0.063; Type IV-A, P = 0.053). The rate of complications was similar in both groups. Pancreatitis was a common presentation in children with a choledochal cyst, however, there was no clear statistically significant association with Todani types and pancreatitis. © 2016 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  1. Recurrent acute pancreatitis in anorexia and bulimia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Luc G; Stephenson, Kathryn E; Herring, Sharon; Marti, Jennifer L

    2004-07-01

    Mild pancreatitis has been reported as a consequence of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or what has been termed the "dietary chaos syndrome". Either chronic malnutrition, or refeeding after periods of malnutrition, may precipitate acute pancreatitis through several pathogenetic mechanisms. A 26-year-old woman with a ten-year history of anorexia and bulimia presented with a third episode of acute pancreatitis in three months. The patient had been abstinent from alcohol for many years. Imaging studies during all three admissions failed to identify any biliary disease, including gallstones or biliary sludge. A cholecystectomy was performed, with a normal intraoperative cholangiogram, and no abnormalities on pathologic examination of the gallbladder and bile. The patient was discharged on hospital day 10 with no pain, and she has begun to return to regular eating habits. Pancreatitis has not recurred after 6 months of follow up. We have identified 14 cases in the literature of acute pancreatitis associated with anorexia or bulimia. In the absence of evidence for gallstone, alcohol or metabolic etiologies, eating disorders may contribute to the pathophysiology of some idiopathic cases of pancreatitis.

  2. Acute pyogenic necrotizing encephalomyelitis: a fulminant and fatal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhugiri, Venkatesh Shankar; Gundamaneni, Sudheer Kumar; Santosh, Vani; Jagadisan, Barath; Sasidharan, Gopalakrishnan Madhavan; Roopesh-Kumar, Rathakrishnan V; Yadav, Awdhesh Kumar; Singh, Manish; Ananthakrishnan, Ramesh; Pariarath, Nisha; Biswal, Niranjan

    2013-05-01

    In this report the authors describe a rare case of a fulminant, pyogenic, necrotizing infection of the spinal cord and brain. Necrotizing lesions of the brain and spinal cord are usually infectious in origin and are associated with high rates of morbidity and death. Although the pathogens responsible have been identified in a few instances, the causal factors remain unknown in many cases. An 11-year-old girl developed acute, rapidly progressive paraplegia with bladder involvement and sensory loss below T-10. She had been treated recently for a Staphylococcus aureus infection of the knee joint precipitated by a penetrating injury with organic matter in the aftermath of a cyclone. Although appropriate antibiotic therapy was instituted, the spinal cord infection progressed to involve the entire spinal cord, brainstem, and brain. This fulminant course was marked by a rapid deterioration in the patient's clinical condition, ultimately leading to her death. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a previously undescribed pattern of longitudinal enhancement along the spinal cord, as well as the white matter tracts in the brainstem and brain. The possible route of spread of infection along the neuraxis is postulated to be the potential space along the white matter tracts. Treatment is not standardized due to the rarity of the condition.

  3. Nutrition in acute pancreatitis: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodewijkx, Piet J; Besselink, Marc G; Witteman, Ben J; Schepers, Nicolien J; Gooszen, Hein G; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Bakker, Olaf J

    2016-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis poses unique nutritional challenges. The optimal nutritional support in patients with severe acute pancreatitis has been a subject of debate for decades. This review provides a critical review of the available literature. According to current literature, enteral nutrition is superior to parenteral nutrition, although several limitations should be taken into account. The optimal route of enteral nutrition remains unclear, but normal or nasogastric tube feeding seems safe when tolerated. In patients with predicted severe acute pancreatitis an on-demand feeding strategy is advised and when patients do not tolerate an oral diet after 72 hours, enteral nutrition can be started. The use of supplements, both parenteral as enteral, are not recommended. Optimal nutritional support in severe cases often requires a tailor-made approach with day-to-day evaluation of its effectiveness.

  4. Haematoma in the transverse mesocolon secondary to acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case of acute haematoma of the transverse mesocolon secondary to acute necrotizing pancreatitis is presented. with a brief discussion of the pathogenesis and computed tomographic findings. The value of computed tomography in acute complicated pancreatitis is emphasized.

  5. Genetic and immunologic aspects of acute pancreatitis : An odyssey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijmeijer, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is the leading cause of acute hospitalization for gastrointestinal diseases. The course of acute pancreatitis is often mild and self-limiting, but in 15-25% of patients, pancreatitis is severe with an increased mortality risk. Infectious complications, and especially bacterial

  6. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy: an unresolved issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Pankaj

    2010-04-28

    Management of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is based on expert opinion only, due to geographic and ethic variations. Nonbiliary causes should be sought as they are associated with worse outcomes. Alcohol as a cause of acute pancreatitis is not rare. Hemoconcentration as a marker of fluid deficit and severity should be predicted with caution and fluid resuscitation should be done carefully by closely monitoring the central venous pressure, cardiac and respiratory system. Hypercalcemia of hyperparathyroidism may be falsely lowered due to hypoalbuminemia or suppressed by magnesium tocolysis.

  7. Role of Biomarkers in Diagnosis and Prognostic Evaluation of Acute Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meher, Susanta; Mishra, Tushar Subhadarshan; Sasmal, Prakash Kumar; Rath, Satyajit; Sharma, Rakesh; Rout, Bikram; Sahu, Manoj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a potentially life threatening disease. The spectrum of severity of the illness ranges from mild self-limiting disease to a highly fatal severe necrotizing pancreatitis. Despite intensive research and improved patient care, overall mortality still remains high, reaching up to 30–40% in cases with infected pancreatic necrosis. Although little is known about the exact pathogenesis, it has been widely accepted that premature activation of digestive enzymes within the pancreatic acinar cell is the trigger that leads to autodigestion of pancreatic tissue which is followed by infiltration and activation of leukocytes. Extensive research has been done over the past few decades regarding their role in diagnosis and prognostic evaluation of severe acute pancreatitis. Although many standalone biochemical markers have been studied for early assessment of severity, C-reactive protein still remains the most frequently used along with Interleukin-6. In this review we have discussed briefly the pathogenesis and the role of different biochemical markers in the diagnosis and severity evaluation in acute pancreatitis. PMID:26345247

  8. Icam-1 and acute pancreatitis complicated by acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, XiPing; Wu, Dijiong; Jiang, Xinge

    2009-01-08

    One of the most common complications of acute pancreatitis is acute lung injury, during which intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) plays an important role by participating in leukocyte adhesion and activation as well as by inducing the "cascade effect" of inflammatory mediators, pulmonary microcirculation dysfunction and even acute respiratory distress syndrome, multiple organ failure or death. Although it is generally believed that the modulatory mechanism of ICAM-1 during this process is associated with the activation of nuclear transcription factor kappa B which is mediated by IL-1, IL-6, IL-18 and oxygen free radical, etc., further studies are still required to clarify it. Since the upregulation of ICAM-1 expression in the lung during acute lung injury is one of main pathogeneses, the early detection of the ICAM-1 expression level may contribute to the prevention and treatment of acute lung injury. Moreover, reducing pulmonary ICAM-1 expression levels through treatment with anti-ICAM-1 monoclonal antibody (aICAM-1) and antagonists of the neurokinin 1 receptor, etc., should have a positive effect on protecting the lungs during acute pancreatitis. This review aims to further clarify the relationship between ICAM-1 and acute pancreatitis complicated by acute lung injury, and therefore provides a theoretical basis for the formulation of corresponding therapeutic measures in clinical practice for acute pancreatitis.

  9. Role of autophagy in development and progression of acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Shuli

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is considered an autodigestive disorder in which inappropriate activation of trypsinogen to trypsin within pancreatic acinar cells leads to the development of pancreatitis. Autophagy is an evolutionarily preserved degradation process of cytoplasmic cellular constituents, and it is one of the early pathological processes in acute pancreatitis. Autophagic flux is impaired in acute pancreatitis, which mediates the key pathologic responses of this disease. Impaired autophagy, dysfunction of lysosomes, and dysregulation of autophagy suggest a disorder of the endolysosomal pathway in acute pancreatitis. The role of autophagy in acute pancreatitis is discussed from the aspects of autophagic process, autophagy and activation of trypsinogen, impaired autophagy and acute pancreatitis, and defective autophagy promoting inflammation.

  10. Disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome: complete pancreas transection secondary to acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gámez-del-Castillo, Juan Manuel; Garcés-Albir, Marina; Fernández-Moreno, María Carmen; Morera-Ocón, Francisco Javier; Villagrasa, Rosana; Sabater-Ortí, Luis

    2016-03-01

    Disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome is a serious complication of acute pancreatitis which is defined by a complete discontinuity of the pancreatic duct, such that a viable side of the pancreas remains isolated from the gastrointestinal tract. This pancreatic disruption is infrequently observed in the clinical practice and its diagnostic and therapeutic management are controversial. We present an extreme case of disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome with complete duct disruption and pancreatic transection following acute pancreatitis, as well as the diagnostic and therapeutic processes carried out.

  11. Spatial and temporal differences of HMGB1 expression in the pancreas of rats with acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Can; Huang, Lihua; Li, Xia; Zhu, Hongwei; Li, Zhiqiang; Yu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the spatial and temporal differences in expression between HMGB1 and early-stage inflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-α) in pancreas tissue in rats with acute pancreatitis. SD rats (BW 350 ± 30 g, n = 48) were randomly divided into the experimental group (n = 36) which were injected with 5% sodium taurocholate into the bilipancreatic duct retrogradely to produce acute necrotic pancreatitis (ANP) rat models, and the sham-operated (SO) group (n = 12) injected with equal dose of saline. The rats were sacrificed at different time points at 0 h, 3 h, 6 h, 12 h, and 24 h post modeling, respectively. The peripheral blood amylase and different inflammatory factors in ANP rats at different time points were detected by ELISA, and the expression of HMGB1 in the pancreatic tissue was detected by immunohistochemistry, Western blot and Q-PCR methods. Results showed that the serum amylase in the ANP model rats was significantly higher than the sham-operated group (P pancreatitis tissue did not change significantly at 3 h and 6 h (P > 0.05), however, it increased remarkably at 12 h, and maintained up to 24 h (P > 0.05). As a late inflammatory factor, the expression of HMGB1 in acute pancreatitis was obviously later than the early inflammatory factors IL-1, TNF-α and IL-6. HMGB1 may play a key role in maintaining the development of the acute pancreatitis.

  12. Ruptured ectopic pregnancy mimicking acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitura, Kryspin; Romanczuk, Mikolaj

    2009-05-01

    Ectopic pregnancy may lead to massive haemorrhage, infertility or death. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are crucial to save patients who would otherwise die. Serum amylase and lipase measurements are known biochemical markers of pancreatic inflammation and a recognized finding that may help diagnose acute pancreatitis. To the best of our knowledge (Medline, Pubmed, Cochrane Library have been researched) the following study presents the first case of ruptured ectopic pregnancy accompanied by markedly elevated amylase and lipase levels mimicking acute pancreatitis ever reported. A previously healthy, nulliparous 35-year-old woman was admitted to hospital with a 2-day history of abdominal pain and vomiting. Her last menstrual period was 7 weeks before presentation. At the admission, the patient was hemodynamically stable. The abdomen was soft with tenderness in its mesogastric area. Blood tests revealed markedly elevated activities of the pancreatic enzymes. Acute pancreatitis was the early clinical diagnosis and subsequent therapy was initiated. After 12 hours the condition of the patient suddenly worsened. She was clinically shocked with pallor, hypotension and tachycardia. Laboratory tests revealed anaemia and increased activities of pancreatic enzymes. An ultrasound examination demonstrated an accumulation of intraperitoneal fluid in the pelvis. Subsequently, the patient was subjected to immediate laparotomy. The peritoneal cavity contained large amount of blood. A cystic mass was found and extracted from the ruptured and bleeding right fallopian tube. Histological examination confirmed a rupture of an ectopic pregnancy of a 6-week-old foetus with an intact gestational sac. The patient made an uneventful recovery and was discharged from hospital after 8 days. Our case proves that a misdiagnosed ruptured ectopic pregnancy in the event of elevated activities of pancreatic enzymes may lead to delayed diagnosis of haemorrhage to peritoneum, resulting in hemodynamic

  13. Acute Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: A Nationwide Matched-cohort Study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegård, Jakob; Cronin Fenton, Deirdre; Heide-Jørgensen, Uffe

    2018-01-01

    . Pancreatic cancer risk was expressed as hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% CIs, calculated using the Cox proportional hazards model. Cox models were stratified by age, sex, and year of pancreatitis diagnosis and adjusted for alcohol- and smoking-related conditions, and Charlson Comorbidity Index score. Results We...... included 41,669 patients diagnosed with incident acute pancreatitis and 208,340 comparison individuals. Patients with acute pancreatitis had an increased risk of pancreatic cancer compared with the age- and sex-matched general population throughout the follow-up period. The risk decreased over time......Background & Aims Acute pancreatitis may be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. However, findings from studies on this association are conflicting. We investigated the association between acute pancreatitis and increased risk of pancreatic cancer. Methods We conducted a nationwide, population...

  14. The Burden of Systemic Adiposity on Pancreatic Disease: Acute Pancreatitis, Non-Alcoholic Fatty Pancreas Disease, and Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malli, Ahmad; Li, Feng; Conwell, Darwin L; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; Hussan, Hisham; Krishna, Somashekar G

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic as recognized by the World Health Organization. Obesity and its related comorbid conditions were recognized to have an important role in a multitude of acute, chronic, and critical illnesses including acute pancreatitis, nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease, and pancreatic cancer. This review summarizes the impact of adiposity on a spectrum of pancreatic diseases.

  15. Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction produces acute pancreatitis in the possum

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, J; Thomas, A; Woods, C; Schloithe, A; Toouli, J; Saccone, G

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction has been implicated as a cause of various forms of acute pancreatitis. However, there is no direct evidence to show that sphincter of Oddi dysfunction can cause obstruction of trans-sphincteric flow resulting in acute pancreatitis.
AIMS—To determine if induced sphincter of Oddi spasm can produce trans-sphincteric obstruction and, in combination with stimulated pancreatic secretion, induce acute pancreatitis.
METHODS—In anaesthetised possums, the pancre...

  16. Pancreatic panniculitis associated with acute pancreatitis and hemorrhagic pseudocysts: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Yong Suk; Kim, Mi Sung; Park, Chan Sub; Park, Ji Yeon; Park, Noh Hyuck [Kwandong Univ., Myongji Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Pancreatic panniculitis is an inflammation and necrosis of fat at distant foci in patients with pancreatic disorders, most frequently, pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. Clinically, pancreatic panniculitis is manifested by painless or painful subcutaneous nodules on the legs, buttocks, or trunk. The usual sites are the distal parts of the lower extremities. To the best of our knowledge, there have not been many reports for the radiologic findings of pancreatic panniculitis. In this article, we report a case of pancreatic panniculitis, including radiologic findings of CT and ultrasonography. The patient was presented with painful subcutaneous nodules on the trunk, and had underlying acute pancreatitis and hemorrhagic pseudocysts.

  17. Pancreatic panniculitis associated with acute pancreatitis and hemorrhagic pseudocysts: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Yong Suk; Kim, Mi Sung; Park, Chan Sub; Park, Ji Yeon; Park, Noh Hyuck

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic panniculitis is an inflammation and necrosis of fat at distant foci in patients with pancreatic disorders, most frequently, pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. Clinically, pancreatic panniculitis is manifested by painless or painful subcutaneous nodules on the legs, buttocks, or trunk. The usual sites are the distal parts of the lower extremities. To the best of our knowledge, there have not been many reports for the radiologic findings of pancreatic panniculitis. In this article, we report a case of pancreatic panniculitis, including radiologic findings of CT and ultrasonography. The patient was presented with painful subcutaneous nodules on the trunk, and had underlying acute pancreatitis and hemorrhagic pseudocysts

  18. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma presenting as acute pancreatitis during pregnancy: clinical and radiologic manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Dinushi; Kandavar, Ramprasad; Palacios, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    Only seven cases of pancreatic adenocarcinoma diagnosed during pregnancy have been reported. In this article, we describe a case of pancreatic adenocarcinoma presenting clinically as acute pancreatitis in a pregnant patient. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) revealed a pancreatic mass with an inflammatory component and multiple hyperintense metastatic lesions in the liver. The patient was initially treated for biliary pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer was not suspected given her young age and absence of risk factors. A diagnosis of pancreatic cancer in a pregnant patient requires a high index of suspicion, and pancreatitis can be a mode of presentation.

  19. Acute pancreatitis and acute renal failure following multiple hornet stings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sharma

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Hymenoptera is a class of insects that sting in order to subdue their prey. Humans coming into accidental contact with these insects results in stings that may cause from mild local reaction like weal formation around the sting site to severe systemic reactions such as intravascular hemolysis, acute renal failure, pulmonary edema, cerebral edema, and rarely pancreatitis. We report here the clinical course of a patient who developed concurrent acute pancreatitis and pigment-induced acute renal failure after multiple hornet stings.

  20. Acute pancreatitis: Demographics, aetiological factors and outcomes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although acute pancreatitis is a common reason for emergency hospital admissions,1 there is a paucity of information about the disease in a South African context2,3 and to what extent disease severity and outcomes compare with published literature on the subject. We prospectively investigated the hospital prevalence,.

  1. Enteral Nutrition and Acute Pancreatitis: A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanier, B. W. M.; Bruno, M. J.; Mathus-Vliegen, E. M. H.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. In patients with acute pancreatitis (AP), nutritional support is required if normal food cannot be tolerated within several days. Enteral nutrition is preferred over parenteral nutrition. We reviewed the literature about enteral nutrition in AP. Methods. A MEDLINE search of the English

  2. Acute management of hyperlipaemic pancreatitis: a successful ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    successful treatment modality in the acute management of hyperlipaemic pancreatitis. Case study. A 32-year-old ... including diabetes mellitus, pregnancy, hypothyroidism, excessive alcohol intake and nephrotic syndrome, as well as the .... Hypertriglyceridemia: its etiology, effects and treatment. Canad Med Assoc J. 2007 ...

  3. Acute pancreatitis associated with hypertriglyceridemia: a life-threatening complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayataş, Semra Eser; Eser, Mehmet; Cam, Cetin; Cogendez, Ebru; Guzin, Kadir

    2010-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis is rare cause in pregnancy and gallstones are clearly the most common cause of pancreatitis during pregnancy. Only a small percentage of women with acute pancreatitis are associated with hypertriglyceridemia and it is most often noted during the last two trimesters of pregnancy. Hypertriglyceridemia is a rare cause of pancreatitis in pregnant women and complication such as pancreatitis carries a higher risk of mortality for both the mother and the fetus. Our purpose was to report our experience with acute pancreatitis as a lethal complication of hypertriglyceridemia during the third trimester of pregnancy.

  4. Acute pancreatitis: current perspectives on diagnosis and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Adarsh P; Mourad, Moustafa M; Bramhall, Simon R

    2018-01-01

    The last two decades have seen the emergence of significant evidence that has altered certain aspects of the management of acute pancreatitis. While most cases of acute pancreatitis are mild, the challenge remains in managing the severe cases and the complications associated with acute pancreatitis. Gallstones are still the most common cause with epidemiological trends indicating a rising incidence. The surgical management of acute gallstone pancreatitis has evolved. In this article, we revisit and review the methods in diagnosing acute pancreatitis. We present the evidence for the supportive management of the condition, and then discuss the management of acute gallstone pancreatitis. Based on the evidence, our local institutional pathways, and clinical experience, we have produced an outline to guide clinicians in the management of acute gallstone pancreatitis. PMID:29563826

  5. Histoprotective effect of antihypoxant olifen during experimental acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstoi, A D; Dzhurko, B I; Vashetko, R V; Medvedev, Y V; Gol'tsov, V R; Dvoinov, V G; Zakharova, E V

    2001-04-01

    We evaluated the efficiency of perfusion with olifen in preventing oxidative stress at the early stage of acute pancreatitis. Transaortic perfusion with olifen prevented clinical and biochemical symptoms of acute pancreatitis, attenuated oxidative stress, reduced peritoneal exudation, and restricts the area of pancreatic necrosis to 6% tissue.

  6. Clinical practice guideline: management of acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Joshua A.; Hsu, Jonathan; Bawazeer, Mohammad; Marshall, John; Friedrich, Jan O.; Nathens, Avery; Coburn, Natalie; May, Gary R.; Pearsall, Emily; McLeod, Robin S.

    2016-01-01

    There has been an increase in the incidence of acute pancreatitis reported worldwide. Despite improvements in access to care, imaging and interventional techniques, acute pancreatitis continues to be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite the availability of clinical practice guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis, recent studies auditing the clinical management of the condition have shown important areas of noncompliance with evidence-based recommendations. This underscores the importance of creating understandable and implementable recommendations for the diagnosis and management of acute pancreatitis. The purpose of the present guideline is to provide evidence-based recommendations for the management of both mild and severe acute pancreatitis as well as the management of complications of acute pancreatitis and of gall stone–induced pancreatitis. Une hausse de l’incidence de pancréatite aiguë a été constatée à l’échelle mondiale. Malgré l’amélioration de l’accès aux soins et aux techniques d’imagerie et d’intervention, la pancréatite aiguë est toujours associée à une morbidité et une mortalité importantes. Bien qu’il existe des guides de pratique clinique pour la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë, des études récentes sur la vérification de la prise en charge clinique de cette affection révèlent des lacunes importantes dans la conformité aux recommandations fondées sur des données probantes. Ces résultats mettent en relief l’importance de formuler des recommandations compréhensibles et applicables pour le diagnostic et la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë. La présente ligne directrice vise à fournir des recommandations fondées sur des données probantes pour la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë, qu’elle soit bénigne ou grave, ainsi que de ses complications et de celles de la pancréatite causée par un calcul biliaire. PMID:27007094

  7. [Acute secundary abdomen to pancreatic hydatid cyst].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjuán Rodríguez, S; Morán Penco, J M; Rincón Rodera, P; González Díez, G

    2005-01-01

    The hydatidosis is a frequent zoonosis in Spain, but isolated location in pancreas and their onset as acute abdomen is excepcional. We present a boy 14 years old, with abdominal pain and low-grade fever since 1 month. Hemogram shows eosinophilia, and echography an anechoic mass in tail of pancreas beside of free peritoneal liquid. At surgery procedure: a broken hydatid cyst is verified, surrounded of tissues inflammatory reaction that evolved to pancreatic fistula. The differents forms from clinical presentation of the pancreatic hydatid cyst, as well as the complications related to their location are analyzed.

  8. [Minimally invasive treatment for acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Approximately 20% of patients with acute pancreatitis develop pancreatic necrosis, which is often complicated by secondary infection. This is a serious condition, which continues to have a death-rate of between 10% and 40% despite concerted efforts. Traditionally, management was aggressive, with open necrosectomy, but this has developed into an approach of watchful waiting, attempting to postpone surgery until necrosis can be better controlled. More recently, video-assisted retroperitoneal debridement (VARD) has become available as a minimally invasive surgical option, with the theoretical advantage of causing less trauma to these already severely ill patients. Van Santvoort et al. conducted a multicentre randomized study comparing open necrosectomy with a step-up approach consisting of percutaneous drainage followed, if necessary, by VARD. They show that a composite endpoint, consisting of major morbidity factors and mortality, occurs significantly less in the step-up approach, i.e. 40% versus 69%. Interestingly, 35% of patients in the step-up approach group were adequately treated without the need of a subsequent VARD procedure. An important subsidiary effect of this study is that care for patients with acute pancreatitis has been significantly improved, as a result of cooperation between academic and community hospitals within the Dutch Acute Pancreatitis Study Group: an expert team of experienced surgeons, specialists in gastroenterology and hepatology, and radiologists provide advice within 24 hours. Those patients in whom the disease has a complicated course can be transferred to specialised centres of treatment.

  9. Probiotics enhance pancreatic glutathione biosynthesis and reduce oxidative stress in experimental acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutgendorff, Femke; Trulsson, Lena M.; van Minnen, L. Paul; Rijkers, Ger T.; Timmerman, Harro M.; Franzen, Lennart E.; Gooszen, Hein G.; Akkermans, Louis M. A.; Soderholm, Johan D.; Sandstrom, Per A.

    2008-01-01

    Factors determining severity of acute pancreatitis (AP) are poorly understood. Oxidative stress causes acinar cell injury and contributes to the severity, whereas prophylactic probiotics ameliorate experimental pancreatitis. Our objective was to study how probiotics affect oxidative stress,

  10. Acute pancreatitis : complication of chicken pox in an immunocompetent host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Pinaki; Maity, Pranab; Basu, Arindam; Dey, Somitra; Das, Biman; Ghosh, U S

    2012-12-01

    Chicken pox is a benign self limited disease. But it may rarely be complicated with acute pancreatitis in otherwise healthy patient. We present a case of varicella pancreatitis and its marked recovery with acyclovir.

  11. Transgastric Local Pancreatic Hypothermia: A Novel, Rapid Multimodal Therapy for Acute Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0327 TITLE: Transgastric Local Pancreatic Hypothermia: A Novel, Rapid Multimodal Therapy for Acute Pancreatitis ...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0327 Transgastric Local Pancreatic Hypothermia: A Novel, Rapid Multimodal Therapy for Acute... Pancreatitis 5b. GRANT NUMBER PR110417 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Betty Diamond 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Dr. Vijay P. Singh 5e. TASK

  12. Relationship between the exocrine and endocrine pancreas after acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Stephanie L M; Kennedy, James I C; Murphy, Rinki; Phillips, Anthony R J; Windsor, John A; Petrov, Maxim S

    2014-12-07

    To determine the prevalence and time course of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in individuals with newly diagnosed prediabetes or diabetes mellitus after acute pancreatitis. Relevant literature cited in three major biomedical journal databases (EMBASE, MEDLINE, and Scopus) was reviewed independently by two authors. There were no language constraints but the search was limited to human studies. Studies included were cohort studies of adult patients who were discharged after an attack of acute pancreatitis. Patients were excluded if they were under 18 years of age or had a previous diagnosis of prediabetes or diabetes mellitus, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, or chronic pancreatitis. The main outcome measure was the prevalence of concomitant pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients who were diagnosed with prediabetes and diabetes mellitus after an attack of acute pancreatitis. Subgroup analysis was conducted for patients who were diagnosed with prediabetes only and those who were diagnosed with diabetes mellitus only. Subgroup analysis looking at the time course of concomitant pancreatic exocrine and endocrine insufficiency was also conducted. Pooled prevalence and corresponding 95% confidence intervals were calculated for all outcome measures and P-values acute pancreatitis was 43% (95%CI: 30%-56%). The pooled prevalence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in individuals after acute pancreatitis was 29% (95%CI: 19%-39%). The prevalence of concomitant pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in individuals with newly diagnosed prediabetes or diabetes was 40% (95%CI: 25%-55%). The prevalence of concomitant pancreatic exocrine insufficiency among individuals with prediabetes alone and diabetes mellitus alone was 41% (95%CI: 12%-75%) and 39% (95%CI: 28%-51%), respectively. Further analysis showed that the prevalence of concomitant pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in individuals with prediabetes or diabetes decreases over time after an attack of acute pancreatitis

  13. Pancreatic Perfusion CT in Early Stage of Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa Tsuji

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Early intensive care for severe acute pancreatitis is essential for improving SAP mortality rates. However, intensive therapies for SAP are often delayed because there is no ideal way to accurately evaluate severity in the early stages. Currently, perfusion CT has been shown useful to predict prognosis of SAP in the early stage. In this presented paper, we would like to review the clinical usefulness and limitations of perfusion CT for evaluation of local and systemic complications in early stage of SAP.

  14. ACUTE BILATERAL VIRAL NECROTIZING RETINITIS : AN UNCOMMON CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Ku.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A 22 year old male with a history of high grade fever 2 days, diarrhea 3 times and vomiting 2 times presented with diminution of vision in right eye of 1 days duration. His best corrected visual acuity (BCVA was counting finger 1 meter with no pin hole im provement and 20/20 ( S nellen ’ s in the right and left eye respectively. Fundus examination RE revealed white lesion in geographic fashion with clear edge involving macula and in left eye small peanut size white lesion present at paramacular area. Clinicall y a diagnosis of acute necrotizing was made. We started treatment by intra venous antiviral and systemic steroid. ELISA (serum and PCR (aqueous were positive for herpes simplex virus ( I ndex above 1.1 i.e. 1.54 . 1,2 The lesions showed a good response to t he above treatment. At 2 months follow - up, lesion had resolved well with BCVA of 20/40 and 20/20 in right and left eye respectively

  15. Hyperamylasaemia and acute pancreatitis in paracetamol poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, L E; Dalhoff, K

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hyperamylasaemia and even acute pancreatitis have been reported in patients with paracetamol poisoning. AIMS: To describe the incidence, clinical characteristics, and prognostic implications of hyperamylasaemia in paracetamol poisoning. PATIENTS: Six hundred and two patients transferred...... to a specialized unit with severe paracetamol poisoning and 212 unselected patients admitted from the local region. METHODS: Retrospective study based on hospital charts. The optimum threshold of serum amylase to discriminate non-survivors was identified. RESULTS: An elevated serum amylase (>100 U/L) occurred...... in 28 of the unselected patients (13%), in 218 of the transferred patients (36%), and in 118 of 148 patients (80%) with fulminant hepatic failure. Only 33 cases of paracetamol-associated acute pancreatitis were diagnosed. A threshold serum amylase of 150 U/L to discriminate non-survivors had sensitivity...

  16. Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  17. Acute pancreatitis complicating dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kalenahalli Jagadish; Chandrashekar, Anitha; Basavaraja, Chetak Kadabasal; Kumar, Halasahalli Chowdegowda Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Dengue infection can have spectrum of manifestations, often with an unpredictable clinical progression and outcome. There have been increasing reports of atypical manifestations. Abdominal pain or tenderness and persistent vomiting (warning signs) are present in the majority of cases with severe dengue prior to clinical deterioration. We report a 10-year-old child who presented with fever, persistent vomiting, and abdominal pain. A diagnosis of acute pancreatitis was made. This is a very infrequently reported complication of dengue hemorrhagic fever.

  18. The Impair Iron Metabolism in Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Orlov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to develop a method for preventing hepatic failure. Subjects and methods: Sixty-three patients with a complicated course of acute pancreatitis, admitted to the intensive care unit, were examined and treated. Thirty-one patients received standard intensive therapy and 32 patients had an intensive treatment program comprising deferoxamine in a dose of 6—12 mg/kg without octreotide. The activities of AsAT and AlAT and the levels of total bilirubin and its fractions, ferritin, and free hemoglobin were determined in plasma three times (on admission, 1 and 3 days later; the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase were also examined. The severity of endotoxemia was assessed by the levels of low- and medium-molecular-weight substances in plasma and on red blood cells. Results. Incorporation of deferoxamine into the intensive therapy program for severe acute pancreatitis could reduce the incidence of hepatopathy and decrease that of pancreatogenic sepsis and retroperitoneal phlegmon by 3 times and mortality rate by 19.6%. Conclusion. The use of deferoxamine in the intensive therapy program is pathogenetically warranted because, by binding excess iron ions in plasma, the agent prevents the development of occasionally fatal complications of acute pancreatitis.

  19. Pharmacological approach to acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, U.C.; Semb, S.; Nøjgaard, Camilla

    2008-01-01

    be useful as prophylaxis against post endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis (PEP). The protease inhibitor gabexate mesilate (GM) is used routinely as treatment to AP in some countries, but randomized clinical trials and a meta-analysis do not support this practice. Nitroglycerin (NGL......) is a nitrogen oxide (NO) donor, which relaxes the sphincter of Oddi. Studies show conflicting results when applied prior to ERCP and a large multicenter randomized study is warranted. Steroids administered as prophylaxis against PEP has been validated without effect in several randomized trials. The non......-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) indomethacin and diclofenac have in randomized studies showed potential as prophylaxis against PEP. Interleukin 10 (IL-10) is a cytokine with anti-inflammatory properties but two trials testing IL-10 as prophylaxis to PEP have returned conflicting results. Antibodies...

  20. Timing of cholecystectomy after acute severe pancreatitis in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    TALEBI-BAKHSHAYESH, Mousa; MOHAMMADZADEH, Alireza; ZARGAR, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common diseases of the gastrointestinal tract and is usually caused by gallstones; its occurrence in pregnancy is rare. Cholecystectomy for biliary pancreatitis during pregnancy is unavoidable, but its timing is controversial. We herein present the case of a patient who underwent termination of pregnancy due to deteriorated acute severe pancreatitis during the 27th week of gestation. Cholecystectomy was performed because of the relapse of acute biliary pa...

  1. Yersiniosis as a possible cause of acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, J; Teglgaard Hansen, P

    1985-01-01

    In some cases of acute pancreatitis no cause can be identified. An etiologic role of Yersinia enterocolitica type 3 was suggested in two previous reports. A case is now presented which supports this hypothesis by simultaneity of reactive phase of yersiniosis and an acute attack of pancreatitis...... of otherwise unknown cause. Although the coincidence may have been fortuitous, the pattern common to this and the earlier published cases suggests that it may yield a further clue to an etiologic understanding of acute pancreatitis....

  2. An Unusual Case of Colon Perforation Complicating Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony A. Aghenta

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Colonic complications of severe acute pancreatitis occur rarely. Although there have been several theories on how pancreatic pseudocysts rupture into the colon, the exact pathogenesis remains unknown. We report an unusual case of pseudocysts complicating severe acute pancreatitis presenting with colonic perforation in a 71-year-old man with a history of chronic mesenteric ischemia. Pressure effects from a giant pseudocyst and intravascular volume depletion with acute insult on chronic mesenteric ischemia are highlighted as possible etiologic factors.

  3. A rare disease in the differential diagnosis of acute pancreatitis: acute brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berber, Ilhami; Erkurt, Mehmet Ali; Yetkin, Funda; Unlu, Serkan; Yilmaz, Sami; Bentli, Recep; Bazna, Sezai

    2014-01-01

    Some infectious organisms may give rise to acute pancreatitis; brucellosis, however, extremely rarely leads to acute pancreatitis. A 40-year-old man was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis, the etiology of which was determined to be acute brucellosis. The patient was discharged without complications approximately 15 days after the initiation of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and doxycycline treatment. Brucella infections may rarely be complicated by acute pancreatitis. Thus, brucellosis should be remembered in the etiology of acute pancreatitis in regions such as Turkey, where Brucella infections are endemic.

  4. The role of pancreatic ducts in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegyi, Peter; Rakonczay, Zoltan

    2015-07-01

    Pancreatic ducts secrete 2.5 l of alkaline, HCO3(-)-rich fluid daily which greatly contributes to the homeostasis of the pancreas. Ducts are also important in the pathophysiology of the pancreas; alteration of ductal function can lead to severe diseases such as cystic fibrosis and chronic pancreatitis. The role of pancreatic ducts in the development of acute pancreatitis has only been uncovered recently. Pancreatitis inducing agents like bile acids and ethanol dose-dependently affect pancreatic ductal secretion; low concentrations stimulate, whereas high concentrations inhibit secretion. The majority of the review will focus on the central role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a critical protein in the regulation of ductal secretion, in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis which is highlighted by numerous investigations. Downregulation of CFTR expression results in increased severity of acute pancreatitis in mice. Furthermore, human genetic studies have demonstrated statistically significant association of CFTR mutations with acute recurrent pancreatitis. Overall, the data support the involvement of pancreatic ducts in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. Copyright © 2015 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Bacterial Diversity in Oral Samples of Children in Niger with Acute Noma, Acute Necrotizing Gingivitis, and Healthy Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadelmann, Benoît; Baratti-Mayer, Denise; Gizard, Yann; Mombelli, Andrea; Pittet, Didier; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Background Noma is a gangrenous disease that leads to severe disfigurement of the face with high morbidity and mortality, but its etiology remains unknown. Young children in developing countries are almost exclusively affected. The purpose of the study was to record and compare bacterial diversity in oral samples from children with or without acute noma or acute necrotizing gingivitis from a defined geographical region in Niger by culture-independent molecular methods. Methods and Principal Findings Gingival samples from 23 healthy children, nine children with acute necrotizing gingivitis, and 23 children with acute noma (both healthy and diseased oral sites) were amplified using “universal” PCR primers for the 16 S rRNA gene and pooled according to category (noma, healthy, or acute necrotizing gingivitis), gender, and site status (diseased or control site). Seven libraries were generated. A total of 1237 partial 16 S rRNA sequences representing 339 bacterial species or phylotypes at a 98–99% identity level were obtained. Analysis of bacterial composition and frequency showed that diseased (noma or acute necrotizing gingivitis) and healthy site bacterial communities are composed of similar bacteria, but differ in the prevalence of a limited group of phylotypes. Large increases in counts of Prevotella intermedia and members of the Peptostreptococcus genus are associated with disease. In contrast, no clear-cut differences were found between noma and non-noma libraries. Conclusions Similarities between acute necrotizing gingivitis and noma samples support the hypothesis that the disease could evolve from acute necrotizing gingivitis in certain children for reasons still to be elucidated. This study revealed oral microbiological patterns associated with noma and acute necrotizing gingivitis, but no evidence was found for a specific infection-triggering agent. PMID:22413030

  6. Bacterial diversity in oral samples of children in niger with acute noma, acute necrotizing gingivitis, and healthy controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Bolivar

    Full Text Available Noma is a gangrenous disease that leads to severe disfigurement of the face with high morbidity and mortality, but its etiology remains unknown. Young children in developing countries are almost exclusively affected. The purpose of the study was to record and compare bacterial diversity in oral samples from children with or without acute noma or acute necrotizing gingivitis from a defined geographical region in Niger by culture-independent molecular methods.Gingival samples from 23 healthy children, nine children with acute necrotizing gingivitis, and 23 children with acute noma (both healthy and diseased oral sites were amplified using "universal" PCR primers for the 16 S rRNA gene and pooled according to category (noma, healthy, or acute necrotizing gingivitis, gender, and site status (diseased or control site. Seven libraries were generated. A total of 1237 partial 16 S rRNA sequences representing 339 bacterial species or phylotypes at a 98-99% identity level were obtained. Analysis of bacterial composition and frequency showed that diseased (noma or acute necrotizing gingivitis and healthy site bacterial communities are composed of similar bacteria, but differ in the prevalence of a limited group of phylotypes. Large increases in counts of Prevotella intermedia and members of the Peptostreptococcus genus are associated with disease. In contrast, no clear-cut differences were found between noma and non-noma libraries.Similarities between acute necrotizing gingivitis and noma samples support the hypothesis that the disease could evolve from acute necrotizing gingivitis in certain children for reasons still to be elucidated. This study revealed oral microbiological patterns associated with noma and acute necrotizing gingivitis, but no evidence was found for a specific infection-triggering agent.

  7. Biliary tract and pancreatic surgery complicated by acute pancreatitis: a clinical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chenggang; Li, Xin; Sun, Jintang; Zou, Peng; Gao, Shubo; Zhang, Peixun

    2015-01-01

    To study the clinical treatment features of biliary tract and pancreatic surgery complicated by acute pancreatitis. A retrospective analysis of 21 cases of biliary tract and pancreatic surgery complicated by acute pancreatitis in the Department of General Surgery in our hospital during May 2005 to July 2011 was performed; the clinical treatment features were analyzed in terms of surgical option, onset interval of acute pancreatitis after last surgery, length of stay in hospital and Ranson score. There was no statistic difference between the two groups (A: The onset interval of acute pancreatitis after last surgery acute pancreatitis after last surgery > 0.5 year) in pathogenetic condition and length of stay in hospital. All patients were discharged after treatment, a follow-up of 6-18 months found no recurrence of pancreatitis. There is no relevance between the treatment feature and onset interval of biliary and pancreatic surgery complicated by acute pancreatitis. The disease is still treated meanly with symptomatic and supportive treatment, while the etiological treatment is also particularly important.

  8. How Does Cholecystectomy Influence Recurrence of Idiopathic Acute Pancreatitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Claire L; Abbas, Saleh M; Watters, David A K

    2016-12-01

    Idiopathic acute pancreatitis is diagnosed in approximately 10-30 % of cases of acute pancreatitis. While there is evidence to suggest that the cause in many of these patients is microlithiasis, this fact has not been translated into a resource efficient treatment strategy that is proven to reduce recurrence rates. The aim of this study was to examine the value of prophylactic cholecystectomy following an episode of acute pancreatitis in patients with no history of alcohol abuse and no stones found on ultrasound. This was a retrospective study of 2236 patients who presented to a regional Australian hospital. Patients were included when diagnosed with acute pancreatitis with no confirmed cause. Recurrence of acute pancreatitis was compared between those that did and did not undergo cholecystectomy. One hundred ninety-five consecutive patients met the study definition of "idiopathic" acute pancreatitis. 33.8 % (66/195) underwent cholecystectomy. The patients who had cholecystectomy had a recurrence rate of 19.7 % (13/66) whereas, of those managed expectantly, 42.8 % (68/159) had at least one recurrence of acute pancreatitis (P = 0.001). Following an episode of acute pancreatitis with no identifiable cause, in patients fit for surgery, cholecystectomy should be considered to reduce the risk of recurrent episodes of pancreatitis.

  9. Timing of cholecystectomy after acute severe pancreatitis in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi-Bakhshayesh, Mousa; Mohammadzadeh, Alireza; Zargar, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common diseases of the gastrointestinal tract and is usually caused by gallstones; its occurrence in pregnancy is rare. Cholecystectomy for biliary pancreatitis during pregnancy is unavoidable, but its timing is controversial. We herein present the case of a patient who underwent termination of pregnancy due to deteriorated acute severe pancreatitis during the 27th week of gestation. Cholecystectomy was performed because of the relapse of acute biliary pancreatitis 10 days after being discharged. The interval from pancreatitis to cholecystectomy varies with its severity; in mild pancreatitis the interval may be one week, but in severe cases it maybe up to three weeks. Because pancreatitis may relapse during this interval, as occurred in the present case, a better solution for the timing of cholecystectomy must be sought.

