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Sample records for acute myelogenous leukemia

  1. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute myelogenous leukemia - children; AML; Acute myeloid leukemia - children; Acute granulocytic leukemia - children; Acute myeloblastic leukemia - children; Acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) - children

  2. Allogeneic Transplantation for Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-14

    Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute; Leukemia; Leukemia Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL); Leukemia Acute Lymphoid Leukemia (ALL); Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Leukemia Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Leukemia Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

  3. Skin changes in acute myelogenous leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittal R

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year old woman developed progressive, firm, mild to moderately itchy, erythematous, papular and nodular lesions, over cheeks, extensors of limbs, scalp and lower back without any accompanying systemic complaints except for severe backache. Initially clinical diagnosis was cutaneous sarcoidosis. However presence of myeloblasts, monoblasts, myelocytes and metamyelocytes in peripheral blood smear and typical histopathology of nodule with mixed cellular infiltrate more around blood vessels, sweat glands and hair follicles with admixture of larger polymorphonuclears (myeloblasts/myelocytes, eosinophils with double nuclei, and larger phagocytic cells confirmed the diagnosis of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML.

  4. Acute myelogenous leukemia and acute leukemic appendicitis: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Po-Jen Hsiao; Shih-Ming Kuo; Jia-Hong Chen; Hsuen-Fu Lin; Pau-Ling Chu; Shih-Hua Lin; Ching-Liang Ho

    2009-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) can involve the gastrointestinal tract but rarely involves the appendix.We report a male patient who had 1 year partial remission from AML and who presented with apparent acute appendicitis as the initial manifestation of leukemia relapse. Pathological findings of the appendix revealed transmural infiltrates of myeloblasts, whichindicated a diagnosis of leukemia. Unfortunately, the patient died from progression of the disease on the 19th d after admission. Although leukemic cell infiltration of the appendix is uncommon, patients with leukemia relapse can present with symptoms mimicking acute appendicitis.

  5. Nilotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-29

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  6. Systemic mastocytosis with associated acute myelogenous leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Zhrebker, Leah; Cooper, Barry; Krause, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic mastocytosis (SM) is a condition associated with a clonal neoplastic proliferation of mast cells. Approximately 40% of patients with SM present with an associated clonal hematological non–mast cell lineage disorder. Patients presenting with SM–acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have the worst prognosis. We present a case of a 62-year-old woman who was diagnosed with SM-AML. After initial treatment with a standard regimen of cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C)/idarubicin, her bone marrow showed re...

  7. Tanespimycin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  8. Tipifarnib in the treatment of newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith E Karp

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Judith E Karp1, Jeffrey E Lancet21Division of Hematologic Malignancies, Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; 2H. Lee Moffitt Comprehensive Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida, USAAbstract: Farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs represent a new class of signal transduction inhibitors that block the processing of cellular polypeptides that have cysteine terminal residues and, by so doing, interdict multiple pathways involved in proliferation and survival of diverse malignant cell types. Tipifarnib is an orally bioavailable, nonpeptidomimetic methylquinolone FTI that has exhibited clinical activity in patients with myeloid malignancies including elderly adults with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML who are not candidates for traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy, patients with high-risk myelodysplasia, myeloproliferative disorders, and imatinib-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia. Because of its relatively low toxicity profile, tipifarnib provides an important alternative to traditional cytotoxic approaches for elderly patients who are not likely to tolerate or even benefit from aggressive chemotherapy. In this review, we will focus on the clinical development of tipifarnib for treatment of newly diagnosed AML, both as induction therapy for elderly adults with poor-risk AML and as maintenance therapy following achievement of first complete remission following induction and consolidation therapies for poor-risk AML. As with all other malignancies, the optimal approach is likely to lie in rational combinations of tipifarnib with cytotoxic, biologic and/or immunomodulatory agents with non-cross-resistant mechanisms of action. Gene expression profi ling has identified networks of differentially expressed genes and gene combinations capable of predicting response to single agent tipifarnib. The clinical and correlative laboratory trials in progress and under development will provide the critical foundations for

  9. Splenic microabscesses in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eight patients with acute myelogenous leukemia in complete remission after induction chemotherapy got septic fever. Fever was unresponsive to broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. Ultrasonography showed multiple 0,5-2 cm in diameter, anechoic densities and some 1-3 cm ''target'' appearances in spleen and liver. Computed tomography demonstrated multiple, round, 0,5-2 cm areas of diminished attenuation in spleen and liver, which did not enhance like the surrounding parenchyma. These microabscesses increased in size and number of lesions without equivalent antifungal therapy and decreased or disappeared after specific treatment. Candida-infection was assured by histologic liver specimen in four patients, fungal organisms were seen microscopically in liver-biopsy in one patient and at autopsy one patient was found to have candida disseminated to the spleen, liver, kidneys, lungand CNS. (orig.)

  10. Farnesyltransferase inhibitor tipifarnib inhibits Rheb prenylation and stabilizes Bax in acute myelogenous leukemia cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Husheng; McDonald, Jennifer S.; Yun, Seongseok; Schneider, Paula A.; Peterson, Kevin L.; Flatten, Karen S.; Loegering, David A.; Ann L Oberg; Riska, Shaun M.; Huang, Shengbing; Sinicrope, Frank A.; Adjei, Alex A.; Judith E Karp; Meng, X. Wei; Kaufmann, Scott H.

    2014-01-01

    Although farnesyltransferase inhibitors have shown promising activity in relapsed lymphoma and sporadic activity in acute myelogenous leukemia, their mechanism of cytotoxicity is incompletely understood, making development of predictive biomarkers difficult. In the present study, we examined the action of tipifarnib in human acute myelogenous leukemia cell lines and clinical samples. In contrast to the Ras/MEK/ERK pathway-mediated Bim upregulation that is responsible for tipifarnib-induced ki...

  11. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-09

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Pancytopenia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. The clinically relevant pharmacogenomic changes in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emadi, Ashkan; Karp, Judith E

    2012-08-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is an extremely heterogeneous neoplasm with several clinical, pathological, genetic and molecular subtypes. Combinations of various doses and schedules of cytarabine and different anthracyclines have been the mainstay of treatment for all forms of AMLs in adult patients. Although this combination, with the addition of an occasional third agent, remains effective for treatment of some young-adult patients with de novo AML, the prognosis of AML secondary to myelodysplastic syndromes or myeloproliferative neoplasms, treatment-related AML, relapsed or refractory AML, and AML that occurs in older populations remains grim. Taken into account the heterogeneity of AML, one size does not and should not be tried to fit all. In this article, the authors review currently understood, applicable and relevant findings related to cytarabine and anthracycline drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters in adult patients with AML. To provide a prime-time example of clinical applicability of pharmacogenomics in distinguishing a subset of patients with AML who might be better responders to farnesyltransferase inhibitors, the authors also reviewed findings related to a two-gene transcript signature consisting of high RASGRP1 and low APTX, the ratio of which appears to positively predict clinical response in AML patients treated with farnesyltransferase inhibitors.

  13. Inhibition of pentose phosphate pathway suppresses acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Xu, Qian; Ji, Dexiang; Wei, Yanlin; Chen, Huamei; Li, Tingting; Wan, Bolin; Yuan, Liya; Huang, Ruibin; Chen, Guoan

    2016-05-01

    Pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is a metabolic pathway that generates NADPH and pentose. PPP genes have been reported to be primarily or secondarily upregulated in many cancers. We aimed to study the general alteration of PPP in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). We performed data mining and analysis of the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) AML dataset for genetic alteration of the PPP gene set. In vitro studies including proliferation, migration, and invasion assays, together with metabolite consumption and oxidation assays, were performed. PPP genes were upregulated in 61 % of patients with AML. The majority of altered cases were expression changes measured by RNA sequencing. Expressions of critical PPP genes such as G6PD, PFKL, PFKP, and PGLS were consistently upregulated in all altered cases. Altered PPP is not associated with survival or disease relapse. PPP inhibition using 6-aminonicotinamide (6AN) increases glucose oxidative metabolism in AML. 6AN decreased the glucose oxidation and increased fatty acid oxidation. Here, we showed that PPP inhibition increased glucose oxidative metabolism in AML. PPP inhibition suppressed growth, migration, and invasion of AML, but not colony formation. PPP plays an important role in AML. Our results could contribute to the development of novel targeted treatment.

  14. Acute myelogenous leukemia switch lineage upon relapse to acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa; Arreguin-Gonzalez, Farina; Rodriguez-Osorio, Carlos A; Sadowinski, Stanislaw; Pelayo, Rosana; Medina-Sanson, Aurora

    2009-01-01

    Acute leukemia, the most common form of cancer in children, accounts for approximately 30% of all childhood malignancies, with acute lymphoblastic leukemia being five times more frequent than acute myeloid leukemia. Lineage switch is the term that has been used to describe the phenomenon of acute leukemias that meet the standard French-American-British system criteria for a particular lineage (either lymphoid or myeloid) upon initial diagnosis, but meet the criteria for the opposite lineage a...

  15. EphB1 Suppression in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia : Regulating the DNA Damage Control System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, K. R.; Scherpen, F. J. G.; Garcia-Manero, G.; Yang, H.; Kaspers, G. J. L.; Cloos, J.; Zwaan, C. M.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M. M.; Kornblau, S. M.; De Bont, E. S. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of ephrin receptor (EphB1) expression may associate with aggressive cancer phenotypes; however, the mechanism of action remains unclear. To gain detailed insight into EphB1 function in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), comprehensive analysis of EphB1 transcriptional regulation was conducted. In

  16. Survival after intestinal mucormycosis in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, R; Arnau, E; Julia, A; Lopez, A; Nadal, A; Allende, E

    1986-12-15

    A young woman with acute myelocytic leukemia developed acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding immediately after a first remission induction of her leukemia. After the site of bleeding was located in the descending colon, a necrotic bleeding ulcer was resected. Histologic examination of the ulcer established the diagnosis of gastrointestinal mucormycosis. Treatment with amphotericin B was administered because of the high risk of dissemination. The patient has been followed for 9 months with no evidence of relapse of infection. Survival after gastrointestinal mucormycosis in acute leukemia has not previously been reported in the English language literature. Success in managing mucormycosis depends on the adherence to the recommended principles of early aggressive diagnostic measures, excisional surgery, amphotericin B therapy, and control of the underlying predisposing condition.

  17. Stages of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Chronic ...

  18. Development of therapeutic agents for elderly patients with acute myelogenous leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Hourigan, Christopher S.; Judith E Karp

    2010-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a disease more common in the elderly than the young. It is increasingly recognized that conventional cytotoxic chemotherapies used in children and young adults may not be appropriate in older adults because of diverse host- and disease-biology factors. This review highlights some of the most promising new treatment options that are being evaluated for older patients with AML. These options include CPX-351 (Celator Pharmaceuticals Inc), a unique liposomal fo...

  19. Nucleophosmin mutations in childhood acute myelogenous leukemia with normal karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Dell'Oro, Maria Grazia; Mecucci, Cristina; Giarin, Emanuela; Masetti, Riccardo; Rossi, Vincenzo; Locatelli, Franco; Martelli, Massimo F; Basso, Giuseppe; Pession, Andrea; Biondi, Andrea; Falini, Brunangelo

    2005-08-15

    Nucleophosmin (NPM) is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein involved in leukemia-associated chromosomal translocations, and it regulates the alternate reading frame (ARF)-p53 tumor-suppressor pathway. Recently, it has been demonstrated that mutations of the NPM1 gene alter the protein at its C-terminal, causing its cytoplasmic localization. Cytoplasmic NPM was detected in 35% of adult patients with primary non-French-American-British (FAB) classification M3 acute myeloid leukemia (AML), associated mainly with normal karyotype. We evaluated the prevalence of the NPM1 gene mutation in non-M3 childhood AML patients enrolled in the ongoing Associazione Italiana di Ematologia e Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP-AML02) protocol in Italy. NPM1 mutations were found in 7 (6.5%) of 107 successfully analyzed patients. NPM1-mutated patients carried a normal karyotype (7/26, 27.1%) and were older in age. Thus, the NPM1 mutation is a frequent abnormality in AML patients without known genetic marker; the mutation may represent a new target to monitor minimal residual disease in AML and a potential candidate for alternative and targeted treatments.

  20. Vorinostat and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  1. The Effects of Hemodynamic Shear Stress on Stemness of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raddatz, Andrew; Triantafillu, Ursula; Kim, Yonghyun (John)

    2015-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have recently been identified as the root cause of tumors generated from cancer cell populations. This is because these CSCs are drug-resistant and have the ability to self-renew and differentiate. Current methods of culturing CSCs require much time and money, so cancer cell culture protocols, which maximize yield of CSCs are needed. It was hypothesized that the quantity of Acute myelogenous leukemia stem cells (LSCs) would increase after applying shear stress to the leukemia cells based on previous studies with breast cancer in bioreactors. The shear stress was applied by pumping the cells through narrow tubing to mimic the in vivo bloodstream environment. In support of the hypothesis, shear stress was found to increase the amount of LSCs in a given leukemia population. This work was supported by NSF REU Site Award 1358991.

  2. The prognostic importance of polypharmacy in older adults treated for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML)

    OpenAIRE

    Elliot, Kathleen; Tooze, Janet A.; Geller, Rachel; Powell, Bayard L.; Pardee, Timothy S.; Ritchie, Ellen; Kennedy, LeAnne; Callahan, Kathryn E.; Klepin, Heidi D.

    2014-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the prognostic significance of polypharmacy and inappropriate medication use among 150 patients >60 years of age receiving induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). After adjustment for age and comorbidity, increased number of medications at diagnosis (≥4 vs. ≤1) was associated with increased 30-day mortality (OR=9.98, 95% CI=1.18–84.13), lower odds of complete remission status (OR=0.20, 95% CI=0.06–0.65), and higher overall mortality (HR=2.13, ...

  3. Isolated Biliary Granulocytic Sarcoma Followed by Acute Myelogeneous Leukemia with Multilineage Dysplasia: A Case Report and Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Sung, Chang Ohk; Ko,Young Hyeh; Park, Cheol Keun; Jang, Kee Taek; Heo, Jin Seok

    2006-01-01

    Granulocytic sarcoma is a rare extramedullary tumor composed of myeloid progenitor cells. Primary involvement of the biliary tract without evidence of leukemia is exceedingly rare. Here, we report an isolated biliary granulocytic sarcoma in a 30-yr-old man who presented with jaundice, fever, and chill without any evidence of leukemia. However, five months after the diagnosis, he developed acute myelogenous leukemia with multilineage dysplasia and chromosomal abnormality. A rare possibility of...

  4. Targeting aberrant glutathione metabolism to eradicate human acute myelogenous leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Shanshan; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Callahan, Kevin P; Balys, Marlene; Ashton, John M; Neering, Sarah J; Lagadinou, Eleni D; Corbett, Cheryl; Ye, Haobin; Liesveld, Jane L; O'Dwyer, Kristen M; Li, Zheng; Shi, Lei; Greninger, Patricia; Settleman, Jeffrey; Benes, Cyril; Hagen, Fred K; Munger, Joshua; Crooks, Peter A; Becker, Michael W; Jordan, Craig T

    2013-11-22

    The development of strategies to eradicate primary human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells is a major challenge to the leukemia research field. In particular, primitive leukemia cells, often termed leukemia stem cells, are typically refractory to many forms of therapy. To investigate improved strategies for targeting of human AML cells we compared the molecular mechanisms regulating oxidative state in primitive (CD34(+)) leukemic versus normal specimens. Our data indicate that CD34(+) AML cells have elevated expression of multiple glutathione pathway regulatory proteins, presumably as a mechanism to compensate for increased oxidative stress in leukemic cells. Consistent with this observation, CD34(+) AML cells have lower levels of reduced glutathione and increased levels of oxidized glutathione compared with normal CD34(+) cells. These findings led us to hypothesize that AML cells will be hypersensitive to inhibition of glutathione metabolism. To test this premise, we identified compounds such as parthenolide (PTL) or piperlongumine that induce almost complete glutathione depletion and severe cell death in CD34(+) AML cells. Importantly, these compounds only induce limited and transient glutathione depletion as well as significantly less toxicity in normal CD34(+) cells. We further determined that PTL perturbs glutathione homeostasis by a multifactorial mechanism, which includes inhibiting key glutathione metabolic enzymes (GCLC and GPX1), as well as direct depletion of glutathione. These findings demonstrate that primitive leukemia cells are uniquely sensitive to agents that target aberrant glutathione metabolism, an intrinsic property of primary human AML cells. PMID:24089526

  5. Association of in vitro radiosensitivity and cancer in a family with acute myelogenous leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The γ-ray sensitivity of skin fibroblasts from six members of a cancer family was investigated using a colony-forming assay. Fibroblasts from the three members with cancer (two sisters with acute myelogenous leukemia and the mother with cervical carcinoma) showed a significant ( p > 0.05) increase in radiosensitivity, while three members without cancer (the father and two sons) showed a normal radioresponse. The possiblity that the increased γ-ray sensitivity was due to defective DNA repair was investigated using assays for DNA repair replication, single-strand break rejoining, and removal of enzyme-sensitive sites in γ-irradiated DNA. Results of these assays indicate that the kinetics of enzymatic repair of radiogenic DNA damage in general, and the rejoining of single-strand scissions and excision repair of base and sugar radioproducts in partigular, were the same in the cell lines from the sensitive and clinically normal family members

  6. Haploidentical vs cord blood transplantation for adults with acute myelogenous leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Melhem; Solh

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoeitic cell transplantation is established as a curative treatment for patients w acute myelogenous leukemia. Haploidentical family donor and umbilical cord blood(UCB) are alternative sources of stem cells for patients lacking a matched sibling or unrelated do-nor. The early challenges of transplant complications related to poor engraftment and graft-vs-host disease have been overcome with new strategies such as using 2 units and increased cell dose in UCB and T-cell deple-tion and post transplantation cyclophosphamide in hap-loidentical transplantation. The outcomes of alternative transplantation for acute leukemia were compared to other traditional graft sources. For patients lacking a matched sibling or unrelated donor, either strategy is a suitable option. The choice should rely mostly on the urgency of the transplantation and the available cell dose as well as the expertise available at the trans-plant center. This manuscript reviews the options of alternative donor transplantation and highlights recent advances in each of these promising transplantation options.

  7. Induction of differentiation and apoptosis- a possible strategy in the treatment of adult acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruserud, O; Gjertsen, B T; Huang, Ts

    2000-01-01

    A differentiation block with accumulation of immature myeloid cells characterizes acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). However, native AML cells often show some morphological signs of differentiation that allow a classification into different subsets, and further differentiation may be induced by exposure to various soluble mediators, e.g., all trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) and several cytokines. Combination therapy with ATRA and chemotherapy should now be regarded as the standard treatment for the acute promyelocytic leukemia variant of AML. Several agents can induce leukemic cell differentiation for other AML subtypes, although these effects differ between patients. Differentiation may then be associated with induction of apoptosis, and differentiation-inducing therapy may therefore become useful in combination with intensive chemotherapy to increase the susceptibility of AML blasts to drug-induced apoptosis. However, it should be emphasized that differentiation and apoptosis can occur as separate events with different regulation in AML cells, and future studies in AML should therefore focus on: A) the identification of new agents with more predictable effects on differentiation and apoptosis; B) the use of clinical and laboratory parameters to define new subsets of AML patients in which differentiation/apoptosis induction has a predictable and beneficial effect, and C) further characterization of how AML blast sensitivity to drug-induced apoptosis is modulated by differentiation induction.

  8. Pharmacokinetic targeting of intravenous busulfan reduces conditioning regimen related toxicity following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for acute myelogenous leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishihori Taiga

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Optimal conditioning therapy for hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML remains undefined. We retrospectively compared outcomes of a consecutive series of 51 AML patients treated with oral busulfan (1 mg/kg every 6 hours for 4 days and cyclophosphamide (60 mg/kg IV × 2 days - (Bu/Cy with 100 consecutive AML patients treated with pharmacokinetic targeted IV busulfan (AUC

  9. "HLA Class II Allele and Haplotype Frequencies in Iranian Patients with Acute Myelogenous Leukemia and Control Group "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolfattah Sarafnejad

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated some significant differences in HLA allele frequencies in leukemic patients and normal subjects. We have analyzed HLA class II alleles and haplotypes in 60 Iranian patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML and 180 unrelated normal subjects. Blood samples were collected after obtaining informed consents. From the patients and control DNA extraction and HLA typing were performed using PCR-SSP method. Significant positive association with the disease was found for HLA-DRB1*11 allele (35% vs. 24.7%, p=0.033. Two alleles including HLA-DRB4 and –DQB1*0303 were found to be significantly decreased in patients compared to controls. Regarding haplotype analysis, no significant association was found between case and control groups. It is suggested that HLA-DRB1*11 allele plays as a presumptive predisposing factor while the HLA-DRB4 and –DQB1*0303 alleles are suggested as protective genetic factors against acute myelogenous leukemia. Larger studies are needed to confirm and establish the role of these associations with acute myelogenous leukemia.

  10. Treatment Options for Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Chronic ...

  11. General Information about Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Chronic ...

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Chronic ...

  13. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    CML; Chronic myeloid leukemia; Chronic granulocytic leukemia; Leukemia - chronic granulocytic ... nuclear disaster. It takes many years to develop leukemia from radiation exposure. Most people treated for cancer ...

  14. A comprehensive review of occupational and general population cancer risk: 1,3-Butadiene exposure-response modeling for all leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, myeloid neoplasm and lymphoid neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sielken, Robert L; Valdez-Flores, Ciriaco

    2015-11-01

    Excess cancer risks associated with 1,3-butadiene (BD) inhalation exposures are calculated using an extensive data set developed by the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) from an epidemiology study of North American workers in the styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) industry. While the UAB study followed SBR workers, risk calculations can be adapted to estimate both occupational and general population risks. The data from the UAB SBR study offer an opportunity to quantitatively evaluate the association between cumulative exposure to BD and different types of cancer, accounting for the number of tasks involving high-intensity exposures to BD as well as confounding associated with the exposures to the multiple other chemicals in the SBR industry. Quantitative associations of BD exposure and cancer, specifically leukemia, can be further characterized by leukemia type, including potential associations with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), and the groups of lymphoid and myeloid neoplasms. Collectively, these multiple evaluations lead to a comprehensive analysis that makes use of all of the available information and is consistent with the risk assessment goals of the USEPA and other regulatory agencies, and in line with the recommendations of the USEPA Science Advisory Board. While a range of cancer risk values can result from these multiple factors, a preferred case for occupational and general population risk is highlighted. Cox proportional hazards models are used to fit exposure-response models to the most recent UAB data. The slope of the model with cumulative BD ppm-years as the predictor variable is not statistically significantly greater than zero for CML, AML, or, when any one of eight exposure covariates is added to the model, for all leukemias combined. The slope for CLL is statistically significantly different from zero. The slope for myeloid neoplasms is not statistically

  15. Ring chromosome 18 abnormality in acute myelogenous leukemia: the clinical dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malone Adriana K

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The ring chromosome is a circular, structural abnormality composed of either multiple chromosomes or a single chromosome with loss of genetic material at one or both ends. This chromosomal rearrangement is often unstable with frequent recombinations and may be accompanied by either loss or amplification of genetic material1. Considering that ring chromosomes are rare in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML, it is difficult to risk stratify patient prognosis, particularly when the ring chromosome occurs as the sole abnormality. Here we report a case of a ring chromosome 18 abnormality in a patient with newly diagnosed AML with monocytic differentiation. Cytogenetic analysis demonstrated 46, XY, r(18(p11q21 karyotype in 19 of 34 evaluated metaphase cells. The patient received induction chemotherapy and subsequent allogeneic cord blood transplant from a sex-matched donor, and remained in hematologic and cytogenetic remission for 120 days post transplant. Soon after, he developed post transplant lymphoproliferative disorder and died of multi-organ failure. Although r(18 chromosomal abnormalities were not classified in the recent updated evidence-and expert opinion-based recommendations for the diagnosis and management of AML (likely due to the small number of reported cases, the patient was treated as high risk with stem cell transplantation. This was based on the unstable nature of the ring chromosome and the poor outcomes described in the literature of patients with sole ring 18 abnormalities.

  16. Evolution of acute myelogenous leukemia stem cell properties after treatment and progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Tzu-Chieh; LaMere, Mark; Stevens, Brett M; Ashton, John M; Myers, Jason R; O'Dwyer, Kristen M; Liesveld, Jane L; Mendler, Jason H; Guzman, Monica; Morrissette, Jennifer D; Zhao, Jianhua; Wang, Eunice S; Wetzler, Meir; Jordan, Craig T; Becker, Michael W

    2016-09-29

    Most cancers evolve over time as patients initially responsive to therapy acquire resistance to the same drugs at relapse. Cancer stem cells have been postulated to represent a therapy-refractory reservoir for relapse, but formal proof of this model is lacking. We prospectively characterized leukemia stem cell populations (LSCs) from a well-defined cohort of patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) at diagnosis and relapse to assess the effect of the disease course on these critical populations. Leukemic samples were collected from patients with newly diagnosed AML before therapy and after relapse, and LSC frequency was assessed by limiting dilution analyses. LSC populations were identified using fluorescent-labeled cell sorting and transplantation into immunodeficient NOD/SCID/interleukin 2 receptor γ chain null mice. The surface antigen expression profiles of pretherapy and postrelapse LSCs were determined for published LSC markers. We demonstrate a 9- to 90-fold increase in LSC frequency between diagnosis and relapse. LSC activity at relapse was identified in populations of leukemic blasts that did not demonstrate this activity before treatment and relapse. In addition, we describe genetic instability and exceptional phenotypic changes that accompany the evolution of these new LSC populations. This study is the first to characterize the evolution of LSCs in vivo after chemotherapy, identifying a dramatic change in the physiology of primitive AML cells when the disease progresses. Taken together, these findings provide a new frame of reference by which to evaluate candidate AML therapies in which both disease control and the induction of more advanced forms of disease should be considered. PMID:27421961

  17. Phase I Dose-Escalation Trial of Clofarabine Followed by Escalating Doses of Fractionated Cyclophosphamide in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemias

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Disorders; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia; Acute Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelofibrosis; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

  18. Atypical Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... myeloproliferative neoplasms, leukemia , and other conditions . Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia Key Points Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia is a disease ... chance of recovery) and treatment options. Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia is a disease in which too many myelocytes ...

  19. Acute myelogenous leukemia developed after radioactive iodine therapy and palliative radiation therapy in metastatic papillary thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Tae Young; Kwak, Jae Sik; Oh, Kyung Suk; Lee, Seung Bai; Chung, Byung Sun; Kim, Eun Sil; Kim, Chong Soon [Hanil Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-08-01

    Radioactive iodine treatment has been widely used for nearly 50 years in the treatment of thyroid cancer to ablate residual thyroid tissue after thyroidectomy and to treat metastatic disease. Leukemia is a rare complication associated with the radioactive iodine therapy. The occurrence of leukemia is known to be related to the cumulative dosage of I-131 more than 37 GBq (1 Ci) and also associated with the intervals of less than 12 months between the repeated doses. We report a case of a 52 year-old female patient with papillary cancer of thyroid who developed acute myelogenous leukemia after the total 20.4 GBq (550 mCi) of I-131 therapy over 3.2 years and palliative radiation therapy ( 3000 cGy) due to multiple bone metastasis of papillary cancer.

  20. Acute Myelogenous Leukemia without Maturation with a Retinoic Alpha-Receptor Deletion: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Trosclair

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL is characterized by a t(15;17 which fuses the 17q retinoic acid alpha-receptor sequence to the 15q PML gene sequence. The resulting fusion product plays a role in the development and maintenance of APL, and is very rarely found in other acute myeloid leukemia (AML subtypes. Rare complex APL genomic rearrangements have retinoic acid alpha-receptor sequence deletions. Here we report a retinoic acid alpha-receptor sequence deletion in a case of AML without differentiation. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a retinoic acid alpha-receptor sequence deletion in this AML subtype.

  1. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Bone Marrow Transplantation in Treating Children With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  2. Anti-Tumor and Immune Enhancing Activities of Rice Bran Gramisterol on Acute Myelogenous Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsuda Somintara

    Full Text Available Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML is a cancer of the blood that most commonly affects human adults. The specific cause of AML is unclear, but it induces abnormality of white blood cells that grow rapidly and accumulate in bone marrow interfering with the production and functions of the normal blood cells. AML patients face poor prognosis and low quality of life during chemotherapy or transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells due to the progressive impairment of their immune system. The goal of this study is to find natural products that have the potential to delay growth or eliminate the abnormal leukemic cells but cause less harmful effect to the body's immune system.The unsaponified fraction of Riceberry rice bran (RBDS and the main pure compound, gramisterol, were studied for cytotoxicity and biological activities in WEHI-3 cells and in the leukemic mouse model induced by transplantation of WEHI-3 cells intraperitoneally. In the in vitro assay, RBDS and gramisterol exerted sub-G1 phase cell cycle arrest with a potent induction of apoptosis. Both of them effectively decreased cell cycle controlling proteins (cyclin D1 and cyclin E, suppressed cellular DNA synthesis and mitotic division, and reduced anti-apoptosis Bcl-2 protein, but increased apoptotic proteins (p53 and Bax and activated caspase-3 enzyme in the intrinsic cell death stimulation pathway. In leukemic mice, daily feeding of RBDS significantly increased the amount of immune function-related cells including CD3+, CD19+, and CD11b+, and elevated the serum levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, and IL-12β cytokines, but suppressed IL-10 level. At the tumor sites, CD11b+ cells were polarized and became active phagocytotic cells. Treatment of mice normal immune cells with gramisterol alone or a combination of gramisterol with cytokines released from RBDS-treated leukemic mice splenocytes culture synergistically increased pSTAT1 transcriptional factor that up-regulated the genes controlling

  3. [Esophageal aspergillosis in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia and febrile neutropenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besa, Santiago; Kattan, Eduardo; Cid, Ximena; Claro, Juan C

    2014-04-01

    Aspergillosis usually compromises the respiratory system, but can also affect others. We report a 46 yo female with acute myeloid leukemia, developed febrile neutropenia and dysphagia. Endoscopy revealed esophageal cytomegalovirus-like ulcers, but biopsies showed Aspergillus spp. It's important to consider aspergillosis in the differential diagnosis of esophageal lesions in high-risk patients.

  4. Automatic Recognition of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in Blood Microscopic Images Using K-means Clustering and Support Vector Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Fatemeh; Najafabadi, Tooraj Abbasian; Araabi, Babak Nadjar

    2016-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a subtype of acute leukemia, which is characterized by the accumulation of myeloid blasts in the bone marrow. Careful microscopic examination of stained blood smear or bone marrow aspirate is still the most significant diagnostic methodology for initial AML screening and considered as the first step toward diagnosis. It is time-consuming and due to the elusive nature of the signs and symptoms of AML; wrong diagnosis may occur by pathologists. Therefore, the need for automation of leukemia detection has arisen. In this paper, an automatic technique for identification and detection of AML and its prevalent subtypes, i.e., M2-M5 is presented. At first, microscopic images are acquired from blood smears of patients with AML and normal cases. After applying image preprocessing, color segmentation strategy is applied for segmenting white blood cells from other blood components and then discriminative features, i.e., irregularity, nucleus-cytoplasm ratio, Hausdorff dimension, shape, color, and texture features are extracted from the entire nucleus in the whole images containing multiple nuclei. Images are classified to cancerous and noncancerous images by binary support vector machine (SVM) classifier with 10-fold cross validation technique. Classifier performance is evaluated by three parameters, i.e., sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. Cancerous images are also classified into their prevalent subtypes by multi-SVM classifier. The results show that the proposed algorithm has achieved an acceptable performance for diagnosis of AML and its common subtypes. Therefore, it can be used as an assistant diagnostic tool for pathologists. PMID:27563575

  5. Automatic Recognition of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in Blood Microscopic Images Using K-means Clustering and Support Vector Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Fatemeh; Najafabadi, Tooraj Abbasian; Araabi, Babak Nadjar

    2016-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a subtype of acute leukemia, which is characterized by the accumulation of myeloid blasts in the bone marrow. Careful microscopic examination of stained blood smear or bone marrow aspirate is still the most significant diagnostic methodology for initial AML screening and considered as the first step toward diagnosis. It is time-consuming and due to the elusive nature of the signs and symptoms of AML; wrong diagnosis may occur by pathologists. Therefore, the need for automation of leukemia detection has arisen. In this paper, an automatic technique for identification and detection of AML and its prevalent subtypes, i.e., M2-M5 is presented. At first, microscopic images are acquired from blood smears of patients with AML and normal cases. After applying image preprocessing, color segmentation strategy is applied for segmenting white blood cells from other blood components and then discriminative features, i.e., irregularity, nucleus-cytoplasm ratio, Hausdorff dimension, shape, color, and texture features are extracted from the entire nucleus in the whole images containing multiple nuclei. Images are classified to cancerous and noncancerous images by binary support vector machine (SVM) classifier with 10-fold cross validation technique. Classifier performance is evaluated by three parameters, i.e., sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. Cancerous images are also classified into their prevalent subtypes by multi-SVM classifier. The results show that the proposed algorithm has achieved an acceptable performance for diagnosis of AML and its common subtypes. Therefore, it can be used as an assistant diagnostic tool for pathologists.

  6. A case of treatment-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia following high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Geun Doo; Kim, Sang-We; Suh, Cheol Won; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Bahng, Hye Seung; Jeong, Young Hoon; Park, Il Gwon; Kim, Woo-Kun; Kim, Sang-Hee; Suh, Eul-Ju; Park, Chan-Jeoung; Ji, Hyun-Sook; Lee, Jung-Shin

    2002-01-01

    Treatment-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS) and acute myelogenous leukemia (t-AML) are now well established as complications of cytotoxic chemotherapy. We experienced a 28-yr-old female patient who developed t-MDS/t-AML with characteristic chromosomal abnormalities including 11q23 chromosomal rearrangement following high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The patient was admitted with bulky abdominal masses of B cell lineage n...

  7. Pathologic rupture of the spleen in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia and leukostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Cunha De Santis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Rupture of the spleen can be classified as spontaneous, traumatic, or pathologic. Pathologic rupture has been reported in infectious diseases such as infectious mononucleosis, and hematologic malignancies such as acute and chronic leukemias. Splenomegaly is considered the most relevant factor that predisposes to splenic rupture. A 66-year-old man with acute myeloid leukemia evolved from an unclassified myeloproliferative neoplasm, complaining of fatigue and mild upper left abdominal pain. He was pale and presented fever and tachypnea. Laboratory analyses showed hemoglobin 8.3 g/dL, white blood cell count 278 × 109/L, platelet count 367 × 109/L, activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT ratio 2.10, and international normalized ratio (INR 1.60. A blood smear showed 62% of myeloblasts. The immunophenotype of the blasts was positive for CD117, HLA-DR, CD13, CD56, CD64, CD11c and CD14. Lactate dehydrogenase was 2384 U/L and creatinine 2.4 mg/dL (normal range: 0.7-1.6 mg/dL. Two sessions of leukapheresis were performed. At the end of the second session, the patient presented hemodynamic instability that culminated in circulatory shock and death. The post-mortem examination revealed infiltration of the vessels of the lungs, heart, and liver, and massive infiltration of the spleen by leukemic blasts. Blood volume in the peritoneal cavity was 500 mL. Acute leukemia is a rare cause of splenic rupture. Male gender, old age and splenomegaly are factors associated with this condition. As the patient had leukostasis, we hypothesize that this, associated with other factors such as lung and heart leukemic infiltration, had a role in inducing splenic rupture. Finally, we do not believe that leukapheresis in itself contributed to splenic rupture, as it is essentially atraumatic.

  8. Chronic myelogenous leukemia in chronic phase transforming into acute leukemia under treatment with dasatinib 4 months after diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yukitsugu; Tokita, Katsuya; Nagasawa, Fusako; Takahashi, Wataru; Nakamura, Yuko; Sasaki, Ko; Ichikawa, Motoshi; Mitani, Kinuko

    2016-03-01

    We report a 64-year-old woman morphologically diagnosed with chronic myelogenous leukemia in the chronic phase. Despite having achieved a complete hematological response following treatment with dasatinib, she developed lymphoblastic crisis 4 months later. Blastic cells were in a CD45-negative and SSC-low fraction, and positive for CD10, CD19, CD34, and HLA-DR expression and rearrangement in the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene. Chemotherapy using the HyperCVAD/MA regimen led to a complete cytogenetic response, and after cord blood transplantation, she obtained a complete molecular remission. However, the crisis recurred 6 months later. Another salvage therapy using L-AdVP regimen followed by nilotinib led to a complete molecular remission. Retrospective analyses using flow cytometry and polymerase chain reaction revealed a minimal blastic crisis clone present in the initial marrow in chronic phase. This case is informative as it suggests that sudden blastic crisis may occur from an undetectable blastic clone present at initial diagnosis and that leukemic stem cells may survive cytotoxic chemotherapy that eliminates most of the blastic cells. PMID:26662559

  9. Acquired protein C deficiency in a child with acute myelogenous leukemia, splenic, renal, and intestinal infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Roula A; Jalkh, Khalil S; Farhat, Hussein Z; Sayad, Paul E; Kadri, Adel M

    2011-03-01

    We report the case of a 6-year-old boy diagnosed with acute promyelocytic leukemia (AML-M3V) when he presented with pallor, abdominal pain, anorexia, and fatigue. Induction chemotherapy was started according to the AML-BFM 98 protocol along with Vesanoid (ATRA, All-trans retinoic acid). On the sixth day of induction, he developed splenic and gallbladder infarcts. Splenectomy and cholecystectomy were performed while chemotherapy induction continued as scheduled. Four days later, he developed ischemic areas in the kidneys and ischemic colitis in the sigmoid colon. Hypercoagulation studies showed severe deficiency of protein C. Tests showed protein C 16% (reference range 70-140%), protein S 87% (reference range 70-140%), antithrombin III 122% (reference range 80-120%), prothrombin time 13.6 s (reference = 11.3), INR (international normalized ratio) 1.21, partial thromboplastin time 33 s (reference = 33), fibrinogen 214 mg/dl, D-dimer 970 μg/ml, factor II 98%, and that antinuclear antibody, antiphospholipid antibodies, mutation for factor II gene (G20210A), and mutation for Arg506 Gln of factor V were all negative (factor V Leiden). There was no evidence of clinical disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). He was treated with low molecular weight heparin and did well. He continues to be in complete remission 7 years later with normal protein C levels. Acquired protein C deficiency can occur in a variety of settings and has been reported in acute myelocytic leukemia. However, clinically significant thrombosis in the absence of clinical DIC, such as our case, remains extremely rare.

  10. HLA-B17 and the HLA-A1, B17 haplotype in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, E; Parrish, E; Cooper, R

    1979-08-01

    Seventy-nine Caucasians with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) were genotyped to determine whether AML, the induction of remission or patient survival were associated with particular HLA phenotypes or haplotypes. HLA-B17 and B27 were increased in AML patients over 40 years of age. Combined analysis of four independent studies indicates that HLA-B17 is significantly but weakly associated with AML, relative risk = 1.48 (.01 less than P less than .025). The A1, B17 and Aw24, Bw35 haplotypes occurred more frequently in the AML group as compared to racial and geographic controls (uncorrected P = 0.0068 and 0.0098, respectively Fisher's Exact Test). Induction of remission occurred less frequently in patients with the B17 phenotype as compared to patients lacking this antigen (P = 0.047). Patient survival was associated with remission status (P = 0.002) but was not significantly associated with particular HLA phenotypes or haplotypes. These results indicate that a gene or genes in the HLA-B region of the major histocompatibility complex can influence susceptibility to AML and also the response to chemotherapy.

  11. Investigation on Marking Method for Phenomenon on Regrowth Drug Resistance in Relapsed Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Yan(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Preisler H D Venugopal P.Regrowth resistance in cancer:why has it been largely ignored.Cell Prolif 1995 28:347[2]Preisler H D Gropal V.Regrowth drug resistance in leukemia and lymphoma:the need for a new system to classify treatmetn failure and for approaches to treatment.LeukRes 1994 18:149[3]陈燕 乐蓓蓓 喻东姣等.急性髓系白血病Bcl-2/Bax比值与细胞生长类型和耐药关系的研究.同济医科大学学报 1998 27(5):341[4]何明生 陈燕 吴裕丹等.DNR荧光直方图诊断白血病细胞耐药的意义.同济医科大学学报 1999 28(1):31[5]Raza A Yasin Z Gande C.A comparison of rate of DNA synthesis in myeloblasts from peripheral blood and bone marrows of patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia.Exp Cell Res 1988 176:13[6]Boise L H Gonzalez-Garcia M Postema C E et al.Bcl&127;X a bcl-2- related gene that functions as a dominant regulator of apoptotic cell death.Cell 1993 74:597[7]杨天楹.急性白血病疗效标准.见:张之南主编.血液病诊断及疗效标准.第2版.北京:科学出版社 1998.214---228[8]Estey E H.Regrowth resistance.Leuk Res 1994 18:161[9]蒋大宗 张文修编.数值诊断的统计方法.西安:陕西科学技术出版社 1981.174-176[10].Smyth M J Krasovskis E Sutton V R et al.The drug efflux protein P-glycoprotein additionally protects drugresistant tumor cells from multiple forms of caspase-dependent apoptosis.Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1998 95:7024

  12. Therapeutic potential of MEK inhibition in acute myelogenous leukemia: rationale for "vertical" and "lateral" combination strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardi, Maria Rosaria; Scerpa, Maria Cristina; Bergamo, Paola; Ciuffreda, Ludovica; Petrucci, Maria Teresa; Chiaretti, Sabina; Tavolaro, Simona; Mascolo, Maria Grazia; Abrams, Stephen L; Steelman, Linda S; Tsao, Twee; Marchetti, Antonio; Konopleva, Marina; Del Bufalo, Donatella; Cognetti, Francesco; Foà, Robin; Andreeff, Michael; McCubrey, James A; Tafuri, Agostino; Milella, Michele

    2012-10-01

    In hematological malignancies, constitutive activation of the RAF/MEK/ERK pathway is frequently observed, conveys a poor prognosis, and constitutes a promising target for therapeutic intervention. Here, we investigated the molecular and functional effects of pharmacological MEK inhibition in cell line models of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and freshly isolated primary AML samples. The small-molecule, ATP-non-competitive, MEK inhibitor PD0325901 markedly inhibited ERK phosphorylation and growth of several AML cell lines and approximately 70 % of primary AML samples. Growth inhibition was due to G(1)-phase arrest and induction of apoptosis. Transformation by constitutively active upstream pathway elements (HRAS, RAF-1, and MEK) rendered FDC-P1 cells exquisitely prone to PD0325901-induced apoptosis. Gene and protein expression profiling revealed a selective effect of PD0325901 on ERK phosphorylation and compensatory upregulation of the RAF/MEK and AKT/p70( S6K ) kinase modules, potentially mediating resistance to drug-induced growth inhibition. Consequently, in appropriate cellular contexts, both "vertical" (i.e., inhibition of RAF and MEK along the MAPK pathway) and "lateral" (i.e., simultaneous inhibition of the MEK/ERK and mTOR pathways) combination strategies may result in synergistic anti-leukemic effects. Overall, MEK inhibition exerts potent growth inhibitory and proapoptotic activity in preclinical models of AML, particularly in combination with other pathway inhibitors. Deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms of action of MEK inhibitors will likely translate into more effective targeted strategies for the treatment of AML. PMID:22399013

  13. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Lymphocytic or Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  15. A family inheriting different subtypes of acute myelogenous leukemia identifies a gene common to the differentation of multiple hematopoetic lineages and acting early in leukemogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horwitz, M.S.; Radich, J. [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Sabath, D.E. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The initial steps promoting carcinogenesis in the hematologic malignancies remain poorly understood. We report on a family with an incompletely penetrant, autosomal dominant syndrome of acute myelogenous leukemia, affecting at least eight adults from three generations. The affected individuals have developed leukemias differing in morphologic subtype, tumor cytogenetics, and abruptness of presentation. Within this family are found subtypes affecting the granulocytic, monocytic, and megakaryocytic lineages. At least one individual has a normal tumor karyotype while another has complex rearrangements including monsomy 7, trisomy 8 and translocation 1;7. Some have presented with acute onset and others with a protracted myelodysplasia syndrome. One person at fifty percent risk of inheriting this gene developed disseminated atypical mycobacterium infection in the absence of leukemia, but also without apparent causes for acquired deficiencies in cellular immunity. Features common to affected family members, including the individual with mycobacterium infection, are the early presence in bone marrow of red cell and platelet maturation defects. A search for mutations in diseased marrows fails to detect abnormalities of p53 exons 5, 6, 7 and 8 or N-ras codons 12, 13 and 61. We conclude that there is a gene in this family that probably acts early in hematopoetic differentiation and confers susceptibility to a wide range of leukemia subtypes spanning the maturation of the myeloid series.

  16. The Experimental and Clinical Study on the Effect of Curcumin on Cell Cycle Proteins and Regulating Proteins of Apoptosis in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈燕; 吴裕丹; 何静; 陈文娟

    2002-01-01

    Summary: To investigate whether the Bcl-2 gene family is involved in modulating mechanism ofapoptosis and change of cell cycle protein induced by curcumin in acute myeloid leukemia HL-60cell line and primary acute myelogenous leukemic cells, the Bcl-2 family member Mcl-l, Bax andBak and cell cycle proteins including P27kipl, P21wafl, cyclin D3 and pRbp- were selected and their ex-pression detected by SABC immuno-histochemical stain method. The attitude of sub-G1 peak inDNA histogram was determined by FCM. The TUNEL positive cell percentage was identified byterminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase ( TdT )-mediated Biotin dUNP end labeling technique. Itwas found that when HL-60 cells were treated with 25 μmol/L curcumin for 24 h, the expressionlevel of Mcl-1 was down-regulated, but that of Bax and Bak up-regulated time-dependently. Therewas significant difference in the expression level of Mcl-1, Bax and Bak between the curcumin-treated groups and control group (P<0. 05-0. 01). At the same time, curcumin had no effect onprogress of cell cycle in primaty acute myelogenous leukemia at newly diagnosis, but could in-crease the peak of Sub-G1 (P<0. 05), and down-regulate the expression of Mcl-1 and up-regulatethe expression of Bax and Bak with the difference being statistically significant. The expression ofP27kipl, P21wafl and pRbp- were elevated and that of cyclin D3 decreased in the presence of curcumin.These findings suggested that the Bcl-2 gene family indeed participated in the regulatory process ofapoptosisinduced by curcumin in HL-60 cells and AML cells. Curcumin can induce apoptosis ofprimary acute myelogenous leukemic cells and disturb cell cycle progression of HL-60 cells. Themechanism appeared to be mediated by perturbing Go/G1 phases checkpoints which associated withup-regulation of P27kipl, P21wafl and pRbp- expression, and down-regulation of cyclin D3.

  17. Establishment of a new cell line (MTT-95 showing basophilic differentiation from the bone marrow of a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia (M7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizobuchi N

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available A new myeloid cell line, MTT-95, was established from the bone marrow of a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML, M7. MTT-95 cells differentiate into mature basophilic cells in culture medium with no chemical component or cytokine. Surface phenotypes were as follows: CD11b 79.3%, CD13 92.4%, CD33 99.8%, CD34 87.9%, CD41a 77.6% and HLA-DR 0.3%. MTT-95 cells were strongly positive for glycoprotein IIb/IIIa by immunohistochemical staining and revealed metachromatic granules. MTT-95 cells seem to possess characteristics of both megakaryocytes and basophils. These findings suggest that MTT-95 cells are basophil progenitors. MTT-95 cells might be useful in the study not only of the biological aspects of basophils, but also of the diversities of AML (M7.

  18. Acute Leukemia: Diagnosis, Management, and Potential for Cure

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Keith; Keating, Armand

    1988-01-01

    Acute leukemia is an uncommon malignant disorder resulting from the clonal proliferation of hematopoietic precursors of the myeloid or lymphoid lineages. Of the two major subgroups, acute lymphoblastic leukemia is more common in children, while acute myelogenous leukemia predominates in adults. With modern chemotherapy 60%-70% of all children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia can be long-term survivors and are potentially cured. Although the prognosis in acute myelogenous leukemia is less fav...

  19. Sweet′s syndrome in accelerated chronic myelogenous leukemia: A case report and review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Akhil Kapoor; Surender Beniwal; Satya Narayan; Ashok Kalwar

    2014-01-01

    Sweet′s syndrome (acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis) is a well documented entity in acute leukemia. However, there have been only rare reports of its association with chronic leukemia. We report a case of sweet′s syndrome in a patient of BCR-ABL positive chronic myelogenous leukemia in accelerated phase for its rare association, classical clinical presentation and dramatic therapeutic response to corticosteroids.

  20. Sweet′s syndrome in accelerated chronic myelogenous leukemia: A case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhil Kapoor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sweet′s syndrome (acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis is a well documented entity in acute leukemia. However, there have been only rare reports of its association with chronic leukemia. We report a case of sweet′s syndrome in a patient of BCR-ABL positive chronic myelogenous leukemia in accelerated phase for its rare association, classical clinical presentation and dramatic therapeutic response to corticosteroids.

  1. An adult case of chronic myelogenous leukemia with myeloblastic involvement of the central nervous system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watanabe,Akiharu

    1984-06-01

    Full Text Available A 31-year-old female with chronic myelogenous leukemia, who developed myeloblastic involvement of the central nervous system during acute myeloblastic transformation of the disease, was treated with methotrexate intrathecally. The therapy produced prompt clinical response and complete reversal of abnormal cerebrospinal fluid findings. However, the patient expired 10 months following the acute blastic crisis.

