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Sample records for acute myelogenous leukemia

  1. Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for information in your local library and on the Internet. Good sources include the National Cancer Institute, the ... mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/acute-myelogenous-leukemia/basics/definition/CON-20043431 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  2. Allogeneic Transplantation for Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-14

    Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute; Leukemia; Leukemia Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL); Leukemia Acute Lymphoid Leukemia (ALL); Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Leukemia Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Leukemia Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

  3. Acute myelogenous leukemia in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Emilio, A; Dragone, P; De Negri, G; Montaldi, A; Stella, M; Battista, R

    1989-01-01

    We report on a patient with acute promyelocytic leukemia diagnosed at the 22nd week of pregnancy. She received chemotherapeutic treatment and reached a complete remission. At the 28th week of gestation the patient delivered, by cesarean section, a normal male infant. At present the mother is still disease-free 27 months after diagnosis. The child, too, is in good health. We point out the possibility of producing live babies with current chemotherapy regimens without exposing either the mother or the fetus to excessive risks.

  4. Nilotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-29

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  5. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-10

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    CML; Chronic myeloid leukemia; Chronic granulocytic leukemia; Leukemia - chronic granulocytic ... Chronic myelogenous leukemia is grouped into phases: Chronic Accelerated Blast crisis The chronic phase can last for ...

  7. Tipifarnib in the treatment of newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith E Karp

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Judith E Karp1, Jeffrey E Lancet21Division of Hematologic Malignancies, Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; 2H. Lee Moffitt Comprehensive Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida, USAAbstract: Farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs represent a new class of signal transduction inhibitors that block the processing of cellular polypeptides that have cysteine terminal residues and, by so doing, interdict multiple pathways involved in proliferation and survival of diverse malignant cell types. Tipifarnib is an orally bioavailable, nonpeptidomimetic methylquinolone FTI that has exhibited clinical activity in patients with myeloid malignancies including elderly adults with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML who are not candidates for traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy, patients with high-risk myelodysplasia, myeloproliferative disorders, and imatinib-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia. Because of its relatively low toxicity profile, tipifarnib provides an important alternative to traditional cytotoxic approaches for elderly patients who are not likely to tolerate or even benefit from aggressive chemotherapy. In this review, we will focus on the clinical development of tipifarnib for treatment of newly diagnosed AML, both as induction therapy for elderly adults with poor-risk AML and as maintenance therapy following achievement of first complete remission following induction and consolidation therapies for poor-risk AML. As with all other malignancies, the optimal approach is likely to lie in rational combinations of tipifarnib with cytotoxic, biologic and/or immunomodulatory agents with non-cross-resistant mechanisms of action. Gene expression profi ling has identified networks of differentially expressed genes and gene combinations capable of predicting response to single agent tipifarnib. The clinical and correlative laboratory trials in progress and under development will provide the critical foundations for

  8. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-14

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Erythroid Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Blasts Under 10 Percent of Bone Marrow Nucleated Cells; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Pancytopenia; Refractory Anemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Acute myelogenous leukemia following chemotherapy and radiation for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aso, Teijiro; Hirota, Yuichi; Kondou, Seiji; Matsumoto, Isao; Matsuzaka, Toshimitsu; Iwashita, Akinori

    1989-03-01

    In August 1982, a 44-year-old man was diagnosed as having rectal cancer, histologically diagnosed as well differentiated adenocarcinoma, and abdominoperineal resection and colostomy were performed. Postoperatively, he received chemotherapy with mitomycin C up to a total dose of 100 mg. In September 1986, lung metastasis occurred and he was treated with a combination chemotherapy consisting of cisplatin, pirarubicin and 5-fluorouracil. In the following year, radiation treatment (total: 6900 rad) was given for a recurrent pelvic lesion. Peripheral blood on April 30, 1988, showed anemia, thrombocytopenia and appearance of myeloblasts, and a diagnosis of acute myelogenous leukemia (FAB: M1) was made. Combination chemotherapy (including aclarubicin, vincristine, behenoyl ara-C, daunorubicin, 6-mercaptopurine, cytarabine, etoposide and prednisolone) failed to induce remission and the patient died in June 1988. This case was thought to be one of secondary leukemia occurring after chemotherapy and radiation treatment for rectal cancer. This case clearly indicates the need for a careful follow-up of long-term survivors who have received cancer therapy. (author).

  10. Acute myelogenous leukemia | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tin Receptor Agonist, Eltrombopag, Administered to Subjects with Acute Myelogenou...tion(s) being investigated Acute myelogenous leukemia E.1.1.1Medical condition in easily understood language Acute...1.2Version 18.1 E.1.2Level LLT E.1.2Classification code 10000886 E.1.2Term Acute

  11. The clinically relevant pharmacogenomic changes in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emadi, Ashkan; Karp, Judith E

    2012-08-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is an extremely heterogeneous neoplasm with several clinical, pathological, genetic and molecular subtypes. Combinations of various doses and schedules of cytarabine and different anthracyclines have been the mainstay of treatment for all forms of AMLs in adult patients. Although this combination, with the addition of an occasional third agent, remains effective for treatment of some young-adult patients with de novo AML, the prognosis of AML secondary to myelodysplastic syndromes or myeloproliferative neoplasms, treatment-related AML, relapsed or refractory AML, and AML that occurs in older populations remains grim. Taken into account the heterogeneity of AML, one size does not and should not be tried to fit all. In this article, the authors review currently understood, applicable and relevant findings related to cytarabine and anthracycline drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters in adult patients with AML. To provide a prime-time example of clinical applicability of pharmacogenomics in distinguishing a subset of patients with AML who might be better responders to farnesyltransferase inhibitors, the authors also reviewed findings related to a two-gene transcript signature consisting of high RASGRP1 and low APTX, the ratio of which appears to positively predict clinical response in AML patients treated with farnesyltransferase inhibitors.

  12. Inhibition of pentose phosphate pathway suppresses acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Xu, Qian; Ji, Dexiang; Wei, Yanlin; Chen, Huamei; Li, Tingting; Wan, Bolin; Yuan, Liya; Huang, Ruibin; Chen, Guoan

    2016-05-01

    Pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is a metabolic pathway that generates NADPH and pentose. PPP genes have been reported to be primarily or secondarily upregulated in many cancers. We aimed to study the general alteration of PPP in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). We performed data mining and analysis of the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) AML dataset for genetic alteration of the PPP gene set. In vitro studies including proliferation, migration, and invasion assays, together with metabolite consumption and oxidation assays, were performed. PPP genes were upregulated in 61 % of patients with AML. The majority of altered cases were expression changes measured by RNA sequencing. Expressions of critical PPP genes such as G6PD, PFKL, PFKP, and PGLS were consistently upregulated in all altered cases. Altered PPP is not associated with survival or disease relapse. PPP inhibition using 6-aminonicotinamide (6AN) increases glucose oxidative metabolism in AML. 6AN decreased the glucose oxidation and increased fatty acid oxidation. Here, we showed that PPP inhibition increased glucose oxidative metabolism in AML. PPP inhibition suppressed growth, migration, and invasion of AML, but not colony formation. PPP plays an important role in AML. Our results could contribute to the development of novel targeted treatment.

  13. 7-Hydroxystaurosporine and Perifosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. EphB1 Suppression in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia : Regulating the DNA Damage Control System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, K. R.; Scherpen, F. J. G.; Garcia-Manero, G.; Yang, H.; Kaspers, G. J. L.; Cloos, J.; Zwaan, C. M.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M. M.; Kornblau, S. M.; De Bont, E. S. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of ephrin receptor (EphB1) expression may associate with aggressive cancer phenotypes; however, the mechanism of action remains unclear. To gain detailed insight into EphB1 function in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), comprehensive analysis of EphB1 transcriptional regulation was conducted. In

  15. Survival after intestinal mucormycosis in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, R; Arnau, E; Julia, A; Lopez, A; Nadal, A; Allende, E

    1986-12-15

    A young woman with acute myelocytic leukemia developed acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding immediately after a first remission induction of her leukemia. After the site of bleeding was located in the descending colon, a necrotic bleeding ulcer was resected. Histologic examination of the ulcer established the diagnosis of gastrointestinal mucormycosis. Treatment with amphotericin B was administered because of the high risk of dissemination. The patient has been followed for 9 months with no evidence of relapse of infection. Survival after gastrointestinal mucormycosis in acute leukemia has not previously been reported in the English language literature. Success in managing mucormycosis depends on the adherence to the recommended principles of early aggressive diagnostic measures, excisional surgery, amphotericin B therapy, and control of the underlying predisposing condition.

  16. Nucleophosmin mutations in childhood acute myelogenous leukemia with normal karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Dell'Oro, Maria Grazia; Mecucci, Cristina; Giarin, Emanuela; Masetti, Riccardo; Rossi, Vincenzo; Locatelli, Franco; Martelli, Massimo F; Basso, Giuseppe; Pession, Andrea; Biondi, Andrea; Falini, Brunangelo

    2005-08-15

    Nucleophosmin (NPM) is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein involved in leukemia-associated chromosomal translocations, and it regulates the alternate reading frame (ARF)-p53 tumor-suppressor pathway. Recently, it has been demonstrated that mutations of the NPM1 gene alter the protein at its C-terminal, causing its cytoplasmic localization. Cytoplasmic NPM was detected in 35% of adult patients with primary non-French-American-British (FAB) classification M3 acute myeloid leukemia (AML), associated mainly with normal karyotype. We evaluated the prevalence of the NPM1 gene mutation in non-M3 childhood AML patients enrolled in the ongoing Associazione Italiana di Ematologia e Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP-AML02) protocol in Italy. NPM1 mutations were found in 7 (6.5%) of 107 successfully analyzed patients. NPM1-mutated patients carried a normal karyotype (7/26, 27.1%) and were older in age. Thus, the NPM1 mutation is a frequent abnormality in AML patients without known genetic marker; the mutation may represent a new target to monitor minimal residual disease in AML and a potential candidate for alternative and targeted treatments.

  17. Vorinostat and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  18. Fatal Breakthrough Mucormycosis in an Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Patient while on Posaconazole Prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seung Hun; Kim, Hyun Seon; Bae, Myoung Nam; Kim, Jihye; Yoo, Ji Yeon; Lee, Kwan Yong; Lee, Dong-Gun; Kim, Hee-Je

    2015-03-01

    Posaconazole is a new oral triazole with broad-spectrum antifungal activity. Posaconazole has also shown a significant advantage of preventing invasive fungal infection compared to fluconazole or itraconazole in patients with prolonged neutropenia. Indeed, posaconazole has been commonly used for antifungal prophylaxis in patients undergoing remission induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. We experienced a case of fatal mucormycosis despite posaconazole prophylaxis. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of fatal breakthrough mucormycosis in a patient receiving posaconazole prophylaxis during remission induction chemotherapy in Korea. This case demonstrated that breakthrough fungal infection can occurs in patients receiving posaconazole prophylaxis because of its limited activity against some mucorales.

  19. Pulmonary Complications of Azanucleoside Therapy in Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Molina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Our primary aim was to identify potential risk factors and clinical outcome of azanucleoside induced pulmonary complications in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS and Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML. We present an 89-year-old female with MDS derived AML who developed fatigability, hypoxemia, and bilateral lung infiltrates indicating interstitial lung disease after 11 cycles of azanucleoside. In addition, we describe a cohort of six MDS patients with fever, cough, dyspnea, and pulmonary infiltrates at early time point during azanucleoside treatment. Early and late onset of pulmonary manifestations suggest different pathogenic mechanisms. Brief azanucleoside discontinuation and steroids led to rapid improvement in symptoms.

  20. Initial presentation of acute myelogenous leukemia in the infiltrate underlying an actinic keratosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collin Blattner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an 85-year-old female patient who presented with an erythematous keratotic lesion on her temple suspicious of squamous cell carcinoma. Histological evaluation revealed actinic keratosis, but the underlying atypical infiltrate contained atypical myeloid forms consistent with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML. Upon further questioning, it was determined that the patient had a history of myelodysplastic syndrome. Her skin biopsy provided the first evidence of progression to AML. This case serves as an important reminder of the role the dermatopathologist plays in identifying serious systemic disease.

  1. Targeting Aberrant Glutathione Metabolism to Eradicate Human Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Shanshan; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Callahan, Kevin P.; Balys, Marlene; Ashton, John M.; Neering, Sarah J.; Lagadinou, Eleni D.; Corbett, Cheryl; Ye, Haobin; Liesveld, Jane L.; O'Dwyer, Kristen M.; Li, Zheng; Shi, Lei; Greninger, Patricia; Settleman, Jeffrey; Benes, Cyril; Hagen, Fred K.; Munger, Joshua; Crooks, Peter A.; Becker, Michael W.; Jordan, Craig T.

    2013-01-01

    The development of strategies to eradicate primary human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells is a major challenge to the leukemia research field. In particular, primitive leukemia cells, often termed leukemia stem cells, are typically refractory to many forms of therapy. To investigate improved strategies for targeting of human AML cells we compared the molecular mechanisms regulating oxidative state in primitive (CD34+) leukemic versus normal specimens. Our data indicate that CD34+ AML cells have elevated expression of multiple glutathione pathway regulatory proteins, presumably as a mechanism to compensate for increased oxidative stress in leukemic cells. Consistent with this observation, CD34+ AML cells have lower levels of reduced glutathione and increased levels of oxidized glutathione compared with normal CD34+ cells. These findings led us to hypothesize that AML cells will be hypersensitive to inhibition of glutathione metabolism. To test this premise, we identified compounds such as parthenolide (PTL) or piperlongumine that induce almost complete glutathione depletion and severe cell death in CD34+ AML cells. Importantly, these compounds only induce limited and transient glutathione depletion as well as significantly less toxicity in normal CD34+ cells. We further determined that PTL perturbs glutathione homeostasis by a multifactorial mechanism, which includes inhibiting key glutathione metabolic enzymes (GCLC and GPX1), as well as direct depletion of glutathione. These findings demonstrate that primitive leukemia cells are uniquely sensitive to agents that target aberrant glutathione metabolism, an intrinsic property of primary human AML cells. PMID:24089526

  2. [Two cases of acute myelogenous leukemia with Bacillus cereus bacteremia resulting in fatal intracranial hemorrhage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, H; Moriyama, Y; Tatekawa, T; Tominaga, N; Teshima, H; Hiraoka, A; Masaoka, T; Yoshinaga, T

    1993-12-01

    This manuscript reports Bacillus cereus sepsis in two cases with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) who suffered complications of fatal intracranial hemorrhage during remission induction therapy. The first case was 43-year-old male with AML (M0) receiving first consolidation chemotherapy who developed sudden diarrhea, abdominal pain and spiking fever. Two days later, he died of intracranial hemorrhage. The second case was 15-year-old male with AML (M5b) who was receiving first induction chemotherapy. He developed headache and vomiting following spiking fever and diarrhea. He died of subarachnoid hemorrhage the next day. In both cases, Bacillus cereus was isolated from blood culture. Fatal intracranial hemorrhage due to severe bleeding tendency caused rapid to death in both cases. These bleeding tendencies might have been induced by B. cereus sepsis. In addition, we should not overlook B. cereus as contamination, but rather consider it as a potential pathogen, when isolated from blood culture.

  3. [Bacillus cereus sepsis and subarachnoid hemorrhage following consolidation chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawatani, Eri; Kishikawa, Yuki; Sankoda, Chikahiro; Kuwahara, Nobuo; Mori, Daisuke; Osoegawa, Kouichi; Matsuishi, Eijo; Gondo, Hisashi

    2009-04-01

    A 64-year-old man with acute myelogenous leukemia (FAB classification, M7) in remission received consolidation chemotherapy with mitoxantrone/cytosine arabinoside. WBC counts decreased to 0/microl on day 14, and fever (39.3 degrees C) and epigastralgia developed on day 15. Cefozopran was instituted for febrile neutropenia; however, on day 16, he was found to be in cardiac arrest. CT scan on day 16 revealed subarachnoid hemorrhage. Gram-positive rods were isolated from blood cultures on day 15, and were later identified as B.cereus. He recovered transiently, but eventually died on day 19. Postmortem examination demonstrated many colonies of B. cereus in the cerebrum, cerebellum, lung, and liver. Hepatocyte necrosis was also observed in the liver. Bacterial aneurysms or septic emboli were not identified in the arachnoid vessels, but necrosis of cerebral vessels was prominent, which was considered to be the cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage has been reported to be associated with B. cereus sepsis, which developed at nadir following chemotherapy for leukemia patients. Because of the aggressive clinical course of B. cereus sepsis, including the risk for subarachnoid hemorrhage, early treatment with effective antibiotics for B. cereus sepsis would be important in the management of leukemia patients after chemotherapy.

  4. [Treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia in patients more than 80 years old].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeyama, H; Yamamoto, Y; Miyata, Y; Yamada, H; Watanabe, E; Aoki, H; Iinuma, M

    1997-07-01

    We studied fifteen patients older than 80 years of age with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) treated between 1984 and 1996. Among 15 cases of AML including 7 de novo cases and 8 from myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or hypoplastic leukemia, 14 patients had complications, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus or other malignancies. Although patients with de novo AML showed high peripheral WBC counts and higher cellularity of bone marrow than those from MDS or hypoplastic leukemia, it was difficult in some cases to distinguish these types of AML from hematological findings. Of the 6 AML cases, three had entered complete remission (CR) by a standard dose of combination chemotherapy (BHAC-DMP). One CR patient has had CR for more than 9 years now with good QOL. Among the 3 patients treated by low-dose Ara-C, one attained CR but only for a short period. Four other patients received BRM, such as G-CSF or Ubenimex, and 2 patients died without chemotherapy. Since AML at more than 80 years of age is a highly heterogenous disease, it would be reasonable to give antileukemic agents according to the individual patient's condition.

  5. Haploidentical vs cord blood transplantation for adults with acute myelogenous leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Melhem; Solh

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoeitic cell transplantation is established as a curative treatment for patients w acute myelogenous leukemia. Haploidentical family donor and umbilical cord blood(UCB) are alternative sources of stem cells for patients lacking a matched sibling or unrelated do-nor. The early challenges of transplant complications related to poor engraftment and graft-vs-host disease have been overcome with new strategies such as using 2 units and increased cell dose in UCB and T-cell deple-tion and post transplantation cyclophosphamide in hap-loidentical transplantation. The outcomes of alternative transplantation for acute leukemia were compared to other traditional graft sources. For patients lacking a matched sibling or unrelated donor, either strategy is a suitable option. The choice should rely mostly on the urgency of the transplantation and the available cell dose as well as the expertise available at the trans-plant center. This manuscript reviews the options of alternative donor transplantation and highlights recent advances in each of these promising transplantation options.

  6. Induction of differentiation and apoptosis- a possible strategy in the treatment of adult acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruserud, O; Gjertsen, B T; Huang, Ts

    2000-01-01

    A differentiation block with accumulation of immature myeloid cells characterizes acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). However, native AML cells often show some morphological signs of differentiation that allow a classification into different subsets, and further differentiation may be induced by exposure to various soluble mediators, e.g., all trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) and several cytokines. Combination therapy with ATRA and chemotherapy should now be regarded as the standard treatment for the acute promyelocytic leukemia variant of AML. Several agents can induce leukemic cell differentiation for other AML subtypes, although these effects differ between patients. Differentiation may then be associated with induction of apoptosis, and differentiation-inducing therapy may therefore become useful in combination with intensive chemotherapy to increase the susceptibility of AML blasts to drug-induced apoptosis. However, it should be emphasized that differentiation and apoptosis can occur as separate events with different regulation in AML cells, and future studies in AML should therefore focus on: A) the identification of new agents with more predictable effects on differentiation and apoptosis; B) the use of clinical and laboratory parameters to define new subsets of AML patients in which differentiation/apoptosis induction has a predictable and beneficial effect, and C) further characterization of how AML blast sensitivity to drug-induced apoptosis is modulated by differentiation induction.

  7. A phase 2 study of MK-0457 in patients with BCR-ABL T315I mutant chronic myelogenous leukemia and philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seymour, J F; Kim, D W; Rubin, E;

    2014-01-01

    Aurora kinase overexpression has been observed in patients with hematologic malignancies. MK-0457, a pan-aurora kinase inhibitor that also inhibits the ABL T315I mutant, was evaluated to treat patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) or Philadelphia chromosome (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic...

  8. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Amino Acid Translations are all sourced from dbSNP 144 Overview Alternate Names: Synonym AML - Acute... myeloblastic leukaemia; Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloblastic Leukemias; Acute... Myelocytic Leukemia; Acute Myelocytic Leukemias; Acute Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myelogenous Leukemias; Acute... granulocytic leukaemia; Acute myeloblastic leukemia; Acute myeloid leukaemia; Acute myeloid leukaemia - category; Acute... myeloid leukaemia, disease; Acute myeloid leukemia; Acute myelo

  9. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-27

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  10. Ceramide-tamoxifen regimen targets bioenergetic elements in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morad, Samy A F; Ryan, Terence E; Neufer, P Darrell; Zeczycki, Tonya N; Davis, Traci S; MacDougall, Matthew R; Fox, Todd E; Tan, Su-Fern; Feith, David J; Loughran, Thomas P; Kester, Mark; Claxton, David F; Barth, Brian M; Deering, Tye G; Cabot, Myles C

    2016-07-01

    The objective of our study was to determine the mechanism of action of the short-chain ceramide analog, C6-ceramide, and the breast cancer drug, tamoxifen, which we show coactively depress viability and induce apoptosis in human acute myelogenous leukemia cells. Exposure to the C6-ceramide-tamoxifen combination elicited decreases in mitochondrial membrane potential and complex I respiration, increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS), and release of mitochondrial proapoptotic proteins. Decreases in ATP levels, reduced glycolytic capacity, and reduced expression of inhibitors of apoptosis proteins also resulted. Cytotoxicity of the drug combination was mitigated by exposure to antioxidant. Cells metabolized C6-ceramide by glycosylation and hydrolysis, the latter leading to increases in long-chain ceramides. Tamoxifen potently blocked glycosylation of C6-ceramide and long-chain ceramides. N-desmethyltamoxifen, a poor antiestrogen and the major tamoxifen metabolite in humans, was also effective with C6-ceramide, indicating that traditional antiestrogen pathways are not involved in cellular responses. We conclude that cell death is driven by mitochondrial targeting and ROS generation and that tamoxifen enhances the ceramide effect by blocking its metabolism. As depletion of ATP and targeting the "Warburg effect" represent dynamic metabolic insult, this ceramide-containing combination may be of utility in the treatment of leukemia and other cancers. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Ceramide-tamoxifen regimen targets bioenergetic elements in acute myelogenous leukemia1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morad, Samy A. F.; Ryan, Terence E.; Neufer, P. Darrell; Zeczycki, Tonya N.; Davis, Traci S.; MacDougall, Matthew R.; Fox, Todd E.; Tan, Su-Fern; Feith, David J.; Loughran, Thomas P.; Kester, Mark; Claxton, David F.; Barth, Brian M.; Deering, Tye G.; Cabot, Myles C.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of our study was to determine the mechanism of action of the short-chain ceramide analog, C6-ceramide, and the breast cancer drug, tamoxifen, which we show coactively depress viability and induce apoptosis in human acute myelogenous leukemia cells. Exposure to the C6-ceramide-tamoxifen combination elicited decreases in mitochondrial membrane potential and complex I respiration, increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS), and release of mitochondrial proapoptotic proteins. Decreases in ATP levels, reduced glycolytic capacity, and reduced expression of inhibitors of apoptosis proteins also resulted. Cytotoxicity of the drug combination was mitigated by exposure to antioxidant. Cells metabolized C6-ceramide by glycosylation and hydrolysis, the latter leading to increases in long-chain ceramides. Tamoxifen potently blocked glycosylation of C6-ceramide and long-chain ceramides. N-desmethyltamoxifen, a poor antiestrogen and the major tamoxifen metabolite in humans, was also effective with C6-ceramide, indicating that traditional antiestrogen pathways are not involved in cellular responses. We conclude that cell death is driven by mitochondrial targeting and ROS generation and that tamoxifen enhances the ceramide effect by blocking its metabolism. As depletion of ATP and targeting the “Warburg effect” represent dynamic metabolic insult, this ceramide-containing combination may be of utility in the treatment of leukemia and other cancers. PMID:27140664

  12. Successful treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia with favorable cytogenetics by reduced-intensity stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Takeshi; Yasumoto, Atsushi; Arita, Kotaro; Sugita, Jun-Ichi; Shigematsu, Akio; Okada, Kohei; Takahata, Mutsumi; Onozawa, Masahiro; Kahata, Kaoru; Takeda, Yukari; Obara, Masato; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Endo, Tomoyuki; Nishio, Mitsufumi; Sato, Norihiro; Tanaka, Junji; Hashino, Satoshi; Koike, Takao; Asaka, Masahiro; Imamura, Masahiro

    2010-03-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) with favorable cytogenetics responds well to chemotherapy. If the leukemia relapses, allogenic hematopoietic stem transplantation (allo-HSCT) is considered as a treatment option. Since the efficacy of reduced-intensity stem cell transplantation (RIST) for AML with favorable cytogenetics has not been established, we retrospectively analyzed the outcomes of allo-HSCT in AML patients according to cytogenetic risks. The outcome of allo-HSCT for AML patients with favorable cytogenetics seemed to be superior to that for AML patients with intermediate cytogenetics. In AML patients with favorable cytogenetics, the 3-year overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) rates were 88 and 76%, respectively, in the RIST group. Both the 3-year OS and RFS rates were 81% in the conventional stem cell transplantation (CST) group. The outcome of RIST for AML patients with favorable cytogenetics was comparable to that for patients who received CST despite the more advanced age and greater organ dysfunction in RIST group than in CST group. None of the patients died within 90 days after RIST. Moreover, there was no relapse in patients with favorable cytogenetics who were in hematological remission prior to RIST. Thus, RIST for AML patients with favorable cytogenetics in remission is safe and effective.

  13. Pharmacokinetic targeting of intravenous busulfan reduces conditioning regimen related toxicity following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for acute myelogenous leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishihori Taiga

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Optimal conditioning therapy for hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML remains undefined. We retrospectively compared outcomes of a consecutive series of 51 AML patients treated with oral busulfan (1 mg/kg every 6 hours for 4 days and cyclophosphamide (60 mg/kg IV × 2 days - (Bu/Cy with 100 consecutive AML patients treated with pharmacokinetic targeted IV busulfan (AUC

  14. Rapidly progressive cutaneous Rhizopus microsporus infection presenting as Fournier's gangrene in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, C M; Alonso, C D; Subhawong, A P; Kwiatkowski, N P; Showel, M; Carroll, K C; Marr, K A

    2011-08-01

    Members of the genus Rhizopus within the class Zygomycetes can cause devastating opportunistic infections. Cutaneous disease arising from direct inoculation of fungal spores has the potential to disseminate widely. Here, we describe a dramatic case of cutaneous Rhizopus infection involving the penis in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia. Despite aggressive surgical debridement, systemic antifungal therapy, and donor lymphocyte infusion, the infection was ultimately fatal. This case illustrates the unique diagnostic and therapeutic challenges in the clinical management of cutaneous Rhizopus infection.

  15. The medical and surgical management of typhlitis in children with acute nonlymphocytic (myelogenous) leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamberger, R C; Weinstein, H J; Delorey, M J; Levey, R H

    1986-02-01

    The treatment of acute leukemia in childhood has been increasingly successful. Infectious complications are the major cause of morbidity and mortality among these patients receiving aggressive chemotherapy. In particular, neutropenic enterocolitis or typhlitis has had a reported mortality of 50% to 100%. The authors reviewed a series of 77 previously untreated patients with acute myelogenous leukemia begun on treatment from March 1976 to June 1984 to better define the characteristics of typhlitis and its optimum management. Twenty-five patients had episodes of typhlitis, characterized by fever, abdominal pain, and tenderness, occurring during periods of neutropenia. Ten of these patients had watery diarrhea as a major additional symptom, and nine patients had a significant episode of gastrointestinal bleeding. In seven instances, blood culture results were positive, all for intestinal flora. The episodes of typhlitis occurred most frequently during the induction therapy (19 patients). Five patients experienced typhlitis during maintenance therapy, and one patient had acute appendicitis. Two patients had typhlitis during their reinduction therapy, and of note, one had had abdominal symptoms during her initial induction. All patients were treated initially with broad-spectrum antibiotics and bowel rest. Four criteria have been used for surgical intervention: (1) persistent gastrointestinal bleeding after resolution of neutropenia and thrombocytopenia and correction of clotting abnormalities; (2) evidence of free intraperitoneal perforation; (3) clinical deterioration requiring support with vasopressors, or large volumes of fluid, suggesting uncontrolled sepsis; and (4) development of symptoms of an intra-abdominal process, in the absence of neutropenia, which would normally require surgery. Using these criteria, five patients required surgical intervention for typhlitis or its sequelae and one for acute appendicitis. There was one perioperative death resulting from

  16. A comprehensive review of occupational and general population cancer risk: 1,3-Butadiene exposure-response modeling for all leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, myeloid neoplasm and lymphoid neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sielken, Robert L; Valdez-Flores, Ciriaco

    2015-11-05

    Excess cancer risks associated with 1,3-butadiene (BD) inhalation exposures are calculated using an extensive data set developed by the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) from an epidemiology study of North American workers in the styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) industry. While the UAB study followed SBR workers, risk calculations can be adapted to estimate both occupational and general population risks. The data from the UAB SBR study offer an opportunity to quantitatively evaluate the association between cumulative exposure to BD and different types of cancer, accounting for the number of tasks involving high-intensity exposures to BD as well as confounding associated with the exposures to the multiple other chemicals in the SBR industry. Quantitative associations of BD exposure and cancer, specifically leukemia, can be further characterized by leukemia type, including potential associations with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), and the groups of lymphoid and myeloid neoplasms. Collectively, these multiple evaluations lead to a comprehensive analysis that makes use of all of the available information and is consistent with the risk assessment goals of the USEPA and other regulatory agencies, and in line with the recommendations of the USEPA Science Advisory Board. While a range of cancer risk values can result from these multiple factors, a preferred case for occupational and general population risk is highlighted. Cox proportional hazards models are used to fit exposure-response models to the most recent UAB data. The slope of the model with cumulative BD ppm-years as the predictor variable is not statistically significantly greater than zero for CML, AML, or, when any one of eight exposure covariates is added to the model, for all leukemias combined. The slope for CLL is statistically significantly different from zero. The slope for myeloid neoplasms is not statistically

  17. MLN4924 induces Noxa upregulation in acute myelogenous leukemia and synergizes with Bcl-2 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorr, K L B; Schneider, P A; Meng, X W; Dai, H; Smith, B D; Hess, A D; Karp, J E; Kaufmann, S H

    2015-12-01

    MLN4924 (pevonedistat), an inhibitor of the Nedd8 activating enzyme (NAE), has exhibited promising clinical activity in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Here we demonstrate that MLN4924 induces apoptosis in AML cell lines and clinical samples via a mechanism distinct from those observed in other malignancies. Inactivation of E3 cullin ring ligases (CRLs) through NAE inhibition causes accumulation of the CRL substrate c-Myc, which transactivates the PMAIP1 gene encoding Noxa, leading to increased Noxa protein, Bax and Bak activation, and subsequent apoptotic changes. Importantly, c-Myc knockdown diminishes Noxa induction; and Noxa siRNA diminishes MLN4924-induced killing. Because Noxa also neutralizes Mcl-1, an anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 paralog often upregulated in resistant AML, further experiments have examined the effect of combining MLN4924 with BH3 mimetics that target other anti-apoptotic proteins. In combination with ABT-199 or ABT-263 (navitoclax), MLN4924 exerts a synergistic cytotoxic effect. Collectively, these results provide new insight into MLN4924-induced engagement of the apoptotic machinery that could help guide further exploration of MLN4924 for AML.

  18. LEO1 is regulated by PRL-3 and mediates its oncogenic properties in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Phyllis S Y; Zhou, Jianbiao; Cheong, Lip-Lee; Liu, Shaw-Cheng; Qian, Jingru; Guo, Tiannan; Sze, Siu Kwan; Zeng, Qi; Chng, Wee Joo

    2014-06-01

    PRL-3, an oncogenic dual-specificity phosphatase, is overexpressed in 50% of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and associated with poor survival. We found that stable expression of PRL-3 confers cytokine independence and growth advantage of AML cells. However, how PRL-3 mediates these functions in AML is not known. To comprehensively screen for PRL3-regulated proteins in AML, we performed SILAC-based quantitative proteomics analysis and discovered 398 significantly perturbed proteins after PRL-3 overexpression. We show that Leo1, a component of RNA polymerase II-associated factor (PAF) complex, is a novel and important mediator of PRL-3 oncogenic activities in AML. We described a novel mechanism where elevated PRL-3 protein increases JMJD2C histone demethylase occupancy on Leo1 promoter, thereby reducing the H3K9me3 repressive signals and promoting Leo1 gene expression. Furthermore, PRL-3 and Leo1 levels were positively associated in AML patient samples (N=24; PPRL-3 oncogenic phenotypes in AML. Loss of Leo1 leads to destabilization of the PAF complex and downregulation of SOX2 and SOX4, potent oncogenes in myeloid transformation. In conclusion, we identify an important and novel mechanism by which PRL-3 mediates its oncogenic function in AML.

  19. Phase I Dose-Escalation Trial of Clofarabine Followed by Escalating Doses of Fractionated Cyclophosphamide in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemias

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Disorders; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia; Acute Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelofibrosis; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

  20. The Construction and Identification of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived from Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-Fang Zhu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study aimed to establish an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC line from acute myelogenous leukemia (AML cells in vitro and identify their biological characteristics. Methods: Cells from the AML-infiltrated skin from an M6 patient were infected with a lentivirus carrying OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and C-MYC to induce iPSCs. The characteristics of the iPSCs were confirmed by alkaline phosphatase (ALP staining. The proliferation ability of iPSCs was detected with a CCK-8 assay. The expression of pluripotency markers was measured by immunostaining, and the expression of stem cell-related genes was detected by qRT-PCR; distortion during the induction process was detected by karyotype analysis; the differentiation potential of iPSCs was determined by embryoid body-formation and teratoma-formation assays. ALP staining confirmed that these cells exhibited positive staining and had the characteristics of iPSCs. Results: The CCK-8 assay showed that the iPSCs had the ability to proliferate. Immunostaining demonstrated that iPSC clones showed positive expression of NANOG, SSEA-3, SSEA-4, TRA-1-60 and TRA-1-81. qRT-PCR results revealed that the mRNA expression of Nanog, Lin28, Cripto, FOX3, DNMT3b, DPPA2, and DPPA4 significantly increased in iPSCs. Karyotype analysis found no chromosome aberration in the iPSCs. The results of the embryoid body-formation and teratoma-formation assays indicated that the iPSCs had the potential to differentiate into all three germ layers. Conclusion: Our study provided evidence that an iPSC line derived from AML cells was successfully established.

  1. PROGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF NRAS GENE MUTATIONS IN CHILDREN WITH ACUTE MYELOGENOUS LEUKEMIA

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    Rabab Aly

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: NRAS mutations are the most commonly detected molecular abnormalities  in hematologic malignancies, especially in those of myeloid origin. Objective: We aimed to determine the frequency of NRAS (NRAS mutation; and its prognostic significance in Egyptian children with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML. Subject and methods: Peripheral blood and bone marrow (BM samples were taken from  39 de novo pediatric AML patients. Twenty subjects with matched age and sex were  selected as a control group. Samples from patients and control were analyzed for Exons 1, 2 of NRAS gene using genomic PCR-SSCP method. Results: NRAS mutations at the time of diagnosis was found in 6/39 (15.4% AML  cases.  Patients with NRAS   had no significant  improved clinical  outcome than patients without mutation. Patients with NRAS  had similar complete remission (CR rates compared with non mutated patients (66.7% vs. 69.5%, P=0.43.  Those in CR had a similar relapse rate regardless of the presence ofNRAS  (RR 33.4% vs. 30.2%, P=0.26.  However, an adverse prognosis for 3 year overall survival (OS was associated with the presence of NRAS mutations. This adverse prognosis associated with NRAS mutations was also observed in terms  of disease-free survival (DFS  (P=0.007. Univariate analysis showed that unfavorable prognostic factors for DFS were cytogenetic data (P = 0.005 and the NRAS gene mutation (P = 0.002.  Conclusion: NRAS  did not contribute to increase the disease recurrence, however NRAS  was found to be a poor prognostic factor for children with AML. Further studies to confirm these findings are required because of the small number of patients with NRAS mutation.

  2. PROGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF NRAS GENE MUTATIONS IN CHILDREN WITH ACUTE MYELOGENOUS LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel A. Hagag

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: NRAS mutations are the most commonly detected molecular abnormalities  in hematologic malignancies, especially in those of myeloid origin. Objective: We aimed to determine the frequency of NRAS (NRAS mutation; and its prognostic significance in Egyptian children with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML. Subject and methods: Peripheral blood and bone marrow (BM samples were taken from  39 de novo pediatric AML patients. Twenty subjects with matched age and sex were  selected as a control group. Samples from patients and control were analyzed for Exons 1, 2 of NRAS gene using genomic PCR-SSCP method. Results: NRAS mutations at the time of diagnosis was found in 6/39 (15.4% AML  cases.  Patients with NRAS   had no significant  improved clinical  outcome than patients without mutation. Patients with NRAS  had similar complete remission (CR rates compared with non mutated patients (66.7% vs. 69.5%, P=0.43.  Those in CR had a similar relapse rate regardless of the presence ofNRAS  (RR 33.4% vs. 30.2%, P=0.26.  However, an adverse prognosis for 3 year overall survival (OS was associated with the presence of NRAS mutations. This adverse prognosis associated with NRAS mutations was also observed in terms  of disease-free survival (DFS  (P=0.007. Univariate analysis showed that unfavorable prognostic factors for DFS were cytogenetic data (P = 0.005 and the NRAS gene mutation (P = 0.002.  Conclusion: NRAS  did not contribute to increase the disease recurrence, however NRAS  was found to be a poor prognostic factor for children with AML. Further
    studies to confirm these findings are required because of the small number of patients with NRAS mutation.

  3. Molecular basis of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia As bases moleculares da leucemia mielóide aguda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo M. Rego

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML is frequently associated with recurring chromosomal translocations, which lead to the fusion of two genes encoding transcription factors. As the moieties of these fusion proteins retain part of the functional domains of the wild-type proteins, they may interfere directly or indirectly with the transcriptional regulation of the leukemic cell, conferring survival advantage. The majority of the transcription factors commonly involved in recurring chromosomal translocations may be grouped in one of the following families: core binding factor (CBF, retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARalpha, homeobox (HOX family, and mixed lineage leukemia (MLL. In vivo analysis of the molecular basis of leukemogenesis through the generation of transgenic mouse models revealed that a common theme is the recruitment of transcriptional co-activators and co-repressors by these fusion proteins. However, the expression of the fusion protein is not sufficient to induce full blown leukemia, as evidenced in part by the long latencies required for disease development in the transgenic models of leukemia, and therefore, second mutagenic events may contribute to AML pathogenesis.A leucemia mielóide aguda (LMA está freqüentemente associada a translocações cromossômicas recorrentes. Em muitos casos, os genes presentes nos pontos de quebra cromossômica são conhecidos e, quase todos codificam para fatores de transcrição. O gene híbrido, resultante da justaposição de exons de genes distintos, codifica para proteínas de fusão. Como estas retêm a maior parte dos domínios funcionais das proteínas selvagens, elas interferem direta ou indiretamente com regulação da transcrição gênica, conferindo vantagem à sobrevivência das células leucêmicas. A maioria dos fatores de transcrição afetados pelas translocações cromossômicas associadas a LMA pode ser agrupada numa das seguintes famílias: dos core binding factors (CBF, do receptor

  4. Outcome and medical costs of patients with invasive aspergillosis and acute myelogenous leukemia-myelodysplastic syndrome treated with intensive chemotherapy: An observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Slobbe, Lennert; Polinder, Suzanne; Doorduijn, Jeanette; Lugtenburg, Pieternella; Barzouhi, Abdelilah; Steyerberg, Ewout; Rijnders, Bart

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Invasive aspergillosis (IA) is a leading cause of mortality in patients with acute leukemia. Management of IA is expensive, which makes prevention desirable. Because hospital resources are limited, prevention costs have to be compared with treatment costs and outcome. Methods. In 269 patients treated for acute myelogenous leukemia-myelodysplastic syndrome (AML-MDS) during 2002-2007, evidence of IA was collected using high-resolution computed tomography and galactomanna...

  5. Anti-Tumor and Immune Enhancing Activities of Rice Bran Gramisterol on Acute Myelogenous Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsuda Somintara

    Full Text Available Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML is a cancer of the blood that most commonly affects human adults. The specific cause of AML is unclear, but it induces abnormality of white blood cells that grow rapidly and accumulate in bone marrow interfering with the production and functions of the normal blood cells. AML patients face poor prognosis and low quality of life during chemotherapy or transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells due to the progressive impairment of their immune system. The goal of this study is to find natural products that have the potential to delay growth or eliminate the abnormal leukemic cells but cause less harmful effect to the body's immune system.The unsaponified fraction of Riceberry rice bran (RBDS and the main pure compound, gramisterol, were studied for cytotoxicity and biological activities in WEHI-3 cells and in the leukemic mouse model induced by transplantation of WEHI-3 cells intraperitoneally. In the in vitro assay, RBDS and gramisterol exerted sub-G1 phase cell cycle arrest with a potent induction of apoptosis. Both of them effectively decreased cell cycle controlling proteins (cyclin D1 and cyclin E, suppressed cellular DNA synthesis and mitotic division, and reduced anti-apoptosis Bcl-2 protein, but increased apoptotic proteins (p53 and Bax and activated caspase-3 enzyme in the intrinsic cell death stimulation pathway. In leukemic mice, daily feeding of RBDS significantly increased the amount of immune function-related cells including CD3+, CD19+, and CD11b+, and elevated the serum levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, and IL-12β cytokines, but suppressed IL-10 level. At the tumor sites, CD11b+ cells were polarized and became active phagocytotic cells. Treatment of mice normal immune cells with gramisterol alone or a combination of gramisterol with cytokines released from RBDS-treated leukemic mice splenocytes culture synergistically increased pSTAT1 transcriptional factor that up-regulated the genes controlling

  6. Acute Myelogenous Leukemia without Maturation with a Retinoic Alpha-Receptor Deletion: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trosclair, Christopher; Pollen, Maressa; Capraro, Gerald; Cotelingam, James; Shackelford, Rodney E

    2014-05-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is characterized by a t(15;17) which fuses the 17q retinoic acid alpha-receptor sequence to the 15q PML gene sequence. The resulting fusion product plays a role in the development and maintenance of APL, and is very rarely found in other acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subtypes. Rare complex APL genomic rearrangements have retinoic acid alpha-receptor sequence deletions. Here we report a retinoic acid alpha-receptor sequence deletion in a case of AML without differentiation. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a retinoic acid alpha-receptor sequence deletion in this AML subtype.

  7. Acute Myelogenous Leukemia without Maturation with a Retinoic Alpha-Receptor Deletion: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Trosclair

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL is characterized by a t(15;17 which fuses the 17q retinoic acid alpha-receptor sequence to the 15q PML gene sequence. The resulting fusion product plays a role in the development and maintenance of APL, and is very rarely found in other acute myeloid leukemia (AML subtypes. Rare complex APL genomic rearrangements have retinoic acid alpha-receptor sequence deletions. Here we report a retinoic acid alpha-receptor sequence deletion in a case of AML without differentiation. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a retinoic acid alpha-receptor sequence deletion in this AML subtype.

  8. [Induction and maintenance treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia in adults by sequential use of combination chemotherapy (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fülle, H H

    1977-04-15

    The therapeutic regimens for acute myelogenous leukemia in 2 different periods of time will be described with comparison of their results. A. 28 adults were treated with cytosine arabinoside and 6-thioguanine only. Thereby, 28% complete and 16% partial remissions were achieved. The mean duration of the complete remissions was 23 weeks. The mean survival time of the patients with complete remission amounted to 53 weeks B. 46% complete and 12% partial remissions were obtained in 37 patients treated with cytosine arabinoside and 6-thioguanine doubling the dosage of the above mentioned regimen followed by 3 cycles of TRAP (and COAP). Using a maintenance therapy with modified TRAP, COAP, and POMP cycles the complete remissions lasted 47 weeks at an average. The mean survival time of patients with complete remission was 87 weeks after start of treatment.

  9. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Bone Marrow Transplantation in Treating Children With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  10. [Esophageal aspergillosis in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia and febrile neutropenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besa, Santiago; Kattan, Eduardo; Cid, Ximena; Claro, Juan C

    2014-04-01

    Aspergillosis usually compromises the respiratory system, but can also affect others. We report a 46 yo female with acute myeloid leukemia, developed febrile neutropenia and dysphagia. Endoscopy revealed esophageal cytomegalovirus-like ulcers, but biopsies showed Aspergillus spp. It's important to consider aspergillosis in the differential diagnosis of esophageal lesions in high-risk patients.

  11. Melittin Nanoparticles Selectively Target Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Blasts to Induce Apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张馨之; 方格

    2016-01-01

    In Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML), immature white blood cells, called myeloblasts, are formed from blood stem cells and build up in the bone marrow, blocking out white blood cells, red blood cells and platelets.1 Current treatments for AML are aimed at eli

  12. BMS-214662 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  13. Pathologic rupture of the spleen in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia and leukostasis

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    Gil Cunha De Santis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Rupture of the spleen can be classified as spontaneous, traumatic, or pathologic. Pathologic rupture has been reported in infectious diseases such as infectious mononucleosis, and hematologic malignancies such as acute and chronic leukemias. Splenomegaly is considered the most relevant factor that predisposes to splenic rupture. A 66-year-old man with acute myeloid leukemia evolved from an unclassified myeloproliferative neoplasm, complaining of fatigue and mild upper left abdominal pain. He was pale and presented fever and tachypnea. Laboratory analyses showed hemoglobin 8.3 g/dL, white blood cell count 278 × 109/L, platelet count 367 × 109/L, activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT ratio 2.10, and international normalized ratio (INR 1.60. A blood smear showed 62% of myeloblasts. The immunophenotype of the blasts was positive for CD117, HLA-DR, CD13, CD56, CD64, CD11c and CD14. Lactate dehydrogenase was 2384 U/L and creatinine 2.4 mg/dL (normal range: 0.7-1.6 mg/dL. Two sessions of leukapheresis were performed. At the end of the second session, the patient presented hemodynamic instability that culminated in circulatory shock and death. The post-mortem examination revealed infiltration of the vessels of the lungs, heart, and liver, and massive infiltration of the spleen by leukemic blasts. Blood volume in the peritoneal cavity was 500 mL. Acute leukemia is a rare cause of splenic rupture. Male gender, old age and splenomegaly are factors associated with this condition. As the patient had leukostasis, we hypothesize that this, associated with other factors such as lung and heart leukemic infiltration, had a role in inducing splenic rupture. Finally, we do not believe that leukapheresis in itself contributed to splenic rupture, as it is essentially atraumatic.

  14. Cloning, Expression, Purification and Crystallization of NHR3 Domain from Acute Myelogenous Leukemia-related Protein AML1-ETO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Tao YANG; Dong-Hui WU; Xiao-Yu XUE; Wen-Xue LIANG; Xiao-Yu MIAO; Hai PANG; Sai-Juan CHEN

    2004-01-01

    The t(8;21)translocation is one of the most frequent chromosome abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia.This transtocation creates a fusion between the acute myelogenous leukemia 1(AML1,a transcription factor)gene on chromosome 21 and the eight-twenty-one(ETO,a zinc finger nuclear protein)gene on chromosome 8,leading to the repression of certain AML 1 target genes.We cloned NHR3 domain coding fragment into vector pGEX-6p-1 using PCR and obtained recombinant plasmid pGEX-6p-1-NHR3,which can be induced to stably overexpress fusion protein in E.coli.Through the purification on GST affinity chromatography column and PreScission protease cleavage,a large amount of NHR3 protein with high purity was obtained.In order to avoid possible interference of some strong negative charged molecules,NHR3 protein was further purified by Mono Q anion exchange chromatography.The NHR3 crystals were grown with hanging drop/vapor diffusion method and the first crystals appeared after four weeks at 18 ℃in 0.2 M Tris-sodium citrate dihydrate,0.1 M sodium cacodylate,pH 6.5,and 30% iso-propanol(V/V).ESI mass spectrum showed that the molecular weight of this domain was in agreement with its primary structure sequence prediction,and circular dichroism spectral data(190-250 nm)showed that NHR3 had a well-defined secondary structure of 25.9% α-helix,23.2% random coil and 50.9% turn,which was consistent with GOV4 software prediction.

  15. Maintenance Therapy with Decitabine after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Acute Myelogenous Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusic, Iskra; Choi, Jaebok; Fiala, Mark A; Gao, Feng; Holt, Matthew; Cashen, Amanda F; Vij, Ravi; Abboud, Camille N; Stockerl-Goldstein, Keith E; Jacoby, Meghan A; Uy, Geoffrey L; Westervelt, Peter; DiPersio, John F

    2015-10-01

    Decitabine is a hypomethylating agent that irreversibly inhibits DNA methyltransferase I, inducing leukemic differentiation and re-expression of epigenetically silenced putative tumor antigens. We assessed safety and efficacy of decitabine maintenance after allogeneic transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Decitabine maintenance may help eradicate minimal residual disease, decrease the incidence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and facilitate a graft-versus-leukemia effect by enhancing the effect of T regulatory lymphocytes. Patients with AML/MDS in complete remission (CR) after allotransplantation started decitabine between day +50 and +100. We investigated 4 decitabine doses in cohorts of 4 patients: 5, 7.5, 10, and 15 mg/m(2)/day × 5 days every 6 weeks, for a maximum 8 cycles. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was defined as the maximum dose at which ≤ 25% of people experience dose-limiting toxicities during the first cycle of treatment. Twenty-four patients were enrolled and 22 were evaluable. All 4 dose levels were completed and no MTD was reached. Overall, decitabine maintenance was well tolerated. Grade 3 and 4 hematological toxicities were experienced by 75% of patients, including all patients treated at the highest dose level. Nine patients completed all 8 cycles and 8 of them remain in CR. Nine patients died from relapse (n = 4), infectious complications (n = 3), and GVHD (n = 2). Most occurrences of acute GVHD were mild and resolved without interruption of treatment; 1 patient died of acute gut GVHD. Decitabine maintenance did not clearly impact the rate of chronic GVHD. Although there was a trend of increased FOXP3 expression, results were not statistically significant. In conclusion, decitabine maintenance is associated with acceptable toxicities when given in the post-allotransplantation setting. Although the MTD was not reached, the dose of 10 mg/m(2) for 5 days every 6 weeks appeared to be the

  16. Assessment of Drug Sensitivity in Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells From Acute Myelogenous Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome Ex Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorr, Katherine L B; Finn, Laura E; Smith, B Douglas; Hess, Allan D; Foran, James M; Karp, Judith E; Kaufmann, Scott H

    2016-11-07

    : Current understanding suggests that malignant stem and progenitor cells must be reduced or eliminated for prolonged remissions in myeloid neoplasms such as acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Multicolor flow cytometry has been widely used to distinguish stem and myeloid progenitor cells from other populations in normal and malignant bone marrow. In this study, we present a method for assessing drug sensitivity in MDS and AML patient hematopoietic stem and myeloid progenitor cell populations ex vivo using the investigational Nedd8-activating enzyme inhibitor MLN4924 and standard-of-care agent cytarabine as examples. Utilizing a multicolor flow cytometry antibody panel for identification of hematopoietic stem cells, multipotent progenitors, common myeloid progenitors, granulocyte-monocyte progenitors, and megakaryocyte-erythroid progenitors present in mononuclear cell fractions isolated from bone marrow aspirates, we compare stem and progenitor cell counts after treatment for 24 hours with drug versus diluent. We demonstrate that MLN4924 exerts a cytotoxic effect on MDS and AML stem and progenitor cell populations, whereas cytarabine has more limited effects. Further application of this method for evaluating drug effects on these populations ex vivo and in vivo may inform rational design and selection of therapies in the clinical setting.

  17. HLA-B17 and the HLA-A1, B17 haplotype in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, E; Parrish, E; Cooper, R

    1979-08-01

    Seventy-nine Caucasians with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) were genotyped to determine whether AML, the induction of remission or patient survival were associated with particular HLA phenotypes or haplotypes. HLA-B17 and B27 were increased in AML patients over 40 years of age. Combined analysis of four independent studies indicates that HLA-B17 is significantly but weakly associated with AML, relative risk = 1.48 (.01 less than P less than .025). The A1, B17 and Aw24, Bw35 haplotypes occurred more frequently in the AML group as compared to racial and geographic controls (uncorrected P = 0.0068 and 0.0098, respectively Fisher's Exact Test). Induction of remission occurred less frequently in patients with the B17 phenotype as compared to patients lacking this antigen (P = 0.047). Patient survival was associated with remission status (P = 0.002) but was not significantly associated with particular HLA phenotypes or haplotypes. These results indicate that a gene or genes in the HLA-B region of the major histocompatibility complex can influence susceptibility to AML and also the response to chemotherapy.

  18. Acquired protein C deficiency in a child with acute myelogenous leukemia, splenic, renal, and intestinal infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Roula A; Jalkh, Khalil S; Farhat, Hussein Z; Sayad, Paul E; Kadri, Adel M

    2011-03-01

    We report the case of a 6-year-old boy diagnosed with acute promyelocytic leukemia (AML-M3V) when he presented with pallor, abdominal pain, anorexia, and fatigue. Induction chemotherapy was started according to the AML-BFM 98 protocol along with Vesanoid (ATRA, All-trans retinoic acid). On the sixth day of induction, he developed splenic and gallbladder infarcts. Splenectomy and cholecystectomy were performed while chemotherapy induction continued as scheduled. Four days later, he developed ischemic areas in the kidneys and ischemic colitis in the sigmoid colon. Hypercoagulation studies showed severe deficiency of protein C. Tests showed protein C 16% (reference range 70-140%), protein S 87% (reference range 70-140%), antithrombin III 122% (reference range 80-120%), prothrombin time 13.6 s (reference = 11.3), INR (international normalized ratio) 1.21, partial thromboplastin time 33 s (reference = 33), fibrinogen 214 mg/dl, D-dimer 970 μg/ml, factor II 98%, and that antinuclear antibody, antiphospholipid antibodies, mutation for factor II gene (G20210A), and mutation for Arg506 Gln of factor V were all negative (factor V Leiden). There was no evidence of clinical disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). He was treated with low molecular weight heparin and did well. He continues to be in complete remission 7 years later with normal protein C levels. Acquired protein C deficiency can occur in a variety of settings and has been reported in acute myelocytic leukemia. However, clinically significant thrombosis in the absence of clinical DIC, such as our case, remains extremely rare.