  10. [Acute pancreatitis in our case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedeković, V; Orlić, R; Ljumanović, J; Buljat, G

    1977-01-01

    On the Surgery Department of Military Hospital in Zagreb 164 cases of acute pancreatitis, among them 88 male and 76 female, were treated during the period of 1963 to 1974. Diagnosis was based on anamnesis, clinical symptoms, laboratory tests as well as X-ray pictures of the lungs and abdomen. In most cases (72,5 percent) etiology of the disease has shown changes of biliary tract; obesity and alchoholism were also present in high percentage. Operative treatment was applied in 72 cases and 92 cases have undergone conservative treatment. Indications for surgical intervention were lithiasis, cholecystitis, inefficiency of conservative therapy during the first 12 hours and such cases in which diagnosis could not have been given with sufficient certainty. Along with usual surgical treatment in 23 cases in which biliary obstruction and serose pancreatitis were present choledochoduodenostomy was applied with satisfactory results. 28 patients died out of 164; mortality percentage 17,1.

  11. [TRANSPAPILLARY INTERVENTIONS FOR AN ACUTE PANCREATITIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastashenko, I L

    2015-08-01

    Experience of the endoscopic retrograde pancreatocholangiography performance in emergency (in 4-6 h after admittance to hospital) in 513 patients with suggestion for biliary acute pancreatitis (AP) presence was adduced. In 451 (87.9%) patients preliminary diagnosis was confirmed: in 402 (89.1%)--calculous cholecystitis, complicated by choledocholithiasis, was revealed, in 49 (10.9%)--residual choledocholithiasis. Establishment of biliary genesis of an AP assumes performance of endoscopic papillosphincterotomy and choledocholithextraction. Biliary causes of an AP were excluded in 62 (12.1%) patients, in 34 (54.8%) of them characteristic changes in duodenum were revealed, in 13 (21.0%)--destructive changes of pancreatic ductal system. While diagnosis of an AP of nonbiliary origin a conservative tactics of treatment was selected.

  12. Acute pancreatitis due to pancreatic hydatid cyst: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makni Amin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hydatid disease is a major health problem worldwide. Primary hydatid disease of the pancreas is very rare and acute pancreatitis secondary to hydatid cyst has rarely been reported. We report the case of a 38-year-old man who presented acute pancreatitis. A diagnosis of hydatid cyst of the pancreas, measuring 10 cm, was established by abdominal computed tomography before surgery. The treatment consisted of a distal pancreatectomy. The postoperative period was uneventful. Additionally, a review of the literature regarding case reports of acute pancreatitis due to pancreatic hydatid cyst is presented.

  13. Acute Pancreatitis: The Role of Imaging and Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maher, Michael M.; Lucey, Brian C.; Gervais, Debra A.; Mueller, Peter R.

    2004-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis can manifest as a benign condition with minimal abdominal pain and hyperamylasemia or can have a fulminant course, which can be life-threatening usually due to the development of infected pancreatic necrosis, and multisystem organ failure. Fortunately, 70-80% of patients with acute pancreatitis have a benign self-limiting course. The initial 24-48 hours after the initial diagnosis is usually the period that determines the subsequent course, and for many of the 20-30% of patients who subsequently have a fulminant course, this becomes apparent within this time frame. With reference to long-term outcome following acute pancreatitis, most cases recover without long-term sequelae with only a minority of cases progressing to chronic pancreatitis. In the initial management of acute pancreatitis, assessment of metabolic disturbances and systemic organ dysfunction is critical. However, the advent and continued refinement of cross-sectional imaging modalities over the past two decades has led to a prominent role for diagnostic imaging in assessing acute pancreatitis. Furthermore, these cross-sectional imaging modalities have enabled the development of diagnostic and therapeutic interventional techniques in the hands of radiologists. In this article we review the diagnostic features of acute pancreatitis, the clinical staging systems, complications and the role of imaging. The role of interventional radiology techniques in the management of acute pancreatitis will be discussed as well as potential complications associated with these treatments

  14. Incretin-based therapy and risk of acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Reimar Wernich; Pedersen, Lars; Møller, Niels

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the use of incretin-based drugs (GLP-1 receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 [DPP4] inhibitors) is associated with acute pancreatitis. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The study was a nationwide population-based case-control study using medical databases...... in Denmark. Participants were 12,868 patients with a first-time hospitalization for acute pancreatitis between 2005 and 2012 and a population of 128,680 matched control subjects. The main outcome measure was the odds ratio (OR) for acute pancreatitis associated with different antihyperglycemic drugs. We...... adjusted for history of gallstones, alcoholism, obesity, and other pancreatitis-associated comorbidities and medications. RESULTS: A total of 89 pancreatitis patients (0.69%) and 684 control subjects (0.53%) were ever users of incretins. The crude OR for acute pancreatitis among incretin users was 1.36 (95...

  15. Chronic pancreatitis: a sequela of acute fatty liver of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apiratpracha, Wichian; Yoshida, Eric M; Scudamore, Charles H; Charles, Scudamore H; Weiss, Alan A; Byrne, Michael F

    2008-02-01

    Chronic pancreatitis following acute fatty liver of pregnancy is rarely reported. We treated a 34-year-old woman who developed acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP) after delivery by caesarean section at 32 weeks of gestation. AFLP was complicated by acute pancreatitis and multiple organ failure. The management of the disease was primarily supportive. She recovered from acute fulminant liver failure and multi-organ failure, apart from the development of symptomatic chronic pancreatitis thereafter. Investigations failed to identify any other causes of chronic pancreatitis. The patient responded very well to pancreatic enzyme supplement for the treatment of steatorrhoea. To our knowledge, this is the first report of chronic pancreatitis as a consequence of multi-organ dysfunction caused by AFLP.

  16. The complex treatment of acute pancreatitis using miniinvasive surgical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. I. Ohrimenko

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays methods used in acute pancreatitis diagnostic do not allow to find the most optimal indications, terms of surgical drainage approaches in surgical treatment of acute pancreatitis. Aim. In order to develop optimal diagnostic and treatment algorithm 316 patients took part in the study. Methods and results. Surgery outcomes were assessed by the next methods: ultrasound, computed tomography. We determined that destructive changes in pancreas in group of sterile pancreatic necrosis were limited. In cases of infected pancreatic necrosis the damage was spread and the disease course was septic. That’s why the operative treatment in cases of sterile pancreatitis has to be used with strict indications such as fermentative peritonitis, acute liquid formations, acute pseudocysts. Conclusion. In such cases miniinvasive surgery is mainly used while in the cases of infected pancreatic necrosis we ought to choose open surgery treatment.

  17. Lipolysis of visceral adipocyte triglyceride by pancreatic lipases converts mild acute pancreatitis to severe pancreatitis independent of necrosis and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Krutika; Trivedi, Ram N; Durgampudi, Chandra; Noel, Pawan; Cline, Rachel A; DeLany, James P; Navina, Sarah; Singh, Vijay P

    2015-03-01

    Visceral fat necrosis has been associated with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) for over 100 years; however, its pathogenesis and role in SAP outcomes are poorly understood. Based on recent work suggesting that pancreatic fat lipolysis plays an important role in SAP, we evaluated the role of pancreatic lipases in SAP-associated visceral fat necrosis, the inflammatory response, local injury, and outcomes of acute pancreatitis (AP). For this, cerulein pancreatitis was induced in lean and obese mice, alone or with the lipase inhibitor orlistat and parameters of AP induction (serum amylase and lipase), fat necrosis, pancreatic necrosis, and multisystem organ failure, and inflammatory response were assessed. Pancreatic lipases were measured in fat necrosis and were overexpressed in 3T3-L1 cells. We noted obesity to convert mild cerulein AP to SAP with greater cytokines, unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs), and multisystem organ failure, and 100% mortality without affecting AP induction or pancreatic necrosis. Increased pancreatic lipase amounts and activity were noted in the extensive visceral fat necrosis of dying obese mice. Lipase inhibition reduced fat necrosis, UFAs, organ failure, and mortality but not the parameters of AP induction. Pancreatic lipase expression increased lipolysis in 3T3-L1 cells. We conclude that UFAs generated via lipolysis of visceral fat by pancreatic lipases convert mild AP to SAP independent of pancreatic necrosis and the inflammatory response. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Acute pancreatitis : new frontiers in diagnosis and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    van Santvoort, H.C.

    2010-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas mostly caused by gallstones and alcohol abuse. Around 15 to 20% of patients show a severe clinical course, which is characterised by multiple organ failure and necrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma and/ or peripancreatic fat tissue. In around 30% of patients with necrotising pancreatitis, secondary infection of necrosis occurs, probably due to bacterial translocation from the patient’s own gut. Infected necrosis is an indication for ...

  19. Activity of neutrophil elastase reflects the progression of acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novovic, Srdan; Andersen, Anders M; Nord, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective. Neutrophil elastase (NE) concentration is associated with progression of acute pancreatitis (AP), but measuring total NE concentration includes biologically inactive NE. This study aims to investigate the relationship between NE activity and the aetiology and severity of AP...... was associated with predicted severity of AP and AP-associated respiratory failure. Specific NE inhibitors may have therapeutic potential in acute pancreatitis....

  20. Resistin: New serum marker for predicting severity of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibar, Yunus I; Albayrak, Fatih; Arabul, Mahmut; Dursun, Hakan; Albayrak, Yavuz; Ozturk, Yasin

    2016-04-01

    To assess the effectiveness of resistin in predicting the severity of acute pancreatitis. Patients with acute pancreatitis who presented at the Gastroenterology Clinic, Erzurum Education and Research Hospital, Turkey were enrolled in this prospective study. White blood cell (WBC), C-reactive protein (CRP) and resistin levels were measured on admission and at 24 h, day 3 and day 7 following admission, along with other blood parameters. Patients were divided into two groups: mild acute pancreatitis and moderate/severe acute pancreatitis. Of 59 patients with acute pancreatitis (mild, n = 37; moderate/severe, n = 22), significant between-group differences were found in terms of resistin and CRP levels. Receiver operating curve analysis showed that resistin levels were better for predicting severe cases of acute pancreatitis than CRP or WBC levels on day 3 (area under the curve [AUC], 0.88 versus 0.81 and 0.63, respectively). Resistin levels on day 3 were better than CRP levels for predicting necrosis development (AUC, 0.70 versus 0.69, respectively). Resistin may represent a new, effective indicator to predict the severity of acute pancreatitis and presence of necrosis in patients with acute pancreatitis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. The predictive value of proteinuria in acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, M. J.; van Santvoort, H. C.; Besselink, M. G.; van Ramshorst, B.; Boerma, D.; Timmer, R.; Bollen, T. L.; Weusten, B. L. A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis has a highly variable clinical course. Early and reliable predictors for the severity of acute pancreatitis are lacking. Proteinuria appears to be a useful predictor of disease severity and outcome in a variety of clinical conditions. This study aims to investigate the predictive

  2. Successful Plasma Exchange for Acute Pancreatitis Complicated With Hypertriglyceridemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuji Takahira MD

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A 33-year-old male with acute pancreatitis induced by hypertriglyceridemia had problems during treatment with plasma exchange. The hypercoagulable state was prevented by introducing innovative methods for cleaning and warming of the circuit and dialyzer. This enabled successful therapy, and the patient fully recovered from life-threatening acute pancreatitis.

  3. Successful Plasma Exchange for Acute Pancreatitis Complicated With Hypertriglyceridemia

    OpenAIRE

    Takahira, Shuji; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kin, Hunsook; Ooya, Yoshitaka; Sekine, Yasumasa; Sonoda, Kenichiro; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Nomura, Yushi; Takane, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Youhei; Tsukamoto, Isao; Nemoto, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    A 33-year-old male with acute pancreatitis induced by hypertriglyceridemia had problems during treatment with plasma exchange. The hypercoagulable state was prevented by introducing innovative methods for cleaning and warming of the circuit and dialyzer. This enabled successful therapy, and the patient fully recovered from life-threatening acute pancreatitis.

  4. Acute pancreatitis : new frontiers in diagnosis and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Santvoort, H.C.

    2010-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas mostly caused by gallstones and alcohol abuse. Around 15 to 20% of patients show a severe clinical course, which is characterised by multiple organ failure and necrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma and/ or peripancreatic fat tissue. In

  5. Yersiniosis as a possible cause of acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, J; Teglgaard Hansen, P

    1985-01-01

    In some cases of acute pancreatitis no cause can be identified. An etiologic role of Yersinia enterocolitica type 3 was suggested in two previous reports. A case is now presented which supports this hypothesis by simultaneity of reactive phase of yersiniosis and an acute attack of pancreatitis...

  6. CT findings in patients with acute pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshimatsu, S.; Ibukuro, K.; Inoue, Y.; Shichijo, Y.

    1987-04-01

    Computed tomographic images of 42 patients with acute pancreatitis were analysed in a prospective study. CT images were normal in 14 patients. In 16 patients diffuse enlargement of pancreas was observed. Limited swelling chiefly in the head and tail was seen in 11 patients. Fluid collections was observed in the lesser sac (9 cases), in the anterior pararenal space (10 cases), and in the posterior pararenal space (2 cases). Drainage was done on 5 patients. Two of them survived. In two cases without fluid collection, gastrojejunostomy was necessary because of obstruction of duodenum.

  7. CXCR2 inhibition suppresses acute and chronic pancreatic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Colin W; Karim, Saadia A; Foth, Mona; Rishi, Loveena; Leach, Joshua D G; Porter, Ross J; Nixon, Colin; Jeffry Evans, T R; Carter, C Ross; Nibbs, Robert J B; Sansom, Owen J; Morton, Jennifer P

    2015-09-01

    Pancreatitis is a significant clinical problem and the lack of effective therapeutic options means that treatment is often palliative rather than curative. A deeper understanding of the pathogenesis of both acute and chronic pancreatitis is necessary to develop new therapies. Pathological changes in pancreatitis are dependent on innate immune cell recruitment to the site of initial tissue damage, and on the coordination of downstream inflammatory pathways. The chemokine receptor CXCR2 drives neutrophil recruitment during inflammation, and to investigate its role in pancreatic inflammation, we induced acute and chronic pancreatitis in wild-type and Cxcr2(-/-) mice. Strikingly, Cxcr2(-/-) mice were strongly protected from tissue damage in models of acute pancreatitis, and this could be recapitulated by neutrophil depletion or by the specific deletion of Cxcr2 from myeloid cells. The pancreata of Cxcr2(-/-) mice were also substantially protected from damage during chronic pancreatitis. Neutrophil depletion was less effective in this model, suggesting that CXCR2 on non-neutrophils contributes to the development of chronic pancreatitis. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of CXCR2 in wild-type mice replicated the protection seen in Cxcr2(-/-) mice in acute and chronic models of pancreatitis. Moreover, acute pancreatic inflammation was reversible by inhibition of CXCR2. Thus, CXCR2 is critically involved in the development of acute and chronic pancreatitis in mice, and its inhibition or loss protects against pancreatic damage. CXCR2 may therefore be a viable therapeutic target in the treatment of pancreatitis. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  8. Acute idiopathic pancreatitis in pregnancy: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Yeon; Jung, Sung Hoon; Choi, Hyung Wook; Song, Dong Jin; Jeong, Cheol Yoon; Lee, Dong Hyun; Whang, Il Soon

    2014-11-21

    Acute pancreatitis during pregnancy is a rare event, and can be associated with high maternal mortality and fetal loss. Gallstone disease is thought to be the most common causative factor of acute pancreatitis, but, in many cases, the cause remains unclear. We report a case of a 36-year-old woman at 35 wk of gestation, who presented with severe pain confined to the upper abdomen and radiating to the back. The patient was diagnosed with acute idiopathic pancreatitis, which was managed conservatively; she recovered within several days and then delivered a healthy baby. Therefore it is important to consider acute pancreatitis when a pregnant woman presents with upper abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting in order to improve fetal and maternal outcomes for patients with acute pancreatitis.

  9. Acute pancreatitis following orlistat therapy: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Faheem Asem; Mahmud, Sajid

    2010-01-08

    Orlistat is a pancreatic lipase inhibitor licensed for the treatment of obesity. As obesity rates increase and non-prescription dispensing of orlistat increases, an awareness of its adverse effects is of crucial importance as complications arise more frequently from increased use. Orlistat induced pancreatitis has been described only once previously, but without a diagnostic increase in serum amylase. We report the case of two patients who developed severe acute abdominal pain and elevated pancreatic enzymes at 2 and 10 days after starting orlistat. In one case no alterative precipitant was identified. In the other, a predisposing history of pancreatic injury was present. In both cases all other contributory causes were excluded. Our reports suggest orlistat can trigger drug induced acute pancreatitis in certain patients. For patients presenting with abdominal pain soon after commencing orlistat, a diagnosis of pancreatitis must be considered. We also recommend cautious use of orlistat in patients at risk of pancreatic injury.

  10. Inorganic mercury causes pancreatic β-cell death via the oxidative stress-induced apoptotic and necrotic pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yawen; Huang Chunfa; Yang Chingyao; Yen Chengchieh; Tsai Kehsung; Liu Shinghwa

    2010-01-01

    Mercury is a well-known highly toxic metal. In this study, we characterize and investigate the cytotoxicity and its possible mechanisms of inorganic mercury in pancreatic β-cells. Mercury chloride (HgCl 2 ) dose-dependently decreased the function of insulin secretion and cell viability in pancreatic β-cell-derived HIT-T15 cells and isolated mouse pancreatic islets. HgCl 2 significantly increased ROS formation in HIT-T15 cells. Antioxidant N-acetylcysteine effectively reversed HgCl 2 -induced insulin secretion dysfunction in HIT-T15 cells and isolated mouse pancreatic islets. Moreover, HgCl 2 increased sub-G1 hypodiploids and annexin-V binding in HIT-T15 cells, indicating that HgCl 2 possessed ability in apoptosis induction. HgCl 2 also displayed several features of mitochondria-dependent apoptotic signals including disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, increase of mitochondrial cytochrome c release and activations of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and caspase 3. Exposure of HIT-T15 cells to HgCl 2 could significantly increase both apoptotic and necrotic cell populations by acridine orange/ethidium bromide dual staining. Meanwhile, HgCl 2 could also trigger the depletion of intracellular ATP levels and increase the LDH release from HIT-T15 cells. These HgCl 2 -induced cell death-related signals could be significantly reversed by N-acetylcysteine. The intracellular mercury levels were markedly elevated in HgCl 2 -treated HIT-T15 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that HgCl 2 -induced oxidative stress causes pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and cytotoxicity involved the co-existence of apoptotic and necrotic cell death.

  11. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis Causing a Highway to the Colon with Subsequent Road Closure: Pancreatic Colonic Fistula Presenting as a Large Bowel Obstruction Treated with Pancreatic Duct Stenting

    OpenAIRE

    Cochrane, Justin; Schlepp, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Context. Colonic complications associated with acute pancreatitis have a low incidence but carry an increased risk of mortality with delayed diagnosis and treatment. Pancreatic colonic fistula is most commonly associated with walled off pancreatic necrosis or abscess formation and rarely forms spontaneously. Classic clinical manifestations for pancreatic colonic fistula include diarrhea, hematochezia, and fever. Uncommonly pancreatic colonic fistula presents as large bowel obstruction. Case. ...

  12. Ansa pancreatica as a predisposing factor for recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Takana Yamakawa; Gonoi, Wataru; Yoshikawa, Takeharu; Hayashi, Naoto; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2016-10-28

    To determine the non-biased prevalence and clinical significance of ansa pancreatica in patients with acute pancreatitis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Our institutional review board approved this cross-sectional study, which consisted of a community-based cohort of 587 consecutive participants in a whole-body health-check program, and 73 subjects with episode of acute pancreatitis (55 patients with a single episode of acute pancreatitis, and 18 patients with recurrent acute pancreatitis). All of the subjects underwent abdominal MRI including magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, medical examinations, and blood tests. Two board-certified, diagnostic, abdominal radiologists evaluated the images, and ansa pancreatica was diagnosed based on its characteristic anatomy on MRI. Compared with the community group [5/587 (0.85%)], patients with recurrent acute pancreatitis had a significantly higher frequency of ansa pancreatica [2/18 (11.1%)] ( P = 0.016; OR = 14.3; 95%CI: 1.27-96.1), but not compared with patients with single-episode acute pancreatitis [1/55 (1.8%)] ( P = 0.42; OR = 2.1; 95%CI: 0.44-19.7). Multiple logistic regression analysis using age, alcohol intake, presence of ansa pancreatica, and presence of autoimmune disease as independent covariates, revealed a significant relationship between the presence of ansa pancreatica and recurrent acute pancreatitis. The presence of autoimmune disease was also significantly associated with the onset of recurrent acute pancreatitis. On the other hand, neither age nor alcohol intake were significantly related to the onset of recurrent acute pancreatitis. The present study is the first to provide robust evidence that the presence of ansa pancreatica is significantly associated with recurrent acute pancreatitis.

  13. Leiden Mutation and the Course of Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Ershov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the impact of Leiden mutation on the course of severe acute pancreatitis. Subjects and methods. One hundred and twelve people were examined. Group 1 comprised 50 patients diagnosed with severe acute pancreatitis without coagulation factor V (Leiden mutation. Group 2 included 42 patients with severe acute pancreatitis who were found to have Leiden mutation. Acute pancreatitis was first diagnosed in both groups. Group 3 consisted of 20 apparently healthy individuals (a control group. The severity of the underlying disease was determined in accordance with the clinical and laboratory parameters recommended by the I. I. Dzhanelidze Saint Petersburg Research Institute of Emergence Care. Results. This investigation revealed an association of Leiden mutation with trends in the development of acute pancreatitis. Group 2 exhibited a more severe disease: large focal pancreatic necrosis was twice more common and infectious complications developed more frequently; more aggressive and radical treatments were more often used. The patients with Leiden mutation had higher mortality rates (33% in the Leiden mutation group and 24% in the non-mutation group. Conclusion. The findings should be kept in mind in elaborating new diagnostic methods and principles in the treatment of the underlying disease and in the prevention of its complications in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. Key words: acute pancreatitis, Leiden mutation.

  14. Liver transplantation for acute liver failure accompanied by severe acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirino, Izumi; Fujimoto, Yasuhiro; Hata, Koichiro; Uemoto, Shinji

    2016-09-06

    The role of liver transplantation (LT) in acute liver failure (ALF) complicated by severe acute pancreatitis is still unclear. We here report a case of deceased-donor LT for idiopathic ALF accompanied by severe acute pancreatitis. A 58-year-old man with no history of liver disease presented with idiopathic ALF and acute pancreatitis. After careful consideration, he received a liver from a deceased donor. Following surgery, the patient's liver function rapidly reverted to normal level and the acute pancreatitis simultaneously subsided. The patient later developed a pancreatic pseudocyst, which was treated successfully with combination interventional radiology. LT can be considered for ALF associated with severe acute pancreatitis if there is no clinical evidence of an absolute contraindication for organ transplantation, such as systemic or local infection. Moreover, we recommend a close follow-up by ultrasonography to allow early detection and treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts following surgery. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  15. Multislice Spiral Perfusion Computed Tomography to Assess Pancreatic Vascularity in Mild Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chunjiang; Xu, Xiangfeng

    This study aims to use perfusion computed tomography to compare pancreatic perfusion in mild acute pancreatitis (MAP) versus normal pancreas. This observational study included 39 patients with MAP and 18 patients with normal pancreatic function. Perfusion computed tomography parameters, including blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time, and permeability surface area product, were compared. Both serum and urinary amylase levels were significantly higher in patients with MAP than in controls (all Ps Pancreatic perfusion seems to be poorer, and pancreatic vascular leakage may increase in MAP compared with normally functioned pancreas.

  16. Acute Suppuration of the Pancreatic Duct in a Patient with Tropical Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliane S. Deeb

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Pancreatic sepsis secondary to infected necrosis, pseudocyst, or pancreatic abscess is a well-known clinical entity. Acute suppuration of the pancreatic duct (ASPD in the setting of chronic calcific pancreatitis and pancreatic ductal obstruction with septicemia is a rare complication that is seldom reported. It is our aim to report a case of ASPD with Klebsiella ornithinolytica, in the absence of pancreatic abscess or infected necrosis. Case Report: A 46-year-old Asian-Indian man with chronic tropical pancreatitis who was admitted with recurrent epigastric pain that rapidly evolved into septic shock. A CT scan of abdomen revealed a dilated pancreatic duct with a large calculus. Broad-spectrum antibiotics, vasopressors and activated recombinant protein C were initiated. Emergency ERCP showed the papilla of Vater spontaneously expelling pus. Probing and stenting was instantly performed until pus drainage ceased. Repeat CT scan confirmed the absence of pancreatic necrosis or fluid collection, and decreasing ductal dilatation. Dramatic clinical improvement was observed within 36 hours after intervention. Blood cultures grew Klebsiella ornithinolytica. The patient completed his antibiotic course and was discharged. Conclusion: ASPD without pancreatic abscess or infected necrosis is an exceptional clinical entity that should be included in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic sepsis. A chronically diseased pancreas and diabetes may have predisposed to the uncommon pathogen. The presence of intraductal pancreatic stones obstructing outflow played a major role in promoting bacterial growth, suppuration and septicemia. Immediate drainage of the pancreatic duct with endoscopic intervention is critical and mandatory.

  17. Pancreatic enzyme therapy for pancreatic exocrine insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2007-04-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency with steatorrhea is a major consequence of pancreatic diseases (eg, chronic pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer), extrapancreatic diseases such as celiac disease and Crohn's disease, and gastrointestinal and pancreatic surgical resection. Recognition of this entity is highly relevant to avoid malnutrition-related morbidity and mortality. Therapy for pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is based on the oral administration of pancreatic enzymes aiming at providing the duodenal lumen with sufficient active lipase at the time of gastric emptying of nutrients. Administration of enzymes in the form of enteric-coated minimicrospheres avoids acid-mediated lipase inactivation and ensures gastric emptying of enzymes in parallel with nutrients. Nevertheless, such factors as acidic intestinal pH and bacterial overgrowth may prevent normalization of fat digestion even in compliant patients. The present article critically reviews current therapeutic approaches to pancreatic exocrine insufficiency.

  18. Acute pancreatitis : a newly recognised potential complication of canine babesiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J. Möhr

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective study describes 4 cases of canine babesiosis with histologically confirmed acute pancreatitis. In addition, 16 dogs with babesiosis are reported with serum amylase (>3500 U/l and/or lipase (>650 U/l activity elevations of a magnitude that would support a diagnosis of probable acute pancreatitis, although extra-pancreatic sources of the enzymes could not be excluded in these cases. Median time of pancreatitis diagnosis was 2.5 days post-admission, with primarily young (median age 3 years, sexually intact dogs affected. The development of pancreatitis was unrelated to the degree of anaemia at time of admission. In addition to pancreatitis, 80 % of cases suffered from other babesial complications, namely icterus (13, acute respiratory distress syndrome (6, immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia (6, renal failure (3, haemoconcentration (2 and cerebral syndrome (2. Acute respiratory distress syndrome, renal failure and cerebral syndrome were associated with a poor prognosis, with 4 of the 5 dogs included in the overall 26 % mortality rate having at least 1 of these complications. Haemolytic anaemia with ischaemia-reperfusion injury to the pancreas is proposed as a possible primary pathophysiological mechanism in babesial pancreatitis. Hypotensive shock, immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia, haemoconcentration and possibly altered lipid metabolism in babesiosis may also be involved. The previously postulated pro-inflammatory cytokine milieu of complicated babesiosis may underlie the progression, if not the primary initiation, of pancreatic pathology. Acute pancreatitis may represent the previously reported 'gut' form of babesiosis.

  19. Acute Pancreatitis in a Patient with Complicated Falciparum Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Bhupen; Bhattacharya, Prasanta Kumar; Lynrah, Kryshan G; Ete, Tony; Issar, Neel Kanth

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most common protozoan diseases, especially in tropical countries. The clinical manifestation of malaria, especially falciparum malaria varies from mild acute febrile illness to life threatening severe systemic complications involving one or more organ systems. We would like to report a case of complicated falciparum malaria involving cerebral, renal, hepatic system along with acute pancreatitis. The patient was successfully treated with anti malarial and other supportive treatment. To the best of our knowledge there are very few reports of acute pancreatitis due to malaria. Falciparum malaria therefore should be added to the list of infectious agents causing acute pancreatitis especially in areas where malaria is endemic.

  20. Acute pancreatitis during pregnancy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducarme, G; Maire, F; Chatel, P; Luton, D; Hammel, P

    2014-02-01

    This article aims to draw together recent thinking on pregnancy and acute pancreatitis (AP), with a particular emphasis on pregnancy complications, birth outcomes and management of AP during pregnancy contingent on the etiology. AP during pregnancy is a rare but severe disease with a high maternal-fetal mortality, which has recently decreased thanks to earlier diagnosis and some maternal and neonatal intensive care improvement. AP usually occurs during the third trimester or the early postpartum period. The most common causes of AP are gallstones (65 to 100%), alcohol abuse and hypertriglyceridemia. Although the diagnostic criteria for AP are not specific for pregnant patients, Ranson and Balthazar criteria are used to evaluate the severity and treat AP during pregnancy. The fetal risks from AP during pregnancy are threatened preterm labor, prematurity and in utero fetal death. In cases of acute biliary pancreatitis during pregnancy, a consensual strategy could be adopted according to the gestational age, and taking in consideration the high risk of recurrence of AP (70%) with conservative treatment and the specific risks of each treatment. This could include: conservative treatment in first trimester and laparoscopic cholecystectomy in second trimester. During the third trimester, conservative treatment or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with biliary endoscopic sphincterotomy, and laparoscopic cholecystectomy in early postpartum period are recommended. A multidisciplinary approach, including gastroenterologists and obstetricians, seems to be the key in making the best choice for the management of AP during pregnancy.

  1. Acute pancreatitis in dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simadibrata, Marcellus

    2012-01-01

    We reported a case of acute pancreatitis as the complication of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). This complication can cause more severe fatal condition, and difficulties in treatment, although it is rare. Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) is one of the endemic diseases and often come as an outbreak event in South East Asia including Indonesia. Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) is a global public health problem, because until now there has been no medicine to eradicate the dengue virus, no dengue vaccine and difficult to eradicate the mosquitoes as the contagious vector. Diagnosis and treatment of acute pancreatitis as early as possible is important to improve the patient's condition and survival. The patient was a 59 year old male and had been treated conservatively. The patient was admitted to the hospital, oral fasting until the fourth day, given parenteral nutrition, antibiotic and other intravenous medicines. Initial oral liquid diet was given on the fifth day of hospitalization and changed gradually according to the condition. The patient was then improved and discharged from the hospital.

  2. Acute anter ior necrotizing scler itis: A case repor t

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuen Keat Gan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing scleritis is an uncommon but potential disastrous infection to the eye. It is commonly caused by vaso-occlusive autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis or surgically-induced, and rarely due to infections. In this article, we presented a rare case of necrotizing scleritis caused by herpes infection in an immunocompromised patient. A 49 years old, retroviral positive gentleman presented to our clinic with a painful, red right eye associated with watering, photophobia and blurring of vision. His right eye rapidly deteriorated leading to an impending perforation of the sclera despite intensive antimicrobial therapy. The patient was started on acyclovir ointment and subsequently improved remarkably salvaging the eye from the need of an evisceration. Although the visual prognosis was poor, structural integrity of the eye was achieved.

  3. Ascaris lumbricoides-induced acute pancreatitis: diagnosis during EUS for a suspected small pancreatic tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiavillano, Benedetto; Carrara, Silvia; Petrone, Maria Chiara; Arcidiacono, Paolo Giorgio; Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2009-09-04

    Ascaris lumbricoides is the second most common intestinal parasite world-wide and, although the infection can be asymptomatic, in some cases it can present with complications, such as acute pancreatitis. We describe the case of a 37-year-old man, with a history of travelling in Eastern countries who presented with Ascaris lumbricoides-induced acute pancreatitis mimicking a small pancreatic cancer, diagnosed during an upper EUS. The endoscopy revealeda roundworm floating in the duodenum; its endoultrasonographic appearance showed a diffuse inhomogeneous pattern, with hypoechoic echotexture, such as in acute pancreatitis. Microbiological examination of the worm revealed a 20 cm long Ascaris lumbricoides. In non endemic countries, acute pancreatitis induced by Ascaris lumbricoides is an unusual diagnosis, and should be suspected especially in patients with history of traveling in endemic areas.

  4. Chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  5. Role of bedside index for severity of acute pancreatitis (bisap score in predicting outcome in acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahnawaz Bashir Bhat

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the role of Bedside index for severity of acute pancreatitis (BISAP score in predicting the outcome of acute pancreatitis. Methods: This single hospital based prospective study included fifty patients of acute pancreatitis admitted within 48 hours of onset of symptoms, who were divided into two groups according to admission BISAP score. BISAP score 3 (severe acute pancreatitis. The ability of BISAP score to predict mortality, morbidity and hospital stay in acute pancreatitis patients was analyzed. Results: A BISAP score of >3 was associated with increased risk of development of transient organ failure, persistent organ failure and pancreatic necrosis (Statistically significant. Mortality in group with BISAP and #8805;3 was 23.5% (4 patients which was statistically higher than group with BISAP score and #706;3 (0 patients (p=0.019.The mean duration of hospital stay of patients in group with BISAP score < 3 was 7.58 +/- 4.04 days and in group with BISAP score and #8805;3 was 15.35 +/- 1.66.(p=0.02. Conclusion: Bedside index for severity in acute pancreatitis (BISAP score, at admission is an excellent score in predicting the mortality, morbidity and hospital stay and hence management protocol in patients admitted with acute pancreatitis. [J Contemp Med 2015; 5(4.000: 215-220

  6. Strategic management of severe acute pancreatitis in the Jehovah's witness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamdar, S; Siriwardena, A K

    2005-11-01

    Haemorrhage can be a lethal complication of severe acute pancreatitis. Management includes identification and control of the source of bleeding and supportive therapy such as blood transfusion. Individuals who refuse transfusion on the grounds of religious belief can provide a further major challenge. The management in these individuals can be focused from the outset with a strategy that aims to avert anaemia and transfusion. This article reports a case of severe acute pancreatitis in a woman of the Jehovah's Witness faith. The episode was complicated by infected pancreatic necrosis requiring surgical intervention. Careful strategic planning is critical to the management of severe acute pancreatitis in patients of the Jehovah's Witness faith. In this case, acute pancreatitis complicated by infected necrosis was successfully managed by the use of preoperative erythropoietin, venesection using paediatric blood vials, meticulous intraoperative attention to haemostasis and the use of adjunctive intraoperative techniques such as argon diathermy.

  7. Questions about the use of antibiotics in acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assef Jose

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objective The use of antibiotics in acute pancreatitis despite recent clinical trials remains controversial. The aim of this study is to review the latest clinical trials and guidelines about antibiotics in acute pancreatitis and determine its proper use. Methods Through a Medline search, we selected and analyzed pertinent randomized clinical trials and guidelines that evaluated the use of antibiotics in acute pancreatitis. We answered the most frequent questions about this topic. Results and conclusion Based on these clinical trials and guidelines, we conclude that the best treatment currently is the use of antibiotics in patients with severe acute pancreatitis with more than 30% of pancreatic necrosis. The best option for the treatment is Imipenem 3 × 500 mg/day i.v. for 14 days. Alternatively, Ciprofloxacin 2 × 400 mg/day i.v. associated with Metronidazole 3 × 500 mg for 14 days can also be considered as an option.

  8. [Amylase test in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehesa, M; Segovia, E

    1979-01-01

    The determination of serum and urinary amylase are methods used in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis, however there are many abdominal problems that can cause hyperamylasemia, in the absence of pancreatic disease, for this reason in 1969 Levitt and col. signaled the possible advantages of amylase/creatinine clearence ratio, in the clinical diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. This test was used in cases with acute pancreatitis, as in other diseases, in correlation with levels in normal subjects, with the objective of evaluating its clinica utility, in relation to the formentioned paragraph. Results concluded that the amylase/creatinine ratio is not of greater diagnostic utility than the determination of urinary amylase, in acute pancreatitis.

  9. MDCT of acute pancreatitis: Intraindividual comparison of single-phase versus dual-phase MDCT for initial assessment of acute pancreatitis using different CT scoring systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avanesov, Maxim, E-mail: m.avanesov@uke.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Weinrich, Julius M.; Kraus, Thomas [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Derlin, Thorsten [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hannover Medical School (Germany); Adam, Gerhard; Yamamura, Jin [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Karul, Murat [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Marienkrankenhaus Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Objectives: The purpose of the retrospective study was to evaluate the additional value of dual-phase multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) protocols over a single-phase protocol on initial MDCT in patients with acute pancreatitis using three CT-based pancreatitis severity scores with regard to radiation dose. Methods: In this retrospective, IRB approved study MDCT was performed in 102 consecutive patients (73 males; 55years, IQR48–64) with acute pancreatitis. Inclusion criteria were CT findings of interstitial edematous pancreatitis (IP) or necrotizing pancreatitis (NP) and a contrast-enhanced dual-phase (arterial phase and portal-venous phase) abdominal CT performed at ≥72 h after onset of symptoms. The severity of pancreatic and extrapancreatic changes was independently assessed by 2 observers using 3 validated CT-based scoring systems (CTSI, mCTSI, EPIC). All scores were applied to arterial phase and portal venous phase scans and compared to score results of portal venous phase scans, assessed ≥14 days after initial evaluation. For effective dose estimation, volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) and dose length product (DLP) were recorded in all examinations. Results: In neither of the CT severity scores a significant difference was observed after application of a dual-phase protocol compared with a single-phase protocol (IP: CTSI: 2.7 vs. 2.5, p = 0.25; mCTSI: 4.0 vs. 4.0, p = 0.10; EPIC: 2.0 vs. 2.0, p = 0.41; NP: CTSI: 8.0 vs. 7.0, p = 0.64; mCTSI: 8.0 vs. 8.0, p = 0.10; EPIC: 3.0 vs. 3.0, p = 0.06). The application of a single-phase CT protocol was associated with a median effective dose reduction of 36% (mean dose reduction 31%) compared to a dual-phase CT scan. Conclusions: An initial dual-phase abdominal CT after ≥72 h after onset of symptoms of acute pancreatitis was not superior to a single-phase protocol for evaluation of the severity of pancreatic and extrapancreatic changes. However, the effective radiation dose may be reduced by 36% using a

  10. MDCT of acute pancreatitis: Intraindividual comparison of single-phase versus dual-phase MDCT for initial assessment of acute pancreatitis using different CT scoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanesov, Maxim; Weinrich, Julius M; Kraus, Thomas; Derlin, Thorsten; Adam, Gerhard; Yamamura, Jin; Karul, Murat

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of the retrospective study was to evaluate the additional value of dual-phase multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) protocols over a single-phase protocol on initial MDCT in patients with acute pancreatitis using three CT-based pancreatitis severity scores with regard to radiation dose. In this retrospective, IRB approved study MDCT was performed in 102 consecutive patients (73 males; 55years, IQR48-64) with acute pancreatitis. Inclusion criteria were CT findings of interstitial edematous pancreatitis (IP) or necrotizing pancreatitis (NP) and a contrast-enhanced dual-phase (arterial phase and portal-venous phase) abdominal CT performed at ≥72h after onset of symptoms. The severity of pancreatic and extrapancreatic changes was independently assessed by 2 observers using 3 validated CT-based scoring systems (CTSI, mCTSI, EPIC). All scores were applied to arterial phase and portal venous phase scans and compared to score results of portal venous phase scans, assessed ≥14days after initial evaluation. For effective dose estimation, volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) and dose length product (DLP) were recorded in all examinations. In neither of the CT severity scores a significant difference was observed after application of a dual-phase protocol compared with a single-phase protocol (IP: CTSI: 2.7 vs. 2.5, p=0.25; mCTSI: 4.0 vs. 4.0, p=0.10; EPIC: 2.0 vs. 2.0, p=0.41; NP: CTSI: 8.0 vs. 7.0, p=0.64; mCTSI: 8.0 vs. 8.0, p=0.10; EPIC: 3.0 vs. 3.0, p=0.06). The application of a single-phase CT protocol was associated with a median effective dose reduction of 36% (mean dose reduction 31%) compared to a dual-phase CT scan. An initial dual-phase abdominal CT after ≥72h after onset of symptoms of acute pancreatitis was not superior to a single-phase protocol for evaluation of the severity of pancreatic and extrapancreatic changes. However, the effective radiation dose may be reduced by 36% using a single-phase protocol. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier

  11. The Effects of Pancreatic Microcirculatory Disturbances on Histopathologic Tissue Damage and the Outcome in Severe Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomkötter, Lena; Erbes, Johannes; Trepte, Constantin; Hinsch, Andrea; Dupree, Anna; Bockhorn, Maximilian; Mann, Oliver; Izbicki, Jakob R; Bachmann, Kai

    2016-02-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas with a high morbidity and mortality. To date, no causal treatment is known. The aim of the present study was to analyze the impact of pancreatic microcirculatory disturbances in severe acute pancreatitis and to correlate the effects with histopathologic tissue damage and outcome. Severe acute pancreatitis was induced in 129 pigs by injection of glycodeoxycholic acid into the pancreatic duct. Pancreatic microcirculation, pancreatic tissue oxygenation, histopathologic tissue damage, and survival were measured and analyzed. Our study demonstrates a strong correlation between pancreatic microcirculatory disturbances and histopathologic tissue damage (r = 0.728; P pancreatitis according to an established porcine pancreatitis score (r = 0.694; P pancreatic microcirculation were shown to be associated with an increased mortality rate in severe acute pancreatitis. We found that pancreatic microcirculatory disturbances have significant effects on histopathologic tissue damage and the outcome of severe acute pancreatitis. For a better survival of severe acute pancreatitis, the treatment should focus on an improvement of pancreatic microcirculation.

  12. Activation and Regulation of Hemostasis in Acute Liver Failure and Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisman, Ton; Porte, Robert J.

