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Sample records for acute myeloid leukaemia

  1. Gene expression profiling in acute myeloid leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, H. J. M.; Huls, G.; de Bont, E. S. J. M.

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease characterised by clonal malignant haematopoiesis with a differentiation arrest and excessive proliferation of leukaemic blasts. Over the past decades, the heterogeneity of AML has been illustrated by evolving classifications based on

  2. Acute myeloid leukaemia presenting as faecal incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hoon; Cho, Young Soon; Jang, Pyung Moon; Kim, Ho Jung; Jang, Hye Young

    2007-01-01

    Epidural sacral nerve compression as an initial feature of leukaemia is a rare complication. The findings in a 16‐year‐old boy who presented to an emergency department with symptoms of faecal incontinence are reported herein. Radiological imaging demonstrated soft‐tissue masses in the sacral epidural space. The diagnosis of acute myeloid leukaemia was confirmed on bone marrow aspirate. The characteristics and management of extramedullary leukaemia are discussed. PMID:17452690

  3. Exploring the acute myeloid leukaemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TB Thapa

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The acute myeloid leukemias are genetically a diverse group of neoplasm with varied clinical behavior and response to treatment. Advances in immunophenotyping, cytogenetics and molecular genetics have resulted in better understanding of their genesis. Risk stratification of different variants is now emerging. Therapy strategies are now increasingly being developed considering the inherent biological behavior of the different subtypes. It is anticipated that in the future, deeper secrets of these once fatal diseases will be unraveled by advances in newer genomic techniques. It is hoped that future use of gene specific tailored therapy and strategies will result in longer survival in cases showing poorer prognosis at present. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jpn.v3i6.9001 Journal of Pathology of Nepal (2013 Vol. 3, 497-501

  4. [An immunological approach to acute myeloid leukaemia].

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    González, B; Bueno, D; Rubio, P M; San Román, S; Plaza, D; Sastre, A; García-Miguel, P; Fernández, L; Valentín, J; Martínez, I; Pérez-Martínez, A

    2016-04-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is the second haematological malignancy in the paediatric population, and one of the leading causes of childhood cancer mortality. Survival is currently around 60%, with no improvement in last decades, suggesting that new therapeutic approaches are needed. The anti-leukaemia effect mediated by the lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells of the immune system has been established in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and also as adoptive immunotherapy after consolidation chemotherapy schemes. A retrospective study was conducted on the clinical characteristics of patients diagnosed and treated for AML in our centre during 1996-2014. The mean fluorescence intensities of HLA-I, MICA/B and ULBP1-4, ligands for NK cell receptors, were also analysed in ten new diagnosed leukaemia cases, five myeloid and five lymphoid. A total of 67 patients were used in this analysis. With a median follow up of 25 months, the event-free survival was 62% (95% CI: 55-67). Secondary AML, non-M3 phenotype, and the absence of favourable cytogenetic markers had a lower survival. The probability of relapse was 38% (95% CI: 31-45). The expression of HLA-I and ULBP-4 was significantly lower in myeloid than in lymphoid blast cells. Our clinical results are similar to those described in the literature. Survival did not significantly change in recent decades, and the likelihood of relapse remains high. Myeloid blasts might be more susceptible to the cytotoxicity of NK cells through their lower expression of HLA-I. NK therapy strategies in minimal disease situation could be effective, as reported by other groups. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Proteomic profile of acute myeloid leukaemia: A review update

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pathophysiology of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) through proteome expressions, thus confirming the viability of ..... affected by acute lymphoid leukaemia) were .... these cells resistant to FTY-720 increase the expression of miR-191-5p and a suppression of. miR-142-3pcan be attributable to reduction of the. B subunit.

  6. Aberrant Gene Expression in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Frederik Otzen

    genes and genetic signatures and for reducing dimensionally of gene expression data. Next, we have used machine-learning methods to predict survival and to assess important predictors based on these results. General application of a number of these methods has been implemented into two public query......Summary Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML) is an aggressive cancer of the bone marrow, affecting formation of blood cells during haematopoiesis. This thesis presents investigation of AML using mRNA gene expression profiles (GEP) of samples extracted from the bone marrow of healthy and diseased subjects....... Here GEPs from purified healthy haematopoietic populations, with different levels of differentiation, form the basis for comparison with diseased samples. We present a mathematical transformation of mRNA microarray data to make it possible to compare AML samples, carrying expanded aberrant...

  7. Therapy related Acute Myeloid Leukaemia 8 Years after Treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hodgkin's Disease (HD) is a curable malignancy even in Nigeria, our limitations in health care delivery notwithstanding. However, secondary malignancies especially Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML) may occur as late complications following alkylating cytotoxic drugs therapy, with or without radiotherapy. This is a case ...

  8. Congenital Acute Myeloid Leukaemia with Pseudo-Chediak-Higashi Like Granules: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Vandana; Barman, Sandip; Sharma, Pooja; Sikka, Meera

    2016-11-01

    Congenital leukaemia is a very rare entity comprising 0.8% of all childhood leukaemias. Pseudo-Chediak-Higashi Anomaly (PCHA) in acute leukaemia is a rarely described entity. However, co-existence of congenital myeloid leukaemia with PCHA is a very rare entity and to the best of our knowledge has not been described in literature till date. A full term new-born presented on the 27 th day of life with severe gastroenteritis. Complete blood counts and peripheral smear examination revealed leucocytosis with presence of 76% blast cells. Approximately 15% of these blast cells showed presence of pseudo-Chediak-Higashi like granules. The diagnosis of acute myeloid leukaemia was confirmed by flow cytometry. The case report is presented due to its rarity and to highlight the differential diagnosis and clinical implications of this entity.

  9. Clofarabine in the treatment of poor risk acute myeloid leukaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Krawczyk, Janusz

    2010-09-01

    Clofarabine is a second generation nucleoside analogue. It inhibits DNA repair and activates the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway leading to cell death. In vitro clofarabine has demonstrated synergy with daunorubicin and Ara-C and in phase II clinical trials has shown promising activity in poor risk Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients. In our institution over a 24 month period 22 AML patients (11 M, 11 F) with poor risk features, deemed unsuitable for standard therapy, were treated with clofarabine, alone (eight patients) or in combination (14 patients) for up to three cycles of treatment. The median age was 67.5 years (24-76) with 16 patients > 60 years. At the time of treatment 18 patients had active AML. Four patients intolerant of standard induction received clofarabine as consolidation. The overall response rate (ORR) for the 18 patients with active AML was 61%, nine patients (50%) achieving a complete response (CR). Induction and consolidation were well tolerated with no unexpected toxicities. Predictably, all patients developed grade 4 neutropenia but the median duration was only 20 days (17-120). Induction mortality was acceptable at 17%. In conclusion, clofarabine (alone or in combination) is active in poor risk AML with an acceptable safety profile and should be considered a potential option in poor risk AML patients.

  10. Effective control of acute myeloid leukaemia and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia progression by telomerase specific adoptive T-cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandri, Sara; De Sanctis, Francesco; Lamolinara, Alessia; Boschi, Federico; Poffe, Ornella; Trovato, Rosalinda; Fiore, Alessandra; Sartori, Sara; Sbarbati, Andrea; Bondanza, Attilio; Cesaro, Simone; Krampera, Mauro; Scupoli, Maria T; Nishimura, Michael I; Iezzi, Manuela; Sartoris, Silvia; Bronte, Vincenzo; Ugel, Stefano

    2017-10-20

    Telomerase (TERT) is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that preserves the molecular organization at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. Since TERT deregulation is a common step in leukaemia, treatments targeting telomerase might be useful for the therapy of hematologic malignancies. Despite a large spectrum of potential drugs, their bench-to-bedside translation is quite limited, with only a therapeutic vaccine in the clinic and a telomerase inhibitor at late stage of preclinical validation. We recently demonstrated that the adoptive transfer of T cell transduced with an HLA-A2-restricted T-cell receptor (TCR), which recognize human TERT with high avidity, controls human B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL) progression without severe side-effects in humanized mice. In the present report, we show the ability of our approach to limit the progression of more aggressive leukemic pathologies, such as acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (B-ALL). Together, our findings demonstrate that TERT-based adoptive cell therapy is a concrete platform of T cell-mediated immunotherapy for leukaemia treatment.

  11. Radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouffler, S.D.; Silver, A.R.J.; Cox, R. [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom)

    2000-07-01

    Ample epidemiological studies of human populations implicate ionizing radiation as a carcinogen and these quantitative studies provide the foundation for the core estimates of radiation cancer risk. The majority of the epidemiological data originate from situations of radiation exposure at high dose and high dose rate. The relevance of risk estimates based on such exposures to the more commonly encountered low dose and dose rate situation has been questioned frequently. Thus, there is a need to investigate and quantitate low dose and dose rate effects. A number of approaches may be considered, for example, very large scale epidemiology, very large scale animal experimentation; however, both of these present problems of a practical and/or ethical nature. A further possible approach is that of mechanistic modelling. This requires a fairly detailed understanding of neoplastic disease and how it develops post-irradiation. Many factors and variables have to be taken into consideration in mechanistic modelling approaches. Testing of mechanistic modelling schemes is best carried out using animal model systems. Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a radiogenic cancer of significance in man and several good mouse models of the disease are available. Here, recent studies conducted at NRPB with the aim of elucidating the post-irradiation development of AML will be discussed. In particular three areas critical for developing a sound mechanistic model will be covered, definition of the initiating event; study of disease progression, this addresses the question of the frequency of conversion of initiated cells into the neoplastic state and the influence of genetic background on leukaemogenesis. (author)

  12. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin: an anti-CD33 immunoconjugate for the treatment of acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasi, Roberto

    2008-04-01

    Gemtuzumab ozogamicin consists of a semisynthetic derivative of calicheamicin, a potent cytotoxic antibiotic, linked to a humanized anti-CD33 monoclonal antibody. To describe the pharmacology of gemtuzumab ozogamicin and to provide an overview of clinical trials in acute myeloid leukaemia. Review and summary of publications on gemtuzumab ozogamicin indexed in the PubMed electronic database. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin has shown moderate activity as a single agent in patients with CD33-positive refractory or relapsed acute myeloid leukaemia, with more promising results in acute promyelocytic leukaemia. The side effect profile may be an improvement on conventional chemotherapy, except for a higher frequency of veno-occlusive disease or sinusoidal obstructive syndrome, especially after a subsequent haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Because of the different mechanisms of action and non-overlapping toxicities, the integration of this immunoconjugate with standard chemotherapy is a rational approach, and Phase III trials are ongoing both in the induction and in the post-remission settings.

  13. Changing bone marrow micro-environment during development of acute myeloid leukaemia in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, B T; Jensen, P O; Helledie, N

    1998-01-01

    The Brown Norwegian rat transplanted with promyelocytic leukaemic cells (BNML) has been used as a model for human acute myeloid leukaemia. We have previously shown that both the blood supply to the bone marrow and the metabolic rate decrease in relation to the leukaemic development in these rats....

  14. Autoimmune diseases, infections, use of antibiotics and the risk of acute myeloid leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østgård, Lene S G; Nørgaard, Mette; Pedersen, Lars

    2018-01-01

    Previous studies reported increased risk of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) in individuals with inflammatory conditions. However, it is unclear whether this association is explained by preceding cytotoxic therapy or haematological diseases. We conducted a nationwide case-control study that included...

  15. Acute myeloid leukaemia presenting as bilateral proptosis in a young child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charudutt Kalamkar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid sarcoma is an extramedullary manifestation of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML. Aims We are reporting a paediatric case presenting with bilateral proptosis, which we were able to diagnose with peripheral blood smear (PBS examination. Methods Case Report Results This case highlights the utility of simple routinely available PBS test in diagnosing this rare disease. Conclusion Our case highlights the importance of haemogram and peripheral blood smear in the initial evaluation of proptosis. Correct diagnosis of this rare entity is vital especially in cases where (myeloid sarcoma MS is the presenting feature of AML.

  16. Molecular evidence for a common leukaemic progenitor in acute mixed lymphoid and myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S H; Culligan, D; Couzens, S; Fisher, J; John, S; Pollard, P; Burnett, A; Whittaker, J

    1996-01-01

    De novo acute leukaemia presenting with a mixed lymphoid and myeloid leukaemic population has rarely been described. We have used the consensus Ig heavy chain primers and DNA isolated from these two distinct populations of cells in polymerase chain reactions. We demonstrated that both populations of cells exhibited Ig heavy chain gene rearrangements. Cloning and subsequent DNA sequencing of the amplified products showed a common V-D-J junctional nucleotide sequence. This work therefore provides the first evidence that the leukaemic cells in de novo acute leukaemia with a mixed lymphoid and myeloid population are derived from a common progenitor clone and may offer an explanation for the poor prognosis in these patients.

  17. Outcome after intensive reinduction therapy and allogeneic stem cell transplant in paediatric relapsed acute myeloid leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Lene; Forestier, Erik; Hasle, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Given that 30-40% of children with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) relapse after primary therapy it is important to define prognostic factors and identify optimal therapy. From 1993 to 2012, 543 children from the Nordic countries were treated according to two consecutive protocols: 208 children rel...... receiving SCT as part of relapse therapy. Our data show that intensive re-induction followed by SCT can give cure rates of 40% in children with relapsed AML....

  18. Detailed molecular characterisation of acute myeloid leukaemia with a normal karyotype using targeted DNA capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, N; Varela, I; Grove, C; Manes, N; Yusa, K; Moreno, T; Segonds-Pichon, A; Bench, A; Gudgin, E; Herman, B; Bolli, N; Ellis, P; Haddad, D; Costeas, P; Rad, R; Scott, M; Huntly, B; Bradley, A; Vassiliou, G S

    2013-09-01

    Advances in sequencing technologies are giving unprecedented insights into the spectrum of somatic mutations underlying acute myeloid leukaemia with a normal karyotype (AML-NK). It is clear that the prognosis of individual patients is strongly influenced by the combination of mutations in their leukaemia and that many leukaemias are composed of multiple subclones, with differential susceptibilities to treatment. Here, we describe a method, employing targeted capture coupled with next-generation sequencing and tailored bioinformatic analysis, for the simultaneous study of 24 genes recurrently mutated in AML-NK. Mutational analysis was performed using open source software and an in-house script (Mutation Identification and Analysis Software), which identified dominant clone mutations with 100% specificity. In each of seven cases of AML-NK studied, we identified and verified mutations in 2-4 genes in the main leukaemic clone. Additionally, high sequencing depth enabled us to identify putative subclonal mutations and detect leukaemia-specific mutations in DNA from remission marrow. Finally, we used normalised read depths to detect copy number changes and identified and subsequently verified a tandem duplication of exons 2-9 of MLL and at least one deletion involving PTEN. This methodology reliably detects sequence and copy number mutations, and can thus greatly facilitate the classification, clinical research, diagnosis and management of AML-NK.

  19. Feedback mechanisms control coexistence in a stem cell model of acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Helena L; MacLean, Adam L; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2016-07-21

    Haematopoietic stem cell dynamics regulate healthy blood cell production and are disrupted during leukaemia. Competition models of cellular species help to elucidate stem cell dynamics in the bone marrow microenvironment (or niche), and to determine how these dynamics impact leukaemia progression. Here we develop two models that target acute myeloid leukaemia with particular focus on the mechanisms that control proliferation via feedback signalling. It is within regions of parameter space permissive of coexistence that the effects of competition are most subtle and the clinical outcome least certain. Steady state and linear stability analyses identify parameter regions that allow for coexistence to occur, and allow us to characterise behaviour near critical points. Where analytical expressions are no longer informative, we proceed statistically and sample parameter space over a coexistence region. We find that the rates of proliferation and differentiation of healthy progenitors exert key control over coexistence. We also show that inclusion of a regulatory feedback onto progenitor cells promotes healthy haematopoiesis at the expense of leukaemia, and that - somewhat paradoxically - within the coexistence region feedback increases the sensitivity of the system to dominance by one lineage over another. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Distinctive patterns of microRNA expression associated with karyotype in acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Dixon-McIver

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML is the most common acute leukaemia in adults; however, the genetic aetiology of the disease is not yet fully understood. A quantitative expression profile analysis of 157 mature miRNAs was performed on 100 AML patients representing the spectrum of known karyotypes common in AML. The principle observation reported here is that AMLs bearing a t(15;17 translocation had a distinctive signature throughout the whole set of genes, including the up regulation of a subset of miRNAs located in the human 14q32 imprinted domain. The set included miR-127, miR-154, miR-154*, miR-299, miR-323, miR-368, and miR-370. Furthermore, specific subsets of miRNAs were identified that provided molecular signatures characteristic of the major translocation-mediated gene fusion events in AML. Analysis of variance showed the significant deregulation of 33 miRNAs across the leukaemic set with respect to bone marrow from healthy donors. Fluorescent in situ hybridisation analysis using miRNA-specific locked nucleic acid (LNA probes on cryopreserved patient cells confirmed the results obtained by real-time PCR. This study, conducted on about a fifth of the miRNAs currently reported in the Sanger database (microrna.sanger.ac.uk, demonstrates the potential for using miRNA expression to sub-classify cancer and suggests a role in the aetiology of leukaemia.

  1. RNAi screen identifies Brd4 as a therapeutic target in acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, Johannes; Shi, Junwei; Wang, Eric; Rappaport, Amy R; Herrmann, Harald; Sison, Edward A; Magoon, Daniel; Qi, Jun; Blatt, Katharina; Wunderlich, Mark; Taylor, Meredith J; Johns, Christopher; Chicas, Agustin; Mulloy, James C; Kogan, Scott C; Brown, Patrick; Valent, Peter; Bradner, James E; Lowe, Scott W; Vakoc, Christopher R

    2011-08-03

    Epigenetic pathways can regulate gene expression by controlling and interpreting chromatin modifications. Cancer cells are characterized by altered epigenetic landscapes, and commonly exploit the chromatin regulatory machinery to enforce oncogenic gene expression programs. Although chromatin alterations are, in principle, reversible and often amenable to drug intervention, the promise of targeting such pathways therapeutically has been limited by an incomplete understanding of cancer-specific dependencies on epigenetic regulators. Here we describe a non-biased approach to probe epigenetic vulnerabilities in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), an aggressive haematopoietic malignancy that is often associated with aberrant chromatin states. By screening a custom library of small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) targeting known chromatin regulators in a genetically defined AML mouse model, we identify the protein bromodomain-containing 4 (Brd4) as being critically required for disease maintenance. Suppression of Brd4 using shRNAs or the small-molecule inhibitor JQ1 led to robust antileukaemic effects in vitro and in vivo, accompanied by terminal myeloid differentiation and elimination of leukaemia stem cells. Similar sensitivities were observed in a variety of human AML cell lines and primary patient samples, revealing that JQ1 has broad activity in diverse AML subtypes. The effects of Brd4 suppression are, at least in part, due to its role in sustaining Myc expression to promote aberrant self-renewal, which implicates JQ1 as a pharmacological means to suppress MYC in cancer. Our results establish small-molecule inhibition of Brd4 as a promising therapeutic strategy in AML and, potentially, other cancers, and highlight the utility of RNA interference (RNAi) screening for revealing epigenetic vulnerabilities that can be exploited for direct pharmacological intervention.

  2. Maintenance treatment with azacytidine for patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) or acute myeloid leukaemia following MDS in complete remission after induction chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grövdal, Michael; Karimi, Mohsen; Khan, Rasheed

    2010-01-01

    This prospective Phase II study is the first to assess the feasibility and efficacy of maintenance 5-azacytidine for older patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia and MDS-acute myeloid leukaemia syndromes in complete remission (CR) after induction...

  3. Platelet doubling after the first azacitidine cycle is a promising predictor for response in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia (CMML) and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients in the Dutch azacitidine compassionate named patient programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Helm, Lieke H.; Alhan, Canan; Wijermans, Pierre W.; van Marwijk Kooy, Marinus; Schaafsma, Ron; Biemond, Bart J.; Beeker, Aart; Hoogendoorn, Mels; van Rees, Bastiaan P.; de Weerdt, Okke; Wegman, Jurgen; Libourel, Ward J.; Luykx-de Bakker, Sylvia A.; Minnema, Monique C.; Brouwer, Rolf E.; Croon-de Boer, Fransien; Eefting, Matthijs; Jie, Kon-Siong G.; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A.; Koedam, Jan; Veeger, Nic J. G. M.; Vellenga, Edo; Huls, Gerwin

    2011-01-01

    The efficacy of azacitidine in the treatment of high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia (CMML) and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) (20-30% blasts) has been demonstrated. To investigate the efficacy of azacitidine in daily clinical practice and to identify predictors

  4. Radioimmunotherapy for treatment of acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. Conceptual chances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchmann, I.; Helisch, A.; Bartenstein, P.; Meyer, R.G.; Herr, W.

    2005-01-01

    The prognosis of patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) has improved considerably by introduction of aggressive consolidation chemotherapy and haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Nevertheless, only 20-30% of patients with AML achieve long-term disease-free survival after SCT. The most common cause of treatment failure is relapse. Additionally, mortality rates are significantly increased by therapy-related causes such as toxicity of chemotherapy and complications of SCT. Including radioimmunotherapies in the treatment of AML and myelodyplastic syndrome (MDS) allows for the achievement of a pronounced antileukaemic effect for the reduction of relapse rates on the one hand. On the other hand, no increase of acute toxicity and later complications should be induced. These effects are important for the primary reduction of tumour cells as well as for the myelblative conditioning before SCT. This paper provides a systematic and critical review of the currently used radionuclides and immunoconjugates for the treatment of AML and MDS and summarizes the literature on primary tumour cell reductive radioimmunotherapies on the one hand and conditioning radioimmunotherapies before SCT on the other hand. (orig.)

  5. Potentially avoidable hospital admissions in older patients with acute myeloid leukaemia in the USA: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jawahri, Areej; Keenan, Tanya; Abel, Gregory A; Steensma, David P; LeBlanc, Thomas W; Chen, Yi-Bin; Hobbs, Gabriela; Traeger, Lara; Fathi, Amir T; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Wadleigh, Martha; Ballen, Karen K; Amrein, Philip C; Stone, Richard M; Temel, Jennifer S

    2016-06-01

    Older adults (≥60 years of age) with acute myeloid leukaemia spend a substantial proportion of their life in hospital after diagnosis. We examined reasons for their hospital admissions and identified potentially avoidable hospital admissions (PAH) in this age group in the USA. In this retrospective analysis, we examined the reasons for hospital admissions in older patients diagnosed with and treated for acute myeloid leukaemia at two tertiary care hospitals in the USA. We included patients receiving intensive induction chemotherapy or non-intensive treatment. We excluded those with acute promyelocytic leukaemia, those seen only for a one-time consultation who received primary treatment elsewhere, and those who received supportive care alone. We identified the eligible cohort using the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital Leukemia Clinical Research Information Systems database. Practising oncologists used a consensus-driven medical record review process to identify the primary reason for each hospital admission and categorise it as potentially avoidable or not avoidable on the basis of an adaptation of Graham's criteria for PAH. We used multivariable logistic regression analyses to identify predictors of PAH. Between May 1, 2005, and Dec 23, 2011, we assessed 1040 hospital admissions (excluding initial admission for diagnosis) in 329 consecutively admitted patients. The most common primary reasons for hospital admissions were: fever or infection (396 [38%]), planned admission for chemotherapy or transplantation (391 [38%]), and uncontrolled symptoms (102 [10%]). We identified 172 (27%) of 649 unplanned hospital admissions as potentially avoidable; among these admissions, 82 (48%) were readmissions because of previous premature hospital discharge, 32 (19%) because of problems that could have been managed in the outpatient setting, and 26 (15%) because of failure of timely outpatient follow-up. In a mixed logistic regression model, higher

  6. Azacitidine: a review of its use in the management of myelodysplastic syndromes/acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Gillian M

    2012-05-28

    Azacitidine (Vidaza®) is a pyrimidine nucleoside analogue of cytidine. This article reviews the clinical efficacy and tolerability of azacitidine in the treatment of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS)/acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), as well as summarizing its pharmacological properties. The randomized, multicentre Cancer and Leukemia Group B 9221 trial compared the efficacy of subcutaneous azacitidine with that of supportive care alone in patients with MDS fulfilling French-American-British (FAB) classification criteria. The overall response rate, the complete response rate and the complete plus partial response rate were significantly higher in patients receiving azacitidine than in those receiving supportive care alone. The randomized, open-label, multicentre AZA-001 trial compared the efficacy of subcutaneous azacitidine with that of conventional care in adults with higher-risk (i.e. International Prognostic Scoring System intermediate-2-risk or high-risk classification) MDS/AML. Prior to randomization, investigators preselected patients to the conventional care strategy considered most appropriate (i.e. best supportive care, low-dose cytarabine or intensive chemotherapy). The median duration of overall survival was significantly prolonged by 9.4 months in patients with higher-risk MDS receiving azacitidine versus those receiving conventional care. The survival benefit seen with azacitidine versus conventional care was maintained across various patient subgroups (e.g. in patients aged ≥75 years, in those who did not achieve complete remission and in patients with WHO-defined AML). The efficacy of subcutaneous or intravenous azacitidine was also shown in a noncomparative trial in Japanese patients with MDS fulfilling FAB classification criteria, and registry programmes in various countries support the efficacy of azacitidine in patients with MDS. Azacitidine was generally well tolerated in patients with MDS, including in the elderly. Across trials

  7. Post-remission treatment with allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients aged 60 years and older with acute myeloid leukaemia: a time-dependent analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versluis, Jurjen; Hazenberg, Carin L. E.; Passweg, Jakob R.; van Putten, Wim L. J.; Maertens, Johan; Biemond, Bart J.; Theobald, Matthias; Graux, Carlos; Kuball, Jurgen; Schouten, Harry C.; Pabst, Thomas; Löwenberg, Bob; Ossenkoppele, Gert; Vellenga, Edo; Cornelissen, Jan J.; Meulendijks, Ine; Cornelisse, Petra; van Hooije, Christel; Biaggi, Christine; van der Holt, Bronno; Labopin, Myriam; de Bock, B.; Breems, D. A.; Zachee, P.; Ferrant, A.; Vekemans, M. C.; Mineur, P.; Delannoy, A.; Maertens, J.; Verhoef, G.; van Steenweghen, S.; Bosly, A.; Graux, C.; Jaeger, E.; Theobald, M.; Beck, J.; Fischer, Th; Gjertsen, B. T.; Bargetzi, M.; Wernli, M.; Passweg, J.; Gratwohl, A.; Leoncini-Francini, L.; Marini, G.; Fey, M. F.; Pabst, T.; Chapuis, B.; Chalandon, Y.; Herr, A.; Wuillemin, W. A.; Gregor, M.; Piquet, D.; Zimmerli-Schwab, B.; Hess, U.; Binder, D.; Kroner, Th; Mantz, M.; Jacky, E.; Schanz, U.; Wittebol, S.; van der Lelie, J.; Leeksma, O. C.; Janssen, J. J. W. M.; Ossenkoppele, G. J.; Huijgens, P. C.; Deenik, W.; Posthuma, W.; Wijermans, P. W.; Schaafsma, M. R.; Legdeur, M.; Huls, G.; Vellenga, E.; Daenen, S. M. G. J.; Voogt, P. J.; Joosten, P.; Schouten, H. C.; Laterveen, L.; Biesma, D. H.; de Weerdt, O.; Löwenberg, B.; Cornelissen, J. J.; Sonneveld, P.; Zijlmans, J.; Jongen-Lavrencic, M.; de Greef, G. E.; van Zaanen, H.; Verdonck, L. F.; Kuball, J.; van Marwijk Kooy, M.

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia mainly affects elderly people, with a median age at diagnosis of around 70 years. Although about 50-60% of patients enter first complete remission upon intensive induction chemotherapy, relapse remains high and overall outcomes are disappointing. Therefore, effective

  8. Post-remission treatment with allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients aged 60 years and older with acute myeloid leukaemia : a time-dependent analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versluis, Jurjen; Hazenberg, Carin L. E.; Passweg, Jakob R.; van Putten, Wim L. J.; Maertens, Johan; Biemond, Bart J.; Theobald, Matthias; Graux, Carlos; Kuball, Jurgen; Schouten, Harry C.; Pabst, Thomas; Lowenberg, Bob; Ossenkoppele, Gert; Vellenga, Edo; Cornelissen, Jan J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute myeloid leukaemia mainly affects elderly people, with a median age at diagnosis of around 70 years. Although about 50-60% of patients enter first complete remission upon intensive induction chemotherapy, relapse remains high and overall outcomes are disappointing. Therefore,

  9. Various distinctive cytogenetic abnormalities in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia aged 60 years and older express adverse prognostic value : results from a prospective clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Holt, Bronno; Breems, Dimitri A.; Beverloo, H. Berna; van den Berg, Eva; Burnett, Alan K.; Sonneveld, Pieter; Lowenberg, Bob

    Diagnostic cytogenetic abnormalities are considered important prognostic factors in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). However, the prognostic assessments have mainly been derived from patients with AML aged <60 years. Two recent studies of AML patients of 60 years and older proposed

  10. Somatic mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenases 1 and 2 are prognostic and follow-up markers in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia with normal karyotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virijevic Marijana

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2 genes are frequent molecular lesions in acute myeloid leukaemia with normal karyotype (AML-NK. The effects of IDH mutations on clinical features and treatment outcome in AML-NK have been widely investigated, but only a few studies monitored these mutations during follow-up.

  11. The development of a three-dimensional scaffold for ex vivo biomimicry of human acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Teresa Mortera; Mantalaris, Athanasios; Bismarck, Alexander; Panoskaltsis, Nicki

    2010-03-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a cancer of haematopoietic cells that develops in three-dimensional (3-D) bone marrow niches in vivo. The study of AML has been hampered by lack of appropriate ex vivo models that mimic this microenvironment. We hypothesised that fabrication and optimisation of suitable biomimetic scaffolds for culturing leukaemic cells ex vivo might facilitate the study of AML in its native 3-D niche. We evaluated the growth of three leukaemia subtype-specific cell lines, K-562, HL60 and Kasumi-6, on highly porous scaffolds fabricated from biodegradable and non-biodegradable polymeric materials, such as poly (L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), polyurethane (PU), poly (methyl-methacrylate), poly (D, L-lactade), poly (caprolactone), and polystyrene. Our results show that PLGA and PU supported the best seeding efficiency and leukaemic growth. Furthermore, the PLGA and PU scaffolds were coated with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, collagen type I (62.5 or 125 microg/ml) and fibronectin (25 or 50 microg/ml) to provide biorecognition signals. The 3 leukaemia subtype-specific lines grew best on PU scaffolds coated with 62.5 microg/ml collagen type I over 6 weeks in the absence of exogenous growth factors. In conclusion, PU-collagen scaffolds may provide a practical model to study the biology and treatment of primary AML in an ex vivo mimicry. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. CD33 monoclonal antibody conjugated Au cluster nano-bioprobe for targeted flow-cytometric detection of acute myeloid leukaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Retnakumari, Archana; Jayasimhan, Jasusri; Chandran, Parwathy; Menon, Deepthy; Nair, Shantikumar; Mony, Ullas; Koyakutty, Manzoor, E-mail: manzoork@aims.amrita.edu, E-mail: ullasmony@aims.amrita.edu [Amrita Centre for Nanoscience and Molecular Medicine, Amrita Institute of Medical Science, Cochin 682 041 (India)

    2011-07-15

    Protein stabilized gold nanoclusters (Au-NCs) are biocompatible, near-infrared (NIR) emitting nanosystems having a wide range of biomedical applications. Here, we report the development of a Au-NC based targeted fluorescent nano-bioprobe for the flow-cytometric detection of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells. Au-NCs with {approx} 25-28 atoms showing bright red-NIR fluorescence (600-750 nm) and average size of {approx} 0.8 nm were prepared by bovine serum albumin assisted reduction-cum-stabilization in aqueous phase. The protein protected clusters were conjugated with monoclonal antibody against CD33 myeloid antigen, which is overexpressed in {approx} 99.2% of the primitive population of AML cells, as confirmed by immunophenotyping using flow cytometry. Au-NC-CD33 conjugates having average size of {approx} 12 nm retained bright fluorescence over an extended duration of {approx} a year, as the albumin protein protects Au-NCs against degradation. Nanotoxicity studies revealed excellent biocompatibility of Au-NC conjugates, as they showed no adverse effect on the cell viability and inflammatory response. Target specificity of the conjugates for detecting CD33 expressing AML cells (KG1a) in flow cytometry showed specific staining of {approx} 95.4% of leukaemia cells within 1-2 h compared to a non-specific uptake of {approx} 8.2% in human peripheral blood cells (PBMCs) which are CD33{sup low}. The confocal imaging also demonstrated the targeted uptake of CD33 conjugated Au-NCs by leukaemia cells, thus confirming the flow cytometry results. This study demonstrates that novel nano-bioprobes can be developed using protein protected fluorescent nanoclusters of Au for the molecular receptor targeted flow cytometry based detection and imaging of cancer cells.

  13. CD33 monoclonal antibody conjugated Au cluster nano-bioprobe for targeted flow-cytometric detection of acute myeloid leukaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retnakumari, Archana; Jayasimhan, Jasusri; Chandran, Parwathy; Menon, Deepthy; Nair, Shantikumar; Mony, Ullas; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2011-07-01

    Protein stabilized gold nanoclusters (Au-NCs) are biocompatible, near-infrared (NIR) emitting nanosystems having a wide range of biomedical applications. Here, we report the development of a Au-NC based targeted fluorescent nano-bioprobe for the flow-cytometric detection of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells. Au-NCs with ~ 25-28 atoms showing bright red-NIR fluorescence (600-750 nm) and average size of ~ 0.8 nm were prepared by bovine serum albumin assisted reduction-cum-stabilization in aqueous phase. The protein protected clusters were conjugated with monoclonal antibody against CD33 myeloid antigen, which is overexpressed in ~ 99.2% of the primitive population of AML cells, as confirmed by immunophenotyping using flow cytometry. Au-NC-CD33 conjugates having average size of ~ 12 nm retained bright fluorescence over an extended duration of ~ a year, as the albumin protein protects Au-NCs against degradation. Nanotoxicity studies revealed excellent biocompatibility of Au-NC conjugates, as they showed no adverse effect on the cell viability and inflammatory response. Target specificity of the conjugates for detecting CD33 expressing AML cells (KG1a) in flow cytometry showed specific staining of ~ 95.4% of leukaemia cells within 1-2 h compared to a non-specific uptake of ~ 8.2% in human peripheral blood cells (PBMCs) which are CD33low. The confocal imaging also demonstrated the targeted uptake of CD33 conjugated Au-NCs by leukaemia cells, thus confirming the flow cytometry results. This study demonstrates that novel nano-bioprobes can be developed using protein protected fluorescent nanoclusters of Au for the molecular receptor targeted flow cytometry based detection and imaging of cancer cells.

  14. CD33 monoclonal antibody conjugated Au cluster nano-bioprobe for targeted flow-cytometric detection of acute myeloid leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retnakumari, Archana; Jayasimhan, Jasusri; Chandran, Parwathy; Menon, Deepthy; Nair, Shantikumar; Mony, Ullas; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2011-01-01

    Protein stabilized gold nanoclusters (Au-NCs) are biocompatible, near-infrared (NIR) emitting nanosystems having a wide range of biomedical applications. Here, we report the development of a Au-NC based targeted fluorescent nano-bioprobe for the flow-cytometric detection of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells. Au-NCs with ∼ 25-28 atoms showing bright red-NIR fluorescence (600-750 nm) and average size of ∼ 0.8 nm were prepared by bovine serum albumin assisted reduction-cum-stabilization in aqueous phase. The protein protected clusters were conjugated with monoclonal antibody against CD33 myeloid antigen, which is overexpressed in ∼ 99.2% of the primitive population of AML cells, as confirmed by immunophenotyping using flow cytometry. Au-NC-CD33 conjugates having average size of ∼ 12 nm retained bright fluorescence over an extended duration of ∼ a year, as the albumin protein protects Au-NCs against degradation. Nanotoxicity studies revealed excellent biocompatibility of Au-NC conjugates, as they showed no adverse effect on the cell viability and inflammatory response. Target specificity of the conjugates for detecting CD33 expressing AML cells (KG1a) in flow cytometry showed specific staining of ∼ 95.4% of leukaemia cells within 1-2 h compared to a non-specific uptake of ∼ 8.2% in human peripheral blood cells (PBMCs) which are CD33 low . The confocal imaging also demonstrated the targeted uptake of CD33 conjugated Au-NCs by leukaemia cells, thus confirming the flow cytometry results. This study demonstrates that novel nano-bioprobes can be developed using protein protected fluorescent nanoclusters of Au for the molecular receptor targeted flow cytometry based detection and imaging of cancer cells.

  15. Survival of Mexican Children with Acute Myeloid Leukaemia Who Received Early Intensification Chemotherapy and an Autologous Transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elva Jiménez-Hernández

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In Mexico and other developing countries, few reports of the survival of children with acute leukaemia exist. Objective. We aimed at comparing the disease-free survival of children with acute myeloid leukaemia who, in addition to being treated with the Latin American protocol of chemotherapy and an autologous transplant, either underwent early intensified chemotherapy or did not undergo such treatment. Procedure. This was a cohort study with a historical control group, forty patients, less than 16 years old. Group A (20 patients, diagnosed in the period 2005–2007, was treated with the Latin American protocol of chemotherapy with an autologous transplant plus early intensified chemotherapy: high doses of cytarabine and mitoxantrone. Group B (20 patients, diagnosed in the period 1999–2004, was treated as Group A, but without the early intensified chemotherapy. Results. Relapse-free survival for Group A was 90% whereas that for Group B it was 60% (P=0.041. Overall survival for Group A (18, 90% was higher than that for Group B (60%. Complete remission continued for two years of follow-up. Conclusions. Relapse-free survival for paediatric patients treated with the Latin American protocol of chemotherapy with an autologous transplant plus early intensified chemotherapy was higher than that for those who did not receive early intensified chemotherapy.

  16. Haemostatic function and biomarkers of endothelial damage before and after platelet transfusion in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, A M; Leinøe, E B; Johansson, P I

    2015-01-01

    and after platelet transfusion in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Blood was sampled before, 1 and 24 h after platelet transfusion. Primary and secondary haemostasis was evaluated by whole blood aggregometry (Multiplate) and thromboelastography (TEG). Endothelial biomarkers (s......OBJECTIVES: The beneficial effect of platelet transfusion on haemostasis is well established, but there is emerging evidence that platelet transfusion induces an inflammatory response in vascular endothelial cells. BACKGROUND: We investigated haemostatic function and endothelial biomarkers before......ICAM-1, syndecan-1, sThrombomodulin, sVE-Cadherin) and platelet activation biomarkers (sCD40L, TGF-beta) were investigated along with haematology/biochemistry analyses. RESULTS: Twenty-two patients were included. Despite continued low platelet counts, platelet transfusion normalised the median values...

  17. Incidence and significance of FLT3-ITD and NPM1 mutations in patients with normal karyotype acute myeloid leukaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haslam, K

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a heterogeneous clonal disorder of haematopoietic progenitor cells. Approximately half of all adult AML patients have a normal karyotype (NK-AML) and an intermediate risk prognosis. AIMS: To determine the incidence and prognostic significance of NPM1 and FLT3-ITD mutations in a population of patients with NK-AML. METHODS: FLT3-ITD and NPM1 mutation status was retrospectively sought in presentation samples from 44 NK-AML patients. RESULTS: FLT3-ITD and NPM1 mutations were detected in 45.5 and 54.5% of patients, respectively, allowing stratification according to genotype. CONCLUSIONS: FLT3-ITD and NPM1 mutation status can be defined in NK-AML. Prospective screening for these mutations is advocated in all NK-AML patients, as the genotype is of clinical importance when considering treatment options including stem cell transplantation.

  18. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 Inhibition Constrains Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase 1 (IDO1 Activity in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Rutella

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1 metabolizes L-tryptophan to kynurenines (KYN, inducing T-cell suppression either directly or by altering antigen-presenting-cell function. Cyclooxygenase (COX-2, the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of prostaglandins, is over-expressed by several tumours. We aimed at determining whether COX-2 inhibitors down-regulate the IFN-g-induced expression of IDO1 in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML cells. IFN-γ at 100 ng/mL up-regulated COX-2 and IDO1 in HL-60 AML cells, both at mRNA and protein level. The increased COX-2 and IDO1 expression correlated with heightened production of prostaglandin (PGE2 and kynurenines, respectively. Nimesulide, a preferential COX-2 inhibitor, down-regulated IDO1 mRNA/protein and attenuated kynurenine synthesis, suggesting that overall IDO inhibition resulted both from reduced IDO1 gene transcription and from inhibited IDO1 catalytic activity. From a functional standpoint, IFN-g-challenged HL-60 cells promoted the in vitro conversion of allogeneic CD4+CD25− T cells into bona fide CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells, an effect that was significantly reduced by treatment of IFN-γ-activated HL-60 cells with nimesulide. Overall, these data point to COX-2 inhibition as a potential strategy to be pursued with the aim at circumventing leukaemia-induced, IDO-mediated immune dysfunction.

  19. Adapting a Vacuum Assisted Closure dressing to challenging wounds: negative pressure treatment for perineal necrotizing fasciitis with rectal prolapse in a newborn affected by acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negosanti, Luca; Aceti, Arianna; Bianchi, Tommaso; Corvaglia, Luigi; Negosanti, Francesca; Sgarzani, Rossella; Morselli, Paolo Giovanni; Cipriani, Riccardo; Negosanti, Massimino; Patrizi, Annalisa; Faldella, Giacomo

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a newborn with acute myeloid leukaemia, who developed perineal necrotizing fasciitis due to Pseudomonas Aeruginosa, after twenty days of life. Following surgical debridement, she was effectively treated with topical negative pressure therapy (V.A.C.(R) device) with silver foam dressings, this achieved complete closure in thirteen days. Negative pressure therapy should be considered when conventional wound care fails to achieve complete wound closure, even in neonates.

  20. Case report: hydroquinone and/or glutaraldehyde induced acute myeloid leukaemia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexopoulos Evangelos C

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposures to high doses of irradiation, to chemotherapy, benzene, petroleum products, paints, embalming fluids, ethylene oxide, herbicides, pesticides, and smoking have been associated with an increased risk of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML. Although there in no epidemiological evidence of relation between X-ray developer, fixer and replenisher liquids and AML, these included glutaraldehyde which has weakly associated with lymphocytic leukemia in rats and hydroquinone has been increasingly implicated in producing leukemia, causing DNA and chromosomal damage, inhibits topo-isomerase II, alter hematopoiesis and inhibit apoptosis of neoplastic cells. Case presentation Two white females (A and B hired in 1985 as medical radiation technologists in a primary care center, in Greece. In July 2001, woman A, 38-years-old, was diagnosed as having acute monocytic leukaemia (FAB M5. The patient did not respond to therapy and died threeweeks later. In August 2001, woman B, 35-year-old, was diagnosed with acute promyelocytic leukaemia (FAB M3. Since discharge, she is in continuous complete remission. Both women were non smokers without any medical history. Shortly after these incidents official inspectors and experts inspected workplace, examined equipment, archives of repairs, notes, interviewed and monitored employees. They concluded that shielding was inadequate for balcony's door but personal monitoring did not show any exceeding of TLV of 20 mSv yearly and cytogenetics analysis did not reveal findings considered to be characteristics of ionizing exposure. Equipment for developing photos had a long list of repairs, mainly leakages of liquids and increases of temperature. On several occasions the floor has been flooded especially during 1987–1993 and 1997–2001. Inspection confirmed a complete lack of ventilation and many spoiled medical x-ray films. Employees reported that an "osmic" level was continuously evident and frequently

  1. Population pharmacokinetics of cytarabine, etoposide and daunorubicin in the treatment of acute myeloid leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh-Madsen, Mikkel; Bender, B.; Jensen, M. K.

    2012-01-01

    insights into the PK of this combination treatment. METHODS: A prospective population PK study of twenty-three patients with acute myeloid leukemia was undertaken. Plasma concentrations of patients were determined by high-pressure liquid chromatography. PK models were developed with NONMEM......PURPOSE: Interpatient variability in the pharmacokinetics (PK) of cytarabine, etoposide, and daunorubicin following body surface area-adjusted doses calls for studies that point to other covariates to explain this variability. The purpose of this study was to investigate such relationships and give......(®); for daunorubicin, PK information from a prior study was utilized. RESULTS: Baseline white blood cell count (bWBC) influenced the PK for all drugs. A small, statistically insignificant improvement in model fit was achieved when a relationship between bWBC and daunorubicin central volume of distribution was included...

  2. Granulocytic sarcoma in a patient with chronic myeloid leukaemia in complete haematological, cytogenetic and molecular remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittai, Adam; Yu, Eun-Mi; Tabbara, Imad

    2014-12-23

    Granulocytic sarcoma, also known as myeloid sarcoma, is an extramedullary tumour composed of immature myeloid cells. Granulocytic sarcoma is typically found in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia, accelerated phase or blast crisis of chronic myeloid leukaemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, or as an isolated event without bone marrow involvement. We present a case of granulocytic sarcoma in a patient with chronic myeloid leukaemia in the setting of complete haematological, molecular and cytogenetic remission. Our patient was first treated with imatinib for chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukaemia. After maintaining remission for 42 months, he developed a granulocytic sarcoma in his spine. In this case report, we describe our case, along with the three other cases reported in the literature. In addition to being a rare diagnosis, this case demonstrates the importance of being vigilant in diagnosing the cause of back pain and atypical symptoms in patients with a history of leukaemia. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  3. A phase 1 clinical trial of vorinostat in combination with decitabine in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia or myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschbaum, Mark; Gojo, Ivana; Goldberg, Stuart L; Bredeson, Christopher; Kujawski, Lisa A; Yang, Allen; Marks, Peter; Frankel, Paul; Sun, Xing; Tosolini, Alessandra; Eid, Joseph E; Lubiniecki, Gregory M; Issa, Jean-Pierre

    2014-10-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) may respond to treatment with epigenetic-modifying agents. Histone deacetylase inhibitors may synergize with hypomethylating agents. This phase 1 dose-escalation study was designed to determine the maximum tolerated dose, recommended phase 2 dose, safety and tolerability of vorinostat plus decitabine in patients with relapsed/refractory AML, newly-diagnosed AML, or intermediate- to high-grade MDS. Thirty-four patients received concurrent therapy with decitabine plus vorinostat and 37 received sequential therapy with decitabine followed by vorinostat. Twenty-nine patients had relapsed/refractory AML, 31 had untreated AML and 11 had MDS. The target maximum administered dose (MAD) of decitabine 20 mg/m(2) daily for 5 d plus vorinostat 400 mg/d for 14 d was achieved for concurrent and sequential schedules, with one dose-limiting toxicity (Grade 3 QTc prolongation) reported in the sequential arm. Common toxicities were haematological and gastrointestinal. Responses were observed more frequently at the MAD on the concurrent schedule compared with the sequential schedule in untreated AML (46% vs. 14%), relapsed/refractory AML (15% vs. 0%) and MDS (60% vs. 0%). Decitabine plus vorinostat given concurrently or sequentially appears to be safe and well-tolerated. Concurrent therapy shows promising clinical activity in AML or MDS, warranting further investigation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Acute leukaemia: making sense of a complex blood cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Meenaghan, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Acute leukaemia represents a diverse group of blood cancers that affect both children and adults. Treatment schedules for these haematology cancers are often prolonged, with many associated side effects and complications. Nurses caring for patients with acute leukaemia require an anticipatory approach, where care is aimed at minimizing the side effects of treatment and being constantly vigilant for any impending adverse effects. Moreover, patients require support for the psychosocial issues that can arise for patients during their illness. This article provides an overview of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and acute myeloid leukaemia. Nursing considerations in the care of patients being treated for acute leukaemia are also explored.

  5. Label-free imaging and identification of typical cells of acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndrome by Raman microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanna, R; Ronchi, P; Lenferink, A T M; Tresoldi, C; Morasso, C; Mehn, D; Bedoni, M; Picciolini, S; Terstappen, L W M M; Ciceri, F; Otto, C; Gramatica, F

    2015-02-21

    In clinical practice, the diagnosis and classification of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) start from the manual examination of stained smears of bone marrow (BM) and peripheral blood (PB) by using an optical microscope. This step is subjective and scarcely reproducible. Therefore, the development of subjective and potentially automatable methods for the recognition of typical AML/MDS cells is necessary. Here we have used Raman spectroscopy for distinguishing myeloblasts, promyelocytes, abnormal promyelocytes and erhytroblasts, which have to be counted for a correct diagnosis and morphological classification of AML and MDS. BM samples from patients affected by four different AML subtypes, mostly characterized by the presence of the four subpopulations selected for this study, were analyzed. First, each cell was scanned by acquiring 4096 spectra, thus obtaining Raman images which demonstrate an accurate description of morphological features characteristic of each subpopulation. Raman imaging coupled with hierarchical cluster analysis permitted the automatic discrimination and localization of the nucleus, the cytoplasm, myeloperoxidase containing granules and haemoglobin. Second, the averaged Raman fingerprint of each cell was analysed by multivariate analysis (principal component analysis and linear discriminant analysis) in order to study the typical vibrational features of each subpopulation and also for the automatic recognition of cells. The leave-one-out cross validation of a Raman-based classification model demonstrated the correct classification of myeloblasts, promyelocytes (normal/abnormal) and erhytroblasts with an accuracy of 100%. Normal and abnormal promyelocytes were distinguished with 95% accuracy. The overall classification accuracy considering the four subpopulations was 98%. This proof-of-concept study shows that Raman micro-spectroscopy could be a valid approach for developing label-free, objective and automatic

  6. Acute myeloid leukaemia: expression of MYC protein and its association with cytogenetic risk profile and overall survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mughal, Muhammad Kashif; Akhter, Ariz; Street, Lesley; Pournazari, Payam; Shabani-Rad, Meer-Taher; Mansoor, Adnan

    2017-09-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a clinically aggressive disease with marked genetic heterogeneity. Cytogenetic abnormalities provide the basis for risk stratification into clinically favourable, intermediate, and unfavourable groups. There are additional genetic mutations, which further influence the prognosis of patients with AML. Most of these result in molecular aberrations whose downstream target is MYC. It is therefore logical to study the relationship between MYC protein expression and cytogenetic risk groups. We studied MYC expression by immunohistochemistry in a large cohort (n = 199) of AML patients and correlated these results with cytogenetic risk profile and overall survival (OS). We illustrated differential expression of MYC protein across various cytogenetic risk groups (p = 0.03). Highest expression of MYC was noted in AML patients with favourable cytogenetic risk group. In univariate analysis, MYC expression showed significant negative influence of OS in favourable and intermediate cytogenetic risk group (p = 0.001). Interestingly, MYC expression had a protective effect in the unfavourable cytogenetic risk group. In multivariate analysis, while age and cytogenetic risk group were significant factors influencing survival, MYC expression by immunohistochemistry methods also showed some marginal impact (p = 0.069). In conclusion, we have identified differential expression of MYC protein in relation to cytogenetic risk groups in AML patients and documented its possible impact on OS in favourable and intermediate cytogenetic risk groups. These preliminary observations mandate additional studies to further investigate the routine clinical use of MYC protein expression in AML risk stratification. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Smoking and subsequent risk of acute myeloid leukaemia: A pooled analysis of 9 cohort studies in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugai, Tomotaka; Matsuo, Keitaro; Oze, Isao; Ito, Hidemi; Wakai, Kenji; Wada, Keiko; Nagata, Chisato; Nakayama, Tomio; Liu, Rong; Kitamura, Yuri; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Tsuji, Ichiro; Sugawara, Yumi; Sawada, Norie; Sadakane, Atsuko; Tanaka, Keitaro; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Inoue, Manami; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Shimazu, Taichi

    2018-02-01

    Smoking has been identified as a significant risk factor for acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). However, epidemiological evidence for the effect of smoking on the risk of AML among Asians is scarce. Here, we investigated the impact of smoking habits on the risk of AML by conducting a pooled analysis of 9 population-based prospective cohort studies in Japan. We analysed original data on smoking habits at baseline from 9 cohort studies. Hazard ratios (HRs) in the individual studies were calculated using a Cox proportional hazard model adjusted for potential confounders and combined using a random-effects model. During 4 808 175 person-years of follow-up for a total of 344 676 participants (165 567 men and 179 109 women), 245 AML cases (139 men and 106 women) were identified. For both sexes combined, current smokers had a marginally significant increased risk of AML compared to never smokers (HR = 1.44, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.97-2.14). Ever smokers with more than 30 pack-years had a statistically significant increased risk of AML compared to never smokers among both sexes combined (HR = 1.66, 95% CI, 1.06-2.63). By sex, this significant association was observed only among men, with an HR of 1.69 (95% CI, 1.00-2.87) for ever smokers with more than 30 pack-years relative to never smokers. In conclusion, this study confirmed that cigarette smoking increases the risk of AML in Japanese. This study provides important evidence that smoking increases the risk of AML among Asians, which has already been shown in Western populations. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Extramedullary Myeloid Cell Tumour Presenting As Leukaemia Cutis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thappa Devinder Mohan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We herewith report a case of extramedullary myeloid cell tumour presenting as leukaemia cutis for its rarity. It occurred in a 50 year old male patient who presented to us with a 40 days history of painless raised solid skin swellings over the trunk. Histopathological examination of the skin biopsy and bone marrow biopsy showed features suggestive of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Immunophenotyping on skin biopsy specimens and bone marrow biopsy found tumour cells expressing CD43 and Tdt but were negative for CD3 and CD20. These features were consistent with extramedullary myeloid cell tumour involving skin and subcutis (cutaneous manifestation of acute myeloid leukaemia.

  9. Neurological Complications Of Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia: Any ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of the five, two (40%) patients presented with bilateral hearing impairment, each beginning with the left ear; one (20%) presented with left ear hearing loss; one ... pathogenetic mechanisms underlying these complications with a view to finding specific treatment measures for worrisome chronic myeloid leukaemia-related ...

  10. ABSTRACT CHRONIC MYELOID LEUKAEMIA IN CENTRAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2003-09-09

    , USA. .... anaemia (Hb ≤ 9.4g/dl recorded in 86 (57.3%) patients and ..... J.M. Chronic myeloid leukaemia. In. Haematology, Basic Principles and Practice 2nd edn., (ed.), R. Hoffman. Churchill Livingstone, New York, USA.

  11. A novel RT-qPCR assay for quantification of the MLL-MLLT3 fusion transcript in acute myeloid leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildgaard, Lotte; Ommen, Hans Beier; Lausen, Birgitte Frederiksen

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) of the monocytic lineage often lack molecular markers for minimal residual disease (MRD) monitoring. The MLL-MLLT3 fusion transcript found in patients with AML harbouring t(9;11) is amenable to RT-qPCR quantification but because of the heter......OBJECTIVES: Patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) of the monocytic lineage often lack molecular markers for minimal residual disease (MRD) monitoring. The MLL-MLLT3 fusion transcript found in patients with AML harbouring t(9;11) is amenable to RT-qPCR quantification but because...... of the heterogeneity of translocation break points, the MLL-MLLT3 fusion gene is a challenging target. We hypothesised that MRD monitoring using MLL-MLLT3 as a RT-qPCR marker is feasible in the majority of patients with t(9;11)-positive AML. METHODS: Using a locked nucleic acid probe, we developed a sensitive RT-qPCR...... follow-up. Two patients relapsed, and both were MRD positive in BM after first induction course. A total of three relapses occurred, and they were detected by RT-qPCR 3 wks before haematological relapse was diagnosed. CONCLUSION: This MLL-MLLT3 RT-qPCR assay could be useful in MRD monitoring of a group...

  12. Hyperleucocytosis in paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia - the challenge of white blood cell counts above 200 × 10(9) /l. The NOPHO experience 1984-2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeller, Bernward; Glosli, Heidi; Forestier, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Hyperleucocytosis in paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. We studied hyperleucocytosis in 890 patients with AML aged 0-18 years registered in the Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology (NOPHO) registry, with special focus on...

  13. Expression of co-stimulatory and adhesion molecules and chemokine or apoptosis receptors on acute myeloid leukaemia : high CD40 and CD11a expression correlates with poor prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, RE; Hoefnagel, J; van der Burg, BB; Jedema, [No Value; Zwinderman, KH; Starrenburg, ICW; Kluin-Nelemans, HC; Barge, RMY; Willemze, R; Falkenburg, JHF

    2001-01-01

    The expression of adhesion and co-stimulatory molecules. and chemokine and death receptors such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and FAS on acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) may influence the biology of the disease and response to chemotherapy and immunotherapy. In this study, we analysed the expression

  14. Silencing of HMGA2 reverses retardance of cell differentiation in human myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Li; Xu, Hongfa; Chen, Guoshu; Wei, Xiaoping; Yu, Baodan; Ye, Jingmei; Xu, Lihua; Tan, Huo

    2018-02-06

    High-mobility group AT-hook 2 (HMGA2) may serve as an architectural transcription factor, and it can regulate a range of normal biological processes including proliferation and differentiation. Upregulation of HMGA2 expression is correlated to the undifferentiated phenotype of immature leukaemic cells. However, the underlying mechanism of HMGA2-dependent myeloid differentiation blockage in leukaemia is unknown. To reveal the role and mechanism of HMGA2 in differentiation arrest of myeloid leukaemia cells, the quantitative expression of HMGA2 and homeobox A9 (HOXA9) was analysed by real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The regulatory function of HMGA2 in blockage of differentiation in human myeloid leukaemia was investigated through in vitro assays (XTT assay, May-Grünwald-Giemsa, flow cytometry analysis and western blot). We found that the expression of HMGA2 and HOXA9 was reduced during the process of granulo-monocytic maturation of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells, knockdown of HMGA2 promotes terminal (granulocytic and monocytic) differentiation of myeloid leukaemia primary blasts and cell lines, and HOXA9 was significantly downregulated in leukaemic cells with knockdown of HMGA2. Downregulation of HOXA9 in myeloid leukaemia cells led to increased differentiation capacity in vitro. Our data suggest that increased expression of HMGA2 represents a possible new mechanism of myeloid differentiation blockage of leukaemia. Aberrant expression of HMGA2 may enhance HOXA9-dependent leukaemogenesis and myeloid leukaemia phenotype. Disturbance of the HMGA2-HOXA9 pathway is probably a therapeutic strategy in myeloid leukaemia.

  15. Occurrence of graft-versus-host disease increases mortality after umbilical cord blood transplantation for acute myeloid leukaemia: a report from Eurocord and the ALWP of the EBMT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, F; Ruggeri, A; Beohou, E; Labopin, M; Mohty, M; Sanz, J; Vigouroux, S; Furst, S; Bosi, A; Chevallier, P; Cornelissen, J J; Michallet, M; Sierra, J; Karakasis, D; Savani, B N; Gluckman, E; Nagler, A

    2018-02-01

    The efficacy of umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) as treatment for acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) relies on immune-mediated graft-versus-leukaemia effects. Previous studies have suggested a strong association between graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) occurrence and graft-versus-leukaemia effects after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Here, we evaluated the kinetics of relapse rate in correlation with GVHD occurrence after UCBT. The kinetics of relapse rate over time in correlation to GVHD occurrence were assessed by calculating the relapse rate per patient-year within sequential 90-day intervals. The impact of GVHD on relapse and mortality was further studied in multivariate Cox models handling GVHD as a time-dependent covariate. The study included data from 1068 patients given single (n = 567) or double (n = 501) UCBT. The proportion of patients with grade II, III and IV acute GVHD was 20%, 7% and 4%, respectively. At 2 years, the cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD was 42%, the cumulative incidence of relapse was 32%, and overall survival was 32% as well. Relapse rates declined gradually over time during the first 30 months after transplantation. There was a possible suggestion that grade II-IV acute (HR = 0.8, P = 0.1) and chronic (HR = 0.65, P = 0.1) GVHD decreased relapse risk. However, grade II-IV acute GVHD significantly increased early (the first 18 months after UCBT) mortality (HR = 1.3, P = 0.02), whilst chronic GVHD increased each early (HR = 2.7, P chronic GVHD each increases overall mortality after UCBT for AML mitigating the possible graft-versus-leukemia effect of GVHD. © 2017 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  16. A review of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukaemia (t-MDS/AML) in Irish patients: a single centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maung, Su W; Burke, Cathie; Hayde, Jennifer; Walshe, Janice; McDermott, Ray; Desmond, Ronan; McHugh, Johnny; Enright, Helen

    2017-07-01

    To demonstrate the incidence, characteristics, treatment and outcomes of patients with therapy-related myelodysplastic syndromes and therapy-related acute myeloid leukaemia (t-MDS/AML) in a tertiary referral centre. Patients meeting the diagnostic criteria for t-MDS/AML from 2003 to 2014 were reviewed to analyse their diagnostic features, details of antecedent disorder and treatment, approach to management and survival. 39 patients who developed t-MDS/AML were identified with incidence of 8.7%. Median age and gender distribution were similar to de novo MDS but t-MDS/AML patients had greater degree of cytopenia and adverse karyotypes. Time to development of t-MDS/AML was shortest for patients with antecedent haematological malignancy compared to solid tumours and autoimmune disorders (46, 85 and 109 months). Patients with prior acute leukaemia had the shortest latency and poor overall survival. Treatment options included best supportive care (56%), Azacitidine (31%) or intensive chemotherapy/allogeneic transplant (13%). Median OS of all patients was 14 months. Survival declined markedly after two years and 5-year OS was 13.8%. Longer survival was associated with blast count MDS/AML patients showed unique characteristics which influenced their treatment and outcomes. IPSS-R may be useful in risk-adapted treatment approaches and can predict outcomes. Survival remains poor but improved outcomes were seen with allogeneic transplantation. Azacitidine may be effective in patients unfit for intensive therapies.

  17. Promoter hypermethylation of the retinoic acid receptor beta2 gene is frequent in acute myeloid leukaemia and associated with the presence of CBFβ-MYH11 fusion transcripts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rethmeier, Anita; Aggerholm, Anni; Olesen, Lene Hyldahl

    2006-01-01

    Silencing of the putative tumour suppressor gene retinoic acid receptor beta2 (RARbeta2) caused by aberrant promoter hypermethylation has been identified in several solid tumours. In order to evaluate the extent of RARbeta2 hypermethylation and transcription in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML...... was unmethylated in 10/10 bone marrow and 7/7 blood samples from healthy individuals, the gene was hypermethylated in 43% of the AML patients. The RARbeta2 degree of promoter methylation differed between and within individuals, and the mRNA transcription levels of the gene varied inter-individually by a factor...... of 4000. A significant inverse correlation between promoter hypermethylation and gene expression could be established (t-test, P = 0.019). Comparison of methylation data with a series of other molecular alterations in the same patient materials revealed a correlation between hypermethylation...

  18. Sepsis in acute myeloid leukaemia patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy: no impact of chitotriosidase and mannose-binding lectin polymorphisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klostergaard, Anja; Steffensen, Rudi; Møller, Jens K

    2010-01-01

    Infections after chemotherapy often cause significant morbidity in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Chitotriosidase (CHIT) and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) are part of the innate immune system. Polymorphism in the CHIT-coding gene (CHIT1) may be associated with Gram-negative sepsis...... was a major concomitant factor for death. No significant associations between CHIT1 polymorphism and sepsis (P = 0.85) or death caused by sepsis (P = 0.14) were found. Furthermore, no significant associations between MBL2 polymorphism and sepsis (P = 0.76) or death caused by sepsis (P = 0.24) were observed...... in children with AML, and polymorphism in the MBL-coding gene (MBL2) seems to modify the risk of infections in several patient groups. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible associations between polymorphisms in CHIT1, MBL2 and sepsis in adult patients treated with high-dose chemotherapy...