  19. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children and young adults with secondary myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia after aplastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimi, Ayami; Strahm, Brigitte; Baumann, Irith; Furlan, Ingrid; Schwarz, Stephan; Teigler-Schlegel, Andrea; Walther, Joachim-Ulrich; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Göhring, Gudrun; Nöllke, Peter; Führer, Monika; Niemeyer, Charlotte M

    2014-03-01

    Secondary myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia (sMDS/sAML) are the most serious secondary events occurring after immunosuppressive therapy in patients with aplastic anemia. Here we evaluate the outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in 17 children and young adults with sMDS/sAML after childhood aplastic anemia. The median interval between the diagnosis of aplastic anemia and the development of sMDS/sAML was 2.9 years (range, 1.2 to 13.0 years). At a median age of 13.1 years (range, 4.4 to 26.7 years), patients underwent HSCT with bone marrow (n = 6) or peripheral blood stem cell (n = 11) grafts from HLA-matched sibling donors (n = 2), mismatched family donors (n = 2), or unrelated donors (n = 13). Monosomy 7 was detected in 13 patients. The preparative regimen consisted of busulfan, cyclophosphamide, and melphalan in 11 patients and other agents in 6 patients. All patients achieved neutrophil engraftment. The cumulative incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was 47%, and that of chronic GVHD was 70%. Relapse occurred in 1 patient. The major cause of death was transplant-related complication (n = 9). Overall survival and event-free survival at 5 years after HSCT were both 41%. In summary, this study indicates that HSCT is a curative therapy for some patients with sMDS/sAML after aplastic anemia. Future efforts should focus on reducing transplantation-related mortality.

  20. WP1066 disrupts Janus kinase-2 and induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in acute myelogenous leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Faderl, Stefan; Van, Quin; Koch, Patricia; Harris, David; Liu, Zhiming; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Wang, Yongtao; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Priebe, Waldemar; Estrov, Zeev

    2007-12-01

    Several cytokines and growth factors that stimulate the proliferation of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells transduce their signals by activating the transcription factor Janus-activated kinase 2 (JAK2). Accordingly, the inhibition of JAK2 or of its downstream signaling pathways suppresses the proliferation of AML cells. Because (E)-3(6-bromopyridin-2-yl)-2-cyano-N-((S0-1-phenylethyl)acrylamide) (WP1066) is a novel analogue of the JAK2 inhibitor AG490, we tested its activity in AML cells and investigated its mechanism of action. Using clonogenic assays, we found that although WP1066 had a marginal effect on normal marrow progenitors, it inhibited the proliferation of AML colony-forming cells obtained from patients with newly diagnosed AML and that of the AML cell lines OCIM2 and K562. WP1066 inhibited OCIM2 cell multiplication by inducing accumulation of cells at the G(0)-G(1) phase of the cell cycle. Similar to its parent compound AG490, WP1066 inhibited the phosphorylation of JAK2, but unlike AG490, WP1066 also degraded JAK2 protein, thereby blocking its downstream signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) and phosphoinositide-3-kinase pathways. These effects resulted in the activation of the caspase pathway. Incubation of both OCIM2 and K562 cells with WP1066 activated caspase-3, induced cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and caused caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death. Thus, WP1066 is a potent JAK2 inhibitor whose effects in AML and other hematologic malignancies merit further investigation.

  1. Epidemiologic Investigation of a Cluster of Neuroinvasive Bacillus cereus Infections in 5 Patients With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Chanu; Klompas, Michael; Tamburini, Fiona B; Fremin, Brayon J; Chea, Nora; Epstein, Lauren; Halpin, Alison Laufer; Guh, Alice; Gallen, Rachel; Coulliette, Angela; Gee, Jay; Hsieh, Candace; Desjardins, Christopher A; Pedamullu, Chandra Sekhar; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Manzo, Veronica E; Folkerth, Rebecca Dunn; Milner, Danny A; Pecora, Nicole; Osborne, Matthew; Chalifoux-Judge, Diane; Bhatt, Ami S; Yokoe, Deborah S

    2015-09-01

    Background.  Five neuroinvasive Bacillus cereus infections (4 fatal) occurred in hospitalized patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) during a 9-month period, prompting an investigation by infection control and public health officials. Methods.  Medical records of case-patients were reviewed and a matched case-control study was performed. Infection control practices were observed. Multiple environmental, food, and medication samples common to AML patients were cultured. Multilocus sequence typing was performed for case and environmental B cereus isolates. Results.  All 5 case-patients received chemotherapy and had early-onset neutropenic fevers that resolved with empiric antibiotics. Fever recurred at a median of 17 days (range, 9-20) with headaches and abrupt neurological deterioration. Case-patients had B cereus identified in central nervous system (CNS) samples by (1) polymerase chain reaction or culture or (2) bacilli seen on CNS pathology stains with high-grade B cereus bacteremia. Two case-patients also had colonic ulcers with abundant bacilli on autopsy. No infection control breaches were observed. On case-control analysis, bananas were the only significant exposure shared by all 5 case-patients (odds ratio, 9.3; P = .04). Five environmental or food isolates tested positive for B cereus, including a homogenized banana peel isolate and the shelf of a kitchen cart where bananas were stored. Multilocus sequence typing confirmed that all case and environmental strains were genetically distinct. Multilocus sequence typing-based phylogenetic analysis revealed that the organisms clustered in 2 separate clades. Conclusions.  The investigation of this neuroinvasive B cereus cluster did not identify a single point source but was suggestive of a possible dietary exposure. Our experience underscores the potential virulence of B cereus in immunocompromised hosts.

  2. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Lymphocytic or Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. PS-341 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Blast Phase, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  4. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  5. A family inheriting different subtypes of acute myelogenous leukemia identifies a gene common to the differentation of multiple hematopoetic lineages and acting early in leukemogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horwitz, M.S.; Radich, J. [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Sabath, D.E. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The initial steps promoting carcinogenesis in the hematologic malignancies remain poorly understood. We report on a family with an incompletely penetrant, autosomal dominant syndrome of acute myelogenous leukemia, affecting at least eight adults from three generations. The affected individuals have developed leukemias differing in morphologic subtype, tumor cytogenetics, and abruptness of presentation. Within this family are found subtypes affecting the granulocytic, monocytic, and megakaryocytic lineages. At least one individual has a normal tumor karyotype while another has complex rearrangements including monsomy 7, trisomy 8 and translocation 1;7. Some have presented with acute onset and others with a protracted myelodysplasia syndrome. One person at fifty percent risk of inheriting this gene developed disseminated atypical mycobacterium infection in the absence of leukemia, but also without apparent causes for acquired deficiencies in cellular immunity. Features common to affected family members, including the individual with mycobacterium infection, are the early presence in bone marrow of red cell and platelet maturation defects. A search for mutations in diseased marrows fails to detect abnormalities of p53 exons 5, 6, 7 and 8 or N-ras codons 12, 13 and 61. We conclude that there is a gene in this family that probably acts early in hematopoetic differentiation and confers susceptibility to a wide range of leukemia subtypes spanning the maturation of the myeloid series.

  6. CD8+ T cells activated during the course of murine acute myelogenous leukemia elicit therapeutic responses to late B7 vaccines after cytoreductive treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunussi-Joannopoulos, K; Krenger, W; Weinstein, H J; Ferrara, J L; Croop, J M

    1997-04-15

    We have previously shown in a murine acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) model that leukemic mice can be cured with a B7 vaccine if immunized early in the disease and that CD8+ T cells are necessary for tumor rejection. However, when B7 vaccine is administered 2 weeks after leukemia inoculation, the effect is only prolonged survival, ending in death virtually of all the mice. To distinguish between tumor kinetics and tumor-induced immunosuppression as potential mechanisms eliminating the therapeutic potential of late B7 vaccines, we performed in vitro T-cell studies during leukemia progression and in vivo studies on the clinical outcome of late B7 vaccines in combination with prior cytoreductive chemotherapy. Our results show that CD8+ T cells from leukemic mice 1 and 2 weeks after leukemia inoculation proliferate more vigorously in response to in vitro activation than cells from normal mice and produce Th1-type cytokines interleukin-2 and interferon-gamma. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) assays demonstrate that cells from week-2 vaccinated mice (which succumb to their leukemia), surprisingly develop a stronger CTL activity than cells from week-1 vaccinated mice (which reject their leukemia). Finally, the combination of late chemotherapy and late B7 vaccine administration can cure only 20% of leukemic mice, whereas early chemotherapy and the same late B7 vaccine administration cure 100% of leukemic mice. These results demonstrate that in murine AML tumor growth does not induce T-cell anergy or a Th2 cytokine profile and suggest that tumor growth is most likely to be the limiting factor in the curative potential of late B7 vaccines.

  7. Overcoming resistance in chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Resistance in chronic myelogenous leukemia is an issue that has developed in parallel to the availability of rationally designed small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors to treat the disease. A significant fraction of patients with clinical resistance are recognized to harbor point mutations/substitutions in the Abl kinase domain, which limit or preclude drug binding and activity. Recent data suggest that compound mutations may develop as well. Proper identification of clinical resistance and prudent screening for all causes of resistance, ranging from adherence to therapy to Abl kinase mutations, is crucial to success with kinase inhibitor therapy. There is currently an array of Abl kinase inhibitors with unique toxicity and activity profiles available, allowing for individualizing therapy beginning with initial choice at diagnosis and as well informed choice of subsequent therapy in the face of toxicity or resistance, with or without Abl kinase domain mutations. Recent studies continue to highlight the merits of increasingly aggressive initial therapy to subvert resistance and importance of early response to identify need for change in therapy. Proper knowledge and navigation amongst novel therapy options and consideration of drug toxicities, individual patient characteristics, disease response, and vigilance for development of resistance are necessary elements of optimized care for the patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia.

  8. A case of platelet refractoriness in a patient with acute myelogenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    blast cells which accumulate in the bone marrow and circulate in the ... Patients with AML commonly present with clinical and laboratory features of anaemia, ...... acute myelogenous leukemia who undergo autologous stem cell transplantation.

  9. Classification of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML M2 and AML M3) using Momentum Back Propagation from Watershed Distance Transform Segmented Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryani, Esti; Wiharto; Palgunadi, Sarngadi; Nurcahya Pradana, TP

    2017-01-01

    This study uses image processing to analyze white blood cell with leukemia indicated that includes the identification, analysis of shapes and sizes, as well as white blood cell count indicated the symptoms of leukemia. A case study in this research was blood cells, from the type of leukemia Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML), M2 and M3 in particular. Image processing operations used for segmentation by utilizing the color conversion from RGB (Red, Green dab Blue) to obtain white blood cell candidates. Furthermore, the white blood cells candidates are separated by other cells with active contour without edge. WBC (White Blood Cell) results still have intersected or overlap condition. Watershed distance transform method can separate overlap of WBC. Furthermore, the separation of the nucleus from the cytoplasm using the HSI (Hue Saturation Intensity). The further characteristic extraction process is done by calculating the area WBC, WBC edge, roundness, the ratio of the nucleus, the mean and standard deviation of pixel intensities. The feature extraction results are used for training and testing in determining the classification of AML: M2 and M3 by using the momentum backpropagation algorithm. The classification process is done by testing the numeric data input from the feature extraction results that have been entered in the database. K-Fold validation is used to divide the amount of training data and to test the classification of AML M2 and M3. The experiment results of eight images trials, the result, was 94.285% per cell accuracy and 75% per image accuracy

  10. An adult case of chronic myelogenous leukemia with myeloblastic involvement of the central nervous system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watanabe,Akiharu

    1984-06-01

    Full Text Available A 31-year-old female with chronic myelogenous leukemia, who developed myeloblastic involvement of the central nervous system during acute myeloblastic transformation of the disease, was treated with methotrexate intrathecally. The therapy produced prompt clinical response and complete reversal of abnormal cerebrospinal fluid findings. However, the patient expired 10 months following the acute blastic crisis.

  11. Management of chronic myelogenous leukemia in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Amit; Rolen, Katrina; Shah, Binay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Discovery of tyrosine kinase inhibitors has led to improvement in survival of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients. Many young CML patients encounter pregnancy during their lifetime. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors inhibit several proteins that are known to have important functions in gonadal development, implantation and fetal development, thus increasing the risk of embryo toxicities. Studies have shown imatinib to be embryotoxic in animals with varying effects in fertility. Since pregnancy is rare in CML, there are no randomized controlled trials to address the optimal management of this condition. However, there are several case reports and case series on CML in pregnancy. At the present time, there is no consensus on how to manage different pregnancy situations in CML. In this article, we review current literature on CML in pregnancy, discuss the effects of several tyrosine kinase inhibitors on fertility and pregnancy and suggest an evidence-based treatment of CML in pregnancy.

  12. A new Leukemia Prognostic Scoring System for refractory/relapsed adult acute myelogeneous leukaemia patients: a GOELAMS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevallier, P; Labopin, M; Turlure, P; Prebet, T; Pigneux, A; Hunault, M; Filanovsky, K; Cornillet-Lefebvre, P; Luquet, I; Lode, L; Richebourg, S; Blanchet, O; Gachard, N; Vey, N; Ifrah, N; Milpied, N; Harousseau, J-L; Bene, M-C; Mohty, M; Delaunay, J

    2011-06-01

    A simplified prognostic score is presented based on the multivariate analysis of 138 refractory/relapsed acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients (median age 55 years, range: 19-70) receiving a combination of intensive chemotherapy+Gemtuzumab as salvage regimen. Overall, 2-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were 29±4% and 36±4%, respectively. Disease status (relapse Leukemia Prognostic Scoring System was then validated on an independent cohort of 111 refractory/relapsed AML patients. This new simplified prognostic score, using three clinical and biological parameters routinely applied, allow to discriminate around two third of the patients who should benefit from a salvage intensive regimen in the setting of refractory/relapsed AML patients. The other one third of the patients should receive investigational therapy.

  13. Epidemiology, outcomes, and risk factors of invasive fungal infections in adult patients with acute myelogenous leukemia after induction chemotherapy☆,☆☆,★,★★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neofytos, Dionissios; Lu, Kit; Hatfield-Seung, Amy; Blackford, Amanda; Marr, Kieren A.; Treadway, Suzanne; Ostrander, Darin; Nussenblatt, Veronique; Karp, Judith

    2014-01-01

    This is a retrospective, single-center study of adult patients with newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), who received intensive induction timed sequential chemotherapy from 1/2005 to 6/2010. Among 254 consecutive AML patients, 123 (48.4%) developed an invasive fungal infection (IFI): 14 (5.5%) patients with invasive candidiasis (IC) and 108 (42.5%) patients with invasive mould infections (IMI). Among 108 IMI identified, 4 (3.7%) were proven, 1 (0.9%) probable, and 103 (95.4%) were possible, using current definitions. Overall, 6-month mortality was 23.7% (27/114) and 20.6% (26/126) for patients with and without an IFI, respectively. Older age (≥50 years; hazard ratio [HR]: 2.5, P < 0.001), female gender (HR: 1.7, P = 0.006), and baseline renal and/or liver dysfunction (HR: 2.4, P < 0.001) were the strongest mortality predictors. We report relatively low rates of IC despite lack of routine primary antifungal prophylaxis, albeit associated with poor long-term survival. High rates of IMI, the vast majority with a possible diagnosis, were observed. Host-related variables (demographics and baseline organ dysfunction) were identified as the most significant risk factors for IFI and mortality predictors in this series. PMID:23142166

  14. Multi-institutional phase 2 clinical and pharmacogenomic trial of tipifarnib plus etoposide for elderly adults with newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Judith E; Vener, Tatiana I; Raponi, Mitch; Ritchie, Ellen K; Smith, B Douglas; Gore, Steven D; Morris, Lawrence E; Feldman, Eric J; Greer, Jacqueline M; Malek, Sami; Carraway, Hetty E; Ironside, Valerie; Galkin, Steven; Levis, Mark J; McDevitt, Michael A; Roboz, Gail R; Gocke, Christopher D; Derecho, Carlo; Palma, John; Wang, Yixin; Kaufmann, Scott H; Wright, John J; Garret-Mayer, Elizabeth

    2012-01-05

    Tipifarnib (T) exhibits modest activity in elderly adults with newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Based on preclinical synergy, a phase 1 trial of T plus etoposide (E) yielded 25% complete remission (CR). We selected 2 comparable dose levels for a randomized phase 2 trial in 84 adults (age range, 70-90 years; median, 76 years) who were not candidates for conventional chemotherapy. Arm A (T 600 mg twice a day × 14 days, E 100 mg days 1-3 and 8-10) and arm B (T 400 mg twice a day × 14 days, E 200 mg days 1-3 and 8-10) yielded similar CR, but arm B had greater toxicity. Total CR was 25%, day 30 death rate 7%. A 2-gene signature of high RASGRP1 and low aprataxin (APTX) expression previously predicted for T response. Assays using blasts from a subset of 40 patients treated with T plus E on this study showed that AMLs with a RASGRP1/APTX ratio of more than 5.2 had a 78% CR rate and negative predictive value 87%. This ratio did not correlate with outcome in 41 patients treated with conventional chemotherapies. The next T-based clinical trials will test the ability of the 2-gene signature to enrich for T responders prospectively. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00602771.

  15. Sarcoma granulocítico multicêntrico como recidiva de leucemia mieloide aguda Multicentric granulocytic sarcoma as relapse of acute myelogenous leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taciana G. S. Aguiar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoma granulocítico (SG é um tumor sólido extramedular, constituído por células precursoras de granulócitos. É geralmente associado a leucemia mieloide aguda ou raramente a outras desordens mieloproliferativas. O tumor geralmente ocorre precedendo uma leucemia mieloide aguda, durante o seu curso ou após a remissão ter sido alcançada. O prognóstico é pobre e tem como principais modalidades terapêuticas a quimioterapia e a radioterapia. Relata- se um caso de SG multicêntrico, de evolução rápida, com acometimento difuso de pele, mamas, gânglios linfáticos, tecido celular subcutâneo e líquor, em mulher de 45 anos, fora de tratamento para leucemia mieloide aguda e em remissão hematológica há 18 meses. A paciente apresentava dor intensa em membro inferior direito há uma semana e estava em anticoagulação oral há seis meses por trombose venosa profunda neste membro. Diagnosticado o SG, a paciente foi tratada com radioterapia e quimioterapia com boa resposta. Após três meses de seguimento, em vigência do tratamento quimioterápico, evoluiu com recidiva do SG neste membro, associado ao acometimento das mamas e posteriormente do sistema nervoso central, evoluindo para óbito em aplasia e sepses.Granulocytic sarcoma is an extramedullary solid tumor consisting of immature granulocytic cells. It is often associated with acute myelogenous leukemia and more rarely with other myeloproliferative disorders. The tumor generally occurs before acute myeloid leukemia, during its course or after disease remission. It has a poor prognosis with the main therapeutic options being chemotherapy and radiotherapy. A multicentric accelerated case of granulocytic sarcoma of a 45- year- old woman with diffuse skin, breast, lymphatic ganglia and subcutaneous tissue presentations no longer undergoing treatment for acute myeloid leukemia and in hematologic remission for 18 months is reported. The patient presented with severe pain of right lower

  16. Prospective comparative study of bone marrow transplantation and postremission chemotherapy for childhood acute myelogenous leukemia. The Associazione Italiana Ematologia ed Oncologia Pediatrica Cooperative Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadori, S; Testi, A M; Aricò, M; Comelli, A; Giuliano, M; Madon, E; Masera, G; Rondelli, R; Zanesco, L; Mandelli, F

    1993-06-01

    This study was conducted to assess the comparative values of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) with sequential postremission chemotherapy (SPC) in children with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) in first remission. From March 1987 to March 1990, 161 assessable patients younger than 15 years of age with newly diagnosed AML were treated uniformly with two courses of daunorubicin and standard-dose cytarabine. After initial consolidation with a course of daunorubicin, cytarabine, and thioguanine (DAT), patients in complete remission (CR) were randomized to receive either ABMT or SPC, except for those with an HLA-matched sibling who were assigned to undergo BMT. SPC consisted of three additional courses of DAT, followed by three pairs of drugs administered sequentially for a total of six cycles. Overall, 127 of 161 patients attained CR (79%). The estimated probabilities of survival and event-free survival (EFS) at 5 years for all patients were 42% and 25%, respectively (median follow-up, 28 months). For the 127 complete responders, the 5-year probability of disease-free survival (DFS) was 31%, with a cumulative risk of relapse of 64%. For the purpose of this study, all complete responders were evaluated for analysis of disease outcome according to the intent-to-treat principle, regardless of whether they actually received the intended therapy. The 5-year DFS was 51% for the BMT group (n = 24), significantly higher (P = .03) than that observed for the other cohorts: 21% for ABMT (n = 35), 27% for SPC (n = 37), and 34% for a group of 31 nonrandomized (NR) patients. Bone marrow relapse was the most frequent cause of postremission failure in all therapeutic subgroups, including the BMT cohort, in which no deaths attributable to the toxicity of the procedure were recorded. The results of this study show that BMT is more effective than ABMT or SPC in preventing leukemia relapse and extending DFS duration in children

  17. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. Chronic myelogenous leukemia and benzene exposure: a systematic review and meta-analysis of the case-control literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, Steven H; Engel, Arnold; Joshi, Kiran P; Byrd, Daniel M; Chen, Rusan

    2009-12-10

    Benzene exposure is well demonstrated as a cause of acute myelogenous leukemia, but not of chronic myelogenous leukemia. Previous literature reviews based on case series and cohort studies have not shown an association. We have now conducted a literature search for case-control studies that examine the association between benzene exposure and chronic myelogenous leukemia. Six case-control studies have been found. These derive from occupational groups, cancer registries, and a clinical laboratory. Their exposure ascertainments are all based on job histories, job-exposure matricies, or industrial hygiene data. The odds ratios (ORs) for individual studies range from 0.73 to 1.2. The pooled OR is 1.003 with 95% confidence interval (CI) of 0.94-1.07 (p=0.98) for both a fixed effects model and a random effects model. The case-control literature indicates that chronic myelogenous leukemia does not appear to be related to benzene exposure.

  19. SphK1 inhibitor II (SKI-II) inhibits acute myelogenous leukemia cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Weng, Wei; Sun, Zhi-Xin; Fu, Xian-Jie; Ma, Jun; Zhuang, Wen-Fang

    2015-05-15

    Previous studies have identified sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) as a potential drug target for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the current study, we investigated the potential anti-leukemic activity of a novel and specific SphK1 inhibitor, SKI-II. We demonstrated that SKI-II inhibited growth and survival of human AML cell lines (HL-60 and U937 cells). SKI-II was more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors SK1-I and FTY720 in inhibiting AML cells. Meanwhile, it induced dramatic apoptosis in above AML cells, and the cytotoxicity by SKI-II was almost reversed by the general caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. SKI-II treatment inhibited SphK1 activation, and concomitantly increased level of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) precursor ceramide in AML cells. Conversely, exogenously-added S1P protected against SKI-II-induced cytotoxicity, while cell permeable short-chain ceramide (C6) aggravated SKI-II's lethality against AML cells. Notably, SKI-II induced potent apoptotic death in primary human AML cells, but was generally safe to the human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from healthy donors. In vivo, SKI-II administration suppressed growth of U937 leukemic xenograft tumors in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. These results suggest that SKI-II might be further investigated as a promising anti-AML agent.

  20. Subsequent primary malignancies and acute myelogenous leukemia transformation among myelodysplastic syndrome patients treated with or without lenalidomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollison, Dana E; Shain, Kenneth H; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Hampras, Shalaka S; Fulp, William; Fisher, Kate; Al Ali, Najla H; Padron, Eric; Lancet, Jeffrey; Xu, Qiang; Olesnyckyj, Martha; Kenvin, Laurie; Knight, Robert; Dalton, William; List, Alan; Komrokji, Rami S

    2016-07-01

    The few studies that have examined rates of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) transformation in lenalidomide-treated myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients have been limited to deletion 5q MDS. The association between lenalidomide and subsequent primary malignancies (SPMs) in MDS patients has not been evaluated previously. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the risk of both SPM and AML in association with lenalidomide. A cohort of MDS patients (n = 1248) treated between 2004 and 2012 at Moffitt Cancer Center were identified, and incident cases of SPM and AML transformation were ascertained. Using a nested case-control design, MDS controls were 1:1 matched to SPM (n = 41) and AML (n = 150) cases, on age and date of MDS diagnosis, gender, follow-up time, IPSS, and del (5q). Associations between lenalidomide and (1) SPM incidence and (2) AML transformation were estimated with hazards ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in the cohort and odds ratios (OR) in the case-control analysis. SPM incidence did not differ significantly between cohort MDS patients treated with (0.7 per 100 person-years) or without lenalidomide (1.4 per 100 person-years) (HR = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.40-2.74), whereas a significantly reduced SPM risk was observed in the case-control sample (OR = 0.03, 95% CI = Lenalidomide was not associated with AML transformation in the cohort analysis (HR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.44-1.27) or in the case-control analyses (OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 0.52-2.56), after adjustment for potential confounders. Lenalidomide was not associated with increased risk of SPM or AML transformation in a large cohort of MDS patients mostly including nondeletion 5q MDS.

  1. Beneficial effects of post-transfusional hepatitis in acute myelogenous leukemia may be mediated by lipopolysaccharides, tumor necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treon, S P; Broitman, S A

    1992-10-01

    Post-transfusional hepatitis is often a complication in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) in whom survival is paradoxically prolonged. The etiology is unknown. In previous studies, we showed that impaired hepatic endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) clearance in patients with acute viral hepatitis A, B, or C versus controls results in endotoxemia and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) release. TNF-alpha mediates anti-proliferative and differentiating effects in AML cell lines. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) released in acute viral hepatitis, acts in synergy with TNF-alpha. HL60, KG1, and U937 AML cells treated 3, 6, and 9 days with physiologically attainable TNF-alpha (10 U/ml), IFN-gamma (100 U/ml) and LPS (10 ng/ml) levels, have significantly diminished viability and cell growth versus controls. Treatment of HL60 AML cells with LPS/TNF-alpha/IFN-gamma also resulted in significantly increased monocytic pathway differentiation not seen with KG1 or U937 AML cells. HL60 AML cells treated with TNF-alpha/IFN-gamma for 6 days released endogenous TNF-alpha (1.57 U/10(6) cells) upon LPS stimulation compared to less than 0.01 U/10(6) cells in non-LPS-stimulated TNF-alpha/IFN-gamma-treated cells or untreated cells (p less than 0.0001). Untreated HL60 AML cells co-cultured with HL60 cells pretreated for 6 days with TNF-alpha/IFN-gamma and then subjected to LPS stimulation had significantly diminished cell growth compared to controls (p less than 0.0001). This effect could be reversed with anti-TNF-alpha antibody, supporting the concept that endogenous TNF-alpha release by LPS/TNF-alpha/IFN-gamma treated HL60 AML cells may act by paracrine means to suppress growth of other AML cells. The beneficial effects of post-transfusional hepatitis in AML patients may be mediated via LPS/TNF-alpha/IFN-gamma-induced AML cell growth suppression and/or terminal differentiation in which AML cells participate by releasing TNF-alpha after being acted upon by LPS

  2. Comparison of molecular biology, immunological characteristics and clinical efficacy in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia with or without FLT3-ITD gene mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-ting LI

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To compare the clinical and laboratory characteristics, therapeutic efficacy and prognosis of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML with or without FLT3-ITD gene mutation. Methods The clinical data of 93 AML patients, aged from 10 to 66 years, were retrospectively analyzed. Among them, 21 patients were FLT3-ITD gene (FLT3-ITD+AML group positive, and 72 patients were negative for FLT3-ITD gene (FLT3-ITD-AML group. The patients' chromosomes were examined, and mutation of FLT3-ITD and NPM1 gene and the expressions of HOX11, ETO, EVI and NPM1 gene were analyzed, along with the 2-year event-free survival and 2-year overall survival were learned. Results At primary diagnosis, the proportion of patients with WBC>100×109/L, and bleeding rate was significantly higher in FLT3-ITD+ AML group than that in FLT3-ITD-AML group (P=0.04; P=0.01, but no statistical difference was found in age, immunophenotype and chromosomal abnormality (P>0.05. The complete remission (CR rate was 28.57% in FLT3-ITD+ AML group, and it was obviously lower than that in FLT3-ITD-AML group (55.56%, P=0.013. The 2-year event-free survival was 29.2% in FLT3-ITD+ AML group, and it was significantly lower than that in FLT3-ITD-AML group (37.7%; P=0.04. Meanwhile, 33.3% of the patients in FLT3-ITD-AML group were also positive for NPM1 gene expression, and all of them did not get complete remission. However, only 1.39% of the patients expressed NPM1 gene in FLT3-ITD-AML group, but 50% of them got complete remission (P=0.022. Conclusion Patients with FLT3-ITD+AML were easily associated with high WBC counts, bleeding, lower CR rate, poor event-free survival, and poor prognosis.

  3. Myeloid sarcoma presenting as a colon polyp and harbinger of chronic myelogenous leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert Rogers; Mark Ettel; Margaret Cho; Alexander Chan; Xiao-Jun Wu; Antonio G Neto

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma, also known as granulocytic sarcoma or chloroma is an unusual accumulation of malignant myeloid precursor cells in an extramedullary site, which disrupts the normal architecture of the involved tissue. It is known to occur more commonly in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia and less commonly in those with myelodysplastic syndrome and myeloproliferative neoplasm, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia. The most common sites of involvement include bone, skin and lymph nodes. However, rare cases have been reported in the gastrointestinal tract, genitourinary tract, or breast. Most commonly, a neoplastic extramedullary proliferation of myeloid precursors in a patient would have systemic involvement of a myeloid neoplasm, including in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. Infrequently, extramedullary disease may be the only site of involvement. It may also occur as a localized antecedent to more generalized disease or as a site of recurrence. Herein, we present the first case in the English literature of a patient presenting with an isolated site of myeloid sarcoma arising in the form of a colonic polyp which, after subsequent bone marrow biopsy, was found to be a harbinger of chronic myelogenous leukemia.

  4. Outcome and medical costs of patients with invasive aspergillosis and acute myelogenous leukemia-myelodysplastic syndrome treated with intensive chemotherapy: An observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Slobbe (Lennert); S. Polinder (Suzanne); J.K. Doorduijn (Jeanette); P.J. Lugtenburg (Pieternella); A. el Barzouhi (Abdelilah); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); B.J.A. Rijnders (Bart)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Invasive aspergillosis (IA) is a leading cause of mortality in patients with acute leukemia. Management of IA is expensive, which makes prevention desirable. Because hospital resources are limited, prevention costs have to be compared with treatment costs and outcome. Methods

  5. An exploratory phase 2 study of investigational Aurora A kinase inhibitor alisertib (MLN8237 in acute myelogenous leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart L. Goldberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alisertib (MLN8237 is an investigational, oral, selective, Aurora A kinase (AAK inhibitor. In this phase 2 trial, 57 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML or high-grade myelodysplastic syndrome received alisertib 50 mg BID for 7 days in 21-day cycles. Responses in 6/35 AML patients (17% response rate with an additional 49% stable disease, 34% transfusion independence included 1 complete response lasting >1 year. No responses were observed in MDS patients. Adverse events >30% included diarrhea, fatigue, nausea, febrile neutropenia, and stomatitis. Results suggest modest activity in AML, supporting further research to better understand how AAK inhibition may induce leukemic cell senescence.

  6. A case of platelet refractoriness in a patient with acute myelogenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... in a patient with acute myelogenous leukaemia and paraplegia: management in a ... is to document the management of platelet refractoriness in a patient with acute ... of central nervous system involvement in acute myelogenous leukaemia.

  7. On the global dynamics of a chronic myelogenous leukemia model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishchenko, Alexander P.; Starkov, Konstantin E.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we analyze some features of global dynamics of a three-dimensional chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) model with the help of the stability analysis and the localization method of compact invariant sets. The behavior of CML model is defined by concentrations of three cellpopulations circulating in the blood: naive T cells, effector T cells specific to CML and CML cancer cells. We prove that the dynamics of the CML system around the tumor-free equilibrium point is unstable. Further, we compute ultimate upper bounds for all three cell populations and provide the existence conditions of the positively invariant polytope. One ultimate lower bound is obtained as well. Moreover, we describe the iterative localization procedure for refining localization bounds; this procedure is based on cyclic using of localizing functions. Applying this procedure we obtain conditions under which the internal tumor equilibrium point is globally asymptotically stable. Our theoretical analyses are supplied by results of the numerical simulation.

  8. Spotlight on nilotinib in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harnicar S

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Stephen Harnicar, Sherry Mathew Department of Pharmacy, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Nowhere has targeted therapy been more successful in the hematologic malignancy arena than chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML. By targeting the BCR–ABL fusion oncogene, the introduction of tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKIs has dramatically improved the outcomes of this disease. Nilotinib is a second-generation TKI that initially gained approval for the treatment of imatinib-resistant or -intolerant disease for patients with chronic or accelerated-phase CML. Investigation in the first-line setting also demonstrated efficacy, and expanded nilotinib’s approval to include therapy for patients with treatment-naïve chronic-phase CML. Data also exist for blast-phase disease, which allows nilotinib to be an option for all phases. Nilotinib’s place in therapy is continuously being expanded by research in novel areas, such as post-hematopoietic stem cell transplants for prevention of relapse and in the pediatric arena. With multiple TKIs now approved for the treatment of CML, delineating the pharmacologic distinctions of nilotinib is an asset when determining therapy. By understanding the pharmacokinetics and dependence on hepatic metabolism of nilotinib, the clinician can manage the potential toxicities, interactions, and unique dosing of this drug. The recognition of mechanisms of resistance, patient adherence, and cost-effectiveness are similarly significant considerations. Actively integrating these various specifics will allow clinicians to optimize nilotinib therapy for the CML patient. Keywords: nilotinib, chronic myelogenous leukemia, CML, tyrosine-kinase inhibitor, TKI 

  9. Vorinostat, Cytarabine, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed and/or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Myeloproliferative Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  10. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. SphK1 inhibitor II (SKI-II) inhibits acute myelogenous leukemia cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Li; Weng, Wei; Sun, Zhi-Xin; Fu, Xian-Jie; Ma, Jun, E-mail: majuntongrensh1@126.com; Zhuang, Wen-Fang, E-mail: wenfangzhuangmd@163.com

    2015-05-15

    Previous studies have identified sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) as a potential drug target for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the current study, we investigated the potential anti-leukemic activity of a novel and specific SphK1 inhibitor, SKI-II. We demonstrated that SKI-II inhibited growth and survival of human AML cell lines (HL-60 and U937 cells). SKI-II was more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors SK1-I and FTY720 in inhibiting AML cells. Meanwhile, it induced dramatic apoptosis in above AML cells, and the cytotoxicity by SKI-II was almost reversed by the general caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. SKI-II treatment inhibited SphK1 activation, and concomitantly increased level of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) precursor ceramide in AML cells. Conversely, exogenously-added S1P protected against SKI-II-induced cytotoxicity, while cell permeable short-chain ceramide (C6) aggravated SKI-II's lethality against AML cells. Notably, SKI-II induced potent apoptotic death in primary human AML cells, but was generally safe to the human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from healthy donors. In vivo, SKI-II administration suppressed growth of U937 leukemic xenograft tumors in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. These results suggest that SKI-II might be further investigated as a promising anti-AML agent. - Highlights: • SKI-II inhibits proliferation and survival of primary and transformed AML cells. • SKI-II induces apoptotic death of AML cells, but is safe to normal PBMCs. • SKI-II is more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors in inhibiting AML cells. • SKI-II inhibits SphK1 activity, while increasing ceramide production in AML cells. • SKI-II dose-dependently inhibits U937 xenograft growth in SCID mice.

  12. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in children with acute myelogenous leukemia in first remission. Associazione Italiana di Ematologia e Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP) and the Gruppo Italiano per il Trapianto di Midollo Osseo (GITMO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dini, G; Boni, L; Abla, O; Uderzo, C; Polchi, P; Locatelli, F; Di Bartolomeo, P; Arcese, W; Iori, A P; Rossetti, F

    1994-06-01

    Fifty-nine children, aged 1-15 years, with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) received a bone marrow transplant (BMT) from an HLA-identical sibling (n = 57) or from an identical twin (n = 2), while in first remission (CR). These children represent, to the best of our knowledge, all children grafted in first CR in 11 Italian centers between 1980 and 1990. Patients were prepared with total body irradiation (TBI) plus cyclophosphamide (CY) (n = 50) or melphalan (n = 2) or with busulfan plus CY (n = 7). GVHD prophylaxis consisted of cyclosporin A (n = 48), methotrexate (n = 7) or cyclosporin and methotrexate (n = 2). Survivors have been followed for 21-137 months (median 59 months). Actuarial relapse-free survival was 58% at 66-137 months (95% confidence interval (CI) 44-72). Actuarial risk of relapse was 23% at 48 months (95% CI 10.9-34.8). Risk of non-relapse deaths was 33% in the period 1980-87 and 4% in the period 1988-90 (p = 0.02). In multivariate analysis patients with a blood cell count > 14 x 10(9)/l at diagnosis showed a lower relapse-free survival compared with patients with counts < 14 x 10(9)/l (p = 0.006). We could not detect an effect of FAB subtype, patient age, time to achieve remission or transplant-related variables, including year of BMT, on relapse-free survival. In conclusion, allogeneic marrow transplantation can achieve long-term relapse-free survival in over 50% of children with AML and should be considered as consolidation therapy if a matched sibling is available.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Miliaria-rash after neutropenic fever and induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia Miliária 'rash' após neutropenia febril e quimioterapia de indução para a leucemia mielóide aguda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuyet A Nguyen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Miliaria is a disorder of the eccrine sweat glands which occurs in conditions of increased heat and humidity. It can be associated with persistent febrile states as well as with certain drugs. We presented a 40 year-old female with myelodysplastic syndrome and progression to acute myelogenous leukemia who was admitted to the hospital for chemotherapy induction. The patient was treated with idarubicin and cytarabine. She became pancytopenic and developed neutropenic fever and was started on vancomycin and cefepime, but was persistently febrile with night sweats. Five days into her fevers, she developed diffuse, nonpruritic and fragile vesicles together with drenching nightsweats. The patient's exanthem was diagnosed as Miliaria crystallina, most probably induced by neutropenic fever and idarubucin exposureMiliária é uma desordem das glândulas sudoríparas écrinas, que ocorre em condições de aumento de calor e umidade. Miliária pode ser associada com estados febris persistentes bem como com certos medicamentos. Apresentamos o caso de uma mulher de 40 anos com síndrome mielodisplásica e progressão para leucemia mielóide aguda que foi admitida no hospital para quimioterapia de indução. A paciente foi tratada com idarrubicina e citarabina. Ela se tornou pancitopênica e desenvolveu neutropenia febril. Iniciou tratamento com vancomicina e cefepime, mas a febre com sudorese noturna continou. Cinco dias depois a paciente desenvolveu vesículas difusas, não pruríticas e frágeis juntamente com a persistência de sudorese noturna. O exantema do paciente foi diagnosticado como Miliária cristalina, provavelmente induzida por neutropenia febril e exposição a idarubucin

  14. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Nonlymphocytic, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym ANLL; Acute Nonlymphoblastic Leukemia; Acute Nonl...ymphoblastic Leukemias; Acute Nonlymphocytic Leukemia; Acute Nonlymphocytic Leukemias; Leukemia, Acute Nonly...mphoblastic; Leukemia, Acute Nonlymphocytic; Leukemia, Nonlymphoblastic, Acute; Leukemias, Acute Nonlymphoblastic; Leukemias, Acute... Nonlymphocytic; Nonlymphoblastic Leukemia, Acute; Nonlymphoblastic Leukemias, Acut...e; Nonlymphocytic Leukemia, Acute; Nonlymphocytic Leukemias, Acute PharmGKB Accessi

  15. Down-regulation of MicroRNAs 222/221 in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia with Deranged Core-Binding Factor Subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Brioschi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Core-binding factor leukemia (CBFL is a subgroup of acutemyeloid leukemia (AML characterized by genetic mutations involving the subunits of the core-binding factor (CBF. The leukemogenesis model for CBFL posits that one, or more, gene mutations inducing increased cell proliferation and/or inhibition of apoptosis cooperate with CBF mutations for leukemia development. One of the most commonmutations associated with CBF mutations involves the KIT receptor. A high expression of KIT is a hallmark of a high proportion of CBFL. Previous studies indicate that microRNA (MIR 222/221 targets the 3′ untranslated region of the KIT messenger RNA and our observation that AML1 can bind the MIR-222/221 promoter, we hypothesized that MIR-222/221 represents the link between CBF and KIT. Here, we show that MIR-222/221 expression is upregulated after myeloid differentiation of normal bone marrow AC133+ stem progenitor cells. CBFL blasts with either t(8;21 or inv(16 CBF rearrangements with high expression levels of KIT (CD117 display a significantly lower level of MIR-222/221 expression than non-CBFL blasts. Consistently, we found that the t(8;21 AML1-MTG8 fusion protein binds the MIR-222/221 promoter and induces transcriptional repression of a MIR-222/221-LUC reporter. Because of the highly conserved sequence homology, we demonstrated concomitant MIR-222/221 down-regulation and KIT up-regulation in the 32D/WT1 mouse cell model carrying the AML1-MTG16 fusion protein. This study provides the first hint that CBFL-associated fusion proteins may lead to up-regulation of the KIT receptor by down-regulating MIR-222/221, thus explaining the concomitant occurrence of CBF genetic rearrangements and overexpression of wild type or mutant KIT in AML.

  16. Mixed phenotype acute leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Zixing; Wang Shujie

    2014-01-01

    Objective To highlight the current understanding of mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL).Data sources We collected the relevant articles in PubMed (from 1985 to present),using the terms "mixed phenotype acute leukemia","hybrid acute leukemia","biphenotypic acute leukemia",and "mixed lineage leukemia".We also collected the relevant studies in WanFang Data base (from 2000 to present),using the terms "mixed phenotype acute leukemia" and "hybrid acute leukemia".Study selection We included all relevant studies concerning mixed phenotype acute leukemia in English and Chinese version,with no limitation of research design.The duplicated articles are excluded.Results MPAL is a rare subgroup of acute leukemia which expresses the myeloid and lymphoid markers simultaneously.The clinical manifestations of MPAL are similar to other acute leukemias.The World Health Organization classification and the European Group for Immunological classification of Leukaemias 1998 cdteria are most widely used.MPAL does not have a standard therapy regimen.Its treatment depends mostly on the patient's unique immunophenotypic and cytogenetic features,and also the experience of individual physician.The lack of effective treatment contributes to an undesirable prognosis.Conclusion Our understanding about MPAL is still limited.The diagnostic criteria have not been unified.The treatment of MPAL remains to be investigated.The prognostic factor is largely unclear yet.A better diagnostic cdteria and targeted therapeutics will improve the therapy effect and a subsequently better prognosis.

  17. Inhibitory effects of rapamycin on proliferation of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells and its mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李杰

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the inhibitory effects of rapamycin on proliferation of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells and its possible mechanism. Methods The effects of rapamycin at various concentrations on cell proliferation of CML cell line K562 cells were analyzed by MTT. The expressions

  18. Myelogenous leukemia in a bearded dragon (Acanthodraco vitticeps).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocidlowski, M E; McNamara, P L; Wojcieszyn, J W

    2001-03-01

    A 3-yr-old bearded dragon (Acanthodraco vitticeps) presented with lethargy, a swollen right elbow joint, inability to move its rear limbs normally, and marked leukocytosis. The majority of leukocytes were an abnormal mononuclear lymphoid-type cell with a high nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio, a slightly blue cytoplasm, nuclei with coarsely granular chromatin, and some nuclear clefts. Acute leukemia of lymphoid or myeloid origin was tentatively diagnosed. The abnormal mononuclear leukocyte cell population stained positively for the myeloid cytochemical stains: peroxidase, chloroacetate esterase, and L1-calprotectin. The abnormal cell population of the peripheral blood did not stain with the lymphoid cytochemical stains: alpha-naphthyl butyrate esterase, CD3, and CD79a.

  19. Congenital acute megakaryocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N B Mathur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital leukemia (CL is an extremely rare disorder in the newborn, significant proportion of which is of myeloid origin, primarily of M4 or M5 morphology. As compared to pediatric leukemia, CL is a more aggressive disease. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML-M7 or acute megakaryocytic leukemia is a rare type of AML with an incidence of 0.5 per million per year. Median age of presentation is 6 years, and children may present with a broad variety of symptoms including low-grade fever, diarrhea, easy bruising, failure to gain weight and life-threatening conditions.

  20. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Monocytic, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Acute Monoblastic Leukemias; Acute... Monocytic Leukemia; Acute Monocytic Leukemias; Acute monoblastic leukaemia; Acute monoblastic leukemia; Acute... monocytic leukaemia; Acute monocytic leukemia, morphology; Acute monocytoid leukemia; Leukemia, Acute... Monoblastic; Leukemia, Acute Monocytic; Leukemia, Monoblastic, Acute; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute... Schilling-Type Myeloid; Leukemias, Acute Monoblastic; Leukemias, Acute Monocytic; M5a - Acute monoblastic leukaemia; M5a - Acute

  1. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Version 1.2014: Featured Updates to the NCCN Guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    O’Brien, Susan; Radich, Jerald P.; Abboud, Camille N.; Akhtari, Mojtaba; Altman, Jessica K.; Berman, Ellin; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Deininger, Michael; Devine, Steven; Fathi, Amir T.; Gotlib, Jason; Jagasia, Madan; Kropf, Patricia; Moore, Joseph O.; Pallera, Arnel

    2013-01-01

    The 2014 NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia recommend quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) standardized to International Scale (IS) as the preferred method for monitoring molecular response to tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy. A BCR-ABL1 transcript level of 10% or less (IS) is now included as the response milestone at 3 and 6 months. Change of therapy to an alternate TKI is recommended for patients with BCR-ABL1...

  2. Response of chronic myelogenous leukemia patients to COAP-splenectomy. A Southwest Oncology Group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, J P; Waddell, C C; Coltman, C A; Morrison, F S; Stephens, R L; Balcerzak, S P; Baker, L H; Chen, T T

    1984-11-01

    Eighty-seven patients from 18 institutions with a confirmed diagnosis of chronic myelogenous leukemia were registered on a Southwest Oncology Group protocol for multiagent induction and single-agent maintenance chemotherapy, with randomization to an immunotherapy arm. Elective surgical splenectomy was performed for 42 patients at the completion of 3 months of induction therapy. Final analysis of the study revealed statistically significant survival advantages were correlated with age, splenectomy, the absence of hepatic leukemic infiltrate at the time of splenectomy, and race.

  3. Tophaceous gout in an amputation stump in a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Christine B.; Mohana-Borges, Aurea; Pathria, Mini [Department of Radiology, UCSD and VAHCS, 3350 La Village Drive, La Jolla, CA 92161 (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Gout is a common rheumatologic disorder that can have an unusual clinical presentation. This case report describes the development of a gouty tophus at a site of remote traumatic forearm amputation in a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). It further addresses the imaging characteristics of tophaceous gout as well as the differential diagnostic considerations as regards both the imaging findings and the clinical presentation. (orig.)

  4. Permanent Sensorineural Deafness in a Patient with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Secondary to Intracranial Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakshi Kapur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 52-year-old male presented with tinnitus and fullness in left ear for one day. Workup revealed a white blood cell count of 685×103/μL with marked increase in granulocyte series and myeloid precursors on peripheral smear. The initial impression was chronic myelogenous leukemia with hyperleukocytosis, and patient was started on hydration, hydroxyurea, and allopurinol. Patient tolerated bone marrow biopsy well but continued to bleed excessively from the biopsy site. Results confirmed Philadelphia chromosome positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (chronic phase. On day three of hospitalization, patient developed sudden slurred speech along with shaking movements involving extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple hemorrhages throughout the brain. Hydroxyurea was continued until insurance coverage for nilotinib was getting approved. On day nine of hospitalization, patient developed sudden bilateral sensorineural deafness. Repeat magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple new hemorrhages throughout the brain. Computer tomography of the temporal bones showed inflammatory changes in right and left mastoid cells. Nilotinib was started on day eleven of hospitalization. Patient’s white blood cell count continued to decrease, but there was no improvement in hearing. Four months later, patient was treated with bilateral transmastoid cochlear implants. This case highlights permanent deafness as a hemorrhagic complication secondary to chronic myelogenous leukemia.

  5. Clinical Research on Treatment of Age-Related Acute Myelogenous Leukemia with Integrated Treatment of Chinese and Western Medicine%中西医结合治疗老年性急性髓细胞白血病临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡晓莹; 陈珮; 邱仲川; 赵琳; 黄中迪; 朱小勤

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To observe the clinical curative effect of integrated treatment of Chinese and western medicine on age-related acute myelogenous leukemia ( AML ) . Methods:26 patients with age-related acute myelogenous leukemia were randomly divided into qi-benefiting and heat-clearing formula plus decitabine group(treatment group) and decitabine group(control group). The clinical curative effect and adverse reac tions of the two groups were observed. Result:The completely relieving rate of treatment group was lower than that of the control group and the effective rate was higher than that of the control group. There was no significant difference between the curative effect of the two groups (P>0.05). The significantly effective rate and total effective rate of TCM syndrome improvement of treatment group were significantly higher than that of the control group (P0.05)。治疗组中医证候改善显效率及总有效率明显高于对照组(P<0.05)。治疗过程中治疗组感染发生率、口腔溃疡发生率、恶心呕吐发生率明显低于对照组(P<0.05)。结论:益气清热方联合地西他滨能有效治疗老年性AML,中药能减轻地西他滨的不良反应。

  6. [Acute plasma cell leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsalbe, V; Domíngues, C; Roa, I; Busel, D; González, S

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Cell Leukemia is a very rare form of plasmocytic dyscrasia, whose clinical and pathological characteristics warrant its recognition as a distinct subentity. We report the case of a 60 years old man who presented a rapidly fatal acute plasma cell leukemia, with multiple osteolytic lesions, hipercalcemia, renal and cardiac failure.

  7. [Sudden deafness as the initial manifestation of chronic myelogenous leukemia: case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yandi; An, Lifeng; Jin, Guanghua

    2015-05-01

    To study the pathogenesis of hearing loss in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). To report one case with CML whose first sign was sudden unilateral hearing loss. Sudden hearing loss in CML was presented with dramatic high white blood cell count in peripheral blood. Some cases of sudden hearing loss in CML may be improved or even cured by leukapheresis and intrathecal chemotherapy. The proposed pathogenesis for deafness in leukemia is due to hyperleukocytosis, hyperviscosity syndrome, leukemic infiltration and the inner ear hemorrhage. In treatment, clinicians should quickly reduce the number of white blood cells to lighten the tumor burden. Intrathecal injection of MTX and plasmapheresis is commonly used.

  8. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for information in your local library and on the Internet. Good sources include the National Cancer Institute, the ... mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/acute-lymphocytic-leukemia/basics/definition/CON-20042915 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  9. General Information about Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to ... acute granulocytic leukemia, and acute nonlymphocytic leukemia. Enlarge Anatomy of the bone. The bone is made up ...

  10. PEGylated dendritic nanoarchitechture improves mean survival time of BDF1mice bearing myelogenous k -562 leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ramadoss Karthikeyan; Pureti Madhu Kumar; Palanirajan Vijayaraj Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To developing and exploring the use ofPEGylated poly(propylene imine) dendritic architecture for the delivery of an anti leukemic activity ofPrednisolone.Methods:For this study,PEGylated poly(propylene imine) dendritic architecture was synthesized and loaded with Prednisolone and targeted to the ascetic form of myelogenous leukemia k-562 cellines in hybrid miceBDF1, was used as tumor model.Theantileukemic activity was assessed by use of the criterionT/C%, whereT was the mean survival time(MST, days) of the drug treated mice, bearing k-562 leukemia andC- the mean survival time(MST, days) of untreated control animals, bearing the same leukemia cellines.Results:An antileukemic activity of the studiedPrednisolone loaded PEGylatedPolypropyleneimine(PPI) dendrimer was found to have increasing the mean survival time of the k-562 myelogenous leukemia cellines bearingBDF1 mice.The criterion“increase of life span”(ILS%) reached maximally270.1% for the drug loaded dendrimer.Conclusion:The studied dendrimer withPrednisolone showed lower toxicity with improved antileukemic activity in comparison with freePrednisolone.The further experiments in this field are in progress, aiming to design better dendritic formulations, with potential clinical use.

  11. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow. Bone marrow is the soft tissue inside ... develops quickly. Both adults and children can get acute myeloid leukemia ( AML ). This article is about AML in children.

  12. Mechanisms of Disease Persistence in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    Fischer T, Deininger MW, Lennard AL, Hochhaus A, Ottmann OG, Gratwohl A, Baccarani M, Stone R, Tura S, Mahon FX, Fernandes-Reese S, Gathmann I...leukemia: results of a phase 2 study. Blood 99:1928-1937, 2002. 130. Sawyers CL, Hochhaus A, Feldman E, Goldman JM, Miller CB, Ottmann OG, Schiffer...STI571) in accelerated phase CML. Blood 100:1628-1633, 2002. 140. Ottmann OG, Druker BJ, Sawyers CL, Goldman JM, Reiffers J, Silver RT, Tura S

  13. Molecular monitoring of BCR-ABL transcripts in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia: is high sensitivity of clinical value?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkin, Maxim; Schiffer, Charles A

    2010-04-01

    Monitoring of disease response during treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia dramatically changed after the introduction of real-time PCR, which allows quantification of BCR-ABL transcript levels with high sensitivity and precision. However, its role in patients who have achieved complete cytogenetic response is not entirely clear; incorrect interpretation of results could lead to unnecessary changes from an effective treatment. This review discusses the current evidence regarding the benefits, uncertainties, and potential drawbacks of molecular monitoring in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia in chronic phase.