    Acute liver failure and acute pancreatitis are accompanied by substantial changes in the hemostatic system. In acute liver failure, defective synthesis of coagulation factors and intravascular activation of coagulation results in thrombocytopenia and reduced levels of proteins involved in

  13. The role of diagnostic radiology in pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmas, Nevra

    2001-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a frequent inflammatory and necrotic process of pancreas and peripancreatic field. To detect the presence of infected or sterile necrotic components and hemorrhage of the pancreatic paranchyma is important for therapeutic approach. Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by irreversible exocrine dysfunction, progressive loss of pancreatic tissue and morphological changes of the pancreatic canal. Imaging modalities play a primary role in the management of both acute and chronic pancreatitis. CT and MR imaging confirm the diagnosis and detect the severity of disease. In chronic pancreatitis, MRCP after Secretin administration, Spiral CT and endoscopic US seems to replace diagnostic ERCP. However differentiation of pseudotumor of chronic pancreatitis from the pancreatic carcinoma is difficult with either imaging modalities

  14. The role of diagnostic radiology in pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmas, Nevra E-mail: elmas@med.ege.edu.tr

    2001-05-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a frequent inflammatory and necrotic process of pancreas and peripancreatic field. To detect the presence of infected or sterile necrotic components and hemorrhage of the pancreatic paranchyma is important for therapeutic approach. Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by irreversible exocrine dysfunction, progressive loss of pancreatic tissue and morphological changes of the pancreatic canal. Imaging modalities play a primary role in the management of both acute and chronic pancreatitis. CT and MR imaging confirm the diagnosis and detect the severity of disease. In chronic pancreatitis, MRCP after Secretin administration, Spiral CT and endoscopic US seems to replace diagnostic ERCP. However differentiation of pseudotumor of chronic pancreatitis from the pancreatic carcinoma is difficult with either imaging modalities.

  15. Inhibitors of ORAI1 Prevent Cytosolic Calcium-Associated Injury of Human Pancreatic Acinar Cells and Acute Pancreatitis in 3 Mouse Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Li; Voronina, Svetlana; Javed, Muhammad A.; Awais, Muhammad; Szatmary, Peter; Latawiec, Diane; Chvanov, Michael; Collier, David; Huang, Wei; Barrett, John; Begg, Malcolm; Stauderman, Ken; Roos, Jack; Grigoryev, Sergey; Ramos, Stephanie; Rogers, Evan; Whitten, Jeff; Velicelebi, Gonul; Dunn, Michael; Tepikin, Alexei V.; Criddle, David N.; Sutton, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Sustained activation of the cytosolic calcium concentration induces injury to pancreatic acinar cells and necrosis. The calcium release–activated calcium modulator ORAI1 is the most abundant Ca2+ entry channel in pancreatic acinar cells; it sustains calcium overload in mice exposed to toxins that induce pancreatitis. We investigated the roles of ORAI1 in pancreatic acinar cell injury and the development of acute pancreatitis in mice. Methods Mouse and human acinar cells, as well as HEK 293 cells transfected to express human ORAI1 with human stromal interaction molecule 1, were hyperstimulated or incubated with human bile acid, thapsigargin, or cyclopiazonic acid to induce calcium entry. GSK-7975A or CM_128 were added to some cells, which were analyzed by confocal and video microscopy and patch clamp recordings. Acute pancreatitis was induced in C57BL/6J mice by ductal injection of taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate or intravenous' administration of cerulein or ethanol and palmitoleic acid. Some mice then were given GSK-7975A or CM_128, which inhibit ORAI1, at different time points to assess local and systemic effects. Results GSK-7975A and CM_128 each separately inhibited toxin-induced activation of ORAI1 and/or activation of Ca2+ currents after Ca2+ release, in a concentration-dependent manner, in mouse and human pancreatic acinar cells (inhibition >90% of the levels observed in control cells). The ORAI1 inhibitors also prevented activation of the necrotic cell death pathway in mouse and human pancreatic acinar cells. GSK-7975A and CM_128 each inhibited all local and systemic features of acute pancreatitis in all 3 models, in dose- and time-dependent manners. The agents were significantly more effective, in a range of parameters, when given at 1 vs 6 hours after induction of pancreatitis. Conclusions Cytosolic calcium overload, mediated via ORAI1, contributes to the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. ORAI1 inhibitors might be developed

  16. Damage to pancreatic acinar cells and preservation of islets of Langerhans in a rat model of acute pancreatitis induced by Karwinskia humboldtiana (buckthorn).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcano-Diaz, Katya; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely; Segoviano-Ramirez, Juan Carlos; Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Loera-Arias, Maria de Jesus; Garcia-Juarez, Jaime

    2016-09-01

    Karwinskia humboldtiana (Kh) is a poisonous plant that grows in some regions of the American continent. Consuming large amounts of Kh fruit results in acute intoxication leading to respiratory failure, culminating in death within days. There is evidence of histological damage to the lungs, liver, and kidneys following accidental and experimental Kh intoxication. To date, the microscopic effect of Kh consumption on the pancreas has not been described. We examined the early effects of Kh fruit on pancreatic tissue at different stages of acute intoxication in the Wistar rat. We found progressive damage confined to the exocrine pancreas, starting with a reduction in the number of zymogen granules, loss of acinar architecture, the presence of autophagy-like vesicles, apoptosis and inflammatory infiltrate. The pancreatic pathology culminated in damaged acini characterized by necrosis and edema, with a complete loss of lobular architecture. Interestingly, the morphology of the islets of Langerhans was conserved throughout our evaluations. Taken together, our results indicate the damage induced by a high dose of Kh fruit in the Wistar rat is consistent with an early acute necrotizing pancreatitis that exclusively affects the exocrine pancreas. Therefore, this system might be useful as an animal model to study the treatment of pancreatic diseases. More importantly, as the islets of Langerhans were preserved, the active compounds of Kh fruit could be utilized for the treatment of acinar pancreatic cancer. Further studies might provide insight into the severity of acute Kh intoxication in humans and influence the design of treatments for pancreatic diseases and acinar pancreatic cancer.

  17. Lipase or amylase for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Ola Z; Bhayana, Vipin

    2017-12-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rapid onset of inflammation of the pancreas causing mild to severe life threatening conditions [1, 2]. In Canada, acute pancreatitis is the 5th most expensive digestive disease in Canada with a considerable economic burden on the health care system [3]. The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis is usually based on the presence of abdominal pain and elevated levels of serum amylase and/or lipase. Many health care centers use either serum amylase, lipase or both to diagnose acute pancreatitis without considering which one could provide a better diagnostic accuracy. The aim of this review is to investigate whether serum lipase alone is a sufficient biomarker for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. We have examined various studies looking at the utilization, sensitivity, specificity and cost associated savings of lipase and amylase in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. When comparing different studies, serum lipase offers a higher sensitivity than serum amylase in diagnosing acute pancreatitis. Lipase also offers a larger diagnostic window than amylase since it is elevated for a longer time, thus allowing it to be a useful diagnostic biomarker in early and late stages of acute pancreatitis. Several recent evidence-based guidelines recommend the use of lipase over amylase. Nevertheless, both lipase and amylase alone lack the ability to determine the severity and etiology of acute pancreatitis. The co-ordering of both tests has shown little to no increase in the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Thus, unnecessary testing and laboratory expenditures can be reduced by testing lipase alone. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Acute pancreatitis associated with everolimus after kidney transplantation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Francesco; Cappelli, Gianni

    2016-10-28

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) following KT is a rare and often fatal complication of the early post-transplant period. Common causative factors for AP are rare after KT; anti-rejection drugs as CyA, prednisone and MMF have been implicated, although evidence is not strong and we found no reports on possible causative role for mTOR inhibitors. A 55-year-old Caucasian man with end-stage renal disease due to idiopathic membrano-prolipherative glomerulonephritis underwent single kidney transplantation (KT) from cadaveric donor. Anti-rejection protocol was based on Basiliximab induction followed by prednisone and mycophenolate mophetil (MMF) and Cyclosporine; Everolimus (Eve) was scheduled to substitute MMF at week 3. At day 1 he had an asymptomatic elevation of pancreatic enzymes, spontaneously resolved. The further course was unremarkable and on day 19 he started Eve, with following asymptomatic rise in pancreatic enzymes. At day 33 the patient presented with abdominal pain and a marked elevation in serum amylase (1383 U/l) and lipase (1015 U/l), normal liver enzymes and bilirubin, no hypercalcemia, mild elevation in triglycerids; RT-PCRs for Cytomegalovirus or Epstein-Barr virus were negative. The patient had no history of alcohol abuse; ultrasound, CT and MRI found no evidence of biliary lithiasis. CT scans showed a patchy fluid collection in the pancreatic head area, consistent with idiopathic necrotizing pancreatitis. The patient was treated medically and Eve was withdrawn 1 week after. Patient underwent guided drainage of the fluid collection, but developed bacterial sepsis; surgical intervention was required with debridement of necrotic tissue, lavage and drainage; immunosuppression was totally withdrawn. Following course was complicated with multiple systemic infection. Transplantectomy for acute rejection was performed, and patient entered hemodialysis. Our patient had a presentation that is consistent for a causative role of Eve. A predisposing condition (acute

  19. Hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis in pregnancy causing maternal death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hae Rin; Kim, Suk Young; Cho, Yoon Jin; Chon, Seung Joo

    2016-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is rare and occurs in approximately 3 in 10,000 pregnancies. It rarely complicates pregnancy, and can occur during any trimester, however over half (52%) of cases occur during the third trimester and during the post-partum period. Gallstones are the most common cause of acute pancreatitis. On the other hand, acute pancreatitis caused by hypertriglyceridemia due to increase of estrogen during the gestational period is very unusual, but complication carries a higher risk of morbidity and mortality for both the mother and the fetus. We experienced a case of pregnant woman who died of acute exacerbation of hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis at 23 weeks of gestation. We report on progress and management of this case along with literature reviews.

  20. What Have We Learned About Acute Pancreatitis in Children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Harrison X.; Lowe, Mark E.; Husain, Sohail Z.

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric pancreatitis has received much attention during the past few years. Numerous reports have identified an increasing trend in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis in children and key differences in disease presentation and management between infants and older children. The present review provides a brief, evidence-based focus on the latest progress in the clinical field. It also poses important questions for emerging multicenter registries to answer about the natural history and management of affected children with pancreatitis. PMID:21336157

  1. [Alternative method of prognostication of an acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytvynenko, O M; Homoliako, I V; Kaliuzhka, A S

    2013-04-01

    Changes in the neutrophils system of peripheral blood in 26 patients, suffering different forms of an acute pancreatitis, were studied. Concordance between results of the acute pancreatitis prognostication in accordance with the Ranson and APACHE II scales and structural-functional state of the neutrophils system were established. Technological quality, speed of performance, sensitivity, objectiveness constitute advantages of a new method of estimation. The proposed method is a perspective one for the course prognostication and monitoring of complicated forms of an acute pancreatitis. Its application would facilitate the patients stratification in accordance to severity of their state and choice of the treatment tactics.

  2. Pancreatite necro-hemorrágica: atualização e momento de operar Necrotizing pancreatitis: update and when to operate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Antonio Refinetti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A pancreatite necro-hemorrágica representa a variante mais grave do espectro de apresentações clínicas que podem compor o quadro da pancreatite aguda. Embora já conhecida há muitos séculos, inúmeras questões permanecem em aberto acerca dessa entidade e o número de trabalhos sobre o assunto publicados nos últimos anos tem sido muito expressivo. MÉTODO: Foi realizada ampla pesquisa na literatura, com especial atenção aos artigos publicados nos últimos três anos e indexados ao PubMed. Foram utilizados os seguintes descritores de forma cruzada: pancreatitis, surgical procedures; necrosis. A pesquisa inicial evidenciou cerca de 13.000 artigos, sendo avaliados os mais relevantes dos últimos três anos além de artigos mais antigos, considerados "clássicos" sobre o assunto e que, portanto, não poderiam deixar de ser citados. CONCLUSÃO: O tratamento da pancreatite aguda envolve um grande número de questões, dentre as quais as mais importantes estão relacionadas ao manejo da antibioticoterapia, tipo de dieta empregada e as questões relacionadas ao manejo da necrose infectada. Em especial, mudanças radicais foram implementadas nos últimos anos sobre todos esses tópicos, e uma atualização constante deve ser obrigatoriamente buscada pelos profissionais envolvidos no tratamento dessa doença.BACKGROUND: Necrotizing pancreatitis represents the most severe form of presentation from the clinical spectra of acute pancreatitis. Although known for many centuries, many questions remain open about this entity and a great number of articles were published about this matter in the last few years. METHOD: A throughout research in the literature, with special attention to the articles published in the last three years and indexed to the PubMed was performed. The following headings were used: pancreatitis, surgical procedures, necrosis. The initial research rendered about 13 000 articles, and the ones published in the last three

  3. [Essential therapeutic strategies for acute pancreatitis--guidelines for initial treatment and their significance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Koichi

    2004-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a disease with a wide variety of pathophysiologies, ranging from mild to severe condition. In about 80% to 90% of cases, acute pancreatitis presents as a mild inflammation with low morbidity and mortality, self-reversing to normal condition within 3-4 days. However, the natural course of severe pancreatitis progresses into SIRS and necrosis of the pancreas and its surrounding tissue. And infection of the necrotic tissue develops in sepsis and organ failures. Therefore, the initial management for acute pancreatitis would significantly contribute on the early prognosis. The first step includes not only diagnosis but also initial treatment according to etiological assessment and severity stratification. The summarization of initial management revealed as follows: monitorings of temperature, pulse rate, blood pressure, urine output volume, abdominal pain etc, and treatments of cardio-pulmonary care with sufficient fluid resuscitation, pain control, resting of pancreas etc. As the treatment of the initial management after initial onset, the significances of nasogastric tube drainage, prophylactic use of broadspectrum antibiotics, continuous infusion of protease inhibitors, use of H2 receptor antagonists, control by enteral nutrition and so on have been discussed. And also the indications of total parenteral nutrition, selective digestive decontamination and the efficacies of peritoneal lavage, continuous hemodiafiltration and continuous arterial infusion of protease inhibitor and antibiotics have been reviewed. For those events, the evidences were collected by a systemic search of MEDLINE and Japan Centra Revues Medicina. And then practical recommendations were also graded and introduced to provide a framework for clinitians to manage acute pancreatitis as a guideline. This paper described a part of those recommendations.

  4. Intra-abdominal hypertension in acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Waele, Jan J; Leppäniemi, Ari K

    2009-06-01

    The incidence of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is approximately 60-80%. It is usually an early phenomenon, partly related to the effects of the inflammatory process, causing retroperitoneal edema, fluid collections, ascites, and ileus, and partly iatrogenic, resulting from aggressive fluid resuscitation. It also can manifest at a later stage, often associated with local pancreatic complications. IAH is associated with impaired organ dysfunction, especially of the cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems. Using current definitions, the incidence of the clinical manifestation, abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS), has been reported as 27% in the largest study so far. Despite several intervention options, the mortality in patients developing ACS remains high: 50-75%. Prevention with judicious use of crystalloids is important, and nonsurgical interventions, such as nasogastric decompression, short-term use of neuromuscular blockers, removal of fluid by extracorporeal techniques, and percutaneous drainage of ascites should be instituted early. The indications for surgical decompression are still not clearly defined, but undoubtedly some patients benefit from it. It can be achieved with full-thickness laparostomy (midline or transverse subcostal) or through a subcutaneous linea alba fasciotomy. Despite the improvement in physiological variables and significant decrease in IAP, the effects of surgical decompression on organ function and outcome are less clear. Because of the significant morbidity associated with surgical decompression and the management of the ensuing open abdomen, more research is needed to define better the appropriate indications and techniques for surgical intervention.

  5. Comparison of biohumoral and morphological parameters in acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasić Tomislav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute pancreatitis occurs as a result of autodigestive activation of pancreatic proenzymes, within the parenchyma of the glands. Objective. The goal of the work was to establish possible connection of etiology and severity of the acute pancreatitis and biohumoral parameters, ultrasound and CT. Methods. The study included 273 patients with pancreatitis, classified by Ranson’s score, according to degree of severity and etiology, whose biohumoral parameters were correlated with each other, and with the ultrasound and CT findings. Results. The values of amylase and ALT were significantly higher in the severe form of pancreatitis and biliary etiology compared to etilic (p<0.05. The ratio of AST/ALT was significantly higher in the group of etilic compared to biliary etiology (p<0.05. LDH was significantly higher in the severe form group compared to moderate form of pancreatitis (p<0.01. Cholesterol was significantly higher in the group of biliary compared to the group of etilic pancreatitis (p<0.05. There was a negative low correlation between the value of calcium ions in the plasma and CT analysis (p=0.05. Low degree negative correlation between the value of calcium ions and ultrasound analysis was established (p=0.0001. Conclusion. There was a negative correlation between the level of ionized calcium in the blood and the degree of the acute pancreatitis by the Balthazar score. Mean value of alpha amylase, total value of cholesterol and ALT were significantly higher in the group of biliary compared to the group of etilic acute pancreatitis. The average values of the alpha amylase, LDH and ALT were significantly higher in the group of severe form of the acute pancreatitis compared to the group of moderate form. The ratio AST/ALT was significantly higher in the group of etilic than in the group of biliary pancreatitis.

  6. Tissue harmonic imaging in the evaluation of acute pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, Mandeep; Sandhu, Manavjit; Sood, Bimal; Lal, Anupam; Suri, Sudha; Bhasin, Deepak

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the role of tissue harmonic imaging (THI) in acute pancreatitis, and to compare its findings with conventional grey-scale sonography and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) scan, we evaluated 25 patients diagnosed with acute pancreatitis on clinical examination and laboratory findings. Conventional grey-scale ultrasound followed by tissue harmonic sonography was done on the same machine followed by a CECT within 12 h of the ultrasound examination. The present study showed that sonograms obtained with THI were of much better quality than those obtained conventionally, especially for the pancreatic tail. The benefits of harmonic imaging were more apparent in obese patients and in others whose body habitus was unfavourable for sonography. In the assessment of pancreatic image quality, grey-scale imaging had an accuracy of 60, 80 and 28% in relation to the head, body and tail, respectively. In comparison, THI had a far higher accuracy of 80, 92 and 60% in relation to the head, body and tail, respectively, with the superiority being most obvious in the pancreatic tail region. There were no cases in which tissue harmonic sonography provided less information than conventional sonography. However, CECT scan remained the best modality in all patients for the evaluation of acute pancreatitis. It showed superior demonstration of all the morphological changes, ranging from minimal pancreatic oedema to extensive fluid collections, necrosis and the haemorrhage that developed in fulminant severe pancreatitis. Our experience thus suggests that THI cannot replace CT scan as the gold standard in the assessment of acute pancreatitis, as it is poor in evaluating the pancreatic tail, cannot clearly distinguish phlegmon from necrosis, and is inferior to CT in the assessment of the complications of acute pancreatitis Copyright (2004) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  7. Management of hypertriglyceridaemia-induced acute pancreatitis in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Tejal; Poon, Leona C Y; Teoh, T G; Moorthy, K; Robinson, Stephen; Neary, Nicola; Valabhji, Jonathan

    2015-05-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a recognised rare complication in pregnancy. The reported incidence varies between 3 and 7 in 10 000 pregnancies and is higher in the third trimester. The commonest causes in pregnancy include gallstones, alcohol and hypertriglyceridaemia. Non-gallstone pancreatitis is associated with more complications and poorer outcome with hypertriglyceridaemia-induced acute pancreatitis having mortality rates ranging from 7.5 to 9.0% and 10.0 to 17.5% for mother and foetus, respectively. A 40-year-old para 4 woman, who presented at 15(+4) weeks' gestation, was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis. Past medical history included Graves' disease and hypertriglyceridaemia. Fenofibrate was discontinued immediately after discovery of the pregnancy. Initial investigations showed elevated amylase (475.0 µ/L) and triglycerides (46.6 mmol/L). Imaging revealed an inflamed pancreas without evidence of biliary obstruction/gallstones hence confirming the diagnosis of hypertriglyceridaemia-induced acute pancreatitis. Laboratory tests gradually improved (triglyceride 5.2 mmol/L on day 17). On day 18, ultrasound confirmed foetal demise (18(+1) weeks) and a hysterotomy was performed as she had had four previous caesarean sections. Management of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy requires a multi-disciplinary approach. Hypertriglyceridaemia-induced acute pancreatitis has poor outcomes when diagnosed in early pregnancy. Identifying those at risk pre-pregnancy and antenatally can allow close monitoring through pregnancy to optimise care.

  8. Nonalcoholic fatty liver and the severity of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolasevic, I; Orlic, L; Poropat, G; Jakopcic, I; Stimac, D; Klanac, A; Carovic, F; Milic, S

    2017-03-01

    To explore the effect of nonalcoholic fatty liver as a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome on the severity of acute pancreatitis. We hypothesized that patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver would have a more severe form of acute pancreatitis. We retrospectively analyzed 822 patients hospitalized with acute pancreatitis. We diagnosed acute pancreatitis and determined its severity according the revised Atlanta classification criteria from 2012. We assessed nonalcoholic fatty liver with computed tomography. There were 198 (24.1%) patients out of 822 analyzed who had nonalcoholic fatty liver. Patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver had statistically higher incidence of moderately severe (35.4% vs. 14.6%; p=0.02) and severe acute pancreatitis (20.7% vs. 9.6%; pacute pancreatitis and nonalcoholic fatty liver (OR 2.13, 95%CI 1.236-3.689). Compared to patients without nonalcoholic fatty liver, patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver had a higher death rate, however not statistically significant (5.6% vs. 4.3%; p=NS). Presence of nonalcoholic fatty liver at admission can indicate a higher risk for developing more severe forms of acute pancreatitis and could be used as an additional prognostic tool. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Surgical Approach to Treatment of Necrotizing Pancreatitis: Early Primary Drainage without Necrosectomy. Review of Seven Recent Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Rubtsov

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Unsatisfactory results of surgery in the late course of pancreatic necrosis made us search for indications and variants of operation in the early phase of the disease. As early surgical intervention, the universal approach was used in 7 patients with necrotizing pancreatitis who had a different prevalence of the inflammatory process in the retroperitoneal space. The drainage proved to be effective and enabled us to always prevent generalized infectious complications in the later phases of the disease in absence of local complications specific for open surgery: bleeding and digestive fistulas. In spite of obvious infected process development in primary open surgery, we noticed a stable decrease in procalcitonin level following the drainage. A surgical intervention has been developed enabling one to reveal in time the volume of damaged retroperitoneal fat tissue and to drain it adequately in compliance with the process prevalence, thus avoiding septic complications in the late phase of the disease. The method’s advantage involves refusal from necrosectomy in primary intervention, weekly staged revisions of the retroperitoneal space via formed contrapertures as dictated by evolution of the necrotic process in the gland.

  10. Energy expenditure during severe acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouffard, Y H; Delafosse, B X; Annat, G J; Viale, J P; Bertrand, O M; Motin, J P

    1989-01-01

    Energy expenditure (EE) was measured, during 3 consecutive days, in six patients suffering from acute pancreatitis. Measurements were achieved postoperatively, under mechanical ventilation, using a mass spectrometer system. EE represented 1.49 times (range: 1.08-1.78) the predicted resting energy expenditure (PREE) according to the reevaluated Harris-Benedict equation. There was a weak positive correlation between EE and core temperature and a negative correlation between EE and nitrogen balance. EE/PREE was not different between septic and nonseptic patients (1.58 +/- 0.06 vs. 1.39 +/- 0.07). The calculations of nutrient oxidation rate indicated a high protein catabolic rate, a neoglucogenesis, and a lipolysis.

  11. Optimizing the Treatment of Acute Duct-Destructive Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhakiev, Bazylbek S.; Karsakbayev, Uteugali G.; Kelimberdiev, Mersaid S.; ?uhamedgalieva, Bodagoz M.; K?nonenko, Aleksander F.

    2016-01-01

    The search for new methods for treating duct-destructive pancreatitis is a relevant problem. Endogenous intoxication and oxidative stress that accompany acute pancreatitis often progress even after surgery, which forces one to search for additional possibilities of preventing these severe consequences. This research studied the effect of small…

  12. Acute pancreatitis at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Nairobi: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CONCLUSIONS: The current management of acute pancreatitis at AKUH is physician dependant and not in conformity with the established and recommended guidelines. The CT scans were over-prescribed, their timing inappropriate and efforts to exclude the cause of pancreatitis moderate. The mortality rate is acceptable ...

  13. A solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas in a man presenting with acute pancreatitis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emi Chikuie

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: We report a man with a small SPN of the pancreas presenting with acute pancreatitis and mimicking pancreatic cancer. We should be aware that this rare pancreatic tumor can become a cause of acute pancreatitis.

  14. The incidence and aetiology of acute pancreatitis across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Stephen E; Morrison-Rees, Sian; John, Ann; Williams, John G; Brown, Tim H; Samuel, David G

    Acute pancreatitis is increasingly one of the most important acute gastrointestinal conditions throughout much of the world, although incidence and aetiology varies across countries and regions. This study investigated regional and national patterns in the incidence and aetiology of acute pancreatitis, demographic patterns in incidence and trends over time in incidence across Europe. A structured review of acute pancreatitis incidence and aetiology from studies of hospitalised patient case series, cohort studies or other population based studies from 1989 to 2015 and a review of trends in incidence from 1970 to 2015 across all 51 European states. The incidence of acute pancreatitis was reported from 17 countries across Europe and ranged from 4.6 to 100 per 100 000 population. Incidence was usually highest in eastern or northern Europe, although reported rates often varied according to case ascertainment criteria. Of 20 studies that reported on trends in incidence, all but three show percentage increases over time (overall median increase = 3.4% per annum; range = -0.4%-73%). The highest ratios of gallstone to alcohol aetiologies were identified in southern Europe (Greece, Turkey, Italy and Croatia) with lowest ratios mainly in eastern Europe (Latvia, Finland, Romania, Hungary, Russia and Lithuania). The incidence of acute pancreatitis varies across Europe. Gallstone is the dominant aetiology in southern Europe and alcohol in eastern Europe with intermediate ratios in northern and western Europe. Acute pancreatitis continues to increase throughout most of Europe. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. A case of necrotizing mediastinitis induced by acute pyoper icardium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jang Su

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Deep neck infection is a potentially life-threatening disease, especially complicated with descending necrotizing mediastinitis (DNM. The mean age of DNM is 49–57.8 years old. The commonly seen causes are tonsillar, pharyngeal infection and odontogenic origins. When the deep neck infection extended to the mediastinal spaces, the pleural effusion or pericardial effusion may appear. Here is a rare young lady who had fever and sore throat for 2 weeks, and chest X-ray showed bilateral pleural effusion. After surgical drainage, the Escherichia coli grew over the culture of pericardial effusion. This case is rarely seen in the presence of Escherichia coli pyopericardium originating from DNM in the past. Overall mortality rate of DNM is around 11.2%–17% nowadays. We should keep in mind that for DNM, early diagnosis and aggressively surgical intervention with suitable drainage, and intensive postoperative care should be conducted to lower the morbidity and mortality.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: acute necrotizing encephalopathy type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... induced acute encephalopathy 3 Related Information How are genetic conditions and genes named? ... National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: Flu (Influenza) National Institute of Neurological Disorders ...

  17. Midkine is overexpressed in acute pancreatitis and promotes the pancreatic recovery in L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Li; Qiao, Zhenguo; Xu, Chunfang; Shen, Jiaqing

    2017-06-01

    Midkine (MK) is involved in the pathogenesis of numerous malignancies, but the expression and effect of MK in acute pancreatitis (AP) have not been well studied and documented. In this study, the expression of MK was assayed in mice with L-arginine-induced AP. A recombinant human MK (rhMK) was introduced in this study to test the effect of MK on the L-arginine-induced AP. Serum amylase and lipase were assayed. Pancreas tissue samples were also collected for the evaluation of histological injury. Western blot and immunochemical staining of α-amylase and proliferating cell nuclear antigen were applied for the study of acinar regeneration in the pancreas. The elevation of MK expression was found in mice with AP induced by L-arginine. After rhMK administration, rhMK did not affect the severity of acute pancreatic injury in acute phase in L-arginine-induced pancreatitis in mice, in accordance with changes of serum amylase and lipase and the histological evaluation. But during the recovery phase, the area of remaining acinar cells was increased and the fibrosis was reduced in rhMK-treated mice. Furthermore, the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and α-amylase was also upregulated after rhMK treatment. Midkine is over-expressed during AP in the animal model. Recombinant MK could promote the recovery of L-arginine-induced pancreatitis in mice. Therefore, MK may be involved in the regeneration of acinar cells in AP, and rhMK may be a possible therapeutic intervention for the repairment of AP. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Immune-modulating therapy in acute pancreatitis: Fact or fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinosoglou, Karolina; Gogos, Charalambos

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is one of the most common diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, bearing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Current treatment of AP remains unspecific and supportive and is mainly targeted to aggressively prevent systemic complications and organ failure by intensive care. As acute pancreatitis shares an indistinguishable profile of inflammation with sepsis, therapeutic approaches have turned towards modulating the systemic inflammatory response. Targets, among others, have included pro- and anti-inflammatory modulators, cytokines, chemokines, immune cells, adhesive molecules and platelets. Even though, initial results in experimental models have been encouraging, clinical implementation of immune-regulating therapies in acute pancreatitis has had a slow progress. Main reasons include difficulty in clinical translation of experimental data, poor understanding of inflammatory response time-course, flaws in experimental designs, need for multimodal approaches and commercial drawbacks. Whether immune-modulation in acute pancreatitis remains a fact or just fiction remains to be seen in the future. PMID:25386069

  19. A transatlantic survey of nutrition practice in acute pancreatitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duggan, SN

    2012-08-01

    Many guidelines exist for the nutritional management of acute pancreatitis; however, little is known regarding current practice. We aimed to investigate feeding practices, including the use of parenteral\\/enteral nutrition.

  20. TRO40303 Ameliorates Alcohol-Induced Pancreatitis Through Reduction of Fatty Acid Ethyl Ester–Induced Mitochondrial Injury and Necrotic Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Muhammad Ahsan; Wen, Li; Awais, Muhammad; Latawiec, Diane; Huang, Wei; Chvanov, Michael; Schaller, Sophie; Bordet, Thierry; Michaud, Magali; Pruss, Rebecca; Tepikin, Alexei; Criddle, David; Sutton, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibition is a promising approach to treat acute pancreatitis (AP). We sought to determine (i) the effects of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibitor 3,5-seco-4-nor-cholestan-5-one oxime-3-ol (TRO40303) on murine and human pancreatic acinar cell (PAC) injury induced by fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) or taurolithocholic acid-3-sulfate and (ii) TRO40303 pharmacokinetics and efficacy in experimental alcoholic AP (FAEE-AP). Methods Changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]c), and cell fate were examined in freshly isolated murine or human PACs by confocal microscopy. TRO40303 pharmacokinetics were assessed in cerulein-induced AP and therapeutic efficacy in FAEE-AP induced with palmitoleic acid and ethanol. Severity of AP was assessed by standard biomarkers and blinded histopathology. Results TRO40303 prevented loss of Δψm and necrosis induced by 100 μM palmitoleic acid ethyl ester or 500 μM taurolithocholic acid-3-sulfate in murine and human PACs. Pharmacokinetic analysis found TRO40303 accumulated in the pancreas. A single dose of 3 mg/kg TRO40303 significantly reduced serum amylase (P = 0.043), pancreatic trypsin (P = 0.018), and histopathology scores (P = 0.0058) in FAEE-AP. Conclusions TRO40303 protects mitochondria and prevents necrotic cell death pathway activation in murine and human PACs, ameliorates the severity of FAEE-AP, and is a candidate drug for human AP. PMID:29200128

  1. Clinical Study on Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy in 26 Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Qihui, Cheng; Xiping, Zhang; Xianfeng, Ding

    2012-01-01

    Aim. This paper investigated the pathogenesis and treatment strategies of acute pancreatitis (AP) in pregnancy. Methods. We analyzed retrospectively the characteristics, auxiliary diagnosis, treatment strategies, and clinical outcomes of 26 cases of patients with AP in pregnancy. Results. All patients were cured finally. (1) Nine cases of 22 mild acute pancreatitis (MAP) patients selected automatic termination of pregnancy because of the unsatisfied therapeutic efficacy or those patients’ req...

  2. [Experience and thinking on multidisciplinary management of acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Wang, Xiaohui

    2015-09-01

    The diagnostic and therapeutic course of acute pancreatitis is complicated. The treatment strategy existed dispute. The management of acute pancreatitis includes intensive care, fluid resuscitation, organ function support, infection control, endoscopic interventional management, surgical operation and other fields. The diagnosis and treatment mode of multidisciplinary integrate collaboration has been established. It will make the greatest benefit if we depend on evidence-based medicine, play the superiority of professional team and make individual treatment protocols.

  3. Features of medical tactics and its perioperative medications in acute pancreatitis of biliary etiology in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.I. Savoliuk

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was clinical and laboratory evaluation of the effectiveness of traditional and optimized therapeutic and diagnostic technologies in acute pancreatitis of biliary etiology in diabetic patients with diabetes mellitus. Materials and methods. The article analyzes the results of treatment of 122 diabetic patients with acute biliary pancreatitis. Laboratory analysis was conducted within the monitoring cytopathic hypoxia markers, depending on the morphological forms of acute pancreatitis and effectiveness of optimized and traditional standard therapy. Results. The results indicate that acute pancreatitis of biliary etiology in diabetic patients was accompanied by a consistent pattern of imbalance in the cytopathic hypoxia system, which is determined by the severity of the pancreatic morphological changes. Interstitial form was accompanied by high levels of carbonyl group by 30.7 %, 38.75 % for adenosine deaminase and decreased level of arginine to 18.05 %; localized pancreatic necrosis was characterized by increased endothelial dysfunction markers (nitrates and nitrites to 18.35 %, homocysteine 52 %; diffuse pancreatic necrosis was characterized by increased markers of stimulated catabolism of purine nucleotides (xanthine and hypoxanthine to 85.2 %; subtotal-total pancreatic necrosis — increased levels of relative enzymes (xanthine oxidase and xanthine dehydrogenase to 44.39 %. Pattern dynamics violations of cytopathic hypoxia markers allows use them as the predictors of functional liver failure and multiple organ failure in diabetic patients with necrotic forms of acute biliary pancreatitis. Conclusions. Standard treatment methods do not allow effectively correct cytopathic hypoxia, endotoxemia and hepatic failure. Proposed optimized complex of conservative therapy allow effectively and timely correction them, namely in the interstitial form on day 4, localized pancreatic necrosis on day 7, diffuse pancreatic necrosis on day 10

  4. Effects of Erdosteine on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapolat, Banu; Karapolat, Sami; Gurleyik, Emin; Yasar, Mehmet

    2017-10-01

    To create acute pancreatitis condition experimentally in rats using cerulein, and to reveal histopathological effects in pancreatic tissue with erdosteine. An experimental study. Department of General Surgery, Duzce University, Turkey, from June to October 2014. Thirty male Wistar albino rats were divided into three groups. No procedures were applied to Group 1. The rats in Group 2 and Group 3 were injected cerulein, to establish an experimental pancreatitis model and the blood amylase and lipase values were examined. The rats in Group 3 were given 10 mg/kg erdosteine. This treatment was continued for another 2 days and the rats were sacrificed. The pancreatic tissues were examined histopathologically for edema, inflammation, acinar necrosis, fat necrosis, and vacuolization. The lipase and amylase values and the histopathological examination of pancreatic tissues evidenced that the experimental acute pancreatitis model was established and edema, inflammation, acinar necrosis, fat necrosis, and vacuolization were observed in the pancreatic tissues. The statistical results suggest that erdosteine can decrease the edema, inflammation, acinar necrosis, fat necrosis and vacuolization scores in the tissues. The severity of acute pancreatitis, induced by cerulein in rats, is reduced with the use of erdosteine.

  5. Health Care Utilization and Costs Associated With Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, Vaibhav; Patwardhan, Soumil; Garg, Sushil K; Jobanputra, Yash; Lopez, Rocio; Sanaka, Madhusudhan R

    2017-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common inpatient diagnosis among gastrointestinal disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of inpatient admissions, costs, and mortality rates associated with acute pancreatitis in the United States. We analyzed the National Inpatient Sample for all patients in which acute pancreatitis (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision code: 577.0) was the principal discharge diagnosis during the period 1997-2012. The statistical significance of the difference in the hospital discharges, length of stay, and costs over the study period was determined by utilization of regression analysis. In 1997, there were 164,776 admissions with a principal discharge diagnosis of acute pancreatitis as compared with 275,170 in 2012 (P acute pancreatitis decreased from 6.4 days in 1997 to 4.7 days in 2012 (P acute pancreatitis and associated costs have increased markedly over the last 16 years in the United States. However, the lengths of stay and mortality rates have decreased significantly.

  6. Experimental pancreatitis in the rat: role of bile reflux in sodium taurocholate-induced acute haemorrhagic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, J. F.; van Gool, J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1986-01-01

    Mortality of sodium taurocholate-induced acute haemorrhagic pancreatitis in the rat was prevented by biliary diversion. Bile reflux into the pancreas after the induction of pancreatitis is postulated to be a major factor affecting mortality of this popular model of acute pancreatitis. The reduction

  7. Prophylactic use of octreotide for asparaginase-induced acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Sachi; Higa, Takeshi; Suzuki, Mitsuyoshi; Fujimura, Junya; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2017-08-01

    In the present study, we sought to evaluate the prophylactic use of octreotide for asparaginase-induced acute pancreatitis. We reviewed the medical records of seven patients in two institutions who received prophylactic octreotide for re-administration of asparaginase after asparaginase-induced acute pancreatitis. Three patients completed asparaginase treatment without developing pancreatitis, and four experienced recurrence of pancreatitis. A literature search using PubMed identified four additional patients in whom asparaginase was successfully re-administered with octreotide. Prophylactic use of octreotide may, thus, be warranted for patients who would benefit from re-administration of asparaginase for cancer treatment; however, careful observation is needed to monitor for breakthrough recurrence of pancreatitis.

  8. Lung injury in acute pancreatitis: mechanisms, prevention, and therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shields, Conor J

    2012-02-03

    Lung injury is the most pertinent manifestation of extra-abdominal organ dysfunction in pancreatitis. The propensity of this retroperitoneal inflammatory condition to engender a diffuse and life-threatening lung injury is significant. Approximately one third of patients will develop acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, which account for 60% of all deaths within the first week. The variability in the clinical course of pancreatitis renders it a vexing entity and makes demonstration of the efficacy of any specific intervention difficult. The distinct pathologic entity of pancreatitis-associated lung injury is reviewed with a focus on etiology and potential therapeutic maneuvers.

  9. Pancreatic Pseudocyst Ruptured due to Acute Intracystic Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunishige Okamura

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Rupture of pancreatic pseudocyst is one of the rare complications and usually results in high mortality. The present case was a rupture of pancreatic pseudocyst that could be treated by surgical intervention. A 74-year-old man developed abdominal pain, vomiting, and diarrhea, and he was diagnosed with cholecystitis and pneumonia. Three days later, acute pancreatitis occurred and computed tomography (CT showed slight hemorrhage in the cyst of the pancreatic tail. After another 10 days, CT showed pancreatic cyst ruptured due to intracystic hemorrhage. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed leakage of contrast agent from pancreatic tail cyst to enclosed abdominal cavity. His left hypochondrial pain was increasing, and CT showed rupture of the cyst of the pancreatic tail into the peritoneal cavity was increased in 10 days. CT showed also two left renal tumors. Therefore we performed distal pancreatectomy with concomitant resection of transverse colon and left kidney. We histopathologically diagnosed pancreatic pseudocyst ruptured due to intracystic hemorrhage and renal cell carcinoma. Despite postoperative paralytic ileus and fluid collection at pancreatic stump, they improved by conservative management and he could be discharged on postoperative day 29. He has achieved relapse-free survival for 6 months postoperatively. The mortality of pancreatic pseudocyst rupture is very high if some effective medical interventions cannot be performed. It should be necessary to plan appropriate treatment strategy depending on each patient.

  10. The role of MRI in evaluation of acute pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Maiko; Munechika, Horotsugu

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the role of MRI in acute pancreatitis. The findings of MPD (main pancreatic duct) and CBD (common bile duct) on MR cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) images were retrospectively reviewed in 60 patients with acute pancreatitis. The patients were divided into two groups; severe and mild pancreatitis, according to the criteria of Japanese group of investigation for pancreatic diseases. T2 weighed MR images were compared with contrast-enhanced CT images for evaluation of severity of the disease. MRCP images were also compared with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) images for evaluation of MPD and CBD. CBD was more clearly demonstrated by MRCP than MPD. Both MPD and CBD were more clearly seen in the mild group than in the severe group. A few false-negative cases were seen in MRCP. T2 weighed MR images were almost the same as contrast-enhanced CT images in diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. MRCP is useful for evaluation of CBD in severe cases and for evaluation of both CBD and MPD in mild cases of acute pancreatitis. The severity of disease can be evaluated by combination of T2 weighted MR images and MRCP alternative to contrast-enhanced CT. (author)

  11. Clinical Study on Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy in 26 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Qihui

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. This paper investigated the pathogenesis and treatment strategies of acute pancreatitis (AP in pregnancy. Methods. We analyzed retrospectively the characteristics, auxiliary diagnosis, treatment strategies, and clinical outcomes of 26 cases of patients with AP in pregnancy. Results. All patients were cured finally. (1 Nine cases of 22 mild acute pancreatitis (MAP patients selected automatic termination of pregnancy because of the unsatisfied therapeutic efficacy or those patients’ requirements. (2 Four cases of all patients were complicated with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP; 2 cases underwent uterine incision delivery while one of them also received cholecystectomy, debridement and drainage of pancreatic necrosis, and percutaneous jejunostomy. One case had a fetal death when complicated with SAP; she had to receive extraction of bile duct stones and drainage of abdominal cavity after induced abortion. The other one case with hyperlipidemic pancreatitis was given induced abortion and hemofiltration. Conclusions. The first choice of MAP in pregnancy is the conventional therapy. Apart from the conventional therapy, we need to terminate pregnancy as early as possible for patients with SAP. Removing biliary calculi and drainage is supposed to be considered for acute biliary pancreatitis. Lowering blood lipids treatment should be applied to hyperlipidemic pancreatitis or given to hemofiltration when necessary.