  2. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  3. Clofarabine in combination with a standard remission induction regimen (cytosine arabinoside and idarubicin) in patients with previously untreated intermediate and bad-risk acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (HR-MDS): phase I results of an ongoing phase I/II study of the leukemia groups of EORTC and GIMEMA (EORTC GIMEMA 06061/AML-14A trial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemze, R.; Suciu, S.; Muus, P.; Halkes, C.J.; Meloni, G.; Meert, L.; Karrasch, M.; Rapion, J.; Vignetti, M.; Amadori, S.; Witte, T.J.M. de; Marie, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of clofarabine combined with the EORTC-GIMEMA 3 + 10 induction regimen (idarubicin + cytosine arabinoside) in adults with untreated acute myelogenous leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome. In this phase I trial, 25 patients (medi

  4. Multi-institutional phase 2 clinical and pharmacogenomic trial of tipifarnib plus etoposide for elderly adults with newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vener, Tatiana I.; Raponi, Mitch; Ritchie, Ellen K.; Smith, B. Douglas; Gore, Steven D.; Morris, Lawrence E.; Feldman, Eric J.; Greer, Jacqueline M.; Malek, Sami; Carraway, Hetty E.; Ironside, Valerie; Galkin, Steven; Levis, Mark J.; McDevitt, Michael A.; Roboz, Gail R.; Gocke, Christopher D.; Derecho, Carlo; Palma, John; Wang, Yixin; Kaufmann, Scott H.; Wright, John J.; Garret-Mayer, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Tipifarnib (T) exhibits modest activity in elderly adults with newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Based on preclinical synergy, a phase 1 trial of T plus etoposide (E) yielded 25% complete remission (CR). We selected 2 comparable dose levels for a randomized phase 2 trial in 84 adults (age range, 70-90 years; median, 76 years) who were not candidates for conventional chemotherapy. Arm A (T 600 mg twice a day × 14 days, E 100 mg days 1-3 and 8-10) and arm B (T 400 mg twice a day × 14 days, E 200 mg days 1-3 and 8-10) yielded similar CR, but arm B had greater toxicity. Total CR was 25%, day 30 death rate 7%. A 2-gene signature of high RASGRP1 and low aprataxin (APTX) expression previously predicted for T response. Assays using blasts from a subset of 40 patients treated with T plus E on this study showed that AMLs with a RASGRP1/APTX ratio of more than 5.2 had a 78% CR rate and negative predictive value 87%. This ratio did not correlate with outcome in 41 patients treated with conventional chemotherapies. The next T-based clinical trials will test the ability of the 2-gene signature to enrich for T responders prospectively. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00602771. PMID:22001391

  5. Multi-institutional phase 2 clinical and pharmacogenomic trial of tipifarnib plus etoposide for elderly adults with newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Judith E; Vener, Tatiana I; Raponi, Mitch; Ritchie, Ellen K; Smith, B Douglas; Gore, Steven D; Morris, Lawrence E; Feldman, Eric J; Greer, Jacqueline M; Malek, Sami; Carraway, Hetty E; Ironside, Valerie; Galkin, Steven; Levis, Mark J; McDevitt, Michael A; Roboz, Gail R; Gocke, Christopher D; Derecho, Carlo; Palma, John; Wang, Yixin; Kaufmann, Scott H; Wright, John J; Garret-Mayer, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Tipifarnib (T) exhibits modest activity in elderly adults with newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Based on preclinical synergy, a phase 1 trial of T plus etoposide (E) yielded 25% complete remission (CR). We selected 2 comparable dose levels for a randomized phase 2 trial in 84 adults (age range, 70-90 years; median, 76 years) who were not candidates for conventional chemotherapy. Arm A (T 600 mg twice a day × 14 days, E 100 mg days 1-3 and 8-10) and arm B (T 400 mg twice a day × 14 days, E 200 mg days 1-3 and 8-10) yielded similar CR, but arm B had greater toxicity. Total CR was 25%, day 30 death rate 7%. A 2-gene signature of high RASGRP1 and low aprataxin (APTX) expression previously predicted for T response. Assays using blasts from a subset of 40 patients treated with T plus E on this study showed that AMLs with a RASGRP1/APTX ratio of more than 5.2 had a 78% CR rate and negative predictive value 87%. This ratio did not correlate with outcome in 41 patients treated with conventional chemotherapies. The next T-based clinical trials will test the ability of the 2-gene signature to enrich for T responders prospectively. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00602771.

  6. A role for BMP-induced homeobox gene MIXL1 in acute myelogenous leukemia and identification of type I BMP receptor as a potential target for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Aaron; Liu, Bin; Liang, Hong; Wei, Caimiao; Guindani, Michele; Lu, Yue; Liang, Shoudan; St John, Lisa S; Molldrem, Jeff; Nagarajan, Lalitha

    2014-12-30

    Mesoderm Inducer in Xenopus Like1 (MIXL1), a paired-type homeobox transcription factor induced by TGF-β family of ligands is required for early embryonic specification of mesoderm and endoderm. Retrovirally transduced Mixl1 is reported to induce acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) with a high penetrance. But the mechanistic underpinnings of MIXL1 mediated leukemogenesis are unknown. Here, we establish the protooncogene c-REL to be a transcriptional target of MIXL1 by genome wide chromatin immune precipitation. Accordingly, expression of c-REL and its downstream targets BCL2L1 and BCL2A2 are elevated in MIXL1 expressing cells. Notably, MIXL1 regulates c-REL through a zinc finger binding motif, potentially by a MIXL1-Zinc finger protein transcriptional complex. Furthermore, MIXL1 expression is detected in the cancer genome atlas (TCGA) AML samples in a pattern mutually exclusive from that of HOXA9, CDX2 and HLX suggesting the existence of a core, yet distinct HOX transcriptional program. Finally, we demonstrate MIXL1 to be induced by BMP4 and not TGF-β in primary human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Consequently, MIXL1 expressing AML cells are preferentially sensitive to the BMPR1 kinase inhibitor LDN-193189. These findings support the existence of a novel MIXL1-c REL mediated survival axis in AML that can be targeted by BMPR1 inhibitors. (MIXL1- human gene, Mixl1- mouse ortholog, MIXL1- protein). PMID:25544748

  7. Sarcoma granulocítico multicêntrico como recidiva de leucemia mieloide aguda Multicentric granulocytic sarcoma as relapse of acute myelogenous leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taciana G. S. Aguiar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoma granulocítico (SG é um tumor sólido extramedular, constituído por células precursoras de granulócitos. É geralmente associado a leucemia mieloide aguda ou raramente a outras desordens mieloproliferativas. O tumor geralmente ocorre precedendo uma leucemia mieloide aguda, durante o seu curso ou após a remissão ter sido alcançada. O prognóstico é pobre e tem como principais modalidades terapêuticas a quimioterapia e a radioterapia. Relata- se um caso de SG multicêntrico, de evolução rápida, com acometimento difuso de pele, mamas, gânglios linfáticos, tecido celular subcutâneo e líquor, em mulher de 45 anos, fora de tratamento para leucemia mieloide aguda e em remissão hematológica há 18 meses. A paciente apresentava dor intensa em membro inferior direito há uma semana e estava em anticoagulação oral há seis meses por trombose venosa profunda neste membro. Diagnosticado o SG, a paciente foi tratada com radioterapia e quimioterapia com boa resposta. Após três meses de seguimento, em vigência do tratamento quimioterápico, evoluiu com recidiva do SG neste membro, associado ao acometimento das mamas e posteriormente do sistema nervoso central, evoluindo para óbito em aplasia e sepses.Granulocytic sarcoma is an extramedullary solid tumor consisting of immature granulocytic cells. It is often associated with acute myelogenous leukemia and more rarely with other myeloproliferative disorders. The tumor generally occurs before acute myeloid leukemia, during its course or after disease remission. It has a poor prognosis with the main therapeutic options being chemotherapy and radiotherapy. A multicentric accelerated case of granulocytic sarcoma of a 45- year- old woman with diffuse skin, breast, lymphatic ganglia and subcutaneous tissue presentations no longer undergoing treatment for acute myeloid leukemia and in hematologic remission for 18 months is reported. The patient presented with severe pain of right lower

  8. SphK1 inhibitor II (SKI-II) inhibits acute myelogenous leukemia cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Weng, Wei; Sun, Zhi-Xin; Fu, Xian-Jie; Ma, Jun; Zhuang, Wen-Fang

    2015-05-15

    Previous studies have identified sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) as a potential drug target for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the current study, we investigated the potential anti-leukemic activity of a novel and specific SphK1 inhibitor, SKI-II. We demonstrated that SKI-II inhibited growth and survival of human AML cell lines (HL-60 and U937 cells). SKI-II was more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors SK1-I and FTY720 in inhibiting AML cells. Meanwhile, it induced dramatic apoptosis in above AML cells, and the cytotoxicity by SKI-II was almost reversed by the general caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. SKI-II treatment inhibited SphK1 activation, and concomitantly increased level of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) precursor ceramide in AML cells. Conversely, exogenously-added S1P protected against SKI-II-induced cytotoxicity, while cell permeable short-chain ceramide (C6) aggravated SKI-II's lethality against AML cells. Notably, SKI-II induced potent apoptotic death in primary human AML cells, but was generally safe to the human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from healthy donors. In vivo, SKI-II administration suppressed growth of U937 leukemic xenograft tumors in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. These results suggest that SKI-II might be further investigated as a promising anti-AML agent.

  9. Proteomic profiling identifies distinct protein patterns in acute myelogenous leukemia CD34+CD38- stem-like cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M Kornblau

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is believed to arise from leukemic stem-like cells (LSC making understanding the biological differences between LSC and normal stem cells (HSC or common myeloid progenitors (CMP crucial to understanding AML biology. To determine if protein expression patterns were different in LSC compared to other AML and CD34+ populations, we measured the expression of 121 proteins by Reverse Phase Protein Arrays (RPPA in 5 purified fractions from AML marrow and blood samples: Bulk (CD3/CD19 depleted, CD34-, CD34+(CMP, CD34+CD38+ and CD34+CD38-(LSC. LSC protein expression differed markedly from Bulk (n =31 cases, 93/121 proteins and CD34+ cells (n = 30 cases, 88/121 proteins with 54 proteins being significantly different (31 higher, 23 lower in LSC than in either Bulk or CD34+ cells. Sixty-seven proteins differed significantly between CD34+ and Bulk blasts (n = 69 cases. Protein expression patterns in LSC and CD34+ differed markedly from normal CD34+ cells. LSC were distinct from CD34+ and Bulk cells by principal component and by protein signaling network analysis which confirmed individual protein analysis. Potential targetable submodules in LSC included the proteins PU.1(SP1, P27, Mcl1, HIF1α, cMET, P53, Yap, and phospho-Stats 1, 5 and 6. Protein expression and activation in LSC differs markedly from other blast populations suggesting that studies of AML biology should be performed in LSC.

  10. Cytogenetic evidence for recurrence of acute myelogenous leukemia after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in donor hematopoietic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elfenbein, G.J.; Brogaonkar, D.S.; Bias, W.B.

    1978-09-01

    A 22-yr-old man with acute myelocytic leukemia received a bone marrow transplant from a genotypically HLA-identical female sibling after cyclophosphamide preparation. He remained in complete remission for 18 mo, when he developed a chloroma in the perineum. The chloroma was treated with local radiotherapy. The chloroma recurred 8 mo later and was treated with radiotherapy followed by combination chemotherapy. At 34 mo after transplant, marrow relapse and chloroma were documented. The first chloroma contained host cells by fluorescent Y-chromatin body analyses of interphase nuclei. All metaphase cells and karyotypes from peripheral blood and marrow samples showed no evidence of host cells from 3 wk after transplant through the time of marrow relapse. Data from autosomal and sex chromosome studies indicate that the marrow relapse occurred in cells of donor origin. A new consistent chromosome abnormality (45, X, -X, t(8;21) (q22; q22)) was observed in a majority of donor cells. The patient received a second bone marrow transplant from the same donor after preparation with busulfan and cyclophosphamide and attained a complete remission with full hematologic engraftment.

  11. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of WBC) are produced, a child will develop acute lymphoblastic, or lymphoid, leukemia (ALL). This is the most common type of childhood leukemia, affecting about 75% of kids with this cancer of the blood cells. Kids ... (AML) Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) Cancer ...

  12. Resistance to BN myelogenous leukemia in rat radiation chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis → LBNFl rat radiation chimeras showed marked resistance to transplanted BN myelogenous leukemia when compared to naive LBNFl, LBNFl → LBNFl, or BN → LBNFl. This occurred in the absence of overt graft versus host disease or of anti-BN response in mixed lymphocyte culture. Bone marrow specific antigens may serve as the target of the resistance mechanism. (author)

  13. Clofarabine Plus Cytarabine Compared With Cytarabine Alone in Older Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myelogenous Leukemia: Results From the CLASSIC I Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faderl, Stefan; Wetzler, Meir; Rizzieri, David; Schiller, Gary; Jagasia, Madan; Stuart, Robert; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Avigan, David; Craig, Michael; Collins, Robert; Maris, Michael; Kovacsovics, Tibor; Goldberg, Stuart; Seiter, Karen; Hari, Parameswaran; Greiner, Jochen; Vey, Norbert; Recher, Christian; Ravandi, Farhad; Wang, Eunice S.; Vasconcelles, Michael; Huebner, Dirk; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To compare the receipt of clofarabine plus cytarabine (Clo+Ara-C arm) with cytarabine (Ara-C arm) in patients ≥ 55 years old with refractory or relapsed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Patients and Methods Patients were randomly assigned to receive either clofarabine (Clo) 40 mg/m2 or a placebo followed by Ara-C 1 g/m2 for five consecutive days. The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Secondary end points included event-free survival (EFS), 4-month EFS, overall remission rate (ORR; complete remission [CR] plus CR with incomplete peripheral blood count recovery), disease-free survival (DFS), duration of remission (DOR), and safety. Results Among 320 patients with confirmed AML (median age, 67 years), the median OS was 6.6 months in the Clo+Ara-C arm and 6.3 months in the Ara-C arm (hazard ratio [HR], 1.00; 95% CI, 0.78 to 1.28; P = 1.00). The ORR was 46.9% in the Clo+Ara-C arm (35.2% CR) versus 22.9% in the Ara-C arm (17.8% CR; P < .01). EFS (HR: 0.63; 95% CI, 0.49 to 0.80; P < .01) and 4-month EFS (37.7% v 16.6%; P < .01) favored the Clo+Ara-C arm compared with Ara-C arm, respectively. DFS and DOR were similar in both arms. Overall 30-day mortality was 16% and 5% for CLO+Ara-C and Ara-C arms, respectively. In the Clo+Ara-C and Ara-C arms, the most common grade 3 to 4 toxicities were febrile neutropenia (47% v 35%, respectively), hypokalemia (18% v 11%, respectively), thrombocytopenia (16% v 17%, respectively), pneumonia (14% v 10%, respectively), anemia (13% v 0%, respectively), neutropenia (11% v 9%, respectively), increased AST (11% v 2%, respectively), and increased ALT (10% v 3%, respectively). Conclusion Although the primary end point of OS did not differ between arms, Clo+Ara-C significantly improved response rates and EFS. Study follow-up continues, and the role of clofarabine in the treatment of adult patients with AML continues to be investigated. PMID:22585697

  14. Comparison of molecular biology, immunological characteristics and clinical efficacy in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia with or without FLT3-ITD gene mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-ting LI

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To compare the clinical and laboratory characteristics, therapeutic efficacy and prognosis of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML with or without FLT3-ITD gene mutation. Methods The clinical data of 93 AML patients, aged from 10 to 66 years, were retrospectively analyzed. Among them, 21 patients were FLT3-ITD gene (FLT3-ITD+AML group positive, and 72 patients were negative for FLT3-ITD gene (FLT3-ITD-AML group. The patients' chromosomes were examined, and mutation of FLT3-ITD and NPM1 gene and the expressions of HOX11, ETO, EVI and NPM1 gene were analyzed, along with the 2-year event-free survival and 2-year overall survival were learned. Results At primary diagnosis, the proportion of patients with WBC>100×109/L, and bleeding rate was significantly higher in FLT3-ITD+ AML group than that in FLT3-ITD-AML group (P=0.04; P=0.01, but no statistical difference was found in age, immunophenotype and chromosomal abnormality (P>0.05. The complete remission (CR rate was 28.57% in FLT3-ITD+ AML group, and it was obviously lower than that in FLT3-ITD-AML group (55.56%, P=0.013. The 2-year event-free survival was 29.2% in FLT3-ITD+ AML group, and it was significantly lower than that in FLT3-ITD-AML group (37.7%; P=0.04. Meanwhile, 33.3% of the patients in FLT3-ITD-AML group were also positive for NPM1 gene expression, and all of them did not get complete remission. However, only 1.39% of the patients expressed NPM1 gene in FLT3-ITD-AML group, but 50% of them got complete remission (P=0.022. Conclusion Patients with FLT3-ITD+AML were easily associated with high WBC counts, bleeding, lower CR rate, poor event-free survival, and poor prognosis.

  15. [Therapy-related chronic myelogenous leukemia following RFM therapy in a patient with follicular lymphoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibazaki, Mio; Sumi, Masahiko; Takeda, Wataru; Kirihara, Takehiko; Kurihara, Taro; Sato, Keijiro; Ueki, Toshimitsu; Hiroshima, Yuki; Ueno, Mayumi; Ichikawa, Naoaki; Mori, Yuichi; Kobayashi, Hikaru

    2014-08-01

    Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia are increasingly being recognized as treatment complications in patients receiving chemotherapy or radiotherapy for previous neoplasms. However, therapy-related chronic myelogenous leukemia is relatively rare. A 61-year-old woman with a history of radiation therapy for breast cancer had previously, in 2007, received 4 courses of chemotherapy (RFM: rituximab, fludarabine, and mitoxantrone) for follicular lymphoma. In 2010, she was diagnosed with chronic-phase chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) with Philadelphia chromosome but no other cytogenetic anomalies. Although a complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) was achieved with imatinib therapy, she developed leukocytosis with lymphoblasts and lymphoid crisis was diagnosed in January 2013. G-banded karyotyping showed 45, XX, -7, t, (9;22)(q33;q11.2). Unrelated bone marrow stem cell transplantation was performed after she had achieved a CCyR with dasatinib therapy. Polymerase chain reaction detected no major bcr/abl transcript in her bone marrow 42 days after transplantation. The majority of secondary leukemias resulting from the use of cytotoxic drugs can be divided into two well-defined groups depending on whether the patient has received alkylating agents or topoisomerase II inhibitors. However, concerns regarding the leukemogenic potential of fludarabine-based chemotherapy are growing. The potential risk of therapy-related leukemias including CML needs to be considered following fludarabine-based chemotherapy. PMID:25186488

  16. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... studying the leukemia cells collected from the blood, bone marrow, and/or spinal fluid, doctors can determine the type of leukemia a child has. This is important because treatment varies among different types ... blood or bone marrow, doctors can tell whether the Philadelphia chromosome is ...

  17. Therapeutic Autologous Lymphocytes and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With High-Risk or Recurrent Myeloid Leukemia After Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-12

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Activation of the hedgehog pathway in chronic myelogeneous leukemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Bing

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hedgehog (Hh signaling pathway is involved in regulation of many tissues development and oncogenesis. Recently, Hh signaling has been identified as a required functional pathway for leukemia stem cells(LSCs, and loss of this pathway impairs leukemia progression. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the expression of Hedgehog signaling molecules in Chronic Myelogeneous Leukemia (CML patients and normal people by semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR and to correlate mRNA expression to patients' clinical data. Results Here, we showed that Sonic hedgehog (Shh, Smoothened (Smo, and Gli1 genes of Hh signaling were significantly upregulated in CML patients when compared with normal people (P 0.05. Conclusions These findings suggested that activation of the Hh pathway maybe associated with CML progression. Treatment of CML with imatinib, a selective inhibitor of the BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has no significant influence on the inhibition of Hh pathway of CML-CP patients.

  19. Acute childhood leukemia: Nursing care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern therapy for childhood acute leukemia has provided a dramatically improved prognosis over that of just 30 years ago. In the early 1960's survival rates for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) were 4% and 3%, respectively. By the 1980's survival rates had risen to 72% for all and 25% to 40% for AML. Today, a diagnosis of all carries an 80% survival rate and as high as a 90% survival rate for some low-risk subtypes. Such high cure rates depend on intense and complex, multimodal therapeutic protocols. Therefore, nursing care of the child with acute leukemia must meet the demands of complicated medical therapies and balance those with the needs of a sick child and their concerned family. An understanding of disease process and principles of medical management guide appropriate and effective nursing interventions. Leukemia is a malignant disorder of the blood and blood- forming organs (bone marrow, lymph nodes and spleen). Most believe that acute leukemia results from a malignant transformation of a single early haematopoietic stem cell that is capable of indefinite self-renewal. These immature cells of blasts do not respond to normal physiologic stimuli for differentiation and gradually become the predominant cell in the bone marrow

  20. On the global dynamics of a chronic myelogenous leukemia model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishchenko, Alexander P.; Starkov, Konstantin E.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we analyze some features of global dynamics of a three-dimensional chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) model with the help of the stability analysis and the localization method of compact invariant sets. The behavior of CML model is defined by concentrations of three cellpopulations circulating in the blood: naive T cells, effector T cells specific to CML and CML cancer cells. We prove that the dynamics of the CML system around the tumor-free equilibrium point is unstable. Further, we compute ultimate upper bounds for all three cell populations and provide the existence conditions of the positively invariant polytope. One ultimate lower bound is obtained as well. Moreover, we describe the iterative localization procedure for refining localization bounds; this procedure is based on cyclic using of localizing functions. Applying this procedure we obtain conditions under which the internal tumor equilibrium point is globally asymptotically stable. Our theoretical analyses are supplied by results of the numerical simulation.

  1. Management of Advanced-Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radich, Jerald P

    2016-05-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia represents the poster child of successful precision medicine in cancer, with amazing survival results achieved with targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in many patients with chronic-phase disease. Unfortunately, however, this good news has not extended to patients in blast crisis, for whom survival has not clearly been improved with TKIs. During his presentation at the NCCN 21st Annual Conference, Jerald P. Radich, MD, briefly explored the biology behind advanced-stage disease and several of the molecular findings in disease progression. He also reviewed some of the therapeutic options in advanced disease, emphasizing that transplantation, although fraught with some difficulties, offers the best long-term prognosis for patients in blast crisis. PMID:27226510

  2. Spotlight on nilotinib in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harnicar S

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Stephen Harnicar, Sherry Mathew Department of Pharmacy, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Nowhere has targeted therapy been more successful in the hematologic malignancy arena than chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML. By targeting the BCR–ABL fusion oncogene, the introduction of tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKIs has dramatically improved the outcomes of this disease. Nilotinib is a second-generation TKI that initially gained approval for the treatment of imatinib-resistant or -intolerant disease for patients with chronic or accelerated-phase CML. Investigation in the first-line setting also demonstrated efficacy, and expanded nilotinib’s approval to include therapy for patients with treatment-naïve chronic-phase CML. Data also exist for blast-phase disease, which allows nilotinib to be an option for all phases. Nilotinib’s place in therapy is continuously being expanded by research in novel areas, such as post-hematopoietic stem cell transplants for prevention of relapse and in the pediatric arena. With multiple TKIs now approved for the treatment of CML, delineating the pharmacologic distinctions of nilotinib is an asset when determining therapy. By understanding the pharmacokinetics and dependence on hepatic metabolism of nilotinib, the clinician can manage the potential toxicities, interactions, and unique dosing of this drug. The recognition of mechanisms of resistance, patient adherence, and cost-effectiveness are similarly significant considerations. Actively integrating these various specifics will allow clinicians to optimize nilotinib therapy for the CML patient. Keywords: nilotinib, chronic myelogenous leukemia, CML, tyrosine-kinase inhibitor, TKI 

  3. SphK1 inhibitor II (SKI-II) inhibits acute myelogenous leukemia cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Li; Weng, Wei; Sun, Zhi-Xin; Fu, Xian-Jie; Ma, Jun, E-mail: majuntongrensh1@126.com; Zhuang, Wen-Fang, E-mail: wenfangzhuangmd@163.com

    2015-05-15

    Previous studies have identified sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) as a potential drug target for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the current study, we investigated the potential anti-leukemic activity of a novel and specific SphK1 inhibitor, SKI-II. We demonstrated that SKI-II inhibited growth and survival of human AML cell lines (HL-60 and U937 cells). SKI-II was more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors SK1-I and FTY720 in inhibiting AML cells. Meanwhile, it induced dramatic apoptosis in above AML cells, and the cytotoxicity by SKI-II was almost reversed by the general caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. SKI-II treatment inhibited SphK1 activation, and concomitantly increased level of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) precursor ceramide in AML cells. Conversely, exogenously-added S1P protected against SKI-II-induced cytotoxicity, while cell permeable short-chain ceramide (C6) aggravated SKI-II's lethality against AML cells. Notably, SKI-II induced potent apoptotic death in primary human AML cells, but was generally safe to the human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from healthy donors. In vivo, SKI-II administration suppressed growth of U937 leukemic xenograft tumors in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. These results suggest that SKI-II might be further investigated as a promising anti-AML agent. - Highlights: • SKI-II inhibits proliferation and survival of primary and transformed AML cells. • SKI-II induces apoptotic death of AML cells, but is safe to normal PBMCs. • SKI-II is more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors in inhibiting AML cells. • SKI-II inhibits SphK1 activity, while increasing ceramide production in AML cells. • SKI-II dose-dependently inhibits U937 xenograft growth in SCID mice.

  4. Miliaria-rash after neutropenic fever and induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia Miliária 'rash' após neutropenia febril e quimioterapia de indução para a leucemia mielóide aguda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuyet A Nguyen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Miliaria is a disorder of the eccrine sweat glands which occurs in conditions of increased heat and humidity. It can be associated with persistent febrile states as well as with certain drugs. We presented a 40 year-old female with myelodysplastic syndrome and progression to acute myelogenous leukemia who was admitted to the hospital for chemotherapy induction. The patient was treated with idarubicin and cytarabine. She became pancytopenic and developed neutropenic fever and was started on vancomycin and cefepime, but was persistently febrile with night sweats. Five days into her fevers, she developed diffuse, nonpruritic and fragile vesicles together with drenching nightsweats. The patient's exanthem was diagnosed as Miliaria crystallina, most probably induced by neutropenic fever and idarubucin exposureMiliária é uma desordem das glândulas sudoríparas écrinas, que ocorre em condições de aumento de calor e umidade. Miliária pode ser associada com estados febris persistentes bem como com certos medicamentos. Apresentamos o caso de uma mulher de 40 anos com síndrome mielodisplásica e progressão para leucemia mielóide aguda que foi admitida no hospital para quimioterapia de indução. A paciente foi tratada com idarrubicina e citarabina. Ela se tornou pancitopênica e desenvolveu neutropenia febril. Iniciou tratamento com vancomicina e cefepime, mas a febre com sudorese noturna continou. Cinco dias depois a paciente desenvolveu vesículas difusas, não pruríticas e frágeis juntamente com a persistência de sudorese noturna. O exantema do paciente foi diagnosticado como Miliária cristalina, provavelmente induzida por neutropenia febril e exposição a idarubucin

  5. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in children with acute myelogenous leukemia in first remission. Associazione Italiana di Ematologia e Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP) and the Gruppo Italiano per il Trapianto di Midollo Osseo (GITMO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dini, G; Boni, L; Abla, O; Uderzo, C; Polchi, P; Locatelli, F; Di Bartolomeo, P; Arcese, W; Iori, A P; Rossetti, F

    1994-06-01

    Fifty-nine children, aged 1-15 years, with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) received a bone marrow transplant (BMT) from an HLA-identical sibling (n = 57) or from an identical twin (n = 2), while in first remission (CR). These children represent, to the best of our knowledge, all children grafted in first CR in 11 Italian centers between 1980 and 1990. Patients were prepared with total body irradiation (TBI) plus cyclophosphamide (CY) (n = 50) or melphalan (n = 2) or with busulfan plus CY (n = 7). GVHD prophylaxis consisted of cyclosporin A (n = 48), methotrexate (n = 7) or cyclosporin and methotrexate (n = 2). Survivors have been followed for 21-137 months (median 59 months). Actuarial relapse-free survival was 58% at 66-137 months (95% confidence interval (CI) 44-72). Actuarial risk of relapse was 23% at 48 months (95% CI 10.9-34.8). Risk of non-relapse deaths was 33% in the period 1980-87 and 4% in the period 1988-90 (p = 0.02). In multivariate analysis patients with a blood cell count > 14 x 10(9)/l at diagnosis showed a lower relapse-free survival compared with patients with counts < 14 x 10(9)/l (p = 0.006). We could not detect an effect of FAB subtype, patient age, time to achieve remission or transplant-related variables, including year of BMT, on relapse-free survival. In conclusion, allogeneic marrow transplantation can achieve long-term relapse-free survival in over 50% of children with AML and should be considered as consolidation therapy if a matched sibling is available.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Mixed phenotype acute leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Zixing; Wang Shujie

    2014-01-01

    Objective To highlight the current understanding of mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL).Data sources We collected the relevant articles in PubMed (from 1985 to present),using the terms "mixed phenotype acute leukemia","hybrid acute leukemia","biphenotypic acute leukemia",and "mixed lineage leukemia".We also collected the relevant studies in WanFang Data base (from 2000 to present),using the terms "mixed phenotype acute leukemia" and "hybrid acute leukemia".Study selection We included all relevant studies concerning mixed phenotype acute leukemia in English and Chinese version,with no limitation of research design.The duplicated articles are excluded.Results MPAL is a rare subgroup of acute leukemia which expresses the myeloid and lymphoid markers simultaneously.The clinical manifestations of MPAL are similar to other acute leukemias.The World Health Organization classification and the European Group for Immunological classification of Leukaemias 1998 cdteria are most widely used.MPAL does not have a standard therapy regimen.Its treatment depends mostly on the patient's unique immunophenotypic and cytogenetic features,and also the experience of individual physician.The lack of effective treatment contributes to an undesirable prognosis.Conclusion Our understanding about MPAL is still limited.The diagnostic criteria have not been unified.The treatment of MPAL remains to be investigated.The prognostic factor is largely unclear yet.A better diagnostic cdteria and targeted therapeutics will improve the therapy effect and a subsequently better prognosis.

  7. Veliparib and Topotecan With or Without Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, High-Risk Myelodysplasia, or Aggressive Myeloproliferative Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-05

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Essential Thrombocythemia; Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Cell Neoplasm; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative, BCR-ABL1 Positive Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  8. Human acute myelogenous leukemia stem cells are rare and heterogeneous when assayed in NOD/SCID/IL2Rγc-deficient mice

    OpenAIRE

    Sarry, Jean-Emmanuel; Murphy, Kathleen; Perry, Robin; Sanchez, Patricia V.; Secreto, Anthony; Keefer, Cathy; Swider, Cezary R.; Strzelecki, Anne-Claire; Cavelier, Cindy; Récher, Christian; Mansat-De Mas, Véronique; Delabesse, Eric; Danet-Desnoyers, G; Carroll, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Human leukemic stem cells, like other cancer stem cells, are hypothesized to be rare, capable of incomplete differentiation, and restricted to a phenotype associated with early hematopoietic progenitors or stem cells. However, recent work in other types of tumors has challenged the cancer stem cell model. Using a robust model of xenotransplantation based on NOD/SCID/IL2Rγc-deficient mice, we confirmed that human leukemic stem cells, functionally defined by us as SCID leukemia-initiating cells...

  9. Down-regulation of MicroRNAs 222/221 in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia with Deranged Core-Binding Factor Subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Brioschi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Core-binding factor leukemia (CBFL is a subgroup of acutemyeloid leukemia (AML characterized by genetic mutations involving the subunits of the core-binding factor (CBF. The leukemogenesis model for CBFL posits that one, or more, gene mutations inducing increased cell proliferation and/or inhibition of apoptosis cooperate with CBF mutations for leukemia development. One of the most commonmutations associated with CBF mutations involves the KIT receptor. A high expression of KIT is a hallmark of a high proportion of CBFL. Previous studies indicate that microRNA (MIR 222/221 targets the 3′ untranslated region of the KIT messenger RNA and our observation that AML1 can bind the MIR-222/221 promoter, we hypothesized that MIR-222/221 represents the link between CBF and KIT. Here, we show that MIR-222/221 expression is upregulated after myeloid differentiation of normal bone marrow AC133+ stem progenitor cells. CBFL blasts with either t(8;21 or inv(16 CBF rearrangements with high expression levels of KIT (CD117 display a significantly lower level of MIR-222/221 expression than non-CBFL blasts. Consistently, we found that the t(8;21 AML1-MTG8 fusion protein binds the MIR-222/221 promoter and induces transcriptional repression of a MIR-222/221-LUC reporter. Because of the highly conserved sequence homology, we demonstrated concomitant MIR-222/221 down-regulation and KIT up-regulation in the 32D/WT1 mouse cell model carrying the AML1-MTG16 fusion protein. This study provides the first hint that CBFL-associated fusion proteins may lead to up-regulation of the KIT receptor by down-regulating MIR-222/221, thus explaining the concomitant occurrence of CBF genetic rearrangements and overexpression of wild type or mutant KIT in AML.

  10. A vascular bone necrosis in an untreated case of chronic myelogenous leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hip pain due to aseptic necrosis of the femoral head was the first clinical manifestation of chronic myelogenous leukemia in a 9-year-old white female. An erroneous diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis was first entertained. Physical examination showed splenomegaly, complete blood count revealed leucocytosis of 359 000. The initial radiograph of the involved hip was negative. Biopsy revealed aseptic necrosis of the femoral head. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) was diagnosed on the basis of the peripheral blood smear and bone marrow biopsy. Two months later, radiograph, radionuclide bone scan, and magnetic resonance imaging (MR) of the involved hip were positive for aseptic necrosis of the femoral head. (orig.)

  11. Congenital acute megakaryocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N B Mathur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital leukemia (CL is an extremely rare disorder in the newborn, significant proportion of which is of myeloid origin, primarily of M4 or M5 morphology. As compared to pediatric leukemia, CL is a more aggressive disease. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML-M7 or acute megakaryocytic leukemia is a rare type of AML with an incidence of 0.5 per million per year. Median age of presentation is 6 years, and children may present with a broad variety of symptoms including low-grade fever, diarrhea, easy bruising, failure to gain weight and life-threatening conditions.

  12. Inhibitory effects of rapamycin on proliferation of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells and its mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李杰

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the inhibitory effects of rapamycin on proliferation of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells and its possible mechanism. Methods The effects of rapamycin at various concentrations on cell proliferation of CML cell line K562 cells were analyzed by MTT. The expressions

  13. Progress in the Studies of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Stem Cell--Review%急性髓系白血病干细胞的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔久嵬; 张学敏; 王冠军

    2003-01-01

    急性髓系白血病(AML)细胞群是由不同分化阶段的白血病细胞组成,其中最原始的细胞为白血病干细胞(leukemia stem cell, LSC).虽然LSC所占比例极少,但仅其具有维持白血病细胞克隆的作用.AML的恶性转化发生在干细胞水平,这种发生恶性转化的干细胞的细胞和分子遗传学改变决定了白血病细胞克隆的分化特点,从而形成不同亚型的AML. LSC与正常造血干细胞(hematopoietic stem cell, HSC)有许多相似之处,它具有自我更新能力和有限的分化潜能,同时又具有其自身独特的特征.LSC具有某些特殊的细胞表面标志,如CD90-, CD117-, CD123+.与正常的HSC相比,肿瘤抑制性蛋白-死亡相关蛋白激酶和干扰素调节因子1在LSC中高表达.与相对分化的白血病细胞相比,LSC主要处于G0期, 其对常规化疗药物无效,因此LSC是白血病复发的根源.虽然LSC具有耐药的特点,但经合适的刺激如蛋白酶体抑制剂MG-132的处理,LSC比正常HSC更易于凋亡.本文将近年来对LSC的细胞和分子生物学方面研究的进展进行综述,为白血病发病机制及治疗策略的探讨提供新的思路.

  14. Myelogenous leukemia in a bearded dragon (Acanthodraco vitticeps).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocidlowski, M E; McNamara, P L; Wojcieszyn, J W

    2001-03-01

    A 3-yr-old bearded dragon (Acanthodraco vitticeps) presented with lethargy, a swollen right elbow joint, inability to move its rear limbs normally, and marked leukocytosis. The majority of leukocytes were an abnormal mononuclear lymphoid-type cell with a high nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio, a slightly blue cytoplasm, nuclei with coarsely granular chromatin, and some nuclear clefts. Acute leukemia of lymphoid or myeloid origin was tentatively diagnosed. The abnormal mononuclear leukocyte cell population stained positively for the myeloid cytochemical stains: peroxidase, chloroacetate esterase, and L1-calprotectin. The abnormal cell population of the peripheral blood did not stain with the lymphoid cytochemical stains: alpha-naphthyl butyrate esterase, CD3, and CD79a.

  15. Myelogenous leukemia in a bearded dragon (Acanthodraco vitticeps).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocidlowski, M E; McNamara, P L; Wojcieszyn, J W

    2001-03-01

    A 3-yr-old bearded dragon (Acanthodraco vitticeps) presented with lethargy, a swollen right elbow joint, inability to move its rear limbs normally, and marked leukocytosis. The majority of leukocytes were an abnormal mononuclear lymphoid-type cell with a high nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio, a slightly blue cytoplasm, nuclei with coarsely granular chromatin, and some nuclear clefts. Acute leukemia of lymphoid or myeloid origin was tentatively diagnosed. The abnormal mononuclear leukocyte cell population stained positively for the myeloid cytochemical stains: peroxidase, chloroacetate esterase, and L1-calprotectin. The abnormal cell population of the peripheral blood did not stain with the lymphoid cytochemical stains: alpha-naphthyl butyrate esterase, CD3, and CD79a. PMID:12790401

  16. Skin changes in acute myelogenous leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Mittal R; Kullar Jastinder; Sethi P; Puneeth

    2000-01-01

    A 65-year old woman developed progressive, firm, mild to moderately itchy, erythematous, papular and nodular lesions, over cheeks, extensors of limbs, scalp and lower back without any accompanying systemic complaints except for severe backache. Initially clinical diagnosis was cutaneous sarcoidosis. However presence of myeloblasts, monoblasts, myelocytes and metamyelocytes in peripheral blood smear and typical histopathology of nodule with mixed cellular infiltrate more around blood vessels, ...

  17. Heterogeneity of leukemia-initiating capacity of chronic myelogenous leukemia stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Li, Ling; Ho, Yinwei; Li, Min; Marcucci, Guido; Tong, Wei; Bhatia, Ravi

    2016-03-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) results from transformation of a long-term hematopoietic stem cell (LTHSC) by expression of the BCR-ABL fusion gene. However, BCR-ABL-expressing LTHSCs are heterogeneous in their capacity as leukemic stem cells (LSCs). Although discrepancies in proliferative, self-renewal, and differentiation properties of normal LTHSCs are being increasingly recognized, the mechanisms underlying heterogeneity of leukemic LTHSCs are poorly understood. Using a CML mouse model, we identified gene expression differences between leukemic and nonleukemic LTHSCs. Expression of the thrombopoietin (THPO) receptor MPL was elevated in leukemic LTHSC populations. Compared with LTHSCs with low MPL expression, LTHSCs with high MPL expression showed enhanced JAK/STAT signaling and proliferation in response to THPO in vitro and increased leukemogenic capacity in vivo. Although both G0 and S phase subpopulations were increased in LTHSCs with high MPL expression, LSC capacity was restricted to quiescent cells. Inhibition of MPL expression in CML LTHSCs reduced THPO-induced JAK/STAT signaling and leukemogenic potential. These same phenotypes were also present in LTHSCs from patients with CML, and patient LTHSCs with high MPL expression had reduced sensitivity to BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment but increased sensitivity to JAK inhibitors. Together, our studies identify MPL expression levels as a key determinant of heterogeneous leukemia-initiating capacity and drug sensitivity of CML LTHSCs and suggest that high MPL-expressing CML stem cells are potential targets for therapy. PMID:26878174

  18. Occurrence of chronic lymphocytic leukemia in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pritish K Bhattacharyya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is the most common leukemia of adults in the western world and constitutes about 33% of all leukemia′s. The incidence of CLL increases with age and are more common in older population. Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML on the contrary occurs in both young adults and elderly and is a chronic myeloproliferative disease that originates from abnormal pluripotent stem cells and results in involvement of multiple hematopoietic lineages, but predominantly myeloid and less commonly lymphoid. Association between CLL and myeloid malignancies (CML, acute myeloid leukemia and MDS, myelodysplastic syndrome is rare. In literature documenting CLL and CML in same patients, occur either simultaneously or CML is preceded by CLL.

  19. Clinical Research on Treatment of Age-Related Acute Myelogenous Leukemia with Integrated Treatment of Chinese and Western Medicine%中西医结合治疗老年性急性髓细胞白血病临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡晓莹; 陈珮; 邱仲川; 赵琳; 黄中迪; 朱小勤

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To observe the clinical curative effect of integrated treatment of Chinese and western medicine on age-related acute myelogenous leukemia ( AML ) . Methods:26 patients with age-related acute myelogenous leukemia were randomly divided into qi-benefiting and heat-clearing formula plus decitabine group(treatment group) and decitabine group(control group). The clinical curative effect and adverse reac tions of the two groups were observed. Result:The completely relieving rate of treatment group was lower than that of the control group and the effective rate was higher than that of the control group. There was no significant difference between the curative effect of the two groups (P>0.05). The significantly effective rate and total effective rate of TCM syndrome improvement of treatment group were significantly higher than that of the control group (P0.05)。治疗组中医证候改善显效率及总有效率明显高于对照组(P<0.05)。治疗过程中治疗组感染发生率、口腔溃疡发生率、恶心呕吐发生率明显低于对照组(P<0.05)。结论:益气清热方联合地西他滨能有效治疗老年性AML,中药能减轻地西他滨的不良反应。

  20. P-GLYCOPROTEIN QUANTITATION IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mali in Nikougoftar

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Multi drug resistance(MDR is a major problem in the treatment of cancer and hemalological malignancies. This resistance is multi factorial and is the result of decreased intra cellular drug accumulation. This is partly due to the presence of a 170KD intra membranous protein termed P-glycoprotein(P-gp that is an energy-dependent efflux pump which has increased expression on drug-resistance cells. In this study we identified the presence of P-gp by staining with Fluorescent Iso Thio Cyanate (FITC conjugated anti P-gp in acute leukemia patients and flow cytometry in addition to performing immunophenotype analysis and French, American British (FAB classification. Results revealed that one fifth of leuke¬mic patients expressed P-gp and this phenotype was more prevalent in Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia(AUL and Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML than in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia(ALL. Other findings showed a logical rela¬tionship between this phenotype and age groups. There was not any association between P-gp+ phenotype and FAB and Immunophenotyping sub classification, but there was a linear relationship between CD34 and CD7 expression and P-gp+ phenotype. The accumulation of P-gp molecule that was stated as Mean Fluores¬cence Intensity (MFI on the blasts1 membrane of AUL and AML patients showed marked increase in comparison to ALL. Furthermore MFI in P-gp+ relapsed patients was much more than P-gp+ pretreatment patients.

  1. Role of exosomes released by chronic myelogenous leukemia cells in angiogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Taverna, S; Flugy Papè, AM; SAIEVA, L; Kohn, EC; A. Santoro; Meraviglia, S; De Leo, G; ALESSANDRO, R

    2011-01-01

    The present study is designed to assess if exosomes released from Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) cells may modulate angiogenesis. We have isolated and characterized the exosomes generated from LAMA84 CML cells and demonstrated that addition of exosomes to human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC) induces an increase of both ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 cell adhesion molecules and interleukin-8 expression. The stimulation of cell-cell adhesion molecules was paralleled by a dose-dependent increase of a...

  2. Molecular relapse in chronic myelogenous leukemia patients after bone marrow transplantation detected by polymerase chain reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relapse of chronic myelogenous leukemia after bone marrow transplantation can be detected by using clinical, cytogenetic, or molecular tools. A modification of the polymerase chain reaction can be used in patients to detect low levels of the BCR-ABL-encoded mRNA transcript, a specific marker for chronic myelogenous leukemia. Early detection of relapse after bone marrow transplantation could potentially alter treatment decisions. The authors prospectively evaluated 19 patients for evidence of molecular relapse, cytogenetic relapse, and clinical relapse after bone marrow transplantation. They used the polymerase chain reaction to detect residual BCR-ABL mRNA in patients followed up to 45 months after treatment and found 4 patients with BCR-ABL mRNA expression following bone marrow transplantation. Fifteen patients did not express detectable BCR-ABL mRNA. All 19 patients remain in clinical remission. In this prospective study of chronic myelogenous leukemia patients treated with bone marrow transplantation, molecular relapse preceded cytogenetic relapse in those patients who persistently express BCR-ABL mRNA. They recommend using standard clinical and cytogenetic testing to make patient care decisions until further follow-up determines the clinical outcome of those patients with residual BCR-ABL mRNA transcripts detected by polymerase chain reaction

  3. Permanent Sensorineural Deafness in a Patient with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Secondary to Intracranial Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakshi Kapur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 52-year-old male presented with tinnitus and fullness in left ear for one day. Workup revealed a white blood cell count of 685×103/μL with marked increase in granulocyte series and myeloid precursors on peripheral smear. The initial impression was chronic myelogenous leukemia with hyperleukocytosis, and patient was started on hydration, hydroxyurea, and allopurinol. Patient tolerated bone marrow biopsy well but continued to bleed excessively from the biopsy site. Results confirmed Philadelphia chromosome positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (chronic phase. On day three of hospitalization, patient developed sudden slurred speech along with shaking movements involving extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple hemorrhages throughout the brain. Hydroxyurea was continued until insurance coverage for nilotinib was getting approved. On day nine of hospitalization, patient developed sudden bilateral sensorineural deafness. Repeat magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple new hemorrhages throughout the brain. Computer tomography of the temporal bones showed inflammatory changes in right and left mastoid cells. Nilotinib was started on day eleven of hospitalization. Patient’s white blood cell count continued to decrease, but there was no improvement in hearing. Four months later, patient was treated with bilateral transmastoid cochlear implants. This case highlights permanent deafness as a hemorrhagic complication secondary to chronic myelogenous leukemia.

  4. Common proviral integration region on mouse chromosome 7 in lymphomas and myelogenous leukemias induced by Friend murine leukemia virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Silver, J.; Kozak, C

    1986-01-01

    Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MuLV) induces a variety of hematopoietic neoplasms 2 to 12 months after inoculation into newborn mice. These neoplasms are clonal or oligoclonal and contain a small number of F-MuLV insertions in high-molecular-weight DNA. To investigate whether different tumors have proviral insertions in the same region, a provirus-cellular DNA junction fragment from an F-MuLV-induced myelogenous leukemia was cloned in lambda gtWES, and a portion of the flanking cellular DNA ...

  5. Clofarabine in combination with a standard remission induction regimen (cytosine arabinoside and idarubicin) in patients with previously untreated intermediate and bad-risk acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (HR-MDS): phase I results of an ongoing phase I/II study of the leukemia groups of EORTC and GIMEMA (EORTC GIMEMA 06061/AML-14A trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemze, R; Suciu, S; Muus, P; Halkes, C J M; Meloni, G; Meert, L; Karrasch, M; Rapion, J; Vignetti, M; Amadori, S; de Witte, T; Marie, J P

    2014-06-01

    This study aims to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of clofarabine combined with the EORTC-GIMEMA 3 + 10 induction regimen (idarubicin + cytosine arabinoside) in adults with untreated acute myelogenous leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome. In this phase I trial, 25 patients (median age 56 years) received 5 days of clofarabine as 1-h infusion (arm A) or push injection (arm B) at the dose level of 5 × 10 or 5 × 15 mg/m(2)/day in an algorithmic dose escalation 3 + 3 design. A consolidation course (intermediate dose cytosine arabinoside, idarubicin) was planned for patients in complete remission (CR). Primary endpoint was safety and tolerance as measured by dose limiting toxicity (DLT); secondary endpoints were response rate, other grade III/IV toxicities, and hematological recovery after induction and consolidation. Five DLTs were observed (in arm A: one DLT at 10 mg/m(2)/day, three at 15 mg/m(2)/day; in arm B: one DLT at 15 mg/m(2)/day). Three patients receiving 15 mg/m(2)/day were withdrawn due to adverse events not classified as DLT. Prolonged hypoplasia was observed in five patients. CR + complete remission with incomplete recovery were achieved in 21 patients (11/12 (92 %) receiving clofarabine 10 mg/m(2)/day; 10/13 (77 %) receiving clofarabine 15 mg/m(2)/day). Clofarabine, 5 × 10 mg/m(2)/day, resulted in one DLT and no early treatment withdrawals. MTD of clofarabine combined with cytosine arabinoside and idarubicin is 5 × 10 mg/m(2)/day. PMID:24682421

  6. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Yang, Jun J; Hunger, Stephen P;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To review the impact of collaborative studies on advances in the biology and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children and adolescents. METHODS: A review of English literature on childhood ALL focusing on collaborative studies was performed. The resulting article was re...

  7. PEGylated dendritic nanoarchitechture improves mean survival time of BDF1mice bearing myelogenous k -562 leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ramadoss Karthikeyan; Pureti Madhu Kumar; Palanirajan Vijayaraj Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To developing and exploring the use ofPEGylated poly(propylene imine) dendritic architecture for the delivery of an anti leukemic activity ofPrednisolone.Methods:For this study,PEGylated poly(propylene imine) dendritic architecture was synthesized and loaded with Prednisolone and targeted to the ascetic form of myelogenous leukemia k-562 cellines in hybrid miceBDF1, was used as tumor model.Theantileukemic activity was assessed by use of the criterionT/C%, whereT was the mean survival time(MST, days) of the drug treated mice, bearing k-562 leukemia andC- the mean survival time(MST, days) of untreated control animals, bearing the same leukemia cellines.Results:An antileukemic activity of the studiedPrednisolone loaded PEGylatedPolypropyleneimine(PPI) dendrimer was found to have increasing the mean survival time of the k-562 myelogenous leukemia cellines bearingBDF1 mice.The criterion“increase of life span”(ILS%) reached maximally270.1% for the drug loaded dendrimer.Conclusion:The studied dendrimer withPrednisolone showed lower toxicity with improved antileukemic activity in comparison with freePrednisolone.The further experiments in this field are in progress, aiming to design better dendritic formulations, with potential clinical use.

  8. Incidence of Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Children in Haji Adam Malik Hospital Medan

    OpenAIRE

    Nafianti, Selvi; Rosdiana, Nelly; Lubis, Bidasari

    2010-01-01

    Background: Leukemia is the most common malignancy in childhood and about 15 percent of childhood leukemia cases are acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). It is reported in more than 13,000 people newly diagnosed each year. The overall survival rate has reached a plateau at approximately 60%, suggesting that further intensification of therapy per se will not substantially improve survival rates. Methods: This study was retrospective with all the children who came to Division Hematology-Oncology H...

  9. Chronic myelogenous leukemia: molecular monitoring in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. Ryabchikova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib has led to significant progress in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML treatment. To date, genetic monitoring is a mandatory attribute of therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The purpose of this study was to access the imatinib therapy efficacy in CML patients using complete molecular genetic monitoring by standard cytogenetics, realtime polymerase chain reaction and mutational analysis. Correlation between cytogenetic and molecular response was shown. Heterogeneity of molecular response in each patient group was revealed by expression of BCR-ABL. Kinase domain mutations were detected in 32 % of CML patients resistant to imatinib.

  10. Renal Bleeding Due to Extramedullary Hematopoiesis in a Patient With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Zettner

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML is a myeloproliferative disorder that normally presents in middle-aged adults. Renal infiltration and extramedullary hematopoiesis in renal tissue has been rarely reported. This case report presents a patient with CML and renal insufficiency who developed gross hematuria. Efforts at controlling the hematuria led to a cascade of events propelled by the underlying disorder that ultimately led to a radical nephrectomy, multiorgan failure, and prolonged hospitalization. We suggest that management of gross hematuria in clinically stable patients with CML, suspected of having extramedullary hematopoiesis, should prioritize treatment of the myeloproliferative disorder over efforts to control bleeding.

  11. Molecular monitoring of BCR-ABL transcripts in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia: is high sensitivity of clinical value?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkin, Maxim; Schiffer, Charles A

    2010-04-01

    Monitoring of disease response during treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia dramatically changed after the introduction of real-time PCR, which allows quantification of BCR-ABL transcript levels with high sensitivity and precision. However, its role in patients who have achieved complete cytogenetic response is not entirely clear; incorrect interpretation of results could lead to unnecessary changes from an effective treatment. This review discusses the current evidence regarding the benefits, uncertainties, and potential drawbacks of molecular monitoring in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia in chronic phase.