  14. Chronic myelogenous leukemia: molecular monitoring in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. Ryabchikova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib has led to significant progress in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML treatment. To date, genetic monitoring is a mandatory attribute of therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The purpose of this study was to access the imatinib therapy efficacy in CML patients using complete molecular genetic monitoring by standard cytogenetics, realtime polymerase chain reaction and mutational analysis. Correlation between cytogenetic and molecular response was shown. Heterogeneity of molecular response in each patient group was revealed by expression of BCR-ABL. Kinase domain mutations were detected in 32 % of CML patients resistant to imatinib.

  15. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Myelomonocytic, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemias; Acute... myelomonocytic leukaemia (clinical); Acute myelomonocytic leukemia (clinical); Acute mye...lomonocytic leukemia, FAB M4; Leukemia, Acute Myelomonocytic; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute, M4; Leukemia, Myeloi...d, Naegeli-Type; Leukemia, Naegeli-Type Myeloid; Leukemias, Acute Myelomonocytic; Myeloid Leukemia, Acute..., M4; Myeloid Leukemia, Naegeli Type; Myeloid Leukemia, Naegeli-Type; Myelomonocytic Leukemia, Acute

  16. Prolonged chronic phase in chronic myelogenous leukemia after homoharringtonine therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yu-feng; DENG Zhi-kui; XUAN Heng-bao; ZHU Jia-bin; DING Bang-he; LIU Xiao-ning; CHEN Bao-an

    2009-01-01

    Background Homoharringtonine (HH'r) is effective in treating late stage chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML), but little is known about long term maintenance during complete cytogenetic response. Long term efficacy and toxicity profiles of low dose HHT were evaluated in this study.Methods One hundred and six patients with CML received 1.5 mg/m2 of HHT alone by continuous daily infusion for seven to nine days every four weeks. Of 79 patients in the control group, 31 were treated with interferon α (IFN-α) and 48 with hydroxycarbamide. For 17 patients who failed to achieve cytogenetic response within 12 months' treatment of IFN-α, HHT was administered. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to detect the BCR-ABL mRNA expression in 36 Philadelphia positive CML patients enrolled after 2007. Haematological and cytogenetic responses were evaluated in all patients at the 12th month of follow-up. Long term efficacy was assessed in a follow-up with a median time of 54 months (12 months-98 months).Results After 12 months of therapy, cytogenetic response rate of the HHT, IFN-α and hydroxycarbamide groups were 39/106, 14/31 and 3/48, and corresponding molecular cytogenetic response rates 6/18, 3/8 and 0. Of the 17 patients who received HHT as salvage treatment, 6 achieved cytogenetic response (3 major). At the 48 months' follow-up, cytogenetic response was maintained in 32/39 patients treated with HHT. Patients who had cytogenetic response in HHT group or treated with IFN-α also showed longer median chronic durations, which were 45 months (12 months-98 months) and 49 months (12 months-92 months) respectively, indicating a longer survival time.Conclusions Low dose HHT alone showed considerable short term and long term efficacy in the treatment of late stage CML. It may also be a good choice for patients who have failed imatinib, IFN-α treatment or haematopoietic stem cell transplantation or cannot afford these treatments.

  17. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia in remission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagler, Arnon; Rocha, Vanderson; Labopin, Myriam

    2013-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide (Cy) combined with total-body irradiation (TBI) or with busulfan (Bu) are currently the most common myeloablative regimens used in allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (alloSCT) in adults with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Intravenous (IV) Bu has more predictable bioavailabil......Cyclophosphamide (Cy) combined with total-body irradiation (TBI) or with busulfan (Bu) are currently the most common myeloablative regimens used in allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (alloSCT) in adults with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Intravenous (IV) Bu has more predictable...

  18. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Yang, Jun J; Hunger, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To review the impact of collaborative studies on advances in the biology and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children and adolescents. METHODS: A review of English literature on childhood ALL focusing on collaborative studies was performed. The resulting article...

  19. Induction of differentiation of myelogenous leukemia cells by humulone, a bitter in the hop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Y; Tobe, H; Makishima, M; Yokoyama, A; Okabe-Kado, J

    1998-07-01

    The active form of vitamin D, 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (VD3), inhibits proliferation and induces differentiation of myelomonocytic leukemia cells, but its clinical use is limited by the adverse effect of hypercalcemia. VD3 mobilizes calcium stores from bone by inducing the dissolution of bone mineral and matrix. We have recently found that humulone, a bitter in the hop extract for beer brewing, effectively inhibits bone resorption. In this study we examined the effect of humulone on the differentiation of human myelogenous leukemia cells. Humulone alone inhibited the growth of monoblastic leukemia U937 cells while only slightly increasing differentiation markers such as nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT)-reducing and lysozyme activities. Humulone effectively enhanced the differentiation-inducing action of VD3. Other myelomonocytic leukemia cells were induced to differentiate by VD3 and this was also enhanced by humulone. Since humulone is a less-toxic inhibitor of bone resorption, the combination of humulone and VD3 may be useful in differentiation therapy of myelomonocytic leukemia.

  20. Structural Biology Contributions to the Discovery of Drugs to Treat Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan-Jacob, Sandra W.; Fendrich, Gabriele; Floersheimer, Andreas; Furet, Pascal; Liebetanz, Janis; Rummel, Gabriele; Rheinberger, Paul; Centeleghe, Mario; Fabbro, Doriano; Manley, Paul W.

    This case study illustrates how the determination of multiple co-crystal structures of the protein tyrosine kinase c-Abl was used to support drug discovery efforts leading to the design of nilotinib, a newly approved therapy for imatinib-intolerant and - resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) results from the BCR-Abl onco-protein, which possesses a constitutively activated Abl tyrosine kinase domain. Although many chronic-phase CML patients treated with imatinib as first-line therapy maintain excellent, durable responses, patients who have progressed to advanced-stage CML frequently fail, or lose their response to therapy, often due to the emergence of drug-resistant mutants of the protein. More than 60 such point mutations have been detected in imatinib-resistant patients. We determined the crystal structures of wild-type and mutant Abl kinase in complex with imatinib and other small molecule Abl inhibitors, with the aim of understanding the molecular basis for resistance and to aid in the design and optimization of inhibitors active against the resistance mutants. These results are presented in a way which illustrates the approaches used to generate multiple structures, the type of information that can be gained and the way this information is used to support drug discovery.

  1. Update on the management of Philadelphia chromosome positive chronic myelogenous leukemia: role of nilotinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emole J

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Josephine Emole,1 Taiwo Talabi,2 Javier Pinilla-Ibarz1 1Department of Malignant Hematology, 2Moffitt Program for Outreach Wellness Education and Resources, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA Abstract: Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML is a pluripotent stem cell disease characterized by the presence of the Philadelphia chromosome and the bcr-abl gene. The discovery of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs revolutionized therapy for CML, such that durable response, increased overall survival, and increased progression-free survival of patients in chronic phase CML is now possible. Due to resistance and intolerance to imatinib, there was need for development of second- and third-generation TKIs for the treatment of CML. This review examines the role of nilotinib, an oral second-generation TKI, in the treatment of Philadelphia positive CML. The pharmacology, efficacy, and safety of nilotinib are critically evaluated. Patient-related issues, including tolerance, drug interactions, and quality of life issues are also examined. Keywords: chronic myelogenous leukemia, nilotinib, tyrosine kinase inhibitor

  2. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Biphenotypic, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym Acute bilineal leukaemia; Acute bilineal leukemia; Acute... biphenotypic leukaemia; Acute biphenotypic leukemia; Acute mixed lineage leukaemia; Acute mixed line...age leukemia; B and T Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B and T Cell Leukemia, Acute; B- and T-Cell Acute L...ymphoblastic Leukemia; B- and T-Cell Leukemia, Acute; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute..., Mixed Cell; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, Mixed-Cell; Leukemia, Mixed Cell; Leukemia, Mixed, B and T Cell

  3. Acute Myeloid Leukemia NOS | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available abel Study of Sargramostim Among Patients Receiving Myelosuppressive Induction Chemotherapy for Acute Myelog...g Myelosuppressive Induction Chemotherapy for Acute Myelogenous Leukemia A.4.1Sponsor's protocol code number...r disease under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute ...Myeloid Leukemia NOS E.1.1.1Medical condition in easily understood language Acute Myeloid Leukemia NOS E.1.1...r investigation E.1.2Version 18.0 E.1.2Level PT E.1.2Classification code 10000880 E.1.2Term Acute

  4. [Myelogenous leukemia in children. ANLL9205 study by Children's Cancer and Leukemia Study Group (CCLSG)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimaya, J; Horikoshi, Y; Shimizu, H; Maeda, H; Koizumi, S; Kawakami, K; Watanabe, A; Utsumi, J; Kikuta, A; Oka, T; Mugishima, H; Kawamura, N; Gushiken, T; Ohta, S; Yamamura, Y; Ishida, Y; Sekine, I; Okada, N; Fujimoto, T

    1997-02-01

    Treatment results were evaluated in 45 children with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) treated on the ANLL-9205 protocol of the Children's Cancer Leukemia Study Group (CCLSG, Japan). In this protocol, terarubicin (THP-ADR), vincristine and continuous infusion of cytosine arabinoside (Ara C) were applied for remission induction therapy (AVC), and VP16+ high dose Ara C were used sequentially for 32 or 48 weeks. Eleven patients received stem cell transplantation. Thirty-eight out of the 43 eligible patients (88.4%) achieved complete remission, and the overall 3-year event-free survival (EFS) was 55.6% (S.E.,10%). This favorable response was attributed mainly to the high induction rate of patients with the M5, M7 FAB subtypes and higher WBC counts (> or = 10 x 10(9)/L). There was no difference in the 3-year EFS of these patients who discontinued treatment between 32 weeks and 48 weeks. Serious toxicities were not observed in this study. These findings suggest that the ANLL-9205 protocol is an effective and safe treatment regimen for childhood AML. When comparing the treatment period of 32 or 48 weeks, the difference was not statistically significant.

  5. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Reduced intensity conditioning is superior to nonmyeloablative conditioning for older chronic myelogenous leukemia patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplant during the tyrosine kinase inhibitor era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warlick, Erica; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Pedersen, Tanya L;

    2012-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and reduced intensity conditioning (RIC)/nonmyeloablative (NMA) conditioning hematopoietic cell transplants (HCTs) have changed the therapeutic strategy for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients. We analyzed post-HCT outcomes of 306 CML patients reported to...

  7. [Undifferentiated blastic cell crisis of chronic myelogenous leukemia with myeloblastic tumor in the skin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, K; Kiyosaki, M; Amaya, H; Nakamaki, T; Hino, K; Tomoyasu, S

    2000-04-01

    A 54-year-old female, who had been treated for 4 years in the chronic phase of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) was admitted for management of a CML blastic crisis. Blast cells showed strong positive expression of CD7 and HLA-DR, and weakly expressed CD2, CD5 and CD10, as well. The cells were peroxidase negative in peripheral blood and bone marrow. An undifferentiated blastic crisis was diagnosed and she was treated with Interferon-alpha and VP(vincristine 2 mg/week; prednisolone 30 mg/day). A 5-7 mm in diameter tumor in the skin of the anterior right chest appeared one week after VP therapy. The tumor consisted of blasts which were CD13, CD33 and peroxidase positive, unlike the peripheral undifferentiated blasts. This is a rare case of mixed blast crisis with an increase in undifferentiated blasts in peripheral blood and bone marrow, and myeloblastic tumor formation in the skin.

  8. Autologous stem cell transplantation for therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroger, N.; Brand, R.; Biezen, A. van; Cahn, J.; Slavin, S.; Blaise, D.; Sierra, J.; Zander, A.; Niederwieser, D.; Witte, T.J.M. de

    2006-01-01

    We report the results of 65 patients with treatment-related myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)/acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) who were transplanted from an autograft and reported to the EBMT. The median age was 39 years (range, 3-69), and stem cell source was bone marrow (n = 31), or peripheral blood

  9. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Eosinophilic, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Acute Eosinophilic Leukemias; Acute... eosinophilic leukemia; Eosinophilic Leukemia, Acute; Eosinophilic Leukemias, Acute; Leukemia, Acute... Eosinophilic; Leukemias, Acute Eosinophilic PharmGKB Accession Id: PA446179 External Vocabularies Me...SH: Leukemia, Eosinophilic, Acute (D015472) SnoMedCT: Acute eosinophilic leukemia... (277604002) UMLS: C0023439 (C0023439) NDFRT: Leukemia, Eosinophilic, Acute [Disease/Finding] (N0000003269)

  10. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Erythroblastic, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym AML M6; Acute Erythroblastic Leukemia; Acute Erythroblastic Leukemias; Acu...te erythraemic myelosis [obs]; Acute erythremia [obs]; Acute erythremic myelosis [obs]; Acute... erythroid leukaemia; Acute erythroid leukemia; Acute myeloid leukaemia, M6 type; Acute myeloid le...Erythroblastic Leukemia, Acute; Erythroblastic Leukemias, Acute; Erythroleukaemia...; Erythroleukemia; Erythroleukemias; FAB M6; Leukemia, Acute Erythroblastic; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute, M6; Leukemias, Acute

  11. KEGG PATHWAY / Acute myeloid leukemia [KEGG

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available PATHWAY: map05221 Entry map05221Pathway Name Acute myeloid leukemia Description Acute...Class Human Diseases; Cancers Pathwaymap map05221Acute myeloid leukemia Disease H00003Acute myeloid leukemia...inkDB DBGET integrated database retrieval system KEGG PATHWAY / Acute myeloid leukemia ...

  12. Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Center Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) Coping With Your Child's Cancer: Liz Scott's Story Side Effects of Chemotherapy and ... Stem Cell Transplants Caring for a Seriously Ill Child Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Cancer Center Chemotherapy Some Kinds of Cancer Kids Get ...

  13. Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faderl, Stefan; O’Brien, Susan; Pui, Ching-Hon; Stock, Wendy; Wetzler, Meir; Hoelzer, Dieter; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), a clonal expansion of hematopoietic blasts, is a highly heterogeneous disease comprising many entities for which distinct treatment strategies are pursued. Although ALL is a success story in pediatric oncology, results in adults lag behind those in children. An expansion of new drugs, more reliable immunologic and molecular techniques for the assessment of minimal residual disease, and efforts at more precise risk stratification are generating new aspects of adult ALL therapy. For this review, the authors summarized pertinent and recent literature on ALL biology and therapy, and they discuss current strategies and potential implications of novel approaches to the management of adult ALL. PMID:20101737

  14. Upregulation of Leukocytic Syncytin-1 in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi; Zhu, Hongyan; Song, Jianxin; Jiang, Yaxian; Ouyang, Hongmei; Huang, Rongzhong; Zhang, Guiqian; Fan, Xin; Tao, Rui; Jiang, Jie; Niu, Hua

    2016-07-09

    BACKGROUND Syncytin-1, a cell membrane-localizing fusogen, is abnormally expressed in several cancers, including endometrial cancer, breast cancer, and leukemia. Although abnormal syncytin-1 expression has been detected in two-thirds of leukemia blood samples, its expression profile in acute leukemia patients has not yet been analyzed. MATERIAL AND METHODS Bone marrow samples from 50 acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cases and 14 B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (B-cell ALL) patients were subjected to flow cytometry to assess leukocyte type distributions and leukocytic syncytin-1 surface expression. RT-PCR was applied to assess leukocytic syncytin-1 mRNA expression. Statistical analysis was applied to compare syncytin-1 expression between AML and B-cell ALL patients across blasts, granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes as well as to determine clinical factors statistically associated with changes in syncytin-1 expression. RESULTS The leukocyte type distributions of the AML and B-cell ALL cohorts highly overlapped, with an observable difference in blast distribution between the 2 cohorts. The AML cohort displayed significantly greater syncytin-1 surface and mRNA expression (pphenotype and the acute monocytic leukemia phenotype in particular.

  15. Overexpression of P-glycoprotein induces acquired resistance to imatinib in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing-Xiang Peng; Amit K. Tiwari; Hsiang-Chun Wu; Zhe-Sheng Chen

    2012-01-01

    Imatinib,a breakpoint cluster region (BCR)-Abelson murine leukemia (ABL) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI),has revolutionized the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML).However,development of multidrug resistance(MDR) limits the use of imatinib.In the present study,we aimed to investigate the mechanisms of cellular resistance to imatinib in CML.Therefore,we established an imatinib-resistant human CML cell line (K562-imatinib) through a stepwise selection process.While characterizing the phenotype of these cells,we found that K562-imatinib cells were 124.6-fold more resistant to imatinib than parental K562 cells.In addition,these cells were cross-resistant to second- and third-generation BCR-ABL TKIs.Western blot analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR) demonstrated that P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and MDR1 mRNA levels were increased in K562-imatinib cells.In addition,accumulation of [14C]6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) was decreased,whereas the ATP-dependent efflux of [14C] 6-MP and [3H]methotrexate transport were increased in K562-imatinib cells.These data suggest that the overexpression of P-gp may play a crucial role in acquired resistance to imatinib in CML K562-imatinib cells.

  16. Lapatinib induces autophagy, apoptosis and megakaryocytic differentiation in chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huey-Lan Huang

    Full Text Available Lapatinib is an oral, small-molecule, dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR, or ErbB/Her in solid tumors. Little is known about the effect of lapatinib on leukemia. Using human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML K562 cells as an experimental model, we found that lapatinib simultaneously induced morphological changes resembling apoptosis, autophagy, and megakaryocytic differentiation. Lapatinib-induced apoptosis was accompanied by a decrease in mitochondrial transmembrane potential and was attenuated by the pancaspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk, indicating a mitochondria-mediated and caspase-dependent pathway. Lapatinib-induced autophagic cell death was verified by LC3-II conversion, and upregulation of Beclin-1. Further, autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine as well as autophagy-related proteins Beclin-1 (ATG6, ATG7, and ATG5 shRNA knockdown rescued the cells from lapatinib-induced growth inhibition. A moderate number of lapatinib-treated K562 cells exhibited features of megakaryocytic differentiation. In summary, lapatinib inhibited viability and induced multiple cellular events including apoptosis, autophagic cell death, and megakaryocytic differentiation in human CML K562 cells. This distinct activity of lapatinib against CML cells suggests potential for lapatinib as a therapeutic agent for treatment of CML. Further validation of lapatinib activity in vivo is warranted.

  17. [Efficacy of levocarnitine for tyrosine kinase inhibitor-induced painful muscle cramps in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Michiko; Kuroda, Hiroyuki; Shimoyama, Saori; Ito, Ryo; Sugama, Yusuke; Sato, Ken; Yamauchi, Natsumi; Horiguchi, Hiroto; Nakamura, Hajime; Hamaguchi, Kota; Abe, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Shigeyuki; Maeda, Masahiro; Kato, Junji

    2016-04-01

    Muscle cramps are side effects commonly associated with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment. Patients suffering from muscle cramps are treated with various medications such as calcium, magnesium and vitamin supplements, but these therapies are often ineffective. We report two patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia who developed muscle cramps caused by TKI. These patients were treated successfully with levocarnitine. Both of our cases revealed the beneficial effects of levocarnitine treatment on TKI-induced muscle cramps.

  18. Decitabine, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-20

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-30

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  1. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  2. The exodus subfamily of CC chemokines inhibits the proliferation of chronic myelogenous leukemia progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hromas, R; Cripe, L; Hangoc, G; Cooper, S; Broxmeyer, H E

    2000-02-15

    Chemokines are a family of related proteins that regulate leukocyte infiltration into inflamed tissue and play important roles in disease processes. Among the biologic activities of chemokines is inhibition of proliferation of normal hematopoietic progenitors. However, chemokines that inhibit normal progenitors rarely inhibit proliferation of hematopoietic progenitors from patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). We and others recently cloned a subfamily of CC chemokines that share similar amino-terminal peptide sequences and a remarkable ability to chemoattract T cells. These chemokines, Exodus-1/LARC/MIP-3alpha, Exodus-2/SLC/6Ckine/TCA4, and Exodus-3/CKbeta11/MIP-3beta, were found to inhibit proliferation of normal human marrow progenitors. The study described here found that these chemokines also inhibited the proliferation of progenitors in every sample of marrow from patients with CML that was tested. This demonstration of consistent inhibition of CML progenitor proliferation makes the 3 Exodus chemokines unique among chemokines. (Blood. 2000;95:1506-1508)

  3. Clinical roundtable monograph: Emerging treatment options for TKI-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Jorge; Radich, Jerald; Mauro, Michael J

    2012-10-01

    The development of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) that inhibit signaling of the constitutive BCR-ABL protein revolutionized the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). These agents have dramatically changed the treatment landscape for CML, shifting the use of allogeneic stem cell transplantation to selected patients in the salvage setting. Four BCR-ABL TKIs are now commercially available for the treatment of CML: the first-generation TKI imatinib, and the second-generation TKIs dasatinib, nilotinib, and bosutinib. Continuous treatment with these agents induces durable responses in a high proportion of patients with chronic-phase CML. Research is focused on identifying which patients can discontinue therapy without a recurrence of disease. For the group of patients with resistance to TKIs, multiple alternative therapies are being evaluated. The third-generation TKI ponatinib is a BCR-ABL inhibitor that has demonstrated significant activity, including in patients with the TKI resistance mutation T315I. The homoharringtonine derivative omacetaxine mepesuccinate, which inhibits protein synthesis, has also demonstrated clinical activity in CML, including in patients with TKI resistance due to T315I and in patients who have TKI resistance despite no evidence of ABL mutations. It is essential that clinicians implement these new agents with care and change therapies only when appropriate in order to preserve as many options as possible for future use if needed.

  4. Clinical roundtable monograph: Unmet needs in the management of chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Elias J; Bixby, Dale; Akard, Luke P

    2012-12-01

    Approximately 5,000 cases of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) are diagnosed each year in the United States. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has dramatically improved survival time for many CML patients. Current first-line treatment options include imatinib and the second-generation agents nilotinib and dasatinib. Second- and third-line agents include nilotinib, dasatinib, bosutinib, and the new agent ponatinib. Despite the effectiveness of TKIs, some patients develop resistance or intolerance to these agents. A number of mutations of the BCR-ABL gene have been identified and are associated with TKI resistance. Patients may benefit from switching to a second-line TKI, undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant, or receiving newly emerging agents. Although early response is associated with improved patient outcome, clinicians lack tests that can determine which patients will benefit from which therapies. To ensure adequate response, patients should be monitored by both polymerase chain reaction and cytogenetic analysis of the bone marrow. This roundtable monograph reviews key unmet needs in patients with CML related to disease management and treatment options.

  5. Biochemical and functional characterization of proteoglycans isolated from basophils of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, D D; Bland, C E; Wasserman, S I

    1984-04-01

    Human basophils were obtained from three donors with myelogenous leukemia. Proteoglycans were labeled by using [35S]sulfate as precursor and were extracted in 1 M NaCl with protease inhibitors to preserve their native structure. [35S]proteoglycans filtered on Sepharose 4B with an average m.w. similar to that of a rat heparin proteoglycan that has an estimated m.w. of 750,000. The [35S]glycosaminoglycan side chains filtered with an average m.w. slightly smaller than a 60,000-m.w. glycosaminoglycan marker. The [35S]glycosaminoglycans were resistant to heparinase and susceptible to degradation by chondroitin AC lyase and chondroitin ABC lyase. The intact [35S]glycosaminoglycans chromatographed on DEAE Sepharose as a single peak eluting just before an internal heparin marker. These findings indicate that the [35S]glycosaminoglycans were made up only of chondroitin sulfates. No heparin was identified. The chondroitin sulfate disaccharides that resulted from the action of chondroitin ABC lyase on the basophil glycosaminoglycans consisted of 92% delta Di-4S, 6% delta Di-6S, and 2% disulfated disaccharides. The [35S]chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans were susceptible to cleavage with proteases and could be shown to be released intact from basophils during degranulation initiated by the calcium ionophore A23187. The basophil proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans were capable of binding histamine in water, but not in phosphate-buffered saline, and had no anticoagulant activity.

  6. Chronic myelogenous leukemia accompanied by megaloblastic anemia showing atypical clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koiso, Hiromi; Tsukamoto, Norifumi; Shimano, Shun-ichi; Karasawa, Masamitsu; Murakami, Hirokazu; Nojima, Yoshihisa

    2011-11-01

    Leukocytosis, splenomegaly, and an increased vitamin B(12) level are characteristic findings of chronic myelogenous leukemia in the chronic phase (CML-CP). Here, we report a patient with CML-CP accompanied by megaloblastic anemia. A 61-year-old man consulted our hospital because of anemia and thrombocytopenia. On physical examination, there were no remarkable findings; there was no hepatosplenomegaly. Laboratory findings were: hemoglobin 6.0 g/dl; MCV 113.6 fl; platelet count 100×10(9)/l; white cell count 8.66×10(9)/l; and LDH 1,236 IU/l. Peripheral blood smear demonstrated hypersegmented neutrophils and megalocytes with emergence of myeloblasts, giant metamyelocytes, and nucleated red cells. Vitamin B(12) and folic acid levels were low. Bone marrow examination showed megaloblastic change in the erythroblasts and myeloid hyperplasia. Following vitamin B(12) and folic acid administration, anemia and thrombocytopenia rapidly improved; thereafter, marked leukocytosis became evident. Based on the presence of t(9;22)(q34;q11) on cytogenetic study and a positive result for Major bcr/abl fusion gene, a diagnosis of CML-CP was established. This case illustrates that ineffective erythropoiesis results in anemia and thrombocytopenia in CML with vitamin B12 and/or folic acid deficiency.

  7. [Economic burden for patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia--healthcare economics and medical governance of cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Yuko; Kami, Masahiro

    2010-04-01

    Due to the recent economic downturn, the economic burden of cancer patients has been further worsened. Specifically for chronic myelogenous leukemia patients, their annual income has decreased by 1, 500, 000 yen from 2000 to 2008, while the cost of their medications has increased from 1,000,000 yen to 1,200,000 yen due the advent of the new drug, Glivec, which was approved in 2001. The scores for psychological burden have increased 30% over the past 8 years before Glivec became available. The economic crisis among cancer patients is a consequence of structural problems with many anticancer drugs and cancer treatment. Especially, problems involving the cost of medical care and the system of drug pricing should be resolved by thorough discussion not only with cancer patients but also with the entire population. Discussion on the medical expense burden for CML patients has flourished through patients' spontaneous activities and information disclosure to a wider population through the internet. This methodology will be significant in establishing medical governance in cancer treatment in Japan.

  8. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia- Initiating Cells Require Polycomb Group Protein EZH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huafeng; Peng, Cong; Huang, Jialiang; Li, Bin E; Kim, Woojin; Smith, Elenoe C; Fujiwara, Yuko; Qi, Jun; Cheloni, Giulia; Das, Partha P; Nguyen, Minh; Li, Shaoguang; Bradner, James E; Orkin, Stuart H

    2016-11-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) have revolutionized chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) management. Disease eradication, however, is hampered by innate resistance of leukemia-initiating cells (LIC) to TKI-induced killing, which also provides the basis for subsequent emergence of TKI-resistant mutants. We report that EZH2, the catalytic subunit of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2), is overexpressed in CML LICs and required for colony formation and survival and cell-cycle progression of CML cell lines. A critical role for EZH2 is supported by genetic studies in a mouse CML model. Inactivation of Ezh2 in conventional conditional mice and through CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene editing prevents initiation and maintenance of disease and survival of LICs, irrespective of BCR-ABL1 mutational status, and extends survival. Expression of the EZH2 homolog EZH1 is reduced in EZH2-deficient CML LICs, creating a scenario resembling complete loss of PRC2. EZH2 dependence of CML LICs raises prospects for improved therapy of TKI-resistant CML and/or eradication of disease by addition of EZH2 inhibitors. This work defines EZH2 as a selective vulnerability for CML cells and their LICs, regardless of BCR-ABL1 mutational status. Our findings provide an experimental rationale for improving disease eradication through judicious use of EZH2 inhibitors within the context of standard-of-care TKI therapy. Cancer Discov; 6(11); 1237-47. ©2016 AACR.See related article by Scott et al., p. 1248This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 1197. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Promyelocytic, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym APL - Acute promyelocytic leukaemia; APL - Acute ...promyelocytic leukemia; APML - Acute promyelocytic leukaemia; APML - Acute promyelocytic leukemia; Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia; Acut...e Promyelocytic Leukemias; Acute myeloid leukaemia, PML/RAR-alpha; Acute myeloid le...ukemia, PML/RAR-alpha; Acute myeloid leukemia, t(15;17)(q22;q11-12); Acute promye...locytic leukaemia (clinical); Acute promyelocytic leukaemia, FAB M3; Acute promyelocytic leukaemia, PML/RAR-alpha; Acute

  10. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-23

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Decitabine and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Revealing stiffening and brittling of chronic myelogenous leukemia hematopoietic primary cells through their temporal response to shear stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laperrousaz, B.; Berguiga, L.; Nicolini, F. E.; Martinez-Torres, C.; Arneodo, A.; Maguer Satta, V.; Argoul, F.

    2016-06-01

    Cancer cell transformation is often accompanied by a modification of their viscoelastic properties. When capturing the stress-to-strain response of primary chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells, from two data sets of CD34+ hematopoietic cells isolated from healthy and leukemic bone marrows, we show that the mean shear relaxation modulus increases upon cancer transformation. This stiffening of the cells comes along with local rupture events, detected as reinforced sharp local maxima of this modulus, suggesting that these cancer cells respond to a local mechanical stress by a cascade of local brittle failure events.

  13. Physiological measurements corroborate symptomatic improvement after therapeutic leukapheresis in a pregnant woman with chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galera, Pallavi; Haynes, Stefanie; Sulmasy, Paula; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Greene, Mindy; Vauthrin, Michelle; Brettler, Doreen; Liebmann, James; Mark Madison, J; Weinstein, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Therapeutic leukapheresis can control the white blood cell count (WBC) of pregnant women with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) who have hyperleukocytosis without leukostasis. The medical justification for this treatment has not been objectively documented. We report a 27-year-old woman, diagnosed with CML at 10-week gestation, who developed severe dyspnea on exertion. A workup that included chest CT and echocardiography with a bubble study detected no cardiopulmonary pathology to explain her symptoms, and thus she was referred for leukapheresis. Prior to her first leukapheresis, which lowered her WBC from 154 × 10(3) /μL to 133 × 10(3) /μL, her oxygen saturation (SpO2 ) on room air decreased from 98 to 93% during 100 feet of slow ambulation and she was dyspneic. Just after the leukapheresis, her dyspnea on exertion was much improved and her SpO2 remained at 98% with repeat ambulation. Spirometry and lung volume studies obtained before and after her first leukapheresis demonstrated 32 and 31% improvements in forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 s respectively, a 25% increase in functional residual capacity, and a 142% improvement in expiratory reserve volume. Residual volume decreased by almost 20%. Three times in a week, leukapheresis was continued until her WBC was controlled with interferon α-2b approximately 4 weeks later. Her dyspnea had completely resolved. She gave birth by elective caesarean section to a healthy boy at 32 weeks. Corroboration of symptom relief by leukapheresis with physiological data may justify such treatment in pregnant patients with CML. J. Clin. Apheresis 31:393-397, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Caveolin-1 contributes to realgar nanoparticle therapy in human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Dan; Liu, Yan; Xi, Ronggang; Zou, Wei; Wu, Lijun; Zhang, Zhiran; Liu, Zhongyang; Qu, Chao; Xu, Baoli; Wang, Xiaobo

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is characterized by the t(9;22) (q34;q11)-associated Bcr-Abl fusion gene, which is an essential element of clinical diagnosis. As a traditional Chinese medicine, realgar has been widely used for the treatment of various diseases for >1,500 years. Inspired by nano-drug, realgar nanoparticles (NPs) have been prepared with an average particle size of processes including tumorigenesis and tumor development. In previous studies, it was found that realgar NPs can inhibit several types of tumor cell proliferation. However, the therapeutic effect of realgar NPs on CML has not been fully elucidated. In the present paper, it was demonstrated that realgar NPs can inhibit the proliferation of K562 cells and degrade Bcr-Abl fusion protein effectively. Both apoptosis and autophagy were activated in a dose-dependent manner in realgar NPs treated cells, and the induction of autophagy was associated with class I phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. Morphological analysis indicated that realgar NPs induced differentiation effectively in CML cells. Furthermore, it was identified that Cav-1 might play a crucial role in realgar NP therapy. In order to study the effects of Cav-1 on K562 cells during realgar NP treatment, a Cav-1 overexpression cell model was established by using transient transfection. The results indicated that Cav-1 overexpression inhibited K562 cell proliferation, promoted endogenic autophagy, and increased the sensitivity of K562 cells to realgar NPs. Therefore, the results demonstrated that realgar NPs degraded Bcr-Abl oncoprotein, while the underlying mechanism might be related to apoptosis and autophagy, and Cav-1 might be considered as a potential target for clinical comprehensive therapy of CML.

  15. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-24

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  16. FR901228 in Treating Children With Refractory or Recurrent Solid Tumors or Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Choroid Plexus Tumor; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Craniopharyngioma; Childhood Grade I Meningioma; Childhood Grade II Meningioma; Childhood Grade III Meningioma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Infratentorial Ependymoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Spinal Cord Neoplasm; Childhood Supratentorial Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  17. Aurora kinase inhibitors: which role in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia patients resistant to imatinib?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Martinelli

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available At present, there are no compounds in clinical development in the field of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML or Philadelphia-positive (Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL that have been documented to harbor significant activity against the imatinib-resistant T315I mutation. Recent reports on the pre-clinical activity of some emerging tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as ON012380, VX-680 and PHA-739358 promise possible clinical efficacy against this specific Bcr-Abl mutant form. Here, we focus on the role of aurora kinase inhibitor VX-680 and PHA-739358 in blocking the leukemogenic pathways driven by wild-type and T315I-Bcr-Abl in CML or Ph+ ALL by reviewing recent research evidence. We also discuss the possibility of employing aurora kinase inhibitors as a promising new therapeutic approach in the treatment of CML and Ph+ ALL patients resistant to first and second generation TK inhibitors.

  18. Acute leukemia in early childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Emerenciano

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemia in early childhood is biologically and clinically distinct. The particular characteristics of this malignancy diagnosed during the first months of life have provided remarkable insights into the etiology of the disease. The pro-B, CD10 negative immunophenotype is typically found in infant acute leukemia, and the most common genetic alterations are the rearrangements of the MLL gene. In addition, the TEL/AML1 fusion gene is most frequently found in children older than 24 months. A molecular study on a Brazilian cohort (age range 0-23 months has detected TEL/AML1+ve (N = 9, E2A/PBX1+ve (N = 4, PML/RARA+ve (N = 4, and AML1/ETO+ve (N = 2 cases. Undoubtedly, the great majority of genetic events occurring in these patients arise prenatally. The environmental exposure to damaging agents that give rise to genetic changes prenatally may be accurately determined in infants since the window of exposure is limited and known. Several studies have shown maternal exposures that may give rise to leukemogenic changes. The Brazilian Collaborative Study Group of Infant Acute Leukemia has found that mothers exposed to dipyrone, pesticides and hormones had an increased chance to give birth to babies with infant acute leukemia [OR = 1.48 (95%CI = 1.05-2.07, OR = 2.27 (95%CI = 1.56-3.31 and OR = 9.08 (95%CI = 2.95-27.96], respectively. This review aims to summarize recent clues that have facilitated the elucidation of the biology of early childhood leukemias, with emphasis on infant acute leukemia in the Brazilian population.

  19. An analysis of strategic treatment interruptions during imatinib treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia with imatinib-resistant mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquin, Dana; Sacco, David; Shamshoian, John

    2015-04-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a cancer of the white blood cells that results from increased and uncontrolled growth of myeloid cells in the bone marrow and the accumulation of these cells in the blood. The most common form of treatment for CML is imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Although imatinib is an effective treatment for CML and most patients treated with imatinib do attain some form of remission, imatinib does not completely eradicate all leukemia cells, and if treatment is stopped, all patients eventually relapse (Cortes, 2005). In Kim (2008), the authors developed a mathematical model for the dynamics of CML under imatinib treatment that incorporates the anti-leukemia immune response, and in Paquin (2011), the authors used this mathematical model to study strategic treatment interruptions as a potential therapeutic strategy for CML patients. Although the authors presented the results of several numerical simulations in Paquin (2011), the studies in that work did not include the possibility of imatinib-resistant mutations or an initial population of imatinib-resistant leukemia cells. As resistance is a significant consideration in any drug treatment, it is important to study the efficacy of the strategic treatment interruption plan in the presence of imatinib resistance. In this work, we modify the delay differential equations model of Kim (2008), Paquin (2011) to include the possibility of imatinib resistance, and we analyze strategic treatment interruptions as a potential therapeutic tool in the case of patients with imatinib-resistance leukemia cells.

  20. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, B-Cell, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available UTR Alleles, Functions, and Amino Acid Translations are all sourced from dbSNP 144 Overview Alternate Names: Synonym Acute... B-Cell Leukemia; Acute B-Cell Leukemias; Acute B-Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute... B-Lymphocytic Leukemias; Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, Burkitt's type; Acute lymphoblastic leuka...emia, mature B-cell type; Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Burkitt's type; Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, mature... B-cell type; B Cell Leukemia, Acute; B Lymphocytic Leukemia, Acute; B-ALL; B-Cell Leukemia, Acute

  1. How I treat acute and chronic leukemia in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, Tal; Pereg, David; Lishner, Michael

    2008-09-01

    The prevalence of pregnancy associated leukemia is approximately 1 case out of 10,000 pregnancies. This rare occurrence precludes the conducting of large, prospective studies to examine diagnostic, management and outcome issues. The treatment of a pregnant woman with leukemia may be associated with severe adverse fetal outcome including death and malformations, and therefore poses a difficult challenge for both the patient and the attending physician. Chemotherapy during the 1st trimester is associated with an increased risk for congenital malformations. However, this risk diminishes as pregnancy advances. When acute leukemia is diagnosed during the 1st trimester, patients should be treated promptly similar to non-pregnant patients. However, the aggressive induction therapy should follow pregnancy termination. When the diagnosis is made later in pregnancy standard chemotherapy regimen should be considered and usually pregnancy termination is not mandatory. However, both the mother and the fetus should be under close observation and delivery should be postponed to a non-cytopenic period. Pregnancy associated chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) can be treated with interferon throughout pregnancy with no apparent increase in adverse fetal outcome. In the very rare case of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) during pregnancy treatment can usually be delayed until after delivery.

  2. High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-14

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  3. Caveolin-1 contributes to realgar nanoparticle therapy in human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi D

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Dan Shi,1,* Yan Liu,1,* Ronggang Xi,1 Wei Zou,2 Lijun Wu,3 Zhiran Zhang,1 Zhongyang Liu,1 Chao Qu,1 Baoli Xu,1 Xiaobo Wang1 1Department of Pharmacy, The 210th Hospital of People’s Liberation Army, 2College of Life Science, Liaoning Normal University, Dalian, Liaoning, 3Department of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML is characterized by the t(9;22 (q34;q11-associated Bcr-Abl fusion gene, which is an essential element of clinical diagnosis. As a traditional Chinese medicine, realgar has been widely used for the treatment of various diseases for >1,500 years. Inspired by nano-drug, realgar nanoparticles (NPs have been prepared with an average particle size of <100 nm in a previous work. Compared with coarse realgar, the realgar NPs have higher bioavailability. As a principal constituent protein of caveolae, caveolin-1 (Cav-1 participates in regulating various cellular physiological and pathological processes including tumorigenesis and tumor development. In previous studies, it was found that realgar NPs can inhibit several types of tumor cell proliferation. However, the therapeutic effect of realgar NPs on CML has not been fully elucidated. In the present paper, it was demonstrated that realgar NPs can inhibit the proliferation of K562 cells and degrade Bcr-Abl fusion protein effectively. Both apoptosis and autophagy were activated in a dose-dependent manner in realgar NPs treated cells, and the induction of autophagy was associated with class I phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. Morphological analysis indicated that realgar NPs induced differentiation effectively in CML cells. Furthermore, it was identified that Cav-1 might play a crucial role in realgar NP therapy. In order to study the effects of Cav-1 on K562 cells during

  4. Impact of oncology pharmacist-managed oral anticancer therapy in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Masha Sh; Cheung, Nathan

    2016-12-01

    Studies have identified non-adherence as one of the major contributing factors to treatment failure in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients receiving imatinib. Published literature has demonstrated a unique role of oncology pharmacists, as part of a multidisciplinary team, in contributing to overall positive outcomes for patients. To evaluate the impact of an oncology pharmacist-managed oral anticancer therapy program on oral medication adherence in CML patients versus usual care. Electronic refill history and medical records of patients diagnosed with CML treated with oral tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) managed by oncology pharmacists during a 6-year period, were retrospectively reviewed. Imatinib adherence rate, as the primary endpoint, was compared with the rate for those in the usual care group within the same organization. The secondary endpoints were descriptive to characterize pharmacist interventions for all TKIs. A total of 56 patients including 45 who were treated with imatinib, were evaluated. The group managed by oncology pharmacists resulted in a higher percentage of imatinib adherence rate compared to usual care (88.6% vs 65.8%, p = 0.0046). A total of 3432 pharmacist encounters were reviewed, and 567 interventions of six categories including side effect monitoring/management (n = 95; 16.8%); drug interaction detection (n = 109; 19.2%); TKI dose adjustment (n = 82; 14.5%); laboratory monitoring (n = 200; 35.3%); non-CML related drug choice (n = 74; 13.1%); and copay assistance (n = 7; 1.2%), were documented. This resulted in a mean of 10.1 interventions per patient. Our oncology pharmacist-managed oral anticancer therapy program significantly improved TKI adherence rates in CML patients. We attribute the success of our program to consistent follow-up by utilizing routine phone, and secure email follow-ups, that allowed our oncology pharmacists to build a close and trustworthy relationship with patients and

  5. Acute acalculous cholecystitis complicating chemotherapy for acute myeloblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Olfa Kassar; Feten Kallel; Manel Ghorbel; Hatem. Bellaaj; Zeineb Mnif; Moez Elloumi

    2015-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a rare complication in the treatment of acute myeloblastic leukemia. Diagnosis of acute acalculous cholecystitis remains difficult during neutropenic period. We present two acute myeloblastic leukemia patients that developed acute acalculous cholecystitis during chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. They suffered from fever, vomiting and acute pain in the epigastrium. Ultrasound demonstrated an acalculous gallbladder. Surgical management was required in one patie...

  6. Immunoglobulin D multiple myeloma, plasma cell leukemia and chronic myelogenous leukemia in a single patient treated simultaneously with lenalidomide, bortezomib, dexamethasone and imatinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed Ali

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma (MM is a neoplastic lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by uncontrolled monoclonal plasma cell proliferation. Among different isotypes of MM, immunoglobulin D (IgD MM is very rare, representing only 1 to 2% of all isotypes. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML is a neoplastic myeloproliferative disorder of pluripotent hematopoietic stem cell, which is characterized by the uncontrolled proliferation of myeloid cells. An 88-year-old male was diagnosed simultaneously with IgD kappa MM and CML. A distinctive feature in this patient was the progression to plasma cell leukemia without any symptomatic myeloma stage. He was treated simultaneously with lenalidomide, bortezomib and imatinib. Synchronous occurrence of these rare hematological malignancies in a single patient is an exceedingly rare event. Multiple hypotheses to explain co-occurrence of CML and MM have been proposed; however, the exact etiological molecular pathophysiology remains elusive.

  7. Juvenile chronic myelogenous leukemia: report of the Italian Registry. Associazione Italiana di Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aricò, M; Bossi, G; Schirò, R; Galimberti, M; Longoni, D; Macchia, P; Miniero, R; Natale, D; Pession, A; Pillon, M

    1993-01-01

    Since juvenile chronic myeloid leukemia (JCML) represents no more than 2% of leukemia in children, clinical and investigative experience of this disorder has been limited. In order to evaluate the diagnostic criteria currently applied, to provide centralized facilities for blood culture and to collect data on treatment, and to propose a uniform treatment protocol in our country, a National Registry for JCML was recently established in the "Associazione Italiana di Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica" (AIEOP). Out of the 24 cases reported from 9/35 centres, 22 were considered sufficiently documented and were enrolled in the Registry. Clonogenic assay on marrow and peripheral blood cells was performed in all available cases. Common features were non-specific clinical (fever, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, lymphadenomegaly) and hematologic alterations (anemia, thrombocytopenia, leukocytosis usually < 50 x 10(9)/l, monocytosis, circulating immature granulocytes, increased HbF, normal karyotype). In 11 out of 11 cases, in vitro blood cultures showed the spontaneous growth of CFU-C in the absence of any exogenous source of colony-stimulating activity. Twelve of the 22 patients (55%) are alive (probability of survival 47.7%); most patients were treated according to an acute myeloid leukemia-directed schedule; 5/7 children treated with interferon were alive with disease after a median time of 29 months from diagnosis (range 8-95 months); 4/5 children who underwent bone marrow transplantation were alive in complete remission 10, 24, 42 and 118 months, after the diagnosis. Age < 1 year at presentation was the most significant prognostic factor in terms of probability of survival (80% vs 28%; p = 0.0024). JCML must be considered in young children for whom acute leukemia has been suspected but ruled out; in vitro cultures should be considered mandatory to confirm the diagnosis. Age less than one year at the presentation was associated with prolonged survival. Only bone marrow

  8. Oncogenes, protooncogenes, and tumor suppressor genes in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijiya, N; Gewirtz, A M

    1995-05-01

    In recent years, our understanding of normal human hematopoiesis has expanded greatly. We have increased our knowledge of regulatory growth factors, the receptors through which they act, and the secondary messengers involved in transducing the growth/differentiation signals from the cytoplasmic membrane to the nucleus. This knowledge has revealed potential mechanisms for inducing the neoplastic transformation of hematopoietic cells. This applies in particular to the role of viral oncogenes and cellular protooncogenes and, more recently, to the role of tumor suppressor genes. Protooncogenes are intimately involved in the processes of cell proliferation and differentiation. Therefore, any amplification, mutation, structural alteration, or change in transcriptional regulation of protooncogenes might lead to or be associated with induction of the malignant phenotype. Based on the importance of these genes in leukemogenesis and the maintenance of the malignant phenotype, it seems reasonable to hypothesize that targeted disruption of leukemogenic genes may be of therapeutic value.

  9. Decitabine With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-14

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Pleural effusions in patients with acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiz, Saadia A; Bashoura, Lara; Lei, Xiudong; Sampat, Keeran R; Brown, Tiffany C; Eapen, George A; Morice, Rodolfo C; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Jimenez, Carlos A

    2013-02-01

    Pleural effusions are rarely observed in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). Therefore the underlying etiology of pleural effusions and the efficacy and safety of pleural procedures in this population has not been well studied. In a retrospective review of cases from 1997 to 2007, we identified 111 patients with acute leukemia or MDS/MPN who underwent pleural procedures. Clinical characteristics were reviewed, and survival outcomes were estimated by Kaplan-Meier methods. A total of 270 pleural procedures were performed in 111 patients (69 AML, 27 ALL, 15 MDS/MPN). The main indications for pleural procedures were possible infection (49%) and respiratory symptoms (48%), and concomitant clinical symptoms included fever (34%), dyspnea (74%), chest pain (24%) and cough (37%). Most patients had active disease (61%). The most frequent etiology of pleural effusions was infection (47%), followed by malignancy (36%). Severe thrombocytopenia (platelet count < 20 × 10(3)/µL) was present in 43% of the procedures, yet the procedural complication rate was only 1.9%. Multivariate analysis revealed that older age, AML, MDS/MPN and active disease status were associated with a shorter median overall survival. Infection and malignant involvement are the most common causes of pleural effusion in patients with acute leukemia or MDS. After optimizing platelet count and coagulopathy, thoracentesis may be performed safely and with high diagnostic yield in this population. Survival in these patients is determined by the response to treatment of the hematologic malignancy.

  11. Alemtuzumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-20

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  12. The expression and clinical significance of survivin gene in leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王艳

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of survivin in leukemia and the prognostic significance in acute leukemia(AL). Methods The expression of survivin mRNA was measured in 105 AL and 21 chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients with semi-quantity reverse transcription (RT)-PCR.15 adults were tested as normal

  13. Nivolumab and Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-25

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  14. Traumatic stress in acute leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodin, Gary; Yuen, Dora; Mischitelle, Ashley; Minden, Mark D; Brandwein, Joseph; Schimmer, Aaron; Marmar, Charles; Gagliese, Lucia; Lo, Christopher; Rydall, Anne; Zimmermann, Camilla

    2013-01-01

    Objective Acute leukemia is a condition with an acute onset that is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. However, the psychological impact of this life-threatening condition and its intensive treatment has not been systematically examined. In the present study, we investigate the prevalence and correlates of post-traumatic stress symptoms in this population. Methods Patients with acute myeloid, lymphocytic, and promyelocytic leukemia who were newly diagnosed, recently relapsed, or treatment failures were recruited at a comprehensive cancer center in Toronto, Canada. Participants completed the Stanford Acute Stress Reaction Questionnaire, Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale, CARES Medical Interaction Subscale, and other psychosocial measures. A multivariate regression analysis was used to assess independent predictors of post-traumatic stress symptoms. Results Of the 205 participants, 58% were male, mean age was 50.1 ± 15.4 years, 86% were recently diagnosed, and 94% were receiving active treatment. The mean Stanford Acute Stress Reaction Questionnaire score was 30.2 ± 22.5, with 27 of 200 (14%) patients meeting criteria for acute stress disorder and 36 (18%) for subsyndromal acute stress disorder. Post-traumatic stress symptoms were associated with more physical symptoms, physical symptom distress, attachment anxiety, and perceived difficulty communicating with health-care providers, and poorer spiritual well-being (all p relationships with health-care providers, and with individual psychological characteristics. Longitudinal study is needed to determine the natural history, but these findings suggest that intervention may be indicated to alleviate or prevent traumatic stress in this population. PMID:22081505

  15. [Treatment of acute leukemias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, R; Gerecke, D

    1982-11-12

    The effective treatment of acute (myeloblastic and lymphoblastic) leukaemias depends on the induction of remissions as well as on the maintenance of these remissions. Whereas the use of anthracyclines and of cytosine arabinoside in different combinations notably increased the rate of induction of remissions, their maintenance was less successful until now. We present a scheme using, beside MTX and 6-MP, modified COAP regimes periodically every 3 months. The follow-up of 26 patients treated in this way is encouraging since nearly one third remained in full haematological remission after 3 years of observation.

  16. The Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østgård, Lene Sofie Granfeldt; Nørgaard, Jan Maxwell; Raaschou-Jensen, Klas Kræsten

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The main aim of the Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry (DNLR) was to obtain information about the epidemiology of the hematologic cancers acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). STUDY POPULATION: The registry...... was established in January 2000 by the Danish Acute Leukemia Group and has been expanded over the years. It includes adult AML patients diagnosed in Denmark since 2000, ALL patients diagnosed since 2005, and MDS patients diagnosed since 2010. The coverage of leukemia patients exceeds 99%, and the coverage of MDS...... years. To ensure this high coverage, completeness, and quality of data, linkage to the Danish Civil Registration System and the Danish National Registry of Patients, and several programmed data entry checks are used. CONCLUSION: The completeness and positive predictive values of the leukemia data have...

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute ... bleeding and forming blood clots. Smoking, previous chemotherapy treatment, and exposure to radiation may affect the risk ...

  18. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute ... bleeding and forming blood clots. Smoking, previous chemotherapy treatment, and exposure to radiation may affect the risk ...

  19. A case of chronic myelogenous leukemia in pregnancy characterized by a complex translocation t(9;22;11(q34;q11.2;q13

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surachit Kumar

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The management of chronic myelogenous leukemia during pregnancy requires balancing the well-being of the mother with that of the fetus. We report a case of a 26-year-old lady who was diagnosed with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML at 15 weeks gestation and who had an atypical chromosome t(9;22;11 (q34;q11.2;q13 translocation. She was observed through the remainder of the pregnancy and the disease remained stable; she delivered a normal boy. Treatment with imatinib mesylate was initiated shortly after delivery and she went into molecular complete remission. We discuss the course of the disease and suggest guidelines for managing pregnancy with respect to the currently available agents imatinib, dasatinib and nilotinib.

  20. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with gross hematuria

    OpenAIRE

    Kalbani, Naifain Al; Weitzman, Sheila; Abdelhaleem, Mohamed; Carcao, Manuel; Abla, Oussama

    2007-01-01

    A case of a six-year-old boy presenting with gross hematuria is reported. Investigations revealed the etiology of the hematuria to be thrombocytopenia in the setting of newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The diagnosis of leukemia was confirmed by bone marrow examination. The patient’s hematuria completely resolved with platelet transfusions. Although thrombocytopenia is a very common presenting feature of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, gross hematuria is exceedingly rare. Thus, thro...

  1. [Cord blood transplantation after successful treatment of brain abscess caused by Bacillus cereus in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, Hideyuki; Kawano, Tomoko; Tanaka, Masatugu; Kobayashi, Shoichi; Okabe, Gaichi; Maruta, Atsuo; Nagao, Takeshi; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki; Mori, Hiraku

    2006-11-01

    Central nervous system infection caused by Bacillus cereus is a rare condition, which often progresses rapidly and is fatal in immunocompromised patients. A 54-year-old woman with acute myelogenous leukemia fell into a coma with high fever during severe neutropenia while undergoing chemotherapy. A blood culture demonstrated the presence of B. cereus and magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple abnormal lesions in her brain. The patient was treated with meropenem and vancomycin, and recovered from the coma in a week. Antibiotic therapy was administered for seven weeks, and then she underwent cord blood transplantation for refractory acute myelogenous leukemia with successful engraftment without exacerbation of the brain abscess. This case demonstrates that brain abscess caused by B. cereus can be treated without surgical treatment.