  12. Management of patients after recovering from acute severe biliary pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedemadi, Georgia; Nikolopoulos, Manolis; Kalaitzopoulos, Ioannis; Sgourakis, George

    2016-01-01

    Cholelithiasis is the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, accounting 35%-60% of cases. Around 15%-20% of patients suffer a severe attack with high morbidity and mortality rates. As far as treatment is concerned, the optimum method of late management of patients with severe acute biliary pancreatitis is still contentious and the main question is over the correct timing of every intervention. Patients after recovering from an acute episode of severe biliary pancreatitis can be offered alternative options in their management, including cholecystectomy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and sphincterotomy, or no definitive treatment. Delaying cholecystectomy until after resolution of the inflammatory process, usually not earlier than 6 wk after onset of acute pancreatitis, seems to be a safe policy. ERCP and sphincterotomy on index admission prevent recurrent episodes of pancreatitis until cholecystectomy is performed, but if used for definitive treatment, they can be a valuable tool for patients unfit for surgery. Some patients who survive severe biliary pancreatitis may develop pseudocysts or walled-off necrosis. Management of pseudocysts with minimally invasive techniques, if not therapeutic, can be used as a bridge to definitive operative treatment, which includes delayed cholecystectomy and concurrent pseudocyst drainage in some patients. A management algorithm has been developed for patients surviving severe biliary pancreatitis according to the currently published data in the literature. PMID:27678352

  13. Acoustic radiation force impulse shear wave elastography (ARFI) of acute and chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goertz, Ruediger S., E-mail: ruediger.goertz@uk-erlangen.de; Schuderer, Johanna, E-mail: Johanna@schuderer-floss.de; Strobel, Deike, E-mail: deike.strobel@uk-erlangen.de; Pfeifer, Lukas, E-mail: Lukas.Pfeifer@uk-erlangen.de; Neurath, Markus F., E-mail: Markus.Neurath@uk-erlangen.de; Wildner, Dane, E-mail: Dane.Wildner@uk-erlangen.de

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • ARFI elastography of the pancreas is feasible. • Shear wave velocities in patients with acute or chronic pancreatitis or carcinoma are higher than those occurring in normal tissue. • ARFI values considerable overlap between different pathologies. - Abstract: Introduction: Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) elastography evaluates tissue stiffness non-invasively and has rarely been applied to pancreas examinations so far. In a prospective and retrospective analysis, ARFI shear wave velocities of healthy parenchyma, pancreatic lipomatosis, acute and chronic pancreatitis, adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine tumor (NET) of the pancreas were evaluated and compared. Material and methods: In 95 patients ARFI elastography of the pancreatic head, and also of the tail for a specific group, was analysed retrospectively. Additionally, prospectively in 100 patients ARFI was performed in the head and tail of the pancreas. Results: A total of 195 patients were included in the study. Healthy parenchyma (n = 21) and lipomatosis (n = 30) showed similar shear wave velocities of about 1.3 m/s. Acute pancreatitis (n = 35), chronic pancreatitis (n = 53) and adenocarcinoma (n = 52) showed consecutively increasing ARFI values, respectively. NET (n = 4) revealed the highest shear wave velocities amounting to 3.62 m/s. ARFI elastography showed relevant differences between acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis or adenocarcinoma. With a cut-off value of 1.74 m/s for the diagnosis of a malignant disease the sensitivity was 91.1% whereas the specificity amounted to 60.4%. Conclusion: ARFI shear wave velocities present differences in various pathologies of the pancreas. Acute and chronic pancreatitis as well as neoplastic lesions show high ARFI values. Very high elasticity values may indicate malignant disease of the pancreas. However, there is a considerable overlap between the entities.

  14. Emodin promoted pancreatic claudin-5 and occludin expression in experimental acute pancreatitis rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xian-Ming; Li, Bang-Ku; Xing, Shi-Mei; Ruan, Hai-Ling

    2012-05-07

    To investigate the effect of emodin on pancreatic claudin-5 and occludin expression, and pancreatic paracellular permeability in acute pancreatitis (AP). Experimental pancreatitis was induced by retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct. Emodin was injected via the external jugular vein 0 or 6 h after induction of AP. Rats from sham operation and AP groups were injected with normal saline at the same time. Samples of pancreas were obtained 6 or 12 h after drug administration. Pancreatic morphology was examined with hematoxylin and eosin staining. Pancreatic edema was estimated by measuring tissue water content. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 level were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Pancreatic paracellular permeability was assessed by tissue dye extravasation. Expression of pancreatic claudin-5 and occludin was examined by immunohistology, quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. Pancreatic TNF-α and IL-6 levels, wet/dry ratio, dye extravasation, and histological score were significantly elevated at 3, 6 and 12 h following sodium taurocholate infusion; treatment with emodin prevented these changes at all time points. Immunostaining of claudin-5 and occludin was detected in rat pancreas, which was distributed in pancreatic acinar cells, ductal cells and vascular endothelial cells, respectively. Sodium taurocholate infusion significantly decreased pancreatic claudin-5 and occludin mRNA and protein levels at 3, 6 and 12 h, and that could be promoted by intravenous administration of emodin at all time points. These results demonstrate that emodin could promote pancreatic claudin-5 and occludin expression, and reduce pancreatic paracellular permeability.

  15. Acute pancreatitis caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae: an unusual etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés Lacasa, Teresa; Duarte Borges, María Alejandra; García Marín, Alicia; Gómez Cuervo, Covadonga

    2017-06-01

    It is well known that the most important etiologies of acute pancreatitis are gallstones and alcohol consumption. Once these causes have been ruled out, especially in young adults, it is important to consider less frequent etiologic factors such as drugs, trauma, malformations, autoimmunity or systemic diseases. Other rare and less well studied causes of this pathology are infections, among which Mycoplasma pneumoniae has been reported to cause acute pancreatitis as an unusual extrapulmonary manifestation. Here, we report the case of a 21-year-old patient who had acute idiopathic pancreatitis associated with an upper respiratory tract infection. After an in-depth study, all other causes of pancreatitis were ruled out and Mycoplasma was established as the clinical etiology.

  16. Perfusion measurement in acute pancreatitis using dynamic perfusion MDCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bize, Pierre E; Platon, Alexandra; Becker, Christoph D; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2006-01-01

    Our objective was to determine whether MDCT with perfusion imaging could help in assessing the severity of acute pancreatitis in the initial phase of the disease. One hundred six patients with abdominal pain were prospectively enrolled in this study. Patients were separated into two groups: P1 (severe) and P2 (mild) acute pancreatitis. Mean perfusion value was 24.8 mL/100 mL/min in the P1 group and 50.5 mL/100 mL/min in the P2 group (p = 0.0016, significant). Our preliminary data suggest that pancreatic perfusion measurement using MDCT with perfusion imaging could help in assessing the severity of acute pancreatitis.

  17. Endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) in acute alcoholic and biliary pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambs, H.J.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis of the ERP findings in 31 patients with acute pancreatitis enable us to define the terminology of the pancreatogram in these diseases. Irregularities of the ducts indicate previous damage to the organ. A frequent phenomenon is thinning of lateral branches, which can be explained by compression due to oedema. Early parenchymal staining indicates abnormal permeability of the duct epithelium. Cavities are an expression of acute pseudo-cysts. A sign characteristic of alcoholic pancreatitis is the presence of contrast defects due to protein plugs and due to increased viscosity of pancreatic secretions. These observations confirm the theory that protein precipitates due to abnormal secretions play an important role in acute pancreatitis. (orig.) [de

  18. Asparaginase-associated pancreatitis is not predicted by hypertriglyceridemia or pancreatic enzyme levels in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raja, Raheel Altaf; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Sørensen, Ditte Nørbo

    2017-01-01

    Background: l-Asparaginase is an important drug for treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), but is associated with serious toxicities, including pancreatitis and hypertriglyceridemia (HTG). Asparaginase-associated pancreatitis (AAP) is a common reason for stopping asparaginase...

  19. Acute pancreatitis and pregnancy: a 10-year single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Alejandro; Petrov, Maxim S; Brooks, David C; Banks, Peter A; Ashley, Stanley W; Tavakkolizadeh, Ali

    2007-12-01

    Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is rare. We report our institutional therapeutic approaches to this disease and its effect on maternal and fetal outcomes. A retrospective review of medical records of pregnant women admitted to Brigham and Women's Hospital between 1996 and 2006. Twenty-one patients, presenting with 34 episodes of acute pancreatitis were identified. Most attacks (56%) occurred in the second trimester. Twelve patients had biliary pancreatitis. Three had pancreatitis secondary to other causes and six had "undetermined" etiologies. Of those with biliary pancreatitis, six underwent cholecystectomy; in a third of these cases, initial conservative therapy had failed. The other six patients underwent endoscopic sphincterotomy (n=2) or conservative therapy (n=4). Fifty percent of the patients with biliary pancreatitis managed conservatively had a recurrent episode of pancreatitis vs none in the cholecystectomy group. There was no significant difference in length of hospital stay between the three treatment groups (cholecystectomy, sphincterotomy, and conservative therapy). No maternal deaths were observed; there were four preterm labors and one fetal loss. If treated conservatively, pregnant patients with biliary pancreatitis appear to have a high recurrence rate. Early surgical intervention is appropriate, safe, and does not increase the length of hospital stay.

  20. Reproducibility in the assessment of acute pancreatitis with computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire Filho, Edison de Oliveira; Vieira, Renata La Rocca; Yamada, Andre Fukunishi; Shigueoka, David Carlos; Bekhor, Daniel; Freire, Maxime Figueiredo de Oliveira; Ajzen, Sergio; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Imaging Diagnosis]. E-mail: eofilho@ig.com.br; eoffilho@uol.com.br

    2007-11-15

    Objective: To evaluate the reproducibility of unenhanced and contrast-enhanced computed tomography in the assessment of patients with acute pancreatitis. Materials and methods: Fifty-one unenhanced and contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography studies of patients with acute pancreatitis were blindly reviewed by two radiologists (observers 1 and 2). The morphological index was separately calculated for unenhanced and contrast-enhanced computed tomography and the disease severity index was established. Intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility of computed tomography was measured by means of the kappa index ({kappa}). Results: Interobserver agreement was {kappa} 0.666, 0.705, 0.648, 0.547 and 0.631, respectively for unenhanced and contrast-enhanced morphological index, presence of pancreatic necrosis, pancreatic necrosis extension, and disease severity index. Intraobserver agreement (observers 1 and 2, respectively) was {kappa} = 0.796 and 0.732 for unenhanced morphological index; {kappa} 0.725 and 0.802 for contrast- enhanced morphological index; {kappa} = 0.674 and 0.849 for presence of pancreatic necrosis; {kappa} = 0.606 and 0.770 for pancreatic necrosis extension; and {kappa} = 0.801 and 0.687 for disease severity index at computed tomography. Conclusion: Computed tomography for determination of morphological index and disease severity index in the staging of acute pancreatitis is a quite reproducible method. The absence of contrast- enhancement does not affect the computed tomography morphological index reproducibility. (author)

  1. The revised Atlanta criteria 2012 altered the classification, severity assessment and management of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jie; Qu, Hong-Ping; Zheng, Yun-Feng; Song, Xu-Wei; Li, Lei; Xu, Zhi-Wei; Mao, En-Qiang; Chen, Er-Zhen

    2016-06-01

    The Atlanta criteria for acute pancreatitis (AP) has been revised recently. This study was to evaluate its practical value in classification of AP, the severity assessment and management. The clinical features, severity classification, outcome and risk factors for mortality of 3212 AP patients who had been admitted in Ruijin Hospital from 2004 to 2011 were analyzed based on the revised Atlanta criteria (RAC) and the original Atlanta criteria (OAC). Compared to the OAC group, the incidence of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) was decreased by approximately one half (13.9% vs 28.2%) in the RAC group. The RAC presented a lower sensitivity but higher specificity, and its predictive value for severity and poor outcome was higher than those of the OAC. The proportion of SAP diagnosis and ICU admission in the early phase in the RAC group was significantly lower than that in the OAC group (Pacute necrotic collection and walled-off necrosis. Compared to the OAC, the acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) score, Ranson score, idiopathic etiology, respiratory failure and laparotomy debridement were not risk factors of death in contrast to walled-off necrosis. Interestingly, hypertriglyceridemia-related SAP had good outcomes in both groups. The RAC showed a higher predictive value for severity and poorer outcome than the OAC. However, the RAC resulted in fewer ICU admissions in the early phase due to its lower sensitivity for diagnosis of SAP. Among SAP cases, older age, high CTSI, renal and cardiovascular failure, complications of acute necrotic collection and walled-off necrosis were independent risk factors for mortality.

  2. Prognostic criteria in acute pancreatitis: importance of assessment of pancreatic necrosis by contrast-enhanced CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echevarria, F.; Martinez, B.; Lopez, F.; Vuelta, R.V.

    1997-01-01

    To compare the value of the clinical criteria of Ranson, the classical tomographic criteria of Balthzar and the severity of illness index according to CT in predicting the development of complications of acute pancreatitis. A retrospective study was performed in 100 patients with clinical and analytical evidence of acute pancreatitis. All patients were assessed according to Ranson score at admission and 48 hours later, and contrast-enhanced abdominal CT was carried out. The tomographic images were analyzed on the basis of the classical criteria of Balthazar and the new CT severity of illness index, which includes the assessment of pancreatic necrosis, identified as the areas of the pancreas that are not enhanced by the administration of the contrast material. These three criteria were then correlated with onset of medical and surgical implications. Our findings show that, of the three criteria analyzed, the CT severity of illness index presents the greatest specificity, sensitivity and positive and negative predictive values in the prediction of complications of acute pancreatitis. We conclude that the inclusion of pancreatic necrosis in the tomographic study improves the early assessment of the prognosis of acute pancreatitis. (Author) 20 refs

  3. Antibiotic therapy for prophylaxis against infection of pancreatic necrosis in acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villatoro, Eduardo; Mulla, Mubashir; Larvin, Mike

    2010-05-12

    Pancreatic necrosis may complicate severe acute pancreatitis, and is detectable by computed tomography (CT). If it becomes infected mortality increases, but the use of prophylactic antibiotics raises concerns about antibiotic resistance and fungal infection. To determine the efficacy and safety of prophylactic antibiotics in acute pancreatitis complicated by CT proven pancreatic necrosis. Searches were updated in November 2008, in The Cochrane Library (Issue 2, 2008), MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL. Conference proceedings and references from found articles were also searched. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing antibiotics versus placebo in acute pancreatitis with CT proven necrosis. Primary outcomes were mortality and pancreatic infection rates. Secondary end-points included non pancreatic infection, all sites infection, operative rates, fungal infections, and antibiotic resistance. Subgroup analyses were performed for antibiotic regimen (beta-lactam, quinolone, and imipenem). Seven evaluable studies randomised 404 patients. There was no statistically significant effect on reduction of mortality with therapy: 8.4% versus controls 14.4%, and infected pancreatic necrosis rates: 19.7% versus controls 24.4%. Non-pancreatic infection rates and the incidence of overall infections were not significantly reduced with antibiotics: 23.7% versus 36%; 37.5% versus 51.9% respectively. Operative treatment and fungal infections were not significantly different. Insufficient data were provided concerning antibiotic resistance.With beta-lactam antibiotic prophylaxis there was less mortality (9.4% treatment, 15% controls), and less infected pancreatic necrosis (16.8% treatment group, 24.2% controls) but this was not statistically significant. The incidence of non-pancreatic infections was non-significantly different (21% versus 32.5%), as was the incidence of overall infections (34.4% versus 52.8%), and operative treatment rates. No significant differences were seen with

  4. An experimental model of hemolysis-induced acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saruc M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature indicates that acute pancreatitis is a complication of massive hemolysis with a prevalence of about 20%. We describe an experimental model of hemolysis-induced acute pancreatitis. Hemolytic anemia was induced in rats by a single ip injection of 60 mg/kg of 20 mg/ml acetylphenylhydrazine (APH in 20% (v/v ethanol on the first experimental day (day 0. One hundred and fifty Wistar albino rats weighing 180-200 g were divided into three groups of 50 animals each: groups 1, 2 and 3 were injected ip with APH, 20% ethanol, and physiological saline, respectively. Ten rats from each group were sacrificed on study days 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Serum amylase, lipase levels and pancreatic tissue tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha and platelet-activating factor (PAF contents were determined and a histological examination of the pancreas was performed. No hemolysis or pancreatitis was observed in any of the rats in groups 2 and 3. In group 1, massive hemolysis was observed in 35 (70% of 50 rats, moderate hemolysis in seven (14%, and no hemolysis in eight (16%. Thirty-three of 35 (94.2% rats with massive hemolysis had hyperamylasemia, and 29 of these rats (82.8% had histologically proven pancreatitis. The most severe pancreatitis occurred on day 3, as demonstrated by histology. Tissue TNF-alpha and PAF levels were statistically higher in group 1 than in groups 2 and 3. Acute massive hemolysis induced acute pancreatitis, as indicated by histology, in almost 80% of cases. Hemolysis may induce acute pancreatitis by triggering the release of proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines.

  5. Acute and chronic pancreatitis: epidemiology and clinical aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanier, B.W.M.

    2011-01-01

    In Nederland zijn de afgelopen jaren de incidentiecijfers en de ziekenhuisopnamen voor acute en chronische alvleesklierontsteking (pancreatitis) gestegen. De verwachting is dat deze blijven toenemen bij een vergrijzende samenleving. Uit de EARL-studie van Marcel Spanier komt naar voren dat bij acute

  6. Haemorrhagic pseudocyst of the pancreatic tail causing acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haemorrhagic pseudocyst of the pancreatic tail causing acute abdominal pain in a 12-year-old girl ... Introduction. The acute abdomen in childhood has various aetiologies and represents a leading cause of hospitalization of children [1]. ... The decision was made to manage the patient surgically because of her progressive ...

  7. Acute pancreatitis in children: an experience with 50 cases | Ibrahim ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/purpose Acute pancreatitis in childhood is not common. It can be associated with severe morbidity and mortality. The role of clinical evaluation is vital as it can be misdiagnosed easily. The objective of this study was to review the etiology, presentation, diagnosis, management, and prognosis of acute ...

  8. Nutritional support in patients with severe acute pancreatitis Soporte nutricional en pacientes con pancreatitis aguda grave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Marcela Peláez Hernández

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Severe acute pancreatitis is associated with a systemic inflammatory response leading to a hypermetabolic, hypercatabolic condition; for those reasons, patients suffering from this disease require an excellent artificial nutritional support in order to maintain the structural integrity and the function of vital organs with minimal pancreatic secretion. Total parenteral nutrition has been the standard practice in the treatment of patients with severe acute pancreatitis because of the favorable outcomes of early nutritional support while avoiding pancreatic stimulation; however, recent evidence suggests there are potentially greater benefits with enteral as compared with parenteral nutrition, including fewer septic and metabolic complications and lesser costs. That is why present guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis recommend that enteral instead of parenteral nutrition be used in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. La pancreatitis aguda, especialmente en su forma grave, está asociada con una respuesta inflamatoria sistémica que lleva a un estado de hipermetabolismo e hipercatabolismo, en el que se requiere un excelente soporte nutricional que permita mantener la integridad estructural y la función de los órganos vitales con un estímulo mínimo de la secreción pancreática. La nutrición parenteral total era el soporte de elección, que permitía obtener todos los beneficios de la nutrición temprana sin estimular la secreción pancreática; pero la evidencia actual muestra mayores beneficios con la nutrición enteral, porque se asocia con menos complicaciones infecciosas y metabólicas y con disminución en los costos. Por ello las guías actuales de tratamiento de la pancreatitis aguda grave recomiendan como primera elección el soporte nutricional enteral.

  9. Acoustic radiation force impulse shear wave elastography (ARFI) of acute and chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertz, Ruediger S; Schuderer, Johanna; Strobel, Deike; Pfeifer, Lukas; Neurath, Markus F; Wildner, Dane

    2016-12-01

    Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) elastography evaluates tissue stiffness non-invasively and has rarely been applied to pancreas examinations so far. In a prospective and retrospective analysis, ARFI shear wave velocities of healthy parenchyma, pancreatic lipomatosis, acute and chronic pancreatitis, adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine tumor (NET) of the pancreas were evaluated and compared. In 95 patients ARFI elastography of the pancreatic head, and also of the tail for a specific group, was analysed retrospectively. Additionally, prospectively in 100 patients ARFI was performed in the head and tail of the pancreas. A total of 195 patients were included in the study. Healthy parenchyma (n=21) and lipomatosis (n=30) showed similar shear wave velocities of about 1.3m/s. Acute pancreatitis (n=35), chronic pancreatitis (n=53) and adenocarcinoma (n=52) showed consecutively increasing ARFI values, respectively. NET (n=4) revealed the highest shear wave velocities amounting to 3.62m/s. ARFI elastography showed relevant differences between acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis or adenocarcinoma. With a cut-off value of 1.74m/s for the diagnosis of a malignant disease the sensitivity was 91.1% whereas the specificity amounted to 60.4%. ARFI shear wave velocities present differences in various pathologies of the pancreas. Acute and chronic pancreatitis as well as neoplastic lesions show high ARFI values. Very high elasticity values may indicate malignant disease of the pancreas. However, there is a considerable overlap between the entities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Acute Pancreatitis Following Orlistat Therapy: Report of Two Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Faheem Asem Ahmad; Sajid Mahmud

    2010-01-01

    Context Orlistat is a pancreatic lipase inhibitor licensed for the treatment of obesity. As obesity rates increase and non-prescription dispensing of orlistat increases, an awareness of its adverse effects is of crucial importance as complications arise more frequently from increased use. Orlistat induced pancreatitis has been described only once previously, but without a diagnostic increase in serum amylase. Case report We report the case of two patients who developed severe acute abdominal ...

  11. Docosahexaenoic Acid Inhibits Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo Kyung Jeong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is an important regulator in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis (AP. Reactive oxygen species induce activation of inflammatory cascades, inflammatory cell recruitment, and tissue damage. NF-κB regulates inflammatory cytokine gene expression, which induces an acute, edematous form of pancreatitis. Protein kinase C δ (PKCδ activates NF-κB as shown in a mouse model of cerulein-induced AP. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, an ω-3 fatty acid, exerts anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects in various cells and tissues. This study investigated whether DHA inhibits cerulein-induced AP in rats by assessing pancreatic edema, myeloperoxidase activity, levels of lipid peroxide and IL-6, activation of NF-κB and PKCδ, and by histologic observation. AP was induced by intraperitoneal injection (i.p. of cerulein (50 μg/kg every hour for 7 h. DHA (13 mg/kg was administered i.p. for three days before AP induction. Pretreatment with DHA reduced cerulein-induced activation of NF-κB, PKCδ, and IL-6 in pancreatic tissues of rats. DHA suppressed pancreatic edema and decreased the abundance of lipid peroxide, myeloperoxidase activity, and inflammatory cell infiltration into the pancreatic tissues of cerulein-stimulated rats. Therefore, DHA may help prevent the development of pancreatitis by suppressing the activation of NF-κB and PKCδ, expression of IL-6, and oxidative damage to the pancreas.

  12. Pediatric Burkitt lymphoma presenting as acute pancreatitis: MRI characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amodio, John; Brodsky, Jennie E. [SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Brooklyn, NY (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare initial presentation of non-Hodgkin lymphoma with few reported cases described in older adults and even fewer in children. MRI features of Burkitt lymphoma of the pancreas are sparse in the radiologic literature. We present a 6-year-old boy who presented with pancreatitis and obstructive jaundice, which was the result of Burkitt lymphoma of the pancreas. The imaging findings of pancreatic involvement of Burkitt lymphoma on MRI are discussed and the contributory role of the radiologist in guiding the appropriate clinical work-up of this disease is highlighted. (orig.)

  13. Protective effects of polyenoylphosphatidylcholine in rats with severe acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangyi; Wu, Zheng; Sha, Huanchen; Wang, Zheng; Ma, Zhenhua; Wu, Erxi; Ma, Qingyong

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of polyenoylphosphatidylcholine (PPC) in rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and its mechanism. Seventy-two clean, conventional Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 groups (SAP; sham operation [SO], SAP + PPC, and SO + PPC; n = 18 per group). The SAP model was induced by injecting 4% sodium taurocholate (1 mL/kg) into the biliopancreatic duct. Animals in the SO groups underwent laparotomy and biliopancreatic duct puncture without fluid injection. Polyenoylphosphatidylcholine (50 mg/kg) was injected through the penis dorsal vein. Pancreatic acinar cell membrane fluidity and pancreatic tissue calcium pump activity were measured through fluorescence polarization and quantization of phosphonium ions, whereas pancreatic tissue superoxide dismutase and malondialdehyde were detected through xanthine oxidase method and thiobarbituric acid colorimetric analysis method, respectively. The SAP + PPC group had significantly improved pathologic pancreas; increased in pancreatic acinar cell membrane fluidity, pancreatic tissue Ca-Mg-ATPase activity, and superoxide dismutase; as well as decreased in malondialdehyde, ascites volume, and serum amylase compared with the SAP group. Polyenoylphosphatidylcholine could reduce the damage to the pancreas through increasing pancreatic acinar cell membrane fluidity and pancreatic tissue calcium pump activity. Polyenoylphosphatidylcholine also scavenges oxygen free radicals and reduces lipid peroxide levels.

  14. Infarto esplénico secundario a pancreatitis aguda Splenic infarction secondary to acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Arenal Vera

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Fundamento y objetivo: la estrecha relación anatómica del páncreas con los vasos esplénicos y el bazo es responsable de complicaciones esplénicas en el curso de la pancreatitis aguda. El objetivo es presentar dos casos clínicos de pancreatitis aguda grave que sufrieron infarto esplénico como complicación de la enfermedad pancreática. Pacientes, participantes: en un periodo de tres meses, dos pacientes fueron diagnosticados de infarto esplénico secundario a pancreatitis aguda. En ambos casos el diagnóstico y seguimiento evolutivo del infarto esplénico se hizo a través de tomografía axial computerizada. Resultados: en el primer paciente, las imágenes muestran de forma inequívoca la afectación de la arteria esplénica por el proceso inflamatorio pancreático. En el segundo, no se pudo demostrar afectación de los vasos esplénicos, por lo que la única posible explicación etiológica es un incremento de coagulabilidad intravascular. Conclusiones: sería recomendable añadir las complicaciones esplénicas al conjunto de complicaciones graves extrapancreáticas de la pancreatitis aguda. La tomografía axial computerizada es de gran utilidad para la detección y seguimiento de las complicaciones esplénicas de la pancreatitis aguda.Background and objective: the close anatomic relationship of the pancreas with the splenic vessels and the spleen is responsible for splenic complications in the course of acute pancreatitis. Our objective was to report two cases of severe acute pancreatitis complicated by splenic infarction. Patients: in a three-month period of time two patients were diagnosed with splenic infarction secondary to acute pancreatitis. In both cases splenic infarction diagnosis and follow-up were carried out using computed tomography. Results: in the first case images clearly showed a narrowing of the splenic artery due to the inflammatory pancreatic condition. In the second case no involvement of the splenic vessels could

  15. Pancreatic hyperamylasemia during acute gastroenteritis: incidence and clinical relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pignattari Elena

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many case reports of acute pancreatitis have been reported but, up to now, pancreatic abnormalities during acute gastroenteritis have not been studied prospectively. Objectives To evaluate the incidence and the clinical significance of hyperamylasemia in 507 consecutive adult patients with acute gastroenteritis. Methods The clinical significance of hyperamylasemia, related predisposing factors and severity of gastroenteritis were assessed. Results Hyperamylasemia was detected in 10.2 % of patients studied. Although amylasemia was found over four times the normal values in three cases, the clinical features of acute pancreatitis were recorded in only one case (0.1%. Hyperamylasemia was more likely (17% where a microorganism could be identified in the stools (p Salmonella spp. and in particular S. enteritidis, was the microorganism most frequently associated with hyperamylasemia [17/84 (20.2 % and 10/45 (22.2%, respectively], followed by Rotavirus, Clostridium difficile and Campylobacter spp. Patients with hyperamylasemia had more severe gastroenteritis with an increased incidence of fever (80 % vs 50.6 %, O.R. 3.0; P Conclusions Hyperamylasemia is relatively frequent, and is associated with severe gastroenteritis. However, acute pancreatitis in the setting of acute gastroenteritis, is a rare event.

  16. [SIRS and CARS: discussion based on the pathologic condition of acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, M; Nozawa, F; Okabe, A; Shibata, M; Kuwata, K; Ogawa, M

    2000-06-01

    Relationship between SIRS and CARS in the pathologic condition of acute pancreatitis was discussed. SIRS promotes excessive inflammatory reaction and CARS induces the susceptibility to infection. Both conditions can develop into organ failure in acute pancreatitis. Hence, countermeasures for both conditions are mandatory in the care of patients with acute pancreatitis.

  17. Determinants of Severity in Acute Pancreatitis: A Nation-wide Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternby, Hanna; Bolado, Federico; Canaval-Zuleta, Héctor J; Marra-López, Carlos; Hernando-Alonso, Ana I; Del-Val-Antoñana, Adolfo; García-Rayado, Guillermo; Rivera-Irigoin, Robin; Grau-García, Francisco J; Oms, Lluís; Millastre-Bocos, Judith; Pascual-Moreno, Isabel; Martínez-Ares, David; Rodríguez-Oballe, Juan A; López-Serrano, Antonio; Ruiz-Rebollo, María L; Viejo-Almanzor, Alejandro; González-de-la-Higuera, Belén; Orive-Calzada, Aitor; Gómez-Anta, Ignacio; Pamies-Guilabert, José; Fernández-Gutiérrez-Del-Álamo, Fátima; Iranzo-González-Cruz, Isabel; Pérez-Muñante, Mónica E; Esteba, María D; Pardillos-Tomé, Ana; Zapater, Pedro; de-Madaria, Enrique

    2018-04-18

    The aim of this study was to compare and validate the different classifications of severity in acute pancreatitis (AP) and to investigate which characteristics of the disease are associated with worse outcomes. AP is a heterogeneous disease, ranging from uneventful cases to patients with considerable morbidity and high mortality rates. Severity classifications based on legitimate determinants of severity are important to correctly describe the course of disease. A prospective multicenter cohort study involving patients with AP from 23 hospitals in Spain. The Atlanta Classification (AC), Revised Atlanta Classification (RAC), and Determinant-based Classification (DBC) were compared. Binary logistic multivariate analysis was performed to investigate independent determinants of severity. A total of 1655 patients were included; 70 patients (4.2%) died. RAC and DBC were equally superior to AC for describing the clinical course of AP. Although any kind of organ failure was associated with increased morbidity and mortality, persistent organ failure (POF) was the most significant determinant of severity. All local complications were associated with worse outcomes. Infected pancreatic necrosis correlated with high morbidity, but in the presence of POF, it was not associated to higher mortality when compared with sterile necrotizing pancreatitis. Exacerbation of previous comorbidity was associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The RAC and DBC both signify an advance in the description and differentiation of AP patients. Herein, we describe the complications of the disease independently associated to morbidity and mortality. Our findings are valuable not only when designing future studies on AP but also for the improvement of current classifications.

  18. Accuracy of ultrasound in the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis with coexistent acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, J; Afonso, A C; Constantino, J; Matos, A; Henriques, C; Zago, M; Pinheiro, L

    2017-02-01

    Acute cholecystitis and pancreatitis are acute forms of cholecystolithiasis. The presence of acute cholecystitis can lead to important changes in therapy in the early course of acute pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to identify the accuracy of ultrasonography in diagnosing acute cholecystitis with coexistent acute pancreatitis. Subjects were all those patients admitted to our hospital with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis between 1998 and 2015 who underwent cholecystectomy within 15 days of the ultrasonography performed on admittance. Patient data were analyzed retrospectively to compare the ultrasound findings with the pathological findings of the resected gallbladders. Patients were allocated to two groups according to the signs of acute cholecystitis on ultrasonography: group 1 negative and group 2 positive. One hundred and twenty patients were enrolled in the study: 77 in group 1 and 43 in group 2. Similar results were found for the two groups with respect to the pathological diagnosis of acute cholecystitis, i.e., 31.2 % for group 1 and 27.9 % for group 2. Analysis indicated that there was no correlation between the ultrasonography data and pathological findings (p = 0.708). On the basis of our study, ultrasound findings alone cannot be used to accurately diagnose acute cholecystitis in the setting of acute pancreatitis.

  19. Refractor y thrombotic thrombocytopenic pur pura following acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebisa Bekele

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP is a rare blood disorder with an estimated incidence of 4–5 cases per million people per year. It is characterized by small-vessel platelet-rich thrombi that cause thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and organ damage. There are reports in literature that TTP and acute pancreatitis are associated, indicating each can be the cause of the other. However, acute pancreatitis triggering TTP is very rare. A 71 years old female presented with abdominal pain of 3 days, followed by dark urine. She had icteric sclera, petechial rash and mild epigastric tenderness. Lab findings were significant for hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and elevated lipase. CT of abdomen showed evidence of pancreatitis and cholelithiasis. After admission, patient developed symptoms of stroke. Further investigation showed elevated lactate dehydrogenase and normal coagulation studied with peripheral blood smear showed 5–6 schistocytes/high power field. Disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs-13 (ADAMTS13 activity showed less than 3% with high ADAMTS13 inhibitor 2.2. Patient required 6–7 weeks of daily plasmapheresis until she showed complete response. Our patient presented with clinical features of pancreatitis prior to having dark urine and petechial rash. Therefore, we strongly believe that our patient had pancreatitis which was followed by TTP. Patient's ADMTS13 activity was 6% after 10 plasma exchanges, signifying refractory TTP and higher risk for morbidity and mortality. There are limited data and consensus on the management of refractory TTP. TTP and acute pancreatitis are associated. However, refractory TTP following acute pancreatitis is rarely mentioned in the literature. We would like to emphasize the importance of having higher clinical suspicion of the association of both disease entities.

  20. Pancreatitis with Electrocardiographic Changes Mimicking Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Khairy

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A 64-year-old woman with mild acute pancreatitis presented with epigastric pain, nausea and vomiting while undergoing hemodialysis for chronic renal insufficiency. Serial electrocardiograms revealed new onset ST segment elevations in leads V2 to V4 mimicking an anterior myocardial infarction, followed by diffusely inverted deep T waves. No cardiac pathology was demonstrated by echocardiography or coronary angiography. A review of the literature and possible pathophysiological mechanisms of electrocardiographic changes in acute pancreatitis, such as metabolic abnormalities, hemodynamic instability, vasopressors, pericarditis, myocarditis, a cardiobiliary reflex, exacerbation of underlying cardiac pathology, coagulopathy and coronary vasospasm, are discussed.

  1. Long-term recurrence and death rates after acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Helle; Tønnesen, Hanne; Tønnesen, Maja Hanne

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare long-term recurrence and death rates after a first episode of acute pancreatitis in patients with and without gallstones. Additionally, it was of interest to find out if there were factors predictive of readmission or death.......The aim of this study was to compare long-term recurrence and death rates after a first episode of acute pancreatitis in patients with and without gallstones. Additionally, it was of interest to find out if there were factors predictive of readmission or death....

  2. Eruptive xanthomas and acute pancreatitis in a patient with hypertriglyceridemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez Desirée

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute pancreatitis and eruptive xanthomas are the only recognised direct complications of severe hypertriglyceridaemia. We present the case of a 33-years old male patient in whom the onset of a type 2 diabetes, added to an unknown familial hyperlipidemia, precipitated a dramatic raise of serum triglyceride levels, that cause in turn an acute pancreatitis and the appearance of dermic eruptive xanthomas. Translation This article is translated from Spanish, originally published in Archivos de Medicina. The original work is at doi:10.3823/001

  3. Pancreatic exocrine function and morphology following an episode of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yaping; Wu, Deqing; Zeng, Yue; Wang, Xingpeng

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess pancreatic exocrine function (PEF) and morphology in patients recovering from a first episode of acute pancreatitis (AP). Sixty-five eligible patients recovering from AP and 70 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. We evaluated PEF by fecal elastase 1 (FE-1) and used ultrasonography to detect pancreatic morphology for all patients and 40 controls. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) incidence in the severe and mild AP subgroups was 60.5% and 39.5%, respectively. The FE-1 level in patients who had undergone surgical care was significantly lower compared with the controls (P 0.05). Surprisingly, the defecation change correlated with the EPI level. In these patients, a stepwise recovery was observed over the following 2.4 years. Compared with the controls, the diameter of pancreatic duct was enlarged, and abdominal pain during recovery was found to be the independent risk factor for pancreatic duct expansion, although a significant difference was not exhibited between the AP subgroups concerning FE-1 concentration (P = 0.591). Our results indicated that many AP patients may have long-lasting EPI and an expanded main pancreatic duct; thus, routine evaluation of PEF is warranted.

  4. Ischemic penumbra in early stage of severe acute pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Yoshihisa; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Shiokawa, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the existence of an ischemic penumbra, which indicates ischemic but still viable lesion, in the early stage of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Seventy-one consecutive patients with SAP were enrolled. We divided the pancreas into three regions, the head, body and tail, and measured pancreatic blood flow (F V ) and volume (V D ) in each region by perfusion CT with one compartment method within three days after the onset of symptoms. Three weeks later, all patients underwent contrast-enhanced CT to diagnose each region for the development of pancreatic necrosis. Of the 227 pancreatic regions from 71 SAP patients, 30 regions were diagnosed as positive for pancreatic necrosis. F V and V D in regions that developed pancreatic necrosis were significantly lower than those in regions without necrosis (35.7±50.7 vs. 197.0±227.6 ml/min, p V D V ≥37.5 ml/min and V D V D ≥3.4%, 4 (11.7%) developed necrosis. None of 141 regions with F V ≥37.5 ml/min and V D ≥3.4% developed necrosis. If F V or V D was low, not all regions developed pancreatic necrosis; therefore, we considered that these regions could include zones of ischemic penumbra. (author)

  5. What may cause fetus loss from acute pancreatitis in pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Min; Xu, Jian-Ming; Song, Sha-Sha; Mei, Qiao; Zhang, Li-Jiu

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy (APIP) poses a serious threat to the mother and her fetus, and might lead to fetal loss including miscarriage and stillbirth in certain patients. We sought to identify possible factors that affect fetal distress and evaluated outcomes of patients with APIP. We retrospectively reviewed clinical records of 54 pregnant women with APIP, who were treated at 2 tertiary clinical centers over a 6-year period. Clinical characteristics including etiology and severity of APIP, fetal monitoring data, and maternofetal outcomes were analyzed. Etiology of APIP included acute biliary pancreatitis (ABP, n = 14), hyperlipidemic pancreatitis (HLP, n = 22), and other etiologies (n = 18). Severity was classified as mild acute pancreatitis (MAP, n = 23), moderately severe acute pancreatitis (MSAP, n = 24), and severe acute pancreatitis (SAP, n = 7). The incidence of preterm delivery, fetal distress, and fetal loss increased with the progression of severity of APIP (P < .05). The severity of HLP was significantly higher than that of ABP and APIP of other etiology (P < .01). HLP was more likely to lead to fetal distress than other APs (P < .01). Only 12 (22.2%) patients had fetal monitoring including non-stress test (NST); 1 case of SAP (14.3%) and 15 cases of MSAP (62.5%) were not transferred to intensive care unit for intensive monitoring. The incidence of fetal distress and fetal loss increased with worsening of APIP severity. HLP tends to result in worse fetal outcomes. The deficiencies of fetal state monitoring, lack of assessment, and management of pregnant women might increase the fetal loss in APIP. PMID:29443736

  6. A rare case of thrombotic microangiopathy triggered by acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kevin; Nadeem, Ahmed Jamal; Doratotaj, Behzad

    2017-05-15

    Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) occurring after acute pancreatitis is rarely described. Without prompt intervention, TMA can be, and often is, lethal, so prompt recognition is important. Here, we present a case of a 61-year-old woman with a history of alcohol misuse who presented with epigastric pain, nausea and vomiting after binge drinking. Elevated serum lipase and imaging were suggestive of acute-on-chronic pancreatitis. Although the patient's symptoms of acute pancreatitis subsided, her anaemia, thrombocytopenia and acute kidney injury worsened. A peripheral blood smear revealed schistocytes, prompting suspicion for TMA. Therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) was promptly initiated and she completed 10 TPE sessions that improved her anaemia and serum creatinine and resolved the thrombocytopenia. Since TPE was effective and the ADAMTS13 assay revealed 55% activity in the absence of anti-ADAMTS13 IgG prior to initiation of therapy, a confident diagnosis of TMA caused by acute pancreatitis was made. There was no evidence of relapse 2 years later. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Duodenal foreign body mimicking acute pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willard, M.D.; Wolf, A.M.; Green, R.