  19. Residual disease detected by flow cytometry is an independent predictor of survival in childhood acute myeloid leukaemia; results of the NOPHO-AML 2004 study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tierens, Anne; Bjørklund, Elizabeth; Siitonen, Sanna

    2016-01-01

    Early response after induction is a prognostic factor for disease outcome in childhood acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Residual disease (RD) detection by multiparameter flow cytometry (MFC) was performed at day 15 and before consolidation therapy in 101 patients enrolled in the Nordic Society...... of Paediatric Haemato-Oncology AML 2004 study. A multicentre laboratory approach to RD analysis was used. Event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) was significantly different in patients with and without RD at both time points, using a 0·1% RD cut-off level. RD-negative and -positive patients after...... first induction showed a 5-year EFS of 65 ± 7% and 22 ± 7%, respectively (P consolidation therapy had a 5-year EFS of 57 ± 7% and 11 ± 7%, respectively (P

  20. Guadecitabine (SGI-110) in treatment-naive patients with acute myeloid leukaemia: phase 2 results from a multicentre, randomised, phase 1/2 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantarjian, Hagop M; Roboz, Gail J; Kropf, Patricia L; Yee, Karen W L; O'Connell, Casey L; Tibes, Raoul; Walsh, Katherine J; Podoltsev, Nikolai A; Griffiths, Elizabeth A; Jabbour, Elias; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Rizzieri, David; Stock, Wendy; Savona, Michael R; Rosenblat, Todd L; Berdeja, Jesus G; Ravandi, Farhad; Rock, Edwin P; Hao, Yong; Azab, Mohammad; Issa, Jean-Pierre J

    2017-10-01

    The hypomethylating drugs azacitidine and decitabine have shown efficacy in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukaemia, but complete tumour responses are infrequent and of short duration, possibly because of the short half-lives and suboptimal bone marrow exposure of the drugs. Guadecitabine, a next-generation hypomethylating drug, has a longer half-life and exposure than its active metabolite decitabine. A phase 1 study established 60 mg/m 2 guadecitabine for 5 days as an effective treatment schedule. In this phase 2 study, we aimed to assess the safety and activity of two doses and schedules of guadecitabine in older (≥65 years) patients with treatment-naive acute myeloid leukaemia who were not candidates for intensive chemotherapy. We did a multicentre, randomised, open-label, phase 1/2 study of guadecitabine in cohorts of patients with treatment-naive acute myeloid leukaemia, relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukaemia, and myelodysplastic syndromes; here we report the phase 2 results from the cohort of treatment-naive patients with acute myeloid leukaemia. We included patients aged at least 65 years from 14 US medical centres (hospitals and specialist cancer clinics) who were not candidates for intensive chemotherapy and randomly assigned them (1:1) using a computer algorithm (for dynamic randomisation) to guadecitabine 60 or 90 mg/m 2 on days 1-5 (5-day schedule) of a 28-day treatment cycle. Treatment allocation was not masked. We also assigned additional patients to guadecitabine 60 mg/m 2 in a 10-day schedule in a 28-day treatment cycle after a protocol amendment. The primary endpoint was composite complete response (complete response, complete response with incomplete platelet recovery, or complete response with incomplete neutrophil recovery regardless of platelets). Response was assessed in all patients (as-treated) who received at least one dose of guadecitabine. We present the final analysis, although at the time of the database lock

  1. Randomized trial of two schedules of low-dose gemtuzumab ozogamicin as induction monotherapy for newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukaemia in older patients not considered candidates for intensive chemotherapy. A phase II study of the EORTC and GIMEMA leukaemia groups (AML-19).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amadori, S.; Suciu, S.; Selleslag, D.; Stasi, R.; Alimena, G.; Baila, L.; Rizzoli, V.; Borlenghi, E.; Gaidano, G.; Magro, D.; Torelli, G.; Muus, P.; Venditti, A.; Cacciola, E.; Lauria, F; Vignetti, M.; Witte, T.J.M. de

    2010-01-01

    This study compared two schedules of low-dose gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) as induction monotherapy for untreated acute myeloid leukaemia in older patients unfit for intensive chemotherapy, to identify the more promising regimen for further study. Patients were randomized to receive either best

  2. Effects of stem cell factor on hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha accumulation in human acute myeloid leukaemia and LAD2 mast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard F Gibbs

    Full Text Available Stem cell factor (SCF is a hematopoietic growth factor that exerts its activity by signalling through the tyrosine kinase receptor known as Kit or CD117. SCF-Kit signalling is crucial for the survival, proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic cells of myeloid lineage. Furthermore, since myeloid leukaemia cells express the Kit receptor, SCF may play an important role in myeloid leukaemia progression too. However, the mechanisms of this pathophysiological effect remain unclear. Recent evidence shows that SCF triggers accumulation of the inducible alpha subunit of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1 in hematopoietic cells--a transcription complex that plays a pivotal role in cellular adaptation to low oxygen availability. However, it is unknown how SCF impacts on HIF-1α accumulation in human myeloid leukaemia and mast cells. Here we show that SCF induces HIF-1α accumulation in THP-1 human myeloid leukaemia cells but not in LAD2 mast cells. We demonstrated that LAD2 cells have a more robust glutathione (GSH-dependent antioxidative system compared to THP-1 cells and are therefore protected against the actions of ROS generated in an SCF-dependent manner. BSO-induced GSH depletion led to a significant decrease in HIF-1α prolyl hydroxylase (PHD activity in THP-1 cells and to near attenuation of it in LAD2 cells. In THP-1 cells, SCF-induced HIF-1α accumulation is controlled via ERK, PI3 kinase/PKC-δ/mTOR-dependent and to a certain extent by redox-dependent mechanisms. These results demonstrate for the first time an important cross-talk of signalling pathways associated with HIF-1 activation--an important stage of the myeloid leukaemia cell life cycle.

  3. Central nervous system leukemia in a patient with concurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma and acute myeloid leukaemia: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun-Qing; Mai, Wen-Yuan; Wang, Si-Ben; Lou, Yin-Jun; Yan, Sen-Xiang; Jin, Jie; Xu, Wei-Lai

    2017-12-01

    Concurrent case of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has not been reported. Here, we report a case of NPC, who was concurrently suffered from AML one mother after the NPC diagnosis. The patient was a 45-year-old male who presented with a mass on his right side neck. The patient was diagnosed with Epstein-Barr virus negative type-2 non-keratinizing carcinoma with clivus involvement and unilateral metastasis to the cervical lymph node. He was treated with one cycle of cisplatin and 69.76 Gy of concurrent external-beam radiation. Three months after completion of chemo-radiotherapy, the patient was diagnosed as acute myeloid leukemia, which achieved complete remission after one course induction chemotherapy. Two months later, however, the patient was diagnosed as central nervous system leukemia. He ultimately died of relapsed leukemia. The overall survival of the patient was 10 months. The co-occurrence of NPC and AML is rare and prognosis is poor. Radiotherapy in NPC can disrupt the blood-brain barrier, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of central nervous system leukemia. Early alert and prevention of central nervous system leukemia following radiotherapy in NPC patient is recommended. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A prospective phase II randomized study of deferasirox to prevent iatrogenic iron overload in patients undertaking induction/consolidation chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Glen A; Morris, Kirk L; Subramonpillai, Elango; Curley, Cameron; Butler, Jason; Durrant, Simon

    2013-06-01

    This prospective randomized phase II study aimed to determine the safety and efficacy of deferasirox in preventing iatrogenic iron overload in patients receiving induction/consolidation chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) ize. Serum ferritin, transferrin saturation and CRP were measured pre-, mid- and post- each chemotherapy cycle. Patients were randomized to receive either therapy with deferasirox vs. no deferasirox therapy once serum ferritin increased to >500 μg/l. The trial was stopped prematurely due to excess gastrointestinal (GI) and infectious toxicity demonstrable in the deferasirox arm, after 10 patients had been randomized to deferasirox and 6 patients to the control arm. Overall, deferasirox was poorly tolerated, with median maximum tolerated dose only 13·8 mg/kg/d and no patient able to tolerate doses >20 mg/kg/d. Median duration of deferasirox therapy was only 72 d (range 19-130 d), with 9/10 patients requiring unplanned dose interruptions and 4/10 patients unable to continue the drug predominantly due to GI effects. Although all 3 treatment-related deaths occurred in the deferasirox arm (P = 0·25), median overall survival was similar between treatment arms. Use of deferasirox to prevent iatrogenic iron overload in AML patients undertaking induction/consolidation is poorly tolerated and appears to be associated with excess GI and infectious toxicity. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Pevonedistat (MLN4924), a First-in-Class NEDD8-activating enzyme inhibitor, in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes: a phase 1 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swords, Ronan T; Erba, Harry P; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Bixby, Dale L; Altman, Jessica K; Maris, Michael; Hua, Zhaowei; Blakemore, Stephen J; Faessel, Hélène; Sedarati, Farhad; Dezube, Bruce J; Giles, Francis J; Medeiros, Bruno C

    2015-05-01

    This trial was conducted to determine the dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of the first in class NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE) inhibitor, pevonedistat, and to investigate pevonedistat pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Pevonedistat was administered via a 60-min intravenous infusion on days 1, 3 and 5 (schedule A, n = 27), or days 1, 4, 8 and 11 (schedule B, n = 26) every 21-days. Dose escalation proceeded using a standard '3 + 3' design. Responses were assessed according to published guidelines. The MTD for schedules A and B were 59 and 83 mg/m(2) , respectively. On schedule A, hepatotoxicity was dose limiting. Multi-organ failure (MOF) was dose limiting on schedule B. The overall complete (CR) and partial (PR) response rate in patients treated at or below the MTD was 17% (4/23, 2 CRs, 2 PRs) for schedule A and 10% (2/19, 2 PRs) for schedule B. Pevonedistat plasma concentrations peaked after infusion followed by elimination in a biphasic pattern. Pharmacodynamic studies of biological correlates of NAE inhibition demonstrated target-specific activity of pevonedistat. In conclusion, administration of the first-in-class agent, pevonedistat, was feasible in patients with MDS and AML and modest clinical activity was observed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Treatment for myeloid leukaemia of Down syndrome: population-based experience in the UK and results from the Medical Research Council AML 10 and AML 12 trials.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rao, A.; Hills, R.K.; Stiller, C.; Gibson, B.E.; Graaf, S.S.N. de; Hann, I.M.; O'Marcaigh, A.; Wheatley, K.; Webb, D.K.

    2006-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) children are at an increased risk of developing myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). We retrospectively analysed the population-based data on 81 children with myeloid leukaemia of Down syndrome (ML-DS) from the UK National Registry of Childhood Tumours and experience

  7. P-gp activity is a critical resistance factor against AVE9633 and DM4 cytotoxicity in leukaemia cell lines, but not a major mechanism of chemoresistance in cells from acute myeloid leukaemia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Ruoping; Legrand, Ollivier; Marie, Jean-Pierre; Cohen, Simy; Perrot, Jean-Yves; Faussat, Anne-Marie; Zuany-Amorim, Claudia; Marjanovic, Zora; Morjani, Hamid; Fava, Fanny; Corre, Elise

    2009-01-01

    AVE9633 is a new immunoconjugate comprising a humanized monoclonal antibody, anti-CD33 antigen, linked through a disulfide bond to the maytansine derivative DM4, a cytotoxic agent and potent tubulin inhibitor. It is undergoing a phase I clinical trial. Chemoresistance to anti-mitotic agents has been shown to be related, in part, to overexpression of ABC proteins. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential roles of P-gp, MRP1 and BCRP in cytotoxicity in AVE9633-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). This study used AML cell lines expressing different levels of P-gp, MRP1 or BCRP proteins and twenty-five samples from AML patients. Expression and functionality of the transporter protein were analyzed by flow cytometry. The cytotoxicity of the drug was evaluated by MTT and apoptosis assays. P-gp activity, but not MRP1 and BCRP, attenuated AVE9633 and DM4 cytotoxicity in myeloid cell lines. Zosuquidar, a potent specific P-gp inhibitor, restored the sensitivity of cells expressing P-gp to both AVE9633 and DM4. However, the data from AML patients show that 10/25 samples of AML cells (40%) were resistant to AVE9633 or DM4 (IC 50 > 500 nM), and this was not related to P-gp activity (p-Value: 0.7). Zosuquidar also failed to re-establish drug sensitivity. Furthermore, this resistance was not correlated with CD33 expression (p-Value: 0.6) in those cells. P-gp activity is not a crucial mechanism of chemoresistance to AVE9633. For patients whose resistance to conventional anthracycline AML regimens is related to ABC protein expression, a combination with AVE9633 could be beneficial. Other mechanisms such as microtubule alteration could play an important role in chemoresistance to AVE9633

  8. Oral manifestations of acute leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović Mirjana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukaemia is the most common form of chilhood cancer. The aim of this paper was to underline the importance of oral manifestations in children with acute leukaemia. The disease and its treatment can directly or indirectly affect oral health. Oral manifestations are gingival inflammation and enlargement. Leukaemic cells are capable of infiltrating the gingiva and the deeper periodontal tissues which leads to ulceration and infection of oral tissues. Gingival bleeding is a common sign in patients with leukaemia. Symptoms include local lymphadenopathy, mucous membrane Petechiae and ecchymoses. Cytotoxic drugs have direct effects like mucositis, involving atrophy, desquamation and ulceration of the mucosa, with increasing the risk for local and systemic infections. Leukaemia can directly influence dental care and dental treatment, while oral lesions may have life-threatening consequences. Knowledge and skills among dentists may also not be adequate to treat children with acute leukaemia. It is therefore imperative that all stomatologists be aware of dental problems that occur in leukaemia in order to be able to effectively carry out appropriate measures to mitigate these problems.

  9. Screening microarrays of novel monoclonal antibodies for binding to T-, B- and myeloid leukaemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, Larissa; Huang, Pauline; Chrisp, Jeremy S; Mulligan, Stephen P; Christopherson, Richard I

    2005-10-20

    We have developed a microarray (DotScan) that enables rapid immunophenotyping and classification of leukaemias and lymphomas by measuring the capture of cells by immobilized dots of 82 CD antibodies [Belov, L., de la Vega, O., dos Remedios, C.G., Mulligan, S.P., 2001. Immunophenotyping of leukemia using a cluster of differentiation antibody microarray. Cancer Res. 61, 4483; Belov, L., Huang, P., Barber, N., Mulligan, S.P., Christopherson, R.I., 2003. Identification of repertoires of surface antigens on leukemias using an antibody microarray. Proteomics 3, 2147]. The DotScan technology has been used to investigate the properties of 498 new antibodies submitted to the HLDA8 Workshop. These antibodies have been applied as 10 nl dots to a film of nitrocellulose on a microscope slide to make an HLDA8 microarray. After blocking the remaining nitrocellulose surface, individual arrays were incubated with each of 7 cell types from a human leukaemia cell panel consisting of three cell lines, CCRF-CEM (a T-cell acute lymphocytic leukaemia), MEC-1 (derived from B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia) and HL-60 (a promyelocytic leukaemia), and four leukaemias from patients: a T-cell prolymphocytic leukaemia, a B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, and two acute myeloid leukaemias. Leukaemia cells were captured by those immobilized antibodies for which they expressed the corresponding surface molecule. Unbound cells were gently washed off, bound cells were fixed to the arrays and dot patterns were recorded using a DotScan array reader and quantified using DotScan data analysis software. The data obtained show the unique expression profiles of the 7 cell types in the leukaemia cell panel obtained with the DotScan microarray, and the differential capture patterns for these 7 cell types screened against the 498 antibodies in the HLDA8 microarray constructed for this study.

  10. Somatic mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenases 1 and 2 are prognostic and follow-up markers in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia with normal karyotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karan-Djurasevic, Teodora; Marjanovic, Irena; Tosic, Natasa; Mitrovic, Mirjana; Djunic, Irena; Colovic, Natasa; Vidovic, Ana; Suvajdzic-Vukovic, Nada; Tomin, Dragica; Pavlovic, Sonja

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) genes are frequent molecular lesions in acute myeloid leukaemia with normal karyotype (AML-NK). The effects of IDH mutations on clinical features and treatment outcome in AML-NK have been widely investigated, but only a few studies monitored these mutations during follow-up. Patients and methods In our study samples from 110 adult de novo AML-NK were studied for the presence of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations, their associations with other prognostic markers and disease outcome. We also analyzed the stability of these mutations during the course of the disease in complete remission (CR) and relapse. Results IDH mutations were found in 25 (23%) patients. IDH+ patients tend to have lower CR rate compared to IDH-patients (44% vs 62.2%, p = 0.152), and had slightly lower disease free survival (12 months vs 17 months; p = 0.091). On the other hand, the presence of IDH mutations had significant impact on overall survival (2 vs 7 months; p = 0.039). The stability of IDH mutations were studied sequentially in 19 IDH+ patients. All of them lost the mutation in CR, and the same IDH mutations were detected in relapsed samples. Conclusions Our study shows that the presence of IDH mutations confer an adverse effect in AML-NK patients, which in combination with other molecular markers can lead to an improved risk stratification and better treatment. Also, IDH mutations are very stable during the course of the disease and can be potentially used as markers for minimal residual disease detection. PMID:27904446

  11. Quantitative multiplex quantum dot in-situ hybridisation based gene expression profiling in tissue microarrays identifies prognostic genes in acute myeloid leukaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tholouli, Eleni [Department of Haematology, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9WL (United Kingdom); MacDermott, Sarah [The Medical School, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, M13 9PT Manchester (United Kingdom); Hoyland, Judith [School of Biomedicine, Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, M13 9PT Manchester (United Kingdom); Yin, John Liu [Department of Haematology, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9WL (United Kingdom); Byers, Richard, E-mail: richard.byers@cmft.nhs.uk [School of Cancer and Enabling Sciences, Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, The University of Manchester, Stopford Building, Oxford Road, M13 9PT Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Development of a quantitative high throughput in situ expression profiling method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Application to a tissue microarray of 242 AML bone marrow samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification of HOXA4, HOXA9, Meis1 and DNMT3A as prognostic markers in AML. -- Abstract: Measurement and validation of microarray gene signatures in routine clinical samples is problematic and a rate limiting step in translational research. In order to facilitate measurement of microarray identified gene signatures in routine clinical tissue a novel method combining quantum dot based oligonucleotide in situ hybridisation (QD-ISH) and post-hybridisation spectral image analysis was used for multiplex in-situ transcript detection in archival bone marrow trephine samples from patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Tissue-microarrays were prepared into which white cell pellets were spiked as a standard. Tissue microarrays were made using routinely processed bone marrow trephines from 242 patients with AML. QD-ISH was performed for six candidate prognostic genes using triplex QD-ISH for DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, and for HOXA4, HOXA9, Meis1. Scrambled oligonucleotides were used to correct for background staining followed by normalisation of expression against the expression values for the white cell pellet standard. Survival analysis demonstrated that low expression of HOXA4 was associated with poorer overall survival (p = 0.009), whilst high expression of HOXA9 (p < 0.0001), Meis1 (p = 0.005) and DNMT3A (p = 0.04) were associated with early treatment failure. These results demonstrate application of a standardised, quantitative multiplex QD-ISH method for identification of prognostic markers in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded clinical samples, facilitating measurement of gene expression signatures in routine clinical samples.

  12. Residual disease detected by flow cytometry is an independent predictor of survival in childhood acute myeloid leukaemia; results of the NOPHO-AML 2004 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierens, Anne; Bjørklund, Elizabeth; Siitonen, Sanna; Marquart, Hanne Vibeke; Wulff-Juergensen, Gitte; Pelliniemi, Tarja-Terttu; Forestier, Erik; Hasle, Henrik; Jahnukainen, Kirsi; Lausen, Birgitte; Jonsson, Olafur G; Palle, Josefine; Zeller, Bem; Fogelstrand, Linda; Abrahamsson, Jonas

    2016-08-01

    Early response after induction is a prognostic factor for disease outcome in childhood acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Residual disease (RD) detection by multiparameter flow cytometry (MFC) was performed at day 15 and before consolidation therapy in 101 patients enrolled in the Nordic Society of Paediatric Haemato-Oncology AML 2004 study. A multicentre laboratory approach to RD analysis was used. Event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) was significantly different in patients with and without RD at both time points, using a 0·1% RD cut-off level. RD-negative and -positive patients after first induction showed a 5-year EFS of 65 ± 7% and 22 ± 7%, respectively (P < 0·001) and an OS of 77 ± 6% (P = 0·025) and 51 ± 8%. RD-negative and -positive patients at start of consolidation therapy had a 5-year EFS of 57 ± 7% and 11 ± 7%, respectively (P < 0·001) and an OS of 78 ± 6% and 28 ± 11%) (P < 0·001). In multivariate analysis only RD was significantly correlated with survival. RD before consolidation therapy was the strongest independent prognostic factor for EFS [hazard ratio (HR):5·0; 95% confidence interval (CI):1·9-13·3] and OS (HR:7·0; 95%CI:2·0-24·5). In conclusion, RD before consolidation therapy identifies patients at high risk of relapse in need of intensified treatment. In addition, RD detection can be performed in a multicentre setting and can be implemented in future trials. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Genetic variation of the gene coding for microRNA-204 (miR-204) is a risk factor in acute myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butrym, Aleksandra; Łacina, Piotr; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Bogunia-Kubik, Katarzyna; Mazur, Grzegorz

    2018-01-30

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) are small molecules known to be involved in post-transcriptional gene expression. Many of them have been shown to influence risk for various diseases. Recent studies suggest that lower expression of miR-204, a gene coding for miRNA-204, is correlated with shorter survival in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). This observation prompted us to analyse the effect of two polymorphisms of the miR-204 gene, one in the upstream flanking region (rs718447 A > G) and the other inside the gene itself (rs112062096 A > G), both also in intron 3 of the TRPM3 gene. The study was conducted on DNA samples isolated from AML patients (n = 95) and healthy individuals (n = 148), who were genotyped using the Light SNiP assays. The miR-204 rs718447 GG homozygosity was found to constitute a risk factor associated with susceptibility to AML (73/95 vs 92/148, AML patients vs healthy controls, OR = 2.020, p = 0.017). Additionally, this genotype was more frequent in patients with subtypes M0-M1 in the French-American-British (FAB) classification as compared to patients with subtypes M2-M7 (23/25 vs 39/57, p = 0.026). We also found that presence of allele A was linked to longer survival of AML patients. Our results show that polymorphism in miR-204 flanking region may constitute a risk and prognostic factor in AML.

  14. Pneumocystis carinii Pneumonia in Acute Lymphatic Leukaemia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case report of a patient who developed fatal pneumocystis pneumonia while in remission from acute lymphatic leukaemia is presented. Clinical and aetiological aspects of this rare infection are discussed. Attention is drawn to diagnostic pitfalls encountered in leukaemia.

  15. Priapism as an initial presentation of chronic myeloid leukaemia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the idiopathic types are believed to be associated with an initial prolonged sexual stimulation. Two case reports illustrating the possibility of such cases being the first presentation of myeloproliferative disorder are thus presented. Keywords: Chronic myeloid leukaemia, Priapism, Presentation Sahel Medical Journal Vol.

  16. Tuberculosis complicating imatinib treatment for chronic myeloid leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daniels, J. M. A.; Vonk-Noordegraaf, A.; Janssen, J. J. W. M.; Postmus, P. E.; van Altena, R.

    Although imatinib is not considered a predisposing factor for tuberculosis (TB), the present case report describes three patients in whom imatinib treatment for chronic myeloid leukaemia was complicated by TB. This raises the question of whether imatinib increases susceptibility to TB. There are

  17. Imaging findings of upper abdominal involvement by acute megakaryoblastic leukaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amemiya, Shiori; Akahane, Masaaki; Ohtomo, Kuni [University of Tokyo, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Takita, Junko; Igarashi, Takashi [University of Tokyo, Department of Paediatrics, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2008-04-15

    Acute megakaryoblastic leukaemia (AMKL), a relatively rare type of acute myeloid leukaemia, is characterized by frequent involvement of the liver, spleen and lymph nodes in addition to myelofibrosis in children. Diagnosis is difficult both clinically and pathologically, and the hepatic or lymph node involvement is not uncommonly misinterpreted as solid tumour. We report the imaging findings of upper abdominal involvement by AMKL in an infant. The hepatic lesion, initially suspected to be hepatoblastoma, showed a distinctive appearance on MRI suggesting its infiltrative nature. With the association of splenic lesion and lymphadenopathy, the imaging findings were considered indicative of a haematological disorder. (orig.)

  18. Haematopoietic cell transplantation with and without sorafenib maintenance for patients with FLT3-ITD acute myeloid leukaemia in first complete remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Andrew M; Li, Shuli; Fathi, Amir T; Wadleigh, Martha; Ho, Vincent T; Collier, Kerry; Connolly, Christine; Ballen, Karen K; Cutler, Corey S; Dey, Bimalangshu R; El-Jawahri, Areej; Nikiforow, Sarah; McAfee, Steven L; Koreth, John; Deangelo, Daniel J; Alyea, Edwin P; Antin, Joseph H; Spitzer, Thomas R; Stone, Richard M; Soiffer, Robert J; Chen, Yi-Bin

    2016-11-01

    We performed a retrospective study analysing the effect of sorafenib, an oral fms-Like Tyrosine Kinase 3 (FLT3)/multikinase inhibitor, as post-transplant maintenance in adult patients with FLT3-internal tandem duplication (ITD) acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). We identified consecutive patients with FLT3-ITD AML diagnosed between 2008 and 2014 who received haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in first complete remission (CR1). Post-HCT initiation of sorafenib (yes/no) was evaluated as a time-varying covariate in the overall survival/progression-free survival (OS/PFS) analysis and we performed a landmark analysis of controls alive without relapse at the median date of sorafenib initiation. We identified 26 sorafenib patients and 55 controls. Median follow-up was 27·2 months post-HCT for sorafenib survivors, and 38·4 months for controls (P = 0·021). The median time to initiating sorafenib was 68 days post-HCT; 43 controls were alive without relapse at this cut-off. Sorafenib patients had improved 2-year OS in the d+68 landmark analysis (81% vs. 62%, P = 0·029). Sorafenib was associated with improved 2-year PFS (82% vs. 53%, P = 0·0081) and lower 2-year cumulative incidence of relapse (8·2% vs. 37·7%, P = 0·0077). In multivariate analysis, sorafenib significantly improved OS [Hazard ratio (HR) 0·26, P = 0·021] and PFS (HR 0·25, P = 0·016). There was no difference in 2-year non-relapse mortality (9·8% vs. 9·3%, P = 0·82) or 1-year chronic graft-versus-host disease (55·5% vs. 37·2%, P = 0·28). These findings suggest potential benefit of post-HCT sorafenib in FLT3-ITD AML, and support further evaluation of post-HCT FLT3 inhibition. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation in adult patients with acute myeloid leukaemia and 17p abnormalities in first complete remission: a study from the Acute Leukemia Working Party (ALWP) of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poiré, Xavier; Labopin, Myriam; Maertens, Johan; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Blaise, Didier; Ifrah, Norbert; Socié, Gérard; Gedde-Dhal, Tobias; Schaap, Nicolaas; Cornelissen, Jan J; Vigouroux, Stéphane; Sanz, Jaime; Michaux, Lucienne; Esteve, Jordi; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon

    2017-01-18

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) with 17p abnormalities (abn(17p)) carries a very poor prognosis due to high refractoriness to conventional chemotherapy, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) appears as the only potential curative option. To address outcomes after allo-SCT in patients with abn(17p), we retrospectively analysed de novo or secondary AML undergoing SCT between 2000 and 2013 from the EBMT registry. One hundred thirty-nine patients with confirmed abn(17p) have been selected. At the time of transplant, one hundred twenty-five were in first remission (CR1). Median age was 54 years old. Abn(17p) was associated with a monosomal karyotype in 83% of patients, complex karyotype in 91%, monosomy 5 or 5q deletion (-5/5q-) in 55%, monosomy 7 (-7) in 39% and both -5/5q and -7 in 27%. Seventy-three patients (59%) had a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen. The 2-year overall survival (OS) and leukaemia-free survival (LFS) were 28 and 24%, respectively. The 2-year non-relapse mortality (NRM) was 15%, and 2-year relapse incidence (RI) was 61%. The cumulative incidence of grade II to IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) was 24% and that of chronic GvHD was 21%. In multivariate analysis, the presence of a -5/5q- in addition to abn(17p) was significantly and independently associated with worse OS, LFS and higher RI. Age and donor types did not correlate with outcome. Conditioning intensity was not statistically associated with OS, LFS and NRM when adjusted for patients' age. In contrast to the dismal prognosis reported for AML patients harbouring abn(17p) undergoing conventional chemotherapy, allogeneic SCT provides responses in about 25% of those patients transplanted in CR1.

  20. Functional exhaustion of CD4+T cells induced by co-stimulatory signals from myeloid leukaemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkazanc, Didem; Yoyen-Ermis, Digdem; Tavukcuoglu, Ece; Buyukasik, Yahya; Esendagli, Gunes

    2016-12-01

    To cope with immune responses, tumour cells implement elaborate strategies such as adaptive resistance and induction of T-cell exhaustion. T-cell exhaustion has been identified as a state of hyporesponsiveness that arises under continuous antigenic stimulus. Nevertheless, contribution of co-stimulatory molecules to T-cell exhaustion in cancer remains to be better defined. This study explores the role of myeloid leukaemia-derived co-stimulatory signals on CD4 + T helper (Th) cell exhaustion, which may limit anti-tumour immunity. Here, CD86 and inducible T-cell co-stimulator ligand (ICOS-LG) co-stimulatory molecules that are found on myeloid leukaemia cells supported Th cell activation and proliferation. However, under continuous stimulation, T cells co-cultured with leukaemia cells, but not with peripheral blood monocytes, became functionally exhausted. These in vitro-generated exhausted Th cells were defined by up-regulation of programmed cell death 1 (PD-1), cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4), lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG3) and T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-containing protein 3 (TIM-3) inhibitory receptors. They were reluctant to proliferate upon re-stimulation and produced reduced amounts of interleukin-2 (IL-2), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Nonetheless, IL-2 supplementation restored the proliferation capacity of the exhausted Th cells. When the co-stimulation supplied by the myeloid leukaemia cells were blocked, the amount of exhausted Th cells was significantly decreased. Moreover, in the bone marrow aspirates from patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), a subpopulation of Th cells expressing PD-1, TIM-3 and/or LAG3 was identified together with CD86 + and/or ICOS-LG + myeloid blasts. Collectively, co-stimulatory signals derived from myeloid leukaemia cells possess the capacity to facilitate functional exhaustion in Th cells. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. immunophenotyping of acute leukaemias by flow cytometry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-12-01

    Dec 1, 2009 ... ... of acute leukaemias within our resource constrained setting. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS. To the University of Nairobi, and the American. Society of Hematology (ASH), which enabled me to undertake training in flow cytometry of leukaemias and lymphomas at the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center,. Houston ...

  2. Granular acute lymphoblastic leukaemia of childhood: a morphological phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbyshire, P J; Lilleyman, J S

    1987-01-01

    Three hundred and twenty consecutive children with lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), treated on the Medical Research Council UKALL VIII schedule, had their Romanowsky stained diagnostic marrows reviewed for the presence of azurophil granules in blast cell cytoplasm. Twenty patients (7%) had greater than 5% blasts showing this feature; 19 had the cell phenotype of "common ALL." Male children and those with French-American-British (FAB) L2 morphology predominantly showed this feature. There was also a strong correlation between granularity and non-diffuse acid phosphate positivity, but no obvious difference between the 20 patients in their response to treatment emerged during a minimum follow up of 15 months. The "granular" variant occurs in around 7% of children with ALL, but has no clear prognostic importance. Morphologists should be aware of its existence and incidence to avoid confusion with acute myeloid leukaemia. Images p252-a PMID:3470317

  3. A Novel Three-Colour Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization Approach for the Detection of t(7;12)(q36;p13) in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia Reveals New Cryptic Three Way Translocation t(7;12;16)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naiel, Abdulbasit [Leukaemia and Chromosome Research Laboratory, Division of Biosciences, Brunel University, London, Middlesex UB8 3PH (United Kingdom); Vetter, Michael [MetaSystems, Altlussheim 68804 (Germany); Plekhanova, Olga [Regional Children’s Hospital N 1, Ekaterinburg 620149 (Russian Federation); Fleischman, Elena; Sokova, Olga [N.N. Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center Russian Academy of Medical Science, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation); Tsaur, Grigory [Regional Children’s Hospital N 1, Ekaterinburg 620149 (Russian Federation); Research Institute of Medical Cell Technologies, Ekaterinburg 620149 (Russian Federation); Harbott, Jochen [Oncogenetic Laboratory, Department of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology, Justus Liebig University, Giessen 35392 (Germany); Tosi, Sabrina, E-mail: sabrina.tosi@brunel.ac.uk [Leukaemia and Chromosome Research Laboratory, Division of Biosciences, Brunel University, London, Middlesex UB8 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2013-03-11

    The t(7;12)(q36;p13) translocation is a recurrent chromosome abnormality that involves the ETV6 gene on chromosome 12 and has been identified in 20–30% of infant patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). The detection of t(7;12) rearrangements relies on the use of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) because this translocation is hardly visible by chromosome banding methods. Furthermore, a fusion transcript HLXB9-ETV6 is found in approximately 50% of t(7;12) cases, making the reverse transcription PCR approach not an ideal screening method. Considering the report of few cases of variant translocations harbouring a cryptic t(7;12) rearrangement, we believe that the actual incidence of this abnormality is higher than reported to date. The clinical outcome of t(7;12) patients is believed to be poor, therefore an early and accurate diagnosis is important in the clinical management and treatment. In this study, we have designed and tested a novel three-colour FISH approach that enabled us not only to confirm the presence of the t(7;12) in a number of patients studied previously, but also to identify a cryptic t(7;12) as part of a complex rearrangement. This new approach has proven to be an efficient and reliable method to be used in the diagnostic setting.

  4. Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Yöntem, Ahmet; Bayram, İbrahim

    2018-01-01

    Acute leukemia is basically divided intoacute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia. About 15-20% ofchildhood leukemia is caused by acute myeloid leukemia.AML is classified according to morphological, cytochemical and immunophenotypiccharacteristics. AML patients may present with various clinical signsand symptoms due to leukemic cell infiltration. Age, gender, race, structuralfeatures of the patient and cytogenetic abnormalities are important factorsaffecting prognosis in AML. Th...

  5. The relationship between bcl-2 expression and response to chemotherapy in acute leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maung, Z T; MacLean, F R; Reid, M M; Pearson, A D; Proctor, S J; Hamilton, P J; Hall, A G

    1994-09-01

    Immunocytochemistry was used to assess bcl-2 expression in blasts obtained from the bone marrow of 28 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) (16 children and six adults at presentation and three children and three adults on relapse) and 20 with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) (19 adults and one child, 13 with de novo AML, 11 at presentation and two on relapse, and seven secondary to myelodysplasia or chronic myeloid leukaemia). Slides were examined both for the percentage of positive cells and for the intensity of staining using a five-point scale. There was a statistically significant increase in both the percentage of positive cells seen (P presentation in ALL. There was a significantly greater intensity of staining in cells from patients with ALL (P important prognostic feature in both de novo AML and in ALL, but not in secondary AML.

  6. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia presenting as Juvenile Idiopathic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2013-04-28

    Apr 28, 2013 ... malignancies that occur in children <15year of age and. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) accounts for about 77% of cases of childhood leukemias.1 Bone pain, particularly of the lower extremities is a common manifestation of childhood ALL. Although the initial presentation of childhood ALL is usually ...

  7. Unusual presentations of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, (ALL) is increasingly reported to present in an atypical fashion which may have significant implications for treatment outcomes and survival. This case report presents a Nigerian child who's clinical and radiological features together with effusion cytological findings were suggestive ...

  8. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia presenting as Juvenile Idiopathic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia in children commonly presents with osteo articular manifestations that may mimic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. This may create considerable diagnostic difficulty and lead to delay in commencing appropriate treatment. Case: An eight year old boy who presented with multiple ...

  9. The Complexity of Targeting PI3K-Akt-mTOR Signalling in Human Acute Myeloid Leukaemia: The Importance of Leukemic Cell Heterogeneity, Neighbouring Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Immunocompetent Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette K. Brenner

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic targeting of PI3K-Akt-mTOR is considered a possible strategy in human acute myeloid leukaemia (AML; the most important rationale being the proapoptotic and antiproliferative effects of direct PI3K/mTOR inhibition observed in experimental studies of human AML cells. However, AML is a heterogeneous disease and these effects caused by direct pathway inhibition in the leukemic cells are observed only for a subset of patients. Furthermore, the final effect of PI3K-Akt-mTOR inhibition is modulated by indirect effects, i.e., treatment effects on AML-supporting non-leukemic bone marrow cells. In this article we focus on the effects of this treatment on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and monocytes/macrophages; both these cell types are parts of the haematopoietic stem cell niches in the bone marrow. MSCs have unique membrane molecule and constitutive cytokine release profiles, and mediate their support through bidirectional crosstalk involving both cell-cell contact and the local cytokine network. It is not known how various forms of PI3K-Akt-mTOR targeting alter the molecular mechanisms of this crosstalk. The effect on monocytes/macrophages is also difficult to predict and depends on the targeted molecule. Thus, further development of PI3K-Akt-mTOR targeting into a clinical strategy requires detailed molecular studies in well-characterized experimental models combined with careful clinical studies, to identify patient subsets that are likely to respond to this treatment.

  10. Current approach to the treatment of chronic myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasic, Ivan; Lipton, Jeffrey H

    2017-04-01

    Of all the cancers, chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) has witnessed the most rapid evolution of the therapeutic milieu in recent decades. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) as a therapeutic option has profoundly changed patient experience and outcome. The availability of multiple new highly effective therapies has increasingly underscored the importance of a good understanding of the underlying pathophysiological basis in CML, as well as patient-specific factors in choosing the right treatment for every individual. The treatment of CML has migrated in many jurisdictions from the office of a highly specialized malignant hematologist to the general hematologist or even a general practitioner. The goal of this review is to offer an overview of the modern approach to the treatment of CML, with an emphasis on chronic phase (CP) CML, including both TKI-based therapies such as imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib, bosutinib and ponatinib, and non-TKI medications, such as omacetaxine. We discuss evidence behind each drug, most common and material adverse reactions and outline how this information can be used in selecting the right drug for the right patient. We also discuss evidence as it relates to other therapies, including stem cell transplant (SCT), and patients in accelerated (AP) and blastic phase (BP). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Atypical chronic myeloid leukaemia: A case of an orphan disease-A multicenter report by the Polish Adult Leukemia Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozd-Sokołowska, Joanna; Mądry, Krzysztof; Waszczuk-Gajda, Anna; Biecek, Przemysław; Szwedyk, Paweł; Budziszewska, Katarzyna; Raźny, Magdalena; Dutka, Magdalena; Obara, Agata; Wasilewska, Ewa; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Piekarska, Agnieszka; Bober, Grażyna; Krzemień, Helena; Stella-Hołowiecka, Beata; Kapelko-Słowik, Katarzyna; Sawicki, Waldemar; Paszkowska-Kowalewska, Małgorzata; Machowicz, Rafał; Dwilewicz-Trojaczek, Jadwiga

    2018-03-07

    Atypical chronic myeloid leukaemia (aCML) belongs to myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms. Because of its rarity and changing diagnostic criteria throughout subsequent classifications, data on aCML are very scarce. Therefore, we at the Polish Adult Leukemia Group performed a nationwide survey on aCML. Eleven biggest Polish centres participated in the study. Altogether, 45 patients were reported, among whom only 18 patients (40%) fulfilled diagnostic criteria. Among misdiagnosed patients, myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative syndrome unclassifiable and chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia were the most frequent diagnoses. Thirteen patients were male, median age 64.6 years (range 40.4-80.9). The median parameters at diagnosis were as follows: white blood cell count 97 × 10 9 /L (23.8-342) with immature progenitors amounting at 27.5% (12-72), haemoglobin 8.6 g/dL (3.9-14.9), and platelet count 66 × 10 9 /L (34-833). Cytoreductive treatment was used in all patients, and 2 patients underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The median overall survival was 14.1 months (95% CI, 7.2), with median acute myeloid leukaemia-free survival of 13.3 months (95% CI, 3.6-22.6). Cumulative incidence of acute myeloid leukaemia transformation after 1 year in aCML group was 12.5% (95% CI, 0%-29.6%). To conclude, aCML harbours a poor prognosis. Treatment options are limited, with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation being the only curative method at present, although only a minority of patients are transplant eligible. Educational measures are needed to improve the quality of diagnoses. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. High PRDM16 expression identifies a prognostic subgroup of pediatric acute myeloid leukaemia correlated to FLT3-ITD, KMT2A-PTD, and NUP98-NSD1: the results of the Japanese Paediatric Leukaemia/Lymphoma Study Group AML-05 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Norio; Ohki, Kentaro; Kobayashi, Tohru; Hara, Yusuke; Yamato, Genki; Tanoshima, Reo; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Tomizawa, Daisuke; Park, Myoung-Ja; Shimada, Akira; Sotomatsu, Manabu; Arakawa, Hirokazu; Horibe, Keizo; Adachi, Souichi; Taga, Takashi; Tawa, Akio; Hayashi, Yasuhide

    2016-02-01

    Recent reports described the NUP98-NSD1 fusion as an adverse prognostic marker for acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and PRDM16 (also known as MEL1) as the representative overexpressed gene in patients harbouring NUP98-NSD1 fusion. PRDM16 gene expression levels were measured via real-time polymerase chain reaction in 369 paediatric patients with de novo AML, of whom 84 (23%) exhibited PRDM16 overexpression (PRDM16/ABL1 ratio ≥0·010). The frequencies of patients with high or low PRDM16 expression differed widely with respect to each genetic alteration, as follows: t(8;21), 4% vs. 96%, P NUP98-NSD1, 100% vs. 0%, P < 0·001. The overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) among PRDM16-overexpressing patients were significantly worse than in patients with low PRDM16 expression (3-year OS: 51% vs. 81%, P < 0·001, 3-year EFS: 32% vs. 64%, P < 0·001) irrespective of other cytogenetic alterations except for NPM1. PRDM16 gene expression was particularly useful for stratifying FLT3-internal tandem duplication-positive AML patients (3-year OS: high = 30% vs. low = 70%, P < 0·001). PRDM16 overexpression was highly recurrent in de novo paediatric AML patients with high/intermediate-risk cytogenetic profiles and was independently associated with an adverse outcome. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss as the first manifestation of chronic myeloid leukaemia: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, M; Tian, F; Sun, J

    2014-11-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss rarely occurs in patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia. We present a case report of a patient who presented with sudden sensorineural hearing loss as the first manifestation of chronic myeloid leukaemia, and review the mechanisms responsible for sudden sensorineural hearing loss in leukaemic patients. A 31-year-old female presented to our clinic with unilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus. Pure tone audiometry revealed profound sensorineural hearing loss in the left ear at all frequencies. During an investigation into her hearing loss, the patient was found to have chronic myeloid leukaemia. Every case of sudden sensorineural hearing loss must be carefully evaluated, and haematological disorders must be considered in the differential diagnosis of sudden hearing loss.

  14. [Acute myeloid Leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braess, Jan

    2016-11-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has been genetically characterized extensively and can now be subdivided into 9 to 11 pathogenetically different subtypes according to their profile of driver mutations. In clinical practice karyotyping and molecular analysis of NPM1, cEBPa and FLT3-ITD are required for treatment stratification and potentially genotype specific treatment. Some markers such as NPM1 not only offer prognostic information but can also serve as markers of minimal residual disease and thus have the potential to guide therapy in the future.The basis of curative treatment is intensive combination chemotherapy comprizing cytarabine and an anthracycline ("7 + 3" regimen). The prolonged duration of aplasia can be reduced significantly by accelerated therapy ("S-HAM" regimen). Following achievement of a complete remission patients with a low risk of relapse - based on genetic and clinical features - receive chemotherapy based consolidation therapy whereas high risk patients - and potentially also those with an intermediate risk - receive an allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Whereas adding the rather unspecific tyrosinekinase inhibitor sorafenib to standard treatment in unselected AML patients has not improved overall survival (OS), the addition of midostaurin to standard therapy in the selected group FLT3 mutated patients has resulted in a moderate but significant OS benefit.Real world data show that in patients below 50 years a cure rate of ca. 50 % can be achieved. However less than 10 % of patients above the age of 70 will be alive after five years even after intensive treatment. Therefore when curative and intensive treatment is deemed impossible the therapeutic standard in elderly and unfit patients used to be low-dose cytarabine with an average OS of 4 months. This has now been replaced by a new standard of care of hypomethylating agents - azacytidine and decitabine - which both achieve higher remission rates and show strong trends towards a prolonged OS

  15. Splenic irradiation before bone marrow transplantation for chronic myeloid leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gratwohl, A.; Hermans, J.; Biezen, A.V.

    1996-01-01

    A total of 229 patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) in chronic phase were randomized between 1986 and 1990 to receive or not receive additional splenic irradiation as part of their conditioning prior to bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Both groups, 115 patients with and 114 patients without splenic irradiation, were very similar regarding distribution of age, sex, donor/recipient sex combination, conditioning, graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) prevention method and blood counts at diagnosis or prior to transplant. 135 patients (59%) are alive as of October 1995 with a minimum follow-up of 5 years. 52 patients have relapsed (23%), 26 patients in the irradiated, 26 patients in the non-irradiated group (n.s.) with a relapse incident at 6 years of 28%. The main risk factor for relapse was T-cell depletion as the method for GvHD prevention, and an elevated basophil count in the peripheral blood prior to transplant. Relapse incidence between patients with or without splenic irradiation was no different in patients at high risk for relapse, e.g. patients transplanted with T-cell-depleted marrows (P = n.s.) and in patients with low risk for relapse, e.g. patients transplanted with non-T-cell-depleted transplants and basophil counts 3% basophils in peripheral blood). In this patient group, relapse incidence was 11% at 6 years with splenic irradiation but 32% in the non-irradiated group (P = 0.05). Transplant-related mortality was similar whether patients received splenic irradiation or not. This study suggests an advantage in splenic irradiation prior to transplantation for CML in this subgroup of patients and illustrates the need for tailored therapy. (Author)

  16. MicroRNAs as Potential Biomarkers in Acute Promyelocytic Leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imilia Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL is an M3 subtype of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML. This classification is based on the morphology of promyelocytic cell. The clinical characteristics of APL can be recognized by haemorrhagic episodes, a differentiation block at the promyelocytic stage, and sensitivity to the differentiation response to all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA. Cytogenetically, APL is characterized by a balanced reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 15 and 17, which results in the production of PML/RARα fusion protein. Recent studies reported that microRNAs (miRNAs have also been proposed to contribute to the pathogenesis of APL. miRNAs have been associated with the pathogenesis of cancer and their involvement as oncogenic and tumour suppressor activities have been identified. They are involved in various biological processes including the cell proliferation, differentiation, growth and development, metabolism, apoptosis, and haematopoiesis. The new discovery of miRNAs as possible therapeutic markers will provide new insight for the diagnosis and therapeutic entries for the treatment of APL. This review highlights the potential of miRNAs as biomarkers in APL.

  17. Analysis of images of acute human and animal leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinermann, Emmanuel

    1981-01-01

    This research thesis first proposes a review of the development of stereology: historical backgrounds, basic principles. It discusses the choices regarding instrumentation: Coulter counter (principle and theory), quantitative analysis of particles, image analyser (optical microscope, epidiascope, scanners, detection, electronic pencil, computers, programming and data processing system), and stereo-logical parameters. The author then reports the stereo-logical study of acute human leukaemia: definition, classification, determination of spherical particle size distribution, lympho-blast size distributions. He reports the comparative study of rat L 5222 leukaemia and Brown Norway rat acute myelocytic leukaemia, and discusses their relationship with acute human leukaemia

  18. Estimation of current cumulative incidence of leukaemia-free patients and current leukaemia-free survival in chronic myeloid leukaemia in the era of modern pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlík, Tomáš; Janoušová, Eva; Pospíšil, Zdeněk; Mužík, Jan; Záčková, Daniela; Ráčil, Zdeněk; Klamová, Hana; Cetkovský, Petr; Trněný, Marek; Mayer, Jiří; Dušek, Ladislav

    2011-10-11

    The current situation in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) presents a new challenge for attempts to measure the therapeutic results, as the CML patients can experience multiple leukaemia-free periods during the course of their treatment. Traditional measures of treatment efficacy such as leukaemia-free survival and cumulative incidence are unable to cope with multiple events in time, e.g. disease remissions or progressions, and as such are inappropriate for the efficacy assessment of the recent CML treatment. Standard nonparametric statistical methods are used for estimating two principal characteristics of the current CML treatment: the probability of being alive and leukaemia-free in time after CML therapy initiation, denoted as the current cumulative incidence of leukaemia-free patients; and the probability that a patient is alive and in any leukaemia-free period in time after achieving the first leukaemia-free period on the CML treatment, denoted as the current leukaemia-free survival. The validity of the proposed methods is further documented in the data of the Czech CML patients consecutively recorded between July 2003 and July 2009 as well as in simulated data. The results have shown a difference between the estimates of the current cumulative incidence function and the common cumulative incidence of leukaemia-free patients, as well as between the estimates of the current leukaemia-free survival and the common leukaemia-free survival. Regarding the currently available follow-up period, both differences have reached the maximum (12.8% and 20.8%, respectively) at 3 years after the start of follow-up, i.e. after the CML therapy initiation in the former case and after the first achievement of the disease remission in the latter. Two quantities for the evaluation of the efficacy of current CML therapy that may be estimated with standard nonparametric methods have been proposed in this paper. Both quantities reliably illustrate a patient's disease

  19. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase A1298C genotypes are associated with the risks of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and chronic myelogenous leukaemia in the Korean population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, M; Park, J Y; Cho, H C; Lee, K M; Shin, H Y; Cho, H I

    2006-06-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a key enzyme involved in folate metabolism, DNA methylation and synthesis. We investigated the association between MTHFR polymorphisms and the risks of acute and chronic leukaemias. MTHFR C677T and A1298C were genotyped in 396 Korean individuals using multiplex polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment-length polymorphism. They were acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL, n = 89), acute myeloid leukaemia (AML, n = 55), biphenotypic acute leukaemia (n = 12), chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML, n = 40), and normal controls (n = 200). C677T genotypes were not associated with the risk of each disease. A1298C variants, however, significantly decreased the risks of ALL and CML compared with 1298AA. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals of 1298AC and 1298AC + CC were 0.53 (0.31-0.93) and 0.54 (0.31-0.93) in ALL, and 0.34 (0.14-0.80) and 0.40 (0.18-0.89) in CML, respectively, compared with 1298AA. These findings demonstrate that the development of ALL and CML is more dependent on folate status, and more susceptible to DNA instability than that of AML. In addition, A1298C rather than C677T may be a more important genetic risk modifier in leukaemogenesis at least in the Korean population.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... normal acute myeloid leukemia Cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) is one form of a cancer ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... acute myeloid leukemia Core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... collapse boxes. Description Core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia (CBF-AML) is one form of a cancer ...

  2. Aberrant Gene Expression in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Frederik Otzen

    -based gene-lookup webservices, called HemaExplorer and BloodSpot. These web-services support the aim of making data and analysis of haematopoietic cells from mouse and human accessible for researchers without bioinformatics expertise. Finally, in order to aid the analysis of the very limited number...

  3. Detection and analysis of tumour biomarkers to strengthen the diagnosis of acute and chronic leukaemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Cerón-Maldonado

    2015-04-01

    A panel of molecular markers that included 11 genes derived from chromosomal translocations BCR-ABL major and minor breakpoints, E2A-PBX1, MLL-AF4, TEL-AML1, PML-RARα, AML1-ETO was standardised; cancer testis antigens (CTA derived from NY-ESO1 and MAGE-A3 epigenetic alterations and multi-drug-resistant genes ABCB1 and ABCG2. 30 patients diagnosed with leukaemia from Mexico's General Hospital (Hospital General de Mexico were included. They suffered from acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL and acute myeloblastic leukaemia (AML; bone marrow mononuclear cells were used, from which RNA was extracted for the synthesis of cDNA and RT-PCR for each of the markers. In acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL, BCR-ABL biomarkers expressed under 30% (3/10, E2A-PBX1 10% (1/10, ABC-B1 80% (8/10, and ABC-G2 60% (6/10. Patients with acute myeloblastic leukaemia (AML expressed 30% PML-RARα (3/10, 40% ABC-B1 (4/10, and 10% ABC-G2 (1/10. Lastly, in patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML, BCR-ABL was over 100% (10/10, ABC-B1 20% (2/10, and ABC-G2 50% (5/10. The presence of transcripts from chimeric genes minor BCR-ABL and E2A-PBX1 in ALL; PML-RARα in AML; and major BCR-ABL in CML, confirms the importance that the panel of molecular markers has in strengthening the diagnosis and prognosis of these conditions.

  4. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-30

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Serum & cerebrospinal fluid ferritin levels in children with acute leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, A; Rusia, U; Anand, N K; Sood, S K

    1989-06-01

    Serum and CSF ferritin were estimated in 35 consecutive patients of acute leukaemia at the time of admission and on induction of remission. Serum ferritin levels were significantly raised in 94 per cent patients of acute leukaemia. The mean (+/- SD) serum ferritin (314.36 +/- 158.4 micrograms/1) was significantly higher when compared with control values (P less than 0.001). Remission induction resulted in significant fall in serum ferritin values to a mean of 149 (+/- 98.7) micrograms/l (P less than 0.05). Serum ferritin is thus of value in assessing the state of remission and is a sensitive indicator of the leukaemic cell mass and the state of activity of the disease. CSF ferritin levels in acute leukaemia were comparable to normal control values. CSF ferritin did not reflect CNS involvement in acute leukaemia and therefore its value as a tumour marker of CNS infiltration is doubtful.

  6. Acute lymphocytic leukaemia in children in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Does-van den Berg, A. van der.

    1980-01-01

    Some features, present at diagnosis in children with acute lymphocytic leukaemia, investigated during the period 1973-1975, and the results of treatment according to protocol AL II of the Dutch Childhood Leukaemia Study Group (SNWLK), are described. This report concerns the results of induction treatment, elective treatment of the central nervous system, and also of the prospective comparative study on the influence of the addition of cyclophosphamide to maintenance treatment with 6-mercaptopurine and methotrextate. In the context of the investigation of long-term side effects of disease and treatment, the immunocompetence of children with acute lymphocytic leukaemia in continuous remission after cessation of therapy was studied. (Auth.)

  7. Morphology of leukaemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Ladines-Castro

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukaemias are characterised by uncontrolled proliferation of immature blood cells with lymphoid or myeloid lineage. Morphological classification is based on the identification of the leukaemia cell line and its stage of differentiation. The first microscopic descriptions dating from the 1930s pointed to 2 different types of leukaemia cells: lymphoid and myeloid. In 1976, the consensus that led to the French-American-British (FAB classification was achieved. This includes criteria for identifying myeloid and lymphoid leukaemias, and gives a list of morphological subtypes, describing how these affect the patient's prognosis. Today, despite new classifications based on sophisticated studies, FAB classification is widely used by experts due to its technical simplicity, good diagnostic reliability and cost-effectiveness.

  8. [Dasatinib. A novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dufva, I.H.; Stentoft, J.; Hasselbalch, H.C.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukaemia is characterized by an abnormal tyrosin kinase in the cytoplasm of the clonal cells. The enzyme is derived from a fusion gene on the Philadelphia-chromosome, evolved by a translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22. Understanding the biology of the tyrosin kinase led to t...... to targeted therapy, inhibiting the ATP-binding site by a small molecule--imatinib (Glivec). A novel 2nd generation tyrosin kinase inhibitor--dasatinib (Sprycel)--is now available in cases of insufficient response or intolerance to imatinib Udgivelsesdato: 2008/1/28...

  9. Monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells as prognostic factor in chronic myeloid leukaemia patients treated with dasatinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giallongo, Cesarina; Parrinello, Nunziatina L; La Cava, Piera; Camiolo, Giuseppina; Romano, Alessandra; Scalia, Marina; Stagno, Fabio; Palumbo, Giuseppe A; Avola, Roberto; Li Volti, Giovanni; Tibullo, Daniele; Di Raimondo, Francesco

    2018-02-01

    Myeloid suppressor cells are a heterogeneous group of myeloid cells that are increased in patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) inducing T cell tolerance. In this study, we found that therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) decreased the percentage of granulocytic MDSC, but only patients treated with dasatinib showed a significant reduction in the monocytic subset (M-MDSC). Moreover, a positive correlation was observed between number of persistent M-MDSC and the value of major molecular response in dasatinib-treated patients. Serum and exosomes from patients with CML induced conversion of monocytes from healthy volunteers into immunosuppressive M-MDSC, suggesting a bidirectional crosstalk between CML cells and MDSC. Overall, we identified M-MDSC as prognostic factors in patients treated with dasatinib. It might be of interest to understand whether MDSC may be a candidate predictive markers of relapse risk following TKI discontinuation, suggesting their potential significance as practice of precision medicine. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  10. Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia: a Single-Centre Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kakucs Enikő

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Autologous haemopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT is an important treatment modality for patients with acute myeloid leukemia with low and intermediate risk disease. It has served advantages over allogenic transplantation, because it does not need a matched donor, there is no graft versus host disease, there are less complications and a faster immune reconstitution than in the allo-setting. The disadvantage is the lack of the graft versus leukaemia effect.

  11. Chronic Subdural Hematoma development in Accelerated phase of Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia presenting with seizure and rapid progression course with fatal outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheja Amol

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Occurrence of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH in leukemia is rare, and most reported cases occurred in relation with acute myeloid leukaemia; however, occurrence is extremely rare in accelerated phase of chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML. Seizure as presentation of SDH development in CML cases is not reported in literature. Authors report an elderly male, who was diagnosed as CML, accelerated phase of developing SDH. Initially presented to local physician with seizure; urgent CT scan head was advised, but ignored and sensorium rapidly worsened over next day and reported to our emergency department in deeply comatose state, where imaging revealed chronic subdural hematoma with hypoxic brain injury with fatal outcome. Seizure, progressive worsening of headache, vomiting and papilloedema are harbinger of intracranial space occupying lesion and requires CT head in emergency medical department for exclusion, who are receiving treatment of haematological malignancy

  12. Myeloperoxidase index and subtypes of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eivazi-Ziaei, Jamal

    2009-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) should be classified into subtypes according to the French-American-British (FAB) or, preferably, the newer World Health Organization (WHO) classification schemes. FAB is purely a morphological classification. It does not determine treatment (except M3) or prognosis for the patient which requires cytogenetics. Haematological analyzer had been used for classification of leukaemia in several studies. Neutrophil myeloperoxidase activity (MPXI) can be performed by Technicon H1 (Bayer) automated cell counter. The aim of this study was the statement of myeloperoxidase index and subgroups of AML. In the study of medical records of 72 patients with AML from 2006-7, we found that MPXI was negative in M4 and M5 while 75% of M3 cases had high MPXI values. MPXI level may help to differentiate subtypes of AML.

  13. Birth weight in offspring and leukaemia risk in parents-A nation-wide register-based cohort study from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marklund, Maria; Rostgaard, Klaus; Hjalgrim, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    with parental risk of leukaemia overall or of leukaemia subtypes except for a twofold increased acute lymphatic leukaemia risk in fathers of high birth weight offspring and an increasing paternal risk of chronic myeloid leukaemia with increasing offspring birth weight. These may both be chance findings. Our...

  14. Nucleophosmin 1 expression in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Davoudi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nucleophosmin1 is a multifunctional protein that shuttles between nucleus and cytoplasm in some subtypes of acute myeloid leukemias. Mutated Nucleophosmin1 expresses aberrantly in the cytoplasm of the cell and transports from nucleolus to the cytoplasm. It is diagnosed by immunohistochemical techniques, flow cytometry assay and mutational analysis.The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of Nucleophosmin1 mutation on the clinical presentations, prognosis, diagnosis and the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia. Thirteen articles were extracted from PubMed, Google scholar and Scopus in which the Nucleophosmin1 mutation correlated with gingival hyperplasia, high white blood cell count, lymphadenopathy, high platelet count and other signs and symptoms of myelomonocytic and monocytic acute myeloid leukemias. This mutation is a provisional entity in the classification of acute myeloid leukemia, which influences on the prognosis, clinical course and the treatment of some subtypes of acute myeloid leukemias. Nucleophosmin1 mutation has favorable prognostic value in the absence of other concomitant mutations.

  15. ETV6-RUNX1+Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia in Identical Twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Anthony M; Greaves, Mel

    2017-01-01

    Acute leukaemia is the major subtype of paediatric cancer with a cumulative risk of 1 in 2000 for children up to the age of 15 years. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is a biologically and clinically diverse disease with distinctive subtypes; multiple chromosomal translocations exist within the subtypes and each carries its own prognostic relevance. The most common chromosome translocation observed is the t(12;21) that results in an in-frame fusion between the first five exons of ETV6 (TEL) and almost the entire coding region of RUNX1 (AML1).The natural history of childhood ALL is almost entirely clinically silent and is well advanced at the point of diagnosis. It has, however, been possible to backtrack this process through molecular analysis of appropriate clinical samples: (i) leukaemic clones in monozygotic twins that are either concordant or discordant for ALL; (ii) archived neonatal blood spots or Guthrie cards from individuals who later developed leukaemia; and (iii) stored, viable cord blood cells.Here, we outline our studies on the aetiology and pathology of childhood ALL that provide molecular evidence for a monoclonal, prenatal origin of ETV6-RUNX1+ leukaemia in monozygotic identical twins. We provide mechanistic support for the concept that altered patterns of infection during early childhood can deliver the necessary promotional drive for the progression of ETV6-RUNX1+ pre-leukaemic cells into a postnatal overt leukaemia.

  16. Cryptic Chromosome Abormalities in Acute Leukaemia: Identification and Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J.C.M. van Zutven

    2005-01-01

    textabstractSpecific chromosome aberrations are observed in 50% of all new acute leukaemia patients. As a result of chromosome aberrations, genes located at the breakpoints can be disrupted and fusion genes can be formed. In addition, genes can be lost or amplified. An increasing number of these

  17. Incidence of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in white and coloured ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To record the age-specific incidence rate (ASIR) for diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in coloured and white children aged 0 - 12 years in the Western Cape (WC). Design. A retrospective population-based study using the 1991 population census to calculate the mean annual childhood population ...

  18. Academic career after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kingma, A; Rammeloo, LAJ; van der Does-van den Berg, A; Rekers-Mombarg, L; Postma, A

    Aim-To evaluate academic career in long term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), in comparison to their healthy siblings. Patients-Ninety four children treated for ALL with cranial irradiation 18 or 25 Gy and intrathecal methotrexate as CNS prophylaxis. Median age at

  19. Presence of clone-specific markers at birth in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjalgrim, L L; Madsen, H O; Melbye, M; Jørgensen, P; Christiansen, M; Andersen, M T; Pallisgaard, N; Hokland, P; Clausen, N; Ryder, L P; Schmiegelow, K; Hjalgrim, H

    2002-10-21

    Recent studies have suggested that development of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia may often be initiated in utero. To provide further evidence of an prenatal origin of childhood leukaemia, we conducted a molecular biological investigation of nine children with B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia carrying the chromosomal translocation t(12;21), the most common subtype of all childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Specifically, for each child we identified the non-constitutive chromosomal sequences made up by the t(12;21) fusion gene. From these, leukaemia clone-specific DNA primers were constructed and applied in nested polymerase chain reaction analyses of DNA extracted from the patients' Guthrie cards obtained at birth. Leukaemia clone-specific fusion gene regions were demonstrated in Guthrie card DNA of three patients, age 2 years 11 months, 3 years 4 months, and 5 years 8 months at leukaemia diagnosis. Our findings are consistent with previous observations, and thus provide further evidence that the development of t(12;21) B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia may be initiated in utero. Review of the current literature moreover indicates that age at leukaemia may be inversely correlated with the burden of cells with leukaemia clonal markers, i.e. leukaemia predisposed cells at birth, and that certain types of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia develop as a multiple step process involving both pre- and postnatal genetic events.

  20. Molecular techniques for the personalised management of patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alikian, Mary; Gale, Robert Peter; Apperley, Jane F; Foroni, Letizia

    2017-03-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is the paradigm for targeted cancer therapy. RT-qPCR is the gold standard for monitoring response to tyrosine kinase-inhibitor (TKI) therapy based on the reduction of blood or bone marrow BCR-ABL1 . Some patients with CML and very low or undetectable levels of BCR-ABL1 transcripts can stop TKI-therapy without CML recurrence. However, about 60 percent of patients discontinuing TKI-therapy have rapid leukaemia recurrence. This has increased the need for more sensitive and specific techniques to measure residual CML cells. The clinical challenge is to determine when it is safe to stop TKI-therapy. In this review we describe and critically evaluate the current state of CML clinical management, different technologies used to monitor measurable residual disease (MRD) focus on comparingRT-qPCR and new methods entering clinical practice. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of new methods.