  2. Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia Presenting as Leukemia Cutis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetha Narayanan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukemia cutis (LC is defined as infiltration of the skin by leukemic cells resulting in clinically recognizable cutaneous lesions. It is common in congenital leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia. However, LC has rarely been reported with mixed phenotypic acute leukemia (MPAL. We report the case of a lady who presented with erythematous papular and nodular lesions all over the body. Skin biopsy showed leukemic infiltration and bone marrow aspiration showed MPAL of the T/myeloid with monocytic differentiation lineage. This is the first report of an adult patient with MPAL of the T/myeloid with monocytic differentiation type presenting with leukemia cutis. She was started on chemotherapy with Hyper-CVAD. There is complete resolution of the skin lesions and she has achieved bone marrow remission after the first cycle of chemotherapy.

  3. Isorhamnetin 3-O-robinobioside from Nitraria retusa leaves enhance antioxidant and antigenotoxic activity in human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K562

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boubaker Jihed

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this report, the isorhamnetin 3-o-robinobioside and its original extract, the ethyl acetate extract, from Nitraria retusa leaves, were evaluated for their ability to induce antioxidant and antigenotoxic effects in human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line. Methods Nitraria retusa products properties were carried out by firstly evaluating their effects against lipid peroxidation induced by H2O2, using the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances species (TBARS assay, and proceeding to the assay of cellular antioxidant activity, then doing the comet assay. Results The isorhamnetin 3-o-robinobioside showed a protective effect against lipid peroxidation induced by H2O2. The same natural compound and ethyl acetate extract inhibited oxidation induced by 2,2′-azobis (2-amidinopropane dihydrochloride in human chronic myelogenous leukemia cells with respectively 50% inhibitory concentration values of 0.225 mg/ml and 0.31 mg/ml, reflecting a significant antioxidant potential. The same two products inhibited the genotoxicity induced by hydroxyl radicals in the same human cell line (by 77.77% at a concentration of 800 μg/ml and by 80.55% at a concentration of 1000 μg/ml respectively. Conclusions The isorhamnetin 3- o-robinobioside and its original extract, the ethyl acetate extract, from Nitraria retusa leaves, have a great antioxidant and antigenotoxic potential on human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K562.

  4. IDH mutations in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakheja, Dinesh; Konoplev, Sergej; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Chen, Weina

    2012-10-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a heterogeneous group of diseases. Mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) genes represent a novel class of point mutations in acute myeloid leukemia. These mutations prevent oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate and confer novel enzymatic activity, facilitating the reduction of α-ketoglutarate to d-2-hydroxyglutarate, a putative oncometabolite. IDH1/IDH2 mutations are heterozygous, and their combined frequency is approximately 17% in unselected acute myeloid leukemia cases, 27% in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia cases, and up to 67% in acute myeloid leukemia cases with cuplike nuclei. These mutations are largely mutually exclusive. Despite many similarities of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations, it is possible that they represent distinct molecular or clinical subgroups of acute myeloid leukemia. All known mutations involve arginine (R), in codon 132 of IDH1 or codon 140 or 172 of IDH2. IDH1(R132) and IDH2(R140) mutations are frequently accompanied by normal cytogenetics and NPM1 mutation, whereas IDH2(R172) is frequently the only mutation detected in acute myeloid leukemia. There is increasing evidence that the prognostic impact of IDH1/2 mutations varies according to the specific mutation and also depends on the context of concurrent mutations of other genes. IDH1(R132) mutation may predict poor outcome in a subset of patients with molecular low-risk acute myeloid leukemia, whereas IDH2(R172) mutations confer a poor prognosis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Expression of IDH1/2 mutants induces an increase in global DNA hypermethylation and inhibits TET2-induced cytosine 5-hydroxymethylation, DNA demethylation. These data suggest that IDH1/2 mutations constitute a distinct mutational class in acute myeloid leukemia, which affects the epigenetic state, an important consideration for the development of therapeutic agents.

  5. Cellular immune profiling after sequential clofarabine and lenalidomide for high risk myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Prachi; Klotz, Jeffrey; Dunavin, Neil; Lu, Kit; Koklanaris, Eleftheria; Draper, Debbie; Superata, Jeanine; Chinian, Fariba; Yu, Quan; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Wong, Susan; Muranski, Pawel; Barrett, A John; Ito, Sawa; Battiwalla, Minoo

    2017-01-01

    Patients with high risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) are commonly older with multiple co-morbidities, rendering them unsuitable for intensive induction chemotherapy or transplantation. We report preliminary cellular immune profiling of four cases receiving sequential clofarabine and lenalidomide for high risk MDS and AML in a phase I study. Our results highlight the potential of immune profiling for monitoring immune-modifying agents in high risk MDS and AML.

  6. Cellular immune profiling after sequential clofarabine and lenalidomide for high risk myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prachi Jain

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with high risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML are commonly older with multiple co-morbidities, rendering them unsuitable for intensive induction chemotherapy or transplantation. We report preliminary cellular immune profiling of four cases receiving sequential clofarabine and lenalidomide for high risk MDS and AML in a phase I study. Our results highlight the potential of immune profiling for monitoring immune-modifying agents in high risk MDS and AML.

  7. Quantification of BCR-ABL mRNA in Plasma/Serum of Patients with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miwako Narita, Anri Saito, Aya Kojima, Minami Iwabuchi, Naoya Satoh, Takayoshi Uchiyama, Akie Yamahira, Tatsuo Furukawa, Hirohito Sone, Masuhiro Takahashi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantification of tumor-associated mRNA extracted from blood cells/tissues containing tumor cells is used for evaluation of treatment efficacy or residual tumor cell burden in tumors including leukemia. However, this method using tumor cell-containing blood/tissue is difficult to evaluate the whole tumor cell burden in the body. In order to establish an efficient method to evaluate the whole tumor cell burden in the body, we tried to quantify tumor-associated mRNA existing in plasma/serum instead of leukemia cell-containing blood cells in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML and compared the levels of BCR-ABL mRNA between plasma/serum and peripheral blood cells. mRNA of BCR-ABL, WT1 or GAPDH (control molecule was detected by real-time RT-PCR using RNA extracted from plasma/serum of almost all the patients with CML. Copy numbers of BCR-ABL mRNA were significantly correlated between plasma/serum and peripheral blood cells. However, levels of BCR-ABL mRNA extracted from serum were low compared with those extracted with peripheral blood cells. The present findings suggest that although real-time RT-PCR of mRNA existing in plasma/serum could be used for evaluating the whole tumor cell burden in the body, it's required to establish an efficient method to quantify plasma/serum mRNA by nature without degrading during the procedure.

  8. Veliparib and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-19

    Accelerated Phase of Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With PML-RARA; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Vorinostat With or Without Isotretinoin in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphoma, or Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-16

    Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  10. Ipilimumab and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-12

    Chimerism; Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Recipient; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; RAEB-1; RAEB-2; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Novel Approach for Coexpression Analysis of E2F1–3 and MYC Target Genes in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengfeng Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML is characterized by tremendous amount of immature myeloid cells in the blood circulation. E2F1–3 and MYC are important transcription factors that form positive feedback loops by reciprocal regulation in their own transcription processes. Since genes regulated by E2F1–3 or MYC are related to cell proliferation and apoptosis, we wonder if there exists difference in the coexpression patterns of genes regulated concurrently by E2F1–3 and MYC between the normal and the CML states. Results. We proposed a method to explore the difference in the coexpression patterns of those candidate target genes between the normal and the CML groups. A disease-specific cutoff point for coexpression levels that classified the coexpressed gene pairs into strong and weak coexpression classes was identified. Our developed method effectively identified the coexpression pattern differences from the overall structure. Moreover, we found that genes related to the cell adhesion and angiogenesis properties were more likely to be coexpressed in the normal group when compared to the CML group. Conclusion. Our findings may be helpful in exploring the underlying mechanisms of CML and provide useful information in cancer treatment.

  12. Implication of the Autologous Immune System in BCR-ABL Transcript Variations in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Patients Treated with Imatinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, Geoffrey D; Lepoutre, Thomas; El Cheikh, Raouf; Bernard, Samuel; Ruby, Jérémy; Labussière-Wallet, Hélène; Nicolini, Franck E; Levy, Doron

    2015-10-01

    Imatinib and other tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) have improved treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML); however, most patients are not cured. Deeper mechanistic understanding may improve TKI combination therapies to better control the residual leukemic cell population. In analyzing our patients' data, we found that many patients who otherwise responded well to imatinib therapy still showed variations in their BCR-ABL transcripts. To investigate this phenomenon, we applied a mathematical model that integrates CML and an autologous immune response to the patients' data. We define an immune window or a range of leukemic loads for which the autologous immune system induces an improved response. Our modeling results suggest that, at diagnosis, a patient's leukemic load is able to partially or fully suppress the autologous immune response developed in a majority of patients, toward the CML clone(s). Imatinib therapy drives the leukemic population into the "immune window," allowing the patient's autologous immune cells to expand and eventually mount an efficient recognition of the residual leukemic burden. This response drives the leukemic load below this immune window, allowing the leukemic population to partially recover until another weaker immune response is initiated. Thus, the autologous immune response may explain the oscillations in BCR-ABL transcripts regularly observed in patients on imatinib. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Cells Contribute to the Stromal Myofibroblasts in Leukemic NOD/SCID Mouse In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke Shirasaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We recently reported that chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML cells converted into myofibroblasts to create a microenvironment for proliferation of CML cells in vitro. To analyze a biological contribution of CML-derived myofibroblasts in vivo, we observed the characters of leukemic nonobese diabetes/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID mouse. Bone marrow nonadherent mononuclear cells as well as human CD45-positive cells obtained from CML patients were injected to the irradiated NOD/SCID mice. When the chimeric BCR-ABL transcript was demonstrated in blood, human CML cells were detected in NOD/SCID murine bone marrow. And CML-derived myofibroblasts composed with the bone marrow-stroma, which produced significant amounts of human vascular endothelial growth factor A. When the parental CML cells were cultured with myofibroblasts separated from CML cell-engrafted NOD/SCID murine bone marrow, CML cells proliferated significantly. These observations indicate that CML cells make an adequate microenvironment for their own proliferation in vivo.

  14. The venom of the spider Macrothele raveni induces apoptosis in the myelogenous leukemia K562 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhonghua; Zhao, Yan; Li, Jing; Xu, Shiyan; Liu, Changjun; Zhu, Yanghui; Liang, Songping

    2012-08-01

    Spider venoms are a rich source of bioactive compounds with therapeutic potential. In traditional Chinese medicine, spiders and spider venoms have been used in the treatment of various ailments. In the present study, the venom of the spider Macrothele raveni potently suppressed cell growth in the myelogenous leukemia K562 cell line in a dose and time-dependent manner with an IC(50) of 5.1 μg/mL. The venom also had a low inhibitory effect on human lymphocytes with an IC(50) of approximately 36.4 μg/mL, indicating that the venom is relatively selective for leukemic cells. Venom treated K562 cells showed typical morphological indicators of apoptosis including condensation of nuclei and fragmentation of DNA. Annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide dual staining further demonstrated that the venom had potent apoptogenic activity. Venom treatment induced caspase 3 and caspase 8 activation in K562 cells and promoted PARP cleavage. The present results indicate that the venom of the spider M. raveni potently and selectively suppresses the growth of K562 cells by inducing apoptosis via caspase 3 and caspase 8 mediated signaling pathways.

  15. Real-time analysis of imatinib- and dasatinib-induced effects on chronic myelogenous leukemia cell interaction with fibronectin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Obr

    Full Text Available Attachment of stem leukemic cells to the bone marrow extracellular matrix increases their resistance to chemotherapy and contributes to the disease persistence. In chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML, the activity of the fusion BCR-ABL kinase affects adhesion signaling. Using real-time monitoring of microimpedance, we studied in detail the kinetics of interaction of human CML cells (JURL-MK1, MOLM-7 and of control BCR-ABL-negative leukemia cells (HEL, JURKAT with fibronectin-coated surface. The effect of two clinically used kinase inhibitors, imatinib (a relatively specific c-ABL inhibitor and dasatinib (dual ABL/SRC family kinase inhibitor, on cell binding to fibronectin is described. Both imatinib and low-dose (several nM dasatinib reinforced CML cell interaction with fibronectin while no significant change was induced in BCR-ABL-negative cells. On the other hand, clinically relevant doses of dasatinib (100 nM had almost no effect in CML cells. The efficiency of the inhibitors in blocking the activity of BCR-ABL and SRC-family kinases was assessed from the extent of phosphorylation at autophosphorylation sites. In both CML cell lines, SRC kinases were found to be transactivated by BCR-ABL. In the intracellular context, EC50 for BCR-ABL inhibition was in subnanomolar range for dasatinib and in submicromolar one for imatinib. EC50 for direct inhibition of LYN kinase was found to be about 20 nM for dasatinib and more than 10 µM for imatinib. Cells pretreated with 100 nM dasatinib were still able to bind to fibronectin and SRC kinases are thus not necessary for the formation of cell-matrix contacts. However, a minimal activity of SRC kinases might be required to mediate the increase in cell adhesivity induced by BCR-ABL inhibition. Indeed, active (autophosphorylated LYN was found to localize in cell adhesive structures which were visualized using interference reflection microscopy.

  16. Immunological effects of donor lymphocyte infusion in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia relapsing after bone marrow transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castro F.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (alloBMT is the only curative therapy for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML. This success is explained by the delivery of high doses of antineoplastic agents followed by the rescue of marrow function and the induction of graft-versus-leukemia reaction mediated by allogeneic lymphocytes against host tumor cells. This reaction can also be induced by donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI producing remission in most patients with CML who relapse after alloBMT. The immunological mechanisms involved in DLI therapy are poorly understood. We studied five CML patients in the chronic phase, who received DLI after relapsing from an HLA-identical BMT. Using flow cytometry we evaluated cellular activation and apoptosis, NK cytotoxicity, lymphocytes producing cytokines (IL-2, IL-4 and IFN-gamma, and unstimulated (in vivo lymphocyte proliferation. In three CML patients who achieved hematological and/or cytogenetic remission after DLI we observed an increase of the percent of activation markers on T and NK cells (CD3/DR, CD3/CD25 and CD56/DR, of lymphocytes producing IL-2 and IFN-gamma, of NK activity, and of in vivo lymphocyte proliferation. These changes were not observed consistently in two of the five patients who did not achieve complete remission with DLI. The percent of apoptotic markers (Fas, FasL and Bcl-2 on lymphocytes and CD34-positive cells did not change after DLI throughout the different study periods. Taken together, these preliminary results suggest that the therapeutic effect of DLI in the chronic phase of CML is mediated by classic cytotoxic and proliferative events involving T and NK cells but not by the Fas pathway of apoptosis.

  17. Successful pregnancy in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegre, A; Chunchurreta, R; Rodriguez-Alarcon, J; Cruz, E; Prada, M

    1982-01-01

    A successful pregnancy with a normal baby in a woman with acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with daunorubicin from the ninth week of gestation is reported. Daunorubicin is an effective agent against this leukemia during pregnancy. That daunorubicin may be safely used, when required during the early gestation, is suggested.

  18. Childhood central nervous system leukemia: historical perspectives, current therapy, and acute neurological sequelae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laningham, Fred H. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Division of Diagnostic Imaging, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center, Memphis, TN (United States); Kun, Larry E. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center, Memphis, TN (United States); Reddick, Wilburn E.; Ogg, Robert J. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Division of Translational Imaging Research, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); Morris, E.B. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Oncology, Memphis, TN (United States); Pui, Ching-Hon [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Oncology, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2007-11-15

    During the past three decades, improvements in the treatment of childhood leukemia have resulted in high cure rates, particularly for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Unfortunately, successful therapy has come with a price, as significant morbidity can result from neurological affects which harm the brain and spinal cord. The expectation and hope is that chemotherapy, as a primary means of CNS therapy, will result in acceptable disease control with less CNS morbidity than has been observed with combinations of chemotherapy and radiotherapy over the past several decades. In this review we discuss the poignant, historical aspects of CNS leukemia therapy, outline current methods of systemic and CNS leukemia therapy, and present imaging findings we have encountered in childhood leukemia patients with a variety of acute neurological conditions. A major objective of our research is to understand the neuroimaging correlates of acute and chronic effects of cancer and therapy. Specific features related to CNS leukemia and associated short-term toxicities, both disease- and therapy-related, are emphasized in this review with the specific neuroimaging findings. Specific CNS findings are similarly important when treating acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), and details of leukemic involvement and toxicities are also presented in this entity. Despite contemporary treatment approaches which favor the use of chemotherapy (including intrathecal therapy) over radiotherapy in the treatment of CNS leukemia, children still occasionally experience morbid neurotoxicity. Standard neuroimaging is sufficient to identify a variety of neurotoxic sequelae in children, and often suggest specific etiologies. Specific neuroimaging findings frequently indicate a need to alter antileukemia therapy. It is important to appreciate that intrathecal and high doses of systemic chemotherapy are not innocuous and are associated with acute, specific, recognizable, and often serious neurological

  19. Acute acalculous cholecystitis complicating chemotherapy for acute myeloblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfa Kassar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a rare complication in the treatment of acute myeloblastic leukemia. Diagnosis of acute acalculous cholecystitis remains difficult during neutropenic period. We present two acute myeloblastic leukemia patients that developed acute acalculous cholecystitis during chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. They suffered from fever, vomiting and acute pain in the epigastrium. Ultrasound demonstrated an acalculous gallbladder. Surgical management was required in one patient and conservative treatment was attempted in the other patient. None treatment measures were effective and two patients died. Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a serious complication in neutropenic patients. Earlier diagnosis could have expedited the management of these patients.

  20. Acute myeloid leukemia presenting as galactorrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, K. Rakul; Devi, R. Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) presents with symptoms related to pancytopenia (weakness, infections, bleeding diathesis) and organ infiltration with leukemic cells. Galactorrhea is an uncommon manifestation of AML. We report a case of AML presenting with galactorrhea. PMID:27695173

  1. Acute myeloid leukemia presenting as galactorrhea

    OpenAIRE

    Nambiar, K. Rakul; Nair, Sreejith G.; Devi, R. Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) presents with symptoms related to pancytopenia (weakness, infections, bleeding diathesis) and organ infiltration with leukemic cells. Galactorrhea is an uncommon manifestation of AML. We report a case of AML presenting with galactorrhea.

  2. Tanespimycin in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Leukemia or Solid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Disseminated Neuroblastoma; Metastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Osteosarcoma; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Osteosarcoma

  3. Clinical advances in the management of chronic myelogenous leukemia: focus on bosutinib and patient considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sweet K

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Kendra Sweet,1 Javier Pinilla-Ibarz,1 Ling Zhang21Malignant Hematology, 2Hematopathology, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USAAbstract: The treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia has changed significantly over the past 15 years, and as of now, there are five BCR-ABL1 (breakpoint cluster region-Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors that have gained approval for treatment of this disease. All five are very effective drugs, and the decision surrounding which to use in specific patients is based on numerous factors. Bosutinib is one of the newer tyrosine kinase inhibitors to gain approval, and has been studied in the first-line setting as well as after failure of other tyrosine kinase inhibitors. It is an SRC-ABL1 (steroid receptor co-activator-ABL1 inhibitor that works in the presence of most kinase domain mutations. The primary side effects of bosutinib are gastrointestinal upsets. In the appropriate clinical setting, bosutinib can be considered a valuable addition to the armamentarium of treatments available for chronic myeloid leukemia.Keywords: chronic myeloid leukemia, bosutinib, treatment options

  4. High-Dose Busulfan and High-Dose Cyclophosphamide Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Multiple Myeloma, or Recurrent Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; De Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent

  5. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-07

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  6. Pentamidine sensitizes chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Geng; Jiang, Jikai; Liu, Xiao-shan

    2012-11-01

    Pentamidine (PMD) is an anti-protozoa drug with potential anticancer activity. Here we show that PMD at clinically achievable plasma drug concentrations slightly inhibited the growth of human leukemia cell lines. PMD close to its therapeutic doses sensitized TRAIL-resistant K562 cells to the cytokine and potentiated TRAIL-induced apoptosis through activation of caspase-8 and -3. When we investigated the underlying mechanism, we observed that treatment with PMD increased DR5 expression at both mRNA and protein levels and down-regulated anti-apoptotic XIAP and Mcl-1 protein levels. This study provides a rationale for a more in-depth exploration into the combined treatment with PMD and TRAIL as a valuable strategy for leukemia therapy.

  7. The Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østgård, Lene Sofie Granfeldt; Nørgaard, Jan Maxwell; Raaschou-Jensen, Klas Kræsten;

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The main aim of the Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry (DNLR) was to obtain information about the epidemiology of the hematologic cancers acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). STUDY POPULATION: The registry...... patients is currently 90%. MAIN VARIABLES AND DESCRIPTIVE DATA: Approximately, 250 AML patients, 25 ALL patients, and 230 MDS patients are registered in the DNLR every year. In January 2015, the registry included detailed patient characteristics, disease characteristics, treatment characteristics...... years. To ensure this high coverage, completeness, and quality of data, linkage to the Danish Civil Registration System and the Danish National Registry of Patients, and several programmed data entry checks are used. CONCLUSION: The completeness and positive predictive values of the leukemia data have...

  8. Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  10. Acute Myeloid Leukemia - Genetics Home Reference [Genetics Home Reference (Conditions)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Conditions Genes Chromosomes Handbook Glossary Resources Conditions > Acute Myeloid...te myeloid leukemia with mutated CEBPA Fanconi anemia You may also search Genetics Home Reference for Acut...e Myeloid Leukemia for additional information. Published : October 27, 2014 Acute Myeloid Leukemia - Genetics Home Reference ...

  11. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and G-CSF in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Constitutive Activation of AKT Pathway Inhibits TNF-induced Apoptosis in Mitochondrial DNA-Deficient human myelogenous leukemia ML-1a

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Seigo; Naito, Akihiro; Asano, Takayuki; Evans, Teresa T; Reddy, Shrikanth A.G.; Higuchi, Masahiro

    2008-01-01

    TNF plus protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide induced apoptosis in human myelogenous leukemia ML-1a but not in C19, respiration minus mitochondrial DNA deficient C19 cells, derived from ML-1a. To investigate how mitochondrial DNA depletion inhibits apoptosis, we investigated AKT. Both AKT and its phosphorylated form were observed only in C19, indicating that depletion of mtDNA increased protein and the active form of AKT. Treatment of C19 with LY294002, which inhibits PI-3 kinase and inh...

  14. Splenic hemochromatosis incidentally found on Tc-99m MDP bone scan in a chronic myelogenous leukemia patient who received bone marrow transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Byeong Cheol; Seo, Ji Hyoung; Bae, Jin Ho; Jeong, Sin Young; Lee, Jae Tae; Lee, Kyu Bo [School of Medicine, Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-01

    Tc-99m MDP bone scan was performed to evaluate a generalized bone pain in a 24-year-old male chronic myelogenous leukemia patient who received bone marrow transplantation at 7 months ago. The patient had received large amounts of blood transfusion for managing symptoms related to anemia. Bone scan revealed substantial splenic tracer uptake. Magnetic resonance image and laboratory evidence of hemochromatosis suggests that the presence of large quantities of iron in the spleen of this patient may have been responsible for the splenic uptake of the bone scanning agent. The authors report a c ase of splenic hemochromatosis incidentally found on Tc-99m MDP bone scan.

  15. Acute promyelocytic leukemia and pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giagounidis, A A; Beckmann, M W; Giagounidis, A S; Aivado, M; Emde, T; Germing, U; Riehs, T; Heyll, A; Aul, C

    2000-04-01

    In acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), the use of all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) as a differentiating agent induces complete remission in a high percentage of patients. In pregnancy, however, this drug bears the risk of severe teratogenicity to the child. We report the case of a 23-yr-old woman at 21 weeks' gestation suffering from APL. She was treated with ATRA (45 mg/m2) for 40 d and two courses of standard chemotherapy. The mother achieved complete remission within 22 d of treatment. Fetal development was normal, and a healthy premature girl was born in the 35th week of pregnancy. In a review of the literature we have identified 14 cases of APL in pregnancy treated with ATRA alone or in combination with chemotherapy. ATRA has been used as early as in the 3rd week of gestation and in no case have malformations or other teratogenic effects occurred. Side-effects, however, ranged from fetal cardiac arrhythmias to induction of labour. Although known to exhibit severe teratogenic effects during the first trimester of pregnancy, ATRA seems to be reasonably safe during the second and third trimesters in the treatment of APL. However, careful obstetric follow-up is mandatory regarding fetal cardiac complications.

  16. Management of acute myeloid leukemia during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avivi, Irit; Brenner, Benjamin

    2014-06-01

    Diagnosis of acute leukemia during pregnancy presents significant medical challenges. Pancytopenia, caused by bone marrow substitution with leukemic cells, impairs maternal and fetal health. Chemotherapeutic agents required to be immediately used to save the mother's life are likely to adversely affect fetal development and outcome, especially if administered at an early gestational stage. Patients diagnosed with acute leukemia during the first trimester are, therefore, recommended to undergo pregnancy termination. At later gestational stages, antileukemic therapy can be administered, although in this case, fetal outcome is still associated with increased incidence of growth restriction and loss. Special attention to the issue of future reproduction, adopting a personalized fertility preservation approach, is required. This article addresses these subjects, presenting women diagnosed with acute myeloid and acute promyelocytic leukemia in pregnancy. The rarity of this event, resulting in insufficient data, emphasizes the need for collaborative efforts to optimize management of this complicated clinical condition.

  17. Bortezomib in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-30

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Relationship between serum cholesterol and low dense lipoprotein receptor activity of patients with acute myelogenous leukemia%急性髓性白血病患者血清胆固醇水平变化 与低密度脂蛋白受体活性的关系研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李蔚; 彭军; 张茂宏; 徐松德

    2001-01-01

    测定了52例初发未治急性髓性白血病(AML)患者血清胆固醇浓度及其外周血白血病细胞对125I-低密度脂蛋白(125I-LDL)的降解率,结果显示两者呈负相关,白细胞数及125I-LDL降解率较高者血清胆固醇浓度较低,化疗后,随着外周血白血病细胞消失,血清胆固醇及LDL胆固醇水平升高。据此推测AML患者的低胆固醇血症可能归因于白血病细胞的LDL受体活性增高,白血病细胞对LDL的高摄取及降解为利用LDL作为化疗药物的载体靶向治疗白血病提供了新思路。%The serum cholesterol concentration and the rates of degradationof 125 I-low density lipoprotein(125I-LDL)by isolated leukemic cells of 52 patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia at diagnosis were assayed.The results showed that the lowest serum cholesterol concentrations were found in the patients with very high rates of cellular degradation of 125 I-LDL.After chemotherapy,both LDL cholesterol and total serum cholesterol levels rosed concomitantly with the fall in white blood cell counts.This suggests that a high receptor-mediated uptake and degradation of LDL by the leukemic cells may be the cause of hypocholesterolaemia in acute myeloblastic leukemia.LDL-receptor activity in leukemic cells may provide a basis for therapeutic approaches.

  19. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-29

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Predictors of Neuropsychological Change in Patients with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Mary-Ellen; Chang, Grace; Jones, Jennifer A.; Antin, Joseph R.; Orav, E. John

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the course of neuropsychological functioning in patients with chronic myelogeous leukemia (n = 91) or myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 15) who underwent standard treatment for their disease or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) at baseline, 12 months, and 18 months post-treatment. At baseline, 23% of the participants (n = 75) in the longitudinal sample had Z-scores on at least one of the neuropsychological tests that were <1.4. Participants in the study showed improvement over baseline at the 12 and 18 months assessments. The average Z-scores for the six cognitive domains in the longitudinal data set over the course of the study ranged from −0.89 to 0.59. Significant predictors of change in neuropsychological test scores included age, with older participants showing less improvement over time. Other predictors included baseline cognitive domains (language, memory, and attention), previous cocaine use, disease status, intelligence quotient, and quality of life measures. Findings support previous studies in patients with hematological malignancies who showed cognitive impairments at baseline prior to HSCT. However, there was little evidence for further cognitive decline over the course of 18 months. PMID:23391504

  1. Azacitidine With or Without Entinostat in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. AR-42 and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-21

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Psychological Risk Factors in Acute Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouva M.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Several theoretical models have been occasionally proposed to account for the involvement of psychological factors in cancer genesis. Family environment and relations as well as certain personality traits were correlated to cancer onset. However, little is known in the case of acute leukemia. The present study examined family environment, state-trait anxiety, hostility and the direction of hostility as well as alexithymia in 41 acute leukemia patients and their first degree relatives (70. In accordance with previous findings, the present results showed that family cohesion, conflict and organization as well as guilt, state anxiety and alexithymia were significant risk factors for the development of the disease.

  4. Targeting etoposide to acute myelogenous leukaemia cells using nanostructured lipid carriers coated with transferrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajavinia, Amir; Varshosaz, Jaleh; Jafarian Dehkordi, Abbas

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the diverse properties of transferrin (Tf)-conjugated nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) prepared using three different fatty amines, including stearylamine (SA), dodecylamine (DA) and spermine (SP), and two different methods for Tf coupling. Etoposide-loaded NLCs were prepared by an emulsion-solvent evaporation method followed by probe sonication. Chemical coupling of NLCs with Tf was mediated by an amide linkage between the surface-exposed amino group of the fatty amine and the carboxyl group of the protein. The physical coating was performed in a Ringer-Hepes buffer medium. NLCs were characterized by their particle size, zeta potential, polydispersity index, drug entrapment percentage, drug release profiles and Tf-coupling efficiency. The cytotoxicity of NLCs on K562 acute myelogenous leukaemia cells was studied by MTT assay, and their cellular uptake was studied by a flow cytometry method. SA-containing NLCs showed the lowest particle size, the highest zeta potential and the largest coupling efficiency values. The drug entrapment percentage and the zeta potential decreased after Tf coupling, but the average particle size increased. SP-containing formulations released their drug contents comparatively slower than SA- or DA-containing NLCs. Unconjugated NLCs released moderately more drug than Tf-NLCs. Flow cytometry studies revealed enhanced cellular uptake of Tf-NLCs compared to unconjugated ones. Blocking Tf receptors resulted in a significantly higher cell survival rate for Tf-NLCs. The highest cytotoxic activity was observed in the chemically coupled SA-containing nanoparticles, with an IC50 value of 15-fold lower than free etoposide.

  5. Acute myeloid leukemia in the pregnant patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Xavier

    2015-08-01

    Although acute myeloid leukemia (AML) mostly occurs in older patients, it could be seen in women of childbearing age. It is therefore not surprising that in some patients, the management of AML will be complicated by a coexistent pregnancy. However, the association of leukemia and pregnancy is uncommon. Its incidence is estimated to be 1 in 75,000-100,000 pregnancies. During pregnancy, most leukemias are acute: two-thirds are myeloid and one-third are lymphoblastic. There is no standard approach for this clinical dilemma, in part because of variables such as the type of AML, the seriousness of the symptoms, and the patient's personal beliefs. In many cases, the diagnostic workup has to be altered because of the pregnancy, and often available treatments have varying risks to the fetus. While chemotherapy is reported to have some risks during the first trimester, it is admitted that it can be administered safely during the second and the third trimesters.

  6. Granulocyte Colony-stimulating Factor-primed Bone Marrow: An Excellent Stem-cell Source for Transplantation in Acute Myelocytic Leukemia and Chronic Myelocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhang Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Steady-state bone marrow (SS-BM and granulocyte colony-stimulating growth factor-primed BM/peripheral blood stem-cell (G-BM/G-PBSC are the main stem-cell sources used in allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Here, we evaluated the treatment effects of SS-BM and G-BM/G-PBSC in human leucocyte antigen (HLA-identical sibling transplantation. Methods: A total of 226 patients (acute myelogenous leukemia-complete remission 1, chronic myelogenous leukemia-chronic phase 1 received SS-BM, G-BM, or G-PBSC from an HLA-identical sibling. Clinical outcomes (graft-versus-host disease [GVHD], overall survival, transplant-related mortality [TRM], and leukemia-free survival [LFS] were analyzed. Results: When compared to SS-BM, G-BM gave faster recovery time to neutrophil or platelet (P 0.05. Conclusions: G-CSF-primed bone marrow shared the advantages of G-PBSC and SS-BM. We conclude that G-BM is an excellent stem-cell source that may be preferable to G-PBSC or SS-BM in patients receiving HLA-identical sibling hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

  7. Treatment strategies in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han Li-na, [No Value; Zhou Jin, [No Value; Schuringa, Jan Jacob; Vellenga, Edo

    2011-01-01

    Objective To summarize the risk stratification and current treatment strategies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and discuss the role of emerging novel agents that might be applied in future clinical trials. Data sources The data in this article were collected from PubMed database with relevant Engl

  8. Treatment strategies in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han Li-na, [No Value; Zhou Jin, [No Value; Schuringa, Jan Jacob; Vellenga, Edo

    2011-01-01

    Objective To summarize the risk stratification and current treatment strategies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and discuss the role of emerging novel agents that might be applied in future clinical trials. Data sources The data in this article were collected from PubMed database with relevant

  9. Genetics Home Reference: acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a shortage of normal white and red blood cells and platelets in the body, which causes many of the signs and symptoms of the condition. People with acute promyelocytic leukemia are especially susceptible to developing bruises, small red dots under the skin (petechiae), nosebleeds, bleeding ...

  10. Cytarabine dose for acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Löwenberg (Bob); T. Pabst (Thomas); E. Vellenga (Edo); W. van Putten; H.C. Schouten (Harry); C. Graux (Carlos); A. Ferrant (Augustin); P. Sonneveld (Pieter); B.J. Biemond (Bart); A. Gratwohl (Alois); G.E. de Greef (Georgine); L.F. Verdonck (Leo); M.R. Schaafsma (Martijn); M. Gregor (Michael); M. Theobald; U. Schanz (Urs); J. Maertens (Johan); G.J. Ossenkoppele (Gert)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Cytarabine (ara-C) is an important drug in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). High-dose cytarabine (2000 to 3000 mg per square meter of body-surface area) is toxic but results in higher rates of relapse-free survival than does the conventional dose of 100 to 400 m

  11. Cytarabine Dose for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lowenberg, Bob; Pabst, Thomas; Vellenga, Edo; van Putten, Wim; Schouten, Harry C.; Graux, Carlos; Ferrant, Augustin; Sonneveld, Pieter; Biemond, Bart J.; Gratwohl, Alois; de Greef, Georgine E.; Verdonck, Leo F.; Schaafsma, Martijn R.; Gregor, Michael; Theobald, Matthias; Schanz, Urs; Maertens, Johan; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cytarabine (ara-C) is an important drug in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). High-dose cytarabine (2000 to 3000 mg per square meter of body-surface area) is toxic but results in higher rates of relapse-free survival than does the conventional dose of 100 to 400 mg per square

  12. 47,XYY karyotype in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanduz, S; Aktan, M; Ozturk, S; Tutkan, G; Cefle, K; Pekcelen, Y

    1998-10-01

    A case of acute myelomonocytic leukemia (AMMoL; M4) with a 47,XYY karyotype is reported. This chromosome aneuploidy was found in both bone marrow cells and mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes. The contribution of XYY chromosomal constitution in the pathogenesis of AMMoL is controversial.

  13. Molecular Insights in MLL Rearranged Acute Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W. Stam (Ronald)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractAcute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in infants (<1 year of age) is characterized by a high incidence (~80%) of rearrangements of the MLL gene, resistance to several important chemotherapeutic drugs, and a poor treatment outcome. With overall survival rates for infant ALL not exceeding 50%

  14. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-04

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, C; Hofmann, Julian; Burmeister, T;

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) gene are associated with high-risk infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. We used long-distance inverse-polymerase chain reaction to characterize the chromosomal rearrangement of individual acute leukemia ...

  16. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Juvenile Myelomonocytic ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or made in a laboratory are used to boost, direct, or restore the body’s natural defenses against ... may include the following: Combination chemotherapy plus central nervous system sanctuary therapy with intrathecal chemotherapy . A clinical ...

  17. Caspofungin Acetate or Fluconazole in Preventing Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-31

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Fungal Infection; Neutropenia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  18. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzbieta Gocek

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA, which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17(q22;q12 chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS. Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML.

  19. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gocek, Elzbieta; Marcinkowska, Ewa, E-mail: ema@cs.uni.wroc.pl [Department of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, ul Tamka 2, Wroclaw 50-137 (Poland)

    2011-05-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17)(q22;q12) chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D) is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs) which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML.

  20. Imatinib-induced postoperative periorbital purpura: GASP (Gleevec-Associated Surgical Purpura) in a woman with imatinib-treated chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzalone, C Lane; Cohen, Philip R; Kurzrock, Razelle; Cortes, Jorge E

    2014-01-15

    Imatinib mesylate is a selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor used in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia. Ocular side effects of imatinib include periorbital edema, which may become so severe as to obstruct the visual field. The purpose of this case study is to describe the clinical characteristics of imatinib- induced postoperative periorbital purpura. We retrospectively reviewed the medical literature using PubMed, searching the terms edema, Gleevec, imatinib, periorbital, postoperative and purpura. Patient reports and previous reviews of the subject were critically assessed and the salient features are presented. Three patients have undergone surgery to reduce the imatinib-induced periorbital edema; two of these individuals have developed imatinib-induced postoperative periorbital purpura. We recommend discontinuing imatinib usage one week prior to periorbital surgery and not resuming therapy until the eighth postoperative day.

  1. Mobilized peripheral blood stem cells compared with bone marrow from HLA-identical siblings for reduced-intensity conditioning transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia in complete remission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagler, Arnon; Labopin, Myriam; Shimoni, Avichai;

    2012-01-01

    to compare the outcome of mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) (n = 1430) vs. bone marrow (BM) (n = 107) for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients with complete remission that underwent RIC-alloSCT from compatible sibling donors. The leukemia features, the disease status, and the time from......, relapse, and NRM when comparing PBSC to BM grafts from sibling donors following RIC conditioning. This is the first study comparing PBSC to BM grafts in the RIC setting, analyzing a homogeneous population of patients with AML in remission. Whether PBSC should be preferred for advanced phases...

  2. Atypical Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and given back to the patient through an infusion . These reinfused stem cells grow into (and restore) ... include transfusion therapy or drug therapy , such as antibiotics to fight infection . Targeted therapy Targeted therapy is ...

  3. Cholecalciferol in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Intensive Induction Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-18

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Granulocyte Colony-stimulating Factor-primed Bone Marrow: An Excellent Stem-cell Source for Transplantation in Acute Myelocytic Leukemia and Chronic Myelocytic Leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuhang Li; Min Jiang; Chen Xu; Jianlin Chen; Botao Li; Jun Wang; Jiangwei Hu

    2015-01-01

    Background:Steady-state bone marrow (SS-BM) and granulocyte colony-stimulating growth factor-primed BM/peripheral blood stem-cell (G-BM/G-PBSC) are the main stem-cell sources used in allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.Here,we evaluated the treatment effects of SS-BM and G-BM/G-PBSC in human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling transplantation.Methods:A total of 226 patients (acute myelogenous leukemia-complete remission 1,chronic myelogenous leukemia-chronic phase 1) received SS-BM,G-BM,or G-PBSC from an HLA-identical sibling.Clinical outcomes (graft-versus-host disease [GVHD],overall survival,transplant-related mortality [TRM],and leukemia-free survival [LFS]) were analyzed.Results:When compared to SS-BM,G-BM gave faster recovery time to neutrophil or platelet (P < 0.05).Incidence of grade Ⅲ-Ⅳ acute GVHD and extensive chronic GVHD (cGVHD) was lower than seen with SS-BM (P < 0.05) and similar to G-PBSC.Although the incidence of cGVHD in the G-BM group was similar to SS-BM,both were lower than G-PBSC (P < 0.05).G-BM and G-PBSC exhibited similar survival,LFS,and TRM,but were significantly different from SS-BM (P < 0.05).There were no significant differences in leukemia relapse rates among the groups (P > 0.05).Conclusions:G-CSF-primed bone marrow shared the advantages of G-PBSC and SS-BM.We conclude that G-BM is an excellent stem-cell source that may be preferable to G-PBSC or SS-BM in patients receiving HLA-identical sibling hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

  5. Jellyfish extract induces apoptotic cell death through the p38 pathway and cell cycle arrest in chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Choong-Hwan; Abekura, Fukushi; Park, Jun-Young; Park, Nam Gyu; Chang, Young-Chae; Lee, Young-Choon; Chung, Tae-Wook; Ha, Ki-Tae; Son, Jong-Keun

    2017-01-01

    Jellyfish species are widely distributed in the world’s oceans, and their population is rapidly increasing. Jellyfish extracts have several biological functions, such as cytotoxic, anti-microbial, and antioxidant activities in cells and organisms. However, the anti-cancer effect of Jellyfish extract has not yet been examined. We used chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells to evaluate the mechanisms of anti-cancer activity of hexane extracts from Nomura’s jellyfish in vitro. In this study, jellyfish are subjected to hexane extraction, and the extract is shown to have an anticancer effect on chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells. Interestingly, the present results show that jellyfish hexane extract (Jellyfish-HE) induces apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. To identify the mechanism(s) underlying Jellyfish-HE-induced apoptosis in K562 cells, we examined the effects of Jellyfish-HE on activation of caspase and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), which are responsible for cell cycle progression. Induction of apoptosis by Jellyfish-HE occurred through the activation of caspases-3,-8 and -9 and phosphorylation of p38. Jellyfish-HE-induced apoptosis was blocked by a caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD. Moreover, during apoptosis in K562 cells, p38 MAPK was inhibited by pretreatment with SB203580, an inhibitor of p38. SB203580 blocked jellyfish-HE-induced apoptosis. Additionally, Jellyfish-HE markedly arrests the cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase. Therefore, taken together, the results imply that the anti-cancer activity of Jellyfish-HE may be mediated apoptosis by induction of caspases and activation of MAPK, especially phosphorylation of p38, and cell cycle arrest at the Go/G1 phase in K562 cells. PMID:28133573

  6. Phenotypic, genotypic, and functional characterization of normal and acute myeloid leukemia-derived marrow endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, Russell J; Azadniv, Mitra; Guo, Naxin; Acklin, Joshua; Lacagnina, Kimberly; Coppage, Myra; Liesveld, Jane L

    2016-05-01

    In addition to participation in homing, egress, and transmigration of hematopoietic cells, marrow endothelium also contributes to cell proliferation and survival. Endothelial cells from multiple vascular beds are able to prevent spontaneous or therapy-induced apoptosis in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) blasts. Marrow-derived endothelial cells from leukemia patients have not been well-characterized, and in this work, endothelial cells were purified from marrow aspirates from normal subjects or from newly diagnosed AML patients to compare these cells phenotypically and functionally. By reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, these cells express CD31, Tie-2, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), supporting endothelial origin. They take up acetyl low-density lipoprotein and are able to form tubular structures. Culture of AML cells with endothelial cells from both normal and AML subjects supported adhesion, transmigration, and leukemia colony-forming unit outgrowth. RNA-sequencing analysis revealed 130 genes significantly up- or downregulated in AML-derived endothelial cells as compared with those derived from normal marrow. The genes differentially expressed (p phenotype and function to their normal marrow-derived counterparts, but genomic analysis suggests a differential signature with altered expression of genes, which could play a role in leukemogenesis or leukemia cell maintenance in the marrow microenvironment. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Global characteristics of childhood acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Samad, A; Pombo-de-Oliveira, M S; Scelo, G; Smith, M T; Feusner, J; Wiemels, J L; Metayer, C

    2015-03-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) comprises approximately 5-10% of childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases in the US. While variation in this percentage among other populations was noted previously, global patterns of childhood APL have not been thoroughly characterized. In this comprehensive review of childhood APL, we examined its geographic pattern and the potential contribution of environmental factors to observed variation. In 142 studies (spanning >60 countries) identified, variation was apparent-de novo APL represented from 2% (Switzerland) to >50% (Nicaragua) of childhood AML in different geographic regions. Because a limited number of previous studies addressed specific environmental exposures that potentially underlie childhood APL development, we gathered 28 childhood cases of therapy-related APL, which exemplified associations between prior exposures to chemotherapeutic drugs/radiation and APL diagnosis. Future population-based studies examining childhood APL patterns and the potential association with specific environmental exposures and other risk factors are needed.

  9. Cytogenetic patterns in acute nonlymphocytic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testa, J.R.; Rowley, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    Analysis of chromosomal banding patterns in acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) reveals that approximately 50% of patients have an abnormal karyotype. Although there is substantial variability, certain nonrandom abnormalities occur, e.g., +8, -7, and the 8;21 translocation (often accompanied by loss of an X or Y chromosome). The 15;17 translocation appears to be highly specific for acute promyelocytic leukemia. These abnormalities usually are not seen in remission, but reappear in relapse, sometimes exhibiting further clonal evolution; a +8 is the most frequently observed evolutionary change. Patients with ANLL following treatment of a malignant lymphoma tend to have hypodiploid modal numbers and frequently show loss of a chromosome No. 5 or No. 7.

  10. Acute leukemic appendicitis in a patient with acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatim Karachiwala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukemic and lymphomatous infiltration of the appendix is a rare complication. We present the case of a 31-year-old male with acute promyelocytic leukemia who developed acute abdomen on day 11 of induction chemotherapy with idarubicin and cytarabine. After appropriate work-up, a clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis was made. Despite severe pancytopenia, he successfully underwent laparoscopic appendectomy. The final pathology revealed leukemic infiltration of the appendix. It is hypothesized that the leukemic infiltration may play a role in the development of acute appendicitis. Further, this case demonstrates the need to maintain a high index of suspicion and prompt surgical intervention for surgical pathologies in neutropenic patients.

  11. Frank hematuria as the presentation feature of acute leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suriya Owais

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Muco-cutaneous bleeding is a common presenting feature of acute leukemias. Mucosal bleeding usually manifests as gum bleeding and/or epistaxis but may occur in any mucosal surface of the body. Hematuria as an isolated or main presenting feature of acute leukemia is rare. We describe two cases of acute leukemia, a 19 year old male with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and a 52 year old male with acute myeloid leukemia, both presenting with gross hematuria. There was no demonstrable leukemic infiltration of the urinary tract on imaging studies. Hematuria in these patients was likely to be due to occult leukemic infiltration of the urinary system, aggravated by thrombocytopenia, as it subsided after starting chemotherapy. Our cases highlight that hematuria should be remembered as a rare presenting feature of acute leukemia.

  12. B cell acute lymphocytic leukemia in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottsford-Miller, Justin; Haeri, Sina; Baker, Arthur M; Boles, Jeremiah; Brown, Mark

    2011-08-01

    Acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) is a rare occurrence in pregnancy and can be rapidly fatal if left untreated. The need for immediate treatment of ALL, coupled with the maternal-fetal risks from the chemotherapy regimen render a therapeutic dilemma in pregnant women with ALL. We report a case of ALL diagnosed in the 24th week of pregnancy to outline our management strategy, to demonstrate the feasibility of treatment with multi-agent chemotherapy, and to provide a review of the literature.

  13. Expression of CD133 in acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolba, Fetnat M; Foda, Mona E; Kamal, Howyda M; Elshabrawy, Deena A

    2013-06-01

    There have been conflicting results regarding a correlation between CD133 expression and disease outcome. To assess CD133 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and to evaluate its correlation with the different clinical and laboratory data as well as its relation to disease outcome, the present study included 60 newly diagnosed acute leukemic patients; 30 ALL patients with a male to female ratio of 1.5:1 and their ages ranged from 9 months to 48 years, and 30 AML patients with a male to female ratio of 1:1 and their ages ranged from 17 to 66 years. Flow cytometric assessment of CD133 expression was performed on blast cells. In ALL, no correlations were elicited between CD133 expression and some monoclonal antibodies, but in AML group, there was a significant positive correlation between CD133 and HLA-DR, CD3, CD7 and TDT, CD13 and CD34. In ALL group, patients with negative CD133 expression achieved complete remission more than patients with positive CD133 expression. In AML group, there was no statistically significant association found between positive CD133 expression and treatment outcome. The Kaplan-Meier curve illustrated a high significant negative correlation between CD133 expression and the overall survival of the AML patients. CD133 expression is an independent prognostic factor in acute leukemia, especially ALL patients and its expression could characterize a group of acute leukemic patients with higher resistance to standard chemotherapy and relapse. CD133 expression was highly associated with poor prognosis in acute leukemic patients.

  14. Midostaurin and Decitabine in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia and FLT3 Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-10

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With FLT3/ITD Mutation; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Gene Mutations; FLT3 Tyrosine Kinase Domain Point Mutation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. JAK Mutations in High-Risk Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Charles G. Mullighan; Jinghui Zhang; Richard C. Harvey; J. Racquel Collins-Underwood; Brenda A. Schulman; Letha A. Phillips; Sarah K. Tasian; Mignon L. Loh; Xiaoping Su; Wei Liu; Meenakshi Devidas; Susan R. Atlas; I-Ming Chen; Robert J. Clifford; Daniela S. Gerhard; William L. Carroll; Gregory H. Reaman; Malcolm Smith; James R. Downing; Stephen P. Hunger; Cheryl L. Willman; Janet D. Rowley

    2009-01-01

    Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a heterogeneous disease consisting of distinct clinical and biological subtypes that are characterized by specific chromosomal abnormalities or gene mutations...

  16. Acute Central Nervous System Complications in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baytan, Birol; Evim, Melike Sezgin; Güler, Salih; Güneş, Adalet Meral; Okan, Mehmet

    2015-10-01

    The outcome of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia has improved because of intensive chemotherapy and supportive care. The frequency of adverse events has also increased, but the data related to acute central nervous system complications during acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment are sparse. The purpose of this study is to evaluate these complications and to determine their long term outcome. We retrospectively analyzed the hospital reports of 323 children with de novo acute lymphoblastic leukemia from a 13-year period for acute neurological complications. The central nervous system complications of leukemic involvement, peripheral neuropathy, and post-treatment late-onset encephalopathy, and neurocognitive defects were excluded. Twenty-three of 323 children (7.1%) suffered from central nervous system complications during acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment. The majority of these complications (n = 13/23; 56.5%) developed during the induction period. The complications included posterior reversible encephalopathy (n = 6), fungal abscess (n = 5), cerebrovascular lesions (n = 5), syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (n = 4), and methotrexate encephalopathy (n = 3). Three of these 23 children (13%) died of central nervous system complications, one from an intracranial fungal abscess and the others from intracranial thrombosis. Seven of the survivors (n = 7/20; 35%) became epileptic and three of them had also developed mental and motor retardation. Acute central neurological complications are varied and require an urgent approach for proper diagnosis and treatment. Collaboration among the hematologist, radiologist, neurologist, microbiologist, and neurosurgeon is essential to prevent fatal outcome and serious morbidity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Methylation of Gene CHFR Promoter in Acute Leukemia Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Hui; LIU Wengli; ZHOU Jianfeng; XU Huizhen

    2005-01-01

    Summary: In order to explore whether gene CHFR was inactivated by methylation in leukemia cells, the expression of CHFR was examined before and after treatment with demethylation agent in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937 leukemia cell lines by means of RT-PCR. The methylation of promoter in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937 cells as well as 41 acute leukemia patients was analyzed by MS-PCR. The results showed that methylation of CHFR promoter was inactivated and could be reversed by treatment with a demethylating agent in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937. CHFR promoter methylation was detected in 39 % of acute leukemia patients. There was no difference in incidence of CHFR promoter methylation between acute myelocytic leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia. In conclusion, CHFR is frequently inactivated in acute leukemia and is a good candidate for the leukemia supper gene. By affecting mitotic checkpoint function, CHFR inactivation likely plays a key role in tumorigenesis in acute leukemia. Moreover, the methylation of gene CHFR appears to be a good index with which to predict the sensitivity of acute leukemia to microtubule inhibitors.

  18. Decitabine, Donor Natural Killer Cells, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Tretinoin, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride With or Without Arsenic Trioxide Followed by Tretinoin With or Without Mercaptopurine and Methotrexate in Treating Patients With Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  20. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without PSC 833, Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation, and/or Interleukin-2 in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  1. Invasive fungal infections in acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Vijaya R; Viola, George M; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2011-08-01

    Invasive fungal infection (IFI) is among the leading causes for morbidity, mortality, and economic burden for patients with acute leukemia. In the past few decades, the incidence of IFI has increased dramatically. The certainty of diagnosis of IFI is based on host factors, clinical evidence, and microbiological examination. Advancement in molecular diagnostic modalities (e.g. non-culture-based serum biomarkers such as β-glucan or galactomannan assays) and high-resolution radiological imaging has improved our diagnostic approach. The early use of these diagnostic tests assists in the early initiation of preemptive therapy. Nonetheless, the complexity of IFI in patients with leukemia and the limitations of these diagnostic tools still mandate astute clinical acumen. Its management has been further complicated by the increasing frequency of infection by non-Aspergillus molds (e.g. zygomycosis) and the emergence of drug-resistant fungal pathogens. In addition, even though the antifungal armamentarium has expanded rapidly in the past few decades, the associated mortality remains high. The decision to initiate antifungal treatment and the choice of anti-fungal therapy requires careful consideration of several factors (e.g. risk stratification, local fungal epidemiologic patterns, concomitant comorbidities, drug-drug interactions, prior history of antifungal use, overall cost, and the pharmacologic profile of the antifungal agents). In order to optimize our diagnostic and therapeutic management of IFI in patients with acute leukemia, further basic research and clinical trials are desperately needed.