    1993-01-01

    Objective: To determine the specificity and sensitivity of plasma and urinary trypsinogen activation peptide (TAP) concentrat. Design: Retrospective analysis of clinical cases. Procedure: Dogs were classified into three groups: healthy animals, dogs with confirmed pancreatitis and dogs with nonpancreatic disease, which clinically or biochemically resembled pancreatitis. This last group was further subdivided into dogs with renal and those with nonrenal disease. The plasma and urinary TAP concentration was determined by a competitive enzyme immunoassay. Clinical cases additionally had serum trypsin-like immunoreactivity concentration measured, as well as radiography and ultrasound of the abdomen and further diagnostic procedures. Nonparametric analysis of variance (Kruskal-Wallis test) was performed using Statistix 4.0 program. Results: There was a wide range of urinary TAP concentration in healthy dogs (mean 52.30 nmol/L, standard deviation 55.25) that made interpretation of urinary TAP concentrations difficult in the other groups. There was a narrow reference range for plasma TAP (mean 2.67 nmol/L, standard deviation 0.93). Plasma and urinary TAP concentrations, as well as urinary TAP to creatinine ratio, were all increased in dogs that died with necrotising pancreatitis. Values were not increased in mild, interstitial pancreatitis. Increased plasma TAP concentrations were also present in dogs with severe renal disease. Conclusion: Plasma TAP concentration isa good prognostic indicator in naturally occurring pancreatitis in dogs. The failure of TAP to increase in mild pancreatitis, and the increase present in severe renal disease, suggests its measurement has limited application as a sole diagnostic tool for canine pancreatitis. Further investigations are required in order to explain the large variability of urinary TAP concentration and the presence of circulating TAP in healthy dogs

  8. Differential roles of inflammatory cells in pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayerle, Julia; Dummer, Annegret; Sendler, Mathias; Malla, Sudarshan Ravi; van den Brandt, Cindy; Teller, Steffen; Aghdassi, Ali; Nitsche, Claudia; Lerch, Markus M

    2012-03-01

    The incidence of acute pancreatitis per 100,000 of population ranges from 5 to 80. Patients suffering from hemorrhagic-necrotizing pancreatitis die in 10-24% of cases. 80% of all cases of acute pancreatitis are etiologically linked to gallstone disease immoderate alcohol consumption. As of today no specific causal treatment for acute pancreatitis exists. Elevated C-reactive protein levels above 130,mg/L can also predict a severe course of acute pancreatitis. The essential medical treatment for acute pancreatitis is the correction of hypovolemia. Prophylactic antibiotics should be restricted to patients with necrotizing pancreatitis, infected necrosis or other infectious complications. However, as premature intracellular protease activation is known to be the primary event in acute pancreatitis. Severe acute pancreatitis is characterized by an early inflammatory immune response syndrome (SIRS) and a subsequent compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS) contributing to severity as much as protease activation does. CARS suppresses the immune system and facilitates nosocomial infections including infected pancreatic necrosis, one of the most feared complications of the disease. A number of attempts have been made to suppress the early systemic inflammatory response but even if these mechanisms have been found to be beneficial in animal models they failed in daily clinical practice. © 2012 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Hypertriglyceridemia-associated acute pancreatitis with chylous ascites in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Shih-Chang; Lee, King-Teh; Wang, Shen-Nien; Kuo, Kung-Kai; Chen, Jong-Shyong

    2006-07-01

    Both cholesterol and triglyceride levels in serum increase progressively during pregnancy. Hypertriglyceridemia is a well-recognized cause of acute pancreatitis, while pancreatitis-associated chylous ascites has rarely been reported. We report a 28-year-old female with coexistence of hypertriglyceridemia, acute pancreatitis, and chylous ascites during pregnancy. After emergency cesarean section, she was treated with nil per os, intravenous hydration, antibiotics, and analgesics as required. Due to the development of positive peritonitis 5 days later, an exploratory laparotomy was performed. Surgical interventions included pancreatic necrosectomy, right hemicolectomy and ileostomy, cholecystostomy, gastrostomy, and feeding jejunostomy. Postoperative treatment included antibiotics, total parenteral nutrition, and then low-fat diet with medium-chain triglyceride supplementation. She was discharged on the 43rd day after surgery and was free of symptoms during 6 months of follow-up. Ileocolostomy was performed 6 months after discharge. Fasting lipid profile should be regularly monitored during pregnancy due to the association of hypertriglyceridemia with development of acute pancreatitis in the mother.

  10. Hypertriglyceridemia-associated Acute Pancreatitis with Chylous Ascites in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Chang Chuang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Both cholesterol and triglyceride levels in serum increase progressively during pregnancy. Hypertrigly-ceridemia is a well-recognized cause of acute pancreatitis, while pancreatitis-associated chylous ascites has rarely been reported. We report a 28-year-old female with coexistence of hypertriglyceridemia, acute pancreatitis, and chylous ascites during pregnancy. After emergency cesarean section, she was treated with nil per os, intravenous hydration, antibiotics, and analgesics as required. Due to the development of positive peritonitis 5 days later, an exploratory laparotomy was performed. Surgical interventions included pancreatic necrosec-tomy, right hemicolectomy and ileostomy, cholecystostomy, gastrostomy, and feeding jejunostomy. Postoperative treatment included antibiotics, total parenteral nutrition, and then low-fat diet with medium-chain triglyceride supplementation. She was discharged on the 43rd day after surgery and was free of symptoms during 6 months of follow-up. Ileocolostomy was performed 6 months after discharge. Fasting lipid profile should be regularly monitored during pregnancy due to the association of hypertriglyceridemia with development of acute pancreatitis in the mother.

  11. Acute pancreatitis with saw palmetto use: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amankona Raymond

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Saw palmetto is a phytotherapeutic agent commercially marketed for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Evidence suggests that saw palmetto is a safe product, and mild gastrointestinal adverse effects have been reported with its use. We report a case of acute pancreatitis, possibly secondary to the use of saw palmetto. Case presentation A 61-year-old Caucasian man with a history of benign prostatic hyperplasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease developed epigastric pain associated with nausea 36 hours prior to presentation. He denied drinking alcohol prior to the development of his symptoms. His home medications included saw palmetto, lansoprazole and multivitamins. Laboratory results revealed elevated lipase and amylase levels. An abdominal ultrasound demonstrated a nondilated common bile duct, without choledocholithiasis. Computed tomography of his abdomen showed the pancreatic tail with peripancreatic inflammatory changes, consistent with acute pancreatitis. Our patient's condition improved with intravenous fluids and pain management. On the fourth day of hospitalization his pancreatic enzymes were within normal limits: he was discharged home and advised to avoid taking saw palmetto. Conclusion It is our opinion that a relationship between saw palmetto and the onset of acute pancreatitis is plausible, and prescribers and users of saw palmetto should be alert to the possibility of such adverse reactions.

  12. Acute pancreatitis following scoliosis surgery: description and clinical course in 14 adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bouyousfi, Maalik; Leveque, Christine; Miladi, Lotfi; Irtan, Sabine; Hamza, Jamil; Oualha, Mehdi

    2016-10-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a possible complication after scoliosis surgery. Although some risk factors have been documented in the literature, clinical description of pancreatitis diagnosis and ensuing course still remain very poor. The aim of this study was to describe characteristics of acute pancreatitis after scoliosis surgery. A descriptive, retrospective and single-center study of fourteen adolescents with postoperative acute pancreatitis after spine fusion surgery in scoliosis management between April 2003 and August 2012 was performed. Acute pancreatitis occurred within 9.5 days (4-51) after surgery. Abdominal pain was atypical and was expressed in only half of the children. Ileus, nausea and vomiting were the most frequent signs. None of the acute pancreatitis cases was severe. Acute pancreatitis is an early complication of scoliosis surgery. Clinical signs are atypical and non-severe and can induce misleading forms. Presence of delayed digestive problems should alert the clinician to the risk of pancreatitis in the aftermath of scoliosis surgery.

  13. The aetiology of acute and chronic pancreatitis over time in a hospital in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøjgaard, Camilla; Bendtsen, Flemming; Matzen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The change in aetiology over time of acute and chronic pancreatitis has been sparsely described, as has also the validity of the diagnostic codes. The aim of the study was 1) to clarify whether the aetiology of acute and chronic pancreatitis changed during the period 1983-2005, and 2......) to validate the diagnostic codes over time for acute and chronic pancreatitis registered in the Danish National Patient Registry (NPR) in the same period. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All admissions at Hvidovre Hospital coded in the NPR in 1983, 1994 and 2005 with a diagnosis of either acute or chronic pancreatitis......: Gallstone disease significantly (p = 0.04) increased as the cause of acute pancreatitis over the 22-year period, while alcohol remained the major cause of chronic pancreatitis. The validity of the diagnoses for patients with acute pancreatitis varied between 51% and 73%, and for chronic pancreatitis between...

  14. Acute pancreatitis in mice impairs bacterial clearance from the lungs, whereas concurrent pneumonia prolongs the course of pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Westerloo, David J.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Bruno, Marco J.; de Vos, Alex F.; Florquin, Sandrine; van der Poll, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Nosocomial pneumonia is a feared complication in the critically ill patient. Serious acute pancreatitis is frequently complicated by infections. The objectives of this study were to determine the influence of acute pancreatitis on host defense against Pseudomonas pneumonia and to

  15. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood: a fatal complication of swine flu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.R.; Maheshwari, P.K.; Haque, A.

    2010-01-01

    Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood (ANEC) is a rare condition characterized by the presence of multifocal symmetrical brain lesions involving mainly thalami, brainstem, cerebellum and white matter. ANEC is a serious and life threatening complication of simple viral infections. We present a case of a young child who developed this condition with classical clinical and radiological findings consistent with ANEC, secondary to swine flu (H1N1). He needed ventilatory support and had profound motor and intellectual deficit on discharge. We report this case with aim of raising awareness about this fatal complication of swine flu which has become a global health care issue these days. (author)

  16. Non-traumatic abdominal emergencies: imaging and intervention in acute pancreatic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Procacci, Carlo; Mansueto, Giancarlo; D' Onofrio, Mirko; Gasparini, Anna; Ferrara, Rosa Maria [Department of Radiology, University Hospital ' ' G.B. Rossi' ' , Piazza L.A. Scuro 10, 37134 Verona (Italy); Falconi, Massimo [Department of Surgery, University Hospital ' ' G.B. Rossi' ' , Piazza L.A. Scuro 10, 37134 Verona (Italy)

    2002-10-01

    Pancreatic emergency, unrelated to traumatic events, can occur as a consequence of the more significant pancreatic pathologies (acute and chronic pancreatitis, tumors) or of the interventional or surgical treatment carried out as therapy for the above-mentioned lesions. Acute pancreatic conditions are represented by pancreatic infections, the involvement of organs, structures, and adjacent spaces within the pancreatic disease, and, lastly, vascular complications. Acute pancreatic conditions are common in pancreatic diseases and can be catastrophic; even if there is a gamut in the severity of clinical presentation, each can be potentially life threatening. Immediate radiological detection of the lesions together with a correct therapeutic percutaneous radiological approach whenever an interventional procedure is preferable to surgery or, when performed before surgery, whenever it can optimize its results, is of fundamental importance in the management of these patients. This article focuses on the essential role of radiology and the integration of imaging and intervention in acute pancreatic conditions. (orig.)

  17. Non-traumatic abdominal emergencies: imaging and intervention in acute pancreatic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procacci, Carlo; Mansueto, Giancarlo; D'Onofrio, Mirko; Gasparini, Anna; Ferrara, Rosa Maria; Falconi, Massimo

    2002-01-01

    Pancreatic emergency, unrelated to traumatic events, can occur as a consequence of the more significant pancreatic pathologies (acute and chronic pancreatitis, tumors) or of the interventional or surgical treatment carried out as therapy for the above-mentioned lesions. Acute pancreatic conditions are represented by pancreatic infections, the involvement of organs, structures, and adjacent spaces within the pancreatic disease, and, lastly, vascular complications. Acute pancreatic conditions are common in pancreatic diseases and can be catastrophic; even if there is a gamut in the severity of clinical presentation, each can be potentially life threatening. Immediate radiological detection of the lesions together with a correct therapeutic percutaneous radiological approach whenever an interventional procedure is preferable to surgery or, when performed before surgery, whenever it can optimize its results, is of fundamental importance in the management of these patients. This article focuses on the essential role of radiology and the integration of imaging and intervention in acute pancreatic conditions. (orig.)

  18. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI findings of acute pancreatitis in ectopic pancreatic tissue: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangasamy, Senthur J; Zheng, Larry; Mcintosh, Lacey; Lee, Paul; Roychowdhury, Abhijit

    2014-07-28

    Acute pancreatitis in ectopic pancreatic tissue is an uncommon cause of acute abdominal pain and can be difficult to diagnose on imaging. Our aim is to raise awareness and aid in the diagnosis of this entity by highlighting helpful dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI imaging findings. We report a 51-year-old man with acute onset epigastric pain presented to ER. With the presence of elevated serum lipase, the clinical diagnosis of acute pancreatitis was made. Contrast enhanced CT demonstrated normal pancreas and a focal mass at the duodenojejunal flexure, mimicked a neoplasm. Subsequent dynamic contrast enhanced MR images demonstrated enhancement pattern of the lesion similar to the native pancreatic tissue enhancement, a finding raised the possibility of acute pancreatitis in ectopic pancreatic tissue, but tumor was not excluded. Finally, patient undergone surgical bowel resection including the suspected mass that was proved as an ectopic pancreatic tissue on microscopic examination. We concluded that findings on dynamic contrast enhanced MR imaging can be characteristic and diagnostic of acute pancreatitis in ectopic pancreatic tissue in the appropriate clinical setting.

  19. Relationship between pancreatic hormones and glucose metabolism: A cross-sectional study in patients after acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendharkar, Sayali A; Asrani, Varsha M; Xiao, Amy Y; Yoon, Harry D; Murphy, Rinki; Windsor, John A; Petrov, Maxim S

    2016-07-01

    Abnormal glucose metabolism is present in almost 40% of patients after acute pancreatitis, but its pathophysiology has been poorly investigated. Pancreatic hormone derangements have been sparingly studied to date, and their relationship with abnormal glucose metabolism is largely unknown. The aim was to investigate the associations between pancreatic hormones and glucose metabolism after acute pancreatitis, including the effect of potential confounders. This was a cross-sectional study of 83 adult patients after acute pancreatitis. Fasting venous blood was collected from all patients and used for analysis of insulin, glucagon, pancreatic polypeptide, amylin, somatostatin, C-peptide, glucose, and hemoglobin A1c. Statistical analyses were conducted using the modified Poisson regression, multivariable linear regression, and Spearman's correlation. Age, sex, body mass index, recurrence of acute pancreatitis, duration from first attack, severity, and etiology were adjusted for. Increased insulin was significantly associated with abnormal glucose metabolism after acute pancreatitis, in both unadjusted (P = 0.038) and adjusted (P = 0.001) analyses. Patients with abnormal glucose metabolism also had significantly decreased pancreatic polypeptide (P = 0.001) and increased amylin (P = 0.047) in adjusted analyses. Somatostatin, C-peptide, and glucagon were not changed significantly in both unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Increased insulin resistance and reduced insulin clearance may be important components of hyperinsulinemic compensation in patients after acute pancreatitis. Increased amylin and reduced pancreatic polypeptide fasting levels characterize impaired glucose homeostasis. Clinical studies investigating islet-cell hormonal responses to mixed-nutrient meal testing and euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamps are now warranted for further insights into the role of pancreatic hormones in glucose metabolism derangements secondary to pancreatic diseases. Copyright © 2016

  20. Acute pancreatitis associated with elevated troponin levels: whether ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presentation of retrosternal chest pain with normal electrocardiogram (ECG) during chest pain followed by initial presentation of acute pancreatitis can lead to a dilemma in managing such a patient, and whether to thrombolyse such a patient is a real controversy. We hereby present a similar case who was diagnosed to ...

  1. Endoscopic sphincterotomy and cholecystectomy in acute biliary pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costa, D.W. da; Schepers, N.J.; Romkens, T.E.; Boerma, D.; Bruno, M.J.; Bakker, O.J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This review discusses current insights with regard to biliary tract management during and after acute biliary pancreatitis. METHODS: A MEDLINE and EMBASE search was done and studies were selected based on methodological quality and publication date. The recommendations of recent

  2. Factors associated with long-term mortality in acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøjgaard, Camilla; Matzen, Peter; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the long-term prognosis of acute pancreatitis (AP) is limited. The aims were to investigate: (1) prognostic factors associated with long-term mortality in patients with AP; (2) whether or not the level of serum (S-)amylase at admission had an impact on the prognosis; (3) causes...

  3. Clinical Course of Acute Pancreatitis in Chronic Kidney Disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to assess the clinical course, etiology and complications of acute pancreatitis among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients in a tertiary care renal center in Karachi. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the clinical course of CKD patients who presented to our emergency room with ...

  4. [CLASSIFICATION OF ACUTE PANCREATITIS: CURRENT STATE OF THE ISSUE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnenko, S F; Gol'tsov, V P; Savello, V E; Vashetko, R V

    2015-01-01

    The article analyzed disadvantages of "Atlanta-92" classification of acute pancreatitis and its two modifications: APCWG-2012 and IAP-2011. The school of Saint-Petersburg pancreatologists suggested the classification AP of Russian Surgical Society (2014), which represented the concept of disease staging.

  5. Acute Pancreatitis in a Patient with Complicated Falciparum Malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Barman, Bhupen; Bhattacharya, Prasanta Kumar; Lynrah, Kryshan G; Ete, Tony; Issar, Neel Kanth

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most common protozoan diseases, especially in tropical countries. The clinical manifestation of malaria, especially falciparum malaria varies from mild acute febrile illness to life threatening severe systemic complications involving one or more organ systems. We would like to report a case of complicated falciparum malaria involving cerebral, renal, hepatic system along with acute pancreatitis. The patient was successfully treated with anti malarial and other supportive...

  6. Reduced Pancreatic Exocrine Function and Organellar Disarray in a Canine Model of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yuepeng; Bai, Yongyu; Li, Qiang; Bhugul, Pravin Avinash; Huang, Xince; Liu, Lewei; Pan, Liangliang; Ni, Haizhen; Chen, Bicheng; Sun, Hongwei; Zhang, Qiyu; Hehir, Michael; Zhou, Mengtao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the pancreatic exocrine function in a canine model and to analyze the changes in organelles of pancreatic acinar cells during the early stage of acute pancreatitis (AP). AP was induced by retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate (0.5 ml/kg) into the main pancreatic duct of dogs. The induction of AP resulted in serum hyperamylasemia and a marked reduction of amylase activity in the pancreatic fluid (PF). The pancreatic exocrine function was markedly decreased in subjects with AP compared with the control group. After the induction of AP, histological examination showed acinar cell edema, cytoplasmic vacuolization, fibroblasts infiltration, and inflammatory cell infiltration in the interstitium. Electron micrographs after the induction of AP revealed that most of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) were dilated and that some of the ribosomes were no longer located on the RER. The mitochondria were swollen, with shortened and broken cristae. The present study demonstrated, in a canine model, a reduced volume of PF secretion with decreased enzyme secretion during the early stage of AP. Injury of mitochondria and dilatation and degranulation of RER may be responsible for the reduced exocrine function in AP. Furthermore, the present model and results may be useful for researching novel therapeutic measures in AP.

  7. Reduced Pancreatic Exocrine Function and Organellar Disarray in a Canine Model of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuepeng Jin

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the pancreatic exocrine function in a canine model and to analyze the changes in organelles of pancreatic acinar cells during the early stage of acute pancreatitis (AP. AP was induced by retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate (0.5 ml/kg into the main pancreatic duct of dogs. The induction of AP resulted in serum hyperamylasemia and a marked reduction of amylase activity in the pancreatic fluid (PF. The pancreatic exocrine function was markedly decreased in subjects with AP compared with the control group. After the induction of AP, histological examination showed acinar cell edema, cytoplasmic vacuolization, fibroblasts infiltration, and inflammatory cell infiltration in the interstitium. Electron micrographs after the induction of AP revealed that most of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER were dilated and that some of the ribosomes were no longer located on the RER. The mitochondria were swollen, with shortened and broken cristae. The present study demonstrated, in a canine model, a reduced volume of PF secretion with decreased enzyme secretion during the early stage of AP. Injury of mitochondria and dilatation and degranulation of RER may be responsible for the reduced exocrine function in AP. Furthermore, the present model and results may be useful for researching novel therapeutic measures in AP.

  8. Dynamic Measurement of Disease Activity in Acute Pancreatitis: The Pancreatitis Activity Scoring System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bechien U; Batech, Michael; Quezada, Michael; Lew, Daniel; Fujikawa, Kelly; Kung, Jonathan; Jamil, Laith H; Chen, Wansu; Afghani, Elham; Reicher, Sonya; Buxbaum, James; Pandol, Stephen J

    2017-07-01

    Acute pancreatitis has a highly variable course. Currently there is no widely accepted method to measure disease activity in patients hospitalized for acute pancreatitis. We aimed to develop a clinical activity index that incorporates routine clinical parameters to assist in the measurement, study, and management of acute pancreatitis. We used the UCLA/RAND appropriateness method to identify items for inclusion in the disease activity instrument. We conducted a systematic literature review followed by two sets of iterative modified Delphi meetings including a panel of international experts between November 2014 and November 2015. The final instrument was then applied to patient data obtained from five separate study cohorts across Southern California to assess profiles of disease activity. From a list of 35 items comprising 6 domains, we identified 5 parameters for inclusion in the final weighted clinical activity scoring system: organ failure, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, abdominal pain, requirement for opiates and ability to tolerate oral intake. We applied the weighted scoring system across the 5 study cohorts comprising 3,123 patients. We identified several distinct patterns of disease activity: (i) overall there was an elevated score at baseline relative to discharge across all study cohorts, (ii) there were distinct patterns of disease activity related to duration of illness as well as (iii) early and persistent elevation of disease activity among patients with severe acute pancreatitis defined as persistent organ failure. We present the development and initial validation of a clinical activity score for real-time assessment of disease activity in patients with acute pancreatitis.

  9. Asparaginase-associated pancreatitis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolthers, Benjamin O.; Frandsen, Thomas L.; Baruchel, André

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Survival for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia surpasses 90% with contemporary therapy; however, patients remain burdened by the severe toxic effects of treatment, including asparaginase-associated pancreatitis. To investigate the risk of complications and risk of re-exposing pa......BACKGROUND: Survival for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia surpasses 90% with contemporary therapy; however, patients remain burdened by the severe toxic effects of treatment, including asparaginase-associated pancreatitis. To investigate the risk of complications and risk of re...... of a second asparaginase-associated pancreatitis was not associated with severity of the first asparaginase-associated pancreatitis and a second asparaginase-associated pancreatitis did not involve an increased risk of complications, asparaginase re-exposure should be determined mainly by the anticipated need...... for asparaginase for antileukaemic efficacy. A study of the genetic risk factors identifying patients in whom asparaginase exposure should be restricted is needed. FUNDING: The Danish Childhood Cancer Foundation and The Danish Cancer Society (R150-A10181)....

  10. Long-term results and quality of life of patients undergoing sequential surgical treatment for severe acute pancreatitis complicated by infected pancreatic necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinquepalmi, Lorenza; Boni, Luigi; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Rovera, Francesca; Diurni, Mario; Benevento, Angelo; Dionigi, Renzo

    2006-01-01

    Infected pancreatic necrosis (IPN) is one of the most severe complications of acute pancreatitis (AP). Sequential surgical debridement represents one of the most effective treatments in terms of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this paper is to describe the quality of life and long-term results (e.g., nutritional, muscular, and pancreatic function) of patients treated by sequential necrosectomy at the Department of Surgery of the University of Insubria (Varese, Italy). Data were collected on patients undergoing sequential surgical debridement as treatment for IPN. The severity of AP was evaluated using the Ranson criteria, the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II) Score, and the Sepsis Score, as well as the extent of necrosis. The surgical approach was through a midline or subcostal laparotomy, followed by exploration of the peritoneal cavity, wide debridement, and peritoneal lavage. The abdomen was either left open or closed partially with a surgical zipper, with multiple re-laparotomies scheduled until debridement of necrotic tissue was complete. The long-term evaluation focused on late morbidity, performance status, and abdominal wall function. In the majority of patients (68%), mixed flora were isolated. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the microorganism identified most commonly (59%), often associated with Candida albicans or C. glabrata. The mean total hospital stay was 71+/-38 days (range 13-146 days), of which 24+/-19 days (range 0-66 days) were in the intensive care unit. Eight patients died, the deaths being caused by multiple organ dysfunction syndrome in seven patients and hemorrhage from the splenic artery in one. Normal exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function was observed in 28 patients (88%). At discharge, four patients had steatorrhea, which was temporary. Eight patients (23%) developed pancreatic pseudocysts, and in six, cystogastostomy was performed. Most patients (29/32, 91%) developed a post-operative hernia, but only five

  11. Impact of global Fxr deficiency on experimental acute pancreatitis and genetic variation in the FXR locus in human acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijmeijer, Rian M.; Schaap, Frank G.; Smits, Alexander J. J.; Kremer, Andreas E.; Akkermans, Louis M. A.; Kroese, Alfons B. A.; Rijkers, Ger T.; Schipper, Marguerite E. I.; Verheem, André; Wijmenga, Cisca; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Erpecum, Karel J.

    2014-01-01

    Infectious complications often occur in acute pancreatitis, related to impaired intestinal barrier function, with prolonged disease course and even mortality as a result. The bile salt nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR), which is expressed in the ileum, liver and other organs including the

  12. Impact of Global Fxr Deficiency on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis and Genetic Variation in the FXR Locus in Human Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijmeijer, Rian M.; Schaap, Frank G.; Smits, Alexander J. J.; Kremer, Andreas E.; Akkermans, Louis M. A.; Kroese, Alfons B. A.; Rijkers, Ger. T.; Schipper, Marguerite E. I.; Verheem, Andre; Wijmenga, Cisca; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Erpecum, Karel J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Infectious complications often occur in acute pancreatitis, related to impaired intestinal barrier function, with prolonged disease course and even mortality as a result. The bile salt nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR), which is expressed in the ileum, liver and other organs

  13. Impact of Global Fxr Deficiency on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis and Genetic Variation in the FXR Locus in Human Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijmeijer, R.M.; Schaap, F.G.; Smits, A.J.A.; Kremer, A.E.; Akkermans, L.M.; Kroese, A.B.A.; Rijkers, G.T.; Schipper, M.E.; Verheem, A.; Wijmenga, C.; Gooszen, H.G.; Erpecum, K.J. van

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infectious complications often occur in acute pancreatitis, related to impaired intestinal barrier function, with prolonged disease course and even mortality as a result. The bile salt nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR), which is expressed in the ileum, liver and other organs

  14. Necrotizing mycotic vasculitis with cerebral infarction caused by Aspergillus niger in a horse with acute typholocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunev, S S; Ehrhart, E J; Jensen, H E; Foreman, J H; Richter, R A; Messick, J B

    1999-07-01

    An 18-year-old Morgan mare was presented to the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, University of Illinois, with a 10-day history of watery diarrhea, depression, and dysphagia. On admission, the animal was severely dehydrated, depressed, and unable to swallow and had no clinical signs of diarrhea. The respiratory and heart rate and body temperature were within normal limits. Following fluid therapy, the mare developed severe watery diarrhea and continued to be depressed, incoordinated, and dysphagic. The animal died on the fourth day after admission and was sent to the Laboratories of Veterinary Diagnostic Medicine for necropsy. Gross postmortem findings were consistent with an acute cerebral infarction in the right cerebral hemisphere, an acute necrotizing typhlocolitis, multifocal petechial and ecchymotic hemorrhages, enlarged and congested pars intermedia of the pituitary gland, and marked bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasia with multifocal areas of necrosis and hemorrhage. Histologic evaluation of the affected brain demonstrated an area of coagulative necrosis of the gray matter, with hemorrhage, vasculitis, and thrombosis. There were many fungal hyphae 3.5-6.0 microm, pale basophilic, septate, and occasionally branching at 45 degrees present in the arterial walls and throughout the necrotic tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed Aspergillus niger as the etiologic agent responsible for the mycotic vasculitis and infarction in the brain. Bacteria culture and immunohistochemical staining of the colon and cecum failed to demonstrate specific pathogens.

  15. Acute fatty liver of pregnancy associated with severe acute pancreatitis: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Cássio Vieira; Moreira, Alecsandro; Baima, Julio P; Franzoni, Leticia de C; Lima, Talles B; Yamashiro, Fabio da S; Coelho, Kunie Yabuki Rabelo; Sassaki, Ligia Y; Caramori, Carlos Antonio; Romeiro, Fernando G; Silva, Giovanni F

    2014-07-27

    Acute fatty liver of pregnancy is a rare disease that affects women in the third trimester of pregnancy. Although infrequent, the disease can cause maternal mortality. The diagnosis is not always clear until the pregnancy is terminated, and significant complications, such as acute pancreatitis, can occur. Pancreatic involvement typically only occurs in severe cases after the development of hepatic and renal impairment. To date, little knowledge is available regarding how the disease causes pancreatitis. Treatment involves supportive measures and pregnancy interruption. In this report, we describe a case of a previously healthy 26-year-old woman at a gestational age of 27 wk and 6 d who was admitted with severe abdominal pain and vomiting. This case illustrates the clinical and laboratory overlap between acute fatty liver of pregnancy and pancreatitis, highlighting the difficulties in differentiating each disease. Furthermore, the hypothesis for this overlapping is presented, and the therapeutic options are discussed.

  16. Acute pancreatitis: reflections through the history of the Atlanta Consensus

    OpenAIRE

    Torres López, Ana María; Hoyos Duque, Sergio Iván

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process with systemic and local repercussions. Most cases are mild with low mortality rate, but 20% of the patients have severe pancreatitis with a mortality rate up to 30%. Through the years the medical community has tried to reach consensus about this disease in order to better understand, classify and treat it. The most important of these has been known as the Atlanta Consensus 1992, in use for many years. However, it has been recently the subject of v...

  17. Acute pancreatitis: reflections through the history of the Atlanta Consensus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres López, Ana María

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process with systemic and local repercussions. Most cases are mild with low mortality rate, but 20% of the patients have severe pancreatitis with a mortality rate up to 30%. Through the years the medical community has tried to reach consensus about this disease in order to better understand, classify and treat it. The most important of these has been known as the Atlanta Consensus 1992, in use for many years. However, it has been recently the subject of various proposals for changes and updates, which are discussed in this review article.

  18. Scrotal Swelling as a Complication of Hydrochlorothiazide Induced Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Nikiforov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Scrotal swelling is a rare complication of acute pancreatitis with few reported cases in the literature. In this case report, we present a 59-year-old male with hydrochlorothiazide induced pancreatitis who developed scrotal swelling. Case Presentation. A 59-year-old male presented to the emergency department with sharp epigastric abdominal pain that radiated to the back and chest. On physical examination, he had abdominal tenderness and distention with hypoactive bowel sounds. Computed tomography (CT scan of the abdomen showed acute pancreatitis. The patient’s condition deteriorated and he was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU. After he improved and was transferred out of the ICU, the patient developed swelling of the scrotum and penis. Ultrasound (US of the scrotum showed large hydrocele bilaterally with no varicoceles or testicular masses. Good blood flow was observed for both testicles. The swelling diminished over the next eight days with the addition of Lasix and the patient was discharged home in stable condition. Conclusion. Scrotal swelling is a rare complication of acute pancreatitis. It usually resolves spontaneously with conservative medical management such as diuretics and elevation of the legs.

  19. Successful transgastric cytogastrostomy in a dog with acute pancreatitis and pancreatic pseudocyst complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugita, K.; Sugita, K.; Mishina, M.; Aoki, D.; Kayanuma, H.; Watanabe, T.

    2009-01-01

    A five-year-old, spayed female mixed breed dog was presented after four weeks of vomiting and anorexia, and was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis. A large, anechoic mass having no blood flow organization was seen adjoining the stomach in an ultrasonic examination of the abdomen. A large ball-like mass protruded from the stomach pylorus under mucous membrane causing stricture of the stomach, and obstructing the transit. A low-density mass of consistent texture extending from the left limb of the main mass was confirmed by CT. A celiotomy was performed and a pancreatic cyst was confirmed. A transgastric cytogastrostomy was performed to treat the pancreatic pseudocyst. Clinical signs resolved following surgery, and 16 months after surgery there have been no complications

  20. [Severe acute pancreatitis during pregnancy among black African women: about a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawani, Ismaïl; Kpossou, Aboudou Raimi; Noukpozounkou, Bruno; Gnangnon, Freddy Houehanou Rodrigue; Souaibou, Yacoubou Imorou; Gbessi, Dansou Gaspard; Hounkpatin, Benjamin; Dossou, Fancis Moïse; Olory-Togbe, Jean-Léon

    2017-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is rare during pregnancy. It is associated with high maternofoetal mortality. It is mainly caused by biliary lithiasis but, in many cases, the cause of acute pancreatitis is undetermined. We here report the case of a 37-year old patient presenting with acute pancreatitis revealed by acute febrile bowel obstruction at 29 weeks of amenorrhea. The diagnosis was made during surgery. The patient had a miscarriage in the postoperative period. She died on the 8th postoperative day.

  1. Use of laparoscopy for diagnosing experimentally induced acute pancreatitis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-wook; Oh, Ye-in; Choi, Ji-hye; Kim, Dae-yong; Youn, Hwa-young

    2014-12-01

    Diagnosis of acute pancreatitis in dogs remains a significant challenge despite the development of advanced diagnostic methodologies. Visual inspection and pancreas biopsy using laparoscopy are generally considered to be procedures free of complications when conducted on healthy animals. However, the usefulness of laparoscopy for diagnosing acute pancreatitis has not been assessed. In the present study, the efficacy of laparoscopy for diagnosing acute pancreatitis in dogs was evaluated in animals with experimentally induced acute pancreatitis. Gross appearance of the pancreatic area was examined by laparoscopy to survey for the presence of edema, adhesions, effusion, pseudocysts, hemorrhage, and fat necrosis. Laparoscopic biopsy was performed and the histopathologic results were compared to those of pancreatic samples obtained during necropsy. The correlation between laparoscopy and histopathologic findings of the pancreas was evaluated. The presence of adhesions, effusion, and hemorrhage in the pancreatic area observed by laparoscopy significantly correlated with the histopathologic results (p pancreatitis in dogs.

  2. Controlled clinical trial of selective decontamination for the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J.T. Luiten (Ernest); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); J.F. Lange (Johan); H.A. Bruining (Hajo)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: A randomized, controlled, multicenter trial was undertaken in 102 patients with objective evidence of severe acute pancreatitis to evaluate whether selective decontamination reduces mortality. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Secondary pancreatic

  3. VALIDITY OF CONTRAST ENHANCED CT IN THE ASSESSMENT OF ACUTE PANCREATITIS AND ITS RELATED COMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannivanan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND In the earlier days, ultrasonogram was considered as one of the most important investigation for pancreatitis, later the clinicians started using cholangiography in acute pancreatitis, but today CT is considered as a gold standard test in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Though the sensitivity of CT in diagnosing acute pancreatitis was not studied much particularly in a mild case, but a good-quality contrast enhanced CT demonstrates distinct pancreatic and peri-pancreatic abnormalities. AIM To assess the importance of computed tomography in diagnosing acute pancreatitis and its related complications. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective study was conducted on 150 patients with clinically suspected pancreatitis. CT was performed on all the patients with Siemens Spiral CT scanner Sensation 16 slice. Oral contrast of was 1000 mL given one hour prior to the scan in the form of taking 250 mL every 15 mins. The CT severity index (CTSI and the necrosis point scoring was used to assess the severity of acute pancreatitis. All the complications related to acute pancreatitis were also assessed. RESULTS The CT analysis in the detection of acute pancreatitis showed the sensitivity of 100% and the positive predictive value of 97.3%. The severity index of acute pancreatitis based on the CT imaging had shown that majority of the patients are with moderate (60.6% level of acute pancreatitis. The necrosis point scoring showed that 54.6% of the patients had necrosis involving less than 30% of the pancreas. Among the various complications detected by CECT the commonest were pleural effusion and ascites. CONCLUSION CECT is the most important gold standard technique both for diagnosis as well as for predicting the prognosis in acute pancreatitis. The clinicians should routinely send the patient for the CT imaging whenever there is a suspicion of pancreatitis clinically.

  4. The incidence of acute pancreatitis: impact of social deprivation, alcohol consumption, seasonal and demographic factors1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, SE; Akbari, A; Thorne, K; Atkinson, M; Evans, PA

    2013-01-01

    Background The incidence of acute pancreatitis has increased sharply in many European countries and the USA in recent years. Aim To establish trends in incidence and mortality for acute pancreatitis in Wales, UK, and to assess how incidence may be linked to factors including social deprivation, seasonal effects and alcohol consumption. Methods Use of record linked inpatient, mortality and primary care data for 10 589 hospitalised cases of acute pancreatitis between 1999 and 2010. Results The incidence of acute pancreatitis was 30.0 per 100 000 population overall, mortality was 6.4% at 60 days. Incidence increased significantly from 27.6 per 100 000 in 1999 to 36.4 in 2010 (average annual increase = 2.7% per year), there was little trend in mortality (0.2% average annual reduction). The largest increases in incidence were among women aged acute pancreatitis and 1.5 for gallstone acute pancreatitis). Acute pancreatitis was increased significantly during the Christmas and New Year weeks by 48% (95% CI = 24–77%) for alcoholic aetiology, but not for gallstone aetiology (9%). Alcoholic admissions were increased with higher consumption of spirits and beer, but not wine. Conclusions The study shows an elevated rate of alcoholic acute pancreatitis during the Christmas and New Year period. Acute pancreatitis continues to rise, most rapidly for young women, while alcoholic acute pancreatitis is linked strongly with social deprivation. PMID:23859492

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging for the Normal Mesostenium and Involvement of the Mesostenium in Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Xiao Chi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main point of this paper is to study MRI findings of the normal mesostenium and the involvement of the mesostenium in acute pancreatitis and to discuss the relationship between the involvement of the mesostenium and the severity of acute pancreatitis. In clinical practice, the mesenterical involvement in acute pancreatitis was often observed on MRI in daily works, which was little recorded in the reported studies. We conducted the current study to assess the mesenterical involvement in acute pancreatitis with MRI. We found that the mesenterical involvement of acute pancreatitis patients is common on MRI. The mesenterical involvement has a positive correlation with the MR severity index and the Acute Physiology and Chronic Healthy Evaluation II scoring system. It has been shown that MR can be used to visualize mesenterical involvement, which is a supplementary indicator in evaluating the severity of acute pancreatitis and local and systemic complications.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging for the Normal Mesostenium and Involvement of the Mesostenium in Acute Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Xiao Xiao; Zhang, Xiao Ming; Chen, Tian Wu; Tang, Wei; Xiao, Bo; Ji, Yi Fan; Huang, Xiao Hua

    2014-01-01

    The main point of this paper is to study MRI findings of the normal mesostenium and the involvement of the mesostenium in acute pancreatitis and to discuss the relationship between the involvement of the mesostenium and the severity of acute pancreatitis. In clinical practice, the mesenterical involvement in acute pancreatitis was often observed on MRI in daily works, which was little recorded in the reported studies. We conducted the current study to assess the mesenterical involvement in acute pancreatitis with MRI. We found that the mesenterical involvement of acute pancreatitis patients is common on MRI. The mesenterical involvement has a positive correlation with the MR severity index and the Acute Physiology and Chronic Healthy Evaluation II scoring system. It has been shown that MR can be used to visualize mesenterical involvement, which is a supplementary indicator in evaluating the severity of acute pancreatitis and local and systemic complications. PMID:25136639

  7. The 5-HT3Receptor Antagonist Ondansetron Attenuates Pancreatic Injury in Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Takuto; Onuki, Yuta; Shinoda, Hajime; Mihara, Taiki; Hori, Masatoshi; Inomata, Tomo

    2017-08-01

    The 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 receptor (5-HT 3 R) antagonist ondansetron has been clinically approved as an anti-emetic agent. Recent findings indicate that ondansetron has anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of the present study was to assess the therapeutic action of ondansetron in cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis model. Male-BALB/c mice were used in the present study. Acute pancreatitis was induced by an hourly injection of cerulein. Ondansetron was administered subcutaneously at a dose of 3 mg/kg. The messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of 5-HT 3 R in pancreatic tissue was assessed with RT-PCR. Plasma amylase, lipase, and interleukin (IL)-6 levels were evaluated. Pancreatic injury was histopathologically graded, and myeloperoxidase (MPO)-positive cells were counted. 5-HT 3 R mRNA was expressed in the pancreas. In acute pancreatitis model mice, amylase, lipase, and IL-6 levels were significantly increased in the blood. With ondansetron treatment, these levels were significantly decreased. Histopathological evaluation revealed that ondansetron attenuated the inflammatory damage in acute pancreatitis. The number of infiltrated neutrophils stained by MPO was decreased by ondansetron treatment. In summary, the 5-HT 3 R antagonist ondansetron attenuated pancreatic injury through its anti-inflammatory action. These findings suggest that ondansetron may potentially be of use for therapy of acute pancreatitis.

  8. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging indicates the severity of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas Tertulino, Franklin; Schraibman, Vladimir; Ardengh, José Celso; do Espírito-Santo, Danilo Cerqueira; Ajzen, Sergio Aron; Torrez, Franz Robert Apodaca; Lobo, Edson Jose; Szejnfeld, Jacob; Goldman, Suzan Menasce

    2015-02-01

    To test the use of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) to differentiate between different degrees of severity of acute pancreatitis (AP). Thirty-six patients who underwent DW-MRI and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography were divided into patients with mild AP (mAP, n = 15), patients with necrotizing AP (nAP, n = 8), and patients with a normal pancreas (nP, n = 15; controls). The pancreas was divided into head, body, and tail, and each segment was classified according to image features: pattern 1, normal; pattern 2, mild inflammation; and pattern 3, necrosis. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were measured in each segment and correlated with clinical diagnoses. A total of 108 segments was assessed (three segments per patient). Segments classified as pattern 1 in the nP and mAP groups showed similar ADC values (P = 0.29). ADC values calculated for the pancreatic segments grouped according to the different image patterns (1-3) were significantly different (P < 0.001). Comparisons revealed significant differences in signal intensity between all three patterns (P < 0.05). DW-MRI was a compatible and safe image option to differentiate tissue image patterns in patients with mAP, nAP, and nP, mainly in those with contraindications to contrast-enhanced MRI (which is classically required for determining the presence of necrosis) or computed tomography. ADC measures allowed precise differentiation between patterns 1, 2, and 3.

  9. Appendectomy and resection of the terminal ileum with secondary severe necrotic changes in acute perforated appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiryajev, Yuri N; Volkov, Nikolay N; Kashintsev, Alexey A; Chalenko, Marina V; Radionov, Yuri V

    2015-01-25

    Resectional procedures for advanced and complicated appendicitis are performed infrequently. Their extent can vary: cecal resection, ileocecectomy, and even right hemicolectomy. We present a very rare case of appendectomy that was combined with partial ileal resection for severe necrotic changes and small perforation of the ileum. A 19-year-old female patient was hospitalized with right iliac fossa pain and fever 10 days after the onset of symptoms. On laparoscopy, a large mass in a right iliac fossa was found. The ultrasound-guided drainage of the suspected appendiceal abscess was unavailable. After conversion using McBurney's incision, acute perforated appendicitis was diagnosed. It was characterized by extension of severe necrotic changes onto the ileal wall and complicated by right iliac fossa abscess. A mass was bluntly divided, and a large amount of pus with fecaliths was discharged and evacuated. Removal of necrotic tissues from the ileal wall led to the appearance of a small defect in the bowel. A standard closure of this defect was considered as very unsafe due to a high risk of suture leakage or bowel stenosis. We perform a resection of the involved ileum combined with appendectomy and drainage/tamponade of an abscess cavity. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. The patient was discharged on the 15th day. In advanced appendicitis, the involved bowel resection can prevent possible complications (e.g., ileus, intestinal fistula, peritonitis, and intra-abdominal abscess). Our case may be the first report of an appendectomy combined with an ileal resection for advanced and complicated appendicitis.