  1. Treatment strategies in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han Li-na, [No Value; Zhou Jin, [No Value; Schuringa, Jan Jacob; Vellenga, Edo

    2011-01-01

    Objective To summarize the risk stratification and current treatment strategies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and discuss the role of emerging novel agents that might be applied in future clinical trials. Data sources The data in this article were collected from PubMed database with relevant

  2. Clinico-pathological profile of acute promyelocytic leukaemia at Al-Amal Oncology-Haematology Centre, Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, F A; Yassin, M A; El-Ayoubi, H R; Alhiji, I A; Albinali, A S; Almansour, S M; Qafoud, F M

    2010-09-01

    This cases series describes the profile of adult patients with acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APt) at a referral hospital in Qatar. Of 34 acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cases diagnosed, 11(32%) were classified as APt. Disseminated intravascular coagulation was common at presentation (91%). Severe thrombocytopenia was seen in 73%, leukocytosis in 55% and severe anaemia in 45%. Only 2 patients were of the classic hypergranular type. In the remaining 9 patients, 3 morphological subtypes were recognized: microgranular variant (6 patients), hyperbasophilic (2 patients) and regular nuclear outline M3r (1 patient). Translocation t(15;17) was detected in 63% of cases. APL constitutes a high proportion of AML cases in Qatar, with considerable morphological heterogeneity and a oredominance of APL variants with unfavourable oresenting features.

  3. Daunorubicin Hydrochloride, Cytarabine and Oblimersen Sodium in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. High-flow priapism in acute lymphatic leukaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mentzel, Hans-Joachim; Vogt, Susanna; Kaiser, Werner A. [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Bachstrasse 18, 07740, Jena (Germany); Kentouche, Karim; Doerfel, Claus; Zintl, Felix [Department of Paediatrics, University of Jena (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Priapism is defined as prolonged and persistent erection of the penis without sexual stimulation. It is associated with excessive hyperleukocytosis (e.g. in acute or chronic leukaemia); however, this complication is rarely seen in the pediatric population. We report a 12-year-old boy suffering from acute leukaemia presenting with, at first intermittent, but increasingly persistent erection. Doppler US revealed signs of high-flow priapism. MRI excluded intrapelvic tumour masses, and three-dimensional contrast-enhanced MR angiography could not demonstrate an arteriovenous fistula or thrombosis. Cavernosal blood-gas measurement was in agreement with high-flow priapism. On the basis of the imaging findings, invasive therapeutic management was avoided in our patient with a successful outcome. (orig.)

  5. Genetically Modified T-cell Immunotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Persistent/Recurrent Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-02

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Early Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Late Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Interleukin-3 Receptor Subunit Alpha Positive; Minimal Residual Disease; Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. A comparison of busulphan versus total body irradiation combined with cyclophosphamide as conditioning for autograft or allograft bone marrow transplantation in patients with acute leukaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringden, O. [Huddinge Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Clinical Immunology; Labopin, M.; Gorin, N.C. [Hopital Saint-Antoine, Paris (France). Centre International Greffes de Moelle; Tura, S. [Orsola University Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Arcese, W. [University `La Sapienza`, Rome (Italy). Haematology; Iriondo, A. [Hospital National, Santander (Spain); Zittoun, R. [Hotel-Dieu, Paris (France). Service d`Hematologie; Sierra, J. [Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain)

    1996-06-01

    We retrospectively compared the outcome in patients in the EBMT database transplanted for acute leukaemia from January 1987 to January 1994 who received busulphan and cyclophosphamide (BU/CY) as a pretransplant regimen versus those who received cyclophosphamide and total-body irradiation (CY-TBI). The patients were matched for type of transplant (autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) versus allogenic (BMT)), diagnosis (acute lymphoblast leukaemia (ALL) ora cute myeloid leukaemia (AML)), status (early first complete remission, CR-1) versus intermediate (second or later remission, first relapse), age, FAB classification for AML, prevention of graft-versus-host disease and year of transplantation. BU/CY and CY/TBI as pretransplant regimens gave similar results in all situations, except ABMT for ALL intermediate stages with more than 2 years from diagnosis to transplantation, where a lower RI and a higher LFS were associated with CY/TBI. (author).

  7. Recurrent Cytogenetic Abnormalities in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, John J; Park, Tae Sung; Wan, Thomas S K

    2017-01-01

    The spectrum of chromosomal abnormality associated with leukemogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is broad and heterogeneous when compared to chronic myeloid leukemia and other myeloid neoplasms. Recurrent chromosomal translocations such as t(8;21), t(15;17), and inv(16) are frequently detected, but hundreds of other uncommon chromosomal aberrations from AML also exist. This chapter discusses 22 chromosomal abnormalities that are common structural, numerical aberrations, and other important but infrequent (less than 1 %) translocations emphasized in the WHO classification. Brief morphologic, cytogenetic, and clinical characteristics are summarized, so as to provide a concise reference to cancer cytogenetic laboratories. Morphology based on FAB classification is used together with the current WHO classification due to frequent mentioning in a vast number of reference literatures. Characteristic chromosomal aberrations of other myeloid neoplasms such as myelodysplastic syndrome and myeloproliferative neoplasm will be discussed in separate chapters-except for certain abnormalities such as t(9;22) in de novo AML. Gene mutations detected in normal karyotype AML by cutting edge next generation sequencing technology are also briefly mentioned.

  8. Summary curves for patients transplanted for chronic myeloid leukaemia salvaged by a donor lymphocyte infusion: the current leukaemia-free survival curve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, John P.; Keiding, Niels; Shu, Youyi

    2000-01-01

    CML, donor lymphocyte infusion, leukaemia-free survival, current leukaemia-free survival, statistical methods......CML, donor lymphocyte infusion, leukaemia-free survival, current leukaemia-free survival, statistical methods...

  9. [Acute myeloid leukemia with bone marrow erythroblastosis: about one case illustrating the new WHO classification (2008)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincenot, Anne; Abarah, Wajed; Frayfer, Jamilé; Mahfouz, Imad; Andre-Kerneis, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    We reported here a case of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) in a 28-year-old male patient, which diagnosis is discussed according to the different classifications. This case focused on some new criteria and changes in the new WHO classification (2008) of AML, especially when erythroid precursors represent over 50% of bone marrow nucleated cells. It also pointed on some gene mutations (NPM1, CEPBA, FLT3, WT1…) and their prognostic features in AML with a normal karyotype, leading to individualize two new provisional entities in the WHO classification of tumours of hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues 2008.

  10. Molecular processes involved in B cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malouf, Camille; Ottersbach, Katrin

    2018-02-01

    B cell leukaemia is one of the most frequent malignancies in the paediatric population, but also affects a significant proportion of adults in developed countries. The majority of infant and paediatric cases initiate the process of leukaemogenesis during foetal development (in utero) through the formation of a chromosomal translocation or the acquisition/deletion of genetic material (hyperdiploidy or hypodiploidy, respectively). This first genetic insult is the major determinant for the prognosis and therapeutic outcome of patients. B cell leukaemia in adults displays similar molecular features as its paediatric counterpart. However, since this disease is highly represented in the infant and paediatric population, this review will focus on this demographic group and summarise the biological, clinical and epidemiological knowledge on B cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia of four well characterised subtypes: t(4;11) MLL-AF4, t(12;21) ETV6-RUNX1, t(1;19) E2A-PBX1 and t(9;22) BCR-ABL1.

  11. Biomarkers in Bone Marrow Samples From Pediatric Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  12. [Disseminated fusariosis in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, N.E.; Ralfkiaer, E.M.; Kjeldsen, L.

    2008-01-01

    Invasive mould infections are a major cause of infectious mortality in highly immunosuppressed patients. Incidence in this high risk group is 10-20% with a death rate in excess of 50%. Most invasive moulds are Aspergillus spp. We present a case of a 74-year-old woman with acute lymphoblastic...... leukaemia who developed a rare disseminated mould infection with Fusarium solani during induction chemotherapy. We present the case story and discuss the pathogenesis, clinical characteristics and treatment of invasive fusariosis Udgivelsesdato: 2008/9/8...

  13. Asparaginase-associated pancreatitis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolthers, Benjamin O.; Frandsen, Thomas L.; Baruchel, André

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Survival for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia surpasses 90% with contemporary therapy; however, patients remain burdened by the severe toxic effects of treatment, including asparaginase-associated pancreatitis. To investigate the risk of complications and risk of re-exposing pa......BACKGROUND: Survival for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia surpasses 90% with contemporary therapy; however, patients remain burdened by the severe toxic effects of treatment, including asparaginase-associated pancreatitis. To investigate the risk of complications and risk of re...... of a second asparaginase-associated pancreatitis was not associated with severity of the first asparaginase-associated pancreatitis and a second asparaginase-associated pancreatitis did not involve an increased risk of complications, asparaginase re-exposure should be determined mainly by the anticipated need...... for asparaginase for antileukaemic efficacy. A study of the genetic risk factors identifying patients in whom asparaginase exposure should be restricted is needed. FUNDING: The Danish Childhood Cancer Foundation and The Danish Cancer Society (R150-A10181)....

  14. [Clinical and biological prognostic factors in relapsed acute myeloid leukemia patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yébenes-Ramírez, Manuel; Serrano, Josefina; Martínez-Losada, Carmen; Sánchez-García, Joaquín

    2016-09-02

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most frequent type of acute leukemia in adults. Despite recent advances in the characterization of pathogenesis of AML, the cure rates are under 40%, being leukemia relapse the most common cause of treatment failure. Leukaemia relapse occurs due to clonal evolution or clonal escape. In this study, we aimed to analyze the clinical and biological factors influencing outcomes in patients with AML relapse. We included a total of 75 AML patients who experienced leukaemia relapse after achieving complete remission. We performed complete immunophenotyping and conventional karyotyping in bone marrow aspirates obtained at diagnosis and at leukemia relapse. Overall survival (OS) of the series was 3.7%±2.3, leukaemia progression being the most common cause of death. Patients relapsing before 12 months and those with adverse cytogenetic-molecular risk had statistically significant worse outcomes. A percentage of 52.5 of patients showed phenotypic changes and 50% cytogenetic changes at relapse. We did not find significant clinical factors predicting clonal evolution. The presence of clonal evolution at relapse did not have a significant impact on outcome. Patients with relapsed AML have a dismal prognosis, especially those with early relapse and adverse cytogenetic-molecular risk. Clonal evolution with phenotypic and cytogenetic changes occurred in half of the patients without predictive clinical factors or impact on outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. New Complex Chromosomal Translocation in Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia: t(9;18;22(q34;p11;q11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdeljabar El Andaloussi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A Chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML case with a new complex t(9;18;22(q34;p11;q11 of a 29-year-old man is being reported. For the first time, this translocation has been characterized by karyotype complemented with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. In CML, the complex and standard translocations have the same prognosis. The patient was treated with standard initial therapy based on hydroxyurea before he died due to heart failure four months later. Our finding indicates the importance of combined cytogenetic analysis for diagnosis and guidance of treatment in clinical diagnosis of CML.

  16. Treatment for myeloid leukaemia of Down syndrome: population-based experience in the UK and results from the Medical Research Council AML 10 and AML 12 trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Anupama; Hills, Robert K; Stiller, Charles; Gibson, Brenda E; de Graaf, Siebold S N; Hann, Ian M; O'Marcaigh, Aengus; Wheatley, Keith; Webb, David K H

    2006-03-01

    Down syndrome (DS) children are at an increased risk of developing myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). We retrospectively analysed the population-based data on 81 children with myeloid leukaemia of Down syndrome (ML-DS) from the UK National Registry of Childhood Tumours and experience in the Medical Research Council (MRC) AML 10 and AML 12 trials, which enrolled 46 children with ML-DS from 1988 to 2002. Eight per cent of UK children with AML had DS, but DS children comprised only 5% of children registered in MRC trials. The unique clinical characteristics of ML-DS were confirmed. Overall survival (OS) of ML-DS at 5 years increased from 47% in UK children diagnosed from 1988 to 1995 to 75% in children diagnosed from 1996 to 2002. OS for DS children registered in AML 10 and AML 12 was 74% in 5 years and improved from AML 10 to AML 12 (56% vs. 83%) There was no significant difference in OS between DS and non-DS children (OS: 74% vs. 62%, P = 0.4) in the trials, but this result masked a significant increase in early death amongst DS children, with a significant reduction in mortality later on. Relapse was significantly reduced (3% vs. 39%, P = 0.0003), leading to the improved disease-free survival (83% vs. 56%, P = 0.02). Given the increased number of early treatment-related deaths, future treatment protocols should aim to reduce chemotherapy dosage or intensity whilst maintaining low rates of resistant and recurrent disease.

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid asparagine depletion during pegylated asparaginase therapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Louise Tram; Nersting, Jacob; Raja, Raheel A

    2014-01-01

    L-asparaginase is an important drug in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) asparagine depletion is considered a marker of asparaginase effect in the central nervous system (CNS) and may play a role in CNS-directed anti-leukaemia therapy...

  18. Cutaneous myeloid sarcoma: natural history and biology of an uncommon manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, M Yadira; Ghahramani, Grant K; Frisch, Stephanie; Armbrecht, Eric S; Lind, Anne C; Nguyen, Tudung T; Hassan, Anjum; Kreisel, Friederike H; Frater, John L

    2013-05-01

    We conducted a retrospective study of patients with cutaneous myeloid sarcoma, from 2 tertiary care institutions. Eighty-three patients presented, with a mean age of 52 years. Diagnosis of myeloid sarcoma in the skin was difficult due to the low frequency of myeloperoxidase and/or CD34+ cases (56% and 19% of tested cases, respectively). Seventy-one of the 83 patients (86%) had ≥ 1 bone marrow biopsy. Twenty-eight (39%) had acute myeloid leukemia with monocytic differentiation. Twenty-three had other de novo acute myeloid leukemia subtypes. Thirteen patients had other myeloid neoplasms, of which 4 ultimately progressed to an acute myeloid leukemia. Seven had no bone marrow malignancy. Ninety-eight percent of the patients received chemotherapy, and approximately 89% died of causes related to their disease. Cutaneous myeloid sarcoma in most cases represents an aggressive manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia. Diagnosis can be challenging due to lack of myeloblast-associated antigen expression in many cases, and difficulty in distinguishing monocyte-lineage blasts from neoplastic and non-neoplastic mature monocytes.

  19. Acute myeloid leukemia: advances in diagnosis and classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasserjian, R P

    2013-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is an aggressive myeloid neoplasm characterized by ≥20% myeloblasts in the blood or bone marrow. Current treatment strategies for acute myeloid leukemia are based on both patient-related parameters such as age and performance status as well as the intrinsic characteristics of particular disease subtypes. Subtyping of acute myeloid leukemia requires an integration of information from the patient's clinical history (such as any prior preleukemic myeloid neoplasm or cytotoxic potentially leukemogenic therapy), the leukemia morphology, cytogenetic findings, and the mutation status of particular genes (NPM1, FLT3, and CEBPA). In recent years, a barrage of information has become available regarding gene mutations that occur in acute myeloid leukemia and their influence on prognosis. Future therapies for acute myeloid leukemia will increasingly rely on the genetic signatures of individual leukemias and will adjust therapy to the predicted disease aggressiveness as well as employ therapies targeted against particular deregulated genetic pathways. This article reviews current standards for diagnosing and classifying acute myeloid leukemia according to the 2008 WHO Classification. Data that have subsequently accumulated regarding newly characterized gene mutations are also presented. It is anticipated that future leukemia classifications will employ a combination of karyotypic features and the gene mutation pattern to stratify patients to increasingly tailored treatment plans. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Cytogenetic abnormalities in acute leukaemia of ambiguous lineage: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manola, Kalliopi N

    2013-10-01

    Acute leukaemia of ambiguous lineage (ALAL) is a rare complex entity with heterogeneous clinical, immunophenotypic, cytogenetic and molecular genetic features and adverse outcome. According to World Health Organization 2008 classification, ALAL encompasses those leukaemias that show no clear evidence of differentiation along a single lineage. The rarity of ALAL and the lack of uniform diagnostic criteria have made it difficult to establish its cytogenetic features, although cytogenetic analysis reveals clonal chromosomal abnormalities in 59-91% of patients. This article focuses on the significance of cytogenetic analysis in ALAL supporting the importance of cytogenetic analysis in the pathogenesis, diagnosis, prognosis, follow up and treatment selection of ALAL. It reviews in detail the types of chromosomal aberrations, their molecular background, their correlation with immunophenotype and age distribution and their prognostic relevance. It also summarizes some novel chromosome aberrations that have been observed only once. Furthermore, it highlights the ongoing and future research on ALAL in the field of cytogenetics. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Imatinib discontinuation in chronic phase myeloid leukaemia patients in sustained complete molecular response : A randomised trial of the Dutch-Belgian Cooperative Trial for Haemato-Oncology (HOVON)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thielen, Noortje; van der Holt, Bronno; Cornelissen, Jan J.; Verhoef, Gregor E. G.; Gussinklo, Titia; Biemond, Bart J.; Daenen, Simon M. G.; Deenik, Wendy; Kooy, Rien van Marwijk; Petersen, Eefke; Smit, Willem M.; Valk, Peter J. M.; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; Janssen, Jeroen J. W. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Tyrosine kinase inhibitors treatment in responding chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) patients is generally continued indefinitely. In this randomised phase II trial, we investigated whether CML patients in molecular response(4.5) (MR4.5, quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain

  2. Imatinib discontinuation in chronic phase myeloid leukaemia patients in sustained complete molecular response: A randomised trial of the Dutch-Belgian Cooperative Trial for Haemato-Oncology (HOVON)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thielen, Noortje; van der Holt, Bronno; Cornelissen, Jan J.; Verhoef, Gregor E. G.; Gussinklo, Titia; Biemond, Bart J.; Daenen, Simon M. G.; Deenik, Wendy; van Marwijk Kooy, Rien; Petersen, Eefke; Smit, Willem M.; Valk, Peter J. M.; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; Janssen, Jeroen J. W. M.

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors treatment in responding chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) patients is generally continued indefinitely. In this randomised phase II trial, we investigated whether CML patients in molecular response(4.5) (MR(4.5), quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction

  3. Host genome variations and risk of infections during induction treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Bendik; Wesolowska-Andersen, Agata; Lausen, Birgitte

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate association of host genomic variation and risk of infections during treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Methods: We explored association of 34 000 singlenucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related primarily to pharmacogenomics and immune function...

  4. Extramedullary leukemia in children with acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støve, Heidi Kristine; Sandahl, Julie Damgaard; Abrahamsson, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prognostic significance of extramedullary leukemia (EML) in childhood acute myeloid leukemia is not clarified. PROCEDURE: This population-based study included 315 children from the NOPHO-AML 2004 trial. RESULTS: At diagnosis, 73 (23%) patients had EML: 39 (12%) had myeloid sarcoma...

  5. Translational Studies in Elderly Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. van der Holt (Bronno)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe production of blood cells (hematopoiesis) takes place in the bone marrow. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a clonal disease, which is characterized by an increase in the number of myeloid cells in the bone marrow and an arrest in their maturation. This frequently results in a severe

  6. Emerging therapies for acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caner Saygin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is characterized by clinical and biological heterogeneity. Despite the advances in our understanding of its pathobiology, the chemotherapy-directed management has remained largely unchanged in the past 40 years. However, various novel agents have demonstrated clinical activity, either as single agents (e.g., isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH inhibitors, vadastuximab or in combination with standard induction/consolidation at diagnosis and with salvage regimens at relapse. The classes of agents described in this review include novel cytotoxic chemotherapies (CPX-351 and vosaroxin, epigenetic modifiers (guadecitabine, IDH inhibitors, histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors, bromodomain and extraterminal (BET inhibitors, FMS-like tyrosine kinase receptor 3 (FLT3 inhibitors, and antibody-drug conjugates (vadastuximab, as well as cell cycle inhibitors (volasertib, B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2 inhibitors, and aminopeptidase inhibitors. These agents are actively undergoing clinical investigation alone or in combination with available chemotherapy.

  7. Current Management of Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubnitz, Jeffrey E

    2017-02-01

    The outcome for children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has improved significantly over the past 30 years, with complete remission and overall survival rates exceeding 90 and 60%, respectively, in recent clinical trials. However, these improvements have not been achieved by the introduction of new agents. Instead, intensification of standard chemotherapy, more precise risk classification, improvements in supportive care, and the use of minimal residual disease to monitor response to therapy have all contributed to this success. Nevertheless, novel therapies are needed, as the cure rates for many subtypes of childhood AML remain unacceptably low. Here, we briefly review advances in our understanding of the biology and genetics of AML, the results of recent clinical trials, and current recommendations for the treatment of children with AML.

  8. Targeting MTHFD2 in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikman, Yana; Puissant, Alexandre; Alexe, Gabriela; Furman, Andrew; Chen, Liying M; Frumm, Stacey M; Ross, Linda; Fenouille, Nina; Bassil, Christopher F; Lewis, Caroline A; Ramos, Azucena; Gould, Joshua; Stone, Richard M; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Galinsky, Ilene; Clish, Clary B; Kung, Andrew L; Hemann, Michael T; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Banerji, Versha; Stegmaier, Kimberly

    2016-06-27

    Drugs targeting metabolism have formed the backbone of therapy for some cancers. We sought to identify new such targets in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The one-carbon folate pathway, specifically methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase-cyclohydrolase 2 (MTHFD2), emerged as a top candidate in our analyses. MTHFD2 is the most differentially expressed metabolic enzyme in cancer versus normal cells. Knockdown of MTHFD2 in AML cells decreased growth, induced differentiation, and impaired colony formation in primary AML blasts. In human xenograft and MLL-AF9 mouse leukemia models, MTHFD2 suppression decreased leukemia burden and prolonged survival. Based upon primary patient AML data and functional genomic screening, we determined that FLT3-ITD is a biomarker of response to MTHFD2 suppression. Mechanistically, MYC regulates the expression of MTHFD2, and MTHFD2 knockdown suppresses the TCA cycle. This study supports the therapeutic targeting of MTHFD2 in AML. © 2016 Pikman et al.

  9. Chicken pox and acute monocytic leukaemia skin lesions in an HIV-seropositive man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Salmonière, P; Janier, M; Gilquin, J; Carlotti, A; Sutton, L; Leblond, V; Daniel, F

    1994-11-01

    Lymphoid neoplasia is now well known to occur in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection but the first case of acute monocytic leukaemia in an HIV-seropositive man has been only recently described. We report the case of an HIV-infected patient who simultaneously developed skin lesions of acute monocytic leukaemia and chicken pox. We suggest that HIV may produce a malignant transformation of monocytic cells.

  10. The experience of acute leukaemia in adult patients: a qualitative thematic synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Constantina; Johnston, Bridget; Themessl-Huber, Markus

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this review was to systematically identify and synthesise all qualitative evidence on how adult patients diagnosed with acute leukaemia experience living with their illness. A systematic search strategy was developed comprising of two search strings: i) acute leukaemia and ii) qualitative methodology. The search strategy was run in seven electronic databases (Medline, CINAHL, PsychINFO, EMBASE, BNI & Archive, SSCI and ASSIA). Nine qualitative studies in adult patients with acute leukaemia, published in peer reviewed journals between 01/1990 and 01/2013 were included in the final sample. The qualitative thematic synthesis resulted in the development of a conceptual model describing a person's path to build a renewed self. Following the initial blow of diagnosis with the range of initial reactions, patients with acute leukaemia are living in a contracting world; they have to deal with the life in hospital, the several losses and the impact of their illness on their emotions and interpersonal relationships. Several factors take up a buffering role at that stage: coping, support, information and hope. Finally, patients accommodate acute leukaemia in their lives through re-evaluating personal values and assigning new meaning to their experience. Results from this thematic synthesis are indicative of the impact of acute leukaemia on patients' lives and the processes they use to make sense and accommodate the illness in their life. Increasing our understanding of these processes is warranted to improve patient care. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Genetics of therapy-related myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, J.; Andersen, Mette Klarskov; Andersen, M.T.

    2008-01-01

    Myelodysplasia (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are heterogeneous, closely associated diseases arising de novo or following chemotherapy with alkylating agents, topoisomerase II inhibitors, or after radiotherapy. Whereas de novo MDS and AML are almost always subclassified according...

  12. Genome wide molecular analysis of minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.P.G. Silva (Fernando); I. Almeida (Inês); B. Morolli (Bruno); G. Brouwer-Mandema (Geeske); H. Wessels (Hans); R. Vossen (Rolf); H. Vrieling (Harry); E.W.A. Marijt (Erik); P.J.M. Valk (Peter); J.C. Kluin-Nelemans (Hanneke); W.R. Sperr (Wolfgang); W.D. Ludwig; M. Giphart-Gassler (Micheline)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia is heterogeneous in karyotype and is defined by immature morphological and molecular characteristics. This originally French-American-British classification is still used in the new World Health Organization classification when

  13. Genome wide molecular analysis of minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, Fernando P. G.; Almeida, Ines; Morolli, Bruno; Brouwer-Mandema, Geeske; Wessels, Hans; Vossen, Rolf; Vrieling, Harry; Marijt, Erik W. A.; Valk, Peter J. M.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Sperr, Wolfgang R.; Ludwig, Wolf-Dieter; Giphart-Gassler, Micheline

    2009-01-01

    Background Minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia is heterogeneous in karyotype and is defined by immature morphological and molecular characteristics. This originally French-American-British classification is still used in the new World Health Organization classification when other

  14. Ponatinib for Treating Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia: An Evidence Review Group Perspective of a NICE Single Technology Appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandor, Abdullah; Stevenson, Matt; Stevens, John; James, Marrissa Martyn-St; Hamilton, Jean; Byrne, Jenny; Rudin, Claudius; Rawdin, Andrew; Wong, Ruth

    2018-02-26

    As part of its single technology appraisal process, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the company that manufactures ponatinib (Inclusig ® ; Incyte Corporation) to submit evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness for previously treated chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) and Philadelphia-chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (Ph+ ALL). This paper focusses on the three phases of CML: the chronic phase (CP), the accelerated phase (AP) and the blast crisis phase (BP). The School of Health and Related Research Technology Appraisal Group at the University of Sheffield was commissioned to act as the independent Evidence Review Group (ERG). This article presents the critical review of the company's submission by the ERG and the outcome of the NICE guidance. Clinical evidence for ponatinib was derived from a phase II, industry-sponsored, single-arm, open-label, multicentre, non-comparative study. Despite the limited evidence and potential for biases, this study demonstrated that ponatinib was likely to be an effective treatment (in terms of major cytogenetic response and major haematological response) with an acceptable safety profile for patients with CML. Given the absence of any head-to-head studies comparing ponatinib with other relevant comparators, the company undertook a matching-adjusted indirect comparison (MAIC) of ponatinib with bosutinib. The approach was only used for patients with CP-CML because comprehensive data were not available for the AP- or BP-CML groups to allow the matching technique to be used. Despite the uncertainty about the MAIC approach, ponatinib was considered likely to offer advantages over bosutinib in the third-line setting, particularly for complete cytogenetic response. The company developed two health economic models to assess the cost effectiveness of ponatinib for the treatment of patients in CP-CML or in advanced CML (AP- or BP-CML, which were modelled separately). The company did

  15. Secondary Leukemia in a non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Patient Presenting as Myeloid Sarcoma of the Breast

    OpenAIRE

    Pitini, Vincenzo; Arrigo, Carmela; Sauta, Maria Grazia; Altavilla, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    As defined by the World Health Organization classification of tumors of hematopoietic and lymphoid tissue, myeloid sarcoma (MS) is a tumor mass of myeloblasts or immature myeloid cells that can arise before, concurrent with, or following acute myeloid leukaemia. We describe a case of secondary leukemia presenting itself as MS of the breast in a patient previously treated for a non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

  16. Genetics of therapy-related myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, J.; Andersen, Mette Klarskov; Andersen, M.T.

    2008-01-01

    Myelodysplasia (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are heterogeneous, closely associated diseases arising de novo or following chemotherapy with alkylating agents, topoisomerase II inhibitors, or after radiotherapy. Whereas de novo MDS and AML are almost always subclassified according to cytog......Myelodysplasia (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are heterogeneous, closely associated diseases arising de novo or following chemotherapy with alkylating agents, topoisomerase II inhibitors, or after radiotherapy. Whereas de novo MDS and AML are almost always subclassified according...

  17. Proteomic profile of acute myeloid leukaemia: A review update ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... This review draws attention to the progress and advancements in cancer proteomics technology with the aim of simplifying the understanding of the mechanisms underlying the disease and to contribute to detection of biomarkers in addition to the development of novel ...

  18. Cytoplasmic nucleophosmin (cNPM) in acute myeloid leukaemia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amani H. Kazem

    2011-08-26

    Aug 26, 2011 ... cytoplasmic positivity for NPM was significantly correlated with increased survival and better out- come after cycles of chemotherapy. .... Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS) version 17 format and data explore was carried out. ..... ACT cytogenetics laboratory manual. The Association of. Cytogenetic ...

  19. The nutritional management of a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The risk of malnutrition is compounded further when treatment is initiated. A micronutrient deficiency is possible in most cancer patients who consume. 10 days. Vomiting and diarrhoea further contribute to the loss of micronutrients. Adequate nutrition intervention and care can ...

  20. Molecular Genetic Markers in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Yohe

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetics play an increasingly important role in the risk stratification and management of acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients. Traditionally, AML classification and risk stratification relied on cytogenetic studies; however, molecular detection of gene mutations is playing an increasingly important role in classification, risk stratification, and management of AML. Molecular testing does not take the place of cytogenetic testing results, but plays a complementary role to help refine prognosis, especially within specific AML subgroups. With the exception of acute promyelocytic leukemia, AML therapy is not targeted but the intensity of therapy is driven by the prognostic subgroup. Many prognostic scoring systems classify patients into favorable, poor, or intermediate prognostic subgroups based on clinical and genetic features. Current standard of care combines cytogenetic results with targeted testing for mutations in FLT3, NPM1, CEBPA, and KIT to determine the prognostic subgroup. Other gene mutations have also been demonstrated to predict prognosis and may play a role in future risk stratification, although some of these have not been confirmed in multiple studies or established as standard of care. This paper will review the contribution of cytogenetic results to prognosis in AML and then will focus on molecular mutations that have a prognostic or possible therapeutic impact.

  1. BCL11A expression in acute phase chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jiawei; Zhang, Fan; Tao, Huiquan; Ma, Xiao; Su, Guangsong; Xie, Xiaoli; Xu, Zhongjuan; Zheng, Yanwen; Liu, Hong; He, Chao; Mao, Zhengwei Jenny; Wang, Zhiwei; Chang, Weirong; Gale, Robert Peter; Wu, Depei; Yin, Bin

    2016-08-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has chronic and acute phases. In chronic phase myeloid differentiation is preserved whereas in acute phase myeloid differentiation is blocked. Acute phase CML resembles acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Chronic phase CML is caused by BCR-ABL1. What additional mutation(s) cause transition to acute phase is unknown and may differ in different persons with CML. BCL11A encodes a transcription factor and is aberrantly-expressed in several haematological and solid neoplasms. We analyzed BCL11A mRNA levels in subjects with chronic and acute phase CML. BCL11A transcript levels were increased in subjects with CML in acute phase compared with those in normals and in subjects in chronic phase including some subjects studied in both phases. BCL11A mRNA levels were correlated with percent bone marrow blasts and significantly higher in lymphoid versus myeloid blast crisis. Differentiation of K562 with butyric acid, a CML cell line, decreased BCL11A mRNA levels. Cytology and flow cytometry analyses showed that ectopic expression of BCL11A in K562 cells blocked differentiation. These data suggest BCL11A may operate in transformation of CML from chronic to acute phase in some persons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A new Leukemia Prognostic Scoring System for refractory/relapsed adult acute myelogeneous leukaemia patients: a GOELAMS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevallier, P; Labopin, M; Turlure, P; Prebet, T; Pigneux, A; Hunault, M; Filanovsky, K; Cornillet-Lefebvre, P; Luquet, I; Lode, L; Richebourg, S; Blanchet, O; Gachard, N; Vey, N; Ifrah, N; Milpied, N; Harousseau, J-L; Bene, M-C; Mohty, M; Delaunay, J

    2011-06-01

    A simplified prognostic score is presented based on the multivariate analysis of 138 refractory/relapsed acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients (median age 55 years, range: 19-70) receiving a combination of intensive chemotherapy+Gemtuzumab as salvage regimen. Overall, 2-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were 29±4% and 36±4%, respectively. Disease status (relapse Leukemia Prognostic Scoring System was then validated on an independent cohort of 111 refractory/relapsed AML patients. This new simplified prognostic score, using three clinical and biological parameters routinely applied, allow to discriminate around two third of the patients who should benefit from a salvage intensive regimen in the setting of refractory/relapsed AML patients. The other one third of the patients should receive investigational therapy.

  3. CD19-Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells for Treatment of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, C L; thor Straten, Per

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) for cancer represents a promising new treatment modality. ACT based on the administration of cytotoxic T cells genetically engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) recognizing CD19 expressed by B cell malignancies has been shown to induce complete lasting...... responses in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). So far, eleven clinical trials including 99 CLL and ALL patients treated with CAR T cells targeting CD19 have been published, and the results from these trials are promising with impressive clinical...... responses in heavily pretreated patients. Thus, CAR T cell therapy has induced complete responses in both CLL and ALL, and surprisingly, current results indicate that patients with ALL are more prone to respond than are CLL patients. Importantly, the majority of CAR cell studies have observed severe therapy...

  4. The Epigenetic Landscape of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Conway O’Brien

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a genetically heterogeneous disease. Certain cytogenetic and molecular genetic mutations are recognized to have an impact on prognosis, leading to their inclusion in some prognostic stratification systems. Recently, the advent of high-throughput whole genome or exome sequencing has led to the identification of several novel recurrent mutations in AML, a number of which have been found to involve genes concerned with epigenetic regulation. These genes include in particular DNMT3A, TET2, and IDH1/2, involved with regulation of DNA methylation, and EZH2 and ASXL-1, which are implicated in regulation of histones. However, the precise mechanisms linking these genes to AML pathogenesis have yet to be fully elucidated as has their respective prognostic relevance. As massively parallel DNA sequencing becomes increasingly accessible for patients, there is a need for clarification of the clinical implications of these mutations. This review examines the literature surrounding the biology of these epigenetic modifying genes with regard to leukemogenesis and their clinical and prognostic relevance in AML when mutated.

  5. ERYTHEMA NODOSUM REVEALING ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chebbi Wafa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Erythema nodosum (EN is the most common type of panniculitis. It may be idiopathic or secondary to various etiologies. However, the occurrence of erythema nodosum in malignant hemopathy had rarely been reported. Case report: A 42 year-old woman presented with a four week history of recurrent multiple painful erythematous nodules developed on the lower limbs associated with arthralgia of the ankles and fever. The clinical features of skin lesions with contusiform color evolution allowed establishing the diagnosis of EN. No underlying cause was found. The skin lesions were improved with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine. Three months later, the patient consulted for recurrence of EN associated with fever, inflammatory polyarthralgia and hepatosplenomegaly. The peripheral blood count revealed pancytopenia. A bone marrow examination confirmed the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia type 2. Initiation of chemotherapy was followed by the complete disappearance of skin lesions of EN. Conclusion: Paraneoplastic erythema nodosum is a rare entity. In the literature, a few cases of association with leukemia have been reported. Exploration for solid neoplasms or hemopathy in case of recurrent EN or resistance to conventional treatment should be systematic

  6. Novel therapeutic options in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Medinger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a biologically complex and molecularly and clinically heterogeneous disease, and its incidence is increasing as the population ages. Cytogenetic anomalies and mutation testing remain important prognostic tools for tailoring treatment after induction therapy. Despite major advances in understanding the genetic landscape of AML and its impact on the pathophysiology and biology of the disease, as well as the rapid development of new drugs, standard treatment options have not experienced major changes during the past three decades. Especially for patients with intermediate or high-risk AML, which often show relapse. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT remains the best chance for cure. Here we review the state of the art therapy of AML, with special focus on new developments in immunotherapies and cellular therapies including HSCT and particularly discuss the impact of new conditioning and haplo-identical donor regimens for HSCT, post-transplant strategies for preventing and treating relapse, and emerging novel therapeutic options.

  7. Unfavorable-risk acute myeloid leukemia dissected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Stephen A; Mohan, Sanjay R; Savona, Michael R

    2016-03-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an immensely heterogeneous disease based on the presence of varying combinations of morphologic, immunophenotypic, genetic, and molecular characteristics identified among those diagnosed with this disease. Although current therapeutic strategies provide a reasonable likelihood of achieving a complete remission for the majority of patients, relapse rates and subsequent disease-related mortality remain unacceptably high. Improved methods of risk stratification are needed to better identify patients at considerable risk of relapse in hopes of allowing for early therapeutic intervention and/or intensification that may lead to a higher likelihood of cure. The current status of risk stratification of AML and emerging technologies with potential to improve prognostic classification and outcomes are summarized in this review. Refinement of our understanding of the impact of current pretreatment AML cytogenetic, immunophenotypic, and molecular aberrations to predict outcomes and guide therapeutic decision-making is ongoing. Emerging data suggest that incorporation of the degree of posttreatment response and/or the detection of minimal residual disease can improve the accuracy of risk stratification for individual patients. Although pretreatment disease characteristics remain the hallmark of prognostication for AML patients, posttreatment parameters such as minimal residual disease assessment and degree of response to therapy possess the ability to further refine our identification of patients with unfavorable disease and thereby influence decisions regarding therapeutic planning.

  8. Alternative Donor Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelli Bejanyan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT is a potentially curative therapy for adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, but its use for consolidation therapy after first remission with induction chemotherapy used to be limited to younger patients and those with suitable donors. The median age of AML diagnosis is in the late 60s. With the introduction of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC, many older adults are now eligible to receive allo-HCT, including those who are medically less fit to receive myeloablative conditioning. Furthermore, AML patients commonly have no human leukocyte antigen (HLA-identical or medically suitable sibling donor available to proceed with allo-HCT. Technical advances in donor matching, suppression of alloreactivity, and supportive care have made it possible to use alternative donors, such as unrelated umbilical cord blood (UCB and partially HLA-matched related (haploidentical donors. Outcomes after alternative donor allo-HCT are now approaching the outcomes observed for conventional allo-HCT with matched related and unrelated donors. Thus, with both UCB and haploidentical donors available, lack of donor should rarely be a limiting factor in offering an allo-HCT to adults with AML.

  9. Proteasome subunit expression analysis and chemosensitivity in relapsed paediatric acute leukaemia patients receiving bortezomib-containing chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Niewerth

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug combinations of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib with cytotoxic chemotherapy are currently evaluated in phase 2 and 3 trials for the treatment of paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia (AML and acute lymphocytic leukaemia (ALL. Methods We investigated whether expression ratios of immunoproteasome to constitutive proteasome in leukaemic cells correlated with response to bortezomib-containing re-induction chemotherapy in patients with relapsed and refractory acute leukaemia, enrolled in two Children’s Oncology Group phase 2 trials of bortezomib for ALL (COG-AALL07P1 and AML (COG-AAML07P1. Expression of proteasome subunits was examined in 72 patient samples (ALL n = 60, AML n = 12 obtained before start of therapy. Statistical significance between groups was determined by Mann-Whitney U test. Results Ratios of immunoproteasome to constitutive proteasome subunit expression were significantly higher in pre-B ALL cells than in AML cells for both β5i/β5 and β1i/β1 subunits (p = 0.004 and p < 0.001. These ratios correlated with therapy response in AML patients; β1i/β1 ratios were significantly higher (p = 0.028 between patients who did (n = 4 and did not reach complete remission (CR (n = 8, although for β5i/β5 ratios, this did not reach significance. For ALL patients, the subunit ratios were also higher for patients who showed a good early response to therapy but this relation was not statistically significant. Overall, for this study, the patients were treated with combination therapy, so response was not only attributed to proteasome inhibition. Moreover, the leukaemic blast cells were not purified for these samples. Conclusions These first ex vivo results encourage further studies into relative proteasome subunit expression to improve proteasome inhibition-containing therapy and as a potential indicator of bortezomib response in acute leukaemia.

  10. Late effects of treatment in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, P.

    1987-01-01

    The overall aim of this study was a comprehensive assessment of the nature and severity of the late effects of treatment in a group of children surviving acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. In the absence of damage preceding treatment, late effects could be ascribed to treatment. Cranial irradiation, methotrexate, L-asparaginase and cytosine arabinoside are therapeutic modalities most likely to cause injury to the central nervous system. Survivors of childhood leukaemia also showed an increase in weight-for-height during and after therapy which appeared to be the consequence of a loss in statural growth as well as increasing weight-for-age. Assessment of endocrine function in leukaemia survivors indicated abnormalities in the regulation of growth hormone and thyroid stimulating hormone in some patients. Survivors of childhood leukaemia were shown to have an intellectual deficit compared with their siblings and a high incidence of visual-perceptual defects. The intellectual effects of lower doses of cranial irradiation are as yet unknown. A variety of minor neurological abnormalities were detected among leukaemia survivors and thought to be related to preceding central nervous system 'prophylactic' chemotherapy and irradiation. A new instrument, the functional deficit score, was derived to reflect overall outcome in survivors of childhood leukaemia. With few exceptions, leukaemia survivors in this study had received 2400 rads of deep x-ray therapy as cranial irradiation. This dosage has since been reduced world-wide. Current cranial irradiation 'prophylaxis' consists of 1800 rad of megavoltage radiotherapy

  11. Metabolic syndrome in the survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Ouf, Noran M; Jan, Mohammed M

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a common complication encountered in children surviving acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Affected patients develop obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. Metabolic syndrome is a consequence of multiple factors, particularly hormonal imbalance induced by various ALL treatments. This review aims to evaluate the risk factors and mechanisms leading to the development of metabolic syndrome. Further research is needed to improve our understanding of the mechanisms leading to insulin resistance and the associated endothelial and adipose tissue dysfunction. Future studies should also examine other possible contributing factors, such as environmental and genetic factors. Understanding these factors will help in guiding modifications of the current ALL treatment protocols in order to prevent the development of this syndrome and hence improve the quality of life of ALL survivors. Until this is achieved, clinicians should continue to identify patients at risk early and use a therapeutic approach that combines dietary restrictions and enhanced physical activity. Copyright © 2014 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. L-asparaginase induced hyperlipidaemia in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesheli, H. M.; Tamaddoni, A.; Hosseinzadeh, F.; Moghaddam, T. G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate hyperlipidaemia in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) receiving L-asparaginase. Methods: A case-control study carried out between October 2007 and October 2010 with 77 patients undergoing chemotherapy at a teaching children hospital in Babol, Iran. Patients were treated with anti-leukaemic agents according to the protocols for standard-risk and high-risk ALL. Those patients who received asparaginase represented the cases and those who did not receive it were the controls. Biochemical markers were checked during the induction phase chemotherapy. Lipid profile of patients was recorded. Data was analysed using SPSS 16. Results: Of the 77 patients, 37 (48.05%) received asparaginase therapy and 40 (51.94%) patients did not. The mean peak triglyceride and cholesterol levels during asparaginase therapy in the first group were significantly higher than the levels in the second group. Conclusion: Severe hyperlipidaemia may be the cause of some morbidity in children receiving asparaginase. Asparaginase-induced hyperlipidaemia should be monitored in ALL patients during the induction phase of treatment. (author)

  13. Apoptosis in chronic myeloid leukaemia: normal responses by progenitor cells to growth factor deprivation, X-irradiation and glucocorticoids

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    Amos, T.A.S.; Lewis, J.L.; Grand, F.H.; Gooding, R.P.; Goldman, J.M.; Gordon, M.Y. [Royal Postgraduate Medical School, London (United Kingdom)

    1995-10-01

    Inhibition of apoptosis (genetically programmed active cell death) by p210 BCR-ABL expression is a mechanism that might contribute to clonal expansion in chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). Since cell death following exposure to ionizing radiation and many chemotherapeutic agents can occur by the apoptotic pathway, inhibition of apoptosis would be expected to confer a relative resistance to these treatments. Similarly, cells deprived of growth factors in vitro die by apoptosis, and inhibition of apoptosis would therefore be expected to allow cells to survive better in growth factor-deprived conditions. We found that the survival of normal and CML myeloid progenitors was the same after in vitro incubation in deprived conditions and after treatment with X-irradiation or glucocorticoids. We also found that mature cells in colonies produced by CML progenitors (CFU-GM) did not survive better than those produced by normal progenitor cells. Flow cytometric analysis of propidium iodide-stained cells provided a direct indication that the degree of apoptosis may correspond to the degree of deprivation. These results suggest that inhibition of apoptosis may not be the primary mechanism whereby BCR-ABL influences the expansion of the malignant clone in CML. (Author).

  14. Apoptosis in chronic myeloid leukaemia: normal responses by progenitor cells to growth factor deprivation, X-irradiation and glucocorticoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amos, T.A.S.; Lewis, J.L.; Grand, F.H.; Gooding, R.P.; Goldman, J.M.; Gordon, M.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Inhibition of apoptosis (genetically programmed active cell death) by p210 BCR-ABL expression is a mechanism that might contribute to clonal expansion in chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). Since cell death following exposure to ionizing radiation and many chemotherapeutic agents can occur by the apoptotic pathway, inhibition of apoptosis would be expected to confer a relative resistance to these treatments. Similarly, cells deprived of growth factors in vitro die by apoptosis, and inhibition of apoptosis would therefore be expected to allow cells to survive better in growth factor-deprived conditions. We found that the survival of normal and CML myeloid progenitors was the same after in vitro incubation in deprived conditions and after treatment with X-irradiation or glucocorticoids. We also found that mature cells in colonies produced by CML progenitors (CFU-GM) did not survive better than those produced by normal progenitor cells. Flow cytometric analysis of propidium iodide-stained cells provided a direct indication that the degree of apoptosis may correspond to the degree of deprivation. These results suggest that inhibition of apoptosis may not be the primary mechanism whereby BCR-ABL influences the expansion of the malignant clone in CML. (Author)

  15. Acute leukaemia with a pure erythroid phenotype: under-recognized morphological and cytogenetic signatures associated universally with primary refractory disease and a dismal clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, David C; Ozkaya, Neval; Lovitch, Scott B

    2017-08-01

    Pure erythroid leukaemia (PEL) is an extremely rare and aggressive subtype of acute myeloid leukaemia defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as a neoplastic proliferation of immature cells committed exclusively to the erythroid lineage, comprising >80% of bone marrow cells and not meeting the criteria of other well-defined myeloid neoplasms. The aim of this study was to describe the clinicopathological features of acute leukaemias with a pure erythroid phenotype (ALPEP) irrespective of their WHO classification and to determine if ALPEP represents a distinct clinicopathological entity. We identified seven cases of ALPEP, in which immature cells fulfilled WHO morphological and immunophenotypical criteria for PEL. All patients except one were male, with a median age of 60 years. Three cases represented de novo PEL, three were therapy-related myeloid neoplasms and one was a blast phase of a myeloproliferative neoplasm. Extensive tumour necrosis was present in five cases (71%). Five cases with available modal karyotypes all demonstrated a complex karyotype involving the TP53 gene locus, with three cases (60%) also showing a monosomy 5 or deletion 5q and additional material on chromosome 19q13. All patients died of their disease, with a mean overall survival of 189 and 64.7 days in cases without and with necrosis on the initial biopsy, respectively. We describe previously unreported but relatively common findings of extensive tumour necrosis and recurring cytogenetic abnormalities in ALPEP. Our findings suggest strongly that ALPEP represents a distinct clinicopathological entity regardless of its WHO classification. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Changes in the expression of FGFR3 in patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia receiving transplants of allogeneic peripheral blood stem cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvořáková, D.; Krejčí, P.; Mayer, J.; Fajkus, Jiří; Hampl, Aleš; Dvořák, Petr

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 3 (2001), s. 832-835 ISSN 0007-1048 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA312/97/0393; GA MŠk ME 198 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5045916 Keywords : fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 * chronic myeloid leukaemia * stem cell transplantation Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.815, year: 2001

  17. [Myeloid/natural killer cell precursor and myeloid/natural killer cell acute leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Ming; Chen, Bao-An

    2014-04-01

    With the popularity of flow cytometry, the classification of leukemia become more detailed. Myeloid/natural killer cell precursor acute leukemia and myeloid/natural killer cell acute leukemias are generally recognized as two kinds of rare leukemias and have poor prognosis. The cells expressed both myeloid and lymphatic antigens in these two leukemia and can not be diagnosed by morphology. The only basis to make a definite diagnosis is their unique Immunophenotyping. The role of CD7 and CD56 in these two leukemia are compelling, in the other hand, as the progress of cell differentiation research, there are many new awareness of NK cell differentiation. In this article, the biological origin, clinical manifestation, diagnosis, treatment and the role of CD7 and CD56 in these two leukemia are briefly summarized.

  18. Childhood vaccinations and risk of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søegaard, Signe Holst; Rostgaard, Klaus; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Hargreave, Marie; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Hviid, Anders

    2017-06-01

    It has been proposed that childhood vaccinations protect against acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in children by modulation of future responses to common infections in childhood. However, the available studies provide inconsistent findings, and population-based cohort studies with longitudinal information on vaccinations are lacking. In a register-based cohort of all children born in Denmark from 1 January 1990 to 31 December 2008, followed up until age 15 years or 31 December 2009 ( n  = 1 225 404), we evaluated exposure to childhood vaccination and risk of childhood ALL, including information on ALL subtypes. Using Cox regression, we estimated hazard ratios (HRs) comparing vaccinated with unvaccinated children. Childhood ALL was diagnosed in 490 children during 10 829 194 person-years of follow-up. Neither the total number of vaccine doses received nor exposure to each vaccination given in childhood was associated with altered risk of ALL, including the following: (i) Haemophilus influenzae type b [HR, 1.04; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.68-1.61]; ii) measles, mumps and rubella (HR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.76-1.34); iii) whole-cell pertussis (HR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.51-2.39); and iv) diphtheria, tetanus and inactivated polio (HR, 1.14; 95% CI, 0.42-3.13). Analyses conducted according to ALL subtypes defined by immunopheno- and karyotypes showed no association with childhood vaccination. This nationwide cohort study provides no support of the proposed protective effect of childhood vaccination against childhood ALL. © The Author 2017; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association

  19. Quercus Suber L. Cork Extracts Induce Apoptosis in Human Myeloid Leukaemia HL-60 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejarano, Ignacio; Godoy-Cancho, Belén; Franco, Lourdes; Martínez-Cañas, Manuel A; Tormo, María A

    2015-08-01

    Quercus suber L. cork contains a diversity of phenolic compounds, mostly low molecular weight phenols. A rising number of reports support with convergent findings that polyphenols evoke pro-apoptotic events in cancerous cells. However, the literature related to the anti-cancer bioactivity of Q. suber L. cork extractives (QSE) is still limited. Herein, we aim to describe the antitumor potential displayed by cork extractives obtained by different extraction methods in the human promyelocytic leukaemia cells. In order to quantify the effects of QSE on cancer cells viability, phosphatidylserine exposure, caspase-3 activity, mitochondrial membrane potential and cell cycle were evaluated. The results indicated that the QSE present a time-dependent and dose-dependent cytotoxicity in the human promyelocytic leukaemia cells. Such a noxious effect leads these leukaemia cells to their death through apoptotic processes by altering the mitochondrial outer membrane potential, activating caspase-3 and externalizing phosphatidylserine. However, cells cycle progression was not affected by the treatments. This study contributes to open a new way to use this natural resource by exploiting its anti-cancer properties. Moreover, it opens new possibilities of application of cork by-products, being more efficient in the sector of cork-based agriculture. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Aplastic anaemia preceding acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in an adult with isolated deletion of chromosome 9q.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Kevin

    2008-12-01

    Aplastic anaemia (AA) can precede acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in 2% of children but this is rarely reported to occur in adults. A 21-year-old male presented with bone marrow failure and bone marrow biopsy showed a profoundly hypocellular marrow. He recovered spontaneously but represented 2 months later when he was diagnosed with pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Chromosomal examination revealed 46,XY,del(9)(q13q34). To the best of our knowledge this is the first case to be reported of aplasia preceding ALL with 9q minus as the sole chromosomal abnormality.

  1. Reproducibility and prognostic significance of morphologic dysplasia in de novo acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Olga K; Pozdnyakova, Olga; Campigotto, Federico; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Stone, Richard M; Neuberg, Donna; Hasserjian, Robert P

    2015-07-01

    The 2008 WHO classification of acute myeloid leukemia includes a category of acute myeloid leukemia with myelodysplasia-related changes; however, the significance of multilineage dysplasia alone is controversial and its reproducibility has not been evaluated in acute myeloid leukemia. We performed an in-depth analysis of morphologic dysplasia in 159 de novo acute myeloid leukemia cases lacking myelodysplasia-related cytogenetic abnormalities. Using the 2008 WHO criteria, there were 89 acute myeloid leukemia-not otherwise specified (56%) and 43 acute myeloid leukemia with myelodysplasia-related changes (27%), while 27 cases were ambiguous as to myelodysplasia-related changes status due to limited maturing cells (acute myeloid leukemia-not evaluable, 17%). On multivariable analysis, neither acute myeloid leukemia with myelodysplasia-related changes nor acute myeloid leukemia-not evaluable showed significantly different event-free survival compared with acute myeloid leukemia-not otherwise specified in the 137 patients treated with induction chemotherapy. When individual dysplastic features were analyzed, only micromegakaryocytes and hypogranulated myeloid cells emerged as factors significantly associated with shorter event-free survival in a multivariable analysis that included the other significant covariates of age, white blood count, platelet count, abnormal karyotype and stem-cell transplantation. Our findings indicate that the current 2008 WHO definition of multilineage dysplasia in acute myeloid leukemia in its current form is not optimal, and that the use of a more restricted definition of morphologic dysplasia results in more relevant risk stratification that is independent of other conventional prognostic factors.

  2. Effectiveness of imatinib mesylate over etoposide in the treatment of sensitive and resistant chronic myeloid leukaemia cellsin vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husaini, Roslina; Ahmad, Munirah; Zakaria, Zubaidah

    2017-06-01

    Chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) is a form of leukaemia derived from the myeloid cell lineage. Imatinib mesylate, the breakpoint cluster region-abelson murine leukeamia kinase inhibitor, is a specific reagent used in the clinical treatment of CML. The DNA topoisomerase II inhibitor, etoposide, is also employed as a therapeutic, though it is used to a lesser extent. The present study aims to evaluate the effects of CML-targeted therapy, utilising imatinib mesylate and etoposide in the in vitro treatment of parental sensitive and adriamycin-resistant CML in the K562 and K562/ADM cell lines, respectively. Preliminary work involved the screening of multidrug resistant (MDR) gene expression, including MDR1, MRP1 and B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) at the mRNA levels. The sensitive and resistant CML cell lines expressed the MRP1 gene, though the sensitive K562 cells expressed low, almost undetectable levels of MDR1 and BCL-2 genes relative to the K562/ADM cells. Following treatment with imatinib mesylate or etoposide, the IC50 for imatinib mesylate did not differ between the sensitive and resistant cell lines (0.492±0.024 and 0.378±0.029, respectively), indicating that imatinib mesylate is effective in the treatment of CML regardless of cell chemosensitivity. However, the IC50 for etoposide in sensitive K562 cells was markedly lower than that of K562/ADM cells (50.6±16.5 and 194±8.46 µM, respectively), suggesting that the higher expression levels of MDR1 and/or BCL-2 mRNA in resistant cells may be partially responsible for this effect. This is supported by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling data, whereby a higher percentage of apoptotic cells were found in the sensitive and resistant K562 cells treated with imatinib mesylate (29.3±0.2 and 31.9±16.7%, respectively), whereas etoposide caused significant apoptosis of sensitive K562 cells (18.3±8.35%) relative to K562/ADM cells (5.17±3.3%). In addition, the MDR genes in K562/ADM cells were knocked

  3. Diagnostic work-up of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Olga K; Sohani, Aliyah R; Bhargava, Parul; Nardi, Valentina

    2017-03-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by a clonal expansion of undifferentiated myeloid precursors resulting in impaired hematopoiesis and bone marrow failure. In 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) published revisions to the classification of myeloid neoplasms and acute leukemias. Similar to the 2008 classification, the updated classification incorporates clinical features, morphology, immunophenotyping, and cytogenetics, with greater emphasis on molecular genetics, to define disease entities. This brief review addresses the various components of pathologic assessment to establish a diagnosis of AML and to help risk stratify patients, with an emphasis on newer techniques used in the detection of mutations with prognostic significance, as well as assays employed in the evaluation of minimal residual disease following treatment. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Characterization of miRNomes in Acute and Chronic Myeloid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Xiong

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid leukemias are highly diverse diseases and have been shown to be associated with microRNA (miRNA expression aberrations. The present study involved an in-depth miRNome analysis of two human acute myeloid leukemia (AML cell lines, HL-60 and THP-1, and one human chronic myeloid leukemia (CML cell line, K562, via massively parallel signature sequencing. mRNA expression profiles of these cell lines that were established previously in our lab facilitated an integrative analysis of miRNA and mRNA expression patterns. miRNA expression profiling followed by differential expression analysis and target prediction suggested numerous miRNA signatures in AML and CML cell lines. Some miRNAs may act as either tumor suppressors or oncomiRs in AML and CML by targeting key genes in AML and CML pathways. Expression patterns of cell type-specific miRNAs could partially reflect the characteristics of K562, HL-60 and THP-1 cell lines, such as actin filament-based processes, responsiveness to stimulus and phagocytic activity. miRNAs may also regulate myeloid differentiation, since they usually suppress differentiation regulators. Our study provides a resource to further investigate the employment of miRNAs in human leukemia subtyping, leukemogenesis and myeloid development. In addition, the distinctive miRNA signatures may be potential candidates for the clinical diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of myeloid leukemias.

  5. Intracranial Myeloid Sarcoma Metastasis Mimicking Acute Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandip S. Gill

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid sarcoma, a rare consequence of myeloproliferative disorders, is rarely seen in the central nervous system, most commonly in the pediatric population. Although there are a handful of case reports detailing initial presentation of CNS myeloid sarcoma in the adult population, we have been unable to find any reports of CNS myeloid sarcoma presenting as a large mass lesion in a herniating patient. Here, we present the case of a patient transferred to our facility for a very large subdural hematoma. Based on imaging characteristics, it was felt to be a spontaneous hematoma secondary to coagulopathy. No coagulopathy was found. Interestingly, he did have a history of acute myeloid leukemia (AML diagnosed 2 months previously, and intraoperatively he was found to have a confluent white mass invading both the subdural and subarachnoid spaces. There was minimal associated hemorrhage and final pathology showed myeloid sarcoma. This is the first report we are aware of in which CNS myeloid sarcoma presented as a subdural metastasis and also the first report in which we are aware of this etiology causing a herniation syndrome secondary to mass effect.

  6. Ploidy and clinical characteristics of childhood acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandahl, Julie Damgaard; Kjeldsen, Eigil; Abrahamsson, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    We report the first large series (n = 596) of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) focusing on modal numbers (MN) from the population-based NOPHO-AML trials. Abnormal karyotypes were present in 452 cases (76%) and numerical aberrations were present in 40% (n = 237) of all pediatric AML. Among...

  7. Occupational exposure to solvents and acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talibov, Madar; Lehtinen-Jacks, Susanna; Martinsen, Jan Ivar

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the current study was to assess the relation between occupational exposure to solvents and the risk of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). METHODS: Altogether, this study comprises 15 332 incident cases of AML diagnosed in Finland, Norway, Sweden and Iceland from 1961-2005 and 76...

  8. Mutational analysis of Bax and Bcl-2 in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, G. S.; Buitenhuis, C. K.; Martínez Muñoz, C.; Verwijs-Jassen, M.; Behrendt, H.; Zsiros, J.; Smets, L. A.

    1998-01-01

    In childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia there are large interpatient variations in levels of the apoptosis-regulating proteins Bax and Bcl-2, but the molecular basis for this variation is unknown. Point-mutations in bax have been reported in cell lines derived from haematological malignancies.

  9. Risk factors for treatment related mortality in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Bendik; Åsberg, Ann; Heyman, Mats

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In spite of major improvements in the cure rate of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), 2-4% of patients still die from treatment related complications. PROCEDURE: We investigated the pattern of treatment related deaths (TRDs) and possible risk factors in the NOPHO ALL-92...... towards patients at risk. Pediatr Blood Cancer. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc....

  10. Prognostic value of minimal residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, JJM; Seriu, T; Panzer-Grumayer, ER; Biondi, A; Pongers-Willemse, MJ; Corral, L; Stolz, F; Schrappe, M; Masera, G; Kamps, WA; Gadner, H; van Wering, ER; Ludwig, WD; Basso, G; de Bruijn, MAC; Cazzaniga, G; Hettinger, A; van der Does-van den Berg, A; Hop, WCJ; Riehm, H; Bartram, CR

    1998-01-01

    Background Sensitive techniques for detection of minimal residual disease (MRD) at degrees of one leukaemic cell per 10(3)-10(6) cells (10(-3)-10(-6)) during follow-up of children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) can provide insight into the effectiveness of cytotoxic treatment. However, it

  11. Triple immunofluorescence staining for prediction of relapse in childhood precursor B acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervoordeldonk, S. F.; Merle, P. A.; Behrendt, H.; Steenbergen, E. J.; van Leeuwen, E. F.; van den Berg, H.; von dem Borne, A. E.; van der Schoot, C. E.; Slaper-Cortenbach, I. C.