  2. Decitabine, Vorinostat, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-19

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Histamine revisited: Role in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasan R Bhandari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Histamine dihydrochloride (HDC is derived from biogenic amine histamine. It suppresses the production of reactive oxygen species which inhibits the stimulation of T cells and natural killer (NK cells. Co-administration of the cytokine interleukin (IL-2 and HDC assists the activation of T cells and NK cells by IL-2, causing in the destruction of cancer cells, including those of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. A significantly longer leukemia-free survival (LFS; primary endpoint was demonstrated in a phase III trial in adult patients with AML in first or subsequent remission, in those who received subcutaneous HDC and concomitant subcutaneous IL-2 as maintenance therapy compared to that of patients receiving no treatment. However, the difference in overall survival (OS between the two groups was not significant. Patients had acceptable levels of adverse effects. Thus, HDC in addition to IL-2 appears to be a useful maintenance therapy option for adult patients with AML in remission.

  4. Perifosine induces protective autophagy and upregulation of ATG5 in human chronic myelogenous leukemia cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin TONG; Yan-yan LIU; Liang-shun YOU; Wen-bin QIAN

    2012-01-01

    Aim:The efficacy of the Akt inhibitor perifosine against chronic myeloid leukemia (CML)cells and its mechanisms of action are unknown.In this study,the cytotoxic effects of perifosine on CML and acute myeloid leukemia (AML)cell lines were compared to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the differences.Methods:Human AML cell lines Kasumi-1 and HL-60,and the CML cell line K562 were used.Cell viability was quantitated using MTT assay.Apoptosis was determined using Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide and Hoechst staining,which were followed by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy analysis,respectively.Caspase pathway activation and the expression of autophagy-related genes were examined using Western blot.Autophagy was studied using electron microscopy,the acridine orange staining method,and GFP-LC3 was examined with fluorescence microscopy.Results:In contrast to AML cell lines,the CML cell lines K562 and K562/G (an imatinib-insensitive CML cell line)were resistant to perifosine (2.5-20 μmol/L)in respect to inhibiting cell growth and inducing apoptosis.Perifosine (2.5,5,and 10 μmol/L)inhibited Akt and its phosphorylation in AML cells,but not in CML cells.Treatment with perifosine (20 μmol/L)resulted in autophagy in CML cells as shown by the increased formation of acidic vesicular organelles and the accumulation of LC3-II.Treatment of CML cells with perifosine (5,10,and 20 μmol/L)dose-dependently upregulated AGT5,but not Beclin 1 at the protein level.Furthermore,inhibition of autophagyby chloroquine (40 nmol/L)significantly suppressed the cell growth and induced apoptosis in CML cells treated with perifosine (20 μmol/L).Conclusion:Our results show that CML cell lines were resistant to the Akt inhibitor perifosine in vitro,which is due to perifosine-induced protective autophagy and upregulation of ATG5.

  5. Outcomes in patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachir, Fatima; Zerrouk, Jihane; Howard, Scott C; Graoui, Omar; Lahjouji, Ali; Hessissen, Leila; Bennani, Sanae; Quessar, Assmae; El Aouad, Rajae

    2014-08-01

    Mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) includes biphenotypic and bilineal types of leukemia, which constitute rare subtypes that require individualized therapy. Outcomes in Moroccan patients with MPAL are unknown. Among 1264 patients with acute leukemia, 20 were classified as having MPAL, including 17 with biphenotypic acute leukemia (1.3%) and 3 with bilineal leukemia (0.2%). There were 8 adults and 12 children. In 12 cases (60%), leukemic blasts expressed myeloid and T-lymphoid antigens, and, in 5 cases (25%), leukemic blasts expressed B lymphoid antigens plus myeloid antigens. Patients were initially treated on protocols for acute myeloid leukemia (n=4), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, n=14), or with palliative care (n=2). The probability of survival at 2 years in MPAL cases was 52%± 14%. Six of the 12 patients younger than 15 years remain alive versus 1 of 8 adult patients. Patients treated with ALL-directed therapy had significantly higher overall survival than those treated with acute myeloid leukemia-directed therapy (P=0.003). There was no association between the phenotypic characteristics and the clinical outcome (P=0.83). In conclusion, MPAL represents 1.5% of acute leukemia in Morocco. The prognosis is poor, but initial treatment with therapy directed toward ALL, improved supportive care, and the prevention of abandonment of therapy may improve outcomes in this subgroup of patients.

  6. Zoonotic Infections in Pediatric Patients With Acute Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have described the impact of zoonotic diseases in children with leukemia. This study aimed to describe the frequency of and associated demographic factors for zoonotic diseases in pediatric acute leukemia patients. Descriptive and comparative statistics relative to age, sex, and patient region were performed on an assembled 11-year retrospective cohort of acute leukemia patients. Of 10,197 patients, 88 patients (0.86%) were found to have a zoonotic infection. Gastrointestinal dise...

  7. Data quality in the Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostgård, Lene Sofie Granfeldt; Nørgaard, Jan Maxwell; Severinsen, Marianne Tang

    2013-01-01

    The Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry (DNLR) has documented coverage of above 98.5%. Less is known about the quality of the recorded data.......The Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry (DNLR) has documented coverage of above 98.5%. Less is known about the quality of the recorded data....

  8. Molecular cytogenetics for acute megakaryocytic leukemia diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Matveeva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Acute megakaryocytic leukemia (AML M7 – a rare disease characterized by poor treatment response, except for t(1;22 variant in infants. Cytogenetic abnormalities in AML M7 are highly heterogeneous. We collected samples from children with AML M7 to analyze the disease cytogenetic profile. During September 2009 to March 2012 20 AML M7 patients was studied using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Complex and heterogeneous chromosomal abnormalities were revealed. It was found that no recurring abnormalities and cytogenetic markers unique to each patients. Also, the 19p13 amplification described previously only in myeloid cell lines was detected.

  9. Molecular cytogenetics for acute megakaryocytic leukemia diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Matveeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute megakaryocytic leukemia (AML M7 – a rare disease characterized by poor treatment response, except for t(1;22 variant in infants. Cytogenetic abnormalities in AML M7 are highly heterogeneous. We collected samples from children with AML M7 to analyze the disease cytogenetic profile. During September 2009 to March 2012 20 AML M7 patients was studied using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Complex and heterogeneous chromosomal abnormalities were revealed. It was found that no recurring abnormalities and cytogenetic markers unique to each patients. Also, the 19p13 amplification described previously only in myeloid cell lines was detected.

  10. Liver Involvement with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Mathews

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Liver involvement with acute myeloid leukemia (AML is rarely reported. The majority of published cases suggest a cholestatic picture and obstructive jaundice at presentation. On the contrary, our patient presented with transaminitis without cholestasis. Elevated liver function tests persisted in our patient despite cholecystectomy; however, they normalized with chemotherapy administration, suggesting that AML was the causative effect of the hepatitis-like picture. Our review of the literature revealed that most reported cases of AML with liver involvement had short-lived remissions and an overall ominous prognosis. In our opinion, patients who have liver involvement with AML should be offered alternative investigational therapies with a low hepatic toxicity profile.

  11. Epigenetic Modifications in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael James Burke

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant epigenetic modifications are well-recognized drivers for oncogenesis. Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is no exception and serves as a model toward the significant impact these heritable alterations can have in leukemogenesis. In this brief review, we will focus on the main aspects of epigenetics which control leukemogenesis in pediatric ALL, mainly DNA methylation, histone modification and microRNA alterations. As we continue to gain better understanding of the driving mechanisms for pediatric ALL at both diagnosis and relapse, therapeutic interventions directed toward these pathways and mechanisms can be harnessed and introduced into clinical trials for pediatric ALL.

  12. Blood group change in acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, Rakul K.; Prakash, N. P.; Vijayalakshmi, K.

    2017-01-01

    Blood group antigens are either sugars or proteins found attached to the red blood cell membrane. ABO blood group antigens are the most clinically important antigens because they are the most immunogenic. As red blood cell antigens are inherited traits, they are usually not altered throughout the life of an individual. There have been occasional case reports of ABO blood group antigen change in malignant conditions. We report two such cases of ABO antigen alteration associated with acute myeloid leukemia. These patients had suppression of their blood group antigens during their leukemic phase, and the antigens were reexpressed when the patients attained remission.

  13. Maternal acute lymphoctic leukemia with rearrangement of the mixed lineage leukemia gene occurring during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljurf, Mahmoud; Nassar, Amr; Saleh, Abu J; Almhareb, Fahed; Alzahrani, Hazzaa; Walter, Claudia; Bakr, Mohammad; Ahmed, Syed Osman; Chaudhri, Naeem

    2009-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a relatively rare disease during pregnancy, accounting for about 15% of all cases of pregnancy-associated leukemia. Although mixed lineage leukemia gene (MLL) rearrangement is the dominant genetic aberration in infantile acute leukemia, the occurrence of MLL gene rearrangement in maternal ALL occurring during pregnancy has not been reported. Out of 31 cases of maternal leukemia diagnosed during pregnancy at our institution, 5 were ALL cases. Three of the 5 patients had MLL gene rearrangement. The data for these 5 patients are presented in this report. We believe that the association of MLL gene rearrangement with maternal leukemia is biologically plausible and this observation needs to be validated in a larger cohort of pregnancy-associated maternal leukemia cases.

  14. Decitabine and Valproic Acid in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Efficacy of the dual PI3K and mTOR inhibitor NVP-BEZ235 in combination with imatinib mesylate against chronic myelogenous leukemia cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin P

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Pengliang Xin, Chuntuan Li, Yan Zheng, Qunyi Peng, Huifang Xiao, Yuanling Huang, Xiongpeng Zhu Department of Haematology, First Hospital of Quanzhou Affiliated to Fujian Medical University, Licheng, Quanzhou, Fujian Province, China Background: Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway is a therapy target of cancer. We aimed to confirm the effect of dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor NVP-BEZ235 on proliferation, apoptosis, and autophagy of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML cells and sensitivity of tyrosine kinase inhibitor in vitro.Methods: Two human CML cell lines, K562 and KBM7R (T315I mutant strain, were used. The proliferation of CML cells was detected by MTS (Owen’s reagent assay. Cell cycle and apoptosis assay were examined by flow cytometric analysis. The phosphorylation levels and the expression levels were both evaluated by Western blot analysis. NVP-BEZ235 in combination with imatinib was also used to reveal the effect on proliferation and apoptosis.Results: NVP-BEZ235 significantly inhibited the proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and the half-maximal inhibitory concentration values of NVP-BEZ235 inhibiting the proliferation of K562 and KBM7R were 0.37±0.21 and 0.43±0.27 µmol/L, respectively, after 48 h. Cell apoptosis assay showed that NVP-BEZ235 significantly increased the late apoptotic cells. Cell cycle analysis indicated that the cells were mostly arrested in G1/G0 phase after treatment by NVP-BEZ235. In addition, results also found that, after treatment by NVP-BEZ235, phosphorylation levels of Akt kinase and S6K kinase significantly reduced, and the expression levels of cleaved caspase-3 significantly increased; meanwhile, the expression levels of caspase-3, B-cell lymphoma-2, cyclin D1, and cyclin D2 significantly decreased, and the ratio of LC3II/LC3I was significantly increased with increased LC3II expression level. Moreover, imatinib in combination with NVP-BEZ235

  16. High-Risk Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhojwani, Deepa; Howard, Scott C.; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2009-01-01

    Although most children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are cured, certain subsets have a high risk of relapse. Relapse risk can be predicted by early response to therapy, clinical and pharmacogenetic features of the host, and genetic characteristics of leukemic cells. Though early treatment response can be assessed by the peripheral blast cell count after 1 week of single-agent glucocorticoid treatment or percent of bone marrow blasts by morphology after 1 or 2 weeks of multiagent induction treatment, determination of minimal residual disease by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or flow cytometry after 2 to 6 weeks of induction is the most precise and useful measure. Augmented therapy has improved outcome for the poor responders to initial treatment. Infants with mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL)–rearranged ALL comprise a very poor-risk group wherein further intensification of chemotherapy causes significant toxicity. Hybrid protocols incorporating drugs effective for acute myeloid leukemia could improve survival, a strategy being tested in international trials. Studies on the biology of MLL-induced leukemogenesis have prompted the development of novel targeted agents, currently under evaluation in clinical trials. Short-term outcomes of patients with Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)–positive ALL have improved significantly by adding tyrosine kinase inhibitors to standard chemotherapy regimens. New agents and methods to overcome resistance are under investigation, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation is recommended for certain subsets of patients, for example those with Ph+ and T-cell ALL with poor early response. Genome-wide interrogation of leukemic cell genetic abnormalities and germline genetic variations promise to identify new molecular targets for therapy. PMID:19778845

  17. Molecular Genetic Markers in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Yohe

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetics play an increasingly important role in the risk stratification and management of acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients. Traditionally, AML classification and risk stratification relied on cytogenetic studies; however, molecular detection of gene mutations is playing an increasingly important role in classification, risk stratification, and management of AML. Molecular testing does not take the place of cytogenetic testing results, but plays a complementary role to help refine prognosis, especially within specific AML subgroups. With the exception of acute promyelocytic leukemia, AML therapy is not targeted but the intensity of therapy is driven by the prognostic subgroup. Many prognostic scoring systems classify patients into favorable, poor, or intermediate prognostic subgroups based on clinical and genetic features. Current standard of care combines cytogenetic results with targeted testing for mutations in FLT3, NPM1, CEBPA, and KIT to determine the prognostic subgroup. Other gene mutations have also been demonstrated to predict prognosis and may play a role in future risk stratification, although some of these have not been confirmed in multiple studies or established as standard of care. This paper will review the contribution of cytogenetic results to prognosis in AML and then will focus on molecular mutations that have a prognostic or possible therapeutic impact.

  18. Cytogenetics of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manola, Kalliopi N

    2009-11-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease accounting for 15-20% of all childhood acute leukemias, while it is responsible for more than half of the leukemic deaths in these patients. This article focuses on the significance of cytogenetic analysis in pediatric AML supporting the importance of cytogenetic analysis in the pathogenesis, diagnosis, prognosis, follow-up and treatment selection in childhood AML. It reviews in detail the types and frequencies of most common chromosomal aberrations, their molecular background, their correlation with French American British (FAB) subtypes and age distribution and their prognostic relevance. It also summarizes some less frequent or rare chromosome aberrations in which the prognostic classification has not been determined yet owning to the small number of patients and the variable treatment modalities used in different study groups. Furthermore, it discusses the association of specific chromosome rearrangements with prenatal exposure to carcinogenic agents or therapeutic agents and highlights the ongoing and future research on pediatric AML in the evolving field of Cytogenetics.

  19. Zoonotic infections in pediatric patients with acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lothstein, Katherine; Fisher, Brian; Li, Yimei; Seif, Alix; Harris, Tracey; Torp, Kari; Kavcic, Marko; Huang, Yuan-Shung V; Rheingold, Susan R; Aplenc, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Few studies have described the impact of zoonotic diseases in children with leukemia. This study aimed to describe the frequency of and associated demographic factors for zoonotic diseases in pediatric acute leukemia patients. Descriptive and comparative statistics relative to age, sex, and patient region were performed on an assembled 11-year retrospective cohort of acute leukemia patients. Of 10,197 patients, 88 patients (0.86%) were found to have a zoonotic infection. Gastrointestinal diseases were the most commonly (86.4%) identified zoonotic illnesses. Although rare, zoonotic diseases do occur in children with leukemia and frequency varies by age, region, and gender.

  20. High-performance Liquid Chromatographic Ultraviolet Detection of Nilotinib in Human Plasma from Patients with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, and Comparison with Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Ryosuke; Satho, Yuhki; Itoh, Hiroki

    2016-11-01

    A method for determining nilotinib concentration in human plasma is proposed using high-performance liquid chromatography and ultraviolet detection. Nilotinib and the internal standard dasatinib were separated using a mobile phase of 0.5% Na2 PO4 H2 O (pH 2.5)-acetonitrile-methanol (55:25:20, v/v/v) on a Capcell Pak C18 MG II column (250 × 4.6 mm) at a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min, and ultraviolet measurement at 250 nm. The calibration curve exhibited linearity over the nilotinib concentration range of 50-2,500 ng/ml at 250 nm, with relative standard deviations (n = 5) of 7.1%, 2.5%, and 2.9% for 250, 1,500, and 2,500 ng/ml, respectively. The detection limit for nilotinib was 5 ng/ml due to three blank determinations (ρ = 3). This method was successfully applied to assaying nilotinib in human plasma samples from patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia. In addition, we compared the results with those measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) at BML, Inc. (a commercial laboratory). A strong correlation was observed between the nilotinib concentrations measured by our high-performance liquid chromatographic method and those obtained by LC/MS-MS (r(2) = 0.988, P < 0.01). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Safranal, a Crocus sativus L constituent suppresses the growth of K-562 cells of chronic myelogenous leukemia. In silico and in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geromichalos, George D; Papadopoulos, Theophanis; Sahpazidou, Despina; Sinakos, Zacharias

    2014-12-01

    Crocin, a main constituent of Crocus sativus L (saffron), has been found to inhibit the growth of K-562 human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells expressing Bcr-Abl protein tyrosine kinase activity. The aim of our study is to investigate the ability of the bioactive saffron's constituents, crocin (CRC) and safranal (SFR), to inhibit the Bcr-Abl protein activity employing an in silico approach, as well as the in vitro effect of these compounds on K-562 growth and gene expression of Bcr-Abl. In silico molecular docking studies revealed that mostly SFR can be attached to Bcr-Abl protein, positioned inside the protein's binding cavity at the same place with the drug used in the treatment of CML, imatinib mesylate (IM). The predicted polar interactions and hydrophobic contacts constructing a hydrophobic cavity inside the active site, explain the observed inhibitory activity. Cytotoxicity experiments showed that SFR and CRC mediate cytotoxic response to K562 cells. In vitro studies on the expression of Bcr-Abl gene revealed that SFR and in a lesser degree IM inhibited the expression of the gene, while in contrast CRC induced an increase. The ultimate goal was to evaluate the existence of a potential antitumor activity of saffron's constituents SFR and CRC.

  2. The value of open access and a patient centric approach to oral oncolytic utilization in the treatment of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia: A U.S. perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Lopamudra; Gitlin, Matthew; Siegartel, Lisa R; Makenbaeva, Dinara

    2017-04-01

    Since the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), the treatment of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) has resulted in significant improvement in patient survival but at a higher pharmaceutical cost to payers. The recent introduction of generic imatinib presents an opportunity to lower pharmacy costs within a population that is growing due to improved survival. Recent literature has focused on the likely benefits to payers of step therapy through generic imatinib. Areas covered: This review provides a perspective that is broader than the evaluation of financial savings or narrowly defined health economic metrics by incorporating factors such as CML patient heterogeneity, including varying levels of disease progression risk, comorbidities and genetic mutation status, differences in TKI product profiles, clinical guideline recommendations, and the importance of individualized patient care. A focused literature review evaluating the real-world impact of utilization management programs is presented. Expert commentary: The findings indicate that payers can achieve substantial savings without the need to implement utilization management policies. Compromises in the ability to provide individualized patient care and unwanted economic consequences resulting from increased costs of disease progression, adverse events, and lack of response to treatment due to utilization management are summarized.

  3. Integrative genomic analysis in K562 chronic myelogenous leukemia cells reveals that proximal NCOR1 binding positively regulates genes that govern erythroid differentiation and Imatinib sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Mark D; van den Berg, Patrick R; Russell, James L; Singh, Prashant K; Battaglia, Sebastiano; Campbell, Moray J

    2015-09-01

    To define the functions of NCOR1 we developed an integrative analysis that combined ENCODE and NCI-60 data, followed by in vitro validation. NCOR1 and H3K9me3 ChIP-Seq, FAIRE-seq and DNA CpG methylation interactions were related to gene expression using bootstrapping approaches. Most NCOR1 combinations (24/44) were associated with significantly elevated level expression of protein coding genes and only very few combinations related to gene repression. DAVID's biological process annotation revealed that elevated gene expression was uniquely associated with acetylation and ETS binding. A matrix of gene and drug interactions built on NCI-60 data identified that Imatinib significantly targeted the NCOR1 governed transcriptome. Stable knockdown of NCOR1 in K562 cells slowed growth and significantly repressed genes associated with NCOR1 cistrome, again, with the GO terms acetylation and ETS binding, and significantly dampened sensitivity to Imatinib-induced erythroid differentiation. Mining public microarray data revealed that NCOR1-targeted genes were significantly enriched in Imatinib response gene signatures in cell lines and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients. These approaches integrated cistrome, transcriptome and drug sensitivity relationships to reveal that NCOR1 function is surprisingly most associated with elevated gene expression, and that these targets, both in CML cell lines and patients, associate with sensitivity to Imatinib.

  4. Rearrangement and expression of beta-T-cell receptor and immunoglobulin genes in established Ph1 chronic myelogenous leukemia cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenson, J; Koeffler, H P

    1989-01-01

    We have determined the arrangement and expression of immunoglobulin (Ig) and beta-T-cell receptor (TCR) genes in six established Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph1) chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cell lines, and correlated these results with their phenotypic characteristics. Three cell lines with nonlymphoid characteristics, EM2, EM3, and K562, did not demonstrate rearrangement or expression of Ig or beta-TCR genes. A new cell line, MB, with a mature B-cell phenotype recently established in our laboratory, contained light and heavy chain immunoglobulin gene rearrangements and expressed mature Ig RNA. In a cell line with an early lymphoid phenotype, BV173, this analysis showed rearrangement of Ig heavy chain and beta-TCR genes, unrearranged Ig light chain DNA, and expression of only an immature beta-TCR transcript. This line provides evidence for T-cell lineage involvement in Ph1 CML. One cell line without markers of any cell type, KCL-22, demonstrated rearranged, unexpressed Ig heavy chain genes, suggesting these cells are at the very earliest stages of lymphoid differentiation. These lines should provide valuable tools to dissect the molecular biology of differentiation in CML and in early lymphocytes.

  5. Isolated Ocular Manifestation of Relapsed Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Presenting as Myeloid Blast Crisis in a Patient on Imatinib Therapy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Gulati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Blast phase in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML has rarely been reported to involve extramedullary sites like skin, lymph nodes, and central nervous system. Clinical history, characteristic hematologic findings (elevated leukocyte counts, myelocytic predominance, and basophilia, and Philadelphia chromosome are of high diagnostic significance especially in isolated extramedullary presentations. We describe a unique case of CML relapse with blast phase involving the eye. A 66-year-old man with a known diagnosis of CML on imatinib and in molecular remission for 3 years presented with a painful blind eye. Histologic examination revealed diffuse involvement of choroid, iris, vitreous humor, and the optic nerve by blast cells. The blasts expressed CD34, aberrant TdT, and a myeloid phenotype (CD13, CD33, and CD117. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH of vitreous fluid detected BCR-ABL1 gene rearrangement. Additionally, trisomy 8 and gains of 9 and 22 were seen which were not present in the initial diagnostic marrow study 3 years ago. At relapse, the bone marrow, peripheral blood, and the cerebrospinal fluid were not involved by CML. Patient received induction chemotherapy and single dose prophylactic intrathecal methotrexate and was maintained on antityrosine kinase therapy and eventually underwent allogenic stem cell transplantation.

  6. Induction of apoptosis by shikonin through a ROS/JNKmediated process in Bcr/Abl-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the signaling events induced by shikonin that lead to the induction of apoptosis in Bcr/ Abl-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells (e.g., K562, LAMA84). Treatment of K562 cells with shikonin (e.g., 0.5 μM) resulted in profound induction of apoptosis accompanied by rapid generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), striking activation of c-Jun-N-terminai kinase (JNK) and p38, marked release of the mitochondrial proteins cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO, activation of caspase-9 and -3, and cleavage of PARP. Scavenging of ROS completely blocked all of the above-mentioned events (i.e., JNK and p38 phosphorylation, cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO release, caspase and PARP cleavage, as well as the induction of apoptosis) following shikonin treatment. Inhibition of JNK and knock-down of JNKI significantly attenuated cytochrome c release, caspase cleavage and apoptosis, but did not affect shikonin-mediated ROS production. Additionally, inhibition of caspase activation completely blocked shikonin-induced apoptosis, but did not appreciably modify shikonin-mediated cytochrome c release or ROS generation. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that shikonin-induced oxidative injury operates at a proximal point in apoptotic signaling cascades, and subsequently activates the stress-related JNK pathway, triggers mitochondrial dysfunction, cytochrome c release, and caspase activation, and leads to apoptosis. Our data also suggest that shikonin may be a promising agent for the treatment of CML, as a generator of ROS.

  7. Functionally deregulated AML1/RUNX1 cooperates with BCR-ABL to induce a blastic phase-like phenotype of chronic myelogenous leukemia in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoko Yamamoto

    Full Text Available Patients in the chronic phase (CP of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML have been treated successfully following the advent of ABL kinase inhibitors, but once they progress to the blast crisis (BC phase the prognosis becomes dismal. Although mechanisms underlying the progression are largely unknown, recent studies revealed the presence of alterations of key molecules for hematopoiesis, such as AML1/RUNX1. Our analysis of 13 BC cases revealed that three cases had AML1 mutations and the transcript levels of wild-type (wt. AML1 were elevated in BC compared with CP. Functional analysis of representative AML1 mutants using mouse hematopoietic cells revealed the possible contribution of some, but not all, mutants for the BC-phenotype. Specifically, K83Q and R139G, but neither R80C nor D171N mutants, conferred upon BCR-ABL-expressing cells a growth advantage over BCR-ABL-alone control cells in cytokine-free culture, and the cells thus grown killed mice upon intravenous transfer. Unexpectedly, wt.AML1 behaved similarly to K83Q and R139G mutants. In a bone marrow transplantation assay, K83Q and wt.AML1s induced the emergence of blast-like cells. The overall findings suggest the roles of altered functions of AML1 imposed by some, but not all, mutants, and the elevated expression of wt.AML1 for the disease progression of CML.

  8. Successful acute lymphoblastic leukemia-type therapy in two children with mixed-phenotype acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsubo, Keisuke; Yabe, Miharu; Yabe, Hiromasa; Fukumura, Akiko; Morimoto, Tsuyoshi; Kato, Masahiko; Mochizuki, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    Mixed-phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) is a rare type of leukemia expressing both myeloid and lymphoid markers. There is limited information, especially on pediatric cases. Therefore, the optimal therapeutic approach to pediatric MPAL has not been defined. Here, we report two pediatric cases of MPAL. According to the 2008 World Health Organization (WHO) classification and European Group for the Immunological Characterization of Leukemias (EGIL) criteria, patient 1 was diagnosed with overt MPAL positive for the myeloid marker myeloperoxidase (MPO), and B-lymphoid markers. Patient 2 was diagnosed with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) using EGIL criteria. According to the 2008 WHO classification, however, patient 2 was diagnosed with overt MPAL positive for CD3, T-lymphoid markers and MPO. We chose an ALL-type therapy consisting of both lymphoid- and myeloid-directed agents; these patients have maintained complete remission following treatment. Further information on pediatric MPAL is needed to establish an appropriate therapeutic strategy including stem cell transplantation for this rare condition. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  9. Imatinib treatment induces CD5+ B lymphocytes and IgM natural antibodies with anti-leukemic reactivity in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Catellani

    Full Text Available Imatinib mesylate is a first line treatment of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia and of a rare form of gastrointestinal stromal cancer, where the response to the drug is also linked to the immune system activation with production of antineoplastic cytokines. In this study, forty patients in the chronic phase of disease, treated with imatinib mesylate, were analyzed. Bone marrow aspirates were drawn at diagnosis, after 3, 6, 12, 18 months for haematological, cytofluorimetric, cytogenetic, biomolecular evaluation and cytokine measurement. Responder and non responder patients were defined according to the European LeukemiaNet recommendations. In responder patients (n = 32, the percentage of bone marrow CD20(+CD5(+sIgM(+ lymphocytes, and the plasma levels of IgM, were significantly higher, at 3 months and up to 9 months, than in non responders. These IgM reacted with O-linked sugars expressed by leukemic cells and could induce tumor cell apoptosis. In responder patients the stromal-derived factor-1 and the B-lymphocyte-activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family significantly raised in the bone marrow after imatinib administration, together with the bone morphogenetic proteins-2 and -7. All patients with high number of CD20(+CD5(+sIgM(+ cells and high stromal-derived factor-1 and B lymphocyte activating factor levels, underwent complete cytogenetic and/or molecular remission by 12 months. We propose that CD20(+CD5(+sIgM(+ lymphocytes producing anti-carbohydrate antibodies with anti-tumor activity, might contribute to the response to imatinib treatment. As in multivariate analysis bone marrow CD20(+CD5(+sIgM(+ cells and stromal-derived factor-1 and B-lymphocyte-activating factor levels were significantly related to cytogenetical and molecular changes, they might contribute to the definition of the pharmacological response.

  10. KEGG DISEASE / Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) [KEGG DISEASE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DISEASE: H00003 Entry H00003Disease Name Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) Description Acute.... Category Cancer Brite Human diseases [BR:br08402] Cancers Cancers of haematopoietic and lymphoid tissues H00003Acute...atopoietic and related tissue C92Myeloid leukaemia H00003Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) Cancer-accociated carb...ohydrates [br08441.html] H00003 Pathway hsa05221Acute myeloid leukemiahsa05202Transcriptional misregulation ... or t(16; 16)(p13, q22), (CBF-beta/MYH11) ICD-O: 9866/3, Tumor type: Acute promyelocytic leukaemia (AML with

  11. Lenalidomide, Cytarabine, and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-22

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Nonrandom chromosomal abnormalities in acute nonlymphocytic leukemia in patients treated for Hodgkin disease and non-Hodgkin lymphomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, J.D.; Golomb, H.M.; Vardiman, J.

    1977-11-01

    Chromosomal analyses of myeloid cells were performed on ten patients who had acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) following treatment for malignant lymphoma. Seven patients had Hodgkin disease and three had non-Hodgkin lymphoma, poorly differentiated lymphocytic type. Six patients were treated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy; two had radiotherapy only, and two chemotherapy only. The median time between diagnosis of lymphoma and subsequent leukemia was 58 mo. Four patients had the blast phase of a myeloproliferative syndrome, four had acute myelogenous leukemia, one had acute promyelocytic leukemia, and the tenth, erythroleukemia. None of four patients whose leukemia was treated with intensive chemotherapy responded. Every patient had an abnormal karyotype. Seven of the patients showed hypodiploid cell lines, two a pseudodiploid, and one a hyperdiploid cell line. Cells from every patient except one were lacking a B chromosome; in eight, this could be identified as a No. 5. Five of nine patients were lacking a No. 7. Loss or rearrangement of No. 17 was found in four and of Nos. 6 or 8 in three patients. Many of the karyotypes were bizarre, with marker chromosomes and minute chromosomes. The karyotypic pattern seen in these patients showed no correlation with the nature of the original lymphoma, the type of leukemia, or the therapy used. The chromosomal pattern of hypodiploid cell lines found in ANLL that arose de novo was similar to that occurring in treated lymphoma. However, in ANLL de novo, less than half of the patients had fewer than 46 chromosomes, and less than 10% had fewer than 45 chromosomes. In this study, 70% of the patients had fewer than 46 and 40% had fewer than 45 chromosomes. The critical question thus concerns the factors, as yet unknown, that predispose to the development of hypodiploid modal numbers in ANLL in lymphoma.

  13. Role of autophagy in acute myeloid leukemia therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su-Ping Zhang; Yu-Na Niu; Na Yuan; Ai-Hong Zhang; Dan Chao; Qiu-Ping Xu; Li-Jun Wang

    2013-01-01

    Despite its dual role in determining cell fate in a wide array of solid cancer cell lines,autophagy has been robustly shown to suppress or kill acute myeloid leukemia cells via degradation of the oncogenic fusion protein that drives leukemogenesis.However,autophagy also induces the demise of acute leukemia cells that do not express the known fusion protein,though the molecular mechanism remains elusive.Nevertheless,since it can induce cooperation with apoptosis and differentiation in response to autophagic signals,autophagy can be manipulated for a better therapy on acute myeloid leukemia.

  14. ERYTHEMA NODOSUM REVEALING ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

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    Chebbi Wafa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Erythema nodosum (EN is the most common type of panniculitis. It may be idiopathic or secondary to various etiologies. However, the occurrence of erythema nodosum in malignant hemopathy had rarely been reported. Case report: A 42 year-old woman presented with a four week history of recurrent multiple painful erythematous nodules developed on the lower limbs associated with arthralgia of the ankles and fever. The clinical features of skin lesions with contusiform color evolution allowed establishing the diagnosis of EN. No underlying cause was found. The skin lesions were improved with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine. Three months later, the patient consulted for recurrence of EN associated with fever, inflammatory polyarthralgia and hepatosplenomegaly. The peripheral blood count revealed pancytopenia. A bone marrow examination confirmed the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia type 2. Initiation of chemotherapy was followed by the complete disappearance of skin lesions of EN. Conclusion: Paraneoplastic erythema nodosum is a rare entity. In the literature, a few cases of association with leukemia have been reported. Exploration for solid neoplasms or hemopathy in case of recurrent EN or resistance to conventional treatment should be systematic

  15. [Infections in the child with acute leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, J M; Jiménez, E; Jiménez, R

    1981-01-01

    One hundred and twenty-five febrile episodes in 82 children with acute leukemia were studied; 46% of the patients were from urban and 54% from rural areas. The origin of the fever was identified in 91% of the episodes, prevailing pneumonia, septicemia, chickenpox and herpes zoster. The etiological agent was identified in 46% of the cases. A viral predominance was evident, and among them varicela-zoster, following in importance gram-negative bacteria. Histoplasma capsulatum and Pneumocystis carinii were isolated in two occassions each. Sepsis was found more frequently in children with active leukemia than in those in remission (p less than 0.001). Forty-four febrile episodes occurred in patients with less than 1,000 neutrophils/ul. The daily-risk rate of infection was higher in children fom rural than in those from urban areas (p less than 0.001). After clinical and laboratory studies, methicillin and gentamicin were used, in addition to carbenicillin or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is selected cases. This treatment was effective in 86% of the cases. Twelve (15%) children died, 6 of whom were in remission at that moment.

  16. Targeting the acute myeloid leukemia stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Alexandre; Luciana, M; Krause, Fontanari; Rego, Eduardo M

    2010-02-01

    The idea that within the bulk of leukemic cells there are immature progenitors which are intrinsically resistant to chemotherapy and able to repopulate the tumor after treatment is not recent. Nevertheless, the term leukemia stem cells (LSCs) has been adopted recently to describe these immature progenitors based on the fact that they share the most relevant features of the normal hematopoetic stem cells (HSCs), i.e. the self-renewal potential and quiescent status. LSCs differ from their normal counterparts and from the more differentiated leukemic cells regarding the default status of pathways regulating apoptosis, cell cycle, telomere maintenance and transport pumps activity. In addition, unique features regarding the interaction of these cells with the microenvironment have been characterized. Therapeutic strategies targeting these unique features are at different stages of development but the reported results are promising. The aim of this review is, by taking acute myeloid leukemia (AML) as a bona fide example, to discuss some of the mechanisms used by the LSCs to survive and the strategies which could be used to eradicate these cells.

  17. c-fms expression in acute leukemias with complex phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrès, H; Dubreuil, P; Falzetti, F; Courcoul, M A; Lopez, M; Falcinelli, F; Birg, F; Tabilio, A; Mannoni, P

    1990-10-01

    The c-fms proto-oncogene product, which is the receptor for the macrophage colony-stimulating factor CSF-1, is always found expressed in acute myeloid leukemia cells, irrespective of their stage of differentiation according to the FAB classification (Dubreuil P, Torrès H, Courcoul M, Birg F, Mannoni P. Blood 1988;72:1081-1085). We have extended this study and looked for c-fms expression in poorly differentiated myeloid leukemias, in a series of acute leukemias of either T or B origin and in biphenotypic leukemias. We now report that expression of c-fms is still related to the myeloid origin of the leukemic proliferation, but that it can also be found in some acute leukemias presenting clonal rearrangements of the T cell receptor gene. Thus expression of the c-fms/CSF-1 receptor may not be exclusively a marker for myeloid proliferations.

  18. Precision Medicine for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Catherine; Karp, Judith E.; Hourigan, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of precision medicine is to personalize therapy based on individual patient variation, to correctly select the right treatment, for the right patient, at the right time. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous collection of myeloid malignancies with diverse genetic etiology and the potential for intra-patient clonal evolution over time. We discuss here how the precision medicine paradigm might be applied to the care of AML patients by focusing on the potential roles of targeting therapy by patient-specific somatic mutations and aberrant pathways, ex-vivo drug sensitivity and resistance testing, high sensitivity measurements of residual disease burden and biology along with potential clinical trial and regulatory constraints. PMID:26514194

  19. Importance of genetics in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Pippa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML comprises a biologically and clinically heterogeneous group of aggressive disorders that occur as a consequence of a wide variety of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities in hematopoietic progenitors. Despite significant advances in the understanding of the biology of AML, most patients will die from relapsed disease. Whole-genome studies have identified novel recurrent gene mutations with prognostic impact in AML; furthermore, it is likely that in the near future genome-wide sequencing will become a routine for newly diagnosed patients with AML. Therefore, future clinical trials should aim to identify genetically defined high-risk patients, and further research is necessary to identify effective agents and develop new individualized therapeutic strategies for the treatment of this deadly disease.

  20. Treatment strategies in acute myeloid leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Li-na; ZHOU Jin; Jan Jacob Schuringa; Edo Vellenga

    2011-01-01

    Objective To summarize the risk stratification and current treatment strategies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and discuss the role of emerging novel agents that might be applied in future clinical trials.Data sources The data in this article were collected from PubMed database with relevant English articles published from 1991 to 2009.Study selection Articles regarding the risk stratification and therapeutic options of AML, as well as the characteristics of leukemic stem cells were selected.Results AML is a heterogeneous disease with variable clinical outcome dependent on several prognostic factors,including age, cytogenetics and molecular markers. The advances in the understanding of AML pathogenesis and development will generate potential novel agents that might improve the treatment results of standard chemotherapy.Conclusion Deeper insight into the multiple transforming events of AML may aid us in designing combinations of small molecule inhibitors based on the individual patient characteristics.

  1. Open Label, Phase II Study to Evaluate Efficacy and Safety of Oral Nilotinib in Philadelphia Positive (Ph+) Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-07

    Leukemia; Leukemia,Pediatric; Leukemia, Myleiod; Leukemia, Mylegenous, Chronic; Leukemia, Mylegenous, Accelerated; BCR-ABL Positive; Myeloproliferative Disorder; Bone Marrow Disease; Hematologic Diseases; Neoplastic Processes; Imatinib; Dasatinib; Enzyme Inhibitor; Protein Kinase Inhibitor

  2. Serological identification of immunogenic antigens in acute monocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Zhang, Wanggang; Cao, Xingmei; Li, Fuyang; Liu, Xinping; Yao, Libo

    2005-05-01

    In order to improve disease-free survival and potentially a cure, it is necessary to identify more potent leukemia antigen. Here, we defined the acute monocytic leukemia-associated antigen (LAA) recognized by the humoral immune system for the first time. We have applied the method of serologic analysis of recombinant cDNA expression library (SEREX) on acute monocytic leukemia (FAB M5), followed by DNA sequencing and analyzing of positive clones. Then, the reactivity of normal and other leukemia sera with positive clones were performed. Thirty-five distinct novel antigens reactive with autologous IgG were identified by SEREX analysis on an acute monocytic leukemia patient and were characterized according to cDNA sequence and the reactivity with allogeneic sera. Twenty of the 35 antigens identified in this study were recognized by IgG antibodies in normal sera, and the remaining 15 were recognized exclusively by sera from allogeneic leukemia patients but not by normal donor sera, suggested that the immune response to these 15 antigens are leukemia related. The 15 immunogenic antigens detected by immune responses in the autologous host facilitate the identification of epitopes recognized by antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and are potential candidates for diagnosis and immunotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

  3. Acute myeloid leukemia-targeted toxin activates both apoptotic and necroptotic death mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrick Horita

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML is the second most common leukemia with approximately 13,410 new cases and 8,990 deaths annually in the United States. A novel fusion toxin treatment, diphtheria toxin GM-CSF (DT-GMCSF has been shown to selectively eliminate leukemic repopulating cells that are critical for the formation of AML. We previously showed that DT-GMCSF treatment of U937 cells, an AML cell line, causes activation of caspases and the induction of apoptosis. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In this study we further investigate the mechanisms of cell death induced by DT-GMCSF and show that, in addition to the activation of caspase-dependent apoptosis, DT-GMCSF also kills AML cells by simultaneously activating caspase-independent necroptosis. These mechanisms depend on the ability of the targeted toxin to inhibit protein synthesis, and are not affected by the receptor that is targeted or the mechanism through which protein synthesis is blocked. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that fusion toxin proteins may be effective for treating AML cells whether or not they are defective in apoptosis.

  4. Abnormal expression of FLI1 protein is an adverse prognostic factor in acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yi Hua; Zhang, Nianxiang; Singh, Neera; Faderl, Stefan; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; York, Heather; Qutub, Amina A.; Coombes, Kevin R.; Watson, Dennis K.

    2011-01-01

    Friend leukemia virus integration 1 (FLI1), an Ets transcription factor family member, is linked to acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) by chromosomal events at the FLI1 locus, but the biologic impact of FLI1 expression on AML is unknown. FLI1 protein expression was measured in 511 newly diagnosed AML patients. Expression was similar in peripheral blood (PB) and BM and higher at diagnosis than at relapse (P = .02). Compared with normal CD34+ cells, expression in AML was above or below normal in 32% and 5% of patients, respectively. Levels were negatively correlated with an antecedent hematologic disorder (P = .002) but not with age or cytogenetics. Mutated NPM1 (P = .0007) or FLT3-ITD (P 0.3) with 19 others. The FLI1 level was not predictive of remission attainment, but patients with low or high FLI1 expression had shorter remission duration (22.6 and 40.3 vs 51.1 weeks, respectively; P = .01) and overall survival (45.2 and 35.4 vs 59.4 weeks, respectively; P = .03). High FLI1 levels were adverse in univariate and multivariate analysis. FLI1 expression is frequently abnormal and prognostically adverse in AML. FLI1 and/or its response genes may be therapeutically targetable to interfere with AML cell biology. PMID:21917756

  5. Symptom-Adapted Physical Activity Intervention in Minimizing Physical Function Decline in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Autonomous growth potential of leukemia blast cells is associated with poor prognosis in human acute leukemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakubowski Ann A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have described a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mouse model that permits the subcutaneous growth of primary human acute leukemia blast cells into a measurable subcutaneous nodule which may be followed by the development of disseminated disease. Utilizing the SCID mouse model, we examined the growth potential of leukemic blasts from 133 patients with acute leukemia, (67 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL and 66 acute myeloid leukemia (AML in the animals after subcutaneous inoculation without conditioning treatment. The blasts displayed three distinct growth patterns: "aggressive", "indolent", or "no tumor growth". Out of 133 leukemias, 45 (33.8% displayed an aggressive growth pattern, 14 (10.5% displayed an indolent growth pattern and 74 (55.6% did not grow in SCID mice. The growth probability of leukemias from relapsed and/or refractory disease was nearly 3 fold higher than that from patients with newly diagnosed disease. Serial observations found that leukemic blasts from the same individual, which did not initiate tumor growth at initial presentation and/or at early relapse, may engraft and grow in the later stages of disease, suggesting that the ability of leukemia cells for engraftment and proliferation was gradually acquired following the process of leukemia progression. Nine autonomous growing leukemia cell lines were established in vitro. These displayed an aggressive proliferation pattern, suggesting a possible correlation between the capacity of human leukemia cells for autonomous proliferation in vitro and an aggressive growth potential in SCID mice. In addition, we demonstrated that patients whose leukemic blasts displayed an aggressive growth and dissemination pattern in SClD mice had a poor clinical outcome in patients with ALL as well as AML. Patients whose leukemic blasts grew indolently or whose leukemia cells failed to induce growth had a significantly longer DFS and more favorable clinical course.

  7. Genome wide molecular analysis of minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, Fernando P. G.; Almeida, Ines; Morolli, Bruno; Brouwer-Mandema, Geeske; Wessels, Hans; Vossen, Rolf; Vrieling, Harry; Marijt, Erik W. A.; Valk, Peter J. M.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Sperr, Wolfgang R.; Ludwig, Wolf-Dieter; Giphart-Gassler, Micheline

    2009-01-01

    Background Minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia is heterogeneous in karyotype and is defined by immature morphological and molecular characteristics. This originally French-American-British classification is still used in the new World Health Organization classification when other

  8. Genome wide molecular analysis of minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, Fernando P. G.; Almeida, Ines; Morolli, Bruno; Brouwer-Mandema, Geeske; Wessels, Hans; Vossen, Rolf; Vrieling, Harry; Marijt, Erik W. A.; Valk, Peter J. M.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Sperr, Wolfgang R.; Ludwig, Wolf-Dieter; Giphart-Gassler, Micheline

    2009-01-01

    Background Minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia is heterogeneous in karyotype and is defined by immature morphological and molecular characteristics. This originally French-American-British classification is still used in the new World Health Organization classification when other criteri

  9. Endometrial and acute myeloid leukemia cancer genomes characterized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two studies from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program reveal details about the genomic landscapes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and endometrial cancer. Both provide new insights into the molecular underpinnings of these cancers.

  10. Decitabine Followed by Idarubicin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-09

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts

  11. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim Followed by Infusion of Non-HLA Matched Ex Vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitors in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-13

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Advances in Management of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia with Arsenic Trioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jun

    2007-01-01

    @@ Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), with specific features in cell morphology, is classified as M3 by French-American-British (FAB).Among M3, 95% of patients show specific chromosome translocation t(15;17)q(22;21) with PML-RAR α fusion gene, and 5% of patients show other subtypes. According to the statistical analysis of 2 540 adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML)cases in Harbin Institute of Hematology & Oncology, APL accounted for 23%.

  13. [Problems in maintenance therapy in acute myeloid leukemias in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürtler, R; Raderecht, C

    1975-01-01

    Problems of maintaining therapy for acute myelocytic leukemias in adults are discussed. The analysis of the maintaining therapy in 22 patients affected with an acute myelocytic leukemia and living for more than 6 months revealed that the interval therapy with a high dosage of cytostatic combinations in the sense of the COAP scheme is preferable compared with the daily administration of 6-mercaptopurin, in addition methotrexate twice a week. Reasons for this are discussed.

  14. Infections in acute leukemia in Indian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Roy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: In the present study acute leukemic children were studied to determine the incidence and principal site of infection, correlation with absolute neutrophil count, causative organisms and to standardize the initial empirical anti microbial therapy. Materials and methods: A total 40 children in the age group 6 month to 12 year with acute leukemia relapse were included in this study. A total 82 infectious episodes including 61 febrile episodes were investigated for infectious etiology. Results: We found that the frequency of infections increased significantly with the degree of immunocompromisation specially neutropenia (ANC < 500/cmm. The skin and soft tissue was the commonest site of infection (26.83%, followed by respiratory tract (21.95%. Staphylococcus nonhemolytic coagulase-negative (34%, followed by Klebsiella (17% were the most common organisms isolated from blood. Staphylococcus non-hemolytic coagulase-negative was also the commonest isolate (26% from other sites of infection. Most strains were sensitive to Cloxacillin, cephalosporin and aminoglycosides. Conclusion: For the treatment of febrile episodes, empirical use of beta-lactamase resistant penicillin e.g. Cloxacillin or cephalosporin combined with an aminoglycosides with a broad spectrum antifungal like fluconazole in selective cases at the first sign of infection is recommended. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2013, Vol-9, No-1, 40-47 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v9i1.9672

  15. [Acute myeloid leukemia originating from the same leukemia clone after the complete remission of acute lymphoid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Isao; Nakamaki, Tsuyoshi; Amaya, Hiroshi; Kiyosaki, Masanobu; Kawakami, Keiichiro; Yamada, Kazunari; Yokoyama, Akihiro; Hino, Ken-ichiro; Tomoyasu, Shigeru

    2003-09-01

    A 22-year-old female was diagnosed as having acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) in February 1995, from the findings of peroxidase negative, CD10+, CD19+, TdT+ and rearrangement of IgH and TCR beta. AdVP (doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone) therapy achieved a complete remission (CR). Bone marrow transplantation had to be abandoned because of the lack of an HLA-identical donor. Intensification therapy was thus carried out repeatedly. In June 1998, myeloblast with Auer rods, peroxidase positive, CD13+, CD33+ and HLA-DR+, appeared. The patient was diagnosed as having lineage switch acute myeloid leukemia (AML) from ALL. Though A-DMP (cytosine arabinoside, daunorubicin, 6-mercaptopurine) therapy was resistant, AdVP therapy led to a CR. The patient died of cardiotoxicity from anthracyclines in February 1999. From the results of the Ramasamy method using the clonal rearrangements of the Ig heavy chain gene locus, the origin of the pathological cells of ALL and AML was indicated to be the same leukemia clone.

  16. Role of Ikaros in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Philippe; Kastner; Susan; Chan

    2011-01-01

    Ikaros is a zinc finger transcriptional regulator encoded by the Ikzf1 gene.Ikaros displays crucial functions in the hematopoietic system and its loss of function has been linked to the development of lymphoid leukemia.In particular,Ikaros has been found in recent years to be a major tumor suppressor involved in human B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.Its role in T-cell leukemia,however,has been more controversial.While Ikaros deficiency appears to be very frequent in murine T-cell leukemias,loss of Ikaros appears to be rare in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL).We review here the evidence linking Ikaros to T-ALL in mouse and human systems.

  17. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Presented as Multiple Breast Masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayrak, Ilkay Koray; Yalin, Turkay; Ozmen, Zafer; Aksoz, Tolga; Doughanji, Roula [Ondokuz Mayis University, Samsun (Turkmenistan)

    2009-10-15

    Breast metastases in cases leukemia are very rare and occur primarily in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. We report the involvement of breast metastases in a 30-year-old woman with acute T cell lymphoblastic leukemia. The patient's mammograms revealed an extremely dense pattern with ill-defined, denser mass-like lesions in both breasts. A bilateral breast ultrasonographic evaluation revealed lobular-shaped and partly ill-defined hypoechoic masses with a multi-septated nodular (mottled) appearance.

  18. Imatinib induces H2AX phosphorylation and apoptosis in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells in vitro via caspase-3/Mst1 pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-jun ZHANG; Lian-ning DUAN; Cheng-rong LU; Yan CAO; Yuan LUO; Rong-feng BAO; Shu YAN; Mei XUE; Feng ZHU; Zhe WANG

    2012-01-01

    Aim:Histone H2AX is a novel tumor suppressor and its phosphorylation at the C terminus (Ser139 and Tyr142)is required for tumor cell apoptosis.The aim of the present study was to elucidate the mechanisms underlying imatinib-induced C-terminal phosphorylation of H2AX in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells in vitro.Methods:BCR-ABL-positive K562 cells were used.Microscopy,Western blotting and flow cytometry were used to study the signaling pathways that regulate imatinib-induced H2AX phosphorylation and the apoptotic mechanisms.Results:Treatment of K562 cells with imatinib (1-8 μmol/L)induced phosphorylation of H2AX at Ser139 and Tyr142 in time-and dose-dependent manners.In contrast,imatinib at the same concentrations did not affect H2AX acetylation at Lys 5,and the acetylated H2AX maintained a higher level in the cells.Meanwhile,imatinib (1-8 μmol/L)activated caspase-3 and its downstream mammalian STE20-like kinase 1 (Mst1),and induced apoptosis of K562 cells.The caspase-3 inhibitor Z-VAD (40 μmol/L)reduced imatinibinduced H2AX phosphorylation at Ser139 and Tyr142 and blocked imatinib-induced apoptosis of K562 cells.Imatinib (4 μmol/L)induced expression of Williams-Beuren syndrome transcription factor (WSTF),but not wild-type p53-induced phosphatase 1 (Wip1)in K562 cells.Conclusion:The caspase-3/Mst1 pathway is required for H2AX C-terminal phosphorylation at Ser139 and Tyr142 and subsequent apoptosis in Bcr-Abl-positive K562 cells induced by imatinib.

  19. H2AX phosphorylation regulated by p38 is involved in Bim expression and apoptosis in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells induced by imatinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yaqiong; Xiong, Min; Duan, Lianning; Liu, Ze; Niu, Tianhui; Luo, Yuan; Wu, Xinpin; Xu, Chengshan; Lu, Chengrong

    2014-08-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that histone H2AX plays a critical role in regulation of tumor cell apoptosis and acts as a novel human tumor suppressor protein. However, the action of H2AX in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells is unknown. The detailed mechanism and epigenetic regulation by H2AX remain elusive in cancer cells. Here, we report that H2AX was involved in apoptosis of CML cells. Overexpression of H2AX increased apoptotic sensitivity of CML cells (K562) induced by imatinib. However, overexpression of Ser139-mutated H2AX (blocking phosphorylation) decreased sensitivity of K562 cells to apoptosis. Similarly, knockdown of H2AX made K562 cells resistant to apoptotic induction. These results revealed that the function of H2AX involved in apoptosis is strictly related to its phosphorylation (Ser139). Our data further indicated that imatinib may stimulate mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family member p38, and H2AX phosphorylation followed a similar time course, suggesting a parallel response. H2AX phosphorylation can be blocked by p38 siRNA or its inhibitor. These data demonstrated that H2AX phosphorylation was regulated by p38 MAPK pathway in K562 cells. However, the p38 MAPK downstream, mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase-1 and -2, which phosphorylated histone H3, were not required for H2AX phosphorylation during apoptosis. Finally, we provided epigenetic evidence that H2AX phosphorylation regulated apoptosis-related gene Bim expression. Blocking of H2AX phosphorylation inhibited Bim gene expression. Taken together, these data demonstrated that H2AX phosphorylation regulated by p38 is involved in Bim expression and apoptosis in CML cells induced by imatinib.