  10. [Determinant-based classification of acute pancreatitis severity. International multidisciplinary classification of acute pancreatitis severity: the 2013 German edition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layer, P; Dellinger, E P; Forsmark, C E; Lévy, P; Maraví-Poma, E; Shimosegawa, T; Siriwardena, A K; Uomo, G; Whitcomb, D C; Windsor, J A; Petrov, M S

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a new international classification of acute pancreatitis severity on the basis of a sound conceptual framework, comprehensive review of published evidence, and worldwide consultation. The Atlanta definitions of acute pancreatitis severity are ingrained in the lexicon of pancreatologists but suboptimal because these definitions are based on empiric descriptions of occurrences that are merely associated with severity. A personal invitation to contribute to the development of a new international classification of acute pancreatitis severity was sent to all surgeons, gastroenterologists, internists, intensive medicine specialists, and radiologists who are currently active in clinical research on acute pancreatitis. The invitation was not limited to members of certain associations or residents of certain countries. A global Web-based survey was conducted and a dedicated international symposium was organised to bring contributors from different disciplines together and discuss the concept and definitions. The new international classification is based on the actual local and systemic determinants of severity, rather than descriptions of events that are correlated with severity. The local determinant relates to whether there is (peri)pancreatic necrosis or not, and if present, whether it is sterile or infected. The systemic determinant relates to whether there is organ failure or not, and if present, whether it is transient or persistent. The presence of one determinant can modify the effect of another such that the presence of both infected (peri)pancreatic necrosis and persistent organ failure have a greater effect on severity than either determinant alone. The derivation of a classification based on the above principles results in 4 categories of severity - mild, moderate, severe, and critical. This classification is the result of a consultative process amongst pancreatologists from 49 countries spanning North America, South America

  11. Acute Pancreatitis and Rhabdomyolysis with Acute Kidney Injury following Multiple Wasp Stings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seo Hee Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple wasp stings can induce multiple organ dysfunction by toxic reactions. However, acute pancreatitis is a rare manifestation in wasp sting injury. A 74-year-old woman visited the emergency department by anaphylactic shock because of multiple wasp stings. Acute kidney injury, rhabdomyolysis, hepatotoxicity, and coagulopathy were developed next day. Serum amylase and lipase were elevated and an abdominal computed tomography revealed an acute pancreatitis. Urine output was recovered after 16 days of oliguria (below 500 ml/day. Her kidney, liver, and pancreas injury gradually improved after sessions of renal replacement therapy.

  12. Rational drug use in acute pancreatitis: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosić Nikola

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is a sudden inflammation of pancreas where its enzymes autodigest the gland. Two main causes of acute pancreatitis are alcoholism and billiar calculosis. Treatment consists of preventing dehydration, analgesia, decrease of pancreatic exocrine function, enteral nutritional support , respiratory and renal function support and surgery. The patient presents with abdominal pain that lasts for few days and is followed by vomiting. Laboratory tests first revealed abnormal values of blood count and pancreas enzymes (leucocytes -19,7 x 109/L, hematocrit - 0,32, amylase - 52569 IU/L, lypase - 4750 IU/L, CRP - 152 IU/L, albumins - 25 g/L, followed by abnormal values of liver enzymes (AST - 80 IU/L, ALT - 127 IU/L, GGT - 362 IU/L. Further diagnostic procedures showed billiary calculosis, pleural effusion and acute pancreatitis with ascites. No surgery was performed, due to the lack of infect ion and the signs of the patient going into recovery. It was observed that not all diagnostic procedures that exist in the protocol of treatment, such as ERCP or biopsy of pancreatic t issue with microbiological investigation, were performed. Considering the rules of rat ional drug therapy, as well as the protocols that are to be applied in Clinical center 'Kragujevac' in Kragujevac, it was observed that some drugs (antibiotics and albumin were not used in a proper manner, i.e. in compliance with the protocol, which increased the cost of the treatment without improving the patient health or shortening the hospital stay.

  13. [Acute pancreatitis and pregnancy: Cases study and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlet, P; Lambert, V; Carles, G

    2015-06-01

    To describe issues associated with the diagnosis of acute pregnancy-associated pancreatitis. Retrospective study of cases presenting at our establishment from 2002 to 2012. These cases were defined on the basis of the association of abdominal pain, serum lipase levels three times normal values, or signs of pancreatitis on ultrasound scans carried out on women pregnant at the time of diagnosis. A retrospective analysis of the medical files of these patients was carried out, considering epidemiological and etiological criteria, the treatments administered and maternal/fetal fate. We identified 10 cases during the study period, corresponding to an incidence of 1/1942. In 70% of cases, the patient was in the last three months of pregnancy. The pain was atypical in 70% of cases and ultrasound revealed biliary lithiasis in 30% of cases. None of the women died. In terms of neonatal morbidity, there were five preterm births, including one of an infant that died at the age of seven days. We then carried out a literature review, from which we determined the most appropriate course of action in cases of acute pancreatitis during pregnancy. Pancreatitis should be considered in pregnant women with abdominal pains because this diagnosis is easy to confirm and maternal and fetal outcomes are essentially dependent on the early etiological management of this condition. Preterm birth is the predominant factor for neonatal morbidity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Method of prevention of acute pancreatitis after diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolstokorov A.S.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective of the study: Prevention of acute pancreatitis after diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP. Material and Methods. Analysis of the results of diagnostic and therapeutic ERCP, of the patients treated at Saratov Regional clinical hospital f during the period from 2006 to 2010. Results, lincrease in pancreatic amylase levels in blood above 50 U/l till ERCP is a risk factor for development of acute pancreatitis after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP. Conclusion. The above-stated follows to the background of increased pancreatic amylase levels in blood, performance of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography led to the development of acute pancreatitis.

  15. Ischemic acute pancreatitis with pancreatic pseudocyst in a patient with abdominal aortic aneurysm and generalized atheromatosis - case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocota, Ileana; Badea, Radu; Scridon, Traian; Dumitrascu, Dan L

    2015-03-21

    Ischemic pancreatitis is a rare medical entity. The pancreatic tissue is susceptible to ischemia with the possibility of developing acute pancreatitis. The abdominal aortic aneurysm can be one possible cause of pancreatic hypoperfusion. We report the case of a 68-year-old man, Caucasian, with a history of a cluster of severe cardiovascular conditions, who presented epigastric pain of variable intensity for about 2 weeks. The pain occurred after intense physical effort, and was associated with anorexia and asthenia. The palpation revealed epigastric pain and palpable pulsatile mass above the umbilicus. Laboratory tests showed increased serum and urine amylases. The abdominal contrast-enhanced CT scan evidenced acute lesions of the pancreas and a caudal pancreatic pseudocyst of 39x24 mm. An abdominal aortic aneurysm was also described (which extended from the kidney level to the bilateral femoral level) with a maximum diameter of 60.5 mm and generalized atheromatosis. By corroborating clinical, anamnestic, laboratory and imaging data, the case was diagnosed as moderately severe acute ischemic pancreatitis, pancreatic pseudocyst, abdominal aortic aneurysm, generalized atheromatosis. The pancreatic pseudocyst was resorbed in eight months. Surgery for the abdominal aneurysm was performed after the resorption of the pseudocyst. The patient died after aortic surgery because of a septic complication. Ischemic pancreatitis is a rare condition but should be considered in a patient with upper abdominal pain and elevated amylase in the context of an abdominal aortic aneurysm and generalized atheromatosis.

  16. Acute pancreatitis: The role of imaging in diagnosis and management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharwani, Nishat, E-mail: nishat.bharwani@nhs.ne [Imaging Department, Barts and The London NHS Trust, St Bartholomew' s Hospital, Ground Floor, King George V Wing, London EC1A 7BE (United Kingdom); Patel, Shilpa; Prabhudesai, Shirish; Fotheringham, Tim; Power, Niall [Imaging Department, Barts and The London NHS Trust, St Bartholomew' s Hospital, Ground Floor, King George V Wing, London EC1A 7BE (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the more commonly encountered aetiologies in the emergency setting and its incidence is rising. Presentations range from a mild-self limiting condition which usually responds to conservative management to one with significant morbidity and mortality in its most severe forms. While clinical criteria are necessary to make the initial diagnosis, contrast-enhanced CT is the mainstay of imaging and has a vital role in assessing the extent and evolution of the disease and its associated complications. The purpose of this article is to summarise the natural course of acute severe pancreatitis, clarify confusing nomenclature, demonstrate the morphological stages in conjunction with radiological scoring systems and illustrate the complications. We will review and illustrate the increasing and significant role interventional radiology has in the management of these patients, which are often life-saving and surgery-sparing.

  17. Colopancreatic Fistula: An Uncommon Complication of Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouhanna Abu Ghanimeh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Colonic complications, including colopancreatic fistulas (CPFs, are uncommon after acute and chronic pancreatitis. However, they have been reported and are serious. CPFs are less likely to close spontaneously and are associated with a higher risk of complications. Therefore, more definitive treatment is required that includes surgical and endoscopic options. We present a case of a 62-year-old male patient with a history of heavy alcohol intake and recurrent acute pancreatitis who presented with a 6-month history of watery diarrhea and abdominal pain. His abdominal imaging showed a possible connection between the colon and the pancreas. A further multidisciplinary workup by the gastroenterology and surgery teams, including endoscopic ultrasound, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, and colonoscopy, resulted in a diagnosis of CPF. A distal pancreatectomy and left hemicolectomy were performed, and the diagnosis of CPF was confirmed intraoperatively. The patient showed improvement afterward.

  18. Laparoscopic Management of Acute Pancreatitis Secondary to Rapunzel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijan Koushk Jalali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 17-year-old girl presented with bilious vomiting and abdominal pain to the surgery department. The history was positive for trichotillomania and trichophagia. A CT scan showed a mass in the stomach, which was highly suspicious for a gastric bezoar. Drooping parts of the bezoar caused a duodenal obstruction with secondary acute pancreatitis. The bezoar was removed via a laparoscopically performed gastrotomy.

  19. Giant cell arteritis complicated by acute pancreatitis: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Seneviratne Deepthi; Mollan Susan P; Elsherbiny Samer; Worstmann Theresa

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Introduction We describe a case of giant cell arteritis in a woman who was treated with high-dose systemic corticosteroids and subsequently developed acute pancreatitis. Case presentation A 78-year-old Caucasian woman presented with four weeks of progressive headache and scalp tenderness. One day before ophthalmology assessment, she had experienced visual obscurations in both eyes. Her visual acuity was 6/9 in both eyes, with a right afferent pupillary defect and right swollen optic ...

  20. Successful treatment of Pseudomembranous necrotizing Aspergillus tracheobronchitis in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanić Jelena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pseudomembranous necrotizing Aspergillus tracheobronchitis is a rare form of pulmonary aspergillosis which occurs in immunocompromised patients. Case Outline. A female patient aged 71, suffering from acute myeloid leukemia, developed the symptoms of progressive shortness of breath and inspiratory stridor. The diagnosis in our case was made on the histological findings from tissues obtained by bronchoscopy. A chest CT scan suggested the state of the compromised trachea and left principal bronchus lumen. The long-term regimen with itraconazole in the dose of 400 mg/24 hours proved efficient in our patient. Conclusion. Progressive shortness of breath and inspiratory stridor in immunocompromised patients along with radiological and CT changes should be also considered as pulmonary aspergillosis in differential diagnosis. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175056

  1. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy in a child with H1N1 influenza infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, Jane B.; Remigio, Cheryl; Milligan, Thomas; Deline, Carol

    2010-01-01

    Since the World Health Organization declared a global pandemic of novel influenza A H1N1 in June 2009, there has been a sustained rise in the number of cases of this strain of influenza. Although most cases are mild with complete and uneventful recovery, multiple cases of severe infection with complications including death have been reported. To the best of our knowledge, the majority of fatal outcomes in the United States have been related to pulmonary complications. We report a 12-year-old girl infected with influenza A H1N1 whose clinical course was complicated by rapid progressive neurologic deterioration and striking CT and MRI findings consistent with acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE). To our knowledge this has not been reported in the pediatric radiology literature. We hope this case will alert radiologists to this complication and familiarize radiologists with imaging findings that herald ANE. (orig.)

  2. A case of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura induced by acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arimoto M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Miyoko Arimoto1, Yutaka Komiyama2, Fumiko Okamae1, Akemi Ichibe1, Setsuko Teranishi1, Hirohiko Tokunaga1, Keiko Nakaya3, Michie Fujiwara3, Manabu Yamaoka4, Shuji Onishi4, Rie Miyamoto5, Naoto Nakamichi5, Shosaku Nomura51Blood Transfusion Unit, Kansai Medical University Takii Hospital, 2Department of Clinical Sciences and Laboratory Medicine, Kansai Medical University, 3Clinical Medical Technology Unit, Kansai Medical University Takii Hospital, 4Blood Transfusion Unit, Kansai Medical University Hirakata Hospital, 5First Department of Internal Medicine, Kansai Medical University, Moriguchi, JapanAbstract: Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP is a multisystemic microvascular disorder that may be caused by an imbalance between unusually large von Willebrand factor multimers and the cleaving protease ADAMTS13. In acquired TTP, especially in secondary TTP with various underlying diseases, the diagnosis is difficult because there are many cases that do not exhibit severe deficiency of ADAMTS13 or raised levels of ADAMST13 inhibitors. It is well known that collagen disease, malignancy, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation can be underlying conditions that induce TTP. However, TTP induced by acute pancreatitis, as experienced by our patient, has rarely been reported. Our patient completely recovered with treatments using steroids and plasma exchange (PE only. In cases where patients develop acute pancreatitis with no apparent causes for hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia, the possibility of TTP should be considered. Treatments for TTP including PE should be evaluated as soon as a diagnosis is made.Keywords: thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, ADAMTS13, acute pancreatitis, plasma exchange

  3. Giant cell arteritis complicated by acute pancreatitis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seneviratne Deepthi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We describe a case of giant cell arteritis in a woman who was treated with high-dose systemic corticosteroids and subsequently developed acute pancreatitis. Case presentation A 78-year-old Caucasian woman presented with four weeks of progressive headache and scalp tenderness. One day before ophthalmology assessment, she had experienced visual obscurations in both eyes. Her visual acuity was 6/9 in both eyes, with a right afferent pupillary defect and right swollen optic nerve. She was diagnosed as having temporal arteritis and was urgently treated with high-dose pulsed intravenous and oral corticosteroids. Her previous diet-controlled diabetes needed insulin and oral hyperglycaemic therapy to control erratic blood sugars. On day 8 of treatment with steroids, she became unwell with epigastric pain and vomiting. She was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis and was treated conservatively. Conclusion Acute pancreatitis, a potentially life-threatening condition, is a rare but important side effect of systemic corticosteroids.

  4. Drug-associated acute pancreatitis : twenty-one years of spontaneous reporting in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eland, I A; van Puijenbroek, E P; Sturkenboom, M J; Wilson, J H; Stricker, B H

    OBJECTIVE: Drugs are considered a rare cause of acute pancreatitis. We conducted a descriptive study to assess which drugs have been associated with acute pancreatitis in spontaneous adverse drug reaction reports in The Netherlands. METHODS: Our study is based on reports of drug-associated acute

  5. Radiological evaluation about the effects of acute and chronic pancreatitis on the stomach patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaun, Woo Ki; Han, Chang Yul [In Je Medical College, Paik Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soo Sung [Chung Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-06-15

    The present study was intended to examine the spectrum of radiographic patterns of the stomach associated with acute and chronic pancreatitis and their complications. Subjects served for the study consisted of 70 cases of pancreatitis (36 cases in acute stage and 34 cases in chronic stage). Intramural and perigastric permeation of extravasated pancreatic enzymes and secondary inflammatory reaction that follows are responsible for the radiographic change observed. 1. Generalized rugal thickening and particularly selective mucosal prominences in greater curvature of body and antrum are characteristically seen in acute (14 of 36 cases- 39%) and chronic pancreatitis (11 of 34 cases- 32%) 2. The only finding of the chronic pancreatitis includes patterns mimicking limits plastica, indurated and nondistensible rugae induced by perigastric adhesion (11 of 34 cases- 32%) Familiarization with these patterns of involvement contributes to the radiographic diagnosis of acute pancreatitis and avoides serious diagnostic errors in case of chronic pancreatitis.

  6. The aetiology of acute and chronic pancreatitis over time in a hospital in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøjgaard, Camilla; Bendtsen, Flemming; Matzen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The change in aetiology over time of acute and chronic pancreatitis has been sparsely described, as has also the validity of the diagnostic codes. The aim of the study was 1) to clarify whether the aetiology of acute and chronic pancreatitis changed during the period 1983-2005, and 2) to validate...... the diagnostic codes over time for acute and chronic pancreatitis registered in the Danish National Patient Registry (NPR) in the same period....

  7. Study of the early management of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvaderani, Maryam; Eslick, Guy D; Faraj, Shadi; Vagg, Daniel; Cox, Michael R

    2017-10-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common acute surgical presentation with evidence-based guidelines for early management. The aim of this study was to assess the compliance to the published guidelines in patients presenting with AP in Western Sydney. A retrospective case note audit was conducted for all patients with a confirmed diagnosis of AP from 2008 to 2011 in Western Sydney. There were 932 patients. The mortality was low for mild (0.7%) and severe (1.2%) AP. There was an under-utilization of ultrasound (U/S) with 239 (25.6%) patients not having a U/S. There was an over-utilization of early (within 72 h) computed tomography scanning for diagnosis (31.1%), assessment of severity (16.1%) and assessment for the presence of complications (7.3%). Inappropriate prophylactic antibiotic usage occurred in 15.3% patients. Of 373 cases of gallstone pancreatitis, only 231 (69.1%) had a cholecystectomy within 4 weeks of presentation. There was an under-utilization of early endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for associated cholangitis (12.5%). Only 16 (18.8%) patients with severe pancreatitis received enteric feeding. In patients with pancreatic necrosis, 50% had invasive intervention delayed beyond 4 weeks and 69% had minimally invasive procedures performed prior to necrosectomy. Patients having a minimally invasive procedure initially showed an improvement in mortality compared with those who had primary necrosectomy (0 versus 40%, P = 0.025). Although morbidity and mortality were acceptable, there was a failure to comply with evidence-based guidelines for the early management of pancreatitis. The results support for the development and auditing of protocols for the early assessment and treatment of AP in all hospitals. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  8. Acute pancreatitis and pregnancy: case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayara Kato Perez

    2013-06-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammation of pancreas that involves other organs around it or systems. In this report, a case of acute pancreatitis during pregnancy will be discussed and it deserves importance due to the low incidence and high morbidity and mortality. Its main etiologic factor is cholelithiasis, and pregnant women could develop acute pancreatitis associated with hyperlipidemia. So that, this case involves a first-time mother at second trimester of pregnancy that, with her clinical, laboratory and image evaluation, was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis with biliary etiology and, on this situation, pharmacological therapeutic was chosen, allied to general measures.

  9. Influence of delayed cholecystectomy after acute gallstone pancreatitis on recurrence: consequences of lack of resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Bejarano-González

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute pancreatitis is often a relapsing condition, particularly when its triggering factor persists. Our goal is to determine the recurrence rate of acute biliary pancreatitis after an initial episode, and the time to relapse, as well as to identify the risk factors for recurrence. Material and method: We included all patients admitted for a first acute gallstone pancreatitis event during four years. Primary endpoints included readmission for recurrence and time to relapse. Results: We included 296 patients admitted on a total of 386 occasions. The incidence of acute biliary pancreatitis in our setting is 17.5/100,000 population/year. In all, 19.6% of pancreatitis were severe (22.6% of severe acute pancreatitis for first episodes versus 3.6% for recurring pancreatitis, with an overall mortality of 4.4%. Overall recurrence rate was 15.5%, with a median time to relapse of 82 days. In total, 14.2% of patients relapsed after an acute pancreatitis event without cholecystectomy or endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography. Severe acute pancreatitis recur in 7.2% of patients, whereas mild cases do so in 16.3%, this being the only risk factor for recurrence thus far identified. Conclusions: Patients admitted for pancreatitis should undergo cholecystectomy as soon as possible or be guaranteed priority on the waiting list. Otherwise, endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography with sphincterotomy may be an alternative to surgery for selected patients.

  10. Effects of subtotal colectomy on bacterial translocation during experimental acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Minnen, LP; Nieuwenhuijs, VB; de Bruijn, MT; Verheem, A; Visser, MR; van Dijk, JE; Akkermans, LMA; Gooszen, HG

    Objectives: The colon is considered a major source of bacteria causing infection of pancreatic necrosis in acute pancreatitis (AP). Subtotal colectomy before AP in rats reduces mortality, but its role in affecting small bowel flora, bacterial translocation, and infection of pancreatic necrosis is

  11. Ansa Pancreatica: A Case Report of a Type of Ductal Variation in a Patient with Idiopathic Acute Recurrent Pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hye Mi; Park, Jung Yup; Kim, Myeong Jin [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    Ansa pancreatica is a rare type of pancreatic ductal variation. Recently, ansa pancreatic has been considered as a predisposing factor in patients with idiopathic acute pancreatitis. To the best of our knowledge, no previously published report in Korea has described ansa pancreatica. We report a case of acute recurrent pancreatitis with ansa pancreatica, which was revealed on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP)

  12. CT findings and CT score in acute pancreatitis compared with severity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Tadahiro; Yasuda, Hideki; Uchiyama, Katsuhiro; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Sikata, Jun-ichi; Nagai, Jun

    1986-01-01

    CT findings in 28 patients with acute pancreatitis were compared with severity of the disease. The pancreatic image, which demonstrates the pancreatic lesion, was studied with respect to 9 items, and fluid collection showing the peripancreatic status with respect to 13 items. 1) According to Forell's classification, the lesion was minor in 8 patients, moderate in 11, and severe in 9. 2) The detection rates of abnormal pancreatic images and fluid collection increased with the advance in the severity of the disease. 3) The mean CT score by severity was 0.88 ± 0.64 for minor pancreatitis, 7.18 ± 4.51 for moderate pancreatitis, and 13.44 ± 4.22 for severe pancreatitis. Significant differences were observed among the groups, suggesting the usefulness of the CT score in evaluating the severity of acute pancreatitis. (author)

  13. Acute pancreatitis: pancreas divisum with ventral duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurram, Krishna C; Czapla, Agata; Thakkar, Shyam

    2014-10-07

    Acute recurrent pancreatitis occurs rarely in individuals with pancreas divisum. A 39-year-old woman with no significant history presented with pancreatitis. CT scan and MRI suggested acute on chronic pancreatitis with calcifications and pancreatic divisum. An endoscopic ultrasound demonstrated complete pancreas divisum. A large calcification measuring 12 mm × 6 mm was seen in the head of the pancreas with associated dilation of the ventral pancreatic duct. Fine-needle aspiration of the dilated ventral pancreatic duct showed an amylase level of 36,923 U/L and a carcinoembryonic antigen of 194. A ventral duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm was suspected and a pancreaticoduodenectomy procedure was recommended. After the procedure, pathology demonstrated an intraductal papillary lesion in the main duct with moderate dysplasia. A pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, grade 2 was also present. Margins of resection were clear. This case represents the importance of assessing for secondary causes of pancreatitis in pancreas divisum. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  14. Colonic Necrosis in a 4-Year-Old with Hyperlipidemic Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany J. Patton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we report the case of a 4-year-old male with severe acute pancreatitis due to hyperlipidemia, who presented with abdominal pain, metabolic abnormalities, and colonic necrosis. This colonic complication was secondary to the extension of a large peripancreatic fluid collection causing direct serosal autodigestion by pancreatic enzymes. Two weeks following the initial presentation, the peripancreatic fluid collection developed into a mature pancreatic pseudocyst, which was percutaneously drained. To our knowledge, this is the youngest documented pediatric case of colonic necrosis due to severe pancreatitis and the first descriptive pediatric case of a colonic complication due to hyperlipidemia-induced acute pancreatitis.

  15. Targeted Gene Next-Generation Sequencing in Chinese Children with Chronic Pancreatitis and Acute Recurrent Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yuan; Yuan, Wentao; Yu, Bo; Guo, Yan; Xu, Xu; Wang, Xinqiong; Yu, Yi; Yu, Yi; Gong, Biao; Xu, Chundi

    2017-12-01

    To identify causal mutations in certain genes in children with acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) or chronic pancreatitis (CP). After patients were enrolled (CP, 55; ARP, 14) and their clinical characteristics were investigated, we performed next-generation sequencing to detect nucleotide variations among the following 10 genes: cationic trypsinogen protease serine 1 (PRSS1), serine protease inhibitor, Kazal type 1 (SPINK1), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR), chymotrypsin C (CTRC), calcium-sensing receptor (CASR), cathepsin B (CTSB), keratin 8 (KRT8), CLAUDIN 2 (CLDN2), carboxypeptidase A1 (CPA1), and ATPase type 8B member 1 (ATP8B1). Mutations were searched against online databases to obtain information on the cause of the diseases. Certain novel mutations were analyzed using the SIFT2 and Polyphen-2 to predict the effect on protein function. There were 45 patients with CP and 10 patients with ARP who harbored 1 or more mutations in these genes; 45 patients had at least 1 mutation related to pancreatitis. Mutations were observed in the PRSS1, SPINK1, and CFTR genes in 17 patients, the CASR gene in 5 patients, and the CTSB, CTRC, and KRT8 genes in 1 patient. Mutations were not found in the CLDN, CPA1, or ATP8B1 genes. We found that mutations in SPINK1 may increase the risk of pancreatic duct stones (OR, 11.07; P = .003). The patients with CFTR mutations had a higher level of serum amylase (316.0 U/L vs 92.5 U/L; P = .026). Mutations, especially those in PRSS1, SPINK1, and CFTR, accounted for the major etiologies in Chinese children with CP or ARP. Children presenting mutations in the SPINK1 gene may have a higher risk of developing pancreatic duct stones. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Mielitis aguda necrotizante en un paciente con Sida Acute necrotizing myelitis in an AIDS patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Corti

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Como consecuencia de la infección por el virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana tipo-1 (HIV-1, otros patógenos como citomegalovirus (CMV y herpes simple tipo 1-2 (HSV 1-2 pueden comprometer tanto el sistema nervioso central como el periférico. Estos agentes pueden involucrar también a la médula espinal y causar una mielitis aguda necrotizante. Esta complicación ocurre por lo general en pacientes con enfermedad HIV/sida avanzada y marcada inmunodeficiencia, con recuentos de linfocitos T CD4+ de menos de 50 cél/µL. El cuadro clínico, los cambios en el LCR y las neuroimágenes generan una importante sospecha diagnóstica. Es fundamental el inicio precoz de la terapia antiviral específica. Se presenta un paciente con enfermedad avanzada debida al HIV-1 y mielitis aguda necrotizante por CMV y HSV bajo la forma clínica de síndrome de la cola de caballo.In the setting of HIV infection, cytomegalovirus (CMV and herpes simplex virus type 1-2 (HSV 1-2 can affect both the central and peripheral nervous systems. These agents can involve the spinal cord and produce a necrotizing transverse myelitis. This usually occurs in AIDS patients with severe immunodeficiency: CD4 + lymphocyte counts typically are less than 50 cell/µL. The clinical presentation, CSF and imaging studies can provide a high level of suspicion diagnosis. Prompt initiation of antiviral specific drugs is essential. We report a patient with an acute necrotizing myelitis (cauda equina syndrome secondary to CMV and HSV infections.

  17. Acute pancreatitis in dogs: advances in understanding, diagnostics, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Caroline

    2012-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis in dogs is a potentially reversible condition, but in severe forms it can cause systemic and local complications. These complications are driven by the cytokine, complement, and kinin systems, with the roles of these systems along with other substances such as nitric oxide being increasingly studied. The intestinal tract and altered pancreatic microcirculation also contribute greatly to the perpetuation of disease. Diagnosis remains difficult, because the true diagnostic utility of the current tests available is problematic to establish. Further understanding of the pathophysiology of this disease has opened up new areas of research into optimal treatments. In particular, the role of enteral nutrition has been the focus of much attention, and current recommendations are to feed earlier in the disease than previously thought. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Imaging of the pancreas. Acute and chronic pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balthazar, Emil J.; Megibow, Alec J. [NYU-Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Pozzi Mucelli, Roberto (eds.) [Policlinico ' ' GB Rossi' ' Verona Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Radiology

    2009-07-01

    With the aid of numerous high-quality illustrations, this volume explains the strengths and limitations of the different techniques employed in the imaging of pancreatitis. Ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and interventional imaging are each considered separately in the settings of acute and chronic pancreatitis. A further section is devoted to imaging of the complications of these conditions. Throughout, care has been taken to ensure that the reader will achieve a sound understanding of how the imaging findings derive from the pathophysiology of the disease processes. The significance of the imaging findings for clinical and therapeutic decision making is clearly explained, and protocols are provided that will assist in obtaining the best possible images. (orig.)

  19. Hepatic infarction complicating acute pancreatitis: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Suk; Hong, Sung Hwan; Park, Hong Suk; Lee, Eil Seong; Kang, Ik Won [College of Medicine, Hallym University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-07-01

    Hepatic infarction is relatively uncommon and is usually related to surgery or interventional procedures. Pancreatitis-associated hepatic infarction has not been reported in the literature, and we now describe a case of hepatic infarction in a 31-year-old man with acute pancreatitis. Initial CT scanning demonstrated an enlarged pancreas with multifocal fluid collection, and a large wedge-shaped low attenuation lesion was seen in the right lobe of the liver along with thrombi in the posteroinferior branch of the right portal vein. Hepatic arteriography and SMA portography revealed a pseudoaneurysm in the right hepatic artery, thrombi in the main portal vein and its posteroinferior branch, and perfusion defects confined to S6 of the liver. (author)

  20. Pathogenesis of Cardiac Depression in Acute Destructive Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Ershov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective is to identify the pathogenic factors for progression of pancreatogenic cardiac failure in the nearest and remote periods.Materials and methods. The study was carried out on 130 male Wistar rats (292±4.0 g divided into 4 groups. The animals were anesthetized with ethyl ether. Acute destructive pancreatitis was simulated in three experimental groups by infusion of bile (0.15 ml/kg body weight taken from the bile duct into the pancreatic tissue. The isolated isovolumically contracting rat heart (according to E. L. Fallen et al was simulated 24 hours, 7 days and 1 month after the bile infusion. The pressure in the left ventricle was measured by electric manometer BMT and registered along with the first derivative at the device N3384P calculating the systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and the speed of contraction and relaxation. At the same time the perfusate samples passed through the coronary arteries were har vested, and aspartate aminotransferase (AST and glucose were determined by standard methods. To identify the cardiac depression, the high contraction rhythm and hypercalcemic and hypoxic perfusion were applied.Results. It was found that in acute destructive pancreatitis the power and speed parameters of the heart con tractile function were altered that led to lowering the systolic blood pressure and velocity of contraction and relax ation of the left ventricular myocardium and increased diastolic blood pressure as an indicator of cardyomyocyte contracture rate. These abnormalities were evidently manifested in increased heartbits, including hypercalcemic and hypoxic perfusion of the isolated hearts. Glucose consumption was raised per each mmHg generated by the ventricular pressure.Conclusion. the most significant pathogenetic factors of pancreatogenic heart failure include hypoxia, car diomyocyte membrane destruction, inhibition of sarcolemma Capump, sarcoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondrial dysfunction. The maximum depression

  1. Therapeutic Effect of Obestatin in the Course of Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowczan, Jakub; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Kusnierz-Cabala, Beata; Tomaszewska, Romana; Dembinski, Artur

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of obestatin therapy on the course of cerulein-induced pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis was induced by cerulein given intraperitoneally 5 times with 1 hour intervals at the dose of 50 μg/kg per dose. Obestatin was administered twice a day at the dose of 8 nmol/kg per dose, starting the first dose 24 hours after the last injection of cerulein. Severity of acute pancreatitis (AP) was examined at 0 hour or 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, and 10 days after the last injection of cerulein. Administration of cerulein led to development of acute edematous pancreatitis in all rats, and maximal severity of this disease was observed 24 hours after induction of pancreatitis. Treatment with obestatin reduced morphological signs of pancreatic damage (pancreatic edema, leukocyte infiltration, vacuolization of acinar cells) and led to earlier regeneration of the pancreas. Biochemical indexes of severity of pancreatitis such as serum activity of pancreatic digestive enzymes were significantly reduced in animals treated with obestatin. These effects were accompanied by increase in pancreatic DNA synthesis and decrease in serum level of proinflammatory interleukin 1β. In addition, administration of obestatin improved pancreatic blood flow in rats with AP. Treatment with exogenous obestatin reduces severity of AP and accelerates pancreatic recovery.

  2. [A case of severe acute pancreatitis with hyperlipidemia in a pregnant woman].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ido, Yumi; Gushima, Ryosuke; Ozaki, Tetsu; Maki, Youko; Nonaka, Kouichi; Kaku, Eisuke; Murao, Tetsuya; Naoe, Hideaki; Yokomine, Kazunori; Sakurai, Kouichi; Sasaki, Yutaka

    2012-07-01

    A 29-year-old pregnant woman was referred to our hospital with suspected acute pancreatitis. On admission, the serum levels of pancreatic enzyme, total cholesterol and triglyceride were markedly elevated, which suggesting acute pancreatitis with hyperlipidemia. Treatment consisted of continuous hemodiafiltration, LDL apheresis, heparin and insulin combination therapy. On the 24th day of hospitalization, a cesarean section delivery resulted in the birth of a healthy infant. We reported a case of hyperlipidemia-induced acute pancreatitis in a woman with second trimester pregnancy, where multidisciplinary treatment was quite effective.

  3. Acute pancreatitis after thoracic duct ligation for iatrogenic chylothorax. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bédat, Benoît; Scarpa, Cosimo Riccardo; Sadowski, Samira Mercedes; Triponez, Frédéric; Karenovics, Wolfram

    2017-01-23

    To report the association between thoracic duct ligation and acute pancreatitis. The association between sudden stop of lymphatic flow and pancreatitis has been established in experimental models. A 57-year-old woman operated for thymoma presented a iatrogenic chylothorax. After thoracic duct ligation, she presented an acute pancreatitis which resolved after conservative treatment. The chylothorax disappeared within 4 days of thoracic duct ligation. This is the first report of acute pancreatitis following thoracic duct ligation. The pancreas and digestive tract should be assessed in symptomatic patients after thoracic duct ligation.

  4. The effect of oral pancreatic enzyme supplementation on the course and outcome of acute pancreatitis: a randomized, double-blind parallel-group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Stefan; Schütte, Kerstin; Glasbrenner, Bernhard; Mayerle, Julia; Simon, Peter; Henniges, Friederike; Sander-Struckmeier, Suntje; Lerch, Marcus M; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2014-03-10

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is a significant problem after acute pancreatitis. To evaluate whether oral pancreatic enzyme supplementation improves the recovery of pancreatic exocrine function and to explore the efficacy, safety and tolerability of pancreatic enzyme supplementation in patients during the refeeding period after acute pancreatitis. Prospective double-blind, placebo controlled, randomized study. The sudy included 56 patients with acute pancreatitis. Primary efficacy variable was recovery from pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. Secondary objectives were body weight, abdominal pain, course of APACHE II score, patient's symptoms and quality of life. Twenty of the 56 patients showed low fecal elastase values indicating pancreatic exocrine insufficiency after acute pancreatitis. Median time to recovery from exocrine pancreatic insufficiency was 14 days in the enzyme supplementation group and 23 days in the placebo group but overall differences for primary and all but one secondary endpoint did not reach statistical significance. However, a positive tendency in favour of enzyme supplementation was found for quality of life parameters (FACT-Pa) in all subscores. There were no relevant differences between placebo and oral pancreatic enzyme supplementation detected with respect to safety and tolerability. Enzyme supplementation positively effects the course of acute pancreatitis if administered during the early refeeding phase after acute pancreatitis. There is evidence that oral pancreatic enzyme supplementation has a positive impact on the course of the disease and the global health status (less weight loss, less flatulence, improved quality of life). Oral pancreatic enzyme supplementation was safely administered and can be added to the treatment regimen of patients in a refeeding status after severe acute pancreatitis.

  5. Recurrent acute pancreatitis: an approach to diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedia, Saurabh; Dhingra, Rajan; Garg, Pramod Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) is defined as more than two attacks of acute pancreatitis (AP) without any evidence of underlying chronic pancreatitis (CP). As the known causes of AP are generally taken care of, RAP usually occurs in the idiopathic group, which forms 20%-25% of cases of AP. The causes of idiopathic RAP (IRAP) can be mechanical, toxic-metabolic, anatomical, or miscellaneous. Microlithiasis commonly reported from the West is not a common cause of IRAP among Indian patients. Pancreas divisum (PD) is now believed as a cofactor, the main factor being associated genetic mutations. The role of Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD) as a cause of IRAP remains controversial. Malignancy should be ruled out in any patient with IRAP > 50 years of age. Early CP can present initially as RAP. The work-up of patients with IRAP includes a detailed history and investigations. Primary investigations include liver function tests (LFT), serum calcium and triglyceride, abdominal ultrasonography (USG) and contrast-ehhanced computed tomography (CECT) abdomen. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and possibly endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) are indicated in the secondary phase if the work-up is negative after the primary investigations. EUS is advised usually 6-8 weeks after an acute episode. Treatment of patients with IRAP is aimed at the specific aetiology. In general, empirical cholecystectomy should be discouraged with the availability and widespread use of EUS. Endoscopic sphincterotomy is advised if there is strong suspicion of SOD. Minor papilla sphincterotomy should be carried out in those with PD but with limited expectations. Regular follow-up of patients with IRAP is necessary because most patients are likely to develop CP in due course.

  6. International Multidisciplinary Classification of Acute Pancreatitis Severity: The 2013 Spanish Edition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maraví-Poma, E.; Patchen Dellinger, E.; Forsmark, C. E.; Layer, P.; Lévy, P.; Shimosegawa, T.; Siriwardena, A. K.; Uomo, G.; Whitcomb, D. C.; Windsor, J. A.; Petrov, M. S.; Abu Hilal, M.; Abu-Zidan, F. M.; Acosta, J. M.; Ainsworth, A. P.; Aizcorbe Garralda, M.; Alagozlu, H.; Al'aref, S. J.; Albeniz Arbizu, E.; Alhajeri, A.; Almeida, J. L.; Ammori, B. J.; Andersson, R.; Ardengh, J. C.; Arroyo-Sanchez, A. S.; Arvanitakis, M.; Ashley, S. W.; Aygencel, G.; Ayoub, W. A.; Baillie, J.; Bala, M.; Ball, C. G.; Banks, P. A.; Baron, T. H.; Barreto, S. G.; Basaranoglu, M.; Beger, H. G.; Bernal Monterde, V.; Besselink, M. G.; Bharwani, N.; Bhasin, D. K.; Bong, J. J.; Botoi, G.; Bruennler, T.; Bruno, M. J.; Cairoli, E.; Carter, C. R.; Cernea, D.; Chari, S. T.; Chooklin, S.; Cochior, D.; Col, C.; Conwell, D. L.; Correia, M. I.; Dambrauskas, Z.; Darvas, K.; de Campos, T.; de Casasola, G. G.; de Waele, J. J.; del Chiaro, M.; Delle Fave, G.; Dellinger, E. P.; de-Madaria, E.; Dervenis, C.; di Sebastiano, P.; Diuzheva, T. G.; Duarte-Rojo, A.; Fagenholz, P. J.; Farkas, G.; Farre Viladrich, A.; Fernandez-del Castillo, C.; Friess, H.; Frossard, J. L.; Gandhi, V.; Gardner, T. B.; Garg, P. K.; Gloor, B.; Gluk, M.; Goltsov, V. R.; Guevara-Campos, J.; Gumbs, A. A.; Hackert, T.; Hauser, G.; Horvath, K. D.; Howard, T. J.; Igarashi, H.; Ioannidis, O.; Jaber, S.; James, F. E.; Jha, R. K.; Johnson, C. D.; Juneja, D.; Kamisawa, T.; Kandasami, P.; Kantarcioglu, M.; Kapoor, V. K.; Karakan, T.; Kaya, E.; Khaliq, A.; Kiriyama, S.; Kochhar, R.; Konstantinou, G. N.; Kylanpaa, M. L.; Lankisch, P. G.; Laplaza Santos, C.; Lata, J.; Lerch, M. M.; Levy, P.; Lopez, A.; Lopez Camps, V.; Lujano-Nicolas, L. A.; Lund, H.; Lytras, D.; Macaya Redin, L.; Machado, M. C.; Macias Rodriguez, M. A.; Mann, O.; Maravi-Poma, E.; Marincas, M.; Marwah, S.; Mas, E.; Matheus, A. S.; Mayerle, J.; Meier, R.; Mennecier, D.; Mifkovic, A.; Mofidi, R.; Mole, D. J.; Morris-Stiff, G.; Mossner, J.; Muftuoglu, M. A.; Munsell, M. A.; Nathens, A. B.; Neri, V.; Nojgaard, C.; Nordback, I.; Ocampo, C.; Olejnik, J.; O'Reilly, D. A.; Oria, A.; Panek, J.; Papachristou, G. I.; Parekh, D.; Parks, R. W.; Passaglia, C.; Pearce, C. B.; Pellegrini, D.; Perez-Mateo, M.; Pettila, V.; Pezzilli, R.; Pitchumoni, C. S.; Pongprasobchai, S.; Poves Prim, I.; Puolakkainen, P.; Pupelis, G.; Radenkovic, D. V.; Rahman, S. H.; Rau, B.; Regidor Sanz, E.; Repiso, A.; Rodrigo, L.; Rydzewska, G.; Sánchez-Izquierdo Riera, J. A.; Savides, T. J.; Scaglione, M.; Serrablo, A.; Servin-Torres, E.; Sethu, I.; Sezgin, O.; Shankar-Hari, M.; Singer, M. V.; Sinha, S. K.; Sjoberg Bexelius, T.; Skipworth, J. R.; Soriano, F. G.; Sotoudehmanesh, R.; Spanier, B. W.; Stabuc, B.; Stroescu, C.; Szentkereszty, Z.; Takacs, T.; Takada, T.; Takeda, K.; Takeyama, Y.; Talukdar, R.; Tang, W.; Tanjoh, K.; Tarnasky, P. R.; Teich, N.; Tellado, J. M.; Tenner, S.; Thomson, A.; Tireli, M.; Tong, Z.; Triantopoulou, C.; Uy, M. C.; van Geenen, E. J.; Vege, S. S.; Velasco Guardado, A.; Vettoretto, N.; Wada, K.; Warshaw, A. L.; Wilson, J. S.; Windsor, J.; Wittau, M.; Wu, B. U.; Wysocki, A. P.; Yan Quiros, E.; Yasuda, T.; Yu, C.; Zerem, E.; Zhou, X.; Zubia Olazcoaga, F.; Zyromski, N. J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To develop a new classification of acute pancreatitis severity on the basis of a sound conceptual framework, comprehensive review of the published evidence, and worldwide consultation. Backgrounds: The Atlanta definitions of acute pancreatitis severity are ingrained in the lexicon of

  7. Acute pancreatitis as an adverse event in patients with the duodenal-jejunal bypass liner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Betzel, B; Homan, J.; Aarts, E.; Janssen, I.; Spanier, M.; Wahab, P.J.; Groenen, M.; Berends, F.