    1996-01-01

    In this study we describe a fast and sensitive method using three-colour immunofluorescence for the detection of cells with phenotypes that are rare in normal bone marrow (BM) but occur frequently in children with precursor B acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. We show that, in the first year after

  12. An analysis of prognostic variables in acute lymphocytic leukaemia in a heterogenous South African population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesseling, PB; Buurman, M; Oud, C; Nel, ED

    The records of all 96 children below the age of 15 years diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia at Tygerberg Hospital in the Republic of South African between 1983 and 1995 were reviewed to determine risk factors which may predict poor outcome. Age <2 and > 8 years, and white cell count >20 x

  13. Azole-based chemoprophylaxis of invasive fungal infections in paediatric patients with acute leukaemia: an internal audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Sara; Pieper, Stephanie; Kolve, Hedwig; Goletz, Grazyna; Jürgens, Heribert; Groll, Andreas H

    2014-03-01

    Children and adolescents with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and recurrent acute leukaemias (RALs) are at high risk of life-threatening invasive fungal infections (IFIs). We analysed implementation, safety and efficacy of a standard operating procedure for oral, azole-based, mould-active antifungal prophylaxis. Patients with AML and RALs aged ≥13 years received 200 mg of posaconazole three times daily and patients aged 2-12 years received 200 mg of voriconazole two times daily from the completion of chemotherapy until haematopoietic recovery. Algorithms for fever or focal findings in all patients with haematological malignancies included blood cultures, high-resolution CT and other appropriate imaging, serial serum galactomannan, invasive diagnostics and pre-emptive therapy with change in class if on antifungal medication. From 2006 to 2010, 40 patients (0.8-17 years; 21 males) with newly diagnosed AML (n = 31) or RAL (n = 9) were admitted, of whom 36 received a total of 149 courses of chemotherapy (reasons for exclusion: contraindications and early death ≤3 days). Azole prophylaxis was given in 87.2% (n = 130/149) of episodes. Pre-emptive antifungal therapy for pulmonary infiltrates was initiated in 5/36 (13.9%) patients or 6/130 (4.6%) episodes for a duration of 3-22 days. No proven or probable IFIs occurred. Adverse events (AEs) were common but mostly low grade and reversible. Three courses (2.3%) were discontinued due to AEs. In simultaneously admitted new patients with acute lymphatic leukaemia (ALL; n = 101) and paediatric lymphomas (n = 29) not receiving standard antifungal prophylaxis, proven/probable IFIs occurred in 4 patients with ALL (4.0%) and 7/130 patients (5.4%) received pre-emptive therapy. Azole-based, mould-active antifungal prophylaxis in high-risk paediatric patients with AML and RALs was satisfactorily implemented, well tolerated and effective. The low rate of IFIs in patients with ALL/lymphoma supports the lack of a general indication for

  14. A reevaluation of erythroid predominance in Acute Myeloid Leukemia using the updated WHO 2016 Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolskee, Elizabeth; Mikita, Geoff; Rea, Bryan; Bagg, Adam; Zuo, Zhuang; Sun, Yi; Goswami, Maitrayee; Wang, Sa A; Oak, Jean; Arber, Daniel A; Allen, M Brandon; George, Tracy I; Rogers, Heesun J; Hsi, Eric; Hasserjian, Robert P; Orazi, Attilio

    2018-02-05

    The 2016 WHO update changed the diagnostic criteria for myeloid neoplasms with erythroid predominance, limiting the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia to cases with ≥20% blasts in the bone marrow or peripheral blood. Although acute myeloid leukemia with ≥50% erythroid cells has historically been presumed to represent acute myeloid leukemia with myelodysplasia-related changes, this hypothesis has never been systematically examined. We sought to investigate the clinicopathologic, cytogenetic, and molecular features of acute myeloid leukemia with erythroid predominance to subclassify cases as defined by the 2016 WHO. We retrospectively identified patients with ≥50% erythroid precursors and either ≥20% bone marrow blasts or ≥20% peripheral blood blasts at the time of initial diagnosis at seven major academic centers. Laboratory and clinical data were obtained. Patients were then reclassified according to 2016 WHO guidelines. A matched control group was also obtained. We identified 146 patients with acute myeloid leukemia with erythroid predominance (62% M, average age: 62 y, range: 5-93 y). Of these, 91 were acute myeloid leukemia with myelodysplasia-related changes, 20 (14%) were therapy-related myeloid neoplasm, 23 (16%) acute myeloid leukemia, not otherwise specified, and ten acute myeloid leukemia with recurrent cytogenetic/molecular abnormalities. The bone marrow blast count ranged from 9-41%. There was no difference in survival for patients with erythroid predominance compared to patients with acute myeloid leukemia without erythroid proliferations. In a multivariable analysis, cytogenetic risk was the only significant predictor of survival. We find a significantly lower rate of FLT3 and RAS pathway alterations in acute myeloid leukemia with erythroid predominance compared to controls. Our study is one of the first to apply the 2016 WHO guidelines for classification of acute myeloid leukemia. We find acute myeloid leukemia with erythroid

  15. HOXA9 is critical in the proliferation, differentiation, and malignancy of leukaemia cells both in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shibing; Yu, Juan; Lv, Xin; Zhang, Lijuan

    2017-10-01

    Progress in the understanding of the molecular mechanism for acute myeloid leukaemia is of great significance to generate new potential targets for treatment. Recent studies showed that HOXA9, a homeodomain-containing transcription factor, is commonly deregulated in acute leukaemia. In this study, we elucidated the direct correlation between HoxA9 expression and progression of leukaemia using 2 different types of leukaemia cells HL-60 and MOLT-3. The HoxA9 expression level was decreased in leukaemia cells with the treatment of all-trans retinoic acid or arsenic trioxide (As 2 O 3 ). Downregulation of HoxA9 could impair the proliferation and promote the leukaemia cell death. HoxA9 silencing also potentiated the differentiation of leukaemia cells, and in vivo studies demonstrated that HoxA9 downregulation could interfere the tumour growth. Interestingly, HoxA9 silencing also led to the alteration in miRNA expression, mediating the promoting effect on the leukaemia cell differentiation. Therefore, this work provided a promising and potentially efficient target to leukaemia treatment, indicating that HoxA9 is likely to be an ideal candidate in the gene therapy against acute myeloid leukaemia. In this study, we elucidated the critical role of HoxA9 in the proliferation and differentiation of leukaemia cells both in vitro and in vivo. The effect of HoxA9 modulation was correlated with the clinical effect of all-trans retinoic acid and As 2 O 3 . Furthermore, HoxA9 also regulated the miRNA expression, controlling the leukaemia cell differentiation. Therefore, this work provided new insights into molecular mechanism underlying the leukaemia treatment, potentially putting forward a brand new target to the gene therapy against leukaemia. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Identification of de Novo Fanconi Anemia in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-13

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Fanconi Anemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  17. MEK Inhibitor MEK162, Idarubicin, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-04

    Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Dynamics of myeloid cell populations during relapse-preventive immunotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydström, Anna; Hallner, Alexander; Aurelius, Johan; Sander, Frida Ewald; Bernson, Elin; Kiffin, Roberta; Thoren, Fredrik Bergh; Hellstrand, Kristoffer; Martner, Anna

    2017-08-01

    Relapse of leukemia in the postchemotherapy phase contributes to the poor prognosis and survival in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In an international phase IV trial (ClinicalTrials.gov; NCT01347996), 84 patients with AML in first complete remission who had not undergone transplantation received immunotherapy with histamine dihydrochloride (HDC) and low-dose IL-2 with the aim of preventing relapse. The dynamics of myeloid cell counts and expression of activation markers was assessed before and after cycles of immunotherapy and correlated with clinical outcome in terms of relapse risk and survival. During cycles, a pronounced increase in blood eosinophil counts was observed along with a reduction in monocyte and neutrophil counts. A strong reduction of blood monocyte counts during the first HDC/IL-2 treatment cycle predicted leukemia-free survival. The HDC component of the immunotherapy exerts agonist activity at histamine type 2 receptors (H2Rs) that are expressed by myeloid cells. It was observed that the density of H 2 R expression in blood monocytes increased during cycles of immunotherapy and that high monocyte H 2 R expression implied reduced relapse risk and improved overall survival. Several other activation markers, including HLA-DR, CD86, and CD40, were induced in monocytes and dendritic cells during immunotherapy but did not predict clinical outcome. In addition, expression of HLA-ABC increased in all myeloid populations during therapy. A low expression of HLA-ABC was associated with reduced relapse risk. These results suggest that aspects of myeloid cell biology may impact clinical benefit of relapse-preventive immunotherapy in AML. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  19. The Rho-ROCK pathway as a new pathological mechanism of innate immune subversion in chronic myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basbous, Sara; Levescot, Anaïs; Piccirilli, Nathalie; Brizard, Françoise; Guilhot, François; Roy, Lydia; Bourmeyster, Nicolas; Gombert, Jean-Marc; Herbelin, André

    2016-11-01

    CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are believed to play a key role in cancer immune surveillance, and are functionally deficient in patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). Herein, we have hypothesized that this defect might originate from BCR-ABL-dependent dysfunctions in myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs). Indeed, flow cytometry and confocal microscopy revealed that cell surface expression of CD1d was downregulated in CML mDCs, relative to healthy donor (HD) controls. The decreased cell surface display of CD1d could not be ascribed to defective mDC differentiation, as attested by normal expression of HLA-DR and the CD86 maturation marker. On the other hand, reduced membrane expression was not associated with decreased intracytoplasmic levels of CD1d or its mRNA transcripts, consistent with intracellular retention. In vitro treatment of CML mDCs with the Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y-27632 partially restored both cell surface CD1d expression and CD1d-mediated antigen presentation, whereas it had no effect on HD mDCs. An inhibitor of BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase (TK), imatinib mesylate (IM), had no such activity. Similar recovery of CD1d expression occurred with fasudil, another ROCK inhibitor that is commonly used in clinical trials. Our data support the conclusion that BCR-ABL-dependent ROCK, but not TK, is involved in CD1d downregulation. We propose that ROCK, which is most likely activated by the DH/PH domain of BCR-ABL, mediates iNKT-cell immune subversion in CML patients by downregulating CD1d expression on CML mDCs. Our study reveals the ROCK-mDC axis as a new potential target to restore immune surveillance in patients with CML, offering new therapeutic perspectives for CML treatment. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Recurrence of acute myeloid leukemia in cryptorchid testis: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Góes, Luccas Santos Patto de [Hospital do Servidor Público Municipal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lopes, Roberto Iglesias [Hospital do Servidor Público Municipal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Campos, Octavio Henrique Arcos [Hospital do Servidor Público Municipal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, Luiz Carlos Neves de; Sant' Anna, Alexandre Crippa; Dall' Oglio, Marcos Francisco; Srougi, Miguel [Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    A 23-year-old male with a history of bone marrow transplant for acute myeloid leukemia. He presented a large mass in the right inguinal region 5 years ago. Upon physical examination, right-sided cryptorchidism was observed. The tumor markers alpha-fetoprotein and beta-HCG were within normalcy range and lactate dehydrogenase was raised. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis revealed right testicular mass in contiguity with the inguinal canal to the ipsilateral retroperitoneum, associated with right hydronephrosis. Due to the risk of germ-cell tumor in undescended testicle, the patient underwent radical right orchiectomy. The pathological examination showed recurrence of acute myeloid leukemia in the testis. He was referred to oncology for adjuvant therapy. Our literature review found no similar cases described.

  1. Relationship between cigarette smoking and risk of chronic myeloid leukaemia: a meta-analysis of epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ling; Deng, Hui-Yang; Chen, Sheng-Jiang; Wei, Wei

    2017-05-01

    Previous epidemiologic studies that have been reported on the association between cigarette smoking and risk of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) have remained controversial. A comprehensive meta-analysis was performed to evaluate smoking as a potential relationship factor and incidence of CML. Systematic literatures collected from articles published before August 2015 were searched from PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library. A total of 10 studies (nine case-controls and one cohort) met inclusion criteria of this meta-analysis. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated to assess the strength of the association between cigarette smoking and risk of CML in this study. Quality assessments were performed on the studies with the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. I2 index was used to evaluate heterogeneity. Finally, publication bias was assessed through funnel plots and Begger's test. No significant association was observed between ever-smokers and CML when compared among non-smokers (OR = 1.13, 95% CI: 0.99-1.29) or between subgroups stratified by smoking history, gender, geographical region, study design and source of patients. Our results demonstrate that this association was stronger in individuals who smoked smoked >20 cigarettes/day (OR = 1.24, 95% CI: 0.55-2.81). Moreover, cumulative smoking of 30 pack-years was associated with ORs of 1.22, 1.32 and 1.39, respectively (P smoking may significantly increase the risk of CML in a dose-dependent manner. However, additional well-designed, prospective cohort studies are required to verify these findings and identify other risk factors associated with CML.

  2. Chronic myeloid leukaemia in Spain: Its presentation characteristics have changed. Spanish section of the EUTOS population-based registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, S; Casado, L F; Giraldo, P; Maestro, B; Andrade, M; Redondo, S; García-Gutiérrez, V; Ayala, R; Garcia, N; Steegmann, J L

    2016-01-01

    To provide more reliable data on the epidemiology of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) in Spain than are currently available. The EUTOS population-based project of European LeukemiaNet is a population registry of new CML cases in patients 18 years of age or older from 22 European areas. The Spanish section included the autonomous communities of Madrid, Castilla-La Mancha and Aragon, from 1-2-2010 to 31-12-2012. A total of 250 cases were recorded in 35 months. The overall incidence was 1.08 cases/10(5) inhabitants-year, with a predominance of men (58%) and clear differences among the communities. The incidence standardised by age was similar (overall, 1.04; men, 1.31; women, 0.81). The median age was 54 years. The incidence increased with age, reaching a peak at>65 years, although 31.7% of cases appeared between the ages of 20 and 44 years. Four percent of cases were diagnosed in advanced stages (2.4% in accelerated phase, 1.6% in blast crisis), 56% were asymptomatic, 38% had splenomegaly, and the Sokal score was high in 11% (lower than what was previously reflected in the literature). The current incidence of CML in Spain is higher than previously reported and similar to that of the European studies. Unlike the classical descriptions, CML presented mostly in asymptomatic form, with no splenomegaly, less leucocytosis and in stages with better prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  3. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  4. Recurrence of acute myeloid leukemia in cryptorchid testis: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Góes, Luccas Santos Patto de; Lopes, Roberto Iglesias; Campos, Octavio Henrique Arcos; Oliveira, Luiz Carlos Neves de; Sant’Anna, Alexandre Crippa; Dall’Oglio, Marcos Francisco; Srougi, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    A 23-year-old male with a history of bone marrow transplant for acute myeloid leukemia. He presented a large mass in the right inguinal region 5 years ago. Upon physical examination, right-sided cryptorchidism was observed. The tumor markers alpha-fetoprotein and beta-HCG were within normalcy range and lactate dehydrogenase was raised. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis revealed right testicular mass in contiguity with the inguinal canal to the ipsilateral retroperitoneum, associat...

  5. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Ali

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We report a case series of 12 patients with acute myeloid leukemia who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplant with a matched related donor. Male to female ratio was 1:1. The main complication post-transplant was graft-versus-host disease (n=7 patients. Transplant-related mortality involved one patient; cause of death was multi-organ failure. After a median follow up of 36.0±11.3 months, overall survival was 16%.

  6. Traffic-related air pollution and risk for leukaemia of an adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Ketzel, Matthias; Harbo Poulsen, Aslak; Sørensen, Mette

    2016-03-01

    Air pollution causes lung cancer, but associations with other cancers have not been established. We investigated whether long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution is associated with the risk of the general population for leukaemia. We identified 1,967 people in whom leukaemia was diagnosed in 1992-2010 from a nation-wide cancer registry and selected 3,381 control people at random, matched on sex and year of birth, from the entire Danish population. Residential addresses since 1971 were traced in a population registry, and outdoor concentrations of NOx and NO2 , as indicators of traffic-related air pollution, were calculated at each address in a dispersion model. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate the risk for leukaemia after adjustment for income, educational level, cohabitation status and co-morbidity. In linear analyses, we found odds ratios for acute myeloid leukaemia of 1.20 (95% confidence interval: 1.04-1.38) per 20 µg/m(3) increase in NOx and 1.31 (1.02-1.68) per 10 µg/m(3) increase in NO2 , calculated as time-weighted average exposure at all addresses since 1971. We found no association with chronic myeloid or lymphocytic leukaemia. This study indicates an association between long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution and acute myeloid leukaemia in the general population, but not for other subtypes of leukaemia. © 2015 UICC.

  7. [Acute pancreatitis during chemotherapy of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia complicated with pseudocyst].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorska-Fic, Barbara; Stańczak, Elzbieta; Matysiak, Michał; Kamiński, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of pancreatitis in patients with haematopoetic neoplasms who are treated with L-asparaginase is fom 2 to 24%. In majority of cases the pancreatitis is oedematous and self-limiting. Acute haemorrhagic or necrotizing pancreatitis caused by L-asparaginase is rare but potentially life-threatening complication. We present 2 cases of acute pancreatitis in children aged 2 and 4 years. They were diagnosed to have acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and were treated according to the ALLLIC BFM 2002 protocol. Acute pancreatitis developed in these children after induction therapy and was followed by formation of a pseudocyst. In both cases the diagnosis of this complication was made directly after phase I of the protocol I (after eighth dose of L-Asparaginase). In the first case the course of acute pancreatitis was mild. Normalization of the amylase levels occurred after 7 days and the diagnosis of post inflammatory cyst was made 15 days after the first signs of the disease. But thereafter, during the additional complication (pneumonia with Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriemia) the pancreatic cyst became infected. In the second case acute pancreatitis had a severe course and the child required treatment in the Intensive Care Unit for 21 days. The cyst was diagnosed after 20 days from the beginning of symptoms. The surgical procedure, applied in both cases was internal drainage by anastomosis of the cyst with the back wall of the stomach. Antileukaemic treatment was recommenced after 6-8 weeks when complications resolved. Currently both children are well and remain in haematological remission and continue maintenance chemotherapy.

  8. Successful treatment of acute promyelocytic leukaemia without chemotherapy and blood transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tøstesen, Michael; Østgård, Lene S G; Kjeldsen, Eigil

    2018-01-01

    Untreated acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) is a rapidly lethal blood cancer. Conventional treatment consists of all-trans retinoic acid and chemotherapy. Standard chemo-therapy-containing treatments necessitate the use of blood products. This is a case report of typical APL in a 32-year-old fe......-old female patient, who due to religious conviction refused supportive therapy with blood products. A treatment regimen consisting of all-trans retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide was successful without the use of blood transfusions.......Untreated acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) is a rapidly lethal blood cancer. Conventional treatment consists of all-trans retinoic acid and chemotherapy. Standard chemo-therapy-containing treatments necessitate the use of blood products. This is a case report of typical APL in a 32-year...

  9. Isochromosome 9q as a sole anomaly in an Omani boy with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achandira, Udayakumar Muthappa; Pathare, Anil V; Kindi, Salam Al; Dennison, David; Yahyaee, Said Al

    2009-01-01

    This report describes a case of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in which isochromosome 9q (i(9q)) was the sole acquired cytogenetic abnormality. The Immunophenotype showed positivity for CD3, CD4, CD5, CD7, CD8, CD10, CD71, CD117 and TdT, consistent with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). The chromosomal analysis of bone marrow showed 46,XY,i(9)(q10) in all the metaphases analysed. The bone marrow morphology was ALL-L2 as per the French–American–British criteria. Isochromosomes are rare chromosomal abnormalities in childhood ALL and the effect of i(9q) is not well established. The patient’s good response to therapy with normal cytogenetics within a month of induction, and disease-free survival after bone marrow transplant are indicative of a good prognosis in such cases. PMID:21686579

  10. Epigenetic dysregulation in chronic myeloid leukaemia: A myriad of mechanisms and therapeutic options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschmieder, Steffen; Vetrie, David

    2017-08-02

    The onset of global epigenetic changes in chromatin that drive tumor proliferation and heterogeneity is a hallmark of many forms of cancer. Identifying the epigenetic mechanisms that govern these changes and developing therapeutic approaches to modulate them, is a well-established avenue pursued in translational cancer medicine. Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) arises clonally when a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) acquires the capacity to produce the constitutively active tyrosine kinase BCR-ABL1 fusion protein which drives tumor development. Treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) that target BCR-ABL1 has been transformative in CML management but it does not lead to cure in the vast majority of patients. Thus novel therapeutic approaches are required and these must target changes to biological pathways that are aberrant in CML - including those that occur when epigenetic mechanisms are altered. These changes may be due to alterations in DNA or histones, their biochemical modifications and requisite 'writer' proteins, or to dysregulation of various types of non-coding RNAs that collectively function as modulators of transcriptional control and DNA integrity. Here, we review the evidence for subverted epigenetic mechanisms in CML and how these impact on a diverse set of biological pathways, on disease progression, prognosis and drug resistance. We will also discuss recent progress towards developing epigenetic therapies that show promise to improve CML patient care and may lead to improved cure rates. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical pathway for patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia: The Euriclea Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, Stefano; Gargiulo, Gianpaolo; Bombaci, Felice; Artioli, Giovanna; Cosentino, Chiara; Pignatelli, Adriana Concetta; Torino, Daniela; Lionetti, Maria Marcella; Samarani, Emanuela; Cappucciati, Lorella; Bordiga, Paola; Diodati, Antonella; Caffarri, Cristiana; Rosini, Irene; Pane, Fabrizio

    2017-07-18

    The use of Tirosine Kinase Ihnibitors (TKIs) for the treatment of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) has definitely represented a turning point in the treatment of the onco-hematological diseases. Over the years, the interest of physicians, nurses, patients and caregivers has increasingly focused on the aspects of the humanization of care, the management of side effects and on the full and constant therapeutic adherence. The aim of the project was to define patient-oriented care processes, based on a proactive approach that can fully respond to the new health needs of CML patients. A nursing expert Working Group (WG) was established. WG reviewed literature about CML patients assistance and then it was conducted a survey on organizational models for the treatment of CML patients, adopted by Italian haematologic and transplant centers.  Finally, the main issues regarding CML patients care were identified and discussed on a multiprofessional basis. Euriclea Project for care of CML patients with the description of a new and expanded nurse role was defined. The Nurse Case Manager or Nursing Clinical Experts were identified as key people for the management of the side effects of treatment, the promotion of the therapeutic adherence and the evaluation of efficacy and effectiveness of the process through the identification of specific indicators for structure, process and outcome. The focal areas of the care process were identified so as to define a different approach to the CML patient, through a holistic view of care and the multidisciplinary interventions.

  12. Diagnostic radiography as a risk factor for chronic myeloid and monocytic leukaemia (CML)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preston-Martin, S.; Thomas, D.C.; Yu, M.C.; Henderson, B.E.

    1989-01-01

    The study included 136 Los Angeles County residents aged 20-69 with chronic myeloid and monocytic leukemia CML diagnosed from 1979 to 1985 (cases) and 136 neighbourhood controls. During 3-20 years before diagnosis more cases than controls had radiographic examinations of back, gastrointestinal (GI) tract and kidneys, and cases more often had GI and back radiography on multiple occasions (odds ratio (OR) for back X-rays on five or more occasions = 12.0; P < 0.01). Published estimates were used to assign a minimum dose to active bone marrow for various radiographic procedures. ORs were estimated for cumulative marrow doses for each of four time periods (3-5 years, 6-10 years, 11-20 years and 3-20 years before diagnosis). ORs for exposure to 0.99, 100-999, 1000-1999 and ≥ 2000 mrad in the 3-20 years before diagnosis were 1.0, 1.4, 1.6 and 2.4 (P for highest exposure category and P for trend both < 0.05). The association was strongest for 6-10 years before diagnosis, and effects of radiation exposure during this period remained significant after consideration of other risk factors in a logistic regression analysis. (author)

  13. Effect of Anacardium occidentale leaf extract on human acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Janaína M; Cury, Nathalia M; Yunes, José A; López, Jorge A; Hernández-Macedo, Maria L

    2018-01-16

    Anacardium occidentale leaves are used in folk medicine due its therapeutic properties attributed to phenolic compounds. Therefore, this study was undertaken on its hydroethanolic leaf extract (AoHE) to evaluate cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction on acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cells. Results indicated that AoHE interfered in the cell cycle progression, inducing apoptosis by activation of casp3 at lower concentrations, thence, a promising candidate for the development of new cancer drugs.

  14. Cyclosporine, Pravastatin Sodium, Etoposide, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-27

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-19

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Secondary cancers among children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treated by the Tokyo Children's Cancer Study Group protocols: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Yasushi; Maeda, Miho; Urayama, Kevin Y; Kiyotani, Chikako; Aoki, Yuki; Kato, Yoko; Goto, Shoko; Sakaguchi, Sachi; Sugita, Kenichi; Tokuyama, Mika; Nakadate, Naoya; Ishii, Eizaburo; Tsuchida, Masahiro; Ohara, Akira

    2014-01-01

    With improvement in survival, it is important to evaluate the impact of treatment on secondary cancers in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) survivors. A retrospective cohort study comprising 2918 children diagnosed with ALL and enrolled on Tokyo Children's Cancer Study Group (TCCSG) protocols between 1984 and 2005 was conducted to evaluate the incidence of secondary cancers and associated factors including treatment protocol, cranial irradiation and other characteristics of the primary ALL. Thirty-seven patients developed secondary cancers, including acute myeloid leukaemia (n = 11), myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 5), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 2), brain tumours (n = 13) and other solid carcinomas (n = 6) within a median follow-up duration of 9·5 years. The cumulative incidence of any secondary cancers was 1·0% (95% confidence interval (CI), 0·7-1·4%) at 10 years and 2·4% (95% CI, 1·5-3·7%) at 20 years, respectively. Standardized incidence rate ratio of secondary cancers was 9·3 (95% CI, 6·5-12·8). Multivariate analyses showed an increased risk of secondary cancers associated with the recent treatment protocol and cranial irradiation. There was no evidence of a reduction in secondary cancer incidence despite marked decreases in cranial irradiation use in the recent protocols. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Secondary Leukemia in a non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Patient Presenting as Myeloid Sarcoma of the Breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Pitini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As defined by the World Health Organization classification of tumors of hematopoietic and lymphoid tissue, myeloid sarcoma (MS is a tumor mass of myeloblasts or immature myeloid cells that can arise before, concurrent with, or following acute myeloid leukaemia. We describe a case of secondary leukemia presenting itself as MS of the breast in a patient previously treated for a non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

  18. Occurrence of Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Young Pregnant Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Menezes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Although acute leukaemia is rare in pregnancy its importance lies in its life-threatening potential, both to the child and the mother. The possibility of vertical transmission of leukemic cells increases the attention devoted to these patients and their offspring. Three cases of pregnant young women (15-17 years of age with AML are presented. This series of cases is the first report where gene abnormalities such as ITD mutations of the FLT3 gene and AML1/ETO fusion genes were screened in pregnant AML patients and their babies, so far. Unfortunately, very poor outcomes have been associated to similar cases described in literature, and the same was true to the patients described herein. Although very speculative, we think that the timing and possible similar exposures would be involved in all cases.

  19. Treatment-related toxicities in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia predisposition syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, K.

    2016-01-01

    Although most children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) do not harbor germline mutations that strongly predispose them to development of this malignancy, large syndrome registries and detailed mapping of exomes or whole genomes of familial leukaemia kindreds have revealed that 3-5% of all...... childhood ALL cases are due to such germline mutations, but the figure may be higher. Most of these syndromes are primarily characterized by their non-malignant phenotype, whereas ALL may be the dominating or even only striking manifestation of the syndrome in some families. Identification of such ALL...... patients is important in order to adjust therapy and offer genetic counseling and cancer surveillance to mutation carriers in the family. In the coming years large genomic screening projects are expected to reveal further hitherto unrecognised familial ALL syndromes. The treatment of ALL cases harboring...

  20. Esophageal Candidiasis as the Initial Manifestation of Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komeno, Yukiko; Uryu, Hideki; Iwata, Yuko; Hatada, Yasumasa; Sakamoto, Jumpei; Iihara, Kuniko; Ryu, Tomiko

    2015-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman presented with persistent dysphagia. A gastroendoscopy revealed massive esophageal candidiasis, and oral miconazole was prescribed. Three weeks later, she returned to our hospital without symptomatic improvement. She was febrile, and blood tests showed leukocytosis (137,150 /μL, blast 85%), anemia and thrombocytopenia. She was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). She received chemotherapy and antimicrobial agents. During the recovery from the nadir, bilateral ocular candidiasis was detected, suggesting the presence of preceding candidemia. Thus, esophageal candidiasis can be an initial manifestation of AML. Thorough examination to detect systemic candidiasis is strongly recommended when neutropenic patients exhibit local candidiasis prior to chemotherapy.

  1. Comorbidity and performance status in acute myeloid leukemia patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østgård, Lene Sofie Granfeldt; Nørgaard, J M; Sengeløv, H

    2015-01-01

    As the world population ages, the comorbidity burden in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients increases. Evidence on how to integrate comorbidity measures into clinical decision-making is sparse. We determined the prognostic impact of comorbidity and World Health Organization Performance Status (...... with an increased short- and long-term mortality (adjusted 90 day MR, PS⩾2=3.43 (95%CI=2.30-5.13); adjusted 91 day-3 year MR=1.35 (95%CI=1.06-1.74)). We propose that more patients with comorbidity may benefit from intensive chemotherapy....

  2. Complexity on Acute Myeloid Leukemia mRNA Transcript Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Cattani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the sequence analysis of acute myeloid leukemia mRNA. Six transcript variants of mlf1 mRNA, with more than 2000 bps, are analyzed by focusing on the autocorrelation of each distribution. Through the correlation matrix, some patches and similarities are singled out and commented, with respect to similar distributions. The comparison of Kolmogorov fractal dimension will be also given in order to classify the six variants. The existence of a fractal shape, patterns, and symmetries are discussed as well.

  3. A case report of acute myeloid leukemia and neurofibromatosis 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Sartor

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 65-year old patient affected by neurofibromatosis 1, documented by the presence of germ-line mutation on the NF1 gene, who developed various hyperproliferative malignant and benign diseases. He was brought to our attention for the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia revealed by major fatigue and dyspnea. The disease characteristics at diagnosis were hyperleukocytosis and complex karyotype with the inversion of the chromosome 16, classifying as a high-risk leukemia. The association between leukemia and neurofibromatosis 1 is controversial and needs to be further investigated. Nevertheless, such patients present a wide number of comorbidities that make therapeutic strategies most difficult.

  4. Genital Infection as a First Sign of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Oiso

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Fournier’s gangrene is a life-threatening disorder caused by aerobic and anaerobic bacterial infection. We report a case of genital infection as the initial warning sign of acute myeloid leukemia. We were able to prevent progression to Fournier’s gangrene in our patient by immediate intensive therapy with incision, blood transfusions and intravenous administration of antibiotics. This case suggests that hematologists and dermatologists should keep in mind that genital infection can be a first sign of hematologic malignancy.

  5. Response-guided induction therapy in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia with excellent remission rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsson, Jonas; Forestier, Erik; Heldrup, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the early treatment response in children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a response-guided induction strategy that includes idarubicin in the first course.......To evaluate the early treatment response in children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a response-guided induction strategy that includes idarubicin in the first course....

  6. Collaborative Efforts Driving Progress in Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwaan, C Michel; Kolb, Edward A; Reinhardt, Dirk; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Adachi, Souichi; Aplenc, Richard; De Bont, Eveline S J M; De Moerloose, Barbara; Dworzak, Michael; Gibson, Brenda E S; Hasle, Henrik; Leverger, Guy; Locatelli, Franco; Ragu, Christine; Ribeiro, Raul C; Rizzari, Carmelo; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E; Smith, Owen P; Sung, Lillian; Tomizawa, Daisuke; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; Creutzig, Ursula; Kaspers, Gertjan J L

    2015-09-20

    Diagnosis, treatment, response monitoring, and outcome of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have made enormous progress during the past decades. Because AML is a rare type of childhood cancer, with an incidence of approximately seven occurrences per 1 million children annually, national and international collaborative efforts have evolved. This overview describes these efforts and includes a summary of the history and contributions of each of the main collaborative pediatric AML groups worldwide. The focus is on translational and clinical research, which includes past, current, and future clinical trials. Separate sections concern acute promyelocytic leukemia, myeloid leukemia of Down syndrome, and relapsed AML. A plethora of novel antileukemic agents that have emerged, including new classes of drugs, are summarized as well. Finally, an important aspect of the treatment of pediatric AML--supportive care--and late effects are discussed. The future is bright, with a wide range of emerging innovative therapies and with more and more international collaboration that ultimately aim to cure all children with AML, with fewer adverse effects and without late effects. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  7. Collaborative Efforts Driving Progress in Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwaan, C. Michel; Kolb, Edward A.; Reinhardt, Dirk; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Adachi, Souichi; Aplenc, Richard; De Bont, Eveline S.J.M.; De Moerloose, Barbara; Dworzak, Michael; Gibson, Brenda E.S.; Hasle, Henrik; Leverger, Guy; Locatelli, Franco; Ragu, Christine; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Rizzari, Carmelo; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Smith, Owen P.; Sung, Lillian; Tomizawa, Daisuke; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Creutzig, Ursula; Kaspers, Gertjan J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis, treatment, response monitoring, and outcome of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have made enormous progress during the past decades. Because AML is a rare type of childhood cancer, with an incidence of approximately seven occurrences per 1 million children annually, national and international collaborative efforts have evolved. This overview describes these efforts and includes a summary of the history and contributions of each of the main collaborative pediatric AML groups worldwide. The focus is on translational and clinical research, which includes past, current, and future clinical trials. Separate sections concern acute promyelocytic leukemia, myeloid leukemia of Down syndrome, and relapsed AML. A plethora of novel antileukemic agents that have emerged, including new classes of drugs, are summarized as well. Finally, an important aspect of the treatment of pediatric AML—supportive care—and late effects are discussed. The future is bright, with a wide range of emerging innovative therapies and with more and more international collaboration that ultimately aim to cure all children with AML, with fewer adverse effects and without late effects. PMID:26304895

  8. Alantolactone selectively ablates acute myeloid leukemia stem and progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahui Ding

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The poor outcomes for patients diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML are largely attributed to leukemia stem cells (LSCs which are difficult to eliminate with conventional therapy and responsible for relapse. Thus, new therapeutic strategies which could selectively target LSCs in clinical leukemia treatment and avoid drug resistance are urgently needed. However, only a few small molecules have been reported to show anti-LSCs activity. Methods The aim of the present study was to identify alantolactone as novel agent that can ablate acute myeloid leukemia stem and progenitor cells from AML patient specimens and evaluate the anticancer activity of alantolactone in vitro and in vivo. Results The present study is the first to demonstrate that alantolactone, a prominent eudesmane-type sesquiterpene lactone, could specifically ablate LSCs from AML patient specimens. Furthermore, in comparison to the conventional chemotherapy drug, cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C, alantolactone showed superior effects of leukemia cytotoxicity while sparing normal hematopoietic cells. Alantolactone induced apoptosis with a dose-dependent manner by suppression of NF-kB and its downstream target proteins. DMA-alantolactone, a water-soluble prodrug of alantolactone, could suppress tumor growth in vivo. Conclusions Based on these results, we propose that alantolactone may represent a novel LSCs-targeted therapy and eudesmane-type sesquiterpene lactones offer a new scaffold for drug discovery towards anti-LSCs agents.

  9. Azelaic Acid Exerts Antileukemic Activity in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yunbao; Liu, Dong; Wei, Yongchang; Su, Dan; Lu, Chenyang; Hu, Yanchao; Zhou, Fuling

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an acute leukemia common in most adults; its prevalence intensifies with age. The overall survival of AML is very poor because of therapeutic resistance. Azelaic acid (AZA) is non-toxic, non-teratogenic, and non-mutagenic and its antitumor effect on various tumor cells is well established; Nonetheless, its therapeutic effects in AML cells are largely unknown. In this study, it was shown that AZA significantly inhibits the cell viability and induces apoptosis in AML cells in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, AZA suppressed the expression of phosphorylated Akt, Jab1 and Trx, and this suppression was enhanced by treatment with Jab1 siRNA. Furthermore, AZA sensitized AML cells to Ara-c chemotherapy. The suppressive effect of AZA on tumor growth was examined in vivo by subcutaneously inoculated AML cells in a tumor model using nude mice. These findings indicate that AZA is useful as an effective ingredient in antineoplastic activity.

  10. Allergy and acute leukaemia in children with Down syndrome: a population study. Report from the Mexican inter-institutional group for the identification of the causes of childhood leukaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Núñez-Enríquez, J C; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, A; Buchán-Durán, E P; Bernáldez-Ríos, R; Medina-Sansón, A; Jiménez-Hernández, E; Amador-Sanchez, R; Peñaloza-Gonzalez, J G; Paredes-Aguilera, R; Alvarez-Rodriguez, F J; Bolea-Murga, V; de Diego Flores-Chapa, J; Flores-Lujano, J; Bekker-Mendez, V C; Rivera-Luna, R

    2013-01-01

    Background: Allergies have been described as protective factors against the development of childhood acute leukaemia (AL). Our objective was to investigate the associations between allergy history and the development of AL and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in children with Down syndrome (DS). Methods: A case–control study was performed in Mexico City. The cases (n=97) were diagnosed at nine public hospitals, and the controls (n=222) were recruited at institutions for children with DS. O...

  11. Myeloid sarcoma developing in pre-existing pyoderma gangrenosum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ida Bruun; Møller, Hanne; Kjaerskov, Mette Wanscher

    2009-01-01

    We report here a case of pyoderma gangrenosum in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome developing into myeloid sarcoma as a sign of transformation to acute leukaemia. The patient was treated successfully with intensive chemotherapy and achieved complete remission, and her otherwise expanding...

  12. MicroRNA profiling can classify acute leukemias of ambiguous lineage as either acute myeloid leukemia or acute lymphoid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leeuw, David C; van den Ancker, Willemijn; Denkers, Fedor; de Menezes, Renée X; Westers, Theresia M; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A; Smit, Linda

    2013-04-15

    Classification of acute leukemia is based on the commitment of leukemic cells to the myeloid or the lymphoid lineage. However, a small percentage of acute leukemia cases lack straightforward immunophenotypical lineage commitment. These leukemias of ambiguous lineage represent a heterogeneous category of acute leukemia that cannot be classified as either acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL). The lack of clear classification of acute leukemias of ambiguous lineage as either AML or ALL is a hurdle in treatment choice for these patients. Here, we compared the microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles of 17 cases with acute leukemia of ambiguous lineage and 16 cases of AML, B-cell acute lymphoid leukemia (B-ALL), and T-cell acute lymphoid leukemia (T-ALL). We show that leukemias of ambiguous lineage do not segregate as a separate entity but exhibit miRNA expression profiles similar to AML, B-ALL, or T-ALL. We show that by using only 5 of the most lineage-discriminative miRNAs, we are able to define acute leukemia of ambiguous lineage as either AML or ALL. Our results indicate the presence of a myeloid or lymphoid lineage-specific genotype, as reflected by miRNA expression, in these acute leukemias despite their ambiguous immunophenotype. miRNA-based classification of acute leukemia of ambiguous lineage might be of additional value in therapeutic decision making.

  13. Competitive PCR for quantification of minimal residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyvold, C; Madsen, H O; Ryder, L P

    2000-01-01

    A very precise and reproducible polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was developed in order to quantify minimal residual disease (MRD) in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). A clone-specific competitor was constructed by introducing a restriction site in a PCR product identical...... under identical conditions. After restriction enzyme cleavage, the PCR products originating from the competitor and the malignant clone can be distinguished by size in a gel electrophoresis step and the amount of residual disease can be determined. The method is very sensitive with a detection limit...

  14. Risk factors for treatment related mortality in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Bendik; Åsberg, Ann; Heyman, Mats

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In spite of major improvements in the cure rate of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), 2-4% of patients still die from treatment related complications. PROCEDURE: We investigated the pattern of treatment related deaths (TRDs) and possible risk factors in the NOPHO ALL-92.......2%), and the overall subsequent risk of induction death and death in first complete remission (CR1) was 1.2% and 1.8%, respectively. Infections were the major cause of death comprising 72% of all cases including 9 deaths from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 11 deaths from fungal infections. Other causes of death included...

  15. Low dose irradiation and risk of leukaemia: A case-control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chobanova, N.; Bayrakova, A.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of low dose irradiation (medical X-ray diagnostic) on the developing of leukaemias in adults is investigated. The influence of non-radiation agents (occupational exposure to chemical carcinogens, past viral infections, family aggregations) to leukaemias are considered also. During this retrospective study 228 patients have been examined with the following diagnosis: acute myeloid leukaemia, chronic myelogenous leukaemias, myelodisplastic syndrome and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (diagnosed between 1991-1993). Each case has been matched with two controls. Statistically significant increase has been found in the risk of developing leukaemias after X-ray diagnostic irradiation (OR = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.14 ./. 3.46). Exposure to chemical agents is also associated with significant increase in the risk (OR = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.25 ./. 2.86). (author)

  16. Case Report: A child with acute lymphocytic leukaemia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The patient was a child aged 5 years who had been diagnosed to have acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). Chemotherapy was given with wysolone, vincristine, daunomycin, l-asparaginase, and intrathecal methotrexate. In addition he was given fluconazole and co-trimoxazole to cover infections during the induction period ...

  17. Genomics of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Diagnosis and Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullinger, Lars; Döhner, Konstanze; Döhner, Hartmut

    2017-03-20

    In recent years, our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of myeloid neoplasms, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), has been greatly advanced by genomics discovery studies that use novel high-throughput sequencing techniques. AML, similar to most other cancers, is characterized by multiple somatically acquired mutations that affect genes of different functional categories, a complex clonal architecture, and disease evolution over time. Patterns of mutations seem to follow specific and temporally ordered trajectories. Mutations in genes encoding epigenetic modifiers, such as DNMT3A, ASXL1, TET2, IDH1, and IDH2, are commonly acquired early and are present in the founding clone. The same genes are frequently found to be mutated in elderly individuals along with clonal expansion of hematopoiesis that confers an increased risk for the development of hematologic cancers. Furthermore, such mutations may persist after therapy, lead to clonal expansion during hematologic remission, and eventually lead to relapsed disease. In contrast, mutations involving NPM1 or signaling molecules (eg, FLT3, RAS) typically are secondary events that occur later during leukemogenesis. Genetic data are now being used to inform disease classification, risk stratification, and clinical care of patients. Two new provisional entities, AML with mutated RUNX1 and AML with BCR- ABL1, have been included in the current update of the WHO classification of myeloid neoplasms and AML, and mutations in three genes- RUNX1, ASXL1, and TP53-have been added in the risk stratification of the 2017 European LeukemiaNet recommendations for AML. Integrated evaluation of baseline genetics and assessment of minimal residual disease are expected to further improve risk stratification and selection of postremission therapy. Finally, the identification of disease alleles will guide the development and use of novel molecularly targeted therapies.

  18. Rapidly progressing, fatal and acute promyelocytic leukaemia that initially manifested as a painful third molar: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suárez-Cuenca Juan A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Acute promyelocytic leukaemia, an uncommon and devastating subtype of leukaemia, is highly prevalent in Latin American populations. The disease may be detected by a dentist since oral signs are often the initial manifestation. However, despite several cases describing oral manifestations of acute promyelocytic leukaemia and genetic analysis, reports of acute promyelocytic leukaemia in Hispanic populations are scarce. The identification of third molar pain as an initial clinical manifestation is also uncommon. This is the first known case involving these particular features. Case presentation A 24-year-old Latin American man without relevant antecedents consulted a dentist for pain in his third molar. After two dental extractions, the patient experienced increased pain, poor healing, jaw enlargement and bleeding. A physical examination later revealed that the patient had pallor, jaw enlargement, ecchymoses and gingival haemorrhage. Laboratory findings showed pancytopaenia, delayed coagulation times, hypoalbuminaemia and elevated lactate dehydrogenase. Splenomegaly was detected on ultrasonography. Peripheral blood and bone marrow analyses revealed a hypercellular infiltrate of atypical promyelocytic cells. Cytogenetic analysis showing genetic translocation t(15;17 further confirmed acute promyelocytic leukaemia. Despite early chemotherapy, the patient died within one week due to intracranial bleeding secondary to disseminated intravascular coagulation. Conclusion The description of this unusual presentation of acute promyelocytic leukaemia, the diagnostic difficulties and the fatal outcome are particularly directed toward dental surgery practitioners to emphasise the importance of clinical assessment and preoperative evaluation as a minimal clinically-oriented routine. This case may also be of particular interest to haematologists, since the patient's cytogenetic analysis, clinical course and therapeutic response are well

  19. Cytochemical studies in leukaemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batra Neelam

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred cases of acute leukaemia were studied, by Romanowsky stains and by cytochemical stains such as Sudan Black B, Periodic Acid Schiff, Alkaline phosphatase and Peroxidase stains. Cases difficult to diagnose by Romanowsky stained smears were easily classified by these supplementary stains. Their importance as supplements to the routine Romanowsky staining in the diagnosis of leukaemia is emphasized and the division of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia based on these patterns is suggested.

  20. C-type lectin-like molecule-1: a novel myeloid cell surface marker associated with acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Alexander B. H.; van den Oudenrijn, Sonja; Bakker, Arjen Q.; Feller, Nicole; van Meijer, Marja; Bia, Judith A.; Jongeneelen, Mandy A. C.; Visser, Therese J.; Bijl, Nora; Geuijen, Cecilia A. W.; Marissen, Wilfred E.; Radosevic, Katarina; Throsby, Mark; Schuurhuis, Gerrit Jan; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; de Kruif, John; Goudsmit, Jaap; Kruisbeek, Ada M.

    2004-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has a poor prognosis due to treatment-resistant relapses. A humanized anti-CD33 antibody (Mylotarg) showed a limited response rate in relapsed AML. To discover novel AML antibody targets, we selected a panel of single chain Fv fragments using phage display technology

  1. Current diagnosis and treatment for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Norio

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a complex disease caused by chromosomal aberrations, mutations, epigenetic modifications, and the deregulated expression of genes, leading to increased myeloid cell proliferation and decreased hematopoietic progenitor cell differentiation. Although most of these aberrations are correlated with prognosis, accurate risk stratification remains a challenge even after incorporating these molecular markers. Currently, some genetic mutations that allow risk stratification have been identified in adult AML, including DNMT3A and IDH1/2. However, these mutations are rare in pediatric AML cases, indicating that a different pathogenesis may exist between adult and pediatric AML. To reveal further details of pediatric AML pathogenesis, the authors performed whole-exome sequencing and whole-transcriptome analysis using massively parallel sequencing technologies in addition to gene expression array. We found that PRDM16 and EVI1-overexpressing patients had significantly worse overall survival and event-free survival, and these overexpressed genes were useful for stratifying patients with FLT3-ITD positive and/or normal karyotype. In order to further this work and establish more appropriate risk classification and molecular target drug development, target validation clinical studies are needed and expected.

  2. Acute myeloid leukemia ontogeny is defined by distinct somatic mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsley, R Coleman; Mar, Brenton G; Mazzola, Emanuele; Grauman, Peter V; Shareef, Sarah; Allen, Steven L; Pigneux, Arnaud; Wetzler, Meir; Stuart, Robert K; Erba, Harry P; Damon, Lloyd E; Powell, Bayard L; Lindeman, Neal; Steensma, David P; Wadleigh, Martha; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Neuberg, Donna; Stone, Richard M; Ebert, Benjamin L

    2015-02-26

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) can develop after an antecedent myeloid malignancy (secondary AML [s-AML]), after leukemogenic therapy (therapy-related AML [t-AML]), or without an identifiable prodrome or known exposure (de novo AML). The genetic basis of these distinct pathways of AML development has not been determined. We performed targeted mutational analysis of 194 patients with rigorously defined s-AML or t-AML and 105 unselected AML patients. The presence of a mutation in SRSF2, SF3B1, U2AF1, ZRSR2, ASXL1, EZH2, BCOR, or STAG2 was >95% specific for the diagnosis of s-AML. Analysis of serial samples from individual patients revealed that these mutations occur early in leukemogenesis and often persist in clonal remissions. In t-AML and elderly de novo AML populations, these alterations define a distinct genetic subtype that shares clinicopathologic properties with clinically confirmed s-AML and highlights a subset of patients with worse clinical outcomes, including a lower complete remission rate, more frequent reinduction, and decreased event-free survival. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00715637. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  3. A rare case of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia with hemophilia A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Biju

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A rare case of Acute lymphoblastic leukemia with hemophillia in a 12 year old boy is presented in the article. Patient was known case of hemophillia (factor VIII deficiency. He was diagnosed as a case of ALL based on bone marrow examination and immunophenotypic study. Patient was treated as per Children Cancer group guidelines. The main aim of reporting this rare association lies in developing treatment strategies in preventing life threatening bleeding due to this rare association which though may be accidental but need further research.

  4. Rapid Evolution to Blast Crisis Associated with a Q252H ABL1 Kinase Domain Mutation in e19a2 BCR-ABL1 Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L. McCarron

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A minority of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML patients express variant transcripts of which the e19a2 BCR-ABL1 fusion is the most common. Instances of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI resistance in e19a2 BCR-ABL1 CML patients have rarely been reported. A case of e19a2 BCR-ABL1 CML is described in whom imatinib resistance, associated with a Q252H ABL1 kinase domain mutation, became apparent soon after initiation of TKI therapy. The patient rapidly transformed to myeloid blast crisis (BC with considerable bone marrow fibrosis and no significant molecular response to a second generation TKI. The clinical course was complicated by comorbidities with the patient rapidly succumbing to advanced disease. This scenario of Q252H-associated TKI resistance with rapid BC transformation has not been previously documented in e19a2 BCR-ABL1 CML. This case highlights the considerable challenges remaining in the management of TKI-resistant BC CML, particularly in the elderly patient.

  5. In vivo RNAi screening for the identification of oncogenes and tumor suppressors in acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ge, Ying

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy characterized by uncontrolled expansion of immature myeloid cells in the hematopoietic tissues. Alternative splicing and epigenetic regulation are two mechanisms implicated in the pathogenesis of AML. In order to identify the essential spli...

  6. Acquired mutations in ASXL1 in acute myeloid leukemia: Prevalence and prognostic value

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Pratcorona (Marta); S. Abbas (Saman); M.A. Sanders (Mathijs); J.E. Koenders (Jasper); F.G. Kavelaars (François); C.A.J. Erpelinck-Verschueren (C. A J); A. Zeilemakers (Annelieke); B. Löwenberg (Bob); P.J.M. Valk (Peter)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractSomatic mutations in the additional sex comb-like 1 (ASXL1) gene have been described in various types of myeloid malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia. Analysis of novel markers, such as ASXL1 mutations, in independent clinical trials is indispensable before considering them for

  7. Absence of mutations in the RET gene in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M; Hofstra, RMW; Stulp, RP; Wu, Y; Buys, CHCM; Willemze, R; Landegent, JE

    Expression of the tyrosine kinase receptor RET has previously been detected in normal hematopoietic cells, and especially in cells of the myeloid lineage. Furthermore, RET was shown to be differentially expressed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a disease characterized by excessive cell growth and

  8. Risk factors for treatment related mortality in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Bendik; Åsberg, Ann; Heyman, Mats

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In spite of major improvements in the cure rate of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), 2-4% of patients still die from treatment related complications. PROCEDURE: We investigated the pattern of treatment related deaths (TRDs) and possible risk factors in the NOPHO ALL-92 an...... towards patients at risk. Pediatr Blood Cancer. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.......BACKGROUND: In spite of major improvements in the cure rate of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), 2-4% of patients still die from treatment related complications. PROCEDURE: We investigated the pattern of treatment related deaths (TRDs) and possible risk factors in the NOPHO ALL-92...... and ALL-2000 protocols. Fifty-five TRDs were identified among the 1,645 ALL-92 patients and 33 among the 1,090 ALL-2000 patients. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in the incidence of TRDs between the two protocols (3.4% vs. 3.2%). Five patients died before initiation of therapy (0...

  9. Allelic Imbalances in Radiation—Associated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Rosemann

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML can develop as a secondary malignancy following radiotherapy, but also following low-dose environmental or occupational radiation exposure. Therapy-related AML frequently carries deletions of chromosome 5q and/or 7, but for low-dose exposure associated AML this has not been described. For the present study we performed genome-wide screens for loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH in a set of 19 AML cases that developed after radiation-exposure following the Chernobyl accident. Using Affymetrix SNP arrays we found large regions of LOH in 16 of the cases. Eight cases (42% demonstrated LOH at 5q and/or 7, which is a known marker of complex karyotypic changes and poor prognosis. We could show here for the first time that exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation induces AML with molecular alterations similar to those seen in therapy-related cases.

  10. The heterogeneity of pediatric MLL-rearranged acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balgobind, B V; Zwaan, C M; Pieters, R; Van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M

    2011-08-01

    Translocations involving the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) gene, localized at 11q23, comprise 15 to 20% of all pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases. This review summarizes current knowledge about the etiology, biology, clinical characteristics and differences in outcome in MLL-rearranged pediatric AML. Furthermore, we discuss the role of cooperating events in MLL-rearranged pediatric AML, and future therapeutic strategies to improve outcome. We conclude that MLL-rearranged pediatric AML is a heterogeneous disease, and prognosis depends on various factors, for example, translocation partner, age, WBC and additional cytogenetic aberrations. The relationship of outcome with specific translocation partners requires that they be searched for in the diagnostic work-up of AML. To achieve further improvements in outcome, unraveling the biology of MLL-rearranged pediatric AML is warranted.

  11. Biology and relevance of human acute myeloid leukemia stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Daniel; Majeti, Ravindra

    2017-03-23

    Evidence of human acute myeloid leukemia stem cells (AML LSCs) was first reported nearly 2 decades ago through the identification of rare subpopulations of engrafting cells in xenotransplantation assays. These AML LSCs were shown to reside at the apex of a cellular hierarchy that initiates and maintains the disease, exhibiting properties of self-renewal, cell cycle quiescence, and chemoresistance. This cancer stem cell model offers an explanation for chemotherapy resistance and disease relapse and implies that approaches to treatment must eradicate LSCs for cure. More recently, a number of studies have both refined and expanded our understanding of LSCs and intrapatient heterogeneity in AML using improved xenotransplant models, genome-scale analyses, and experimental manipulation of primary patient cells. Here, we review these studies with a focus on the immunophenotype, biological properties, epigenetics, genetics, and clinical associations of human AML LSCs and discuss critical questions that need to be addressed in future research. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  12. Genetic Testing in Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Valentina; Hasserjian, Robert P

    2016-03-01

    Cytogenetic analysis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is essential for disease diagnosis, classification, prognostic stratification, and treatment guidance. Molecular genetic analysis of CEBPA, NPM1, and FLT3 is already standard of care in patients with AML, and mutations in several additional genes are assuming increasing importance. Mutational analysis of certain genes, such as SF3B1, is also becoming an important tool to distinguish subsets of MDS that have different biologic behaviors. It is still uncertain how to optimally combine karyotype with mutation data in diagnosis and risk-stratification of AML and MDS, particularly in cases with multiple mutations and/or several mutationally distinct subclones. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Diagnostics, classification and prognostic criteria of acute myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmeier, Bernhard; Buske, Christian; Spiekermann, Karsten; Bohlander, Stefan; Feuring-Buske, Michaela; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Braess, Jan

    2007-04-15

    The continuously growing knowledge about criteria important for biology, pathogenesis, prognosis and treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) necessitates a broad spectrum of diagnostic methods for first diagnosis and for the further course of the disease. Relevant diagnostic techniques (cytomorphology with cytochemistry, immunophenotyping, cytogenetics and molecular genetics, DNA array) are described - with a focus on their mode of operation as well on their clinical significance. Due to the high clinical relevance and growing complexity, AML diagnostics should be performed in specialized laboratories. Compared to the FAB classification which is based primarily on morphological criteria, the classification recommended in 2001 by the WHO additionally takes cytogenetics, molecular genetics and further clinical factors into consideration. Both classifications are described. A wide range of prognostic criteria of AML is discussed on the basis of currently available clinical data. The most important criteria are the karyotype of the leukemic clone and the patient's age.

  14. Relapsing acute myeloid leukemia presenting as hypopyon uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapna P Hegde

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior segment infiltration in acute myeloid leukemia (AML presenting as hypopyon uveitis is very rare. We report this case as an uncommon presentation in a patient on remission after bone marrow transplant for AML. In addition to the hypopyon, the patient presented with "red eye" caused by ocular surface disease due to concurrent graft-versus-host disease and glaucoma. The classical manifestations of masquerade syndrome due to AML were altered by concurrent pathologies. Media opacities further confounded the differential diagnosis. We highlight the investigations used to arrive at a definitive diagnosis. In uveitis, there is a need to maintain a high index of clinical suspicion, as early diagnosis in ocular malignancy can save sight and life.

  15. A Case of Acute Myeloid Leukemia (FAB M2 with Inversion 16 Who Presented with Pelvic Myeloid Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Çakan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemias are the most common childhood cancer in all age groups. Acute myeloid leukemias (AML constitute about 15–20% of acute leukemias. Fatigability, pallor, fever, and bleeding are the most common presenting symptoms of AML. Hepatosplenomegaly and lymphadenopathy are commonly encountered during physical examination. In rare instances eruptions due to skin involvement and localized tumor masses (myeloid sarcoma may be found. Myeloid sarcoma is especially seen in AML-M2 subtype. By cytogenetic analysis, in AML-M2 subtype t(8;21 is often seen and it is more probable to find inversion 16 in AML-M4Eos subtype. Herein, we present a 15-year-old girl whose initial symptom was abdominal pain for three days and her pathological sign was a large abdominal mass which was verified by imaging studies and diagnosed as myeloid sarcoma by biopsy. On bone marrow examination, she had diagnosis of AML-M2 and by cytogenetic analysis inversion 16 was positive. She was treated with AML-BFM 2004 protocol and she is being followed up in remission on her ninth month of the maintenance therapy.

  16. Involvement of BAFF and APRIL in Resistance to Apoptosis of Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolkun, Lukasz; Grubczak, Kamil; Schneider, Gabriela; Zembko, Paula; Radzikowska, Urszula; Singh, Paulina; Kloczko, Janusz; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z; Moniuszko, Marcin; Eljaszewicz, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    B-cell activation factor of the TNF family (BAFF), and a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL), two members of the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily, beyond playing a significant role in normal B-cell development, promote survival and proliferation of malignant B cells. Both ligands interact with 3 receptors: BAFF-R, specific to BAFF, and TACI and BCMA which are shared by both BAFF and APRIL. Here we wished to investigate the potential role of these proteins in resistance of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) blasts to apoptosis. We found that the levels of both mRNA and proteins of APRIL, BAFF and their receptors were expressed in leukaemic cells of 24 newly diagnosed, untreated AML patients. We also demonstrated that patients who did not further respond to induction therapy (NR) presented with significantly higher baseline APRIL and BAFF expression on AML blasts as compared to these subjects who, after induction, achieved complete remission (CR) following induction therapy. Moreover, we observed striking differences in baseline levels of BCMA between CR and NR patients as we did not find detectable expression of this receptor in the latter group of patients. Interestingly, we found that AML blasts collected at baseline from NR patients cultured in presence of exogenous BAFF and APRIL were significantly more resistant to spontaneous or drug-induced apoptosis as compared with cells derived from CR patients. Altogether, our data confirm that BAFF and APRIL signaling play important role in AML pathogenesis and susceptibility to cytotoxic therapy while measuring of BCMA expression on AML cells can become a novel prognostic factor for chemotherapy response.

  17. Prolonged bone marrow T1-relaxation in acute leukaemia. In vivo tissue characterization by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Sørensen, P G; Karle, H

    1987-01-01

    osseous tissue. Nine patients with acute leukaemia, one patient with myelodysplastic syndrome, and ten normal volunteers were included in the study. The T1- and T2-relaxation processes were measured in the lumbar spine bone marrow using a wholebody superconductive MR-scanner operating at 1.5 Tesla...

  18. Rise and fall of subclones from diagnosis to relapse in pediatric B-acute lymphoblastic leukaemia | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is incomplete understanding of genetic heterogeneity and clonal evolution during cancer progression. Here we use deep whole-exome sequencing to describe the clonal architecture and evolution of 20 pediatric B-acute lymphoblastic leukaemias from diagnosis to relapse. We show that clonal diversity is comparable at diagnosis and relapse and clonal survival from diagnosis to relapse is not associated with mutation burden.

  19. Outcome of treatment in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia with rearrangements of the 11q23 chromosomal region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pui, CH; Gaynon, PS; Boyett, JM; Chessells, JM; Baruchel, A; Kamps, W; Silverman, LB; Biondi, A; Harms, DO; Vilmer, E; Schrappe, M; Camitta, B

    2002-01-01

    Background The prognosis and optimum treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) with abnormalities of chromosomal band 11q23 are controversial. We aimed to identify prognostic factors that might help in planning future therapy, and to assess the effectiveness of haemopoietic

  20. Vincristine induced apoptosis in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cells: A mitochondrial controlled pathway regulated by reactive oxygen species?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groninger, E.; Boer, A.W. de; Graaf, S.S.N. de; Kamps, W.A.; Bont, E.S. de

    2002-01-01

    Vincristine (VCR), a microtubule interfering anti-cancer agent, plays a key role in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). The route of VCR induced apoptosis in ALL cells is not well defined. In this study we demonstrated caspase-9 and -3 activation in vivo in bone marrow

  1. Vincristine induced apoptosis in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cells : A mitochondrial controlled pathway regulated by reactive oxygen species?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groninger, E; Meeuwsen-De Boer, GJ; Kamps, WA; De Bont, ESJM

    2002-01-01

    Vincristine (VCR), a microtubule interfering anticancer agent, plays a key role in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). The route of VCR induced apoptosis in ALL cells is not well defined. In this study we demonstrated caspase-9 and -3 activation in vivo in bone marrow

  2. Resilience factors play an important role in the mental health of parents when children survive acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilertsen, Mary-Elizabeth; Hjemdal, Odin; Le, Thien Thanh; Diseth, Trond H; Reinfjell, Trude

    2016-01-01

    Childhood cancer is a tremendous stressor that requires parents to adapt to new challenges, and research has mainly focused on psychopathology and rarely on a resource-oriented perspective, such as resilience. This study assessed resilience factors among parents of children surviving acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and parents of healthy children. We also explored the association between parental resilience and mental health. The study compared 57 parents of 40 children from eight to 15 years of age in remission from acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and 63 parents of 42 healthy children. The Resilience Scale for Adults and the General Health Questionnaire were used to assess parental resilience and mental health. Parents of children surviving acute lymphoblastic leukaemia showed significantly lower levels of resilience than parents of healthy children, but no significant difference was found for mental health. Certain resilience factors were positively associated with mental health, especially for mothers, such as family cohesion, good perception of self and being able to plan their future. Resilience factors may help to protect parents' mental health, especially mothers, when their child has survived acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and should be considered in a clinical setting. Further research on resilience factors for fathers is needed. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression after treatment with glucocorticoid therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordijn, Maartje S.; Gemke, Reinoud J. B. J.; van Dalen, Elvira C.; Rotteveel, Joost; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Glucocorticoids play a major role in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). However, supraphysiological doses may cause suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. HPA axis suppression resulting in reduced cortisol response may cause an impaired stress

  4. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression after treatment with glucocorticoid therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordijn, Maartje S.; Rensen, Niki; Gemke, Reinoud J. B. J.; van Dalen, Elvira C.; Rotteveel, Joost; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids play a major role in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). However, supraphysiological doses can suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. HPA axis suppression resulting in reduced cortisol response may cause an impaired stress response and an inadequate

  5. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression after treatment with glucocorticoid therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensen, Niki; Gemke, Reinoud J. B. J.; van Dalen, Elvira C.; Rotteveel, Joost; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.

    2017-01-01

    Glucocorticoids play a major role in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). However, supraphysiological doses can suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. HPA axis suppression resulting in reduced cortisol response may cause an impaired stress response and an inadequate

  6. Genome‐wide analysis of cytogenetic aberrations in ETV6/RUNX1‐positive childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borst, Louise; Wesolowska, Agata; Joshi, Tejal

    2012-01-01

    The chromosomal translocation t(12;21) resulting in the ETV6/RUNX1 fusion gene is the most frequent structural cytogenetic abnormality among patients with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). We investigated 62 ETV6/RUNX1‐positive childhood ALL patients by single nucleotide polymorphism...

  7. DNA incorporation of 6-thioguanine nucleotides during maintenance therapy of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedeland, Rikke L; Hvidt, Kristian; Nersting, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    To explore the DNA incorporation of 6-thioguanine nucleotide levels (DNA-6TGN) during 6-mercaptopurine (6MP) therapy of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and its relation to erythrocyte levels of their metabolites: 6-thioguanine-nucleotides (E-6TGN...

  8. Asparaginase-associated pancreatitis in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in the NOPHO ALL2008 protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raja, Raheel A; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Albertsen, BK

    2014-01-01

    L-asparaginase is an important drug in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Treatment is associated with several toxicities, including acute pancreatitis. Clinical course, presentation, re-exposure to L-asparginase after pancreatitis and risk of recurrent pancreatitis...... ALL toxicity registry. NOPHO ALL2008 includes eight or 15 doses of intramuscular pegylated L-asparginase (PEG-asparaginase) 1000 iu/m(2) /dose at 2-6 weeks intervals, with a total of 30 weeks of exposure to PEG-asparaginase (clinicaltrials.gov no: NCT00819351). Of 786 children, 45 were diagnosed...... with AAP with a cumulative risk of AAP of 5·9%. AAP occurred after a median of five doses (range 1-13), and 11 d (median) from the latest administration of PEG-Asparaginase. Thirteen patients developed pseudocysts (30%) and 11 patients developed necrosis (25%). One patient died from pancreatitis. Twelve...

  9. Splenic artery pseudoaneurysm due to acute pancreatitis in a 6-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treated with L-aspariginase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Cæcilie Crawley; Laursen, Christian B; Dalby, Kasper

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare phenomenon in children but its incidence seems to be increasing. In children, it is generally caused due to systemic illness, biliary disease, trauma, idiopathy and side effects of medicines like L-aspariginase. Acute pancreatitis is difficult to diagnose in children...... pseudoaneurysm due to acute pancreatitis in a 6-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treated with L-aspariginase. He presented with fever, irritability and pain in his left groin region....

  10. Rare cytogenetic abnormalities and alteration of microRNAs in acute myeloid leukemia and response to therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Shahjahani; Elham Khodadi; Mohammad Seghatoleslami; Javad Mohammadi Asl; Neda Golchin; Zeynab Deris Zaieri; Najmaldin Saki

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common acute leukemia in adults, which is heterogeneous in terms of morphological, cytogenetic and clinical features. Cytogenetic abnormalities, including karyotype aberrations, gene mutations and gene expression abnormalities are the most important diagnostic tools in diagnosis, classification and prognosis in acute myeloid leukemias. Based on World Health Organization (WHO) classification, acute myeloid leukemias can be divided to four groups. Due to...