  20. Clinical effects of nilotinib on chronic myelogenous leukemia%尼洛替尼治疗慢性粒细胞白血病的临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江慧敏; 曾庆曙; 倪婧; 鲍静; 阮敏

    2012-01-01

    To observe the efficacy and adverse reactions of a second -generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor( TKI) nilotinib on 14 chronic myelogenous leukemia ( CML) cases who were resistance or intolerance of imatinib therapy . 10 cases(71. 4% ) achieved complete hematologic remission ( CHR) ,2 cases (20% ) relapsed after remission. 2 cases ( 14. 3% ) were complete cytogenetic remission ( CCyR) , 4 cases (28. 6% ) were partial cytogenetic remission (PCyR) ,of which 1 case(16. 7% ) relapsed in 3 months after remission. Nilotinib is a effective drug for the resistance or intolerance of imatinib in patients with CML , which has a higher remission rate of hematology and genetics .%观察二代酪氨酸激酶抑制剂(TKI)尼洛替尼对14例伊马替尼耐药或不耐受的慢性粒细胞白血病(CML)患者的疗效及不良反应.14例患者有10例(71.4%)获得血液学完全缓解(CHR),其中2例(20%)缓解后复发.14例患者中2例(14.3%)获得完全遗传学缓解(CCyR),4例(28.6%)获部分遗传学缓解(PCyR),其中1例(16.7%)缓解后3个月复发.提示尼洛替尼对伊马替尼治疗耐药或不耐受的CML患者有较高的血液学及遗传学缓解率.

  1. Acute appendicitis in acute leukemia and the potential role of decitabine in the critically ill patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Warad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute appendicitis in children with acute leukemia is uncommon and often recognized late. Immunocompromised host state coupled with the importance of avoiding treatment delays makes management additionally challenging. Leukemic infiltration of the appendix though rare must also be considered. Although successful conservative management has been reported, surgical intervention is required in most cases. We present our experience with acute appendicitis in children with acute leukemia and a case of complete remission of acute myeloid leukemia with a short course of decitabine. Decitabine may serve as bridging therapy in critically ill patients who are unable to undergo intensive chemotherapy.

  2. Brucella bacteremia in patients with acute leukemia: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Anazi Khalid

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brucellosis may cause serious infections in healthy individuals living in countries that are endemic for the infection. However, reports of brucella infections in immunocompromised hosts are relatively rare. Case Presentations Reported here are two patients with acute leukemia who developed Brucella melitensis bacteremia during their follow up at the Armed Forces Hospital in Riyadh. The first patient developed B. melitensis bacteremia during the transformation of his myelodysplasia into acute myeloid leukemia. The second patient developed B. melitensis bacteremia while his acute lymphoblastic leukemia was under control. Interestingly, he presented with acute cholecystitis during the brucella sepsis. Both brucella infections were associated with a marked reduction in the hematological parameters in addition to other complications. The bacteremic episodes were successfully treated with netilmicin, doxycycline and ciprofloxacin. Conclusion Brucellosis can cause systemic infections, complicated bacteremia and serious morbidity in patients with acute leukemia living in endemic areas. These infections may occur at the presentation of the leukemia or even when the leukemia is in remission. Nevertheless, the early diagnosis of brucellosis and the administration of appropriate antimicrobial therapy for sufficient duration usually improves the outcome in these immunocompromised patients.

  3. [Our experiences in the treatment of acute leukemias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelić, S; Dragović, M; Vidaković, B; Plecas, V

    1976-01-01

    This paper deals with observations concerning treatment of acute leukemia in the Department of haematology of The Clinical hospital of Belgrade during the period from 1970 to 1975, and with results of the treatment itself. During the last five years, 27 patients with different types of acute leukemia were treated. The type of acute leukemia was determined using cytological criteria of Levy and Lortholary and cytochemical criteria as described by Hayhoe. One thrid of the patients died during the first days of hospitalisation, before any effect of cytostatic treatment could be evaluated. The cause of death in those patients was septic shock, intracranial haemorrhage or cardiovascular colapsus; initial signs of those complications of acute leukemia were allready present before diagnosis. Those data point to the fact that diagnosis of acute leukemia is often made too late, when irreversible ocmplications of the disease are allready established. Patients over sixty, often "fragile" to aggresive cytostatic therapy, may enter complete and relatively long lasting remission with induction therapy cosisting of 6-mercaptopurine and methotrexate only. Allthough the number of cases was rather limited, the authors had rather disappointing results with the 06-LA-66 protocole in adult lymphoblastic leukemia. The first with COAP treatment protocole seem encouraging. Adequate cytostatic therapy was in several cases impossible, duo to the lack of adequate substitution therapy; such inadequate cytostatic therapy resulted in partial remissions with a rather poor quality survival. A beeter cooperation is needed between hospital centers and institutions which provide matherial for the substitution theapy.

  4. PROGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF EXPRESSION OF SURVIVIN IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓娟; 戴国仪; 曹利民; 王国华; 朱慧芬; 张悦; 沈关心

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of survivin gene and its significance in acute leukemia. Methods: The expression of surviving in 134 acute leukemia patients and 4 leukemia cell lines was detected by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence analysis. Results: We detected survivin expression in 78 of 134 acute leukemia patients and all the cell lines but not in normal controls and anemia patients. Survivin gene expression correlated with a lower white blood cell count, which was 11×109/L and 48×109/L in the positive and negative group respectively (P<0.01 by the Mann-Whitney test). In 55 cases of FAB M1/M2/M3, it was associated with leukemic cell maturation(P<0.01 by the Fisher test). Survivin expression was strongly related to survival time of acute leukemia patients (P<0.05). Conclusion: These data suggest that survivin expression may be considered as a new unfavorable prognostic factor for acute leukemia due to its important role in apoptosis inhibition that influences disease outcome.

  5. Decitabine as Maintenance Therapy After Standard Therapy in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-19

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Fournier's gangrene as first presentation of promyelocytic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, HJ; Girbes, ARJ; Daenen, S

    A 50-year-old male is described who presented with Fournier's gangrene as what is probably the first manifestation of a newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), promyelocytic type or variant type M-3, according to the FAB classification. Despite aggressive fluid resuscitation, tuned

  7. Evaluation of Serum Leptin Level in Children With Acute Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraj Shahramian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Leptin is a multifunctional hormone plays an important role in regulating lipid, energy, homeostasis, angiogenesis, inflammation, hematopoiesis and cell cycle. This polypeptide is effective in growth and differentiation of leukemic cells through an Ob-R receptor expressed by them. Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate serum leptin levels in patients with acute leukemia and compare it in lymphoid and myeloid groups. Patients and Methods This analytical case-control study, conducted on 60 children in age ranged from 6 months to 16 years in two case and control groups in Ali ibn Abi Talib hospital, Zahedan. They matched based on age and gender and examined after their parent’s satisfaction according to the parental consent forms. None of patients had heart disease, digestive, glandular and metabolic problems, iron deficiency anemia and chronic kidney disease. After collecting the samples, leptin levels of both groups were measured with ELISA kit. Then, the gathered data were analyzed in SPSS-20 software, using independent t-test in considering of 95% confidence interval. Results Leptin serum levels in patients with acute leukemia and controls showed significant difference (P < 0.05. Leptin serum levels in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloblastic leukemia showed significant difference (P < 0.05. Leptin serum level in relation to age and gender groups was not statistically significant. Conclusions The findings of this study showed that in patients with acute leukemia, leptin serum levels increase independently of age and gender. In addition, leptin serum levels in acute lymphoid leukemia were higher than acute myeloid leukemia in this study.

  8. Expression of CD71 by flow cytometry in acute leukemias: More often seen in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Amit; Dorwal, Pranav; Jain, Dharmendra; Tyagi, Neetu; Mehra, Simmi; Sachdev, Ritesh; Raina, Vimarsh

    2016-01-01

    CD71 is a marker that has been usually used for identifying dysplasia in the erythroid series. We have tried to evaluate the expression of CD71 in various types of acute leukemias. We studied 48 patients of acute leukemia, of which 25 were acute myeloid leukemia (AML), 13 were precursor B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), 8 were T-ALL, and 2 were mixed phenotype acute leukemia (T/myeloid) as per the WHO classification. We found that the expression of CD71 was most prevalent in AMLs (84%), followed by T-ALL (50%) and least in B-ALL (30%). This finding clearly shows the higher expression of CD71 in AMLs compared to other common type of leukemias, such as B- and T-ALL. We suggest that the high expression of CD71 in AMLs could be used as a diagnostic marker and may also be used for minimal residual disease analysis after further studies in posttreatment scenario. This study is the first of its kind in the South Asian population.

  9. Notch signaling in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieselhuber, N R; Klco, J M; Verdoni, A M; Lamprecht, T; Sarkaria, S M; Wartman, L D; Ley, T J

    2013-07-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is initiated by the PML-RARA (PR) fusion oncogene and has a characteristic expression profile that includes high levels of the Notch ligand Jagged-1 (JAG1). In this study, we used a series of bioinformatic, in vitro, and in vivo assays to assess the role of Notch signaling in human APL samples, and in a PML-RARA knock-in mouse model of APL (Ctsg-PML-RARA). We identified a Notch expression signature in both human primary APL cells and in Kit+Lin-Sca1+ cells from pre-leukemic Ctsg-PML-RARA mice. Both genetic and pharmacologic inhibition of Notch signaling abrogated the enhanced self-renewal seen in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells from pre-leukemic Ctsg-PML-RARA mice, but had no influence on cells from age-matched wild-type mice. In addition, six of nine murine APL tumors tested displayed diminished growth in vitro when Notch signaling was inhibited pharmacologically. Finally, we found that genetic inhibition of Notch signaling with a dominant-negative Mastermind-like protein reduced APL growth in vivo in a subset of tumors. These findings expand the role of Notch signaling in hematopoietic diseases, and further define the mechanistic events important for PML-RARA-mediated leukemogenesis.

  10. Treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Daisy; Hladnik, Lindsay

    2009-06-01

    Management of the pregnant patient with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a challenge. Immediate treatment of APL is critical, as it is an oncologic emergency, with a high risk of morbidity and mortality associated with disseminated intravascular coagulation. However, administration of chemotherapy and differentiating agents in pregnancy is controversial because of potential teratogenic effects. In addition, complications associated with APL, including retinoic acid syndrome, add to the complexity of management. To better understand how to manage this complex patient care situation, we searched the PubMed database (January 1972-May 2008) for English-language articles about maternal and fetal outcomes resulting from APL treatment during pregnancy. A total of 42 cases from 35 articles were identified: 12 first-trimester, 21 second-trimester, and 9 third-trimester cases. The most commonly administered agents were all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), anthracyclines, and antimetabolites. Complete remission was reported in 35 (83%) of 42 patients. Administration of ATRA or chemotherapy in the first trimester was associated with an increased risk of fetal malformations and spontaneous abortion, whereas administration in the second and third trimesters was associated with relatively favorable fetal outcomes. The overall treatment of the pregnant patient with APL should include a discussion about pregnancy termination, especially if APL is diagnosed in the first trimester. If the pregnancy is to continue, then the appropriate chemotherapy regimen needs to be determined. Frequent fetal monitoring, along with aggressive management of potential APL-related complications, is necessary to allow for optimal maternal and fetal outcomes.

  11. Elastase mediated fibrinolysis in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudijk, E J; Nieuwenhuis, H K; Bos, R; Fijnheer, R

    2000-06-01

    The bleeding syndrome of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is complex and consists of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and hyperfibrinolysis. Elastase, derived from malignant promyelocytes, is believed to mediate the fibrinogeno- and fibrinolysis by aspecific proteolysis. In this study we measured the role of elastase in fifteen patients with APL by using an assay for elastase degraded fibrin(ogen) and the results were compared with those obtained in patients with sepsis induced DIC. High levels of elastase were observed in sepsis and APL. The levels of fibrinogen and fibrin degradation products were significantly higher in APL patients compared to patients with sepsis induced DIC. Nevertheless, the level of elastase degraded fibrin(ogen) was higher in the sepsis group (635.3 ng/ml, compared to 144.3 ng/ml in APL; p <0.0001). So, the enormous increase in fibrin and fibrinogen degradation products in APL cannot be explained by elastase activity. This study suggests a minor role for elastase mediated proteolysis in the hemorrhagic diathesis in APL patients.

  12. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Progress Through Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun J.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Pieters, Rob; Schrappe, Martin; Biondi, Andrea; Vora, Ajay; Baruchel, André; Silverman, Lewis B.; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Escherich, Gabriele; Horibe, Keizo; Benoit, Yves C.M.; Izraeli, Shai; Yeoh, Allen Eng Juh; Liang, Der-Cherng; Downing, James R.; Evans, William E.; Relling, Mary V.; Mullighan, Charles G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To review the impact of collaborative studies on advances in the biology and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children and adolescents. Methods A review of English literature on childhood ALL focusing on collaborative studies was performed. The resulting article was reviewed and revised by the committee chairs of the major ALL study groups. Results With long-term survival rates for ALL approaching 90% and the advent of high-resolution genome-wide analyses, several international study groups or consortia were established to conduct collaborative research to further improve outcome. As a result, treatment strategies have been improved for several subtypes of ALL, such as infant, MLL-rearranged, Philadelphia chromosome–positive, and Philadelphia chromosome–like ALL. Many recurrent genetic abnormalities that respond to tyrosine kinase inhibitors and multiple genetic determinants of drug resistance and toxicities have been identified to help develop targeted therapy. Several genetic polymorphisms have been recognized that show susceptibility to developing ALL and that help explain the racial/ethnic differences in the incidence of ALL. Conclusion The information gained from collaborative studies has helped decipher the heterogeneity of ALL to help improve personalized treatment, which will further advance the current high cure rate and the quality of life for children and adolescents with ALL. PMID:26304874

  13. Novel therapeutic options in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Medinger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a biologically complex and molecularly and clinically heterogeneous disease, and its incidence is increasing as the population ages. Cytogenetic anomalies and mutation testing remain important prognostic tools for tailoring treatment after induction therapy. Despite major advances in understanding the genetic landscape of AML and its impact on the pathophysiology and biology of the disease, as well as the rapid development of new drugs, standard treatment options have not experienced major changes during the past three decades. Especially for patients with intermediate or high-risk AML, which often show relapse. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT remains the best chance for cure. Here we review the state of the art therapy of AML, with special focus on new developments in immunotherapies and cellular therapies including HSCT and particularly discuss the impact of new conditioning and haplo-identical donor regimens for HSCT, post-transplant strategies for preventing and treating relapse, and emerging novel therapeutic options.

  14. Bacillus cereus bacteremia in an adult with acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funada, H; Uotani, C; Machi, T; Matsuda, T; Nonomura, A

    1988-03-01

    Bacillus cereus, which used to be considered non-pathogenic, was isolated from the blood of a patient with acute leukemia who was receiving intensive chemotherapy. Fatal bacteremia developed with a clinical syndrome of acute gastroenteritis, followed by both meningoencephalitis with subarachnoid hemorrhage and multiple liver abscesses probably caused by infective vasculitis. Surveillance stool cultures revealed colonization with the organism prior to the onset of diarrhea, and repetitive blood cultures were found to be positive. Thus, this case suggested some new important clinicopathologic features of true B. cereus bacteremia complicating acute leukemia.

  15. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adolescents and young adults in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usvasalo, Anu; Räty, Riikka; Knuutila, Sakari; Vettenranta, Kim; Harila-Saari, Arja; Jantunen, Esa; Kauppila, Marjut; Koistinen, Pirjo; Parto, Katriina; Riikonen, Pekka; Salmi, Toivo T; Silvennoinen, Raija; Elonen, Erkki; Saarinen-Pihkala, Ulla M

    2008-08-01

    Interest has recently been paid to adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, particularly because all reports so far published indicate that these patients have a better outcome when treated with pediatric rather than adult therapeutic protocols. There are different biological subtypes of acute lymphoblastic leukemia with distinct features and prognoses; the distribution of these subtypes is not well known among adolescents. We, therefore, studied acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adolescents and young adults aged 10 to 25 years in Finland. This population-based study included 225 consecutive patients aged 10-25 years diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia during 1990-2004. One hundred and twenty-eight patients (10-16 years) were treated with pediatric Nordic (NOPHO) protocols, and 97 patients (17-25 years) with Finnish Leukemia Group National protocols. We characterized the biological subtypes, clinical features and outcome of these patients. For the whole cohort, the remission rate was 96%, 5-year event-free survival 62% and overall survival 72%. The 5-year event-free survival was 67% for the pediatric treatment group and 60% for the adult treatment group (p=n.s.). Patients with inferior outcome were those with a white blood cell count >or= 100 x 10(9)/L, the Philadelphia chromosome and MLL. Good prognostic features were TEL-AML1, hyperdiploidy, and pediatric intermediate risk stratification. Unlike all previous studies, we found that the outcome of adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with pediatric or adult therapeutic protocols was comparable. The success of the adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy emphasizes the benefit of central referral of patients to academic centers and adherence to research protocols.

  16. Small?molecule Hedgehog inhibitor attenuates the leukemia?initiation potential of acute myeloid leukemia cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fukushima, Nobuaki; Minami, Yosuke; Kakiuchi, Seiji; Kuwatsuka, Yachiyo; Hayakawa, Fumihiko; Jamieson, Catoriona; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Naoe, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway has been implicated in the maintenance of leukemia stem cell populations in several model systems. PF?04449913 (PF?913) is a selective, small?molecule inhibitor of Smoothened, a membrane protein that regulates the Hedgehog pathway. However, details of the proof?of?concept and mechanism of action of PF?913 following administration to patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are unclear. This study examined the role of the Hedgehog signali...

  17. ADAMTS2 gene dysregulation in T/myeloid mixed phenotype acute leukemia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tota, Giuseppina; Coccaro, Nicoletta; Zagaria, Antonella; Anelli, Luisa; Casieri, Paola; Cellamare, Angelo; Minervini, Angela; Minervini, Crescenzio Francesco; Brunetti, Claudia; Impera, Luciana; Carluccio, Paola; Cumbo, Cosimo; Specchia, Giorgina; Albano, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Mixed phenotype acute leukemias (MPAL) include acute leukemias with blasts that express antigens of more than one lineage, with no clear evidence of myeloid or lymphoid lineage differentiation. T/myeloid (T/My...

  18. Characterization of CEBPA mutations and promoter hypermethylation in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground Dysfunctioning of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBP α) in acute myeloid leukemia can be caused, amongst others, by mutations in the encoding gene (CEBPA) and by promoter hypermethylation. CEBPA-mutated acute myeloid leukemia is associated with a favorable outcome, but this may be restricted to the case of double mutations in CEBPA in adult acute myeloid leukemia. In pediatric acute myeloid leukemia, data on the impact of these mutations are limited to one series, ...

  19. Pristimerin induces apoptosis in imatinib-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia cells harboring T315I mutation by blocking NF-κB signaling and depleting Bcr-Abl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Qi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML is characterized by the chimeric tyrosine kinase Bcr-Abl. Bcr-Abl-T315I is the notorious point mutation that causes resistance to imatinib and the second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors, leading to poor prognosis. CML blasts have constitutive p65 (RelA NF-κB transcriptional activity, and NF-κB may be a potential target for molecular therapies in CML that may also be effective against CML cells with Bcr-Abl-T315I. Results In this report, we discovered that pristimerin, a quinonemethide triterpenoid isolated from Celastraceae and Hippocrateaceae, inhibited growth and induced apoptosis in CML cells, including the cells harboring Bcr-Abl-T315I mutation. Additionally, pristimerin inhibited the growth of imatinib-resistant Bcr-Abl-T315I xenografts in nude mice. Pristimerin blocked the TNFα-induced IκBα phosphorylation, translocation of p65, and expression of NF-κB-regulated genes. Pristimerin inhibited two steps in NF-κB signaling: TAK1→IKK and IKK→IκBα. Pristimerin potently inhibited two pairs of CML cell lines (KBM5 versus KBM5-T315I, 32D-Bcr-Abl versus 32D-Bcr-Abl-T315I and primary cells from a CML patient with acquired resistance to imatinib. The mRNA and protein levels of Bcr-Abl in imatinib-sensitive (KBM5 or imatinib-resistant (KBM5-T315I CML cells were reduced after pristimerin treatment. Further, inactivation of Bcr-Abl by imatinib pretreatment did not abrogate the TNFα-induced NF-κB activation while silencing p65 by siRNA did not affect the levels of Bcr-Abl, both results together indicating that NF-κB inactivation and Bcr-Abl inhibition may be parallel independent pathways. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report to show that pristimerin is effective in vitro and in vivo against CML cells, including those with the T315I mutation. The mechanisms may involve inhibition of NF-κB and Bcr-Abl. We concluded that pristimerin could be a lead compound for

  20. Transformation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome to Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in a Child

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Childhood myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is an uncommon condition. Unlike adult MDS, pediatric patients have a more progressive course and rapidly transform to acute myeloid leukemia. Evolution to acute lymphoblastic leukemia is extremely rare. We report a 5 year old female child who presented with refractory anemia with excess blasts and transformed into acute lymphoblastic leukemia 4 months after initial diagnosis.

  1. Tretinoin and Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-08

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Myeloid Neoplasm

  2. Renal Presentation in Pediatric Acute Leukemia: Report of 2 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherief, Laila M; Azab, Seham F; Zakaria, Marwa M; Kamal, Naglaa M; Abd Elbasset Aly, Maha; Ali, Adel; Abd Alhady, Mohamed

    2015-09-01

    Renal enlargement at time of diagnosis of acute leukemia is very unusual. We here in report 2 pediatric cases of acute leukemia who had their renal affection as the first presenting symptom with no evidences of blast cells in blood smear and none of classical presentation of acute leukemia. The first case is a 4-year-old girl who presented with pallor and abdominal enlargement. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral symmetrical homogenous enlarged kidneys suggestive of infiltration. Complete blood picture (CBC) revealed white blood count 11 × 10⁹/L, hemoglobin 8.7 g/dL and platelet count 197 × 10⁹/L. Bone marrow aspiration was performed, and diagnosed precursor B-cell ALL was made. The child had an excellent response to modified CCG 1991 standard risk protocol of chemotherapy with sustained remission, but unfortunately relapsed 11 month after the end of therapy. The second child was 13-month old, presented with pallor, vomiting, abdominal enlargement, and oliguria 2 days before admission. Initial CBC showed bicytopenia, elevated blood urea, creatinine, and serum uric acid, while abdominal ultrasonography revealed bilateral renal enlargement. Bone marrow examination was done and showed 92% blast of biphenotypic nature. So, biphynotypic leukemia with bilateral renal enlargement and acute renal failure was subsequently diagnosed. The patients admitted to ICU and received supportive care and prednisolone. Renal function normalized and chemotherapy was started. The child achieved complete remission with marked reduction of kidney size but, unfortunately she died from sepsis in consolidation phase of therapy. This case demonstrates an unusual early renal enlargement in childhood acute leukemia. Renal involvement of acute leukemia should be considered in child presenting with unexplained bilateral renal enlargement with or without renal function abnormalities and bone marrow examination should be included in the workup.

  3. Diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    The Cancergram covers both acute and chronic leukemia in all of its forms (acute lymphocytic, acute monocytic, acute or sub-acute granulocytic, chronic granulocytic, chronic lymphocytic, chronic monocytic, plasma cell, stem cell, and hairy cell). Other neoplastic conditions of the reticuloendothelial system, lymphatic system, spleen, multiple myeloma, macroglobulinemia and other monoclonal gammopathies are excluded, and will be coveted by other Cancergrams now under development. This Cancergram includes abstracts concerning all clinical aspects of the disease, such as diagnosis and staging, supportive care, evaluation, and therapy. Animal models, tissue culture experiments, carcinogenesis and other pre-clinical studies are generally excluded, except for those considered to have direct clinical relevance.

  4. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lower part of the spinal column, after a small area on the lower back is numbed. These treatments are given in addition to treatment that is used to kill leukemia cells in the rest of the body. All children ...

  5. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lower part of the spinal column, after a small area on the lower back is numbed. These treatments are given in addition to treatment that is used to kill leukemia cells in the rest of the body. All children ...

  6. General Information about Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lower part of the spinal column, after a small area on the lower back is numbed. These treatments are given in addition to treatment that is used to kill leukemia cells in the rest of the body. All children ...

  7. Risk Groups for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lower part of the spinal column, after a small area on the lower back is numbed. These treatments are given in addition to treatment that is used to kill leukemia cells in the rest of the body. All children ...

  8. What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lymphoid tissue is found in lymph nodes, the thymus, the spleen, the tonsils and adenoids, and is ... destroy some germs by surrounding and digesting them. Development of leukemia Any type of early blood-forming ...

  9. Decitabine and Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-09

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Ploidy and clinical characteristics of childhood acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandahl, Julie Damgaard; Kjeldsen, Eigil; Abrahamsson, Jonas;

    2014-01-01

    We report the first large series (n = 596) of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) focusing on modal numbers (MN) from the population-based NOPHO-AML trials. Abnormal karyotypes were present in 452 cases (76%) and numerical aberrations were present in 40% (n = 237) of all pediatric AML. Among...... with early onset (median age 2 years), female sex (57%), and a dominance of acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) (29%). Hypodiploidy constituted 8% of all AML and was associated with older age (median age 9 years), male predominance (60%), FAB M2 (56%), and t(8;21)(q22;q22) (56%) with loss of sex...

  11. Second Malignant Neoplasms After Treatment of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, K.; Levinsen, Mette Frandsen; Attarbaschi, Andishe

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Second malignant neoplasms (SMNs) after diagnosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are rare events. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed data on risk factors and outcomes of 642 children with SMNs occurring after treatment for ALL from 18 collaborative study groups between 1980...... and 2007. RESULTS: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML; n = 186), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS; n = 69), and nonmeningioma brain tumor (n = 116) were the most common types of SMNs and had the poorest outcome (5-year survival rate, 18.1% ± 2.9%, 31.1% ± 6.2%, and 18.3% ± 3.8%, respectively). Five-year survival...

  12. Esophageal strictures during treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Kevin

    2012-02-01

    Esophageal stricture is a rare complication of paediatric cancer treatment that usually occurs after esophageal exposure to radiotherapy. We describe 4 cases of esophageal stricture during chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. All patients presented with refractory vomiting and were diagnosed with radiologic contrast studies. None of the patients had received radiotherapy. Esophageal candidiasis was seen in 2 patients but the remaining 2 patients had earlier systemic candidiasis. High-dose dexamethasone may predispose these children to both esophageal candidiasis and peptic esophagitis. The etiology of esophageal strictures during treatment for acute leukemia is likely to be multifactorial but systemic candidiasis may play a significant role.

  13. Relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskarsson, Trausti; Söderhäll, Stefan; Arvidson, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Relapse is the main reason for treatment failure in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Despite improvements in the up-front therapy, survival after relapse is still relatively poor, especially for high-risk relapses. The aims of this study were to assess outcomes following acute lymphoblastic...... leukemia relapse after common initial Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology protocol treatment; to validate currently used risk stratifications, and identify additional prognostic factors for overall survival. Altogether, 516 of 2735 patients (18.9%) relapsed between 1992 and 2011 and were...

  14. Evaluation of multielements in human serum of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) using SRTXRF; Avaliacao multielementar em soro humano de individuos portadores de leucemia mieloide cronica (LMC) usando SRTXRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitao, Catarine Canellas Gondim

    2005-04-15

    In this work, trace elements were analyzed in serum of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) by Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence using synchrotron radiation (SRTXRF). Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) affects the myeloid cells in the blood and affects 1 to 2 people per 100,000 and accounts for 7-20% cases of leukemia. Sixty patients with CML and sixty healthy volunteers (control group) were studied. Blood was collected into vacutainers without additives. Directly after collection, each blood sample was centrifuged at 3000 rev/min for 10 min in order to separate blood cells and suspended particles from blood serum. Sera were transferred into polyethylene tubes and stored in a freezer at 253 K. A 500 {sup m}u{sup L} serum quantity was spiked with Ga (50 {sup m}u{sup L} ) as internal standard. 10 {sup m}u{sup L} aliquots were pipetted on Perspex sample carrier. After deposition, the samples were left to dry under an infrared lamp. The measurements were performed at the X-Ray Fluorescence Beamline at Brazilian National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), using a polychromatic beam. Standard solutions with gallium as internal standard were prepared for calibration system. It was possible to determine the concentrations of the following elements: P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br and Rb. Starting from the ANOVA test was observed that the elements P, S, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu and Rb presented real significant differences ({alpha} = 0.05) between groups (healthy subjects and CML patients) and Sex (males and females). (author)

  15. Pathogenesis of disseminated intravascular coagulation in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia, and its treatment using recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikezoe, Takayuki

    2014-07-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is an uncommon subtype of acute myelogenous leukemia characterized by the proliferation of blasts with distinct morphology, a specific balanced reciprocal translocation t(15;17), and life-threatening hemorrhage caused mainly by enhanced fibrinolytic-type disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). The introduction of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) into anthracycline-based induction chemotherapy regimens has dramatically improved overall survival of individuals with APL, although hemorrhage-related death during the early phase of therapy remains a serious problem. Moreover, population-based studies have shown that the incidence of early death during induction chemotherapy is nearly 30 %, and the most common cause of death is associated with hemorrhage. Thus, development of a novel treatment strategy to alleviate abnormal coagulation in APL patients is urgently required. Recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin (rTM) comprises the active extracellular domain of TM, and has been used for treatment of DIC since 2008 in Japan. Use of rTM in combination with remission induction chemotherapy, including ATRA, produces potent resolution of DIC without exacerbation of bleeding tendency in individuals with APL. This review article discusses the pathogenesis and features of DIC caused by APL, as well as the possible anticoagulant and anti-leukemic action of rTM in APL patients.

  16. Immunotherapy of acute leukemia by chimeric antigen receptor-modified lymphocytes using an improved Sleeping Beauty transposon platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnani, Chiara F; Turazzi, Nice; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Calabria, Andrea; Tenderini, Erika; Tettamanti, Sarah; Giordano Attianese, Greta M P; Cooper, Laurence J N; Aiuti, Alessandro; Montini, Eugenio; Biondi, Andrea; Biagi, Ettore

    2016-08-09

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T-cell adoptive immunotherapy is a remarkable therapeutic option proven effective in the treatment of hematological malignancies. In order to optimize cell manufacturing, we sought to develop a novel clinical-grade protocol to obtain CAR-modified cytokine-induced killer cells (CIKs) using the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system. Administration of irradiated PBMCs overcame cell death of stimulating cells induced by non-viral transfection, enabling robust gene transfer together with efficient T-cell expansion. Upon single stimulation, we reached an average of 60% expression of CD123- and CD19- specific 3rd generation CARs (CD28/OX40/TCRzeta). Furthermore, modified cells displayed persistence of cell subsets with memory phenotype, specific and effective lytic activity against leukemic cell lines and primary blasts, cytokine secretion, and proliferation. Adoptive transfer of CD123.CAR or CD19.CAR lymphocytes led to a significant anti-tumor response against acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) disseminated diseases in NSG mice. Notably, we found no evidence of integration enrichment near cancer genes and transposase expression at the end of the differentiation. Taken all together, our findings describe a novel donor-derived non-viral CAR approach that may widen the repertoire of available methods for T cell-based immunotherapy.

  17. Understanding Health Care Costs in a Wisconsin Acute Leukemia Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Steinert

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We investigated factors driving health care costs of patients with a diagnosis of acute myeloid and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods: Standard costs identified in insurance claims data obtained from the Wisconsin Health Information Organization were used in a sample of 837 acute leukemia patients from April 2009 to June 2011. The Andersen behavioral model of health care utilization guided selection of patient and community factors expected to influence health care costs. A generalized linear model fitting gamma-distributed data with log-link technique was used to analyze cost. Results: Type of treatment received and disease severity represented significant cost drivers, and patients receiving at least some of their treatment from academic medical centers experienced higher costs. Inpatient care and pharmacy costs of patients who received treatment from providers located in areas of higher poverty experienced lower costs, raising questions of potential treatment and medical practice disparities between provider locations. Directions of study findings were not consistent between different types of services received and underscore the complexity of investigating health care cost. Conclusions: While prevalence of acute leukemia in the United States is low compared to other diseases, its extreme high cost of treatment is not well understood and potentially influences treatment decisions. Acute leukemia health care costs may not follow expected patterns; further exploration of the relationship between cost and the treatment decision, and potential treatment disparities between providers in different socioeconomic locations, is needed.

  18. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, C; Hofmann, J; Burmeister, T; Gröger, D; Park, T S; Emerenciano, M; Pombo de Oliveira, M; Renneville, A; Villarese, P; Macintyre, E; Cavé, H; Clappier, E; Mass-Malo, K; Zuna, J; Trka, J; De Braekeleer, E; De Braekeleer, M; Oh, S H; Tsaur, G; Fechina, L; van der Velden, V H J; van Dongen, J J M; Delabesse, E; Binato, R; Silva, M L M; Kustanovich, A; Aleinikova, O; Harris, M H; Lund-Aho, T; Juvonen, V; Heidenreich, O; Vormoor, J; Choi, W W L; Jarosova, M; Kolenova, A; Bueno, C; Menendez, P; Wehner, S; Eckert, C; Talmant, P; Tondeur, S; Lippert, E; Launay, E; Henry, C; Ballerini, P; Lapillone, H; Callanan, M B; Cayuela, J M; Herbaux, C; Cazzaniga, G; Kakadiya, P M; Bohlander, S; Ahlmann, M; Choi, J R; Gameiro, P; Lee, D S; Krauter, J; Cornillet-Lefebvre, P; Te Kronnie, G; Schäfer, B W; Kubetzko, S; Alonso, C N; zur Stadt, U; Sutton, R; Venn, N C; Izraeli, S; Trakhtenbrot, L; Madsen, H O; Archer, P; Hancock, J; Cerveira, N; Teixeira, M R; Lo Nigro, L; Möricke, A; Stanulla, M; Schrappe, M; Sedék, L; Szczepański, T; Zwaan, C M; Coenen, E A; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Strehl, S; Dworzak, M; Panzer-Grümayer, R; Dingermann, T; Klingebiel, T; Marschalek, R

    2013-11-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) gene are associated with high-risk infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. We used long-distance inverse-polymerase chain reaction to characterize the chromosomal rearrangement of individual acute leukemia patients. We present data of the molecular characterization of 1590 MLL-rearranged biopsy samples obtained from acute leukemia patients. The precise localization of genomic breakpoints within the MLL gene and the involved translocation partner genes (TPGs) were determined and novel TPGs identified. All patients were classified according to their gender (852 females and 745 males), age at diagnosis (558 infant, 416 pediatric and 616 adult leukemia patients) and other clinical criteria. Combined data of our study and recently published data revealed a total of 121 different MLL rearrangements, of which 79 TPGs are now characterized at the molecular level. However, only seven rearrangements seem to be predominantly associated with illegitimate recombinations of the MLL gene (≈ 90%): AFF1/AF4, MLLT3/AF9, MLLT1/ENL, MLLT10/AF10, ELL, partial tandem duplications (MLL PTDs) and MLLT4/AF6, respectively. The MLL breakpoint distributions for all clinical relevant subtypes (gender, disease type, age at diagnosis, reciprocal, complex and therapy-induced translocations) are presented. Finally, we present the extending network of reciprocal MLL fusions deriving from complex rearrangements.

  19. Optimizing asparaginase therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzari, Carmelo; Conter, Valentino; Starý, Jan; Colombini, Antonella; Moericke, Anja; Schrappe, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Asparaginases are important agents used in the treatment of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Three types of asparaginase are currently available: two are derived from Escherichia coli [native asparaginase and pegylated asparaginase (PEG-asparaginase)] and one from Erwinia chrysanthemi (crisantaspase). All three products share the same mechanism of action but have different pharmacokinetic properties, which do not make them easily interchangeable. Among the known toxicities and side-effects, allergic reactions and silent inactivation represent the most important limitations to the prolonged use of any asparaginase product, with associated reduced therapeutic effects and poorer outcomes. Routine real time monitoring can help to identify patients with silent inactivation and facilitate a switch to a different product to ensure continued depletion of asparagine, completion of the treatment schedule and maintenance of outcomes. However, the most appropriate second-line treatment is still a matter of debate. PEG-asparaginase has lower immunogenicity and a longer half-life than native Escherichia coli (E. coli) asparaginase, which makes it useful for both first-line and second-line use with a reduced number of doses. However, PEG-asparaginase displays cross-reactivity with native E. coli asparaginase that may harm its therapeutic effects. Crisantaspase does not display cross-reactivity to either of the E. coli-derived products, which has made crisantaspase the second-line treatment option in a number of recent protocols. As crisantaspase has a much shorter biological half-life than the E. coli-derived products, the appropriate dosage and administration schedule are of paramount importance in delivering treatment with this product. In the ongoing trial AIEOP-BFM ALL 2009 (Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica - Berlin-Franklin-Munster), in which PEG-asparaginase is used first-line, one dose of PEG-asparaginase is substituted by seven doses

  20. Childhood acute leukemias are frequent in Mexico City: descriptive epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekker-Méndez Vilma

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide, acute leukemia is the most common type of childhood cancer. It is particularly common in the Hispanic populations residing in the United States, Costa Rica, and Mexico City. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of acute leukemia in children who were diagnosed and treated in public hospitals in Mexico City. Methods Included in this study were those children, under 15 years of age and residents of Mexico City, who were diagnosed in 2006 and 2007 with leukemia, as determined by using the International Classification of Childhood Cancer. The average annual incidence rates (AAIR, and the standardized average annual incidence rates (SAAIR per million children were calculated. We calculated crude, age- and sex-specific incidence rates and adjusted for age by the direct method with the world population as standard. We determined if there were a correlation between the incidence of acute leukemias in the various boroughs of Mexico City and either the number of agricultural hectares, the average number of persons per household, or the municipal human development index for Mexico (used as a reference of socio-economic level. Results Although a total of 610 new cases of leukemia were registered during 2006-2007, only 228 fit the criteria for inclusion in this study. The overall SAAIR was 57.6 per million children (95% CI, 46.9-68.3; acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL was the most frequent type of leukemia, constituting 85.1% of the cases (SAAIR: 49.5 per million, followed by acute myeloblastic leukemia at 12.3% (SAAIR: 6.9 per million, and chronic myeloid leukemia at 1.7% (SAAIR: 0.9 per million. The 1-4 years age group had the highest SAAIR for ALL (77.7 per million. For cases of ALL, 73.2% had precursor B-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR: 35.8 per million and 12.4% had T-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR 6.3 per million. The peak ages for ALL were 2-6 years and 8-10 years. More than half the children (58.8% were

  1. Imatinib Mesylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-28

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; BCR-ABL1 Fusion Protein Expression; Minimal Residual Disease; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive; T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  2. [Tumor lysis syndrome in a pregnancy complicated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Goris, M P; Sánchez-Zamora, R; Torres-Aguilar, A A; Briones Garduño, J C

    2016-04-01

    Acute leukemia is rare during pregnancy, affects about 1 in 75,000 pregnancies, of all leukemias diagnosed only 28% are acute lymphoblastic leukemia, this is a risk factor to develop spontaneous tumor lysis syndrome, it's a oncologic complication potentially deadly if the prophylactic treatment its avoided. Cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia associated with pregnancy has been poorly documented in the literature the association of these two entities to pregnancy is the first report published worldwide, so the information is limited.

  3. mRNA overexpression of BAALC: A novel prognostic factor for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Azizi, Zahra; Rahgozar, Soheila; Moafi, Alireza; DABAGHI, MOHAMMAD; NADIMI, MOTAHAREH

    2015-01-01

    BAALC is a novel molecular marker in leukemia that is highly expressed in patients with acute leukemia. Increased expression levels of BAALC are known as poor prognostic factors in adult acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemia. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of the BAALC gene expression levels in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and its association with MDR1. Using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), the...

  4. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Arising in CALR Mutated Essential Thrombocythemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen E. Langabeer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in an existing myeloproliferative neoplasm is rare with historical cases unable to differentiate between concomitant malignancies or leukemic transformation. Molecular studies of coexisting JAK2 V617F-positive myeloproliferative neoplasms and mature B cell malignancies indicate distinct disease entities arising in myeloid and lymphoid committed hematopoietic progenitor cells, respectively. Mutations of CALR in essential thrombocythemia appear to be associated with a distinct phenotype and a lower risk of thrombosis yet their impact on disease progression is less well defined. The as yet undescribed scenario of pro-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia arising in CALR mutated essential thrombocythemia is presented. Intensive treatment for the leukemia allowed for expansion of the original CALR mutated clone. Whether CALR mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms predispose to the acquisition of additional malignancies, particularly lymphoproliferative disorders, is not yet known.

  5. Acute lymphocytic leukemia recurring in the spinal epidural space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashida, Tetsuhiro; Kawasaki, Takashi; Sakata, Katsumi; Tanabe, Yutaka; Kanno, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Isao

    2007-08-01

    A 27-year-old man presented with a very rare spinal epidural mass associated with recurrence of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) manifesting as acute progressive neurological deficits. The patient presented with shoulder pain and ambulatory difficulties 3 years after remission of ALL treated by bone marrow transplantation. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an epidural mass extending from C-7 to T-3, which compressed the cord and extended to the intervertebral foramen along the roots. After decompression surgery, the symptoms dramatically improved. Histological examination showed clusters of immature lymphocytes consistent with recurrence of leukemia, so chemotherapy and radiation therapy were carried out. At 1 year after the operation, no local mass expansion or systemic progression of leukemia had occurred. Leukemic mass must be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural mass, even in patients with ALL.

  6. High expression of RbAp46 gene in patients with acute leukemia or chronic myelogenous leukemia in blast crisis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Shao-yan; CHEN Zi-xing; GU Wei-ying; CEN Jian-nong; ZHAO Ye

    2005-01-01

    @@ The retinoblastoma (Rb) suppressor associated protein 46 (RbAp46) also named retinoblastoma binding protein 7 (RBBP7) was first identified as a protein in HeLa cells that binds to an Rb affinity column.RbAp46 has been shown to be a core component of the mSin3 histone deacetylase (HDAC) complex1 and NuRD ( a multi-subunit complex containing chromosome-remodeling activity).2 RbAp46 is also known as the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) type B subunit 2.3 Thus,RbAp46 functions as a core-histone-binding subunit that targets chromatin assembly factors,chromatin-remodeling factors,histone acetyltransferase and deacetylase to their histone substrates in chromatin.Guan et al4 isolated RbAp46 as a downstream target gene of the Wilms'tumor suppressor gene (WT1),mediating the function of WT1.It has been discovered recently that RbAp46 specifically interacts with the BRCT domain of breast cancer and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1 and modulates its transcriptional transactivation activity.5

  7. Cytotoxic effect of Spirulina platensis extracts on human acute leukemia Kasumi-1 and chronic myelogenous leukemia K-562 cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flor Yohana Flores Hernandez

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The cytotoxicity exhibited by Spirulina extract to cancer cell lines might be due to the presence of phytopigments (carotenoids, chlorophyll, phycocyanin as well as polysaccharides that were reported previously as constituents of the extract. So crude extracts of Spirulina can be used as a source to develop anticancer drugs.

  8. Mutational analysis of NOTCH1, 2, 3 and 4 genes in common solid cancers and acute leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Hak; Jeong, Eun Goo; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2007-12-01

    NOTCH proteins (NOTCH1, NOTCH2, NOTCH3 and NOTCH4) play crucial roles in embryonic development. Also, mounting evidence indicates that NOTCH contributes to the pathogenesis of hematopoietic and solid malignancies. Recent studies reported a high incidence of gain-of-function mutations of the NOTCH1 gene in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALL). To see whether NOTCH1 mutation occurs in other malignancies, we analyzed NOTCH1 for the detection of somatic mutations in 334 malignancies, including 48 lung, 48 breast, 48 colorectal and 48 gastric carcinomas, and 142 acute leukemias (105 acute myelogenous leukemias, 32 B-ALLs and 4 T-ALLs) by single-strand conformation polymorphism assay. Also, to see whether other NOTCH genes harbor somatic mutations, we analyzed NOTCH2, NOTCH3 and NOTCH4 genes in the same tissue samples. Overall, we detected three NOTCH mutations in the cancers, which consisted of one NOTCH1 mutation in the T-ALLs (25.0%), one NOTCH2 mutation in the breast carcinomas (2.1%), and one NOTCH3 mutation in the colorectal carcinomas (2.0%). There was no NOTCH mutation in other malignancies analyzed. Our data indicate that NOTCH1 is mutated in T-ALL, but not in other common human cancers, and that NOTCH2, NOTCH3 and NOTH4 genes are rarely mutated in common human cancers. Despite the importance of NOTCH activation in many types of human cancers, mutation of NOTCH genes, except for NOTCH1 mutation in T-ALL, may not play an important role in the tumorigenesis of common cancers.

  9. Azacitidine in Combination With Mitoxantrone, Etoposide Phosphate, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed and Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-19

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. EPIDEMIOLOGY AND TREATMENT OF ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA IN LATIN AMERICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Magalhães Rego

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Distinct epidemiological characteristics have been described in Acute Promielocytic Leukemia (APL. Populations from Latin America have a higher incidence of APL and in some geographic areas a distinct distribution of the PML-RARA isoforms is present. Here, we review the main differences in APL epidemilogy in Latin America as well as treatment outcomes.

  11. Pneumatosis Intestinalis in a Patient with Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Mangaonkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumatosis Intestinalis is a rare condition characterized by the presence of gas within the intestinal wall. We describe a case of a 33-year-old woman with acute promyelocytic leukemia who developed nausea and nonbloody diarrhea. CT showed intramural air in transverse and descending colon. Patient clinically improved with conservative management.

  12. Collaborative efforts driving progress in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Zwaan (Michel); E.A. Kolb (Edward A.); D. Reinhardt (Dirk); J. Abrahamsson; S. Adachi (Susumu); R. Aplenc (Richard); E.S.J.M. de Bont (Eveline); B. de Moerloose (Barbara); M.N. Dworzak (Michael); B. Gibson (Brenda); H. Hasle (Henrik); G. Leverger (Guy); F. Locatelli (Franco); C. Ragu (Christine); R.C. Ribeiro (Raul C.); C. Rizzari (Carmelo); J.E. Rubnitz (Jeffrey); O.P. Smith (Owen Patrick); L. Sung (Lillian); D. Tomizawa (Daisuke); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry); U. Creutzig; G.J. Kaspers (Gertjan)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractDiagnosis, treatment, response monitoring, and outcome of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have made enormous progress during the past decades. Because AML is a rare type of childhood cancer, with an incidence of approximately seven occurrences per 1 million children annually, nati

  13. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children with Down syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buitenkamp, Trudy D; Izraeli, Shai; Zimmermann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) have an increased risk of B-cell precursor (BCP) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The prognostic factors and outcome of DS-ALL patients treated in contemporary protocols are uncertain. We studied 653 DS-ALL patients enrolled in 16 international trials from 1995...

  14. L-asparaginase treatment in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Pieters (Rob); S.P. Hunger (Stephen); J. Boos (Joachim); C. Rizzari (Carmelo); L.B. Silverman (Lewis); A. Baruchel (André); N. Goekbuget (Nicola); M. Schrappe (Martin); C.H. Pui (Ching-Hon)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAsparaginases are a cornerstone of treatment protocols for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and are used for remission induction and intensification treatment in all pediatric regimens and in the majority of adult treatment protocols. Extensive clinical data have shown that intensive a

  15. Collaborative Efforts Driving Progress in Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, C. Michel; Kolb, Edward A.; Reinhardt, Dirk; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Adachi, Souichi; Aplenc, Richard; De Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; De Moerloose, Barbara; Dworzak, Michael; Gibson, Brenda E. S.; Hasle, Henrik; Leverger, Guy; Locatelli, Franco; Ragu, Christine; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Rizzari, Carmelo; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Smith, Owen P.; Sung, Lillian; Tomizawa, Daisuke; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Creutzig, Ursula; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis, treatment, response monitoring, and outcome of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have made enormous progress during the past decades. Because AML is a rare type of childhood cancer, with an incidence of approximately seven occurrences per 1 million children annually, national and int

  16. Obesity in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iughetti Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common malignancy in childhood. Continuous progress in risk-adapted treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia has secured 5-year event-free survival rates of approximately 80% and 8-year survival rates approaching 90%. Almost 75% of survivors, however, have a chronic health condition negatively impacting on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Obesity can be considered one of the most important health chronic conditions in the general population, with an increasing incidence in patients treated for childhood cancers and especially in acute lymphoblastic leukemia survivors who are, at the same time, more at risk of experiencing precocious cardiovascular and metabolic co-morbidities. The hypothalamic-pituitary axis damage secondary to cancer therapies (cranial irradiation and chemotherapy or to primary tumor together with lifestyle modifications and genetic factors could affect long-term outcomes. Nevertheless, the etiology of obesity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia is not yet fully understood. The present review has the aim of summarizing the published data and examining the most accepted mechanisms and main predisposing factors related to weight gain in this particular population.

  17. Bone histomorphometry in children with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, JA; Koudstaal, J; Wiersema-Buist, J; Kamps, WA; Timens, W

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain insight into bone formation and resorption in children with newly diagnosed untreated acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In 23 consecutive children with ALL, a bone biopsy was taken from the crista iliaca posterior under ketamine anesthesia, together with t

  18. Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) in acute leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plasschaert, SLA; van der Kolk, Dorina M.; De Bont, ESJM; Vellenga, E; Kamps, WA; De Vries, EGE

    Multidrug resistance, cross- resistance to structurally and functionally unrelated drugs, is an important cause of treatment failure in acute leukemia. Multidrug resistance can result from the overexpression of ATP- dependent efflux pumps, such as P- glycoprotein and members of the multidrug

  19. Relationship between ABO blood group and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavasolian, F; Abdollahi, E; Vakili, M; Amini, A

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) constitute a family of genetically heterogeneous lymphoid neoplasms derived from B- and T-lymphoid progenitors. ALL affects both children and adults. Diagnosis is based on morphologic, immunophenotypic, and genetic features that allow differentiation from normal progenitors and other hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic neoplasms. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between ALL and ABO blood group. This is a case-control study that was carried out in Amir Oncology Hospital in Shiraz during 2011 to2013. The case group consisted of 293 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. And compared with 300 subject in control group ( the age in the case group was between 2-5 year, and the age in the control group was between 2-45 year) .Statistical analyzes was done performed by chi -square test. The results was considered significant when p value ABO blood group distribution was 82(A), 59 (B), 24 (AB) and 128(O) in patient with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and the blood group of 300 participants in the control group include, 63% (25) A, 69% (25.6) B, 18 % 06.8) AB and 101% (42.6) O. The ABO blood group distribution showed that there is significant differences between ABO blood group and patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia . This study showed significant association between ALL and ABO blood group and showed that blood group AB was associated with a higher risk of All (p value<0.001).

  20. Epigenetics in MLL-rearranged infant Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J.P.M. Stumpel (Dominique)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractNowadays the cure rate for children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has exceeded 80%. Although this is considered to be one of the major successes in pediatric oncology, the subgroup of patients that did not benefit from the improved therapeutic strategies should not be

  1. Occupational exposure to solvents and acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talibov, Madar; Lehtinen-Jacks, Susanna; Martinsen, Jan Ivar;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the current study was to assess the relation between occupational exposure to solvents and the risk of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). METHODS: Altogether, this study comprises 15 332 incident cases of AML diagnosed in Finland, Norway, Sweden and Iceland from 1961-2005 and 76...

  2. Pharmacogenetics Influence Treatment Efficacy in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devidsen, M.L.; Dalhoff, K.; Schmiegelow, K.

    2008-01-01

    in treatment resistance and toxic side effects. As most childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment protocols include up to 13 different chemotherapeutic agents, the impact of individual SNPs has been difficult to evaluate. So far Focus has mainly been on the widely used glucocorticosteroids, methotrexate...

  3. Neurodevelopmental Sequelae of Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Its Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, Laura A.; Spiegler, Brenda J.

    2008-01-01

    This review will describe the neurocognitive outcomes associated with pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and its treatment. The literature is reviewed with the aim of addressing methodological issues, treatment factors, risks and moderators, special populations, relationship to neuroimaging findings, and directions for future research.…

  4. Etiology of common childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: the adrenal hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, K.; Vestergaard, T.; Nielsen, S.M.

    2008-01-01

    The pattern of infections in the first years of life modulates our immune system, and a low incidence of infections has been linked to an increased risk of common childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We here present a new interpretation of these observations--the adrenal hypothesis...

  5. Pharmacogenetics influence treatment efficacy in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Marie Louise; Dalhoff, Kim; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2008-01-01

    in treatment resistance and toxic side effects. As most childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment protocols include up to 13 different chemotherapeutic agents, the impact of individual SNPs has been difficult to evaluate. So far focus has mainly been on the widely used glucocorticosteroids, methotrexate...

  6. Prognosis of children with mixed phenotype acute leukemia treated on the basis of consistent immunophenotypic criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejstrikova, Ester; Volejnikova, Jana; Fronkova, Eva; Zdrahalova, Katerina; Kalina, Tomas; Sterba, Jaroslav; Jabali, Yahia; Mihal, Vladimir; Blazek, Bohumir; Cerna, Zdena; Prochazkova, Daniela; Hak, Jiri; Zemanova, Zuzana; Jarosova, Marie; Oltova, Alexandra; Sedlacek, Petr; Schwarz, Jiri; Zuna, Jan; Trka, Jan; Stary, Jan; Hrusak, Ondrej

    2010-06-01

    Mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) represents a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma. The European Group for the Immunological Classification of Leukemias (EGIL) scoring system unambiguously defines MPAL expressing aberrant lineage markers. Discussions surrounding it have focused on scoring details, and information is limited regarding its biological, clinical and prognostic significance. The recent World Health Organization classification is simpler and could replace the EGIL scoring system after transformation into unambiguous guidelines. Simple immunophenotypic criteria were used to classify all cases of childhood acute leukemia in order to provide therapy directed against acute lymphoblastic leukemia or acute myeloid leukemia. Prognosis, genotype and immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor gene rearrangement status were analyzed. The incidences of MPAL were 28/582 and 4/107 for children treated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia regimens, respectively. In immunophenotypic principal component analysis, MPAL treated as T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia clustered between cases of non-mixed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia, while other MPAL cases were included in the respective non-mixed B-cell progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia or acute myeloid leukemia clusters. Analogously, immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor gene rearrangements followed the expected pattern in patients treated as having acute myeloid leukemia (non-rearranged, 4/4) or as having B-cell progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (rearranged, 20/20), but were missing in 3/5 analyzed cases of MPAL treated as having T-cell acute lymphobastic leukemia. In patients who received acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment, the 5-year event-free survival of the MPAL cases was worse than that of the non-mixed cases (53+/-10% and 76+/-2% at 5 years, respectively, P=0.0075), with a more pronounced difference among B lineage cases. The small numbers of MPAL cases

  7. Alantolactone selectively ablates acute myeloid leukemia stem and progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahui Ding

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The poor outcomes for patients diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML are largely attributed to leukemia stem cells (LSCs which are difficult to eliminate with conventional therapy and responsible for relapse. Thus, new therapeutic strategies which could selectively target LSCs in clinical leukemia treatment and avoid drug resistance are urgently needed. However, only a few small molecules have been reported to show anti-LSCs activity. Methods The aim of the present study was to identify alantolactone as novel agent that can ablate acute myeloid leukemia stem and progenitor cells from AML patient specimens and evaluate the anticancer activity of alantolactone in vitro and in vivo. Results The present study is the first to demonstrate that alantolactone, a prominent eudesmane-type sesquiterpene lactone, could specifically ablate LSCs from AML patient specimens. Furthermore, in comparison to the conventional chemotherapy drug, cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C, alantolactone showed superior effects of leukemia cytotoxicity while sparing normal hematopoietic cells. Alantolactone induced apoptosis with a dose-dependent manner by suppression of NF-kB and its downstream target proteins. DMA-alantolactone, a water-soluble prodrug of alantolactone, could suppress tumor growth in vivo. Conclusions Based on these results, we propose that alantolactone may represent a novel LSCs-targeted therapy and eudesmane-type sesquiterpene lactones offer a new scaffold for drug discovery towards anti-LSCs agents.