  12. Deorphanization and characterization of the ectopically expressed olfactory receptor OR51B5 in myelogenous leukemia cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manteniotis, S; Wojcik, S; Göthert, J R; Dürig, J; Dührsen, U; Gisselmann, G; Hatt, H

    2016-01-01

    The ectopic expression of olfactory receptors (ORs) in the human body has been of major interest in the past decade. Several studies have reported the expression of ORs not only in healthy tissues such as heart, sperm or skin cells, but also in cancerous tissues of the liver, prostate or intestine. In the present study, we detected the expression of OR51B5 in the chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cell line K562 and in white blood cell samples of clinically diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients by reverse transcription-PCR and immunocytochemical staining. The known OR51B5 ligand isononyl alcohol increased the levels of intracellular Ca2+ in both AML patient blood cells and K562 cells. With calcium imaging experiments, we characterized in greater detail the OR51B5-mediated signaling pathway. Here, we observed an involvement of adenylate cyclase and the downstream L-type and T-type calcium channels. In addition, the activation of OR51B5 leads to an inhibition of cell proliferation in K562 cells. In western blot experiments, we found that incubation with isononyl alcohol led to a reduction in p38-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) phosphorylation that might be responsible for the decreased cell proliferation. In the present study, we characterized the OR51B5-mediated signaling pathway downstream of the activation with isononyl alcohol, which leads to reduced proliferation and therefore provide a novel pharmacological target for CML and AML, the latter of which remains difficult to treat. PMID:27551504

  13. Induction of differentiation of myelogenous leukemia cells by humulone, a bitter in the hop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Y; Tobe, H; Makishima, M; Yokoyama, A; Okabe-Kado, J

    1998-07-01

    The active form of vitamin D, 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (VD3), inhibits proliferation and induces differentiation of myelomonocytic leukemia cells, but its clinical use is limited by the adverse effect of hypercalcemia. VD3 mobilizes calcium stores from bone by inducing the dissolution of bone mineral and matrix. We have recently found that humulone, a bitter in the hop extract for beer brewing, effectively inhibits bone resorption. In this study we examined the effect of humulone on the differentiation of human myelogenous leukemia cells. Humulone alone inhibited the growth of monoblastic leukemia U937 cells while only slightly increasing differentiation markers such as nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT)-reducing and lysozyme activities. Humulone effectively enhanced the differentiation-inducing action of VD3. Other myelomonocytic leukemia cells were induced to differentiate by VD3 and this was also enhanced by humulone. Since humulone is a less-toxic inhibitor of bone resorption, the combination of humulone and VD3 may be useful in differentiation therapy of myelomonocytic leukemia.

  14. Update on the management of Philadelphia chromosome positive chronic myelogenous leukemia: role of nilotinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emole J

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Josephine Emole,1 Taiwo Talabi,2 Javier Pinilla-Ibarz1 1Department of Malignant Hematology, 2Moffitt Program for Outreach Wellness Education and Resources, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA Abstract: Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML is a pluripotent stem cell disease characterized by the presence of the Philadelphia chromosome and the bcr-abl gene. The discovery of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs revolutionized therapy for CML, such that durable response, increased overall survival, and increased progression-free survival of patients in chronic phase CML is now possible. Due to resistance and intolerance to imatinib, there was need for development of second- and third-generation TKIs for the treatment of CML. This review examines the role of nilotinib, an oral second-generation TKI, in the treatment of Philadelphia positive CML. The pharmacology, efficacy, and safety of nilotinib are critically evaluated. Patient-related issues, including tolerance, drug interactions, and quality of life issues are also examined. Keywords: chronic myelogenous leukemia, nilotinib, tyrosine kinase inhibitor

  15. Development and evaluation of drug-antibody conjugates for the treatment of human myelogenous leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An immune serum to the Ph1+ human myelogenous leukemia cell line, K-562, was developed in goats. Following exhaustive absorptions, the antiserum and its immunoglobulin (Ig) fraction were highly cytotoxic for the homologenous cells in vitro in the presence of complement. In a nude mouse-human myelogenous leukemia model system, the Ig inhibits the growth and proliferation of myelosarcomas made up of K-562 cells. At the concentration of 6 mg or more, and beginning at 7 days after transplantation of myelosarcomas in nude mice, the administration of immunoglobulins resulted in the total suppression and subsequent elimination of the tumors. The dose-response relationship between the amount of Ig injected and the growth of myelosarcomas was demonstrated to be linear i.e., the extent of inhibition of tumor growth was directly dependent upon the dose of Ig given. Also, the uptake of 125I-labelled immunoglobulins by the K-562 myelosarcomas was at least 6-fold higher than that of the corresponding preimmune globulins

  16. Survival of patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemias: A large population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Runhua; Munker, Reinhold

    2015-06-01

    Little is known about the incidence and treatment outcome of patients with acute biphenotypic leukemias. The World Health Organization (WHO) established the term of acute leukemia of ambiguous phenotype in 2001 (revised in 2008) introducing the term of mixed phenotype acute leukemias. Using the database of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry (SEER), we identified 313 patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemias and compared them with 14,739 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 34,326 patients with acute myelogenous leukemias diagnosed between 2001 and 2011. As a further control group, 1777 patients were included who were not classified as myeloid, lymphoid or biphenotypic (other acute leukemias). The incidence of mixed phenotype acute leukemias is 0.35 cases/1,000,000 person-years. In a multivariate analysis, the prognosis depends strongly on age (as with other leukemias) and it has the worst outcome of all four types of leukemia. However, the prognosis has improved, comparing 2001-2005 with 2006-2011. We present the first comprehensive, population-based study of acute biphenotypic or mixed phenotype acute leukemias according to the WHO classification. Especially in older patients, the prognosis is unfavorable and new treatments should be investigated.

  17. Group-specific human granulocyte antigens on a chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line with a Philadelphia chromosome marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, S I; Terasaki, P I; Billing, R J; Bergh, O J; Minowada, J; Klein, E

    1977-05-01

    Group-specific human granulocyte antigens are serologically detectable with granulocytotoxic-positive human alloantisera on a cell line, K562, of chronic myelogenous leukemia origin which bears a Philadelphia chromosomal marker. The same cell line lacks serologically detectable HLA, B2 microglobulin, and B-lymphocyte antigens. Granulocyte antigens are important cell markers for cell lines of suspected myeloid lineage.

  18. Mannosylerythritol lipid induces granulocytic differentiation and inhibits the tyrosine phosphorylation of human myelogenous leukemia cell line K562

    OpenAIRE

    Isoda, Hiroko; Nakahara, Tadaatsu

    1997-01-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipid (MEL), which induced granulocytic differentiation of human promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL60, also induced differentiation of human myelogenous leukemia cell line K562. MEL inhibited insulin-dependent cell proliferation and induced leukocyte esterase activity of K562 cells. MEL markedly increased the differentiation-associated characteristics in granulocytes, such as nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reducing ability, expression of Fc receptors, and phagocytic activity ...

  19. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia in remission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagler, Arnon; Rocha, Vanderson; Labopin, Myriam;

    2013-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide (Cy) combined with total-body irradiation (TBI) or with busulfan (Bu) are currently the most common myeloablative regimens used in allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (alloSCT) in adults with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Intravenous (IV) Bu has more predictable...

  20. Interleukin-2 and its application in the treatment of patients with acute myelogenous leukemia%白细胞介素-2的抗肿瘤机制及其在急性髓系白血病中的临床应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾敏; 秘营昌

    2008-01-01

    白细胞介素-2(IL-2)作为机体免疫网络中最重要的起调节作用的细胞因子,由活化的T或NK细胞以自分泌或旁分泌方式产生,在激活和维持免疫应答以及促进淋巴细胞发育中起着重要的作用,并已应用于肿瘤的临床治疗及试验性研究中,现就IL-2的抗肿瘤机制及其在急性髓系白血病(AML)中的临床应用作一综述.%As one of the cytokines which play important role in the regulation of immune system,such as activating and maintaining immune response and promoting lymphocyte development,interleukin-2 is secreted by activated T cell or NK cell and has been extensively applied to clinical therapy and laboratory research. This paper is maily about the anti-tumor mechanism of interleukin-2 and its application in the treatment of patients with acute myelogenous leukemia.

  1. HLA-DRB1基因多态性与急性淋巴细胞白血病和慢性髓性白血病易感性关联的研究%Association between HLA-DRB1 allele polymorphism and susceptibility to acute lymphoblastic leukemia and chronic myelogenous leukemia in Chinese Han

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹孟德; 陈宗德; 苏堤; 秦东春; 岳保红; 苏天水; 燕桂香; 盛光耀

    2001-01-01

    目的探讨急性淋巴细胞白血病(ALL)和慢性髓性白血病(CML)易感性与HLA-DRB1基因多态性之间的关联性,找出急性淋巴细胞白血病和慢性髓性白血病的易感基因。方法采用序列特异性引物聚合酶链反应(PCR-SSP)DNA分型技术对56例ALL患者、48例CML患者和105例健康对照进行了HLA-DRB1基因分型。结果 ALL患者组与HLA-DR7基因关联,基因频率为24.1%,RR =2.56,χ2=7.34,P<0.01;CML患者组与HLA-DR4基因关联,基因频率为22.9%,RR =5.076,χ2=17.88,P<0.01;其他等位基因频率在实验组与对照组间差异无显著性。结论提示在河南汉族人群中,HLA-DR7与ALL有关联,HLA-DR4与CML有关联。%Objective To explore the possible association between HLA-DRB1 allele polymorphism and susceptibility to acute lymphoblastic leukemia(ALL) as well as chronic myelogenous leukemia(CML) in Chinese He′nan Han People and to find the predisposing genes of ALL and CML. Methods 105 normal people and 56 ALL patients and 48 CML patients of He′nan Han nationality were tested for HLA-DRB1 by polymerase chain reaction with sequence specific primers(PCR-SSP). Results Compared with normal controls, the frequency of HLA-DR7 was significantly increased in ALL group with a relative risk (RR) as 2.56 (χ2 =7.34, P<0.01) and with an etiological fraction (EF) as 0.29; the frequencies of other DRB1 alleles were not significantly increased in the ALL group. The frequency of HLA-DR4 was significantly increased in CML patient group, with a relative risk (RR) as 5.076 (χ2=17.88, P<0.01) and with an etiological fraction (EF) as 0.18, while the frequencies of other DRB1 alleles were not significantly increased in CML group. Conclusion These results showed that susceptibility to ALL is positively related to HLA-DR7 gene and susceptibility to CML is strongly correlated with HLA-DR4 gene.

  2. Decitabine, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-20

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Reduced intensity conditioning is superior to nonmyeloablative conditioning for older chronic myelogenous leukemia patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplant during the tyrosine kinase inhibitor era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warlick, Erica; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Pedersen, Tanya L;

    2012-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and reduced intensity conditioning (RIC)/nonmyeloablative (NMA) conditioning hematopoietic cell transplants (HCTs) have changed the therapeutic strategy for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients. We analyzed post-HCT outcomes of 306 CML patients reported to...

  4. Occurrence of chronic lymphocytic leukemia in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacharyya, Pritish K

    2013-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common leukemia of adults in the western world and constitutes about 33% of all leukemia′s. The incidence of CLL increases with age and are more common in older population. Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) on the contrary occurs in both young adults and elderly and is a chronic myeloproliferative disease that originates from abnormal pluripotent stem cells and results in involvement of multiple hematopoietic lineages, but predominantly myeloid and ...

  5. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  6. Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  7. T-lineage blast crisis of chronic myelogenous leukemia: simple record of 4 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartika W. Taroeno-Hariadi

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Blast crisis (BC transformation in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML can involve each differentiation lineage of the hematopoietic system, i.e. granulocyte, monocyte, erythrocyte, megakaryocyte, and lymphocyte lineage. The lymphoid blast crisis (BC leukemia cells usually belong to B-lineage, commonly having the phenotype of Pre-B stage of the B-lineage, in which cell-surface immunoglobulin (sIg is not yet expressed. In contrast, T-lineage BC of CML is extremely rare. The objective of this study is to describe the fenotype, fusion transcript of bcr-abl, TdT, and cytoplasmic CD3 in T-lineage BC CML cases. Case report study. This report shows a simple summary of 4 cases of T-lineage BC of CML which have been collected in the phenotypic and genotypic analysis study for 17 years (1987-2004. In all cases, the chromosomal analysis revealed the presence of t(9;22(q34;q11 at presentation. Cell surface analysis were done at diagnosis. Cases’ mononuclear cells stored as 10% DMSO were retrieved to be performed reverse transcription (RT PCR BCR-ABL multiplex to demonstrate the presence of the fusion transcript of bcr-abl. RT-PCR was also performed for detecting the expression of cytoplasmic CD3ε and terminal deoxynucleotydil transferase (TdT. The results of cell surface antigen (CSA at presentation showed that 1 case was CD7+, CD5-, and CD2-; 1 case CD7+, CD5+, and CD2-; and 2 cases CD7+, CD5+ and CD2+ indicating that all these T-lineage BC of CML cells show the phenotype of pre-(pro- thymic stage phenotype. In the present study, two cases showed b2a2, one e1a2, and one negative bcr-abl transcript. The RT-PCR revealed the presence of CD3ε mRNA in all cases, and TdT mRNA in only one case. These results can constitute a basis for the future analysis of T-lineage BC of CML from now on. (Med J Indones 2005; 14: 184-9Keywords: chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML, blastic crisis (BC, T-lineage, bcr-abl fusion gene, CDε, TdT

  8. Lapatinib induces autophagy, apoptosis and megakaryocytic differentiation in chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huey-Lan Huang

    Full Text Available Lapatinib is an oral, small-molecule, dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR, or ErbB/Her in solid tumors. Little is known about the effect of lapatinib on leukemia. Using human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML K562 cells as an experimental model, we found that lapatinib simultaneously induced morphological changes resembling apoptosis, autophagy, and megakaryocytic differentiation. Lapatinib-induced apoptosis was accompanied by a decrease in mitochondrial transmembrane potential and was attenuated by the pancaspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk, indicating a mitochondria-mediated and caspase-dependent pathway. Lapatinib-induced autophagic cell death was verified by LC3-II conversion, and upregulation of Beclin-1. Further, autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine as well as autophagy-related proteins Beclin-1 (ATG6, ATG7, and ATG5 shRNA knockdown rescued the cells from lapatinib-induced growth inhibition. A moderate number of lapatinib-treated K562 cells exhibited features of megakaryocytic differentiation. In summary, lapatinib inhibited viability and induced multiple cellular events including apoptosis, autophagic cell death, and megakaryocytic differentiation in human CML K562 cells. This distinct activity of lapatinib against CML cells suggests potential for lapatinib as a therapeutic agent for treatment of CML. Further validation of lapatinib activity in vivo is warranted.

  9. Overexpression of P-glycoprotein induces acquired resistance to imatinib in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing-Xiang Peng; Amit K. Tiwari; Hsiang-Chun Wu; Zhe-Sheng Chen

    2012-01-01

    Imatinib,a breakpoint cluster region (BCR)-Abelson murine leukemia (ABL) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI),has revolutionized the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML).However,development of multidrug resistance(MDR) limits the use of imatinib.In the present study,we aimed to investigate the mechanisms of cellular resistance to imatinib in CML.Therefore,we established an imatinib-resistant human CML cell line (K562-imatinib) through a stepwise selection process.While characterizing the phenotype of these cells,we found that K562-imatinib cells were 124.6-fold more resistant to imatinib than parental K562 cells.In addition,these cells were cross-resistant to second- and third-generation BCR-ABL TKIs.Western blot analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR) demonstrated that P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and MDR1 mRNA levels were increased in K562-imatinib cells.In addition,accumulation of [14C]6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) was decreased,whereas the ATP-dependent efflux of [14C] 6-MP and [3H]methotrexate transport were increased in K562-imatinib cells.These data suggest that the overexpression of P-gp may play a crucial role in acquired resistance to imatinib in CML K562-imatinib cells.

  10. Decitabine and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Histological and In Vivo Microscopic Analysis of the Bone Marrow Microenvironment in a Murine Model of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissenberger, Eva S; Krause, Daniela S

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of the leukemic bone marrow microenvironment, also called the leukemic bone marrow niche, is an essential method to determine and to evaluate the progression of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and other leukemias in murine models. In this chapter we introduce the murine model of CML primarily used in our laboratory by describing blood and bone marrow analysis as well as the method of histological sectioning and immunohistochemistry in combination with various stainings that can help to understand the complex interaction between leukemic cells, their normal hematopoietic counterparts, and the bone marrow microenvironment. We conclude with describing how to image the bone marrow niche using in vivo microscopy. PMID:27581139

  12. General Information about Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  13. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  14. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  15. General Information about Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  16. Stages of Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  17. Stages of Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  18. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  19. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  20. Acute lymphocytic Leukemia masquerading as acute osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two children each developed a focal destructive bone lesion accompanied by intermittent fever, swelling, tenderness and elevated ESR. Blood counts were normal; bone marrow aspiration showed acute leukemia. The bone lesions healed in both patients after anti-leukemic therapy. We suggest that the similar roentgenographic appearance of osteomyelitis, bone infarction and focal destructive lesions in leukemia probably reflects a common, basically ischemic process of bone. (orig.)

  1. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-24

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  2. Leukemia Stem Cells and Human Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Bernt, Kathrin M.; Armstrong, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    Leukemias and other cancers have been proposed to contain a subpopulation of cells that display characteristics of stem cells, and which maintain tumor growth. That most anti-cancer therapy is directed against the bulk of the tumor, and possibly spares the cancer stem cells, may lie at the heart of treatment failures with conventional modalities. Leukemia stem cells are fairly well described for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but their existence and relevance for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (...

  3. Polyradiculoneuritis revealing an acute monoblastic leukemia 5

    OpenAIRE

    Wafa Allam; Hassan Errihani; Yahya Hsaini

    2010-01-01

    Acute polyradiculoneuritis has been frequently reported in association with malignant disorders, especially those of the lymphoid system. To date, there have been no reported cases of acute monoblastic leukemia associated with this polyradiculopathy. The authors tell us about a very rare case of leukemia presenting as acute monoblastic leukemia 5 (AML5) in a 28 years old patient from Morroco

  4. Immunoglobulin D Multiple Myeloma, Plasma Cell Leukemia and Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in a Single Patient Treated Simultaneously with Lenalidomide, Bortezomib, Dexamethasone and Imatinib

    OpenAIRE

    Naveed Ali; Pickens, Peter V.; Auerbach, Herbert E.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a neoplastic lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by uncontrolled monoclonal plasma cell proliferation. Among different isotypes of MM, immunoglobulin D (IgD) MM is very rare, representing only 1 to 2% of all isotypes. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a neoplastic myeloproliferative disorder of pluripotent hematopoietic stem cell, which is characterized by the uncontrolled proliferation of myeloid cells. An 88-year-old male was diagnosed simultaneously with...

  5. Total Body Irradiation for Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Su Mi; Choi, Ihl Bohng; Kang, Ki Mun; Kim, In Ah; Shinn, Kyung Sub; Kim, Choon Choo; Kim, Dong Jip [Catholic University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-06-15

    Between July 1987 and December 1992, we treated 22 patients with chromic myelogenous leukemia; 14 in the chronic phase and 8 with more advanced disease. All were received with allogeneic bone marrow transplantation from HLA-identical sibling donors after a total body irradiation (TBI) cyclophosphamide conditioning regimen. Patients were non-randomly assigned to either 1200 cGy/6 fractions/3 days (6 patients) or 1320 cGy/8 fractions/4 days (16 patients) by dose of TBI. Of the 22 patients, 8 were prepared with cyclophosphamide alone, 14 were conditioned with additional adriamycin or daunorubicin. To prevent graft versus host disease, cyclosporine was given either alone or in conjunction with methotrexate. The actuarial survival and leukemic-free survival at four years were 58.5% and 41.2%, respectively, and the relapse rate was 36% among 22 patients. There was a statistically significant difference in survival between the patients in chronic phase and more advanced phase (76% vs 33%, p=0.05). The relapse rate of patients receiving splenectomy was higher than that of patients receiving splenic irradiation (50% vs 0%, p=0.04). We conclude that the probability of cure is highest if transplantation is performed while the patient remains in the chronic phase.

  6. Acute leukemia in early childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Emerenciano

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemia in early childhood is biologically and clinically distinct. The particular characteristics of this malignancy diagnosed during the first months of life have provided remarkable insights into the etiology of the disease. The pro-B, CD10 negative immunophenotype is typically found in infant acute leukemia, and the most common genetic alterations are the rearrangements of the MLL gene. In addition, the TEL/AML1 fusion gene is most frequently found in children older than 24 months. A molecular study on a Brazilian cohort (age range 0-23 months has detected TEL/AML1+ve (N = 9, E2A/PBX1+ve (N = 4, PML/RARA+ve (N = 4, and AML1/ETO+ve (N = 2 cases. Undoubtedly, the great majority of genetic events occurring in these patients arise prenatally. The environmental exposure to damaging agents that give rise to genetic changes prenatally may be accurately determined in infants since the window of exposure is limited and known. Several studies have shown maternal exposures that may give rise to leukemogenic changes. The Brazilian Collaborative Study Group of Infant Acute Leukemia has found that mothers exposed to dipyrone, pesticides and hormones had an increased chance to give birth to babies with infant acute leukemia [OR = 1.48 (95%CI = 1.05-2.07, OR = 2.27 (95%CI = 1.56-3.31 and OR = 9.08 (95%CI = 2.95-27.96], respectively. This review aims to summarize recent clues that have facilitated the elucidation of the biology of early childhood leukemias, with emphasis on infant acute leukemia in the Brazilian population.

  7. High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-19

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. FR901228 in Treating Children With Refractory or Recurrent Solid Tumors or Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Choroid Plexus Tumor; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Craniopharyngioma; Childhood Grade I Meningioma; Childhood Grade II Meningioma; Childhood Grade III Meningioma; Childhood High-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Infratentorial Ependymoma; Childhood Low-grade Cerebral Astrocytoma; Childhood Spinal Cord Neoplasm; Childhood Supratentorial Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  9. The pharmacokinetics of subcutaneous cytosine arabinoside in patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Slevin, M L; Piall, E M; Aherne, G.W.; Johnston, A.; Sweatman, M C; Lister, T. A.

    1981-01-01

    1 The pharmacokinetics of subcutaneous cytosine arabinoside were compared with bolus intravenous injection and intravenous infusion in five patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia. 2 Subcutaneous cytosine arabinoside was rapidly absorbed and then declined biexponentially with initial and terminal half-lives similar to intravenous bolus injection. 3 Cytosine arabinoside levels declined rapidly after intravenous bolus and subcutaneous bolus injection, and fell below steady state infusion leve...

  10. Revealing stiffening and brittling of chronic myelogenous leukemia hematopoietic primary cells through their temporal response to shear stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laperrousaz, B.; Berguiga, L.; Nicolini, F. E.; Martinez-Torres, C.; Arneodo, A.; Maguer Satta, V.; Argoul, F.

    2016-06-01

    Cancer cell transformation is often accompanied by a modification of their viscoelastic properties. When capturing the stress-to-strain response of primary chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells, from two data sets of CD34+ hematopoietic cells isolated from healthy and leukemic bone marrows, we show that the mean shear relaxation modulus increases upon cancer transformation. This stiffening of the cells comes along with local rupture events, detected as reinforced sharp local maxima of this modulus, suggesting that these cancer cells respond to a local mechanical stress by a cascade of local brittle failure events.

  11. Physiological measurements corroborate symptomatic improvement after therapeutic leukapheresis in a pregnant woman with chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galera, Pallavi; Haynes, Stefanie; Sulmasy, Paula; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Greene, Mindy; Vauthrin, Michelle; Brettler, Doreen; Liebmann, James; Mark Madison, J; Weinstein, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Therapeutic leukapheresis can control the white blood cell count (WBC) of pregnant women with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) who have hyperleukocytosis without leukostasis. The medical justification for this treatment has not been objectively documented. We report a 27-year-old woman, diagnosed with CML at 10-week gestation, who developed severe dyspnea on exertion. A workup that included chest CT and echocardiography with a bubble study detected no cardiopulmonary pathology to explain her symptoms, and thus she was referred for leukapheresis. Prior to her first leukapheresis, which lowered her WBC from 154 × 10(3) /μL to 133 × 10(3) /μL, her oxygen saturation (SpO2 ) on room air decreased from 98 to 93% during 100 feet of slow ambulation and she was dyspneic. Just after the leukapheresis, her dyspnea on exertion was much improved and her SpO2 remained at 98% with repeat ambulation. Spirometry and lung volume studies obtained before and after her first leukapheresis demonstrated 32 and 31% improvements in forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 s respectively, a 25% increase in functional residual capacity, and a 142% improvement in expiratory reserve volume. Residual volume decreased by almost 20%. Three times in a week, leukapheresis was continued until her WBC was controlled with interferon α-2b approximately 4 weeks later. Her dyspnea had completely resolved. She gave birth by elective caesarean section to a healthy boy at 32 weeks. Corroboration of symptom relief by leukapheresis with physiological data may justify such treatment in pregnant patients with CML. J. Clin. Apheresis 31:393-397, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26053950

  12. Clonal evolution in Ph{prime}-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia in blast crisis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, J.H.; Gebre, W.; Kalavar, M. [Nassau City Medical Center, E. Meadow, NY (United States)]|[State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, New York (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) usually transforms into accelerated and/or blastic phases (ABP) in 2 to 6 years, and patients with CML often succumb to the disease with cytogenetic evolvement. This 43-year-old man was know for his CML for the last 6 years. He experienced clinical deterioration with massive splenomegaly and granulocytic sarcoma in the enlarged axillary lymph nodes. The white blood cell count was 132.2 x 10{sup 9}/L with 14% basophils and less than 5% myeloblasts in the blood and the marrow. The peripheral blood disclosed 46,XY,t(9;22)(q34;q11)[9]/48,XY,+8,t(9;22)(q34;q11),+22q{sup -}[11]. He was treated accordingly and succumbed to the disease 6 months later. In CML, the Ph{prime}-positive finding is present in about 95% of the patients. The remaining Ph{prime}-negative ones are either bcr-positive or bcr-negative. This group may comprise heterogenous myeloid disorders and shows more often RAS gene mutations than {open_quotes}classic{close_quotes} CML. The common chromosomal abnormalities seen in ABP are an additional Ph{prime} chromosome, trisomy 8, isochrosome 17 and trisomy 19. Some 15-35% of patients in ABP show only Ph{prime} without additional mutation. Although overall survival is grim, patients with CML in ABP with additional chromosomal changes, regardless of the blastic natures, fare worse than those without. The presence of clonal evolution at the onset of ABP denotes clinical and hematologic deterioration and adversely effects patient`s survival.

  13. 混合造血干细胞移植联合DLI-IL-2治疗急性髓性白血病的疗效%Efficacy of mixed hematopoietic stem cell transplantation combined with donor lymphocyte infusion and IL-2 in treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王存邦; 白海; 葸瑞; 潘耀柱; 张茜; 周进茂; 吴涛; 徐淑芬

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨急性髓性白血病(acute myelogenous leukemia,AML)患者采用自体外周血干细胞混合HLA半相合异体骨髓移植(autologous peripheral blood stem cell mixed with HLA haploidentieai allogeneic bone marrow transplantation,Mixed-HSCT)联合供体淋巴细胞输注+白介素2(donor lymphocyte infusion combined interleukin-2,DLI-IL-2)治疗的疗效.方法:采用联合治疗方案的试验组23例AML患者中男性15例、女性8例,中位年龄22(17~41)岁;采用单纯移植治疗的对照组14例AML患者中男性10例、女性4例,中位年龄21(19~4JD)岁.两组患者在完全缓解期采用TBI+VEMAC方案预处理,对照组患者接受单纯Mixed-HSCT移植,试验组患者接受Mixed-HSCT且造血重建后继续DLI-1L-2治疗1~8次;各组在治疗前后进行染色体核型分析及骨髓检查.随访时间>3年.结果:两组患者均获得造咀重建,无移植物抗宿主病(graft-versus-host disease,GVHD)发生.试验组有6例形成混合嵌合体(46XX/46XY),随访显示存活15例,长期无病存活率(disease.free survival,DFS)为65.2%;对照组有3例形成混合嵌合体(46XX/46XY),随访显示存活7例,DFS为50.O%.两组患者治疗后的不良反应(口腔溃疡、出血性膀胱炎、发热等)相似.结论:Mixed-HSCT联合DLI-IL-2治疗对AML患者长期无病生存有积极意义,无严重不良反应.%Objective:To study the efficacy of mixed-HSCT (autologous peripheral blood stem cell mixed with HLA haploidentical allogeneic bone marrow transplantation ) combined with donor lymphocyte infusion plus interleukin-2 (DLI + IL-2) in treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients.Methods: Twenty-three AML patients (15 males and 8 females, median age 22 years) were enrolled in this study as mixed-HSCT combined DLI + IL-2 group, and 14 AML patients ( 10 males and 4 females, median age 21 years) were enrolled as control group.All patients in the two groups received TBI + VEMAC therapy after complete remission, patients

  14. Decitabine With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-14

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Entinostat and Clofarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Relapsed, or Refractory Poor-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Bilineage/Biphenotypic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-16

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  16. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-09

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult L1 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult L2 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  17. An analysis of strategic treatment interruptions during imatinib treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia with imatinib-resistant mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquin, Dana; Sacco, David; Shamshoian, John

    2015-04-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a cancer of the white blood cells that results from increased and uncontrolled growth of myeloid cells in the bone marrow and the accumulation of these cells in the blood. The most common form of treatment for CML is imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Although imatinib is an effective treatment for CML and most patients treated with imatinib do attain some form of remission, imatinib does not completely eradicate all leukemia cells, and if treatment is stopped, all patients eventually relapse (Cortes, 2005). In Kim (2008), the authors developed a mathematical model for the dynamics of CML under imatinib treatment that incorporates the anti-leukemia immune response, and in Paquin (2011), the authors used this mathematical model to study strategic treatment interruptions as a potential therapeutic strategy for CML patients. Although the authors presented the results of several numerical simulations in Paquin (2011), the studies in that work did not include the possibility of imatinib-resistant mutations or an initial population of imatinib-resistant leukemia cells. As resistance is a significant consideration in any drug treatment, it is important to study the efficacy of the strategic treatment interruption plan in the presence of imatinib resistance. In this work, we modify the delay differential equations model of Kim (2008), Paquin (2011) to include the possibility of imatinib resistance, and we analyze strategic treatment interruptions as a potential therapeutic tool in the case of patients with imatinib-resistance leukemia cells.

  18. Alemtuzumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-20

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  19. Combination Chemotherapy and Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Children With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-07

    L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Non-T, Non-B Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  20. Nivolumab and Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-25

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  1. Studying Biomarkers in Samples From Younger Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Other Myeloid Malignancies; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4)

  2. Epidemiology of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the etiology of acute leukemia is largely unknown, some facets of the puzzle are becoming clarified. Recognition of important patterns in age-specific mortality rates has suggested that events early in life, perhaps even prenatally, may have an influence on developing leukemia in childhood. The racial differences evident in mortality, incidence, and immunologic subtype of ALL suggest either differences in exposures to certain factors or differences in responses to those factors by white children. Hereditary factors appear to play a role. Familial and hereditary conditions exist that have high incidences of acute leukemia. Chromosomal anomalies are common in these conditions. Viral infections may play a role by contributing to alteration in genetic material through incorporation of the viral genome. How that virus is dealt with after primary infection seems important. The presence of immunodeficiency may allow wider dissemination or enhanced replication of such viruses, thereby increasing the likelihood of cellular transformation to an abnormal cell. Proliferation of that malignant cell to a clone may depend on other cofactors. Perhaps prolonged exposure to substances like benzene or alkylating agents may enhance these interactions between virus and genetic material. Does this change DNA repair mechanisms. Are viral infections handled differently. Is viral genomic information more easily integrated into host cells. Ionizing radiation has multiple effects. Alteration in genetic material occurs both at the molecular and chromosomal levels. DNA may be altered, lost, or added in the cell's attempt to recover from the injury

  3. Oncogenes, protooncogenes, and tumor suppressor genes in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijiya, N; Gewirtz, A M

    1995-05-01

    In recent years, our understanding of normal human hematopoiesis has expanded greatly. We have increased our knowledge of regulatory growth factors, the receptors through which they act, and the secondary messengers involved in transducing the growth/differentiation signals from the cytoplasmic membrane to the nucleus. This knowledge has revealed potential mechanisms for inducing the neoplastic transformation of hematopoietic cells. This applies in particular to the role of viral oncogenes and cellular protooncogenes and, more recently, to the role of tumor suppressor genes. Protooncogenes are intimately involved in the processes of cell proliferation and differentiation. Therefore, any amplification, mutation, structural alteration, or change in transcriptional regulation of protooncogenes might lead to or be associated with induction of the malignant phenotype. Based on the importance of these genes in leukemogenesis and the maintenance of the malignant phenotype, it seems reasonable to hypothesize that targeted disruption of leukemogenic genes may be of therapeutic value.

  4. Immunoglobulin D multiple myeloma, plasma cell leukemia and chronic myelogenous leukemia in a single patient treated simultaneously with lenalidomide, bortezomib, dexamethasone and imatinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed Ali

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma (MM is a neoplastic lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by uncontrolled monoclonal plasma cell proliferation. Among different isotypes of MM, immunoglobulin D (IgD MM is very rare, representing only 1 to 2% of all isotypes. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML is a neoplastic myeloproliferative disorder of pluripotent hematopoietic stem cell, which is characterized by the uncontrolled proliferation of myeloid cells. An 88-year-old male was diagnosed simultaneously with IgD kappa MM and CML. A distinctive feature in this patient was the progression to plasma cell leukemia without any symptomatic myeloma stage. He was treated simultaneously with lenalidomide, bortezomib and imatinib. Synchronous occurrence of these rare hematological malignancies in a single patient is an exceedingly rare event. Multiple hypotheses to explain co-occurrence of CML and MM have been proposed; however, the exact etiological molecular pathophysiology remains elusive.

  5. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Presenting as Acute Appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherri Rauenzahn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Appendicitis in leukemic patients is uncommon but associated with increased mortality. Additionally, leukemic cell infiltration of the appendix is extremely rare. While appendectomy is the treatment of choice for these patients, diagnosis and management of leukemia have a greater impact on remission and survival. A 59-year-old Caucasian female was admitted to the surgical service with acute right lower quadrant pain, nausea, and anorexia. She was noted to have leukocytosis, anemia, and thrombocytopenia. Abdominal imaging demonstrated appendicitis with retroperitoneal and mesenteric lymphadenopathy for which she underwent laparoscopic appendectomy. Peripheral smear, bone marrow biopsy, and surgical pathology of the appendix demonstrated acute myeloid leukemia (AML with nonsuppurative appendicitis. In the setting of AML, prior cases described the development of appendicitis with active chemotherapy. Of these cases, less than ten patients had leukemic infiltration of the appendix, leading to leukostasis and nonsuppurative appendicitis. Acute appendicitis with leukemic infiltration as the initial manifestation of AML has only been described in two other cases in the literature with an average associated morbidity of 32.6 days. The prompt management in this case of appendicitis and AML resulted in an overall survival of 185 days.

  6. The expression and clinical significance of survivin gene in leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王艳

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of survivin in leukemia and the prognostic significance in acute leukemia(AL). Methods The expression of survivin mRNA was measured in 105 AL and 21 chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients with semi-quantity reverse transcription (RT)-PCR.15 adults were tested as normal

  7. 急性髓细胞白血病细胞来源的树突状细胞的诱导及功能研究%The Induction and Function Study on Dendritic Cells Derived from Blasts from Patients with Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟冬梅; 赵春亭; 吴少玲; 王宝中; 吕振华

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the induction method and function of dendritic cells (DC) derived from acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) blasts in vitro, cytokine-supplemented suspension cultures of leukemia blasts in 25 AML patients were performed. Mononuclear cells were cultured for 8 to 12 days using recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF), recombinant human interleukin-4 (rhIL-4) and recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha(rhTNF-α). Morphology, phenotype, cytogenetics, and function of induced cells were studied. The results showed that after culture for 3 days, cells in 20/25 AML cases demonstrated an increase in size with dendritic morphology. After culture for 8 9 days, the percentage of such cells reached peak. When cultured for 12 days, the total number of cells and the number of cells with DC morphology decreased greatly. Phenotypic analyses of cells (11/20 cases) were measured by flow cytometry before and after culture. Before culture, cells did not express CD1a, CD80 and CD83,while expressed CD54, CD86 and HLA-DR with low frequency. After culture, cells upregulated CD1a, CD80, CD83,CD54, CD86 and HLA-DR significantly. A marked increase of the T-cell stimulatory capacity could be generated in AlloMLRs. FISH confirmed the leukemic origin of generated cells. In conclusion, leukemia-derived DC can be generated from AML blasts using cytokine combination (GM-CSF, IL-4, and TNF-α) in vitro.%为了研究急性髓细胞白血病(AML)细胞诱导成树突状细胞(DC)的方法及其DC的功能,分离25例AML患者骨髓或外周血单个核细胞,在含有细胞因子rhGM-CSF,rhIL-4,rhTNF-α的LMDM完全培养基中培养8-12天,进行细胞形态学、表型、遗传学及功能测定.结果表明:20/25例自诱导培养的第3天起,在倒置显微镜下可观察到部分细胞体积增大,形态由圆形变得不规则,可见驼峰样或细刺状胞浆突起;在第8 9天,该类细胞所占的比例达到峰值.至第12天,细胞总

  8. Inhibitory Effects of Omacetaxine on Leukemic Stem Cells and BCR-ABL-Induced Chronic Myeloid Leukemia and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yaoyu; Hu, Yiguo; Michaels, Shawnya; Segal, David; Brown, Dennis; Li, Shaoguang

    2009-01-01

    Omacetaxine mepesuccinate (formerly homoharringtonine) is a molecule with a mechanism of action that is different from tyrosine kinase inhibitors and its activity in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) seems to be independent of BCR-ABL mutation status. Using BCR-ABL-expressing myelogenous and lymphoid cell lines and mouse models of CML and B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) induced by wild type BCR-ABL or T315I mutant-BCR-ABL, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of omacetaxine on CML and...

  9. Comparative clinical study of Philadelphia chromosome -positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia and lymphoid blast crisis of chronic myelogenous leukemia%Ph+急性淋巴细胞白血病与慢性粒细胞白血病急淋变的比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘延方; 程远东; 王芳; 孟小莉; 董慧; 孙慧; 孙玲; 万鼎铭; 姜中兴; 刘林湘; 陈绍倩; 谢新生

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨Ph染色体阳性急性淋巴细胞白血病(Ph+ ALL)与慢性粒细胞白血病急淋变的临床特点.方法 对21例Ph+ ALL患者及31例慢粒急淋变患者的临床资料进行回顾性对比分析.结果 Ph+ ALL与慢粒急淋变有以下区别:①慢粒急淋变肝脾肿大发生率(80.65%)比Ph+ ALL( 14.28%)高(P<0.05);②起病时慢粒急淋变外周血白细胞数比Ph+ ALL高(P<0.05);③Ph+ ALL完全缓解率(76.19%)比慢粒急淋变(48.39%)高(P<0.05).Ph+ ALL的中位生存期为(10.76±6.91)个月,而慢粒急淋变的中位生存期为(7.06±6.03)个月,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).慢粒急淋变者完全缓解后Ph染色体持续存在,Ph+ ALL患者完全缓解后Ph染色体消失.两组患者年龄、性别、骨髓中原始加幼稚细胞数差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 Ph+ ALL与慢粒急淋变具有不同的临床特点及治疗反应.%Objective To explore the clinical features of patients with Philadelphia chromosome - positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph+ ALL) and with chronic myeloid leukemia in lymphoid blast crisis (CML LBC). Methods Retrospective analysis of the clinical data of 21 cases of Ph+ ALL and 31 cases of CML LBC. Results Comparing with Ph+ ALL patients, CML LBC patients showed following clinical features: ① The incidence of splenomegaly and hepatomegaly (80. 65% ) was higher than that of Ph+ ALL (14. 28% ) ( P 0.05 ). Conclusions Paitents with Ph+ ALL and CML LBC present with different clinical features and therapeutic response.

  10. Veliparib and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-20

    Accelerated Phase of Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Brachial Plexopathy due to Myeloid Sarcoma in a Patient With Acute Myeloid Leukemia After Allogenic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Ha, Yumi; Sung, Duk Hyun; Park, Yoonhong; Kim, Du Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma is a solid, extramedullary tumor comprising of immature myeloid cells. It may occur in any organ; however, the invasion of peripheral nervous system is rare. Herein, we report the case of myeloid sarcoma on the brachial plexus. A 37-year-old woman with acute myelogenous leukemia achieved complete remission after chemotherapy. One year later, she presented right shoulder pain, progressive weakness in the right upper extremity and hypesthesia. Based on magnetic resonance images ...

  12. Ipilimumab and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-12

    Chimerism; Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Recipient; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; RAEB-1; RAEB-2; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Leukemia cutis with lymphoglandular bodies: a clue to acute lymphoblastic leukemia cutis

    OpenAIRE

    Obiozor, Cynthia; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Fraga, Garth R.

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia cutis describes cutaneous lesions produced by infiltrates of leukemic cells. It usually manifests contemporaneously with the initial diagnosis of systemic leukemia, but may also precede or follow systemic leukemia. Most cases are associated with acute myeloid leukemia. Adult B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia cutis is very rare. We report a 59-year-old woman with a history of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapsed with aleukemic lymphoblastic leukemia cutis. Lymphoglandular bodi...

  14. Acute acalculous cholecystitis complicating chemotherapy for acute myeloblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfa Kassar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a rare complication in the treatment of acute myeloblastic leukemia. Diagnosis of acute acalculous cholecystitis remains difficult during neutropenic period. We present two acute myeloblastic leukemia patients that developed acute acalculous cholecystitis during chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. They suffered from fever, vomiting and acute pain in the epigastrium. Ultrasound demonstrated an acalculous gallbladder. Surgical management was required in one patient and conservative treatment was attempted in the other patient. None treatment measures were effective and two patients died. Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a serious complication in neutropenic patients. Earlier diagnosis could have expedited the management of these patients.

  15. Minimal Residual Disease in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ommen, Hans Beier; Nederby, Line; Toft-Petersen, Marie;

    2014-01-01

    This chapter discusses how minimal residual disease (MRD) is detected and managed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. The most commonly used techniques to detect residual leukemia in patients in complete remission (CR) are quantitative PCR (qPCR) and multicolor flow cytometry (MFC). While q...

  16. Cancer Statistics: Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... population data for older age groups are available. Statistics at a Glance Show More At a Glance ... acute lymphocytic leukemia in the United States. Survival Statistics Show More How Many People Survive 5 Years ...

  17. Forced Expression of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 6 Confers Resistance of Pro-B Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia to Gleevec Treatment▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo, Tracy C.; Chavarria-Smith, Joseph E.; Huang, Dan; Schlissel, Mark S.

    2011-01-01

    The gene encoding c-ABL, a nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinase, is involved in a chromosomal translocation resulting in expression of a BCR-Abl fusion protein that causes most chronic myelogenous and some acute lymphocytic leukemias (CML and ALL) in humans. The Abelson murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV) expresses an alternative form of c-Abl, v-Abl, that transforms murine pro-B cells, resulting in acute leukemia and providing an experimental model for human disease. Gleevec (STI571) inhibits the ...

  18. Treatment of marrow stroma with interferon-alpha restores normal beta 1 integrin-dependent adhesion of chronic myelogenous leukemia hematopoietic progenitors. Role of MIP-1 alpha.

    OpenAIRE

    R Bhatia; McGlave, P B; Verfaillie, C M

    1995-01-01

    The mechanisms by which interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) restores normal hematopoiesis in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) are not well understood. We have recently demonstrated that IFN-alpha acts directly on CML hematopoietic progenitors to restore their adhesion to marrow stroma by modulating beta 1 integrin receptor function. In the present study we examined the effect of IFN-alpha treatment of marrow stroma on subsequent adhesion of CML progenitors. Stromal layers were preincubated with IF...

  19. Curcumin inhibits in vitro and in vivo chronic myelogenous leukemia cells growth: a possible role for exosomal disposal of miR-21

    OpenAIRE

    Taverna, S; Giallombardo, M.; Pucci, M; Flugy, A; Manno, M.; Raccosta, S; Rolfo, C.; Leo, G.; Alessandro, R

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are nanosize vesicles released from cancer cells containing microRNAs that can influence gene expression in target cells. Curcumin has been shown to exhibit antitumor activities in a wide spectrum of human cancer. The addition of Curcumin, to Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) cells, caused a dose-dependent increase of PTEN, target of miR-21. Curcumin treatment also decreased AKT phosphorylation and VEGF expression and release. Colony formation assays indicated that Curcumin affects ...

  20. BCR-ABL transcript variations in chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia patients on imatinib first-line: Possible role of the autologous immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, Geoffrey D; Lepoutre, Thomas; Nicolini, Franck E; Levy, Doron

    2016-05-01

    Many chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients in chronic phase who respond well to imatinib therapy show fluctuations in their leukemic loads in the long-term. We developed a mathematical model of CML that incorporates the intervention of an autologous immune response. Our results suggest that the patient's immune system plays a crucial role in imatinib therapy in maintaining disease control over time. The observed BCR-ABL/ABL oscillations in such patients provide a signature of the autologous immune response. PMID:27467931

  1. Childhood central nervous system leukemia: historical perspectives, current therapy, and acute neurological sequelae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laningham, Fred H. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Division of Diagnostic Imaging, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center, Memphis, TN (United States); Kun, Larry E. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center, Memphis, TN (United States); Reddick, Wilburn E.; Ogg, Robert J. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Division of Translational Imaging Research, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); Morris, E.B. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Oncology, Memphis, TN (United States); Pui, Ching-Hon [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Oncology, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2007-11-15

    During the past three decades, improvements in the treatment of childhood leukemia have resulted in high cure rates, particularly for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Unfortunately, successful therapy has come with a price, as significant morbidity can result from neurological affects which harm the brain and spinal cord. The expectation and hope is that chemotherapy, as a primary means of CNS therapy, will result in acceptable disease control with less CNS morbidity than has been observed with combinations of chemotherapy and radiotherapy over the past several decades. In this review we discuss the poignant, historical aspects of CNS leukemia therapy, outline current methods of systemic and CNS leukemia therapy, and present imaging findings we have encountered in childhood leukemia patients with a variety of acute neurological conditions. A major objective of our research is to understand the neuroimaging correlates of acute and chronic effects of cancer and therapy. Specific features related to CNS leukemia and associated short-term toxicities, both disease- and therapy-related, are emphasized in this review with the specific neuroimaging findings. Specific CNS findings are similarly important when treating acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), and details of leukemic involvement and toxicities are also presented in this entity. Despite contemporary treatment approaches which favor the use of chemotherapy (including intrathecal therapy) over radiotherapy in the treatment of CNS leukemia, children still occasionally experience morbid neurotoxicity. Standard neuroimaging is sufficient to identify a variety of neurotoxic sequelae in children, and often suggest specific etiologies. Specific neuroimaging findings frequently indicate a need to alter antileukemia therapy. It is important to appreciate that intrathecal and high doses of systemic chemotherapy are not innocuous and are associated with acute, specific, recognizable, and often serious neurological

  2. Isorhamnetin 3-O-robinobioside from Nitraria retusa leaves enhance antioxidant and antigenotoxic activity in human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K562

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boubaker Jihed

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this report, the isorhamnetin 3-o-robinobioside and its original extract, the ethyl acetate extract, from Nitraria retusa leaves, were evaluated for their ability to induce antioxidant and antigenotoxic effects in human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line. Methods Nitraria retusa products properties were carried out by firstly evaluating their effects against lipid peroxidation induced by H2O2, using the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances species (TBARS assay, and proceeding to the assay of cellular antioxidant activity, then doing the comet assay. Results The isorhamnetin 3-o-robinobioside showed a protective effect against lipid peroxidation induced by H2O2. The same natural compound and ethyl acetate extract inhibited oxidation induced by 2,2′-azobis (2-amidinopropane dihydrochloride in human chronic myelogenous leukemia cells with respectively 50% inhibitory concentration values of 0.225 mg/ml and 0.31 mg/ml, reflecting a significant antioxidant potential. The same two products inhibited the genotoxicity induced by hydroxyl radicals in the same human cell line (by 77.77% at a concentration of 800 μg/ml and by 80.55% at a concentration of 1000 μg/ml respectively. Conclusions The isorhamnetin 3- o-robinobioside and its original extract, the ethyl acetate extract, from Nitraria retusa leaves, have a great antioxidant and antigenotoxic potential on human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K562.

  3. Quantification of BCR-ABL mRNA in Plasma/Serum of Patients with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miwako Narita, Anri Saito, Aya Kojima, Minami Iwabuchi, Naoya Satoh, Takayoshi Uchiyama, Akie Yamahira, Tatsuo Furukawa, Hirohito Sone, Masuhiro Takahashi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantification of tumor-associated mRNA extracted from blood cells/tissues containing tumor cells is used for evaluation of treatment efficacy or residual tumor cell burden in tumors including leukemia. However, this method using tumor cell-containing blood/tissue is difficult to evaluate the whole tumor cell burden in the body. In order to establish an efficient method to evaluate the whole tumor cell burden in the body, we tried to quantify tumor-associated mRNA existing in plasma/serum instead of leukemia cell-containing blood cells in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML and compared the levels of BCR-ABL mRNA between plasma/serum and peripheral blood cells. mRNA of BCR-ABL, WT1 or GAPDH (control molecule was detected by real-time RT-PCR using RNA extracted from plasma/serum of almost all the patients with CML. Copy numbers of BCR-ABL mRNA were significantly correlated between plasma/serum and peripheral blood cells. However, levels of BCR-ABL mRNA extracted from serum were low compared with those extracted with peripheral blood cells. The present findings suggest that although real-time RT-PCR of mRNA existing in plasma/serum could be used for evaluating the whole tumor cell burden in the body, it's required to establish an efficient method to quantify plasma/serum mRNA by nature without degrading during the procedure.

  4. Vorinostat With or Without Isotretinoin in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphoma, or Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-16

    Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  5. Radioimmunotherapy for Treatment of Acute Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodet-Milin, Caroline; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Eugène, Thomas; Guérard, François; Gaschet, Joëlle; Bailly, Clément; Mougin, Marie; Bourgeois, Mickaël; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Chérel, Michel; Chevallier, Patrice

    2016-03-01

    Acute leukemias are characterized by accumulation of immature cells (blasts) and reduced production of healthy hematopoietic elements. According to the lineage origin, two major leukemias can be distinguished: acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL). Although the survival rate for pediatric ALL is close to 90%, half of the young adults with AML or ALL and approximately 90% of older patients with AML or ALL still die of their disease, raising the need for innovative therapeutic approaches. As almost all leukemic blasts express specific surface antigens, targeted immunotherapy appears to be particularly promising. However, published results of immunotherapy alone are generally modest. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) brings additional therapeutic mechanisms using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed to tumor antigens, thus adding radiobiological cytotoxicity to immunologic cytotoxicity. Because of the high radiosensitivity of tumor cells and the diffuse widespread nature of the disease, making it rapidly accessible to circulating radiolabeled mAbs, acute leukemias represent relevant indications for RIT. With the development of recombinant and humanized mAbs, innovative radionuclides, and more efficient radiolabeling and pretargeting techniques, RIT has significantly improved over the last 10 years. Different approaches of α and β RIT targeting CD22, CD33, CD45, or CD66 antigens have already been evaluated or are currently being developed in the treatment of acute leukemia. This review summarizes the preclinical and clinical studies demonstrating the potential of RIT in treatment of AML and ALL. PMID:26897718

  6. Treating refractory leukemias in childhood, role of clofarabine

    OpenAIRE

    Harned, Theresa M.; Gaynon, Paul S.