  11. DNA copy number analysis from mice with radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Certain mouse strains such as CBA C3H and RFM have high incidence of radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The data in this series wer generated by using...

  12. Clinical impact of leukemic blast heterogeneity at diagnosis in cytogenetic intermediate-risk acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Marianne Hutchings; Klausen, Tobias Wirenfeldt; Boegsted, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Individual cellular heterogeneity within the acute myeloid leukemia (AML) bone marrow samples can be observed by multi parametric flow cytometry analysis (MFC) indicating that immunophenotypic screening for leukemic blast subsets may have prognostic impact....

  13. Outcome of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia patients receiving intensive care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maude, Shannon L; Fitzgerald, Julie C; Fisher, Brian T; Li, Yimei; Huang, Yuan-Shung; Torp, Kari; Seif, Alix E; Kavcic, Marko; Walker, Dana M; Leckerman, Kateri H; Kilbaugh, Todd J; Rheingold, Susan R; Sung, Lillian; Zaoutis, Theoklis E; Berg, Robert A; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Thomas, Neal J; Aplenc, Richard

    2014-02-01

    Children with acute myeloid leukemia are at risk for sepsis and organ failure. Outcomes associated with intensive care support have not been studied in a large pediatric acute myeloid leukemia population. Our objective was to determine hospital mortality of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia patients requiring intensive care. Retrospective cohort study of children hospitalized between 1999 and 2010. Use of intensive care was defined by utilization of specific procedures and resources. The primary endpoint was hospital mortality. Forty-three children's hospitals contributing data to the Pediatric Health Information System database. Patients who are newly diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia and who are 28 days through 18 years old (n = 1,673) hospitalized any time from initial diagnosis through 9 months following diagnosis or until stem cell transplant. A reference cohort of all nononcology pediatric admissions using the same intensive care resources in the same time period (n = 242,192 admissions) was also studied. None. One-third of pediatric patients with acute myeloid leukemia (553 of 1,673) required intensive care during a hospitalization within 9 months of diagnosis. Among intensive care admissions, mortality was higher in the acute myeloid leukemia cohort compared with the nononcology cohort (18.6% vs 6.5%; odds ratio, 3.23; 95% CI, 2.64-3.94). However, when sepsis was present, mortality was not significantly different between cohorts (21.9% vs 19.5%; odds ratio, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.89-1.53). Mortality was consistently higher for each type of organ failure in the acute myeloid leukemia cohort versus the nononcology cohort; however, mortality did not exceed 40% unless there were four or more organ failures in the admission. Mortality for admissions requiring intensive care decreased over time for both cohorts (23.7% in 1999-2003 vs 16.4% in 2004-2010 in the acute myeloid leukemia cohort, p = 0.0367; and 7.5% in 1999-2003 vs 6.5% in 2004-2010 in the nononcology

  14. Leukaemic infiltration and cytomegalovirus retinitis in a patient with acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukaemia in complete remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldaña Garrido, J D; Martínez Rubio, M; Carrión Campo, R; Moya Moya, M A; Rico Sergado, L

    2017-03-01

    A 43-year-old woman in remission from T- cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia was referred to our hospital with suspected leukaemic retinitis. The funduscopic examination of her left eye revealed multifocal yellow-white peripheral retinitis and retinal haemorrhage. The patient was treated for cytomegalovirus retinitis after an extended haematological investigation showed no abnormalities. Initial improvement was followed by papillitis in the left eye and motility restriction in the right eye. Magnetic resonance and lumbar puncture confirmed leukaemia relapse. Specific treatment was initiated with complete resolution. Ocular involvement may precede haematological leukaemia relapse. Physicians should be alerted when ocular symptoms appear in these cases. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Base excision repair deficiency in acute myeloid leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheer, N.M.

    2009-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy of the hematopoietic system arising from a transformed myeloid progenitor cell. Genomic instability is the hallmark of AML and characterized by a variety of cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities. Whereas 10% to 20% of AML cases reflect long-term sequelae of cytotoxic therapies for a primary disorder, the etiology for the majority of AMLs remains unknown. The integrity of DNA is under continuous attack from a variety of exogenous and endogenous DNA damaging agents. The majority of DNA damage is caused by constantly generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulting from metabolic by-products. Base excision repair (BER) is the major DNA repair mechanism dealing with DNA base lesions that are induced by oxidative stress or alkylation. In this study we investigated the BER in AML. Primary AML patients samples as well as AML cell lines were treated with hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). DNA damage induction and repair was monitored by the alkaline comet assay. In 15/30 leukemic samples from patients with therapy-related AML, in 13/35 with de novo AML and 14/26 with AML following a myelodysplastic syndrome, significantly reduced single strand breaks (SSBs) representing BER intermediates were found. In contrast, normal SSB formation was seen in mononuclear cells of 30 healthy individuals and 30/31 purified hematopoietic stem- and progenitor cell preparations obtained from umbilical cord blood. Additionally, in 5/10 analyzed AML cell lines, no SSBs were formed upon H 2 O 2 treatment, either. Differences in intracellular ROS concentrations or apoptosis could be excluded as reason for this phenomenon. A significantly diminished cleavage capacity for 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine as well as for Furan was observed in cell lines that exhibited no SSB formation. These data demonstrate for the first time that initial steps of BER are impaired in a proportion of AML cell lines and leukemic cells from patients with different forms of

  16. CD117 expression on blast cells in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goryainova N.V.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to analyze the frequency of CD117 (c-KIT antigen expression on the blast cells in acute myeloid leukemia (AML, evaluation of the presence of the relationship between the expression of the c-KIT and leukemia according to the FAB classification and definition of co-expression of the antigen CD117, antigens CD33 and CD34. The data of 47 patients with AML were diagnosed. M0 AML variant was established in 3 (6% patients, M1 – in 2 (4%, M2 – in 9 (20%, M4 – in 22 (47% and M5 – in 11 (23%. For immunophenotypic stu¬dies monoclonal antibodies (mAb that detect antigens of anti-CD34, anti-CD33 and anti-CD117 (Becton Dickinson, USA were used. The presence of the antigen CD117 was detected in 39 people, accounting for 83% of all surveyed. Antigen c-KIT was present in 48.117.0% cells on average: in all 3 cases – AML M0, in2 cases of AML M1, in 6 cases – AML M2, 20 of 22 cases – AML M4 and in 8 of 11 AML M5 cases. Average levels of CD117 in investigated leukemia cases statistically differed significantly (p=0.0067. Among 39 CD117- positive patients in 25 (53% co-expression of CD117+/CD34+ was revealed. Expression of CD117+/CD34- was observed in 14 cases (30%, CD117-/CD34+ – in 4 cases (8,5%, CD117-/CD34- – in 4 cases (8.5%. CD34 had of 64% of cells of myeloid origin. A high positive cor¬relation between expression of CD117 and CD34 (r=+0,5169 was determined, being statistically significant (p0,0067.

  17. Drug Repurposing for the Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibeke Andresen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a heterogeneous disease characterized by the accumulation of immature myeloid progenitor cells in the bone marrow, compromising of normal blood cell production and ultimately resulting in bone marrow failure. With a 20% overall survival rate at 5 years and 50% in the 18- to 65-year-old age group, new medicines are needed. It is proposed that development of repurposed drugs may be a part of the new therapy needed. AML is subdivided into recurrent molecular entities based on molecular genetics increasingly accessible for precision medicine. Novel therapy developments form a basis for novel multimodality therapy and include liposomal daunorubicin/cytarabine, broad or FLT3-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors, Bcl-2 family inhibitors, selective inhibitors of nuclear export, metabolic inhibitors, and demethylating agents. The use of non-transplant immunotherapy is in early development in AML with the exceptional re-approval of a toxin-conjugated anti-CD33. However, the full potential of small molecule inhibitors and modalities like immunological checkpoint inhibitors, immunostimulatory small molecules, and CAR-T cell therapy is unknown. Some novel therapeutics will certainly benefit AML patient subgroups; however, due to high cost, more affordable alternatives are needed globally. Also the heterogeneity of AML will likely demand a broader repertoire of therapeutic molecules. Drug repurposing or repositioning represent a source for potential therapeutics with well-known toxicity profiles and reasonable prices. This implies that biomarkers of response need to accompany the development of antileukemic therapies for sharply defined patient subgroups. We will illustrate repurposing in AML with selected examples and discuss some experimental and regulatory limitations that may obstruct this development.

  18. Stringent or nonstringent complete remission and prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øvlisen, Andreas K; Oest, Anders; Bendtsen, Mette D

    2018-01-01

    transfusion dependency and were suggested to be of prognostic value. In the present report, we evaluated the prognostic impact of achieving sCR and non-sCR in the Danish National Acute Leukaemia Registry, including 769 patients registered with classical CR (ie, bone marrow...

  19. Disturbed pubertal growth in girls after acute leukaemia: a relative growth hormone insufficiency with late presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moëll, C

    1988-01-01

    Long-term follow-up of growth and development after acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in childhood has previously been limited to the prepubertal period. This study describes pubertal growth, final height and the spontaneous secretion of GH in girls treated for ALL, including CNS irradiation with 24 Gy. Ten girls, treated earlier for ALL, experienced the menarche at a mean age of 12.2 years. This is significantly earlier than the mean for Swedish girls. Prepubertal growth was near normal after the end of therapy for leukaemia. Mean final height was -1.7 SD, which is 1.5 SD less than at onset and 1.0 SD less than 1 year after the end of treatment. Thirteen other girls had a blunted spontaneous secretion of GH, several years after treatment for ALL; there was no increase in GH secretion during puberty. These results suggest that girls who have been treated for ALL, including CNS irradiation, have a relative GH insufficiency. This insufficiency becomes obvious only when the girls cannot respond to the increased need for GH during the pubertal spurt.

  20. Persistent MRD before and after allogeneic BMT predicts relapse in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Rosemary; Shaw, Peter J; Venn, Nicola C; Law, Tamara; Dissanayake, Anuruddhika; Kilo, Tatjana; Haber, Michelle; Norris, Murray D; Fraser, Chris; Alvaro, Frank; Revesz, Tamas; Trahair, Toby N; Dalla-Pozza, Luciano; Marshall, Glenn M; O'Brien, Tracey A

    2015-02-01

    Minimal residual disease (MRD) during early chemotherapy is a powerful predictor of relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and is used in children to determine eligibility for allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in first (CR1) or later complete remission (CR2/CR3). Variables affecting HSCT outcome were analysed in 81 children from the ANZCHOG ALL8 trial. The major cause of treatment failure was relapse, with a cumulative incidence of relapse at 5 years (CIR) of 32% and treatment-related mortality of 8%. Leukaemia-free survival (LFS) and overall survival (OS) were similar for HSCT in CR1 (LFS 62%, OS 83%, n = 41) or CR2/CR3 (LFS 60%, OS 72%, n = 40). Patients achieving bone marrow MRD negativity pre-HSCT had better outcomes (LFS 83%, OS 92%) than those with persistent MRD pre-HSCT (LFS 41%, OS 64%, P 50. A Cox multivariate regression model for LFS retained both B-other ALL subtype (hazard ratio 4·1, P = 0·0062) and MRD persistence post-HSCT (hazard ratio 3·9, P = 0·0070) as independent adverse prognostic variables. Persistent MRD could be used to direct post-HSCT therapy. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. [Acute myeloid leukemia. Genetic diagnostics and molecular therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenk, R F; Döhner, K; Döhner, H

    2013-02-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a genetically heterogeneous disease. The genetic diagnostics have become an essential component in the initial work-up for disease classification, prognostication and prediction. More and more promising molecular targeted therapeutics are becoming available. A prerequisite for individualized treatment strategies is a fast pretherapeutic molecular screening including the fusion genes PML-RARA, RUNX1-RUNX1T1 and CBFB-MYH11 as well as mutations in the genes NPM1, FLT3 and CEBPA. Promising new therapeutic approaches include the combination of all- trans retinoic acid and arsentrioxid in acute promyelocytic leukemia, the combination of intensive chemotherapy with KIT inhibitors in core-binding factor AML and FLT3 inhibitors in AML with FLT3 mutation, as well as gemtuzumab ozogamicin therapy in patients with low and intermediate cytogenetic risk profiles. With the advent of the next generation sequencing technologies it is expected that new therapeutic targets will be identified. These insights will lead to a further individualization of AML therapy.

  2. Azelaic Acid Exerts Antileukemic Activity in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunbao Pan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is an acute leukemia common in most adults; its prevalence intensifies with age. The overall survival of AML is very poor because of therapeutic resistance. Azelaic acid (AZA is non-toxic, non-teratogenic, and non-mutagenic and its antitumor effect on various tumor cells is well established; Nonetheless, its therapeutic effects in AML cells are largely unknown. In this study, it was shown that AZA significantly inhibits the cell viability and induces apoptosis in AML cells in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, AZA suppressed the expression of phosphorylated Akt, Jab1 and Trx, and this suppression was enhanced by treatment with Jab1 siRNA. Furthermore, AZA sensitized AML cells to Ara-c chemotherapy. The suppressive effect of AZA on tumor growth was examined in vivo by subcutaneously inoculated AML cells in a tumor model using nude mice. These findings indicate that AZA is useful as an effective ingredient in antineoplastic activity.

  3. Evolving Therapies in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Progress at Last?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelo, Daniel J; Stein, Eytan M; Ravandi, Farhad

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an acquired disease characterized by chromosomal translocations and somatic mutations that lead to leukemogenesis. Systemic combination chemotherapy with an anthracycline and cytarabine remains the standard induction regimen for "fit" adults. Patients who achieve complete remission generally receive postinduction therapy with cytarabine-based chemotherapy or an allogeneic bone marrow transplant. Those unfit for induction chemotherapy are treated with hypomethylating agents (HMAs), low-dose cytarabine, or they are offered supportive care alone with transfusions and prophylactic antimicrobials. The revolution in understanding the genetics of AML, facilitated by next-generation sequencing, has led to many new drugs against driver mutations. Better methods of identification of leukemic blasts have provided us with better means to detect the disease left behind after cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens. This measurable residual disease has been correlated with poorer relapse-free survival, demonstrating the need for novel strategies to eradicate it to improve the outcome of patients with acute leukemias. In this article, we discuss adapting and improving AML therapy by age and comorbidities, emerging targeted therapies in AML, and minimal residual disease (MRD) assessment in AML.

  4. Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Clinical Spectrum of 125 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Sadia; Zaheer, Hasan Abbas; Irfan, Syed Mohammed; Ashar, Sana

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is an acquired clonal heterogeneous stem cell disorder. Hence, various parameters are sought out to categorize this disease into subtypes, so that as a consequence specific treatment modalities can be offered. Conventionally, the practically used method for classification utilizes French American British (FAB) criteria based on morphology and cytochemistry. The aim of present study was to determine the current spectrum of AML sub types in patients in Karachi. This single centre cross sectional study was conducted at Liaquat National Hospital, Karachi, extending from January 2010 to December 2014. Data were retrieved from archives were analyzed with SPSS version 22. A total of 125 patients were diagnosed at our institution with de novo AML during five years period, 76 males and 49 females. Median age was 34.5 years. AML-M1 was the predominant FAB subtype (23.2%) followed by M2 (18.4%), M3 and M4 (16% each), M0 (14.4%), M5 (7.2%), M6 (3.2%) and M7 (1.6%). AML in Pakistani patients is seen in a relatively young population. The most common FAB subtype observed in our study was acute myeloblastic leukemia, without maturation (M1).

  5. Diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia in a dental hospital; report of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-10-10

    Oct 10, 2014 ... [1]. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) can present as leukemic infiltrates in many sites including gingival enlargement, mucosal and skin nodules.[5] Oral lesions occur both in acute and chronic forms of all types of leukemias, however, oral manifestations are more common in the acute stages of the disease.

  6. [Treatment of acute myeloid leukemia -- a single center experience (2007-2013)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmeczi, Anna; Udvardy, Miklós; Illés, Arpád; Telek, Béla; Kiss, Attila; Batár, Péter; Reményi, Gyula; Szász, Róbert; Ujj, Zsófia; Márton, Adrienn; Ujfalusi, Anikó; Hevessy, Zsuzsanna; Pinczés, László; Bedekovics, Judit; Rejtő, László

    2014-04-27

    Mortality of acute myeloid leukemia is still 60-70% in young (myeloid leukemia. From 2007 to 2013, 173 patients with acute myeloid leukemia were treated. Patients were classified according to the European LeukemiaNet prognostic guideline. Association between mortality and the type of acute myeloid leukemia (secondary or primary), dose of daunoblastin at induction of treatment, and the rate of minimal residual disease were investigated. The 5-year survival probability was 25% in young adults and 2% in the elderly. The survival was significantly influenced by these prognostic factors. The 5-year survival rate was 50% in the young, favorable prognostic group. The 90 mg/m2 daunoblastin dose was found to be beneficial. Addition of bortezomib to the standard induction protocol had an additional beneficial effect. The speed and depth of the response to induction therapy, and the initial white blood cell count had an apparent effect on survival.

  7. Myeloid Sarcoma after Allogenic Stem Cell Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Successful Consolidation Treatment Approaches in Two Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silje Johansen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid sarcoma is an extramedullary (EM manifestation (i.e., manifestation outside the bone marrow of acute myeloid leukemia (AML; it is assumed to be relatively uncommon and can be the only manifestation of leukemia relapse after allogenic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT. An EM sarcoma can manifest in any part of the body, although preferentially manifesting in immunological sanctuary sites as a single or multiple tumors. The development of myeloid sarcoma after allo-SCT is associated with certain cytogenetic abnormalities, developing of graft versus host disease (GVHD, and treatment with donor lymphocytes infusion (DLI. It is believed that posttransplant myeloid sarcomas develop because the EM sites evade immune surveillance. We present two patients with EM myeloid sarcoma in the breast and epipharynx, respectively, as the only manifestation of leukemia relapse. Both patients were treated with a combination of local and systemic therapy, with successfully longtime disease-free survival. Based on these two case reports, we give an updated review of the literature and discuss the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of EM sarcoma as the only manifestation of AML relapse after allo-SCT. There are no standard guidelines for the treatment of myeloid sarcomas in allotransplant recipients. In our opinion, the treatment of these patients needs to be individualized and should include local treatment (i.e., radiotherapy combined with systemic therapy (i.e., chemotherapy, immunotherapy, DLI, or retransplantation. The treatment has to consider both the need for sufficient antileukemic efficiency versus the risk of severe complications due to cumulative toxicity.

  8. Consensus definitions of 14 severe acute toxic effects for childhood lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, K.; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Barzilai, Shlomit

    2016-01-01

    Although there are high survival rates for children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, their outcome is often counterbalanced by the burden of toxic effects. This is because reported frequencies vary widely across studies, partly because of diverse definitions of toxic effects. Using the Delphi......, asparaginase-associated pancreatitis, arterial hypertension, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, seizures, depressed level of consciousness, methotrexate-related stroke-like syndrome, peripheral neuropathy, high-dose methotrexate-related nephrotoxicity, sinusoidal obstructive syndrome......, thromboembolism, and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia) that are serious but too rare to be addressed comprehensively within any single group, or are deemed to need consensus definitions for reliable incidence comparisons, were selected for assessment. Our results showed that none of the protocols addressed all 14...

  9. Maternal diabetes and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in the offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søegaard, Signe Holst; Rostgaard, Klaus; Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Maternal diabetes may be linked to childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in the offspring. METHODS: We assessed the association between maternal pregestational or gestational diabetes and offspring risk of childhood ALL in a register-based study, including all singletons born...... in Denmark during 1996-2015 (n=1 187 482). RESULTS: Adjusted hazard ratios of childhood ALL were 2.91 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.30-6.51) for maternal pregestational diabetes and 1.75 (95% CI: 1.02-2.98) for maternal gestational diabetes. Paternal diabetes did not alter offspring ALL risk, and we found...... no association between offspring ALL and later maternal risk of diabetes. CONCLUSIONS: Regardless that absolute ALL risk among offspring of women with diabetes remains low, our findings suggest that characteristics of the diabetic intrauterine environment promote ALL development. This offers a setting for future...

  10. E2A-PBX1 fusion in adult acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: biological and clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foa, Robin; Vitale, Antonella; Mancini, Marco; Cuneo, Antonio; Mecucci, Cristina; Elia, Loredana; Lombardo, Romina; Saglio, Giuseppe; Torelli, Giuseppe; Annino, Luciana; Specchia, Giorgina; Damasio, Eugenio; Recchia, Anna; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Morra, Enrica; Volpe, Ettore; Tafuri, Agostino; Fazi, Paola; Hunger, Stephen P; Mandelli, Franco

    2003-02-01

    Molecular and cytogenetic studies performed in 305 adult acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) patients enrolled in the gimema (Gruppo Italiano Malattie EMatologiche dell'Adulto) multicentric protocols identified an E2A-PBX1 fusion and/or t(1;19) in 10 patients (3.3%). All had common ALL, were mostly CyIg+ and were CD34/CD13/CD33-. Nine patients achieved a complete remission (CR); five patients showed a haematological relapse after 7 months (median). Four patients are alive in first CR with a median follow-up of 29 months; three patients are molecularly negative. This abnormality is frequently associated with early treatment failure. E2A-PBX1+ adult ALL should be considered for intensified treatment strategies and monitoring of minimal residual disease.

  11. Growth hormone secretion in children after therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawlaczyk, B.; Krause, W.

    1990-01-01

    In eight children, after the termination of therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) the secretion of growth hormone (GH) was determined by the stimulation test with clonidine. The children were treated in the period from 1983 till 1988 and they were administered chemotherapy, intrathecal methotrexate therapy and cranial 60 Co irradiation in a dose of 1800 rads. In one case a complete GH deficiency was found, in three cases there was a partial deficiency and in the remaining cases the secretion was regular. No correlation was found between the biochemical values of GH and the clinical stature. There was also no interrelation between the duration of chemotherapy and the degree of pituitary gland failure. We have compared the results of GH output in children treated for ALL with those of 44 children in whom short stature was diagnosed. The age in both groups was similar. (author)

  12. Co-trimoxazole alone for prevention of bacterial infection in patients with acute leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starke, I D; Donnelly, P; Catovsky, D; Darrell, J; Johnson, S A; Goldman, J M; Galton, D A

    1982-01-02

    43 patients undergoing treatment for acute leukaemia were randomised to receive either co-trimoxazole alone or co-trimoxazole with framycetin and colistin as antibacterial prophylaxis during periods of neutropenia. There were no significant differences between the two treatment groups in the time before the onset of the first fever, the number of episodes of fever or of septicaemia per patient, the number of neutropenic days during which patients remained afebrile or did not require systemic antibiotics, or the number of resistant organisms acquired. Co-trimoxazole alone is cheaper and easier to take than co-trimoxazole with framycetin and colistin, and it is therefore preferable to the three-drug combination for the prophylaxis of bacterial infection.

  13. Pattern of Leukaemia Patients Admitted in Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, T. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Any tissue of the body can give rise to cancer. However, those tissues which multiply rapidly are at high risk of developing cancer and haematopoietic system is one of them. Neoplasms of this system are known as leukaemia and lymphoma, according to the types of white cells involved.Study of cancer patterns in different societies, however can contribute a substantial knowledge about the aetiology of cancer. The present Study was designed and aimed to estimate the frequency of different types of leukaemia in patients admitted in Ayub Teaching hospital Abbottabad. Methods: Data from the patients admitted at oncology Department of Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad from 2010 to 2015 was collected and analysed to calculate cumulative and year-wise frequency of leukaemia and its major types. Frequency distribution with reference to gender and age was also calculated. Results: In our analysis about 16 percent patients had acute myelocytic leukaemia and 32 percent patients had acute lymphocytic leukaemia; while chronic myeloid leukaemia outnumbered chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (11 percent and 3 percent); Hodgkin lymphoma was seen in 18 percent cases while Non Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) was present in 20 percent cases. Out of the total, 150 cases (75 percent) belonged to mountainous areas of Hazara, i.e., 40 cases belonged to Kohistan, another 40 cases were residents of Battagram, 45 cases belonged to hilly areas of Mansehra and 25 cases to Kaghan valley, while only 50 (25 percent) cases were from the plain areas of Abbottabad and Haripur districts, i.e., 20 and 30 cases respectively. Conclusion: Leukaemia is more common in hilly areas of Hazara, since majority of the cases belonged to well-known mountainous regions of Kohistan, Battagram, Kaghan or Mansehra and only few cases belonged to the plain areas of Abbottabad and Haripur districts. (author)

  14. Lysosomal disruption preferentially targets acute myeloid leukemia cells and progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhai, Mahadeo A.; Prabha, Swayam; Hurren, Rose; Rutledge, Angela C.; Lee, Anna Y.; Sriskanthadevan, Shrivani; Sun, Hong; Wang, Xiaoming; Skrtic, Marko; Seneviratne, Ayesh; Cusimano, Maria; Jhas, Bozhena; Gronda, Marcela; MacLean, Neil; Cho, Eunice E.; Spagnuolo, Paul A.; Sharmeen, Sumaiya; Gebbia, Marinella; Urbanus, Malene; Eppert, Kolja; Dissanayake, Dilan; Jonet, Alexia; Dassonville-Klimpt, Alexandra; Li, Xiaoming; Datti, Alessandro; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Wrana, Jeff; Rogers, Ian; Sonnet, Pascal; Ellis, William Y.; Corey, Seth J.; Eaves, Connie; Minden, Mark D.; Wang, Jean C.Y.; Dick, John E.; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; Schimmer, Aaron D.

    2012-01-01

    Despite efforts to understand and treat acute myeloid leukemia (AML), there remains a need for more comprehensive therapies to prevent AML-associated relapses. To identify new therapeutic strategies for AML, we screened a library of on- and off-patent drugs and identified the antimalarial agent mefloquine as a compound that selectively kills AML cells and AML stem cells in a panel of leukemia cell lines and in mice. Using a yeast genome-wide functional screen for mefloquine sensitizers, we identified genes associated with the yeast vacuole, the homolog of the mammalian lysosome. Consistent with this, we determined that mefloquine disrupts lysosomes, directly permeabilizes the lysosome membrane, and releases cathepsins into the cytosol. Knockdown of the lysosomal membrane proteins LAMP1 and LAMP2 resulted in decreased cell viability, as did treatment of AML cells with known lysosome disrupters. Highlighting a potential therapeutic rationale for this strategy, leukemic cells had significantly larger lysosomes compared with normal cells, and leukemia-initiating cells overexpressed lysosomal biogenesis genes. These results demonstrate that lysosomal disruption preferentially targets AML cells and AML progenitor cells, providing a rationale for testing lysosomal disruption as a novel therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:23202731

  15. Molecular Therapeutic Approaches for Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K Tasian

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Approximately two thirds of children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML are cured with intensive multi-agent chemotherapy. However, primary chemorefractory and relapsed AML remains a significant source of childhood cancer mortality, highlighting the need for new therapies. Further therapy intensification with traditional cytotoxic agents is not feasible given the potential for significant toxicity to normal tissues with conventional chemotherapy and the risk for long-term end-organ dysfunction. Significant emphasis has been placed upon the development of molecularly targeted therapeutic approaches for adults and children with high-risk subtypes of AML with the goal of improving remission induction and minimizing relapse. Several promising agents are currently in clinical testing or late preclinical development for AML, including monoclonal antibodies against leukemia cell surface proteins, kinase inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors, epigenetic agents, and chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cell immunotherapies. Many of these therapies have been specifically tested in children with relapsed/refractory AML via phase 1 and 2 trials with a smaller number of new agents under phase 3 evaluation for children with de novo AML. Although successful identification and implementation of new drugs for children with AML remains a formidable challenge, enthusiasm for novel molecular therapeutic approaches is great given the potential for significant clinical benefit for children who will otherwise fail standard therapy.

  16. Maxillo-orbital granulocytic sarcoma in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandana Chakraborti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Granulocytic sarcoma or chloroma, a manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a rare cause of childhood proptosis. A 14-year-old boy presented with progressively increasing unilateral proptosis and swelling of lower eyelid and face on the right side. Contrast enhanced computed tomographic images revealed enhancing infiltrates occupying the right orbit, maxillary antrum, and infratemporal fossa. Incisional biopsy from the orbital swelling and the bone marrow aspirate showing leukemic blast cells confirmed the diagnosis of AML. The peripheral smear was normal initially, but high total leukocytic count with immature blast cells was evident after 1-month of presentation. Chemotherapy brought about the remission of the disease. However, the delay in diagnosis because of negative peripheral blood smear examination and inconclusive fine-needle aspiration biopsy led to the loss of vision in right eye. Diagnosis of such case can be made by a combination of good clinical examination and relevant investigations. This case of maxillo-orbital granulocytic sarcoma is reported because of its rarity and to emphasize the clinical and cyto-histological features and problems concerning differential diagnosis.

  17. Karyotype complexity and prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stölzel, F; Mohr, B; Kramer, M; Oelschlägel, U; Bochtler, T; Berdel, W E; Kaufmann, M; Baldus, C D; Schäfer-Eckart, K; Stuhlmann, R; Einsele, H; Krause, S W; Serve, H; Hänel, M; Herbst, R; Neubauer, A; Sohlbach, K; Mayer, J; Middeke, J M; Platzbecker, U; Schaich, M; Krämer, A; Röllig, C; Schetelig, J; Bornhäuser, M; Ehninger, G

    2016-01-15

    A complex aberrant karyotype consisting of multiple unrelated cytogenetic abnormalities is associated with poor prognosis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The European Leukemia Net classification and the UK Medical Research Council recommendation provide prognostic categories that differ in the definition of unbalanced aberrations as well as the number of single aberrations. The aim of this study on 3526 AML patients was to redefine and validate a cutoff for karyotype complexity in AML with regard to adverse prognosis. Our study demonstrated that (1) patients with a pure hyperdiploid karyotype have an adverse risk irrespective of the number of chromosomal gains, (2) patients with translocation t(9;11)(p21∼22;q23) have an intermediate risk independent of the number of additional aberrations, (3) patients with ⩾4 abnormalities have an adverse risk per se and (4) patients with three aberrations in the absence of abnormalities of strong influence (hyperdiploid karyotype, t(9;11)(p21∼22;q23), CBF-AML, unique adverse-risk aberrations) have borderline intermediate/adverse risk with a reduced overall survival compared with patients with a normal karyotype.

  18. Recent developments in immunotherapy of acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix S. Lichtenegger

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The advent of new immunotherapeutic agents in clinical practice has revolutionized cancer treatment in the past decade, both in oncology and hematology. The transfer of the immunotherapeutic concepts to the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML is hampered by various characteristics of the disease, including non-leukemia-restricted target antigen expression profile, low endogenous immune responses, and intrinsic resistance mechanisms of the leukemic blasts against immune responses. However, considerable progress has been made in this field in the past few years. Within this manuscript, we review the recent developments and the current status of the five currently most prominent immunotherapeutic concepts: (1 antibody-drug conjugates, (2 T cell-recruiting antibody constructs, (3 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cells, (4 checkpoint inhibitors, and (5 dendritic cell vaccination. We focus on the clinical data that has been published so far, both for newly diagnosed and refractory/relapsed AML, but omitting immunotherapeutic concepts in conjunction with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Besides, we have included important clinical trials that are currently running or have recently been completed but are still lacking full publication of their results. While each of the concepts has its particular merits and inherent problems, the field of immunotherapy of AML seems to have taken some significant steps forward. Results of currently running trials will reveal the direction of further development including approaches combining two or more of these concepts.

  19. Recombinant EphB4-HSA Fusion Protein and Azacitidine or Decitabine for Relapsed or Refractory Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients Previously Treated With a Hypomethylating Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. A 78-year-old man with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapper, Elliot B; Luptakova, Katarina; Joyce, Robin M; Tzachanis, Dimitrios

    2014-08-30

    Male, 78. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Dyspnea • fatigue. Idarubicin followed by cytarabine. Chemotherapy. Hematology. Unusual clinical course. Renal failure is a common presentation of acute myelomonocytic and monocytic leukemia. It is usually the result of a combined glomerular and tubular dysfunction and is associated with a poor prognosis. No guidelines exist for treatment. We herein describe the case of a 78-year-old Caucasian man who presented with acute myeloid leukemia M5, leukostasis with a white count of 340 000/ml, and acute renal failure with a creatinine of 7.7/dL. The patient was initially treated with leukapheresis and 3 days of idarubicin in the setting of continuous renal replacement therapy that resulted in rapid reversal of his renal failure. He then received 7 days of continuous infusion cytarabine and went into a complete remission. Renal failure may complicate the presentation of AML but can be reversible with treatment. Dose adjustment of the chemotherapy is not needed and the treatment can be greatly facilitated with the use of continuous renal replacement therapy, as indicated in our case report. In addition, we emphasize that organ dysfunction, even in elderly patients, is not necessarily a contraindication to aggressive treatment if it is felt to be disease-related and reversible.

  1. Multiplex fusion gene testing in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima-Yamashita, Yuka; Matsuo, Hidemasa; Yamada, Miho; Deguchi, Takao; Kiyokawa, Nobutaka; Shimada, Akira; Tawa, Akio; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Tomizawa, Daisuke; Taga, Takashi; Kinoshita, Akitoshi; Adachi, Souichi; Horibe, Keizo

    2018-01-01

    Gene abnormalities, particularly chromosome rearrangements generating gene fusion, are associated with clinical characteristics and prognosis in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Karyotyping is generally performed to enable risk stratification, but the results are not always consistent with those of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and more accurate and rapid methods are required. A total of 487 samples from de novo AML patients enrolled in the Japanese Pediatric Leukemia/Lymphoma Study Group (JPLSG) AML-05 study (n = 448), and from acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients enrolled in the JPLSG AML-P05 study (n = 39) were available for this investigation. Multiplex quantitative RT-PCR was performed to detect eight important fusion genes: AML1(RUNX1)-ETO(RUNX1T1), CBFB-MYH11, MLL(KMT2A)-AF9(MLLT3), MLL-ELL, MLL-AF6(MLLT4), FUS(TLS)-ERG, NUP98-HOXA9, and PML-RARA. Fusion genes were detected in 207 (46.2%) of the 448 AML-05 patient samples. After exclusion of two samples with PML-RARA, no chromosomal abnormalities were identified on karyotyping in 19 of 205 patients (9.3%) positive for fusion genes on RT-PCR. Fusion genes were confirmed on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in 11 of these 19 patients. In contrast, fusion genes were detected in 37 of 39 patients (94.9%) from the AML-P05 study, and 33 of these results were consistent with the karyotyping. There were discrepancies in four patients (10.8%), three with normal karyotypes and one in whom karyotyping was not possible. All four of these patients were PML-RARA positive on FISH. Multiplex quantitative RT-PCR-based fusion gene screening may be effective for diagnosis of pediatric AML. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  2. Measurement of BCR-ABL1 by RT-qPCR in chronic myeloid leukaemia: findings from an International EQA Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Stuart; Travis, Debbie; Whitby, Liam; Bainbridge, John; Cross, Nicholas C P; Barnett, David

    2017-05-01

    Sequential measurement of BCR-ABL1 mRNA levels by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is embedded in the management of patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML), and has played an important role in the remarkable improvement in patient outcomes seen in this disease. As a provider of external quality assessment (EQA) in this area, UK NEQAS for Leucocyte Immunophenotyping (UKNEQAS LI) has a unique perspective on the changing face of BCR-ABL1 testing in CML. To assess the impact of technical standardisation and the development of the International Scale (IS) upon the accuracy of BCR-ABL1 testing, we reviewed EQA trial data from 2007 to 2015. Comparison of participant results identified considerable variability at both high and low levels of disease, including therapeutically important decision points; however, results converted to the IS showed less variability compared to unconverted data sets. We also found that different methods of converting to the IS produce consistently different median results within UKNEQAS LI IS data sets. This data suggests that whilst the development of the IS has improved the comparability of results between centres, there is still the need for further improvement in the processes of converting raw results to the IS in order to fully realise the benefits of molecular monitoring of CML. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. A single nucleotide polymorphism in cBIM is associated with a slower achievement of major molecular response in chronic myeloid leukaemia treated with imatinib.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Augis

    Full Text Available BIM is essential for the response to tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKI in chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML patients. Recently, a deletion polymorphism in intron 2 of the BIM gene was demonstrated to confer an intrinsic TKI resistance in Asian patients. The present study aimed at identifying mutations in the BIM sequence that could lead to imatinib resistance independently of BCR-ABL mutations.BIM coding sequence analysis was performed in 72 imatinib-treated CML patients from a French population of our centre and in 29 healthy controls (reference population as a case-control study. Real-time quantitative PCR (RT qPCR was performed to assess Bim expression in our reference population.No mutation with amino-acid change was found in the BIM coding sequence. However, we observed a silent single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP c465C>T (rs724710. A strong statistical link was found between the presence of the T allele and the high Sokal risk group (p = 0.0065. T allele frequency was higher in non responsive patients than in the reference population (p = 0.0049. Similarly, this T allele was associated with the mutation frequency on the tyrosine kinase domain of BCR-ABL (pT SNP of BIM could be useful for predicting the outcome of imatinib-treated CML patients.

  4. Direct and indirect targeting of MYC to treat acute myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Kogan, Scott; Goga, Andrei; Brondfield, S; Brondfield, S; Umesh, S; Umesh, S; Corella, A; Corella, A; Zuber, J; Rappaport, AR; Rappaport, AR; Gaillard, C

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 The Author(s) Purpose: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common acute leukemia in adults and is often resistant to conventional therapies. The MYC oncogene is commonly overexpressed in AML but has remained an elusive target. We aimed to exami

  5. Diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia in a dental hospital; report of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs) are aggressive hematopoietic neoplasms that, if untreated, can lead to death within days. Owing to its high morbidity rate, early diagnosis and appropriate medical therapy is essential. Oral lesions may be the presenting feature of acute leukemias and are, therefore, important diagnostic ...

  6. Rare myeloid sarcoma/acute myeloid leukemia with adrenal mass after allogeneic mobilization peripheral blood stem cell transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ya-Fei; Li, Qian; Xu, Wen-Gui; Xiao, Jian-Yu; Pang, Qing-Song; Yang, Qing; Zhang, Yi-Zuo

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma (MS) is a rare hematological neoplasm that develops either de novo or concurrently with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). This neoplasm can also be an initial manifestation of relapse in a previously treated AML that is in remission. A 44-year-old male patient was diagnosed with testis MS in a local hospital in August 2010. After one month, bone marrow biopsy and aspiration confirmed the diagnosis of AML. Allogeneic mobilization peripheral blood stem cell transplantation was performed, with the sister of the patient as donor, after complete remission (CR) was achieved by chemotherapy. Five months after treatment, an adrenal mass was detected by positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT). Radiotherapy was performed for the localized mass after a multidisciplinary team (MDT) discussion. The patient is still alive as of May 2013, with no evidence of recurrent MS or leukemia

  7. Fusion of the NUP98 gene with the LEDGF/p52 gene defines a recurrent acute myeloid leukemia translocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Mario

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The NUP98 gene is involved in multiple rearrangements in haematological malignancy. The leukemic cells in an acute myeloid leukemia (AML patient with a t(9;11(p22;p15 were recently shown to have a fusion between the NUP98 gene and the LEDGF gene but it was not demonstrated that this fusion was recurrent in other leukaemia patients with the same translocation. Results We used RT-PCR to analyse the leukemic cells from an AML patient who presented with a cytogenetically identical translocation as the sole chromosomal abnormality. A NUP98-LEDGF fusion transcript was observed and confirmed by sequencing. The reciprocal transcript was also observed. The fusion transcript was not detectable during remission and recurred at relapse. The breakpoints in the NUP98 and LEDGF genes were different to those previously reported. The NUP98 breakpoint occurs in the intron between exons 8 and 9. It is the most 5' breakpoint reported in a translocation involving the NUP98 gene. All of the LEDGF gene is included in the fusion except for exon 1 which codes for the first 24 amino terminal amino acids. Conclusions Our results show that fusion of the NUP98 and LEDGF genes is a new recurrent translocation in AML.

  8. Genomic Classification and Prognosis in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaemmanuil, Elli; Gerstung, Moritz; Bullinger, Lars; Gaidzik, Verena I; Paschka, Peter; Roberts, Nicola D; Potter, Nicola E; Heuser, Michael; Thol, Felicitas; Bolli, Niccolo; Gundem, Gunes; Van Loo, Peter; Martincorena, Inigo; Ganly, Peter; Mudie, Laura; McLaren, Stuart; O'Meara, Sarah; Raine, Keiran; Jones, David R; Teague, Jon W; Butler, Adam P; Greaves, Mel F; Ganser, Arnold; Döhner, Konstanze; Schlenk, Richard F; Döhner, Hartmut; Campbell, Peter J

    2016-06-09

    Recent studies have provided a detailed census of genes that are mutated in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Our next challenge is to understand how this genetic diversity defines the pathophysiology of AML and informs clinical practice. We enrolled a total of 1540 patients in three prospective trials of intensive therapy. Combining driver mutations in 111 cancer genes with cytogenetic and clinical data, we defined AML genomic subgroups and their relevance to clinical outcomes. We identified 5234 driver mutations across 76 genes or genomic regions, with 2 or more drivers identified in 86% of the patients. Patterns of co-mutation compartmentalized the cohort into 11 classes, each with distinct diagnostic features and clinical outcomes. In addition to currently defined AML subgroups, three heterogeneous genomic categories emerged: AML with mutations in genes encoding chromatin, RNA-splicing regulators, or both (in 18% of patients); AML with TP53 mutations, chromosomal aneuploidies, or both (in 13%); and, provisionally, AML with IDH2(R172) mutations (in 1%). Patients with chromatin-spliceosome and TP53-aneuploidy AML had poor outcomes, with the various class-defining mutations contributing independently and additively to the outcome. In addition to class-defining lesions, other co-occurring driver mutations also had a substantial effect on overall survival. The prognostic effects of individual mutations were often significantly altered by the presence or absence of other driver mutations. Such gene-gene interactions were especially pronounced for NPM1-mutated AML, in which patterns of co-mutation identified groups with a favorable or adverse prognosis. These predictions require validation in prospective clinical trials. The driver landscape in AML reveals distinct molecular subgroups that reflect discrete paths in the evolution of AML, informing disease classification and prognostic stratification. (Funded by the Wellcome Trust and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT

  9. Acute Myeloid Leukemia: analysis of epidemiological profile and survival rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Mariana Cardoso; da Silva, Denise Bousfield; Freund, Ana Paula Ferreira; Dacoregio, Juliana Shmitz; Costa, Tatiana El Jaick Bonifácio; Costa, Imaruí; Faraco, Daniel; Silva, Maurício Laerte

    2016-01-01

    To describe the epidemiological profile and the survival rate of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a state reference pediatric hospital. Clinical-epidemiological, observational, retrospective, descriptive study. The study included new cases of patients with AML, diagnosed between 2004 and 2012, younger than 15 years. Of the 51 patients studied, 84% were white; 45% were females and 55%, males. Regarding age, 8% were younger than 1 year, 47% were aged between 1 and 10 years, and 45% were older than 10 years. The main signs/symptoms were fever (41.1%), asthenia/lack of appetite (35.2%), and hemorrhagic manifestations (27.4%). The most affected extra-medullary site was the central nervous system (14%). In 47% of patients, the white blood cell (WBC) count was below 10,000/mm(3) at diagnosis. The minimal residual disease (MRD) was less than 0.1%, on the 15th day of treatment in 16% of the sample. Medullary relapse occurred in 14% of cases. When comparing the bone marrow MRD with the vital status, it was observed that 71.42% of the patients with type M3 AML were alive, as were 54.05% of those with non-M3 AML. The death rate was 43% and the main proximate cause was septic shock (63.6%). In this study, the majority of patients were male, white, and older than 1 year. Most patients with WBC count <10,000/mm(3) at diagnosis lived. Overall survival was higher in patients with MRD <0.1%. The prognosis was better in patients with AML-M3. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Andrographolide inhibits growth of acute promyelocytic leukaemia cells by inducing retinoic acid receptor-independent cell differentiation and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikam, Shiamala D; Manikam, Shiamala T; Stanslas, Johnson

    2009-01-01

    The growth inhibiting potential of andrographolide was evaluated in three acute promyelocytic leukaemia cell line models (HL-60, NB4 and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-resistant NB4-R2). In elucidating the mechanisms of growth inhibition, a special emphasis was placed on assessing the induction of differentiation and apoptosis by andrographolide in the primary acute promyelocytic leukaemia NB4 cells. The compound was 2- and 3-fold more active in inhibiting the growth of HL-60 and NB4-R2 cells compared with NB4 cells, respectively. At IC50 (concentration at which growth of 50% of the cells (compared with medium only treated control cells) is inhibited; 4.5 microM) the compound exhibited strong cell-differentiating activity in NB4 cells, similar to ATRA (IC50 1.5 microM). In the presence of a pure retinoic acid receptor antagonist AGN193109, the growth inhibition of NB4 cells by ATRA was reversed, whereas the activity of andrographolide was not affected. This clearly suggested that andrographolide's cell differentiating activity to induce growth inhibition of NB4 cells most likely occurred via a retinoic acid receptor-independent pathway. At higher concentration (2xIC50), andrographolide was an efficient inducer of apoptosis in NB4 cells. Taken together, these results suggest andrographolide and its derivatives, apparently with a novel cell differentiating mechanism and with ability to induce apoptosis, might be beneficial in the treatment of primary and ATRA-resistant acute promyelocytic leukaemia.

  11. Procoagulant activity of extracellular vesicles as a potential biomarker for risk of thrombosis and DIC in patients with acute leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheldof, Damien; Haguet, Hélène; Dogné, Jean-Michel; Bouvy, Céline; Graux, Carlos; George, Fabienne; Sonet, Anne; Chatelain, Christian; Chatelain, Bernard; Mullier, François

    2017-02-01

    Haemostatic complication is common for patients with hematologic malignancies. Recent studies suggest that the procoagulant activity (PCA) of extracellular vesicles (EV) may play a major role in venous thromboembolism and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) in acute leukaemia. To study the impact of EVs from leukaemic patients on thrombin generation and to assess EV-PCA as a potential biomarker for thrombotic complications in patients with acute leukaemia. Blood samples from a cohort of patients with newly diagnosed acute leukaemia were obtained before treatment (D-0), 3 and 7 days after treatment (D-3 and D-7). Extracellular vesicles were isolated and concentrated by ultracentrifugation. EV-PCA was assessed by thrombin generation assay, and EV-associated tissue factor activity was measured using a commercial bio-immunoassay (Zymuphen MP-TF®). Of the 53 patients, 6 had increased EV-PCA at D-0 and 4 had a thrombotic event. Patients without thrombotic events (n = 47) had no elevated EV-PCA. One patient had increased EVs with procoagulant activity at D-3 and developed a DIC at D-5. This patient had no increased EVs-related tissue factor activity from D-0 to D-7 (2 pg/ml), of these, four had a thrombosis and two had haemorrhages. Procoagulant activity of extracellular vesicles could have a predictive value in excluding the risk of thrombotic events. Our findings also suggest a possible association between thrombotic events and EV-PCA.

  12. Coffee and tea consumption and risk of leukaemia in an adult population: A reanalysis of the Italian multicentre case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, Stefano; Merlo, Domenico Franco; Stagnaro, Emanuele

    2017-04-01

    Coffee and tea are the most frequently consumed beverages in the world. Their potential effect on the risk of developing different types of malignancies has been largely investigated, but studies on leukaemia in adults are scarce. The present investigation is aimed at evaluating the potential role of regular coffee and tea intake on the risk of adult leukaemia by reanalysing a large population based case-control study carried out in Italy, a country with a high coffee consumption and a low use of green tea. Interviewed subjects, recruited between 1990 and 1993 in 11 Italian areas, included 1771 controls and 651 leukaemia cases. Association between Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML), Acute Lymphoid Leukaemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia, Chronic Lymphoid Leukaemia, and use of coffee and tea was evaluated by standard logistic regression. Odds Ratios (OR) were estimated adjusting for the following potential confounders: gender, age, residence area, smoking habit, educational level, previous chemotherapy treatment, alcohol consumption and exposure to electromagnetic fields, radiation, pesticides and aromatic hydrocarbons. No association was observed between regular use of coffee and any type of leukaemia. A small protective effect of tea intake was found among myeloid malignancies, which was more evident among AML (OR=0.68, 95%CI: 0.49-0.94). However, no clear dose-response relation was found. The lower risk of leukaemia among regular coffee consumers, reported by a few of previous small studies, was not confirmed. The protective effect of tea on the AML risk is only partly consistent with results from other investigations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Acute sinusitis and blindness as the first presentation of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim, K. H.; Thomas, G.; van Beers, E. J.; Hosman, A. E.; Mourits, M. P.; van Noesel, C. J. M.; Kater, A. P.; Reinartz, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is the most frequent form of leukaemia among adults in the Western world, presenting at a median age of 65 years. The diagnosis is usually made incidentally during routine blood examination while the disease is still in its early phase. We report a case of

  14. PERCENTAGE OF CIPROFLOXACIN-RESISTANT STRAINS OF CITROBACTER FREUNDII IN ACUTE LEUKAEMIA PATIENTS WITH CIPROFLOXACIN PROPHYLAXIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rika Strauch

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Authors tried to determine an efficiency of ciprofloxacin as infection prophylaxis in patients with acute leukaemia treated at the Department of Haematology in Clinical Center of Ljubljana. Due to cytotoxic chemotherapy, aplasia of bone marrow is inevitable. Therefore, these patients are at high risk for bacterial and fungal infection. The authors have noticed a rise in the number of ciprofloxacin-resistant strains of Citrobacter freundii and decided to find out if ciprofloxacin is still usable in this setting.Patients and methods. 45 patients with acute leukaemia were admitted to the Department of Haematology in the Clinical Center of Ljubljana during the year 2001 and 2002. All the patients received ciprofloxacin 2 × 500 mg on a daily basis. Citrobacter freundii was isolated in 11 patients, to whom we determined the proportion of ciprofloxacin-resistant strains of Citrobacter freundii and other Enterobacteriaceae. Susceptibility testing was done by the NCCCLS standards by the disc diffusion method and minimal inhibitory concentration.Results. C. freundii was isolated in 11 patients with AL. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL C. freundii was isolated in 6 patients (54.5%. Ciprofloxacin-resistant C. freundii was isolated in 6 patients (54.5%. Six patients (54.5% had ciprofloxacin-resistant C. freundii which was ESBL positive at the same time. In AL patients with C. freundii (n = 11 almost half of isolated bacteria were Gram negative bacilli (45.2%, n = 292, mostly from the family of Enterobacteriaceae. More than half of enterobacteria were ciprofloxacin-resistant, one third of them were also ESBL positive. Out of 131 enterobacteria, C. freundii was isolated 37 times. (28.2%.Conclusions. C. freundii was isolated in one fourth of AL patients. Half of the isolates were ciprofloxacin-resistant. The same was true for isolated enterobacteria. Almost all of ciprofloxacin-resistant bacteria were ESBL positive. There is a question

  15. Effect of central nervous system radiotherapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia on lymphocyte subpopulations and indicators of leucocyte migration inhibition in the peripheral blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesarz-Kruz, E.; Lukas, A; Sroczynska, M.; Lukas, W; Sonta-Jakimczyk, D.

    1981-01-01

    The reported investigations of changes in lymphocyte subpopulations and indicators of leycocyte migration inhibition in the peripheral blood were carried out in 17 children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia subjected to prophylactic irradiation of the central nervous system. It was found that the depressive effect of radioprophylaxis affected mostly lymphocytes B. The usefulness of immunomodulation application in children with this leukaemia immediately after completion of radiotherapy is considered. (author)

  16. Pubertal development and fertility in survivors of childhood acute myeloid leukemia treated with chemotherapy only

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molgaard-Hansen, Lene; Skou, Anne-Sofie; Juul, Anders

    2013-01-01

    More than 60% of children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) become long-term survivors. Most are cured using chemotherapy without hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We report on pubertal development and compare self-reported parenthood among AML survivors and their siblings.......More than 60% of children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) become long-term survivors. Most are cured using chemotherapy without hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We report on pubertal development and compare self-reported parenthood among AML survivors and their siblings....

  17. Molecular and cytogenetic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia: review and case studies

    OpenAIRE

    Velloso,Elvira Deolinda Rodrigues Pereira; Motta,Carlos Henrique Ares Silveira da; Furtado,Juliana Braga; Bacal,Nydia Strachman; Silveira,Paulo Augusto Achucarro; Moyses,Cynthia Bachir; Sitnik,Roberta; Pinho,João Renato Rebello

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the frequency of mutations that may lead to a good or bad prognosis, as well as their relation with the karyotype and immunophenotype in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Methods: Thirty samples of patients with acute myeloid leukemia were studied, in which FLT3-ITD, FLT3-TKD and NPM1 mutations were investigated. All samples were submitted to immunophenotyping and 25 to karyotyping. Results: An occurrence of 33.3% NPM1 mutation and an equal number of FLT3-ITD mutatio...

  18. Molecular response to imatinib & its correlation with mRNA expression levels of imatinib influx & efflux transporters in patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia in chronic phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant Malhotra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Imatinib is the standard first-line treatment for chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML patients. About 20 to 30 per cent patients develop resistance to imatinib and fail imatinib treatment. One of the mechanisms proposed is varying expression levels of the drug transporters. This study was aimed to determine the expression levels of imatinib transporter genes (OCT1, ABCB1, ABCG2 in CML patients and to correlate these levels with molecular response. Methods: Sixty three CML chronic phase patients who were on 400 mg/day imatinib for more than two years were considered for gene expression analysis study for OCT1, ABCB1 and ABCG2 genes. These were divided into responders and non-responders. The relative transcript expression levels of the three genes were compared between these two categories. The association between the expression values of these three genes was also determined. Results: No significant difference in the expression levels of OCT1, ABCB1 and ABCG2 was found between the two categories. The median transcript expression levels of OCT1, ABCB1 and ABCG2 genes in responders were 26.54, 10.78 and 0.64 versus 33.48, 7.09 and 0.53 in non-responders, respectively. A positive association was observed between the expression of the ABCB1 and ABCG2 transporter genes (r=0.407, P<0.05 while no association was observed between the expression of either of the ABC transporter genes with the OCT1 gene. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings demonstrated that the mRNA expression levels of imatinib transporter genes were not correlated with molecular response in CML patients. Further studies need to be done on a large sample of CML patients to confirm these findings.

  19. Updated estimates of survival and cost effectiveness for imatinib versus interferon-alpha plus low-dose cytarabine for newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Shelby D; Anstrom, Kevin J; Li, Yanhong; Schulman, Kevin A

    2008-01-01

    For trials in which participants are followed beyond the main study period to assess long-term outcomes, economic evaluations conducted using short-term data should be systematically updated to reflect new information. We used 60-month survival data from the IRIS (International Randomized study of Interferon vs STI571) trial to update previously published cost-effectiveness estimates, based on 19 months of follow-up, of imatinib versus interferon (IFN)-alpha plus low-dose cytarabine in patients with chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukaemia. For patients treated with imatinib, we used the 60-month data to calibrate the survival curves generated from the original cost-effectiveness model. We used historical data to model survival for patients randomized to IFNalpha. We updated costs for medical resources using 2006 Medicare reimbursement rates and applied average wholesale prices (AWPs) and wholesale acquisition costs (WACs) to study medications. Five-year survival for patients randomized to imatinib was better than predicted in the original model (89.4% vs 83.2%). We estimated remaining life expectancy with first-line imatinib to be 19.1 life-years (3.8 life-years over the original model) and 15.2 QALYs (3.1 QALYs over the original estimate). Estimates for IFNalpha remained at 9.1 life-years and 6.3 QALYs. When we applied AWPs to study medications, incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were $US 51,800-57,500 per QALY. When we applied WACs, ICERs were $US 42,000-46,200 per QALY. Although the analysis revealed that the original survival estimates were conservative, the updated cost-effectiveness ratios were consistent with, or slightly higher than, the original estimates, depending on the method for assigning costs to study medications.

  20. Evaluation of minimal residual disease in patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia on IFN-alpha 2b therapy using conventional cytogenetics and fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talwar, Rashmi; Choudhry, V P; Jobanputra, Vaidehi; Kucheria, Kiran

    2002-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) is a haematopoietic malignancy characterized by the presence of the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome that results from balanced reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22 leading to the formation of the bcr/abl fusion gene. Studies have shown that interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) therapy induces both cytogenetic (reduction in Ph+ cells) and molecular response (reduction in the bcr/abl positive cells) in a large proportion of patients, thereby improving their prognosis and survival. There are no reports available from India on the clinical management of CML patients using IFN-alpha therapy and molecular methods for the evaluation of residual disease. We evaluated the efficacy of IFN-alpha 2b therapy bysequential cytogenetic and molecularanalysis. Karyotypingwas done from G-banded metaphases obtained from 24-hour culture of bone marrow aspirates of 45 patients. Cytogenetic analysis was repeated at intervals of 4-6 months during the course of IFN-alpha therapy. Dual-colour fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis using specific probes for bcr and abl genes was done to assess the molecular response. Eight patients achieved complete cytogenetic response with no Ph+ cells. Using FISH analysis, 4 of these patients were negative for the fusion gene implying a complete response, while the remaining 4 patients showed bcr/abl fusion signals that represent residual disease. Our study emphasizes the need for sequential cytogenetic and molecular analysis in the management of patients with CML and for the evaluation of minimal residual disease in patients on IFN-alpha therapy.

  1. Increased megakaryocytic proliferation, pro-platelet deposition and expression of fibrosis-associated factors in children with chronic myeloid leukaemia with bone marrow fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, K; Stucki-Koch, A; Göhring, G; Kreipe, H; Suttorp, M

    2017-07-01

    Paediatric chronic myeloid leukaemia (ped-CML) is rare and ped-CML with fibre accumulation in the bone marrow (MF) is thought to be even rarer. In adults (ad-CML), fibrosis represents an adverse prognostic factor. So far, the pro-fibrotic changes in the bone marrow microenvironment have not been investigated in detail in ped-CML. From a total of 66 ped-CML in chronic phase, biopsies were analysable and 10 had MF1/2 (MF1, n=8/10; MF2, n=2/10). We randomly selected 16 ped-CML and 16 ad-CML cases with and without fibrosis (each n=8) as well as 18 non-neoplastic controls. Bone marrow samples were analysed with a real-time PCR-based assay (including 127 genes for paediatric cases) and by immunohistochemistry. We found increased expression of megakaryocytic genes in ped-CML. The number of megakaryocytes and pro-platelets are increased in CML patients, but the most significant increase was noted for ped-CML-MF1/2. Anti-fibrotic MMP9 expression was lower in children than in adults. Cell mobilisation-related CXCL12 was decreased in young and adult patients with CML but not the corresponding receptor CXCR4. In summary, fibre accumulation in ped-CML-MF1/2 is associated with increased megakaryocytic proliferation and increased interstitial pro-platelet deposition. Deregulated expression of matrix-modulating factors shifts the bone marrow microenvironment towards fibrosis.

  2. Inhibition of protein kinase CK2 by CX-5011 counteracts imatinib-resistance preventing rpS6 phosphorylation in chronic myeloid leukaemia cells: new combined therapeutic strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salizzato, Valentina; Borgo, Christian; Cesaro, Luca; Pinna, Lorenzo A.; Donella-Deana, Arianna

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder promoted by the constitutive tyrosine kinase activity of Bcr-Abl oncoprotein. Although treatment with the Bcr-Abl-inhibitor imatinib represents the first-line therapy against CML, almost 20-30% of patients develop chemotherapeutic resistance and require alternative therapy. Here we show that a strong hyper-phosphorylation/activation of ERK1/2, Akt Ser473, and 40S ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) is detectable in imatinib-resistant KCL22 and K562 CML cells as compared to the -sensitive cell variants. In imatinib-resistant CML cells, high concentration of imatinib is required to strongly inhibit Bcr-Abl, ERK1/2 and Akt Ser473 phosphorylation, but under these conditions the phosphorylation of rpS6, a common downstream effector of MEK/ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathways is only slightly reduced. By contrast, down-regulation of the protein kinase CK2 by the inhibitor CX-5011 or by silencing the CK2 subunits does not affect the activation state of MEK/ERK1/2 or PI3K/Akt/mTOR signalling, but causes a drop in rpS6 phosphorylation in parallel with reduced protein synthesis. CK2-inhibition by CX-5011 induces cell death by apoptosis and acts synergistically with imatinib or the MEK-inhibitor U0126 in reducing the viability of imatinib-resistant CML cells. The ternary mixture containing CX-5011, imatinib and U0126 represents the most effective synergistic combination to counteract CML cell viability. These results disclose a novel CK2-mediated mechanism of acquired imatinib-resistance resulting in hyper-phosphorylation of rpS6. We suggest that co-targeting CK2 and MEK protein kinases is a promising strategy to restore responsiveness of resistant CML cells to imatinib. PMID:26919095

  3. Dose-adjusted arsenic trioxide for acute promyelocytic leukaemia in chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firkin, Frank; Roncolato, Fernando; Ho, Wai Khoon

    2015-10-01

    To determine the potential for arsenic trioxide (ATO) to be safely and effectively incorporated into induction therapy of newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) in patients with severe chronic renal failure (CRF) by reduction of the ATO dosage to compensate for reduced renal elimination of arsenic in CRF. Two of the four CRF patients with APL in the study were dialysis-dependent, and two had eGFRs of 18 and 19 mL/min/1.73 m(2) . ATO dosage schedules were adjusted to obtain comparable whole-blood arsenic levels to those in APL patients with normal renal function who achieved molecular remission (MR) while receiving 10 mg ATO daily for 28 d. Average ATO administered per day in CRF patients ranged from 36 to 50% of the ATO administered to APL patients with normal renal function. No clinically significant cardiac, hepatic or other toxicities were detected. RT-PCR-negative MR was achieved after one treatment course in two patients and after two courses in the others. Relapse-free survival is 155, 60, 43 and 5 months. The observations in this pilot study have demonstrated whole-blood arsenic levels can provide a guide to adjustments of ATO dosage schedules that permit safe and effective therapeutic outcomes in APL patients with severely compromised renal function. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Immunoglobulin genes and T-cell receptors as molecular markers in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazić Jelena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL is a malignant clonal disease, one of the most common malignancies in childhood. Contemporary protocols ensure high remission rate and long term free survival. The ability of molecular genetic methods help to establish submicroscopic classification and minimal residual disease (MRD follow up, in major percent responsible for relapse. Objective. The aim of the study was to detect the frequency of IgH and TCR gene rearrangements and their correlation with clinical parameters. Methods. Forty-one children with ALL were enrolled in the study group, with initial diagnosis of IgH and TCR gene rearrangements by polimerase chain reaction ( PCR. MRD follow-up was performed in induction phase when morphological remission was expected, and after intensive chemiotherapy. Results. In the study group IgH rearrangement was detected in 82.9% of children at the diagnosis, while TCR rearrangement was seen in 56.1%. On induction day 33, clonal IgH rearrangements persisted in 39% and TCR rearrangements in 36.5% of children. Conclusion. Molecular analysis of genetic alterations and their correlation with standard prognostic parameters show the importance of risk stratification revision which leads to new therapy intensification approach. MRD stands out as a precise predictive factor for the relapse of disease.

  5. The effect of game-based exercise on infant acute lymphocytic leukaemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Édgar Cortés Reyes

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To establish the effect of a game-based exercise programme on Physical Deconditioning Syndrome (PDS in 5 to 12 year-old children suffering Acute Lymphocytic Leukaemia (ALL. Materials and methods. This was a quasi-experimental study involving seven children being treated for ALL at the National Cancer Institute (NCI in Bogotá, Colombia. Fitness determinants (aerobic capacity, muscle strength, flexibility, motor skills and proprioception were initially assessed to establish their exercise regime category, classifying subjects into three levels. Post-intervention assessment at the end of the programme verified changes in such determinants. Results. Seven children aged 5 to 12 years-old (9±2.13 years suffering from ALL (4 girls and 3 boys met the inclusion criteria. Most determinants underwent changes leading to an increase in patients’ evaluation scores (except for muscle strength, which remained constant. Whilst determinant variation was important, a greater difference was found when the overall score was analysed (p=0.05, signifying that the intervention had changed these children’s health status. Conclusion. Game-based exercise was useful for managing PDS in 5 to12 year-old ALL patients and suggested new ways of providing an intervention concerning physical therapy. However, studies involving a larger target population and longer intervention time are needed to identify new findings in this field.