  8. Leukemia Associated Antigens: Their Dual Role as Biomarkers and Immunotherapeutic Targets for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schmitt

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukemia associated antigens (LAAs are being increasingly identified by methods such as cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL cloning, serological analysis of recombinant cDNA expression libraries (SEREX and mass spectrometry (MS. In additional, large scale screening techniques such as microarray, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE and 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE have expanded our understanding of the role that tumor antigens play in the biological processes which are perturbed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML. It has become increasingly apparent that these antigens play a dual role, not only as targets for immunotherapy, but also as biomarkers of disease state, stage, response to treatment and survival. We need biomarkers to enable the identification of the patients who are most likely to benefit from specific treatments (conventional and/or novel and to help clinicians and scientists improve clinical end points and treatment design. Here we describe the LAAs identified in AML, to date, which have already been shown to play a dual role as biomarkers of AML disease.Abbreviations: AML: acute myeloid leukemia; APL: acute promyelocytic leukemia; ATRA: all-trans-retinoic acid; B-CLL: B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia; CT: cancer-testis; CTL: cytotoxic T-lymphocyte; FAB: French-American-British; HI: hypusination inhibitors; HSP: heat shock protein; ITD: internal tandem duplication; LAA: leukemia associated antigen; MDS: myelodysplastic syndrome; MGEA6: meningioma antigen 6; MPD: myeloproliferative disease; MS: mass spectrometry; NK: natural killer; PRAME: preferentially expressed antigen of melanoma; PRTN3: proteinase 3; RAGE-1: renal antigen 1; RHAMM: receptor for hyaluronic acid-mediated motility; RQ-PCR: real-time PCR; SAGE: serial analysis of gene expression; SCT: stem cell transplant; SEREX: serological analysis of recombinant cDNA expression libraries; SNPs: single nucleotide polymorphisms; UPD

  9. HISTORY OF ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA: A TALE OF ENDLESS REVOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cicconi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Only few thousand people are diagnosed each year of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL worldwide. However, for a number of reasons such rare disease is regarded as a paradigm in the entire field of medicine. Once considered the most malignant human leukemia as well as the one associated with the worst prognosis, APL has been transformed in the past few decades into the most frequently curable one. This extraordinary progress has been the result of an unprecedented coincidence of advances in both biological and clinical research.

  10. Oral health of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadalagere Lakshmana Girish Babu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukemia is a malignancy of the bone marrow and blood. It is the most common childhood cancer in India. Advances in the treatment regimens have greatly increased the chances of survival. Both the disease and its treatment change the oral environment. In some cases, oral manifestations are the presenting feature of the disease and it will be the dentist′s responsibility to identify the underlying disorder and guide the diagnosis of the patient. Hence, the aim of present article is to review the literature concerning the oral health of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL.

  11. Comorbidity and performance status in acute myeloid leukemia patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østgård, Lene Sofie Granfeldt; Nørgaard, J M; Sengeløv, H

    2015-01-01

    As the world population ages, the comorbidity burden in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients increases. Evidence on how to integrate comorbidity measures into clinical decision-making is sparse. We determined the prognostic impact of comorbidity and WHO Performance Status (PS) on achievement......-term mortality [adjusted 90-day MR, PS⩾2=3.43 (95%CI=2.30-5.13); adjusted 91-day-3-year MR=1.35 (95%CI=1.06-1.74)]. We propose that more patients with comorbidity may benefit from intensive chemotherapy.Leukemia accepted article preview online, 5 August 2014; doi:10.1038/leu.2014.234....

  12. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia with Bilateral Renal Masses Masquerading as Nephroblastomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Thakore

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the most common malignancy in the pediatric patient population. However, renal involvement as the primary manifestation of ALL is rare. We report a case of a 4-year-old boy with bilateral renal lesions resembling nephroblastic rests as the first finding of early stage ALL preceding hematological changes and subsequent classic clinical findings by two weeks. These renal hypodensities completely resolved after one week of induction chemotherapy. This case demonstrates that renal involvement can be the only initial presenting finding of leukemia. Children with lesions resembling nephroblastic rests need appropriate surveillance due to the risk of malignant disease.

  13. Clonal origins of ETV6-RUNX1+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alpar, D.; Wren, D.; Ermini, Luca;

    2015-01-01

    Studies on twins with concordant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have revealed that ETV6-RUNX1 gene fusion is a common, prenatal genetic event with other driver aberrations occurring subclonally and probably postnatally. The fetal cell type that is transformed by ETV6-RUNX1 is not identified...... by such studies or by the analysis of early B-cell lineage phenotype of derived progeny. Ongoing, clonal immunoglobulin (IG) and cross-lineage T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements are features of B-cell precursor leukemia and commence at the pro-B-cell stage of normal B-cell lineage development. We reasoned...

  14. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total-Body Irradiation and Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ring Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ring Sideroblasts

  15. Relapsed/Refractory acute myeloid leukemia patients | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Treatment of relapsed/refractory leukemia with intravenous administration of Dacarbazine Trattamento della leucemia...tment of relapsed/refractory leukemia with intravenous administration of Dacarbazine Trattamento della leucemia...on(s) being investigated Relapsed/Refractory acute myeloid leukemia patients Pazienti affetti da leucemia... language Relapsed/Refractory acute myeloid leukemia patients Pazienti affetti da leucemia acuta mieloide re...arbazina nei pazienti affetti da leucemia acuta mieloide recidivata/refrattaria i cui blasti esprimono bassi

  16. Acute pediatric leg compartment syndrome in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Eric; Truntzer, Jeremy; Trunzter, Jeremy; Klinge, Steve; Schwartz, Kevin; Schiller, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is an orthopedic surgical emergency and may result in devastating complications in the setting of delayed or missed diagnosis. Compartment syndrome has a variety of causes, including posttraumatic or postoperative swelling, external compression, burns, bleeding disorders, and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Rare cases of pediatric acute compartment syndrome in the setting of acute myeloid leukemia and, even less commonly, chronic myeloid leukemia have been reported. The authors report the first known case of pediatric acute compartment syndrome in a patient without a previously known diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia. On initial examination, an 11-year-old boy presented with a 2-week history of progressive left calf pain and swelling after playing soccer. Magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a hematoma in the left superficial posterior compartment. The patient had unrelenting pain, intermittent lateral foot parethesias, and inability to bear weight. Subsequently, he was diagnosed with acute compartment syndrome and underwent fasciotomy and evacuation of a hematoma. Laboratory results showed an abnormal white blood cell count of 440×10(9)/L (normal, 4.4-11×10(9)) and international normalized ratio of 1.3 (normal, 0.8-1.2). Further testing included the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene located on the Philadelphia chromosome, leading to a diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia. Monotherapy with imatinib mesylate (Gleevec) was initiated. This report adds another unique case to the growing literature on compartment syndrome in the pediatric population and reinforces the need to consider compartment syndrome, even in unlikely clinical scenarios. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Acute hepatitis A induction of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a causal relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senadhi, V; Emuron, D; Gupta, R

    2010-09-01

    Precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia accounts for 2% of all lymphoid neoplasms in the United States and occurs most frequently in childhood, but can also occur in adults with a median age of 39 years. It is more commonly seen in males and in Caucasians. We present a case of a 51-year-old Caucasian female with the development of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia after suffering acute hepatitis A 4 weeks prior to her diagnosis. She presented with malaise for a month without spontaneous bruising/bleeding, infections, or B-symptoms, such as fevers, night sweats, or unintentional weight loss. Nonspecific viral transformation of bone marrow has been discussed in the literature, but we specifically describe hepatitis A-induced adult-onset precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, which is the first reported case in the literature.

  18. Non-infectious chemotherapy-associated acute toxicities during childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Müller, Klaus; Mogensen, Signe Sloth; Mogensen, Pernille Rudebeck; Wolthers, Benjamin Ole; Stoltze, Ulrik Kristoffer; Tuckuviene, Ruta; Frandsen, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    During chemotherapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, all organs can be affected by severe acute side effects, the most common being opportunistic infections, mucositis, central or peripheral neuropathy (or both), bone toxicities (including osteonecrosis), thromboembolism, sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, endocrinopathies (especially steroid-induced adrenal insufficiency and hyperglycemia), high-dose methotrexate-induced nephrotoxicity, asparaginase-associated hypersensitivity, pancreatitis, and hyperlipidemia. Few of the non-infectious acute toxicities are associated with clinically useful risk factors, and across study groups there has been wide diversity in toxicity definitions, capture strategies, and reporting, thus hampering meaningful comparisons of toxicity incidences for different leukemia protocols. Since treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia now yields 5-year overall survival rates above 90%, there is a need for strategies for assessing the burden of toxicities in the overall evaluation of anti-leukemic therapy programs. PMID:28413626

  19. Acute erythroid leukemia: autopsy report of a rare disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Rúbia Ferreira

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute erythroid leukemia (AEL is a rare subtype of acute myeloid leukemia(AML, characterized by predominant erythroid proliferation. The 2008 WorldHealth Organization (WHO classification of AML defined two AEL subtypes:erythroleukaemia (EL, in which erythroid precursors account for 50% or moreof all nucleated bone marrow cells and myeloblasts account for 20% or more ofthe nonerythroid cell population; and pure erythroid leukemia (PEL, in whicherythroid precursors account for 80% or more of all nucleated bone marrowcells. We report the case of an elderly female patient with wasting syndromeand pancytopenia without evidence of blasts in peripheral blood. A diagnosisof PEL was established on the basis of bone marrow biopsy findings. Thepatient died on postadmission day 20, and an autopsy was performed. Wereclassified the disease as EL on the basis of the autopsy findings, whichincluded myeloblasts accounting for more than 20% of the nonerythroid cellsin the bone marrow, as well as leukemic infiltration and myeloid metaplasia insolid organs, such as the liver, spleen, kidneys, adrenal glands, and abdominallymph nodes. A rare disease, AEL accounts for less than 5% of all AMLs and ispractically a diagnosis of exclusion. Autopsy reports of AEL are extremely rarein the literature. We demonstrate that in the case reported here, leukemia cellstended to infiltrate solid organs with myeloid metaplasia. Our findings alsoshow that a larger neoplastic bone marrow sample is crucial to the correctdiagnosis of EL, which is based on morphological and quantitative criteria.

  20. Chromosomal banding patterns in patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testa, J.R.; Rowley, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    Approximately 50% of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) patients studied with banding techniques have detectable clonal karyotypic abnormalities. Although there is considerable variability, certain nonrandom abnormalities are observed, including trisomy 8, monosomy 7, and the 8;21 translocation (frequently accompanied by loss of an X or Y). The 15;17 translocation is highly specific for acute promyelocytic leukemia. Clonal evolution of the karyotype can be observed in a significant number of ANLL patients for whom serial cytogenetic analyses are obtained. Gain of a No. 8 is the most frequently observed evolutionary change. Bone marrow cells from paients who develop ANLL following treatment of a previous malignancy often have hypodiploid modal numbers and frequently show loss of all or part of a chromosome No. 5 or No. 7.

  1. CDX2 gene expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanaa H. Arnaoaut

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available CDX genes are classically known as regulators of axial elongation during early embryogenesis. An unsuspected role for CDX genes has been revealed during hematopoietic development. The CDX gene family member CDX2 belongs to the most frequent aberrantly expressed proto-oncogenes in human acute leukemias and is highly leukemogenic in experimental models. We used reversed transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR to determine the expression level of CDX2 gene in 30 pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL at diagnosis and 30 healthy volunteers. ALL patients were followed up to detect minimal residual disease (MRD on days 15 and 42 of induction. We found that CDX2 gene was expressed in 50% of patients and not expressed in controls. Associations between gene expression and different clinical and laboratory data of patients revealed no impact on different findings. With follow up, we could not confirm that CDX2 expression had a prognostic significance.

  2. Recurrence of acute myeloid leukemia in cryptorchid testis: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Góes, Luccas Santos Patto de [Hospital do Servidor Público Municipal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lopes, Roberto Iglesias [Hospital do Servidor Público Municipal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Campos, Octavio Henrique Arcos [Hospital do Servidor Público Municipal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, Luiz Carlos Neves de; Sant' Anna, Alexandre Crippa; Dall' Oglio, Marcos Francisco; Srougi, Miguel [Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    A 23-year-old male with a history of bone marrow transplant for acute myeloid leukemia. He presented a large mass in the right inguinal region 5 years ago. Upon physical examination, right-sided cryptorchidism was observed. The tumor markers alpha-fetoprotein and beta-HCG were within normalcy range and lactate dehydrogenase was raised. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis revealed right testicular mass in contiguity with the inguinal canal to the ipsilateral retroperitoneum, associated with right hydronephrosis. Due to the risk of germ-cell tumor in undescended testicle, the patient underwent radical right orchiectomy. The pathological examination showed recurrence of acute myeloid leukemia in the testis. He was referred to oncology for adjuvant therapy. Our literature review found no similar cases described.

  3. New decision support tool for acute lymphoblastic leukemia classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhukar, Monica; Agaian, Sos; Chronopoulos, Anthony T.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we build up a new decision support tool to improve treatment intensity choice in childhood ALL. The developed system includes different methods to accurately measure furthermore cell properties in microscope blood film images. The blood images are exposed to series of pre-processing steps which include color correlation, and contrast enhancement. By performing K-means clustering on the resultant images, the nuclei of the cells under consideration are obtained. Shape features and texture features are then extracted for classification. The system is further tested on the classification of spectra measured from the cell nuclei in blood samples in order to distinguish normal cells from those affected by Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. The results show that the proposed system robustly segments and classifies acute lymphoblastic leukemia based on complete microscopic blood images.

  4. Aberrant Signaling Pathways in T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongiovanni, Deborah; Saccomani, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive disease caused by the malignant transformation of immature progenitors primed towards T-cell development. Clinically, T-ALL patients present with diffuse infiltration of the bone marrow by immature T-cell blasts high blood cell counts, mediastinal involvement, and diffusion to the central nervous system. In the past decade, the genomic landscape of T-ALL has been the target of intense research. The identification of specific genomic alterations has contributed to identify strong oncogenic drivers and signaling pathways regulating leukemia growth. Notwithstanding, T-ALL patients are still treated with high-dose multiagent chemotherapy, potentially exposing these patients to considerable acute and long-term side effects. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the signaling pathways relevant for the pathogenesis of T-ALL and the opportunities offered for targeted therapy. PMID:28872614

  5. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a comprehensive review and 2017 update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terwilliger, T; Abdul-Hay, M

    2017-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the second most common acute leukemia in adults, with an incidence of over 6500 cases per year in the United States alone. The hallmark of ALL is chromosomal abnormalities and genetic alterations involved in differentiation and proliferation of lymphoid precursor cells. In adults, 75% of cases develop from precursors of the B-cell lineage, with the remainder of cases consisting of malignant T-cell precursors. Traditionally, risk stratification has been based on clinical factors such age, white blood cell count and response to chemotherapy; however, the identification of recurrent genetic alterations has helped refine individual prognosis and guide management. Despite advances in management, the backbone of therapy remains multi-agent chemotherapy with vincristine, corticosteroids and an anthracycline with allogeneic stem cell transplantation for eligible candidates. Elderly patients are often unable to tolerate such regimens and carry a particularly poor prognosis. Here, we review the major recent advances in the treatment of ALL. PMID:28665419

  6. Elbow septic arthritis associated with pediatric acute leukemia: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Takuya; Yagi, Hirohisa; Okada, Mitsuhiro; Yokoi, Takuya; Shintani, Kosuke; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Acute leukemia in children presents with various clinical manifestations that mimic orthopaedic conditions. The association of septic arthritis of the elbow with acute leukemia is very rare, and the correct diagnosis of acute leukemia is often established only after treatment of the septic arthritis. In this article, we present a three-year-old child patient with elbow septic arthritis related to acute leukemia, diagnosed promptly by bone marrow aspiration on the same day as emergency surgical debridement of the septic elbow joint due to the maintenance of a high index of suspicion, and treated with chemotherapy as soon as possible. The emergency physician and orthopaedist must recognize unusual patterns of presentation like this. Since delay in initiating treatment of septic arthritis may result in growth disturbance, elbow septic arthritis associated with pediatric acute leukemia must be treated promptly and appropriately. Early diagnosis is a good prognostic feature of childhood acute leukemia.

  7. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with a uterine cervical mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Geetha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Involvement of female genital tract with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is extremely rare, and it is even rarer for a patient to have symptomatic presentation. We report the case of a middle-aged lady with ALL, who presented with severe abnormal uterine bleeding and a uterine cervical mass. Biopsy of the cervical mass showed infiltration by leukemic blasts. She received chemotherapy with Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster protocol and is alive in remission after 10 years.

  8. Mercaptopurine/Methotrexate Maintenance Therapy of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, K.; Nielsen, Stine N; Frandsen, Thomas L;

    2014-01-01

    The antileukemic mechanisms of 6-mercaptopurine (6MP) and methotrexate (MTX) maintenance therapy are poorly understood, but the benefits of several years of myelosuppressive maintenance therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia are well proven. Currently, there is no international consensus on drug...... intensive and toxic earlier treatment phases, and often more challenging. Ongoing research address the applicability of drug metabolite measurements for dose adjustments, extensive host genome profiling to understand diversity in treatment efficacy and toxicity, and alternative thiopurine dosing regimens...

  9. Vincristine sulfate liposomal injection for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Soosay Raj TA; Smith AM; Moore AS

    2013-01-01

    Trisha A Soosay Raj,1 Amanda M Smith,2 Andrew S Moore,1,21Royal Children's Hospital, Children's Health Queensland Hospital and Health Service, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; 2Queensland Children's Medical Research Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, AustraliaAbstract: Vincristine (VCR) is one of the most extensively used cytotoxic compounds in hemato-oncology. VCR is particularly important for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), a...

  10. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Ali

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We report a case series of 12 patients with acute myeloid leukemia who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplant with a matched related donor. Male to female ratio was 1:1. The main complication post-transplant was graft-versus-host disease (n=7 patients. Transplant-related mortality involved one patient; cause of death was multi-organ failure. After a median follow up of 36.0±11.3 months, overall survival was 16%.

  11. Optic nerve infiltration by acute lymphoblastic leukemia: MRI contribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Maria de Fatima; Braga, Flavio Tulio [Federal University of Sao Paulo, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Paulista School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rocha, Antonio Jose da [Santa Casa de Misericordia de Sao Paulo, Servico de Diagnostico por Imagem, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Lederman, Henrique Manoel [Federal University of Sao Paulo, Division of Diagnostic Imaging in Pediatrics, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2005-08-01

    We describe the clinical presentation and imaging features of a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that was complicated by optic nerve infiltration. The clinical and diagnostic characteristics of this complication must be recognized so that optimal therapy can be started to prevent blindness. MR imaging is useful in early detection and should be performed in any leukemic patient with ocular complaints, even during remission. (orig.)

  12. Identification of homogeneously staining regions in leukemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Heydarian Moghadam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Homogeneously staining regions (HSR or double minute chromosomes (dmin are autonomously replicating extra-chromosomal elements that are frequently associated with gene amplification in a variety of cancers. The diagnosis of leukemia patients was based on characterization of the leukemic cells obtained from bone marrow cytogenetics. This study report two cases, one with Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia without maturation (AML-M1, aged 23-year-old female, and the other with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML-blast crisis, a 28-year-old female associated with double minute chromosomes. Most cases of acute myeloid leukemia with dmin in the literature (including our cases have been diagnosed as having acute myeloid leukemia.

  13. Effect of Taurine on Febrile Episodes in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Islambulchilar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of our study was to evaluate the effect of oral taurine on the incidence of febrile episodes during chemotherapy in young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods: Forty young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, at the beginning of maintenance course of their chemotherapy, were eligible for this study. The study population was randomized in a double blind manner to receive either taurine or placebo (2 gram per day orally. Life quality and side effects including febrile episodes were assessed using questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Pearson’s Chi square test. Results: Of total forty participants, 43.8% were female and 56.3 % were male. The mean age was 19.16±1.95 years (ranges: 16-23 years. The results indicated that the levels of white blood cells are significantly (P<0.05 increased in taurine treated group. There was no elevation in blasts count. A total of 70 febrile episodes were observed during study, febrile episodes were significantly (P<0.05 lower in taurine patients in comparison to the control ones. Conclusion: The overall incidence of febrile episodes and infectious complications in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients receiving taurine was lower than placebo group. Taurine’s ability to increase leukocyte count may result in lower febrile episodes.

  14. Cellulitis with Leukocytopenia as an Initial Sign of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Sachiko Sakamoto; Naoki Oiso; Masakatsu Emoto; Shusuke Uchida; Ayaka Hirao; Yoichi Tatsumi; Itaru Matsumura; Akira Kawada

    2012-01-01

    Patients with hematologic malignancies are immunosuppressive and may develop cutaneous or invasive infections as a primary sign of immune suppression. Acute promyelocytic leukemia (acute myeloid leukemia M3) is caused by translocation of reciprocal chromosomal rearrangement t(15;17), which produces an oncogenic protein. We herein describe a 71-year-old man having cellulitis with leukocytopenia as a first sign of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Dermatologists and hematologists should keep in min...

  15. ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction and Myelodysplastic Syndrome with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Transformation

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction and acute myeloid leukemia are rarely reported as concomitant conditions. The management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in patients who have acute myeloid leukemia is challenging: the leukemia-related thrombocytopenia, platelet dysfunction, and systemic coagulopathy increase the risk of bleeding, and the administration of thrombolytic agents can be fatal. We report the case of a 76-year-old man who presented emergently with STEMI, myelodysplastic syn...

  16. [Local involvement of the optic nerve by acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardczyk-Meller, Jadwiga; Stefańska, Katarzyna

    2005-01-01

    The leucemias quite commonly involve the eyes and adnexa. In some cases it causes visual complants. Both, the anterior chamber of the eye and the posterior portion of the globe may sites of acute or chronic leukemia and leucemic relapse. We report an unique case of a 14 years old leucemic patient who suffered visual loss and papilloedema, due to a unilateral local involvement within optic nerve, during second relapse of acute lymphocytic leuemia. In spite of typical treatment of main disease, the boy had died. The authors present typical ophthalmic features of the leucemia, too.

  17. Laboratory-Treated Donor Cord Blood Cell Infusion Following Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-31

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Association of acute myeloid leukemia's most immature phenotype with risk groups and outcomes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gerber, Jonathan M; Zeidner, Joshua F; Morse, Sarah; Blackford, Amanda L; Perkins, Brandy; Yanagisawa, Breann; Zhang, Hao; Morsberger, Laura; Karp, Judith; Ning, Yi; Gocke, Christopher D; Rosner, Gary L; Smith, B Douglas; Jones, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    The precise phenotype and biology of acute myeloid leukemia stem cells remain controversial, in part because the "gold standard" immunodeficient mouse engraftment assay fails in a significant fraction...

  19. Activation of a promyelocytic leukemia-tumor protein 53 axis underlies acute promyelocytic leukemia cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablain, Julien; Rice, Kim; Soilihi, Hassane; de Reynies, Aurélien; Minucci, Saverio; de Thé, Hugues

    2014-02-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is driven by the promyelocytic leukemia (PML)-retinoic acid receptor-α (PML-RARA) fusion protein, which interferes with nuclear receptor signaling and PML nuclear body (NB) assembly. APL is the only malignancy definitively cured by targeted therapies: retinoic acid (RA) and/or arsenic trioxide, which both trigger PML-RARA degradation through nonoverlapping pathways. Yet, the cellular and molecular determinants of treatment efficacy remain disputed. We demonstrate that a functional Pml-transformation-related protein 53 (Trp53) axis is required to eradicate leukemia-initiating cells in a mouse model of APL. Upon RA-induced PML-RARA degradation, normal Pml elicits NB reformation and induces a Trp53 response exhibiting features of senescence but not apoptosis, ultimately abrogating APL-initiating activity. Apart from triggering PML-RARA degradation, arsenic trioxide also targets normal PML to enhance NB reformation, which may explain its clinical potency, alone or with RA. This Pml-Trp53 checkpoint initiated by therapy-triggered NB restoration is specific for PML-RARA-driven APL, but not the RA-resistant promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF)-RARA variant. Yet, as NB biogenesis is druggable, it could be therapeutically exploited in non-APL malignancies.

  20. Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia in Four Year Old Female Child - A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirudha V. Kushtagi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Leukemia is the most common malignancy of childhood representing about 30 % of oncohematological diseases diagnosed in children less than 15 years of age. We report the case of a 4 year old girl with acute promyelocytic leukemia whose blasts showed the morphology characteristic of acute promyelocytic leukemia variant. The case is reported because in the paediatric population the acute promyelocytic leukemia is a rare occurrence moreover, it represent a true oncohematology emergency, in this case the laboratory has a significant role since the timing of diagnosis must be very short. It helps in therapeutic protocols compared to conventional therapeutic protocols in Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML, the introduction of retinoid All-Trans-Retinoic Acid (ATRA, both in children and adults with Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL, has significantly reduced the early mortality.

  1. CpG island methylator phenotype and its relationship with prognosis in adult acute leukemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hai-Ying; Wu, Dan-Sen; Zhou, Hua-Rong; Shen, Jian-Zhen

    2014-09-01

    To investigated the relationship between CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) and prognosis in adults with acute leukemia. Bone marrow samples from 53 acute myeloid leukemia and 50 acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients were collected. The methylation status of 18 tumor suppressor genes was determined using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Greater than 30% of acute leukemia patients had methylated p15, p16, CDH1, CDH13, RUNX3, sFRP1, ID4, and DLC-1 genes; methylation of ≥4 were defined as CIMP positive. Age, type of leukemia, white blood cell count, and CIMP status were significantly associated with recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) (P acute leukemia.

  2. Acute myocardial infarction as a finding of acute promyelocytic leukemia-related coagulation disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkurt, Zübeyde N; Aypar, Eda; Sarifakiogullari, Serpil; Taçoy, Gülten; Özdag, Murat; Kahraman, Seda; Çengel, Atiye

    2015-12-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has one of the most favorable prognoses among other leukemia subtypes. However, the major cause of mortality in APL is disseminated intravascular coagulation at the presentation. We present a case of acute myocardial infarction (MI) at the time of APL diagnosis before treatment. The patient suffered from chest pain, sweating and giddiness. He was hypoxic, hypotensive and bradycardic. ECG showed inferior MI. Unfractioned heparin infusion (850 U/h) was started and 5 min after the previous ECG showed total ST resolution. We suggest that in this case, MI was not related to atherosclerotic plaque rupture but related to DIC manifestation.

  3. Outcomes after Induction Failure in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrappe, Martin; Hunger, Stephen P.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Saha, Vaskar; Gaynon, Paul S.; Baruchel, André; Conter, Valentino; Otten, Jacques; Ohara, Akira; Versluys, Anne Birgitta; Escherich, Gabriele; Heyman, Mats; Silverman, Lewis B.; Horibe, Keizo; Mann, Georg; Camitta, Bruce M.; Harbott, Jochen; Riehm, Hansjörg; Richards, Sue; Devidas, Meenakshi; Zimmermann, Martin

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Failure of remission-induction therapy is a rare but highly adverse event in children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). METHODS We identified induction failure, defined by the persistence of leukemic blasts in blood, bone marrow, or any extramedullary site after 4 to 6 weeks of remission-induction therapy, in 1041 of 44,017 patients (2.4%) 0 to 18 years of age with newly diagnosed ALL who were treated by a total of 14 cooperative study groups between 1985 and 2000. We analyzed the relationships among disease characteristics, treatments administered, and outcomes in these patients. RESULTS Patients with induction failure frequently presented with high-risk features, including older age, high leukocyte count, leukemia with a T-cell phenotype, the Philadelphia chromosome, and 11q23 rearrangement. With a median follow-up period of 8.3 years (range, 1.5 to 22.1), the 10-year survival rate (±SE) was estimated at only 32±1%. An age of 10 years or older, T-cell leukemia, the presence of an 11q23 rearrangement, and 25% or more blasts in the bone marrow at the end of induction therapy were associated with a particularly poor outcome. High hyperdiploidy (a modal chromosome number >50) and an age of 1 to 5 years were associated with a favorable outcome in patients with precursor B-cell leukemia. Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation from matched, related donors was associated with improved outcomes in T-cell leukemia. Children younger than 6 years of age with precursor B-cell leukemia and no adverse genetic features had a 10-year survival rate of 72±5% when treated with chemotherapy only. CONCLUSIONS Pediatric ALL with induction failure is highly heterogeneous. Patients who have T-cell leukemia appear to have a better outcome with allogeneic stem-cell transplantation than with chemotherapy, whereas patients who have precursor B-cell leukemia without other adverse features appear to have a better outcome with chemotherapy. (Funded by Deutsche

  4. Acute leukemia case presented with hypercalcemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Selçuk Bektaş

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available An 8-year-old girl patient referred to our emergency clinic with articular pain, stomachache and fever complaints. Past history revealed that she was suffering from pain in both knees and ankle joints for 8 days. The joint temperature increased and swelling did not accompany articular pain. Family history was unremarkable. In the physical examination, there was sensitivity in the knees, elbows and ankles during movement. The patient had normal complete blood cell count, and no blast or atypical cells were observed in peripheral smear. Serum electrolytes, liver and kidney function tests were normal except for hypercalcemia. The 25 (OH vitamin D and 1-25 (OH2 vitamin D levels were within normal range. In bone marrow aspiration, infiltration of cells with lymphoblastic and homogenous cellular features was observed. With positivity of cCD79, CD19, CD45, the case was considered as preB cell leukemia. Body bone scintigraphy performed for bone metastasis was normal. After the chemotherapy, hydration and furosemid treatment, the calcium level returned to normal. This case emphasized on the fact that, children with hypercalcemia should undergo a detailed examination for malignancies even though no blast or atypical lymphocyte are observed in their peripheral blood smear before steroid treatment is applied and if necessary, bone marrow aspiration should be taken into account.

  5. Antileukemic Efficacy of Continuous vs Discontinuous Dexamethasone in Murine Models of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura B Ramsey

    Full Text Available Osteonecrosis is one of the most common, serious, toxicities resulting from the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In recent years, pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia clinical trials have used discontinuous rather than continuous dosing of dexamethasone in an effort to reduce the incidence of osteonecrosis. However, it is not known whether discontinuous dosing would compromise antileukemic efficacy of glucocorticoids. Therefore, we tested the efficacy of discontinuous dexamethasone against continuous dexamethasone in murine models bearing human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts (n = 8 patient samples or murine BCR-ABL+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Plasma dexamethasone concentrations (7.9 to 212 nM were similar to those achieved in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia using conventional dosages. The median leukemia-free survival ranged from 16 to 59 days; dexamethasone prolonged survival from a median of 4 to 129 days in all seven dexamethasone-sensitive acute lymphoblastic leukemias. In the majority of cases (7 of 8 xenografts and the murine BCR-ABL model we demonstrated equal efficacy of the two dexamethasone dosing regimens; whereas for one acute lymphoblastic leukemia sample, the discontinuous regimen yielded inferior antileukemic efficacy (log-rank p = 0.002. Our results support the clinical practice of using discontinuous rather than continuous dexamethasone dosing in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  6. Haploidentical Transplantation in Children with Acute Leukemia: The Unresolved Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarita Rani Jaiswal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT remains a curative option for children with high risk and advanced acute leukemia. Yet availability of matched family donor limits its use and although matched unrelated donor or mismatched umbilical cord blood (UCB are viable options, they fail to meet the global need. Haploidentical family donor is almost universally available and is emerging as the alternate donor of choice in adult patients. However, the same is not true in the case of children. The studies of haploidentical HSCT in children are largely limited to T cell depleted grafts with not so encouraging results in advanced leukemia. At the same time, emerging data from UCBT are challenging the existing paradigm of less stringent HLA match requirements as perceived in the past. The use of posttransplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCY has yielded encouraging results in adults, but data in children is sorely lacking. Our experience of using PTCY based haploidentical HSCT in children shows inadequacy of this approach in younger children compared to excellent outcome in older children. In this context, we discuss the current status of haploidentical HSCT in children with acute leukemia in a global perspective and dwell on its future prospects.

  7. Tumefactive intracranial presentation of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forester, Craig M. [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Braunreiter, Chi L. [University of Utah, Division of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Primary Children' s Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Helen DeVos Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Grand Rapids, MI (United States); Yaish, Hasan; Afify, Zeinab [University of Utah, Division of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Primary Children' s Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hedlund, Gary L. [Primary Children' s Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2009-11-15

    In children, leukemia is the most common malignancy, and approximately 75% of leukemias are acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Central nervous system leukemia is found at diagnosis in fewer than 5% of children with ALL. Leukemic intracranial masses have been described with acute myeloid leukemia, but ALL presenting as a mass lesion is rare. We describe a unique case of an intracranial confirmed precursor B cell (pre-B) ALL mass in a 13-year-old girl that was diagnosed by brain CT, MRI and cerebral angiography, and confirmed by biopsy. This report details pertinent history and distinguishing imaging features of an intracranial ALL tumefaction. (orig.)

  8. Mixed-phenotype acute leukemia: historical overview and a new definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, O K; Arber, D A

    2010-11-01

    Acute leukemia with a mixed phenotype is a rare disease and comprises 2-5% of all acute leukemias. These disorders have been known historically by a variety of names, such as mixed lineage leukemia, bilineal leukemia and biphenotypic leukemia, and the criteria for diagnosis have often been arbitrary. The scoring criteria proposed by the European Group for the Immunological Characterization of Leukemias represented a major attempt to define this disorder. However, the relative weight given to some markers and the lack of lineage specificity of most markers have raised questions regarding the significance of this approach. In 2008, the World Health Organization classification of hematopoietic and lymphoid tumors proposed a simpler diagnostic algorithm, which relies on fewer and more lineage-specific markers to define mixed-phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL). MPAL with t(9;22) and MLL rearrangement have been separated. Several studies have suggested that patients with acute leukemia of mixed phenotype have a worse clinical outcome when compared with matched controls with acute myeloid leukemia or acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Further studies are needed to confirm the significance of MPAL as currently defined, to determine a standardized treatment approach and to better understand the biological and clinical aspects of this disease.

  9. Small-molecule Hedgehog inhibitor attenuates the leukemia-initiation potential of acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Nobuaki; Minami, Yosuke; Kakiuchi, Seiji; Kuwatsuka, Yachiyo; Hayakawa, Fumihiko; Jamieson, Catoriona; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Naoe, Tomoki

    2016-10-01

    Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway has been implicated in the maintenance of leukemia stem cell populations in several model systems. PF-04449913 (PF-913) is a selective, small-molecule inhibitor of Smoothened, a membrane protein that regulates the Hedgehog pathway. However, details of the proof-of-concept and mechanism of action of PF-913 following administration to patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are unclear. This study examined the role of the Hedgehog signaling pathway in AML cells, and evaluated the in vitro and in vivo effects of the Smoothened inhibitor PF-913. In primary AML cells, activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway was more pronounced in CD34(+) cells than CD34(-) cells. In vitro treatment with PF-913 induced a decrease in the quiescent cell population accompanied by minimal cell death. In vivo treatment with PF-913 attenuated the leukemia-initiation potential of AML cells in a serial transplantation mouse model, while limiting reduction of tumor burden in a primary xenotransplant system. Comprehensive gene set enrichment analysis revealed that PF-913 modulated self-renewal signatures and cell cycle progression. Furthermore, PF-913 sensitized AML cells to cytosine arabinoside, and abrogated resistance to cytosine arabinoside in AML cells cocultured with HS-5 stromal cells. These findings imply that pharmacologic inhibition of Hedgehog signaling attenuates the leukemia-initiation potential, and also enhanced AML therapy by sensitizing dormant leukemia stem cells to chemotherapy and overcoming resistance in the bone marrow microenvironment. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  10. Angiogenesis in Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Opportunities for Novel Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Trujillo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML arises from neoplastic transformation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and relapsed disease remains one of the greater challenges in treating this hematologic malignancy. This paper focuses on angiogenic aspects of AML including the significance and prognostic value of bone marrow microvessel density and circulating cytokine levels. We show three general mechanisms whereby AML exploits angiogenic pathways, including direct induction of angiogenesis, paracrine regulation, and autocrine stimulation. We also present early evidence that leukemia cells contribute directly to vascular endothelia. Novel treatment strategies are proposed, and a review of relevant antiangiogenic clinical trials is presented. By understanding how blood vessels can serve as a reservoir for refractory and relapsed AML, new diagnostics and promising treatment strategies can be developed.

  11. Clinical features and early treatment response of central nervous system involvement in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinsen, Mette; Taskinen, Mervi; Abrahamsson, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains a therapeutic challenge. PROCEDURE: To explore leukemia characteristics of patients with CNS involvement at ALL diagnosis, we analyzed clinical features and early treatment response of 744...... leukemia and patients without such characteristics (0.50 vs. 0.61; P = 0.2). CONCLUSION: CNS involvement at diagnosis is associated with adverse prognostic features but does not indicate a less chemosensitive leukemia....

  12. Impaired dexamethasone-related increase of anticoagulants is associated with the development of osteonecrosis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L. te Winkel (Mariël Lizet); I.M. Appel (Inge); R. Pieters (Rob); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractCoagulation alterations may be involved in osteonecrosis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Retrospectively, we evaluated the available coagulation parameters at diagnosis and during induction treatment of 161 acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients: 24 with symptomatic osteonecros

  13. The negative impact of being underweight and weight loss on survival of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hoed, Marissa A. H.; Pluijm, Saskia M. F.; de Groot-Kruseman, Hester A.; te Winkel, Mariel L.; Fiocco, Martha; van den Akker, Erica L. T.; Hoogerbrugge, Peter; van den Berg, Henk; Leeuw, Jan A.; Bruin, Marrie C. A.; Bresters, Dorine; Veerman, Anjo J. P.; Pieters, Rob; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.

    2015-01-01

    Body mass index and change in body mass index during treatment may influence treatment outcome of pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, previous studies in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia reported contradictory results. We prospectively collected data on body composit

  14. Acute Pancreatitis and Diabetic Ketoacidosis following L-Asparaginase/Prednisone Therapy in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dania Lizet Quintanilla-Flores

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis are unusual adverse events following chemotherapy based on L-asparaginase and prednisone as support treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We present the case of a 16-year-old Hispanic male patient, in remission induction therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia on treatment with mitoxantrone, vincristine, prednisone, and L-asparaginase. He was hospitalized complaining of abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Hyperglycemia, acidosis, ketonuria, low bicarbonate levels, hyperamylasemia, and hyperlipasemia were documented, and the diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis was made. Because of uncertainty of the additional diagnosis of acute pancreatitis as the cause of abdominal pain, a contrast-enhanced computed tomography was performed resulting in a Balthazar C pancreatitis classification.

  15. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available on the Trial E.1 Medical condition or disease under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute... lymphoblastic leukemia E.1.1.1Medical condition in easily understood language Acute lymphoblastic

  16. A regimen combining the Wee1 inhibitor AZD1775 with HDAC inhibitors targets human acute myeloid leukemia cells harboring various genetic mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L; Zhang, Y; Chen, S; Kmieciak, M; Leng, Y; Lin, H; Rizzo, K A; Dumur, C I; Ferreira-Gonzalez, A; Dai, Y; Grant, S

    2015-04-01

    AZD1775 targets the cell cycle checkpoint kinase Wee1 and potentiates genotoxic agent cytotoxicity through p53-dependent or -independent mechanisms. Here, we report that AZD1775 interacted synergistically with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs, for example, Vorinostat), which interrupt the DNA damage response, to kill p53-wild type (wt) or -deficient as well as FLT3-ITD leukemia cells in association with pronounced Wee1 inhibition and diminished cdc2/Cdk1 Y15 phosphorylation. Similarly, Wee1 shRNA knockdown significantly sensitized cells to HDACIs. Although AZD1775 induced Chk1 activation, reflected by markedly increased Chk1 S296/S317/S345 phosphorylation leading to inhibitory T14 phosphorylation of cdc2/Cdk1, these compensatory responses were sharply abrogated by HDACIs. This was accompanied by premature mitotic entry, multiple mitotic abnormalities and accumulation of early S-phase cells displaying increased newly replicated DNA, culminating in robust DNA damage and apoptosis. The regimen was active against patient-derived acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells harboring either wt or mutant p53 and various next-generation sequencing-defined mutations. Primitive CD34(+)/CD123(+)/CD38(-) populations enriched for leukemia-initiating progenitors, but not normal CD34(+) hematopoietic cells, were highly susceptible to this regimen. Finally, combining AZD1775 with Vorinostat in AML murine xenografts significantly reduced tumor burden and prolonged animal survival. A strategy combining Wee1 with HDACI inhibition warrants further investigation in AML with poor prognostic genetic aberrations.

  17. Targeted positron emission tomography imaging of CXCR4 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herhaus, Peter; Habringer, Stefan; Philipp-Abbrederis, Kathrin; Vag, Tibor; Gerngross, Carlos; Schottelius, Margret; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Steiger, Katja; Altmann, Torben; Weißer, Tanja; Steidle, Sabine; Schick, Markus; Jacobs, Laura; Slawska, Jolanta; Müller-Thomas, Catharina; Verbeek, Mareike; Subklewe, Marion; Peschel, Christian; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus; Götze, Katharina; Keller, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia originates from leukemia-initiating cells that reside in the protective bone marrow niche. CXCR4/CXCL12 interaction is crucially involved in recruitment and retention of leukemia-initiating cells within this niche. Various drugs targeting this pathway have entered clinical trials. To evaluate CXCR4 imaging in acute myeloid leukemia, we first tested CXCR4 expression in patient-derived primary blasts. Flow cytometry revealed that high blast counts in patients with acute myeloid leukemia correlate with high CXCR4 expression. The wide range of CXCR4 surface expression in patients was reflected in cell lines of acute myeloid leukemia. Next, we evaluated the CXCR4-specific peptide Pentixafor by positron emission tomography imaging in mice harboring CXCR4 positive and CXCR4 negative leukemia xenografts, and in 10 patients with active disease. [(68)Ga]Pentixafor-positron emission tomography showed specific measurable disease in murine CXCR4 positive xenografts, but not when CXCR4 was knocked out with CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. Five of 10 patients showed tracer uptake correlating well with leukemia infiltration assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. The mean maximal standard uptake value was significantly higher in visually CXCR4 positive patients compared to CXCR4 negative patients. In summary, in vivo molecular CXCR4 imaging by means of positron emission tomography is feasible in acute myeloid leukemia. These data provide a framework for future diagnostic and theranostic approaches targeting the CXCR4/CXCL12-defined leukemia-initiating cell niche.

  18. Detection of FLT3 Oncogene Mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Using Conformation Sensitive Gel Electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    FLT3 (fms-related tyrosine kinase 3) is a receptor tyrosine kinase class III that is expressed on by early hematopoietic progenitor cells and plays an important role in hematopoietic stem cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. FLT3 is also expressed on leukemia blasts in most cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In order to determine the frequency of FLT3 oncogene mutations, we analyzed genomic DNA of adult de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and...

  19. Specific small nucleolar RNA expression profiles in acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valleron, W; Laprevotte, E; Gautier, E-F; Quelen, C; Demur, C; Delabesse, E; Agirre, X; Prósper, F; Kiss, T; Brousset, P

    2012-09-01

    Apart from microRNAs, little is known about the regulation of expression of non-coding RNAs in cancer. We investigated whether small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) accumulation displayed specific signatures in acute myeloblastic and acute lymphoblastic leukemias. Using microarrays and high-throughput quantitative PCR (qPCR), we demonstrate here that snoRNA expression patterns are negatively altered in leukemic cells compared with controls. Interestingly, a specific signature was found in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) with ectopic expression of SNORD112-114 snoRNAs located at the DLK1-DIO3 locus. In vitro experiments carried out on APL blasts demonstrate that transcription of these snoRNAs was lost under all-trans retinoic acid-mediated differentiation and induced by enforced expression of the PML-RARalpha fusion protein in negative leukemic cell lines. Further experiments revealed that the SNORD114-1 (14q(II-1)) variant promoted cell growth through cell cycle modulation; its expression was implicated in the G0/G1 to S phase transition mediated by the Rb/p16 pathways. This study thus reports three important observations: (1) snoRNA regulation is different in normal cells compared with cancer cells; (2) a relationship exists between a chromosomal translocation and expression of snoRNA loci; and (3) snoRNA expression can affect Rb/p16 cell cycle regulation. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that snoRNAs have a role in cancer development.

  20. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available estigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia E.1.1.1Medical conditio...E.1.2Version 18.0 E.1.2Level LLT E.1.2Classification code 10000845 E.1.2Term Acute lymphoblastic leukemia E.

  1. Aurora kinases in childhood acute leukemia: The promise of aurora B as therapeutic target

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A. Hartsink-Segers (S.); C.M. Zwaan (Michel); C. Exalto (Carla); M.W.J. Luijendijk (M. W J); V. Calvert (V.); E.F. Petricoin (Emanuel F.); W.E. Evans (William); D. Reinhardt (Dirk); V. de Haas (Valerie); M. Hedtjärn (M.); B.R. Hansen (B.); T. Koch (T.); H.N. Caron (Huib); R. Pieters (Rob); M.L. den Boer (Monique)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWe investigated the effects of targeting the mitotic regulators aurora kinase A and B in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Aurora protein expression levels in pediatric ALL and AML patient samples were determined by western blot and reverse ph

  2. High frequency of BTG1 deletions in acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children with down syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundin, Catarina; Hjorth, Lars; Behrendtz, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    Previous cytogenetic studies of myeloid and acute lymphoblastic leukemias in children with Down syndrome (ML-DS and DS-ALL) have revealed significant differences in abnormality patterns between such cases and acute leukemias in general. Also, certain molecular genetic aberrations characterize DS...

  3. All-trans-retinoic acid-induced pseudotumor cerebri in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Anoop

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available All-trans-retinoic acid is an integral part in the treatment strategy of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL. Here we describe a case of pseudotumor cerebri associated with all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA during the induction therapy in an adult with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL.

  4. Unravelling Pathobiological Molecular Mechanisms of T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.D. Mendes (Rui Daniel)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractT-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) represents 10-15% of pediatric acute leukemias. Despite major therapeutic improvements due to treatment intensification and refined risk-adapted stratification during the past decade, ~30% of T-ALL cases relapse with very poor prognosis.

  5. Characterization of CEBPA mutations and promoter hypermethylation in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollink, Iris H. I. M.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Arentsen-Peters, Susan T. C. J. M.; Zimmermann, Martin; Peeters, Justine K.; Valk, Peter J. M.; Balgobind, Brian V.; Sonneveld, Edwin; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; Trka, Jan; Baruchel, Andre; Creutzig, Ursula; Pieters, Rob; Reinhardt, Dirk; Zwaan, C. Michel

    2011-01-01

    Background Dysfunctioning of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBP alpha) in acute myeloid leukemia can be caused, amongst others, by mutations in the encoding gene (CEBPA) and by promoter hypermethylation. CEBPA-mutated acute myeloid leukemia is associated with a favorable outcome, but this m

  6. Prediction of molecular subtypes in acute myeloid leukemia based on gene expression profiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.G.W. Verhaak (Roel); B.J. Wouters (Bas); C.A.J. Erpelinck (Claudia); S. Abbas (Saman); H.B. Beverloo (Berna); S. Lugthart (Sanne); B. Löwenberg (Bob); H.R. Delwel (Ruud); P.J.M. Valk (Peter)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractWe examined the gene expression profiles of two independent cohorts of patients with acute myeloid leukemia [n=247 and n=214 (younger than or equal to 60 years)] to study the applicability of gene expression profiling as a single assay in prediction of acute myeloid leukemia-specific mol

  7. Characterization of CEBPA mutations and promoter hypermethylation in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.H.I.M. Hollink (Iris); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry); S.T.C.J.M. Arentsen-Peters (Susan); M. Zimmermann (Martin); J. Peeters (Justine); P.J.M. Valk (Peter); B.V. Balgobind (Brian); E. Sonneveld (Edwin); G.J. Kaspers (Gertjan); E.S.J.M. de Bont (Eveline); J. Trka (Jan); A. Baruchel (André); U. Creutzig (Ursula); R. Pieters (Rob); D. Reinhardt (Dirk); C.M. Zwaan (Michel)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground Dysfunctioning of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBP α) in acute myeloid leukemia can be caused, amongst others, by mutations in the encoding gene (CEBPA) and by promoter hypermethylation. CEBPA-mutated acute myeloid leukemia is associated with a favorable outcome, but th

  8. New vessel formation and aberrant VEGF/VEGFR signaling in acute leukemia : Does it matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Bont, ESJM; Neefjes, VME; Rosati, S; Vellenga, E; Kamps, WA

    2002-01-01

    Although many patients with acute leukemia achieve a hematological complete remission with aggressive intensive therapy protocols, a large proportion shows reoccurrence of disease. Novel strategies are warranted. In acute leukemia new vessel formation is observed. New vessel formation is the result

  9. Analyses of karyotypic characteristics and prognosis in pediatric acute myeloblastic leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮敏

    2012-01-01

    Objective Acute myeloblastic leukemia(AML) accounts for 15 to 25 percent of childhood acute leukemias. Cytogenetic information is important for diagnosis,classification and prognosis of AML. Our aim was to analyze the relationship between karyotypic characteristics and prognosis of childhood

  10. New vessel formation and aberrant VEGF/VEGFR signaling in acute leukemia : Does it matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Bont, ESJM; Neefjes, VME; Rosati, S; Vellenga, E; Kamps, WA

    2002-01-01

    Although many patients with acute leukemia achieve a hematological complete remission with aggressive intensive therapy protocols, a large proportion shows reoccurrence of disease. Novel strategies are warranted. In acute leukemia new vessel formation is observed. New vessel formation is the result

  11. Response-guided induction therapy in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia with excellent remission rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsson, Jonas; Forestier, Erik; Heldrup, Jesper;

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the early treatment response in children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a response-guided induction strategy that includes idarubicin in the first course.......To evaluate the early treatment response in children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a response-guided induction strategy that includes idarubicin in the first course....

  12. Effect of age and body weight on toxicity and survival in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løhmann, Ditte J A; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Ha, Shau-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia is very toxic and the association between outcome and age and Body Mass Index is unclear. We investigated effect of age and Body Mass Index on toxicity and survival in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia. We studied all patients who completed first indu...

  13. Conventional chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia: a Brazilian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Borgia Barbosa Pagnano

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Young patients affected by acute myeloid leukemia (AML achieve complete remission (CR using conventional chemotherapy in about 55-85%. However, 30% of patients fail to achieve CR and the remission duration is often only about 12 months. More intensive treatment after CR seems to be necessary in order to maintain CR and obtain a definitive cure. In Brazil, few reports have been published on this important subject. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe a Brazilian experience in the treatment of "de novo" acute myeloid leukemia (AML in younger adult patients (age < 60 years. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis. SETTING: University Hospital, Hematology and Hemotherapy Center, State University of Campinas, Brazil. PARTICIPANTS: Newly diagnosed cases of "de novo" AML in the period from January 1994 to December 1998 were evaluated retrospectively, in relation to response to treatment, overall survival (OS and disease free survival (DFS. Cases with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL were also included in this analysis. RESULTS: On the basis of an intention to treat, 78 cases of AML, including 17 cases of APL, were evaluated. The overall median follow-up was 272 days. The complete remission (CR rate was 63.6% in the AML group (excluding APL and 78% in the APL group. The 5-year estimated disease-free survival (DFS was 80% for the APL group and 34% for the AML group (P = 0.02. The 5-year estimated overall survival (OS was 52% for the APL group and 20.5% for the AML group, respectively (P = NS. Relapse was observed in 12/39 (30.7% patients with AML and 1/11 (9% with APL. CONCLUSIONS: These results are similar to those reported in the literature. However, relapse and mortality rates remain high, and a search for more aggressive strategies in order to prevent relapse is recommended.

  14. Lithium Carbonate in Treating Patients With Acute Intestinal Graft-Versus-Host-Disease (GVHD) After Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-24

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Breakpoint Cluster Region-abl Translocation (BCR-ABL) Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Disseminated Neuroblastoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Gastrointestinal Complications; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Poor Prognosis Metastatic Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  15. Genital Infection as a First Sign of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Oiso

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Fournier’s gangrene is a life-threatening disorder caused by aerobic and anaerobic bacterial infection. We report a case of genital infection as the initial warning sign of acute myeloid leukemia. We were able to prevent progression to Fournier’s gangrene in our patient by immediate intensive therapy with incision, blood transfusions and intravenous administration of antibiotics. This case suggests that hematologists and dermatologists should keep in mind that genital infection can be a first sign of hematologic malignancy.