    2008-01-01

    Approximately 4000 children and adolescents under the age of 20 years develop acute leukemia per year in the US. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common pediatric cancer. Despite impressive improvements in outcome, relapsed ALL is the fourth most common pediatric malignancy. Therapy for relapsed ALL remains unsatisfactory, and the majority of relapse patients still succumb to leukemia. Between one-third and one-half of patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) relapse, and ...

  7. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  8. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and G-CSF in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Blinatumomab and Combination Chemotherapy or Dasatinib, Prednisone, and Blinatumomab in Treating Older Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-05

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  10. Levofloxacin in Preventing Infection in Young Patients With Acute Leukemia Receiving Chemotherapy or Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-08

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Bacterial Infection; Diarrhea; Fungal Infection; Musculoskeletal Complications; Neutropenia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  11. Obatoclax Mesylate, Vincristine Sulfate, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Dexrazoxane Hydrochloride in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphoma, or Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-30

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  12. High-Dose Busulfan and High-Dose Cyclophosphamide Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Multiple Myeloma, or Recurrent Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; De Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent

  13. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  14. Nucleophosmin 1 expression in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Davoudi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nucleophosmin1 is a multifunctional protein that shuttles between nucleus and cytoplasm in some subtypes of acute myeloid leukemias. Mutated Nucleophosmin1 expresses aberrantly in the cytoplasm of the cell and transports from nucleolus to the cytoplasm. It is diagnosed by immunohistochemical techniques, flow cytometry assay and mutational analysis.The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of Nucleophosmin1 mutation on the clinical presentations, prognosis, diagnosis and the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia. Thirteen articles were extracted from PubMed, Google scholar and Scopus in which the Nucleophosmin1 mutation correlated with gingival hyperplasia, high white blood cell count, lymphadenopathy, high platelet count and other signs and symptoms of myelomonocytic and monocytic acute myeloid leukemias. This mutation is a provisional entity in the classification of acute myeloid leukemia, which influences on the prognosis, clinical course and the treatment of some subtypes of acute myeloid leukemias. Nucleophosmin1 mutation has favorable prognostic value in the absence of other concomitant mutations.

  15. What Are the Risk Factors for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... both ALL and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Japanese atomic bomb survivors had a greatly increased risk of developing ... cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. Most cases occur in Japan and the Caribbean area. This disease is not ...

  16. Do We Know What Causes Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topic Can acute myeloid leukemia be prevented? Do we know what causes acute myeloid leukemia? Some people ... genes – the instructions for how our cells function. We tend to look like our parents because they ...

  17. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Cells Contribute to the Stromal Myofibroblasts in Leukemic NOD/SCID Mouse In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke Shirasaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We recently reported that chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML cells converted into myofibroblasts to create a microenvironment for proliferation of CML cells in vitro. To analyze a biological contribution of CML-derived myofibroblasts in vivo, we observed the characters of leukemic nonobese diabetes/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID mouse. Bone marrow nonadherent mononuclear cells as well as human CD45-positive cells obtained from CML patients were injected to the irradiated NOD/SCID mice. When the chimeric BCR-ABL transcript was demonstrated in blood, human CML cells were detected in NOD/SCID murine bone marrow. And CML-derived myofibroblasts composed with the bone marrow-stroma, which produced significant amounts of human vascular endothelial growth factor A. When the parental CML cells were cultured with myofibroblasts separated from CML cell-engrafted NOD/SCID murine bone marrow, CML cells proliferated significantly. These observations indicate that CML cells make an adequate microenvironment for their own proliferation in vivo.

  18. The venom of the spider Macrothele raveni induces apoptosis in the myelogenous leukemia K562 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhonghua; Zhao, Yan; Li, Jing; Xu, Shiyan; Liu, Changjun; Zhu, Yanghui; Liang, Songping

    2012-08-01

    Spider venoms are a rich source of bioactive compounds with therapeutic potential. In traditional Chinese medicine, spiders and spider venoms have been used in the treatment of various ailments. In the present study, the venom of the spider Macrothele raveni potently suppressed cell growth in the myelogenous leukemia K562 cell line in a dose and time-dependent manner with an IC(50) of 5.1 μg/mL. The venom also had a low inhibitory effect on human lymphocytes with an IC(50) of approximately 36.4 μg/mL, indicating that the venom is relatively selective for leukemic cells. Venom treated K562 cells showed typical morphological indicators of apoptosis including condensation of nuclei and fragmentation of DNA. Annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide dual staining further demonstrated that the venom had potent apoptogenic activity. Venom treatment induced caspase 3 and caspase 8 activation in K562 cells and promoted PARP cleavage. The present results indicate that the venom of the spider M. raveni potently and selectively suppresses the growth of K562 cells by inducing apoptosis via caspase 3 and caspase 8 mediated signaling pathways.

  19. Immunological effects of donor lymphocyte infusion in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia relapsing after bone marrow transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castro F.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (alloBMT is the only curative therapy for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML. This success is explained by the delivery of high doses of antineoplastic agents followed by the rescue of marrow function and the induction of graft-versus-leukemia reaction mediated by allogeneic lymphocytes against host tumor cells. This reaction can also be induced by donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI producing remission in most patients with CML who relapse after alloBMT. The immunological mechanisms involved in DLI therapy are poorly understood. We studied five CML patients in the chronic phase, who received DLI after relapsing from an HLA-identical BMT. Using flow cytometry we evaluated cellular activation and apoptosis, NK cytotoxicity, lymphocytes producing cytokines (IL-2, IL-4 and IFN-gamma, and unstimulated (in vivo lymphocyte proliferation. In three CML patients who achieved hematological and/or cytogenetic remission after DLI we observed an increase of the percent of activation markers on T and NK cells (CD3/DR, CD3/CD25 and CD56/DR, of lymphocytes producing IL-2 and IFN-gamma, of NK activity, and of in vivo lymphocyte proliferation. These changes were not observed consistently in two of the five patients who did not achieve complete remission with DLI. The percent of apoptotic markers (Fas, FasL and Bcl-2 on lymphocytes and CD34-positive cells did not change after DLI throughout the different study periods. Taken together, these preliminary results suggest that the therapeutic effect of DLI in the chronic phase of CML is mediated by classic cytotoxic and proliferative events involving T and NK cells but not by the Fas pathway of apoptosis.

  20. Clinical advances in the management of chronic myelogenous leukemia: focus on bosutinib and patient considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sweet K

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Kendra Sweet,1 Javier Pinilla-Ibarz,1 Ling Zhang21Malignant Hematology, 2Hematopathology, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USAAbstract: The treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia has changed significantly over the past 15 years, and as of now, there are five BCR-ABL1 (breakpoint cluster region-Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors that have gained approval for treatment of this disease. All five are very effective drugs, and the decision surrounding which to use in specific patients is based on numerous factors. Bosutinib is one of the newer tyrosine kinase inhibitors to gain approval, and has been studied in the first-line setting as well as after failure of other tyrosine kinase inhibitors. It is an SRC-ABL1 (steroid receptor co-activator-ABL1 inhibitor that works in the presence of most kinase domain mutations. The primary side effects of bosutinib are gastrointestinal upsets. In the appropriate clinical setting, bosutinib can be considered a valuable addition to the armamentarium of treatments available for chronic myeloid leukemia.Keywords: chronic myeloid leukemia, bosutinib, treatment options

  1. Combination of small interfering RNA-directed B cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 oncogene silencing and arsenic using a nanomedicine strategy for the enhanced cytotoxicity of acute myelogenous leukemia in vitro%载小干扰RNA纳米微粒沉默U937细胞B细胞淋巴瘤/白血病-2基因增加砷剂细胞毒效应的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾林涓; 钟淑萍; 李学刚; 林忠; 黄开红; 陈茵婷

    2014-01-01

    目的 观察载小干扰RNA(siRNAs)纳米微粒沉默B细胞淋巴瘤/白血病-2(bcl-2)基因联合纳米砷剂协同抗急性髓性白血病效应.方法 凝胶阻滞电泳、荧光显微镜、流式细胞仪及噻唑蓝(MTT)法分别用于评估正聚乙二醇(PEG)-多聚赖氨酸(PLL)负载siRNAs能力、细胞转染效率及对细胞活力影响,Western blot法观察siRNAs沉默靶基因,MTT法评估siRNAs联合纳米砷剂对U937协同抑制效应.结果 N/P-10时,PEG-PLL和siRNAs基本复合,U937细胞活力为(85.06±5.80)%,转染效率为(83.70±0.37)%,转染后bcl-2蛋白表达下降为(44.1 l±4.39)%.空载体、纯砷单药、纳米As单药及联合用药组细胞活力分别为(99.44±1.45)%、(87.76±2.21)%、(92.98±4.34)%、(67.93±8.16)%(P<0.05)(砷1.25 μmol/L);(99.56±2.53)%、(54.08±4.46)%、(57.85±2.11)%、(38.60±6.24)%(P<0.05)(砷2.50 μmol/L); (98.88±1.59)%、(37.62±1.38)%、(51.31±3.14)%、(28.92±4.97)%(p<0.05)(砷5.00 μmol/L);(97.72±2.55)%、(29.44±4.14)%、(40.18±3.72)%、(20.56±4.97)%(P<0.05)(砷10.00 μmol/L); (96.65±2.03)%、(21.49±1.60)%、(26.34±0.97)%、(15.90±1.70)%(P<0.05)(砷20.00 μmol/L).结论 PEG-PLL对U937细胞毒性较低、转染效率较高,PEG-PLL/siRNAs沉默bel-2联合纳米As获得协同抗白血病效应.%Objective To observed the synergetic inhibitory effects on human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) by nanoparticle-mediated small interfering RNA (siRNAs) and arsenic therapy in vitro.Methods Gel retardation assay,fluorescence microscopy,flow cytometry assay and methyl thiazol tetrazolium (MTT) assay was performed to evaluate siRNAs complexation capacity,transfection efficiency and in-fluence on cell viability of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-poly (L-lysine) (PLL).The down regulation of B cell lymphoma/leukemia-2 (bcl-2) gene expression was comfirmed by Western blotting assay.The MTT assay was further performed to evaluate the synergetic inhibitory

  2. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-29

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. AR-42 and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-21

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Psychological Risk Factors in Acute Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouva M.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Several theoretical models have been occasionally proposed to account for the involvement of psychological factors in cancer genesis. Family environment and relations as well as certain personality traits were correlated to cancer onset. However, little is known in the case of acute leukemia. The present study examined family environment, state-trait anxiety, hostility and the direction of hostility as well as alexithymia in 41 acute leukemia patients and their first degree relatives (70. In accordance with previous findings, the present results showed that family cohesion, conflict and organization as well as guilt, state anxiety and alexithymia were significant risk factors for the development of the disease.

  5. Coexistent chronic myelogenous leukemia with squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx associated with NOD2/CARD15 mutation in a young adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraczek, Marcin; Stembalska, Agnieszka; Karpinski, Pawel; Krecicki, Tomasz

    2016-06-01

    We report the case of a 37-year-old man with human papillomavirus-positive squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx coexisting with chronic myelogenous leukemia. The patient had no history of smoking or alcohol consumption. Within a few months, his rapidly growing tumor was classified as T4aN2cM0. It could be assumed that the rapid increase in the tumor mass, which did not respond positively to treatment, might have been associated with the coexistence of the chronic myelogenous leukemia, which had been found incidentally. Genetic testing revealed the presence of insertion mutation 3020insC within the NOD2 gene, which might be an important genetic predisposing factor, not only for a single tumor such as laryngeal cancer, but also for multiple primary neoplasms. The presence of an NOD2 mutation could significantly worsen the course of the cancer. Therefore, given the relatively high frequency of 3020insC mutations in the general population, it might be reasonable to perform genetic testing on a wider scale for patients with head or neck cancer, particularly in cases that follow an atypical course. It is also worth emphasizing the importance of thorough and periodically repeated laryngeal examinations in patients with chronic leukemia. PMID:27304445

  6. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-10

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission

  7. Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Residual Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Cytarabine Dose for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Lowenberg; T. Pabst; E. Vellenga; W. van Putten; H.C. Schouten; C. Graux; A. Ferrant; P. Sonneveld; B.J. Biemond; A. Gratwohl; G.E. de Greef; L.F. Verdonck; M.R. Schaafsma; M. Gregor; M. Theobald; U. Schanz; J. Maertens; G.J. Ossenkoppele

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cytarabine (ara-C) is an important drug in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). High-dose cytarabine (2000 to 3000 mg per square meter of body-surface area) is toxic but results in higher rates of relapse-free survival than does the conventional dose of 100 to 400 mg per square

  9. Cytarabine dose for acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Löwenberg (Bob); T. Pabst (Thomas); E. Vellenga (Edo); W. van Putten; H.C. Schouten (Harry); C. Graux (Carlos); A. Ferrant (Augustin); P. Sonneveld (Pieter); B.J. Biemond (Bart); A. Gratwohl (Alois); G.E. de Greef (Georgine); L.F. Verdonck (Leo); M.R. Schaafsma (Martijn); M. Gregor (Michael); M. Theobald; U. Schanz (Urs); J. Maertens (Johan); G.J. Ossenkoppele (Gert)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Cytarabine (ara-C) is an important drug in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). High-dose cytarabine (2000 to 3000 mg per square meter of body-surface area) is toxic but results in higher rates of relapse-free survival than does the conventional dose of 100 to 400 m

  10. Use of clofarabine for acute childhood leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Pession

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A Pession, R Masetti, K Kleinschmidt, A MartoniPediatric Oncology and Hematology “Lalla Seràgnoli”, University of Bologna, ItalyAbstract: A second-generation of purine nucleoside analogs, starting with clofarabine, has been developed in the course of the search for new therapeutic agents for acute childhood leukemia, especially for refractory or relapsed disease. Clofarabine is a hybrid of fludarabine and cladribine, and has shown to have antileukemic activity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia as well as in myeloid disorders. As the only new antileukemic chemotherapeutic agent to enter clinical use in the last 10 years, clofarabine was approved as an orphan drug with the primary indication of use in pediatric patients. Toxicity has been tolerable in a heavily pretreated patient population, and clofarabine has been demonstrated to be safe, both as a single agent and in combination therapies. Liver dysfunction has been the most frequently observed adverse event, but this is generally reversible. Numerous Phase I and II trials have recently been conducted, and are still ongoing in an effort to find the optimal role for clofarabine in various treatment strategies. Concomitant use of clofarabine, cytarabine, and etoposide was confirmed to be safe and effective in two independent trials. Based on the promising results when used as a salvage regimen, clofarabine is now being investigated for its potential to become part of frontline protocols.Keywords: clofarabine, pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia, pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

  11. Bilateral breast involvement in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakeem A, Mandakini BT, Asif K, Firdaus, Shagufta RC

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Breast involvement by leukemic infiltration is usually bilateral, but may be unilateral. Clinically patients can present with either single or multiple masses, or with diffuse breast engorgement, with or without nodularity. The affected patients are predominantly young adults. We present a case of an adolescent girl with acute myeloid leukemia having bilateral breast infiltration by leukemic cells.

  12. Molecular Insights in MLL Rearranged Acute Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W. Stam (Ronald)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractAcute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in infants (<1 year of age) is characterized by a high incidence (~80%) of rearrangements of the MLL gene, resistance to several important chemotherapeutic drugs, and a poor treatment outcome. With overall survival rates for infant ALL not exceeding 50%

  13. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-04

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Splenic hemochromatosis incidentally found on Tc-99m MDP bone scan in a chronic myelogenous leukemia patient who received bone marrow transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Byeong Cheol; Seo, Ji Hyoung; Bae, Jin Ho; Jeong, Sin Young; Lee, Jae Tae; Lee, Kyu Bo [School of Medicine, Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-01

    Tc-99m MDP bone scan was performed to evaluate a generalized bone pain in a 24-year-old male chronic myelogenous leukemia patient who received bone marrow transplantation at 7 months ago. The patient had received large amounts of blood transfusion for managing symptoms related to anemia. Bone scan revealed substantial splenic tracer uptake. Magnetic resonance image and laboratory evidence of hemochromatosis suggests that the presence of large quantities of iron in the spleen of this patient may have been responsible for the splenic uptake of the bone scanning agent. The authors report a c ase of splenic hemochromatosis incidentally found on Tc-99m MDP bone scan.

  15. Decreased expression of the amplified mdr1 gene in revertants of multidrug-resistant human myelogenous leukemia K562 occurs without loss of amplified DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Sugimoto, Y.; Roninson, I B; Tsuruo, T.

    1987-01-01

    Amplification and increased expression of the mdr1 gene associated with multidrug resistance in human tumors were found in multidrug-resistant sublines of human myelogenous leukemia K562 selected with vincristine (K562/VCR) or adriamycin (K562/ADM). In two revertant cell lines of K562/ADM, amplification of the mdr1 gene was maintained at the same level as in K562/ADM, but expression of the 4.5-kilobase mdr1 mRNA was greatly decreased, indicating that amplified genes may be inactivated at the ...

  16. Differential effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists on doxorubicin-resistant human myelogenous leukemia (K562/DOX) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, B; Samadi, N; Baradaran, B; Rameshknia, V; Shafiei-Irannejad, V; Majidinia, M; Targhaze, N; Zarghami, N

    2015-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumor cells is still a main obstacle for the chemotherapeutic treatment of cancers. Therefore, identification of safe and effective MDR reversing compounds with minimal adverse side effects is an important approach in the cancer treatment. Studies show that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARs) ligands can inhibit cell growth in many cancers. Here, we investigated the effect of different PPAR agonists include fenofibrate, troglitazone and aleglitazar on doxorubicin-resistant human myelogenous leukemia (K562/DOX) cells. The effects of doxorubicin (DOX) following treatment with PPAR agonists on cell viability were evaluated using MTT assay and the reversal fold (RF) values. Rhodamine123 (Rh123) assays were used to determine P-gp functioning. P-gp mRNA/protein expression was measured by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and western blot analysis after incubation with troglitazone and aleglitazar. Our results showed that troglitazone and aleglitazar significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of DOX and decreased the RF values in K562/DOX cells, however, no such results were found for fenofibrate. Troglitazone and aleglitazar significantly down regulated P-gp expression in K562/DOX cells; in addition, the present study revealed that aleglitazar elevated intracellular accumulation of Rh123in K562/DOX cells as short-term effects, which also contribute to the reversal of MDR. These findings show that troglitazone and especially aleglitazar exhibited potent effects in the reversal of P-gp-mediated MDR, suggesting that these compounds may be effective for combination therapy strategies and circumventing MDR in K562/DOX cells to other conventional chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:26718439

  17. Curcumin synergistically augments bcr/abl phosphorethieate antisense oligonucleotides to inhibit growth of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun-zhong ZHANG; Jian-hua XU; Xiu-wang HUANG; Li-xian WU; Yu SU; Yuan-zhong CHEN

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the growth inhibition effect of the combination of bcr/abl phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotides (PS-ASODN) and curcumin (cur), and the possible mechanisms of cur on the chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K562. Methods: The K562 cell line was used as a P210bcr/abl-positive cell model in vitro and was exposed to different concentrations of PS-ASODN (0-20 μmol/L), cur (0-20 μmol/L), or a combination of both. Growth inhibition and apoptosis of K562 cells were assessed by MTT assay and AO/EB fluorescent staining, respec-tively. The expression levels of P210bct/abl, NF-κB and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) were assessed by Western blot. Results: Exposure to cur (5-20 μmol/L) and PS-ASODN (5-20 μmol/L) resulted in a synergistic inhibitory effect on cell growth.Growth inhibition was associated with the inhibition of the proliferation and in-duction of apoptosis. Western blot analysis showed that the drugs synergisti-cally downregulated the level of P210bcr/abl and NF-κB. Cur downregulated Hsp90,whereas no synergism was observed when cur was combined with PS-ASODN.Conclusion: PS-ASODN and cur exhibited a synergistic inhibitory effect on the cell growth of K562. The synergistic growth inhibition was mediated through different mechanisms that involved the inhibition of P210bcr/abl.

  18. Relationship between serum cholesterol and low dense lipoprotein receptor activity of patients with acute myelogenous leukemia%急性髓性白血病患者血清胆固醇水平变化 与低密度脂蛋白受体活性的关系研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李蔚; 彭军; 张茂宏; 徐松德

    2001-01-01

    测定了52例初发未治急性髓性白血病(AML)患者血清胆固醇浓度及其外周血白血病细胞对125I-低密度脂蛋白(125I-LDL)的降解率,结果显示两者呈负相关,白细胞数及125I-LDL降解率较高者血清胆固醇浓度较低,化疗后,随着外周血白血病细胞消失,血清胆固醇及LDL胆固醇水平升高。据此推测AML患者的低胆固醇血症可能归因于白血病细胞的LDL受体活性增高,白血病细胞对LDL的高摄取及降解为利用LDL作为化疗药物的载体靶向治疗白血病提供了新思路。%The serum cholesterol concentration and the rates of degradationof 125 I-low density lipoprotein(125I-LDL)by isolated leukemic cells of 52 patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia at diagnosis were assayed.The results showed that the lowest serum cholesterol concentrations were found in the patients with very high rates of cellular degradation of 125 I-LDL.After chemotherapy,both LDL cholesterol and total serum cholesterol levels rosed concomitantly with the fall in white blood cell counts.This suggests that a high receptor-mediated uptake and degradation of LDL by the leukemic cells may be the cause of hypocholesterolaemia in acute myeloblastic leukemia.LDL-receptor activity in leukemic cells may provide a basis for therapeutic approaches.

  19. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, C; Hofmann, Julian; Burmeister, T;

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) gene are associated with high-risk infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. We used long-distance inverse-polymerase chain reaction to characterize the chromosomal rearrangement of individual acute leukemia ...

  20. Caspofungin Acetate or Fluconazole in Preventing Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-23

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Fungal Infection; Neutropenia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  1. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzbieta Gocek

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA, which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17(q22;q12 chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS. Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML.

  2. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gocek, Elzbieta; Marcinkowska, Ewa, E-mail: ema@cs.uni.wroc.pl [Department of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, ul Tamka 2, Wroclaw 50-137 (Poland)

    2011-05-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17)(q22;q12) chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D) is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs) which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML.

  3. Identification of de Novo Fanconi Anemia in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-13

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Fanconi Anemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  4. Targeting MTHFD2 in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikman, Yana; Puissant, Alexandre; Alexe, Gabriela; Furman, Andrew; Chen, Liying M; Frumm, Stacey M; Ross, Linda; Fenouille, Nina; Bassil, Christopher F; Lewis, Caroline A; Ramos, Azucena; Gould, Joshua; Stone, Richard M; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Galinsky, Ilene; Clish, Clary B; Kung, Andrew L; Hemann, Michael T; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Banerji, Versha; Stegmaier, Kimberly

    2016-06-27

    Drugs targeting metabolism have formed the backbone of therapy for some cancers. We sought to identify new such targets in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The one-carbon folate pathway, specifically methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase-cyclohydrolase 2 (MTHFD2), emerged as a top candidate in our analyses. MTHFD2 is the most differentially expressed metabolic enzyme in cancer versus normal cells. Knockdown of MTHFD2 in AML cells decreased growth, induced differentiation, and impaired colony formation in primary AML blasts. In human xenograft and MLL-AF9 mouse leukemia models, MTHFD2 suppression decreased leukemia burden and prolonged survival. Based upon primary patient AML data and functional genomic screening, we determined that FLT3-ITD is a biomarker of response to MTHFD2 suppression. Mechanistically, MYC regulates the expression of MTHFD2, and MTHFD2 knockdown suppresses the TCA cycle. This study supports the therapeutic targeting of MTHFD2 in AML. PMID:27325891

  5. An Adult Male Presenting with Concurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma Involving a CCND1-IGH Translocation and Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia with a Variant (9;22) Translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Peter M; Siangchin, Ken; Song, Sophie; Shabsovich, David; Naeini, Yalda; Tirado, Carlos A

    2016-01-01

    The t(11;14)(q13;q32) involving IGH and CCND1 a nd t(9;22) (q34;q11.2) involving BCR and ABL1 are common abnormalities in plasma cell myeloma (PCM) and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), respectively. However, the concurrence of the two malignancies is extremely rare. Herein, we present a case of an 87-year-old male who presented with anemia and monocytosis. FISH studies on a bone marrow sample enriched for plasma cells detected a t(11;14) positive for IGH and CCND1 fusion in 92% of nuclei. However, cytogenetic analysis of the bone marrow revealed a t(9;22)(q34;q11.2) in 40% of the metaphases. Interphase and metaphase FISH studies on the sample confirmed the presence of the BCR-ABL1 fusion in 88% of nuclei but did not show any signals corresponding to the derivative 9, suggesting a variant t(9;22) with a deletion or additional material of unknown origin at the 9q34 band of the derivative 9 and a derivative 22 bearing the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene. The concurrence of plasma cell myeloma and chronic myelogenous leukemia is extremely rare with less than 20 cases reported. The molecular pathway in which the multiple malignancies arise is still poorly understood, and this case provides insight into the concurrence of PCM and CML. PMID:27584682

  6. Lithium Carbonate and Tretinoin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Targeting etoposide to acute myelogenous leukaemia cells using nanostructured lipid carriers coated with transferrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajavinia, Amir; Varshosaz, Jaleh; Jafarian Dehkordi, Abbas

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the diverse properties of transferrin (Tf)-conjugated nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) prepared using three different fatty amines, including stearylamine (SA), dodecylamine (DA) and spermine (SP), and two different methods for Tf coupling. Etoposide-loaded NLCs were prepared by an emulsion-solvent evaporation method followed by probe sonication. Chemical coupling of NLCs with Tf was mediated by an amide linkage between the surface-exposed amino group of the fatty amine and the carboxyl group of the protein. The physical coating was performed in a Ringer-Hepes buffer medium. NLCs were characterized by their particle size, zeta potential, polydispersity index, drug entrapment percentage, drug release profiles and Tf-coupling efficiency. The cytotoxicity of NLCs on K562 acute myelogenous leukaemia cells was studied by MTT assay, and their cellular uptake was studied by a flow cytometry method. SA-containing NLCs showed the lowest particle size, the highest zeta potential and the largest coupling efficiency values. The drug entrapment percentage and the zeta potential decreased after Tf coupling, but the average particle size increased. SP-containing formulations released their drug contents comparatively slower than SA- or DA-containing NLCs. Unconjugated NLCs released moderately more drug than Tf-NLCs. Flow cytometry studies revealed enhanced cellular uptake of Tf-NLCs compared to unconjugated ones. Blocking Tf receptors resulted in a significantly higher cell survival rate for Tf-NLCs. The highest cytotoxic activity was observed in the chemically coupled SA-containing nanoparticles, with an IC50 value of 15-fold lower than free etoposide.

  8. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliusson, Gunnar; Hough, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    Leukemias are a group of life threatening malignant disorders of the blood and bone marrow. In the adolescent and young adult (AYA) population, the acute leukemias are most prevalent, with chronic myeloid leukemia being infrequently seen. Factors associated with more aggressive disease biology tend to increase in frequency with increasing age, whilst tolerability of treatment strategies decreases. There are also challenges regarding the effective delivery of therapy specific to the AYA group, consequences on the unique psychosocial needs of this age group, including compliance. This chapter reviews the current status of epidemiology, pathophysiology, treatment strategies and outcomes of AYA leukemia, with a focus on acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27595359

  10. Frank hematuria as the presentation feature of acute leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suriya Owais

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Muco-cutaneous bleeding is a common presenting feature of acute leukemias. Mucosal bleeding usually manifests as gum bleeding and/or epistaxis but may occur in any mucosal surface of the body. Hematuria as an isolated or main presenting feature of acute leukemia is rare. We describe two cases of acute leukemia, a 19 year old male with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and a 52 year old male with acute myeloid leukemia, both presenting with gross hematuria. There was no demonstrable leukemic infiltration of the urinary tract on imaging studies. Hematuria in these patients was likely to be due to occult leukemic infiltration of the urinary system, aggravated by thrombocytopenia, as it subsided after starting chemotherapy. Our cases highlight that hematuria should be remembered as a rare presenting feature of acute leukemia.

  11. Pathogenesis and prognostication in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Zuckerman, Tsila; Rowe, Jacob M.

    2014-01-01

    The process of lymphoid maturation is tightly controlled by the hierarchical activation of transcription factors and selection through functional signal transduction. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) represents a group of B/T-precursor-stage lymphoid cell malignancies arising from genetic alterations that block lymphoid differentiation and drive aberrant cell proliferation and survival. With recent advances in next-generation sequencing, we are discovering new mutations affecting normal lym...

  12. Use of clofarabine for acute childhood leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Masetti, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    A Pession, R Masetti, K Kleinschmidt, A MartoniPediatric Oncology and Hematology “Lalla Seràgnoli”, University of Bologna, ItalyAbstract: A second-generation of purine nucleoside analogs, starting with clofarabine, has been developed in the course of the search for new therapeutic agents for acute childhood leukemia, especially for refractory or relapsed disease. Clofarabine is a hybrid of fludarabine and cladribine, and has shown to have antileukemic activity i...

  13. Novel Therapies for Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Fullmer, Amber; O’Brien, Susan; Kantarjian, Hagop; Jabbour, Elias

    2009-01-01

    The outcome of salvage therapy for relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains poor. Salvage therapy mimics regimens with activity in newly diagnosed ALL. Novel strategies under investigation as monotherapy or in combination with chemotherapy improve the treatment of relapsed disease. For some ALL subsets, specific therapies are indicated. The addition of targeted therapy in Philadelphia chromosome–positive ALL has improved responses in relapsed patients without resistance to availabl...

  14. Expression of CD133 in acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolba, Fetnat M; Foda, Mona E; Kamal, Howyda M; Elshabrawy, Deena A

    2013-06-01

    There have been conflicting results regarding a correlation between CD133 expression and disease outcome. To assess CD133 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and to evaluate its correlation with the different clinical and laboratory data as well as its relation to disease outcome, the present study included 60 newly diagnosed acute leukemic patients; 30 ALL patients with a male to female ratio of 1.5:1 and their ages ranged from 9 months to 48 years, and 30 AML patients with a male to female ratio of 1:1 and their ages ranged from 17 to 66 years. Flow cytometric assessment of CD133 expression was performed on blast cells. In ALL, no correlations were elicited between CD133 expression and some monoclonal antibodies, but in AML group, there was a significant positive correlation between CD133 and HLA-DR, CD3, CD7 and TDT, CD13 and CD34. In ALL group, patients with negative CD133 expression achieved complete remission more than patients with positive CD133 expression. In AML group, there was no statistically significant association found between positive CD133 expression and treatment outcome. The Kaplan-Meier curve illustrated a high significant negative correlation between CD133 expression and the overall survival of the AML patients. CD133 expression is an independent prognostic factor in acute leukemia, especially ALL patients and its expression could characterize a group of acute leukemic patients with higher resistance to standard chemotherapy and relapse. CD133 expression was highly associated with poor prognosis in acute leukemic patients. PMID:23532815

  15. Midostaurin and Decitabine in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia and FLT3 Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-10

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With FLT3/ITD Mutation; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Gene Mutations; FLT3 Tyrosine Kinase Domain Point Mutation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Recurrent deletions of IKZF1 in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    de Rooij, Jasmijn D.E.; Beuling, Eva; Marry M van den Heuvel-Eibrink; Obulkasim, Askar; Baruchel, André; Trka, Jan; Reinhardt, Dirk; Sonneveld, Edwin; Gibson, Brenda E.S.; Pieters, Rob; Zimmermann, Martin; Zwaan, C. Michel; Fornerod, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    IKAROS family zinc finger 1/IKZF1 is a transcription factor important in lymphoid differentiation, and a known tumor suppressor in acute lymphoid leukemia. Recent studies suggest that IKZF1 is also involved in myeloid differentiation. To investigate whether IKZF1 deletions also play a role in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia, we screened a panel of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia samples for deletions of the IKZF1 locus using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and for mutations...

  17. Brain Function in Young Patients Receiving Methotrexate for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-08

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Long-Term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Children; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Psychological Impact of Cancer; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Juvenile Myelomonocytic ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... time, MDS may become AML. Transient myeloproliferative disorder (TMD) is a type of MDS. This disorder of ... of life. Infants who have Down syndrome and TMD have an increased chance of developing AML before ...

  19. Therapy Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia with t(8;16) Mimicking Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chharchhodawala, Taher; Gajendra, Smeeta; Tiwari, Priya; Gogia, Ajay; Gupta, Ritu

    2016-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with t(8;16)(p11;q13) is a distinct clinical and morphological entity with poor prognosis, which is characterized by a high frequency of extramedullary involvement, most commonly leukemia cutis; association with therapy related AML; frequent coagulopathy and morphologic features overlapping acute promyelocytic leukemia(APL). Herein, we present a case of 47 year-old post-menopausal woman developing secondary AML with t(8;16)(p11;q13) after 1 year of completion of therapy for breast carcinoma. Blasts were granulated with few showing clefted nucleus resembling promyelocytes and immnuophenotyping showed high side scatter with MPO positivity and CD 34 and HLA-DR negativity. In view of promyelocyte like morphology and immunophenotyping of blasts, possibility of APL was considered but, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for PML-RARα fusion transcript came out to be negative. Conventional cytogenetics showed t(8;16)(p11;q13). So, we should keep possibility of t(8;16) (p11;q13) in therapy related acute myeloid leukemia in patient showing clinical and morphological features of acute promyelocytic leukemia. PMID:27408347

  20. Granulocyte Colony-stimulating Factor-primed Bone Marrow: An Excellent Stem-cell Source for Transplantation in Acute Myelocytic Leukemia and Chronic Myelocytic Leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuhang Li; Min Jiang; Chen Xu; Jianlin Chen; Botao Li; Jun Wang; Jiangwei Hu

    2015-01-01

    Background:Steady-state bone marrow (SS-BM) and granulocyte colony-stimulating growth factor-primed BM/peripheral blood stem-cell (G-BM/G-PBSC) are the main stem-cell sources used in allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.Here,we evaluated the treatment effects of SS-BM and G-BM/G-PBSC in human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling transplantation.Methods:A total of 226 patients (acute myelogenous leukemia-complete remission 1,chronic myelogenous leukemia-chronic phase 1) received SS-BM,G-BM,or G-PBSC from an HLA-identical sibling.Clinical outcomes (graft-versus-host disease [GVHD],overall survival,transplant-related mortality [TRM],and leukemia-free survival [LFS]) were analyzed.Results:When compared to SS-BM,G-BM gave faster recovery time to neutrophil or platelet (P < 0.05).Incidence of grade Ⅲ-Ⅳ acute GVHD and extensive chronic GVHD (cGVHD) was lower than seen with SS-BM (P < 0.05) and similar to G-PBSC.Although the incidence of cGVHD in the G-BM group was similar to SS-BM,both were lower than G-PBSC (P < 0.05).G-BM and G-PBSC exhibited similar survival,LFS,and TRM,but were significantly different from SS-BM (P < 0.05).There were no significant differences in leukemia relapse rates among the groups (P > 0.05).Conclusions:G-CSF-primed bone marrow shared the advantages of G-PBSC and SS-BM.We conclude that G-BM is an excellent stem-cell source that may be preferable to G-PBSC or SS-BM in patients receiving HLA-identical sibling hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

  1. Decitabine, Donor Natural Killer Cells, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Methylation of Gene CHFR Promoter in Acute Leukemia Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Hui; LIU Wengli; ZHOU Jianfeng; XU Huizhen

    2005-01-01

    Summary: In order to explore whether gene CHFR was inactivated by methylation in leukemia cells, the expression of CHFR was examined before and after treatment with demethylation agent in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937 leukemia cell lines by means of RT-PCR. The methylation of promoter in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937 cells as well as 41 acute leukemia patients was analyzed by MS-PCR. The results showed that methylation of CHFR promoter was inactivated and could be reversed by treatment with a demethylating agent in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937. CHFR promoter methylation was detected in 39 % of acute leukemia patients. There was no difference in incidence of CHFR promoter methylation between acute myelocytic leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia. In conclusion, CHFR is frequently inactivated in acute leukemia and is a good candidate for the leukemia supper gene. By affecting mitotic checkpoint function, CHFR inactivation likely plays a key role in tumorigenesis in acute leukemia. Moreover, the methylation of gene CHFR appears to be a good index with which to predict the sensitivity of acute leukemia to microtubule inhibitors.

  3. Clofarabine and Melphalan Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplasia or Acute Leukemia in Remission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-09

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Criteria and Classification of Hybrid Acute Leukemia in 72 Acute Leukemias Based Mainly on Flow Cytometric Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Aoki, Sadao; Nomoto, Nobuhiko; Maruyama, Souichi; Shinada, Shoji; Shibata, Akira

    1991-01-01

    Phenotypes of leukemic cells can be determined through dual staining with pairs of FITC-labeled and PE-labeled monoclonal antibodies using a laser flow cytometer. Hybrid acute leukemia (HAL) was diagnosed when leukemic cells expressed 2 or more lymphoid markers and at least on myeloid marker simultaneously. Based on this criteria, nineteen out of 72 cases with untreated acute leukemia were diagnosed as HAL, 15 of 29 (51%) patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 4 of 43 (9%) patients wi...

  5. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without PSC 833, Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation, and/or Interleukin-2 in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  6. Diagnosis of large granular lymphocytic leukemia in a patient previously treated for acute myeloblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Sinem Civriz Bozdag; Sinem Namdaroglu; Omur Kayikci; Gülsah Kaygusuz; Itir Demiriz; Murat Cinarsoy; Emre Tekgunduz; Fevzi Altuntas

    2013-01-01

    Large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia is a lymphoproliferative disease characterized by the clonal expansion of cytotoxic T or natural killer cells. We report on a patient diagnosed with T-cell LGL leukemia two years after the achievement of hematologic remission for acute myeloblastic leukemia.

  7. WEE1 Inhibitor AZD1775 With or Without Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-12

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Histamine revisited: Role in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasan R Bhandari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Histamine dihydrochloride (HDC is derived from biogenic amine histamine. It suppresses the production of reactive oxygen species which inhibits the stimulation of T cells and natural killer (NK cells. Co-administration of the cytokine interleukin (IL-2 and HDC assists the activation of T cells and NK cells by IL-2, causing in the destruction of cancer cells, including those of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. A significantly longer leukemia-free survival (LFS; primary endpoint was demonstrated in a phase III trial in adult patients with AML in first or subsequent remission, in those who received subcutaneous HDC and concomitant subcutaneous IL-2 as maintenance therapy compared to that of patients receiving no treatment. However, the difference in overall survival (OS between the two groups was not significant. Patients had acceptable levels of adverse effects. Thus, HDC in addition to IL-2 appears to be a useful maintenance therapy option for adult patients with AML in remission.

  9. The genetic signature of acute leukemia in infacy

    OpenAIRE

    Chantrain, Christophe; Poirel, Hélène

    2010-01-01

    Infant leukemia is a rare malignant disease with clinical and biological features distinct from older children. It is characterized by a high incidence of mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene rearrangement and a poor outcome despite intensive chemotherapy. Recent genetic studies argue in favor of a unique biology of infant acute leukemia. This review describes the specific genetic signature of infant leukemia. It discusses the important insights it provides into the understanding of leukemogenes...

  10. The BCR-ABLT315I mutation compromises survival in chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia patients resistant to tyrosine kinase inhibitors, in a matched pair analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolini, Franck E; Ibrahim, Amr R; Soverini, Simona;

    2013-01-01

    patients with chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia harboring a T315I mutation and resistant to imatinib mesylate was compared to a similar cohort of 53 chronic phase patients resistant to imatinib, but with no detectable T315I mutation, in the pre-ponatinib era. These patients were matched according...... to age at diagnosis, interval between disease diagnosis and start of imatinib treatment, and duration of imatinib therapy. Kaplan-Meier survival analyses demonstrated the significant negative impact of the presence of the T315I mutation on overall survival (since imatinib-resistance: 48.4 months for...... T315I(+) patients versus not reached for T315I(-) ones; P=0.006) and failure-free survival (since imatinib-resistance: 34.7 months for T315I(+) patients versus not reached for T315I(-) patients; P=0.003). In addition, Cox proportional hazard models adjusted on overall survival demonstrated the...

  11. Data quality in the Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostgård, Lene Sofie Granfeldt; Nørgaard, Jan Maxwell; Severinsen, Marianne Tang;

    2013-01-01

    The Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry (DNLR) has documented coverage of above 98.5%. Less is known about the quality of the recorded data.......The Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry (DNLR) has documented coverage of above 98.5%. Less is known about the quality of the recorded data....

  12. Prognostic Significance of the Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Derived Sequence 1 (LYL1 Gene Expression in Egyptian Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia El Menshawy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Aberrant activation of transcription factor genes is the most frequent target of genetic alteration in lymphoid malignancies. The lymphoblastic leukemia-derived sequence 1 (LYL1 gene, which encodes a basic helix-loop helix, was first identified with human T-cell acute leukemia. Recent studies suggest its involvement in myeloid malignancies. We aimed to study the expression percent of oncogene LYL1 in primary and secondary high-risk myeloid leukemia and the impact on prognostic significance in those patients. METHODS: Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction for detection of LYL1 oncogenes, our study was carried out on 39 myeloid leukemia patients including de novo cases, myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS with transformation, and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML in accelerated and blast crisis, in addition to 10 healthy individuals as the reference control. RESULTS: LYL1 expression was increased at least 2 times compared to the controls. The highest expression of this transcription factor was observed in the MDS cases transformed to acute leukemia at 7.3±3.1, p=0.0011. LYL1 expression was found in 68.2%, 75%, and 77.8% of cases of acute myeloid leukemia, CML crisis, and MDS, respectively. Significant correlation of LYL1 overexpression with some subtypes of French-American-British classification was found. There was, for the first time, significant correlation between the blood count at diagnosis and LYL1 expression (p=0.023, 0.002, and 0.031 for white blood cells, hemoglobin, and platelets, respectively. The rate of complete remission was lower with very high levels of LYL1 expression and the risk of relapse increased with higher levels of LYL1 expression, suggesting an unfavorable prognosis for cases with enhanced expression. CONCLUSION: Overexpression of LYL1 is highly associated with acute myeloid leukemia and shows more expression in MDS with unfavorable prognosis in response to induction chemotherapy. These

  13. Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Treating Patients With High-Risk Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. DIAGNOSIS AND SUBCLASSIFICATION OF ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Chiaretti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is a disseminated malignancy of B- or T-lymphoblasts which imposes a rapid and accurate diagnostic process to support an optimal risk-oriented therapy and thus increase the curability rate. The need for a precise diagnostic algorithm is underlined by the awareness that both ALL therapy and related success rates may vary greatly in function of ALL subset, from standard chemotherapy in patients with standard-risk ALL, to allotransplantation (SCT and targeted therapy in high-risk patients and cases expressing suitable biological targets, respectively. This review offers a glimpse on how best identify ALL and the most relevant ALL subsets.

  15. Etoposide, Prednisone, Vincristine Sulfate, Cyclophosphamide, and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride With Asparaginase in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-26

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent T Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Refractory B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Refractory T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  16. Decitabine and Valproic Acid in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. High-Risk Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhojwani, Deepa; Howard, Scott C.; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2009-01-01

    Although most children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are cured, certain subsets have a high risk of relapse. Relapse risk can be predicted by early response to therapy, clinical and pharmacogenetic features of the host, and genetic characteristics of leukemic cells. Though early treatment response can be assessed by the peripheral blast cell count after 1 week of single-agent glucocorticoid treatment or percent of bone marrow blasts by morphology after 1 or 2 weeks of multiagent induction treatment, determination of minimal residual disease by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or flow cytometry after 2 to 6 weeks of induction is the most precise and useful measure. Augmented therapy has improved outcome for the poor responders to initial treatment. Infants with mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL)–rearranged ALL comprise a very poor-risk group wherein further intensification of chemotherapy causes significant toxicity. Hybrid protocols incorporating drugs effective for acute myeloid leukemia could improve survival, a strategy being tested in international trials. Studies on the biology of MLL-induced leukemogenesis have prompted the development of novel targeted agents, currently under evaluation in clinical trials. Short-term outcomes of patients with Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)–positive ALL have improved significantly by adding tyrosine kinase inhibitors to standard chemotherapy regimens. New agents and methods to overcome resistance are under investigation, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation is recommended for certain subsets of patients, for example those with Ph+ and T-cell ALL with poor early response. Genome-wide interrogation of leukemic cell genetic abnormalities and germline genetic variations promise to identify new molecular targets for therapy. PMID:19778845

  18. High-risk childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhojwani, Deepa; Howard, Scott C; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2009-01-01

    Although most children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are cured, certain subsets have a high risk of relapse. Relapse risk can be predicted by early response to therapy, clinical and pharmacogenetic features of the host, and genetic characteristics of leukemic cells. Though early treatment response can be assessed by the peripheral blast cell count after 1 week of single-agent glucocorticoid treatment or percent of bone marrow blasts by morphology after 1 or 2 weeks of multiagent induction treatment, determination of minimal residual disease by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or flow cytometry after 2 to 6 weeks of induction is the most precise and useful measure. Augmented therapy has improved outcome for the poor responders to initial treatment. Infants with mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL)-rearranged ALL comprise a very poor-risk group wherein further intensification of chemotherapy causes significant toxicity. Hybrid protocols incorporating drugs effective for acute myeloid leukemia could improve survival, a strategy being tested in international trials. Studies on the biology of MLL-induced leukemogenesis have prompted the development of novel targeted agents, currently under evaluation in clinical trials. Short-term outcomes of patients with Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-positive ALL have improved significantly by adding tyrosine kinase inhibitors to standard chemotherapy regimens. New agents and methods to overcome resistance are under investigation, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation is recommended for certain subsets of patients, for example those with Ph+ and T-cell ALL with poor early response. Genome-wide interrogation of leukemic cell genetic abnormalities and germline genetic variations promise to identify new molecular targets for therapy. PMID:19778845

  19. Perinatal risk factors for acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, Casey; Sundquist, Jan; Sieh, Weiva; Winkleby, Marilyn A; Sundquist, Kristina

    2015-12-01

    Infectious etiologies have been hypothesized for acute leukemias because of their high incidence in early childhood, but have seldom been examined for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We conducted the first large cohort study to examine perinatal factors including season of birth, a proxy for perinatal infectious exposures, and risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood. A national cohort of 3,569,333 persons without Down syndrome who were born in Sweden in 1973-2008 were followed up for AML incidence through 2010 (maximum age 38 years). There were 315 AML cases in 69.7 million person-years of follow-up. We found a sinusoidal pattern in AML risk by season of birth (P birth order, parental age, and parental country of birth were not associated with AML. In this large cohort study, birth in winter was associated with increased risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood, possibly related to immunologic effects of early infectious exposures compared with summer birth. These findings warrant further investigation of the role of seasonally varying perinatal exposures in the etiology of AML. PMID:26113060

  20. Nanomedicine approaches in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatar, Andra-Sorina; Nagy-Simon, Timea; Tomuleasa, Ciprian; Boca, Sanda; Astilean, Simion

    2016-09-28

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the malignancy with the highest incidence amongst children (26% of all cancer cases), being surpassed only by the cancers of the brain and of the nervous system. The most recent research on ALL is focusing on new molecular therapies, like targeting specific biological structures in key points in the cell cycle, or using selective inhibitors for transmembranary proteins involved in cell signalling, and even aiming cell surface receptors with specifically designed antibodies for active targeting. Nanomedicine approaches, especially by the use of nanoparticle-based compounds for the delivery of drugs, cancer diagnosis or therapeutics may represent new and modern ways in the near future anti-cancer therapies. This review offers an overview on the recent role of nanomedicine in the detection and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia as resulting from a thorough literature survey. A short introduction on the basics of ALL is presented followed by the description of the conventional methods used in the ALL detection and treatment. We follow our discussion by introducing some of the general nano-strategies used for cancer detection and treatment. The detailed role of organic and inorganic nanoparticles in ALL applications is further presented, with a special focus on gold nanoparticle-based nanocarriers of antileukemic drugs. PMID:27460684

  1. How Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia Classified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also form the basis for treating these leukemias. Markers on the leukemia cells If the leukemia cells ... no signs or symptoms of the disease. A molecular complete remission means there is no evidence of ...

  2. Dasatinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-08

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  3. [Cytosine-arabinoside in high doses in refractory acute granulocytic leukemia. Apropos of 17 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouet, J P; Simon, M; Fenaux, P; Pollet, J P; Bauters, F

    1985-01-01

    A total of 17 patients, 6 female and 11 male (age range 13 to 56 years), received high dose Ara-C for treatment of refractory acute myelogenous leukemia. Ara-C was given at 3 g/m2 twice daily for 6 days as a 1 infusion. 1 patient (with induced acute leukemia) was treated directly, two after failure of a chemotherapy schedule containing the usual dose Ara-C, 12 for first relapse and 2 for subsequent relapse. Maximum follow up is 16 months. Beside hematological toxicity, systemic tolerance was good with no neurological of cutaneous effects. Despite preventive corticoid eyewash, ocular complications occurred in 6 cases, mild and resolvable in 5 of them. The immediate results were as follows: 3 deaths during induction (18%); 6 failures (35%); 8 complete remissions (CR) (47%). After primary chemo-resistance (two cases) failure was always noted. In 3 cases, after less than 12 infusions had been given, 2 failures and 1 very short CR were noted. In 2 patients, when doxorubicin was added to Ara-C, we observed 1 death during induction and 1 failure. Of the patients achieving CR 8 were treated by periodic courses with high dose Ara-C and 4 of them relapsed. The longest failure free duration was 11 months. Median survival duration of the 17 patients is 5 months. PMID:3862072

  4. Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia, unlike acute erythroid leukemia, predicts an unfavorable outcome after allogeneic HSCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiyama, Ken; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Eto, Tetsuya; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Uchida, Naoyuki; Kanamori, Heiwa; Fukuda, Takahiro; Miyamura, Koichi; Inoue, Yoshiko; Taguchi, Jun; Mori, Takehiko; Iwato, Koji; Morishima, Yasuo; Nagamura-Inoue, Tokiko; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Takami, Akiyoshi

    2016-08-01

    Acute erythroid leukemia (FAB-M6) and acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (FAB-M7) exhibit closely related properties in cells regarding morphology and the gene expression profile. Although allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is considered the mainstay of the treatment for both subtypes of leukemia due to their refractoriness to chemotherapy and high rates of relapse, it remains unclear whether allo-HSCT is curative in such cases due to their scarcity. We retrospectively examined the impact of allo-HSCT in 382 patients with M6 and 108 patients with M7 using nationwide HSCT data and found the overall survival (OS) and relapse rates of the M6 patients to be significantly better than those of the M7 patients after adjusting for confounding factors and statistically comparable with those of the patients with M0/M1/M2/M4/M5 disease. Consequently, the factors of age, gender, performance status, karyotype, disease status at HSCT and development of graft-vs.-host disease predicted the OS for the M6 patients, while the performance status and disease status at HSCT were predictive of the OS for the M7 patients. These findings substantiate the importance of distinguishing between M6 and M7 in the HSCT setting and suggest that unknown mechanisms influence the HSCT outcomes of these closely related subtypes of leukemia. PMID:27244257

  5. Age Difference in Immunophenotype of Acute Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunori Nakase

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the immunophenotype of 880 cases with acute leukemia and analyzed their age difference in relation to the morphological subtype and the karyotype. We divided the patients into 3 age groups: child (0-15 years, adult (16-59 years and elderly (60 years and older group. The diagnoses based on the French-American-British (FAB criteria and the immunophenotype as follows: 453 patients as acute myeloid leukemia (AML, 366 as precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL (24 CD10- cases and 342 CD10+ cases, 10 B-cell ALL and 51 T-cell ALL. In AML, there were no significant age differences in the frequency of FAB subtypes. Karyotypically, the frequencies of t(8;21 and 11q23 decreased with age and that of 5/7/8 abnormality increased with age. As for the immunophenotype in each FAB subtype, CD11b in M2 (0% and CD34 in M3 (0% were less commonly expressed in the child group than in the other age groups. Whereas Both CD11b (100% and CD34 (60% in M4 were more predominantly expressed in the child group than in the other age groups. Lymphoid antigen, CD19 showed a higher frequency (38.5% in the child M2 than did other age M2 groups, reflecting the distribution pattern of t(8;21 among the 3 age groups. Additionally, the child group more frequently expressed this antigen (33.3% than the older groups among CD7+ AML. In ALL, the frequency of CD10+ precursor B ALL was more common in the child group (84% than in the adult group. On the other hand, B-cell ALL showed a lower frequency (0.7% in the child group and T-cell ALL did a higher frequency (18.3% in the adult group than any other age groups, respectively. Although the frequency of t(9;22 increased with age in CD10+ precursor-B ALL, myeloid antigen (CD13/CD33 expression evenly distributed among the 3 age groups. Our results suggest that phenotypic heterogeneity gradually emerged with age irrespective of the pattern of karyotype.