  6. Identification of Arsenic Direct-Binding Proteins in Acute Promyelocytic Leukaemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The identification of arsenic direct-binding proteins is essential for determining the mechanism by which arsenic trioxide achieves its chemotherapeutic effects. At least two cysteines close together in the amino acid sequence are crucial to the binding of arsenic and essential to the identification of arsenic-binding proteins. In the present study, arsenic binding proteins were pulled down with streptavidin and identified using a liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer (LC-MS/MS. More than 40 arsenic-binding proteins were separated, and redox-related proteins, glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1, heat shock 70 kDa protein 9 (HSPA9 and pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2, were further studied using binding assays in vitro. Notably, PKM2 has a high affinity for arsenic. In contrast to PKM2, GSTP1and HSPA9 did not combine with arsenic directly in vitro. These observations suggest that arsenic-mediated acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL suppressive effects involve PKM2. In summary, we identified several arsenic binding proteins in APL cells and investigated the therapeutic mechanisms of arsenic trioxide for APL. Further investigation into specific signal pathways by which PKM2 mediates APL developments may lead to a better understanding of arsenic effects on APL.

  7. Family circumstances and survival from childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in West Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Friederike; Kaatsch, Peter; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-04-01

    Little is known about the relationship between family characteristics and survival from childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), which we studied for the first time in German children. ALL cases were diagnosed between 1992 and 1994 and information on family characteristics was collected during a previously conducted nationwide case-control study. Children were followed for 10 years after diagnosis, as few disease-related events occur afterwards. Cox proportional hazards models estimating hazard ratios (HR) were calculated using overall as well as event-free survival methods. Second born children showed statistically significant better survival compared to first or later born children, with HRs ranging between 0.54 and 0.64 compared to firstborns. Somewhat poorer survival was observed for children having 3 or more siblings. A relationship was found for parental age at child's diagnosis, with poorer survival for children with younger parents (≤25 years of age at child's diagnosis), or with older fathers. The HR was statistically significant for fathers being ≥41years of age (HR of 2.1). No relationship between degree of urbanization of the place of residence at diagnosis and ALL survival was observed. Family circumstances may have an impact on survival from childhood ALL in Germany. Further research is warranted to elaborate the relationship of specific family characteristics and ALL survival and to investigate possible differential adherence to therapy and interactions with physicians. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Osteonecrosis following treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: The Southampton Children's Hospital experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, A; Gray, J; Harvey, N; Davies, J H; Oreffo, R O C; Reading, I; Clarke, N M P; Aarvold, A

    2017-12-01

    To determine the prevalence of osteonecrosis (ON) in children following treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), characterise these cases and review treatment methods. All children diagnosed and treated for ALL between 01 January 2003 and 31 December 2013 at our centre were retrospectively reviewed. Logistic regression was used to investigate risk factors for ON occurrence. Of 235 children treated for ALL, 48/235 (20.4%) children suffered musculoskeletal symptoms necessitating radiological investigation. A total of 13 (5.5%) had MRI-diagnosed ON, with a median diagnosis time of 12 months (interquartile range 10 to 14) following initiation of chemotherapy.ON affected 40 joints in 13 children. The most commonly involved joints were hips (14 joints in eight patients) and knees (12 joints in seven patients).Older age at ALL diagnosis was associated with significantly increased risk of development of ON per year (odds ratio 1.35, 95% confidence interval 1.17 to 1.57, p < 0.001).Eight children underwent at least one surgical intervention. Joint arthroplasty was undertaken in nine joints of four children at a mean age of 18.3 years. All patients who underwent hip arthroplasty had previously received core decompression, with a mean time of 27.8 months (18 to 33) between treatments. ON is a significant complication of ALL treatment. Our results suggest risk stratification for development of ON by age, and targeted monitoring of high-risk joints is possible. ON treatment is varied with little evidence base.

  9. Targeting oncogenic interleukin-7 receptor signalling with N-acetylcysteine in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Marc R; Reed, Casie; Eisenberg, Amy R; Tseng, Jen-Chieh; Twizere, Jean-Claude; Daakour, Sarah; Yoda, Akinori; Rodig, Scott J; Tal, Noa; Shochat, Chen; Berezovskaya, Alla; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Sallan, Stephen E; Weinstock, David M; Izraeli, Shai; Kung, Andrew L; Kentsis, Alex; Look, A Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Activating mutations of the interleukin-7 receptor (IL7R) occur in approximately 10% of patients with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL). Most mutations generate a cysteine at the transmembrane domain leading to receptor homodimerization through disulfide bond formation and ligand-independent activation of STAT5. We hypothesized that the reducing agent N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a well-tolerated drug used widely in clinical practice to treat acetaminophen overdose, would reduce disulfide bond formation, and inhibit mutant IL7R-mediated oncogenic signalling. We found that treatment with NAC disrupted IL7R homodimerization in IL7R-mutant DND-41 cells as assessed by non-reducing Western blot, as well as in a luciferase complementation assay. NAC led to STAT5 dephosphorylation and cell apoptosis at clinically achievable concentrations in DND-41 cells, and Ba/F3 cells transformed by an IL7R-mutant construct containing a cysteine insertion. The apoptotic effects of NAC could be rescued in part by a constitutively active allele of STAT5. Despite using doses lower than those tolerated in humans, NAC treatment significantly inhibited the progression of human DND-41 cells engrafted in immunodeficient mice. Thus, targeting leukaemogenic IL7R homodimerization with NAC offers a potentially effective and feasible therapeutic strategy that warrants testing in patients with T-ALL. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Current challenges and opportunities in treating adult patients with Philadelphia-negative acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolach, Ofir; Amitai, Irina; DeAngelo, Daniel J

    2017-12-01

    Significant advances have been made in recent years in the field of Philadelphia-negative acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). New insights into the biology and genetics of ALL as well as novel clinical observations and new drugs are changing the way we diagnose, risk-stratify and treat adult patients with ALL. New genetic subtypes and alterations refine risk stratification and uncover new actionable therapeutic targets. The incorporation of more intensive, paediatric and paediatric-inspired approaches for young adults seem to have a positive impact on survival in this population. Minimal residual disease at different time points can assist in tailoring risk-adapted interventions for patients based on individual response. Finally, novel targeted approaches with monoclonal antibodies, immunotherapies and small molecules are moving through clinical development and entering the clinic. The aim of this review is to consolidate the abundance of emerging data and to review and revisit the concepts of risk-stratification, choice of induction and post-remission strategies as well as to discuss and update the approach to specific populations with ALL, such as young adult, elderly/unfit and relapsed/refractory patients with ALL. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. A study on the predictability of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia response to treatment using a hybrid oncosimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounoglou, Eleftherios; Kolokotroni, Eleni; Stanulla, Martin; Stamatakos, Georgios S

    2018-02-06

    Efficient use of Virtual Physiological Human (VPH)-type models for personalized treatment response prediction purposes requires a precise model parameterization. In the case where the available personalized data are not sufficient to fully determine the parameter values, an appropriate prediction task may be followed. This study, a hybrid combination of computational optimization and machine learning methods with an already developed mechanistic model called the acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) Oncosimulator which simulates ALL progression and treatment response is presented. These methods are used in order for the parameters of the model to be estimated for retrospective cases and to be predicted for prospective ones. The parameter value prediction is based on a regression model trained on retrospective cases. The proposed Hybrid ALL Oncosimulator system has been evaluated when predicting the pre-phase treatment outcome in ALL. This has been correctly achieved for a significant percentage of patient cases tested (approx. 70% of patients). Moreover, the system is capable of denying the classification of cases for which the results are not trustworthy enough. In that case, potentially misleading predictions for a number of patients are avoided, while the classification accuracy for the remaining patient cases further increases. The results obtained are particularly encouraging regarding the soundness of the proposed methodologies and their relevance to the process of achieving clinical applicability of the proposed Hybrid ALL Oncosimulator system and VPH models in general.

  12. Developing "Care Assistant": A smartphone application to support caregivers of children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingting; Yao, Nengliang; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Fen; Liu, Yanyan; Geng, Zhaohui; Yuan, Changrong

    2016-04-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy. Caring for children with ALL is an uncommon experience for parents without medical training. They urgently need professional assistance when their children are recovering at home. This paper documents the process of developing an Android application (app) "Care Assistant" for family caregivers of children with ALL. Key informant interviews and focus group studies were used before programming the app. The key informants and focus group members included: caregivers of children with ALL, cancer care physicians and nurses, and software engineers. We found several major challenges faced by caregivers: limited access to evidence-based clinic information, lack of financial and social assistance, deficient communications with doctors or nurses, lack of disease-related knowledge, and inconvenience of tracking treatments and testing results. This feedback was used to develop "Care Assistant". This app has eight modules: personal information, treatment tracking, family care, financial and social assistance, knowledge centre, self-assessment questionnaires, interactive platform, and reminders. We have also developed a web-based administration portal to manage the app. The usability and effectiveness of "Care Assistant" will be evaluated in future studies. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Leukaemia in childhood | Kruger | Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leukaemia means white blood. It is a disease of the white blood cells and was first described by Virchow in 1845.1 Leukaemia can present as an acute disease, occurring more often in the younger age groups, or as a chronic disease, usually in the older age group. Acute leukaemia is rare, but about 1 in 2 000 people will ...

  14. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-05

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Erythroid Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Blasts Under 10 Percent of Bone Marrow Nucleated Cells; Blasts Under 5 Percent of Bone Marrow Nucleated Cells; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Pancytopenia; Refractory Anemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Behandling af akut myeloid leukæmi uden transfusion af blodprodukter hos et medlem af Jehovas Vidner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Christian; Jensen, Morten Krogh

    2011-01-01

    We present a case in which a young woman was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia, FAB-classification type M2. As a member of Jehovah's Witnesses she refused to accept any treatment involving blood transfusions. A modified induction and consolidation chemotherapy regimen was applied, tailored...

  16. Characterization of miRNomes in acute and chronic myeloid leukemia cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Qian; Yang, Yadong; Wang, Hai; Li, Jie; Wang, Shaobin; Li, Yanming; Yang, Yaran; Cai, Kan; Ruan, Xiuyan; Yan, Jiangwei; Hu, Songnian; Fang, Xiangdong

    2014-04-01

    Myeloid leukemias are highly diverse diseases and have been shown to be associated with microRNA (miRNA) expression aberrations. The present study involved an in-depth miRNome analysis of two human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines, HL-60 and THP-1, and one human chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cell line, K562, via massively parallel signature sequencing. mRNA expression profiles of these cell lines that were established previously in our lab facilitated an integrative analysis of miRNA and mRNA expression patterns. miRNA expression profiling followed by differential expression analysis and target prediction suggested numerous miRNA signatures in AML and CML cell lines. Some miRNAs may act as either tumor suppressors or oncomiRs in AML and CML by targeting key genes in AML and CML pathways. Expression patterns of cell type-specific miRNAs could partially reflect the characteristics of K562, HL-60 and THP-1 cell lines, such as actin filament-based processes, responsiveness to stimulus and phagocytic activity. miRNAs may also regulate myeloid differentiation, since they usually suppress differentiation regulators. Our study provides a resource to further investigate the employment of miRNAs in human leukemia subtyping, leukemogenesis and myeloid development. In addition, the distinctive miRNA signatures may be potential candidates for the clinical diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of myeloid leukemias. Copyright © 2014. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Identification of the translocation t(15;17) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) initially classified as FAB M1: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braham Jmili, N; Omri, H; Senana Sendi, H; Fekih, S; Hizem, S; Sriha, B; Khelif, A; Saad, A; Kortas, M

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of a patient aged about 53 years, who initially presented with hematological disorders (WBC: 44000/mm3, Hb: 11g/dl, Pit: 127000/mm3) without tumoral syndrome. The Wright-Giemsa stained bone marrow and peripheral blood smears showed a population of blast cells characterized by cells with high N/C and strongly basophilic cytoplasm without granules. The nuclei were predominantly round. Nuclear chromatin was fine and contained small nucleoli. Cytochemisty was positive for peroxidase activity. Immunophenotyping showed myeloid typical markers of granulocytic lineage (MP0+, CD13+, CD33+, CD117+, CD34-). The karyotype revealed the expression of t(15;17) chromosomal translocation. The diagnosis of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) was then evoked initially. The cytological features corresponded closely to the M1 subtype as defined in the FAB classification. The patient was treated with induction therapy according to the 7/3 protocol. One month later, he was discharged from hospital on hematological and cytogenetic remission. He died at home because of a heart attack. From the biological findings the patient was retrospectively diagnosed as having promyelocytic leukemia (hyperbasophilic form).

  18. Homeobox gene expression in acute myeloid leukemia is linked to typical underlying molecular aberrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.S. Kramarzova (Karolina Skvarova); K. Fiser (Karel); E. Mejstříková (Ester); K. Rejlova (Katerina); M. Zaliova (Marketa); M.W.J. Fornerod (Maarten); H.A. Drabkin (Harry); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry); J. Stary (Jan); J. Trka (Jan); J. Starkova (Julia)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Background:__ Although distinct patterns of homeobox (HOX) gene expression have been described in defined cytogenetic and molecular subsets of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), it is unknown whether these patterns are the direct result of transcriptional alterations or

  19. C/EBPγ deregulation results in differentiation arrest in acute myeloid leukemia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alberich-Jorda, M.; Wouters, B.; Balaštík, Martin; Shapiro-Koss, C.; Zhang, H.; DiRuscio, A.; Radomska, H.S.; Ebralidze, A.K.; Amabile, G.; Ye, M.; Zhang, J.Y.; Lowers, I.; Avellino, R.; Melcnick, A.; Figueroa, M.E.; Valk, P.J.M.; Delwel, R.; Tenen, D.G.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 12 (2012), s. 4490-4504 ISSN 0021-9738 Grant - others:NIH(US) CA118316; NIH(US) HL56745 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : C/EBP transcription factor * acute myeloid leukemia * differentiation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 12.812, year: 2012

  20. Monosomal karyotype in acute myeloid leukemia: A better indicator of poor prognosis than a complex karyotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breems, Dimitri A.; van Putten, Wim L. J.; de Greef, Georgine E.; van Zelderen-Bhola, Shama L.; Gerssen-Schoorl, Klasien B. J.; Mellink, Clemens H. M.; Nieuwint, Aggie; Jotterand, Martine; Hagemeijer, Anne; Beverloo, H. Berna; Lowenberg, Bob

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the prognostic value of various cytogenetic components of a complex karyotype in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Patients and Methods Cytogenetics and overall survival (OS) were analyzed in 1,975 AML patients age 15 to 60 years. Results Besides AML with normal cytogenetics (CN)

  1. Evaluation of gene expression signatures predictive of cytogenetic and molecular subtypes of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balgobind, Brian V.; Van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; De Menezes, Renee X.; Reinhardt, Dirk; Hollink, Iris H. I. M.; Arentsen-Peters, Susan T. J. C. M.; van Wering, Elisabeth R.; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.; Cloos, Jacqueline; de Bont, Evelien S. J. M.; Cayuela, Jean-Michel; Baruchel, Andre; Meyer, Claus; Marschalek, Rolf; Trka, Jan; Stary, Jan; Beverloo, H. Berna; Pieters, Rob; Zwaan, C. Michel; den Boer, Monique L.

    Background Pediatric acute myeloid leukemia is a heterogeneous disease characterized by non-random genetic aberrations related to outcome. The genetic subtype is currently detected by different diagnostic procedures which differ in success rate and/or specificity. Design and Methods We examined the

  2. Evaluation of gene expression signatures predictive of cytogenetic and molecular subtypes of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.V. Balgobind (Brian); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry); R.X. de Menezes (Renee); D. Reinhardt (Dirk); I.H.I.M. Hollink (Iris); S.T.C.J.M. Arentsen-Peters (Susan); E.R. van Wering (Elisabeth); G.J. Kaspers (Gertjan); J. Cloos (Jacqueline); E.S.J.M. de Bont (Eveline); J.M. Cayuela (Jean Michel); A. Baruchel (André); C. Meyer (Claus); R. Marschalek (Rolf); J. Trka (Jan); J. Stary (Jan); H.B. Beverloo (Berna); R. Pieters (Rob); C.M. Zwaan (Christian Michel); M.L. den Boer (Monique)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground Pediatric acute myeloid leukemia is a heterogeneous disease characterized by non-random genetic aberrations related to outcome. The genetic subtype is currently detected by different diagnostic procedures which differ in success rate and/or specificity. Design and Methods We

  3. EVI1 overexpression in distinct subtypes of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balgobind, B. V.; Lugthart, S.; Hollink, I. H.; Arentsen-Peters, S. T. J. C. M.; van Wering, E. R.; Reinhardt, D.; Creutzig, U.; Kaspers, G. J. L.; de Bont, E. S. J. M.; Stary, J.; Trka, J.; Zimmermann, M.; Beverloo, H. B.; Pieters, R.; Delwel, R.; Zwaan, C. M.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M. M.

    Overexpression of the ecotropic virus integration-1 (EVI1) gene (EVI1+), localized at chromosome 3q26, is associated with adverse outcome in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In pediatric AML, 3q26 abnormalities are rare, and the role of EVI1 is unknown. We studied 228 pediatric AML samples for

  4. Treatment-related Myelodysplastic Syndrome in a Child With Acute Myeloid Leukemia and TPMT Heterozygosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensman, Lars M; Kjeldsen, Eigil; Nersting, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We describe a patient diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and low activity of thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) who developed secondary myelodysplastic syndrome after treatment. OBSERVATION: A 10-year-old boy presented with AML-M2 with t(8;21)(q22;q22) and genotyping...

  5. Sox4 is a key oncogenic target in C/EBP alpha mutant acute myeloid leukemia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zhang, H.; Alberich-Jorda, Meritxell; Amabile, G.; Yang, H.; Staber, P.B.; DiRuscio, A.; Welner, R.S.; Ebralidze, A.; Zhang, J.; Levantini, E.; Lefebvre, V.; Valk, P.J.; Delwel, R.; Hoogenkamp, M.; Nerlov, C.; Cammenga, J.; Saez, B.; Scadden, D.T.; Bonifer, C.; Ye, M.; Tenen, D.G.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 5 (2013), s. 575-588 ISSN 1535-6108 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LK21307 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Sox4 * C/EBP alpha * acute myeloid leukemia Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 23.893, year: 2013

  6. Quality of health in survivors of childhood acute myeloid leukemia treated with chemotherapy only

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molgaard-Hansen, Lene; Glosli, Heidi; Jahnukainen, Kirsi

    2011-01-01

    More than 60% of children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) become long-term survivors, and approximately 50% are cured with chemotherapy only. Limited data exist about their long-term morbidity and social outcomes. The aim of the study was to compare the self-reported use of health care services...

  7. Inhibition of autophagy as a treatment strategy for p53 wild-type acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folkerts, Hendrik; Hilgendorf, Susan; Wierenga, Albertus T J; Jaques, Jennifer; Mulder, André B; Coffer, Paul J; Schuringa, Jan Jacob; Vellenga, Edo

    2017-01-01

    Here we have explored whether inhibition of autophagy can be used as a treatment strategy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Steady-state autophagy was measured in leukemic cell lines and primary human CD34(+) AML cells with a large variability in basal autophagy between AMLs observed. The autophagy

  8. Pretransplant HLA mistyping in diagnostic samples of acute myeloid leukemia patients due to acquired uniparental disomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubois, V.; Sloan-Bena, F.; Cesbron, A.; Hepkema, B. G.; Gagne, K.; Gimelli, S.; Heim, D.; Tichelli, A.; Delaunay, J.; Drouet, M.; Jendly, S.; Villard, J.; Tiercy, J-M

    Although acquired uniparental disomy (aUPD) has been reported in relapse acute myeloid leukemia (AML), pretransplant aUPD involving chromosome 6 is poorly documented. Such events could be of interest because loss of heterozygosity (LOH) resulting from aUPD in leukemic cells may lead to erroneous

  9. C/EBPγ deregulation results in differentiation arrest in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Alberich-Jorda (Meritxell); B.J. Wouters (Bas); M. Balastik (Martin); C. Shapiro-Koss (Clara); H. Zhang (Hong); A. DiRuscio (Annalisa); H.S. Radomska (Hanna); A. Ebralidze (Alexander); G. Amabile (Giovanni); M. Ye (Min); J. Zhang (Junyan); I. Lowers (Irene); R. Avellino (Roberto); A. Melnick (Ari); M.E. Figueroa (Maria Eugenia); P.J.M. Valk (Peter); H.R. Delwel (Ruud); D.G. Tenen (Daniel)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractC/EBPs are a family of transcription factors that regulate growth control and differentiation of various tissues. We found that C/EBPγ is highly upregulated in a subset of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples characterized by C/EBPα hypermethylation/silencing. Similarly, C/EBPγ was

  10. Single institute study of FLT3 mutation in acute myeloid leukemia ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    FLT3/ITD mutation; p53 tumor suppressor gene; NRAS gene; acute myeloid leukemia (AML); tetraploidy/near-tetraploidy; human genetics. ... Institute of Hematology, Medical School, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia; Institute of Molecular Genetics and Genetic Engineering, Medical School, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia; Institute of ...

  11. Classification of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia based on miRNA expression profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Obulkasim (Askar); J.E. Katsman-Kuipers (Jenny); P. Verboon (Peter); M.A. Sanders (Mathijs); I.P. Touw (Ivo); M. Jongen-Lavrencic (Mojca); R. Pieters (Rob); J.-H. Klusmann; C.M. Zwaan (Christian Michel); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry); M.W.J. Fornerod (Maarten)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractPediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease with respect to biology as well as outcome. In this study, we investigated whether known biological subgroups of pediatric AML are reflected by a common microRNA (miRNA) expression pattern. We assayed 665 miRNAs on 165

  12. A comparison of surface marker analysis and FAB classification in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Reijden, H. J.; van Rhenen, D. J.; Lansdorp, P. M.; van't Veer, M. B.; Langenhuijsen, M. M.; Engelfriet, C. P.; von dem Borne, A. E.

    1983-01-01

    Surface marker analysis with rosette tests and a large panel of xenoantisera and monoclonal antibodies was done on the malignant cells of 55 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The diagnosis was made on morphological and cytochemical grounds, and the leukemias were classified according to

  13. Common and Overlapping Oncogenic Pathways Contribute to the Evolution of Acute Myeloid Leukemias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kvinlaug, Brynn T.; Chan, Wai-In; Bullinger, Lars; Ramaswami, Mukundhan; Sears, Christopher; Foster, Donna; Lazic, Stanley E.; Okabe, Rachel; Benner, Axel; Lee, Benjamin H.; De Silva, Inusha; Valk, Peter J. M.; Delwel, Ruud; Armstrong, Scott A.; Doehner, Hartmut; Gilliland, D. Gary; Huntly, Brian J. P.

    2011-01-01

    Fusion oncogenes in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) promote self-renewal from committed progenitors, thereby linking transformation and self-renewal pathways. Like most cancers, AML is a genetically and biologically heterogeneous disease, but it is unclear whether transformation results from common or

  14. A study of KIT activating mutations in acute myeloid leukemia M0 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)-M0 is a cancer of blood-forming cells in the bone marrow. KIT gene is a receptor tyrosine kinase class III that is expressed on by early hematopoietic progenitor cells and plays an important role in hematopoietic stem cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. Mutations of KIT receptor ...

  15. Minimal Residual Disease in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Still a Work in Progress?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Mosna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Minimal residual disease evaluation refers to a series of molecular and immunophenotypical techniques aimed at detecting submicroscopic disease after therapy. As such, its application in acute myeloid leukemia has greatly increased our ability to quantify treatment response, and to determine the chemosensitivity of the disease, as the final product of the drug schedule, dose intensity, biodistribution, and the pharmakogenetic profile of the patient. There is now consistent evidence for the prognostic power of minimal residual disease evaluation in acute myeloid leukemia, which is complementary to the baseline prognostic assessment of the disease. The focus for its use is therefore shifting to individualize treatment based on a deeper evaluation of chemosensitivity and residual tumor burden. In this review, we will summarize the results of the major clinical studies evaluating minimal residual disease in acute myeloid leukemia in adults in recent years and address the technical and practical issues still hampering the spread of these techniques outside controlled clinical trials. We will also briefly speculate on future developments and offer our point of view, and a word of caution, on the present use of minimal residual disease measurements in “real-life” practice. Still, as final standardization and diffusion of the methods are sorted out, we believe that minimal residual disease will soon become the new standard for evaluating response in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia.

  16. Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Adolescent and Young Adult Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guldane Cengiz Seval

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this review were to discuss standard and investigational treatment strategies for adolescent and young adult with acute myeloid leukemia, excluding acute promyelocytic leukemia. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML in adolescent and young adult patients (AYAs may need a different type of therapy than those currently used in children and older patients. As soon as AML is diagnosed, AYA patient should be offered to participate in well-designed clinical trials. The standard treatment approach for AYAs with AML is remission induction chemotherapy with an anthracycline/cytarabine combination, followed by either consolidation chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation, depending on the ability of the patient to tolerate intensive treatment and cytogenetic features. Presently, continuing progress of novel drugs targeting specific pathways in acute leukemia may bring AML treatment into a new era.

  17. Measuring the impact of a restrictive transfusion guideline in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeg, R T; Leinoe, E B; Andersen, P

    2013-01-01

    Interventions to change physician transfusion behavior are often evaluated by examining the amount of red blood cell (RBC) units transfused or the proportion of patients transfused before and after the intervention. The pre-transfusion haemoglobin concentration is a sensitive measure of transfusi...... concentration fell significantly. Pre-transfusion haemoglobin determination is a sensitive measure of the effect of an intervention to change physician transfusion behaviour....

  18. Bcl-2 protein level in blood of patients with acute myeloid leukaemia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    De plus, la détermination des valeurs normales de la protéine bcl-2 pourrait être utile aux études portant sur diverses maladies où l'apoptose est soit augmentée, soit diminuée ou encore différée. ... diseases, such as Alzheimer disease and. Parkinson disease, are associated with the premature death of particular subsets of.

  19. Bcl-2 protein level in blood of patients with acute myeloid leukaemia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ةدﺎﺤﻟا ﺔﯿﻋﺎﺨﻨﻟا ﺎﯿﻤﯿﻛﻮﻠﻟا. ؛. ضاﺮﻋأ. ضﺮﻣ. ﻚﯿﺘﺳﻼﺒﺴﯾدﻮﻠﯿﻤﻟا. ؛. ﻦﯿﺗوﺮﺑ p53. Résumé. Nous avons recherché la relation entre la protéine bcl-2 dans le sang et l'existence d'une leucémie myéloïde aiguë (LMA), bcl-2 étant une protéine anti-apoptotique incriminée dans le cancer. Des échantillons sanguins ont été prélevés chez 28 patients ...

  20. Rhabdomyolysis Following Initiation of Posaconazole Use for Antifungal Prophylaxis in a Patient With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayur D. Mody MD

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Posaconazole is a commonly used medication for antifungal prophylaxis in patients with high-risk acute leukemia, such as acute myeloid leukemia. Despite clinical data that show that posaconazole is superior to other antifungal prophylaxis medications, posaconazole is known to have many side effects and drug-drug interactions. We present a patient who developed rhabdomyolysis after being started on posaconazole for prophylaxis in the setting of relapsed acute myeloid leukemia.

  1. Rhabdomyolysis Following Initiation of Posaconazole Use for Antifungal Prophylaxis in a Patient With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Mayur D.; Ravindranathan, Deepak; Gill, Harpaul S.; Kota, Vamsi K.

    2017-01-01

    Posaconazole is a commonly used medication for antifungal prophylaxis in patients with high-risk acute leukemia, such as acute myeloid leukemia. Despite clinical data that show that posaconazole is superior to other antifungal prophylaxis medications, posaconazole is known to have many side effects and drug-drug interactions. We present a patient who developed rhabdomyolysis after being started on posaconazole for prophylaxis in the setting of relapsed acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:28203579

  2. High expression of lnc-CRNDE presents as a biomarker for acute myeloid leukemia and promotes the malignant progression in acute myeloid leukemia cell line U937.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Zhou, Q; Ma, J-J

    2018-02-01

    To detect the expression of long non-coding RNA-CRNDE in patients with acute myeloid leukemia and its effect on proliferation and apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemia cell line U937. 81 cases of newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) were enrolled, and 35 non-malignant hematological patients were selected as controls. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) was performed to detect the expression of lncRNA-CRNDE in the bone marrow specimens of the subjects, and the difference between the two groups was also compared. The correlation between the expression of lncRNA-CRNDE and the sex, age, classification and total survival of clinical patients was analyzed according to the clinical data. U937 cells and monocytes isolated from normal people were cultured, and the expression of lncRNA-CRNDE in acute myeloid leukemia cell line U937 and normal monocytes was compared. SiRNA-CRNDE and pcDNA-CRNDE were transfected into U937 cells, and cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay was performed to detect proliferation of U937 cells, Annexin V/PI flow cytometry was carried out to detect cell apoptosis. Cell cycle was measured by flow cytometry. The expression of lncRNA-CRNDE in patients with AML and U937 cells was significantly higher than that in non-malignant hematological controls. Results of clinical data showed that the expression of lncRNA-CRNDE was associated with the classification and total survival of myeloid leukemia in clinical patients. After transfection of siRNA-CRNDE, the proliferation and cloning ability of U937 cells decreased, while the apoptosis increased (p < 0.01) and cells were arrested in G0-G1 phase. Meanwhile, after transfection of pcDNA-CRNDE, the proliferation ability of U937 cells increased significantly, which indicated that the expression of lncRNA-CRNDE might play an essential role in promoting the proliferation of U937 cells. LncRNA-CRNDE is highly expressed in the bone marrow tissues of AML patients, and the expression level is negatively correlated with the

  3. Recruitment of childhood leukaemia patients to clinical trials in Great Britain during 1980-2007: variation by birth weight, congenital malformation, socioeconomic status and ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Anjali; Diggens, Nicole; Stiller, Charles; Richards, Sue; Stevens, Michael C G; Murphy, Michael F G

    2014-05-01

    To assess recruitment of children to national clinical trials for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) in Great Britain during 1980-2007 and describe variation by some factors that might influence trial entry. Records of leukaemia patients aged 0-14 years at diagnosis were identified in the National Registry of Childhood Tumours and linked to birth registrations, Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group records, Hospital Episode Statistics and Medical Research Council clinical trial registers. Trial entry rates were compared between categories of birth weight, congenital malformation, socioeconomic status and ethnicity. 9147 ALL and 1466 AML patients were eligible for national clinical trials during 1980-2007. Overall recruitment rates were 81% and 60% respectively. For ALL, rates varied significantly with congenital malformation (Down syndrome 61%, other malformations 80%, none 82%; p4000 g 67%; p=0.001) and congenital malformation (Down syndrome 28%, other malformations 56%, none 63%; pcongenital malformations.

  4. Pediatric acute myeloid leukemia: biology and therapeutic implications of genomic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarlock, Katherine; Meshinchi, Soheil

    2015-02-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a molecularly heterogeneous disease and age-associated molecular alterations result in younger children harboring a distinct signature from older children and adolescents. Pediatric AML has a genetic and epigenetic profile with significant differences compared to adult AML. Somatic and epigenetic alterations contribute to myeloid leukemogenesis and can evolve from diagnosis to relapse. Cytogenetic alterations, somatic mutations and response to induction therapy are important in informing risk stratification and appropriate therapy allocation. Next-generation sequencing technologies are providing novel insights into the biology of AML and have the ability to identify potential targets for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Drug screen in patient cells suggests quinacrine to be repositioned for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, A; Österroos, A; Hassan, S; Gullbo, J; Rickardson, L; Jarvius, M; Nygren, P; Fryknäs, M; Höglund, M; Larsson, R

    2015-01-01

    To find drugs suitable for repositioning for use against leukemia, samples from patients with chronic lymphocytic, acute myeloid and lymphocytic leukemias as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were tested in response to 1266 compounds from the LOPAC 1280 library (Sigma). Twenty-five compounds were defined as hits with activity in all leukemia subgroups (<50% cell survival compared with control) at 10 μM drug concentration. Only one of these compounds, quinacrine, showed low activity in normal PBMCs and was therefore selected for further preclinical evaluation. Mining the NCI-60 and the NextBio databases demonstrated leukemia sensitivity and the ability of quinacrine to reverse myeloid leukemia gene expression. Mechanistic exploration was performed using the NextBio bioinformatic software using gene expression analysis of drug exposed acute myeloid leukemia cultures (HL-60) in the database. Analysis of gene enrichment and drug correlations revealed strong connections to ribosomal biogenesis nucleoli and translation initiation. The highest drug–drug correlation was to ellipticine, a known RNA polymerase I inhibitor. These results were validated by additional gene expression analysis performed in-house. Quinacrine induced early inhibition of protein synthesis supporting these predictions. The results suggest that quinacrine have repositioning potential for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia by targeting of ribosomal biogenesis

  6. Distinct gene expression profiles of acute myeloid/T-lymphoid leukemia with silenced CEBPA and mutations in NOTCH1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.J. Wouters (Bas); M.A. Jordà; K. Keeshan (Karen); I. Louwers (Irene); C.A.J. Erpelinck (Claudia); D. Tielemans; A.W. Langerak (Anton); Y. He (Yiping); Y. Yashiro-Ohtani (Yumi); P. Zhang (Pu); C.J. Hetherington (Christopher); R.G.W. Verhaak (Roel); P.J.M. Valk (Peter); B. Löwenberg (Bob); D.G. Tenen (Daniel); W.S. Pear (Warren); H.R. Delwel (Ruud)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractGene expression profiling of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) allows the discovery of previously unrecognized molecular entities. Here, we identified a specific subgroup of AML, defined by an expression profile resembling that of AMLs with mutations in the myeloid transcription factor

  7. Validation of a mouse xenograft model system for gene expression analysis of human acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Richard W

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pre-clinical models that effectively recapitulate human disease are critical for expanding our knowledge of cancer biology and drug resistance mechanisms. For haematological malignancies, the non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID mouse is one of the most successful models to study paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL. However, for this model to be effective for studying engraftment and therapy responses at the whole genome level, careful molecular characterisation is essential. Results Here, we sought to validate species-specific gene expression profiling in the high engraftment continuous ALL NOD/SCID xenograft. Using the human Affymetrix whole transcript platform we analysed transcriptional profiles from engrafted tissues without prior cell separation of mouse cells and found it to return highly reproducible profiles in xenografts from individual mice. The model was further tested with experimental mixtures of human and mouse cells, demonstrating that the presence of mouse cells does not significantly skew expression profiles when xenografts contain 90% or more human cells. In addition, we present a novel in silico and experimental masking approach to identify probes and transcript clusters susceptible to cross-species hybridisation. Conclusions We demonstrate species-specific transcriptional profiles can be obtained from xenografts when high levels of engraftment are achieved or with the application of transcript cluster masks. Importantly, this masking approach can be applied and adapted to other xenograft models where human tissue infiltration is lower. This model provides a powerful platform for identifying genes and pathways associated with ALL disease progression and response to therapy in vivo.

  8. FISH Detection of PML-RARA Fusion in ins(15;17 Acute Promyelocytic Leukaemia Depends on Probe Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynda J. Campbell

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL is usually confirmed by cytogenetics showing the characteristic t(15;17, but a minority of patients have a masked PML/RARA fusion. We report ten patients with APL and no evidence of the t(15;17, in whom the insertion of RARA into PML could not be demonstrated by initial FISH studies using a standard dual fusion probe but was readily identified using smaller probes. Given the need for rapid diagnosis of APL, it is important to be aware of the false negative rate for large PML/RARA FISH probes in the setting of masked rearrangements.

  9. Mutations in the gene for the granulocyte colony-stimulating-factor receptor in patients with acute myeloid leukemia preceded by severe congenital neutropenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Dong (Fan); R.K. Brynes; N. Tidow; K. Welte (Karl); B. Löwenberg (Bob); I.P. Touw (Ivo)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND. In severe congenital neutropenia the maturation of myeloid progenitor cells is arrested. The myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia develop in some patients with severe congenital neutropenia. Abnormalities in the signal-transduction

  10. Malignant pleural effusion in acute myeloid leukemia with hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suharti, C; Santosa; Setiawan, Budi

    2015-04-01

    Pleural effusions can be the first presentation of a hematologic malignancy. The most common disorders with pleural effusion are Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma with a frequency of 20 to 30%, especially if mediastinal involvement. Acute and chronic leukemia are rarely accompanied by pleural involvement. We describe a 46-year-old female with history of progressive dyspnoea. Physical examination was revealed massive left pleural effusion. Complete blood count revealed anemia, trombositopenia and normal leucocyte count. Viral serology test shown positive of HBsAg and total antiHBc. Chest X-ray revealed left pleural effusion. Pleural fluid cytology was myeloblast consistent with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Bone marrow aspiration smear, bone marrow biopsy smear, and flow cytometry analysis were consistent with acute myeloid leukemia without maturation (AML M0-FAB classification).

  11. Recent advances in the pathogenesis and treatment of juvenile myelomonocytic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Mignon L

    2011-03-01

    Myeloid neoplasms derive from the pathological clonal expansion of an abnormal stem cell and span a diverse spectrum of phenotypes including acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Expansion of myeloid blasts with suppression of normal haematopoiesis is the hallmark of AML, whereas MPN is associated with over-proliferation of one or more lineages that retain the capacity to differentiate, and MDS is characterized by cytopenias and aberrant differentiation. MPD and MDS can progress to AML, which is likely due to the acquisition of cooperative mutations. Juvenile myelomonocytic leukaemia (JMML) is an aggressive myeloid neoplasm of childhood that is clinically characterized by overproduction of monocytic cells that can infiltrate organs, including the spleen, liver, gastrointestinal tract, and lung. JMML is categorized as an overlap MPN/MDS by the World Health Organization and also shares some clinical and molecular features with chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia, a similar disease in adults. While the current standard of care for patients with JMML relies on allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), relapse is the most frequent cause of treatment failure. This review outlines our understanding of the genetic underpinnings of JMML with a recent update on the discovery of novel CBL mutations, as well as a brief review on current therapeutic approaches. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Molecular pathway activation features of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Ivan; Suntsova, Maria; Mutorova, Olga; Sorokin, Maxim; Garazha, Andrew; Ilnitskaya, Elena; Spirin, Pavel; Larin, Sergey; Kovalchuk, Olga; Prassolov, Vladimir; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Roumiantsev, Alexander; Buzdin, Anton

    2016-11-19

    Acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) is characterized by overproduction of immature white blood cells in the bone marrow. ALL is most common in the childhood and has high (>80%) cure rate. In contrast, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has far greater mortality rate than the ALL and is most commonly affecting older adults. However, AML is a leading cause of childhood cancer mortality. In this study, we compare gene expression and molecular pathway activation patterns in three normal blood, seven pediatric ALL and seven pediatric AML bone marrow samples. We identified 172/94 and 148/31 characteristic gene expression/pathway activation signatures, clearly distinguishing pediatric ALL and AML cells, respectively, from the normal blood. The pediatric AML and ALL cells differed by 139/34 gene expression/pathway activation biomarkers. For the adult 30 AML and 17 normal blood samples, we found 132/33 gene expression/pathway AML-specific features, of which only 7/2 were common for the adult and pediatric AML and, therefore, age-independent. At the pathway level, we found more differences than similarities between the adult and pediatric forms. These findings suggest that the adult and pediatric AMLs may require different treatment strategies.

  13. MR features of isolated uterine relapse in an adolescent with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novellas, Sebastien; Fournol, Maude; Geoffray, Anne; Chevallier, Patrick [Regional Hospital Centre and University of Nice, Medical Imaging Service, Archet 2 Hospital, 151 route de Saint Antoine de Ginestiere, B.P. 3079, Nice Cedex 3 (France); Deville, Anne [Regional Hospital Centre and University of Nice, Paediatric Service, Archet 2 Hospital, Nice (France); Kurzenne, Jean-Yves [Regional Hospital Centre and University of Nice, Paediatric Surgery Service, Archet 2 Hospital, Nice (France)

    2008-03-15

    Relapses of lymphoblastic leukaemia traditionally involve the central nervous system and testes in boys. Involvement of the female pelvic organs is frequently found at autopsy; however, involvement of the cervical uterus is rare and even less commonly symptomatic. A 13-cm uterine mass was discovered in a 15-year-old adolescent with a history of lymphoblastic leukaemia during childhood. Pelvic MRI was the best tool to assess the size, characteristics and invasive nature of this lesion of the uterine cervix. To our knowledge, this is a unique case in that we describe the MRI appearance of a relapsing lymphoblastic leukaemic mass both before and after treatment. (orig.)

  14. Integration of gene expression and DNA-methylation profiles improves molecular subtype classification in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taskesen, E.; Babaei, S.; Reinders, M.J.M.; De Ridder, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is characterized by various cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities. Detection of these abnormalities is important in the risk-classification of patients but requires laborious experimentation. Various studies showed that gene expression profiles (GEP), and

  15. A novel application of furazolidone: anti-leukemic activity in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueqing Jiang

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is the most common malignant myeloid disorder of progenitor cells in myeloid hematopoiesis and exemplifies a genetically heterogeneous disease. The patients with AML also show a heterogeneous response to therapy. Although all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA has been successfully introduced to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL, it is rather ineffective in non-APL AML. In our present study, 1200 off-patent marketed drugs and natural compounds that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA were screened for anti-leukemia activity using the retrovirus transduction/transformation assay (RTTA. Furazolidone (FZD was shown to inhibit bone marrow transformation mediated by several leukemia fusion proteins, including AML1-ETO. Furazolidone has been used in the treatment of certain bacterial and protozoan infections in human and animals for more than sixty years. We investigated the anti-leukemic activity of FZD in a series of AML cells. FZD displayed potent antiproliferative properties at submicromolar concentrations and induced apoptosis in AML cell lines. Importantly, FZD treatment of certain AML cells induced myeloid cell differentiation by morphology and flow cytometry for CD11b expression. Furthermore, FZD treatment resulted in increased stability of tumor suppressor p53 protein in AML cells. Our in vitro results suggest furazolidone as a novel therapeutic strategy in AML patients.

  16. Vorinostat and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  17. INCIDENCE OF ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA AFTER BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Giovanna Valentini

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer among women and the leading cause of death among middle-aged women. Early detection by mammography screening and improvement of therapeutic options have increased breast cancer survival rates, with the consequence that late side effects of cancer treatment become increasingly important. In particular, patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy regimens, commonly including alkylating agents and anthracyclines, are at increased risk of developing leukemia, further enhanced by the use of radiotherapy. In the last few years also the use of growth factors seems to increase the risk of secondary leukemia. The purpose of this review is to update epidemiology of therapy-related myeloid neoplasms occurring in breast cancer patients

  18. Epidemiology and Clinical Significance of Secondary and Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granfeldt Østgård, Lene Sofie; Medeiros, Bruno C; Sengeløv, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Secondary and therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia (sAML and tAML, respectively) remain therapeutic challenges. Still, it is unclear whether their inferior outcome compared with de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) varies as a result of previous hematologic disease or can be explained...... by differences in karyotype and/or age. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In a Danish national population-based study of 3,055 unselected patients with AML diagnosed from 2000 to 2013, we compared the frequencies and characteristics of tAML, myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) -sAML, and non-MDS-sAML (chronic myelomonocytic...... leukemia and myeloproliferative neoplasia) versus de novo AML. Limited to intensive therapy patients, we compared chance of complete remission by logistic regression analysis and used a pseudo-value approach to compare relative risk (RR) of death at 90 days, 1 year, and 3 years, overall and stratified...

  19. Molecular Analysis of Gene Rearrangements and Mutations in Acute Leukemias and Myeloid Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholl, Lynette M; Longtine, Janina; Kuo, Frank C

    2017-01-11

    A subset of acute leukemias and other myeloid neoplasms contains specific genetic alterations, many of which are associated with unique clinical and pathologic features. These alterations include chromosomal rearrangements leading to oncogenic fusion proteins or alteration of gene expression by juxtaposing oncogenes to enhancer elements, as well as mutations leading to aberrant activation of a variety of proteins critical to hematopoietic progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation. Molecular analysis is central to diagnosis and clinical management of leukemias, permitting genetic confirmation of a clinical and histologic impression, providing prognostic and predictive information, and facilitating detection of minimal residual disease. This unit will outline approaches to the molecular diagnosis of the most frequent and clinically relevant genetic alterations in acute leukemias and myeloid neoplasms. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. Allergic complications of L-asparaginase therapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinidis Georgios

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. L-asparaginase (L-ASP is one of the most effective medications for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL in children, and allergic reactions to the therapy are considered the most significant side effects. Objective. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and type of allergic reactions, as well as to identify potential risk factors for the development of allergic reactions during L-ASP therapy in children with ALL. Methods. The study encompassed 70 patients under 18 years of age, who were treated at the Institute for Child and Youth Healthcare of Vojvodina, Novi Sad in the period January 2000 - June 2009. We analyzed the frequency and type of allergic reactions during the administration of L-ASP, the onset of allergic reaction in relation to the phase of therapy of underlying disease, as well as the prevalence of allergic reactions in relation to drug administration method. Results. Allergic reaction manifested in 17 patients (24%. In 14 patients (82% allergic reaction to L-ASP manifested as urticaria, bronchospasm or anaphylaxis, whereas a mild local reaction was observed in only three patients (18%. In a group treated, according to the high-risk protocol, the prevalence of allergic reactions was statistically significantly higher in the intermediate-risk group of patients (p<0.01, i.e. statistically significantly more frequent, as compared to the standard-risk group of patients (p<0.05. The majority of patients (11; 65% developed allergic reactions to the 9th dose of L-ASP, i.e. the first dose during the reinduction phase. The time interval between the last L-ASP dose in the induction phase and the 1st dose in the reinduction phase was at least four weeks. With respect to administration method, the majority of patients (16; 94% developed allergic reaction after intravenous application of L-ASP. Conclusion. Potential risk factors for the development of allergic reaction to L-ASP are a high-risk therapy

  1. PCR-positivity in harvested bone marrow predicts relapse after transplantation with autologous purged bone marrow in children in second remission of precursor B-cell acute leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervoordeldonk, S. F.; Merle, P. A.; Behrendt, H.; Steenbergen, E. J.; van den Berg, H.; van Wering, E. R.; von dem Borne, A. E.; van der Schoot, C. E.; van Leeuwen, E. F.; Slaper-Cortenbach, I. C.

    1997-01-01

    Purging of autologous bone marrow (BM) grafts of children in second remission after a relapse of precursor B acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in the BM has been carried out in our laboratory since 1987, initially by complement mediated cell lysis. This protocol was extended by performing an

  2. Effectiveness of environmental control measures to decrease the risk of invasive aspergillosis in acute leukaemia patients during hospital building work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combariza, J F; Toro, L F; Orozco, J J

    2017-08-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) is a significant problem in acute leukaemia patients. Construction work near hospital wards caring for immunocompromised patients is one of the main risk factors for developing invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA). To assess the impact of environmental control measures used during hospital construction for the prevention of IA in acute leukaemia patients. A retrospective cohort study was developed to evaluate the IA incidence in acute leukaemia patients with different environmental control measures employed during hospital construction. We used European Organisation for the Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criterial diagnosis parameters for definition of IA. A total of 175 episodes of inpatient care were evaluated, 62 of which did not have any environmental control measures (when an outbreak occurred), and 113 that were subject to environmental control measures directed to preventing IA. The study showed an IA incidence of 25.8% for the group without environmental control measures vs 12.4% for those who did receive environmental control measures (P=0.024). The relative risk for IA was 0.595 (95% confidence interval: 0.394-0.897) for the group with environmental control measures. The current study suggests that the implementation of environmental control measures during a hospital construction has a positive impact for prevention of IA in patients hospitalized with acute leukaemia. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A variant at 9p21.3 functionally implicates CDKN2B in paediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia aetiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hungate, Eric A.; Vora, Sapana R.; Gamazon, Eric R.; Moriyama, Takaya; Best, Timothy; Hulur, Imge; Lee, Younghee; Evans, Tiffany-Jane; Ellinghaus, Eva; Stanulla, Martin; Rudant, Jéremie; Orsi, Laurent; Clavel, Jacqueline; Milne, Elizabeth; Scott, Rodney J.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Cox, Nancy J.; Loh, Mignon L.; Yang, Jun J.; Skol, Andrew D.; Onel, Kenan

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (BCP-ALL) is the most common cancer of childhood, yet little is known about BCP-ALL predisposition. In this study, in 2,187 cases of European ancestry and 5,543 controls, we discover and replicate a locus indexed by rs77728904 at 9p21.3

  4. High white blood cell count at diagnosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: biological background and prognostic impact. Results from the NOPHO ALL-92 and ALL-2000 studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaitkeviciene, G; Forestier, E; Hellebostad, M

    2011-01-01

    Prognostic impact of peripheral blood white blood cell count (WBC) at the diagnosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) was evaluated in a population-based consecutive series of 2666 children aged 1–15 treated for ALL between 1992 and 2008 in the five Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland...

  5. Outpatient Management Following Intensive Induction or Salvage Chemotherapy for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Walter, Roland B.; Taylor, Lenise R.; Gardner, Kelda M.; Dorcy, Kathleen Shannon; Vaughn, Jennifer E.; Estey, Elihu H.

    2013-01-01

    Adults with newly diagnosed or relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) commonly receive intensive chemotherapy to achieve disease remission. In the United States and many other countries, it is standard practice that these patients remain hospitalized “preemptively” until blood count recovery due to the risk for overwhelming infections and bleeding during pancytopenia. This care policy requires hospitalization for an average of 3–4 weeks after completion of chemotherapy. However, highly effecti...

  6. Defining the dose of gemtuzumab ozogamicin in combination with induction chemotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burnett, Alan; Cavenagh, Jamie; Russell, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    Arecent source data meta-analysis of randomized trials in adults assessing the immunoconjugate gemtuzumab ozogamicin combined with standard chemotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia showed a significant survival benefit in patients without an adverse karyotype. It is not clear whether the optimal dose.......17-3.39), P=0.01, respectively, which in addition was associated with a higher rate of veno-occlusive disease (5.6% vs 0.5%; Pcombination with induction chemotherapy when...

  7. Successful hematopoietic cell transplantation in a patient with X-linked agammaglobulinemia and acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Arja, Rolla F; Chernin, Leah R; Abusin, Ghada; Auletta, Jeffery; Cabral, Linda; Egler, Rachel; Ochs, Hans D; Torgerson, Troy R; Lopez-Guisa, Jesus; Hostoffer, Robert W; Tcheurekdjian, Haig; Cooke, Kenneth R

    2015-09-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by marked reduction in all classes of serum immunoglobulins and the near absence of mature CD19(+) B-cells. Although malignancy has been observed in patients with XLA, we present the first reported case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a patient with XLA. We also demonstrate the complete correction of the XLA phenotype following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for treatment of the patient's leukemia. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Knockdown of miR-128a induces Lin28a expression and reverts myeloid differentiation blockage in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Luciana; Trino, Stefania; Laurenzana, Ilaria; Tagliaferri, Daniela; Falco, Geppino; Grieco, Vitina; Bianchino, Gabriella; Nozza, Filomena; Campia, Valentina; D'Alessio, Francesca; La Rocca, Francesco; Caivano, Antonella; Villani, Oreste; Cilloni, Daniela; Musto, Pellegrino; Del Vecchio, Luigi

    2017-06-01

    Lin28A is a highly conserved RNA-binding protein that concurs to control the balance between stemness and differentiation in several tissue lineages. Here, we report the role of miR-128a/Lin28A axis in blocking cell differentiation in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by abnormally controlled proliferation of myeloid progenitor cells accompanied by partial or total inability to undergo terminal differentiation. First, we found Lin28A underexpressed in blast cells from AML patients and AML cell lines as compared with CD34+ normal precursors. In vitro transfection of Lin28A in NPM1-mutated OCI-AML3 cell line significantly triggered cell-cycle arrest and myeloid differentiation, with increased expression of macrophage associate genes (EGR2, ZFP36 and ANXA1). Furthermore, miR-128a, a negative regulator of Lin28A, was found overexpressed in AML cells compared with normal precursors, especially in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and in 'AML with maturation' (according to 2016 WHO classification of myeloid neoplasms and acute leukemia). Its forced overexpression by lentiviral infection in OCI-AML3 downregulated Lin28A with ensuing repression of macrophage-oriented differentiation. Finally, knockdown of miR-128a in OCI-AML3 and in APL/AML leukemic cells (by transfection and lentiviral infection, respectively) induced myeloid cell differentiation and increased expression of Lin28A, EGR2, ZFP36 and ANXA1, reverting myeloid differentiation blockage. In conclusion, our findings revealed a new mechanism for AML differentiation blockage, suggesting new strategies for AML therapy based upon miR-128a inhibition.

  9. Targeting acute myeloid leukemia stem cells: a review and principles for the development of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollyea, Daniel A; Gutman, Jonathan A; Gore, Lia; Smith, Clayton A; Jordan, Craig T

    2014-08-01

    Despite an increasingly rich understanding of its pathogenesis, acute myeloid leukemia remains a disease with poor outcomes, overwhelmingly due to disease relapse. In recent years, work to characterize the leukemia stem cell population, the disease compartment most difficult to eliminate with conventional therapy and most responsible for relapse, has been undertaken. This, in conjunction with advances in drug development that have allowed for increasingly targeted therapies to be engineered, raises the hope that we are entering an era in which the leukemia stem cell population can be eliminated, resulting in therapeutic cures for acute myeloid leukemia patients. For these therapies to become available, they must be tested in the setting of clinical trials. A long-established clinical trials infrastructure has been employed to shepherd new therapies from proof-of-concept to approval. However, due to the unique features of leukemia stem cells, drugs that are designed to specifically eliminate this population may not be adequately tested when applied to this model. Therefore, in this review article, we seek to identify the relevant features of acute myeloid leukemia stem cells for clinical trialists, discuss potential strategies to target leukemia stem cells, and propose a set of guidelines outlining the necessary elements of clinical trials to allow for the successful testing of stem cell-directed therapies. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  10. Prognostic Value of a CYP2B6 Gene Polymorphism in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alazhary, Nevin M; Shafik, Roxan E; Shafik, Hanan E; Kamel, Mahmoud M

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study aimed to detect a CYP2B6 polymorphism in de novo cases of acute myeloid leukemia patients and identify any role in disease progression and outcome. DNA was isolated from peripheral blood of 82 newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia cases and the CYP2B6 G15631T gene polymorphism was assayed by PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). The frequency of the GG genotype (wild type) was 48 (58.5%) and that of the mutant type T allele was 34 (41.9%). GT genotype heterozygous variants were found in 28 (34%), and TT genotype homozygous variants in 6 (7.3%) cases. We found no significant association between the CYP2B6 G15631T polymorphism and complete response (CR) (p-value=0.768), FAB classification (p-value=0.51), cytogenetic analysis (p-value=0.673), and overall survival (p-value=0.325). Also, there were no significant links with early toxic death (p-value=0.92) or progression- free survival (PFS) (p-value=0.245). Our results suggest that the CYP2B6 polymorphism has no role in disease progression, therapeutic outcome, patient free survival, early toxic death and overall survival in acute myeloid leukemia patients.

  11. Acute Panmyelosis with Myelofibrosis - A Rare Subtype of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tathagata Chatterjee

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available One case of acute panmyelosis with myelofibrosis (APMF is being reported. A 45 year old male presented with abrupt onset of rapidly progressing low backache, weakness and pancytopenia. On examination there was no organomegaly. Peripheral blood examination revealed normocytic normochromic red blood cells with 10% circulating blasts. Flowcytometric examination of peripheral blood revealed blasts which were positive for CD 34 ,HLA- DR and myeloid associated antigens (i.e. CD13 and CD33.Blasts were negative for anti MPO. Bone marrow aspirate resulted in a dry tap. Bone marrow biopsy revealed panmyeloid proliferation with scattered blasts which were CD 34 positive on imunohistochemistry and negative for anti MPO. Reticulin stain showed grade III myelofibrosis (WHO. Differential diagnosis considered included AML-M7, MDS-RAEB II and AML with myelodysplasia . He was started on chemotherapy [idarubicin and cytarabine; 3+7 induction regimen followed by three cycles of HIDAC (High dose cytosine arabinoside] after which patient was in complete morphological remission with markedly reduced bone marrow fibrosis. He is now being worked up for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Patient is asymptomatic at eight months of diagnosis. In conclusion these patients should be managed aggressively with AML therapy and this case report reaffirms the fact that APMF is subtype of AML.

  12. Sinonasal Lymphoma Presenting as a Probable Sanctuary Site for Relapsed B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Y. Lim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sinonasal lymphoma is a non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL representing 1.5% of all lymphomas. It presents as an unremitting ulceration with progressive destruction of midline sinonasal and surrounding structures. Poor prognosis warrants early treatment although diagnosis is challenging and frequently delayed. It is usually primary in origin and to our knowledge the sinonasal region has never been reported as a sanctuary site in leukaemia/lymphoma relapse. We present a unique case of B-cell ALL (acute lymphoblastic leukaemia with late relapse to the nasal septum as a sinonasal lymphoblastic lymphoma and with genetic support for this as a sanctuary site.

  13. Rare cytogenetic abnormalities and alteration of microRNAs in acute myeloid leukemia and response to therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Shahjahani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is the most common acute leukemia in adults, which is heterogeneous in terms of morphological, cytogenetic and clinical features. Cytogenetic abnormalities, including karyotype aberrations, gene mutations and gene expression abnormalities are the most important diagnostic tools in diagnosis, classification and prognosis in acute myeloid leukemias. Based on World Health Organization (WHO classification, acute myeloid leukemias can be divided to four groups. Due to the heterogeneous nature of AML and since most therapeutic protocols in AML are based on genetic alterations, gathering further information in the field of rare disorders as well as common cytogenetic abnormalities would be helpful in determining the prognosis and treatment in this group of diseases. Recently, the role of microRNAs (miRNAs in both normal hematopoiesis and myeloid leukemic cell differentiation in myeloid lineage has been specified. miRNAs can be used instead of genes for AML diagnosis and classification in the future, and can also play a decisive role in the evaluation of relapse as well as response to treatment in the patients. Therefore, their use in clinical trials can affect treatment protocols and play a role in therapeutic strategies for these patients. In this review, we have examined rare cytogenetic abnormalities in different groups of acute myeloid leukemias according to WHO classification, and the role of miRNA expression in classification, diagnosis and response to treatment of these disorders has also been dealt with.

  14. Rare Cytogenetic Abnormalities and Alteration of microRNAs in Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Response to Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahjahani, Mohammad; Khodadi, Elahe; Seghatoleslami, Mohammad; Asl, Javad Mohammadi; Golchin, Neda; Zaieri, Zeynab Deris

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common acute leukemia in adults, which is heterogeneous in terms of morphological, cytogenetic and clinical features. Cytogenetic abnormalities, including karyotype aberrations, gene mutations and gene expression abnormalities are the most important diagnostic tools in diagnosis, classification and prognosis in acute myeloid leukemias. Based on World Health Organization (WHO) classification, acute myeloid leukemias can be divided to four groups. Due to the heterogeneous nature of AML and since most therapeutic protocols in AML are based on genetic alterations, gathering further information in the field of rare disorders as well as common cytogenetic abnormalities would be helpful in determining the prognosis and treatment in this group of diseases. Recently, the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in both normal hematopoiesis and myeloid leukemic cell differentiation in myeloid lineage has been specified. miRNAs can be used instead of genes for AML diagnosis and classification in the future, and can also play a decisive role in the evaluation of relapse as well as response to treatment in the patients. Therefore, their use in clinical trials can affect treatment protocols and play a role in therapeutic strategies for these patients. In this review, we have examined rare cytogenetic abnormalities in different groups of acute myeloid leukemias according to WHO classification, and the role of miRNA expression in classification, diagnosis and response to treatment of these disorders has also been dealt with. PMID:26779308

  15. Rare Cytogenetic Abnormalities and Alteration of microRNAs in Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Response to Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahjahani, Mohammad; Khodadi, Elahe; Seghatoleslami, Mohammad; Asl, Javad Mohammadi; Golchin, Neda; Zaieri, Zeynab Deris; Saki, Najmaldin

    2015-02-10

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common acute leukemia in adults, which is heterogeneous in terms of morphological, cytogenetic and clinical features. Cytogenetic abnormalities, including karyotype aberrations, gene mutations and gene expression abnormalities are the most important diagnostic tools in diagnosis, classification and prognosis in acute myeloid leukemias. Based on World Health Organization (WHO) classification, acute myeloid leukemias can be divided to four groups. Due to the heterogeneous nature of AML and since most therapeutic protocols in AML are based on genetic alterations, gathering further information in the field of rare disorders as well as common cytogenetic abnormalities would be helpful in determining the prognosis and treatment in this group of diseases. Recently, the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in both normal hematopoiesis and myeloid leukemic cell differentiation in myeloid lineage has been specified. miRNAs can be used instead of genes for AML diagnosis and classification in the future, and can also play a decisive role in the evaluation of relapse as well as response to treatment in the patients. Therefore, their use in clinical trials can affect treatment protocols and play a role in therapeutic strategies for these patients. In this review, we have examined rare cytogenetic abnormalities in different groups of acute myeloid leukemias according to WHO classification, and the role of miRNA expression in classification, diagnosis and response to treatment of these disorders has also been dealt with.

  16. Modeling of C/EBPalpha mutant acute myeloid leukemia reveals a common expression signature of committed myeloid leukemia-initiating cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirstetter, Peggy; Schuster, Mikkel B; Bereshchenko, Oksana

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the CEBPA gene are present in 7%-10% of human patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, no genetic models exist that demonstrate their etiological relevance. To mimic the most common mutations affecting CEBPA-that is, those leading to loss of the 42 kDa C/EBPalpha isoform (p...... penetrance. p42-deficient leukemia could be transferred by a Mac1+c-Kit+ population that gave rise only to myeloid cells in recipient mice. Expression profiling of this population against normal Mac1+c-Kit+ progenitors revealed a signature shared with MLL-AF9-transformed AML....

  17. C/EBPγ deregulation results in differentiation arrest in acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberich-Jordà, Meritxell; Wouters, Bas; Balastik, Martin; Shapiro-Koss, Clara; Zhang, Hong; DiRuscio, Annalisa; Radomska, Hanna S.; Ebralidze, Alexander K.; Amabile, Giovanni; Ye, Min; Zhang, Junyan; Lowers, Irene; Avellino, Roberto; Melnick, Ari; Figueroa, Maria E.; Valk, Peter J.M.; Delwel, Ruud; Tenen, Daniel G.