    2015-01-01

    Placement of the duodenal-jejunal bypass liner (DJBL) is a minimally invasive technique for the management of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. Acute pancreatitis was seen in 5 of 167 patients (3 %) in our series. It is suggested that acute pancreatitis in patients with the DJBL

  8. Effects of abdominal fat distribution parameters on severity of acute pancreatitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Leary, D P

    2012-07-01

    Obesity is a well-established risk factor for acute pancreatitis. Increased visceral fat has been shown to exacerbate the pro-inflammatory milieu experienced by patients. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between the severity of acute pancreatitis and abdominal fat distribution parameters measured on computed tomography (CT) scan.

  9. Epidemiology, aetiology and outcome of acute and chronic pancreatitis: An update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanier, B. W. M.; Dijkgraaf, M. G. W.; Bruno, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past decades several epidemiological studies have been published reporting on incidence trends, hospital admissions, etiological factors and outcome of both acute and chronic pancreatitis. Over time, the incidence of acute pancreatitis has increased in the Western countries. Also, the

  10. Is the SPINK1 variant p.N34S overrepresented in patients with acute pancreatitis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jøergensen, Maiken Thyregod; Brusgaard, Klaus; Novovic, Srdan

    2012-01-01

    Serine Protease Inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) protects against premature intracellular activation of trypsinogen and development of acute pancreatitis. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of SPINK1 mutations (a) in unselected patients with first-time acute pancreatitis and (b) in the Danish...

  11. Nabumetone use and risk of acute pancreatitis in a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Shih-Chang; Liao, Kuan-Fu; Hung, Hung-Chang; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Chih-Hsueh

    2016-01-01

    It remains unknown whether nabumetone increases or decreases acute pancreatitis risk. To investigate this, we conducted a population-based case-control study using the database from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. We analysed 5384 cases aged 20-84 years who had their first attack of acute pancreatitis during 1998-2011 and 21,536 controls without acute pancreatitis, and matched them according to sex, age and year in which acute pancreatitis was diagnosed. Never use of nabumetone was defined as subjects who had never received a nabumetone prescription; active use as subjects receiving a minimum of one prescription for nabumetone within 7 days before acute pancreatitis diagnosis and non-active use of nabumetone as subjects who did not receive a prescription for nabumetone within 7 days before but received at least one prescription for nabumetone ≥8 days before. The odds ratio and 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated to investigate the risk of acute pancreatitis associated with nabumetone use, using the multivariable unconditional logistic regression model. The adjusted odds ratio of acute pancreatitis was 3.69 (95%CI 1.69, 8.05) for subjects with active use of nabumetone compared with those with never use. The odds ratios decreased to 1.0 (95%CI 0.88, 1.12) for subjects with non-active use. Active use of nabumetone may increase the risk of acute pancreatitis. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Acute pancreatitis in peritoneal dialysis and haemodialysis: risk, clinical course, outcome, and possible aetiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruno, M. J.; van Westerloo, D. J.; van Dorp, W. T.; Dekker, W.; Ferwerda, J.; Tytgat, G. N.; Schut, N. H.

    2000-01-01

    It has been suggested that the incidence of acute pancreatitis in patients with end stage renal failure is increased. To assess the risk of acute pancreatitis in patients on long term peritoneal dialysis and long term haemodialysis compared with the general population, to evaluate its clinical

  13. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome and Intra-abdominal Ischemia in Patients with Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, M.; Buddingh, K. T.; Bosma, B.; Nieuwenhuijs, V. B.; Hofker, H. S.; Zijlstra, J. G.

    Severe acute pancreatitis may be complicated by intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH), abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS), and intestinal ischemia. The aim of this retrospective study is to describe the incidence, treatment, and outcome of patients with severe acute pancreatitis and ACS, in

  14. Successful Plasma Exchange for Acute Pancreatitis Complicated With Hypertriglyceridemia: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahira, Shuji; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kin, Hunsook; Ooya, Yoshitaka; Sekine, Yasumasa; Sonoda, Kenichiro; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Nomura, Yushi; Takane, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Youhei; Tsukamoto, Isao; Nemoto, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    A 33-year-old male with acute pancreatitis induced by hypertriglyceridemia had problems during treatment with plasma exchange. The hypercoagulable state was prevented by introducing innovative methods for cleaning and warming of the circuit and dialyzer. This enabled successful therapy, and the patient fully recovered from life-threatening acute pancreatitis.

  15. Diagnostic Accuracy of Modified CT Severity Index in Assessing Severity of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehan, Amna; Shabbir, Zonaira; Shaukat, Asim; Riaz, Osman

    2016-12-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of modified CT severity index in assessing the severe acute pancreatitis keeping APACHE II as gold standard. Cross-sectional (validation) study. Department of Radiology, Allied Hospital, Faisalabad, from February to August 2014. A total of 120 patients of either gender aged 20-60 years with epigastric pain radiating to back and having sonographic findings (decreased or heterogeneous pancreatic echogenicity, pancreatic enlargement, peripancreatic fluid collection), supportive of acute pancreatitis were taken. CT with intravenous contrast was performed on 128-slice scanner within 24 hours of presentation. Slice thickness was 3 mm in region of pancreas. Modified CT severity index was calculated. Score above 5 was graded as severe pancreatitis. APACHE II score of >11 considered as gold standard was also calculated within 24 hours of admission. Mean age of the patients was 39.03 ±8.71 years. Most of the patients were females 73 (60.8%). Out of 120 patients, 43 (35.83%) patients had severe acute pancreatitis. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of modified CT severity index in assessing the severe acute pancreatitis were 100%, 87%, 81.13% and 100%, respectively. The diagnostic accuracy was yielded as 91.67% considered APACHE II as gold standard. Modified CT severity index had high diagnostic accuracy in assessment of severe acute pancreatitis and can be used reliably in early prediction of complications of severe acute pancreatitis.

  16. Epidemiology, aetiology and outcomes of acute pancreatitis: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvaderani, Maryam; Eslick, Guy D; Vagg, Daniel; Faraj, Shadi; Cox, Michael R

    2015-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common acute surgical presentation in Western Society. The causes and pattern of pancreatitis has not been previously documented for Western Sydney. As Western Sydney contains many areas of low socio-economic status with an expected high level of alcohol abuse, it was hypothesised that alcoholic pancreatitis would be more prevalent in this population. The aims of this study were to determine the epidemiology, aetiology and outcomes of acute pancreatitis. A retrospective analysis of patients presenting with acute pancreatitis to four tertiary hospitals over a four-year period was undertaken. 932 patients presented with acute pancreatitis with a median age of 50 years (range 16-95); 470 (50.4%) were female. Almost half had gallstones (40%), 25.6% idiopathic, 22% alcohol induced and 3.9% post ERCP. 69 (7.4%) of patients were admitted to ICU/HDU, with a median length of stay in ICU was 6 days (range 1-106). 85 (11.1%) patients had severe pancreatitis (score ≥ 3). Mortality in this study was 1% (9). The majority of patients with acute pancreatitis in Western Sydney present with mild disease and have a low risk of morbidity or mortality. The ratio of gallstone to alcohol aetiology was 2:1. Idiopathic pancreatitis is responsible for more cases than expected. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Acute pancreatitis complicated by infected pseudocyst in a child with pancreas divisum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meniconi, Roberto Luca; Caronna, Roberto; Schiratti, Monica; Casciani, Emanuele; Russillo, Gabriele; Chirletti, Piero

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis occurs less frequently in children than in adults, although it seems to be more common than has been considered in the past. There are several causes of pancreatitis in childhood: trauma, infections or structural gland anomalies as pancreas divisum. We report a case of non-traumatic severe acute pancreatitis in a 8-year-old girl with pancreas divisum, complicated by a rapid formation of a large infected pseudocyst which required a surgical internal drainage by a Roux-en-Y cystojejunostomy. Pancreas divisum is the most common congenital anomaly of the pancreas with an incidence of 3-10% of population, and its role in causing acute or recurrent pancreatitis is still controversial. There are only sporadic observations of acute pancreatitis complicated by pseudocyst in children with pancreatic anomalies and its treatment is not standardized. Three different approaches have been described to treat a pancreatic pseudocyst: percutaneous, endoscopic or surgical drainage. We decided to perform a pseudocyst-jejunostomy because of the disease severity. Even in the non-invasive era, the surgical approach to treat a large complicated pseudocysts in children still represents a safe and feasible approach in emergencies as acute abdomen, bleeding or sepsis. Complications of percutaneous and endoscopic drainages are avoided and long term results are excellent. Acute pancreatitis, Pancreas divisum, Pancreatic pseudocyst.

  18. An unexpected complication of acute pancreatitis: Intra-cardiac thrombus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Muhammed; Gümüşdağ, Ayça; Börklü, Edibe Betül; Dayı, Şennur Ünal; Avcı, İlhan İlker; Güvenç, Tolga Sinan; Güngör, Barış; Karabay, Can Yücel; Kozan, Ömer

    2017-05-01

    Left atrial thrombus after acute pancreatitis (AP) is a rare clinical statement. Because of induction of systemic prothrombotic process by AP; some patients with underlying risk factors may develop an intra-cardiac thrombus. We present a 53years-old-woman with moderate mitral stenosis and atrial fibrillation. However the patient was under warfarin treatment, she developed a big left atrial big thrombus which was originated from left atrial appendage after she was suffered from AP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Advances in the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WU Jie

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The incidence rate of acute pancreatitis (AP has been gradually increasing in recent years, and pediatric AP is often seen in clinical practice. Pediatric AP has complex causes and diverse clinical manifestations, and infants and children cannot clearly explain their discomforts, which makes it more difficult to make an accurate diagnosis and may easily cause misdiagnosis, missed diagnosis, and delayed treatment. A deep understanding of pediatric AP helps to improve the diagnosis and treatment level of this disease. This article reviews the advances in the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric AP, in order to provide guidance to clinical practice.

  20. Idiopathic cystic artery aneurysm complicated with hemobilia and acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al'aref, Subhi J; Abdel-Rahman, Husham; Hussain, Nasir

    2008-10-01

    Aneurysm of the cystic artery is not common, and it is a rare cause of hemobilia. Most of reported cases are pseudoaneurysms resulting from either an inflammatory process in the abdomen or abdominal trauma. We report a healthy individual who developed hemobilia and acute pancreatitis associated with cystic artery aneurysm. The patient was managed with angio-embolization with an uneventful post-embolization course. Visceral artery aneurysms are rare and can rupture with potentially grave outcome due to excessive bleeding. Angiographic embolization as a common method of treatment for visceral artery aneurysms was used in our patient with good outcome.

  1. The Value of Secretin-Enhanced MRCP in Patients With Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrasegaran, Kumar; Tahir, Bilal; Barad, Udaykamal; Fogel, Evan; Akisik, Fatih; Tirkes, Temel; Sherman, Stuart

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the additional value of secretin-enhanced MRCP over conventional (non-secretin-enhanced) MRCP in diagnosing disease in patients with recurrent acute pancreatitis. A retrospective review of a radiology database found 72 patients with recurrent acute pancreatitis who had secretin-enhanced MRCP and ERCP correlation within 3 months of each other between January 2007 and December 2011. Of these patients, 54 had no history of pancreatic tumor or surgery and underwent MRI more than 3 months after an episode of acute pancreatitis. In addition, 57 age- and sex-matched control subjects with secretin-enhanced MRCP and ERCP correlation and without a diagnosis of recurrent acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis were enrolled as the control group. All studies were anonymized, and secretin-enhanced MRCP images (image set A) were separated from conventional 2D and 3D MRCP and T2-weighted images (image set B). Image sets A and B for each patient were assigned different and randomized case numbers. Two blinded reviewers independently assessed both image sets for ductal abnormalities and group A image sets for exocrine response to secretin. There were statistically significantly more patients with recurrent acute pancreatitis with reduced exocrine function compared with patients in the control group (32% vs 9%; p acute pancreatitis were more likely to have side branch dilation (p = 0.02; odds ratio, 3.6), but not divisum, compared with the control group. Secretin-enhanced images were superior to non-secretin-enhanced images for detecting ductal abnormalities in patients with recurrent acute pancreatitis, with higher sensitivity (76% vs 56%; p = 0.01) and AUC values (0.983 vs 0.760; p acute pancreatitis showed exocrine functional abnormalities. Secretin-enhanced MRCP had a significantly higher yield for ductal abnormalities than did conventional MRI and should be part of the MRCP protocol for investigation of patients with recurrent acute

  2. Management and outcomes of acute pancreatitis patients over the last decade: A US tertiary-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutroumpakis, Efstratios; Slivka, Adam; Furlan, Alessandro; Dasyam, Anil K; Dudekula, Anwar; Greer, Julia B; Whitcomb, David C; Yadav, Dhiraj; Papachristou, Georgios I

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) management remains largely supportive and can be challenging in patients with severe disease. This study aims to describe a ten-year US tertiary-center experience in managing AP patients. Clinical management and outcomes of 400 prospectively enrolled AP patients stratified by the Revised Atlanta Classification were analyzed; trends in management between early (2004-2008) and late enrollment phase (2009-2014) were assessed. Fifty-two% of patients were classified as mild AP (MAP); moderately severe (MoAP) and severe (SAP) grades contained 23.5% and 24.5% of participants. Intravenous fluid administration during the first 24 h (MAP 3.7, MoAP 4.7, and SAP 4.8 L), need for ICU (6%, 23%, 93%), and nutritional support (7%, 51%, 90%) increased significantly with greater AP severity (p MoAP (p < 0.001). Enteral nutrition (18% vs. 30%) and minimally invasive pancreatic interventions (19% vs. 41%) were more commonly used in the late phase (p < 0.05). The overall median length of hospitalization was 7 days reaching 29 days in SAP group. Mortality was 5%; all deaths occurred in SAP group. This study provides an extensive report on clinical management of AP and its trends overtime. Pancreatic intervention is required in less than 50% of patients with necrotizing pancreatitis. Utilization of enteral nutrition and minimally invasive pancreatic interventions has been increasing over time. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. The Long-term Prospective Follow-up of Pancreatic Function After the First Episode of Acute Alcoholic Pancreatitis: Recurrence Predisposes One to Pancreatic Dysfunction and Pancreatogenic Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikkola, Jussi; Laukkarinen, Johanna; Lahtela, Jorma; Seppänen, Hanna; Järvinen, Satu; Nordback, Isto; Sand, Juhani

    2017-02-01

    Data on the prevalence of pancreatic dysfunction after an episode of acute pancreatitis are conflicting. Our aim was to evaluate the natural course of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic function in the long-term follow-up after the first episode of acute alcoholic pancreatitis (AAP). A total of 77 patients who survived their first episode of AAP between January 2001 and February 2005 were prospectively followed up for a maximum of 13 years. During the follow-up, patients were repeatedly interviewed and monitored for recurrences, new diabetes, and chronic pancreatitis. The pancreatic function was evaluated repeatedly during the follow-up. Of the patients, 35% had ≥1 recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) episodes during the follow-up. New pancreatogenic diabetes developed in 19% of the previously nondiabetic patients, but only in patients with RAP (13/26 vs. 0/42; OR=39; 95% CI, 4.6-327.1). In addition, 55% of the patients developed new prediabetes or diabetes, and even this was more frequent in patients with RAP (86% vs. 42%; OR=8.2; 95% CI, 1.2-54.3). Exocrine dysfunction developed in 24% of the patients and was associated with abnormal findings in the endocrine function (P=0.003). Patients with RAP had a higher overall mortality compared with patients without RAP episodes during the follow-up (36% vs. 13%; HR=4.0; 95% CI, 1.4-11.0). The risk for pancreatic endocrine dysfunction, pancreatogenic diabetes and mortality increases significantly if the patient has recurrent episodes of AAP. The risk of developing pancreatic dysfunction after AAP should be recognized and pancreatic function should be screened routinely during the years after the first episode of AAP.

  4. [Acute pancreatitis and afferent loop syndrome. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajas-Fregoso, Elpidio Manuel; Romero-Hernández, Teodoro; Macías-Amezcua, Michel Dassaejv

    2013-01-01

    The afferent syndrome loop is a mechanic obstruction of the afferent limb before a Billroth II or Roux-Y reconstruction, secondary in most of case to distal or subtotal gastrectomy. Clinical case: Male 76 years old, with antecedent of cholecystectomy, gastric adenocarcinoma six years ago, with subtotal gastrectomy and Roux-Y reconstruction. Beginning a several abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, abdominal distension, without peritoneal irritation sings. Amylase 1246 U/L, lipase 3381 U/L. Computed Tomography with thickness wall and dilatation of afferent loop, pancreas with diffuse enlargement diagnostic of acute pancreatitis secondary an afferent loop syndrome. The afferent loop syndrome is presented in 0.3%-1% in all cases with Billroth II reconstruction, with a mortality of up to 57%, the obstruction lead accumulation of bile, pancreatic and intestinal secretions, increasing the pressure and resulting in afferent limb, bile conduct and Wirsung conduct dilatation, triggering an inflammatory response that culminates in pancreatic inflammation. The severity of the presentation is related to the degree and duration of the blockage.

  5. [History of surgical intervention in severe acute pancreatitis treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunyou; Gou, Shanmiao

    2015-09-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is hard to treat for the abrupt onset, critical condition and complicated pathophysiology. Historically, the treatment strategy of SAP hovered between surgical intervention and conservative treatment. At the turn of the 20(th) century, SAP was reported to be cured by surgical intervention in a series cases, which lead to the dominance of surgical intervention in SAP treatment. Subsequently, SAP was documented to respond to nonoperative therapy. A wave of conservatism emerged, and surgical intervention for SAP was rarely practiced for the next 3 decades. However, surgeons refined the indications and considered new approaches for surgical treatment in 1960s because of the poor outcomes of conservation, and surgical interventions was mainly performed at early stage of SAP. However, a series of prospective studies showed that conservative treatment of patients with sterile pancreatic necrosis is superior to surgical intervention, and that delayed intervention provide improved outcomes in 1990s, which changed the treatment concept of SAP again. The modern treatment concept formed during the progression: organ supportive care dominates in the early stage of the disease, and surgical intervention should be performed at late stage with proper indications. Despite the advances in treatment, the morbidity of SAP is still 5%-20%, which suggests the pancreatic surgeons' exploration in the future.

  6. Current concepts in the management of acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautham Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis (AP are based on the Western experience, which may be difficult to extrapolate in India due to socioeconomic constraints. Hence, modifications based on the available resources and referral patterns should be introduced so as to ensure appropriate care. We reviewed the current literature on the management of AP available in English on Medline and proposed guidelines locally applicable. Patients of AP presenting with systemic inflammatory response syndrome are at risk of moderate-severe pancreatitis and hence, should be referred to a tertiary center early. The vast majority of patients with AP have mild disease and can be managed at smaller centers. Early aggressive fluid resuscitation with controlled fluid expansion, early enteral nutrition, and culture-directed antibiotics improve outcomes in AP. Infected pancreatic necrosis should be managed in a tertiary care hospital within a multidisciplinary setup. The “step up” approach involving antibiotics, percutaneous drainage, and minimally invasive necrosectomy instituted sequentially based on clinical response has improved the outcomes in this subgroup of patients.

  7. Acute biliary pancreatitis related with pregnancy: a 5-year single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turhan, Ahmet Nuray; Gönenç, Murat; Kapan, Selin; Islim, Filiz; Oner, Osman Zekai; Tulubaş, Erkam; Aygün, Erşan

    2010-03-01

    Pregnancy-associated acute biliary pancreatitis is a rare but challenging clinical entity in terms of diagnosis and management. We report our institutional medical data of pregnancy-associated acute biliary pancreatitis. Medical records of 27 patients admitted to our clinics for pregnancy-associated acute biliary pancreatitis between January 2005 and January 2010 were reviewed. Of the 27 patients, 25 (93%) were in the post-partum period, and 2 (7%) were pregnant. Seventeen patients (63%) were managed with conservative treatment, and were scheduled for interval cholecystectomy, while 10 patients (37%) had early cholecystectomy prior to discharge. The mortality rate was 3% (n=1). Pregnancy-associated acute biliary pancreatitis usually has a mild-to-moderate clinical course with a favorable outcome, and can be managed successfully with conservative treatment. Early cholecystectomy done prior to discharge in the initial admission should be considered in mild-to-moderate pregnancy-associated acute biliary pancreatitis, except in patients within the first trimester.

  8. Acute pancreatitis in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus treated with dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tzu-Lin; Shen, Mei-Chiou; Yu, Ming-Lung; Huang, Yaw-Bin; Chen, Chung-Yu

    2016-04-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors are approved for use in monotherapy or in combination therapy for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus for acute pancreatitis were made through the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System, and this led to a revision in the prescribing information for these drugs. Therefore, this study is designed to evaluate DPP-4 inhibitors induced acute pancreatitis via the spontaneous adverse drug reactions (ADRs) reporting system in a medical center. In four of 2305 ADR cases, it is suspected that DPP-4 inhibitors induced moderate to serious acute pancreatitis. Beyond drugs, other factors also contribute to acute pancreatitis and affect the possibility of ADRs assessed using the Naranjo algorithm. Finally, our results indicate that the incidence of DPP-4 inhibitors induced acute pancreatitis is low. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, diabetes mellitus and serum nutritional markers after acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vujasinovic, Miroslav; Tepes, Bojan; Makuc, Jana; Rudolf, Sasa; Zaletel, Jelka; Vidmar, Tjasa; Seruga, Maja; Birsa, Bostjan

    2014-12-28

    To investigate impairment and clinical significance of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function in patients after acute pancreatitis (AP). Patients with AP were invited to participate in the study. Severity of AP was determined by the Atlanta classification and definitions revised in 2012. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) was diagnosed by the concentration of fecal elastase-1. An additional work-up, including laboratory testing of serum nutritional markers for determination of malnutrition, was offered to all patients with low levels of fecal elastase-1 FE. Hemoglobin A1c or oral glucose tolerance tests were also performed in patients without prior diabetes mellitus, and type 3c diabetes mellitus (T3cDM) was diagnosed according to American Diabetes Association criteria. One hundred patients were included in the study: 75% (75/100) of patients had one attack of AP and 25% (25/100) had two or more attacks. The most common etiology was alcohol. Mild, moderately severe and severe AP were present in 67, 15 and 18% of patients, respectively. The mean time from attack of AP to inclusion in the study was 2.7 years. PEI was diagnosed in 21% (21/100) of patients and T3cDM in 14% (14/100) of patients. In all patients with PEI, at least one serologic nutritional marker was below the lower limit of normal. T3cDM was more frequently present in patients with severe AP (P = 0.031), but was also present in some patients with mild and moderately severe AP. PEI was present in all degrees of severity of AP. There were no statistically significantly differences according to gender, etiology and number of AP attacks. As exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency can develop after AP, routine follow-up of patients is necessary, for which serum nutritional panel measurements can be useful.

  10. Antioxidant inhibits HMGB1 expression and reduces pancreas injury in rats with severe acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhong Wei; Zhang, Qi Yu; Zhou, Meng Tao; Liu, Na Xin; Chen, Tong Ke; Zhu, Ye Fan; Wu, Liang

    2010-09-01

    Pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis is still unclear, which leads to a lack of proper treatment in severe acute pancreatitis therapeutic strategy. To investigate the effect of treatment with antioxidant pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate on pancreas injury in rats with severe acute pancreatitis and its possible mechanism. A total of 144 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated into a sham operation group (n=48), a severe acute pancreatitis group (n=48), and a pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate-treated group (n=48). All the rats were killed at 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h after operation. The pancreas histopathologies were observed and serum amylase levels were tested. Meanwhile, the nuclear factor-kappaB activation, tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels and high-mobility group box protein-1 expression levels in pancreatic tissue were studied. Animals receiving pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate had significantly improved pancreas histopathology and lower serum amylase levels (pacute pancreatitis group, pancreas tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels reached a peak at 6 h after operation and afterwards rapidly declined to normal levels. However, high-mobility group box protein-1 levels in pancreatic tissue increased remarkably at the 12th hour, reached a peak at 24 h, and maintained up to 48 h post-severe acute pancreatitis. Compared to the severe acute pancreatitis group, the pancreas nuclear factor-kappaB activity, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, high-mobility group box protein-1 levels in the pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate-treated group all remarkably decreased (pacute pancreatitis. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate might inhibit the activation of nuclear factor-kappaB to blockade tumor necrosis factor-alpha, thereby indirectly suppressing the high-mobility group box protein-1 and reducing pancreatic tissue damage in rats with severe acute pancreatitis.

  11. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood in non-Asian patients: report of three cases and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastroyianni, Sotiria D; Gionnis, Dimitrios; Voudris, Konstantinos; Skardoutsou, Angeliki; Mizuguchi, Masashi

    2006-10-01

    Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood is a novel type of parainfectious encephalopathy with a racial and geographic predilection, rarely reported from other than East Asian areas. The objective was to describe the clinical, imaging, and other laboratory findings of non-Asian patients with acute necrotizing encephalopathy. Data were collected from three patients diagnosed in Athens over a 4-year period plus 16 cases reported from other European and North American countries. One of the Greek children died, and the other two had a normal outcome. A neuropathologic examination in the fatal case showed edematous necrosis without inflammatory, reactive, or proliferative changes. Data from Greek and other non-Asian patients support the homogeneity of the disease worldwide.

  12. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy: a comparison of associated conditions, treatments and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Audrey; Patenaude, Valerie; Abenhaim, Haim A

    2014-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare condition in pregnancy. The aim of this study is to compare associated conditions, treatments and complications of pancreatitis in pregnant and age-matched non-pregnant controls. We carried out a population-based retrospective cohort study using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample (HCUP-NIS) from 2003 to 2010. A cohort of pregnant women with acute pancreatitis was created and compared to a created age-matched cohort of non-pregnant women with acute pancreatitis at a 1:4 ratio. Comparisons of associated conditions, treatment types, and complications were carried out using unconditional logistic regression. We identified 7725 cases of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy. As compared to non-pregnant controls, pancreatitis in pregnancy was more likely to be associated with cholelithiasis and less likely with hyperlipidemia and alcohol abuse. Pancreatitis in pregnancy was more likely to be treated with parenteral nutrition and less likely to undergo endoscopic sphincterotomy. As compared to non-pregnant controls, pregnant women with pancreatitis were less likely to have pancreatic pseudocysts/hemorrhage/necrosis, generalized peritonitis, adult respiratory distress syndrome, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and death. Pancreatitis in pregnancy is predominantly caused by cholelithiasis, and unlike in the non-pregnant state, usually has a milder course.

  13. Protective Effects of Hydrogen Gas on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao-Xin Zhou

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis (AP is an inflammatory disease mediated by damage to acinar cells and pancreatic inflammation. In patients with AP, subsequent systemic inflammatory responses and multiple organs dysfunction commonly occur. Interactions between cytokines and oxidative stress greatly contribute to the amplification of uncontrolled inflammatory responses. Molecular hydrogen (H2 is a potent free radical scavenger that not only ameliorates oxidative stress but also lowers cytokine levels. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of H2 gas on AP both in vitro and in vivo. For the in vitro assessment, AR42J cells were treated with cerulein and then incubated in H2-rich or normal medium for 24 h, and for the in vivo experiment, AP was induced through a retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the pancreatobiliary duct (0.1 mL/100 g body weight. Wistar rats were treated with inhaled air or 2% H2 gas and sacrificed 12 h following the induction of pancreatitis. Specimens were collected and processed to measure the amylase and lipase activity levels; the myeloperoxidase activity and production levels; the cytokine mRNA expression levels; the 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, malondialdehyde, and glutathione levels; and the cell survival rate. Histological examinations and immunohistochemical analyses were then conducted. The results revealed significant reductions in inflammation and oxidative stress both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the beneficial effects of H2 gas were associated with reductions in AR42J cell and pancreatic tissue damage. In conclusion, our results suggest that H2 gas is capable of ameliorating damage to the pancreas and AR42J cells and that H2 exerts protective effects both in vitro and in vivo on subjects with AP. Thus, the results obtained indicate that this gas may represent a novel therapy agent in the management of AP.

  14. Novel findings in the management of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolado, Federico; de-Madaria, Enrique

    2016-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a potentially serious disease whose incidence is on the increase. Pancreas divisum does not meet the required criteria to be considered an aetiological factor. Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction may be another cause of idiopathic AP. Less invasive methods cannot replace Sphincter of Oddi manometry in diagnosis. Almost half of patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome develop organ failure, but the mechanisms involved are not completely understood. Obesity is a risk factor for severity in AP; the cause could be the presence of free unsaturated fatty acids, which have pro-inflammatory activity. Prognosis is better in patients with isolated extra-pancreatic necrosis than in those with parenchymal necrosis or with both. The mortality rate among those with infected pancreatic necrosis is 15-20%. The "moderately severe" group is widely heterogeneous and this category may require redefinition. Laparoscopic treatment of pseudocysts is an alternative to endoscopic drainage and could be the first-line option in patients requiring cholecystectomy. The use of lumen-apposing metal stents to treat pancreatic necrosis is cost-effective. Quality of life in some patients following an attack of AP is significantly impaired even at 1 year. Aggressive fluid therapy is not superior to standard fluid therapy in preventing post-ERCP AP. The role of statins in AP prevention is still unclear. Aggressive fluid resuscitation and the use of lactated Ringer solution seem to be beneficial in the treatment of AP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Use of Simvastatin and Risk of Acute Pancreatitis: A Nationwide Case-Control Study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Ming; Liao, Kuan-Fu; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lai, Shih-Wei

    2017-07-01

    The correlation between simvastatin use and acute pancreatitis is explored. A case-control study was conducted to analyze claim data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. The case group comprising a total of 3882 subjects aged 20 to 84 years with their first acute pancreatitis episode occurring between 1998 and 2011 formed the case group, against 3790 randomly selected controls matched for sex, age, comorbidities, and index year of acute pancreatitis diagnosis. Recent use of simvastatin was defined as subjects whose last remaining simvastatin tablet was noted ≤7 days before the date of acute pancreatitis diagnosis. Remote use of simvastatin was defined as subjects whose last remaining 1 tablet for simvastatin was noted >7 days before the date of acute pancreatitis diagnosis. Never use of simvastatin was defined as subjects who had never been prescribed simvastatin. A multivariable unconditional logistic regression model was used to estimate the odds ratio and 95%CI to explore the correlation between simvastatin use and acute pancreatitis. After adjustment for confounders, multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that the adjusted odds ratio of acute pancreatitis was 1.3 for subjects with recent use of simvastatin (95%CI 1.02, 1.73), when compared with those with never use of simvastatin. The crude odds ratio decreased to 1.1 for those with remote use of simvastatin (95%CI 0.93, 1.34) but without statistical significance. Recent use of simvastatin is associated with acute pancreatitis. Clinicians should consider the possibility of simvastatin-associated acute pancreatitis for patients presenting for acute pancreatitis without known cause. © 2017, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  16. Acute pancreatitis secondary to intramural duodenal hematoma: Case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozawa, Kazue; Watanabe, Manabu; Igarashi, Yoshinori; Matsukiyo, Yasushi; Matsui, Teppei; Sumino, Yasukiyo

    2010-07-28

    Nontraumatic intramural duodenal hematoma (IDH) is rare disease and it is generally related to coagulation abnormalities. Reports of nontraumatic IDH associated with pancreatic disease are relatively rare, and various conditions including acute or chronic pancreatitis are thought to be associated with nontraumatic IDH. However, the association between IDH and acute pancreatitis remains unknown. We report the case of a 45-year-old man who presented with vomiting and right hypochondrial pain. He had no medical history, but was a heavy drinker. The diagnosis of IDH was established by computed tomography, ultrasonography and endoscopy, and it was complicated by acute pancreatitis. The lesions resolved with conservative management. We discuss this case in the context of previously reported cases of IDH concomitant with acute pancreatitis. In our patient, acute pancreatitis occurred concurrently with hematoma, probably due to obstruction of the duodenal papilla, or compression of the pancreas caused by the hematoma. The present analysis of the published cases of IDH with acute pancreatitis provides some information on the pathogenesis of IDH and its relationship with acute pancreatitis.

  17. Effect of the acute postoperative pancreatitis at the postoperative period in the abdominal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotenko К.V.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The study aims the influence of development of the acute postoperative pancreatitis at the early postoperative period; determine its influence at the frequency and spectrum of complications after abdominal surgery. Material and methods. The work is based on the results of the complex examination and surgical treatment of 1934 patients with various disorders of the digestive system (complicated duodenal ulcer and gastric ulcer, gastric cancer, the proximal and distal pancreatic cancer, colon cancer and postgastrectomy syndromes. The dependence of the overall incidence of postoperative complications, the number of complications per patient, and the number of infectious and inflammatory complications per patient, hospital mortality and length of postoperative hospital days for the development of acute postoperative pancreatitis were studied. Results. Acute postoperative pancreatitis is a leading cause of morbidity postoperative intra-abdominal operations. 97,8% of the cases of complicated early postoperative period of the operations on the organs of the abdominal cavity caused by the development of acute postoperative pancreatitis. Specific complications for the acute postoperative pancreatitis (satellite complications were identified. Satellite complication had a clearly defined correlation with the development of the acute postoperative pancreatitis. The negative effect of acute postoperative pancreatitis on the severity of the postoperative period, on the morbidity, on the number of complications per patient, on the number of the infectious and inflammatory complications per patient, hospital mortality and on the duration of the postoperative hospital stay were found.

  18. LIVER FUNCTION TESTS IN PREDICTING CBD STONES IN ACUTE BILIARY PANCREATITIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, J T; Smith, M D; Omoshoro-Jones, J A O; Devar, J D; Gaylard, P D; Khan, Z K; Jugmohan, B J

    2017-06-01

    Acute biliary pancreatitis is a significant cause of pancreatitis. The role and timing of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in the setting of acute biliary pancreatitis is still controversial. Persistent choledocholithiasis in acute biliary pancreatitis occurs and establishing which patients require an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography based on liver function tests only can be challenging. Retrospective analysis of the Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital's ERCP database was performed. All ERCPs performed in patients with acute biliary pancreatitis were identified and analysed. A total of 2830 ERCPs were performed during the study period. In total 99 (3%) were performed for suspected choledocholithiasis in acute biliary pancreatitis with abnormal liver function tests. Thirty (30%) of the ERCPs confirmed choledocholithiasis while the remaining 69 (70%) yielded no choledocholithiasis. A significantly higher proportion of patients with choledocholithiasis required a needle knife sphincterotomy for deep biliary cannulation. The incidence of immediate complications, such as bleeding, false tract formation and perforation were comparable between the two groups. Two models were developed to determine specific cut-off values for conjugated bilirubin, ALP, GGT, AST and ALT. The calculated cut-off values yielded poor correlation between sensitivity and specificity. Determining persistent choledocholithiasis in acute biliary pancreatitis based on liver function test alone is not ideal. Using conjugated bilirubin, ALP, GGT, AST and ALT to guide one to perform an ERCP in acute biliary pancreatitis can be misleading.

  19. A case of pancreatic arteriovenous malformation identified by investigating the cause of upper abdominal pain associated with acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kohei; Monden, Kazuteru; Ueki, Toru; Tatsukawa, Masashi; Sadamori, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Kousaku; Takakura, Norihisa

    2016-07-01

    A man in his 60s with epigastric pain was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis and subsequently recovered following conservative treatment. However, because of repeated upper abdominal pain and the formation of a pancreatic pseudocyst, he was transferred to our institution for evaluation. Dynamic computed tomography (CT) scanning confirmed abnormal vessels in the tail of the pancreas and early venous return to the splenic vein in the early arterial phase. Abdominal angiography revealed a racemose vascular network in the tail of the pancreas, confirming the presence of an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) in this region. This AVM was thought to be the cause of the acute pancreatitis, so a distal pancreatectomy was performed. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful, and there has been no recurrence at the 7-month postoperative follow-up. Surgical resection has a low recurrence rate and good outcome;thus, if a pancreatic AVM appears difficult to treat with conservative medical therapy, surgical resection appears to be the definitive treatment.

  20. Acute pancreatitis with a mucinous cystoadenoma of the pancreas in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asciutti, Stefania; Kanninen, Tomi T; Clerici, Graziano; Nardi, Elisabetta; Castellani, Danilo; DI Renzo, Gian Carlo; Clerici, Carlo

    2010-03-01

    Pregnancy complicated by pancreatitis is a rare and difficultly managed clinical situation. Gallstones are the most frequent cause of pancreatitis in pregnancy. Non-gallstone pancreatitis in pregnancy has been shown to be significantly more prone to premature delivery and pseudocyst formation. Cystic lesions as a cause of pancreatitis in pregnancy have not, to our knowledge, been observed. Pancreatic cystic lesions in general are rare, but are difficult to treat given problems in clarifying their malignancy. Mucinous cystic neoplasms are considered premalignant lesions and resection is recommended. Receptors for estrogen and progesterone receptors in these cysts may cause cystic growth during pregnancy. Treatment recommendations for pancreatitis in pregnancy are not well defined; this applies as well to treatment protocols for cystic lesions. In this case report we describe a new potential cause of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy due to compression of the principal pancreatic duct by a mucinous cystoadenoma.

  1. Fatal H1N1-Related Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy in an Adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jin Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE is a severe neurological complication of influenza infection, including H1N1 influenza. Many cases of ANE have been reported in the pediatric literature, but very few cases have been described in adults. The cause of ANE remains unknown—the influenza virus is not known to be neurotropic, and evidence of direct viral involvement of the central nervous system (CNS has not been demonstrated in the limited cases of ANE in which pathological specimens have been obtained. Here we report a fatal case of ANE from H1N1 influenza infection in an adult. Neuroimaging and postmortem analysis both showed widespread brain edema, necrosis, and hemorrhage, but molecular studies and postmortem pathology revealed no evidence of direct viral involvement of the CNS. This case of fatal ANE in an adult is consistent with the hypothesis generated from pediatric cases that the host immune response, and not direct viral invasion of the CNS, is responsible for pathogenesis of ANE.

  2. Role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor in acute lung injury in mice with acute pancreatitis complicated by endotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Naoyuki; Nishihira, Jun; Takahashi, Yoshika; Kemmotsu, Osamu; Hattori, Yuichi

    2006-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis accompanied by a subsequent infectious attack can often lead to multisystem organ dysfunction, including acute lung injury (ALI), but the molecular mechanisms are poorly defined. In this study, we explored the role of the priming insult by induction of cerulein pancreatitis, which was followed by the second attack due to endotoxemia, in the development of ALI in mice. Experiments revealed that LPS injection in mice with acute pancreatitis caused the development of ALI, as indicated by blood-gas derangements, pulmonary vascular hyperpermeability, increased inflammatory cell counts in bronchoalveolar lavage, and histologic lung damage. This was associated with the pancreatitis-induced increase in expression of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in the lungs, together with elevated expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4, both of which were inhibited by administration of anti-protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2 antibody. Furthermore, anti-MIF antibody treatment suppressed the pancreatitis-induced elevation of TLR-4 pulmonary expression. Genetic removal of MIF from mice resulted in less development of ALI in the setting of acute pancreatitis complicated by endotoxemia. These findings demonstrate that activation of protease-activated receptor-2 with trypsin, which can be released after pancreatitis induction, positively regulates the transcript level of MIF, and increased MIF results in exaggerated pulmonary expression of TLR-4, leading to the development of ALI with a subsequent infectious attack. We thus suggest that interventions designed to modulate MIF may have therapeutic advantages in treating ALI in patients with acute pancreatitis complicated by bacterial infection.

  3. Candida albicans pancreatitis in a child with cystic fibrosis post lung transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, Mark M.; Sheybani, Elizabeth F. [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, 510 S. Kingshighway Blvd., Campus Box 8131, St. Louis, MO (United States); Zhang, Lingxin [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Stoll, Janis M. [Washington University School of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-04-15

    We present a case of Candida albicans infection of a previously intact pancreas in a child with cystic fibrosis status post lung transplantation. Although Candida superinfection in necrotizing pancreatitis is not uncommon, this is a unique case of Candida infection of non-necrotic pancreatic parenchyma. This case presented a diagnostic dilemma for radiologists because it appeared virtually identical to acute interstitial edematous pancreatitis on imaging. Ultimately, endoscopic US-based biopsy was pursued for diagnosis. Although difficult to treat and compounded by the immunocompromised status of the child, the pancreatic infection improved with antifungal therapy. (orig.)