  6. Perifosine induces protective autophagy and upregulation of ATG5 in human chronic myelogenous leukemia cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin TONG; Yan-yan LIU; Liang-shun YOU; Wen-bin QIAN

    2012-01-01

    Aim:The efficacy of the Akt inhibitor perifosine against chronic myeloid leukemia (CML)cells and its mechanisms of action are unknown.In this study,the cytotoxic effects of perifosine on CML and acute myeloid leukemia (AML)cell lines were compared to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the differences.Methods:Human AML cell lines Kasumi-1 and HL-60,and the CML cell line K562 were used.Cell viability was quantitated using MTT assay.Apoptosis was determined using Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide and Hoechst staining,which were followed by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy analysis,respectively.Caspase pathway activation and the expression of autophagy-related genes were examined using Western blot.Autophagy was studied using electron microscopy,the acridine orange staining method,and GFP-LC3 was examined with fluorescence microscopy.Results:In contrast to AML cell lines,the CML cell lines K562 and K562/G (an imatinib-insensitive CML cell line)were resistant to perifosine (2.5-20 μmol/L)in respect to inhibiting cell growth and inducing apoptosis.Perifosine (2.5,5,and 10 μmol/L)inhibited Akt and its phosphorylation in AML cells,but not in CML cells.Treatment with perifosine (20 μmol/L)resulted in autophagy in CML cells as shown by the increased formation of acidic vesicular organelles and the accumulation of LC3-II.Treatment of CML cells with perifosine (5,10,and 20 μmol/L)dose-dependently upregulated AGT5,but not Beclin 1 at the protein level.Furthermore,inhibition of autophagyby chloroquine (40 nmol/L)significantly suppressed the cell growth and induced apoptosis in CML cells treated with perifosine (20 μmol/L).Conclusion:Our results show that CML cell lines were resistant to the Akt inhibitor perifosine in vitro,which is due to perifosine-induced protective autophagy and upregulation of ATG5.

  7. Relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskarsson, Trausti; Söderhäll, Stefan; Arvidson, Johan;

    2016-01-01

    Relapse is the main reason for treatment failure in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Despite improvements in the up-front therapy, survival after relapse is still relatively poor, especially for high-risk relapses. The aims of this study were to assess outcomes following acute lymphoblastic...... approaches is urgently needed to increase survival in relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia....... leukemia relapse after common initial Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology protocol treatment; to validate currently used risk stratifications, and identify additional prognostic factors for overall survival. Altogether, 516 of 2735 patients (18.9%) relapsed between 1992 and 2011 and were...

  8. Role of autophagy in acute myeloid leukemia therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su-Ping Zhang; Yu-Na Niu; Na Yuan; Ai-Hong Zhang; Dan Chao; Qiu-Ping Xu; Li-Jun Wang

    2013-01-01

    Despite its dual role in determining cell fate in a wide array of solid cancer cell lines,autophagy has been robustly shown to suppress or kill acute myeloid leukemia cells via degradation of the oncogenic fusion protein that drives leukemogenesis.However,autophagy also induces the demise of acute leukemia cells that do not express the known fusion protein,though the molecular mechanism remains elusive.Nevertheless,since it can induce cooperation with apoptosis and differentiation in response to autophagic signals,autophagy can be manipulated for a better therapy on acute myeloid leukemia.

  9. Prethymic Cytoplasmic CD3 Negative Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Cannizzo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute undiffentiated leukemia (AUL is an acute leukemia with no more than one membrane marker of any given lineage. Blasts often express HLA-DR, CD34, and/or CD38 and may be positive for terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT. The expression of CD34, HLA-DR, and CD38 has been shown in pro-T-ALL, although in this case, blasts should also express CD7 and cyCD3. However, some cases of T-ALL without CD3 in the cytoplasm and all TCR chain genes in germ line configuration are reported, features that fit well with a very early hematopoietic cell. We report a case of acute leukemia CD34+/−HLADR+CD7+CD38+cyCD3− in which a diagnosis of AUL was considered. However the blasts were also positive for CD99 and TCR delta gene rearrangement which was found on molecular studies. Therefore a differential diagnosis between AUL and an early cyCD3 negative T-ALL was debated.

  10. Molecular mechanisms in differentiation-induction in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Nigten, Jeannet

    2007-01-01

    Leukemia is a hematological malignancy that is characterized by the clonal expansion of immature hematopoietic cells, which have escaped from the tightly coordinated cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis controls. In general, leukemia is characterized by a variety of mutations in pathways that are required for normal hematopoiesis. This thesis describes target genes of the mutated transcription factor PML-RAR , which is expressed in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cells. APL...

  11. ERYTHEMA NODOSUM REVEALING ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chebbi Wafa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Erythema nodosum (EN is the most common type of panniculitis. It may be idiopathic or secondary to various etiologies. However, the occurrence of erythema nodosum in malignant hemopathy had rarely been reported. Case report: A 42 year-old woman presented with a four week history of recurrent multiple painful erythematous nodules developed on the lower limbs associated with arthralgia of the ankles and fever. The clinical features of skin lesions with contusiform color evolution allowed establishing the diagnosis of EN. No underlying cause was found. The skin lesions were improved with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine. Three months later, the patient consulted for recurrence of EN associated with fever, inflammatory polyarthralgia and hepatosplenomegaly. The peripheral blood count revealed pancytopenia. A bone marrow examination confirmed the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia type 2. Initiation of chemotherapy was followed by the complete disappearance of skin lesions of EN. Conclusion: Paraneoplastic erythema nodosum is a rare entity. In the literature, a few cases of association with leukemia have been reported. Exploration for solid neoplasms or hemopathy in case of recurrent EN or resistance to conventional treatment should be systematic

  12. Mixed Phenotypic Acute Leukemia Presenting as Mediastinal Mass-2 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardhan, Rig; Kotwal, Jyoti; Ganguli, Prosenjit; Ahmed, Rehan; Sharma, Ajay; Singh, Jasjit

    2016-06-01

    Mixed phenotype acute leukemia symbolizes a very small subset of acute leukemia that simply cannot be allocated as lymphoid or myeloid lineage. The 2008 World Health Organisation classification established stringent standard for diagnosis of mixed phenotype acute leukemia, accentuating myeloperoxidase for myeloid lineage, cytoplasmic CD3 for T lineage and CD19 with other B markers for B lineage obligation. Mixed phenotype leukemia is rare and 3-5 % of acute leukmias of all age groups, is associated with poor outcome with overall survival of 18 months. We wish to present two cases of mixed phenotypic acute leukemia who presented with mediastinal masses, were suspected to be T cell lymphoma/leukemia clinically and radiologically. In one case, tissue diagnosis was given as lymphoma for which treatment was given. These cases show that patients diagnosed as lymphoma on histopathology can be cases of mixed phenotype acute leukemia and varying specific treatment protocols and follow up are required. Awareness of these entities will help in proper diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27408360

  13. Importance of genetics in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Pippa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML comprises a biologically and clinically heterogeneous group of aggressive disorders that occur as a consequence of a wide variety of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities in hematopoietic progenitors. Despite significant advances in the understanding of the biology of AML, most patients will die from relapsed disease. Whole-genome studies have identified novel recurrent gene mutations with prognostic impact in AML; furthermore, it is likely that in the near future genome-wide sequencing will become a routine for newly diagnosed patients with AML. Therefore, future clinical trials should aim to identify genetically defined high-risk patients, and further research is necessary to identify effective agents and develop new individualized therapeutic strategies for the treatment of this deadly disease.

  14. Treatment strategies in acute myeloid leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Li-na; ZHOU Jin; Jan Jacob Schuringa; Edo Vellenga

    2011-01-01

    Objective To summarize the risk stratification and current treatment strategies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and discuss the role of emerging novel agents that might be applied in future clinical trials.Data sources The data in this article were collected from PubMed database with relevant English articles published from 1991 to 2009.Study selection Articles regarding the risk stratification and therapeutic options of AML, as well as the characteristics of leukemic stem cells were selected.Results AML is a heterogeneous disease with variable clinical outcome dependent on several prognostic factors,including age, cytogenetics and molecular markers. The advances in the understanding of AML pathogenesis and development will generate potential novel agents that might improve the treatment results of standard chemotherapy.Conclusion Deeper insight into the multiple transforming events of AML may aid us in designing combinations of small molecule inhibitors based on the individual patient characteristics.

  15. Perinatal risk factors for acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, Casey; Sundquist, Jan; Sieh, Weiva; Winkleby, Marilyn A; Sundquist, Kristina

    2015-12-01

    Infectious etiologies have been hypothesized for acute leukemias because of their high incidence in early childhood, but have seldom been examined for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We conducted the first large cohort study to examine perinatal factors including season of birth, a proxy for perinatal infectious exposures, and risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood. A national cohort of 3,569,333 persons without Down syndrome who were born in Sweden in 1973-2008 were followed up for AML incidence through 2010 (maximum age 38 years). There were 315 AML cases in 69.7 million person-years of follow-up. We found a sinusoidal pattern in AML risk by season of birth (P < 0.001), with peak risk among persons born in winter. Relative to persons born in summer (June-August), incidence rate ratios for AML were 1.72 (95 % CI 1.25-2.38; P = 0.001) for winter (December-February), 1.37 (95 % CI 0.99-1.90; P = 0.06) for spring (March-May), and 1.27 (95 % CI 0.90-1.80; P = 0.17) for fall (September-November). Other risk factors for AML included high fetal growth, high gestational age at birth, and low maternal education level. These findings did not vary by sex or age at diagnosis. Sex, birth order, parental age, and parental country of birth were not associated with AML. In this large cohort study, birth in winter was associated with increased risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood, possibly related to immunologic effects of early infectious exposures compared with summer birth. These findings warrant further investigation of the role of seasonally varying perinatal exposures in the etiology of AML.

  16. MOLECULAR PATHOGENESIS OF SECONDARY ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Osheroff

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Balanced chromosomal translocations that generate chimeric oncoproteins are considered to be initiating lesions in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia. The most frequent is the t(15;17(q22;q21, which fuses the PML and RARA genes, giving rise to acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL. An increasing proportion of APL cases are therapy-related (t-APL, which develop following exposure to radiotherapy and/or chemotherapeutic agents that target DNA topoisomerase II (topoII, particularly mitoxantrone and epirubicin. To gain insights into molecular mechanisms underlying the formation of the t(15;17 we mapped the translocation breakpoints in a series of t-APLs, which revealed significant clustering according the nature of the drug exposure. Remarkably, in approximately half of t-APL cases arising following mitoxantrone treatment for breast carcinoma or multiple sclerosis, the chromosome 15 breakpoint fell within an 8-bp “hotspot” region in PML intron 6, which was confirmed to be a preferential site of topoII-mediated DNA cleavage induced by mitoxantrone.  Chromosome 15 breakpoints falling outside the “hotspot”, and the corresponding RARA breakpoints were also shown to be functional topoII cleavage sites. The observation that particular regions of the PML and RARA loci are susceptible to topoII-mediated DNA damage induced by epirubicin and mitoxantrone may underlie the propensity of these agents to cause APL.

     

  17. Cyclophosphamide and Busulfan Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelofibrosis, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelofibrosis; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  18. Cytarabine added to interferon improves the cost-effectiveness of initial therapy for patients with early chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, J R; Guilhot, J; Giles, F J; Aoki, N; Wirt, D P; Guilhot, F

    2001-03-01

    The French Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Study Group prospective randomized study results indicate that the addition of cytarabine to alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) increases the rate of major cytogenetic response and prolongs survival in patients with early chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). The French group study design permitted a single crossover to include or discontinue cytarabine or interferon. Endpoints were overall survival, complete hematologic remission (CHR) at six months, and major cytogenetic response at 12 months. We modified a published Markov model that compared IFN-alpha alone to IFN-alpha plus cytarabine and included the possibility of crossover as in the French study. The model permits allogeneic and autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT), and follows cytogenetic response and acceleration of CML through death. Treatment response, toxicity, and survival are drawn from the French Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Study Group population of 810 patients on an intention-to-treat model. Survivals are extended to 62 months based on currently available follow-up. Costs from a United States oncology specialty institution, and state utilities from previous research and a quality-adjusted Time Without Symptoms or Toxicity analysis of the subject study were discounted at 3% per annum. At the median cohort age of 50, cytarabine offers 21 months of added median survival to IFN-alpha, which itself is superior to conventional chemotherapy by 21 months. Cost-effectiveness estimates for cytarabine added to IFN-alpha range from $7,000 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) to $35,000 per QALY, under all plausible assumptions superior to IFN-alpha alone. The model is sensitive to the quality of life on therapy, as well as to remission rate with additive cytarabine, although the cost-effectiveness calculations are robust over the entire range of clinical assumptions. Based on data from the French study, cytarabine added to IFN-alpha substantially improves the cost

  19. JAK kinase inhibitors for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Degryse, Sandrine; Cools, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia have identified activating mutations in components of the interleukin-7 receptor complex (IL7R, JAK1, and JAK3). It will be of interest to investigate both JAK1 and JAK3 kinase inhibitors as targeted agents for these leukemias.

  20. Symptom-Adapted Physical Activity Intervention in Minimizing Physical Function Decline in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim Bayram

    2014-01-01

    In children patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, according to the European bone marrow transplant handbook, the indications for stem cell transplantation, conditioning regimen, donor selection and information about sources of stem cells will be evaluated.

  2. Serum metabonomics of acute leukemia using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Siddiqui, Amna Jabbar; Shamsi, Tahir; Choudhary, M. Iqbal; Rahman, Atta-ur

    2016-01-01

    Acute leukemia is a critical neoplasm of white blood cells. In order to differentiate between the metabolic alterations associated with two subtypes of acute leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), we investigated the serum of ALL and AML patients and compared with two controls (healthy and aplastic anemia) using 1H NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy. Thirty-seven putative metabolites were identified using Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence. The use of PLS-DA and OPLS-DA models gave results with 84.38% and 90.63% classification rate, respectively. The metabolites responsible for classification are mainly lipids, lactate and glucose. Compared with controls, ALL and AML patients showed serum metabonomic differences involving aberrant metabolism pathways including glycolysis, TCA cycle, lipoprotein changes, choline and fatty acid metabolisms. PMID:27480133

  3. Autonomous growth potential of leukemia blast cells is associated with poor prognosis in human acute leukemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakubowski Ann A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have described a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mouse model that permits the subcutaneous growth of primary human acute leukemia blast cells into a measurable subcutaneous nodule which may be followed by the development of disseminated disease. Utilizing the SCID mouse model, we examined the growth potential of leukemic blasts from 133 patients with acute leukemia, (67 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL and 66 acute myeloid leukemia (AML in the animals after subcutaneous inoculation without conditioning treatment. The blasts displayed three distinct growth patterns: "aggressive", "indolent", or "no tumor growth". Out of 133 leukemias, 45 (33.8% displayed an aggressive growth pattern, 14 (10.5% displayed an indolent growth pattern and 74 (55.6% did not grow in SCID mice. The growth probability of leukemias from relapsed and/or refractory disease was nearly 3 fold higher than that from patients with newly diagnosed disease. Serial observations found that leukemic blasts from the same individual, which did not initiate tumor growth at initial presentation and/or at early relapse, may engraft and grow in the later stages of disease, suggesting that the ability of leukemia cells for engraftment and proliferation was gradually acquired following the process of leukemia progression. Nine autonomous growing leukemia cell lines were established in vitro. These displayed an aggressive proliferation pattern, suggesting a possible correlation between the capacity of human leukemia cells for autonomous proliferation in vitro and an aggressive growth potential in SCID mice. In addition, we demonstrated that patients whose leukemic blasts displayed an aggressive growth and dissemination pattern in SClD mice had a poor clinical outcome in patients with ALL as well as AML. Patients whose leukemic blasts grew indolently or whose leukemia cells failed to induce growth had a significantly longer DFS and more favorable clinical course.

  4. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim Followed by Infusion of Non-HLA Matched Ex Vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitors in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-13

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Decitabine Followed by Idarubicin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-09

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts

  6. Advances in Management of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia with Arsenic Trioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jun

    2007-01-01

    @@ Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), with specific features in cell morphology, is classified as M3 by French-American-British (FAB).Among M3, 95% of patients show specific chromosome translocation t(15;17)q(22;21) with PML-RAR α fusion gene, and 5% of patients show other subtypes. According to the statistical analysis of 2 540 adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML)cases in Harbin Institute of Hematology & Oncology, APL accounted for 23%.

  7. Childhood acute leukemias are frequent in Mexico City: descriptive epidemiology

    OpenAIRE

    Bekker-Méndez Vilma; Alamilla-Galicia Paola; Cárdenas-Cardos Rocío; del Campo-Martínez María; Paredes-Aguilera Rogelio; Duarte-Rodríguez David; Torres-Nava José; Velázquez-Aviña Martha; Jiménez-Hernández Elva; Alvarado-Ibarra Martha; Dorantes-Acosta Elisa; Rivera-Luna Roberto; Rodríguez-Zepeda María; Flores-Lujano Janet; Bolea-Murga Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Worldwide, acute leukemia is the most common type of childhood cancer. It is particularly common in the Hispanic populations residing in the United States, Costa Rica, and Mexico City. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of acute leukemia in children who were diagnosed and treated in public hospitals in Mexico City. Methods Included in this study were those children, under 15 years of age and residents of Mexico City, who were diagnosed in 2006 and 2...

  8. PML-RARα co-operates with Sox4 in acute myeloid leukemia development in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Omidvar, Nader; Maunakea, Mei Lin; Jones, Letetia; Sevcikova, Sabina; Yin, Bin; Himmel, Karen L.; Tennant, Thelma R.; Le Beau, Michelle M; Largaespada, David A.; Kogan, Scott C.

    2013-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia is characterized by a chromosomal translocation involving the retinoic acid receptor alpha gene. To identify co-operating pathways to leukemogenesis, we crossed MRP8-PML/RARA transgenic mice with BXH-2 mice which harbor an endogenous murine leukemia virus that causes acute myeloid leukemia. Approximately half of the leukemias that arose in this cross showed features of acute promyelocytic leukemia. We identified 22 proviral insertion sites in acute promyelocytic-l...

  9. Infections in acute leukemia in Indian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Roy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: In the present study acute leukemic children were studied to determine the incidence and principal site of infection, correlation with absolute neutrophil count, causative organisms and to standardize the initial empirical anti microbial therapy. Materials and methods: A total 40 children in the age group 6 month to 12 year with acute leukemia relapse were included in this study. A total 82 infectious episodes including 61 febrile episodes were investigated for infectious etiology. Results: We found that the frequency of infections increased significantly with the degree of immunocompromisation specially neutropenia (ANC < 500/cmm. The skin and soft tissue was the commonest site of infection (26.83%, followed by respiratory tract (21.95%. Staphylococcus nonhemolytic coagulase-negative (34%, followed by Klebsiella (17% were the most common organisms isolated from blood. Staphylococcus non-hemolytic coagulase-negative was also the commonest isolate (26% from other sites of infection. Most strains were sensitive to Cloxacillin, cephalosporin and aminoglycosides. Conclusion: For the treatment of febrile episodes, empirical use of beta-lactamase resistant penicillin e.g. Cloxacillin or cephalosporin combined with an aminoglycosides with a broad spectrum antifungal like fluconazole in selective cases at the first sign of infection is recommended. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2013, Vol-9, No-1, 40-47 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v9i1.9672

  10. Dimethyl sulfoxide inactivates the anticancer effect of cisplatin against human myelogenous leukemia cell lines in in vitro assays

    OpenAIRE

    Rahul Raghavan; Sanith Cheriyamundath; Joseph Madassery

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effect of DMSO on cisplatin induced cytotoxicity (invitro) against K562 (Human mylogenous leukemia) cell line and to study the cisplatin-DMSO adduct formation using UV-spectrophotometer. Materials and methods: Effect of DMSO on the cytotoxicity of cisplatin was studied in K562 (Chronic mylogenous leukemia) cell line by MTT assay. Cisplatin-DMSO adduct formation was studied by continuously monitoring the increase in absorption peaks for 30 minutes using UV-s...

  11. Acute myeloid leukemia-targeted toxin activates both apoptotic and necroptotic death mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrick Horita

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML is the second most common leukemia with approximately 13,410 new cases and 8,990 deaths annually in the United States. A novel fusion toxin treatment, diphtheria toxin GM-CSF (DT-GMCSF has been shown to selectively eliminate leukemic repopulating cells that are critical for the formation of AML. We previously showed that DT-GMCSF treatment of U937 cells, an AML cell line, causes activation of caspases and the induction of apoptosis. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In this study we further investigate the mechanisms of cell death induced by DT-GMCSF and show that, in addition to the activation of caspase-dependent apoptosis, DT-GMCSF also kills AML cells by simultaneously activating caspase-independent necroptosis. These mechanisms depend on the ability of the targeted toxin to inhibit protein synthesis, and are not affected by the receptor that is targeted or the mechanism through which protein synthesis is blocked. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that fusion toxin proteins may be effective for treating AML cells whether or not they are defective in apoptosis.

  12. Role of Ikaros in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Philippe; Kastner; Susan; Chan

    2011-01-01

    Ikaros is a zinc finger transcriptional regulator encoded by the Ikzf1 gene.Ikaros displays crucial functions in the hematopoietic system and its loss of function has been linked to the development of lymphoid leukemia.In particular,Ikaros has been found in recent years to be a major tumor suppressor involved in human B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.Its role in T-cell leukemia,however,has been more controversial.While Ikaros deficiency appears to be very frequent in murine T-cell leukemias,loss of Ikaros appears to be rare in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL).We review here the evidence linking Ikaros to T-ALL in mouse and human systems.

  13. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Presented as Multiple Breast Masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayrak, Ilkay Koray; Yalin, Turkay; Ozmen, Zafer; Aksoz, Tolga; Doughanji, Roula [Ondokuz Mayis University, Samsun (Turkmenistan)

    2009-10-15

    Breast metastases in cases leukemia are very rare and occur primarily in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. We report the involvement of breast metastases in a 30-year-old woman with acute T cell lymphoblastic leukemia. The patient's mammograms revealed an extremely dense pattern with ill-defined, denser mass-like lesions in both breasts. A bilateral breast ultrasonographic evaluation revealed lobular-shaped and partly ill-defined hypoechoic masses with a multi-septated nodular (mottled) appearance.

  14. Acute appendicitis in acute leukemia and the potential role of decitabine in the critically ill patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Warad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute appendicitis in children with acute leukemia is uncommon and often recognized late. Immunocompromised host state coupled with the importance of avoiding treatment delays makes management additionally challenging. Leukemic infiltration of the appendix though rare must also be considered. Although successful conservative management has been reported, surgical intervention is required in most cases. We present our experience with acute appendicitis in children with acute leukemia and a case of complete remission of acute myeloid leukemia with a short course of decitabine. Decitabine may serve as bridging therapy in critically ill patients who are unable to undergo intensive chemotherapy.

  15. Mobilized peripheral blood stem cells compared with bone marrow from HLA-identical siblings for reduced-intensity conditioning transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia in complete remission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagler, Arnon; Labopin, Myriam; Shimoni, Avichai;

    2012-01-01

    Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC)-alloSCT is increasingly used for acute myelogenous leukemia. Limited data are available for the comparison of peripheral blood stem cells with bone marrow for RIC-alloSCT. We used the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) ALWP data......, relapse, and NRM when comparing PBSC to BM grafts from sibling donors following RIC conditioning. This is the first study comparing PBSC to BM grafts in the RIC setting, analyzing a homogeneous population of patients with AML in remission. Whether PBSC should be preferred for advanced phases...

  16. PROGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF EXPRESSION OF SURVIVIN IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓娟; 戴国仪; 曹利民; 王国华; 朱慧芬; 张悦; 沈关心

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of survivin gene and its significance in acute leukemia. Methods: The expression of surviving in 134 acute leukemia patients and 4 leukemia cell lines was detected by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence analysis. Results: We detected survivin expression in 78 of 134 acute leukemia patients and all the cell lines but not in normal controls and anemia patients. Survivin gene expression correlated with a lower white blood cell count, which was 11×109/L and 48×109/L in the positive and negative group respectively (P<0.01 by the Mann-Whitney test). In 55 cases of FAB M1/M2/M3, it was associated with leukemic cell maturation(P<0.01 by the Fisher test). Survivin expression was strongly related to survival time of acute leukemia patients (P<0.05). Conclusion: These data suggest that survivin expression may be considered as a new unfavorable prognostic factor for acute leukemia due to its important role in apoptosis inhibition that influences disease outcome.

  17. Decitabine as Maintenance Therapy After Standard Therapy in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-19

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Functionally deregulated AML1/RUNX1 cooperates with BCR-ABL to induce a blastic phase-like phenotype of chronic myelogenous leukemia in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoko Yamamoto

    Full Text Available Patients in the chronic phase (CP of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML have been treated successfully following the advent of ABL kinase inhibitors, but once they progress to the blast crisis (BC phase the prognosis becomes dismal. Although mechanisms underlying the progression are largely unknown, recent studies revealed the presence of alterations of key molecules for hematopoiesis, such as AML1/RUNX1. Our analysis of 13 BC cases revealed that three cases had AML1 mutations and the transcript levels of wild-type (wt. AML1 were elevated in BC compared with CP. Functional analysis of representative AML1 mutants using mouse hematopoietic cells revealed the possible contribution of some, but not all, mutants for the BC-phenotype. Specifically, K83Q and R139G, but neither R80C nor D171N mutants, conferred upon BCR-ABL-expressing cells a growth advantage over BCR-ABL-alone control cells in cytokine-free culture, and the cells thus grown killed mice upon intravenous transfer. Unexpectedly, wt.AML1 behaved similarly to K83Q and R139G mutants. In a bone marrow transplantation assay, K83Q and wt.AML1s induced the emergence of blast-like cells. The overall findings suggest the roles of altered functions of AML1 imposed by some, but not all, mutants, and the elevated expression of wt.AML1 for the disease progression of CML.

  19. RalA, a GTPase targeted by miR-181a, promotes transformation and progression by activating the Ras-related signaling pathway in chronic myelogenous leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaochuang; Yang, Juhua; Li, Yumin; Li, Tianfu; Wang, Ruirui; Fei, Jia

    2016-01-01

    BCR/ABL is a well-known activator of multiple signaling pathways. RalA, a Ras downstream signaling molecule and a small GTPase, plays an important role in Bcr-Abl-induced leukemogenesis but the exact mechanism remains elusive. Here, we show that RalA GTPase activity is commonly high in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cell lines and patient samples. Overexpression of RalA results in malignant transformation and progression, and induces resistance to imatinib (IM) in BaF3 and K562 cell lines. RalA reduced survival and led to IM resistance in a xenografted mouse model. Ablation of RalA by either siRNA or miR-181a, a RalA targeting microRNA, attenuated the malignant phenotypes in K562 cells. RBC8, a selective Ral inhibitor, enhanced the inhibitory effects of IM in K562, KCL22 and BaF3-P210 cells. Interestingly, the phospho-specific protein microarray assay revealed that multiple phosphorylation signal proteins were decreased by RalA inhibition, including SAPK, JNK, SRC, VEGFR2, P38 MAPK, c-Kit, JunB, and Keratin18. Among them, P38 MAPK and SAPK/JNK are Ras downstream signaling kinases. Taken together, RalA GTPase might be an important oncogene activating the Ras-related signaling pathway in CML. PMID:26967392

  20. Isolated Ocular Manifestation of Relapsed Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Presenting as Myeloid Blast Crisis in a Patient on Imatinib Therapy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Gulati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Blast phase in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML has rarely been reported to involve extramedullary sites like skin, lymph nodes, and central nervous system. Clinical history, characteristic hematologic findings (elevated leukocyte counts, myelocytic predominance, and basophilia, and Philadelphia chromosome are of high diagnostic significance especially in isolated extramedullary presentations. We describe a unique case of CML relapse with blast phase involving the eye. A 66-year-old man with a known diagnosis of CML on imatinib and in molecular remission for 3 years presented with a painful blind eye. Histologic examination revealed diffuse involvement of choroid, iris, vitreous humor, and the optic nerve by blast cells. The blasts expressed CD34, aberrant TdT, and a myeloid phenotype (CD13, CD33, and CD117. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH of vitreous fluid detected BCR-ABL1 gene rearrangement. Additionally, trisomy 8 and gains of 9 and 22 were seen which were not present in the initial diagnostic marrow study 3 years ago. At relapse, the bone marrow, peripheral blood, and the cerebrospinal fluid were not involved by CML. Patient received induction chemotherapy and single dose prophylactic intrathecal methotrexate and was maintained on antityrosine kinase therapy and eventually underwent allogenic stem cell transplantation.

  1. Induction of apoptosis by shikonin through a ROS/JNKmediated process in Bcr/Abl-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the signaling events induced by shikonin that lead to the induction of apoptosis in Bcr/ Abl-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells (e.g., K562, LAMA84). Treatment of K562 cells with shikonin (e.g., 0.5 μM) resulted in profound induction of apoptosis accompanied by rapid generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), striking activation of c-Jun-N-terminai kinase (JNK) and p38, marked release of the mitochondrial proteins cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO, activation of caspase-9 and -3, and cleavage of PARP. Scavenging of ROS completely blocked all of the above-mentioned events (i.e., JNK and p38 phosphorylation, cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO release, caspase and PARP cleavage, as well as the induction of apoptosis) following shikonin treatment. Inhibition of JNK and knock-down of JNKI significantly attenuated cytochrome c release, caspase cleavage and apoptosis, but did not affect shikonin-mediated ROS production. Additionally, inhibition of caspase activation completely blocked shikonin-induced apoptosis, but did not appreciably modify shikonin-mediated cytochrome c release or ROS generation. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that shikonin-induced oxidative injury operates at a proximal point in apoptotic signaling cascades, and subsequently activates the stress-related JNK pathway, triggers mitochondrial dysfunction, cytochrome c release, and caspase activation, and leads to apoptosis. Our data also suggest that shikonin may be a promising agent for the treatment of CML, as a generator of ROS.

  2. Safranal, a Crocus sativus L constituent suppresses the growth of K-562 cells of chronic myelogenous leukemia. In silico and in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geromichalos, George D; Papadopoulos, Theophanis; Sahpazidou, Despina; Sinakos, Zacharias

    2014-12-01

    Crocin, a main constituent of Crocus sativus L (saffron), has been found to inhibit the growth of K-562 human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells expressing Bcr-Abl protein tyrosine kinase activity. The aim of our study is to investigate the ability of the bioactive saffron's constituents, crocin (CRC) and safranal (SFR), to inhibit the Bcr-Abl protein activity employing an in silico approach, as well as the in vitro effect of these compounds on K-562 growth and gene expression of Bcr-Abl. In silico molecular docking studies revealed that mostly SFR can be attached to Bcr-Abl protein, positioned inside the protein's binding cavity at the same place with the drug used in the treatment of CML, imatinib mesylate (IM). The predicted polar interactions and hydrophobic contacts constructing a hydrophobic cavity inside the active site, explain the observed inhibitory activity. Cytotoxicity experiments showed that SFR and CRC mediate cytotoxic response to K562 cells. In vitro studies on the expression of Bcr-Abl gene revealed that SFR and in a lesser degree IM inhibited the expression of the gene, while in contrast CRC induced an increase. The ultimate goal was to evaluate the existence of a potential antitumor activity of saffron's constituents SFR and CRC.

  3. Integrative genomic analysis in K562 chronic myelogenous leukemia cells reveals that proximal NCOR1 binding positively regulates genes that govern erythroid differentiation and Imatinib sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Mark D; van den Berg, Patrick R; Russell, James L; Singh, Prashant K; Battaglia, Sebastiano; Campbell, Moray J

    2015-09-01

    To define the functions of NCOR1 we developed an integrative analysis that combined ENCODE and NCI-60 data, followed by in vitro validation. NCOR1 and H3K9me3 ChIP-Seq, FAIRE-seq and DNA CpG methylation interactions were related to gene expression using bootstrapping approaches. Most NCOR1 combinations (24/44) were associated with significantly elevated level expression of protein coding genes and only very few combinations related to gene repression. DAVID's biological process annotation revealed that elevated gene expression was uniquely associated with acetylation and ETS binding. A matrix of gene and drug interactions built on NCI-60 data identified that Imatinib significantly targeted the NCOR1 governed transcriptome. Stable knockdown of NCOR1 in K562 cells slowed growth and significantly repressed genes associated with NCOR1 cistrome, again, with the GO terms acetylation and ETS binding, and significantly dampened sensitivity to Imatinib-induced erythroid differentiation. Mining public microarray data revealed that NCOR1-targeted genes were significantly enriched in Imatinib response gene signatures in cell lines and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients. These approaches integrated cistrome, transcriptome and drug sensitivity relationships to reveal that NCOR1 function is surprisingly most associated with elevated gene expression, and that these targets, both in CML cell lines and patients, associate with sensitivity to Imatinib.

  4. Rearrangement and expression of beta-T-cell receptor and immunoglobulin genes in established Ph1 chronic myelogenous leukemia cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenson, J; Koeffler, H P

    1989-01-01

    We have determined the arrangement and expression of immunoglobulin (Ig) and beta-T-cell receptor (TCR) genes in six established Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph1) chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cell lines, and correlated these results with their phenotypic characteristics. Three cell lines with nonlymphoid characteristics, EM2, EM3, and K562, did not demonstrate rearrangement or expression of Ig or beta-TCR genes. A new cell line, MB, with a mature B-cell phenotype recently established in our laboratory, contained light and heavy chain immunoglobulin gene rearrangements and expressed mature Ig RNA. In a cell line with an early lymphoid phenotype, BV173, this analysis showed rearrangement of Ig heavy chain and beta-TCR genes, unrearranged Ig light chain DNA, and expression of only an immature beta-TCR transcript. This line provides evidence for T-cell lineage involvement in Ph1 CML. One cell line without markers of any cell type, KCL-22, demonstrated rearranged, unexpressed Ig heavy chain genes, suggesting these cells are at the very earliest stages of lymphoid differentiation. These lines should provide valuable tools to dissect the molecular biology of differentiation in CML and in early lymphocytes.

  5. Establishment and Utilization of a Tetracycline-controlled Inducible RNA Interfering System to Repress Gene Expression in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan YANG; Yun ZHANG; Ying-Li CAO; Shu-Hui WANG; Li LIU

    2005-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi), a posttranscriptional gene silencing process mediated by small doublestranded RNA specifically complementary to the targeted transcript, has been used extensively in the development of novel therapeutic approaches against various human diseases including chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML).Here, we report the successful construction of a tetracycline-controlled siRNA in CML cell line K562. A K562 cell line stably expressing the reverse tetracycline-controlled transactivator (rtTA) was constructed. A tetracycline responsive element (TRE) was integrated into the RNA polymerase Ⅲ promoter region of pBS/U6 that was used to drive specific siRNA to target the novel cytokine receptor-like factor 3 (CRLF3) gene. The results show that rtTA was able to recognize the TRE to prevent siRNA-mediated exogenous and endogenous CRLF3 gene repressions. Moreover, CRLF3-siRNA mediated gene repression could be induced in a dose-dependent manner in the presence of doxycycline. Thus, the inducible siRNAi system in K562 cells might be useful for the study of RNAi-mediated therapeutic approaches against CML.

  6. Busulfan and Etoposide Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Low-Dose Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Clofarabine or Daunorubicin Hydrochloride and Cytarabine Followed By Decitabine or Observation in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Tacrolimus and Methotrexate With or Without Sirolimus in Preventing Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Young Patients Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-23

    B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Graft Versus Host Disease; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  9. Acute myeloid leukemia masquerading as hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Zeinah, Ghaith F; Weisman, Paul; Ganesh, Karuna; Katz, Seth S; Dogan, Ahmet; Abou-Alfa, Ghassan K; Stein, Eytan M; Jarnagin, William; Mauro, Michael J; Harding, James J

    2016-06-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is often diagnosed on the basis of high quality imaging without a biopsy in the cirrhotic liver. This is a case of a 64-year-old Caucasian man with no history of liver disease or cirrhosis that presented with fatigue, weight loss, and abdominal distension and was found to have a large, isolated liver mass with arterial enhancement and portal venous washout on triple-phase computed tomography (CT) suspicious for HCC. The patient was initially referred for a surgical evaluation. Meanwhile, he developed fevers, pancytopenia, and worsening back pain, and a subsequent spinal MRI revealed a heterogeneous bone marrow signal suspicious for metastatic disease. A bone marrow biopsy that followed was diffusely necrotic. A core biopsy of the patient's liver mass was then performed and was diagnostic of acute monocytic-monoblastic leukemia. Findings from peripheral flow cytometry and a repeat bone marrow biopsy were also consistent with this diagnosis, and induction chemotherapy with cytarabine and idarubicin was initiated. This case describes a rare presentation of myeloid sarcoma (MS) as an isolated, hypervascular liver mass that mimics HCC in its radiographic appearance. Due to the broad differential for a liver mass, a confirmatory biopsy should routinely be considered prior to surgical intervention. PMID:27284485

  10. Genetic abnormalities associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Takafumi; Kanakura, Yuzuru

    2016-06-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) occurs with high frequency in childhood and is associated with high mortality in adults. Recent technical advances in next-generation sequencing have shed light on genetic abnormalities in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells as the precursor to ALL pathogenesis. Based on these genetic abnormalities, ALL is now being reclassified into newly identified subtypes. Philadelphia chromosome-like B-lineage ALL is one of the new high-risk subtypes characterized by genetic alterations that activate various signaling pathways, including those involving cytokine receptors, tyrosine kinases, and epigenetic modifiers. Philadelphia chromosome-like ALL is essentially heterogeneous; however, deletion mutations in the IKZF1 gene encoding the transcription factor IKAROS underlie many cases as a key factor inducing aggressive phenotypes and poor treatment responses. Whole-genome sequencing studies of ALL patients and ethnically matched controls also identified inherited genetic variations in lymphoid neoplasm-related genes, which are likely to increase ALL susceptibility. These findings are directly relevant to clinical hematology, and further studies on this aspect could contribute to accurate diagnosis, effective monitoring of residual disease, and patient-oriented therapies. PMID:26991355

  11. Acute myeloid leukemia in the older patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin, John E; Smith, Scott E

    2003-10-15

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an extremely heterogeneous disorder. The biology of AML is incompletely understood, but much data indicates that older patients have a more biologically diverse and chemotherapy resistant form of AML that is quite different from that seen in the younger patients. Approximately 60% of AML cases are in patients greater than 60 years of age, so the predominant burden is in older patients. This problem will be magnified in the future, because the US population is both growing and aging. When one examines the treatment outcomes of older AML patients over the last three decades, there is little progress in long-term survival. Nine major published randomized placebo controlled trials of myeloid growth factors given during induction for AML have been conducted. All of these trials with one exception demonstrated no significant impact on the clinical outcomes of complete response (CR) rate, disease-free, and overall survival. However, the duration of neutropenia was consistently and uniformly reduced by the use of growth factor in all nine of these trials. Because of the favorable impact of the colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) on resource use, antibiotic days, hospital days, etc., it can be more economical and beneficial to use CSFs in AML than to withhold use. The overall dismal outlook for the older AML patient can only be altered by clinical trials with new therapeutic agents. New cellular and molecularly targeted agents are entering clinical trials and bring hope for progress to this area of cancer therapy. PMID:14563517

  12. Acute myeloid leukemia masquerading as hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Zeinah, Ghaith F.; Weisman, Paul; Ganesh, Karuna; Katz, Seth S.; Dogan, Ahmet; Abou-Alfa, Ghassan K.; Stein, Eytan M.; Jarnagin, William; Mauro, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is often diagnosed on the basis of high quality imaging without a biopsy in the cirrhotic liver. This is a case of a 64-year-old Caucasian man with no history of liver disease or cirrhosis that presented with fatigue, weight loss, and abdominal distension and was found to have a large, isolated liver mass with arterial enhancement and portal venous washout on triple-phase computed tomography (CT) suspicious for HCC. The patient was initially referred for a surgical evaluation. Meanwhile, he developed fevers, pancytopenia, and worsening back pain, and a subsequent spinal MRI revealed a heterogeneous bone marrow signal suspicious for metastatic disease. A bone marrow biopsy that followed was diffusely necrotic. A core biopsy of the patient’s liver mass was then performed and was diagnostic of acute monocytic-monoblastic leukemia. Findings from peripheral flow cytometry and a repeat bone marrow biopsy were also consistent with this diagnosis, and induction chemotherapy with cytarabine and idarubicin was initiated. This case describes a rare presentation of myeloid sarcoma (MS) as an isolated, hypervascular liver mass that mimics HCC in its radiographic appearance. Due to the broad differential for a liver mass, a confirmatory biopsy should routinely be considered prior to surgical intervention. PMID:27284485

  13. Open Label, Phase II Study to Evaluate Efficacy and Safety of Oral Nilotinib in Philadelphia Positive (Ph+) Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-07

    Leukemia; Leukemia,Pediatric; Leukemia, Myleiod; Leukemia, Mylegenous, Chronic; Leukemia, Mylegenous, Accelerated; BCR-ABL Positive; Myeloproliferative Disorder; Bone Marrow Disease; Hematologic Diseases; Neoplastic Processes; Imatinib; Dasatinib; Enzyme Inhibitor; Protein Kinase Inhibitor

  14. ALLOGENEIC PERIPHERAL BLOOD AND BONE MARROW STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION FOR CHRONIC MYELOGENOUS LEUKEMIA: A SINGLE CENTER STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ghavamzadeh

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available In this center, from 1991 to 2002, 89 chronic myelogenous leukemic (CML patients, age ranging between 8-48 years with a median age of 29, underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Eighty-eight patients were in the first chronic phase of disease. Twenty-three patients received bone marrow transplantation (BMT and 66 patients received peripheral blood stem cell transplantations (PBSCT. Transplantation was performed at a median interval of 19 months post-diagnosis. All with five exceptions received busulfan + cyclophosphamide (Bu Cy conditioning regimens. To maintain graft vs. host disease (GVHD prophylaxis, all with three exceptions received cyclosporine + metothrexate. Administration of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF, per protocol, was included in post-transplantation regimens from the year 1999 on 48 patients. All patients received marrow transplantations from sibling donors. Fifty seven of transplanted patients are alive. Disease free survivals (DFS from 6.2 to 9.5 and from 2.2 to 6.2 years for BMT group were 38.2% and 47.8%, respectively. DFS for PBSCT group was calculated as 54.3% in a period of 1.9 to 4.6 years.

  15. Distribution of ABO blood group in children with acute leukemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meliha Sakić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study is the fi rst study about the distribution ABO blood types at children with acute leukemia in Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. The aim of the study is to point out distribution of blood type groups at children with acute leukemia (ALMethods: The number of children in this study was the following: 145 children with acute leukemia and 27 of children with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML. All of the children were treated at Hemato- Oncology Unitof Pediatric Clinic in Sarajevo, in the period January 2000 until December 2010. Age of children was between 1 month and 15 years.Results: The results showed that different blood types were registered in 93. 1% of children who got ill and treated from acute leukemia for the mentioned period. At 6. 9 % of children, none of the blood types wereregistered. It was noticed that 40.9 % children who have registered blood type O, 37% blood type A,16% blood type B and 6.5% blood type AB had AL, too. It has been observed that children with following bloodtypes had AML: O, 47.8%, A, 47.7% and AB, 30.4%.Conclusion: Signifi cance ABO types distribution was confi rmed for children with ALL, p<0, 05. The analysis of the distribution of ABO types based on gender showed that signifi cance was confi rmed at females with both ALL and AML (p<0.05.

  16. Risk Groups for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leukemia may come back in the blood and bone marrow , brain, spinal cord , testicles , or other parts of the body. ... lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that comes back outside the bone marrow may include the ... to the brain and/or spinal cord for cancer that comes back in the ...

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leukemia may come back in the blood and bone marrow , brain, spinal cord , testicles , or other parts of the body. ... lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that comes back outside the bone marrow may include the ... to the brain and/or spinal cord for cancer that comes back in the ...

  18. General Information about Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leukemia may come back in the blood and bone marrow , brain, spinal cord , testicles , or other parts of the body. ... lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that comes back outside the bone marrow may include the ... to the brain and/or spinal cord for cancer that comes back in the ...

  19. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leukemia may come back in the blood and bone marrow , brain, spinal cord , testicles , or other parts of the body. ... lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that comes back outside the bone marrow may include the ... to the brain and/or spinal cord for cancer that comes back in the ...

  20. Brachial Plexopathy due to Myeloid Sarcoma in a Patient With Acute Myeloid Leukemia After Allogenic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Yumi; Sung, Duk Hyun; Park, Yoonhong; Kim, Du Hwan

    2013-04-01

    Myeloid sarcoma is a solid, extramedullary tumor comprising of immature myeloid cells. It may occur in any organ; however, the invasion of peripheral nervous system is rare. Herein, we report the case of myeloid sarcoma on the brachial plexus. A 37-year-old woman with acute myelogenous leukemia achieved complete remission after chemotherapy. One year later, she presented right shoulder pain, progressive weakness in the right upper extremity and hypesthesia. Based on magnetic resonance images (MRI) and electrophysiologic study, a provisional diagnosis of brachial plexus neuritis was done and hence steroid pulse therapy was carried out. Three months later the patient presented epigastric pain. After upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, myeloid sarcoma of gastrointestinal tract was confirmed pathologically. Moreover, 18-fluoride fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography showed a fusiform shaped mass lesion at the brachial plexus overlapping with previous high signal lesion on the MRI. Therefore, we concluded the final diagnosis as brachial plexopathy due to myeloid sarcoma. PMID:23705126

  1. Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Focus on Novel Therapeutic Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Tara L.; M. Yair Levy

    2012-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease with variable clinical outcomes. Cytogenetic analysis reveals which patients may have favorable risk disease, but 5-year survival in this category is only approximately 60%, with intermediate and poor risk groups faring far worse. Advances in our understanding of the biology of leukemia pathogenesis and prognosis have not been matched with clinical improvements. Unsatisfactory outcomes persist for the majority of patients with AML, parti...

  2. Karyotype complexity and prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Stölzel, F.; Mohr, B.; Kramer, M.; Oelschlägel, U; Bochtler, T; Berdel, W E; Kaufmann, M; Baldus, C D; Schäfer-Eckart, K; R. Stuhlmann; Einsele, H; Krause, S W; Serve, H; Hänel, M.; Herbst, R.

    2016-01-01

    A complex aberrant karyotype consisting of multiple unrelated cytogenetic abnormalities is associated with poor prognosis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The European Leukemia Net classification and the UK Medical Research Council recommendation provide prognostic categories that differ in the definition of unbalanced aberrations as well as the number of single aberrations. The aim of this study on 3526 AML patients was to redefine and validate a cutoff for karyotype complexity...

  3. Vitamin D Protects Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells from Dexamethasone

    OpenAIRE

    Antony, Reuben; Sheng, Xia; Ehsanipour, Ehsan A.; Ng, Emily; Pramanik, Rocky; Klemm, Lars; Ichihara, Brian; Mittelman, Steven D.

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been linked with increased cancer risk, and vitamin D has been shown to be cytotoxic to some cancer cells in vitro. In the present study we evaluated whether vitamin D would have antiproliferative or cytotoxic effects on human pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Contrary to our hypotheses, calcitriol, the active form of vitamin D, had no effect on leukemia cell proliferation. Calcitriol actually had a modest effect to impair dexamethasone cytotoxicity and induct...

  4. Role of Ikaros in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Kastner, Philippe; Chan, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Ikaros is a zinc finger transcriptional regulator encoded by the Ikzf1 gene. Ikaros displays crucial functions in the hematopoietic system and its loss of function has been linked to the development of lymphoid leukemia. In particular, Ikaros has been found in recent years to be a major tumor suppressor involved in human B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Its role in T-cell leukemia, however, has been more controversial. While Ikaros deficiency appears to be very frequent in murine T-cell l...

  5. Temozolomide and cisplatin in relapsed/refractory acute leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasul Muhammad

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cisplatin depletes MGMT and increases the sensitivity of leukemia cells to temozolomide. We performed a phase I study of cisplatin and temozolomide in patients with relapsed and refractory acute leukemia. Fifteen patients had AML, 3 had ALL, and 2 had biphenotypic leukemia. The median number of prior chemotherapy regimens was 3 (1–5. Treatment was well tolerated up to the maximal doses of temozolomide 200 mg/m2/d times 7 days and cisplatin 100 mg/m2 on day 1. There was one complete remission in this heavily pretreated patient population. Five of 20 (25% patients demonstrated a significant reduction in bone marrow blasts.