    2012-01-01

    C/EBPs are a family of transcription factors that regulate growth control and differentiation of various tissues. We found that C/EBPγ is highly upregulated in a subset of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples characterized by C/EBPα hypermethylation/silencing. Similarly, C/EBPγ was upregulated in murine hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells lacking C/EBPα, as C/EBPα mediates C/EBPγ suppression. Studies in myeloid cells demonstrated that CEBPG overexpression blocked neutrophilic differentiation. Further, downregulation of Cebpg in murine Cebpa-deficient stem/progenitor cells or in human CEBPA-silenced AML samples restored granulocytic differentiation. In addition, treatment of these leukemias with demethylating agents restored the C/EBPα-C/EBPγ balance and upregulated the expression of myeloid differentiation markers. Our results indicate that C/EBPγ mediates the myeloid differentiation arrest induced by C/EBPα deficiency and that targeting the C/EBPα-C/EBPγ axis rescues neutrophilic differentiation in this unique subset of AMLs. PMID:23160200

  18. Mutated nucleophosmin detects clonal multilineage involvement in acute myeloid leukemia: Impact on WHO classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualucci, Laura; Liso, Arcangelo; Martelli, Maria Paola; Bolli, Niccolò; Pacini, Roberta; Tabarrini, Alessia; Carini, Manola; Bigerna, Barbara; Pucciarini, Alessandra; Mannucci, Roberta; Nicoletti, Ildo; Tiacci, Enrico; Meloni, Giovanna; Specchia, Giorgina; Cantore, Nicola; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Pileri, Stefano; Mecucci, Cristina; Mandelli, Franco; Martelli, Massimo Fabrizio; Falini, Brunangelo

    2006-12-15

    Because of a lack of specific clonality markers, information on lineage involvement and cell of origin of acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype (AML-NK), is missing. Because Nucleophosmin (NPM) gene is frequently mutated in AML-NK and causes aberrant NPM cytoplasmic localization (NPMc+), it was used as an AML lineage clonality marker. Clonal NPM exon 12 mutations were detected in myeloid, monocytic, erythroid, and megakaryocytic cells but not in fibroblasts or endothelia that were laser-microdissected from 3 patients with NPMc+ AML. Aberrant cytoplasmic expression of mutated NPM proteins was identified with anti-NPM antibodies in 2 or more myeloid hemopoietic cell lineages in 99 (61.5%) of 161 of NPMc+ AML paraffin-embedded bone marrow biopsies; lymphoid involvement was excluded in 3 investigated cases. These findings suggest that NPMc+ AML derives from either a common myeloid or earlier progenitor. Immunohistochemical studies show that varying combinations and ratios of NPMc+ leukemic cells from distinct lineages are responsible for heterogeneity within each French-American-British (FAB) classification type and for NPMc+ AML falling into different FAB categories. These findings question the value of FAB criteria in subdividing the WHO category of "AML not otherwise characterized" and suggest that, for clinical use, NPMc+ AML be provisionally regarded as a separate AML with prognostic significance.

  19. Recent trends and concepts in the management of leukaemia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Currently the treatment for Acute Leukaemia, which consists of Acute Myeloblastic Leukaemia (AML) and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (ALL), consists of the preventive and the definitive aspects of therapy. Recent trends that have been elucidated involve aspects of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, stem cell transplant, and ...

  20. Myeloid Heme Oxygenase-1 Regulates the Acute Inflammatory Response to Zymosan in the Mouse Air Pouch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Brines

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is induced by many stimuli to modulate the activation and function of different cell types during innate immune responses. Although HO-1 has shown anti-inflammatory effects in different systems, there are few data on the contribution of myeloid HO-1 and its role in inflammatory processes is not well understood. To address this point, we have used HO-1M-KO mice with myeloid-restricted deletion of HO-1 to specifically investigate its influence on the acute inflammatory response to zymosan in vivo. In the mouse air pouch model, we have shown an exacerbated inflammation in HO-1M-KO mice with increased neutrophil infiltration accompanied by high levels of inflammatory mediators such as interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and prostaglandin E2. The expression of the degradative enzyme matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3 was also enhanced. In addition, we observed higher levels of serum MMP-3 in HO-1M-KO mice compared with control mice, suggesting the presence of systemic inflammation. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that myeloid HO-1 plays an anti-inflammatory role in the acute response to zymosan in vivo and suggest the interest of this target to regulate inflammatory processes.

  1. Expression of CD71 by flow cytometry in acute leukemias: More often seen in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Pande

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: CD71 is a marker that has been usually used for identifying dysplasia in the erythroid series. We have tried to evaluate the expression of CD71 in various types of acute leukemias. Materials and Methods: We studied 48 patients of acute leukemia, of which 25 were acute myeloid leukemia (AML, 13 were precursor B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL, 8 were T-ALL, and 2 were mixed phenotype acute leukemia (T/myeloid as per the WHO classification. Results: We found that the expression of CD71 was most prevalent in AMLs (84%, followed by T-ALL (50% and least in B-ALL (30%. Conclusion: This finding clearly shows the higher expression of CD71 in AMLs compared to other common type of leukemias, such as B- and T-ALL. We suggest that the high expression of CD71 in AMLs could be used as a diagnostic marker and may also be used for minimal residual disease analysis after further studies in posttreatment scenario. This study is the first of its kind in the South Asian population.

  2. Expression of CD71 by flow cytometry in acute leukemias: More often seen in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Amit; Dorwal, Pranav; Jain, Dharmendra; Tyagi, Neetu; Mehra, Simmi; Sachdev, Ritesh; Raina, Vimarsh

    2016-01-01

    CD71 is a marker that has been usually used for identifying dysplasia in the erythroid series. We have tried to evaluate the expression of CD71 in various types of acute leukemias. We studied 48 patients of acute leukemia, of which 25 were acute myeloid leukemia (AML), 13 were precursor B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), 8 were T-ALL, and 2 were mixed phenotype acute leukemia (T/myeloid) as per the WHO classification. We found that the expression of CD71 was most prevalent in AMLs (84%), followed by T-ALL (50%) and least in B-ALL (30%). This finding clearly shows the higher expression of CD71 in AMLs compared to other common type of leukemias, such as B- and T-ALL. We suggest that the high expression of CD71 in AMLs could be used as a diagnostic marker and may also be used for minimal residual disease analysis after further studies in posttreatment scenario. This study is the first of its kind in the South Asian population.

  3. Biological and clinical meaning of myeloid antigen expression in the acute lymphocytic leukemia in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsan Suarez, Vianed; Sanchez Segura, Miriam; Socarras Ferrer, Bertha B; Valle Perez, Lazaro O del

    2009-01-01

    In 238 children presenting with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) authors studied the possible association between the myeloid antigens expression with determined biologic and clinic features at disease onset. The cellular immunophenotyping was performed by ultraimmunocytochemical method. From the total of diagnosed ALLs, the 21,8% were LLA-Mi+. There was a lymphadenopathies predominance (71,2%), splenomegaly (65,4%) and hepatomegaly (57,7%) in patients with LLA-Mi+ and very significant differences (p =0,003, p = 0,0068, and p = 0,000, respectively. There was also alight predominance of mediastinum adenopathies, CNS infiltration and hemorrahagic manifestations in patients with LLA-Mi+, no statistically significant. Results showed that in our patients the myeloid antigen expression on the lymphoid blasts influenced on appearance of determined presentation of morphologic and clinical features in children

  4. Targeted Therapies in Hematology and Their Impact on Patient Care: Chronic and Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Elias Jabbour Jorge; Ravandi, Farhad; O’Brien, Susan; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2014-01-01

    Advances in the genetic and molecular characterizations of leukemias have enhanced our capabilities to develop targeted therapies. The most dramatic examples of targeted therapy in cancer to date are the use of targeted BCR-ABL protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) which has revolutionized the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Inhibition of the signaling activity of this kinase has proved to be a highly successful treatment target, transforming the prognosis of patients with CML. In contrast, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an extremely heterogeneous disease with outcomes that vary widely according to subtype of the disease. Targeted therapy with monoclonal antibodies and small molecule kinase inhibitors are promising strategies to help improve the cure rates in AML. In this review, we will highlight the results of recent clinical trials in which outcomes of CML and AML have been influenced significantly. Also, novel approaches to sequencing and combining available therapies will be covered. PMID:24246694

  5. Results obtained from the treatment of the acute lymphoid leukaemia (ALL) to children from areas affected by the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.

    1993-01-01

    Since march 1990, 103 children with acute lymphoid leukaemia (ALL) have received medical treatment in Cuba. All the patients had arrived with a previous treatment, which had them go through different stages of the therapeutic scheme which was in force in our country, the 7-ALL-87. The statistical study by the Kaplan Meler method showed a complete remission period of a 64% at 24 months. The event-free survival was of a 64%, and the global survival was of an 89%. In 25 children (24,2%), a relapse in the bone marrow was produced, where as 4 children (3,8%) underwent a relapse in the central nervous system. Eleven patients died, mostly because of a progression in the disease; 73 (70,8%) are under remission for periods of 3-32 months. Bone marrow autologous transplant was performed in five children with high risk; 2 died and the other 3 are under remission

  6. Association of 1800 cGy cranial irradiation with intellectual function in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankovic, Momcilo; Masera, G.; Brouwers, Pim

    1994-01-01

    Cranial radiation therapy in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia has been associated with adverse neuropsychological effects, such as low intelligence. We evaluated 203 children for six years in a multi-centre European study. The patients were divided into two groups: 129 children treated with 1800 cGy of cranial radiation therapy and 74 children who received high-dose methotrexate but no radiation therapy. We found a significant decline in full scale intelligence quotient in the irradiated group that increased with the length of time from diagnosis. Younger age at diagnosis was associated with lower full scale intelligence quotient in the radiated group. Our results indicate that a radiation dose of 1800 cGy can have negative effects on neurocognitive function and we continue to question the benefit of low-dose cranial radiation therapy. (author)

  7. SWOG S0910: A Phase 2 Trial of Clofarabine/Cytarabine/Epratuzumab for Relapsed/Refractory Acute Lymphocytic Leukaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advani, Anjali S.; McDonough, Shannon; Coutre, Steven; Wood, Brent; Radich, Jerald; Mims, Martha; O’Donnell, Margaret; Elkins, Stephanie; Becker, Michael; Othus, Megan; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Precursor B-acute lymphoblastic leukaemias (pre-B ALLs) comprise the majority of ALLs and virtually all blasts express CD22 in the cytoplasm and on the cell surface. In the present study (Southwestern Oncology Group S0910), we evaluated the addition of epratuzumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against CD22, to the combination of clofarabine and cytarabine in adults with relapsed/refractory pre-B ALL. The response rate [complete remission and complete remission with incomplete count recovery ] was 52%, significantly higher than our previous trial with clofarabine/cytarabine alone, where the response rate was 17%. This result is encouraging and suggests a potential benefit to adding epratuzumab to chemotherapy for ALL; however, a randomized trial will be needed to answer this question. PMID:24579885

  8. Phase 1 dose-finding study of rebastinib (DCC-2036) in patients with relapsed chronic myeloid leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Jorge; Talpaz, Moshe; Smith, Hedy P; Snyder, David S; Khoury, Jean; Bhalla, Kapil N; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; Larson, Richard; Mitchell, David; Wise, Scott C; Rutkoski, Thomas J; Smith, Bryan D; Flynn, Daniel L; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Rosen, Oliver; Van Etten, Richard A

    2017-03-01

    A vailable tyrosine kinase inhibitors for chronic myeloid leukemia bind in an adenosine 5'-triphosphate-binding pocket and are affected by evolving mutations that confer resistance. Rebastinib was identified as a switch control inhibitor of BCR-ABL1 and FLT3 and may be active against resistant mutations. A Phase 1, first-in-human, single-agent study investigated rebastinib in relapsed or refractory chronic or acute myeloid leukemia. The primary objectives were to investigate the safety of rebastinib and establish the maximum tolerated dose and recommended Phase 2 dose. Fifty-seven patients received treatment with rebastinib. Sixteen patients were treated using powder-in-capsule preparations at doses from 57 mg to 1200 mg daily, and 41 received tablet preparations at doses of 100 mg to 400 mg daily. Dose-limiting toxicities were dysarthria, muscle weakness, and peripheral neuropathy. The maximum tolerated dose was 150 mg tablets administered twice daily. Rebastinib was rapidly absorbed. Bioavailability was 3- to 4-fold greater with formulated tablets compared to unformulated capsules. Eight complete hematologic responses were achieved in 40 evaluable chronic myeloid leukemia patients, 4 of which had a T315I mutation. None of the 5 patients with acute myeloid leukemia responded. Pharmacodynamic analysis showed inhibition of phosphorylation of substrates of BCR-ABL1 or FLT3 by rebastinib. Although clinical activity was observed, clinical benefit was insufficient to justify continued development in chronic or acute myeloid leukemia. Pharmacodynamic analyses suggest that other kinases inhibited by rebastinib, such as TIE2, may be more relevant targets for the clinical development of rebastinib ( clinicaltrials.gov Identifier:00827138 ). Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  9. CAR-T cells targeting CLL-1 as an approach to treat acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinghua; Chen, Siyu; Xiao, Wei; Li, Wende; Wang, Liang; Yang, Shuo; Wang, Weida; Xu, Liping; Liao, Shuangye; Liu, Wenjian; Wang, Yang; Liu, Nawei; Zhang, Jianeng; Xia, Xiaojun; Kang, Tiebang; Chen, Gong; Cai, Xiuyu; Yang, Han; Zhang, Xing; Lu, Yue; Zhou, Penghui

    2018-01-10

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is one of the most common types of adult acute leukemia. Standard chemotherapies can induce complete remission in selected patients; however, a majority of patients eventually relapse and succumb to the disease. Thus, the development of novel therapeutics for AML is urgently needed. Human C-type lectin-like molecule-1 (CLL-1) is a type II transmembrane glycoprotein, and its expression is restricted to myeloid cells and the majority of AML blasts. Moreover, CLL-1 is expressed in leukemia stem cells (LSCs), but absent in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which may provide a potential therapeutic target for AML treatment. We tested the expression of CLL-1 antigen on peripheral blood cells and bone marrow cells in healthy donor and AML patients. Then, we developed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) containing a CLL1-specific single-chain variable fragment, in combination with CD28, 4-1BB costimulatory domains, and CD3-ζ signaling domain. We further investigate the function of CLL-1 CAR-T cells. The CLL-1 CAR-T cells specifically lysed CLL-1 + cell lines as well as primary AML patient samples in vitro. Strong anti-leukemic activity was observed in vivo by using a xenograft model of disseminated AML. Importantly, CLL-1 + myeloid progenitor cells and mature myeloid cells were specifically eliminated by CLL-1 CAR-T cells, while normal HSCs were not targeted due to the lack of CLL-1 expression. CLL-1 CAR-T represents a promising immunotherapy for the treatment of AML.

  10. Cutaneous myeloid sarcoma associated with chronic myeloid leukemia*

    OpenAIRE

    Vasconcelos, Erica Rodrigues de Araujo; Bauk, Alexander Richard; Rochael, Mayra Carrijo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Myeloid sarcoma is an extramedullary tumor of malignant myeloid cells often associated with acute myeloid leukemia, chronic myeloproliferative disorders and myelodysplastic syndromes. The skin is one of the most commonly affected sites. We report a rare case of cutaneous myeloid sarcoma associated with chronic myeloid leukemia.

  11. Association of Therapy for Autoimmune Disease With Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertz-Archambault, Natalie; Kosiorek, Heidi; Taylor, Gretchen E; Kelemen, Katalin; Dueck, Amylou; Castro, Janna; Marino, Robert; Gauthier, Susanne; Finn, Laura; Sproat, Lisa Z; Palmer, Jeanne; Mesa, Ruben A; Al-Kali, Aref; Foran, James; Tibes, Raoul

    2017-07-01

    Therapy-related myeloid neoplasms are a potentially life-threatening consequence of treatment for autoimmune disease (AID) and an emerging clinical phenomenon. To query the association of cytotoxic, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulating agents to treat patients with AID with the risk for developing myeloid neoplasm. This retrospective case-control study and medical record review included 40 011 patients with an International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, coded diagnosis of primary AID who were seen at 2 centers from January 1, 2004, to December 31, 2014; of these, 311 patients had a concomitant coded diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Eighty-six cases met strict inclusion criteria. A case-control match was performed at a 2:1 ratio. Odds ratio (OR) assessment for AID-directed therapies. Among the 86 patients who met inclusion criteria (49 men [57%]; 37 women [43%]; mean [SD] age, 72.3 [15.6] years), 55 (64.0%) had MDS, 21 (24.4%) had de novo AML, and 10 (11.6%) had AML and a history of MDS. Rheumatoid arthritis (23 [26.7%]), psoriasis (18 [20.9%]), and systemic lupus erythematosus (12 [14.0%]) were the most common autoimmune profiles. Median time from onset of AID to diagnosis of myeloid neoplasm was 8 (interquartile range, 4-15) years. A total of 57 of 86 cases (66.3%) received a cytotoxic or an immunomodulating agent. In the comparison group of 172 controls (98 men [57.0%]; 74 women [43.0%]; mean [SD] age, 72.7 [13.8] years), 105 (61.0%) received either agent (P = .50). Azathioprine sodium use was observed more frequently in cases (odds ratio [OR], 7.05; 95% CI, 2.35- 21.13; P myeloid neoplasm. The control and case cohorts had similar systemic exposures by agent category. No association was found for anti-tumor necrosis factor agents. Finally, no timeline was found for the association of drug exposure with the incidence in development of myeloid neoplasm.

  12. Molecular and cytogenetic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia: review and case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Deolinda Rodrigues Pereira Velloso

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the frequency of mutations that maylead to a good or bad prognosis, as well as their relation withthe karyotype and immunophenotype in patients with acutemyeloid leukemia. Methods: Thirty samples of patients withacute myeloid leukemia were studied, in which FLT3-ITD, FLT3-TKD and NPM1 mutations were investigated. All samples weresubmitted to immunophenotyping and 25 to karyotyping. Results:An occurrence of 33.3% NPM1 mutation and an equal numberof FLT3-ITD mutation were observed. When only the cases withnormal karyotype were studied, this figures increased to 50 and40%, respectively. Eight percent of cases with normal karyotypeand genotype NPM1+/FLT3- were included in the group of acutemyeloid leukemia with good prognosis. The typical phenotypeof acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype and mutatedNPM1 (HLA-DR and CD34 negative was not observed in thissmall series. Conclusion: Good prognosis cases were identifiedin this series, emphasizing the need to include new geneticmarkers in the diagnostic routine for the correct classification ofacute myeloid leukemia, to more properly estimate prognosis anddetermine treatment.

  13. The Past, Present and Future Subclassification of Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forthun, Rakel B; Hinrichs, Carina; Dowling, Tara H; Bruserud, Øystein; Selheim, Frode

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized as a heterogeneous disease where the patients are sub grouped according to several classification systems and mutational analyses. Diagnosis of AML is based on identification of the specific myeloid cell initiating the disease, quantification of immature blasts in bone marrow and peripheral blood, as well as detection of mutations and translocations. The heterogeneity of AML is caused by a block in differentiation that may occur in any of the different myeloid cell populations. These undifferentiated cells also harbor an increased proliferation potential that leads to accumulation of immature leukemic cells. The current development of more sensitive and less labor intensive analysis methods has led classification of patients from being a system based on morphology of the leukemic cells to being more sophisticated, detecting translocations and small mutations found in the whole leukemic clone or in a minor subclone. This review aims to describe the most common classification systems of AML, including frequently occurring translocations, mutations and epigenetic alterations, as well as describe traditional and novel methods for diagnosis and analysis of these patients.

  14. Importance of CD117 in the Assignation of a Myeloid Lineage in Acute Leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomerantz, Alan; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Sergio; Demichelis-Gómez, Roberta; Barrera-Lumbreras, Georgina; Barrales-Benítez, Olga V; Díaz-Huízar, María José; Goldberg-Murow, Monica; López-Karpovitch, Xavier; Aguayo, Álvaro

    2017-02-01

    The correct classification of acute leukemias (AL) is an essential part in the evaluation of any patient with this disease. Historically, CD117 has been an important asset in the diagnosis of patients with mixed-phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL). In an attempt to simplify the diagnosis of MPAL with fewer and more lineage specific markers, the World Health Organization (WHO) proposed in 2008 a new criteria for the diagnosis of this type of AL, which excluded CD117 from the myeloid markers that are utilized to diagnose MPAL. In order to assess whether CD117 is necessary in the diagnosis of MPAL, we evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of CD117 for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in 331 patients with AL. The calculated sensitivity of CD117 for AML was 85.88% (103/120), while the specificity was 83.9% (177/211). Besides myeloperoxidase (MPO), which was used as the gold standard in differentiating AML from other type of ALs, the most specific markers for AML in our study were CD14 and CD64 (99.5 and 95.6%). Although the specificity of CD117 in this study is not as high as CD14 and CD64, markers concomitantly used in this this study and in the WHO classification, based on the results of other researches (i.e. the specificity of CD117 for AML was 100% in one study) and due to the fact that its specificity for AML in this study is relatively high, we recommend the use CD117 in assigning a myeloid lineage in MPAL. Copyright © 2017 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Expression profile and specific network features of the apoptotic machinery explain relapse of acute myeloid leukemia after chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragusa, Marco; Consoli, Carla; Camuglia, Maria Grazia; Di Pietro, Cinzia; Milone, Giuseppe; Purrello, Michele; Avola, Giuseppe; Angelica, Rosario; Barbagallo, Davide; Guglielmino, Maria Rosa; Duro, Laura R; Majorana, Alessandra; Statello, Luisa; Salito, Loredana

    2010-01-01

    According to the different sensitivity of their bone marrow CD34+ cells to in vitro treatment with Etoposide or Mafosfamide, Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML) patients in apparent complete remission (CR) after chemotherapy induction may be classified into three groups: (i) normally responsive; (ii) chemoresistant; (iii) highly chemosensitive. This inversely correlates with in vivo CD34+ mobilization and, interestingly, also with the prognosis of the disease: patients showing a good mobilizing activity are resistant to chemotherapy and subject to significantly higher rates of Minimal Residual Disease (MRD) and relapse than the others. Based on its known role in patients' response to chemotherapy, we hypothesized an involvement of the Apoptotic Machinery (AM) in these phenotypic features. To investigate the molecular bases of the differential chemosensitivity of bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in CR AML patients, and the relationship between chemosensitivity, mobilizing activity and relapse rates, we analyzed their AM expression profile by performing Real Time RT-PCR of 84 AM genes in CD34+ pools from the two extreme classes of patients (i.e., chemoresistant and highly chemosensitive), and compared them with normal controls. The AM expression profiles of patients highlighted features that could satisfactorily explain their in vitro chemoresponsive phenotype: specifically, in chemoresistant patients we detected up regulation of antiapoptotic BIRC genes and down regulation of proapoptotic APAF1, FAS, FASL, TNFRSF25. Interestingly, our analysis of the AM network showed that the dysregulated genes in these patients are characterized by high network centrality (i.e., high values of betweenness, closeness, radiality, stress) and high involvement in drug response. AM genes represent critical nodes for the proper execution of cell death following pharmacological induction in patients. We propose that their dysregulation (either due to inborn or de novo genomic

  16. Expression profile and specific network features of the apoptotic machinery explain relapse of acute myeloid leukemia after chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Pietro Cinzia

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background According to the different sensitivity of their bone marrow CD34+ cells to in vitro treatment with Etoposide or Mafosfamide, Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML patients in apparent complete remission (CR after chemotherapy induction may be classified into three groups: (i normally responsive; (ii chemoresistant; (iii highly chemosensitive. This inversely correlates with in vivo CD34+ mobilization and, interestingly, also with the prognosis of the disease: patients showing a good mobilizing activity are resistant to chemotherapy and subject to significantly higher rates of Minimal Residual Disease (MRD and relapse than the others. Based on its known role in patients' response to chemotherapy, we hypothesized an involvement of the Apoptotic Machinery (AM in these phenotypic features. Methods To investigate the molecular bases of the differential chemosensitivity of bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSC in CR AML patients, and the relationship between chemosensitivity, mobilizing activity and relapse rates, we analyzed their AM expression profile by performing Real Time RT-PCR of 84 AM genes in CD34+ pools from the two extreme classes of patients (i.e., chemoresistant and highly chemosensitive, and compared them with normal controls. Results The AM expression profiles of patients highlighted features that could satisfactorily explain their in vitro chemoresponsive phenotype: specifically, in chemoresistant patients we detected up regulation of antiapoptotic BIRC genes and down regulation of proapoptotic APAF1, FAS, FASL, TNFRSF25. Interestingly, our analysis of the AM network showed that the dysregulated genes in these patients are characterized by high network centrality (i.e., high values of betweenness, closeness, radiality, stress and high involvement in drug response. Conclusions AM genes represent critical nodes for the proper execution of cell death following pharmacological induction in patients. We propose that their

  17. Cytogenetically Unrelated Clones in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Showing Different Responses to Chemotherapy

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    Kohei Kasahara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML with two cytogenetically unrelated clones. The patient was a 45-year-old male who was diagnosed with acute monoblastic leukemia (AMoL. Initial G-band analysis showed 51,XY,+6,+8,inv(9(p12q13c,+11,+13,+19[12]/52,idem,+Y[8], but G-band analysis after induction therapy showed 45,XY,-7,inv(9(p12q13c[19]/46,XY,inv(9(p12q13c[1]. Retrospective FISH analysis revealed a cryptic monosomy 7 clone in the initial AML sample. The clone with multiple trisomies was eliminated after induction therapy and never recurred, but a clone with monosomy 7 was still detected in myelodysplastic marrow with a normal blast percentage. Both clones were successfully eliminated after related peripheral blood stem cell transplantation, but the patient died of relapsed AML with monosomy 7. We concluded that one clone was de novo AMoL with chromosome 6, 8, 11, 13, and 19 trisomy and that the other was acute myeloid leukemia with myelodysplasia-related changes (AML-MRC with chromosome 7 monosomy showing different responses to chemotherapy. Simultaneous onset of cytogenetically unrelated hematological malignancies that each have a different disease status is a rare phenomenon but is important to diagnose for a correct understanding of the disease status and for establishing an appropriate treatment strategy.

  18. The subclonal complexity of STIL-TAL1+ T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furness, Caroline L; Mansur, Marcela B; Weston, Victoria J; Ermini, Luca; van Delft, Frederik W; Jenkinson, Sarah; Gale, Rosemary; Harrison, Christine J; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S; Sanchez-Martin, Marta; Ferrando, Adolfo A; Kearns, Pamela; Titley, Ian; Ford, Anthony M; Potter, Nicola E; Greaves, Mel

    2018-03-20

    Single-cell genetics were used to interrogate clonal complexity and the sequence of mutational events in STIL-TAL1+ T-ALL. Single-cell multicolour FISH was used to demonstrate that the earliest detectable leukaemia subclone contained the STIL-TAL1 fusion and copy number loss of 9p21.3 (CDKN2A/CDKN2B locus), with other copy number alterations including loss of PTEN occurring as secondary subclonal events. In three cases, multiplex qPCR and phylogenetic analysis were used to produce branching evolutionary trees recapitulating the snapshot history of T-ALL evolution in this leukaemia subtype, which confirmed that mutations in key T-ALL drivers, including NOTCH1 and PTEN, were subclonal and reiterative in distinct subclones. Xenografting confirmed that self-renewing or propagating cells were genetically diverse. These data suggest that the STIL-TAL1 fusion is a likely founder or truncal event. Therapies targeting the TAL1 auto-regulatory complex are worthy of further investigation in T-ALL.

  19. NPM1 mutations in therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia with uncharacteristic features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Tolstrup; Andersen, Mette Klarskov; Christiansen, D.H.

    2008-01-01

    Frameshift mutations of the nucleophosmin gene (NPM1) were recently reported as a frequently occurring abnormality in patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML). To evaluate the frequency of NPM1 mutations in patients with therapy-related myelodysplasia (t-MDS) and therapy-related AML (t......-/-7, the most frequent abnormalities of t-MDS/t-AML, were not observed (P=0.002). This raises the question whether some of the cases presenting NPM1 mutations were in fact cases of de novo leukemia. The close association to class I mutations and the inverse association to class II mutations suggest...

  20. Trisomy 8 in Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia. A NOPHO-AML Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Anne Cathrine Lund; Sandahl, Julie Damgaard; Kjeldsen, Eigil

    2016-01-01

    Trisomy 8 (+8) is a common cytogenetic aberration in acute myeloid leukemia (AML); however, the impact of +8 in pediatric AML is largely unknown. We retrospectively investigated 609 patients from the NOPHO-AML database to determine the clinical and cytogenetic characteristics of +8 in pediatric AML......;11). Trisomy 8 alone was associated with older age (median age 10.1 years), FAB M2 (33%), and FLT3-ITD mutations (58%). The 5-year event-free survival for patients with +8 alone was 50% and 5-year overall survival was 75%. In conclusion, +8 is one of the most common cytogenetic aberrations in pediatric AML...

  1. Chronic meningitis by histoplasmosis: report of a child with acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.H. Pereira

    Full Text Available Meningitis is a common evolution in progressive disseminated histoplasmosis in children, and is asymptomatic in many cases. In leukemia, the impaired of the T cells function can predispose to the disseminated form. The attributed mortality rate in this case is 20%-40% and the relapse rate is as high as 50%; therefore, prolonged treatment may be emphasized. We have described a child with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, that developed skin lesions and asymptomatic chronic meningitis, with a good evolution after prolonged treatment with amphotericin B deoxycholate followed by fluconazole.

  2. DNMT3A GENE POINT MUTATIONS DETECTION IN ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA PATIENTS USING SEQUENCING TECHNIQUE

    OpenAIRE

    A. V. Vinogradov; A. V. Rezaykin; A. G. Sergeev

    2015-01-01

    Aim: to estimate the frequency of DNMT3A gene exons 18–26 point mutations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients (pts) using target automatic sequencing technique.Material and Methods. Bone marrow and peripheral blood samples were obtained from 34 AML pts aged 21 to 64, who were treated in Sverdlovsk Regional Hematological Centre (Ekaterinburg) during the period 2012–2014. Distribution of the pts according to FAB-classification was as follows: AML M0 – 3, M1 – 1, M2 – 12, M3 – 3, M4 – 10, M...

  3. Rhabdomyolysis Caused by Candida parapsilosis in a Patient with Acute Myeloid Leukemia after Bone Marrow Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakiuchi, Seiji; Yakushijin, Kimikazu; Yamamoto, Katsuya; Tomioka, Hideo; Inui, Yumiko; Okamura, Atsuo; Kawamoto, Shinichiro; Minami, Yosuke; Murayama, Tohru; Ito, Mitsuhiro; Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Minami, Hironobu

    2015-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is characterized by a marked elevation of the creatine kinase (CK) levels and myoglobinuria, thus leading to renal dysfunction. Various viruses or bacteria can be etiologic agents, but mycosis has only rarely been reported to be a cause of rhabdomyolysis. In this report, we describe an adolescent male with acute myeloid leukemia who underwent allogeneic bone marrow transplantation and thereafter developed rhabdomyolysis and Candida parapsilosis fungemia almost at the same time. Following treatment for C. parapsilosis, the transaminase and CK levels both satisfactorily decreased. This case illustrates that C. parapsilosis infection may be a causative agent of rhabdomyolysis in immunocompromised patients.

  4. Asparaginase-associated pancreatitis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: an observational Ponte di Legno Toxicity Working Group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolthers, Benjamin O; Frandsen, Thomas L; Baruchel, André; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Barzilai, Shlomit; Colombini, Antonella; Escherich, Gabriele; Grell, Kathrine; Inaba, Hiroto; Kovacs, Gábor; Liang, Der-Cherng; Mateos, Marion; Mondelaers, Veerle; Möricke, Anja; Ociepa, Tomasz; Samarasinghe, Sujith; Silverman, Lewis B; van der Sluis, Inge M; Stanulla, Martin; Vrooman, Lynda M; Yano, Michihiro; Zapotocka, Ester; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2017-09-01

    Survival for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia surpasses 90% with contemporary therapy; however, patients remain burdened by the severe toxic effects of treatment, including asparaginase-associated pancreatitis. To investigate the risk of complications and risk of re-exposing patients with asparaginase-associated pancreatitis to asparaginase, 18 acute lymphoblastic leukaemia trial groups merged data for this observational study. Patient files from 26 trials run by 18 trial groups were reviewed on children (aged 1·0-17·9 years) diagnosed with t(9;22)-negative acute lymphoblastic leukaemia between June 1, 1996, and Jan 1, 2016, who within 50 days of asparaginase exposure developed asparaginase-associated pancreatitis. Asparaginase-associated pancreatitis was defined by at least two criteria: abdominal pain, pancreatic enzymes at least three times the upper limit of normal (ULN), and imaging compatible with pancreatitis. Patients without sufficient data for diagnostic criteria were excluded. Primary outcomes were defined as acute and persisting complications of asparaginase-associated pancreatitis and risk of re-exposing patients who suffered an episode of asparaginase-associated pancreatitis to asparaginase. Data were collected from Feb 2, 2015, to June 30, 2016, and analysed and stored in a common database at Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. Of 465 patients with asparaginase-associated pancreatitis, 33 (8%) of 424 with available data needed mechanical ventilation, 109 (26%) of 422 developed pseudocysts, acute insulin therapy was needed in 81 (21%) of 393, and seven (2%) of 458 patients died. Risk of assisted mechanical ventilation, need for insulin, pseudocysts, or death was associated with older age (median age for patients with complications 10·5 years [IQR 6·4-13·8] vs without complications 6·1 years [IQR 3·6-12·2], ppancreatitis, 31 (11%) of 275 patients still needed insulin or had recurrent abdominal pain or both. Both the risk of persisting

  5. FBXW7 and NOTCH1 mutations in childhood T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and T cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Myoung-Ja; Taki, Tomohiko; Oda, Megumi; Watanabe, Tomoyuki; Yumura-Yagi, Keiko; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Hara, Junichi; Horibe, Keizo; Hayashi, Yasuhide

    2009-04-01

    Mutation analysis of FBXW7 and NOTCH1 genes was performed in 55 T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL) and 14 T cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (T-NHL) patients who were treated on the Japan Association of Childhood Leukaemia Study (JACLS) protocols ALL-97 and NHL-98. FBXW7 and/or NOTCH1 mutations were found in 22 (40.0%) of 55 T-ALL and 7 (50.0%) of 14 T-NHL patients. FBXW7 mutations were found in 8 (14.6%) of 55 T-ALL and 3 (21.4%) of 14 T-NHL patients, and NOTCH1 mutations in 17 (30.9%) of 55 T-ALL and 6 (42.9%) of 14 T-NHL patients. Three (5.4%) T-ALL and two (1.4%) T-NHL patients had mutations in both FBXW7 and NOTCH1. FBXW7 mutations included one insertion, one deletion, one deletion/insertion and nine missense mutations. NOTCH1 mutations were detected in the heterodimerization domain (HD) in 15 cases, in the PEST domain in seven cases, and in both the HD and PEST domains in one case. Five-year event-free survival and overall survival for patients with FBXW7 and/or NOTCH1 mutations were 95.5% (95% CI, 71.9-99.4%) and 100% respectively, suggesting that T-ALL patients with FBXW7 and/or NOTCH1 mutation represent a good prognosis compared to those without FBXW7 and/or NOTCH1 mutations (63.6%, P = 0.007 and 78.8%, P = 0.023, respectively).

  6. Identification of i(X)(p10) as the sole molecular abnormality in atypical chronic myeloid leukemia evolved into acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnari, Carmelo; Panetta, Paola; Fabiani, Emiliano; Nardone, Anna Maria; Postorivo, Diana; Falconi, Giulia; Franceschini, Luca; Rizzo, Manuela; Rapisarda, Vito Mario; De Bellis, Eleonora; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Voso, Maria Teresa

    2018-03-01

    The World Health Organization classifies atypical chronic myeloid leukemia (aCML) as a myeloproliferative/myelodisplastic hematological disorder. The primary manifestations are leukocytosis with disgranulopoiesis, absence of basophilia and/or monocytosis, splenomegaly and absence of Philadelphia chromosome or BCR/ABL fusion. Overall 50-65% of patients demonstrate karyotypic abnormalities, although no specific cytogenetic alterations have been associated with this disease. X chromosome alterations have been rarely reported in myeloid malignancies. Although Isodicentric X, idic(X)(q13) is well known in females with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), little data are available on X isochromosome and its pathogenetic potential in these disorders. i(X)(p10) is observed in a variety of hematologic malignancies, both myeloid and lymphoid, as a unique abnormality, as well as part of a more complex karyotype, in females and less frequently in male patients. The present report describes the first patient with aCML, with documented isolated i(X)(p10), who developed a secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML).

  7. A mathematical model of phosphorylation AKT in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adi, Y. A., E-mail: yudi.adi@math.uad.ac.id [Department of Mathematic Faculty of MIPA Universitas Ahmad Dahlan (Indonesia); Department of Mathematic Faculty of MIPA Universitas Gadjah Mada (Indonesia); Kusumo, F. A.; Aryati, L. [Department of Mathematic Faculty of MIPA Universitas Gadjah Mada (Indonesia); Hardianti, M. S. [Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Gadjah Mada (Indonesia)

    2016-04-06

    In this paper we consider a mathematical model of PI3K/AKT signaling pathways in phosphorylation AKT. PI3K/AKT pathway is an important mediator of cytokine signaling implicated in regulation of hematopoiesis. Constitutive activation of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway has been observed in Acute Meyloid Leukemia (AML) it caused by the mutation of Fms-like Tyrosine Kinase 3 in internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD), the most common molecular abnormality associated with AML. Depending upon its phosphorylation status, protein interaction, substrate availability, and localization, AKT can phosphorylate or inhibite numerous substrates in its downstream pathways that promote protein synthesis, survival, proliferation, and metabolism. Firstly, we present a mass action ordinary differential equation model describing AKT double phosphorylation (AKTpp) in a system with 11 equations. Finally, under the asumtion enzyme catalyst constant and steady state equilibrium, we reduce the system in 4 equation included Michaelis Menten constant. Simulation result suggested that a high concentration of PI3K and/or a low concentration of phospatase increased AKTpp activation. This result also indicates that PI3K is a potential target theraphy in AML.

  8. A mathematical model of phosphorylation AKT in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adi, Y. A.; Kusumo, F. A.; Aryati, L.; Hardianti, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we consider a mathematical model of PI3K/AKT signaling pathways in phosphorylation AKT. PI3K/AKT pathway is an important mediator of cytokine signaling implicated in regulation of hematopoiesis. Constitutive activation of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway has been observed in Acute Meyloid Leukemia (AML) it caused by the mutation of Fms-like Tyrosine Kinase 3 in internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD), the most common molecular abnormality associated with AML. Depending upon its phosphorylation status, protein interaction, substrate availability, and localization, AKT can phosphorylate or inhibite numerous substrates in its downstream pathways that promote protein synthesis, survival, proliferation, and metabolism. Firstly, we present a mass action ordinary differential equation model describing AKT double phosphorylation (AKTpp) in a system with 11 equations. Finally, under the asumtion enzyme catalyst constant and steady state equilibrium, we reduce the system in 4 equation included Michaelis Menten constant. Simulation result suggested that a high concentration of PI3K and/or a low concentration of phospatase increased AKTpp activation. This result also indicates that PI3K is a potential target theraphy in AML.

  9. Benefit of oral nutritional supplements for children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia during remission-induction chemotherapy: a quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Rui; Chen, Gai-Yun; Fu, San-Xian; Zhong, Jie; Ma, Yan

    2018-01-01

    To determine the effect of oral nutritional supplements (ONS) on children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia undergoing remission-induction chemotherapy. We included 127 paediatric patients who were diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and undergoing remission- induction chemotherapy in the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University. Children from two paediatric wards who met the inclusion criteria were enrolled. One ward was randomly chosen as the intervention group and the other ward as the control group. Children in the two groups were matched for age and sex. The ONS group was administered Peptamen® (n=60) and the control group was administered a low-fat diet (n=67). The baseline information before treatment was not significantly different between groups (p>0.05). In the control group, weight loss at the end of chemotherapy was significantly higher than that of ONS group (poral nutritional supplements can improve the nutritional status of children, reduce the incidence of complications, and decrease the costs of hospitalization.

  10. Antileukaemia effect of rapamycin alone or in combination with daunorubicin on Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xi; Lin, Juan; Gong, Yuping; Ma, Hongbing; Shuai, Xiao; Zhou, Ruiqing; Guo, Yong; Shan, Qingqing; He, Guangcui

    2012-09-01

    The translocation (9;22) (q34;q11), known as the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome and bcr-abl fusion gene, is the common cytogenetic abnormality and an unfavourable prognosis in adult acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Although chemotherapeutic treatment produced high rates of complete response in approximately 70%-80% of newly diagnosed Ph+ ALL, the onset of resistance and clinical relapse is rapid. Therefore, the efficacy of treatment in Ph+ ALL is still to be determined. In this study, we aimed to assess the antileukemic activity of rapamycin (RAPA) (Sigma-Aldrich Corporation, MO, USA), a mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor, alone and in combination with daunorubicin (DNR) (Pharmacia & Upjohn Company, Germany) in a Ph+ acute lymphoblastic cell line SUP-B15 and a primary Ph+ ALL sample in vitro. Here, we demonstrated that 50 nmol/L of RAPA significantly intensified the inhibition induced by DNR on both Ph+ ALL cell line and a primary Ph+ ALL sample. Notably, we reported that the consequence of DNR treatment induced the over expression of the components of mammalian target of rapamycin signalling pathway, whereas RAPA effectively eliminated this deleterious side effect of DNR, which might enhance DNR's ability to kill drug-resistant cancer. The synergistic effect was also associated with the increase in autophagy, blockage of cell cycle progression in the G1 phase. Altogether, our results suggest that DNR in combination with RAPA is more effective in the treatment of Ph+ ALL compared with DNR alone. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Association between MTHFR polymorphisms and acute myeloid leukemia risk: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Tao Qin

    Full Text Available Previous observational studies investigating the association between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR polymorphisms and acute myeloid leukemia risk (AML have yielded inconsistent results. The aim of this study is to derive a more precise estimation of the association between MTHFR (C677T and A1298C polymorphisms and acute myeloid leukemia risk. PubMed and Embase databases were systematically searched to identify relevant studies from their inception to August 2013. Odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were the metric of choice. Thirteen studies were selected for C677T polymorphism (1838 cases and 5318 controls and 9 studies (1335 patients and 4295 controls for A1298C polymorphism. Overall, pooled results showed that C677T polymorphism was not significant associated with AML risk(OR, 0.98-1.04; 95% CI, 0.86-0.92 to 1.09-1.25. Similar results were observed for the A1298C polymorphism and in subgroup analysis. All comparisons revealed no substantial heterogeneity nor did we detect evidence of publication bias. In summary, this meta-analysis provides evidence that MTHFR polymorphisms were not associated with AML risk. Further investigations are needed to offer better insight into the role of these polymorphisms in AML carcinogenesis.

  12. Association between MTHFR Polymorphisms and Acute Myeloid Leukemia Risk: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yan; Lu, Ge-Ning; Wang, Ren-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Previous observational studies investigating the association between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphisms and acute myeloid leukemia risk (AML) have yielded inconsistent results. The aim of this study is to derive a more precise estimation of the association between MTHFR (C677T and A1298C) polymorphisms and acute myeloid leukemia risk. PubMed and Embase databases were systematically searched to identify relevant studies from their inception to August 2013. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were the metric of choice. Thirteen studies were selected for C677T polymorphism (1838 cases and 5318 controls) and 9 studies (1335 patients and 4295 controls) for A1298C polymorphism. Overall, pooled results showed that C677T polymorphism was not significant associated with AML risk(OR, 0.98–1.04; 95% CI, 0.86–0.92 to 1.09–1.25). Similar results were observed for the A1298C polymorphism and in subgroup analysis. All comparisons revealed no substantial heterogeneity nor did we detect evidence of publication bias. In summary, this meta-analysis provides evidence that MTHFR polymorphisms were not associated with AML risk. Further investigations are needed to offer better insight into the role of these polymorphisms in AML carcinogenesis. PMID:24586405

  13. Leukemogenic mechanisms and targets of a NUP98/HHEX fusion in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, Dragana; Gorello, Paolo; Liu, Ting; Ehret, Sabire; La Starza, Roberta; Desjobert, Cecile; Baty, Florent; Brutsche, Martin; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheila; Santoro, Alessandra; Mecucci, Christina; Schwaller, Juerg

    2008-06-15

    We have studied a patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and t(10;11)(q23;p15) as the sole cytogenetic abnormality. Molecular analysis revealed a translocation involving nucleoporin 98 (NUP98) fused to the DNA-binding domain of the hematopoietically expressed homeobox gene (HHEX). Expression of NUP98/HHEX in murine bone marrow cells leads to aberrant self-renewal and a block in normal differentiation that depends on the integrity of the NUP98 GFLG repeats and the HHEX homeodomain. Transplantation of bone marrow cells expressing NUP98/HHEX leads to transplantable acute leukemia characterized by extensive infiltration of leukemic blasts expressing myeloid markers (Gr1(+)) as well as markers of the B-cell lineage (B220(+)). A latency period of 9 months and its clonal character suggest that NUP98/HHEX is necessary but not sufficient for disease induction. Expression of EGFP-NUP98/HHEX fusions showed a highly similar nuclear localization pattern as for other NUP98/homeodomain fusions, such as NUP98/HOXA9. Comparative gene expression profiling in primary bone marrow cells provided evidence for the presence of common targets in cells expressing NUP98/HOXA9 or NUP98/HHEX. Some of these genes (Hoxa5, Hoxa9, Flt3) are deregulated in NUP98/HHEX-induced murine leukemia as well as in human blasts carrying this fusion and might represent bona fide therapeutic targets.

  14. Over-Expression of Catalase in Myeloid Cells Confers Acute Protection Following Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Bernadette Cabigas

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and new treatment options are greatly needed. Oxidative stress is increased following myocardial infarction and levels of antioxidants decrease, causing imbalance that leads to dysfunction. Therapy involving catalase, the endogenous scavenger of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, has been met with mixed results. When over-expressed in cardiomyocytes from birth, catalase improves function following injury. When expressed in the same cells in an inducible manner, catalase showed a time-dependent response with no acute benefit, but a chronic benefit due to altered remodeling. In myeloid cells, catalase over-expression reduced angiogenesis during hindlimb ischemia and prevented monocyte migration. In the present study, due to the large inflammatory response following infarction, we examined myeloid-specific catalase over-expression on post-infarct healing. We found a significant increase in catalase levels following infarction that led to a decrease in H2O2 levels, leading to improved acute function. This increase in function could be attributed to reduced infarct size and improved angiogenesis. Despite these initial improvements, there was no improvement in chronic function, likely due to increased fibrosis. These data combined with what has been previously shown underscore the need for temporal, cell-specific catalase delivery as a potential therapeutic option.

  15. Extramedullary Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML: Leukemic Pleural Effusion, Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen ePemmaraju

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective and Importance: Malignant pleural effusions occur in the setting of both solid and hematologic malignancies. Pleural effusion caused by leukemic infiltration is an unusual extramedullary manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML with fewer than 20 cases reported.1-11 We report a case of pericardial and pleural effusions in a patient with AML and review the literature. Clinical presentation: In this case, a 55 year old man with previous history of myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN experienced transformation AML, heralded by appearance of leukemic pleural effusions. The patient was identified to have leukemic pleural effusion based upon extended cytogenetic analysis of the pleural fluid, as morphologic analysis alone was insufficient. Intervention: The patient was treated with hypomethylator-based and intensive chemotherapy strategies, both of which maintained resolution of the effusions in the remission setting. Conclusion: Due to the rarity of diagnosis of leukemic pleural effusions, both cytogenetic and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH testing are recommended. Futhermore, systemic chemotherapy directed at the AML can lead to complete resolution of leukemic pleural effusions. Objective and ImportancePleural effusion caused by leukemic infiltration is an unusual extramedullary manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML, but may be more common than previously thought. Fewer than 20 cases have been reported.1-11 We report a case of pericardial and pleural effusions in a patient with AML and review the literature.

  16. Targeting iron homeostasis induces cellular differentiation and synergizes with differentiating agents in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callens, Celine; Coulon, Séverine; Naudin, Jerome; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Boissel, Nicolas; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Wang, Pamella Huey Mei; Agarwal, Saurabh; Tamouza, Houda; Paubelle, Etienne; Asnafi, Vahid; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Dessen, Philippe; Canioni, Danielle; Chandesris, Olivia; Rubio, Marie Therese; Beaumont, Carole; Benhamou, Marc; Dombret, Hervé; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Monteiro, Renato C; Moura, Ivan C; Hermine, Olivier

    2010-04-12

    Differentiating agents have been proposed to overcome the impaired cellular differentiation in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, only the combinations of all-trans retinoic acid or arsenic trioxide with chemotherapy have been successful, and only in treating acute promyelocytic leukemia (also called AML3). We show that iron homeostasis is an effective target in the treatment of AML. Iron chelating therapy induces the differentiation of leukemia blasts and normal bone marrow precursors into monocytes/macrophages in a manner involving modulation of reactive oxygen species expression and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). 30% of the genes most strongly induced by iron deprivation are also targeted by vitamin D3 (VD), a well known differentiating agent. Iron chelating agents induce expression and phosphorylation of the VD receptor (VDR), and iron deprivation and VD act synergistically. VD magnifies activation of MAPK JNK and the induction of VDR target genes. When used to treat one AML patient refractory to chemotherapy, the combination of iron-chelating agents and VD resulted in reversal of pancytopenia and in blast differentiation. We propose that iron availability modulates myeloid cell commitment and that targeting this cellular differentiation pathway together with conventional differentiating agents provides new therapeutic modalities for AML.

  17. Targeting iron homeostasis induces cellular differentiation and synergizes with differentiating agents in acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callens, Celine; Coulon, Séverine; Naudin, Jerome; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Boissel, Nicolas; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Wang, Pamella Huey Mei; Agarwal, Saurabh; Tamouza, Houda; Paubelle, Etienne; Asnafi, Vahid; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Dessen, Philippe; Canioni, Danielle; Chandesris, Olivia; Rubio, Marie Therese; Beaumont, Carole; Benhamou, Marc; Dombret, Hervé; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Monteiro, Renato C.

    2010-01-01

    Differentiating agents have been proposed to overcome the impaired cellular differentiation in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, only the combinations of all-trans retinoic acid or arsenic trioxide with chemotherapy have been successful, and only in treating acute promyelocytic leukemia (also called AML3). We show that iron homeostasis is an effective target in the treatment of AML. Iron chelating therapy induces the differentiation of leukemia blasts and normal bone marrow precursors into monocytes/macrophages in a manner involving modulation of reactive oxygen species expression and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). 30% of the genes most strongly induced by iron deprivation are also targeted by vitamin D3 (VD), a well known differentiating agent. Iron chelating agents induce expression and phosphorylation of the VD receptor (VDR), and iron deprivation and VD act synergistically. VD magnifies activation of MAPK JNK and the induction of VDR target genes. When used to treat one AML patient refractory to chemotherapy, the combination of iron-chelating agents and VD resulted in reversal of pancytopenia and in blast differentiation. We propose that iron availability modulates myeloid cell commitment and that targeting this cellular differentiation pathway together with conventional differentiating agents provides new therapeutic modalities for AML. PMID:20368581

  18. The 2016 revision to the World Health Organization classification of myeloid neoplasms and acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arber, Daniel A; Orazi, Attilio; Hasserjian, Robert; Thiele, Jürgen; Borowitz, Michael J; Le Beau, Michelle M; Bloomfield, Clara D; Cazzola, Mario; Vardiman, James W

    2016-05-19

    The World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues was last updated in 2008. Since then, there have been numerous advances in the identification of unique biomarkers associated with some myeloid neoplasms and acute leukemias, largely derived from gene expression analysis and next-generation sequencing that can significantly improve the diagnostic criteria as well as the prognostic relevance of entities currently included in the WHO classification and that also suggest new entities that should be added. Therefore, there is a clear need for a revision to the current classification. The revisions to the categories of myeloid neoplasms and acute leukemia will be published in a monograph in 2016 and reflect a consensus of opinion of hematopathologists, hematologists, oncologists, and geneticists. The 2016 edition represents a revision of the prior classification rather than an entirely new classification and attempts to incorporate new clinical, prognostic, morphologic, immunophenotypic, and genetic data that have emerged since the last edition. The major changes in the classification and their rationale are presented here. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  19. The mutational oncoprint of recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities in adult patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisfeld, A-K; Mrózek, K; Kohlschmidt, J; Nicolet, D; Orwick, S; Walker, C J; Kroll, K W; Blachly, J S; Carroll, A J; Kolitz, J E; Powell, B L; Wang, E S; Stone, R M; de la Chapelle, A; Byrd, J C; Bloomfield, C D

    2017-10-01

    Recurrent chromosomal abnormalities and gene mutations detected at the time of diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are associated with particular disease features, treatment response and survival of AML patients, and are used to denote specific disease entities in the World Health Organization classification of myeloid neoplasms and acute leukemia. However, large studies that integrate cytogenetic and comprehensive mutational information are scarce. We created a comprehensive oncoprint of mutations associated with recurrent cytogenetic findings by combining the information on mutational patterns of 80 cancer- and leukemia-associated genes with cytogenetic findings in 1603 adult patients with de novo AML. We show unique differences in the mutational profiles among major cytogenetic subsets, identify novel associations between recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities and both specific gene mutations and gene functional groups, and reveal differences in cytogenetic and mutational features between patients younger than 60 years and those aged 60 years or older. The identified associations between cytogenetic and molecular genetic data may help guide mutation testing in AML, and result in more focused application of targeted therapy in patients with de novo AML.

  20. A phase II study of the EGFR inhibitor gefitinib in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deangelo, Daniel J; Neuberg, Donna; Amrein, Philip C; Berchuck, Jacob; Wadleigh, Martha; Sirulnik, L Andres; Galinsky, Ilene; Golub, Todd; Stegmaier, Kimberly; Stone, Richard M

    2014-04-01

    Novel therapies for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia are required to overcome disease resistance and to provide potentially less toxic therapies for older adults. Prior clinical trials involving patients with non-small cell lung cancer have demonstrated the safety and biologic activity of the administration of EGFR inhibitors in carefully selected patients. The potential efficacy of this approach in patients with acute myeloid leukemia is unknown. The effects of gefitinib on differentiation induction and cell viability in AML cell lines and primary patient AML cells were previously reported and cell viability was inhibited in a clinically achievable range. To determine if EGFR inhibitors would be therapeutically efficacious in advanced AML, we performed a phase II trial in which 18 patients with a median age of 72 (range, 57-84 years) were treated with gefitinib (750mg orally daily). While there were no unexpected toxicities, no patients experienced an objective response, though one had stable disease lasting 16 months. We conclude that in spite of pre-clinical activity and anecdotal cases of response to EGFR inhibitors, routine use of the EGFR inhibitor gefitinib as a single agent for advanced AML is not appropriate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Biting back: BiTE antibodies as a promising therapy for acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Roland B

    2014-06-01

    The experience with gemtuzumab ozogamicin has highlighted both the potential value and limitations of antibodies in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Recently, bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE) antibodies have emerged as a means to harness polyclonal cytotoxic T-cells and cause highly efficient lysis of targeted tumor cells. Promising early results have been obtained with the CD19-directed BiTE antibody, blinatumomab, in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A first candidate for AML is the CD33/CD3 molecule, AMG 330, for which several recent preclinical studies demonstrated high potency and efficacy in destroying CD33(+) human AML cells. Many questions remain to be addressed, but BiTE antibodies may offer an exciting new tool in a disease for which the outcomes in many patients remain unsatisfactory.

  2. Cytarabine and daunorubicin or idarubicin in induction therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eivazi-Ziaei, J.; Kermani, I.A.; Nikanfar, A.; Maljaie, H.; Mahmoudpour, A.; Dolatkhah, R.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the most common form of acute leukemia, is treated by remission induction and post-remission therapy. Remission induction is usually achieved by administration of cytarabine along with an anthracycline such as Daunorubicin (DAU) or Idarubicin (IDA). Our objective was see the benefits if any of IDA over DAU in AML therapy. Methodology: Eighty adult AML patients were enrolled in this study, where 40 received DAU and 40 were treated with IDA. Remission status in each subject was studied and response to therapy was subsequently analyzed using SPSS. Results: Complete remission, partial remission and no responsive status were 15, 19, and 14 respectively for patients on DAU and 14, 18, and 11 for patients on IDA protocol. No significant benefit was detected for IDA compared to DAU in response to therapy. Conclusion: We found no benefit in using IDA over DAU in induction therapy for AML patients treated in northwest of Iran. (author)

  3. Extensive Bone Marrow Necrosis in a Case of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Transformed from a Myeloproliferative Neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Shapiro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Extensive necrosis affecting more than 50% of the bone marrow is an extremely rare histopathological finding. Relatively little is known about its clinical significance because it is most commonly identified at autopsy - whether it is an independent prognostic marker or whether it is a surrogate marker of underlying disease burden remains unclear. We describe herein a case of a 66-year-old patient with acute myeloid leukemia who presented with acute bone marrow failure and was found to have extensive necrosis. We include presenting clinical features, pathology attained at biopsy, and the challenge of treatment. Bone marrow necrosis is a rare but important clinicopathological entity whose recognition may herald the way for more effective prognostication of underlying disease.

  4. Nilotinib-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in a Patient with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vihang Patel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nilotinib, a second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is used for treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML; it has been widely used especially for imatinib-resistant CML. Despite being a novel drug in this therapeutic class, it has the potential to be harmful. We present the case of an elderly woman who developed life-threatening acute pancreatitis as an adverse event after having started the drug. There is only one reported case in the literature of nilotinib-induced acute pancreatitis. The purpose of this case report is to educate physicians who prescribe this medication to be aware of potential life-threatening adverse events. As more and more therapies are available, physicians should be aware of potential effects of cancer treatment that could be life-threatening to patients.

  5. De-escalation of tyrosine kinase inhibitor dose in patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia with stable major molecular response (DESTINY): an interim analysis of a non-randomised, phase 2 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Richard E; Polydoros, Fotios; Apperley, Jane F; Milojkovic, Dragana; Pocock, Christopher; Smith, Graeme; Byrne, Jenny L; de Lavallade, Hugues; O'Brien, Stephen G; Coffey, Tony; Foroni, Letizia; Copland, Mhairi

    2017-07-01

    Discontinuation of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy is feasible for some patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia with deep molecular responses; however, patients with stable major molecular response (MMR), but not MR4, have not been studied, nor has the effect of treatment de-escalation rather than outright cessation. We aimed to examine the effects of treatment de-escalation as a prelude to complete cessation, not only in patients with MR4 or greater, but also in those with MMR but not MR4. We did this interim analysis of a non-randomised, phase 2 trial at 20 hospitals in the UK. We recruited patients (aged ≥18 years) with chronic myeloid leukaemia in first chronic phase who had received TKI for 3 years or more and were either in stable MR4 (BCR-ABL1:ABL1 ratio 0·1%) on two consecutive samples. The primary endpoint of this interim analysis was the proportion of patients who lost MMR on de-escalation and regained MMR on TKI resumption. Analyses were by intention to treat. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01804985. Between Dec 16, 2013 and April 10, 2015, we enrolled 174 patients into the MMR cohort (n=49) or the MR4 cohort (n=125). During the 12 months of half-dose therapy, 12 patients (7%) had molecular recurrence, all of whom regained MMR within 4 months of full-dose TKI resumption (median time to recovery 77 days). Recurrence was significantly lower in the MR4 cohort (three [2%; 90% CI 0·2-4·8] of 121 evaluable patients) than in the MMR cohort (nine [19%; 90% CI 9·5-28·0] of 48 evaluable patients; hazard ratio 0·12, 90% CI 0·04-0·37; p=0·0007), but was unrelated to previous TKI or TKI therapy duration. Adverse events (eg, lethargy, diarrhoea, rash, and nausea) improved during the first 3 months of de-escalation, though not thereafter. 16 serious adverse events were reported, including one fatality due to worsening pre-existing peripheral arterial occlusive disease in a patient who had received only imatinib. TKI de

  6. Frequency of fab subtypes in acute myeloid leukemia patients at Aga Khan University Hospital Karachi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harani, Mahadev S; Adil, Salman Naseem; Shaikh, Mohammad Usman; Kakepoto, Ghulam Nabi; Khurshid, Mohammmad

    2005-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease. Therefore, various parameters are needed to classify this disease into subtypes, so that specific treatment approaches can be utilized effectively. The commonly used method for diagnosis and classification is based on FAB criteria using morphology and cytochemical stains. For some of the categories, immunophenotyping is necessary. The aim of present study is to determine the frequency of various sub types in acute myeloid leukemia using FAB criteria in our population. This will aid in the correct diagnosis of acute leukemia and hence proper management of the patients. This is descriptive case control study conducted at Aga Khan University Hospital from January 1999 to December 2000. The total number of subjects was 116 that included both adults and children. The patients were diagnosed on the basis of bone marrow morphology using FAB classification. Cytochemistry was done in all cases, while immunophenotyping was considered only in those cases that were found to be problematic. Among 116 patients, 70 were males and 46 were females with male to female ratio 1.5:1. The age ranged between 6 months to 85 years with a mean age of 32 years. AML-M4 was the predominant French-American-British (FAB) subtype (36.2%) followed by M2 (30.25%), M3 (10.4%), M1 (8.7%), M0 (7.7%), M5a (3.5%), M5b (2.5%) and M6 (0.8%). The most common FAB subtype observed in our study was Acute myelomonocytic leukemia (M4) which is in accordance with studies reported from Saudia Arabia and a previous study reported from our institution. However,other national and international studies have reported Myeloblastic Leukemia with maturation (M2) as the predominant subtype of AML.

  7. Nutritional status and quality of life in patients with acute leukaemia prior to and after induction chemotherapy in three hospitals in Tehran, Iran: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malihi, Z; Kandiah, M; Chan, Y M; Hosseinzadeh, M; Sohanaki Azad, M; Zarif Yeganeh, M

    2013-07-01

    The primary objective of the present study was to assess changes in the nutritional status and quality of life in acute leukaemia patients, aged ≥15 years, who had undergone induction chemotherapy. A preliminary and post-induction chemotherapy assessment of patients' nutritional status, quality of life, sociodemographic status and medical characteristics was conducted using the Patient Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA) and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality of life (QOL-C30, version 3) questionnaires. The PG-SGA is a clinical nutrition assessment tool used to evaluate oncology patients. Patients with newly-diagnosed acute leukaemia, aged ≥15 years, at three hospitals in Tehran (from May 2009 to March 2010), were recruited for the present study. Sixty-three acute leukaemia patients [65% men and 35% women with a mean (SD) age of 33 (15.4) years] participated in the present study. A total of 19.4% were found to be malnourished prior to chemotherapy. After chemotherapy, 76.1% of patients were considered moderately malnourished, whereas 6.3% were severely malnourished. After induction chemotherapy, both the nutritional status and quality of life deteriorated in the majority of patients, as demonstrated by a paired t-test. A deteriorated nutritional status and quality of life was the result of the side effects posed by induction chemotherapy in the patients investigated in the present study. These findings highlight the need for an appropriate nutritional support programme to improve the nutritional status and quality of life in patients with leukaemia undergoing chemotherapy. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  8. The histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid potently augments gemtuzumab ozogamicin-induced apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Cate, B.; Samplonius, D. F.; Bijma, T.; de Leij, L. F. M. H.; Helfrich, W.; Bremer, E.

    Gemtuzumab ozogamicin ( GO) is a calicheamicin-conjugated antibody directed against CD33, an antigen highly expressed on acute myeloid leukemic (AML) cells. CD33-specific binding triggers internalization of GO and subsequent hydrolytic release of calicheamicin. Calicheamicin then translocates to the

  9. Alloreactive natural killer cells for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia: from stem cell transplantation to adoptive immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana eRuggeri

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer cells express activating and inhibitory receptors which recognize MHC class I alleles, termed Killer cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIRs. Preclinical and clinical data from haploidentical T-cell depleted stem cell transplantation have demonstrated that alloreactive KIR-L mismatched natural killer cells play a major role as effectors against acute myeloid leukemia. Outside the transplantation setting, several reports have proven the safety and feasibility of natural killer cell infusion in acute myeloid leukemia patients and, in some cases, provided evidence that transferred NK cells are functionally alloreactive and may have a role in disease control. Aim of the present work is to briefly summarize the most recent advances in the field by moving from the first preclinical and clinical demonstration of donor NK alloreactivity in the transplantation setting to the most recent attempts of exploiting the use of alloreactive NK cell infusion as a means of adoptive immunotherapy against acute myeloid leukemia. Altogether, these data highlight the pivotal role of NK cells for the development of novel immunological approaches in the clinical management of acute myeloid leukemia.