  4. Acute Pancreatitis with Rapid Clinical Improvement in a Child with Isovaleric Acidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elpis Mantadakis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Isovaleric acidemia is a rare branched-chain organic acidemia. The authors describe a 3.5-year-old girl with isovaleric acidemia and acute abdominal pain associated with bilious emesis. Elevated serum amylase and abdominal ultrasonography demonstrating an enlarged and edematous pancreas, along with the presence of peripancreatic exudates, confirmed the presence of acute pancreatitis. The patient recovered quickly with intravenous hydration, pancreatic rest, and administration of intravenous L-carnitine. Pancreatitis should be ruled out in the context of vomiting in any patient with isovaleric acidemia. Conversely, branched-chain organic acidemias should be included in the differential diagnosis of any child with pancreatitis of unknown origin.

  5. The fusion of autophagosome with lysosome is impaired in L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongwei; Yu, Xiao; Zhu, Shaihong; Li, Xia; Lu, Ben; Li, Zhiqiang; Yu, Can

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory pancreatic disease that carries considerable morbidity and mortality. The pathogenesis of this disease remains poorly understood. We investigated the incidence of autophagy in mice following induction of acute pancreatitis. Mice were received intraperitoneal injections of L-arginine (200 mg × 2/100 g BW), while controls were administered with saline. Pancreatic tissues were assessed by histology, electron microscopy and western blotting. Injection of L-arginine resulted in the accumulation of autophagosomes and a relative paucity of autolysosomes. Moreover, the autophagy marker p62 is significantly increased. However, the lysosomal-associated membrane protein-2 (Lamp-2), a protein that is required for the proper fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes, is decreased in acute pancreatitis. These results suggest that a crucial role for autophagy and Lamp-2 in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. Our data suggest that the autophagic flux is impaired in acute pancreatitis. The depletion of Lamp-2 may play a role in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis.

  6. A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE PANCREATITIS IN A PERIPHERAL TERTIARY HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Karunahara

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES Acute pancreatitis (AP is one of the most common diseases in gastroenterology. Two percent of all patients admitted to hospital are diagnosed with AP. During the last decade, an increasing incidence was observed, mostly because of a higher sensitivity of diagnostic tests. Treatment of Acute Pancreatitis is still symptomatic and no specific medication is available today. As a result of popular belief that the pancreas should be put to rest during acute pancreatitis, the parenteral route for nutrition is still predominantly used in Acute Pancreatitis. There has been increasing evidence; however, about gut being main source of microorganisms causing infectious pancreatic complications and multiorgan failure. In patients with severe pancreatitis, oral intake is inhibited by nausea and subileus. Although some reports show that enteral feeding is possible in acute pancreatitis and associated with fewer septic complications. Although the evidence is inconclusive to support enteral nutrition in all patients with severe acute pancreatitis, the enteral route may be used if tolerated. Supportive treatment is the most important line of management in acute pancreatitis. The aim is to study the management of acute pancreatitis in a peripheral tertiary hospital and to assess the outcome of the management. METHODS & MATERIALS Data Collection: Patients with acute abdominal pain are admitted in hospital and diagnosed as acute pancreatitis based on blood investigations and radiological findings. Patients categorised- Revised Atlanta Classification. Different medical management modes followed and outcomes recorded, tabulated and analysed. Research Design: Retrospective study. Research Settings: Mahatma Gandhi Memorial Government Hospital, Trichy, Tamilnadu. Duration: 5 yrs. (2010-2015 Sample Size: 186. Inclusion Criteria: Patients between 12 and 75 yrs. of age, patients admitted to the hospital as a case of acute pancreatitis, both sexes

  7. Statins and the risk of acute pancreatitis: A population-based case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thisted, Henriette; Jacobsen, Jacob; Munk, Estrid Muff

    2006-01-01

    , and 25 817 age- and gender-matched controls from the general population. Prescriptions for statins prior to admission with acute pancreatitis or index date among controls were retrieved from prescription databases. We used conditional logistic regression analysis to estimate odds ratios for acute......: Our findings speak against a strong causative effect of statins on the risk of acute pancreatitis, and may even indicate a mild protective effect....

  8. Effect of carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum on the severity of acute pancreatitis: an experimental study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yol, S; Bostanci, E B; Ozogul, Y; Zengin, N I; Ozel, U; Bilgihan, A; Akoglu, M

    2004-12-01

    In the management of mild acute biliary pancreatitis, it is generally recommended to perform laparoscopic cholecystectomy after the subsidence of the attack during the same hospital admission. The effect of laparoscopy on abdominal organs has been widely investigated but not in acute pancreatitis. This study used an animal model of mild acute pancreatitis to examine the effects of CO(2) pneumoperitoneum on acute pancreatitis in rats. Mild acute pancreatitis was induced in 30 male Sprague-Dawley rats by surgical ligation of the biliopancreatic duct. After 2 days, animals were assigned to three groups: sham operation (animals were anesthetized for 30 min without undergoing laparotomy), CO(2) pneumoperitoneum (applied for 30 min at a pressure of 12 mmHg), and laparotomy (performed for 30 min, and then the abdomen was closed). Two hours after the surgical procedures, animals were killed and levels of lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, glucose, urea, hematocrit, and leukocyte count among Ranson's criteria and levels of amylase, lipase, and total bilirubin were measured to determine the severity of acute pancreatitis. Histopathologic examination of the pancreas was done, and malondialdehyde and glutathione levels of the pancreas and lung were determined. The only significant differences between the groups were in lactate dehydrogenase and aspartate aminotransferase levels, which were significantly higher in the pneumoperitoneum group compared to the sham operation group. CO(2) pneumoperitoneum for 30 min at a pressure of 12 mmHg did not affect the severity of acute pancreatitis induced by ligation of the biliopancreatic duct in rats.

  9. Splenectomy Correlates With Increased Risk of Acute Pancreatitis: A Case-Control Study in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of the study was to investigate the association between splenectomy and acute pancreatitis. Methods We conducted a case-control study using the database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. We included 7666 subjects aged 20–84 years with first-time acute pancreatitis during the period of 1998–2011 as cases and 30 664 randomly selected subjects without acute pancreatitis as controls. Both cases and controls were matched for sex, age, and index year of acute pancreatitis diagnosis. The association of acute pancreatitis with splenectomy was examined using a multivariable unconditional logistic regression model and reported as an odds ratio and its 95% confidence interval (CI). Results After adjustment for covariables, the adjusted odds ratio of acute pancreatitis was 2.90 for subjects with splenectomy (95% CI, 1.39–6.05) compared with subjects without splenectomy. Conclusions Splenectomy is associated with acute pancreatitis. Further studies are necessary to clarify the underlying mechanism. PMID:27087607

  10. Pancreatic morphological changes in long-term follow-up after initial episode of acute alcoholic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikkola, Jussi; Rinta-Kiikka, Irina; Räty, Sari; Laukkarinen, Johanna; Lappalainen-Lehto, Riitta; Järvinen, Satu; Seppänen, Hanna; Nordback, Isto; Sand, Juhani

    2014-01-01

    The long-term morphological changes induced by a single episode of alcoholic pancreatitis are not known. Our aim was to study these morphological changes in secretin-stimulated magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (S-MRCP) after the first episode of alcohol-associated acute pancreatitis and to evaluate the risk factors and possible protective factors potentially associated with later chronic findings. We have previously reported 2-year follow-up results in pancreatic morphology. This study extends the follow-up to 9 years. In this prospective follow-up study, S-MRCP imaging was performed for 44 (41 M, 3 F; mean age, 46 (25-68) years) patients after their first episode of alcohol-associated pancreatitis. Pancreatic morphology was evaluated at 3 months and at 2, 7, and 9 years after hospitalization. Recurrent attacks of pancreatitis were studied and pancreatic function was monitored by laboratory tests. Patients' alcohol consumption was evaluated with questionnaires, laboratory markers, and self-estimated alcohol consumption via interview. Smoking and body mass index were annually recorded. At 3 months, 32 % of the patients had normal findings in S-MRCP, 52 % had acute, and 16 % had chronic changes. At 7 years, S-MRCP was performed on 36 patients with normal findings in 53 %, the rest (47 %) having chronic findings. Pancreatic cyst was present in 36 %, parenchymal changes in 28 %, and atrophy in 28 % of the cases. There were no new changes in the pancreas in the attending patients between 7 and 9 years (18 patients). Of the patients with only acute findings at 3 months, 60 % resolved to normal in 7 years, but the rest (40 %) showed chronic changes later on. The initial attack was mild in 65 %, moderate in 25 %, and severe in 10 % of the patients. Patients with mild first attack had fewer chronic changes at 7 years compared to patients with moderate or moderate and severe together (p = 0.03, p = 0.01). Of the patients in the

  11. Use of methimazole and risk of acute pancreatitis: A case-control study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Some cases of acute pancreatitis have been reported to be associated with use of methimazole. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between use of methimazole and risk of acute pancreatitis on the basis of a systematic analysis. This was a population-based case-control study analyzing the database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. There were 5764 individuals aged 20-84 years with a first attack of acute pancreatitis from 1998 to 2011 as the cases and 23,056 randomly selected sex- and age-matched individuals without acute pancreatitis as the controls. Use of methimazole was categorized as "never use" and "ever use." We estimated the relative risk of acute pancreatitis associated with the use of methimazole by calculating the odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) using a multivariable logistic regression model. After adjustment for confounding factors, the OR of acute pancreatitis was 0.91 in individuals with ever use of methimazole, when compared with individuals with never use of methimazole (95% CI, 0.60-1.38). Unlike methimazole use, alcohol-related disease, biliary stone, cardiovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and hypertriglyceridemia were factors significantly associated with acute pancreatitis. Our study does not detect a substantial association between the use of methimazole and risk of acute pancreatitis on the basis of systematic analysis. There appears to be a discrepancy between case reports and our systematic analysis about the association between the use of methimazole and risk of acute pancreatitis.

  12. Increased Risk of Acute Pancreatitis in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chi Ching; Chiou, Chi Sheng; Lin, Hsiu Li; Wang, Li Hsuan; Chang, Yu Sheng; Lin, Hsiu-Chen

    2015-01-01

    The study was conducted to determine whether patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at increased risk of acute pancreatitis compared with those without RA and to determine if the risk of acute pancreatitis varied by anti-RA drug use. We used the large population-based dataset from the National Health Insurance (NHI) program in Taiwan to conduct a retrospective cohort study. Patients newly diagnosed with RA between 2000 and 2011 were referred to as the RA group. The comparator non-RA group was matched with propensity score, using age and sex, in the same time period. We presented the incidence density by 100,000 person-years. The propensity score and all variables were analyzed in fully adjusted Cox proportional hazard regression. The cumulative incidence of acute pancreatitis was assessed by Kaplan-Meier analysis, with significance based on the log-rank test. From claims data of one million enrollees randomly sampled from the Taiwan NHI database, 29,755 adults with RA were identified and 119,020 non- RA persons were matched as a comparison group. The RA cohort had higher incidence density of acute pancreatitis (185.7 versus 119.0 per 100,000 person-years) than the non-RA cohort. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) was 1.62 (95% CI [confidence interval] 1.43–1.83) for patients with RA to develop acute pancreatitis. Oral corticosteroid use decreased the risk of acute pancreatitis (adjusted HR 0.83, 95% CI 0.73–0.94) but without a dose-dependent effect. Current use of disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs or tumor necrosis factor blockers did not decrease the risk of acute pancreatitis. In conclusion, patients with RA are at an elevated risk of acute pancreatitis. Use of oral corticosteroids may reduce the risk of acute pancreatitis. PMID:26262880

  13. Serological diagnosis and prognosis of severe acute pancreatitis by analysis of serum glycoprotein 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggenbuck, Dirk; Goihl, Alexander; Hanack, Katja; Holzlöhner, Pamela; Hentschel, Christian; Veiczi, Miklos; Schierack, Peter; Reinhold, Dirk; Schulz, Hans-Ulrich

    2017-05-01

    Glycoprotein 2 (GP2), the pancreatic major zymogen granule membrane glycoprotein, was reported to be elevated in acute pancreatitis in animal models. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were developed to evaluate human glycoprotein 2 isoform alpha (GP2a) and total GP2 (GP2t) as specific markers for acute pancreatitis in sera of 153 patients with acute pancreatitis, 26 with chronic pancreatitis, 125 with pancreatic neoplasms, 324 with non-pancreatic neoplasms, 109 patients with liver/biliary disease, 67 with gastrointestinal disease, and 101 healthy subjects. GP2a and GP2t levels were correlated with procalcitonin and C-reactive protein in 152 and 146 follow-up samples of acute pancreatitis patients, respectively. The GP2a ELISA revealed a significantly higher assay accuracy in contrast to the GP2t assay (sensitivity ≤3 disease days: 91.7%, specificity: 96.7%, positive likelihood ratio [LR+]: 24.6, LR-: 0.09). GP2a and GP2t levels as well as prevalences were significantly elevated in early acute pancreatitis (≤3 disease days) compared to all control cohorts (ppancreatitis at admission compared with mild cases (ppancreatitis with lethal outcome was 7.8 on admission (p=0.0222). GP2a and GP2t levels were significantly correlated with procalcitonin [Spearman's rank coefficient of correlation (ρ)=0.21, 0.26; p=0.0110, 0.0012; respectively] and C-reactive protein (ρ=0.37, 0.40; ppancreatitis and analysis of GP2a can aid in the differential diagnosis of acute upper abdominal pain and prognosis of severe acute pancreatitis.

  14. Alteration of the renin-angiotensin system in caerulein induced acute pancreatitis in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddam, Ravinder Reddy; Ang, Abel Damien; Badiei, Alireza; Chambers, Stephen T; Bhatia, Madhav

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if RAS bioactive enzymes and peptides are perturbed in acute pancreatitis and associated lung injury. The intervention group of mice were treated with ten hourly intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of caerulein (50 μg/kg) to induce acute pancreatitis. Animals were euthanized, samples of pancreas, lung and blood were collected, and plasma was prepared and stored for subsequent analysis. ACE and ACE2 activities were determined by spectrofluorometric assay. ACE, ACE2, Ang II and Ang-(1-7) levels were quantified by ELISA. There was a significant decrease in ACE2 enzymatic activity in pancreatic and lung tissues of mice with acute pancreatitis. In contrast, there were no significant changes in measured levels of ACE and ACE2 in the pancreas, and lung or activity of ACE in pancreatic and lung tissue following acute pancreatitis. There were no significant differences in the activities and levels of circulating ACE and ACE2 following acute pancreatitis. The ACE to ACE2 activity ratio was markedly increased in pancreatic and lung tissues of mice with acute pancreatitis. No significant changes were observed in the levels of Ang II except for a decrease in lung tissue. No changes were observed in Ang-(1-7) levels in pancreas, lung and plasma between the groups. The Ang II to Ang-(1-7) ratio was increased in the pancreas but was decreased in the lung following caerulein treatment. These data suggest dysregulation of RAS in acute pancreatitis as evidenced by altered Ang II/Ang-(1-7) levels induced by the imbalance of ACE/ACE2 activity. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier India Pvt Ltd.

  15. Administration of human recombinant activated protein C is not associated with pancreatic parenchymal haemorrhage in L-arginine-induced experimental acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamdar, Saurabh; Babu, Benoy I; Nirmalan, Mahesh; Jeziorska, Maria; McMahon, Raymond F T; Siriwardena, Ajith K

    2013-11-10

    Microvascular thrombosis is a critical event in severe acute pancreatitis. Human recombinant activated protein C (Xigris®, Eli Lilly, Indianapolis, IN, USA) modulates the interplay between pro-inflammatory and pro-coagulant pathways and maintains microvascular patency. However, the anticoagulant properties of Xigris® may precipitate bleeding from the inflamed pancreas. This study tests the hypothesis that Xigris® can ameliorate experimental acute pancreatitis without causing pancreatic haemorrhage. Sprague Dawley rats were allocated as follows: Group 1: control (n=7); Group 2: acute pancreatitis (n=6); Group 3: administration of Xigris® 500 µg/kg body weight before induction of acute pancreatitis (n=6); and Group 4: Administration of Xigris® 500 µg/kg body weight 30 minutes after induction of acute pancreatitis (n=6). Acute pancreatitis was induced by intraperitoneal administration of L-arginine 300 mg/100 g body weight. Animals were sacrificed at 48 hours and biochemical, haematological, and histological markers of pancreatic haemorrhage and inflammation assessed. Median lipase in animals with acute pancreatitis was 10 U/mL (range: 7-16 U/mL) compared to 5.5 (range: 3-8 U/mL) in controls (P=0.028). Lipase was also elevated in animals given Xigris® both before (12 U/mL, range: 8-22 U/mL; P=0.031 vs. control group) and after (46 U/mL, range: 9-71 U/mL; P=0.015 vs. control group) induction of acute pancreatitis). Haemoglobin levels were similar among all groups (P=0.323). There was no histological evidence of pancreatic haemorrhage in animals treated with Xigris®. Pre-treatment with Xigris® was associated with a significant reduction in pancreatic injury. This effect was absent when Xigris® was administered after induction of acute pancreatitis. Xigris® did not lead to pancreatic haemorrhage in experimental acute pancreatitis. Administration of Xigris® prior to induction of acute pancreatitis was associated with amelioration of injury. This effect was

  16. Kontribusi Higiene Mulut terhadap Timbulnya Acute Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis (ANUG (Survei Epidemiologi di Kecamatan Pacet Kabupaten Cianjur Jawa Barat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Mirna

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This analytical epidemiological survey was aimed to investigate the correlation between oral hygiene and the onset of an infectious, necrotic, ulcerative disease called acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (ANUG. The study involved 319 elementary school children consisting of 163 (52% male and 156 (48% female pupils from Kecamatan Pacet, Cianjur, WestJawa. Samples were chosen by stratified simple random sampling. The obtained data were analyzed with Bivariant Test (Chi2Ttest, and the results showed a quite high prevalence of ANUG, aboout 15.3% in total and consisting 9% male and 6.3% female subjects. The correlation between oral hygiene and the onset of ANUG was found to be significant (p<0.05. It was concluded that oral hygiene has an important contribution to the onset of ANUG.

  17. Risk of acute pancreatitis in patients with cronic inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Højgaard; Fonager, Kirsten; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are few epidemiologic data about the risk of acute pancreatitis in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases; we therefore wanted to estimate the risk of a first episode of acute pancreatitis in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis in the total Danish population. METHODS......: The study included all patients discharged from Danish hospitals with a diagnosis of Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis registered in the Danish National Registry of Patients in the period from 1977 to 1992. The first episode of acute pancreatitis was identified in the cohort. The observed number...... of patients with acute pancreatitis was compared with expected numbers on the basis of age, sex, and calendar-specific incidence rates in the general population. RESULTS: Overall, 15,526 patients were discharged and followed up for 112,824 person-years. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) for acute...

  18. Excretion of cephalothin and cefamandole by the normal pancreas and in acute pancreatitis in dogs.

    OpenAIRE

    Studley, J G; Schentag, J J; Schenk, W G

    1982-01-01

    Nine mongrel dogs were studied to evaluate the excretion of cefamandole (five dogs) and cephalothin (four dogs) in the pancreatic fluid. Each dog was studied before and after the induction of pancreatitis, with 2 weeks between studies. After intravenous administration of a 25-mg/kg dose of either cephalosporin, serum and pancreatic fluid concentrations were monitored for 6 h. Both cephalothin and cefamandole were excreted in bactericidal concentrations in the normal pancreas and in acute panc...

  19. Role of N-13 ammonia PET/CT in diagnosing pancreatic necrosis in patients with acute pancreatitis as compared to contrast enhanced CT--results of a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Raghava; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai; Khaliq, Abdul; Manrai, Manish; Appasani, Sreekanth; Bhattacharya, Anish; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Kochhar, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Contrast enhanced computerized tomography (CECT) is used to determine severity of acute pancreatitis based upon the presence and extent of necrosis. However limitations do exist precluding its applicability in renal failure. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for cardiac perfusion shows good uptake of N-13 ammonia ((13)NH3) metabolites in pancreas owing to high perfusion. To evaluate the role of (13)NH3 PET/CT in acute pancreatitis and compare it with CECT in diagnosing and quantifying pancreatic necrosis. Patients presenting within 1 week of acute pancreatitis were studied. Static PET images were acquired after intravenous injection of 370-740 MBq of (13)NH3. (13)NH3 PET/CT was followed by CECT in the absence of renal impairment. Maximum standard-uptake-value (SUVmax) of pancreas (P) and liver (L) were taken and their ratio (P/L) was estimated to determine perfusion. Areas within pancreas with no tracer uptake were considered necrotic. These patients were managed as per institutional protocol. Patients undergoing (13)NH3 PET/CT for coronary artery disease were used as controls. 29 patients (72% males) were studied of whom 6 had elevated serum creatinine. (13)NH3 PET/CT was done in all patients along with 9 controls while CECT was carried out after PET/CT in 23 patients. Median levels of SUVmax (P/L) in the controls, uninvolved pancreas and necrotic areas were 1.0 (0.86-1.03), 0.66 (0.50-0.92) and 0.12 (0.07-0.21) respectively (p PET/CT picked up necrosis (PET/CT which was confirmed on surgery or subsequent CECT after improvement of renal failure. This pilot study is the first in literature to diagnose necrosis in patients with acute pancreatitis using (13)NH3 PET/CT. With minimal additional radiation burden, it is possible to estimate the absolute tissue perfusion as well. With no adverse renal side effects, this can be an alternative to CECT in patients with renal failure giving similar information. It has good agreement with CECT with a good

  20. Pseudoaneurysm of the celiac trunk following acute pancreatitis. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brnic, Z.; Hebrang, A.; Novacic, K.; Popic, J.; Janus, D.

    2002-01-01

    Background. Visceral artery aneurysms (VAA) are well-known complication of pancreatitis. Splenic artery is the most common localisation, but other peripancreatic vessels may also be affected. Although VAA may develop palpable epigastric mass, bleeding and pain, they are often fully asymptomatic, being incidentally picked up on abdominal US, CT or angiography for other reasons. Case report. The authors report a case of a 38-year-old male with pseudoaneurysm of celiac trunk following an acute pancreatitis. The complex cystic-solid epigastric mass was initially detected by grey-scale US, and its vascular nature was suspected on colour-Doppler US scan. Precise localisation was determined by angiography. Conclusions. Colour-Doppler US is a reliable diagnostic method for detection of VAA, but hardly identifies the vessel of origin in many patients. Angiography is fundamental for the final diagnosis, followed by immobilisation in selected cases. Celiac axis always has to be kept in mind as a rare possible localisation of VAA. (author)

  1. Epidural anesthesia improves pancreatic perfusion and decreases the severity of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Samira M; Andres, Axel; Morel, Philippe; Schiffer, Eduardo; Frossard, Jean-Louis; Platon, Alexandra; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Bühler, Leo

    2015-11-21

    To study the safety of epidural anesthesia (EA), its effect on pancreatic perfusion and the outcome of patients with acute pancreatitis (AP). From 2005 to August 2010, patients with predicted severe AP [Ranson score ≥ 2, C-reactive protein > 100 or necrosis on computed tomography (CT)] were prospectively randomized to either a group receiving EA or a control group treated by patient controlled intravenous analgesia. Pain management was evaluated in the two groups every eight hours using the visual analog pain scale (VAS). Parameters for clinical severity such as length of hospital stay, use of antibiotics, admission to the intensive care unit, radiological/clinical complications and the need for surgical necrosectomy including biochemical data were recorded. A CT scan using a perfusion protocol was performed on admission and at 72 h to evaluate pancreatic blood flow. A significant variation in blood flow was defined as a 20% difference in pancreatic perfusion between admission and 72 h and was measured in the head, body and tail of the pancreas. We enrolled 35 patients. Thirteen were randomized to the EA group and 22 to the control group. There were no differences in demographic characteristics between the two groups. The Balthazar radiological severity score on admission was higher in the EA group than in the control group (mean score 4.15 ± 2.54 vs 3.38 ± 1.75, respectively, P = 0.347) and the median Ranson scores were 3.4 and 2.7 respectively (P = NS). The median duration of EA was 5.7 d, and no complications of the epidural procedure were reported. An improvement in perfusion of the pancreas was observed in 13/30 (43%) of measurements in the EA group vs 2/27 (7%) in the control group (P = 0.0025). Necrosectomy was performed in 1/13 patients in the EA group vs 4/22 patients in the control group (P = 0.63). The VAS improved during the first ten days in the EA group compared to the control group (0.2 vs 2.33, P = 0.034 at 10 d). Length of stay and mortality

  2. Acute pancreatitis as an unusual early post-operative complication following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankush Sarwal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG at present one of the most commonly performed surgical treatments for morbid obesity worldwide. There are some complications regarding this procedure in the literature. This report presents a patient who developed acute pancreatitis immediate post-LSG. Patient was referred to our institute on 10th post-operative day with a complaint of fever, nausea, abdominal pain and leucocytosis. A diagnostic laparoscopy showed pancreatitis. Post-operatively, the patient was managed on treatment line of acute pancreatitis and recovered well. LSG is a common procedure in bariatric, and the most common complications are leakage and bleeding from the suture line. However, we encountered pancreatitis after LSG which is a rarely reported complication after LSG. We hypothesise that the development of acute pancreatitis in patients undergoing LSG is not well recognised and reported.

  3. Prognosis of acute and chronic pancreatitis - a 30-year follow-up of a Danish cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøjgaard, Camilla

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute and chronic pancreatitis are most frequently caused by a high consumption of alcohol and tobacco but often the aetiology is unknown. The diseases have a high risk of complications, but the long-term prognosis and the natural course of the diseases are only sparsely described. The aims...... of the study were to investigate the long-term prognosis of acute pancreatitis (AP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP), the risk of progression to CP, and the natural course of progressive acute pancreatitis. Hereby, describe the prognostic factors associated with mortality and the causes of death in these patients....... The study was based on the large prospective cohort study - Copenhagen Pancreatitis Study - of patients in the Copenhagen Municipality admitted with either AP or CP fulfilling specific diagnostic criteria and enrolled in the study during 1977 to 1982 and in 2008 followed up by linkage to the Danish...

  4. Acute Pancreatitis Complicated with Transient Portal Venous Thrombosis in One Patient with Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo You-Hsien Lin

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Portal venous thrombosis (PVT is a condition associated with high morbidity. The etiologies of PVT include intra-abdominal inflammation or infection, surgical intervention, abdominal malignancies such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and pancreatic carcinoma, or abnormality in coagulation caused by various reasons such as liver cirrhosis. Management of PVT should be based on its etiology and the condition of the patient. We describe a cirrhotic patient with HCC who suffered from acute pancreatitis. PVT in the main trunk was detected at admission due to the episode of acute pancreatitis. The etiology of thrombosis was considered to be inflammation around the main portal trunk caused by pancreatitis rather than cirrhosis or HCC. We did not instigate any management for the thrombosis. Acute pancreatitis was relieved after conservative treatment. Follow-up imaging study performed 46 days after detection of thrombosis showed spontaneous complete resolution of the thrombus. Our experience may provide useful information for the management of such patients.

  5. Association between triglyceride levels and cardiovascular disease in patients with acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Laurel A; Swendsen, C Scott; Sears, Dawn M; MacCarthy, Andrea A; McNeal, Catherine J

    2018-01-01

    Conventional wisdom supports prescribing "fibrates before statins", that is, prioritizing treatment of hypertriglyceridemia (hTG) to prevent pancreatitis ahead of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol to prevent coronary heart disease. The relationship between hTG and acute pancreatitis, however, may not support this approach to clinical management. This study analyzed administrative data from the Veterans Health Administration for evidence of (1) temporal association between assessed triglycerides level and days to acute pancreatitis admission; (2) association between hTG and outcomes in the year after hospitalization for acute pancreatitis; (3) relative rates of prescription of fibrates vs statins in patients with acute pancreatitis; (4) association of prescription of fibrates alone versus fibrates with statins or statins alone with rates of adverse outcomes after hospitalization for acute pancreatitis. Only modest association was found between above-normal or extremely high triglycerides and time until acute pancreatitis. CHD/MI/stroke occurred in 23% in the year following AP, supporting cardiovascular risk management. Fibrates were prescribed less often than statins, defying conventional wisdom, but the high rates of cardiovascular events in the year following AP support a clinical focus on reducing cardiovascular risk factors.

  6. Acute Pancreatitis Complicated with Diabetic Ketoacidosis in a Young Adult without Hypertriglyceridemia: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Hyun; Oh, Myung Jin

    2016-11-25

    Systemic complications related to acute pancreatitis include acute respiratory distress syndrome, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, disseminated intravascular coagulation, hypocalcemia, hyperglycemia, and insulin dependent diabetes or diabetic ketoacidosis. In practice, the development of diabetic ketoacidosis induced by acute pancreatitis is rare and generally associated with hypertriglyceridemia. However, herein we report a case of a 34-year-old female without hypertriglyceridemia, who was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis complicated with diabetic ketoacidosis. The patient was admitted with complaints of febrile sensation, back pain, and abdominal pain around the epigastric area. Levels of serum amylase and lipase were elevated to 663 U/L and 3,232 U/L. Contrast-enhanced abdominal CT showed pancreatic swelling, peri-pancreatic fat infiltration and fluid collection. The patient was initially diagnosed with simple acute pancreatitis. Though the symptoms were rapidly relieved after initiation of treatment, severe hyperglycemia (575 mg/dL), severe metabolic acidosis (pH 6.9), and ketonuria developed at four days after hospitalization. However, serum triglyceride levels remained within the normal range (134 mg/dL). Finally, the patient was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis complicated with diabetic ketoacidosis unrelated to hypertriglyceridemia. She recovered through insulin and fluid therapy, and receives insulin therapy at the outpatient clinic.

  7. CONTRAST-ENHANCED ULTRASONOGRAPHY OF THE PANCREAS IN HEALTHY DOGS AND IN DOGS WITH ACUTE PANCREATITIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rademacher, Nathalie; Schur, David; Gaschen, Frédéric; Kearney, Michael; Gaschen, Lorrie

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatitis is the most frequent disease affecting the exocrine pancreas in dogs and reliable diagnostic techniques for predicting fatal complications are lacking. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) improves detection of tissue perfusion as well as organ lesion vascular pattern. Objectives of this prospective case control study were to compare perfusion characteristics and enhancement patterns of the pancreas in healthy dogs and dogs with pancreatitis using CEUS. Ten healthy dogs and eight dogs with pancreatitis were selected based on physical examination, abdominal ultrasound, and blood analysis findings. A CEUS study of the pancreas was performed for each dog and two observers who were aware of clinical status used advanced ultrasound quantification software to analyze time-intensity curves. Perfusion patterns were compared between healthy and affected dogs. In dogs with acute pancreatitis, mean pixel and peak intensity of the pancreatic parenchyma was significantly higher than that of normal dogs (P = 0.05) in between 6 and 60 s (P = dogs with acute pancreatitis compared to healthy dogs. Wash-in rates were greater and had a consistently steeper slope to peak in dogs with pancreatitis as opposed to healthy dogs. All dogs with pancreatitis showed a decrease in pixel intensity 10-15 days after the initial examination (P = 0.011) and their times to peak values were prolonged compared to the initial exam. Findings from the current study supported the use of CEUS for diagnosing pancreatitis, pancreatic necrosis, and disease monitoring following therapy in dogs. © 2015 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  8. Effects of urtica dioica extract on experimental acute pancreatitis model in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Baris; Basar, Omer; Aktas, Bora; Altinbas, Akif; Ekiz, Fuat; Büyükcam, Fatih; Albayrak, Aynur; Ginis, Zeynep; Oztürk, Gülfer; Coban, Sahin; Ucar, Engin; Kaya, Oskay; Yüksel, Osman; Caner, Sedat; Delibasi, Tuncay

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is the acute inflammation of pancreas and peripancreatic tissues, and distant organs are also affected. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Urtica dioica extract (UDE) treatment on cerulein induced acute pancreatitis in rats. Twenty-one Wistar Albino rats were divided into three groups: Control, Pancreatitis, and UDE treatment group. In the control group no procedures were performed. In the pancreatitis and treatment groups, pancreatitis was induced with intraperitoneal injection of cerulein, followed by intraperitoneal injection of 1 ml saline (pancreatitis group) and 1 ml 5.2% UDE (treatment group). Pancreatic tissues were examined histopathologically. Pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α), amylase and markers of apoptosis (M30, M65) were also measured in blood samples. Immunohistochemical staining was performed with Caspase-3 antibody. Histopathological findings in the UDE treatment group were less severe than in the pancreatitis group (5.7 vs 11.7, p = 0.010). TNF-α levels were not statistically different between treated and control groups (63.3 vs. 57.2, p = 0.141). UDE treatment was associated with less apoptosis [determined by M30, caspase-3 index (%)], (1.769 vs. 0.288, p = 0.056; 3% vs. 2.2%, p = 0.224; respectively). UDE treatment of pancreatitis merits further study.

  9. Expression and clinical significance of rhubarb on serum amylase and TNF-alpha of rat model of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W F; Li, Z T; Fang, J J; Wang, G B; Yu, Y; Liu, Z Q; Wu, Y N; Zheng, S S; Cai, L

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of rhubarb extract on acute pancreatitis. Ninety-six healthy Sprague Dawley rats, weighing 301±5.12 g were randomly divided into 4 groups: sham surgery (group A), acute pancreatitis model (group B), acute pancreatitis with normal saline (group C), and acute pancreatitis model with rhubarb (group D). The levels of serum amylase (AMY) and TNF-α were measured at 1st, 6th, 12th and 24th hour after modeling, and the pancreatic tissue were used to observe the pathologic changes. Compared to the sham group, the serum AMY and serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) levels were significantly increased in the other groups (p acute pancreatitis. The rhubarb reduced the serum AMY and TNF-α level in rats with acute pancreatitis and reduced the pathological changes of pancreas and other tissues.

  10. Did Alexander the Great die of acute pancreatitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbarounis, C N

    1997-06-01

    I propose that Alexander the Great died of acute pancreatitis secondary to heavy alcohol consumption and a very rich meal. The cause of death of prominent historic or artistic figures attracts considerable interest of historians and researchers. This is especially the case for Alexander the Great. More than 20,000 publications, books, or monographs on the life and work of Alexander the Great have been published. There are several theories and hypotheses regarding the cause of his death, that are based on historic descriptions, diaries, notations, and interpretations of events. It is inevitable that history and myth intermingle in any investigative approach, no matter how scholarly. In this article, on the basis of several historic sources. I have made an effort to reconstruct the final 14 days of his life and record the course of medical events that preceded his death with the formulation of a plausible diagnosis.

  11. Microproteinuria Predicts Organ Failure in Patients Presenting with Acute Pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertilsson, Sara; Swärd, Per; Håkansson, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The disease course of acute pancreatitis (AP) ranges from mild and self-limiting to severe inflammation, associated with significant morbidity and mortality. At present, there are no universally accepted and reliable predictors for severity. Microproteinuria has been associated...... with the presence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome as well as trauma, although its association with AP is not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the value of microproteinuria to predict development of organ failure in AP. Methods: Consecutive AP patients were prospectively enrolled.......70–1.00). Conclusion: The α1-microglobulin/creatinine ratio upon presentation with AP is related to inflammation and predicts development of organ failure. Further studies are warranted to evaluate its potential usefulness in predicting outcome for AP patients....

  12. Historical review of our knowledge of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Salvador

    2018-02-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of most common causes of consultation due to abdominal pain in medical emergency units and it requires hospital admission. Although the majority of cases are mild and patients tend to recover quickly, a small percentage of cases is severe, with mortality in the region of 5-10%. This historical review considers how our understanding of this disease has changed since it was first described in 1579 thanks to the contributions of renowned experts such as Nicolaes Tulp, Reginald Fitz, Nicholas Senn and many others who, through their expertise and dedication, have improved the survival of patients with this disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Hypercalcemia and acute pancreatitis in a male patient with acute promyelocytic leukemia and pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Ali S; Adel, Ahmad M; Hussein, Radwa M; Abdullah, Mohammed Aj; Yousaf, Anil; Mudawi, Deena; Mohamed, Shehab F; Nashwan, Abdulqadir J; Soliman, Dina; Ibrahim, Feryal; Yassin, Mohamed A

    2018-04-03

    We report a rare case of hypercalcemia and acute pancreatitis in a subject with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and pulmonary tuberculosis, during all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) treatment. Both associated complications were potentially due to several causes. A careful monitoring and exclusion of all causative factors must be addressed. Further research is necessary to improve our understanding of risk factors for these complications in patients with (APL). Studying these patterns may help us to improve outcomes for all children and young adults with hematologic malignancies.

  14. Progression from acute to chronic pancreatitis: prognostic factors, mortality, and natural course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøjgaard, Camilla; Becker, Ulrik; Matzen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the natural course of acute pancreatitis (AP) and risk of progression to chronic pancreatitis (CP) is limited. The aims were to describe: (1) the incidence of progression from AP to CP, (2) prognostic factors for progression, and (3) the natural course and mortality of progressive AP....

  15. Acute pancreatic pseudocyst in an 18-month old girl in a resource ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute pancreatic pseudocyst is a rare occurrence in young children—infants, toddlers and pre-schoolers. Blunt abdominal trauma which most times would have been overlooked after initial treatment tends to be the commonest cause of pancreatic pseudocyst in young children. The management of an 18-month-old girl who ...

  16. Effect of percutaneous catheter drainage on pancreatic injury in rats with severe acute pancreatitis induced by sodium taurocholate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang-yu; Dai, Rui-wu; Luo, Hao; Liu, Wei-hui; Chen, Tao; Lin, Ning; Wang, Tao; Luo, Guo-de; Tang, Li-jun

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD) on pancreatic injury in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) rats. Sixty Wistar rats were equally randomized into three groups: a sham operated control group, an SAP control group, and a PCD group. The levels of inflammatory cytokines, the activity of group II phospholipase A2 (PLA2) in blood and ascitic fluid, and the pancreas level of group II PLA2 and trypsin activity were measured 24 h after the operation. The apoptosis of the pancreatic cells, the expression of cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), active caspase-3, Bcl-2 and Bax in the pancreas was detected. Pancreatic pathological changes were observed. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines, the activity of group II PLA2 and trypsin activity in pancreas in the SAP group were higher than those in the PCD group. The histopathological results revealed that the pancreatic injury was alleviated in the PCD group. The expression of COX-2 and iNOS in the pancreatic tissue in the SAP control rats was higher than that in the PCD rats. The expression of Bcl-2 was decreased and the expression of active caspase-3 and Bax was increased in the pancreas of PCD rats. The apoptosis index of the pancreatic cells in the PCD rats was higher than that in the SAP control rats. PCD can relieve SAP-induced pancreatic injury by inhibiting inflammatory reactions, and promoting apoptosis of pancreatic cells. Copyright © 2014 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Both Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency and Signs of Pancreatic Inflammation Are Prevalent in Children with Complicated Severe Acute Malnutrition: An Observational Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, Rosalie H.; Meyer, Sophie L.; Stehmann, Tijs A.; Bourdon, Céline; Bandsma, Robert H. J.; Voskuijl, Wieger P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess whether pancreatic function is impaired in children with severe acute malnutrition, is different between edematous vs nonedematous malnutrition, and improves by nutritional rehabilitation. Study design We followed 89 children with severe acute malnutrition admitted to Queen

  18. Both Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency and Signs of Pancreatic Inflammation Are Prevalent in Children with Complicated Severe Acute Malnutrition : An Observational Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, Rosalie H.; Meyer, Sophie L.; Stehmann, Tijs A.; Bourdon, Celine; Bandsma, Robert H. J.; Voskuijl, Wieger P.

    Objectives To assess whether pancreatic function is impaired in children with severe acute malnutrition, is different between edematous vs nonedematous malnutrition, and improves by nutritional rehabilitation. Study design We followed 89 children with severe acute malnutrition admitted to Queen

  19. Clinics related to acute pancreatitis wonder whether IFN-γ can attenuate pancreatic injury or not

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Amanvermez

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis (AP is an inflammatory disease of the pancreatic tissue associated with little or no fibrosis of the gland. Continued clinical and experimental studies/trials are important for understanding AP pathogenesis and its current treatment approaches. Meng et al. [1] contribute to our knowledge on NF-κB and cytokines IL-18 and IL-27 in experimental AP at 6 h, 12 h, 24 h and 48 h after IFN-γ treatment. However, the messages are implicit both in presentation of results and in the paper itself are complicated by the fact that is likely to be data interferences in relation to AP treated with IFN-γ. For instance, the conclusion that “the increase in NF-κB and 1L-18 may exert influence on pro-inflammatory cytokines to deteriorate inflammation in the pancreas. Thus, to control the IFN-γ might has promise to attenuate pancreatitis… IFN-γ treatment might be associated with JAK-STAT mediated transcription activation” is based on a speculative opinion. There are just similar sentences taken from different articles excepting for cited references in introduction section, the amount of the application dose for IFN-γ is unknown and the authors are no interpretation their own findings on discussion section in this study. According to this study, serum amylase level, the edema, the NF-κB and TNF-a expression in the pancreas were significantly increased in the treatment of IFN-γ after AP. As a result of these findings, the application of IFN-γ can cause a deleterious effect within the pancreas in the course of AP. On the other hand, Hayashi et al. [2] reported that recombinant murine IFN-γ therapy markedly alleviated acute pancreatitis when administered 4 hours in mice, with reduced NF-κB activation and COX-2 expression. Thus, IFN-γ may possess anti-inflammatory effects on AP by repression of the proinflammatory consequences of NF-κB activation. In addition, Rau et al. [3] have indicated that immunostimulative treatment with

  20. [The role of four criteria in assessment of the severity and prognosis of hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L X; Du, L C; Liu, X; Chen, J; Hao, J Y

    2016-09-01

    To explore the four criteria, including bedside index for severity in acute pancreatitis(BISAP), Ranson score, modified CT severity index(MCTSI) and acute physiology and chronic health evaluation scoring systemⅡ(APACHE Ⅱ) in assessment of severity and prognosis of hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis. A total of 326 patients with hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis were studied retrospectively from August 2006 to July 2015. The discrepancy of the four criteria in assessment of severity and prognosis of hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis was comp