  6. Philadelphia Chromosome-positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Lymphoid Blast Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolenova, Alexandra; Maloney, Kelly W; Hunger, Stephen P

    2016-08-01

    The clinical characteristics of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in lymphoid blast crisis (BC) can resemble those of Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph ALL). Because of this, there can be concern as to whether a patient with newly diagnosed Ph leukemia has Ph ALL or CML in lymphoid BC. This distinction has significant potential therapeutic implications because most children with Ph ALL are now treated with chemotherapy plus a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, whereas allogeneic stem cell transplant is usually recommended for any patient with CML that presents in or later develops BC. PMID:27164534

  7. GLUCOCORTICOID RECEPTOR IN CHILDHOOD ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ping; LIAO Qing-kui; LUO Chun-hua

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship among glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) level, immunological classification and clinical efficacy of chemotherapy in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) children. Methods: The GCR level of venous blood lymphocytes was measured by receptor radioligand binding assay in 50 cases with childhood ALL and 41 normal children. The immunological classification of 32 children with ALL was analyzed by ABC immunoenzymatic method. Results: The GCR number in venous blood lymphocytes of normal children was 4651±1617 binding sites/cell. The normal range (95%) was 1482-7800 binding sites/cell. The GCR level of 50 cases with ALL (6695±5256 binding sites/cell) was significantly higher than that of the normal ones (t=2.50, P<0.05). The GCR level of the ALL children with good prognosis was significantly higher than that of bad prognosis (t=4.39,P<0.001). The relationship between immunological classification and GCR level of 32 cases with children ALL was as follows: GCR level of T-ALL and B-ALL were significantly lower than AUL, C-ALL and pre-B-ALL; the prognosis of T-ALL and B-ALL was also bad; the GCR level of the group with good prognosis was significantly higher than that with bad prognosis in all immunological types. Conclusion: The GCR level of the peripheral venous blood lymphocytes in children ALL may be an important biochemistry indicator and used to predict prognosis and guide combination chemotherapy. The relationship between GCR and immunological classification can be useful to the expectation of prognosis.

  8. CYTOGENETIC FINDINGS IN ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh. Toogeh

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetics has now been well established as one of the most valuable prognostic factors in acute myeloid leukemia (AML. This is the first study to describe the cytogenetic findings in Iranian AML patients. During 1998 to 2001, 104 patients with adult de novo AML (excluding M3 were diagnosed and treated with the standard protocols in our center. Adequate cytogenetic analysis performed on bone marrow at diagnosis was available in 39 of these patients. Clonal chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 74.4% of the patients. The chromosomal changes seen in this study in order of frequency were: t(9;22, trisomy 11 [n=4, 10.3%], trisomy 8, Abn (3q[n=3, 7.7%], trisomy 22, monosomy 7/del (7q, monosomy X, complex karyotype [n=2, 5.1%], and t (8;21, t (6;9, trisomy 21, monosomy 5/del (5q, monosomy Y, and Abn (11q [n=1, 2.6%]. We also categorized the patients into favorable (2.6%, intermediate (74.4%, and unfavorable (23.1% prognostic groups based on the criteria defined by Grimwade et al in MRC-AML-10. The frequencies of different clinical and paraclinical indices were studied in these groups. Notably, complete remission (CR rates after one cycle of chemotherapy were 60.0% and 25.0% in intermediate and unfavorable prognostic groups respectively. The overall CR rates were 83.3% and 66.6% in the mentioned groups. These findings are somewhat comparable to the results of the larger studies in other countries, suggesting the importance of cytogenetics in Iranian patients. The differences could be due to methodological variations (notably exclusion of AML-M3 in this study, and the small sample size, although ethnic and geographical differences should not be disregarded. To further clarify these results with statistical significance a larger analytical study with a greater sample size is certainly needed

  9. Cytogenetic studies of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek Abd -Alla Atia

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML describes as a group of hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by expansion of undifferentiated myeloid progenitors. Acquired chromosomal anomaly particularly reciprocal translocations constitute one of the major events contribute to leukemogenesis. Patient and Methods: 45 untreated, newly diagnosed patients with de novo AML were enrolled in the present study and subjected to cytogenetic analysis. Four ml of heparinized peripheral blood were collected for 72 hours synchronized culture, and then chromosome G- banding analysis was performed using standard methods. The karyotypes were designated according to the International System for Human Cytogenetic Nomenclature (ISCN. The collected data were analyzed statistically. Result: Cytogenetic analysis and karyotype results were obtained in 45 patients with de novo AML. Males constituted 33.3%, and females constituted 66.7% of this group. The patients' age ranged from 17-60 years. Chromosomal anomalies have been detected in 21 out of 45 patients (46.7%. However five different types of chromosome anomalies have been detected; where seven cases (33.3% carrying t(15;17( q22;q21; six cases (28.5% carrying t(8;21(q22;q22; three cases (14.3% had trisomy 8; three cases (14.3% had monosomy 7; and lastly two cases (9.5% carrying inv(3(q21q26. Conclusion: Conventional cytogenetic analysis reliability detects chromosomal abnormalities in AML patients at the time of diagnosis. Chromosomal anomalies detected in Egyptian AML patients, are similar to some extent to those recorded in other areas of the world

  10. Prognostic impact of persistent cytogenetic abnormalities at complete remission in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Nicholas J; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Jabbour, Elias J; O'Brien, Susan M; Faderl, Stefan; Burger, Jan A; Garris, Rebecca; Qiao, Wei; Huang, Xuelin; Jain, Nitin; Konopleva, Marina; Kadia, Tapan M; Daver, Naval; Borthakur, Gautam; Cortes, Jorge E; Ravandi, Farhad

    2016-06-01

    In acute myelogenous leukemia, the persistent detection of abnormal cytogenetics at complete remission (ACCR) is associated with inferior outcomes. However, the prognostic significance of ACCR in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is unknown. We evaluated 272 adult patients with ALL and abnormal cytogenetics at baseline who were treated with frontline induction chemotherapy, achieved complete remission (CR) and had cytogenetic analysis performed at the time of CR. ACCR was observed in 26 patients (9.6%). Median relapse-free survival was 22 months (95% CI, 12 months to not reached) for patients with ACCR vs. 48 months (range, 30-125 months) in patients with normal cytogenetics at CR (NCCR; P = 0.31). Median overall survival also did not differ significantly between the ACCR (99 months [range, 17 months to not reached]) and NCCR groups (67 months [range, 47 months to not reached], P = 0.86). The specificity of ACCR for minimal residual disease (MRD) positivity by multi-parameter flow cytometry (MFC) was 43%, and there was overall poor correlation between these two methods for the detection of residual disease. When patients were stratified by MRD status, the presence or absence of persistent cytogenetic abnormalities at CR did not add additional prognostic information. This study suggests that there is poor association between MRD assessment by MFC and the presence or absence of cytogenetic abnormalities at CR in adult patients with ALL. ACCR was not associated with adverse outcomes in ALL and did not add additional prognostic information when MRD status by MFC was known.

  11. Prognostic impact of persistent cytogenetic abnormalities at complete remission in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Nicholas J; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Jabbour, Elias J; O'Brien, Susan M; Faderl, Stefan; Burger, Jan A; Garris, Rebecca; Qiao, Wei; Huang, Xuelin; Jain, Nitin; Konopleva, Marina; Kadia, Tapan M; Daver, Naval; Borthakur, Gautam; Cortes, Jorge E; Ravandi, Farhad

    2016-06-01

    In acute myelogenous leukemia, the persistent detection of abnormal cytogenetics at complete remission (ACCR) is associated with inferior outcomes. However, the prognostic significance of ACCR in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is unknown. We evaluated 272 adult patients with ALL and abnormal cytogenetics at baseline who were treated with frontline induction chemotherapy, achieved complete remission (CR) and had cytogenetic analysis performed at the time of CR. ACCR was observed in 26 patients (9.6%). Median relapse-free survival was 22 months (95% CI, 12 months to not reached) for patients with ACCR vs. 48 months (range, 30-125 months) in patients with normal cytogenetics at CR (NCCR; P = 0.31). Median overall survival also did not differ significantly between the ACCR (99 months [range, 17 months to not reached]) and NCCR groups (67 months [range, 47 months to not reached], P = 0.86). The specificity of ACCR for minimal residual disease (MRD) positivity by multi-parameter flow cytometry (MFC) was 43%, and there was overall poor correlation between these two methods for the detection of residual disease. When patients were stratified by MRD status, the presence or absence of persistent cytogenetic abnormalities at CR did not add additional prognostic information. This study suggests that there is poor association between MRD assessment by MFC and the presence or absence of cytogenetic abnormalities at CR in adult patients with ALL. ACCR was not associated with adverse outcomes in ALL and did not add additional prognostic information when MRD status by MFC was known. PMID:26800008

  12. Tretinoin and Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-08

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Myeloid Neoplasm

  13. The JAK2V617F activating mutation occurs in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia, but not in acute lymphoblastic leukemia or chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Levine, Ross L; Loriaux, Marc; Huntly, Brian J.P.; Loh, Mignon L.; Beran, Miroslav; Stoffregen, Eric; Berger, Roland; Clark, Jennifer J; Willis, Stephanie G; Kim T. Nguyen; Flores, Nikki J.; Estey, Elihu; Gattermann, Norbert; Armstrong, Scott; Look, A. Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Activating mutations in tyrosine kinases have been identified in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic malignancies. Recently, we and others identified a single recurrent somatic activating mutation (JAK2V617F) in the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) tyrosine kinase in the myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs) polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and myeloid metaplasia with myelofibrosis. We used direct sequence analysis to determine if the JAK2V617F mutation was present in acute myeloid leukemia (A...

  14. Jak2 inhibition deactivates Lyn kinase through the SET–PP2A–SHP1 pathway, causing apoptosis in drug-resistant cells from chronic myelogenous leukemia patients

    OpenAIRE

    Samanta, AK; Chakraborty, SN; Wang, Y.; Kantarjian, H; Sun, X.; Hood, J; Perrotti, D; Arlinghaus, RB

    2009-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients treated with imatinib mesylate (IM) become drug resistant by mutations within the kinase domain of Bcr–Abl, and by other changes that cause progression to advanced stage (blast crisis) and increased expression of the Lyn tyrosine kinase, the regulation of which is not understood yet. In Bcr–Abl+ cells inhibition of Jak2, a downstream target of Bcr–Abl, by either Jak2 inhibitors or Jak2-specific short interfering RNA (siRNA) reduced the level of the ...

  15. BCR/ABL-negative primitive progenitors suitable for transplantation can be selected from the marrow of most early-chronic phase but not accelerated-phase chronic myelogenous leukemia patients

    OpenAIRE

    Verfaillie, Catherine; R Bhatia; Miller, W.; F. Mortari; Van Roy, V.; Burger, S.; Mccullough, J; Stieglbauer, K; Dewald, G; Heimfeld, S; Miller, J. S.; McGlave, P B

    1996-01-01

    We have previously reported that selection of marrow cells on the basis of the CD34+HLA-DR- phenotype (34+DR-) may result in the recovery of Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)- and BCR/ABL-negative long-term culture-initiating cells (LTC-IC) in selected patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). We now present data on 27 early chronic-phase ([ECP] studied within 1 year after diagnosis) and 23 advanced-phase ([AP] late chronic phase, ie, studied >1 year from diagnosis, or accelerated phase) C...

  16. Fournier's gangrene as first presentation of promyelocytic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, HJ; Girbes, ARJ; Daenen, S

    1998-01-01

    A 50-year-old male is described who presented with Fournier's gangrene as what is probably the first manifestation of a newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), promyelocytic type or variant type M-3, according to the FAB classification. Despite aggressive fluid resuscitation, tuned infusio

  17. Imatinib induces H2AX phosphorylation and apoptosis in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells in vitro via caspase-3/Mst1 pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-jun ZHANG; Lian-ning DUAN; Cheng-rong LU; Yan CAO; Yuan LUO; Rong-feng BAO; Shu YAN; Mei XUE; Feng ZHU; Zhe WANG

    2012-01-01

    Aim:Histone H2AX is a novel tumor suppressor and its phosphorylation at the C terminus (Ser139 and Tyr142)is required for tumor cell apoptosis.The aim of the present study was to elucidate the mechanisms underlying imatinib-induced C-terminal phosphorylation of H2AX in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells in vitro.Methods:BCR-ABL-positive K562 cells were used.Microscopy,Western blotting and flow cytometry were used to study the signaling pathways that regulate imatinib-induced H2AX phosphorylation and the apoptotic mechanisms.Results:Treatment of K562 cells with imatinib (1-8 μmol/L)induced phosphorylation of H2AX at Ser139 and Tyr142 in time-and dose-dependent manners.In contrast,imatinib at the same concentrations did not affect H2AX acetylation at Lys 5,and the acetylated H2AX maintained a higher level in the cells.Meanwhile,imatinib (1-8 μmol/L)activated caspase-3 and its downstream mammalian STE20-like kinase 1 (Mst1),and induced apoptosis of K562 cells.The caspase-3 inhibitor Z-VAD (40 μmol/L)reduced imatinibinduced H2AX phosphorylation at Ser139 and Tyr142 and blocked imatinib-induced apoptosis of K562 cells.Imatinib (4 μmol/L)induced expression of Williams-Beuren syndrome transcription factor (WSTF),but not wild-type p53-induced phosphatase 1 (Wip1)in K562 cells.Conclusion:The caspase-3/Mst1 pathway is required for H2AX C-terminal phosphorylation at Ser139 and Tyr142 and subsequent apoptosis in Bcr-Abl-positive K562 cells induced by imatinib.

  18. Cessation of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with chronic-phase chronic myelogenous leukemia following durable complete molecular response: a single center facing the dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliakis, Theodoros; Papadopoulou, Vasiliki; Diamantopoulos, Panagiotis T; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis; Zervakis, Konstantinos; Giannakopoulou, Nefeli; Tilimidos, Gerassimos; Angelopoulou, Maria; Siakantaris, Marina P; Pangalis, Gerassimos; Mantzourani, Marina; Variami, Eleni; Viniou, Nora Athina

    2013-08-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), namely imatinib mesylate (IM) and recently approved second-generation TKIs dasatinib and nilotinib, are currently considered the treatment of choice for newly-diagnosed chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia (CP-CML). Although treatment with TKIs has not yet been proven curative, it certainly accomplishes a sustained control of the disease in the vast majority of patients. More than a decade after the successful launching of IM in first-line treatment of CP-CML and the subsequent introduction of second-generation TKIs in this setting, the question of the possibility of TKI cessation in a specific subset of patients has emerged. Side-effects of TKIs, along with some patients' wish to abandon the drugs and the rising financial burden upon healthcare systems, have led to the dilemma whether IM can be safely withdrawn after achieving deep molecular remissions and which patients are suitable for this discontinuation. We examined the data of our patients with CML in search of potential canditates for cessation of TKI therapy and identified their characteristics. We also performed a thorough review of the relevant literature. Eight out of fifty patients were discriminated on grounds of sustained complete molecular response (CMR) exceeding 12 months, most of them with a low or intermediate Sokal score at diagnosis. The median interval from IM initiation to CMR was almost 2 years and the median duration of detected CMR reached 6.5 years. Based on the promising results of prospective clinical trials reporting successful cessation of treatment with TKIs on selected subgroups of patients, we decided to proceed to interruption of therapy in the specific subset of our patients and closely monitor their response. PMID:23898127

  19. Decitabine and Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-08

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Ploidy and clinical characteristics of childhood acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandahl, Julie Damgaard; Kjeldsen, Eigil; Abrahamsson, Jonas;

    2014-01-01

    We report the first large series (n = 596) of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) focusing on modal numbers (MN) from the population-based NOPHO-AML trials. Abnormal karyotypes were present in 452 cases (76%) and numerical aberrations were present in 40% (n = 237) of all pediatric AML. Among...... with early onset (median age 2 years), female sex (57%), and a dominance of acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) (29%). Hypodiploidy constituted 8% of all AML and was associated with older age (median age 9 years), male predominance (60%), FAB M2 (56%), and t(8;21)(q22;q22) (56%) with loss of sex...

  1. Esophageal strictures during treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Kevin

    2012-02-01

    Esophageal stricture is a rare complication of paediatric cancer treatment that usually occurs after esophageal exposure to radiotherapy. We describe 4 cases of esophageal stricture during chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. All patients presented with refractory vomiting and were diagnosed with radiologic contrast studies. None of the patients had received radiotherapy. Esophageal candidiasis was seen in 2 patients but the remaining 2 patients had earlier systemic candidiasis. High-dose dexamethasone may predispose these children to both esophageal candidiasis and peptic esophagitis. The etiology of esophageal strictures during treatment for acute leukemia is likely to be multifactorial but systemic candidiasis may play a significant role.

  2. Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fluid (CSF, the fluid surrounding the brain and spinal cord) for examination in a lab. Flow cytometry tests. Using markers on leukemia cells collected from the blood, bone marrow, and/or CSF, doctors can determine the type ...

  3. Detection of Telomerase Activity and the Expression of Telomerase Subunits in the Patients with Acute Myelogenous Leukaemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李一荣; 吴健民; 王琳; 陈凤花; 胡丽华

    2004-01-01

    Summary: Telomerase activity and the expression of telomerase subunits (for example, telomerase reverse transcriptase and telomerase associated protein 1 and telomerase RNA component) of peripheral white blood cells were detected in the patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML)and the correlation between telomerase activity and the expression of telomerase subunits was observed. In 94 peripheral white blood cells from 18 healthy volunteers and 76 patients with AML,including 31 AML at initial presentation, 24 at relapse and 21 at complete remission, the telomerase activity and telomerase subunits mRNA or RNA were detected by PCR-ELISA and RT-PCR respectively. The results showed that the positive rate of telomerase from patients with AML at initial presentation, at relapse and at complete remission was 74.1 %, 79.2 % and 4.8 % respectively.The positive rate of telomerase reverse transcriptase mRNA from healthy volunteers, AML at initial presentation, AML at relapse and AML at complete remission was 5.6 %, 80. 6 %, 83.3 %and 9.5 % respectively. The positive rate of telomerase associated protein 1 mRNA and telomerase RNA component in all samples were 100 %. It was suggested that the up-regulation of telomerase activity and the expression of telomerase reverse transcriptase is correlated closely with the occurrence and relapse of AML, so telomerase activity and the expression of telomerase reverse transcriptase may be used to estimate the curative effect and predict relapse of AML. Moreover, the upregulation of telomerase activity is correlated with the expression of telomerase reverse transcriptase significantly.

  4. Understanding Health Care Costs in a Wisconsin Acute Leukemia Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Steinert

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We investigated factors driving health care costs of patients with a diagnosis of acute myeloid and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods: Standard costs identified in insurance claims data obtained from the Wisconsin Health Information Organization were used in a sample of 837 acute leukemia patients from April 2009 to June 2011. The Andersen behavioral model of health care utilization guided selection of patient and community factors expected to influence health care costs. A generalized linear model fitting gamma-distributed data with log-link technique was used to analyze cost. Results: Type of treatment received and disease severity represented significant cost drivers, and patients receiving at least some of their treatment from academic medical centers experienced higher costs. Inpatient care and pharmacy costs of patients who received treatment from providers located in areas of higher poverty experienced lower costs, raising questions of potential treatment and medical practice disparities between provider locations. Directions of study findings were not consistent between different types of services received and underscore the complexity of investigating health care cost. Conclusions: While prevalence of acute leukemia in the United States is low compared to other diseases, its extreme high cost of treatment is not well understood and potentially influences treatment decisions. Acute leukemia health care costs may not follow expected patterns; further exploration of the relationship between cost and the treatment decision, and potential treatment disparities between providers in different socioeconomic locations, is needed.

  5. Childhood acute leukemias are frequent in Mexico City: descriptive epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekker-Méndez Vilma

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide, acute leukemia is the most common type of childhood cancer. It is particularly common in the Hispanic populations residing in the United States, Costa Rica, and Mexico City. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of acute leukemia in children who were diagnosed and treated in public hospitals in Mexico City. Methods Included in this study were those children, under 15 years of age and residents of Mexico City, who were diagnosed in 2006 and 2007 with leukemia, as determined by using the International Classification of Childhood Cancer. The average annual incidence rates (AAIR, and the standardized average annual incidence rates (SAAIR per million children were calculated. We calculated crude, age- and sex-specific incidence rates and adjusted for age by the direct method with the world population as standard. We determined if there were a correlation between the incidence of acute leukemias in the various boroughs of Mexico City and either the number of agricultural hectares, the average number of persons per household, or the municipal human development index for Mexico (used as a reference of socio-economic level. Results Although a total of 610 new cases of leukemia were registered during 2006-2007, only 228 fit the criteria for inclusion in this study. The overall SAAIR was 57.6 per million children (95% CI, 46.9-68.3; acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL was the most frequent type of leukemia, constituting 85.1% of the cases (SAAIR: 49.5 per million, followed by acute myeloblastic leukemia at 12.3% (SAAIR: 6.9 per million, and chronic myeloid leukemia at 1.7% (SAAIR: 0.9 per million. The 1-4 years age group had the highest SAAIR for ALL (77.7 per million. For cases of ALL, 73.2% had precursor B-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR: 35.8 per million and 12.4% had T-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR 6.3 per million. The peak ages for ALL were 2-6 years and 8-10 years. More than half the children (58.8% were

  6. Base-pair resolution DNA methylation sequencing reveals profoundly divergent epigenetic landscapes in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altuna Akalin

    Full Text Available We have developed an enhanced form of reduced representation bisulfite sequencing with extended genomic coverage, which resulted in greater capture of DNA methylation information of regions lying outside of traditional CpG islands. Applying this method to primary human bone marrow specimens from patients with Acute Myelogeneous Leukemia (AML, we demonstrated that genetically distinct AML subtypes display diametrically opposed DNA methylation patterns. As compared to normal controls, we observed widespread hypermethylation in IDH mutant AMLs, preferentially targeting promoter regions and CpG islands neighboring the transcription start sites of genes. In contrast, AMLs harboring translocations affecting the MLL gene displayed extensive loss of methylation of an almost mutually exclusive set of CpGs, which instead affected introns and distal intergenic CpG islands and shores. When analyzed in conjunction with gene expression profiles, it became apparent that these specific patterns of DNA methylation result in differing roles in gene expression regulation. However, despite this subtype-specific DNA methylation patterning, a much smaller set of CpG sites are consistently affected in both AML subtypes. Most CpG sites in this common core of aberrantly methylated CpGs were hypermethylated in both AML subtypes. Therefore, aberrant DNA methylation patterns in AML do not occur in a stereotypical manner but rather are highly specific and associated with specific driving genetic lesions.

  7. Dasatinib in high-risk core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission: a French Acute Myeloid Leukemia Intergroup trial

    OpenAIRE

    Boissel, Nicolas; Renneville, Aline; Leguay, Thibaut; Lefebvre, Pascale Cornillet; Recher, Christian; Lecerf, Thibaud; Delabesse, Eric; Berthon, Céline; Blanchet, Odile; Prebet, Thomas; Pautas, Cécile; Chevallier, Patrice; Leprêtre, Stéphane; Girault, Stéphane; Bonmati, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia is a favorable acute myeloid leukemia subset cytogenetically defined by t(8;21) or inv(16)/t(16;16) rearrangements, disrupting RUNX1 (previously CBFA/AML1) or CBFB transcription factor functions. The receptor tyrosine kinase KIT is expressed in the vast majority of these acute myeloid leukemias and frequent activating KIT gene mutations have been associated with a higher risk of relapse. This phase II study aimed to evaluate dasatinib as maintenance ...

  8. How mRNA is misspliced in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML)?

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, Aminetou Mint; Thénoz, Morgan; Solly, Françoise; Balsat, Marie; Mortreux, Franck; Wattel, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Approximately one-third of expressed genes are misspliced in AML, opening the possibility that additional factors than splicing factor mutations might cause RNA missplicing in these diseases. AML cells harbor a constellation of epigenetic modifications and regularly express large amounts of WT1 transcripts. Histone acetylation/methylation and DNA CpG methylation favor either exon skipping or inclusion, mainly through interfering with RNA Pol II-mediated elongation. This can result either from...

  9. [Tumor lysis syndrome in a pregnancy complicated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Goris, M P; Sánchez-Zamora, R; Torres-Aguilar, A A; Briones Garduño, J C

    2016-04-01

    Acute leukemia is rare during pregnancy, affects about 1 in 75,000 pregnancies, of all leukemias diagnosed only 28% are acute lymphoblastic leukemia, this is a risk factor to develop spontaneous tumor lysis syndrome, it's a oncologic complication potentially deadly if the prophylactic treatment its avoided. Cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia associated with pregnancy has been poorly documented in the literature the association of these two entities to pregnancy is the first report published worldwide, so the information is limited. PMID:27443101

  10. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Arising in CALR Mutated Essential Thrombocythemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen E. Langabeer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in an existing myeloproliferative neoplasm is rare with historical cases unable to differentiate between concomitant malignancies or leukemic transformation. Molecular studies of coexisting JAK2 V617F-positive myeloproliferative neoplasms and mature B cell malignancies indicate distinct disease entities arising in myeloid and lymphoid committed hematopoietic progenitor cells, respectively. Mutations of CALR in essential thrombocythemia appear to be associated with a distinct phenotype and a lower risk of thrombosis yet their impact on disease progression is less well defined. The as yet undescribed scenario of pro-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia arising in CALR mutated essential thrombocythemia is presented. Intensive treatment for the leukemia allowed for expansion of the original CALR mutated clone. Whether CALR mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms predispose to the acquisition of additional malignancies, particularly lymphoproliferative disorders, is not yet known.

  11. Leukemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Masetti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemia is the most common type of childhood and adolescence cancer, characterized by clonal proliferation of variably differentiated myeloid or lymphoid precursors. Recent insights into the molecular pathogenesis of leukemia have shown that epigenetic modifications, such as deacetylation of histones and DNA methylation, play crucial roles in leukemogenesis, by transcriptional silencing of critical genes. Histone deacetylases (HDACs are potential targets in the treatment of leukaemia, and, as a consequence, inhibitors of HDACs (HDIs are being studied for therapeutic purposes. HDIs promote or enhance several different anticancer mechanisms, such as apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and cellular differentiation and, therefore, are in evidence as promising treatment for children and adolescents with acute leukemia, in monotherapy or in association with other anticancer drugs. Here we review the main preclinical and clinical studies regarding the use of HDIs in treating childhood and adolescence leukemia.

  12. Pathogenesis of disseminated intravascular coagulation in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia, and its treatment using recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikezoe, Takayuki

    2014-07-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is an uncommon subtype of acute myelogenous leukemia characterized by the proliferation of blasts with distinct morphology, a specific balanced reciprocal translocation t(15;17), and life-threatening hemorrhage caused mainly by enhanced fibrinolytic-type disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). The introduction of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) into anthracycline-based induction chemotherapy regimens has dramatically improved overall survival of individuals with APL, although hemorrhage-related death during the early phase of therapy remains a serious problem. Moreover, population-based studies have shown that the incidence of early death during induction chemotherapy is nearly 30 %, and the most common cause of death is associated with hemorrhage. Thus, development of a novel treatment strategy to alleviate abnormal coagulation in APL patients is urgently required. Recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin (rTM) comprises the active extracellular domain of TM, and has been used for treatment of DIC since 2008 in Japan. Use of rTM in combination with remission induction chemotherapy, including ATRA, produces potent resolution of DIC without exacerbation of bleeding tendency in individuals with APL. This review article discusses the pathogenesis and features of DIC caused by APL, as well as the possible anticoagulant and anti-leukemic action of rTM in APL patients.

  13. Antibodies: Immunoconjugates and autologous cellular therapy in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advani, Anjali

    2015-01-01

    Using a case study of a 57-year-old man with relapsed/refractory precursor-B (pre-B) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), this review discusses treatment with immunoconjugates and autologous therapy in acute ALL. Three therapies--blinatumomab, inotuzumab, and CAR T cells--are considered here, each with advantages in specific clinical situations. These therapies represent some of the exciting advances that have been made in the treatment of ALL over the last several years.

  14. Collaborative efforts driving progress in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Zwaan (Michel); E.A. Kolb (Edward A.); D. Reinhardt (Dirk); J. Abrahamsson; S. Adachi (Susumu); R. Aplenc (Richard); E.S.J.M. de Bont (Eveline); B. de Moerloose (Barbara); M.N. Dworzak (Michael); B. Gibson (Brenda); H. Hasle (Henrik); G. Leverger (Guy); F. Locatelli (Franco); C. Ragu (Christine); R.C. Ribeiro (Raul C.); C. Rizzari (Carmelo); J.E. Rubnitz (Jeffrey); O.P. Smith (Owen Patrick); L. Sung (Lillian); D. Tomizawa (Daisuke); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry); U. Creutzig; G.J. Kaspers (Gertjan)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractDiagnosis, treatment, response monitoring, and outcome of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have made enormous progress during the past decades. Because AML is a rare type of childhood cancer, with an incidence of approximately seven occurrences per 1 million children annually, nati

  15. Collaborative Efforts Driving Progress in Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, C. Michel; Kolb, Edward A.; Reinhardt, Dirk; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Adachi, Souichi; Aplenc, Richard; De Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; De Moerloose, Barbara; Dworzak, Michael; Gibson, Brenda E. S.; Hasle, Henrik; Leverger, Guy; Locatelli, Franco; Ragu, Christine; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Rizzari, Carmelo; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Smith, Owen P.; Sung, Lillian; Tomizawa, Daisuke; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Creutzig, Ursula; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis, treatment, response monitoring, and outcome of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have made enormous progress during the past decades. Because AML is a rare type of childhood cancer, with an incidence of approximately seven occurrences per 1 million children annually, national and int

  16. Second Malignant Neoplasms After Treatment of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, K.; Levinsen, Mette Frandsen; Attarbaschi, Andishe;

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Second malignant neoplasms (SMNs) after diagnosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are rare events. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed data on risk factors and outcomes of 642 children with SMNs occurring after treatment for ALL from 18 collaborative study groups between 19...

  17. L-asparaginase treatment in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Pieters (Rob); S.P. Hunger (Stephen); J. Boos (Joachim); C. Rizzari (Carmelo); L.B. Silverman (Lewis); A. Baruchel (André); N. Goekbuget (Nicola); M. Schrappe (Martin); C.H. Pui (Ching-Hon)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAsparaginases are a cornerstone of treatment protocols for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and are used for remission induction and intensification treatment in all pediatric regimens and in the majority of adult treatment protocols. Extensive clinical data have shown that intensive a

  18. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children with Down syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buitenkamp, Trudy D; Izraeli, Shai; Zimmermann, Martin;

    2014-01-01

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) have an increased risk of B-cell precursor (BCP) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The prognostic factors and outcome of DS-ALL patients treated in contemporary protocols are uncertain. We studied 653 DS-ALL patients enrolled in 16 international trials from 1995...

  19. Pharmacokineties of vincristine monotherapy in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groninger, E; Meeuwsen-de Boer, T; Koopmans, P; UGes, D; Sluiter, W; Veerman, A; Kamps, W

    2002-01-01

    We studied vincristine pharmacokinetics in 70 children newly diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, after a single dose of vincristine as monotherapy. Vincristine plasma concentrations were measured by HPLC analysis. A two-compartment, first-order pharmacokinetic model was fitted to the data b

  20. Molecular mechanisms of glucocorticoid resistance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J.E. Tissing (Wim)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractAcute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common form of cancer in children, with 110 – 120 newly diagnosed children in the Netherlands each year. ALL is a haematological malignancy of lymphoid precursor cells and can be divided into two sub-groups: B-cell precursor ALL and T-cell p

  1. Acute respiratory failure in 3 children with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Britt; Hellebostad, Marit; Ifversen, Marianne;

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia is a rare hematopoietic stem cell disease in children with features of both myelodysplasia and myeloproliferation. Extramedullary involvement has been reported and pulmonary involvement secondary to leukemic infiltration is an initial manifestation, which may resu...... in acute respiratory failure....

  2. Etiology of common childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: the adrenal hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, K.; Vestergaard, T.; Nielsen, S.M.;

    2008-01-01

    The pattern of infections in the first years of life modulates our immune system, and a low incidence of infections has been linked to an increased risk of common childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We here present a new interpretation of these observations--the adrenal hypothesis...

  3. Neurodevelopmental Sequelae of Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Its Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, Laura A.; Spiegler, Brenda J.

    2008-01-01

    This review will describe the neurocognitive outcomes associated with pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and its treatment. The literature is reviewed with the aim of addressing methodological issues, treatment factors, risks and moderators, special populations, relationship to neuroimaging findings, and directions for future research.…

  4. Comorbidity and performance status in acute myeloid leukemia patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østgård, L S G; Nørgaard, J.M; Sengeløv, H;

    2015-01-01

    As the world population ages, the comorbidity burden in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients increases. Evidence on how to integrate comorbidity measures into clinical decision-making is sparse. We determined the prognostic impact of comorbidity and World Health Organization Performance Status (PS...

  5. Vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, Kim R.; ter Elst, Arja; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    This review is designed to provide an overview of the current literature concerning vascular endothelial growth factor signaling (VEGF) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Aberrant VEGF signaling operates in the bone marrow of AML patients and is related to a poor prognosis. The altered signaling pathw

  6. Obesity in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iughetti Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common malignancy in childhood. Continuous progress in risk-adapted treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia has secured 5-year event-free survival rates of approximately 80% and 8-year survival rates approaching 90%. Almost 75% of survivors, however, have a chronic health condition negatively impacting on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Obesity can be considered one of the most important health chronic conditions in the general population, with an increasing incidence in patients treated for childhood cancers and especially in acute lymphoblastic leukemia survivors who are, at the same time, more at risk of experiencing precocious cardiovascular and metabolic co-morbidities. The hypothalamic-pituitary axis damage secondary to cancer therapies (cranial irradiation and chemotherapy or to primary tumor together with lifestyle modifications and genetic factors could affect long-term outcomes. Nevertheless, the etiology of obesity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia is not yet fully understood. The present review has the aim of summarizing the published data and examining the most accepted mechanisms and main predisposing factors related to weight gain in this particular population.

  7. Anxiety in acute leukemia patients and their family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouva M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Among other malignant diseases, acute leukemia appears to directly threaten life due to the remarkably rapid courseof illness. Although psychosocial issues related to cancer have been of a great interest, little research has beenconducted on psychological characteristics of adult patients suffering from acute leukemia and their families. Thepresent study aimed to evaluate state and trait anxiety in acute leukemia patients and their families. 111 subjectsparticipated voluntarily, including 41 patients, hospitalized at the Hematology Department of the Ioannina UniversityHospital during the year 2001, and 70 patients’ first-degree relatives. The instrument adopted was the State - TraitAnxiety Inventory (STAI. Patients and their relatives were asked to complete this self-report questionnaire and ademographic questionnaire, while being at wards. Results showed that relatives reported significantly greater stateanxiety (P= .014. Despite the possible limitations of the present study, it could be suggested that family attitudetowards a life threatening disease as well as the psychosocial needs related to such a stressful situation should bereconsidered. In order to investigate the effect of anxiety on acute leukemia, a re-evaluation of the patients and theirrelatives examined should be attempted later in the course of illness. Family involvement in the course of a malignantdisease as well as coping with such a crisis is considered as an important area of research. .

  8. Acute myocardial infarction during induction chemotherapy for acute MLL t(4;11) leukemia with lineage switch and extreme leukocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Čolović Nataša; Bogdanović Andrija; Virijević Marijana; Vidović Ana; Tomin Dragica

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. In patients with acute leukemias hemorrhage is the most frequent problem. Vein thrombotic events may appear rarely but arterial thromboses are exceptionally rare. We present a patient with acute leukemia and bilateral deep leg vein thrombosis who developed an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) during induction chemotherapy. The etiology and treatment of AMI in patients with acute leukemia, which is a rare occurrence, is discussed. Case Outline....

  9. Family history of autoimmune thyroid disease and childhood acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perillat-Menegaux, Florence; Clavel, Jacqueline; Auclerc, Marie-Françoise; Baruchel, André; Leverger, Guy; Nelken, Brigitte; Philippe, Noël; Sommelet, Danièle; Vilmer, Etienne; Hémon, Denis

    2003-01-01

    The association between a familial history of autoimmune disease and childhood acute leukemia was investigated in a French case-control study that, overall, was designed to assess the role of perinatal, infectious, environmental, and genetic factors in the etiology of childhood acute leukemia. Familial histories of autoimmune disease in first- and second-degree relatives were compared in 279 incident cases, 240 cases of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and 39 cases of acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia (ANLL), and 285 controls. Recruitment was frequency matched by age, gender, hospital, and ethnic origin. Odds ratios (OR) were estimated using an unconditional regression model taking into account the stratification variables, socioeconomic status, and familial structure. A statistically significant association between a history of autoimmune disease in first- or second-degree relatives and ALL (OR, 1.7; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.0-2.8) was found. A relationship between thyroid diseases overall and ALL (OR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.0-3.9) was observed. This association was more pronounced for potentially autoimmune thyroid diseases (Grave's disease and/or hyperthyroidism and Hashimoto's disease and/or hypothyroidism) (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.1-10.7 and OR, 5.6; 95% CI, 1.0-31.1, respectively for ALL and ANLL), whereas it was not statistically significant for the other thyroid diseases (thyroid goiter, thyroid nodule, and unspecified thyroid disorders) (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 0.7-3.5 and OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.2-7.0, respectively, for ALL and ANLL). The results suggest that a familial history of autoimmune thyroid disease may be associated with childhood acute leukemia.

  10. BCL11A expression in acute phase chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jiawei; Zhang, Fan; Tao, Huiquan; Ma, Xiao; Su, Guangsong; Xie, Xiaoli; Xu, Zhongjuan; Zheng, Yanwen; Liu, Hong; He, Chao; Mao, Zhengwei Jenny; Wang, Zhiwei; Chang, Weirong; Gale, Robert Peter; Wu, Depei; Yin, Bin

    2016-08-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has chronic and acute phases. In chronic phase myeloid differentiation is preserved whereas in acute phase myeloid differentiation is blocked. Acute phase CML resembles acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Chronic phase CML is caused by BCR-ABL1. What additional mutation(s) cause transition to acute phase is unknown and may differ in different persons with CML. BCL11A encodes a transcription factor and is aberrantly-expressed in several haematological and solid neoplasms. We analyzed BCL11A mRNA levels in subjects with chronic and acute phase CML. BCL11A transcript levels were increased in subjects with CML in acute phase compared with those in normals and in subjects in chronic phase including some subjects studied in both phases. BCL11A mRNA levels were correlated with percent bone marrow blasts and significantly higher in lymphoid versus myeloid blast crisis. Differentiation of K562 with butyric acid, a CML cell line, decreased BCL11A mRNA levels. Cytology and flow cytometry analyses showed that ectopic expression of BCL11A in K562 cells blocked differentiation. These data suggest BCL11A may operate in transformation of CML from chronic to acute phase in some persons. PMID:27285855

  11. Oral health of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadalagere Lakshmana Girish Babu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukemia is a malignancy of the bone marrow and blood. It is the most common childhood cancer in India. Advances in the treatment regimens have greatly increased the chances of survival. Both the disease and its treatment change the oral environment. In some cases, oral manifestations are the presenting feature of the disease and it will be the dentist′s responsibility to identify the underlying disorder and guide the diagnosis of the patient. Hence, the aim of present article is to review the literature concerning the oral health of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL.

  12. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total-Body Irradiation and Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ring Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ring Sideroblasts

  13. Modulation of Akt and ERK1/2 pathways by resveratrol in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML cells results in the downregulation of Hsp70.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumyajit Banerjee Mustafi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Resveratrol is known to downregulate the high endogenous level of Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML K562 cells and induce apoptosis. Since Heat Shock Factor 1 (HSF1 controls transcription of Hsp70, we wanted to probe the signaling pathways responsible for transcriptional activation of HSF1. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cells exposed to 40microM Resveratrol rapidly abolished serine473 phosphorylation of Akt and significantly reduced its kinase activity. Inactivation of Akt pathway by Resveratrol subsequently blocked serine9 phosphorylation of Gsk3beta. Active non-phosphorylated Gsk3beta rendered HSF1 transcriptionally inactive and reduced Hsp70 production. Blocking PI3K/Akt activity also demonstrated similar effects on Hsp70 comparable to Resveratrol. Inactivation of Gsk3beta activity by inhibitors SB261763 or LiCl upregulated Hsp70. Resveratrol significantly modulated ERK1/2 activity as evident from hyper phosphorylation at T302/Y304 residues and simultaneous upregulation in kinase activity. Blocking ERK1/2 activation resulted in induction of Hsp70. Therefore, increase in ERK1/2 activity by Resveratrol provided another negative influence on Hsp70 levels through negative regulation of HSF1 activity. 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17AAG, a drug that inhibits Hsp90 chaperone and degrades its client protein Akt concomitantly elevated Hsp70 levels by promoting nuclear translocation of HSF1 from the cytosol. This effect is predominantly due to inhibition of both Akt and ERK1/2 activation by 17AAG. Simultaneously treating K562 with Resveratrol and 17AAG maintained phosho-ERK1/2 levels close to untreated controls demonstrating their opposite effects on ERK1/2 pathway. Resveratrol was found not to interfere with Bcr-Abl activation in K562 cells. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Thus our study comprehensively illustrates that Resveratrol acts downstream of Bcr-Abl and inhibits Akt activity but stimulates ERK

  14. Acute leukemia of childhood: A single institution's experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavković Bojana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate distribution of immunophenotypic and cytogenetic features of childhood acute leukemia (AL in the cohort of 239 newly diagnosed patients registered at the leading pediatric oncohematology center in the country during a six-year period (1996-2002. With approximately 60-70% of all childhood AL cases in Serbia and Montenegro being diagnosed and treated in this institution the used data represent a valid research sample to draw conclusions for entire country. On the basis of five phenotypic markers, the distribution of immunological subtypes was as follows: 169 (70.7% expressed B-cell marker CD19 (137 were CD10 positive and 32 CD10 negative, 37 (15.5% belonged to T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL (cyCD3 positive, and 33 (13.8% were acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML (CD13 positive and/or CD33 positive in the absence of lymphoid-associated antigens. The ratio of males and females was 1.5:1. Most of the cases were between the ages of 2 and 4, and were predominantly B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL cases. Another peak of age distribution was observed at the age of 7. The frequency of T-ALL (18% of ALL was similar to that reported for Mediterranean countries: France (19.4%, Greece (28.1%, Southern Italy (28.3%, and Bulgaria (28.0%. Cytogenetic analyses were performed in 193 patients: 164 ALL and 29 AML. Normal karyotype was found in 57% of ALL and in 55% of AML patients, while cytogenetic abnormalities including structural, numerical, and complex chromosomal rearrangements were found in 43% of ALL and in 45% of AML patients. Our results represent a contribution to epidemiological aspects of childhood leukemia studies.

  15. The acute lymphoblastic leukemia of Down Syndrome - Genetics and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izraeli, Shai

    2016-03-01

    Children with Down Syndrome (DS) are at markedly increased risk for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The ALL is of B cell precursor (BCP) phenotype. T-ALL is only rarely diagnosed as well as infant leukemia. Gene expression profiling and cytogenetics suggest that DS-ALL is an heterogeneous disease. More than half of the leukemias are characterized by aberrant expression of the thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) receptor CRLF2 caused by genomic rearrangements. These rearrangements are often associated with somatic activating mutations in the receptors or in the downstream components of the JAK-STAT pathway. The activation of JAK-STAT pathway suggests that targeted therapy with JAK or downstream inhibitors may be effective for children with DS-ALL. The basis of the increased risk of BCP-ALL and in particular of the CRLF2 aberrations is presently unknown. Neither is it known which genes on the trisomic chromosome 21 are involved. PMID:26631987

  16. Acute Hepatitis A Induction of Precursor B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Causal Relationship?

    OpenAIRE

    Senadhi, V.; Emuron, D.; R. Gupta

    2010-01-01

    Background Precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia accounts for 2% of all lymphoid neoplasms in the United States and occurs most frequently in childhood, but can also occur in adults with a median age of 39 years. It is more commonly seen in males and in Caucasians. Case Report We present a case of a 51-year-old Caucasian female with the development of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia after suffering acute hepatitis A 4 weeks prior to her diagnosis. She presented with mala...

  17. Dronabinol has preferential antileukemic activity in acute lymphoblastic and myeloid leukemia with lymphoid differentiation patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Kampa-Schittenhelm, Kerstin Maria; Salitzky, Olaf; Akmut, Figen; Illing, Barbara; Kanz, Lothar; Salih, Helmut Rainer; Schittenhelm, Marcus Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been previously demonstrated in several cancer models, that Dronabinol (THC) may have anti-tumor activity – however, controversial data exists for acute leukemia. We have anecdotal evidence that THC may have contributed to disease control in a patient with acute undifferentiated leukemia. Methods To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the antileukemic efficacy of THC in several leukemia cell lines and native leukemia blasts cultured ex vivo. Expression analysis for the CB1/2 ...

  18. Prevalence of transient hyperglycemia and diabetes mellitus in pediatric patients with acute leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Banihashem, A; Ghasemi, A.; N. Ghaemi; Moazzen, N; Amirabadi, A

    2014-01-01

    Background The most common malignancy of children is Leukemia, accounting approximately one third of cancer diagnosis. Available data demonstrate improvement in survival of pediatric leukemia, so evaluation of side effects of treatment is very important. This study investigates hyperglycemia and diabetes mellitus prevalence in pediatric patients with acute leukemia. Materials and Methods This study was performed in children with acute leukemia. At the first admission, demographic data was col...

  19. High expression of RbAp46 gene in patients with acute leukemia or chronic myelogenous leukemia in blast crisis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Shao-yan; CHEN Zi-xing; GU Wei-ying; CEN Jian-nong; ZHAO Ye

    2005-01-01

    @@ The retinoblastoma (Rb) suppressor associated protein 46 (RbAp46) also named retinoblastoma binding protein 7 (RBBP7) was first identified as a protein in HeLa cells that binds to an Rb affinity column.RbAp46 has been shown to be a core component of the mSin3 histone deacetylase (HDAC) complex1 and NuRD ( a multi-subunit complex containing chromosome-remodeling activity).2 RbAp46 is also known as the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) type B subunit 2.3 Thus,RbAp46 functions as a core-histone-binding subunit that targets chromatin assembly factors,chromatin-remodeling factors,histone acetyltransferase and deacetylase to their histone substrates in chromatin.Guan et al4 isolated RbAp46 as a downstream target gene of the Wilms'tumor suppressor gene (WT1),mediating the function of WT1.It has been discovered recently that RbAp46 specifically interacts with the BRCT domain of breast cancer and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1 and modulates its transcriptional transactivation activity.5

  20. Evaluation of multielements in human serum of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) using SRTXRF; Avaliacao multielementar em soro humano de individuos portadores de leucemia mieloide cronica (LMC) usando SRTXRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitao, Catarine Canellas Gondim

    2005-04-15

    In this work, trace elements were analyzed in serum of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) by Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence using synchrotron radiation (SRTXRF). Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) affects the myeloid cells in the blood and affects 1 to 2 people per 100,000 and accounts for 7-20% cases of leukemia. Sixty patients with CML and sixty healthy volunteers (control group) were studied. Blood was collected into vacutainers without additives. Directly after collection, each blood sample was centrifuged at 3000 rev/min for 10 min in order to separate blood cells and suspended particles from blood serum. Sera were transferred into polyethylene tubes and stored in a freezer at 253 K. A 500 {sup m}u{sup L} serum quantity was spiked with Ga (50 {sup m}u{sup L} ) as internal standard. 10 {sup m}u{sup L} aliquots were pipetted on Perspex sample carrier. After deposition, the samples were left to dry under an infrared lamp. The measurements were performed at the X-Ray Fluorescence Beamline at Brazilian National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), using a polychromatic beam. Standard solutions with gallium as internal standard were prepared for calibration system. It was possible to determine the concentrations of the following elements: P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br and Rb. Starting from the ANOVA test was observed that the elements P, S, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu and Rb presented real significant differences ({alpha} = 0.05) between groups (healthy subjects and CML patients) and Sex (males and females). (author)

  1. Acute erythroid leukemia: autopsy report of a rare disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Rúbia Ferreira

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute erythroid leukemia (AEL is a rare subtype of acute myeloid leukemia(AML, characterized by predominant erythroid proliferation. The 2008 WorldHealth Organization (WHO classification of AML defined two AEL subtypes:erythroleukaemia (EL, in which erythroid precursors account for 50% or moreof all nucleated bone marrow cells and myeloblasts account for 20% or more ofthe nonerythroid cell population; and pure erythroid leukemia (PEL, in whicherythroid precursors account for 80% or more of all nucleated bone marrowcells. We report the case of an elderly female patient with wasting syndromeand pancytopenia without evidence of blasts in peripheral blood. A diagnosisof PEL was established on the basis of bone marrow biopsy findings. Thepatient died on postadmission day 20, and an autopsy was performed. Wereclassified the disease as EL on the basis of the autopsy findings, whichincluded myeloblasts accounting for more than 20% of the nonerythroid cellsin the bone marrow, as well as leukemic infiltration and myeloid metaplasia insolid organs, such as the liver, spleen, kidneys, adrenal glands, and abdominallymph nodes. A rare disease, AEL accounts for less than 5% of all AMLs and ispractically a diagnosis of exclusion. Autopsy reports of AEL are extremely rarein the literature. We demonstrate that in the case reported here, leukemia cellstended to infiltrate solid organs with myeloid metaplasia. Our findings alsoshow that a larger neoplastic bone marrow sample is crucial to the correctdiagnosis of EL, which is based on morphological and quantitative criteria.

  2. New decision support tool for acute lymphoblastic leukemia classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhukar, Monica; Agaian, Sos; Chronopoulos, Anthony T.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we build up a new decision support tool to improve treatment intensity choice in childhood ALL. The developed system includes different methods to accurately measure furthermore cell properties in microscope blood film images. The blood images are exposed to series of pre-processing steps which include color correlation, and contrast enhancement. By performing K-means clustering on the resultant images, the nuclei of the cells under consideration are obtained. Shape features and texture features are then extracted for classification. The system is further tested on the classification of spectra measured from the cell nuclei in blood samples in order to distinguish normal cells from those affected by Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. The results show that the proposed system robustly segments and classifies acute lymphoblastic leukemia based on complete microscopic blood images.

  3. CDX2 gene expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanaa H. Arnaoaut

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available CDX genes are classically known as regulators of axial elongation during early embryogenesis. An unsuspected role for CDX genes has been revealed during hematopoietic development. The CDX gene family member CDX2 belongs to the most frequent aberrantly expressed proto-oncogenes in human acute leukemias and is highly leukemogenic in experimental models. We used reversed transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR to determine the expression level of CDX2 gene in 30 pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL at diagnosis and 30 healthy volunteers. ALL patients were followed up to detect minimal residual disease (MRD on days 15 and 42 of induction. We found that CDX2 gene was expressed in 50% of patients and not expressed in controls. Associations between gene expression and different clinical and laboratory data of patients revealed no impact on different findings. With follow up, we could not confirm that CDX2 expression had a prognostic significance.

  4. Elbow septic arthritis associated with pediatric acute leukemia: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Takuya; Yagi, Hirohisa; Okada, Mitsuhiro; Yokoi, Takuya; Shintani, Kosuke; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Acute leukemia in children presents with various clinical manifestations that mimic orthopaedic conditions. The association of septic arthritis of the elbow with acute leukemia is very rare, and the correct diagnosis of acute leukemia is often established only after treatment of the septic arthritis. In this article, we present a three-year-old child patient with elbow septic arthritis related to acute leukemia, diagnosed promptly by bone marrow aspiration on the same day as emergency surgical debridement of the septic elbow joint due to the maintenance of a high index of suspicion, and treated with chemotherapy as soon as possible. The emergency physician and orthopaedist must recognize unusual patterns of presentation like this. Since delay in initiating treatment of septic arthritis may result in growth disturbance, elbow septic arthritis associated with pediatric acute leukemia must be treated promptly and appropriately. Early diagnosis is a good prognostic feature of childhood acute leukemia.