  16. Massive pulmonary embolism at the onset of acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Sorà

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Life-threatening bleeding is a major and early complication of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL, but in the last years there is a growing evidence of thromboses in  APL. We report the first case of a young woman with dyspnea as the first symptom of APL due to massive pulmonary embolism (PE successfully treated with thrombolysis for PE and heparin. APL has been processed with a combination of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA and arsenic trioxide (ATO obtaining complete remission.

  17. [Nursing diagnosis in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Luccas Melo; Gorini, Maria Isabel Pinto Coelho

    2006-09-01

    This case study aimed at identifying Nursing Diagnosis (ND) in adult patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia, with the purpose of contributing to the Systematization of Nurse Care. Interviews and observation were used for data collection, in addition to Nursing Process application. During the three months of data collection, other NDs were obtained by searching the files of the 6 patients. The 32 ND found in this study were grouped according to Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Out of these 32 ND, 15 corresponded to changes in Physiological Needs, and 10 to changes in Protection and Safety Needs.

  18. CLINICOPATHOLOGICAL STUDY OF ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA - A MULTIPARAMETER STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagannath

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (ALL, a malignancy of lymphoid lineage cells, has excellent prognosis in children. Leukemia is the most prevalent childhood cancer and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL constitutes 75% of all cases. The most frequent presenting symptoms are fever, weight loss and pallor. Early detection of clinical symptoms positively affects timely diagnosis. AIMS & OBJECTIVES The objectives of the present study were to assess frequency of presenting symptoms, laboratory data and prognostic factors in children with diagnosis of ALL. MATERIALS & METHODS The present study (2014 was performed in the hematology section of Department of Pathology of Gajra Raja Medical College, Gwalior over a period of 12 months from 1st October 2013 to 30th September 2014. This was a prospective study. The blood samples were received from various departments of Jayarogya hospital especially from the Pediatric and Medicine departments. RESULTS Out of the 37 cases diagnosed as Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, 25(67.57% were male and 12(32.43%, were female, (male:female ratio: 2.1:1. 43.35% of patients which comprises highest number of cases belonged to 11-20 years of age group. The most frequent presenting symptoms was fever (83.78% followed by weakness (70.27% and loss of appetite (27% while most frequent presenting sign was pallor (86.48% followed by lymphadenopathy (67.57% and splenomegaly (48.65%. Complete blood cell count was abnormal in all of the patients, and pancytopenia was detected in 10.81% of the patients. Of all the patients, 91.89% had abnormal white blood cell (WBC count at presentation, 10.81% had leucopenia and 80% had leucocytosis. FAB L1 subtype was more common as compared to FAB L2 subtype. CONCLUSION In our study (2014, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia was more prevalent in males than in females and more common in childhood than in adult. FAB L1 subtype was more common as compared to FAB L2 subtype.

  19. Complexity on Acute Myeloid Leukemia mRNA Transcript Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Cattani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the sequence analysis of acute myeloid leukemia mRNA. Six transcript variants of mlf1 mRNA, with more than 2000 bps, are analyzed by focusing on the autocorrelation of each distribution. Through the correlation matrix, some patches and similarities are singled out and commented, with respect to similar distributions. The comparison of Kolmogorov fractal dimension will be also given in order to classify the six variants. The existence of a fractal shape, patterns, and symmetries are discussed as well.

  20. Acute myeloid leukemia: conventional cytogenetics, FISH, and moleculocentric methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissette, Jennifer J D; Bagg, Adam

    2011-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a complex group of hematologic neoplasms characterized by distinctive morphologic, immunophenotypic, and genetic abnormalities. However, it has become evident that genetic aberrations are central to the genesis of AML and have assumed an increasingly relevant role in the classification of AML. Here we discuss hallmark recurrent translocations that define specific World Health Organization (WHO) entities and other frequently encountered genetic aberrations that do not (yet) define specific entities. Additionally, we discuss emerging technologies and their application to the discovery of new abnormalities and to their potential role in the future diagnosis and classification of AML.

  1. Unilateral Hydronephrosis and Renal Damage after Acute Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egle Simanauskiene

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 14-year-old boy presented with asymptomatic right hydronephrosis detected on routine yearly ultrasound examination. Previously, he had at least two normal renal ultrasonograms, 4 years after remission of acute myeloblastic leukemia, treated by AML-BFM-93 protocol. A function of the right kidney and no damage on the left was confirmed by a DMSA scan. Right retroperitoneoscopic nephrectomy revealed 3 renal arteries with the lower pole artery lying on the pelviureteric junction. Histologically chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis was detected. In the pathogenesis of this severe unilateral renal damage, we suspect the exacerbation of deleterious effects of cytostatic therapy on kidneys with intermittent hydronephrosis.

  2. Esophageal Candidiasis as the Initial Manifestation of Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komeno, Yukiko; Uryu, Hideki; Iwata, Yuko; Hatada, Yasumasa; Sakamoto, Jumpei; Iihara, Kuniko; Ryu, Tomiko

    2015-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman presented with persistent dysphagia. A gastroendoscopy revealed massive esophageal candidiasis, and oral miconazole was prescribed. Three weeks later, she returned to our hospital without symptomatic improvement. She was febrile, and blood tests showed leukocytosis (137,150 /μL, blast 85%), anemia and thrombocytopenia. She was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). She received chemotherapy and antimicrobial agents. During the recovery from the nadir, bilateral ocular candidiasis was detected, suggesting the presence of preceding candidemia. Thus, esophageal candidiasis can be an initial manifestation of AML. Thorough examination to detect systemic candidiasis is strongly recommended when neutropenic patients exhibit local candidiasis prior to chemotherapy.

  3. Testis Scintigraphy in a Patient with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine Şencan Eren

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is a pediatric malignancy associated with remissions and relapses. Common relapsing sitesare meninges, testis and ovary. Testicular scintigraphy is a highly specific modality used mainly in the differential diagnosis of testicular torsion and epidydimitis/epidydimo-orchitis. There is only one interesting image on leukemic infiltration with scrotal scintigraphy in the literature. The aim of this case presentation is to report that although the scintigraphic appearance of testicular torsion was observed in a patient with the diagnosis of ALL, testicular ALL infiltration was revealed in pathologic examination.

  4. Ecthyma gangrenosum in a patient with acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryeziu, Emrush; Kryeziu, K; Bajraktari, Gjani; Abazi, M; Zylfiu, B; Rudhani, I; Sadiku, Sh; Ukimeri, A; Brovina, A; Dreshaj, Sh; Telaku, S

    2010-01-01

    Ecthymagangrenosum (EG)is a rare condition with characteristic clinical appearance of red maculae that progresses to a central area of necrosis surrounded by an erythematous halo. The most frequently it is caused by Pseudomonas bacteriaemia in neutropenic patient. The authors presents a patient with acute myloblastic leukemia M4 type in whom in relapse EG caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was found. The patient was treated with antibiotics and surgical debridement. The author wants to point out on clinical significance this condition with high mortality rate.

  5. Pyomyositis During Induction Chemotherapy for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Liang Kao

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we report on the correct diagnosis and effective treatment procedures for pyomyositis, a very rare complication that remains a diagnostic challenge in children being treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. We report the case of a 10-year-old girl suffering from pyomyositis with ALL. Correct diagnosis is usually delayed because the initial symptom of pyomyositis, usually local pain, is similar to the common side effect of vincristine, a drug necessary for ALL induction therapy. We summarize the procedures taken to reach a timely diagnosis and therapeutic success.

  6. Additional chromosome abnormalities in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with all-trans retinoic acid and chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cervera, Jose; Montesinos, Pau; Hernandez-Rivas, Jesus M.; Calasanz, Maria J.; Aventin, Anna; Ferro, Maria T.; Luno, Elisa; Sanchez, Javier; Vellenga, Edo; Rayon, Chelo; Milone, Gustavo; de la Serna, Javier; Rivas, Concha; Gonzalez, Jose D.; Tormo, Mar; Amutio, Elena; Gonzalez, Marcos; Brunet, Salut; Lowenberg, Bob; Sanz, Miguel A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute promyelocytic leukemia is a subtype of acute myeloid leukemia characterized by the t(15;17). The incidence and prognostic significance of additional chromosomal abnormalities in acute promyelocytic leukemia is still a controversial matter. Design and Methods Based on cytogenetic dat

  7. Additional chromosome abnormalities in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with all-trans retinoic acid and chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Cervera (José); P. Montesinos (Pau); J.M. Hernandez-Rivas (J. M.); M.J. Calasanz (Maria); A. Aventín (Anna); M.T. Ferro (María); E. Luño (Elisa); J. Sánchez (Javier); E. Vellenga (Edo); C. Rayón (Chelo); G. Milone (Gustavo); J. de Serna (Javier); C. Rivas (Concha); J.D. González (José David); M. Tormo (Mar); E. Amutio (Elena); S. Brunet (Salut); B. Löwenberg (Bob); M.A. Sanz (Miguel Angel)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Acute promyelocytic leukemia is a subtype of acute myeloid leukemia characterized by the t(15;17). The incidence and prognostic significance of additional chromosomal abnormalities in acute promyelocytic leukemia is still a controversial matter. Design and Methods: Based on c

  8. Identification and targeting leukemia stem cells: The path to the cure for acute myeloid leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianbiao; Zhou; Wee-Joo; Chng

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence support the notion that acute myeloid leukemia(AML) is organized in a hierarchical system, originating from a special proportion of leukemia stem cells(LSC). Similar to their normal counterpart, hematopoietic stem cells(HSC), LSC possess selfrenewal capacity and are responsible for the continued growth and proliferation of the bulk of leukemia cells in the blood and bone marrow. It is believed that LSC are also the root cause for the treatment failure and relapse of AML because LSC are often resistant to chemotherapy. In the past decade, we have made significant advancement in identification and understanding the molecular biology of LSC, but it remains a daunting task to specifically targeting LSC, while sparing normalHSC. In this review, we will first provide a historical overview of the discovery of LSC, followed by a summary of identification and separation of LSC by either cell surface markers or functional assays. Next, the review will focus on the current, various strategies for eradicating LSC. Finally, we will highlight future directions and challenges ahead of our ultimate goal for the cure of AML by targeting LSC.

  9. MORPHOLOGIC & FLOWCYTOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF ACUTE LEUKEMIAS IN A TEACHING HOSPITAL IN CHHATTISGARH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabia Parveen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Immunophenotyping of leukemi a by flowcytometry offers a better classification of the hematopoietic lineage of malignant cells as compared to morphology. AIM : To determine the immunophenotypic subtypes of acute leukemia in a tertiary care teaching hospital. MATERIAL & METHODS : A one y ear study of morphologic & flowcytometric data of patients with acute leukemia. RESULTS : Total numbers of acute leukemia patients diagnosed morphologically were 45, out of which 20 patients underwent immunophenotyping by flowcytometry. Maximum patients wer e in the age group of 0 - 10 yrs followed by 11 - 20 yrs with males outnumbering female. Immunophenotypically they belonged to ALL - B cell lineage, ALL - T cell lineage, AML, biphenotypic, inconclusive. CONCLUSION : Immunophenotyping of acute leukemias by flowcyto metry, not only helps to confirm the morphologic diagnosis but also helps in assigning specific lineage to the blasts, particularly in acute lymphoid leukemia

  10. Lysosomal disruption preferentially targets acute myeloid leukemia cells and progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhai, Mahadeo A.; Prabha, Swayam; Hurren, Rose; Rutledge, Angela C.; Lee, Anna Y.; Sriskanthadevan, Shrivani; Sun, Hong; Wang, Xiaoming; Skrtic, Marko; Seneviratne, Ayesh; Cusimano, Maria; Jhas, Bozhena; Gronda, Marcela; MacLean, Neil; Cho, Eunice E.; Spagnuolo, Paul A.; Sharmeen, Sumaiya; Gebbia, Marinella; Urbanus, Malene; Eppert, Kolja; Dissanayake, Dilan; Jonet, Alexia; Dassonville-Klimpt, Alexandra; Li, Xiaoming; Datti, Alessandro; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Wrana, Jeff; Rogers, Ian; Sonnet, Pascal; Ellis, William Y.; Corey, Seth J.; Eaves, Connie; Minden, Mark D.; Wang, Jean C.Y.; Dick, John E.; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; Schimmer, Aaron D.

    2012-01-01

    Despite efforts to understand and treat acute myeloid leukemia (AML), there remains a need for more comprehensive therapies to prevent AML-associated relapses. To identify new therapeutic strategies for AML, we screened a library of on- and off-patent drugs and identified the antimalarial agent mefloquine as a compound that selectively kills AML cells and AML stem cells in a panel of leukemia cell lines and in mice. Using a yeast genome-wide functional screen for mefloquine sensitizers, we identified genes associated with the yeast vacuole, the homolog of the mammalian lysosome. Consistent with this, we determined that mefloquine disrupts lysosomes, directly permeabilizes the lysosome membrane, and releases cathepsins into the cytosol. Knockdown of the lysosomal membrane proteins LAMP1 and LAMP2 resulted in decreased cell viability, as did treatment of AML cells with known lysosome disrupters. Highlighting a potential therapeutic rationale for this strategy, leukemic cells had significantly larger lysosomes compared with normal cells, and leukemia-initiating cells overexpressed lysosomal biogenesis genes. These results demonstrate that lysosomal disruption preferentially targets AML cells and AML progenitor cells, providing a rationale for testing lysosomal disruption as a novel therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:23202731

  11. Physiologically based toxicokinetic modeling of secondary acute myelolytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Manas Kumar; Nath, Debjani

    2014-01-01

    Benzene, designated as environmental and occupational carcinogen and hematotoxin, has been associated with secondary leukemia. To develop a toxicokinetic model of AML, benzene can be used as leukemogenic agent. The aim of the present study was to optimize the dose, period and time of cumulative benzene exposure of Swiss Albino mice and to analyze survival rate; alteration in cell cycle regulation and other clinical manifestations in mice exposed to benzene vapour at a dose 300 ppm × 6 h/day × 5 days/week for 2 weeks, i.e., 9000(a)ppm cumulative dose. Analyzing physiological parameters like plasma enzyme profile, complete hematology (Hb %, RBC indices and WBC differentials), hematopoietic cells morphology, expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins, tissue histology and analysis of DNA fragmentation, optimum conditions were established. Down regulation of p53 and p21 and up regulation of CDK2, CDK4, CDK6, cyclin D1 and E in this exposed group were marked as the optimum conditions of cellular deregulation for the development of secondary AML. Elevated level of Plasma AST/ALT with corresponding changes in liver histology showing extended sinusoids within the hepatocytic cell cords in optimally exposed animals also confirmed the toxicokinetic relation of benzene with leukemia. It can be concluded from the above observations that the 9000(a)ppm exposed animals can serve as the induced laboratory model of secondary acute myeloid leukemia.

  12. Persistence of BCR/ABL mRNA-expressing bone-marrow cells in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia in complete cytogenetic remission induced by interferon-alpha therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberlé, F; Toiron, Y; Camerlo, J; Lafage, M; Sainty, D; Arnoulet, C; Raineri, V; Gabert, J; Maraninchi, D; Mannoni, P

    1995-06-01

    Complete hematologic and cytogenetic responses can be obtained with interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) in 15-25% of the patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). In these patients, reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) can be used to evaluate minimal residual disease. We studied 12 patients who remained Philadelphia-negative for a median period of 21 months on IFN-alpha therapy. Using RT-PCR, the specific transcript was found in all bone marrow (BM) samples. Ten patients still exhibiting a persistent residual clone remained in cytogenetic remission for a median period of 14 months. As we observed a dissociation between bcr-abl expression in BM and peripheral blood (PB) cells, and given the known fluctuations of the bcr-abl PCR results, we suggest that PB negative results should be confirmed on BM specimens. Alternatively, it remains to be demonstrated whether longitudinal monitoring of residual disease would benefit from quantitative PCR or double fluorescence in situ hybridization.

  13. BME, a novel compound of anthraquinone, down regulated P-glycoprotein expression in doxorubicin-resistant human myelogenous leukemia (K562/DOX) cells via generation of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianhong; Liu, Lu; Cen, Juan; Ji, Biansheng

    2015-09-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumor cells is still a main obstacle for the chemotherapeutic treatment of cancers. Thus, development of effective MDR reversing agents is an important approach in the clinic. The present study revealed that BME, a novel compound of anthraquinone, elevated intracellular accumulation of the P-gp substrates and reduced concentration resulting in 50% inhibition of cell growth (IC50) values for doxorubicin (DOX) in doxorubicin-resistant human myelogenous leukemia (K562/DOX) cells. Further more, BME was also reported to down regulated P-gp expression accompanying with generation of nontoxic low level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (iROS) and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 as well as c-JUN N-terminal kinase (JNK). However, treatment with N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), U0216 and SP600125 almost abolished actions of the BME mentioned above. These results indicated that the effect of the BME on the P-gp may be involved in generation of nontoxic low level of iROS and activation of ERK1/2 or JNK, which suggested valuable clues to screen and develop P-gp reversing agents.

  14. Leukemia-induced phenotypic and functional defects in natural killer cells predict failure to achieve remission in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringaris, Kate; Sekine, Takuya; Khoder, Ahmad; Alsuliman, Abdullah; Razzaghi, Bonnie; Sargeant, Ruhena; Pavlu, Jiri; Brisley, Gill; de Lavallade, Hugues; Sarvaria, Anushruthi; Marin, David; Mielke, Stephan; Apperley, Jane F; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Barrett, A John; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2014-05-01

    The majority of patients with acute myeloid leukemia will relapse, and older patients often fail to achieve remission with induction chemotherapy. We explored the possibility that leukemic suppression of innate immunity might contribute to treatment failure. Natural killer cell phenotype and function was measured in 32 consecutive acute myeloid leukemia patients at presentation, including 12 achieving complete remission. Compared to 15 healthy age-matched controls, natural killer cells from acute myeloid leukemia patients were abnormal at presentation, with downregulation of the activating receptor NKp46 (P=0.007) and upregulation of the inhibitory receptor NKG2A (P=0.04). Natural killer cells from acute myeloid leukemia patients had impaired effector function against autologous blasts and K562 targets, with significantly reduced CD107a degranulation, TNF-α and IFN-γ production. Failure to achieve remission was associated with NKG2A overexpression and reduced TNF-α production. These phenotypic and functional abnormalities were partially restored in the 12 patients achieving remission. In vitro co-incubation of acute myeloid leukemia blasts with natural killer cells from healthy donors induced significant impairment in natural killer cell TNF-α and IFN-γ production (P=0.02 and P=0.01, respectively) against K562 targets and a trend to reduced CD107a degranulation (P=0.07). Under transwell conditions, the inhibitory effect of AML blasts on NK cytotoxicity and effector function was still present, and this inhibitory effect was primarily mediated by IL-10. These results suggest that acute myeloid leukemia blasts induce long-lasting changes in natural killer cells, impairing their effector function and reducing the competence of the innate immune system, favoring leukemia survival.

  15. Nanoparticle targeted therapy against childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satake, Noriko; Lee, Joyce; Xiao, Kai; Luo, Juntao; Sarangi, Susmita; Chang, Astra; McLaughlin, Bridget; Zhou, Ping; Kenney, Elaina; Kraynov, Liliya; Arnott, Sarah; McGee, Jeannine; Nolta, Jan; Lam, Kit

    2011-06-01

    The goal of our project is to develop a unique ligand-conjugated nanoparticle (NP) therapy against childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). LLP2A, discovered by Dr. Kit Lam, is a high-affinity and high-specificity peptidomimetic ligand against an activated α4β1 integrin. Our study using 11 fresh primary ALL samples (10 precursor B ALL and 1 T ALL) showed that childhood ALL cells expressed activated α4β1 integrin and bound to LLP2A. Normal hematopoietic cells such as activated lymphocytes and monocytes expressed activated α4β1 integrin; however, normal hematopoietic stem cells showed low expression of α4β1 integrin. Therefore, we believe that LLP2A can be used as a targeted therapy for childhood ALL. The Lam lab has developed novel telodendrimer-based nanoparticles (NPs) which can carry drugs efficiently. We have also developed a human leukemia mouse model using immunodeficient NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ null mice engrafted with primary childhood ALL cells from our patients. LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be evaluated both in vitro and in vivo using primary leukemia cells and this mouse model. NPs will be loaded first with DiD near infra-red dye, and then with the chemotherapeutic agents daunorubicin or vincristine. Both drugs are mainstays of current chemotherapy for childhood ALL. Targeting properties of LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be evaluated by fluorescent microscopy, flow cytometry, MTS assay, and mouse survival after treatment. We expect that LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be preferentially delivered and endocytosed to leukemia cells as an effective targeted therapy.

  16. Molecular cytogenetic analyses of HIG, a novel human cell line carrying t(1;3)(p36.3;q25.3) established from a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia in blastic crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, Noriko; Ogawa, Seishi; Motokura, Tohru; Hangaishi, Akira; Wang, Lili; Qiao, Ying; Nannya, Yasuhito; Kogi, Mieko; Hirai, Hisamaru

    2003-12-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities involving 1p36, 3q21, and/or 3q26 have been reported in a subset of myeloid neoplasms having characteristic dysmegakaryopoiesis, and the overexpression of EVI1 on 3q26 or of MEL1 on 1p36 has been implicated in their pathogenesis. We describe molecular cytogenetic analyses of a novel human cell line, HIG, established from a unique case in which a novel translocation t(1;3)(p36;q26) appeared as the sole additional chromosomal abnormality at the time of blastic transformation of chronic myelogenous leukemia. The patient displayed clinical features resembling those of the 3q21q26 syndrome. The HIG cell line retained der(1)t(1;3)(p36;q26) but lost t(9;22)(q34;q11). To identify the relevant gene that would be deregulated by this translocation, we molecularly cloned the translocation's breakpoints. They were distant from the breakpoint cluster regions of the 3q21q26 syndrome or t(1;3)(p36;q21), and neither the EVI1 nor the MEL1 transcript was detected in the HIG cell line. None of the genes located within 150 kilobase pairs of the breakpoints were aberrantly expressed, suggesting that in this case other gene(s) more distant from the breakpoints are deregulated by possible remote effects. Further analyses of the deregulated genes in the HIG cell line should provide important insight into the mechanisms involved in these types of leukemias.

  17. A Rare Case of Extramedullary T/Myeloid Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia with t(1;5)(q23;q33)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Monabati, Ahmad; Safaei, Akbar; Nouri, Sadat; Safavi, Moeinadin; Solhjoo, Freidoon

    2016-01-01

    Mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) is a rare neoplasm which accounts for 2–5% of all leukemias and it is classified under heading of acute leukemia of ambiguous lineage in 2008 WHO classification...

  18. Treatment of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Without Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Campana, Dario; Pei, Deqing; Bowman, W. Paul; Sandlund, John T.; Kaste, Sue C.; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Raimondi, Susana C.; Onciu, Mihaela; Coustan-Smith, Elaine; Kun, Larry E.; Jeha, Sima; Cheng, Cheng; Howard, Scott C.; Simmons, Vickey; Bayles, Amy; Metzger, Monika L.; Boyett, James M.; Leung, Wing; Handgretinger, Rupert; Downing, James R.; Evans, William E.; Relling, Mary V.

    2009-01-01

    Background We conducted a clinical trial to test whether prophylactic cranial irradiation could be omitted in all children with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods A total of 498 evaluable patients were enrolled. Treatment intensity was based on presenting features and the level of minimal residual disease after remission induction treatment. Continuous complete remission was compared between the 71 patients who previously would have received prophylactic cranial irradiation and the 56 historical controls who received it. Results The 5-year event-free and overall survival probabilities (95% confidence interval) for all 498 patients were 85.6% (79.9% to 91.3%) and 93.5% (89.8% to 97.2%), respectively. The 5-year cumulative risk of isolated central-nervous-system (CNS) relapse was 2.7% (1.1% to 4.2%), and that of any CNS relapse (isolated plus combined) was 3.9% (1.9% to 5.9%). The 71 patients had significantly better continuous complete remission than the 56 historical controls (P=0.04). All 11 patients with isolated CNS relapse remain in second remission for 0.4 to 5.5 years. CNS leukemia (CNS-3 status) or a traumatic lumbar puncture with blasts at diagnosis and a high level of minimal residual disease (≥ 1%) after 6 weeks of remission induction were significantly associated with poorer event-free survival. Risk factors for CNS relapse included the presence of the t(1;19)[TCF3-PBX1], any CNS involvement at diagnosis, and T-cell immunophenotype. Common adverse effects included allergic reactions to L-asparaginase, osteonecrosis, thrombosis, and disseminated fungal infection. Conclusions With effective risk-adjusted chemotherapy, prophylactic cranial irradiation can be safely omitted in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:19553647

  19. Vincristine sulfate liposomal injection for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soosay Raj TA

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Trisha A Soosay Raj,1 Amanda M Smith,2 Andrew S Moore,1,21Royal Children's Hospital, Children's Health Queensland Hospital and Health Service, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; 2Queensland Children's Medical Research Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, AustraliaAbstract: Vincristine (VCR is one of the most extensively used cytotoxic compounds in hemato-oncology. VCR is particularly important for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, a disease that accounts for approximately one-third of all childhood cancer diagnoses. VCR's full therapeutic potential has been limited by dose-limiting neurotoxicity, classically resulting in autonomic and peripheral sensory–motor neuropathy. In the last decade, however, the discovery that liposomal encapsulation of chemotherapeutics can modulate the pharmacokinetic characteristics of a compound has stimulated much interest in liposomal VCR (vincristine sulfate liposomal injection [VSLI] formulations for the treatment of ALL and other hematological malignancies. Promising data from recent clinical trials investigating VSLI in adults with ALL resulted in US Food and Drug Administration approval for use in patients with Philadelphia chromosome (t[9;22]/BCR–ABL1 (Ph-negative (Ph- disease. Additional clinical trials of VSLI in adults and children with both Ph-positive (Ph+ and Ph- ALL are ongoing. Here we review the preclinical and clinical experience to date with VSLI for ALL.Keywords: vincristine sulfate liposomal injection, liposomes, sphingosomal vincristine, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chemotherapy

  20. Chemotherapy for acute leukemia during pregnancy. Five case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassas, A; Kartalis, G; Klearchou, N; Tsatalas, K; Sinacos, Z; Mantalenakis, S

    1984-01-01

    We summarize the cases of four women with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and of one with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) presenting in the first, second and third trimester of pregnancy. Remission of AML was induced by doxorubicin, vincristine, and cytosine arabinoside. The ALL case was treated with vincristine and prednisone initially, and subsequently with vindesine for maintenance. Four patients entered a complete (3 AML and the ALL case), and one (AML) a partial remission. This patient was delivered of a normal, 3140 g, male infant by Caesarian section in the 38th gestational week and 1 month later she died of her disease. One patient (AML, promyelocytic type) who presented in the 10th week of pregnancy underwent elective abortion while in remission after induction treatment. The patient with ALL gave birth to a normal, full-term, male infant by Caesarian section. The two other patients (AML) had spontaneous deliveries of normal male infants in the 37th and 38th weeks of pregnancy. Growth and development of three of the children are normal at 12, 36, and 37 months of life while the fourth child was lost to follow-up evaluation. The disease relapsed in all mothers but they are still alive at 15 (ALL), 37, and 42 months after diagnosis. We feel that current chemotherapy could improve the high post-partum maternal mortality rate and the chance of producing live babies without excessive risk to the fetus or the mother, even if administered relatively early in the course of pregnancy.

  1. Correlation of morphologic and cytochemical diagnosis with flowcytometric analysis in acute leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Belurkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The classification of acute leukemias has revolutionized over the years. Immunophenotyping of acute leukemia has gained popularity because of its influence on treatment and prognosis of the disease. The various antigens expressed by the leukemic cells can be assessed by flowcytometry (FCA and can be used in rendering specific treatment and predicting the outcome of the different types of acute leukemia. Aims: The main aim of this study was to compare the morphologic and cytochemical diagnoses with flowcytometric diagnoses in acute leukemia and to analyze the usefulness of FCA over morphology. Results: In this study we analyzed 50 cases of acute leukemia and found concordance rate as high as 86% between morphologic/cytochemical diagnosis and flowcytometric diagnosis. Of these, complete concordance was seen in 58% of the cases and partial concordance was seen in 22% of the cases. Non-concordance was seen in only 4% of our cases. In remaining 16% of our cases FCA helped in sub classifying the acute leukemia where morphology and cytochemistry had failed to do so. CD19 and 20 were found to be consistent B-cell markers and CD3 was a very specific marker for T-cell leukemia. CD13 and 33 were important myeloid markers and were aided by other secondary panel of markers like CD14, CD117 and CD41. Conclusion: FCA not only helps in confirming morphologic diagnosis in acute leukemia but also helps in assigning specific lineage to the blasts, particularly in acute lymphoid leukemia. Immunophenotyping is of utmorst importance in classifying acute leukemia as it greatly influences the treatment and the prognosis.

  2. The study for loss of bcl-xs expression as a prognostic factor in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Inokuchi, Koiti; Dan, Kazuo

    2002-12-01

    We reported here abnormal expression profile of the bcl-x gene is associated with the recurrence in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).The bcl-x gene product exists in two forms, bcl-xl and bcl-xs. The bcl-xl, similar to bcl-2, inhibits apoptosis, whereas bcl-xs counters the effects of bcl-2 and bcl-xl. Mononuclear cells of bone marrow cells were obtained from 50 patients with recurrent AML at diagnosis prior to treatment and during relapse. We investigated the expression of the two isoforms of the bcl-x gene, bcl-xl and bcl-xs. The bcl-xl transcript was detected in all patients at both stages, but the bcl-xs transcript was not detected in six cases at both stages and in seven other cases at relapse (bcl-xs (-) group, n=13). The duration of relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) of the bcl-xs (-) group were significantly shorter than those of the bcl-xs (+) group (RFS: P=0.04; OS: P=0.02). Subsequently, mutation of the bcl-x gene was investigated. No mutation of the bcl-x gene was detected in all patients of both stages. Some refractory leukemic cells which escape chemotherapy-induced apoptosis due to loss of the bcl-xs transcript may continue to proliferate, resulting in the relapse of chemotherapy-resistant leukemia. The examination of the expression status of the bcl-x gene could facilitate the prediction of chemotherapy resistance and the prognosis of patients with refractory AML. The future large study will confirm the present data about loss of bcl-xs gene expression as prognostic factor.

  3. Association of ARID5B gene variants with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Yemeni children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Absi, Boshra; Noor, Suzita M; Saif-Ali, Riyadh; Salem, Sameer D; Ahmed, Radwan H; Razif, Muhammad Fm; Muniandy, Sekaran

    2017-04-01

    Studies have shown an association between ARID5B gene polymorphisms and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, the association between ARID5B variants and acute lymphoblastic leukemia among the Arab population still needs to be studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between ARID5B variants with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Yemeni children. A total of 14 ARID5B gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 289 Yemeni children, of whom 136 had acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 153 were controls, using the nanofluidic Dynamic Array (Fluidigm 192.24 Dynamic Array). Using logistic regression adjusted for age and gender, the risks of acute lymphoblastic leukemia were presented as odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. We found that nine SNPs were associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia under additive genetic models: rs7073837, rs10740055, rs7089424, rs10821936, rs4506592, rs10994982, rs7896246, rs10821938, and rs7923074. Furthermore, the recessive models revealed that six SNPs were risk factors for acute lymphoblastic leukemia: rs10740055, rs7089424, rs10994982, rs7896246, rs10821938, and rs7923074. The gender-specific impact of these SNPs under the recessive genetic model revealed that SNPs rs10740055, rs10994982, and rs6479779 in females, and rs10821938 and rs7923074 in males were significantly associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk. Under the dominant model, SNPs rs7073837, rs10821936, rs7896246, and rs6479778 in males only showed striking association with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The additive model revealed that SNPs with significant association with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were rs10821936 (both males and females); rs7073837, rs10740055, rs10994982, and rs4948487 (females only); and rs7089424, rs7896246, rs10821938, and rs7923074 (males only). In addition, the ARID5B haplotype block (CGAACACAA) showed a higher risk for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The haplotype (CCCGACTGC) was

  4. Therapy-induced secondary acute myeloid leukemia with t(11;19)(q23;p13.1) in a pediatric patient with relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Daniel N; Morris, Heather D; Feusner, James H; Koduru, Prasad; Wilson, Kathleen; Timmons, Charles F; Cavalier, MaryEllen; Luu, Hung S

    2014-11-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is classified based upon recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities. The t(15;17)(q24.1;q21.1) abnormality is found in 5% to 8% of de novo acute myeloid leukemia and is diagnostic of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). The translocation results in fusion of the retinoic acid receptor-α (RARA) gene at 17q21.1 and the promyelocytic leukemia (PML) gene at 15q24.1. Standard APL therapy is a combination of all-trans retinoic acid and anthracycline-based chemotherapy. Anthracycline treatment is associated with secondary clonal chromosomal aberrations that can lead to therapy-related secondary myeloid neoplasms. We present a pediatric case of relapsed APL coexistent with treatment-associated secondary myeloid neoplasm with t(11;19)(q23;p13.1).

  5. [A case of mediastinal growing teratoma syndrome with acute megakaryoblastic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Masachika; Igarashi, Natsue; Fujimori, Fumio; Kuriyama, Hideyuki; Ebe, Yusuke; Nishibori, Takeaki; Sato, Kazuhiro; Hosaka, Yasuko; Yamato, Yasushi; Togashi, Kenichi; Yano, Toshio

    2014-07-01

    We report a case of a 38-year-old man who was diagnosed with a mediastinal germ cell tumor. After induction chemotherapy, the tumor marker levels normalized, but the tumor itself continued to grow. Surgical resection was performed successfully, but the patient developed acute megakaryoblastic leukemia 6 months later, and induction and consolidation therapies failed to achieve remission. Leukemia cells invaded the central nervous system following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and the patient died 5 months after being diagnosed with leukemia. This very rare case of a mediastinal germ cell tumor met the criteria for "growing teratoma syndrome", against a background of acute megakaryoblastic leukemia.

  6. Inhibition factors of arsenic trioxide therapeutic effects in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sui Meijuan; Zhang Zhuo; Zhou Jin

    2014-01-01

    Objective To summarize limitations involved in arsenic trioxide therapeutic effects in acute promyelocytic leukemia,because current studies show that some individuals of acute promyelocytic leukemia have relatively poor outcomes during treatment with arsenic trioxide.Data sources Most relevant articles were included in the PubMed database between 2000 and 2013 with the keywords "acute promyelocytic leukemia","arsenic trioxide","thiol" or "methylation".In addition,a few older articles were also reviewed.Study selection Data and articles related to arsenic trioxide effect in acute promyelocytic leukemia treatment were selected and reviewed.We developed an overview of limitations associated with arsenic trioxide therapeutic effect.Results This review focuses on the researches about the arsenic trioxide therapeutic effect in acute promyelocytic leukemia and summarizes three mainly limitations which can influence the arsenic trioxide therapeutic effect to different degrees.First,with the combination of arsenic and glutathione the therapeutic effect and cytotoxicity decrease when glutathione concentration increases; second,arsenic methylation,stable arsenic methylation products weaken the apoptosis effect of arsenic trioxide in leukemia cells; third,gene mutations affect the sensitivity of tumor cells to arsenic trioxide and increase the resistance of leukemia cells to arsenic trioxide.Conclusions The chief limitations are listed in the review.If we can exclude all of them,we can obtain a better therapeutic effect of arsenic trioxide in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia.

  7. Similar Survival for Patients Undergoing Reduced-Intensity Total Body Irradiation (TBI) Versus Myeloablative TBI as Conditioning for Allogeneic Transplant in Acute Leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikell, John L., E-mail: jmikell@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Waller, Edmund K. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Switchenko, Jeffrey M. [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Rangaraju, Sravanti; Ali, Zahir; Graiser, Michael [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Hall, William A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Langston, Amelia A. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Esiashvili, Natia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Khoury, H. Jean [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Khan, Mohammad K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the mainstay of treatment for adults with acute leukemia. Total body irradiation (TBI) remains an important part of the conditioning regimen for HCST. For those patients unable to tolerate myeloablative TBI (mTBI), reduced intensity TBI (riTBI) is commonly used. In this study we compared outcomes of patients undergoing mTBI with those of patients undergoing riTBI in our institution. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of all patients with acute leukemia who underwent TBI-based conditioning, using a prospectively acquired database of HSCT patients treated at our institution. Patient data including details of the transplantation procedure, disease status, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), response rates, toxicity, survival time, and time to progression were extracted. Patient outcomes for various radiation therapy regimens were examined. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed. Results: Between June 1985 and July 2012, 226 patients with acute leukemia underwent TBI as conditioning for HSCT. Of those patients, 180 had full radiation therapy data available; 83 had acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 94 had acute myelogenous leukemia; 45 patients received riTBI, and 135 received mTBI. Median overall survival (OS) was 13.7 months. Median relapse-free survival (RFS) for all patients was 10.2 months. Controlling for age, sex, KPS, disease status, and diagnosis, there were no significant differences in OS or RFS between patients who underwent riTBI and those who underwent mTBI (P=.402, P=.499, respectively). Median length of hospital stay was shorter for patients who received riTBI than for those who received mTBI (16 days vs 23 days, respectively; P<.001), and intensive care unit admissions were less frequent following riTBI than mTBI (2.22% vs 12.69%, respectively, P=.043). Nonrelapse survival rates were also similar (P=.186). Conclusions: No differences in OS or RFS were seen between

  8. Laboratory Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-06

    CD19-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  9. ST-elevation myocardial infarction and myelodysplastic syndrome with acute myeloid leukemia transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jao, Geoffrey T; Knovich, Mary Ann; Savage, Rodney W; Sane, David C

    2014-04-01

    Acute myocardial infarction and acute myeloid leukemia are rarely reported as concomitant conditions. The management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in patients who have acute myeloid leukemia is challenging: the leukemia-related thrombocytopenia, platelet dysfunction, and systemic coagulopathy increase the risk of bleeding, and the administration of thrombolytic agents can be fatal. We report the case of a 76-year-old man who presented emergently with STEMI, myelodysplastic syndrome, and newly recognized acute myeloid leukemia transformation. Standard antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy were contraindicated by the patient's thrombocytopenia and by his reported ecchymosis and gingival bleeding upon admission. He declined cardiac catheterization, was provided palliative care, and died 2 hours after hospital admission. We searched the English-language medical literature, found 8 relevant reports, and determined that the prognosis for patients with concomitant STEMI and acute myeloid leukemia is clearly worse than that for either individual condition. No guidelines exist to direct the management of STEMI and concomitant acute myeloid leukemia. In 2 reports, dual antiplatelet therapy, anticoagulation, and drug-eluting stent implantation were used without an increased risk of bleeding in the short term, even in the presence of thrombocytopenia. However, we think that a more conservative approach--balloon angioplasty with the provisional use of bare-metal stents--might be safer. Simultaneous chemotherapy for the acute myeloid leukemia is crucial. Older age seems to be a major risk factor: patients too frail for emergent treatment can die within hours or days.

  10. The role of ZAP70 kinase in acute lymphoblastic leukemia infiltration into the central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsadeq, Ameera; Fedders, Henning; Vokuhl, Christian; Belau, Nele M.; Zimmermann, Martin; Wirbelauer, Tim; Spielberg, Steffi; Vossen-Gajcy, Michaela; Cario, Gunnar; Schrappe, Martin; Schewe, Denis M.

    2017-01-01

    Central nervous system infiltration and relapse are poorly understood in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We examined the role of zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 in preclinical models of central nervous system leukemia and performed correlative studies in patients. Zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells was modulated using short hairpin ribonucleic acid-mediated knockdown or ectopic expression. We show that zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 regulates CCR7/CXCR4 via activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases. High expression of zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells resulted in a higher proportion of central nervous system leukemia in xenografts as compared to zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 low expressing counterparts. High zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 also enhanced the migration potential towards CCL19/CXCL12 gradients in vitro. CCR7 blockade almost abrogated homing of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells to the central nervous system in xenografts. In 130 B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 117 T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients, zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 and CCR7/CXCR4 expression levels were significantly correlated. Zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 expression correlated with central nervous system disease in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and CCR7/CXCR4 correlated with central nervous system involvement in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. In multivariate analysis, zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 expression levels in the upper third and fourth quartiles were associated with central nervous system involvement in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (odds ratio=7.48, 95% confidence interval, 2.06–27.17; odds ratio=6.86, 95% confidence interval, 1.86–25.26, respectively). CCR7 expression in the upper fourth quartile correlated with

  11. The role of ZAP70 kinase in acute lymphoblastic leukemia infiltration into the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsadeq, Ameera; Fedders, Henning; Vokuhl, Christian; Belau, Nele M; Zimmermann, Martin; Wirbelauer, Tim; Spielberg, Steffi; Vossen-Gajcy, Michaela; Cario, Gunnar; Schrappe, Martin; Schewe, Denis M

    2017-02-01

    Central nervous system infiltration and relapse are poorly understood in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We examined the role of zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 in preclinical models of central nervous system leukemia and performed correlative studies in patients. Zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells was modulated using short hairpin ribonucleic acid-mediated knockdown or ectopic expression. We show that zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 regulates CCR7/CXCR4 via activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases. High expression of zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells resulted in a higher proportion of central nervous system leukemia in xenografts as compared to zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 low expressing counterparts. High zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 also enhanced the migration potential towards CCL19/CXCL12 gradients in vitro CCR7 blockade almost abrogated homing of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells to the central nervous system in xenografts. In 130 B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 117 T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients, zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 and CCR7/CXCR4 expression levels were significantly correlated. Zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 expression correlated with central nervous system disease in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and CCR7/CXCR4 correlated with central nervous system involvement in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. In multivariate analysis, zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 expression levels in the upper third and fourth quartiles were associated with central nervous system involvement in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (odds ratio=7.48, 95% confidence interval, 2.06-27.17; odds ratio=6.86, 95% confidence interval, 1.86-25.26, respectively). CCR7 expression in the upper fourth quartile correlated with central

  12. Dose Escalation of Total Marrow Irradiation With Concurrent Chemotherapy in Patients With Advanced Acute Leukemia Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Jeffrey Y.C., E-mail: jwong@coh.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Forman, Stephen; Somlo, George [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Rosenthal, Joseph [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Department of Pediatrics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy; Radany, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Palmer, Joycelynne [Department of Biostatistics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Stein, Anthony [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We have demonstrated that toxicities are acceptable with total marrow irradiation (TMI) at 16 Gy without chemotherapy or TMI at 12 Gy and the reduced intensity regimen of fludarabine/melphalan in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). This article reports results of a study of TMI combined with higher intensity chemotherapy regimens in 2 phase I trials in patients with advanced acute myelogenous leukemia or acute lymphoblastic leukemia (AML/ALL) who would do poorly on standard intent-to-cure HCT regimens. Methods and Materials: Trial 1 consisted of TMI on Days -10 to -6, etoposide (VP16) on Day -5 (60 mg/kg), and cyclophosphamide (CY) on Day -3 (100 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=3 patients), 13.5 (n=3 patients), and 15 (n=6 patients) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Trial 2 consisted of busulfan (BU) on Days -12 to -8 (800 {mu}M min), TMI on Days -8 to -4, and VP16 on Day -3 (30 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=18) and 13.5 (n=2) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Results: Trial 1 had 12 patients with a median age of 33 years. Six patients had induction failures (IF), and 6 had first relapses (1RL), 9 with leukemia blast involvement of bone marrow ranging from 10%-98%, 5 with circulating blasts (24%-85%), and 2 with chloromas. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Eleven patients achieved complete remission at Day 30. With a median follow-up of 14.75 months, 5 patients remained in complete remission from 13.5-37.7 months. Trial 2 had 20 patients with a median age of 41 years. Thirteen patients had IF, and 5 had 1RL, 2 in second relapse, 19 with marrow blasts (3%-100%) and 13 with peripheral blasts (6%-63%). Grade 4 dose-limiting toxicities were seen at 13.5 Gy (stomatitis and hepatotoxicity). Stomatitis was the most frequent toxicity in both trials. Conclusions: TMI dose escalation to 15 Gy is possible when combined with CY/VP16 and is associated with acceptable toxicities and encouraging outcomes. TMI dose escalation is not possible with BU/VP16 due to

  13. Prognotic significance of pretreatment proliferative activity in adult acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, J S; George, S L; Frei, E; Bodey, G P; Nickerson, R C; Freireich, E J

    1977-04-01

    A statistical analysis of the prognostic significance of eight pretreatment variables was undertaken for 71 previously untreated adult patients with acute leukemia seen at M.D. Anderson Hospital over a 5 1/2-year period. None of the patients had received any prior therapy. Nearly all of the patients (68 of the 71) were treated with 4- or 5-day courses of arabinosyl-cytosine alone or in combination with cyclophosphamide, vincristine (oncovin) and prednisone (COAP). The pretreatment variables studied were age at diagnosis, the percent labeling index of the bone marrow leukemic cells, diagnosis, the highest temperature prior to start of treatment, the marrow clot section cellularity and smear differential percent of blasts, percent absolute marrow leukemic cell infiltrate and absolute number of blasts X 10(3)/mm3 in the peripheral blood. Fifty-one patients had acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) and 20 patients had acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Using a statistical regression model approach, the only variables found to be of significant prognostic importance with respect to the probability of complete remission for AML patients were the pretreatment percent labeling index, the age of the patient and the highest temperature prior to start of treatment. Unlike AML, the initial percent labeling index did not appear to be of prognostic significance for ALL patients. AML patients with high labeling indices (larger than or equal to 9%) and young patients in general (especially those less than 40 years old) had the best remission rates. With respect to the length of complete remission and survival for all patients, the only important variables were the pretreatment percent labeling index and the age of the patient, respectively. Once in complete remission, an initially high labeling index was an unfavorable sign with respect to length of remission, regardless of the patient's diagnosis. The results of this study are supportive of studies in experimental systems

  14. Temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai-Yoshida, Emi; Ogihara, Masaaki; Ozawa, Miwa; Nozaki, Taiki; Morino, Michiharu; Manabe, Atsushi; Hosoya, Ryota

    2013-07-01

    Of 71 acute lymphoblastic leukemia survivors at our hospital over the past 10 years, 2 children developed mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS). This is the first report to describe the clinical course of MTLE-HS observed longitudinally by EEG and MRI. Patient 1 experienced a seizure during chemotherapy involving intrathecal methotrexate. Postseizure MRI suggested methotrexate encephalopathy or leukemic invasion. Anticonvulsant therapy was initiated; subsequent EEGs and MRIs revealed normal results. Three years after chemotherapy, a diffuse, irregular spike-and-wave pattern was observed on interictal EEG. Five years after chemotherapy, the patient developed MTLE-HS comprising complex partial seizures, typical temporal spikes on EEG, and hippocampal sclerosis (HS). Patient 2 did not experience seizures during chemotherapy. Four years later, the patient started experiencing complex partial seizures, and a diffuse, irregular spike-and-wave pattern was observed on interictal EEG. A clinical picture of MTLE-HS developed 2 years later. In both patients, nonspecific EEG abnormalities (ie, diffuse, irregular spike-and-wave activity) preceded the appearance of HS on MRI by 2 years, suggesting an insidious advance of HS during the latent period. Such atypical EEG findings may indicate MTLE-HS during follow-up of leukemia patients. MTLE-HS develops several years after an initial precipitating incident such as prolonged seizures, central nervous system infection, and brain trauma. In our cases, the initial precipitating incident may have been chemotherapy and/or prolonged seizures. Thus, MTLE-HS associated with leukemia may not be as rare as generally believed. A large cohort study of late neurologic complications is warranted.

  15. Treatment Outcome in Older Patients with Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Pounds, Stanley; Cao, Xueyuan; Jenkins, Laura; Dahl, Gary; Bowman, W. Paul; Taub, Jeffrey W; Pui, Ching-Hon; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Campana, Dario; Inaba, Hiroto

    2013-01-01

    Background Older age has historically been an adverse prognostic factor in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The impact of age relative to that of other prognostic factors on the outcome of patients treated in recent trials is unknown. Methods Clinical outcome and causes of treatment failure of 351 patients enrolled on three consecutive protocols for childhood AML between 1991 and 2008 were analyzed according to age and protocol. Results The more recent protocol (AML02) produced improved outcomes for 10- to 21-year-old patients compared to 2 earlier studies (AML91 and 97), with 3-year rates of event-free survival (EFS), overall survival (OS) and cumulative incidence of refractory leukemia or relapse (CIR) for this group similar to those of 0- to 9-year old patients: EFS, 58.3% ± 5.4% vs. 66.6% ± 4.9%, P=.20; OS, 68.9% ± 5.1% vs. 75.1% ± 4.5%, P=.36; cumulative incidence of refractory leukemia or relapse, 21.9% ± 4.4%; vs. 25.3% ± 4.1%, P=.59. EFS and OS estimates for 10–15-year-old patients overlapped those for 16–21-year-old patients. However, the cumulative incidence of toxic death was significantly higher for 10- to 21-year-old patients compared to younger patients (13.2% ± 3.6 vs. 4.5% ± 2.0%, P=.028). Conclusion The survival rate for older children with AML has improved on our recent trial and is now similar to that of younger patients. However, deaths from toxicity remain a significant problem in the older age group. Future trials should focus on improving supportive care while striving to develop more effective antileukemic therapy. PMID:22674050

  16. Subdural hemorrhages in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: case report and literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Yin; CaiXia Qiu; XiaoHui Dong; YeLong Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background:Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is a rare hematological malignancy.Pure subdural hemorrhages in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia patient are extremely rare.Case presentation:This case presented acute spontaneous subdural hemorrhage without head trauma at first,and acute lymphoblastic leukemia was diagnosed later.The second time,the patient was admitted with multiple pure subdural hemorrhages in different locations and periods with a history of slight head trauma.Conclusions:Pure subdural hemorrhages can occur in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.More care would be needed for pure subdural hemorrhages without obvious head trauma,and patients with hematological malignancies should be protected from even mild head trauma.

  17. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in a Man Treated With Fingolimod for Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley Cohan MD, PhD

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A man with relapsing multiple sclerosis, treated with fingolimod 0.5 mg/d for 15 months, developed acute lymphoblastic leukemia and died 4 months after immune ablation and bone marrow allograft, from graft versus host disease. To our knowledge, this is the first case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia reported in a patient treated with fingolimod. Although no causal relationship can be established between fingolimod use and acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk in this single case, future surveillance for lymphatic cell malignancies in patients treated with fingolimod appears justified.

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid beta-2-microglobulin in adult patients with acute leukemia or lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P B; Kjeldsen, L; Dalhoff, K

    1992-01-01

    Beta-2-microglobulin (B2m) was measured in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum from 18 adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloblastic leukemia or lymphoma in order to detect early central nervous system (CNS) involvement or relapse. Six had CNS-involvement documented by neurologic...... determination of CSF-B2m alone may be a useful and sensitive marker of CNS-dissemination in acute leukemia and malignant lymphoma. Using the criteria of CSF-B2m greater than 160 nmol/l as a positive diagnostic test the sensitivity of the test was 100%, the specificity was 76%. The same values for the CSF...

  19. Therapeutic Effects of Myeloid Cell Leukemia-1 siRNA on Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Karami

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Up-regulation of Mcl-1, a known anti-apoptotic protein, is associated with the survival and progression of various malignancies including leukemia. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of Mcl-1 small interference RNA (siRNA on the proliferation and apoptosis of HL-60 acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells. Methods: siRNA transfection was performed using Lipofectamine™2000 reagent. Relative mRNA and protein expressions were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Trypan blue assay was performed to assess tumor cell proliferation after siRNA transfection. The cytotoxic effect of Mcl-1 siRNA on leukemic cells was measured using MTT assay. Apoptosis was detected using ELISA cell death assay. Results: Mcl-1 siRNA clearly lowered both Mcl-1 mRNA and protein levels in a time-dependent manner, leading to marked inhibition of cell survival and proliferation. Furthermore, Mcl-1 down-regulation significantly enhanced the extent of HL-60 apoptotic cells. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the down-regulation of Mcl-1 by siRNA can effectively trigger apoptosis and inhibit the proliferation of leukemic cells. Therefore, Mcl-1 siRNA may be a potent adjuvant in AML therapy.

  20. Parental Tobacco Smoking and Acute Myeloid Leukemia: The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metayer, Catherine; Petridou, Eleni; Aranguré, Juan Manuel Mejía; Roman, Eve; Schüz, Joachim; Magnani, Corrado; Mora, Ana Maria; Mueller, Beth A; de Oliveira, Maria S Pombo; Dockerty, John D; McCauley, Kathryn; Lightfoot, Tracy; Hatzipantelis, Emmanouel; Rudant, Jérémie; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Kaatsch, Peter; Miligi, Lucia; Wesseling, Catharina; Doody, David R; Moschovi, Maria; Orsi, Laurent; Mattioli, Stefano; Selvin, Steve; Kang, Alice Y; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2016-08-15

    The association between tobacco smoke and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is well established in adults but not in children. Individual-level data on parental cigarette smoking were obtained from 12 case-control studies from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC, 1974-2012), including 1,330 AML cases diagnosed at age <15 years and 13,169 controls. We conducted pooled analyses of CLIC studies, as well as meta-analyses of CLIC and non-CLIC studies. Overall, maternal smoking before, during, or after pregnancy was not associated with childhood AML; there was a suggestion, however, that smoking during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk in Hispanics (odds ratio = 2.08, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.20, 3.61) but not in other ethnic groups. By contrast, the odds ratios for paternal lifetime smoking were 1.34 (95% CI: 1.11, 1.62) and 1.18 (95% CI: 0.92, 1.51) in pooled and meta-analyses, respectively. Overall, increased risks from 1.2- to 1.3-fold were observed for pre- and postnatal smoking (P < 0.05), with higher risks reported for heavy smokers. Associations with paternal smoking varied by histological type. Our analyses suggest an association between paternal smoking and childhood AML. The association with maternal smoking appears limited to Hispanic children, raising questions about ethnic differences in tobacco-related exposures and biological mechanisms, as well as study-specific biases.