  10. Differences between the CD34+ and CD34- blast compartments in apoptosis resistance in acute myeloid leukemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stijn, van A.; Pol, van der M.A.; Kok, A.; Bontje, PM; Roemen, GM; Beelen, R.H.J.; Ossenkoppele, G.J.; Schuurhuis, G.J.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Altered expression of members of the Bcl-2 family might account for the observed apoptosis resistance to chemotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Given the poor prognosis associated with CD34+ expression in AML, we studied the role of spontaneous apoptosis and

  11. P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance protein activities in relation to treatment outcome in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, EGE; van Putten, WLJ; Verdonck, LF; Ossenkoppele, GJ; Verhoef, GEG; Vellenga, E

    Despite treatment with intensive chemotherapy, a considerable number of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) die from their disease due to the occurrence of resistance. Overexpression of the transporter proteins P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) 1 has been identified

  12. Enhancer Activation by Pharmacologic Displacement of LSD1 from GFI1 Induces Differentiation in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

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    Alba Maiques-Diaz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Pharmacologic inhibition of LSD1 promotes blast cell differentiation in acute myeloid leukemia (AML with MLL translocations. The assumption has been that differentiation is induced through blockade of LSD1’s histone demethylase activity. However, we observed that rapid, extensive, drug-induced changes in transcription occurred without genome-wide accumulation of the histone modifications targeted for demethylation by LSD1 at sites of LSD1 binding and that a demethylase-defective mutant rescued LSD1 knockdown AML cells as efficiently as wild-type protein. Rather, LSD1 inhibitors disrupt the interaction of LSD1 and RCOR1 with the SNAG-domain transcription repressor GFI1, which is bound to a discrete set of enhancers located close to transcription factor genes that regulate myeloid differentiation. Physical separation of LSD1/RCOR1 from GFI1 is required for drug-induced differentiation. The consequent inactivation of GFI1 leads to increased enhancer histone acetylation within hours, which directly correlates with the upregulation of nearby subordinate genes. : Maiques-Diaz et al. report that, while LSD1 inhibitors target both scaffolding and enzymatic functions of the protein, drug-induced myeloid leukemia cell differentiation is primarily due to the disruption and release from enhancers of GFI1/CoREST complexes, leading to the activation of subordinate myeloid transcription factor genes. Keywords: LSD1, GFI1, acute myeloid leukemia, MLL, acetylation, methylation

  13. BCR-ABL-positive acute myeloid leukemia: a new entity? Analysis of clinical and molecular features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuendorff, Nina Rosa; Burmeister, Thomas; Dörken, Bernd; Westermann, Jörg

    2016-08-01

    BCR-ABL-positive acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a rare subtype of AML that is now included as a provisional entity in the 2016 revised WHO classification of myeloid malignancies. Since a clear distinction between de novo BCR-ABL+ AML and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) blast crisis is challenging in many cases, the existence of de novo BCR-ABL+ AML has been a matter of debate for a long time. However, there is increasing evidence suggesting that BCR-ABL+ AML is in fact a distinct subgroup of AML. In this study, we analyzed all published cases since 1975 as well as cases from our institution in order to present common clinical and molecular features of this rare disease. Our analysis shows that BCR-ABL predominantly occurs in AML-NOS, CBF leukemia, and AML with myelodysplasia-related changes. The most common BCR-ABL transcripts (p190 and p210) are nearly equally distributed. Based on the analysis of published data, we provide a clinical algorithm for the initial differential diagnosis of BCR-ABL+ AML. The prognosis of BCR-ABL+ AML seems to depend on the cytogenetic and/or molecular background rather than on BCR-ABL itself. A therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as imatinib, dasatinib, or nilotinib is reasonable, but-due to a lack of systematic clinical data-their use cannot be routinely recommended in first-line therapy. Beyond first-line treatment of AML, the use of TKI remains an individual decision, both in combination with intensive chemotherapy and/or as a bridge to allogeneic stem cell transplantation. In each single case, potential benefits have to be weighed against potential risks.

  14. Association of loss of heterozygosity with cytogenetic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.F. Pinheiro

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Deletions on chromosomes 5 and 7 are frequently seen in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS and acute myeloid leukemia (AML. It is assumed that these deletions indicate loss of tumor suppressor genes on these chromosomes and until these tumor suppressor genes are identified, the functional consequences of these deletions and the molecular basis of these myeloid disorders cannot be completely understood. We evaluated loss of heterozygosity (LOH in 44 patients (18 MDS and 26 AML, diagnosed according to WHO classification criteria at diagnosis, using a four-microsatellite marker panel: an intragenic marker on the 7th intron of gene IRF-1 of the 5q31.1 region and three markers located inside the 7q31.1 region and correlated the LOH with karyotype abnormalities. The microsatellites chosen corresponded to chromosome regions frequently deleted in MDS/AML. The samples with Q (peak area less than or equal to 0.50 were indicative of LOH. The percent of informative samples (i.e., heterozygous for the intragenic microsatellite in gene IRF-1 and in loci D7S486, D7S515 and D7S522 were 66.6, 73.7, 75.5, and 48.8%, respectively. Cytogenetic abnormalities by G-banding were found in 36% (16/44 of the patients (2 of 18 MDS and 14 of 26 AML patients. We found a significantly positive association of the occurrence of LOH with abnormal karyotype (P < 0.05; chi-square test and there were cases with LOH but the karyotype was normal (by G-banding. These data indicate that LOH in different microsatellite markers is possibly an event previous to chromosomal abnormalities in these myeloid neoplasias.

  15. DNA-thioguanine nucleotide concentration and relapse-free survival during maintenance therapy of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (NOPHO ALL2008)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stine Nygaard; Grell, Kathrine; Nersting, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    analysed data from centralised and blinded analyses of 6-mercaptopurine and methotrexate metabolites in blood samples from patients with non-high-risk childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Eligible patients were aged 1·0-17·9 years; had been diagnosed with non-high-risk precursor B-cell or T......-cell leukaemia; had been treated according to the Nordic Society of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology ALL2008 protocol; and had reached maintenance therapy in first remission. Maintenance therapy was (mercaptopurine 75 mg/m(2) once per day and methotrexate 20 mg/m(2) once per week, targeted to a leucocyte count...... Society, Childhood Cancer Foundation (Denmark), Childhood Cancer Foundation (Sweden), Nordic Cancer Union, Otto Christensen Foundation, University Hospital Rigshospitalet, and Novo Nordic Foundation....

  16. Leukemia Associated Antigens: Their Dual Role as Biomarkers and Immunotherapeutic Targets for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

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    Michael Schmitt

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukemia associated antigens (LAAs are being increasingly identified by methods such as cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL cloning, serological analysis of recombinant cDNA expression libraries (SEREX and mass spectrometry (MS. In additional, large scale screening techniques such as microarray, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE and 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE have expanded our understanding of the role that tumor antigens play in the biological processes which are perturbed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML. It has become increasingly apparent that these antigens play a dual role, not only as targets for immunotherapy, but also as biomarkers of disease state, stage, response to treatment and survival. We need biomarkers to enable the identification of the patients who are most likely to benefit from specific treatments (conventional and/or novel and to help clinicians and scientists improve clinical end points and treatment design. Here we describe the LAAs identified in AML, to date, which have already been shown to play a dual role as biomarkers of AML disease.Abbreviations: AML: acute myeloid leukemia; APL: acute promyelocytic leukemia; ATRA: all-trans-retinoic acid; B-CLL: B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia; CT: cancer-testis; CTL: cytotoxic T-lymphocyte; FAB: French-American-British; HI: hypusination inhibitors; HSP: heat shock protein; ITD: internal tandem duplication; LAA: leukemia associated antigen; MDS: myelodysplastic syndrome; MGEA6: meningioma antigen 6; MPD: myeloproliferative disease; MS: mass spectrometry; NK: natural killer; PRAME: preferentially expressed antigen of melanoma; PRTN3: proteinase 3; RAGE-1: renal antigen 1; RHAMM: receptor for hyaluronic acid-mediated motility; RQ-PCR: real-time PCR; SAGE: serial analysis of gene expression; SCT: stem cell transplant; SEREX: serological analysis of recombinant cDNA expression libraries; SNPs: single nucleotide polymorphisms; UPD

  17. Lymphoid associated antigen expression in new cases of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Jha

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Occurrence of aberrant phenotype has been reported in acute leukemias with varying frequency though its prognostic importance remains controversial. In acute myeloid leukemias, aberrant phenotype, as high as 88 %, has been reported. To evaluate the occurrence of aberrant lymphoid phenotypes and to correlate their presence with various French American British classification, 100 cases of fresh acute myeloid leukemias were analyzed for lymphoid markers CD 4,7,8,10 and 19. Materials and Methods: Whole blood or bone marrow aspirate collected in EDTA were processed by standard method and subjected to immunophenotyping for B Cells marker CD 19 and 10 and T cell marker CD 4, 7 and 8. Results: Aberrant lymphoid markers were seen in 35(35% cases. All FAB subtypes except M7 showed aberrancy for the markers studied. However it was the most common in M0 (100%, followed by M2 (51.9%. T cell aberrancy was the most common, comprising 62.8% (22/35 of total aberrancy. CD 7 was the most common aberrantly expressed marker, seen in 20% AML, followed by CD 4(14% and CD 19 (8%. Conclusion: Occurrence of lymphoid phenotypes is frequent in pediatric as well adult AML. Though T cell markers are more common, only B cell as well as both B and T cell markers may be co expressed. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jpn.v3i6.8999   Journal of Pathology of Nepal (2013 Vol. 3, 487-490

  18. Behandling af akut myeloid leukæmi uden transfusion af blodprodukter hos et medlem af Jehovas Vidner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Christian; Jensen, Morten Krogh

    2011-01-01

    We present a case in which a young woman was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia, FAB-classification type M2. As a member of Jehovah's Witnesses she refused to accept any treatment involving blood transfusions. A modified induction and consolidation chemotherapy regimen was applied, tailored...... to reduce prolonged myelosuppression. Despite severe anaemia, she survived to achieve complete remission. She is currently under treatment-free observation after two courses of consolidation treatment....

  19. Analysis of ZAP70 expression in adult acute lymphoblastic leukaemia by real time quantitative PCR

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    Chakupurakal Geothy

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ZAP70 gene expression is associated with poor prognosis in B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders especially chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL but its role in adult B-ALL has not been established. On diagnostic samples from 76 patients with adult ALL (65 with B-ALL and 11 with T-ALL ZAP70 mRNA expression levels were studied by real time-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR analysis. Findings A broad distribution of ZAP70 expression was observed in ALL, ranging from 0.002 to 5.3 fold that of the ZAP70 positive Jurkat reference cell line. No association was observed between expression levels and the presence of specific cytogenetic abnormalities. Five cases, including one case of T-ALL, had ZAP70 expression above the level of the Jurkat reference cell line. Conclusions Our results confirm the frequent expression of ZAP70 in adult ALL. Limited comparisons made did highlight poor-risk patients with high ZAP70 expression, but due to lack of clinical information on patient samples we were unable to directly assess the impact on disease prognosis. ZAP-70 may be an important laboratory assay in adult ALL and further studies are warranted to study a potential correlation with cytogenetic and other genetic markers.

  20. In vitro testing of chemotherapeutic drug combinations in acute myelocytic leukaemia using the fluorometric microculture cytotoxicity assay (FMCA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, R; Fridborg, H; Kristensen, J; Sundström, C; Nygren, P

    1993-05-01

    The fluorometric microculture cytotoxicity assay (FMCA) was employed for analysing the effect of different chemotherapeutic drug combinations and their single constituents in 44 cases of acute myelocytic leukaemia (AML). A large heterogeneity with respect to cell kill was observed for all combinations tested, the interactions ranging from antagonistic to synergistic in terms of the multiplicative concept for drug interactions. However, an 'additive' model provided a significantly better fit of the data compared to the effect of the most active single agent of the combination (Dmax) for several common antileukaemic drug combinations. When the two interaction models were related to treatment outcome 38% of the non-responders showed preference for the additive model whereas the corresponding figure for responders was 80%. Overall, in 248 of 290 (85%) tests performed with drug combinations, there was an agreement between the effect of the combination and that of the most active single component. Direct comparison of Dmax and the combination for correlation with clinical outcome demonstrated only minor differences in the ability to predict drug resistance. The results show that FMCA appear to report drug interactions in samples from patients with AML in accordance with clinical experience. Furthermore, testing single agents as a substitute for drug combinations may be adequate for detection of clinical drug resistance to combination therapy in AML.

  1. Silencing of TESTIN by dense biallelic promoter methylation is the most common molecular event in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

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    Song Sarah

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aberrant promoter DNA methylation has been reported in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL and has the potential to contribute to its onset and outcome. However, few reports demonstrate consistent, prevalent and dense promoter methylation, associated with tumour-specific gene silencing. By screening candidate genes, we have detected frequent and dense methylation of the TESTIN (TES promoter. Results Bisulfite sequencing showed that 100% of the ALL samples (n = 20 were methylated at the TES promoter, whereas the matched remission (n = 5, normal bone marrow (n = 6 and normal PBL (n = 5 samples were unmethylated. Expression of TES in hyperdiploid, TEL-AML+, BCR-ABL+, and E2A-PBX+ subtypes of B lineage ALL was markedly reduced compared to that in normal bone marrow progenitor cells and in B cells. In addition TES methylation and silencing was demonstrated in nine out of ten independent B ALL propagated as xenografts in NOD/SCID mice. Conclusion In total, 93% of B ALL samples (93 of 100 demonstrated methylation with silencing or reduced expression of the TES gene. Thus, TES is the most frequently methylated and silenced gene yet reported in ALL. TES, a LIM domain-containing tumour suppressor gene and component of the focal adhesion complex, is involved in adhesion, motility, cell-to-cell interactions and cell signalling. Our data implicate TES methylation in ALL and provide additional evidence for the involvement of LIM domain proteins in leukaemogenesis.

  2. Sensitivity and resistance towards isoliquiritigenin, doxorubicin and methotrexate in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cell lines by pharmacogenomics.

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    Youns, Mahmoud; Fu, Yu-Jie; Zu, Yuan-Gang; Kramer, Anne; Konkimalla, V Badireenath; Radlwimmer, Bernhard; Sültmann, Holger; Efferth, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    The development of drug resistance in cancer cells necessitates the identification of novel agents with improved activity towards cancer cells. In the present investigation, we compared the cytotoxicity of the chalcone flavonoide, isoliquiritigenin (ISL), with that of doxorubicin (DOX) and methotrexate (MTX) in five T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL) cell lines (Jurkat, J-Jhan, J16, HUT78 and Karpas 45). To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms which determine the response of T-ALL cells towards ISL, DOX and MTX, we applied array-based matrix comparative genomic hybridisation and microarray-based mRNA expression profiling and compared the genomic and transcriptomic profiles of the cell lines with their 50% inhibition (IC(50)) values for these three drugs. The IC(50) values for ISL did not correlate with those for DOX or MTX, indicating that ISL was still active in DOX- or MTX-unresponsive cell lines. Likewise, the genomic imbalances of chromosomal clones and mRNA expression profile significantly correlating with IC(50) values for ISL were different from thoses correlating with IC(50) values for DOX and MTX. In conclusion, ISL represents a cytotoxic natural product with activity towards T-ALL cell lines. There was no cross-resistance between ISL and DOX or MTX, and the genomic and transcriptomic profiles pointed to different molecular modes of action of ISL as compared to DOX and MTX, indicating that ISL may be a valuable adjunct for cancer therapy to treat otherwise drug-resistant tumours.

  3. Intracranial CNS Manifestations of Myeloid Sarcoma in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Review of the Literature and Three Case Reports from the Author’s Institution

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    Gustavo M. Cervantes

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid sarcoma (MS of the central nervous system (CNS is a rare presentation of leukemic mass infiltration outside of the bone marrow. It may involve the subperiosteum and dura mater and, on rare occasions, can also invade the brain parenchyma. The disease is most commonly seen in children or young adults; however, it has been described in multiple age groups. MS can be seen in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, chronic myeloid leukemia and other myeloproliferative disorders. This entity has the potential to be underdiagnosed if the MS appearance precedes the first diagnosis of leukemia. The main reason is that their appearance on CT and MRI has a broad differential diagnosis, and proper diagnosis of MS can only be made if the imaging findings are correlated with the clinical history and laboratory findings. Herein, we describe the intracranial CNS manifestations of MS in patients with AML on CT and MRI involving the brain and/or meninges. This study is based on a systematic review of the literature. In addition, three case reports from the author’s institution with AML and intracranial involvement of MS are included. Our aim is to enhance the awareness of this entity among both clinicians and radiologists.

  4. Dasatinib accelerates valproic acid-induced acute myeloid leukemia cell death by regulation of differentiation capacity.

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    Sook-Kyoung Heo

    Full Text Available Dasatinib is a compound developed for chronic myeloid leukemia as a multi-targeted kinase inhibitor against wild-type BCR-ABL and SRC family kinases. Valproic acid (VPA is an anti-epileptic drug that also acts as a class I histone deacetylase inhibitor. The aim of this research was to determine the anti-leukemic effects of dasatinib and VPA in combination and to identify their mechanism of action in acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells. Dasatinib was found to exert potent synergistic inhibitory effects on VPA-treated AML cells in association with G1 phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction involving the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase and caspase-3, -7 and -9. Dasatinib/VPA-induced cell death thus occurred via caspase-dependent apoptosis. Moreover, MEK/ERK and p38 MAPK inhibitors efficiently inhibited dasatinib/VPA-induced apoptosis. The combined effect of dasatinib and VPA on the differentiation capacity of AML cells was more powerful than the effect of each drug alone, being sufficiently strong to promote AML cell death through G1 cell cycle arrest and caspase-dependent apoptosis. MEK/ERK and p38 MAPK were found to control dasatinib/VPA-induced apoptosis as upstream regulators, and co-treatment with dasatinib and VPA to contribute to AML cell death through the regulation of differentiation capacity. Taken together, these results indicate that combined dasatinib and VPA treatment has a potential role in anti-leukemic therapy.

  5. Radotinib Induces Apoptosis of CD11b+ Cells Differentiated from Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

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    Sook-Kyoung Heo

    Full Text Available Radotinib, developed as a BCR/ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI, is approved for the second-line treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML in South Korea. However, therapeutic effects of radotinib in acute myeloid leukemia (AML are unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that radotinib significantly decreases the viability of AML cells in a dose-dependent manner. Kasumi-1 cells were more sensitive to radotinib than NB4, HL60, or THP-1 cell lines. Furthermore, radotinib induced CD11b expression in NB4, THP-1, and Kasumi-1 cells either in presence or absence of all trans-retinoic acid (ATRA. We found that radotinib promoted differentiation and induced CD11b expression in AML cells by downregulating LYN. However, CD11b expression induced by ATRA in HL60 cells was decreased by radotinib through upregulation of LYN. Furthermore, radotinib mainly induced apoptosis of CD11b+ cells in the total population of AML cells. Radotinib also increased apoptosis of CD11b+ HL60 cells when they were differentiated by ATRA/dasatinib treatment. We show that radotinib induced apoptosis via caspase-3 activation and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm in CD11b+ cells differentiated from AML cells. Our results suggest that radotinib may be used as a candidate drug in AML or a chemosensitizer for treatment of AML by other therapeutics.

  6. Demographic and Clinical Characteristics of Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia--Tertiary Care Experience.

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    Sultan, Sadia; Zaheer, Hasan Abbas; Irfan, Syed Mohammed; Ashar, Sana

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an acquired clonal frequent malignant disorder of myeloid progenitor cells. Our aim was to study demographical and clinicopathological features of adult Pakistani AML patients at presentation. In this single centre study extending from January 2010 to December 2014, data were retrieved from the patient records with a predetermined performa and analyzed with SPSS version 22. Overall 125 patients were diagnosed at our institution with de novo AML during the study period. There were 76 males and 49 females (ratio 1.5:1), with an age range between 15 and 85 years and a mean age of 38.8±20.1 years. The major complaints were fever (72.8%), generalized weakness (60%), bleeding (37.6%) and dyspnea (12%). Physical examination revealed pallor in 56.8%, splenomegaly and hepatomegaly in 16% and 12.8%, respectively, and lymphodenopathy in 10.4%. The mean hemoglobin was 8.19±2.12g/dl with a mean MCV of 86.0±9.83 fl, a mean total leukocyte count of 43.1±68.5x109/l, an ANC of 3.09±6.66x109/l and a mean platelet count of 62.3±78.6x109/l. AML in Pakistani patients is seen in a relatively very young population with male preponderance, compared with the west. However, clinico-pathological features appear comparable to published data.

  7. Requirement for CDK6 in MLL-rearranged acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placke, Theresa; Faber, Katrin; Nonami, Atsushi; Putwain, Sarah L; Salih, Helmut R; Heidel, Florian H; Krämer, Alwin; Root, David E; Barbie, David A; Krivtsov, Andrei V; Armstrong, Scott A; Hahn, William C; Huntly, Brian J; Sykes, Stephen M; Milsom, Michael D; Scholl, Claudia; Fröhling, Stefan

    2014-07-03

    Chromosomal rearrangements involving the H3K4 methyltransferase mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) trigger aberrant gene expression in hematopoietic progenitors and give rise to an aggressive subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Insights into MLL fusion-mediated leukemogenesis have not yet translated into better therapies because MLL is difficult to target directly, and the identity of the genes downstream of MLL whose altered transcription mediates leukemic transformation are poorly annotated. We used a functional genetic approach to uncover that AML cells driven by MLL-AF9 are exceptionally reliant on the cell-cycle regulator CDK6, but not its functional homolog CDK4, and that the preferential growth inhibition induced by CDK6 depletion is mediated through enhanced myeloid differentiation. CDK6 essentiality is also evident in AML cells harboring alternate MLL fusions and a mouse model of MLL-AF9-driven leukemia and can be ascribed to transcriptional activation of CDK6 by mutant MLL. Importantly, the context-dependent effects of lowering CDK6 expression are closely phenocopied by a small-molecule CDK6 inhibitor currently in clinical development. These data identify CDK6 as critical effector of MLL fusions in leukemogenesis that might be targeted to overcome the differentiation block associated with MLL-rearranged AML, and underscore that cell-cycle regulators may have distinct, noncanonical, and nonredundant functions in different contexts. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  8. DNA Methylation Events as Markers for Diagnosis and Management of Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome

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    Geórgia Muccillo Dexheimer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During the onset and progression of hematological malignancies, many changes occur in cellular epigenome, such as hypo- or hypermethylation of CpG islands in promoter regions. DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that regulates gene expression and is a key event for tumorigenesis. The continuous search for biomarkers that signal early disease, indicate prognosis, and act as therapeutic targets has led to studies investigating the role of DNA in cancer onset and progression. This review focuses on DNA methylation changes as potential biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis, response to treatment, and early toxicity in acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. Here, we report that distinct changes in DNA methylation may alter gene function and drive malignant cellular transformation during several stages of leukemogenesis. Most of these modifications occur at an early stage of disease and may predict myeloid/lymphoid transformation or response to therapy, which justifies its use as a biomarker for disease onset and progression. Methylation patterns, or its dynamic change during treatment, may also be used as markers for patient stratification, disease prognosis, and response to treatment. Further investigations of methylation modifications as therapeutic biomarkers, which may correlate with therapeutic response and/or predict treatment toxicity, are still warranted.

  9. A CRISPR Dropout Screen Identifies Genetic Vulnerabilities and Therapeutic Targets in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

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    Konstantinos Tzelepis

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is an aggressive cancer with a poor prognosis, for which mainstream treatments have not changed for decades. To identify additional therapeutic targets in AML, we optimize a genome-wide clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR screening platform and use it to identify genetic vulnerabilities in AML cells. We identify 492 AML-specific cell-essential genes, including several established therapeutic targets such as DOT1L, BCL2, and MEN1, and many other genes including clinically actionable candidates. We validate selected genes using genetic and pharmacological inhibition, and chose KAT2A as a candidate for downstream study. KAT2A inhibition demonstrated anti-AML activity by inducing myeloid differentiation and apoptosis, and suppressed the growth of primary human AMLs of diverse genotypes while sparing normal hemopoietic stem-progenitor cells. Our results propose that KAT2A inhibition should be investigated as a therapeutic strategy in AML and provide a large number of genetic vulnerabilities of this leukemia that can be pursued in downstream studies.

  10. The MDM-2 Antagonist Nutlin-3 Promotes the Maturation of Acute Myeloid Leukemic Blasts

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    Paola Secchiero

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The small-molecule inhibitor of murine double minute (MDM-2, Nutlin-3, induced variable apoptosis in primary acute myeloid leukemia (AML blasts, promoted myeloid maturation of surviving cells, as demonstrated by analysis of CD11 b, CD14 surface antigens, by morphologic examination. Although the best-characterized activity of Nutlin-3 is activation of the p53 pathway, Nutlin-3 induced maturation also in one AML sample characterized by p53 deletion, as well as in the p53-/- human myeloblastic HL-60 cell line. At the molecular level, the maturational activity of Nutlin-3 in HL-60 cells was accompanied by the induction of E2F1 transcription factor, it was significantly counteracted by specific gene knockdown with small interfering RNA for E2F1. Moreover, Nutlin-3, as well as tumor necrosis factor (TNF α, potentiated the maturational activity of recombinant TNF-related apoptosis-inducing lig, (TRAIL in HL-60 cells. However, although TNF-α significantly counteracted the proapoptotic activity of TRAIL, Nutlin-3 did not interfere with the proapoptotic activity of TRAIL. Taken together, these data disclose a novel, potentially relevant therapeutic role for Nutlin-3 in the treatment of both p53 wild-type, p53-/- AML, possibly in association with recombinant TRAIL.

  11. Mouse models of NPM1-mutated acute myeloid leukemia: biological and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sportoletti, P; Varasano, E; Rossi, R; Mupo, A; Tiacci, E; Vassiliou, G; Martelli, M P; Falini, B

    2015-02-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) carrying nucleophosmin (NPM1) mutations displays distinct biological and clinical features that led to its inclusion as a provisional disease entity in the 2008 World Health Organization (WHO) classification of myeloid neoplasms. Studies of the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of NPM1-mutated AML have benefited greatly from several mouse models of this leukemia developed over the past few years. Immunocompromised mice xenografted with NPM1-mutated AML served as the first valuable tool for defining the biology of the disease in vivo. Subsequently, genetically engineered mouse models of the NPM1 mutation, including transgenic and knock-in alleles, allowed the generation of mice with a constant genotype and a reproducible phenotype. These models have been critical for investigating the nature of the molecular effects of these mutations, defining the function of leukemic stem cells in NPM1-mutated AML, identifying chemoresistant preleukemic hemopoietic stem cells and unraveling the key molecular events that cooperate with NPM1 mutations to induce AML in vivo. Moreover, they can serve as a platform for the discovery and validation of new antileukemic drugs in vivo. Advances derived from the analysis of these mouse models promise to greatly accelerate the development of new molecularly targeted therapies for patients with NPM1-mutated AML.

  12. New classification of acute myeloid leukemia and precursor-related neoplasms: changes and unsolved issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falini, Brunangelo; Tiacci, Enrico; Martelli, Maria Paola; Ascani, Stefano; Pileri, Stefano A

    2010-10-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) classification of lympho-hematopoietic neoplasms is increasingly based on genetic criteria. Here, we focus on changes that, as compared to the 2001 edition, were introduced into the 2008 WHO classification of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and related precursor neoplasms. The category of AML with recurrent genetic abnormalities was expanded to account for 60% of AML by adding three distinct entities, i.e., AML with t(6,9), inv(3), or t(1;22), and two provisional entities, i.e., AML with mutated NPM1 or CEBPA. These changes have greatly modified the approaches to diagnosis and prognostic stratification of AML patients. To emphasize the need of various parameters for diagnosis, including myelodysplasia (MD)-related cytogenetic abnormalities, history of myelodysplasia or myelodysplasia/myeloproliferative neoplasm, and multilineage dysplasia, the category of "AML with multilineage dysplasia" was re-named AML with MD-related changes. Finally, we describe the unique characteristics of myeloid proliferations associated with Down syndrome and blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm.

  13. The creatine kinase pathway is a metabolic vulnerability in EVI1-positive acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenouille, Nina; Bassil, Christopher F; Ben-Sahra, Issam; Benajiba, Lina; Alexe, Gabriela; Ramos, Azucena; Pikman, Yana; Conway, Amy S; Burgess, Michael R; Li, Qing; Luciano, Frédéric; Auberger, Patrick; Galinsky, Ilene; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Stone, Richard M; Zhang, Yi; Perkins, Archibald S; Shannon, Kevin; Hemann, Michael T; Puissant, Alexandre; Stegmaier, Kimberly

    2017-03-01

    Expression of the MECOM (also known as EVI1) proto-oncogene is deregulated by chromosomal translocations in some cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is associated with poor clinical outcome. Here, through transcriptomic and metabolomic profiling of hematopoietic cells, we reveal that EVI1 overexpression alters cellular metabolism. A screen using pooled short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) identified the ATP-buffering, mitochondrial creatine kinase CKMT1 as necessary for survival of EVI1-expressing cells in subjects with EVI1-positive AML. EVI1 promotes CKMT1 expression by repressing the myeloid differentiation regulator RUNX1. Suppression of arginine-creatine metabolism by CKMT1-directed shRNAs or by the small molecule cyclocreatine selectively decreased the viability, promoted the cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of human EVI1-positive cell lines, and prolonged survival in both orthotopic xenograft models and mouse models of primary AML. CKMT1 inhibition altered mitochondrial respiration and ATP production, an effect that was abrogated by phosphocreatine-mediated reactivation of the arginine-creatine pathway. Targeting CKMT1 is thus a promising therapeutic strategy for this EVI1-driven AML subtype that is highly resistant to current treatment regimens.

  14. Therapeutic reactivation of protein phosphatase 2A in acute myeloid leukemia

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    Kavitha eRamaswamy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A is a serine/threonine phosphatase that is required for normal cell growth and development. PP2A is a potent tumor suppressor, which is inactivated in cancer cells as a result of genetic deletions and mutations. In myeloid leukemias, genes encoding PP2A subunits are generally intact. Instead, PP2A is functionally inhibited by post-translational modifications of its catalytic C subunit, and interactions with negative regulators by its regulatory B and scaffold A subunits. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of genetic and functional inactivation of PP2A in human cancers, with a particular focus on human acute myeloid leukemias (AML. By analyzing expression of genes encoding PP2A subunits using transcriptome sequencing, we find that PP2A dysregulation in AML is characterized by silencing and overexpression of distinct A scaffold and B regulatory subunits, respectively. We review the mechanisms of functional PP2A activation by drugs such as fingolimod, forskolin, OP449, and perphenazine. This analysis yields two non-mutually exclusive mechanisms for therapeutic PP2A re-activation: i allosteric activation of the phosphatase activity, and ii stabilization of active holo-enzyme assembly and displacement of negative regulatory factors from A and B subunits. Future studies should allow the development of specific and potent pharmacologic activators of PP2A, and definition of susceptible disease subsets based on specific mechanisms of PP2A dysregulation.

  15. In vitro evaluation of triazenes: DNA cleavage, antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity against acute myeloid leukemia cells

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    Domingues, Vanessa O.; Hoerner, Rosmari; Reetz, Luiz G.B.; Kuhn, Fabio, E-mail: rosmari.ufsm@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM), RS (Brazil). Dept. de Analises Clinicas e Toxicologicas; Coser, Virginia M.; Rodrigues, Jacqueline N.; Bauchspiess, Rita; Pereira, Waldir V. [Hospital Universitario de Santa Maria, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Hematologia-Oncologia; Paraginski, Gustavo L.; Locatelli, Aline; Fank, Juliana de O.; Giglio, Vinicius F.; Hoerner, Manfredo, E-mail: hoerner.manfredo@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM), RS (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2010-07-01

    The asymmetric diazoamines 1-(2-chlorophenyl)-3-(4-carboxyphenyl)triazene (1), 1-(2-fluorophenyl)-3-(4-carboxyphenyl)triazene (2) and 1-(2-fluorophenyl)-3-(4-amidophenyl) triazene (3) were evaluated for their ability to cleave pUC18 and pBSKII plasmid DNA, antibacterial activity and in vitro cytotoxicity against acute myeloid leukemia cells and normal leukocytes using the bioassay of reduction of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT). The triazenes showed ability to cleave the two types of plasmid DNA: triazene 1 at pH 8.0 and 50 deg C; triazene 2 at pH 6.5 and 37 and 50 deg C; triazene 3 at pH 6.5 and 37 deg C. The compounds presented cytotoxic activity against myeloid leukemia cells. Compound 1 showed high activity against B. cereus (MIC = 32 {mu}g mL{sup -1}). The observation of intermolecular hydrogen bonding in the solid state of compound 3, based on the structural analysis by X-ray crystallography, as well as the results of IR and UV-Vis spectroscopic analyses of compounds 1, 2 and 3 are discussed in the present work. (author)

  16. Impact of graft-versus-host disease after reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, F; Labopin, M; Niederwieser, D

    2012-01-01

    This report investigated the impact of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) on transplantation outcomes in 1859 acute myeloid leukemia patients given allogeneic peripheral blood stem cells after reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC allo-SCT). Grade I acute GVHD was associated with a lower risk of rela...... of relapse (hazards ratio (HR)=0.7, P=0.02) translating into a trend for better overall survival (OS; HR=1.3; P=0.07). Grade II acute GVHD had no net impact on OS, while grade III-IV acute GVHD was associated with a worse OS (HR=0.4, P...

  17. The relationship between clinical feature, complex immunophenotype, chromosome karyotype, and outcome of patients with acute myeloid leukemia in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Bingjie; Zhou, Lanlan; Jiang, Xuejie; Li, Xiaodong; Zhong, Qingxiu; Wang, Zhixiang; Yi, Zhengshan; Zheng, Zhongxin; Yin, Changxin; Cao, Rui; Liao, Libin; Meng, Fanyi

    2015-01-01

    Mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) is a complex entity expressing both lymphoid and myeloid immunophenotyping. In the present study, 47 MPAL, 60 lymphoid antigen-positive acute myeloid leukemia (Ly(+)AML), and 90 acute myeloid leukemia with common myeloid immunophenotype (Ly(-)AML) patients were investigated. We found that, in MPAL patients, there were high proportions of blast cells in bone marrow and incidence of hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, and Philadelphia chromosome. The overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) in MPAL patients were significantly shorter than those in Ly(+)AML and Ly(-)AML. With regard to the patients with normal karyotype only, the OS and RFS of MPAL were significantly lower than those of the Ly(+)AML and Ly(-)AML; but there were no significant differences in OS and RFS among the patients with complex karyotype. The OS rates of 3 groups with complex karyotype were lower than those of patients with normal karyotype. In Cox multivariate analysis, complex karyotype was an independent pejorative factor for both OS and RFS. Therefore, MPAL is confirmed to be a poor-risk disease while Ly(+)AML does not impact prognosis. Complex karyotype is an unfavorable prognosis factor in AML patients with different immunophenotype. Mixed immunophenotype and complex karyotype increase the adverse risk when they coexist.

  18. Current Approaches in the Treatment of Relapsed and Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

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    Nestor R. Ramos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The limited sensitivity of the historical treatment response criteria for acute myeloid leukemia (AML has resulted in a different paradigm for treatment compared with most other cancers presenting with widely disseminated disease. Initial cytotoxic induction chemotherapy is often able to reduce tumor burden to a level sufficient to meet the current criteria for “complete” remission. Nevertheless, most AML patients ultimately die from their disease, most commonly as clinically evident relapsed AML. Despite a variety of available salvage therapy options, prognosis in patients with relapsed or refractory AML is generally poor. In this review, we outline the commonly utilized salvage cytotoxic therapy interventions and then highlight novel investigational efforts currently in clinical trials using both pathway-targeted agents and immunotherapy based approaches. We conclude that there is no current standard of care for adult relapsed or refractory AML other than offering referral to an appropriate clinical trial.

  19. Loss of the histone methyltransferase EZH2 induces resistance to multiple drugs in acute myeloid leukemia

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    Göllner, Stefanie; Oellerich, Thomas; Agrawal-Singh, Shuchi

    2017-01-01

    In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), therapy resistance frequently occurs, leading to high mortality among patients. However, the mechanisms that render leukemic cells drug resistant remain largely undefined. Here, we identified loss of the histone methyltransferase EZH2 and subsequent reduction...... of histone H3K27 trimethylation as a novel pathway of acquired resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and cytotoxic drugs in AML. Low EZH2 protein levels correlated with poor prognosis in AML patients. Suppression of EZH2 protein expression induced chemoresistance of AML cell lines and primary cells...... in vitro and in vivo. Low EZH2 levels resulted in derepression of HOX genes, and knockdown of HOXB7 and HOXA9 in the resistant cells was sufficient to improve sensitivity to TKIs and cytotoxic drugs. The endogenous loss of EZH2 expression in resistant cells and primary blasts from a subset of relapsed AML...

  20. Sox4 is a key oncogenic target in C/EBPα mutant Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Alberich-Jordà, Meritxell; Amabile, Giovanni; Yang, Henry; Staber, Philipp B.; DiRuscio, Annalisa; Welner, Rob; Ebralidze, Alexander; Zhang, Junyan; Levantini, Elena; Lefebvre, Véronique; Valk, Peter J.M.; Delwel, Ruud; Hoogenkamp, Maarten; Nerlov, Claus; Cammenga, Jörg; Saez, Borja; Scadden, David T.; Bonifer, Constanze

    2014-01-01

    Summary Mutation or epigenetic silencing of the transcription factor C/EBPα is observed in ~10% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In both cases, a common global gene expression profile is observed, but down-stream targets relevant for leukemogenesis are not known. Here we identify Sox4 as a direct target of C/EBPα whereby its expression is inversely correlated with C/EBPα activity. Downregulation of Sox4 abrogated increased self-renewal of leukemic cells and restored their differentiation. Gene expression profiles of leukemia initiating cells (LICs) from both Sox4 overexpression and murine C/EBPα mutant AML models clustered together, but differed from other types of AML. Our data demonstrate that Sox4 overexpression resulting from C/EBPα inactivation contributes to the development of leukemia with a distinct LIC phenotype. PMID:24183681

  1. Acute Myeloid Leukemia in a Patient With X-linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemura, Tomonari; Motobayashi, Mitsuo; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Shimodaira, Takahiro; Kurata, Takashi; Kobayashi, Norimoto; Agematsu, Kazunaga; Nakazawa, Yozo

    2017-11-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a defect in the differentiation and function of T cells. An increased malignancy risk, mainly lymphatic malignancy, has been described in patients with SCID. We report a patient with X-linked SCID who developed acute myeloid leukemia, derived from the recipient with somatic NRAS mutation 4 months after cord blood transplantation (CBT). Loss of heterozygosity phenomenon of the recipient at 6q14 locus was observed at 2 months post-CBT and progressed to 6q deletion (6q-) chromosome abnormality. Somatic NRAS mutation was detected at 3 months post-CBT. Thus, 6q- and NRAS mutation were strongly associated with the leukemic transformation in our patient.

  2. TGIF1 is a negative regulator of MLL-rearranged acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willer, Anton; Jakobsen, Janus Schou; Ohlsson, E

    2015-01-01

    influence the clinical outcome. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that TALE family members can act both positively and negatively on transcriptional programs responsible for leukemic maintenance and provide novel insights into the regulatory gene expression circuitries in MLL-rearranged AML.Leukemia......Members of the TALE (three-amino-acid loop extension) family of atypical homeodomain-containing transcription factors are important downstream effectors of oncogenic fusion proteins involving the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene. A well-characterized member of this protein family is MEIS1, which...... orchestrates a transcriptional program required for the maintenance of MLL-rearranged acute myeloid leukemia (AML). TGIF1/TGIF2 are relatively uncharacterized TALE transcription factors, which, in contrast to the remaining family, have been shown to act as transcriptional repressors. Given the general...

  3. Tetraspanin CD81 is an adverse prognostic marker in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Thomas; Guihard, Soizic; Roumier, Christophe; Peyrouze, Pauline; Gonzales, Fanny; Berthon, Céline; Quesnel, Bruno; Preudhomme, Claude; Behal, Hélène; Duhamel, Alain; Roche-Lestienne, Catherine; Cheok, Meyling

    2016-09-20

    CD81 is a cell surface protein which belongs to the tetraspanin family. While in multiple myeloma its expression on plasma cells is associated with worse prognosis, this has not yet been explored in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We measured membrane expression of CD81 on AML cells at diagnosis, evaluated its association with AML characteristics and its influence on patient outcome after intensive chemotherapy in a cohort of 134 patients. CD81 was detected in 92/134 (69%) patients. Patients with AML expressing CD81 had elevated leukocyte count (P=0.02) and were more likely classified as intermediate or adverse-risk by cytogenetics (Pclassification and a potential therapeutic target for drug development in AML.

  4. SYK is a critical regulator of FLT3 in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puissant, Alexandre; Fenouille, Nina; Alexe, Gabriela; Pikman, Yana; Bassil, Christopher F; Mehta, Swapnil; Du, Jinyan; Kazi, Julhash U; Luciano, Frédéric; Rönnstrand, Lars; Kung, Andrew L; Aster, Jon C; Galinsky, Ilene; Stone, Richard M; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Hemann, Michael T; Stegmaier, Kimberly

    2014-02-10

    Cooperative dependencies between mutant oncoproteins and wild-type proteins are critical in cancer pathogenesis and therapy resistance. Although spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) has been implicated in hematologic malignancies, it is rarely mutated. We used kinase activity profiling to identify collaborators of SYK in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and determined that FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) is transactivated by SYK via direct binding. Highly activated SYK is predominantly found in FLT3-ITD positive AML and cooperates with FLT3-ITD to activate MYC transcriptional programs. FLT3-ITD AML cells are more vulnerable to SYK suppression than FLT3 wild-type counterparts. In a FLT3-ITD in vivo model, SYK is indispensable for myeloproliferative disease (MPD) development, and SYK overexpression promotes overt transformation to AML and resistance to FLT3-ITD-targeted therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in bone marrow cells leading to acute myeloid leukemia in mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobuhiko Ban; Tomoko Kusama

    1996-01-01

    It is well known that radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia (RI-AML) in mice is charaterized by deletion and/or rearrangement of chromosome 2. While chromosome 2 has been suspected to be a target of RI-AML, radiation-sensitive site of the chromosome might be implicated in the leukemogenesis. There were few cytogenetical studies, however, focusing on chromosomal rearrangements shortly after irradiation, and little was known about the frequency and pattern of chromosome 2 aberrations during the early period. In this study, metaphase samples were prepared from whole-body irradiated mice 24 hours after irradiation, most of the cells considered to be in the first mitotic stage. Distribution of chromosomal breakpoints on the metaphase samples were analyzed to study the relationship between chromosome aberrations and RI-AML. (author)

  6. Successful treatment of Pseudomembranous necrotizing Aspergillus tracheobronchitis in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanić Jelena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pseudomembranous necrotizing Aspergillus tracheobronchitis is a rare form of pulmonary aspergillosis which occurs in immunocompromised patients. Case Outline. A female patient aged 71, suffering from acute myeloid leukemia, developed the symptoms of progressive shortness of breath and inspiratory stridor. The diagnosis in our case was made on the histological findings from tissues obtained by bronchoscopy. A chest CT scan suggested the state of the compromised trachea and left principal bronchus lumen. The long-term regimen with itraconazole in the dose of 400 mg/24 hours proved efficient in our patient. Conclusion. Progressive shortness of breath and inspiratory stridor in immunocompromised patients along with radiological and CT changes should be also considered as pulmonary aspergillosis in differential diagnosis. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175056

  7. Chimeric antigen receptors for adoptive T cell therapy in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxue Fan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Currently, conventional therapies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML have high failure and relapse rates. Thus, developing new strategies is crucial for improving the treatment of AML. With the clinical success of anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cell therapies against B-lineage malignancies, many studies have attempted to translate the success of CAR T cell therapy to other malignancies, including AML. This review summarizes the current advances in CAR T cell therapy against AML, including preclinical studies and clinical trials, and discusses the potential AML-associated surface markers that could be used for further CAR technology. Finally, we describe strategies that might address the current issues of employing CAR T cell therapy in AML.

  8. Global proteomics dataset of miR-126 overexpression in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin M. Schoof

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A deep proteomics analysis was conducted on a primary acute myeloid leukemia culture system to identify potential protein targets regulated by miR-126. Leukemia cells were transduced either with an empty control lentivirus or one containing the sequence for miR-126, and resulting cells were analyzed using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC coupled with high resolution mass spectrometry. The mass spectrometry data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PRIDE: PXD001994. The proteomics data and statistical analysis described in this article is associated with a research article, “miR-126 regulates distinct self-renewal outcomes in normal and malignant hematopoietic stem cells” (Lechman et al., 2016 [1], and serves as a resource for researchers working in the field of microRNAs and their regulation of protein levels.

  9. Influence of Chemotherapy on the Lipid Peroxidation and Antioxidant Status in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Sanaat

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapeutic agents used in patients with cancer cause to generate the enormous amounts of free radicals associated with cell injury. In this study we assess the effects of chemotherapy regimen on oxidant/antioxidant status in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML. 38 newly diagnosed patients with acute myeloid leukemia were recruited in this study. All patients received cytarabine and daunorubicin as chemotherapy regimen. Plasma levels of malondialdehyde (MDA, total antioxidant status (TAS, and the levels of erythrocyte activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPx were determined before chemotherapy and 14 days after chemotherapy with cytarabine and daunorubicin. Plasma MDA concentrations increased significantly (from 2.68±0.89 nmol/L to 3.14±1.29 nmol/L during the 14days post-chemotherapy period (P=0.04. Plasma TAS concentrations changed with chemotherapy from 1.09±0.15 mmol/L to 1.02±0.14 mmol/L with P=0.005. Erythrocyte SOD and GPX activity decreased overtime from 1157.24±543.61 U/g Hb to 984.01±419.09 U/g Hb (P=0.04 and 46.96±13.70 U/g Hb to 41.40±6.44 U/g Hb (P=0.02 respectively. We report here that there is an increase in malondialdehyde levels and a decrease in the levels of antioxidant enzymes and total antioxidant status. This suggests that chemotherapy causes these changes as a result of enormous production of reactive oxygen species in the patients with AML. Antioxidant supplementation must be approached with caution because of the probability of reduction the therapeutic efficacy of these cytotoxic drugs.

  10. Potential of ponatinib to treat chronic myeloid leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Price KE

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Kimberly E Price, Najma Saleem, Georgina Lee, Michael SteinbergMassachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences University, Worcester, MA, USAAbstract: Development of BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs have improved outcomes for patients diagnosed with chronic myeloid leukemia and Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, resistance or intolerance to these TKIs still leaves some patients without many treatment options. One point mutation in particular, the T315I mutation, has been shown to be resistant to first and second generation TKIs. The third generation TKI, ponatinib, may provide an option for these patients. Ponatinib (Iclusig®, an orally available, pan-tyrosine kinase inhibitor has a unique binding mechanism allowing inhibition of BCR-ABL kinases, including those with the T315I point mutation. A Phase II study evaluated ponatinib in patients who were resistant or intolerant to nilotinib or dasatinib or patients who had the T315I mutation. In the Phase II study, ponatinib produced a major cytogenetic response in 54% of chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients. It further achieved major hematologic response in 52% of patients in the accelerated phase, 31% of patients in the blast phase, and 41% of Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. Ponatinib also showed efficacy in patients with the T315I mutation. Serious adverse events included arterial thrombosis, hepatotoxicity, cardiovascular risks, pancreatitis, hemorrhage, fluid retention, myelosuppression, rash, abdominal pain, and embryo–fetal toxicity. Due to the risk of these adverse events and potential drug interactions, the use of ponatinib must be carefully weighed against the benefits in treating patients who have limited treatment options.Keywords: BCR-ABL, tyrosine kinase inhibitor, TKI, T315I, Philadelphia chromosome

  11. A segmentation method based on HMRF for the aided diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jie; Liu, Shuai; Song, Jinming

    2017-12-01

    The diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is purely dependent on counting the percentages of blasts (>20%) in the peripheral blood or bone marrow. Manual microscopic examination of peripheral blood or bone marrow aspirate smears is time consuming and less accurate. The first and very important step in blast recognition is the segmentation of the cells from the background for further cell feature extraction and cell classification. In this paper, we aimed to utilize computer technologies in image analysis and artificial intelligence to develop an automatic program for blast recognition and counting in the aspirate smears. We proposed a method to analyze the aspirate smear images, which first performs segmentation of the cells by k-means cluster, then builds cell image representing model by HMRF (Hidden-Markov Random Field), estimates model parameters through probability of EM (expectation maximization), carries out convergence iteration until optimal value, and finally achieves second stage refined segmentation. Furthermore, the segmentation results are compared with several other methods using six classes of cells respectively. The proposed method was applied to six groups of cells from 61 bone marrow aspirate images, and compared with other algorithms for its performance on the analysis of the whole images, the segmentation of nucleus, and the efficiency of calculation. It showed improved segmentation results in both the cropped images and the whole images, which provide the base for down-stream cell feature extraction and identification. Segmentation of the aspirate smear images using the proposed method helps the analyst in differentiating six groups of cells and in the determination of blasts counting, which will be of great significance for the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Improved outcome of childhood acute myeloid leukemia in an Eastern European country: Lithuanian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kairiene, Igne; Pasauliene, Ramune; Lipunova, Nadezda; Vaitkeviciene, Goda; Rageliene, Lina; Rascon, Jelena

    2017-10-01

    The reported treatment outcomes of children treated for cancer in Eastern European countries are inferior to those in Northern/Western Europe. We hypothesized that recent survival rates could be comparable to the current standards and performed a population-based analysis of treatment outcome of childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in Lithuania, a small Eastern European country. Children childhood cancer, with an overall survival (OS) rate of > 80% in high-income countries. The difference in survival rates between Northern/Western and Eastern European countries as well as between high- and middle-/low-income countries is as much as 20%. Recently, the 5-year event-free survival rate of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has reached > 60% in high-income countries. The survival rates for myeloproliferative diseases were the lowest in Eastern European countries. • The reported inferior survival rates were calculated based on outcome data of patients treated until 2007. The recent survival rates in Eastern European countries are unknown. What is New: • Being a small Eastern European country, Lithuania has experienced good economic growth during the last decade. We hypothesized that economic growth and gain of experience could result in better survival rates of children treated for cancer in our country in recent years. • A population-based analysis of treatment outcome of childhood AML treated in Lithuania in the recent years was performed for the first time. The survival rates of childhood AML in Lithuania are comparable to those of other high-income countries. Current survival rates of children treated for cancer in Eastern European countries could be comparable to the best current standards contributing to better European survival rates of childhood cancer in general.

  13. Hypermethylation of the GATA binding protein 4 (GATA4) promoter in Chinese pediatric acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yan-Fang; Fang, Fang; Hu, Shao-Yan; Lu, Jun; Cao, Lan; Zhao, Wen-Li; Xiao, Pei-Fang; Li, Zhi-Heng; Wang, Na-Na; Xu, Li-Xiao; Du, Xiao-Juan; Sun, Li-Chao; Li, Yan-Hong; Li, Yi-Ping; Xu, Yun-Yun; Ni, Jian; Wang, Jian; Feng, Xing; Pan, Jian

    2015-10-21

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the second-most common form of leukemia in children. Aberrant DNA methylation patterns are a characteristic feature of AML. GATA4 has been suggested to be a tumor suppressor gene regulated by promoter hypermethylation in various types of human cancers although the expression and promoter methylation of GATA4 in pediatric AML is still unclear. Transcriptional expression levels of GATA4 were evaluated by semi-quantitative and real-time PCR. Methylation status was investigated by methylation-specific PCR (MSP) and bisulfate genomic sequencing (BGS). The prognostic significance of GATA4 expression and promoter methylation was assessed in 105 cases of Chinese pediatric acute myeloid leukemia patients with clinical follow-up records. MSP and BGS analysis showed that the GATA4 gene promoter is hypermethylated in AML cells, such as the HL-60 and MV4-11 human myeloid leukemia cell lines. 5-Aza treatment significantly upregulated GATA4 expression in HL-60 and MV4-11 cells. Aberrant methylation of GATA4 was observed in 15.0 % (3/20) of the normal bone marrow control samples compared to 56.2 % (59/105) of the pediatric AML samples. GATA4 transcript levels were significantly decreased in AML patients (33.06 ± 70.94; P = 0.011) compared to normal bone marrow/idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura controls (116.76 ± 105.39). GATA4 promoter methylation was correlated with patient leukocyte counts (WBC, white blood cells) (P = 0.035) and minimal residual disease MRD (P = 0.031). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed significantly shorter overall survival time in patients with GATA4 promoter methylation (P = 0.014). Epigenetic inactivation of GATA4 by promoter hypermethylation was observed in both AML cell lines and pediatric AML samples; our study implicates GATA4 as a putative tumor suppressor gene in pediatric AML. In addition, our findings imply that GATA4 promoter methylation is correlated with WBC and MRD. Kaplan

  14. Hypermethylation of the GATA binding protein 4 (GATA4) promoter in Chinese pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Yan-Fang; Fang, Fang; Hu, Shao-Yan; Lu, Jun; Cao, Lan; Zhao, Wen-Li; Xiao, Pei-Fang; Li, Zhi-Heng; Wang, Na-Na; Xu, Li-Xiao; Du, Xiao-Juan; Sun, Li-Chao; Li, Yan-Hong; Li, Yi-Ping; Xu, Yun-Yun; Ni, Jian; Wang, Jian; Feng, Xing; Pan, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the second-most common form of leukemia in children. Aberrant DNA methylation patterns are a characteristic feature of AML. GATA4 has been suggested to be a tumor suppressor gene regulated by promoter hypermethylation in various types of human cancers although the expression and promoter methylation of GATA4 in pediatric AML is still unclear. Transcriptional expression levels of GATA4 were evaluated by semi-quantitative and real-time PCR. Methylation status was investigated by methylation-specific PCR (MSP) and bisulfate genomic sequencing (BGS). The prognostic significance of GATA4 expression and promoter methylation was assessed in 105 cases of Chinese pediatric acute myeloid leukemia patients with clinical follow-up records. MSP and BGS analysis showed that the GATA4 gene promoter is hypermethylated in AML cells, such as the HL-60 and MV4-11 human myeloid leukemia cell lines. 5-Aza treatment significantly upregulated GATA4 expression in HL-60 and MV4-11 cells. Aberrant methylation of GATA4 was observed in 15.0 % (3/20) of the normal bone marrow control samples compared to 56.2 % (59/105) of the pediatric AML samples. GATA4 transcript levels were significantly decreased in AML patients (33.06 ± 70.94; P = 0.011) compared to normal bone marrow/idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura controls (116.76 ± 105.39). GATA4 promoter methylation was correlated with patient leukocyte counts (WBC, white blood cells) (P = 0.035) and minimal residual disease MRD (P = 0.031). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed significantly shorter overall survival time in patients with GATA4 promoter methylation (P = 0.014). Epigenetic inactivation of GATA4 by promoter hypermethylation was observed in both AML cell lines and pediatric AML samples; our study implicates GATA4 as a putative tumor suppressor gene in pediatric AML. In addition, our findings imply that GATA4 promoter methylation is correlated with WBC and MRD. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis

  15. Acute myeloid leukemia after kidney transplantation: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Cardarelli

    Full Text Available Abstract The incidence of malignancy is greater in kidney transplant recipients compared to the general population, though the higher risk is not equally distributed to all types of cancers. In face of the increased longevity of renal transplant recipients, certain cancers, such as acute leukemias, are becoming more prevalent. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML typically presents with cytopenias and infections, both common findings after kidney transplantation. Therefore, the diagnosis of AML may be initially overlooked in these patients. We report the case of a 33-year-old man who presented with fever, pancytopenia and acute worsening of his renal allograft function 9 years after a living unrelated kidney transplant. After initial negative infectious work-up, a kidney biopsy revealed C4d-positive antibody-mediated rejection in combination with scattered atypical inflammatory cells. A subsequent bone marrow biopsy confirmed AML. He underwent successful induction chemotherapy with daunorubucin and cytarabine and ultimately achieved a complete remission. However, he developed a Page kidney with worsening renal function and abdominal pain three weeks after biopsy in the setting of chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia. Herein, we discuss the prevalence, risk factors, presentation and management of leukemia after kidney transplantation.

  16. Use of arsenic trioxide in remission induction and consolidation therapy for acute promyelocytic leukaemia in the Australasian Leukaemia and Lymphoma Group (ALLG) APML4 study: a non-randomised phase 2 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iland, Harry J; Collins, Marnie; Bradstock, Ken; Supple, Shane G; Catalano, Alberto; Hertzberg, Mark; Browett, Peter; Grigg, Andrew; Firkin, Frank; Campbell, Lynda J; Hugman, Amanda; Reynolds, John; Di Iulio, Juliana; Tiley, Campbell; Taylor, Kerry; Filshie, Robin; Seldon, Michael; Taper, John; Szer, Jeff; Moore, John; Bashford, John; Seymour, John F

    2015-09-01

    Initial treatment of acute promyelocytic leukaemia traditionally involves tretinoin (all-trans retinoic acid) combined with anthracycline-based risk-adapted chemotherapy, with arsenic trioxide being the treatment of choice at relapse. To try to reduce the relapse rate, we combined arsenic trioxide with tretinoin and idarubicin in induction therapy, and used arsenic trioxide with tretinoin as consolidation therapy. Patients with previously untreated genetically confirmed acute promyelocytic leukaemia were eligible for this study. Eligibilty also required Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-3, age older than 1 year, normal left ventricular ejection fraction, Q-Tc interval less than 500 ms, absence of serious comorbidity, and written informed consent. Patients with genetic variants of acute promyelocytic leukaemia (fusion of genes other than PML with RARA) were ineligible. Induction comprised 45 mg/m(2) oral tretinoin in four divided doses daily on days 1-36, 6-12 mg/m(2) intravenous idarubicin on days 2, 4, 6, and 8, adjusted for age, and 0·15 mg/kg intravenous arsenic trioxide once daily on days 9-36. Supportive therapy included blood products for protocol-specified haemostatic targets, and 1 mg/kg prednisone daily as prophylaxis against differentiation syndrome. Two consolidation cycles with tretinoin and arsenic trioxide were followed by maintenance therapy with oral tretinoin, 6-mercaptopurine, and methotrexate for 2 years. The primary endpoints of the study were freedom from relapse and early death (within 36 days of treatment start) and we assessed improvement compared with the 2 year interim results. To assess durability of remission we compared the primary endpoints and disease-free and overall survival at 5 years in APML4 with the 2 year interim APML4 data and the APML3 treatment protocol that excluded arsenic trioxide. This study is registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, number ACTRN12605000070639. 124

  17. Post-transplant outcome in chronic myeloid leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raza, S.; Ullah, K.; Ahmed, P.; Kamal, M.K.

    2008-01-01

    To determine post-transplant survival in chronic myeloid leukaemia patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplant. All patients of chronic myeloid leukaemia in chronic phase having HLA identical donor and age under 55 years, normal hepatic, renal and cardiac functions with good performance status were selected. Patients in accelerated phase or blast crisis, poor performance status, impaired hepatic, renal, cardiac functions or pregnancy were excluded. Survival was calculated from the date of transplant to death or last follow-up according to Kaplan-Meier and Cox (proportional hazard) regression analysis methods. Thirty seven patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia underwent allogeneic stem cell transplant from HLA identical sibling donors. Thirty two patients were male and five were females. Median age of patients was 28 years. All patients and donors were CMV positive. Post-transplant complications encountered were acute GvHD (Grade II-IV) (n=13, 35.1%), chronic GvHD in 18.9% (n=7), Veno Occlusive Disease (VOD) in 5.4% (n=2), acute renal failure in 2.7% (n=1), haemorrhagic cystitis in 2.7% (n=1), bacterial infections in 40.5% (n=15), fungal infections in 16.2% (n=6), CMV infection in 5.4% (n=2), tuberculosis in 5.4% (n=2), Herpes Zoster infection 2.7% (n=1) and relapse in 2.7% (n=1). Mortality was observed in 27% (n=10). Major causes of mortality were GvHD, VOD, septicemia, CMV infection and disseminated Aspergillosis. Overall Disease Free Survival (DFS) was 73% with a median duration of follow-up of 47.4 + 12 months. DFS was 81% in standard risk and 54.5% in high-risk group. Results of allogeneic stem cell transplant in standard risk group CML patients were good and comparable with other international centres, however, results in high-risk CML patients need further improvement, although, number of patients in this group is small. (author)

  18. Leukaemia incidence among workers in the shoe and boot manufacturing industry: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forand Steven P

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous reports have indicated an excess of leukaemia in Broome County, New York, particularly in the Town of Union. Surveillance of cancer incidence data indicates that a large proportion of these cases occurred among males ages 65 and older. Shoe and boot manufacturing has been the largest single industry in this area throughout much of the past century. Occupational studies from Europe suggest a link between leukaemia and employment in the shoe and boot manufacturing industry. However, researchers have not found a positive association between leukaemia and employment in the shoe industry among workers in the United States. Methods A matched case-control study was conducted to investigate the association between leukaemia incidence among males 65 and older and employment in the shoe and boot manufacturing industry. Thirty-six cases of leukaemia occurring between 1981–1990; among males age 65 and older; residing in the town of Union met the study case criteria. Death certificates were obtained for each of the cases. These were matched to death certificates of 144 controls on date of death and date of birth +/- 1 year. Death certificates were then examined to determine the employer and occupation of each study subject. Conditional logistic regression was used to determine the risk of leukaemia among those working in the industry. Results The risk of both leukaemia (OR = 1.47; 95% CI 0.70, 3.09 and acute myeloid leukaemia (OR = 1.19; 95% CI 0.33, 4.28 were elevated among those employed in the shoe and boot manufacturing industry, however neither was statistically significant. Conclusion The results, though suggestive of an association between leukaemia and employment in the shoe and boot manufacturing industry, were not statistically conclusive due mainly to limited study power. Several additional limitations may also have prevented the observance of more conclusive findings. Better exposure assessment, information on

  19. Impact of hydrochloric acid instillation on salvage of infected central venous catheters in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Mette; Rosthøj, Steen

    2013-01-01

    Bacteraemia associated with indwelling central venous catheters (CVC) causes significant morbidity in children with cancer. Hydrochloric acid (HCl) instillations have been reported to salvage CVCs with antibiotic-refractory infection. We implemented this treatment in 2002. The impact on the survival of CVCs has been evaluated in a retrospective cohort study of children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Children with newly diagnosed ALL during 1999-2005 having their first CVC inserted before (n = 16) and after (n = 24) the introduction of the procedure were studied. All bacteraemic episodes were reviewed, recording bacteriological findings and treatment, and the time to premature or planned removal of the CVC was determined. In the comparison cohort, 31.0% (9/29) of bacteraemic episodes led to removal of the CVC, compared to 5.5% (2/36) in the intervention cohort (p = 0.01). Thus, the rate of catheter loss due to infection fell from 56.3% (9/16) to 8.3% (2/24) after introducing HCl treatment (p = 0.0025). Overall, the premature catheter removal rate fell from 75.0% (12/16) to 45.8% (11/24) (p = 0.10). Analysed in a CUSUM plot the reduced frequency of premature CVC removal evidently coincided with the introduction of the procedure. In a subgroup analysis of 21 monobacterial infections with coagulase-negative staphylococci, a decrease in systemic and lock antibiotic therapy was found. No adverse events were noted. HCl instillations significantly reduced the need to remove and replace CVCs. The procedure is practical, appears to be safe, and may reduce the consumption of antibiotics.

  20. Outcome of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia after Induction Therapy --- Three-Year Experience in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Belayet Hossain

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of different malignancies is increasing among the world populations. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL is the most common of all the paediatric malignancies. Response to induction therapy is one of the most important predictors of long term outcome of ALL. Objective: To see the immediate outcome of paediatric ALL patients following induction therapy. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was conducted from January 2013 to December 2015. Total 221 paediatric ALL patients were included in this study. Diagnosis was based on history, examination, blast cells count on peripheral blood film and bone marrow study, CSF study and immunophenotyping of peripheral blood/bone marrow aspirate in patients who were financially capable. Among them, parents of 40 (18% patients did not agree to start chemotherapy. According to Modified UK ALL 2003 protocol (Regimen A & B 181 patients were given induction therapy (vincristine, prednisolone, L-asparaginase, and daunomycin in high risk patients. Among them 14 patients discontinued, 10 patients died during chemotherapy and rest 157 patients completed induction phase. Bone marrow study was repeated after completion of induction therapy and remission pattern was seen. Results: Out of 157 chemotherapy completed patients, 137 (87% went into complete remission (25% blast cells in the bone marrow. Ten (5.5% patients died due to bleeding, febrile neutropenia and sepsis during the course of induction therapy. Conclusion: ALL in children is curable with effective chemotherapy. Poverty, ignorance and misconception regarding outcome are responsible for refusal and discontinuation of chemotherapy in third world countries like Bangladesh. Mortality and treatment cost can be reduced with the improvement of the facilities for isolation, barrier nursing and supportive treatment, and by creating awareness.