  5. Acute myeloid leukemia with non-specific cutaneous manifestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotokey, R K; Potsangham, T; Das, R

    2008-09-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is not uncommon in upper Assam. Primary skin manifestation in AML though very rare, may be found. The skin manifestation may be the first presentation in AML. Here such a case has been discussed which presented with primarily skin manifestation, subsequently diagnosed as AML. Therefore routine investigations are mandatory in all patients before going for a sophisticated investigation so that the diagnosis is not missed. PMID:19086364

  6. Distribution of common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen in nonhematopoietic tissues

    OpenAIRE

    1981-01-01

    The common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA), as defined by J-5 murine monoclonal antibodies, was detected on renal tubular and glomerular cells from fetal and adult donors by an indirect immunoperoxidase technique. CALLA could also be detected on epithelial cells of the fetal small intestine and on myoepithelial cells of adult breast but not on myoepithelial cells of the salivary gland. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of immunoprecipitated 125I-l...

  7. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Arising in CALR Mutated Essential Thrombocythemia

    OpenAIRE

    Langabeer, Stephen E.; Karl Haslam; David O’Brien; Johanna Kelly; Claire Andrews; Ciara Ryan; Richard Flavin; Hayden, Patrick J.; Bacon, Christopher L.

    2016-01-01

    The development of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in an existing myeloproliferative neoplasm is rare with historical cases unable to differentiate between concomitant malignancies or leukemic transformation. Molecular studies of coexisting JAK2 V617F-positive myeloproliferative neoplasms and mature B cell malignancies indicate distinct disease entities arising in myeloid and lymphoid committed hematopoietic progenitor cells, respectively. Mutations of CALR in essential thrombocythemia appear to...

  8. Optic nerve infiltration by acute lymphoblastic leukemia: MRI contribution

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    Soares, Maria de Fatima; Braga, Flavio Tulio [Federal University of Sao Paulo, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Paulista School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rocha, Antonio Jose da [Santa Casa de Misericordia de Sao Paulo, Servico de Diagnostico por Imagem, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Lederman, Henrique Manoel [Federal University of Sao Paulo, Division of Diagnostic Imaging in Pediatrics, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2005-08-01

    We describe the clinical presentation and imaging features of a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that was complicated by optic nerve infiltration. The clinical and diagnostic characteristics of this complication must be recognized so that optimal therapy can be started to prevent blindness. MR imaging is useful in early detection and should be performed in any leukemic patient with ocular complaints, even during remission. (orig.)

  9. Amifostine Treatment of a Patient with Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Tekgündüz, Emre; ERİKÇİ, ALEV AKYOL; Ahmet ÖZTÜRK

    2009-01-01

    The prognosis for the majority of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients without a donor is dismal whether conventional salvage chemotherapy regimens or investigational strategies are used, and most of these patients will eventually die of their disease. There is no standard chemotherapy regimen that provides durable complete remission in patients with refractory AML. Beneficial effects of amifostine, either alone or in combination with conventional chemotherapy, was demonstrated in patients w...

  10. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Ali

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We report a case series of 12 patients with acute myeloid leukemia who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplant with a matched related donor. Male to female ratio was 1:1. The main complication post-transplant was graft-versus-host disease (n=7 patients. Transplant-related mortality involved one patient; cause of death was multi-organ failure. After a median follow up of 36.0±11.3 months, overall survival was 16%.

  11. Genomics of acute myeloid leukemia : the next generation

    OpenAIRE

    Laura eRiva; Lucilla eLuzi; Pier Giuseppe ePelicci

    2012-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is, as other types of cancer, a genetic disorder of somatic cells. The detection of somatic molecular abnormalities that may cause and maintain AML is crucial for stratifying patients. The development of mutation-specific therapeutic interventions will hopefully increase cure rates and improve patients’ quality of life. This mini-review illustrates how next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are changing the study of cancer genomics of adult AML patients.

  12. Chromosome aberrations and environmental exposures in acute leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Lindquist, Ragnhild Rosengren

    2009-01-01

    The aims of this thesis are to evaluate the role of environmental exposures, especially professional exposure to organic solvents and petroleum products in the etiology of acute leukemia and to investigate if there is a correlation between the exposure to a specific leukemogen factor and a clonal chromosome aberration of the leukemic cells. Papers I and II present results of a case-control study of environmental exposures, in all occupations during life-time, medical treatm...

  13. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Are Egyptian children adherent to maintenance therapy?

    OpenAIRE

    Elhamy Rifky Abdel Khalek; Laila M Sherif; Naglaa Mohamed Kamal; Gharib, Amal F.; H M Shawky

    2015-01-01

    Background, Aims, Settings and Design: Poor adherence to oral maintenance chemotherapy can cause relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). A multicenter study for the evaluation of adherence to oral 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) maintenance chemotherapy for childhood ALL in Egypt to identify contributing factors and possible steps to promote adherence. Materials and Methods: The study included 129 children with ALL in complete remission receiving 6-MP single daily oral dose in the evening....

  14. New Fusion Transcripts Identified in Normal Karyotype Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Hongxiu Wen; Yongjin Li; Malek, Sami N.; Kim, Yeong C.; Jia Xu; Peixian Chen; Fengxia Xiao; Xin Huang; Xianzheng Zhou; Zhenyu Xuan; Shiva Mankala; Guihua Hou; Rowley, Janet D.; Zhang, Michael Q; San Ming Wang

    2012-01-01

    Genetic aberrations contribute to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, half of AML cases do not contain the well-known aberrations detectable mostly by cytogenetic analysis, and these cases are classified as normal karyotype AML. Different outcomes of normal karyotype AML suggest that this subgroup of AML could be genetically heterogeneous. But lack of genetic markers makes it difficult to further study this subgroup of AML. Using paired-end RNAseq method, we performed a transcriptome analy...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Z. Acute promyelocytic leukaemia: novel insights into the mechanisms of cure. Nat Rev Cancer. 2010 Nov;10( ... with a qualified healthcare professional . About Genetics Home Reference Site Map Contact Us Selection Criteria for Links ...

  16. Effect of Taurine on Febrile Episodes in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Islambulchilar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of our study was to evaluate the effect of oral taurine on the incidence of febrile episodes during chemotherapy in young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods: Forty young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, at the beginning of maintenance course of their chemotherapy, were eligible for this study. The study population was randomized in a double blind manner to receive either taurine or placebo (2 gram per day orally. Life quality and side effects including febrile episodes were assessed using questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Pearson’s Chi square test. Results: Of total forty participants, 43.8% were female and 56.3 % were male. The mean age was 19.16±1.95 years (ranges: 16-23 years. The results indicated that the levels of white blood cells are significantly (P<0.05 increased in taurine treated group. There was no elevation in blasts count. A total of 70 febrile episodes were observed during study, febrile episodes were significantly (P<0.05 lower in taurine patients in comparison to the control ones. Conclusion: The overall incidence of febrile episodes and infectious complications in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients receiving taurine was lower than placebo group. Taurine’s ability to increase leukocyte count may result in lower febrile episodes.

  17. Unrelated Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Children with Acute Leukemia: Experience at a Single Institution

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jae Hee; Yoon, Hoi Soo; Song, Joon Sup; Choi, Eun Seok; Moon, Hyung Nam; Seo, Jong Jin; Im, Ho Joon

    2009-01-01

    We evaluate the outcomes in children with acute leukemia who received allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) using unrelated donor. Fifty-six children in complete remission (CR) received HCT from unrelated donors between 2000 and 2007. Thirty-five had acute myeloid leukemia, and 21 had acute lymphoid leukemia. Stem cell sources included bone marrow in 38, peripheral blood in 4, and cord blood (CB) in 14. Four patients died before engraftment and 52 engrafted. Twenty patients...

  18. Correlation of morphologic and cytochemical diagnosis with flowcytometric analysis in acute leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Sushma Belurkar; Himabindu Mantravadi; Chethan Manohar; Annamma Kurien

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The classification of acute leukemias has revolutionized over the years. Immunophenotyping of acute leukemia has gained popularity because of its influence on treatment and prognosis of the disease. The various antigens expressed by the leukemic cells can be assessed by flowcytometry (FCA) and can be used in rendering specific treatment and predicting the outcome of the different types of acute leukemia. Aims: The main aim of this study was to compare the morphologic and cyt...

  19. Pancytopenic Prodrome (pre-ALL) of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Adults: Possible Pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Sohn, Sang Kyun; Suh, Jang Soo; Lee, Jaetae; Lee, Kyu Bo

    1998-01-01

    We report two cases of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with preleukemic phase of pancytopenia with a few abnormal lymphoid cells in bone marrow aspirates. The initial diagnosis of each case was suspicious aplastic anemia and hypoplastic anemia. Both cases progressed to overt acute lymphoblastic leukemia within 1 year. We suggest that initial pancytopenic phase (pre-ALL) may precede the diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults and differential diagnosis from myelodyspl...

  20. Temsirolimus, Dexamethasone, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, Vincristine Sulfate, and Pegaspargase in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-09

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  1. Rearrangement of the breakpoint cluster region in Philadelphia chromosome positive acute leukemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Isao; Sekito,Noriko; Takeuchi, Makoto; Osada, Ken; Matsuzaki,Toshiro; Fukuda, Shunichi; Lai,Minyu; Uchida, Kozaburo; Kimura,Ikuro; Miyamoto,Kanji; Kitajima,Koichi; Sanada, Hiroshi

    1988-01-01

    The rearrangement of breakpoint cluster region (ber) was examined in leukemic cells obtained from 3 patients initially diagnosed as having Ph+ acute leukemia, 2 with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and one with acute mixed leukemia. DNA was digested with Bgl II and BamH I. The ber rearrangement was present in the case of acute mixed leukemia (Case 1), but was absent in the 2 cases of ALL (Cases 2 and 3). These results suggest that Case 1 represented a type of blast crisis of chronic myelocyt...

  2. Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes That Have Relapsed or Not Responded to Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Clofarabine for the treatment of adult acute lymphoid leukemia: the Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia intergroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, Françoise; Leguay, Thibaut; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Rousselot, Philippe; Vey, Norbert; Pigneux, Arnaud; Ifrah, Norbert; Dombret, Hervé

    2015-04-01

    Clofarabine, a second-generation purine analog displaying potent inhibition of DNA synthesis and favorable pharmacologic profile, is approved for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) after failure of at least two previous regimens in patients up to 21 years of age at diagnosis. Good neurologic tolerance, synergy with alkylating agents, management guidelines defined through pediatric ALL and adult acute myeloid leukemia, have also prompted its administration in more than 100 adults with Philadelphia chromosome-positive and negative B lineage and T lineage ALL, as single agent (40 mg/m(2)/ day for 5 days), or in combination. In a Group for Research on Adult Acute Lympho- blastic Leukemia (GRAALL) retrospective study of two regimens (clofarabine ± cyclophosphamide + / - etoposide (ENDEVOL) ± mitoxantrone ± asparaginase ± dexamethasone (VANDEVOL)), remission was achieved in 50% of 55 relapsed/refractory patients, and 17-35% could proceed to allogeneic stem cell. Clofarabine warrants further exploration in advanced ALL treatment and bridge-to-transplant. PMID:24996442

  4. Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia in Four Year Old Female Child - A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirudha V. Kushtagi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Leukemia is the most common malignancy of childhood representing about 30 % of oncohematological diseases diagnosed in children less than 15 years of age. We report the case of a 4 year old girl with acute promyelocytic leukemia whose blasts showed the morphology characteristic of acute promyelocytic leukemia variant. The case is reported because in the paediatric population the acute promyelocytic leukemia is a rare occurrence moreover, it represent a true oncohematology emergency, in this case the laboratory has a significant role since the timing of diagnosis must be very short. It helps in therapeutic protocols compared to conventional therapeutic protocols in Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML, the introduction of retinoid All-Trans-Retinoic Acid (ATRA, both in children and adults with Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL, has significantly reduced the early mortality.

  5. Chronic subdural hematoma in a child with acute myeloid leukemia after leukocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Basmaci

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe complications that develop in the early stages in patients with acute leukemia have a mortal course. Bleeding, leukostasis, and less frequently, infections are responsible for early mortality. Hemorrhage is most common in acute leukemia and usually leads to death. Hemorrhage may occur due to chemotherapy or bone marrow transplantation in patients with acute leukemia. Leukocytosis, thrombocytopenia, sepsis, and coagulopathy increase the risk of bleeding. There may be multiple etiologic factors. Subdural or subarachnoid hemorrhage is less common than an intra-axial hemorrhage. The incidence of spontaneous subdural hematoma is higher in patients with leukemia. Although advances in the treatment of platelet transfusion and disseminated intravascular coagulation have decreased the incidence of hemorrhagic complications in patients receiving chemotherapy for acute leukemia, intracranial hemorrhage-related deaths are a significant problem. We discussed the etiology and management of chronic subdural hematoma detected in a two-year-old male patient with Acute Myeloid Leukemia and hyperleukocytosis.

  6. Outcomes after Induction Failure in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrappe, Martin; Hunger, Stephen P.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Saha, Vaskar; Gaynon, Paul S.; Baruchel, André; Conter, Valentino; Otten, Jacques; Ohara, Akira; Versluys, Anne Birgitta; Escherich, Gabriele; Heyman, Mats; Silverman, Lewis B.; Horibe, Keizo; Mann, Georg; Camitta, Bruce M.; Harbott, Jochen; Riehm, Hansjörg; Richards, Sue; Devidas, Meenakshi; Zimmermann, Martin

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Failure of remission-induction therapy is a rare but highly adverse event in children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). METHODS We identified induction failure, defined by the persistence of leukemic blasts in blood, bone marrow, or any extramedullary site after 4 to 6 weeks of remission-induction therapy, in 1041 of 44,017 patients (2.4%) 0 to 18 years of age with newly diagnosed ALL who were treated by a total of 14 cooperative study groups between 1985 and 2000. We analyzed the relationships among disease characteristics, treatments administered, and outcomes in these patients. RESULTS Patients with induction failure frequently presented with high-risk features, including older age, high leukocyte count, leukemia with a T-cell phenotype, the Philadelphia chromosome, and 11q23 rearrangement. With a median follow-up period of 8.3 years (range, 1.5 to 22.1), the 10-year survival rate (±SE) was estimated at only 32±1%. An age of 10 years or older, T-cell leukemia, the presence of an 11q23 rearrangement, and 25% or more blasts in the bone marrow at the end of induction therapy were associated with a particularly poor outcome. High hyperdiploidy (a modal chromosome number >50) and an age of 1 to 5 years were associated with a favorable outcome in patients with precursor B-cell leukemia. Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation from matched, related donors was associated with improved outcomes in T-cell leukemia. Children younger than 6 years of age with precursor B-cell leukemia and no adverse genetic features had a 10-year survival rate of 72±5% when treated with chemotherapy only. CONCLUSIONS Pediatric ALL with induction failure is highly heterogeneous. Patients who have T-cell leukemia appear to have a better outcome with allogeneic stem-cell transplantation than with chemotherapy, whereas patients who have precursor B-cell leukemia without other adverse features appear to have a better outcome with chemotherapy. (Funded by Deutsche

  7. Acute leukemia case presented with hypercalcemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Selçuk Bektaş

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available An 8-year-old girl patient referred to our emergency clinic with articular pain, stomachache and fever complaints. Past history revealed that she was suffering from pain in both knees and ankle joints for 8 days. The joint temperature increased and swelling did not accompany articular pain. Family history was unremarkable. In the physical examination, there was sensitivity in the knees, elbows and ankles during movement. The patient had normal complete blood cell count, and no blast or atypical cells were observed in peripheral smear. Serum electrolytes, liver and kidney function tests were normal except for hypercalcemia. The 25 (OH vitamin D and 1-25 (OH2 vitamin D levels were within normal range. In bone marrow aspiration, infiltration of cells with lymphoblastic and homogenous cellular features was observed. With positivity of cCD79, CD19, CD45, the case was considered as preB cell leukemia. Body bone scintigraphy performed for bone metastasis was normal. After the chemotherapy, hydration and furosemid treatment, the calcium level returned to normal. This case emphasized on the fact that, children with hypercalcemia should undergo a detailed examination for malignancies even though no blast or atypical lymphocyte are observed in their peripheral blood smear before steroid treatment is applied and if necessary, bone marrow aspiration should be taken into account.

  8. Antileukemic Efficacy of Continuous vs Discontinuous Dexamethasone in Murine Models of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura B Ramsey

    Full Text Available Osteonecrosis is one of the most common, serious, toxicities resulting from the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In recent years, pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia clinical trials have used discontinuous rather than continuous dosing of dexamethasone in an effort to reduce the incidence of osteonecrosis. However, it is not known whether discontinuous dosing would compromise antileukemic efficacy of glucocorticoids. Therefore, we tested the efficacy of discontinuous dexamethasone against continuous dexamethasone in murine models bearing human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts (n = 8 patient samples or murine BCR-ABL+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Plasma dexamethasone concentrations (7.9 to 212 nM were similar to those achieved in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia using conventional dosages. The median leukemia-free survival ranged from 16 to 59 days; dexamethasone prolonged survival from a median of 4 to 129 days in all seven dexamethasone-sensitive acute lymphoblastic leukemias. In the majority of cases (7 of 8 xenografts and the murine BCR-ABL model we demonstrated equal efficacy of the two dexamethasone dosing regimens; whereas for one acute lymphoblastic leukemia sample, the discontinuous regimen yielded inferior antileukemic efficacy (log-rank p = 0.002. Our results support the clinical practice of using discontinuous rather than continuous dexamethasone dosing in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  9. Reclassification of leukemia among A-bomb survivors in Nagasaki using French-American-British (FAB) classification for acute leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concordance rate for diagnoses of atomic bomb-related cases of leukemia in Nagasaki was determined using the French-American-British (FAB) classification for acute leukemias and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Two Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) hematologists and one of the members (JMB) of the FAB cooperative group reviewed independently the peripheral blood and/or bone marrow smears from 193 people with leukemia or a related disorder. There was 85 % agreement in the identification of types and subtypes of acute leukemia. There was almost complete agreement for the diagnoses of non-FAB disorders (chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and others) resulting in overall concordance of 88.2 %. The present study suggest that the previously established leukemia types for about a quarter of the cases of acute leukemia and related disorders except CML should be changed. Considerable numbers of cases of ATL and MDS were involved in this series. The frequency of the former disease was not high in the high-dose irradiated group, but that of the latter was considerably high. All subtypes of AML except M3 and M6 were present in the high-dose group. The striking difference in CML incidence between Nagasaki and Hiroshima may continue to be a problem in relation to biological response to radiation exposure. (author)

  10. Bony Lesions in Pediatric Acute Leukemia: Pictorial Essay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makhtoom Shahnazi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemia is the most common malignancy in childhood, which mainly involves children less than 15 years of age. The growing skeleton is the main site of involvement in children. Leukemic cells proliferate within the massive red bone marrow in children. So besides the pallor, petechia, purpura and ecchymosis in the skin and mucosal surfaces, bone pain and other bony lesions are other manifestations of leukemia.On the other hand, bony lesions are more prevalent in children than adults with no poor prognosis in comparison to patients without bone lesions. These bony lesions may precede other laboratory tests so familiarity with these presentations is very important for earlier diagnosis.In this pictorial essay, we tried to gather the most common bony lesions that may be seen in acute leukemia in different cases admitted to our hospital with general malaise and localized tenderness and discomfort leading us to perform plain X-ray for further evaluation. Finding these bony lesions helps clinicians to reach the diagnosis quickly. These findings include metaphyseal lucent band and erosion, periosteal reaction, small lucent bone lesion and permeative appearance, reduced bone density and collapsed vertebra.

  11. Haploidentical Transplantation in Children with Acute Leukemia: The Unresolved Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarita Rani Jaiswal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT remains a curative option for children with high risk and advanced acute leukemia. Yet availability of matched family donor limits its use and although matched unrelated donor or mismatched umbilical cord blood (UCB are viable options, they fail to meet the global need. Haploidentical family donor is almost universally available and is emerging as the alternate donor of choice in adult patients. However, the same is not true in the case of children. The studies of haploidentical HSCT in children are largely limited to T cell depleted grafts with not so encouraging results in advanced leukemia. At the same time, emerging data from UCBT are challenging the existing paradigm of less stringent HLA match requirements as perceived in the past. The use of posttransplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCY has yielded encouraging results in adults, but data in children is sorely lacking. Our experience of using PTCY based haploidentical HSCT in children shows inadequacy of this approach in younger children compared to excellent outcome in older children. In this context, we discuss the current status of haploidentical HSCT in children with acute leukemia in a global perspective and dwell on its future prospects.

  12. Tumefactive intracranial presentation of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forester, Craig M. [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Braunreiter, Chi L. [University of Utah, Division of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Primary Children' s Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Helen DeVos Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Grand Rapids, MI (United States); Yaish, Hasan; Afify, Zeinab [University of Utah, Division of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Primary Children' s Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hedlund, Gary L. [Primary Children' s Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2009-11-15

    In children, leukemia is the most common malignancy, and approximately 75% of leukemias are acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Central nervous system leukemia is found at diagnosis in fewer than 5% of children with ALL. Leukemic intracranial masses have been described with acute myeloid leukemia, but ALL presenting as a mass lesion is rare. We describe a unique case of an intracranial confirmed precursor B cell (pre-B) ALL mass in a 13-year-old girl that was diagnosed by brain CT, MRI and cerebral angiography, and confirmed by biopsy. This report details pertinent history and distinguishing imaging features of an intracranial ALL tumefaction. (orig.)

  13. Identification of homogeneously staining regions in leukemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Heydarian Moghadam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Homogeneously staining regions (HSR or double minute chromosomes (dmin are autonomously replicating extra-chromosomal elements that are frequently associated with gene amplification in a variety of cancers. The diagnosis of leukemia patients was based on characterization of the leukemic cells obtained from bone marrow cytogenetics. This study report two cases, one with Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia without maturation (AML-M1, aged 23-year-old female, and the other with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML-blast crisis, a 28-year-old female associated with double minute chromosomes. Most cases of acute myeloid leukemia with dmin in the literature (including our cases have been diagnosed as having acute myeloid leukemia.

  14. Angiogenesis in Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Opportunities for Novel Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Trujillo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML arises from neoplastic transformation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and relapsed disease remains one of the greater challenges in treating this hematologic malignancy. This paper focuses on angiogenic aspects of AML including the significance and prognostic value of bone marrow microvessel density and circulating cytokine levels. We show three general mechanisms whereby AML exploits angiogenic pathways, including direct induction of angiogenesis, paracrine regulation, and autocrine stimulation. We also present early evidence that leukemia cells contribute directly to vascular endothelia. Novel treatment strategies are proposed, and a review of relevant antiangiogenic clinical trials is presented. By understanding how blood vessels can serve as a reservoir for refractory and relapsed AML, new diagnostics and promising treatment strategies can be developed.

  15. Individualized leukemia cell-population profiles in common B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Hua Yu; Jing-Tao Dong; Yong-Qian Jia; Neng-Gang Jiang; Ting-Ting Zeng; Hong Xu; Xian-Ming Mo

    2013-01-01

    Immunophenotype is critical for diagnosing common B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (common ALL) and detecting minimal residual disease.We developed a protocol to explore the immunophenotypic profiles of common ALL based on the expression levels of the antigens associated with B lymphoid development,including IL-7Rα (CD127),cytoplasmic CD79a (cCD79a),CD19,VpreB (CD179a),and slgM,which are successive and essential for progression of B cells along their developmental pathway.Analysis of the immunophenotypes of 48 common ALL cases showed that the immunophenotypic patterns were highly heterogeneous,with the leukemic cell population differing from case to case.Through the comprehensive analysis of immunophenotypic patterns,the profiles of patient-specific composite leukemia cell populations could provide detailed information helpful for the diagnosis,therapeutic monitoring,and individualized therapies for common ALL.

  16. Acute Pancreatitis and Diabetic Ketoacidosis following L-Asparaginase/Prednisone Therapy in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dania Lizet Quintanilla-Flores

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis are unusual adverse events following chemotherapy based on L-asparaginase and prednisone as support treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We present the case of a 16-year-old Hispanic male patient, in remission induction therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia on treatment with mitoxantrone, vincristine, prednisone, and L-asparaginase. He was hospitalized complaining of abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Hyperglycemia, acidosis, ketonuria, low bicarbonate levels, hyperamylasemia, and hyperlipasemia were documented, and the diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis was made. Because of uncertainty of the additional diagnosis of acute pancreatitis as the cause of abdominal pain, a contrast-enhanced computed tomography was performed resulting in a Balthazar C pancreatitis classification.

  17. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, and/or Advanced Myeloproliferative Neoplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-28

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Neoplasm With 10% Blasts or Higher

  18. Environment-mediated drug resistance in Bcr/Abl-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Feldhahn, Niklas; Arutyunyan, Anna; Stoddart, Sonia; ZHANG Bin; Schmidhuber, Sabine; Yi, Sun-ju; Kim, Yong-Mi; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2012-01-01

    Although cure rates for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have increased, development of resistance to drugs and patient relapse are common. The environment in which the leukemia cells are present during the drug treatment is known to provide significant survival benefit. Here, we have modeled this process by culturing murine Bcr/Abl-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells in the presence of stroma while treating them with a moderate dose of two unrelated drugs, the farnesyltransferase i...

  19. Aurora kinases in childhood acute leukemia: The promise of aurora B as therapeutic target

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A. Hartsink-Segers (S.); C.M. Zwaan (Michel); C. Exalto (Carla); M.W.J. Luijendijk (M. W J); V. Calvert (V.); E.F. Petricoin (Emanuel F.); W.E. Evans (William); D. Reinhardt (Dirk); V. de Haas (Valerie); M. Hedtjärn (M.); B.R. Hansen (B.); T. Koch (T.); H.N. Caron (Huib); R. Pieters (Rob); M.L. den Boer (Monique)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWe investigated the effects of targeting the mitotic regulators aurora kinase A and B in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Aurora protein expression levels in pediatric ALL and AML patient samples were determined by western blot and reverse ph

  20. High frequency of BTG1 deletions in acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children with down syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundin, Catarina; Hjorth, Lars; Behrendtz, Mikael;

    2012-01-01

    Previous cytogenetic studies of myeloid and acute lymphoblastic leukemias in children with Down syndrome (ML-DS and DS-ALL) have revealed significant differences in abnormality patterns between such cases and acute leukemias in general. Also, certain molecular genetic aberrations characterize DS...

  1. Response-guided induction therapy in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia with excellent remission rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsson, Jonas; Forestier, Erik; Heldrup, Jesper;

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the early treatment response in children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a response-guided induction strategy that includes idarubicin in the first course.......To evaluate the early treatment response in children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a response-guided induction strategy that includes idarubicin in the first course....

  2. Analyses of karyotypic characteristics and prognosis in pediatric acute myeloblastic leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮敏

    2012-01-01

    Objective Acute myeloblastic leukemia(AML) accounts for 15 to 25 percent of childhood acute leukemias. Cytogenetic information is important for diagnosis,classification and prognosis of AML. Our aim was to analyze the relationship between karyotypic characteristics and prognosis of childhood

  3. MORPHOLOGIC & FLOWCYTOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF ACUTE LEUKEMIAS IN A TEACHING HOSPITAL IN CHHATTISGARH

    OpenAIRE

    Rabia Parveen; Minal; Vanita; Patra; Swati

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND : Immunophenotyping of leukemi a by flowcytometry offers a better classification of the hematopoietic lineage of malignant cells as compared to morphology. AIM : To determine the immunophenotypic subtypes of acute leukemia in a tertiary care teaching hospital. MATERIAL & METHODS : A one y ear study of morphologic & flowcytometric data of patients with acute leukemia. RESULTS : Total numbers ...

  4. A Rare Case of Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Presenting with Paraparesis and Multiple Osteolytic Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Verma, S P; Dubashi, B.; Basu, D; Dutta, T. K.; Kar, R.

    2013-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with bone involvement and multiple osteolytic lesions has been commonly reported in pediatric population. Various myeloid and lymphoid malignancies can rarely present with bony lesions. We are reporting an adult female patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who presented with paraparesis and multiple osteolytic lesions in skull initially giving false impression of multiple myeloma.

  5. Characterization of CEBPA mutations and promoter hypermethylation in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollink, Iris H. I. M.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Arentsen-Peters, Susan T. C. J. M.; Zimmermann, Martin; Peeters, Justine K.; Valk, Peter J. M.; Balgobind, Brian V.; Sonneveld, Edwin; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; Trka, Jan; Baruchel, Andre; Creutzig, Ursula; Pieters, Rob; Reinhardt, Dirk; Zwaan, C. Michel

    2011-01-01

    Background Dysfunctioning of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBP alpha) in acute myeloid leukemia can be caused, amongst others, by mutations in the encoding gene (CEBPA) and by promoter hypermethylation. CEBPA-mutated acute myeloid leukemia is associated with a favorable outcome, but this m

  6. CD20 expression characteristic and prognosis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏敏

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyzed the expression and clinical characteristics of CD20 marker in children with B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia(B-ALL)and evaluated its medical significance in assessing the prognosis of disease.Methods From November 2008 to July 2012,125cases of children with B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia were collected from Shanghai Children’s Hospital,

  7. [Nursing diagnosis in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Luccas Melo; Gorini, Maria Isabel Pinto Coelho

    2006-09-01

    This case study aimed at identifying Nursing Diagnosis (ND) in adult patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia, with the purpose of contributing to the Systematization of Nurse Care. Interviews and observation were used for data collection, in addition to Nursing Process application. During the three months of data collection, other NDs were obtained by searching the files of the 6 patients. The 32 ND found in this study were grouped according to Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Out of these 32 ND, 15 corresponded to changes in Physiological Needs, and 10 to changes in Protection and Safety Needs.

  8. Complexity on Acute Myeloid Leukemia mRNA Transcript Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Cattani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the sequence analysis of acute myeloid leukemia mRNA. Six transcript variants of mlf1 mRNA, with more than 2000 bps, are analyzed by focusing on the autocorrelation of each distribution. Through the correlation matrix, some patches and similarities are singled out and commented, with respect to similar distributions. The comparison of Kolmogorov fractal dimension will be also given in order to classify the six variants. The existence of a fractal shape, patterns, and symmetries are discussed as well.

  9. Management of Acute Myeloid Leukemia in the Intensive Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Andrew J; Altemeier, William A; Johnston, Christine; Gernsheimer, Terry; Becker, Pamela S

    2015-10-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who are newly diagnosed or relapsed and those who are receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy are predisposed to conditions such as sepsis due to bacterial and fungal infections, coagulopathies, hemorrhage, metabolic abnormalities, and respiratory and renal failure. These conditions are common reasons for patients with AML to be managed in the intensive care unit (ICU). For patients with AML in the ICU, providers need to be aware of common problems and how to manage them. Understanding the pathophysiology of complications and the recent advances in risk stratification as well as newer therapy for AML are relevant to the critical care provider. PMID:24756309

  10. Transplantations in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia--grounds for optimism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstone, Anthony H

    2009-01-01

    The large MRC/ECOG Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Study establishes the value of sibling donor allogeneic transplantation in patients with standard risk, demonstrating superior outcome to conventional chemotherapy. The small but significant number of patients having matched unrelated donor transplantations on this study protocol appear to do well and might establish the value of such an approach for those without a sibling. Reduced-intensity conditioning might begin to address the transplantation-related mortality problems of the older patients. The youngest adults might not need to undergo transplantation at all. If they are now treated on pediatric chemotherapy protocols, their outcome appears to improve significantly. PMID:19778843

  11. Unilateral Hydronephrosis and Renal Damage after Acute Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egle Simanauskiene

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 14-year-old boy presented with asymptomatic right hydronephrosis detected on routine yearly ultrasound examination. Previously, he had at least two normal renal ultrasonograms, 4 years after remission of acute myeloblastic leukemia, treated by AML-BFM-93 protocol. A function of the right kidney and no damage on the left was confirmed by a DMSA scan. Right retroperitoneoscopic nephrectomy revealed 3 renal arteries with the lower pole artery lying on the pelviureteric junction. Histologically chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis was detected. In the pathogenesis of this severe unilateral renal damage, we suspect the exacerbation of deleterious effects of cytostatic therapy on kidneys with intermittent hydronephrosis.

  12. Esophageal Candidiasis as the Initial Manifestation of Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komeno, Yukiko; Uryu, Hideki; Iwata, Yuko; Hatada, Yasumasa; Sakamoto, Jumpei; Iihara, Kuniko; Ryu, Tomiko

    2015-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman presented with persistent dysphagia. A gastroendoscopy revealed massive esophageal candidiasis, and oral miconazole was prescribed. Three weeks later, she returned to our hospital without symptomatic improvement. She was febrile, and blood tests showed leukocytosis (137,150 /μL, blast 85%), anemia and thrombocytopenia. She was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). She received chemotherapy and antimicrobial agents. During the recovery from the nadir, bilateral ocular candidiasis was detected, suggesting the presence of preceding candidemia. Thus, esophageal candidiasis can be an initial manifestation of AML. Thorough examination to detect systemic candidiasis is strongly recommended when neutropenic patients exhibit local candidiasis prior to chemotherapy.

  13. Ecthyma gangrenosum in a patient with acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryeziu, Emrush; Kryeziu, K; Bajraktari, Gjani; Abazi, M; Zylfiu, B; Rudhani, I; Sadiku, Sh; Ukimeri, A; Brovina, A; Dreshaj, Sh; Telaku, S

    2010-01-01

    Ecthymagangrenosum (EG)is a rare condition with characteristic clinical appearance of red maculae that progresses to a central area of necrosis surrounded by an erythematous halo. The most frequently it is caused by Pseudomonas bacteriaemia in neutropenic patient. The authors presents a patient with acute myloblastic leukemia M4 type in whom in relapse EG caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was found. The patient was treated with antibiotics and surgical debridement. The author wants to point out on clinical significance this condition with high mortality rate.

  14. Combination Chemotherapy and Rituximab in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-07

    B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; L3 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma

  15. Individualized leukemia cell-population profiles in common B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients

    OpenAIRE

    Xian-Ming Mo; Hong Xu; Ting-Ting Zeng; Neng-Gang Jiang; Yong-Qian Jia; Jing-Tao Dong; Jian-Hua Yu; Wen-Tong Meng

    2013-01-01

    Immunophenotype is critical for diagnosing common B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (common ALL) and detecting minimal residual disease. We developed a protocol to explore the immunophenotypic profiles of common ALL based on the expression levels of the antigens associated with B lymphoid development, including IL-7R alpha (CD127), cytoplasmic CD79a (cCD79a), CD19, VpreB (CD179a), and sIgM, which are successive and essential for progression of B cells along their developmental pathway. Anal...

  16. Flow cytometric analysis of Mixed phenotype acute leukemia: Experience from a tertiary oncology center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu Sukumaran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL is a rare subset of acute leukemia where the blasts exhibit lineage specific antigens of more than one lineage. Flow cytometric immunophenotyping is essential for the diagnosis of MPAL and the accurate diagnosis highly depends on the panel of markers used. The precise incidence of MPAL is uncertain as various institutions use different combinations of antibodies to assign the blasts to a particular lineage. Aim: The aim was to study the immunoprofile of acute leukemia including aberrant antigen expressions and to study the incidence, clinical features, laboratory findings, and immunophenotype of MPAL in our institution. Materials and Methods: All cases of acute leukemias in which flow cytometric analysis during 1-year period from July 2012 to July 2013 were included in this study. Results: During the study period, flow cytometric analysis of 506 cases was performed. B lymphoblastic leukemia was the most common subtype of acute leukemia. CD13 was the most common aberrant antigen expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia and CD7 was the most common aberrant antigen expression in acute myeloid leukemia. A diagnosis of MPAL was made in 15 cases, which accounted for 2.96% of all leukemias. 9 cases were diagnosed as T/myeloid, 5 cases as B/myeloid and 1 case as B/T. Conclusion: Mixed phenotype acute leukemia is a rare subset of acute leukemia. Flow cytometry is critical in establishing a diagnosis of MPAL. The panel of antibodies used is important in the identification of the "mixed" phenotype. Cytoplasmic markers (cytoplasmic MPO, cytoplasmic 79a, cytoplasmic 22 and cytoplasmic CD3 should be included in the primary flow cytometric panel.

  17. MORPHOLOGIC & FLOWCYTOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF ACUTE LEUKEMIAS IN A TEACHING HOSPITAL IN CHHATTISGARH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabia Parveen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Immunophenotyping of leukemi a by flowcytometry offers a better classification of the hematopoietic lineage of malignant cells as compared to morphology. AIM : To determine the immunophenotypic subtypes of acute leukemia in a tertiary care teaching hospital. MATERIAL & METHODS : A one y ear study of morphologic & flowcytometric data of patients with acute leukemia. RESULTS : Total numbers of acute leukemia patients diagnosed morphologically were 45, out of which 20 patients underwent immunophenotyping by flowcytometry. Maximum patients wer e in the age group of 0 - 10 yrs followed by 11 - 20 yrs with males outnumbering female. Immunophenotypically they belonged to ALL - B cell lineage, ALL - T cell lineage, AML, biphenotypic, inconclusive. CONCLUSION : Immunophenotyping of acute leukemias by flowcyto metry, not only helps to confirm the morphologic diagnosis but also helps in assigning specific lineage to the blasts, particularly in acute lymphoid leukemia

  18. Lysosomal disruption preferentially targets acute myeloid leukemia cells and progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhai, Mahadeo A.; Prabha, Swayam; Hurren, Rose; Rutledge, Angela C.; Lee, Anna Y.; Sriskanthadevan, Shrivani; Sun, Hong; Wang, Xiaoming; Skrtic, Marko; Seneviratne, Ayesh; Cusimano, Maria; Jhas, Bozhena; Gronda, Marcela; MacLean, Neil; Cho, Eunice E.; Spagnuolo, Paul A.; Sharmeen, Sumaiya; Gebbia, Marinella; Urbanus, Malene; Eppert, Kolja; Dissanayake, Dilan; Jonet, Alexia; Dassonville-Klimpt, Alexandra; Li, Xiaoming; Datti, Alessandro; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Wrana, Jeff; Rogers, Ian; Sonnet, Pascal; Ellis, William Y.; Corey, Seth J.; Eaves, Connie; Minden, Mark D.; Wang, Jean C.Y.; Dick, John E.; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; Schimmer, Aaron D.

    2012-01-01

    Despite efforts to understand and treat acute myeloid leukemia (AML), there remains a need for more comprehensive therapies to prevent AML-associated relapses. To identify new therapeutic strategies for AML, we screened a library of on- and off-patent drugs and identified the antimalarial agent mefloquine as a compound that selectively kills AML cells and AML stem cells in a panel of leukemia cell lines and in mice. Using a yeast genome-wide functional screen for mefloquine sensitizers, we identified genes associated with the yeast vacuole, the homolog of the mammalian lysosome. Consistent with this, we determined that mefloquine disrupts lysosomes, directly permeabilizes the lysosome membrane, and releases cathepsins into the cytosol. Knockdown of the lysosomal membrane proteins LAMP1 and LAMP2 resulted in decreased cell viability, as did treatment of AML cells with known lysosome disrupters. Highlighting a potential therapeutic rationale for this strategy, leukemic cells had significantly larger lysosomes compared with normal cells, and leukemia-initiating cells overexpressed lysosomal biogenesis genes. These results demonstrate that lysosomal disruption preferentially targets AML cells and AML progenitor cells, providing a rationale for testing lysosomal disruption as a novel therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:23202731

  19. Identification and targeting leukemia stem cells: The path to the cure for acute myeloid leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianbiao; Zhou; Wee-Joo; Chng

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence support the notion that acute myeloid leukemia(AML) is organized in a hierarchical system, originating from a special proportion of leukemia stem cells(LSC). Similar to their normal counterpart, hematopoietic stem cells(HSC), LSC possess selfrenewal capacity and are responsible for the continued growth and proliferation of the bulk of leukemia cells in the blood and bone marrow. It is believed that LSC are also the root cause for the treatment failure and relapse of AML because LSC are often resistant to chemotherapy. In the past decade, we have made significant advancement in identification and understanding the molecular biology of LSC, but it remains a daunting task to specifically targeting LSC, while sparing normalHSC. In this review, we will first provide a historical overview of the discovery of LSC, followed by a summary of identification and separation of LSC by either cell surface markers or functional assays. Next, the review will focus on the current, various strategies for eradicating LSC. Finally, we will highlight future directions and challenges ahead of our ultimate goal for the cure of AML by targeting LSC.

  20. Nanoparticle targeted therapy against childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satake, Noriko; Lee, Joyce; Xiao, Kai; Luo, Juntao; Sarangi, Susmita; Chang, Astra; McLaughlin, Bridget; Zhou, Ping; Kenney, Elaina; Kraynov, Liliya; Arnott, Sarah; McGee, Jeannine; Nolta, Jan; Lam, Kit

    2011-06-01

    The goal of our project is to develop a unique ligand-conjugated nanoparticle (NP) therapy against childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). LLP2A, discovered by Dr. Kit Lam, is a high-affinity and high-specificity peptidomimetic ligand against an activated α4β1 integrin. Our study using 11 fresh primary ALL samples (10 precursor B ALL and 1 T ALL) showed that childhood ALL cells expressed activated α4β1 integrin and bound to LLP2A. Normal hematopoietic cells such as activated lymphocytes and monocytes expressed activated α4β1 integrin; however, normal hematopoietic stem cells showed low expression of α4β1 integrin. Therefore, we believe that LLP2A can be used as a targeted therapy for childhood ALL. The Lam lab has developed novel telodendrimer-based nanoparticles (NPs) which can carry drugs efficiently. We have also developed a human leukemia mouse model using immunodeficient NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ null mice engrafted with primary childhood ALL cells from our patients. LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be evaluated both in vitro and in vivo using primary leukemia cells and this mouse model. NPs will be loaded first with DiD near infra-red dye, and then with the chemotherapeutic agents daunorubicin or vincristine. Both drugs are mainstays of current chemotherapy for childhood ALL. Targeting properties of LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be evaluated by fluorescent microscopy, flow cytometry, MTS assay, and mouse survival after treatment. We expect that LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be preferentially delivered and endocytosed to leukemia cells as an effective targeted therapy.

  1. Successful Administration of Recombinant Human Soluble Thrombomodulin α (Recomodulin for Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation during Induction Chemotherapy in an Elderly Patient with Acute Monoblastic Leukemia Involving the t(9;11(p22;q23 MLL/AF9 Translocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutaka Takagi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with acute myelogenous leukemia complicate with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC, not only at the time of the initially leukemia diagnosis, but also during induction chemotherapy. In Japan, recently, a recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin alpha (Recomodulin has been introduced as a new type of anti-DIC agent for clinical use in patients with hematological cancer or infectious disease. We describe a 67-year-old female case in which 25,600 units of Recomodulin for 6 days were successfully administered for both initially complicating and therapy-induced DIC without any troubles of bleeding in an acute monoblastic leukemia (AML-M5a patient with the MLL gene translocation. Furthermore, the levels of DIC biomarkers recovered rapidly after the Recomodulin treatment. Our case suggests that DIC control using Recomodulin is one of the crucial support-therapies during remission induction chemotherapy in patients with acute leukemia of which type tends to complicate extramedullary or extranodal infiltration having potential to onset DIC.

  2. Aleukemic Leukemia Cutis Manifesting with Disseminated Nodular Eruptions and a Plaque Preceding Acute Monocytic Leukemia: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonal, Ipek; Hindilerden, Fehmi; Coskun, Raif; Dogan, Oner Ibrahim; Nalcaci, Meliha

    2011-01-01

    Aleukemic leukemia cutis (ALC), a discrete tumor of leukemic cells involving the skin, may be the first manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia, preceding the onset in marrow and blood by months and years. ALC is often difficult to diagnose and is associated with a dismal prognosis. A 63-year-old male presented with nodular swellings on the face, a plaque extending over the right shoulder and multiple enlarged cervical lymph nodes. The skin biopsy of the plaque lesion showed a diffuse neoplastic infiltration extending from the dermis to subcutaneous tissue with diffuse positivity for myeloperoxidase and focal positivity for CD34 on immunohistochemical staining. The diagnosis was leukemia cutis. One month later, acute monocytic leukemia (FAB AML-M5b) was diagnosed. The patient died on the seventh month of diagnosis. PMID:22187541

  3. Aleukemic Leukemia Cutis Manifesting with Disseminated Nodular Eruptions and a Plaque Preceding Acute Monocytic Leukemia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ipek Yonal

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Aleukemic leukemia cutis (ALC, a discrete tumor of leukemic cells involving the skin, may be the first manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia, preceding the onset in marrow and blood by months and years. ALC is often difficult to diagnose and is associated with a dismal prognosis. A 63-year-old male presented with nodular swellings on the face, a plaque extending over the right shoulder and multiple enlarged cervical lymph nodes. The skin biopsy of the plaque lesion showed a diffuse neoplastic infiltration extending from the dermis to subcutaneous tissue with diffuse positivity for myeloperoxidase and focal positivity for CD34 on immunohistochemical staining. The diagnosis was leukemia cutis. One month later, acute monocytic leukemia (FAB AML-M5b was diagnosed. The patient died on the seventh month of diagnosis.

  4. Treatment of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Without Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Campana, Dario; Pei, Deqing; Bowman, W. Paul; Sandlund, John T.; Kaste, Sue C.; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Raimondi, Susana C.; Onciu, Mihaela; Coustan-Smith, Elaine; Kun, Larry E.; Jeha, Sima; Cheng, Cheng; Howard, Scott C.; Simmons, Vickey; Bayles, Amy; Metzger, Monika L.; Boyett, James M.; Leung, Wing; Handgretinger, Rupert; Downing, James R.; Evans, William E.; Relling, Mary V.

    2009-01-01

    Background We conducted a clinical trial to test whether prophylactic cranial irradiation could be omitted in all children with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods A total of 498 evaluable patients were enrolled. Treatment intensity was based on presenting features and the level of minimal residual disease after remission induction treatment. Continuous complete remission was compared between the 71 patients who previously would have received prophylactic cranial irradiation and the 56 historical controls who received it. Results The 5-year event-free and overall survival probabilities (95% confidence interval) for all 498 patients were 85.6% (79.9% to 91.3%) and 93.5% (89.8% to 97.2%), respectively. The 5-year cumulative risk of isolated central-nervous-system (CNS) relapse was 2.7% (1.1% to 4.2%), and that of any CNS relapse (isolated plus combined) was 3.9% (1.9% to 5.9%). The 71 patients had significantly better continuous complete remission than the 56 historical controls (P=0.04). All 11 patients with isolated CNS relapse remain in second remission for 0.4 to 5.5 years. CNS leukemia (CNS-3 status) or a traumatic lumbar puncture with blasts at diagnosis and a high level of minimal residual disease (≥ 1%) after 6 weeks of remission induction were significantly associated with poorer event-free survival. Risk factors for CNS relapse included the presence of the t(1;19)[TCF3-PBX1], any CNS involvement at diagnosis, and T-cell immunophenotype. Common adverse effects included allergic reactions to L-asparaginase, osteonecrosis, thrombosis, and disseminated fungal infection. Conclusions With effective risk-adjusted chemotherapy, prophylactic cranial irradiation can be safely omitted in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:19553647

  5. Fanconi Syndrome: A Rare Initial Presentation of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Kamal Kant; Law, Arjun Datt; Jain, Nidhi; Khadwal, Alka; Suri, Vikas; Malhotra, Pankaj; Varma, Subhash Chander

    2016-06-01

    A-14-year old boy, presented with a short history of excessive thirst and increased urine output. Clinical examination showed pallor, generalized lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. For evaluation of his polyuric state he underwent routine laboratory investigations, including renal function test, acid-base studies, urine analysis. Blood tests suggested hypokalemia, hypouricemia, hypocalcemia and hyperchloremia with normal liver and kidney function tests. The arterial blood gas analysis was suggestive of normal anion gap metabolic acidosis. Urine analysis was suggestive of hyperuricosuria, hypercalciuria and glycosuria with a positive urine anion gap. His hemogram showed pancytopenia with differential count showing 88% blasts. Bone marrow examination and flowcytometry confirmed the diagnosis of B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Hence this case was atypical and very interesting in the sense that the Fanconi syndrome is very rare to be an initial presenting feature of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The patient was started on oral as well intravenous supplementation with potassium, bicarbonate, calcium and phosphorus. Simultaneously, as per the modified BFM -90 protocol (four drug based regimen-Prednisolone, vincristine, daunorubicin, cyclophosphamide along with l-asparaginase), he was started on induction protocol. By the end of 3rd week of induction therapy, his urine output started normalizing and finally settled at the end of induction therapy. At present he is in the maintenance phase of chemotherapy. PMID:27408343

  6. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF HEMOSTATIC MOLECULAR MARKERS IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴方; 王学锋; 璩斌; 王鸿利; 沈志祥; 王振义

    2002-01-01

    Objective To elucidate the clinical significance of hemostatic molecular markers changes in acute leukemia (AL). Methods A series of hemostatic molecular markers including tissue factor ( TF) , tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT), plasmin anti-plasmin complex (PAP), urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA), and urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor ( uPAR) were measured in AL. Results The plasma level of TF, TAT, u-PA and u-PAR was significantly elevated before treatment, while in acute myeloid leukemia ( AML ) , only the level of TFPl and PAP increased.After treatment, TF and TAT remained at high level in AML, u-PA and u-PAR were still abnormal except in patients who obtained complete remission ( CR ). PAP and u-PA elevated remarkably in patient with severe hemorrhage. Conclusion The results indicated that there was hemostatic abnormal as well as hyperfibrinolysis in AL, which varied with different type of AL and can be ameliorated with clinical improvement. The measurement of TF, TAT, PAP may provide useful information for the diagnosis of DIC ; u-PA, u-PAR may be considered as useful markers for prognosis. Patient with sever hemorrhage should be treated with antifibrinolysis drugs, and great attention should be paid to prevent hypercoagulability in patients with AML after chemotherapeutic treatment.

  7. Treatment of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia from Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Li Hsiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is a cancer that immature white blood cells continuously overproduce in the bone marrow. These cells crowd out normal cells in the bone marrow bringing damage and death. Methotrexate (MTX is a drug used in the treatment of various cancer and autoimmune diseases. In particular, for the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, it had significant effect. MTX competitively inhibits dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR, an enzyme that participates in the tetrahydrofolate synthesis so as to inhibit purine synthesis. In addition, its downstream metabolite methotrexate polyglutamates (MTX-PGs inhibit the thymidylate synthase (TS. Therefore, MTX can inhibit the synthesis of DNA. However, MTX has cytotoxicity and neurotoxin may cause multiple organ injury and is potentially lethal. Thus, the lower toxicity drugs are necessary to be developed. Recently, diseases treatments with Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM as complements are getting more and more attention. In this study, we attempted to discover the compounds with drug-like potential for ALL treatment from the components in TCM. We applied virtual screen and QSAR models based on structure-based and ligand-based studies to identify the potential TCM component compounds. Our results show that the TCM compounds adenosine triphosphate, manninotriose, raffinose, and stachyose could have potential to improve the side effects of MTX for ALL treatment.

  8. Genetics of therapy-related myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, J.; Andersen, Mette Klarskov; Andersen, M.T.;

    2008-01-01

    Myelodysplasia (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are heterogeneous, closely associated diseases arising de novo or following chemotherapy with alkylating agents, topoisomerase II inhibitors, or after radiotherapy. Whereas de novo MDS and AML are almost always subclassified according to cytog......Myelodysplasia (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are heterogeneous, closely associated diseases arising de novo or following chemotherapy with alkylating agents, topoisomerase II inhibitors, or after radiotherapy. Whereas de novo MDS and AML are almost always subclassified according...... are now observed to cluster differently in these pathways with an identical pattern in de novo and in t-MDS and t-AML. An association is observed between activating mutations of genes in the tyrosine kinase RAS-BRAF signal-transduction pathway (Class I mutations) and inactivating mutations of genes...... encoding hematopoietic transcription factors (Class II mutations). Point mutations of AML1 and RAS seem to cooperate and predispose to progression from t-MDS to t-AML. Recently, critical genetic effects underlying 5q-/-5 and 7q-/-7 have been proposed. Their association and cooperation with point mutations...

  9. Correlation of morphologic and cytochemical diagnosis with flowcytometric analysis in acute leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Belurkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The classification of acute leukemias has revolutionized over the years. Immunophenotyping of acute leukemia has gained popularity because of its influence on treatment and prognosis of the disease. The various antigens expressed by the leukemic cells can be assessed by flowcytometry (FCA and can be used in rendering specific treatment and predicting the outcome of the different types of acute leukemia. Aims: The main aim of this study was to compare the morphologic and cytochemical diagnoses with flowcytometric diagnoses in acute leukemia and to analyze the usefulness of FCA over morphology. Results: In this study we analyzed 50 cases of acute leukemia and found concordance rate as high as 86% between morphologic/cytochemical diagnosis and flowcytometric diagnosis. Of these, complete concordance was seen in 58% of the cases and partial concordance was seen in 22% of the cases. Non-concordance was seen in only 4% of our cases. In remaining 16% of our cases FCA helped in sub classifying the acute leukemia where morphology and cytochemistry had failed to do so. CD19 and 20 were found to be consistent B-cell markers and CD3 was a very specific marker for T-cell leukemia. CD13 and 33 were important myeloid markers and were aided by other secondary panel of markers like CD14, CD117 and CD41. Conclusion: FCA not only helps in confirming morphologic diagnosis in acute leukemia but also helps in assigning specific lineage to the blasts, particularly in acute lymphoid leukemia. Immunophenotyping is of utmorst importance in classifying acute leukemia as it greatly influences the treatment and the prognosis.

  10. Lithium Carbonate in Treating Patients With Acute Intestinal Graft-Versus-Host-Disease After Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; De Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Disseminated Neuroblastoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Gastrointestinal Complications; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Poor Prognosis Metastatic Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent

  11. Low efficacy and high mortality associated with clofarabine treatment of relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Daniel A; Wadleigh, Martha; McDonnell, Anne M; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Stone, Richard M; Steensma, David P

    2015-02-01

    Clofarabine, a second-generation nucleoside analog, has clinical activity in relapsed or refractory acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, there are few data evaluating performance of clofarabine in populations of patients not enrolled in clinical trials. We reviewed outcomes for 84 patients treated with clofarabine for relapsed or refractory AML or MDS, either with clofarabine as monotherapy (n=19) or in combination with cytarabine (n=65). Using International Working Group (IWG) response criteria, the overall response rate (ORR) of all treated patients was 21%, with a complete response rate with either complete or incomplete hematopoietic recovery (CRR=CR+CRi) of 14%. For combination therapy, ORR was 22% with CRR of 18%, and monotherapy patients had an ORR of 21% with CRR of 11%. Although limited by small numbers, subgroup analysis did not reveal variation in response rates when comparing different risk factors. The 30-day mortality was 21% and median survival was 3 months; a subset of 12 patients who were able to go to transplant had an 18-month median survival. Clofarabine's efficacy in a "real-world" setting appears to be less than has been reported in clinical trials, and treatment is associated with a high early mortality rate. PMID:25554239

  12. Synthesis and Characterization of Folate-Targeted Dextran/Retinoic Acid Micelles for Doxorubicin Delivery in Acute Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Varshosaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Folate and retinoic acid grafted/dextran (FA-RA/DEX copolymers with different molecular weight of DEX were synthesized using carbonyldiimidazole and dimethylaminopyridine for targeted delivery of doxorubicin (DOX in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML. The copolymers structure was confirmed by 1H NMR and FTIR. Critical micelle concentration (CMC of each copolymer was determined using pyrene as a fluorescent probe. DOX was loaded in micelles by the direct dissolution method. Physical properties of micelles, including particle size, zeta potential, drug loading efficiency, and drug release profiles, were examined. The orientation of the folate ligand on the surface of the micelles was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS technique. The cytotoxicity of micelles loaded with DOX at different concentrations was studied in KG1 cells using MTT assay and their cellular uptake by flow cytometry technique. FTIR and 1H NMR spectra confirmed successful production of the targeted micelles and XPS spectra showed the surface orientation of folate. R15D10F7 copolymer produced micelles with particle size of 82.86 nm, polydispersity index of 0.3, zeta potential of −4.68 mV, drug loading efficiency of 96%, and release efficiency of 63%. DOX loaded in folate-targeted micelles of RA/DEX was more toxic than that in nontargeted micelles and free drug and seems promising in reducing drug resistance in AML.

  13. Inhibition factors of arsenic trioxide therapeutic effects in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sui Meijuan; Zhang Zhuo; Zhou Jin

    2014-01-01

    Objective To summarize limitations involved in arsenic trioxide therapeutic effects in acute promyelocytic leukemia,because current studies show that some individuals of acute promyelocytic leukemia have relatively poor outcomes during treatment with arsenic trioxide.Data sources Most relevant articles were included in the PubMed database between 2000 and 2013 with the keywords "acute promyelocytic leukemia","arsenic trioxide","thiol" or "methylation".In addition,a few older articles were also reviewed.Study selection Data and articles related to arsenic trioxide effect in acute promyelocytic leukemia treatment were selected and reviewed.We developed an overview of limitations associated with arsenic trioxide therapeutic effect.Results This review focuses on the researches about the arsenic trioxide therapeutic effect in acute promyelocytic leukemia and summarizes three mainly limitations which can influence the arsenic trioxide therapeutic effect to different degrees.First,with the combination of arsenic and glutathione the therapeutic effect and cytotoxicity decrease when glutathione concentration increases; second,arsenic methylation,stable arsenic methylation products weaken the apoptosis effect of arsenic trioxide in leukemia cells; third,gene mutations affect the sensitivity of tumor cells to arsenic trioxide and increase the resistance of leukemia cells to arsenic trioxide.Conclusions The chief limitations are listed in the review.If we can exclude all of them,we can obtain a better therapeutic effect of arsenic trioxide in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia.

  14. ADAMTS2 gene dysregulation in T/myeloid mixed phenotype acute leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Tota, Giuseppina; Coccaro, Nicoletta; Zagaria, Antonella; Anelli, Luisa; Casieri, Paola; Cellamare, Angelo; Minervini, Angela; Minervini, Crescenzio Francesco; Brunetti, Claudia; Impera, Luciana; Carluccio, Paola; Cumbo, Cosimo; Specchia, Giorgina; Albano, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Background Mixed phenotype acute leukemias (MPAL) include acute leukemias with blasts that express antigens of more than one lineage, with no clear evidence of myeloid or lymphoid lineage differentiation. T/myeloid (T/My) MPAL not otherwise specified (NOS) is a rare leukemia that expresses both T and myeloid antigens, accounting for less than 1% of all leukemias but 89% of T/My MPAL. From a molecular point of view, very limited data are available on T/My MPAL NOS. Case presentation In this re...

  15. [A case of mediastinal growing teratoma syndrome with acute megakaryoblastic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Masachika; Igarashi, Natsue; Fujimori, Fumio; Kuriyama, Hideyuki; Ebe, Yusuke; Nishibori, Takeaki; Sato, Kazuhiro; Hosaka, Yasuko; Yamato, Yasushi; Togashi, Kenichi; Yano, Toshio

    2014-07-01

    We report a case of a 38-year-old man who was diagnosed with a mediastinal germ cell tumor. After induction chemotherapy, the tumor marker levels normalized, but the tumor itself continued to grow. Surgical resection was performed successfully, but the patient developed acute megakaryoblastic leukemia 6 months later, and induction and consolidation therapies failed to achieve remission. Leukemia cells invaded the central nervous system following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and the patient died 5 months after being diagnosed with leukemia. This very rare case of a mediastinal germ cell tumor met the criteria for "growing teratoma syndrome", against a background of acute megakaryoblastic leukemia.

  16. Clinical Study of Acute Mixed-lineage Leukemia in 14 Children

    OpenAIRE

    Yaodong Zhang; Lina Tan; Xiaoling Zhang; Haiyan Wei; Qun Hu

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Acute mixed-lineage leukemia (AMLL) is characterized as the acute leukemia involved with acute myeloid cells and lymphoid cells at the same time. The AMLL is easily misdiagnosed because of a dual character involved with lymphoid and myeloid cells. At present, researches of AMLL in adults are more common. Only some are reported for children. Therefore, our aim was to study clinical characteristics of the childhood AMLL.Methods: From January 2000 to July 2009, 14 cases of AMLL childr...

  17. The study for loss of bcl-xs expression as a prognostic factor in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Inokuchi, Koiti; Dan, Kazuo

    2002-12-01

    We reported here abnormal expression profile of the bcl-x gene is associated with the recurrence in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).The bcl-x gene product exists in two forms, bcl-xl and bcl-xs. The bcl-xl, similar to bcl-2, inhibits apoptosis, whereas bcl-xs counters the effects of bcl-2 and bcl-xl. Mononuclear cells of bone marrow cells were obtained from 50 patients with recurrent AML at diagnosis prior to treatment and during relapse. We investigated the expression of the two isoforms of the bcl-x gene, bcl-xl and bcl-xs. The bcl-xl transcript was detected in all patients at both stages, but the bcl-xs transcript was not detected in six cases at both stages and in seven other cases at relapse (bcl-xs (-) group, n=13). The duration of relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) of the bcl-xs (-) group were significantly shorter than those of the bcl-xs (+) group (RFS: P=0.04; OS: P=0.02). Subsequently, mutation of the bcl-x gene was investigated. No mutation of the bcl-x gene was detected in all patients of both stages. Some refractory leukemic cells which escape chemotherapy-induced apoptosis due to loss of the bcl-xs transcript may continue to proliferate, resulting in the relapse of chemotherapy-resistant leukemia. The examination of the expression status of the bcl-x gene could facilitate the prediction of chemotherapy resistance and the prognosis of patients with refractory AML. The future large study will confirm the present data about loss of bcl-xs gene expression as prognostic factor.

  18. Treatment Outcome in Older Patients with Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Pounds, Stanley; Cao, Xueyuan; Jenkins, Laura; Dahl, Gary; Bowman, W. Paul; Taub, Jeffrey W; Pui, Ching-Hon; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Campana, Dario; Inaba, Hiroto

    2013-01-01

    Background Older age has historically been an adverse prognostic factor in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The impact of age relative to that of other prognostic factors on the outcome of patients treated in recent trials is unknown. Methods Clinical outcome and causes of treatment failure of 351 patients enrolled on three consecutive protocols for childhood AML between 1991 and 2008 were analyzed according to age and protocol. Results The more recent protocol (AML02) produced improved outcomes for 10- to 21-year-old patients compared to 2 earlier studies (AML91 and 97), with 3-year rates of event-free survival (EFS), overall survival (OS) and cumulative incidence of refractory leukemia or relapse (CIR) for this group similar to those of 0- to 9-year old patients: EFS, 58.3% ± 5.4% vs. 66.6% ± 4.9%, P=.20; OS, 68.9% ± 5.1% vs. 75.1% ± 4.5%, P=.36; cumulative incidence of refractory leukemia or relapse, 21.9% ± 4.4%; vs. 25.3% ± 4.1%, P=.59. EFS and OS estimates for 10–15-year-old patients overlapped those for 16–21-year-old patients. However, the cumulative incidence of toxic death was significantly higher for 10- to 21-year-old patients compared to younger patients (13.2% ± 3.6 vs. 4.5% ± 2.0%, P=.028). Conclusion The survival rate for older children with AML has improved on our recent trial and is now similar to that of younger patients. However, deaths from toxicity remain a significant problem in the older age group. Future trials should focus on improving supportive care while striving to develop more effective antileukemic therapy. PMID:22674050

  19. CD117 expression on blast cells in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goryainova N.V.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to analyze the frequency of CD117 (c-KIT antigen expression on the blast cells in acute myeloid leukemia (AML, evaluation of the presence of the relationship between the expression of the c-KIT and leukemia according to the FAB classification and definition of co-expression of the antigen CD117, antigens CD33 and CD34. The data of 47 patients with AML were diagnosed. M0 AML variant was established in 3 (6% patients, M1 – in 2 (4%, M2 – in 9 (20%, M4 – in 22 (47% and M5 – in 11 (23%. For immunophenotypic stu¬dies monoclonal antibodies (mAb that detect antigens of anti-CD34, anti-CD33 and anti-CD117 (Becton Dickinson, USA were used. The presence of the antigen CD117 was detected in 39 people, accounting for 83% of all surveyed. Antigen c-KIT was present in 48.117.0% cells on average: in all 3 cases – AML M0, in2 cases of AML M1, in 6 cases – AML M2, 20 of 22 cases – AML M4 and in 8 of 11 AML M5 cases. Average levels of CD117 in investigated leukemia cases statistically differed significantly (p=0.0067. Among 39 CD117- positive patients in 25 (53% co-expression of CD117+/CD34+ was revealed. Expression of CD117+/CD34- was observed in 14 cases (30%, CD117-/CD34+ – in 4 cases (8,5%, CD117-/CD34- – in 4 cases (8.5%. CD34 had of 64% of cells of myeloid origin. A high positive cor¬relation between expression of CD117 and CD34 (r=+0,5169 was determined, being statistically significant (p0,0067.

  20. Prognostic relevance of RUNX1 mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Grossmann, Vera; Kern, Wolfgang; Harbich, Stefan; Alpermann, Tamara; Jeromin, Sabine; Schnittger, Susanne; Haferlach, Claudia; Haferlach, Torsten; Kohlmann, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The runt-related transcription factor 1, RUNX1, is crucial in the development of myeloid and lymphoid cell lineages and has been reported to be mutated in myeloid malignancies in approximately 30% of cases. In this study, the mutational status of RUNX1 was investigated in 128 acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. We detected a mutation rate of 18.3% (13 of 71) in patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 3.8% (2 of 52) in patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and no muta...

  1. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in a Man Treated With Fingolimod for Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley Cohan MD, PhD

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A man with relapsing multiple sclerosis, treated with fingolimod 0.5 mg/d for 15 months, developed acute lymphoblastic leukemia and died 4 months after immune ablation and bone marrow allograft, from graft versus host disease. To our knowledge, this is the first case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia reported in a patient treated with fingolimod. Although no causal relationship can be established between fingolimod use and acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk in this single case, future surveillance for lymphatic cell malignancies in patients treated with fingolimod appears justified.

  2. Similar Survival for Patients Undergoing Reduced-Intensity Total Body Irradiation (TBI) Versus Myeloablative TBI as Conditioning for Allogeneic Transplant in Acute Leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikell, John L., E-mail: jmikell@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Waller, Edmund K. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Switchenko, Jeffrey M. [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Rangaraju, Sravanti; Ali, Zahir; Graiser, Michael [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Hall, William A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Langston, Amelia A. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Esiashvili, Natia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Khoury, H. Jean [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Khan, Mohammad K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the mainstay of treatment for adults with acute leukemia. Total body irradiation (TBI) remains an important part of the conditioning regimen for HCST. For those patients unable to tolerate myeloablative TBI (mTBI), reduced intensity TBI (riTBI) is commonly used. In this study we compared outcomes of patients undergoing mTBI with those of patients undergoing riTBI in our institution. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of all patients with acute leukemia who underwent TBI-based conditioning, using a prospectively acquired database of HSCT patients treated at our institution. Patient data including details of the transplantation procedure, disease status, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), response rates, toxicity, survival time, and time to progression were extracted. Patient outcomes for various radiation therapy regimens were examined. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed. Results: Between June 1985 and July 2012, 226 patients with acute leukemia underwent TBI as conditioning for HSCT. Of those patients, 180 had full radiation therapy data available; 83 had acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 94 had acute myelogenous leukemia; 45 patients received riTBI, and 135 received mTBI. Median overall survival (OS) was 13.7 months. Median relapse-free survival (RFS) for all patients was 10.2 months. Controlling for age, sex, KPS, disease status, and diagnosis, there were no significant differences in OS or RFS between patients who underwent riTBI and those who underwent mTBI (P=.402, P=.499, respectively). Median length of hospital stay was shorter for patients who received riTBI than for those who received mTBI (16 days vs 23 days, respectively; P<.001), and intensive care unit admissions were less frequent following riTBI than mTBI (2.22% vs 12.69%, respectively, P=.043). Nonrelapse survival rates were also similar (P=.186). Conclusions: No differences in OS or RFS were seen between

  3. Spinal granulocytic sarcoma (chloroma presenting as acute cord compression in a nonleukemic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalayci Murat

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The case of a previously healthy 24-year-old man diagnosed with extradural thoracic granulocytic sarcoma with no evidence of bone marrow or other hematological involvement is described. The tumor was removed totally by microsurgery. The histopathological examination was consistent with granulocytic sarcoma. Granulocytic sarcomas are most commonly found in the context of an acute myelogenous leukemia or in chronic myelogenous leukemia. They rarely have been reported in otherwise healthy patients without any evidence of systemic disease. A review of the literature revealed only 14 more nonleukaemic cases with granulocytic sarcoma causing thoracic spinal cord compression.

  4. Acute myeloid leukemia following radioactive iodine therapy for papillary carcinoma of the thyroid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Ankit

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Radioactive iodine (RAI therapy plays an important role in the management of thyroid malignancies. Leukemia is a very rare complication of radioactive therapy. There are very few case reports with doses below 100 mCi causing leukemia. We report a case of papillary carcinoma of the thyroid treated with 80 mCi RAI who later developed acute myeloid leukemia. Thus, all patients with thyroid carcinoma treated with RAI should undergo periodic hematological examinations irrespective of RAI dose.

  5. Acute myeloid leukemia following radioactive iodine therapy for papillary carcinoma of the thyroid

    OpenAIRE

    Jain Ankit; Premalata CS; Saini KV; Bapsy PP; Sajeevan KV; Tejinder Singh; Ullas Batra; Babu Govind; Lokanatha Dasappa; Suresh Atilli; Permeshwar R

    2009-01-01

    Radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy plays an important role in the management of thyroid malignancies. Leukemia is a very rare complication of radioactive therapy. There are very few case reports with doses below 100 mCi causing leukemia. We report a case of papillary carcinoma of the thyroid treated with 80 mCi RAI who later developed acute myeloid leukemia. Thus, all patients with thyroid carcinoma treated with RAI should undergo periodic hematological examinations irrespective of RAI dose.

  6. Successful treatment with interferon of chicken pox in children with acute leukemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Byung Soo

    1984-01-01

    Childhood leukemia, especially acute lymphocytic leukemia, can now be completely cured by a multimodality approach in one out of every two patients. Since prolonged maintenance therapy with anti-cancer agents for three years is required for complete cure, a significant problem during this course of treatment is death due to secondary infection. Those with childhood leukemia receiving anti-cancer chemotherapy who became secondarily injected with chicken pox can now be treated successfully with...

  7. Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia with Low Hypodiploidy in a Pediatric Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Salazar, Elizabeth G.; Wertheim, Gerald B.; Biegel, Jaclyn A.; Hwang, William; Tasian, Sarah K.; Rheingold, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a 16 year-old female with mixed phenotype acute leukemia B/myeloid, NOS (formerly biphenotypic leukemia) with masked hypodiploidy and somatic TP53 and CDKN2A/B deletions. She achieved morphologic remission with lymphoid-directed multi-agent chemotherapy, but experienced an early medullary relapse 11 months from initial diagnosis. Her case details the unusual finding of hypodiploidy in a patient with ambiguous lineage leukemia and highlights the complexity of therapy se...

  8. Retinoid receptor signaling and autophagy in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orfali, Nina [Cork Cancer Research Center, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA. (United States); McKenna, Sharon L. [Cork Cancer Research Center, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Cahill, Mary R. [Department of Hematology, Cork University Hospital, Cork (Ireland); Gudas, Lorraine J., E-mail: ljgudas@med.cornell.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA. (United States); Mongan, Nigel P., E-mail: nigel.mongan@nottingham.ac.uk [Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham, LE12 5RD (United Kingdom); Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA. (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Retinoids are a family of signaling molecules derived from vitamin A with well established roles in cellular differentiation. Physiologically active retinoids mediate transcriptional effects on cells through interactions with retinoic acid (RARs) and retinoid-X (RXR) receptors. Chromosomal translocations involving the RARα gene, which lead to impaired retinoid signaling, are implicated in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), alone and in combination with arsenic trioxide (ATO), restores differentiation in APL cells and promotes degradation of the abnormal oncogenic fusion protein through several proteolytic mechanisms. RARα fusion-protein elimination is emerging as critical to obtaining sustained remission and long-term cure in APL. Autophagy is a degradative cellular pathway involved in protein turnover. Both ATRA and ATO also induce autophagy in APL cells. Enhancing autophagy may therefore be of therapeutic benefit in resistant APL and could broaden the application of differentiation therapy to other cancers. Here we discuss retinoid signaling in hematopoiesis, leukemogenesis, and APL treatment. We highlight autophagy as a potential important regulator in anti-leukemic strategies. - Highlights: • Normal and aberrant retinoid signaling in hematopoiesis and leukemia is reviewed. • We suggest a novel role for RARα in the development of X-RARα gene fusions in APL. • ATRA therapy in APL activates transcription and promotes onco-protein degradation. • Autophagy may be involved in both onco-protein degradation and differentiation. • Pharmacologic autophagy induction may potentiate ATRA's therapeutic effects.

  9. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia with Eosinophilia and Strongyloides Stercoralis Hyperinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadollah Zahedpasha

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the most common malignancy in children. Bone pain is an important symptom that can be severe. Eosinophilia without any other abnormal laboratory findings is rare in ALL. Strongyloides stercoralis in ALL causes disseminated fatal disease.Case Presentation: This 9-year-old girl presented with bone pain in lumbar region. Bone pain was the only symptom. The patient didnt have organomegaly. The BM samples were studied by flow cytometry, which showed pre-B cell ALL. Larva of Strongyloides stercoralis was found in fecal examination. Plain chest x ray showed bilateral para-cardiac infiltration. Strongyloidiasis was treated before starting chemotherapy. After two days treatment with Mebendazol the patient developed cough, dyspnea, respiratory distress and fever. The treatment changed to Ivermectin for 2 days. Chemotherapy started five days after diagnosis of leukemia.Conclusion: The patient complained merely of bone pain in lumbar region without any other signs and symptoms. Peripheral blood smear showed eosinophilia without any other abnormality. Stool examination showed Strongyloides stercoralis larvae. We suggest that all patients diagnosed as ALL in tropical and subtropical regions should be evaluated for parasitic infection especially with Strongyloides stercoralis.

  10. Molecular Therapeutic Approaches for Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia

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    Sarah K Tasian

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Approximately two thirds of children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML are cured with intensive multi-agent chemotherapy. However, primary chemorefractory and relapsed AML remains a significant source of childhood cancer mortality, highlighting the need for new therapies. Further therapy intensification with traditional cytotoxic agents is not feasible given the potential for significant toxicity to normal tissues with conventional chemotherapy and the risk for long-term end-organ dysfunction. Significant emphasis has been placed upon the development of molecularly targeted therapeutic approaches for adults and children with high-risk subtypes of AML with the goal of improving remission induction and minimizing relapse. Several promising agents are currently in clinical testing or late preclinical development for AML, including monoclonal antibodies against leukemia cell surface proteins, kinase inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors, epigenetic agents, and chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cell immunotherapies. Many of these therapies have been specifically tested in children with relapsed/refractory AML via phase 1 and 2 trials with a smaller number of new agents under phase 3 evaluation for children with de novo AML. Although successful identification and implementation of new drugs for children with AML remains a formidable challenge, enthusiasm for novel molecular therapeutic approaches is great given the potential for significant clinical benefit for children who will otherwise fail standard therapy.

  11. Microenvironmental cues for T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passaro, Diana; Quang, Christine Tran; Ghysdael, Jacques

    2016-05-01

    Intensive chemotherapy regimens have led to a substantial improvement in the cure rate of patients suffering from T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Despite this progress, about 15% and 50% of pediatric and adult cases, respectively, show resistance to treatment or relapse with dismal prognosis, calling for further therapeutic investigations. T-ALL is an heterogeneous disease, which presents intrinsic alterations leading to aberrant expression of transcription factors normally involved in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell development and mutations in genes implicated in the regulation of cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and T-cell development. Gene expression profiling allowed the classification of T-ALL into defined molecular subgroups that mostly reflects the stage of their differentiation arrest. So far this knowledge has not translated into novel, targeted therapy. Recent evidence points to the importance of extrinsic signaling cues in controlling the ability of T-ALL to home, survive, and proliferate, thus offering the perspective of new therapeutic options. This review summarizes the present understanding of the interactions between hematopoietic cells and bone marrow/thymic niches during normal hematopoiesis, describes the main signaling pathways implicated in this dialog, and finally highlights how malignant T cells rely on specific niches to maintain their ability to sustain and propagate leukemia. PMID:27088913

  12. Current management of newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicconi, L; Lo-Coco, F

    2016-08-01

    The management of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has considerably evolved during the past two decades. The advent of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and its inclusion in combinatorial regimens with anthracycline chemotherapy has provided cure rates exceeding 80%; however, this widely adopted approach also conveys significant toxicity including severe myelosuppression and rare occurrence of secondary leukemias. More recently, the advent of arsenic trioxide (ATO) and its use in association with ATRA with or without chemotherapy has further improved patient outcome by allowing to minimize the intensity of chemotherapy, thus reducing serious toxicity while maintaining high anti-leukemic efficacy. The advantage of ATRA-ATO over ATRA chemotherapy has been recently demonstrated in two large randomized trials and this option has now become the new standard of care in low-risk (i.e. non-hyperleukocytic) patients. In light of its rarity, abrupt onset and high risk of early death and due to specific treatment requirements, APL remains a challenging condition that needs to be managed in highly experienced centers. We review here the results of large clinical studies conducted in newly diagnosed APL as well as the recommendations for appropriate diagnosis, prevention and management of the main complications associated with modern treatment of the disease. PMID:27084953

  13. /sup 32/P and acute leukemia: development of leukemia in a patient with hemoglobin Yakima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagby, G.C. Jr.; Richert-Boe, K.; Koler, R.D.

    1978-08-01

    In 1954 a then 31-yr-old male was found to have erythrocytosis. Over the ensuing decade he received 72 mCi /sup 32/P. In 1964 his daughters were found to have erythrocytosis. Further investigation led to the discovery of hemoglobin Yakima, a variant with high oxygen affinity. He received no further therapy and was well until 1975, when he developed the preleukemic syndrome. Within 12 mo he developed acute nonlymphocytic leukemia accompanied by fetal erythropoiesis. Because the initial discovery of this type of hemoglobinopathy came 27 yr after the introduction of /sup 32/P for use in the treatment of polycythemia vera, and because there are now known to be more than 39 different high-oxygen-affinity hemoglobins, we anticipate that more patients such as ours have been exposed to /sup 32/P. The exposed population should be closely followed, since this will likely permit assessment of the risk of /sup 32/P-induced leukemia in a nonneoplastic condition.

  14. Therapeutic Effects of Myeloid Cell Leukemia-1 siRNA on Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Karami

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Up-regulation of Mcl-1, a known anti-apoptotic protein, is associated with the survival and progression of various malignancies including leukemia. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of Mcl-1 small interference RNA (siRNA on the proliferation and apoptosis of HL-60 acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells. Methods: siRNA transfection was performed using Lipofectamine™2000 reagent. Relative mRNA and protein expressions were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Trypan blue assay was performed to assess tumor cell proliferation after siRNA transfection. The cytotoxic effect of Mcl-1 siRNA on leukemic cells was measured using MTT assay. Apoptosis was detected using ELISA cell death assay. Results: Mcl-1 siRNA clearly lowered both Mcl-1 mRNA and protein levels in a time-dependent manner, leading to marked inhibition of cell survival and proliferation. Furthermore, Mcl-1 down-regulation significantly enhanced the extent of HL-60 apoptotic cells. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the down-regulation of Mcl-1 by siRNA can effectively trigger apoptosis and inhibit the proliferation of leukemic cells. Therefore, Mcl-1 siRNA may be a potent adjuvant in AML therapy.

  15. Parental Tobacco Smoking and Acute Myeloid Leukemia: The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metayer, Catherine; Petridou, Eleni; Aranguré, Juan Manuel Mejía; Roman, Eve; Schüz, Joachim; Magnani, Corrado; Mora, Ana Maria; Mueller, Beth A; de Oliveira, Maria S Pombo; Dockerty, John D; McCauley, Kathryn; Lightfoot, Tracy; Hatzipantelis, Emmanouel; Rudant, Jérémie; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Kaatsch, Peter; Miligi, Lucia; Wesseling, Catharina; Doody, David R; Moschovi, Maria; Orsi, Laurent; Mattioli, Stefano; Selvin, Steve; Kang, Alice Y; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2016-08-15

    The association between tobacco smoke and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is well established in adults but not in children. Individual-level data on parental cigarette smoking were obtained from 12 case-control studies from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC, 1974-2012), including 1,330 AML cases diagnosed at age controls. We conducted pooled analyses of CLIC studies, as well as meta-analyses of CLIC and non-CLIC studies. Overall, maternal smoking before, during, or after pregnancy was not associated with childhood AML; there was a suggestion, however, that smoking during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk in Hispanics (odds ratio = 2.08, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.20, 3.61) but not in other ethnic groups. By contrast, the odds ratios for paternal lifetime smoking were 1.34 (95% CI: 1.11, 1.62) and 1.18 (95% CI: 0.92, 1.51) in pooled and meta-analyses, respectively. Overall, increased risks from 1.2- to 1.3-fold were observed for pre- and postnatal smoking (P < 0.05), with higher risks reported for heavy smokers. Associations with paternal smoking varied by histological type. Our analyses suggest an association between paternal smoking and childhood AML. The association with maternal smoking appears limited to Hispanic children, raising questions about ethnic differences in tobacco-related exposures and biological mechanisms, as well as study-specific biases. PMID:27492895

  16. Clinical activity of alvocidib (flavopiridol) in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidner, Joshua F; Karp, Judith E

    2015-12-01

    There have been minimal therapeutic advancements in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) over the past 4 decades and outcomes remain unsatisfactory. Alvocidib (formerly flavopiridol) is a multi-serine threonine cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor with demonstrable in vitro and clinical activity in AML when combined in a timed sequential chemotherapy regimen, FLAM (alvocidib followed by cytarabine continuous infusion and mitoxantrone). FLAM has been evaluated in sequential phase 1 and phase 2 studies in 149 and 256 relapsed/refractory and newly diagnosed non-favorable risk AML patients, respectively, with encouraging findings in both patient populations warranting further investigation. This review highlights the mechanism of action of alvocidib, pre-clinical studies of alvocidib in AML, and the clinical trials evaluating alvocidib alone and in combination with cytotoxic agents (FLAM) in AML.

  17. Sapacitabine in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkin, Maxim; Richards, Ashley I

    2015-01-01

    Prognosis of elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains poor and new treatment approaches are urgently needed. A novel nucleoside analog sapacitabine has recently emerged as a feasible agent because of its oral administration and acceptable toxicity profile. Clinical efficacy of sapacitabine, both as a single agent and in combination, has been evaluated in elderly AML patients or AML patients unfit for standard intensive chemotherapy. Response rates varied from 15 to 45% in phase II studies. Sapacitabine was overall well-tolerated with gastrointestinal and myelosuppression-related complications were the most common side effects. Unfortunately, in a phase III study sapacitabine showed no clinical superiority as compared to low-dose cytarabine (LDAC) in patients with AML. Another large phase III study comparing the combination of sapacitabine with decitabine to decitabine alone is currently ongoing and is expected to be completed by the end of 2015 or by the first half of 2016.

  18. Invasive fungal diseases in patients with acute lymphoid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolato, Andrea; Nouér, Simone A; Garnica, Marcia; Portugal, Rodrigo; Maiolino, Angelo; Nucci, Marcio

    2016-09-01

    Invasive fungal disease (IFD) represents an important complication in patients with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL). The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of IFD in ALL patients with neutropenia, identify factors associated with IFD, and estimate the impact of IFD on the outcome. All patients with ALL who developed febrile neutropenia from 1987 to 2013 were evaluated. Cases of IFD were classified as proven or probable. Factors associated with IFD were evaluated by comparing episodes with and without a diagnosis of IFD. Among 350 episodes of febrile neutropenia, 31 IFDs were diagnosed (8.8%). Prolonged neutropenia was the only factor associated with IFD caused by yeasts. Factors associated with IFD caused by molds by multivariate analysis were the period after 2008, receipt of allogeneic transplant, relapsed ALL and prolonged neutropenia. Patients in relapse should receive induction chemotherapy in rooms with HEPA filter and receive antifungal prophylaxis. PMID:26949001

  19. Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Presenting with Severe Marrow Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsh Shah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL presenting with severely fibrotic marrow. There are four other reports of similar cases in the literature. Our patient was treated with All-Transretinoic Acid- (ATRA- containing induction chemotherapy, followed by consolidation and maintenance therapy. He achieved a complete morphologic remission with adequate count recovery in a timely fashion, and later a molecular remission was documented. The patient remains in molecular remission and demonstrates normal blood counts now more than 4 years after induction. Since the morphological appearance may not be typical and the bone marrow may not yield an aspirate for cytogenetic analysis, awareness of such entity is important to make a correct diagnosis of this potentially curable disease.

  20. Inherited genetic variants associated with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Masatoshi; Urayama, Kevin

    2016-07-01

    Numerous efforts have been made to elucidate the roles of individual genetic background factors in the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Most have taken the form of case-control studies focusing on specific candidate gene polymorphisms. Recently, a more rigorous and comprehensive approach referred to as a genome-wide association study (GWAS) has been widely utilized and has achieved success. Case-control studies evaluating candidate gene associations have shown cumulative evidence of a role for folate metabolism and xenobiotic metabolism/transport pathway genetic variants. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)s identified by GWAS appear to indicate a strong role for genes encoding transcription factors involved in cellular differentiation. Further studies are needed to clarify the accumulating evidence obtained from both candidate gene and genome-wide investigations. PMID:27498736

  1. Novel Prognostic and Therapeutic Mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medinger, Michael; Lengerke, Claudia; Passweg, Jakob

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a biologically complex and molecularly and clinically heterogeneous disease, and its incidence increases with age. Cytogenetics and mutation testing remain important prognostic tools for treatment after induction therapy. The post-induction treatment is dependent on risk stratification. Despite rapid advances in determination of gene mutations involved in the pathophysiology and biology of AML, and the rapid development of new drugs, treatment improvements changed slowly over the past 30 years, with the majority of patients eventually experiencing relapse and dying of their disease. Allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the best chance of cure for patients with intermediate- or high-risk disease. This review gives an overview about advances in prognostic markers and novel treatment options for AML, focusing on new prognostic and probably therapeutic mutations, and novel drug therapies such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:27566651

  2. Cranial radiation in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia. Neuropsychologic sequelae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A battery of neuropsychologic tests was administered ''blindly'' to 18 children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) who had been randomly assigned to treatment regimens with or without cranial radiation. These children were all in complete continuous remission for more than 3 1/2 years and were no longer receiving therapy. The results indicated no substantial differences between groups as a function of radiation therapy. However, decreased neuropsychologic performance was found when the entire sample was compared with population norms. These data do not support the hypothesis that cranial radiation therapy is responsible for the neuropsychologic sequelae seen in these survivors of ALL. Post hoc multiple regression analysis indicated that parental education levels accounted for more of the neuropsychologic variability seen in these children than other factors such as age at diagnosis, type of therapy, or sex of child

  3. Relapsing acute myeloid leukemia presenting as hypopyon uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapna P Hegde

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior segment infiltration in acute myeloid leukemia (AML presenting as hypopyon uveitis is very rare. We report this case as an uncommon presentation in a patient on remission after bone marrow transplant for AML. In addition to the hypopyon, the patient presented with "red eye" caused by ocular surface disease due to concurrent graft-versus-host disease and glaucoma. The classical manifestations of masquerade syndrome due to AML were altered by concurrent pathologies. Media opacities further confounded the differential diagnosis. We highlight the investigations used to arrive at a definitive diagnosis. In uveitis, there is a need to maintain a high index of clinical suspicion, as early diagnosis in ocular malignancy can save sight and life.

  4. Study on subsequent neurologic complications in children with acute leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Naoaki; Shimazaki, Haruyo; Hoshi, Yasutaka; Akatsuka, Jun-ichi (Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1989-06-01

    Twenty-seven children with acute leukemia were studied in order to detect the subsequent neurologic complications due to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Twenty-four patients with ALL received central nervous system prophylaxis including cranial irradiation. The methods of evaluation consisted of electroencephalogram (EEG), computed tomography of the head (CT scan), soft neurological sign, intelligence quotient (IQ) and Bender Gestalt test. The patients with relapse showed severe abnormalities in various kinds of examinations. Younger children at diagnosis were associated with a higher abnormality rate of soft neurological signs and Bender Gestalt test. Factors which were found to be closely associated with a lower IQ score included younger children at diagnosis and longer duration of remission time. These results indicate the need for caution for the dosage of cranial irradiation for younger patients in CNS prophylaxis, and improvement of a lower IQ score in long-term survivors requires further investigation as to the appropriate intellectual environment for their development after remission. (author).

  5. Prediction of intellectual deficits in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possible predictors of reported lower cognitive functioning in irradiated children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were investigated. Thirty-four subjects, 5-14 years old, with ALL in continuous complete remission and without evidence of current or past central nervous system disease, were examined 9-110 months after diagnosis, using standard measures of intelligence and academic achievement. Subjects with a history of post-irradiation somnolence syndrome were significantly older at diagnosis than nonsomnolent subjects. Intelligence (IQ) was found to be unrelated to history of somnolence syndrome. IQ and achievement were unrelated to age at irradiation, irradiation-examination interval, and radiation dosages. The strongest predictor of IQ by far is parental social class. The importance of controlling for social class differences when searching for treatment effects on IQ and achievement is stressed

  6. Cerebral aspergillus infection in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia induction therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Prakash

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Angioinvasive pulmonary infection from filamentous fungi is not an uncommon occurrence in immunocompromised patients like acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. Rarely, these lesions can spread via the hematogenous route and involve multiple visceral organs. We report a case of a 14-year-old boy with ALL who developed angioinvasive pulmonary aspergillosis early in the course of induction therapy, which was followed by hematogenous dissemination and formation of multiple brain abscesses. The patient was treated with intravenous amphotericin B. There was no response to the therapy and the patient succumbed to disseminated infection. Postmortem lung biopsy confirmed angioinvasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Poor penetration of amphotericin B across the blood-brain barrier could be one of the contributory factors for poor response to antifungal therapy. We discuss the various antifungal agents with respect to their penetration in brain.

  7. Dose Escalation of Total Marrow Irradiation With Concurrent Chemotherapy in Patients With Advanced Acute Leukemia Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Jeffrey Y.C., E-mail: jwong@coh.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Forman, Stephen; Somlo, George [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Rosenthal, Joseph [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Department of Pediatrics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy; Radany, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Palmer, Joycelynne [Department of Biostatistics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Stein, Anthony [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We have demonstrated that toxicities are acceptable with total marrow irradiation (TMI) at 16 Gy without chemotherapy or TMI at 12 Gy and the reduced intensity regimen of fludarabine/melphalan in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). This article reports results of a study of TMI combined with higher intensity chemotherapy regimens in 2 phase I trials in patients with advanced acute myelogenous leukemia or acute lymphoblastic leukemia (AML/ALL) who would do poorly on standard intent-to-cure HCT regimens. Methods and Materials: Trial 1 consisted of TMI on Days -10 to -6, etoposide (VP16) on Day -5 (60 mg/kg), and cyclophosphamide (CY) on Day -3 (100 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=3 patients), 13.5 (n=3 patients), and 15 (n=6 patients) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Trial 2 consisted of busulfan (BU) on Days -12 to -8 (800 {mu}M min), TMI on Days -8 to -4, and VP16 on Day -3 (30 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=18) and 13.5 (n=2) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Results: Trial 1 had 12 patients with a median age of 33 years. Six patients had induction failures (IF), and 6 had first relapses (1RL), 9 with leukemia blast involvement of bone marrow ranging from 10%-98%, 5 with circulating blasts (24%-85%), and 2 with chloromas. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Eleven patients achieved complete remission at Day 30. With a median follow-up of 14.75 months, 5 patients remained in complete remission from 13.5-37.7 months. Trial 2 had 20 patients with a median age of 41 years. Thirteen patients had IF, and 5 had 1RL, 2 in second relapse, 19 with marrow blasts (3%-100%) and 13 with peripheral blasts (6%-63%). Grade 4 dose-limiting toxicities were seen at 13.5 Gy (stomatitis and hepatotoxicity). Stomatitis was the most frequent toxicity in both trials. Conclusions: TMI dose escalation to 15 Gy is possible when combined with CY/VP16 and is associated with acceptable toxicities and encouraging outcomes. TMI dose escalation is not possible with BU/VP16 due to

  8. Acute respiratory distress syndrome associated with tumor lysis syndrome in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Macaluso

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumor lysis syndrome is a serious and dangerous complication usually associated with antiblastic treatment in some malignancies characterized by high cell turn-over. Mild or severe electrolyte abnormalities including high serum levels of uric acid, potassium, phosphorus, creatinine, bun and reduction of calcium can be responsible for multi-organ failure, involving mostly kidneys, heart and central nervous system. Renal damage can be followed by acute renal failure, weight gain, progressive liver impairment, overproduction of cytokines, and subsequent maintenance of multi-organ damage. Life-threatening acute respiratory failure associated with tumor lysis syndrome is rare. We describe a child with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed an unusually dramatic tumor lysis syndrome, after administration of the first low doses of steroid, that was rapidly associated with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Subsequent clinical course and treatment modalities that resulted in the gradual and full recovery of the child are also described.

  9. Acute respiratory distress syndrome associated with tumor lysis syndrome in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaluso, Alessandra; Genova, Selene; Maringhini, Silvio; Coffaro, Giancarlo; Ziino, Ottavio; D'Angelo, Paolo

    2015-02-24

    Tumor lysis syndrome is a serious and dangerous complication usually associated with antiblastic treatment in some malignancies characterized by high cell turn-over. Mild or severe electrolyte abnormalities including high serum levels of uric acid, potassium, phosphorus, creatinine, bun and reduction of calcium can be responsible for multi-organ failure, involving mostly kidneys, heart and central nervous system. Renal damage can be followed by acute renal failure, weight gain, progressive liver impairment, overproduction of cytokines, and subsequent maintenance of multi-organ damage. Life-threatening acute respiratory failure associated with tumor lysis syndrome is rare. We describe a child with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed an unusually dramatic tumor lysis syndrome, after administration of the first low doses of steroid, that was rapidly associated with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Subsequent clinical course and treatment modalities that resulted in the gradual and full recovery of the child are also described. PMID:25918625

  10. Clinico-hematological profile in biphenotypic acute leukemia

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    S Gujral

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : We present a clinico-hematological profile and treatment outcome of Biphenotypic Acute Leukemia (BAL. Aim : Study incidence and subtypes of BAL, correlate with age, morphology, and cytogenetic findings and correlate the clinico-hematological data with the treatment response. St Jude′s and the EGIL′s criteria have been compared for their diagnostic and clinical relevance. Material and Methods : Diagnosis was based on WHO classification, including clinical details, morphology, cytochemistry, immunophenotyping, and molecular genetics. We included those cases, which fulfilled the European Group for the Immunological Characterization of Acute Leukemia′s (EGIL′s scoring system criteria for the diagnosis of BAL, as per recommendation of the WHO classification. Results : There were 32 patients diagnosed with BAL, based on EGIL′s criteria. Incidence of BAL was 1.2%. B-Myeloid (14 cases followed by T-Myeloid BAL (13 cases were the commonest subtypes. Polymorphous population of blasts (16 cases was commonly associated with T-Myeloid BAL (10 cases. BCR ABL fusion positivity was a common cytogenetic abnormality (seven cases. Fifteen patients received chemotherapy; eight achieved complete remission (CR at the end of the induction period. Conclusions : Pediatric BAL and T-B lymphoid BAL have a better prognosis. A comprehensive panel of reagents is required, including cytoplasmic markers; to diagnose BAL. St Jude′s criteria is a simple, easy, and cost-effective method to diagnose BAL. The outcome-related prognostic factors include age, HLA-DR, CD34 negativity, and subtype of BAL. BCR-ABL expression is an important prognostic factor, as these cases will be labeled as Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML in blast crisis with biphenotypic expression and treated accordingly.

  11. Cord blood transplantation for the treatment of acute leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meerim Park; Young-ho Lee

    2013-01-01

    Objective This review discussed the available data on treatment outcomes of cord blood transplantation (CBT) for acute leukemia.Data sources The data cited in this review were obtained from articles listed in Medline and Pubmed.Study selection We reviewed the articles of clinical results from various registries and institutions,as well as our experiences with CBT in children,adolescents and adults.Results This research has clearly shown that cord blood (CB) has several unique characteristics resulting in distinct advantage and disadvantages when compared to transplantation with unrelated donor bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells.The field of CBT has advanced from investigating its safety and feasibility to addressing more specific issues such as accelerating engraftment,extending access,and examining outcomes in specific subgroups of patients.Many approaches have been investigated in the attempt to improve engraftment and survival.Variable factors have been identified,such as factors related to donor choice (human leukocyte antigen (HLA) compatibility,cell dose,and others) and transplantation (conditioning and graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis regimen).Data support that CB should be considered a reasonable option in those that do not have HLA matched sibling donor and for those in whom the time to transplant is critical.Conclusions CB is a reasonable alternative to unrelated donor bone marrow or peripheral blood progenitor cells for transplantation.Recently developed strategies aimed at improving hematopoietic recovery and reducing early transplantation-related mortality could further improve treatment outcomes of CBT for patients with acute leukemia.

  12. PROGNOSTIC VALUE OF BRAIN AND ACUTE LEUKEMIA CYTOPLASMIC GENE EXPRESSION IN EGYPTIAN CHILDREN WITH ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    adel abd elhaleim hagag

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract      Background: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML accounts for 25%-35% of the acute leukemia in children. BAALC (Brain and Acute Leukemia, Cytoplasmic gene is a recently identified gene on chromosome 8q22.3 that has prognostic significance in AML.  The aim of this work was to study the impact of BAALC gene expression on prognosis of AML in Egyptian children. Patients and methods: This study was conducted on 40 patients of newly diagnosed AML who were subjected to the following: Full history taking, clinical examination, laboratory investigations including: complete blood count, LDH, bone marrow aspiration, cytochemistry and immunophenotyping, assessment of BAALC Gene by real time PCR in bone marrow aspirate mononuclear cells before the start of chemotherapy. Results: BAALC gene expression showed positive expression in 24 cases (60% and negative expression in 16 cases (40%. Patients who showed positive BAALC gene expression included 10 patients achieved complete remission, 8 patients died and 6 relapsed patients, while patients who showed negative expression include 12 patients achieved complete remission, 1 relapsed patient and 3 patients died. There was significant association between BAALC gene expression and FAB classification of patients of AML patientsas positive BAALC expression is predominantly seen in FAB subtypes M1 and M2 compared with negative BAALC gene expression that was found more in M3 and M4 (8 cases with M1, 12 cases with M2, 1 case with M3 and 3 cases with M4 in positive BAALC expression versus 2 cases with M1, 3 cases with M2, 4 cases with M3 and 7 cases with M4 in BAALC gene negative expression group with significant difference regarding FAB subtypes. As regard age, sex, splenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, pallor, purpura, platelets count, WBCs count, and percentage of blast cells in BM, the present study showed no significant association with BAALC. Conclusion: BAALC expression is an important prognostic factor in AML

  13. The landscape of somatic mutations in infant MLL-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukemias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Anna K; Ma, Jing; Wang, Jianmin;

    2015-01-01

    Infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with MLL rearrangements (MLL-R) represents a distinct leukemia with a poor prognosis. To define its mutational landscape, we performed whole-genome, exome, RNA and targeted DNA sequencing on 65 infants (47 MLL-R and 18 non-MLL-R cases) and 20 older childr...

  14. Gene-expression patterns in drug-resistant acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells and response to treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Holleman (Amy); C. Cheng (Cheng); C.H. Pui (Ching-Hon); W.E. Evans (William); M.V. Relling (Mary); R. Pieters (Rob); G.E. Janka-Schaub (Gritta); M.H. Cheok (Meyling); M.L. den Boer (Monique); W. Yang; A.J. Veerman; K.M. Kazemier (Karin); D. Pei (Deqing)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is curable with chemotherapy in approximately 80 percent of patients. However, the cause of treatment failure in the remaining 20 percent of patients is largely unknown. METHODS: We tested leukemia cells from 173

  15. Glioblastoma multiforme in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Kirit

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available An 11-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia had received prophylactic cranial irradiation (1800 cGy /10 fractions and intrathecal methotrexate. Five years later, he developed a glioblastoma multiforme in the right frontal region while the leukemia was in remission. It is possible that the glioma may have been induced by radiation and /or chemotherapy.

  16. Tracheoesophageal fistula resulting from invasive aspergillosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Si Won [Daejeon St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Catholic University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-04-15

    Tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) in adult patients is an uncommon complication in leukemia. We present here on a case of TEF in a 46-year-old woman with ALL. The patient was asymptomatic and TEF is resulted from aspergillus bronchitis during the chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)

  17. Delayed Neurotoxicity Associated with Therapy for Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Peter D.; Kamen, Barton A.

    2006-01-01

    Most children diagnosed today with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) will be cured. However, treatment entails risk of neurotoxicity, causing deficits in neurocognitive function that can persist in the years after treatment is completed. Many of the components of leukemia therapy can contribute to adverse neurologic sequelae, including…

  18. Tracheoesophageal fistula resulting from invasive aspergillosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) in adult patients is an uncommon complication in leukemia. We present here on a case of TEF in a 46-year-old woman with ALL. The patient was asymptomatic and TEF is resulted from aspergillus bronchitis during the chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)

  19. Estimation of plasma concentrations of hepatocyte growth factor in acute leukemia in Upper Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed E. Ahmed

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: The results of the present study suggest that high plasma HGF may play a significant role in the leukemia process and contribute to the leukemic cell dissemination. The clinical significance of the increased level of HGF in acute leukemia needs further investigation and may suggest a novel therapeutic approach in this disease.

  20. New treatment strategies in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia : Hypomethylating agents and proteasome inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Helm, Lidia Henrieke

    2016-01-01

    New treatment strategies in leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes Treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is challenging, especially in the large group of patients older than 60 years. In these patients, results of standard chemotherapy are often disappointing